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Sample records for akademisches auslandsamt zis

  1. Akademische Sternkarten, Berlin 1830-59

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, D. H. P.

    The star charts published by the Berlin Academy between 1830 and 1859 are now largely remembered only for the fact that they enabled Galle to discover Neptune in 1846. The plan to produce them was proposed by F.W. Bessel in 1822 ( A.N.,l, 17, 257). He suggested that the catalogues of Bradley, Lalande and Piazzi should be reduced according to a uniform scheme and collated with the zone catalogues within 15 degrees of the equator which he was publishing piecemeal at that time. The catalogued stars were to be supplemented by un-catalogued stars which could be seen in a `comet-seeker'. The first reason put forward for the project was to aid the discovery of comets and minor planets. Twenty four astronomers were to take part in the work, each taking an hour of right ascension. The results were to be published by the `Koniglichen Akademie der Wissenschaften in Berlin' as both charts and catalogue. The project was not completed until 1859, after Bessel's death. The introduction is signed by Encke and Dove. Most contributors confined themselves to the catalogued stars, only three made supplementary observations of fainter stars. They used a `Glasmikrometer' invented by Steinheil. The project is an early paradigm of international co-operation. It led to the `Bonner durchmusterung' of Argelander, who was himself a contributor to the Akademische Sternkarten. The 19th century concept of a `durchmusterung' led to the 20th century concept of a `flux-limited sample'.

  2. Hydrodynamic Modeling Analysis for Leque Island and zis a ba Restoration Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect

    Whiting, Jonathan M.; Khangaonkar, Tarang

    2015-01-31

    Ducks Unlimited, Inc. in collaboration with Washington State Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW), and Stillaguamish Tribe of Indians have proposed the restoration of Leque Island and zis a ba (formerly Matterand) sites near the mouth of Old Stillaguamish River Channel in Port Susan Bay, Washington. The Leque Island site, which is owned by WDFW, consists of nearly 253 acres of land south of Highway 532 that is currently behind a perimeter dike. The 90-acres zis a ba site, also shielded by dikes along the shoreline, is located just upstream of Leque Island and is owned by Stillaguamish Tribes. The proposed actions consider the removal or modification of perimeter dikes at both locations to allow estuarine functions to be restored. The overall objective of the proposed projects is to remove the dike barriers to 1) provide connectivity and access between the tidal river channel and the restoration site for use by juvenile migrating salmon and 2) create a self-sustaining tidal marsh habitat. Ducks Unlimited engaged Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to develop a three-dimensional hydrodynamic model of the Port Susan Bay, Skagit Bay, and the interconnecting Leque Island region for use in support of the feasibility assessment for the Leque Island and zis a ba restoration projects. The objective of this modeling-based feasibility assessment is to evaluate the performance of proposed restoration actions in terms of achieving habitat goals while assessing the potential hydraulic and sediment transport impacts to the site and surrounding parcels of land.

  3. Decreased regional cerebral blood flow in the bilateral thalami and medulla oblongata determined by an easy Z-score (eZIS) analysis of (99m)Tc-ECD-SPECT images in a case of MM2-thalamic-type sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Yuichi; Iwasaki, Yasushi; Yoshikura, Nobuaki; Asano, Takahiko; Hatano, Taku; Tatsumi, Shinsui; Satoh, Katsuya; Kimura, Akio; Kitamoto, Tetsuyuki; Yoshida, Mari; Inuzuka, Takashi

    2015-11-15

    We report a case of autopsy-verified MM2-thalamic-type sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD) in a 46-year-old patient with a 16-month history of abnormal behavior, progressive dementia, insomnia, and speech disturbances without family history. Neurological examination revealed progressive dementia, frontal signs, insomnia, speech disturbance, gait disturbance and bilaterally exaggerated tendon reflexes. Both brain MRI and cerebrospinal fluid examinations, including 14-3-3 protein, yielded normal results. An easy Z-score (eZIS) analysis for (99m)Tc-ethyl cysteinate dimer-single photon emission computed tomography ((99m)Tc-ECD-SPECT) revealed decreased regional cerebral blood flow in the bilateral thalami and medulla oblongata. PRNP gene analysis revealed methionine homozygosity at codon 129 without mutation. Neuropathological examinations revealed severe neuronal loss, gliosis, and hypertrophic astrocytosis in the medial thalamus and inferior olivary nucleus. A slight depletion of Purkinje cells was observed. PrP immunostaining showed no obvious PrP deposits in the basal ganglia, thalamus, cerebellum, or brainstem; however, mild synaptic-type PrP deposits with some smaller plaque-like structures were only partially observed in the localized region of the frontal lobe with the spongiform change. Western blot analyses of protease-resistant PrP showed a type 2 pattern. In conclusion, eZIS analysis of (99m)Tc-ECD-SPECT images is useful for detecting both thalamic and medullary lesions. This is the first case of medullary lesions detected in a live patient with MM2-thalamic-type sCJD using SPECT. PMID:26421831

  4. Michael Mästlin as a Tübingen professor - academic everyday life at the beginning of the 17th century. (German Title: Michael Mästlin als Tübinger Professor - akademischer Alltag an der Schwelle zum 17. Jahrhundert)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wischnath, Johannes Michael

    This contribution elucidates everyday academic at Tübingen University at the beginning of the 17th century, which formed a framework for Michael Mästlin's life as a teacher ad researcher. These activities included administrative tasks, meetings and negotiations, disputations and examinations, church services, academic festivities, group ceremonies and meals. This reconstruction is not only based on unpublished files and minutes of the university and the faculty of arts, but also on the diary of the Greek scholar Martin Crusius, which contains numerous surprising and colourful details from the life of the astronomer.

  5. Characterization of ZnInxSey Thin Films as a Buffer Layer for High Efficiency Cu(InGa)Se2 Thin-Film Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohtake, Yasutoshi; Chaisitsak, Sutichai; Yamada, Akira; Konagai, Makoto

    1998-06-01

    The structural, optical and electrical properties of ZnInxSey (ZIS) thin films on Cu(InGa)Se2 (CIGS) thin films and glass substrates were characterized. Polycrystalline ZIS thin films were grown by the coevaporation method using three constituent elements. We confirmed the formation of ZnIn2Se4 from the X-ray diffraction patterns of the ZIS thin films on glass substrates. From the transmittance and reflectance measurements of these films, the bandgap of ZIS is estimated at around 2.0 eV in this study. In addition, the ZIS films on glass substrates show low dark conductivity and high photosensitivity, which are suitable for the buffer layer in CIGS thin-film solar cells. We also fabricated the CIGS thin-film solar cells with a ZnO/ZIS/CIGS structure, and investigated the relationship between the cell performance and the beam intensity ratio of zinc to indium.

  6. Method of junction formation for CIGS photovoltaic devices

    DOEpatents

    Delahoy, Alan E.

    2006-03-28

    Sulfur is used to improve the performance of CIGS devices prepared by the evaporation of a single source ZIS type compound to form a buffer layer on the CIGS. The sulfur may be evaporated, or contained in the ZIS type material, or both. Vacuum evaporation apparatus of many types useful in the practice of the invention are known in the art. Other methods of delivery, such as sputtering, or application of a thiourea solution, may be substituted for evaporation.

  7. Method of junction formation for CIGS photovoltaic devices

    DOEpatents

    Delahoy, Alan E.

