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Sample records for airy st john

  1. 33 CFR 110.183 - St. Johns River, Florida.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false St. Johns River, Florida. 110.183... ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.183 St. Johns River, Florida. (a) The anchorage grounds—(1... anchor in the St. Johns River, as depicted on NOAA chart 11491, between the entrance buoy (STJ) and...

  2. 33 CFR 110.183 - St. Johns River, Florida.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false St. Johns River, Florida. 110.183... ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.183 St. Johns River, Florida. (a) The anchorage grounds—(1... anchor in the St. Johns River, as depicted on NOAA chart 11491, between the entrance buoy (STJ) and...

  3. 33 CFR 110.183 - St. Johns River, Florida.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false St. Johns River, Florida. 110.183... ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.183 St. Johns River, Florida. (a) The anchorage grounds—(1... anchor in the St. Johns River, as depicted on NOAA chart 11491, between the entrance buoy (STJ) and...

  4. Chemistry of St. John's Wort: Hypericin and Hyperforin

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vollmer, John J.; Rosenson, Jon

    2004-01-01

    The appeal as natural antidepressant is the major selling point of St. John's Wort, which is referred to as "Prozac from the plant kingdom". Hypericin and hyperforin, two major constituents with significant biological activity of St. John's Wort and which are complex molecules with unusual features, are examined.

  5. Interaction of St John's wort (Hypericum perforatum) with clozapine.

    PubMed

    Van Strater, Annelies C P; Bogers, Jan P A M

    2012-03-01

    St John's wort (Hypericum perforatum) is notorious for its ability to induce the enzymes of the P450 system. Especially, it induces CYP1A2 and CYP3A4, enzymes that are closely involved in the metabolism of clozapine. We present a patient with schizophrenia, who was stable on a fixed dose with stable plasma level of clozapine, and who deteriorated after she started self-medicating with St John's wort. The reduced plasma clozapine level and the psychiatric condition normalized after the withdrawal of St John's wort. It is possible that, beside the induction of P450-enzymes, the induction of P-glycoprotein by St John's wort aggravated psychiatric deterioration of the patient. Physicians should be alert to patients self-medicating with over-the-counter medicines, especially when these medicines can lower clozapine concentrations below the therapeutic range.

  6. St. John's wort for the treatment of psychiatric disorders.

    PubMed

    Sarris, Jerome

    2013-03-01

    St. John's wort (Hypericum perforatum) has been extensively studied and reviewed for its use in depression; however, there is less salient discussion on its clinical application for a range of other psychiatric disorders. This article outlines the current evidence of the efficacy of St John's wort in common psychiatric disorders, including major depression, bipolar depression, attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder, social phobia, and somatization disorder. Mechanisms of action, including emerging pharmacogenetic data, safety, and clinical considerations are also detailed.

  7. St. John's wort and antidepressant drug interactions in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Lantz, M S; Buchalter, E; Giambanco, V

    1999-01-01

    There is increasing interest in and use of the herbal preparation St. John's wort. Hypericin, the major active ingredient, has many psychoactive properties. The agent is sold in the US as a nutritional supplement and is recommended for numerous conditions, including depression, anxiety, insomnia, and inflammation. We report a series of five cases of clinically diagnosed central serotonergic syndrome among elderly patients who combined prescription antidepressants with St. John's wort. Older adults are large consumers of both over-the-counter and prescription medications. They are particularly vulnerable to interactions between medications and products sold as nutritional or herbal supplements. St. John's wort requires further evaluation due to potential for drug interactions with central nervous system agents and for more definitive therapeutic indications.

  8. Geology of St. John, U.S. Virgin Islands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rankin, Douglas W.

    2002-01-01

    The rocks of St. John, which is located near the eastern end of the Greater Antilles and near the northeastern corner of the Caribbean plate, consist of Cretaceous basalt, andesite, keratophyre, their volcaniclastic and hypabyssal intrusive equivalents, and minor calcareous rocks and chert. These rocks were intruded by Tertiary mafic dikes and tonalitic plutons. The oldest rocks formed in an extensional oceanic environment characterized by abundant keratophyre and sheeted dikes. Subduction-related volcanism of the east-west-trending marine Greater Antilles volcanic arc began on St. John near the transition between the Early and Late Cretaceous. South-directed compression, probably caused by the initial collision between the Greater Antilles arc of the Caribbean plate and the Bahama platform of the North American plate, deformed the Cretaceous strata into east-west-trending folds with axial-plane cleavage. Late Eocene tonalitic intrusions, part of the Greater Antilles arc magmatism, produced a contact aureole that is as much as two kilometers wide and that partly annealed the axial-plane cleavage. East-west compression, possibly related to the relative eastward transport of the Caribbean plate in response to the beginning of spreading at the Cayman Trough, produced long-wavelength, low-amplitude folds whose axes plunge gently north and warp the earlier folds. A broad north-plunging syncline-anticline pair occupies most of St. John. The last tectonic event affecting St. John is recorded by a series of post-late Eocene sinistral strike-slip faults related to the early stages of spreading at the Cayman Trough spreading center and sinistral strike-slip accommodation near the northern border of the Caribbean plate. Central St. John is occupied by a rhomb horst bounded by two of these sinistral faults. Unlike other parts of the Greater Antilles, evidence for recent tectonic movement has not been observed on St. John.

  9. St. John's Wort versus Counterfeit St. John's Wort: An HPTLC Study.

    PubMed

    Frommenwiler, Débora A; Reich, Eike; Sudberg, Sidney; Sharaf, Maged H M; Bzhelyansky, Anton; Lucas, Ben

    2016-09-01

    Hypericum perforatum L. is the most commonly used herb for treating depression. Due to the popularity of this botanical, there is a potential for economically driven adulteration of St. John's wort (SJW) products. The goal of this study was to investigate SJW ingredients suspected to be adulterated based on simple preliminary HPTLC tests. Commercial samples were analyzed by HPTLC following the United States Pharmacopeia (USP) monograph methodology, with additional visualization under white light. A number of these samples presented odd methanolic solution colors and unconventional HPTLC fingerprints, suggesting the presence of other species and/or extraneous polar additives. To achieve identification and separation of the polar additives, a new reversed-phase HPTLC method was developed. The adulterants were identified as synthetic dyes in the amounts of 0.51 to 1.36% by weight. Identities of the dyes were confirmed by scanning densitometry and HPTLC-MS. A modified USP method with additional detection mode permitted the identification of eight SJW samples adulterated with dyes and six others with flavonoid fingerprints different from those specified by USP from a total of 37 samples of dry extracts, finished products, and bulk raw herb. A decision flowchart is proposed to guide the detection of adulteration of SJW in a systematic fashion. PMID:27343017

  10. St. John's Wort versus Counterfeit St. John's Wort: An HPTLC Study.

    PubMed

    Frommenwiler, Débora A; Reich, Eike; Sudberg, Sidney; Sharaf, Maged H M; Bzhelyansky, Anton; Lucas, Ben

    2016-09-01

    Hypericum perforatum L. is the most commonly used herb for treating depression. Due to the popularity of this botanical, there is a potential for economically driven adulteration of St. John's wort (SJW) products. The goal of this study was to investigate SJW ingredients suspected to be adulterated based on simple preliminary HPTLC tests. Commercial samples were analyzed by HPTLC following the United States Pharmacopeia (USP) monograph methodology, with additional visualization under white light. A number of these samples presented odd methanolic solution colors and unconventional HPTLC fingerprints, suggesting the presence of other species and/or extraneous polar additives. To achieve identification and separation of the polar additives, a new reversed-phase HPTLC method was developed. The adulterants were identified as synthetic dyes in the amounts of 0.51 to 1.36% by weight. Identities of the dyes were confirmed by scanning densitometry and HPTLC-MS. A modified USP method with additional detection mode permitted the identification of eight SJW samples adulterated with dyes and six others with flavonoid fingerprints different from those specified by USP from a total of 37 samples of dry extracts, finished products, and bulk raw herb. A decision flowchart is proposed to guide the detection of adulteration of SJW in a systematic fashion.

  11. [Phytotherapy threats with emphasis on St. John's wort medicines].

    PubMed

    Sienkiewicz, Jacek; Czarnik-Matusewicz, Henryk; Wiela-Hojeńska, Anna

    2013-11-01

    Plant medicines used by patients in self-treatment contain powerfully acting active substances which can be a source of adverse events including interactions with synthetic medicines. Usage of St. John's wort causes high risk of various complications. St. John's wort preparations shouldn't be combined with antidepressants without physician's consultation. Long-term intake of medicines which contain Hypericum perforatum extracts can be a reason of undesirable interactions with isoenzymes CYP3A4, CYP1A2, CYP2C9, CYP2C19 and P-glycoprotein (P-gp) for which St John's wort is a substrate. Compounds present in the St. John's wort, especially hyperforin, increase the activity of cytochrome P450 in the liver and intestinal mucosa as well as P-gp, which can accelerate their elimination from the body, decrease their concentrations and reduce the effect. Effective and safe phytotherapy requires a lot of knowledge about the properties and toxicity of preparations used and accurate monitoring of the consequences of their actions.

  12. Chemistry of St. John's Wort: Hypericin and Hyperforin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vollmer, John J.; Rosenson, Jon

    2004-10-01

    St. John's wort is a common plant that has been used medicinally for over 20 centuries. This herb is currently used by millions of people, primarily as natural antidepressant; yet, its efficacy is still under constant debate. St. John's wort contains a large aromatic molecule, hypericin, twisted by steric interactions into the shape of a propeller. For use as antidepressant, St. John's wort is standardized to the content of hypericin, but this molecule was recently found not to be the active ingredient. A totally different bicyclic molecule with complex substitution pattern, hyperforin, was then studied as the causative agent. Both molecules are strongly active in biological systems. Hypericin has shown antiviral activity and is a potent natural photosensitizer that has been used in photodynamic therapy against cancer and against HIV in stored blood. Hyperforin was found to activate a particular receptor in the liver that induces the production of an enzyme used for the metabolism of medications. This effect causes more rapid breakdown of many prescription medications and can interfere with their effectiveness. This finding should prompt a reevaluation of regular use of St. John's wort.

  13. English Language Progammes for Refugees in St. John's, Newfoundland.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bassler, Tonya

    1990-01-01

    Examines the strengths and weaknesses of various English language acquisition programs that are used to speed refugees' transition into Canadian society. The study focuses specifically on those refugees who qualify for federal government settlement assistance and reside in St. John's, Newfoundland. (eight references) (GLR)

  14. 33 CFR 117.325 - St. Johns River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false St. Johns River. 117.325 Section 117.325 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES... for the Main Street (US17) drawbridge, mile 24.7, at Jacksonville, must open on signal except...

  15. St. John's Wort (Hypericum Perforatum) and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... considerations focusing on known or potential drug-herb interactions. Arch Intern Med 158(20): 2200-2211. Moretti ME, et al. 2009 Evaluating the safety of St. John’s Wort in human pregnancy. Reprod Toxicol. 28(1):96-99. Nordeng ...

  16. 77 FR 419 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; St. Johns River, Jacksonville, FL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-05

    ... of the Florida East Coast automated railroad bridge across the St. Johns River, mile 24.9, in... required on the Florida East Coast automated railroad bridge over the St. Johns River in Jacksonville... result of this deviation, the Florida East Coast automated railroad bridge over the St. Johns River...

  17. Topical application of St. John's wort (Hypericum perforatum).

    PubMed

    Wölfle, Ute; Seelinger, Günter; Schempp, Christoph M

    2014-02-01

    St. John's wort (Hypericum perforatum) has been intensively investigated for its antidepressive activity, but dermatological applications also have a long tradition. Topical St. John's wort preparations such as oils or tinctures are used for the treatment of minor wounds and burns, sunburns, abrasions, bruises, contusions, ulcers, myalgia, and many others. Pharmacological research supports the use in these fields. Of the constituents, naphthodianthrones (e.g., hypericin) and phloroglucinols (e.g., hyperforin) have interesting pharmacological profiles, including antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, anticancer, and antimicrobial activities. In addition, hyperforin stimulates growth and differentiation of keratinocytes, and hypericin is a photosensitizer which can be used for selective treatment of nonmelanoma skin cancer. However, clinical research in this field is still scarce. Recently, sporadic trials have been conducted in wound healing, atopic dermatitis, psoriasis, and herpes simplex infections, partly with purified single constituents and modern dermatological formulations. St. John's wort also has a potential for use in medical skin care. Composition and stability of pharmaceutical formulations vary greatly depending on origin of the plant material, production method, lipophilicity of solvents, and storage conditions, and this must be regarded with respect to practical as well as scientific purposes.

  18. Water resources of St. John the Baptist Parish, Louisiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    White, Vincent E.; Prakken, Lawrence B.; Fendick, Robert B.

    2015-01-01

    Information concerning the availability, use, and quality of water in St. John the Baptist Parish, Louisiana, is critical for proper water-supply management. The purpose of this fact sheet is to present information that can be used by water managers, parish residents, and others for stewardship of this vital resource. Information on the availability, past and current use, use trends, and water quality from groundwater and surface-water sources in the parish is presented. Previously published reports and data stored in the U.S. Geological Survey’s National Water Information System (http://waterdata.usgs.gov/nwis) are the primary sources of the information presented here.

  19. Water in St. John, U.S. Virgin Islands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cosner, O.J.

    1972-01-01

    Water for domestic and municipal supply on St. John, in the past, has been obtained from rain catchments, dug wells, and barge shipments from St. Thomas and Puerto Rico. As a result of this study, small ground-water supplies have been developed for the Virgin Islands National Park. Ground water occurs in significant but limited quantities in the fractured volcanic rock throughout most of the Island. Yield of wells in this aquifer ranges from less than 100 to about 2,000 gpd (gallons per day). The average long-term yield of the three drilled wells in use by the National Park Service in 1967 was about 1,000 gpd. Yield ofl,000 to 5,000 gpd may be expected in the Coral Bay and the Reef Bay areas. Estimated total recharge of the fractured volcanic rock on St. John, based on a recharge of 1 to 3 inches per year, is 1,000,000 to 3,000,000 gpd. Perhaps as much as a quarter to a third of this water could be developed practically, depending on the rainfall in a given year. The chemical quality of the ground water in the fractured-rock aquifer in areas uncontaminated by sea water ranges from 600 to 2,000 mg/l (milligrams per liter) or more dissolved solids. Water from-formations in the higher altitudes is of better quality than that in the lower formations. Small quantities of ground water are available from beach sand, alluvium, and fractured rock near the sea. However, these sources tend to be brackish and are subject to salt-water encroachment. There are no perennial streams on St. John. There are a few spring-fed pools in stream channels, however, that are sustained, except in severe drought. Storm runoff is estimated to average 1 inch over the island annually, and evaporation from open water surfaces is about 70 inches per year. Ponds can be developed, but because of the high .evaporation they may be unreliable during droughts. Rain water collected in cisterns from roofs and catchments yield about 50 gpd per 1,000 square feet of catch area during an average year of

  20. Does St. John's Wort cause regression in gastrointestinal system adenocarcinomas?

    PubMed

    Karaarslan, Serap; Cokmert, Suna; Cokmez, Atilla

    2015-11-15

    St. John's Wort (SJW) is an old herb which has long been consumed widely for its anti-inflammatory, antiviral, and anti-depressive properties. Here we present a detailed clinical evaluation of three cases (two colon and one duodenal adenocarcinoma) with remarkable and intensive lymphoplasmocytic host reaction, at the basal part of tumor, intensive fibrosis, giant cells, plasma cell increase in lymph nodes and few giant cells in germinal centers in resection specimens. The observation of similar host reaction in those tumors having otherwise usual appearance was interesting. None of the cases received neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy or additional treatment before surgery but only SJW. These cases are presented to increase the awareness about such cases. Further research is needed to reveal the possible effect of SJW, which has long been consumed for different treatment purposes, on human tumors.

  1. The mechanisms of action of St. John's wort: an update.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Mathias; Butterweck, Veronika

    2015-06-01

    Pharmacological research confirms and supports the clinically observed antidepressant efficacy of St. John's wort (Hypericum perforatum L., SJW). This contribution is an update of a former review by the authors in 2007. Positive evidence of antidepressant effects has been found with SJW preparations, extract fractions, and single constituents. The efficacy of SJW is obviously defined by a range of parallel mechanisms of action, triggered by different constituents. In vitro research showed, among other tests, positive effects in neurotransmitter regulation (in beta adrenergic systems and glutamate receptors) and ion channel conductance. Antidepressant effects were confirmed in typical in vivo models such as the forced swimming test, the open field test, the tail suspension test, or a model of stress-impaired memory. The overall effect cannot be attributed to a single constituent or fraction. SJW is therefore an outstanding example of the total extract being defined as the active constituent of herbal medicines.

  2. Determination of total hypericins in St. John's wort and herbal medicinal products.

    PubMed

    Anyzewska, Małgorzata; Kowalczuk, Anna; Łozak, Anna; Jabłczyńska, Renata; Fijałek, Zbigniew

    2010-01-01

    The work aimed to determine the levels of hypericins expressed as hypericin in the herbal substance of St. John's wort, in capsules and tablets containing the extract of St. John's wort, tablets containing powdered herb and in tincture and juice from fresh St. John's wort, by HPLC method with spectrophotometric detection. In addition, the amount of hypericins in the infusion prepared from St. John's wort was determined by HPLC and spectrophotometry methods. According to traditional indications aqueous infusions from St. John's wort containing mainly hydrophilic components are used in gastrointestinal diseases. On the other hand, ethanolic extracts containing hypericin and hyperforin affect the CNS and are indicated for the treatment of episodes of mild depressive disorders. The results obtained in the work indicate that the daily dose of hypericins taken by a patient as infusions is 0.328 mg on average for herbs in sachets and in bulk form. It can be compared to the daily dose of hypericins contained in tablets and capsules based on the alkoholic extract of St. John's wort and tablets containing powdered St. John's wort herb. For solid dosage forms, this dose ranges from 0.288 mg to 0.636 mg. The assays were performed using consistent analytical methods for all tested pharmaceutical products and consequently it was possible to compare doses taken by patients and their strength of action.

  3. St John's wort (Hypericum perforatum): drug interactions and clinical outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, L; Yue, Q Y; Bergquist, C; Gerden, B; Arlett, P

    2002-01-01

    Aims The aim of this work is to identify the medicines which interact with the herbal remedy St John's wort (SJW), and the mechanisms responsible. Methods A systematic review of all the available evidence, including worldwide published literature and spontaneous case reports provided by healthcare professionals and regulatory authorities within Europe has been undertaken. Results A number of clinically significant interactions have been identified with prescribed medicines including warfarin, phenprocoumon, cyclosporin, HIV protease inhibitors, theophylline, digoxin and oral contraceptives resulting in a decrease in concentration or effect of the medicines. These interactions are probably due to the induction of cytochrome P450 isoenzymes CYP3A4, CYP2C9, CYP1A2 and the transport protein P-glycoprotein by constituent(s) in SJW. The degree of induction is unpredictable due to factors such as the variable quality and quantity of constituent(s) in SJW preparations. In addition, possible pharmacodynamic interactions with selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors and serotonin (5-HT1d) receptor-agonists such as triptans used to treat migraine were identified. These interactions are associated with an increased risk of adverse reactions. Conclusions In Sweden and the UK the potential risks to patients were judged to be significant and therefore information about the interactions was provided to health care professionals and patients. The product information of the licensed medicines involved has been amended to reflect these newly identified interactions and SJW preparations have been voluntarily labelled with appropriate warnings. PMID:12392581

  4. 33 CFR 165.722 - Security Zone: St. Johns River, Jacksonville, Florida.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Mulberry Cover Manatee refuge, 400 feet from Naval Air Station Jacksonville boat ramp, at 30°13′00″ N, 81... shoreline of the St. Johns River and Mulberry Cove to the point of beginning. Datum: NAD 83 (b)...

  5. 33 CFR 165.722 - Security Zone: St. Johns River, Jacksonville, Florida.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Mulberry Cover Manatee refuge, 400 feet from Naval Air Station Jacksonville boat ramp, at 30°13′00″ N, 81... shoreline of the St. Johns River and Mulberry Cove to the point of beginning. Datum: NAD 83 (b)...

  6. 33 CFR 165.722 - Security Zone: St. Johns River, Jacksonville, Florida.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Mulberry Cover Manatee refuge, 400 feet from Naval Air Station Jacksonville boat ramp, at 30°13′00″ N, 81... shoreline of the St. Johns River and Mulberry Cove to the point of beginning. Datum: NAD 83 (b)...

  7. 33 CFR 165.722 - Security Zone: St. Johns River, Jacksonville, Florida.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Mulberry Cover Manatee refuge, 400 feet from Naval Air Station Jacksonville boat ramp, at 30°13′00″ N, 81... shoreline of the St. Johns River and Mulberry Cove to the point of beginning. Datum: NAD 83 (b)...

  8. Altitude and generalized configuration of the top of the Floridan aquifer, St. Johns County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spechler, Rick M.

    1983-01-01

    The Floridan aquifer is the principal source of freshwater to wells in most of St. Johns County. The aquifer consists of a thick sequence of interbedded limestone and dolomite of Eocene age. The top of the Floridan aquifer, which is irregular throughout St. Johns County, ranges from less than 90 feet below sea level in the extreme southestern part to more than 360 feet below sea level in the northern part. (USGS)

  9. Protein in St. John's Wort may suppress HIV-1 gene expression. Research suggests interesting possibilities.

    PubMed

    2005-12-01

    St. John's Wort contains a protein that inhibits HIV-1 replication, according to new research. Investigators who have spent more than a decade studying the mechanism of development of neurological disorders in AIDS patients decided to look at the impact St. John's Wort might have on neuronal cells, says Kamel Khalili, PhD, director of the Center for Neurovirology, professor, and acting chair of the department of neuroscience at Temple University's School of Medicine in Philadelphia, PA. PMID:16397939

  10. Impaired Glucose Tolerance in Healthy Men Treated with St. John's Wort.

    PubMed

    Stage, Tore Bjerregaard; Damkier, Per; Christensen, Mette Marie Hougaard; Nielsen, Lene Buch-Krogh; Højlund, Kurt; Brøsen, Kim

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine whether the over-the-counter herbal medicinal plant St. John's wort affects glucose tolerance in healthy men. To do this, we included 10 healthy men who were examined by a 2-hr oral glucose tolerance test on three occasions: A: baseline; B: after 21 days of treatment with St. John's wort; and C: at least 6 weeks after the last capsule of St. John's wort was ingested. Plasma glucose, serum insulin and C-peptide levels were measured during an oral glucose tolerance test and used for estimation of area under the concentration-time curve (AUC) as well as indices of insulin sensitivity and insulin secretion. We found that treatment with St. John's wort increased total and incremental glucose AUC and 2-hr plasma glucose levels. Surprisingly, this effect was sustained and even further increased 6 weeks after the last capsule of St. John's wort was taken. No effect on indices of insulin sensitivity was seen, but indices of insulin secretion were reduced even after adjustment for insulin sensitivity. In conclusion, this study indicates that long-term treatment with St. John's wort may impair glucose tolerance by reducing insulin secretion in young, healthy men. The unregulated use of this over-the-counter drug might be a risk factor for impaired glucose tolerance and type 2 diabetes.

  11. St. John's wort treatment in women bears risks beyond pharmacokinetic drug interactions.

    PubMed

    Hohmann, Nicolas; Maus, Anna; Carls, Alexandra; Haefeli, Walter E; Mikus, Gerd

    2016-04-01

    We analyzed adverse events in a clinical phase I trial to assess dose-dependent metabolic effects of St. John's wort co-administered with rifampicin in 12 healthy volunteers. Within 3-6 days after increasing the St. John's wort dose from 300 to 600 mg TID, five of six female participants developed ambient temperature-dependent allodynia and paresthesia in sun-exposed areas (back of the hands and perioral and nasal area). Aggravation of symptoms resulted in persistence of paresthesia and phototoxic erythrodermia. None of the male participants showed any of these effects. Gender, duration of treatment, dose, and solar exposure seem to be extrinsic and host factors facilitating St. John's wort-induced neuropathy. The risk to develop this adverse effect is almost exclusively present in women.

  12. St John's wort greatly decreases the plasma concentrations of oral S-ketamine.

    PubMed

    Peltoniemi, Marko A; Saari, Teijo I; Hagelberg, Nora M; Laine, Kari; Neuvonen, Pertti J; Olkkola, Klaus T

    2012-12-01

    Ketamine is an intravenous anaesthetic and analgesic agent but it can also be used orally as an adjuvant in the treatment of chronic pain. This study investigated the effect of the herbal antidepressant St John's wort, an inducer of cytochrome P450 3A4 (CYP3A4), on the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of oral S-ketamine. In a randomized cross-over study with two phases, 12 healthy subjects were pretreated with oral St John's wort or placebo for 14 days. On day 14, they were given an oral dose of 0.3 mg/kg of S-ketamine. Plasma concentrations of ketamine and norketamine were measured for 24 h and pharmacodynamic variables for 12 h. St John's wort decreased the mean area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC(0-∞)) of ketamine by 58% (P < 0.001) and decreased the peak plasma concentration (C(max)) of ketamine by 66% (P < 0.001) when compared with placebo. Mean C(max) of norketamine (the major metabolite of ketamine) was decreased by 23% (P = 0.002) and mean AUC(0-∞) of norketamine by 18% (P < 0.001) by St John's wort. There was a statistically significant linear correlation between the self-reported drug effect and C(max) of ketamine (r = 0.55; P < 0.01). St John's wort greatly decreased the exposure to oral S-ketamine in healthy volunteers. Although this decrease was not associated with significant changes in the analgesic or behavioural effects of ketamine in the present study, usual doses of S-ketamine may become ineffective if used concomitantly with St John's wort.

  13. Inpainting using airy diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorduy Hernandez, Sara

    2015-09-01

    One inpainting procedure based on Airy diffusion is proposed, implemented via Maple and applied to some digital images. Airy diffusion is a partial differential equation with spatial derivatives of third order in contrast with the usual diffusion with spatial derivatives of second order. Airy diffusion generates the Airy semigroup in terms of the Airy functions which can be rewritten in terms of Bessel functions. The Airy diffusion can be used to smooth an image with the corresponding noise elimination via convolution. Also the Airy diffusion can be used to erase objects from an image. We build an algorithm using the Maple package ImageTools and such algorithm is tested using some images. Our results using Airy diffusion are compared with the similar results using standard diffusion. We observe that Airy diffusion generates powerful filters for image processing which could be incorporated in the usual packages for image processing such as ImageJ and Photoshop. Also is interesting to consider the possibility to incorporate the Airy filters as applications for smartphones and smart-glasses.

  14. 33 CFR 165.721 - Safety Zone: St. Johns River, Jacksonville, FL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... zone during the specified conditions: The waters within a 500 yard radius of the fireworks barge or barges during the storage, preparation, and launching of fireworks in the St. Johns River between the... frequencies. It terminates at the conclusion of the fireworks display unless terminated earlier by the...

  15. 33 CFR 165.721 - Safety Zone: St. Johns River, Jacksonville, FL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... zone during the specified conditions: The waters within a 500 yard radius of the fireworks barge or barges during the storage, preparation, and launching of fireworks in the St. Johns River between the... frequencies. It terminates at the conclusion of the fireworks display unless terminated earlier by the...

  16. 33 CFR 165.721 - Safety Zone: St. Johns River, Jacksonville, FL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... zone during the specified conditions: The waters within a 500 yard radius of the fireworks barge or barges during the storage, preparation, and launching of fireworks in the St. Johns River between the... frequencies. It terminates at the conclusion of the fireworks display unless terminated earlier by the...

  17. 33 CFR 165.721 - Safety Zone: St. Johns River, Jacksonville, FL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... zone during the specified conditions: The waters within a 500 yard radius of the fireworks barge or barges during the storage, preparation, and launching of fireworks in the St. Johns River between the... frequencies. It terminates at the conclusion of the fireworks display unless terminated earlier by the...

  18. 33 CFR 165.721 - Safety Zone: St. Johns River, Jacksonville, FL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... zone during the specified conditions: The waters within a 500 yard radius of the fireworks barge or barges during the storage, preparation, and launching of fireworks in the St. Johns River between the... frequencies. It terminates at the conclusion of the fireworks display unless terminated earlier by the...

  19. Man and the Biosphere: Ground Truthing Coral Reefs for the St. John Island Biosphere Reserve.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brody, Michael J.; And Others

    Research on the coral species composition of St. John's reefs in the Virgin Islands was conducted through the School for Field Studies (SFS) Coral Reef Ecology course (winter 1984). A cooperative study program based on the United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization's (Unesco) program, Man and the Biosphere, was undertaken by…

  20. 78 FR 57063 - Special Local Regulations; Jacksonville Dragon Boat Festival; St. Johns River; Jacksonville, FL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-17

    ... Jacksonville, Florida during the Jacksonville Dragon Boat Festival, a series of paddle boat races. The event is..., Inc. will host the Jacksonville Dragon Boat Festival, a series of boat races. The Race Area will be...: Sec. 100.35T07-0652 Special Local Regulations; Jacksonville Dragon Boat Festival; St. Johns......

  1. 33 CFR 165.722 - Security Zone: St. Johns River, Jacksonville, Florida.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ....722 Security Zone: St. Johns River, Jacksonville, Florida. (a) Location. The water located within the... the shoreline at mean high water; thence past Piney Point and Black Point to the northern edge of... southerly, remaining 400′ seaward of the mean high water shoreline to 30°11′40″ N, 81°41′15.5″ W;...

  2. Medieval Theories of Education: Hugh of St Victor and John of Salisbury

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    FitzGerald, Brian D.

    2010-01-01

    This paper offers an assessment of two 12th-century theories of education, Hugh of St Victor's "Didascalicon" and John of Salisbury's "Metalogicon", maintaining that their works both draw on traditional Christian teachings and respond to contemporary pedagogical interests in systematising knowledge and integrating classical learning. The two works…

  3. St. John's wort significantly increased the systemic exposure and toxicity of methotrexate in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Shih-Ying; Juang, Shin-Hun; Tsai, Shang-Yuan; Chao, Pei-Dawn Lee; Hou, Yu-Chi

    2012-08-15

    St. John's wort (SJW, Hypericum perforatum) is one of the popular nutraceuticals for treating depression. Methotrexate (MTX) is an immunosuppressant with narrow therapeutic window. This study investigated the effect of SJW on MTX pharmacokinetics in rats. Rats were orally given MTX alone and coadministered with 300 and 150 mg/kg of SJW, and 25 mg/kg of diclofenac, respectively. Blood was withdrawn at specific time points and serum MTX concentrations were assayed by a specific monoclonal fluorescence polarization immunoassay method. The results showed that 300 mg/kg of SJW significantly increased the AUC{sub 0−t} and C{sub max} of MTX by 163% and 60%, respectively, and 150 mg/kg of SJW significantly increased the AUC{sub 0−t} of MTX by 55%. In addition, diclofenac enhanced the C{sub max} of MTX by 110%. The mortality of rats treated with SJW was higher than that of controls. In conclusion, coadministration of SJW significantly increased the systemic exposure and toxicity of MTX. The combined use of MTX with SJW would need to be with caution. -- Highlights: ► St. John's wort significantly increased the AUC{sub 0−t} and C{sub max} of methotrexate. ► Coadministration of St. John's wort increased the exposure and toxicity of methotrexate. ► The combined use of methotrexate with St. John's wort will need to be with caution.

  4. 33 CFR 165.720 - Safety/Security Zone: St. Johns River, Jacksonville, FL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... zones contained in 33 CFR 165.23 and 165.33 of this part, entry into any portion of the described zone... § 165.720 Safety/Security Zone: St. Johns River, Jacksonville, FL. (a) Location. The water and the...

  5. Stationary nonlinear Airy beams

    SciTech Connect

    Lotti, A.; Faccio, D.; Couairon, A.; Papazoglou, D. G.; Panagiotopoulos, P.; Tzortzakis, S.; Abdollahpour, D.

    2011-08-15

    We demonstrate the existence of an additional class of stationary accelerating Airy wave forms that exist in the presence of third-order (Kerr) nonlinearity and nonlinear losses. Numerical simulations and experiments, in agreement with the analytical model, highlight how these stationary solutions sustain the nonlinear evolution of Airy beams. The generic nature of the Airy solution allows extension of these results to other settings, and a variety of applications are suggested.

  6. Geology of the insular shelf south of St. Thomas and St. John, U.S. Virgin Islands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Garrison, L. E.; Holmes, Charles Ward; Trumbull, James V.

    1971-01-01

    A reconnaissance study has been made of the geology of the insular shelf south of St. Thomas and St. John, Virgin Islands. High-resolution seismic-reflection profiling reveals that a buried northeast-southwest striking bedrock ridge controls the shallow structure of the eastern portion of the shelf. This ridge is thought to be related to the Virgin Islands pluton farther north. Bedrock in the western shelf portion is more deeply buried and is thought to be a flatter terrain, probably lithologically similar to rocks exposed on St. Thomas. The sediment cover appears to consist principally of carbonate grains in the sand-size range. This sand is covered to various degrees by carbonate nodules at depths below about 34 m, but at shallower depths the nodules are not present. Three large areas of sandy bottom were mapped 1) west of Brewers Bay, 2) near Buck Island, and 3) off south-central St. John. Variations in the amounts of land-derived particles, organic matter, and silt/clay sized material were mapped in these bodies.

  7. Planning applications in east central Florida. [St. Johns National Wildlife Refuge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hannah, J. W.; Thomas, G. L.; Esparza, F. (Principal Investigator); Millard, J. J.

    1975-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. St. Johns National Wildlife Refuge, a 4000 acre marsh, was established primarily to protect the Dusky Seaside Sparrow. A vegetation map of the refuge based on ground observations and color infrared photography was made. The preferred habitat of this sparrow is high-to-medium density spartina (a marsh grass) with no trees nearby. An increase in spartina density corresponds to an increase in marsh wetness. A thematic map shows the birds habitat preferences.

  8. Saving lives and conserving blood: changing blood transfusion practices at St. John's Hospital, Springfield, Missouri.

    PubMed

    Hover, Alexander R; Madigan, Kevin; Skidmore, Lesha; Shell, Don

    2003-01-01

    We measured mean transfusion rates for 11 conditions accounting for the majority of inpatient blood transfusions and the pre-transfusion hemoglobin threshold triggering the transfusion. We then developed evidence-based recommendations for lower blood hemoglobin transfusion 'triggers.' Implementation of the transfusion guidelines and consensus building has decreased blood transfusion for the eleven conditions at St. John's Regional Health System (SJRHS) by 11.3% year to date (July 2002-March 2003).

  9. Bucking the Trend, St. John's University Converts Instructors into Tenure-Track Professors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    June, Audrey Williams

    2009-01-01

    Scholars who teach composition, a staple on the schedule of many a college freshman, often wind up stringing together a series of adjunct teaching jobs while keeping an eye out for that first step on the golden track to tenure. This article reports on a group of 20 people hired by St. John's University to teach in its first-year writing program,…

  10. 33 CFR 334.510 - U.S. Navy Fuel Depot Pier, St. Johns River, Jacksonville, Fla.; restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    .... Johns River, Jacksonville, Fla.; restricted area. 334.510 Section 334.510 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE DANGER ZONE AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.510 U.S. Navy Fuel Depot Pier, St. Johns River, Jacksonville, Fla.; restricted area. (a)...

  11. 33 CFR 334.510 - U.S. Navy Fuel Depot Pier, St. Johns River, Jacksonville, Fla.; restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    .... Johns River, Jacksonville, Fla.; restricted area. 334.510 Section 334.510 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE DANGER ZONE AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.510 U.S. Navy Fuel Depot Pier, St. Johns River, Jacksonville, Fla.; restricted area. (a)...

  12. St. John Health integrating new corporate identity, brand. Brand/logo to be rolled out over two-year period.

    PubMed

    Rees, Tom

    2003-01-01

    St. John Health, Warren, Mich., is integrating a new corporate identity and brand strategy for its network of nine wholly-owned and two affiliated hospital, along with more than 100 physician offices and specialty centers in southeast Michigan. "A new identity is a great rallying cry. It automatically says. 'We have a new mission. We have a new system. We are reaching new people,'" said Eunice O'Loughlan, VP, corporate communications for St. John Health.

  13. 33 CFR 334.510 - U.S. Navy Fuel Depot Pier, St. Johns River, Jacksonville, Fla.; restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false U.S. Navy Fuel Depot Pier, St... REGULATIONS § 334.510 U.S. Navy Fuel Depot Pier, St. Johns River, Jacksonville, Fla.; restricted area. (a) The... that have been specifically authorized to do so by the Officer in Charge of the Navy Fuel Depot....

  14. 33 CFR 334.510 - U.S. Navy Fuel Depot Pier, St. Johns River, Jacksonville, Fla.; restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false U.S. Navy Fuel Depot Pier, St... REGULATIONS § 334.510 U.S. Navy Fuel Depot Pier, St. Johns River, Jacksonville, Fla.; restricted area. (a) The... that have been specifically authorized to do so by the Officer in Charge of the Navy Fuel Depot....

  15. Potential inhibitors to recovery of Acropora palmata populations in St. John, US Virgin Islands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grober-Dunsmore, R.; Bonito, V.; Frazer, T.K.

    2006-01-01

    Populations of Acropora palmata in the Caribbean were decimated in the 1970s and 1980s, with little apparent signs of recovery until the late 1990s. Here, we document an increase in A. palmata colonies between 2001 and 2003 at 8 of 11 monitoring sites in waters adjacent to the island of St. John, US Virgin Islands. The shallow waters along the NW coast of the island exhibited the greatest increase in colony abundance, perhaps due to greater larval supply and/or conditions that favor settlement and subsequent survivorship. Of concern, however, is the lack of survival of large colonies (at all sites), which are most frequently affected by stressors (e.g. Coralliophila abbreviata, damselfishes, active disease) and are most likely to be remnants (colonies with discontinuous, living coral-tissue over an existing coral framework). Predation by C. abbreviata and active coral disease may directly contribute to the development of these remnant colonies. In addition, we recorded damage to colonies attributed to damselfishes and raise the possibility that these territorial reef-inhabitants act as vectors in the transmission of coral disease. While the incidence of disease around St. John is generally low, it may persist as a ubiquitous, chronic stress. Finally, because stressors are more prevalent on large colonies and in high-density stands, they have the potential to inhibit the recovery of A. palmata populations to their historic condition. ?? Inter-Research 2006.

  16. Paradise Threatened: Land Use and Erosion on St. John, US Virgin Islands

    PubMed

    Macdonald; Anderson; Dietrich

    1997-11-01

    / Rapid development and the concomitant increases in erosion and sedimentation are believed to threaten the reefs and other marine resources that are a primary attraction of St. John and Virgin Islands National Park. Average annual sediment yields from undeveloped areas were estimated from a sediment pond and a mangrove swamp as less than 20 and less than 40 t/km2/yr, respectively. Geomorphic evidence indicates that plantation agriculture during the 18th and 19th centuries did not cause severe erosion. Since about 1950 there has been rapid growth in roads and development due to increasing tourism and second-home development. Our field investigations identified the approximately 50 km of unpaved roads as the primary source of anthropogenic sediment. Field measurements of the road network in two catchments led to the development of a vector-based GIS model to predict road surface erosion and sediment delivery. We estimate that road erosion has caused at least a fourfold increase in island-wide sediment yields and that current sedimentation rates are unprecedented. Paving the dirt roads and implementing standard sediment control practices can greatly reduce current sediment yields and possible adverse effects on the marine ecosystems surrounding St. John.KEY WORDS: Erosion; Sediment yield; Roads; Dry tropics; Development PMID:9336484

  17. Early signs of recovery of Acropora palmata in St. John, US Virgin Islands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Muller, E.M.; Rogers, Caroline S.; van Woesik, R.

    2014-01-01

    Since the 1980s, diseases have caused significant declines in the population of the threatened Caribbean coral Acropora palmata. Yet it is largely unknown whether the population densities have recovered from these declines and whether there have been any recent shifts in size-frequency distributions toward large colonies. It is also unknown whether colony size influences the risk of disease infection, the most common stressor affecting this species. To address these unknowns, we examined A. palmata colonies at ten sites around St. John, US Virgin Islands, in 2004 and 2010. The prevalence of white-pox disease was highly variable among sites, ranging from 0 to 53 %, and this disease preferentially targeted large colonies. We found that colony density did not significantly change over the 6-year period, although six out of ten sites showed higher densities through time. The size-frequency distributions of coral colonies at all sites were positively skewed in both 2004 and 2010, however, most sites showed a temporal shift toward more large-sized colonies. This increase in large-sized colonies occurred despite the presence of white-pox disease, a severe bleaching event, and several storms. This study provides evidence of slow recovery of the A. palmata population around St. John despite the persistence of several stressors.

  18. An integrated surface and borehole seismic case study: Fort St. John Graben area, Alberta, Canada

    SciTech Connect

    Hinds, R.C. . Dept. of Geology); Kuzmiski, R. ); Anderson, N.L. . Kansas Geological Survey); Richards, B.R. )

    1993-11-01

    The deltaic sandstones of the basal Kiskatinaw Formation (Stoddard Group, upper Mississippian) were preferentially deposited within structural lows in a regime characterized by faulting and structural lows in a regime characterized by faulting and structural subsidence. In the Fort St. John Graben area, northwest Alberta, Canada, these sandstone facies can form reservoirs where they are laterally sealed against the flanks of upthrown fault blocks. Exploration for basal Kiskatinaw reservoirs generally entails the acquisition and interpretation of surface seismic data prior to drilling. These data are used to map the grabens in which these sandstones were deposited, and the horst blocks which act as lateral seals. Subsequent to drilling, vertical seismic profile (VSP) surveys can be run. These data supplement the surface seismic and well log control in that: (1) VSP data can be directly correlated to surface seismic data. As a result, the surface seismic control can be accurately tied to the subsurface geology; (2) multiples, identified on VSP data, can be deconvolved out of the surface seismic data; and (3) the subsurface, in the vicinity of the borehole, is more clearly resolved on the VSP data than on surface seismic control. On the Fort St. John Graben data set incorporated into this paper, faults which are not well resolved on the surface seismic data, are better delineated on VSP data. The interpretative processing of these data illustrate the use of the seismic profiling technique in the search for hydrocarbons in structurally complex areas.

  19. Quantitative analysis of the major constituents of St John's wort with HPLC-ESI-MS.

    PubMed

    Chandrasekera, Dhammitha H; Welham, Kevin J; Ashton, David; Middleton, Richard; Heinrich, Michael

    2005-12-01

    A method was developed to profile the major constituents of St John's wort extracts using high-performance liquid chromatography-electrospray mass spectrometry (HPLC-ESI-MS). The objective was to simultaneously separate, identify and quantify hyperforin, hypericin, pseudohypericin, rutin, hyperoside, isoquercetrin, quercitrin and chlorogenic acid using HPLC-MS. Quantification was performed using an external standardisation method with reference standards. The method consisted of two protocols: one for the analysis of flavonoids and glycosides and the other for the analysis of the more lipophilic hypericins and hyperforin. Both protocols used a reverse phase Luna phenyl hexyl column. The separation of the flavonoids and glycosides was achieved within 35 min and that of the hypericins and hyperforin within 9 min. The linear response range in ESI-MS was established for each compound and all had linear regression coefficient values greater than 0.97. Both protocols proved to be very specific for the constituents analysed. MS analysis showed no other signals within the analyte peaks. The method was robust and applicable to alcoholic tinctures, tablet/capsule extracts in various solvents and herb extracts. The method was applied to evaluate the phytopharmaceutical quality of St John's wort preparations available in the UK in order to test the method and investigate if they contain at least the main constituents and at what concentrations.

  20. Ultrabroadband Airy light bullets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piksarv, Peeter; Valdmann, Andreas; Valtna-Lukner, Heli; Saari, Peeter

    2014-04-01

    We present the measurements of the spatiotemporal impulse responses of two optical systems for launching ultrashort Airy pulses, incl. ultrabroadband nonspreading Airy beams whose main lobe size remains invariantly small over propagation. First, a spatial light modulator and, second, a custom refractive element with continuous surface profile were used to impose the required cubic phase on the input field. White-light spectral interferometry setup based on the SEA TADPOLE technique was applied for full spatio-temporal characterization of the impulse response with ultrahigh temporal resolution approaching a single cycle of the light wave. The results were compared to the theoretical model.

  1. Ultrabroadband Airy light bullets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piksarv, P.; Valdmann, A.; Valtna-Lukner, H.; Saari, P.

    2014-08-01

    We present the measurements of the spatiotemporal impulse responses of two optical systems for launching ultrashort Airy pulses, including ultrabroadband nonspreading Airy beams whose main lobe size remains invariantly small over propagation. First, a spatial light modulator and, second, a custom refractive element with continuous surface profile were used to impose the required cubic phase on the input field. A white-light spectral interferometry setup based on the SEA TADPOLE technique was applied for full spatio-temporal characterization of the impulse response with ultrahigh temporal resolution approaching a single cycle of the light wave. The results were compared to the theoretical model.

  2. St. John's Wort in patients non-responders to clopidogrel undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention: a single-center randomized open-label trial (St. John's Trial).

    PubMed

    Trana, Catalina; Toth, Gabor; Wijns, William; Barbato, Emanuele

    2013-06-01

    We assessed if St. John's Wort (SJW) improves platelet response in patients (pts) resistant to clopidogrel after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Stable angina pts non-responders to 600 mg clopidogrel (P2Y12 reaction units (PRU) >240) were randomized (2:1) to SJW (n = 15) or placebo (n = 8). SJW (300 mg × 3/day) was administrated for 2 weeks after PCI. Platelet reactivity was assessed by VerifyNowTM before (BL), 2 (T1), and 4 weeks (T2) after PCI. PRU significantly changed during protocol in SJW (BL (316 ± 60) vs. T1 (170 ± 87) vs. T2 (220 ± 96), p < 0.0001) and placebo group (BL (288 ± 36) vs. T1 (236 ± 31) vs. T2 (236 ± 62), p = 0.046). Yet, PRU changes from BL were higher at T1 in SJW than in placebo group (Δ%, -47 ± 24 vs. -16 ± 15, p = 0.0033), with no differences at T2 between the groups (Δ%, -30 ± 29 vs. -17 ± 24, p = 0.30). Residual platelet reactivity improved with SJW during the first month post-PCI.

  3. 33 CFR 334.510 - U.S. Navy Fuel Depot Pier, St. Johns River, Jacksonville, Fla.; restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false U.S. Navy Fuel Depot Pier, St... REGULATIONS § 334.510 U.S. Navy Fuel Depot Pier, St. Johns River, Jacksonville, Fla.; restricted area. (a) The area is described as: (1) A line running at 238.5° true and paralleling the pier at 100 feet...

  4. Fourier transform infrared imaging analysis in discrimination studies of St. John's wort (Hypericum perforatum).

    PubMed

    Huck-Pezzei, V A; Pallua, J D; Pezzei, C; Bittner, L K; Schönbichler, S A; Abel, G; Popp, M; Bonn, G K; Huck, C W

    2012-10-01

    In the present study, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) imaging and data analysis methods were combined to study morphological and molecular patterns of St. John's wort (Hypericum perforatum) in detail. For interpretation, FTIR imaging results were correlated with histological information gained from light microscopy (LM). Additionally, we tested several evaluation processes and optimized the methodology for use of complex FTIR microscopic images to monitor molecular patterns. It is demonstrated that the combination of the used spectroscopic method with LM enables a more distinct picture, concerning morphology and distribution of active ingredients, to be gained. We were able to obtain high-quality FTIR microscopic imaging results and to distinguish different tissue types with their chemical ingredients.

  5. Mammalian neurohormones: potential significance in reproductive physiology of St. John's wort (Hypericum perforatum L.)?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murch, Susan; Saxena, Praveen

    2002-10-01

    Melatonin and serotonin are indoleamine neurohormones that function as photoperiod signals in many species and have recently been found in St. John's wort, a medicinal plant used in the treatment of depression. There is no known role for melatonin in higher plants but melatonin functions as a signal of changes in photoperiod in other species. In the current study, serotonin and melatonin were quantified during flower development. Higher concentrations of serotonin were found in flower buds at the tetrad stage of microspore development and higher melatonin concentrations were detected during uninucleate mircosporogenesis. Additionally, the regeneration potential of isolated anthers was highest in the same stage that had elevated melatonin concentrations. These data provide the first evidence of the presence of melatonin during flower development and raise many questions about the potential roles of serotonin and melatonin as regulatory molecules in the reproductive flexibility of higher plants.

  6. Convocatum EST: Addresses by the President of St. John's College at Matriculation Convocations in Annapolis and Santa Fe Over Three Decades, 1950-1980.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weigle, Richard Daniel

    A collection of brief addresses made by Richard Daniel Weigle to successive entering classes at St. John's College at matriculation convocations over three decades (1950-1980) are presented. The 25 convocation addresses concern the following topics: Plato's cave and St. John's College; history; liberal education and women; Subiaco and community;…

  7. Weathering and soil erosion at watershed scale in St. John, US Virgin Islands.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gudiño, Napoleón; Kretzschmar, Thomas; Gray, Sarah

    2015-04-01

    Human activities may increase soil erosion and the delivery of land-based sediment into coastal waters from steep sub-tropical islands. These changes may also affect water-rock interaction, which alters the geochemistry of storm-water and the clay mineralogy of eroded sediments. The purpose of this analysis is to compare storm-water, sediment geochemistry and modeled erosion rates between developed and undeveloped watersheds on Saint John, United States Virgin Islands (USVI). The saturation index was calculated by "The Geochemist's Workbench", supported by X-Ray diffraction on clay minerals. The Revised and Modified Universal Soil Loss Equations were used to estimate both annual mean (2010) and storm-event (Hurricane Otto) based erosion rates. Relative concentration of illite was higher in Coral Bay. Calculated RUSLE/MUSLE-based erosion rates were higher for the developed compared to the undeveloped watersheds. Results of this investigation suggest that rural/urban development of watersheds may increase the weathering, soil erosion and coastal sedimentation causing a negative effect on the marine ecosystem in St. John USVI.

  8. TESTING PHARMACEUTICAL RELEASE OF ACTIVE SUBSTANCES FROM MEDICINAL PRODUCTS CONTAINING ST. JOHN'S WORT.

    PubMed

    Sakowska, Joanna; Anyzewska, Małgorzata; Łozak, Anna; Kowalczuk, Anna; Jabłczyńska, Renata

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the content of hypericins and flavonoids in tablets and capsules containing the extract or powdered herb of St. John's wort, in herbs for infusion and herbal infusions and to release of these compounds from tablets and capsules. HPLC method was used to determine the assay of hypericins and flavonoids in all tested products. The hypericins content was between 0.35 mg and 1.44 mg per tablet or capsule. The release of hypericins from these products in the phosphate buffer of pH 6.8 is between 30 and 60% of the determined content. The degree of hypericins release from herbs into infusions was 15% on average, which corresponds to 0.64 mg of hypericins per infusion of 4 g of herbs. The flavonoids content was between 8.79 and 36.3 mg per tablet or capsule. The release of flavonoids in the phosphate buffer of pH 6.8 is between 63 and 85% of the determined content. The degree of flavonoids release was 76% on average, which corresponds to 77.0 mg per infusion of 4 g of herbs. The test results confirmed that infusions from the St. John's wort constitute are a rich source of flavonoids. At the same time, the universally accepted opinion that aqueous infusions contain only trace amounts of hypericins was not confirmed. Infusions from Herba hyperici may also be a source of hypericins in amounts comparable with the minimum dose recommended for the treatment of mild to moderate depressive episodes. PMID:27180432

  9. TESTING PHARMACEUTICAL RELEASE OF ACTIVE SUBSTANCES FROM MEDICINAL PRODUCTS CONTAINING ST. JOHN'S WORT.

    PubMed

    Sakowska, Joanna; Anyzewska, Małgorzata; Łozak, Anna; Kowalczuk, Anna; Jabłczyńska, Renata

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the content of hypericins and flavonoids in tablets and capsules containing the extract or powdered herb of St. John's wort, in herbs for infusion and herbal infusions and to release of these compounds from tablets and capsules. HPLC method was used to determine the assay of hypericins and flavonoids in all tested products. The hypericins content was between 0.35 mg and 1.44 mg per tablet or capsule. The release of hypericins from these products in the phosphate buffer of pH 6.8 is between 30 and 60% of the determined content. The degree of hypericins release from herbs into infusions was 15% on average, which corresponds to 0.64 mg of hypericins per infusion of 4 g of herbs. The flavonoids content was between 8.79 and 36.3 mg per tablet or capsule. The release of flavonoids in the phosphate buffer of pH 6.8 is between 63 and 85% of the determined content. The degree of flavonoids release was 76% on average, which corresponds to 77.0 mg per infusion of 4 g of herbs. The test results confirmed that infusions from the St. John's wort constitute are a rich source of flavonoids. At the same time, the universally accepted opinion that aqueous infusions contain only trace amounts of hypericins was not confirmed. Infusions from Herba hyperici may also be a source of hypericins in amounts comparable with the minimum dose recommended for the treatment of mild to moderate depressive episodes.

  10. The treatment of minor depression with St. John's Wort or citalopram: failure to show benefit over placebo.

    PubMed

    Rapaport, Mark Hyman; Nierenberg, Andrew A; Howland, Robert; Dording, Christina; Schettler, Pamela J; Mischoulon, David

    2011-07-01

    This paper presents new data addressing two important controversies in psychiatry: the construct of Minor Depression (MinD) and the efficacy of St. John's Wort for milder forms of depressive disorders. Data are from a three-arm, 12 week, randomized clinical trial of investigating the efficacy of St. John's Wort (810 mg/day), citalopram (20 mg/day), or placebo for acute treatment of MinD. Due to a high placebo response on all outcome measures, neither St. John's Wort nor citalopram separated from placebo on change in depressive symptom severity, quality of life, or well-being. However, systematic assessment of potential adverse effects (AEs) led to three important observations: (1) prior to the administration of study compound, 60% of subjects endorsed items that would be characterized as AEs once study compound was administered, (2) St. John's Wort and citalopram were each associated with a significant number of new or worsening AEs during treatment, and (3) using a structured interview for identifying AEs at baseline and during treatment is informative. MinD was not responsive to either a conventional antidepressant or a nutraceutical, and both compounds were associated with a notable side effects burden. Other treatment approaches for MinD should be investigated.

  11. 77 FR 60135 - St. Johns National Wildlife Refuge, FL; Final Comprehensive Conservation Plan and Finding of No...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-02

    ..., Florida. In the final CCP, we describe how we will manage this refuge for the next 15 years. ADDRESSES... (Draft CCP/EA). The CCP will guide us in managing and administering St. Johns NWR for the next 15 years... wildlife refuge. The purpose for developing a CCP is to provide refuge managers with a 15-year plan...

  12. Effect of St. John's Wort (Hypericum perforatum) treatment on restraint stress-induced behavioral and biochemical alteration in mice

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background A stressful stimulus is a crucial determinant of health and disease. Antidepressants are used to manage stress and their related effects. The present study was designed to investigate the effect of St. John's Wort (Hypericum perforatum) in restraint stress-induced behavioral and biochemical alterations in mice. Methods Animals were immobilized for a period of 6 hr. St. John's Wort (50 and 100 mg/kg) was administered 30 minutes before the animals were subjecting to acute immobilized stress. Various behavioral tests parameters for anxiety, locomotor activity and nociceptive threshold were assessed followed by biochemical assessments (malondialdehyde level, glutathione, catalase, nitrite and protein) subsequently. Results 6-hr acute restraint stress caused severe anxiety like behavior, antinociception and impaired locomotor activity as compared to unstressed animals. Biochemical analyses revealed an increase in malondialdehyde, nitrites concentration, depletion of reduced glutathione and catalase activity as compared to unstressed animal brain. Five days St. John's Wort treatment in a dose of 50 mg/kg and 100 mg/kg significantly attenuated restraint stress-induced behavioral (improved locomotor activity, reduced tail flick latency and antianxiety like effect) and oxidative damage as compared to control (restraint stress). Conclusion Present study highlights the modest activity of St. John's Wort against acute restraint stress induced modification. PMID:20459658

  13. Streamflow and water-quality characteristics at selected sites of the St. Johns River in central Florida, 1933 to 2002

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kroening, Sharon E.

