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Sample records for akademi university thermal

  1. Cultural Encounter at Bonn's Akademie Neiderberg.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Eric; Kelz, Heinrich P.

    1987-01-01

    Describes the participation of five Pennsylvania colleges in a summer study program at the Akademie Neiderberg in Bonn, West Germany. The program offers an integrated approach to language instruction and cultural studies that is tailored to fit the specific needs and preparation of its participants. (CB)

  2. Thermal Characterization of the Universal Multizone Crystallizator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watring, D. A.; Lehoczky, S. L.; Babcsan, N.; Barczy, P.

    1995-01-01

    The Universal Multizone Crystallizator (UMC) is a special apparatus for crystal growth under terrestrial and microgravity conditions. The use of twenty-five zones allows the, UMC to be used for several normal freezing growth techniques. The thermal profile is electronically translated along the stationary sample by systematically reducing the power to the control zones. Elimination of mechanical translation devices increases the systems reliability while simultaneously reducing the size and weight. This paper addresses the UMC furnace design, sample cartridge, typical thermal profiles and corresponding power requirements necessary for two normal freezing techniques: dynamic gradient freeze and zone melting crystal growth.

  3. Universal thermal and electrical conductivity from holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Sachin

    2010-11-01

    It is known from earlier work of Iqbal, Liu [1] that the boundary transport coefficients such as electrical conductivity (at vanishing chemical potential), shear viscosity etc. at low frequency and finite temperature can be expressed in terms of geometrical quantities evaluated at the horizon. In the case of electrical conductivity, at zero chemical potential gauge field fluctuation and metric fluctuation decouples, resulting in a trivial flow from horizon to boundary. In the presence of chemical potential, the story becomes complicated due to the fact that gauge field and metric fluctuation can no longer be decoupled. This results in a nontrivial flow from horizon to boundary. Though horizon conductivity can be expressed in terms of geometrical quantities evaluated at the horizon, there exist no such neat result for electrical conductivity at the boundary. In this paper we propose an expression for boundary conductivity expressed in terms of geometrical quantities evaluated at the horizon and thermodynamic quantities. We also consider the theory at finite cutoff recently constructed in [2], at radius r c outside the horizon and give an expression for cutoff dependent electrical conductivity ( σ( r c )), which interpolates smoothly between horizon conductivity σ H ( r c → r h ) and boundary conductivity σ B ( r c → ∞). Using the results about the conductivity we gain much insight into the universality of thermal conductivity to viscosity ratio proposed in [3].

  4. Infrared Thermal Imaging as a Tool in University Physics Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mollmann, Klaus-Peter; Vollmer, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Infrared thermal imaging is a valuable tool in physics education at the university level. It can help to visualize and thereby enhance understanding of physical phenomena from mechanics, thermal physics, electromagnetism, optics and radiation physics, qualitatively as well as quantitatively. We report on its use as lecture demonstrations, student…

  5. Reheating of the Universe as holographic thermalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawai, Shinsuke; Nakayama, Yu

    2016-08-01

    Assuming gauge/gravity correspondence we study reheating of the Universe using its holographic dual. Inflaton decay and thermalisation of the decay products correspond to collapse of a spherical shell and formation of a blackhole in the dual anti-de Sitter (AdS) spacetime. The reheating temperature is computed as the Hawking temperature of the developed blackhole probed by a dynamical boundary, and is determined by the inflaton energy density and the AdS radius, with corrections from the dynamics of the shell collapse. For given initial energy density of the inflaton field the holographic model typically gives lower reheating temperature than the instant reheating scenario, while it is shown to be safely within phenomenological bounds.

  6. Universal Parametrization of Thermal Photon Production in Hadronic Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heffernan, Matthew; Hohler, Paul; Rapp, Ralf

    2014-09-01

    As the production of photons and dileptons from high-energy collisions is able to provide information on the high temperature and high density phases of nuclear matter, an improved and universal parametrization of the rather involved microscopic calculations is key to honing the theory behind this production. We focus on photon emission rates from hadronic many-body calculations of the in-medium rho spectral function, which includes the effects of baryons and antibaryons. Across a range of temperatures from 0.1 to 0.18 GeV and baryon chemical potentials from 0 to 0.4 GeV, a parametrization of thermal photon rates for energies from 0.2 to 5 GeV is numerically determined through the use of nested fitting methods. This provides a fully functional description of thermal photon production largely within an unprecedented 20% of the calculated values from the spectral function, a significant reduction in error from available parametrizations. The contribution of photons and dileptons from pion-pion bremsstrahlung is evaluated for the importance of its contribution. The functional form, coupled with the comparison to the bremsstrahlung production of thermal photons, will provide a baseline for guiding future studies. As the production of photons and dileptons from high-energy collisions is able to provide information on the high temperature and high density phases of nuclear matter, an improved and universal parametrization of the rather involved microscopic calculations is key to honing the theory behind this production. We focus on photon emission rates from hadronic many-body calculations of the in-medium rho spectral function, which includes the effects of baryons and antibaryons. Across a range of temperatures from 0.1 to 0.18 GeV and baryon chemical potentials from 0 to 0.4 GeV, a parametrization of thermal photon rates for energies from 0.2 to 5 GeV is numerically determined through the use of nested fitting methods. This provides a fully functional description of

  7. Development of outdoor thermal index indicating universal and separate effects on human thermal comfort.

    PubMed

    Nagano, Kazuo; Horikoshi, Tetsumi

    2011-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to propose a new outdoor thermal index that simultaneously indicates universal and separate effects. The value indicating universal effect in this index consists of the summation of air temperature and the effective temperature differences by air velocity, longwave radiation, solar radiation, and humidity. This paper describes the theoretical construction of this newly derived index to compare with previous indices. The calculations of the new index are demonstrated using the observed data in order to explicitly indicate the specific features of the new index. PMID:20526886

  8. Universal crossovers between entanglement entropy and thermal entropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swingle, Brian; Senthil, T.

    2013-01-01

    We postulate the existence of universal crossover functions connecting the universal parts of the entanglement entropy to the low-temperature thermal entropy in gapless quantum many-body systems. These scaling functions encode the intuition that the same low-energy degrees of freedom which control low-temperature thermal physics are also responsible for the long-range entanglement in the quantum ground state. We demonstrate the correctness of the proposed scaling form and determine the scaling function for certain classes of gapless systems whose low-energy physics is described by a conformal field theory. We also use our crossover formalism to argue that local systems which are “natural” can violate the boundary law at most logarithmically. In particular, we show that several non-Fermi-liquid phases of matter have entanglement entropy that is at most of order Ld-1log(L) for a region of linear size L thereby confirming various earlier suggestions in the literature. We also briefly apply our crossover formalism to the study of fluctuations in conserved quantities and discuss some subtleties that occur in systems that spontaneously break a continuous symmetry.

  9. Universal parametrization of thermal photon rates in hadronic matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heffernan, Matthew; Hohler, Paul; Rapp, Ralf

    2015-02-01

    Electromagnetic (EM) radiation off strongly interacting matter created in high-energy heavy-ion collisions (HICs) encodes information on the high-temperature phases of nuclear matter. Microscopic calculations of thermal EM emission rates are usually rather involved and not readily accessible to broad applications in models of the fireball evolution which are required to compare with experimental data. An accurate and universal parametrization of the microscopic calculations is thus key to honing the theory behind the EM spectra. Here we provide such a parametrization for photon emission rates from hadronic matter, including the contributions from in-medium ρ mesons (which incorporate effects from baryons and antibaryons), as well as bremsstrahlung from π π scattering. Individual parametrizations for each contribution are numerically determined through nested fitting functions for photon energies from 0.2 to 5 GeV in chemically equilibrated matter of temperatures 100-180 MeV and baryon chemical potentials 0-400 MeV. Special care is taken to extent the parametrizations to chemical off-equilibrium as encountered in HICs after chemical freeze-out. This provides a functional description of thermal photon rates within a 20% variation of the microscopically calculated values.

  10. The Universal Thermal Climate Index UTCI compared to ergonomics standards for assessing the thermal environment.

    PubMed

    Bröde, Peter; Błazejczyk, Krzysztof; Fiala, Dusan; Havenith, George; Holmér, Ingvar; Jendritzky, Gerd; Kuklane, Kalev; Kampmann, Bernhard

    2013-01-01

    The growing need for valid assessment procedures of the outdoor thermal environment in the fields of public weather services, public health systems, urban planning, tourism & recreation and climate impact research raised the idea to develop the Universal Thermal Climate Index UTCI based on the most recent scientific progress both in thermo-physiology and in heat exchange theory. Following extensive validation of accessible models of human thermoregulation, the advanced multi-node 'Fiala' model was selected to form the basis of UTCI. This model was coupled with an adaptive clothing model which considers clothing habits by the general urban population and behavioral changes in clothing insulation related to actual environmental temperature. UTCI was developed conceptually as an equivalent temperature. Thus, for any combination of air temperature, wind, radiation, and humidity, UTCI is defined as the air temperature in the reference condition which would elicit the same dynamic response of the physiological model. This review analyses the sensitivity of UTCI to humidity and radiation in the heat and to wind in the cold and compares the results with observational studies and internationally standardized assessment procedures. The capabilities, restrictions and potential future extensions of UTCI are discussed. PMID:23411753

  11. University Students' Understanding of Thermal Physics in Everyday Contexts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Georgiou, Helen; Sharma, Manjula Devi

    2012-01-01

    Thermal physics is in the realm of everyday experience, underlies current environmental concerns, and underpins studies in sciences, health and engineering. In the state of NSW in Australia, the coverage of thermal topics in high school is minimal, and, hence, so is the conceptual understanding of students. This study takes a new approach at…

  12. Universal aspects of thermalization after a quantum quench

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrison, James R.; Grover, Tarun

    A very fundamental problem in quantum statistical mechanics involves whether--and how--an isolated quantum system will thermalize at long times. The Eigenstate Thermalization Hypothesis (ETH) posits that when thermalization occurs, it occurs at the level of each individual energy eigenstate. In recent work, we examined an isolated quantum system that obeys ETH and identified the precise class of operators for which ETH is satisfied. Here, we use similar techniques to study the more general case of a time-evolved system after a quantum quench. Given a ``typical'' initial state, we investigate the class of operators that thermalize and the associated time scales, and remark on the similarities and differences compared with a single eigenstate at finite energy density. Possible experimental implications will be discussed

  13. Predicting urban outdoor thermal comfort by the Universal Thermal Climate Index UTCI—a case study in Southern Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bröde, Peter; Krüger, Eduardo L.; Rossi, Francine A.; Fiala, Dusan

    2012-05-01

    Recognising that modifications to the physical attributes of urban space are able to promote improved thermal outdoor conditions and thus positively influence the use of open spaces, a survey to define optimal thermal comfort ranges for passers-by in pedestrian streets was conducted in Curitiba, Brazil. We applied general additive models to study the impact of temperature, humidity, and wind, as well as long-wave and short-wave radiant heat fluxes as summarised by the recently developed Universal Thermal Climate Index (UTCI) on the choice of clothing insulation by fitting LOESS smoothers to observations from 944 males and 710 females aged from 13 to 91 years. We further analysed votes of thermal sensation compared to predictions of UTCI. The results showed that females chose less insulating clothing in warm conditions compared to males and that observed values of clothing insulation depended on temperature, but also on season and potentially on solar radiation. The overall pattern of clothing choice was well reflected by UTCI, which also provided for good predictions of thermal sensation votes depending on the meteorological conditions. Analysing subgroups indicated that the goodness-of-fit of the UTCI was independent of gender and age, and with only limited influence of season and body composition as assessed by body mass index. This suggests that UTCI can serve as a suitable planning tool for urban thermal comfort in sub-tropical regions.

  14. Predicting urban outdoor thermal comfort by the Universal Thermal Climate Index UTCI--a case study in Southern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Bröde, Peter; Krüger, Eduardo L; Rossi, Francine A; Fiala, Dusan

    2012-05-01

    Recognising that modifications to the physical attributes of urban space are able to promote improved thermal outdoor conditions and thus positively influence the use of open spaces, a survey to define optimal thermal comfort ranges for passers-by in pedestrian streets was conducted in Curitiba, Brazil. We applied general additive models to study the impact of temperature, humidity, and wind, as well as long-wave and short-wave radiant heat fluxes as summarised by the recently developed Universal Thermal Climate Index (UTCI) on the choice of clothing insulation by fitting LOESS smoothers to observations from 944 males and 710 females aged from 13 to 91 years. We further analysed votes of thermal sensation compared to predictions of UTCI. The results showed that females chose less insulating clothing in warm conditions compared to males and that observed values of clothing insulation depended on temperature, but also on season and potentially on solar radiation. The overall pattern of clothing choice was well reflected by UTCI, which also provided for good predictions of thermal sensation votes depending on the meteorological conditions. Analysing subgroups indicated that the goodness-of-fit of the UTCI was independent of gender and age, and with only limited influence of season and body composition as assessed by body mass index. This suggests that UTCI can serve as a suitable planning tool for urban thermal comfort in sub-tropical regions. PMID:21604151

  15. Distinguishing de Sitter universe from thermal Minkowski spacetime by Casimir-Polder-like force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Zehua; Jing, Jiliang

    2014-07-01

    We demonstrate that the static ground state atom, which interacts with a conformally coupled massless scalar field in the de Sitter invariant vacuum, can obtain a position-dependent energy-level shift and this shift could cause a Casimir-Polder-like force on it. Interestingly no such force arises on the inertial atom bathed in a thermal radiation in the Minkowski universe. Thus, although the energy-level shifts of the static atom for these two cases are structurally the same, whether the energy-level shift causes the Casimir-Polder-like force, in principle, could be as an indicator to distinguish de Sitter universe from the thermal Minkowski spacetime.

  16. The "macromolecular tourist": universal temperature dependence of thermal diffusion in aqueous colloidal suspensions.

    PubMed

    Iacopini, S; Rusconi, R; Piazza, R

    2006-01-01

    By performing measurements on a large class of macromolecular and colloidal systems, we show that thermophoresis (particle drift induced by thermal gradients) in aqueous solvents displays a distinctive universal dependence on temperature. For systems of particles interacting via temperature-independent forces, this behavior is strictly related to the solvent thermal expansivity, while an additional, T-independent term is needed to account for the behavior of "thermophilic" (migrating to the warmth) particles. The former relation between thermophoresis and thermal expansion may be exploited to envisage other fruitful studies of colloidal diffusion in inhomogeneous fluids. PMID:16446985

  17. Students' Pre-Knowledge as a Guideline in the Teaching of Introductory Thermal Physics at University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leinonen, Risto; Rasanen, Esa; Asikainen, Mervi; Hirvonen, Pekka E.

    2009-01-01

    This study concentrates on analysing university students' pre-knowledge of thermal physics. The students' understanding of the basic concepts and of the adiabatic compression of an ideal gas was studied at the start of an introductory level course. A total of 48 students participated in a paper-and-pencil test, and analysis of the responses…

  18. Evaluation of thermal comfort in university classrooms through objective approach and subjective preference analysis.

    PubMed

    Nico, Maria Anna; Liuzzi, Stefania; Stefanizzi, Pietro

    2015-05-01

    Assessing thermal comfort becomes more relevant when the aim is to maximise learning and productivity performances, as typically occurs in offices and schools. However, if, in the offices, the Fanger model well represents the thermal occupant response, then on the contrary, in schools, adaptive mechanisms significantly influence the occupants' thermal preference. In this study, an experimental approach was performed in the Polytechnic University of Bari, during the first days of March, in free running conditions. First, the results of questionnaires were compared according to the application of the Fanger model and the adaptive model; second, using a subjective scale, a complete analysis was performed on thermal preference in terms of acceptability, neutrality and preference, with particular focus on the influence of gender. The user possibility to control the indoor plant system produced a significant impact on the thermal sensation and the acceptability of the thermal environment. Gender was also demonstrated to greatly influence the thermal judgement of the thermal environment when an outdoor cold climate occurs. PMID:25683538

  19. Global forecasting of thermal health hazards: the skill of probabilistic predictions of the Universal Thermal Climate Index (UTCI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pappenberger, F.; Jendritzky, G.; Staiger, H.; Dutra, E.; Di Giuseppe, F.; Richardson, D. S.; Cloke, H. L.

    2015-03-01

    Although over a hundred thermal indices can be used for assessing thermal health hazards, many ignore the human heat budget, physiology and clothing. The Universal Thermal Climate Index (UTCI) addresses these shortcomings by using an advanced thermo-physiological model. This paper assesses the potential of using the UTCI for forecasting thermal health hazards. Traditionally, such hazard forecasting has had two further limitations: it has been narrowly focused on a particular region or nation and has relied on the use of single `deterministic' forecasts. Here, the UTCI is computed on a global scale, which is essential for international health-hazard warnings and disaster preparedness, and it is provided as a probabilistic forecast. It is shown that probabilistic UTCI forecasts are superior in skill to deterministic forecasts and that despite global variations, the UTCI forecast is skilful for lead times up to 10 days. The paper also demonstrates the utility of probabilistic UTCI forecasts on the example of the 2010 heat wave in Russia.

  20. Thermal comfort in urban green spaces: a survey on a Dutch university campus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yafei; de Groot, Rudolf; Bakker, Frank; Wörtche, Heinrich; Leemans, Rik

    2016-06-01

    To better understand the influence of urban green infrastructure (UGI) on outdoor human thermal comfort, a survey and physical measurements were performed at the campus of the University of Groningen, The Netherlands, in spring and summer 2015. Three hundred eighty-nine respondents were interviewed in five different green spaces. We aimed to analyze people's thermal comfort perception and preference in outdoor urban green spaces, and to specify the combined effects between the thermal environmental and personal factors. The results imply that non-physical environmental and subjective factors (e.g., natural view, quiet environment, and emotional background) were more important in perceiving comfort than the actual thermal conditions. By applying a linear regression and probit analysis, the comfort temperature was found to be 22.2 °C and the preferred temperature was at a surprisingly high 35.7 °C. This can be explained by the observation that most respondents, who live in temperate regions, have a natural tendency to describe their preferred state as "warmer" even when feeling "warm" already. Using the Kruskal-Wallis H test, the four significant factors influencing thermal comfort were people's exposure time in green spaces, previous thermal environment and activity, and their thermal history. However, the effect of thermal history needs further investigation due to the unequal sample sizes of respondents from different climate regions. By providing evidence for the role of the objective and subjective factors on human thermal comfort, the relationship between UGI, microclimate, and thermal comfort can assist urban planning to make better use of green spaces for microclimate regulation.

  1. Universal Controlled-Phase Gates Between Distant Atoms Separately Trapped in Thermal Cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dong; Ye, Liu

    2014-09-01

    Nonlocal implementation of a family of universal two-qubit controlled-phase gates is investigated in the regime of cavity quantum electrodynamics (CQED) system. With the driving of classical field, the atoms taken as qubits can be efficiently coupled to thermal cavities. In the course of the implementation, atomic spontaneous emission and cavity decay are negligible. With the help of quantum repeaters, our proposal can accomplish entanglement-based a family of universal controlled-phase logic gates for remote two atoms with high fidelity and success probability. Remarkably, our proposal is able to break through the limitation that error probability scales exponentially with the length of the channel. Furthermore, experimental feasibility of the scenario presented is evaluated and it turns out that it is realizable according to today's CQED technologies. It is here emphasised that our proposal might be important to long-distance communication in prospective quantum multi-node networks.

  2. Universal Controlled-Phase Gates Between Distant Atoms Separately Trapped in Thermal Cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dong; Ye, Liu

    2015-04-01

    Nonlocal implementation of a family of universal two-qubit controlled-phase gates is investigated in the regime of cavity quantum electrodynamics (CQED) system. With the driving of classical field, the atoms taken as qubits can be efficiently coupled to thermal cavities. In the course of the implementation, atomic spontaneous emission and cavity decay are negligible. With the help of quantum repeaters, our proposal can accomplish entanglement-based a family of universal controlled-phase logic gates for remote two atoms with high fidelity and success probability. Remarkably, our proposal is able to break through the limitation that error probability scales exponentially with the length of the channel. Furthermore, experimental feasibility of the scenario presented is evaluated and it turns out that it is realizable according to today's CQED technologies. It is here emphasised that our proposal might be important to long-distance communication in prospective quantum multi-node networks.

  3. A Dynamically Driven, Universal Thermal Profile of Galaxy Groups and Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiss, Ido; Keshet, Uri

    2015-09-01

    Large scale structures such as groups and clusters of galaxies show a universal, nearly linear entropy radial profile K(r). Using deprojected 16 clusters and 12 groups from the literature, we find that K\\propto {r}0.96+/- 0.01, consistent with the mean power-law index (0.9–1.1) of previous studies. A similarly good fit is given by a τ \\propto {r}0.72+/- 0.01 ratio between cooling and free-fall times. Both profiles slightly flatten at small radii, as τ becomes of order unity. The entropy profile is usually attributed to self-similar shock accretion (shown to be inconsistent with the data), to non-standard heat conduction, or to turbulent heating. We argue that a dynamical mechanism is needed to sustain such a universal profile, oblivious to the temperature peak at the edge of the core and to the virial shock at the outskirts, and robust to the presence of ongoing cooling, merger, and active galactic nucleus activity. In particular, we show that such a profile can be naturally obtained in a spiral flow, which is likely to underlie most galaxy aggregates according to the ubiquitous spiral patterns and cold fronts observed. Generalizing a two-phase spiral flow model out to the virial radius surprisingly reproduces the thermal profile. A generalized Schwarzschild criterion indicates that observed spiral patterns must involve a convective layer, which may regulate the thermal profile.

  4. Deriving the operational procedure for the Universal Thermal Climate Index (UTCI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bröde, Peter; Fiala, Dusan; Błażejczyk, Krzysztof; Holmér, Ingvar; Jendritzky, Gerd; Kampmann, Bernhard; Tinz, Birger; Havenith, George

    2012-05-01

    The Universal Thermal Climate Index (UTCI) aimed for a one-dimensional quantity adequately reflecting the human physiological reaction to the multi-dimensionally defined actual outdoor thermal environment. The human reaction was simulated by the UTCI-Fiala multi-node model of human thermoregulation, which was integrated with an adaptive clothing model. Following the concept of an equivalent temperature, UTCI for a given combination of wind speed, radiation, humidity and air temperature was defined as the air temperature of the reference environment, which according to the model produces an equivalent dynamic physiological response. Operationalising this concept involved (1) the definition of a reference environment with 50% relative humidity (but vapour pressure capped at 20 hPa), with calm air and radiant temperature equalling air temperature and (2) the development of a one-dimensional representation of the multivariate model output at different exposure times. The latter was achieved by principal component analyses showing that the linear combination of 7 parameters of thermophysiological strain (core, mean and facial skin temperatures, sweat production, skin wettedness, skin blood flow, shivering) after 30 and 120 min exposure time accounted for two-thirds of the total variation in the multi-dimensional dynamic physiological response. The operational procedure was completed by a scale categorising UTCI equivalent temperature values in terms of thermal stress, and by providing simplified routines for fast but sufficiently accurate calculation, which included look-up tables of pre-calculated UTCI values for a grid of all relevant combinations of climate parameters and polynomial regression equations predicting UTCI over the same grid. The analyses of the sensitivity of UTCI to humidity, radiation and wind speed showed plausible reactions in the heat as well as in the cold, and indicate that UTCI may in this regard be universally useable in the major areas of

  5. Deriving the operational procedure for the Universal Thermal Climate Index (UTCI).

    PubMed

    Bröde, Peter; Fiala, Dusan; Błażejczyk, Krzysztof; Holmér, Ingvar; Jendritzky, Gerd; Kampmann, Bernhard; Tinz, Birger; Havenith, George

    2012-05-01

    The Universal Thermal Climate Index (UTCI) aimed for a one-dimensional quantity adequately reflecting the human physiological reaction to the multi-dimensionally defined actual outdoor thermal environment. The human reaction was simulated by the UTCI-Fiala multi-node model of human thermoregulation, which was integrated with an adaptive clothing model. Following the concept of an equivalent temperature, UTCI for a given combination of wind speed, radiation, humidity and air temperature was defined as the air temperature of the reference environment, which according to the model produces an equivalent dynamic physiological response. Operationalising this concept involved (1) the definition of a reference environment with 50% relative humidity (but vapour pressure capped at 20 hPa), with calm air and radiant temperature equalling air temperature and (2) the development of a one-dimensional representation of the multivariate model output at different exposure times. The latter was achieved by principal component analyses showing that the linear combination of 7 parameters of thermophysiological strain (core, mean and facial skin temperatures, sweat production, skin wettedness, skin blood flow, shivering) after 30 and 120 min exposure time accounted for two-thirds of the total variation in the multi-dimensional dynamic physiological response. The operational procedure was completed by a scale categorising UTCI equivalent temperature values in terms of thermal stress, and by providing simplified routines for fast but sufficiently accurate calculation, which included look-up tables of pre-calculated UTCI values for a grid of all relevant combinations of climate parameters and polynomial regression equations predicting UTCI over the same grid. The analyses of the sensitivity of UTCI to humidity, radiation and wind speed showed plausible reactions in the heat as well as in the cold, and indicate that UTCI may in this regard be universally useable in the major areas of

  6. Crossover between different universality classes: Scaling for thermal transport in one dimension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Daxing

    2016-01-01

    For thermal transport in one-dimensional (1D) systems, recent studies have suggested that employing different theoretical models and different numerical simulations under different system's parameter regimes might lead to different universality classes of the scaling exponents. In order to well understand the universality class(es), here we perform a direct dynamics simulation for two archetype 1D oscillator systems with quite different phonon dispersions under various system's parameters and find that there is a crossover between the different universality classes. We show that by varying anharmonicity and temperatures, the space-time scaling exponents for the systems with different dispersions can be feasibly tuned in different ways. The underlying picture is suggested to be understood by phonons performing various kinds of continuous-time random walks (in most cases, be the Lévy walks but not always), probably induced by the peculiar phonon dispersions along with nonlinearity. The results and suggested mechanisms may provide insights into controlling the transport of heat in some 1D materials.

  7. Constraints on the very early universe from thermal WIMP dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Drees, Manuel; Kakizaki, Mitsuru; Iminniyaz, Hoernisa

    2007-11-15

    We investigate the relic density n{sub {chi}} of nonrelativistic long-lived or stable particles {chi} in nonstandard cosmological scenarios. We calculate the relic abundance starting from arbitrary initial temperatures of the radiation-dominated epoch, and derive the lower bound on the initial temperature T{sub 0}{>=}m{sub {chi}}/23, assuming that thermally produced {chi} particles account for the dark matter energy density in the Universe; this bound holds for all {chi} annihilation cross sections. We also investigate cosmological scenarios with modified expansion rate. Even in this case an approximate formula similar to the standard one is capable of predicting the final relic abundance correctly. Choosing the {chi} annihilation cross section such that the observed cold dark matter abundance is reproduced in standard cosmology, we constrain possible modifications of the expansion rate at T{approx}m{sub {chi}}/20, well before big bang nucleosynthesis.

  8. Early-universe thermal production of not-so-invisible axions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, Michael S.

    1987-01-01

    It is found that, for Peccei-Quinn symmetry-breaking scales of less than about 4 x 10 to the 8th GeV (corresponding to axion masses of greater than about 0.03 eV) thermal production of axions in the early universe (via the Primakoff and photoproduction processes) dominates coherent production by a factor of about 1200/m sub a/(1 eV)/ exp 2.175. The photon luminosity from the decays of these relic axions leads to an upper limit to the axion mass of order 2-5 eV. If the axion mass saturates this bound, relic axion decays may well be detectable.

  9. Thermal-hydraulic modeling of the Pennsylvania State University Breazeale Nuclear Reactor (PSBR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Jong E.

    2005-11-01

    Earlier experiments determined that the Pennsylvania State University Breazeale Nuclear Reactor (PSBR) core is cooled, not by an axial flow, but rather by a strong cross flow due to the thermal expansion of the coolant. To further complicate the flow field, a nitrogen-16 (N-16) pump was installed above the PSBR core to mix the exiting core buoyant thermal plume in order to delay the rapid release of radioactive N-16 to the PSBR pool surface. Thus, the interaction between the N-16 jet flow and the buoyancy driven flow complicates the analysis of the flow distribution in the PSBR pool. The main objectives of this study is to model the thermal-hydraulic behavior of the PSBR core and pool. During this study four major things were performed including the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model for the PSBR pool, the stand-alone fuel rod model for a PSBR fuel rod, the velocity measurements in and around the PSBR core, and the temperature measurements in the PSBR pool. Once the flow field was predicted by the CFD model, the measurement devices were manufactured and calibrated based on the CFD results. The major contribution of this study is to understand and to explain the flow behavior in the PSBR subchannels and pool using the FLOW3D model. The stand-alone dynamic fuel rod model was developed to determine the temperature distribution inside a PSBR fuel rod. The stand-alone fuel rod model was coupled to the FLOW3D model and used to predict the temperature behavior during steady-state and pulsing. The heat transfer models in the stand-alone fuel rod code are used in order to overcome the disadvantage of the CFD code, which does not calculate the mechanical stress, the gap conductance, and the two phase heat transfer. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)

  10. Pre-Flight Analysis, Test Evaluation and Flight Verification of the Thermal System of Tohoku University SPRITE-SAT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakamoto, Yuji; Nakazato, Yasuhiro; Sawakami, Tomoki; Yoshida, Kazuya; Takahashi, Yukihiro

    The microsatellite SPRITE-SAT developed by Tohoku University was launched in January 2009. Regarding the thermal system of SPRITE-SAT, the mathematical model, the parameter determination for the heat transfer coefficients, and the comparison between the estimate and real temperature in flight mode are shown in this paper. The precision of thermal analysis using the simple 7-node model was solved. The estimate error of temperature in orbit is less than 5 degrees Celsius in panels with most of instruments.

  11. Universality classes for phonon relaxation and thermal conduction in one-dimensional vibrational systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santhosh, G.; Kumar, Deepak

    2011-10-01

    We study phonon relaxation in chains of particles coupled through polynomial-type pair-interaction potentials and obeying quantum dynamics. We present detailed calculations for the sixth-order potential and find that the wave-vector-dependent relaxation rate follows a power-law behavior, Γ(q)˜qδ, with δ=5/3, which is identical to that of the fourth-order potential. We argue through diagrammatic analysis that this is a generic feature of even-power potentials. Our earlier analysis has shown that δ=3/2 when the leading-order term in the nonlinear potential is odd, suggesting that there are two universality classes for the phonon relaxation rates dependent on a simple property of the potential. This implies that the thermal conductivity κ which diverges as a function of chain size N as κ∝Nα also has two universal behaviors, in that α=1-1/δ as follows from a finite-size argument. We support these arguments by numerical calculations of conductivity for chains obeying classical dynamics for polynomial potentials of some even and odd powers.

  12. Students' pre-knowledge as a guideline in the teaching of introductory thermal physics at university

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leinonen, Risto; Räsänen, Esa; Asikainen, Mervi; Hirvonen, Pekka E.

    2009-05-01

    This study concentrates on analysing university students' pre-knowledge of thermal physics. The students' understanding of the basic concepts and of the adiabatic compression of an ideal gas was studied at the start of an introductory level course. A total of 48 students participated in a paper-and-pencil test, and analysis of the responses revealed that they had several kinds of problems. They did not differentiate between concepts, confusing in particular the concepts of temperature, internal energy and heat. The students also seemed to have serious problems in applying the first law of thermodynamics: they were frequently more likely to use the ideal gas law rather than the first law, e.g., in the case of adiabatic compression, even though it cannot provide a proper explanation of the phenomenon. More detailed analysis revealed that the underlying reasons for many of the problems detected were based on an inadequate understanding of micro-level models of substance. At the upper secondary level, students have acquired an impression of how particles move, vibrate and interact, but they have not learnt how to apply the ideas and concepts of the micro-models in a scientific manner. All of this means that university teachers need to exercise great care in designing their teaching. Explicit recommendations for teachers to take into account both the findings of this research project and also students' pre-knowledge are presented in the discussion section at the end of this paper.

  13. A NEW SINGLE-CRYSTAL FILTERED THERMAL NEUTRON SOURCE FOR NEUTRON CAPTURE THERAPY RESEARCH AT THE UNIVERSITY OF MISSOURI

    SciTech Connect

    John D. Brockman; David W. Nigg; M. Frederick Hawthorne

    2008-09-01

    Parameter studies, design calculations and initial neutronic performance measurements have been completed for a new thermal neutron beamline to be used for neutron capture therapy cell and small-animal radiobiology studies at the University of Missouri Research Reactor. The beamline features the use of single-crystal silicon and bismuth sections for neutron filtering and for reduction of incident gamma radiation. The calculated and measured thermal neutron flux produced at the irradiation location is on the order of 9.5x108 neutrons/cm2-s, with a measured cadmium ratio (Au foils) of 105, indicating a well-thermalized spectrum.

  14. Initial Performance Characterization for a Thermalized Neutron Beam for Neutron Capture Therapy Research at Washington State University

    SciTech Connect

    David W. Nigg; P.E> Sloan; J.R. Venhuizen; C.A. Wemple

    2005-11-01

    The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) and Washington State University (WSU) have constructed a new epithermal-neutron beam for collaborative Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) preclinical research at the WSU TRIGATM research reactor facility1. More recently, additional beamline components were developed to permit the optional thermalization of the beam for certain types of studies where it is advantageous to use a thermal neutron source rather than an epithermal source. This article summarizes the results of some initial neutronic performance measurements for the thermalized system, with a comparison to the expected performance from the design computations.

  15. Surface Temperature Mapping of the University of Northern Iowa Campus Using High Resolution Thermal Infrared Aerial Imageries

    PubMed Central

    Savelyev, Alexander; Sugumaran, Ramanathan

    2008-01-01

    The goal of this project was to map the surface temperature of the University of Northern Iowa campus using high-resolution thermal infrared aerial imageries. A thermal camera with a spectral bandwidth of 3.0-5.0 μm was flown at the average altitude of 600 m, achieving ground resolution of 29 cm. Ground control data was used to construct the pixel- to-temperature conversion model, which was later used to produce temperature maps of the entire campus and also for validation of the model. The temperature map then was used to assess the building rooftop conditions and steam line faults in the study area. Assessment of the temperature map revealed a number of building structures that may be subject to insulation improvement due to their high surface temperatures leaks. Several hot spots were also identified on the campus for steam pipelines faults. High-resolution thermal infrared imagery proved highly effective tool for precise heat anomaly detection on the campus, and it can be used by university facility services for effective future maintenance of buildings and grounds.

  16. The physiological equivalent temperature - a universal index for the biometeorological assessment of the thermal environment.

    PubMed

    Höppe, P

    1999-10-01

    With considerably increased coverage of weather information in the news media in recent years in many countries, there is also more demand for data that are applicable and useful for everyday life. Both the perception of the thermal component of weather as well as the appropriate clothing for thermal comfort result from the integral effects of all meteorological parameters relevant for heat exchange between the body and its environment. Regulatory physiological processes can affect the relative importance of meteorological parameters, e.g. wind velocity becomes more important when the body is sweating. In order to take into account all these factors, it is necessary to use a heat-balance model of the human body. The physiological equivalent temperature (PET) is based on the Munich Energy-balance Model for Individuals (MEMI), which models the thermal conditions of the human body in a physiologically relevant way. PET is defined as the air temperature at which, in a typical indoor setting (without wind and solar radiation), the heat budget of the human body is balanced with the same core and skin temperature as under the complex outdoor conditions to be assessed. This way PET enables a layperson to compare the integral effects of complex thermal conditions outside with his or her own experience indoors. On hot summer days, for example, with direct solar irradiation the PET value may be more than 20 K higher than the air temperature, on a windy day in winter up to 15 K lower. PMID:10552310

  17. University Students Explaining Adiabatic Compression of an Ideal Gas—A New Phenomenon in Introductory Thermal Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leinonen, Risto; Asikainen, Mervi A.; Hirvonen, Pekka E.

    2012-12-01

    This study focuses on second-year university students' explanations and reasoning related to adiabatic compression of an ideal gas. The phenomenon was new to the students, but it was one which they should have been capable of explaining using their previous upper secondary school knowledge. The students' explanations and reasoning were investigated with the aid of paper and pencil tests ( n = 86) and semi-structured interviews ( n = 5) at the start of a thermal physics course at the University of Eastern Finland. The paper and pencil test revealed that the students had difficulties in applying content taught during earlier education in a new context: only a few of them were able to produce a correct explanation for the phenomenon. A majority of the students used either explanations with invalid but physically correct models, such as the ideal gas law or a microscopic model, or erroneous dependencies between quantities. The results also indicated that students had problems in seeing deficiencies or inconsistencies in their reasoning, in both test and interview situations. We suggest in our conclusion that the contents of upper secondary school thermal physics courses should be carefully examined to locate the best emphases for different laws, principles, concepts, and models. In particular, the limitations of models should be made explicit in teaching and students should be guided towards critical scientific thinking, including metaconceptual awareness.

  18. Thermal relics in modified cosmologies: Bounds on evolution histories of the early Universe and cosmological boosts for PAMELA

    SciTech Connect

    Catena, R.; Fornengo, N.; Pato, M.; Pieri, L.; Masiero, A.

    2010-06-15

    Alternative cosmologies, based on extensions of general relativity, predict modified thermal histories in the early Universe during the pre-big bang nucleosynthesis era, an epoch which is not directly constrained by cosmological observations. When the expansion rate is enhanced with respect to the standard case, thermal relics typically decouple with larger relic abundances. The correct value of the relic abundance is therefore obtained for larger annihilation cross sections, as compared to standard cosmology. A direct consequence is that indirect detection rates are enhanced. Extending previous analyses of ours, we derive updated astrophysical bounds on the dark matter annihilation cross sections and use them to constrain alternative cosmologies in the pre-big bang nucleosynthesis era. We also determine the characteristics of these alternative cosmologies in order to provide the correct value of relic abundance for a thermal relic for the (large) annihilation cross section required to explain the PAMELA results on the positron fraction, therefore providing a ''cosmological boost'' solution to the dark matter interpretation of the PAMELA data.

  19. Blue-tilted tensor spectrum and thermal history of the Universe

    SciTech Connect

    Kuroyanagi, Sachiko; Takahashi, Tomo; Yokoyama, Shuichiro E-mail: tomot@cc.saga-u.ac.jp

    2015-02-01

    We investigate constraints on the spectral index of primordial gravitational waves (GWs), paying particular attention to a blue-tilted spectrum. Such constraints can be used to test a certain class of models of the early Universe. We investigate observational bounds from LIGO+Virgo, pulsar timing and big bang nucleosynthesis, taking into account the suppression of the amplitude at high frequencies due to reheating after inflation and also late-time entropy production. Constraints on the spectral index are presented by changing values of parameters such as reheating temperatures and the amount of entropy produced at late time. We also consider constraints under the general modeling approach which can approximately describe various scenarios of the early Universe. We show that the constraints on the blue spectral tilt strongly depend on the underlying assumption and, in some cases, a highly blue-tilted spectrum can still be allowed.

  20. Chilled Water Thermal Storage System and Demand Response at the University of California at Merced

    SciTech Connect

    Granderson, Jessica; Dudley, Junqiao Han; Kiliccote, Sila; Piette, Mary Ann

    2009-10-08

    The University of California at Merced is a unique campus that has benefited from intensive efforts to maximize energy efficiency, and has participated in a demand response program for the past two years. Campus demand response evaluations are often difficult because of the complexities introduced by central heating and cooling, non-coincident and diverse building loads, and existence of a single electrical meter for the entire campus. At the University of California at Merced, a two million gallon chilled water storage system is charged daily during off-peak price periods and used to flatten the load profile during peak demand periods. This makes demand response more subtle and challenges typical evaluation protocols. The goal of this research is to study demand response savings in the presence of storage systems in a campus setting. First, University of California at Merced summer electric loads are characterized; second, its participation in two demand response events is detailed. In each event a set of strategies were pre-programmed into the campus control system to enable semi-automated response. Finally, demand savings results are applied to the utility's DR incentives structure to calculate the financial savings under various DR programs and tariffs. A key conclusion to this research is that there is significant demand reduction using a zone temperature set point change event with the full off peak storage cooling in use.

  1. University of Minnesota Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage (ATES) project report on the first long-term cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Walton, M. )

    1991-10-01

    The technical feasibility of high-temperature (>100{degrees}C) aquifer thermal energy storage (IOTAS) in a deep, confined aquifer was tested in a series of experimental cycles at the University of Minnesota's St. Paul field test facility (FTF). This report describes the additions to the FTF for the long-term cycles and the details of the first long-term cycle (LT1) that was conducted from November 1984 through May 1985. Heat recovery; operational experience; and thermal, chemical, hydrologic, and geologic aspects of LT1 are reported. The permits for long-term cycles required the addition of a monitoring well 30.5 m from the storage well for monitoring near the edge of the thermally affected area and allowed the addition of a cation-exchange water softener to enable continuous operation during the injection phase. Approximately 62% of the 9.47 GWh of energy added to the 9.21 {times} 10{sup 4} m{sup 3} of ground water stored in the aquifer LT1 was recovered. Ion-exchange water softening of the heated and stored ground water prevented scaling in the system heat exchangers and the storage well and changed the major-ion chemistry of the stored water. Temperatures at the storage horizons in site monitoring wells reached as high as 108{degrees}C during the injection phase of LT1. Following heat recovery, temperatures were <30{degrees}C at the same locations. Less permeable horizons underwent slow temperature changes. No thermal or chemical effects were observed at the remote monitoring site. 25 refs.

  2. University of Minnesota Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage (ATES) project report on the first long-term cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Walton, M.

    1991-10-01

    The technical feasibility of high-temperature (>100{degrees}C) aquifer thermal energy storage (IOTAS) in a deep, confined aquifer was tested in a series of experimental cycles at the University of Minnesota`s St. Paul field test facility (FTF). This report describes the additions to the FTF for the long-term cycles and the details of the first long-term cycle (LT1) that was conducted from November 1984 through May 1985. Heat recovery; operational experience; and thermal, chemical, hydrologic, and geologic aspects of LT1 are reported. The permits for long-term cycles required the addition of a monitoring well 30.5 m from the storage well for monitoring near the edge of the thermally affected area and allowed the addition of a cation-exchange water softener to enable continuous operation during the injection phase. Approximately 62% of the 9.47 GWh of energy added to the 9.21 {times} 10{sup 4} m{sup 3} of ground water stored in the aquifer LT1 was recovered. Ion-exchange water softening of the heated and stored ground water prevented scaling in the system heat exchangers and the storage well and changed the major-ion chemistry of the stored water. Temperatures at the storage horizons in site monitoring wells reached as high as 108{degrees}C during the injection phase of LT1. Following heat recovery, temperatures were <30{degrees}C at the same locations. Less permeable horizons underwent slow temperature changes. No thermal or chemical effects were observed at the remote monitoring site. 25 refs.

  3. Ocean thermal energy at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1982-07-01

    Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) systems that provide synthetic fuels (e.g., methanol), energy intensive products such as ammonia (for fertilizers and chemicals), and aluminum were developed. The work also includes assessment and design concepts for hybrid plants, such as geothermal OTEC (GEOTEC) plants. Management of the conceptual design activity of the two industry teams that are designing offshore OTEC pilot plants that could deliver power to Oahu, Hawaii is discussed. In addition, a program in which tests of a different kind of ocean energy device, a turbine that is air driven as a result of wave action in a chamber is being planned.

  4. IMPROVED COMPUTATIONAL CHARACTERIZATION OF THE THERMAL NEUTRON SOURCE FOR NEUTRON CAPTURE THERAPY RESEARCH AT THE UNIVERSITY OF MISSOURI

    SciTech Connect

    Stuart R. Slattery; David W. Nigg; John D. Brockman; M. Frederick Hawthorne

    2010-05-01

    Parameter studies, design calculations and initial neutronic performance measurements have been completed for a new thermal neutron beamline to be used for neutron capture therapy cell and small-animal radiobiology studies at the University of Missouri Research Reactor. The beamline features the use of single-crystal silicon and bismuth sections for neutron filtering and for reduction of incident gamma radiation. The computational models used for the final beam design and performance evaluation are based on coupled discrete-ordinates and Monte Carlo techniques that permit detailed modeling of the neutron transmission properties of the filtering crystals with very few approximations. This is essential for detailed dosimetric studies required for the anticipated research program.

  5. Gravitational collapse and the thermal evolution of low-metallicity gas clouds in the early Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiaki, Gen; Yoshida, Naoki; Hirano, Shingo

    2016-08-01

    We study gravitational collapse of low-metallicity gas clouds and the formation of protostars by three-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations. Grain growth, non-equilibrium chemistry, molecular cooling, and chemical heating are solved in a self-consistent manner for the first time. We employ the realistic initial conditions for the abundances of metal and dust, and the dust size distribution obtained from recent Population III supernova calculations. We also introduce the state-of-the-art particle splitting method based on the Voronoi tessellation and achieve an extremely high mass resolution of ˜ 10-5 M⊙ (10 Earth masses) in the central region. We follow the thermal evolution of several clouds with various metallicities. We show that the condition for cloud fragmentation depends not only on the gas metallicity but also on the collapse timescale. In many cases, the cloud fragmentation is prevented by the chemical heating owing to molecular hydrogen formation even though dust cooling becomes effective. Meanwhile, in several cases, efficient OH and H2O cooling promotes the cloud elongation, and then cloud "filamentation" is driven by dust thermal emission as a precursor of eventual fragmentation. While the filament fragmentation is driven by rapid gas cooling with metallicity ≳ 10-5 Z⊙, fragmentation occurs in a different manner by the self-gravity of a circumstellar disk with metallicity ≲ 10-5 Z⊙. We use a semi-analytic model to estimate the number fraction of the clouds which undergo the filament fragmentation to be 20-40% with metallicity 10-5-10-4 Z⊙. Overall, our simulations show a viable formation path of the recently discovered Galactic low-mass stars with extremely small metallicities.

  6. University of Minnesota aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) project report on the second long-term cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Hoyer, M.C.; Hallgren, J.P.; Lauer, J.L.; Walton, M.; Eisenreich, S.J.; Howe, J.T.; Splettstoesser, J.F. )

    1991-12-01

    The technical feasibility of high-temperature (>100{degrees}C (>212{degrees}F)) aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) in a deep, confined aquifer was tested in a series of experimental cycles at the University of Minnesota's St. Paul field test facility (FTF). This report describes the second long-term cycle (LT2), which was conducted from October 1986 through April 1987. Heat recovery; operational experience; and thermal, chemical, hydrologic, and geologic effects are reported. Approximately 61% of the 9.21 GWh of energy added to the 9.38 {times} 10{sup 4} m{sup 3} of ground water stored during LT2 was recovered. Temperatures of the water stored and recovered averaged 118{degrees}C (244{degrees}F) and 85{degrees}C (185{degrees}F), respectively. Results agreed with previous cycles conducted at the FTF. System operation during LT2 was nearly as planned. Operational experience from previous cycles at the FTF was extremely helpful. Ion-exchange softening of the heated and stored aquifer water prevented scaling in the system heat exchangers and the storage well, and changed the major-ion chemistry of the stored water. Sodium bicarbonate replaced magnesium and calcium bicarbonate as primary ions in the softened water. Water recovered form storage was approximately at equilibrium with respect to dissolved ions. Silica, calcium, and magnesium were significantly higher in recovered water than in injected water. Sodium was significantly lower in water recovered than in water stored.

  7. University of Minnesota aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) project report on the second long-term cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Hoyer, M.C.; Hallgren, J.P.; Lauer, J.L.; Walton, M.; Eisenreich, S.J.; Howe, J.T.; Splettstoesser, J.F.

    1991-12-01

    The technical feasibility of high-temperature [>100{degrees}C (>212{degrees}F)] aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) in a deep, confined aquifer was tested in a series of experimental cycles at the University of Minnesota`s St. Paul field test facility (FTF). This report describes the second long-term cycle (LT2), which was conducted from October 1986 through April 1987. Heat recovery; operational experience; and thermal, chemical, hydrologic, and geologic effects are reported. Approximately 61% of the 9.21 GWh of energy added to the 9.38 {times} 10{sup 4} m{sup 3} of ground water stored during LT2 was recovered. Temperatures of the water stored and recovered averaged 118{degrees}C (244{degrees}F) and 85{degrees}C (185{degrees}F), respectively. Results agreed with previous cycles conducted at the FTF. System operation during LT2 was nearly as planned. Operational experience from previous cycles at the FTF was extremely helpful. Ion-exchange softening of the heated and stored aquifer water prevented scaling in the system heat exchangers and the storage well, and changed the major-ion chemistry of the stored water. Sodium bicarbonate replaced magnesium and calcium bicarbonate as primary ions in the softened water. Water recovered form storage was approximately at equilibrium with respect to dissolved ions. Silica, calcium, and magnesium were significantly higher in recovered water than in injected water. Sodium was significantly lower in water recovered than in water stored.

  8. The universe in a box - Thermal effects in the standard cold dark matter scenario

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cen, R. Y.; Ostriker, Jeremiah P.; Jameson, Anthony; Liu, Feng

    1990-01-01

    An attempt is made to compute the evolution of a representative piece of the universe at a minimal resolution of a flux-based mesh code coupled with a standard particle-mesh dark matter code. It is found that, on scales greater than 1/h Mpc, dark matter is more clumped than gas. Bremsstrahlung and Compton cooling are unimportant on scales of 1 Mpc or greater. Shocks gradually heat the gas, leaving most of it in voids at T = 10 exp 3.5 K or less, but with a small fraction reaching T = 10 million K or more. Ultraviolet and soft X-ray emission from the heated gas is significant, providing an important part of the background radiation field and significant ionizing of the intergalactic medium. The mean induced Delta T/T for microwave background radiation in the Rayleigh-Jeans part of the spectrum is 1.1 x 10 to the -6th with fluctuation of 5.6 x 10 to the -7th on arcmin scales and a mean y parameter of 5.5 x 10 to the -7th, which is potentially detectable by the COBE satellite.

  9. Observing the Non-Thermal Universe with the Highest Energy Photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dingus, Brenda L.; HAWC, VERITAS, CTA

    2016-01-01

    Astrophysical sources of relativistic particles radiate gamma rays to such high energies that they can be detected from the ground. The existence of high energy gamma rays implies that even higher energy particles are being accelerated placing strong constraints on these non-thermal accelerators. Within our galaxy, TeV gamma rays have been detected from supernova remnants, pulsar wind nebula, x-ray binaries and some yet to be identified sources in the Galactic plane. In addition, these gamma rays have sufficient energy to be attenuated by the interaction with infrared photons producing an electron-positron pair. Thus the spectrum of gamma rays can also constrain the infrared photon density, which for distant extragalactic sources is a direct probe of cosmology. The known extragalactic TeV sources are primarily the blazer class of active galactic nuclei. And TeV gamma rays might even be produced by annihilating dark matter.The US currently supports two ground-based gamma-ray observatories—HAWC and VERITAS—and NSF is developing a prototype for the international Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) observatory. The HAWC (High Altitude Water Cherenkov) observatory just began operation of the full detector in March 2015 and with its wide field of view scans ~2/3 of the sky each day for TeV sources. VERITAS (Very EneRgetic Imaging Telescope Array System) is an array of four imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes that follows individual sources to produce lightcurves and spectra from 85 GeV to > 30 TeV. The combination of both a survey and pointed observatory is very complementary with a broad scientific reach that includes the study of extragalactic and Galactic objects as well as the search for astrophysical signatures of dark matter and the measurement of cosmic rays. I will present the current view of the TeV sky and the latest results from HAWC and VERITAS as well as plans for CTA.

  10. University of Minnesota aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) project report on the third long-term cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Hoyer, M.C.; Hallgren, J.P.; Uebel, M.H.; Delin, G.N.; Eisenreich, S.J.; Sterling, R.L.

    1994-12-01

    The University of Minnesota aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) system has been operated as a field test facility (FTF) since 1982. The objectives were to design, construct, and operate the facility to study the feasibility of high-temperature ATES in a confined aquifer. Four short-term and two long-term cycles were previously conducted, which provided a greatly increased understanding of the efficiency and geochemical effects of high-temperature aquifer thermal energy storage. The third long-term cycle (LT3) was conducted to operate the ATES system in conjunction with a real heating load and to further study the geochemical impact that heated water storage had on the aquifer. For LT3, the source and storage wells were modified so that only the most permeable portion, the Ironton-Galesville part, of the Franconia-Ironton-Galesville aquifer was used for storage. This was expected to improve storage efficiency by reducing the surface area of the heated volume and simplify analysis of water chemistry results by reducing the number of aquifer-related variables which need to be considered. During LT3, a total volume of 63.2 {times} 10{sup 3} m {sup 3} of water was injected at a rate of 54.95 m{sup 3}/hr into the storage well at a mean temperature of 104.7{degrees}C. Tie-in to the reheat system of the nearby Animal Sciences Veterinary Medicine (ASVM) building was completed after injection was completed. Approximately 66 percent (4.13 GWh) of the energy added to the aquifer was recovered. Approximately 15 percent (0.64 GWh) of the usable (10 building. Operations during heat recovery with the ASVM building`s reheat system were trouble-free. Integration into more of the ASVM (or other) building`s mechanical systems would have resulted in significantly increasing the proportion of energy used during heat recovery.

  11. Applicability of Universal Thermal Climate Index (UTCI) in occupational heat stress assessment: a case study in brick industries

    PubMed Central

    VATANI, Javad; GOLBABAEI, Farideh; DEHGHAN, Somayeh Farhang; YOUSEFI, Azam

    2015-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the applicability of Universal Thermal Climate Index (UTCI) as an innovative and science-based index in public health researches, in occupational heat stress assessment. All indoor and outdoor workers (200 people) of Brick industries of Shahroud, Iran participated in the research. First, the environmental variables such as air temperature, wet-bulb temperature, globe temperature, air velocity and relative humidity were measured; then UTCI and WBGT (wet-bulb globe temperature) indices were calculated. Simultaneously, physiological parameters including systolic and diastolic blood pressure, oral temperature, skin temperature, tympanic temperature and heart rate of workers were measured. UTCI and WBGT indices were 34.2 ± 2°C, 21.8 ± 1.8°C in the outdoor environments and 38.1 ± 4.4°C, 24.7 ± 3.3°C at the indoor environments, respectively. There were the weak inverse relationships between UTCI and WBGT indices at the outdoor environments and physiological responses such as systolic blood pressure, and diastolic blood pressure. However, there were no similar results for indoor environments. The significant relationships were found between UTCI and WBGT at both indoor and outdoor environments. Both UTCI and WBGT indices are suitable for assessing the occupational heat stress. Although, UTCI index seems more appropriate for heat stress assessment in the environments with low humidity and air velocity. PMID:26320731

  12. Thermal structures and materials for high-speed flight; Collection of Papers of the 1st Thermal Structures Conference, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Nov. 13-15, 1990

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thornton, Earl A.

    The present conference discusses aerobrake-maneuver vehicle aerothermodynamics, aerothermal issues in the structural design of high speed vehicles, laser surface-alloying of superlight metals with ceramic surfaces, high-temperature Al alloys for supersonic and hypersonic vehicles, advanced metallics for high temperature airframes, novel materials for engine applications, and the development status of computational methods for high temperature structural design. Also discussed are a transient thermal-structural analysis using adaptive unstructured remeshing and mesh movement, the FEM thermoviscoplastic analysis of aerospace structures, hot-structures testing techniques, a thermal-structural analysis of a carbon-carbon/refractory metal heat pipe-cooled leading edge, dynamic effects in thermoviscoplastic structures, microlevel thermal effects in metal-matrix composites (MMCs), thermomechanical effects in the plasma spray manufacture of MMC monotapes, and intelligent HIP processing. Most of the presentations at this conference were abstracted previously (see A91-16027 to A91-16047).

  13. The INTEGRAL Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoenfelder, V.; Lichti, G.; Winkler, C.

    2004-10-01

    The 5th INTEGRAL workshop "The INTEGRAL Universe" was held at the premises of the Bayerische Akademie der Wissenschaften in Munich, Germany, from February 16 - 20, 2004. The workshop was attended by over 230 scientists from all over the world. The aim of the workshop was twofold: to bring the scientists together who are using data from the INTEGRAL mission and to present first results which were obtained by the four INTEGRAL instruments during the first 18 months of operation. It was for the first time after launch that INTEGRAL results were presented and discussed in a broader scientific context and compared with results obtained with other instruments at different wavelengths (especially in the optical, infrared and radio). Naturally the results concentrated mainly on the hard X-ray regime since photons are plentiful and the sensitivity of the INTEGRAL instruments is best there. But also very interesting early results at low-energy gamma-rays, especially on gamma-ray lines, were presented. Because of INTEGRAL?s ability to measure and localize gamma-ray bursts quickly, this topic also drew a lot of attention and stimulating results were presented. The following list emphasizes the scientific importance of the topics which were covered by 6 invited, 1 special and 64 contributed talks as well as about 180 posters: + Nucleosynthesis and gamma-ray line spectroscopy + Pulsars + X-ray binaries (with neutron stars and black holes) + Interstellar continuum emission + AGN (Seyferts and Blazars) + Clusters of galaxies + Cosmic background radiation + Gamma-ray bursts + Unidentified gamma-ray sources + Solar flare gamma-rays + Data analysis (posters only) * Future instruments and missions (posters only)

  14. A Significantly Twisted Spirocyclic Phosphine Oxide as a Universal Host for High-Efficiency Full-Color Thermally Activated Delayed Fluorescence Diodes.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Ding, Dongxue; Tao, Youtian; Wei, Ying; Chen, Runfeng; Xie, Linghai; Huang, Wei; Xu, Hui

    2016-04-01

    A universal thermally activated delayed fluorescence (TADF) host, 4'-diphenylphosphinoylspiro[fluorene-9,9'-xanthene] (SFXSPO), is constructed with a highly distorted and asymmetric configuration and disordered molecular packing in its solid state. SFXSPO successfully endows its full-color TADF diodes with state-of-the-art performance, e.g., the record external quantum efficiency of 22.5% and 19.1% and internal quantum efficiency of ≈100% for its yellow TADF diodes and single-host full-TADF nearly-white-emitting devices, respectively. PMID:26923460

  15. EVALUATION OF TWO METHODS OF THERMAL WEED CONTROL IN FRUIT TREE ORCHARDS, PESTICIDE SPECIAL STUDY, COLORADO STATE UNIVERSITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Research Objectives: 1) Compare the efficiency of two different types of thermal flamers: a direct flamer (Red Dragon, Inc., LaCrosse, Kansas) and a prototype infrared weed flamer (Sunburst, Inc., Eugene Oregon) in controlling weed populations in an apple orchard. 2) Determine ...

  16. University Students Explaining Adiabatic Compression of an Ideal Gas--A New Phenomenon in Introductory Thermal Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leinonen, Risto; Asikainen, Mervi A.; Hirvonen, Pekka E.

    2012-01-01

    This study focuses on second-year university students' explanations and reasoning related to adiabatic compression of an ideal gas. The phenomenon was new to the students, but it was one which they should have been capable of explaining using their previous upper secondary school knowledge. The students' explanations and reasoning were…

  17. Report on research of calculus fragmentation by HIFU-induced cavitation in Tsinghua University: 2. Thermal effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, S. H.; Zuo, Z. G.

    2012-11-01

    Thermal effects in the research of breaking kidney stones using HIFU-induced cavitation were studied. Damages to the phantom could be observed after an acting period of HIFU. It was shown that temperature rise is much greater in phantom than in water. Greatest changes occur near the focal region of HIFU transducer. Distinct temperature changes can be observed with input of continuous signals, while modest changes appear with input of pulsed signals. The fact that pulsed signals generate less damage, indicate the favourable acting patterns of HIFU. More tests are being done at the moment.

  18. Thermal neutron fluence in a treatment room with a Varian linear accelerator at a medical university hospital

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wen-Shan; Changlai, Sheng-Pin; Pan, Lung-Kwang; Tseng, Hsien-Chun; Chen, Chien-Yi

    2011-09-01

    The indium foil activation technique has been employed to measure thermal neutron fluences ( Φth) among various locations in the treatment room with a 20×20 cm 2 field size and a 15 and 10 MV X-ray beam. Spatial Φth are visualized using colored three-dimensional graphical representations; intensities are up to (1.97±0.13)×10 5 and (1.46±0.13)×10 4 n cm -2/Gy-X at isocenter, respectively. The Φth is found to increase with the X-ray energy of the LINAC and decreases as it moves away from the beam center. However, thermal neutron exposure is not assessed in routine dosimetry planning and radiation assessment of patients since neutron dose contributes <1% of the given therapy dose. However, unlike the accelerated beam limited within the gantry window, photoneutrons are widely spread in the treatment room. Distributions of Φth were measured in water phantom irradiated with 15 MV X-ray beams. The shielding effect of the maze was also evaluated. The experimentally estimated Φth along the maze distance was fitted explicate and the tenth-value layer (TVL) was calculated and discussed. Use of a 10 cm-thick polyethylene door placed at the maze was suitable for radiation shielding.

  19. The University of Minnesota aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) field test facility -- system description, aquifer characterization, and results of short-term test cycles

    SciTech Connect

    Walton, M.; Hoyer, M.C.; Eisenreich, S.J.; Holm, N.L.; Holm, T.R.; Kanivetsky, R.; Jirsa, M.A.; Lee, H.C.; Lauer, J.L.; Miller, R.T.; Norton, J.L.; Runke, H. )

    1991-06-01

    Phase 1 of the Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage (ATES) Project at the University of Minnesota was to test the feasibility, and model, the ATES concept at temperatures above 100{degrees}C using a confined aquifer for the storage and recovery of hot water. Phase 1 included design, construction, and operation of a 5-MW thermal input/output field test facility (FTF) for four short-term ATES cycles (8 days each of heat injection, storage, and heat recover). Phase 1 was conducted from May 1980 to December 1983. This report describes the FTF, the Franconia-Ironton-Galesville (FIG) aquifer used for the test, and the four short-term ATES cycles. Heat recovery; operational experience; and thermal, chemical, hydrologic, and geologic effects are all included. The FTF consists of monitoring wells and the source and storage well doublet completed in the FIG aquifer with heat exchangers and a fixed-bed precipitator between the wells of the doublet. The FIG aquifer is highly layered and a really anisotropic. The upper Franconia and Ironton-Galesville parts of the aquifer, those parts screened, have hydraulic conductivities of {approximately}0.6 and {approximately}1.0 m/d, respectively. Primary ions in the ambient ground water are calcium and magnesium bicarbonate. Ambient temperature FIG ground water is saturated with respect to calcium/magnesium bicarbonate. Heating the ground water caused most of the dissolved calcium to precipitate out as calcium carbonate in the heat exchanger and precipitator. Silica, calcium, and magnesium were significantly higher in recovered water than in injected water, suggesting dissolution of some constituents of the aquifer during the cycles. Further work on the ground water chemistry is required to understand water-rock interactions.

  20. Preliminary Experiments and Determination of the Thermal Gradient in a 12.7 mm CaF2 Furnace Assembly, Humboldt State University Piston-Cylinder Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwab, B. E.

    2004-12-01

    A 12.7 mm piston-cylinder laboratory has been established at Humboldt State University. A series of double-thermocouple (DTC) experiments were performed to measure the thermal profile of the furnace assembly following the procedures of Pickering et al. (1998, Amer. Min.). Furnace assemblies consist of a 304 stainless base plug, CaF&_{2} sleeve, straight-walled graphite heater tube, crushable MgO inner parts, and lower graphite plug and ring which allow for extrusion of the graphite heater tube during shortening of the sleeve and MgO pieces. Careful measurement of pre- and post-run assembly parts indicate an average 30-35% shortening of the assembly. DTC results show a thermal peak that is displaced \\sim2.0 mm above the center of the effective furnace, defined as the length of inner MgO pieces post-run. This offset is in the same direction (upward, toward base plug), but slightly less than the offset described by Pickering et al. (1998). A secondary measure of the thermal profile using spinel growth via reaction between MgO and Al_{2}O_{3} assembly parts (e.g., Watson et al., 2002, CMP) is underway. A single partial melting experiment was performed at 1.0 GPa and 1330\\degC for 72 hours using intermediate peridotite starting material INT-A in a graphite-lined Pt capsule with vitreous carbon spheres as a melt sink. Phase compositions were determined by electron microprobe and mass balance calculations were made to determine melt fraction and mineral mode. Initial calculations yield glass:olivine:cpx:opx:spinel proportions of: 5.0:54.2:15.9:23.9:1.1. These preliminary results correspond well with previous work performed at the University of Oregon on the same starting material (Schwab and Johnston, 2001). The best match is with a 1315\\degC experiment (INT-A13) in terms of mode (6.9:53.7:13.4:25.0:1.0) and glass composition, indicating that the temperature of this initial experiment may be slightly cooler than the target temperature, however the results of this

  1. Performance of a New Composite Single-Crystal Filtered Thermal Neutron Beam for Neutron Capture Therapy Research at the University of Missouri

    SciTech Connect

    John D. Brockman; David W. Nigg; M. Frederick Hawthorne; Charles McKibben

    2008-11-01

    The University of Missouri (MU) Institute for Nano and Molecular Medicine, the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and the University of Missouri Research Reactor (MURR) have undertaken a new collaborative research initiative to further the development of improved boron delivery agents for BNCT. The first step of this effort has involved the design and construction of a new thermal neutron beam irradiation facility for cell and small-animal radiobological research at the MURR. In this paper we present the beamline design with the results of pertinent neutronic design calculations. Results of neutronic performance measurements, initiated in February 2008, will also be available for inclusion in the final paper. The new beam will be located in an existing 152.4 mm (6’) diameter MURR beam tube extending from the core to the right in Figure 1. The neutron beam that emanates from the berylium reflector around the reactor is filtered with single-crystal silicon and single-crystal bismuth segments to remove high energy, fission spectrum neutrons and reactor gamma ray contamination. The irradiation chamber is downstream of the bismuth filter section, and approximately 3.95 m from the central axis of the reactor. There is sufficient neutron flux available from the MURR at its rated power of 10 MW to avoid the need for cryogenic cooling of the crystals. The MURR operates on average 150 hours per week, 52 weeks a year. In order to take advantage of 7800 hours of operation time per year the small animal BNCT facility will incorparate a shutter constucuted of boral, lead, steel and polyethylene that will allow experimenters to access the irradiation chamber a few minutes after irradiation. Independent deterministic and stochastic models of the coupled reactor core and beamline were developed using the DORT two-dimensional radiation transport code and the MCNP-5 Monte Carlo code, respectively. The BUGLE-80 47-neutron, 20-gamma group cross section library was employed for the DORT

  2. Thermal neutron equivalent dose assessment around the KFUPM neutron source storage area using NTDs. King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals.

    PubMed

    Abu-Jarad, F; Fazal-ur-Rehman; Al-Haddad, M N; Al-jarallah, M I

    2002-01-01

    Area passive neutron dosemeters based on nuclear track detectors (NTDs) have been used for 13 days to assess accumulated low doses of thermal neutrons around neutron source storage area of the King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals (KFUPM). Moreover, the aim of this study is to check the effectiveness of shielding of the storage area. NTDs were mounted with the boron converter on their surface as one compressed unit. The converter is a lithium tetraborate (Li2B4O7) layer for thermal neutron detection via 10B(n,alpha)7Li and 6Li(n,alpha)3H nuclear reactions. The area passive dosemeters were installed on 26 different locations around the source storage area and adjacent rooms. The calibration factor for NTD-based area passive neutron dosemeters was found to be 8.3 alpha tracks x cm(-2) x microSv(-1) using active snoopy neutron dosemeters in the KFUPM neutron irradiation facility. The results show the variation of accumulated dose with locations around the storage area. The range of dose rates varied from as low as 40 nSvx h(-1) up to 11 microSv x h(-1). The study indicates that the area passive neutron dosemeter was able to detect accumulated doses as low as 40 nSv x h(-1), which could not be detected with the available active neutron dosemeters. The results of the study also indicate that an additional shielding is required to bring the dose rates down to background level. The present investigation suggests extending this study to find the contribution of doses from fast neutrons around the neutron source storage area using NTDs through proton recoil. The significance of this passive technique is that it is highly sensitive and does not require any electronics or power supplies, as is the case in active systems. PMID:12474945

  3. Thermal Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    The University of Georgia used NASTRAN, a COSMIC program that predicts how a design will stand up under stress, to develop a model for monitoring the transient cooling of vegetables. The winter use of passive solar heating for poultry houses is also under investigation by the Agricultural Engineering Dept. Another study involved thermal analysis of black and green nursery containers. The use of NASTRAN has encouraged student appreciation of sophisticated computer analysis.

  4. Effects of thermal fluctuations on thermal inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Hiramatsu, Takashi; Miyamoto, Yuhei; Yokoyama, Jun’ichi

    2015-03-12

    The mechanism of thermal inflation, a relatively short period of accelerated expansion after primordial inflation, is a desirable ingredient for a certain class of particle physics models if they are not to be in contention with the cosmology of the early Universe. Though thermal inflation is most simply described in terms of a thermal effective potential, a thermal environment also gives rise to thermal fluctuations that must be taken into account. We numerically study the effects of these thermal fluctuations using lattice simulations. We conclude that though they do not ruin the thermal inflation scenario, the phase transition at the end of thermal inflation proceeds through phase mixing and is therefore not accompanied by the formations of bubbles nor appreciable amplitude of gravitational waves.

  5. Effects of thermal fluctuations on thermal inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiramatsu, Takashi; Miyamoto, Yuhei; Yokoyama, Jun'ichi

    2015-03-01

    The mechanism of thermal inflation, a relatively short period of accelerated expansion after primordial inflation, is a desirable ingredient for a certain class of particle physics models if they are not to be in contention with the cosmology of the early Universe. Though thermal inflation is most simply described in terms of a thermal effective potential, a thermal environment also gives rise to thermal fluctuations that must be taken into account. We numerically study the effects of these thermal fluctuations using lattice simulations. We conclude that though they do not ruin the thermal inflation scenario, the phase transition at the end of thermal inflation proceeds through phase mixing and is therefore not accompanied by the formations of bubbles nor appreciable amplitude of gravitational waves.

  6. Mars Thermal Inertia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    This image shows the global thermal inertia of the Martian surface as measured by the Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) instrument on the Mars Global Surveyor. The data were acquired during the first 5000 orbits of the MGS mapping mission. The pattern of inertia variations observed by TES agrees well with the thermal inertia maps made by the Viking Infrared Thermal Mapper experiment, but the TES data shown here are at significantly higher spatial resolution (15 km versus 60 km).

    The TES instrument was built by Santa Barbara Remote Sensing and is operated by Philip R. Christensen, of Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ.

  7. Validation of the GOSAT Thermal Infrared (TIR) Band using the University of Wisconsin airborne Scanning High-resolution Interferometer Sounder (S-HIS) and ground-based Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI) at Railroad Valley, Nevada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knuteson, R.; kuze, A.; Shiomi, K.; Taylor, J. K.; Garms, E.; Roman, J.; Revercomb, H. E.; Tobin, D. C.; Gero, P.; Best, F. A.

    2011-12-01

    We provide a quantitative assessment of the calibration accuracy of the thermal infrared measurements from the Greenhouse Gases Observing SATellite (GOSAT), which was launched on January 23, 2009. Results will be presented comparing the observed emission spectra from the TANSO-FTS sensor onboard GOSAT to coincident observations from high altitude aircraft and ground-based spectrometers during the June 2011 Railroad Valley Vicarious Calibration and Validation campaign. The 2011 campaign was the third in a series of joint Japan/U.S. field measurements to assess the calibration of the GOSAT sensors and validate derived products of carbon dioxide and methane. As part of the 2011 campaign, the University of Wisconsin Scanning High-resolution Interferometer Sounder (S-HIS) successfully overflew Railroad Valley, Nevada onboard the high-altitude NASA ER-2 along with the Airborne Visible/InfraRed Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) and the MODIS/ASTER Airborne Simulator (MASTER). The ER-2 overpass of Railroad Valley on June 20, 2011 was timed to coincide with an overpass of the GOSAT satellite at 21:19 UTC. A joint JPL/UWisc team provided coincident upper air observations of pressure, temperature, and water vapor using Vaisala radiosondes released from the center of the Railroad Valley dry lakebed (playa) for six GOSAT daytime overpasses and three nighttime overpasses between 19-26 June 2011. The University of Wisconsin also made ground-based measurements from the center of the playa during each GOSAT overpass with an Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer. The AERI was operated from a research vehicle with the capability to measure the upwelling surface radiance at three view angles and the downwelling atmospheric emission at two angles. The ground-based AERI provided accurate surface emissivity and surface temperature for use in forward model calculations of the satellite observed infrared emission between 6 and 17 microns.

  8. THERMAL DEPOLYMERIZATION OF POSTCONSUMER PLASTICS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The University of North Dakota Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) performed two series of tests to evaluate process conditions for thermal depolymerization of postconsumer plastics. The objective of the first test series was to provide data for optimization of reactio...

  9. Tuning universality far from equilibrium

    PubMed Central

    Karl, Markus; Nowak, Boris; Gasenzer, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Possible universal dynamics of a many-body system far from thermal equilibrium are explored. A focus is set on meta-stable non-thermal states exhibiting critical properties such as self-similarity and independence of the details of how the respective state has been reached. It is proposed that universal dynamics far from equilibrium can be tuned to exhibit a dynamical transition where these critical properties change qualitatively. This is demonstrated for the case of a superfluid two-component Bose gas exhibiting different types of long-lived but non-thermal critical order. Scaling exponents controlled by the ratio of experimentally tuneable coupling parameters offer themselves as natural smoking guns. The results shed light on the wealth of universal phenomena expected to exist in the far-from-equilibrium realm. PMID:23928853

  10. Relative thermalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    del Rio, Lídia; Hutter, Adrian; Renner, Renato; Wehner, Stephanie

    2016-08-01

    Locally thermal quantum systems may contradict traditional thermodynamics: heat can flow from a cold body to a hotter one, if the two are highly entangled. We show that to recover thermodynamic laws, we must use a stronger notion of thermalization: a system S is thermal relative to a reference R if S is both locally thermal and uncorrelated with R . Considering a general quantum reference is particularly relevant for a thermodynamic treatment of nanoscale quantum systems. We derive a technical condition for relative thermalization in terms of conditional entropies. Established results on local thermalization, which implicitly assume a classical reference, follow as special cases.

  11. Relative thermalization.

    PubMed

    Del Rio, Lídia; Hutter, Adrian; Renner, Renato; Wehner, Stephanie

    2016-08-01

    Locally thermal quantum systems may contradict traditional thermodynamics: heat can flow from a cold body to a hotter one, if the two are highly entangled. We show that to recover thermodynamic laws, we must use a stronger notion of thermalization: a system S is thermal relative to a reference R if S is both locally thermal and uncorrelated with R. Considering a general quantum reference is particularly relevant for a thermodynamic treatment of nanoscale quantum systems. We derive a technical condition for relative thermalization in terms of conditional entropies. Established results on local thermalization, which implicitly assume a classical reference, follow as special cases. PMID:27627243

  12. Innovative Universities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barsi, Louis M.; Kaebnick, Gweneth W.

    1989-01-01

    The phenomenon of innovation within the university is examined, noting the possibility of innovation as a key to college vitality. A study was conducted using a group of institutions that demonstrated recent innovative spirit. Members of the American Association of State Colleges and Universities (AASCU), each has been recognized in an annual…

  13. University Futures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Richard

    2012-01-01

    Recent radical changes to university education in England have been discussed largely in terms of the arrangements for transferring funding from the state to the student as consumer, with little discussion of what universities are for. It is important, while challenging the economic rationale for the new system, to resist talking about higher…

  14. Overseas Universities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Inter-University Council for Higher Education Overseas, London (England).

    The following articles and reports are presented in this publication of "Overseas Universities:""Appropriate Technology and University Education," by John Twidell; "The Training of Engineering Staff for Higher Education Institutions in Developing Countries," by D. W. Daniel, C. A. Leal, J. H. Maynes and T. Wilmore; "A Case Study of an Academic…

  15. University Architecture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Brian

    This book explores how universities relate their built environment to academic discourse, asserting that the character of universities is often a charming dialogue between order and disarray. It contains numerous photographs and building plans for example campuses throughout the world. In part 1, "The Campus," chapters are: (1) "Academic Mission…

  16. Challenged Universities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillis, Malcolm

    1995-01-01

    Pricing and financial aid issues affecting research universities, particularly private universities, are examined, including underpricing of services, decentralization, and diversification of higher education in the United States. The growth of federal regulation is also considered, especially the State Postsecondary Review Entities (SPREs)…

  17. Universal Expansion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McArdle, Heather K.

    1997-01-01

    Describes a week-long activity for general to honors-level students that addresses Hubble's law and the universal expansion theory. Uses a discrepant event-type activity to lead up to the abstract principles of the universal expansion theory. (JRH)

  18. Thermal engine

    SciTech Connect

    Karnes, T.E.; Trupin, R.J.

    1984-01-03

    A thermal engine utilizing a strip of nitinol material or other thermally responsive shape memory effect material to drive a reciprocating output shaft, said strip of material forming a common wall between two different alternating temperature sources which thermally cycle the material.

  19. Our Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stern, Alan

    2001-03-01

    The Universe in which we live is unimaginably vast and ancient, with countless star systems, galaxies, and extraordinary phenomena such as black holes, dark matter, and gamma ray bursts. What phenomena remain mysteries, even to seasoned scientists? Our Universe is a fascinating collection of essays by some of the world's foremost astrophysicists. Some are theorists, some computational modelers, some observers, but all offer their insights into the most cutting-edge, difficult, and curious aspects of astrophysics. Compiled, the essays describe more than the latest techniques and findings. Each of the ten contributors offers a more personal perspective on their work, revealing what motivates them and how their careers and lives have been shaped by their desire to understand our universe. S. Alan Stern is Director of the Department of Space Studies at Southwest Research Institute in Boulder, Colorado. He is a planetary scientist and astrophysicist with both observational and theoretical interests. Stern is an avid pilot and a principal investigator in NASA's planetary research program, and he was selected to be a NASA space shuttle mission specialist finalist. He is the author of more than 100 papers and popular articles. His most recent book is Pluto & Charon (Wiley, 1997). Contributors: Dr. John Huchra, Harvard University Dr. Esther Hu, University of Hawaii, Honolulu Dr. John Mather, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Dr. Nick Gnedin, University of Colorado, Boulder Dr. Doug Richstone, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor Dr. Bohdan Paczynski, Princeton University, NJ Dr. Megan Donahue, Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD Dr. Jerry Ostriker, Princeton University, New Jersey G. Bothun, University of Oregon, Eugene

  20. Universe Awareness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sankatsing Nava, Tibisay; Russo, Pedro

    2015-08-01

    Universe Awareness (UNAWE) is an educational programme coordinated by Leiden University that uses the beauty and grandeur of the Universe to encourage young children, particularly those from an underprivileged background, to have an interest in science and technology and foster their sense of global citizenship from the earliest age.UNAWE's twofold vision uses our Universe to inspire and motivate very young children: the excitement of the Universe provides an exciting introduction to science and technology, while the vastness and beauty of the Universe helps broaden the mind and stimulate a sense of global citizenship and tolerance. UNAWE's goals are accomplished through four main activities: the coordination of a global network of more than 1000 astronomers, teachers and educators from more than 60 countries, development of educational resources, teacher training activities and evaluation of educational activities.Between 2011 and 2013, EU-UNAWE, the European branch of UNAWE, was funded by the European Commission to implement a project in 5 EU countries and South Africa. This project has been concluded successfully. Since then, the global project Universe Awareness has continued to grow with an expanding international network, new educational resources and teacher trainings and a planned International Workshop in collaboration with ESA in October 2015, among other activities.

  1. Plasma universe

    SciTech Connect

    Alfven, H.

    1986-09-01

    A model based on the emissions and behavior of the most prevalent material in the universe leads one to view the world as an active and rapidly changing place, and helps one analyze the development of its components.

  2. Universal Truths.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horgan, John

    1990-01-01

    Described is a symposium of Nobel laureates held in the summer of 1990 to discuss cosmology. Different views on the structure and evolution of the universe are presented. Evidence for different theories of cosmology is discussed. (CW)

  3. Einstein's Universe.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlson, Eric; Wald, Robert

    1979-01-01

    Presents a guide to be used by students and teachers in conjunction with a television program about Einstein. Provides general information about special and general relativity, and the universe. Includes questions for discussion after each section and a bibliography. (MA)

  4. Eternal Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wetterich, C.

    2014-08-01

    We discuss cosmological models for an eternal Universe. Physical observables show no singularity from the infinite past to the infinite future. While the Universe is evolving, there is no beginning and no end—the Universe exists forever. The early state of inflation is described in two different, but equivalent pictures. In the freeze frame the Universe emerges from an almost static state with flat geometry. After entropy production it shrinks and "thaws" slowly from a "freeze state" with extremely low temperature. The field transformation to the second "big bang picture" (Einstein frame) is singular. This "field singularity" is responsible for an apparent singularity of the big bang. Furthermore, we argue that past-incomplete geodesics do not necessarily indicate a singularity or beginning of the Universe. Proper time ceases to be a useful concept for physical time if particles become massless. We propose to define physical time by counting the number of zeros of a component of the wave function. This counting is independent of the choice of coordinates and frames, and applies to massive and massless particles alike.

  5. Plasma universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alfven, H.

    1986-01-01

    Traditionally the views on the cosmic environent have been based on observations in the visual octave of the electromagnetic spectrum, during the last half-century supplemented by infrared and radio observations. Space research has opened the full spectrum. Of special importance are the X-ray-gamma-ray regions, in which a number of unexpected phenomena have been discovered. Radiations in these regions are likely to originate mainly from magnetised cosmic plasmas. Such a medium may also emit synchrotron radiation which is observable in the radio region. If a model of the universe is based on the plasma phenomena mentioned it is found that the plasma universe is drastically different from the traditional visual universe. Information about the plasma universe can also be obtained by extrapolation of laboratory experiments and magnetospheric in situ measurements of plasmas. This approach is possible because it is likely that the basic properties of plasmas are the same everywhere. In order to test the usefulness of the plasma universe model it is applied to cosmogony. Such an approach seems to be rather successful. For example, the complicated structure of the Saturnian C ring can be accounted for. It is possible to reconstruct certain phenomena 4 to 5 billions of years ago with an accuracy of better than 1%.

  6. Thermal Magnifier and Minifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Xiang-Ying; Chen, Yi-Xuan; Huang, Ji-Ping

    2016-03-01

    For thermal conduction cases, one can detect the size of an object explicitly by measuring the temperature distribution around it. If the temperature is the only signature we can obtain, we will give an incorrect judgment on the shape or size of the object by disturbing the distribution of it. According to this principle, in this article, we develop a transformation method and design a dual-functional thermal device, which can create a thermal illusion that the object inside it “seems” to appear bigger or smaller than its original size. This device can functionally switch among magnifier and minifier at will. The proposed device consists of two layers: the cloak and the complementary material. A thermal cloak can make the internal region thermally “invisible” while the complementary layer offsets this effect. The combination leads to the illusion of magnification and minification. As a result of finite element simulations, the performances of the illusions are confirmed. Support by the National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant No. 11222544, by the Fok Ying Tung Education Foundation under Grant No. 131008, by the Program for New Century Excellent Talents in University (NCET-12-0121), and by the Chinese National Key Basic Research Special Fund under Grant No. 2011CB922004

  7. Thermal Environments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rutgers, Norman

    The role that a good thermal environment plays in the educational process is discussed. Design implications arise from an analysis of the heating and ventilating principles as apply to vocational-technical facilities. The importance of integrating thermal components in the total design is emphasized. (JS)

  8. Abundance, Distribution and Cycling of Organic Carbon and Nitrogen in University Valley (McMurdo Dry Valleys of Antarctica) Permafrost Soils with Differing Ground Thermal and Moisture Conditions: Analogue to C-N Cycle on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faucher, B. F.; Lacelle, D. L.; Davila, A. D.; Pollard, W. P.; McKay, C. P. M.

    2016-05-01

    High elevation McMurdo Dry Valleys of Antarctica are key Mars analogue sites. Our investigation focuses on the link between ground ice origin, distribution and cycling of organic carbon and nitrogen in University Valley, and its soil habitability.

  9. University Citizenship.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kleinsasser, Audrey M.

    2002-01-01

    When called to serve on committees and take on other assignments outside their job descriptions, many educators run in the other direction. How can this work be reframed so educators can play a positive and active role as university citizens? This kind of involvement must be nurtured by all those on campus who play a leadership role. (Author)

  10. Universal Design.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rydeen, James E.

    1999-01-01

    Examines universal school design that is both user-friendly for all students and compliant with the Americans with Disabilities Act. This approach provides the basic functional design issues for easy traffic control, as well as orientation and classrooms that are adaptable to future curricular changes. Discusses new standards that impact design…

  11. New Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burgett, Bruce

    2011-01-01

    The public-private alliance signals a future in which self-serving agreements could become the coin of the realm. Such a future would be a betrayal of the historical promise of public universities to innovate in ways that expand access to higher education. Given the rise of market-based models in educational policy circles, the threat of the…

  12. University Builders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pearce, Martin

    This publication explores a diverse collection of new university buildings. Ranging from the design of vast new campuses, such as that by Wilford and Stirling at Temasek, Singapore, through to the relatively modest yet strategically important, such as the intervention by Allies and Morrison at Southampton, this book examines the new higher…

  13. Widener University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valesey, Brigitte; Allen, Jo

    2009-01-01

    Founded in 1821, Widener University is a two-state (Pennsylvania and Delaware), four-campus, eight-college private institution serving approximately 6,700 students. Following arrival of the new senior vice president and provost in 2004 and subsequent reorganization of vice presidential responsibilities, Student Affairs is now led by a dean of…

  14. Universities 2035

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thrift, Nigel

    2016-01-01

    This paper examines the future of Western higher education. Situated midway between an analysis and a polemic, it concerns itself with how we might begin to actively design the universities of the future. That will require a productionist account of higher education which is so far sadly lacking. But there are signs that such an account might be…

  15. Thermal tachyacoustic cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agarwal, Abhineet; Afshordi, Niayesh

    2014-08-01

    An intriguing possibility that can address pathologies in both early Universe cosmology (i.e. the horizon problem) and quantum gravity (i.e. nonrenormalizability), is that particles at very high energies and/or temperatures could propagate arbitrarily fast. A concrete realization of this possibility for the early Universe is the tachyacoustic (or speedy sound) cosmology, which could also produce a scale-invariant spectrum for scalar cosmological perturbations. Here, we study thermal tachyacoustic cosmology (TTC), i.e. this scenario with thermal initial conditions. We find that a phase transition in the early Universe, around the scale of the grand unified theory (GUT scale; T ˜1015 GeV), during which the speed of sound drops by 25 orders of magnitude within a Hubble time, can fit current CMB observations. We further discuss how production of primordial black holes constrains the cosmological acoustic history, while coupling TTC to Horava-Lifshitz gravity leads to a lower limit on the amplitude of tensor modes (r≳10-3), that are detectable by CMBpol (and might have already been seen by the BICEP-Keck Collaboration).

  16. Expanding Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schrödinger, E.

    2011-02-01

    Preface; Part I. The de Sitter Universe: 1. Synthetic construction; 2. The reduced model: geodesics; 3. The elliptic interpretation; 4. The static frame; 5. The determination of parallaxes; 6. The Lemaître-Robertson frame; Part II. The Theory of Geodesics: 7. On null geodesics; i. Determination of the parameter for null lines in special cases; ii. Frequency shift; 8. Free particles and light rays in general expanding spaces, flat or hyperspherical; i. Flat spaces; ii. Spherical spaces; iii. The red shift for spherical spaces; Part III. Waves in General Riemannian Space-Time: 9. The nature of our approximation; 10. The Hamilton-Jacobi theory in a gravitational field; 11. Procuring approximate solutions of the Hamilton-Jacobi equation from wave theory; Part IV. Waves in an Expanding Universe: 12. General considerations; 13. Proper vibrations and wave parcels; Bibliography.

  17. Thermal Insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Commercially known as Solimide, Temptronics, Inc.'s thermal insulation has application in such vehicles as aircraft, spacecraft and surface transportation systems (i.e. rapid transit cars, trains, buses, and ships) as acoustical treatment for door, wall, and ceiling panels, as a means of reducing vibrations, and as thermal insulation (also useful in industrial equipment). Product originated from research conducted by Johnson Space Center on advanced flame-resistant materials for minimizing fire hazard in the Shuttle and other flight vehicles.

  18. University lobbying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richman, Barbara T.

    In the past year, an increasing number of individual academic institutions have lobbied in Congress for new science facilities funds thus circumventing the traditional peer review process of evaluating the merits of such facilities. As an attempt to stem this rising tide, the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) governing council and the Association of American Universities (AAU) recently and independently issued strong statements condemning lobbying by individual universities and enthusiastically supporting the peer review system.“Informed peer judgments on the scientific merits of specific proposals, in open competition, should be a central element in the awarding of all federal funds for science,” the NAS resolution stated. AAU, meanwhile, implored “scientists, leaders of America's universities, and members of Congress” to “refrain from actions that would make scientific decisions a test of political influence rather than a judgment on the quality of the work to be done.” Roughly 50 research institutions constitute AAU; the two AAU Canadian members did not vote on the consortium's statement.

  19. Thermal Expansion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ventura, Guglielmo; Perfetti, Mauro

    All solid materials, when cooled to low temperatures experience a change in physical dimensions which called "thermal contraction" and is typically lower than 1 % in volume in the 4-300 K temperature range. Although the effect is small, it can have a heavy impact on the design of cryogenic devices. The thermal contraction of different materials may vary by as much as an order of magnitude: since cryogenic devices are constructed at room temperature with a lot of different materials, one of the major concerns is the effect of the different thermal contraction and the resulting thermal stress that may occur when two dissimilar materials are bonded together. In this chapter, theory of thermal contraction is reported in Sect. 1.2 . Section 1.3 is devoted to the phenomenon of negative thermal expansion and its applications.

  20. JPL Advanced Thermal Control Technology Roadmap - 2012

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birur, Gaj; Rodriguez, Jose I.

    2012-01-01

    NASA's new emphasis on human exploration program for missions beyond LEO requires development of innovative and revolutionary technologies. Thermal control requirements of future NASA science instruments and missions are very challenging and require advanced thermal control technologies. Limited resources requires organizations to cooperate and collaborate; government, industry, universities all need to work together for the successful development of these technologies.

  1. Recapturing the Universal in the University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnett, Ronald

    2005-01-01

    The idea of "the university" has stood for universal themes--of knowing, of truthfulness, of learning, of human development, and of critical reason. Through its affirming and sustaining of such themes, the university came itself to stand for universality in at least two senses: the university was neither partial (in its truth criteria) nor local…

  2. Open University

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2011-04-25

    Michel Pentz est née en Afrique du Sud et venu au Cern en 1957 comme physicien et président de l'associaion du personnel. Il est également fondateur du mouvement Antiapartheid de Genève et a participé à la fondation de l'Open University en Grande-Bretagne. Il nous parle des contextes pédagogiques, culturels et nationaux dans lesquels la méthode peut s'appliquer.

  3. How hot are expanding universes?

    SciTech Connect

    Obadia, Nathaniel

    2008-10-15

    A way to address the conundrum of quantum gravity is to illustrate the potentially fundamental interplay between quantum field theory, curved space-times physics, and thermodynamics. So far, when studying moving quantum systems in the vacuum, the only known perfectly thermal temperatures are those obtained for constant (or null) accelerations A in constant (or null) Hubble parameters H space-times. In this paper, restricting ourselves to conformally coupled scalar fields, we present the most comprehensive expression for the temperature undergone by a moving observer in the vacuum, valid for any time-dependent linear accelerations and Hubble parameters: T={radical}(A{sup 2}+H{sup 2}+2Ht)/2{pi} where t=dt/d{tau} is the motion's Lorentz factor. The inequivalence between a constant T and actual thermality is explained. As a byproduct, all the Friedmann universes for which observers at rest feel the vacuum as a thermal bath are listed.

  4. Purdue University

    SciTech Connect

    Daly, P.; Grabowski, Z.; Mayer, R.H.

    1995-08-01

    The Purdue University group, including several thesis students, is working on a measurement of high-spin nuclear states at ATLAS. They use in-beam gamma-ray techniques to investigate several aspects of nuclear structure at high spin, testing the validity of shell-model calculations for high-spin-yrast states near Z = 50. The nuclei are produced via deep inelastic reactions, rather than with the more conventional fusion reactions. This technique allows the study of neutron-rich nuclei that cannot be studied by other means. The group is studying proton-rich nuclei with N{approximately}82 using the FMA and an electron spectrometer. Furthermore, D. Nisius is a Ph.D. student, resident at ANL, performing his thesis work under the supervision of R.V.F. Janssens.

  5. Thermal defoliation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The negative perception some consumers hold regarding agricultural chemicals has resulted in an increased demand for organic foods and fibers, and in increasing political pressure for the regulation of agricultural production practices. This has revived interest in thermal defoliation of cotton and ...

  6. Thermal Effects.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Panyue; Ye, Jie; Zeng, Guangming

    2015-10-01

    This review focuses on the research literatures published in 2014 relating to topics of thermal effects in water pollution control. This review is divided into the following sections: anaerobic wastewater and sludge treatment, biological nitrogen and phosphorus removal, membrane biological treatment, sewage sludge pyrolysis, natural treatment, resource recovery, electrolysis, oxidation and adsorption treatment. PMID:26420108

  7. Thermal effects

    SciTech Connect

    Harrelson, M.E.; Talmadge, S.S.; Cravens, J.B.

    1984-06-01

    A literature review is presented of recent studies on the role of temperature effects and change in temperature caused by thermal power plants on aquatic life. Several of these studies involve the use of models that allow testing of hypotheses concerning the effects of temperature on fish and insects. 91 references.

  8. THERMAL DEFOLIATION

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An apparatus designed to defoliate cotton with hot air was tested in two varieties and two field conditions. Cotton defoliation using hot air was as effective as defoliation using tyical chemicals under some conditions. Aphid populations were eliminated by the thermal treatment, reducing the risk ...

  9. Thermal Hardware for the Thermal Analyst

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinfeld, David

    2015-01-01

    The presentation will be given at the 26th Annual Thermal Fluids Analysis Workshop (TFAWS 2015) hosted by the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) Thermal Engineering Branch (Code 545). NCTS 21070-1. Most Thermal analysts do not have a good background into the hardware which thermally controls the spacecraft they design. SINDA and Thermal Desktop models are nice, but knowing how this applies to the actual thermal hardware (heaters, thermostats, thermistors, MLI blanketing, optical coatings, etc...) is just as important. The course will delve into the thermal hardware and their application techniques on actual spacecraft. Knowledge of how thermal hardware is used and applied will make a thermal analyst a better engineer.

  10. Thermal Clothing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Gateway Technologies, Inc. is marketing and developing textile insulation technology originally developed by Triangle Research and Development Corporation. The enhanced thermal insulation stems from Small Business Innovation Research contracts from NASA's Johnson Space Center and the U.S. Air Force. The effectiveness of the insulation comes from the microencapsulated phase-change materials originally made to keep astronauts gloved hands warm. The applications for the product range from outer wear, housing insulation, and blankets to protective firefighting gear and scuba diving suits. Gateway has developed and begun marketing thermal regulating products under the trademark, OUTLAST. Products made from OUTLAST are already on the market, including boot and shoe liners, winter headgear, hats and caps for hunting and other outdoor sports, and a variety of men's and women's ski gloves.

  11. Thermal Effects.

    PubMed

    Yan, Ming; Zhang, Panyue; Zeng, Guangming

    2016-10-01

    This review focuses on the research literatures published in 2015 relating to topics of thermal effects in water pollution control. This review is divided into the following sections: biological nitrogen and phosphorus removal, wastewater treatment for organic conversion, industrial wastewater treatment, anaerobic digestion of sewage sludge and solid waste, sludge biochar preparation and application, pyrolysis of sewage sludge, reduction heavy metal in sewage sludge and soil, and other issues of wastewater and sludge treatment. PMID:27620109

  12. GCFR thermal-hydraulic experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Schlueter, G.; Baxi, C.B.; Dalle Donne, M.; Gat, U.; Fenech, H.; Hanson, D.; Hudina, M.

    1980-01-01

    The thermal-hydraulic experimental studies performed and planned for the Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor (GCFR) core assemblies are described. The experiments consist of basic studies performed to obtain correlations, and bundle experiments which provide input for code validation and design verification. These studies have been performed and are planned at European laboratories, US national laboratories, Universities in the US, and at General Atomic Company

  13. Thermal insulator

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, R.; Asada, Y.; Matsuo, Y.; Mikoda, M.

    1985-07-16

    A thermal insulator comprises an expanded resin body having embedded therein an evacuated powder insulation portion which consists of fine powder and a container of film-like plastics or a film-like composite of plastics and metal for enclosing the powder. The resin body has been expanded by a Freon gas as a blowing agent. Since a Freon gas has a larger molecular diameter than the constituent gases of air, it is less likely to permeate through the container than air. Thus present invention provides a novel composite insulator which fully utilizes the benefits of vacuum insulation without necessitating a strong and costly material for a vacuum container.

  14. Heat transmission between a profiled nanowire and a thermal bath

    SciTech Connect

    Blanc, Christophe; Heron, Jean-Savin; Fournier, Thierry; Bourgeois, Olivier

    2014-07-28

    Thermal transport through profiled and abrupt contacts between a nanowire and a reservoir has been investigated by thermal conductance measurements. It is demonstrated that above 1 K the transmission coefficients are identical between abrupt and profiled junctions. This shows that the thermal transport is principally governed by the nanowire itself rather than by the resistance of the thermal contact. These results are perfectly compatible with the previous theoretical models. The thermal conductance measured at sub-Kelvin temperatures is discussed in relation to the universal value of the quantum of thermal conductance.

  15. USAF solar thermal applications overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hauger, J. S.; Simpson, J. A.

    1981-01-01

    Process heat applications were compared to solar thermal technologies. The generic process heat applications were analyzed for solar thermal technology utilization, using SERI's PROSYS/ECONOMAT model in an end use matching analysis and a separate analysis was made for solar ponds. Solar technologies appear attractive in a large number of applications. Low temperature applications at sites with high insolation and high fuel costs were found to be most attractive. No one solar thermal technology emerges as a clearly universal or preferred technology, however,, solar ponds offer a potential high payoff in a few, selected applications. It was shown that troughs and flat plate systems are cost effective in a large number of applications.

  16. Jet Fuel Thermal Stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, W. F. (Editor)

    1979-01-01

    Various aspects of the thermal stability problem associated with the use of broadened-specification and nonpetroleum-derived turbine fuels are addressed. The state of the art is reviewed and the status of the research being conducted at various laboratories is presented. Discussions among representatives from universities, refineries, engine and airframe manufacturers, airlines, the Government, and others are presented along with conclusions and both broad and specific recommendations for future stability research and development. It is concluded that significant additional effort is required to cope with the fuel stability problems which will be associated with the potentially poorer quality fuels of the future such as broadened specification petroleum fuels or fuels produced from synthetic sources.

  17. University School at the University of Tulsa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hollingsworth, Patricia

    2004-01-01

    This article features the University School at The University of Tulsa, which was established in 1982 as a private, full-school program for gifted students from age 3 through 8th grade. The mission of the University School is to serve as a local and national model of excellence in gifted education. The goal is for students to maximize their…

  18. University Handbook. University of Wisconsin, Whitewater.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wisconsin Univ., Whitewater.

    The University of Wisconsin-Whitewater's handbook is divided into major sections dealing with: the university; business services; university services; student matters; curricular matters; and personnel matters. Various topics are covered, including: tuition for senior citizens, medical insurance, risk management, degree requirements, student…

  19. Quantum cloning disturbed by thermal Davies environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dajka, Jerzy; Łuczka, Jerzy

    2016-03-01

    A network of quantum gates designed to implement universal quantum cloning machine is studied. We analyze how thermal environment coupled to auxiliary qubits, `blank paper' and `toner' required at the preparation stage of copying, modifies an output fidelity of the cloner. Thermal environment is described in terms of the Markovian Davies theory. We show that such a cloning machine is not universal any more but its output is independent of at least a part of parameters of the environment. As a case study, we consider cloning of states in a six-state cryptography's protocol. We also briefly discuss cloning of arbitrary input states.

  20. Quantum cloning disturbed by thermal Davies environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dajka, Jerzy; Łuczka, Jerzy

    2016-06-01

    A network of quantum gates designed to implement universal quantum cloning machine is studied. We analyze how thermal environment coupled to auxiliary qubits, `blank paper' and `toner' required at the preparation stage of copying, modifies an output fidelity of the cloner. Thermal environment is described in terms of the Markovian Davies theory. We show that such a cloning machine is not universal any more but its output is independent of at least a part of parameters of the environment. As a case study, we consider cloning of states in a six-state cryptography's protocol. We also briefly discuss cloning of arbitrary input states.

  1. Modified gravity in contemporary universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arbuzova, E. V.; Dolgov, A. D.

    2013-03-01

    Astronomical data in favor of cosmological acceleration and possible explanations of accelerated expansion of the universe are discussed. Main attention is paid to gravity modifications at small curvature which could induce accelerated cosmological expansion. It is shown that gravitating systems with mass density rising with time evolve to a singular state with infinite curvature scalar. The universe evolution during the radiation-dominated epoch is studied in the R 2-extended gravity theory. Particle production rate by the oscillating curvature and the back reaction of particle production on the evolution of R are calculated in one-loop approximation. Possible implications of the model for cosmological creation of non-thermal dark matter are discussed.

  2. Thermal lensing in ocular media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vincelette, Rebecca Lee

    2009-12-01

    This research was a collaborative effort between the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) and the University of Texas to examine the laser-tissue interaction of thermal lensing induced by continuous-wave, CW, near-infrared, NIR, laser radiation in the eye and its influence on the formation of a retinal lesion from said radiation. CW NIR laser radiation can lead to a thermal lesion induced on the retina given sufficient power and exposure duration as related to three basic parameters; the percent of transmitted energy to, the optical absorption of, and the size of the laser-beam created at the retina. Thermal lensing is a well-known phenomenon arising from the optical absorption, and subsequent temperature rise, along the path of the propagating beam through a medium. Thermal lensing causes the laser-beam profile delivered to the retina to be time dependent. Analysis of a dual-beam, multidimensional, high-frame rate, confocal imaging system in an artificial eye determined the rate of thermal lensing in aqueous media exposed to 1110, 1130, 1150 and 1318-nm wavelengths was related to the power density created along the optical axis and linear absorption coefficient of the medium. An adaptive optics imaging system was used to record the aberrations induced by the thermal lens at the retina in an artificial eye during steady-state. Though the laser-beam profiles changed over the exposure time, the CW NIR retinal damage thresholds between 1110--1319-nm were determined to follow conventional fitting algorithms which neglected thermal lensing. A first-order mathematical model of thermal lensing was developed by conjoining an ABCD beam propagation method, Beer's law of attenuation, and a solution to the heat-equation with respect to radial diffusion. The model predicted that thermal lensing would be strongest for small (< 4-mm) 1/e2 laser-beam diameters input at the corneal plane and weakly transmitted wavelengths where less than 5% of the energy is delivered to the retina

  3. Global Map of Thermal Neutrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Observations by NASA's 2001 Mars Odyssey spacecraft show a global view of Mars in low energy, or thermal, neutrons. Thermal neutrons are sensitive to the presence of hydrogen and the presence of carbon dioxide, in this case 'dry ice' frost. The red area at the top of the map indicates that about one meter (three feet) of carbon dioxide frost covers the surface, as it does every Mars winter in the polar regions. Soil enriched by hydrogen is indicated by the deep blue colors on the map, which show a low intensity of thermal neutrons. An enhancement of thermal neutrons close to the south pole, seen as a light green color, indicates the presence of residual carbon dioxide in the south polar cap, even though the annual frost dissipated from that region during southern summer.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. Investigators at Arizona State University in Tempe, the University of Arizona in Tucson, and NASA's Johnson Space Center, Houston, operate the science instruments. The gamma-ray spectrometer was provided by the University of Arizona in collaboration with the Russian Aviation and Space Agency, which provided the high-energy neutron detector, and the Los Alamos National Laboratories, New Mexico, which provided the neutron spectrometer. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  4. Cosmology of a charged universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, A.

    1979-01-01

    The Proca generalization of electrodynamics admits the possibility that the universe could possess a net electric charge uniformly distributed throughout space, while possessing no electric field. A general-relativistic model of cosmological expansion dominated by such a charged background has been calculated, and is consistent with present observational limits on the Hubble constant, the deceleration parameter, and the age of the universe. However, if this cosmology applied at the present epoch, the very early expansion of the universe would have been too rapid for cosmological nucleosynthesis or thermalization of the background radiation to have occurred. Hence, domination of the present expansion by background charge appears to be incompatible with the 3-K background and big-bang production of light elements. If the present background charge density were sufficiently small (but not strictly zero), expansion from the epoch of nucleosynthesis would proceed according to the conventional scenario, but the energy due to the background charge would have dominated at some earlier epoch. This last possibility leads to equality of pressure and energy density in the primordial universe.

  5. Hydrogen fuel - Universal energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prince, A. G.; Burg, J. A.

    The technology for the production, storage, transmission, and consumption of hydrogen as a fuel is surveyed, with the physical and chemical properties of hydrogen examined as they affect its use as a fuel. Sources of hydrogen production are described including synthesis from coal or natural gas, biomass conversion, thermochemical decomposition of water, and electrolysis of water, of these only electrolysis is considered economicially and technologically feasible in the near future. Methods of production of the large quantities of electricity required for the electrolysis of sea water are explored: fossil fuels, hydroelectric plants, nuclear fission, solar energy, wind power, geothermal energy, tidal power, wave motion, electrochemical concentration cells, and finally ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC). The wind power and OTEC are considered in detail as the most feasible approaches. Techniques for transmission (by railcar or pipeline), storage (as liquid in underwater or underground tanks, as granular metal hydride, or as cryogenic liquid), and consumption (in fuel cells in conventional power plants, for home usage, for industrial furnaces, and for cars and aircraft) are analyzed. The safety problems of hydrogen as a universal fuel are discussed, noting that they are no greater than those for conventional fuels.

  6. CEQATR Thermal Test Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balusek, Alan R.

    2009-01-01

    A thermal test overview of the Constellation Environmental Qualification and Acceptance Test Requirement (CEQATR) is presented. The contents include: 1) CEQATR Thermal Test Overview; 2) CxP Environments; 3) CEQATR Table 1.2-1; 4) Levels of Assembly; 5) Definitions for Levels of Assembly; 6) Hardware Applicability; 7) CEQATR Thermal-Related Definitions; 8) Requirements for unit-level thermal testing; 9) Requirements for major assembly level thermal testing; 10) General thermal testing requirements; 11) General thermal cycle, thermal vacuum profiles; 12) Test tolerances; 13) Vacuum vs Ambient; 14) Thermal Gradient; 15) Sequence of Testing; 16) Alternative Strategies; 17) Protoflight; 18) Halt/Hass; 19) Humidity; and 20) Tailoring.

  7. Advanced thermally stable jet fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Schobert, H.H.

    1999-01-31

    The Pennsylvania State University program in advanced thermally stable coal-based jet fuels has five broad objectives: (1) Development of mechanisms of degradation and solids formation; (2) Quantitative measurement of growth of sub-micrometer and micrometer-sized particles suspended in fuels during thermal stressing; (3) Characterization of carbonaceous deposits by various instrumental and microscopic methods; (4) Elucidation of the role of additives in retarding the formation of carbonaceous solids; (5) Assessment of the potential of production of high yields of cycloalkanes by direct liquefaction of coal. Future high-Mach aircraft will place severe thermal demands on jet fuels, requiring the development of novel, hybrid fuel mixtures capable of withstanding temperatures in the range of 400--500 C. In the new aircraft, jet fuel will serve as both an energy source and a heat sink for cooling the airframe, engine, and system components. The ultimate development of such advanced fuels requires a thorough understanding of the thermal decomposition behavior of jet fuels under supercritical conditions. Considering that jet fuels consist of hundreds of compounds, this task must begin with a study of the thermal degradation behavior of select model compounds under supercritical conditions. The research performed by The Pennsylvania State University was focused on five major tasks that reflect the objectives stated above: Task 1: Investigation of the Quantitative Degradation of Fuels; Task 2: Investigation of Incipient Deposition; Task 3: Characterization of Solid Gums, Sediments, and Carbonaceous Deposits; Task 4: Coal-Based Fuel Stabilization Studies; and Task 5: Exploratory Studies on the Direct Conversion of Coal to High Quality Jet Fuels. The major findings of each of these tasks are presented in this executive summary. A description of the sub-tasks performed under each of these tasks and the findings of those studies are provided in the remainder of this volume

  8. Universities as Management Arenas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Donald E.

    1973-01-01

    The process of university leadership is examined in terms of (1) the development of more sophisticated models of the kind of organization a university is, and (2) the development of more precise delineations of the nature of the multiple leadership tasks that must be performed in a university setting. The university is viewed as an "organized…

  9. California State University, Sacramento

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Varlotta, Lori E.

    2009-01-01

    California State University, Sacramento, commonly referred to as "Sacramento State," is a booming metropolitan university located on 300 acres in the state capital of California. The university, the seventh largest in the California State University system, enrolls a multicultural student body of approximately 29,000 students. At Sacramento State,…

  10. Adult Learners in Universities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Janette, Ed.

    1981-01-01

    Theories on adult development and learning and some of the Ontario universities' programs and services for the adult learner are examined, and Athabasca University, Alberta's answer to the British Open University, is described. Peter O'Donnell discusses adult learners' needs and explains how Athabasca University serves this specific type of…

  11. Motivating University Researchers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hendriks, Paul; Sousa, Celio

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents an empirical investigation into how universities approach the need and means for motivating university researchers through their management practices. The role of work motivation for this group deserves attention because pressures from outside and within the universities are said to have made university research less of a…

  12. The Global University Press

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dougherty, Peter J.

    2012-01-01

    The modern world's understanding of American university press has long been shaped by university-press books. American university-press books are good international advertisements for the universities whose logos grace their spines. The growth of transnational scholarship and the expansion of digital communications networks are converging in ways…

  13. When Collective Bargaining Fails: The Boston University, Temple University, University of Bridgeport, and Yeshiva University Cases.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuechle, David

    This paper highlights some of the similarities and differences in the labor-management experiences of Boston University (Massachusetts), Temple University (Pennsylvania), the University of Bridgeport (Connecticut), and Yeshiva University (New York) to determine which may represent failures and which do not. In comparing the Yeshiva and Boston…

  14. Masks of the Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, Edward

    2011-11-01

    Preface; Introducing the masks; Part I. Worlds in the Making: 1. The magic Universe; 2. The mythic Universe; 3. The geometric Universe; 4. The medieval Universe; 5. The infinite Universe; 6. The mechanistic Universe; Part II. The Heart Divine: 7. Dance of the atoms and waves; 8. Fabric of space and time; 9. Nearer to the heart's desire; 10. The cosmic tide; 11. Do dreams ever come true?; Part III. The Cloud of Unknowing: 12. The witch universe; 13. The spear of Archytas; 14. All that is made; 15. The cloud of unknowing; 16. Learned ignorance.

  15. Seasonal thermal energy storage

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, R.D.; Kannberg, L.D.; Raymond, J.R.

    1984-05-01

    This report describes the following: (1) the US Department of Energy Seasonal Thermal Energy Storage Program, (2) aquifer thermal energy storage technology, (3) alternative STES technology, (4) foreign studies in seasonal thermal energy storage, and (5) economic assessment.

  16. LDCM Preliminary Thermal Trades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, Robert; Pagnutti, Mary; Blonski, Slawomir; Spruce, Joe

    2001-01-01

    The expected cost of adding thermal bands to the next generation Landsat Data Continuity Mission (LDCM) could be significant. This viewgraph presentation investigates both traditional cooled cross-track scanners and new architectures (cooled and uncooled) which could enable a low cost thermal capability. The presentation includes surveys of applications of Landsat thermal data and the architecture of thermal instruments. It also covers new thermal architecture sensor trades, ALI Architecture with Uncooled TIR Detectors, and simulated thermal imagery.

  17. Thermally cascaded thermoelectric generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flaherty, R.

    1970-01-01

    High efficiency thermoelectric generator utilizes a high-temperature thermoelectric material in thermal series with a low-temperature material. A thermally cascaded generator increases system efficiency.

  18. Thermal conductivity of zirconia thermal barrier coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dinwiddie, R. B.; Beecher, S. C.; Nagaraj, B. A.; Moore, C. S.

    1995-01-01

    Thermal barrier coatings (TBC's) applied to the hot gas components of turbine engines lead to enhanced fuel efficiency and component reliability. Understanding the mechanisms which control the thermal transport behavior of the TBC's is of primary importance. Physical vapor description (PVD) and plasma spraying (PS) are the two most commonly used coating techniques. These techniques produce coatings with unique microstructures which control their performance and stability. The PS coatings were applied with either standard power or hollow sphere particles. The hollow sphere particles yielded a lower density and lower thermal conductivity coating. The thermal conductivity of both fully and partially stabilized zirconia, before and after thermal aging, will be compared. The thermal conductivity of the coatings permanently increase upon being exposed to high temperatures. These increases are attributed to microstructural changes within the coatings. Sintering of the as fabricated plasma sprayed lamellar structure is observed by scanning electron microscopy of coatings isothermally heat treated at temperatures greater than 1100 C. During this sintering process the planar porosity between lamella is converted to a series of small spherical pores. The change in pore morphology is the primary reason for the observed increase in thermal conductivity. This increase in thermal conductivity can be modeled using a relationship which depends on both the temperature and time of exposure. Although the PVD coatings are less susceptible to thermal aging effects, preliminary results suggest that they have a higher thermal conductivity than PS coatings, both before and after thermal aging. The increases in thermal conductivity due to thermal aging for partially stabilized plasma sprayed zirconia have been found to be less than for fully stabilized plasma sprayed zirconia coatings. The high temperature thermal diffusivity data indicates that if these coatings reach a temperature above

  19. Thermal conductivity of zirconia thermal barrier coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dinwiddie, R. B.; Beecher, S. C.; Nagaraj, B. A.; Moore, C. S.

    1995-01-01

    Thermal barrier coatings (TBC's) applied to the hot gas components of turbine engines lead to enhanced fuel efficiency and component reliability. Understanding the mechanisms which control the thermal transport behavior of the TBC's is of primary importance. Physical vapor deposition (PVD) and plasma spraying (PS) are the two most commonly used coating techniques. These techniques produce coatings with unique microstructures which control their performance and stability. The PS coatings were applied with either standard powder or hollow sphere particles. The hollow sphere particles yielded a lower density and lower thermal conductivity coating. The thermal conductivity of both fully and partially stabilized zirconia, before and after thermal aging, will be compared. The thermal conductivity of the coatings permanently increases upon exposed to high temperatures. These increases are attributed to microstructural changes within the coatings. Sintering of the as-fabricated plasma sprayed lamellar structure is observed by scanning electron microscopy of coatings isothermally heat treated at temperatures greater than 1100 C. During this sintering process the planar porosity between lamella is converted to a series of small spherical pores. The change in pore morphology is the primary reason for the observed increase in thermal conductivity. This increase in thermal conductivity can be modeled using a relationship which depends on both the temperature and time of exposure. Although the PVD coatings are less susceptible to thermal aging effects, preliminary results suggest that they have a higher thermal conductivity than PS coatings, both before and after thermal aging. The increases in thermal conductivity due to thermal aging for partially stabilized plasma sprayed zirconia have been found to be less than for fully stabilized plasma sprayed zirconia coatings. The high temperature thermal diffusivity data indicate that if these coatings reach a temperature above 1100 C

  20. Thermal Ignition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boettcher, Philipp Andreas

    Accidental ignition of flammable gases is a critical safety concern in many industrial applications. Particularly in the aviation industry, the main areas of concern on an aircraft are the fuel tank and adjoining regions, where spilled fuel has a high likelihood of creating a flammable mixture. To this end, a fundamental understanding of the ignition phenomenon is necessary in order to develop more accurate test methods and standards as a means of designing safer air vehicles. The focus of this work is thermal ignition, particularly auto-ignition with emphasis on the effect of heating rate, hot surface ignition and flame propagation, and puffing flames. Combustion of hydrocarbon fuels is traditionally separated into slow reaction, cool flame, and ignition regimes based on pressure and temperature. Standard tests, such as the ASTM E659, are used to determine the lowest temperature required to ignite a specific fuel mixed with air at atmospheric pressure. It is expected that the initial pressure and the rate at which the mixture is heated also influences the limiting temperature and the type of combustion. This study investigates the effect of heating rate, between 4 and 15 K/min, and initial pressure, in the range of 25 to 100 kPa, on ignition of n-hexane air mixtures. Mixtures with equivalence ratio ranging from 0.6 to 1.2 were investigated. The problem is also modeled computationally using an extension of Semenov's classical auto-ignition theory with a detailed chemical mechanism. Experiments and simulations both show that in the same reactor either a slow reaction or an ignition event can take place depending on the heating rate. Analysis of the detailed chemistry demonstrates that a mixture which approaches the ignition region slowly undergoes a significant modification of its composition. This change in composition induces a progressive shift of the explosion limit until the mixture is no longer flammable. A mixture that approaches the ignition region

  1. Optical Coating Thermal Noise Testbed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartman, Michael T.; Eichholz, Johannes; Tanner, David B.; Mueller, Guido

    2015-04-01

    Interferometric gravitational-wave detectors measure the length strain of a passing gravitational-wave as differential arm length changes in kilometer-long Michelson interferometers. The second-generation detectors, such as Advanced LIGO (aLIGO), will achieve strain sensitivities which are limited by Brownian thermal noise in the optical coatings of the interferometers' arm-cavity mirror test masses. Brownian coating thermal noise (CTN) is the apparent motion on the mirror surface on the order of 10-17 -10-20 m resulting from thermal fluctuations in the coating and the coating's internal friction. The result is a source of length noise in optical resonators that is a function of the coating temperature and the coating material's mechanical loss. At the University of Florida we are constructing the THermal noise Optical Resonator (THOR), a testbed for the direct measurement of CTN in the aLIGO test mass coating as well as future coating candidates. The material properties of the coating (namely mechanical loss) are temperature dependent, making cryogenic mirrors a prospect for future gravitational-wave detectors. To explore this option we are simultaneously building a cryogenic CTN testbed, CryoTHOR. This is a presentation on the status of these testbeds. This work is supported by NSF Grants PHY-0969935 and PHY-1306594.

  2. Thermal Decomposition Kinetics of HMX

    SciTech Connect

    Burnham, A K; Weese, R K

    2004-11-18

    Nucleation-growth kinetic expressions are derived for thermal decomposition of HMX from a variety of thermal analysis data types, including mass loss for isothermal and constant rate heating in an open pan and heat flow for isothermal and constant rate heating in open and closed pans. Conditions are identified in which thermal runaway is small to nonexistent, which typically means temperatures less than 255 C and heating rates less than 1 C/min. Activation energies are typically in the 140 to 165 kJ/mol range for open pan experiments and about 150 to 165 kJ/mol for sealed pan experiments. Our activation energies tend to be slightly lower than those derived from data supplied by the University of Utah, which we consider the best previous thermal analysis work. The reaction clearly displays more than one process, and most likely three processes, which are most clearly evident in open pan experiments. The reaction is accelerated in closed pan experiments, and one global reaction appears to fit the data well. Comparison of our rate measurements with additional literature sources for open and closed low temperature pyrolysis from Sandia gives a likely activation energy of 165 kJ/mol at 10% conversion.

  3. Entropy generation method to quantify thermal comfort

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boregowda, S. C.; Tiwari, S. N.; Chaturvedi, S. K.

    2001-01-01

    The present paper presents a thermodynamic approach to assess the quality of human-thermal environment interaction and quantify thermal comfort. The approach involves development of entropy generation term by applying second law of thermodynamics to the combined human-environment system. The entropy generation term combines both human thermal physiological responses and thermal environmental variables to provide an objective measure of thermal comfort. The original concepts and definitions form the basis for establishing the mathematical relationship between thermal comfort and entropy generation term. As a result of logic and deterministic approach, an Objective Thermal Comfort Index (OTCI) is defined and established as a function of entropy generation. In order to verify the entropy-based thermal comfort model, human thermal physiological responses due to changes in ambient conditions are simulated using a well established and validated human thermal model developed at the Institute of Environmental Research of Kansas State University (KSU). The finite element based KSU human thermal computer model is being utilized as a "Computational Environmental Chamber" to conduct series of simulations to examine the human thermal responses to different environmental conditions. The output from the simulation, which include human thermal responses and input data consisting of environmental conditions are fed into the thermal comfort model. Continuous monitoring of thermal comfort in comfortable and extreme environmental conditions is demonstrated. The Objective Thermal Comfort values obtained from the entropy-based model are validated against regression based Predicted Mean Vote (PMV) values. Using the corresponding air temperatures and vapor pressures that were used in the computer simulation in the regression equation generates the PMV values. The preliminary results indicate that the OTCI and PMV values correlate well under ideal conditions. However, an experimental study

  4. Some aspects of thermal leptogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchmüller, W.; Di Bari, P.; Plümacher, M.

    2004-08-01

    Properties of neutrinos may be the origin of the matter antimatter asymmetry of the universe. In the see saw model for neutrino masses, this leads to important constraints on the properties of light and heavy neutrinos. In particular, an upper bound on the light neutrino masses of 0.1 eV can be derived. We review the present status of thermal leptogenesis with emphasis on the theoretical uncertainties and discuss some implications for lepton and quark mass hierarchies, CP violation and dark matter. We also comment on the 'leptogenesis conspiracy', the remarkable fact that neutrino masses may lie in the range where leptogenesis works best.

  5. THERMAL ENVIRONMENT AND LEARNING.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LANE, W.R.

    RESEARCH ON THERMAL ENVIRONMENT IN SCHOOLS IS SUMMARIZED AND THE STATUS OF "THERMAL ENVIRONMENT AND LEARNING" RESEARCH COMPLETED AND/OR UNDERWAY IN THE IOWA CENTER FOR RESEARCH IN SCHOOL ADMINISTRATION IS REPORTED. RESULTS ARE--(1) CHILDREN DID LEARN BETTER UNDER MODEL THERMAL CONDITIONS, (2) TEACHERS MUST BECOME MORE AWARE OF THERMAL CONDITIONS,…

  6. Thermal barrier research

    SciTech Connect

    Moses, K.G.

    1990-03-07

    The thermal barrier region in the TARA device is a complex arrangement combining ion-plugging by sloshing ions with an ECRH-generated thermal barrier plasma. An axisymmetric, high-mirror-ratio magnetic field, adjacent to the central cell, provides the confinement of the thermal barrier plasma and sloshing ions. This paper discusses research being done in this thermal barrier region.

  7. Thermal conductivity of zirconia thermal barrier coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Dinwiddie, R.B.; Beecher, S.C.; Nagaraj, B.A.; Moore, C.S.

    1995-10-01

    Thermal barrier coatings (TBC`s) applied to the hot gas components of turbine engines lead to enhanced fuel efficiency and component reliability. Understanding the mechanisms which control the thermal transport behavior of the TBC`s is of primary importance. Physical vapor deposition (PVD) and plasma spraying (PS) are the two most commonly used coating techniques. These techniques produce coatings with unique microstructures which control their performance and stability. The PS coatings were applied with either standard powder or hollow sphere particles. The hollow sphere particles yielded a lower density and lower thermal conductivity coating. The thermal conductivity of both fully and partially stabilized zirconia, before and after thermal aging, will be compared. The thermal conductivity of the coatings permanently increases upon exposed to high temperatures. These increases are attributed to microstructural changes within the coatings. Sintering of the as-fabricated plasma sprayed lamellar structure is observed by scanning electron microscopy of coatings isothermally heat treated at temperatures greater than 1100 C. During this sintering process the planar porosity between lamella is converted to a series of small spherical pores. The change in pore morphology is the primary reason for the observed increase in thermal conductivity. This increase in thermal conductivity can be modeled using a relationship which depends on both the temperature and time of exposure. Although the PVD coatings are less susceptible to thermal aging effects, preliminary results suggest that they have a higher thermal conductivity than PS coatings, both before and after thermal aging. The increases in thermal conductivity due to thermal aging for partially stabilized plasma sprayed zirconia have been found to be less than for fully stabilized plasma sprayed zirconia coatings.

  8. Universal Controller for Spacecraft Mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levanas, Greg; McCarthy, Thomas; Hunter, Don; Buchanan, Christine; Johnson, Michael; Cozy, Raymond; Morgan, Albert; Tran, Hung

    2006-01-01

    An electronic control unit has been fabricated and tested that can be replicated as a universal interface between the electronic infrastructure of a spacecraft and a brushless-motor (or other electromechanical actuator) driven mechanism that performs a specific mechanical function within the overall spacecraft system. The unit includes interfaces to a variety of spacecraft sensors, power outputs, and has selectable actuator control parameters making the assembly a mechanism controller. Several control topologies are selectable and reconfigurable at any time. This allows the same actuator to perform different functions during the mission life of the spacecraft. The unit includes complementary metal oxide/semiconductor electronic components on a circuit board of a type called rigid flex (signifying flexible printed wiring along with a rigid substrate). The rigid flex board is folded to make the unit fit into a housing on the back of a motor. The assembly has redundant critical interfaces, allowing the controller to perform time-critical operations when no human interface with the hardware is possible. The controller is designed to function over a wide temperature range without the need for thermal control, including withstanding significant thermal cycling, making it usable in nearly all environments that spacecraft or landers will endure. A prototype has withstood 1,500 thermal cycles between 120 and +85 C without significant deterioration of its packaging or electronic function. Because there is no need for thermal control and the unit is addressed through a serial bus interface, the cabling and other system hardware are substantially reduced in quantity and complexity, with corresponding reductions in overall spacecraft mass and cost.

  9. University settles discrimination case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gwynne, Peter

    2011-02-01

    A settlement has been reached in a case brought against the University of Kentucky by astrophysicist Martin Gaskell over his claim that the university illegally denied him a staff position on the basis of his evangelical Christian faith.

  10. Metaphor and Universal Language.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blown, Eric; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Attempts to identify elements of universal language and probes the limitations of the communication metaphor. Universal language is discussed in terms of the theory of quantum nonlocality and the implications of this theory for communication with extraterrestrial beings. (PCB)

  11. Towards a Living Universe.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raine, Kathleen

    1981-01-01

    There is a growing realization that the premises of materialism are applicable within certain limits only. The mystical writings of Blake teach that man's body is a mental body, and his universe a mental universe. (JN)

  12. Gambling with the Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawking, Stephen

    2002-05-01

    This is an excerpt from Stephen Hawking's book The Universe in a Nutshell. Roger Penrose and Stephen Hawking, Lucasian Professor of Mathematics at the University of Cambridge, were able to show that Einstein's General Theory of Relativity implied that the universe and time itself must have had a beginning in a tremendous explosion. The discovery of the expansion of the universe is one of the great intellectual revolutions of the twentieth century.

  13. Situated University, Situated Writing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feldman, Ann M.

    2009-01-01

    This article argues that teaching as a situated, civic activity must be a core intellectual activity in the engaged metropolitan university. Situated writing provides the key pedagogy for the Chicago Civic Leadership Certificate Program at the University of Illinois at Chicago, an engaged public research university. The role of writing, or…

  14. British Universities: Visitor's Jurisdiction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khan, Anwar N.

    1993-01-01

    The office and functions of the university visitor in Britain have deep-seated origins in the common law. The visitorial jurisdiction is exclusive in domestic and internal matters. Despite cases brought by disgruntled members of universities, the office of the university visitor was not abolished, and its powers were not eliminated. Analyzes these…

  15. John Carroll University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dean, Kathleen Lis; Rombalski, Patrick; O'Dell, Kyle

    2009-01-01

    John Carroll University (JCU) is a Jesuit Catholic institution located in University Heights, approximately 10 miles east of Cleveland, Ohio. Founded in 1888, the university has a population of 3,400 undergraduates and 800 graduate students. The Division of Student Affairs at JCU comprises 11 units. The mission of the division is the same as that…

  16. Our Listless Universities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bloom, Allan

    1983-01-01

    Students in the best universities do not believe in anything, and those universities are doing nothing about it. The great questions--God, freedom, and immortality--hardly touch the young. The universities have no vision, no view of what a human being must know in order to be considered educated. (MLW)

  17. Program Budgeting: Universities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio Board of Regents, Columbus. Management Improvement Program.

    This manual recognizes there is a wide spectrum of budgeting practices in today's colleges and universities. In particular, universities in Ohio are at different stages in their utilization of program budgeting principles and also have different needs. Thus, this program budgeting manual was written to meet the specific needs of universities in…

  18. The Moral University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berube, Maurice R.; Berube, Clair T.

    2010-01-01

    The Moral University examines the ways that universities act morally toward students, faculty, their communities and the nation. It considers the effectiveness of moral reasoning courses in the curriculum and the growth of leadership courses. The book deals with the myriad ways in which universities act positively toward their communities. It also…

  19. The University Culture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simplicio, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    In this article the author discusses the role university culture can play on a campus and how it can impact policy and practice. The article explores how a university's history, values, and vision form its culture and how this culture in turn affects its stability and continuity. The article discusses how newcomers within the university are…

  20. Internationalising the University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Suzy

    2008-01-01

    "International" and "internationalisation" are two terms frequently used today in association with the university. In this paper I consider the way in which the notion of internationalisation connects to the contemporary university, which I have termed "Neo-liberal". I begin by outlining the main characteristics of the contemporary university and…

  1. Regulation of University Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindblom-Ylanne, Sari; Nevgi, Anne; Trigwell, Keith

    2011-01-01

    The aims of the present study are twofold: firstly, to explore dimensions in the regulation of teaching in a multidisciplinary sample of university teachers, and secondly, to analyse factors related to the regulation of university teaching. Seventy-three university teachers representing several disciplines participated in the study. These teachers…

  2. Universities That Litigate Patents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rooksby, Jacob H.

    2012-01-01

    American research universities frequently obtain and license patents to their faculty members' inventions. While university licensing is carefully tracked and thoroughly studied, little is known about university decisions to assertively litigate their patents through filing patent infringement lawsuits in federal court. Which universities…

  3. Virtual Universe & Its Interface to Physical Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asija, Pal

    2005-04-01

    This paper postulates a virtual universe and compares and contrasts its properties to that of our known physical universe. A particular attention is paid to the interface between the two and challenges for transition from one to the other. Also discussed is the relationship of the virtual universe to such entities and concepts as dark matter, black holes, time travel, speed of light, mass, gravity just to name just a few. The paper also discusses interface between us physical beings and temporary virtual beings and eventually ultra beings. It also tangentially discusses relationship between body, brain, mind of physical beings with that of virtual and ultra beings. The paper also discusses why virtual beings do not have the same limitations and capabilities as we do. The past, present, elsewhere and potential of physical and virtual universes is compared. Finally possible pathways to discovery of TOE (Theory of Everything) is hypothesized.

  4. The Tenth Thermal and Fluids Analysis Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Majumdar, Alok (Compiler); McConnaughey, Paul (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The Tenth Thermal arid Fluids Analysis Workshop (TFAWS 99) was held at the Bevill Center, University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, Alabama, September 13-17, 1999. The theme for the hands-on training workshop and conference was "Tools and Techniques Contributing to Engineering Excellence". Forty-seven technical papers were presented in four sessions. The sessions were: (1) Thermal Spacecraft/Payloads, (2) Thermal Propulsion/Vehicles, (3) Interdisciplinary Paper, and (4) Fluids Paper. Forty papers were published in these proceedings. The remaining seven papers were not available in electronic format at the time of publication. In addition to the technical papers, there were (a) nine hands-on classes on thermal and flow analyses software, (b) twelve short courses, (c) thirteen product overview lectures, and (d) three keynote lectures. The workshop resulted in participation of 171 persons representing NASA Centers, Government agencies, aerospace industries, academia, software providers, and private corporations.

  5. 'Thermal forces': colloids in temperature gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piazza, Roberto

    2004-09-01

    In the presence of a thermal gradient, macromolecular solutes or dispersed particles drift to the cold or to the hot side: this effect is known as thermophoresis, and is the counterpart of particle suspensions of the Soret effect (or thermal diffusion) in simple fluid mixtures. Here I review recent experimental results on colloid thermophoresis and present new data suggesting a universal nature for the temperature dependence of thermophoresis in aqueous systems. There are strong analogies between thermophoresis in liquids and other thermally induced flow processes like gas thermal creep and membrane thermo-osmosis; starting from these, I present some guidelines for a general model of thermophoresis in disperse systems, accounting both for single-particle and collective effects.

  6. Twelfth Thermal and Fluids Analysis Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Majumdar, Alok (Compiler)

    2002-01-01

    The Twelfth Thermal and Fluids Analysis Workshop (TFAWS 01) was held at the Bevill Center, The University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, Alabama, September 10-14, 2001. The theme for the hands-on training workshop and conference was "Engineering Excellence and Advances in the New Millenium." Forty-five technical papers were presented in four sessions: (1) Thermal Spacecraft/Payloads, (2) Thermal Propulsion/Vehicles, (3) Interdisciplinary Papers, and (4) Fluids Papers. Thirty-nine papers were published in these proceedings. The remaining six papers were not available in electronic format at the time of publication. In addition to the technical papers, there were (a) nine hands-on classes on thermal and flow analyses software, (b) thirteen short courses and product overview lectures, (c) five keynote lectures and, (d) panel discussions consisting of eight presentations. The workshop resulted in participation of 195 persons representing NASA Centers, Government agencies, aerospace industries, academia, software providers, and private corporations.

  7. MEMS thermal switch for spacecraft thermal control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beasley, Matthew A.; Firebaugh, Samara L.; Edwards, Richard L.; Keeney, Allen C.; Osiander, Robert

    2004-01-01

    Small satellites with their low thermal capacitance are vulnerable to rapid temperature fluctuations. Therefore, thermal control becomes important, but the limitations on mass and electrical power require new approaches. Possible solutions to actively vary the heat rejection of the satellite in response to variations in the thermal load and environmental condition are the use of a variable emissivity coating (VEC), micro-machined shutters and louvers, or thermal switches. An elegant way the radiate heat is to switch the thermal contact between the emitting surface and the radiator electrostatically. This paper describes the design and fabrication of an active radiator for satellite thermal control based on such a micro electromechanical (MEMS) thermal switch. The switch operates by electrostatically moving a high emissivity surface layer in and out of contact with the radiator. The electromechanical model and material considerations for the thermal design of the MEMS device are discussed. The design utilizes a highly thermal conductive gold membrane supported by low-conductance SU-8 posts. The fabrication process is described. Measured actuation voltages were consistent with the electrostatic model, ranging from 8 to 25 volts.

  8. Dynamic thermal environment and thermal comfort.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Y; Ouyang, Q; Cao, B; Zhou, X; Yu, J

    2016-02-01

    Research has shown that a stable thermal environment with tight temperature control cannot bring occupants more thermal comfort. Instead, such an environment will incur higher energy costs and produce greater CO2 emissions. Furthermore, this may lead to the degeneration of occupants' inherent ability to combat thermal stress, thereby weakening thermal adaptability. Measured data from many field investigations have shown that the human body has a higher acceptance to the thermal environment in free-running buildings than to that in air-conditioned buildings with similar average parameters. In naturally ventilated environments, occupants have reported superior thermal comfort votes and much greater thermal comfort temperature ranges compared to air-conditioned environments. This phenomenon is an integral part of the adaptive thermal comfort model. In addition, climate chamber experiments have proven that people prefer natural wind to mechanical wind in warm conditions; in other words, dynamic airflow can provide a superior cooling effect. However, these findings also indicate that significant questions related to thermal comfort remain unanswered. For example, what is the cause of these phenomena? How we can build a comfortable and healthy indoor environment for human beings? This article summarizes a series of research achievements in recent decades, tries to address some of these unanswered questions, and attempts to summarize certain problems for future research. PMID:26171688

  9. Nuclear processes in the early Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reeves, H.

    PART I The thermal history of matter Cosmic densities Reaching for the past Cosmic time scales The expansion time scale The reaction time scales Primordial nucleosynthesis Nucleosynthetic yields Testing cosmological models Proliferation of particle families Evidence from the width of the Z Evidence from mass renormalization Evidence from primordial nucleosynthesis A multidimensional universe PART II The cosmic quark-haron phase transition Recipes for the glue The phase diagram Exploring the phase diagram The bag models Following the path of the stars

  10. Discovering the Expanding Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nussbaumer, Harry; Bieri, Lydia; Sandage, Foreword by Allan

    2009-03-01

    Acknowledgments; Foreword; 1. Introduction; 2. Cosmological concepts at the end of the Middle Ages; 3. Nebulae as a new astronomical phenomenon; 4. On the construction of the Heavens; 5. Island universes turn into astronomical facts: a universe of galaxies; 6. The early cosmology of Einstein and de Sitter; 7. The dynamical universe of Friedmann; 8. Redshifts: how to reconcile Slipher and de Sitter?; 9. Lemaître discovers the expanding universe; 10. Hubble's contribution of 1929; 11. The breakthrough for the expanding universe; 12. Hubble's anger about de Sitter; 13. Robertson and Tolman join the game; 14. The Einstein-de Sitter universe; 15. Are Sun and Earth older than the universe?; 16. In search of alternative tracks; 17. The seed for the Big Bang; 18. Summary and Postscript; Appendix; References; Index.

  11. Westinghouse thermal barrier coatings development

    SciTech Connect

    Goedjen, J.G.; Wagner, G.

    1995-10-01

    Westinghouse, in conjunction with the Department of Energy and Oak Ridge National Laboratory, has embarked upon a program for the development of advanced thermal barrier coatings for industrial gas turbines. Development of thermal barrier coatings (TBC`s) for industrial gas turbines has relied heavily on the transfer of technology from the aerospace industry. Significant differences in the time/temperature/stress duty cycles exist between these two coating applications. Coating systems which perform well in aerospace applications may not been optimized to meet power generation performance requirements. This program will focus on development of TBC`s to meet the specific needs of power generation applications. The program is directed at developing a state-of-the-art coating system with a minimum coating life of 25,000 hours at service temperatures required to meet increasing operating efficiency goals. Westinghouse has assembled a team of university and industry leaders to accomplish this goal. Westinghouse will coordinate the efforts of all program participants. Chromalloy Turbine Technologies, Inc. and Sermatech International, Inc. will be responsible for bond coat and TBC deposition technology. Praxair Specialty Powders, Inc. will be responsible for the fabrication of all bond coat and ceramic powders for the program. Southwest Research Institute will head the life prediction modelling effort; they will also be involved in coordinating nondestructive evaluation (NDE) efforts. Process modelling will be provided by the University of Arizona.

  12. Thermal Transport in Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christman, Jeremy; Moore, Andrew; Khatun, Mahfuza

    2011-10-01

    Recent advances in nanostructure technology have made it possible to create small devices at the nanoscale. Carbon nanotubes (CNT's) are among the most exciting building blocks of nanotechnology. Their versatility and extremely desirable properties for electronic and other devices have driven intense research and development efforts in recent years. A review of electrical and thermal conduction of the structures will be presented. The theoretical investigation is mainly based on molecular dynamics. Green Kubo relation is used for the study of thermal conductivity. Results include kinetic energy, potential energy, heat flux autocorrelation function, and heat conduction of various CNT structures. Most of the computation and simulation has been conducted on the Beowulf cluster at Ball State University. Various software packages and tools such as Visual Molecular Dynamics (VMD), Large-scale Atomic/Molecular Massively Parallel Simulator (LAMMPS), and NanoHUB, the open online resource at Purdue University have been used for the research. The work has been supported by the Indiana Academy of Science Research Fund, 2010-2011.

  13. Thermal physiology in a changing thermal world

    PubMed Central

    Horowitz, Michal; Kenny, Glen P; McAllen, Robin M; van Marken Lichtenbelt, Wouter D

    2015-01-01

    This editorial focuses on articles submitted to the Temperature call “Thermal Physiology in a Changing Thermal World.” It highlights an array of topics related to thermoregulatory and metabolic functions in adverse environments, and the complexity and adaptability of the systems to changing climatic conditions, at various levels of body organization. PMID:27226998

  14. Universities Scale Like Cities

    PubMed Central

    van Raan, Anthony F. J.

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies of urban scaling show that important socioeconomic city characteristics such as wealth and innovation capacity exhibit a nonlinear, particularly a power law scaling with population size. These nonlinear effects are common to all cities, with similar power law exponents. These findings mean that the larger the city, the more disproportionally they are places of wealth and innovation. Local properties of cities cause a deviation from the expected behavior as predicted by the power law scaling. In this paper we demonstrate that universities show a similar behavior as cities in the distribution of the ‘gross university income’ in terms of total number of citations over ‘size’ in terms of total number of publications. Moreover, the power law exponents for university scaling are comparable to those for urban scaling. We find that deviations from the expected behavior can indeed be explained by specific local properties of universities, particularly the field-specific composition of a university, and its quality in terms of field-normalized citation impact. By studying both the set of the 500 largest universities worldwide and a specific subset of these 500 universities -the top-100 European universities- we are also able to distinguish between properties of universities with as well as without selection of one specific local property, the quality of a university in terms of its average field-normalized citation impact. It also reveals an interesting observation concerning the working of a crucial property in networked systems, preferential attachment. PMID:23544062

  15. Thermal lag, fusion, and the compensation effect during biomass pyrolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Antal, M.J. Jr.; Narayan, R.

    1995-12-01

    Results from a numerical model for endothermic biomass pyrolysis, which includes both high activation energy kinetics and heat transfer to the reacting solid particle, are presented. The model accounts for conventional thermocouple thermal lag, and unconventional thermal lag due to heat demand by the chemical reaction (which is governed by Arrhenius kinetics). We show that biomass fusion, first identified quantitatively by Lede and Villermaux at the University of Nancy in France, is a manifestation of severe thermal lag that results from the chemical reaction heat demand. We also show that unidentified thermal lag in TGA experiments manifests itself as the compensation effect.

  16. Selling University Reform: The University of Melbourne and the Press

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Potts, Anthony

    2012-01-01

    Since the advent of the "Times Higher Education Supplement World University Rankings" and the "Academic Rankings of World Universities" by Shanghai Jiao Tong University, some Australian universities have become especially concerned with being ranked among the 100 leading universities. The University of Melbourne, Australia's second oldest…

  17. On universal knot polynomials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mironov, A.; Mkrtchyan, R.; Morozov, A.

    2016-02-01

    We present a universal knot polynomials for 2- and 3-strand torus knots in adjoint representation, by universalization of appropriate Rosso-Jones formula. According to universality, these polynomials coincide with adjoined colored HOMFLY and Kauffman polynomials at SL and SO/Sp lines on Vogel's plane, respectively and give their exceptional group's counterparts on exceptional line. We demonstrate that [m,n]=[n,m] topological invariance, when applicable, take place on the entire Vogel's plane. We also suggest the universal form of invariant of figure eight knot in adjoint representation, and suggest existence of such universalization for any knot in adjoint and its descendant representations. Properties of universal polynomials and applications of these results are discussed.

  18. Solar Thermal Rocket Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sercel, J. C.

    1986-01-01

    Paper analyzes potential of solar thermal rockets as means of propulsion for planetary spacecraft. Solar thermal rocket uses concentrated Sunlight to heat working fluid expelled through nozzle to produce thrust.

  19. Automatic thermal switch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wing, L. D.; Cunningham, J. W. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    An automatic thermal switch to control heat flow includes a first thermally conductive plate, a second thermally conductive plate and a thermal transfer plate pivotally mounted between the first and second plates. A phase change power unit, including a plunger connected to the transfer plate, is in thermal contact with the first thermally conductive plate. A biasing element, connected to the transfer plate, biases the transfer plate in a predetermined position with respect to the first and second plates. When the phase change power unit is actuated by an increase in heat transmitted through the first plate, the plunger extends and pivots the transfer plate to vary the thermal conduction between the first and second plates through the transfer plate. The biasing element, transfer plate and piston can be arranged to provide either a normally closed or normally open thermally conductive path between the first and second plates.

  20. ASTER Thermal Anomalies in western Colorado

    DOE Data Explorer

    Zehner, Richard E.

    2013-01-01

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Publication Date: 2012 Title: ASTER Thermal Anomalies Western Edition: First Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains the areas identified as areas of anomalous surface temperature from ASTER satellite imagery. The temperature is calculated using the Emissivity Normalization Algorithm that separate temperature from emissivity. Areas that had temperature greater than 2σ, and areas with temperature equal to 1σ to 2σ, were considered ASTER modeled very warm and warm surface exposures (thermal anomalies), respectively Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4547052.446651 m Left: 158917.090117 m Right: 4101162.228281 m Bottom: 4101162.228281 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal Code: 80309-0216 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 303-492-6782 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS’1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System ’1984 (WGS ’1984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich Angular Unit: Degree Digital Form: Format Name: Shape file

  1. Determining in-situ thermal conductivity of coarse textured materials through numerical analysis of thermal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, H.; Hamamoto, S.; Moldrup, P.; Komatsu, T.

    2013-12-01

    Ground source heat pump (GSHP) systems use ground or groundwater as a heat/cooling source, typically by circulating anti-freezing solution inside a vertically installed closed-loop tube known as a U-tube to transfer heat to/from the ground. Since GSHP systems are based on renewable energy and can achieve much higher coefficient of performance (COP) than conventional air source heat pump systems, use of GSHP systems has been rapidly increasing worldwide. However, environmental impacts by GSHP systems including thermal effects on subsurface physical-chemical and microbiological properties have not been fully investigated. To rigorously assess GSHP impact on the subsurface environment, ground thermal properties including thermal conductivity and heat capacity need to be accurately characterized. Ground thermal properties were investigated at two experimental sites at Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology (TAT) and Saitama University (SA), both located in the Kanto area of Japan. Thermal properties were evaluated both by thermal probe measurements on boring core samples and by performing in-situ Thermal Response Tests (TRT) in 50-80 m deep U-tubes. At both TAT and SU sites, heat-pulse probe measurements gave unrealistic low thermal conductivities for coarse textured materials (dominated by particles > 75 micrometers). Such underestimation can be partly due to poor contact between probe and porous material and partly to markedly decreasing sample water content during drilling, carrying, and storing sandy/gravelly samples. A more reliable approach for estimating in-situ thermal conductivity of coarse textured materials is therefore needed, and may be based on the commonly used TRT test. However, analyses of TRT data is typically based on Kelvin's line source model and provides an average (effective) thermal property for the whole soil profile around the U-tube but not for each geological layer. The main objective of this study was therefore to develop a method

  2. Thermal Remote Anemometer Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heyman, Joseph S.; Heath, D. Michele; Winfree, William P.; Miller, William E.; Welch, Christopher S.

    1988-01-01

    Thermal Remote Anemometer Device developed for remote, noncontacting, passive measurement of thermal properties of sample. Model heated locally by scanning laser beam and cooled by wind in tunnel. Thermal image of model analyzed to deduce pattern of airflow around model. For materials applications, system used for evaluation of thin films and determination of thermal diffusivity and adhesive-layer contact. For medical applications, measures perfusion through skin to characterize blood flow and used to determine viabilities of grafts and to characterize tissues.

  3. The Chinese Television University.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCormick, R.

    1980-01-01

    Presents an overview of China's Beijing Broadcasting and Television University: background, establishment, administration and structure, students, courses, teaching package, and course production. (JD)

  4. Typical universal entanglers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Feng; Luo, MingXing; Chen, XiuBo; Yang, YiXian; Wang, XiaoJun

    2014-10-01

    A universal entangler is a very powerful fault-tolerant entangling device for generating quantum entanglements from any joint states. Our paper aims to address the construction of universal entanglers. We prove that universal entanglers may be obtained from random unitary gates according to the Harr measure. The success probability is close to 1 for large system spaces. This result represents the typical density of entanglement subspaces in large state spaces. It also partially solves an open problem of universal bipartite entanglers and is explained by some experiment simulations.

  5. Thermal neutron detection system

    DOEpatents

    Peurrung, Anthony J.; Stromswold, David C.

    2000-01-01

    According to the present invention, a system for measuring a thermal neutron emission from a neutron source, has a reflector/moderator proximate the neutron source that reflects and moderates neutrons from the neutron source. The reflector/moderator further directs thermal neutrons toward an unmoderated thermal neutron detector.

  6. Thermal Performance Benchmarking (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Moreno, G.

    2014-11-01

    This project will benchmark the thermal characteristics of automotive power electronics and electric motor thermal management systems. Recent vehicle systems will be benchmarked to establish baseline metrics, evaluate advantages and disadvantages of different thermal management systems, and identify areas of improvement to advance the state-of-the-art.

  7. Spacecraft thermal control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Guidance for the assessment and control of spacecraft temperatures is provided with emphasis on unmanned spacecraft in the space environment. The heat balance, elements of thermal design, and thermal control are discussed along with thermal testing, design criteria, and recommended practices.

  8. Rice University: College and University Systems Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CAUSE/EFFECT, 1984

    1984-01-01

    Computing began at Rice University with the first computer project on campus about 1958. In 1960 a computer center was formed. Today's Institute for Computer Services and Applications serves Rice administration, departments, faculty, and students by writing systems, maintaining files, entering data, retrieving information, etc. (MLW)

  9. University Funding Changes and University Efficiency.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mace, John

    1993-01-01

    A discussion of the current economics of the United Kingdom's higher education system outlines conceptual models used by economists for evaluating a system's efficiency and applies them to assess the effect of recent funding changes. It is concluded that increased emphasis on research is adversely affecting university teaching quality. (MSE)

  10. Thermal Spin Transfer Torques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Gerrit

    2009-03-01

    The coupling between spin and charge in electronic transport is studied in the field of spintronics. Heat currents are coupled to both charge and spin currents as well [1]. This extension of spintronics to what may be called ``spin caloritronics'' recently enjoys renewed attention [2]. The spin-transfer torque associated with electric currents can excite magnetizations in nanostructures, switching magnetic configuration in spin valves and move domain walls in magnetic wires when exceeding critical values of the order of 10^7Acm-2 [3]. Also heat currents transfer spin angular momentum [4], either intrinsically or via the thermoelectric generation of particle spin currents. We predict that temperature differences of the order of 100 K over typical metallic nanostructures cause effects equivalent to the critical charge current densities. In this talk I will give a brief review of various aspects of spin caloritronics with emphasis on thermal spin transfer torques. This work has been carried out in collaboration with Moosa Hatami, Qinfang Zhang, Paul Kelly, Hans Joakim Skadsem, Arne Brataas and Sadamichi Maekawa. [4pt] [1] M. Johnson and R.H. Silsbee, Phys. Rev. B 35, 4959 (1987).[0pt] [2] International Workshop on Spin Caloritronics, Lorentz Center of Leiden University, 9-13 February 2009, http://www.lorentzcenter.nl/lc/web/2009/323/info.php3?wsid=323[0pt] [3] D. C. Ralph and M. D. Stiles, J. Magn. Magn. Mater. 320, 1190 (2008).[0pt] [4] M. Hatami, G.E.W. Bauer, Q. Zhang, and P.J. Kelly, Phys. Rev. Lett. 99, 066603 (2007).

  11. Thermal Management and Thermal Protection Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hasnain, Aqib

    2016-01-01

    During my internship in the Thermal Design Branch (ES3), I contributed to two main projects: i) novel passive thermal management system for future human exploration, ii) AVCOAT undercut thermal analysis. i) As NASA prepares to further expand human and robotic presence in space, it is well known that spacecraft architectures will be challenged with unprecedented thermal environments. Future exploration activities will have the need of thermal management systems that can provide higher reliability, mass and power reduction and increased performance. In an effort to start addressing the current technical gaps the NASA Johnson Space Center Passive Thermal Discipline has engaged in technology development activities. One of these activities was done through an in-house Passive Thermal Management System (PTMS) design for a lunar lander. The proposed PTMS, functional in both microgravity and gravity environments, consists of three main components: a heat spreader, a novel hybrid wick Variable Conductance Heat Pipe (VCHP), and a radiator. The aim of this PTMS is to keep electronics on a vehicle within their temperature limits (0 and 50 C for the current design) during all mission phases including multiple lunar day/night cycles. The VCHP was tested to verify its thermal performance. I created a thermal math model using Thermal Desktop (TD) and analyzed it to predict the PTMS performance. After testing, the test data provided a means to correlate the thermal math model. This correlation took into account conduction and convection heat transfer, representing the actual benchtop test. Since this PTMS is proposed for space missions, a vacuum test will be taking place to provide confidence that the system is functional in space environments. Therefore, the model was modified to include a vacuum chamber with a liquid nitrogen shroud while taking into account conduction and radiation heat transfer. Infrared Lamps were modelled and introduced into the model to simulate the sun

  12. Inflationary gravitational waves and the evolution of the early universe

    SciTech Connect

    Jinno, Ryusuke; Moroi, Takeo; Nakayama, Kazunori E-mail: moroi@hep-th.phys.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp

    2014-01-01

    We study the effects of various phenomena which may have happened in the early universe on the spectrum of inflationary gravitational waves. The phenomena include phase transitions, entropy productions from non-relativistic matter, the production of dark radiation, and decoupling of dark matter/radiation from thermal bath. These events can create several characteristic signatures in the inflationary gravitational wave spectrum, which may be direct probes of the history of the early universe and the nature of high-energy physics.

  13. Thermal Effusivity Tomography from Pulsed Thermal Imaging

    2006-12-01

    The software program generates 3D volume distribution of thermal effusivity within a test material from one-sided pulsed thermal imaging data. Thsi is the first software capable of accurate, fast and automated thermal tomographic imaging of inhomogeneous materials to produce 3D images similar to those obtained from 3D X-ray CT (all previous thermal-imaging software can only produce 2D results). Because thermal effusivity is an intrisic material property that is related to material constituent, density, conductivity, etc.,more » quantitative imaging of effusivity allowed direct visualization of material's internal constituent/structure and damage distributions, thereby potentially leading to quantitative prediction of other material properties such as strength. I can be therefre be used for 3D imaging of material structure in fundamental material studies, nondestructive characterization of defects/flaws in structural engineering components, health monitoring of material damage and degradation during service, and medical imaging and diagnostics. This technology is one-sided, non contact and sensitive to material's thermal property and discontinuity. One major advantage of this tomographic technology over x-ray CT and ultrasounds is its natural efficiency for 3D imaging of the volume under a large surface area. This software is implemented with a method for thermal computed tomography of thermal effusivity from one-sided pulsed thermal imaging (or thermography) data. The method is based on several solutions of the governing heat transfer equation under pulsed thermography test condition. In particular, it consists of three components. 1) It utilized the thermal effusivity as the imaging parameter to construct the 3D image. 2) It established a relationship between the space (depth) and the time, because thermography data are in the time domain. 3) It incorporated a deconvolution algorithm to solve the depth porfile of the material thermal effusivity from the measured

  14. Universal Symbols and Cartography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Modley, Rudolf

    The broad use of maps by non-cartographers imposes on the cartographer the burden to make maps not only accurate, but to use symbols which make map-reading easier for the public. The latter requirement implies a need for universal symbols. Although there are no universal symbols today (letters, words, and figures, to a lesser extent, are dependent…

  15. For Free Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ainley, Patrick

    2005-01-01

    This article is a shortened version of an inaugural professorial lecture given at the University of Greenwich on 19 January 2005 as an intervention in the debate at that time within that university and other English further and higher education institutions over the appropriate level of fees to charge in 2006. It anticipates the likely effects…

  16. Faculty Handbook, Stanford University.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanford Univ., CA.

    University policies, regulations, and procedures that apply to faculty members directly or indirectly, as well as the university's organization and governance, are described in the 1975 handbook. A brief history of Stanford's academic development and a bibliography to other information sources related to academic affairs are also provided.…

  17. Arizona State University. Exemplars.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wegner, Gregory R.

    This report discusses how the Arizona Board of Regents, which has governing authority over the state's three public universities, dealt with the inability of the universities to respond to new societal needs in a timely manner; a major impediment was felt to be tenure. After a series of meetings of administrators and faculty leaders, the Board…

  18. Marketing University Outreach Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foster, Ralph S., Jr., Ed.; And Others

    A collection of 12 essays and model program descriptions addresses issues in the marketing of university extension, outreach, and distance education programs. They include: (1) "Marketing and University Outreach: Parallel Processes" (William I. Sauser, Jr. and others); (2) "Segmenting and Targeting the Organizational Market" (Vaughan C. Judd); (3)…

  19. Tutors for a University.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Styler, W. E.

    The pamphlet describes the system developed at Hull University for providing tutors for adult education, and analyzes the use of full-time and part-time tutors. These tutors are responsible for teaching courses, generally shorter in duration than a standard academic course, and geared for adults not in school rather than for university students.…

  20. Universal Semantics in Translation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Zhenying

    2009-01-01

    What and how we translate are questions often argued about. No matter what kind of answers one may give, priority in translation should be granted to meaning, especially those meanings that exist in all concerned languages. In this paper the author defines them as universal sememes, and the study of them as universal semantics, of which…

  1. Family Bonding with Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meer, Jonathan; Rosen, Harvey S.

    2010-01-01

    One justification offered for legacy admissions policies at universities is that that they bind entire families to the university. Proponents maintain that these policies have a number of benefits, including increased donations from members of these families. We use a rich set of data from an anonymous selective research institution to investigate…

  2. Talent Management for Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradley, Andrew P.

    2016-01-01

    This paper explores human resource management practices in the university sector with a specific focus on talent pools and talent management more generally. The paper defines talent management in the context of the university sector and then explores its interdependence with organisational strategy, the metrics used to measure academic performance…

  3. UNIVERSAL HIGHER EDUCATION.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MCGRATH, EARL J.

    THIS DOCUMENT IS A REPORT ON A GROUP INQUIRY INTO THE SUBSTANCE AND IMPLICATIONS OF UNIVERSAL HIGHER EDUCATION. ELEVEN CHAPTERS ARE PAPERS PRESENTED AT A CONFERENCE HELD UNDER THE AUSPICES OF THE INSTITUTE OF HIGHER EDUCATION, TEACHERS COLLEGE, COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY, IN PUERTO RICO, NOVEMBER 15-21, 1964, FORECASTING THE FORM AND MISSION OF AMERICAN…

  4. Slippery Rock University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnhold, Robert W.

    2008-01-01

    Slippery Rock University (SRU), located in western Pennsylvania, is one of 14 state-owned institutions of higher education in Pennsylvania. The university has a rich tradition of providing professional preparation programs in special education, therapeutic recreation, physical education, and physical therapy for individuals with disabilities.…

  5. Universal Design Problem Solving

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sterling, Mary C.

    2004-01-01

    Universal design is made up of four elements: accessibility, adaptability, aesthetics, and affordability. This article addresses the concept of universal design problem solving through experiential learning for an interior design studio course in postsecondary education. Students' experiences with clients over age 55 promoted an understanding of…

  6. Asian Open Universities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, John

    1983-01-01

    The appearance of open universities in Asia is of interest to Australian educators, particularly since the Asian institutions differ in some respects from the British model which combined open entry to all and extensively employed the electronic media. The Asian Open Universities have provided access to higher education for many. (SSH)

  7. Reeducation at Heidelberg University.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giles, Geoffrey J.

    1997-01-01

    Utilizes German archival records to illuminate crucial post-war events at Heidelberg University. The university became the focal point of attempts to define the theoretical and practical meaning of "geistige Umerziehung" (spiritual reeducation). Discusses the conflict between U.S. authorities and such esteemed German scholars as Karl Jaspers and…

  8. The universal propagator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klauder, John R.

    1993-01-01

    For a general Hamiltonian appropriate to a single canonical degree of freedom, a universal propagator with the property that it correctly evolves the coherent-state Hilbert space representatives for an arbitrary fiducial vector is characterized and defined. The universal propagator is explicitly constructed for the harmonic oscillator, with a result that differs from the conventional propagators for this system.

  9. Managing Tomorrow's University.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michalak, Craig L., Ed.

    The issues addressed in this conference report concern budgeting, the resourceful manager, extramural funding, employer-employee interaction, management information systems, and management of the university in the future. Contents include: the keynote address by F. E. Balderston; "University Budgeting in an Era of Scarce Resources," by F. M. Bowen…

  10. Understanding University Technology Transfer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association of American Universities, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Federal government agencies provide about $33 billion a year to universities to conduct scientific research. That continuing investment expands human knowledge and helps educate the next generation of science and technology leaders. New discoveries from university research also form the basis for many new products and processes that benefit the…

  11. University, Research, Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laroui, Abdallah

    1991-01-01

    Describes personal experiences with university research and development. Criticizes university research as ineffective and inwardly focused, resulting in a concept of scientific research that negates the notion of economic development. Complains that the focus of study no longer contributes to an increase in consumable wealth. Urges that…

  12. Modelling University Governance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trakman, Leon

    2008-01-01

    Twentieth century governance models used in public universities are subject to increasing doubt across the English-speaking world. Governments question if public universities are being efficiently governed; if their boards of trustees are adequately fulfilling their trust obligations towards multiple stakeholders; and if collegial models of…

  13. [The University in Crisis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abram, Morris B.

    The university reflects the revolution in the world. Large numbers of "find out" students are not goal oriented and are affected by malaise; many approve of the use of violence in certain situations. Part of the revolution must be accepted and part rejected. The university is extremely vulnerable to violence and, unless it is contained, American…

  14. Dynamics of Anisotropic Universes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez, Jérôme

    2006-11-01

    We present a general study of the dynamical properties of Anisotropic Bianchi Universes in the context of Einstein General Relativity. Integrability results using Kovalevskaya exponents are reported and connected to general knowledge about Bianchi dynamics. Finally, dynamics toward singularity in Bianchi type VIII and IX universes are showed to be equivalent in some precise sence.

  15. University Patent Policy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Latker, Norman J.

    The relationship between university research and public need is discussed from both a historical and contemporary perspective. Examples are cited of European experiences in which there has been obvious industrial motivation for research performed by the universities. The author notes that there are no difficulties with the level of government…

  16. The United Nations University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salam, Abdus

    1973-01-01

    Reports the progress already made toward the establishment of a postgraduate international university under United Nations auspices. The resolution adopted by the U.N. General Assembly provides a concise statement of the nature and aims of the United Nations University, which is likely to start operating in 1974. (JR)

  17. Miami University Information Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miami Univ., Oxford, OH.

    The 1975 information manual is designed to provide current data on policies, procedures, services, facilities, organization and governance of Miami University and, through the extensive index, quick access to this information. The manual is complementary to the university catalog and directory. Information relating to students is in the Student…

  18. University-industry interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hastings, Daniel E.

    1990-01-01

    It is posited that university industry interaction is highly desirable from the viewpoint of the long term economic development of the country as well as being desirable for the Space Grant Programs. The present and future possible interactions are reviewed for the three university levels namely, undergraduate, graduate, and faculty research.

  19. The Pennsylvania State University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burlingame, Philip J.; Dowhower, Andrea L.

    2009-01-01

    Founded in 1855 as the Farmer's High School, the Pennsylvania State University (Penn State) began as a small college in Centre County providing agricultural education to young men from regional farm families. Penn State became a land-grant university in 1863 following passage of the Morrill Act. Today, Penn State enrolls more than 83,000 students…

  20. University Freedom in Turkey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dolasir, Semiyha

    2006-01-01

    Freedom means the right of the universities to do their scientific activities and to regulate and do the higher education through their organs. The three feet that make up the university freedom are scientific freedom, administrative freedom and financial freedom. Scientific freedom is realized by the freedom of the faculty and teaching staff and…

  1. The Fully Functioning University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bourner, Tom

    2008-01-01

    This article offers an answer to the question: What goals have persisted across all the stages of the development of the Western university? The main conclusion is that the following three goals have been the common threads: the higher education of students, the advancement of knowledge, and service to those outside the walls of the university.…

  2. Quantum Thermal Transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joulain, Karl; Drevillon, Jérémie; Ezzahri, Younès; Ordonez-Miranda, Jose

    2016-05-01

    We demonstrate that a thermal transistor can be made up with a quantum system of three interacting subsystems, coupled to a thermal reservoir each. This thermal transistor is analogous to an electronic bipolar one with the ability to control the thermal currents at the collector and at the emitter with the imposed thermal current at the base. This is achieved by determining the heat fluxes by means of the strong-coupling formalism. For the case of three interacting spins, in which one of them is coupled to the other two, that are not directly coupled, it is shown that high amplification can be obtained in a wide range of energy parameters and temperatures. The proposed quantum transistor could, in principle, be used to develop devices such as a thermal modulator and a thermal amplifier in nanosystems.

  3. Quantum Thermal Transistor.

    PubMed

    Joulain, Karl; Drevillon, Jérémie; Ezzahri, Younès; Ordonez-Miranda, Jose

    2016-05-20

    We demonstrate that a thermal transistor can be made up with a quantum system of three interacting subsystems, coupled to a thermal reservoir each. This thermal transistor is analogous to an electronic bipolar one with the ability to control the thermal currents at the collector and at the emitter with the imposed thermal current at the base. This is achieved by determining the heat fluxes by means of the strong-coupling formalism. For the case of three interacting spins, in which one of them is coupled to the other two, that are not directly coupled, it is shown that high amplification can be obtained in a wide range of energy parameters and temperatures. The proposed quantum transistor could, in principle, be used to develop devices such as a thermal modulator and a thermal amplifier in nanosystems. PMID:27258859

  4. New Openings in University-Industry Cooperation: Aalto University as the Forerunner of European University Reform

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Markkula, Markku; Lappalainen, Pia

    2009-01-01

    The Innovation University (IU)--to be called the Aalto University after Alvav Aalto, a famous Finnish architect and MIT professor--is a new university which will be created through a merger of three existing universities: the Helsinki University of Technology (TKK), the Helsinki School of Economics (HSE) and the University of Art and Design…

  5. An Innovative High Thermal Conductivity Fuel Design

    SciTech Connect

    Jamil A. Khan

    2009-11-21

    Thermal conductivity of the fuel in today's Light Water Reactors, Uranium dioxide, can be improved by incorporating a uniformly distributed heat conducting network of a higher conductivity material, Silicon Carbide. The higher thermal conductivity of SiC along with its other prominent reactor-grade properties makes it a potential material to address some of the related issues when used in UO2 [97% TD]. This ongoing research, in collaboration with the University of Florida, aims to investigate the feasibility and develop a formal methodology of producing the resultant composite oxide fuel. Calculations of effective thermal conductivity of the new fuel as a function of %SiC for certain percentages and as a function of temperature are presented as a preliminary approach. The effective thermal conductivities are obtained at different temperatures from 600K to 1600K. The corresponding polynomial equations for the temperature-dependent thermal conductivities are given based on the simulation results. Heat transfer mechanism in this fuel is explained using a finite volume approach and validated against existing empirical models. FLUENT 6.1.22 was used for thermal conductivity calculations and to estimate reduction in centerline temperatures achievable within such a fuel rod. Later, computer codes COMBINE-PC and VENTURE-PC were deployed to estimate the fuel enrichment required, to maintain the same burnup levels, corresponding to a volume percent addition of SiC.

  6. The Thermal Expansion Of Feldspars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hovis, G. L.; Medford, A.; Conlon, M.

    2009-12-01

    Hovis and others (1) investigated the thermal expansion of natural and synthetic AlSi3 feldspars and demonstrated that the coefficient of thermal expansion (α) decreases significantly, and linearly, with increasing room-temperature volume (VRT). In all such feldspars, therefore, chemical expansion limits thermal expansion. The scope of this work now has been broadened to include plagioclase and Ba-K feldspar crystalline solutions. X-ray powder diffraction data have been collected between room temperature and 925 °C on six plagioclase specimens ranging in composition from anorthite to oligoclase. When combined with thermal expansion data for albite (2,3,4) a steep linear trend of α as a function of VRT emerges, reflecting how small changes in composition dramatically affect expansion behavior. The thermal expansion data for five synthetic Ba-K feldspars ranging in composition from 20 to 100 mole percent celsian, combined with data for pure K-feldspar (3,4), show α-VRT relationships similar in nature to the plagioclase series, but with a slope and intercept different from the latter. Taken as a group all Al2Si2 feldspars, including anorthite and celsian from the present study along with Sr- (5) and Pb-feldspar (6) from other workers, show very limited thermal expansion that, unlike AlSi3 feldspars, has little dependence on the divalent-ion (or M-) site occupant. This apparently is due to the necessitated alternation of Al and Si in the tetrahedral sites of these minerals (7), which in turn locks the tetrahedral framework and makes the M-site occupant nearly irrelevant to expansion behavior. Indeed, in feldspar series with coupled chemical substitution it is the change away from a 1:1 Al:Si ratio that gives feldspars greater freedom to expand. Overall, the relationships among α, chemical composition, and room-temperature volume provide useful predictive tools for estimating feldspar thermal expansion and give insight into the controls of expansion behavior in

  7. Thermal Effusivity Tomography from Pulsed Thermal Imaging

    2008-11-05

    The software program generates 3D volume distribution of thermal effusivity within a test material from one—sided pulsed thermal imaging data. Thsi is the first software capable of accurate, fast and automated thermal tomographic imaging of inhomogeneoirs materials to produce 3D images similar to those obtained from 3D X—ray CT (all previous thepnal—imaging software can only produce 20 results) . Because thermal effusivity is an Intrisic material property that is related to material constituent, density, conductivity,more » etc., quantitative imaging of eftusivity allowed direct visualization of material’s internal constituent/structure and damage distributions, thereby potentially leading to quantitative prediction of other material properties such as strength. I can be therefre be used for 3D imaging of material structure in fundamental material studies, nondestructive characterization of defects/flaws in structural engineering components, health monitoring of material damage and degradation during service, and medical imaging and diagnostics. This technology is one—sided, non contact and sensitive to material’s thermal property and discontinuity. One major advantage of this tomographic technology over x-ray CT and ultrasounds is its natural efficiency for 3D imaging of the volume under a large surface area. This software is implemented with a method for thermal computed tomography of thermal effusivity from one—sided pulsed thermal imaging (or thermography) data. The method is based on several solutions of the governing heat transfer equation under pulsed thermography test condition. In particular, it consists of three components. 1) It utilized the thermal effusivity as the imaging parameter to construct the 3D image. 2) It established a relationship between the space (depth) and the time, because thermography data are in the time domain. 3) It incorporated a deconvolution algorithm to solve the depth porfile of the material thermal effusivity from the

  8. A photon thermal diode.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhen; Wong, Carlaton; Lubner, Sean; Yee, Shannon; Miller, John; Jang, Wanyoung; Hardin, Corey; Fong, Anthony; Garay, Javier E; Dames, Chris

    2014-01-01

    A thermal diode is a two-terminal nonlinear device that rectifies energy carriers (for example, photons, phonons and electrons) in the thermal domain, the heat transfer analogue to the familiar electrical diode. Effective thermal rectifiers could have an impact on diverse applications ranging from heat engines to refrigeration, thermal regulation of buildings and thermal logic. However, experimental demonstrations have lagged far behind theoretical proposals. Here we present the first experimental results for a photon thermal diode. The device is based on asymmetric scattering of ballistic energy carriers by pyramidal reflectors. Recent theoretical work has predicted that this ballistic mechanism also requires a nonlinearity in order to yield asymmetric thermal transport, a requirement of all thermal diodes arising from the second Law of Thermodynamics, and realized here using an 'inelastic thermal collimator' element. Experiments confirm both effects: with pyramids and collimator the thermal rectification is 10.9 ± 0.8%, while without the collimator no rectification is detectable (<0.3%). PMID:25399761

  9. The Transient Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shappee, Benjamin John

    When one looks at the night sky, one usually gets the impression of a static and constant universe. Quite apart from appearances, the sky is teeming with violent, variable, and transient events that shape our universe. These capricious objects are not only penetrating probes into physical conditions too extreme for earthbound laboratories, but they are also useful tools to measure the universe. In this dissertation, I investigate the observational and theoretical properties of three classes of transient/variable objects: thermonuclear supernovae, Cepheid variable stars, and active galactic nuclei.

  10. Imagine the Universe. 4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Nicholas

    1999-01-01

    This CD-ROM contains compilations of three NASA Website pages from the Laboratory for High Energy Astrophysics at the Goddard Space Flight Center. The three sites on the CD-ROM are: (1) the Imagine the Universe!, (for ages 14 on up), which is dedicated to discussion of the Universe, what we know, how it is evolving and the kinds of objects and phenomena it contains; (2) StarChild: A learning center for young astronomers, (for ages 4-14), contains information about the Solar System, the Universe and space explorations; and (3) the Astronomy picture of the day, which offers a new astronomical image and caption for each calendar day.

  11. Type II universal spacetimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hervik, S.; Málek, T.; Pravda, V.; Pravdová, A.

    2015-12-01

    We study type II universal metrics of the Lorentzian signature. These metrics simultaneously solve vacuum field equations of all theories of gravitation with the Lagrangian being a polynomial curvature invariant constructed from the metric, the Riemann tensor and its covariant derivatives of an arbitrary order. We provide examples of type II universal metrics for all composite number dimensions. On the other hand, we have no examples for prime number dimensions and we prove the non-existence of type II universal spacetimes in five dimensions. We also present type II vacuum solutions of selected classes of gravitational theories, such as Lovelock, quadratic and L({{Riemann}}) gravities.

  12. Thermal hydraulics development for CASL

    SciTech Connect

    Lowrie, Robert B

    2010-12-07

    This talk will describe the technical direction of the Thermal-Hydraulics (T-H) Project within the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL) Department of Energy Innovation Hub. CASL is focused on developing a 'virtual reactor', that will simulate the physical processes that occur within a light-water reactor. These simulations will address several challenge problems, defined by laboratory, university, and industrial partners that make up CASL. CASL's T-H efforts are encompassed in two sub-projects: (1) Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD), (2) Interface Treatment Methods (ITM). The CFD subproject will develop non-proprietary, scalable, verified and validated macroscale CFD simulation tools. These tools typically require closures for their turbulence and boiling models, which will be provided by the ITM sub-project, via experiments and microscale (such as DNS) simulation results. The near-term milestones and longer term plans of these two sub-projects will be discussed.

  13. Phoenix Lowered into Thermal Vacuum Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander was lowered into a thermal vacuum chamber at Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver, in December 2006.

    The spacecraft was folded in its aeroshell and underwent environmental testing that simulated the extreme conditions the spacecraft will see during its nine-and-a-half-month cruse to Mars.

    The Phoenix mission is led by Principal Investigator Peter H. Smith of the University of Arizona, Tucson, with project management at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory and development partnership with Lockheed Martin Space Systems. International contributions for Phoenix are provided by the Canadian Space Agency, the University of Neuchatel (Switzerland), the University of Copenhagen, and the Max Planck Institute in Germany. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  14. Nanoscale Thermal Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baloch, Kamal; Brintlinger, Todd; Qi, Yi; Goldhaber-Gordon, David; Cumings, John

    2007-03-01

    We present real time, in-situ, high resolution thermal imaging of metallic nanowires. The nanowires are grown on the front-side of silicon nitride membranes. Resistive heating along the wires produces thermal gradients which melt/freeze 20-200nm diameter indium islands deposited by thermal evaporation on the back-side of the membrane. These transitions can be imaged using a transmission electron microscope operating in dark-field mode such that contrast corresponds to the phase of an individual island. Global changes in temperature can be used to calibrate the melting point of individual islands and to account for the presence of the ˜100nm thick silicon nitride membrane. Thermal modeling confirms the imaged thermal behavior. This technique could be generally employed for thermal imaging of nanowires and nanotubes, wherein the nanoscale systems are imaged in-situ and under electrical bias. Results of local resistive heating in a carbon nanotube device will also be shown

  15. HEATS: Thermal Energy Storage

    SciTech Connect

    2012-01-01

    HEATS Project: The 15 projects that make up ARPA-E’s HEATS program, short for “High Energy Advanced Thermal Storage,” seek to develop revolutionary, cost-effective ways to store thermal energy. HEATS focuses on 3 specific areas: 1) developing high-temperature solar thermal energy storage capable of cost-effectively delivering electricity around the clock and thermal energy storage for nuclear power plants capable of cost-effectively meeting peak demand, 2) creating synthetic fuel efficiently from sunlight by converting sunlight into heat, and 3) using thermal energy storage to improve the driving range of electric vehicles (EVs) and also enable thermal management of internal combustion engine vehicles.

  16. Scanning thermal plumes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scarpace, F. L.; Madding, R. P.; Green, T., III

    1975-01-01

    Over a three-year period 800 thermal line scans of power plant plumes were made by an airborne scanner, with ground truth measured concurrently at the plants. Computations using centered finite differences in the thermal scanning imagery show a lower bound in the horizontal temperature gradient in excess of 1.6 C/m. Gradients persist to 3 m below the surface. Vector plots of the velocity of thermal fronts are constructed by tracing the front motion in successive thermal images. A procedure is outlined for the two-point ground calibration of a thermal scanner from an equation describing the scanner signal and the voltage for two known temperatures. The modulation transfer function is then calculated by input of a thermal step function and application of digital time analysis techniques using Fast Fourier Transforms to the voltage output. Field calibration tests are discussed. Data accuracy is limited by the level of ground truth effort chosen.

  17. Catalytic thermal barrier coatings

    DOEpatents

    Kulkarni, Anand A.; Campbell, Christian X.; Subramanian, Ramesh

    2009-06-02

    A catalyst element (30) for high temperature applications such as a gas turbine engine. The catalyst element includes a metal substrate such as a tube (32) having a layer of ceramic thermal barrier coating material (34) disposed on the substrate for thermally insulating the metal substrate from a high temperature fuel/air mixture. The ceramic thermal barrier coating material is formed of a crystal structure populated with base elements but with selected sites of the crystal structure being populated by substitute ions selected to allow the ceramic thermal barrier coating material to catalytically react the fuel-air mixture at a higher rate than would the base compound without the ionic substitutions. Precious metal crystallites may be disposed within the crystal structure to allow the ceramic thermal barrier coating material to catalytically react the fuel-air mixture at a lower light-off temperature than would the ceramic thermal barrier coating material without the precious metal crystallites.

  18. Seasonal thermal energy storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, R. D.; Kannberg, L. D.; Raymond, J. R.

    1984-05-01

    Seasonal thermal energy storage (STES) using heat or cold available from surplus, waste, climatic, or cogeneration sources show great promise to reduce peak demand, reduce electric utility load problems, and contribute to establishing favorable economics for district heating and cooling systems. Heated and chilled water can be injected, stored, and recovered from aquifers. Geologic materials are good thermal insulators, and potentially suitable aquifers are distributed throughout the United States. Potential energy sources for use in an aquifer thermal energy storage system include solar heat, power plant cogeneration, winter chill, and industrial waste heat source. Topics covered include: (1) the U.S. Department of Energy seasonal thermal energy storage program; (2) aquifer thermal energy storage technology; (3) alternative STES technology; (4) foreign studies in seasonal thermal energy storage; and (5) economic assessment.

  19. Single mode thermal emission.

    PubMed

    Fohrmann, Lena Simone; Petrov, Alexander Yu; Lang, Slawa; Jalas, Dirk; Krauss, Thomas F; Eich, Manfred

    2015-10-19

    We report on the properties of a thermal emitter which radiates into a single mode waveguide. We show that the maximal power of thermal radiation into a propagating single mode is limited only by the temperature of the thermal emitter and does not depend on other parameters of the waveguide. Furthermore, we show that the power of the thermal emitter cannot be increased by resonant coupling. For a given temperature, the enhancement of the total emitted power is only possible if the number of excited modes is increased. Either a narrowband or a broadband thermal excitation of the mode is possible, depending on the properties of the emitter. We finally discuss an example system, namely a thermal source for silicon photonics. PMID:26480429

  20. Profiting from University Research: Tapping into University Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aaron, Elizabeth

    1988-01-01

    Indicates that industry sponsored research in the university environment is increasing. Lists reasons for companies to use university research. Notes 1980 Baigh-Dole Bill which allows the university first rights to technologies they develop. (MVL)

  1. University of Florida Campus, Plaza of the Americas, University of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    University of Florida Campus, Plaza of the Americas, University of Florida Campus Quad Bounded by West University Avenue, US 441/Southwest 13th Street, Stadium Road, and North-South Drive, Gainesville, Alachua County, FL

  2. Thermally Activated Driver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kinard, William H.; Murray, Robert C.; Walsh, Robert F.

    1987-01-01

    Space-qualified, precise, large-force, thermally activated driver (TAD) developed for use in space on astro-physics experiment to measure abundance of rare actinide-group elements in cosmic rays. Actinide cosmic rays detected using thermally activated driver as heart of event-thermometer (ET) system. Thermal expansion and contraction of silicone oil activates driver. Potential applications in fluid-control systems where precise valve controls are needed.

  3. TFAWS: Ares Thermal Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharp, John R.

    2007-01-01

    As part of a Constellation session at the 2007 Thermal & Fluids Analysis Workshop (TFAWS), an overview of the Crew Launch Vehicle (CLV), Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV) and Lunar Lander systems will be given. This presentation provides a general description of the CLV (also known as Ares-I)and Ares-V vehicles portion of the session. The presentation will provide an overview of the thermal requirements, design environments, challenges and thermal modeling examples.

  4. Solid state thermal rectifier

    DOEpatents

    None

    2016-07-05

    Thermal rectifiers using linear nanostructures as core thermal conductors have been fabricated. A high mass density material is added preferentially to one end of the nanostructures to produce an axially non-uniform mass distribution. The resulting nanoscale system conducts heat asymmetrically with greatest heat flow in the direction of decreasing mass density. Thermal rectification has been demonstrated for linear nanostructures that are electrical insulators, such as boron nitride nanotubes, and for nanostructures that are conductive, such as carbon nanotubes.

  5. Universal router concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pesch, W. A.

    1970-01-01

    Portable universal router can cut holes of large diameter and irregular shapes, machine recesses, and drill holes with certain edge-distance limitations. Rectangular and round holes may be cut without a template.

  6. Berkeley College, Yale University.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russell, James S.

    2000-01-01

    Examines the controversial architectural technique of combining contemporary features with traditional designs at Yale University's Berkeley College, and discusses whether there is a place for this type of juxtaposition in architectural design. Photos and diagrams are included. (GR)

  7. California's "Free" Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cudhea, David

    1974-01-01

    Heliotrope, Orpheus, and Communiversity, San Francisco's three free universities, offer curricula with combinations of alchemy, magic, Volkswagen repairs, options in education, dance, conversational Mandarin, basic plumbing, and brain wave experiences. (Author/PG)

  8. The hidden universe

    SciTech Connect

    Disney, M.

    1985-01-01

    Astronomer Disney has followed a somewhat different tack than that of most popular books on cosmology by concentrating on the notion of hidden (as in not directly observable by its own radiation) matter in the universe.

  9. The universal path integral

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lloyd, Seth; Dreyer, Olaf

    2016-02-01

    Path integrals calculate probabilities by summing over classical configurations of variables such as fields, assigning each configuration a phase equal to the action of that configuration. This paper defines a universal path integral, which sums over all computable structures. This path integral contains as sub-integrals all possible computable path integrals, including those of field theory, the standard model of elementary particles, discrete models of quantum gravity, string theory, etc. The universal path integral possesses a well-defined measure that guarantees its finiteness. The probabilities for events corresponding to sub-integrals can be calculated using the method of decoherent histories. The universal path integral supports a quantum theory of the universe in which the world that we see around us arises out of the interference between all computable structures.

  10. The processing of nanopowders by thermal plasma technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Lirong; Reddy, Ramana G.

    2006-04-01

    The thermal plasma synthesis of nanopowders is a relatively new technology with great potential for future industrial applications. This article introduces research carried out in the plasma processing laboratory at the University of Alabama in Tuscaloosa, Alabama. Ceramic nanopowders and nanofibers (SiC, TiC, and B4C) and nanocomposite powders (TiC-Al(Ti), TiC-Fe(Ti), and TiN-Fe (Ti)) were successfully synthesized by thermal plasma technology.

  11. Thermal-Wave Microscope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Robert E.; Kramarchuk, Ihor; Williams, Wallace D.; Pouch, John J.; Gilbert, Percy

    1989-01-01

    Computer-controlled thermal-wave microscope developed to investigate III-V compound semiconductor devices and materials. Is nondestructive technique providing information on subsurface thermal features of solid samples. Furthermore, because this is subsurface technique, three-dimensional imaging also possible. Microscope uses intensity-modulated electron beam of modified scanning electron microscope to generate thermal waves in sample. Acoustic waves generated by thermal waves received by transducer and processed in computer to form images displayed on video display of microscope or recorded on magnetic disk.

  12. Solar Thermal Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerrish, Harold P., Jr.

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents viewgraphs on Solar Thermal Propulsion (STP). Some of the topics include: 1) Ways to use Solar Energy for Propulsion; 2) Solar (fusion) Energy; 3) Operation in Orbit; 4) Propulsion Concepts; 5) Critical Equations; 6) Power Efficiency; 7) Major STP Projects; 8) Types of STP Engines; 9) Solar Thermal Propulsion Direct Gain Assembly; 10) Specific Impulse; 11) Thrust; 12) Temperature Distribution; 13) Pressure Loss; 14) Transient Startup; 15) Axial Heat Input; 16) Direct Gain Engine Design; 17) Direct Gain Engine Fabrication; 18) Solar Thermal Propulsion Direct Gain Components; 19) Solar Thermal Test Facility; and 20) Checkout Results.

  13. Thermal-Radiation Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Gordon

    1993-01-01

    Thermal Radiation Analyzer System (TRASYS) computer program is software program having generalized capability to solve equations of radiation-related aspects of thermal-analysis problems. Computes total thermal-radiation environment for spacecraft in orbit. Software calculates internode-radiation-interchange data as well as data on rates of incidence and absorption of heat originating from environmental radiant sources. Provides data of both types in format directly usable by such thermal-analyzer programs as SINDA '85/FLUINT (available from COSMIC, program number MSC-21528). CRAY version of TRASYS (P25) written in FORTRAN 77. Other versions available upon request.

  14. Thermal comfort following immersion.

    PubMed

    Guéritée, Julien; Redortier, Bernard; House, James R; Tipton, Michael J

    2015-02-01

    Unlike thermal comfort in air, little research has been undertaken exploring thermal comfort around water sports. We investigated the impact of swimming and cooling in air after swimming on thermal comfort. After 10 min of swimming-and-resting cycles in 28°C water, volunteers wearing two types of garments or in swim briefs, faced winds in 24°C air, at rest or when stepping. Thermal comfort was significantly higher during swimming than resting. Post-immersion, following maximum discomfort, in 45 of 65 tests thermal comfort improved although mean skin temperature was still cooling (0.26 [SD 0.19] °C·min(-1) - max was 0.89°C·min(-1)). When thermal comfort was re-established mean skin temperature was lower than at maximal discomfort in 39 of 54 tests (0.81 [SD 0.58] °C - max difference was 2.68°C). The reduction in thermal discomfort in this scenario could be due to the adaptation of thermoreceptors, or to reductions in cooling rates to levels where discomfort was less stimulated. The relief from the recent discomfort may explain why, later, thermal comfort returned to initial levels in spite of poorer thermal profiles. PMID:25485520

  15. Electronic Equipment Thermal Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, R. L.; Jenkins, L. C.

    An assessment is made of the importance of thermal management in electronic equipment design, illustrating the ways in which CAD technology may be used to improve electronic equipment thermal management programs. Attention is given to the Electronic Equipment Thermal Management portion of the aircraft system-level Thermal Management Control (TMC) program. TMC establishes the process by which the airframe's environmental control system and the electronic equipment are integrated to optimize system reliability through life cycle cost minimization, by allocating available cooling capacity to system elements on the basis of derived benefits.

  16. Thermal power loops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gottschlich, Joseph M.; Richter, Robert

    1991-01-01

    The concept of a thermal power loop (TPL) to transport thermal power over relatively large distances is presented as an alternative to heat pipes and their derivatives. The TPL is compared to heat pipes, and capillary pumped loops with respect to size, weight, conservation of thermal potential, start-up, and 1-g testing capability. Test results from a proof of feasibility demonstrator at the NASA JPL are discussed. This analysis demonstrates that the development of specific thermal power loops will result in substantial weight and cost savings for many spacecraft.

  17. Space thermal control development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoover, M. J.; Grodzka, P. G.; Oneill, M. J.

    1971-01-01

    The results of experimental investigations on a number of various phase change materials (PCMs) and PCMs in combination with metals and other materials are reported. The evaluations include the following PCM system performance characteristics: PCM and PCM/filler thermal diffusivities, the effects of long-term thermal cycling, PCM-container compatibility, and catalyst effectiveness and stability. Three PCMs demonstrated performance acceptable enough to be considered for use in prototype aluminum thermal control devices. These three PCMs are lithium nitrate trihydrate with zinc hydroxy nitrate catalyst, acetamide, and myristic acid. Of the fillers tested, aluminum honeycomb filler was found to offer the most increase in system thermal diffusivity.

  18. The Endless Universe

    SciTech Connect

    Steinhardt, Paul

    2003-09-24

    This talk will introduce the Cyclic Model of the Universe, a radical alternative to standard big bang/inflationary cosmology in which space and time exist indefinitely, high energy inflation is avoided, dark energy is given a prominent role, and the universe undergoes periodic epochs of expansion and cooling. The model, which is motivated by recent ideas in superstring theory, seems capable of reproducing all of the successes of the standard picture and leads to distinctive predictions.

  19. Physics of the universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sachs, Mendel

    ch. 1. Physics of the universe. Introduction. Is Newton's theory an explanation of gravity? The expanding universe. The oscillating universe cosmology. The theory of general relativity. The role of space and time. Geometry and matter. Generalization of Einstein's field equations. A unified field theory -- ch. 2. A language of cosmology: the mathematical basis of general relativity. Introduction. Einstein's tensor formulation. The Riemann curvature tensor. The geodesic equation. The vacuum equation. The crucial tests of general relativity. The logic of the spacetime language -- ch. 3. A unified field theory in general relativity: extension from the tensor to the quaternion language. Introduction. Factorization of Einstein's tensor field equations. The Riemann curvature tensor in quaternion form. The quaternion metrical field equations. A symmetric tensor-antisymmetric tensor representation of general relativity - gravity and electromagnetism. The Einstein field equations from the symmetric tensor part. The Maxwell field equations from the antisymmetric tensor part. Conclusions -- ch. 4. An oscillating, spiral universe cosmology. introduction. Dynamics of the expansion and contraction of the universe. Dynamics of the oscillating universe cosmology. Derivation of the Hubble law as an approximation. The spiral structure of the universe. Concluding remarks -- ch. 5. Dark matter. Introduction. The field equations and the ground state solution for the bound particle-antiparticle pair. Olber's paradox -- ch. 6. Concluding remarks. Black holes. Pulsars. On the human race and cosmology -- ch. 7. Philosophical considerations. On truth. Positivism versus realism, subjectivity versus objectivity. On Mach's influence in physics and cosmology. References and notes -- Postscript. Physics in the 21st century. Holism. The universe. The Mach principle and the origin of inertia from general relativity.

  20. The Low Temperature Universe

    SciTech Connect

    Blandford, Roger; Simeon, Paul

    2009-12-16

    We are used to thinking of the universe as a hot place, full of bright stars, quasars, gamma ray bursts, and so on, emanating from a giant explosion - the Big Bang. However, the universe can also be a surprisingly cool place. It is permeated by a background radiation with a temperature close to that of liquid helium. This paper is based on a public lecture aimed at non-specialists.

  1. The Runaway Universe

    SciTech Connect

    Blanford, Roger

    2004-10-26

    The Universe appears to be flat, accelerating and lightweight. In this talk, I will explain what these terms mean, how we developed this view and its implications. I will also discuss the connection between cosmology and particle physics experiments being conducted at accelerators and in underground laboratories. I will conclude with a description of some proposed telescopes that will help us understand much more about the geometry, expansion and contents of our Universe.

  2. University contracts summary book

    SciTech Connect

    1980-08-01

    The principal objectives of the Fossil Energy Program are to seek new ideas, new data, fundamental knowledge that will support the ongoing programs, and new processes to better utilize the nation's fossil energy resources with greater efficiency and environmental acceptability. Toward this end, the Department of Energy supports research projects conducted by universities and colleges to: Ensure a foundation for innovative technology through the use of the capabilities and talents in our academic institutions; provide an effective, two-way channel of communication between the Department of Energy and the academic community; and ensure that trained technical manpower is developed to carry out basic and applied research in support of DOE's mission. Fossil Energy's university activities emphasize the type of research that universities can do best - research to explore the potential of novel process concepts, develop innovative methods and materials for improving existing processes, and obtain fundamental information on the structure of coal and mechanisms of reactions of coal, shale oil, and other fossil energy sources. University programs are managed by different Fossil Energy technical groups; the individual projects are described in greater detail in this book. It is clear that a number of research areas related to the DOE Fossil Energy Program have been appropriate for university involvement, and that, with support from DOE, university scientific and technical expertise can be expected to continue to play a significant role in the advancement of fossil energy technology in the years to come.

  3. Thermal Decomposition Kinetics of HMX

    SciTech Connect

    Burnham, A K; Weese, R K

    2004-05-05

    Nucleation-growth kinetic expressions are derived for thermal decomposition of HMX from a variety of types of data, including mass loss for isothermal and constant rate heating in an open pan, and heat flow for isothermal and constant rate heating in open and closed pans. Conditions are identified in which thermal runaway is small to nonexistent, which typically means temperatures less than 255 C and heating rates less than 1 C/min. Activation energies are typically in the 140 to 150 kJ/mol regime for open pan experiments and about 160 kJ/mol for sealed pan experiments. Our activation energies are about 10% lower than those derived from data supplied by the University of Utah, which we consider the best previous work. The reaction clearly displays more than one process, and most likely three processes, which are most clearly evident in open pan experiments. The reaction is accelerated for closed pan experiments, and one global reaction appears to fit the data well.

  4. Scattering Solar Thermal Concentrators

    SciTech Connect

    Giebink, Noel C.

    2015-01-31

    This program set out to explore a scattering-based approach to concentrate sunlight with the aim of improving collector field reliability and of eliminating wind loading and gross mechanical movement through the use of a stationary collection optic. The approach is based on scattering sunlight from the focal point of a fixed collection optic into the confined modes of a sliding planar waveguide, where it is transported to stationary tubular heat transfer elements located at the edges. Optical design for the first stage of solar concentration, which entails focusing sunlight within a plane over a wide range of incidence angles (>120 degree full field of view) at fixed tilt, led to the development of a new, folded-path collection optic that dramatically out-performs the current state-of-the-art in scattering concentration. Rigorous optical simulation and experimental testing of this collection optic have validated its performance. In the course of this work, we also identified an opportunity for concentrating photovoltaics involving the use of high efficiency microcells made in collaboration with partners at the University of Illinois. This opportunity exploited the same collection optic design as used for the scattering solar thermal concentrator and was therefore pursued in parallel. This system was experimentally demonstrated to achieve >200x optical concentration with >70% optical efficiency over a full day by tracking with <1 cm of lateral movement at fixed latitude tilt. The entire scattering concentrator waveguide optical system has been simulated, tested, and assembled at small scale to verify ray tracing models. These models were subsequently used to predict the full system optical performance at larger, deployment scale ranging up to >1 meter aperture width. Simulations at an aperture widths less than approximately 0.5 m with geometric gains ~100x predict an overall optical efficiency in the range 60-70% for angles up to 50 degrees from normal. However, the

  5. The GRAVITY spectrometers: thermal behaviour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wank, Imke; Straubmeier, Christian; Wiest, Michael; Yazici, Senol; Fischer, Sebastian; Eisenhauer, Frank; Perrin, Guy S.; Perraut, Karine; Brandner, Wolfgang; Amorim, Antonio; Schöller, Markus; Eckart, Andreas

    2014-07-01

    GRAVITY is a 2nd generation VLTI Instrument o which operates on 6 interferometric baselines by using all 4 Unit Telescopes. It will deliver narrow angle astrometry with 10μas accuracy at the infrared K-band. At the 1. Physikalische Institut of the University of Cologne, which is part of the international GRAVITY consortium, two spectrometers, one for the sciene object, and one for the fringe tracking object, have been designed, manufactured and tested. These spectrometers are two individual devices, each with own housing and interfaces. For a minimized thermal background, the spectrometers are actively cooled down to an operating temperature of 80K in the ambient temperature environment of the Beam Combiner Instrument (BCI) cryostat. The outer casings are mounted thermal isolated to the base plate by glass fiber reinforced plastic (GRP) stands, copper cooling structures conduct the cold inside the spectrometers where it is routed to components via Cu cooling stripes. The spectrometers are covered with shells made of multi insulation foil. There will be shown and compared 3 cooling installations: setups in the Cologne test dewar, in the BCI dewar and in a mock-up cad model. There are some striking differences between the setup in the 2 different dewars. In the Cologne Test dewar the spectrometers are connected to the coldplate (80K); a Cu cooling structure and the thermal isolating GRP stands are bolted to the coldplate. In the BCI dewer Cu cooling structure is connected to the bottom of the nitrogen tank (80K), the GRP stands are bolted to the base plate (240K). The period of time during the cooldown process will be analyzed.

  6. The University-Industry Relations of an Entrepreneurial University: The Case of the University of Twente.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schutte, Frits

    1999-01-01

    Describes the development of the University of Twente from a regional teaching university to a national research university, the "entrepreneurial university" of the Netherlands. Focuses on spinoffs from the university, an incubator in a business and science park and the generation of venture capital. Estimates the regional impact of such…

  7. Thermal Properties, Thermal Shock, and Thermal Cycling Behavior of Lanthanum Zirconate-Based Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Xingye; Lu, Zhe; Jung, Yeon-Gil; Li, Li; Knapp, James; Zhang, Jing

    2016-06-01

    Lanthanum zirconate (La2Zr2O7) coatings are newly proposed thermal barrier coating (TBC) systems which exhibit lower thermal conductivity and potentially higher thermal stability compared to other traditional thermal barrier systems. In this work, La2Zr2O7 and 8 wt pct yttria stabilized zirconia (8YSZ) single-layer and double-layer TBC systems were deposited using the air plasma spray technique. Thermal properties of the coatings were measured. Furnace heat treatment and jet engine thermal shock tests were implemented to evaluate coating performance during thermal cycling. The measured average thermal conductivity of porous La2Zr2O7 coating ranged from 0.59 to 0.68 W/m/K in the temperature range of 297 K to 1172 K (24 °C to 899 °C), which was approximately 25 pct lower than that of porous 8YSZ (0.84 to 0.87 W/m/K) in the same temperature range. The coefficients of thermal expansion values of La2Zr2O7 were approximately 9 to 10 × 10-6/K from 400 K to 1600 K (127 °C to 1327 °C), which were about 10 pct lower than those of porous 8YSZ. The double-layer coating system consisting of the porous 8YSZ and La2Zr2O7 layers had better thermal shock resistance and thermal cycling performance than those of single-layer La2Zr2O7 coating and double-layer coating with dense 8YSZ and La2Zr2O7 coatings. This study suggests that porous 8YSZ coating can be employed as a buffer layer in La2Zr2O7-based TBC systems to improve the overall coating durability during service.

  8. Thermal Properties, Thermal Shock, and Thermal Cycling Behavior of Lanthanum Zirconate-Based Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Xingye; Lu, Zhe; Jung, Yeon-Gil; Li, Li; Knapp, James; Zhang, Jing

    2016-03-01

    Lanthanum zirconate (La2Zr2O7) coatings are newly proposed thermal barrier coating (TBC) systems which exhibit lower thermal conductivity and potentially higher thermal stability compared to other traditional thermal barrier systems. In this work, La2Zr2O7 and 8 wt pct yttria stabilized zirconia (8YSZ) single-layer and double-layer TBC systems were deposited using the air plasma spray technique. Thermal properties of the coatings were measured. Furnace heat treatment and jet engine thermal shock tests were implemented to evaluate coating performance during thermal cycling. The measured average thermal conductivity of porous La2Zr2O7 coating ranged from 0.59 to 0.68 W/m/K in the temperature range of 297 K to 1172 K (24 °C to 899 °C), which was approximately 25 pct lower than that of porous 8YSZ (0.84 to 0.87 W/m/K) in the same temperature range. The coefficients of thermal expansion values of La2Zr2O7 were approximately 9 to 10 × 10-6/K from 400 K to 1600 K (127 °C to 1327 °C), which were about 10 pct lower than those of porous 8YSZ. The double-layer coating system consisting of the porous 8YSZ and La2Zr2O7 layers had better thermal shock resistance and thermal cycling performance than those of single-layer La2Zr2O7 coating and double-layer coating with dense 8YSZ and La2Zr2O7 coatings. This study suggests that porous 8YSZ coating can be employed as a buffer layer in La2Zr2O7-based TBC systems to improve the overall coating durability during service.

  9. The Lockheed alternate partial polarizer universal filter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Title, A. M.

    1976-01-01

    A tunable birefringent filter using an alternate partial polarizer design has been built. The filter has a transmission of 38% in polarized light. Its full width at half maximum is .09A at 5500A. It is tunable from 4500 to 8500A by means of stepping motor actuated rotating half wave plates and polarizers. Wave length commands and thermal compensation commands are generated by a PPD 11/10 minicomputer. The alternate partial polarizer universal filter is compared with the universal birefringent filter and the design techniques, construction methods, and filter performance are discussed in some detail. Based on the experience of this filter some conclusions regarding the future of birefringent filters are elaborated.

  10. Universal Slow Dynamics in Granular Solids

    SciTech Connect

    TenCate, James A.; Smith, Eric; Guyer, Robert A.

    2000-07-31

    Experimental properties of a new form of creep dynamics are reported, as manifest in a variety of sandstones, limestone, and concrete. The creep is a recovery behavior, following the sharp drop in elastic modulus induced either by nonlinear acoustic straining or rapid temperature change. The extent of modulus recovery is universally proportional to the logarithm of the time after source discontinuation in all samples studied, over a scaling regime covering at least 10{sup 3} s . Comparison of acoustically and thermally induced creep suggests a single origin based on internal strain, which breaks the symmetry of the inducing source. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  11. Paradoxes of Thermal Radiation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Besson, U.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents an analysis of the thermal behaviour of objects exposed to a solar-type flux of thermal radiation. It aims to clarify certain apparent inconsistencies between theory and observation, and to give a detailed exposition of some critical points that physics textbooks usually treat in an insufficient or incorrect way. In particular,…

  12. Solar Thermal Propulsion Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Harnessing the Sun's energy through Solar Thermal Propulsion will propel vehicles through space by significantly reducing weight, complexity, and cost while boosting performance over current conventional upper stages. Another solar powered system, solar electric propulsion, demonstrates ion propulsion is suitable for long duration missions. Pictured is an artist's concept of space flight using solar thermal propulsion.

  13. Thermal Writing 1987

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peckham, Robert F.

    1987-04-01

    The creating of intelligent marks on a substrate by means of thermal energy has been in use for thousands of years, e.g., branding of livestock and burning images onto wood. During the past 30 years, this type of imaging has been significantly refined. Recent advances allow the creation of color images, 16 shades of gray and letter quality printing on white substrates. Permanent images are now being written with direct thermal processes. The foregoing make thermal writing very attractive for numerous applications. The general technology of how thermal writing is accomplished today, its applications, and why society should use thermal writing are the topics of this paper. To attempt to cover in great technical detail all of the current advancements in thermal writing is beyond our scope here. What is intended is the proposition that THERMAL WRITING is a superior form of creating images on paper substrates for Society's on demand hard copy requirements. First let's look at how thermal writing is being accomplished with today's technologies.

  14. THERMAL DESORPTION TREATMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Thermal desorption is an ex situ means to physically separate volatile and some semivolatile contaminants from soil, sediments, sludges, and filter cakes. or wastes containing up to 10% organics or less, thermal desorption can be used alone for site remediation. t also may find a...

  15. Thermal energy storage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    The planning and implementation of activities associated with lead center management role and the technical accomplishments pertaining to high temperature thermal energy storage subsystems are described. Major elements reported are: (1) program definition and assessment; (2) research and technology development; (3) industrial storage applications; (4) solar thermal power storage applications; and (5) building heating and cooling applications.

  16. Thermal protection apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Bennett, Gloria A.; Elder, Michael G.; Kemme, Joseph E.

    1985-01-01

    An apparatus which thermally protects sensitive components in tools used in a geothermal borehole. The apparatus comprises a Dewar within a housing. The Dewar contains heat pipes such as brass heat pipes for thermally conducting heat from heat sensitive components to a heat sink such as ice.

  17. Nuclear thermal propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennett, Gary L.

    1991-01-01

    This document is presented in viewgraph form, and the topics covered include the following: (1) the direct fission-thermal propulsion process; (2) mission applications of direct fission-thermal propulsion; (3) nuclear engines for rocket vehicles; (4) manned mars landers; and (5) particle bed reactor design.

  18. Thermally actuated wedge block

    DOEpatents

    Queen, Jr., Charles C.

    1980-01-01

    This invention relates to an automatically-operating wedge block for maintaining intimate structural contact over wide temperature ranges, including cryogenic use. The wedging action depends on the relative thermal expansion of two materials having very different coefficients of thermal expansion. The wedge block expands in thickness when cooled to cryogenic temperatures and contracts in thickness when returned to room temperature.

  19. Thermally exfoliated graphite oxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prud'Homme, Robert K. (Inventor); Aksay, Ilhan A. (Inventor); Abdala, Ahmed (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A modified graphite oxide material contains a thermally exfoliated graphite oxide with a surface area of from about 300 sq m/g to 2600 sq m/g, wherein the thermally exfoliated graphite oxide displays no signature of the original graphite and/or graphite oxide, as determined by X-ray diffraction.

  20. Thermal protection apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Bennett, G.A.; Elder, M.G.; Kemme, J.E.

    1984-03-20

    The disclosure is directed to an apparatus for thermally protecting sensitive components in tools used in a geothermal borehole. The apparatus comprises a Dewar within a housing. The Dewar contains heat pipes such as brass heat pipes for thermally conducting heat from heat sensitive components such as electronics to a heat sink such as ice.

  1. A thermal ground cloak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Tianzhi; Wu, Qinghe; Xu, Weikai; Liu, Di; Huang, Lujun; Chen, Fei

    2016-02-01

    The thermal cloak has been a long-standing scientific dream of researchers and engineers. Recently thermal metamaterials with man-made micro-structure have been presented based on the principle of transformation optics (TO). This new concept has received considerable attention, which is a powerful tool for manipulating heat flux in thermal imaging systems. However, the inherent material singularity has long been a captivation of experimental realization. As an alternative method, the scattering-cancellation-based cloak (or bi-layer thermal cloak) has been presented to remove the singularity for achieving the same cloaking performance. Nevertheless, such strategy needs prerequisite knowledge (geometry and conductivity) of the object to be cloaked. In this paper, a new thermal ground cloak is presented to overcome the limitations. The device is designed, fabricated and measured to verify the thermal cloaking performance. We experimentally show that the remarkably low complexity of the device can fully and effectively be manipulated using realizable transformation thermal devices. More importantly, this thermal ground cloak is designed to exclude heat flux without knowing the information of the cloaked object.

  2. Spacecraft Thermal Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birur, Gajanana C.; Siebes, Georg; Swanson, Theodore D.; Powers, Edward I. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Thermal control of the spacecraft is typically achieved by removing heat from the spacecraft parts that tend to overheat and adding heat to the parts that tend get too cold. The equipment on the spacecraft can get very hot if it is exposed to the sun or have internal heat generation. The pans also can get very cold if they are exposed to the cold of deep space. The spacecraft and instruments must be designed to achieve proper thermal balance. The combination of the spacecraft's external thermal environment, its internal heat generation (i.e., waste heat from the operation of electrical equipment), and radiative heat rejection will determine this thermal balance. It should also be noted that this is seldom a static situation, external environmental influences and internal heat generation are normally dynamic variables which change with time. Topics discussed include thermal control system components, spacecraft mission categories, spacecraft thermal requirements, space thermal environments, thermal control hardware, launch and flight operations, advanced technologies for future spacecraft,

  3. Low Thermal Conductivity Thermal Barrier Coatings Developed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming

    2003-01-01

    Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) are used extensively in modern gas turbine engines to thermally insulate air-cooled metallic components from the hot gases in the engine. These coatings typically consist of a zirconia-yttria ceramic that has been applied by either plasma spraying or physical vapor deposition. Future engines will rely even more heavily on TBCs and will require materials that have even higher temperature capability with improved insulation (i.e., lower thermal conductivity even after many hours at high temperature). This report discusses new TBCs that have been developed with these future requirements in mind. The Ultra-Efficient Engine Technology Program at the NASA Glenn Research Center is funding this effort, which has been conducted primarily at Glenn with contractor support (GE and Howmet) for physical vapor deposition. As stated, the new TBC not only had to be more insulating but the insulation had to persist even after many hours of exposure-that is, the new TBC had to have both lower conductivity and improved sintering resistance. A new type of test rig was developed for this task. This new test approach used a laser to deliver a known high heat flux in an essentially uniform pattern to the surface of the coating, thereby establishing a realistic thermal gradient across its thickness. This gradient was determined from surface and backside pyrometry; and since the heat flux and coating thickness are known, this permitted continuous monitoring of thermal conductivity. Thus, this laser rig allowed very efficient screening of candidate low-conductivity, sinter-resistant TBCs. The coating-design approach selected for these new low-conductivity TBCs was to identify oxide dopants that had the potential to promote the formation of relatively large and stable groupings of defects known as defect clusters. This approach was used because it was felt that such clusters would reduce conductivity while enhancing stability. The approach proved to be

  4. Thermal expansion in nanoresonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mancardo Viotti, Agustín; Monastra, Alejandro G.; Moreno, Mariano F.; Florencia Carusela, M.

    2016-08-01

    Inspired by some recent experiments and numerical works related to nanoresonators, we perform classical molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the thermal expansion and the ability of the device to act as a strain sensor assisted by thermally-induced vibrations. The proposed model consists in a chain of atoms interacting anharmonically with both ends clamped to thermal reservoirs. We analyze the thermal expansion and resonant frequency shifts as a function of temperature and the applied strain. For the transversal modes the shift is approximately linear with strain. We also present analytical results from canonical calculations in the harmonic approximation showing that thermal expansion is uniform along the device. This prediction also works when the system operates in a nonlinear oscillation regime at moderate and high temperatures.

  5. Lecture on Thermal Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dennis, Brian R.

    2006-01-01

    This lecture will cover solar thermal radiation, particularly as it relates to the high energy solar processes that are the subject of this summer school. After a general review of thermal radiation from the Sun and a discussion of basic definitions, the various emission and absorption mechanisms will be described including black-body emission, bremsstrahlung, free-bound, and atomic line emissions of all kinds. The bulk of the time will be spent discussing the observational characteristics of thermal flare plasma and what can be learned about the flare energy release process from observations of the thermal radiation at all wavelengths. Information that has been learned about the morphology, temperature distribution, and composition of the flare plasma will be presented. The energetics of the thermal flare plasma will be discussed in relation to the nonthermal energy of the particles accelerated during the flare. This includes the total energy, the radiated and conductive cooling processes, and the total irradiated energy.

  6. Microsecond switchable thermal antenna

    SciTech Connect

    Ben-Abdallah, Philippe Benisty, Henri; Besbes, Mondher

    2014-07-21

    We propose a thermal antenna that can be actively switched on and off at the microsecond scale by means of a phase transition of a metal-insulator material, the vanadium dioxide (VO{sub 2}). This thermal source is made of a periodically patterned tunable VO{sub 2} nanolayer, which support a surface phonon-polariton in the infrared range in their crystalline phase. Using electrodes properly registered with respect to the pattern, the VO{sub 2} phase transition can be locally triggered by ohmic heating so that the surface phonon-polariton can be diffracted by the induced grating, producing a highly directional thermal emission. Conversely, when heating less, the VO{sub 2} layers cool down below the transition temperature, the surface phonon-polariton cannot be diffracted anymore so that thermal emission is inhibited. This switchable antenna could find broad applications in the domain of active thermal coatings or in those of infrared spectroscopy and sensing.

  7. Solar thermal aircraft

    DOEpatents

    Bennett, Charles L.

    2007-09-18

    A solar thermal powered aircraft powered by heat energy from the sun. A heat engine, such as a Stirling engine, is carried by the aircraft body for producing power for a propulsion mechanism, such as a propeller. The heat engine has a thermal battery in thermal contact with it so that heat is supplied from the thermal battery. A solar concentrator, such as reflective parabolic trough, is movably connected to an optically transparent section of the aircraft body for receiving and concentrating solar energy from within the aircraft. Concentrated solar energy is collected by a heat collection and transport conduit, and heat transported to the thermal battery. A solar tracker includes a heliostat for determining optimal alignment with the sun, and a drive motor actuating the solar concentrator into optimal alignment with the sun based on a determination by the heliostat.

  8. Thermal treatment wall

    DOEpatents

    Aines, Roger D.; Newmark, Robin L.; Knauss, Kevin G.

    2000-01-01

    A thermal treatment wall emplaced to perform in-situ destruction of contaminants in groundwater. Thermal destruction of specific contaminants occurs by hydrous pyrolysis/oxidation at temperatures achievable by existing thermal remediation techniques (electrical heating or steam injection) in the presence of oxygen or soil mineral oxidants, such as MnO.sub.2. The thermal treatment wall can be installed in a variety of configurations depending on the specific objectives, and can be used for groundwater cleanup, wherein in-situ destruction of contaminants is carried out rather than extracting contaminated fluids to the surface, where they are to be cleaned. In addition, the thermal treatment wall can be used for both plume interdiction and near-wellhead in-situ groundwater treatment. Thus, this technique can be utilized for a variety of groundwater contamination problems.

  9. Low thermal conductivity oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Wei; Phillpot, Simon R.; Wan, Chunlei; Chernatynskiy, Aleksandr; Qu, Zhixue

    2012-10-09

    Oxides hold great promise as new and improved materials for thermal-barrier coating applications. The rich variety of structures and compositions of the materials in this class, and the ease with which they can be doped, allow the exploration of various mechanisms for lowering thermal conductivity. In this article, we review recent progress in identifying specific oxides with low thermal conductivity from both theoretical and experimental perspectives. We explore the mechanisms of lowering thermal conductivity, such as introducing structural/chemical disorder, increasing material density, increasing the number of atoms in the primitive cell, and exploiting the structural anisotropy. We conclude that further systematic exploration of oxide crystal structures and chemistries are likely to result in even further improved thermal-barrier coatings.

  10. Space Suit Thermal Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Anthony B.; Nair, Satish S.; Miles, John B.; Iovine, John V.; Lin, Chin H.

    1998-01-01

    The present NASA space suit (the Shuttle EMU) is a self-contained environmental control system, providing life support, environmental protection, earth-like mobility, and communications. This study considers the thermal dynamics of the space suit as they relate to astronaut thermal comfort control. A detailed dynamic lumped capacitance thermal model of the present space suit is used to analyze the thermal dynamics of the suit with observations verified using experimental and flight data. Prior to using the model to define performance characteristics and limitations for the space suit, the model is first evaluated and improved. This evaluation includes determining the effect of various model parameters on model performance and quantifying various temperature prediction errors in terms of heat transfer and heat storage. The observations from this study are being utilized in two future design efforts, automatic thermal comfort control design for the present space suit and design of future space suit systems for Space Station, Lunar, and Martian missions.

  11. Tunable thermal link

    DOEpatents

    Chang, Chih-Wei; Majumdar, Arunava; Zettl, Alexander K.

    2014-07-15

    Disclosed is a device whereby the thermal conductance of a multiwalled nanostructure such as a multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) can be controllably and reversibly tuned by sliding one or more outer shells with respect to the inner core. As one example, the thermal conductance of an MWCNT dropped to 15% of the original value after extending the length of the MWCNT by 190 nm. The thermal conductivity returned when the tube was contracted. The device may comprise numbers of multiwalled nanotubes or other graphitic layers connected to a heat source and a heat drain and various means for tuning the overall thermal conductance for applications in structure heat management, heat flow in nanoscale or microscale devices and thermal logic devices.

  12. Multiwall thermal protection system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, L. R. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    Multiwall insulating sandwich panels are provided for thermal protection of hypervelocity vehicles and other enclosures. In one embodiment, the multiwall panels are formed of alternate layers of dimpled and flat metal (titanium alloy) foil sheets and beaded scarfed edge seals to provide enclosure thermal protection up to 1000 F. An additional embodiment employs an intermediate fibrous insulation for the sandwich panel to provide thermal protection up to 2000 F. A third embodiment employs a silicide coated columbium waffle as the outer panel skin and fibrous layered intermediate protection for thermal environment protection up to 2500 F. The use of multiple panels on an enclosure facilitate repair and refurbishment of the thermal protection system due to the simple support provided by the tab and clip attachment for the panels.

  13. Low temperature thermal hall conductivity of a nodal chiral superconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yip, Sungkit

    2016-08-01

    Motivated by Sr2RuO4, we consider a chiral superconductor where the gap is strongly suppressed along certain momentum directions. We evaluate the thermal Hall conductivity in the gapless regime, i.e., at low temperature compared with the impurity band width γ, taking the simplest model of isotropic impurity scattering. We find that, under favorable circumstances, this thermal Hall conductivity can be quite significant and is smaller than the diagonal component (the universal thermal conductivity) only by a factor of 1/{ln}(2{{{Δ }}}M/γ ), where {{{Δ }}}M is the maximum gap.

  14. Full analytical evaluation of thermal transport properties of nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamedov, B. A.

    2016-02-01

    New approaches for the analytical evaluation of the heat capacities and thermal conductivity of nanowires are presented. The most significant result of our calculation is an explicit closed form in terms of elementary functions. This allows the specific heat and thermal conductivity of nanowires to be easily evaluated within the arbitrary values of parameters. The proposed method is applied successfully to the evaluation of the heat capacities and thermal conductivity of Ni nanowire and can be used as a universal heat capacity evaluation scheme for all nanowires and other nanostructures. The theoretical model has been verified by comparing the predicted results with those obtained from the available analytical and literature data.

  15. Fibonacci family of dynamical universality classes.

    PubMed

    Popkov, Vladislav; Schadschneider, Andreas; Schmidt, Johannes; Schütz, Gunter M

    2015-10-13

    Universality is a well-established central concept of equilibrium physics. However, in systems far away from equilibrium, a deeper understanding of its underlying principles is still lacking. Up to now, a few classes have been identified. Besides the diffusive universality class with dynamical exponent [Formula: see text], another prominent example is the superdiffusive Kardar-Parisi-Zhang (KPZ) class with [Formula: see text]. It appears, e.g., in low-dimensional dynamical phenomena far from thermal equilibrium that exhibit some conservation law. Here we show that both classes are only part of an infinite discrete family of nonequilibrium universality classes. Remarkably, their dynamical exponents [Formula: see text] are given by ratios of neighboring Fibonacci numbers, starting with either [Formula: see text] (if a KPZ mode exist) or [Formula: see text] (if a diffusive mode is present). If neither a diffusive nor a KPZ mode is present, all dynamical modes have the Golden Mean [Formula: see text] as dynamical exponent. The universal scaling functions of these Fibonacci modes are asymmetric Lévy distributions that are completely fixed by the macroscopic current density relation and compressibility matrix of the system and hence accessible to experimental measurement. PMID:26424449

  16. Fibonacci family of dynamical universality classes

    PubMed Central

    Popkov, Vladislav; Schadschneider, Andreas; Schmidt, Johannes; Schütz, Gunter M.

    2015-01-01

    Universality is a well-established central concept of equilibrium physics. However, in systems far away from equilibrium, a deeper understanding of its underlying principles is still lacking. Up to now, a few classes have been identified. Besides the diffusive universality class with dynamical exponent z=2, another prominent example is the superdiffusive Kardar−Parisi−Zhang (KPZ) class with z=3/2. It appears, e.g., in low-dimensional dynamical phenomena far from thermal equilibrium that exhibit some conservation law. Here we show that both classes are only part of an infinite discrete family of nonequilibrium universality classes. Remarkably, their dynamical exponents zα are given by ratios of neighboring Fibonacci numbers, starting with either z1=3/2 (if a KPZ mode exist) or z1=2 (if a diffusive mode is present). If neither a diffusive nor a KPZ mode is present, all dynamical modes have the Golden Mean z=(1+5)/2 as dynamical exponent. The universal scaling functions of these Fibonacci modes are asymmetric Lévy distributions that are completely fixed by the macroscopic current density relation and compressibility matrix of the system and hence accessible to experimental measurement. PMID:26424449

  17. The Universe Revealed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spence, Pam

    1998-10-01

    The Universe is a bewildering place to the uninitiated. The concepts and theories that govern space seem complex and often contradictory. The Universe Revealed provides the keys to unlocking the wonders of the cosmos. Elegantly written and lavishly illustrated, it begins with the Sun and stretches through our solar system into deepest space. Lucid prose, written by many of the people who have shaped our current thinking on space, and spectacular photographs make the physics of the Universe accessible and provide a solid background for understanding the most recent astronomical discoveries. Covering the most intriguing features of the cosmos, the topics discussed range from the Earth and global warming to cosmic collisions and the size of the Universe. Major sections examine the Solar System, stars, galaxies, cosmology, and the observational techniques used by astronomers, both amateur and professional. The Universe Revealed represents the collaboration of internationally renowned experts in astronomy and cosmology, with contributions from authors including David Malin, F. Duccio Macchetto, Iain Nicholson, Neil Bone, Ian Ridpath, Seth Shostak, Mike Lancaster, Steve Miller, Ken Croswell, Geoff McNamara, and Steven Young. This extraordinary blend of astronomy, astrophysics, and cosmology, will appeal to amateur and armchair astronomers alike.

  18. University Reactor Instrumentation Program

    SciTech Connect

    Vernetson, W.G.

    1992-11-01

    Recognizing that the University Reactor Instrumentation Program was developed in response to widespread needs in the academic community for modernization and improvement of research and training reactors at institutions such as the University of Florida, the items proposed to be supported by this grant over its two year period have been selected as those most likely to reduce foreed outages, to meet regulatory concerns that had been expressed in recent years by Nuclear Regulatory Commission inspectors or to correct other facility problems and limitations. Department of Energy Grant Number DE-FG07-90ER129969 was provided to the University of Florida Training Reactor(UFTR) facility through the US Department of Energy's University Reactor Instrumentation Program. The original proposal submitted in February, 1990 requested support for UFTR facility instrumentation and equipment upgrades for seven items in the amount of $107,530 with $13,800 of this amount to be the subject of cost sharing by the University of Florida and $93,730 requested as support from the Department of Energy. A breakdown of the items requested and total cost for the proposed UFTR facility instrumentation and equipment improvements is presented.

  19. Systems analysis of thermal storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Copeland, R. J.

    1981-08-01

    Analyses were conducted on thermal storage concepts for solar thermal applications. These studies include estimates of both the obtainable costs of thermal storage concepts and their worth to a user (i.e., value). Based on obtainable costs and performance, an in-depth study evaluated thermal storage concepts for water/steam, organic fluid, and gas/Brayton solar thermal receivers. Promising and nonpromising concepts were identified. Thermal storage concepts were evaluated for a liquid metal receiver. The value of thermal storage in a solar thermal industrial process heat application was analyzed. Several advanced concepts studied, include ground-mounted thermal storage for parabolic dishes with Stirling engines.

  20. Non-thermal Plasma and Oxidative Stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toyokuni, Shinya

    2015-09-01

    Thermal plasmas and lasers have been used in medicine to cut and ablate tissues and for coagulation. Non-equilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma (NEAPP; non-thermal plasma) is a recently developed, non-thermal technique with possible biomedical applications. Although NEAPP reportedly generates reactive oxygen/nitrogen species, electrons, positive ions, and ultraviolet radiation, few research projects have been conducted to merge this technique with conventional free radical biology. Recently, Prof. Masaru Hori's group (Plasma Nanotechnology Research Center, Nagoya University) developed a NEAPP device with high electron density. Here electron spin resonance revealed hydroxyl radicals as a major product. To merge non-thermal plasma biology with the preexisting free radical biology, we evaluated lipid peroxidation and DNA modifications in various in vitro and ex vivo experiments. Conjugated dienes increased after exposure to linoleic and alfa-linolenic acids. An increase in 2-thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances was also increased after exposure to phosphatidylcholine, liposomes or liver homogenate. Direct exposure to rat liver in medium produced immunohistochemical evidence of 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal- and acrolein-modified proteins. Exposure to plasmid DNA induced dose-dependent single/double strand breaks and increased the amounts of 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine and cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers. These results indicate that oxidative biomolecular damage by NEAPP is dose-dependent and thus can be controlled in a site-specific manner. Simultaneous oxidative and UV-specific DNA damage may be useful in cancer treatment. Other recent advancements in the related studies of non-thermal plasma in Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine will also be discussed.

  1. University-Community Engagement: Case Study of University Social Responsibility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chile, Love M.; Black, Xavier M.

    2015-01-01

    Corporatisation of universities has drawn parallels between contemporary universities and business corporations, and extended analysis of corporate social responsibility to universities. This article reports on a case study of university-community engagement with schools and school communities through youth engagement programmes to enhance…

  2. Why Does the Universe Inflate?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawking, S. W.

    It is a great pleasure for me to be back again in Chile, to celebrate the 60th birthday of an old friend, and esteemed colleague, Claudio Bunster, whom I have known for almost 40 years. Claudio has done so much for science in general, and for science in Chile in particular. Being in the city of Valdivia where CECS, the center he created, is located, is quite meaningful to me. Twenty-five years ago, we held a Nuffield workshop on the Very Early Universe in Cambridge. The inflation scenario had just been proposed, by Guth and others, to account for many of the otherwise unexplained features of the Hot Big Bang model. The original Old Inflation proposal depicted in Fig. 1, of thin walled bubbles, forming in a meta-stable vacuum state, was shown not to work. If the bubble formation rate was high, the bubbles would be close together, and inflation would not last long enough. On the other hand if the bubble formation rate was low, the bubbles would be so far apart, that they never join up and thermalize.

  3. The Experimental Determination of Thermal Neutron Flux in the Radiochemistry Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grant, Patrick M.

    1977-01-01

    Describes an experiment for determining the thermal neutron flux of the light-water nuclear reactor at the University of California, Irvine. The difficulty of the activity can be varied to match the student's level of proficiency. (SL)

  4. Preliminary experimental evaluation of thermal conductivity of ceramic pebble beds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aquaro, D.; Lo Frano, R.

    2014-04-01

    This paper illustrates the preliminary experimental tests for determining the effective thermal conductivity of ceramic pebble beds versus temperature and compression strains. Ceramic pebble beds are promising candidates to be used in breeding blankets for nuclear fusion reactor as breeder and neutron multiplier. The tests were performed with an experimental rig, built at the DICI-University of Pisa, which permits to determine the thermal conductivity of pebble beds in steady state conditions, at several temperatures and compression forces. The values of thermal conductivity of pebble beds are obtained as function of a known conductivity of an alumina disc. The assessment of the method has been performed determining the effective thermal conductivity of alumina pebbles beds of different diameters. Void fraction and compression strains are the parameters that mainly influence the variability of the thermal conductivity of the beds.

  5. The apparent Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binétruy, P.; Helou, A.

    2015-10-01

    We exploit the parallel between dynamical black holes and cosmological spacetimes to describe the evolution of Friedmann-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker universes from the point of view of an observer in terms of the dynamics of the apparent horizon. Using the Hayward-Kodama formalism of dynamical black holes, we clarify the role of the Clausius relation to derive the Friedmann equations for a Universe, in the spirit of Jacobson’s work on the thermodynamics of spacetime. We also show how dynamics at the horizon naturally leads to the quantum-mechanical process of Hawking radiation. We comment on the connection of this work with recent ideas to consider our observable Universe as a Bose-Einstein condensate and on the corresponding role of vacuum energy.

  6. A Non Singular Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawking, Stephen

    2005-01-01

    The last chapter of my PhD thesis, contained my first singularity theorem. This showed that under certain reasonable conditions, any cosmological solution of the field equations, would have a big bang singularity. At this singularity, classical general relativity would break down, so one could not use it to predict how the universe began. It was therefore necessary to develop a quantum theory of gravity, in order to understand the origin of the universe. In this talk, I explore if the origin of the universe can be semi classical, and non singular. This is possible despite the singularity theorems, because like so many other no go theorems, they have a get out clause. In this case, the get out is the strong energy condition.

  7. Music of the Universe

    SciTech Connect

    2010-01-01

    Scientists are quite familiar with what a supernova looks like — when these stars are destroyed in the most massive explosions in the universe, they leave their mark as one of the brightest objects in space, at least for several weeks. While the supernova can be seen, it cant be heard, as sound waves cannot travel through space. But what if the light waves emitted by the exploding star and other cosmological phenomena could be translated into sound? Thats the idea behind a Rhythms of the Universe, a musical project to sonify the universe by Grateful Dead percussionist and Grammy award-winning artist Mickey Hart that caught the attention of Nobel Prize-winning astrophysicist George Smoot of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Sounds courtesy of Keith Jackson. Images courtesy of NASA

  8. The Classification of Universes

    SciTech Connect

    Bjorken, J.D.

    2004-02-18

    We define a universe as the contents of a spacetime box with comoving walls, large enough to contain measurable phenomena, but not much larger. This allows the construction of a local ensemble of such universes, given modest extrapolations of the observed properties of the cosmos. We then assume that further out similar universes can be constructed, but with different standard model parameters, strongly correlated with the size in a definite way, where by size is meant the Hubble scale at late times. This allows an estimate of the range of sizes supporting life as we know it. The result allows some understanding of the hierarchy problems of particle physics. Other possible implications of the assumptions made will be discussed, including a possible connection between the QCD vacuum structure and cosmological horizon structure. In all cases, our approach is as bottoms-up and as phenomenological as possible, suggesting that theories of the multiverse may eventually lay some claim of being scientific.

  9. The anamorphic universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ijjas, Anna; Steinhardt, Paul J.

    2015-10-01

    We introduce ``anamorphic'' cosmology, an approach for explaining the smoothness and flatness of the universe on large scales and the generation of a nearly scale-invariant spectrum of adiabatic density perturbations. The defining feature is a smoothing phase that acts like a contracting universe based on some Weyl frame-invariant criteria and an expanding universe based on other frame-invariant criteria. An advantage of the contracting aspects is that it is possible to avoid the multiverse and measure problems that arise in inflationary models. Unlike ekpyrotic models, anamorphic models can be constructed using only a single field and can generate a nearly scale-invariant spectrum of tensor perturbations. Anamorphic models also differ from pre-big bang and matter bounce models that do not explain the smoothness. We present some examples of cosmological models that incorporate an anamorphic smoothing phase.

  10. The Biological Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dick, Steven J.

    1999-12-01

    Throughout the twentieth century, from the furor over Percival Lowell's claim of canals on Mars to the sophisticated Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence, otherworldly life has often intrigued and occasionally consumed science and the public. The Biological Universe provides a rich and colorful history of the attempts during the twentieth century to answer questions such as whether "biological law" reigns throughout the universe and whether there are other histories, religions, and philosophies outside those on Earth. Covering a broad range of topics, including the search for life in the solar system, the origins of life, UFOs, and aliens in science fiction, Steven J. Dick shows how the concept of extraterrestrial intelligence is a world view of its own, a "biophysical cosmology" that seeks confirmation no less than physical views of the universe. This book will fascinate astronomers, historians of science, biochemists, and science fiction readers.

  11. Phonology without universal grammar

    PubMed Central

    Archangeli, Diana; Pulleyblank, Douglas

    2015-01-01

    The question of identifying the properties of language that are specific human linguistic abilities, i.e., Universal Grammar, lies at the center of linguistic research. This paper argues for a largely Emergent Grammar in phonology, taking as the starting point that memory, categorization, attention to frequency, and the creation of symbolic systems are all nonlinguistic characteristics of the human mind. The articulation patterns of American English rhotics illustrate categorization and systems; the distribution of vowels in Bantu vowel harmony uses frequencies of particular sequences to argue against Universal Grammar and in favor of Emergent Grammar; prefix allomorphy in Esimbi illustrates the Emergent symbolic system integrating phonological and morphological generalizations. The Esimbi case has been treated as an example of phonological opacity in a Universal Grammar account; the Emergent analysis resolves the pattern without opacity concerns. PMID:26388791

  12. Phonology without universal grammar.

    PubMed

    Archangeli, Diana; Pulleyblank, Douglas

    2015-01-01

    The question of identifying the properties of language that are specific human linguistic abilities, i.e., Universal Grammar, lies at the center of linguistic research. This paper argues for a largely Emergent Grammar in phonology, taking as the starting point that memory, categorization, attention to frequency, and the creation of symbolic systems are all nonlinguistic characteristics of the human mind. The articulation patterns of American English rhotics illustrate categorization and systems; the distribution of vowels in Bantu vowel harmony uses frequencies of particular sequences to argue against Universal Grammar and in favor of Emergent Grammar; prefix allomorphy in Esimbi illustrates the Emergent symbolic system integrating phonological and morphological generalizations. The Esimbi case has been treated as an example of phonological opacity in a Universal Grammar account; the Emergent analysis resolves the pattern without opacity concerns. PMID:26388791

  13. Thermally-related safety issues associated with thermal batteries.

    SciTech Connect

    Guidotti, Ronald Armand

    2006-06-01

    Thermal batteries can experience thermal runaway under certain usage conditions. This can lead to safety issues for personnel and cause damage to associated test equipment if the battery thermally self destructs. This report discusses a number of thermal and design related issues that can lead to catastrophic destruction of thermal batteries under certain conditions. Contributing factors are identified and mitigating actions are presented to minimize or prevent undesirable thermal runaway.

  14. Apollo telescope mount thermal systems unit thermal vacuum test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trucks, H. F.; Hueter, U.; Wise, J. H.; Bachtel, F. D.

    1971-01-01

    The Apollo Telescope Mount's thermal systems unit was utilized to conduct a full-scale thermal vacuum test to verify the thermal design and the analytical techniques used to develop the thermal mathematical models. Thermal vacuum test philosophy, test objectives configuration, test monitoring, environment simulation, vehicle test performance, and data correlation are discussed. Emphasis is placed on planning and execution of the thermal vacuum test with particular attention on problems encountered in conducting a test of this maguitude.

  15. Did the universe recombine?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartlett, James G.; Stebbins, Albert

    1991-01-01

    The Zel'dovich-Sunyaev model-independent arguments for the existence of a neutral hydrogen phase is reviewed in light of new limits on the Compton y parameter from COBE. It is concluded that with baryon densities compatible with standard cosmological nucleosynthesis, the universe could have remained fully ionized throughout its history without producing a detectable spectral distortion. It is argued that it is unlikely that spectral observations of the cosmic microwave background will ever require the universe to have recombined for flat cosmologies.

  16. Understanding the Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenstein, George

    2013-04-01

    Part I. Steps to Astronomy: 1. The sky; 2. The origins of astronomy; 3. Gravity and orbits; 4. Light; 5. The astronomers' tools: telescopes and space probes; Part II. The Solar System: 6. Introducing the Solar System; 7. The inner Solar System; 8. The outer Solar System; 9. Smaller bodies in the Solar System; 10. Planets beyond the Solar System; Part III. Stars: 11. Our Sun; 12. A census of stars; 13. The formation of stars and planets; 14. Stellar structure; 15. Stellar evolution and death; Part IV. Galaxies and the Universe: 16. The Milky Way galaxy; 17. Galaxies; 18. Cosmology; 19. Life in the Universe; Index.

  17. Universal cause for celebration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gething, Phillip

    2008-11-01

    The universal law of ageing applies to human beings, animals, plants and inanimate objects. All ages increase by exactly one day per 24 hours, and Hubble's constant gets a tiny bit smaller each day, because it is not really constant at all but varies in time. If we suppose that our universe originated in a Big Bang about 13.7 billion years ago, it too has a birthday each year, but we do not know the actual date. Was it on (say) a wet Wednesday in May or a sunny Saturday in November? It would be nice to know, so that we could have a yearly celebration to mark the event.

  18. Universality in ant behaviour.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Kim; Papavassiliou, Dario; de Figueiredo, Alexandre; Franks, Nigel R; Sendova-Franks, Ana B

    2015-01-01

    Prediction for social systems is a major challenge. Universality at the social level has inspired a unified theory for urban living but individual variation makes predicting relationships within societies difficult. Here, we show that in ant societies individual average speed is higher when event duration is longer. Expressed as a single scaling function, this relationship is universal because for any event duration an ant, on average, moves at the corresponding average speed except for a short acceleration and deceleration at the beginning and end. This establishes cause and effect within a social system and may inform engineering and control of artificial ones. PMID:25411406

  19. The Biological Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dick, Steven J.

    2000-03-01

    Introduction; 1. From the physical world to the biological universe: Democritus to Lowell; 2. Plurality of worlds and the decline of anthropocentrism; 3. The solar system: the limits of observation; 4. Solar systems beyond: the limits of theory; 5. Extraterrestrials in literature and the arts: the role of imagination; 6. The UFO controversy: on perception and deception; 7. The origin and evolution of life in the extraterrestrial context; 8. SETI: the Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence; 9. The convergence of disciplines: birth of a new science; 10. The meaning of life; Summary and conclusion: the biological universe and the limits of science.

  20. The Biological Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dick, Steven J.

    1996-09-01

    Introduction; 1. From the physical world to the biological universe: Democritus to Lowell; 2. Plurality of worlds and the decline of anthropocentrism; 3. The solar system: the limits of observation; 4. Solar systems beyond: the limits of theory; 5. Extraterrestrials in literature and the arts: the role of imagination; 6. The UFO controversy: on perception and deception; 7. The origin and evolution of life in the extraterrestrial context; 8. SETI: the Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence; 9. The convergence of disciplines: birth of a new science; 10. The meaning of life; Summary and conclusion: the biological universe and the limits of science.

  1. Imaging the early universe

    SciTech Connect

    Krupa, Tyler J.

    2000-07-01

    An international team of cosmologists has released the first detailed images of the universe in its infancy. The images reveal the structure that existed when the universe was a tiny fraction of its current age and 1,000 times smaller and hotter than it is today. Research carried out as part of this project is shedding light on some of cosmology's long-standing mysteries, such as the nature of the matter and energy that dominate intergalactic space and whether space is ''curved'' or ''flat.''(c) 2000 Optical Society of America.

  2. UTM: Universal Transit Modeller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deeg, Hans J.

    2014-12-01

    The Universal Transit Modeller (UTM) is a light-curve simulator for all kinds of transiting or eclipsing configurations between arbitrary numbers of several types of objects, which may be stars, planets, planetary moons, and planetary rings. A separate fitting program, UFIT (Universal Fitter) is part of the UTM distribution and may be used to derive best fits to light-curves for any set of continuously variable parameters. UTM/UFIT is written in IDL code and its source is released in the public domain under the GNU General Public License.

  3. A universal functional object

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, J. P.

    1972-01-01

    A scheme is presented for realizing any function, combinational or sequential, in a single universal function scheme, termed the universal function object UF. This scheme is addressed to the problem of the proliferation of the number of parts (cards, chips) necessary for conventional implementation in an LSI technology of a computer system. The UF implementation will use about ten times more circuits than a conventional implementation regardless of the size of the design. The UF approach also includes general-purpose spares for failing circuits. The procedure could be used both at manufacture to increase yields, as well as to achieve automatic repair.

  4. An Early Cyclic Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duhe, William; Biswas, Tirthibir

    2014-03-01

    We provide a comprehensive numerical study of the Emergent Cyclic Inflation scenario. This is a scenario where instead of traditional monotonic slow roll inflation, the universe expands over numerous short asymmetric cycles due to the production of entropy via interactions among different species. This is one of the very few scenarios of inflation which provides a nonsingular geodesically complete space-time and does not require any ``reheating'' mechanism. A special thanks to Loyola University for an excellent community to help this project grow.

  5. The Expanding Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heacox, William D.

    2015-11-01

    Introducing the Universe; Part I. Conceptual Foundations: 1. Newtonian cosmology; 2. General relativity; 3. Relativistic cosmology; Part II. General Relativity: 4. General covariance; 5. Equivalence principle; 6. Space-time curvature; 7. Einstein field equations of gravitation; Part III. Universal Expansion: 8. Cosmological field equations; 9. Cosmography; 10. Expansion dynamics; Part IV. Expansion Models: 11. Radiation; 12. Matter; 13. Dark energy; 14. Observational constraints; 15. Concordance cosmological model; Part V. Expansion History: 16. Particle era; 17. Plasma era; 18. Galaxy era; 19. Afterword: the new modern cosmology; Part VI: Appendices; Bibliography; Index.

  6. Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation of Black Hole Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Tianxi

    2009-05-01

    Recently, the author has proposed an alternative cosmological model called black hole universe. According to this model, the universe originated from a hot star-like black hole with several solar masses, and gradually grew up through a supermassive black hole with billion solar masses to the present state with hundred billion-trillion solar masses by accreting ambient materials and merging with other black holes. The entire space is structured with infinite layers hierarchically. The innermost three layers are the universe that we are living, the outside called mother universe, and the inside star-like and supermassive black holes called child universes. The outermost layer is infinite in radius and limits to zero for both the mass density and absolute temperature. The observed cosmic microwave background radiation can be explained as the black body radiation of the black hole universe. When a hot and dense star-like black hole accretes its ambient matter and radiation or merges with other black holes, it expands and cools down. In terms of the Planck law of the black body radiation, a possible thermal history of the black hole universe is obtained. The result shows that the temperature of the present universe can be 3 K as observed if the universe originated from a hot star-like black hole. The initial properties (e.g., temperature, angular momentum, etc.) of the star-like black hole are not critical to the present universe, because most matter and radiation are from the mother universe. Therefore, the black hole universe model is also consistent with the observation of the cosmic microwave background radiation.

  7. [Traditions of university studies at Kaunas University of Medicine].

    PubMed

    Bruneviciūte, Raimonda; Brazdzionyte, Julija

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this article is to highlight the dimensions of the traditions of the idea of the university that are relevant in our today's world--the autonomy of the university, education of a free and creative personality, and belonging to the unified space of studies--and to review the experience of Kaunas University of Medicine in the development of the traditions of university studies. The research object was university studies, and the methods applied in this research were analysis of literature and analysis of documents. The article consists of the introduction, two parts, and generalization. The first part discusses the autonomy of the university, the importance of liberal studies, and the influence of the European higher education and provides a generalized survey of the historical tradition of university studies in Lithuania. The second part of the article reviews the predominant factors that condition the development of university studies at Kaunas University of Medicine: organization of studies and implementation of liberal studies realized through general university education subjects into the modern content of university studies. The generalization of the results of the performed analysis allows for stating that the contents and the organization of curricula and the ongoing reforms at Kaunas University of Medicine expand the continuity of the traditions of the European university education, highlight the idea of the university, and realize university studies that reflect modern global tendencies. PMID:17090986

  8. Thermal barrier coating system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecura, S.; Leibert, C. H. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A coating system which contains a bond coating and a thermal barrier coating is applied to metal surfaces such as turbine blades and provides both low thermal conductivity and improved adherence when exposed to high temperature gases or liquids. The bond coating contains NiCrAlY and the thermal barrier coating contains a reflective oxide. The reflective oxides ZrO2-Y2O3 and ZrO2-MgO have demonstrated significant utility in high temperature turbine applications.

  9. Thermal energy transformer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berdahl, C. M.; Thiele, C. L. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    For use in combination with a heat engine, a thermal energy transformer is presented. It is comprised of a flux receiver having a first wall defining therein a radiation absorption cavity for converting solar flux to thermal energy, and a second wall defining an energy transfer wall for the heat engine. There is a heat pipe chamber interposed between the first and second walls having a working fluid disposed within the chamber and a wick lining the chamber for conducting the working fluid from the second wall to the first wall. Thermal energy is transferred from the radiation absorption cavity to the heat engine.

  10. Thermal Skin fabrication technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milam, T. B.

    1972-01-01

    Advanced fabrication techniques applicable to Thermal Skin structures were investigated, including: (1) chemical machining; (2) braze bonding; (3) diffusion bonding; and (4) electron beam welding. Materials investigated were nickel and nickel alloys. Sample Thermal Skin panels were manufactured using the advanced fabrication techniques studied and were structurally tested. Results of the program included: (1) development of improved chemical machining processes for nickel and several nickel alloys; (2) identification of design geometry limits; (3) identification of diffusion bonding requirements; (4) development of a unique diffusion bonding tool; (5) identification of electron beam welding limits; and (6) identification of structural properties of Thermal Skin material.

  11. Thermal energy storage

    SciTech Connect

    Tomlinson, J.J. ); Kannberg, L.D. )

    1990-09-01

    This paper discusses how thermal energy storage (TES) can aid in the efficient use and provision of thermal energy, wherever there is a mismatch between energy generation and use. Three fundamental types of thermal energy storage processes (sensible, latent, and thermochemical) can be used, and many different media are available within each type. Various subsets of these processes are being researched and developed to accelerate TES implementation, focusing on applications in building heating and cooling, industrial energy efficiency, and utility and space power systems. TES can contribute significantly to meeting society's needs for more efficient, environmentally benign energy use in these and other sectors.

  12. Thermal energy storage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grodzka, P. G.; Picklesimer, E. A.

    1978-01-01

    The general scope of study on thermal energy storage development includes: (1) survey and review possible concepts for storing thermal energy; (2) evaluate the potentials of the surveyed concepts for practical applications in the low and high temperature ranges for thermal control and storage, with particular emphasis on the low temperature range, and designate the most promising concepts; and (3) determine the nature of further studies required to expeditiously convert the most promising concept(s) to practical applications. Cryogenic temperature control by means of energy storage materials was also included.

  13. Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    In order to reduce heat transfer between a hot gas heat source and a metallic engine component, a thermal insulating layer of material is placed between them. This thermal barrier coating is applied by plasma spray processing the thin films. The coating has been successfully employed in aerospace applications for many years. Lewis Research Center, a leader in the development engine components coating technology, has assisted Caterpillar, Inc. in applying ceramic thermal barrier coatings on engines. Because these large engines use heavy fuels containing vanadium, engine valve life is sharply decreased. The barrier coating controls temperatures, extends valve life and reduces operating cost. Additional applications are currently under development.

  14. Thermal insulation protection means

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dotts, R. L.; Smith, J. A.; Strouhal, G. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    A system for providing thermal insulation for portions of a spacecraft which do not exceed 900 F during ascent or reentry relative to the earth's atmosphere is described. The thermal insulation is formed of relatively large flexible sheets of needled Nomex felt having a flexible waterproof coating. The thickness of the felt is sized to protect against projected temperatures and is attached to the structure by a resin adhesive. Vent holes in the sheets allow ventilation while maintaining waterproofing. The system is heat treated to provide thermal stability.

  15. Thermal radiative properties: Coatings.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Touloukian, Y. S.; Dewitt, D. P.; Hernicz, R. S.

    1972-01-01

    This volume consists, for the most part, of a presentation of numerical data compiled over the years in a most comprehensive manner on coatings for all applications, in particular, thermal control. After a moderately detailed discussion of the theoretical nature of the thermal radiative properties of coatings, together with an overview of predictive procedures and recognized experimental techniques, extensive numerical data on the thermal radiative properties of pigmented, contact, and conversion coatings are presented. These data cover metallic and nonmetallic pigmented coatings, enamels, metallic and nonmetallic contact coatings, antireflection coatings, resin coatings, metallic black coatings, and anodized and oxidized conversion coatings.

  16. Thermal Protection Materials Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Selvaduray, Guna; Cox, Michael

    1998-01-01

    The main portion of this contract year was spent on the development of materials for high temperature applications. In particular, thermal protection materials were constantly tested and evaluated for thermal shock resistance, high-temperature dimensional stability, and tolerance to hostile environmental effects. The analytical laboratory at the Thermal Protection Materials Branch (TPMB), NASA-Ames played an integral part in the process of materials development of high temperature aerospace applications. The materials development focused mainly on the determination of physical and chemical characteristics of specimens from the various research programs.

  17. Southern Universities: Are They Rising?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitehead, John S.

    1986-01-01

    This essay reviews four recent works on Southern universities: (1) "The University of Georgia: A Bicentennial History" (Dyer, 1985); (2) "A Pictorial History of the University of Georgia" (Boney, 1984); (3) To Foster Knowledge: A History of the University of Tennessee 1794-1970" (Montgomery, et al., 1984); and (4) "Gone with the Ivy: A Biography…

  18. Universals in the World's Musics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Steven; Jordania, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    Many decades of skepticism have prevented the field of musicology from embracing the importance of musical universals. When universals "have" been discussed, it has generally been in the form of meta-critiques about the concept of universals, rather than in positive proposals about actual universals. We present here a typology of four categories…

  19. Universities Venture into Venture Capitalism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Desruisseaux, Paul

    2000-01-01

    Reports that some universities are starting their own venture-capital funds to develop campus companies, or are investing endowment funds with established venture-capital firms inclined to finance potential spinoffs from campus research. Examples cited are from the University of Alabama, Vanderbilt University (Tennessee), University of…

  20. State University System of Florida

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Board of Governors, State University System of Florida, 2012

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents some information about the State University System of Florida. The following are presented in this paper: (1) University Work Plans and Annual Reports; (2) State University System 2009 Annual Report; (3) Quick Facts: Planned New Degree Programs--2010 to 2013; (4) State University System Tuition Differential Summary, FY…

  1. Student Perceptions of University Effectiveness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kleemann, Gary L.; Richardson, Richard C., Jr.

    Student perceptions of the effectiveness of three state universities was studied: Arizona State University, University of Arizona, and Northern Arizona University. An operational definition of effectiveness was proposed based on the literature, and a list of organizational activities was validated by administrators, faculty, community…

  2. Universal Design for Academic Facilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salmen, John P. S.

    2011-01-01

    Universal design (UD) can play a role in many aspects of academic life and is often thought of in the context of learning. However, this chapter focuses on the impact of UD on the design of facilities in a university or campus setting. Universal design has the potential for transforming universities into truly egalitarian institutions that…

  3. Thermal-Structures and Materials Testing Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teate, Anthony A.

    1997-01-01

    Since its inception and successful implementation in 1997 at James Madison University, the Thermal Structures and Materials Testing Laboratory (T-SaMTL) funded by the NASA Langley Research Center is evolving into one of the University's premier and exemplary efforts to increase minority representation in the sciences and mathematics. Serving ten (10) students and faculty directly and almost fifty (50) students indirectly, T-SAMTL, through its recruitment efforts, workshops, mentoring program, tutorial services and its research and computational laboratories has marked the completion of the first year with support from NASA totaling $ 100,000. Beginning as an innovative academic research and mentoring program for underrepresented minority science and mathematics students, the program now boasts a constituency which consists of 50% graduating seniors in the spring of 1998 with 50% planning to go to graduate school. The program's intent is to increase the number of underrepresented minorities who receive doctoral degrees in the sciences by initiating an academically enriched research program aimed at strengthening the academic and self actualization skills of undergraduate students with the potential to pursue doctoral study in the sciences. The program provides financial assistance, academic enrichment, and professional and personal development support for minority students who demonstrate the potential and strong desire to pursue careers in the sciences and mathematics. James Madison University was awarded the first $100,000, in April 1997, by The NASA Langley Research Center for establishment and support of its Thermal Structures and Materials Testing

  4. Universal Teller Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DuPage Area Vocational Education Authority, Addison, IL.

    This curriculum guide has been designed to provide the teacher with a basis for planning a comprehensive program in the career field of universal teller, and to allow the teacher and learner maximum flexibility. The teaching or instruction, in both educational and financial institutions, can be accomplished through large formal groups, small…

  5. Universal Nonverbal Intelligence Test.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bracken, Bruce A.; McCallum, R. Steve

    This kit presents all components of the Universal Nonverbal Intelligence Test (UNIT), a newly developed instrument designed to measure the general intelligence and cognitive abilities of children and adolescents (ages 5 through 17) who may be disadvantaged by traditional verbal and language-loaded measures such as children with speech, language,…

  6. A Universe of Questions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zeldovich, Yakov

    1992-01-01

    Reprinted from the original Russian manuscript of Yakov Zeldovich, this article chronicles his studies of the universe and his attempts to construct a theory of its evolution. He provides the high school student with compelling cosmological discussions about uniformity, galactic clusters, radiation, evolution, the big bang, and gravitational…

  7. Organizing University Marketing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Thomas E.

    During a period of projected declining enrollments some years ago, colleges and universities began looking to business and industry for models and methods to achieve stability and exhibit accountability. Zero-based budgeting, computerized record keeping, and planned-programmed-budgeting systems found their way to college campuses. A trend to…

  8. PARKING PROGRAMS FOR UNIVERSITIES.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    KINNE, W.S., JR.

    PARKING FACILITIES WERE SURVEYED AT 83 REPRESENTATIVE UNIVERSITIES AND COLLEGES, AND THE METHODS USED IN ADMINISTERING, CONTROLLING AND FINANCING WERE EVALUTED. GENERAL RECOMMENDATIONS WERE MADE CONCERNING (1) THE LOCATION AND DESIGN OF PARKING LOTS AND GARAGES, (2) THE PRACTICE OF CURB PARKING ON CAMPUS, AND (3) THE FINANCING OF PARKING…

  9. Radiation in the universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stuhlinger, Ernst; Truemper, Joachim; Weisskopf, Martin

    1992-01-01

    When Wilhelm Conrad Roentgen discovered radiation one hundred years ago, it seemed that what was discovered was one of the rarest and most volatile members of the family of the basic modules of our natural world. Today cosmologists report that a substantial part of the universe's radiation energy consists of X-rays, which travel through cosmic space with the speed of light.

  10. Colorado State University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKelfresh, David A.; Bender, Kim K.

    2009-01-01

    Colorado State University (CSU) is located in Fort Collins, which is a midsize city of 134,000 situated in Northern Colorado at the western edge of the Great Plains and at the base of the Rocky Mountains. CSU's total enrollment is approximately 25,000 students. The Division of Student Affairs comprises 30 departments organized into programmatic…

  11. University Study in Canada.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association of Universities and Colleges of Canada, Ottawa (Ontario). International Programmes Div.

    These notes for overseas students intending to attend university in Canada contain information on admission requirements and application and registration procedures. A sample budget for a 1967-68 undergraduate as well as a discussion of medical and other insurance are included in the summary of possible financial expenditures. Although there are…

  12. Mapping the Universe.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landy, S. D.

    1999-06-01

    Galaxies congregate into clusters, clusters amass into superclusters and so on - at every observed scale, as astronomers build maps of the sky, they find matter organized into clumps. Yet taken as a whole, the texture of the universe is smooth, in keeping with theory. A new "music of the spheres" may explain how ordered structures emerged from the original smooth chaos.

  13. Mathematics: The Universal Language?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffert, Sharon B.

    2009-01-01

    Mathematics is considered the universal language, but students who speak languages other than English have difficulty doing mathematics in English. For instance, because of a lack of familiarity with the problem's context, many have trouble understanding exactly what operations to perform. In the United States, approximately one in seven students…

  14. A Universal Phylogenetic Tree.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Offner, Susan

    2001-01-01

    Presents a universal phylogenetic tree suitable for use in high school and college-level biology classrooms. Illustrates the antiquity of life and that all life is related, even if it dates back 3.5 billion years. Reflects important evolutionary relationships and provides an exciting way to learn about the history of life. (SAH)

  15. University Libraries in Transition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hyatt, James A.

    1986-01-01

    College and university libraries are experiencing change in the ways they provide services and in their responses to rising costs and reduced financial support. These conditions result from three major phenomena: the information explosion, the technology revolution, and escalating library costs. (MLW)

  16. Should Universities Promote Employability?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCowan, Tristan

    2015-01-01

    Employability is becoming increasingly central to the mission and functioning of universities, spurred on by national and supranational agencies, and the demands of marketisation. This article provides a response to the normative dimensions of the question, progressing through four stages: first, there is a brief consideration of the meaning and…

  17. Langston University. A History.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patterson, Zella J. Black; Wert, Lynette L.

    Oklahoma's Langston University, a land-grant college founded under the Morrill Act of 1890, is described. Its founding and growth in the Oklahoma Territory was intertwined with that of black settlers--new arrivals in the territory, some of them former slaves who gathered to establish a farming community and built a higher education institution for…

  18. The Changing University?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schuller, Tom, Ed.

    This collection of papers investigates change and compares university education experiences worldwide, looking at it from the perspective of numbers of students, range of institutions, funding, institutional functions, boundaries, and directions, orientation of students and staff, and institutional change. After an introduction by Tom Schuler,…

  19. Homecoming at Atwater University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marshall, Sarah M.; Van Pelt, Scott; Kingsak, Phoebe; Williams, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Atwater University (AU) administration is struggling with an increased number of student alcohol-related problems. In particular, during the annual homecoming parade, students are extremely intoxicated and belligerent toward alumni. The new dean of students is appalled by the condoned student behavior. He also received two complaint letters from…

  20. Community University Research Agreement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Settee, Priscilla; Thomas-Prokop, Shelley

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes the process of engaging the extended Indigenous community within Saskatoon and the surrounding First Nations communities in what would be a first major research project between Indigenous communities and the University of Saskatchewan. A management committee was established comprised of all the major Saskatoon/Saskatchewan…

  1. Student and University Governance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shoben, Edward Joseph, Jr.

    It is necessary to provide organizational and political bases from which genuine student influence can be exercised if we assume that (1) extensive and meaningful participation by students in university governance is likely to be a permanent feature of academic life; (2) participation legitimately represents serious student concerns and provides a…

  2. A Polarized Universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wanjek, Christopher

    2003-01-01

    The CMB polarization was produced as light scattered off a primordial cloud of protons and electrons nearly 14 billion years ago, about 400,000 years after the Big Bang. This marks the moment of recombination, when the universe finally cooled enough to allow electrons to join protons. The CMB is the light that broke through the fog.

  3. West Texas State University.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roach, Ed D.

    1988-01-01

    Threats in the external environment, the arrival of a planning-oriented new president, and new regional reaccreditation criteria prompted West Texas State University to undertake a successful strategic planning venture. Leadership must focus strategic planning in a manner that recognizes the decentralized and collegial elements present in higher…

  4. University of Nevada, Reno

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Library Journal, 2004

    2004-01-01

    A $10 million gift will help the University of Nevada, Reno (UNR), begin construction next year on a new $66 million "Knowledge Center." The donation comes in $5 million gifts from Reno-based International Game Technology (IGT), a slot machine manufacturer, and from former IGT chair Chuck Mathewson and his wife, Ann. UNR's current library was…

  5. Universal voice processor development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The development of a universal voice processor is discussed. The device is based on several circuit configurations using hybrid techniques to satisfy the electrical specifications. The steps taken during the design process are described. Circuit diagrams of the final design are presented. Mathematical models are included to support the theoretical aspects.

  6. NRC Targets University Reactors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marshall, Eliot

    1984-01-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) wants universities to convert to low-grade fuel in their research reactions. Researchers claim the conversion, which will bring U.S. reactors in line with a policy the NRC is trying to impress on foreigners, could be financially and scientifically costly. Impact of the policy is considered. (JN)

  7. Islamist Movement Challenges Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindsey, Ursula

    2013-01-01

    In Tunisian and Egyptian universities, scholars face a growing Islamist resolve to remake their countries on the basis of religious principles. Both Tunisia and Egypt face questions that could affect higher education across the Middle East and North Africa: Can their new Islamist governments spread conservative religious values and also create…

  8. University City Core Plan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Philadelphia City Planning Commission, PA.

    A redevelopment plan for an urban core area of about 300 acres was warranted by--(1) unsuitable building conditions, (2) undesirable land usage, and (3) faulty traffic circulation. The plan includes expansion of two universities and creation of a regional science center, high school, and medical center. Guidelines for proposed land use and zoning…

  9. Revisiting the University Front

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lock, Grahame; Lorenz, Chris

    2007-01-01

    The article argues that the most important trends in the recent metamorphosis of higher education, especially of university teaching and research, cannot be understood without placing them in the context of general developments in political life. Both processes reveal alarming features and there is a link between them. In recent decades a religion…

  10. The Universe as Calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Wakely, Scott P.

    2006-10-27

    The maturation of very high energy astrophysics has enabled many novel physics applications. Among these is the investigation of extragalactic photon fields, which in some cases encode specific calorimetric information about such things as the formation of large-scale structure and the total high-energy luminosity of the universe. The origins of these backgrounds, and techniques for probing them will be discussed.

  11. Universities under Scrutiny.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, William

    This report is intended to stimulate discussion among and within the 18 countries comprising the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) about recent, current and future changes in the role and functions of their universities. Of particular concern are difficulties associated with preparing, legislating, and implementing…

  12. Universities in Their Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Fred

    2012-01-01

    Universities often seem to be far more concerned about their international connections than their local relationships. The local context seems not to matter much either to their jetsetting vice-chancellors or to their lecturers and researchers under pressure to get papers published in obscure journals. That is how it may seem, but it is not…

  13. Antimatter in the universe

    SciTech Connect

    Dolgov, A. D.

    2011-03-15

    The models leading to a high abundance of antimatter in the universe are discussed. Special attention is payed to the model of antimatter creation in the form of compact stellar-like objects. Such objects can contribute significantly to the cosmological dark matter. Observational signatures of antimatter in the Galaxy are discussed.

  14. Oregon State University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanderson, Rebecca A.; Ketcham, Patricia L.

    2009-01-01

    Oregon State University (OSU) is located in Corvallis, a community of 53,000 people situated in the heart of the Willamette Valley between Portland and Eugene. Approximately 15,700 undergraduate and 3,400 graduate students, including 2,600 U.S. students of color and 950 international students, are currently enrolled at OSU across 11 academic…

  15. Personnel Management. Universities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio Board of Regents, Columbus. Management Improvement Program.

    This manual is one of 10 completed in the Ohio Management Improvement Program (MIP) during the 1971-73 biennium. In this project, Ohio's 34 public universities and colleges, in an effort directed and staffed by the Ohio Board of Regents, have developed manuals of management practices, in this case, concerning personnel management. Emphasis in this…

  16. The University and Freedom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmidt, Benno

    1992-01-01

    The president of Yale University examines the tension between the values of community and harmony and of intellectual freedom on college campuses. He notes incidents at various campuses opposing expressions deemed offensive to some groups. He opposes suppression of unpopular voices (even if seemingly bigoted) and supports freedom of thought and…

  17. Evolution of the Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Primack, Joel

    2006-04-01

    Cosmology is in the midst of a scientific revolution that is establishing its lasting foundations. The good agreement between many different sorts of observations and the predictions of the now-standard Lambda Cold Dark Matter (LCDM) theory gives us hope that this is humanity's first picture of the history of the universe as a whole that might actually be true. An unexpected feature of this new picture is that we humans appear to be central or special in many ways -- for example, we are made of the rarest stuff in the universe (stardust); we are intermediate in size between the smallest possible size (the Planck length) and the largest size (the cosmic horizon); and we are living at a pivotal time: the period in the history of the universe when its expansion began to accelerate rather than slow down, and in the middle of the ten-billion-year lifetime of our solar system and of the billion year most habitable period of our planet, and at what must be the end of the exponential growth of human impact on the earth. This talk will review key observations that support modern cosmology, describe some symbolic ways of understanding the modern cosmos, and discuss some possible implications of a cosmic perspective for our 21st century worldview. Based on a new book, The View from the Center of the Universe: Discovering Our Extraordinary Place in the Cosmos, by Joel R. Primack and Nancy Ellen Abrams (Riverhead Books, April 2006).

  18. University Student Online Plagiarism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Yu-mei

    2008-01-01

    This article reports a study investigating university student online plagiarism. The following questions are investigated: (a) What is the incidence of student online plagiarism? (b) What are student perceptions regarding online plagiarism? (c) Are there any differences in terms of student perceptions of online plagiarism and print plagiarism? (d)…

  19. Universality of particle multiplicities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goulianos, K.

    1994-09-01

    We discuss the scaling properties and universality aspects of the rapidity and multiplicity distributions of particles produced in high energy hadronic and e(+)e(-) interactions. This paper is based on material presented in three lectures on pomeron phenomenology, which included a review of traditional soft pomeron physics and selected topics on hard diffraction processes probing the structure function of the pomeron.

  20. Life in the Universe

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lowman, Paul D., Jr.

    2003-01-01

    The belief that life exists in the universe is an optimism shared by many. With several manned missions expected to be carried out in the future, the possibility of discovering life in outer space will revolutionize the field of astrobiology. In this article, the author presents a summary of recent developments and discoveries made in the search…

  1. Entrepreneurial Planning: Tufts University.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunn, John A.

    1990-01-01

    This paper focuses on key strategic decisions taken at Tufts University (Massachusetts) under President Jean Mayer noting the role of formal planning and institutional research. Initiatives in the following areas are described: the School of Veterinary Medicine, nutrition, environmental management, entrepreneurial liberation, fund raising, and a…

  2. The Classification of Universes

    SciTech Connect

    Bjorken, J

    2004-04-09

    We define a universe as the contents of a spacetime box with comoving walls, large enough to contain essentially all phenomena that can be conceivably measured. The initial time is taken as the epoch when the lowest CMB modes undergo horizon crossing, and the final time taken when the wavelengths of CMB photons are comparable with the Hubble scale, i.e. with the nominal size of the universe. This allows the definition of a local ensemble of similarly constructed universes, using only modest extrapolations of the observed behavior of the cosmos. We then assume that further out in spacetime, similar universes can be constructed but containing different standard model parameters. Within this multiverse ensemble, it is assumed that the standard model parameters are strongly correlated with size, i.e. with the value of the inverse Hubble parameter at the final time, in a manner as previously suggested. This allows an estimate of the range of sizes which allow life as we know it, and invites a speculation regarding the most natural distribution of sizes. If small sizes are favored, this in turn allows some understanding of the hierarchy problems of particle physics. Subsequent sections of the paper explore other possible implications. In all cases, the approach is as bottoms up and as phenomenological as possible, and suggests that theories of the multiverse so constructed may in fact lay some claim of being scientific.

  3. Communities in University Mathematics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biza, Irene; Jaworski, Barbara; Hemmi, Kirsti

    2014-01-01

    This paper concerns communities of learners and teachers that are formed, develop and interact in university mathematics environments through the theoretical lens of "Communities of Practice." From this perspective, learning is described as a process of participation and reification in a community in which individuals belong and form…

  4. University Reactor Instrumentation Grant

    SciTech Connect

    S. M. Bajorek

    2000-02-01

    A noble gas air monitoring system was purchased through the University Reactor Instrumentation Grant Program. This monitor was installed in the Kansas State TRIGA reactor bay at a location near the top surface of the reactor pool according to recommendation by the supplier. This system is now functional and has been incorporated into the facility license.

  5. Reform in Canadian Universities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Small, J. M.

    1994-01-01

    A survey of 67 Canadian university vice presidents and 66 deans concerning reform in recent years found that the many changes reported were modest and reactive rather than bold and proactive. Most common changes involved strategic planning, retrenchment, curriculum expansion, response to enrollment changes, administrative restructuring, and more…

  6. Teaching Geomorphology at University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sugden, David; Hamilton, Patrick

    1978-01-01

    Geomorphology courses in British universities emphasize the main landform/process systems rather than more abstract concepts. Recommends a more theoretical focus on fundamental geomorphic processes and methodological problems. Available from: Faculty of Modern Studies, Oxford Polytechnic, Headington, Oxford OX3 OBP, England. (Author/AV)

  7. Discovering the Invisible Universe.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friedman, Herbert

    1991-01-01

    The discovery of radio waves, infrared, and x-rays and their importance in describing the universe and its origins is discussed. Topics include radio waves from space, the radio pioneers of World War II, radio telescopes, infrared radiation, satellites, space missions, and x-ray telescopes. (KR)

  8. Understanding University Undergraduate Applications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Molinero, Cecilio Mar

    1990-01-01

    Much marketing information can be obtained for admissions policy formation and forecasting from existing data sources, including course perceptions, the nature of the competition, and the admissions policies of the competition. The British university application system would benefit by exploiting computer applications of this concept. (MSE)

  9. The University as Microcosm

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaldis, Byron

    2009-01-01

    This paper puts forward the model of "microcosm-macrocosm" isomorphism encapsulated in certain philosophical views on the form of university education. The human being as a "microcosm" should reflect internally the external "macrocosm". Higher Education is a socially instituted attempt to guide human beings into forming themselves as microcosms of…

  10. Entropy of the Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Humitaka

    2010-06-01

    Charles Darwin's calculation of a life of Earth had ignited Kelvin's insight on a life of Sun, which had eventually inherited to the physical study of stellar structure and energy source. Nuclear energy had secured a longevity of the universe and the goal of the cosmic evolution has been secured by the entropy of black holes.

  11. The Universal Access System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Neil G.

    This final report discusses the outcomes of a project that created a Universal Access System (UAS), a system that gives students with disabilities access to the same computers as their classmates. The project developed a new approach in which the needs of the individual with disabilities are handled separately from the computers and other devices…

  12. The University Needs "You"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webb, Allen

    2009-01-01

    Colleges and universities need English education professors who know what it is to teach five classes a day, accommodate IEPs, and still take on extracurricular activities. They need English education professors who not only present at NCTE Annual Conventions, but who also want to be in schools talking to teachers on a regular basis. They need…

  13. Universal nonlinear entanglement witnesses

    SciTech Connect

    Kotowski, Marcin; Kotowski, Michal

    2010-06-15

    We give a universal recipe for constructing nonlinear entanglement witnesses able to detect nonclassical correlations in arbitrary systems of distinguishable and/or identical particles for an arbitrary number of constituents. The constructed witnesses are expressed in terms of expectation values of observables. As such, they are, at least in principle, measurable in experiments.

  14. Explorers of the Universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alvarez, Marino C.; Busby, Michael R.; Sotoohi, Goli; Rodriguez, William J.; Hennig, Lee Ann; Berenty, Jerry; King, Terry; Grener, Doreen; Kruzan, John

    1998-01-01

    The Explorers of the Universe is a multifaceted scientific/literacy project that involves teachers and their students with problem oriented situations using authentic materials. This paper presents examples of self-directed cases researched by high school students and the met acognitive tools they use in the planning, carrying out, and finalizing their reports.

  15. The Universal Trap.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodman, Paul

    The compulsory system of education is criticized on the grounds that it has become a regimented "universal trap" antithetical to democracy. In contrast to the Jeffersonian concept of education in the service of citizen initiative for the preservation of freedom, current compulsory education is a tool of industrialism and of a rigidly stratified…

  16. Images of the Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stott, Carole

    1991-11-01

    Images of the Universe is a special collection of essays written to celebrate astronomy and the inauguration of the British Astronomical Association. Colin Ronan opens the book with a fascinating account of developments over the past hundred years. Next, the solar system is explored by Richard Baum, John Rogers, Richard McKim, and Patrick Moore. Comets and meteors are explained by David Hughes. The stars, birthplace of the elements, are examined by Jacqueline Mitton and John Isles. Paul Murdin gives an account of the brightest supernova to be seen from Earth since 1604. Iain Nicolson explores G2, the single dwarf called the Sun. Heather Couper and Nigel Henbest look at the Milky Way, the hazy band of light that is the edge on view of our galaxy. Malcolm Longair looks beyond our own galaxy into the deep sky. Paul Davies gives an account of the first one second of the existence of our expanding Universe. How did it all happen? Martin Rees, the cosmologist, speculates on the origin of the Universe. The ensuing narrative by many famous astronomers and science writers is written at a general level and will be accessible to anyone with a passing interest in the astronomical wonders of our universe. Carole Stott is the author of The Greenwich Guide to Stargazing (1990), and The Greenwich Guide to Astronomy in Action (1990).

  17. Creating Adaptable Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spanier, Graham B.

    2010-01-01

    Shifting demographics, rising costs of operations, a changing competitive landscape, reductions in state appropriations, pressures for accountability, and a widespread economic decline characterize the environment in which today's colleges and universities operate. This article examines some of the current responses to these challenges and…

  18. Howard University Bookstore

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maxon, Hazel Carter; Negron, Jaime

    1977-01-01

    Two full-time university bookstores, with three satellites helping during rush period, serve the Howard students and faculty. Solutions to problems of space, acquiring used books, and communications with faculty members are discussed, and the successful retailing of black studies books is described. (LBH)

  19. Toward the Multicultural University.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowser, Benjamin P., Ed.; And Others

    This book is about the growing need for a more inclusive curriculum and university. The debate about multicultural education is moved from an ideological debate to the realm of the practical in these selections. The first part of the book outlines the demographic and historic realities that make multiculturalism imperative. The second part gives…

  20. Universal Design for Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rose, David

    2001-01-01

    This article presents testimony before the Senate Appropriation Committee on the future of educational technology. Assistive technologies for students with disabilities are explained, and the need for Congress to support continued development of assistive devices, digital curricula, and universal design for learning technologies is stressed. (CR)

  1. University for Masses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharma, Motilal

    Education, a basic need, is the foundation of developing countries such as Bangladesh. Ignorance and illiteracy are obstacles to growth and technological progress. Formal schooling must be supplemented with nonformal education, distance education, and out-of-school education for workers who want to continue their studies. Universities must develop…

  2. University Scientists as Entrepreneurs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richter, Maurice N. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    The formation of business firms by academic scientists is an example of the deteriorating boundary between the academic and business world. The conditions and routes contributing to this phenomenon are explored. This challenge to establish academic and scientific values and norms is resulting in enhanced autonomy for university scientists. (ETS)

  3. Multilayer thermal barrier coating systems

    DOEpatents

    Vance, Steven J.; Goedjen, John G.; Sabol, Stephen M.; Sloan, Kelly M.

    2000-01-01

    The present invention generally describes multilayer thermal barrier coating systems and methods of making the multilayer thermal barrier coating systems. The thermal barrier coating systems comprise a first ceramic layer, a second ceramic layer, a thermally grown oxide layer, a metallic bond coating layer and a substrate. The thermal barrier coating systems have improved high temperature thermal and chemical stability for use in gas turbine applications.

  4. The Universe's First Fireworks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] [figure removed for brevity, see original site] [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Poster VersionFigure 1Figure 2

    This is an image from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope of stars and galaxies in the Ursa Major constellation. This infrared image covers a region of space so large that light would take up to 100 million years to travel across it. Figure 1 is the same image after stars, galaxies and other sources were masked out. The remaining background light is from a period of time when the universe was less than one billion years old, and most likely originated from the universe's very first groups of objects -- either huge stars or voracious black holes. Darker shades in the image on the left correspond to dimmer parts of the background glow, while yellow and white show the brightest light.

    Brief History of the Universe In figure 2, the artist's timeline chronicles the history of the universe, from its explosive beginning to its mature, present-day state.

    Our universe began in a tremendous explosion known as the Big Bang about 13.7 billion years ago (left side of strip). Observations by NASA's Cosmic Background Explorer and Wilkinson Anisotropy Microwave Probe revealed microwave light from this very early epoch, about 400,000 years after the Big Bang, providing strong evidence that our universe did blast into existence. Results from the Cosmic Background Explorer were honored with the 2006 Nobel Prize for Physics.

    A period of darkness ensued, until about a few hundred million years later, when the first objects flooded the universe with light. This first light is believed to have been captured in data from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope. The light detected by Spitzer would have originated as visible and ultraviolet light, then stretched, or redshifted, to lower-energy infrared wavelengths during its long voyage to reach us across expanding space. The light detected by the

  5. The Artful Universe Expanded

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrow, John D.

    2005-07-01

    Our love of art, writes John Barrow, is the end product of millions of years of evolution. How we react to a beautiful painting or symphony draws upon instincts laid down long before humans existed. Now, in this enhanced edition of the highly popular The Artful Universe , Barrow further explores the close ties between our aesthetic appreciation and the basic nature of the Universe. Barrow argues that the laws of the Universe have imprinted themselves upon our thoughts and actions in subtle and unexpected ways. Why do we like certain types of art or music? What games and puzzles do we find challenging? Why do so many myths and legends have common elements? In this eclectic and entertaining survey, Barrow answers these questions and more as he explains how the landscape of the Universe has influenced the development of philosophy and mythology, and how millions of years of evolutionary history have fashioned our attraction to certain patterns of sound and color. Barrow casts the story of human creativity and thought in a fascinating light, considering such diverse topics as our instinct for language, the origins and uses of color in nature, why we divide time into intervals as we do, the sources of our appreciation of landscape painting, and whether computer-generated fractal art is really art. Drawing on a wide variety of examples, from the theological questions raised by St. Augustine and C.S. Lewis to the relationship between the pure math of Pythagoras and the music of the Beatles, The Artful Universe Expanded covers new ground and enters a wide-ranging debate about the meaning and significance of the links between art and science.

  6. Universe or Multiverse?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carr, Bernard

    2009-08-01

    Part I. Overviews: 1. Introduction and overview Bernard Carr; 2. Living in the multiverse Steven Weinberg; 3. Enlightenment, knowledge, ignorance, temptation Frank Wilczek; Part II. Cosmology and Astrophysics: 4. Cosmology and the multiverse Martin J. Rees; 5. The anthropic principle revisited Bernard Carr; 6. Cosmology from the top down Stephen Hawking; 7. The multiverse hierarchy Max Tegmark; 8. The inflationary universe Andrei Linde; 9. A model of anthropic reasoning: the dark to ordinary matter ratio Frank Wilczek; 10. Anthropic predictions: the case of the cosmological constant Alexander Vilenkin; 11. The definition and classification of universes James D. Bjorken; 12. M/string theory and anthropic reasoning Renata Kallosh; 13. The anthropic principle, dark energy and the LHC Savas Dimopoulos and Scott Thomas; Part III. Particle Physics and Quantum Theory: 14. Quarks, electrons and atoms in closely related universes Craig J. Hogan; 15. The fine-tuning problems of particle physics and anthropic mechanisms John F. Donoghue; 16. The anthropic landscape of string theory Leonard Susskind; 17. Cosmology and the many worlds interpretation of quantum mechanics Viatcheslav Mukhanov; 18. Anthropic reasoning and quantum cosmology James B. Hartle; 19. Micro-anthropic principle for quantum theory Brandon Carter; Part IV. More General Philosophical Issues: 20. Scientific alternatives to the anthropic principle Lee Smolin; 21. Making predictions in a multiverse: conundrums, dangers, coincidences Anthony Aguirre; 22. Multiverses: description, uniqueness and testing George Ellis; 23. Predictions and tests of multiverse theories Don N. Page; 24. Observation selection theory and cosmological fine-tuning Nick Bostrom; 25. Are anthropic arguments, involving multiverses and beyond, legitimate? William R. Stoeger; 26. The multiverse hypothesis: a theistic perspective Robin Collins; 27. Living in a simulated universe John D. Barrow; 28. Universes galore: where will it all end? Paul

  7. Thermal atmospheric models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Hollis Ralph

    1987-01-01

    The static thermal atmosphere is described and its predictions are compared to observations both to test the validity of the classic assumptions and to distinguish and describe those spectral features with diagnostic value.

  8. Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (NTP)

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA's history with nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP) technology goes back to the earliest days of the Agency. The Manned Lunar Rover Vehicle and the Nuclear Engine for Rocket Vehicle Applications p...

  9. Space tug thermal control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ward, T. L.

    1975-01-01

    The future development of full capability Space Tug will impose strict requirements upon the thermal design. While requiring a reliable and reusable design, Space Tug must be capable of steady-state and transient thermal operation during any given mission for mission durations of up to seven days and potentially longer periods of time. Maximum flexibility and adaptability of Space Tug to the mission model requires that the vehicle operate within attitude constraints throughout any specific mission. These requirements were translated into a preliminary design study for a geostationary deploy and retrieve mission definition for Space Tug to determine the thermal control design requirements. Results of the study are discussed with emphasis given to some of the unique avenues pursued during the study, as well as the recommended thermal design configuration.

  10. Tungsten thermal neutron dosimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ball, L. L.; Richardson, P. J.; Sheibley, D. W.

    1969-01-01

    Tungsten-185 activity, which is produced by neutron activation of tungsten-184, determines thermal neutron flux. Radiochemical separation methods and counting techniques for irradiated tungsten provide accurate determination of the radiation exposure.

  11. Thermal Expansion "Paradox."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fakhruddin, Hasan

    1993-01-01

    Describes a paradox in the equation for thermal expansion. If the calculations for heating a rod and subsequently cooling a rod are determined, the new length of the cool rod is shorter than expected. (PR)

  12. INNOVATIVE THERMAL TREATMENT PROCESSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper contains discussions of several innovative thermal processes for treating or destroying hazardous wastes. Processes discussed can be included in the categories wet oxidation, molten glass, fluidized bed incineration, pyrolysis, molten salt, electric reactors, and plasma...

  13. Cryogenic thermal diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paulsen, Brandon R.; Batty, J. C.; Agren, John

    2000-01-01

    Space based cryogenic thermal management systems for advanced infrared sensor platforms are a critical failure mode to the spacecraft missions they are supporting. Recent advances in cryocooler technologies have increased the achievable cooling capacities and decreased the operating temperatures of these systems, but there is still a fundamental need for redundancy in these systems. Cryogenic thermal diodes act as thermal switches, allowing heat to flow through them when in a conduction mode and restricting the flow of heat when in an isolation mode. These diodes will allow multiple cryocoolers to cool a single infrared focal plane array. The Space Dynamics Laboratory has undertaken an internal research and development effort to develop this innovative technology. This paper briefly describes the design parameters of several prototype thermal diodes that were developed and tested. .

  14. Thermal cloak-concentrator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Xiangying; Li, Ying; Jiang, Chaoran; Ni, Yushan; Huang, Jiping

    2016-07-01

    For macroscopically manipulating heat flow at will, thermal metamaterials have opened a practical way, which possesses a single function, such as either cloaking or concentrating the flow of heat even though environmental temperature varies. By developing a theory of transformation heat transfer for multiple functions, here we introduce the concept of intelligent thermal metamaterials with a dual function, which is in contrast to the existing thermal metamaterials with single functions. By assembling homogeneous isotropic materials and shape-memory alloys, we experimentally fabricate a kind of intelligent thermal metamaterials, which can automatically change from a cloak (or concentrator) to a concentrator (or cloak) when the environmental temperature changes. This work paves an efficient way for a controllable gradient of heat, and also provides guidance both for arbitrarily manipulating the flow of heat and for efficiently designing similar intelligent metamaterials in other fields.

  15. Thermal Properties Measurement Report

    SciTech Connect

    Carmack, Jon; Braase, Lori; Papesch, Cynthia; Hurley, David; Tonks, Michael; Zhang, Yongfeng; Gofryk, Krzysztof; Harp, Jason; Fielding, Randy; Knight, Collin; Meyer, Mitch

    2015-08-01

    The Thermal Properties Measurement Report summarizes the research, development, installation, and initial use of significant experimental thermal property characterization capabilities at the INL in FY 2015. These new capabilities were used to characterize a U3Si2 (candidate Accident Tolerant) fuel sample fabricated at the INL. The ability to perform measurements at various length scales is important and provides additional data that is not currently in the literature. However, the real value of the data will be in accomplishing a phenomenological understanding of the thermal conductivity in fuels and the ties to predictive modeling. Thus, the MARMOT advanced modeling and simulation capability was utilized to illustrate how the microstructural data can be modeled and compared with bulk characterization data. A scientific method was established for thermal property measurement capability on irradiated nuclear fuel samples, which will be installed in the Irradiated Material Characterization Laboratory (IMCL).

  16. Fast differential thermal analysis.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wunderlich, B.; Wolpert, S. M.

    1972-01-01

    A study is conducted of the limits of time-dependent differential thermal analysis (DTA). Applications of DTA to the hysteresis phenomena of glasses are also reported. The computation of DTA sample temperatures is discussed, giving attention to feasible heating rates, transient effects to be measured, and the simulation of DTA responses to changes in thermal diffusivity similar to hysteresis phenomena in glasses. The reproducibility of temperature recording is checked with zone-refined organic chemicals.

  17. Thermal coupling measurement method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenthal, L. A.; Menichelli, V. J.

    1974-01-01

    Heat flow from an embedded heated wire responds to a change in the ambient environment. The wire is part of a self-balancing bridge system, and heat flow is measured directly in watts. Steady-state and transient thermal coupling can be measured directly and is an indication of the thermal resistance and diffusivity for the system under study. The method is applied to an aerospace electroexplosive component.

  18. Photovoltaic-thermal collectors

    DOEpatents

    Cox, III, Charles H.

    1984-04-24

    A photovoltaic-thermal solar cell including a semiconductor body having antireflective top and bottom surfaces and coated on each said surface with a patterned electrode covering less than 10% of the surface area. A thermal-absorbing surface is spaced apart from the bottom surface of the semiconductor and a heat-exchange fluid is passed between the bottom surface and the heat-absorbing surface.

  19. Thermally sprayed coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Diaz, D.J.; Blann, G.A. )

    1991-05-01

    Standardization of specimen preparation for microstructural evaluation of thermally sprayed coatings is considered. Metallographic specimen preparation procedures including sectioning, encapsulation, planar grinding, and power lapping of thermally sprayed coatings are described. A Co-Ni-Cr-W coating on an AISI 410 stainless steel substrate is used as a control sample. Specimen-preparation techniques have been evaluated through scanning electron microscopy for determining the percentage of apparent porosity and energy dispersive spectroscopy for determining elemental composition.

  20. Nanoscale thermal probing

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Yanan; Wang, Xinwei

    2012-01-01

    Nanoscale novel devices have raised the demand for nanoscale thermal characterization that is critical for evaluating the device performance and durability. Achieving nanoscale spatial resolution and high accuracy in temperature measurement is very challenging due to the limitation of measurement pathways. In this review, we discuss four methodologies currently developed in nanoscale surface imaging and temperature measurement. To overcome the restriction of the conventional methods, the scanning thermal microscopy technique is widely used. From the perspective of measuring target, the optical feature size method can be applied by using either Raman or fluorescence thermometry. The near-field optical method that measures nanoscale temperature by focusing the optical field to a nano-sized region provides a non-contact and non-destructive way for nanoscale thermal probing. Although the resistance thermometry based on nano-sized thermal sensors is possible for nanoscale thermal probing, significant effort is still needed to reduce the size of the current sensors by using advanced fabrication techniques. At the same time, the development of nanoscale imaging techniques, such as fluorescence imaging, provides a great potential solution to resolve the nanoscale thermal probing problem. PMID:22419968

  1. Hermes thermal control concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moscatelli, Antonio; Bottaccini, Massimiliano; Ferro, Claudio

    1991-12-01

    The Hermes Space Vehicle is made up of the reusable Hermes Spaceplane (HSP) itself and an expendable rear Hermes Resource Module (HRM). Both the HSP and HRM contain pressurized (habitable) compartments and unpressurized compartments. The complex configuration of the space vehicle and the mission profile require the adoption of a particularly flexible thermal control system which can satisfy the different requirements of the HSP and the HRM together with stringent safety and reliability requirements. All these aspects led to a thermal control design concept which uses active and passive means distributed through all compartments of the space vehicle. The ACTS (Active Thermal Control Section) is dedicated to the control of very high and concentrated thermal loads. It is based on a dual loop concept for heat collection (water and Freon R114 cooling loops), transportation and rejection through dedicated devicers. The PTCS (Passive Thermal Control Section) controls low heat fluxes spread on large surfaces. It relies on different concepts of insulation together with a system of temperature sensors and heaters, to control the thermal excursions of the space plane components and internal structural parts.

  2. Quantifying the reheating temperature of the universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazumdar, Anupam; Zaldívar, Bryan

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this paper is to determine an exact definition of the reheat temperature for a generic perturbative decay of the inflaton. In order to estimate the reheat temperature, there are two important conditions one needs to satisfy: (a) the decay products of the inflaton must dominate the energy density of the universe, i.e. the universe becomes completely radiation dominated, and (b) the decay products of the inflaton have attained local thermodynamical equilibrium. For some choices of parameters, the latter is a more stringent condition, such that the decay products may thermalise much after the beginning of radiation-domination. Consequently, we have obtained that the reheat temperature can be much lower than the standard-lore estimation. In this paper we describe under what conditions our universe could have efficient or inefficient thermalisation, and quantify the reheat temperature for both the scenarios. This result has an immediate impact on many applications which rely on the thermal history of the universe, in particular gravitino abundance. Instant thermalisation: when the inflaton decay products instantly thermalise upon decay. Efficient thermalisation: when the inflaton decay products thermalise right at the instant when radiation epoch starts dominating the universe. Delayed thermalisation: when the inflaton decay products thermalise deep inside the radiation dominated epoch after the transition from inflaton-to-radiation domination had occurred. This paper is organised as follows. In Section 2 we set the stage and write down the relevant equations for our analysis. The standard lore about the reheating epoch is briefly commented in Section 3. Section 4 is devoted to present our analysis, in which we study the conditions under which the plasma attains thermalisation. Later on, in Section 5 we discuss the concept of reheat temperature such as to properly capture the issues of thermalisation. Finally, we conclude in Section 6.

  3. Model Comparison for Electron Thermal Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moses, Gregory; Chenhall, Jeffrey; Cao, Duc; Delettrez, Jacques

    2015-11-01

    Four electron thermal transport models are compared for their ability to accurately and efficiently model non-local behavior in ICF simulations. Goncharov's transport model has accurately predicted shock timing in implosion simulations but is computationally slow and limited to 1D. The iSNB (implicit Schurtz Nicolai Busquet electron thermal transport method of Cao et al. uses multigroup diffusion to speed up the calculation. Chenhall has expanded upon the iSNB diffusion model to a higher order simplified P3 approximation and a Monte Carlo transport model, to bridge the gap between the iSNB and Goncharov models while maintaining computational efficiency. Comparisons of the above models for several test problems will be presented. This work was supported by Sandia National Laboratory - Albuquerque and the University of Rochester Laboratory for Laser Energetics.

  4. Comparison of UTCI to selected thermal indices.

    PubMed

    Blazejczyk, Krzysztof; Epstein, Yoram; Jendritzky, Gerd; Staiger, Henning; Tinz, Birger

    2012-05-01

    Over the past century more than 100 indices have been developed and used to assess bioclimatic conditions for human beings. The majority of these indices are used sporadically or for specific purposes. Some are based on generalized results of measurements (wind chill, cooling power, wet bulb temperature) and some on the empirically observed reactions of the human body to thermal stress (physiological strain, effective temperature). Those indices that are based on human heat balance considerations are referred to as "rational indices". Several simple human heat balance models are known and are used in research and practice. This paper presents a comparative analysis of the newly developed Universal Thermal Climate Index (UTCI), and some of the more prevalent thermal indices. The analysis is based on three groups of data: global data-set, synoptic datasets from Europe, and local scale data from special measurement campaigns of COST Action 730. We found the present indices to express bioclimatic conditions reasonably only under specific meteorological situations, while the UTCI represents specific climates, weather, and locations much better. Furthermore, similar to the human body, the UTCI is very sensitive to changes in ambient stimuli: temperature, solar radiation, wind and humidity. UTCI depicts temporal variability of thermal conditions better than other indices. The UTCI scale is able to express even slight differences in the intensity of meteorological stimuli. PMID:21614619

  5. Comparison of UTCI to selected thermal indices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blazejczyk, Krzysztof; Epstein, Yoram; Jendritzky, Gerd; Staiger, Henning; Tinz, Birger

    2012-05-01

    Over the past century more than 100 indices have been developed and used to assess bioclimatic conditions for human beings. The majority of these indices are used sporadically or for specific purposes. Some are based on generalized results of measurements (wind chill, cooling power, wet bulb temperature) and some on the empirically observed reactions of the human body to thermal stress (physiological strain, effective temperature). Those indices that are based on human heat balance considerations are referred to as "rational indices". Several simple human heat balance models are known and are used in research and practice. This paper presents a comparative analysis of the newly developed Universal Thermal Climate Index (UTCI), and some of the more prevalent thermal indices. The analysis is based on three groups of data: global data-set, synoptic datasets from Europe, and local scale data from special measurement campaigns of COST Action 730. We found the present indices to express bioclimatic conditions reasonably only under specific meteorological situations, while the UTCI represents specific climates, weather, and locations much better. Furthermore, similar to the human body, the UTCI is very sensitive to changes in ambient stimuli: temperature, solar radiation, wind and humidity. UTCI depicts temporal variability of thermal conditions better than other indices. The UTCI scale is able to express even slight differences in the intensity of meteorological stimuli.

  6. Graphene optical-to-thermal converter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manjavacas, Alejandro; Thongrattanasiri, Sukosin; Greffet, Jean-Jacques; Garcia de Abajo, Javier

    2015-03-01

    Infrared plasmons in doped graphene nanostructures produce large optical absorption that can be used for narrow-band thermal light emission at tunable frequencies that strongly depend on the doping charge. By virtue of Kirchhoff's law, thermal light emission is proportional to the absorption, thus resulting in narrow emission lines associated with the electrically controlled plasmons of heated graphene. Here we show that realistic designs of graphene plasmonic structures can release over 90% of the emission through individual infrared lines with 1% bandwidth. We examine anisotropic graphene structures in which efficient heating can be produced upon optical pumping tuned to a plasmonic absorption resonance situated in the blue region relative to the thermal emission. An incoherent thermal light converter is thus achieved. Our results open a new approach for designing tunable nanoscale infrared light sources. A.M. acknowledges financial support from the Welch foundation through the J. Evans Attwell-Welch Postdoctoral Fellowship Program of the Smalley Institute of Rice University (Grant L-C-004).

  7. PREFACE: Eurotherm Seminar 102: Thermal Management of Electronic Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Punch, J.; Walsh, E.

    2014-07-01

    About EUROTHERM The aim of the EUROTHERM Committee (www.eurothermcommittee.eu) is to promote and foster European cooperation in Thermal Sciences and Heat Transfer by gathering together scientists and engineers working in specialized areas. The Committee consists of members representing and appointed by national bodies in the EU countries. The current President of EUROTHERM is Professor Anton van Steenhoven from the University of Eindhoven (The Netherlands). The Committee organizes and coordinates European scientific events such as the EUROTHERM Seminars (about 4 per year) and the European Thermal Sciences Conference (every 4 years). About EUROTHERM Seminar 102 (www.eurothermseminar102.com) This seminar, part of the long-running series of European seminars on the thermal sciences, took place in June 2014 at the University of Limerick in Limerick, Ireland. The seminar addressed the topic of 'Thermal Management of Electronic Systems', a critical contemporary application area which represents a vibrant challenge for practitioners of the thermal sciences. We convey special thanks to the reviewers who have evaluated these papers. We also thank the scientific committee, consisting of internationally recognized experts. Their role has been to manage the evaluation of abstracts and the papers selection process as co-coordinators for specific topics. This seminar was hosted by the Stokes Institute at the University of Limerick. It could not have been organized without the efficient help of our administrators and technicians for IT support. This volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series includes 27 articles presented at the seminar. Dr. Jeff Punch, Chair Stokes Institute, University of Limerick, Limerick, Ireland Email: jeff.punch@ul.ie Prof. Edmond Walsh, Co-Chair Associate Professor, Osney Laboratories, Department of Engineering Science, University of Oxford, UK Email: edmond.walsh@bnc.ox.ac.uk

  8. The Dark Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livio, Mario

    2010-04-01

    1. A brief history of dark matter Vera Rubin; 2. Microlensing towards the Magellanic Clouds Kailash Sahu; 3. Searching for galactic dark matter Harvey Richer; 4. Hot gas in clusters of galaxies and Omega Megan Donahue; 5. Tracking the Baryon density from the Big Bang to the present Gary Steigman; 6. Modified Newtonian dynamics and its implications Bob Sanders; 7. Cosmological parameters and quintessence from radio galaxies Ruth Daly and Eric Guerra; 8. The mass density of the Universe Neta Bahcall; 9. Growth of structure in the Universe John Peacock; 10. Cosmological implications of the most distant supernova (known) Adam Riess; 11. Dynamical probes of the Halo mass function Chris Kochanek; 12. Detection of gravitational waves from inflation Marc Kamionkowski and Andrew Jaffe; 13. Cosmological constant problems and their solution Alex Vilenkin; 14. Dark Matter and dark energy: a physicist's perspective Michael Dine.

  9. The Dark Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livio, Mario

    2004-02-01

    1. A brief history of dark matter Vera Rubin; 2. Microlensing towards the Magellanic Clouds Kailash Sahu; 3. Searching for galactic dark matter Harvey Richer; 4. Hot gas in clusters of galaxies and Omega Megan Donahue; 5. Tracking the Baryon density from the Big Bang to the present Gary Steigman; 6. Modified Newtonian dynamics and its implications Bob Sanders; 7. Cosmological parameters and quintessence from radio galaxies Ruth Daly and Eric Guerra; 8. The mass density of the Universe Neta Bahcall; 9. Growth of structure in the Universe John Peacock; 10. Cosmological implications of the most distant supernova (known) Adam Riess; 11. Dynamical probes of the Halo mass function Chris Kochanek; 12. Detection of gravitational waves from inflation Marc Kamionkowski and Andrew Jaffe; 13. Cosmological constant problems and their solution Alex Vilenkin; 14. Dark Matter and dark energy: a physicist's perspective Michael Dine.

  10. Universal Test Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laughery, Mike

    A universal test facility (UTF) for Space Station Freedom is developed. In this context, universal means that the experimental rack design must be: automated, highly marketable, and able to perform diverse microgravity experiments according to NASA space station requirements. In order to fulfill these broad objectives, the facility's customers, and their respective requirements, are first defined. From these definitions, specific design goals and the scope of the first phase of this project are determined. An examination is first made into what types of research are most likely to make the UTF marketable. Based on our findings, the experiments for which the UTF would most likely be used included: protein crystal growth, hydroponics food growth, gas combustion, gallium arsenide crystal growth, microorganism development, and cell encapsulation. Therefore, the UTF is designed to fulfill all of the major requirements for the experiments listed above. The versatility of the design is achieved by taking advantage of the many overlapping requirements presented by these experiments.

  11. Universality classes of inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Roest, Diederik

    2014-01-01

    We investigate all single-field, slow-roll inflationary models whose slow-roll parameters scale as 1/N in the limit of a large number of e-folds N. We proof that all such models belong to two universality classes, characterised by a single parameter. One class contains small field models like hilltop inflation, while the other class consists of large field models like chaotic inflation. We give the leading expressions for the spectral index and tensor-to-scalar ratio r, which are universal for each class, plus subleading corrections for a number of models. This predicts r either to be unobservably small, r < 0.01, or close to the present observational limit, r ≈ 0.07.

  12. Universal Test Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laughery, Mike

    1994-01-01

    A universal test facility (UTF) for Space Station Freedom is developed. In this context, universal means that the experimental rack design must be: automated, highly marketable, and able to perform diverse microgravity experiments according to NASA space station requirements. In order to fulfill these broad objectives, the facility's customers, and their respective requirements, are first defined. From these definitions, specific design goals and the scope of the first phase of this project are determined. An examination is first made into what types of research are most likely to make the UTF marketable. Based on our findings, the experiments for which the UTF would most likely be used included: protein crystal growth, hydroponics food growth, gas combustion, gallium arsenide crystal growth, microorganism development, and cell encapsulation. Therefore, the UTF is designed to fulfill all of the major requirements for the experiments listed above. The versatility of the design is achieved by taking advantage of the many overlapping requirements presented by these experiments.

  13. Life in the Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2001-10-01

    Live Webcast from Europe's Leading Research Organisations Summary Is there life elsewhere in the Universe? Are we alone? These questions have always fascinated humanity and for more than 50 years, physicists, biologists, chemists, cosmologists, astronomers and other scientists have worked tirelessly to answer these fundamental questions. And now this November via webcast, all the world will have the opportunity to see and hear the latest news on extraterrestrial life from the most prestigious research centers and how for the past three months, European students have had the chance to jump into the scientists' shoes and explore these questions for themselves. The event is being sponsored by the European Organisation for Nuclear Research (CERN) , the European Space Agency (ESA) and the European Southern Observatory (ESO) , in cooperation with the European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL) and the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) and the European Association for Astronomy Education (EAAE). "Life in the Universe" is being mounted in collaboration with the Research Directorate-General of the European Commission for the European Week of Science and Technology in November 2001 . "Life in the Universe" competitions are already underway in 23 European countries to find the best projects from school students between 14 and 18. Two winning teams from each country will be invited to a final event at CERN in Geneva on 8-11 November 2001 to present their projects and discuss them with a panel of International Experts at a special three-day event. They will also compete for the "Super Prize" - a free visit to ESA's and ESO's research and technology facilities at Kourou and Paranal in South America. Students participating in the programme are encouraged to present their views on extraterrestrial life creatively. The only requirement is that the views be based upon scientific evidence. Many projects are being submitted just now - among them are scientific essays

  14. Thermal relics in cosmology with bulk viscosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iorio, A.; Lambiase, G.

    2015-03-01

    In this paper we discuss some consequences of cosmological models in which the primordial cosmic matter is described by a relativistic imperfect fluid. The latter takes into account the dissipative effects (bulk viscosity) arising from different cooling rates of the fluid components in the expanding Universe. We discuss, in particular, the effects of the bulk viscosity on Big Bang Nucleosynthesis and on the thermal relic abundance of particles, looking at recent results of PAMELA experiment. The latter has determined an anomalous excess of positron events, which cannot be explained by conventional cosmology and particle physics.

  15. Artificial Retina Project: Electromagnetic and Thermal Effects

    SciTech Connect

    Lazzi, Gianluca

    2014-08-29

    This award supported the investigation on electromagnetic and thermal effects associated with the artificial retina, designed in collaboration with national laboratories, universities, and private companies. Our work over the two years of support under this award has focused mainly on 1) Design of new telemetry coils for optimal power and data transfer between the implant and the external device while achieving a significant size reduction with respect to currently used coils; 2) feasibility study of the virtual electrode configuration 3) study the effect of pulse shape and duration on the stimulation efficacy.

  16. Landsat TM and ETM+ Thermal Band Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barsi, Julia A.; Hook, Simon J.; Palluconi, Frank D.; Schott, John R.; Raqueno, Nina G.

    2006-01-01

    Landsat-5 Thematic Mapper (TM) has been imaging the Earth since March 1984 and Landsat-7 Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+) was added to the series of Landsat instruments in April 1999. The stability and calibration of the ETM+ has been monitored extensively since launch. Though not monitored for many years, TM now has a similar system in place to monitor stability and calibration. University teams have been evaluating the on-board calibration of the instruments through ground-based measurements since 1999. This paper considers the calibration efforts for the thermal band, Band 6, of both the Landsat-5 and Landsat-7 instruments.

  17. Kansas State University

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, T.; Carnes, K.; Needham, V.

    1995-08-01

    Argonne has fabricated the niobium resonators and some other linac components required for the superconducting accel/decel linac now in operation at Kansas State University. Several staff members from KSU spent a substantial period of time at ANL during FY 1985 in order to learn the technology, and they return occasionally to assemble and test the resonators. There is a continuing interchange of technical information between ANL and KSU related to linac operations, tuning, and resonator maintenance.

  18. Inflation in the universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, M. S.

    1987-05-01

    The big bang cosmology is a highly successful model, providing a reliable and tested accounting of the Universe from 0.01 sec after the bang until today, some 15 Gyr later. However, very special initial data seem to be required in order to account for the observed smoothness and flatness of our Hubble volume and for the existence of the small primeval density inhomogeneities required for the formation of structure in the Universe. Inflation offers a means of accounting for these special initial data, which is based on physics at sub-planck energy scales (much less than mpl approx. = 10 to the 19th power GeV) and is motivated by contemporary ideas in particle theory. Here the status of the Inflationary Paradigm is reviewed. At present essentially all inflationary models involve a very weakly-coupled (quantified by the presence of a dimensionless parameter of order 10 to the -12 or so) scalar field which is displaced from the minimum of its potential. Regions of the Universe where the scalar field is initially displaced from its minimum undergo inflation as the scalar field relaxes, resulting in a Universe today which resembles ours in regions much larger than our present Hubble volume (approx. = 10 to the 28 cm), may be highly irregular. The most conspicuous blemish on the paradigm is the lack of a compelling particle physics model to implement it. Also reviewed are some other unresolved issues, and the all important confrontation between inflation and observational data is fully discussed. Finally, the possibility that inflation leads to large-scale, primeval magnetic fields of sufficient strength to be of astrophysical interest is covered.

  19. Dark matter universe.

    PubMed

    Bahcall, Neta A

    2015-10-01

    Most of the mass in the universe is in the form of dark matter--a new type of nonbaryonic particle not yet detected in the laboratory or in other detection experiments. The evidence for the existence of dark matter through its gravitational impact is clear in astronomical observations--from the early observations of the large motions of galaxies in clusters and the motions of stars and gas in galaxies, to observations of the large-scale structure in the universe, gravitational lensing, and the cosmic microwave background. The extensive data consistently show the dominance of dark matter and quantify its amount and distribution, assuming general relativity is valid. The data inform us that the dark matter is nonbaryonic, is "cold" (i.e., moves nonrelativistically in the early universe), and interacts only weakly with matter other than by gravity. The current Lambda cold dark matter cosmology--a simple (but strange) flat cold dark matter model dominated by a cosmological constant Lambda, with only six basic parameters (including the density of matter and of baryons, the initial mass fluctuations amplitude and its scale dependence, and the age of the universe and of the first stars)--fits remarkably well all the accumulated data. However, what is the dark matter? This is one of the most fundamental open questions in cosmology and particle physics. Its existence requires an extension of our current understanding of particle physics or otherwise point to a modification of gravity on cosmological scales. The exploration and ultimate detection of dark matter are led by experiments for direct and indirect detection of this yet mysterious particle. PMID:26417091

  20. Inflation in the universe

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, M.S.

    1987-05-01

    The hot big bang cosmology, or the standard cosmology as it is appropriately known, is a highly successful model, providing a reliable and tested accounting of the Universe from 0.01 sec after the bang until today, some 15 Gyr later. However, very special initial data seem to be required in order to account for the observed smoothness and flatness of our Hubble volume and for the existence of the small primeval density inhomogeneities required for the formation of structure in the Universe. Inflation offers a means of accounting for these special initial data, which is based upon physics at sub-planck energy scales (<< m/sub pl/ approx. = 10/sup 19/ GeV) and is motivated by contemporary ideas in particle theory. Here I review the status of the 'Inflationary Paradigm'. At present essentially all inflationary models involve a very weakly-coupled (quantified by the presence of a dimensionless parameter of order 10/sup -12/ or so) scalar field which is displaced from the minimum of its potential. Regions of the Universe where the scalar field is initially displaced from its minimum undergo inflation as the scalar field relaxes, resulting in a Universe today which resembles ours in regions much larger than our present Hubble volume (approx. = 10/sup 28/ cm), but which on very large scales (>> 10/sup 28/ cm) may be highly irregular. The most conspicuous blemish on the paradigm is the lack of a compelling particle physics model to implement it. I also review some other unresolved issues, and discuss in detail the all important confrontation between inflation and observational data. Finally, I discuss the possibility that inflation leads to large-scale, primeval magnetic fields of sufficient strength to be of astrophysical interest. 123 refs., 4 figs.

  1. A Universal Syntax Checker.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leahy, John Francis, III

    A universal syntax checker was constructed to be utilized with a text editor in a time-sharing environment. This syntax checker is a top-down, left-right, slow-back parser that will provide, when supplied the syntax of any language in the Backus-normal form, a syntax check for any string written in a language described. The procedure is capable of…

  2. On separate universes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Liang; Pajer, Enrico; Schmidt, Fabian

    2015-10-01

    The separate universe conjecture states that in General Relativity a density perturbation behaves locally (i.e. on scales much smaller than the wavelength of the mode) as a separate universe with different background density and curvature. We prove this conjecture for a spherical compensated tophat density perturbation of arbitrary amplitude and radius in ΛCDM. We then use Conformal Fermi Coordinates to generalize this result to scalar perturbations of arbitrary configuration and scale in a general cosmology with a mixture of fluids, but to linear order in perturbations. In this case, the separate universe conjecture holds for the isotropic part of the perturbations. The anisotropic part on the other hand is exactly captured by a tidal field in the Newtonian form. We show that the separate universe picture is restricted to scales larger than the sound horizons of all fluid components. We then derive an expression for the locally measured matter bispectrum induced by a long-wavelength mode of arbitrary wavelength, a new result which in standard perturbation theory is equivalent to a relativistic second-order calculation. We show that nonlinear gravitational dynamics does not generate observable contributions that scale like local-type non-Gaussianity flocNL, and hence does not contribute to a scale-dependent galaxy bias Δ b propto k-2 on large scales; rather, the locally measurable long-short mode coupling assumes a form essentially identical to subhorizon perturbation theory results, once the long-mode density perturbation is replaced by the synchronous-comoving gauge density perturbation. Apparent flocNL-type contributions arise through projection effects on photon propagation, which depend on the specific large-scale structure tracer and observable considered, and are in principle distinguishable from the local mode coupling induced by gravity. We conclude that any observation of flocNL beyond these projection effects signals a departure from standard single

  3. Astronomy in Romanian universities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbosu, Mihail

    In this work we present characteristics of the Romanian higher education related to the study of Astronomy. In spite of Romanian economic problems, opportunities for Bachelor's degree, Master's degree (at "Babes-Bolyai" University of Cluj-Napoca) and Ph.D. degree are provided for students enrolled at the faculties of Mathematics or Physics. General regulations, description of courses, research resources and job opportunities are also described and discussed in this paper.

  4. Dark matter universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahcall, Neta A.

    2015-10-01

    Most of the mass in the universe is in the form of dark matter-a new type of nonbaryonic particle not yet detected in the laboratory or in other detection experiments. The evidence for the existence of dark matter through its gravitational impact is clear in astronomical observations-from the early observations of the large motions of galaxies in clusters and the motions of stars and gas in galaxies, to observations of the large-scale structure in the universe, gravitational lensing, and the cosmic microwave background. The extensive data consistently show the dominance of dark matter and quantify its amount and distribution, assuming general relativity is valid. The data inform us that the dark matter is nonbaryonic, is "cold" (i.e., moves nonrelativistically in the early universe), and interacts only weakly with matter other than by gravity. The current Lambda cold dark matter cosmology-a simple (but strange) flat cold dark matter model dominated by a cosmological constant Lambda, with only six basic parameters (including the density of matter and of baryons, the initial mass fluctuations amplitude and its scale dependence, and the age of the universe and of the first stars)-fits remarkably well all the accumulated data. However, what is the dark matter? This is one of the most fundamental open questions in cosmology and particle physics. Its existence requires an extension of our current understanding of particle physics or otherwise point to a modification of gravity on cosmological scales. The exploration and ultimate detection of dark matter are led by experiments for direct and indirect detection of this yet mysterious particle.

  5. Universality of particle multiplicities

    SciTech Connect

    Goulianos, K. |

    1994-09-01

    We discuss the scaling properties and universality aspects of the rapidity and multiplicity distributions of particles produced in high energy hadronic and e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} interactions. This paper is based on material presented in three lectures on pomeron phenomenology, which included a review of traditional soft pomeron physics and selected topics on hard diffraction processes probing the structure function of the pomeron.

  6. Imagine the Universe!

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    Welcome to Imagine the Universe! Contained on this CD-ROM you will find three astronomy and space science learning centers, individually captured from the World Wide Web in December of 2000. Each site contains its own learning adventure full of facts, fun, beautiful images, movies, and excitement. (1) Imagine The Universe: this site is dedicated to a discussion about our Universe... what we know about it, how it is evolving, and the kinds of objects and phenomena it contains. Emphasizing the X-ray and gamma-ray parts of the electromagnetic spectrum, it also discusses how scientists know what they know, what mysteries remain, and how the answers to remaining mysteries may one day be found. Lots of movies, quizzes, and a special section for educators. Geared for ages 14 and up. This site can be viewed on-line at http://imagine.gsfc.nasa.gov/. (2) StarChild- a learning center for young astronomers: the 1998 Webby Award Winner for Best Education Website, StarChild is aimed at ages 4-14. It contains easy-to-understand information about our Solar System, the Universe, and space exploration. There are also activities, songs, movies, and puzzles. This site can be viewed on-line at http://starchild.gsfc.nasa.gov/. (3) Astronomy Picture of the Day: APOD offers a new astronomical image and caption each calendar day. We have captured the year 2000 entries of this award-winning site and included them on the disk. The images and information provide a wonderful resource for all ages. This site can be viewed on-line at http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/astropix.html.

  7. Dark matter universe

    PubMed Central

    Bahcall, Neta A.

    2015-01-01

    Most of the mass in the universe is in the form of dark matter—a new type of nonbaryonic particle not yet detected in the laboratory or in other detection experiments. The evidence for the existence of dark matter through its gravitational impact is clear in astronomical observations—from the early observations of the large motions of galaxies in clusters and the motions of stars and gas in galaxies, to observations of the large-scale structure in the universe, gravitational lensing, and the cosmic microwave background. The extensive data consistently show the dominance of dark matter and quantify its amount and distribution, assuming general relativity is valid. The data inform us that the dark matter is nonbaryonic, is “cold” (i.e., moves nonrelativistically in the early universe), and interacts only weakly with matter other than by gravity. The current Lambda cold dark matter cosmology—a simple (but strange) flat cold dark matter model dominated by a cosmological constant Lambda, with only six basic parameters (including the density of matter and of baryons, the initial mass fluctuations amplitude and its scale dependence, and the age of the universe and of the first stars)—fits remarkably well all the accumulated data. However, what is the dark matter? This is one of the most fundamental open questions in cosmology and particle physics. Its existence requires an extension of our current understanding of particle physics or otherwise point to a modification of gravity on cosmological scales. The exploration and ultimate detection of dark matter are led by experiments for direct and indirect detection of this yet mysterious particle. PMID:26417091

  8. Universal Stoppers Are Rupert

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jerrard, Richard P.; Wetzel, John E.

    2008-01-01

    A stopper is called "universal" if it can be used to plug pipes whose cross-sections are a circle, a square, and an isosceles triangle, with the diameter of the circle, the side of the square, and the base and altitude of the triangle all equal. Echoing the well-known result for equal cubes that is attributed to Prince Rupert, we show that it is…

  9. Universality and string theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachlechner, Thomas Christian

    The first run at the Large Hadron Collider has deeply challenged conventional notions of naturalness, and CMB polarization experiments are about to open a new window to early universe cosmology. As a compelling candidate for the ultraviolet completion of the standard model, string theory provides a prime opportunity to study both early universe cosmology and particle physics. However, relating low energy observations to ultraviolet physics requires knowledge of the metastable states of string theory through the study of vacua. While it is difficult to directly obtain infrared data from explicit string theory constructions, string theory imposes constraints on low energy physics. The study of ensembles of low energy theories consistent with ultra-violet constraints provides insight on generic features we might expect to occur in string compactifications. In this thesis we present a statistical treatment of vacuum stability and vacuum properties in the context of random supergravity theories motivated by string theory. Early universe cosmology provides another avenue to high energy physics. From the low energy perspective large field inflation is typically considered highly unnatural: the scale relevant for the diameter of flat regions in moduli space is sub-Planckian in regions of perturbative control. To approach this problem, we consider generic Calabi-Yau compactifications of string theory and find that super-Planckian diameters of axion fundamental domains in fact arise generically. We further demonstrate that such super-Planckian flat regions are plausibly consistent with theWeak Gravity Conjecture.

  10. Averaging the inhomogeneous universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paranjape, Aseem

    2012-03-01

    A basic assumption of modern cosmology is that the universe is homogeneous and isotropic on the largest observable scales. This greatly simplifies Einstein's general relativistic field equations applied at these large scales, and allows a straightforward comparison between theoretical models and observed data. However, Einstein's equations should ideally be imposed at length scales comparable to, say, the solar system, since this is where these equations have been tested. We know that at these scales the universe is highly inhomogeneous. It is therefore essential to perform an explicit averaging of the field equations in order to apply them at large scales. It has long been known that due to the nonlinear nature of Einstein's equations, any explicit averaging scheme will necessarily lead to corrections in the equations applied at large scales. Estimating the magnitude and behavior of these corrections is a challenging task, due to difficulties associated with defining averages in the context of general relativity (GR). It has recently become possible to estimate these effects in a rigorous manner, and we will review some of the averaging schemes that have been proposed in the literature. A tantalizing possibility explored by several authors is that the corrections due to averaging may in fact account for the apparent acceleration of the expansion of the universe. We will explore this idea, reviewing some of the work done in the literature to date. We will argue however, that this rather attractive idea is in fact not viable as a solution of the dark energy problem, when confronted with observational constraints.

  11. The universal ancestor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woese, C.

    1998-01-01

    A genetic annealing model for the universal ancestor of all extant life is presented; the name of the model derives from its resemblance to physical annealing. The scenario pictured starts when "genetic temperatures" were very high, cellular entities (progenotes) were very simple, and information processing systems were inaccurate. Initially, both mutation rate and lateral gene transfer levels were elevated. The latter was pandemic and pervasive to the extent that it, not vertical inheritance, defined the evolutionary dynamic. As increasingly complex and precise biological structures and processes evolved, both the mutation rate and the scope and level of lateral gene transfer, i.e., evolutionary temperature, dropped, and the evolutionary dynamic gradually became that characteristic of modern cells. The various subsystems of the cell "crystallized," i.e., became refractory to lateral gene transfer, at different stages of "cooling," with the translation apparatus probably crystallizing first. Organismal lineages, and so organisms as we know them, did not exist at these early stages. The universal phylogenetic tree, therefore, is not an organismal tree at its base but gradually becomes one as its peripheral branchings emerge. The universal ancestor is not a discrete entity. It is, rather, a diverse community of cells that survives and evolves as a biological unit. This communal ancestor has a physical history but not a genealogical one. Over time, this ancestor refined into a smaller number of increasingly complex cell types with the ancestors of the three primary groupings of organisms arising as a result.

  12. The Flying University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friesen, Catherine

    The Flying University is solo theater performance framed as an academic lecture about Marie Curie and her discovery of radium, delivered to a group of women who have gathered in secret to further their education. As the lecture proceeds, the professor brings in her own research based on a study of Esther Horsch (1905-1991) who lived on a farm in central Illinois. She introduces data from Esther's journals, personal memories, and dreams about Esther's life. The professor's investigation of radium plays at the intersections of magical and mundane, decay and the transformation of life, and the place of ambition in these two women's lives. The intention of this piece is to explore these themes, which are full of mystery, through the traces of the daily lives of Mme. Curie and Esther. Their words and photos are used as roots from which to imagine the things that echo beyond their familiar work; elemental and also fantastically radiant. The Flying University was written and performed by Catherine Friesen April 27-29, 2012 in the Center for Performance Experiment at Hamilton College as part of the University of South Carolina MFA Acting Class of 2013 showcase, Pieces of Eight.

  13. Unfolding our Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolson, Iain

    1999-10-01

    The beauty of the stars, the planets, and other faraway objects of wonder is readily apparent, while the reason for their splendor is not. Now, there exists a source of expert advice that amateur astronomers and interested stargazers can actually understand: Unfolding Our Universe. Popular science writer and award winning author Iain Nicolson opens the world of astronomy to a wide audience. He takes readers into the heart of the Universe, clearly detailing the facts, concepts, methods, and current findings of astronomical science. This unique book strikes a perfect balance between the fundamentals of the subject and cutting-edge research. Step by step, the volume leads to a complete understanding of astronomy. Readers can access the material without referring to any mathematical principles or formulas. The well-designed text allows more ambitious readers to easily delve more deeply into key points and consult basic mathematics found within self-contained boxes. More than 100 full-color photographs beautifully and clearly illustrate all concepts. The wealth of color illustrations and very readable chapters make this book a delight for the casual reader to browse, while the clear and concise explanations will appeal to anyone with an interest in the science of astronomy. Iain Nicolson is the author or co-author of some 17 books, including The Universe (with Patrick Moore) and Heavenly Bodies. In 1995, he received the Eric Zucker Award from the Federation of Astronomical Societies (UK) for his work in popularizing the subject.

  14. [Universal electrogustometer EG-2].

    PubMed

    Wałkanis, Andrzej; Czesak, Michał; Pleskacz, Witold A

    2011-01-01

    Electrogustometry is a method for taste diagnosis and measurement. The EG-2 project is being developed in cooperation between Warsaw University of Technology and Military institute of Medicine in Warsaw. The device is an evolution of the recent universal electrogustometer EG-1 prototype. Due to considerations and experiences acquired during prototype usage, many enhancements have been incorporated into device. The aim was to create an easy-to-use, portable, battery powered device, enabled for fast measurements. Developed electrogustometer is using innovative, low-power microprocessor system, which control whole device. User interface is based on 5.7" graphical LCD (Liquid Crystal Display) and touchscreen. It can be directly operated by finger or with optional stylus. Dedicated GUI (Graphical User Interface) offers simple, predefined measurements and advance settings of signal parameters. It is also possible to store measurements results and patients data in an internal memory. User interface is multilanguage. Signals for patients examinations, supplied with bipolar electrode, are generated by an on-board circuit using DDS (Direct-Digital Synthesis) and DAC (Digital-to-Analog Converter). Electrogustometer is able to generate DC, sinus, triangle or rectangle signals with current amplitude from 0 to 500 pA and frequency form 0 to 500 Hz. Device is designed for manual and automeasurement modes. By using USB (Universal Serial Bus) port it is possible to retrieve data stored in internal memory and charging of built-in Li-lon battery as a source of power. PMID:21735666

  15. The Universal Ancestor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woese, Carl

    1998-06-01

    A genetic annealing model for the universal ancestor of all extant life is presented; the name of the model derives from its resemblance to physical annealing. The scenario pictured starts when ``genetic temperatures'' were very high, cellular entities (progenotes) were very simple, and information processing systems were inaccurate. Initially, both mutation rate and lateral gene transfer levels were elevated. The latter was pandemic and pervasive to the extent that it, not vertical inheritance, defined the evolutionary dynamic. As increasingly complex and precise biological structures and processes evolved, both the mutation rate and the scope and level of lateral gene transfer, i.e., evolutionary temperature, dropped, and the evolutionary dynamic gradually became that characteristic of modern cells. The various subsystems of the cell ``crystallized,'' i.e., became refractory to lateral gene transfer, at different stages of ``cooling,'' with the translation apparatus probably crystallizing first. Organismal lineages, and so organisms as we know them, did not exist at these early stages. The universal phylogenetic tree, therefore, is not an organismal tree at its base but gradually becomes one as its peripheral branchings emerge. The universal ancestor is not a discrete entity. It is, rather, a diverse community of cells that survives and evolves as a biological unit. This communal ancestor has a physical history but not a genealogical one. Over time, this ancestor refined into a smaller number of increasingly complex cell types with the ancestors of the three primary groupings of organisms arising as a result.

  16. Thermal Fatigue and Fracture Behavior of Ceramic Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dong-Ming; Choi, Sung R.; Miller, Robert A.

    2001-01-01

    Thermal fatigue and fracture behavior of plasma-sprayed ceramic thermal barrier coatings has been investigated under high heat flux and thermal cyclic conditions. The coating crack propagation is studied under laser heat flux cyclic thermal loading, and is correlated with dynamic fatigue and strength test results. The coating stress response and inelasticity, fatigue and creep interactions, and interface damage mechanisms during dynamic thermal fatigue processes are emphasized.

  17. Thermal relics: Do we know their abundances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamionkowski, Marc; Turner, Michael S.

    1990-01-01

    The relic abundance of a particle species that was once in thermal equilibrium in the expanding Universe depends upon a competition between the annihilation rate of the species and the expansion rate of the Universe. Assuming that the Universe is radiation dominated at early times the relic abundance is easy to compute and well known. At times earlier than about 1 sec after the bang there is little or no evidence that the Universe had to be radiation dominated, although that is the simplest and standard assumption. Because early-Universe relics are of such importance both to particle physics and to cosmology, three nonstandard possibilities are considered in detail for the Universe at the time a species' abundance froze in: energy density dominated by shear (i.e., anisotropic expansion), energy density dominated by some other nonrelativistic species, and energy density dominated by the kinetic energy of the scalar field that sets the gravitational constant in a Brans-Dicke-Jordan cosmological mode. In the second case the relic abundance is less than the standard value, while in the other two cases it can be enhanced by a significant factor. Two other more exotic possibilities for enhancing the relic abundance of a species are also mentioned--a larger value of Newton's constant at early times (e.g., as might occur in superstring or Kaluza-Klein theories) or a component of the energy density at early times with a very stiff equation of state (p greater than rho/3), e.g., a scalar field phi with potential V(phi) = Beta /phi/ (exp n) with n greater than 4. Results have implications for dark matter searches and searches for particle relics in general.

  18. SCORPION persistent surveillance system with universal gateway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coster, Michael; Chambers, Jon; Winters, Michael; Belesi, Joe

    2008-04-01

    This paper addresses benefits derived from the universal gateway utilized in Northrop Grumman Systems Corporation's (NGSC) SCORPION, a persistent surveillance and target recognition system produced by the Xetron campus in Cincinnati, Ohio. SCORPION is currently deployed in Operations Iraqi Freedom (OIF) and Enduring Freedom (OEF). The SCORPION universal gateway is a flexible, field programmable system that provides integration of over forty Unattended Ground Sensor (UGS) types from a variety of manufacturers, multiple visible and thermal electro-optical (EO) imagers, and numerous long haul satellite and terrestrial communications links, including the Army Research Lab (ARL) Blue Radio. Xetron has been integrating best in class sensors with this universal gateway to provide encrypted data exfiltration and remote sensor command and control since 1998. SCORPION data can be distributed point to point, or to multiple Common Operational Picture (COP) systems, including Command and Control Personal Computer (C2PC), Common Data Interchange Format for the Situational Awareness Display (CDIF/SAD), Force XXI Battle Command Brigade and Below (FBCB2), Defense Common Ground Systems (DCGS), and Remote Automated Position Identification System (RAPIDS).

  19. Universal binding energy relations in metallic adhesion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrante, J.; Smith, J. R.; Rose, J. J.

    1984-01-01

    Rose, Smith, and Ferrante have discovered scaling relations which map the adhesive binding energy calculated by Ferrante and Smith onto a single universal binding energy curve. These binding energies are calculated for all combinations of Al(111), Zn(0001), Mg(0001), and Na(110) in contact. The scaling involves normalizing the energy by the maximum binding energy and normalizing distances by a suitable combination of Thomas-Fermi screening lengths. Rose et al. have also found that the calculated cohesive energies of K, Ba, Cu, Mo, and Sm scale by similar simple relations, suggesting the universal relation may be more general than for the simple free electron metals for which it was derived. In addition, the scaling length was defined more generally in order to relate it to measurable physical properties. Further this universality can be extended to chemisorption. A simple and yet quite accurate prediction of a zero temperature equation of state (volume as a function of pressure for metals and alloys) is presented. Thermal expansion coefficients and melting temperatures are predicted by simple, analytic expressions, and results compare favorably with experiment for a broad range of metals.

  20. Thermal evolution of cometary nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prialnik, D.

    2014-07-01

    Thermal modeling of comet nuclei and similar objects involves the solution of conservation equations for energy and masses of the various components over time. For simplicity, the body is generally, but not necessarily, assumed to be of spherical shape. The processes included in such calculations are heat transfer, gas flow, dust drag, phase transitions, internal heating by various sources, internal structure alterations, surface sublimation. Physical properties --- such as the thermal conductivity, permeability, material strength, and porous structure --- are assumed, based on the best available estimates from laboratory experiments and space-mission results. Calculations employ various numerical procedures and require significant computational power, data analysis, and often sophisticated methods of graphical presentation. They start with a body of given size, mass, and composition, as well as a given orbit. The results yield properties and activity patterns that can be confronted with observations. Initial parameters may be adjusted until agreement is achieved. A glimpse into the internal structure of the object, which is inaccessible to direct observation, is thus obtained. The last decade, since the extensive overview of the subject was published (Modeling the structure and activity of comet nuclei, Prialnik, D.; Benkhoff, J.; Podolak, M., in Comets II, M. C. Festou, H. U. Keller, and H. A. Weaver, eds., University of Arizona Press, Tucson, p.359-387), thermal modeling has significantly advanced. This was prompted both by new properties and phenomena gleaned from observations, one example being main-belt comets, and the continual increase in computational power and performance. Progress was made on two fronts. On the computational side, multi-dimensional models have been developed, adaptive-grid and moving-boundaries techniques have been adopted, and long-term evolutionary calculations have become possible, even spanning the lifetime of the Solar System. On

  1. Landsat and Thermal Infrared Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arvidson, Terry; Barsi, Julia; Jhabvala, Murzy; Reuter, Dennis

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this chapter is to describe the collection of thermal images by Landsat sensors already on orbit and to introduce the new thermal sensor to be launched in 2013. The chapter describes the thematic mapper (TM) and enhanced thematic mapper plus (ETM+) sensors, the calibration of their thermal bands, and the design and prelaunch calibration of the new thermal infrared sensor (TIRS).

  2. Thermal modulation for gas chromatography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hasselbrink, Ernest F. (Inventor); Libardoni, Mark (Inventor); Stewart, Kristine (Inventor); Waite, J. Hunter (Inventor); Block, Bruce P. (Inventor); Sacks, Richard D. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A thermal modulator device for gas chromatography and associated methods. The thermal modulator device includes a recirculating fluid cooling member, an electrically conductive capillary in direct thermal contact with the cooling member, and a power supply electrically coupled to the capillary and operable for controlled resistive heating of the capillary. The capillary can include more than one separate thermally modulated sections.

  3. Remotely Sensed Thermal Anomalies in western Colorado

    DOE Data Explorer

    Hussein, Khalid

    2012-02-01

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Publication Date: 2012 Title: Landsat Thermal Anomalies Western Edition: First Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains the areas identified as areas of anomalous surface temperature from Landsat satellite imagery in Western Colorado. Data was obtained for two different dates. The digital numbers of each Landsat scene were converted to radiance and the temperature was calculated in degrees Kelvin and then converted to degrees Celsius for each land cover type using the emissivity of that cover type. And this process was repeated for each of the land cover types (open water, barren, deciduous forest and evergreen forest, mixed forest, shrub/scrub, grassland/herbaceous, pasture hay, and cultivated crops). The temperature of each pixel within each scene was calculated using the thermal band. In order to calculate the temperature an average emissivity value was used for each land cover type within each scene. The NLCD 2001 land cover classification raster data of the zones that cover Colorado were downloaded from USGS site and used to identify the land cover types within each scene. Areas that had temperature residual greater than 2σ, and areas with temperature equal to 1σ to 2σ, were considered Landsat modeled very warm and warm surface exposures (thermal anomalies), respectively Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4546381.234113 m Left: 140556.857021 m Right: 573390.000000 m Bottom: 4094583.641581 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth

  4. The Universal Multizone Crystallizator (UMC) Furnace: An International Cooperative Agreement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watring, D. A.; Su, C.-H.; Gillies, D.; Roosz, T.; Babcsan, N.

    1996-01-01

    The Universal Multizone Crystallizator (UMC) is a special apparatus for crystal growth under terrestrial and microgravity conditions. The use of twenty-five zones allows the UMC to be used for several normal freezing growth techniques. The thermal profile is electronically translated along the stationary sample by systematically reducing the power to the control zones. Elimination of mechanical translation devices increases the systems reliability while simultaneously reducing the size and weight. This paper addresses the UMC furnace design, sample cartridge and typical thermal profiles and corresponding power requirements necessary for the dynamic gradient freeze crystal growth technique. Results from physical vapor transport and traveling heater method crystal growth experiments are also discussed.

  5. Thermal Lens Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchiyama, Kenji; Hibara, Akihide; Kimura, Hiroko; Sawada, Tsuguo; Kitamori, Takehiko

    2000-09-01

    We developed a novel laser microscope based on the thermal lens effect induced by a coaxial beam comprised of excitation and probe beams. The signal generation mechanism was confirmed to be an authentic thermal lens effect from the measurement of signal and phase dependences on optical configurations between the sample and the probe beam focus, and therefore, the thermal lens effect theory could be applied. Two-point spatial resolution was determined by the spot size of the excitation beam, not by the thermal diffusion length. Sensitivity was quite high, and the detection ability, evaluated using a submicron microparticle containing dye molecules, was 0.8 zmol/μm2, hence a distribution image of trace chemical species could be obtained quantitatively. In addition, analytes are not restricted to fluorescent species, therefore, the thermal lens microscope is a promising analytical microscope. A two-dimensional image of a histamine molecule distribution, which was produced in mast cells at the femtomole level in a human nasal mucous polyp, was obtained.

  6. Thermal Arc Spray Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hafiz Abd Malek, Muhamad; Hayati Saad, Nor; Kiyai Abas, Sunhaji; Mohd Shah, Noriyati

    2013-06-01

    Usage of protective coating for corrosion protection was on highly demand during the past decade; and thermal spray coating played a major part during that time. In recent years, the thermal arc spray coating becomes a popular coating. Many big players in oil and gas such as PETRONAS, EXXON MOBIL and SHELL in Malaysia tend to use the coating on steel structure as a corrosion protection. Further developments in coating processes, the devices, and raw materials have led to expansion of functional coatings and applications scope from conventional coating to specialized industries. It is widely used because of its ability to withstand high process temperature, offer advantages in efficiency, lower cost and acts as a corrosion protection. Previous research also indicated that the thermal arc spray offers better coating properties compared to other methods of spray. This paper reviews some critical area of thermal spray coating by discussing the process/parameter of thermal arc spray technology and quality control of coating. Coating performance against corrosion, wear and special characteristic of coating are also described. The field application of arc spray technology are demonstrated and reviewed.

  7. Prediction of tissue thermal damage.

    PubMed

    Li, Xin; Zhong, Yongmin; Subic, Aleksandar; Jazar, Reza; Smith, Julian; Gu, Chengfan

    2016-04-29

    This paper presents a method to characterize tissue thermal damage by taking into account the thermal-mechanical effect of soft tissues for thermal ablation. This method integrates the bio-heating conduction and non-rigid motion dynamics to describe thermal-mechanical behaviors of soft tissues and further extends the traditional tissue damage model to characterize thermal-mechanical damage of soft tissues. Simulations and comparison analysis demonstrate that the proposed method can effectively predict tissue thermal damage and it also provides reliable guidelines for control of the thermal ablation procedure. PMID:27163325

  8. Green University Initiatives in China: A Case of Tsinghua University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhao, Wanxia; Zou, Yonghua

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine green university initiatives in the context of China, using Tsinghua University, which is China's green university pioneer, as a case study. Design/methodology/approach: The research method used for this paper is a case study based on participant observation and document analysis. The approach to…

  9. Who Should Go to University? Justice in University Admissions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kotzee, Ben; Martin, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    Current debates regarding justice in university admissions most often approach the question of access to university from a technical, policy-focussed perspective. Despite the attention that access to university receives in the press and policy literature, ethical discussion tends to focus on technical matters such as who should pay for university…

  10. Lee-Wick radiation induced bouncing universe models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Kaushik; Cai, Yi-Fu; Das, Suratna

    2013-04-01

    The present article discusses the effect of a Lee-Wick partner infested radiation phase of the early universe. As Lee-Wick partners can contribute negative energy density it is always possible that at some early phase of the universe when the Lee-Wick partners were thermalized the total energy density of the universe became very small making the effective Hubble radius very big. This possibility gives rise to the probability of a bouncing universe. As will be shown in the article a simple Lee-Wick radiation is not enough to produce a bounce. There can be two possibilities which can produce a bounce in the Lee-Wick radiation phase. One requires a cold dark matter candidate to trigger the bounce and the other possibility requires the bouncing temperature to be fine-tuned such as all the Lee-Wick partners of the standard fields are not thermalized at the bounce temperature. Both the possibilities give rise to a blue-tilted power spectrum of metric perturbations. Moreover the bouncing universe model can predict the lower limit of the masses of the Lee-Wick partners of chiral fermions and massless gauge bosons. The mass limit intrinsically depends upon the bounce temperature.

  11. Spacecraft Thermal Control Coatings References

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kauder, Lonny

    2005-01-01

    The successful thermal design of spacecraft depends in part on a knowledge of the solar absorption and hemispherical emittance of the thermal control coatings used in and on the spacecraft. Goddard Space Flight Center has had since its beginning a group whose mission has been to provide thermal/optical properties data of thermal control coatings to thermal engineers. This handbook represents a summary of the data and knowledge accumulated over many years at GSFC.

  12. Article for thermal energy storage

    DOEpatents

    Salyer, Ival O.

    2000-06-27

    A thermal energy storage composition is provided which is in the form of a gel. The composition includes a phase change material and silica particles, where the phase change material may comprise a linear alkyl hydrocarbon, water/urea, or water. The thermal energy storage composition has a high thermal conductivity, high thermal energy storage, and may be used in a variety of applications such as in thermal shipping containers and gel packs.

  13. Highly directional thermal emitter

    DOEpatents

    Ribaudo, Troy; Shaner, Eric A; Davids, Paul; Peters, David W

    2015-03-24

    A highly directional thermal emitter device comprises a two-dimensional periodic array of heavily doped semiconductor structures on a surface of a substrate. The array provides a highly directional thermal emission at a peak wavelength between 3 and 15 microns when the array is heated. For example, highly doped silicon (HDSi) with a plasma frequency in the mid-wave infrared was used to fabricate nearly perfect absorbing two-dimensional gratings structures that function as highly directional thermal radiators. The absorption and emission characteristics of the HDSi devices possessed a high degree of angular dependence for infrared absorption in the 10-12 micron range, while maintaining high reflectivity of solar radiation (.about.64%) at large incidence angles.

  14. Thermal trim for luminaire

    SciTech Connect

    Bazydola, Sarah; Ghiu, Camil-Daniel; Harrison, Robert; Jeswani, Anil

    2013-11-19

    A luminaire with a thermal pathway to reduce the junction temperature of the luminaire's light source, and methods for so doing, are disclosed. The luminaire includes a can, a light engine, and a trim, that define a substantially continuous thermal pathway from the light engine to a surrounding environment. The can defines a can cavity and includes a can end region. The light engine is within the can cavity and includes a light source and a heat sink, including a heat sink end region, coupled thereto. The trim is at least partially disposed within the can cavity and includes a first trim end region coupled to the heat sink end region and a second trim end region coupled to the can end region. Thermal interface material may be located between: the heat sink and the trim, the trim and the can, and/or the heat sink and the light source.

  15. Thermal insulated glazing unit

    DOEpatents

    Selkowitz, Stephen E.; Arasteh, Dariush K.; Hartmann, John L.

    1991-01-01

    An improved insulated glazing unit is provided which can attain about R5 to about R10 thermal performance at the center of the glass while having dimensions about the same as those of a conventional double glazed insulated glazing unit. An outer glazing and inner glazing are sealed to a spacer to form a gas impermeable space. One or more rigid, non-structural glazings are attached to the inside of the spacer to divide the space between the inner and outer glazings to provide insulating gaps between glazings of from about 0.20 inches to about 0.40 inches. One or more glazing surfaces facing each thermal gap are coated with a low emissivity coating. Finally, the thermal gaps are filled with a low conductance gas such as krypton gas.

  16. Thermal insulated glazing unit

    DOEpatents

    Selkowitz, S.E.; Arasteh, D.K.; Hartmann, J.L.

    1988-04-05

    An improved insulated glazing unit is provided which can attain about R5 to about R10 thermal performance at the center of the glass while having dimensions about the same as those of a conventional double glazed insulated glazing unit. An outer glazing and inner glazing are sealed to a spacer to form a gas impermeable space. One or more rigid, non-structural glazings are attached to the inside of the spacer to divide the space between the inner and outer glazings to provide insulating gaps between glazings of from about 0.20 inches to about 0.40 inches. One or more glazing surfaces facing each thermal gap are coated with a low emissivity coating. Finally, the thermal gaps are filled with a low conductance gas such as krypton gas. 2 figs.

  17. Thermal barrier coating system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecura, S. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    A high temperature oxidation resistant, thermal barrier coating system is disclosed for a nickel cobalt, or iron base alloy substrate. An inner metal bond coating contacts the substrate, and a thermal barrier coating covers the bond coating. NiCrAlR, FeCrAlR, and CoCrAlR alloys are satisfactory as bond coating compositions where R=Y or Yb. These alloys contain, by weight, 24.9-36.7% chromium, 5.4-18.5% aluminum, and 0.05 to 1.55% yttrium or 0.05 to 0.53% ytterbium. The coatings containing ytterbium are preferred over those containing yttrium. An outer thermal barrier coating of partial stabilized zirconium oxide (zirconia) which is between 6% and 8%, by weight, of yttrium oxide (yttria) covers the bond coating. Partial stabilization provides a material with superior durability. Partially stabilized zirconia consists of mixtures of cubic, tetragonal, and monoclinic phases.

  18. Highly Thermal Conductive Nanocomposites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, Ya-Ping (Inventor); Connell, John W. (Inventor); Veca, Lucia Monica (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    Disclosed are methods for forming carbon-based fillers as may be utilized in forming highly thermal conductive nanocomposite materials. Formation methods include treatment of an expanded graphite with an alcohol/water mixture followed by further exfoliation of the graphite to form extremely thin carbon nanosheets that are on the order of between about 2 and about 10 nanometers in thickness. Disclosed carbon nanosheets can be functionalized and/or can be incorporated in nanocomposites with extremely high thermal conductivities. Disclosed methods and materials can prove highly valuable in many technological applications including, for instance, in formation of heat management materials for protective clothing and as may be useful in space exploration or in others that require efficient yet light-weight and flexible thermal management solutions.

  19. Thermal evolution of Venus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arkani-Hamed, J.; Toksoz, M. N.

    1984-09-01

    A modification of the Boussinesq fluid assumption is the basis of the present theory of three-dimensional and finite amplitude convection in a viscous spherical shell with temperature- and pressure-dependent physical parameters. The theory is applied to the definition of thermal evolution models for Venus which emphasize the effects of certain physical parameters on thermal evolution, rather than the specific thermal history of the planet. It is suggested that a significant portion of the present temperature in the mantle and surface heat flux of Venus is due to the decay of a high temperature that was established in the planet at the completion of its core formation, and that Venus has been highly convective over the course of its history, until about 0.5 Ga ago.

  20. Thermally driven ballistic rectifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, J.; Sánchez, D.; Larsson, M.; Linke, H.

    2012-05-01

    The response of electric devices to an applied thermal gradient has, so far, been studied almost exclusively in two-terminal devices. Here we present measurements of the response to a thermal bias of a four-terminal, quasiballistic junction with a central scattering site. We find a novel transverse thermovoltage measured across isothermal contacts. Using a multiterminal scattering model extended to the weakly nonlinear voltage regime, we show that the device's response to a thermal bias can be predicted from its nonlinear response to an electric bias. Our approach forms a foundation for the discovery and understanding of advanced, nonlocal, thermoelectric phenomena that in the future may lead to novel thermoelectric device concepts.

  1. Research on Universal Combinatorial Coding

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Jun; Zhang, Zhuo; Mo, Juan

    2014-01-01

    The conception of universal combinatorial coding is proposed. Relations exist more or less in many coding methods. It means that a kind of universal coding method is objectively existent. It can be a bridge connecting many coding methods. Universal combinatorial coding is lossless and it is based on the combinatorics theory. The combinational and exhaustive property make it closely related with the existing code methods. Universal combinatorial coding does not depend on the probability statistic characteristic of information source, and it has the characteristics across three coding branches. It has analyzed the relationship between the universal combinatorial coding and the variety of coding method and has researched many applications technologies of this coding method. In addition, the efficiency of universal combinatorial coding is analyzed theoretically. The multicharacteristic and multiapplication of universal combinatorial coding are unique in the existing coding methods. Universal combinatorial coding has theoretical research and practical application value. PMID:24772019

  2. Research on universal combinatorial coding.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jun; Zhang, Zhuo; Mo, Juan

    2014-01-01

    The conception of universal combinatorial coding is proposed. Relations exist more or less in many coding methods. It means that a kind of universal coding method is objectively existent. It can be a bridge connecting many coding methods. Universal combinatorial coding is lossless and it is based on the combinatorics theory. The combinational and exhaustive property make it closely related with the existing code methods. Universal combinatorial coding does not depend on the probability statistic characteristic of information source, and it has the characteristics across three coding branches. It has analyzed the relationship between the universal combinatorial coding and the variety of coding method and has researched many applications technologies of this coding method. In addition, the efficiency of universal combinatorial coding is analyzed theoretically. The multicharacteristic and multiapplication of universal combinatorial coding are unique in the existing coding methods. Universal combinatorial coding has theoretical research and practical application value. PMID:24772019

  3. Thermal characterization of nanofluids using laser induced thermal lens technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurian, Achamma; Kumar, Rajesh B.; George, Sajan D.

    2009-08-01

    A laser induced thermal lens technique has been employed to evaluate the dynamic thermal parameter, the thermal diffusivity, of gold nanofluids. Gold nanoparticles were synthesized by citrate reduction of HAuCl4 in water. The UVVIS optical absorption spectra show an absorption peak around 540 nm owing to surface Plasmon resonance band of the gold particles. The thermal diffusivity of gold nanoparticles was evaluated by knowing the time constant of transient thermal lens obtained by fitting the experimental curve to the theoretical model of the mode-matched thermal lens. Analyses of the results show that the nanofluid exhibits lower thermal diffusivity value in comparison to the host medium, water. Further investigations also reveal that the concentration of nanoparticles in the fluid have influence on the measured thermal diffusivity value. Results are interpreted in terms of interfacial thermal resistance around the nanoparticles as well as on the clustering of nanoparticles.

  4. Thermal Diffusivity Measurements in Edible Oils using Transient Thermal Lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valdez, R. Carbajal.; Pérez, J. L. Jiménez.; Cruz-Orea, A.; Martín-Martínez, E. San.

    2006-11-01

    Time resolved thermal lens (TL) spectrometry is applied to the study of the thermal diffusivity of edible oils such as olive, and refined and thermally treated avocado oils. A two laser mismatched-mode experimental configuration was used, with a He Ne laser as a probe beam and an Ar+ laser as the excitation one. The characteristic time constant of the transient thermal lens was obtained by fitting the experimental data to the theoretical expression for a transient thermal lens. The results showed that virgin olive oil has a higher thermal diffusivity than for refined and thermally treated avocado oils. This measured thermal property may contribute to a better understanding of the quality of edible oils, which is very important in the food industry. The thermal diffusivity results for virgin olive oil, obtained from this technique, agree with those reported in the literature.

  5. Slocum-TREC Thermal Glider

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huntsberger, Terry; Jones, Jack A.; Valdez, Thomas; Stirbl, Rob

    2012-01-01

    JPL is now teaming with Teledyne-Webb-Research to produce the first thermal glider that uses PCM for direct buoyancy control (not electronic pumps) and to produce all other required electricity. TWR has increased electrical production total efficiency from 0.45 to 0.61. JPL performed over 6000 cycles (2.4 years) of accelerated life testing of a piston accumulator. Design, fabrication, and testing will be performed in 2012, with deployment by Rutgers University in late 2012. The proposed goal of the ocean endurance tests was 3 months, but will be extended to at last 1 year. The piston accumulator was cycled over 6,000 times in a three-month period in order to simulate continuous glider life of about 2.4 years, The life test data suggests that we might accumulate roughly 0.5 cc of gas in the oil bladders for each cycle. PCM canisters will be fabricated with a compressed aluminum foam core, 7.5% foam selected (< 42 minutes to freeze anticipated) An Axi 5345/18 3-Phase AC alternator selected for power generation, 61% energy storage efficiency A 4-Cell A123 Energy Storage Systems battery selected for energy storage, buss voltage 14.4 to 12.5 V (13.2 V nominal) Glider deployment expected in late 2012

  6. Advanced nuclear thermal propulsion concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howe, Steven D.

    1993-01-01

    In 1989, a Presidential directive created the Space Exploration Initiative (SEI) which had a goal of placing mankind on Mars in the early 21st century. The SEI was effectively terminated in 1992 with the election of a new administration. Although the initiative did not exist long enough to allow substantial technology development, it did provide a venue, for the first time in 20 years, to comprehensively evaluate advanced propulsion concepts which could enable fast, manned transits to Mars. As part of the SEI based investigations, scientists from NASA, DoE National Laboratories, universities, and industry met regularly and proceeded to examine a variety of innovative ideas. Most of the effort was directed toward developing a solid-core, nuclear thermal rocket and examining a high-power nuclear electric propulsion system. In addition, however, an Innovative Concepts committee was formed and charged with evaluating concepts that offered a much higher performance but were less technologically mature. The committee considered several concepts and eventually recommended that further work be performed in the areas of gas core fission rockets, inertial confinement fusion systems, antimatter based rockets, and gas core fission electric systems. Following the committee's recommendations, some computational modeling work has been performed at Los Alamos in certain of these areas and critical issues have been identified.

  7. [Patients' University, illness and learning].

    PubMed

    Tourette-Turgis, Catherine

    2015-10-01

    The Patients' University, a pilot project at the Université Pierre et Marie Curie, in Paris, enables patients-experts to follow a degree program in patient therapeutic education (University Diploma and Master). Recently, graduate patients and patients directly concerned proposed to co-create a new university certificate for treatment pathway coordinators for breast cancer, rounding out the 120-hour university certificate program on healthcare democracy and meeting the recommendations of the new cancer plan. PMID:26455618

  8. Hydrodynamic simulation of non-thermal pressure profiles of galaxy clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, Kaylea; Nagai, Daisuke; Lau, Erwin T.

    2014-09-01

    Cosmological constraints from X-ray and microwave observations of galaxy clusters are subjected to systematic uncertainties. Non-thermal pressure support due to internal gas motions in galaxy clusters is one of the major sources of astrophysical uncertainties. Using a mass-limited sample of galaxy clusters from a high-resolution hydrodynamical cosmological simulation, we characterize the non-thermal pressure fraction profile and study its dependence on redshift, mass, and mass accretion rate. We find that the non-thermal pressure fraction profile is universal across redshift when galaxy cluster radii are defined with respect to the mean matter density of the universe instead of the commonly used critical density. We also find that the non-thermal pressure is predominantly radial, and the gas velocity anisotropy profile exhibits strong universality when galaxy cluster radii are defined with respect to the mean matter density of the universe. However, we find that the non-thermal pressure fraction is strongly dependent on the mass accretion rate of the galaxy cluster. We provide fitting formulae for the universal non-thermal pressure fraction and velocity anisotropy profiles of gas in galaxy clusters, which should be useful in modeling astrophysical uncertainties pertinent to using galaxy clusters as cosmological probes.

  9. Solar thermal power towers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreith, F.; Meyer, R. T.

    1984-07-01

    The solar thermal central receiver technology, known as solar power towers, is rapidly evolving to a state of near-term energy availability for electrical power generation and industrial process heat applications. The systems consist of field arrays of heliostat reflectors, a central receiver boiler, short term thermal storage devices, and either turbine-generators or heat exchangers. Fluid temperatures up to 550 C are currently achievable, and technology developments are underway to reach 1100 C. Six solar power towers are now under construction or in test operation in five countries around the world.

  10. Ablative thermal protection systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaniman, J.; Fisher, R.; Wojciechowski, C.; Dean, W.

    1983-01-01

    The procedures used to establish the TPS (thermal protection system) design of the SRB (solid rocket booster) element of the Space Shuttle vehicle are discussed. A final evaluation of the adequacy of this design will be made from data obtained from the first five Shuttle flights. Temperature sensors installed at selected locations on the SRB structure covered by the TPS give information as a function of time throughout the flight. Anomalies are to be investigated and computer design thermal models adjusted if required. In addition, the actual TPS ablator material loss is to be measured after each flight and compared with analytically determined losses. The analytical methods of predicting ablator performance are surveyed.

  11. Thermal energy storage material

    DOEpatents

    Leifer, Leslie

    1976-01-01

    A thermal energy storage material which is stable at atmospheric temperature and pressure and has a melting point higher than 32.degree.F. is prepared by dissolving a specific class of clathrate forming compounds, such as tetra n-propyl or tetra n-butyl ammonium fluoride, in water to form a substantially solid clathrate. The resultant thermal energy storage material is capable of absorbing heat from or releasing heat to a given region as it transforms between solid and liquid states in response to temperature changes in the region above and below its melting point.

  12. Thermal plasmas for nanofabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shigeta, Masaya; Murphy, Anthony B.

    2011-05-01

    In this paper, we review the recent progress in nanofabrication by thermal plasmas, and attempt to define some of the most important issues in the field. For synthesis of nanoparticles, the experimental studies in the past five years are briefly introduced; the theoretical and numerical modelling works of the past 20 years are reviewed with some detailed explanations. Also, the use of thermal plasmas to produce nanostructured films and coatings is described. A wide range of technologies have been developed, ranging from chemical vapour deposition processes to new plasma spraying processes. We present an overview of the different techniques and the important physical phenomena, as well as the requirements for future progress.

  13. Thermal ignition combustion system

    DOEpatents

    Kamo, R.; Kakwani, R.M.; Valdmanis, E.; Woods, M.E.

    1988-04-19

    The thermal ignition combustion system comprises means for providing walls defining an ignition chamber, the walls being made of a material having a thermal conductivity greater than 20 W/m C and a specific heat greater than 480 J/kg C with the ignition chamber being in constant communication with the main combustion chamber, means for maintaining the temperature of the walls above a threshold temperature capable of causing ignition of a fuel, and means for conducting fuel to the ignition chamber. 8 figs.

  14. Thermal insulating material

    SciTech Connect

    Billings, P.J.

    1981-12-08

    A thermal insulating material which includes silicone coated perlite providing thermal insulation, powdered perlite to fill in the gaps between the silicone coated perlite particle, and a specially formulated binder for the perlite is disclosed. The binder has a powder portion comprising a mixture of gypsum and cement for strength and a liquid portion comprising polyvinyl acetate, a colloid and water. After these materials are mixed in proper proportions, water is added to provide the fluidity necessary for application, such as by spraying or molding into prefabricated panels.

  15. Thermal Network Modelling Handbook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    Thermal mathematical modelling is discussed in detail. A three-fold purpose was established: (1) to acquaint the new user with the terminology and concepts used in thermal mathematical modelling, (2) to present the more experienced and occasional user with quick formulas and methods for solving everyday problems, coupled with study cases which lend insight into the relationships that exist among the various solution techniques and parameters, and (3) to begin to catalog in an orderly fashion the common formulas which may be applied to automated conversational language techniques.

  16. Heat pipes - Thermal diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aptekar, B. F.; Baum, J. M.; Ivanovskii, M. N.; Kolgotin, F. F.; Serbin, V. I.

    The performance concept and peculiarities of the new type of thermal diode with the trap and with the wick breakage are dealt with in the report. The experimental data were obtained and analysed for the working fluid mass and the volume of the liquid in the wick on the forward-mode limiting heat transfer. The flow rate pulsation of the working fluid in the wick was observed visually on the setup with the transparent wall. The quantitative difference on the data on the investigated thermal diode and on the identical heat pipes without the wick breakage is found experimentally concerning the forward-mode limiting heat transfer.

  17. Thermal Barrier Coating Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brindley, W. J. (Compiler); Lee, W. Y. (Compiler); Goedjen, J. G. (Compiler); Dapkunas, S. J. (Compiler)

    1995-01-01

    This document contains the agenda and presentation abstracts for the Thermal Barrier Coating Workshop, sponsored by NASA, DOE, and NIST. The workshop covered thermal barrier coating (TBC) issues related to applications, processing, properties, and modeling. The intent of the workshop was to highlight the state of knowledge on TBC's and to identify critical gaps in knowledge that may hinder TBC use in advanced applications. The workshop goals were achieved through presentations by 22 speakers representing industry, academia, and government as well as through extensive discussion periods.

  18. Thermal test options

    SciTech Connect

    Koski, J.A.; Keltner, N.R.; Sobolik, K.B.

    1993-02-01

    Shipping containers for radioactive materials must be qualified to meet a thermal accident environment specified in regulations, such at Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 71. Aimed primarily at the shipping container design, this report discusses the thermal testing options available for meeting the regulatory requirements, and states the advantages and disadvantages of each approach. The principal options considered are testing with radiant heat, furnaces, and open pool fires. The report also identifies some of the facilities available and current contacts. Finally, the report makes some recommendations on the appropriate use of these different testing methods.

  19. Thermal ignition combustion system

    DOEpatents

    Kamo, Roy; Kakwani, Ramesh M.; Valdmanis, Edgars; Woods, Melvins E.

    1988-01-01

    The thermal ignition combustion system comprises means for providing walls defining an ignition chamber, the walls being made of a material having a thermal conductivity greater than 20 W/m.degree. C. and a specific heat greater than 480 J/kg.degree. C. with the ignition chamber being in constant communication with the main combustion chamber, means for maintaining the temperature of the walls above a threshold temperature capable of causing ignition of a fuel, and means for conducting fuel to the ignition chamber.

  20. Ontario Universities - 1998: Resource Document.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council of Ontario Universities, Toronto.

    This report on the financial status of Ontario (Canada) universities notes that Ontario's universities continue to receive less than universities in any other Canadian province in per capita funding and have had the largest two-year decline in public funding of any jurisdiction in Canada or the United States. It notes that although total operating…