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Sample records for ajcc cancer staging

  1. A nomogram improves AJCC stages for colorectal cancers by introducing CEA, modified lymph node ratio and negative lymph node count

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhen-yu; Gao, Wei; Luo, Qi-feng; Yin, Xiao-wei; Basnet, Shiva; Dai, Zhen-ling; Ge, Hai-yan

    2016-01-01

    Lymph node stages (pN stages) are primary contributors to survival heterogeneity of the 7th AJCC staging system for colorectal cancer (CRC), indicating spaces for modifications. To implement the modifications, we selected eligible CRC patients from the Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) database as participants in a training (n = 6675) and a test cohort (n = 6760), and verified tumor deposits to be metastatic lymph nodes to derive modified lymph node count (mLNC), lymph node ratio (mLNR), and positive lymph node count (mPLNC). After multivariate Cox regression analyses with forward stepwise elimination of the mLNC and mPLNC for the training cohort, a nomogram was constructed to predict overall survival (OS) via incorporating preoperative carcinoembryonic antigen, pT stages, negative lymph node count, mLNR and metastasis. Internal validations of the nomogram showed concordance indexes (c-index) of 0.750 (95% CI, 0.736–0.764) and 0.749 before and after corrections for overfitting. Serial performance evaluations indicated that the nomogram outperformed the AJCC stages (c-index = 0.725) with increased accuracy, net benefits, risk assessment ability, but comparable complexity and clinical validity. All the results were reproducible in the test cohort. In summary, the proposed nomogram may serve as an alternative to the AJCC stages. However, validations with longer follow-up periods are required. PMID:27941905

  2. The Eighth Edition AJCC Cancer Staging Manual: Continuing to build a bridge from a population-based to a more "personalized" approach to cancer staging.

    PubMed

    Amin, Mahul B; Greene, Frederick L; Edge, Stephen B; Compton, Carolyn C; Gershenwald, Jeffrey E; Brookland, Robert K; Meyer, Laura; Gress, Donna M; Byrd, David R; Winchester, David P

    2017-03-01

    The American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) staging manual has become the benchmark for classifying patients with cancer, defining prognosis, and determining the best treatment approaches. Many view the primary role of the tumor, lymph node, metastasis (TNM) system as that of a standardized classification system for evaluating cancer at a population level in terms of the extent of disease, both at initial presentation and after surgical treatment, and the overall impact of improvements in cancer treatment. The rapid evolution of knowledge in cancer biology and the discovery and validation of biologic factors that predict cancer outcome and response to treatment with better accuracy have led some cancer experts to question the utility of a TNM-based approach in clinical care at an individualized patient level. In the Eighth Edition of the AJCC Cancer Staging Manual, the goal of including relevant, nonanatomic (including molecular) factors has been foremost, although changes are made only when there is strong evidence for inclusion. The editorial board viewed this iteration as a proactive effort to continue to build the important bridge from a "population-based" to a more "personalized" approach to patient classification, one that forms the conceptual framework and foundation of cancer staging in the era of precision molecular oncology. The AJCC promulgates best staging practices through each new edition in an effort to provide cancer care providers with a powerful, knowledge-based resource for the battle against cancer. In this commentary, the authors highlight the overall organizational and structural changes as well as "what's new" in the Eighth Edition. It is hoped that this information will provide the reader with a better understanding of the rationale behind the aggregate proposed changes and the exciting developments in the upcoming edition. CA Cancer J Clin 2017;67:93-99. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  3. Comparison of the AJCC, MSTS, and Modified Spanier Systems for Clinical and Pathologic Staging of Osteosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Cates, Justin M M

    2017-03-01

    The prognostic performance of the 2 most commonly used staging systems for skeletal sarcoma (the American Joint Committee on Cancer [AJCC] and Musculoskeletal Tumor Society [MSTS] systems) have never been compared analytically. Another staging system originally proposed by Spanier has not yet been validated. Given the recent release of the 8th edition of the AJCC Cancer Staging Manual, this study was designed to directly compare these anatomic staging systems in a series of 153 high-grade, intramedullary osteosarcomas. Kaplan-Meier curves were plotted and pairwise comparisons between each stage category were performed. Predictive accuracy of each staging system for determining 5-year disease-free survival was evaluated by comparing areas under receiver-operating characteristic curves generated from logistic regression analysis. Multiple concordance indices were calculated using bootstrapping methods (200 replications). ρk and R were estimated as measures of the variation in survival outcomes explained by the regression models. The AJCC, MSTS, and a modified version of the Spanier staging systems showed similar discriminatory abilities and no significant differences in the levels of contrast between different tumor stages across staging systems. Addition of T-category information from each staging system contributed significant prognostic information compared with a Cox proportional hazard regression model consisting only of the presence or absence of metastatic disease as a measure of disease extent. Concordance indices and predictive accuracy for 5-year disease-free survival were not significantly different among the different staging systems either. Similar findings were observed after accounting for other important prognostic variables. Additional studies are necessary to determine performance parameters of each staging system for other types of skeletal sarcoma. Prognostic performance of osteosarcoma staging systems would also be improved by incorporating

  4. An International Multi-Institutional Validation of Age 55 Years as a Cutoff for Risk Stratification in the AJCC/UICC Staging System for Well-Differentiated Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Nixon, Iain J.; Wang, Laura Y.; Migliacci, Jocelyn C.; Eskander, Antoine; Campbell, Michael J.; Aniss, Ahmad; Morris, Lilah; Vaisman, Fernanda; Corbo, Rossana; Momesso, Denise; Vaisman, Mario; Carvalho, Andre; Learoyd, Diana; Leslie, William D.; Nason, Richard W.; Kuk, Deborah; Wreesmann, Volkert; Morris, Luc; Palmer, Frank L.; Ganly, Ian; Patel, Snehal G.; Singh, Bhuvanesh; Tuttle, R. Michael; Shaha, Ashok R.; Gönen, Mithat; Pathak, K. Alok; Shen, Wen T.; Sywak, Mark; Kowalski, Luis; Freeman, Jeremy; Perrier, Nancy; Shah, Jatin P.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Age is a critical factor in outcome for patients with well-differentiated thyroid cancer. Currently, age 45 years is used as a cutoff in staging, although there is increasing evidence to suggest this may be too low. The aim of this study was to assess the potential for changing the cut point for the American Joint Committee on Cancer/Union for International Cancer Control (AJCC/UICC) staging system from 45 years to 55 years based on a combined international patient cohort supplied by individual institutions. Methods: A total of 9484 patients were included from 10 institutions. Tumor (T), nodes (N), and metastasis (M) data and age were provided for each patient. The group was stratified by AJCC/UICC stage using age 45 years and age 55 years as cutoffs. The Kaplan–Meier method was used to calculate outcomes for disease-specific survival (DSS). Concordance probability estimates (CPE) were calculated to compare the degree of concordance for each model. Results: Using age 45 years as a cutoff, 10-year DSS rates for stage I–IV were 99.7%, 97.3%, 96.6%, and 76.3%, respectively. Using age 55 years as a cutoff, 10-year DSS rates for stage I–IV were 99.5%, 94.7%, 94.1%, and 67.6%, respectively. The change resulted in 12% of patients being downstaged, and the downstaged group had a 10-year DSS of 97.6%. The change resulted in an increase in CPE from 0.90 to 0.92. Conclusions: A change in the cutoff age in the current AJCC/UICC staging system from 45 years to 55 years would lead to a downstaging of 12% of patients, and would improve the statistical validity of the model. Such a change would be clinically relevant for thousands of patients worldwide by preventing overstaging of patients with low-risk disease while providing a more realistic estimate of prognosis for those who remain high risk. PMID:26914539

  5. Comparative study between two different staging systems (AJCC TNM VS BALLANTYNE’S) for mucosal melanomas of the Head & Neck

    PubMed Central

    Aguilar-Romero, Madeleine; Villavicencio-Valencia, Verónica; Zepeda-Castilla, Ernesto; Vidrio-Morgado, Horacio; Peteuil, Nathalie; Mosqueda-Taylor, Adalberto

    2016-01-01

    Background Mucosal melanoma (MM) of head and neck (H &N) is a rare entity with a quite poor prognosis. Ballantyne’s staging system has been commonly used since 1970. In the 7th edition of the AJCC Staging Manual a new chapter for the staging of TNM Classification system for mucosal melanoma (MM) of the head and neck (H &N) has been introduced to reflect the particularly aggressive biological behavior of this neoplasm. The aim of this study was to analyze and compare among Ballantyne’s staging system vs TNM H &N in terms of overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) in a consecutive population of patients with MM in a cancer centre. Material and Methods Descriptive analysis of demographic, clinical and pathological variables of MM of the Head & Neck were performed. We compared the survival curves for both systems according to the Kaplan-Meier method using the Log-rank test. Results An up-staging migration effect from Ballantyne’s localized disease to moderately and very advanced disease according to AJCC staging system. The 5-year DFS and OS for Ballantyne’s Localized Disease and AJCC Stage III were 31% and 36% vs. 47% and 50%, respectively. For locoregional disease the 5-year DFS / OS were 5% / 10% for Bal-lantyne’s system vs. 13.8% / 17.8% and 0 / 0% for AJCC Stages IVA and IVB, respectively. Conclusions In this series, the TNM staging system for MM of the H &N predicted better the prognosis of the disease when comparing with Ballantyne’s system. Key words:Head and neck, mucosal melanoma, AJCC TNM, Ballantynes´s staging system. PMID:27031071

  6. Metastatic lymph node ratio, 6th or 7th AJCC edition: witch is the best lymph node classification for esophageal cancer? Prognosis factor analysis in 487 patients

    PubMed Central

    CORAL, Roberto V.; BIGOLIN, André V.; CORAL, Roberto P.; HARTMANN, Antonio; DRANKA, Carolina; ROEHE, Adriana V.

    2015-01-01

    Background The esophageal cancer is one of the most common and aggressive worldwide. Recently, the AJCC changed the staging system, considering, among others, the important role of the lymph node metastasis on the prognosis. Aim To discuss the applicability of different forms of lymph node staging in a western surgical center. Methods Four hundred eighty seven patients with esophageal cancer were enrolled. Three staging systems were evaluated, the 6th and the 7th AJCC editions and the Lymph Node Metastatic Ratio. Results The majority of the cases were squamous cell carcinoma. The mean lymph node sample was eight. Considering the survival, there was no significant difference between the patients when they were classified by the 7th AJCC edition. Analysis of the Lymph Node Metastatic Ratio, just on the group of patients with 0 to 25%, has shown significant difference (p=0,01). The 6th AJCC edition shows the major significant difference between among the classifications evaluated. Conclusion In this specific population, the 7th AJCC edition for esophageal cancer was not able to find differences in survival when just the lymph node analysis was considered. PMID:26176242

  7. The impact of tumor deposits on colonic adenocarcinoma AJCC TNM staging and outcome.

    PubMed

    Jin, Ming; Roth, Rachel; Rock, Jonathan B; Washington, Mary Kay; Lehman, Amy; Frankel, Wendy L

    2015-01-01

    The definition of tumor deposits (TDs) in colonic adenocarcinoma has been modified in different editions of the AJCC/TNM staging system. Studies have shown that the presence of TD is associated with advanced tumor growth and poor prognosis. Most of these data were obtained in patients with simultaneous lymph node (LN) metastases. Reports focusing on the impact of TD in patients without LN metastasis are limited. We retrospectively restaged all right-sided colonic adenocarcinomas over a 10-year period using criteria from the fifth, sixth, and seventh AJCC edition. We compared the number of tumor nodule interpreted as LN and TD in each edition and evaluated the stage migration caused by TD definition change. We then assessed clinical significance of TD in the AJCC seventh edition by comparing 5-year overall survival of N1c patients versus other N category (N0, N1, N2) patients with similar T and M status. We showed that the average number of tumor nodules interpreted as LNs per case and the number of cases with positive LNs were significantly decreased with the seventh edition compared with fifth/sixth; however, numbers of cases with TDs and <12 LNs were significantly increased with the seventh edition compared with fifth/sixth. These changes, however, resulted in minimal effects on the final stage grouping. Our survival analysis showed that N1c patients had significantly worse survival compared with N0 patients. Although not statistically significant, the hazard ratios indicated that the N1c group might have worse survival than the N1 group and better survival than the N2 group. Therefore, we conclude that TDs predict patient outcome at least similarly to positive LNs.

  8. Vitronectin and dermcidin serum levels predict the metastatic progression of AJCC I–II early‐stage melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Ortega‐Martínez, Idoia; Gardeazabal, Jesús; Erramuzpe, Asier; Sanchez‐Diez, Ana; Cortés, Jesús; García‐Vázquez, María D.; Pérez‐Yarza, Gorka; Izu, Rosa; Luís Díaz‐Ramón, Jose; de la Fuente, Ildefonso M.; Asumendi, Aintzane

    2016-01-01

    Like many cancers, an early diagnosis of melanoma is fundamental to ensure a good prognosis, although an important proportion of stage I–II patients may still develop metastasis during follow‐up. The aim of this work was to discover serum biomarkers in patients diagnosed with primary melanoma that identify those at a high risk of developing metastasis during the follow‐up period. Proteomic and mass spectrophotometry analysis was performed on serum obtained from patients who developed metastasis during the first years after surgery for primary tumors and compared with that from patients who remained disease‐free for more than 10 years after surgery. Five proteins were selected for validation as prognostic factors in 348 melanoma patients and 100 controls by ELISA: serum amyloid A and clusterin; immune system proteins; the cell adhesion molecules plakoglobin and vitronectin and the antimicrobial protein dermcidin. Compared to healthy controls, melanoma patients have high serum levels of these proteins at the moment of melanoma diagnosis, although the specific values were not related to the histopathological stage of the tumors. However, an analysis based on classification together with multivariate statistics showed that tumor stage, vitronectin and dermcidin levels were associated with the metastatic progression of patients with early‐stage melanoma. Although melanoma patients have increased serum dermcidin levels, the REPTree classifier showed that levels of dermcidin <2.98 μg/ml predict metastasis in AJCC stage II patients. These data suggest that vitronectin and dermcidin are potent biomarkers of prognosis, which may help to improve the personalized medical care of melanoma patients and their survival. PMID:27216146

  9. How Does Magnetic Resonance Imaging Influence Staging According to AJCC Staging System for Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma Compared With Computed Tomography?

    SciTech Connect

    Liao Xinbiao; Mao Yanping; Liu Lizhi; Tang Linglong; Sun Ying; Wang Yan; Lin Aihua; Cui Chunyan; Li Li; Ma Jun

    2008-12-01

    Purpose: To analyze the degree and pattern of influence of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) on staging according to the 6th edition of the American Joint Committee on Cancer staging system compared with computed tomography (CT). Methods and Materials: The MRI and CT scans and medical records of 420 consecutive patients with newly diagnosed nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) were analyzed retrospectively. The tumors of all patients were staged according to the 6th edition of the American Joint Committee on Cancer staging system. Results: A significant difference (p <0.05) was found between CT and MRI in demonstrating involvement in the oropharynx (CT, 25.0% vs. MRI, 14.5%), prevertebral muscle (CT, 18.4% vs. MRI, 36.0%), parapharyngeal space (CT, 82.6% vs. MRI, 68.8%), skull base (CT, 31.0% vs. MRI, 52.6%), sphenoid sinus (CT, 13.6% vs. MRI, 16.7%), ethmoid sinus (CT, 7.1% vs. MRI, 3.3%), intracranial area (CT, 4.8% vs. MRI, 16.0%), and retropharyngeal lymph nodes (CT, 52.1% vs. MRI, 69.0%). The incidence of cervical lymph node metastasis and lymph node metastasis at each level was similar according to CT and MRI. MRI resulted in changes in 49.8% of T stage cases, 10.7% of N stage cases, and 38.6% of clinical stage cases. Conclusion: MRI demonstrated early primary tumor involvement more precisely and deep primary tumor infiltration more easily. The use of MRI caused dramatic changes in the results of the T stage and clinical staging and should be preferred to CT in staging NPC. Patients would benefit from changes in treatment strategies resulting from the use of MRI.

  10. Paclitaxel, Nab-paclitaxel, or Ixabepilone With or Without Bevacizumab in Treating Patients With Stage IIIC or Stage IV Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-11-14

    Estrogen Receptor Negative; Estrogen Receptor Positive; HER2/Neu Negative; HER2/Neu Positive; Male Breast Carcinoma; Progesterone Receptor Negative; Progesterone Receptor Positive; Recurrent Breast Carcinoma; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer AJCC v6; Stage IV Breast Cancer

  11. Protein signatures correspond to survival outcomes of AJCC stage III melanoma patients

    PubMed Central

    Mactier, Swetlana; Kaufman, Kimberley L; Wang, Penghao; Crossett, Ben; Pupo, Gulietta M; Kohnke, Philippa L; Thompson, John F; Scolyer, Richard A; Yang, Jean Y; Mann, Graham J; Christopherson, Richard I

    2014-01-01

    Summary Outcomes for melanoma patients with stage III disease differ widely even within the same subcategory. Molecular signatures that more accurately predict prognosis are needed to stratify patients according to risk. Proteomic analyses were used to identify differentially abundant proteins in extracts of surgically excised samples from patients with stage IIIc melanoma lymph node metastases. Analysis of samples from patients with poor (n = 14, <1 yr) and good (n = 19, >4 yr) survival outcomes identified 84 proteins that were differentially abundant between prognostic groups. Subsequent selected reaction monitoring analysis verified 21 proteins as potential biomarkers for survival. Poor prognosis patients are characterized by increased levels of proteins involved in protein metabolism, nucleic acid metabolism, angiogenesis, deregulation of cellular energetics and methylation processes, and decreased levels of proteins involved in apoptosis and immune response. These proteins are able to classify stage IIIc patients into prognostic subgroups (P < 0.02). This is the first report of potential prognostic markers from stage III melanoma using proteomic analyses. Validation of these protein markers in larger patient cohorts should define protein signatures that enable better stratification of stage III melanoma patients. PMID:24995518

  12. Protein signatures correspond to survival outcomes of AJCC stage III melanoma patients.

    PubMed

    Mactier, Swetlana; Kaufman, Kimberley L; Wang, Penghao; Crossett, Ben; Pupo, Gulietta M; Kohnke, Philippa L; Thompson, John F; Scolyer, Richard A; Yang, Jean Y; Mann, Graham J; Christopherson, Richard I

    2014-11-01

    Outcomes for melanoma patients with stage III disease differ widely even within the same subcategory. Molecular signatures that more accurately predict prognosis are needed to stratify patients according to risk. Proteomic analyses were used to identify differentially abundant proteins in extracts of surgically excised samples from patients with stage IIIc melanoma lymph node metastases. Analysis of samples from patients with poor (n = 14, <1 yr) and good (n = 19, >4 yr) survival outcomes identified 84 proteins that were differentially abundant between prognostic groups. Subsequent selected reaction monitoring analysis verified 21 proteins as potential biomarkers for survival. Poor prognosis patients are characterized by increased levels of proteins involved in protein metabolism, nucleic acid metabolism, angiogenesis, deregulation of cellular energetics and methylation processes, and decreased levels of proteins involved in apoptosis and immune response. These proteins are able to classify stage IIIc patients into prognostic subgroups (P < 0.02). This is the first report of potential prognostic markers from stage III melanoma using proteomic analyses. Validation of these protein markers in larger patient cohorts should define protein signatures that enable better stratification of stage III melanoma patients.

  13. Serologic biomarkers of Epstein-Barr virus correlate with TNM classification according to the seventh edition of the UICC/AJCC staging system for nasopharyngeal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Sun, Peng; Chen, Cui; Cheng, Yi-Kan; Zeng, Zhi-Jian; Chen, Xin-Lin; Liu, Li-Zhi; Gu, Mo-Fa

    2014-09-01

    This study aimed to investigate the association between Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-related biomarkers and TNM classification according to the seventh edition of AJCC/UICC staging system for nasopharyngeal carcinoma. Serum VCA-IgA and EA-IgA titers and plasma EBV-DNA load were quantified at baseline in 779 patients; the rates of positivity and titers/load were compared by TNM classification. The VCA-IgA-positive rate was significantly associated with advanced N classification and stage; the EA-IgA-positive rate with advanced T and N classifications and stage; the EBV-DNA-positive rate with advanced T, N and M classifications and stage. The percentage of triple-positive patients was higher in patients with advanced TNM classification. The VCA-IgA titer and EA-IgA titer correlated positively with T classification, N classification and disease stage (1:117 in Stage I, 1:188.4 in Stage II, 1:231.12 in Stage III, 1:265.91 in Stage IV, and 1:18.34 in Stage I, 1:32.11 in Stage II, 1:34.77 in Stage III, 1:37.65 in Stage IV, respectively). EBV DNA load correlated positively with T, N and M classification and stage [median lg (EBV DNA): 0 (IQ range 0-1.85) in Stage I, 1.32 (0-3.51) in Stage II, 3.33 (0-4.30) in Stage III, 3.83 (2.85-4.71) in Stage IV]. Serum VCA-IgA/EA-IgA titers and plasma EBV DNA correlated strongly with TNM classification according to the seventh edition of the AJCC/UICC; however, plasma EBV DNA load could accurately predict metastatic disease. EBV serological biomarkers may enhance the accuracy of TNM staging and help to avoid excessive imaging examinations in routine evaluation.

  14. Phosphohistone-H3 (PHH3) is prognostic relevant in Merkel cell carcinomas but Merkel cell polyomavirus is a more powerful prognostic factor than AJCC clinical stage, PHH3, Ki-67 or mitotic indices.

    PubMed

    Iwasaki, Takeshi; Matsushita, Michiko; Nonaka, Daisuke; Kato, Masako; Nagata, Keiko; Murakami, Ichiro; Hayashi, Kazuhiko

    2015-08-01

    Merkel cell carcinomas (MCCs) associated with Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV) have better prognosis than those without MCPyV. The relationship between mitotic index (MI) and MCC outcome has remained elusive because of the difficulty in differentiating mitotic cells from apoptotic ones. We evaluated the role of phosphohistone-H3 (PHH3) (Ser10), a new mitotic count biomarker, in MCPyV-positive or -negative MCC patients, and assessed its prognostic value in comparison to Ki-67 labeling index or MI using hematoxylin and eosin (HE) staining. We compared the prognostic value of PHH3 mitotic index with that of MI by HE in 19 MCPyV-positive and 9 MCPyV-negative MCC patients. PHH3-positive immunoreactivity was mostly observed in mitotic figures. Multivariate analysis significantly showed that MCPyV status (HR, 0.004; 95% CI 0.0003-0.058) and the American Joint Committee of Cancer (AJCC) stage (HR, 5.02; 95% CI 1.23-20.51) were observed as significantly independent prognostic factors for OS. PHH3-positive cell counts/10 HPF was a slightly significant independent prognostic factor for OS (HR, 4.96; 95% CI 0.93-26.55). PHH3-positive MI and MCPyV status in MCC patients are useful in prognostication, although MCPyV-infection is a more powerful prognostic factor in MCCs than the AJCC scheme on proliferation or mitotic indices.

  15. ACTOplus Met XR in Treating Patients With Stage I-IV Oral Cavity or Oropharynx Cancer Undergoing Definitive Treatment

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-04-10

    Oral Cavity Neoplasm; Oropharyngeal Neoplasm; Stage I Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma AJCC v6 and v7; Stage I Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma AJCC v6 and v7; Stage II Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma AJCC v6 and v7; Stage II Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma AJCC v6 and v7; Stage III Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma AJCC v6 and v7; Stage III Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma AJCC v7; Stage IVA Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma AJCC v6 and v7; Stage IVA Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma AJCC v7; Stage IVB Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma AJCC v6 and v7; Stage IVB Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma AJCC v7; Stage IVC Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma AJCC v6 and v7; Stage IVC Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma AJCC v7

  16. The degree of extramural spread of T3 rectal cancer: a plea to the UICC and AJCC.

    PubMed

    Zinicola, R; Pedrazzi, G; Haboubi, N; Nicholls, R J

    2017-03-01

    The above article, published online on 15 July 2016 in Wiley Online Library (wileyonlinelibrary.com), has been retracted by agreement between the authors, the journal Editor-in-Chief, Neil Mortensen, and John Wiley & Sons Limited. After acceptance the authors were made aware of a contribution to a prior publication of the UICC, TNM Supplement: A commentary on uniform use, 4th Edition, ed. C. Wittekind (Wiley, 2012), p. 195, which renders the central argument of their article invalid. They have therefore asked for it to be withdrawn. A modified version of the paper was published in the January 2017 issue (volume 19; issue 1) with the title "The degree of extramural spread of T3 rectal cancer: an appeal to the American Joint Committee on Cancer".

  17. Ovarian Cancer Stage II

    MedlinePlus

    ... Download Title: Ovarian Cancer Stage II Description: Three-panel drawing of stage IIA, IIB, and stage II primary peritoneal cancer; the first panel (stage IIA) shows cancer inside both ovaries that ...

  18. Cancer Staging

    MedlinePlus

    ... Grants Management Legal Requirements NCI Grant Policies Grant Management Contacts Other Funding Find NCI funding for small business innovation, technology transfer, and contracts Training Cancer Training at ...

  19. Ovarian Cancer Stage I

    MedlinePlus

    ... Three-panel drawing of stage IA, IB, and IC; the first panel (stage IA) shows cancer inside ... cancer inside both ovaries. The third panel (stage IC) shows cancer inside both ovaries, and one ovary ...

  20. Cervical Cancer Stage IIIA

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    ... hyphen, e.g. -historical Searches are case-insensitive Cervical Cancer Stage IIIA Add to My Pictures View / ... 1275x1275 View Download Large: 2550x2550 View Download Title: Cervical Cancer Stage IIIA Description: Stage IIIA cervical cancer; ...

  1. Cervical Cancer Stage IIIB

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    ... hyphen, e.g. -historical Searches are case-insensitive Cervical Cancer Stage IIIB Add to My Pictures View / ... 1425x1326 View Download Large: 2850x2651 View Download Title: Cervical Cancer Stage IIIB Description: Stage IIIB cervical cancer; ...

  2. Cervical Cancer Stage IVB

    MedlinePlus

    ... hyphen, e.g. -historical Searches are case-insensitive Cervical Cancer Stage IVB Add to My Pictures View / ... 1200x1305 View Download Large: 2400x2610 View Download Title: Cervical Cancer Stage IVB Description: Stage IVB cervical cancer; ...

  3. Cervical Cancer Stage IVA

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    ... hyphen, e.g. -historical Searches are case-insensitive Cervical Cancer Stage IVA Add to My Pictures View / ... 1575x1200 View Download Large: 3150x2400 View Download Title: Cervical Cancer Stage IVA Description: Stage IVA cervical cancer; ...

  4. Pancreatic Cancer Stage 3

    MedlinePlus

    ... 3 Description: Stage III pancreatic cancer; drawing shows cancer in the pancreas, common hepatic artery, and portal vein. Also shown ... and superior mesenteric artery. Stage III pancreatic cancer. Cancer ... near the pancreas. These include the superior mesenteric artery, celiac axis, ...

  5. Prostate cancer - major changes in the American Joint Committee on Cancer eighth edition cancer staging manual.

    PubMed

    Buyyounouski, Mark K; Choyke, Peter L; McKenney, Jesse K; Sartor, Oliver; Sandler, Howard M; Amin, Mahul B; Kattan, Michael W; Lin, Daniel W

    2017-02-21

    Answer questions and earn CME/CNE The eighth edition of the American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) tumor-node-metastasis (TNM) Staging Manual has been updated and improved to ensure the highest degree of clinical relevance and to improve its utility for patient evaluation and clinical research. Major changes include: 1) pathologically organ-confined disease is now considered pT2 and is no longer subclassified by extent of involvement or laterality, 2) tumor grading now includes both the Gleason score (as in the seventh edition criteria) and the grade group (introduced in the eighth edition criteria), 3) prognostic stage group III includes select, organ-confined disease based on prostate-specific antigen and Gleason/grade group status, and 4) 2 statistical prediction models are included in the staging manual. The AJCC will continue to critically analyze emerging prostate cancer biomarkers and tools for their ability to prognosticate and guide treatment decision making with the highest level of accuracy and confidence for patients and physicians. CA Cancer J Clin 2017. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  6. Stages of Endometrial Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Stage II endometrial cancer. Cancer has spread into connective tissue of the cervix, but has not spread outside ... uterus. In stage II , cancer has spread into connective tissue of the cervix , but has not spread outside ...

  7. Alternative staging of regional lymph nodes in gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Szczepanik, Antoni M.; Paszko, Agata; Szura, Miroslaw; Scully-Horner, Thecla; Kulig, Jan

    2016-01-01

    The TNM pN stage based on the number of metastatic lymph nodes is an independent prognostic factor in gastric cancer. Many studies have highlighted the phenomenon of stage migration and problems in comparing groups of patients with different numbers of total lymph nodes harvested within TNM staging. The current version of UICC/AJCC and JGCA TNM classifications postulates a minimal number of 16 lymph nodes as the base for N stage determination. Alternative systems such as lymph node ratio (LNR), positive to negative lymph node ratio (PNLNR), and LOGODDS (or LODDS), were implemented to increase the quality of LN assessment. These methods have reached the background in the literature, but to date no standard approach according to the cut-offs for the stages has been implemented. LOGODDS is the method that most reflects the number of harvested lymph nodes. The rationale for alternative staging methods, their correlations, and limitations are presented. PMID:27713774

  8. [Evaluation of American Joint Commission on Cancer(8(th) edition) and Japanese Pancreas Society(7(th) edition)changes for T and N staging in patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma].

    PubMed

    Yang, Y M

    2017-01-01

    Accurate staging for cancer is the basis for clinical practice, individualized treatment strategy, and prognosis determination.Recently, the T and N staging systems for pancreatic adenocarcinoma were updated by both American Joint Commission on Cancer(AJCC)8(th) edition and Japanese Pancreas Society 7(th) edition, in which more objective parameters were applied.When a large number of patients within the test set were staged, AJCC 8(th) edition has showed more reproducible and helped to predict the patient prognosis more accurately.

  9. Breast cancer staging

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000911.htm Breast cancer staging To use the sharing features on this ... Once your health care team knows you have breast cancer , they will do more tests to stage it. ...

  10. Cervical Cancer Stage IB

    MedlinePlus

    ... hyphen, e.g. -historical Searches are case-insensitive Cervical Cancer Stage IB Add to My Pictures View / ... 1613x1200 View Download Large: 3225x2400 View Download Title: Cervical Cancer Stage IB Description: Stage IB1 and IB2 ...

  11. Cervical Cancer Stage IA

    MedlinePlus

    ... hyphen, e.g. -historical Searches are case-insensitive Cervical Cancer Stage IA Add to My Pictures View / ... 1500x1200 View Download Large: 3000x2400 View Download Title: Cervical Cancer Stage IA Description: Stage IA1 and IA2 ...

  12. Ovarian Cancer Stage IV

    MedlinePlus

    ... hyphen, e.g. -historical Searches are case-insensitive Ovarian Cancer Stage IV Add to My Pictures View /Download : ... 1200x1335 View Download Large: 2400x2670 View Download Title: Ovarian Cancer Stage IV Description: Drawing of stage IV shows ...

  13. Ovarian Cancer Stage IIIC

    MedlinePlus

    ... hyphen, e.g. -historical Searches are case-insensitive Ovarian Cancer Stage IIIC Add to My Pictures View /Download : ... 1530x1350 View Download Large: 3060x2700 View Download Title: Ovarian Cancer Stage IIIC Description: Drawing of stage IIIC shows ...

  14. Stages of Gallbladder Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Serosal (outer) layer. Between these layers is supporting connective tissue . Primary gallbladder cancer starts in the inner layer ... has spread beyond the muscle layer to the connective tissue around the muscle. Stage IIIA In stage IIIA , ...

  15. Prognostic Discrepancy of the 6th and 7th UICC N Classification for Lymph Node Staging in Gastric Cancer Patients after Curative Resection

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Sung Jin; Suh, Byoung Jo; Park, Jong Kwon; Oh, Sung Don; Yu, Hang Jong

    2017-01-01

    Background The validity of N classification of the 7th edition of the American Joint Committee on Cancer/Union Internationale contre le Cancer (AJCC/UICC) tumor-node-metastasis (TNM) staging system is still under debate. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the prognostic efficacy of the 7th edition of the AJCC/UICC TNM staging system (focusing on N stage), in comparison with the 6th edition, at a single Eastern institution. Methods We analyzed 1,435 patients with gastric cancer who underwent curative resection performed from September 1998 to August 2003 at the Memorial Jin-Pok Kim Korea Gastric Cancer Center. We analyzed the survival rate of the patients according to the AJCC/UICC 6th and 7th editions, and compared each stage, focusing on N stage. Results Significant differences in the 5-year survival rates were observed between the 6th and the 7th AJCC/UICC staging system. In the 6th edition staging system, the Kaplan-Meier curves discriminated each N stage significantly. In contrast, there was no difference in terms of survival curves for N stage according to the 7th edition, especially between N1 and N2: the Kaplan-Meier plots of survival curves between N1 (77.0%) and N2 (78.1%) stages overlapped significantly (p < 0.05). Conclusion Although the 7th UICC staging system is a more detailed and sophisticated system in the T category, there was no prognostic significance between the pN1 and pN2 stages according to our data. Therefore, we suggest establishing a new UICC staging system taking into consideration the application of the N stage. PMID:28203165

  16. Pancreatic Cancer Stage 4

    MedlinePlus

    ... lung, liver, and peritoneal cavity. An inset shows cancer cells spreading from the pancreas, through the blood and lymph system, to another ... abdomen that contains the intestines, stomach, and liver). Cancer may also have spread to ... pancreas or to lymph nodes. Stage IV pancreatic cancer. ...

  17. Early stage colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Hugh James

    2013-12-14

    Evidence has now accumulated that colonoscopy and removal of polyps, especially during screening and surveillance programs, is effective in overall risk reduction for colon cancer. After resection of malignant pedunculated colon polyps or early stage colon cancers, long-term repeated surveillance programs can also lead to detection and removal of asymptomatic high risk advanced adenomas and new early stage metachronous cancers. Early stage colon cancer can be defined as disease that appears to have been completely resected with no subsequent evidence of involvement of adjacent organs, lymph nodes or distant sites. This differs from the clinical setting of an apparent "curative" resection later pathologically upstaged following detection of malignant cells extending into adjacent organs, peritoneum, lymph nodes or other distant sites, including liver. This highly selected early stage colon cancer group remains at high risk for subsequent colon polyps and metachronous colon cancer. Precise staging is important, not only for assessing the need for adjuvant chemotherapy, but also for patient selection for continued surveillance. With advanced stages of colon cancer and a more guarded outlook, repeated surveillance should be limited. In future, novel imaging technologies (e.g., confocal endomicroscopy), coupled with increased pathological recognition of high risk markers for lymph node involvement (e.g., "tumor budding") should lead to improved staging and clinical care.

  18. Stages of Pancreatic Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... cancer) cells form in the tissues of the pancreas. The pancreas is a gland about 6 inches ... spleen , and bile ducts . Tests that examine the pancreas are used to detect (find), diagnose, and stage ...

  19. Pancreatic Cancer Stage 2A

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2A Description: Stage IIA pancreatic cancer; drawing shows cancer in the pancreas and duodenum. The bile duct and pancreatic duct are also shown. Stage IIA pancreatic cancer. Cancer has spread to nearby tissue and organs ...

  20. Pancreatic Cancer Stage 2B

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2B Description: Stage IIB pancreatic cancer; drawing shows cancer in the pancreas and in nearby lymph nodes. Also shown are the bile duct, pancreatic duct, and duodenum. Stage IIB pancreatic cancer. Cancer has spread to nearby lymph nodes and ...

  1. Staging for vulvar cancer.

    PubMed

    Hacker, Neville F; Barlow, Ellen L

    2015-08-01

    Vulvar cancer has been staged by the International Federation of Gynaecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) since 1969, and the original staging system was based on clinical findings only. This system provided a very good spread of prognostic groupings. Because vulvar cancer is virtually always treated surgically, the status of the lymph nodes is the most important prognostic factor and this can only be determined with certainty by histological examination of resected lymph nodes, FIGO introduced a surgical staging system in 1988. This was modified in 1994 to include a category of microinvasive vulvar cancer (stage IA), because such patients have virtually no risk of lymph node metastases. This system did not give a reasonably even spread of prognostic groupings. In addition, patients with stage III disease were shown to be a heterogeneous group prognostically, and the number of positive nodes and the morphology of those nodes were not taken into account. A new surgical staging system for vulvar cancer was introduced by FIGO in 2009. Initial retrospective analyses have suggested that this new staging system has overcome the major deficiencies in the 1994 system.

  2. Head and Neck cancers-major changes in the American Joint Committee on cancer eighth edition cancer staging manual.

    PubMed

    Lydiatt, William M; Patel, Snehal G; O'Sullivan, Brian; Brandwein, Margaret S; Ridge, John A; Migliacci, Jocelyn C; Loomis, Ashley M; Shah, Jatin P

    2017-03-01

    Answer questions and earn CME/CNE The recently released eighth edition of the American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) Staging Manual, Head and Neck Section, introduces significant modifications from the prior seventh edition. This article details several of the most significant modifications, and the rationale for the revisions, to alert the reader to evolution of the field. The most significant update creates a separate staging algorithm for high-risk human papillomavirus-associated cancer of the oropharynx, distinguishing it from oropharyngeal cancer with other causes. Other modifications include: the reorganizing of skin cancer (other than melanoma and Merkel cell carcinoma) from a general chapter for the entire body to a head and neck-specific cutaneous malignancies chapter; division of cancer of the pharynx into 3 separate chapters; changes to the tumor (T) categories for oral cavity, skin, and nasopharynx; and the addition of extranodal cancer extension to lymph node category (N) in all but the viral-related cancers and mucosal melanoma. The Head and Neck Task Force worked with colleagues around the world to derive a staging system that reflects ongoing changes in head and neck oncology; it remains user friendly and consistent with the traditional tumor, lymph node, metastasis (TNM) staging paradigm. CA Cancer J Clin 2017;67:122-137. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  3. The principles of cancer staging

    PubMed Central

    Brierley, James; Gospodarowicz, Mary; O’Sullivan, Brian

    2016-01-01

    The anatomic disease extent or tumour stage of a cancer at diagnosis as a determinant of prognosis is discussed. The importance of cancer stage in individual patient prognosis and determination of treatment is reviewed as well as its value in research and cancer control activities. The conflict between the need for stability of cancer stage definitions over time and the need to evolve with advances in medicine are examined. The ecancer elearning modules on Cancer Stage are introduced. PMID:28101141

  4. Stages of Parathyroid Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & Early Detection Treatment Cancer & Public Health ... Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & Early Detection Treatment Cancer & Public Health ...

  5. Bioimpedance Spectroscopy in Detecting Lower-Extremity Lymphedema in Patients With Stage I, Stage II, Stage III, or Stage IV Vulvar Cancer Undergoing Surgery and Lymphadenectomy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-09

    Lymphedema; Perioperative/Postoperative Complications; Stage IA Vulvar Cancer; Stage IB Vulvar Cancer; Stage II Vulvar Cancer; Stage IIIA Vulvar Cancer; Stage IIIB Vulvar Cancer; Stage IIIC Vulvar Cancer; Stage IVA Vulvar Cancer; Stage IVB Vulvar Cancer

  6. Cetuximab, Cisplatin, and Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Stage IB, Stage II, Stage III, or Stage IVA Cervical Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-29

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Small Cell Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage III Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer

  7. Chemotherapy Toxicity On Quality of Life in Older Patients With Stage I, Stage II, Stage III, or Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial, Primary Peritoneal Cavity, or Fallopian Tube Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-09

    Stage I Ovarian Cancer; Stage IA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage II Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage III Ovarian Cancer; Stage III Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer

  8. Staging of intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Ronnekleiv-Kelly, Sean M.

    2017-01-01

    Intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICC) comprises approximately 5−30% of primary liver tumors, however it has been increasing over the last several decades. Up to and including the 6th edition of the American Joint Committee on Cancer/Union for International Cancer Control (AJCC/UICC) edition staging system, ICC was staged the same as hepatocellular carcinoma. In the 7th edition AJCC/UICC manual, the staging system of ICC was revised such that a distinct classification was proposed. Pathologic features for prognosis included vascular invasion, tumor multiplicity, local extension, periductal infiltration and lymph nodal metastasis. Over the last decade, as the incidence of ICC has increased and surgery for this indication has become more common, more data has been published on the prognostic factors associated with long-term survival. PMID:28261593

  9. Stages of Colon Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... for information about colorectal cancer in children. Health history affects the risk of developing colon cancer. Anything ... colorectal cancer include the following: Having a family history of colon or rectal cancer in a first- ...

  10. How Is Ovarian Cancer Staged?

    MedlinePlus

    ... recent FIGO staging. Stages of ovarian and fallopian tube cancer Once a patient's T, N, and M ... only within the ovary (or ovaries) or fallopian tube(s). It has not spread to organs and tissues ...

  11. Stages of Skin Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Skin Cancer Skin color and being exposed to sunlight can increase the risk of nonmelanoma skin cancer ... carcinoma include the following: Being exposed to natural sunlight or artificial sunlight (such as from tanning beds) ...

  12. Understanding cancer staging

    MedlinePlus

    ... a tumor. This tumor can grow into the surrounding tissues and organs. As the cancer progresses, cancer ... tumor and how much it has spread into surrounding tissue. Lymph Nodes (N): NX: Lymph nodes cannot ...

  13. Stages of Esophageal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... layers of tissue , including mucous membrane , muscle, and connective tissue . Esophageal cancer starts on the inside lining of ... and spread into the muscle layer or the connective tissue layer of the esophagus wall. The cancer cells ...

  14. Prostate cancer staging

    MedlinePlus

    ... test. A faster increase could show a more aggressive tumor. A prostate biopsy is done in your ... suggest the cancer is slow growing and not aggressive. Higher numbers indicate a faster growing cancer that ...

  15. Stages of Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... to treat breast cancer. Internal radiation therapy with strontium-89 (a radionuclide ) is used to relieve bone ... breast cancer that has spread to the bones. Strontium-89 is injected into a vein and travels ...

  16. Stages of Anal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... cancer that remains after treatment with external-beam radiation therapy. Patients who have had treatment that saves the sphincter ... cancer remains or comes back after treatment with radiation therapy and chemotherapy. ... options. Patients who have had treatment that saves the sphincter ...

  17. Stages of Nasopharyngeal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... or smaller; or is found in the parapharyngeal space. Cancer may have spread to one or more ... of the tongue, and the tonsils . The parapharyngeal space is a fat-filled, triangular area near the ...

  18. Stages of Thyroid Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... rate, body temperature, and how quickly food is changed into energy ( metabolism ). Control the amount of calcium ... test has been developed that can find the changed gene before medullary thyroid cancer appears. The patient ...

  19. The Tumor-Log Odds of Positive Lymph Nodes-Metastasis Staging System, a Promising New Staging System for Gastric Cancer after D2 Resection in China

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhi-qiang; Ren, Chao; Wang, De-shen; Zhang, Dong-sheng; Luo, Hui-yan; Li, Yu-hong; Xu, Rui-hua

    2012-01-01

    Background In this study, we established a hypothetical tumor-lodds-metastasis (TLM) and tumor-ratio-metastasis (TRM) staging system. Moreover, we compared them with the 7th edition of American Joint Committee on Cancer tumor-nodes-metastasis (AJCC TNM) staging system in gastric cancer patients after D2 resection. Methods A total of 1000 gastric carcinoma patients receiving treatment in our center were selected for the analysis. Finally, 730 patients who received D2 resection were retrospectively studied. Patients were staged using the TLM, TRM and the 7th edition AJCC TNM system. Survival analysis was performed with a Cox regression model. We used two parameters to compare the TNM, TRM and TLM staging system, the −2log likelihood and the hazard ratio. Results The cut points of lymph node ratio (LNR) were set as 0, 0–0.3, 0.3–0.6, 0.6–1.0. And for the log odds of positive lymph nodes (LODDS), the cut points were established as≤−0.5, −0.5-0, 0-0.5, >0.5. There were significant differences in survival among patients in different LODDS classifications for each pN or LNR groups. When stratified by the LODDS classifications, the prognosis was highly homologous between those in the according pN or LNR classifications. Multivariate analysis showed that TLM staging system was better than the TRM or TNM system for the prognostic evaluation. Conclusions The TLM system was superior to the TRM or TNM system for prognostic assessment of gastric adenocarcinoma patients after D2 resection. PMID:22348125

  20. Erlotinib Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Stage I-III Colorectal Cancer or Adenoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-22

    Adenomatous Polyp; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Stage I Colon Cancer; Stage I Rectal Cancer; Stage IIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIIC Rectal Cancer

  1. Stages of Vulvar Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... seen at the time of the surgery, some patients may have chemotherapy or radiation therapy after surgery to kill any cancer cells that ... lymph node , nearby lymph nodes are also removed. Radiation therapy for patients who cannot have surgery . Check the list of ...

  2. Treating Male Breast Cancer by Stage

    MedlinePlus

    ... Men Treating Breast Cancer in Men Treatment of Breast Cancer in Men, by Stage Because there have been ... Doctor About Breast Cancer in Men? More In Breast Cancer In Men About Breast Cancer in Men Causes, ...

  3. Treatment Options by Stage (Endometrial Cancer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Stage II endometrial cancer. Cancer has spread into connective tissue of the cervix, but has not spread outside ... uterus. In stage II , cancer has spread into connective tissue of the cervix , but has not spread outside ...

  4. Screening for Breast Cancer: Staging and Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Screening For Breast Cancer Staging and Treatment Past Issues / Summer 2014 Table of Contents Staging The extent (stage) of breast cancer needs to be determined to help choose the ...

  5. Paclitaxel and Carboplatin With or Without Bevacizumab in Treating Patients With Stage II, Stage III, or Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer, Primary Peritoneal Cancer, or Fallopian Tube Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-12-21

    Fallopian Tube Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Transitional Cell Carcinoma; Malignant Ovarian Mixed Epithelial Tumor; Ovarian Brenner Tumor; Ovarian Clear Cell Adenocarcinofibroma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Transitional Cell Carcinoma; Primary Peritoneal Serous Adenocarcinoma; Stage IIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Undifferentiated Ovarian Carcinoma

  6. Cardiac Rehabilitation Program in Improving Cardiorespiratory Fitness in Stage 0-III Breast Cancer Survivors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-30

    Cancer Survivor; Stage 0 Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  7. Changes in Brain Function in Patients With Stage I, Stage II, Stage III, or Stage IV Ovarian, Primary Peritoneal, or Fallopian Tube Cancer Who Are Receiving Chemotherapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-26

    Cognitive Side Effects of Cancer Therapy; Malignant Ovarian Epithelial Tumor; Ovarian Brenner Tumor; Ovarian Carcinosarcoma; Ovarian Choriocarcinoma; Ovarian Clear Cell Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Dysgerminoma; Ovarian Embryonal Carcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mixed Germ Cell Tumor; Ovarian Mucinous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Polyembryoma; Ovarian Sarcoma; Ovarian Seromucinous Carcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Teratoma; Ovarian Yolk Sac Tumor; Stage I Ovarian Cancer; Stage IA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IA Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IB Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IC Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage II Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIA Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIB Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIC Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Undifferentiated Ovarian Carcinoma

  8. Adjuvant Chemotherapy for Stage II Right- and Left-Sided Colon Cancer: Analysis of SEER-Medicare Data

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Jennifer M.; Schumacher, Jessica; Allen, Glenn O.; Neuman, Heather; Lange, Erin O’Connor; LoConte, Noelle K.; Greenberg, Caprice C.; Smith, Maureen A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Survival benefit from adjuvant chemotherapy is established for stage III colon cancer; however, uncertainty exists for stage II patients. Tumor heterogeneity, specifically microsatellite instability (MSI) which is more common in right-sided cancers, may be the reason for this observation. We examined the relationship between adjuvant chemotherapy and overall 5-year mortality for stage II colon cancer by location (right- versus left-side) as a surrogate for MSI. Methods Using Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER)-Medicare data, we identified Medicare beneficiaries from 1992 to 2005 with AJCC stage II (n=23,578) and III (n=17,148) primary adenocarcinoma of the colon who underwent surgery for curative intent. Overall 5-year mortality was examined with Kaplan-Meier survival analysis and Cox proportional hazards regression with propensity score weighting. Results Eighteen percent (n=2,941) of stage II patients with right-sided cancer and 22% (n=1,693) with left-sided cancer received adjuvant chemotherapy. After adjustment, overall 5-year survival benefit from chemotherapy was observed only for stage III patients (right-sided: HR 0.64; 95% CI, 0.59–0.68, p<0.001 and left-sided: HR 0.61; 95% CI, 0.56–0.68, p<0.001). No survival benefit was observed for stage II patients with either right-sided (HR 0.97; 95% CI, 0.87–1.09, p=0.64) or left-sided cancer (HR 0.97; 95% CI, 0.84–1.12, p=0.68). Conclusions Among Medicare patients with stage II colon cancer, a substantial number receive adjuvant chemotherapy. Adjuvant chemotherapy did not improve overall 5-year survival for either right- or left-sided colon cancers. Our results reinforce existing guidelines and should be considered in treatment algorithms for older adults with stage II colon cancer. PMID:24643898

  9. [A comparison between 3.0 T MRI and histopathology for preoperative T staging of potentially resectable esophageal cancer].

    PubMed

    Wang, Z Q; Zhang, F G; Guo, J; Zhang, H K; Qin, J J; Zhao, Y; Ding, Z D; Zhang, Z X; Zhang, J B; Yuan, J H; Li, H L; Qu, J R

    2017-03-21

    Objective: To explore the value of 3.0 T MRI using multiple sequences (star VIBE+ BLADE) in evaluating the preoperative T staging for potentially resectable esophageal cancer (EC). Methods: Between April 2015 and March 2016, a total of 66 consecutive patients with endoscopically proven resectable EC underwent 3.0T MRI in the Affiliated Cancer Hospital of Zhengzhou University.Two independent readers were assigned a T staging on MRI according to the 7th edition of UICC-AJCC TNM Classification, the results of preoperative T staging were compared and analyzed with post-operative pathologic confirmation. Results: The MRI T staging of two readers were highly consistent with histopathological findings, and the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of preoperative T staging MR imaging were also very high. Conclusion: 3.0 T MRI using multiple sequences is with high accuracy for patients of potentially resectable EC in T staging. The staging accuracy of T1, T2 and T3 is better than that of T4a. 3.0T MRI using multiple sequences could be used as a noninvasive imaging method for pre-operative T staging of EC.

  10. Carboplatin and Paclitaxel With or Without Cisplatin and Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Stage I, Stage II, Stage III, or Stage IVA Endometrial Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-09

    Endometrial Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Endometrial Serous Adenocarcinoma; Stage IA Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IB Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage II Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IIIA Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IIIB Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IIIC Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IVA Uterine Corpus Cancer

  11. Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma is Spread to the Peripancreatic Soft Tissue in the Majority of Resected Cases, Rendering the AJCC T-Stage Protocol (7th Edition) Inapplicable and Insignificant: A Size-Based Staging System (pT1: ≤2, pT2: >2–≤4, pT3: >4 cm) is More Valid and Clinically Relevant

    PubMed Central

    Saka, Burcu; Balci, Serdar; Basturk, Olca; Bagci, Pelin; Postlewait, Lauren M.; Maithel, Shishir; Knight, Jessica; El-Rayes, Bassel; Kooby, David; Sarmiento, Juan; Muraki, Takashi; Oliva, Irma; Bandyopadhyay, Sudeshna; Akkas, Gizem; Goodman, Michael; Reid, Michelle D.; Krasinskas, Alyssa; Everett, Rhonda; Adsay, Volkan

    2016-01-01

    Background Most studies have failed to identify any prognostic value of the current T-stage protocol for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) by the American Joint Committee on Cancer and the Union for International Cancer Control unless some grouping was performed. Methods To document the parameters included in this T-stage protocol, 223 consecutive pancreatoduodenectomy specimens with PDAC were processed by a uniform grossing protocol. Results Peripancreatic soft tissue (PST) involvement, the main pT3 parameter, was found to be inapplicable and irreproducible due to lack of a true capsule in the pancreas and variability in the amount and distribution of adipose tissue. Furthermore, 91 % of the cases showed carcinoma in the adipose tissue, presumably representing the PST, and thus were classified as pT3. An additional 4.5 % were qualified as pT3 due to extension into adjacent sites. The T-stage defined as such was not found to have any correlation with survival (p = 0.4). A revised T-stage protocol was devised that defined pT1 as 2 cm or smaller, pT2 as >2–4 cm, and pT3 as larger than 4 cm. This revised protocol was tested in 757 consecutive PDACs. The median and 3-year survival rates of this size-based protocol were 26, 18, 13 months, and 40 %, 26 %, 20 %, respectively (p < 0.0001). The association between higher T-stage and shorter survival persisted in N0 cases and in multivariate modeling. Analysis of the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results database also confirmed the survival differences (p < 0.0001). Conclusions This study showed that resected PDACs are already spread to various surfaces of the pancreas, leaving only about 4 % of PDACs to truly qualify as pT1/T2, and that the current T-stage protocol does not have any prognostic correlation. In contrast, as shown previously in many studies, size is an important prognosticator, and a size-based T-stage protocol is more applicable and has prognostic value in PDAC. PMID:26832882

  12. Prognostic Impact of Erythropoietin Expression and Erythropoietin Receptor Expression on Locoregional Control and Survival of Patients Irradiated for Stage II/III Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Rades, Dirk; Setter, Cornelia; Dahl, Olav; Schild, Steven E.; Noack, Frank

    2011-06-01

    Purpose: Prognostic factors can guide the physician in selecting the optimal treatment for an individual patient. This study investigates the prognostic value of erythropoietin (EPO) and EPO receptor (EPO-R) expression of tumor cells for locoregional control and survival in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. Methods and Materials: Fourteen factors were investigated in 62 patients irradiated for stage II/III NSCLC, as follows: age, gender, Karnofsky performance score (KPS), histology, grading, TNM/American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) stage, surgery, chemotherapy, pack years (average number of packages of cigarettes smoked per day multiplied by the number of years smoked), smoking during radiotherapy, hemoglobin levels during radiotherapy, EPO expression, and EPO-R expression. Additionally, patients with tumors expressing both EPO and EPO-R were compared to those expressing either EPO or EPO-R and to those expressing neither EPO nor EPO-R. Results: On univariate analysis, improved locoregional control was associated with AJCC stage II cancer (p < 0.048), surgery (p < 0.042), no smoking during radiotherapy (p = 0.024), and no EPO expression (p = 0.001). A trend was observed for a KPS of >70 (p = 0.08), an N stage of 0 to 1 (p = 0.07), and no EPO-R expression (p = 0.10). On multivariate analysis, AJCC stage II and no EPO expression remained significant. No smoking during radiotherapy was almost significant. On univariate analysis, improved survival was associated with N stage 0 to 1 (p = 0.009), surgery (p = 0.039), hemoglobin levels of {>=}12 g/d (p = 0.016), and no EPO expression (p = 0.001). On multivariate analysis, N stage 0 to 1 and no EPO expression maintained significance. Hemoglobin levels of {>=}12 g/d were almost significant. On subgroup analyses, patients with tumors expressing both EPO and EPO-R had worse outcomes than those expressing either EPO or EPO-R and those expressing neither EPO nor RPO-R. Conclusions: EPO expression of tumor cells

  13. Stages of Male Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Male Breast Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information about Male Breast Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Male ...

  14. Stages of Childhood Liver Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Liver Cancer Prevention Liver Cancer Screening Research Childhood Liver Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Childhood Liver Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points ...

  15. Vorinostat and Azacitidine in Treating Patients With Locally Recurrent or Metastatic Nasopharyngeal Cancer or Nasal Natural Killer T-Cell Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-04-10

    Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Nasopharyngeal Keratinizing Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Nasopharyngeal Undifferentiated Carcinoma; Stage IV Nasopharyngeal Keratinizing Squamous Cell Carcinoma AJCC v7; Stage IV Nasopharyngeal Undifferentiated Carcinoma AJCC v7

  16. Survival Analyses for Patients With Surgically Resected Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors by World Health Organization 2010 Grading Classifications and American Joint Committee on Cancer 2010 Staging Systems.

    PubMed

    Yang, Min; Ke, Neng-wen; Zeng, Lin; Zhang, Yi; Tan, Chun-lu; Zhang, Hao; Mai, Gang; Tian, Bo-le; Liu, Xu-bao

    2015-12-01

    In 2010, World Health Organization (WHO) reclassified pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (p-NETs) into 4 main groups: neuroendocrine tumor G1 (NET G1), neuroendocrine tumor G2 (NET G2), neuroendocrine carcinoma G3 (NEC G3), mixed adeno and neuroendocrine carcinoma (MANEC). Clinical value of these newly updated WHO grading criteria has not been rigorously validated. The authors aimed to evaluate the clinical consistency of the new 2010 grading classifications by WHO and the 2010 tumor-node metastasis staging systems by American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) on survivals for patients with surgically resected p-NETs. Moreover, the authors would validate the prognostic value of both criteria for p-NETs.The authors retrospectively collected the clinicopathologic data of 120 eligible patients who were all surgically treated and histopathologically diagnosed as p-NETs from January 2004 to February 2014 in our single institution. The new WHO criteria were assigned to 4 stratified groups with a respective distribution of 62, 35, 17, and 6 patients. Patients with NET G1 or NET G2 obtained a statistically better survival compared with those with NEC G3 or MANEC (P < 0.001). Survivals of NET G1 was also better than those of NET G2 (P = 0.023), whereas difference of survivals between NEC G3 and MANEC present no obvious significance (P = 0.071). The AJCC 2010 staging systems were respectively defined in 61, 36, 12, and 11 patients for each stage. Differences of survivals of stage I with stage III and IV were significant (P < 0.001), as well as those of stage II with III and IV (P < 0.001); whereas comparisons of stage I with stage II and stage III with IV were not statistically significant (P = 0.129, P = 0.286; respectively). Together with radical resection, these 2 systems were both significant in univariate and multivariate analysis (P < 0.05).The newly updated WHO 2010 grading classifications and the AJCC 2010 staging systems could consistently reflect the clinical outcome

  17. Mindfulness Meditation or Survivorship Education in Improving Behavioral Symptoms in Younger Stage 0-III Breast Cancer Survivors (Pathways to Wellness)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-21

    Cancer Survivor; Early-Stage Breast Carcinoma; Stage 0 Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  18. Revised FIGO staging system for endometrial cancer.

    PubMed

    Lewin, Sharyn N

    2011-06-01

    In 1988 the International Federation of Gynecologists and Obstetricians (FIGO) developed a surgical staging system for endometrial cancer. The FIGO staging system was recently revised in 2009 to reflect our growing understanding of the natural history of endometrial cancer. In this review, we describe the revised 2009 FIGO staging system for tumors of the uterine corpus and examine the effect of the new changes in the staging criteria.

  19. Cisplatin and Paclitaxel in Treating Patients With Stage IIB, Stage IIC, Stage III, or Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer, Fallopian Tube Cancer, or Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-29

    Chemotherapeutic Agent Toxicity; Endometrial Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Gastrointestinal Complication; Malignant Ovarian Mixed Epithelial Tumor; Neurotoxicity Syndrome; Ovarian Brenner Tumor; Ovarian Clear Cell Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma; Stage II Ovarian Cancer; Stage III Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Undifferentiated Ovarian Carcinoma

  20. Bortezomib in Treating Patients With Stage IIIB or Stage IV Lung Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-08-04

    Adenocarcinoma of the Lung; Bronchoalveolar Cell Lung Cancer; Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

  1. How Is Bone Cancer Staged?

    MedlinePlus

    ... the bone or nearby lymph nodes M1: Distant metastasis (the cancer has spread) M1a: The cancer has spread only to the lung M1b: The cancer has spread to other sites (like the brain, the liver, etc.) Grades of bone cancer G1- ...

  2. Omega-3 Fatty Acid in Treating Patients With Stage I-III Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-13

    Ductal Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Lobular Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Male Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  3. A Study of 358 Cases of Locally Advanced Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma Receiving Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy: Improving the Seventh Edition of the American Joint Committee on Cancer T-Staging System

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Qin; He, Yuxiang; Zhao, Yajie; Wang, Yin; Kuang, Weilu

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the rationality and limitations of the seventh edition of the American Joint Committee on Cancer (the 7th AJCC edition) T-staging system for locally advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). The prognosis of 358 patients with stage T3/T4 NPC treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) was analyzed with the Kaplan–Meier method or the log-rank test. The 7th AJCC staging system of NPC has some limitations in that the T category is neither the significant factor in OS/LRFS nor the independent prognostic factor in OS/LRFS/DMFS/DFS (P > 0.05). After adjustment by anatomic structures, univariate analysis has shown that the adjusted-T category has statistical significance between T3 and T4 for OS (86.4% and 71.3%, P = 0.002), LRFS (97% and 90.9%, P = 0.048), DMFS (90.9% and 77.2%, P = 0.001), and DFS (86.2% and 67.5%, P = 0.000), and multivariate analysis has shown that the adjusted-T category is an independent prognostic factor for OS/DMFS/DFS (with the exception of LRFS). Then, GTV-P was taken into consideration. Multivariate analysis showed that these nT categories serve as suitable independent prognostic factors for OS/DMFS/DFS (P < 0.001) and LRFS (HR = 3.131; 95% CI, 1.090–8.990; P = 0.043). The 7th AJCC staging system has limitations and should be improved by including the modifications suggested, such as anatomic structures and tumor volume adjustment. PMID:28265567

  4. Developing and Implementing the AJCC Prognostic System for Breast Cancer.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-08-01

    patients by outcome. A measure of discriminative accuracy is being created to assess the accuracy of the artificial neural networks ’ predictions. We are...and Systems in Oncology. Kluwer Academic Publishers, in preparation. Burke HB (ed). Artificial Neural Networks in Medicine. Kluwer Academic Publishers...429-437. Burke HB, Goodman PH, Rosen DB, Henson DE, Weinstein JN, Harrell Jr. FE, Marks JR, Winchester DP, Bostwick DG. Artificial neural networks improve

  5. Azacitidine in Treating Patients With Triple Negative Stage I-IV Invasive Breast Cancer That Can Be Removed By Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-02-05

    Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer

  6. Psychosexual Intervention in Patients With Stage I-III Gynecologic or Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-04-12

    Ovarian Sarcoma; Ovarian Stromal Cancer; Stage I Uterine Sarcoma; Stage I Vaginal Cancer; Stage I Vulvar Cancer; Stage IA Cervical Cancer; Stage IA Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage IA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IA Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IA Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IA Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage IB Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage IB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IB Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IB Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IB Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IC Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IC Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IC Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage II Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage II Gestational Trophoblastic Tumor; Stage II Uterine Sarcoma; Stage II Vaginal Cancer; Stage II Vulvar Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIA Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIA Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIA Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIB Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIB Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIB Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIC Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIC Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIC Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage III Gestational Trophoblastic Tumor; Stage III Uterine Sarcoma; Stage III Vaginal Cancer; Stage III Vulvar Cancer; Stage IIIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIA Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIB Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIIC Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Germ Cell

  7. Stages of Salivary Gland Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... does not go away. Tests that examine the head, neck, and the inside of the mouth are used ... team of doctors who are experts in treating head and neck cancer. Your treatment will be overseen by a ...