    2004-01-01

    To meet water-supply needs in central Florida for 2020, the St. Johns River is being considered as a source of water supply to augment ground water from the Floridan aquifer system. Current (2004) information on streamflow and water-quality characteristics of the St. Johns River in east-central Florida is needed by water resources planners to assess the feasibility of using the river as an alternate source of water supply and to design water treatment facilities. To address this need, streamflow and water quality of the 90-mile-long middle reach of the St. Johns River, Florida, from downstream of Lake Poinsett to near DeLand, were characterized by using retrospective (1991-99) and recently collected data (2000-02). Streamflow characteristics were determined by using data from water years 1933-2000. Water-quality characteristics were described using data from 1991-99 at 15 sites on the St. Johns River and 1 site each near the mouths of the Econlockhatchee and Wekiva Rivers. Data were augmented with biweekly water-quality data and continuous physical properties data at four St. Johns River sites and quarterly data from sites on the Wekiva River, Blackwater Creek, and downstream of Blue Springs from 2000-02. Water-quality constituents described were limited to information on physical properties, major ions and other inorganic constituents, nutrients, organic carbon, suspended solids, and phytoplankton chlorophyll-a. The occurrence of antibiotics, human prescription and nonprescription drugs, pesticides, and a suite of organic constituents, which may indicate domestic or industrial waste, were described at two St. Johns River sites using limited data collected in water years 2002-03. The occurrence of these same constituents in water from a pilot water treatment facility on Lake Monroe also was described using data from one sampling event conducted in March 2003. Dissolved oxygen concentration and water pH values in the St. Johns River were significantly lower during

  14. Voigt Airy surface magneto plasmons.

    PubMed

    Hu, Bin; Wang, Qi Jie; Zhang, Ying

    2012-09-10

    We present a basic theory on Airy surface magneto plasmons (SMPs) at the interface between a dielectric layer and a metal layer (or a doped semiconductor layer) under an external static magnetic field in the Voigt configuration. It is shown that, in the paraxial approximation, the Airy SMPs can propagate along the surface without violating the nondiffracting characteristics, while the ballistic trajectory of the Airy SMPs can be tuned by the applied magnetic field. In addition, the self-deflection-tuning property of the Airy SMPs depends on the direction of the external magnetic field applied, owing to the nonreciprocal effect. PMID:23037243

  15. The Sargassum Frogfish (Histrio histrio Linnaeus) observed in mangroves in St. John, US Virgin Islands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rogers, C.S.; Pietsch, T.W.; Randall, J.E.; Arnold, R.J.

    2010-01-01

    The Sargassum Frogfish (Histrio histrio), the only pelagic member of the frogfish family Antennariidae, is considered an obligate associate of floating mats of the brown algae Sargassum natans and S. fluitans (Adams 1960; Dooley 1972; Pietsch and Grobecker 1987). Between February and April 2010, 20 of these fish were observed in three mangrove-fringed bays in Virgin Islands Coral Reef National Monument, St. John, US Virgin Islands. All of them were clinging to clumps of the red alga Acanthophora spicifera growing on the submerged prop roots of red mangrove trees (Rhizophora mangle) distributed along an estimated total of 2,160 mof shoreline (Fig. 1). All of the fish were at a depth of less than 0.5 meters. Two individuals were seen on one prop root, but the other 18 were solitary. Their estimated standard lengths ranged from about 20 to 100 mm. Littler and Littler (2000, p. 295) published a photograph of one individual in blades of the green alga Ulva lactuca growing on a prop root in Belize. This is the first report of the Sargassum Frogfish living in association with attached algae.

  16. Estimation of dermatological application of creams with St. John's Wort oil extracts.

    PubMed

    Arsić, Ivana; Zugić, Ana; Tadić, Vanja; Tasić-Kostov, Marija; Mišić, Dušan; Primorac, Marija; Runjaić-Antić, Dušanka

    2011-12-28

    Oleum Hyperici, the oil extract of St. John's Wort (SJW), is one of the oldest folk remedies, traditionally used in the topical treatment of wounds, bruises, ulcers, cuts, burns, hemorrhoids and also as an antiseptic. Considering the advantageous characteristics of emulsion applications, in the present study we have formulated three O/W creams containing 15% (w/v) of SJW oil extract as an active ingredient. The aim was to estimate dermatological application of the prepared creams for the abovementioned indications. The extracts were prepared according to the prescriptions from traditional medicine, however with different vegetable oils used as an extractant, namely: Olive, palm and sunflower oil. The investigated O/W creams demonstrated significant antiinflammatory effects in an in vivo double-blind randomized study, using a sodium lauryl sulphate test. Both skin parameters assessed in the study (electrical capacitance and erythema index), were restored to the baseline value after a seven-day treatment with the tested creams. Almost all investigated SJW oil extracts and corresponding creams displayed the same antimicrobial activity against the most of the investigated microorganisms with obtained minimal inhibitory concentrations values of 1,280 µg/mL, 2,560 µg/mL or >2,560 µg/mL.

  17. Long-term variation of octocoral populations in St. John, US Virgin Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenz, Elizabeth A.; Bramanti, Lorenzo; Lasker, Howard R.; Edmunds, Peter J.

    2015-12-01

    The decline in abundance of scleractinian corals over the past three decades in the Caribbean has raised the possibility that other important benthic taxa, such as octocorals, are also changing in abundance. We used photoquadrats taken over 20 yr from reefs (7-9 m depth) at six sites on the south coast of St. John, US Virgin Islands, to test the hypothesis that octocorals have changed in abundance since 1992. Octocorals were counted in 0.25 m2 photoquadrats at 2- to 3-yr intervals and identified to genus or family. Overall, there was variation over time in population density of octocorals (pooled among taxa, and also separately for Antillogorgia spp., Gorgonia spp., and plexaurids) at each site, and densities remained unchanged or increased over 20 yr; where increases in density occurred, the effects were accentuated after 2002. The local-scale analysis was expanded to the Caribbean (including the Florida Keys) by compiling data for octocoral densities from 31 studies for reefs at ≤25 m depth between 1968 and 2013. At this scale, analyses were limited by the paucity of historical data, and despite a weak trend of higher octocoral densities in recent decades, statistically, there was no change in octocoral abundance over time. Together with data from the whole Caribbean, the present analysis suggests that octocorals have not experienced a decadal-scale decline in population density, which has occurred for many scleractinian corals.

  18. St. John's wort significantly increased the systemic exposure and toxicity of methotrexate in rats.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shih-Ying; Juang, Shin-Hun; Tsai, Shang-Yuan; Chao, Pei-Dawn Lee; Hou, Yu-Chi

    2012-08-15

    St. John's wort (SJW, Hypericum perforatum) is one of the popular nutraceuticals for treating depression. Methotrexate (MTX) is an immunosuppressant with narrow therapeutic window. This study investigated the effect of SJW on MTX pharmacokinetics in rats. Rats were orally given MTX alone and coadministered with 300 and 150 mg/kg of SJW, and 25mg/kg of diclofenac, respectively. Blood was withdrawn at specific time points and serum MTX concentrations were assayed by a specific monoclonal fluorescence polarization immunoassay method. The results showed that 300 mg/kg of SJW significantly increased the AUC(0-t) and C(max) of MTX by 163% and 60%, respectively, and 150 mg/kg of SJW significantly increased the AUC(0-t) of MTX by 55%. In addition, diclofenac enhanced the C(max) of MTX by 110%. The mortality of rats treated with SJW was higher than that of controls. In conclusion, coadministration of SJW significantly increased the systemic exposure and toxicity of MTX. The combined use of MTX with SJW would need to be with caution.

  19. St. John's wort reversal of meningeal nociception: a natural therapeutic perspective for migraine pain.

    PubMed

    Galeotti, N; Ghelardini, C

    2013-07-15

    Despite a number of antimigraine drugs belonging to different pharmacological classes are available, there is a huge unmet need for better migraine pharmacotherapy. We here demonstrated the capability of Hypericum perforatum, popularly called St. John's wort (SJW), to relieve meningeal nociception in an animal model induced by administration of the nitric oxide (NO) donors glyceryl trinitrate (GTN) and sodium nitroprusside (SNP). GTN and SNP produced a delayed meningeal inflammation, as showed by the upregulation of interleukin (IL)-1β and inducible NO synthase (iNOS), and a prolonged cold allodynia and heat hyperalgesia with a time-course consistent with NO-induced migraine attacks. A single oral administration of a SJW dried extract (5mg/kg p.o.) counteracted the nociceptive behaviour and the overexpression of IL-1β and iNOS. To clarify the cellular pathways involved, the expression of protein kinase C (PKC) and downstream effectors was detected. NO donors increased expression and phosphorylation of PKCγ, PKCɛ and transcription factors, such as nuclear factor (NF)-κB, cyclic AMP response element binding protein (CREB), Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription (STAT)-1. All these molecular events were prevented by SJW and hypericin, a SJW main component. In conclusion, SJW counteracted the NO donor-induced pain hypersensitivity and meningeal activation by blocking PKC-mediated pathways involving NF-κB, CREB, STAT1. These results might suggest SJW as an innovative and safe perspective for migraine pain.

  20. St. John's wort extract and hyperforin protect rat and human pancreatic islets against cytokine toxicity.

    PubMed

    Novelli, Michela; Beffy, Pascale; Menegazzi, Marta; De Tata, Vincenzo; Martino, Luisa; Sgarbossa, Anna; Porozov, Svetlana; Pippa, Anna; Masini, Matilde; Marchetti, Piero; Masiello, Pellegrino

    2014-02-01

    The extract of Hypericum perforatum (St. John's wort, SJW) and its component hyperforin (HPF) were previously shown to inhibit cytokine-induced activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription-1 and nuclear factor κB and prevent apoptosis in a cultured β-cell line. Objective of this study was to assess the protection exerted by SJW and HPF on isolated rat and human islets exposed to cytokines in vitro. Functional, ultrastructural, biomolecular and cell death evaluation studies were performed. In both rat and human islets, SJW and HPF counteracted cytokine-induced functional impairment and down-regulated mRNA expression of pro-inflammatory target genes, such as iNOS, CXCL9, CXCL10, COX2. Cytokine-induced NO production from cultured islets, evaluated by nitrites measurement in the medium, was significantly reduced in the presence of the vegetal compounds. Noteworthy, the increase in apoptosis and necrosis following 48-h exposure to cytokines was fully prevented by SJW and partially by HPF. Ultrastructural morphometric analysis in human islets exposed to cytokines for 20 h showed that SJW or HPF avoided early β-cell damage (e.g., mitochondrial alterations and loss of insulin granules). In conclusion, SJW compounds protect rat and human islets against cytokine effects by counteracting key mechanisms of cytokine-mediated β-cell injury and represent promising pharmacological tools for prevention or limitation of β-cell dysfunction and loss in type 1 diabetes.

  1. St. John's Wort Attenuates Colorectal Carcinogenesis in Mice through Suppression of Inflammatory Signaling.

    PubMed

    Manna, Soumen K; Golla, Srujana; Golla, Jaya Prakash; Tanaka, Naoki; Cai, Yan; Takahashi, Shogo; Krausz, Kristopher W; Matsubara, Tsutomu; Korboukh, Ilia; Gonzalez, Frank J

    2015-09-01

    Despite widespread use as well as epidemiologic indications, there have been no investigations into the effect of St. John's wort (SJW) extract on colorectal carcinogenesis in vivo. This study reports a systematic evaluation of the impact of dietary supplementation of SJW extract on azoxymethane-induced colorectal carcinogenesis in mice. Mice were fed with either AIN-93G (control) diet or SJW extract-supplemented diet (SJW diet) prior to azoxymethane treatment. SJW diet was found to significantly improve the overall survival of azoxymethane-treated mice. Pretreatment with the SJW diet significantly reduced body weight loss as well as decrease of serum albumin and cholesterol levels associated with azoxymethane-induced colorectal tumorigenesis. SJW diet-fed mice showed a significant decrease in tumor multiplicity along with a decrease in incidence of large tumors and a trend toward decreased total tumor volume in a dose-dependent manner. A short-term study, which examined the effect of SJW prior to rectal bleeding, also showed decrease in colorectal polyps in SJW diet-fed mice. Nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/2) pathways were attenuated by SJW administration. SJW extract resulted in early and continuous attenuation of these pathways in the colon epithelium of SJW diet-fed mice under both short-term and long-term treatment regimens. In conclusion, this study demonstrated the chemopreventive potential of SJW extract against colorectal cancer through attenuation of proinflammatory processes.

  2. Molecular phylogenetics and morphological evolution of St. John's wort (Hypericum; Hypericaceae).

    PubMed

    Nürk, Nicolai M; Madriñán, Santiago; Carine, Mark A; Chase, Mark W; Blattner, Frank R

    2013-01-01

    Phylogenetic hypotheses for the large cosmopolitan genus Hypericum (St. John's wort) have previously been based on morphology, and molecular studies have thus far included only a few species. In this study, we used 360 sequences of the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region of nuclear ribosomal DNA (nrDNA) for 206 species representing Hypericum (incl. Triadenum and Thornea) and three other genera of Hypericaceae to generate an explicit phylogenetic hypothesis for the genus using parsimony and model-based methods. The results indicate that the small genus Triadenum is nested in a clade within Hypericum containing most of the New World species. Sister to Hypericum is Thornea from Central America. Within Hypericum, three large clades and two smaller grades were found; these are based on their general morphology, especially characters used previously in taxonomy of the genus. Relative to the most recent classification, around 60% of the sections of Hypericum were monophyletic. We used a Bayesian approach to reconstruct ancestral states of selected morphological characters, which resulted in recognition of characters that support major clades within the genus and a revised interpretation of morphological evolution in Hypericum. The shrubby habit represents the plesiomorphic state from which herbs evolved several times. Arborescent species have radiated convergently in high-elevation habitats in tropical Africa and South America.

  3. St. John's Wort Has Metabolically Favorable Effects on Adipocytes In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Fuller, Scott; Richard, Allison J; Ribnicky, David M; Beyl, Robbie; Mynatt, Randall; Stephens, Jacqueline M

    2014-01-01

    In addition to serving as a storage site for reserve energy, adipocytes play a critical role in whole-body insulin sensitivity and glucose metabolism. St. John's Wort (SJW) is a botanical supplement widely used as an over-the-counter treatment of depression and a variety of other conditions associated with anxiety and nerve pain. Previous studies in our laboratory demonstrated that SJW inhibits insulin-stimulated glucose uptake and adipocyte differentiation in cultured murine and mature human adipocytes. To investigate the effects of SJW on adipocyte function in vivo, we utilized C57BL/6J mice. In our studies, mice were administered SJW extract (200 mg/kg) once daily by gavage for two weeks. In contrast to our in vitro studies, mice treated with SJW extract showed increased levels of adiponectin in white adipose tissue in a depot specific manner (P < 0.01). SJW also exerted an insulin-sensitizing effect as indicated by a significant increase in insulin-stimulated Akt serine phosphorylation in epididymal white adipose tissue (P < 0.01). Food intake, body weight, fasting blood glucose, and fasting insulin did not differ between the two groups. These results are important as they indicate that SJW does not promote metabolic dysfunction in adipose tissue in vivo.

  4. Investigating the effectiveness of St John's wort herb as an antimicrobial agent against mycobacteria.

    PubMed

    Mortensen, Trent; Shen, Shujie; Shen, Fenann; Walsh, Marie K; Sims, Ronald C; Miller, Charles D

    2012-09-01

    A persistent need exists for effective treatment agents for mycobacterial infections. This research investigated the effectiveness of the Hypericum perforatum herb (commonly known as St John's wort; SJW) in its growth inhibition of mycobacteria. A SJW extract was effective at inhibiting five nonpathogenic Mycobacterium isolates and Bacillus subtilis, but not Escherichia coli. Quantitative studies of concentration sensitivity to the SJW extract were performed with minimal bactericidal concentrations (MBC) ranging from 0.33 to 2.66 mg extract/mL. The SJW compounds hyperforin (Hfn), hypericin (Hpn), and pseudohypericin (Phn) were quantified in the extract using HPLC. The SJW extract solution of 133 mg extract/mL used in this study contained 2.3 mg Hfn/mL, 0.8 mg Hpn/mL, and 2.1 mg Phn/mL. Purified Hfn, Hpn, and Phn were tested for inhibitory activity against Mycobacterium JLS (M. JLS) at similar concentrations used in the crude extract. While Hfn was inhibitory at 46 µg/mL, none of the purified SJW constituents were bactericidal at concentrations corresponding to SJW treatments. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis of SJW-treated M. JLS cells showed changes in cell surface morphology.

  5. PKC-mediated potentiation of morphine analgesia by St. John's Wort in rodents and humans.

    PubMed

    Galeotti, Nicoletta; Farzad, Mersedeh; Bianchi, Enrica; Ghelardini, Carla

    2014-01-01

    Our purpose was to combine the use of morphine with clinically available inhibitors of protein kinase C (PKC), finally potentiating morphine analgesia in humans. Thermal tests were performed in rodents and humans previously administered with acute or chronic morphine combined or not with increasing doses of the PKC-blocker St. John's Wort (SJW) or its main component hypericin. Phosphorylation of the γ subunit of PKC enzyme was assayed by western blotting in the periaqueductal grey matter (PAG) from rodents co-administered with morphine and hypericin and was prevented in rodent PAG by SJW or hypericin co-administration with morphine, inducing a potentiation of morphine analgesia in thermal pain. The score of pain assessment in healthy volunteers were decreased by 40% when morphine was co-administered with SJW at a dose largely below those used to obtain an antidepressant or analgesic effect in both rodents and humans. The SJW/hypericin potentiating effect lasted in time and preserved morphine analgesia in tolerant mice. Our findings indicate that, in clinical practice, SJW could reduce the dose of morphine obtaining the same analgesic effect. Therefore, SJW and one of its main components, hypericin, appear ideal to potentiate morphine-induced analgesia.

  6. Inhibitory effect of the herbal antidepressant St. John's wort (Hypericum perforatum) on rat gastric motility.

    PubMed

    Capasso, Raffaele; Borrelli, Francesca; Aviello, Gabriella; Capasso, Francesco; Izzo, Angelo A

    2008-02-01

    St. John's wort (Hypericum perforatum) is a highly popular and effective herbal antidepressant that clinically interacts with a number of conventional drugs. Because alterations in gastric emptying can cause pharmacokinetic interactions, in the present study we evaluated the effect of a standardized extract prepared from the flowering tops of Hypericum perforatum (SJW extract) on rat gastric motility. Orally administered SJW extract delayed gastric emptying in vivo. In vitro studies showed that SJW extract was significantly more active in inhibiting acetylcholine (or prostaglandin E2)-induced contractions than electrical field stimulation (EFS)-induced contractions. The effect of SJW extract on EFS-induced contractions was unaffected by drugs that inhibit intrinsic inhibitory nerves or by tachykinin antagonists, but it was reduced by the 5-hydroxytryptamine antagonist methysergide. The inhibitory effect of SJW extract on acetylcholine-induced contractions was reduced by the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase inhibitor cyclopiazonic acid, but not by the L-type Ca2+ channel blocker nifedipine or by methysergide. Among the chemical constituents of SJW extract tested, hyperforin and, to a lesser extent, the flavonoids kaempferol and quercitrin, inhibited acetylcholine-induced contractions. It is concluded that SJW has a direct inhibitory effect on smooth muscle and could also possibly modulate gastric neurotransmission. If extended to humans, the inhibitory effect of SJW extract on gastric emptying in vivo could contribute, at least in part, to the clinical pharmacokinetic interactions between conventional medicines and this herbal antidepressant. PMID:18172613

  7. Potentiometric Surface of the Upper Floridan Aquifer in the St. Johns River Water Management District and Vicinity, Florida, May 2009

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kinnaman, Sandra L.; Dixon, Joann F.

    2009-01-01

    This map depicts the potentiometric surface of the Upper Floridan aquifer in the St. Johns River Water Management District and vicinity for May 2009. Potentiometric contours are based on water-level measurements collected at 625 wells during the period May 14 - May 29, near the end of the dry season. Some contours are inferred from previous potentiometric-surface maps with larger well networks. The potentiometric surface of the carbonate Upper Floridan aquifer responds mainly to rainfall, and more locally, to groundwater withdrawals and spring flow. Potentiometric-surface highs generally correspond to topographic highs where the aquifer is recharged. Springs and areas of diffuse upward leakage naturally discharge water from the aquifer and are most prevalent along the St. Johns River. Areas of discharge are reflected by depressions in the potentiometric surface. Groundwater withdrawals locally have lowered the potentiometric surface. Groundwater in the Upper Floridan aquifer generally flows from potentiometric highs to potentiometric lows in a direction perpendicular to the contours.

  8. The 'first' instead of the 'oldest'. St. John's Riverside, in Yonkers, N.Y., markets its history.

    PubMed

    Botvin, Judith D

    2002-01-01

    St. John's Riverside Hospital, Yonkers, N.Y., built an integrated campaign upon its long history. Using billboards, print ads, bus shelters, radio and TV it touted its 130-plus years and its long history of firsts. Its integrated campaign proclaimed these "firsts." It specifically targeted its marketing to middle to upper-middle income residents of the surrounding area, particularly females between ages 25 and 54.

  9. The 'first' instead of the 'oldest'. St. John's Riverside, in Yonkers, N.Y., markets its history.

    PubMed

    Botvin, Judith D

    2002-01-01

    St. John's Riverside Hospital, Yonkers, N.Y., built an integrated campaign upon its long history. Using billboards, print ads, bus shelters, radio and TV it touted its 130-plus years and its long history of firsts. Its integrated campaign proclaimed these "firsts." It specifically targeted its marketing to middle to upper-middle income residents of the surrounding area, particularly females between ages 25 and 54. PMID:12238239

  10. The Effect of Natural Mulches on Crop Performance, Weed Suppression and Biochemical Constituents of Catnip and St. John's Wort.

    PubMed

    Duppong, L M; Delate, K; Liebman, M; Horton, R; Romero, F; Kraus, G; Petrich, J; Chowdbury, P K

    2004-01-01

    Because of expanding markets for high-value niche crops, opportunities have increased for the production of medicinal herbs in the USA. An experiment was conducted in 2001 and 2002 near Gilbert, IA, to study crop performance, weed suppression, and environmental conditions associated with the use of several organic mulches in the production of two herbs, catnip (Nepeta cataria L.) and St. John's wort (Hypericum perforatum L. 'Helos'). Treatments were arranged in a completely randomized design and included a positive (hand-weeded) control, a negative (nonweeded) control, oat straw, a flax straw mat, and a nonwoven wool mat. Catnip plant height was significantly greater in the oat straw than the other treatments at 4 wk through 6 wk in 2001; at 4 to 8 wk in 2002, catnip plant height and width was significantly lower in the negative control compared with the other treatments. Catnip yield was significantly higher in the flax straw mat than all other treatments in 2001. In 2002, St. John's wort yields were not statistically different in any treatments. All weed management treatments had significantly fewer weeds than the non-weeded rows in 2002. Total weed density comparisons in each crop from 2 yr showed fewer weeds present in the flax straw and wool mat treatments compared with positive control plots. There was no significant weed management treatment effect on the concentration of the target compounds, nepetalactone in catnip and pseudohypericin-hypericin in St. John's wort, although there was a trend toward higher concentrations in the flax straw treatment.

  11. Modeling and Analysis of Sea-level Rise Impacts on Salinity in the Lower St. Johns River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bacopoulos, P.

    2015-12-01

    There is deliberate attention being paid to studying sea-level rise impacts on the lower St. Johns River, a drowned coastal plain-type estuary with low topographic drive, located in northeastern Florida. One area of attention is salinity in the river, which influences the entire food web, including sea and marsh grasses, juvenile crustaceans and fishes, wading birds and migratory waterfowl, marine mammals and other predator animals. It is expected that elevated ocean levels will increase the salinity of the estuarine waters, leading to deleterious effects on dependent species of the river biology. The objective of the modeling and analysis was: 1) to establish baseline conditions of salinity for the lower St. Johns River; and 2) to examine future conditions of salinity, as impacted by sea-level rise. Establishing baseline conditions entailed validation of the model for present-day salinity in the lower St. Johns River via comparison to available data. Examining future conditions entailed application of the model for sea-level rise scenarios, with comparison to the baseline conditions, for evaluation of sea-level rise impacts on salinity. While the central focus was on the physics of sea-level rise impacts on salinity, some level of salinity-biological assessment was conducted to identify sea-level rise/salinity thresholds, as related to negatively impacting different species of the river biology.

  12. Bohmian trajectories of Airy packets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nassar, Antonio B.; Miret-Artés, Salvador

    2014-09-01

    The discovery of Berry and Balazs in 1979 that the free-particle Schrödinger equation allows a non-dispersive and accelerating Airy-packet solution has taken the folklore of quantum mechanics by surprise. Over the years, this intriguing class of wave packets has sparked enormous theoretical and experimental activities in related areas of optics and atom physics. Within the Bohmian mechanics framework, we present new features of Airy wave packet solutions to Schrödinger equation with time-dependent quadratic potentials. In particular, we provide some insights to the problem by calculating the corresponding Bohmian trajectories. It is shown that by using general space-time transformations, these trajectories can display a unique variety of cases depending upon the initial position of the individual particle in the Airy wave packet. Further, we report here a myriad of nontrivial Bohmian trajectories associated to the Airy wave packet. These new features are worth introducing to the subject's theoretical folklore in light of the fact that the evolution of a quantum mechanical Airy wave packet governed by the Schrödinger equation is analogous to the propagation of a finite energy Airy beam satisfying the paraxial equation. Numerous experimental configurations of optics and atom physics have shown that the dynamics of Airy beams depends significantly on initial parameters and configurations of the experimental set-up.

  13. Bohmian trajectories of Airy packets

    SciTech Connect

    Nassar, Antonio B.; Miret-Artés, Salvador

    2014-09-15

    The discovery of Berry and Balazs in 1979 that the free-particle Schrödinger equation allows a non-dispersive and accelerating Airy-packet solution has taken the folklore of quantum mechanics by surprise. Over the years, this intriguing class of wave packets has sparked enormous theoretical and experimental activities in related areas of optics and atom physics. Within the Bohmian mechanics framework, we present new features of Airy wave packet solutions to Schrödinger equation with time-dependent quadratic potentials. In particular, we provide some insights to the problem by calculating the corresponding Bohmian trajectories. It is shown that by using general space–time transformations, these trajectories can display a unique variety of cases depending upon the initial position of the individual particle in the Airy wave packet. Further, we report here a myriad of nontrivial Bohmian trajectories associated to the Airy wave packet. These new features are worth introducing to the subject’s theoretical folklore in light of the fact that the evolution of a quantum mechanical Airy wave packet governed by the Schrödinger equation is analogous to the propagation of a finite energy Airy beam satisfying the paraxial equation. Numerous experimental configurations of optics and atom physics have shown that the dynamics of Airy beams depends significantly on initial parameters and configurations of the experimental set-up.

  14. Antinociceptive effects of St. John's wort, Harpagophytum procumbens extract and Grape seed proanthocyanidins extract in mice.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Shinya; Hirai, Keita; Hatanaka, Junya; Hanato, Junko; Umegaki, Keizo; Yamada, Shizuo

    2008-02-01

    Hypericum perforatum extract (St. John's wort, SJW), Harpagophytum procumbens extract (HPE) and Grape seed proanthocyanidin extract (GSPE) have a broad spectrum of biological activities including antidepressant, anti-inflammatory or anti-oxidant effects. The aim of this study was to clarify antinociceptive properties of SJW, HPE and GSPE in mice with mechanisms that might potentially underlie these activities. Also, the effects of these herbal extracts on the antinociception and plasma and brain concentrations of morphine were examined. Oral pretreatment with SJW (100-1000 mg/kg) and HPE (30-300 mg/kg) attenuated significantly times of licking/biting both first and second phases of formalin injection in mice in the dose-dependent manner, and GSPE (10-300 mg/kg) suppressed second phase. Naloxone (5 mg/kg, s.c.) significantly attenuated antinociceptive effect of HPE but not SJW and GSPE. Formalin injection resulted in significant increase in the content of nitrites/nitrates (NO(x)) in mouse spinal cord. The rise of spinal NO(x) content by formalin was significantly attenuated by HPE and SJW. The pretreatment with SJW significantly potentiated an antinociceptive effect of morphine (0.3 mg/kg, s.c.), although concentrations of morphine in plasma and brain were not significantly changed by these herbal extracts. In conclusion, the present study has shown that SJW, HPE and GSPE exert significant antinociceptive effects in the formalin test of mice. In addition, opioidergic system seems to be involved in the antinociceptive effect of HPE but not SJW and GSPE. Furthermore, SJW potentiates morphine-induced antinociception possibly by pharmacodynamic interaction. PMID:18239280

  15. Characterization of shallow groundwater quality in the Lower St. Johns River Basin: a case study.

    PubMed

    Ouyang, Ying; Zhang, Jia-En; Parajuli, Prem

    2013-12-01

    Characterization of groundwater quality allows the evaluation of groundwater pollution and provides information for better management of groundwater resources. This study characterized the shallow groundwater quality and its spatial and seasonal variations in the Lower St. Johns River Basin, Florida, USA, under agricultural, forest, wastewater, and residential land uses using field measurements and two-dimensional kriging analysis. Comparison of the concentrations of groundwater quality constituents against the US EPA's water quality criteria showed that the maximum nitrate/nitrite (NO x ) and arsenic (As) concentrations exceeded the EPA's drinking water standard limits, while the maximum Cl, SO 4 (2-) , and Mn concentrations exceeded the EPA's national secondary drinking water regulations. In general, high kriging estimated groundwater NH 4 (+) concentrations were found around the agricultural areas, while high kriging estimated groundwater NO x concentrations were observed in the residential areas with a high density of septic tank distribution. Our study further revealed that more areas were found with high estimated NO x concentrations in summer than in spring. This occurred partially because of more NO x leaching into the shallow groundwater due to the wetter summer and partially because of faster nitrification rate due to the higher temperature in summer. Large extent and high kriging estimated total phosphorus concentrations were found in the residential areas. Overall, the groundwater Na and Mg concentration distributions were relatively more even in summer than in spring. Higher kriging estimated groundwater As concentrations were found around the agricultural areas, which exceeded the EPA's drinking water standard limit. Very small variations in groundwater dissolved organic carbon concentrations were observed between spring and summer. This study demonstrated that the concentrations of groundwater quality constituents varied from location to location

  16. St John's wort for depression--an overview and meta-analysis of randomised clinical trials.

    PubMed Central

    Linde, K.; Ramirez, G.; Mulrow, C. D.; Pauls, A.; Weidenhammer, W.; Melchart, D.

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To investigate if extracts of Hypericum perforatum (St John's wort) are more effective than placebo in the treatment of depression, are as effective as standard antidepressive treatment, and have fewer side effects than standard antidepressant drugs. DESIGN--Systematic review and meta-analysis of trials revealed by searches. TRIALS--23 randomised trials including a total of 1757 outpatients with mainly mild or moderately severe depressive disorders: 15 (14 testing single preparations and one a combination with other plant extracts) were placebo controlled, and eight (six testing single preparations and two combinations) compared hypericum with another drug treatment. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--A pooled estimate of the responder rate ratio (responder rate in treatment group/responder rate in control group), and numbers of patients reporting and dropping out for side effects. RESULTS--Hypericum extracts were significantly superior to placebo (ratio = 2.67; 95% confidence interval 1.78 to 4.01) and similarly effective as standard antidepressants (single preparations 1.10; 0.93 to 1.31, combinations 1.52; 0.78 to 2.94). There were two (0.8%) drop outs for side effects with hypericum and seven (3.0%) with standard antidepressant drugs. Side effects occurred in 50 (19.8%) patients on hypericum and 84 (52.8%) patients on standard antidepressants. CONCLUSION--There is evidence that extracts of hypericum are more effective than placebo for the treatment of mild to moderately severe depressive disorders. Further studies comparing extracts with standard antidepressants in well defined groups of patients and comparing different extracts and doses are needed. Images Fig 1 PMID:8704532

  17. Minimum flows and levels method of the St. Johns River Water Management District, Florida, USA.

    PubMed

    Neubauer, Clifford P; Hall, Greeneville B; Lowe, Edgar F; Robison, C Price; Hupalo, Richard B; Keenan, Lawrence W

    2008-12-01

    The St. Johns River Water Management District (SJRWMD) has developed a minimum flows and levels (MFLs) method that has been applied to rivers, lakes, wetlands, and springs. The method is primarily focused on ecological protection to ensure systems meet or exceed minimum eco-hydrologic requirements. MFLs are not calculated from past hydrology. Information from elevation transects is typically used to determine MFLs. Multiple MFLs define a minimum hydrologic regime to ensure that high, intermediate, and low hydrologic conditions are protected. MFLs are often expressed as statistics of long-term hydrology incorporating magnitude (flow and/or level), duration (days), and return interval (years). Timing and rates of change, the two other critical hydrologic components, should be sufficiently natural. The method is an event-based, non-equilibrium approach. The method is used in a regulatory water management framework to ensure that surface and groundwater withdrawals do not cause significant harm to the water resources and ecology of the above referenced system types. MFLs are implemented with hydrologic water budget models that simulate long-term system hydrology. The method enables a priori hydrologic assessments that include the cumulative effects of water withdrawals. Additionally, the method can be used to evaluate management options for systems that may be over-allocated or for eco-hydrologic restoration projects. The method can be used outside of the SJRWMD. However, the goals, criteria, and indicators of protection used to establish MFLs are system-dependent. Development of regionally important criteria and indicators of protection may be required prior to use elsewhere.

  18. Airy beam optical parametric oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aadhi, A.; Chaitanya, N. Apurv; Jabir, M. V.; Vaity, Pravin; Singh, R. P.; Samanta, G. K.

    2016-05-01

    Airy beam, a non-diffracting waveform, has peculiar properties of self-healing and self-acceleration. Due to such unique properties, the Airy beam finds many applications including curved plasma wave-guiding, micro-particle manipulation, optically mediated particle clearing, long distance communication, and nonlinear frequency conversion. However, many of these applications including laser machining of curved structures, generation of curved plasma channels, guiding of electric discharges in a curved path, study of nonlinear propagation dynamics, and nonlinear interaction demand Airy beam with high power, energy, and wavelength tunability. Till date, none of the Airy beam sources have all these features in a single device. Here, we report a new class of coherent sources based on cubic phase modulation of a singly-resonant optical parametric oscillator (OPO), producing high-power, continuous-wave (cw), tunable radiation in 2-D Airy intensity profile existing over a length >2 m. Based on a MgO-doped periodically poled LiNbO3 crystal pumped at 1064 nm, the Airy beam OPO produces output power more than 8 W, and wavelength tunability across 1.51–1.97 μm. This demonstration gives new direction for the development of sources of arbitrary structured beams at any wavelength, power, and energy in all time scales (cw to femtosecond).

  19. Airy beam optical parametric oscillator.

    PubMed

    Aadhi, A; Chaitanya, N Apurv; Jabir, M V; Vaity, Pravin; Singh, R P; Samanta, G K

    2016-01-01

    Airy beam, a non-diffracting waveform, has peculiar properties of self-healing and self-acceleration. Due to such unique properties, the Airy beam finds many applications including curved plasma wave-guiding, micro-particle manipulation, optically mediated particle clearing, long distance communication, and nonlinear frequency conversion. However, many of these applications including laser machining of curved structures, generation of curved plasma channels, guiding of electric discharges in a curved path, study of nonlinear propagation dynamics, and nonlinear interaction demand Airy beam with high power, energy, and wavelength tunability. Till date, none of the Airy beam sources have all these features in a single device. Here, we report a new class of coherent sources based on cubic phase modulation of a singly-resonant optical parametric oscillator (OPO), producing high-power, continuous-wave (cw), tunable radiation in 2-D Airy intensity profile existing over a length >2 m. Based on a MgO-doped periodically poled LiNbO3 crystal pumped at 1064 nm, the Airy beam OPO produces output power more than 8 W, and wavelength tunability across 1.51-1.97 μm. This demonstration gives new direction for the development of sources of arbitrary structured beams at any wavelength, power, and energy in all time scales (cw to femtosecond). PMID:27143582

  20. Airy beam optical parametric oscillator.

    PubMed

    Aadhi, A; Chaitanya, N Apurv; Jabir, M V; Vaity, Pravin; Singh, R P; Samanta, G K

    2016-05-04

    Airy beam, a non-diffracting waveform, has peculiar properties of self-healing and self-acceleration. Due to such unique properties, the Airy beam finds many applications including curved plasma wave-guiding, micro-particle manipulation, optically mediated particle clearing, long distance communication, and nonlinear frequency conversion. However, many of these applications including laser machining of curved structures, generation of curved plasma channels, guiding of electric discharges in a curved path, study of nonlinear propagation dynamics, and nonlinear interaction demand Airy beam with high power, energy, and wavelength tunability. Till date, none of the Airy beam sources have all these features in a single device. Here, we report a new class of coherent sources based on cubic phase modulation of a singly-resonant optical parametric oscillator (OPO), producing high-power, continuous-wave (cw), tunable radiation in 2-D Airy intensity profile existing over a length >2 m. Based on a MgO-doped periodically poled LiNbO3 crystal pumped at 1064 nm, the Airy beam OPO produces output power more than 8 W, and wavelength tunability across 1.51-1.97 μm. This demonstration gives new direction for the development of sources of arbitrary structured beams at any wavelength, power, and energy in all time scales (cw to femtosecond).

  1. Airy beam optical parametric oscillator

    PubMed Central

    Aadhi, A.; Chaitanya, N. Apurv; Jabir, M. V.; Vaity, Pravin; Singh, R. P.; Samanta, G. K.

    2016-01-01

    Airy beam, a non-diffracting waveform, has peculiar properties of self-healing and self-acceleration. Due to such unique properties, the Airy beam finds many applications including curved plasma wave-guiding, micro-particle manipulation, optically mediated particle clearing, long distance communication, and nonlinear frequency conversion. However, many of these applications including laser machining of curved structures, generation of curved plasma channels, guiding of electric discharges in a curved path, study of nonlinear propagation dynamics, and nonlinear interaction demand Airy beam with high power, energy, and wavelength tunability. Till date, none of the Airy beam sources have all these features in a single device. Here, we report a new class of coherent sources based on cubic phase modulation of a singly-resonant optical parametric oscillator (OPO), producing high-power, continuous-wave (cw), tunable radiation in 2-D Airy intensity profile existing over a length >2 m. Based on a MgO-doped periodically poled LiNbO3 crystal pumped at 1064 nm, the Airy beam OPO produces output power more than 8 W, and wavelength tunability across 1.51–1.97 μm. This demonstration gives new direction for the development of sources of arbitrary structured beams at any wavelength, power, and energy in all time scales (cw to femtosecond). PMID:27143582

  2. Runoff and suspended sediment yields from an unpaved road segment, St John, US Virgin Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos-Scharrón, Carlos E.; MacDonald, Lee H.

    2007-01-01

    Unpaved roads are believed to be the primary source of terrigenous sediments being delivered to marine ecosystems around the island of St John in the eastern Caribbean. The objectives of this study were to: (1) measure runoff and suspended sediment yields from a road segment; (2) develop and test two event-based runoff and sediment prediction models; and (3) compare the predicted sediment yields against measured values from an empirical road erosion model and from a sediment trap. The runoff models use the Green-Ampt infiltration equation to predict excess precipitation and then use either an empirically derived unit hydrograph or a kinematic wave to generate runoff hydrographs.Precipitation, runoff, and suspended sediment data were collected from a 230 m long, mostly unpaved road segment over an 8-month period. Only 3-5 mm of rainfall was sufficient to initiate runoff from the road surface. Both models simulated similar hydrographs. Model performance was poor for storms with less than 1 cm of rainfall, but improved for larger events. The largest source of error was the inability to predict initial infiltration rates.The two runoff models were coupled with empirical sediment rating curves, and the predicted sediment yields were approximately 0.11 kg per square meter of road surface per centimetre of precipitation. The sediment trap data indicated a road erosion rate of 0.27 kg m-2 cm-1. The difference in sediment production between these two methods can be attributed to the fact that the suspended sediment samples were predominantly sand and silt, whereas the sediment trap yielded mostly sand and gravel. The combination of these data sets yields a road surface erosion rate of 0.31 kg m-2 cm-1, or approximately 36 kg m-2 year-1. This is four orders of magnitude higher than the measured erosion rate from undisturbed hillslopes. The results confirm the importance of unpaved roads in altering runoff and erosion rates in a tropical setting, provide insights into the

  3. St John's Wort (Hypericum perforatum L.) Photomedicine: Hypericin-Photodynamic Therapy Induces Metastatic Melanoma Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Kleemann, Britta; Loos, Benjamin; Scriba, Thomas J.; Lang, Dirk; Davids, Lester M.

    2014-01-01

    Hypericin, an extract from St John's Wort (Hypericum perforatum L.), is a promising photosensitizer in the context of clinical photodynamic therapy due to its excellent photosensitizing properties and tumoritropic characteristics. Hypericin-PDT induced cytotoxicity elicits tumor cell death by various mechanisms including apoptosis, necrosis and autophagy-related cell death. However, limited reports on the efficacy of this photomedicine for the treatment of melanoma have been published. Melanoma is a highly aggressive tumor due to its metastasizing potential and resistance to conventional cancer therapies. The aim of this study was to investigate the response mechanisms of melanoma cells to hypericin-PDT in an in vitro tissue culture model. Hypericin was taken up by all melanoma cells and partially co-localized to the endoplasmic reticulum, mitochondria, lysosomes and melanosomes, but not the nucleus. Light activation of hypericin induced a rapid, extensive modification of the tubular mitochondrial network into a beaded appearance, loss of structural details of the endoplasmic reticulum and concomitant loss of hypericin co-localization. Surprisingly the opposite was found for lysosomal-related organelles, suggesting that the melanoma cells may be using these intracellular organelles for hypericin-PDT resistance. In line with this speculation we found an increase in cellular granularity, suggesting an increase in pigmentation levels in response to hypericin-PDT. Pigmentation in melanoma is related to a melanocyte-specific organelle, the melanosome, which has recently been implicated in drug trapping, chemotherapy and hypericin-PDT resistance. However, hypericin-PDT was effective in killing both unpigmented (A375 and 501mel) and pigmented (UCT Mel-1) melanoma cells by specific mechanisms involving the externalization of phosphatidylserines, cell shrinkage and loss of cell membrane integrity. In addition, this treatment resulted in extrinsic (A375) and intrinsic (UCT

  4. Natural and Anthropogenic Influences on Coastal Evolution Rates: St. John, USVI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, L. E.; Brooks, G. R.; Larson, R. A.; Devine, B.; Holmes, C.; Schwing, P. T.

    2007-05-01

    Sediment cores collected in salt ponds along the coast of St. John, USVI, show that anthropogenic activities have accelerated the rate of coastal evolution. Previous phases of this research indicate that at least some salt ponds form by coral reef growth cutting off open embayments. Over time, ponds fill with island-derived sediments. Rates of sediment accumulation have been shown to increase where anthropogenic activities are present. The objective of this study is to quantify the time required to infill salt ponds in natural and anthropogenically influenced settings. Sediment cores were collected from five salt ponds, chosen primarily on the basis of degree of anthropogenic development within the watershed. Based on detailed geochronological analyses (210Pb, 137Cs, and 7Be for the last 100 years, and 14C for long-term accumulation) we determined accumulation rates using two methods. Linear accumulation rates were calculated to determine sediment accumulation over time. Compacted linear accumulation rates take into consideration compaction of sediments over time. Results show that ponds naturally infill at a rate of 3 - 7 cm/100 yrs. Ponds in pristine watersheds (Newfound Bay) have maintained their natural accumulation rate of 3 - 7 cm/100 yrs. Ponds in areas of low anthropogenic activities (Long Bay/Southgate) infill at 4 - 9 cm/100 yrs, reflecting a slight increase in accumulation due to anthropogenic activity. Ponds moderately impacted by anthropogenic activity (Fish Bay) show a substantial increase of 15 - 20 cm/100 yrs accumulation rate. This compares to heavily impacted areas, such as Coral Bay which has been shown to exhibit a 10-fold increase in sediment accumulation rate over the last 25-50 years. Thus, results show a progressive increase in sediment accumulation rate linked to increasing levels of anthropogenic activities within the associated watershed. Given these rates, ponds naturally become completely infilled in 4,000-6,000 years. Anthropogenic

  5. Reproduction and early-age survival of manatees at Blue Spring, Upper St. Johns River, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    O'Shea, Thomas J.; Hartley, W.C.; O'Shea, Thomas J.; Ackerman, B.B.; Percival, H. Franklin

    1995-01-01

    We summarize reproduction of adults and survival of calves and subadult Florida manatees (Trichechus manatus latirostris) that were identified in winter at Blue Spring on the upper St. Johns River in Florida. Some records span more than 20 years, but most are from 15-year continuous annual observations during winter 1978-79 through winter 1992-93. Fifty-seven, first-year calves were identified; 55 litter sizes were one, and one consisted oftwins (1.79% of all births). Sex ratios of first-year calves did notsignificantly differfrom 1:1. Based on 21 of35 sighted females (15 individuals) that appeared pregnant and returned with calves during the subsequent winter, we estimated an early (neonatal to about 6 months) calf survival of 0.600. Based on estimations with a minimum-number-known-alive method, calf survival from the first to the second winter was at least 0.822, and subadult survival was 0.903 to the third, 0.958 to the fourth, 1.00 to the fifth, and 1.00 to the sixth winters. Seven females were observed from year of birth to their first winter with a nursing calf; the mean age at parturition to the first calf that survived to the next winter was 5.4 + 0.98 (SD) years. The estimated ages at first conception ranged from 3 to 6 years. The proportion of adult pregnant females was 0.410/year. Weaning was not observed in winter. Intervals between births averaged 2.60 + 0.81 years. The pooled proportion of adult females nursing first-winter calves was 0.303; the proportion of adult females nursing calves of any age was 0.407. These values do not significantly differ from those ofmanatees from the Crystal River or Atlantic Coast study areas. Anecdotal accounts are provided that suggested the existence of a pseudo estrus, an 11 to 13-month gestation, suppression of parturition in winter, and giving birth in quiet backwaters and canals. A female from Blue Spring produced at least seven calves during the 22 years since first observed and died giving birth at an estimated

  6. St John's Wort (Hypericum perforatum L.) photomedicine: hypericin-photodynamic therapy induces metastatic melanoma cell death.

    PubMed

    Kleemann, Britta; Loos, Benjamin; Scriba, Thomas J; Lang, Dirk; Davids, Lester M

    2014-01-01

    Hypericin, an extract from St John's Wort (Hypericum perforatum L.), is a promising photosensitizer in the context of clinical photodynamic therapy due to its excellent photosensitizing properties and tumoritropic characteristics. Hypericin-PDT induced cytotoxicity elicits tumor cell death by various mechanisms including apoptosis, necrosis and autophagy-related cell death. However, limited reports on the efficacy of this photomedicine for the treatment of melanoma have been published. Melanoma is a highly aggressive tumor due to its metastasizing potential and resistance to conventional cancer therapies. The aim of this study was to investigate the response mechanisms of melanoma cells to hypericin-PDT in an in vitro tissue culture model. Hypericin was taken up by all melanoma cells and partially co-localized to the endoplasmic reticulum, mitochondria, lysosomes and melanosomes, but not the nucleus. Light activation of hypericin induced a rapid, extensive modification of the tubular mitochondrial network into a beaded appearance, loss of structural details of the endoplasmic reticulum and concomitant loss of hypericin co-localization. Surprisingly the opposite was found for lysosomal-related organelles, suggesting that the melanoma cells may be using these intracellular organelles for hypericin-PDT resistance. In line with this speculation we found an increase in cellular granularity, suggesting an increase in pigmentation levels in response to hypericin-PDT. Pigmentation in melanoma is related to a melanocyte-specific organelle, the melanosome, which has recently been implicated in drug trapping, chemotherapy and hypericin-PDT resistance. However, hypericin-PDT was effective in killing both unpigmented (A375 and 501mel) and pigmented (UCT Mel-1) melanoma cells by specific mechanisms involving the externalization of phosphatidylserines, cell shrinkage and loss of cell membrane integrity. In addition, this treatment resulted in extrinsic (A375) and intrinsic (UCT

  7. Monitoring the coral disease, plague type II, on coral reefs in St. John, U.S. Virgin Islands.

    PubMed

    Miller, J; Rogers, C; Waara, R

    2003-06-01

    In July 1997, conspicuous white patches of necrotic tissue and bare skeleton began to appear on scleractinian corals in several bays around St. John, US Virgin Islands. Analysis of diseased coral tissue from five different species confirmed the presence of a Sphingomonas-like bacterium, the pathogen for plague type II. To date, 14 species of hard corals have been affected by plague type II around St. John. This disease was monitored at Haulover and Tektite Reefs at depths of 7-12 meters. The study site at Tektite Reef has > 50% cover by scleractinian corals with 90% of hard corals being composed of Montastraea annularis. Monthly surveys at Tektite Reef from December 1997 to May 2001 documented new incidence of disease (bare white patches of skeleton) every month with associated loss of living coral and 90.5% of all disease patches occurred on M. annularis. The frequency of disease within transects ranged from 3 to 58%, and the area of disease patches ranged from 0.25 to 9000 cm2. The average percent cover by the disease within 1 m2 ranged from 0.01% (+/- 0.04 SD) to 1.74% (+/- 9.08 SD). Photo-monitoring of 28 diseased corals of 9 species begun in September 1997 at Haulover Reef revealed no recovery of diseased portions with all necrotic tissue being overgrown rapidly by turf algae, usually within less than one month. Most coral colonies suffered partial mortality. Very limited recruitment (e.g., of Agaricia spp., Favia spp. and sponges) has been noted on the diseased areas. This coral disease has the potential to cause more loss of live coral on St. John reefs than any other stress to date because it targets the dominant reef building species, M. annularis.

  8. Monitoring the coral disease, plague type II, on coral reefs in St. John, U.S. Virgin Islands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, J.; Rogers, C.; Waara, R.

    2003-01-01

    In July 1997, conspicuous white patches of necrotic tissue and bare skeleton began to appear on scleractinian corals in several bays around St. John, US Virgin Islands. Analysis of diseased coral tissue from five different species confirmed the presence of a Sphingomonas-like bacterium, the pathogen for plague type II. To date, 14 species of hard corals have been affected by plague type II around St. John. This disease was monitored at Haulover and Tektite Reefs at depths of 7-12 meters. The study site at Tektite Reef has >50% cover by scleractinian corals with 90% of hard corals being composed of Montastraea annular is. Monthly surveys at Tektite Reef from December 1997 to May 2001 documented new incidence of disease (bare white patches of skeleton) every month with associated loss of living coral and 90.5% of all disease patches occurred on M. annularis. The frequency of disease within transects ranged from 3 to 58%, and the area of disease patches ranged from 0.25 to 9000 cm2. The average percent cover by the disease within 1 m2 ranged from 0.01% (?? 0.04 SD) to 1.74% (?? 9.08 SD). Photo-monitoring of 28 diseased corals of 9 species begun in September 1997 at Haulover Reef revealed no recovery of diseased portions with all necrotic tissue being overgrown rapidly by turf algae, usually within less than one month. Most coral colonies suffered partial mortality. Very limited recruitment (e.g., of Agaricia spp., Favia spp. and sponges) has been noted on the diseased areas. This coral disease has the potential to cause more loss of live coral on St. John reefs than any other stress to date because it targets the dominant reef building species, M. annularis.

  9. Monitoring the coral disease, plague type II, on coral reefs in St. John, U.S. Virgin Islands.

    PubMed

    Miller, J; Rogers, C; Waara, R

    2003-06-01

    In July 1997, conspicuous white patches of necrotic tissue and bare skeleton began to appear on scleractinian corals in several bays around St. John, US Virgin Islands. Analysis of diseased coral tissue from five different species confirmed the presence of a Sphingomonas-like bacterium, the pathogen for plague type II. To date, 14 species of hard corals have been affected by plague type II around St. John. This disease was monitored at Haulover and Tektite Reefs at depths of 7-12 meters. The study site at Tektite Reef has > 50% cover by scleractinian corals with 90% of hard corals being composed of Montastraea annularis. Monthly surveys at Tektite Reef from December 1997 to May 2001 documented new incidence of disease (bare white patches of skeleton) every month with associated loss of living coral and 90.5% of all disease patches occurred on M. annularis. The frequency of disease within transects ranged from 3 to 58%, and the area of disease patches ranged from 0.25 to 9000 cm2. The average percent cover by the disease within 1 m2 ranged from 0.01% (+/- 0.04 SD) to 1.74% (+/- 9.08 SD). Photo-monitoring of 28 diseased corals of 9 species begun in September 1997 at Haulover Reef revealed no recovery of diseased portions with all necrotic tissue being overgrown rapidly by turf algae, usually within less than one month. Most coral colonies suffered partial mortality. Very limited recruitment (e.g., of Agaricia spp., Favia spp. and sponges) has been noted on the diseased areas. This coral disease has the potential to cause more loss of live coral on St. John reefs than any other stress to date because it targets the dominant reef building species, M. annularis. PMID:15264553

  10. [Hypericin and hyperforin: bioactive components of St. John's Wort (Hypericum perforatum). Their isolation, analysis and study of physiological effect].

    PubMed

    Vacek, J; Klejdus, B; Kubán, V

    2007-04-01

    St. John's Wort (Hypericum perforatum L.) is commonly accepted as a medicinal plant. The data on the physiological activities of the individual substances that are produced in different organs of H. perforatum are well known at present. The highest attention is focused on the characterization and phytochemical properties of hypericin and hyperforin. These organic compounds are used as antidepressant, anticarcinogenic (photodynamic), antimicrobial and virostatic agents. The review paper surveys the present knowledge of chemical and analytical methods for their identification and quantification, physiological activity, and pharmacological and biomedical applications of hypericin and hyperforin. PMID:17619301

  11. Celery root extract as an inducer of mania induction in a patient on venlafaxine and St John's Wort.

    PubMed

    Khalid, Zaira; Osuagwu, Ferdnand C; Shah, Bilal; Roy, Nikita; Dillon, James E; Bradley, Ronald

    2016-09-01

    Celery root belongs to a group of plants classified as the umbelliferous family, which contains phytoestrogens. Phytoestrogens are structurally similar to estrogen as they share a pair of hydroxyl groups and phenolic ring, which enables them to bind to estrogen receptors directly, making them a herbal remedy for low estrogen states such as menopause. We present a case of a female patient with depression who was stabilized on venlafaxine and St John's Wort, and who developed a manic episode due to elevated serum venlafaxine levels after she started taking celery extracts for menopausal related issues. We proffer a hypothesis for this unusual occurrence. PMID:27467225

  12. Celery root extract as an inducer of mania induction in a patient on venlafaxine and St John's Wort.

    PubMed

    Khalid, Zaira; Osuagwu, Ferdnand C; Shah, Bilal; Roy, Nikita; Dillon, James E; Bradley, Ronald

    2016-09-01

    Celery root belongs to a group of plants classified as the umbelliferous family, which contains phytoestrogens. Phytoestrogens are structurally similar to estrogen as they share a pair of hydroxyl groups and phenolic ring, which enables them to bind to estrogen receptors directly, making them a herbal remedy for low estrogen states such as menopause. We present a case of a female patient with depression who was stabilized on venlafaxine and St John's Wort, and who developed a manic episode due to elevated serum venlafaxine levels after she started taking celery extracts for menopausal related issues. We proffer a hypothesis for this unusual occurrence.