    2010-01-26

    Sulfur is used to improve the performance of CIGS devices prepared by the evaporation of a single source ZIS type compound to form a buffer layer on the CIGS. The sulfur may be evaporated, or contained in the ZIS type material, or both. Vacuum evaporation apparatus of many types useful in the practice of the invention are known in the art. Other methods of delivery, such as sputtering, or application of a thiourea solution, may be substituted for evaporation.

  8. Enhanced Photoexcited Carrier Separation in Oxygen-Doped ZnIn2 S4 Nanosheets for Hydrogen Evolution.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wenlong; Zhang, Lei; Xie, Junfeng; Zhang, Xiaodong; Liu, Qinghua; Yao, Tao; Wei, Shiqiang; Zhang, Qun; Xie, Yi

    2016-06-01

    Limited by the relatively sluggish charge-carrier separation in semiconductors, the photocatalytic performance is still far below what is expected. Herein, a model of ZnIn2 S4 (ZIS) nanosheets with oxygen doping is put forward to obtain in-depth understanding of the role that doping atoms play in photocatalysis. It shows enhanced photocatalytic activity compared with pristine ZIS. The electron dynamics analyzed by ultrafast transient absorption spectroscopy reveals that the average recovery lifetime of photoexcited electrons is increased by 1.53 times upon oxygen incorporation into the ZIS crystals, indicating enhanced separation of photoexcited carriers in oxygen-doped ZIS nanosheets. As expected, the oxygen-doped ZIS nanosheets show a remarkably improved photocatalytic activity with a hydrogen evolution rate of up to 2120 μmol h(-1)  g(-1) under visible-light irradiation, which is 4.5 times higher than that of the pristine ZIS nanosheets. PMID:27100950

  9. Fabrication of hierarchically structured novel redox-mediator-free ZnIn2S4 marigold flower/Bi2WO6 flower-like direct Z-scheme nanocomposite photocatalysts with superior visible light photocatalytic efficiency.

    PubMed

    Jo, Wan-Kuen; Lee, Joon Yeob; Natarajan, Thillai Sivakumar

    2016-01-14

    Novel, hierarchically nanostructured, redox-mediator-free, direct Z-scheme nanocomposite photocatalysts were synthesized via a facile hydrothermal method followed by wet-impregnation. The photocatalysts had a ZnIn2S4 marigold flower/Bi2WO6 flower-like (ZIS/BW) composition, which led to superior visible-light photocatalytic efficiency with excellent stability and reusability. The hierarchical marigold flower and flower-like morphologies of ZIS and BW were confirmed by FE-SEM and TEM analyses and further revealed that formation of the hierarchical marigold flower-like ZIS structure followed the formation of nanoparticles, growth of the ZIS petals, and self-assembly of these species. Powder X-ray diffraction and UV-visible diffuse reflectance spectroscopy analyses as well as the enhancement in the surface area and pore volume of the composite provide evidence of strong coupling between hierarchical BW and the ZIS nanostructures. The efficiency of the hierarchical direct Z-scheme photocatalysts for photocatalytic decomposition of metronidazole (MTZ) under visible-light irradiation was evaluated. The hierarchically nanostructured ZIS/BW nanocomposites with 50% loading of ZIS exhibited superior visible-light photocatalytic decomposition efficiency (PDE) compared to the composites with other percentages of ZIS and pristine BW. A probable mechanism for the enhanced photocatalytic efficiency of the ZIS/BW composite in MTZ degradation under visible irradiation was proposed. Radical quenching studies demonstrated that h(+), ˙OH, and O2˙(-) are the primary reactive radicals involved, which confirms that the Z-scheme mechanism of transfer of charge carriers accounts for the higher photocatalytic activity. Kinetic analysis revealed that MTZ degradation follows pseudo-first-order kinetics and the reusability of the composite catalyst for up to four cycles confirms the excellent stability of the hierarchical structure. It is concluded that the hierarchical structure of the ZIS

  10. Deforestation and Forest Fires in Roraima and Their Relationship with Phytoclimatic Regions in the Northern Brazilian Amazon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barni, Paulo Eduardo; Pereira, Vaneza Barreto; Manzi, Antonio Ocimar; Barbosa, Reinaldo Imbrozio

    2015-05-01

    Deforestation and forest fires in the Brazilian Amazon are a regional-scale anthropogenic process related to biomass burning, which has a direct impact on global warming due to greenhouse gas emissions. Containment of this process requires characterizing its spatial distribution and that of the environmental factors related to its occurrence. The aim of this study is to investigate the spatial and temporal distribution of deforested areas and forest fires in the State of Roraima from 2000 to 2010. We mapped deforested areas and forest fires using Landsat images and associated their occurrence with two phytoclimatic zones: zone with savanna influence (ZIS), and zone without savanna influence (ZOS). Total deforested area during the interval was estimated at 3.06 × 103 km2 (ZIS = 55 %; ZOS = 45 %) while total area affected by forest fires was estimated at 3.02 × 103 km2 (ZIS = 97.7 %; ZOS = 2.3 %). Magnitude of deforestation in Roraima was not related to the phytoclimatic zones, but small deforested areas (≤17.9 ha) predominated in ZOS while larger deforestation classes (>17.9 ha) predominated in ZIS, which is an area with a longer history of human activities. The largest occurrence of forest fires was observed in the ZIS in years with El Niño events. Our analysis indicates that the areas most affected by forest fires in Roraima during 2000-2010 were associated with strong climatic events and the occurrence these fires was amplified in ZIS, a sensitive phytoclimatic zone with a higher risk of anthropogenic fires given its drier climate and open forest structure.

  11. Plasmonically Enhanced Photocatalytic Hydrogen Production from Water: The Critical Role of Tunable Surface Plasmon Resonance from Gold-Silver Nanoshells.

    PubMed

    Li, Chien-Hung; Li, Min-Chih; Liu, Si-Ping; Jamison, Andrew C; Lee, Dahye; Lee, T Randall; Lee, Tai-Chou

    2016-04-13

    Gold-silver nanoshells (GS-NSs) having a tunable surface plasmon resonance (SPR) were employed to facilitate charge separation of photoexcited carriers in the photocalytic production of hydrogen from water. Zinc indium sulfide (ZnIn2S4; ZIS), a visible-light-active photocatalyst, where the band gap varies with the [Zn]/[In] ratio, was used as a model ZIS system (E(g) = 2.25 eV) to investigate the mechanisms of plasmonic enhancement associated with the nanoshells. Three types of GS-NS cores with intense absorptions centered roughly at 500, 700, and 900 nm were used as seeds for preparing GS-NS@ZIS core-shell structures via a microwave-assisted hydrothermal reaction, yielding core-shell particles with composite diameters of ∼200 nm. Notably, an interlayer of dielectric silica (SiO2) between the GS-NSs and the ZIS photocatalyst provided another parameter to enhance the production of hydrogen and to distinguish the charge-transfer mechanisms. In particular, the direct transfer of hot electrons from the GS-NSs to the ZIS photocatalyst was blocked by this layer. Of the 10 particle samples examined in this study, the greatest hydrogen gas evolution rate was observed for GS-NSs having a SiO2 interlayer thickness of ∼17 nm and an SPR absorption centered at ∼700 nm, yielding a rate 2.6 times higher than that of the ZIS without GS-NSs. The apparent quantum efficiencies for these core-shell particles were recorded and compared to the absorption spectra. Analyses of the charge-transfer mechanisms were evaluated and are discussed based on the experimental findings. PMID:26973998