  8. Nutraceutical use in late-stage cancer

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Jay; Brown, Vondina; Ellis, Jane; Logothetis, Britt; Weber, Rebecca

    2012-01-01

    Access to a wealth of information on the internet has led many cancer patients to use complementary methods as an adjunct to traditional therapy for cancer, with, and more often, without informing their primary caregiver. Of the common complementary modalities, the use of dietary supplements appears to be highly prevalent in patients in active treatment for cancer, and later in cancer survivors. Emerging research suggests that some plant-based agents may, indeed, impact late-stage cancer, influencing molecular processes corrupted by tumor cells to evade detection, expand clonally, and invade surrounding tissues. The intent of this article is to review some of the current science underpinning the use of nutraceuticals in the latter stages of cancer. PMID:20714787

  9. Stages of Small Intestine Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... seen at the time of the surgery, some patients may be given radiation therapy after surgery to kill any cancer cells that ... palliative therapy to relieve symptoms and improve the patient's quality of ... therapy with radiosensitizers , with or without chemotherapy . A clinical ...

  10. Nomogram Prediction of Survival and Recurrence in Patients With Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer Undergoing Curative Resection Followed by Adjuvant Chemoradiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Changhoon; Kim, Kyubo; Chie, Eui Kyu; Kim, Jin Ho; Jang, Jin-Young; Kim, Sun Whe; Han, Sae-Won; Oh, Do-Youn; Im, Seock-Ah; Kim, Tae-You; Bang, Yung-Jue; Ha, Sung W.

    2013-11-01

    Purpose: To develop nomograms for predicting the overall survival (OS) and relapse-free survival (RFS) in patients with extrahepatic bile duct cancer undergoing adjuvant chemoradiation therapy after curative resection. Methods and Materials: From January 1995 through August 2006, a total of 166 consecutive patients underwent curative resection followed by adjuvant chemoradiation therapy. Multivariate analysis using Cox proportional hazards regression was performed, and this Cox model was used as the basis for the nomograms of OS and RFS. We calculated concordance indices of the constructed nomograms and American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) staging system. Results: The OS rate at 2 years and 5 years was 60.8% and 42.5%, respectively, and the RFS rate at 2 years and 5 years was 52.5% and 38.2%, respectively. The model containing age, sex, tumor location, histologic differentiation, perineural invasion, and lymph node involvement was selected for nomograms. The bootstrap-corrected concordance index of the nomogram for OS and RFS was 0.63 and 0.62, respectively, and that of AJCC staging for OS and RFS was 0.50 and 0.52, respectively. Conclusions: We developed nomograms that predicted survival and recurrence better than AJCC staging. With caution, clinicians may use these nomograms as an adjunct to or substitute for AJCC staging for predicting an individual's prognosis and offering tailored adjuvant therapy.

  11. Alternative Dosing of Exemestane Before Surgery in Treating Postmenopausal Patients With Stage 0-II Estrogen Positive Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-17

    Estrogen Receptor Positive; Postmenopausal; Stage 0 Breast Cancer; Stage I Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer

  12. Vaccine Therapy and Cyclophosphamide in Treating Patients With Stage II-III Breast or Stage II-IV Ovarian, Primary Peritoneal, or Fallopian Tube Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-10

    Recurrent Breast Carcinoma; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer

  13. Liquid biopsy in early stage lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Ramírez, Cristina; Robles, Ana I.; Molina, Miguel Ángel; Faus-Dáder, María José; Calleja-Hernández, Miguel Ángel

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-associated deaths worldwide. Surgery is the standard treatment for early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, 30% to 80% of these patients will die within 5 yearS of diagnosis. Circulating cell-free DNA (cfDNA) harbors pathologic characteristics of the original tumor, such as gene mutations or epigenetic alterations. Analysis of cfDNA has revolutionized the clinical care of advanced lung cancer patients undergoing targeted therapies. However, the low concentration of cfDNA in the blood of early-stage NSCLC patients has hampered its use for management of early disease. Continuing development of more specific and sensitive techniques for detection and analysis of cfDNA will soon enable its leverage in early stage and, perhaps, even screening settings. Therefore, cfDNA analysis may become a tool used for routine NSCLC diagnosis and for monitoring tumor burden, as well as for identifying hidden residual disease. In this review, we will focus on the current evidence of cfDNA in patients with early-stage NSCLC, new and upcoming approaches to identify circulating-tumor biomarkers, their clinical applications and future directions. PMID:27826533

  14. Bevacizumab and Intravenous or Intraperitoneal Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Stage II-III Ovarian Epithelial Cancer, Fallopian Tube Cancer, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-12-21

    Malignant Ovarian Mixed Epithelial Tumor; Ovarian Brenner Tumor; Ovarian Clear Cell Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Stage IIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Undifferentiated Ovarian Carcinoma

  15. Minocycline Hydrochloride in Reducing Chemotherapy Induced Depression and Anxiety in Patients With Stage I-III Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-28

    Anxiety Disorder; Depression; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  16. Heavy Metal Exposure in Predicting Peripheral Neuropathy in Patients With Stage I-III Breast Cancer Undergoing Chemotherapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-05-01

    Male Breast Cancer; Neurotoxicity; Peripheral Neuropathy; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  17. Sirolimus and Vaccine Therapy in Treating Patients With Stage II-IV Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-04-06

    Recurrent Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma; Stage IIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer

  18. Comparison of Adjuvant Chemotherapy Regimens in Treating Patients With Stage II or Stage III Rectal Cancer Who Are Receiving Radiation Therapy and Fluorouracil Before or After Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-02-26

    Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Stage IIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IVA Rectal Cancer; Stage IVB Rectal Cancer

  19. Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity Cancer (Treatment Options by Stage)

    MedlinePlus

    ... tumor sizes. The following stages are used for maxillary sinus cancer: Stage 0 (Carcinoma in Situ) In ... are found in the innermost lining of the maxillary sinus . These abnormal cells may become cancer and ...

  20. Stages of Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... tumor sizes. The following stages are used for maxillary sinus cancer: Stage 0 (Carcinoma in Situ) In ... are found in the innermost lining of the maxillary sinus . These abnormal cells may become cancer and ...

  1. Neo-adjuvant Therapy With Anastrozole Plus Pazopanib in Stage II and III ER+ Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-24

    Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Human Epidermal Growth Factor 2 Negative Carcinoma of Breast; Male Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer

  2. Bevacizumab, Fluorouracil, Leucovorin Calcium, and Oxaliplatin Before Surgery in Treating Patients With Stage II-III Rectal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-10-24

    Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Stage IIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Rectal Cancer

  3. Cisplatin and Radiation Therapy Followed by Paclitaxel and Carboplatin in Treating Patients With Stage IB-IVA Cervical Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-16

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer

  4. Interactive Gentle Yoga in Improving Quality of Life in Patients With Stage I-III Breast Cancer Undergoing Radiation Therapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-17

    Anxiety Disorder; Depression; Ductal Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Fatigue; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  5. Paclitaxel and Intraperitoneal Carboplatin Followed by Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Stage IIIC-IV Uterine Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-02-10

    Endometrial Serous Adenocarcinoma; Stage IIIA Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IIIB Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IIIC1 Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IIIC2 Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IVA Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IVB Uterine Corpus Cancer

  6. Gamma-Secretase/Notch Signalling Pathway Inhibitor RO4929097, Paclitaxel, and Carboplatin Before Surgery in Treating Patients With Stage II or Stage III Triple-Negative Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-09-03

    Estrogen Receptor Negative; HER2/Neu Negative; Progesterone Receptor Negative; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Triple-Negative Breast Carcinoma

  7. Carboplatin and Paclitaxel or Oxaliplatin and Capecitabine With or Without Bevacizumab as First-Line Therapy in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Stage II-IV or Recurrent Stage I Epithelial Ovarian or Fallopian Tube Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-04-05

    Borderline Ovarian Mucinous Tumor; Ovarian Mucinous Cystadenocarcinoma; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Stage IA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer

  8. Radiation Therapy and Cisplatin With or Without Triapine in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Stage IB2, II, or IIIB-IVA Cervical Cancer or Stage II-IVA Vaginal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-23

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma, Not Otherwise Specified; Stage IB2 Cervical Cancer; Stage II Vaginal Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage III Vaginal Cancer; Stage IIIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Vaginal Cancer; Stage IVB Vaginal Cancer

  9. Palliative Care in Improving Quality of Life and Symptoms in Patients With Stage III-IV Pancreatic or Ovarian Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-18

    Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIB Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIC Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer

  10. F-18-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography (PET) and PET/computed tomography imaging in primary staging of patients with malignant melanoma: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this systematic review was to systematically assess the potential patient-relevant benefit (primary aim) and diagnostic and prognostic accuracy (secondary aim) of positron emission tomography (PET) and PET/computed tomography (CT) in primary staging of malignant melanoma. This systematic review updates the previous evidence for PET(/CT) in malignant melanoma. Materials and methods For the first aim, randomized controlled trials (RCTs) investigating patient-relevant outcomes and comparing PET and PET(/CT) with each other or with conventional imaging were considered. For the secondary aim, a review of reviews was conducted, which was amended by an update search for primary studies. MEDLINE, EMBASE and four databases of the Cochrane Library were searched. The risk of bias was assessed using a modified QUADAS tool. Results No RCTs investigating the patient-relevant benefit of PET(/CT) and no prognostic accuracy studies were found. Seventeen diagnostic accuracy studies of varying quality were identified. For patients with American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) stages I and II, sensitivity mostly ranged from 0 to 67%. Specificity ranged from 77 to 100%. For AJCC stages III and IV, sensitivity ranged from 68 to 87% and specificity from 92 to 98%. Conclusion There is currently no evidence of a patient-relevant benefit of PET(/CT) in the primary staging of malignant melanoma. RCTs investigating patient-relevant outcomes are therefore required. The diagnostic accuracy of PET(/CT) appears to increase with higher AJCC stages. PMID:23237499

  11. Recommendations for Updating T and N Staging Systems for Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma in the Era of Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Zhong-Guo; Chen, Xiao-Qian; Niu, Zhi-Jie; Chen, Kai-Hua; Li, Ling; Qu, Song; Su, Fang; Zhao, Wei; Li, Ye; Pan, Xin-Bin; Zhu, Xiao-Dong

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to compare the 2008 Chinese and the 7th edition of the American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) staging systems for nasopharyngeal carcinoma and to provide proposals for updating T and N staging systems of the present staging system. Methods Between January 2007 and December 2012, a cohort of 752 patients with biopsy-proven, newly diagnosed, non-metastatic nasopharyngeal carcinoma who were treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy were retrospectively analysed. Prognoses were compared by T stage, N stage, and clinical stage according to the two staging systems for overall survival (OS), local relapse-free survival (LRFS), and distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS). Results In terms of both the T and N staging systems, the two current staging systems were comparable in predicting OS. The T classification of the 2008 Chinese staging system was better in predicting LRFS, while the N classification of the 7th edition AJCC staging system was superior in predicting DMFS. In the modern era of intensity-modulated radiotherapy, the staging system should be updated by down-staging the current stage T2 to T1, and it might be rational to merge subcategories N1 and N2. Conclusions The two current staging systems each had advantages in predicting prognosis. It seems reasonable to downstage T2 to T1 and to merge N1 and N2. PMID:27973544

  12. IGFBP-2 Vaccine and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Stage III-IV Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer Undergoing Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-29

    Stage III Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage III Ovarian Cancer; Stage III Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer

  13. Epacadostat Before Surgery in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Stage III-IV Epithelial Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-31

    Stage III Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage III Ovarian Cancer; Stage III Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer

  14. Typhoid Vaccine in Testing Response to Immune Stress in Patients With Stage I-IIIA Breast Cancer Who Received Chemotherapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-11-29

    Cognitive Side Effects of Cancer Therapy; Depression; Recurrent Breast Carcinoma; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer

  15. Combination Chemotherapy and Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant Followed By Aldesleukin and Sargramostim in Treating Patients With Inflammatory Stage IIIB or Metastatic Stage IV Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2011-07-08

    Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Inflammatory Breast Cancer; Male Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer

  16. Fulvestrant and/or Anastrozole in Treating Postmenopausal Patients With Stage II-III Breast Cancer Undergoing Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-06

    Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; Invasive Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Invasive Lobular Breast Carcinoma; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  17. Stages of Adult Primary Liver Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer Prevention Liver Cancer Screening Research Adult Primary Liver Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Adult Primary Liver Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points ...

  18. FLT PET in Measuring Treatment Response in Patients With Newly Diagnosed Estrogen Receptor-Positive, HER2-Negative Stage I-III Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-02

    Estrogen Receptor Positive; HER2/Neu Negative; Male Breast Carcinoma; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  19. Paclitaxel, Polyglutamate Paclitaxel, or Observation in Treating Patients With Stage III or Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial, Peritoneal Cancer, or Fallopian Tube Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-17

    Fallopian Tube Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Serous Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Transitional Cell Carcinoma; Malignant Ovarian Mixed Epithelial Tumor; Ovarian Brenner Tumor; Ovarian Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Transitional Cell Carcinoma; Primary Peritoneal Serous Adenocarcinoma; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Undifferentiated Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Undifferentiated Ovarian Carcinoma

  20. Telomere Length in Predicting Toxicity in Older Patients With Stage III-IV Colorectal Cancer Undergoing Chemotherapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-25

    Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Stage IIIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IV Colon Cancer; Stage IV Rectal Cancer

  1. MRI and PET Imaging in Predicting Treatment Response in Patients With Stage IB-IVA Cervical Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-08

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma, Not Otherwise Specified; Cervical Undifferentiated Carcinoma; Recurrent Cervical Carcinoma; Stage IB2 Cervical Cancer; Stage II Cervical Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage III Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer

  2. Stages of Lip and Oral Cavity Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... team of doctors who are expert in treating head and neck cancer. Treatment will be overseen by a medical ... Oropharyngeal Cancer Screening Oral Complications of Chemotherapy and Head/Neck Radiation Head and Neck Cancers Tobacco (includes help ...

  3. Triciribine Phosphate, Paclitaxel, Doxorubicin Hydrochloride, and Cyclophosphamide in Treating Patients With Stage IIB-IV Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-01-13

    Breast Adenocarcinoma; Estrogen Receptor Positive; HER2/Neu Negative; Recurrent Breast Carcinoma; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer

  4. KeraStat Skin Therapy in Treating Radiation Dermatitis in Patients With Newly Diagnosed Stage 0-IIIA Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-20

    Ductal Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Skin Reactions Secondary to Radiation Therapy; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer

  5. Trastuzumab Emtansine in Treating Older Patients With Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2-Positive Stage I-III Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-03

    Estrogen Receptor Negative; HER2 Positive Breast Carcinoma; Progesterone Receptor Negative; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  6. An actuarial approach to comparing early stage and late stage lung cancer mortality and survival.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, Sara W; Mulshine, James L; Hagstrom, Dale; Pyenson, Bruce S

    2010-02-01

    Comparing the mortality characteristics of different cohorts is an essential process in the life insurance industry. Pseudodisease, lead-time bias, and length bias, which are critical to determining the value of cancer screening, have close analogues in life insurance company management, including the temporal impact of underwriting. Ratios of all-cause mortality rates for cancer cohorts relative to standard population mortality rates can provide insights into early stage and late stage mortality differences, differences by age, sex, race, and histology, and allow modeling of biases associated with early stage detection or screening protocols. The Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) data set has characteristics that allow efficient application of actuarial techniques. We show the mortality burden associated with treated early stage lung cancer and that identifying all lung cancers at early stage could reduce US lung cancer deaths by over 70,000 per year.

  7. Breast-Conserving Surgery Followed by Radiation Therapy With MRI-Detected Stage I or Stage II Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2011-12-07

    Ductal Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; HER2-positive Breast Cancer; Invasive Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Invasive Lobular Breast Carcinoma; Male Breast Cancer; Medullary Ductal Breast Carcinoma With Lymphocytic Infiltrate; Mucinous Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Papillary Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Stage I Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Tubular Ductal Breast Carcinoma

  8. Vaccine Therapy With Sargramostim (GM-CSF) in Treating Patients With Her-2 Positive Stage III-IV Breast Cancer or Ovarian Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-02

    HER2-positive Breast Cancer; Stage III Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage III Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor

  9. Stages of Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... bile ducts or has spread to the liver, lymph nodes , or other places in the body). Whether ... the body. Cancer can spread through tissue , the lymph system , and the blood : Tissue. The cancer spreads ...

  10. Treatment Options by Stage (Esophageal Cancer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... layers of tissue , including mucous membrane , muscle, and connective tissue . Esophageal cancer starts on the inside lining of ... and spread into the muscle layer or the connective tissue layer of the esophagus wall. The cancer cells ...

  11. Stage at Diagnosis | Cancer Trends Progress Report

    Cancer.gov

    The Cancer Trends Progress Report, first issued in 2001, summarizes our nation's advances against cancer in relation to Healthy People targets set forth by the Department of Health and Human Services.

  12. The accuracy of endorectal ultrasonography in rectal cancer staging

    PubMed Central

    COTE, ADRIAN; GRAUR, FLORIN; LEBOVICI, ANDREI; MOIS, EMIL; AL HAJJAR, NADIM; MARE, CODRUTA; BADEA, RADU; IANCU, CORNEL

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims The incidence of rectal cancer in the European Union is about 35% of the total colorectal cancer incidence. Staging rectal cancer is important for planning treatment. It is essential for the management of rectal cancer to have adequate preoperative imaging, because accurate staging can influence the therapeutic strategy, type of resection, and candidacy for neoadjuvant therapy. The aim of this work is to evaluate the accuracy of endorectal ultrasound (ERUS) in rectal cancer staging. Methods A retrospective study was performed to assess the accuracy of ERUS by analyzing patients discharged from Regional Institute of Gastroenterology and Hepatology (IRGH) Cluj-Napoca, Romania, diagnosed with rectal cancer between 01 January 2011 and 31 December 2013. Patients who were preoperatively staged by other imaging methods and those who had ERUS performed in another service were excluded from the analysis. As inclusion criteria remained ERUS performed for patients with rectal cancer in IRGH Cluj-Napoca where they were also operated. We analyzed preoperative T stage obtained by ERUS and it was compared with the histopathology findings. Results The number of patients discharged with a diagnosis of rectal cancer were 200 (operated – 157) in 2011, 193 (operated – 151) in 2012, and 198 (operated – 142) in 2013. We analyzed a total of 51 cases diagnosed with rectal cancer who performed ERUS in IRGH Cluj-Napoca. The results according to the T stage obtained by ERUS and histopathology test were: Under-stage T2= 25.0%, T3=7.9% of cases; Over-stage T2=25.0%, T3=31.6% and T4=60.0% of cases. Less than 20% of patients underwent preoperative radio-chemotherapy. Conclusions ERUS is a method of staging rectal cancer which is human dependent. ERUS is less accurate for T staging of stenotic tumours, but the accuracy may still be within acceptable limits. Surgeons use ERUS to adopt a treatment protocol, knowing the risk of under-staging and over-staging of this method

  13. Impact of tumour volume on prediction of progression-free survival in sinonasal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hennersdorf, Florian; Mauz, Paul-Stefan; Adam, Patrick; Welz, Stefan; Sievert, Anne; Ernemann, Ulrike; Bisdas, Sotirios

    2015-01-01

    Background The present study aimed to analyse potential prognostic factors, with emphasis on tumour volume, in determining progression free survival (PFS) for malignancies of the nasal cavity and the paranasal sinuses. Patients and methods Retrospective analysis of 106 patients with primary sinonasal malignancies treated and followed-up between March 2006 and October 2012. Possible predictive parameters for PFS were entered into univariate and multivariate Cox regression analysis. Kaplan-Meier curve analysis included age, sex, baseline tumour volume (based on MR imaging), histology type, TNM stage and prognostic groups according to the American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) classification. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis concerning the predictive value of tumour volume for recurrence was also conducted. Results The main histological subgroup consisted of epithelial tumours (77%). The majority of the patients (68%) showed advanced tumour burden (AJCC stage III–IV). Lymph node involvement was present in 18 cases. The mean tumour volume was 26.6 ± 21.2 cm3. The median PFS for all patients was 24.9 months (range: 2.5–84.5 months). The ROC curve analysis for the tumour volume showed 58.1% sensitivity and 75.4% specificity for predicting recurrence. Tumour volume, AJCC staging, T- and N- stage were significant predictors in the univariate analysis. Positive lymph node status and tumour volume remained significant and independent predictors in the multivariate analysis. Conclusions Radiological tumour volume proofed to be a statistically reliable predictor of PFS. In the multivariate analysis, T-, N- and overall AJCC staging did not show significant prognostic value. PMID:26401135

  14. Dasatinib, Paclitaxel, and Carboplatin in Treating Patients With Stage III-IV or Recurrent Endometrial Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-12-22

    Endometrial Adenocarcinoma; Endometrial Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Endometrial Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Endometrial Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Endometrial Serous Adenocarcinoma; Endometrial Undifferentiated Carcinoma; Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Uterine Corpus Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IIIB Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IIIC Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IVA Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IVB Uterine Corpus Cancer; Uterine Carcinosarcoma

  15. Circulating Tumor DNA in Predicting Outcomes in Patients With Stage IV Head and Neck Cancer or Stage III-IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-19

    Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Salivary Gland Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IVA Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVC Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVC Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Tongue Cancer; Untreated Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary

  16. Prognostic Factors Affecting Locally Recurrent Rectal Cancer and Clinical Significance of Hemoglobin

    SciTech Connect

    Rades, Dirk Kuhn, Hildegard; Schultze, Juergen; Homann, Nils; Brandenburg, Bernd; Schulte, Rainer; Krull, Andreas; Schild, Steven E.; Dunst, Juergen

    2008-03-15

    Purpose: To investigate potential prognostic factors, including hemoglobin levels before and during radiotherapy, for associations with survival and local control in patients with unirradiated locally recurrent rectal cancer. Patients and Methods: Ten potential prognostic factors were investigated in 94 patients receiving radiotherapy for recurrent rectal cancer: age ({<=}68 vs. {>=}69 years), gender, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status (0-1 vs. 2-3), American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) stage ({<=}II vs. III vs. IV), grading (G1-2 vs. G3), surgery, administration of chemotherapy, radiation dose (equivalent dose in 2-Gy fractions: {<=}50 vs. >50 Gy), and hemoglobin levels before (<12 vs. {>=}12 g/dL) and during (majority of levels: <12 vs. {>=}12 g/dL) radiotherapy. Multivariate analyses were performed, including hemoglobin levels, either before or during radiotherapy (not both) because these are confounding variables. Results: Improved survival was associated with better performance status (p < 0.001), lower AJCC stage (p = 0.023), surgery (p = 0.011), chemotherapy (p = 0.003), and hemoglobin levels {>=}12 g/dL both before (p = 0.031) and during (p < 0.001) radiotherapy. On multivariate analyses, performance status, AJCC stage, and hemoglobin levels during radiotherapy maintained significance. Improved local control was associated with better performance status (p = 0.040), lower AJCC stage (p = 0.010), lower grading (p = 0.012), surgery (p < 0.001), chemotherapy (p < 0.001), and hemoglobin levels {>=}12 g/dL before (p < 0.001) and during (p < 0.001) radiotherapy. On multivariate analyses, chemotherapy, grading, and hemoglobin levels before and during radiotherapy remained significant. Subgroup analyses of the patients having surgery demonstrated the extent of resection to be significantly associated with local control (p = 0.011) but not with survival (p = 0.45). Conclusion: Predictors for outcome in patients who received radiotherapy for

  17. Preoperative staging of nodal status in gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Berlth, Felix; Chon, Seung-Hun; Chevallay, Mickael; Jung, Minoa Karin

    2017-01-01

    An accurate preoperative staging of nodal status is crucial in gastric cancer, because it has a great impact on prognosis and therapeutic decision-making. Different staging methods have been evaluated for gastric cancer in order to predict nodal involvement. So far, no technique could meet the necessary requirements, which include a high detection rate of infiltrated lymph nodes and a low frequency of false-positive results. This article summarizes different staging methods used to assess lymph node status in patients with gastric cancer, evaluates the evidence, and proposes to establish new methods. PMID:28217758

  18. Breast Cancer Basics and You: Staging and Treatment | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Breast Cancer Breast Cancer Basics and You: Staging and Treatment Past Issues / ... Table of Contents Staging The extent (stage) of breast cancer needs to be determined to help choose the ...

  19. Treatment Options (by Stage) for Colon Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer.gov on the Managing Cancer Care page. Contact Us More information about contacting us or receiving ... Facebook Twitter Instagram YouTube Google+ LinkedIn GovDelivery RSS CONTACT INFORMATION Contact Us LiveHelp Online Chat MORE INFORMATION ...

  20. The impact of patient comorbidity on cancer stage at diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Gurney, Jason; Sarfati, Diana; Stanley, James

    2015-01-01

    Background: It is known that cancer stage is affected by comorbidity, but the evidence regarding the magnitude and even direction of this effect is highly inconsistent and poorly understood. The aims of this study were to establish the impact of comorbidity on cancer stage at diagnosis, using both specific individual comorbid conditions and a global measure of comorbidity; and to assess whether this impact varied by cancer site, level of comorbidity burden and individual comorbidity type. Methods: We examined comorbidity among 14 096 patients with breast, colon, rectal, liver, stomach, ovarian, uterine, bladder or kidney cancer. Patients were identified from cancer registry data, and then linked to hospitalisation data to determine the presence of comorbidity in the 5 years preceding cancer diagnosis. Individual comorbid conditions were identified using ICD-10 codes, and overall burden of comorbidity attributed using a cancer-specific measure of comorbidity (C3 Index). Results: We observed that the presence of patient comorbidity (a) increases the odds of being diagnosed with distant metastases, (b) does not lead to earlier diagnosis and (c) increases the likelihood of a patient receiving no stage of disease at diagnosis. Conclusions: Patient comorbidity has a substantial impact on cancer stage at diagnosis; however, this impact varies considerably by cancer type, individual comorbid condition and overall comorbidity burden. PMID:26461060

  1. Automatic staging of bladder cancer on CT urography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garapati, Sankeerth S.; Hadjiiski, Lubomir M.; Cha, Kenny H.; Chan, Heang-Ping; Caoili, Elaine M.; Cohan, Richard H.; Weizer, Alon; Alva, Ajjai; Paramagul, Chintana; Wei, Jun; Zhou, Chuan

    2016-03-01

    Correct staging of bladder cancer is crucial for the decision of neoadjuvant chemotherapy treatment and minimizing the risk of under- or over-treatment. Subjectivity and variability of clinicians in utilizing available diagnostic information may lead to inaccuracy in staging bladder cancer. An objective decision support system that merges the information in a predictive model based on statistical outcomes of previous cases and machine learning may assist clinicians in making more accurate and consistent staging assessments. In this study, we developed a preliminary method to stage bladder cancer. With IRB approval, 42 bladder cancer cases with CTU scans were collected from patient files. The cases were classified into two classes based on pathological stage T2, which is the decision threshold for neoadjuvant chemotherapy treatment (i.e. for stage >=T2) clinically. There were 21 cancers below stage T2 and 21 cancers at stage T2 or above. All 42 lesions were automatically segmented using our auto-initialized cascaded level sets (AI-CALS) method. Morphological features were extracted, which were selected and merged by linear discriminant analysis (LDA) classifier. A leave-one-case-out resampling scheme was used to train and test the classifier using the 42 lesions. The classification accuracy was quantified using the area under the ROC curve (Az). The average training Az was 0.97 and the test Az was 0.85. The classifier consistently selected the lesion volume, a gray level feature and a contrast feature. This predictive model shows promise for assisting in assessing the bladder cancer stage.

  2. The role of laparoscopy in staging of different gynaecological cancers.

    PubMed

    Tse, K Y; Ngan, Hextan Y S

    2015-08-01

    Apart from cervical and vaginal cancers that are staged by clinical examination, most gynaecological cancers are staged surgically. Not only can pelvic and para-aortic lymphadenectomy offer accurate staging information that helps determine patients' prognosis and hence their treatment plan, but it may also provide a therapeutic effect under certain circumstances. In the past, such a procedure required a big laparotomy incision. With the advent of laparoscopic lighting and instrument, laparoscopic lymphadenectomy became popular since the late 1980s. Dargent et al. published the first report on laparoscopic staging in cervical cancers, and many studies then followed. To date, there are numerous case series and trials evaluating the efficacy and safety of laparoscopic surgery in managing gynaecological cancers. In general, compared with laparotomy, laparoscopic lymphadenectomy has less intraoperative blood loss and post-operative pain, fewer wound complications, shorter length of hospital stay and more speedy recovery. However, this is at the expense of longer operative time. The incidence of port-site metastasis is extremely low, although it may be higher in advanced ovarian cancer. Preliminary data showed that there was no significant effect on recurrence and survival, but long-term data are lacking. In this article, the roles of laparoscopy in staging of uterine, cervical and ovarian cancers, the three most common gynaecological cancers, will be reviewed. Novel technologies such as robot-assisted surgery, single-port surgery and sentinel node biopsy will also be discussed.

  3. Treatment Options by Stage (Thyroid Cancer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... rate, body temperature, and how quickly food is changed into energy ( metabolism ). Control the amount of calcium ... test has been developed that can find the changed gene before medullary thyroid cancer appears. The patient ...

  4. Treatment Options by Stage (Nasopharyngeal Cancer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... alcohol . Signs of nasopharyngeal cancer include trouble breathing, speaking, or hearing. These and other signs and symptoms ... or neck. A sore throat. Trouble breathing or speaking. Nosebleeds. Trouble hearing. Pain or ringing in the ...

  5. Treatment Options by Stage (Salivary Gland Cancer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... does not go away. Tests that examine the head, neck, and the inside of the mouth are used ... team of doctors who are experts in treating head and neck cancer. Your treatment will be overseen by a ...

  6. Treatment Options by Stage (Pancreatic Cancer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Find NCI funding for small business innovation, technology transfer, and contracts Training Cancer Training at NCI (Intramural) ... hormones help the body use and store the energy it gets from food. The digestive juices are ...

  7. Family Caregiver Palliative Care Intervention in Supporting Caregivers of Patients With Stage II-IV Gastrointestinal, Gynecologic, Urologic and Lung Cancers

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-08

    Healthy Subject; Localized Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Metastatic Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Psychosocial Effects of Cancer and Its Treatment; Recurrent Bladder Cancer; Recurrent Cervical Cancer; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Gastric Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Recurrent Renal Cell Cancer; Recurrent Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Recurrent Urethral Cancer; Recurrent Uterine Sarcoma; Regional Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Stage II Bladder Cancer; Stage II Renal Cell Cancer; Stage II Urethral Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIA Gastric Cancer; Stage IIA Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIA Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIA Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIA Uterine Sarcoma; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIB Gastric Cancer; Stage IIB Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIB Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIB Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIB Uterine Sarcoma; Stage IIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIC Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIC Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIC Rectal Cancer; Stage III Bladder Cancer; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage III Renal Cell Cancer; Stage III Urethral Cancer; Stage IIIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIIA Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIA Uterine Sarcoma; Stage IIIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIIB Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Uterine Sarcoma; Stage IIIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIIC Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIC

  8. Low-Dose Acetylsalicylic Acid in Treating Patients With Stage I-III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-28

    Adenocarcinoma of the Lung; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

  9. Updates of prostate cancer staging: Prostate-specific membrane antigen

    PubMed Central

    Lamb, Alastair; Nair, Rajesh; Geurts, Nicolas; Mitchell, Catherine; Lawrentschuk, Nathan L; Moon, Daniel A; Murphy, Declan G

    2016-01-01

    The ability to accurately stage prostate cancer in both the primary and secondary staging setting can have a major impact on management. Until recently radiological staging has relied on computer tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and nuclear bone scans to evaluate the extent of disease. However, the utility of these imaging technologies has been limited by their sensitivity and specificity especially in detecting early recurrence. Functional imaging using positron-emission tomography with a radiolabeled ligand targeted to prostate-specific membrane antigen has transformed the prostate cancer imaging landscape. Initial results suggest that it is a substantial improvement over conventional imaging in the setting of recurrence following primary therapy by having a superior ability to detect disease and to do so at an earlier stage. Additionally, it appears that the benefits seen in the secondary staging setting may also exist in the primary staging setting. PMID:27995218

  10. Paediatric cancer stage in population-based cancer registries: the Toronto consensus principles and guidelines.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Sumit; Aitken, Joanne F; Bartels, Ute; Brierley, James; Dolendo, Mae; Friedrich, Paola; Fuentes-Alabi, Soad; Garrido, Claudia P; Gatta, Gemma; Gospodarowicz, Mary; Gross, Thomas; Howard, Scott C; Molyneux, Elizabeth; Moreno, Florencia; Pole, Jason D; Pritchard-Jones, Kathy; Ramirez, Oscar; Ries, Lynn A G; Rodriguez-Galindo, Carlos; Shin, Hee Young; Steliarova-Foucher, Eva; Sung, Lillian; Supriyadi, Eddy; Swaminathan, Rajaraman; Torode, Julie; Vora, Tushar; Kutluk, Tezer; Frazier, A Lindsay

    2016-04-01

    Population-based cancer registries generate estimates of incidence and survival that are essential for cancer surveillance, research, and control strategies. Although data on cancer stage allow meaningful assessments of changes in cancer incidence and outcomes, stage is not recorded by most population-based cancer registries. The main method of staging adult cancers is the TNM classification. The criteria for staging paediatric cancers, however, vary by diagnosis, have evolved over time, and sometimes vary by cooperative trial group. Consistency in the collection of staging data has therefore been challenging for population-based cancer registries. We assembled key experts and stakeholders (oncologists, cancer registrars, epidemiologists) and used a modified Delphi approach to establish principles for paediatric cancer stage collection. In this Review, we make recommendations on which staging systems should be adopted by population-based cancer registries for the major childhood cancers, including adaptations for low-income countries. Wide adoption of these guidelines in registries will ease international comparative incidence and outcome studies.

  11. Staging breast cancer, rehearsing metastatic disease.

    PubMed

    Sinding, Christina; Gray, Ross; Fitch, Margaret; Greenberg, Marlene

    2002-01-01

    Social science researchers have fruitfully used a range of conceptualizations of "performance": as a metaphor for social life, a way of vivifying research findings, and a form of scholarly representation. In this article, the researchers consider performance in its hermeneutic sense, as a way of generating meaning. The drama Handle With Care? Living With Metastatic Breast Cancer was created by a research team, a theater troupe, and women with breast cancer. The researchers employ an interpretive phenomenologicalframework to explore interviews with women with breast cancer involved in creating Handle With Care? The performative context in which the drama developed allowed certain illness meanings to emerge, intensify, and shift. The article also considers ethical dilemmas surfaced by this project.

  12. Sirolimus and Vaccine Therapy in Treating Patients With Stage II-IV Ovarian Epithelial, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-28

    Recurrent Fallopian Tube Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIA Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIA Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIB Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIB Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIC Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIC Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer

  13. Moving Into Stage IV: Pancreatic Cancer.

    PubMed

    Waxler, Robert P

    2016-12-01

    Living with pancreatic cancer is always an adjustment, an attempt to find balance and direction in a world of the sick and the healthy. It is also a journey into unknown territory, a search for beauty, a battle of life against death, eros struggling with thanatos. In this narrative, you will find personal details of the life of a pancreatic cancer patient, his daily struggles, his treatments, his medications, but you will also find his search for the meaning of life itself embedded in his unfolding story, his attempt to come to terms with the questions of why we live and what we might consider to be a genuinely fortunate life.

  14. Treatment Options by Stage (Vulvar Cancer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... seen at the time of the surgery, some patients may have chemotherapy or radiation therapy after surgery to kill any cancer cells that ... lymph node , nearby lymph nodes are also removed. Radiation therapy for patients who cannot have surgery . Check the list of ...

  15. Veliparib and Atezolizumab Either Alone or in Combination in Treating Patients With Stage III-IV Triple Negative Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-15

    BRCA1 Gene Mutation; BRCA2 Gene Mutation; Estrogen Receptor Negative; HER2/Neu Negative; Progesterone Receptor Negative; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Triple-Negative Breast Carcinoma

  16. The Current Role of Staging Laparoscopy in Oesophagogastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, RJ; Kennedy, R; Clements, WDB; Carey, PD; Kennedy, JA

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Oesophagogastric cancers are known to spread rapidly to locoregional lymph nodes and by transcoelomic spread to the peritoneal cavity. Staging laparoscopy combined with peritoneal cytology can detect advanced disease that may not be apparent on other staging investigations. The aim of this study was to determine the current value of staging laparoscopy and peritoneal cytology in light of the ubiquitous use of computed tomography in all oesophagogastric cancers and the addition of positron emission tomography in oesophageal cancer. Methods All patients undergoing staging laparoscopy for distal oesophageal or gastric cancer between March 2007 and August 2013 were identified from a prospectively maintained database. Demographic details, preoperative staging, staging laparoscopy findings, cytology and histopathology results were analysed. Results A total of 317 patients were identified: 159 (50.1%) had gastric adenocarcinoma, 136 (43.0%) oesophageal adenocarcinoma and 22 (6.9%) oesophageal squamous carcinoma. Staging laparoscopy revealed macroscopic metastases in 36 patients (22.6%) with gastric adenocarcinoma and 16 patients (11.8%) with oesophageal adenocarcinoma. Positive peritoneal cytology in the absence of macroscopic peritoneal metastases was identified in a further five patients with gastric adenocarcinoma and six patients with oesophageal adenocarcinoma. There was no significant difference in survival between patients with macroscopic peritoneal disease and those with positive peritoneal cytology (p=0.219). Conclusions Staging laparoscopy and peritoneal cytology should be performed routinely in the staging of distal oesophageal and gastric cancers where other investigations indicate resectability. Currently, in our opinion, patients with positive peritoneal cytology should not be treated with curative intent. PMID:25723693

  17. Paclitaxel, Carboplatin, and Bevacizumab or Paclitaxel, Carboplatin, and Temsirolimus or Ixabepilone, Carboplatin, and Bevacizumab in Treating Patients With Stage III, Stage IV, or Recurrent Endometrial Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-31

    Endometrial Adenocarcinoma; Endometrial Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Endometrial Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Endometrial Serous Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Uterine Corpus Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IIIB Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IIIC Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IVA Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IVB Uterine Corpus Cancer

  18. Should all breast cancer patients with four or more positive lymph nodes who underwent modified radical mastectomy be treated with postoperative radiotherapy? A population-based study

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Haiyong; Kong, Li; Zhang, Chenyue; Chen, Dawei; Zhu, Hui; Yu, Jinming

    2016-01-01

    Postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT) has become a standard adjuvant postoperative therapy for breast cancer patients with four or more positive lymph nodes. However, some studies have demonstrated that some subgroups of the breast cancer patients with four or more positive lymph nodes did not benefit substantially from PMRT. Therefore, it is of great necessity to identify whether all breast cancer patients with four or more positive lymph nodes who underwent modified radical mastectomy be treated with PMRT. In our study, we first established a prognostic model using the Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) database between 1998 and 2001. Univariate and multivariate Cox models were used to assess the prognostic factors, and five risk factors individually associated with prognosis including AJCC stage, AJCC T, Grade, ER status, PR status. Prognostic index of PMRT were defined as the number of risk factor (NRF). The NRF scores correlated well with overall survival of PMRT even if the patients were in the sub-poor prognosis group. Then the prognostic model was validated using the SEER database between 2006 and 2009, and the same results were obtained. In conclusion, different from others studies, our study demonstrated that all patients with four or more positive lymph nodes after modified radical mastectomy need to be treated with PMRT ever if the patients belonged to AJCC T4 in a poor prognosis group. PMID:27690343

  19. Metformin Hydrochloride and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Stage III-IV Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-11-28

    Brenner Tumor; Malignant Ascites; Malignant Pleural Effusion; Ovarian Clear Cell Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mixed Epithelial Carcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Undifferentiated Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer

  20. Ruxolitinib Phosphate, Paclitaxel, and Carboplatin in Treating Patients With Stage III-IV Epithelial Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-20

    Fallopian Tube Carcinosarcoma; Fallopian Tube Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Serous Neoplasm; High Grade Ovarian Serous Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Carcinosarcoma; Ovarian Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Primary Peritoneal Serous Adenocarcinoma; Stage III Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage III Ovarian Cancer; Stage III Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer

  1. Chemoradiation Therapy and Ipilimumab in Treating Patients With Stages IB2-IIB or IIIB-IVA Cervical Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-08

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma, Not Otherwise Specified; Positive Para-Aortic Lymph Node; Positive Pelvic Lymph Node; Stage IB2 Cervical Cancer; Stage II Cervical Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer

  2. Intraperitoneal Paclitaxel, Doxorubicin Hydrochloride, and Cisplatin in Treating Patients With Stage III-IV Endometrial Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-26

    Endometrial Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Endometrial Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Endometrial Mixed Adenocarcinoma; Endometrial Serous Adenocarcinoma; Endometrial Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Endometrial Undifferentiated Carcinoma; Recurrent Uterine Corpus Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IIIC Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IVA Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IVB Uterine Corpus Cancer

  3. Radiation Therapy in Treating Post-Menopausal Women With Early Stage Breast Cancer Undergoing Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-09-02

    Ductal Breast Carcinoma In Situ; Estrogen Receptor Negative; Estrogen Receptor Positive; HER2/Neu Negative; Invasive Cribriform Breast Carcinoma; Invasive Ductal Carcinoma, Not Otherwise Specified; Lobular Breast Carcinoma In Situ; Mucinous Breast Carcinoma; Papillary Breast Carcinoma; Progesterone Receptor Positive; Stage I Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Tubular Breast Carcinoma

  4. Outcomes of Positron Emission Tomography-Staged Clinical N3 Breast Cancer Treated With Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy, Surgery, and Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Hae Jin; Shin, Kyung Hwan; Cho, Kwan Ho; Park, In Hae; Lee, Keun Seok; Ro, Jungsil; Jung, So-Youn; Lee, Seeyoun; Kim, Seok Won; Kang, Han-Sung; Chie, Eui Kyu; Ha, Sung Whan

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the treatment outcome and efficacy of regional lymph node irradiation after neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NCT) and surgery in positron emission tomography (PET)-positive clinical N3 (cN3) breast cancer patients. Methods and Materials: A total of 55 patients with ipsilateral infraclavicular (ICL), internal mammary (IMN), or supraclavicular (SCL) lymph node involvement in the absence of distant metastases, as revealed by an initial PET scan, were retrospectively analyzed. The clinical nodal stage at diagnosis (2002 AJCC) was cN3a in 14 patients (26%), cN3b in 12 patients (22%), and cN3c in 29 patients (53%). All patients were treated with NCT, followed by mastectomy or breast-conserving surgery and subsequent radiotherapy (RT) with curative intent. Results: At the median follow-up of 38 months (range, 9-80 months), 20 patients (36%) had developed treatment failures, including distant metastases either alone or combined with locoregional recurrences that included one ipsilateral breast recurrence (IBR), six regional failures (RF), and one case of combined IBR and RF. Only 3 patients (5.5%) exhibited treatment failure at the initial PET-positive clinical N3 lymph node. The 5-year locoregional relapse-free survival, disease-free survival (DFS), and overall survival rates were 80%, 60%, and 79%, respectively. RT delivered to PET-positive IMN regions in cN3b patients and at higher doses ({>=}55 Gy) to SCL regions in cN3c patients was not associated with improved 5-year IMN/SCL relapse-free survival or DFS. Conclusion: NCT followed by surgery and RT, including the regional lymph nodes, resulted in excellent locoregional control for patients with PET-positive cN3 breast cancer. The primary treatment failure in this group was due to distant metastasis rather than RF. Neither higher-dose RT directed at PET-positive SCL nodes nor coverage of PET-positive IMN nodes was associated with additional gains in locoregional control or DFS.

  5. Lymph node staging in prostate cancer: perspective for the pathologist.

    PubMed

    Prendeville, Susan; van der Kwast, Theodorus H

    2016-12-01

    Pelvic lymph node dissection (PLND) currently represents the gold standard method for nodal staging in the setting of localised prostate cancer and may also have a therapeutic benefit in certain patients. The histopathological evaluation of PLND specimens plays a critical role in accurate lymph node staging, however there is currently a lack of consensus regarding the optimum approach and no quality parameters are in place. In addition, there are no guidelines as to the handling of less commonly encountered nodal specimens such as those identified within the anterior fat pad. This summary provides an overview of pertinent issues regarding lymph node staging in prostate cancer, with a focus on the histopathological evaluation of resected nodal specimens. We hope that this review will further the discussion on how to achieve a more standardised approach to the processing and reporting of PLND specimens in the setting of prostate cancer.

  6. Caloric Restriction in Treating Patients With Stage 0-I Breast Cancer Undergoing Surgery and Radiation Therapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-19

    Ductal Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Invasive Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Invasive Lobular Breast Carcinoma; Lobular Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer

  7. Fulvestrant With or Without Lapatinib in Treating Postmenopausal Women With Stage III or Stage IV Breast Cancer That is Hormone Receptor-Positive

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-04-11

    Estrogen Receptor Positive; HER2 Positive Breast Carcinoma; HER2/Neu Negative; Progesterone Receptor Positive; Recurrent Breast Carcinoma; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer

  8. Carboplatin and Paclitaxel With or Without Bevacizumab in Treating Patients With Stage III or Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial, Primary Peritoneal, or Fallopian Tube Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-08-18

    Fallopian Tube Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Serous Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Transitional Cell Carcinoma; Malignant Ovarian Mixed Epithelial Tumor; Ovarian Brenner Tumor; Ovarian Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Transitional Cell Carcinoma; Primary Peritoneal Serous Adenocarcinoma; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Undifferentiated Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Undifferentiated Ovarian Carcinoma

  9. Breast cancer stage at diagnosis: is travel time important?

    PubMed

    Henry, Kevin A; Boscoe, Francis P; Johnson, Christopher J; Goldberg, Daniel W; Sherman, Recinda; Cockburn, Myles

    2011-12-01

    Recent studies have produced inconsistent results in their examination of the potential association between proximity to healthcare or mammography facilities and breast cancer stage at diagnosis. Using a multistate dataset, we re-examine this issue by investigating whether travel time to a patient's diagnosing facility or nearest mammography facility impacts breast cancer stage at diagnosis. We studied 161,619 women 40 years and older diagnosed with invasive breast cancer from ten state population based cancer registries in the United States. For each woman, we calculated travel time to their diagnosing facility and nearest mammography facility. Logistic multilevel models of late versus early stage were fitted, and odds ratios were calculated for travel times, controlling for age, race/ethnicity, census tract poverty, rural/urban residence, health insurance, and state random effects. Seventy-six percent of women in the study lived less than 20 min from their diagnosing facility, and 93 percent lived less than 20 min from the nearest mammography facility. Late stage at diagnosis was not associated with increasing travel time to diagnosing facility or nearest mammography facility. Diagnosis age under 50, Hispanic and Non-Hispanic Black race/ethnicity, high census tract poverty, and no health insurance were all significantly associated with late stage at diagnosis. Travel time to diagnosing facility or nearest mammography facility was not a determinant of late stage of breast cancer at diagnosis, and better geographic proximity did not assure more favorable stage distributions. Other factors beyond geographic proximity that can affect access should be evaluated more closely, including facility capacity, insurance acceptance, public transportation, and travel costs.

  10. [The role of PET in lung cancer staging].

    PubMed

    Gärtner, Florian C; Buermann, Jens; Skowasch, Dirk; Biersack, Hans-Jürgen; Essler, Markus

    2015-04-01

    The precise staging of lymph-node and distant metastases is pivotal for the choice of surgical procedures and overall therapy planning for patients with lung cancer. FDG-PET/CT plays a central role in the diagnostic algorithm of patients with potentially curable disease. In patients with histologically proven lung cancer, FDG-PET/CT provides a higher diagnostic accuracy in the staging of lymph-node and distant metastases compared to staging with CT alone. Furthermore, as a whole body examination, FDG-PET/CT may replace further additional examinations. Prospective studies have also shown that the number of unnecessary thoracotomies and mediastinoscopies can be reduced by the inclusion of FDG-PET in the preoperative staging.

  11. Esophageal cancer: anatomic particularities, staging, and imaging techniques.

    PubMed

    Encinas de la Iglesia, J; Corral de la Calle, M A; Fernández Pérez, G C; Ruano Pérez, R; Álvarez Delgado, A

    2016-01-01

    Cancer of the esophagus is a tumor with aggressive behavior that is usually diagnosed in advanced stages. The absence of serosa allows it to spread quickly to neighboring mediastinal structures, and an extensive lymphatic drainage network facilitates tumor spread even in early stages. The current TNM classification, harmonized with the classification for gastric cancer, provides new definitions for the anatomic classification, adds non-anatomic characteristics of the tumor, and includes tumors of the gastroesophageal junction. Combining endoscopic ultrasound, computed tomography, positron emission tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging provides greater accuracy in determining the initial clinical stage, and these imaging techniques play an essential role in the selection, planning, and evaluation of treatment. In this article, we review some particularities that explain the behavior of this tumor and we describe the current TNM staging system; furthermore, we discuss the different imaging tests available for its evaluation and include a diagnostic algorithm.

  12. [Effect of cimetidine with chemotherapy on stage IV colorectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Yoshimatsu, Kazuhiko; Ishibashi, Keiichiro; Hashimoto, Masahiko; Umehara, Arihiro; Yokomizo, Hajime; Yoshida, Kiyohito; Fujimoto, Takashi; Iwasaki, Kiyo; Ogawa, Kenji

    2003-10-01

    We herein report the result of a prospective study to investigate the efficacy of cimetidine administration in conjunction with chemotherapy for stage IV colorectal cancer. Sixty-two patients treated with Leucovorin/5-fluorouracil therapy were enrolled from 1996 to 2000. Both groups were well matched for pre-treatment characteristics. There was no difference in survival in cur B patients. However, the cimetidine group had significantly prolonged survival in the patients with cur C or non-resectable carcinoma. This study suggests that cimetidine treatment may improve the survival of patients with non-curative surgery for stage IV colorectal cancer.

  13. Docetaxel, Cisplatin, Pegfilgrastim, and Erlotinib Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Stage IIIB or Stage IV Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-17

    Adenocarcinoma of the Lung; Adenosquamous Cell Lung Cancer; Bronchoalveolar Cell Lung Cancer; Large Cell Lung Cancer; Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Squamous Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

  14. Cancer stage knowledge and desire for information: mismatch in Latino cancer patients?

    PubMed

    Costas-Muniz, Rosario; Sen, Rohini; Leng, Jennifer; Aragones, Abraham; Ramirez, Julia; Gany, Francesca

    2013-09-01

    Having more health knowledge has a crucial and positive impact on cancer outcomes. Patients' cancer knowledge influences their ability to participate actively in decision-making processes for medical care and in treatment choices. The purpose of this study was to determine the demographic and medical correlates of lack of cancer stage knowledge and desire for information among Latino cancer patients. The sample included 271 underserved Latino cancer patients recruited from four cancer clinics in New York City. Participants completed a needs assessment survey in their preferred language, which included sociodemographic and health-related questions. Close to two-thirds of the sample (65%) had no knowledge of their stage, and 38% were unaware of the metastatic state of their tumor. Only 15% of the patients expressed that they would like additional information about their diagnosis and/or treatment. After controlling for sociodemographic characteristics, being an immigrant with limited English proficiency and monolingual in Spanish were predictors of stage unawareness and less desire/need for cancer information. Patients needing interpretation for health care were less likely to know whether their tumor had metastasized and their cancer stage and to desire information about their cancer diagnosis and/or treatment. This study shows considerably low levels of stage awareness among Latinos diagnosed with cancer. This lack of knowledge might adversely impact their treatment decisions and disease management. Future studies should focus on identifying barriers to acquisition of disease information and other disease-specific informational deficits.

  15. Staging and treatment of clinically occult breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, G F; Feig, S A; Rosenberg, A L; Patchefsky, A S; Schwartz, A B

    1984-03-15

    Five hundred fifty-seven biopsies were performed for clinically occult mammary lesions, detected by mammography as clustered calcifications or nonpalpable masses within the breast. One hundred seventy-five cancers were demonstrated within this group, including 106 invasive carcinomas, 10 microinvasive carcinomas, 45 in situ ductal carcinomas, and 14 lobular carcinomas in situ (lobular neoplasia). No patient with in situ or microinvasive carcinoma had evidence of axillary node metastases in 33 specimens studied. However, a disturbingly high proportion of those patients with invasive carcinomas, approximately 35%, had histologically confirmed axillary node metastases, despite the small size of the primary tumors. These observations suggest that the use of the term "minimal" cancer is misleading when applied to invasive carcinoma. Staging systems for breast cancer have been imprecise when referring to nonpalpable lesions. Cancers detected as clustered calcifications only or as areas of parenchymal distortion without an accompanying mass are properly considered as T-0 cancers, with a suggested T-0(m) to indicate that the lesion was detected by mammography. However, when the mammogram indicates the presence of a mass that proves to be malignant, although the clinical examination may have been negative, the cancer should be staged according to the size of the mass on the mammogram, with the notation that it was detected by mammography, e.g., T-1(m), T-2(m), etc. The incidence of axillary node metastases even in these so-called occult cancers is significant, so that recommendations for treatment for any invasive cancer, regardless of its size, must take these observations into account. Similarly, the incidence of multifocal sites of cancer within the breast, even in the noninvasive cancers encountered, must be remembered when treatment is suggested.

  16. Doxorubicin Hydrochloride, Cisplatin, and Paclitaxel or Carboplatin and Paclitaxel in Treating Patients With Stage III-IV or Recurrent Endometrial Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-26

    Recurrent Uterine Corpus Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IIIB Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IIIC Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IVA Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IVB Uterine Corpus Cancer

  17. Akt Inhibitor MK-2206 and Anastrozole With or Without Goserelin Acetate in Treating Patients With Stage II-III Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-12-26

    Estrogen Receptor Positive; HER2/Neu Negative; Recurrent Breast Carcinoma; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  18. Carboplatin and Paclitaxel With or Without Atezolizumab Before Surgery in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed, Stage II-III Triple-Negative Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-31

    Estrogen Receptor Negative; HER2/Neu Negative; Invasive Breast Carcinoma; Progesterone Receptor Negative; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Triple-Negative Breast Carcinoma

  19. Glycoprotein and Glycan in Tissue and Blood Samples of Patients With Stage IB-IVA Cervical Cancer Undergoing Surgery to Remove Pelvic and Abdominal Lymph Nodes

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-26

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Small Cell Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma, Not Otherwise Specified; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage III Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer

  20. Advances take stage - Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Cancer.gov

    Regulatory advances in proteomics will be taking center stage at a Symposia scheduled to occur at the 2011 American Association for Clinical Chemistry (AACC) Annual Meeting. The symposium entitled "Enabling Translational Proteomics with NCI's Clinical Proteomic Technologies for Cancer" is scheduled for July 25, 2011 at AACC's annual Meeting.

  1. Breast cancer screening: stages of adoption among Cambodian American women

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Shin-Ping; Yasui, Yutaka; Kuniyuki, Alan; Schwartz, Stephen M.; Jackson, J. Carey; Taylor, Vicky M.

    2006-01-01

    Background Little information is available on the breast cancer screening behavior of Cambodian American women. Methods We identified households from multiple sources using Cambodian surnames and conducted a cross-sectional survey, administered by bilingual and bicultural interviewers. Breast cancer screening stages of adoption were examined based on concepts from the transtheoretical model of behavioral change. Results Our response rate was 73% (398 women in clinical breast exam (CBE) analysis, and 248 in mammography analysis) with approximately 25% each in the maintenance stage. We found significant associations between screening stage with physician characteristics. Asian American female physician increased the likelihood of being in the maintenance stage (CBE, OR = 10.1, 95% CI 2.8–37.1; mammogram, OR = 74.7, 95% CI 8.3–674.6), compared to Asian American male physician with precontemplation/contemplation stage as our referent outcome. Conclusion Results from this study support the need to promote regular breast cancer screening among Cambodian American women. © 2002 International Society for Preventive Oncology. Published by Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved. PMID:12088201

  2. Methylation of WNT target genes AXIN2 and DKK1 as robust biomarkers for recurrence prediction in stage II colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Kandimalla, R; Linnekamp, J F; van Hooff, S; Castells, A; Llor, X; Andreu, M; Jover, R; Goel, A; Medema, J P

    2017-04-03

    Stage II colon cancer (CC) still remains a clinical challenge with patient stratification for adjuvant therapy (AT) largely relying on clinical parameters. Prognostic biomarkers are urgently needed for better stratification. Previously, we have shown that WNT target genes AXIN2, DKK1, APCDD1, ASCL2 and LGR5 are silenced by DNA methylation and could serve as prognostic markers in stage II CC patients using methylation-specific PCR. Here, we have extended our discovery cohort AMC90-AJCC-II (N=65) and methylation was analyzed by quantitative pyrosequencing. Subsequently, we validated the results in an independent EPICOLON1 CC cohort (N=79). Methylation of WNT target genes is negatively correlated to mRNA expression. A combination of AXIN2 and DKK1 methylation significantly predicted recurrences in univariate (area under the curve (AUC)=0.83, confidence interval (CI): 0.72-0.94, P<0.0001) analysis in stage II microsatellite stable (MSS) CC patients. This two marker combination showed an AUC of 0.80 (CI: 0.68-0.91, P<0.0001) in the EPICOLON1 validation cohort. Multivariate analysis in the Academic Medical Center (AMC) cohort revealed that both WNT target gene methylation and consensus molecular subtype 4 (CMS4) are significantly associated with poor recurrence-free survival (hazard ratio (HR)methylation: 3.84, 95% CI: 1.14-12.43; HRCMS4: 3.73, 95% CI: 1.22-11.48). CMS4 subtype tumors with WNT target methylation showed worse prognosis. Combining WNT target gene methylation and CMS4 subtype lead to an AUC of 0.89 (0.791-0.982, P<0.0001) for recurrence prediction. Notably, we observed that methylation of DKK1 is high in BRAF mutant and CIMP (CpG island methylator phenotype)-positive cancers, whereas AXIN2 methylation appears to be associated with CMS4. Methylation of AXIN2 and DKK1 were found to be robust markers for recurrence prediction in stage II MSS CC patients. Further validation of these findings in a randomized and prospective manner could pave a way to identify

  3. Comparison of Two Combination Chemotherapy Regimens Plus Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Stage III or Stage IV Endometrial Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-04-30

    Endometrial Adenocarcinoma; Endometrial Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Endometrial Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Endometrial Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma, Variant With Squamous Differentiation; Endometrial Serous Adenocarcinoma; Stage III Uterine Corpus Cancer

  4. Patient Preferences in Making Treatment Decisions in Patients With Stage I-IVA Oropharyngeal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-09-01

    Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage II Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Tongue Cancer

  5. Complementary medicine, chemoprevention, and staging of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Crawford, E David

    2003-01-01

    The 13th International Prostate Cancer Update was held in Vail, Colorado, in February 2003. This article provides an overview of the high points in the areas of complementary medicine, chemoprevention, and staging that were discussed at this meeting. M. Scott Lucia, MD, addressed the use of various hormonal agents, antiproliferative or differentiating agents, antiinflammatory agents, and antioxidants in patients with prostate cancer. Wael A. Sakr, MD, provided an overview of prognostic markers for this disease. Arturo Mendoza-Valdes, MD, explored the potential role of exercise for patients with prostate cancer, and Bruce Sodee, MD, described some exciting new developments in prostate imaging. E. David Crawford, MD, discussed the ongoing Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial.

  6. Tumor Staging and HPV-Related Oropharyngeal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Wittekindt, Claus; Klussmann, Jens Peter

    The current TNM staging for oropharyngeal cancer (OSCC) was designed empirically for non-HPV-related disease. Emerging evidence suggests it is unsuited for Human papillomavirus (HPV)-related OSCC. Patients with HPV-positive tumors have improved prognosis, despite presenting at advanced stages. These shortcomings of the current staging system have been identified in single- and multi-institutional trials. Patients with HPV related OSCC typically present with advanced N-stages leading to higher stage groupings. A rarity of stages I and II therefore represents the nature of HPV-related OSCC. Concerning prognosis of the patients, N-category and extracapsular spread seem to be of minor importance, whereas advanced T-stages result in unfavourable outcome. Anatomical staging therefore has been implied into different proposals to prognostic risk classifications in HPV-related disease as an additive compound. Prognostic risk groupings are further enhanced by incorporating non-anatomical factors. To summarize, it can be suggested that the current TNM system alone has little prognostic value in HPV-related OSCC.

  7. [Complications of surgical stage of treatment in patients with cancer of cervix uteri stage IIB].

    PubMed

    Kryzhanivs'ka, A Ie

    2013-11-01

    The results of treatment of 127 patients, suffering cervix uteri cancer stage IIB in period of 1998 - 2012 yrs, were analyzed. Complications of surgical stage of the combined treatment have had occurred in 40.9% patients, including 40.5% patients, to whom neoadjuvant chemotherapy was conducted and in 41.5%--radiation therapy (RTH). The main postoperative complications--retroperitoneal lymphatic cysts--were revealed in 35.4% patients. The factors, raising the risk of postoperative complications occurrence, are following: the primary tumor spreading, metastatic affection of lymphatic nodes of pelvic cavity, preoperative conduction of RTH or chemotherapy.