  13. Generation of electron Airy beams.

    PubMed

    Voloch-Bloch, Noa; Lereah, Yossi; Lilach, Yigal; Gover, Avraham; Arie, Ady

    2013-02-21

    Within the framework of quantum mechanics, a unique particle wave packet exists in the form of the Airy function. Its counterintuitive properties are revealed as it propagates in time or space: the quantum probability wave packet preserves its shape despite dispersion or diffraction and propagates along a parabolic caustic trajectory, even though no force is applied. This does not contradict Newton's laws of motion, because the wave packet centroid propagates along a straight line. Nearly 30 years later, this wave packet, known as an accelerating Airy beam, was realized in the optical domain; later it was generalized to an orthogonal and complete family of beams that propagate along parabolic trajectories, as well as to beams that propagate along arbitrary convex trajectories. Here we report the experimental generation and observation of the Airy beams of free electrons. These electron Airy beams were generated by diffraction of electrons through a nanoscale hologram, which imprinted on the electrons' wavefunction a cubic phase modulation in the transverse plane. The highest-intensity lobes of the generated beams indeed followed parabolic trajectories. We directly observed a non-spreading electron wavefunction that self-heals, restoring its original shape after passing an obstacle. This holographic generation of electron Airy beams opens up new avenues for steering electronic wave packets like their photonic counterparts, because the wave packets can be imprinted with arbitrary shapes or trajectories.

  14. St. John's Wort reduces beta-amyloid accumulation in a double transgenic Alzheimer's disease mouse model-role of P-glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Brenn, Anja; Grube, Markus; Jedlitschky, Gabriele; Fischer, Andrea; Strohmeier, Barbara; Eiden, Martin; Keller, Markus; Groschup, Martin H; Vogelgesang, Silke

    2014-01-01

    The adenosine triphosphate-binding cassette transport protein P-glycoprotein (ABCB1) is involved in the export of beta-amyloid from the brain into the blood, and there is evidence that age-associated deficits in cerebral P-glycoprotein content may be involved in Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis. P-glycoprotein function and expression can be pharmacologically induced by a variety of compounds including extracts of Hypericum perforatum (St. John's Wort). To clarify the effect of St. John's Wort on the accumulation of beta-amyloid and P-glycoprotein expression in the brain, St. John's Wort extract (final hyperforin concentration 5%) was fed to 30-day-old male C57BL/6J-APP/PS1(+/-) mice over a period of 60 or 120 days, respectively. Age-matched male C57BL/6J-APP/PS1(+/-) mice receiving a St. John's Wort-free diet served as controls. Mice receiving St. John's Wort extract showed (i) significant reductions of parenchymal beta-amyloid 1-40 and 1-42 accumulation; and (ii) moderate, but statistically significant increases in cerebrovascular P-glycoprotein expression. Thus, the induction of cerebrovascular P-glycoprotein may be a novel therapeutic strategy to protect the brain from beta-amyloid accumulation, and thereby impede the progression of Alzheimer's disease.

  15. Modes of reproduction in Australian populations of Hypericum perforatum L. (St. John's wort) revealed by DNA fingerprinting and cytological methods.

    PubMed

    Mayo, Gwenda M; Langridge, Peter

    2003-08-01

    Hypericum perforatum L. (St. John's wort) is widely used in homeopathic medicine, but has also become a serious weed in Australia and many other countries. Reproduction in H. perforatum was investigated using markers based on restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) and amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP). Between two Australian populations, plants displayed 14 polymorphisms from a total of 22 scorable RFLP markers when genomic DNA was probed with M13 bacteriophage, but individuals within each population exhibited identical RFLP fingerprints. Ninety-four percent of the progeny of four crosses made between the two populations exhibited identical fingerprint and ploidy level to the maternal parent, and probably originated apomictically. Seven seedlings with recombinant RFLP or AFLP fingerprints were found from a total of 121 progeny. Both molecular marker techniques detected the same recombinants from a subset of screened progeny. Cytological analysis showed that the seven recombinants comprised three tetraploids (2n = 4x = 32), three hexaploids (2n = 6x = 48), and one aneuploid (2n - 1 = 31), which suggested that the level of normal reduced embryo sacs was only 2.5%. These results are discussed in relation to the management of invasive populations, and the implications for plant breeding and production of St. John's wort for medicinal purposes.

  16. Potentiometric Surface of the Upper Floridan Aquifer in the St. Johns River Water Management District and Vicinity, Florida, September 2007

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kinnaman, Sandra L.; Dixon, Joann F.

    2008-01-01

    This map depicts the potentiometric surface of the Upper Floridan aquifer in the St. Johns River Water Management District and vicinity for September 2007. Potentiometric contours are based on water-level measurements collected at 554 wells during the period September 15-27, near the end of the wet season. Some contours are inferred from previous potentiometric-surface maps with larger well networks. The potentiometric surface of the carbonate Upper Floridan aquifer responds mainly to rainfall, and more locally, to ground-water withdrawals and spring flow. Potentiometric-surface highs generally correspond to topographic highs where the aquifer is recharged. Springs and areas of diffuse upward leakage naturally discharge water from the aquifer and are most prevalent along the St. Johns River. Areas of discharge are reflected by depressions in the potentiometric surface. Ground-water withdrawals locally have lowered the potentiometric surface. Ground water in the Upper Floridan aquifer generally flows from potentiometric highs to potentiometric lows in a direction perpendicular to the contours.

  17. Potentiometric Surface of the Upper Floridan Aquifer in the St. Johns River Water Management District and Vicinity, Florida, September 2008

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kinnaman, Sandra L.; Dixon, Joann F.

    2009-01-01

    This map depicts the potentiometric surface of the Upper Floridan aquifer in the St. Johns River Water Management District and vicinity for September 2008. Potentiometric contours are based on water-level measurements collected at 589 wells during the period September 15-25, near the end of the wet season. Some contours are inferred from previous potentiometric-surface maps with larger well networks. The potentiometric surface of the carbonate Upper Floridan aquifer responds mainly to rainfall, and more locally, to ground-water withdrawals and spring flow. Potentiometric-surface highs generally correspond to topographic highs where the aquifer is recharged. Springs and areas of diffuse upward leakage naturally discharge water from the aquifer and are most prevalent along the St. Johns River. Areas of discharge are reflected by depressions in the potentiometric surface. Ground-water withdrawals locally have lowered the potentiometric surface. Ground water in the Upper Floridan aquifer generally flows from potentiometric highs to potentiometric lows in a direction perpendicular to the contours.

  18. An in vitro and hydroponic growing system for hypericin, pseudohypericin, and hyperforin production of St. John's wort (Hypericum perforatum CV new stem).

    PubMed

    Murch, Susan J; Rupasinghe, H P Vasantha; Saxena, Praveen K

    2002-12-01

    While the interest in medicinal plants continues to grow, there is a lack of basic information with respect to efficient protocols for plant production. Recently, in vitro regeneration protocols have been developed to provide masses of sterile, consistent St. John's wort. The current study assessed the potential for acclimatization of in vitro grown St. John's wort plantlets to a nutrient film technique (NFT) hydroponic system in a controlled environment greenhouse. Quantitative analyses of hypericin, hyperforin and pseudohypericin in flower tissues were used as the parameters to assess the quality of the greenhouse-grown plants. The three bioactive compounds were found to be present in similar or higher amounts than previously reported values for field-grown plants. These data provide evidence that greenhouse hydroponic systems can be effectively used for the efficient production of St. John's wort and other medicinal plants.

  19. The hermit crab Calcinus tibicen lives commensally on Millepora spp. in St. John, United States Virgin Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, D.; Edmunds, P. J.

    2013-03-01

    The present work describes an association between the hermit crab Calcinus tibicen and milleporine hydrocorals on shallow reefs (<6-m depth) in St. John, US Virgin Islands. In one bay, most colonies of Millepora spp. were occupied by C. tibicen in 2010 (62 %) and 2011 (50 %). In 2011, the association was common along 23 km of the coast of St. John, as well as at several locations around St. Thomas. On average, a colony of Millepora spp. harbored 4 C. tibicen within its branches, but more crabs were found on bigger colonies. During the day, large numbers of C. tibicen were found on Millepora spp., and these crabs frequently (>88 % of trials) returned to the same colony of Millepora spp. when removed and placed on adjacent surfaces. Of the C. tibicen found on Millepora spp. during the day, 48 % left their colonies at night, but most subsequently returned to the same colony as shown by the high site fidelity of tagged crabs (51 % over 5 days). A Y-maze experiment conducted in the laboratory suggested that C. tibicen could detect (and move toward) Millepora spp. on a spatial scale of about 30 cm and under a flow speed of about 5 cm s-1. When tethered on algal turf or sand, 45 % of C. tibicen disappeared over 7 days and presumably were eaten, whereas 15 % disappeared when tethered on Millepora spp. These results demonstrate that the association between C. tibicen and Millepora spp. is temporally stable and widespread, and suggest that hermit crabs seek Millepora spp. to secure a daytime refuge from predators. In the absence of negative fitness consequences for Millepora spp., but demonstrable benefits to C. tibicen, we propose that the Calcinus- Millepora association is commensal.

  20. A Climatology and Synoptic-Dynamic Basis for Distinguishing Cool-Season Precipitation Events at St. John's, Newfoundland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milrad, Shawn M.

    For St. John's, Newfoundland, at the confluence of several North American storm tracks, we identify synoptic-scale characteristics and precursors of various classes of cool-season precipitation events. Such events, based upon a climatology for 1979-2005, are separated into three categories based on precipitation amount. We find that the storm systems responsible for extreme precipitation events originate farther south and east than corresponding features in moderate and light events. A wind climatology shows that extreme precipitation events at St. John's are characterized almost exclusively by easterly surface and 925 hPa geostrophic winds, and that both the surface and 925 hPa geostrophic winds rotate clockwise with decreasing precipitation amount. Focusing on extreme events, we utilize two methods of manual synoptic typing to further partition events. The first method uses backward air parcel trajectories to separate events by air parcel source region. One subset of events ("west") is characterized by strong upper-level dynamics and high precipitable water values in the central United States, which helps to produce a strong cyclone upon reaching the Atlantic Ocean; this is not seen for "west" events outside the extreme category. The second method of synoptic typing utilizes time series of three ascent-forcing quasi-geostrophic (QG) variables. While most events are characterized by a strong upstream sea-level cyclone originating from the Gulf of Mexico ("cyclone"), a subset are dominated by strong low-level frontogenesis, in the absence of a substantial upstream cyclone ("frontal"). Finally, a dynamic and thermodynamic analysis, and forecast model evaluation is completed for consecutive extreme events in December 2008, which produced over 125 mm of precipitation over six days. The first event is a "cyclone", and is marked by strong QG forcing for ascent in the presence of low static stability and high values of subtropical moisture. The second event is a "frontal

  1. Bleaching increases likelihood of disease on Acropora palmata (Lamarck) in Hawksnest Bay, St John, US Virgin Islands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Muller, E.M.; Rogers, C.S.; Spitzack, Anthony S.; van Woesik, R.

    2008-01-01

    Anomalously high water temperatures may enhance the likelihood of coral disease outbreaks by increasing the abundance or virulence of pathogens, or by increasing host susceptibility. This study tested the compromised-host hypothesis, and documented the relationship between disease and temperature, through monthly monitoring of Acropora palmata colonies from May 2004 to December 2006, in Hawksnest Bay, St John, US Virgin Islands (USVI). Disease prevalence and the rate of change in prevalence showed a positive linear relationship with water temperature and rate of change in water temperature, respectively, but only in 2005 during prolonged periods of elevated temperature. Both bleached and unbleached colonies showed a positive relationship between disease prevalence and temperature in 2005, but the average area of disease-associated mortality increased only for bleached corals, indicating host susceptibility, rather than temperature per se, influenced disease severity on A. palmata. ?? 2007 Springer-Verlag.

  2. Bleaching increases likelihood of disease on Acropora palmata (Lamarck) in Hawksnest Bay, St John, US Virgin Islands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Muller, E.M.; Rogers, Caroline S.; Spitzack, Anthony S.; van Woesik, R.

    2007-01-01

    Anomalously high water temperatures may enhance the likelihood of coral disease outbreaks by increasing the abundance or virulence of pathogens, or by increasing host susceptibility. This study tested the compromised-host hypothesis, and documented the relationship between disease and temperature, through monthly monitoring of Acropora palmata colonies from May 2004 to December 2006, in Hawksnest Bay, St John, US Virgin Islands (USVI). Disease prevalence and the rate of change in prevalence showed a positive linear relationship with water temperature and rate of change in water temperature, respectively, but only in 2005 during prolonged periods of elevated temperature. Both bleached and unbleached colonies showed a positive relationship between disease prevalence and temperature in 2005, but the average area of disease-associated mortality increased only for bleached corals, indicating host susceptibility, rather than temperature per se, influenced disease severity on A. palmata.

  3. Potentiometric surface of the Floridan Aquifer, St. Johns River Water Management District and vicinity, Florida, May 1981

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schiner, George R.; Hayes, Eugene C.

    1981-01-01

    This map presents the potentiometric surface of the Floridan aquifer in the St. Johns River Water Management District and vicinity for May 1981. The Floridan aquifer is the principal source of potable water in the area. Water-level measurements were made in approximately 1,000 wells and at several springs. The potentiometric surface is shown mostly by 5-foot contour intervals. In the Fernandina Beach area 20 and 40-foot intervals are used to show a deep cone of depression. The potentiometric surface ranged from 122 feet above NGVD (National Geodetic Vertical Datum of 1929) in Polk County to 125 feet below NGVD in Nassau County. Water levels were at record lows in many counties due to lack of rainfall. Declines were as much as 10 feet and commonly 5 feet from the May 1980 levels. (USGS)

  4. Could maternal exposure to the antidepressants fluoxetine and St. John's Wort induce long-term reproductive effects on male rats?

    PubMed

    Vieira, Milene Leivas; Hamada, Renata Yumi; Gonzaga, Natalia Ignácio; Bacchi, Andre Demambre; Barbieri, Mainara; Moreira, Estefânia Gastaldello; Mesquita, Suzana de Fátima Paccola; Gerardin, Daniela Cristina Ceccatto

    2013-01-01

    Based on the limited number of studies that have investigated the adverse effects of maternal treatment with antidepressants on the development of male descendents, this study was carried out in rat in order to evaluate if maternal exposure to fluoxetine (FLX) or St. John's Wort (SJW) could disrupt the development of male offspring. The dams were treated daily, by gavage, with 7.5 mg/kg of FLX or 100 mg/kg SJW during pregnancy and lactation. The reproductive and behavior parameters were analyzed in male pups. Results showed decreases in the weight of the full seminal vesicle and in the number of spermatozoa. Moreover, FLX-exposed pups presented reduced seminiferous epithelium height and diameter of seminiferous tubules. The present study shows that maternal exposure to FLX, but not SJW could interfere on reproductive parameters in adult male rats.

  5. St. John's wort and its component hyperforin alleviate experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis through expansion of regulatory T-cells.

    PubMed

    Nosratabadi, Reza; Rastin, Maryam; Sankian, Mojtaba; Haghmorad, Dariush; Tabasi, Nafiseh; Zamani, Shahrzad; Aghaee, Azita; Salehipour, Zohre; Mahmoudi, Mahmoud

    2016-05-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a central nervous system disorder mainly characterized by inflammation, demyelination and axonal injury. Anti-inflammatory agents can be used to ameliorate the disease process. Hypericum perforatum L or St. John's wort is widely used as an anti-depressant and anti-inflammatory remedy in traditional and herbal medicine. Based on St. John's wort properties, the therapeutic potentials of an H. perforatum extract (HPE) and a single component, hyperforin were evaluated for effectiveness against MOG35-55-induced experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), an animal model for human multiple sclerosis. Female C57BL/6 mice were immunized with specific antigen MOG35-55 and then administered different doses of hyperforin or HPE post-immunization. Clinical symptoms/other relevant parameters were assessed daily. Histological analysis of the spinal cord was performed. T-cell proliferative activity was also evaluated using a BrdU assay. The effect of hyperforin on regulatory T-cells (Treg cells) was assessed using flow cytometry. The results indicate hyperforin and HPE reduced the incidence and severity of EAE, an outcome that closely correlated with an inhibition of pathological features (leukocyte infiltration and demyelination) and antigen-specific T-cell proliferation. The study also showed that hyperforin caused increased Treg cell levels in the spleen. These results indicated that hyperforin and HPE could attenuate EAE autoimmune responses by inhibiting immune cell infiltration and expansion of Treg cell and could eventually be considered as a potential candidate for use in the treatment of MS.

  6. The effects of St. John's wort extract and amitriptyline on autonomic responses of blood vessels and sweat glands in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Siepmann, Martin; Kirch, Wilhelm; Krause, Stephanie; Joraschky, Peter; Mueck-Weymann, Michael

    2004-02-01

    St. John's wort extract is widely used and advertised as a "natural antidepressant" lacking autonomic side effects. This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study compared the effects of St. John's wort extract on autonomic responses of blood vessels and sweat glands with those of amitriptyline and placebo. A randomized, double-blind, crossover study was performed in healthy male volunteers aged 22 to 31 years (25 +/- 3 years; mean +/- SD) years. Subjects orally received capsules with 255 to 285 mg St. John's wort extract (900 microg hypericin content), 25 mg amitriptyline, and placebo 3 times daily for periods of 14 days each with at least 14 days between. Vasoconstrictory response of cutaneous blood flow (VR) and skin conductance response (SR) following a single deep inspiration were employed as parameters of autonomic function. St. John's wort extract had no effect on VR and SR. In contrast, SR was diminished and the dilation phase of VR was prolonged following multiple dosing with amitriptyline (P < 0.05). Decreased electrodermal reactivity observed with amitriptyline reflects inhibition of acetylcholine at peripheral m3-cholinoreceptors, whereas prolongation of VR induced by the tricyclic drug may be due to sustained activation of central and/or peripheral sympathetic neurons.

  7. A comparison of patterns of spontaneous adverse drug reaction reporting with St. John's Wort and fluoxetine during the period 2000-2013.

    PubMed

    Hoban, Claire L; Byard, Roger W; Musgrave, Ian F

    2015-07-01

    Herbal medicines are perceived to be safe by the general public and medical practitioners, despite abundant evidence from clinical trials and case reports that show herbal preparations can have significant adverse effects. The overall impact of adverse events to herbal medicines in Australia is currently unknown. Post marketing surveillance of medications through spontaneous adverse drug reaction (ADR) reports to the Therapeutic Goods Administration (TGA) is one way to estimate this risk. The patterns of spontaneously reported ADRs provide insight to herbal dangers, especially when compared with patterns of a mechanistically similar conventional drug. The study compared the pattern of spontaneously reported ADRs to St. John's Wort (Hypericum perforatum), a common herbal treatment for depression which contains selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI), to fluoxetine, a commonly prescribed synthetic SSRI antidepressant. Spontaneous ADR reports sent to the TGA between 2000-2013 for St. John's Wort (n = 84) and fluoxetine (n = 447) were obtained and analysed. The demographic information, types of interaction, severity of the ADR, and the body systems affected (using the Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical classification system) were recorded for individual ADR cases. The majority of spontaneously reported ADRs for St. John's Wort and fluoxetine were concerning females aged 26-50 years (28.6%, 22.8%). The organ systems affected by ADRs to St John's Wort and fluoxetine have a similar profile, with the majority of cases affecting the central nervous system (45.2%, 61.7%). This result demonstrates that herbal preparations can result in ADRs similar to those of prescription medications.

  8. A Human Resource Development Action Plan for the Radiography Program Sponsored by Lincoln Land/St. John's Based on a View of the Radiographer of the Future.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dowd, Steven B.

    The purpose of a practicum was to develop an effective and valid human resource development plan based on a view of the practitioner of the future. The targeted program was one in radiography (radiologic technology) co-sponsored by Lincoln Land Community College and St. John's Hospital (Illinois). A review of the literature was used to establish a…

  9. Bioactive xanthones from the roots of Hypericum perforatum (common St John's Wort)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In contemporary western alternative medicine, extracts of the inflorescences and upper stem leaves of Hypericum perforatum L. (common St. John’s Wort; Clusiaceae) are taken orally for the treatment of mild to moderate depression and applied topically to promote wound-healing. Numerous researchers h...

  10. Potentiometric surface of the upper Floridan Aquifer in the St. Johns River Water Management District and vicinity, May 1995

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Knowles, Leel; O'Reilly, A. M.; Phelps, G.G.; Bradner, L.A.

    1995-01-01

    This map depicts the potentiometric surface of the Upper Floridan aquifer in the St. Johns River Water Management District and vicinity for May 1995. The map is based on water-level measurements made at more than 900 wells and springs. Approximately 30 new wells were added to better define the potentiometric surface mainly in the northwest area of the map. Data on the map were contoured using 5-foot contour intervals in most areas. Two new wells located north of Rainbow Springs indicate a slight northward extension of the depressed area surrounding the springs. Several new wells in Bradford County indicate a slight reduction in the size of the potentiometric-surface high along the northwest edge of the county. The potentiometric surface of this karstic aquifer generally reflects land surface topography. Potentiometric-surface highs often correspond to topographic highs, which are areas of recharge to the Upper Floridan aquifer. Springs within topographic lows along with areas of more diffuse upward leakage are natural zones of discharge. Municipal, agricultural, and industrial withdrawals have lowered the potentiometric surface in some areas. The potentiometric surface ranged from 127 feet above sea level in Polk County to 84 feet below sea level in southeast Georgia near the St. Marys River. Water levels measured in May 1995 generally were about 0 to 4 feet higher than those measured in May 1994 except in St. Lucie County and near Rainbow Springs, where levels were 1 to 3 feet lower. Generally, May 1995 water levels were 0 to 5 feet lower than levels in September 1994, except near Orlando, where levels were 6 to 12 feet lower, and across the northwest corner of the map area which includes Marion, Alachua, Bradford, Baker, and Nassau Counties, north and west Duval County, and south Georgia. (USGS)

  11. Potential effects of deepening the St. Johns River navigation channel on saltwater intrusion in the surficial aquifer system, Jacksonville, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bellino, Jason C.; Spechler, Rick M.

    2013-01-01

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) has proposed dredging a 13-mile reach of the St. Johns River navigation channel in Jacksonville, Florida, deepening it to depths between 50 and 54 feet below North American Vertical Datum of 1988. The dredging operation will remove about 10 feet of sediments from the surficial aquifer system, including limestone in some locations. The limestone unit, which is in the lowermost part of the surficial aquifer system, supplies water to domestic wells in the Jacksonville area. Because of density-driven hydrodynamics of the St. Johns River, saline water from the Atlantic Ocean travels upstream as a saltwater “wedge” along the bottom of the channel, where the limestone is most likely to be exposed by the proposed dredging. A study was conducted to determine the potential effects of navigation channel deepening in the St. Johns River on salinity in the adjacent surficial aquifer system. Simulations were performed with each of four cross-sectional, variable-density groundwater-flow models, developed using SEAWAT, to simulate hypothetical changes in salinity in the surficial aquifer system as a result of dredging. The cross-sectional models were designed to incorporate a range of hydrogeologic conceptualizations to estimate the effect of uncertainty in hydrogeologic properties. The cross-sectional models developed in this study do not necessarily simulate actual projected conditions; instead, the models were used to examine the potential effects of deepening the navigation channel on saltwater intrusion in the surficial aquifer system under a range of plausible hypothetical conditions. Simulated results for modeled conditions indicate that dredging will have little to no effect on salinity variations in areas upstream of currently proposed dredging activities. Results also indicate little to no effect in any part of the surficial aquifer system along the cross section near River Mile 11 or in the water-table unit along the cross

  12. Potentiometric Surface of the Upper Floridan Aquifer in the St. Johns River Water Management District and Vicinity, May 2008

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kinnaman, Sandra L.; Dixon, Joann F.

    2008-01-01

    This map depicts the potentiometric surface of the Upper Floridan aquifer in the St. Johns River Water Management District and vicinity for May 2008. Potentiometric contours are based on water-level measurements collected at 567 wells during the period May 6-May 27, near the end of the dry season. Some contours are inferred from previous potentiometric-surface maps with larger well networks. The potentiometric surface of the carbonate Upper Floridan aquifer responds mainly to rainfall, and more locally, to ground-water withdrawals and spring flow. Potentiometric-surface highs generally correspond to topographic highs where the aquifer is recharged. Springs and areas of diffuse upward leakage naturally discharge water from the aquifer and are most prevalent along the St. Johns River. Areas of discharge are reflected by depressions in the potentiometric surface. Ground-water withdrawals locally have lowered the potentiometric surface. Ground water in the Upper Floridan aquifer generally flows from potentiometric highs to potentiometric lows in a direction perpendicular to the contours. Measured values of the potentiometric surface ranged from 7 feet below NGVD29 near Fernandina Beach, Florida, to 124 feet above NGVD29 in Polk County, Florida. The average water level of the network in May 2008 was about 1 foot lower than the average in September 2007 following below-average rainfall during the dry season of 2007-08. Seasonal differences in network average water levels generally range from 4 to 6 feet. For 457 wells with previous measurements, May 2008 levels ranged from about 19 feet below to about 11 feet above September 2007 water levels. The average water level of the network in May 2008 was about 1 foot higher than the average in May 2007. For 544 wells with previous measurements, May 2008 levels ranged from about 8 feet below to about 13 feet above May 2007 water levels. Long-term hydrographs of ground-water levels for continuous and periodic wells are available

  13. Isolation and Quantification of Oligomeric and Polymeric Procyanidins in the Aerial Parts of St. John's Wort (Hypericum perforatum).

    PubMed

    Hellenbrand, Nils; Lechtenberg, Matthias; Petereit, Frank; Sendker, Jandirk; Hensel, Andreas

    2015-08-01

    Proanthocyanidins (condensed tannins) constitute a class of oligomeric and polymeric polyphenols with flavan-3-ols as monomeric building blocks. Despite the high impact of proanthocyanidins, these polyphenols are mostly quantified by colorimetric methods or by chromatographic determination of the flavan-3-ols as cleavage products or low molecular oligomers as lead compounds. For St. John's wort (Hyperici herba) from Hypericum perforatum, a protocol for preparative isolation of oligomeric and polymeric proanthocyanidins from an acetone-water extract by chromatography on Sephadex®LH20 in combination with preparative high-performance liquid chromatography on the diol stationary phase was developed, yielding procyanidin reference clusters with a defined degree of polymerization from 3 to 10. Identity and purity of these clusters was proven by high-performance liquid chromatography (RP18 and diol phase) and mass spectrometry. For identification and quantification of proanthocyanidin clusters from St. John's wort, an ICH-Q2 (International harmonized guideline for analytical validation) validated high-performance liquid chromatography method with fluorimetric detection was developed using an acetone-water extract of the herbal material, purified by solid-phase extraction for the removal of naphthodianthrones. The method enabled the quantification of procyanidin clusters with a degree of polymerization from 2 to 10. Analysis of nine batches of Hyperici herba from different sources indicated a high variability of proanthocyanidin content in the range from 8 to 37 mg/g. In all of the batches investigated, the trimer cluster DP3 was the dominant proanthocyanidin (about 40 %), followed by DP 4 (about 15 %) and DP5 (about 12 %). Monitoring of procyanidin distribution during seasonal growth of fresh plants of H. perforatum indicated the highest proanthocyanidin content in young plants (about 50 mg/g) and a time-dependent decrease during the growing season to about 16

  14. Detection and quality of previously undetermined Floridan aquifer system discharge to the St. Johns River, Jacksonville, to Green Cove Springs, northeastern Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spechler, R.M.

    1996-01-01

    Potentiometric surface maps of the Upper Floridan aquifer show two depressions around the St. Johns River frm the city of Jacksonville south toward Green Cove Springs. These depressions, depending on their locations, are the result of withdrawals from agricultural, industrial, domestic and public-supply wells, diffuse upward leakage, and discharge from springs. Submerged springs that discharge into the St. Johns River between Jacksonville and Green Cove Springs have been thought to exist, but locating and evaluating these springs had not been attempted before this investigation. Thermal infrared imagery, seismic reflection, and numerous interviews with local residents were used to locate springs. An airborne thermal infrared survey was conducted along a section of the St. Johns River in northeastern Florida during February 1992 to detect possible sources of ground-water discharge to the river. An infrared image displayed one thermal anomaly in the St. Johns River which is associated with a previously unknown spring discharge from the Floridan aquifer system. Thermal anomalies also were observed at six locations where municipal facilities discharge treated wastewater to the river. Results of seismic reflection surveys indicate the presence of collapse and other karst features underlying the St. Johns River. These features indicate that the surficial deposits and the Hawthorn Formation that underlie the river probably do not consist of continuous beds. The collapse or deformation of the Hawthorn Formation or the presence of permeable sediment of localized extent could create zones of relatively high vertical leakance. This could provide a more direct hydraulic connection between the Upper Floridan aquifer and the river. Water samples collected from the only submerged spring in the St. Johns River within the Jacksonville-Green Cove Springs reach indicate that the source of the water is the Floridan aquifer system. Chloride and sulfate concentrations were 12 and 340

  15. Acoustic non-diffracting Airy beam

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Zhou; Guo, Xiasheng Tu, Juan; Ma, Qingyu; Wu, Junru; Zhang, Dong

    2015-03-14

    The acoustic non-diffracting Airy beam as its optical counterpart has unique features of self-bending and self-healing. The complexity of most current designs handicaps its applications. A simple design of an acoustic source capable of generating multi-frequency and broad-band acoustic Airy beam has been theoretically demonstrated by numerical simulations. In the design, a piston transducer is corrugated to induce spatial phase variation for transducing the Airy function. The piston's surface is grooved in a pattern that the width of each groove corresponds to the half wavelength of Airy function. The resulted frequency characteristics and its dependence on the size of the piston source are also discussed. This simple design may promote the wide applications of acoustic Airy beam particularly in the field of medical ultrasound.

  16. Effects of hydraulic borehole mining on ground water at a test site in northeast St Johns County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hampson, P.S.

    1984-01-01

    An experimental mining project was conducted in northeast St. Johns County, Florida, to determine the feasibility of extracting deeply buried phosphate ore by hydraulic borehole mining techniques. The phosphate zone is between 232 and 250 feet below land surface and consists of approximately equal proportions of fine-grained phosphate, sand, and clay. Six wells were constructed at the test site to monitor effects of the mining operation on the ground-water resources of the area. One well penetrated the Floridan aquifer beneath the phosphate zone, another was completed in the phosphate zone, and the other four were finished in water-bearing zones above the phosphate zone. The mining project consisted of three separate tests in which different mining methods were used. Changes in water levels, other than in the mined zone, were detected only in the overlying monitored zone during the first two tests as a result of roof failures in cavities formed by the mining operation. Water-quality changes were observed only in the mined zone and resulted from the injection of water from the deeper Floridan aquifer as part of the mining operation. (USGS)

  17. St. John's Wort (Hypericum perforatum) stimulates human osteoblastic MG-63 cell proliferation and attenuates trabecular bone loss induced by ovariectomy

    PubMed Central

    You, Mi-kyoung; Kim, Du-Woon; Jeong, Kyu-Shik; Bang, Mi-Ae; Kim, Hwan-Seon; Rhuy, Jin

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECFTIVES The effect of St. John's Wort extract (SJW) on MG-63 cell proliferation and trabecular bone loss induced by ovariectomy was examined. MATERIALS/METHODS Proliferation, expression of estrogen receptor (ER) α and ER β, and gene expressions of osteoprotegerin (OPG), osteocalcin (OC) and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) were examined in MG-63 cells treated with or without SJW. Ovariectomized rats were treated with SJW at the dose of 100 or 200 mg/kg/day, β-estradiol-3-benzoate (E2), or vehicle only (OVX-C), and sham operated rats were treated with vehicle only (Sham-C). Serum ALP and C-telopeptide (CTX), and femoral trabecular bone loss were examined. RESULTS SJW increased MG-63 cell proliferation and expression of ER α and ER β, and positive effect was shown on gene expressions of ALP, OC and OPG. SJW also showed estrogen like effect on bone associated with slowing down in trabecular bone loss. Histopathology by H&E showed rats treated with SJW displayed denser structure in metaphyseal region of distal femur compared with rats in OVX-C. SJW was shown to reduce serum CTX in OVX rats. CONCLUSION The present study provides new insight in preventing estrogen deficiency induced bone loss of SJW and possibility for its application in bone health supplement. PMID:26425274

  18. Availability of water in the Floridan aquifer in southern Duval and northern Clay and St Johns counties, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fairchild, R.W.

    1976-01-01

    The Floridan aquifer within the area of investigation consists of 1,100 to 1,800 feet of soft, porous limestone interbedded with hard, dense limestone and dolomite overlain by several hundred feet of confining beds. From late 1948 to May 1972, water levels in wells tapping the Floridan aquifer declined as much as 14 feet in northern Clay and St. Johns Counties and more than 20 feet at Jacksonville in Duval County, Florida. These trends will probably continue as withdrawals from the aquifer increase. Water-level depressions exist at Green Cove Springs and Jacksonville because of natural discharge and large scale withdrawals. Withdrawals from wells could result in well interference unless the wells are spaced at least 1,000 ft apart. Two- to four-inch diameter wells drilled 100 ft or less into the aquifer yield 50 to 250 gal/min. Larger and deeper wells yield 1,000 gal/min or more. Hardness of water is generally less than 10 mg/liter. Quality of water from wells sampled over a span of 10 to 30 years has not changed noticeably. Principal recharge to the Floridan occurs southwest of the area in a lake region where rainfall percolates directly into the aquifer. (Woodard-USGS)

  19. Limnology of Taylor Creek impoundment : with reference to other bodies in Upper St Johns River Basin, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goolsby, D.A.; McPherson, Benjamin F.

    1978-01-01

    Taylor Creek Impoundment, on the western part of the upper St. Johns basin, Fla., provides flood control and flow regulation. The 4,000-acre impoundment was first filled in 1969. The water was of relatively poor quality during the first three years of its existence, 1970-72. The impoundment is deep enough for thermal stratification, and a thermocline usually develops at 8 to 10 feet. During 1970-72 the hypolimnion remained anaerobic for more than six months. The poor water quality is attributed to the decomposition of flooded vegetation, of soil organic matter, and to heavy growths of phytoplankton and duckweed stimulated by an abundant supply of nutrients. Since 1972, the quality of the water has improved because of flushing of the impoundment and depletion of leachable nutrients and soil organic matter. The water is now similar in quality to that of nearby Wolf and Jane Green Creeks. Large releases of water may produce velocities great enough to resuspend bottom sediments several miles downstream where Taylor Creek flows into Lake Poinsett. (Woodard-USGS)

  20. Informal support networks of low-income senior women living alone: evidence from Fort St. John, BC.

    PubMed

    Ryser, Laura; Halseth, Greg

    2011-01-01

    Within the context of an aging Canadian rural and small-town landscape, there is a growing trend of low-income senior women living alone. While there is a perception that rural seniors have well-developed social networks to meet their daily needs, some research suggests that economic and social restructuring processes have impacted the stability of seniors' support networks in small places. While much of the research on seniors' informal networks focuses upon small towns in decline, booming resource economies can also produce challenges for low-income senior women living alone due to both a higher cost of living and the retrenchment of government and service supports. Under such circumstances, an absence of informal supports can impact seniors' health and quality of life and may lead to premature institutionalization. Drawing upon a household survey in Fort St. John, British Columbia, we explore informal supports used by low-income senior women living alone in this different context of the Canadian landscape. Our findings indicate that these women not only have a support network that is comparable to other groups, but that they are also more likely to draw upon such supports to meet their independent-living needs. These women rely heavily on family support, however, and greater efforts are needed to diversify both their formal and informal sources of support as small family networks can quickly become overwhelmed.

  1. Propagation of subtidal sea level oscillations in the river channel: A case study of the St. Johns River, Florida, USA.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yankovsky, Alexander E.; Iyer, Suneil K.

    2015-05-01

    Analysis of water level and river discharge time series collected at three locations in the St. Johns River, FL reveals that subtidal variability with periods of several days is associated with long waves propagating from the ocean into the river channel. These dynamics are similar to tidal wave propagation: both tidal and subtidal frequency bands have the same ratio of free surface-to-discharge standard deviations, which is not the case on oceanic shelves. However, important differences also emerge: as waves pass through the river mouth, tidal oscillations exhibit much stronger attenuation, while subtidal oscillations propagate at a lower speed. Further upstream, where the channel cross-sectional area contracts (between Palatka and Buffalo Bluff), the waves in two frequency bands adjust differently: tidal waves are amplified and continue upstream, while a significant fraction of subtidal energy is reflected. The amplification of tidal waves occurs mostly through the generation of overtides. Also, tidal wave attenuation in the river relative to the mouth is nearly constant over the observation period, while the attenuation of subtidal waves exhibits strong changes. Variations in subtidal attenuation are linked to the influence of the river discharge: higher discharge (relative to the subtidal water level variability) causes stronger attenuation of subtidal waves.

  2. St John's wort (Hypericum perforatum) versus sertraline and placebo in major depressive disorder: continuation data from a 26-week RCT.

    PubMed

    Sarris, J; Fava, M; Schweitzer, I; Mischoulon, D

    2012-11-01

    Hypericum perforatum (St John's wort: SJW) has been extensively studied as an antidepressant in short-term trials, however little research has been conducted on longer-term efficacy.Our objective was to analyze the continuation data from a 26-week randomized, double-blind, controlled study of SJW (LI-160) vs. sertraline and placebo in major depressive disorder. 124 participant "responders" continued treatment after week 8, until week 26. They continued randomly assigned SJW (900-1 500 mg), sertraline (50-100 mg) or matching placebo.At week 26, on the primary outcome, Hamilton depression rating scale (HAM-D) completer scores were: SJW (6.6±4.5), sertraline (7.1±5.4) and placebo (5.7±5.4) with a significant effect for time (p=0.036). Comparisons between all treatments were however non-significant (p=0.61). This effect was mirrored on the other outcomes: the BDI, CGI-severity, CGI-improvement, and on intention-to-treat analyses.While the continuation data revealed an equivocal outcome between treatments at week 26, both SJW and sertraline were still therapeutically effective, with a pronounced "placebo-effect" impeding a significant result at week 26.

  3. St. John's Wort seed and feverfew flower extracts relieve painful diabetic neuropathy in a rat model of diabetes.

    PubMed

    Galeotti, Nicoletta; Maidecchi, Anna; Mattoli, Luisa; Burico, Michela; Ghelardini, Carla

    2014-01-01

    Painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) is a common complication of diabetes and the few approved therapies for the management of pain have limited efficacy and side effects. With the aim to explore and develop new pharmacological treatments, we investigated the antihyperalgesic properties of St. John's Wort (SJW) and feverfew in streptozotocin (STZ)-diabetic rats. Acute administration of a SJW seed extract reversed mechanical hyperalgesia with a prolonged effect. A SJW extract obtained from the aerial portion of the plant and a feverfew flower extract partially relieved neuropathic pain whereas a feverfew leaf extract was ineffective. The antihyperalgesic efficacy of these herbal drugs was comparable to that of clinically used antihyperalgesic drugs (carbamazepine, lamotrigine, l-acetyl-levocarnitine). Further examinations of SJW and feverfew composition revealed that hyperforin and hypericin might be responsible for the antihyperalgesic properties of SJW whereas the efficacy of feverfew seems to be related to the presence of parthenolide. Rats undergoing treatment with SJW and feverfew did not show any behavioral side effect or sign of altered locomotor activity. Our results suggest that SJW and feverfew extracts may become new therapeutic perspectives for painful DPN.

  4. Elemental fingerprinting of Hypericum perforatum (St John's Wort) herb and preparations using ICP-OES and chemometrics.

    PubMed

    Owen, Jade D; Kirton, Stewart B; Evans, Sara J; Stair, Jacqueline L

    2016-06-01

    St. John's wort (SJW) (Hypericum perforatum) is a herbal remedy commonly used to treat mild depression. The elemental profiles of 54 samples (i.e., dry herbs, tablets and capsules) were evaluated by monitoring 25 elements using Inductively Coupled Plasma Optical Emission Spectroscopy (ICP-OES). The major elemental constituents in the SJW samples were Ca (300-199,000μg/g), Mg (410-3,530μg/g), Al (4.4-900μg/g), Fe (1.154-760μg/g), Mn (2.4-261μg/g), Sr (0.88-83.6μg/g), and Zn (7-64μg/g). For the sixteen elements that could be reliably quantified, principal component analysis (PCA) was used to investigate underlying patterns in the data. PCA models identified 7 key elements (i.e., Ba, Ca, Cd, Mg, Mo, Ni and Y), which described 85% of the variance in the dataset in the first three principal components. The PCA approach resulted in a general delineation between the three different formulations and provides a basis for monitoring product quality in this manner.

  5. Pharmacokinetics and cardiovascular effect of etoricoxib in the absence or presence of St. John's Wort in rats.

    PubMed

    Radwan, M A; Baky, N A A; Zaghloul, I; Aboul-Enein, H Y

    2012-07-01

    The effect of chronic administration of etoricoxib (EXB), in the absence or presence of St. John's Wort (SJW), on its pharmacokinetic parameters and blood pressure was investigated in rats.Rats were divided into 3 groups, each group received daily different oral treatment for 3 weeks. Rats' blood pressures were monitored initially, after 1 and 3 weeks of treatment, and after 1 week of discontinuing dosing of both drugs. EXB pharmacokinetic parameters in the absence or presence of SJW were calculated after 3 weeks.SJW was significantly affected EXB pharmacokinetic parameters. The steady state peak plasma concentration and terminal half-life were reduced by 32% and 91%, respectively, due to a > 3 fold increase in its apparent clearance which is a concentration and time dependent effect. EXB was significantly increased (P<0.001) Rats' blood pressure while, co-administration of EXB and SJW was not significantly affect (P>0.05) rats' blood pressure as compared to the control.Monitoring blood pressure of patients anticipated taking EXB for extended period should be advised. The co-administration of SJW with EXB should be avoided since SJW would greatly reduce EXB concentrations by inducing its metabolism.

  6. Metabonomics approach to assessing the modulatory effects of St John's wort, ginsenosides, and clomipramine in experimental depression.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoyan; Zeng, Chuiyu; Lin, Jingchao; Chen, Tianlu; Zhao, Tie; Jia, Zhiying; Xie, Xie; Qiu, Yunping; Su, Mingming; Jiang, Tao; Zhou, Mingmei; Zhao, Aihua; Jia, Wei

    2012-12-01

    The protective effects of St John's Wort extract (SJ), ginsenosides (GS), and clomipramine (CPM) on chronic unpredictable mild stress (CUMS)-induced depression in rats were investigated by using a combination of behavioral assessments and metabonomics. Metabonomic analyses were performed using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry in conjunction with multivariate and univariate statistical analyses. During and at the end point of the chronic stress experiment, food consumption, body weight, adrenal gland, thymus and spleen indices, behavior scores, sucrose consumption, and stress hormone levels were measured. Changes in these parameters reflected characteristic phenotypes of depression in rats. Metabonomic analysis of serum, urine, and brain tissue revealed that CPM and SJ mainly attenuated the alteration of monoamine neurotransmitter metabolites, while GS affected both excitatory/inhibitory amino acids and monoamine neurotransmitter metabolites. GS also attenuated the stress-induced alterations in cerebrum and peripheral metabolites to a greater extent than CPM and SJ. These results provide important mechanistic insights into the protective effects of GS against CUMS-induced depression and metabolic dysfunction.

  7. Appraisal of the interconnection between the St Johns River and the surficial aquifer, east-central Duval County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spechler, R.M.; Stone, R.B.

    1982-01-01

    The proposed deepening of the navigation channel in the St. Johns River to about 46-48 feet below sea level (45 feet below mean low water) may breach up to 11 feet of limestone unit of the lower part of the surficial aquifer along a 25-mile channel. The limestone supplies water to numerous domestic wells along the river in the Jacksonville area. Recent channel improvements to about 39 feet below sea level have already breached the limestone at many locations. Where breaching has not yet occurred, less than 1 to 6 feet of undifferentiated sediments overlie the limestone. These sediments, consisting predominantly of sand, are generally too permeable to form an effective confining layer. Chloride concentrations determined from water in wells tapping the limestone unit range from 8 to 6,600 milligrams per liter. However, chloride concentrations in water from wells located more than 500 feet from the river, were generally less than 30 milligrams per liter. The proposed dredging operation is not expected to alter significantly the present hydrologic system. The current position of the interface most likely represents conditions that will be present after future channel improvements. (USGS)

  8. Elemental fingerprinting of Hypericum perforatum (St John's Wort) herb and preparations using ICP-OES and chemometrics.

    PubMed

    Owen, Jade D; Kirton, Stewart B; Evans, Sara J; Stair, Jacqueline L

    2016-06-01

    St. John's wort (SJW) (Hypericum perforatum) is a herbal remedy commonly used to treat mild depression. The elemental profiles of 54 samples (i.e., dry herbs, tablets and capsules) were evaluated by monitoring 25 elements using Inductively Coupled Plasma Optical Emission Spectroscopy (ICP-OES). The major elemental constituents in the SJW samples were Ca (300-199,000μg/g), Mg (410-3,530μg/g), Al (4.4-900μg/g), Fe (1.154-760μg/g), Mn (2.4-261μg/g), Sr (0.88-83.6μg/g), and Zn (7-64μg/g). For the sixteen elements that could be reliably quantified, principal component analysis (PCA) was used to investigate underlying patterns in the data. PCA models identified 7 key elements (i.e., Ba, Ca, Cd, Mg, Mo, Ni and Y), which described 85% of the variance in the dataset in the first three principal components. The PCA approach resulted in a general delineation between the three different formulations and provides a basis for monitoring product quality in this manner. PMID:26994552

  9. A comparison of patterns of spontaneous adverse drug reaction reporting with St. John's Wort and fluoxetine during the period 2000-2013.

    PubMed

    Hoban, Claire L; Byard, Roger W; Musgrave, Ian F

    2015-07-01

    Herbal medicines are perceived to be safe by the general public and medical practitioners, despite abundant evidence from clinical trials and case reports that show herbal preparations can have significant adverse effects. The overall impact of adverse events to herbal medicines in Australia is currently unknown. Post marketing surveillance of medications through spontaneous adverse drug reaction (ADR) reports to the Therapeutic Goods Administration (TGA) is one way to estimate this risk. The patterns of spontaneously reported ADRs provide insight to herbal dangers, especially when compared with patterns of a mechanistically similar conventional drug. The study compared the pattern of spontaneously reported ADRs to St. John's Wort (Hypericum perforatum), a common herbal treatment for depression which contains selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI), to fluoxetine, a commonly prescribed synthetic SSRI antidepressant. Spontaneous ADR reports sent to the TGA between 2000-2013 for St. John's Wort (n = 84) and fluoxetine (n = 447) were obtained and analysed. The demographic information, types of interaction, severity of the ADR, and the body systems affected (using the Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical classification system) were recorded for individual ADR cases. The majority of spontaneously reported ADRs for St. John's Wort and fluoxetine were concerning females aged 26-50 years (28.6%, 22.8%). The organ systems affected by ADRs to St John's Wort and fluoxetine have a similar profile, with the majority of cases affecting the central nervous system (45.2%, 61.7%). This result demonstrates that herbal preparations can result in ADRs similar to those of prescription medications. PMID:25988866

  10. A survey of environmental pollutants and cellular-stress markers of Porites astreoides at six sites in St. John, U.S. Virgin Islands.

    PubMed

    Downs, Craig A; Woodley, Cheryl M; Fauth, John E; Knutson, Sean; Burtscher, Martina Maria; May, Lisa A; Avadanei, Athena R; Higgins, Julie L; Ostrander, Gary K

    2011-11-01

    Coral communities along the coast of St. John, U.S. Virgin Islands have exhibited site-specific behavior in declines. In order to determine if these specific coral communities are stressed and whether a pollutant or environmental factor present at this site is a probable stressor, we surveyed six near-shore coral communities in St. John, USVI for environmental pollutants and to determine the cellular physiological condition of the coral, Porites astreoides. The six sites within St. John are Cruz Bay, Caneel Bay, Hawksnest Bay, Trunk Bay, Tektite Reef in Beehive Bay, and Red Point. Red Point was considered the reference site because of its abundance and diversity of species, and it was the furthest removed from down-stream and down-current anthropogenic activities. All sites showed distinct cellular-stress marker patterns, indicating that the physiological condition of each population was different. Populations at Cruz, Hawksnest, Trunk, and Tektite were stressed, as indicated by high levels of DNA lesions and expression of stress proteins. Hawksnest and Tektite were contaminated with polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), while Cruz was contaminated with semi-volatile organochlorines and nitrogen-based biocides. At least for Hawksnest and Tektite, stress-marker patterns were consistent with an exposure to PAHs. Fecal coliform levels were high in Cruz and Trunk, indicating fecal contamination, as well as consideration for management action. Results from this study serve as a justification for a more thorough and methodical investigation into the stressors responsible for declines of coral populations within St. John. Furthermore, this study supports the argument for the importance of local factors contributing to regional coral reef declines; that not all forces impacting coral are global.

  11. A survey of environmental pollutants and cellular-stress markers of Porites astreoides at six sites in St. John, U.S. Virgin Islands.

    PubMed

    Downs, Craig A; Woodley, Cheryl M; Fauth, John E; Knutson, Sean; Burtscher, Martina Maria; May, Lisa A; Avadanei, Athena R; Higgins, Julie L; Ostrander, Gary K

    2011-11-01

    Coral communities along the coast of St. John, U.S. Virgin Islands have exhibited site-specific behavior in declines. In order to determine if these specific coral communities are stressed and whether a pollutant or environmental factor present at this site is a probable stressor, we surveyed six near-shore coral communities in St. John, USVI for environmental pollutants and to determine the cellular physiological condition of the coral, Porites astreoides. The six sites within St. John are Cruz Bay, Caneel Bay, Hawksnest Bay, Trunk Bay, Tektite Reef in Beehive Bay, and Red Point. Red Point was considered the reference site because of its abundance and diversity of species, and it was the furthest removed from down-stream and down-current anthropogenic activities. All sites showed distinct cellular-stress marker patterns, indicating that the physiological condition of each population was different. Populations at Cruz, Hawksnest, Trunk, and Tektite were stressed, as indicated by high levels of DNA lesions and expression of stress proteins. Hawksnest and Tektite were contaminated with polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), while Cruz was contaminated with semi-volatile organochlorines and nitrogen-based biocides. At least for Hawksnest and Tektite, stress-marker patterns were consistent with an exposure to PAHs. Fecal coliform levels were high in Cruz and Trunk, indicating fecal contamination, as well as consideration for management action. Results from this study serve as a justification for a more thorough and methodical investigation into the stressors responsible for declines of coral populations within St. John. Furthermore, this study supports the argument for the importance of local factors contributing to regional coral reef declines; that not all forces impacting coral are global. PMID:21735126

  12. Do other Hypericum species have medical potential as St. John's wort (Hypericum perforatum)?

    PubMed

    Stojanović, G; Ðorđević, A; Šmelcerović, A

    2013-01-01

    Among 484 Hypericum L. (Guttiferae/Hypericaceae) species, widespread in warm temperate areas throughout the world, only H. perforatum is widely used in official medicine. Hypericum perforatum has been reported as an antidepressant, antiviral, antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory, and a healing agent. The main constituents of the Hypericum species are naphthodianthrones, primarily represented by hypericin and pseudohypericin, phloroglucinol derivatives, especially hyperforin, and flavonoids, such as quercetin, quercitrin, hyperoside and rutin. Hypericin and pseudohypericin have been found to possess antiretroviral activity. Hyperforin may also have an important contribution to the antidepressant activity of Hypericum extracts. The content of the above active constituents in some Hypericum species is higher than in H. perforatum. Also, a number of studies of the biological activities of Hypericum species have shown that the most recognized species of this genus, H. perforatum, was not the most active. Comprehensive analysis of the published research on the chemical composition and biological activity, showed that H. richeri has a similar pharmacological potential as St. Jon's wort. The species, with high content of naphtodianthrones,which might be used against viruses and retroviruses, are: H. androseamum,H. annulatum, H. barbatum, H. boissieri, H. elegans, H. hirsutum, H. hyssopifolium, H. humifusum, H. montanum. H. montbretii, H. triquetrifolium, H. richeri, H. rochelii, H. rumeliacum, H. thasium, andH. patulum. Very few species (e.g. H. inodorum and H. moseranum) contained the similar amounts of hyperforine as H. perforatum. Since hyperforin was recognized as one of the most crucial components for the antidepressive activity, it seems that H. perforatum barely has an alternative for this purpose. Plant species containing considerable amounts of other acylphloroglucinol derivatives have the potential to demonstrate antibacterial and cytotoxic activity. Some of these

  13. Analysis and stability of the constituents of artichoke and St. John's wort tinctures by HPLC-DAD and HPLC-MS.

    PubMed

    Bilia, A R; Bergonzi, M C; Mazzi, G; Vincieri, F F

    2002-05-01

    In continuing our investigations on tinctures, which represent both herbal drug preparations and herbal medicinal products, 40% and 60% v/v tinctures of artichoke and St. John's wort were investigated. Artichoke is largely used in hepatic disorders, while St. John's wort is an anti-inflammatory, antidepressant, and healing agent. Both herbal drugs contain various constituents, although the compounds responsible for the main effects have not yet been completely identified. However, caffeoylquinic acids and flavones seem to be of crucial importance for the activity of artichoke, as well as flavonoids, naphthodianthrones, and phloroglucinol derivatives for St. John's wort, and they are used as marker constituents. Thus, quantification of all these constituents was performed using high-performance liquid chromatography-diode array detection (HPLC-DAD) and HPLC--mass spectrometry (MS) analyses with rutin as external standard. In addition the stability of the constituents of these tinctures from accelerated and long-term testing was also evaluated. From the results it was evidenced that constituent content depends on the solvent used for the extraction. The stability was also shown to be very different and seems to be related to the water content of the tinctures.

  14. Alterations in cyclosporin A pharmacokinetics and metabolism during treatment with St John's wort in renal transplant patients

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Steffen; Störmer, Elke; Johne, Andreas; Krüger, Hagen; Budde, Klemens; Neumayer, Hans-Hellmut; Roots, Ivar; Mai, Ingrid

    2003-01-01

    Aim This study investigated the effects of St John's wort extract (SJW) on the pharmacokinetics and metabolism of the immunosuppressant cyclosporin A (CSA). Methods In an open-label study, 11 renal transplant patients received 600 mg SJW extract daily for 14 days in addition to their regular regimen of CSA. Blood concentrations of CSA and its metabolites AM1, AM1C, AM9, AM19, and AM4N were measured by HPLC. Results After 2 weeks of SJW coadministration, dose-corrected AUC0–12, Cmax and Ctrough values for CSA decreased significantly by 46%[geometric mean ratio baseline/SJW (95% CI): 1.83 (1.63–2.05)], 42%[1.72 (1.42–2.08)], and 41%[1.70 (1.17–2.47)], respectively. CSA doses were increased from a median of 2.7 mg day−1 kg−1 at baseline to 4.2 mg day−1 kg−1 at day 15, with the first dose adjustment required only 3 days after initiation of SJW treatment. Additionally, the metabolite pattern of CSA was substantially altered during SJW treatment. Whereas dose-corrected AUC values for AM1, AM1c and AM4N significantly decreased by 59%, 61%, and 23% compared with baseline, AUC values for AM9 and AM19 were unchanged. Following the increase in CSA dose, observed AUC and Cmax values for AM9, AM19, and AM4N increased by 20–51% and 43–90%, respectively. Conclusion Administration of SJW extract to patients receiving CSA treatment resulted in a rapid and significant reduction of plasma CSA concentrations. Additionally, the substantial alterations in CSA metabolite kinetics observed may affect the toxicity profile of the drug. PMID:12580993

  15. Hydrology, Water Quality, and Aquatic Communities of Selected Springs in the St. Johns River Water Management District, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walsh, Stephen J.; Knowles, Leel; Katz, Brian G.; Strom, Douglas G.