  12. Synthesis of Zn-In-S Quantum Dots with Tunable Composition and Optical Properties.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xianliang; Damasco, Jossana; Shao, Wei; Ke, Yujie; Swihart, Mark T

    2016-03-01

    II-III-VI semiconductors are of interest due to their chemical stability and composition-tunable optical properties. Here, we report a methodology for the synthesis of monodisperse zinc-indium-sulfide (ZIS) alloy quantum dots (QDs, mean diameter from ∼2 to 3.5 nm) with an In content substantially below that of the stoichiometric ZnIn2 S4 compound. The effects of indium incorporation on the size, lattice constant, and optical properties of ZIS QDs are elucidated. In contrast to previous reports, we employ sulfur dissolved in oleic acid as the sulfur donor rather than thioacetamide (TAA). The size of the ZIS QDs and their crystal lattice constant increased with increasing In incorporation, but they maintained the cubic sphalerite phase of ZnS, rather than the hexagonal phase typical of ZnIn2 S4 . The QDs' absorbance onset at UV wavelengths red-shifts with increasing In content and the accompanying increase in NC size. The ZIS NCs and related materials, whose synthesis is enabled by the approach presented here, provide new opportunities to apply II-III-VI semiconductors in solution-processed UV optoelectronics. PMID:26541645

  13. Deforestation and forest fires in Roraima and their relationship with phytoclimatic regions in the northern Brazilian Amazon.

    PubMed

    Barni, Paulo Eduardo; Pereira, Vaneza Barreto; Manzi, Antonio Ocimar; Barbosa, Reinaldo Imbrozio

    2015-05-01

    Deforestation and forest fires in the Brazilian Amazon are a regional-scale anthropogenic process related to biomass burning, which has a direct impact on global warming due to greenhouse gas emissions. Containment of this process requires characterizing its spatial distribution and that of the environmental factors related to its occurrence. The aim of this study is to investigate the spatial and temporal distribution of deforested areas and forest fires in the State of Roraima from 2000 to 2010. We mapped deforested areas and forest fires using Landsat images and associated their occurrence with two phytoclimatic zones: zone with savanna influence (ZIS), and zone without savanna influence (ZOS). Total deforested area during the interval was estimated at 3.06 × 10(3) km(2) (ZIS = 55 %; ZOS = 45 %) while total area affected by forest fires was estimated at 3.02 × 10(3) km(2) (ZIS = 97.7 %; ZOS = 2.3 %). Magnitude of deforestation in Roraima was not related to the phytoclimatic zones, but small deforested areas (≤17.9 ha) predominated in ZOS while larger deforestation classes (>17.9 ha) predominated in ZIS, which is an area with a longer history of human activities. The largest occurrence of forest fires was observed in the ZIS in years with El Niño events. Our analysis indicates that the areas most affected by forest fires in Roraima during 2000-2010 were associated with strong climatic events and the occurrence these fires was amplified in ZIS, a sensitive phytoclimatic zone with a higher risk of anthropogenic fires given its drier climate and open forest structure. PMID:25604215

  14. Oral Rehabilitation of Adult Edentulous Siblings Severely Lacking Alveolar Bone Due to Ectodermal Dysplasia: A Report of 2 Clinical Cases and a Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yiqun; Zhang, Chenping; Squarize, Cristiane H; Zou, Duohong

    2015-09-01

    The oral conditions of adult edentulous patients with ectodermal dysplasia (ED) often lead to decreased physical and psychological health, and the negative effects can become as extreme as social and psychological isolation. However, restoring oral function of adult edentulous patients with ED using zygomatic implants (ZIs) or conventional implants (CIs) remains challenging for dentists because of the severe atrophy of these patients' alveolar ridges. This report describes 2 cases of adult edentulous siblings with ED; they exhibited severe alveolar bone atrophy and were treated with ZIs and CIs as bases to augment the bone in their anterior jaws. For these patients, bone augmentation was completed with an autogenous fibular graft. Although there was mild evidence of bone graft resorption in the maxilla, the bone augmentation procedures were successful in the 2 patients. Effective osseointegration of the implants was obtained. After placement, the functional and esthetic results of the oral rehabilitation were acceptable. More importantly, restoration of the patients' oral function enhanced their self-confidence and self-esteem. Therefore, restoring oral function in adult patients with ED and edentulous jaws using ZIs and CIs as the bases for bone augmentation is an effective approach. PMID:25957874

  15. Growth mechanism of CuZnInSe2 thin films grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tseng, Ya Hsin; Yang, Chu Shou; Wu, Chia Hsing; Chiu, Jai Wei; Yang, Min De; Wu, Chih-Hung

    2013-09-01

    CuZnInSe2 (CZIS) has potential application in solar cell for absorption layer, and give an advantage to change the band gap from CuInSe2 (1.02 eV) to ZnSe (2.67 eV). Using molecular beam epitaxy technology, the CZIS thin films were grown via CuInSe (CIS) and ZnSe base. In the case of CIS, thin films were grown on Mo-coated soda lime glass with various zinc flux. CIS was transformed into chalcopyrite and sphalerite coexisting CZIS easily but it is difficult to transform into the pure sphalerite CZIS. Zn/(Zn+In+Cu) ratio has limited to approximate 36 at% and the excess-Zn played a catalyst role. In the case of ZnSe base, which was grown on GaAs (001), various In and Cu flux defined as the TIn series and TCu series, respectively. There are four types of compound in the TIn series and TCu series, including ZnSe, InxSey, ZnIn2Se4 (ZIS) and CZIS. In the TIn series under the lowest In and Cu flux, selenium (Se) were randomly combined with cations to form the CZIS. When TIn is increased in this moment, the CZIS was transformed into ZIS. In the TCu series, CZIS demonstrated via In-rich ZIS (Zn(In, Cu)Se) and InxSey base ((Zn, Cu)InSe). It is chalcopyrite and sphalerite coexisting structure in the medium TCu region. In the high TCu region, it is transformed into the Zn-poor and Cu-rich CZIS.

  16. Darwin, Engels und die Rolle der Arbeit in der biologischen und kulturellen Evolution des Menschen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichholf, Josef H.

    Im Jahre 1876, 5 Jahre nach Erscheinen von Darwins Buch über die Evolution des Menschen und die sexuelle Selektion (Darwin 1871), veröffentlichte Friedrich Engels den berühmt gewordenen Essay "Anteil der Arbeit an der Menschwerdung des Affen“ (Engels 1876). Die Kernfrage darin lautet in Kurzform: Warum hat der Mensch eigentlich ein Bedürfnis nach Arbeit? Engels Antwort wird nachfolgend näher betrachtet und vom gegenwärtigen Kenntnisstand aus beurteilt. Wie sich zeigen wird, beantworten seine Überlegungen die Frage nicht wirklich. Sie ist weiterhin offen. Es können lediglich einige zusätzliche Anhaltspunkte zur Diskussion gestellt werden. Angesichts des drängenden Problems millionenfacher Arbeitslosigkeit und der Forderungen nach einem "Grundrecht auf Arbeit“ kommt den Überlegungen zum möglichen Ursprung des Bedürfnisses nach Arbeit mehr als nur akademisches Interesse zu.