  8. Granisetron, Aprepitant, and Dexamethasone in Preventing Nausea and Vomiting in Patients Receiving Chemotherapy for Stage II, III, or IV Ovarian Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-16

    Malignant Ovarian Mixed Epithelial Tumor; Nausea and Vomiting; Ovarian Brenner Tumor; Ovarian Clear Cell Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Stage II Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Undifferentiated Ovarian Carcinoma

  9. Adjuvant chemotherapy for early-stage cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    Asano, Hiroshi; Todo, Yukiharu; Watari, Hidemichi

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this review is to address the current status of adjuvant chemotherapy alone in early-stage cervical cancer treatments in the literature. At present, the therapeutic effect of adjuvant chemotherapy alone after radical surgery (RS) has not yet been established, and radiation therapy (RT) or concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) is recommended as the standard adjuvant therapy after RS for early-stage cervical cancer in various guidelines. The main purpose of adjuvant therapy after RS, however, should be to reduce extrapelvic recurrence rather than local recurrence, although adjuvant RT or CCRT has survival benefits for patients with intermediate- or high-risk factors for recurrence. Moreover, several studies reported that adjuvant therapies including RT were associated with a higher incidence of complications, such as lymphedema, bowel obstruction and urinary disturbance, and a lower grade of long-term quality of life (QOL) or sexual functioning than adjuvant chemotherapy alone. The effect of adjuvant chemotherapy alone for early-stage cervical cancer with intermediate- or high-risk factors for recurrence were not fully investigated in prospective studies, but several retrospective studies suggest that the adjuvant effects of chemotherapy alone are at least similar to that of RT or CCRT in terms of recurrence rate, disease-free survival, or overall survival (OS) with lower incidence of complications. Whereas cisplatin based combination regimens were used in these studies, paclitaxel/cisplatin (TP) regimen, which is currently recognized as a standard chemotherapy regimen for patients with metastatic, recurrent or persistent cervical cancer by Gynecologic Oncology Group (GOG), had also survival benefit as an adjuvant therapy. Therefore, it may be worth considering a prospective randomized controlled trial (RCT) of adjuvant chemotherapy alone using TP regimen versus adjuvant RT as an alternative adjuvant therapy. Because early-stage cervical cancer is a curable

  10. Prognostic factors in early-stage ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tognon, Germana; Carnazza, Mario; Ragnoli, Monica; Calza, Stefano; Ferrari, Federico; Gambino, Angela; Zizioli, Valentina; Notaro, Sara; Sostegni, Benedetta; Sartori, Enrico

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the main prognostic factors in patients with early-stage epithelial ovarian cancer. Data were extracted from 222 patients with initial stage (I–IIA) invasive epithelial ovarian cancer treated with primary surgery followed or not followed by adjuvant therapy, from 1 January 1980 to 31 December 2008, at the Division of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Spedali Civili, Brescia, Italy; the median follow-up was 79 months (SD ± 35,945, range 20–250 months). The negative prognostic factors that were statistically significant (p<0.050) in univariate analysis were grade 2, 3, and X (clear cell in our study); stage IB, IC, IIA; positive peritoneal cytology, age equal to/greater than 54; dense adhesions; capsule rupture (pre-operative or intra-operative) and endometrioid histotype (only for disease-free survival (DFS)). Positive cytology was strongly associated with peritoneal relapses, while adhesions were associated with pelvic relapses. A positive prognosis was associated with the mucinous histotype. Conservative treatment had been carried out in 52% of patients under 40 years of age, and we detected only two relapses and three completions of surgery after a few weeks among 31 women in total. Our study indicated a possible execution in patients with patients with cancer stage IA G1–G2 (p=0.030) or IC G1 (p=0.050), provided well staged. Adjuvant chemotherapy improved the survival of cancers that were not IA G1. The positive prognostic role of taxanes must be emphasised, when used in combination with platino. PMID:23781280

  11. Prostate cancer: multiparametric MR imaging for detection, localization, and staging.

    PubMed

    Hoeks, Caroline M A; Barentsz, Jelle O; Hambrock, Thomas; Yakar, Derya; Somford, Diederik M; Heijmink, Stijn W T P J; Scheenen, Tom W J; Vos, Pieter C; Huisman, Henkjan; van Oort, Inge M; Witjes, J Alfred; Heerschap, Arend; Fütterer, Jurgen J

    2011-10-01

    This review presents the current state of the art regarding multiparametric magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of prostate cancer. Technical requirements and clinical indications for the use of multiparametric MR imaging in detection, localization, characterization, staging, biopsy guidance, and active surveillance of prostate cancer are discussed. Although reported accuracies of the separate and combined multiparametric MR imaging techniques vary for diverse clinical prostate cancer indications, multiparametric MR imaging of the prostate has shown promising results and may be of additional value in prostate cancer localization and local staging. Consensus on which technical approaches (field strengths, sequences, use of an endorectal coil) and combination of multiparametric MR imaging techniques should be used for specific clinical indications remains a challenge. Because guidelines are currently lacking, suggestions for a general minimal protocol for multiparametric MR imaging of the prostate based on the literature and the authors' experience are presented. Computer programs that allow evaluation of the various components of a multiparametric MR imaging examination in one view should be developed. In this way, an integrated interpretation of anatomic and functional MR imaging techniques in a multiparametric MR imaging examination is possible. Education and experience of specialist radiologists are essential for correct interpretation of multiparametric prostate MR imaging findings. Supportive techniques, such as computer-aided diagnosis are needed to obtain a fast, cost-effective, easy, and more reproducible prostate cancer diagnosis out of more and more complex multiparametric MR imaging data.

  12. CDX2 as a Prognostic Biomarker in Stage II and Stage III Colon Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Dalerba, Piero; Sahoo, Debashis; Paik, Soonmyung; Guo, Xiangqian; Yothers, Greg; Song, Nan; Wilcox-Fogel, Nate; Forgó, Erna; Rajendran, Pradeep S.; Miranda, Stephen P.; Hisamori, Shigeo; Hutchison, Jacqueline; Kalisky, Tomer; Qian, Dalong; Wolmark, Norman; Fisher, George A.; van de Rijn, Matt; Clarke, Michael F.

    2016-01-01

    Background The identification of high-risk stage II colon cancers is key to the selection of patients who require adjuvant treatment after surgery. Microarray-based multigene-expression signatures derived from stem cells and progenitor cells hold promise, but they are difficult to use in clinical practice. Methods We used a new bioinformatics approach to search for biomarkers of colon epithelial differentiation across gene-expression arrays and then ranked candidate genes according to the availability of clinical-grade diagnostic assays. With the use of subgroup analysis involving independent and retrospective cohorts of patients with stage II or stage III colon cancer, the top candidate gene was tested for its association with disease-free survival and a benefit from adjuvant chemotherapy. Results The transcription factor CDX2 ranked first in our screening test. A group of 87 of 2115 tumor samples (4.1%) lacked CDX2 expression. In the discovery data set, which included 466 patients, the rate of 5-year disease-free survival was lower among the 32 patients (6.9%) with CDX2-negative colon cancers than among the 434 (93.1%) with CDX2-positive colon cancers (hazard ratio for disease recurrence, 3.44; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.60 to 7.38; P = 0.002). In the validation data set, which included 314 patients, the rate of 5-year disease-free survival was lower among the 38 patients (12.1%) with CDX2 protein–negative colon cancers than among the 276 (87.9%) with CDX2 protein–positive colon cancers (hazard ratio, 2.42; 95% CI, 1.36 to 4.29; P = 0.003). In both these groups, these findings were independent of the patient's age, sex, and tumor stage and grade. Among patients with stage II cancer, the difference in 5-year disease-free survival was significant both in the discovery data set (49% among 15 patients with CDX2-negative tumors vs. 87% among 191 patients with CDX2-positive tumors, P = 0.003) and in the validation data set (51% among 15 patients with CDX2

  13. Dutasteride May Slow the Growth of Early-Stage Prostate Cancer | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    For men who are undergoing active surveillance for early-stage prostate cancer, the drug dutasteride (Avodart) could help control the disease and prevent the need for more aggressive treatments. |

  14. Paclitaxel and Carboplatin With or Without Metformin Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Stage III, IV, or Recurrent Endometrial Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-23

    Endometrial Adenocarcinoma; Endometrial Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Endometrial Serous Adenocarcinoma; Endometrial Undifferentiated Carcinoma; Recurrent Uterine Corpus Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IIIB Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IIIC Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IVA Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IVB Uterine Corpus Cancer

  15. Ziv-Aflibercept Followed by Ziv-Aflibercept, Fluorouracil, and Leucovorin Calcium in Treating Patients With Stage IV Colorectal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-05-04

    Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Stage IVA Colon Cancer; Stage IVA Rectal Cancer; Stage IVB Colon Cancer; Stage IVB Rectal Cancer

  16. Deformable image registration for multimodal lung-cancer staging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheirsilp, Ronnarit; Zang, Xiaonan; Bascom, Rebecca; Allen, Thomas W.; Mahraj, Rickhesvar P. M.; Higgins, William E.

    2016-03-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) and X-ray computed tomography (CT) serve as major diagnostic imaging modalities in the lung-cancer staging process. Modern scanners provide co-registered whole-body PET/CT studies, collected while the patient breathes freely, and high-resolution chest CT scans, collected under a brief patient breath hold. Unfortunately, no method exists for registering a PET/CT study into the space of a high-resolution chest CT scan. If this could be done, vital diagnostic information offered by the PET/CT study could be brought seamlessly into the procedure plan used during live cancer-staging bronchoscopy. We propose a method for the deformable registration of whole-body PET/CT data into the space of a high-resolution chest CT study. We then demonstrate its potential for procedure planning and subsequent use in multimodal image-guided bronchoscopy.

  17. Prostatic Fatty Acids and Cancer Recurrence Following Radical Prostatectomy for Early-Stage Prostate Cancer

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Objective: Results from some observational studies suggest that diet and energy balance influence the clinical course of early-stage prostate cancer. To evaluate possible mechanisms, we prospectively examined the relation between prostatic concentrations of fatty acids at diagnosis and cancer recurr...

  18. Previstage™ GCC test for staging patients with colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mejia, Alex; Waldman, Scott A

    2010-01-01

    The presence of tumor cells in regional lymph nodes is the most important prognostic and predictive marker in staging patients with colorectal cancer. Cancer cells in lymph nodes are associated with a poorer prognosis and an increased risk of recurrent disease. Additionally, nodal metastases identify patients who derive maximum benefit from adjuvant therapy. However, traditional paradigms for staging patients with colorectal cancer underestimate the extent of metastases and patients whose lymph nodes are ostensibly free of tumor cells by histopathology (pN0) have a 25–30% risk of developing recurrent disease, reflected by the presence of occult nodal metastases. These observations underscore the unmet clinical need for molecular approaches to accurately detect metastatic disease and identify patients at risk for disease relapse that could benefit from adjuvant chemotherapy. Detection of disease-specific mRNA targets as prognostic and predictive markers employing quantitative reverse transcription (qRT)-PCR is an emerging technology that has become a benchmark for individualization of patient management. However, to date, applications of qRT-PCR to detecting occult nodal metastases in colorectal cancer have been equivocal, reflecting markers with suboptimal sensitivity and specificity; limitations of utilizing qualitative, rather than quantitative, RT-PCR; and underpowered study designs based on inadequate patient populations. In that context, guanylyl cyclase C (GCC) is the most sensitive and specific biomarker for metastatic colorectal cancer in extra-intestinal tissues. GCC qRT-PCR detects occult metastases in lymph nodes, providing the most powerful independent prognostic information for predicting disease recurrence in pN0 patients in prospective multicenter clinical trials. This technology forms the basis for the Previstage™ GCC Colorectal Cancer Staging Test encompassing a proprietary multiplex qRT-PCR assay compatible with formalin-fixed, paraffin

  19. Evolving molecularly targeted therapies for advanced-stage thyroid cancers.

    PubMed

    Bible, Keith C; Ryder, Mabel

    2016-07-01

    Increased understanding of disease-specific molecular targets of therapy has led to the regulatory approval of two drugs (vandetanib and cabozantinib) for the treatment of medullary thyroid cancer (MTC), and two agents (sorafenib and lenvatinib) for the treatment of radioactive- iodine refractory differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) in both the USA and in the EU. The effects of these and other therapies on overall survival and quality of life among patients with thyroid cancer, however, remain to be more-clearly defined. When applied early in the disease course, intensive multimodality therapy seems to improve the survival outcomes of patients with anaplastic thyroid cancer (ATC), but salvage therapies for ATC are of uncertain benefit. Additional innovative, rationally designed therapeutic strategies are under active development both for patients with DTC and for patients with ATC, with multiple phase II and phase III randomized clinical trials currently ongoing. Continued effort is being made to identify further signalling pathways with potential therapeutic relevance in thyroid cancers, as well as to elaborate on the complex interactions between signalling pathways, with the intention of translating these discoveries into effective and personalized therapies. Herein, we summarize the progress made in molecular medicine for advanced-stage thyroid cancers of different histotypes, analyse how these developments have altered - and might further refine - patient care, and identify open questions for future research.

  20. Genetically Modified T Cells in Treating Patients With Stage III-IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer or Mesothelioma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-04

    Advanced Pleural Malignant Mesothelioma; HLA-A*0201 Positive Cells Present; Recurrent Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Recurrent Pleural Malignant Mesothelioma; Stage III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage III Pleural Mesothelioma; Stage IIIA Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Pleural Mesothelioma

  1. Aflibercept and FOLFOX6 Treatment for Previously Untreated Stage IV Colorectal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-25

    Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Stage IV Colon Cancer; Stage IV Rectal Cancer

  2. Prognostic implication of hepatoduodenal ligament lymph nodes in gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Sung Eun; Choi, Min-Gew; Lee, Jun Ho; Sohn, Tae Sung; Bae, Jae Moon; Kim, Sung

    2017-01-01

    Abstract There has been controversy regarding whether hepatoduodenal lymph node (HDLN) metastasis in gastric cancer is distant or regional metastasis. HDLN positivity was classified as distant metastasis in the 7th American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) classification, but it was reclassified as regional lymph node metastasis in the 8th AJCC classification. The aim of our study is to verify prognostic significance of HDLN metastasis in gastric cancer. This retrospective study enrolled patients with gastric cancer who underwent D2 gastrectomy from January 2007 to June 2010. HDLN was classified as a regional lymph node. Total number of patients was 3175; 143 (4.5%) of them had HDLN metastasis. The HDLN positivity was significantly associated with older age, more advanced tumor stage, undifferentiated histologic type, and pathologic diagnosis of lymphatic, vascular, and perineural invasions. Five-year survival rate of HDLN-positive patients with stages I to III disease was significantly higher than that of stage IV group (59.3% vs 18.8%, P = 0.001). In patients with stage III disease, 5-year survival rate of HDLN-positive group was significantly lower than that of HDLN-negative group (51.7% vs 66.3%, P = 0.001). Multivariate analysis showed that HDLN metastasis was an independent prognostic factor. HDLN has a different prognostic significance from other regional lymph nodes in advanced stage of gastric cancer though its positivity is not considered as distant metastasis. HDLN positivity itself seems to be an independent prognostic factor in gastric cancer, and the survival outcomes of patients with stage III disease need to be reconsidered according to HDLN positivity. PMID:28353581

  3. Carboplatin, Paclitaxel, Bevacizumab, and Veliparib in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Stage II-IV Ovarian Epithelial, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-31

    Fallopian Tube Carcinosarcoma; Fallopian Tube Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Serous Neoplasm; Fallopian Tube Transitional Cell Carcinoma; Ovarian Brenner Tumor; Ovarian Carcinosarcoma; Ovarian Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Seromucinous Tumor; Ovarian Serous Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Transitional Cell Carcinoma; Primary Peritoneal Serous Adenocarcinoma; Stage IIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Undifferentiated Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Undifferentiated Ovarian Carcinoma

  4. Fragmentation in specialist care and stage III colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Tanvir; Chang, Hsien-Yen; Veenstra, Christine M.; Pollack, Craig Evan

    2015-01-01

    Background Patients with cancer frequently transition between different types of specialists and across care settings. We explored how frequently the medical and surgical oncologic care of stage III colon cancer patients occurs across more than one hospital and whether this is associated with mortality and costs. Methods This is a retrospective SEER-Medicare cohort study of 9,075 stage III colon cancer patients diagnosed between 2000 and 2009 receiving both surgical and medical oncologic care within one year of diagnosis. Patients were assigned to the hospital where they had their cancer surgery and to their oncologist's primary hospital, and then characterized according to whether these hospitals were same or different. Outcomes included all-cause mortality, subhazards for colon cancer specific mortality, and cost of care at 12 months. Results 37% of patients received their surgical and medical oncologic care from different hospitals. Rural patients were less likely than urban patients to receive medical oncologic care from the same hospital (OR 0.62, 95%CI 0.43-0.90). Care from the same hospital was not associated with reduced all-cause or colon cancer specific mortality but resulted in lower costs at 12 months (dollars saved $5493, 95%CI $1799, $9525), 8% of median cost. Conclusions Delivery of surgical and medical oncology care at the same hospital was associated with lower costs; however, reforms which seek to improve outcomes and cost through integrating complex care will need to address the significant proportion of patients receiving care across more than one hospital. PMID:26043368

  5. Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Clinicopathologic Features and Survival Outcomes in Asian Pacific Islanders Residing in the United States: A SEER Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hamid, Muhammad Saad; Mina, Bushra

    2015-01-01

    Background. The objective of our study was to ascertain racial/ethnic disparities in Asian/Pacific Islanders (API) for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) clinicopathologic features and survival outcomes based on various tumor characteristics and treatment modalities. Method. SEER database identified invasive NSCLC cases from 2004 to 2010. Variables included American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) stage 7, tumor grade, tumor size, histology, age, marital status, radiation, surgery, and reason for no surgery. The Kruskall-Wallis test and the Z test were used to examine differences between races/ethnicities and the referent, non-Hispanic white (NHW). Multivariate Cox proportional analyses were used to establish the weight of the prognostic significance contributing to disease-specific survival (DSS) in each AJCC stage. Result. Improved DSS was seen in API across stage I (HR: 0.78), stage II (HR: 0.79), and stage IV (HR: 0.86), respectively, compared to the referent NHW (P < 0.01). Prognosis was improved by being married, being female gender, AIS histology, and birth outside the US (P < 0.01). Conclusion. We have demonstrated improved survival among API in early stage and stage IV NSCLC. Further research is necessary to clarify the role of lifestyle and tumor biology for these differences. PMID:25685148

  6. Pegylated Liposomal Doxorubicin Hydrochloride and Carboplatin Followed by Surgery and Paclitaxel in Treating Patients With Triple Negative Stage II-III Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-19

    Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer

  7. Studying the Physical Function and Quality of Life Before and After Surgery in Patients With Stage I Cervical Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-26

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma, Not Otherwise Specified; Lymphedema; Sexual Dysfunction and Infertility; Stage IA1 Cervical Cancer; Stage IA2 Cervical Cancer; Stage IB1 Cervical Cancer

  8. Esophageal Cancer: Role of Imaging in Primary Staging and Response Assessment Post Neoadjuvant Therapy.

    PubMed

    Griffin, Yvette

    2016-08-01

    Advances in the early detection and treatment of esophageal cancer have meant improved survival rates for patients with esophageal cancer. Accurate pretreatment and post-neoadjuvant treatment staging of esophageal cancer is essential for assessing operability and determining the optimum treatment plan. This article reviews the multimodality imaging approach in the diagnosis, staging, and assessment of treatment response in esophageal cancer.

  9. Activated T-cell Therapy, Low-Dose Aldesleukin, and Sargramostim in Treating Patients With Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer That is Stage III-IV, Refractory, or Recurrent

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-15

    Malignant Ovarian Clear Cell Tumor; Malignant Ovarian Serous Tumor; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer

  10. Breast self examination and breast cancer stage at diagnosis.

    PubMed Central

    Mant, D.; Vessey, M. P.; Neil, A.; McPherson, K.; Jones, L.

    1987-01-01

    The relationship between breast self examination (BSE) and breast cancer stage at diagnosis was examined in 616 women aged 15-59 years. Differences in tumour characteristics between those not practising BSE and those practising but not taught were small and inconstant. However, women who had both practised and had been taught BSE had more favourable tumours than the non-practising group. The difference was most marked in terms of tumour size and the involvement of axillary nodes. The proportions of women in the non-BSE and taught-BSE groups with each characteristic were respectively: size less than or equal to 2 cm 33% and 45%, T1 clinical stage 27% and 42%, and N0 pathological stage 37% and 50%. This advantage to taught-BSE women persisted after adjustment for the identified confounding factors of age, social class and oral contraceptive use. The likely impact on breast cancer mortality is difficult to assess, although the potential benefit of the lead time gained must not be ignored when assessing the costs and benefits of BSE. PMID:3814490

  11. Paclitaxel, Bevacizumab And Adjuvant Intraperitoneal Carboplatin in Treating Patients Who Had Initial Debulking Surgery for Stage II, Stage III, or Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial, Primary Peritoneal, or Fallopian Tube Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-06-18

    Brenner Tumor; Fallopian Tube Cancer; Ovarian Clear Cell Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mixed Epithelial Carcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Undifferentiated Adenocarcinoma; Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage II Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage III Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer

  12. Carboplatin and Paclitaxel With or Without Bevacizumab Compared to Docetaxel, Carboplatin, and Paclitaxel in Treating Patients With Stage II, Stage III, or Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cavity Carcinoma (Cancer)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-03-18

    Brenner Tumor; Fallopian Tube Cancer; Ovarian Carcinosarcoma; Ovarian Clear Cell Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mixed Epithelial Carcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Undifferentiated Adenocarcinoma; Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage II Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage III Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer

  13. Survival and prognostic factors comparing stage IB 1 versus stage IB 2 cervical cancer treated with primary radical hysterectomy.

    PubMed

    Srisomboon, Jatupol; Kietpeerakool, Chumnan; Suprasert, Prapaporn; Manopanya, Manatsawee; Siriaree, Sitthicha; Charoenkwan, Kittipat; Cheewakriangkrai, Chalong; Sae-Teng, Charuwan

    2011-01-01

    This study was undertaken to compare the survival rates of stage IB 1 versus stage IB 2 cervical cancer patients and to evaluate the prognostic factors after treatment primarily with radical hysterectomy and pelvic lymphadenectomy (RHPL). Patients with stage IB cervical cancer undergoing primary RHPL at Chiang Mai University Hospital between January 2002 and December 2009 were evaluated for survival and recurrence. Clinicopathological variables were analyzed to identify the prognostic factors affecting the survival of the patients. During the study period, RHPL was performed on 570 stage IB 1 and 110 stage IB 2 cervical cancer patients. With a median follow-up of 48 months, the 5-year disease-free survivals were 98.1% and 82.8% respectively (p<0.001). Multivariate analysis identified four significant prognostic factors affecting survival including sub-staging, non-squamous cell carcinoma histology, lymph node metastasis and the presence of lymph-vascular space invasion. In conclusion, with a primary radical hysterectomy, stage IB 1 cervical cancer patients have a significantly better survival rate than those with stage IB 2. Significant prognostic factors for stage IB cervical cancer include tumor histology, nodal status, and the presence of lymph-vascular space invasion.

  14. Mean platelet volume provides beneficial diagnostic and prognostic information for patients with resectable gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Xiao-Ming; Xia, You-You; Lian, Lian; Zhou, Chong; Li, Xiang-Li; Han, Shu-Guang; Zheng, Yan; Gong, Fei-Ran; Tao, Min; Mao, Zhong-Qi; Li, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Gastric cancer is the fourth most frequent cancer and the second cause of cancer-related mortalities worldwide. Platelets play an important and multifaceted role in cancer progression. Elevated mean platelet volume (MPV) detected in peripheral blood has been identified in various types of cancer. In the present study, we investigated the application value of MPV in early diagnostic and prognostic prediction in patients with resectable gastric cancer. In total, 168 patients with resectable gastric cancer were included and separated into the gastric cancer and healthy control groups according to median pre-operatic MPV value (MPV low, <10.51 or MPV high, ≥10.51). The results showed that the pre-operatic MPV level was significantly higher in gastric cancer patients compared with the healthy subjects. Low pre-operatic MPV level correlated with improved clinicopathological features, including decreased depth of invasion, less lymphonodus metastasis and early tumor stage. The Kaplan-Meier plots showed that the patients with higher pre-operatic MPV had decreased overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS). Surgical tumor resection resulted in a significant decrease in the MPV level. The patients whose MPV level decreased following surgery had an improved OS. Multivariate Cox regression analysis revealed that the depth of invasion, lymphonodus metastasis, American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) stage, and changes in MPV following surgery were prognostic factors affecting OS, and the AJCC stage and pre-operatic MPV were prognostic factors affecting DFS. In conclusion, MPV measurement can provide important diagnostic and prognostic results in patients with resectable gastric cancer. PMID:27703523

  15. Association mining of mutated cancer genes in different clinical stages across 11 cancer types

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tingzhang; Zheng, Shu

    2016-01-01

    Many studies have demonstrated that some genes (e.g. APC, BRAF, KRAS, PTEN, TP53) are frequently mutated in cancer, however, underlying mechanism that contributes to their high mutation frequency remains unclear. Here we used Apriori algorithm to find the frequent mutational gene sets (FMGSs) from 4,904 tumors across 11 cancer types as part of the TCGA Pan-Cancer effort and then mined the hidden association rules (ARs) within these FMGSs. Intriguingly, we found that well-known cancer driver genes such as BRAF, KRAS, PTEN, and TP53 were often co-occurred with other driver genes and FMGSs size peaked at an itemset size of 3∼4 genes. Besides, the number and constitution of FMGS and ARs differed greatly among different cancers and stages. In addition, FMGS and ARs were rare in endocrine-related cancers such as breast carcinoma, ovarian cystadenocarcinoma, and thyroid carcinoma, but abundant in cancers contact directly with external environments such as skin melanoma and stomach adenocarcinoma. Furthermore, we observed more rules in stage IV than in other stages, indicating that distant metastasis needed more sophisticated gene regulatory network. PMID:27556693

  16. Association mining of mutated cancer genes in different clinical stages across 11 cancer types.

    PubMed

    Hu, Wangxiong; Li, Xiaofen; Wang, Tingzhang; Zheng, Shu

    2016-10-18

    Many studies have demonstrated that some genes (e.g. APC, BRAF, KRAS, PTEN, TP53) are frequently mutated in cancer, however, underlying mechanism that contributes to their high mutation frequency remains unclear. Here we used Apriori algorithm to find the frequent mutational gene sets (FMGSs) from 4,904 tumors across 11 cancer types as part of the TCGA Pan-Cancer effort and then mined the hidden association rules (ARs) within these FMGSs. Intriguingly, we found that well-known cancer driver genes such as BRAF, KRAS, PTEN, and TP53 were often co-occurred with other driver genes and FMGSs size peaked at an itemset size of 3~4 genes. Besides, the number and constitution of FMGS and ARs differed greatly among different cancers and stages. In addition, FMGS and ARs were rare in endocrine-related cancers such as breast carcinoma, ovarian cystadenocarcinoma, and thyroid carcinoma, but abundant in cancers contact directly with external environments such as skin melanoma and stomach adenocarcinoma. Furthermore, we observed more rules in stage IV than in other stages, indicating that distant metastasis needed more sophisticated gene regulatory network.

  17. Management of Stage II glottic cancer. [Cobalt 60

    SciTech Connect

    Jose, B.,; Mohammed, A.; Calhoun, D.L.

    1981-08-01

    A detailed retrospective analysis was done of 55 patients with Stage II (TsNqMq) glottic cancer, treated at the University of Louisville Radiation Center from October 1953 to December 1975. Ninety-one percent of the patients were male. Eight-five percent of the patients had squamous cell carcinoma. The five year adjusted survival rate was 81% with a standard error of 5%. Twenty-seven percent of the patients had local failure and 58% of them were salvaged by further surgery. The median time to recurrence was eleven months. There was no case of laryngeal necrosis, and good function of the larynx was achieved in the majority of the patients. Eight second cancers were diagnosed during the continued follow-up of these patients. A brief review of the literature is included.

  18. Laparoscopic Assisted Surgical Staging (LASS) for Endometrial Cancer

    PubMed

    Vidal; Garza-Leal; Iglesias; Salvidar; Garza

    1994-08-01

    We report the first four cases of LASS for endometrial cancer in Mexico. Four patients diagnosed with endometrial adenocarcinoma were selected. These patients underwent peritoneal washing, vaginally assisted laparoscopic hysterectomy, bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy and pelvic biopsies. These biopsies included dissection of common iliac vessel, hypogastric and external vessels, and obturator nerve. An average of 10 nodes were obtained (8-11). In all patients both the nodes and the peritoneal washings were negative. The pathologic surgical staging was: three patients with IBG2 and one patient with IAG2. The patients were discharged on the sixth postoperative day, without complications. The follow-up is of 1 to 7 months and all are alive and without tumor activity. Patients with endometrial cancer often have associated obesity, diabetes and hypertension. For this reason the practice of minimally invasive surgery reduces morbidity. However, a full knowledge of anatomy, oncologic gynecology, and operative laparoscopy is imperative.

  19. State-of-the-art preoperative staging of gastric cancer by MDCT and magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Joon-Il; Joo, Ijin; Lee, Jeong Min

    2014-01-01

    Gastric cancer is one of the most common and fatal cancers. The importance of accurate staging for gastric cancer has become more critical due to the recent introduction of less invasive treatment options, such as endoscopic mucosal resection or laparoscopic surgery. The tumor-node-metastasis staging system is the generally accepted staging system for predicting the prognosis of patients with gastric cancer. Multidetector row computed tomography (MDCT) is a widely accepted imaging modality for the preoperative staging of gastric cancer that can simultaneously assess locoregional staging, including the gastric mass, regional lymph nodes, and distant metastasis. The diagnostic performance of MDCT for T- and N-staging has been improved by the technical development of isotropic imaging and 3D reformation. Although magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was not previously used to evaluate gastric cancer due to the modality’s limitations, the development of high-speed sequences has made MRI a feasible tool for the staging of gastric cancer. PMID:24782607

  20. Deriving stage at diagnosis from multiple population-based sources: colorectal and lung cancer in England

    PubMed Central

    Benitez-Majano, S; Fowler, H; Maringe, C; Di Girolamo, C; Rachet, B

    2016-01-01

    Background: Stage at diagnosis is a strong predictor of cancer survival. Differences in stage distributions and stage-specific management help explain geographic differences in cancer outcomes. Stage information is thus essential to improve policies for cancer control. Despite recent progress, stage information is often incomplete. Data collection methods and definition of stage categories are rarely reported. These inconsistencies may result in assigning conflicting stage for single tumours and confound the interpretation of international comparisons and temporal trends of stage-specific cancer outcomes. We propose an algorithm that uses multiple routine, population-based data sources to obtain the most complete and reliable stage information possible. Methods: Our hierarchical approach derives a single stage category per tumour prioritising information deemed of best quality from multiple data sets and various individual components of tumour stage. It incorporates rules from the Union for International Cancer Control TNM classification of malignant tumours. The algorithm is illustrated for colorectal and lung cancer in England. We linked the cancer-specific Clinical Audit data (collected from clinical multi-disciplinary teams) to national cancer registry data. We prioritise stage variables from the Clinical Audit and added information from the registry when needed. We compared stage distribution and stage-specific net survival using two sets of definitions of summary stage with contrasting levels of assumptions for dealing with missing individual TNM components. This exercise extends a previous algorithm we developed for international comparisons of stage-specific survival. Results: Between 2008 and 2012, 163 915 primary colorectal cancer cases and 168 158 primary lung cancer cases were diagnosed in adults in England. Using the most restrictive definition of summary stage (valid information on all individual TNM components), colorectal cancer stage

  1. Preoperative staging of primary breast cancer. A multicentric study.

    PubMed

    Ciatto, S; Pacini, P; Azzini, V; Neri, A; Jannini, A; Gosso, P; Molino, A; Capelli, M C; di Costanzo, F; Pucciatti, M A

    1988-03-01

    This article reports on a consecutive series of 3627 breast cancer (BC) patients undergoing preoperative staging by chest x-ray (CXR), bone x-ray (BXR) or bone scintigraphy (BS), and liver ecography (LE) or liver scintigraphy (LS). The detection rate (DR) of preclinical asymptomatic distant metastases depended on the T and N category (TNM classification system), and was very low (CXR: 0.30%, BXR: 0.64%, BS: 0.90%, LE: 0.24%, LS: 0.23%). The sensitivity, determined after a 6-month follow-up, was below 0.50% for all tests. The highest value (0.48%) was recorded for BS, which also had the lowest specificity (0.95%). The entire preoperative staging policy using the studied tests seems questionable due to poor sensitivity and an extremely low DR of distant metastases.

  2. Treatment of Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Tracey; Gettinger, Scott; Hensing, Thomas A.; VanDam Sequist, Lecia; Ireland, Belinda; Stinchcombe, Thomas E.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Stage IV non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is a treatable, but not curable, clinical entity in patients given the diagnosis at a time when their performance status (PS) remains good. Methods: A systematic literature review was performed to update the previous edition of the American College of Chest Physicians Lung Cancer Guidelines. Results: The use of pemetrexed should be restricted to patients with nonsquamous histology. Similarly, bevacizumab in combination with chemotherapy (and as continuation maintenance) should be restricted to patients with nonsquamous histology and an Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) PS of 0 to 1; however, the data now suggest it is safe to use in those patients with treated and controlled brain metastases. Data at this time are insufficient regarding the safety of bevacizumab in patients receiving therapeutic anticoagulation who have an ECOG PS of 2. The role of cetuximab added to chemotherapy remains uncertain and its routine use cannot be recommended. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitors as first-line therapy are the recommended treatment of those patients identified as having an EGFR mutation. The use of maintenance therapy with either pemetrexed or erlotinib should be considered after four cycles of first-line therapy in those patients without evidence of disease progression. The use of second- and third-line therapy in stage IV NSCLC is recommended in those patients retaining a good PS; however, the benefit of therapy beyond the third-line setting has not been demonstrated. In the elderly and in patients with a poor PS, the use of two-drug, platinum-based regimens is preferred. Palliative care should be initiated early in the course of therapy for stage IV NSCLC. Conclusions: Significant advances continue to be made, and the treatment of stage IV NSCLC has become nuanced and specific for particular histologic subtypes and clinical patient characteristics and according to the

  3. Imaging Bone Metastases in Breast Cancer: Staging and Response Assessment.

    PubMed

    Cook, Gary J R; Azad, Gurdip K; Goh, Vicky

    2016-02-01

    Bone metastases are common in patients with advanced breast cancer. Given the significant associated morbidity, the introduction of new, effective systemic therapies, and the improvement in survival time, early detection and response assessment of skeletal metastases have become even more important. Although planar bone scanning has recognized limitations, in particular, poor specificity in staging and response assessment, it continues to be the main method in current clinical practice for staging of the skeleton in patients at risk of bone metastases. However, the accuracy of bone scanning can be improved with the addition of SPECT/CT. There have been reported improvements in sensitivity and specificity for staging of the skeleton with either bone-specific PET/CT tracers, such as (18)F-NaF, or tumor-specific tracers, such as (18)F-FDG, although these methods are less widely available and more costly. There is a paucity of data on the use of (18)F-NaF PET/CT for response assessment in breast cancer, but there is increasing evidence that (18)F-FDG PET/CT may improve on current methods in this regard. At the same time, interest and experience in using whole-body morphologic MRI augmented with diffusion-weighted imaging for both staging and response assessment in the skeleton have been increasing. However, data on comparisons of these methods with PET methods to determine the best technique for current clinical practice or for clinical trials are insufficient. There are early data supporting the use (18)F-FDG PET/MRI to assess malignant disease in the skeleton, with the possibility of taking advantage of the synergies offered by combining morphologic, physiologic, and metabolic imaging.

  4. Radiation Therapy, Chemotherapy, and Soy Isoflavones in Treating Patients With Stage IIIA-IIIB Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-28

    Adenocarcinoma of the Lung; Adenosquamous Cell Lung Cancer; Bronchoalveolar Cell Lung Cancer; Large Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Squamous Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

  5. Cetuximab and Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Stage III-IV Head and Neck Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-19

    Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage III Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Tongue Cancer

  6. Risk adjusting survival outcomes of hospitals that treat cancer patients without information on cancer stage

    PubMed Central

    Pfister, David G.; Rubin, David M.; Elkin, Elena B.; Neill, Ushma S.; Duck, Elaine; Radzyner, Mark; Bach, Peter B.

    2016-01-01

    Importance Instituting widespread measurement of outcomes for cancer hospitals using administrative data is difficult due to the lack of cancer specific information such as disease stage. Objective To evaluate the performance of hospitals that treat cancer patients using Medicare data for outcome ascertainment and risk adjustment, and to assess whether hospital rankings based on these measures are influenced by the addition of cancer-specific information. Design Risk adjusted cumulative mortality of patients with cancer captured in Medicare claims from 2005–2009 nationally were assessed at the hospital level. Similar analyses were conducted in the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Result (SEER)-Medicare data for the subset of the US covered by the SEER program to determine whether the exclusion of cancer specific information (only available in cancer registries) from risk adjustment altered measured hospital performance. Setting Administrative claims data and SEER cancer registry data Participants Sample of 729,279 fee-for-service Medicare beneficiaries treated for cancer in 2006 at hospitals treating 10+ patients with each of the following cancers, according to Medicare claims: lung, prostate, breast, colon. An additional sample of 18,677 similar patients in SEER-Medicare administrative data. Main Outcomes and Measures Risk-adjusted mortality overall and by cancer type, stratified by type of hospital; measures of correlation and agreement between hospital-level outcomes risk adjusted using Medicare data alone and Medicare data with SEER data. Results There were large outcome differences between different types of hospitals that treat Medicare patients with cancer. At one year, cumulative mortality for Medicare-prospective-payment-system exempt hospitals was 10% lower than at community hospitals (18% versus 28%) across all cancers, the pattern persisted through five years of follow-up and within specific cancer types. Performance ranking of hospitals was

  7. Prognostic Impact of the Signet Ring Cell Type in Node-Negative Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Pengfei; Wu, Ruiyan; Yang, Chenlu; Geng, Qirong; Liu, Jianjun; Chen, Shangxiang; Liu, Xuechao; Ye, Minting; He, Wenzhuo; Yang, Qiong; Xia, Liangping; Xu, Dazhi

    2016-01-01

    Little is known regarding the prognostic impact of the signet ring cell (SRC) histotype on negative lymph nodes (LNs) in gastric cancer (GC). In this study, we aimed to investigate the differences between SRC and non-SRC GC patients without LN metastasis. The medical records of patients with GC who underwent gastrectomy at Sun Yat-Sen University Cancer Centre from 1996 to 2012 were reviewed to analyse the clinicopathologic characteristics associated with survival. A total of 480 cases of GC patients without LN metastasis were identified, which included 90 SRC GC patients and 390 non-SRC GC patients. Between the two groups, there were a host of significant differences in the American Joint Committee on Cancer, 7th edition (AJCC) stage. We found that SRC histology was correlated with a poor prognosis in terms of recurrence in node-negative GC patients and that SRC histologic analysis combined with AJCC staging maybe an effectual method for prediction of the recurrence rate. Additionally, we found that SRC GC presents a more dismal overall prognosis in patients with perineural or vascular invasion. PMID:27381549

  8. Paclitaxel, Cisplatin, and Topotecan With or Without Filgrastim in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Stage III or Stage IV Epithelial Ovarian Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-23

    Brenner Tumor; Ovarian Clear Cell Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mixed Epithelial Carcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Undifferentiated Adenocarcinoma; Stage III Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer

  9. Palliative Care Intervention in Improving Symptom Control and Quality of Life in Patients With Stage II-IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer and Their Family Caregivers

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-13

    Caregiver; Psychological Impact of Cancer and Its Treatment; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

  10. Identification of Gene-Expression Signatures and Protein Markers for Breast Cancer Grading and Staging

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Fang; Zhang, Chi; Du, Wei; Liu, Chao; Xu, Ying

    2015-01-01

    The grade of a cancer is a measure of the cancer's malignancy level, and the stage of a cancer refers to the size and the extent that the cancer has spread. Here we present a computational method for prediction of gene signatures and blood/urine protein markers for breast cancer grades and stages based on RNA-seq data, which are retrieved from the TCGA breast cancer dataset and cover 111 pairs of disease and matching adjacent noncancerous tissues with pathologists-assigned stages and grades. By applying a differential expression and an SVM-based classification approach, we found that 324 and 227 genes in cancer have their expression levels consistently up-regulated vs. their matching controls in a grade- and stage-dependent manner, respectively. By using these genes, we predicted a 9-gene panel as a gene signature for distinguishing poorly differentiated from moderately and well differentiated breast cancers, and a 19-gene panel as a gene signature for discriminating between the moderately and well differentiated breast cancers. Similarly, a 30-gene panel and a 21-gene panel are predicted as gene signatures for distinguishing advanced stage (stages III-IV) from early stage (stages I-II) cancer samples and for distinguishing stage II from stage I samples, respectively. We expect these gene panels can be used as gene-expression signatures for cancer grade and stage classification. In addition, of the 324 grade-dependent genes, 188 and 66 encode proteins that are predicted to be blood-secretory and urine-excretory, respectively; and of the 227 stage-dependent genes, 123 and 51 encode proteins predicted to be blood-secretory and urine-excretory, respectively. We anticipate that some combinations of these blood and urine proteins could serve as markers for monitoring breast cancer at specific grades and stages through blood and urine tests. PMID:26375396

  11. Targeting of Cancer Stem Cells and Their Microenvironment in Early-Stage MutantK-ras Lung Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    would expect the results that we have seen. However, according to the cancer stem cell theory (5), transient amplifying cells have limited capacity...1 AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0338 TITLE: Targeting of Cancer Stem Cells and Their Microenvironment in Early-Stage Mutant K-ras Lung Cancer...COVERED 15 Sep 2014 - 14 Sep 2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Targeting of Cancer Stem Cells and Their Microenvironment in Early-Stage

  12. Combination Chemotherapy, Radiation Therapy, and Bevacizumab in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Stage III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer That Cannot Be Removed By Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-11-01

    Adenocarcinoma of the Lung; Adenosquamous Cell Lung Cancer; Bronchoalveolar Cell Lung Cancer; Large Cell Lung Cancer; Squamous Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

  13. Ongoing problems concerning 7th TNM Staging System and Proposals for 8th TNM Staging System of Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ureyen, Orhan; Meral, Ulvi Mehmet

    2016-01-01

    Because of different prognosis of gastric cancer patients with the same T and N stages, the impossibility of N3 staging in patients with fewer than 15 removed lymph nodes, and the presence of stage migration phenomenon, the 6th edition TNM Staging System for gastric cancer was updated to the 7th edition TNM staging system in 2009. Despite some opposing views, the superiority of the 7th edition TNM staging system compared to the 6th has been demonstrated in many studies. However, there are doubts about the 7th edition that it will reduce the stage migration phenomenon. The most important problem about the 7th TNM staging system is regarding subgroups N3a and N3b. The separation of N3 stage as N3a and N3b does not contribute to the TNM staging system. In conclusion, separate usage of N3a and N3b subgroups in the TNM staging system should be considered in the creation phase of the 8th edition. PMID:28053675

  14. Stage-to-Stage Comparison of Preoperative and Postoperative Chemoradiotherapy for T3 Mid or Distal Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Yeo, Seung-Gu; Kim, Dae Yong; Park, Ji Won; Choi, Hyo Seong; Oh, Jae Hwan; Kim, Sun Young; Chang, Hee Jin; Kim, Tae Hyun; Sohn, Dae Kyung

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To investigate, in a comparative analysis, the prognostic implications of postchemoradiotherapy (post-CRT) pathologic stage (ypStage) vs. postoperative pathologic stage (pStage) in rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Between May 2001 and December 2006, 487 patients with T3 mid or distal rectal cancer were analyzed retrospectively. Concurrent CRT was administered preoperatively (n = 364, 74.7%) or postoperatively (n = 123, 25.3%). The radiation dose was 50.4 Gy in 28 fractions. All patients underwent a total mesorectal excision and received adjuvant chemotherapy. Disease-free survival (DFS) was estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Differences in DFS, stratified by ypStage and pStage, were compared using the log-rank test. Results: For surviving patients, the median follow-up period was 68 months (range, 12-105 months). The 5-year local recurrence-free survival rate was not different, at 95.3% and 92.1% in preoperative and postoperative CRT groups, respectively (p = 0.402), but the 5-year distant metastasis-free survival rate was significantly different, at 81.6% (preoperative CRT) vs. 65.4% (postoperative CRT; p = 0.001). The 5-year DFS rate of 78.8% in the preoperative CRT group was significantly better than the 63.0% rate in the postoperative CRT group (p = 0.002). Post-CRT pathologic Stage 0-I occurred in 42.6% (155 of 364) of the patients with preoperative CRT. The 5-year DFS rates were 90.2% (ypStage 0-I), 83.5% (ypStage II), 77.3% (pStage II), 58.6% (ypStage III), and 54.7% (pStage III). The DFS rate of ypStage 0-I was significantly better than that of ypStage II or pStage II. Post-CRT pathologic Stage II and III had similar DFS, compared with pStage II and III, respectively. Conclusions: Disease-free survival predicted by each ypStage was similar to that predicted by the respective pStage. Improved DFS with preoperative vs. postoperative CRT was associated with the ypStage 0-I group that showed a similarly favorable outcome to pStage I rectal

  15. Gefitinib in Treating Patients With Stage IB, II, or IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer That Was Completely Removed by Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-19

    Adenocarcinoma of the Lung; Adenosquamous Cell Lung Cancer; Bronchoalveolar Cell Lung Cancer; Large Cell Lung Cancer; Squamous Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

  16. ACR Appropriateness Criteria pretreatment staging of colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Dewhurst, Catherine; Rosen, Max P; Blake, Michael A; Baker, Mark E; Cash, Brooks D; Fidler, Jeff L; Greene, Frederick L; Hindman, Nicole M; Jones, Bronwyn; Katz, Douglas S; Lalani, Tasneem; Miller, Frank H; Small, William C; Sudakoff, Gary S; Tulchinsky, Mark; Yaghmai, Vahid; Yee, Judy

    2012-11-01

    Because virtually all patients with colonic cancer will undergo some form of surgical therapy, the role of preoperative imaging is directed at determining the presence or absence of synchronous carcinomas or adenomas and local or distant metastases. In contrast, preoperative staging for rectal carcinoma has significant therapeutic implications and will direct the use of radiation therapy, surgical excision, or chemotherapy. CT of the chest, abdomen, and pelvis is recommended for the initial evaluation for the preoperative assessment of patients with colorectal carcinoma. Although the overall accuracy of CT varies directly with the stage of colorectal carcinoma, CT can accurately assess the presence of metastatic disease. MRI using endorectal coils can accurately assess the depth of bowel wall penetration of rectal carcinomas. Phased-array coils provide additional information about lymph node involvement. Adding diffusion-weighted imaging to conventional MRI yields better diagnostic accuracy than conventional MRI alone. Transrectal ultrasound can distinguish layers within the rectal wall and provides accurate assessment of the depth of tumor penetration and perirectal spread, and PET and PET/CT have been shown to alter therapy in almost one-third of patients with advanced primary rectal cancer. The ACR Appropriateness Criteria are evidence-based guidelines for specific clinical conditions that are reviewed every 2 years by a multidisciplinary expert panel. The guideline development and review include an extensive analysis of current medical literature from peer-reviewed journals and the application of a well-established consensus methodology (modified Delphi) to rate the appropriateness of imaging and treatment procedures by the panel. In those instances in which evidence is lacking or not definitive, expert opinion may be used to recommend imaging or treatment.

  17. Pembrolizumab and Ruxolitinib Phosphate in Treating Patients With Metastatic Stage IV Triple Negative Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-15

    Breast Carcinoma Metastatic in the Bone; Estrogen Receptor Negative; HER2/Neu Negative; Progesterone Receptor Negative; Recurrent Breast Carcinoma; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Triple-Negative Breast Carcinoma

  18. Combination Chemotherapy and Peripheral Stem Cell Transplantation in Treating Patients With Stage III Ovarian Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-17

    Malignant Ovarian Mixed Epithelial Tumor; Ovarian Clear Cell Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma; Stage III Ovarian Cancer; Undifferentiated Ovarian Carcinoma

  19. Adherence to Guidelines for Cancer Survivors and Health-Related Quality of Life among Korean Breast Cancer Survivors

    PubMed Central

    Song, Sihan; Hwang, Eunkyung; Moon, Hyeong-Gon; Noh, Dong-Young; Lee, Jung Eun

    2015-01-01

    There is limited evidence on the association between adherence to guidelines for cancer survivors and health-related quality of life (HRQoL). In a cross-sectional study of Korean breast cancer survivors, we examined whether adherence to the guidelines of the American Cancer Society (ACS) and World Cancer Research Fund/American Institute for Cancer Research (WCRF/AICR) for cancer survivors was related to levels of HRQoL, assessed by the Korean version of Core 30 (C30) and Breast cancer module 23 (BR23) of the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer-Quality of Life Questionnaire (EORTC-QLQ). We included a total of 160 women aged 21 to 79 years who had been diagnosed with breast cancer according to American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) stages I to III and had breast cancer surgery at least six months before the interview. Increasing adherence to ACS guidelines was associated with higher scores of social functioning (p for trend = 0.05), whereas increasing adherence to WCRF/AICR recommendations was associated with higher scores of arm symptoms (p for trend = 0.01). These associations were limited to those with stage II or III cancer. Diet may be an important factor in relation to quality of life among Korean breast cancer survivors, however our findings warrant further prospective studies to evaluate whether healthy diet improves survivors’ quality of life. PMID:26690215

  20. Integrin genetic variants and stage-specific tumor recurrence in patients with stage II and III colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Bohanes, P; Yang, D; Loupakis, F; LaBonte, M J; Gerger, A; Ning, Y; Lenz, C; Lenz, F; Wakatsuki, T; Zhang, W; Benhaim, L; El-Khoueiry, A; El-Khoueiry, R; Lenz, H-J

    2015-06-01

    Integrins (ITGs) are key elements in cancer biology, regulating tumor growth, angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis through interactions of the tumor cells with the microenvironment. Moving from the hypothesis that ITGs could have different effects in stage II and III colon cancer, we tested whether a comprehensive panel of germline single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in ITG genes could predict stage-specific time to tumor recurrence (TTR). A total of 234 patients treated with 5-fluorouracil-based chemotherapy at the University of Southern California were included in this study. Whole-blood samples were analyzed for germline SNPs in ITG genes using PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism or direct DNA sequencing. In the multivariable analysis, stage II colon cancer patients with at least one G allele for ITGB3 rs4642 had higher risk of recurrence (hazard ratio (HR)=4.027, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 1.556-10.421, P=0.004). This association was also significant in the combined stage II-III cohort (HR=1.975, 95% CI 1.194-3.269, P=0.008). The predominant role of ITGB3 rs4642 in stage II diseases was confirmed using recursive partitioning, showing that ITGB3 rs4642 was the most important factor in stage II diseases. In contrast, in stage III diseases the combined analysis of ITGB1 rs2298141 and ITGA4 rs7562325 allowed to identify three distinct prognostic subgroups (P=0.009). The interaction between stage and the combined ITGB1 rs2298141 and ITGA4 rs7562325 on TTR was significant (P=0.025). This study identifies germline polymorphisms in ITG genes as independent stage-specific prognostic markers for stage II and III colon cancer. These data may help to select subgroups of patients who may benefit from ITG-targeted treatments.

  1. Bevacizumab, Cisplatin, Radiation Therapy, and Fluorouracil in Treating Patients With Stage IIB, Stage III, Stage IVA, or Stage IVB Nasopharyngeal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-04-21

    Stage II Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage III Lymphoepithelioma of the Nasopharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IV Lymphoepithelioma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx

  2. Treatment Options by Stage (Lip and Oral Cavity Cancer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... team of doctors who are expert in treating head and neck cancer. Treatment will be overseen by a medical ... Oropharyngeal Cancer Screening Oral Complications of Chemotherapy and Head/Neck Radiation Head and Neck Cancers Tobacco (includes help ...

  3. Methoxyamine, Pemetrexed Disodium, Cisplatin, and Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Stage IIIA-IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-06

    Metastatic Malignant Neoplasm in the Brain; Stage IIIA Large Cell Lung Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Lung Adenocarcinoma; Stage IIIA Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Large Cell Lung Carcinoma; Stage IIIB Lung Adenocarcinoma; Stage IIIB Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Large Cell Lung Carcinoma; Stage IV Lung Adenocarcinoma; Stage IV Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

  4. Cancer Stage at Diagnosis in HIV-infected People and Transplant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Shiels, Meredith S.; Copeland, Glenn; Goodman, Marc T.; Harrell, Janna; Lynch, Charles F.; Pawlish, Karen; Pfeiffer, Ruth M.; Engels, Eric A.

    2015-01-01

    Background It is unknown whether immunosuppression results in more aggressive, advanced stage cancers. As cancer stage is influenced both by tumor biology and medical surveillance, we assessed cancer stage in HIV-infected individuals and solid organ transplant recipients, two immunosuppressed groups with differences in healthcare utilization. Methods We used data on all cases of 15 cancer types, diagnosed during 1996–2010 in two studies that linked U.S. cancer registries to HIV and transplant registries. Odds ratios (ORs) for advanced (vs. local) disease were estimated comparing HIV and transplant populations to immunocompetent people in polytomous logistic regression models, adjusted for age, sex, race, registry and year. Results A total of 8,411 of 4.5 million cancer cases occurred in HIV-infected people, and 7,322 of 6.4 million cancer cases occurred in transplant recipients. Compared to immunocompetent people with cancer, HIV-infected people were more likely to be diagnosed with distant stage lung (OR=1.13), female breast (OR=1.99), and prostate cancers (OR=1.57), while transplant recipients had fewer distant stage lung (OR=0.54), female breast (OR=0.75) and prostate cancers (OR=0.72). Both immunosuppressed populations had a shift toward advanced stage melanoma (ORs: HIV=1.97; transplant=1.82) and bladder cancer (ORs: HIV=1.42; transplant=1.54). Conclusions Bladder cancer and melanoma were more likely to be diagnosed at non-local stage in both HIV-infected people and transplant recipients, suggesting a role of immunosuppression in their progression. Additionally, we observed a shift for some common cancers toward later stages in HIV-infected individuals and toward earlier stages in transplant recipients, consistent with differential access to medical care or surveillance. PMID:25739496

  5. Breast cancer cell behaviors on staged tumorigenesis-mimicking matrices derived from tumor cells at various malignant stages

    SciTech Connect

    Hoshiba, Takashi; Tanaka, Masaru

    2013-09-20

    Highlights: •Models mimicking ECM in tumor with different malignancy were prepared. •Cancer cell proliferation was suppressed on benign tumor ECM. •Benign tumor cell proliferation was suppressed on cancerous ECM. •Chemoresistance of cancer cell was enhanced on cancerous ECM. -- Abstract: Extracellular matrix (ECM) has been focused to understand tumor progression in addition to the genetic mutation of cancer cells. Here, we prepared “staged tumorigenesis-mimicking matrices” which mimic in vivo ECM in tumor tissue at each malignant stage to understand the roles of ECM in tumor progression. Breast tumor cells, MDA-MB-231 (invasive), MCF-7 (non-invasive), and MCF-10A (benign) cells, were cultured to form their own ECM beneath the cells and formed ECM was prepared as staged tumorigenesis-mimicking matrices by decellularization treatment. Cells showed weak attachment on the matrices derived from MDA-MB-231 cancer cells. The proliferations of MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 was promoted on the matrices derived from MDA-MB-231 cancer cells whereas MCF-10A cell proliferation was not promoted. MCF-10A cell proliferation was promoted on the matrices derived from MCF-10A cells. Chemoresistance of MDA-MB-231 cells against 5-fluorouracil increased on only matrices derived from MDA-MB-231 cells. Our results showed that the cells showed different behaviors on staged tumorigenesis-mimicking matrices according to the malignancy of cell sources for ECM preparation. Therefore, staged tumorigenesis-mimicking matrices might be a useful in vitro ECM models to investigate the roles of ECM in tumor progression.

  6. Relationship between Social Network and Stage of Adoption of Gastric Cancer Screening among the Korean Population.

    PubMed

    Lee, Myung Ha; Choi, Kui Son; Lee, Yoon Young; Suh, Mina; Jun, Jae Kwan

    2013-01-01

    Few studies have examined the relationship between social support and stages of adoption of cancer screening. Here we investigated associations between both structural and functional aspects of social support and stages of adoption of gastric cancer screening in the general population of Korea. The study population was derived from the 2011 Korean National Cancer Screening Survey (KNCSS), an annual cross-sectional survey that uses nationally representative random sampling to investigate cancer screening rates. Data were analyzed from 3,477 randomly selected respondents aged 40-74 years. Respondents were classified according to their stage of adoption of gastric cancer screening: precontemplation (13.2%), contemplation (18.0%), action/maintenance (56.1%), relapse risk (8.5%), and relapse stage (4.1%). Respondents with larger social networks were more likely to be in the contemplation/action/maintenance, or the relapse risk/relapse stages versus the precontemplation stage (OR=1.91, 95%CI: 1.52-2.91; p for tend=0.025). Emotional and instrumental supports were not associated with any stage of adoption of gastric cancer screening. However, respondents who reported receiving sufficient informational support were more likely to be in the relapse risk/relapse stages versus the precontemplation, or the contemplation/action/maintenance stage (p for trend=0.016). Interventions involving interactions between social network members could play an important role in increasing participation in gastric cancer screening.

  7. A cohort study on mental disorders, stage of cancer at diagnosis and subsequent survival

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Chin-Kuo; Hayes, Richard D; Broadbent, Matthew T M; Hotopf, Matthew; Davies, Elizabeth; Møller, Henrik; Stewart, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To assess the stage at cancer diagnosis and survival after cancer diagnosis among people served by secondary mental health services, compared with other local people. Setting Using the anonymised linkage between a regional monopoly secondary mental health service provider in southeast London of four London boroughs, Croydon, Lambeth, Lewisham and Southwark, and a population-based cancer register, a historical cohort study was constructed. Participants A total of 28 477 cancer cases aged 15+ years with stage of cancer recorded at diagnosis were identified. Among these, 2206 participants had been previously assessed or treated in secondary mental healthcare before their cancer diagnosis and 125 for severe mental illness (schizophrenia, schizoaffective or bipolar disorders). Primary and secondary outcome measures Stage when cancer was diagnosed and all-cause mortality after cancer diagnosis among cancer cases registered in the geographical area of southeast London. Results Comparisons between people with and without specific psychiatric diagnosis in the same residence area for risks of advanced stage of cancer at diagnosis and general survival after cancer diagnosed were analysed using logistic and Cox models. No associations were found between specific mental disorder diagnoses and beyond local spread of cancer at presentation. However, people with severe mental disorders, depression, dementia and substance use disorders had significantly worse survival after cancer diagnosis, independent of cancer stage at diagnosis and other potential confounders. Conclusions Previous findings of associations between mental disorders and cancer mortality are more likely to be accounted for by differences in survival after cancer diagnosis rather than by delayed diagnosis. PMID:24477317

  8. The changing hope trajectory in patients with advanced-stage cancer: a nursing perspective.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Judith Brown; Seda, Julie S; Kardinal, Carl G

    2012-06-01

    As patients with advanced-stage cancer move from the initial diagnosis through treatment, remission, recurrence, and advanced-stage disease, the hope trajectory undergoes a dynamic transformation. By identifying the hope trajectory, nurses can help patients focus on obtainable hope objects while balancing the need to present a realistic prognosis. This, in turn, may help patients find meaning and purpose in advanced-stage cancer and facilitate realistic hope when faced with a life-threatening illness.

  9. Cancer classification using the Immunoscore: a worldwide task force.

    PubMed

    Galon, Jérôme; Pagès, Franck; Marincola, Francesco M; Angell, Helen K; Thurin, Magdalena; Lugli, Alessandro; Zlobec, Inti; Berger, Anne; Bifulco, Carlo; Botti, Gerardo; Tatangelo, Fabiana; Britten, Cedrik M; Kreiter, Sebastian; Chouchane, Lotfi; Delrio, Paolo; Arndt, Hartmann; Asslaber, Martin; Maio, Michele; Masucci, Giuseppe V; Mihm, Martin; Vidal-Vanaclocha, Fernando; Allison, James P; Gnjatic, Sacha; Hakansson, Leif; Huber, Christoph; Singh-Jasuja, Harpreet; Ottensmeier, Christian; Zwierzina, Heinz; Laghi, Luigi; Grizzi, Fabio; Ohashi, Pamela S; Shaw, Patricia A; Clarke, Blaise A; Wouters, Bradly G; Kawakami, Yutaka; Hazama, Shoichi; Okuno, Kiyotaka; Wang, Ena; O'Donnell-Tormey, Jill; Lagorce, Christine; Pawelec, Graham; Nishimura, Michael I; Hawkins, Robert; Lapointe, Réjean; Lundqvist, Andreas; Khleif, Samir N; Ogino, Shuji; Gibbs, Peter; Waring, Paul; Sato, Noriyuki; Torigoe, Toshihiko; Itoh, Kyogo; Patel, Prabhu S; Shukla, Shilin N; Palmqvist, Richard; Nagtegaal, Iris D; Wang, Yili; D'Arrigo, Corrado; Kopetz, Scott; Sinicrope, Frank A; Trinchieri, Giorgio; Gajewski, Thomas F; Ascierto, Paolo A; Fox, Bernard A

    2012-10-03

    Prediction of clinical outcome in cancer is usually achieved by histopathological evaluation of tissue samples obtained during surgical resection of the primary tumor. Traditional tumor staging (AJCC/UICC-TNM classification) summarizes data on tumor burden (T), presence of cancer cells in draining and regional lymph nodes (N) and evidence for metastases (M). However, it is now recognized that clinical outcome can significantly vary among patients within the same stage. The current classification provides limited prognostic information, and does not predict response to therapy. Recent literature has alluded to the importance of the host immune system in controlling tumor progression. Thus, evidence supports the notion to include immunological biomarkers, implemented as a tool for the prediction of prognosis and response to therapy. Accumulating data, collected from large cohorts of human cancers, has demonstrated the impact of immune-classification, which has a prognostic value that may add to the significance of the AJCC/UICC TNM-classification. It is therefore imperative to begin to incorporate the 'Immunoscore' into traditional classification, thus providing an essential prognostic and potentially predictive tool. Introduction of this parameter as a biomarker to classify cancers, as part of routine diagnostic and prognostic assessment of tumors, will facilitate clinical decision-making including rational stratification of patient treatment. Equally, the inherent complexity of quantitative immunohistochemistry, in conjunction with protocol variation across laboratories, analysis of different immune cell types, inconsistent region selection criteria, and variable ways to quantify immune infiltration, all underline the urgent requirement to reach assay harmonization. In an effort to promote the Immunoscore in routine clinical settings, an international task force was initiated. This review represents a follow-up of the announcement of this initiative, and of the J

  10. Treatment Choices for Men with Early-Stage Prostate Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Events Scientific Meetings & Lectures Conferences Advisory Board Meetings Social Media Events Cancer Currents Blog All Press Releases 2017 ... Events Scientific Meetings & Lectures Conferences Advisory Board Meetings Social Media Cancer Currents Blog About NCI NCI Overview History ...