    2009-01-01

    Hydrologic, physicochemical, and aquatic community data were collected and compiled by the U.S. Geological Survey for selected springs within the St. Johns River Water Management District from January 2004 to October 2007. Nine springs were included in this study: Alexander, Apopka, Bugg, De Leon, Gemini, Green, Rock, Silver Glen, and Wekiwa. Urban lands increased in Alexander, Apopka, De Leon, Gemini, Green, and Wekiwa springsheds between 1973 and 2004, accompanied by a loss of forested and/or agricultural lands in most springsheds. Forested cover increased and open surface waters and wetlands decreased in the Bugg and Rock springsheds. Although rainfall did not change significantly over time in each springshed, spring discharge decreased significantly in De Leon, Fern Hammock, Rock, Silver, and Wekiwa Springs. Nitrate concentrations increased significantly with time in Apopka, Fern Hammock, Gemini Springs run, and Juniper Springs, and decreased significantly in Alexander Spring, Bugg Spring run, Rock Springs, and Wekiwa Springs. Phosphorus increased significantly with time in Juniper Springs and decreased significantly in Apopka, De Leon, Rock, Silver Glen, and Wekiwa Springs. Benthic macroinvertebrate communities ranged from relatively low diversity assemblages (Green Spring) to assemblages with high taxonomic richness, diversity, and dominance (Rock and De Leon Springs). Shannon-Wiener diversity index averages among samples pooled by spring were lowest for Apopka Spring and greatest for Rock, Bugg, and Silver Glen Springs. Mean Stream Condition Index for pooled samples per spring was lowest for De Leon and Gemini Springs and highest for Rock and Wekiwa Springs. Mean percentages of very tolerant taxa were lowest for Alexander Spring and highest for Bugg and Green Springs. Fish community richness was lowest for Green Spring, and greatest for Alexander Spring run and Silver Glen Springs. Forty five fish species representing 35 genera and 23 families were collected

  16. Factors affecting polyphenol biosynthesis in wild and field grown St. John's Wort (Hypericum perforatum L. Hypericaceae/Guttiferae).

    PubMed

    Bruni, Renato; Sacchetti, Gianni

    2009-01-01

    The increasing diffusion of herbal products is posing new questions: why are products so often different in their composition and efficacy? Which approach is more suitable to increase the biochemical productivity of medicinal plants with large-scale, low-cost solutions? Can the phytochemical profile of a medicinal plant be modulated in order to increase the accumulation of its most valuable constituents? Will polyphenol-rich medicinal crops ever be traded as commodities? Providing a proactive answer to such questions is an extremely hard task, due to the large number of variables involved: intraspecific chemodiversity, plant breeding, ontogenetic stage, post-harvest handling, biotic and abiotic factors, to name but a few. An ideal path in this direction should include the definition of optimum pre-harvesting and post-harvesting conditions and the availability of specific Good Agricultural Practices centered on secondary metabolism enhancement. The first steps to be taken are undoubtedly the evaluation and the organization of scattered data regarding the diverse factors involved in the optimization of medicinal plant cultivation, in order to provide an interdisciplinary overview of main possibilities, weaknesses and drawbacks. This review is intended to be a synopsis of the knowledge on this regard focused on Hypericum perforatum L. (Hypericaceae/Guttiferae) secondary metabolites of phenolic origin, with the aim to provide a reference and suggest an evolution towards the maximization of St. John's Wort bioactive constituents. Factors considered emerged not only from in-field agronomic results, but also from physiological, genetical, biotic, abiotic and phytochemical data that could be scaled up to the application level. To increase quality for final beneficiaries, growers' profits and ultimately transform phenolic-rich medicinal crops into commodities, the emerging trend suggests an integrated and synergic approach. Agronomy and genetics will need to develop their

  17. Bleaching, disease and recovery in the threatened scleractinian coral Acropora palmata in St. John, US Virgin Islands: 2003-2010

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rogers, C.S.; Muller, E.M.

    2012-01-01

    A long-term study of the scleractinian coral Acropora palmata in the US Virgin Islands (USVI) showed that diseases, particularly white pox, are limiting the recovery of this threatened species. Colonies of A. palmata in Haulover Bay, within Virgin Islands National Park, St. John, were examined monthly in situ for signs of disease and other stressors from January 2003 through December 2009. During the study, 89.9 % of the colonies (n = 69) exhibited disease, including white pox (87 %), white band (13 %), and unknown (9 %). Monthly disease prevalence ranged from 0 to 57 %, and disease was the most significant cause of complete colony mortality (n = 17). A positive correlation was found between water temperature and disease prevalence, but not incidence. Annual average disease prevalence and incidence remained constant during the study. Colonies generally showed an increase in the estimated amount of total living tissue from growth, but 25 (36.2 %) of the colonies died. Acropora palmata bleached in the USVI for the first time during the 2005 Caribbean bleaching event. Only one of the 23 colonies that bleached appeared to die directly from bleaching. In 2005, corals that bleached had greater disease prevalence than those that did not bleach. Just over half (52 %) of the colonies incurred some physical damage. Monitoring of fragments (broken branches) that were generated by physical damage through June 2007 showed that 46.1 % died and 28.4 % remained alive; the fragments that attached to the substrate survived longer than those that did not. Recent surveys showed an increase in the total number of colonies within the reef area, formed from both asexual and sexual reproduction. Genotype analysis of 48 of the originally monitored corals indicated that 43 grew from sexual recruits supporting the conclusion that both asexual and sexual reproduction are contributing to an increase in colony density at this site.

  18. Bayesian inference of phylogeny, morphology and range evolution reveals a complex evolutionary history in St. John's wort (Hypericum).

    PubMed

    Meseguer, Andrea Sánchez; Aldasoro, Juan Jose; Sanmartín, Isabel

    2013-05-01

    The genus Hypericum L. ("St. John's wort", Hypericaceae) comprises nearly 500 species of shrubs, trees and herbs distributed mainly in temperate regions of the Northern Hemisphere, but also in high-altitude tropical and subtropical areas. Until now, molecular phylogenetic hypotheses on infra-generic relationships have been based solely on the nuclear marker ITS. Here, we used a full Bayesian approach to simultaneously reconstruct phylogenetic relationships, divergence times, and patterns of morphological and range evolution in Hypericum, using nuclear (ITS) and plastid DNA sequences (psbA-trnH, trnS-trnG, trnL-trnF) of 186 species representing 33 of the 36 described morphological sections. Consistent with other studies, we found that corrections of the branch length prior helped recover more realistic branch lengths in by-gene partitioned Bayesian analyses, but the effect was also seen within single genes if the overall mutation rate differed considerably among sites or regions. Our study confirms that Hypericum is not monophyletic with the genus Triadenum embedded within, and rejects the traditional infrageneric classification, with many sections being para- or polyphyletic. The small Western Palearctic sections Elodes and Adenotrias are the sister-group of a geographic dichotomy between a mainly New World clade and a large Old World clade. Bayesian reconstruction of morphological character states and range evolution show a complex pattern of morphological plasticity and inter-continental movement within the genus. The ancestors of Hypericum were probably tropical shrubs that migrated from Africa to the Palearctic in the Early Tertiary, concurrent with the expansion of tropical climates in northern latitudes. Global climate cooling from the Mid Tertiary onwards might have promoted adaptation to temperate conditions in some lineages, such as the development of the herbaceous habit or unspecialized corollas.

  19. St. John's wort promotes adipocyte differentiation and modulates NF-κB activation in 3T3-L1 cells.

    PubMed

    Hatano, Tomoko; Sameshima, Yuka; Kawabata, Mami; Yamada, Shizuo; Shinozuka, Kazumasa; Nakabayashi, Toshikatsu; Mizuno, Hideya

    2014-01-01

    St. John's wort (SJW), or Hypericum perforatum, is a perennial herb that has been used in the treatment of depression in several countries. Though its therapeutic effect on depression has been extensively studied, its influence on metabolic syndrome is yet to be fully characterized. Therefore, we investigated the effect of SJW extract on adipocyte differentiation and its anti-inflammatory effects by using 3T3-L1 preadipocytes. Oil Red O staining indicated that SJW promotes adipocyte differentiation, while immunoblots indicated that SJW increases the expression of peroxisome proliferator activated receptor γ (PPARγ), a nuclear receptor regulating adipocyte differentiation, and adiponectin, an anti-inflammatory adipokine. Furthermore, the anti-inflammatory activity of SJW was demonstrated by its inhibition of the activation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), an inflammatory transcription factor. Stimulation of mature 3T3-L1 adipocytes by tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) decreased the expression of the NF-κB inhibitor IκBα, and increased its phosphorylation. Treatment with SJW further decreased the TNF-α-induced perturbation in IκBα expression and phosphorylation, which indicated that SJW mediated the inhibition of NF-κB activation. In addition, SJW decreased the TNF-α-induced increase in the mRNA levels of pro-inflammatory adipokines, interleukin-6 (IL-6), and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1). Collectively, our results indicate that SJW treatment could promote adipocyte differentiation probably through its anti-inflammatory activity, which in turn suggests that SJW has the potential to minimize the risk factors of metabolic syndrome.

  20. Bleaching, disease and recovery in the threatened scleractinian coral Acropora palmata in St. John, US Virgin Islands: 2003-2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, C. S.; Muller, E. M.

    2012-09-01

    A long-term study of the scleractinian coral Acropora palmata in the US Virgin Islands (USVI) showed that diseases, particularly white pox, are limiting the recovery of this threatened species. Colonies of A. palmata in Haulover Bay, within Virgin Islands National Park, St. John, were examined monthly in situ for signs of disease and other stressors from January 2003 through December 2009. During the study, 89.9 % of the colonies ( n = 69) exhibited disease, including white pox (87 %), white band (13 %), and unknown (9 %). Monthly disease prevalence ranged from 0 to 57 %, and disease was the most significant cause of complete colony mortality ( n = 17). A positive correlation was found between water temperature and disease prevalence, but not incidence. Annual average disease prevalence and incidence remained constant during the study. Colonies generally showed an increase in the estimated amount of total living tissue from growth, but 25 (36.2 %) of the colonies died. Acropora palmata bleached in the USVI for the first time during the 2005 Caribbean bleaching event. Only one of the 23 colonies that bleached appeared to die directly from bleaching. In 2005, corals that bleached had greater disease prevalence than those that did not bleach. Just over half (52 %) of the colonies incurred some physical damage. Monitoring of fragments (broken branches) that were generated by physical damage through June 2007 showed that 46.1 % died and 28.4 % remained alive; the fragments that attached to the substrate survived longer than those that did not. Recent surveys showed an increase in the total number of colonies within the reef area, formed from both asexual and sexual reproduction. Genotype analysis of 48 of the originally monitored corals indicated that 43 grew from sexual recruits supporting the conclusion that both asexual and sexual reproduction are contributing to an increase in colony density at this site.

  1. Spatiotemporal dynamics of counterpropagating Airy beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiersma, Noémi; Marsal, Nicolas; Sciamanna, Marc; Wolfersberger, Delphine

    2015-08-01

    We analyse theoretically the spatiotemporal dynamics of two incoherent counterpropagating Airy beams interacting in a photorefractive crystal under focusing conditions. For a large enough nonlinearity strength the interaction between the two Airy beams leads to light-induced waveguiding. The stability of the waveguide is determined by the crystal length, the nonlinearity strength and the beam’s intensities and is improved when comparing to the situation using Gaussian beams. We further identify the threshold above which the waveguide is no longer static but evolves dynamically either time-periodically or even chaotically. Above the stability threshold, each Airy-soliton moves erratically between privileged output positions that correspond to the spatial positions of the lobes of the counterpropagating Airy beam. These results suggest new ways of creating dynamically varying waveguides, optical logic gates and chaos-based computing.

  2. Spatiotemporal dynamics of counterpropagating Airy beams

    PubMed Central

    Wiersma, Noémi; Marsal, Nicolas; Sciamanna, Marc; Wolfersberger, Delphine

    2015-01-01

    We analyse theoretically the spatiotemporal dynamics of two incoherent counterpropagating Airy beams interacting in a photorefractive crystal under focusing conditions. For a large enough nonlinearity strength the interaction between the two Airy beams leads to light-induced waveguiding. The stability of the waveguide is determined by the crystal length, the nonlinearity strength and the beam’s intensities and is improved when comparing to the situation using Gaussian beams. We further identify the threshold above which the waveguide is no longer static but evolves dynamically either time-periodically or even chaotically. Above the stability threshold, each Airy-soliton moves erratically between privileged output positions that correspond to the spatial positions of the lobes of the counterpropagating Airy beam. These results suggest new ways of creating dynamically varying waveguides, optical logic gates and chaos-based computing. PMID:26315530

  3. No relevant interaction with alprazolam, caffeine, tolbutamide, and digoxin by treatment with a low-hyperforin St John's wort extract.

    PubMed

    Arold, Gerhard; Donath, Frank; Maurer, Agathe; Diefenbach, Konstanze; Bauer, Steffen; Henneicke-von Zepelin, Hans-Heinrich; Friede, Michael; Roots, Ivar

    2005-04-01

    We evaluated the pharmacokinetic interaction between a low-hyperforin St John's wort (SJW) extract and alprazolam, caffeine, tolbutamide, and digoxin. Previous reports on other SJW products had shown remarkably decreased plasma concentrations of certain co-medicated drugs, which was attributed to an inducing effect of SJW on cytochrome P-450 (CYP) and p-glycoprotein (p-gp) activity. Two randomised, placebo-controlled studies were performed with 28 healthy volunteers (age 18 - 55 years) in each study. In study A, single doses of alprazolam (1 mg; substrate of CYP3A4) and caffeine (100 mg; CYP1A2) were given on days 1 and 11. In study B, single doses of tolbutamide (500 mg, days 1 and 11; CYP2C9) and multiple doses of digoxin (0.75 mg on days -2 and -1, 0.25 mg/die on days 1 to 11; p-gp) were given. The participants received SJW (Esbericum capsules; 240 mg/die of extract, 3.5 mg hyperforin) or placebo on days 2 to 11. Blood for pharmacokinetic analysis was drawn on days 1 and 11. No statistically significant differences were found in the primary kinetic parameter, AUC0 - 24, of alprazolam, caffeine (AUC0 - 12), paraxanthine, tolbutamide, 4-hydroxytolbutamide, and digoxin between the placebo group and the SJW group at the end of the study. The SJW-induced change in AUCs was less than 12 % of the initial median AUC of the participants in studies A and B, thus clinically irrelevant. On day 11, trough concentrations were 2.0 (range 0.6 - 4.1) microg/L and 1.0 (0.2 - 3.9) microg/L for hypericin and pseudohypericin, respectively, whereas hyperforin concentrations were below the quantification limit (< 1 microg/L). Kinetics of investigated probe drugs were only marginally influenced by concomitant treatment with Esbericum capsules. This may be due in particular to the low hyperforin plasma concentration as this SJW component has been shown to activate the PXR receptor which regulates expression of CYP3A4 and p-gp. Our findings corroborate the view that reports about

  4. No relevant interaction with alprazolam, caffeine, tolbutamide, and digoxin by treatment with a low-hyperforin St John's wort extract.

    PubMed

    Arold, Gerhard; Donath, Frank; Maurer, Agathe; Diefenbach, Konstanze; Bauer, Steffen; Henneicke-von Zepelin, Hans-Heinrich; Friede, Michael; Roots, Ivar

    2005-04-01

    We evaluated the pharmacokinetic interaction between a low-hyperforin St John's wort (SJW) extract and alprazolam, caffeine, tolbutamide, and digoxin. Previous reports on other SJW products had shown remarkably decreased plasma concentrations of certain co-medicated drugs, which was attributed to an inducing effect of SJW on cytochrome P-450 (CYP) and p-glycoprotein (p-gp) activity. Two randomised, placebo-controlled studies were performed with 28 healthy volunteers (age 18 - 55 years) in each study. In study A, single doses of alprazolam (1 mg; substrate of CYP3A4) and caffeine (100 mg; CYP1A2) were given on days 1 and 11. In study B, single doses of tolbutamide (500 mg, days 1 and 11; CYP2C9) and multiple doses of digoxin (0.75 mg on days -2 and -1, 0.25 mg/die on days 1 to 11; p-gp) were given. The participants received SJW (Esbericum capsules; 240 mg/die of extract, 3.5 mg hyperforin) or placebo on days 2 to 11. Blood for pharmacokinetic analysis was drawn on days 1 and 11. No statistically significant differences were found in the primary kinetic parameter, AUC0 - 24, of alprazolam, caffeine (AUC0 - 12), paraxanthine, tolbutamide, 4-hydroxytolbutamide, and digoxin between the placebo group and the SJW group at the end of the study. The SJW-induced change in AUCs was less than 12 % of the initial median AUC of the participants in studies A and B, thus clinically irrelevant. On day 11, trough concentrations were 2.0 (range 0.6 - 4.1) microg/L and 1.0 (0.2 - 3.9) microg/L for hypericin and pseudohypericin, respectively, whereas hyperforin concentrations were below the quantification limit (< 1 microg/L). Kinetics of investigated probe drugs were only marginally influenced by concomitant treatment with Esbericum capsules. This may be due in particular to the low hyperforin plasma concentration as this SJW component has been shown to activate the PXR receptor which regulates expression of CYP3A4 and p-gp. Our findings corroborate the view that reports about

  5. Application of acoustic velocity meters for gaging discharge of three low-velocity tidal streams in the St. Johns River basin, northeast Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sloat, J.V.; Gain, W.S.

    1995-01-01

    Index-velocity data collected with acoustic velocity meters, stage data, and cross-sectional area data were used to calculate discharge at three low-velocity, tidal streamflow stations in north-east Florida. Discharge at three streamflow stations was computed as the product of the channel cross-sectional area and the mean velocity as determined from an index velocity measured in the stream using an acoustic velocity meter. The tidal streamlflow stations used in the study were: Six Mile Creek near Picolata, Fla.; Dunns Creek near Satsuma, Fla.; and the St. Johns River at Buffalo Bluff. Cross-sectional areas at the measurement sections ranged from about 3,000 square feet at Six Mile Creek to about 18,500 square feet at St. Johns River at Buffalo Bluff. Physical characteristics for all three streams were similar except for drainage area. The topography primarily is low-relief, swampy terrain; stream velocities ranged from about -2 to 2 feet per second; and the average change in stage was about 1 foot. Instantaneous discharge was measured using a portable acoustic current meter at each of the three streams to develop a relation between the mean velocity in the stream and the index velocity measured by the acoustic velocity meter. Using least-squares linear regression, a simple linear relation between mean velocity and index velocity was determined. Index velocity was the only significant linear predictor of mean velocity for Six Mile Creek and St. Johns River at Buffalo Bluff. For Dunns Creek, both index velocity and stage were used to develop a multiple-linear predictor of mean velocity. Stage-area curves for each stream were developed from bathymetric data. Instantaneous discharge was computed by multiplying results of relations developed for cross-sectional area and mean velocity. Principal sources of error in the estimated discharge are identified as: (1) instrument errors associated with measurement of stage and index velocity, (2) errors in the representation of

  6. Pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) and endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) in stormwater canals and Bayou St. John in New Orleans, Louisiana, USA.

    PubMed

    Boyd, Glen R; Palmeri, Jordan M; Zhang, Shaoyuan; Grimm, Deborah A

    2004-10-15

    Samples were collected from two stormwater canals and a recreational urban waterway known as Bayou St. John in New Orleans, Louisiana, USA and analyzed for a range of pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) and endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs). Concentrations of 7 PPCPs and EDCs were measured by a method that provides for simultaneous extraction and quantification of the following compounds: clofibric acid, naproxen, ibuprofen, fluoxetine, clorophene, triclosan, bisphenol A. The method also was used as an indicator of the occurrence of estrogenic compounds by targeting estrone and 17beta-estradiol. The two canals (Orleans and London) are used to drain a portion of the city's stormwater directly into the Mississippi River or Lake Pontchartrain. Bayou St. John is located between the two canals and supplied with water from Lake Pontchartrain. Results from the 6-month sampling period indicated the following concentration ranges for the two stormwater canals: naproxen (ND - 145 ng/l), ibuprofen (ND - 674 ng/l), triclosan (ND - 29 ng/l) and bisphenol A (1.9-158 ng/l). Concentrations of these target analytes increased with cumulative rainfall. For bayou waters, only naproxen (2.1-4.8 ng/l) and bisphenol A (0.9-44 ng/l) were detected. Estrone was detected but determined non-quantifiable for multiple sampling events at the 3 sites. None of the other target analytes (clofibric acid, fluoxetine, clorophene, and 17beta-estradiol) were detected above their method detection levels. Results of this study demonstrate the occurrence of PPCPs and EDCs in New Orleans stormwater canals and Bayou St. John. Results also demonstrate the use of this analytical technique as an indicator of non-point source sewage contamination in New Orleans stormwater canals.

  7. Maps showing ground-water conditions in the Concho, St. Johns, and White Mountains areas, Apache and Navajo Counties, Arizona, 1975

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harper, R.W.; Anderson, Thomas Warren

    1976-01-01

    The Concho, St. Johns, and White Mountains areas cover about 2 ,300 sq mi in eastern Arizona. Ground water is present in several aquifers that are made up of one or more formations. The maps show ground-water conditions in the Coconini aquifer; in the Triassic, Cretaceous, and Tertiary rocks; and in the alluvium and basaltic rocks. Information on the maps includes depth to water, altitude of the water level, chemical quality of the water, irrigated area, and hydrographs of the water level in selected wells. Scale 1:125,000. (Woodard-USGS).

  8. Evaluation of Water Quality for Two St. Johns River Tributaries Receiving Septic Tank Effluent, Duval County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wicklein, Shaun M.

    2004-01-01

    Tributary streamflow to the St. Johns River in Duval County is thought to be affected by septic tank leachate from residential areas adjacent to these tributaries. Water managers and the city of Jacksonville have committed to infrastructure improvements as part of a management plan to address the impairment of tributary water quality. In order to provide data to evaluate the effects of future remedial activities in selected tributaries, major ion and nutrient concentrations, fecal coliform concentrations, detection of wastewater compounds, and tracking of bacterial sources were used to document septic tank influences on the water quality of selected tributaries. The tributaries Fishing Creek and South Big Fishweir Creek were selected because they drain subdivisions identified as high priority locations for septic tank phase-out projects: the Pernecia and Murray Hill B subdivisions, respectively. Population, housing (number of residences), and septic tank densities for the Murray Hill B subdivision are greater than those for the Pernecia subdivision. Water-quality samples collected in the study basins indicate influences from ground water and septic tanks. Estimated concentrations of total nitrogen ranged from 0.33 to 2.86 milligrams per liter (mg/L), and ranged from less than laboratory reporting limit (0.02 mg/L) to 0.64 mg/L for total phosphorus. Major ion concentrations met the State of Florida Class III surface-water standards; total nitrogen and total phosphorus concentrations exceeded the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Ecoregion XII nutrient criteria for rivers and streams 49 and 96 percent of the time, respectively. Organic wastewater compounds detected at study sites were categorized as detergents, antioxidants and flame retardants, manufactured polycarbonate resins, industrial solvents, and mosquito repellent. The most commonly detected compound was para-nonylphenol, a breakdown product of detergent. Results of wastewater sampling give evidence that

  9. Ultrafast Airy beam optical parametric oscillator.

    PubMed

    Apurv Chaitanya, N; Kumar, S Chaitanya; Aadhi, A; Samanta, G K; Ebrahim-Zadeh, M

    2016-01-01

    We report on the first realization of an ultrafast Airy beam optical parametric oscillator (OPO). By introducing intracavity cubic phase modulation to the resonant Gaussian signal in a synchronously-pumped singly-resonant OPO cavity and its subsequent Fourier transformation, we have generated 2-dimensional Airy beam in the output signal across a 250 nm tuning range in the near-infrared. The generated Airy beam can be tuned continuously from 1477 to 1727 nm, providing an average power of as much as 306 mW at 1632 nm in pulses of ~23 ps duration with a spectral bandwidth of 1.7 nm.

  10. Ultrafast Airy beam optical parametric oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apurv Chaitanya, N.; Kumar, S. Chaitanya; Aadhi, A.; Samanta, G. K.; Ebrahim-Zadeh, M.

    2016-08-01

    We report on the first realization of an ultrafast Airy beam optical parametric oscillator (OPO). By introducing intracavity cubic phase modulation to the resonant Gaussian signal in a synchronously-pumped singly-resonant OPO cavity and its subsequent Fourier transformation, we have generated 2-dimensional Airy beam in the output signal across a 250 nm tuning range in the near-infrared. The generated Airy beam can be tuned continuously from 1477 to 1727 nm, providing an average power of as much as 306 mW at 1632 nm in pulses of ~23 ps duration with a spectral bandwidth of 1.7 nm.

  11. Ultrafast Airy beam optical parametric oscillator

    PubMed Central

    Apurv Chaitanya, N.; Kumar, S. Chaitanya; Aadhi, A.; Samanta, G. K.; Ebrahim-Zadeh, M.

    2016-01-01

    We report on the first realization of an ultrafast Airy beam optical parametric oscillator (OPO). By introducing intracavity cubic phase modulation to the resonant Gaussian signal in a synchronously-pumped singly-resonant OPO cavity and its subsequent Fourier transformation, we have generated 2-dimensional Airy beam in the output signal across a 250 nm tuning range in the near-infrared. The generated Airy beam can be tuned continuously from 1477 to 1727 nm, providing an average power of as much as 306 mW at 1632 nm in pulses of ~23 ps duration with a spectral bandwidth of 1.7 nm. PMID:27476910

  12. Temporal Airy pulses control cell poration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courvoisier, S.; Götte, N.; Zielinski, B.; Winkler, T.; Sarpe, C.; Senftleben, A.; Bonacina, L.; Wolf, J. P.; Baumert, T.

    2016-07-01

    We show that spectral phase shaping of fs-laser pulses can be used to optimize laser-cell membrane interactions in water environment. The energy and peak intensity thresholds required for cell poration with single pulse in the nJ range can be significantly reduced (25% reduction in energy and 88% reduction in peak intensity) by using temporal Airy pulses, controlled by positive third order dispersion, as compared to bandwidth limited pulses. Temporal Airy pulses are also effective to control the morphology of the induced pores, with prospective applications from cellular to tissue opto-surgery and transfection.

  13. Full characterization of Airy beams under physical principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogel-Salazar, J.; Jiménez-Romero, H. A.; Chávez-Cerda, S.

    2014-02-01

    The propagation characteristics of Airy beams is investigated and fully described under the traveling-wave approach analogous to that used for nondiffracting Bessel beams. This is possible when noticing that Airy functions are, in fact, Bessel functions of fractional order 1/3. We show how physical principles impose restrictions such that the nondiffracting Airy beams cannot be of infinite extent as has been argued and introduce quantitative expressions for the maximum transverse and longitudinal extent of Airy beams. We show that under the appropriate physical conditions it is possible to obtain higher-order Airy beams.

  14. Airy, Sir George Biddell (1801-92)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    A brilliant Cambridge mathematician (Senior Wrangler 1823, i.e. leader of the graduating mathematics class), Airy became the seventh Astronomer Royal in 1835 after a brief period as Lucasian Professor at Cambridge. His output was prodigious, and he published nearly 400 scientific papers and 150 reports on various scientific issues, such as the gauge of railways, spectacles to correct astigmatism,...

  15. An evaluation of biomarkers of reproductive function and potential contaminant effects in Florida largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides floridanus) sampled from the St. Johns River

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sepulveda, M.S.; Johnson, W.E.; Higman, J.C.; Denslow, N.D.; Schoeb, T.R.; Gross, T.S.

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this study was to describe and compare several reproductive parameters for Florida largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides floridanus) inhabiting the St. Johns River and exposed to different types and/or degrees of contamination. Welaka was selected as the reference site in this study because of its low urban and agricultural development, Palatka is in close proximity to a paper mill plant, the Green Cove site is influenced by marine shipping activities and Julington Creek site receives discharges of domestic wastewater and storm water runoff from recreational boating marinas. For this study, bass were sampled both prior to (September 1996) and during the spawning season (February 1997). In order to characterize chemical exposure, bass livers were analyzed for up to 90 trace organics and 11 trace metal contaminants. Reproductive parameters measured included gonadosomatic index (GSI), histological evaluation of gonads and plasma concentrations of vitellogenin (VTG), 17??-estradiol (E2) and 11-ketotestosterone (11-KT). In general, the sum of organic chemicals was highest in livers from Palatka bass and bass from Green Cove and Julington Creek had higher hepatic concentrations of low molecular polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and polychlorinated biphenyls when compared to fish from Welaka. Metals were more variable across sites, with highest mean concentrations found in bass from either Julington Creek (Ag, As, Cr, Cu, Zn) or Welaka (Cd, Hg, Pb, Se, Tn). Female bass from Palatka and Green Cove had lower concentrations of E2, VTG and lower GSI in relation to Welaka. Males from Palatka and Green Cove showed comparable declines in 11-KT in relation to males from Julington Creek and GSI were decreased only in Palatka males. These results indicate a geographical trend in reproductive effects, with changes being most pronounced at the site closest to the paper mill (Palatka) and decreasing as the St. Johns River flows downstream. Since reproductive

  16. 1. Historic American Buildings Survey, John A. Bryan, Photographer July ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Historic American Buildings Survey, John A. Bryan, Photographer July 9, 1952 SOUTHEAST PERSPECTIVE. - St. John's Episcopal Mission, Chapel & Rectory, Fort Bennett Vicinity, Green Grass, Dewey County, SD

  17. 9. Historic American Buildings Survey, John A. Bryan, Photographer July ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. Historic American Buildings Survey, John A. Bryan, Photographer July 9, 1952 SOUTHWEST PERSPECTIVE. - St. John's Episcopal Mission, Chapel & Rectory, Fort Bennett Vicinity, Green Grass, Dewey County, SD

  18. 11. Historic American Buildings Survey, John A. Bryan, Photographer July ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. Historic American Buildings Survey, John A. Bryan, Photographer July 9, 1952 CHAPEL INTERIOR. - St. John's Episcopal Mission, Chapel & Rectory, Fort Bennett Vicinity, Green Grass, Dewey County, SD

  19. Airy acoustical-sheet spinner tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitri, F. G.

    2016-09-01

    The Airy acoustical beam exhibits parabolic propagation and spatial acceleration, meaning that the propagation bending angle continuously increases before the beam trajectory reaches a critical angle where it decays after a propagation distance, without applying any external bending force. As such, it is of particular importance to investigate its properties from the standpoint of acoustical radiation force, spin torque, and particle dynamics theories, in the development of novel particle sorting techniques and acoustically mediated clearing systems. This work investigates these effects on a two-dimensional (2D) circular absorptive structure placed in the field of a nonparaxial Airy "acoustical-sheet" (i.e., finite beam in 2D), for potential applications in surface acoustic waves and acousto-fluidics. Based on the characteristics of the acoustic field, the beam is capable of manipulating the circular cylindrical fluid cross-section and guides it along a transverse or parabolic trajectory. This feature of Airy acoustical beams could lead to a unique characteristic in single-beam acoustical tweezers related to acoustical sieving, filtering, and removal of particles and cells from a section of a small channel. The analysis developed here is based on the description of the nonparaxial Airy beam using the angular spectrum decomposition of plane waves in close association with the partial-wave series expansion method in cylindrical coordinates. The numerical results demonstrate the ability of the nonparaxial Airy acoustical-sheet beam to pull, propel, or accelerate a particle along a parabolic trajectory, in addition to particle confinement in the transverse direction of wave propagation. Negative or positive radiation force and spin torque causing rotation in the clockwise or the anticlockwise direction can occur depending on the nondimensional parameter ka (where k is the wavenumber and a is the radius) and the location of the cylinder in the beam. Applications in

  20. Data from in situ Observations of Fish Traps Set by Fishermen in St. John Waters, U.S. Virgin Islands, 1992-94

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Garrison, Virginia H.; Beets, Jim; Friedlander, Alan M.; Canty, Steven

    2011-01-01

    In order to estimate (1) the trapping pressure within Virgin Islands National Park (VINP) waters, (2) the effect of fish traps on park marine resources (both fishes and habitats), and (3) the effectiveness of park regulations in protecting marine resources, traps set by fishers were visually observed and contents censused in situ in 1992, 1993, and 1994, around St. John (U.S. Virgin Islands), within and outside of park waters. A total of 1,340 individual fish (56 species and 23 families) were identified and their lengths estimated for the 211 of 285 visually censused traps that contained fish. This dataset includes for each censused trap: location, depth, substrate/habitat, trap type and construction details, in or out of park waters, and species and estimated fork length (in centimeters) of each individual fish in a trap. Analysis and interpretation of this dataset are provided in previously published reports by the author.

  1. Airy beam self-focusing in a photorefractive medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiersma, Noémi; Marsal, Nicolas; Sciamanna, Marc; Wolfersberger, Delphine

    2016-10-01

    The unique bending and shape-preserving properties of optical Airy beams offer a large range of applications in for example beam routing, optical waveguiding, particle manipulation and plasmonics. In these applications and others, the Airy beam may experience nonlinear light-matter interactions which in turn modify the Airy beam properties and propagation. A well-known example is light self-focusing that leads to the formation of spatial soliton. Here, we unveil experimentally the self-focusing properties of a 1D-Airy beam in a photorefractive crystal under focusing conditions. The transient evolution involves both self-bending and acceleration of the initially launched Airy beam due to the onset of an off-shooting soliton and the resulting nonlocal refractive index perturbation. Both the transient and stationary self-focusing properties can be tuned by varying the bias electric field, the injected Airy beam power and the background illumination.

  2. Airy beam self-focusing in a photorefractive medium

    PubMed Central

    Wiersma, Noémi; Marsal, Nicolas; Sciamanna, Marc; Wolfersberger, Delphine

    2016-01-01

    The unique bending and shape-preserving properties of optical Airy beams offer a large range of applications in for example beam routing, optical waveguiding, particle manipulation and plasmonics. In these applications and others, the Airy beam may experience nonlinear light-matter interactions which in turn modify the Airy beam properties and propagation. A well-known example is light self-focusing that leads to the formation of spatial soliton. Here, we unveil experimentally the self-focusing properties of a 1D-Airy beam in a photorefractive crystal under focusing conditions. The transient evolution involves both self-bending and acceleration of the initially launched Airy beam due to the onset of an off-shooting soliton and the resulting nonlocal refractive index perturbation. Both the transient and stationary self-focusing properties can be tuned by varying the bias electric field, the injected Airy beam power and the background illumination. PMID:27731356

  3. Nonclassicality of vortex Airy beams in the Wigner representation

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Ruipin; Ooi, C. H. Raymond

    2011-10-15

    The Wigner distribution function (WDF) of a vortex Airy beam is calculated analytically. The WDF provides intuitive pictures of the intriguing features of vorticity in phase space. The nonclassical property of the vortex Airy beam and the Airy beam is analyzed through the negative parts of the WDF. The study shows that destructive interference of certain classical waves can mimic nonclassical lights such as those due to quantum effects.

  4. Creating Airy beams employing a transmissive spatial light modulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latychevskaia, Tatiana; Schachtler, Daniel; Fink, Hans-Werner

    2016-08-01

    We present a detailed study of two novel methods for shaping the light optical wavefront by employing a transmissive spatial light modulator (SLM). Conventionally, optical Airy beams are created by employing SLMs in the so-called all phase mode. In the first method, a numerically simulated lens phase distribution is loaded directly onto the SLM, together with the cubic phase distribution. An Airy beam is generated at the focal plane of the numerical lens. We provide for the first time a quantitative properties of the formed Airy beam. We derive the formula for deflection of the intensity maximum of the so formed Airy beam, which is different to the quadratic deflection typical of Airy beams. We cross-validate the derived formula by both simulations and experiment. The second method is based on the fact that a system consisting of a transmissive SLM sandwiched between two polarisers can create a transmission function with negative values. This observation alone has the potential for various other wavefront modulations where the transmission function requires negative values. As an example for this method, we demonstrate that a wavefront can be modulated by passing the SLM system with transmission function with negative values by loading an Airy function distribution directly onto SLM. Since the Airy function is a real-valued function but also with negative values, an Airy beam can be generated by direct transfer of the Airy function distribution onto such an SLM system. In this way, an Airy beam is generated immediately behind the SLM. As both new methods do not employ a physical lens, the two setups are more compact than conventional setups for creating Airy beams. We compare the performance of the two novel methods and the properties of the created Airy beams.

  5. Propagation of Bessel and Airy beams through atmospheric turbulence.

    PubMed

    Nelson, W; Palastro, J P; Davis, C C; Sprangle, P

    2014-03-01

    We investigate, through simulation, the modifications to Bessel and Airy beams during propagation through atmospheric turbulence. We find that atmospheric turbulence disrupts the quasi-non-diffracting nature of Bessel and Airy beams when the transverse coherence length (Fried parameter) nears the initial aperture diameter or diagonal, respectively. The turbulence-induced transverse phase distortion limits the effectiveness of Bessel and Airy beams for applications requiring propagation over long distances in the turbulent atmosphere.

  6. Creating Airy beams employing a transmissive spatial light modulator.

    PubMed

    Latychevskaia, Tatiana; Schachtler, Daniel; Fink, Hans-Werner

    2016-08-01

    We present a detailed study of two novel methods for shaping the light optical wavefront by employing a transmissive spatial light modulator (SLM). Conventionally, optical Airy beams are created by employing SLMs in the so-called all-phase mode. In the first method, a numerically simulated lens phase distribution is loaded directly onto the SLM, together with the cubic phase distribution. An Airy beam is generated at the focal plane of the numerical lens. We provide for the first time, to the best of our knowledge, quantitative properties of the formed Airy beam. We derive the formula for deflection of the intensity maximum of the so-formed Airy beam, which is different from the quadratic deflection typical of Airy beams. We cross-validate the derived formula by both simulations and experiment. The second method is based on the fact that a system consisting of a transmissive SLM sandwiched between two polarizers can create a transmission function with negative values. This observation alone has the potential for various other wavefront modulations where the transmission function requires negative values. As an example for this method, we demonstrate that a wavefront can be modulated by passing the SLM system with transmission function with negative values by loading an Airy function distribution directly onto the SLM. Since the Airy function is a real-valued function but also with negative values, an Airy beam can be generated by direct transfer of the Airy function distribution onto such an SLM system. In this way, an Airy beam is generated immediately behind the SLM. As both new methods do not employ a physical lens, the two setups are more compact than conventional setups for creating Airy beams. We compare the performance of the two novel methods and the properties of the created Airy beams. PMID:27505393

  7. Accelerating Airy-Gauss-Kummer localized wave packets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Wei-Ping; Belić, Milivoj; Zhang, Yiqi; Huang, Tingwen

    2014-01-01

    A general approach to generating three-dimensional nondiffracting spatiotemporal solutions of the linear Schrödinger equation with an Airy-beam time-dependence is reported. A class of accelerating optical pulses with the structure of Airy-Gauss-Kummer vortex beams is obtained. Our results demonstrate that the optical field contributions to the Airy-Gauss-Kummer accelerating optical wave packets of the cylindrical symmetry can be characterized by the radial and angular mode numbers.

  8. Autobiography of Sir George Biddell Airy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Airy, George Biddell; Airy, Wilfred

    2010-06-01

    Preface; 1. Personal sketch of George Biddell Airy; 2. From his birth to his taking his B.A. degree; 3. At Trinity College, Cambridge; 4. At Cambridge Observatory; 5. At Greenwich Observatory, 1836-1846; 6. At Greenwich Observatory, 1846-1856; 7. At Greenwich Observatory, 1856-1866; 8. At Greenwich Observatory, 1866-1876; 9. At Greenwich Observatory to his resignation in 1881; 10. At the White House, Greewich, to his death; Appendix: List of printed papers; Index.

  9. Potentiometric surface of the Floridan Aquifer and its use in management of water resources, St. Johns River Water Management District, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rodis, Harry George; Munch, D.A.

    1983-01-01

    The Floridan aquifer supplies most of the fresh groundwater for municipal, industrial, and agricultural uses within the 12,400 sq mi St. Johns River Water Management District. Because of the growing demand for water and the variation in rainfall, resource managers need timely information on short-term and long-term changes in the availability of fresh water. The purpose of this report is to explain potentiometric surface maps and their value in assessing the resource, particularly during drought conditions. The Floridan aquifer is recharged by rainfall falling directly on the outcrop of the aquifer, and, where the aquifer is overlain by the surficial aquifer with the water table above the potentiometric surface of the Floridan, by water infiltrating downward from the overlying surficial aquifer. Water is discharged by pumping and free-flowing wells, springflow, and upward leakage into overlying formations, streams, and lakes or into the ocean. Fluctuations in the potentiometric surface reflect net gains (recharge) or losses (discharge) of water stored in the aquifer. Net gains occur during the wet season (June through September) when recharge exceeds discharge and causes the potentiometric surface to rise in most places. Net losses in storage, and declines in the potentiometric surface, follow during the dry season (October through May) when discharge exceeds recharge. Seasonal changes in the potentiometric surface, based on a 2-yr average of water level measurements during May and September 1977, and May and September 1978, are illustrated. Two of the greater long-term declines in the potentiometric surface have occurred in the growing metropolitan areas of Jacksonville and Orlando-Winter Park, the two largest public suppliers of water in the Water Management District. Municipal pumpage increased in Jacksonville from 37 million gallons per day (mgd) in 1961 to 56 mgd in 1980. The increased pumpage and a deficiency in rainfall of 15.8 inches contributed to a

  10. Spinning of a submicron sphere by Airy beams.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyoung-Youm; Kim, Saehwa

    2016-01-01

    We show that by employing two incoherent counter-propagating Airy beams, we can manipulate a submicron sphere to spin around a transverse axis. We can control not only the spinning speed, but also the direction of the spinning axis by changing the polarization directions of Airy beams.

  11. Propagation Dynamics of Airy Water-Wave Pulses.

    PubMed

    Fu, Shenhe; Tsur, Yuval; Zhou, Jianying; Shemer, Lev; Arie, Ady

    2015-07-17

    We observe the propagation dynamics of surface gravity water waves, having an Airy function envelope, in both the linear and the nonlinear regimes. In the linear regime, the shape of the envelope is preserved while propagating in an 18-m water tank, despite the inherent dispersion of the wave packet. The Airy wave function can propagate at a velocity that is slower (or faster if the Airy envelope is inverted) than the group velocity. Furthermore, the introduction of the Airy wave packet as surface water waves enables the observation of its position-dependent chirp and cubic-phase offset, predicted more than 35 years ago, for the first time. When increasing the envelope of the input Airy pulse, nonlinear effects become dominant, and are manifested by the generation of water-wave solitons. PMID:26230797

  12. An analysis of partnership performance: the St. Johns Mercy Medical Center-Saint Louis University School of Nursing dedicated education unit project.

    PubMed

    Murray, Teri A; Macintyre, Richard C; Teel, Cynthia S

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to analyze the St. Johns Mercy Medical Center (SJMMC)-Saint Louis University School of Nursing (SLUSON) dedicated education unit (DEU) project for partnership effectiveness. The DEU, an innovative and collaborative academic-service partnership, reconceptualizes the role of the faculty and staff nurse in the clinical educational process. In a DEU, the staff nurse provides the clinical instruction to the student, and the faculty member coaches the staff nurse on the teaching-learning process. Rather than explore the effectiveness of the DEU as an innovative clinical pedagogy, this article analyzes the relationship between the academic and service institutions for strategic effectiveness. The analysis is based on themes found across three successful and distinct academic partnerships and other evaluative models from business, government, and alliance research. The themes and models provide the frameworks needed to analyze the SJMMC-SLUSON academic-service partnership for structure, process, and outcomes. This analysis can serve as a guide for the development of academic-service partnership practices to facilitate successful, sustainable, and replicable partnerships that benefit both institutions. PMID:22142928

  13. ANS complex of St John's wort PR-10 protein with 28 copies in the asymmetric unit: A fiendish combination of pseudosymmetry with tetartohedral twinning

    SciTech Connect

    Sliwiak, Joanna; Dauter, Zbigniew; Kowiel, Marcin; McCoy, Airlie J.; Read, Randy J.; Jaskolski, Mariusz

    2015-03-26

    Hyp-1, a pathogenesis-related class 10 (PR-10) protein from St John's wort (Hypericum perforatum), was crystallized in complex with the fluorescent probe 8-anilino-1-naphthalene sulfonate (ANS). The highly pseudosymmetric crystal has 28 unique protein molecules arranged in columns with sevenfold translational noncrystallographic symmetry (tNCS) along c and modulated X-ray diffraction with intensity crests at l = 7n and l = 7n ± 3. The translational NCS is combined with pseudotetragonal rotational NCS. The crystal was a perfect tetartohedral twin, although detection of twinning was severely hindered by the pseudosymmetry. The structure determined at 2.4 Å resolution reveals that the Hyp-1 molecules (packed as β-sheet dimers) have three novel ligand-binding sites (two internal and one in a surface pocket), which was confirmed by solution studies. In addition to 60 Hyp-1-docked ligands, there are 29 interstitial ANS molecules distributed in a pattern that violates the arrangement of the protein molecules and is likely to be the generator of the structural modulation. In particular, whenever the stacked Hyp-1 molecules are found closer together there is an ANS molecule bridging them.

  14. ANS complex of St John's wort PR-10 protein with 28 copies in the asymmetric unit: A fiendish combination of pseudosymmetry with tetartohedral twinning

    DOE PAGES

    Sliwiak, Joanna; Dauter, Zbigniew; Kowiel, Marcin; McCoy, Airlie J.; Read, Randy J.; Jaskolski, Mariusz

    2015-03-26

    Hyp-1, a pathogenesis-related class 10 (PR-10) protein from St John's wort (Hypericum perforatum), was crystallized in complex with the fluorescent probe 8-anilino-1-naphthalene sulfonate (ANS). The highly pseudosymmetric crystal has 28 unique protein molecules arranged in columns with sevenfold translational noncrystallographic symmetry (tNCS) along c and modulated X-ray diffraction with intensity crests at l = 7n and l = 7n ± 3. The translational NCS is combined with pseudotetragonal rotational NCS. The crystal was a perfect tetartohedral twin, although detection of twinning was severely hindered by the pseudosymmetry. The structure determined at 2.4 Å resolution reveals that the Hyp-1 molecules (packedmore » as β-sheet dimers) have three novel ligand-binding sites (two internal and one in a surface pocket), which was confirmed by solution studies. In addition to 60 Hyp-1-docked ligands, there are 29 interstitial ANS molecules distributed in a pattern that violates the arrangement of the protein molecules and is likely to be the generator of the structural modulation. In particular, whenever the stacked Hyp-1 molecules are found closer together there is an ANS molecule bridging them.« less

  15. The effect of induction of CYP3A4 by St John's wort on ambrisentan plasma pharmacokinetics in volunteers of known CYP2C19 genotype.

    PubMed

    Markert, Christoph; Kastner, Ida Maria; Hellwig, Regina; Kalafut, Peter; Schweizer, Yvonne; Hoffmann, Michael Marcus; Burhenne, Jürgen; Weiss, Johanna; Mikus, Gerd; Haefeli, Walter Emil

    2015-05-01

    To evaluate the impact of CYP2C19 polymorphisms on ambrisentan exposure and to assess its modification by St. John's wort (SJW), 20 healthy volunteers (10 CYP2C19 extensive, four poor and six ultrarapid metabolizers) received therapeutic doses of ambrisentan (5 mg qd po) for 20 days and concomitantly SJW (300 mg tid po) for the last 10 days. To quantify changes of CYP3A4 activity, midazolam (3 mg po) as a probe drug was used. Ambrisentan pharmacokinetics was assessed on days 1, 10 and 20, and midazolam pharmacokinetics before and on days 1, 10, 17 and 20. At steady state, ambrisentan exposure was similar in extensive and ultrarapid metabolizers but 43% larger in poor metabolizers (p < 0.01). In all volunteers, SJW reduced ambrisentan exposure and the relative change (17-26%) was similar in all genotype groups. The extent of this interaction did not correlate with the changes in CYP3A activity (midazolam clearance) (rs = 0.23, p = 0.34). Ambrisentan had no effect on midazolam pharmacokinetics. In conclusion, SJW significantly reduced exposure with ambrisentan irrespective of the CYP2C19 genotype. The extent of this interaction was small and thus likely without clinical relevance.

  16. ANS complex of St John's wort PR-10 protein with 28 copies in the asymmetric unit: a fiendish combination of pseudosymmetry with tetartohedral twinning.

    PubMed

    Sliwiak, Joanna; Dauter, Zbigniew; Kowiel, Marcin; McCoy, Airlie J; Read, Randy J; Jaskolski, Mariusz

    2015-04-01

    Hyp-1, a pathogenesis-related class 10 (PR-10) protein from St John's wort (Hypericum perforatum), was crystallized in complex with the fluorescent probe 8-anilino-1-naphthalene sulfonate (ANS). The highly pseudosymmetric crystal has 28 unique protein molecules arranged in columns with sevenfold translational noncrystallographic symmetry (tNCS) along c and modulated X-ray diffraction with intensity crests at l = 7n and l = 7n ± 3. The translational NCS is combined with pseudotetragonal rotational NCS. The crystal was a perfect tetartohedral twin, although detection of twinning was severely hindered by the pseudosymmetry. The structure determined at 2.4 Å resolution reveals that the Hyp-1 molecules (packed as β-sheet dimers) have three novel ligand-binding sites (two internal and one in a surface pocket), which was confirmed by solution studies. In addition to 60 Hyp-1-docked ligands, there are 29 interstitial ANS molecules distributed in a pattern that violates the arrangement of the protein molecules and is likely to be the generator of the structural modulation. In particular, whenever the stacked Hyp-1 molecules are found closer together there is an ANS molecule bridging them.

  17. Reduced Alzheimer's disease pathology by St. John's Wort treatment is independent of hyperforin and facilitated by ABCC1 and microglia activation in mice.

    PubMed

    Hofrichter, Jacqueline; Krohn, Markus; Schumacher, Toni; Lange, Cathleen; Feistel, Björn; Walbroel, Bernd; Heinze, Hans-Jochen; Crockett, Sara; Sharbel, Timothy F; Pahnke, Jens

    2013-12-01

    Soluble β-amyloid peptides (Aβ) and small Aβ oligomers represent the most toxic peptide moieties recognized in brains affected by Alzheimer's disease (AD). Here we provide the first evidence that specific St. John's wort (SJW) extracts both attenuate Aβ-induced histopathology and alleviate memory impairments in APP-transgenic mice. Importantly, these effects are attained independently of hyperforin. Specifically, two extracts characterized by low hyperforin content (i) significantly decrease intracerebral Aβ42 levels, (ii) decrease the number and size of amyloid plaques, (iii) rescue neocortical neurons, (iv) restore cognition to normal levels, and (iv) activate microglia in vitro and in vivo. Mechanistically, we reveal that the reduction of soluble Aβ42 species is the consequence of a highly increased export activity in the bloodbrain barrier ABCC1transporter, which was found to play a fundamental role in Aβ excretion into the bloodstream. These data (i) support the significant beneficial potential of SJW extracts on AD proteopathy, and (ii) demonstrate for the first time that hyperforin concentration does not necessarily correlate with their therapeutic effects. Hence, by activating ABC transporters, specific extracts of SJW may be used to treat AD and other diseases involving peptide accumulation and cognition impairment. We propose that the anti-depressant and anti-dementia effects of these hyperforin-reduced phytoextracts could be combined for treatment of the elderly, with a concomitant reduction in deleterious hyperforin-related side effects.

  18. Time-course effects of St John's wort on the pharmacokinetics of cyclosporine in dogs: interactions between herbal extracts and drugs.

    PubMed

    Fukunaga, K; Orito, K

    2012-10-01

    To clarify the interaction between St John's wort (SJW) and cyclosporine (CsA) in dogs, the pharmacokinetics of CsA before and during the repeated administration of SJW were analyzed. In the SJW group, SJW (300 mg) was given orally to four dogs every 24 h for 14 days. A single dose of CsA (5 mg/kg) was given orally 7 days before and 7 and 14 days after the initiation of the repeated administration of SJW. In the Control group, a single dose of CsA (5 mg/kg) was given orally to four other dogs in accordance with that in the SJW group. Blood samples from both groups were collected, and whole-blood concentrations of CsA were determined using high-performance liquid chromatography with UV detection. The maximum whole-blood concentration and AUC(0-∞) of the SJW group were significantly lower and the CL(tot) /F and V(d) /F were significantly higher than those in the Control group 7 and 14 days after the initiation of repeated SJW. Thus, repeated administrations of SJW affect the pharmacokinetic profiles of CsA in dogs. Further studies are necessary to elucidate the mechanisms of interaction between SJW and CsA in dogs.

  19. Impact of origin and biological source on chemical composition, anticholinesterase and antioxidant properties of some St. John's wort species (Hypericum spp., Hypericaceae) from the Central Balkans.

    PubMed

    Božin, Biljana; Kladar, Nebojša; Grujić, Nevena; Anačkov, Goran; Samojlik, Isidora; Gavarić, Neda; Conić, Branislava Srđenović

    2013-09-25

    The study shows the influence of the origin of plant material and biological source on the in vitro antioxidant (neutralization of DPPH and OH radical, nitric oxide, and inhibition of lipid peroxidation) and anticholinesterase activity of chemically characterized and quantified ethanol extracts of ten St. John's wort samples. The investigated samples were: five Hypericum perforatum species representatives collected at different localities, one commercial sample of Hyperici herba purchased at a local market and four Hypericum species autochtonous to the Balkan Peninsula (H. maculatum subsp. immaculatum, H. olympicum, H. richeri subsp. grisebachii and H. barbatum). All the examined extracts exhibited notable antioxidant potential, but in most of the cases indigenous Hypericum species expressed stronger effects compared to the original source of the drug, H. perforatum. The changes in the content of phenolic compounds, especially flavonoids, hyperforin and hypericin, related to the source of the drug affected the investigated activities. Since all of the investigated species have shown prominent inhibition of acetylcholinesterase in vitro activity, they could be further investigated as potential substances in preventing of Alzheimer's disease.

  20. St. John's Wort increases brain serotonin synthesis by inhibiting hepatic tryptophan 2, 3 dioxygenase activity and its gene expression in stressed rats.

    PubMed

    Bano, Samina; Ara, Iffat; Saboohi, Kausar; Moattar, Tariq; Chaoudhry, Bushra

    2014-09-01

    We aimed to investigate the effects of herbal St. John's Wort (SJW) on transcriptional regulation of hepatic tryptophan 2, 3 - dioxygenase (TDO) enzyme activity and brain regional serotonin (5-HT) levels in rats exposed to forced swim test (FST). TDO mRNA expression was quantified using real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain (RT-PCR) reaction and brain regional indoleamines were determined by high performance liquid chromatography coupled to fluorescence detector. Behavioral analysis shows significant reduction in immobility time in SJW (500mg/kg/ml) administered rats. It was found that pretreatment of SJW to rats did not prevent stress-induced elevation in plasma corticosterone levels however it increases serotonin synthesis by virtue of inhibiting hepatic TDO enzyme activity and its gene expression, ascertaining the notion that there exists an inverse relationship between hepatic TDO enzyme activity and brain 5-HT. The drug also decreases serotonin turnover in all the brain areas (hypothalamus, hippocampus amygdala) in stressed rats endorsing its monoamine oxidase inhibition property. Inhibition of TDO enzyme activity and its gene expression by the drug provides new insights for the development of therapeutic interventions for stress related mental illnesses.

  1. Permanent 'phase shifts' or reversible declines in coral cover? Lack of recovery of two coral reefs in St. John, US Virgin Islands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rogers, C.S.; Miller, J.