  17. The IMAGIS Projects: Past, Present And Future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Valk, J. P. J.; Stut, W. J. J.; Lodder, H.; Bakker, A. R.; ter Haar Romeny, B. M.

    1988-06-01

    In the Netherlands a national PACS development program has been started, supported by-the Dutch Society of Radiology, and funded by the Dutch Department of Health, because of the national character of the project. Three main partners are cooperating in this development: the Utrecht University Hospital (AZU), BAZIS and Philips International (Product Division Medical Systems), with the Delft University of Technology as the main subcontractor of BAZIS. The non-profit foundation BAZIS, developing and supporting the 'ZIS' Hospital Information System (in use in some 30 Dutch hospitals now, together over 15,000 acute beds), initiated its current IMAGIS (IMAGe Information System) projects in 1984. The Dutch PACS project, in which BAZIS is participating, started in 1986. The final goal of IMAGIS is to achieve a PACS which is fully integrated with already existing hospital information systems (HIS), with support for scientific research. Both the development and operation of such a HIS-PACS include many scientific research aspects. The current efforts of BAZIS are concentrated on three main issues: diagnostic image quality evaluation (e.g. effects of data compression); modelling, software simulation and technology assessment of a prototype PACS (both general and detailed aspects); coupling and integration of PACS and HIS (e.g. the BAZIS 'ZIS'). In this paper we will refer to the following intermediate results: the psychophysical software package for Feature Evaluation And System Inspection By Logged Experiments (FEASIBLE); the modelling and simulation software package for Medical Image Representation, Archiving and Communication, Learned by Extensive Simulation (MIRACLES); first results of the coupling experiments. Finally we will outline the future direction of the IMAGIS projects.

  18. Wavy liquid films in interaction with a strongly confined laminar gas flow: Modeling and direct numerical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dietze, Georg F.; Ruyer-Quil, Christian

    2013-11-01

    Different technological settings concern the flow of a wavy liquid film in contact with a strongly confined gas flow. Micro-gaps for instance, which are employed for the cooling of electronic equipment, involve a pressure-driven evaporating liquid film flowing co-currently to its own vapor. In packed columns used for distillation, falling liquid films sheared by a counter-current gas flow occur within narrow channels. Surface waves on the liquid-gas interface of these flows play an important role as they intensify scalar transfer and may cause flooding of the channel. However, their accurate prediction by full numerical simulation is associated with a substantial computational cost. We evaluate an alternative approach based on a low-dimensional integral boundary layer formulation applied to both fluid layers. The resulting model captures the long-wave (Yih and Kapitza) instabilities of the flow accurately and allows calculations on long domains at low computational cost. These evince a number of intricate wave-induced flow structures within the film and gas as well as a possible route to the flooding of narrow channels under counter-current gas flow conditions. Comparisons with direct numerical simulations using the VOF-CSF approach as well as experiments are convincing. GFD acknowledges support from DAAD (Deutscher Akademischer Austauschdienst).

  19. What Children Tell Us about Their Parents: From Visible Dust to Invisible Planetesimals in Debris Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, Sebastian; Krivov, A. V.; Loehne, T.; Mutschke, H.

    2008-09-01

    Various small body families in the solar system, together with dust they produce through mutual collisions and cometary activity, exemplify a non-planetary component of a planetary system, usually referred to as a "debris disk". Debris disks have been found to be a common phenomenon for main-sequence stars and, similar to the solar system, are believed to comprise planetesimal populations that have accreted at early epochs and survived possible planet formation. However, in contrast to the solar system, observations of extrasolar debris disks only show their dusty portion, whereas the dust-producing planetesimals remain invisible. We show how collisional models of debris disks can be used to "climb up" the ladder of the collisional cascade, from dust towards parent bodies, representing the main mass reservoir of the disks. Applying our approach to five sun-like stars known to harbor dust, we find that the observed excess emission in far-IR to sub-mm is compatible with debris disks collisionally sustained by "large Kuiper belts" of 0.2-50 earth masses (in the bodies up to 100 km in size) with radii of 100-200 AU, larger than thought before. This research has been funded by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG), projects Kr 2164/5-1 and Mu 1164/6-1, by the Deutscher Akademischer Austauschdienst (DAAD), project D/0707543, and by the International Space Science Institute (Bern).

  20. International cooperation in water resources

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jones, J.R.; Beall, R.M.; Giusti, E.V.

    1979-01-01

    bewildering variety of organizations, there certainly exists, for any nation, group, or individual, a demonstrated mechanism for almost any conceivable form of international cooperation in hydrology and water resources. ?? 1979 Akademische Verlagsgesellschaft.

  1. Molecular Mechanisms of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) as a Basis for Individualized and Personalized Therapy: Rationale, Design and Methods of the South Eastern Europe (SEE)-PTSD study.

    PubMed

    Kulenovic, Alma Dzubur; Agani, Ferid; Avdibegovic, Esmina; Jakovljevic, Miro; Babic, Dragan; Kucukalic, Abdulah; Kucukalic, Sabina; Dzananovic, Emina Sabic; Mehmedbasic, Alma Bravo; Uka, Aferdita Goci; Haxhibeqiri, Shpend; Haxhibeqiri, Valdete; Hoxha, Blerina; Sinanovic, Osman; Kravic, Nermina; Muminovic, Mirnesa; Aukst-Margetic, Branka; Jaksic, Nenad; Franc, Ana Cima; Rudan, Dusko; Pavlovic, Marko; Babic, Romana; Bojic, Elma Feric; Marjanovic, Damir; Bozina, Nada; Ziegler, Christiane; Wolf, Christiane; Warrings, Bodo; Domschke, Katharina; Deckert, Jürgen

    2016-06-01

    Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) is a major health problem in South Eastern Europe (SEE). Available treatment options are not efficient enough and the course is often chronic. Little is known about molecular mediators and moderators of pathogenesis and therapy. Genetic and epigenetic variation may be one central molecular mechanism. We therefore established a consortium combining clinical expertise on PTSD from SEE countries Bosnia-Herzegovina (Sarajevo, Tuzla and Mostar), Kosovo (Prishtina) and Croatia (Zagreb) with genetic and epigenetic competence from Germany (Würzburg) in 2011 within the framework of the DAAD (Deutscher Akademischer Austauschdienst)-funded Stability Pact for South Eastern Europe. After obtaining ethical votes and performing rater trainings as well as training in DNA extraction from EDTA blood between 2011 and 2013, we recruited 747 individuals who had experienced war-related trauma in the SEE conflicts between 1991 and 1999. 236 participants had current PTSD, 161 lifetime PTSD and 350 did not have and never had PTSD. Demographic and clinical data are currently merged together with genetic and epigenetic data in a single database to allow for a comprehensive analysis of the role of genetic and epigenetic variation in the pathogenesis and therapy of PTSD. Analyses will be done to a great degree by PhD students from participating SEE centers who in addition to participation in the project had an opportunity to take part in spring and summer schools of the DFG (Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft) funded Research Training Group (RTG) 1253 and thus meet PhD students from Germany and other countries We are confident that our project will not only contribute to a better understanding of genetic and epigenetic mechanisms of PTSD as a basis for future individualized and personalized therapies, but also to the academic development of South Eastern Europe. PMID:27287790