  11. Stages of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... lung cancer include a cough that doesn't go away and shortness of breath. Sometimes lung cancer ... discomfort or pain. A cough that doesn’t go away or gets worse over time. Trouble breathing. ...

  12. The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA): The next stage - TCGA

    Cancer.gov

    The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA), the NIH research program that has helped set the standards for characterizing the genomic underpinnings of dozens of cancers on a large scale, is moving to its next phase.

  13. Breast cancer cell behaviors on staged tumorigenesis-mimicking matrices derived from tumor cells at various malignant stages.

    PubMed

    Hoshiba, Takashi; Tanaka, Masaru

    2013-09-20

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) has been focused to understand tumor progression in addition to the genetic mutation of cancer cells. Here, we prepared "staged tumorigenesis-mimicking matrices" which mimic in vivo ECM in tumor tissue at each malignant stage to understand the roles of ECM in tumor progression. Breast tumor cells, MDA-MB-231 (invasive), MCF-7 (non-invasive), and MCF-10A (benign) cells, were cultured to form their own ECM beneath the cells and formed ECM was prepared as staged tumorigenesis-mimicking matrices by decellularization treatment. Cells showed weak attachment on the matrices derived from MDA-MB-231 cancer cells. The proliferations of MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 was promoted on the matrices derived from MDA-MB-231 cancer cells whereas MCF-10A cell proliferation was not promoted. MCF-10A cell proliferation was promoted on the matrices derived from MCF-10A cells. Chemoresistance of MDA-MB-231 cells against 5-fluorouracil increased on only matrices derived from MDA-MB-231 cells. Our results showed that the cells showed different behaviors on staged tumorigenesis-mimicking matrices according to the malignancy of cell sources for ECM preparation. Therefore, staged tumorigenesis-mimicking matrices might be a useful in vitro ECM models to investigate the roles of ECM in tumor progression.

  14. Disparities in Cancer Incidence, Stage, and Mortality at Boston Health Care for the Homeless Program

    PubMed Central

    Baggett, Travis P.; Chang, Yuchiao; Porneala, Bianca C.; Bharel, Monica; Singer, Daniel E.; Rigotti, Nancy A.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Homeless people have a high burden of cancer risk factors and suboptimal rates of cancer screening, but the epidemiology of cancer has not been well described in this population. We assessed cancer incidence, stage, and mortality in homeless adults relative to general population standards. Methods We cross-linked a cohort of 28,033 adults seen at Boston Health Care for the Homeless Program in 2003–2008 to Massachusetts cancer registry and vital registry records. We calculated age-standardized cancer incidence and mortality ratios (SIRs and SMRs). We examined tobacco use among incident cases and estimated smoking-attributable fractions. Trend tests were used to compare cancer stage distributions with those in Massachusetts adults. Analyses were conducted in 2012–2015. Results During 90,450 person-years of observation, there were 361 incident cancers (SIR=1.13, 95% CI=1.02, 1.25) and 168 cancer deaths (SMR=1.88, 95% CI=1.61, 2.19) among men, and 98 incident cancers (SIR=0.93, 95% CI=0.76, 1.14) and 38 cancer deaths (SMR=1.61, 95% CI=1.14, 2.20) among women. For both sexes, bronchus and lung cancer was the leading type of incident cancer and cancer death, exceeding Massachusetts estimates more than twofold. Oropharyngeal and liver cancer cases and deaths occurred in excess among men, whereas cervical cancer cases and deaths occurred in excess among women. About one third of incident cancers were smoking-attributable. Colorectal, female breast, and oropharyngeal cancers were diagnosed at more-advanced stages than in Massachusetts adults. Conclusions Efforts to reduce cancer disparities in homeless people should include addressing tobacco use and enhancing participation in evidence-based screening. PMID:26143955

  15. Peritumoral eosinophils predict recurrence in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Harbaum, Lars; Pollheimer, Marion J; Kornprat, Peter; Lindtner, Richard A; Bokemeyer, Carsten; Langner, Cord

    2015-03-01

    In colorectal cancer, the presence and extent of eosinophil granulocyte infiltration may render important prognostic information. However, it remains unclear whether an increasing number of eosinophils might simply be linked to the overall inflammatory cell reaction or represent a self-contained, antitumoral mechanism that needs to be documented and promoted therapeutically. Peri- and intratumoral eosinophil counts were retrospectively assessed in 381 primary colorectal cancers from randomly selected patients. Tumors were diagnosed in American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC)/Union Internationale Contre le Cancer (UICC) stage I in 21%, stage II in 32%, stage III in 33%, and stage IV in 14%. Presence and extent of eosinophils was related to various histopathological parameters as well as patients' outcome. Overall, peri- and intratumoral eosinophils were observed in 86 and 75% cancer specimens. The peritumoral eosinophil count correlated strongly with the intratumoral eosinophil count (R=0.69; P<0.001) and with the intensity of the overall inflammatory cell reaction (R=0.318; P<0.001). Both increasing peri- and intratumoral eosinophil counts were significantly associated with lower T and N classification, better tumor differentiation, absence of vascular invasion, as well as improved progression-free and cancer-specific survival. However, only peritumoral eosinophils, but not intratumoral, were an independent prognosticator of favorable progression-free (hazard ratio 0.75; 95% confidence interval 0.58-0.98; P=0.04) and cancer-specific survival (hazard ratio 0.7; 95% confidence interval 0.52-0.93; P=0.01)-independent of the intensity of overall inflammatory cell reaction. This was also found for patients with AJCC/UICC stage II disease, wherein the presence of peritumoral eosinophils was significantly associated with favorable outcome. In conclusion, the number of peritumoral eosinophils had a significant favorable impact on prognosis of colorectal cancer patients

  16. Overview of adjuvant systemic therapy in early stage breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Newman, Lisa A; Singletary, S Eva

    2007-04-01

    The benefits of adjuvant systemic therapy in reducing risk of distant relapse from breast cancer have been recognized for several decades. The intent of adjuvant therapy is to eliminate the occult micrometastatic breast cancer burden before it progresses into clinically apparent disease. Successful delivery of effective adjuvant systemic therapy as a complement to surgical management of breast cancer has contributed to the steady declines in breast cancer mortality observed internationally over the past 2 decades. Ongoing clinical and translational research in breast cancer seeks to improve the efficacy of systemic agents for use in the conventional postoperative (adjuvant) setting.

  17. Treatment Options for Testicular Cancer, by Type and Stage

    MedlinePlus

    ... Chemotherapy with the BEP regimen (bleomycin, etoposide, and cisplatin) for 2 cycles. This has a high cure ... BEP or 4 cycles of EP (etoposide and cisplatin). Stage II germ cell tumors Stage IIA seminomas: ...

  18. Diet and Physical Activity Change or Usual Care in Improving Progression-Free Survival in Patients With Previously Treated Stage II, III, or IV Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-09

    Fallopian Tube Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Serous Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Transitional Cell Carcinoma; Malignant Ovarian Brenner Tumor; Malignant Ovarian Mixed Epithelial Tumor; Ovarian Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Transitional Cell Carcinoma; Primary Peritoneal Serous Adenocarcinoma; Stage IIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Undifferentiated Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Undifferentiated Ovarian Carcinoma

  19. Dynamic changes of driver genes' mutations across clinical stages in nine cancer types.

    PubMed

    Li, Xia

    2016-07-01

    The driver genes play critical roles for tumorigenesis, and the number of identified driver genes reached plateau. But how they act during different cancer development stages is lack of knowledge. We investigated 138 driver genes' mutation changes across clinical stages using 3,477 cases in nine cancer types from the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) and constructed their temporal order relationships. We also examined the codon changes for the widely mutated TP53 and PIK3CA in tumor stages. Combinations of one to three driver genes specifically dominated in each cancer. Across the clinical stages, we categorized three patterns for the behaviors of driver genes' mutation changes in the nine cancer types: recurrently mutated in all the stages and triggering other mutations; certain mutations lost meanwhile other mutations emerged; mutations dominated across entire stages, while other mutations gradually appeared or disappeared. We observed different codon changes dominated in different stages and revealed mutations recurrently occurring on the hotspot regions of the coding sequence may be the core factor for driver genes' tumorigenesis. Our results highlighted the dynamic changes of oncogenesis roles in different clinical stages and suggested different diagnostic decision making according to the clinical stages of patients.

  20. Minimally Invasive Surgery for Early-Stage Lung Cancer: From Innovation to Standard of Care.

    PubMed

    White, Abby; Swanson, Scott J

    2016-11-15

    The era of minimally invasive surgery for lung cancer follows decades of research; the collection and interpretation of countless qualitative and quantitative data points; and tireless efforts by a few pioneering thoracic surgeons who believed they could deliver a safe and oncologically sound operation with less tissue trauma, an improved physiologic profile, and fewer complications than traditional open surgery. This review highlights those efforts and the role of minimally invasive surgery for early-stage lung cancer in light of evolving technology, the emerging understanding of the biology of early-stage lung cancer, and lung cancer screening.

  1. Veliparib With or Without Radiation Therapy, Carboplatin, and Paclitaxel in Patients With Stage III Non-small Cell Lung Cancer That Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-04-03

    Bronchioloalveolar Carcinoma; Large Cell Lung Carcinoma; Lung Adenocarcinoma; Lung Adenocarcinoma, Mixed Subtype; Squamous Cell Lung Carcinoma; Stage III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

  2. YKL-40 in Serum Samples From Patients With Newly Diagnosed Stage III-IV Ovarian Epithelial, Primary Peritoneal Cavity, or Fallopian Tube Cancer Receiving Chemotherapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-19

    Fallopian Tube Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Serous Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Transitional Cell Carcinoma; Malignant Ovarian Brenner Tumor; Malignant Ovarian Clear Cell Tumor; Malignant Ovarian Endometrioid Tumor; Malignant Ovarian Mixed Epithelial Tumor; Malignant Ovarian Mucinous Tumor; Malignant Ovarian Neoplasm; Malignant Ovarian Serous Tumor; Malignant Ovarian Transitional Cell Tumor; Ovarian Adenocarcinoma; Primary Peritoneal Serous Adenocarcinoma; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Undifferentiated Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Undifferentiated Ovarian Carcinoma

  3. Comparison of Laparoscopy and Laparotomy in Surgical Staging of Apparent Early Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Qi; Qu, Hong; Liu, Chongdong; Wang, Shuzhen; Zhang, Zhiqiang; Zhang, Zhenyu

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study was to compare the safety and morbidity of laparoscopic versus laparotomic comprehensive staging of apparent early stage ovarian cancer. In this retrospective study, the outcomes of patients with apparent stage I ovarian cancer who underwent laparoscopic or laparotomic comprehensive surgical staging from January 2002 to January 2014 were evaluated. The long-term survival of patients with early ovarian cancer was compared. Forty-two patients were treated by laparoscopy, and 50 were treated by laparotomy. The median operative time was 200 minutes in the laparoscopy group and 240 minutes in the laparotomy group (P >0.05). The median length of hospital stay was 3 days in the laparoscopy group and 7 days in the laparotomy group (P <0.05). Following laparoscopic and laparotomic staging, the cancer was upstaged for 9 (21.4%) and 10 (20.0%) women, respectively. The median follow-up time was 82 months in the laparoscopic and laparotomic groups, respectively. Excluding the upstaged patients, no recurrence was observed in the present study, and the overall survival and 5-year survival rates were 100% in both the laparoscopy and laparotomy groups. Laparoscopic and laparotomic comprehensive staging of early ovarian cancer were similar in terms of staging adequacy, accuracy and survival rate. Laparoscopic staging was associated with a significantly reduced hospital stay. Prospective randomized trials are required to evaluate the overall oncologic outcomes. PMID:27196468

  4. Treatment Options by Stage (Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer.gov on the Managing Cancer Care page. Contact Us More information about contacting us or receiving ... Facebook Twitter Instagram YouTube Google+ LinkedIn GovDelivery RSS CONTACT INFORMATION Contact Us LiveHelp Online Chat MORE INFORMATION ...

  5. Prognostic factors of second primary contralateral breast cancer in early-stage breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    LI, ZHENG; SERGENT, FABRICE; BOLLA, MICHEL; ZHOU, YUNFENG; GABELLE-FLANDIN, ISABELLE

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the therapeutic outcome of early-stage breast cancer (pT1aN0M0) and to identify prognostic factors for secondary primary contralateral breast cancer (CBC). A total of 85 patients with mammary carcinomas were included. All patients had undergone breast surgery and adjuvant treatment between January 2001 and December 2008 at the Central Hospital of Grenoble University (Grenoble, France). The primary end-points were disease-free survival and secondary CBC, and the potential prognostic factors were investigated. During a median follow-up of 60 months, 10 of the 85 patients presented with secondary primary cancer, of which six suffered with CBC. No patient mortalities were reported. The rates of CBC were 2.35, 3.53 and 7.06% at one, two and five years, respectively. The cumulative univariate analysis showed that microinvasion and family history are potential risk factors for newly CBC. The current study also demonstrated that secondary CBC was more likely to occur in patients with microinvasion or a family history of hte dise. In addition, the systematic treatment of secondary CBC should include hormone therapy. PMID:25435968

  6. The science behind the 7th edition Tumour, Node, Metastasis staging system for lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Henry M; Leong, Steven C; Bowman, Rayleen V; Yang, Ian A; Fong, Kwun M

    2012-02-01

    The Tumour, Node, Metastasis (TNM) system for classifying lung cancer is the cornerstone of modern lung cancer treatment and underpins comparative research; yet is continuously evolving through updated revisions. The recently published Union for International Cancer Control 7th Edition TNM Classification for lung cancer addresses many of its predecessor's shortcomings and has been subject to rigorous evidence-based methodology. It is based on a retrospective analysis of over 80 000 lung cancer patients treated between 1990 and 2000 carried out by the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer. The dataset was truly international and included patients treated by all modalities. Extensive internal and external validation of the findings has ensured that the recommendations are robust and generalizable. For the first time, a single classification system has been shown to be applicable not only to non-small cell lung cancer, but also to be of prognostic significance in small cell lung cancer and bronchopulmonary carcinoid tumours. We review the history of the Union for International Cancer Control TNM staging system, the changes in the most recent 7th edition and the strength of the scientific basis motivating these changes. Limitations of the current staging edition are explored, post-publication independent validation studies are reviewed, and the future of TNM staging for lung cancer is discussed.

  7. Cancer stem cells and early stage basal-like breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Pang-Kuo; Wolfson, Benjamin; Zhou, Qun

    2016-01-01

    Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) is a category of early stage, non-invasive breast tumor defined by the intraductal proliferation of malignant breast epithelial cells. DCIS is a heterogeneous disease composed of multiple molecular subtypes including luminal, HER2 and basal-like types, which are characterized by immunohistochemical analyses and gene expression profiling. Following surgical and radiation therapies, patients with luminal-type, estrogen receptor-positive DCIS breast tumors can benefit from adjuvant endocrine-based treatment. However, there are no available targeted therapies for patients with basal-like DCIS (BL-DCIS) tumors due to their frequent lack of endocrine receptors and HER2 amplification, rendering them potentially susceptible to recurrence. Moreover, multiple lines of evidence suggest that DCIS is a non-obligate precursor of invasive breast carcinoma. This raises the possibility that targeting precursor BL-DCIS is a promising strategy to prevent BL-DCIS patients from the development of invasive basal-like breast cancer. An accumulating body of evidence demonstrates the existence of cancer stem-like cells (CSCs) in BL-DCIS, which potentially determine the features of BL-DCIS and their ability to progress into invasive cancer. This review encompasses the current knowledge in regard to the characteristics of BL-DCIS, identification of CSCs, and their biological properties in BL-DCIS. We summarize recently discovered relevant molecular signaling alterations that promote the generation of CSCs in BL-DCIS and the progression of BL-DCIS to invasive breast cancer, as well as the influence of the tissue microenvironment on CSCs and the invasive transition. Finally, we discuss the translational implications of these findings for the prognosis and prevention of BL-DCIS relapse and progression.

  8. How Are Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Cancers Staged?

    MedlinePlus

    ... nasal cavity or ethmoid sinuses. T categories for maxillary sinus cancer TX: Primary (main) tumor cannot be ... the nose from the brain), and/or the maxillary sinus. T4a: Tumor has grown into other structures ...

  9. Prognostic and predictive significance of MSI in stages II/III colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Saridaki, Zacharenia; Souglakos, John; Georgoulias, Vassilis

    2014-06-14

    In colon cancer, classic disease staging remains the key prognosis and treatment determinant. Although adjuvant chemotherapy has an established role in stage III colon cancer patients, in stage II it is still a subject of controversy due to its restriction to a small subgroup of patients with high-risk histopathologic features. Patients with stage II tumors form a highly heterogeneous group, with five-year relative overall survival rates ranging from 87.5% (IIA) to 58.4% (IIC). Identifying those for whom adjuvant chemotherapy would be appropriate and necessary has been challenging, and prognostic markers which could serve in the selection of patients more likely to recur or benefit from adjuvant chemotherapy are eagerly needed. The stronger candidate in this category seems to be microsatellite instability (MSI). The recently reported European Society for Medical Oncology guidelines suggest that MSI should be evaluated in stage II colorectal cancer patients in order to contribute in treatment decision-making regarding chemotherapy administration. The hypothetical predictive role of MSI regarding its response to 5-fluorouracil-based adjuvant chemotherapy has proven a much more difficult issue to address. Almost every possible relation between MSI and chemotherapy outcome has been described in the adjuvant colon cancer setting in the international literature, and the matter is far from being settled. In this current report we critically evaluate the prognostic and predictive impact of MSI status in patients with stage II and stage III colon cancer patients.

  10. Patients with Old Age or Proximal Tumors Benefit from Metabolic Syndrome in Early Stage Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ying; Liu, Jian-xin; Yu, Hong-mei; Liang, Wei-ping; Jin, Ying; Ren, Chao; He, Ming-ming; Chen, Wei-wei; Luo, Hui-yan; Wang, Zhi-qiang; Zhang, Dong-sheng; Wang, Feng-hua; Li, Yu-hong; Xu, Rui-hua

    2014-01-01

    Background Metabolic syndrome and/or its components have been demonstrated to be risk factors for several cancers. They are also found to influence survival in breast, colon and prostate cancer, but the prognostic value of metabolic syndrome in gastric cancer has not been investigated. Methods Clinical data and pre-treatment information of metabolic syndrome of 587 patients diagnosed with early stage gastric cancer were retrospectively collected. The associations of metabolic syndrome and/or its components with clinical characteristics and overall survival in early stage gastric cancer were analyzed. Results Metabolic syndrome was identified to be associated with a higher tumor cell differentiation (P = 0.036). Metabolic syndrome was also demonstrated to be a significant and independent predictor for better survival in patients aged >50 years old (P = 0.009 in multivariate analysis) or patients with proximal gastric cancer (P = 0.047 in multivariate analysis). No association was found between single metabolic syndrome component and overall survival in early stage gastric cancer. In addition, patients with hypertension might have a trend of better survival through a good control of blood pressure (P = 0.052 in univariate analysis). Conclusions Metabolic syndrome was associated with a better tumor cell differentiation in patients with early stage gastric cancer. Moreover, metabolic syndrome was a significant and independent predictor for better survival in patients with old age or proximal tumors. PMID:24599168

  11. Targeting Lymph Node Retrieval and Assessment in Stage II Colon Cancer: A Quality Outcome Community-Based Cancer Center Study

    PubMed Central

    Grote, Thomas; Hughes, Amy H.; Rimmer, Cathy C.; Less, Dale A.; Abernethy, Amy P.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose Adequate lymph node evaluation is required for the proper staging of colon cancer. The current recommended number of lymph nodes that should be retrieved and assessed is 12. Methods The multidisciplinary Gastrointestinal Tumor Board at the Derrick L. Davis Forsyth Regional Cancer Center reviewed and recommended that a minimum of 12 lymph nodes be examined in all cases of colon cancer to ensure proper staging. This recommendation occurred at the end of the first quarter of 2005. To ensure this new standard was being followed, an outcomes study looking at the number of lymph nodes evaluated in stage II colon cancer was initiated. All patients with stage II colon cancer diagnosed between 2004 and 2006 were reviewed. Results There was a statistically significant improvement in the number of stage II colon cancer patients with 12 or more lymph nodes evaluated. Before the Gastrointestinal Tumor Board's recommendation, 49% (40 out of 82 patients) had 12 or more lymph nodes sampled. The median number of lymph nodes evaluated was 11. After the Gastrointestinal Tumor Board's recommendation, 79% (70 out of 88 patients) had 12 or more lymph nodes sampled. The median number of lymph nodes was 16. Conclusion Multidisciplinary tumor boards can impact the quality of care of patients as demonstrated in this study. Although we do not yet have survival data on these patients, based on the previous literature referenced in this article, we would expect to see an improvement in survival rates in patients with 12 or more nodes retrieved and assessed. PMID:20856779

  12. Screen-detected colorectal cancers are associated with an improved outcome compared with stage-matched interval cancers

    PubMed Central

    Gill, M D; Bramble, M G; Hull, M A; Mills, S J; Morris, E; Bradburn, D M; Bury, Y; Parker, C E; Lee, T J W; Rees, C J

    2014-01-01

    Background: Colorectal cancers (CRCs) detected through the NHS Bowel Cancer Screening Programme (BCSP) have been shown to have a more favourable outcome compared to non-screen-detected cancers. The aim was to identify whether this was solely due to the earlier stage shift of these cancers, or whether other factors were involved. Methods: A combination of a regional CRC registry (Northern Colorectal Cancer Audit Group) and the BCSP database were used to identify screen-detected and interval cancers (diagnosed after a negative faecal occult blood test, before the next screening round), diagnosed between April 2007 and March 2010, within the North East of England. For each Dukes' stage, patient demographics, tumour characteristics, and survival rates were compared between these two groups. Results: Overall, 322 screen-detected cancers were compared against 192 interval cancers. Screen-detected Dukes' C and D CRCs had a superior survival rate compared with interval cancers (P=0.014 and P=0.04, respectively). Cox proportional hazards regression showed that Dukes' stage, tumour location, and diagnostic group (HR 0.45, 95% CI 0.29–0.69, P<0.001 for screen-detected CRCs) were all found to have a significant impact on the survival of patients. Conclusions: The improved survival of screen-detected over interval cancers for stages C and D suggest that there may be a biological difference in the cancers in each group. Although lead-time bias may have a role, this may be related to a tumour's propensity to bleed and therefore may reflect detection through current screening tests. PMID:25247322

  13. A 10-year follow-up of treatment outcomes in patients with early stage breast cancer and clinically negative axillary nodes treated with tangential breast irradiation following sentinel lymph node dissection or axillary clearance.

    PubMed

    Wernicke, A Gabriella; Goodman, Robert L; Turner, Bruce C; Komarnicky, Lydia T; Curran, Walter J; Christos, Paul J; Khan, Imraan; Vandris, Katherine; Parashar, Bhupesh; Nori, Dattatreyudu; Chao, K S Clifford

    2011-02-01

    We compare long-term outcomes in patients with node negative early stage breast cancer treated with breast radiotherapy (RT) without the axillary RT field after sentinel lymph node dissection (SLND) or axillary lymph node dissection (ALND). We hypothesize that though tangential RT was delivered to the breast tissue, it at least partially sterilized occult axillary nodal metastases thus providing low nodal failure rates. Between 1995 and 2001, 265 patients with AJCC stages I-II breast cancer were treated with lumpectomy and either SLND (cohort SLND) or SLND and ALND (cohort ALND). Median follow-up was 9.9 years (range 8.3-15.3 years). RT was administered to the whole breast to the median dose of 48.2 Gy (range 46.0-50.4 Gy) plus boost without axillary RT. Chi-square tests were employed in comparing outcomes of two groups for axillary and supraclavicular failure rates, ipsilateral in-breast tumor recurrence (IBTR), distant metastases (DM), and chronic complications. Progression-free survival (PFS) was compared using log-rank test. There were 136/265 (51%) and 129/265 (49%) patients in the SLND and ALND cohorts, respectively. The median number of axillary lymph nodes assessed was 2 (range 1-5) in cohort SLND and 18 (range 7-36) in cohort ALND (P < 0.0001). Incidence of AFR and SFR in both cohorts was 0%. The rates of IBTR and DM in both cohorts were not significantly different. Median PFS in the SLND cohort is 14.6 years and 10-year PFS is 88.2%. Median PFS in the ALND group is 15.0 years and 10-year PFS is 85.7%. At a 10-year follow-up chronic lymphedema occurred in 5/108 (4.6%) and 40/115 (34.8%) in cohorts SLND and ALND, respectively (P = 0.0001). This study provides mature evidence that patients with negative nodes, treated with tangential breast RT and SLND alone, experience low AFR or SFR. Our findings, while awaiting mature long-term data from NSABP B-32, support that in patients with negative axillary nodal status such treatment provides excellent

  14. Gadolinium metallo nanocongregates as potential magnetosensors for detecting early stage cancers

    SciTech Connect

    Dutta, Ranu; Pandey, Avinash C.

    2015-04-27

    Gadolinium chelates and gadolinium based inorganic nanoparticles have been extensively studied, because of the high magnetic moment of gadolinium. Here, metallic gadolinium nanocongregates have been developed. Upon injecting these nanoparticles in the mice, they initially circulate in the blood stream and are localized at the cancer site, which could be visualized upon application of magnetic field hence acting as small magnetic nanosensors searching for even small cancers, detecting cancers at a very early stage.

  15. Hypofractionated Image Guided Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Stage IV Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-24

    Central Nervous System Metastases; Invasive Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Invasive Ductal Breast Carcinoma With Predominant Intraductal Component; Invasive Lobular Breast Carcinoma; Invasive Lobular Breast Carcinoma With Predominant in Situ Component; Liver Metastases; Lobular Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Lung Metastases; Male Breast Cancer; Medullary Ductal Breast Carcinoma With Lymphocytic Infiltrate; Mucinous Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Papillary Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Tubular Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Tumors Metastatic to Brain

  16. Primary vaginal cancer: role of MRI in diagnosis, staging and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Sunil, J; Klopp, A H; Devine, C E; Sagebiel, T; Viswanathan, C; Bhosale, P R

    2015-01-01

    Primary carcinoma of the vagina is rare, accounting for 1–3% of all gynaecological malignancies. MRI has an increasing role in diagnosis, staging, treatment and assessment of complications in gynaecologic malignancy. In this review, we illustrate the utility of MRI in patients with primary vaginal cancer and highlight key aspects of staging, treatment, recurrence and complications. PMID:25966291

  17. Guided Imagery and Relaxation for Women with Early Stage Breast Cancer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodwin, Linda K.; Lee, Sang Min; Puig, Ana I.; Sherrard, Peter A. D.

    2005-01-01

    Fifty-two women with Stage I and Stage II breast cancer agreed to participate in a study to determine the effectiveness of two interventions, guided imagery and relaxation, to enhance psychological well-being. Participants were randomly assigned to either a guided imagery or relaxation group. Forty women completed the study. A student's t-test was…

  18. Measurement of Loneliness Among Clients Representing Four Stages of Cancer: An Exploratory Study.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-03-01

    UCLA Loneliness Scale was admizistered to’measure...degree of loneliness experienced by clients in these four stages was measured by the Revised UCLA Loneliness Scale developed by Russell, Peplau, and...Problem Will clients, representing four stages of cancer, manifest loneliness as measured by the Revised UCLA Loneliness Scale ? How will these clients

  19. Statins and breast cancer stage and mortality in the Women’s Health Initiative

    PubMed Central

    Desai, Pinkal; Lehman, Amy; Chlebowski, Rowan T.; Kwan, Marilyn L.; Arun, Monica; Manson, JoAnn E.; Lavasani, Sayeh; Wasswertheil-Smoller, Sylvia; Sarto, Gloria E.; LeBoff, Meryl; Cauley, Jane; Cote, Michele; Beebe-Dimmer, Jennifer; Jay, Allison

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the association between statins and breast cancer stage and mortality in the Women’s Health Initiative. Methods The study population included 128,675 post-menopausal women aged 50–79 years, out of which there were 7,883 newly diagnosed cases of in situ (19 %), local (61 %)-, regional (19 %)- and distant (1 %)-stage breast cancer and 401 deaths due to breast cancer after an average of 11.5 (SD = 3.7) years of follow-up. Stage was coded using SEER criteria and was stratified into early (in situ and local)- versus late (regional and distant)-stage disease. Information on statins and other risk factors were collected by self- and interviewer-administered questionnaires. Cause of death was based on medical record review. Multivariable-adjusted hazards ratios (HR) and 95 % confidence intervals (CIs) evaluating the relationship between statin use (at baseline only and in a time-dependent manner) and diagnosis of late-stage breast cancer and breast cancer-specific mortality were computed from Cox proportional hazards analyses after adjusting for appropriate confounders. Results Statins were used by 10,474 women (8 %) at baseline. In the multivariable-adjusted time-dependent model, use of lipophilic statins was associated with a reduction in diagnosis of late-stage breast cancer (HR 0.80, 95 % CI 0.64–0.98, p = 0.035) which was also significant among women with estrogen receptor-positive disease (HR 0.72, 95 % CI 0.56–0.93, p = 0.012). Breast cancer mortality was marginally lower in statin users compared with nonusers (HR 0.59, 95 % CI 0.32–1.06, p = 0.075). Conclusions Prior statin use is associated with lower breast cancer stage at diagnosis. PMID:25736184

  20. Reassessing the NTCTCS Staging Systems for Differentiated Thyroid Cancer, Including Age at Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    McLeod, Donald S.A.; Jonklaas, Jacqueline; Brierley, James D.; Ain, Kenneth B.; Cooper, David S.; Fein, Henry G.; Haugen, Bryan R.; Ladenson, Paul W.; Magner, James; Ross, Douglas S.; Skarulis, Monica C.; Steward, David L.; Xing, Mingzhao; Litofsky, Danielle R.; Maxon, Harry R.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Thyroid cancer is unique for having age as a staging variable. Recently, the commonly used age cut-point of 45 years has been questioned. Objective: This study assessed alternate staging systems on the outcome of overall survival, and compared these with current National Thyroid Cancer Treatment Cooperative Study (NTCTCS) staging systems for papillary and follicular thyroid cancer. Methods: A total of 4721 patients with differentiated thyroid cancer were assessed. Five potential alternate staging systems were generated at age cut-points in five-year increments from 35 to 70 years, and tested for model discrimination (Harrell's C-statistic) and calibration (R2). The best five models for papillary and follicular cancer were further tested with bootstrap resampling and significance testing for discrimination. Results: The best five alternate papillary cancer systems had age cut-points of 45–50 years, with the highest scoring model using 50 years. No significant difference in C-statistic was found between the best alternate and current NTCTCS systems (p = 0.200). The best five alternate follicular cancer systems had age cut-points of 50–55 years, with the highest scoring model using 50 years. All five best alternate staging systems performed better compared with the current system (p = 0.003–0.035). There was no significant difference in discrimination between the best alternate system (cut-point age 50 years) and the best system of cut-point age 45 years (p = 0.197). Conclusions: No alternate papillary cancer systems assessed were significantly better than the current system. New alternate staging systems for follicular cancer appear to be better than the current NTCTCS system, although they require external validation. PMID:26203804

  1. Cancer-related hospitalisations and ‘unknown’ stage prostate cancer: a population-based record linkage study

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xue Qin; Smith, David Paul; Goldsbury, David Eamon; Cooke-Yarborough, Claire; Patel, Manish Indravadan; O'Connell, Dianne Lesley

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To identify reasons for prostate cancer stage being recorded as ‘unknown’ in Australia's largest population-based cancer registry. Design Prospective population-based cohort. Setting New South Wales (NSW) is the most populous state in Australia, with almost one third of the total national population. Participants NSW Cancer Registry (NSWCR) records for prostate cancer cases diagnosed in 2001–2009 were linked to the NSW Admitted Patient Data Collection (APDC) for 2000–2010. All patients in this study had a minimum of 12 months follow-up in the hospital episode records after their date of diagnosis as recorded by the NSWCR. Main outcome measures Incidence of ‘unknown’ stage prostate cancer and cancer-specific survival. Results Of 50 597 prostate cancer cases, 39.9% were recorded as having ‘unknown’ stage. Up to 4 months after diagnosis, 77.2% of cases without a hospital-reported cancer diagnosis were recorded as having ‘unknown’ stage. Among those patients with a hospital-reported cancer diagnosis, stage was ‘unknown’ for 7.6% of cases who received a radical prostatectomy (RP) and for 34.0% of cases who had procedures other than RP. In the latter group, the factors that were related to having ‘unknown’ stage were living in disadvantaged areas (adjusted OR (aOR) range: 1.13 to 1.20), attending a private hospital (aOR range: 1.25 to 2.13), having day-only admission for care (aOR=1.23, 95% CI 1.11 to 1.36), or having procedures other than multiple procedures with imaging (eg, biopsy only, aOR range: 1.11 to 1.45). Conclusions Over half of ‘unknown’ stage prostate cancer cases did not have a hospital-reported prostate cancer diagnosis within the 4 months after initial diagnosis. We identified differences in the likelihood of cases being recorded as ‘unknown’ stage based on socioeconomic status and facility type, which suggests that further investigation of reporting practices in relation to diagnostic and treatment

  2. Lymphedema After Surgery in Patients With Endometrial Cancer, Cervical Cancer, or Vulvar Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-23

    Lymphedema; Stage IA Cervical Cancer; Stage IA Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IA Vulvar Cancer; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage IB Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IB Vulvar Cancer; Stage II Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage II Vulvar Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIA Vulvar Cancer; Stage IIIB Vulvar Cancer; Stage IIIC Vulvar Cancer; Stage IVB Vulvar Cancer

  3. Advances in Medical Management of Early Stage and Advanced Breast Cancer: 2015.

    PubMed

    Witherby, Sabrina; Rizack, Tina; Sakr, Bachir J; Legare, Robert D; Sikov, William M

    2016-01-01

    Standard management of early stage and advanced breast cancer has been improved over the past few years by knowledge gained about the biology of the disease, results from a number of eagerly anticipated clinical trials and the development of novel agents that offer our patients options for improved outcomes or reduced toxicity or both. This review highlights recent major developments affecting the systemic therapy of breast cancer, broken down by clinically relevant patient subgroups and disease stage, and briefly discusses some of the ongoing controversies in the treatment of breast cancer and promising therapies on the horizon.

  4. Vaginal brachytherapy alone is sufficient adjuvant treatment of surgical stage I endometrial cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Solhjem, Matthew C. . E-mail: petersen.ivy@mayo.edu; Petersen, Ivy A.; Haddock, Michael G.

    2005-08-01

    Purpose To determine the efficacy and complications of adjuvant vaginal high-dose-rate brachytherapy alone for patients with Stage I endometrial cancer in whom complete surgical staging had been performed. Methods and Materials Between April 1998 and March 2004, 100 patients with Stage I endometrial cancer underwent surgical staging (total abdominal hysterectomy and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy with pelvic {+-} paraaortic nodal sampling) and postoperative vaginal high-dose-rate brachytherapy at our institution. The total dose was 2100 cGy in three fractions. Results With a median follow-up of 23 months (range 2-62), no pelvic or vaginal recurrences developed. All patients underwent pelvic dissection, and 42% underwent paraaortic nodal dissection. A median of 29.5 pelvic nodes (range 1-67) was removed (84% had >10 pelvic nodes removed). Most patients (73%) had endometrioid (or unspecified) adenocarcinoma, 16% had papillary serous carcinoma, and 11% had other histologic types. The International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage and grade was Stage IA, grade III in 5; Stage IB, grade I, II, or III in 6, 27, or 20, respectively; and Stage IC, grade I, II, or III in 13, 17, or 10, respectively. The Common Toxicity Criteria (version 2.0) complications were mild (Grade 1-2) and consisted primarily of vaginal mucosal changes, temporary urinary irritation, and temporary diarrhea. Conclusion Adjuvant vaginal high-dose-rate brachytherapy alone may be a safe and effective alternative to pelvic external beam radiotherapy for surgical Stage I endometrial cancer.

  5. Cigarette Smoking Prior to First Cancer and Risk of Second Smoking-Associated Cancers Among Survivors of Bladder, Kidney, Head and Neck, and Stage I Lung Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Shiels, Meredith S.; Gibson, Todd; Sampson, Joshua; Albanes, Demetrius; Andreotti, Gabriella; Beane Freeman, Laura; Berrington de Gonzalez, Amy; Caporaso, Neil; Curtis, Rochelle E.; Elena, Joanne; Freedman, Neal D.; Robien, Kim; Black, Amanda; Morton, Lindsay M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Data on smoking and second cancer risk among cancer survivors are limited. We assessed associations between smoking before first cancer diagnosis and risk of second primary smoking-associated cancers among survivors of lung (stage I), bladder, kidney, and head/neck cancers. Methods Data were pooled from 2,552 patients with stage I lung cancer, 6,386 with bladder cancer, 3,179 with kidney cancer, and 2,967 with head/neck cancer from five cohort studies. We assessed the association between prediagnostic smoking and second smoking-associated cancer risk with proportional hazards regression, and compared these estimates to those for first smoking-associated cancers in all cohort participants. Results Compared with never smoking, current smoking of ≥ 20 cigarettes per day was associated with increased second smoking-associated cancer risk among survivors of stage I lung (hazard ratio [HR] = 3.26; 95% CI, 0.92 to 11.6), bladder (HR = 3.67; 95% CI, 2.25 to 5.99), head/neck (HR = 4.45; 95% CI, 2.56 to 7.73), and kidney cancers (HR = 5.33; 95% CI, 2.55 to 11.1). These estimates were similar to those for first smoking-associated cancer among all cohort participants (HR = 5.41; 95% CI, 5.23 to 5.61). The 5-year cumulative incidence of second smoking-associated cancers ranged from 3% to 8% in this group of cancer survivors. Conclusion Understanding risk factors for second cancers among cancer survivors is crucial. Our data indicate that cigarette smoking before first cancer diagnosis increases second cancer risk among cancer survivors, and elevated cancer risk in these survivors is likely due to increased smoking prevalence. The high 5-year cumulative risks of smoking-associated cancers among current smoking survivors of stage I lung, bladder, kidney, and head/neck cancers highlight the importance of smoking cessation in patients with cancer. PMID:25385740

  6. Transvaginal Sonography Versus Cystoscopy for Detecting Urinary Bladder Invasion in Early Stage Cervical Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zutshi, Vijay; Garg, Anju; Batra, Swaraj

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Cervical cancer is a major cause of mortality from cancer among women. In it’s early stage pre operative staging with cystoscopy is a standard procedure for the detection of urinary bladder involvement. Aim The present study was conducted with the aim to compare the efficacy of Transvaginal Sonography (TVS) and cystoscopy in diagnosing bladder involvement in early stage cervical cancer patients by confirming it intraoperatively and further by histopathologic examination. Materials and Methods A prospective partially blinded study was conducted between March 2006 and September 2008 on 30 patients with early stage cervical cancer (Stage I and IIa) who were planned to undergo radical hysterectomy. Pre operatively, these patients underwent both TVS and cystoscopy to diagnose bladder involvement. Presence or absence of bladder involvement was then confirmed intra operatively and by histopathologic examination. Results In all the 30 patients studied, no bladder involvement was seen on cystoscopy where as TVS showed bladder involvement in three patients. Involvement of the bladder in these three patients was confirmed intra operatively and by histopathologic examination. Thus, in our study, TVS was 100% sensitive in detecting bladder involvement. Conclusion TVS is highly sensitive in diagnosing bladder involvement in early stage cervical cancer and could potentially detect cases missed with a cystoscopy.

  7. Neighborhood Composition and Cancer among Hispanics: Tumor Stage and Size at Time of Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Reyes-Ortiz, Carlos A.; Eschbach, Karl; Zhang, Dong D.; Goodwin, James S.

    2013-01-01

    Background We have previously reported that cancer incidence for lung, female breast, and colon and rectum for Hispanics decreases with increasing percentage of Hispanics at the census tract. In contrast, cervical cancer incidence increases with increasing percentage of Hispanics at the census tract. Methods In this study, we investigate the hypothesis that Hispanics living in census tracts with high percentages of Hispanics are diagnosed with more advanced cancer, with respect to tumor size and stage of diagnosis. Data from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results registry and the U.S. Census Bureau were used to estimate the odds of diagnosis at a “late” stage (II, III, IV) versus “early” stage (I) and breast cancer tumor size among Hispanics as a function of census tract percent Hispanic. Hispanic ethnicity in the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results registry was identified by medical record review and Hispanic surname lists. The study also used income of Hispanics living in the census tract and controlled for age at diagnosis and gender. Results We found that Hispanics living in neighborhoods with higher density of Hispanic populations were more likely to be diagnosed with late-stage breast, cervical, or colorectal cancer, and to have a larger tumor size of breast cancer. Conclusions Our findings suggest that the benefits of lower cancer incidence in high tract percent Hispanics are partially offset by poorer access and reduced use of screening in conjunction with lower income, poorer health insurance coverage, and language barriers typical of these communities. PMID:18990733

  8. Understanding quality-of-life while living with late-stage lung cancer: an exploratory study.

    PubMed

    Adorno, Gail; Brownell, Gracie

    2014-01-01

    U.S. Veterans have a higher prevalence of advanced lung cancer and poorer survival outcomes compared to the general population; yet, no studies exist which specifically explore the psychosocial and existential quality-of-life (QOL) of late-stage lung cancer among this population. This article presents the perspectives of older veterans (N = 12) living with late-stage lung cancer who were receiving chemotherapy, routine hospice care, or both concurrently. Based on individual interviews, themes associated with loss of functionality, close relationships, and communicative acts contributed to veterans' perceptions of diminished or enhanced QOL while living with advanced disease. An overarching theme, loss of the person I know myself to be, suggests that personhood is an important concept to consider in QOL assessment. While findings suggest that the experiences of older Veterans with late-stage lung cancer are similar to other populations of lung cancer patients, and persons with incurable cancer in general, further research regarding the influence of veteran identity at end-of-life is warranted. Further research is needed which explores the influence of a whole person approach to QOL during life-limiting illness and end-of-life decision-making, particularly while receiving late-stage cancer-directed therapy.

  9. Intensity Modulated Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation Before Surgery in Treating Older Patients With Hormone Responsive Stage 0-I Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-04

    Ductal Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Invasive Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Invasive Ductal Breast Carcinoma With Predominant Intraductal Component; Lobular Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Medullary Ductal Breast Carcinoma With Lymphocytic Infiltrate; Mucinous Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Papillary Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Progesterone Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Tubular Ductal Breast Carcinoma

  10. Relationship of prediagnostic body mass index with survival after colorectal cancer: Stage-specific associations.

    PubMed

    Kocarnik, Jonathan M; Chan, Andrew T; Slattery, Martha L; Potter, John D; Meyerhardt, Jeffrey; Phipps, Amanda; Nan, Hongmei; Harrison, Tabitha; Rohan, Thomas E; Qi, Lihong; Hou, Lifang; Caan, Bette; Kroenke, Candyce H; Strickler, Howard; Hayes, Richard B; Schoen, Robert E; Chong, Dawn Q; White, Emily; Berndt, Sonja I; Peters, Ulrike; Newcomb, Polly A

    2016-09-01

    Higher body mass index (BMI) is a well-established risk factor for colorectal cancer (CRC), but is inconsistently associated with CRC survival. In 6 prospective studies participating in the Genetics and Epidemiology of Colorectal Cancer Consortium (GECCO), 2,249 non-Hispanic white CRC cases were followed for a median 4.5 years after diagnosis, during which 777 died, 554 from CRC-related causes. Associations between prediagnosis BMI and survival (overall and CRC-specific) were evaluated using Cox regression models adjusted for age at diagnosis, sex, study and smoking status (current/former/never). The association between BMI category and CRC survival varied by cancer stage at diagnosis (I-IV) for both all-cause (p-interaction = 0.03) and CRC-specific mortality (p-interaction = 0.04). Compared to normal BMI (18.5-24.9 kg/m(2) ), overweight (BMI 25.0-29.9) was associated with increased mortality among those with Stage I disease, and decreased mortality among those with Stages II-IV disease. Similarly, obesity (BMI ≥30) was associated with increased mortality among those with Stages I-II disease, and decreased mortality among those with Stages III-IV disease. These results suggest the relationship between BMI and survival after CRC diagnosis differs by stage at diagnosis, and may emphasize the importance of adequate metabolic reserves for colorectal cancer survival in patients with late-stage disease.

  11. Sun Protection Motivational Stages and Behavior: Skin Cancer Risk Profiles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pagoto, Sherry L.; McChargue, Dennis E.; Schneider, Kristin; Cook, Jessica Werth

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To create skin cancer risk profiles that could be used to predict sun protection among Midwest beachgoers. Method: Cluster analysis was used with study participants (N=239), who provided information about sun protection motivation and behavior, perceived risk, burn potential, and tan importance. Participants were clustered according to…

  12. Genomic profiling of stage II and III colon cancers reveals APC mutations to be associated with survival in stage III colon cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    van den Broek, Evert; Krijgsman, Oscar; Sie, Daoud; Tijssen, Marianne; Mongera, Sandra; van de Wiel, Mark A.; Th. Belt, Eric J.; den Uil, Sjoerd H.; Bril, Herman; Stockmann, Hein B.A.C.; Ylstra, Bauke; Carvalho, Beatriz; Meijer, Gerrit A.; Fijneman, Remond J.A.

    2016-01-01

    Tumor profiling of DNA alterations, i.e. gene point mutations, somatic copy number aberrations (CNAs) and structural variants (SVs), improves insight into the molecular pathology of cancer and clinical outcome. Here, associations between genomic aberrations and disease recurrence in stage II and III colon cancers were investigated. A series of 114 stage II and III microsatellite stable colon cancer samples were analyzed by high-resolution array-comparative genomic hybridization (array-CGH) to detect CNAs and CNA-associated chromosomal breakpoints (SVs). For 60 of these samples mutation status of APC, TP53, KRAS, PIK3CA, FBXW7, SMAD4, BRAF and NRAS was determined using targeted massive parallel sequencing. Loss of chromosome 18q12.1-18q12.2 occurred more frequently in tumors that relapsed than in relapse-free tumors (p < 0.001; FDR = 0.13). In total, 267 genes were recurrently affected by SVs (FDR < 0.1). CNAs and SVs were not associated with disease-free survival (DFS). Mutations in APC and TP53 were associated with increased CNAs. APC mutations were associated with poor prognosis in (5-fluorouracil treated) stage III colon cancers (p = 0.005; HR = 4.1), an effect that was further enhanced by mutations in MAPK pathway (KRAS, NRAS, BRAF) genes. We conclude that among multiple genomic alterations in CRC, strongest associations with clinical outcome were observed for common mutations in APC. PMID:27729614

  13. Physical activity in patients with advanced-stage cancer: a systematic review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Albrecht, Tara A; Taylor, Ann Gill

    2012-06-01

    The importance of physical activity for chronic disease prevention and management has become generally well accepted. The number of research interventions and publications examining the benefits of physical activity for patients with cancer has been rising steadily. However, much of that research has focused on the impact of physical activity either prior to or early in the cancer diagnosis, treatment, and survivorship process. Research focusing on the effects of physical activity, specifically for patients with advanced-stage cancer and poorer prognostic outcomes, has been addressed only recently. The purpose of this article is to examine the state of the science for physical activity in the advanced-stage disease subset of the cancer population. Exercise in a variety of intensities and forms, including yoga, walking, biking, and swimming, has many health benefits for people, including those diagnosed with cancer. Research has shown that, for people with cancer (including advanced-stage cancer), exercise can decrease anxiety, stress, and depression while improving levels of pain, fatigue, shortness of breath, constipation, and insomnia. People diagnosed with cancer should discuss with their oncologist safe, easy ways they can incorporate exercise into their daily lives.

  14. Incidence and tumour stages of breast cancer in the region of Aachen, Germany.

    PubMed

    Seemayer, C A; Breuer, Elisabeth; Kroll, G; Markus-Sellhaus, S; Reineke, T H; Mittermayer, C

    2002-03-01

    We present epidemiological data of female breast cancer in the region of Aachen (Germany) including incidence and tumour stages for the period 1996-1997. Furthermore, we compare epidemiological data from Aachen with data from the directly neighbouring Dutch region South-Middle Limburg before and after the introduction of a national mammographic screening programme. The field study of breast cancer was undertaken at the Institute of Pathology and Comprehensive Cancer Center at the University of Aachen, supported by the Federal Ministry of Health (Germany), using data files from the Cancer Registry Aachen. The patient's consent to collect all data concerning her epidemiological and social situation as well as information on the outcome of disease was obtained in 83.4% of all cases. The remaining 16.6% of the cases without a patient's consent are based on histopathological reports. Only those patients are included who were documented as residing in the region of Aachen at the time of diagnosis. Tumour cases were counted according to International Agency for Research on Cancer rules and tumour stages are classified according to UICC guidelines. Incidence rates are calculated as crude value, adapted to the European and World Standard population (ESR, WSR), and the age specific incidence is presented in 5-year intervals. The cumulative risk is assessed for a certain life span by summarizing the age-specific incidences. The age-standardized breast cancer incidence rate in Aachen was 94 per 100 000 women in 1996 and 90 cases of invasive breast cancer per 100 000 women in 1997 according to the ESR. The cumulative risk of developing breast cancer in the life span ranging from 0 to 74 years is approximately 8%. The stage distribution of breast cancer reveals only 4% favourable carcinomata in situ, but 12% advanced T4 tumours. T1 and T2 tumour stages count for about 40% and T3 tumour stages about 4%. Incidence rates and the tumour stages of breast cancer in the region of

  15. Identification of Risk Factors for Recurrence in High-Risk Stage II Colon Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hatano, Satoshi; Ishida, Hideyuki; Ishibashi, Keiichiro; Kumamoto, Kensuke; Haga, Norihiro; Miura, Ichiro

    2013-01-01

    To identify risk factors for recurrence in patients with stage II colon cancer, Cox proportional hazards regression analysis was performed in 194 patients with stage II colon cancer who underwent curative surgery between April 1997 and December 2008. Thirteen clinical and pathologic factors, including use of fluoropyrimidine-based adjuvant chemotherapy in 113 of the patients (58.2%), were assessed. By multivariate analysis, only obstruction, perforation, and T4-level invasion were identified as independent risk factors affecting disease-free survival (DFS) (P < 0.01). The 5-year DFS rate was 70.6% in patients with one or more risk factors (n = 68) and 96.0% in patients with no risk factors (n = 126) (P < 0.01). These results suggest that obstruction, perforation, and T4-level invasion are suitable candidates for prediction of tumor recurrence in patients with stage II colon cancer. The oxaliplatin-based adjuvant chemotherapy, which has been reported to be effective in stage III colon cancer patients, may improve the prognosis in high-risk stage II colon cancer patients. PMID:23701145

  16. Incorporation of CEA Improves Risk Stratification in Stage II Colon Cancer.

    PubMed

    Spindler, Blake A; Bergquist, John R; Thiels, Cornelius A; Habermann, Elizabeth B; Kelley, Scott R; Larson, David W; Mathis, Kellie L

    2017-03-13

    High-risk features are used to direct adjuvant therapy for stage II colon cancer. Currently, high-risk features are identified postoperatively, limiting preoperative risk stratification. We hypothesized carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) can improve preoperative risk stratification for stage II colon cancer. The National Cancer Database (NCDB 2004-2009) was reviewed for stage II colon adenocarcinoma patients undergoing curative intent resection. A novel risk stratification including both traditional high-risk features (T4 lesion, <12 lymph nodes sampled, and poor differentiation) and elevated CEA was developed. Unadjusted Kaplan-Meier and adjusted Cox proportional hazards analyzed overall survival. Concordance Probability Estimates (CPE) assessed discrimination. Seventy-four thousand nine hundred forty-five patients were identified; 40,844 (54.5%) had CEA levels reported and were included. Chemotherapy administration was similar between normal and elevated CEA groups (23.8 vs. 25.1%, p = 0.003). Compared to patients with CEA elevation, 5-year overall survival in patients with normal CEA was improved (74.5 vs. 63.4%, p < 0.001). Restratification incorporating CEA resulted in reclassification of 6912 patients (16.9%) from average to high risk. CPE increased for novel risk stratification (0.634 vs. 0.612, SE = 0.005). The routinely available CEA test improved risk stratification for stage II colon cancer. CEA not only may improve staging of colon cancer but may also help guide additional therapy.

  17. Diagnosis of early-stage esophageal cancer by Raman spectroscopy and chemometric techniques.

    PubMed

    Ishigaki, Mika; Maeda, Yasuhiro; Taketani, Akinori; Andriana, Bibin B; Ishihara, Ryu; Wongravee, Kanet; Ozaki, Yukihiro; Sato, Hidetoshi

    2016-02-07

    Esophageal cancer is a disease with high mortality. In order to improve the 5 year survival rate after cancer treatment, it is important to develop a method for early detection of the cancer and for therapy support. There is increasing evidence that Raman spectroscopy, in combination with chemometric analysis, is a powerful technique for discriminating pre-cancerous and cancerous biochemical changes. In the present study, we used Raman spectroscopy to examine early-stage (stages 0 and I) esophageal cancer samples ex vivo. Comparison between the Raman spectra of cancerous and normal samples using a t-test showed decreased concentrations of glycogen, collagen, and tryptophan in cancerous tissue. Partial least squares regression (PLSR) analysis and self-organization maps (SOMs) discriminated the datasets of cancerous and normal samples into two groups, but there was a relatively large overlap between them. Linear discriminant analysis (LDA) based on Raman bands found in the t-test was able to predict the tissue types with 81.0% sensitivity and 94.0% specificity.

  18. The impact of the Polish mass breast cancer screening program on prognosis in the Pomeranian Province

    PubMed Central

    Skokowski, Jarosław; Bartoszek, Krzystof; Kosowska, Anna; Kalinowski, Leszek; Jaśkiewicz, Janusz

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Mammographic screening results in diagnosis of less advanced breast cancer (BC). A meta-analysis of randomized clinical trials confirmed that BC screening reduces mortality. In 2007, the National Breast Cancer Screening Program (NBCSP) was established in Poland with the crucial aim of reducing mortality from BC. The purpose of this study was to assess the impact of participation in the NBCSP on prognosis. Material and methods A single institution, non-randomized retrospective study was undertaken. The study population comprised 643 patients with BC treated in the Department of Surgical Oncology (DSO) at the Medical University of Gdansk over a 4-year period, from 01.01.2007 until 31.12.2010. Patients were divided into two groups: group A – patients who participated in the NBCSP (n = 238, 37.0%); and group B – patients who did not participate in the NBCSP (n = 405, 63.0%). Results Statistical analysis revealed that group A displayed a less advanced AJCC stage (more patients in AJCC stage I, p = 0.002), lower tumor diameter (more patients with pT1, p = 0.006, and pT < 15 mm, p = 0.008) and a lower incidence of metastases to axillary lymph nodes (more patients with pNO, p = 0.01). From 2009 to 2010 the NBCSP revealed a statistically significant benefit – significantly more patients in stage 0 + I (60.7% vs. 48.8%, p = 0.018) and with tumors pT < 15 mm (48.8% vs. 35.1%, p = 0.011) were observed in group A. Conclusions The study results revealed the beneficial impact of the NBCSP. Superior prognostic factors and favorable staging were observed in women who participated in the NBCSP. PMID:28261300

  19. Annual surveillance mammography after early-stage breast cancer and breast cancer mortality

    PubMed Central

    Paszat, L.F.; Sutradhar, R.; Gu, S.; Rakovitch, E.

    2016-01-01

    Background After treatment for early-stage breast cancer (bca), annual surveillance mammography (asm) is recommended based on the assumption that early detection of an invasive ipsilateral breast tumour recurrence or subsequent invasive contralateral primary bca reduces bca mortality. Methods We studied women with unilateral early-stage bca treated by breast-conserving surgery from 1994 to 1997 who subsequently developed an ipsilateral recurrence or contralateral primary more than 24 months after initial diagnosis, without prior regional or distant metastases. Annual surveillance mammography was defined as 2 episodes of bilateral mammography 11–18 months apart during the 2 years preceding the ipsilateral recurrence or contralateral primary. The association between asm and bca death was evaluated using a Cox proportional hazards model. Results We identified 669 women who experienced invasive ipsilateral recurrence (n = 455) or a contralateral primary (n = 214) at a median interval of 53 months [interquartile range (iqr): 37–72 months] after initial diagnosis, 64.7% of whom had received asm during the preceding 2 years. The median interval between the 2 bilateral mammograms was 12.3 months (iqr: 11.9–13.0 months), and the median interval between the 2nd mammogram and histopathologic confirmation of ipsilateral recurrence or contralateral primary was 1.5 months (iqr: 0.8–3.9 months). Median followup after ipsilateral recurrence or contralateral primary was 7.76 years (iqr: 3.68–9.81 years). The adjusted hazard ratio for bca death associated with asm was 0.86 (95% confidence limits: 0.63, 1.16). Conclusions Annual surveillance mammography was associated with a modestly lowered hazard ratio for bca death. PMID:28050142

  20. Different effects of ERβ and TROP2 expression in Chinese patients with early-stage colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Fang, Yu-Jing; Wang, Guo-Qiang; Lu, Zhen-Hai; Zhang, Lin; Li, Ji-Bin; Wu, Xiao-Jun; Ding, Pei-Rong; Ou, Qing-Jian; Zhang, Mei-Fang; Jiang, Wu; Pan, Zhi-Zhong; Wan, De-Sen

    2012-12-01

    Estrogen receptor beta (ERβ) and TROP2 expressed in colon carcinoma and might play an important role there. We explored the relationship of ERβ and TROP2 expression with the prognosis of early-stage colon cancer. ERβ and TROP2 levels were assessed by immunohistochemistry in normal mucosa and tumoral tissues from 220 Chinese patients with T(3)N(0)M(0) (stage IIa) and T(4)N(0)M(0) (stage IIb) colon cancer in the Cancer Center, Sun Yat-sen University, who underwent curative surgical resection between 1995 and 2003. The Cox proportional hazards regression model was applied to analyze the overall survival (OS) data, and the ROC curve, Kaplan-Meier estimate, log rank test, and Jackknife method were used to show the effect of ERβ and TROP2 expression at different stages of cancer. The 5-year survival rates were not significantly different between the patients with stage IIa and stage IIb colon cancer (83 vs. 80 %, respectively). The high expression of ERβ was related to decreasing OS in stage IIa and stage IIb colon cancer, while the high expression of TROP2 was related to decreasing OS in stage IIb colon cancer. The expression of ERβ and TROP2 has tumor-suppressive and tumor-promoting effect in stage IIa and stage IIb colon cancer, respectively.

  1. Microvessel density and p53 mutations in advanced-stage epithelial ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Nadkarni, Niyati J; Geest, Koen De; Neff, Traci; Young, Barry De; Bender, David P; Ahmed, Amina; Smith, Brian J; Button, Anna; Goodheart, Michael J

    2013-04-30

    We planned to determine the relationship between angiogenesis and p53 mutational status in advanced-stage epithelial ovarian cancer. Using 190 tumor samples from patients with stage III and IV ovarian cancer we performed p53 sequencing, immunohistochemistry, and CD31 microvessel density (MVD) determination. MVD was elevated in tumors with p53 null mutations compared to p53 missense mutation or no mutation. Disease recurrence was increased with higher MVD in both unadjusted and adjusted analyses. In adjusted analysis, p53 null mutation was associated with increased recurrence and worse overall survival. Worse overall survival and increased recurrence risk were also associated with the combination of CD31 MVD values >25 vessels/HPF and any p53 mutation. P53 mutation status and MVD may have prognostic significance in patients with advanced-stage ovarian cancer. Tumors with p53 null mutations are likely to be more vascular, contributing to decreased survival and increased recurrence probability.

  2. Radiation Dose Escalation in Stage III Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Terakedis, Breanne; Sause, William

    2011-01-01

    For patients with stage III non-small-cell lung cancer with unresectable or inoperable tumors, definitive chemoradiotherapy is often utilized. Historically, local control and overall survival rates have been poor. In an effort to improve local control, new chemotherapeutic agents in combination with higher doses of radiotherapy have been investigated. Early dose escalation trials date back to the 1980s, and the feasibility and efficacy of dose escalation for patients with inoperable stage III lung cancer continue to be topics of investigation. Herein, we review the evolution of chemotherapy as it relates to treatment of unresectable stage III lung cancer, and we outline the early and the more recent dose escalation studies. While dose escalation appears to provide a modest benefit in terms of preventing local failure and improving overall survival, advances in diagnostic imaging and radiotherapy treatment have possibly resulted in selection of a more favorable patient population. These variables make statements regarding the benefit of dose escalation challenging. PMID:22645713

  3. Image-Guided Hypofractionated Radiation Therapy With Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy Boost and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Stage II-III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer That Cannot Be Removed By Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-07

    Adenocarcinoma of the Lung; Adenosquamous Cell Lung Cancer; Large Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Squamous Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

  4. [Cervical cancer even after recovery from preliminary stage].

    PubMed

    Burger, Matthé P M

    2013-01-01

    Patients with histologically confirmed cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) grade 1-3 who have completed a 2-year follow-up period with three negative cytological test results show an incidence of invasive carcinoma of 35.1 per 100,000 women years. Their risk for invasive cancer is 4-fold the risk in healthy women who had a negative primary test result. It has been proposed that this group should be kept in long-term, frequent follow-up. The author argues that if cervical cancer develops in these women, the treatment and diagnostics of CIN might have been incorrect. If the thickness of the electrosurgically excised tissue strips is insufficient, more deeply situated parts of the cervical crypts may be left behind in the stroma. After healing, cervical carcinoma may develop beneath a normal surface if these parts of the crypts contain intraepithelial neoplastic cells. This carcinoma is not amenable to early diagnosis. Before deciding on a more intense follow-up, we have to investigate the quality of the diagnostics and treatment in this group of women.