    2006-01-01

    Caribbean coral reefs have changed dramatically in the last 3 to 4 decades, with significant loss of coral cover and increases in algae. Here we present trends in benthic cover from 1989 to 2003 at 2 reefs (Lameshur Reef and Newfound Reef) off St. John, US Virgin Islands (USVI). Coral cover has declined in the fore-reef zones at both sites, and no recovery is evident. At Lameshur Reef, Hurricane Hugo (1989) caused significant physical damage and loss of coral. We suggest that macroalgae rapidly colonized new substrate made available by this storm and have hindered or prevented growth of adult corals, as well as settlement and survival of new coral recruits. Overfishing of herbivorous fishes in the USVI and loss of shelter for these fishes because of major storms has presumably reduced the levels of herbivory that formerly controlled algal abundance. Coral cover declined at Newfound Reef from 1999 to 2000, most likely because of coral diseases. The trends that we have documented, loss of coral followed by no evidence of recovery, appear similar to findings from other studies in the Caribbean. We need to focus on functional shifts in the resilience of coral reefs that result in their inability to recover from natural and human-caused stressors. ?? Inter-Research 2006.

  2. Ten years after the crime: Lasting effects of damage from a cruise ship anchor on a coral reef in St. John, U.S. Virgin Islands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rogers, C.S.; Garrison, V.H.

    2001-01-01

    In October 1988, a cruise ship dropped its anchor on a coral reef in Virgin Islands National Park, St. John, creating a distinct scar roughly 128 m long and 3 m wide from a depth of 22 m to a depth of 6 m. The anchor pulverized coral colonies and smashed part of the reef framework. In April 1991, nine permanent quadrats (1 m2) were established inside the scar over a depth range of 9 m to 12.5 m. At that time, average coral cover inside the scar was less than 1%. These quadrats were surveyed again in 1992, 1993, 1994, 1995 and 1998. Recruits of 19 coral species have been observed, with Agaricia agaricites and Porites spp. the most abundant. Quadrats surveyed outside the scar in June 1994 over the same depth range had a higher percent coral cover (mean = 7.4%, SD = 4.5) and greater average size (maximum length) of coral colonies than in quadrats inside the damaged area. Although coral recruits settle into the scar in high densities, live coral cover has not increased significantly in the last 10 yrs, reflecting poor survival and growth of newly settled corals. The relatively planar aspect of the scar may increase the vulnerability of the recruits to abrasion and mortality from shifting sediments. Ten years after the anchor damage occurred, live coral cover in the still-visible scar (mean = 2.6%, SD = 2.7) remains well below the cover found in the adjacent, undamaged reef.

  3. Highly Variable Contents of Phenolics in St John's Wort Products Impact Their Transport in the Human Intestinal Caco-2 Cell Model: Pharmaceutical and Biopharmaceutical Rationale for Product Standardization

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Song; Jiang, Wen; Yin, Taijun; Hu, Ming

    2010-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to determine content uniformity of phenolics in the St John's Wort (SJW) supplements, and to demonstrate how variations in the product matrices affect their absorption and efflux. LC and LC-MS/MS methods were used to determine the phenolic contents of twelve different products purchased locally or from the internet. Three representative extracts were further submitted to Caco-2 cell transport experiment and transport of rutin, hyperoside, and isoquercitrin were evaluated. The results indicated that twelve different products displayed twelve different HPLC fingerprints, but all products contained the following major compounds: rutin, hyperoside, isoquercitrin, quercitrin, quercetin, and amentoflavone. The content uniformity of these major compounds was poor across products, with the smallest difference in the amounts of amentoflavone (2.6 folds) and largest difference in that of isoquercitrin (28.8 folds). The Caco-2 experiments indicated transport of rutin was vectorial, with the permeabilities varied about 2 folds in both direction of transport. The vectorial permeabilities of hyperoside and isoquercitrin were similarly different. Use of efflux transporter inhibitors studies suggested that MRP2 was involved in isoquercitrin's efflux and the product matrix affected the extent of its efflux. In conclusion, different SJW supplements had highly variable contents of phenolics, and the variability in product matrix and phytochemical compositions affected the permeabilities of key phenolics across the Caco-2 monolayers, which may further impact their bioavailabilities. Therefore, standardization will be necessary to ensure safe and efficacious use of supplements such as SJW. PMID:20450158

  4. Complexity of nearshore strontium-to-calcium ratio variability in a core sample of the massive coral Siderastrea siderea obtained in Coral Bay, St. John, U.S. Virgin Islands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reich, Christopher D.; Kuffner, Ilsa B.; Hickey, T. Don; Morrison, Jennifer M.; Flannery, Jennifer A.

    2013-01-01

    Strontium-to-calcium ratios (Sr/Ca) were measured on the skeletal matrix of a core sample from a colony of the massive coral Siderastrea siderea collected in Coral Bay, St. John, U.S. Virgin Islands. Strontium and calcium are incorporated into the coral skeleton during the precipitation of aragonite by the coral polyps and their ratio is highly temperature dependent. The robustness of this temperature dependence makes Sr/Ca a reliable proxy for sea surface temperature (SST). Details presented from the St. John S. siderea core indicate that terrestrial inputs of sediment and freshwater can disrupt the chemical balance and subsequently complicate the utility of Sr/Ca in reconstructing historical SST. An approximately 44-year-long record of Sr/Ca shows that an annual SST signal is recorded but with an increasing Sr/Ca trend from 1980 to present, which is likely the result of runoff from the mountainous terrain of St. John. The overwhelming influence of the terrestrial fingerprint on local seawater chemistry makes utilizing Sr/Ca as a SST proxy in nearshore environments very difficult.

  5. Accelerated and Airy-Bloch oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longhi, Stefano

    2016-09-01

    A quantum particle subjected to a constant force undergoes an accelerated motion following a parabolic path, which differs from the classical motion just because of wave packet spreading (quantum diffusion). However, when a periodic potential is added (such as in a crystal) the particle undergoes Bragg scattering and an oscillatory (rather than accelerated) motion is found, corresponding to the famous Bloch oscillations (BOs). Here, we introduce an exactly-solvable quantum Hamiltonian model, corresponding to a generalized Wannier-Stark Hamiltonian Ĥ, in which a quantum particle shows an intermediate dynamical behavior, namely an oscillatory motion superimposed to an accelerated one. Such a novel dynamical behavior is referred to as accelerated BOs. Analytical expressions of the spectrum, improper eigenfunctions and propagator of the generalized Wannier-Stark Hamiltonian Ĥ are derived. Finally, it is shown that acceleration and quantum diffusion in the generalized Wannier-Stark Hamiltonian are prevented for Airy wave packets, which undergo a periodic breathing dynamics that can be referred to as Airy-Bloch oscillations.

  6. Rainbows: Mie computations and the Airy approximation.

    PubMed

    Wang, R T; van de Hulst, H C

    1991-01-01

    Efficient and accurate computation of the scattered intensity pattern by the Mie formulas is now feasible for size parameters up to x = 50,000 at least, which in visual light means spherical drops with diameters up to 6 mm. We present a method for evaluating the Mie coefficients from the ratios between Riccati-Bessel and Neumann functions of successive order. We probe the applicability of the Airy approximation, which we generalize to rainbows of arbitrary p (number of internal reflections = p - 1), by comparing the Mie and Airy intensity patterns. Millimeter size water drops show a match in all details, including the position and intensity of the supernumerary maxima and the polarization. A fairly good match is still seen for drops of 0.1 mm. A small spread in sizes helps to smooth out irrelevant detail. The dark band between the rainbows is used to test more subtle features. We conclude that this band contains not only externally reflected light (p = 0) but also a sizable contribution f rom the p = 6 and p = 7 rainbows, which shift rapidly with wavelength. The higher the refractive index, the closer both theories agree on the first primary rainbow (p = 2) peak for drop diameters as small as 0.02 mm. This may be useful in supporting experimental work. PMID:20581954

  7. Airy structure in 16O+14C nuclear rainbow scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohkubo, S.; Hirabayashi, Y.

    2015-08-01

    The Airy structure in 16 O +14 C rainbow scattering is studied with an extended double-folding (EDF) model that describes all the diagonal and off-diagonal coupling potentials derived from the microscopic realistic wave functions for 16 O by using a density-dependent nucleon-nucleon force. The experimental angular distributions at EL=132 , 281, and 382.2 MeV are well reproduced by the calculations. By studying the energy evolution of the Airy structure, the Airy minimum around θ =76∘ in the angular distribution at EL=132 MeV is assigned as the second-order Airy minimum A 2 in contrast to the recent literature which assigns it as the third order A 3 . The Airy minima in the 90∘ excitation function is investigated in comparison with well-known 16 O +16 O and 12 C +12 C systems. Evolution of the Airy structure into the molecular resonances with the 16 O +14 C cluster structure in the low-energy region around Ec .m .=30 MeV is discussed. It is predicted theoretically for the first time for a non-4 N 16O +14 C system that Airy elephants in the 90∘ excitation function are present.

  8. Accelerating Airy beams in the presence of inhomogeneities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Besieris, Ioannis M.; Shaarawi, Amr M.; Zamboni-Rached, Michel

    2016-06-01

    Studies have already been made of accelerating Airy beams in the presence of deterministic inhomogeneities, illustrating, in particular, that the inherent self-healing properties of such beams are preserved. The cases of a range-dependent linear transverse potential and a converging GRIN structure (harmonic oscillator) have been examined thoroughly. Examples will be given in this article of novel accelerating Airy beams in the presence of five other types of potential functions. Three of the resulting exact analytical solutions have a common salient characteristic property: they are constructed using the free-space accelerating Airy beam solution as a seed.

  9. Ridge to reef assessment of metal concentration and mineralogy in rocks and sediments on St. John, U.S. Virgin Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrington, R. J.; Gray, S. C.; Ramos-Scharron, C. E.; O'Shea, B.

    2012-12-01

    Land development on the island of St. John, US Virgin Islands is increasing terrigenous sediment loads into coastal bays and this is adversely affecting its sensitive, near-shore coral reef systems. Accelerated erosion of by-products originating from igneous bedrock may contribute metal-rich sediment to ephemeral streams and bays around St. John. In order to determine how development is affecting the production and transportation of land-based metals from watersheds to reef environments, we compare the chemistry and mineralogy of bedrock and sediment of both an undeveloped and a developed watershed and their corresponding bays. Both watersheds are comprised of bedrock of similar lithology (Water Island Formation: plagiorhyolite and basalt). Our study objectives are to: 1) determine what metal elements could serve as reliable stable geochemical tracers to track the transport of land-derived sediments to reefs; 2) document the total change in metal concentrations from in-situ bedrock and sediment along travel paths as the sediment gets transported from the watersheds to the reefs; and 3) estimate erosion rates from active sediment sources and metal accumulation rates within the marine environment. Whole rock, soil, stream, shore and reef sediment samples were collected from both study areas to represent a ridge to reef progression of material as it is eroded from the bedrock and transported to the reefs. Samples of in-situ rock and sediments were collected by hand, while material representing sediment being eroded from the watersheds and settling in the ephemeral streams and bays was captured by terrestrial and marine sediment traps. Major and trace element concentrations and the mineralogy of rock and sediments were analyzed using X-ray fluorescence, petrography and X-ray diffraction. Analyses of bedrock samples reveal mineral and elemental compositions typical of basalt and plagiorhyolite. In hydrothermally altered bedrock Ba and K concentrations elevated above non

  10. Characterization of the hydrology, water chemistry, and aquatic communities of selected springs in the St. Johns River Water Management District, Florida, 2004

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Phelps, G.G.; Walsh, Stephen J.; Gerwig, Robert M.; Tate, William B.

    2006-01-01

    The hydrology, water chemistry, and aquatic communities of Silver Springs, De Leon Spring, Gemini Springs, and Green Spring in the St. Johns River Water Management District, Florida, were studied in 2004 to provide a better understanding of each spring and to compile data of potential use in future water-management decisions. Ground water that discharges from these and other north-central Florida springs originates from the Upper Floridan aquifer of the Floridan aquifer system, a karstic limestone aquifer that extends throughout most of the State's peninsula. This report summarizes data about flow, water chemistry, and aquatic communities, including benthic invertebrates, fishes, algae, and aquatic macrophytes collected by the U.S. Geological Survey, the St. Johns River Water Management District, and the Florida Department of Environmental Protection during 2004, as well as some previously collected data. Differences in water chemistry among these springs reflect local differences in water chemistry in the Upper Floridan aquifer. The three major springs sampled at the Silver Springs group (the Main Spring, Blue Grotto, and the Abyss) have similar proportions of cations and anions but vary in nitrate and dissolved oxygen concentrations. Water from Gemini Springs and Green Spring has higher proportions of sodium and chloride than the Silver Springs group. Water from De Leon Spring also has higher proportions of sodium and chloride than the Silver Springs group but lower proportions of calcium and bicarbonate. Nitrate concentrations have increased over the period of record at all of the springs except Green Spring. Compounds commonly found in wastewater were found in all the springs sampled. The most commonly detected compound was the insect repellant N,N'-diethyl-methyl-toluamide (DEET), which was found in all the springs sampled except De Leon Spring. The pesticide atrazine and its degradate 2-chloro-4-isopropylamino-6-amino-s-triazine (CIAT) were detected in water

  11. Effect of nutrients and salinity pulses on biomass and growth of Vallisneria americana in lower St Johns River, FL, USA

    PubMed Central

    Boustany, Ronald G.; Michot, Thomas C.; Moss, Rebecca F.

    2015-01-01

    We determined the interactive effects of nutrient loading and salinity pulsing on Vallisneria americana Michx., the dominant submerged aquatic vegetation species in the lower St Johns River (LSJR), FL, USA, and its associated algal community. Five hundred and ninety 6-inch diameter intact plant plugs of Vallisneria were collected from the LSJR in March 2003 and transported to US Geological Survey mesocosm facilities in Lafayette, LA, USA. A 3×3 experimental design consisting of three nutrient levels (control, 1/3 control and 3× control) and three salinity pulsing regimes (no pulse, 1-pulse at 18 ppt and 2-pulse at 12 and 18 ppt) was implemented with three replicates per treatment for a total of 27 experimental tanks. Salinity pulsing significantly reduced all measured Vallisneria growth parameters including above- and below-ground biomass, areal productivity and leaf area index. Nutrient levels had little effect on plants subjected to salinity pulses, but in non-salinity pulse treatments we observed higher mean macrophyte biomass in the low-nutrient loading treatments. Macroalgal components (epiphytes and surface algal mats) were not significantly different ( p=0.2998 and p=0.2444, respectively), but water column chlorophyll a (phytoplankton) was significantly higher ( p<0.0001) in all salinity pulse treatments except for the 1-pulse, low-nutrient treatment. A single salinity pulse at 18 ppt resulted in 22% pot mortality and two consecutive pulses of 18 and 12 ppt resulted in an additional 14% mortality. Individual leaves and ramets lost 59.7% and 67.8%, respectively, in the combined salinity pulse treatments. Nutrient loading tends to have a long-term effect on Vallisneria through complex community interactions while salinity pulsing frequency and intensity has an immediate and direct influence on growth and distribution. PMID:26064592

  12. Effect of nutrients and salinity pulses on biomass and growth of Vallisneria americana in lower St Johns River, FL, USA.

    PubMed

    Boustany, Ronald G; Michot, Thomas C; Moss, Rebecca F

    2015-02-01

    We determined the interactive effects of nutrient loading and salinity pulsing on Vallisneria americana Michx., the dominant submerged aquatic vegetation species in the lower St Johns River (LSJR), FL, USA, and its associated algal community. Five hundred and ninety 6-inch diameter intact plant plugs of Vallisneria were collected from the LSJR in March 2003 and transported to US Geological Survey mesocosm facilities in Lafayette, LA, USA. A 3×3 experimental design consisting of three nutrient levels (control, 1/3 control and 3× control) and three salinity pulsing regimes (no pulse, 1-pulse at 18 ppt and 2-pulse at 12 and 18 ppt) was implemented with three replicates per treatment for a total of 27 experimental tanks. Salinity pulsing significantly reduced all measured Vallisneria growth parameters including above- and below-ground biomass, areal productivity and leaf area index. Nutrient levels had little effect on plants subjected to salinity pulses, but in non-salinity pulse treatments we observed higher mean macrophyte biomass in the low-nutrient loading treatments. Macroalgal components (epiphytes and surface algal mats) were not significantly different ( p=0.2998 and p=0.2444, respectively), but water column chlorophyll a (phytoplankton) was significantly higher ( p<0.0001) in all salinity pulse treatments except for the 1-pulse, low-nutrient treatment. A single salinity pulse at 18 ppt resulted in 22% pot mortality and two consecutive pulses of 18 and 12 ppt resulted in an additional 14% mortality. Individual leaves and ramets lost 59.7% and 67.8%, respectively, in the combined salinity pulse treatments. Nutrient loading tends to have a long-term effect on Vallisneria through complex community interactions while salinity pulsing frequency and intensity has an immediate and direct influence on growth and distribution. PMID:26064592

  13. St. John's wort attenuates irinotecan-induced diarrhea via down-regulation of intestinal pro-inflammatory cytokines and inhibition of intestinal epithelial apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Hu Zeping; Yang Xiaoxia; Chan Suiyung; Xu Anlong; Duan Wei; Zhu Yizhun; Sheu, F.-S.; Boelsterli, Urs Alex; Chan, Eli; Zhang Qiang; Wang, J.-C.; Ee, Pui Lai Rachel; Koh, H.L.; Huang Min; Zhou Shufeng . E-mail: phazsf@nus.edu.sg

    2006-10-15

    Diarrhea is a common dose-limiting toxicity associated with cancer chemotherapy, in particular for drugs such as irinotecan (CPT-11), 5-fluouracil, oxaliplatin, capecitabine and raltitrexed. St. John's wort (Hypericum perforatum, SJW) has anti-inflammatory activity, and our preliminary study in the rat and a pilot study in cancer patients found that treatment of SJW alleviated irinotecan-induced diarrhea. In the present study, we investigated whether SJW modulated various pro-inflammatory cytokines including interleukins (IL-1{beta}, IL-2, IL-6), interferon (IFN-{gamma}) and tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} (TNF-{alpha}) and intestinal epithelium apoptosis in rats. The rats were treated with irinotecan at 60 mg/kg for 4 days in combination with oral SJW or SJW-free control vehicle at 400 mg/kg for 8 days. Diarrhea, tissue damage, body weight loss, various cytokines including IL-1{beta}, IL-2, IL-6, IFN-{gamma} and TNF-{alpha} and intestinal epithelial apoptosis were monitored over 11 days. Our studies demonstrated that combined SJW markedly reduced CPT-11-induced diarrhea and intestinal lesions. The production of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as IL-1{beta}, IFN-{gamma} and TNF-{alpha} was significantly up-regulated in intestine. In the mean time, combined SJW significantly suppressed the intestinal epithelial apoptosis induced by CPT-11 over days 5-11. In particular, combination of SJW significantly inhibited the expression of TNF-{alpha} mRNA in the intestine over days 5-11. In conclusion, inhibition of pro-inflammatory cytokines and intestinal epithelium apoptosis partly explained the protective effect of SJW against the intestinal toxicities induced by irinotecan. Further studies are warranted to explore the potential for STW as an agent in combination with chemotherapeutic drugs to lower their dose-limiting toxicities.

  14. Effect of nutrients and salinity pulses on biomass and growth of Vallisneria americana in lower St Johns River, FL, USA.

    PubMed

    Boustany, Ronald G; Michot, Thomas C; Moss, Rebecca F

    2015-02-01

    We determined the interactive effects of nutrient loading and salinity pulsing on Vallisneria americana Michx., the dominant submerged aquatic vegetation species in the lower St Johns River (LSJR), FL, USA, and its associated algal community. Five hundred and ninety 6-inch diameter intact plant plugs of Vallisneria were collected from the LSJR in March 2003 and transported to US Geological Survey mesocosm facilities in Lafayette, LA, USA. A 3×3 experimental design consisting of three nutrient levels (control, 1/3 control and 3× control) and three salinity pulsing regimes (no pulse, 1-pulse at 18 ppt and 2-pulse at 12 and 18 ppt) was implemented with three replicates per treatment for a total of 27 experimental tanks. Salinity pulsing significantly reduced all measured Vallisneria growth parameters including above- and below-ground biomass, areal productivity and leaf area index. Nutrient levels had little effect on plants subjected to salinity pulses, but in non-salinity pulse treatments we observed higher mean macrophyte biomass in the low-nutrient loading treatments. Macroalgal components (epiphytes and surface algal mats) were not significantly different ( p=0.2998 and p=0.2444, respectively), but water column chlorophyll a (phytoplankton) was significantly higher ( p<0.0001) in all salinity pulse treatments except for the 1-pulse, low-nutrient treatment. A single salinity pulse at 18 ppt resulted in 22% pot mortality and two consecutive pulses of 18 and 12 ppt resulted in an additional 14% mortality. Individual leaves and ramets lost 59.7% and 67.8%, respectively, in the combined salinity pulse treatments. Nutrient loading tends to have a long-term effect on Vallisneria through complex community interactions while salinity pulsing frequency and intensity has an immediate and direct influence on growth and distribution.

  15. Effects of St John's wort (Hypericum perforatum L.) extract on plasma androgen concentrations in healthy men and women: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Donovan, Jennifer L; DeVane, C Lindsay; Lewis, John G; Wang, Jun-Sheng; Ruan, Ying; Chavin, Kenneth D; Markowitz, John S

    2005-10-01

    St John's wort extract (SJW; Hypericum perforatum L.) is taken extensively as a putative herbal antidepressant. It has been shown to induce the activity of cytochrome P-450 3A4 (CYP3A4) and to increase the clearance of numerous drugs and steroids such as cortisol and ethinyl estradiol. This study was conducted to determine if SJW exposure also alters the concentrations of circulating androgenic steroid hormones. The study was conducted using healthy volunteers (6M, 6F) studied before and after a 14-day treatment period with a SJW preparation previously demonstrated to induce the activity of CYP3A4. Plasma concentrations of testosterone, dihydrotestosterone (DHT), dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS), sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) and the combined concentrations of androsterone sulfate (AoS) and epiandrosterone sulfate (epiAoS) were measured by immunoassay methods. The results of analysis demonstrated that SJW did not significantly alter the majority of the androgens studied (p > 0.05) although the combined concentrations of the 5alpha-reduced steroids, AoS and epiAoS, significantly declined following treatment in all subjects (p = 0.02), and in males (p = 0.04). Furthermore, the testosterone to DHT ratio was increased in both men and women. Although the latter increase did not reach statistical significance, it is also consistent with the possible inhibition of 5alpha-reductase by SJW. It is concluded that despite significant induction of CYP3A4, short term administration of SJW does not significantly alter the concentrations of most circulating androgens in men and women but may produce a dimunition in some of the circulating 5alpha-reduced androgens.

  16. Watershed-Marine Linkages: Monitoring how Terrigenous Runoff and Wave-Induced Resuspension Affect Marine Sediment Dynamics in Bays with Coral Reefs, St. John, USVI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, S.; Gray, S. C.; Whinney, J.; Ramos-Scharron, C. E.; Campbell, S.; LaFevor, M. C.

    2015-12-01

    In the USVI, land-based sedimentation in coastal marine environments has increased due to watershed development and is a major cause of coral reef degradation. Watershed runoff and wave/current-induced resuspension of benthic sediment contribute to turbidity/sedimentation. Our objectives are to characterize the spatial and temporal variability of marine sediment dynamics in response to runoff and resuspension in shoreline and reef areas of St. John, USVI, and directly compare the efficacy of time-integrated vs. high-resolution sediment monitoring approaches. To complement a six-year sediment trap study of sedimentation, nephelometers (10-min resolution) were deployed alongside sediment traps (26 day resolution) at four ephemeral stream outfalls and three reefs sites below comparable developed and minimally developed catchments. Watershed runoff was monitored using stream (10-min resolution) and peak crest (2-week resolution) gauges. Mean turbidity/deposition were 4/5 times greater at shore compared to reef sites, 5/6 times greater below developed compared to minimally developed catchments, 2/4 times greater during runoff compared to non-runoff periods, and 100/500 times background levels (time series median) following the largest runoff event of the 5-month time series. Turbidity values due to resuspension during non-runoff periods were primarily controlled by wave height (71% of the variability), tides, and the presence of finer sediment grains. However, the relative contribution to total sedimentation of resuspension vs. watershed runoff varied spatially between sites due to variations in bay geography, benthic sediment grain size, and catchment characteristics. Sediment traps and nephelometers recorded generally consistent temporal patterns of sedimentation at most sites. Though our study confirmed that watershed development increases turbidity and deposition in bays with coral reefs, multiple processes govern sediment dynamics and the distribution of sediments

  17. Effects of rifampicin, dexamethasone, St. John's Wort and Thyroxine on maternal and foetal expression of Abcb1 and organ distribution of talinolol in pregnant rats.

    PubMed

    Saljé, Karen; Lederer, Kirstin; Oswald, Stefan; Dazert, Eike; Warzok, Rolf; Siegmund, Werner

    2012-08-01

    It is well accepted that ABCB1 plays a critical role in absorption, distribution and elimination of many xenobiotics and drugs. Only little is known about the regulation and function of ABCB1 during pregnancy. Thus, the aim of this study is to investigate maternal, placental and foetal Abcb1 expression and function in pregnant rats after induction with rifampicin, dexamethasone, St. John's wort (SJW) or thyroxine. Wistar rats were orally treated with rifampicin (250 mg/kg), SJW (1.0 g/kg), thyroxine (9 μg/kg), dexamethasone (1 mg/kg) or 0.5% methylcellulose suspension (control) for 9 days during late pregnancy (each N = 5). Afterwards, organ mRNA expression and protein content of Abcb1a were determined. Tissue concentrations of the ABCB1 probe drug talinolol were measured after repeated administration of the drug (100 mg/kg, 9 days) and after induction with oral rifampicin (250 mg/kg, 9 days, N = 5). Abcb1 expression was substantially lower in foetal than in maternal organs. Abcb1 was significantly induced by SJW in the maternal jejunum and placenta, by dexamethasone in foetal brain and liver and by thyroxine in the placenta and maternal and foetal brain. Rifampicin induced Abcb1 in all maternal and foetal organs. However, organ distribution of talinolol was not influenced by comedication of rifampicin. In conclusion, maternal and foetal Abcb1 organ expression in pregnant rats is inducible by nuclear receptor agonists. Although rifampicin regulates maternal and foetal Abcb1 expression, organ distribution of talinolol remains unchanged most likely caused by the known inhibitory effect of rifampicin on Abcb1 function.

  18. St. John's wort may ameliorate 2,4,6-trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid colitis off rats through the induction of pregnane X receptors and/or P-glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Sehirli, A O; Cetinel, S; Ozkan, N; Selman, S; Tetik, S; Yuksel, M; Dulger, F G A

    2015-04-01

    It is reported that deficiencies of the pregnane X receptor (PXR) and P-glycoprotein (P-gp), the latter of which is encoded by the MDR1 gene, are important factors in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). It is also known that the activation of PXR is protective of IBD due to the mutual repression between PXR and nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) expression and because NF-κB was reported to play a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of ulcerative colitis. The goal of this study was to investigate whether St. John's wort (SJW) and spironolactone (SPL), both known to have strong inducing effects on cytochrome P 450 (CYP) enzymes as well as PXR and P-gp, have ameliorating effects on 2,4,6-trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid (TNBS) colitis of rats through induction of PXR and/or P-gp. Wistar albino rats (250 - 300 g) were divided into control and TNBS-colitis groups. Each group was then divided into a) control (saline), b) SJW (300 mg/kg p.o. bid), and c) SPL (80 mg/kg p.o.) groups. Drugs were given for 7 days. Both treatments ameliorated the clinical hallmarks of colitis, as determined by body weight loss and assessment of diarrhea, colon length, and bowel histology. Plasma levels of NF-κB, tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and tissue myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, as well as the oxidative stress markers that increased during colitis, decreased significantly after both treatments. The PXR and P-gp expression in the intestinal tissues was diminished in the colitis group but increased after drug treatments. Both drugs appeared to have significant antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects and ameliorated the TNBS colitis of the rats, most likely through their PXR- and P-gp-inducing properties.

  19. Controllable Airy-like beams induced by tunable phase patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, D.; Qian, Y.

    2016-01-01

    We propose and experimentally observe a novel family of Airy-like beams. First, we theoretically investigate the physical generation of our proposed controllable Airy-like beams by introducing a rotation angle factor into the phase function, which can regulate and flexibly control the beam wavefront. Meanwhile we can also readily control the main lobes of these beams to follow appointed parabolic trajectories using the rotation angle factor. We also demonstrate that the controllable Airy-like beams lack the properties of being diffraction-free and self-healing. The experiments are performed and the results are in accord with the theoretical simulations. We believe that the intriguing characteristics of our proposed Airy-like beams could provide more degrees of freedom, and are likely to give rise to new applications and lend versatility to the emerging field.

  20. Continuum Statistics of the Airy2 Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corwin, Ivan; Quastel, Jeremy; Remenik, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    We develop an exact determinantal formula for the probability that the Airy_2 process is bounded by a function g on a finite interval. As an application, we provide a direct proof that {sup({A}2(x)-x^2)} is distributed as a GOE random variable. Both the continuum formula and the GOE result have applications in the study of the end point of an unconstrained directed polymer in a disordered environment. We explain Johansson's (Commun. Math. Phys. 242(1-2):277-329, 2003) observation that the GOE result follows from this polymer interpretation and exact results within that field. In a companion paper (Moreno Flores et al. in Commun. Math. Phys. 2012) these continuum statistics are used to compute the distribution of the endpoint of directed polymers.

  1. AiryÕs Greenwich Staff

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, A.

    2012-01-01

    One major research development in the history of astronomy, pioneered in particular by the SHA, is a shift from the concern with what the ÔgiantsÕ, such as Galileo or Newton, achieved to an examination of the wider spectrum of astronomical personnel. And one rich field of inquiry here is that body of men, and later of women, who earned their livings as assistant astronomers. It is, in fact, an abundantly documented area, including figures employed in Grand Amateur, university, and civic observatories, though without doubt the richest and longest-running body of data pertaining to what might be called the ÔAstronomersÕ GentlemenÕ comes from the archives of the Royal Observatory, Greenwich, especially for the years 1835 to 1881, when Sir George Biddell Airy was Astronomer Royal.

  2. Dispersive Tidal Plume Modeling of Brine Discharge from Reverse Osmosis (RO) Desalination System, Coral Bay, St. John, USVI using Finite Segment Steady-state Response Matrix (SSRM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, J.; Shahvari, A.

    2011-12-01

    This characterization and modeling study of dispersive tidal plume of brine discharge from reverse osmosis (RO) desalination system is a part of the Environmental Assessment (EA) for a new reverse osmosis system in the Coral Bay, St. John, USVI (US Virgin Island). Main foci are on developing the tidal longitudinal (perpendicular to the shoreline) and lateral (parallel to the shoreline) dispersion coefficients and subsequently characterize dispersion and mixing characterization of the negatively buoyant brine discharge plume from the proposed reverse osmosis plant to evaluate the level of salinity variations in the nearshore mixing plume in regard to existing coral reef ecosystem. An in situ dye study was conducted by a marine biologist for this purpose to estimate brine discharge plume dispersion coefficients under oscillatory tidal transport and fate flux for current and proposed plant configuration. Additional tidal and surface runoff hydrologic data, bathymetric data and brine discharge characteristics in the vicinity of the brine discharge location are reflected in this study. With estimated dispersion coefficients, eighteen brine discharge scenarios were evaluated to model anticipated dispersive characteristics under varying operational conditions and ambient tidal current conditions for average measured salinity of 33.27 PSU in loco as well as a standard 35 PSU for typical nearshore water salinity variations. Modeling results indicated that the dispersive tidal plume of design brine discharge from reverse osmosis (RO) desalination system at a discharge of 150,000 gpd would raise salinity no higher than 0.0123 PSU in receiving nearshore estuarine water (Maximum concentration at the segment 3 = 33.2822 PSU at Δt = 12 hrs and 24 hrs in diurnal tidal cycle under when the brine discharge with Base+25% concentration, 81.25 PSU at brine discharge rate of 0.0066 m3/sec, and with a minimum direct overland flow efflux at 0.003 m3/sec - this is a "worst-case" operating

  3. Generation and propagation dynamics of Airy beam with the tunable tail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Huilong; Lü, Yanfei; Xia, Jing; Pu, Xiaoyun; Zhang, Li

    2016-05-01

    We introduce a new kind of Airy beam called Airy beam with the tunable tail, which can be generated from the elliptical flat-topped Gaussian beam. The analytical formula of Airy beam with the tunable tail is derived. Airy beam with the single tail can be obtained by adjusting the ration of the beam width of elliptical flat-topped Gaussian beam. The tail length of Airy beam can be controlled by the order N of incident beam. The normalized intensity distributions of Airy beam with the tunable tail propagating in free space are studied, and the propagation dynamics of Airy beam with the single tail are investigated. Compared with the Airy beam generated from the fundamental Gaussian beam or the flat-topped Gaussian beam, some interesting and useful information has been found.

  4. 7. Historic American Buildings Survey, John A. Bryan, Photographer July ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. Historic American Buildings Survey, John A. Bryan, Photographer July 9, 1952 CHAPEL AND CLASSROOM, SOUTHWEST PERSPECTIVE. - St. John's Episcopal Mission, Chapel & Rectory, Fort Bennett Vicinity, Green Grass, Dewey County, SD

  5. 8. Historic American Buildings Survey, John A. Bryan, Photographer July ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. Historic American Buildings Survey, John A. Bryan, Photographer July 9, 1952 WEST ELEVATION OF CHAPEL. - St. John's Episcopal Mission, Chapel & Rectory, Fort Bennett Vicinity, Green Grass, Dewey County, SD

  6. 10. Historic American Buildings Survey, John A. Bryan, Photographer July ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. Historic American Buildings Survey, John A. Bryan, Photographer July 9, 1952 MEMORIAL PLAQUE IN CHAPEL. - St. John's Episcopal Mission, Chapel & Rectory, Fort Bennett Vicinity, Green Grass, Dewey County, SD

  7. 6. Historic American Buildings Survey, John A. Bryan, Photographer July ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. Historic American Buildings Survey, John A. Bryan, Photographer July 9, 1952 SOUTH WALL OF CHAPEL. - St. John's Episcopal Mission, Chapel & Rectory, Fort Bennett Vicinity, Green Grass, Dewey County, SD

  8. Vessel extraction using the Buckmaster-Airy filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez, Valentina

    2016-05-01

    A new and powerful technique for vessel extraction from biomedical images using the so called Buckmaster- Airy Filter is designed, prototyped and tested. The design, the prototyping and the testing were performed using computer algebra software, specifically the Maple package ImageTools. Some preliminary experiments were performed ant the results were excellent. Our new technique is based on partial differential equations.. Specifically two dimensional Airy diffusion equation and the two dimensional Buckmaster equation were used for designing the new Buckmaster-Airy Filter. Such new filter is able to enhance the quality of an image, producing simultaneously noise elimination, but without altering the edges of the image. The new Bukmaster-Airy filter is applied to the target image via discrete convolution. The results of some experiments of vessel extraction will be presented; and some lines for future research such as the possible implementation of the Buckmaster-Airy Filter as a new plugging for the program ImageJ, will be proposed.

  9. Propagation of an Airy beam through the atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Ji, Xiaoling; Eyyuboğlu, Halil T; Ji, Guangming; Jia, Xinhong

    2013-01-28

    In this paper, the effect of thermal blooming of an Airy beam propagating through the atmosphere is examined, and the effect of atmospheric turbulence is not considered. The changes of the intensity distribution, the centroid position and the mean-squared beam width of an Airy beam propagating through the atmosphere are studied by using the four-dimensional (4D) computer code of the time-dependent propagation of Airy beams through the atmosphere. It is shown that an Airy beam can't retain its shape and the structure when the Airy beam propagates through the atmosphere due to thermal blooming except for the short propagation distance, or the short time, or the low beam power. The thermal blooming results in a central dip of the center lobe, and causes the center lobe to spread and decrease. In contrast with the center lobe, the side lobes are less affected by thermal blooming, such that the intensity maximum of the side lobe may be larger than that of the center lobe. However, the cross wind can reduce the effect of thermal blooming. When there exists the cross wind velocity vx in x direction, the dependence of centroid position in x direction on vx is not monotonic, and there exists a minimum, but the centroid position in y direction is nearly independent of vx.

  10. A comparison of the geochemical signatures of water-rock interaction and erosion rates between developed and undeveloped watersheds, St. John, US Virgin Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gudino, N.; Kretzschmar, T.; Gray, S. C.

    2012-12-01

    Human activities such as deforestation, agriculture, and the building of dirt roads may increase soil erosion and the delivery of land-based sediment into coastal waters from steep sub-tropical islands. These changes may also affect water-rock interaction, which alters the geochemistry of storm waters and the clay mineralogy of eroded sediments. In the US Virgin Islands, land-based sedimentation is thought to be a major cause of the decline of near-shore coral reefs. The objective of this study was to 1) evaluate whether chemical erosion (water-rock interaction) during storms affected the major-element chemistry of storm-water and the clay mineralogy of eroded sediments; and 2) determine if enhanced erosion associated with human activities may impact these parameters. Our approach was to compare storm-water and sediment geochemistry and modeled erosion rates between developed (Coral Bay) and undeveloped (Lameshur) watersheds on St. John, USVI. Terrestrial and marine sediment samples and runoff samples from three storm events, including Hurricane Otto (Oct. 7-9th), were collected during the 2010 hurricane season in Coral Bay and Lameshur watersheds and bays. Major elements in storm waters were measured using ICP-AES. The mineral saturation index was calculated using "The Geochemist's Workbench" (GWB), supported by X-Ray Diffraction analysis on clay minerals. The Revised and Modified Universal Soil Loss Equations were used to estimate both annual mean (2010, RUSLE) and storm-event (Hurricane Otto, MUSLE) based erosion rates. In addition, rates of marine terrigenous sediment accumulation were estimated by Loss On Ignition (LOI) analysis of marine sediment collected using submarine sediment trap arrays. Spatial variations in calcium, magnesium, sodium and potassium concentrations in storm water samples were measured and only calcium was statistical different (p<0.05) between the developed and undeveloped study sites during Hurricane Otto. Event specific differences in

  11. Coral bleaching, hurricane damage, and benthic cover on coral reefs in St. John, U.S. Virgin Islands: A comparison of surveys with the chain transect method and videography

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rogers, C.S.; Miller, J.

    2001-01-01

    The linear chain transect method and videography were used to quantify the percent cover by corals, macroalgae, gorgonians, other living organisms, and substrate along permanent transects on two fringing reefs off St. John. Both methods were used simultaneously on Lameshur reef in November 1998, and on Newfound reef in March and October 1998. Hurricane Georges passed over St. John in September 1998, and a severe coral bleaching episode began the same month. Both methods gave remarkably similar values for coral cover, while the video method gave consistently higher values for gorgonians and macroalgae. The most dramatic difference was in the quantification of bleaching. At Newfound, the chain method indicated 13.4% (SD = 14.1) of the coral tissues were bleached and the video method, 43.4% (SD = 13.0). Corresponding values at Lameshur were 18.1% (SD = 22.3) and 46.5% (SD = 13.3). Although hurricane damage was conspicuous at Newfound reef, neither method showed significant changes in coral cover or other categories as a result of the storm.

  12. Improved Intrapulse Raman Scattering Control via Asymmetric Airy Pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yi; Tehranchi, Amirhossein; Wabnitz, Stefan; Kashyap, Raman; Chen, Zhigang; Morandotti, Roberto

    2015-02-01

    We experimentally demonstrate the possibility of tuning the frequency of a laser pulse via the use of an Airy pulse-seeded soliton self-frequency shift. The intrinsically asymmetric nature of Airy pulses, typically featured by either leading or trailing oscillatory tails (relatively to the main lobe), is revealed through the nonlinear generation of both a primary and a secondary Raman soliton self-frequency shift, a phenomenon which is driven by the soliton fission processes. The resulting frequency shift can be carefully controlled by using time-reversed Airy pulses or, alternatively, by applying an offset to the cubic phase modulation used to generate the pulses. When compared with the use of conventional chirped Gaussian pulses, our technique brings about unique advantages in terms of both efficient frequency tuning and feasibility, along with the generation and control of multicolor Raman solitons with enhanced tunability. Our theoretical analysis agrees well with our experimental observations.

  13. Optical trapping and manipulation of Mie particles with Airy beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Ziyu; Zang, Weiping; Tian, Jianguo

    2016-02-01

    In this paper we calculate the radiation forces and moving trajectories of Mie particles induced by 1D Airy beams using the plane wave spectrum method and arbitrary beam theory. Numerical results show that both the transverse and the longitudinal radiation forces are deeply dependent on the relative refractive index, radii and positions of the scattering particles illuminated by the Airy beam. Due to the radiation forces, Mie particles with different radii and initial positions can be dragged into the nearest main intensity lobes, and move along parabolic trajectories in the direction of the Poynting vector. At the ends of these trajectories, in the presence of Brownian force, the trapped scattering particles show irregular Brownian movement near their equilibrium positions. This characteristic property of Airy beams enables optical sorting to be used more easily in the colloidal and biological sciences.

  14. Airy-Kaup-Kupershmidt filters applied to digital image processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoyos Yepes, Laura Cristina

    2015-09-01

    The Kaup-Kupershmidt operator is applied to the two-dimensional solution of the Airy-diffusion equation and the resulting filter is applied via convolution to image processing. The full procedure is implemented using Maple code with the package ImageTools. Some experiments were performed using a wide category of images including biomedical images generated by magnetic resonance, computarized axial tomography, positron emission tomography, infrared and photon diffusion. The Airy-Kaup-Kupershmidt filter can be used as a powerful edge detector and as powerful enhancement tool in image processing. It is expected that the Airy-Kaup-Kupershmidt could be incorporated in standard programs for image processing such as ImageJ.

  15. Super-resolution imaging based on virtual Airy spot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhengjun; Guo, Cheng; Cui, Junning; Wu, Qun

    2015-02-01

    Based on the theoretical model of Airy spot, a method is proposed for improving the imaging speed from confocal microscopy. The virtual Airy spot is designed for obtaining the pattern on CCD at detecting plane. Here the size of the spot is determined by the parameters of imaging system and intensity data from point detector, which can receive data quicker than CCD. The treatment can improve the speed of imaging comparing with CCD at receiving end. The virtual structured detection is also utilized for generating high-resolution image. Some numerical simulation results are provided for demonstrating the validity of the proposed method.

  16. Annular arrayed-waveguide fiber for autofocusing Airy-like beams.

    PubMed

    Deng, Hongchang; Yuan, Yonggui; Yuan, Libo

    2016-02-15

    We propose and theoretically demonstrate a novel optical fiber with an annular arrayed-waveguide to implement Airy phase and amplitude modulation, and generate an abruptly autofocusing circular Airy beam. The properties of wave propagation in Airy fiber and free space are studied by using the coupled-mode theory and angular spectrum method. The calculated results show that the output beam from such a fiber has a circular Airy-like pattern and can autofocus with the intensity maxima following a parabolic trajectory. We also show that the position of the focus point of the output beam from the Airy fiber can be easily controlled by changing input wavelength.

  17. Photorefractive and computational holography in the experimental generation of Airy beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suarez, Rafael A. B.; Vieira, Tarcio A.; Yepes, Indira S. V.; Gesualdi, Marcos R. R.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we present the experimental generation of Airy beams via computational and photorefractive holography. Experimental generation of Airy beams using conventional optical components presents several difficulties and a practically infeasible. Thus, the optical generation of Airy beams has been made from the optical reconstruction of a computer generated hologram implemented by a spatial light modulator. In the photorefractive holography technique, being used for the first time to our knowledge, the hologram of an Airy beam is constructed (recorded) and reconstructed (read) optically in a nonlinear photorefractive medium. The Airy beam experimental realization was made by a setup of computational and photorefractive holography using a photorefractive Bi12 TiO20 crystal as holographic recording medium. Airy beams and Airy beam arrays were obtained experimentally in accordance with the predicted theory; with excellent prospects for applications in optical trapping and optical communications systems.

  18. Non-diffracting super-airy beam with intensified main lobe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Brijesh Kumar; Remez, Roei; Tsur, Yuval; Arie, Ady

    2016-04-01

    We study, theoretically and experimentally, the concept of non-diffracting super-Airy beam, where the main lobe of the beam is observed to be nearly half in size and with increased intensity compared to the main lobe of the Airy beam. However, reducing the main lobe size does not affect the transverse acceleration and non-spreading features of the beam. Furthermore, we observed that during propagation, super Airy main lobe shows faster self-reconstruction after an obstruction than the Airy main lobe. Therefore, we envision that specifically, a beam with a smaller lobe size and higher intensity can out-perform the Airy beam for applications such as nonlinear optics, curved plasma generation, laser micromachining, and micro- particle manipulation, while the faster reconstruction property of the super-Airy main lobe can surpass the Airy beam in applications of scattering and turbulent media.

  19. Pope John Paul the Great.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelabay, Yarema

    1998-01-01

    Comments on several biographies of and articles about Pope John Paul II. Argues that he has been the most ecclesiastically consequential pontiff in centuries, revitalizing the church by crafting an evangelical Catholic response to the 21st century crisis of modernity. Suggests that the Pope should be the "man of the century." (DSK)

  20. John Napier

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bryant, Kylie; Scott, Paul

    2004-01-01

    John Napier was born in 1550 in the Tower of Merchiston, near Edinburgh, Scotland. Napier's work on logarithms greatly influenced the work that was to be done in the future. The logarithm's ability to simplify calculations meant that Kepler and many others were able to find the relationships and formulas for motion of bodies. In turn, Kepler's…

  1. Proceedings of the 2011 Annual Meeting of the Canadian Mathematics Education Study Group = Actes De La Rencontre Annuelle 2011 Du Groupe Canadien D'étude en Didactique Des Mathématiques (35th, St. John's, Newfoundland, Canada, June 10-14, 2011)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liljedahl, Peter, Ed.; Oesterle, Susan, Ed.; Allan, Darien, Ed.

    2012-01-01

    This submission contains the Proceedings of the 2011 Annual Meeting of the Canadian Mathematics Education Study Group (CMESG), held at Memorial University of Newfoundland in St. John's, Newfoundland. The CMESG is a group of mathematicians and mathematics educators who meet annually to discuss mathematics education issues at all levels of…

  2. Repositioning and steering laser beam power via coherent combination of multiple Airy beams.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ze; Ye, Zhuoyi; Song, Daohong; Zhang, Peng; Chen, Zhigang

    2013-12-10

    We study numerically and experimentally laser coherent combination (LCC) with multiple one- or two-dimensional Airy beams. It is shown that the method of LCC using Airy beams leads to a higher combining efficiency and a better feature of propagation than that using conventional Gaussian beams. Based on such coherent Airy beams combination, we propose a laser steering approach that could achieve large-angle beam steering (over 0.6°) without the need of using any mechanical steering component.

  3. Propagation of Airy Gaussian vortex beams in uniaxial crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weihao, Yu; Ruihuang, Zhao; Fu, Deng; Jiayao, Huang; Chidao, Chen; Xiangbo, Yang; Yanping, Zhao; Dongmei, Deng

    2016-04-01

    The propagation dynamics of the Airy Gaussian vortex beams in uniaxial crystals orthogonal to the optical axis has been investigated analytically and numerically. The propagation expression of the beams has been obtained. The propagation features of the Airy Gaussian vortex beams are shown with changes of the distribution factor and the ratio of the extraordinary refractive index to the ordinary refractive index. The correlations between the ratio and the maximum intensity value during the propagation, and its appearing distance have been investigated. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11374108, 11374107, 10904041, and 11547212), the Foundation of Cultivating Outstanding Young Scholars of Guangdong Province, China, the CAS Key Laboratory of Geospace Environment, University of Science and Technology of China, the National Training Program of Innovation and Entrepreneurship for Undergraduates (Grant No. 2015093), and the Science and Technology Projects of Guangdong Province, China (Grant No. 2013B031800011).

  4. Multi-focus of modulated polarized Airy beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Hongyang; Lin, Jie; Tan, Jiubin; Jin, Peng

    2016-07-01

    The focusing performance of a modulated polarized Airy beam is explored by using the Richards and Wolf vectorial diffraction model in a high numerical aperture system. The multiple foca appeared on the focal plane or along the optical axis when a complex amplitude modulating function was introduced. Two focusing spots with long-focal-depth were additionally observed due to the Airy beam and complex amplitude modulation. The distance between the focuses were changed from 1.15λ to 3.56λ with FWHM of 0.9λ for one-dimensional linear polarized incident beam and from 1.15λ to 3.64λ for two-dimensional beam. The multiple focusing spots are expected to apply in the field of optical trapping and particle acceleration.

  5. Propagation of Airy Gaussian vortex beams in uniaxial crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weihao, Yu; Ruihuang, Zhao; Fu, Deng; Jiayao, Huang; Chidao, Chen; Xiangbo, Yang; Yanping, Zhao; Dongmei, Deng

    2016-04-01

    The propagation dynamics of the Airy Gaussian vortex beams in uniaxial crystals orthogonal to the optical axis has been investigated analytically and numerically. The propagation expression of the beams has been obtained. The propagation features of the Airy Gaussian vortex beams are shown with changes of the distribution factor and the ratio of the extraordinary refractive index to the ordinary refractive index. The correlations between the ratio and the maximum intensity value during the propagation, and its appearing distance have been investigated. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11374108, 11374107, 10904041, and 11547212), the Foundation of Cultivating Outstanding Young Scholars of Guangdong Province, China, the CAS Key Laboratory of Geospace Environment, University of Science and Technology of China, the National Training Program of Innovation and Entrepreneurship for Undergraduates (Grant No. 2015093), and the Science and Technology Projects of Guangdong Province, China (Grant No. 2013B031800011).

  6. Interaction of Airy-Gaussian beams in saturable media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Meiling; Peng, Yulian; Chen, Chidao; Chen, Bo; Peng, Xi; Deng, Dongmei

    2016-08-01

    Based on the nonlinear Schrödinger equation, the interactions of the two Airy-Gaussian components in the incidence are analyzed in saturable media, under the circumstances of the same amplitude and different amplitudes, respectively. It is found that the interaction can be both attractive and repulsive depending on the relative phase. The smaller the interval between two Airy-Gaussian components in the incidence is, the stronger the intensity of the interaction. However, with the equal amplitude, the symmetry is shown and the change of quasi-breathers is opposite in the in-phase case and out-of-phase case. As the distribution factor is increased, the phenomena of the quasi-breather and the self-accelerating of the two Airy-Gaussian components are weakened. When the amplitude is not equal, the image does not have symmetry. The obvious phenomenon of the interaction always arises on the side of larger input power in the incidence. The maximum intensity image is also simulated. Many of the characteristics which are contained within other images can also be concluded in this figure. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11374108 and 10904041), the Foundation for the Author of Guangdong Province Excellent Doctoral Dissertation (Grant No. SYBZZXM201227), and the Foundation of Cultivating Outstanding Young Scholars (“Thousand, Hundred, Ten” Program) of Guangdong Province, China. CAS Key Laboratory of Geospace Environment, University of Science and Technology of China.

  7. Slow-light Airy wave packets and their active control via electromagnetically induced transparency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hang, Chao; Huang, Guoxiang

    2013-07-01

    We propose a scheme to generate (3+1)-dimensional slow-light Airy wave packets in a resonant Λ-type three-level atomic gas via electromagnetically induced transparency. We show that in the absence of dispersion the Airy wave packets formed by a probe field consist of two Airy wave packets accelerated in transverse directions and a longitudinal Gaussian pulse with a constant propagating velocity lowered to 10-5c (c is the light speed in vacuum). We also show that in the presence of dispersion it is possible to generate another type of slow-light Airy wave packet consisting of two Airy beams in transverse directions and an Airy wave packet in the longitudinal direction. In this case, the longitudinal velocity of the Airy wave packet can be further reduced during propagation. Additionally, we further show that the transverse accelerations (or bending) of the both types of slow-light Airy wave packets can be completely eliminated and the motional trajectories of them can be actively manipulated and controlled by using a Stern-Gerlach gradient magnetic field.

  8. Nonlinear evolution of Airy-like beams generated by modulated waveguide arrays.

    PubMed

    Cao, Zheng; Tan, Qinggui; Li, Xiaojun; Qi, Xinyuan

    2016-08-20

    We numerically study the formation of modulated waveguide generated Airy-like beams and their subsequent evolution in homogeneous medium. The results show that the Airy-like beams could be generated from narrow Gaussian beams propagating in one-dimensional transverse separation modulated unbent, cosine bent, or logarithm bent waveguide arrays, respectively. The waveguide-generated Airy-like beams maintain their characteristics when propagating without nonlinearity or under the self-defocusing nonlinearity in homogeneous medium, while the beams are distorted under the self-focusing nonlinearity. The deformation depends on the waveguide bending and the outgoing angles of the Airy-like beams. Our results provide a new way to generate and manipulate the Airy-like beam.

  9. Impacts of cross-phase modulation on modulation instability of Airy pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Yingkai; Fu, Xiquan; Bai, Yanfeng

    2016-10-01

    The modulation instability (MI) of Airy pulses with the influence of cross-phase modulation is studied based on the coupled nonlinear Schrödinger equations in nonlinear media. The main lobe of Airy pulses can be manifested as breakup of MI under interaction with higher power pumped solitons, although the power of Airy pulses is small. By comparing the main lobe's gain spectrum of MI, the gain spectrum has gradually improved with the increase of power of pumped solitons. The gain spectrum of MI of the main lobe is inversely proportional to the truncation coefficient, and then it gradually approaches to that of Gauss pulses with the truncation coefficient increasing to 1. For the side lobes of Airy pulses, there are similar MI but smaller gain spectrum than the main lobe when the pumped solitons is overlapping with corresponding ones of Airy pulses.

  10. Combination of integrated expanded bed adsorption chromatography and countercurrent chromatography for the direct extraction and purification of pseudohypericin and hypericin from St. John's wort (Hypericum perforatum L.).

    PubMed

    Cai, Fanfan; Li, Yang; Zhang, Min; Zhang, Hongyang; Wang, Yuerong; Hu, Ping

    2015-08-01

    St. John's wort has attracted particular attention because of its beneficial effects as an antidepressant, antiviral, and anticancer agent. A method for the combination of integrated expanded bed adsorption chromatography and countercurrent chromatography for the simultaneous extraction and purification of pseudohypericin and hypericin from the herb is presented in this paper. Firstly, the constituents were extracted and directly adsorbed by expanded bed adsorption chromatography under optimal conditions. The stepwise elution was then performed by expanded bed adsorption chromatography that enriched the targets with higher purities and recoveries compared to other methods. Secondly, the eluent fractions from expanded bed adsorption chromatography were further separated by two-step high-speed countercurrent chromatography. A two-step high-speed countercurrent chromatography method with a biphasic solvent system composed of n-hexane/ethyl acetate/methanol/water with a volume ratio of 1:2:1:2 was performed by stepwise changing the flow rate of the mobile phase. Consequently, 5.6 mg of pseudohypericin and 2.2 mg of hypericin with purities of 95.5 and 95.0%, respectively, were successfully obtained from 40 mg of crude sample.

  11. Quantum polarization fluctuations of an Airy beam in turbulent atmosphere in a slant path.

    PubMed

    Yin, Xia; Zhang, Licheng

    2016-07-01

    Polarization of light has many applications in quantum information processing, including quantum teleportation and dense coding. In this paper, we investigate the polarization fluctuations of Airy beams propagating in a slant turbulent channel under the "few-photon" limit. Using the quantum Stokes parameters and the quantum degree of polarization, we demonstrate that the degree of polarization of Airy beams increases significantly with the large number of the detection photons, and a higher photon-number level can retain the stability of polarization. Numerical simulations show that the longer propagation distance and the stronger turbulence will lead to less oscillatory behaviors and a decrease in the polarization degree of Airy beams, but a bigger exponential truncation factor will cause an increase in the polarization degree of Airy beams. In contrast with Gaussian beams, the degree of polarization of Airy beams is less affected by atmospheric turbulence and propagation distance under the same conditions, which means that Airy beams possess a resilient ability against turbulence-induced perturbations. These results indicate that Airy beams have great potential for applications in long-distance free-space optical communications to improve the performance of a polarization-encoded free-space quantum communication system.