  2. PHENIX Collaboration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adare, A.; Afanasiev, S.; Aidala, C.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Akiba, Y.; Akimoto, R.; Al-Bataineh, H.; Al-Ta'ani, H.; Alexander, J.; Alfred, M.; Andrews, K. R.; Angerami, A.; Aoki, K.; Apadula, N.; Aphecetche, L.; Appelt, E.; Aramaki, Y.; Armendariz, R.; Aronson, S. H.; Asai, J.; Asano, H.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Atomssa, E. T.; Averbeck, R.; Awes, T. C.; Azmoun, B.; Babintsev, V.; Bai, M.; Bai, X.; Baksay, G.; Baksay, L.; Baldisseri, A.; Bandara, N. S.; Bannier, B.; Barish, K. N.; Barnes, P. D.; Bassalleck, B.; Basye, A. T.; Bathe, S.; Batsouli, S.; Baublis, V.; Baumann, C.; Baumgart, S.; Bazilevsky, A.; Beaumier, M.; Beckman, S.; Belikov, S.; Belmont, R.; Ben-Benjamin, J.; Bennett, R.; Berdnikov, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Bhom, J. H.; Bickley, A. A.; Bing, X.; Black, D.; Blau, D. S.; Boissevain, J. G.; Bok, J. S.; Borel, H.; Boyle, K.; Brooks, M. L.; Broxmeyer, D.; Bryslawskyj, J.; Buesching, H.; Bumazhnov, V.; Bunce, G.; Butsyk, S.; Camacho, C. M.; Campbell, S.; Caringi, A.; Castera, P.; Chang, B. S.; Chang, W. C.; Charvet, J.-L.; Chen, C.-H.; Chernichenko, S.; Chi, C. Y.; Chiba, J.; Chiu, M.; Choi, I. J.; Choi, J. B.; Choi, S.; Choudhury, R. K.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chung, P.; Churyn, A.; Chvala, O.; Cianciolo, V.; Citron, Z.; Cleven, C. R.; Cole, B. A.; Comets, M. P.; Conesa del Valle, Z.; Connors, M.; Constantin, P.; Cronin, N.; Crossette, N.; Csanád, M.; Csörgő, T.; Dahms, T.; Dairaku, S.; Danchev, I.; Das, K.; Datta, A.; Daugherity, M. S.; David, G.; Dayananda, M. K.; Deaton, M. B.; DeBlasio, K.; Dehmelt, K.; Delagrange, H.; Denisov, A.; d'Enterria, D.; Deshpande, A.; Desmond, E. J.; Dharmawardane, K. V.; Dietzsch, O.; Ding, L.; Dion, A.; Do, J. H.; Donadelli, M.; Drapier, O.; Drees, A.; Drees, K. A.; Dubey, A. K.; Durham, J. M.; Durum, A.; Dutta, D.; Dzhordzhadze, V.; D'Orazio, L.; Edwards, S.; Efremenko, Y. V.; Egdemir, J.; Ellinghaus, F.; Emam, W. S.; Engelmore, T.; Enokizono, A.; En'yo, H.; Esumi, S.; Eyser, K. O.; Fadem, B.; Feege, N.; Fields, D. E.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Fleuret, F.; Fokin, S. L.; Fraenkel, Z.; Frantz, J. E.; Franz, A.; Frawley, A. D.; Fujiwara, K.; Fukao, Y.; Fusayasu, T.; Gadrat, S.; Gainey, K.; Gal, C.; Gallus, P.; Garg, P.; Garishvili, A.; Garishvili, I.; Ge, H.; Giordano, F.; Glenn, A.; Gong, H.; Gong, X.; Gonin, M.; Gosset, J.; Goto, Y.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Grau, N.; Greene, S. V.; Grim, G.; Grosse Perdekamp, M.; Gu, Y.; Gunji, T.; Guo, L.; Guragain, H.; Gustafsson, H.-Å.; Hachiya, T.; Hadj Henni, A.; Haegemann, C.; Haggerty, J. S.; Hahn, K. I.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamblen, J.; Han, R.; Han, S. Y.; Hanks, J.; Harada, H.; Harper, C.; Hartouni, E. P.; Haruna, K.; Hasegawa, S.; Hashimoto, K.; Haslum, E.; Hayano, R.; Hayashi, S.; He, X.; Heffner, M.; Hemmick, T. K.; Hester, T.; Hiejima, H.; Hill, J. C.; Hobbs, R.; Hohlmann, M.; Hollis, R. S.; Holzmann, W.; Homma, K.; Hong, B.; Horaguchi, T.; Hori, Y.; Hornback, D.; Hoshino, T.; Huang, J.; Huang, S.; Ichihara, T.; Ichimiya, R.; Ide, J.; Iinuma, H.; Ikeda, Y.; Imai, K.; Imazu, Y.; Imrek, J.; Inaba, M.; Inoue, Y.; Iordanova, A.; Isenhower, D.; Isenhower, L.; Ishihara, M.; Isinhue, A.; Isobe, T.; Issah, M.; Isupov, A.; Ivanischev, D.; Ivanishchev, D.; Iwanaga, Y.; Jacak, B. V.; Javani, M.; Jeon, S. J.; Jezghani, M.; Jia, J.; Jiang, X.; Jin, J.; Jinnouchi, O.; John, D.; Johnson, B. M.; Jones, T.; Joo, E.; Joo, K. S.; Jouan, D.; Jumper, D. S.; Kajihara, F.; Kametani, S.; Kamihara, N.; Kamin, J.; Kanda, S.; Kaneta, M.; Kaneti, S.; Kang, B. H.; Kang, J. H.; Kang, J. S.; Kanou, H.; Kapustinsky, J.; Karatsu, K.; Kasai, M.; Kawall, D.; Kawashima, M.; Kazantsev, A. V.; Kempel, T.; Key, J. A.; Khachatryan, V.; Khandai, P. K.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kihara, K.; Kijima, K. M.; Kikuchi, J.; Kim, A.; Kim, B. I.; Kim, C.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, E.; Kim, E.-J.; Kim, H.-J.; Kim, H. J.; Kim, K.-B.; Kim, M.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y.-J.; Kim, Y. K.; Kinney, E.; Kiriluk, K.; Kiss, Á.; Kistenev, E.; Kiyomichi, A.; Klatsky, J.; Klay, J.; Klein-Boesing, C.; Kleinjan, D.; Kline, P.; Koblesky, T.; Kochenda, L.; Kochetkov, V.; Kofarago, M.; Komatsu, Y.; Komkov, B.; Konno, M.; Koster, J.; Kotchetkov, D.; Kotov, D.; Kozlov, A.; Král, A.; Kravitz, A.; Krizek, F.; Kubart, J.; Kunde, G. J.; Kurihara, N.; Kurita, K.; Kurosawa, M.; Kweon, M. J.; Kwon, Y.; Kyle, G. S.; Lacey, R.; Lai, Y. S.; Lajoie, J. G.; Layton, D.; Lebedev, A.; Lee, B.; Lee, D. M.; Lee, G. H.; Lee, J.; Lee, K.; Lee, K. B.; Lee, K. S.; Lee, M. K.; Lee, S. H.; Lee, S. R.; Lee, T.; Leitch, M. J.; Leite, M. A. L.; Leitgab, M.; Leitner, E.; Lenzi, B.; Lewis, B.; Li, X.; Lichtenwalner, P.; Liebing, P.; Lim, S. H.; Linden Levy, L. A.; Liška, T.; Litvinenko, A.; Liu, H.; Liu, M. X.; Love, B.; Luechtenborg, R.; Lynch, D.; Maguire, C. F.; Makdisi, Y. I.; Ma, M.; Malakhov, A.; Malik, M. D.; Manion, A.; Manko, V. I.; Mannel, E.; Mao, Y.

    2014-12-01

    We thank the staff of the Collider-Accelerator and Physics Departments at Brookhaven National Laboratory and the staff of the other PHENIX participating institutions for their vital contributions. We acknowledge support from the Office of Nuclear Physics in the Office of Science of the Department of Energy, the National Science Foundation, a sponsored research grant from Renaissance Technologies LLC, Abilene Christian University Research Council, Research Foundation of SUNY, and Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences, Vanderbilt University (USA), Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science, and Technology and the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (Japan), Conselho Nacional de Desenvolvimento Científico e Tecnológico and Fundação de Amparo à Pesquisa do Estado de São Paulo (Brazil), Natural Science Foundation of China, (People's Republic of China), Ministry of Science, Education, and Sports (Croatia), Ministry of Education, Youth and Sports (Czech Republic), Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Commissariat à l'Énergie Atomique, and Institut National de Physique Nucléaire et de Physique des Particules (France), Bundesministerium für Bildung und Forschung, Deutscher Akademischer Austausch Dienst, and Alexander von Humboldt Stiftung (Germany), OTKA NK 101 428 grant and the Ch. Simonyi Fund (Hungary), Department of Atomic Energy and Department of Science and Technology (India), Israel Science Foundation (Israel), National Research Foundation and WCU program of the Ministry Education Science and Technology (Republic of Korea), Physics Department, Lahore University of Management Sciences (Pakistan), Ministry of Education and Science, Russian Academy of Sciences, Federal Agency of Atomic Energy (Russia), VR and Wallenberg Foundation (Sweden), the US Civilian Research and Development Foundation for the Independent States of the Former Soviet Union, and the US-Israel Binational Science Foundation.

  3. PHENIX Collaboration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adare, A.; Afanasiev, S.; Aidala, C.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Akiba, Y.; Akimoto, R.; Al-Bataineh, H.; Al-Ta'ani, H.; Alexander, J.; Alfred, M.; Andrews, K. R.; Angerami, A.; Aoki, K.; Apadula, N.; Aphecetche, L.; Appelt, E.; Aramaki, Y.; Armendariz, R.; Aronson, S. H.; Asai, J.; Asano, H.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Atomssa, E. T.; Averbeck, R.; Awes, T. C.; Azmoun, B.; Babintsev, V.; Bai, M.; Bai, X.; Baksay, G.; Baksay, L.; Baldisseri, A.; Bandara, N. S.; Bannier, B.; Barish, K. N.; Barnes, P. D.; Barnes, P. D.; Bassalleck, B.; Basye, A. T.; Bathe, S.; Batsouli, S.; Baublis, V.; Baumann, C.; Baumgart, S.; Bazilevsky, A.; Beaumier, M.; Beckman, S.; Belikov, S.; Belmont, R.; Ben-Benjamin, J.; Bennett, R.; Berdnikov, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Bhom, J. H.; Bickley, A. A.; Bing, X.; Black, D.; Blau, D. S.; Boissevain, J. G.; Bok, J.; Bok, J. S.; Borel, H.; Boyle, K.; Brooks, M. L.; Broxmeyer, D.; Bryslawskyj, J.; Buesching, H.; Bumazhnov, V.; Bunce, G.; Butsyk, S.; Camacho, C. M.; Campbell, S.; Caringi, A.; Castera, P.; Chang, B. S.; Chang, W. C.; Charvet, J.-L.; Chen, C.-H.; Chernichenko, S.; Chi, C. Y.; Chiba, J.; Chiu, M.; Choi, I. J.; Choi, J. B.; Choi, S.; Choudhury, R. K.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chung, P.; Churyn, A.; Chvala, O.; Cianciolo, V.; Citron, Z.; Cleven, C. R.; Cole, B. A.; Comets, M. P.; Conesa del Valle, Z.; Connors, M.; Constantin, P.; Cronin, N.; Crossette, N.; Csanád, M.; Csörgő, T.; Dahms, T.; Dairaku, S.; Danchev, I.; Das, K.; Datta, A.; Daugherity, M. S.; David, G.; Dayananda, M. K.; Deaton, M. B.; DeBlasio, K.; Dehmelt, K.; Delagrange, H.; Denisov, A.; d'Enterria, D.; Deshpande, A.; Desmond, E. J.; Dharmawardane, K. V.; Dietzsch, O.; Ding, L.; Dion, A.; Do, J. H.; Donadelli, M.; Drapier, O.; Drees, A.; Drees, K. A.; Dubey, A. K.; Durham, J. M.; Durum, A.; Dutta, D.; Dzhordzhadze, V.; D'Orazio, L.; Edwards, S.; Efremenko, Y. V.; Egdemir, J.; Ellinghaus, F.; Emam, W. S.; Engelmore, T.; Enokizono, A.; En'yo, H.; Esumi, S.; Eyser, K. O.; Fadem, B.; Feege, N.; Fields, D. E.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Fleuret, F.; Fokin, S. L.; Fraenkel, Z.; Frantz, J. E.; Franz, A.; Frawley, A. D.; Fujiwara, K.; Fukao, Y.; Fusayasu, T.; Gadrat, S.; Gainey, K.; Gal, C.; Gallus, P.; Garg, P.; Garishvili, A.; Garishvili, I.; Ge, H.; Giordano, F.; Glenn, A.; Gong, H.; Gong, X.; Gonin, M.; Gosset, J.; Goto, Y.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Grau, N.; Greene, S. V.; Grim, G.; Grosse Perdekamp, M.; Gu, Y.; Gunji, T.; Guo, L.; Guragain, H.; Gustafsson, H.-Å.; Hachiya, T.; Hadj Henni, A.; Haegemann, C.; Haggerty, J. S.; Hahn, K. I.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamblen, J.; Han, R.; Han, S. Y.; Hanks, J.; Harada, H.; Harper, C.; Hartouni, E. P.; Haruna, K.; Hasegawa, S.; Hashimoto, K.; Haslum, E.; Hayano, R.; Hayashi, S.; He, X.; Heffner, M.; Hemmick, T. K.; Hester, T.; Hiejima, H.; Hill, J. C.; Hobbs, R.; Hohlmann, M.; Hollis, R. S.; Holzmann, W.; Homma, K.; Hong, B.; Horaguchi, T.; Hori, Y.; Hornback, D.; Hoshino, T.; Huang, J.; Huang, S.; Ichihara, T.; Ichimiya, R.; Ide, J.; Iinuma, H.; Ikeda, Y.; Imai, K.; Imazu, Y.; Imrek, J.; Inaba, M.; Inoue, Y.; Iordanova, A.; Isenhower, D.; Isenhower, L.; Ishihara, M.; Isinhue, A.; Isobe, T.; Issah, M.; Isupov, A.; Ivanischev, D.; Ivanishchev, D.; Iwanaga, Y.; Jacak, B. V.; Javani, M.; Jeon, S. J.; Jezghani, M.; Jia, J.; Jiang, X.; Jin, J.; Jinnouchi, O.; John, D.; Johnson, B. M.; Jones, T.; Joo, E.; Joo, K. S.; Jouan, D.; Jumper, D. S.; Kajihara, F.; Kametani, S.; Kamihara, N.; Kamin, J.; Kanda, S.; Kaneta, M.; Kaneti, S.; Kang, B. H.; Kang, J. H.; Kang, J. S.; Kanou, H.; Kapustinsky, J.; Karatsu, K.; Kasai, M.; Kawall, D.; Kawashima, M.; Kazantsev, A. V.; Kempel, T.; Key, J. A.; Khachatryan, V.; Khandai, P. K.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kihara, K.; Kijima, K. M.; Kikuchi, J.; Kim, A.; Kim, B. I.; Kim, C.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, E.; Kim, E.-J.; Kim, H.-J.; Kim, H. J.; Kim, K.-B.; Kim, M.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y.-J.; Kim, Y. K.; Kinney, E.; Kiriluk, K.; Kiss, Á.; Kistenev, E.; Kiyomichi, A.; Klatsky, J.; Klay, J.; Klein-Boesing, C.; Kleinjan, D.; Kline, P.; Koblesky, T.; Kochenda, L.; Kochetkov, V.; Kofarago, M.; Komatsu, Y.; Komkov, B.; Konno, M.; Koster, J.; Kotchetkov, D.; Kotov, D.; Kozlov, A.; Král, A.; Kravitz, A.; Krizek, F.; Kubart, J.; Kunde, G. J.; Kurihara, N.; Kurita, K.; Kurosawa, M.; Kweon, M. J.; Kwon, Y.; Kyle, G. S.; Lacey, R.; Lai, Y. S.; Lajoie, J. G.; Layton, D.; Lebedev, A.; Lee, B.; Lee, D. M.; Lee, G. H.; Lee, J.; Lee, K.; Lee, K. B.; Lee, K. S.; Lee, M. K.; Lee, S. H.; Lee, S. R.; Lee, T.; Leitch, M. J.; Leite, M. A. L.; Leitgab, M.; Leitner, E.; Lenzi, B.; Lewis, B.; Li, X.; Lichtenwalner, P.; Liebing, P.; Lim, S. H.; Linden Levy, L. A.; Liška, T.; Litvinenko, A.; Liu, H.; Liu, M. X.; Love, B.; Luechtenborg, R.; Lynch, D.; Maguire, C. F.; Makdisi, Y. I.; Maai, M.; Malakhov, A.; Malik, M. D.; Manion, A.; Manko, V. I.

    2014-11-01

    We thank the staff of the Collider-Accelerator and Physics Departments at Brookhaven National Laboratory and the staff of the other PHENIX participating institutions for their vital contributions. We acknowledge support from the Office of Nuclear Physics in the Office of Science of the Department of Energy, the National Science Foundation, a sponsored research grant from Renaissance Technologies LLC, Abilene Christian University Research Council, Research Foundation of SUNY, and Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences, Vanderbilt University (USA), Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science, and Technology and the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (Japan), Conselho Nacional de Desenvolvimento Científico e Tecnológico and Fundaç ao de Amparo à Pesquisa do Estado de São Paulo (Brazil), Natural Science Foundation of China (People's Republic of China), Ministry of Science, Education, and Sports (Croatia), Ministry of Education, Youth and Sports (Czech Republic), Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Commissariat à l'Énergie Atomique, and Institut National de Physique Nucléaire et de Physique des Particules (France), Bundesministerium für Bildung und Forschung, Deutscher Akademischer Austausch Dienst, and Alexander von Humboldt Stiftung (Germany), OTKA NK 101 428 grant and the Ch. Simonyi Fund (Hungary), Department of Atomic Energy and Department of Science and Technology (India), Israel Science Foundation (Israel), National Research Foundation and WCU program of the Ministry Education Science and Technology (Korea), Physics Department, Lahore University of Management Sciences (Pakistan), Ministry of Education and Science, Russian Academy of Sciences, Federal Agency of Atomic Energy (Russia), VR and Wallenberg Foundation (Sweden), the US Civilian Research and Development Foundation for the Independent States of the Former Soviet Union, and the US-Israel Binational Science Foundation.

  4. The Internationalization of the `Astronomische Gesellschaft'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolfschmidt, Gudrun

    Organized internationalization in astronomy started with a first meeting of 15 European astronomers in Gotha in 1798. Two years later the `Vereinigte Astronomische Gesellschaft' (VAG) was founded in Lilienthal, near Bremen, to organize the compilation of ecliptic star charts for finding the missing planet between Mars and Jupiter. Also, cooperation was planned for observing comets and variable stars. More than half of the members originated from non-German speaking countries. For publication of the results the `Monatliche Correspondenz' was founded in 1800 by Franz Xaver von Zach (1754-1832). I will not discuss here the resulting success (discovery of the asteroids and in 1845 the publication of the `Berliner Akademische Sternkarten'). The problem of reducing the increasing amount of asteroid observations came up in 1857 in the `Section Geographie und Astronomie' (founded in 1828) of the `Gesellschaft Deutscher Naturforscher und ärzte'. >From the two roots mentioned, the `Astronomische Gesellschaft' was founded in Heidelberg in 1863 -- again internationally structured: 11 out of 26 members were from foreign observatories, and until the 1930s well over 50% of the members were foreign. Again the main aim was international cooperation, particularly in compiling various catalogues and bibliographies (AGK1 and GuL). A difficult situation arose after World War I when the `International Astronomical Union' (IAU) was founded, in 1919. But these two international organizations, the AG and the IAU, coexisted because they had different goals. Thanks especially to the Swedish astronomer Svante Elis Strömgren (1870-1947), who was elected president, the `Astronomische Gesellschaft' still flourished throughout the 1920s.

  5. Cerebral blood flow in patients with peritoneal dialysis by an easy Z-score imaging system for brain perfusion single-photon emission tomography.

    PubMed

    Isshiki, Rei; Kobayashi, Shuzo; Iwagami, Masao; Tsutumi, Daimu; Mochida, Yasuhiro; Ishioka, Kunihiro; Oka, Machiko; Maesato, Kyoko; Moriya, Hidekazu; Ohtake, Takayasu; Hidaka, Sumi

    2014-06-01

    Cognitive impairment has long been recognized as a complication of chronic kidney disease. However, there is little information available regarding regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in patients with peritoneal dialysis (PD). Therefore, we evaluated rCBF using brain single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). We conducted a cross-sectional study in our hospital. Eighteen consecutive PD patients who could visit the hospital by themselves without any history of stroke were examined by Technetium-99 m-labeled ethylcrysteinate dimer brain SPECT. An easy Z-score imaging system (eZIS) was used to compare rCBF in PD patients with those in age-matched healthy controls. We also evaluated cognitive dysfunction with the mini-mental state examination (MMSE) questionnaire. Only one patient showed an MMSE score of 18 points, and the remaining 14 patients were considered as normal (MMSE ≥ 27), and three patients were considered to have mild cognitive impairment (24 ≤ MMSE ≤ 26). In all patients, rCBF in the posterior cingulated gyri, precunei, and parietal cortices was significantly decreased. The ratio of the reduction of rCBF in each region relative to that of rCBF across the whole brain correlated positively with the PD duration (r = 0.559; P < 0.05). The serum β2-microglobulin level was significantly higher in patients who had a higher ratio of rCBF reduction compared with those with lower ratios. In conclusion, all PD patients in the present study had decreased rCBF irrespective of MMSE scores. PMID:24965295

  6. Tidally-induced Flow Structure Over Intertidal Flats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, M. B.; Ke, X.; Gao, S.

    1998-02-01

    Previous investigations have assumed that a significant linear relationship betweenuz-lnZis sufficient to define a logarithmic velocity profile given by the von Kármán-Prandtl equation. However, it is demonstrated here that such a criterion alone is insufficient. An internal consistency analysis is developed to establish realistic logarithmic velocity profiles, in the estimation of boundary layer parameters associated with intertidal flat environments. The analytical procedure includes: (i) onward linear regression, to establish the relationship between apparentu*values and near-bed current speeds,uz(here, the observedu50is used); (ii) an assessment of the constant and correlation coefficient within theu*-uzrelationship; (iii) calculation ofz0andC50values, on the basis of the slope of the regression line; and (iv) undertaking a comparison between the derivedz0andC50and those obtained using the instantaneous velocity profiles. The internal consistency is shown to be enhanced if the data are filtered, before a more detailed analysis. This approach is applied to the analysis of 192 current velocity (gradient rig) data sets collected from the intertidal flats of the Loughor Estuary and Swansea Bay (South Wales), and The Wash (eastern England). Overall, less than 40% of the data sets are logarithmic in character, with variations between the various stations. Nevertheless, boundary layer parameters were determined for most locations. Non-logarithmic profiles on intertidal flats are considered to be caused by: (i) rotary tidal currents; (ii) wind effects; (iii) wave action and other short-period oscillations; and (iv) topographically-induced secondary flows. Measurement errors can lead also to deviations from an ' idealized ' logarithmic profile.

  7. Remote Operated Vehicle geophysical surveys on land (underground), air and submarine archaeology: General peculiarities of processing and interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eppelbaum, Lev

    2016-04-01

    algorithms relief polari- of anomalous of complex method for combined zation object by archaeological identification 1 - 3 4 - 5 media of desired targets modelsmodels Magnetic + ⊕ ⊕ + ⊕ ⊕ ⊕ ⊕ ⊕ + ⊕ Gravity + ⊕ + ⊕ ⊕ ⊕ + ⊕ ‑ ⊕ Thermal + ⊕ ⊕ + ⊕ ⊕ ⊕ ⊕ ‑ ◇ Thermal (ancient climate + ⊕ ⊕ + ⊕ + ⊕ ∗ ∗ ∗ ‑ analysis) SP + + + ⊕ ⊕ ⊕ ⊕ ‑ ‑ VLF + ⊕ ⊕ + ⊕ ⊕ ⊕ ⊕ ‑ ‑ IP ∗ ⊕ + ⊕ ⊕ ⊕ ⊕ ‑ ‑ Piezoelectric ∗ ⊕ + ⊕ ⊕ ⊕ ⊕ ‑ ‑ Note. Symbols "+" and "‑" designate availability and unavailability of procedures, respectively. "⊕" - authors' modification, "◇" - under preparing. Symbol "∗" designates the absence of necessity for calculation The effect of different heights of observation points and the techniques of its correction was first discussed in magnetic prospecting (Khesin et al., 1996; Eppelbaum et al., 2001). Taking into account that rugged relief may strongly disturb observed geophysical anomalies, the corresponding correction for non-flat relief influenced is of high importance. In essence, there are only two types of general analytical expressions applicable to the description of these geophysical fields (Alexeyev et al., 1996; Khesin et al., 1996; Eppelbaum, 2000). They are ∫ (zs ‑-z)cosγp +-(xs ‑-x)sinγp U1(x,z) = P r2 dxsdzs, S (1) [ ] ∫ (zs ‑ z)2 ‑ (xs ‑ x)2 cosγp + 2(xs ‑ x)(zs ‑ z)sin γp U2(x,z) = P ------------4-----------dxsdzs, S r (2) where γp = 90o ‑ϕp,ϕp is the inclination angle of the polarization vector to the horizon, P is value of this vector (being a scalar in a particular case); S is the cross-section area of the body; P is the polarization vector (dipole moment of a unit volume); r = ° ---2-----2- (xs ‑ x) + (zs ‑ z)is the distance from the observation point M(x, z) to a certain point of the body P(xs,zs) Therefore, it seems sufficient to illustrate the manipulations taking as examples Eqs. (1) and (2). The

  8. Climate Change: Natural Water and Fertilization Effects on Winter Rye (Secale cereale L.) Yield in Monoculture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    László Phd, M., ,, Dr.

    2009-04-01

    . Akad. Tidskr. 139:8. Jolánkai, M., 2005. Effect of climate change on plant cultivation. „AGRO-21" Füzetek. 41. 47-58. Kádár, I., 1992. A növénytáplálás alapelvei és módszerei. MTA TAKI. Budapest. 398 p. Kádár, I., 2005. A rozs (Secale cereale L.) műtrágyázása meszes csernozjom talajon. Növénytermelés. In press Kádár, I., Lásztity, B. & Szemes I., 1982. Az őszi rozs tápanyagfelvételének vizsgálata szabadföldi tartamkísérletben. II. Levélanalízis. Na, Fe, Mn, Zn, Cu felvétele. Agrokémia és Talajtan. 31. 17-28. Kádár, I., Szemes, I. & Lásztity, B., 1984. Relationship between "year effect" and state of nutrition in a long-term winter rye experiment. Növénytermelés. 33. 235-241. Kádár, I. & Szemes, I., 1994. A nyírlugosi tartamkísérlet 30 éve. MTA Talajtani és Agrokémiai Kutató Intézete. Budapest. Láng, I., 1973. Műtrágyázási tartamkísérletek homoktalajokon. MTA Doktori Értekezés. MTA TMB. Budapest. Láng, I., 2005. Éghajlat és időjárás: változás-hatás-válaszadás. „AGRO-21" Füzetek. 43. 3-10. Láng, I., Harnos, Zs. & Jolánkai, M., 2004. Alkalmazkodási stratégiák klímaváltozás esetére: nemzetközi tapasztalatok hazai lehetőségek. "AGRO-21" Füzetek. 35. 70-77. Márton, L., 2002. Climate fluctuations and the effects of N fertilizer on the yield of rye (Secale cereale L.). Plant Production. 51. 199-210. Márton, L., 2004. Rainfall and fertilization effects on crops yield in a global climate change. In: Proc. Role of Multipurpose Agriculture in Sustaining Global Environment-AGROENVIRON 2004 (Udine, 20-24. October 2004). Part 3. 451-456. DPVTA. Udine. Márton, L., 2005a. Disasters as drought-, and rainfall excess and artificial fertilization effects on crop yield. In: Proc. International Conference on Energy, Environment and Disasters-INCEED2005 (Charlotte, 24-30. July 2005). 49-50. ISEG. Charlotte. Márton L., 2005b. Artificial fertilizers and climate change impacts on crops yield. In: Proc