  5. PET-Adjusted Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Stage II-IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-23

    Metastatic Malignant Neoplasm in the Brain; Recurrent Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Stage IIA Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Stage IIB Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

  6. Rural Reversal? Rural-Urban Disparities in Late-stage Cancer Risk in Illinois

    PubMed Central

    McLafferty, Sara; Wang, Fahui

    2009-01-01

    Background Differences in late-stage cancer risk between urban and rural residents are a key component of cancer disparities. Using data from the Illinois State Cancer Registry 1998–2002, we investigate the rural-urban gradient in late-stage cancer risk for four major types of cancer: breast, colorectal, lung and prostate. Methods Multilevel modeling is used to evaluate the role of population composition and area-based contextual factors in accounting for rural-urban variation. Instead of a simple binary rural-urban classification, we use a finer-grained classification that differentiates the densely populated city of Chicago from its suburbs and from smaller metropolitan areas, large towns and rural settings. Results For all four cancers, risk is highest in the most highly urbanized area and decreases as rurality increases, following a J-shaped progression that includes a small upturn in risk in the most isolated rural areas. For some cancers, these geographic disparities are associated with differences in population age and race; for others, the disparities remain after controlling for differences in population composition and ZIP code socioeconomic characteristics and spatial access to health care. Conclusion The observed pattern of urban disadvantage emphasizes the need for more extensive urban-based cancer screening and education programs. PMID:19434667

  7. A Novel Therapeutic Modality for Advanced-Stage Prostate Cancer Treatment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    There is an urgent need to develop effective therapies for the treatment of advanced stage prostate cancer (PrCa) due to their limited or no response to...metastatic PrCa. Our results illustrated that ORM treatment effectively inhibited invasion and motility of PrCa cells. Further, we observed that ORM... effectively inhibits metastasis associated protein 1 (MTA1) in PrCa cells. MTA1 has been reported to be very tightly associated with cancer metastasis in

  8. Trends in 5-year survival rates among breast cancer patients by hormone receptor status and stage

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lu; Linden, Hannah M.; Anderson, Benjamin O.; Li, Christopher I.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Improvement in breast cancer survival has been observed in recent decades in the U.S., but it is unclear if similar survival gains are consistent across breast cancer subtypes, especially with regards to more advanced stages of the disease. Methods Data were from 13 population-based cancer registries participating in the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) program, consisting of women between 20–79 years of age diagnosed with invasive breast cancer between 1992 and 2008. 2-year (1992–2008) and 5-year (1992–2006) breast cancer cause-specific survival rates were calculated and stratified by estrogen receptor (ER)/progesterone receptor (PR) status, stage and race. Annual percent changes in survival rates were assessed. Results From 1992 through 1998–1999, 5-year and 2-year cause specific survival rates significantly improved across ER+/PR+, ER−/PR− and ER+/PR− subtypes, with an annual increase ranging from 0.5%–1.0%. From 1998–1999 to 2006, different patterns were observed by ER/PR subtypes with survival rates slightly improving for ER+/PR+, continuing to improve at a rate of 0.5% per year for ER−/PR−, and dropping 0.3% annually for ER+/PR− No significant survival gains were experienced by patients with ER−/PR+ cancer during the study period. In terms of advanced diseases, greatest annual increases in survival rates were seen for patients with stage III–IV ER+/PR+ and ER−/PR− tumors but less progress was observed for advanced ER+/PR− breast cancers. Conclusion Steady improvements in survival rates for breast cancer have been achieved over the past several decades. However, 5-year survival rates for stage IV disease remained dismally below 20% for most ER/PR subtypes. PMID:25164974

  9. Carbon Ion Radiotherapy for Peripheral Stage I Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamada, Tadashi; Yamamoto, Naoyoshi; Baba, Masayuki

    The National Institute of Radiological Sciences in Chiba, Japan (NIRS) has the highest number of patients with lung cancer treated with carbon ion beams in the world. This report describes the techniques and clinical trials that have been undertaken at NIRS and preliminary results of a current study on single-fraction irradiation. The data are compared to recent results for the treatment of peripheral stage I lung cancer from the literature.

  10. Statin as a Combined Therapy for Advanced-Stage Ovarian Cancer: A Propensity Score Matched Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hong-Yu; Wang, Qian; Xu, Qiu-Hong; Yan, Li; Gao, Xue-Feng; Lu, Yan-Hong

    2016-01-01

    Background. Despite the great achievements in the treatment of advanced-stage ovarian cancer, it is still a severe condition with an unfavorable 5-year survival rate. Statins have been suggested to reduce the risk of several cancers beyond their cholesterol-lowing effects. However, the prognostic significance of statins in patients with advanced-stage ovarian cancer remains controversial. Methods. A retrospective study was performed to evaluate the association between statin intake and overall survival (OS) among patients with advanced-stage ovarian cancer. Patients who underwent cytoreductive surgery followed by courses of intravenous chemotherapy were matched through a propensity score analysis. Results. A total of 60 propensity-matched patients were included. Women in statin group showed a similar OS than the nonstatin counterparts (P = 0.966), whereas residual tumor was significantly associated with better OS (P = 0.013) and was an independent factor that associated with OS (P = 0.002, hazard ratio = 5.460, and 95% confidence interval: 1.894 to 15.742) in multivariable analysis. Conclusions. Our results suggested that statin usage was not associated with improved OS in patients with advanced-stage ovarian cancer undergoing surgery and chemotherapy. Considering the retrospective nature and the relative small sample size of the study, further prospective studies and random control trials are needed. PMID:27975064

  11. Tumor LINE-1 Methylation Level in Association with Survival of Patients with Stage II Colon Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Swets, Marloes; Zaalberg, Anniek; Boot, Arnoud; van Wezel, Tom; Frouws, Martine A.; Bastiaannet, Esther; Gelderblom, Hans; van de Velde, Cornelis J. H.; Kuppen, Peter J. K.

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide DNA hypomethylation is associated with a worse prognosis in early-stage colorectal cancer. To measure genome-wide DNA methylation levels, long interspersed nucleotide element (LINE-1) repeats are used as a surrogate marker. Cohort studies on the clinical impact of genome-wide DNA methylation level in patients with only early-stage colon cancer, are currently lacking. This study aimed to investigate the prognostic value of LINE-1 methylation in a stage II colon cancer cohort (n = 164). Manual needle microdissection of tumor areas was performed on formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tumor tissue sections followed by DNA extraction. Bisulfite converted DNA was used to assess tumor LINE-1 methylation level by qPCR. Patients with LINE-1 hypomethylated tumors had a significantly worse overall survival compared to patients with a higher level of LINE-1 tumor DNA methylation (HR 1.68, 95% CI 1.03–2.75; p = 0.04). This effect was more prominent in patients aged over 65 years (HR 2.00, 95% CI 1.13–3.52; p = 0.02), although the test for age interaction was not significant. No significant effect on recurrence-free survival was observed. Based on these results, tumor LINE-1 hypomethylation is associated with a worse overall survival in stage II colon cancer. Whether the origin of this causation is cancer-specific or age-related can be debated. PMID:28035987

  12. Optimization of the extent of surgical treatment in patients with stage I in cervical cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernyshova, A. L.; Kolomiets, L. A.; Sinilkin, I. G.; Chernov, V. I.; Lyapunov, A. Yu.

    2016-08-01

    The study included 26 patients with FIGO stage Ia1-Ib1 cervical cancer who underwent fertility-sparing surgery (transabdominaltrachelectomy). To visualize sentinel lymph nodes, lymphoscintigraphy with injection of 99mTc-labelled nanocolloid was performed the day before surgery. Intraoperative identification of sentinel lymph nodes using hand-held gamma probe was carried out to determine the radioactive counts over the draining lymph node basin. The sentinel lymph node detection in cervical cancer patients contributes to the accurate clinical assessment of the pelvic lymph node status, precise staging of the disease and tailoring of surgical treatment to individual patient.

  13. Battling regional (stage III) lung cancer: bumpy road of a cancer survivor in the immunotherapy age.

    PubMed

    Hao, Zhonglin; Biddinger, Paul; Schroeder, Carsten; Tariq, Khurram

    2016-07-07

    A 58-year-old woman, a heavy smoker, was diagnosed with stage III squamous cell lung cancer. She was treated with concurrent chemotherapy and radiotherapy, with partial response. 2 months later, she had haemoptysis caused by brisk bleeding from the radiated right upper lobe. Fortunately, her bleed was self-limited. 4 months later, a rapidly enlarging renal mass was discovered and turned out to be metastatic from the lung primary. Second-line chemotherapy with docetaxel and ramucirumab did not have effects on the renal mass after 2 cycles. Despite not being eligible for a durvalumab trial because of lack of PD-L1 expression, she had a meaningful response to nivolumab. Once every 2 weeks, infusion of nivolumab resulted in rapid tumour shrinkage in multiple areas. In the next few months, she experienced a variety of side effects, some of which were potentially life-threatening. She had disease progression 9 months into treatment.

  14. Transcriptome profile of the early stages of breast cancer tumoral spheroids

    PubMed Central

    Pacheco-Marín, Rosario; Melendez-Zajgla, Jorge; Castillo-Rojas, Gonzalo; Mandujano-Tinoco, Edna; Garcia-Venzor, Alfredo; Uribe-Carvajal, Salvador; Cabrera-Orefice, Alfredo; Gonzalez-Torres, Carolina; Gaytan-Cervantes, Javier; Mitre-Aguilar, Irma B.; Maldonado, Vilma

    2016-01-01

    Oxygen or nutrient deprivation of early stage tumoral spheroids can be used to reliably mimic the initial growth of primary and metastatic cancer cells. However, cancer cell growth during the initial stages has not been fully explored using a genome-wide approach. Thus, in the present study, we investigated the transcriptome of breast cancer cells during the initial stages of tumoral growth using RNAseq in a model of Multicellular Tumor Spheroids (MTS). Network analyses showed that a metastatic signature was enriched as several adhesion molecules were deregulated, including EPCAM, E-cadherin, integrins and syndecans, which were further supported by an increase in cell migration. Interestingly, we also found that the cancer cells at this stage of growth exhibited a paradoxical hyperactivation of oxidative mitochondrial metabolism. In addition, we found a large number of regulated (long non coding RNA) lncRNAs, several of which were co-regulated with neighboring genes. The regulatory role of some of these lncRNAs on mRNA expression was demonstrated with gain of function assays. This is the first report of an early-stage MTS transcriptome, which not only reveals a complex expression landscape, but points toward an important contribution of long non-coding RNAs in the final phenotype of three-dimensional cellular models. PMID:27021602

  15. Incidence and Predictors of Bowel Obstruction in Elderly Patients With Stage IV Colon Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Winner, Megan; Mooney, Stephen J.; Hershman, Dawn L.; Feingold, Daniel L.; Allendorf, John D.; Wright, Jason D.; Neugut, Alfred I.

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Research has been limited on the incidence, mechanisms, etiology, and treatment of symptoms that require palliation in patients with terminal cancer. Bowel obstruction (BO) is a common complication of advanced abdominal cancer, including colon cancer, for which small, single-institution studies have suggested an incidence rate of 15% to 29%. Large population-based studies examining the incidence or risk factors associated with BO in cancer are lacking. OBJECTIVE To investigate the incidence and risk factors associated with BO in patients with stage IV colon cancer. DESIGN AND SETTING Retrospective cohort, population-based study of patients in the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results and Medicare claims linked databases who were diagnosed as having stage IV colon cancer from January 1, 1991, through December 31, 2005. PATIENTS Patients 65 years or older with stage IV colon cancer (n = 12 553). MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Time to BO, defined by inpatient hospitalization for BO. We used Cox proportional hazards regression models to determine associations between BO and patient, prior treatment, and tumor features. RESULTS We identified 1004 patients with stage IV colon cancer subsequently hospitalized with BO (8.0%). In multivariable analysis, proximal tumor site (hazard ratio, 1.22 [95% CI, 1.07–1.40]), high tumor grade (1.34 [1.16–1.55]), mucinous histological type (1.27 [1.08–1.50]), and nodal stage N2 (1.52 [1.26–1.84]) were associated with increased risk of BO, as was the presence of obstruction at cancer diagnosis (1.75 [1.47–2.04]). A more recent diagnosis was associated with decreased risk of subsequent obstruction (hazard ratio, 0.84 [95% CI, 0.72–0.98]). CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE In this large population of patients with stage IV colon cancer, BO after diagnosis was less common (8.0%) than previously reported. Risk was associated with site and histological type of the primary tumor. Future studies will explore management and

  16. Promoting Quality and Evidence-Based Care in Early-Stage Breast Cancer Follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Hayes, Daniel F.; Ramsey, Scott D.; Hortobagyi, Gabriel N.; Barlow, William E.; Gralow, Julie R.

    2014-01-01

    Evidence-based guidelines for long-term follow-up of early-stage breast cancer patients developed by oncology societies in the United States and Europe recommend that breast cancer survivors undergo regular evaluation with history and physical examination, as well as annual mammography. Routine blood tests, circulating tumor markers, and/or surveillance imaging studies beyond mammography are not recommended in the absence of concerning symptoms or physical examination findings because of lack of supportive clinical evidence. Despite these guidelines, studies have shown that 20% to 40% of oncologists assess serum tumor markers as part of routine monitoring of early-stage breast cancer patients. As part of efforts to both address the financial challenges confronting the health-care system and optimize patient outcomes, the American Society of Clinical Oncology’s Cost of Care Task Force identified adherence to breast cancer surveillance guidelines as an opportunity to improve care and reduce cost. However, these recommendations are based on trials done in an era of outdated technology and limited therapeutic options. It is possible that recent improvements in diagnostics and treatments could make earlier detection of recurrent disease important for improving both survival and quality of life outcomes. Research is necessary to further inform optimal breast cancer follow-up strategies, which could impact these recommendations. At this time, outside of well-conducted clinical trials, there is no role for ordering routine serial blood or imaging tests in monitoring for recurrence in early-stage breast cancer patients. PMID:24627271

  17. The use of adjuvant bisphophonates in the treatment of early-stage breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Mathew, Aju; Brufsky, Adam M

    2014-11-01

    Adjuvant treatment of breast cancer has resulted in significant improvement in breast cancer-related outcomes. In addition to chemotherapy and endocrine therapy, the bone-protective agents known as bisphosphonates have been extensively investigated for their putative antitumor effect. Backed by strong preclinical data from in vitro and in vivo models, several randomized clinical trials have evaluated the role of bisphosphonates in an adjuvant setting. The recent NSABP B-34 (National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project protocol B-34) and AZURE (Adjuvant Zoledronic Acid to Reduce Recurrence) studies found no disease-free survival benefit with clodronate and zoledronate, respectively, whereas the ABCSG-12 (Austrian Breast and Colorectal Cancer Study Group trial 12) study found improvement in disease-free survival with zoledronate. Data from these trials suggested a beneficial effect of bisphosphonates in older, postmenopausal women and in premenopausal women treated with ovarian suppression. Given the acceptable toxicity profile of bisphosphonates, these agents could be a useful adjunct to adjuvant chemotherapy or endocrine treatment for early-stage breast cancer in a carefully selected subset of patients. This review aims to critically synthesize the results of clinical trials of adjuvant bisphosphonates in early-stage breast cancer, and to provide guidelines for the use of these agents in early-stage breast cancer.

  18. Identification of a Genomic Signature Predicting for Recurrence in Early Stage Ovarian Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    Award Number: W81XWH-12-1-0521 TITLE: Identification of a Genomic Signature Predicting for Recurrence in Early Stage Ovarian Cancer PRINCIPAL...SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-12-1-0521 Identification of a Genomic Signature Predicting for Recurrence in Early-Stage...clinical annotation and accurate pathological review (228 recurrent and 364 non-recurrent), 2) established a specimen repository and clinical data

  19. The Serum Glycome to Discriminate between Early-Stage Epithelial Ovarian Cancer and Benign Ovarian Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Braicu, Elena Iona; Sehouli, Jalid; Tauber, Rudolf; Blanchard, Véronique

    2014-01-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) is the sixth most common cause of cancer deaths in women because the diagnosis occurs mostly when the disease is in its late-stage. Current diagnostic methods of EOC show only a moderate sensitivity, especially at an early-stage of the disease; hence, novel biomarkers are needed to improve the diagnosis. We recently reported that serum glycome modifications observed in late-stage EOC patients by MALDI-TOF-MS could be combined as a glycan score named GLYCOV that was calculated from the relative areas of the 11 N-glycan structures that were significantly modulated. Here, we evaluated the ability of GLYCOV to recognize early-stage EOC in a cohort of 73 individuals comprised of 20 early-stage primary serous EOC, 20 benign ovarian diseases (BOD), and 33 age-matched healthy controls. GLYCOV was able to recognize stage I EOC whereas CA125 values were statistically significant only for stage II EOC patients. In addition, GLYCOV was more sensitive and specific compared to CA125 in distinguishing early-stage EOC from BOD patients, which is of high relevance to clinicians as it is difficult for them to diagnose malignancy prior to operation. PMID:25183900

  20. Metabolomics provide new insights on lung cancer staging and discrimination from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Deja, Stanislaw; Porebska, Irena; Kowal, Aneta; Zabek, Adam; Barg, Wojciech; Pawelczyk, Konrad; Stanimirova, Ivana; Daszykowski, Michal; Korzeniewska, Anna; Jankowska, Renata; Mlynarz, Piotr

    2014-11-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and lung cancer are widespread lung diseases. Cigarette smoking is a high risk factor for both the diseases. COPD may increase the risk of developing lung cancer. Thus, it is crucial to be able to distinguish between these two pathological states, especially considering the early stages of lung cancer. Novel diagnostic and monitoring tools are required to properly determine lung cancer progression because this information directly impacts the type of the treatment prescribed. In this study, serum samples collected from 22 COPD and 77 lung cancer (TNM stages I, II, III, and IV) patients were analyzed. Then, a collection of NMR metabolic fingerprints was modeled using discriminant orthogonal partial least squares regression (OPLS-DA) and further interpreted by univariate statistics. The constructed discriminant models helped to successfully distinguish between the metabolic fingerprints of COPD and lung cancer patients (AUC training=0.972, AUC test=0.993), COPD and early lung cancer patients (AUC training=1.000, AUC test=1.000), and COPD and advanced lung cancer patients (AUC training=0.983, AUC test=1.000). Decreased acetate, citrate, and methanol levels together with the increased N-acetylated glycoproteins, leucine, lysine, mannose, choline, and lipid (CH3-(CH2)n-) levels were observed in all lung cancer patients compared with the COPD group. The evaluation of lung cancer progression was also successful using OPLS-DA (AUC training=0.811, AUC test=0.904). Based on the results, the following metabolite biomarkers may prove useful in distinguishing lung cancer states: isoleucine, acetoacetate, and creatine as well as the two NMR signals of N-acetylated glycoproteins and glycerol.

  1. Preoperative Carcinoembryonic Antigen and Prognosis of Colorectal Cancer. An Independent Prognostic Factor Still Reliable

    PubMed Central

    Li Destri, Giovanni; Rubino, Antonio Salvatore; Latino, Rosalia; Giannone, Fabio; Lanteri, Raffaele; Scilletta, Beniamino; Di Cataldo, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate whether, in a sample of patients radically treated for colorectal carcinoma, the preoperative determination of the carcinoembryonic antigen (p-CEA) may have a prognostic value and constitute an independent risk factor in relation to disease-free survival. The preoperative CEA seems to be related both to the staging of colorectal neoplasia and to the patient's prognosis, although this—to date—has not been conclusively demonstrated and is still a matter of intense debate in the scientific community. This is a retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data. A total of 395 patients were radically treated for colorectal carcinoma. The preoperative CEA was statistically compared with the 2010 American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) staging, the T and N parameters, and grading. All parameters recorded in our database were tested for an association with disease-free survival (DFS). Only factors significantly associated (P < 0.05) with the DFS were used to build multivariate stepwise forward logistic regression models to establish their independent predictors. A statistically significant relationship was found between p-CEA and tumor staging (P < 0.001), T (P < 0.001) and N parameters (P = 0.006). In a multivariate analysis, the independent prognostic factors found were: p-CEA, stages N1 and N2 according to AJCC, and G3 grading (grade). A statistically significant difference (P < 0.001) was evident between the DFS of patients with normal and high p-CEA levels. Preoperative CEA makes a pre-operative selection possible of those patients for whom it is likely to be able to predict a more advanced staging. PMID:25875542

  2. Stage-specific embryonic antigen: determining expression in canine glioblastoma, melanoma, and mammary cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Lin, Weiming; Modiano, Jaime F; Ito, Daisuke

    2017-03-30

    The expression of stage-specific embryonic antigens (SSEAs) was determined in several types of canine cancer cells. Flow cytometry showed SSEA-1 expression in glioblastoma, melanoma, and mammary cancer cells, although none expressed SSEA-3 or SSEA-4. Expression of SSEA-1 was not detected in lymphoma, osteosarcoma, or hemangiosarcoma cell lines. Relatively stable SSEA-1 expression was observed between 24 and 72 h of culture. After 8 days in culture, sorted SSEA-1(-) and SSEA-1(+) cells re-established SSEA-1 expression to levels comparable to those observed in unsorted cells. Our results document, for the first time, the expression of SSEA-1 in several canine cancer cell lines.

  3. Proton Beam Therapy of Stage II and III Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Nakayama, Hidetsugu; Satoh, Hiroaki; Sugahara, Shinji; Kurishima, Koichi; Tsuboi, Koji; Sakurai, Hideyuki; Ishikawa, Shigemi; Tokuuye, Koichi

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: The present retrospective study assessed the role of proton beam therapy (PBT) in the treatment of patients with Stage II or III non-small-cell lung cancer who were inoperable or ineligible for chemotherapy because of co-existing disease or refusal. Patients and Methods: Between November 2001 and July 2008, PBT was given to 35 patients (5 patients with Stage II, 12 with Stage IIIA, and 18 with Stage IIIB) whose median age was 70.3 years (range, 47.4-85.4). The median proton dose given was 78.3 Gy (range, 67.1-91.3) (relative biologic effectiveness). Results: Local progression-free survival for Stage II-III patients was 93.3% at 1 year and 65.9% at 2 years during a median observation period of 16.9 months. Four patients (11.4%) developed local recurrence, 13 (37.1%) developed regional recurrence, and 7 (20.0%) developed distant metastases. The progression-free survival rate for Stage II-III patients was 59.6% at 1 year and 29.2% at 2 years. The overall survival rate of Stage II-III patients was 81.8% at 1 year and 58.9% at 2 years. Grade 3 or greater toxicity was not observed. A total of 15 patients (42.9%) developed Grade 1 and 6 (17.1%) Grade 2 toxicity. Conclusion: PBT for Stage II-III non-small-cell lung cancer without chemotherapy resulted in good local control and low toxicity. PBT has a definite role in the treatment of patients with Stage II-III non-small-cell lung cancer who are unsuitable for surgery or chemotherapy.

  4. Cancer incidence, mortality, and stage at diagnosis in First Nations living in Manitoba

    PubMed Central

    Decker, K.M.; Kliewer, E.V.; Demers, A.A.; Fradette, K.; Biswanger, N.; Musto, G.; Elias, B.; Turner, D.

    2016-01-01

    Background In the present study, we examined breast (bca) and colorectal cancer (crc) incidence and mortality and stage at diagnosis for First Nations (fn) individuals and all other Manitobans (aoms). Methods Several population-based databases were linked to determine ethnicity and to calculate age-standardized incidence and mortality rates. Logistic regression was used to compare bca and crc stage at diagnosis. Results From 1984–1988 to 2004–2008, the incidence of bca increased for fn and aom women. Breast cancer mortality increased for fn women and decreased for aom women. First Nations women were significantly more likely than aom women to be diagnosed at stages iii–iv than at stage i [odds ratio (or) for women ≤50 years of age: 3.11; 95% confidence limits (cl): 1.20, 8.06; or for women 50–69 years of age: 1.72; 95% cl: 1.03, 2.88). The incidence and mortality of crc increased for fn individuals, but decreased for aoms. First Nations status was not significantly associated with crc stage at diagnosis (or for stages i–ii compared with stages iii–iv: 0.98; 95% cl: 0.68, 1.41; or for stages i–iii compared with stage iv: 0.91; 95% cl: 0.59, 1.40). Conclusions Our results underscore the need for improved cancer screening participation and targeted initiatives that emphasis collaboration with fn communities to reduce barriers to screening and to promote healthy lifestyles. PMID:27536172

  5. Management of Anorexia-Cachexia in Late Stage Lung Cancer Patients.

    PubMed

    Del Ferraro, Catherine; Grant, Marcia; Koczywas, Marianna; Dorr-Uyemura, Laura A

    2012-08-01

    Nutritional deficiencies are experienced by most adults with advanced lung cancer during the course of their disease and treatment. Well-nourished individuals tolerate cancer treatment with less morbidity, mortality, and increased response to treatment as compared to those who are malnourished. Novel anti-cancer therapies cause many deficits that impact nutritional and functional status during the treatment process. Nutritional deficits include weight loss, malnutrition, and anorexia-cachexia. Anorexia-Cachexia is complex, not well understood and seen in many solid tumors in late stage disease. Assessing adequate nutrition is one of the most challenging problems for nurses, their patients and patient's families. The purpose of this review is to define and describe cancer anorexia-cachexia in late stage lung cancer, through case presentation, and to describe palliative strategies for prevention, assessment, and management in the palliative care setting. Early assessment for nutritional imbalances must be done regularly with re-evaluation for intervention effectiveness and should continue throughout the illness trajectory. Management of adverse effects of cancer and cancer-related treatment is critical to improving quality of life. Palliative care and hospice nurses play a critical role in early assessment, education and prevention to support nutritional needs for patients and their families.

  6. An improved prognostic model for stage T1a and T1b prostate cancer by assessments of cancer extent

    PubMed Central

    Rajab, Ramzi; Fisher, Gabrielle; Kattan, Michael W; Foster, Christopher S; Møller, Henrik; Oliver, Tim; Reuter, Victor; Scardino, Peter T; Cuzick, Jack; Berney, Daniel M

    2013-01-01

    Treatment decisions on prostate cancer diagnosed by trans-urethral resection (TURP) of the prostate are difficult. The current TNM staging system for pT1 prostate cancer has not been re-evaluated for 25 years. Our objective was to optimise the predictive power of tumor extent measurements in TURP of the prostate specimens. A total of 914 patients diagnosed by TURP of the prostate between 1990 and 1996, managed conservatively were identified. The clinical end point was death from prostate cancer. Diagnostic serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) and contemporary Gleason grading was available. Cancer extent was measured by the percentage of chips infiltrated by cancer. Death rates were compared by univariate and multivariate proportional hazards models, including baseline PSA and Gleason score. The percentage of positive chips was highly predictive of prostate cancer death when assessed as a continuous variable or as a grouped variable on the basis of and including the quintiles, quartiles, tertiles and median groups. In the univariate model, the most informative variable was a four group-split (≤ 10%, >10–25%, > 25–75% and > 75%); (HR = 2.08, 95% CI = 1.8–2.4, P < 0.0001). The same was true in a multivariate model (ΔX2 (1 d.f.) = 15.0, P = 0.0001). The current cutoff used by TNM (< = 5%) was sub-optimal (ΔX2 (1 d.f.) = 4.8, P = 0.023). The current TNM staging results in substantial loss of information. Staging by a four-group subdivision would substantially improve prognostication in patients with early stage disease and also may help to refine management decisions in patients who would do well with conservative treatments. PMID:20834240

  7. Adoption of Hypofractionated Whole-Breast Irradiation for Early-Stage Breast Cancer: A National Cancer Data Base Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Elyn H.; Mougalian, Sarah S.; Soulos, Pamela R.; Rutter, Charles E.; Evans, Suzanne B.; Haffty, Bruce G.; Gross, Cary P.; Yu, James B.

    2014-12-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the relationship of patient, hospital, and cancer characteristics with the adoption of hypofractionation in a national sample of patients diagnosed with early-stage breast cancer. Methods and Materials: We performed a retrospective study of breast cancer patients in the National Cancer Data Base from 2004-2011 who were treated with radiation therapy and met eligibility criteria for hypofractionation. We used logistic regression to identify factors associated with receipt of hypofractionation (vs conventional fractionation). Results: We identified 13,271 women (11.7%) and 99,996 women (88.3%) with early-stage breast cancer who were treated with hypofractionation and conventional fractionation, respectively. The use of hypofractionation increased significantly, with 5.4% of patients receiving it in 2004 compared with 22.8% in 2011 (P<.001 for trend). Patients living ≥50 miles from the cancer reporting facility had increased odds of receiving hypofractionation (odds ratio 1.57 [95% confidence interval 1.44-1.72], P<.001). Adoption of hypofractionation was associated with treatment at an academic center (P<.001) and living in an area with high median income (P<.001). Hypofractionation was less likely to be used in patients with high-risk disease, such as increased tumor size (P<.001) or poorly differentiated histologic grade (P<.001). Conclusions: The use of hypofractionation is rising and is associated with increased travel distance and treatment at an academic center. Further adoption of hypofractionation may be tempered by both clinical and nonclinical concerns.

  8. Radiotherapy for Stage II and Stage III Breast Cancer Patients With Negative Lymph Nodes After Preoperative Chemotherapy and Mastectomy

    SciTech Connect

    Le Scodan, Romuald; Selz, Jessica; Stevens, Denise; Bollet, Marc A.; Lande, Brigitte de la; Daveau, Caroline; Lerebours, Florence; Labib, Alain; Bruant, Sarah

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effect of postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT) in Stage II-III breast cancer patients with negative lymph nodes (pN0) after neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC). Patients and Materials: Of 1,054 breast cancer patients treated with NAC at our institution between 1990 and 2004, 134 had pN0 status after NAC and mastectomy. The demographic data, tumor characteristics, metastatic sites, and treatments were prospectively recorded. The effect of PMRT on locoregional recurrence-free survival and overall survival (OS) was evaluated by multivariate analysis, including known prognostic factors. Results: Of the 134 eligible patients, 78 (58.2%) received PMRT and 56 (41.8%) did not. At a median follow-up time of 91.4 months, the 5-year locoregional recurrence-free survival and OS rate was 96.2% and 88.3% with PMRT and 92.5% and 94.3% without PMRT, respectively (p = NS). The corresponding values at 10 years were 96.2% and 77.2% with PMRT and 86.8% and 87.7% without PMRT (p = NS). On multivariate analysis, PMRT had no effect on either locoregional recurrence-free survival (hazard ratio, 0.37; 95% confidence interval, 0.09-1.61; p = .18) or OS (hazard ratio, 2.06; 95% confidence interval, 0.71-6; p = .18). This remained true in the subgroups of patients with clinical Stage II or Stage III disease at diagnosis. A trend was seen toward poorer OS among patients who had not had a pathologic complete in-breast tumor response after NAC (hazard ratio, 6.65; 95% confidence interval, 0.82-54.12; p = .076). Conclusions: The results from the present retrospective study showed no increase in the risk of distant metastasis, locoregional recurrence, or death when PMRT was omitted in breast cancer patients with pN0 status after NAC and mastectomy. Whether the omission of PMRT is acceptable for these patients should be addressed prospectively.

  9. The modifying effect of patient location on stage-specific survival following colorectal cancer using geosurvival models.

    PubMed

    Chien, Lung-Chang; Schootman, Mario; Pruitt, Sandi L

    2013-03-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third leading cause of cancer death in the US, and stage at diagnosis is the primary prognostic factor. To date, the interplay between geographic place and individual characteristics such as cancer stage with CRC survival is unexplored. We used a Bayesian geosurvival statistical model to evaluate whether the spatial patterns of CRC survival at the census tract level varies by stage at diagnosis (in situ/local, regional, distant), controlling for patient characteristics, surveillance test use, and treatment using linked 1991-2005 SEER-Medicare data of patients ≥ 66 years old in two US metropolitan areas. The spatial pattern of survival varied by stage at diagnosis for both cancer sites and registries. Significant spatial effects were identified in all census tracts for colon cancer and the majority of census tracts for rectal cancer. Geographic disparities appeared to be highest for distant-stage rectal cancer. Compared to those with in situ/local stage in the same census tracts, patients with distant-stage cancer were at most 7.73 times and 4.69 times more likely to die of colon and rectal cancer, respectively. Moreover, frailty areas for CRC at in situ/local stage more likely have a higher relative risk at regional stage, but not at distant stage. We identified geographic areas with excessive risk of CRC death and demonstrated that spatial patterns varied by both cancer type and cancer stage. More research is needed to understand the moderating pathways between geographic and individual-level factors on CRC survival.

  10. Oral tegafur-uracil as metronomic therapy following intravenous FOLFOX for stage III colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Wen-Yen; Ho, Ching-Liang; Lee, Chia-Cheng; Hsiao, Cheng-Wen; Wu, Chang-Chieh; Jao, Shu-Wen; Yang, Jen-Fu; Lo, Cheng-Hsiang; Chen, Jia-Hong

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to estimate the impact of metronomic therapy with oral tegafur-uracil (UFUR) following an intravenous FOLFOX regimen as surgical adjuvant chemotherapy on the overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) of stage III colon cancer patients. From the retrospective database of patients who underwent a surgical resection for colorectal cancer at the Tri-Service General Hospital from October 2008 through December 2014, stage III colon carcinomas treated with radical R0 resection were reviewed. One hundred thirty two patients were treated with a FOLFOX regimen (comparison group), and 113 patients were treated with the same regimen followed by additional oral UFUR (UFUR group). The clinical characteristics and mean age of the comparison and UFUR groups were similar. Furthermore, for all study patients, DFS was not significantly different between the two groups. However, 5-year OS rates were 86.8% and 68.5% in the UFUR and comparison groups, respectively (p = 0.0107). Adding UFUR to a FOLFOX regimen was found to significantly improve the OS in patients with stage III colon cancer. UFUR as a maintenance therapy following FOLFOX regimen as an alternative therapeutic option for the treatment of stage III colon cancer patients. PMID:28328969

  11. Adjuvant radiotherapy for the treatment of stage IV rectal cancer after curative resection

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Min Jung; Kim, Sang Jin; Park, Sung-Chan; Kim, Dae Yong; Park, Ji Won; Ryoo, Seung-Bum; Jeong, Seung-Yong; Park, Kyu Joo; Oh, Heung Kwon; Kim, Duck-Woo; Kang, Sung-Bum; Joo, Jung Nam; Oh, Jae Hwan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The role of pelvic radiotherapy (RT) in stage IV rectal cancer with total mesorectal excision (TME) has not been defined. We evaluated the impact of RT on oncologic outcomes among patients with stage IV rectal cancer who underwent TME and performed a meta-analysis of published studies. The records of stage IV rectal cancer patients who underwent TME between August 2001 and December 2011 were reviewed. Patients who received pelvic RT (RT group) and those who did not (non-RT group) were matched using a propensity score. Oncologic outcomes were compared between the groups. A systematic literature search and meta-analysis was conducted. One hundred seventy-six patients were matched with propensity score matching, resulting in 39 patients in each group. The local recurrence-free survival (LRFS) of the RT group was significantly higher than that of the non-RT group (2-year LRFS: 100% vs 83.6%, respectively, P = 0.038). The overall survival, disease-free survival, and systemic recurrence were not significantly different between the groups. In the meta-analysis, the RT group had a reduced risk for loco-regional recurrence than the non-RT group (RR: 0.48, 95% confidence interval: 0.29–0.79). Pelvic RT might have benefits for loco-regional control in patients with stage IV rectal cancer who undergo TME. PMID:27893653

  12. [Jejunostomy catheter feeding during postoperative chemotherapy for Stage IV gastric cancer].

    PubMed

    Matsuyama, Jin; Fukushima, Yukio; Toshiyama, Reishi; Takeda, Mitsunobu; Tokuoka, Masayoshi; Ide, Yoshihito; Hashimoto, Kazuhiko; Yokoyama, Shigekazu; Morimoto, Takashi; Nomura, Takashi; Kodama, Ken; Sasaki, Yo

    2013-11-01

    Chemotherapy followed by surgery for Stage IV gastric cancer with passage obstruction poses a problem in terms of poor postoperative nutritional status. By maintaining an adequate postoperative nutrition status with jejunostomy catheter feeding, chemotherapy may possibly be continued. We treated 40 cases of Stage IV gastric cancer with passage obstruction from January 2008 to December 2011. In every case, jejunostomy catheter feeding tubes were placed during gastric cancer surgery. We performed 13 total gastrectomies, 20 distal gastrectomies, and 7 gastrojejunal bypass surgeries. Tube obstruction in 4 cases( 10%) and tube deviation in 1 case( 2.5%) occurred during the tube feeding period. Chemotherapy could be resumed in 37 cases( 92.5%), and the duration of chemotherapy was 330 days( range, 41-721). In cases of Stage IV gastric cancer, patients are obliged to start postoperative chemotherapy at an unstable period. By starting jejunal catheter feeding at an early stage after surgery, improved results could be expected in terms of shortening of the hospital stay or continuation of chemotherapy.

  13. Decisional Stage Distribution for Colorectal Cancer Screening among Diverse, Low-Income Study Participants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hester, C. M.; Born, W. K.; Yeh, H. W.; Young, K. L.; James, A. S.; Daley, C. M.; Greiner, K. A.

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) screening uptake among minorities and those with lower incomes is suboptimal. Behavioral interventions specifically tailored to these populations can increase screening rates and save lives. The Precaution Adoption Process Model (PAPM) allows assignment of a decisional stage for adoption of a behavior such as CRC screening.…

  14. Validation of a Milk Consumption Stage of Change Algorithm among Adolescent Survivors of Childhood Cancer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mays, Darren; Gerfen, Elissa; Mosher, Revonda B.; Shad, Aziza T.; Tercyak, Kenneth P.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To assess the construct validity of a milk consumption Stages of Change (SOC) algorithm among adolescent survivors of childhood cancer ages 11 to 21 years (n = 75). Methods: Baseline data from a randomized controlled trial designed to evaluate a health behavior intervention were analyzed. Assessments included a milk consumption SOC…

  15. Long-term stabilization of stage 4 colon cancer using sodium dichloroacetate therapy

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Akbar; Andrews, Douglas; Blackburn, Anneke C

    2016-01-01

    Oral dichloroacetate sodium (DCA) has been investigated as a novel metabolic therapy for various cancers since 2007, based on data from Bonnet et al that DCA can trigger apoptosis of human lung, breast and brain cancer cells. Response to therapy in human studies is measured by standard RECIST definitions, which define “response” by the degree of tumour reduction, or tumour disappearance on imaging. However, Blackburn et al have demonstrated that DCA can also act as a cytostatic agent in vitro and in vivo, without causing apoptosis (programmed cell death). A case is presented in which oral DCA therapy resulted in tumour stabilization of stage 4 colon cancer in a 57 years old female for a period of nearly 4 years, with no serious toxicity. Since the natural history of stage 4 colon cancer consists of steady progression leading to disability and death, this case highlights a novel use of DCA as a cytostatic agent with a potential to maintain long-term stability of advanced-stage cancer. PMID:27803917

  16. Site-specific associations between miRNA expression and survival in colorectal cancer cases

    PubMed Central

    Slattery, Martha L.; Herrick, Jennifer S.; Pellatt, Daniel F.; Mullany, Lila E.; Stevens, John R.; Wolff, Erica; Hoffman, Michael D.; Wolff, Roger K.; Samowitz, Wade

    2016-01-01

    Background MicroRNAs (miRNA) are small non-coding RNA involved in cellular processes, including cell proliferation and angiogenesis. Thus, miRNA expression may alter survival after diagnosis with colorectal cancer (CRC). Results Individuals diagnosed with stage 1 or stage 2 rectal cancer had worse survival than colon cancer cases diagnosed at stage 1 or stage 2. After adjustment for multiple comparisons, no miRNAs were significantly associated with disease stage. Two miRNAs infrequently expressed in the population and not previously reported were associated with survival after diagnosis with colon cancer (miR-1 HR 2.17 95% CI 1.41, 3.36; and miR-101-3p HR 3.51 95% CI 1.72, 7.15). Among those diagnosed with rectal cancer, 201 miRNAs were associated with survival when the FDR q value was < 0.05. Assessment of 105 previously reported miRNAs associated with prognosis showed that four miRNAs influenced colon cancer survival and 17 influenced survival after a diagnosis with rectal cancer when raw p values were considered. Patients and Methods This study includes data from population-based studies of CRC conducted in Utah and the Kaiser Permanente Medical Care Program. A total of 1893 carcinoma and normal paired colorectal mucosa tissue samples were run using the Agilent Human miRNA Microarray V19.0. We assessed miRNA differential expression between paired carcinoma and normal colonic mucosa tissue with CRC- specific survival evaluating stage and site-specific associations after adjusting for age, sex, microsatellite instability tumor status, and AJCC stage. Conclusions MiRNAs dysregulated for both colon and rectal cancer had a greater impact on survival after a diagnosis with rectal cancer. PMID:27517623

  17. Multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging for pre-treatment local staging of prostate cancer: A Cancer Care Ontario clinical practice guideline

    PubMed Central

    Salerno, Jennifer; Finelli, Antonio; Morash, Chris; Morgan, Scott C.; Power, Nicholas; Schieda, Nichola; Haider, Masoom A.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The utility of T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the local staging of prostate cancer is controversial. Due to the success of multiparametric MRI in cancer localization, there is renewed interested in MRI (± functional sequences) for local staging. Guidance on pre-treatment local staging of prostate cancer by MRI was developed using systematic review methodology and expert consultation. Methods: MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, and other databases were searched to identify studies comparing: (1) MRI staging vs. radical prostatectomy staging on diagnostic accuracy outcomes; and (2) MRI staging vs. routine clinical staging on clinical and patient outcomes. Studies meeting inclusion criteria were synthesized by outcome and sensitivity/specificity analysis by tumour location was performed. Evidence quality of included studies was assessed and considered in recommendation formulation. Results: The literature search identified 2510 citations; 62 studies were included. Analysis of MRI ≥1.5 T plus endorectal coil (ER) (± functional sequences) in the detection of extraprostatic extension or seminal vesicle invasion showed modest sensitivities (≥50%) and excellent specificities (>85%) among patients scheduled for radical prostatectomy. MRI upstaging was shown in 20/21 studies, with large variation in correctness (11–85%). Scarcity of clinical and patient outcomes among studies limited synthesis and evaluation. Quality assessment found non-trivial biases. Conclusions: Modest imaging performance was shown for MRI (1.5 T + ER and 3 T ± ER) ± functional sequences in regards to sensitivity. Limitations in study design, reporting of clinical and patient outcomes, and the heterogeneous use of MRI tempered the strength of the recommendations. PMID:27800062

  18. Relation of Preoperative Thrombocytosis between Tumor Stage and Grade in Patients with Endometrial Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kaloglu, Songul; Guraslan, Hakan; Tekirdag, Ali Ismet; Dagdeviren, Hediye; Kaya, Cihan

    2014-01-01

    Objective: We aimed to evaluate the predictive value of preoperative thrombocytosis for postoperative tumor stage and tumor grade in patients with endometrial cancer. Materials and Methods: This was a retrospective study carried out in our gynecologic oncology department between January 2000 and December 2011. We reviewed the medical charts of 190 patients diagnosed with endometrial carcinoma and underwent complete staging procedure. The clinicopathologic characteristics of the patients such as; age, gravidity, parity, menopausal status, body mass index, co-morbidities (diabetes, hypertension etc.), stage, grade, histological subtype, depth of myometrial invasion, peritoneal washing cytology and preoperative platelet count were recorded. Endometrioid adenocarcinomas were graded according to the FIGO classification. Blood samples for the measurement of platelet count were obtained 3 days prior to the surgery. Thrombocytosis was defined as a platelet count of 300×109/L. P values less than 0.05 derived from two-tailed tests were considered statistically significant. Results: The mean age of the study population was 55.4 (range 33–80) years. The mean gravidity was 3.8 (range 0–12) and the mean parity was 3.32 (range 0–11). 108 (56,8%) patients were with body mass index of >30 kg/m2. The mean platelet count among women was 288, 6±90.7×109/L (range 105–772×109/L). The majority of the patients were with early stage diseases during the surgeries. 170 (89.5%) of the patients had stage I to II disease, and 20 (10.5%) of them had stage III to IV disease. There were no statistical significance between thrombocytosis and age, gravidity, parity, BMI, cancer grade and stage, histological subtype of the tumor, depth of invasion, cervical involvement, intrauterine tumor volume and peritoneal washing cytology. Conclusion: We found that preoperative platelet count was not correlated with the stage or grade of endometrial cancer. PMID:25610319

  19. The degree of extramural spread of T3 rectal cancer: an appeal to the American Joint Committee on Cancer.

    PubMed

    Zinicola, R; Pedrazzi, G; Haboubi, N; Nicholls, R J

    2017-01-01

    The T3 category of the TNM classification includes over 60% of all rectal tumours and encompasses the greatest variance in cancer-specific end-points than any other T category. The most recent edition of the cancer staging handbook of the American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) dated 2010 does not divide T3 tumours into subgroups which reflect cancer-specific outcome more sensitively. The original aim of the present study was to review the literature to assess the influence of the degree of extramural extent of T3 rectal cancer on local recurrence and survival. An article written by the authors was accepted for publication but was withdrawn immediately after they became aware of the publication of the 4th edition of the TNM Supplement by the Union for International Cancer Control dated 2012, which was not accessible by the search system used. This article dealt with the subdivision of the T3 category although this was not included in the most up-to-date AJCC guidelines and was stated to be 'entirely optional'. Medline, PubMed and Cochrane Library searches were performed to identify all studies that investigated the degree of extramural spread and its relationship to survival and local recurrence. Twenty-two studies were identified of which 12 assessed the degree of histopathological extramural spread measured in millimetres. In 18 of the 22 studies the degree of extramural spread was a statistically significant prognostic factor for survival and local recurrence. Analysis of the studies indicated that the subdivision of category T3 rectal cancer into two subgroups of extramural spread ≤ 5 mm or more than 5 mm resulted in markedly different survival and local recurrence rates. The data were insufficient to allow validation of any greater subdivision. Measurement of the extent of extramural spread by MRI before any treatment agreed with the histopathological measurement in the surgical specimen to within 1 mm. The extent of extramural spread in T3 rectal

  20. Between Two Worlds: Liminality and Late-Stage Cancer-Directed Therapy.

    PubMed

    Adorno, Gail

    2015-01-01

    Disease-directed therapy near death is a growing trend among persons living with late-stage cancer. As a sociocultural phenomenon, cancer-directed therapy (e.g., chemotherapy) when given for very advanced disease is a process that offers questionable benefits and portends further suffering, but also suggests potential for growth and transcendence. Theories and concepts drawn from cultural anthropology, sociology, and existentialism illustrate how contextual factors contribute to the creation of a "liminal space"; the latter part of the cancer trajectory where living and dying can overlap. When applied to clinical practice, this theoretical framework gives the patient, family, and health care provider a way of "unmasking" a period of transition during terminal illness when aggressive disease-directed care continues to be provided. The liminal space may function as an existential plane; a gateway or threshold with inherent potential for psychospiritual development during the final stage of life.

  1. NR2F6 Expression Correlates with Pelvic Lymph Node Metastasis and Poor Prognosis in Early-Stage Cervical Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Chunhao; Sun, Xiaoying; Zhang, Weijing; Li, Han; Xu, Liqun; Li, Jun; Xu, Benke; Zhang, Yanna

    2016-01-01

    Background: There is an abnormal expression of nuclear receptor subfamily 2 group F member 6 (NR2F6) in human cancers such as breast cancer, colon cancer, and acute myelogenous leukemia. However, its clinical significance in cervical cancer has not been established. We explored NR2F6 expression and its clinicopathological significance in early-stage cervical cancer. Methods: NR2F6 expression in cervical cancer cell lines and cervical cancer tissues was determined by Western blotting, real-time PCR, and immunochemistry (IHC). NR2F6 expression in 189 human early-stage cervical cancer tissue samples was evaluated using IHC. The relevance between NR2F6 expression and early-stage cervical cancer prognosis and clinicopathological features was determined. Results: There was marked NR2F6 mRNA and protein overexpression in the cervical cancer cells and clinical tissues compared with an immortalized squamous cell line and adjacent noncancerous cervical tissues, respectively. In the 189 cervical cancer samples, NR2F6 expression was positively related to International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stage (p = 0.006), squamous cell carcinoma antigen (p = 0.006), vital status (p < 0.001), tumor recurrence (p = 0.001), chemotherapy (p = 0.039), and lymph node metastasis (p < 0.001). Overall and disease-free survival was shorter in patients with early-stage cervical cancer and higher NR2F6 levels than in patients with lower levels of NR2F6. Univariate and multivariate analysis determined that NR2F6 was an independent prognostic factor of survival in early-stage cervical cancer. Conclusions: Taken together, our findings suggest that high NR2F6 expression predicts pelvic lymph node metastasis, tumor recurrence and poor prognosis in early-stage cervical cancer. NR2F6 might be a novel prognostic biomarker and potential therapeutic target of cervical cancer. PMID:27775588

  2. High-dose proton beam therapy for Stage I non-small-cell lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Nihei, Keiji . E-mail: knihei@east.ncc.go.jp; Ogino, Takashi; Ishikura, Satoshi; Nishimura, Hideki

    2006-05-01

    Purpose: To evaluate retrospectively the safety and efficacy of high-dose proton beam therapy (PBT) for Stage I non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Between 1999 and 2003, 37 patients were treated in our institution. The indications for PBT were pathologically proven NSCLC, clinical Stage I, tumor size {<=}5 cm, medically inoperable or refusal of surgery, and written informed consent. A total dose of 70-94 Gy{sub E} was delivered in 20 fractions (3.5-4.9 Gy{sub E} per fraction). Results: Patient characteristics (number of patients) were as follows: Stage IA/IB, 17 of 20; medically inoperable/refusal of surgery, 23/14; total dose 70/80/88/94 Gy{sub E}, 3/17/16/1. With a median follow-up period of 24 months, the 2-year local progression-free and overall survival rates were 80% and 84%, respectively. The 2-year locoregional relapse-free survival rates in Stage IA and Stage IB were 79% and 60%, respectively. No serious acute toxicity was observed. Late Grades 2 and 3 pulmonary toxicities were observed in 3 patients each. Of these 6 patients, 5 had Stage IB disease. Conclusions: Proton beam therapy is a promising treatment modality for Stage I NSCLC, though locoregional relapse and late pulmonary toxicities in Stage IB patients were substantial. Further investigation of PBT for Stage I NSCLC is warranted.

  3. Second cancer risk and mortality in men treated with radiotherapy for stage I seminoma

    PubMed Central

    Horwich, A; Fossa, S D; Huddart, R; Dearnaley, D P; Stenning, S; Aresu, M; Bliss, J M; Hall, E

    2014-01-01

    Background: Patients with stage I testicular seminoma are typically diagnosed at a young age and treatment is associated with low relapse and mortality rates. The long-term risks of adjuvant radiotherapy in this patient group are therefore particularly relevant. Methods: We identified patients and obtained treatment details from 12 cancer centres (11 United Kingdom, 1 Norway) and ascertained second cancers and mortality through national registries. Data from 2629 seminoma patients treated with radiotherapy between 1960 and 1992 were available, contributing 51 151 person-years of follow-up. Results: Four hundred and sixty-eight second cancers (excluding non-melanoma skin cancers) were identified. The standardised incidence ratio (SIR) was 1.61 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.47–1.76, P<0.0001). The SIR was 1.53 (95% CI: 1.39–1.68, P<0.0001) when the 32 second testicular cancers were also excluded. This increase was largely due to an excess risk to organs in the radiation field; for pelvic–abdominal sites the SIR was 1.62 (95% CI: 1.43–1.83), with no significant elevated risk of cancers in organs elsewhere. There was no overall increase in mortality with a standardised mortality ratio (SMR) of 1.06 (95% CI: 0.98–1.14), despite an increase in the cancer-specific mortality (excluding testicular cancer deaths) SMR of 1.46 (95% CI: 1.30–1.65, P<0.0001). Conclusion: The prognosis of stage I seminoma is excellent and it is important to avoid conferring long-term increased risk of iatrogenic disease such as radiation-associated second cancers. PMID:24263066

  4. [Is there alternative to FOLFOX adjuvant chemotherapy for stage III colorectal cancer patients?].

    PubMed

    Esch, Anouk; Coriat, Romain; Perkins, Géraldine; Brezault, Catherine; Chaussade, Stanislas

    2012-01-01

    Being the second cancer for men and the third cancer for women in France, colorectal cancer represents a serious public health issue. Its incidence has increased these last years and despite new therapeutics being developed, it still has a bad prognostic. Thanks in part to Hemoccult national mass screening program, its diagnosis is made possible at an earlier stage, which makes a surgical curative resection and the carrying out of adjuvant chemotherapy possible. For stage III colic cancer that has been surgically removed, adjuvant chemotherapy by FOLFOX 4 has to be offered. Nevertheless, because of its toxicities, the patient's high age, important comorbidities or post-surgical complications, this chemotherapy occasionally cannot be done. What are the colorectal cancer prognostic factors which would guide the chemotherapy? TNM classification, number of examined lymph nodes, MSI status, and presence or not of a perforation or a perinervous, lymphatic or venous invasion is recognized prognostic factors. Also, what are the alternatives of FOLFOX 4 regimen as colorectal cancer adjuvant treatment?

  5. Use of Mueller polarimetric imaging for the staging of human colon cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierangelo, Angelo; Manhas, Sandeep; Benali, Abdelali; Antonelli, Maria Rosaria; Novikova, Tatiana; Validire, Pierre; Gayet, Brice; De Martino, Antonello

    2011-03-01

    In this paper we show the results of multi-spectral Mueller Imaging applied to the analysis of human colon cancer in a backscattering configuration with diffuse light illumination. The analyzed sample behaves as a pure depolarizer. The depolarization power, for both healthy and cancerous zones, is lower for linearly than for circularly polarized incident light for all used wavelengths and increases with increasing wavelength. Based on their visual staging and polarimetric responses, we chose specific zones which we correlated to the histology of the corresponding cuts. The histological examination shows that we see a multilayer interaction in both healthy and abnormal zones, if the light penetration depth is sufficient. The measured depolarization depends on several factors: the presence or absence of tumor, the microscopic structure of cancer (ratio between cellular density and stroma), its exophytic (budding) or endophytic (penetrating) nature, its thickness, the degree of cancer penetration in deeper layers and the nature of healthy tissue left under abnormal layers. These results demonstrate that multi-spectral Mueller imaging can provide useful contrasts for the quick staging of human colon cancer ex-vivo, with additional information about cancerous zones with different microscopic structures.

  6. Lung cancer: Morphological and functional approach to screening, staging and treatment planning.

    PubMed

    Coche, Emmanuel; Lonneux, Max; Geets, Xavier

    2010-03-01

    Lung cancer is a major problem in public health and constitutes the leading cause of cancer-related mortality in the world. Lung cancer screening with low-dose computed tomography is promising but needs to overcome many difficulties, such as the large number of incidentally discovered nodules, the radiation dose delivered to the patient during a whole screening program and its cost. The ultimate target point represented by the reduction of lung cancer-related mortality needs to be proved in large, well-designed, randomized, multicenter, prospective trials. Lung cancer staging by morphological tools seems to be limited owing to the presence of metastases in normal-sized lymph nodes. In this context, multidetector computed tomography cannot be used alone but is useful in conjunction with molecular imaging and MRI. Today, flurodeoxglucose PET-CT appears to be the most accurate method for lung cancer staging and may prevent unnecessary thoracotomies. For treatment planning, flurodeoxglucose PET-CT is playing an increasing role in radiotherapy planning at the target selection and definition steps.

  7. Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation Therapy Is Beneficial for Clinical Stage T2 N0 Esophageal Cancer Patients Due to Inaccurate Preoperative Staging

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jennifer Q.; Hooker, Craig M.; Brock, Malcolm V.; Shin, James; Lee, Sue; How, Remealle; Franco, Noreli; Prevas, Helen; Hulbert, Alicia; Yang, Stephen C.

    2014-01-01

    Background It remains unclear if patients with clinical stage T2 N0 (cT2 N0) esophageal cancer should be offered induction therapy vs surgical intervention alone. Methods This was a retrospective cohort study of cT2 N0 patients undergoing induction therapy, followed by surgical resection, or resection alone, at the Johns Hopkins Hospital from 1989 to 2009. Kaplan-Meier analysis was used to compare all-cause mortality in cT2 N0 patients who had resection alone vs those who had induction chemoradiation therapy, followed by resection. Results A study cohort of 69 patients was identified and divided into two groups: 55 patients (79.7%) received induction therapy and 14 (20.3%) did not. No statistically significant difference in 5-year survival rate was observed for the two groups: 49.5% for the resection-only group and 53.8% for the induction group. More than 50% of cT2 N0 patients were understaged. Conclusions For cT2 N0 esophageal cancer patients, the benefit of neoadjuvant therapy is still unclear. Induction therapy for cT2 N0 did not translate into a statistically significant improvement in survival. However, due to the significant understaging of T2 N0 patients, we recommend neoadjuvant therapy to all cT2N0 patients before operation. PMID:22269708

  8. OPT-821 With or Without Vaccine Therapy in Treating Patients With Ovarian Epithelial Cancer, Fallopian Tube Cancer, or Peritoneal Cancer in Second or Third Complete Remission

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-16

    Stage IA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer

  9. Seventh tumor-node-metastasis staging of gastric cancer: Five-year follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Rausei, Stefano; Ruspi, Laura; Galli, Federica; Pappalardo, Vincenzo; Di Rocco, Giuseppe; Martignoni, Francesco; Frattini, Francesco; Rovera, Francesca; Boni, Luigi; Dionigi, Gianlorenzo

    2016-01-01

    Seventh tumor-node-metastasis (TNM) classification for gastric cancer, published in 2010, introduced changes in all of its three parameters with the aim to increase its accuracy in prognostication. The aim of this review is to analyze the efficacy of these changes and their implication in clinical practice. We reviewed relevant Literature concerning staging systems in gastric cancer from 2010 up to March 2016. Adenocarcinoma of the esophago-gastric junction still remains a debated entity, due to its peculiar anatomical and histological situation: further improvement in its staging are required. Concerning distant metastases, positive peritoneal cytology has been adopted as a criterion to define metastatic disease: however, its search in clinical practice is still far from being routinely performed, as staging laparoscopy has not yet reached wide diffusion. Regarding definition of T and N: in the era of multimodal treatment these parameters should more influence both staging and surgery. The changes about T-staging suggested some modifications in clinical practice. Differently, many controversies on lymph node staging are still ongoing, with the proposal of alternative classification systems in order to minimize the extent of lymphadenectomy. The next TNM classification should take into account all of these aspects to improve its accuracy and the comparability of prognosis in patients from both Eastern and Western world. PMID:27678357

  10. Individualization of indications for postoperative irradiation in stage I endometrial cancer.

    PubMed

    Bokhman, J V; Gastev, A Y

    1990-01-01

    The results of the treatment of 550 Stages I-III endometrial cancer patients are analysed. The postoperative radiation therapy was employed in 311 (56.5 +/- 2.8%) patients. In the pathological Stage I 235 (50.5 +/- 3.2%) out of 465 women were irradiated postoperatively, but the distant irradiation was used in only 93 (20.6%), the others began prophylactic irradiation of vagina. With the aim of regression the nonparametric Cox model it was stated, that some factors, such as hormonosensitivity of the tumor, pathogenic type, histology, stage and mode of operation have a significant influence on survival, and the postoperative irradiation has not. The comparison of the results of treatment in Stage I revealed a slight tendency to increased survival in prognostically unfavourable subgroups with the aim of postoperative irradiation. The 5-year survival in Stage I 90.3%. The individualized indications for postoperative radiation therapy in Stage I endometrial cancer are elaborated deep myometrial invasion, lowering of differentiation of the tumors, hormonoresistence.

  11. Immunoprofiling as a predictor of patient's response to cancer therapy-promises and challenges.

    PubMed

    Bethmann, Daniel; Feng, Zipei; Fox, Bernard A

    2017-02-18

    Immune cell infiltration is common to many tumors and has been recognized by pathologists for more than 100 years. The application of digital imaging and objective assessment software allowed a concise determination of the type and quantity of immune cells and their location relative to the tumor and, in the case of colon cancer, characterized overall survival better than AJCC TNM staging. Subsequently, expression of PD-L1, by 50% or more tumor cells, identified NSCLC patients with double the response rate to anti-PD-1. Soon, automated staining methods will improve reproducibility of multiplex staining and allow for CLIA standards so that multiplex staining can be used to make clinical decisions. Ultimately, machine-learning algorithms will help interpret data from tissue images and lead to improved delivery of precision medicine.