  12. Quantum polarization fluctuations of an Airy beam in turbulent atmosphere in a slant path.

    PubMed

    Yin, Xia; Zhang, Licheng

    2016-07-01

    Polarization of light has many applications in quantum information processing, including quantum teleportation and dense coding. In this paper, we investigate the polarization fluctuations of Airy beams propagating in a slant turbulent channel under the "few-photon" limit. Using the quantum Stokes parameters and the quantum degree of polarization, we demonstrate that the degree of polarization of Airy beams increases significantly with the large number of the detection photons, and a higher photon-number level can retain the stability of polarization. Numerical simulations show that the longer propagation distance and the stronger turbulence will lead to less oscillatory behaviors and a decrease in the polarization degree of Airy beams, but a bigger exponential truncation factor will cause an increase in the polarization degree of Airy beams. In contrast with Gaussian beams, the degree of polarization of Airy beams is less affected by atmospheric turbulence and propagation distance under the same conditions, which means that Airy beams possess a resilient ability against turbulence-induced perturbations. These results indicate that Airy beams have great potential for applications in long-distance free-space optical communications to improve the performance of a polarization-encoded free-space quantum communication system. PMID:27409692

  13. Control on the anomalous interactions of Airy beams in nematic liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Shen, Ming; Li, Wei; Lee, Ray-Kuang

    2016-04-18

    We reveal a controllable manipulation of anomalous interactions between Airy beams in nonlocal nematic liquid crystals numerically. With the help of an in-phase fundamental Gaussian beam, attraction between in-phase Airy beams can be suppressed or become a repulsive one to each other; whereas the attraction can be strengthened when the Gaussian beam is out-of-phase. In contrast to the repulsive interaction in local media, stationary bound states of breathing Airy soliton pairs are found in nematic liquid crystals.

  14. Single pre-treatment with hypericin, a St. John's wort secondary metabolite, attenuates cisplatin- and mitoxantrone-induced cell death in A2780, A2780cis and HL-60 cells.

    PubMed

    Jendželovská, Zuzana; Jendželovský, Rastislav; Hiľovská, Lucia; Kovaľ, Ján; Mikeš, Jaromír; Fedoročko, Peter

    2014-10-01

    St. John's wort (SJW, Hypericum perforatum L.) is a commonly used natural antidepressant responsible for the altered toxicity of some anticancer agents. These interactions have been primarily attributed to the hyperforin-mediated induction of some pharmacokinetic mechanisms. However, as previously demonstrated by our group, hypericin induces the expression of two ABC transporters: multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 (MRP1) and breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP). Because cisplatin (CDDP) and mitoxantrone (MTX) are potential substrates of ABC transporters, we investigated the effect of 24h hypericin pre-treatment on the cytotoxicity of CDDP and MTX in human cancer cell lines. CDDP-sensitive and -resistant ovarian adenocarcinoma cell lines A2780/A2780cis, together with HL-60 promyelocytic leukemia cells and ABCG2-over-expressing cBCRP subclone, were used in our experiments. We present CDDP cytotoxicity attenuated by hypericin pre-treatment in both A2780 and A2780cis cells and MTX cytotoxicity in HL-60 cells. In contrast, hypericin potentiated MTX-induced death in cBCRP cells. Interestingly, hypericin did not restore cell proliferation in rescued cells. Nevertheless, hypericin did increase the expression of MRP1 transporter in A2780 and A2780cis cells indicating the impact of hypericin on certain resistance mechanisms. Additionally, our results indicate that hypericin may be the potential substrate of BCRP transporter. In conclusion, for the first time, we report the ability of hypericin to affect the onset and/or progress of CDDP- and MTX-induced cell death, despite strong cell cycle arrest. Thus, hypericin represents another SJW metabolite that might be able to affect the effectiveness of anti-cancer drugs and that could interact with ABC transporters, particularly with BCRP.

  15. Mineralogical and geochemical consequences of the long-term presence of CO2 in natural reservoirs: An example from the Springerville-St. Johns Field, Arizona, and New Mexico, U.S.A

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moore, J.; Adams, M.; Allis, R.; Lutz, S.; Rauzi, S.

    2005-01-01

    The Springerville-St. Johns CO2 field in eastern Arizona and western New Mexico is one of more than a dozen gas fields developed within the Colorado Plateau and Southern Rocky Mountain region. Extensive travertine (CaCO3) deposits record a long history of CO2 migration and leakage to the atmosphere. The oldest travertine deposits may have formed during the initial filling of the CO2 reservoir when groundwaters exsolved CO2 upon reaching the surface. The youngest travertine deposits are associated with springs on the floor of the Little Colorado River valley, but travertine deposition appears to be insignificant today. Older deposits occur up to 325 m above the valley floor. Geologic relationships suggest travertine deposition began in the late Pleistocene after volcanic activity ended at ???0.3 Ma. Most of the CaCO3 could have been derived from dissolution of the underlying limestones and dolomites. Interactions between the reservoir fluids and rocks were observed in core samples from one of the intervals that produced dry gas. These reactions resulted in the dissolution of carbonate cements and detrital feldspars and the formation of dawsonite and kaolinite. Geochemical simulations suggest that the dawsonite could have been deposited when the CO2 fugacity reached 20 bars and that the kaolinite formed as the CO2 fugacity decreased. Corrosion of drill pipe by acidic waters and a pronounced HCO3 anomaly above the CO2 reservoir provide evidence of a continuing flux of CO2 from depth. CO2 storage occurs primarily as dissolved carbonate species and as gas accumulations. Only a small percentage of the CO2 was sequestered in secondary minerals. ?? 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. 1. Historic American Buildings Survey John O. Brostrup, Photographer September ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Historic American Buildings Survey John O. Brostrup, Photographer September 17, 1936 10:45 A. M. VIEW OF 1315 4th St., S. W., FROM NORTHEAST (front) - Wheat Row, 1315 Fourth Street Southwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  17. Quantitative comparison of self-healing ability between Bessel–Gaussian beam and Airy beam

    SciTech Connect

    Wen, Wei; Chu, Xiuxiang

    2015-09-15

    The self-healing ability during propagation process is one of the most important properties of non-diffracting beams. This ability has crucial advantages to light sheet-based microscopy to reduce scattering artefacts, increase the quality of the image and enhance the resolution of microscopy. Based on similarity between two infinite-dimensional complex vectors in Hilbert space, the ability to a Bessel–Gaussian beam and an Airy beam have been studied and compared. Comparing the evolution of the similarity of Bessel–Gaussian beam with Airy beam under the same conditions, we find that Bessel–Gaussian beam has stronger self-healing ability and is more stable than that of Airy beam. To confirm this result, the intensity profiles of Bessel–Gaussian beam and Airy beam with different similarities are numerically calculated and compared.

  18. Numerical evaluation of the incomplete airy functions and their application to high frequency scattering and diffraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Constantinides, E. D.; Marhefka, R. J.

    1992-01-01

    The incomplete Airy integrals serve as canonical functions for the uniform ray optical solutions to several high frequency scattering and diffraction problems that involve a class of integrals characterized by two stationary points that are arbitrarily close to one another or to an integration endpoint. Integrals of such analytical properties describe transition region phenomena associated with composite shadow boundaries. An efficient and accurate method for computing the incomplete Airy functions would make the solutions to such problems useful for engineering purposes. Here, a convergent series solution form for the incomplete Airy functions is derived. Asymptotic expansions involving several terms were also developed and serve as large argument approximations. The combination of the series solution form with the asymptotic formulae provides for an efficient and accurate computation of the incomplete Airy functions. Validation of accuracy is accomplished using direct numerical integration data.

  19. AIRY: a complete tool for the simulation and the reconstruction of astronomical images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Camera, Andrea; Carbillet, Marcel; Olivieri, Chiara; Boccacci, Patrizia; Bertero, Mario

    2012-07-01

    The Software Package AIRY (acronym for Astronomical Image Restoration in interferometrY) is a software tool designed to perform simulation and/or deconvolution of images of Fizeau interferometers as well as of any kind of optical telescopes. AIRY is written in IDL and is a Software Package of the CADS Problem Solving Environment (PSE): it is made of a set of modules, each one representing a specific task. We present here the last version of the software, arrived at its sixth release after 10 years of development. This version of AIRY summarizes the work done in recent years by our group, both on AIRY and on AIRY-LN, the version of the software dedicated to the image restoration of LINC-NIRVANA (LN), the Fizeau interferometer of the Large Binocular Telescope (LBT). AIRY v.6.0 includes a renewed deconvolution module implementing regularizations, accelerations, and stopping criteria of standard algorithms, such as OSEM and Richardson-Lucy. Several modules of AIRY have been improved and, in particular, the one used for the extraction and extrapolatioThe Software Package AIRY (acronym for Astronomical Image Restoration in interferometrY) is a software tool designed to perform simulation and/or deconvolution of images of Fizeau interferometers as well as of any kind of optical telescopes. AIRY is written in IDL and is a Software Package of the CAOS Problem Solving Environment (PSE): it is made of a set of modules, each one representing a speci_c task. We present here the last version of the software, arrived at its sixth release after 10 years of development. This version of AIRY summarizes the work done in recent years by our group, both on AIRY and on AIRY-LN, the version of the software dedicated to the image restoration of LINC-NIRVANA (LN), the Fizeau interferometer of the Large Binocular Telescope (LBT). AIRY v.6.0 includes a renewed deconvolution module implementing regularizations, accelerations, and stopping criteria of standard algorithms, such as OSEM and

  20. Periodic inversion and phase transition of finite energy Airy beams in a medium with parabolic potential.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yiqi; Belić, Milivoj R; Zhang, Lei; Zhong, Weiping; Zhu, Dayu; Wang, Ruimin; Zhang, Yanpeng

    2015-04-20

    We study periodic inversion and phase transition of normal, displaced, and chirped finite energy Airy beams propagating in a parabolic potential. This propagation leads to an unusual oscillation: for half of the oscillation period the Airy beam accelerates in one transverse direction, with the main Airy beam lobe leading the train of pulses, whereas in the other half of the period it accelerates in the opposite direction, with the main lobe still leading - but now the whole beam is inverted. The inversion happens at a critical point, at which the beam profile changes from an Airy profile to a Gaussian one. Thus, there are two distinct phases in the propagation of an Airy beam in the parabolic potential - the normal Airy and the single-peak Gaussian phase. The length of the single-peak phase is determined by the size of the decay parameter: the smaller the decay, the smaller the length. A linear chirp introduces a transverse displacement of the beam at the phase transition point, but does not change the location of the point. A quadratic chirp moves the phase transition point, but does not affect the beam profile. The two-dimensional case is discussed briefly, being equivalent to a product of two one-dimensional cases.

  1. Polarization-controllable Airy beams generated via a photoaligned director-variant liquid crystal mask

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Bing-Yan; Chen, Peng; Hu, Wei; Ji, Wei; Zheng, Li-Yang; Ge, Shi-Jun; Ming, Yang; Chigrinov, Vladimir; Lu, Yan-Qing

    2015-12-01

    Researches on Airy beams have grown explosively since the first demonstration in 2007 due to the distinguishing properties of nondiffraction, transverse acceleration and self-healing. To date, a simple and compact approach for generating Airy beams in high quality and efficiency has remained challenging. Here, we propose and demonstrate a liquid crystal (LC) polarization Airy mask (PAM) featured by spatially variant LC azimuthal director. The PAM is fabricated through photoaligning LC via a polarization-sensitive alignment agent suophonic azo dye SD1. Thanks to the special design, a novel feature of polarization-controllable switch between dual Airy beams of orthogonal circular polarization is presented. The molecular-level continuity of LC director significantly improves the quality and efficiency of resultant Airy beams. Besides, the PAM can handle intense light due to the absence of absorptive electrodes. Additional merits of compact size, low cost and broad wavelength tolerance are also exhibited. This work settles a fundamental requirement for Airy beam applications of optical manipulations, biology science and even some uncharted territories.

  2. Polarization-controllable Airy beams generated via a photoaligned director-variant liquid crystal mask.

    PubMed

    Wei, Bing-Yan; Chen, Peng; Hu, Wei; Ji, Wei; Zheng, Li-Yang; Ge, Shi-Jun; Ming, Yang; Chigrinov, Vladimir; Lu, Yan-Qing

    2015-01-01

    Researches on Airy beams have grown explosively since the first demonstration in 2007 due to the distinguishing properties of nondiffraction, transverse acceleration and self-healing. To date, a simple and compact approach for generating Airy beams in high quality and efficiency has remained challenging. Here, we propose and demonstrate a liquid crystal (LC) polarization Airy mask (PAM) featured by spatially variant LC azimuthal director. The PAM is fabricated through photoaligning LC via a polarization-sensitive alignment agent suophonic azo dye SD1. Thanks to the special design, a novel feature of polarization-controllable switch between dual Airy beams of orthogonal circular polarization is presented. The molecular-level continuity of LC director significantly improves the quality and efficiency of resultant Airy beams. Besides, the PAM can handle intense light due to the absence of absorptive electrodes. Additional merits of compact size, low cost and broad wavelength tolerance are also exhibited. This work settles a fundamental requirement for Airy beam applications of optical manipulations, biology science and even some uncharted territories. PMID:26626737

  3. Polarization-controllable Airy beams generated via a photoaligned director-variant liquid crystal mask

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Bing-Yan; Chen, Peng; Hu, Wei; Ji, Wei; Zheng, Li-Yang; Ge, Shi-Jun; Ming, Yang; Chigrinov, Vladimir; Lu, Yan-Qing

    2015-01-01

    Researches on Airy beams have grown explosively since the first demonstration in 2007 due to the distinguishing properties of nondiffraction, transverse acceleration and self-healing. To date, a simple and compact approach for generating Airy beams in high quality and efficiency has remained challenging. Here, we propose and demonstrate a liquid crystal (LC) polarization Airy mask (PAM) featured by spatially variant LC azimuthal director. The PAM is fabricated through photoaligning LC via a polarization-sensitive alignment agent suophonic azo dye SD1. Thanks to the special design, a novel feature of polarization-controllable switch between dual Airy beams of orthogonal circular polarization is presented. The molecular-level continuity of LC director significantly improves the quality and efficiency of resultant Airy beams. Besides, the PAM can handle intense light due to the absence of absorptive electrodes. Additional merits of compact size, low cost and broad wavelength tolerance are also exhibited. This work settles a fundamental requirement for Airy beam applications of optical manipulations, biology science and even some uncharted territories. PMID:26626737

  4. Polarization-controllable Airy beams generated via a photoaligned director-variant liquid crystal mask.

    PubMed

    Wei, Bing-Yan; Chen, Peng; Hu, Wei; Ji, Wei; Zheng, Li-Yang; Ge, Shi-Jun; Ming, Yang; Chigrinov, Vladimir; Lu, Yan-Qing

    2015-12-02

    Researches on Airy beams have grown explosively since the first demonstration in 2007 due to the distinguishing properties of nondiffraction, transverse acceleration and self-healing. To date, a simple and compact approach for generating Airy beams in high quality and efficiency has remained challenging. Here, we propose and demonstrate a liquid crystal (LC) polarization Airy mask (PAM) featured by spatially variant LC azimuthal director. The PAM is fabricated through photoaligning LC via a polarization-sensitive alignment agent suophonic azo dye SD1. Thanks to the special design, a novel feature of polarization-controllable switch between dual Airy beams of orthogonal circular polarization is presented. The molecular-level continuity of LC director significantly improves the quality and efficiency of resultant Airy beams. Besides, the PAM can handle intense light due to the absence of absorptive electrodes. Additional merits of compact size, low cost and broad wavelength tolerance are also exhibited. This work settles a fundamental requirement for Airy beam applications of optical manipulations, biology science and even some uncharted territories.

  5. Enhanced and unusual angle-dependent optical forces exerted on Mie particles by Airy surface plasmon wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yang; Xue, Yanli; Li, Jiafang; Li, Zhi-Yuan

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, using an angular spectrum method, we develop an analytical theory for Airy surface plasmon wave excited in a classical Kretschmann setup. It is found that the center of an Airy surface plasmon polariton (SPP) wave has a giant positive lateral shift, and the sidelobes move forward along the surface. The intensity of the Airy SPP wave is greatly enhanced, the corresponding optical forces can be enhanced by more than one order of magnitude. Importantly, we show that the sidelobes of the Airy SPP beam can lead to the splitting of optical force spectra with the variation of incident angle, which is accompanied by strong oscillations emerging at the optimal metal layer thickness. Moreover, the effects of multiple scatterings of the Airy SPP wave between the particle and the metal layer are also discussed. The theoretical analysis could open up new perspectives for the applications of Airy beam in optical manipulation and surface-enhanced Raman scattering.

  6. Petrographic and porosimetric study of opuka stones from different construction phases of the medieval Church of the Beheading of St. John the Baptist in Dolní Chabry (Prague, Czech Republic)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidova, Katerina; Prikryl, Richard; Weishauptova, Zuzana; Racek, Martin

    2015-04-01

    Opuka as a very fine-grained sedimentary rock deposited during Upper Cretaceous in relatively shallow (hemipelagic) marine conditions in the Bohemian Cretaceous Basin (Czech Republic) represents type of natural stone that has been widely exploited and used for construction from about 9th c. AD. Romanesque churches in Prague and central Bohemia are among the first preserved structures for which the opuka has been used. Question whether very local or more distant sources have been employed represents still unsolved matter. In the recent study, we focus on the detailed analysis of specimens of opuka taken from the Church of the Beheading of St. John the Baptist in Dolní Chabry (Prague). During the previous archaeological survey of the recent church (dated to 12th c. AD), remnants (basements constructed of opuka stone) of three older churches have recognized. The aim of recent material study is recognition of similarities or differences between opuka stones coming from these different construction phases and answering a question, whether material from a single source or from different localities has been employed. The study is based on the detailed petrographic examination using four sets of techniques: (1) microscopic observation (basic optical microscopy supplemented with the electron microscopy with microanalysis and X-ray elemental mapping), (2) X-ray diffraction of insoluble residue (composition of clay fraction and detection of some less organized silica forms), (3) chemical analysis and computation of modal composition by using normative minerals based on known mineralogical composition (input from microscopy and XRD), (4) study of physical properties, specifically by means of mercury porosimetry to quantify complex pore space of these rocks. Based on the results, three basic sets of specimens have been distinguished: (1) opuka stone with low content of carbonates (22-26 wt. %) and with higher content of kaolinite and illite (both WCI and PCI), (2) opuka stone

  7. Spiral spectrum of Airy beams propagation through moderate-to-strong turbulence of maritime atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yun; Zhang, Yixin; Hu, Zhengda

    2016-05-16

    The spatial coherence radius in moderate-to-strong maritime turbulence is derived on the basis of the modified Rytov approximation. Models are developed to simulate the spiral spectrum of Airy beams propagating through moderate-to-strong maritime turbulence. In the moderate-to-strong irradiance fluctuation region, we analyze the effects of maritime turbulence on the spread of the spiral spectrum of Airy beams in a horizontal propagation path. Results indicate that the increment in the inner-scale significantly increases the received power. By contrast, the outer-scale elicits a negligible effect on the received power if the ratio of the inner-scale to the outer-scale is less than 0.01. The outer-scale affects the received power only if the ratio is greater than 0.01. The performance of a light source is essential for the received power of Airy beams carrying orbital angular momentum (OAM) through moderate-to-strong maritime turbulence. Airy beams with longer wavelengths, smaller OAM numbers, larger radii of the main ring, and smaller diameters of the circular aperture are less affected by maritime turbulence. Autofocusing of Airy beams is beneficial for the propagation of the spiral spectrum in a certain propagation distance. These results contribute to the design of optical communication systems with OAM encoding for moderate-to-strong maritime turbulence.

  8. Spiral spectrum of Airy beams propagation through moderate-to-strong turbulence of maritime atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yun; Zhang, Yixin; Hu, Zhengda

    2016-05-16

    The spatial coherence radius in moderate-to-strong maritime turbulence is derived on the basis of the modified Rytov approximation. Models are developed to simulate the spiral spectrum of Airy beams propagating through moderate-to-strong maritime turbulence. In the moderate-to-strong irradiance fluctuation region, we analyze the effects of maritime turbulence on the spread of the spiral spectrum of Airy beams in a horizontal propagation path. Results indicate that the increment in the inner-scale significantly increases the received power. By contrast, the outer-scale elicits a negligible effect on the received power if the ratio of the inner-scale to the outer-scale is less than 0.01. The outer-scale affects the received power only if the ratio is greater than 0.01. The performance of a light source is essential for the received power of Airy beams carrying orbital angular momentum (OAM) through moderate-to-strong maritime turbulence. Airy beams with longer wavelengths, smaller OAM numbers, larger radii of the main ring, and smaller diameters of the circular aperture are less affected by maritime turbulence. Autofocusing of Airy beams is beneficial for the propagation of the spiral spectrum in a certain propagation distance. These results contribute to the design of optical communication systems with OAM encoding for moderate-to-strong maritime turbulence. PMID:27409905

  9. Evolution of the ring Airy Gaussian beams with a spiral phase in the Kerr medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Bo; Chen, Chidao; Peng, Xi; Peng, Yulian; Zhou, Meiling; Deng, Dongmei; Guo, Hong

    2016-05-01

    Nonlinear optical phenomena are of great practical interest in optics. The evolution of ring Airy Gaussian beams with a spiral phase in the nonlinear Kerr medium is investigated using the nonlinear Schrödinger equation. Numerical simulations indicate that the distribution factor b can influence the formation of the ring Airy Gaussian beams. Results show that the beams can be oscillating, and the light filament can be achieved under appropriate laser input power. On the other hand, the evolution of the ring Airy Gaussian beams with a spiral phase in the nonlinear Kerr medium can be implemented, and the numerical simulations of the holographic generation of the ring Airy Gaussian vortex beams propagated in the medium demonstrate that the vortex can be preserved along the propagation. The Poynting vector shows that the energy flow of the ring Airy Gaussian beams flows in the opposite direction on both sides of the focus plane; however, for beams with a spiral phase, the flow direction remains the same; the energy flow can rotate in opposite directions on both sides of the focal plane.

  10. Optical Bloch oscillations of an Airy beam in a photonic lattice with a linear transverse index gradient.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Fajun; Li, Baoran; Wang, Meirong; Zhu, Weiren; Zhang, Peng; Liu, Sheng; Premaratne, Malin; Zhao, Jianlin

    2014-09-22

    We theoretically report the existence of optical Bloch oscillations (BO) of an Airy beam in a one-dimensional optically induced photonic lattice with a linear transverse index gradient. The Airy beam experiencing optical BO shows a more robust non-diffracting feature than its counterparts in free space or in a uniform photonic lattice. Interestingly, a periodical recurrence of Airy shape accompanied with constant alternation of its acceleration direction is also found during the BO. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the period and amplitude of BO of an Airy beam can be readily controlled over a wide range by varying the index gradient and/or the lattice period. Exploiting these features, we propose a scheme to rout an Airy beam to a predefined output channel without losing its characteristics by longitudinally modulating the transverse index gradient.

  11. John Glenn - Mini Biography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    Mini Biography of John Glenn, as it was up to 1962. From film to tape transfer of the film 'Friendship 7 - John Glenn' Depicts the historical orbital flight of John Glenn aboard 'Friendship 7', launched on February 20, 1962. Footage of staff at tracking stations worldwide and at Goddard Space Flight Center. Launch from cape canaveral. Flight tracking, re-entry, landing and recovery of Friendship 7.

  12. Optical Bloch oscillations and Zener tunneling of Airy beams in ionic-type photonic lattices.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Fajun; Zhu, Weiren; Shang, Wuyun; Wang, Meirong; Zhang, Peng; Liu, Sheng; Premaratne, Malin; Zhao, Jianlin

    2016-08-01

    We report on the existence of optical Bloch oscillations (OBOs) and Zener tunneling (ZT) of Airy beams in ionic-type photonic lattices with a refractive index ramp. Different from their counterparts in uniform lattices, Airy beams undergoing OBOs show an alternatively switched concave and convex trajectory as well as a periodical revival of input beam profiles. Moreover, the ionic-type photonic lattice established in photorefractive crystal exhibits a reconfigurable lattice structure, which provides a flexible way to tune the amplitude and period of the OBOs. Remarkably, it is demonstrated that the band gap of the lattice can be readily controlled by rotating the lattice inducing beam, which forces the ZT rate to follow two significant different decay curves amidst decreasing index gradient. Our results open up new possibilities for all-optical switching, routing and manipulation of Airy beams.

  13. Lossless Airy Surface Polaritons in a Metamaterial via Active Raman Gain

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qi; Tan, Chaohua; Huang, Guoxiang

    2016-01-01

    We propose a scheme to realize a lossless propagation of linear and nonlinear Airy surface polaritons (SPs) via active Raman gain (ARG). The system we suggest is a planar interface superposed by a negative index metamaterial (NIMM) and a dielectric, where three-level quantum emitters are doped. By using the ARG from the quantum emitters and the destructive interference effect between the electric and magnetic responses from the NIMM, we show that not only the Ohmic loss of the NIMM but also the light absorption of the quantum emitters can be completely eliminated. As a result, non-diffractive Airy SPs may propagate for very long distance without attenuation. We also show that the Kerr nonlinearity of the system can be largely enhanced due to the introduction of the quantum emitters and hence lossless Airy surface polaritonic solitons with very low power can be generated in the system. PMID:26891795

  14. Bose-Einstein condensation of {alpha} particles and Airy structure in nuclear rainbow scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Ohkubo, S.; Hirabayashi, Y.

    2004-10-01

    It is shown that the dilute density distribution of {alpha} particles in nuclei can be observed in the Airy structure in nuclear rainbow scattering. We have analyzed {alpha}+{sup 12}C rainbow scattering to the 0{sub 2}{sup +} (7.65 MeV) state of {sup 12}C in a coupled-channel method with the precise wave functions for {sup 12}C. It is found that the enhanced Airy oscillations in the experimental angular distributions for the 0{sub 2}{sup +} state is caused by the dilute density distribution of this state in agreement for the idea of Bose-Einstein condensation of the three alpha particles.

  15. On the efficient calculation of the incomplete Airy function with application to edge diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cwik, Tom

    1988-12-01

    When the geometrical theory of diffraction (GTD) and its extensions are used to calculate fields across transition regions or in focal areas, various special functions are necessary to create uniform representations. One such transition function is the incomplete Airy function, which is applicable when two reflection points are arbitrarily close to each other and the endpoint of the domain considered. An efficient calculation of the incomplete Airy function is presented and shown to equal known asymptotic expansions when its argument is away from the critical point. By using these expansions, uniform field expressions are found which are consistent with the GTD and maintain its computational efficiency.

  16. Arrays of Gaussian vortex, Bessel and Airy beams by computer-generated hologram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yang; Jiang, Bo; Lü, Shuchao; Liu, Yongqi; Li, Shasha; Cao, Zheng; Qi, Xinyuan

    2016-03-01

    We generate various kinds of arrays of Gaussian vortex, Bessel and Airy beams, respectively, with digital phase holograms (DPH) based on the fractional-Talbot effect by using the phase-only spatial light modulator (SLM). The linear and nonlinear transmissions of these beam arrays in strontium barium niobate (SBN) crystal are investigated numerically and experimentally. Compared with Gaussian vortex arrays, Bessel and Airy beam arrays can keep their patterns unchanged in over 20 mm, realizing non-diffracting transmission. The Fourier spectra (far-field diffraction patterns) of the lattices are also studied. The experimental results are in good agreement with the numerical simulations.

  17. Jasper Johns' Painted Words.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levinger, Esther

    1989-01-01

    States that the painted words in Jasper Johns' art act in two different capacities: concealed words partake in the artist's interrogation of visual perception; and visible painted words question classical representation. Argues that words are Johns' means of critiquing modernism. (RS)

  18. John Dewey, an Appreciation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clopton, Robert W.

    2015-01-01

    The subject of the annual Presidential address of Phi Kappa Phi, presented on May 8, 1962, was John Dewey. Dewey is identified in the public mind chiefly as an educational philosopher. In this address, the author describes the life and work of John Dewey as an indefatigable student of life whose interests ranged, like those of Aristotle, over the…

  19. Norm Estimations of the Modified Teodorescu Transform with Application to a Multidimensional Equation of Airy Type

    SciTech Connect

    Schlichting, A.; Sproessig, W.

    2008-09-01

    We study versions of a generalized Teodorescu transform. In the 2-dimensional case we can describe the asymptotic behaviour by the help of modified Bessel functions. In 3-dimensional case we only have an upper estimate. Such estimates are necessary to prove the convergence of a semi-discretization method for a higher-dimensional analogue of an equation of Airy's type.

  20. Astronaut John Young's Career

    NASA Video Gallery

    John Young served as a NASA astronaut for over four decades, flying on Gemini, Apollo and the Space Shuttle. He walked on the moon during Apollo 16 in 1972 and commanded the first shuttle mission, ...

  1. Commemorating John Dyson

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pittard, Julian M.

    2015-03-01

    John Dyson was born on the 7th January 1941 in Meltham Mills, West Yorkshire, England, and later grew up in Harrogate and Leeds. The proudest moment of John's early life was meeting Freddie Trueman, who became one of the greatest fast bowlers of English cricket. John used a state scholarship to study at Kings College London, after hearing a radio lecture by D. M. McKay. He received a first class BSc Special Honours Degree in Physics in 1962, and began a Ph.D. at the University of Manchester Department of Astronomy after being attracted to astronomy by an article of Zdenek Kopal in the semi-popular journal New Scientist. John soon started work with Franz Kahn, and studied the possibility that the broad emission lines seen from the Orion Nebula were due to flows driven by the photoevaporation of neutral globules embedded in a HII region. John's thesis was entitled ``The Age and Dynamics of the Orion Nebula`` and he passed his oral examination on 28th February 1966.

  2. Nonlinear plasma-assisted collapse of ring-Airy wave packets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panagiotopoulos, Paris; Couairon, Arnaud; Kolesik, Miroslav; Papazoglou, Dimitris G.; Moloney, Jerome V.; Tzortzakis, Stelios

    2016-03-01

    We numerically demonstrate that femtosecond ring-Airy wave packets are able to overcome the reference intensity clamping of 4 ×1013 W/cm2 for filaments generated with Gaussian beams at low numerical apertures and form an intense sharp intensity peak on axis. Numerical simulations, with unidirectional propagation models for the pulse envelope and the carrier resolved electric field, reveal that the driving mechanism for this unexpected intensity increase is due to the self-generated plasma. The plasma formation, in conjunction with the circular geometry of the beam, force the wave packet into a multistage collapse process which takes place faster than the saturating mechanisms can compensate. We report here a nonstandard mechanism that increases the intensity of a collapsing wave packet, due to the joint contributions of the cubic phase of the Airy beam and the formation of a partially reflecting plasma.

  3. Wavelength estimation by using the Airy disk from a diffraction pattern with didactic purposes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivera-Ortega, Uriel; Pico-Gonzalez, Beatriz

    2016-01-01

    In this paper a simple and easy to implement method that uses the Airy disk generated from a Fraunhofer diffraction pattern due to a circular aperture will be used to estimate the wavelength of the illuminating laser source. This estimation is based on the measurement of the Airy disk diameter, whose approximation is directly proportional to the wavelength of the light source and to the distance between the aperture and the image plane; and inversely proportional to the diameter of the aperture. Due to the characteristics and versatility of the present proposal, this is perfectly suitable for use in graduate or undergraduate physics laboratories, or even in classrooms for educational and/or demonstrative purposes.

  4. A compact Airy beam light sheet microscope with a tilted cylindrical lens.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhengyi; Prokopas, Martynas; Nylk, Jonathan; Coll-Lladó, Clara; Gunn-Moore, Frank J; Ferrier, David E K; Vettenburg, Tom; Dholakia, Kishan

    2014-10-01

    Light-sheet imaging is rapidly gaining importance for imaging intact biological specimens. Many of the latest innovations rely on the propagation-invariant Bessel or Airy beams to form an extended light sheet to provide high resolution across a large field of view. Shaping light to realize propagation-invariant beams often relies on complex programming of spatial light modulators or specialized, custom made, optical elements. Here we present a straightforward and low-cost modification to the traditional light-sheet setup, based on the open-access light-sheet microscope OpenSPIM, to achieve Airy light-sheet illumination. This brings wide field single-photon light-sheet imaging to a broader range of endusers. Fluorescent microspheres embedded in agarose and a zebrafish larva were imaged to demonstrate how such a microscope can have a minimal footprint and cost without compromising on imaging quality.

  5. Nonlinear dynamics of Airy-vortex 3D wave packets: emission of vortex light waves.

    PubMed

    Driben, Rodislav; Meier, Torsten

    2014-10-01

    The dynamics of 3D Airy-vortex wave packets is studied under the action of strong self-focusing Kerr nonlinearity. Emissions of nonlinear 3D waves out of the main wave packets with the topological charges were demonstrated. Because of the conservation of the total angular momentum, charges of the emitted waves are equal to those carried by the parental light structure. The rapid collapse imposes a severe limitation on the propagation of multidimensional waves in Kerr media. However, the structure of the Airy beam carrier allows the coupling of light from the leading, most intense peak into neighboring peaks and consequently strongly postpones the collapse. The dependence of the critical input amplitude for the appearance of a fast collapse on the beam width is studied for wave packets with zero and nonzero topological charges. Wave packets carrying angular momentum are found to be much more resistant to the rapid collapse.

  6. Dynamics of Finite Energy Airy Beams Carrying Orbital Angular Momentum in Multilevel Atomic Vapors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Zhenkun; Wang, Shun; Hu, Weifei; Gu, Yuzong

    2016-10-01

    We numerically investigate the dynamics of inward circular finite-energy Airy beams carrying different orbital angular momentum (OAM) numbers in a close-Λ three-level atomic vapor with the electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) window. We report that due to the EIT induced by the microwave field, the transverse intensity distribution properties of Airy beam can be feasibly manipulated and modulated through adjusting OAM numbers l and the frequency detuning, as well as the propagation distance, in the multi-level atomic systems. What's more, the rotation of the beam also can be observed with different positions in atomic ensembles. The investigation may provide a useful tool for studying particle manipulation, signal processing and propagation in graded-index (GRIN) fibers.

  7. A compact Airy beam light sheet microscope with a tilted cylindrical lens

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhengyi; Prokopas, Martynas; Nylk, Jonathan; Coll-Lladó, Clara; Gunn-Moore, Frank J.; Ferrier, David E. K.; Vettenburg, Tom; Dholakia, Kishan

    2014-01-01

    Light-sheet imaging is rapidly gaining importance for imaging intact biological specimens. Many of the latest innovations rely on the propagation-invariant Bessel or Airy beams to form an extended light sheet to provide high resolution across a large field of view. Shaping light to realize propagation-invariant beams often relies on complex programming of spatial light modulators or specialized, custom made, optical elements. Here we present a straightforward and low-cost modification to the traditional light-sheet setup, based on the open-access light-sheet microscope OpenSPIM, to achieve Airy light-sheet illumination. This brings wide field single-photon light-sheet imaging to a broader range of endusers. Fluorescent microspheres embedded in agarose and a zebrafish larva were imaged to demonstrate how such a microscope can have a minimal footprint and cost without compromising on imaging quality. PMID:25360362

  8. A compact Airy beam light sheet microscope with a tilted cylindrical lens.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhengyi; Prokopas, Martynas; Nylk, Jonathan; Coll-Lladó, Clara; Gunn-Moore, Frank J; Ferrier, David E K; Vettenburg, Tom; Dholakia, Kishan

    2014-10-01

    Light-sheet imaging is rapidly gaining importance for imaging intact biological specimens. Many of the latest innovations rely on the propagation-invariant Bessel or Airy beams to form an extended light sheet to provide high resolution across a large field of view. Shaping light to realize propagation-invariant beams often relies on complex programming of spatial light modulators or specialized, custom made, optical elements. Here we present a straightforward and low-cost modification to the traditional light-sheet setup, based on the open-access light-sheet microscope OpenSPIM, to achieve Airy light-sheet illumination. This brings wide field single-photon light-sheet imaging to a broader range of endusers. Fluorescent microspheres embedded in agarose and a zebrafish larva were imaged to demonstrate how such a microscope can have a minimal footprint and cost without compromising on imaging quality. PMID:25360362

  9. Constraints on Airy function zeros from quantum-mechanical sum rules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belloni, M.; Robinett, R. W.

    2009-02-01

    We derive new constraints on the zeros of Airy functions by using the so-called quantum bouncer system to evaluate quantum-mechanical sum rules and perform perturbation theory calculations for the Stark effect. Using commutation and completeness relations, we show how to systematically evaluate sums of the form Sp(n) = ∑k≠n1/(ζk - ζn)p, for natural p > 1, where -ζn is the nth zero of Ai(ζ).

  10. Shaping symmetric Airy beam through binary amplitude modulation for ultralong needle focus

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, Zhao-Xiang; Gong, Lei; Ren, Yu-Xuan; Vaveliuk, Pablo; Chen, Yue; Lu, Rong-De

    2015-11-28

    Needle-like electromagnetic field has various advantages for the applications in high-resolution imaging, Raman spectroscopy, as well as long-distance optical transportation. The realization of such field often requires high numerical aperture (NA) objective lens and the transmission masks. We demonstrate an ultralong needle-like focus in the optical range produced with an ordinary lens. This is achieved by focusing a symmetric Airy beam (SAB) generated via binary spectral modulation with a digital micromirror device. Such amplitude modulation technique is able to shape traditional Airy beams, SABs, as well as the dynamic transition modes between the one-dimensional and two-dimensional (2D) symmetric Airy modes. The created 2D SAB was characterized through measurement of the propagating fields with one of the four main lobes blocked by an opaque mask. The 2D SAB was verified to exhibit self-healing property against propagation with the obstructed major lobe reconstructed after a certain distance. We further produced an elongated focal line by concentrating the SAB via lenses with different NAs and achieved an ultralong longitudinal needle focus. The produced long needle focus will be applied in optical, chemical, and biological sciences.

  11. Interpolation between Airy and Poisson statistics for unitary chiral non-Hermitian random matrix ensembles

    SciTech Connect

    Akemann, G.; Bender, M.

    2010-10-15

    We consider a family of chiral non-Hermitian Gaussian random matrices in the unitarily invariant symmetry class. The eigenvalue distribution in this model is expressed in terms of Laguerre polynomials in the complex plane. These are orthogonal with respect to a non-Gaussian weight including a modified Bessel function of the second kind, and we give an elementary proof for this. In the large n limit, the eigenvalue statistics at the spectral edge close to the real axis are described by the same family of kernels interpolating between Airy and Poisson that was recently found by one of the authors for the elliptic Ginibre ensemble. We conclude that this scaling limit is universal, appearing for two different non-Hermitian random matrix ensembles with unitary symmetry. As a second result we give an equivalent form for the interpolating Airy kernel in terms of a single real integral, similar to representations for the asymptotic kernel in the bulk and at the hard edge of the spectrum. This makes its structure as a one-parameter deformation of the Airy kernel more transparent.

  12. 3. Historic American Buildings Survey Richard Koch, Photographer, April, 1934 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Historic American Buildings Survey Richard Koch, Photographer, April, 1934 SOUTHWEST ELEVATION - Angelina Plantation (Dove Cote & Doll House), State Highway 1, Mount Airy, St. John the Baptist Parish, LA

  13. 4. Historic American Buildings Survey Richard Koch, Photographer, Circa 1925 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. Historic American Buildings Survey Richard Koch, Photographer, Circa 1925 FIREPLACE IN DOLL HOUSE - Angelina Plantation (Dove Cote & Doll House), State Highway 1, Mount Airy, St. John the Baptist Parish, LA

  14. 1. Historic American Buildings Survey Richard Koch, Photographer, Circa 1925 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Historic American Buildings Survey Richard Koch, Photographer, Circa 1925 DOVE COTE AND DOLL HOUSE - Angelina Plantation (Dove Cote & Doll House), State Highway 1, Mount Airy, St. John the Baptist Parish, LA

  15. 2. Historic American Buildings Survey Richard Koch, Photographer, April, 1934 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Historic American Buildings Survey Richard Koch, Photographer, April, 1934 SOUTHWEST ELEVATION - Angelina Plantation (Dove Cote & Doll House), State Highway 1, Mount Airy, St. John the Baptist Parish, LA

  16. 5. Historic American Buildings Survey Richard Koch, Photographer, March, 1934 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. Historic American Buildings Survey Richard Koch, Photographer, March, 1934 VIEW FROM NORTH WEST - Angelina Plantation (Dove Cote & Doll House), State Highway 1, Mount Airy, St. John the Baptist Parish, LA

  17. Who Killed John Keats?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leal, Amy

    2007-01-01

    Two months before he died, John Keats claimed he had been poisoned. Although most scholars and biographers have attributed Keats's fears of persecution, betrayal, and murder to consumptive dementia, Keats's suspicions had begun long before 1820 and were not without some justification. In this article, the author talks about the death of John…

  18. Conversations with John Williams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sullivan, Jack

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the author shares the views of John Williams, Hollywood's premier composer, who has written more than 300 scores, about the future of classical and film music. A gregarious person in a field requiring monklike isolation, Williams values the "association with the soloists, and the wonderful inspiration from players." His…

  19. John Carroll University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dean, Kathleen Lis; Rombalski, Patrick; O'Dell, Kyle

    2009-01-01

    John Carroll University (JCU) is a Jesuit Catholic institution located in University Heights, approximately 10 miles east of Cleveland, Ohio. Founded in 1888, the university has a population of 3,400 undergraduates and 800 graduate students. The Division of Student Affairs at JCU comprises 11 units. The mission of the division is the same as that…

  20. Peter Pindar (John Wolcot).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vales, Robert L.

    This book is designed as an introduction to John Wolcot's works for the general reader, the college student, and the college teacher. Wolcot, whose pen name was Peter Pindar, wrote topical satire on public personalities of the eighteenth century, and his methods of criticism are the motif which guides each chapter and which unites all the satires…

  1. Sir John Meurig Thomas.

    PubMed

    Thomas, John Meurig

    2013-10-11

    "My greatest achievement has been to combine being a teacher, a researcher, and a popularizer of science for over 50 years. My worst nightmare is to find myself dumbstruck when I am about to give a lecture …︁" This and more about Sir John Meurig Thomas can be found on page 10938.

  2. John Glenn's Space Ride.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schamel, Wynell; Potter, Lee Ann

    1998-01-01

    Reviews the accomplishments of John Glenn as a pilot, astronaut, senator, and pioneer in relation to his 1998 flight that made him the oldest person to ever travel into space. Includes photographs for students to study, and recommends classroom activities related to Glenn's career. (DSK)

  3. The John Muir Award.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Graham

    2002-01-01

    The John Muir Award was established in the United Kingdom to respond to minimal environmental awareness, especially among youth. The Award has three levels of effort; all involve discovering a wild place, exploring its wildness, helping to conserve it, and sharing the experience with a wider audience. There is an effort to establish the award in…

  4. John Galen Howard.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Draper, Joan

    1979-01-01

    A biographical sketch of John Galen Howard, founder of the Department of Architecture at the University of California at Berkeley, is presented. Howard's conservative outlook and idealistic nature are examined and his influence on the curriculum at the university is traced. (PHR)

  5. Obituary: John Louis Perdrix, 1926-2005

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orchiston, D. Wayne

    2006-12-01

    journals appeared under the banner of his own publishing house, Astral Press, until 2005 when JAH2 was transferred to the Centre of Astronomy at James Cook University. When cancer was first diagnosed, this did not deter John, and he continued to pursue his astronomical and editorial interests. Early in 2005 the cancer was in remission and John decided to make one final overseas trip, a long-anticipated visit to St. Petersburg. It was while he was returning to Australia that the illness aggressively reappeared, and he was taken off the airplane at Dubai and died peacefully in Rashid Hospital three days later. He was just three days short of his seventy-ninth birthday. Always the consummate gentleman, John Perdrix had a keen sense of humor and was wonderful company. He will be greatly missed by all who knew him. Our condolences go to his six children, Louise, John, Timothy, Fleur, Lisa and Angella.

  6. John McCain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phi Delta Kappan, 2008

    2008-01-01

    This article presents speeches describing John McCain's position on education posted on the McCain campaign's official web site, www.johnmccain.com. These include McCain's speech to LaRaza convention, July 14; McCain's speech to the NAACP, July 16; McCain's speech at the Greater Columbus (Ohio) Convention Center, May 15; and McCain's speech at…

  7. Coherent mid-infrared supercontinuum generation with As2Se3 photonic crystal fiber and femtosecond Airy pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Wu

    2015-12-01

    We discuss a novel method for generating hyper-broadband mid-infrared (MIR) supercontinua (SC) with coherent bandwidth from ~2 μm to ~10 μm by using As2Se3 photonic crystal fiber (PCF) and a 4.1 μm pump with femtosecond (fs) Airy pulse profile. Our simulations confirm that, when pumping in the normal dispersion region, the deceleration and self-healing properties of the Airy pulse can suppress the incoherent noise in modulational instability (MI) induced SC generation and maintain the pulse coherence over a long propagation distance. We also find that fs Airy pulse can generate an MIR SC with a broader coherent bandwidth than these can be achieved with fs parabolic secant pulse.

  8. Results from the Pronghorn field test using passive infrared spectroradiometers-CATSI and AIRIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, James O.; Theriault, Jean-Marc; Bradette, Claude; Gittins, Christopher M.; Marinelli, William J.

    2002-02-01

    The Pronghorn Field Tests were held at the Nevada Test Site for a two-week period in June 2001. Two passive infrared sensors were tested for inclusion into the Joint Service Wide Area Detection Program. The Adaptive InfraRed Imaging Spectroradiometer (AIRIS) and Compact ATmospheric Sounding Interferometer (CATSI) systems were tested with good results. This field test was a joint effort between the U.S (SBCCOM) and Canada (DREV). Various chemicals were detected and quantified from a distance of 1.5 kilometers. Passive ranging of Chemical Plumes was demonstrated.

  9. Results of the Pronghorn field test using passive infrared spectroradiometers: CATSI and AIRIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, James O.; Theriault, Jean-Marc; Bradette, Claude; Gittins, Christopher M.; Marinelli, William J.

    2002-08-01

    The Pronghorn Field Tests were held at the Nevada Test Site for a two-week period in June 2001. Two passive infrared sensors were tested for inclusion into the Joint Service Wide Area Detection Program. The Adaptive InfraRed Imaging Spectroradiometer (AIRIS) and Compact Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (CATSI) systems were tested with good results. This field test was a joint effort between the US (SBCCOM) and Canada (DREV). Various chemicals were detected and quantified from a distance of 1.5 kilometers. Passive ranging of Chemical Plumes was demonstrated.

  10. Airy Equation for the Topological String Partition Function in a Scaling Limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alim, Murad; Yau, Shing-Tung; Zhou, Jie

    2016-06-01

    We use the polynomial formulation of the holomorphic anomaly equations governing perturbative topological string theory to derive the free energies in a scaling limit to all orders in perturbation theory for any Calabi-Yau threefold. The partition function in this limit satisfies an Airy differential equation in a rescaled topological string coupling. One of the two solutions of this equation gives the perturbative expansion and the other solution provides geometric hints of the non-perturbative structure of topological string theory. Both solutions can be expanded naturally around strong coupling.

  11. Two-dimensional χ2 solitons generated by the downconversion of Airy waves.

    PubMed

    Mayteevarunyoo, Thawatchai; Malomed, Boris A

    2016-07-01

    Conversion of truncated Airy waves (AWs) carried by the second-harmonic (SH) component into axisymmetric χ2 solitons is considered in a 2D system with quadratic nonlinearity. The spontaneous conversion is driven by the parametric instability of the SH wave. The input in the form of the AW vortex is also considered. As a result, one, two, or three stable solitons emerge in a well-defined form, unlike the recently studied 1D setting, where the picture is obscured by radiation jets. Shares of the total power captured by the emerging solitons and conversion efficiency are found as functions of parameters of the AW input. PMID:27367065

  12. Test drilling and aquifer test in the Marburg schist near Mount Airy, Frederick County, Maryland

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meyer, Gerald

    1955-01-01

    This memorandum summarizes briefly the data obtained by test drilling and in an aquifer test at Mount Airy, Md. The tests were a part of the State - Federal cooperative study of the ground-water resources of Frederick County, and it is intended that a more complete analysis of the test data will be included in a future report describing the ground-water resource of Frederick County. The purpose of this memorandum is to make the test data immediately available to the general public. Mount Airy is located along the Carroll-Frederick County boundary bout 2 miles north of the intersection of U.S. Highway 40 with the county boundary. Its population is approximately 1,000. The municipal well field, consisting of two drilled wells (fig. 1) is in a valley about one-half mile west of the center of Mount Airy, within about 400 feet of a small stream, and north of Prospect Road. Well 1, about 40 feet north of Prospect Road, is 125 feet deep, 8 inches in diameter, and reportedly yielded 265 gallons per minute (gpm) in 1947 and 201 gpm in a half hour test in March 1955. The writer determined during the tests described in this memorandum that the well has about 34 feet of casing. Well 2, 85 feet north of well 1, is 96 feet deep, 8 inches in diameter, and reportedly yielded 120 gpm in 1947 and 127 gpm in a half hour test in March 1955. The wells are equipped with deep-well turbine pumps powered by electric motors. Cenorally only well 1 is used, and it is pumped for only a few short intervals each day to meet the water requirements of the town (about 75,000 - 80,000 gallons daily). The reported yields of these wells are considerably higher than the average for crystalline-rock wells in the Piedmont of Maryland. The test drilling was done under contract with Edward I. Brown, well driller, between May 3 and May 12, 1955. Water-supply facilities of the town of Mount Airy were kindly made available for the aquifer tests from May 22 to May 30, 1955. The pumping tests consisted of a

  13. Diffraction by three-dimensional slit-shape curves: decomposition in terms of Airy and Pearcey functions.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Vara, P; Barranco, J Silva; De Los Santos G, S I; Munoz-Lopez, J; Torres-Rodriguez, M A; Xique, R Suarez; Martinez-Niconoff, G

    2015-08-01

    We analyze the diffraction field generated by coherent illumination of a three-dimensional transmittance characterized by a slit-shape curve. Generic features are obtained using the Frenet-Serret equations, which allow a decomposition of the optical field. The analysis is performed by describing the influence of the curvature and torsion on osculating, normal, and rectifying planes. We show that the diffracted field has a decomposition in three optical fields propagating along three optical axes that are mutually perpendicular. The decomposition is in terms of the Pearcey and Airy functions, and the generalized Airy function. Experimental results are shown. PMID:26258341

  14. The impact of missing data on clinical trials: A re-analysis of a placebo controlled trial of hypericum perforatum (St Johns Wort) and sertraline in Major Depressive Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Grobler, Anneke C; Matthews, Glenda; Molenberghs, Geert

    2014-01-01

    Rationale and objective Hypericum perforatum (St John’s Wort) is used to treat depression, but the effectiveness has not been established. Recent guidelines described the analysis of clinical trials with missing data, inspiring the re-analysis of this trial using proper missing data methods. The objective was to determine whether hypericum was superior to placebo in treating major depression. Methods A placebo-controlled, randomized clinical trial was conducted for 8 weeks to determine the effectiveness of hypericum or sertraline in reducing depression, measured using the Hamilton depression scale. We performed sensitivity analyses under different assumptions about the missing data process. Results 340 participants were randomized, with 28% lost to follow-up. The missing data mechanism was not missing completely at random. Under missing at random assumptions, some sensitivity analyses found no difference between either treatment arm and placebo, while some sensitivity analyses found a significant difference between sertraline and placebo (95% credible interval [−0.31;−0.01]), but not between hypericum and placebo [−0.08;0.22]. The results were similar when the missing data process was assumed to be missing not at random (95%credible interval for week by sertraline interaction [−0.31;−0.01]; week by hypericum interaction [−0.08;0.22]). Conclusions There is no difference between hypericum and placebo, regardless of the assumption about the missing data process. There is a significant difference between sertraline and placebo with some statistical methods used. It is important to conduct an analysis that takes account of missing data using valid statistically principled methods. The assumptions about the missing data process could influence the results. PMID:24232445

  15. John Campbell Begg

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Robert

    2002-03-01

    John Campbell Begg born in Dunedin in 1876 was the son of Alexander Campbell Begg and Katherine Begg, early Otago settlers. He studied physics and philosophy at the University of Otago before turning to business and rural pursuits. He died in Dunedin in 1965 age 89. The Begg family were foundation members of the Otago Astronomical Society. Visits to the Tanna Hill Observatory were made in 1915. The astronomical observatory which stands in Robin Hood Park, Roslyn, Dunedin bears his name; Beverly Begg Observatory

  16. Marcel Breuer at Saint John's

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlson, Scott

    2008-01-01

    A visitor to Saint John's University and Saint John's Abbey, in north-central Minnesota, sees something of Gothic heritage while standing in front of the abbey church, designed and built around 1960. The church's 112-foot campanile--a trapezoidal slab made of 2,500 tons of steel and concrete--stands boldly in front of a huge concrete honeycomb…

  17. John Bartlett and bioterrorism.

    PubMed

    Henderson, D A

    2014-09-15

    Until 1997, the subject of bioterrorism was not discussed within the medical community and deliberately ignored in national planning efforts. Biological weapons were regarded as "morally repulsive." This complacency stemmed from a 1972 Biological Weapons Convention where all countries agreed to cease offensive biological weapons research. In the 1990s, however, the Soviet Union was discovered to have an extensive bioweapons program and a Japanese religious cult sought to launch an anthrax attack on Tokyo. Biological weapons such as smallpox and anthrax had the potential to cause a national catastrophe. However, little was done until John Bartlett in 1997 led a symposium and program to educate the medical community and the country of the need for definitive bioweapons programs. It was highly persuasive and received a final stimulus when the anthrax attack occurred in the United States in 2001.

  18. JOHN MUIR WILDERNESS, CALIFORNIA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dellinger, David A.; Johnson, Frederick L.

    1984-01-01

    The mineral survey of the John Muir Wilderness, California revealed eight areas of probable and substantiated potential for the occurrence of mineral resources. Tungsten, with accompanying resources of gold, copper, silver, and molybdenum, is found along contacts between granitic rocks and metamorphosed calcareous sedimentary rocks; it is estimated that more than 1 million tons of demonstrated tungsten resources exist in areas of sustantiated resource potential within the wilderness. Resources of gold, silver, lead, copper, zinc, molydenum, and cobalt, occur in small deposits not associated with tungsten; however, the known deposits of these commodities are small and the possibility of the occurrence of larger ones is unlikely. The geologic setting precludes the presence of fossil fuel resources.

  19. John Bartlett and bioterrorism.

    PubMed

    Henderson, D A

    2014-09-15

    Until 1997, the subject of bioterrorism was not discussed within the medical community and deliberately ignored in national planning efforts. Biological weapons were regarded as "morally repulsive." This complacency stemmed from a 1972 Biological Weapons Convention where all countries agreed to cease offensive biological weapons research. In the 1990s, however, the Soviet Union was discovered to have an extensive bioweapons program and a Japanese religious cult sought to launch an anthrax attack on Tokyo. Biological weapons such as smallpox and anthrax had the potential to cause a national catastrophe. However, little was done until John Bartlett in 1997 led a symposium and program to educate the medical community and the country of the need for definitive bioweapons programs. It was highly persuasive and received a final stimulus when the anthrax attack occurred in the United States in 2001. PMID:25151482

  20. Propagation of an Airy-Gaussian vortex beam in linear and nonlinear media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chidao; Peng, Xi; Chen, Bo; Peng, Yulian; Zhou, Meiling; Yang, Xiangbo; Deng, Dongmei

    2016-05-01

    We investigate the propagation of an Airy-Gaussian vortex (AiGV) beam in free space and Kerr media. It is interesting to see that the beam will perform self-healing and main lobe focusing both in free space and Kerr media when the vortex locates at the center of the plane. By controlling the number of the topological charge, the beam distribution factor χ 0 and the position of the vortex, we can control the intensity distribution of the AiGV beam in the out plane both in free space and Kerr media. It is found that when the vortex is close to the center of the plane, it has a strong effect on the intensity distribution of the beam. When the beam propagates in the number of the topological charge, the partial collapse will take place even with low initial input power. We find that the main lobe focusing contributes to this partial collapse.