  12. Preoperative N Staging of Gastric Cancer by Stomach Protocol Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Se Hoon; Kim, Jeong Jae; Lee, Jeong Sub; Kim, Seung Hyoung; Kim, Bong Soo; Maeng, Young Hee; Hyun, Chang Lim; Kim, Min Jeong

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Clinical stage of gastric cancer is currently assessed by computed tomography. Accurate clinical staging is important for the tailoring of therapy. This study evaluated the accuracy of clinical N staging using stomach protocol computed tomography. Materials and Methods Between March 2004 and November 2012, 171 patients with gastric cancer underwent preoperative stomach protocol computed tomography (Jeju National University Hospital; Jeju, Korea). Their demographic and clinical characteristics were reviewed retrospectively. Two radiologists evaluated cN staging using axial and coronal computed tomography images, and cN stage was matched with pathologic results. The diagnostic accuracy of stomach protocol computed tomography for clinical N staging and clinical characteristics associated with diagnostic accuracy were evaluated. Results The overall accuracy of stomach protocol computed tomography for cN staging was 63.2%. Computed tomography images of slice thickness 3.0 mm had a sensitivity of 60.0%; a specificity of 89.6%; an accuracy of 78.4%; and a positive predictive value of 78.0% in detecting lymph node metastases. Underestimation of cN stage was associated with larger tumor size (P<0.001), undifferentiated type (P=0.003), diffuse type (P=0.020), more advanced pathologic stage (P<0.001), and larger numbers of harvested and metastatic lymph nodes (P<0.001 each). Tumor differentiation was an independent factor affecting underestimation by computed tomography (P=0.045). Conclusions Computed tomography with a size criterion of 8 mm is highly specific but relatively insensitive in detecting nodal metastases. Physicians should keep in mind that computed tomography may not be an appropriate tool to detect nodal metastases for choosing appropriate treatment. PMID:24156034

  13. Colon Cancer Staging in Vulnerable Older Adults: Adherence to National Guidelines and Impact on Survival

    PubMed Central

    Leal, TB; Holden, T; Cavalcante, L; Allen, GO; Schumacher, JR; Smith, MA; Weiss, JM; Neuman, HB; LoConte, NK

    2015-01-01

    Background There is concern that elders are not adequately evaluated prior to colon cancer surgery. We sought to determine adherence with ACOVE-3 (Assessing Care of Vulnerable Elders) quality indicators for pre-operative staging prior to colectomy for colon cancer utilizing the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER)-Medicare linked database (1992–2005). Methods We determined the proportion of patients aged 75 and older who had preoperative staging prior to colectomy for colon adenocarcinoma. Preoperative staging was defined as abdominopelvic computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging scan (SCAN) and colonoscopy or flexible sigmoidoscopy (SCOPE). Multivariate logistic regression identified predictors of adherence. Odds ratios were adjusted for comorbidity, socioeconomic status, and disease severity. The association of adherence to ACOVE-3 and survival was quantified. Results Of the 37,862 patients, the majority were 75–84 years, 28% of the patients were ≥85 years. Regarding preoperative staging in the 6-month interval prior to surgical resection, 8% had neither SCAN nor SCOPE, 6% had only SCAN, 43% had only SCOPE, and 43% had both SCAN and SCOPE. Compared to patients who were not staged, those evaluated with either SCOPE alone or SCAN plus SCOPE had lower odds of 3-year mortality. Patients who were staged with SCAN alone had an increased odds of death compared to those who had neither SCAN or SCOPE. Conclusions These data demonstrate that the majority of vulnerable elders with colon cancer did not receive appropriate preoperative staging prior to resection. The findings also confirm that adherence to ACOVE-3 guidelines is associated with improved long-term survival. PMID:25914900

  14. Polymeric composite devices for localized treatment of early-stage breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kan-Dapaah, Kwabena; Soboyejo, Wole

    2017-01-01

    For early-stage breast cancers mastectomy is an aggressive form of treatment. Therefore, there is a need for new treatment strategies that can enhance the use of lumpectomy by eliminating residual cancer cells with limited side effects to reduce local recurrence. Although, various radiotherapy-based methods have been developed, residual cells are found in 20–55% of the time at the first operation. Furthermore, some current treatment methods result in poor cosmesis. For the last decade, the authors have been exploring the use of polymeric composite materials in single and multi-modal implantable biomedical devices for post-operative treatment of breast cancer. In this paper, the concept and working principles of the devices, as well as selected results from experimental and numerical investigations, are presented. The results show the potential of the biomedical implants for cancer treatment. PMID:28245288

  15. Physician-Initiated Stop-Smoking Program for Patients Receiving Treatment for Early-Stage Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-10-06

    Bladder Cancer; Breast Cancer; Colorectal Cancer; Head and Neck Cancer; Lung Cancer; Lymphoma; Prostate Cancer; Testicular Germ Cell Tumor; Tobacco Use Disorder; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  16. Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography in the Staging and Treatment of Anal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Sveistrup, Joen; Loft, Annika; Berthelsen, Anne Kiil; Henriksen, Birthe Merete; Nielsen, Michael Bachmann; Engelholm, Svend Aage

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: This study was intended to determine the role of PET/CT in the staging of anal cancer as a supplement to three-dimensional transanal ultrasound (TAUS) and inguinal ultrasound (US). The impact of the PET/CT on the initial stage and treatment plan proposed by TAUS/US was assessed. Methods and Materials: Ninety-five (95) patients referred to our clinic between July 1, 2005, and December 31, 2009, were retrospectively reviewed. All patients had biopsy-proven primary squamous cell cancer of the anal canal. There were 65 females (68%) and 30 males (32%), and the median age was 58 years (range, 35-88 years). Six (6%) of the patients were HIV positive. All patients were staged with TAUS/US and PET/CT. Results: Twenty-eight (28) patients were diagnosed with suspicious perirectal node metastases. TAUS visualized 24 of these, whereas PET/CT detected 15. Suspicious inguinal nodes were visualized on either US or PET/CT in 41 patients. Seventeen (17) of these had confirmed malignant disease on biopsy, and 15 had confirmed benign disease. All 17 patients (100%) with malignant inguinal nodes were diagnosed by PET/CT, whereas US identified 16 (94%). Ten patients were diagnosed with suspicious inguinal nodes on PET/CT that had not been seen on US. One of these was malignant, three were benign, and six were not biopsied. PET/CT diagnosed eight metastatic sites, whereas TAUS/US diagnosed three. PET/CT discovered three of the five synchronous cancers seen in this study. PET/CT upstaged the disease in 14% of the cases and changed the treatment plan proposed by TAUS/US in 17%. Conclusion: PET/CT has great potential influence on the staging and treatment of anal cancer. TAUS is important in the staging of the primary tumor and N1-stage, whereas PET/CT seems necessary for the N2/3-stage, the M-stage and synchronous cancers.

  17. [Stage 3 recommendations--the early recognition of breast cancer in Germany. Abridged version for medical practitioners].

    PubMed

    Schulz, K-D; Kreienberg, R; Fischer, R; Albert, U-S

    2003-06-01

    The Aim of this level 3 good clinical practice guideline is to help physicians, women and patients in decision making about the appropriate health care for early detection of breast cancer. The principle of early detection of breast cancer comprise the detection and diagnosis of premalignant breast tumors (stage 0, Carcinoma in situ), risk reduction of cancer development as well as the detection and diagnosis of breast cancer at an early stage (stage I), with a 90% chance of cure as shown by a large number of clinical trials. To establish a nation wide, comprehensive quality assuring program for the early detection of breast cancer the guideline summarized in the following paper offers the basis for a timely mortality reduction of breast cancer. The cure of early stage disease will be additionally possible by less invasive treatment allowing patients to maintain quality of life. The guideline leads to a major improvement of women's health care.

  18. Vaccine Therapy in Treating Patients With Stage IIIC-IV Ovarian Epithelial, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer Following Surgery and Chemotherapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-12-28

    Fallopian Tube Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Endometrioid Tumor; Fallopian Tube Mucinous Neoplasm; Fallopian Tube Serous Neoplasm; Fallopian Tube Transitional Cell Carcinoma; Ovarian Clear Cell Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Seromucinous Carcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Transitional Cell Carcinoma; Primary Peritoneal Serous Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Undifferentiated Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Undifferentiated Ovarian Carcinoma

  19. Portable real-time optical coherence tomography system for intraoperative imaging and staging of breast cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Freddy T.; Zysk, Adam M.; Kotynek, Jan G.; Bellafiore, Frank J.; Rowland, Kendrith M.; Johnson, Patricia A.; Chaney, J. Eric; Boppart, Stephen A.

    2007-02-01

    Breast cancer continues to be one of the most widely diagnosed forms of cancer amongst women and the second leading type of cancer deaths amongst women. The recurrence rate of breast cancer is highly dependent on several factors including the complete removal of the primary tumor and the presence of cancer cells in involved lymph nodes. The metastatic spread and staging of breast cancer is also evaluated through the nodal assessment of the regional lymphatic system. A portable real-time spectral domain optical coherence tomography system is being presented as a clinical diagnostic tool in the intraoperative delineation of tumor margins as well as for real time lymph node assessment. The system employs a super luminescent diode centered at 1310 nm with a bandwidth of 92 nm. Using a spectral domain detection system, the data is acquired at a rate of 5 KHz / axial scan. The sample arm is a galvanometer scanning telecentric probe with an objective lens (f = 60 mm, confocal parameter = 1.5 mm) yielding an axial resolution of 8.3 μm and a transverse resolution of 35.0 μm. Images of tumor margins are acquired in the operating room ex vivo on freshly excised human tissue specimen. This data shows the potential of the use of OCT in defining the structural tumor margins in breast cancer. Images taken from ex-vivo samples on the bench system clearly delineate the differences between clusters of tumor cells and nearby adipose cells. In addition, the data shows the potential for OCT as a diagnostic tool in the staging of cancer metastasis through locoregional lymph node assessment.

  20. Correlation analysis of urine metabolites and clinical staging in patients with ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Ting; Lin, Yunliang; Yin, Haiqin; Wang, Shanshan; Sun, Qinglei; Zhang, Peihai; Bi, Wenxiang

    2015-01-01

    This study is to investigate the correlation between urine metabolites and clinical staging in patients with ovarian cancer. The urina sanguinis from 56 cases of primary epithelial ovarian cancer patients and 15 healthy volunteers was collected and the urine metabolites were extracted. Ultra high performance liquid chromatography/time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC-Q-TOF-MS) analysis was performed. Principal component analysis (PCA) and partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) were used to analyze the mass spectrometry data. Database retrieval and comparison of the screened metabolites were performed and one-way ANOVA and least significant difference (LSD) t test were carried out. PCA analysis of UPLC-Q-TOF-MS results showed that the score plots of samples from healthy people and patients with ovarian cancer at different clinical stages were separated. Further PLS-DA analysis significantly improved the classification results. The R2X was 0.757, the R2Y was 0.977 and the Q2Y was 0.87, indicating that the model stability and predictability were good. Eight metabolites, including N-acetylneuraminic acid-9-phosphate, 5’-methioadenosine, uric acid-3-nucleoside, pseudouridine, L-valine, succinic acid, L-proline and β-nicotinamide mononucleotide were identified. The contents of these metabolites increased with the development of the disease. There was correlation between urine metabolites and clinical staging in patients with ovarian cancer. PMID:26770415

  1. Promoting emancipated decision-making for surgical treatment of early stage breast cancer among Jordanian women

    PubMed Central

    Obeidat, Rana F.

    2015-01-01

    To use the critical social theory as a framework to analyze the oppression of Jordanian women with early stage breast cancer in the decision-making process for surgical treatment and suggest strategies to emancipate these women to make free choices. This is a discussion paper utilizing the critical social theory as a framework for analysis. The sexist and paternalistic ideology that characterizes Jordanian society in general and the medical establishment in particular as well as the biomedical ideology are some of the responsible ideologies for the fact that many Jordanian women with early stage breast cancer are denied the right to choose a surgical treatment according to their own preferences and values. The financial and political power of Jordanian medical organizations (e.g., Jordan Medical Council), the weakness of nursing administration in the healthcare system, and the hierarchical organization of Jordanian society, where men are first and women are second, support these oppressing ideologies. Knowledge is a strong tool of power. Jordanian nurses could empower women with early stage breast cancer by enhancing their knowledge regarding their health and the options available for surgical treatment. To successfully emancipate patients, education alone may not be enough; there is also a need for health care providers’ support and unconditional acceptance of choice. To achieve the aim of emancipating women with breast cancer from the oppression inherent in the persistence of mastectomy, Jordanian nurses need to recognize that they should first gain greater power and authority in the healthcare system. PMID:27981122

  2. Promoting emancipated decision-making for surgical treatment of early stage breast cancer among Jordanian women.

    PubMed

    Obeidat, Rana F

    2015-01-01

    To use the critical social theory as a framework to analyze the oppression of Jordanian women with early stage breast cancer in the decision-making process for surgical treatment and suggest strategies to emancipate these women to make free choices. This is a discussion paper utilizing the critical social theory as a framework for analysis. The sexist and paternalistic ideology that characterizes Jordanian society in general and the medical establishment in particular as well as the biomedical ideology are some of the responsible ideologies for the fact that many Jordanian women with early stage breast cancer are denied the right to choose a surgical treatment according to their own preferences and values. The financial and political power of Jordanian medical organizations (e.g., Jordan Medical Council), the weakness of nursing administration in the healthcare system, and the hierarchical organization of Jordanian society, where men are first and women are second, support these oppressing ideologies. Knowledge is a strong tool of power. Jordanian nurses could empower women with early stage breast cancer by enhancing their knowledge regarding their health and the options available for surgical treatment. To successfully emancipate patients, education alone may not be enough; there is also a need for health care providers' support and unconditional acceptance of choice. To achieve the aim of emancipating women with breast cancer from the oppression inherent in the persistence of mastectomy, Jordanian nurses need to recognize that they should first gain greater power and authority in the healthcare system.

  3. Systemic Therapy for Early-Stage Breast Cancer: What the Plastic Surgeon Should Know.

    PubMed

    Teven, Chad M; Schmid, Daniel B; Sisco, Mark; Ward, James; Howard, Michael A

    2017-01-01

    Objective: We review the types, indications, and common regimens of systemic forms of therapy offered in early-stage breast cancer. We further detail the mechanism of action, approved uses, major toxicities, and relevance to breast reconstruction of specific agents. Methods: A review of the literature on PubMed and Cochrane databases was undertaken to define the indications and common regimens of systemic therapy in early-stage breast cancer. In addition, literature describing relevant information regarding specific systemic agents was reviewed. Results: The main objectives of systemic therapy, when provided in the perioperative setting, are to reduce the risk for future recurrence and prolong overall survival. Systemic forms of therapy consist of chemotherapy, hormonal therapy, and targeted therapy and are increasingly being offered to women with early-stage breast cancer. Similarly, as more women are diagnosed with disease that is amenable to surgical extirpation, rates of breast reconstruction are on the rise. Many agents have effects that may impact patient safety with respect to breast reconstruction. Conclusions: Increasingly, women with breast cancer receive 1 or more forms of systemic therapy during the course of their treatment. It is therefore of significant importance that plastic surgeons have a clear understanding of the issues surrounding the use of systemic agents.

  4. Systemic Therapy for Early-Stage Breast Cancer: What the Plastic Surgeon Should Know

    PubMed Central

    Teven, Chad M.; Schmid, Daniel B.; Sisco, Mark; Ward, James

    2017-01-01

    Objective: We review the types, indications, and common regimens of systemic forms of therapy offered in early-stage breast cancer. We further detail the mechanism of action, approved uses, major toxicities, and relevance to breast reconstruction of specific agents. Methods: A review of the literature on PubMed and Cochrane databases was undertaken to define the indications and common regimens of systemic therapy in early-stage breast cancer. In addition, literature describing relevant information regarding specific systemic agents was reviewed. Results: The main objectives of systemic therapy, when provided in the perioperative setting, are to reduce the risk for future recurrence and prolong overall survival. Systemic forms of therapy consist of chemotherapy, hormonal therapy, and targeted therapy and are increasingly being offered to women with early-stage breast cancer. Similarly, as more women are diagnosed with disease that is amenable to surgical extirpation, rates of breast reconstruction are on the rise. Many agents have effects that may impact patient safety with respect to breast reconstruction. Conclusions: Increasingly, women with breast cancer receive 1 or more forms of systemic therapy during the course of their treatment. It is therefore of significant importance that plastic surgeons have a clear understanding of the issues surrounding the use of systemic agents. PMID:28293332

  5. Human papillomavirus types 16 and 18 and the prognosis of patients with stage I cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    de Araújo Catão Zampronha, Rossana; Freitas-Junior, Ruffo; Murta, Eddie Fernando Candido; Michelin, Márcia Antoniazi; Barbaresco, Aline Almeida; Adad, Sheila Jorge; de Oliveira, Amaurillo Monteiro; Rassi, Amanda B.; Oton, Glória Jabur Bittar

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study sought to evaluate the prevalence of human papillomavirus (HPV) types 16 and 18 in women with clinical stage IB cervical cancer treated by radical hysterectomy with pelvic lymphadenectomy as well as to establish a correlation between HPV type and cancer prognosis. METHODS: A single-center cohort study was conducted with 86 patients who had undergone radical hysterectomy for stage I cervical cancer. Prognostic factors and the presence of HPV 16 and 18 were analyzed using a polymerase chain reaction assay. A univariate analysis using Kaplan-Meier curves was conducted to estimate survival. RESULTS: The prevalence of HPV 16 in the study group was 65.3%, and the prevalence of HPV 18 was 33.3%. The prevalence of infection with both viruses was 26.9%. Overall survival at 5 years was 91% among women with HPV 18 and 96% among those without this virus type (p = 0.133). Among the women with HPV 16, the overall survival was 94%, whereas this rate was 96% among those without this virus type (p = 0.663). Disease-free survival was unaffected by the presence of HPV type 16 or 18. CONCLUSION: In the present study, despite the high prevalence of HPV types 16 and 18, the presence of these virus types did not affect the prognosis of patients with stage I cervical cancer who underwent radical hysterectomy. PMID:23778490

  6. [TNM classification of breast cancer: changes and comments on the 7th edition].

    PubMed

    Sinn, H-P; Helmchen, B; Wittekind, C H

    2010-09-01

    The 7th edition of the TNM classification includes only minor changes in the main TNM categories for breast cancer. Only ductal and lobular carcinoma in situ (DCIS, LCIS), and isolated Paget's disease of the nipple are classified as pTis, but not precursor lesions such as atypical ductal or lobular hyperplasia (ADH, ALH). AJCC emphasizes that microscopic measurement is the most accurate and preferred method to determine pT in small invasive cancers and stresses the importance of strict adherence to criteria for T4 cancers. For better distinction from micrometastases in regional lymph nodes, small clusters of cells not greater than 0.2 mm, or nonconfluent or nearly confluent clusters of cells not exceeding 200 cells in a single histologic lymph node cross section are classified as isolated tumour cells (pN0(i+)). The pN classification has otherwise remained unchanged. In the setting of patients having received neoadjuvant therapy, ypT1-ypT3 is based on the total extent of viable tumour cells, irrespective of tumour regression. Stage I breast tumours have been subdivided into Stage IA and Stage IB; Stage IB includes small tumours (TI) with lymph node micrometastases (N1mi). These changes and clarifications will contribute to maintaining the clinical and prognostic relevance of TNM in breast cancer.

  7. Preoperative carcinoembryonic antigen is related to tumour stage and long-term survival in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, M. A.; Buckley, D.; Henson, D. B.; Armitage, N. C.

    1998-01-01

    Evidence as to the value of preoperative carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) in guiding treatment for patients with colorectal cancer is conflicting. The aim of this prospective study was to investigate the value of preoperative CEA in predicting tumour factors of proven prognostic value and long-term survival in patients undergoing surgery for colorectal cancer. Preoperative serum CEA, tumour ploidy, stage and grade were ascertained in 277 patients undergoing colorectal cancer surgery. This cohort of patients were followed up for a minimum of 5 years, or until death, in a dedicated colorectal clinic. Patients with an elevated CEA had a 5 year survival of 39%. This increased to 57% if the CEA was normal (P=0.001). The proportion of patients with a raised CEA increased with a more advanced tumour stage (P < 0.000001) and a poorly differentiated tumour grade (P < 0.005). Once stage had been controlled for, CEA was not a predictor of survival. No relationship between tumour ploidy and CEA was found. In conclusion, a raised preoperative serum CEA is likely to be associated with advanced tumour stage and poor long-term survival, compared with patients with a normal value. PMID:9823977

  8. Preoperative carcinoembryonic antigen is related to tumour stage and long-term survival in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Chapman, M A; Buckley, D; Henson, D B; Armitage, N C

    1998-11-01

    Evidence as to the value of preoperative carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) in guiding treatment for patients with colorectal cancer is conflicting. The aim of this prospective study was to investigate the value of preoperative CEA in predicting tumour factors of proven prognostic value and long-term survival in patients undergoing surgery for colorectal cancer. Preoperative serum CEA, tumour ploidy, stage and grade were ascertained in 277 patients undergoing colorectal cancer surgery. This cohort of patients were followed up for a minimum of 5 years, or until death, in a dedicated colorectal clinic. Patients with an elevated CEA had a 5 year survival of 39%. This increased to 57% if the CEA was normal (P=0.001). The proportion of patients with a raised CEA increased with a more advanced tumour stage (P < 0.000001) and a poorly differentiated tumour grade (P < 0.005). Once stage had been controlled for, CEA was not a predictor of survival. No relationship between tumour ploidy and CEA was found. In conclusion, a raised preoperative serum CEA is likely to be associated with advanced tumour stage and poor long-term survival, compared with patients with a normal value.

  9. The 7th lung cancer TNM classification and staging system: Review of the changes and implications

    PubMed Central

    Mirsadraee, Saeed; Oswal, Dilip; Alizadeh, Yalda; Caulo, Andrea; van Beek, Edwin JR

    2012-01-01

    Lung cancer is the most common cause of death from cancer in males, accounting for more than 1.4 million deaths in 2008. It is a growing concern in China, Asia and Africa as well. Accurate staging of the disease is an important part of the management as it provides estimation of patient’s prognosis and identifies treatment sterategies. It also helps to build a database for future staging projects. A major revision of lung cancer staging has been announced with effect from January 2010. The new classification is based on a larger surgical and non-surgical cohort of patients, and thus more accurate in terms of outcome prediction compared to the previous classification. There are several original papers regarding this new classification which give comprehensive description of the methodology, the changes in the staging and the statistical analysis. This overview is a simplified description of the changes in the new classification and their potential impact on patients’ treatment and prognosis. PMID:22590666

  10. Controversies in the management of stage IIIA non-small-cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Santos, Edgardo S; Castrellon, Aurelio; Blaya, Marcelo; Raez, Luis E

    2008-12-01

    New developments in the management of non-small-cell lung cancer, as well as recent proposals for changing the current lung cancer staging system, are posing a challenge in the therapeutic decision making regarding this disease. For the last two decades, the management of stage IIIA (N2) disease has been controversial and the target for clinical trials has been to determine the best therapeutic approach that may result in better survival outcomes without increasing toxicity. For many years, combined modality treatment (systemic chemotherapy plus radiation therapy) became the standard of care in this setting. However, the poor outcomes seen with combined modality for N2 has obligated us to explore other possibilities. In this sense, recent clinical trials in the neoadjuvant setting using chemotherapy alone or combined modality are providing fruitful results and shifting the paradigm on this stage. A recent, large randomized multicenter trial argues against what has slowly become a current practice in some centers - the use of preoperative modality for N2 disease. Another controversy that we will discuss here is the acceptance of adjuvant therapy for resected stage IB-IIIA non-small-cell lung cancer. It was not long ago that adjuvant radiation therapy was still the standard of care for patients who have pathological nodal disease. We will present the current data on these debatable issues and how to implement this new knowledge into clinical practice.

  11. Developing an Instrument to Measure Socioeconomic Disparities in Quality of Care for Men with Early-Stage Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-01

    proctitis : 558.1 (Gastroenteritis and colitis due to radiation ) Diagnosis of cystitis: 595.x (Cystitis), 595.82 (Irradiation cystitis). Diagnosis of...ABSTRACT Patients with early stage prostate cancer have excellent cause specific survival after definitive local therapy with radiation therapy or radical...have treatment related complications after prostate cancer treatment. This suggests that disparities in treatment, rather than prostate cancer

  12. Couples' Support-Related Communication, Psychological Distress, and Relationship Satisfaction among Women with Early Stage Breast Cancer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manne, Sharon; Sherman, Marne; Ross, Stephanie; Ostroff, Jamie; Heyman, Richard E.; Fox, Kevin

    2004-01-01

    This study examined associations between couple communication about cancer and psychological distress and relationship satisfaction of women diagnosed with early stage breast cancer. One hundred forty-eight couples completed a videotaped discussion of a cancer-related issue and a general issue. Patients completed measures of psychological distress…

  13. Automatic Diagnose of the Stages of Breast Cancer using Intelligent Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiji, G. W.; Marsilin, J. R.

    2012-12-01

    The objective of this paper is to locate the stage of the breast cancer and to locate the tumor tissues. The proposed work is performed in two stages. In the first stage, location of tumour is done and in the second phase retrieving of the tumor images and its stages based on the "query input". Texture and Shape features are used here as Feature descriptors. Shape features used are asymmetry, aspect ratio, eccentricity and Bending Energy. Texture features used are contrast, energy and Gabor Filter. KNN classifier is used for classification and for Pattern matching, Euclidean distance is used. The proposed approach which gives 95.6% accuracy has been compared with earlier approaches. The proposed approach was tested with 32 samples and got annotated by radiologists.

  14. The incidence of bone metastasis after early-stage breast cancer in Canada.

    PubMed

    Liede, Alexander; Jerzak, Katarzyna J; Hernandez, Rohini K; Wade, Sally W; Sun, Ping; Narod, Steven A

    2016-04-01

    Current information on the incidence and prevalence of bone metastases in women with breast cancer is scarce. This study examined the occurrence and predictors of bone metastases, as well as post-metastasis survival in a prospective cohort of Canadian women with breast cancer. We included women treated for early-stage (stage I, II, or III) breast cancer at the Henrietta Banting Breast Centre (HBBC) in Toronto, Canada between 1987 and 2000. Data were abstracted from medical records and pathology reports in the HBBC database; follow-up extended to end of data availability or August 31, 2015. Actuarial survival analyses provided cumulative incidence of bone metastases at 5, 10, and 15 years after breast cancer diagnosis. Kaplan-Meier curves describe breast cancer mortality. Regression models assessed patient, tumor, and treatment characteristics as predictors of bone metastases with all-cause mortality as a competing risk. Among 2097 women studied, the 5-, 10-, and 15-year probability of bone metastasis was 6.5, 10.3, and 11.3 % for the first recurrence, and 8.4, 12.5, and 13.6 % for any bone recurrence. At median follow-up (12.5 years), 13.2 % of patients had bone metastases. Median survival was 1.6 years following bone metastasis, and shorter if both bone and visceral metastases occurred. Advanced age and adjuvant treatment with tamoxifen were protective against bone metastasis. In this representative cohort of women diagnosed with early-stage breast cancer in Ontario, Canada, with long follow-up, the incidence of bone metastases was consistent with longitudinal studies from the United Kingdom, Denmark, and the US.

  15. Dose-Escalated Robotic SBRT for Stage I–II Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Meier, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) is the precise external delivery of very high-dose radiotherapy to targets in the body, with treatment completed in one to five fractions. SBRT should be an ideal approach for organ-confined prostate cancer because (I) dose-escalation should yield improved rates of cancer control; (II) the unique radiobiology of prostate cancer favors hypofractionation; and (III) the conformal nature of SBRT minimizes high-dose radiation delivery to immediately adjacent organs, potentially reducing complications. This approach is also more convenient for patients, and is cheaper than intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Several external beam platforms are capable of delivering SBRT for early-stage prostate cancer, although most of the mature reported series have employed a robotic non-coplanar platform (i.e., CyberKnife). Several large studies report 5-year biochemical relapse rates which compare favorably to IMRT. Rates of late GU toxicity are similar to those seen with IMRT, and rates of late rectal toxicity may be less than with IMRT and low-dose rate brachytherapy. Patient-reported quality of life (QOL) outcomes appear similar to IMRT in the urinary domain. Bowel QOL may be less adversely affected by SBRT than with other radiation modalities. After 5 years of follow-up, SBRT delivered on a robotic platform is yielding outcomes at least as favorable as IMRT, and may be considered appropriate therapy for stage I–II prostate cancer. PMID:25905037

  16. MR imaging of the breast for the detection, diagnosis, and staging of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Orel, S G; Schnall, M D

    2001-07-01

    With the introduction of contrast agents, advances in surface coil technology, and development of new imaging protocols, contrast agent-enhanced magnetic resonance (MR) imaging has emerged as a promising modality for detection, diagnosis, and staging of breast cancer. The reported sensitivity of MR imaging for the visualization of invasive cancer has approached 100%. There are many examples in the literature of MR imaging--demonstrated mammographically, sonographically, and clinically occult breast cancer. Often, breast cancer detected on MR images has resulted in a change in patient care. Despite these results, there are many unresolved issues, including no defined standard technique for contrast-enhanced breast MR imaging, no standard interpretation criteria for evaluating such studies, no consensus on what constitutes clinically important enhancement, and no clearly defined clinical indications for the use of MR imaging. Furthermore, this technology remains costly, and issues of cost-effectiveness and cost competition from percutaneous biopsy have yet to be fully addressed. These factors along with the lack of commercially available MR imaging--guided localization and biopsy systems have slowed the transfer of this imaging technology from research centers to clinical breast imaging practices. Technical requirements, potential clinical applications, and potential pitfalls and limitations of contrast-enhanced MR imaging as a method to help detect, diagnose, and stage breast cancer will be described.

  17. Dose-Escalated Robotic SBRT for Stage I-II Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Meier, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) is the precise external delivery of very high-dose radiotherapy to targets in the body, with treatment completed in one to five fractions. SBRT should be an ideal approach for organ-confined prostate cancer because (I) dose-escalation should yield improved rates of cancer control; (II) the unique radiobiology of prostate cancer favors hypofractionation; and (III) the conformal nature of SBRT minimizes high-dose radiation delivery to immediately adjacent organs, potentially reducing complications. This approach is also more convenient for patients, and is cheaper than intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Several external beam platforms are capable of delivering SBRT for early-stage prostate cancer, although most of the mature reported series have employed a robotic non-coplanar platform (i.e., CyberKnife). Several large studies report 5-year biochemical relapse rates which compare favorably to IMRT. Rates of late GU toxicity are similar to those seen with IMRT, and rates of late rectal toxicity may be less than with IMRT and low-dose rate brachytherapy. Patient-reported quality of life (QOL) outcomes appear similar to IMRT in the urinary domain. Bowel QOL may be less adversely affected by SBRT than with other radiation modalities. After 5 years of follow-up, SBRT delivered on a robotic platform is yielding outcomes at least as favorable as IMRT, and may be considered appropriate therapy for stage I-II prostate cancer.

  18. Chemotherapy With or Without Bevacizumab in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Metastatic Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-04-12

    Recurrent Hypopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Laryngeal Verrucous Carcinoma; Recurrent Lip and Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Cell Carcinoma in the Neck With Occult Primary; Recurrent Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Oral Cavity Verrucous Carcinoma; Recurrent Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Salivary Gland Carcinoma; Salivary Gland Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Squamous Cell Carcinoma Metastatic in the Neck With Occult Primary; Stage IV Hypopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma AJCC v7; Stage IV Major Salivary Gland Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IVA Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Laryngeal Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage IVA Lip and Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma AJCC v6 and v7; Stage IVA Major Salivary Gland Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IVA Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Oral Cavity Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage IVA Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma AJCC v7; Stage IVB Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Laryngeal Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage IVB Lip and Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma AJCC v6 and v7; Stage IVB Major Salivary Gland Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IVB Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Oral Cavity Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage IVB Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma AJCC v7; Stage IVC Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVC Laryngeal Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage IVC Lip and Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma AJCC v6 and v7; Stage IVC Major Salivary Gland Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IVC Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVC Oral Cavity Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage IVC Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma AJCC v7; Tongue Carcinoma; Untreated Metastatic Squamous Cell Carcinoma to Neck With Occult Primary

  19. Outcomes in Patients With Early-Stage Hypopharyngeal Cancer Treated With Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshimura, Ryo-ichi; Kagami, Yoshikazu; Ito, Yoshinori; Asai, Masao; Mayahara, Hiroshi; Sumi, Minako; Itami, Jun

    2010-07-15

    Purpose: To analyze the outcome in patients with early-stage hypopharyngeal cancer (HPC) who were treated with radiotherapy (RT). Methods and Materials: Between February 1988 and February 2007, 77 patients with Stage I or Stage II HPC underwent definitive RT in the Division of Radiation Oncology at the National Cancer Center Hospital. Eleven of the patients received local irradiation, and the other 66 patients received elective bilateral neck irradiation and booster irradiation to the primary lesion. The median follow-up period for all the patients was 33 months from the start of RT, ranging from 3 to 229 months. Results: The rates of overall survival, HPC-specific survival, HPC recurrence-free survival, and local control with laryngeal voice preservation for the 77 patients at 5 years were 47%, 74%, 57%, and 70%, respectively. The survival rates were not affected by the patient characteristics or treatment factors, but the RT field was significantly correlated with local control in a multivariate analysis. Seven of the patients had Grade 3 or greater complications, but these complications occurred after salvage surgery in 6 of the patients. Of the 77 patients, 83% had synchronous or metachronous malignancies, but these malignancies did not influence the survival of the patients if the malignancies were detected at an early stage. Conclusion: RT is an appropriate treatment method for early-stage HPC. However, because synchronous or metachronous malignancies occur at a relatively high frequency, careful follow-up and the early detection of such malignancies are critical.

  20. What Does PET Imaging Add to Conventional Staging of Head and Neck Cancer Patients?

    SciTech Connect

    Pohar, Surjeet . E-mail: poharss@evms.edu; Brown, Robert B.S.; Newman, Nancy; Koniarczyk, Michael; Hsu, Jack; Feiglin, David

    2007-06-01

    Purpose: To determine the value of PET scans in the staging of patients with head and neck carcinoma. Methods and Materials: The charts of 25 patients who underwent neck dissection, computed tomography (CT) scan, and F-18-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) imaging as part of their initial work-up for a head and neck squamous cell cancer between 2000-2003 were reviewed. All patients underwent clinical examination, triple endoscopy, and chest radiograph as part of their clinical staging, adhering to American Joint Commission for Cancer criteria. In addition to the clinical nodal (N) stage, PET findings were incorporated to determine a second type of N staging: clinical N + PET stage. The number of neck sides and nodal levels involved on CT or PET and on pathologic examination were recorded. Results: The sensitivity and specificity for detection of nodal disease were similar for CT and FDG-PET. Positive and negative likelihood ratios were similar for both diagnostic tests. None of our 25 patients had unsuspected distant disease detected by PET. Conclusion: The addition of PET imaging did not improve diagnostic accuracy in our patients compared with CT. PET scanning did not alter clinical management in any of the patients.

  1. Gene expression-based biomarkers for discriminating early and late stage of clear cell renal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bhalla, Sherry; Chaudhary, Kumardeep; Kumar, Ritesh; Sehgal, Manika; Kaur, Harpreet; Sharma, Suresh; Raghava, Gajendra P. S.

    2017-01-01

    In this study, an attempt has been made to identify expression-based gene biomarkers that can discriminate early and late stage of clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) patients. We have analyzed the gene expression of 523 samples to identify genes that are differentially expressed in the early and late stage of ccRCC. First, a threshold-based method has been developed, which attained a maximum accuracy of 71.12% with ROC 0.67 using single gene NR3C2. To improve the performance of threshold-based method, we combined two or more genes and achieved maximum accuracy of 70.19% with ROC of 0.74 using eight genes on the validation dataset. These eight genes include four underexpressed (NR3C2, ENAM, DNASE1L3, FRMPD2) and four overexpressed (PLEKHA9, MAP6D1, SMPD4, C11orf73) genes in the late stage of ccRCC. Second, models were developed using state-of-art techniques and achieved maximum accuracy of 72.64% and 0.81 ROC using 64 genes on validation dataset. Similar accuracy was obtained on 38 genes selected from subset of genes, involved in cancer hallmark biological processes. Our analysis further implied a need to develop gender-specific models for stage classification. A web server, CancerCSP, has been developed to predict stage of ccRCC using gene expression data derived from RNAseq experiments. PMID:28349958

  2. Investigating dielectric properties of different stages of syngeneic murine ovarian cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Salmanzadeh, Alireza; Sano, Michael B.; Gallo-Villanueva, Roberto C.; Roberts, Paul C.; Schmelz, Eva M.; Davalos, Rafael V.

    2013-01-01

    In this study, the electrical properties of four different stages of mouse ovarian surface epithelial (MOSE) cells were investigated using contactless dielectrophoresis (cDEP). This study expands the work from our previous report describing for the first time the crossover frequency and cell specific membrane capacitance of different stages of cancer cells that are derived from the same cell line. The specific membrane capacitance increased as the stage of malignancy advanced from 15.39 ± 1.54 mF m−2 for a non-malignant benign stage to 26.42 ± 1.22 mF m−2 for the most aggressive stage. These differences could be the result of morphological variations due to changes in the cytoskeleton structure, specifically the decrease of the level of actin filaments in the cytoskeleton structure of the transformed MOSE cells. Studying the electrical properties of MOSE cells provides important information as a first step to develop cancer-treatment techniques which could partially reverse the cytoskeleton disorganization of malignant cells to a morphology more similar to that of benign cells. PMID:24403991

  3. Clinical–Pathologic Stage Discrepancy in Bladder Cancer Patients Treated With Radical Cystectomy: Results From the National Cancer Data Base

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, Phillip J.; Lin, Chun Chieh; Jemal, Ahmedin; Shipley, William U.; Fedewa, Stacey A.; Kibel, Adam S.; Kamat, Ashish M.; Virgo, Katherine S.; Blute, Michael L.; Zietman, Anthony L.; Efstathiou, Jason A.

    2014-04-01

    Purpose: To examine the accuracy of clinical staging and its effects on outcome in bladder cancer (BC) patients treated with radical cystectomy (RC), using a large national database. Methods and Materials: A total of 16,953 patients with BC without distant metastases treated with RC from 1998 to 2009 were analyzed. Factors associated with clinical–pathologic stage discrepancy were assessed by multivariate generalized estimating equation models. Survival analysis was conducted for patients treated between 1998 and 2004 (n=7270) using the Kaplan-Meier method and Cox proportional hazards models. Results: At RC 41.9% of patients were upstaged, whereas 5.9% were downstaged. Upstaging was more common in females, the elderly, and in patients who underwent a more extensive lymphadenectomy. Downstaging was less common in patients treated at community centers, in the elderly, and in Hispanics. Receipt of preoperative chemotherapy was highly associated with downstaging. Five-year overall survival rates for patients with clinical stages 0, I, II, III, and IV were 67.2%, 62.9%, 50.4%, 36.9%, and 27.2%, respectively, whereas those for the same pathologic stages were 70.8%, 75.8%, 63.7%, 41.5%, and 24.7%, respectively. On multivariate analysis, upstaging was associated with increased 5-year mortality (hazard ratio [HR] 1.80, P<.001), but downstaging was not associated with survival (HR 0.88, P=.160). In contrast, more extensive lymphadenectomy was associated with decreased 5-year mortality (HR 0.76 for ≥10 lymph nodes examined, P<.001), as was treatment at an National Cancer Institute–designated cancer center (HR 0.90, P=.042). Conclusions: Clinical–pathologic stage discrepancy in BC patients is remarkably common across the United States. These findings should be considered when selecting patients for preoperative or nonoperative management strategies and when comparing the outcomes of bladder sparing approaches to RC.

  4. Highly-accurate metabolomic detection of early-stage ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gaul, David A.; Mezencev, Roman; Long, Tran Q.; Jones, Christina M.; Benigno, Benedict B.; Gray, Alexander; Fernández, Facundo M.; McDonald, John F.

    2015-01-01

    High performance mass spectrometry was employed to interrogate the serum metabolome of early-stage ovarian cancer (OC) patients and age-matched control women. The resulting spectral features were used to establish a linear support vector machine (SVM) model of sixteen diagnostic metabolites that are able to identify early-stage OC with 100% accuracy in our patient cohort. The results provide evidence for the importance of lipid and fatty acid metabolism in OC and serve as the foundation of a clinically significant diagnostic test. PMID:26573008

  5. Entolimod in Treating Patients With Stage III-IV Squamous Cell Head and Neck Cancer Receiving Cisplatin and Radiation Therapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-12-10

    Mucositis; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage III Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage III Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVC Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVC Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral

  6. Examining plasma microRNA markers for colorectal cancer at different stages

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yan; Liu, Yuexin; Cogdell, David; Calin, George A.; Sun, Baocun; Kopetz, Scott; Hamilton, Stanley R.; Zhang, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Circulating microRNAs (miRNAs) have emerged as promising biomarkers; however, few miRNAs have been reproducible and can be used in clinical practice. In this study, we screened the levels of 754 miRNAs using TaqMan array in 50 individual plasma samples from 10 demographically matched healthy controls and 40 colorectal cancer (CRC) patients (10 each of stage I–IV) and identified 22 miRNAs associated with the presence of and stages of CRC. Then we performed the validation for 11 miRNAs in an independent cohort including 187 CRC cases and 47 healthy controls. Comprehensive analyses showed that plasma miR-96 distinguished stage I–IV CRC from healthy controls with an area under curve (AUC) of 0.740; miR-203 separated stage III–IV CRC patients from stage I–II with an AUC of 0.757; and miR-141 differentiated stage IV CRC from stage I–III patients with an AUC of 0.851. Survival analyses showed that plasma miR-96 and miR-200b were independent prognostic factors for overall survival. Thus, we propose four miRNAs (miR-96, miR-203, miR-141 and miR-200b) as clinically validated circulating biomarkers for CRC prognosis that warrant further evaluation for clinical utility. PMID:26863633

  7. Decreased xanthine oxidoreductase is a predictor of poor prognosis in early‐stage gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Linder, N; Haglund, C; Lundin, M; Nordling, S; Ristimäki, A; Kokkola, A; Mrena, J; Wiksten, J‐P; Lundin, J

    2006-01-01

    Background Xanthine oxidoreductase (XOR) is a key enzyme in the degradation of DNA, RNA and high‐energy phosphates. About half of the patients with breast cancer have a decrease in XOR expression. Patients with breast cancer with unfavourable prognosis are independently identified by the loss of XOR. Aim To assess the clinical relevance of XOR expression in gastric cancer. Methods XOR levels were studied by immunohistochemistry in tissue microarray specimens of 337 patients with gastric cancer and the relation between XOR expression and a series of clinicopathological variables, as well as disease‐specific survival, was assessed. Results XOR was moderately decreased in 41% and was undetectable in another 14% of the tumours compared with the corresponding normal tissue. Decreased XOR was associated with advanced stage, deep tumour penetration, diffusely spread tumour location, positive lymph node status, large tumour size, non‐curative disease, cellular aneuploidy, high S‐phase fraction and high cyclooxygenase‐2 expression, but not with p53 expression or Borrmann classification. Down regulation of XOR was associated with unfavourable outcome, and the cumulative 5‐year gastric cancer‐specific survival in patients with strong XOR expression was 47%, compared with 22% in those with moderate to negative expression (p<0.001). This was also true in patients with stage I–II (p = 0.01) and lymph node‐negative (p = 0.02) disease, as well as in patients with smaller (⩽5 cm) tumours (p = 0.02). Conclusion XOR expression in gastric cancer may be a new marker for a more aggressive gastric cancer biology, similar to that previously reported for breast cancer. PMID:16935971

  8. Survivorship Care Plan in Promoting Physical Activity in Breast or Colorectal Cancer Survivors in Wisconsin

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-19

    Cancer Survivor; Healthy Subject; Stage I Colorectal Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIC Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Colorectal Cancer

  9. A blended knowledge translation initiative to improve colorectal cancer staging [ISRCTN56824239

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Frances C; Law, Calvin HL; Last, Linda D; Klar, Neil; Ryan, David P; Smith, Andrew J

    2006-01-01

    Background A significant gap has been documented between best practice and the actual practice of surgery. Our group identified that colorectal cancer staging in Ontario was suboptimal and subsequently developed a knowledge translation strategy using the principles of social marketing and the influence of expert and local opinion leaders for colorectal cancer. Methods/Design Opinion leaders were identified using the Hiss methodology. Hospitals in Ontario were cluster-randomized to one of two intervention arms. Both groups were exposed to a formal continuing medical education session given by the expert opinion leader for colorectal cancer. In the treatment group the local Opinion Leader for colorectal cancer was detailed by the expert opinion leader for colorectal cancer and received a toolkit. Forty-two centres agreed to have the expert opinion leader for colorectal cancer come and give a formal continuing medical education session that lasted between 50 minutes and 4 hours. No centres refused the intervention. These sessions were generally well attended by most surgeons, pathologists and other health care professionals at each centre. In addition all but one of the local opinion leaders for colorectal cancer met with the expert opinion leader for colorectal cancer for the academic detailing session that lasted between 15 and 30 minutes. Discussion We have enacted a unique study that has attempted to induce practice change among surgeons and pathologists using an adapted social marketing model that utilized the influence of both expert and local opinion leaders for colorectal cancer in a large geographic area with diverse practice settings. PMID:16412251

  10. Progress in the management of limited-stage small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Amini, Arya; Byers, Lauren A; Welsh, James W; Komaki, Ritsuko U

    2014-03-15

    Approximately 15% of lung cancer cases are of the small cell subtype, but this variant is highly aggressive and is often diagnosed at advanced stages. Outcomes after current treatment regimens have been poor, with 5-year survival rates as low as 25% for patients with limited-stage disease. Advances in therapy for small cell lung cancer have included the development of more effective chemotherapeutic agents and radiation techniques. For example, hyperfractionated radiotherapy given early in the course of the disease can reduce local recurrence and extend survival. Other technologic advances in radiation planning and delivery such as intensity-modulated radiotherapy, image-guided adaptive radiotherapy, and 4-dimensional computed tomography/positron emission tomography have facilitated the design of treatment volumes that closely conform to the shape of the tumor, which allows higher radiation doses to be given while minimizing radiation-induced toxicity to adjacent structures. Future improvements in outcomes will require clarifying the molecular basis for this disease.

  11. Outcomes of laparoscopic fertility-sparing surgery in clinically early-stage epithelial ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jin-Young; Lee, Yoo-Young; Kim, Tae-Joong; Kim, Byoung-Gie; Bae, Duk-Soo

    2016-01-01

    Objective Fertility-sparing surgery (FSS) is becoming an important technique in the surgical management of young women with early-stage epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC). We retrospectively evaluated the outcome of laparoscopic FSS in presumed clinically early-stage EOC. Methods We retrospectively searched databases of patients who received laparoscopic FSS for EOC between January 1999 and December 2012 at Samsung Medical Center. Women aged ≤40 years were included. The perioperative, oncological, and obstetric outcomes of these patients were evaluated. Results A total of 18 patients was evaluated. The median age of the patients was 33.5 years (range, 14 to 40 years). The number of patients with clinically stage IA and IC was 6 (33.3%) and 12 (66.7%), respectively. There were 7 (38.9%), 5 (27.8%), 3 (16.7%), and 3 patients (16.7%) with mucinous, endometrioid, clear cell, and serous tumor types, respectively. Complete surgical staging to preserve the uterus and one ovary with adnexa was performed in 4 patients (22.2%). Two out of them were upstaged to The International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage IIIA1. During the median follow-up of 47.3 months (range, 11.5 to 195.3 months), there were no perioperative or long term surgical complications. Four women (22.2%) conceived after their respective ovarian cancer treatments. Three (16.7%) of them completed full-term delivery and one is expecting a baby. One patient had disease recurrence. No patient died of the disease. Conclusion FSS in young patients with presumed clinically early-stage EOC is a challenging and cautious procedure. Further studies are urgent to determine the safety and feasibility of laparoscopic FSS in young patients with presumed clinically early-stage EOC. PMID:26768783

  12. Locoregional Recurrence of Breast Cancer in Patients Treated With Breast Conservation Surgery and Radiotherapy Following Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Min, Sun Young; Lee, Seung Ju; Shin, Kyung Hwan; Park, In Hae; Jung, So-Youn; Lee, Keun Seok; Ro, Jungsil; Lee, Seeyoun; Kim, Seok Won; Kim, Tae Hyun; Kang, Han-Sung; Cho, Kwan Ho

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: Breast conservation surgery (BCS) and radiotherapy (RT) following neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NCT) have been linked with high locoregional recurrence (LRR) rates and ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR) rates. The purpose of this study was to analyze clinical outcomes in patients who exhibited LRR and IBTR after being treated by BCS and RT following NCT. Methods and Materials: In total, 251 breast cancer patients treated with BCS and RT following NCT between 2001 and 2006 were included. All patients had been shown to be clinically node-positive. Clinical stage at diagnosis (2003 AJCC) was II in 68% of patients and III in 32% of patients. Of those, 50%, 35%, and 15% of patients received anthracycline-based, taxane-based, and combined anthracycline-taxane NCT, respectively. All patients received RT. Results: During follow-up (median, 55 months), 26 (10%) patients had LRR, 19 of these patients had IBTR. Five-year actuarial rates of IBTR-free and LRR-free survival were 91% and 89%, respectively. In multivariate analyses, lack of hormone suppression therapy was found to increase both LRR and IBTR rates. Hazard ratios were 7.99 (p < 0.0001) and 4.22 (p = 0.004), respectively. Additionally, pathology stage N2 to N3 increased LRR rate (hazard ratio, 4.22; p = 0.004), and clinical AJCC stage III IBTR rate (hazard ratio, 9.05; p = 0.034). Achievement of pathological complete response and presence of multifocal tumors did not affect LRR or IBTR. Conclusions: In patients with locally advanced disease, who were clinically node-positive at presentation, BCS after NCT resulted in acceptably low rates of IBTR and LRR. Mastectomy should be considered as an option in patients who present with clinical stage III tumors or who are not treated with adjuvant hormone suppression therapy, because they exhibit high IBTR rates after NCT and BCS.

  13. Minimally Invasive Molecular Staging (MIMS) RT-PCR Breast Cancer Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-03-31

    a small portion of the node is examined , there is uncertainty as to whether the specific sample evaluated is appropriate. Up to 25% of histologically...develop recurrent disease [10]. 2.1.2 Current Methodology The current practice for staging primary breast cancer patients involves histologic examination of...node biopsy. The lymph nodes are sectioned in half and usually the pathologist examines one or two sections from each node for metastases. Thus, if there

  14. A comparative analysis and guidance for individualized chemotherapy of stage II and III colorectal cancer patients based on pathological markers

    PubMed Central

    Han, Yang; Lu, Su; Yu, Fudong; Liu, Xisheng; Sun, Huimin; Wang, Jingtao; Zhu, Xingwu; Lu, Huijun; Yue, Hao; Wang, Jing; Lin, Jun; Zhou, Chongzhi; Tang, Huamei; Peng, Zhihai

    2016-01-01

    Adjuvant chemotherapy is considered the standard of care for patients with colorectal cancer after curative resection. Although current guidelines provide clear instructions for chemotherapy for stage II high-risk and stage III colorectal cancer, it is insufficient to individualize therapy. We analyzed the outcomes of 902 patients with colorectal cancer treated with or without chemotherapy in our hospital. We found Chinese survival benefit for chemotherapy was consistent with current guidelines. Moreover, our data added to the evidence that chemotherapy might be used for elderly patients with stage II high-risk colorectal cancer. Pathological markers could predict response to individualize therapy in a convenient, fast and inexpensive way. We compared survivals of patients with stage II high-risk and stage III colorectal cancer with chemotherapy in different pathological markers expression, and furthermore used 458 colon adenocarcinoma samples from The Cancer Genome Atlas to verify our preliminary results. We confirmed TOPIIα, EGFR and P170 may be sufficiently predictive markers to individualize chemotherapy. FOLFOX was the optimal adjuvant chemotherapy for patients with stage II high-risk and stage III colorectal cancer when TOPIIα was positive or EGFR or P170 was negative. PMID:27845412

  15. Delay in Breast Cancer: Implications for Stage at Diagnosis and Survival

    PubMed Central

    Caplan, Lee

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer continues to be a disease with tremendous public health significance. Primary prevention of breast cancer is still not available, so efforts to promote early detection continue to be the major focus in fighting breast cancer. Since early detection is associated with decreased mortality, one would think that it is important to minimize delays in detection and diagnosis. There are two major types of delay. Patient delay is delay in seeking medical attention after self-discovering a potential breast cancer symptom. System delay is delay within the health care system in getting appointments, scheduling diagnostic tests, receiving a definitive diagnosis, and initiating therapy. Earlier studies of the consequences of delay on prognosis tended to show that increased delay is associated with more advanced stage cancers at diagnosis, thus resulting in poorer chances for survival. More recent studies have had mixed results, with some studies showing increased survival with longer delays. One hypothesis is that diagnostic difficulties could perhaps account for this survival paradox. A rapidly growing lump may suggest cancer to both doctors and patients, while a slow growing lump or other symptoms could be less obvious to them. If this is the case, then the shorter delays would be seen with the more aggressive tumors for which the prognosis is worse leading to reduced survival. It seems logical that a tumor that is more advanced at diagnosis would lead to shorter survival but the several counter-intuitive studies in this review show that it is dangerous to make assumptions. PMID:25121080

  16. Five-Year Survival Among Stage IIIA Lung Cancer Patients Receiving Two Different Treatment Modalities.

    PubMed

    Bilfinger, Thomas; Keresztes, Roger; Albano, Denise; Nemesure, Barbara

    2016-07-21

    BACKGROUND Five-year survival rates among stage IIIA lung cancer patients range between 2% and 15%, and there is currently no consensus regarding optimal treatment approaches for these patients. The current investigation evaluated survival outcomes among stage IIIA lung cancer patients receiving 2 different treatment modalities, neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by resection versus chemoradiation alone. MATERIAL AND METHODS This retrospective study is based on 127 patients attending the Lung Cancer Evaluation Center at Stony Brook Cancer Center between 2002 and 2014. Patients were treated either with neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by resection or a regimen of chemoradiation alone. Kaplan-Meier curves were used to compare survival outcomes between groups and Cox proportional hazard models were used to evaluate treatment effects on survival, while adjusting for possible confounders. RESULTS Approximately one-fourth (n=33) of patients received neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by surgery, whereas 94 patients received definitive chemoradiation. Patients in the surgical group were found to be significantly younger than those receiving chemoradiation alone (60.1 vs. 67.9 years, respectively; p=0.001). Five-year survival among patients receiving preoperative chemotherapy followed by resection was significantly higher than that among patients receiving chemoradiation alone (63% vs. 19%, respectively; p<0.001), whereas the hazard ratio (HR) was 3-4 times greater in the latter group (HR=3.77, 95% confidence interval=1.87, 7.61). CONCLUSIONS Findings from this study indicate that preoperative chemotherapy followed by resection can improve survival outcomes for stage IIIA lung cancer patients compared with chemoradiation alone. The results reflect a select surgical group of patients; thus, the data highlight the need to develop new therapies that may result in more patients being viable surgical candidates.

  17. Erlotinib Hydrochloride With or Without Carboplatin and Paclitaxel in Treating Patients With Stage III-IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-04-04

    Adenosquamous Lung Carcinoma; Bronchioloalveolar Carcinoma; Lung Adenocarcinoma; Malignant Pericardial Effusion; Malignant Pleural Effusion; Stage IIIB Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

  18. Identification of 42 Genes Linked to Stage II Colorectal Cancer Metastatic Relapse

    PubMed Central

    Al-Temaimi, Rabeah A.; Tan, Tuan Zea; Marafie, Makia J.; Thiery, Jean Paul; Quirke, Philip; Al-Mulla, Fahd

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the leading causes of cancer mortality. Metastasis remains the primary cause of CRC death. Predicting the possibility of metastatic relapse in early-stage CRC is of paramount importance to target therapy for patients who really need it and spare those with low-potential of metastasis. Ninety-six stage II CRC cases were stratified using high-resolution array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) data based on a predictive survival algorithm and supervised clustering. All genes included within the resultant copy number aberrations were each interrogated independently at mRNA level using CRC expression datasets available from public repositories, which included 1820 colon cancers, and 167 normal colon tissues. Reduced mRNA expression driven by copy number losses and increased expression driven by copy number gains revealed 42 altered transcripts (29 reduced and 13 increased transcripts) associated with metastatic relapse, short disease-free or overall survival, and/or epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT). Resultant genes were classified based on gene ontology (GO), which identified four functional enrichment groups involved in growth regulation, genomic integrity, metabolism, and signal transduction pathways. The identified 42 genes may be useful for predicting metastatic relapse in stage II CRC. Further studies are necessary to validate these findings. PMID:27136531

  19. The Significance of the Prognostic Nutritional Index for All Stages of Pancreatic Cancer.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang Hoon; Chung, Moon Jae; Kim, Bun; Lee, Hee Seung; Lee, Hyun Jik; Heo, Ja Yoon; Kim, Yeong Jin; Park, Jeong Youp; Bang, Seungmin; Park, Seung Woo; Song, Si Young; Chung, Jae Bock

    2017-04-01

    Nutritional status affects the prognosis of various tumors. The prognostic nutritional index (PNI) is the known predictor of postoperative outcome in resectable pancreatic cancer patients. This study aimed to validate the prognostic value of PNI in all stages of pancreatic cancer. We retrospectively reviewed 499 patients with pancreatic cancer who were diagnosed at Severance Hospital between January 2006 and December 2011. The PNI value was calculated as 10 × serum albumin (g/dL) + 0.005 × total lymphocyte count (/mm(3)) at initial diagnosis. The median patient age was 62 yr, and 289 were men. The study group comprised resectable disease (n = 121), locally advanced disease (n = 118), and metastatic disease (n = 260). Univariate and multivariate analysis revealed that PNI ≤ 49.5 at initial diagnosis, together with performance status, platelet count, and clinical stage, was significantly associated with overall survival (hazard ratio, 1.562; all P < 0.05). Patients with PNI ≤ 49.5 (n = 208) had shorter median overall survival compared to patients with high PNI (9.8 vs. 14.2 mo; log rank, P < 0.001). In clinical stage subgroup analysis, initial PNI ≤49.5 independently predicted shorter overall survival, especially in resectable and metastatic disease (P = 0.041, P = 0.002, respectively).

  20. Clinical investigation into the initial diagnosis and treatment of 539 patients with stage IV lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Qian; Liu, Shanshan; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Yingjie; Li, Fengxiang; Li, Jianbin

    2017-01-01

    Objective The aim of the study was to analyze clinical data, including the types of pathologic classification, metastatic organs, treatment strategy, and prognosis of patients with stage IV lung cancer. Methods A retrospective analysis of the clinical features of 539 patients with stage IV lung cancer who were initially diagnosed and treated in 2009 was conducted. There were 146 cases of single organ metastases and 393 cases of multiple organ metastases. The Kaplan-Meier method and multivariate Cox regression analysis were performed to analyze the influence of age, pathological classification, metastatic organs, and treatment strategy on overall survival. Results The 1-, 2-, and 3-year survival rates were 64.2% (n=346), 19.7% (n=106), and 1.5% (n=8), respectively. Metastases to the liver and pleura predicted poor prognosis, although bone metastases predicted relatively good prognosis. The prognosis of single brain metastasis was relatively better than that of multiple brain metastases. Multi-factor analysis showed that the patient’s age, different metastatic organs, the numbers of metastatic organs, and different treatment were independent risk factors for survival. Conclusion The prognosis for patients with stage IV lung cancer is poor. Patient’s age, the type and number of metastatic organs, and method of treatment are the main factors affecting survival. PMID:28203086

  1. Efficacy of docetaxel combined with oxaliplatin and fluorouracil against stage III/IV gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yao-Jun; Sun, Wei-Jian; Lu, Ming-Dong; Wang, Fei-Hai; Qi, Dan-Si; Zhang, Yi; Li, Pi-Hong; Huang, He; You, Tao; Zheng, Zhi-Qiang

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the clinical efficacy and toxic effects of neoadjuvant chemotherapy using docetaxel combined with oxaliplatin and fluorouracil for treating stage III/IV gastric cancer. METHODS: A total of 53 stage III/IV gastric cancer patients were enrolled into the study and treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Two of the cases were excluded. The program was as follows: 75 mg/m2 docetaxel and 85 mg/m2 oxaliplatin on day 1 and 1500 mg/m2 fluorouracil on days 1 to 3 for three weeks. RESULTS: The tumour changes, postoperative remission rate, changes in the symptoms and adverse reactions were observed. The overall clinical efficacy (complete remission + partial remission) of the neoadjuvant chemotherapy was 62.7%. R0 radical resection was performed on 60.8% of the patients, with a remission rate (pathological complete response + pathological subtotal response + pathological partial response) of 74.2%. The Karnofksy score improved in 42 cases. The toxicity reactions mostly included myelosuppression, followed by gastrointestinal mucosal lesions, nausea, vomiting and diarrhoea. CONCLUSION: Neoadjuvant chemotherapy consisting of docetaxel combined with oxaliplatin and fluorouracil is effective for stage III/IV gastric cancer. However, the treatment is associated with a high incidence of bone marrow suppression, which should be managed clinically. PMID:25561810

  2. Risk Stratification in Differentiated Thyroid Cancer: An Ongoing Process.

    PubMed

    Omry-Orbach, Gal

    2016-01-28

    Thyroid cancer is an increasingly common malignancy, with a rapidly rising prevalence worldwide. The social and economic ramifications of the increase in thyroid cancer are multiple. Though mortality from thyroid cancer is low, and most patients will do well, the risk of recurrence is not insignificant, up to 30%. Therefore, it is important to accurately identify those patients who are more or less likely to be burdened by their disease over years and tailor their treatment plan accordingly. The goal of risk stratification is to do just that. The risk stratification process generally starts postoperatively with histopathologic staging, based on the AJCC/UICC staging system as well as others designed to predict mortality. These do not, however, accurately assess the risk of recurrence/persistence. Patients initially considered to be at high risk may ultimately do very well yet be burdened by frequent unnecessary monitoring. Conversely, patients initially thought to be low risk, may not respond to their initial treatment as expected and, if left unmonitored, may have higher morbidity. The concept of risk-adaptive management has been adopted, with an understanding that risk stratification for differentiated thyroid cancer is dynamic and ongoing. A multitude of variables not included in AJCC/UICC staging are used initially to classify patients as low, intermediate, or high risk for recurrence. Over the course of time, a response-to-therapy variable is incorporated, and patients essentially undergo continuous risk stratification. Additional tools such as biochemical markers, genetic mutations, and molecular markers have been added to this complex risk stratification process such that this is essentially a continuum of risk. In recent years, additional considerations have been discussed with a suggestion of pre-operative risk stratification based on certain clinical and/or biologic characteristics. With the increasing prevalence of thyroid cancer but stable mortality

  3. Stage-specific embryonic antigen: determining expression in canine glioblastoma, melanoma, and mammary cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Daisuke

    2017-01-01

    The expression of stage-specific embryonic antigens (SSEAs) was determined in several types of canine cancer cells. Flow cytometry showed SSEA-1 expression in glioblastoma, melanoma, and mammary cancer cells, although none expressed SSEA-3 or SSEA-4. Expression of SSEA-1 was not detected in lymphoma, osteosarcoma, or hemangiosarcoma cell lines. Relatively stable SSEA-1 expression was observed between 24 and 72 h of culture. After 8 days in culture, sorted SSEA-1− and SSEA-1+ cells re-established SSEA-1 expression to levels comparable to those observed in unsorted cells. Our results document, for the first time, the expression of SSEA-1 in several canine cancer cell lines. PMID:27456773

  4. Early Stage Breast Cancer Treatments for Younger Medicare Beneficiaries with Different Disabilities

    PubMed Central

    Iezzoni, Lisa I; Ngo, Long H; Li, Donglin; Roetzheim, Richard G; Drews, Reed E; McCarthy, Ellen P

    2008-01-01

    Objective To explore how underlying disability affects treatments and outcomes of disabled women with breast cancer. Data Sources Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results program data, linked with Medicare files and Social Security Administration disability group. Study Design Ninety thousand two hundred and forty-three incident cases of early-stage breast cancer under age 65; adjusted relative risks and hazards ratios examined treatments and survival, respectively, for women in four disability groups compared with nondisabled women. Principal Findings Demographic characteristics, treatments, and survival varied among four disability groups. Compared with nondisabled women, those with mental disorders and neurological conditions had significantly lower adjusted rates of breast conserving surgery and radiation therapy. Survival outcomes also varied by disability type. Conclusions Compared with nondisabled women, certain subgroups of women with disabilities are especially likely to experience disparities in care for breast cancer. PMID:18479411

  5. Application of immuno-PCR for the detection of early stage cancer.

    PubMed

    Khan, Amjad Hayat; Sadroddiny, Esmaeil

    2016-04-01

    Cancer detection in premalignant stage is directly related with increase survival rate. Several biomarkers have been investigated and characterized for monitoring changes inside the cancerous cells. Although enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) is the method of choice in clinical practice for detecting biomarkers in serum/urine samples. However, in certain malignancies the amount of biomarkers before reaching metastasis are too low to be detected by conventional ELISA. The seminal work of Sano et al. led to the development of highly sensitive and powerful detection method, the immuno-PCR (iPCR), which can detect very small amount of antigens/biomarkers. In spite of, several publications on iPCR sensitivity, it has not been recommended for clinical use and is limited to the scientific community only. In order to evaluate the importance of iPCR, we have made an effort to collect published studies, supporting the use of iPCR in detecting premalignant cancer.

  6. Improving pancreatic cancer diagnosis using circulating tumor cells: prospects for staging and single-cell analysis

    PubMed Central

    Court, Colin M; Ankeny, Jacob S; Hou, Shuang; Tseng, Hsian-Rong; Tomlinson, James S

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) is the fourth most common cause of cancer-related death in the USA, primarily due to late presentation coupled with an aggressive biology. The lack of adequate biomarkers for diagnosis and staging confound clinical decision-making and delay potentially effective therapies. Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are a promising new biomarker in PC. Preliminary studies have demonstrated their potential clinical utility, and newer CTC isolation platforms have the potential to provide clinicians access to tumor tissue in a reliable, real-time manner. Such a ‘liquid biopsy’ has been demonstrated in several cancers, and small studies have demonstrated its potential applications in PC. This article reviews the available literature on CTCs as a biomarker in PC and presents the latest innovations in CTC research as well as their potential applications in PC. PMID:26390158

  7. Impact of cancer, type, site, stage and treatment on the nutritional status of patients

    SciTech Connect

    Bozzeti, F.

    1982-08-01

    This study analyzed the nutritional status of cancer patients in relation to type and site of origin of the tumor, stage of disease, and previous chemical or radiation therapy. The analysis was performed on 321 patients (280 with cancer and 41 controls). The nutritional parameters included per cent of weight loss, anthropometric indices (arm circumference, triceps skinfold, arm muscle circumference), creatinine-height index, serum protein, albumin, total iron binding capacity and cholinesterase, C/sub 3/ and C/sub 4/ components of complement, total peripheral lymphocytes, and skin tests. The statistical comparison between patients with different tumors and controls, between patients treated with or without previous chemical or radiation therapy led to the following conclusions: (1) malnutrition is mainly related to the type and site of origin of the tumor and, in the early stages of disease, is more pronounced in patients with cancer of the esophagus and stomach; (2) except in patients with breast and cervix cancer, malnutrition gets more severe as the disease becomes advanced; (3) chemical or radiation therapy has a variable impact on the nutritional status, but in selected patients it causes a drop in body weight, arm circumference, arm muscle circumference, and peripheral lymphocytes; (4) body weight, cutaneous delayed hypersensitivity and serum albumin are the most commonly altered parameters.

  8. Time Course of Mild Arm Lymphedema After Breast Conservation Treatment for Early-Stage Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Bar Ad, Voichita; Cheville, Andrea; Solin, Lawrence J.; Dutta, Pinaki; Both, Stefan; Harris, Eleanor

    2010-01-15

    Purpose: Arm lymphedema is a potential consequence of the treatment for breast carcinoma. The objective of this retrospective study was to characterize the progression of mild arm lymphedema after breast conservation treatment for breast cancer. Methods and Materials: The study cohort was drawn from 1,713 consecutive Stage I or II breast cancer patients who underwent breast conservation therapy, including axillary staging followed by radiation. Arm lymphedema was documented in 266 (16%) of 1,713 patients. One hundred nine patients, 6% of the overall group and 40% of the patients with arm lymphedema, presented with mild arm lymphedema, defined as a difference of 2 cm or less between the measured circumferences of the affected and unaffected arms. Results: Among the 109 patients with mild arm lymphedema at the time of arm lymphedema diagnosis, the rate of freedom from progression to more severe lymphedema was 79% at 1 year, 66% at 3 years, and 52% at 5 years. The patients who were morbidly obese, had positive axillary lymph nodes, or received supraclavicular irradiation at the time of breast cancer treatment were at higher risk of progression from mild arm lymphedema to more severe edema. Conclusions: Mild arm lymphedema, generally considered to be a minor complication after breast conservation treatment for breast cancer, was associated with a risk of progression to a more severe grade of arm lymphedema in a substantial fraction of patients.

  9. Therapeutic management options for stage III non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Stephanie M; Shaikh, Talha; Hallman, Mark

    2017-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death worldwide. Majority of newly diagnosed lung cancers are non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), of which up to half are considered locally advanced at the time of diagnosis. Patients with locally advanced stage III NSCLC consists of a heterogeneous population, making management for these patients complex. Surgery has long been the preferred local treatment for patients with resectable disease. For select patients, multi-modality therapy involving systemic and radiation therapies in addition to surgery improves treatment outcomes compared to surgery alone. For patients with unresectable disease, concurrent chemoradiation is the preferred treatment. More recently, research into different chemotherapy agents, targeted therapies, radiation fractionation schedules, intensity-modulated radiotherapy, and proton therapy have shown promise to improve treatment outcomes and quality of life. The array of treatment approaches for locally advanced NSCLC is large and constantly evolving. An updated review of past and current literature for the roles of surgery, chemotherapeutic agents, radiation therapy, and targeted therapy for stage III NSCLC patients are presented. PMID:28246582

  10. Modified docetaxel, cisplatin and capecitabine for stage IV gastric cancer in Japanese patients: A feasibility study

    PubMed Central

    Maeda, Osamu; Matsuoka, Ayumu; Miyahara, Ryoji; Funasaka, Kohei; Hirooka, Yoshiki; Fukaya, Masahide; Nagino, Masato; Kodera, Yasuhiro; Goto, Hidemi; Ando, Yuichi

    2017-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the feasibility of chemotherapy including fluoropyrimidine, platinum and taxane with modified dosages for unresectable gastric cancer in Japanese patients. METHODS We performed a feasibility study of a modified docetaxel, cisplatin and capecitabine (DCX) regimen for stage IV gastric cancer. In particular, 30 or 40 mg/m2 of docetaxel on day 1, 60 mg/m2 of cisplatin on day 1, and 2000 mg/m2 of capecitabine for 2 wk were administered every three weeks. RESULTS Three patients were treated with modified DCX (mDCX) with 30 mg/m2 docetaxel, and five patients were treated with this regimen with 40 mg/m2 docetaxel. Grade 3 or 4 neutropenia was observed in six of the eight patients; no patients exhibited febrile neutropenia. Partial response was achieved in four of the eight patients. Three patients underwent gastrectomy, which achieved R0 resection without residual tumors in dissected lymph nodes. In one of these three patients, resected specimens revealed pathological complete response in the primary lesion and in lymph nodes. CONCLUSION mDCX was well tolerated by Japanese patients with stage IV gastric cancer. This regimen might be useful for allowing gastric cancer patients with distant lymph node metastasis to undergo conversion surgery. PMID:28246483

  11. Survival of patients with colorectal cancer in Austria by sex, age, and stage.

    PubMed

    Haidinger, Gerald; Waldhoer, Thomas; Hackl, Monika; Vutuc, Christian

    2006-10-01

    This paper for the first time presents Austrian data on survival of patients, diagnosed from 1998 through 2002, with colon cancer and with rectal cancer. Cumulative relative survival rates were calculated by age, standardized for all ages and stages combined, and by age groups (< 50 years, 50-64 years, and =65 years) according to stages (localized, regional metastases and distant metastases). In carcinoma of the colon 5-year relative survival was 66 % in males and 64 % in females. In carcinoma of the rectum 5-year relative survival was 64 % in males and 67 % in females. Compared to the earlier results from the Tyrol (based on patients diagnosed from 1990 through 1994) the 5-year survival of patients with colon cancer increased from 55 % to 66 % in males and from 58 % to 64 % in females. In patients with rectal cancer 5-year survival increased from 44 % to 64 % in males and from 46 % to 67 % in females. This increase in part can be explained by a positive effect of early detection and of better treatment.

  12. Using Computer-extracted Image Phenotypes from Tumors on Breast MRI to Predict Breast Cancer Pathologic Stage

    PubMed Central

    Burnside, Elizabeth S.; Drukker, Karen; Li, Hui; Bonaccio, Ermelinda; Zuley, Margarita; Ganott, Marie; Net, Jose M.; Sutton, Elizabeth; Brandt, Kathleen R.; Whitman, Gary; Conzen, Suzanne; Lan, Li; Ji, Yuan; Zhu, Yitan; Jaffe, Carl; Huang, Erich; Freymann, John; Kirby, Justin; Morris, Elizabeth; Giger, Maryellen

    2015-01-01

    Background To demonstrate that computer-extracted image phenotypes (CEIPs) of biopsy-proven breast cancer on MRI can accurately predict pathologic stage. Methods We used a dataset of de-identified breast MRIs organized by the National Cancer Institute in The Cancer Imaging Archive. We analyzed 91 biopsy-proven breast cancer cases with pathologic stage (stage I = 22; stage II = 58; stage III = 11) and surgically proven nodal status (negative nodes = 46, ≥ 1 positive node = 44, no nodes examined = 1). We characterized tumors by (a) radiologist measured size, and (b) CEIP. We built models combining two CEIPs to predict tumor pathologic stage and lymph node involvement, evaluated them in leave-one-out cross-validation with area under the ROC curve (AUC) as figure of merit. Results Tumor size was the most powerful predictor of pathologic stage but CEIPs capturing biologic behavior also emerged as predictive (e.g. stage I+II vs. III demonstrated AUC = 0.83). No size measure was successful in the prediction of positive lymph nodes but adding a CEIP describing tumor “homogeneity,” significantly improved this discrimination (AUC = 0.62, p=.003) over chance. Conclusions Our results indicate that MRI phenotypes show promise for predicting breast cancer pathologic stage and lymph node status. PMID:26619259

  13. Flexitouch® Home Maintenance Therapy or Standard Home Maintenance Therapy in Treating Patients With Lower-Extremity Lymphedema Caused by Treatment for Cervical Cancer, Vulvar Cancer, or Endometrial Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-29

    Lymphedema; Stage 0 Cervical Cancer; Stage 0 Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage 0 Vulvar Cancer; Stage I Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage I Vulvar Cancer; Stage IA Cervical Cancer; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage II Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage II Vulvar Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage III Cervical Cancer; Stage III Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage III Vulvar Cancer; Stage IV Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer; Stage IVB Cervical Cancer; Stage IVB Vulvar Cancer

  14. Circulating micro-RNA expression profiles in early stage nonsmall cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Heegaard, Niels H H; Schetter, Aaron J; Welsh, Judith A; Yoneda, Mitsuhiro; Bowman, Elise D; Harris, Curtis C

    2012-03-15

    Circulating micro-RNA (miR) profiles have been proposed as promising diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers for cancer, including lung cancer. We have developed methods to accurately and reproducibly measure micro-RNA levels in serum and plasma. Here, we study paired serum and plasma samples from 220 patients with early stage nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and 220 matched controls. We use qRT-PCR to measure the circulating levels of 30 different miRs that have previously been reported to be differently expressed in lung cancer tissue. Duplicate RNA extractions were performed for 10% of all samples, and micro-RNA measurements were highly correlated among those duplicates. This demonstrates high reproducibility of our assay. The expressions of miR-146b, miR-221, let-7a, miR-155, miR-17-5p, miR-27a and miR-106a were significantly reduced in the serum of NSCLC cases, while miR-29c was significantly increased. No significant differences were observed in plasma of patients compared with controls. Overall, expression levels in serum did not correlate well with levels in plasma. In secondary analyses, reduced plasma expression of let-7b was modestly associated with worse cancer-specific mortality in all patients, and reduced serum expression of miR-223 was modestly associated with cancer-specific mortality in stage IA/B patients. MiR profiles also showed considerable differences comparing African American and European Americans. In summary, we found significant differences in miR expression when comparing cases and controls and find evidence that expression of let-7b is associated with prognosis in NSCLC.

  15. SIRT1 induces tumor invasion by targeting epithelial mesenchymal transition-related pathway and is a prognostic marker in triple negative breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Jin, Min-Sun; Hyun, Chang Lim; Park, In Ae; Kim, Ji Young; Chung, Yul Ri; Im, Seock-Ah; Lee, Kyung-Hun; Moon, Hyeong-Gon; Ryu, Han Suk

    2016-04-01

    Absence of therapeutic targets poses a critical hurdle in improving prognosis for patients with triple negative breast cancer (TNBC). We evaluated interaction between SIRT1 and epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT)-associated proteins as well as the role of combined protein expression as a predictor of lymph node metastasis and clinical outcome in TNBC through in vivo and vitro studies. Three hundred nineteen patients diagnosed with TNBC were chosen, immunohistochemical staining for SIRT1 and EMT-related markers' expression was performed on tissue microarrays, and in vitro experiments with each of the three human TNBC cell lines were carried out. The cohort was reclassified according to the use of adjuvant chemotherapy, tumor size, and AJCC stage to analyze the prognostic role of SIRT1 and EMT-related proteins' expression considering different therapeutic modalities and AJCC stages. Combination of four proteins including SIRT1 and three EMT-related proteins was revealed to be a statistically significant independent predictor of lymph node metastasis in the tumor size cohort as well as in the total patient population. Upon Cox regression analysis, increased expression level of the combined proteins correlated with decreased disease-free survival in the total patients as well as those who received adjuvant chemotherapy and those who had early stage breast cancer. In additional in vitro experiments, inhibition of SIRT1 expression with small interfering RNA (siRNA) suppressed tumor invasion in three different TNBC cell lines, and altered expression levels of EMT-related proteins following SIRT1 gene inhibition were identified on western blotting and fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS) analysis; on the other hand, no change in expression levels of the cell cycle-related factors was observed. Our analysis showed the potential role of SIRT1 in association with EMT-related factors on tumor invasion, metastasis, and disease-free survival in TNBC, SIRT1, and

  16. Exome analysis reveals differentially mutated gene signatures of stage, grade and subtype in breast cancers.

    PubMed

    Li, You; Wang, Xiaosheng; Vural, Suleyman; Mishra, Nitish K; Cowan, Kenneth H; Guda, Chittibabu

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancers exhibit highly heterogeneous molecular profiles. Although gene expression profiles have been used to predict the risks and prognostic outcomes of breast cancers, the high variability of gene expression limits its clinical application. In contrast, genetic mutation profiles would be more advantageous than gene expression profiles because genetic mutations can be stably detected and the mutational heterogeneity widely exists in breast cancer genomes. We analyzed 98 breast cancer whole exome samples that were sorted into three subtypes, two grades and two stages. The sum deleterious effect of all mutations in each gene was scored to identify differentially mutated genes (DMGs) for this case-control study. DMGs were corroborated using extensive published knowledge. Functional consequences of deleterious SNVs on protein structure and function were also investigated. Genes such as ERBB2, ESP8, PPP2R4, KIAA0922, SP4, CENPJ, PRCP and SELP that have been experimentally or clinically verified to be tightly associated with breast cancer prognosis are among the DMGs identified in this study. We also identified some genes such as ARL6IP5, RAET1E, and ANO7 that could be crucial for breast cancer development and prognosis. Further, SNVs such as rs1058808, rs2480452, rs61751507, rs79167802, rs11540666, and rs2229437 that potentially influence protein functions are observed at significantly different frequencies in different comparison groups. Protein structure modeling revealed that many non-synonymous SNVs have a deleterious effect on protein stability, structure and function. Mutational profiling at gene- and SNV-level revealed differential patterns within each breast cancer comparison group, and the gene signatures correlate with expected prognostic characteristics of breast cancer classes. Some of the genes and SNVs identified in this study show high promise and are worthy of further investigation by experimental studies.

  17. Exome Analysis Reveals Differentially Mutated Gene Signatures of Stage, Grade and Subtype in Breast Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Li, You; Wang, Xiaosheng; Vural, Suleyman; Mishra, Nitish K.; Cowan, Kenneth H.; Guda, Chittibabu

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancers exhibit highly heterogeneous molecular profiles. Although gene expression profiles have been used to predict the risks and prognostic outcomes of breast cancers, the high variability of gene expression limits its clinical application. In contrast, genetic mutation profiles would be more advantageous than gene expression profiles because genetic mutations can be stably detected and the mutational heterogeneity widely exists in breast cancer genomes. We analyzed 98 breast cancer whole exome samples that were sorted into three subtypes, two grades and two stages. The sum deleterious effect of all mutations in each gene was scored to identify differentially mutated genes (DMGs) for this case-control study. DMGs were corroborated using extensive published knowledge. Functional consequences of deleterious SNVs on protein structure and function were also investigated. Genes such as ERBB2, ESP8, PPP2R4, KIAA0922, SP4, CENPJ, PRCP and SELP that have been experimentally or clinically verified to be tightly associated with breast cancer prognosis are among the DMGs identified in this study. We also identified some genes such as ARL6IP5, RAET1E, and ANO7 that could be crucial for breast cancer development and prognosis. Further, SNVs such as rs1058808, rs2480452, rs61751507, rs79167802, rs11540666, and rs2229437 that potentially influence protein functions are observed at significantly different frequencies in different comparison groups. Protein structure modeling revealed that many non-synonymous SNVs have a deleterious effect on protein stability, structure and function. Mutational profiling at gene- and SNV-level revealed differential patterns within each breast cancer comparison group, and the gene signatures correlate with expected prognostic characteristics of breast cancer classes. Some of the genes and SNVs identified in this study show high promise and are worthy of further investigation by experimental studies. PMID:25803781

  18. Gold nanoparticle-enabled blood test for early stage cancer detection and risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Tianyu; Pierre-Pierre, Nickisha; Yan, Xin; Huo, Qun; Almodovar, Alvin J O; Valerio, Felipe; Rivera-Ramirez, Inoel; Griffith, Elizabeth; Decker, David D; Chen, Sixue; Zhu, Ning

    2015-04-01

    When citrate ligands-capped gold nanoparticles are mixed with blood sera, a protein corona is formed on the nanoparticle surface due to the adsorption of various proteins in the blood to the nanoparticles. Using a two-step gold nanoparticle-enabled dynamic light scattering assay, we discovered that the amount of human immunoglobulin G (IgG) in the gold nanoparticle protein corona is increased in prostate cancer patients compared to noncancer controls. Two pilot studies conducted on blood serum samples collected at Florida Hospital and obtained from Prostate Cancer Biorespository Network (PCBN) revealed that the test has a 90-95% specificity and 50% sensitivity in detecting early stage prostate cancer, representing a significant improvement over the current PSA test. The increased amount of human IgG found in the protein corona is believed to be associated with the autoantibodies produced in cancer patients as part of the immunodefense against tumor. Proteomic analysis of the nanoparticle protein corona revealed molecular profile differences between cancer and noncancer serum samples. Autoantibodies and natural antibodies produced in cancer patients in response to tumorigenesis have been found and detected in the blood of many cancer types. The test may be applicable for early detection and risk assessment of a broad spectrum of cancer. This new blood test is simple, low cost, requires only a few drops of blood sample, and the results are obtained within minutes. The test is well suited for screening purpose. More extensive studies are being conducted to further evaluate and validate the clinical potential of the new test.

  19. Treatment of early stage breast cancer by limited surgery and radical irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, A.M.; Cope, O.; Russo, R.; Wang, C.C.; Schulz, M.D.; Wang, C.; Rodkey, G.

    1980-01-01

    Eighty-five female patients with early stage breast cancer, i.e., Stage I and II were treated by limited surgery followed by radical radiation therapy at Massachusetts General Hospital between January, 1956 and December, 1974. Patients included those who were medically inoperable or who refused mastectomy. The 5-year survival rate was 83% and 76% for Stage I and II, respectively. The corresponding disease free survival (absolute) was 67% and 42%. Although the number of patients so treated is small, there was no significant difference in survival from the results of the radical mastectomy series at the same institution. No major complications were encountered. Seventeen of eighty-five patients developed minor problems; mostly fibrosis and minimal arm lymphedema stemmming from older orthovoltage equipment and treatment techniques. With the current availability of megavoltage equipment, improvements in techniques and dosimetry, complications should decrease. Combined limited surgery and radical radiation therapy should be considered in those patients where a radical mastectomy is not feasible because of psychological or medical problems. Since this procedure results in a cosmetically acceptable breast, radical radiation in early stage breast cancer seems a reasonable alternative to radical mastectomy.

  20. Low Level of Microsatellite Instability Correlates with Poor Clinical Prognosis in Stage II Colorectal Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Mojarad, Ehsan Nazemalhosseini; Kashfi, Seyed Mohammad Hossein; Mirtalebi, Hanieh; Taleghani, Mohammad Yaghoob; Azimzadeh, Pedram; Savabkar, Sanaz; Pourhoseingholi, Mohammad Amin; Jalaeikhoo, Hasan; Asadzadeh Aghdaei, Hamid; Kuppen, Peter J. K.; Zali, Mohammad Reza

    2016-01-01

    The influence of microsatellite instability (MSI) on the prognosis of colorectal cancer (CRC) requires more investigation. We assessed the role of MSI status in survival of individuals diagnosed with primary colorectal cancer. In this retrospective cross-sectional study the MSI status was determined in 158 formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tumors and their matched normal tissues from patients who underwent curative surgery. Cox proportional hazard modeling was performed to assess the clinical prognostic significance. In this study we found that MSI-H tumors were predominantly located in the colon versus rectum (p = 0.03), associated with poorer differentiation (p = 0.003) and TNM stage II/III of tumors (p = 0.02). In CRC patients with stage II, MSI-L cases showed significantly poorer survival compared with patients who had MSI-H or MSS tumors (p = 0.04). This study indicates that MSI-L tumors correlate with poorer clinical outcome in patients with stage II tumors (p = 0.04) or in tumors located in the colon (p = 0.02). MSI-L characterizes a distinct subgroup of CRC patients who have a poorer outcome. This study suggests that MSI status in CRC, as a clinical prognostic marker, is dependent on other factors, such as tumor stage and location. PMID:27429617

  1. Evaluating the stage of change model to a cervical cancer screening intervention among Ohio Appalachian women.

    PubMed

    Krok-Schoen, Jessica L; Oliveri, Jill M; Young, Gregory S; Katz, Mira L; Tatum, Cathy M; Paskett, Electra D

    2016-01-01

    Cervical cancer incidence and mortality rates are disproportionally high among women living in Appalachia Ohio. This study used the Transtheoretical Model to examine screening barriers before and after a lay health advisor (LHA) intervention (2005-2009) to increase cervical cancer screening rates. Ohio Appalachian women (n = 90) who were in need of a Pap test, based on risk-appropriate guidelines, were randomized to a 10-month LHA intervention and received two in-person visits, two phone calls, and four mailed postcards targeted to the participant's stage of change. Findings revealed that 63% had forward stage movement 10 months after the intervention. The most frequently reported screening barriers were time constraints, forgetting to make an appointment, and cost. Women who reported the following barriers-doctor not recommending the test; being unable to afford the test; and being embarrassed, nervous, or afraid of getting a Pap test-were less likely to be in the action stage. Understanding the stages of change related to Pap testing and reported barriers among this underserved population may help inform researchers and clinicians of this population's readiness for change and how to set realistic intervention goals.

  2. Imatinib Mesylate in Treating Patients With Progressive, Refractory, or Recurrent Stage II or Stage III Testicular or Ovarian Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-15

    Ovarian Dysgerminoma; Recurrent Malignant Testicular Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage II Malignant Testicular Germ Cell Tumor; Stage II Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage III Malignant Testicular Germ Cell Tumor; Stage III Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Testicular Seminoma

  3. [Cervical cancer staging - preoperative assessment of tumor extent (a review of the most recent ultrasound studies)].

    PubMed

    Fischerová, D

    2014-12-01

    For treatment planning of cervical cancer it is necessary preoperatively to determine the presence and size of residual tumour after the biopsy, the tumour topography within the cervix and the parametrial and lymph node status. According to current data, ultrasound is comparably accurate with magnetic resonance imaging in view of tumour presence and local extent assessment. Ultrasound, if compared with the magnetic resonance imaging, does not have known contraindications and it is a broadly available diagnostic test. Currently no advanced imaging technique exists that can reliably detect infiltrated lymph nodes in the clinically early stage of the disease, as it often manifests as micrometastatic involvement in non-enlarged lymph nodes. The sensitivity of lymph node detection using ultrasound in the early stage is around 40%, but the specificity is high (96%). For daily practice, this means that a negative ultrasound finding should be always verified by surgical staging based on systematic lymphadenectomy, while positive ultrasound finding usually changes the treatment strategy.

  4. Gastric Cancer in Young Patients

    PubMed Central

    Dhobi, Manzoor A.; Wani, Khursheed Alam; Parray, Fazl Qadir; Wani, Rouf A.; Peer, G. Q.; Abdullah, Safiya; Wani, Imtiyaz A.; Wani, Muneer A.; Shah, Mubashir A.; Thakur, Natasha

    2013-01-01

    Aim. The aim of this study was to see the clinical, pathological, and demographic profile of young patients with stomach carcinoma besides association with p53. Patients and Methods. Prospective study of young patients with stomach carcinoma from January 2005 to December 2009. A total of 50 patients with age less than 40 years were studied. Results. Male female ratio was 1 : 1.08 in young patients and 2.5 : 1 in older patients. A positive family history of stomach cancer in the first degree relatives was present in 10% of young patients. Resection was possible only in 50% young patients. 26% young patients underwent only palliative gastrojejunostomy. The most common operation was lower partial gastrectomy in 68%. Amongst the intraoperative findings peritoneal metastasis was seen in 17.4% in young patients. 50% young patients presented in stage IV as per AJCC classification (P value .004; sig.). None of the patients presented as stage 1 disease in young group. Conclusion. Early detection of stomach carcinoma is very important in all patients but in young patients it is of paramount importance. PMID:24381753

  5. Ropidoxuridine in Treating Patients With Advanced Gastrointestinal Cancer Undergoing Radiation Therapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-31

    Bile Duct Carcinoma; Stage III Colon Cancer; Stage III Esophageal Cancer; Stage III Gastric Cancer; Stage III Liver Cancer; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage III Rectal Cancer; Stage III Small Intestinal Cancer; Stage IIIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIIA Esophageal Cancer; Stage IIIA Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIA Small Intestinal Cancer; Stage IIIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIIB Esophageal Cancer; Stage IIIB Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Small Intestinal Cancer; Stage IIIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIIC Esophageal Cancer; Stage IIIC Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IV Colon Cancer; Stage IV Esophageal Cancer; Stage IV Gastric Cancer; Stage IV Liver Cancer; Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IV Rectal Cancer; Stage IV Small Intestinal Cancer; Stage IVA Colon Cancer; Stage IVA Esophageal Cancer; Stage IVA Liver Cancer; Stage IVA Rectal Cancer; Stage IVB Colon Cancer; Stage IVB Esophageal Cancer; Stage IVB Liver Cancer; Stage IVB Rectal Cancer

  6. Oncotype DX(®) colon cancer assay for prediction of recurrence risk in patients with stage II and III colon cancer: A review of the evidence.

    PubMed

    You, Y Nancy; Rustin, Rudolph B; Sullivan, James D

    2015-06-01

    Advances in molecular biology have enabled identification of tumor biomarkers that allow for individualized risk assessment for patients with cancer. Molecular predictors of clinical outcome can help inform discussion regarding the role of adjuvant chemotherapy in patients with resected colon cancer, such as those with stage II colon cancer in which the benefit of adjuvant therapy is controversial or those with stage III colon cancer who may have a lower risk of recurrence and less absolute benefit from oxaliplatin therapy. This article summarizes the data surrounding the development, validation, and clinical and economic utility of the Oncotype DX(®) colon cancer assay, a multigene expression assay validated to independently predict recurrence risk in patients with stage II and III colon cancer beyond traditional factors.

  7. Impact of Diabetes Status and Medication on Presentation, Treatment, and Outcome of Stage II Colon Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Susie; Wong, Hui-Li; Tie, Jeanne; Desai, Jayesh; Field, Kathryn; Kosmider, Suzanne; Fourlanos, Spiros; Jones, Ian; Skinner, Iain; Gibbs, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes is a risk factor for colorectal cancer and several reports suggest worse cancer-specific outcomes in diabetes patients. Recent studies in multiple tumour types indicate metformin may positively impact on cancer-specific and overall survival. A population-based series of stage II colorectal cancer patients treated and followed from 2000 to 2013 were analysed for baseline characteristics, treatment, and outcomes. 1116 patients with stage II colon cancer were identified, 55.5% were male and median age was 70.9 years (range 20.5–101.2). The diabetes patients (21.6%, n = 241) were older than nondiabetes patients (median 74.0 versus 69.6, p = 0.0001). There was no impact of diabetes on cancer presentation or pathology. Diabetes patients were less likely to receive adjuvant treatment (13.7 versus 24.8%, p = 0.002) but were equally likely to complete treatment (69.7 versus 67.7%, p = 1.00). Diabetes did not significantly impact cancer recurrence (HR = 1.07, 95% CI 0.71–1.63) or overall survival (HR = 1.23, 95% CI 0.88–1.72), adjusted for age. Diabetes medication did not impact cancer recurrence or survival. Cancer presentation and outcomes in diabetes patients are comparable to those of nondiabetes patients in those with stage II colon cancer. The effect of metformin merits further evaluation in patients with colon cancer. PMID:26074965

  8. Impact of Diabetes Status and Medication on Presentation, Treatment, and Outcome of Stage II Colon Cancer Patients.

    PubMed

    Bae, Susie; Wong, Hui-Li; Tie, Jeanne; Desai, Jayesh; Field, Kathryn; Kosmider, Suzanne; Fourlanos, Spiros; Jones, Ian; Skinner, Iain; Gibbs, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes is a risk factor for colorectal cancer and several reports suggest worse cancer-specific outcomes in diabetes patients. Recent studies in multiple tumour types indicate metformin may positively impact on cancer-specific and overall survival. A population-based series of stage II colorectal cancer patients treated and followed from 2000 to 2013 were analysed for baseline characteristics, treatment, and outcomes. 1116 patients with stage II colon cancer were identified, 55.5% were male and median age was 70.9 years (range 20.5-101.2). The diabetes patients (21.6%, n = 241) were older than nondiabetes patients (median 74.0 versus 69.6, p = 0.0001). There was no impact of diabetes on cancer presentation or pathology. Diabetes patients were less likely to receive adjuvant treatment (13.7 versus 24.8%, p = 0.002) but were equally likely to complete treatment (69.7 versus 67.7%, p = 1.00). Diabetes did not significantly impact cancer recurrence (HR = 1.07, 95% CI 0.71-1.63) or overall survival (HR = 1.23, 95% CI 0.88-1.72), adjusted for age. Diabetes medication did not impact cancer recurrence or survival. Cancer presentation and outcomes in diabetes patients are comparable to those of nondiabetes patients in those with stage II colon cancer. The effect of metformin merits further evaluation in patients with colon cancer.

  9. Integrative Protein-Based Prognostic Model for Early Stage Endometrioid Endometrial Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ji-Yeon; Werner, Henrica M.J.; Li, Jie; Westin, Shannon N.; Lu, Yiling; Halle, Mari K.; Trovik, Jone; Salvesen, Helga B.; Mills, Gordon B.; Liang, Han

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Endometrioid endometrial carcinoma (EEC) is the major histological type of endometrial cancer, the most prevalent gynecologic malignancy in USA. EEC recurrence or metastasis is associated with a poor prognosis. Early-stage EEC is generally curable, but a subset has high risk of recurrence or metastasis. Prognosis estimation for early-stage EEC mainly relies on clinicopathological characteristics, but is unreliable. We aimed to identify patients with high-risk early-stage EEC who are most likely to benefit from more extensive surgery and adjuvant therapy by building a prognostic model that integrates clinical variables and protein markers. Experimental Design We employed two large, independent early-stage EEC datasets as training (n = 183) and validation cohorts (n = 333), and generated the levels of 186 proteins and phosphoproteins using reverse-phase protein arrays. By applying an initial filtering and the elastic net to the training samples, we developed a prognostic model for overall survival containing two clinical variables and 18 protein markers and optimized the risk group classification. Results Kaplan-Meier survival analyses in the validation cohort confirmed an improved discriminating power of our prognostic model for patients with early-stage EEC over key clinical variables (log-rank test p-value = 0.565 for disease stage, 0.567 for tumor grade, 1.3×10−4 for the integrative model). Compared with clinical variables (stage, grade, and patient age), only the risk groups defined by the integrative model were consistently significant in both univariate and multivariate analyses across both cohorts. Conclusions Our prognostic model is potentially of high clinical value for stratifying patients with early-stage EEC and improving their treatment strategies. PMID:26224872

  10. Nativity and Neighborhood Characteristics and Cervical Cancer Stage at Diagnosis and Survival Outcomes Among Hispanic Women in California

    PubMed Central

    Guendelman, Sylvia; Harley, Kim G.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. We examined stage of diagnosis and survival after cervical cancer among Hispanic women, and their associations with Hispanic nativity, and explored whether neighborhood socioeconomic status (SES) and residence in a Hispanic enclave modify the association of nativity with stage and survival. Methods. We used California Cancer Registry data (1994–2009) to identify 7958 Hispanic women aged 21 years and older with invasive cervical cancer. We used logistic and Cox proportional hazards models to estimate the associations between stage and mortality with nativity, neighborhood factors, and other covariates. Results. Foreign-born women had similar adjusted relative odds of being diagnosed with stages II through IV (vs stage I) cervical cancer compared with US-born Hispanic women. However, among foreign-born women, those in low-SES–low-enclave neighborhoods were more likely to have late-stage disease than those in high-SES–low-enclave neighborhoods (adjusted odds ratio = 1.91; 95% confidence interval = 1.18, 3.07). Foreign-born women had lower cervical cancer mortality (adjusted hazard ratio = 0.67; 95% confidence interval = 0.58, 0.76) than US-born women, but only in high enclaves. Conclusions. Among Hispanic women, nativity, neighborhood enclaves, and SES interact in their influence on stage and survival of cervical cancer. PMID:25602869

  11. The development and validation of a CT-based radiomics signature for the preoperative discrimination of stage I-II and stage III-IV colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    He, Lan; Chen, Xin; Ma, Zelan; Dong, Di; Tian, Jie; Liang, Changhong; Liu, Zaiyi

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To investigative the predictive ability of radiomics signature for preoperative staging (I-IIvs.III-IV) of primary colorectal cancer (CRC). Methods This study consisted of 494 consecutive patients (training dataset: n=286; validation cohort, n=208) with stage I–IV CRC. A radiomics signature was generated using LASSO logistic regression model. Association between radiomics signature and CRC staging was explored. The classification performance of the radiomics signature was explored with respect to the receiver operating characteristics(ROC) curve. Results The 16-feature-based radiomics signature was an independent predictor for staging of CRC, which could successfully categorize CRC into stage I-II and III-IV (p <0.0001) in training and validation dataset. The median of radiomics signature of stage III-IV was higher than stage I-II in the training and validation dataset. As for the classification performance of the radiomics signature in CRC staging, the AUC was 0.792(95%CI:0.741-0.853) with sensitivity of 0.629 and specificity of 0.874. The signature in the validation dataset obtained an AUC of 0.708(95%CI:0.698-0.718) with sensitivity of 0.611 and specificity of 0.680. Conclusions A radiomics signature was developed and validated to be a significant predictor for discrimination of stage I-II from III-IV CRC, which may serve as a complementary tool for the preoperative tumor staging in CRC. PMID:27120787

  12. Predictive Value of Stemness Factor Sox2 in Gastric Cancer Is Associated with Tumor Location and Stage

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Qian; Li, Ai-Qin; Jin, Peng; Wang, Xin; He, Yu-Qi; Li, Na; Cheng, Tao; Sheng, Jian-Qiu

    2017-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are thought to be the "root" of cancer. Although stemness-related factors ALDH1A1 and Sox2 have been used as markers to identify gastric CSCs, the expression pattern and significance of these factors in gastric cancer have not been sufficiently demonstrated. In this study, the expressions of ALDH1A1 and Sox2 were detected by immunohistochemistry in 122 gastric cancer specimens. And the correlation between Sox2 or ALDH1A1 expression and clinicopathological parameters and overall survival data were analyzed. The positive rate of ALDH1A1 expression was 60%, but there was no significant difference between survival rates of ALDH1A1-positive and ALDH1A1-negative patients. Sox2 was expressed in 42% of specimens and was associated with poor prognosis of patients (P = 0.015). Stratified analysis showed that Sox2 expression correlated with shorter lifespan only in patients with cardiac gastric cancers (P = 0.002) or stage I or II gastric cancers (P = 0.002); but not in patients with non-cardiac cancers (P = 0.556) or stage III or IV gastric cancers (P = 0.121). Analysis on a database cohort validated the correlation between Sox2 expression and poor prognosis in stage II cancer. Also, expression of Sox2 was associated with lymphnode metastasis in patients with cardiac gastric cancer (P = 0.037). A multivariate analysis revealed that Sox2 was an independent prognostic factor in cardiac gastric cancer. Our results indicate that predictive value of Sox2 in gastric cancer is associated with cardiac cancer location and with early cancer stages (I and II). PMID:28046028

  13. Trace elements and heavy metals in hair of stage III breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Benderli Cihan, Yasemin; Sözen, Selim; Oztürk Yıldırım, Sema

    2011-12-01

    This prospective study was designed to compare the hair levels of 36 elements in 52 patients with stage III breast cancer to those of an equal number of healthy individuals. Principal component and cluster analysis were used for source of identification and apportionment of heavy metals and trace elements in these two groups. A higher average level of iron was found in samples from patients while controls had higher levels of calcium. Both patients and controls had elevated levels of tin, magnesium, zinc, and sodium. Almost all element values in cancer patients showed higher dispersion and asymmetry than in healthy controls. Between the two groups, there were statistically significant differences in the concentrations of silver, arsenic, gold, boron, barium, beryllium, calcium, cadmium, cerium, cobalt, cesium, gadolinium, manganese, nickel, lead, antimony, scandium, selenium, and zinc (p < 0.05). Strong positive correlations were found between lead and gold (r = 0.785) in the cancer group and between palladium and cobalt (r = 0.945) in the healthy individuals. Our results show that there are distinct patterns of heavy metals and trace elements in the hair of breast cancer patients in comparison to healthy controls. These results could be of significance in the diagnosis of breast cancer.

  14. Coping with early stage breast cancer: examining the influence of personality traits and interpersonal closeness

    PubMed Central

    Saita, Emanuela; Acquati, Chiara; Kayser, Karen

    2015-01-01

    The study examines the influence of personality traits and close relationships on the coping style of women with breast cancer. A sample of 72 Italian patients receiving treatment for early stage breast cancer was recruited. Participants completed questionnaires measuring personality traits (Interpersonal Adaptation Questionnaire), interpersonal closeness (Inclusion of the Other in the Self Scale), and adjustment to cancer (Mini-Mental Adjustment to Cancer Scale). We hypothesized that diverse personality traits and degrees of closeness contribute to determine the coping styles shown by participants. Multiple regression analyses were conducted for each of the five coping styles (Helplessness/Hopelessness, Anxious Preoccupation, Avoidance, Fatalism, and Fighting Spirit) using personality traits and interpersonal closeness variables (Strength of Support Relations, and Number of Support Relations) as predictors. Women who rated high on assertiveness and social anxiety were more likely to utilize active coping strategies (Fighting Spirit). Perceived strength of relationships was predictive of using an active coping style while the number of supportive relationships did not correlate with any of the coping styles. Implications for assessment of breast cancer patients at risk for negative adaptation to the illness and the development of psychosocial interventions are discussed. PMID:25699003

  15. Contrasting breast cancer molecular subtypes across serial tumor progression stages: biological and prognostic implications

    PubMed Central

    Kimbung, Siker; Kovács, Anikó; Danielsson, Anna; Bendahl, Pär-Ola; Lövgren, Kristina; Stolt, Marianne Frostvik; Tobin, Nicholas P.; Lindström, Linda; Bergh, Jonas; Einbeigi, Zakaria; Fernö, Mårten; Hatschek, Thomas; Hedenfalk, Ingrid

    2015-01-01

    The relevance of the intrinsic subtypes for clinical management of metastatic breast cancer is not comprehensively established. We aimed to evaluate the prevalence and prognostic significance of drifts in tumor molecular subtypes during breast cancer progression. A well-annotated cohort of 304 women with advanced breast cancer was studied. Tissue microarrays of primary tumors and synchronous lymph node metastases were constructed. Conventional biomarkers were centrally assessed and molecular subtypes were assigned following the 2013 St Gallen guidelines. Fine-needle aspirates of asynchronous metastases were transcriptionally profiled and subtyped using PAM50. Discordant expression of individual biomarkers and molecular subtypes was observed during tumor progression. Primary luminal-like tumors were relatively unstable, frequently adopting a more aggressive subtype in the metastases. Notably, loss of ER expression and a luminal to non-luminal subtype conversion was associated with an inferior post-recurrence survival. In addition, ER and molecular subtype assessed at all tumor progression stages were independent prognostic factors for post-recurrence breast cancer mortality in multivariable analyses. Our results demonstrate that drifts in tumor molecular subtypes may occur during tumor progression, conferring adverse consequences on outcome following breast cancer relapse. PMID:26375671

  16. Early-Stage Young Breast Cancer Patients: Impact of Local Treatment on Survival

    SciTech Connect

    Bantema-Joppe, Enja J.; Munck, Linda de; Willemse, Pax H.B.; Langendijk, Johannes A.; Siesling, Sabine; Maduro, John H.

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: In young women, breast-conserving therapy (BCT), i.e., lumpectomy followed by radiotherapy, has been associated with an increased risk of local recurrence. Still, there is insufficient evidence that BCT impairs survival. The aim of our study was to compare the effect of BCT with mastectomy on overall survival (OS) in young women with early-stage breast cancer. Methods and Materials: From two Dutch regional population-based cancer registries (covering 6.2 million inhabitants) 1,453 women <40 years with pathologically T1N0-1M0 breast cancer were selected. Cox regression survival analysis was used to study the effect of local treatment (BCT vs. mastectomy) stratified for nodal stage on survival and corrected for tumor size, age, period of diagnosis, and use of adjuvant systemic therapy. Results: With a median follow-up of 9.6 years, 10-year OS was 83% after BCT and 78% after mastectomy, respectively (unadjusted hazard ratio [HR], 1.37; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.09-1.72). In N0-patients, 10-year OS was 84% after BCT and 81% after mastectomy and local treatment was not associated with differences in OS (HR 1.19; 95% CI, 0.89-1.58; p = 0.25). Within the N1-patient group, OS was better after BCT compared with mastectomy, 79% vs. 71% at 10 years (HR 1.91; 95% CI, 1.28-2.84; p = 0.001) and in patients treated with adjuvant hormonal therapy (HR 0.34; 95% CI, 0.18-0.66; p = 0.001). Conclusions: In this large population-based cohort of early-stage young breast cancer patients, 10-year OS was not impaired after BCT compared with mastectomy. Patients with 1 to 3 positive lymph nodes had better prognosis after BCT than after mastectomy.

  17. Developmental life stage and couples' experiences with prostate cancer: a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Harden, Janet

    2005-01-01

    Prostate cancer affects men in all adult life stages. As couples age, they face developmental tasks specific to their age. The combination of disease-related stressors and ongoing developmental changes may negatively affect the dyad's adjustment to prostate cancer and, consequently, their quality of life (QOL). In spite of this, a life stage perspective has not been used to understand the impact of diagnosis and treatment on patients and their partners across the aging life span. The purpose of this literature review was to explore the relationship between developmental age and disease-specific issues that may affect a couple's QOL as they adapt to a prostate cancer illness. The stages of aging are examined in 3 phases: late middle age (50-64 years); the young-old (65-74); and the old-old (75 years and older). More specifically, these 3 phases were addressed first by presenting the normative developmental challenges of each phase, then disease-related issues from the perspective of the patient, and finally from the perspective of the spousal caregiver. The literature review found that few studies considered age as a relevant factor in the analysis of outcomes of treatment; however, some differences among the groups for both the patient and the caregiver were identified. Ages of participants in the various studies covered a large span of time (50-86 years); consequently, recommendations from these studies do not consider the effect of developmental challenges on the couple's ability to adapt to a prostate cancer diagnosis. Knowledge gaps and implications for research using a developmental approach are identified.

  18. Validated Competing Event Model for the Stage I-II Endometrial Cancer Population

    SciTech Connect

    Carmona, Ruben; Gulaya, Sachin; Murphy, James D.; Rose, Brent S.; Wu, John; Noticewala, Sonal; McHale, Michael T.; Yashar, Catheryn M.; Vaida, Florin; Mell, Loren K.

    2014-07-15

    Purpose/Objectives(s): Early-stage endometrial cancer patients are at higher risk of noncancer mortality than of cancer mortality. Competing event models incorporating comorbidity could help identify women most likely to benefit from treatment intensification. Methods and Materials: 67,397 women with stage I-II endometrioid adenocarcinoma after total hysterectomy diagnosed from 1988 to 2009 were identified in Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) and linked SEER-Medicare databases. Using demographic and clinical information, including comorbidity, we sought to develop and validate a risk score to predict the incidence of competing mortality. Results: In the validation cohort, increasing competing mortality risk score was associated with increased risk of noncancer mortality (subdistribution hazard ratio [SDHR], 1.92; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.60-2.30) and decreased risk of endometrial cancer mortality (SDHR, 0.61; 95% CI, 0.55-0.78). Controlling for other variables, Charlson Comorbidity Index (CCI) = 1 (SDHR, 1.62; 95% CI, 1.45-1.82) and CCI >1 (SDHR, 3.31; 95% CI, 2.74-4.01) were associated with increased risk of noncancer mortality. The 10-year cumulative incidences of competing mortality within low-, medium-, and high-risk strata were 27.3% (95% CI, 25.2%-29.4%), 34.6% (95% CI, 32.5%-36.7%), and 50.3% (95% CI, 48.2%-52.6%), respectively. With increasing competing mortality risk score, we observed a significant decline in omega (ω), indicating a diminishing likelihood of benefit from treatment intensification. Conclusion: Comorbidity and other factors influence the risk of competing mortality among patients with early-stage endometrial cancer. Competing event models could improve our ability to identify patients likely to benefit from treatment intensification.

  19. Early-Stage Breast Cancer in the Octogenarian: Tumor Characteristics, Treatment Choices, and Clinical Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Mamtani, Anita; Gonzalez, Julie J.; Neo, Dayna; Slanetz, Priscilla J.; Houlihan, Mary Jane; Herold, Christina I.; Recht, Abram; Hacker, Michele R.; Sharma, Ranjna

    2016-01-01

    Background Nodal staging with sentinel node biopsy (SLNB), post-lumpectomy radiotherapy (RT), and endocrine therapy (ET) for estrogen receptor-positive (ER+) tumors is valuable in the treatment of early-stage (stages 1 or 2) breast cancer but used less often for elderly women. Methods This retrospective study investigated women referred for surgical evaluation of biopsy-proven primary early-stage invasive breast cancer from January 2001 to December 2010. Clinicopathologic features, treatment course, and outcomes for women ages 80–89 years and 50–59 years were compared. Results The study identified 178 eligible women ages 80–89 years and 169 women ages 50–59 years. The elderly women more often had grade 1 or 2 disease (p = 0.003) and ER+ tumors (p = 0.007) and less frequently had undergone adjuvant therapies (all p ≤ 0.001). Lumpectomy was performed more commonly for the elderly (92 vs. 83 %, p = 0.02), and axillary surgery was less commonly performed (46 vs. 96 %; p < 0.001). Fewer elderly women had undergone post-lumpectomy RT (42 vs. 89 %; p < 0.001) and ET for ER+ tumors (72 vs. 95 %; p < 0.001). During the median follow-up period of 56 months for the 80- to 89-year old group and 98 months for the 50- to 59-year-old group, death from breast cancer was similar (4 vs. 5 %; p = 0.5). The two groups respectively experienced 7 versus 6 locoregional recurrences and 11 versus 13 distant recurrences. Conclusions The octogenarians had disease survivorship similar to that of the younger women despite less frequent use of adjuvant therapies, likely reflecting lower-risk disease features. Whether increased use of axillary surgery, post-lumpectomy RT, and/or ET for ER+ tumors would further improve outcomes is an important area for further study, but treatment should not be deferred solely on the basis of age. PMID:27364507

  20. Biopsy Findings After Breast Conservation Therapy for Early-Stage Invasive Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Vapiwala, Neha Starzyk, Jill; Harris, Eleanor E.; Tchou, Julia C.; Boraas, Marcia C.; Czerniecki, Brian J.; Rosato, Ernest F.; Orel, Susan G.; Solin, Lawrence J.

    2007-10-01

    Purpose: To determine the patterns and factors predictive of positive ipsilateral breast biopsy after conservation therapy for early-stage breast cancer. Methods and Materials: We performed a retrospective review of Stage I-II breast cancer patients initially treated with lumpectomy and radiotherapy between 1977 and 1996, who later underwent post-treatment ipsilateral breast biopsies. Results: A total of 223 biopsies were performed in 193 treated breasts: 171 single and 22 multiple biopsies. Of the 223 biopsies, 56% were positive and 44% were negative for recurrence. The positive biopsy rate (PBR) was 59% for the first and 32% for subsequent biopsies. The median time to the first post-treatment biopsy was 49 months. Of the patients with negative initial biopsy findings, 11% later developed local recurrence. The PBR was 40% among patients with physical examination findings only, 65% with mammographic abnormalities only, and 79% with both findings (p = 0.001). Analysis of the procedure type revealed a PBR of 86% for core and 58% for excisional biopsies compared with 28% for aspiration cytology alone (p = 0.025). The PBR varied inversely with age at the original diagnosis: 49% if {>=}51 years, 57% if 36-50 years, and 83% if {<=}35 years (p = 0.05). The PBR correlated directly with the interval after radiotherapy: 49% if {<=}60 months, 59% if 60.1-120 months, 77% if 120.1-180 months, and 100% if >180 months after completing postlumpectomy radiotherapy (p = 0.01). The PBR was not linked with recurrence location, initial pathologic T or N stage, estrogen receptor/progesterone receptor status, or final pathologic margins (all p {>=} 0.15). Conclusion: After definitive radiotherapy for early-stage breast cancer, a greater PBR was associated with the presence of both mammographic and clinical abnormalities, excisional or core biopsies, younger age at the initial diagnosis, and longer intervals after radiotherapy completion.

  1. Neoadjuvant therapy for early-stage breast cancer: the clinical utility of pertuzumab.

    PubMed

    Gollamudi, Jahnavi; Parvani, Jenny G; Schiemann, William P; Vinayak, Shaveta

    2016-01-01

    Approximately 20% of breast cancer patients harbor tumors that overexpress human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2; also known as ErbB2), a receptor tyrosine kinase that belongs to the epidermal growth factor receptor family of receptor tyrosine kinases. HER2 amplification and hyperactivation drive the growth and survival of breast cancers through the aberrant activation of proto-oncogenic signaling systems, particularly the Ras/MAP kinase and PI3K/AKT pathways. Although HER2-positive (HER2(+)) breast cancer was originally considered to be a highly aggressive form of the disease, the clinical landscape of HER2(+) breast cancers has literally been transformed by the approval of anti-HER2 agents for adjuvant and neoadjuvant settings. Indeed, pertuzumab is a novel monoclonal antibody that functions as an anti-HER2 agent by targeting the extracellular dimerization domain of the HER2 receptor; it is also the first drug to receive an accelerated approval by the US Food and Drug Administration for use in neoadjuvant settings in early-stage HER2(+) breast cancer. Here, we review the molecular and cellular factors that contribute to the pathophysiology of HER2 in breast cancer, as well as summarize the landmark preclinical and clinical findings underlying the approval and use of pertuzumab in the neoadjuvant setting. Finally, the molecular mechanisms operant in mediating resistance to anti-HER2 agents, and perhaps to pertuzumab as well, will be discussed, as will the anticipated clinical impact and future directions of pertuzumab in breast cancer patients.

  2. Neoadjuvant therapy for early-stage breast cancer: the clinical utility of pertuzumab

    PubMed Central

    Gollamudi, Jahnavi; Parvani, Jenny G; Schiemann, William P; Vinayak, Shaveta

    2016-01-01

    Approximately 20% of breast cancer patients harbor tumors that overexpress human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2; also known as ErbB2), a receptor tyrosine kinase that belongs to the epidermal growth factor receptor family of receptor tyrosine kinases. HER2 amplification and hyperactivation drive the growth and survival of breast cancers through the aberrant activation of proto-oncogenic signaling systems, particularly the Ras/MAP kinase and PI3K/AKT pathways. Although HER2-positive (HER2+) breast cancer was originally considered to be a highly aggressive form of the disease, the clinical landscape of HER2+ breast cancers has literally been transformed by the approval of anti-HER2 agents for adjuvant and neoadjuvant settings. Indeed, pertuzumab is a novel monoclonal antibody that functions as an anti-HER2 agent by targeting the extracellular dimerization domain of the HER2 receptor; it is also the first drug to receive an accelerated approval by the US Food and Drug Administration for use in neoadjuvant settings in early-stage HER2+ breast cancer. Here, we review the molecular and cellular factors that contribute to the pathophysiology of HER2 in breast cancer, as well as summarize the landmark preclinical and clinical findings underlying the approval and use of pertuzumab in the neoadjuvant setting. Finally, the molecular mechanisms operant in mediating resistance to anti-HER2 agents, and perhaps to pertuzumab as well, will be discussed, as will the anticipated clinical impact and future directions of pertuzumab in breast cancer patients. PMID:26937204

  3. Patient Preferences in Treatment Choices for Early-Stage Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Betty C.; Wallace, Scott; Hartwig, Matthew G.; D’Amico, Thomas A.; Huber, Joel C.

    2016-01-01

    Background Decision-making for lung cancer treatment can be complex because it involves both provider recommendations based on the patient’s clinical condition and patient preferences. This study describes the relative importance of several considerations in lung cancer treatment from the patient’s perspective. Methods A conjoint preference experiment began by asking respondents to imagine that they had just been diagnosed with lung cancer. Respondents then chose among procedures that differed regarding treatment modalities, the potential for treatment-related complications, the likelihood of recurrence, provider case volume, and distance needed to travel for treatment. Conjoint analysis derived relative weights for these attributes. Results A total of 225 responses were analyzed. Respondents were most willing to accept minimally invasive operations for treatment of their hypothetical lung cancer, followed by stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT); they were least willing to accept thoracotomy. Treatment type and risk of recurrence were the most important attributes from the conjoint experiment (each with a relative weight of 0.23), followed by provider volume (relative weight of 0.21), risk of major complications (relative weight of 0.18), and distance needed to travel for treatment (relative weight of 0.15). Procedural and treatment preferences did not vary with demographics, self-reported health status, or familiarity with the procedures. Conclusions Survey respondents preferred minimally invasive operations over SBRT or thoracotomy for treatment of early-stage non-small cell lung cancer. Treatment modality and risk of cancer recurrence were the most important factors associated with treatment preferences. Provider experience outweighed the potential need to travel for lung cancer treatment. PMID:27623277

  4. Pathologic Stage of Nonsmall Cell Lung Cancer Patients Presenting as Resectable Cases After Neoadjuvant Therapy Did Not Predict the Prognosis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ching-Yang; Fu, Jui-Ying; Wu, Ching-Feng; Liu, Yun-Hen; Hsieh, Ming-Ju; Wu, Yi-Cheng; Yang, Cheng-Ta; Tsai, Ying-Huang

    2015-10-01

    According to the National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) guidelines, treatment plans for nonsmall cell lung cancer are to be based on cancer stage. Cancer staging for patients with resectable disease has been based on pathologic stage instead of preoperative clinical stage. However, the possibility of occult mediastinal lymph node metastases could lead to discrepancy between clinical and pathologic stage. While multi-modality treatments may be beneficial for patients with locally advanced disease, most studies have been based on clinical stage. The aim of this study was to identify the beneficial impact of neoadjuvant therapy and the prognostic value of final pathologic stage in these patients. This study enrolled 530 lung cancer patients who received anatomic resection and mediastinal lymph node dissection at Chang Gung Memorial Hospital from January 2005 through June 2011. All resected specimens were examined by pathologists. Postoperative adjuvant therapies were given according to NCCN guideline recommendations. The clinico-pathologic factors of these patients were collected and analyzed. Patients not receiving neoadjuvant therapy had a better probability of disease-free survival (P < 0.001) and overall survival (P = 0.0005), as well as a lower incidence of early relapse. Patients not receiving neoadjuvant therapy had a better disease-free survival rate in stages IA (P < 0.001), IB (P = 0.002), and IIB (P = 0.0117) from the point of view of final pathologic stage. Patients receiving neoadjuvant therapy may experience a higher incidence of early relapse. Neoadjuvant therapy did not show definite benefits in the disease-free and overall survival rates from the point of view of final pathologic stage. Pathologic stage of nonsmall cell lung cancer patients who presented with resectable disease after neoadjuvant therapy did not predict the prognosis.

  5. Oxidized low-density lipoprotein is associated with advanced-stage prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Wan, Fangning; Qin, Xiaojian; Zhang, Guiming; Lu, Xiaolin; Zhu, Yao; Zhang, Hailiang; Dai, Bo; Shi, Guohai; Ye, Dingwei

    2015-05-01

    Clinical and epidemiological data suggest coronary artery disease shares etiology with prostate cancer (PCa). The aim of this work was to assess the effects of several serum markers reported in cardiovascular disease on PCa. Serum markers (oxidized low-density lipoprotein [ox-LDL], apolipoprotein [apo] B100, and apoB48) in peripheral blood samples from 50 patients from Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center (FUSCC) with localized or lymph node metastatic PCa were investigated in this study. Twenty-five samples from normal individuals were set as controls. We first conducted enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay analysis to select candidate markers that were significantly different between these patients and controls. Then, the clinical relevance between OLR1 (the ox-LDL receptor) expression and PCa was analyzed in The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) cohort. We also investigated the function of ox-LDL in PCa cell lines in vitro. Phosphorylation protein chips were used to analyze cell signaling pathways in ox-LDL-treated PC-3 cells. The ox-LDL level was found to be significantly correlated with N stage of prostate cancer. OLR1 expression was correlated with lymph node metastasis in the TCGA cohort. In vitro, ox-LDL stimulated the proliferation, migration, and invasion of LNCaP and PC-3 in a dose-dependent manner. The results of phosphoprotein microarray illustrated that ox-LDL could influence multiple signaling pathways of PC-3. Activation of proliferation promoting signaling pathways (including β-catenin, cMyc, NF-κB, STAT1, STAT3) as well as apoptosis-associating signaling pathways (including p27, caspase-3) demonstrated that ox-LDL had complicated effects on prostate cancer. Increased serum ox-LDL level and OLR1 expression may indicate advanced-stage PCa and lymph node metastasis. Moreover, ox-LDL could stimulate PCa proliferation, migration, and invasion in vitro.

  6. Radiation Therapy, Cardiac Risk Factors, and Cardiac Toxicity in Early-Stage Breast Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Doyle, John J.; Wang Jian; McBride, Russell; Neugut, Alfred I.; Grann, Victor R. ||; Jacobson, Judith S. |; Grann, Alison; Hershman, Dawn ||. E-mail: dlh23@columbia.edu

    2007-05-01

    Purpose: The benefits of adjuvant radiation therapy (RT) for breast cancer may be counterbalanced by the risk of cardiac toxicity. We studied the cardiac effects of RT and the impact of pre-existing cardiac risk factors (CRFs) in a population-based sample of older patients with breast cancer. Methods and Materials: In the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End-Results (SEER)-Medicare database of women {>=}65 years diagnosed with Stages I to III breast cancer from January 1, 1992 to December 31, 2000, we used multivariable logistic regression to model the associations of demographic and clinical variables with postmastectomy and postlumpectomy RT. Using Cox proportional hazards regression, we then modeled the association between treatment and myocardial infarction (MI) and ischemia in the 10 or more years after diagnosis, taking the predictors of treatment into account. Results: Among 48,353 women with breast cancer; 19,897 (42%) were treated with lumpectomy and 26,534 (55%) with mastectomy; the remainder had unknown surgery type (3%). Receipt of RT was associated with later year of diagnosis, younger age, fewer comorbidities, nonrural residence, and chemotherapy. Postlumpectomy RT was also associated with white ethnicity and no prior history of heart disease (HD). The RT did not increase the risk of MI. Presence of MI was associated with age, African American ethnicity, advanced stage, nonrural residence, more than one comorbid condition, a hormone receptor-negative tumor, CRFs and HD. Among patients who received RT, tumor laterality was not associated with MI outcome. The effect of RT on the heart was not influenced by HD or CRFs. Conclusion: It appears unlikely that RT would increase the risk of MI in elderly women with breast cancer, regardless of type of surgery, tumor laterality, or history of CRFs or HD, for at least 10 years.

  7. Collaboration Between Surgeons and Medical Oncologists and Outcomes for Patients With Stage III Colon Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Tanvir; Chang, Hsien-Yen; Veenstra, Christine M.; Pollack, Craig E.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Collaboration between specialists is essential for achieving high-value care in patients with complex cancer needs. We explore how collaboration between oncologists and surgeons affects mortality and cost for patients requiring multispecialty cancer care. Patients and Methods: This was a retrospective cohort study of patients with stage III colon cancer from SEER-Medicare diagnosed between 2000 and 2009. Patients were assigned to a primary treating surgeon and oncologist. Collaboration between surgeon and oncologist was measured as the number of patients shared between them; this has been shown to reflect advice seeking and referral relationships between physicians. Outcomes included hazards for all-cause mortality, subhazards for colon cancer–specific mortality, and cost of care at 12 months. Results: A total of 9,329 patients received care from 3,623 different surgeons and 2,319 medical oncologists, representing 6,827 unique surgeon–medical oncologist pairs. As the number of patients shared between specialists increased from to one to five (25th to 75th percentile), patients experienced an approximately 20% improved survival benefit from all-cause and colon cancer–specific mortalities. Specifically, for each additional patient shared between oncologist and surgeon, all-cause mortality improved by 5% (hazard ratio, 0.95; 95%CI, 0.92 to 0.97), and colon cancer–specific mortality improved by 5% (subhazard ratio, 0.95; 95% CI, 0.91 to 0.97). There was no association with cost. Conclusion: Specialist collaboration is associated with lower mortality without increased cost among patients with stage III colon cancer. Facilitating formal and informal collaboration between specialists may be an important strategy for improving the care of patients with complex cancers. PMID:25873063

  8. Patient Derived Cancer Cell Lines in Identifying Molecular Changes in Patients With Previously Untreated Pancreatic Cancer Receiving Gemcitabine Hydrochloride-Based Chemotherapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-18

    Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma; Stage IA Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IB Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIA Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIB Pancreatic Cancer; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer

  9. Role of endoscopic ultrasonography in the loco-regional staging of patients with rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Marone, Pietro; de Bellis, Mario; D’Angelo, Valentina; Delrio, Paolo; Passananti, Valentina; Di Girolamo, Elena; Rossi, Giovanni Battista; Rega, Daniela; Tracey, Maura Claire; Tempesta, Alfonso Mario

    2015-01-01

    The prognosis of rectal cancer (RC) is strictly related to both T and N stage of the disease at the time of diagnosis. RC staging is crucial for choosing the best multimodal therapy: patients with high risk locally advanced RC (LARC) undergo surgery after neoadjuvant chemotherapy and radiotherapy (NAT); those with low risk LARC are operated on after a preoperative short-course radiation therapy; finally, surgery alone is recommended only for early RC. Several imaging methods are used for staging patients with RC: computerized tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, positron emission tomography, and endoscopic ultrasound (EUS). EUS is highly accurate for the loco-regional staging of RC, since it is capable to evaluate precisely the mural infiltration of the tumor (T), especially in early RC. On the other hand, EUS is less accurate in restaging RC after NAT and before surgery. Finally, EUS is indicated for follow-up of patients operated on for RC, where there is a need for the surveillance of the anastomosis. The aim of this review is to highlight the impact of EUS on the management of patients with RC, evaluating its role in both preoperative staging and follow-up of patients after surgery. PMID:26140096

  10. 2nd ESMO Consensus Conference in Lung Cancer: locally advanced stage III non-small-cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Eberhardt, W E E; De Ruysscher, D; Weder, W; Le Péchoux, C; De Leyn, P; Hoffmann, H; Westeel, V; Stahel, R; Felip, E; Peters, S

    2015-08-01

    To complement the existing treatment guidelines for all tumour types, ESMO organises consensus conferences to focus on specific issues in each type of tumour. The 2nd ESMO Consensus Conference on Lung Cancer was held on 11-12 May 2013 in Lugano. A total of 35 experts met to address several questions on non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in each of four areas: pathology and molecular biomarkers, first-line/second and further lines of treatment in advanced disease, early-stage disease and locally advanced disease. For each question, recommendations were made including reference to the grade of recommendation and level of evidence. This consensus paper focuses on locally advanced disease.

  11. The new TNM classification of lymph node metastasis minimises stage migration problems in gastric cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    de Manzoni, G; Verlato, G; Roviello, F; Morgagni, P; Di Leo, A; Saragoni, L; Marrelli, D; Kurihara, H; Pasini, F

    2002-01-01

    The present study aimed at investigating whether in gastric cancer patients stage migration occurs with extension of lymphadenectomy, when node metastases are staged according to the new pN classification (UICC 1997). The investigation involved 921 patients, who underwent R0 gastric resection for gastric cancer between 1988 and 1998 in three different Italian centres: Verona (n=236), Forlì (n=409), Siena (n=276). The relation among lymphadenectomy and pN category was assessed by Kendall's partial rank-order correlation coefficient, controlling for depth of tumour invasion. A direct evaluation of the Will Rogers phenomenon was accomplished in the Verona series, by comparing the number of positive nodes actually observed with the number of positive nodes which would have been retrieved by a less extended lymphadenectomy (D1). The number of positive nodes increased remarkably with the enlargement of lymphadenectomy, especially in pT2 patients (from 2.2±3.9 in D1 to 3.9±5.0 in D3) and in pT3/pT4 patients (from 5.1±5.9 in D1 to 11.3±12.6 in D3). Non-parametric statistics highlighted a weak (Kendall's partial T=0.128) but significant (P<0.001) correlation between pN category and extension of lymphadenectomy. In the direct analysis of the Verona series, 22 patients out of 230 (9.6%) migrated to a lower pN tier when ignoring positive nodes retrieved from the second and third level. This percentage increased to 39.1% (90 out of 230) when adopting the TNM 87 classification. In conclusion stage migration is of minor importance in gastric cancer patients, staged according to the new pN classification. British Journal of Cancer (2002) 87, 171–174. doi:10.1038/sj.bjc.6600432 www.bjcancer.com © 2002 Cancer Research UK PMID:12107838

  12. Physical Activity Behavioral Intervention in Obese Endometrial Cancer Survivors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-10-14

    Stage IA Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IB Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage II Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IIIA Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IIIB Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IIIC Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IVA Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IVB Uterine Corpus Cancer

  13. Endoscopic Breast Surgery in Treating Patients With Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-02-05

    Male Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer

  14. Cognitive adaptation theory and quality of life in late-stage cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Christianson, Heidi Fowell; Weis, Jo M; Fouad, Nadya A

    2013-01-01

    In this study, the question of whether using slightly illusionary, positive attributions of self, control, and meaning (e.g., cognitive adaptation theory), in the face of disconfirmatory evidence, facilitates quality of life in late-stage cancer patients was examined. Eighty late-stage cancer patients (Mean age = 59.7, SD = 12.5; 48.8% male, 51.2% female; varying cancer diagnoses) who recently failed or refused first line anti-neoplastic treatment completed questionnaires assessing meaning, control, self-esteem, and optimism, as well as physical and psychological quality of life. Findings suggest that greater self-esteem, control, and meaning predicted physical and psychological quality of life, with physical quality of life being influenced by control beliefs and psychological quality of life influenced by self-esteem. Optimism independently predicted physical quality of life and neither mediated nor moderated the relationship between cognitive adaptation and quality of life. Findings suggest that slightly positive, illusionary beliefs of self, control, and meaning predicted quality of life even in the presence of clear, disconfirmatory environmental evidence.

  15. Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation Using Only Intraoperative Electron Radiation Therapy in Early Stage Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Maluta, Sergio; Dall'Oglio, Stefano; Marciai, Nadia; Gabbani, Milena; Franchini, Zeno; Pietrarota, Paolo; Meliado, Gabriele; Guariglia, Stefania; Cavedon, Carlo

    2012-10-01

    Background: We report the results of a single-institution, phase II trial of accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) using a single dose of intraoperative electron radiation therapy (IOERT) in patients with low-risk early stage breast cancer. Methods and Materials: A cohort of 226 patients with low-risk, early stage breast cancer were treated with local excision and axillary management (sentinel node biopsy with or without axillary node dissection). After the surgeon temporarily reapproximated the excision cavity, a dose of 21 Gy using IOERT was delivered to the tumor bed, with a margin of 2 cm laterally. Results: With a mean follow-up of 46 months (range, 28-63 months), only 1 case of local recurrence was reported. The observed toxicity was considered acceptable. Conclusions: APBI using a single dose of IOERT can be delivered safely in women with early, low-risk breast cancer in carefully selected patients. A longer follow-up is needed to ascertain its efficacy compared to that of the current standard treatment of whole-breast irradiation.

  16. Interleukin-6 stimulates aerobic glycolysis by regulating PFKFB3 at early stage of colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Han, Jun; Meng, Qingyang; Xi, Qiulei; Zhang, Yongxian; Zhuang, Qiulin; Han, Yusong; Jiang, Yi; Ding, Qiurong; Wu, Guohao

    2016-01-01

    Chronic inflammation is a well-known etiological factor for colorectal cancer (CRC) and cancer cells are known to preferentially metabolize glucose through aerobic glycolysis. However, the connection between chronic inflammation and aerobic glycolysis in the development of CRC is largely unexplored. The present study investigated whether interleukin-6 (IL-6), a pro-inflammatory cytokine, promotes the development of CRC by regulating the aerobic glycolysis and the underlying molecular mechanisms. In colitis-associated CRC mouse, anti-IL-6 receptor antibody treatment reduced the incidence of CRC and decreased the expression of key genes in aerobic glycolysis, whereas the plasma concentrations of glucose and lactate were not affected. Consistently, IL-6 treatment stimulated aerobic glycolysis, upregulated key genes in aerobic glycolysis and promoted cell proliferation and migration in SW480 and SW1116 CRC cells. 6-phoshofructo-2-kinase/fructose-2,6-bisphosphatase-3 (PFKFB3) was the most downregulated gene by anti-IL-6 receptor antibody in colorectal adenoma tissues. Further analysis in human samples revealed overexpression of PFKFB3 in colorectal adenoma and adenocarcinoma tissues, which was also associated with lymph node metastasis, intravascular cancer embolus and TNM stage. In addition, the effect of IL-6 on CRC cells can be abolished by knocking down PRKFB3 through siRNA transfection. Our data suggest that chronic inflammation promotes the development of CRC by stimulating aerobic glycolysis and IL-6 is functioning, at least partly, through regulating PFKFB3 at early stage of CRC.

  17. The Management of Early Stage and Metastatic Triple Negative Breast Cancer: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Anders, Carey K.; Zagar, Timothy M.; Carey, Lisa A.

    2013-01-01

    Triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) defined as lacking expression of the estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor and HER2, comprises approximately 15% of incident breast cancers and is over-represented among those with metastatic disease. It is increasingly clear that TNBC is heterogeneous and that there are several biologically distinct subtypes within TNBC, in particular the basal-like subtype but also the claudin-low, among others. While the incidence of BRCA mutations across all subsets of breast cancer is quite low (~5%), BRCA mutations are more common among those with TNBC (~20%) and may have therapeutic implications. The general principles guiding the use of chemotherapy and radiation therapy do not differ dramatically between early stage TNBC and non-TNBC. There is a trend, however, to treat TNBC at a lower stage with chemotherapy as this is the only way to systemically reduce recurrence risk. In the metastatic setting, while cytotoxic chemotherapy is the mainstay of treatment for advanced TNBC, there are many promising targeted therapies in development in both the preclinical and early phase clinical trial settings. While the treatment of TNBC remains a challenge, coordinated efforts between clinician/scientist partnerships providing a comprehensive understanding of TNBC genomic, proteomic and other biologic processes may result in individualized therapy for TNBC faster than other subtypes -- driven by both the heterogeneity we know exists within this clinical entity and the intense need for improved treatment. PMID:23915742

  18. Risk model in stage IB1-IIB cervical cancer with positive node after radical hysterectomy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhilan; Huang, Kecheng; Lu, Zhiyong; Deng, Song; Xiong, Jiaqiang; Huang, Jia; Li, Xiong; Tang, Fangxu; Wang, Zhihao; Sun, Haiying; Wang, Lin; Zhou, Shasha; Wang, Xiaoli; Jia, Yao; Hu, Ting; Gui, Juan; Wan, Dongyi; Ma, Ding; Li, Shuang; Wang, Shixuan

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify risk factors in patients with surgically treated node-positive IB1-IIB cervical cancer and to establish a risk model for disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS). A total of 170 patients who underwent radical hysterectomy and bilateral pelvic lymphadenectomy as primary treatment for node-positive International Federation of Gynaecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stage IB1-IIB cervical cancer from January 2002 to December 2008 were retrospectively analyzed. Five published risk models were evaluated in this population. The variables, including common iliac lymph node metastasis and parametrial invasion, were independent predictors of outcome in a multivariate analysis using a Cox regression model. Three distinct prognostic groups (low, intermediate, and high risk) were defined using these variables. Five-year DFS rates for the low-, intermediate-, and high-risk groups were 73.7%, 60.0%, and 25.0%, respectively (P<0.001), and 5-year OS rates were 81.9%, 42.8%, and 25.0%, respectively (P<0.001). The risk model derived in this study provides a novel means for assessing prognosis of patients with node-positive stage IB1-IIB cervical cancer. Future study will focus on external validation of the model and refinement of the risk scoring systems by adding new biologic markers.

  19. Preoperative serum markers for individual patient prognosis in stage I-III colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Giessen-Jung, Clemens; Nagel, Dorothea; Glas, Maria; Spelsberg, Fritz; Lau-Werner, Ulla; Modest, Dominik Paul; Schulz, Christoph; Heinemann, Volker; Di Gioia, Dorit; Stieber, Petra

    2015-09-01

    Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) remains the only recommended biomarker for follow-up care of colorectal cancer (CRC), but besides CEA, several other serological parameters have been proposed as prognostic markers for CRC. The present retrospective analysis investigates a comprehensive set of serum markers with regard to cancer-specific survival (CSS) and disease-free survival (DFS). A total of 472 patients with colon cancer underwent surgery for curative intent between January 1988 and June 2007. Preoperative serum was analyzed for the following parameters: albumin, alkaline phosphatase (aP), beta-human chorionic gonadotropin (βhCG), bilirubin, cancer antigen 125 (CA 125), cancer antigen 19-9 (CA 19-9), CA 72-4, CEA, C-reactive protein (CRP), cytokeratin-19 soluble fragment (CYFRA 21-1), ferritin, gamma-glutamyltransferase (γGT), glutamate oxaloacetate transaminase (GOT), glutamate pyruvate transaminase (GPT), hemoglobin, haptoglobin, interleukin-6, interleukin-8, creatinine, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), serum amyloid A (SAA), and 25-hydroxyvitamin D. After a median follow-up period of 5.9 years, the overall 3- and 5-year CSS was 91.7 and 84.9 % and DFS rates were 82.7 % (3 years) and 77.6 % (5 years). Multivariate analyses confirmed preoperative CEA as an independent prognostic factor with regard to CSS and DFS. CA 19-9 and γGT also provided prognostic value for CSS and DFS, respectively. Younger age was negatively associated with DFS. According to UICC stage, CEA provided significant prognostic value with regard to CSS and DFS, while CA 19-9 was only prognostic for CSS. Combined analysis is able to identify patients with favorable prognosis. In addition to tumor baseline parameters, preoperative CEA could be confirmed as prognostic marker in colon cancer. CA 19-9 and γGT also provide additional prognostic value with regard to survival and recurrence in stage III and stage I disease, respectively. The combined use of CEA together with CA 19-9 and γGT improve

  20. SU-E-I-85: Exploring the 18F-Fluorodeoxyglucose PET Characteristics in Staging of Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, C; Yin, Y

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to explore the characteristics derived from 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) PET image and assess its capacity in staging of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). Methods: 26 patients with newly diagnosed ESCC who underwent 18F-FDG PET scan were included in this study. Different image-derived indices including the standardized uptake value (SUV), gross tumor length, texture features and shape feature were considered. Taken the histopathologic examination as the gold standard, the extracted capacities of indices in staging of ESCC were assessed by Kruskal-Wallis test and Mann-Whitney test. Specificity and sensitivity for each of the studied parameters were derived using receiver-operating characteristic curves. Results: 18F-FDG SUVmax and SUVmean showed statistically significant capability in AJCC and TNM stages. Texture features such as ENT and CORR were significant factors for N stages(p=0.040, p=0.029). Both FDG PET Longitudinal length and shape feature Eccentricity (EC) (p≤0.010) provided powerful stratification in the primary ESCC AJCC and TNM stages than SUV and texture features. Receiver-operating-characteristic curve analysis showed that tumor textural analysis can capability M stages with higher sensitivity than SUV measurement but lower in T and N stages. Conclusion: The 18F-FDG image-derived characteristics of SUV, textural features and shape feature allow for good stratification AJCC and TNM stage in ESCC patients.

  1. Post-operative radiation therapy for advanced-stage oropharyngeal cancer.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Eric; Panwala, Kathryn; Holland, John

    2002-11-01

    Between 1985 and 1999, 43 patients with locally-advanced, resectable oropharyngeal cancer were treated with combined surgery and post-operative radiation therapy (RT) at Oregon Health and Science University. Five patients (12 per cent) had Stage III disease and 38 patients (88 per cent) had Stage IV disease. All patients had gross total resections of the primary tumour. Thirty-seven patients had neck dissections for regional disease. RT consisted of a mean tumour-bed dose of 63.0 Gy delivered in 1.8-2.0 Gy fractions over a mean of 49 days. At three- and five-years, the actuarial local control was 96 per cent and the actuarial local/regional control was 80 per cent. The three- and five-year actuarial rates of distant metastases were 41 per cent and 46 per cent, respectively. The actuarial overall survival at three- and five-years was 41 per cent and 34 per cent, respectively. The actuarial rates of progression-free survival were 49 per cent at three-years and 45 per cent at five years. Combined surgery and post-operative RT for advanced-stage oropharyngeal cancer results in excellent local/regional control. This particular group of patients experienced a high-rate of developing distant metastases.

  2. Time and Circumstances: Cancer Cell Metabolism at Various Stages of Disease Progression

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Georg F.

    2016-01-01

    Over the past decade, research into the unique ways, in which cancer cells skew their metabolism, has had a renaissance—for the repeated time over more than 80 years since the discovery of an inherent preference for glycolysis. Importantly, the Warburg effect that arises in primary neoplasms is not the sole prominent metabolic phenomenon. Once the transformed cells are shed from their initial growth and begin the process of metastasis, their energy requirements change and they adapt to the increased demand for adenosine triphosphate, which if not satisfied would lead to anoikis. At that stage, oxidoreductases and the respiratory chain are activated. Furthermore, the intrinsic metabolic characteristics of tumor cells may be influenced by extrinsic factors, comprising metabolite secretions from stromal cells or acidification and nutrient deprivation in the late-stage hypoxic environment. While there is metabolic adjustment in cancer cells throughout the disease history, its phenotypic manifestation changes at various times. This stage selectivity has implications for pharmacotherapy ambitions. PMID:28018856

  3. Long-term results of definitive radiotherapy for stage I esophageal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Sai, Heitetsu . E-mail: hsai@kuhp.kyoto-u.ac.jp; Mitsumori, Michihide; Araki, Norio; Mizowaki, Takashi; Nagata, Yasushi; Nishimura, Yasumasa; Hiraoka, Masahiro

    2005-08-01

    Purpose: To analyze retrospectively the long-term results of external beam radiotherapy (RT) with or without intraluminal brachytherapy (ILBT) for patients with Stage I esophageal cancer. Methods and Materials: A total of 34 patients with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma, clinically diagnosed as having Stage I disease, were treated with definitive RT, with or without ILBT. The median age was 69 years. Seven patients were treated with external beam RT alone (median, 64 Gy), and 27 were treated with external beam RT (median, 52 Gy) plus ILBT (8-12 Gy in two to three fractions). Results: The 5-year overall survival, local relapse-free survival, and cause-specific survival rate was 58.9%, 68.4%, and 80.0%, respectively, with a median follow-up of 61 months. Of 9 patients with local recurrence after initial therapy, 7 were successfully treated, and the 5-year cumulative rate of esophagectomy was 19.6%. The 2-year local relapse-free rate for patients with and without ILBT was 79.1% and 53.6%, respectively. Conclusion: Although local recurrence was frequent within 2 years, the disease-specific survival rate was high owing to effective salvage therapy. Definitive RT is a reasonable treatment option for highly comorbid and elderly patients with Stage I esophageal cancer. The role of ILBT needs to be clarified.

  4. Diagnostic yield of endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration for mediastinal staging in lung cancer*

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Bussy, Sebastián; Labarca, Gonzalo; Canals, Sofia; Caviedes, Iván; Folch, Erik; Majid, Adnan

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA) is a minimally invasive diagnostic test with a high diagnostic yield for suspicious central pulmonary lesions and for mediastinal lymph node staging. The main objective of this study was to describe the diagnostic yield of EBUS-TBNA for mediastinal lymph node staging in patients with suspected lung cancer. METHODS: Prospective study of patients undergoing EBUS-TBNA for diagnosis. Patients ≥ 18 years of age were recruited between July of 2010 and August of 2013. We recorded demographic variables, radiological characteristics provided by axial CT of the chest, location of the lesion in the mediastinum as per the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer classification, and definitive diagnostic result (EBUS with a diagnostic biopsy or a definitive diagnostic method). RESULTS: Our analysis included 354 biopsies, from 145 patients. Of those 145 patients, 54.48% were male. The mean age was 63.75 years. The mean lymph node size was 15.03 mm, and 90 lymph nodes were smaller than 10.0 mm. The EBUS-TBNA method showed a sensitivity of 91.17%, a specificity of 100.0%, and a negative predictive value of 92.9%. The most common histological diagnosis was adenocarcinoma. CONCLUSIONS: EBUS-TBNA is a diagnostic tool that yields satisfactory results in the staging of neoplastic mediastinal lesions. PMID:26176519

  5. Clinically Defined Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus and Prognosis in Early-Stage Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Erickson, Kirsten; Patterson, Ruth E.; Flatt, Shirley W.; Natarajan, Loki; Parker, Barbara A.; Heath, Dennis D.; Laughlin, Gail A.; Saquib, Nazmus; Rock, Cheryl L.; Pierce, John P.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Self-reported diabetes has been associated with poor breast cancer outcomes. Research is needed to investigate the relationship between biologically determined glycemic control and breast cancer prognosis. Methods Archived baseline blood samples from the Women's Healthy Eating and Living Study were used to measure hemoglobin A1C (HbA1C) among 3,003 survivors of early-stage breast cancer (age of diagnosis, 28 to 70 years) observed for a median of 7.3 years for additional breast cancer events and 10.3 years for all-cause mortality. HbA1C levels provide an accurate, precise measure of chronic glycemic levels. Cox regression analysis was performed to assess whether baseline HbA1C levels predicted disease-free and overall survival. Results Only 5.8% of women had chronic hyperglycemia (defined as HbA1C levels ≥ 6.5%). Those with HbA1C ≥ 6.5% were older and more likely to be less educated, have nonwhite ethnicity, be obese, and have more advanced breast cancer at diagnosis. HbA1C was significantly associated with overall survival (Ptrend < .001). After adjusting for confounders, risk of all-cause mortality was twice as high in women with HbA1C ≥ 7.0% compared with women with HbA1C less than 6.5% (hazard ratio [HR], 2.35; 95% CI, 1.56 to 3.54). For disease-free survival, there was a nonsignificant 30% increase in risk for HbA1C levels ≥ 7.0% (HR, 1.26; 95% CI, 0.78 to 2.02). During study follow-up, previously diagnosed rather than undiagnosed diabetes seemed to account for the increased risk. Conclusion Chronic hyperglycemia is statistically significantly associated with reduced overall survival in survivors of early-stage breast cancer. Further study of diabetes and its relationship to breast cancer outcomes is warranted. PMID:21115861

  6. Developing an Instrument to Measure Socioeconomic Disparities in Quality of Care for Men with Early Stage Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-01

    with radiation therapy or radical prostatectomy. However, regardless of race, men of lower socioeconomic status are less likely to receive...socioeconomic status are also more likely to have treatment related complications after prostate cancer treatment. This suggests that disparities in...Patients with early stage prostate cancer have excellent cause specific survival after definitive local therapy with radiation therapy or radical

  7. United We Stand? The Effects of a Couple-Coping Intervention on Adjustment to Early Stage Breast or Gynecological Cancer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Jennifer L.; Halford, W. Kim; Ward, Bruce G.

    2004-01-01

    Cancer diagnosis affects the psychological well-being of both patients and their partners, and effective coping has been suggested to be a conjoint process of mutual support. Ninety-four married women with early stage cancer and their partners were randomly assigned to couples-based coping training (CanCOPE), individual coping training for the…

  8. Bisphosphonate-related osteonecrosis of jaws in advanced stage breast cancer was detected from bone scan: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Chirappapha, Prakasit; Thongjood, Thanaporn; Aroonroch, Rangsima

    2017-01-01

    Bisphosphonates (BPs) are indicated to treat skeletal-related events (SREs) for cancer patients with bone metastasis. We report a 79-year-old woman with advanced stage breast cancer with bone metastasis who was prescribed BPs (zoledronate), then developed osteonecrosis of jaw. We provide a brief review of the pathogenesis, diagnosis and treatment of this complication. PMID:28210558

  9. Laparoendoscopic single-site radical hysterectomy for early stage cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    Park, Ju Young; Kim, Yoo Min; Lee, Yoo-Young; Kim, Tae-Joong; Lee, Jeong-Won; Kim, Byoung-Gie; Bae, Duk-Soo

    2017-01-01

    Technical developments have made laparoendoscopic single-site (LESS) surgery increasingly more feasible for treating gynecological conditions, including cancer. However, complex surgeries such as radical hysterectomy have rarely been performed with single-port access because of technical difficulties. The majority of the difficulties are due to the inefficient retraction of tissue during dissection. Here, we report a detailed description of LESS radical hysterectomy plus pelvic lymph node dissection that was successfully performed in two patients with stage IB1 cervical cancer. We used our expertise with LESS to perform space development as much as possible before the ligaments were resected. The oncologic clearance was comparable to that of conventional laparoscopic radical hysterectomy. PMID:28217681

  10. The role of videomediastinoscopy in staging of non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Bacić, Ivan; Skarica, Rade; Sulen, Nina; Zadro, Zvonko; Lisica-Sikić, Natasa; Karlo, Robert; Petani, Barbara

    2012-12-01

    Lung cancer is the most frequent malignant disease and the leading cause of death from malignant diseases in the world and its incidence is increasing. At the time when diagnosis is established most patients have advanced disease and are not candidates for radical surgical treatment. Patients without distant metastases are subjected to various diagnostic methods to detect metastases in mediastinal lymph nodes that make up the path of lymph drainage from the lungs. The most reliable invasive diagnostic procedures for detecting metastases in mediastinal lymph nodes are videomediastinoscopy and endobronchial ultrasound with transtracheal puncture. In the absence of mediastinal lymph node metastases surgery is the treatment of choice. If mediastinal lymph nodes are positive for metastases multimodal treatment is implemented. At the Department of Thoracic Surgery, Zadar General Hospital, videomediastinoscopy for the staging of primary non-small cell lung cancer has been performed routinely since September 2009.

  11. Tangential Radiotherapy Without Axillary Surgery in Early-Stage Breast Cancer: Results of a Prospective Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Julia S.; Winer, Eric P.

    2008-11-01

    Purpose: To determine the risk of regional-nodal recurrence in patients with early-stage, invasive breast cancer, with clinically negative axillary nodes, who were treated with breast-conserving surgery, 'high tangential' breast radiotherapy, and hormonal therapy, without axillary surgery or the use of a separate nodal radiation field. Methods and Materials: Between September 1998 and November 2003, 74 patients who were {>=}55 years of age with Stage I-II clinically node-negative, hormone-receptor-positive breast cancer underwent tumor excision to negative margins without axillary surgery as a part of a multi-institutional prospective study. Postoperatively, all underwent high-tangential, whole-breast radiotherapy with a boost to the tumor bed, followed by 5 years of hormonal therapy. Results: For the 74 patients enrolled, the median age was 74.5 years, and the median pathologic tumor size was 1.2 cm. Lymphatic vessel invasion was present in 5 patients (7%). At a median follow-up of 52 months, no regional-nodal failures or ipsilateral breast recurrences had been identified (95% confidence interval, 0-4%). Eight patients died, one of metastatic disease and seven of other causes. Conclusion: In this select group of mainly older patients with early-stage hormone-responsive breast cancer and clinically negative axillary nodes, treatment with high-tangential breast radiotherapy and hormonal therapy, without axillary surgery, yielded a low regional recurrence rate. Such patients might be spared more extensive axillary treatment (axillary surgery, including sentinel node biopsy, or a separate nodal radiation field), with its associated time, expense, and morbidity.

  12. Epidemiology of cancer in end-stage renal disease dialysis patients: a national cohort study in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Chien, Chih-Chiang; Han, Ming-Ming; Chiu, Yu-Hsien; Wang, Jhi-Joung; Chu, Chin-Chen; Hung, Chien-Ya; Sun, Yih-Min; Yeh, Nai-Cheng; Ho, Chung-Han; Lin, Chih-Ching; Kao, Hao-Yun; Weng, Shih-Feng

    2017-01-01

    The incidence and mortality of site-specific cancers in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) on maintenance dialysis have been rarely studied for Asian populations. We tapped Taiwan`s National Health Insurance Research Database to identify and recruit patients starting maintenance dialysis between 1999 and 2004. They were followed from initiation of dialysis until death, discontinuation of dialysis, or the end of 2008. We calculated the survival rate and mortality risk of dialysis patients with cancer. Of 40,833 dialysis patients, 2352 (5.8%) had been newly diagnosed with cancer. Being older, being male, and having chronic liver disease were factors associated with a higher risk for new cancer in ESRD dialysis patients. In men, liver cancer (20.63%) was the most frequent, followed by cancers of the bladder (16.88%) and kidney (11.61%). In women, bladder cancer (25.57%) was the most frequent, followed by cancers of the kidney (16.31%) and breast (11.20%). The 5-year survival rates for kidney and bladder cancer were higher than for other cancers; the survival rates for lung, stomach, and liver cancer were lower. In conclusion, the distribution of site-specific cancer was different between men and women in patients with ESRD on dialysis. More attention should be paid to teaching dialysis patients how to avoid the well-known cancer risks and carcinogens and individualized regular cancer screenings. PMID:28123593

  13. Prognostic factors of advanced stage non-small-cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Ben Amar, Jihen; Ben Safta, Boutheina; Zaibi, Haifa; Dhahri, Besma; Baccar, Mohamed Ali; Azzabi, Saloua

    2016-05-01

    Background Lung cancer is the main cause of death from cancer in the world. The 5-year survival is about 15%. Despite the progress of medicine the mortality rate decreased only marginally. This poor prognosis is due to late diagnosis. Aim To evaluate overall survival and prognostic factors in patients locally advanced or metastatic non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods Retrospective study including 180 patients with non-small cell lung cancer hospitalized in the department of Charles Nicolle Hospital of Tunis between January 2007 and December 2014. Results The mean age was 61.5 years with a male predominance (93.3%). The median overall survival was 6 months. The poor prognostic factors were the performans status (PS) and early delays of management (<30 days). The factors that improve survival were surgical treatment and delays of management more than 45 days.  Conclusion The prognostic factors in locally advanced and metastatic NSLC in our patient were: PS, management delay and treatment. These factors should be considered in management of patient with advanced stage NSCLC.

  14. Neoadjuvant Therapy for Early-Stage Breast Cancer: Current Practice, Controversies, and Future Directions.

    PubMed

    Santa-Maria, Cesar Augusto; Camp, Melissa; Cimino-Mathews, Ashley; Harvey, Susan; Wright, Jean; Stearns, Vered

    2015-11-01

    Research in the fields of surgical, medical, and radiation oncology has changed the landscape of neoadjuvant therapy in breast cancer, yet many areas of controversy still exist. When considering whether a patient is a candidate for neoadjuvant therapy, ideally the initial assessment should be multidisciplinary in nature and should include clinical, radiographic, and pathologic evaluation. Optimization of systemic therapy is dependent upon identifying the patient's breast cancer subtype; the best approach may include targeted agents, as well as the determination of eligibility for enrollment into clinical trials that incorporate novel therapeutics or predictive biomarkers. This article will review a variety of surgical and radiation-based strategies for management of early-stage breast cancer, including surgical options involving the breast and axilla, and the role of radiation based on response to systemic therapy. Key areas of controversy include the ideal systemic treatment for different breast cancer subtypes, the surgical and radiotherapeutic approaches for management of the axilla, and the role of pathologic response rates as a surrogate for survival in drug development.

  15. Interleukin-17 Could Promote Breast Cancer Progression at Several Stages of the Disease

    PubMed Central

    Welte, Thomas; Zhang, Xiang H.-F.

    2015-01-01

    Metastatic disease accounts for more than 90% of deaths from breast cancer. Yet the factors that trigger metastasis, often years after primary tumor removal, are not understood well. Recently the proinflammatory cytokine interleukin- (IL-) 17 family has been associated with poor prognosis in breast cancer. Here we review current literature on the pathogenic mechanisms driven by IL-17 during breast cancer progression and connect these findings to metastasis. These include (1) direct effects of IL-17 on tumor cells promoting tumor cell survival and invasiveness, (2) regulation of tumor angiogenesis, and (3) interaction with myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) to inhibit antitumor immune response and collaborate at the distant metastatic site. Furthermore, IL-17 might also be a culprit in bone destruction caused by late stage bone metastasis. Interestingly, in addition to these potential prometastasis functions, there is also evidence for an opposite, antitumor role of IL-17 during cancer therapies. We hypothesize that these contradictory roles may be due to chronic, imbalanced versus acute transient nature of the immune reactions, as well as differences in the cells that interact with IL-17+ cells under different circumstances. PMID:26783383

  16. Therapy targeted to the metastatic niche is effective in a model of stage IV breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Byunghee; Kavishwar, Amol; Wang, Ping; Ross, Alana; Pantazopoulos, Pamela; Dudley, Michael; Moore, Anna; Medarova, Zdravka

    2017-01-01

    Treatment of stage IV metastatic breast cancer patients is limited to palliative options and represents an unmet clinical need. Here, we demonstrate that pharmacological inhibition of miRNA-10b - a master regulator of metastatic cell viability – leads to elimination of distant metastases in a mouse model of metastatic breast cancer. This was achieved using the miRNA-10b inhibitory nanodrug, MN-anti-miR10b, which consists of magnetic nanoparticles, conjugated to LNA-based miR-10b antagomirs. Intravenous injection of MN-anti-miR10b into mice bearing lung, bone, and brain metastases from breast cancer resulted in selective accumulation of the nanodrug in metastatic tumor cells. Weekly treatments of mice with MN-anti-miR-10b and low-dose doxorubicin resulted in complete regression of pre-existing distant metastases in 65% of the animals and a significant reduction in cancer mortality. These observations were supported by dramatic reduction in proliferation and increase in apoptosis in metastatic sites. On a molecular level, we observed a significant increase in the expression of HOXD10, which is a known target of miRNA-10b. These results represent first steps into the uncharted territory of therapy targeted to the metastatic niche. PMID:28322342

  17. Identification of a potential ovarian cancer stem cell gene expression profile from advanced stage papillary serous ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Vathipadiekal, Vinod; Saxena, Deepa; Mok, Samuel C; Hauschka, Peter V; Ozbun, Laurent; Birrer, Michael J

    2012-01-01

    Identification of gene expression profiles of cancer stem cells may have significant implications in the understanding of tumor biology and for the design of novel treatments targeted toward these cells. Here we report a potential ovarian cancer stem cell gene expression profile from isolated side population of fresh ascites obtained from women with high-grade advanced stage papillary serous ovarian adenocarcinoma. Affymetrix U133 Plus 2.0 microarrays were used to interrogate the differentially expressed genes between side population (SP) and main population (MP), and the results were analyzed by paired T-test using BRB-ArrayTools. We identified 138 up-regulated and 302 down-regulated genes that were differentially expressed between all 10 SP/MP pairs. Microarray data was validated using qRT-PCR and17/19 (89.5%) genes showed robust correlations between microarray and qRT-PCR expression data. The Pathway Studio analysis identified several genes involved in cell survival, differentiation, proliferation, and apoptosis which are unique to SP cells and a mechanism for the activation of Notch signaling is identified. To validate these findings, we have identified and isolated SP cells enriched for cancer stem cells from human ovarian cancer cell lines. The SP populations were having a higher colony forming efficiency in comparison to its MP counterpart and also capable of sustained expansion and differentiation in to SP and MP phenotypes. 50,000 SP cells produced tumor in nude mice whereas the same number of MP cells failed to give any tumor at 8 weeks after injection. The SP cells demonstrated a dose dependent sensitivity to specific γ-secretase inhibitors implicating the role of Notch signaling pathway in SP cell survival. Further the generated SP gene list was found to be enriched in recurrent ovarian cancer tumors.

  18. Association between Metformin Use and Cancer Stage at Diagnosis among Elderly Medicare Beneficiaries with Preexisting Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus and Incident Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mattes, Malcolm D.; Madhavan, Suresh; Sambamoorthi, Usha

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To examine the association between metformin use and cancer stage at diagnosis among elderly men with preexisting diabetes mellitus and incident prostate cancer. Methods. This study used a population-based observational cohort of elderly men (≥66 years) with preexisting diabetes and incident prostate cancer between 2008 and 2009 (N = 2,652). Cancer stage at diagnosis (localized versus advanced) was based on the American Joint Cancer Committee classification. Metformin use and other independent variables were measured during the one year before cancer diagnosis. Logistic regressions with inverse probability treatment weights were used to control for the observed selection bias. Results. A significantly lower percentage of metformin users were diagnosed with advanced prostate cancer as compared to nonusers (4.7% versus 6.7%, p < 0.03). After adjusting for the observed selection bias and other independent variables, metformin use was associated with a 32% reduction in the risk of advanced prostate cancer (adjusted odds ratio, AOR: 0.68, 95% confidence interval, CI: 0.48, 0.97). Conclusions. This is the first epidemiological study to support the role of metformin in reducing the risk of advanced prostate cancer. Randomized clinical trials are needed to confirm the causal link between metformin use and prostate cancer diagnosis stage. PMID:27547763

  19. Cancer of the Colorectum in Maine, 1995-1998: Determinants of Stage at Diagnosis in a Rural State

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parsons, Margaret A.; Askland, Kathleen D.

    2007-01-01

    Context: Despite screening for colorectal cancer, mortality in the United States remains substantial. In northern New England, little is known about predictors of stage at diagnosis, an important determinant of survival and mortality. Purpose: The objective of this study was to identify predictors of late stage at diagnosis for colorectal cancer…

  20. Glutathione in Preventing Peripheral Neuropathy Caused by Paclitaxel and Carboplatin in Patients With Ovarian Cancer, Fallopian Tube Cancer, and/or Primary Peritoneal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-05

    Chemotherapeutic Agent Toxicity; Neuropathy; Neurotoxicity Syndrome; Pain; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer

  1. Is noncurative gastrectomy always a beneficial strategy for stage IV gastric cancer?

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chang Min; Choi, In Keun; Kim, Jong-Han; Park, Da Won; Kim, Jun Suk

    2017-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study is to suggest a treatment strategy for stage IV gastric cancer by investigating the behavioral difference between initially and recurrent metastatic disease. Methods We reviewed the medical records of the patients who underwent chemotherapy alone for metastatic gastric cancer between January 2006 and September 2013. Patients were divided into those who underwent chemotherapy for metastatic disease since initial diagnosis (IM group) and for metastatic recurrence after curative surgery (RM group). Survival and causes of death were compared between the 2 groups, and significant prognostic factors were also investigated. Results A total of 170 patients were enrolled in this study. Of these patients, 104 were included in the IM group and 66 in the RM group. Overall survival of the IM group did not differ from that of RM (P = 0.569). In the comparison of the causes of death, the IM group had a greater tendency to die from bleeding (P = 0.054) and pneumonia (P = 0.055). In multivariate analysis, bone metastasis (P < 0.001; HR = 2.847), carcinoma peritonei (P = 0.047; HR = 1.766), and the frequency of chemotherapy (P < 0.001; HR = 0.777) were significantly associated with overall survival of IM group. Conclusion Disease-burden mainly contributes to the prognosis of metastatic gastric cancer, although noncurative gastrectomy may be helpful in reducing the mortality of initially metastatic disease. Therefore, disease-burden should be also prioritized in determining the treatment strategies for stage IV gastric cancer. PMID:28090502

  2. Adoption of Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy For Early-Stage Breast Cancer From 2004 Through 2011

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Elyn H.; Mougalian, Sarah S.; Soulos, Pamela R.; Smith, Benjamin D.; Haffty, Bruce G.; Gross, Cary P.; Yu, James B.

    2015-02-01

    Purpose: Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is a newer method of radiation therapy (RT) that has been increasingly adopted as an adjuvant treatment after breast-conserving surgery (BCS). IMRT may result in improved cosmesis compared to standard RT, although at greater expense. To investigate the adoption of IMRT, we examined trends and factors associated with IMRT in women under the age of 65 with early stage breast cancer. Methods and Materials: We performed a retrospective study of early stage breast cancer patients treated with BCS followed by whole-breast irradiation (WBI) who were ≤65 years old in the National Cancer Data Base from 2004 to 2011. We used logistic regression to identify factors associated with receipt of IMRT (vs standard RT). Results: We identified 11,089 women with early breast cancer (9.6%) who were treated with IMRT and 104,448 (90.4%) who were treated with standard RT, after BCS. The proportion of WBI patients receiving IMRT increased yearly from 2004 to 2009, with 5.3% of WBI patients receiving IMRT in 2004 and 11.6% receiving IMRT in 2009. Further use of IMRT declined afterward, with the proportion remaining steady at 11.0% and 10.7% in 2010 and 2011, respectively. Patients treated in nonacademic community centers were more likely to receive IMRT (odds ratio [OR], 1.36; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.30-1.43 for nonacademic vs academic center). Compared to privately insured patients, the uninsured patients (OR, 0.81; 95% CI, 0.70-0.95) and those with Medicaid insurance (OR, 0.87; 95% CI, 0.79-0.95) were less likely to receive IMRT. Conclusions: The use of IMRT rose from 2004 to 2009 and then stabilized. Important nonclinical factors associated with IMRT use included facility type and insurance status.

  3. Aspects of Health-Related Factors and Nutritional Care Needs by Survival Stage among Female Cancer Patients in South Korea

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Eunjoo; Lim, Hyunjung

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This study examined diet-related problems and needs associated with nutritional care according to survival stage in Korean female cancer survivors. Methods 186 outpatients (breast or gynecologic cancer survivors) recruited. Subjects were classified as (1) extended stage (ES, 2–5 years from diagnosis) and (2) long-term stage (LS, ≥5 years from diagnosis). Eating habits, changes in health related factors, nutritional needs, and quality of life were investigated. Results 43% of ES survivors had diet-related problems (p = .031); ES group reported dyspepsia and LS group reported anorexia/nausea as the major problem. Half of ES survivors had taste change, decreasing amount of intake, and reduced quality of life (p < .05). The LS group had a greater preference for sweet tastes than the ES group. According to their diagnosis, ES survivors with breast cancer gained weight (27.1%), whereas ES survivors with gynecologic cancer lost their body weight (34.5%) significantly. LS breast cancer patients showed great food preference for vegetables, whereas those with gynecologic cancer showed an increased preference for fish, meat and grain. Approximately 90% of survivors demanded nutritional care regarding restricted foods, preventing recurrence, particularly in ES survivors (p < .01). Moreover, main factors for nutritional care needs were body weight control for breast cancer and food environment for gynecologic cancer. Conclusion Survivors have different aspects of diet-related problems by survival stage as dyspepsia in ES and anorexia in LS. ES stage had changes in dietary patterns and their food consumption have decreased. Most of survivors have demanded nutritional care regardless of survival stage. These features of each stage should be considered to improve their health. PMID:27695041

  4. The Impact of Delayed Chemotherapy on Its Completion and Survival Outcomes in Stage II Colon Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Fang; Rimm, Alfred A.; Fu, Pingfu; Krishnamurthi, Smitha S.; Cooper, Gregory S.

    2014-01-01

    Background Delayed chemotherapy is associated with inferior survival in stage III colon and stage II/III rectal cancer patients, but similar studies have not been performed in stage II colon cancer patients. We investigate the association between delayed and incomplete chemotherapy, and the association of delayed chemotherapy with survival in stage II colon cancer patients. Patients and Methods Patients (age ≥66) diagnosed as stage II colon cancer and received chemotherapy from 1992 to 2005 were identified from the linked SEER–Medicare database. The association between delayed and incomplete chemotherapy was assessed using unconditional and conditional logistic regressions. Survival outcomes were assessed using stratified Cox regression based on propensity score matched samples. Results 4,209 stage II colon cancer patients were included, of whom 73.0% had chemotherapy initiated timely (≤2 months after surgery), 14.7% had chemotherapy initiated with moderate delay (2–3 months), and 12.3% had delayed chemotherapy (≥3 months). Delayed chemotherapy was associated with not completing chemotherapy (adjusted odds ratio (OR): 1.33 (95% confidence interval: 1.11, 1.59) for moderately delayed group, adjusted OR: 2.60 (2.09, 3.24) for delayed group). Delayed chemotherapy was associated with worse survival outcomes (hazard ratio (HR): 1.75 (1.29, 2.37) for overall survival; HR: 4.23 (2.19, 8.20) for cancer-specific survival). Conclusion Although the benefit of chemotherapy is unclear in stage II colon cancer patients, delay in initiation of chemotherapy is associated with an incomplete chemotherapy course and poorer survival, especially cancer-specific survival. Causal inference in the association between delayed initiation of chemotherapy and inferior survival requires further investigation. PMID:25238395

  5. Is surgery still the optimal treatment for stage I non-small cell lung cancer?

    PubMed Central

    Moghanaki, Drew

    2016-01-01

    There is debate about what is the optimal treatment for operable stage I non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Although surgery has been the standard of care for centuries, recent retrospective and prospective randomized studies indicated that stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) could be an option for this group of patients with similar survival and less toxicities. However, to change the standard of care, more studies are needed and participating ongoing larger randomized studies is the best approach to resolve this controversy. PMID:27183993

  6. Adjuvant systemic chemotherapy for stages II and III colon cancer after complete resection: a clinical practice guideline

    PubMed Central

    Meyers, B.M.; Cosby, R.; Quereshy, F.; Jonker, D.

    2016-01-01

    Background Updated practice guidelines on adjuvant chemotherapy for completely resected colon cancer are lacking. In 2008, Cancer Care Ontario’s Program in Evidence-Based Care developed a guideline on adjuvant therapy for stages ii and iii colon cancer. With newer regimens being assessed in this patient population and older agents being either abandoned because of non-effectiveness or replaced by agents that are more efficacious, a full update of the original guideline was undertaken. Methods Literature searches (January 1987 to August 2015) of medline, embase, and the Cochrane Library were conducted; in addition, abstracts from the American Society of Clinical Oncology, the European Society for Medical Oncology, and the European Cancer Congress were reviewed (the latter for January 2007 to August 2015). A practice guideline was drafted that was then scrutinized by internal and external reviewers whose comments were incorporated into the final guideline. Results Twenty-six unique reports of eighteen randomized controlled trials and thirteen unique reports of twelve meta-analyses or pooled analyses were included in the evidence base. The 5 recommendations developed included 3 for stage ii colon cancer and 2 for stage iii colon cancer. Conclusions Patients with completely resected stage iii colon cancer should be offered adjuvant 5-fluorouracil (5fu)–based chemotherapy with or without oxaliplatin (based on definitive data for improvements in survival and disease-free survival). Patients with resected stage ii colon cancer without “high-risk” features should not receive adjuvant chemotherapy. For patients with “high-risk” features, 5fu-based chemotherapy with or without oxaliplatin should be offered, although no clinical trials have been conducted to conclusively demonstrate the same benefits seen in stage iii colon cancer. PMID:28050138

  7. Disparities Between Blacks and Whites in Stage at Diagnosis, Incidence, and Anatomic Subsite of Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hobley, James; Lindsay II, Jerome A.; McGarrity, Thomas J.

    2006-01-01

    Background A disparity in colorectal cancer (CRC) incidence and mortality has been reported for black men and women in the United States. Objective To determine the magnitude and direction of temporal change in black/white disparity, by anatomic subsites of the colon and rectum. Design Population-based, epidemiologic study. Setting Pennsylvania, 1997–2002. Measurements Black/white ratios of the percentage of cases diagnosed at late stage and of age-adjusted incidence rates, by anatomic subsite, for four 3-year time periods. Results In 2000–2002, 54.6% of CRC cases among blacks were diagnosed at late stage, compared with 51.3% among whites. The percentage of cases in the cecum, transverse colon, splenic flexure, descending colon, sigmoid colon, rectum, and recto-sigmoid diagnosed at a late stage was larger among blacks than among whites. The disparity in the percentage of cases diagnosed at a late stage in the colon and rectum, transverse colon, and descending colon increased during the study period (P<.05). In 2000–2002, incidence was greater among blacks (64.1/100,000) than among whites (59.8/100,000). Incidence for segments of the proximal colon tended to be higher among blacks than among whites. The disparity in the incidence in the transverse colon increased during the study period (P=.021), while the increase in the disparity in the appendix approached statistical significance (P=.051). Limitations The effect of race may have been confounded by unavailable data, including socioeconomic position. Conclusions The black/white disparity in the percentage of cases diagnosed at late stage increased during the study period. The disparity in the percentage of cases diagnosed at a late stage and incidence for the transverse colon also increased. Efforts to increase screening for CRC, especially among blacks, should be enhanced.

  8. Impact of Neoadjuvant Radiation on Survival in Stage III Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Koshy, Matthew; Goloubeva, Olga; Suntharalingam, Mohan

    2011-04-01

    Purpose: The role of surgery in Stage III non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is controversial. This study was undertaken to assess the impact of neoadjuvant radiation therapy for Stage III NSCLC. Methods and Materials: This was a retrospective study from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database that included patients who were 18 years and older with NSCLC classified as Stage III and who underwent definitive therapy from 1988 to 2004. Patients were characterized by type of treatment received. Survival functions were estimated by the Kaplan-Meier method, and Cox regression model was used to analyze trends in overall (OS) and cause-specific survival (CSS). Results: A total of 48,131 patients were selected, with a median follow-up of 10 months (range, 0-203 months). By type of treatment, the 3-year OS was 10% with radiation therapy (RT), 37% with surgery (S), 34% with surgery and postoperative radiation (S-RT), and 45% with neoadjuvant radiation followed by surgery (Neo-RT) (p = 0.0001). Multivariable Cox model identified sex, race, laterality, T stage, N stage, and type of treatment as factors affecting survival. Estimated hazard ratios (HR) adjusted for other variables in regression model showed the types of treatment: S (HR, 1.3; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.2-1.4), S-RT (HR, 1.2; 95% CI, 1.1-1.3), and RT (HR, 2.3; 95% CI, 2.15-2.53) were associated with significantly worse overall survival when compared with Neo-RT (p = 0.0001). Conclusion: This population based study demonstrates that patients with Stage III NSCLC receiving Neo-RT had significantly improved overall survival when compared with other treatment groups.

  9. Circulating and tissue biomarkers in early-stage non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Fumagalli, Caterina; Bianchi, Fabrizio; Raviele, Paola Rafaniello; Vacirca, Davide; Bertalot, Giovanni; Rampinelli, Cristiano; Lazzeroni, Matteo; Bonanni, Bernardo; Veronesi, Giulia; Fusco, Nicola; Barberis, Massimo; Guerini-Rocco, Elena

    2017-01-01

    Objective We sought to characterise circulating and tissue tumour biomarkers of patients who developed early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) during long-term follow-up of a chemoprevention trial (NCT00321893). Materials and Methods Blood and sputum samples were collected from 202 high-risk asymptomatic individuals with CT-detected stable lung nodules. Real-time PCR was performed on plasma to quantify free circulating DNA. Baseline serum was investigated with a previously validated test based on 13 circulating miRNAs (miR-Test). Promoter methylation status of p16, RASSF1a and RARβ2 and telomerase activity were assessed in sputum samples. DNA was extracted from each tumour developed during follow-up and subjected to a mutation survey using the LungCarta panel on the Sequenom MassARRAY platform. Results During follow-up (9 years) six individuals underwent surgery for stage I NSCLC with a median time of disease onset of 20.5 months. MiR-Test scores were positive (range: 0.14–7.24) in four out of six baseline pre-disease onset sera. No association was identified between free circulating DNA or sputum biomarkers and disease onset. All tumours harboured at least one somatic mutation in well-known cancer genes, including KRAS (n = 4), BRAF (n = 1), and TP53 (n = 3). Conclusion Circulating miRNA tests may represent valuable tools to detect clinically-silent tumours. Early-stage lung adenocarcinomas harbour recurrent genetic events similar to those described in advanced-stage NSCLCs. PMID:28194229

  10. Lung cancer staging: the value of PET depends on the clinical setting

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Although positron emission tomography (PET) imaging is widely recommended in the evaluation of patients with lung cancer, randomized controlled trials (RCTs) assessing this have demonstrated inconsistent results. We asked whether differences in the clinical context and endpoints could explain these discrepancies. Methods We used realist synthesis methods to analyze how contextual differences among RCTs affected the results. We focused on RCTs to minimize confounding yet permit evaluation of differences by comparing across studies. Results This analysis suggests that the impact of PET depends on the clinical setting. PET is of greatest benefit in identifying M1 disease in patients with a high chance of such involvement and when little traditional imaging [e.g., abdominal/pelvis computed tomography (CT) and bone scan] is used. Identification of N2,3 involvement by PET prior to resection is seen primarily when there is at least a moderate probability of such and the rate of invasive staging is high. The rate of N2 disease not identified preoperatively appears to increase if PET is used to avoid invasive mediastinal staging in clinical settings in which the risk of N2,3 involvement is moderately high. There is both a potential benefit in avoiding stage-inappropriate resection as well as a risk of missed (stage-appropriate) resection if PET findings are not evaluated carefully. Conclusions A blanket recommendation for PET may be too simplistic without considering nuances of the clinical setting. PMID:25589964

  11. Treatment outcomes after adjuvant radiotherapy following surgery for patients with stage I endometrial cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jiyoung; Lee, Kyung-Ja; Park, Kyung-Ran; Ha, Boram; Kim, Yi-Jun; Jung, Wonguen; Lee, Rena; Kim, Seung Cheol; Moon, Hye Sung; Ju, Woong; Kim, Yun Hwan; Lee, Jihae

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study is to evaluate the treatment outcomes of adjuvant radiotherapy using vaginal brachytherapy (VB) with a lower dose per fraction and/or external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) following surgery for patients with stage I endometrial carcinoma. Materials and Methods The subjects were 43 patients with the International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stage I endometrial cancer who underwent adjuvant radiotherapy following surgery between March 2000 and April 2014. Of these, 25 received postoperative VB alone, while 18 received postoperative EBRT to the whole pelvis; 3 of these were treated with EBRT plus VB. The median EBRT dose was 50.0 Gy (45.0–50.4 Gy) and the VB dose was 24 Gy in 6 fractions. Tumor dose was prescribed at a depth of 5 mm from the cylinder surface and delivered twice per week. Results The median follow-up period for all patients was 57 months (range, 9 to 188 months). Five-year disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) for all patients were 92.5% and 95.3%, respectively. Adjuvant radiotherapy was performed according to risk factors and stage IB, grade 3 and lymphovascular invasion were observed more frequently in the EBRT group. Five-year DFS for EBRT and VB alone were 88.1% and 96.0%, respectively (p = 0.42), and 5-year OS for EBRT and VB alone were 94.4% and 96%, respectively (p = 0.38). There was no locoregional recurrence in any patient. Two patients who received EBRT and 1 patient who received VB alone developed distant metastatic disease. Two patients who received EBRT had severe complications, one each of grade 3 gastrointestinal complication and pelvic bone insufficiency fracture. Conclusion Adjuvant radiotherapy achieved high DFS and OS with acceptable toxicity in stage I endometrial cancer. VB (with a lower dose per fraction) may be a viable option for selected patients with early-stage endometrial cancer following surgery. PMID:27703126

  12. Can CT Screening Give Rise to a Beneficial Stage Shift in Lung Cancer Patients? Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuyan; Han, Wei; Wang, Lei; Xue, Fang; Sui, Xin; Song, Wei; Shi, Ruihong; Jiang, Jingmei

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To portray the stage characteristics of lung cancers detected in CT screenings, and explore whether there’s universal stage superiority over other methods for various pathological types using available data worldwide in a meta-analysis approach. Materials and Methods EMBASE and MEDLINE were searched for studies on lung cancer CT screening in natural populations through July 2015 without language or other filters. Twenty-four studies (8 trials and 16 cohorts) involving 1875 CT-detected lung cancer patients were enrolled and assessed by QUADAS-2. Pathology-confirmed stage information was carefully extracted by two reviewers. Stage I or limited stage proportions were pooled by random effect model with Freeman-Tukey double arcsine transformation. Results Pooled stage I cancer proportion in CT screenings was 73.2% (95% confidence interval: 68.6%, 77.5%), with a significant rising trend (Ptrend<0.05) from baseline (64.7%) to ≥5 repeat rounds (87.1%). Relative to chest radiograph and usual care, the increased stage I proportions in CT were 12.2% (P>0.05), and 46.5% (P<0.05), respectively. Pathology-specifically, adenocarcinomas (66%) and squamous cell lung cancers (17%) composed the majority of CT-detected lung cancers, and had significantly higher stage I proportions relative to chest radiograph (bronchioloalveolar adenocarcinomas, 80.9% vs 51.4%; other adenocarcinomas, 58.8% vs 38.3%; squamous cell lung cancers, 52.3% vs 38.3%; all P<0.05). However, the percentage of small cell lung cancer was lower using CT than other detection routes, and no significant difference in limited stage proportion was observed (6.8% vs 10.8%, P>0.05). Conclusion CT screening can detect more early stage non-small cell lung cancers, but not all of them could be beneficial as there are a considerable number of indolent ones such as bronchioloalveolar adenocarcinomas. Still, current evidence is lacking regarding small cell lung cancers. PMID:27736916

  13. Computerized Cognitive Retraining in Improving Cognitive Function in Breast Cancer Survivors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-02

    Cancer Survivor; Stage 0 Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  14. Standard treatment option in stage III non-small-cell lung cancer: case against trimodal therapy and consolidation drug therapy.

    PubMed

    Jeremić, Branislav

    2015-03-01

    Prospective randomized trials and meta-analyses established concurrent radiochemotherapy (RT-CHT) as standard treatment approach in patients with inoperable, locally advanced (stage IIIA and B) non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). In patients with either clinically (c) or pathologically (p) staged disease (stage IIIA), including those with pN2 disease, trimodal therapy was also frequently practiced in the past and is currently still advocated by large cooperative groups and organizations. Similarly, consolidation CHT provided after concurrent RT-CHT was suggested to be feasible and effective in inoperable stage III NSCLC. Contrasting these practices and suggestions, there is no evidence that trimodal therapy in stage IIIA (clinically or pathologically staged) or consolidation CHT in inoperable stage III NSCLC plays any role in its treatment. In both cases, evidence clearly demonstrates that concurrent RT-CHT is of similar efficacy and less toxic, and it should be considered a standard treatment option for all patients with stage III NSCLC.

  15. Intraoperative Radiotherapy Versus Whole-Breast External Beam Radiotherapy in Early-Stage Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Li; Zhou, Zhirui; Mei, Xin; Yang, Zhaozhi; Ma, Jinli; Chen, Xingxing; Wang, Junqi; Liu, Guangyu; Yu, Xiaoli; Guo, Xiaomao

    2015-01-01

    Abstract There has not been a clear answer about the efficacy of intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) for women with early-stage breast cancer. The aim of this meta-analysis was to summarize the available evidence comparing the efficacy and safety of IORT with those of whole-breast external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) for women with early-stage breast cancer. MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Web of Science, and the Cochrane Library were searched up to October 2014. Two authors independently conducted the literature selection and data extraction. Studies that compared IORT with whole-breast EBRT were included in the systematic review. IORT was defined as a single dose of irradiation to the tumor bed during breast-conserving surgery rather than whole-breast irradiation. Qualities of RCTs were evaluated according to the PEDro scale. Qualities of non-RCTs were evaluated according to the Methodological Index for Non-Randomized Studies (MINORS). The risk ratios (RRs) of ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence, overall mortality, breast cancer mortality, non-breast cancer mortality, and distant metastasis were pooled using a random-effects model. Four studies with 5415 patients were included in this meta-analysis, including 2 randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and 2 non-RCTs. Ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence was significantly higher in patients with IORT compared to those with whole-breast EBRT (RR 2.83, 95% CI 1.23–6.51), but with significant heterogeneity (I2 = 58.5%, P = 0.065). Comparing IORT with whole-breast EBRT, the pooled RRs for overall mortality, breast cancer mortality, non-breast cancer mortality, and distant metastasis were 0.88 (95% CI: 0.66–1.17), 1.20 (95% CI: 0.77–1.86), 0.76 (95% CI: 0.44–1.31), and 0.95 (95% CI: 0.61–1.49), respectively. IORT had a significantly higher risk of ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence than whole-breast EBRT. Overall mortality did not differ significantly. IORT should be used in conjunction with the prudent selection of

  16. Lymphangiogenesis in cervical cancer evaluated by expression of the VEGF-C gene in clinical stage IB-IIIB

    PubMed Central

    Franc, Magdalena; Kachel-Flis, Agata; Michalski, Bogdan; Fila-Daniłow, Anna; Mazurek, Urszula; Michalska, Anna; Kuczerawy, Ilona; Skrzypulec-Plinta, Violetta

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The aim of the present study was to evaluate the profile of VEGF-C gene expression in particular stages of cervical cancer (IB-IIIB) and to estimate the correlation between VEGF-C mRNA quantity profile and clinical stage. Material and methods Material for molecular analysis consisted of cervical cancer tissue specimens collected from 38 women (10, 15, 13 cases were classified as IB, IIB and IIIB, respectively). The control group was composed of normal cervical tissues collected from 10 women who underwent hysterectomy for non-oncological reasons. The number of VEGF-C mRNA copies in particular groups was estimated by the reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) method. Results In the control group the average number of mRNA copies was 134 ± 36 (median: 106), in a group with stage IB it was 16 077 ± 7090 (median: 580), for stage IIB – 35 019 ± 8945 (median: 40 870). The highest number of mRNA VEGF-C copies was derived in a group of patients with cervical cancer of stage IIIB. The average quantity was 56 155 ± 12 470, whereas median 55 981. A statistically significantly higher level of VEGF-C gene expression was disclosed in cervical cancer specimens with stage IIB and IIIB than in the control group. In stage IIIB, the VEGF-C gene expression was significantly higher than in specimens derived from individuals i