  1. Predicting the past: ancient eclipses and Airy, Newcomb, and Huxley on the authority of science.

    PubMed

    Stanley, Matthew

    2012-06-01

    Greek historical accounts of ancient eclipses were an important, if peculiar, focus of scientific attention in the nineteenth century. Victorian-era astronomers tried to correct the classical histories using scientific methods, then used those histories as data with which to calibrate their lunar theories, then rejected the histories as having any relevance at all. The specific dating of these eclipses--apparently a simple exercise in celestial mechanics--became bound up with tensions between scientific and humanistic approaches to the past as well as with wider social debates over the power and authority of science in general. The major figures discussed here, including G. B. Airy, Simon Newcomb, and T. H. Huxley, argued that the critical question was whether science could speak authoritatively about the past. To them, the ability of science to talk about the past indicated its power to talk about the future; it was also the fulcrum of fierce boundary disputes among science, history, and religion.

  2. Chirped self-healing Airy pulses compression in silicon waveguides under fourth-order dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandeng Mandeng, Lucien; Tchawoua, Clément

    2013-03-01

    We present the compression of Airy pulses in silicon-on-insulator (SOI) waveguides under the fourth-order dispersion (FOD) using the variational approach that involves Rayleigh's dissipation function (RDF). All the pulse characteristics are under the influence of the two-photon and the frequency-carrier absorptions. In a quasi-linear approximation, the pulse compression conditions induced by the interaction of the group-velocity dispersion (GVD), the chirp and the FOD are derived. In the nonlinear case, the self-phase modulation (SPM), the two-photon absorption (TPA) and the free-carrier absorption (FCA) reduce the length of compression in a propagation regime of normal GVD, positive chirp and a negative value of FOD. The TPA reduces the maximal power reached than the SPM while the FCA rather increases its value. These results are confirmed in the general case where they all interact with the linear dispersion terms of the SOI waveguide.

  3. Predicting the past: ancient eclipses and Airy, Newcomb, and Huxley on the authority of science.

    PubMed

    Stanley, Matthew

    2012-06-01

    Greek historical accounts of ancient eclipses were an important, if peculiar, focus of scientific attention in the nineteenth century. Victorian-era astronomers tried to correct the classical histories using scientific methods, then used those histories as data with which to calibrate their lunar theories, then rejected the histories as having any relevance at all. The specific dating of these eclipses--apparently a simple exercise in celestial mechanics--became bound up with tensions between scientific and humanistic approaches to the past as well as with wider social debates over the power and authority of science in general. The major figures discussed here, including G. B. Airy, Simon Newcomb, and T. H. Huxley, argued that the critical question was whether science could speak authoritatively about the past. To them, the ability of science to talk about the past indicated its power to talk about the future; it was also the fulcrum of fierce boundary disputes among science, history, and religion. PMID:22908421

  4. Sharply autofocused ring-Airy beams transforming into non-linear intense light bullets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panagiotopoulos, P.; Papazoglou, D. G.; Couairon, A.; Tzortzakis, S.

    2013-10-01

    Controlling the propagation of intense optical wavepackets in transparent media is not a trivial task. During propagation, low- and high-order non-linear effects, including the Kerr effect, multiphoton absorption and ionization, lead to an uncontrolled complex reshaping of the optical wavepacket that involves pulse splitting, refocusing cycles in space and significant variations of the focus. Here we demonstrate both numerically and experimentally that intense, abruptly autofocusing beams in the form of accelerating ring-Airy beams are able to reshape into non-linear intense light-bullet wavepackets propagating over extended distances, while their positioning in space is extremely well defined. These unique wavepackets can offer significant advantages in numerous fields such as the generation of high harmonics and attosecond physics or the precise micro-engineering of materials.

  5. John M. Eisenberg, MD.

    PubMed

    Eisenberg, J M

    1995-08-01

    The complicated interaction between government, academic medical centers, health care payers, and burgeoning market forces has tested the leadership skills of a generation of academicians with little formal training in economics. The emergence of a new breed of physician investigator with solid business credentials has therefore proved attractive to many segments of the medical community. John M. Eisenberg received his MD from Washington University in 1972, his MBA from the Wharton School in 1976, and shortly thereafter headed the division of general internal medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. In addition to championing the role of the generalist in health care delivery, Eisenberg has also played a major part in the reformation of Medicare reimbursement. He has been a commissioner on the Congressional Physician Payment Review Commission since 1986, serving as chairman since 1993. After assuming the chairmanship of the department of medicine at Georgetown University in 1992, Eisenberg served as an advisor to the Clinton administration during its efforts towards national health care reform. Interviewed in his office in Georgetown, Eisenberg reflected on the economic forces twisting post-graduate medical education, the role of non-physician providers in future health care delivery, and the evolving relationship between specialists and generalists. PMID:7552581

  6. Searching for John Goodricke

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    French, Linda M.

    2010-01-01

    John Goodricke (1764-1786) is one of the most intriguing and enigmatic figures in the history of astronomy. Deaf from the age of five, his observations of the light variation of Algol brought him acclaim and the Copley Medal of the Royal Society by the age of nineteen. Together with his neighbor, mentor, and distant relative Edward Pigott, he went on to discover and quantify the light variations of other stars, including Delta Cephei. Goodricke's careful accounts of his observations, and their accuracy, remain a model of clear scientific thinking and reporting. Goodricke's career was short, as was his time on Earth: he died before his 22nd birthday. He left few personal notes or letters, and even many basic circumstances of his life have been misunderstood or misinterpreted. I will discuss Goodricke's apparent change of mind regarding the variations of Algol. I will further describe recent research into his family circumstances and into the allegation advanced by Zdenek Kopal in the 1980s that Goodricke was buried apart from his family because they were ashamed of his deafness.

  7. 33 CFR 117.325 - St. Johns River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... on both the upstream and downstream sides of the bridge flash “Bridge Coming Down,” the lights go to... no vessels under the draw. The draw remains down for a period of eight minutes or while the...

  8. 33 CFR 117.325 - St. Johns River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... on both the upstream and downstream sides of the bridge flash “Bridge Coming Down,” the lights go to... no vessels under the draw. The draw remains down for a period of eight minutes or while the...

  9. 33 CFR 110.73 - St. Johns River, Fla.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... latitude 30°15′11″, longitude 81°41′23″; thence to latitude 30°15′13″, longitude 81°41′14″; thence to latitude 30°15′03″, longitude 81°41′11″; thence to latitude 30°15′04″, longitude 81°41′20″; and thence to... latitude 30°15′03″, longitude 81°41′28″; thence to latitude 30°15′02″, longitude 81°41′10″; thence...

  10. 33 CFR 110.73 - St. Johns River, Fla.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... latitude 30°15′11″, longitude 81°41′23″; thence to latitude 30°15′13″, longitude 81°41′14″; thence to latitude 30°15′03″, longitude 81°41′11″; thence to latitude 30°15′04″, longitude 81°41′20″; and thence to... latitude 30°15′03″, longitude 81°41′28″; thence to latitude 30°15′02″, longitude 81°41′10″; thence...

  11. 33 CFR 110.73 - St. Johns River, Fla.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... latitude 30°15′11″, longitude 81°41′23″; thence to latitude 30°15′13″, longitude 81°41′14″; thence to latitude 30°15′03″, longitude 81°41′11″; thence to latitude 30°15′04″, longitude 81°41′20″; and thence to... latitude 30°15′03″, longitude 81°41′28″; thence to latitude 30°15′02″, longitude 81°41′10″; thence...

  12. 33 CFR 110.73 - St. Johns River, Fla.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... latitude 30°15′11″, longitude 81°41′23″; thence to latitude 30°15′13″, longitude 81°41′14″; thence to latitude 30°15′03″, longitude 81°41′11″; thence to latitude 30°15′04″, longitude 81°41′20″; and thence to... latitude 30°15′03″, longitude 81°41′28″; thence to latitude 30°15′02″, longitude 81°41′10″; thence...

  13. 33 CFR 110.73 - St. Johns River, Fla.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... latitude 30°15′11″, longitude 81°41′23″; thence to latitude 30°15′13″, longitude 81°41′14″; thence to latitude 30°15′03″, longitude 81°41′11″; thence to latitude 30°15′04″, longitude 81°41′20″; and thence to... latitude 30°15′03″, longitude 81°41′28″; thence to latitude 30°15′02″, longitude 81°41′10″; thence...

  14. 33 CFR 110.183 - St. Johns River, Florida.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... anchoring in Anchorage A or B. (2) All vessels intending to enter and anchor in Anchorage A or B shall... security broadcast on channel 13 upon anchoring and every 4 hours thereafter. (5) Anchorage A is...

  15. The Greening of a University: The St. John's Sustainability Initiative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pellow, James P.; Anand, Brij

    2009-01-01

    With "greening" projects dotting the landscape of higher education across the nation, it is encouraging to witness the commitment of many colleges and universities to helping secure the future environmental viability of the nation. The challenges that come with this commitment, however, are not insignificant. A comprehensive university-wide…

  16. John Dewey on Physics Teaching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moyer, Albert E.

    1982-01-01

    Comments on the significance of a brief 1909 article on physics instruction written by John Dewey for the "Symposium on the Purpose and Organization of Physics Teaching in Secondary Schools." Includes the article itself. (SK)

  17. Magic moments with John Bell

    SciTech Connect

    Bertlmann, Reinhold A.

    2015-07-15

    John Bell, with whom I had a fruitful collaboration and warm friendship, is best known for his seminal work on the foundations of quantum physics, but he also made outstanding contributions to particle physics and accelerator physics.

  18. John Hunter and venereal disease.

    PubMed Central

    Wright, D. J.

    1981-01-01

    John Hunter's contribution to the understanding of venereal disease is reviewed. Hunter's evidence for the unitary nature of these diseases is examined and the advances he made in diagnosis, pathology, and management are considered. PMID:7018353

  19. Fabry-Pérot resonator: spectral line shapes, generic and related Airy distributions, linewidths, finesses, and performance at low or frequency-dependent reflectivity.

    PubMed

    Ismail, Nur; Kores, Cristine Calil; Geskus, Dimitri; Pollnau, Markus

    2016-07-25

    We systematically characterize the Fabry-Pérot resonator. We derive the generic Airy distribution of a Fabry-Pérot resonator, which equals the internal resonance enhancement factor, and show that all related Airy distributions are obtained by simple scaling factors. We analyze the textbook approaches to the Fabry-Pérot resonator and point out various misconceptions. We verify that the sum of the mode profiles of all longitudinal modes is the fundamental physical function that characterizes the Fabry-Pérot resonator and generates the Airy distribution. Consequently, the resonator losses are quantified by the linewidths of the underlying Lorentzian lines and not by the measured Airy linewidth. Therefore, we introduce the Lorentzian finesse which provides the spectral resolution of the Lorentzian lines, whereas the usually considered Airy finesse only quantifies the performance of the Fabry-Pérot resonator as a scanning spectrometer. We also point out that the concepts of linewidth and finesse of the Airy distribution of a Fabry-Pérot resonator break down at low reflectivity. Furthermore, we show that a Fabry-Pérot resonator has no cut-off resonance wavelength. Finally, we investigate the influence of frequency-dependent mirror reflectivities, allowing for the direct calculation of its deformed mode profiles.

  20. John Locke on Personal Identity**

    PubMed Central

    Nimbalkar, Namita

    2011-01-01

    John Locke speaks of personal identity and survival of consciousness after death. A criterion of personal identity through time is given. Such a criterion specifies, insofar as that is possible, the necessary and sufficient conditions for the survival of persons. John Locke holds that personal identity is a matter of psychological continuity. He considered personal identity (or the self) to be founded on consciousness (viz. memory), and not on the substance of either the soul or the body. PMID:21694978

  1. John locke on personal identity.

    PubMed

    Nimbalkar, Namita

    2011-01-01

    John Locke speaks of personal identity and survival of consciousness after death. A criterion of personal identity through time is given. Such a criterion specifies, insofar as that is possible, the necessary and sufficient conditions for the survival of persons. John Locke holds that personal identity is a matter of psychological continuity. He considered personal identity (or the self) to be founded on consciousness (viz. memory), and not on the substance of either the soul or the body.

  2. On the joint distribution of the maximum and its position of the Airy2 process minus a parabola

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baik, Jinho; Liechty, Karl; Schehr, Grégory

    2012-08-01

    The maximal point of the Airy2 process minus a parabola is believed to describe the scaling limit of the end-point of the directed polymer in a random medium. This was proved to be true for a few specific cases. Recently, two different formulas for the joint distribution of the location and the height of this maximal point were obtained, one by Moreno Flores, Quastel, and Remenik, and the other by Schehr. The first formula is given in terms of the Airy function and an associated operator, and the second formula is expressed in terms of the Lax pair equations of the Painlevé II equation. We give a direct proof that these two formulas are the same.

  3. Angle-resolved conical emission spectra from filamentation in a solid with an Airy pattern and a Gaussian laser beam.

    PubMed

    Gong, Cheng; Li, ZiXi; Hua, LinQiang; Quan, Wei; Liu, XiaoJun

    2016-09-15

    Filamentation dynamics in fused silica are investigated using an Airy pattern and a Gaussian laser beam. The angle-resolved conical emission spectra are measured and compared with the predictions of several models. Our experimental observations are consistent with the X-waves model in both cases. This indicates that both laser beams spontaneously evolve into nonlinear X-waves and suggests a universal evolution of filaments in fused silica, regardless of the initial laser beam profile. PMID:27628383

  4. Real-time sensor mapping display for airborne imaging sensor test with the adaptive infrared imaging spectroradiometer (AIRIS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burton, Megan M.; Cruger, William E.; Gittins, Christopher; Kindle, Harry; Ricks, Timothy P.

    2005-11-01

    Captive flight testing (CFT) of sensors and seekers requires accurate data collection and display for sensor performance evaluation. The U.S. Army Redstone Technical Test Center (RTTC), in support of the U.S. Army Edgewood Chemical Biological Center (ECBC), has developed a data collection suite to facilitate airborne test of hyperspectral chemical/biological sensors. The data collection suite combines global positioning system (GPS) tracking, inertial measurement unit (IMU) data, accurate timing streams, and other test scenario information. This data collection suite also contains an advanced real-time display of aircraft and sensor field-of-view information. The latest evolution of this system has been used in support of the Adaptive InfraRed Imaging Spectroradiometer (AIRIS), currently under development by Physical Sciences Incorporated for ECBC. For this test, images from the AIRIS sensor were overlaid on a digitized background of the test area, with latencies of 1 second or less. Detects of surrogate chemicals were displayed and geo-referenced. Video overlay was accurate and reliable. This software suite offers great versatility in the display of imaging sensor data; support of future tests with the AIRIS sensor are planned as the system evolves.

  5. Plume Aerosol Size Distribution Modeling and Comparisons to PrAIRie2005 Field Study Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, S.; Liggio, J.; Makar, P.; Li, S.; Racinthe, J.

    2006-12-01

    As part of the analysis phase of the PrAIRie2005 field study, the effects of different Edmonton-area emission sources on local air-quality are being examined. Four large coal-fired power-plants are located to the West of the city. Here, the effects of these power-plants on urban and regional air-quality will be examined, using both plume and regional air-quality models. During the last few decades, coal-fired power plants have been found to be as a major source of pollution, affecting public-health. According to NACEC (North American Commission for Environmental Corporation, 2001)'s report, 46 of the top 50 air polluters in North America were power plants. The importance of such sources has resulted in several attempts to improve understanding of the basic formation mechanisms of plume particulate matter. Sulphur dioxide contributes to acidifying emissions and to the production of secondary acidic aerosols that have been linked to a number of serious human health problems, acid rain and visibility (Seinfeld and Pandis, 1998; Hidy, 1984; Wilson and McMurray, 1981). Primary particulate matter originating directly from coal-fired power plants may also increase secondary particulate mass by providing a surface for sulphuric acid absorption . Environment Canada's PrAIRie2005 field study between August 12th and September 7th, 2005 included overflights and downwind measurements near the Edmonton powerplants (Wabamun, Sundance, Keephills and Genesee). The data collected consisted of particle size distributions, ozone, NOX, total mass and the chemical composition of fine particles. In order to investigate and improve our understanding of the formation mechanisms and physical properties of power-plant-generated aerosols in the Edmonton area, the Plume Aerosol Microphysical (PAM) model has been employed. This model accounts for gas-phase chemistry, aerosol microphysical processes (i.e. homogeneous/heterogeneous nucleation, condensation/evaporation and coagulation) and

  6. Evidence for Mini-Magnetospheres at four Lunar Magnetic Anomalies: Reiner-Gamma, Airy, Descartes and Crozier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nayak, M.; Garrick-Bethell, I.; Hemingway, D.

    2014-12-01

    Lunar swirls are enigmatic high-albedo surface markings co-located with magnetic anomalies. The existence of mini-magnetospheres has been proposed as a formation mechanism, making small-scale magnetic field interactions with the solar wind of interest. Using data from the Lunar Prospector, Clementine, and Advanced Composition Explorer missions, we develop three metrics for the identification of mini-magnetospheres: 1) presence of coherent magnetism at low altitude for magnetic field measurements taken in the solar wind; 2) directional field distortions that are correlated with changes in incident solar wind azimuth; 3) intensification of total field strength. These metrics are applied to four lunar magnetic anomalies with various reflectances and magnetic field strengths, ranging from fully developed swirls (Reiner-Gamma, Airy) to diffuse albedo patches which may or may not be swirls (Descartes, Crozier). Specifically, we compare magnetic field measurements in the solar wind to source magnetization models constructed from observations in the lunar wake and Earth's magnetotail. By applying these criteria, we confirm previous findings of magnetosphere-like phenomena at Reiner-Gamma. We also find evidence of these phenomena at Descartes and Airy, and propose that mini-magnetospheres may exist here. At Airy, very large upwind distortions are observed, comparable to the length scale of the anomaly itself. At Reiner-Gamma and Descartes, this distortion is significantly smaller, yet the average field strengths are higher, implying that the scale of distortion is linked to the anomaly's field strength. Interestingly, at Crozier, the weakest anomaly considered, we do not observe this distortion. However, we do observe evidence of field intensification at high solar wind pressures (16 nPa). While Descartes and Reiner-Gamma are among the strongest anomalies on the Moon, and both exhibit magnetospheric properties, only Reiner-Gamma shows a well-developed swirl pattern

  7. Dr. John Richardson: Arctic Doctor

    PubMed Central

    Houston, C. Stuart

    1988-01-01

    Dr. John Richardson was foremost among a special breed of men, the surgeon-naturalists, one of whom accompanied every exploration party sent out by Great Britain. In addition to performing medical duties, the surgeon-naturalist was expected to identify and collect specimens of plants, animals, and rocks. Dr. Richardson was a member of two of the arctic expeditions led by Sir John Franklin, and participated in the search for the long-overdue third Franklin expedition. ImagesFigure 1 PMID:21253036

  8. Meteor Beliefs Project: Meteoric imagery associated with the death of John Brown in 1859

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drobnock, G. J.; McBeath, A.; Gheorghe, A. D.

    2009-12-01

    An examination is made of metaphorical meteor imagery used in conjunction with the death of American anti-slavery activist John Brown, who was executed in December 1859. Such imagery continues to be used in this regard into the 21st century.

  9. Dynamic enhancement of autofocusing property for symmetric Airy beam with exponential amplitude modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Weiwei; Lu, Yao; Gong, Lei; Chu, Xiuxiang; Xue, Guosheng; Ren, Yuxuan; Zhong, Mincheng; Wang, Ziqiang; Zhou, Jinhua; Li, Yinmei

    2016-07-01

    A symmetric Airy beam (SAB) autofocuses during free space propagation. Such autofocusing SAB is useful in optical manipulation and biomedical imaging. However, its inherently limited autofocusing property may degrade the performance of the SAB in those applications. To enhance the autofocus, a symmetric apodization mask was proposed to regulate the SAB. In combination with the even cubic phase that shapes the SAB, this even exponential function mask with an adjustable parameter regulates the contribution of different frequency spectral components to the SAB. The propagation properties of this new amplitude modulated SAB (AMSAB) were investigated both theoretically and experimentally. Simulation shows that the energy distribution and autofocusing property of an AMSAB can be adjusted by the exponential amplitude modulation. Especially, the beam energy will be more concentrated in the central lobe once the even cubic phase is modulated by the mask with a higher proportion of high-frequency spectral components. Consequently, the autofocusing property and axial gradient force of AMSABs are efficiently enhanced. The experimental generation and characterization for AMSABs were implemented by modulating the collimated beam with a phase-only spatial light modulator. The experimental results well supported the theoretical predictions. With the ability to enhance the autofocus, the proposed exponential apodization modulation will make SAB more powerful in various applications, including optical trapping, fluorescence imaging and particle acceleration.

  10. Airy minima in the scattering of weakly bound light heavy ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michel, F.; Ohkubo, S.

    2005-11-01

    We reanalyze the existing 6Li + 12C elastic scattering angular distributions for incident energies ranging from a few MeV to 318 MeV within the frame of the optical model. Despite the important breakup effects expected in the scattering of such a fragile projectile, the system is found to display a surprising transparency. Indeed the barrier-wave/internal-wave decomposition of the elastic scattering amplitude reveals that a substantial part of the incident flux that penetrates the nuclear interior reemerges in the elastic channel, and typical refractive effects, like Airy minima, are clearly identified in the angular distributions. Coupled channel calculations performed on 12C(6Li,6Li')12C*(Jπ=2+,Ex=4.44 MeV) angular distributions extending through the whole angular range confirm the existence of an important internal-wave contribution in the backward hemisphere. A similar transparency is observed in other systems of this mass region, such as 7Li + 12C or 6Li + 16O. Finally, we examine recent 6He + 12C elastic scattering data obtained at 18 MeV by Milin et al. [Nucl. Phys. A730, 285 (2004)] and extending up to θc.m.≃85°, and we suggest additional measurements that could ascertain whether some transparency persists in the scattering of this radioactive projectile.

  11. Propagation properties of Airy-Gaussian vortex beams through the gradient-index medium.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ruihuang; Deng, Fu; Yu, Weihao; Huang, Jiayao; Deng, Dongmei

    2016-06-01

    Propagation of Airy-Gaussian vortex (AiGV) beams through the gradient-index medium is investigated analytically and numerically with the transfer matrix method. Deriving the analytic expression of the AiGV beams based on the Huygens diffraction integral formula, we obtain the propagate path, intensity and phase distributions, and the Poynting vector of the first- and second-order AiGV beams, which propagate through the paraxial ABCD system. The ballistic trajectory is no longer conventional parabolic but trigonometric shapes in the gradient-index medium. Especially, the AiGV beams represent the singular behavior at the propagation path and the light intensity distribution. The phase distribution and the Poynting vector exhibit in reverse when the AiGV beams through the singularity. As the order increases, the main lobe of the AiGV beams is gradually overlapped by the vortex core. Further, the sidelobe weakens when the AiGV beams propagate nearly to the singularity. Additionally, the figure of the Poynting vector of the AiGV beams proves the direction of energy flow corresponding to the intensity distribution. The vortex of the second-order AiGV beams is larger, and the propagation velocity is faster than that of the first order. PMID:27409428

  12. John Milton: A Research Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Noate, Judith, Comp.

    This handout is a guide to library resources in the J. Murrey Atkins Library at the University of North Carolina-Charlotte, for sources of criticism for the study of 17th-century British author John Milton. The guide is intended to help readers find critical and biographical information on Milton. It explains important reference sources in the…

  13. The Johns Hopkins Hospital Network

    PubMed Central

    Tolchin, Stephen G.; Barta, Wendy; Harkness, Kenneth

    1985-01-01

    The Johns Hopkins Hospital has initiated an ambitious program to apply modern technologies to the development of a new, comprehensive clinical information system. One component of this system is a networking technology for supporting the integration of diverse and functionally distinct information systems. This paper discusses the selection of the networking technology implemented at JHH, issues and problems, networking concepts, protocols and reliability.

  14. John Milton Oskison and Assimilation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larre, Lionel

    2013-01-01

    John Milton Oskison (1874-1947) was a Cherokee writer, journalist, and activist and the author of novels and biographies as well as numerous short stories, essays, and articles about a great variety of subjects. Oskison thought of himself as "an interpreter to the world, of the modern, progressive Indian." The kind of representation Oskison gave…

  15. John James Audubon & the Turkey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hinshaw, Craig

    2012-01-01

    In the first half of the 1800s, John James Audubon roamed the wilds of America attempting to draw all the birds in their natural habitat. He published his life-sized paintings in a huge book entitled "Birds of America." Audubon developed a unique system of depicting the birds in natural poses, such as flying. After shooting the bird, he would wire…

  16. John Sawhill: Academe's Crisis Manager.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chernow, Ron

    1979-01-01

    John C. Sawhill became president of New York University (NYU) and balanced its budget in a year. His administration of the university, his personality, NYU's financial situation and the subsequent reforms, fund raising, faculty morale and governance, and efforts to improve the university's academic reputation are discussed. (JMD)

  17. John Rawls and Affirmative Action.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nagel, Thomas

    2003-01-01

    Discusses the philosophy of John Rawls, asserting that although Rawls never wrote about affirmative action, his ideas are relevant to the issue. Rawls concentrated on "ideal theory," which he believed was the theory of what constituted a truly just society. He considered slavery and racial segregation paradigms of injustice. His ideal theory of…

  18. John Wilson as Moral Educator

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrison, John L.

    1977-01-01

    The work of John Wilson, now teaching at Oxford University, as moral educator is summarized and evaluated. His rationalist humanistic approach is based on a componential characterization of the morally educated person. The rationale and conceptual status of the components is discussed. His position is compared to that of Peter McPhail, R. S.…

  19. John Dewey, Gothic and Modern

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaminsky, James S.

    2010-01-01

    It is argued here that understanding John Dewey's thought as that of a prodigal liberal or a fellow traveller does not capture the complexity of his work. It is also important to recognise the portion of his work that is "historie morale." In the very best sense it is epic, encapsulating the hopes and dreams of a history of the American people in…

  20. A Conversation with John Higham.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hackney, Sheldon; Higham, John

    1994-01-01

    Presents an interview by National Endowment for the Humanities chairman, Sheldon Hackney, with historian John Higham on multiculturalism and national identity. Contends that the centrifugal forces of national, ethnic, and religious diversity need countervailing forces to hold the nation together. (CFR)

  1. John Couch Adams, the astronomer.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, N.

    1989-03-01

    The planet Neptune was discovered more than 140 years ago. The circumstances of the discovery gave rise to great controversy, and very nearly led to an international incident between Britain and France, but this was only one of John Couch Adams' many contributions to astronomical science.

  2. John Eliot in Recent Scholarship.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cogley, Richard W.

    1990-01-01

    Reviews the recent literature on John Eliot--seventeenth-century Massachusetts missionary, minister, and millenarian. Examines disagreements between Alden Vaughan's and Francis Jennings's interpretations of Eliot's missionary writings and Puritan-Indian relations. Discusses James Axtell's ethnohistorical interpretation of Eliot. Emphasizes the…

  3. John N Bahcall (1934 2005)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergström, Lars; Botner, Olga; Carlson, Per; Hulth, Per Olof; Ohlsson, Tommy

    2005-01-01

    John Norris Bahcall, passed away on August 17, 2005, in NewYork City, USA. He was born on December 30, 1934, in Shreveport, Louisiana, USA. He was Richard Black Professor of Astrophysics in the School of Natural Sciences at the Institute forAdvanced Study (IAS) in Princeton, New Jersey, USA and a recipient of the National Medal of Science. In addition, he was President of the American Astronomical Society, President-Elect of the American Physical Society, and a prominent leader of the astrophysics community. John had a long and prolific career in astronomy and astrophysics, spanning five decades and the publication of more than five hundred technical articles, books, and popular papers. John's most recognized scientific contribution was the novel proposal in 1964, together with Raymond Davis Jr, that scientific mysteries of our Sun `how it shines, how old it is, how hot it is' could be examined by measuring the number of neutrinos arriving on Earth from the Sun. Measuring the properties of these neutrinos tests both our understanding of how stars shine and our understanding of fundamental particle physics. However, in the 1960s and 1970s, the observations by Raymond Davis Jr showed a clear discrepancy between John's theoretical predictions, based on standard solar and particle physics models, and what was experimentally measured. This discrepancy, known as the `Solar Neutrino Problem', was examined by hundreds of physicists, chemists, and astronomers over the subsequent three decades. In the late 1990s through 2002, new large-scale neutrino experiments in Japan, Canada, Italy, and Russia culminated in the conclusion that the discrepancy between John's theoretical predictions and the experimental results required a modification of our understanding of particle physics: neutrinos must have a mass and `oscillate' among different particle states. In addition to neutrino astrophysics, John contributed to many areas of astrophysics including the study of dark matter in

  4. Foreword: Sir John Pendry FRS Sir John Pendry FRS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inglesfield, John; Echenique, Pedro

    2008-07-01

    John Pendry John Inglesfield and Pedro Echenique write: John Pendry's 65th birthday is on 4 July 2008, and this issue of the Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter is dedicated to him, with articles by friends, colleagues, and former students. By any standards, John Pendry is a great scientist, who has made—and continues to make—an enormous contribution to physics; the wide range of his interests is reflected in the scope of these articles. Not many scientists can establish a completely new and unexpected area of research, but this has been John's achievement in the last few years in the field of metamaterials, materials whose electromagnetic properties depend on their structure rather than the materials of which the structure is built. In this way, structures with effectively negative electrical permittivity and negative magnetic permeability can be constructed, demonstrating negative refraction; through metamaterials scientists now have access to properties not found in nature, and never previously explored experimentally. Never a week goes by without a potential new application of metamaterials, whether it is perfect lensing, or the cloak of invisibility. This has certainly led to tremendous visibility for John himself, with guest lectures all over the world, and radio and television appearances. John Pendry's first paper was published exactly 40 years ago, 'Analytic properties of pseudopotentials' [1], and since then he has published 310 articles at the latest count. But this first paper already reflected something of the way John works. His PhD project, with Volker Heine at the Cavendish Laboratory, was to interpret the scattering of low energy electrons from surfaces, the technique of LEED which was to become the method of choice for determining surface structure. Although the energy of the electrons in LEED is relatively low—say 50 eV—it is much higher than the energy of the conduction electrons, for which pseudopotentials had been devised, and John

  5. John Glenn: Post-Flight Recovery of Friendship 7

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    Mini Biography of John Glenn, as it was up to 1962. From: The John Glenn Story: Summary of astronaut John Glenn's flying career, from naval aviation training to space flight. The Mercury project is featured as John Glenn flies the Friendship 7 spacecraft. President John F. Kennedy presents the NASA Distinguished service Medal to Astronaut John Glenn.

  6. John Glenn: Presented with NASA Distinguished Service Medal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    John Glenn tours with his family, meets JFK and is presented with the NASA distinguished Service Medal. From: The John Glenn Story: Summary of astronaut John Glenn's flying career, from naval aviation training to space flight. The Mercury project is featured as John Glenn flies the Friendship 7 spacecraft. President John F. Kennedy presents the NASA Distinguished service Medal to Astronaut John Glenn.

  7. Airy minimum crossing θcm = 90° at Elab = 124 MeV for the 16O + 16O system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondo, Y.; Sugiyama, Y.; Tomita, T.; Yamanouchi, Y.; Ikezoe, H.; Ideno, K.; Hamada, S.; Sugimitsu, T.; Hijiya, M.; Fujita, H.

    1996-02-01

    We have measured the elastic scattering angular distribution for the 16O + 16O system at Elab = 124 MeV, where a prominent minimum has been observed in the θcm = 90° excitation function. The measured angular distribution shows modulated Airy structures at large angles with a dip at θcm = 90°. It is concluded that the prominent minimum in the excitation function is due to an Airy minimum, most likely to be the third member, crossing 90° at that energy.

  8. Charles Darwin and John Herschel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warner, B.

    2009-11-01

    The influence of John Herschel on the philosophical thoughts of Charles Darwin, both through the former's book, Natural Philosophy, and through their meeting in 1836 at the Cape of Good Hope, is discussed. With Herschel having himself speculated on evolution just a few months before he met Darwin, it is probable that he stimulated at least the beginnings of the latter's lifelong work on the subject.

  9. The letters of John Dastin.

    PubMed

    Thiesen, Wilfred

    2008-07-01

    John Dastin, a noted alchemist who lived ca. 1300, followed the lead of many of his contemporaries and predecessors in using letters to propagate his views on alchemy. This article identifies a number of letters that Dastin wrote, and includes one text addressed to a cardinal of the city of Naples. This letter is virtually a copy of a work by Arnold of Villanova. I believe that other works ascribed to Dastin will also show a great dependence on Arnold's works. PMID:19048973

  10. John Glenn Biomedical Engineering Consortium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nall, Marsha

    2004-01-01

    The John Glenn Biomedical Engineering Consortium is an inter-institutional research and technology development, beginning with ten projects in FY02 that are aimed at applying GRC expertise in fluid physics and sensor development with local biomedical expertise to mitigate the risks of space flight on the health, safety, and performance of astronauts. It is anticipated that several new technologies will be developed that are applicable to both medical needs in space and on earth.

  11. John C. Jamieson January 5, 1924, to June 26, 1983

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schock, R. N.

    1986-04-01

    John Calhoun Jamieson (Figure 1) was a rare individual who combined unusual scientific talents with a profound respect for his fellow scientists. This special section pays respect to his memory in a way that he truly would have enjoyed—a collection of papers on some of his favorite subjects. John devoted a major part of his life to high-pressure physics and geophysics. His achievements in this regard are extraordinary and form the basis for much of what we now expend a great deal of effort trying to better understand. To gain insight into the intimate connection between John and high-pressure science, we must go back to his early career. He was born and raised in St. Joseph, Missouri, and entered the University of Chicago during the early days of World War II. Like many of the students of that day, he subsequently enlisted in the military service. He served as an army weather observer in the Far East. After the war, he returned to Chicago and took his first degree in 1947. He received his Master's degree in 1951 and received one of the first National Science Foundation awards for graduate work in 1952.

  12. John Bardeen: an extraordinary physicist

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoddeson, Lillian

    2008-04-01

    On the morning of 1 November 1956 the US physicist John Bardeen dropped the frying-pan of eggs that he was cooking for breakfast, scattering its contents on the kitchen floor. He had just heard that he had won the Nobel Prize for Physics along with William Shockley and Walter Brattain for their invention of the transistor. That evening Bardeen was startled again, this time by a parade of his colleagues from the University of Illinois marching to the door of his home bearing champagne and singing "For He's a Jolly Good Fellow".

  13. John Dalton (1766-1844).

    PubMed Central

    Emery, A E

    1988-01-01

    There is no doubt that John Dalton ranks among the great names in science, a position which rests on his enunciation of the Atomic Theory. However, his very first scientific paper in 1798 was concerned with his own affliction of colour blindness and was in fact the first clear description of the disorder. This publication stimulated much subsequent research into the pathophysiology and genetics of the condition. His recorded observations on colour blindness are detailed and precise and betoken the approach which was to characterise all his later research in chemistry. Images PMID:3294412

  14. John Dewey: implications for schooling.

    PubMed

    Silva, D

    1977-01-01

    Propositions, whether great and lasting or insignificant and passing, reside in the "guts of the living." Each age rediscovers its Plato, Dickens, Newton, or Dewey. Each age rewrites history, redefines science, develops its own theoretical perspectives. Propositions are tentative, conditional, or relative. They depend on contemporary priorities, and on a personal space and time context. At any future moment propositions may change, perspectives alter, new choices emerge. John Dewey provided for constructive innovation in schooling and the battles about his suggested criteria continue unabated. The purpose here, however, is only to examine some of Dewey's theoretical propositions and their probable implications (1).

  15. John Dalton (1766-1844).

    PubMed

    Emery, A E

    1988-06-01

    There is no doubt that John Dalton ranks among the great names in science, a position which rests on his enunciation of the Atomic Theory. However, his very first scientific paper in 1798 was concerned with his own affliction of colour blindness and was in fact the first clear description of the disorder. This publication stimulated much subsequent research into the pathophysiology and genetics of the condition. His recorded observations on colour blindness are detailed and precise and betoken the approach which was to characterise all his later research in chemistry.

  16. Toward the 21st Century in Mathematics Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Brien, Thomas C., Ed.

    In an effort to prepare students for the 21st century, this book provides ideas and suggestions for educators on critical areas in mathematics education. A series of articles is presented on content changes, instructional strategies, and the role of computers. These articles include: (1) "Status of Computers" (John Ellsworth); (2) "New Topics for…

  17. John Greenleaf's life of science.

    PubMed

    Watenpaugh, Donald E

    2012-12-01

    This article summarizes the life and career of John E. Greenleaf, PhD. It complements an interview of Dr. Greenleaf sponsored by the American Physiological Society Living History Project found on the American Physiological Society website. Dr. Greenleaf is a "thought leader" and internationally renowned physiologist, with extensive contributions in human systems-level environmental physiology. He avoided self-aggrandizement and believed that deeds rather than words define one's legacy. Viewed another way, however, Greenleaf's words define his deeds: 48% of his 185 articles are first author works, which is an unusually high proportion for a scientist of his stature. He found that writing a thorough and thoughtful discussion section often led to novel ideas that drove future research. Beyond Greenleaf's words are the many students, postdocs, and collaborators lucky enough to have worked with him and thus learn and carry on his ways of science. His core principles included the following: avoid research "fads," embrace diversity, be the first subject in your own research, adhere to rules of fiscal responsibility, and respect administrative forces-but never back down from them when you know you are right. Greenleaf's integrity ensured he was usually right. He thrived on the axiom of many successful scientists: avoid falling in love with hypotheses, so that when unexpected findings appear, they arouse curiosity instead of fear. Dr. Greenleaf's legacy will include the John and Carol Greenleaf Award for prolific environmental and exercise-related publication in the Journal of Applied Physiology. PMID:23209002

  18. John Bardeen and transistor physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huff, Howard R.

    2001-01-01

    John Bardeen and Walter Brattain invented the point-contact semiconductor amplifier (transistor action) in polycrystalline germanium (also observed in polycrystalline silicon) on Dec. 15, 1947, for which they received a patent on Oct. 3, 1950. Bill Shockley was not a co-patent holder on Bardeen and Brattain's point-contact semiconductor amplifier patent since Julius Lilienfeld had already received a patent in 1930 for what would have been Shockley's contribution; namely, the field-effect methodology. Shockley received patents for both his minority-carrier injection concept and junction transistor theory, however, and deservedly shared the Nobel prize with Bardeen and Brattain for his seminal contributions of injection, p-n junction theory and junction transistor theory. We will review the events leading up to the invention of Bardeen and Brattain's point-contact semiconductor amplifier during the magic month of November 17-December 16, 1947 and the invention of Shockley's junction semiconductor amplifier during his magic month of December 24, 1947-January 23, 1948. It was during the course of Bardeen and Brattain's research in November, 1947 that Bardeen also patented the essence of the MOS transistor, wherein the induced minority carriers were confined to the inversion layer enroute to the collector. C. T. Sah has described this device as a sourceless MOS transistor. Indeed, John Bardeen, co-inventor of the point-contact semiconductor amplifier and inventor of the MOS transistor, may rightly be called the father of modern electronics.

  19. John Greenleaf's life of science.

    PubMed

    Watenpaugh, Donald E

    2012-12-01

    This article summarizes the life and career of John E. Greenleaf, PhD. It complements an interview of Dr. Greenleaf sponsored by the American Physiological Society Living History Project found on the American Physiological Society website. Dr. Greenleaf is a "thought leader" and internationally renowned physiologist, with extensive contributions in human systems-level environmental physiology. He avoided self-aggrandizement and believed that deeds rather than words define one's legacy. Viewed another way, however, Greenleaf's words define his deeds: 48% of his 185 articles are first author works, which is an unusually high proportion for a scientist of his stature. He found that writing a thorough and thoughtful discussion section often led to novel ideas that drove future research. Beyond Greenleaf's words are the many students, postdocs, and collaborators lucky enough to have worked with him and thus learn and carry on his ways of science. His core principles included the following: avoid research "fads," embrace diversity, be the first subject in your own research, adhere to rules of fiscal responsibility, and respect administrative forces-but never back down from them when you know you are right. Greenleaf's integrity ensured he was usually right. He thrived on the axiom of many successful scientists: avoid falling in love with hypotheses, so that when unexpected findings appear, they arouse curiosity instead of fear. Dr. Greenleaf's legacy will include the John and Carol Greenleaf Award for prolific environmental and exercise-related publication in the Journal of Applied Physiology.

  20. Struggle for the Soul: John Lawrence Childs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stallones, Jared

    2010-01-01

    John Lawrence Childs was born in Eau Claire, Wisconsin on January 11, 1889, the second child of John Nelson Childs and Helen Janette (Nettie) Smith. In childhood Childs absorbed the values of industry, democracy, and a traditional, but socially conscious, religion. Childs was a Methodist and an intensely private person not given to talking about…

  1. Symposium on John Dewey's "Art as Experience."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burnett, Joe R.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Reports on a symposium about John Dewey's philosophy of art. John Fisher, Richard Shusterman, and Joe R. Burnett state their views on Dewey's contributions to art theory and aesthetics citing Dewey's work, "Art As Experience." The consensus was that although Dewey's opinions are dated, his pragmatist's views offer the opportunity for further study…

  2. John Kotter on Leadership, Management and Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bencivenga, Jim

    2002-01-01

    Excerpts from interview with John Kotter, Konosuke Matsushita Professor of Leadership at the Harvard Business School, about his thoughts on the role of the superintendent as leader and manager. Describes his recent book "John P. Kotter on What Leaders Really Do," 1999. Lists eight-step change process from his book "Leading Change," 1996. (PKP)

  3. John H. Reynolds (1923-2000)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, Grenville

    John Reynolds, AGU Fellow since 1968 and a member of the Volcanology Geochemistry and Petrology section since 1961, died unexpectedly on November 4, 2000. John was a professor emeritus of physics at the University of California, Berkeley and a pioneer in the development and application of noble gas mass spectrometry He was recovering from pneumonia when he suffered a pulmonary embolism.

  4. A to Z with Jasper Johns

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirker, Sara Schmickle

    2008-01-01

    One contemporary artist that kindergarten students can easily relate to is Jasper Johns. In this article, the author discusses how she introduced John's numeric and alphabetic paintings to her kindergarten students. The young artists were amazed that art can be created from the familiar symbols that they are learning to make in their regular…

  5. John Henry--The Steel Driving Man

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, David E.; Gulley, Laura L.

    2005-01-01

    The story of John Henry provided the setting for sixth-grade class to participate in a John Henry Day of mathematics experiments. The students collected data from experiments where students competed against machines and technology. The student analyzed the data by comparing two box plots, a box plot of human data, and a box plot of machine or…

  6. Photocopy of photograph (from Mrs. Martin, grandniece of John French, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (from Mrs. Martin, grandniece of John French, Clinton, Missouri) Circa 1900, photographer unknown JOHN AND ALMIRA FRENCH IN FRONT OF WEST AND SOUTH FACADES - John French Farm, South Grand River, Deepwater, Henry County, MO

  7. John Bahcall and the Solar Neutrino Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahcall, Neta

    2016-03-01

    ``I feel like dancing'', cheered John Bahcall upon hearing the exciting news from the SNO experiment in 2001. The results confirmed, with remarkable accuracy, John's 40-year effort to predict the rate of neutrinos from the Sun based on sophisticated Solar models. What began in 1962 by John Bahcall and Ray Davis as a pioneering project to test and confirm how the Sun shines, quickly turned into a four-decade-long mystery of the `Solar Neutrino Problem': John's models predicted a higher rate of neutrinos than detected by Davis and follow-up experiments. Was the theory of the Sun wrong? Were John's calculations in error? Were the neutrino experiments wrong? John worked tirelessly to understand the physics behind the Solar Neutrino Problem; he led the efforts to greatly increase the accurately of the solar model, to understand its seismology and neutrino fluxes, to use the neutrino fluxes as a test for new physics, and to advocate for important new experiments. It slowly became clear that none of the then discussed possibilities --- error in the Solar model or neutrino experiments --- was the culprit. The SNO results revealed that John's calculations, and hence the theory of the Solar model, have been correct all along. Comparison of the data with John's theory demanded new physics --- neutrino oscillations. The Solar Neutrino saga is one of the most amazing scientific stories of the century: exploring a simple question of `How the Sun Shines?' led to the discovery of new physics. John's theoretical calculations are an integral part of this journey; they provide the foundation for the Solar Neutrino Problem, for confirming how the Sun shines, and for the need of neutrino oscillations. His tenacious persistence, dedication, enthusiasm and love for the project, and his leadership and advocacy of neutrino physics over many decades are a remarkable story of scientific triumph. I know John is smiling today.

  8. John Locke and the case of Anthony Ashley Cooper.

    PubMed

    Anstey, Peter R; Principe, Lawrence M

    2011-01-01

    In June 1668 Anthony Ashley Cooper, later to become the 1st Earl of Shaftesbury, underwent abdominal surgery to drain a large abscess above his liver. The case is extraordinary, not simply on account of the eminence of the patient and the danger of the procedure, but also because of the many celebrated figures involved. A trove of manuscripts relating to this famous operation survives amongst the Shaftesbury Papers in the National Archives at Kew. These include case notes in the hand of the philosopher John Locke and advice from leading physicians of the day including Francis Glisson, Sir George Ent and Thomas Sydenham. The majority of this material has never been published before. This article provides complete transcriptions and translations of all of these manuscripts, thus providing for the first time a comprehensive case history. It is prefaced with an extended introduction.

  9. Medicine in John Locke's philosophy.

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Gonzalez, M A

    1990-12-01

    John Locke's philosophy was deeply affected by medicine of his times. It was specially influenced by the medical thought and practice of Thomas Sydenham. Locke was a personal friend of Sydenham, expressed an avid interest in his work and shared his views and methods. The influence of Sydenham's medicine can be seen in the following areas of Locke's philosophy: his "plain historical method"; the emphasis on observation and sensory experience instead of seeking the essence of things; the rejection of hypotheses and principles; the refusal of research into final causes and inner mechanisms; the ideal of irrefutable evidence and skepticism on the possibilities of certainty in science. The science which for Locke held the highest paradigmatic value in his theory of knowledge was precisely medicine. To a great extent, Locke's Essay on Human Understanding can be understood as an attempt to justify, substantiate, and promote Sydenham's medical method. This method, generalized, was then proposed as an instrument for the elaboration of all natural sciences.

  10. Obituary: John P. Davidson (1924-2010)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Twarog, Bruce; Anthony-Twarog, Barbara

    2011-12-01

    Nuclear physicist and astrophysicist John P. Davidson died at his home on January 10, 2010. He was born on July 22, 1924 in Los Angeles, California. Jack followed his high school interests in rocketry and physical science to the University of California, Berkeley, where he earned a Bachelor of Science degree in physics in June 1948 after serving a stint from 1943 to 1946 in the Army Signal Corps in the European Theater of Operations. Following the war and graduation, Jack embarked on a graduate career in nuclear physics at Washington University, St. Louis. While there, he also initiated what became a life-long partnership with Mary Reiser dedicated to issues of social justice by co-founding an organization to lobby for university admission of African-American students, a policy change opposed by physicist and Chancellor, Arthur Holly Compton. Mary and Jack married in 1949. Jack Davidson's academic career began shortly after completion of his PhD in 1952 under Eugene Feenberg. He taught in Brazil and in Norway before becoming an assistant professor at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in 1957. He stayed at RPI until 1966, at which time he joined the faculty of the University of Kansas where he served faculty and students until his retirement in 1996. His teaching, research and administrative career at KU was distinguished by a growing commitment to the astronomy and astrophysics program. Not only did he foster its growth during his tenure as department chair (1977-1989), he directed a residential summer science program in astronomy for high school students at KU for nearly 10 years in the 1970's. He combined his background in nuclear physics and his fascination with astrophysics into a research program to study elemental abundance anomalies in stellar spectra, authoring with Don Bord several pioneering applications of wavelength coincidence statistics to the ultraviolet spectra of peculiar A stars. At KU, Jack assumed leadership roles in the local chapter of Phi Beta

  11. How Do We Know They're Getting Better? Assessment for 21st Century Minds, K-8

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barell, John

    2012-01-01

    How do we measure students inquiry, problem-solving, and critical thinking abilities so that we know they are prepared to meet the challenges of the 21st century? John Barell explains how inquiry leads to problem-solving and provides specific steps for formative assessment that informs instruction of 21st century skills. Included are examples that…

  12. Archival Footage: John Glenn's Mercury Flight

    NASA Video Gallery

    Archival films document John Glenn's historic Feb. 20, 1962 Mercury flight in his Friendship 7, in which he became the first American to orbit the Earth. Clips include boarding the capsule, splashd...

  13. Obituary: John Louis Perdrix (1926-2005)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orchiston, W.

    2005-12-01

    On 27 June 2005 the Journal of Astronomical History and Heritage lost its founder and Australia lost one of its leading historians of astronomy when John Louis Perdrix died in Dubai after a brief battle with cancer.

  14. John Dewey--Philosopher and Educational Reformer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Talebi, Kandan

    2015-01-01

    John Dewey was an American philosopher and educator, founder of the philosophical movement known as pragmatism, a pioneer in functional psychology, and a leader of the progressive movement in education in the United States.

  15. AIDS clinical trials at John Hopkins.

    PubMed

    2000-01-01

    AIDS clinical trials at Johns Hopkins are described. Contact information, criteria for volunteers, and a brief description are provided. Trial topics include treatments for HIV-1 disease, neurology, and ocular immunology.

  16. John Twysden and John Palmer: 17th-century Northamptonshire astronomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frost, M. A.

    2008-01-01

    John Twysden (1607-1688) and John Palmer (1612-1679) were two astronomers in the circle of Samuel Foster (circa 1600-1652), the subject of a recent paper in this journal. John Twysden qualified in law and medicine and led a peripatetic life around England and Europe. John Palmer was Rector of Ecton, Northamptonshire and later Archdeacon of Northampton. The two astronomers catalogued observations made from Northamptonshire from the 1640s to the 1670s. In their later years Twysden and Palmer published works on a variety of topics, often astronomical. Palmer engaged in correspondence with Henry Oldenburg, the first secretary of the Royal Society, on topics in astronomy and mathematics.

  17. John F. Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    The John F. Kennedy Space Center, America's spaceport, is located along Florida's eastern shore on Cape Canaveral. Established as NASA's Launch Operations Center on July 1, 1962, the center has been the site of launching all U.S. human space flight missions, from the early days of Project Mercury to the space shuttle and the next generation of vehicles. In addition, the center is home to NASA's Launch Services Program, which coordinates all expendable vehicle launches carrying a NASA payload.

    With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER images Earth to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet.

    ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products.

    The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER provides scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping, and monitoring of dynamic conditions and temporal change. Example applications are: monitoring glacial advances and retreats; monitoring potentially active volcanoes; identifying crop stress; determining cloud morphology and physical properties; wetlands evaluation; thermal pollution monitoring; coral reef degradation; surface temperature mapping of soils and geology; and measuring surface heat balance.

    The U.S. science team is located at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Science Mission Directorate.

    Size: 32.6 by 51.2 kilometers (20.2 by 32.2 miles) Location: 28.6 degrees North latitude, 80.6 degrees West longitude Orientation: North at top Image Data: ASTER bands 3, 2, and 1 Original Data Resolution: 15 meters (49

  18. Obituary: John W. Firor (1927-2007)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilman, Peter A.

    2009-12-01

    John W. Firor, a former Director of the High Altitude Observatory and the National Center for Atmospheric Research, and a founder of the Solar Physics Division of the American Astronomical Society, died of Alzheimer's disease in Pullman, Washington on November 5, 2007, he was 80. He was born in Athens Georgia on October 18, 1927, where his father was a professor of agricultural economics. John had an unusually diverse scientific career. His interest in physics and astrophysics began while serving in the army, during which time he was assigned to the Los Alamos National Laboratory, where he guarded highly radioactive materials (many have heard him describe how informal the protections were compared to later times). After his service he returned to college and graduated in physics from Georgia Tech in 1949. He received his Ph.D. from the University of Chicago in 1954, writing his thesis on cosmic rays under John Simpson. John Firor would later remark that: "If you needed cosmic rays to actually do anything, you are sunk." That thought, partly in jest, may help explain his motivation for moving to so many new scientific and management pursuits. John moved from cosmic ray physics to radio astronomy (particularly of the Sun) when he began work at the Carnegie Institution of Washington's Department of Terrestrial Magnetism, where he remained until 1961. During this time, he met Walter Orr Roberts, then the Director of the High Altitude Observatory (HAO) in Boulder, Colorado. HAO was then affiliated with the University of Colorado. In 1959, a movement began to upgrade the atmospheric sciences in the United States by establishing a National Center, where the largest, most important atmospheric research problems could be addressed. Roberts became the first Director of NCAR, as well as the first president of the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR), the consortium of universities that was commissioned to manage and staff the new Center. HAO became a

  19. Astronomy Behind Enemy Lines in Colonial North America: John Winthrop's Observations of the Transits of Venus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schechner, S. J.

    2005-12-01

    In May 1761, John Winthrop packed up two students, an excellent clock, an octant, and two telescopes, and embarked for Newfoundland to observe the Transit of Venus. Winthrop's departure was hasty. Only days before had the President and Fellows of Harvard College approved Professor Winthrop's request to take the college apparatus behind enemy lines to serve the cause of science, and Winthrop knew he had no time to waste if he were to reach Newfoundland and properly calibrate his equipment before the Transit. Winthrop's expedition to St. John's, Newfoundland was nothing short of remarkable. His goal was to help determine the distance from the Earth to the Sun, and he was the only North American astronomer fit for this project. His expedition was financed by the General Court of Massachusetts, which also secured him safe passage across enemy lines during the French and Indian War. Winthrop's trip to St. John's was a major achievement for colonial astronomy, but he was unhappy with his observations and so looked forward to a second chance to observe a transit in 1769. Benjamin Franklin urged him to go to Lake Superior. Planning for that transit was thwarted, however, by two events: (1) the loss of nearly all of Harvard's apparatus in a fire of 1764; and (2) pre-Revolutionary politics in the American colonies. In the end, Winthrop was forced to content himself with first-class observations with new instruments in Cambridge.

  20. Exceptional Scholarship and Democratic Agendas: Interviews with John Goodlad, John Hoyle, Joseph Murphy, and Thomas Sergiovanni

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mullen, Carol A.

    2009-01-01

    This portraiture study of four exceptional scholars in education--John Goodlad, John Hoyle, Joseph Murphy, and Thomas Sergiovanni--provides insight into their scholarly work and life habits, direction and aspirations, assessment and analysis of major trends in the profession, and advice for aspiring leaders and academics. Telephone interviews with…

  1. Conceptions of Childhood in the Educational Philosophies of John Locke and John Dewey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bynum, Gregory Lewis

    2015-01-01

    This article compares progressive conceptions of childhood in the educational philosophies of John Locke and John Dewey. Although the lives of the two philosophers were separated by an ocean and two centuries of history, they had in common the following things: (1) a relatively high level of experience working with, and observing, children that is…

  2. Influences on the Founder of the Johns Hopkins University and the Johns Hopkins Medical School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parker, Franklin

    1994-01-01

    Explains how George Peabody, self-made millionaire and educational philanthropist, was one of three powerful men who influenced Johns Hopkins in founding Johns Hopkins University (the other two being Dr. Joseph Parrish and Dr. Patrick Macaulay). The article looks at how Hopkins, like Peabody, used his wealth for philanthropic purposes. (SM)

  3. Press Site Auditorium dedicated to John Holliman

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    From left, Center Director Roy Bridges and NASA Administrator Daniel S. Goldin applaud as Jay Holliman, with the help of his mother, Mrs. Dianne Holliman, unveils a plaque honoring his father, the late John Holliman. At right is Tom Johnson, news group chairman of CNN. The occasion was the dedication of the KSC Press Site auditorium as the John Holliman Auditorium to honor the CNN national correspondent for his enthusiastic, dedicated coverage of America's space program. The auditorium was built in 1980 and has been the focal point for new coverage of Space Shuttle launches. The ceremony followed the 94th launch of a Space Shuttle, on mission STS-96, earlier this morning.

  4. Press Site Auditorium dedicated to John Holliman

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    NASA Administrator Daniel S. Goldin hands Mrs. Dianne Holliman a plaque honoring her late husband, John Holliman, a CNN national correspondent. Standing behind Goldin is Center Director Roy Bridges. At right is Tom Johnson, news group chairman of CNN. A ceremony dedicated the KSC Press Site auditorium as the John Holliman Auditorium to honor the correspondent for his enthusiastic, dedicated coverage of America's space program. The auditorium was built in 1980 and has been the focal point for new coverage of Space Shuttle launches. The ceremony followed the 94th launch of a Space Shuttle, on mission STS-96, earlier this morning.

  5. Sir John Gurdon: Father of nuclear reprogramming

    PubMed Central

    Blau, Helen M.

    2015-01-01

    Sir John Gurdon founded the field of nuclear reprogramming. His work set the stage for the ever burgeoning area of stem cell biology and regenerative medicine. Here I provide personal reflections on times I shared with John Gurdon and professional reflections of the impact of his ground-breaking research on my own development as a scientist and on the field in general. His paradigm-shifting experiments will continue to provoke scientists to think outside the box for many years to come. PMID:24954777

  6. The Provence ST radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crochet, M.

    1986-01-01

    Since the Alpex Campaign, when 3 Stratosphere-Troposphere (ST) radar operated in Camarque as a cooperative effort of the Aeronomy Laboratory of NOAA, CO, and LSEET from Toulon, a 50 MHz Very High Frequency (VHF) ST radar was developed, improved, and tested. The operating characteristics, main objectives, preliminary results, and future experiment costs of the VHF ST radar are discussed.

  7. John Paul College: The Professional Renewal Journey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mundie, Pauline; Marr, Robert

    2014-01-01

    John Paul College, a K-12 School in Queensland, Australia, recognises the centrality of classroom teachers to the ongoing improvement of student outcomes. The College has implemented a multi-tiered "professional renewal and assessment process." These changes of emphasis are the result of significant research and subsequent/associated…

  8. The Life and Work of John Snow

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Melville, Wayne; Fazio, Xavier

    2007-01-01

    Due to his work to determine how cholera was spread in the 18th century, John Snow (1813-1858) has been hailed as the father of modern epidemiology. This article presents an inquiry model based on his life and work, which teachers can use to develop a series of biology lessons involving the history and nature of science. The lessons presented use…

  9. Press Site Auditorium dedicated to John Holliman

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    A ceremony dedicated the KSC Press Site auditorium as the John Holliman Auditorium to honor the correspondent for his enthusiastic, dedicated coverage of America's space program. The auditorium was built in 1980 and has been the focal point for new coverage of Space Shuttle launches. The ceremony followed the 94th launch of a Space Shuttle, on mission STS-96, earlier this morning.

  10. John Wilkes Booth and the Lincoln Conspiracy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nufrio, Ronald M.

    The 1865 conspiracy to assassinate Abraham Lincoln also included plans to assassinate other government officials on that same April evening. The actor, John Wilkes Booth, succeeded in killing Lincoln, but his fellow conspirators bungled their attempts to kill William Seward, Andrew Johnson, Ulysses S. Grant, and possibly Edwin Stanton. In…

  11. John Todd--Numerical Mathematics Pioneer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albers, Don

    2007-01-01

    John Todd, now in his mid-90s, began his career as a pure mathematician, but World War II interrupted that. In this interview, he talks about his education, the significant developments in his becoming a numerical analyst, and the journey that concluded at Caltech. Among the interesting stories are how he met his wife-to-be the mathematician Olga…

  12. We, John Dewey's Audience of Today

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    da Cunha, Marcus Vinicius

    2016-01-01

    This article suggests that John Dewey's "Democracy and Education" does not describe education in an existing society, but it conveys a utopia, in the sense coined by Mannheim: utopian thought aims at instigating actions towards the transformation of reality, intending to attain a better world in the future. Today's readers of Dewey (his…

  13. John Furlong and the "University Project"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, David

    2014-01-01

    Like many senior teacher-educators and educational researchers, John Furlong has faced in several directions throughout his career, sometimes simultaneously. He has clearly not lost his enthusiasm for what happens in the classroom: he strongly appreciates those magical moments which can happen at any time, and which keep teachers going. He loves…

  14. John B. Watson's Legacy: Learning and Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horowitz, Frances Degen

    1992-01-01

    Evaluates John B. Watson's contributions to developmental psychology. Watson's insistence on objective methodology in psychology retains its influence, but his extreme environmentalism has been rejected. His concern with the principles of learning is reflected in the work of Hull and Skinner. (BC)

  15. Obituary: John Leroy Climenhaga, 1916-2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scarfe, Colin

    2009-01-01

    John Leroy Climenhaga was born on 7 November 1916 on a farm some 10 km from Delisle, a small town on the Canadian prairies, located about 50 km south-west of Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, and died at his home in Victoria, British Columbia, on 27 May 2008. His parents, Reuben and Elizabeth (nee Bert) Climenhaga, were farming folk, and he carried their honest and open attitude to the world throughout his life. John was the seventh born, and last to die, of their ten children. His father also served as an ordained minister of the Brethren in Christ. In early adulthood, John worked on his father's farm, but then attended the University of Saskatchewan, obtaining a B.A. with Honors in Mathematics and Physics and an M.A. in Physics, in 1945 and 1949 respectively. Between these events he worked as a Physics Instructor at Regina College from 1946 to 1948. In 1949 Climenhaga joined the faculty of Victoria College, as one of only two physicists in a small institution that was then part of the University of British Columbia. He remained in Victoria for the rest of his career, playing a major role in the College's growth into a full-fledged university, complete with thriving graduate programs in physics and astronomy as well as in many other fields. He served as Head of the Physics Department during the 1960s, a period which saw the College become the University of Victoria, with a full undergraduate program in Physics, and campaigned successfully for the establishment of a program in Astronomy, which began in 1965. From 1969 until 1972 he held the position of Dean of Arts and Science, and championed the university's participation in the Tri-University Meson Facility, whose high-current medium-energy beam was ideal for the production and study of mesons and their physics. That period was a turbulent one in the university's history, but John's integrity and his balanced and fair-minded approach to conflicts were of immeasurable importance in steering the young institution through it

  16. Speaking Personally--With John Seely Brown

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Journal of Distance Education, 2008

    2008-01-01

    This article presents an interview with John Seely Brown, a visiting scholar at the University of Southern California and a former chief scientist of Xerox Corporation and director of its Palo Alto Research Center (PARC)--a position he held for nearly two decades. While head of PARC, Brown expanded the role of corporate research to include such…

  17. Speaking Personally--With John "Pathfinder" Lester

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beaubois, Terry

    2013-01-01

    John Lester is currently the chief learning officer at ReactionGrid, a software company developing 3-D simulations and multiuser virtual world platforms. Lester's background includes working with Linden Lab on Second Life's education activities and neuroscience research. His primary focus is on collaborative learning and instructional…

  18. John Hull and the Money Culture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Attfield, David

    2008-01-01

    John Hull's recent educational writings have included several on what he calls the "money culture". This is analysed and criticised in this article. Hull offers a Marxist and a neo-Marxist account of the role of money in western societies utilising the labour theory of value, false consciousness and the materialist interpretation of history. It is…

  19. Jean Piaget's Debt to John Dewey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tanner, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Jean Piaget became a veritable institution unto himself in education and psychology, largely as the result of his developmental-stage theory advanced over the second quarter of the twentieth century. Not until Piaget was 73 did he make mention of John Dewey's work at Dewey's laboratory school, founded in 1894 at the University of Chicago. But here…

  20. John Dewey on Philosophy and Childhood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gregory, Maughn; Granger, David

    2012-01-01

    John Dewey was not a philosopher of education in the now-traditional sense of a doctor of philosophy who examines educational ends, means, and controversies through the disciplinary lenses of epistemology, ethics, and political theory, or of agenda-driven schools such as existentialism, feminism, and critical theory. Rather, Dewey was both an…

  1. John Langstaff: Community Musician and Reveler

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bartolome, Sarah J.; Campbell, Patricia Shehan

    2009-01-01

    John Langstaff fits within a select group of pathfinders in American music education who have shaped the profession's service to schools and society with special attention to the traditional musical expressions of American folk. His life and works are worthy of study for the contributions he made as a singer who modelled the nuances of traditional…

  2. Capitalism in Six Westerns by John Ford

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braun, Carlos Rodriguez

    2011-01-01

    The economic and institutional analysis of capitalism can be illustrated through John Ford's Westerns. This article focuses on six classics by Ford that show the move toward modern order, the creation of a new society, and the rule of law. Economic features are pervading, from property rights and contracts to markets, money, and trade. Ford has…

  3. John Dewey's Conundrum: Can Democratic Schools Empower?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shutz, Aaron

    2001-01-01

    Examines John Dewey's vision of and concerns for democratic education, arguing that his approach failed to equip students to act effectively in the world as it was (and still is) and that his model of democracy, while extremely useful, is nonetheless inadequate to serve the varied needs of students living in a diverse and contentious society. (SM)

  4. John W. Thoburn: International Humanitarian Award

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Psychologist, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Presents a short biography of the winner of the American Psychological Association's International Humanitarian Award. The 2012 winner, John W. Thoburn, is an extraordinary psychologist who devotes himself consistently to service to underserved populations, especially in the aftermath of natural or human-induced disasters. He exemplifies a genuine…

  5. John F. Kennedy School and Community Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atlanta Public Schools, GA.

    Located near an existing neighborhood health clinic, the John F. Kennedy School and Community Center provides a neighborhood base for numerous educational, health, and social agencies. The middle school can accommodate over 1,000 students in grades six through eight. The community center fills the need for civic and social organizations often…

  6. John Dewey and Adult Learning in Museums

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monk, David F.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this article is to investigate learning in museums through the lens of John Dewey's philosophy of education and experiential learning. The influence of Dewey's philosophy of education is widespread and resounding. In this article, I examine the experiential qualities of Dewey's philosophy and compare it with the objectives of the…

  7. John Moulton Homestead, water channel with board cover for walkway ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    John Moulton Homestead, water channel with board cover for walkway to house, looking east - John Moulton Homestead, Northwest corner of Mormon Row Road and Antelope Flats Road, Kelly, Teton County, WY

  8. Obituary: John J. Hillman, 1938-2006

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chanover, Nancy

    2007-12-01

    John J. Hillman, a dedicated NASA civil servant, spectroscopist, astrophysicist, planetary scientist, and mentor, died on February 12, 2006 of ocular melanoma at his home in Columbia, Maryland. His professional and personal interests were wide-reaching and varied, and he devoted his career to the advancement of our understanding of the beauty and wonder in the world around us. His love of nature, art, and science made him a true Renaissance man. John was born in Fort Jay, New York, on November 22, 1938, and was raised in Washington, D.C. He received his B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. degrees in Physics from American University in 1967, 1970, and 1975, respectively. He began working at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, then in its infancy, in 1969, juggling a full-time position as a Research Physicist, the completion of his M.S. and Ph.D. degrees, and a young family. His background in molecular spectroscopy enabled him to apply his skills to numerous disciplines within NASA: infrared and radio astronomy; electronic, vibrational, and rotational structure of interstellar molecules; solar and stellar atmospheres; and planetary atmospheres. He published more than 70 journal papers in these disciplines. He was a frequent contributor to the Ohio State University International Symposium on Molecular Spectroscopy, and possessed a rare ability to bridge the gap between laboratory and remote sensing spectroscopy, bringing scientists from different disciplines together to understand our Universe. The last fifteen years of John's career were devoted to the development of acousto-optic tunable filter (AOTF) cameras. He championed this technology as a low-cost, low-power alternative to traditional imaging cameras for in situ or remotely sensed planetary exploration. It was within this context that I got to know John, and eventually worked closely with him on the demonstration and application of this technology for planetary science using ground-based telescopes in New Mexico, California

  9. 7. John and James Dobson Carpet Mill, East and West ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. John and James Dobson Carpet Mill, East and West Parcels, May 17, 1926, (John and James Dobson, Inc. East Falls, Aero Service Corp., Neg. No. 5986, May 17, 1926, Free Library of Philadelphia, Print Collection). - John & James Dobson Carpet Mill (West Parcel), 4041-4055 Ridge Avenue, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  10. Obituary: John W. Firor (1927-2007)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilman, Peter A.

    2009-12-01

    John W. Firor, a former Director of the High Altitude Observatory and the National Center for Atmospheric Research, and a founder of the Solar Physics Division of the American Astronomical Society, died of Alzheimer's disease in Pullman, Washington on November 5, 2007, he was 80. He was born in Athens Georgia on October 18, 1927, where his father was a professor of agricultural economics. John had an unusually diverse scientific career. His interest in physics and astrophysics began while serving in the army, during which time he was assigned to the Los Alamos National Laboratory, where he guarded highly radioactive materials (many have heard him describe how informal the protections were compared to later times). After his service he returned to college and graduated in physics from Georgia Tech in 1949. He received his Ph.D. from the University of Chicago in 1954, writing his thesis on cosmic rays under John Simpson. John Firor would later remark that: "If you needed cosmic rays to actually do anything, you are sunk." That thought, partly in jest, may help explain his motivation for moving to so many new scientific and management pursuits. John moved from cosmic ray physics to radio astronomy (particularly of the Sun) when he began work at the Carnegie Institution of Washington's Department of Terrestrial Magnetism, where he remained until 1961. During this time, he met Walter Orr Roberts, then the Director of the High Altitude Observatory (HAO) in Boulder, Colorado. HAO was then affiliated with the University of Colorado. In 1959, a movement began to upgrade the atmospheric sciences in the United States by establishing a National Center, where the largest, most important atmospheric research problems could be addressed. Roberts became the first Director of NCAR, as well as the first president of the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR), the consortium of universities that was commissioned to manage and staff the new Center. HAO became a

  11. A New Reading of Shakespeare's King John.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usher, Peter D.

    1995-12-01

    Shakespeare wrote King John c.1594, six years after the defeat of the Spanish Armada, and ~ 50 years after publication of the Copernican heliocentric hypothesis. It is said to be the most unhistorical of the History Plays, ``anomalous'', ``puzzling'', and ``odd'', and as such it has engendered far more than the customary range of interpretive opinion. I suggest that the play alerts Elizabethans not just to military and political threats, but to a changing cosmic world view, all especially threatening as they arise in Catholic countries. (a) Personification characterizes the play. John personifies the old order, while Arthur and the Dauphin's armies personify the new. I suggest that Shakespeare decenters King John just as Copernicus decentered the world. (b) Hubert menaces Arthur's eyes for a whole scene (4.1), but the need for such cruelty is not explained and is especially odd as Arthur is already under sentence of death (3.3.65-66). This hitherto unexplained anomaly suggests that the old order fears what the new might see. (c) Eleanor's confession is made only to Heaven and to her son the King (1.1.42-43), yet by echoing and word play the Messenger from France later reveals to John that he is privy to it (4.2.119-124). This circumstance has not been questioned heretofore. I suggest that the Messenger is like the wily Hermes (Mercury), chief communicator of the gods and patron of the sciences; by revealing that he moves in the highest circles, he tells John that he speaks with an authority that transcends even that of a king. The message from on high presages more than political change; it warns of a new cosmic and religious world order (d) Most agree that John is a weak king, so Shakespeare must have suspected flaws in the old ways. He would have known that Tycho Brahe's new star of 1572, the comet of 1577, and the 1576 model of his compatriot Thomas Digges, were shattering old ideas. (e) The tensions of the play are not resolved because in 1594 the new order was

  12. John Holt Stanway: Gone to Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryan, J.

    2008-01-01

    John Holt Stanway (1799Ð1872) was an amateur astronomer who lived in Manchester, England until 1845. He was in contact with the English Ôgrand amateurÕ astronomer, William Henry Smyth, who supported him for Fellowship of the Royal Astronomical Society and evidently advised him on how to build and equip an observatory. Apparently, Stanway had an observatory at Chorlton-cum-Hardy in 1837. In 1845, Stanway left for the United States in response to serious business problems. En route, he met Ashbel Smith, a representative of the government of the Republic of Texas, who convinced Stanway to go to Texas. There he changed his name to John H. Smythe Stanley and settled in Houston, where he re-established his observatory. He became a commercial photographer and wrote about astronomy and other scientific subjects in Houston newspapers until his death in 1872.

  13. John Banister: an Elizabethan surgeon in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Mello, Amílcar D'Avila de

    2011-03-01

    In Brazil's sixteenth-century history, very few references are made to health professionals. On the expedition of Edward Fenton, dispatched by the English Crown in 1582 to set up a trading post in Asia, was the famous barber-surgeon and physician John Banister. The naval squadron, diverted from its original route to repeat the feats of Sir Francis Drake, stopped over in Africa, crossed the Atlantic and anchored off the Santa Catarina coast in Brazil. In these waters, the expedition degenerated into piracy and returned unsuccessful to Europe. John Banister is considered the person who liberated English anatomy from mediaeval slavery, shedding upon it the light of the Renaissance. It was the first time that anyone of this importance in the area of health had visited these latitudes.

  14. John N. Brady (1952-2009): a Generous Spirit

    PubMed Central

    Enquist, Lynn W.

    2009-01-01

    John N. Brady, Chief of the Virus Tumor Biology Section of the Laboratory of Cellular Oncology, National Institutes of Health, died of cancer on 27 April 2009. John was a stellar member of the virology community. He was a longtime Journal of Virology reviewer and a member of the editorial board. He will be missed. Fatah Kashanchi of the George Washington University Medical Center has written John's memorial. Fatah worked with John at the NIH and published more than 30 papers with him. Fatah thanks all the people who contributed to John's obituary, including Kuan-Teh Jeang, Lou Laimins, Mary Loeken, Renaud Mehieux, Paul Lambert, Graziella Piras, Scott Gitlin, Paul Lindholm, Nadia Rosenthal, Sergi Nekhai, Brian Wigdahl, David Price, Susan J. Marriott, Cynthia Masison, Jurgen Dittmer, Eric Verdin, Bassel E. Sawaya, and John's longtime assistants Janet Duvall Grimm and Michael Radonovich, who gave immense support to all the individuals who went through John's lab. PMID:19474098

  15. Astronaut John Young photographed collecting lunar samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    Astronaut John W. Young, commander of the Apollo 16 lunar landing mission, is photographed collecting lunar samples near North Ray crater during the third Apollo 16 extravehicular activity (EVA-3) at the Descartes landing site. This picture was taken by Astronaut Charles M. Duke Jr., lunar module pilot. Young is using the lunar surface rake and a set of tongs. The Lunar Roving Vehicle is parked in the field of large boulders in the background.

  16. John Greenwood, dentist to President Washington.

    PubMed

    Ring, Malvin E

    2010-12-01

    In the practice of dentistry in colonial times, no name shines more brightly than that of John Greenwood, the favorite dentist of President George Washington. But it is more than this alone that brings luster to his name and renown. A study of the advertisements he placed in newspapers in Massachusetts and New York gives us an insight into his treatments and his mode of practice. A newly discovered advertisement adds to our knowledge of this remarkable practitioner. PMID:21261186

  17. John Wesley Powell: soldier, explorer, scientist

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    1969-01-01

    One hundred years ago John Wesley Powell and nine adventure-seeking companions completed the first exploration of the dangerous and almost uncharted canyons of the Green and Colorado Rivers. By this trip, Powell, a 35-year old teacher of natural history, apparently unhampered by the lack of his right forearm (amputated after the Battle of Shiloh) opened up a large unknown part of continental United States and brought to a climax the era of western exploration.

  18. Astronaut John Young displays drawing of Snoopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    Astronaut John W. Young, Apollo 10 command module pilot, displays drawing of Snoopy in this color reproduction taken from the fourth telecast made by the color television camera aboard the Apollo 10 spacecraft. When this picture was made the Apollo 10 spacecraft was about half-way to the moon, or approximately 112,000 nautical miles from the earth. Snoopy will be the code name of the Lunar Module (LM) during Apollo 10 operations when the LM and CM are separated.

  19. The dental health of President John Adams.

    PubMed

    Ring, Malvin E

    2004-01-01

    The oral health of George Washington has been widely studied and written about. Not so, however, with our second president, John Adams, whose dental health was apparently poor throughout his life. His pernicious habit of inducing vomiting to treat various bodily ills, coupled with a great love of sweets, led to the loss of his teeth, which he stubbornly refused to replace with dentures. When he was older, this led to his speech being so badly affected, that he could barely be understood.

  20. John Dewey's Visits to Hawai'i

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McEwan, Hunter

    2015-01-01

    John Dewey visited Hawai'i on three separate occasions. Of all three trips, by far the most important, as far as Dewey's influence on education in Hawai'i is concerned, was in 1899 when he came with his wife, Alice Chipman Dewey, to help launch the University Extension program in Honolulu. The Deweys' second trip was a very brief one--twenty years…

  1. John Marshall: the making of true spectacles.

    PubMed Central

    Bryden, D. J.; Simms, D. L.

    1994-01-01

    In 1693 John Marshall of London devised a novel method of grinding batches of identical, good quality, lenses of a specified focal length. Its commendation by the Royal Society led to a trade war between Marshall and rivals in the Worshipful Company of Spectacle Makers. Despite initial opposition the method was rapidly adopted by London opticians and, though much modified, it forms the unrecognised basis of present day practice. Images p1714-a PMID:7819998

  2. The mystery of John Wilkes Booth's dentist.

    PubMed

    Hyson, J M; Kauffman, M W

    1999-11-01

    For many years there has been much speculation over the identity of the dentist of President Abraham Lincoln's assassin, John Wilkes Booth. Some have considered Dr. William Merrill (1833-1918), a rather prominent Washington, D.C. dentist, as the man who restored two of Booth's teeth with gold a few days before the assassination. Who was the mysterious Dr. Merrill and what evidence do we have that he ever treated Booth? PMID:10726569

  3. How security is changing at John Hopkins.

    PubMed

    McLean, W

    1993-10-01

    William McLean, CHPA, is security director at Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, MD. Formerly chief of security with the Baltimore City Department of Hospitals, McLean has worked in health care security at the director level for 15 years. He also spent eight years with the Baltimore City Police Department. At Hopkins, officials recently decided to overhaul the $7 million security operation because of increasing crime. In this interview, McLean talks about some of the changes.

  4. John A. Simpson (1916-2000)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    John A. Simpson, recipient of the 2000 William Bowie Medal, died August 31 in Chicago at the age of 83. Dr. Simpson, who became an AGU member in 1957 and a Fellow in 1962, spent most of his professional career with the Enrico Fermi Institute for Nuclear Studies of the University of Chicago, and at that university's department of physics. He was a member of the Solar and Heliospheric Physics subsection of SPA.

  5. Spatial and temporal characterization of mosquito distribution and arbovirus transmission activity in St. Johns County, Florida. St. Augustine, FL.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Global information technology (GIT) (including Global Positioning System [GPS], Geographic Information Systems [GIS], and image analysis) can be used to develop adult mosquito sampling methods and to characterize adult mosquito distributions and disease transmission patterns. At this meeting of v...

  6. Obituary: John Daniel Kraus, 1910-2004

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraus, John D., Jr.; Marhefka, Ronald J.

    2005-12-01

    John Daniel Kraus, 94, of Delaware, Ohio, director of the Ohio State University "Big Ear" Radio Observatory, physicist, inventor, and environmentalist died 18 July 2004 at his home in Delaware, Ohio. He was born on 28 June 1910 in Ann Arbor, Michigan. He received a Bachelor of Science in 1930, a Master of Science in 1931, and a PhD in physics in 1933 (at 23 years of age), all from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. During the 1930s at Michigan, he was involved in physics projects, antenna consulting, and in atomic-particle-accelerator research using the University of Michigan's premier cyclotron. Throughout the late 1920s and the 1930s, John was an avid radio amateur with call sign W8JK. He was back on the air in the 1970s. In 2001 the amateur radio magazine CQ named him to the inaugural class of its Amateur Radio Hall of Fame. He developed many widely used innovative antennas. The "8JK closely spaced array" and the "corner reflector" were among his early designs. Edwin H. Armstrong wrote John in July 1941 indicating in part, "I have read with interest your article in the Proceedings of the Institute on the corner reflector...Please let me congratulate you on a very fine piece of work." Perhaps John's most famous invention, and a product of his intuitive reasoning process, is the helical antenna, widely used in space communications, on global positioning satellites, and for other applications. During World War II, John was in Washington, DC as a civilian scientist with the U.S. Navy responsible for "degaussing" the electromagnetic fields of steel ships to make them safe from magnetic mines. He also worked on radar countermeasures at Harvard University's Radio Research Laboratory. He received the U.S. Navy Meritorious Civilian Service Award for his war work. In 1946 he took a faculty position at Ohio State University, becoming professor in 1949, and retiring in 1980 as McDougal Professor Emeritus of Electrical Engineering and Astronomy. Even so, he never retired

  7. 21st Century Scholars

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Terrence

    2009-01-01

    Bethpage Union Free School District in New York is a high-performing district by almost any current accountability measure. Yet administrators and teachers worried that they were not doing enough to prepare their students as critical thinkers for the 21st century. Inspired by the curriculum framework of the Partnership for 21st Century Skills, the…

  8. Obituary: John J. Hillman, 1938-2006

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chanover, Nancy

    2007-12-01

    John J. Hillman, a dedicated NASA civil servant, spectroscopist, astrophysicist, planetary scientist, and mentor, died on February 12, 2006 of ocular melanoma at his home in Columbia, Maryland. His professional and personal interests were wide-reaching and varied, and he devoted his career to the advancement of our understanding of the beauty and wonder in the world around us. His love of nature, art, and science made him a true Renaissance man. John was born in Fort Jay, New York, on November 22, 1938, and was raised in Washington, D.C. He received his B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. degrees in Physics from American University in 1967, 1970, and 1975, respectively. He began working at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, then in its infancy, in 1969, juggling a full-time position as a Research Physicist, the completion of his M.S. and Ph.D. degrees, and a young family. His background in molecular spectroscopy enabled him to apply his skills to numerous disciplines within NASA: infrared and radio astronomy; electronic, vibrational, and rotational structure of interstellar molecules; solar and stellar atmospheres; and planetary atmospheres. He published more than 70 journal papers in these disciplines. He was a frequent contributor to the Ohio State University International Symposium on Molecular Spectroscopy, and possessed a rare ability to bridge the gap between laboratory and remote sensing spectroscopy, bringing scientists from different disciplines together to understand our Universe. The last fifteen years of John's career were devoted to the development of acousto-optic tunable filter (AOTF) cameras. He championed this technology as a low-cost, low-power alternative to traditional imaging cameras for in situ or remotely sensed planetary exploration. It was within this context that I got to know John, and eventually worked closely with him on the demonstration and application of this technology for planetary science using ground-based telescopes in New Mexico, California

  9. John Hughlings-Jackson: a sesquicentennial tribute.

    PubMed

    Swash, M

    1986-09-01

    One hundred and fifty years have elapsed since the birth of John Hughlings-Jackson, a pivotal figure in the development of clinical neuroscience. In this review the origin of Jackson's postulate of a hierarchical organisation of function in the nervous system is described in the context of his education and his contacts with contemporaries, both in his clinical practice at The London Hospital and at the National Hospital, Queen Square, and in relation to the evolutionary approach to the organisation and ideas on biology and society set out by the philosopher Herbert Spencer. PMID:3531410

  10. The healing philosopher: John Locke's medical ethics.

    PubMed

    Short, Bradford William

    2004-01-01

    This article examines a heretofore unexplored facet of John Locke's philosophy. Locke was a medical doctor and he also wrote about medical issues that are controversial today. Despite this, Locke's medical ethics has yet to be studied. An analysis of Locke's education and his teachers and colleagues in the medical profession, of the 17th century Hippocratic Oath, and of the reaction to the last recorded outbreak of the bubonic plague in London, shines some light on the subject of Locke's medical ethics. The study of Locke's medical ethics confirms that he was a deontologist who opposed all suicide and abortion through much of pregnancy.

  11. John Hughlings-Jackson: a sesquicentennial tribute.

    PubMed Central

    Swash, M

    1986-01-01

    One hundred and fifty years have elapsed since the birth of John Hughlings-Jackson, a pivotal figure in the development of clinical neuroscience. In this review the origin of Jackson's postulate of a hierarchical organisation of function in the nervous system is described in the context of his education and his contacts with contemporaries, both in his clinical practice at The London Hospital and at the National Hospital, Queen Square, and in relation to the evolutionary approach to the organisation and ideas on biology and society set out by the philosopher Herbert Spencer. Images PMID:3531410

  12. John Ray in Italy: lost manuscripts rediscovered

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, Michael

    2014-01-01

    This paper discloses the content of two manuscripts of John Ray that have hitherto been unknown to Ray scholars. The manuscripts survive in the Hampshire Record Office, having descended through the Prideaux-Brune family. They record information about Ray's tour of Italy in the 1660s that does not appear in his Observations … made in a journey through … the Low-countries, Germany, Italy and France (1673), including a visit to the museum of Athanasius Kircher in Rome, and provide clues concerning the composition of Ray's 1673 book. PMID:24921104

  13. Dedication: John W. Wright, 1929-1978

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, John W.

    1980-09-01

    The death of John W. Wright in an automobile accident on November 20, 1978, came as a great shock to all who knew him. His family and friends lost a stimulating, compassionate human being whose many-faceted personality they greatly admired. The scientific community working on remote sensing of the air-water interface lost one of its pioneers and leaders. To dedicate this issue of the Journal of Geophysical Research to Dr. Wright seems a fitting tribute to his many scientific achievements.

  14. John Hunter: the first surgical scientist.

    PubMed

    Maxwell, B

    1987-01-01

    John Hunter was a brilliant surgeon and teacher, the father of scientific surgery and surgical pathology and founder of the world-renowned Hunterian museum. This essay attempts to answer the following questions. Who was this man? How did he achieve such a remarkable station? Why was he loved by some yet detested by others? When did the poor student start to become the superb teacher? How did he manage to collect the thousands of specimens he left in his museum? What is it about Hunter that makes him so well remembered today, almost 200 years after his death?

  15. Obituary: John Daniel Kraus, 1910-2004

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraus, John D., Jr.; Marhefka, Ronald J.

    2005-12-01

    John Daniel Kraus, 94, of Delaware, Ohio, director of the Ohio State University "Big Ear" Radio Observatory, physicist, inventor, and environmentalist died 18 July 2004 at his home in Delaware, Ohio. He was born on 28 June 1910 in Ann Arbor, Michigan. He received a Bachelor of Science in 1930, a Master of Science in 1931, and a PhD in physics in 1933 (at 23 years of age), all from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. During the 1930s at Michigan, he was involved in physics projects, antenna consulting, and in atomic-particle-accelerator research using the University of Michigan's premier cyclotron. Throughout the late 1920s and the 1930s, John was an avid radio amateur with call sign W8JK. He was back on the air in the 1970s. In 2001 the amateur radio magazine CQ named him to the inaugural class of its Amateur Radio Hall of Fame. He developed many widely used innovative antennas. The "8JK closely spaced array" and the "corner reflector" were among his early designs. Edwin H. Armstrong wrote John in July 1941 indicating in part, "I have read with interest your article in the Proceedings of the Institute on the corner reflector...Please let me congratulate you on a very fine piece of work." Perhaps John's most famous invention, and a product of his intuitive reasoning process, is the helical antenna, widely used in space communications, on global positioning satellites, and for other applications. During World War II, John was in Washington, DC as a civilian scientist with the U.S. Navy responsible for "degaussing" the electromagnetic fields of steel ships to make them safe from magnetic mines. He also worked on radar countermeasures at Harvard University's Radio Research Laboratory. He received the U.S. Navy Meritorious Civilian Service Award for his war work. In 1946 he took a faculty position at Ohio State University, becoming professor in 1949, and retiring in 1980 as McDougal Professor Emeritus of Electrical Engineering and Astronomy. Even so, he never retired

  16. John Hughlings-Jackson: a sesquicentennial tribute.

    PubMed

    Swash, M

    1986-09-01

    One hundred and fifty years have elapsed since the birth of John Hughlings-Jackson, a pivotal figure in the development of clinical neuroscience. In this review the origin of Jackson's postulate of a hierarchical organisation of function in the nervous system is described in the context of his education and his contacts with contemporaries, both in his clinical practice at The London Hospital and at the National Hospital, Queen Square, and in relation to the evolutionary approach to the organisation and ideas on biology and society set out by the philosopher Herbert Spencer.

  17. The chemistry of John Dalton's color blindness.

    PubMed

    Hunt, D M; Dulai, K S; Bowmaker, J K; Mollon, J D

    1995-02-17

    John Dalton described his own color blindness in 1794. In common with his brother, he confused scarlet with green and pink with blue. Dalton supposed that his vitreous humor was tinted blue, selectively absorbing longer wavelengths. He instructed that his eyes should be examined after his death, but the examination revealed that the humors were perfectly clear. In experiments presented here, DNA extracted from his preserved eye tissue showed that Dalton was a deuteranope, lacking the middlewave photopigment of the retina. This diagnosis is shown to be compatible with the historical record of his phenotype, although it contradicts Thomas Young's belief that Dalton was a protanope.

  18. The nature of isostasy on the moon - How big a Pratt-fall for Airy models. [crustal density-topographic elevation correlation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solomon, S. C.

    1978-01-01

    The correlation between topographic elevation and the major element chemistry of the lunar surface in non-mare regions suggest that a Pratt-type isostatic mechanism may be important in the lunar highlands. Pratt isostasy involves compensation of greater elevation by lower crustal density. Computation of the bulk density from surface chemistry and normative mineralogy, followed by comparisons between calculated density and surface height, is suggested as a means of testing the applicability of the Pratt isostatic model to the moon. A Pratt-type lunar crustal model requires much smaller variations in lunar crustal thickness than those necessitated by a constant-density (Airy) isostatic model. Mechanisms to produce a crust regionally heterogeneous in composition early in lunar differentiation are also required for Pratt isostasy.

  19. Propagation properties of right-hand circularly polarized Airy-Gaussian beams through slabs of right-handed materials and left-handed materials.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jiayao; Liang, Zijie; Deng, Fu; Yu, Weihao; Zhao, Ruihuang; Chen, Bo; Yang, Xiangbo; Deng, Dongmei

    2015-11-01

    The propagation of right-hand circularly polarized Airy-Gaussian beams (RHCPAiGBs) through slabs of right-handed materials (RHMs) and left-handed materials (LHMs) is investigated analytically and numerically with the transfer matrix method. An approximate analytical expression for the RHCPAiGBs passing through a paraxial ABCD optical system is derived on the basis of the Huygens diffraction integral formula. The intensity and the phase distributions of the RHCPAiGBs through RHMs and LHMs are demonstrated. The influence of the parameter χ0 on the propagation of RHCPAiGBs through RHM and LHM slabs is investigated. The RHCPAiGBs possess transverse-momentum currents, which shows that the physics underlying this intriguing accelerating effect is that of the combined contributions of the transverse spin and transverse orbital currents. Additionally, we go a step further to explore the radiation force including the gradient force and scattering force of the RHCPAiGBs.

  20. Can Hooke's Law and the Airy Disk First Zero Radius Formulation Predict That Education and Work Environment Visual Task Excesses Lead to Vision Impairment?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLeod, Douglas M.; McLeod, Roger D.

    2002-10-01

    DMM found that a distant, single church steeple, which appeared "twin-like" after extended studying episodes, could then be brought into correct visual register by a conscious effort. Similar anecdotal events are repeatable by attentive students or workers in the early stages of educationally or work environmentally induced repetitive vision impairment. RDM proposes that his model for vision and its repair utilizes sequentially applied vision improvement stages that are the equivalent of DMM's experience. Such visual events involve feedback signals generated during the crystalline lens's minor dioptric oscillations that are generated by the blinking reflex, empowered by the Airy radius proportional to wavelength times focal length divided by pupil aperture. This implies some conscious control of feedback mechanisms, which can self-regulate vision protecting processes. Continued visual effort under duress invokes Hooke's "stress proportional to strain." Exceeding extrinsic eye muscles' elastic limits overrides spontaneous feedback repair mechanisms.

  1. 5. Historic American Buildings Survey, John Jennings, Photographer February 16, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. Historic American Buildings Survey, John Jennings, Photographer February 16, 1935 BALCONY, SEATING ARRANGEMENT, SOUTH WALL. - Hanover Green Meetinghouse, Nanticoke vicinity, Hanover Green, Luzerne County, PA

  2. 4. Historic American Buildings Survey, John Jennings, Photographer February 16, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. Historic American Buildings Survey, John Jennings, Photographer February 16, 1935 GROUND FLOOR, SEATING ARRANGEMENT & STAIRWAY. - Hanover Green Meetinghouse, Nanticoke vicinity, Hanover Green, Luzerne County, PA

  3. The Trieste Lecture of John Stewart Bell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bassi, Angelo; Carlo Ghirardi, Gian

    2007-03-01

    Delivered at Trieste on the occasion of the 25th Anniversary of the International Centre for Theoretical Physics, 2 November 1989 The video of this lecture is available here. Please see the PDF for the transcript of the lecture. General remarks by Angelo Bassi and GianCarlo Ghirardi During the autumn of 1989 the International Centre for Theoretical Physics, Trieste, celebrated the 25th anniversary of its creation. Among the many prestigious speakers, who delivered extremely interesting lectures on that occasion, was the late John Stewart Bell. All lectures have been recorded on tape. We succeeded in getting a copy of John's lecture. In the lecture, many of the arguments that John had lucidly stressed in his writings appear once more, but there are also extremely interesting new remarks which, to our knowledge, have not been presented elsewhere. In particular he decided, as pointed out by the very choice of the title of his lecture, to call attention to the fact that the theory presents two types of difficulties, which Dirac classified as first and second class. The former are those connected with the so-called macro-objectification problem, the latter with the divergences characterizing relativistic quantum field theories. Bell describes the precise position of Dirac on these problems and he stresses appropriately how, contrary to Dirac's hopes, the steps which have led to a partial overcoming of the second class difficulties have not helped in any way whatsoever to overcome those of the first class. He then proceeds to analyse the origin and development of the Dynamical Reduction Program and draws attention to the problems that still affect it, in particular that of a consistent relativistic generalization. When the two meetings Are there quantum jumps? and On the present status of Quantum Mechanics were organized in Trieste and Losinj (Croatia), on 5 10 September 2005, it occurred to us that this lecture, which has never been published, might represent an

  4. John Lubbock, science, and the liberal intellectual

    PubMed Central

    Clark, J. F. M.

    2014-01-01

    John Lubbock's longest-standing scientific research interest was entomology. Some of his earliest systematic investigations of insect and marine life began under the tutelage of Darwin. Darwin shaped the trajectory of, and the programme for, Lubbock's natural history work. However, to understand John Lubbock's identity as a scientist, he must be located within the context of the Victorian ‘intellectual’. This paper traces Lubbock's entomological work from its early development under Darwin to his later work on insect sensory physiology and comparative psychology. Far from being the death of his scientific career, Lubbock's entry into Parliament marked the pinnacle of his career as a scientific intellectual. He built on his early work on invertebrate anatomy, physiology and taxonomy, and on his archaeological and anthropological research to expound his vision of mental evolution. His research on ‘savages’, on ants, bees and wasps, and on his dog, ‘Van’, permitted him to expatiate upon the psychic unity of all sentient beings, which, in turn, underpinned his overarching educational programme.

  5. AIDS: just the facts from specialists at Johns Hopkins.

    PubMed

    Finkbeiner, A

    1985-12-01

    This article, based on information from specialists at Johns Hopkins, poses and then answers 3 broad questions about the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). 1st, it is asked, "What is AIDS and how serious is it?" It is noted that AIDS is only 1 of several forms taken by infection with the human T-lymphotropic virus type III/lymphadenopathy-associated virus (HTLV-III/LAV). The earliest form of infection is believed to occur within a few weeks of exposure to the virus, and some patients develop an acute syndrome that resembles infectious mononucleosis. These symptoms disappear after 4-6 weeks, by which time the patient has developed antibodies to the virus. About 2-4%/year of asymptomatic carriers go on to develop AIDS-related complex (ARC), and 15-30% of ARC patients develop AIDS within 5 years. The 2nd question posed is, "How do you catch AIDS?" To cause infection, the virus must go directly into the blood, although the virus alone may not be enough to cause sickness. Previous viral infections such as hepatitis B, herpes, cytomegalovirus, and intestinal parasites have been suggested as co-factors of AIDS. Promiscuity increases the chances of contracting AIDS. Observations of the families of AIDS patients and health care personnel who work with AIDS patients suggest that AIDS cannot be caught by casual contact. Finally, it is asked, "What is being done about AIDS?" 4 strategies are outlined: 1) as a result of donor screening for antibodies to HTLV-III/LAV, AIDS has been completely removed from the blood banks; 2) virologists are attempting to understand the virus so that it can be attacked, and understanding has been advanced by the theory that HTLV-III might be what is called a "slow virus;" 3) education about AIDS is changing the sexual practices that transmit AIDS; and 4) epidemiologists are carefully following those who are at risk, have been exposed, or are already sick.

  6. 46 CFR 7.95 - St. Johns Point, FL to Miami Beach, FL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Inlet Entrance Lighted Whistle Buoy “2”); thence to Jupiter Island bearing approximately 180° true. (h) A line drawn from the seaward extremity of Jupiter Inlet North Jetty to the northeast extremity of the concrete apron on the south side of Jupiter Inlet. (i) A line drawn from the seaward extremity...

  7. 46 CFR 7.95 - St. Johns Point, FL to Miami Beach, FL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Inlet Entrance Lighted Whistle Buoy “2”); thence to Jupiter Island bearing approximately 180° true. (h) A line drawn from the seaward extremity of Jupiter Inlet North Jetty to the northeast extremity of the concrete apron on the south side of Jupiter Inlet. (i) A line drawn from the seaward extremity...

  8. 46 CFR 7.95 - St. Johns Point, FL to Miami Beach, FL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Inlet Entrance Lighted Whistle Buoy “2”); thence to Jupiter Island bearing approximately 180° true. (h) A line drawn from the seaward extremity of Jupiter Inlet North Jetty to the northeast extremity of the concrete apron on the south side of Jupiter Inlet. (i) A line drawn from the seaward extremity...

  9. 76 FR 39890 - St. Johns National Wildlife Refuge, FL; Draft Comprehensive Conservation Plan and Environmental...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-07

    ... resources and would adapt management based on discovery of climate change related impacts. We would work... process through a Federal Register notice on December 14, 2009 (74 FR 66147). Please see that notice for... not actively collect data related to climate change trends and their effects on the refuge....

  10. New library buildings: the Health Sciences Library, Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John's.

    PubMed Central

    Fredericksen, R B

    1979-01-01

    The new Health Sciences Library of Memorial University of Newfoundland is described and illustrated. A library facility that forms part of a larger health sciences center, this is a medium-sized academic health sciences library built on a single level. Along with a physical description of the library and its features, the concepts of single-level libraries, phased occupancy, and the project management approach to building a large health center library are discussed in detail. Images PMID:476319

  11. 46 CFR 7.95 - St. Johns Point, FL to Miami Beach, FL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Inlet Entrance Lighted Whistle Buoy “2”); thence to Jupiter Island bearing approximately 180° true. (h) A line drawn from the seaward extremity of Jupiter Inlet North Jetty to the northeast extremity of the concrete apron on the south side of Jupiter Inlet. (i) A line drawn from the seaward extremity...

  12. 46 CFR 7.95 - St. Johns Point, FL to Miami Beach, FL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Inlet Entrance Lighted Whistle Buoy “2”); thence to Jupiter Island bearing approximately 180° true. (h) A line drawn from the seaward extremity of Jupiter Inlet North Jetty to the northeast extremity of the concrete apron on the south side of Jupiter Inlet. (i) A line drawn from the seaward extremity...

  13. 33 CFR 165.720 - Safety/Security Zone: St. Johns River, Jacksonville, FL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...: (1) All waters within 200 yards of Blount Island, Jacksonville, Florida and all adjacent land within 100 yards of the island shoreline during staging of Department of Defense equipment and during the loading/unloading of military supply vessels. (2) All waters within 200 yards of “any” waterfront...

  14. St. John's Wort in Relieving Fatigue in Patients Undergoing Chemotherapy or Hormone Therapy for Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-17

    Chronic Myeloproliferative Disorders; Fatigue; Leukemia; Lymphoma; Multiple Myeloma and Plasma Cell Neoplasm; Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Precancerous Condition; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  15. Remote sensing of wetlands, marshes, and shorelines in Michigan including St. John's Marsh

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowe, D. S.

    1976-01-01

    Remote sensing data are used to show the strategic relationship of the endangered marsh to population centers of SE Michigan. The potential ecological consequences and the impact of past development and changing lake levels are discussed. Applications of remote sensing are presented showing its usefulness for preparing statewide infrared wetland and forest mapping.

  16. 6. VIEW FROM CHESTNUT ST. (upper), WALNUT ST. (lower) THIRD ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. VIEW FROM CHESTNUT ST. (upper), WALNUT ST. (lower) THIRD ST. (right) AND FOURTH ST. (left), SHOWING CARPENTERS HALL, FIRST BANK OF U.S. AND SECOND BANK OF U.S. - Independence National Historical Park, Walnut, Sixth, Chestnut & Second Streets, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  17. Preparing Environments for the 21st Century: Proceedings of the Cuyahoga Community College Faculty Symposium (Cleveland, Ohio, March 5, 1994).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cuyahoga Community Coll., Cleveland, OH.

    Focusing on current environmental issues and strategies for preparing for the future, this document provides the following conference papers: (1) "Preparing Environments for the 21st Century," by Bailus Walker, Jr.; (2) "Green vs. Greed: Development and Conservation," by John Ferrara; (3) "Plants and People: A Developing Relationship," by Alan…

  18. 78 FR 78382 - Notice of January 10, 2014, Meeting of the Fort Hancock 21st Century Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-26

    ... National Park Service Notice of January 10, 2014, Meeting of the Fort Hancock 21st Century Advisory Committee AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Meeting notice. SUMMARY: This notice sets forth... be obtained from John Warren, Park Ranger, Gateway National Recreation Area, 26 Hudson Road,...

  19. Familiar-Strange: Teaching the Scripture as John Would Teach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ha, Tung-Chiew

    2014-01-01

    The Gospel of John teaches through telling the story of Jesus in light of the familiar Hebrew faith stories. It is an interpretive task that presents Jesus to his audience and teaches them adequate faith. John the Teacher skillfully uses narrative skills to create the familiar-strange effect in his storytelling. Each story is followed by a…

  20. Photocopy of drawing. LAUNCH COMPLEX 39, CRAWLER TRANSPORTER. NASA, John ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of drawing. LAUNCH COMPLEX 39, CRAWLER TRANSPORTER. NASA, John F. Kennedy Space Center, Florida. Drawing 79K00088, John F. Kennedy Space Center, November 1969. SYS FUNCTIONAL DRAWING. Sheet 5 - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, Crawler Transporters, Launcher Road, East of Kennedy Parkway North, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  1. Photocopy of drawing. LAUNCH COMPLEX 39, CRAWLER TRANSPORTER. NASA, John ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of drawing. LAUNCH COMPLEX 39, CRAWLER TRANSPORTER. NASA, John F. Kennedy Space Center, Florida. Drawing 79K00081, John F. Kennedy Space Center, December 1969. SYS FUNCTIONAL DRAWING. Sheet 3 - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, Crawler Transporters, Launcher Road, East of Kennedy Parkway North, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  2. Photocopy of drawing. LAUNCH COMPLEX 39, CRAWLER TRANSPORTER. NASA, John ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of drawing. LAUNCH COMPLEX 39, CRAWLER TRANSPORTER. NASA, John F. Kennedy Space Center, Florida. Drawing 79K00088, John F. Kennedy Space Center, November 1969. SYS FUNCTIONAL DRAWING. Sheet 6 - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, Crawler Transporters, Launcher Road, East of Kennedy Parkway North, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  3. 67. Historic American Buildings Survey John Oliver Brostrup, Photographer August ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    67. Historic American Buildings Survey John Oliver Brostrup, Photographer August 12,1936 1:35 P. M. VIEW OF C.C.C. BOYS SCREENING FOR ARTIFACTS. - General John Mason House, Analostan Island or Theodore Roosevelt Island, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  4. 71. Historic American Buildings Survey John O. Brostrup, Photographer August ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    71. Historic American Buildings Survey John O. Brostrup, Photographer August 12, 1936 1:30 P. M. VIEW OF C.C.C. BOYS EXCAVATING IN UNIT A. - General John Mason House, Analostan Island or Theodore Roosevelt Island, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  5. In memoriam - John M. Young (1942-2013)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    It is with sadness that friends and colleagues of John Young learnt of his death at home in Auckland, New Zealand on 30th September 2013. John began his scientific career at the Plant Diseases Division (PDD) of the Department of Scientific and Industrial Research (DSIR), New Zealand after completing...

  6. Tribes of Men: John Joseph Mathews and Indian Internationalism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lutenski, Emily

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses John Joseph Mathews and Indian internationalism. As an old man, Osage intellectual, writer, and historian, John Joseph Mathews recalled his expatriation from the United States during the 1920s. After growing up in Pawhuska, Oklahoma, seat of the Osage Nation, where he had been born in 1894 to a white mother…

  7. 40. Historic American Buildings Survey John O. Brostrup, Photographer August ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    40. Historic American Buildings Survey John O. Brostrup, Photographer August 13, 1936 1:50 P. M. DETAIL OF SOUTH WALL-CENTRAL ROOM OF BASEMENT-UNIT B-AFTER CHALKING - General John Mason House, Analostan Island or Theodore Roosevelt Island, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  8. 39. Historic American Buildings Survey John O. Brostrup, Photographer August ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    39. Historic American Buildings Survey John O. Brostrup, Photographer August 13, 1936 1:30 P. M. DETAIL OF SOUTH WALL-CENTRAL ROOM OF BASEMENT-UNIT B-BEFORE CHALKING. - General John Mason House, Analostan Island or Theodore Roosevelt Island, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  9. John Dewey's Experiential Theories and Leadership Preparation in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berman, Larry A.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the degree to which John Dewey's experiential theories were embedded in leadership preparation curricula in departments of leadership and college student personnel administration at universities in the Midwestern United States. John Dewey, who is considered to be America's greatest philosopher, defined…

  10. 77 FR 27766 - Jamar, John P.; Notice of Filing

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-11

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Jamar, John P.; Notice of Filing Take notice that on May 3, 2012, John P...-8659. Comment Date: 5 p.m. Eastern Time on May 24, 2012. Dated: May 4, 2012. Kimberly D. Bose, Secretary. BILLING CODE 6717-01-P...

  11. A Lifetime of Service: Dr. John Arthur Henschke

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Mary

    2008-01-01

    John Henschke is a lifelong learner who studied with Malcolm Knowles and who interviewed and knew such adult educators as Cyril Houle and his contemporaries. John has devoted his life to service both in the ministry and in education; he has traveled the globe with a view to encouraging lifelong learning and the concepts of andragogy for all. His…

  12. 13. John and James Dobson Carpet Mill, East and West ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. John and James Dobson Carpet Mill, East and West parcels, site plan-upper left, elevation-upper right, and survey-below, 1885. Hexamer, Ernest and Son. Hexamer General Surveys, 1867-1895, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania: E. Hexamer and Son, 1885, pp. 1890-1891. - John & James Dobson Carpet Mill (West Parcel), 4041-4055 Ridge Avenue, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  13. 10. John and James Dobson Carpet Mill, East and West ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. John and James Dobson Carpet Mill, East and West parcels, site plan-lower right, and surrounding environs, 1875. Hopkins, Griffith Morgan. City Atlas of Philadelphia by Wards, 7 vols., Philadelphia, Pennsylvania: G. M. Hopkins and Co., 1875, pp. 46-47. - John & James Dobson Carpet Mill (West Parcel), 4041-4055 Ridge Avenue, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  14. 18. John and James Dobson Carpet Mill, East and West ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. John and James Dobson Carpet Mill, East and West parcels, site plan-lower left, and surrounding environs, 1925. Bromley, George Washington and Bromley, Walter Scott. Atlas of the City of Philadelphia (North Philadelphia), Philadelphia, Pennsylvania: George W. and Walter S. Bromley, 1925, p. 106. - John & James Dobson Carpet Mill (West Parcel), 4041-4055 Ridge Avenue, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  15. 15. John and James Dobson Carpet Mill, East and West ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. John and James Dobson Carpet Mill, East and West parcels, site plan-lower right, and surrounding environs, 1901. Baist, George William. Northern District of Baist's Detail Property Atlases of the City of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 7 vols., Philadelphia, Pennsylvania: G. W. Bromley and Co., 1901, Plan 17. - John & James Dobson Carpet Mill (West Parcel), 4041-4055 Ridge Avenue, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  16. 19. John and James Dobson Carpet Mills, West parcel, topographical ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. John and James Dobson Carpet Mills, West parcel, topographical plan, 1986. Barton and Martin, Engineers. 'Topographical Plan for Dobson Mills.' Prepared for Rouse Urban Housing, Inc., Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 1986. - John & James Dobson Carpet Mill (West Parcel), 4041-4055 Ridge Avenue, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  17. 11. John and James Dobson Carpet Mill, East and West ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. John and James Dobson Carpet Mill, East and West parcels, site plan-upper left, elevation-lower left, and survey-right, 1877. Hexamer, Ernest and Son. Hexamer General Surveys, 1867-1895, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania: E. Hexamer and Son, 1877, pp. 1095-1096. - John & James Dobson Carpet Mill (West Parcel), 4041-4055 Ridge Avenue, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  18. 17. John and James Dobson Carpet Mill, East and West ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. John and James Dobson Carpet Mill, East and West Parcels, site plan, revised through 1914. Hexamer, Ernest and Son. Insurance Maps of the City of Philadelphia, Vol. 21., Philadelphia, Pennsylvania: E. Hexamer and Son, 1893. Revisions, 1914, p. 446. - John & James Dobson Carpet Mill (West Parcel), 4041-4055 Ridge Avenue, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  19. 8. John and James Dobson Carpet Mill, East and West ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. John and James Dobson Carpet Mill, East and West Parcels, site plan, and survey lower left, 1865. Hexamer, Ernest and Son. Hexamer General Surveys, 1867-1895, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania: E. Hexamer and Son, 1865, p. 279. - John & James Dobson Carpet Mill (West Parcel), 4041-4055 Ridge Avenue, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  20. 9. John and James Dobson Carpet Mill, portion of West ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. John and James Dobson Carpet Mill, portion of West parcel, site plan-left, elevation-upper right, and survey-lower right, 1873. Hexamer, Ernest and Son. Hexamer General Surveys 1867-1895, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania: E. Hexamer and Son, 1873, pp. 670-671. - John & James Dobson Carpet Mill (West Parcel), 4041-4055 Ridge Avenue, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA