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Sample records for akari all-sky survey

  1. Ultraluminous infrared galaxies in the AKARI all-sky survey

    SciTech Connect

    Kilerci Eser, E.; Goto, T.; Doi, Y. E-mail: doi@ea.c.u-tokyo.ac.jp

    2014-12-10

    We present a new catalog of 118 ultraluminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs) and one hyperluminous infrared galaxy (HLIRG) by cross-matching the AKARI all-sky survey with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 10 (SDSS DR10) and the final data release of the Two-Degree Field Galaxy Redshift Survey. Forty of the ULIRGs and one HLIRG are new identifications. We find that ULIRGs are interacting pair galaxies or ongoing or postmergers. This is consistent with the widely accepted view: ULIRGs are major mergers of disk galaxies. We confirm the previously known positive trend between the active galactic nucleus fraction and infrared luminosity. We show that ULIRGs have a large offset from the main sequence up to z ∼ 1; their offset from the z ∼ 2 'main sequence' is relatively smaller. We find a result consistent with the previous studies showing that, compared to local star-forming SDSS galaxies of similar mass, local ULIRGs have lower oxygen abundances. We demonstrate for the first time that ULIRGs follow the fundamental metallicity relation (FMR). The scatter of ULIRGs around the FMR (0.09 dex-0.5 dex) is comparable to the scatter of z ∼ 2-3 galaxies. We provide the largest local (0.050

  2. AKARI All-Sky Far-Infrared Survey: Where to Look for AGB Stars?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rybka, P.; Pollo, A.; Takeuchi, T. T.

    2011-09-01

    We selected a sample of 5,176 far-infrared sources from the FIS AKARI All-Sky Survey. Searching public databases, we identified their counterparts observed at other wavelengths and derived a method to separate stars from galaxies. The sample of stars is dominated by AGB-related objects.

  3. Clustering of far-infrared galaxies in the AKARI All-Sky Survey North

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollo, A.; Takeuchi, T. T.; Solarz, A.; Rybka, P.; Suzuki, T. L.; Pȩpiak, A.; Oyabu, S.

    2013-10-01

    We present the measurements of the angular two-point correlation function for AKARI 90-μm point sources, detected outside the Milky Way plane and other regions characterized by high Galactic extinction in the northern Galactic hemisphere, and categorized as extragalactic sources according to our far-infrared-color based criterion. Together with our previous work (Pollo et al., 2013) this is the first measurement of the large-scale angular clustering of galaxies selected in the far-infrared after IRAS. We present the first attempt to estimate the spatial clustering properties of AKARI All-Sky galaxies and we conclude that they are mostly a very nearby ( z ≤ 0.1) population of moderately clustered galaxies. We measure their correlation length r 0 ~ 4.5 h -1 Mpc, which is consistent with the assumption that the FIS AKARI All-Sky surveys observes mostly a nearby star-forming population of galaxies.

  4. The AKARI/IRC mid-infrared all-sky survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishihara, D.; Onaka, T.; Kataza, H.; Salama, A.; Alfageme, C.; Cassatella, A.; Cox, N.; García-Lario, P.; Stephenson, C.; Cohen, M.; Fujishiro, N.; Fujiwara, H.; Hasegawa, S.; Ita, Y.; Kim, W.; Matsuhara, H.; Murakami, H.; Müller, T. G.; Nakagawa, T.; Ohyama, Y.; Oyabu, S.; Pyo, J.; Sakon, I.; Shibai, H.; Takita, S.; Tanabé, T.; Uemizu, K.; Ueno, M.; Usui, F.; Wada, T.; Watarai, H.; Yamamura, I.; Yamauchi, C.

    2010-05-01

    Context. AKARI is the first Japanese astronomical satellite dedicated to infrared astronomy. One of the main purposes of AKARI is the all-sky survey performed with six infrared bands between 9 μm and 200 μm during the period from 2006 May 6 to 2007 August 28. In this paper, we present the mid-infrared part (9 μm and 18 μm bands) of the survey carried out with one of the on-board instruments, the infrared camera (IRC). Aims: We present unprecedented observational results of the 9 μm and 18 μm AKARI all-sky survey and detail the operation and data processing leading to the point source detection and measurements. Methods: The raw data are processed to produce small images for every scan, and the point sources candidates are derived above the 5σ noise level per single scan. The celestial coordinates and fluxes of the events are determined statistically and the reliability of their detections is secured through multiple detections of the same source within milli-seconds, hours, and months from each other. Results: The sky coverage is more than 90% for both bands. A total of 877 091 sources (851 189 for 9 μm, 195 893 for 18 μm) are confirmed and included in the current release of the point source catalog. The detection limit for point sources is 50 mJy and 90 mJy for the 9 μm and 18 μm bands, respectively. The position accuracy is estimated to be better than 2''. Uncertainties in the in-flight absolute flux calibration are estimated to be 3% for the 9 μm band and 4% for the 18 μm band. The coordinates and fluxes of detected sources in this survey are also compared with those of the IRAS survey and are found to be statistically consistent. Catalog is only available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/cgi-bin/qcat?J/A+A/514/A1

  5. Point source calibration of the AKARI/FIS all-sky survey maps for stacking analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arimatsu, Ko; Doi, Yasuo; Wada, Takehiko; Takita, Satoshi; Kawada, Mitsunobu; Matsuura, Shuji; Ootsubo, Takafumi; Kataza, Hirokazu

    2014-04-01

    Investigations of the point spread functions (PSFs) and flux calibrations for stacking analysis have been performed with the far-infrared (wavelength range of 60 to 140 μm) all-sky maps taken by the Far-Infrared Surveyor (FIS) on board the AKARI satellite. The PSFs are investigated by stacking the maps at the positions of standard stars with their fluxes of 0.02-10 Jy. The derived full widths at the half maximum (FWHMs) of the PSFs are ˜ 60'' at 65 and 90 μm and ˜ 90'' at 140 μm, which are much smaller than those of the previous all-sky maps obtained with the Infrared Astronomical Satellite IRAS (˜ 6'). Any flux dependence in the PSFs is not seen on the investigated flux range. By performing the flux calibrations, we found that absolute photometry for faint sources can be carried out with constant calibration factors, which range from 0.6 to 0.8. After applying the calibration factors, the photometric accuracies for the stacked sources in the 65, 90, and 140 μm bands are 9%, 3%, and 21%, respectively, even below the detection limits of the survey. No systematic dependence between the observed flux and model flux is found. These results indicate that the FIS map is a useful dataset for the stacking analyses of faint sources at far-infrared wavelengths.

  6. Calibration of the AKARI far-infrared all-sky survey maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takita, Satoshi; Doi, Yasuo; Ootsubo, Takafumi; Arimatsu, Ko; Ikeda, Norio; Kawada, Mitsunobu; Kitamura, Yoshimi; Matsuura, Shuji; Nakagawa, Takao; Hattori, Makoto; Morishima, Takahiro; Tanaka, Masahiro; Komugi, Shinya

    2015-06-01

    We present an initial analysis of the properties of an all-sky image obtained by the Far-Infrared Surveyor (FIS) onboard the AKARI satellite, at 65 μm (N60), 90 μm (WIDE-S), 140 μm (WIDE-L), and 160 μm (N160). An absolute flux calibration was determined by comparing the data with COBE/DIRBE data sets; the intensity range was as wide as from a few MJy sr-1 to > 1 GJy sr-1. The uncertainties are considered to be the standard deviations with respect to the DIRBE data, and are less than 10% for intensities above 10, 3, 25, and 26 MJy sr-1 at the N60, WIDE-S, WIDE-L, and N160 bands, respectively. The characteristics of point sources in the image were also determined by stacking maps centred on photometric standard stars. The full width at half maxima of the point spread functions (PSFs) were 63″, 78″, and 88″ at the N60, WIDE-S, and WIDE-L bands, respectively. The PSF at the N160 band was not obtained due to the sensitivity, but it is thought to be the same as that of the WIDE-L one.

  7. AKARI All-Sky Survey: Contribution from AGB Stars to the Far Infrared Flux of the Milky Way

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollo, A.; Rybka, P.; Takeuchi, T. T.

    2011-09-01

    Using the data from the AKARI FIS All-Sky Survey, we estimate the contribution from AGB stars to the far-infrared (FIR) flux from the Milky Way. We check the positions of different types of AGB stars in FIR color-color diagrams. Our conclusion is a large contribution from AGB stars, and particularly post-AGB stars, to the FIR flux in the outer regions of the Milky Way, and possibly other similar galaxies. FIR colors of different types of AGB stars are similar, with a large scatter, but post-AGB stars seem to be significantly redder and, as a result, contribute more to the total Galaxy flux at longer FIR wavelengths.

  8. Mid- and Far-Infrared Photometry of Galactic Planetary Nebulae with the AKARI All-Sky Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, J. P.; Márquez-Lugo, R. A.

    2011-04-01

    We provide mid- and far-infrared photometry of 857 Galactic planetary nebulae (PNe) using data derived from the AKARI All-Sky Survey. These include fluxes at 9 and 18 μm obtained with the Infrared Camera (IRC), and at 65, 90, 140 and 160 μm using the far-Infrared Surveyor (FIS). It is noted that the IR luminosities of the youngest PNe are comparable to the total luminosities of the central stars, and subsequently decline to 5×102 L⊙ where D > 0.08 pc. This is consistent with an evolution of PNe dust opacities, and appreciable absorption in young and proto-PNe. We also note that there is little evidence for the evolution in IR/radio flux ratios suggested by previous authors. The fall-off of dust temperatures with increasing nebular diameter is similar to that determined in previous studies, whilst levels of Lyα heating are <0.5 of the total energy budget of the grains. There appears to be an evolution in the infrared excess (IRE) as nebulae expand, with the largest values occurring in the most compact PNe.

  9. ALBEDO PROPERTIES OF MAIN BELT ASTEROIDS BASED ON THE ALL-SKY SURVEY OF THE INFRARED ASTRONOMICAL SATELLITE AKARI

    SciTech Connect

    Usui, Fumihiko; Hasegawa, Sunao; Matsuhara, Hideo; Kasuga, Toshihiro; Ishiguro, Masateru; Kuroda, Daisuke; Mueller, Thomas G.; Ootsubo, Takafumi

    2013-01-01

    We present an analysis of the albedo properties of main belt asteroids (MBAs) detected by the All-Sky Survey of the infrared astronomical satellite AKARI. The characteristics of 5120 asteroids detected by the survey, including their sizes and albedos, were cataloged in the Asteroid Catalog Using AKARI (AcuA). Size and albedo measurements were based on the standard thermal model, using inputs of infrared fluxes and absolute magnitudes measured at optical wavelengths. MBAs, which account for 4722 of the 5120 AcuA asteroids, have semimajor axes of 2.06-3.27 AU, except for the near-Earth asteroids. AcuA provides a complete data set of all MBAs brighter than the absolute magnitude of H < 10.3, which corresponds to the diameter of d > 20 km. We confirmed that the albedo distribution of the MBAs is strongly bimodal as was already known from the past observations, and that the bimodal distribution occurs not only in the total population, but also within inner, middle, and outer regions of the main belt. The bimodal distribution in each group consists of low-albedo components in C-type asteroids and high-albedo components in S-type asteroids. We found that the small asteroids have much more variety in albedo than the large asteroids. In spite of the albedo transition process like space weathering, the heliocentric distribution of the mean albedo of asteroids in each taxonomic type is nearly flat. The mean albedo of the total, on the other hand, gradually decreases with an increase in semimajor axis. This can be explained by the compositional ratio of taxonomic types; that is, the proportion of dark asteroids such as C- and D-types increases, while that of bright asteroids such as S-type decreases, with increasing heliocentric distance. The heliocentric distributions of X-subclasses: E-, M-, and P-types, which can be divided based on albedo values, are also examined. P-types, which are the major component in X-types, are distributed throughout the main belt regions, and the

  10. Infrared and hard X-ray diagnostics of AGN identifications from the Swift/BAT and AKARI all sky surveys.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuta, Keiko

    2011-11-01

    It is known that there is a good correlation between the mid-infrared and the intrinsic soft X-ray luminosities (<10 keV) of local active galactic nuclei (AGN). We now combine two complete all sky surveys in order to study the connection between the infrared and very hard X-ray (>10 keV) luminosities in AGN. We selected sources from the 22-month Swift/BAT hard X-ray survey catalogue which were also detected by Infrared Camera (IRC, 9 and 18 micron) and Far-Infrared Surveyor (FIS, 90 micron) on AKARI. The large sample allows us to include not only Seyfert 1 and 2 galaxies but also quasars, low luminosity AGN and radio-loud objects. We found a strong linear correlation for most of the AGN between the logarithms of the observed infrared and hard X-ray powers over four decades in luminosity, L(IR) vs. L(HX). Many Compton-thick sources show a large deviation from the correlation, probably because of the relatively low observed L(HX) due to the high column density. The observed luminosity correlation indicates that the various types of AGN may be occupying distinct regions of parameter space in the diagram. Color-color plots such as "L(90um)/L(9um) vs. L(HX)/L(9um)" are found to be useful redshift independent indicators for isolating Compton-thick AGN. Interestingly, starburst galaxies are also separated in this plane. This correlation can be a new and important tool for AGN classification, which may be useful for large upcoming surveys.

  11. Mid- and far-infrared properties of Spitzer Galactic bubbles revealed by the AKARI all-sky surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hattori, Yasuki; Kaneda, Hidehiro; Ishihara, Daisuke; Fukui, Yasuo; Torii, Kazufumi; Hanaoka, Misaki; Kokusho, Takuma; Kondo, Akino; Shichi, Kazuyuki; Ukai, Sota; Yamagishi, Mitsuyoshi; Yamaguchi, Yuta

    2016-04-01

    We have carried out a statistical study on the mid- and far-infrared (IR) properties of Galactic IR bubbles observed by Spitzer. Using the Spitzer 8 μm images, we estimated the radii and covering fractions of their shells, and categorized them into closed, broken, and unclassified bubbles with our data analysis method. Then, using the AKARI all-sky images at wavelengths of 9, 18, 65, 90, 140, and 160 μm, we obtained the spatial distributions and the luminosities of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH), warm, and cold dust components by decomposing six-band spectral energy distributions with model fitting. As a result, 180 sample bubbles show a wide range of total IR luminosities corresponding to the bolometric luminosities of a single B-type star to many O-type stars. For all the bubbles, we investigated relationships between the radius, luminosities, and luminosity ratios, and found that there are overall similarities in the IR properties among the bubbles regardless of their morphological types. In particular, they follow a power-law relation with an index of ˜3 between the total IR luminosity and radius, as expected from the conventional picture of the Strömgren sphere. The exceptions are large broken bubbles; they indicate higher total IR luminosities, lower fractional luminosities of the PAH emission, and dust heating sources located nearer to the shells. We discuss the implications of those differences for a massive star-formation scenario.

  12. Mid- and far-infrared properties of Spitzer Galactic bubbles revealed by the AKARI all-sky surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hattori, Yasuki; Kaneda, Hidehiro; Ishihara, Daisuke; Fukui, Yasuo; Torii, Kazufumi; Hanaoka, Misaki; Kokusho, Takuma; Kondo, Akino; Shichi, Kazuyuki; Ukai, Sota; Yamagishi, Mitsuyoshi; Yamaguchi, Yuta

    2016-06-01

    We have carried out a statistical study on the mid- and far-infrared (IR) properties of Galactic IR bubbles observed by Spitzer. Using the Spitzer 8 μm images, we estimated the radii and covering fractions of their shells, and categorized them into closed, broken, and unclassified bubbles with our data analysis method. Then, using the AKARI all-sky images at wavelengths of 9, 18, 65, 90, 140, and 160 μm, we obtained the spatial distributions and the luminosities of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH), warm, and cold dust components by decomposing six-band spectral energy distributions with model fitting. As a result, 180 sample bubbles show a wide range of total IR luminosities corresponding to the bolometric luminosities of a single B-type star to many O-type stars. For all the bubbles, we investigated relationships between the radius, luminosities, and luminosity ratios, and found that there are overall similarities in the IR properties among the bubbles regardless of their morphological types. In particular, they follow a power-law relation with an index of ˜3 between the total IR luminosity and radius, as expected from the conventional picture of the Strömgren sphere. The exceptions are large broken bubbles; they indicate higher total IR luminosities, lower fractional luminosities of the PAH emission, and dust heating sources located nearer to the shells. We discuss the implications of those differences for a massive star-formation scenario.

  13. INFRARED AND HARD X-RAY DIAGNOSTICS OF ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS IDENTIFICATION FROM THE SWIFT/BAT AND AKARI ALL-SKY SURVEYS

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuta, K.; Dotani, T.; Yamamura, I.; Gandhi, P.; Nakagawa, T.; Isobe, N.; Stawarz, L.; Ueda, Y.; Ichikawa, K.; Terashima, Y.; Oyabu, S.

    2012-07-10

    We combine data from two all-sky surveys in order to study the connection between the infrared and hard X-ray (>10 keV) properties for local active galactic nuclei (AGNs). The Swift Burst Alert Telescope all-sky survey provides an unbiased, flux-limited selection of hard X-ray-detected AGNs. Cross-correlating the 22 month hard X-ray survey with the AKARI all-sky survey, we studied 158 AGNs detected by the AKARI instruments. We find a strong correlation for most AGNs between the infrared (9, 18, and 90 {mu}m) and hard X-ray (14-195 keV) luminosities, and quantify the correlation for various subsamples of AGNs. Partial correlation analysis confirms the intrinsic correlation after removing the redshift contribution. The correlation for radio galaxies has a slope and normalization identical to that for Seyfert 1 galaxies, implying similar hard X-ray/infrared emission processes in both. In contrast, Compton-thick (CT) sources show a large deficit in the hard X-ray band, because high gas column densities diminish even their hard X-ray luminosities. We propose two photometric diagnostics for source classification: one is an X-ray luminosity versus infrared color diagram, in which type 1 radio-loud AGNs are well isolated from the others in the sample. The other uses the X-ray versus infrared color as a useful redshift-independent indicator for identifying CT AGNs. Importantly, CT AGNs and starburst galaxies in composite systems can also be differentiated in this plane based upon their hard X-ray fluxes and dust temperatures. This diagram may be useful as a new indicator to classify objects in new and upcoming surveys such as WISE and NuSTAR.

  14. The AKARI Far-Infrared Surveyor (FIS): all-sky Diffuse Map

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komugi, Shinya; Doi, Yasuo; Hattori, Makoto; Kitamura, Yoshimi; Otsubo, Takafumi; Tanaka, Masahiro; Ikeda, Norio; Kato, Daisuke; Nakagawa, Takao

    2011-12-01

    The infrared astronomical satellite AKARI performed an all sky survey at six infrared bands. We report here on the calibration of the all-sky image data, observed in the four long wavelength bands with the FIS instrument (AKARI Far-infrared All Sky Survey : AFASS). The preliminary image attains a calibration uncertainty and sensitivity of better than ~ 30% and ~ 10 MJy str-1, respectively, for all four bands. The point spread function (PSF) is obtained via a stacking technique. The data are shown to be useful for exploring the internal structure and dust spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of nearby galaxies.

  15. AKARI All Sky Survey: contribution from AGB stars to the far infrared flux from the Milky Way related to point sources outside the Galactic plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollo, A.; Takeuchi, T. T.; Rybka, P.

    2011-10-01

    Using data from the FIS AKARI All-Sky Survey, we make a first step towards the estimation of the contribution from Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB) stars to the far-infrared (FIR) flux from the Milky Way. We estimate the contribution from the AGB, and post-AGB, stars to the total flux generated by point sources outside the Galactic plane. Additionally, we present the positions of different types of AGB, and post-AGB, stars in the FIR color-color diagrams. Our main conclusion is that there is a high contribution from AGB stars, and particularly post-AGB stars, to the FIR flux coming from point sources in the outer parts of the Milky Way and possibly other Milky Way-type galaxies. FIR colors of different types of AGB stars remain similar but post-AGB stars are redder in the FIR and, as a result, contribute more to the total Galaxy flux density at longer FIR wavelengths.

  16. AKARI-CAS—Online Service for AKARI All-Sky Catalogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamauchi, C.; Fujishima, S.; Ikeda, N.; Inada, K.; Katano, M.; Kataza, H.; Makiuti, S.; Matsuzaki, K.; Takita, S.; Yamamoto, Y.; Yamamura, I.; Ishihara, D.; Oyabu, S.

    2011-07-01

    The AKARI All-Sky Catalogues are an important infrared astronomical database for next-generation astronomy that take over the IRAS catalog. We have developed an online service, AKARI Catalogue Archive Server (AKARI-CAS), for astronomers. The service includes useful and attractive search tools and visual tools. One of the new features of AKARI-CAS is cached SIMBAD/NED entries, which can match AKARI catalogs with other catalogs stored in SIMBAD or NED. To allow advanced queries to the databases, direct input of SQL is also supported. In those queries, fast dynamic cross-identification between registered catalogs is a remarkable feature. In addition, multiwavelength quick-look images are displayed in the visualization tools, which will increase the value of the service. In the construction of our service, we considered a wide variety of astronomers' requirements. As a result of our discussion, we concluded that supporting users' SQL submissions is the best solution for the requirements. Therefore, we implemented an RDBMS layer so that it covered important facilities, including the whole processing of tables. We found that PostgreSQL is the best open-source RDBMS products for such purpose, and we wrote codes for both simple and advanced searches into the SQL stored functions. To implement such stored functions for fast radial search and cross-identification with minimum cost, we applied a simple technique that is not based on HTM or HEALPix. In contrast, the online application layer became compact and was written in simple procedural PHP codes. In total, our system realizes cost-effective maintenance and enhancements.

  17. The all sky automated survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pojmański, G.

    2014-03-01

    The All Sky Automated Survey (ASAS) is a realization of a Bohdan Paczynski idea of using small and inexpensive telescopes to survey and monitor bright objects in the sky. ASAS uses off-the-shelf telephoto lenses and CCD cameras attached to the custom made parallactic mounts to investigate as many objects in the sky as feasible with current technology and the available funds. We have demonstrated that among stars brighter than 13 magnitude 80% of variable stars remained unknown. Most of these stars are too bright for a 1-meter class telescopes, so 7-15 cm diameter lenses are ideal tools for detecting and monitoring them. During over ten years of observations a huge number of photometric measurements of almost 40,000,000 stars has been collected. Only part of this dataset has been analyzed so far - we have released catalogs of 50,000 variable stars south of declination +28. Recently, we have expanded ASAS towards fainter objects - the ASAS-SN project aims for detecting in real time supernovae in nearby galaxies as well as many transient events in the Milky Way.

  18. The ADS All Sky Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodman, Alyssa

    We will create the first interactive sky map of astronomers' understanding of the Universe over time. We will accomplish this goal by turning the NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS), widely known for its unrivaled value as a literature resource, into a data resource. GIS and GPS systems have made it commonplace to see and explore information about goings-on on Earth in the context of maps and timelines. Our proposal shows an example of a program that lets a user explore which countries have been mentioned in the New York Times, on what dates, and in what kinds of articles. By analogy, the goal of our project is to enable this kind of exploration-on the sky-for the full corpus of astrophysical literature available through ADS. Our group's expertise and collaborations uniquely position us to create this interactive sky map of the literature, which we call the "ADS All-Sky Survey." To create this survey, here are the principal steps we need to follow. First, by analogy to "geotagging," we will "astrotag," the ADS literature. Many "astrotags" effectively already exist, thanks to curation efforts at both CDS and NED. These efforts have created links to "source" positions on the sky associated with each of the millions of articles in the ADS. Our collaboration with ADS and CDS will let us automatically extract astrotags for all existing and future ADS holdings. The new ADS Labs, which our group helps to develop, includes the ability for researchers to filter article search results using a variety of "facets" (e.g. sources, keywords, authors, observatories, etc.). Using only extracted astrotags and facets, we can create functionality like what is described in the Times example above: we can offer a map of the density of positions' "mentions" on the sky, filterable by the properties of those mentions. Using this map, researchers will be able to interactively, visually, discover what regions have been studied for what reasons, at what times, and by whom. Second, where

  19. Far infrared all-sky survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richards, Paul L.

    1991-01-01

    An all-sky survey at submillimeter waves is examined. Far-infrared all-sky surveys were performed using high-thoroughput bolometric detectors from a one-meter balloon telescope. Based on the large-bodied experience obtained with the original all-sky survey telescope, a number of radically different approaches were implemented. Continued balloon measurements of the spectrum of the cosmic microwave background were performed.

  20. Planetary Nebulae from the AKARI Far-IR All-Sky Maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueta, T.; Fullard, A.; Tomasino, R. L.

    2015-12-01

    The far-IR all-sky mapping data obtained by the AKARI Astronomical Satellite were released to the public in January 2015. These maps are expected to provide us with further insights into our understanding of the far-IR universe for the first time since IRAS, especially for extended objects. While the AKARI far-IR all-sky maps are calibrated against the diffuse background emission and a flux correction scheme for point sources is provided, it is not necessarily obvious how one flux-corrects extended sources. Here, we briefly summarize a new flux-correction method for extended objects detected in the AKARI far-IR all-sky maps and its application to planetary nebulae.

  1. Star formation and dust extinction properties of local galaxies from the AKARI-GALEX all-sky surveys . First results from the most secure multiband sample from the far-ultraviolet to the far-infrared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeuchi, T. T.; Buat, V.; Heinis, S.; Giovannoli, E.; Yuan, F.-T.; Iglesias-Páramo, J.; Murata, K. L.; Burgarella, D.

    2010-05-01

    Aims: We explore spectral energy distributions (SEDs), star formation (SF), and dust extinction properties of galaxies in the Local Universe. Methods: The AKARI all-sky survey provided the first bright point source catalog detected at 90 μm. Beginning with this catalog, we selected galaxies by matching the AKARI sources with those in the IRAS point source catalog redshift survey. We measured the total GALEX FUV and NUV flux densities with a photometry software we specifically developed for this purpose. In a further step we matched this sample with the Sloan digital sky survey (SDSS) and 2 micron all sky survey (2MASS) galaxies. With this procedure we obtained a basic sample which consists of 776 galaxies. After removing objects whose photometry was contaminated by foreground sources (mainly in the SDSS), we defined the “secure sample” which contains 607 galaxies. Results: The sample galaxies have redshifts of ⪉0.15, and their 90-μm luminosities range from 106 to 1012 L_⊙, with a peak at 1010 L_⊙. The SEDs display a large variety, especially more than four orders of magnitude at the mid-far-infrared (M-FIR), but if we sort the sample with respect to 90 μm, the average SED shows a coherent trend: the more luminous an SED at 90 μm, the redder the global SED becomes. The Mr - NUV - r color-magnitude relation of our sample does not show bimodality, and the distribution is centered on the green valley. We established formulae to convert the FIR luminosity from the AKARI bands to the total IR (TIR) luminosity LTIR. The luminosity related to the SF activity (LSF) is dominated by LTIR even if we take into account the FIR emission from dust heated by old stars. At a high SF rate (SFR) (>20 M_⊙ yr-1), the fraction of the directly visible SFR, SFRFUV, decreases. We also estimated the FUV attenuation AFUV from the FUV-to-TIR luminosity ratio. We examined the LTIR/LFUV-UV slope (FUV - NUV) relation. The majority of the sample has LTIR/LFUV ratios five to ten

  2. SPHEREx: An All-Sky Spectral Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bock, James; SPHEREx Science Team

    2016-01-01

    SPHEREx, a mission in NASA's Small Explorer (SMEX) program that was selected for Phase A in July 2015, is an all-sky survey satellite designed to address all three science goals in NASA's astrophysics division, in a single survey, with a single instrument. We will probe the physics of inflation by measuring non-Gaussianity by studying large-scale structure, surveying a large cosmological volume at low redshifts, complementing high-z surveys optimized to constrain dark energy. The origin of water and biogenic molecules will be investigated in all phases of planetary system formation - from molecular clouds to young stellar systems with protoplanetary disks - by measuring ice absorption spectra. We will chart the origin and history of galaxy formation through a deep survey mapping large-scale spatial power. Finally, SPHEREx will be the first all-sky near-infrared spectral survey, creating a legacy archive of spectra (0.75 - 4.8 um at R = 41.5 and 150) with high sensitivity using a cooled telescope with large mapping speed.SPHEREx will observe from a sun-synchronous low-earth orbit, covering the entire sky in a manner similar to IRAS, COBE and WISE. During its two-year mission, SPHEREx will produce four complete all-sky maps for constraining the physics of inflation. These same maps contain numerous high signal-to-noise absorption spectra to study water and biogenic ices. The orbit naturally covers two deep regions at the celestial poles, which we use for studying galaxy evolution. All aspects of the SPHEREx instrument and spacecraft have high heritage. SPHEREx requires no new technologies and carries large technical and resource margins on every aspect of the design. The projected instrument sensitivity, based on conservative performance estimates, meets the driving point source sensitivity requirement with 300 % margin.SPHEREx is a partnership between Caltech and JPL, following the successful management structure of the NuSTAR and GALEX SMEX missions. The spacecraft

  3. The ATLAS All-Sky Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denneau, L.

    The Asteroid Terrestrial-impact Last Alert System (ATLAS) is a small project with an ambitious goal: early warning of asteroid impacts on Earth. We aim to provide one day warning for the smallest "town-killer" 30-kiloton asteroids up to three weeks for a 100-megaton impactor. ATLAS will execute a wide-field all-sky survey with four visits per footprint per night down to a sensitivity limit of V=20, suitable for detection dangerous asteroids and enabling other exciting time-domain astronomy. ATLAS is currently under construction and expects to be fully operational in late 2015. We provide an overview of the ATLAS system and discuss how ATLAS can participate in the emerging community of time-domain astronomy.

  4. The Two Micron All Sky Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleinmann, S. G.; Lysaght, M. G.; Pughe, W. L.; Schneider, S. E.; Skrutskie, M. F.; Weinberg, M. D.; Price, S. D.; Matthews, K.; Soifer, B. T.; Huchra, J. P.

    1994-07-01

    The Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS) will provide a uniform survey of the entire sky at three near-infrared wavebands: J(lambdaeff = 1.25 micrometers), H(lambdaeff = 1.65 micrometers), and Ks(lambdaeff = 2.16 micrometers). A major goal of the survey is to probe large scale structures in the Milky Way and in the Local Universe, exploiting the relatively high transparency of the interstellar medium in the near-infrared, and the high near-infrared luminosities of evolved low- and intermediate-mass stars. A sensitive overview of the near-infrared sky is also an essential next step to maximize the gains achievable with infrared array technology. Our assessment of the astrophysical questions that might be addressed with these new arrays is currently limited by the very bright flux limit of the only preceding large scale near-infrared sky survey, the Two Micron Sky Survey carried out at Caltech in the late 1960's. Near-infrared instruments based on the new array technology have already obtained spectra of objects 1 million times fainter than the limit of the TMSS] This paper summarizes the essential parameters of the 2MASS project and the rationale behind those choices, and gives an overview of results obtained with a prototype camera that has been in operation since May 1992. We conclude with a list of expected data products and a statement of the data release policy.

  5. The SPHEREx All-Sky Spectroscopic Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unwin, Stephen C.; SPHEREx Science Team, SPHEREx Project Team

    2016-06-01

    SPHEREx is a mission to conduct an optical-near-IR survey of the entire sky with a spectrum at every pixel location. It was selected by NASA for a Phase A study in its Small Explorer Program; if selected, development would begin in 2016, and the observatory would start a 2-year prime mission in 2020. An all-sky spectroscopic survey can be used to tackle a wide range of science questions. The SPHEREx science team is focusing on three: (1) Probing the physics of inflation through measuring non-Gaussianity from the study of large-scale structure; (2) Studying the origin of water and biogenic molecules in a wide range of physical and chemical environments via ice absorption spectra; (3) Charting the history of star formation in the universe through intensity mapping of the large-scale spatial power. The instrument is a small wide-field telescope operating in the range of 0.75 - 4.8 µm at a spectral resolution of 41.5 in the optical and 150 at the long-wavelength end. It observes in a sun-sync low-earth orbit, covering the sky like WISE and COBE. SPHEREx is a simple instrument that requires no new technology. The Phase A design has substantial technical and resource margins and can be built with low risk. It is a partnership between Caltech and JPL, with Ball Aerospace and the Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute as major partners. This research was carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under a contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. © 2016 California Institute of Technology. Government sponsorship acknowledged.

  6. Modeling of the Zodiacal Emission for the AKARI/IRC Mid-infrared All-sky Diffuse Maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondo, Toru; Ishihara, Daisuke; Kaneda, Hidehiro; Nakamichi, Keichiro; Takaba, Sachi; Kobayashi, Hiroshi; Ootsubo, Takafumi; Pyo, Jeonghyun; Onaka, Takashi

    2016-03-01

    The zodiacal emission, which is the thermal infrared (IR) emission from the interplanetary dust (IPD) in our solar system, has been studied for a long time. Nevertheless, accurate modeling of the zodiacal emission has not been successful to reproduce the all-sky spatial distribution of the zodiacal emission, especially in the mid-IR where the zodiacal emission peaks. Therefore, we aim to improve the IPD cloud model based on Kelsall et al., using the AKARI 9 and 18 μm all-sky diffuse maps. By adopting a new fitting method based on the total brightness, we have succeeded in reducing the residual levels after subtraction of the zodiacal emission from the AKARI data and thus in improving the modeling of the zodiacal emission. Comparing the AKARI and the COBE data, we confirm that the changes from the previous model to our new model are mostly due to model improvements, but not temporal variations between the AKARI and the COBE epoch, except for the position of the Earth-trailing blob. Our results suggest that the size of the smooth cloud, a dominant component in the model, is about 10% more compact than previously thought, and that the dust sizes are not large enough to emit blackbody radiation in the mid-IR. Furthermore, we detect a significant isotropically distributed IPD component, owing to an accurate baseline measurement with AKARI.

  7. The Einstein All-Sky Slew Survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elvis, Martin S.

    1992-01-01

    The First Einstein IPC Slew Survey produced a list of 819 x-ray sources, with f(sub x) approximately 10(exp -12) - 10(exp -10) erg/sq cm s and positional accuracy of approximately 1.2 feet (90 percent radius). The aim of this program was to identify these x-ray sources.

  8. All-sky survey mission observing scenario strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spangelo, Sara C.; Katti, Raj M.; Unwin, Stephen C.; Bock, Jamie J.

    2015-06-01

    This paper develops an observing strategy for space missions performing all-sky surveys, where a single spacecraft maps the celestial sphere subject to realistic constraints. The strategy is flexible, accommodates targeted observations of specific areas of the sky, and achieves the desired trade-off between survey goals. This paper focuses on missions operating in low Earth orbit with interactive and dynamic thermal and stray-light constraints due to the Sun, Earth, and Moon. The approach is applicable to broader mission classes, such as those that operate in different orbits or that survey the Earth. First, the instrument and spacecraft configuration is optimized to enable visibility of the targeted observations throughout the year. Second, a constraint-based strategy is presented for scheduling the observations throughout the year subject to a simplified subset of the constraints. Third, a heuristic-based scheduling algorithm is developed to assign the all-sky observations over short planning horizons. The constraint-based approach guarantees solution feasibility. The approach is applied to the proposed SPHEREx mission, which includes coverage of the north and south celestial poles, galactic plane, and a uniform coverage all-sky survey that maps the entire celestial sphere twice per year. Visualizations demonstrate how the all-sky survey achieves its redundancy requirements over time.

  9. Post-AGB Stars in the AKARI Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siódmiak, N.; Cox, N.; Szczerba, R.; García-Lario, P.

    2009-12-01

    Obscured by their circumstellar dusty envelopes post-AGB stars emit a large fraction of their energy in the infrared and thus, infrared sky surveys like IRAS were essential for discoveries of post-AGBs in the past. Now, with the AKARI infrared sky survey we can extend our knowledge about the late stages of stellar evolution. The long-term goal of our work is to define new photometric criteria to distinguish new post-AGB candidates from the AKARI data. We have cross-correlated the Toruń catalogue of Galactic post-AGB and related objects with the AKARI/FIS All-Sky Survey Bright Source Catalogue (for simplicity, hereafter AKARI). The scientific and technical aspects of our work are presented here as well as our plans for the future. In particular, we found that only 9 post-AGB sources were detected in all four AKARI bands. The most famous objects like: Red Rectangle, Egg Nebula, Minkowski’s Footprint belong to this group. From the technical point of view we discuss positional accuracy by comparing (mostly) 2MASS coordinates of post-AGB objects with those given by AKARI; flux reliability by comparing IRAS 60 and 100 μm fluxes with those from AKARI -N65 and AKARI -90 bands, respectively; as well as completeness of the sample as a function of the IRAS fluxes.

  10. A signal detection strategy for the SETI All Sky Survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawton, W.; Olsen, E. T.; Solomon, J.; Quirk, M. P.

    1985-01-01

    A source detection strategy for the SETI All Sky Survey is described. The method is designed to detect continuous wave (or very narrowband) sources transitting an antenna beam. The short-time spectra of the received signal are accumulated, and candidate extraterrestrial sources are recognized by the recognized by the presence of narrowband power exceeding a threshold function. The threshold function is derived using a Neyman-pearson hypothesis test.

  11. The Einstein All-Sky IPC slew survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elvis, Martin; Plummer, David; Fabbiano, G.

    1989-01-01

    The construction of the Einstein All-Sky Imaging Proportional Counter (IPC) slew survey is considered. It contains approximately 1000 sources between 10(exp -12) and 10(exp -10) erg/sq cm/s with a concentration toward the ecliptic poles and away from the galactic plane. Several sizable samples of bright soft X-ray selected objects for follow-up ROSAT and ASTRO-D observations and statistical study are presented. The survey source list is expected to be available by late 1989. Both paper and remote access online data base versions are to be available. An identification program is considered.

  12. Results from BASS, the BANYAN All-Sky Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gagne, Jonathan; Lafreniere, David; Doyon, Rene; Faherty, Jacqueline K.; Malo, Lison; Artigau, Etienne

    2015-01-01

    We present results from the BANYAN All-Sky Survey (BASS), a systematic all-sky survey for brown dwarf candidates in young moving groups. We describe a cross-match of the 2MASS and ALLWISE catalogs that provides a list of 98 970 potential nearby dwarfs with spectral types later than M5 with measurements of proper motion at precisions typically better than 15 masyr, as well as the Bayesian Analysis for Nearby Young AssociatioNs II tool (BANYAN II) which we use to build the BASS catalog from this 2MASS-ALLWISE cross-match, consisting of more than 300 candidate members of young moving groups. We present the first results of a spectroscopic follow-up of those candidates, which allowed us to identify several new low-mass stars and brown dwarfs displaying signs of low gravity. We use the BASS catalog to show tentative evidence for mass segregation in AB Doradus and Argus, and reveal a new ˜ 13 Mjup\\ co-moving companion to a young low-mass star in BASS. We obtain a moderate-resolution near-infrared spectrum for the companion, which reveals typical signs of youth and a spectral type L4γ.

  13. The All-Sky Swift - INTEGRAL X-Ray Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michelson, Peter

    All-sky surveys at hard X-ray energies (above 15 keV) have proven to be a powerful technique in detecting Galactic and extragalactic source populations. Most of the radiation at hard X-ray energies originates in non-thermal processes. These processes take place in extreme conditions of gravitational fields, of electromagnetic field, and also in explosive events. Such extreme conditions can be found in the Milk Way in the vicinity of neutron stars, black holes, and supernovae. Also extragalactic sources are known to be hard X-ray emitters like Active Galactic Nuclei (AGNs), blazars, and Clusters of Galaxies. Currently the most sensitive flying hard X-ray detectors are the Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) on board the NASA mission Swift and the INTEGRAL Soft-Gamma Ray Imager (IBIS/ISGRI) on board the ESA mission INTEGRAL. BAT and IBIS/ISGRI are coded- mask telescopes that shed continuously light on the Galactic and the extragalactic source populations. However, coded-mask telescopes suffer from heavy systematic effects (errors) preventing them from reaching their theoretical limiting sensitivity. Furthermore, by design, they block ~50% of the incident photons causing and increase of statistical noise. As a consequence BAT and IBIS/ISGRI are not sensitive enough to detect faint objects. In addition it has been proven that the Galactic survey of these instruments is limited by systematic uncertainties. Therefore, further observations on the Galactic plane will not improve the sensitivity of the survey of BAT and IBIS/ISGRI. In this project we show that it is possible to overcome the limits of BAT and of IBIS/ISGRI by combining their observations in the 18 55 keV energy range. We call it the SIX survey that stands for Swift - INTEGRAL X-ray survey. Two major advantages are obtained by merging the observations of BAT and IBIS/ISGRI: 1) the exposure is greatly enhanced (sum of BAT and IBIS/ISGRI) and therefore the sensitivity is improved; 2) the systematic errors of both

  14. Second ROSAT all-sky survey (2RXS) source catalogue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boller, Th.; Freyberg, M. J.; Trümper, J.; Haberl, F.; Voges, W.; Nandra, K.

    2016-04-01

    Aims: We present the second ROSAT all-sky survey source catalogue, hereafter referred to as the 2RXS catalogue. This is the second publicly released ROSAT catalogue of point-like sources obtained from the ROSAT all-sky survey (RASS) observations performed with the position-sensitive proportional counter (PSPC) between June 1990 and August 1991, and is an extended and revised version of the bright and faint source catalogues. Methods: We used the latest version of the RASS processing to produce overlapping X-ray images of 6.4° × 6.4° sky regions. To create a source catalogue, a likelihood-based detection algorithm was applied to these, which accounts for the variable point-spread function (PSF) across the PSPC field of view. Improvements in the background determination compared to 1RXS were also implemented. X-ray control images showing the source and background extraction regions were generated, which were visually inspected. Simulations were performed to assess the spurious source content of the 2RXS catalogue. X-ray spectra and light curves were extracted for the 2RXS sources, with spectral and variability parameters derived from these products. Results: We obtained about 135 000 X-ray detections in the 0.1-2.4 keV energy band down to a likelihood threshold of 6.5, as adopted in the 1RXS faint source catalogue. Our simulations show that the expected spurious content of the catalogue is a strong function of detection likelihood, and the full catalogue is expected to contain about 30% spurious detections. A more conservative likelihood threshold of 9, on the other hand, yields about 71 000 detections with a 5% spurious fraction. We recommend thresholds appropriate to the scientific application. X-ray images and overlaid X-ray contour lines provide an additional user product to evaluate the detections visually, and we performed our own visual inspections to flag uncertain detections. Intra-day variability in the X-ray light curves was quantified based on the

  15. Dusty WDs in the WISE all sky survey ∩ SDSS

    SciTech Connect

    Barber, Sara D.; Kilic, Mukremin; Gianninas, A.; Brown, Warren R.

    2014-05-10

    A recent cross-correlation between the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 7 White Dwarf Catalog with the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) all-sky photometry at 3.4, 4.6, 12, and 22 μm performed by Debes et al. resulted in the discovery of 52 candidate dusty white dwarfs (WDs). However, the 6'' WISE beam allows for the possibility that many of the excesses exhibited by these WDs may be due to contamination from a nearby source. We present MMT+SAO Wide-Field InfraRed Camera J- and H-band imaging observations (0.''5-1.''5 point spread function) of 16 of these candidate dusty WDs and confirm that four have spectral energy distributions (SEDs) consistent with a dusty disk and are not accompanied by a nearby source contaminant. The remaining 12 WDs have contaminated WISE photometry and SEDs inconsistent with a dusty disk when the contaminating sources are not included in the photometry measurements. We find the frequency of disks around single WDs in the WISE ∩ SDSS sample to be 2.6%-4.1%. One of the four new dusty WDs has a mass of 1.04 M {sub ☉} (progenitor mass 5.4 M {sub ☉}) and its discovery offers the first confirmation that massive WDs (and their massive progenitor stars) host planetary systems.

  16. ROSAT all-sky survey on the Einstein EMSS sample

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maccacaro, Tomasso

    1992-01-01

    The cosmological evolution and the luminosity function (XLF) of X ray selected Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN's) are discussed. The sample used is extracted from the Einstein Observatory Extended Medium Sensitivity Surveys (EMSS) and consists of more than 420 objects. Preliminary results from the ROSAT All-Sky Survey data confirm the correctness of the optical identification of the EMSS sources, thus giving confidence to the results obtained from the analysis of the AGN's sample. The XLF observed at different redshifts (up to z approx. 2) gives direct evidence of cosmological evolution. Data have been analyzed within the framework of luminosity evolution models and the two most common evolutionary forms, L sub x(Z) = L sub x(0) x e(sup Cr) and L sub x(Z) = L sub x(0) x (1 + z)(exp C), have been considered. Luminosity dependent evolution is required if the evolution function has the exponential form, whereas the simpler pure luminosity evolution model is still acceptable if the evolution function has the power law form. Using the whole sample of objects the number-counts and the de-evolved (z = 0) XLF have been derived. A comparison of the EMSS data with preliminary ROSAT results presented at this meeting indicates an overall agreement.

  17. The Two Micron All Sky Survey: One Year of Operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cutri, R. M.

    1998-05-01

    The Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS) began routine operations from its northern facility on Mt. Hopkins, AZ one year ago, and from its southern facility on Cerro Tololo, Chile in March of this year. At each site, 50-inch telescopes equipped with identical 3-channel cameras, are systematically imaging the sky in three near infrared wavelength bands, J (1.25mu m), H (1.65mu m) and K_s (2.17mu m). To date, over 10,000 deg(2) of sky have been observed. Ongoing processing and calibration of the survey image data produces three data products: 1) an Image Atlas that will eventually contain approximately one million 512x1024 pixel images (1 arcsec/pix) in the three colors, covering the full sky, 2) a highly complete and reliable catalog that will contain ~ 300 million point sources having SNR>10 photometry at J<=15.8, H<=15.1 and K_s<=14.3 mag. and an astrometric accuracy <0.5arcsec RMS, and 3) a catalog of approximately one million resolved sources, primarily galaxies, having SNR>10 photometric accuracy at J<=15.5, H<=14.8 and K_s<=13.5 mag. Incremental releases of these data products to the community are scheduled to begin in the Spring of 1999. A brief report on the current status and outlook for 2MASS will be given, along with analyses that demonstrate that the survey is achieving, if not exceeding its stated performance goals. Results of several pilot studies that are supporting 2MASS survey validation are presented as a preview of the tremendous scientific opportunities that will be available with the 2MASS databases. Key among these are investigations of the lowest mass objects in the solar neighborhood, probes of the structure of the Milky Way, and of the local universe, and the search for populations of extremely red active galactic nuclei.

  18. Galaxy clustering in the Two Micron All Sky Redshift Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westover, Michael

    To make cosmological measurements using the galaxy distribution we must first understand galaxy biasing the way in which the galaxy distribution differs from the underlying matter distribution. Here I present studies of galaxy biasing using the Two Micron All Sky Redshift Survey, a near-infrared selected survey not subject to many of the selection effects that limit other samples. The relationship between galaxy bias and luminosity is steeper for our near- infrared selected sample than it is for optical samples, with b/b [low *] 0.73 + 0.24 L/L [low *] . I found no dependence upon luminosity in the relative bias between early and late morphologically typed galaxies once the mean dependence of bias upon luminosity was removed. I tested the relative biasing between early- and late-type galaxies using joint counts in cells. I found that a power law biasing model with b PL = 0.86-0.91 was a better fit than linear models. I did not see a significant increase in the quality of the fit when stochasticity was added to the model, in contrast with results from color- and spectral type-selected samples. I tested the hierarchical scaling hypothesis and confirmed that the scale factors S 3 , S 4 , and S 5 are independent of scale, as expected for a matter distribution evolved from Gaussian initial perturbations. There was no increase in the scale factors at large cell sizes as seen in some earlier surveys. I also measured the generalized dimensions D q using a multifractal analysis and found smaller values than have been seen in optically-selected surveys and simulations, indicating that galaxies in the near-infrared selected sample may be more likely to reside in filamentary rather than sheet-like structures.

  19. The All-Sky Automated Survey for Supernovae CV Patrol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Alexandra Bianca; Shappee, Benjamin John; Archer Shappee, Bartlett; ASAS-SN

    2015-01-01

    Even in the modern era, only human eyes scan the entire optical sky for the violent, variable, and transient events that shape our universe. The "All Sky Automated Survey for Supernovae" (ASAS-SN or "Assassin") is changing this by monitoring the extra-galactic sky down to V~17 mag every 2-3 days using multiple telescopes, hosted by Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope Network, in the northern and southern hemispheres. By far the most common events observed by ASAS-SN are the Galactic transients. Since April 2013 ASAS-SN has identified over 180 new cataclysmic variable stars and announced over 260 new outbursts of known CVs. To make our data available to the CV community in 'real time', we have launched an automated 'CV Patrol' to monitor known CVs for outbursts as a useful tool for both professional and amateurs astronomers. It is a long term goal of ASAS-SN to make all our data public in real-time, and this patrol will serve as a framework for future ASAS-SN data releases.

  20. The AGN Content of the Micron all Sky Survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cutri, R. M.

    2000-01-01

    The Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS) began routine operations from its northern facility on Mt. Hopkins, AZ in June of 1997, and from its southern facility on Cerro Tololo, Chile in March of 1998. At each site, highly automated 1.3 m telescopes equipped with identical 3-channel cameras, are systematically imaging the sky in three near infrared wavelength bands, J (1.25 um), H (1.65 um) and K-s (2.17 um). The Survey will ultimately produce an Image Atlas containing nearly two million 512 x 1024 pixel images (1 arcsec/pix) in the three colors, a highly complete and reliable catalog containing approx. 300 million point sources having SNR greater than 10 photometry at J less or = 15.8, H less or = 15.1 and K-s less or = 14.3 mag. and an astrometric accuracy greater than 0.511 RMS, and a catalog of 1-2 million resolved sources, primarily galaxies, having SNR greater than 10 photometric accuracy at J less than or = 15.5, H less than or = 14.8 and K-s less than or = 13.5 mag. The 2MASS Sampler, an introductory set of data, was released to the community in December of 1998 (see http://www.ipac.caltech.edu/2mass/). We review the near IR and optical/IR properties of "conventional" QSOs from UV and optical samples, and estimate the number that will be detected by 2MASS. We also discuss 2MASS's ability to test for for new populations of extremely red AGN that have been missed by UV and Visual surveys, as suggested by from IRAS and radio studies. Results of spectroscopic follow-up of 2MASS-selected new AGN candidates will also be presented.

  1. New cataclysmic variables from the ROSAT All-Sky Survey.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motch, C.; Haberl, F.; Guillout, P.; Pakull, M.; Reinsch, K.; Krautter, J.

    1996-03-01

    We report the discovery of 7 new cataclysmic variables in the low galactic latitude (|b|<=20deg) part of the ROSAT all sky survey. All but one of these new sources have been optically identified. These interacting binaries were either found in subsets of sources chosen for their particular X-ray/optical properties or in specific areas selected for statistical studies. The present sample is therefore not representative of the overall content of the survey. One, or probably two, of these new cataclysmic variables are intermediate polars. RXJ0028.8+5917 (P_s_=312.8s) which exhibits the usual hard X-ray spectrum typical of this class has an orbital period of 4-5 hours and is probably identical to 1H0025+588/4U0027+59. The other pulsating source, RXJ1914.4+2456 (P_s_=567.7s) awaits optical identification in order to confirm its cataclysmic variable nature. RXJ1914.4+2456 has an X-ray energy distribution dominated by a super-soft component which may be fitted with a 43eV black body. RXJ1914.4+2456 thus probably belongs to the new class of soft intermediate polars discovered by ROSAT. Our deep optical search failed to reveal a counterpart brighter than V=~19.7. This upper limit is consistent with the source being a cataclysmic variable if the large amount of absorption detected at X-ray energies is mainly of interstellar origin. Three other sources, RXJ0502.8+1624, RXJ1141.3-6410 and RXJ2123.7+4217 exhibit X-ray and optical properties suggesting magnetic systems.

  2. C-BASS: The C-Band All Sky Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearson, Timothy J.; C-BASS collaboration

    2016-06-01

    The C-Band All Sky Survey (C-BASS) is a project to image the whole sky at a wavelength of 6 cm (frequency 5 GHz), measuring both the brightness and the polarization of the sky. Correlation polarimeters are mounted on two separate telescopes, one at the Owens Valley Observatory (OVRO) in California and another in South Africa, allowing C-BASS to map the whole sky. The OVRO instrument has completed observations for the northern part of the survey. We are working on final calibration of intensity and polarization. The southern instrument has recently started observations for the southern part of the survey from its site at Klerefontein near Carnarvon in South Africa. The principal aim of C-BASS is to allow the subtraction of polarized Galactic synchrotron emission from the data produced by CMB polarization experiments, such as WMAP, Planck, and dedicated B-mode polarization experiments. In addition it will contribute to studies of: (1) the local (< 1 kpc) Galactic magnetic field and cosmic-ray propagation; (2) the distribution of the anomalous dust emission, its origin and the physical processes that affect it; (3) modeling of Galactic total intensity emission, which may allow CMB experiments access to the currently inaccessible region close to the Galactic plane. Observations at many wavelengths from radio to infrared are needed to fully understand the foregrounds. At 5 GHz, C-BASS maps synchrotron polarization with minimal corruption by Faraday rotation, and complements the full-sky maps from WMAP and Planck. I will present the project status, show results of component separation in selected sky regions, and describe the northern survey data products.C-BASS (http://www.astro.caltech.edu/cbass/) is a collaborative project between the Universities of Oxford and Manchester in the UK, the California Institute of Technology (supported by the National Science Foundation and NASA) in the USA, the Hartebeesthoek Radio Astronomy Observatory (supported by the Square Kilometre

  3. IS THE TWO MICRON ALL SKY SURVEY CLUSTERING DIPOLE CONVERGENT?

    SciTech Connect

    Bilicki, Maciej; Chodorowski, Michal; Jarrett, Thomas; Mamon, Gary A.

    2011-11-01

    There is a long-standing controversy about the convergence of the dipole moment of the galaxy angular distribution (the so-called clustering dipole). Is the dipole convergent at all, and if so, what is the scale of the convergence? We study the growth of the clustering dipole of galaxies as a function of the limiting flux of the sample from the Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS). Contrary to some earlier claims, we find that the dipole does not converge before the completeness limit of the 2MASS Extended Source Catalog, i.e., up to 13.5 mag in the near-infrared K{sub s} band (equivalent to an effective distance of 300 Mpc h{sup -1}). We compare the observed growth of the dipole with the theoretically expected, conditional one (i.e., given the velocity of the Local Group relative to the cosmic microwave background), for the {Lambda}CDM power spectrum and cosmological parameters constrained by the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe. The observed growth turns out to be within 1{sigma} confidence level of its theoretical counterpart once the proper observational window of the 2MASS flux-limited catalog is included. For a contrast, if the adopted window is a top hat, then the predicted dipole grows significantly faster and converges (within the errors) to its final value for a distance of about 300 Mpc h{sup -1}. By comparing the observational windows, we show that for a given flux limit and a corresponding distance limit, the 2MASS flux-weighted window passes less large-scale signal than the top-hat one. We conclude that the growth of the 2MASS dipole for effective distances greater than 200 Mpc h{sup -1} is only apparent. On the other hand, for a distance of 80 Mpc h{sup -1} (mean depth of the 2MASS Redshift Survey) and the {Lambda}CDM power spectrum, the true dipole is expected to reach only {approx}80% of its final value. Eventually, since for the window function of 2MASS the predicted growth is consistent with the observed one, we can compare the two to evaluate

  4. Asteroid Catalog Using Akari: AKARI/IRC Mid-Infrared Asteroid Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usui, Fumihiko; Kuroda, Daisuke; Müller, Thomas G.; Hasegawa, Sunao; Ishiguro, Masateru; Ootsubo, Takafumi; Ishihara, Daisuke; Kataza, Hirokazu; Takita, Satoshi; Oyabu, Shinki; Ueno, Munetaka; Matsuhara, Hideo; Onaka, Takashi

    2011-10-01

    We present the results of an unbiased asteroid survey in the mid-infrared wavelength region with the Infrared Camera (IRC) on board the Japanese infrared satellite AKARI. About 20% of the point source events recorded in the AKARI All-Sky Survey observations are not used for the IRC Point Source Catalog (IRC-PSC) in its production process because of a lack of multiple detection by position. Asteroids, which are moving objects on the celestial sphere, remain in these ``residual events''. We identify asteroids out of the residual events by matching them with the positions of known asteroids. For the identified asteroids, we calculate the size and albedo based on the Standard Thermal Model. Finally we have a new brand of asteroid catalog, named the Asteroid Catalog Using AKARI (AcuA), which contains 5120 objects, about twice as many as the IRAS asteroid catalog. The catalog objects comprise 4953 main belt asteroids, 58 near-Earth asteroids, and 109 Jovian Trojan asteroids. The catalog is publicly available via the Internet.

  5. Conducting the deepest all-sky radio pulsar survey ever: The All-Sky High Time Resolution Universe Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, Cherry

    The extreme conditions found in and around pulsars make them fantastic natural laboratories, providing insights to a rich variety of aspects of fundamental physics and astronomy. To discover more pulsars we have begun the High Time Resolution Universe (HTRU) survey; a blind survey of the northern sky with the 100-m Effelsberg radio telescope in Germany and a twin survey of the southern sky with the 64-m Parkes radio telescope in Australia. The HTRU survey uses multi-beam receivers and backends constructed with new advancements in technology, providing unprecedentedly high time and frequency resolution to probe deeper into the Galaxy than ever before. Observations from Parkes have recently been completed and it is thus a suitable moment to review the success of the survey. In my talk I will discuss the discovery highlights such as the magnetar, two “planet-pulsar” binaries and the Fast Radio Bursts (FRBs) from cosmological distances. The HTRU low-latitude data promises to provide the deepest large-scale search ever for the Galactic plane region. I will present an innovative segmented search technique which aims to increase our chances of discoveries of highly accelerated relativistic binary systems, including the potential pulsar-black-hole binaries. I will also provide an update on the survey status for the Northern survey with Effelsberg, which has led to the recent discovery of a highly eccentric binary millisecond pulsar.

  6. Conducting the deepest all-sky pulsar survey ever: the all-sky High Time Resolution Universe survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, Cherry; HTRU Collaboration

    2013-03-01

    The extreme conditions found in and around pulsars make them fantastic natural laboratories, providing insights to a rich variety of fundamental physics and astronomy. To discover more pulsars we have begun the High Time Resolution Universe (HTRU) survey: a blind survey of the northern sky with the 100-m Effelsberg radio telescope in Germany and a twin survey of the southern sky with the 64-m Parkes radio telescope in Australia. The HTRU is an international collaboration with expertise shared among the MPIfR in Germany, ATNF/CASS and Swinburne University of Technology in Australia, University of Manchester in the UK and INAF in Italy. The HTRU survey uses multi-beam receivers and backends constructed with recent advancements in technology, providing unprecedentedly high time and frequency resolution, allowing us to probe deeper into the Galaxy than ever before. While a general overview of HTRU has been given by Keith at this conference, here we focus on three further aspects of HTRU discoveries and highlights. These include the `Diamond-planet pulsar' binary J1719-1438 and a second similar system recently discovered. In addition, we provide specifications of the HTRU-North survey and an update of its status. In the last section we give an overview of the search for highly-accelerated binaries in the Galactic plane region. We discuss the computational challenges arising from the processing of the petabyte-sized HTRU survey data. We present an innovative segmented search technique which aims to increase our chances of discovering highly accelerated relativistic binary systems, potentially including pulsar-black-hole binaries.

  7. The eROSITA All-Sky Survey and its spectroscopic follow-up

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvato, Mara

    2015-08-01

    eROSITA (extended ROentgen Survey with an Imaging Telescope Array) is the core instrument on the Russian/German Spektrum-Roentgen-Gamma (SRG) mission which is current scheduled for launch in 2016. In the soft band (0.5-2 keV), the deep All-sky survey will be 30 times more sensitive than the previous ROSAT All-sky survey, while the first ever true all-sky survey will be mapped in the hard band (2-8 keV).The design driving science is the detection of large samples of galaxy clusters to redshifts z > 1, in order to study the large scale structure in the Universe and test cosmological models including Dark Energy. In addition, eROSITA is expected to yield a sample of around 3 million active galactic nuclei, which is bound to revolutionize our view of the evolution of supermassive black holes and their impact on the process of structure formation in the Universe.I will review the main characteristics of eROSITA All-sky survey, with an eye also on the planned spectroscopic follow-up of the sources with SDSS-IV/SPIDERS and ESO/4MOST.

  8. X ray observations of late-type stars using the ROSAT all-sky survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linsky, Jeffrey L.; Fleming, Thomas A.

    1992-01-01

    The ROSAT mission made the first x ray survey of the entire sky using an imaging detector. Although ROSAT is a joint NASA/German project and involves direct American participation during its second phase of pointed observations, the all-sky survey remains the sole property of the German investigators. NASA grant represented the first use of ROSAT data analysis funds to support direct American participation in the ROSAT all-sky survey. The project involved a collaborative agreement between the Joint Institute for Laboratory Astrophysics (JILA) and the Max-Planck-Institut fur Extraterrestrische Physik (MPE) where JILA supplied MPE with a post-doctoral research associate with experience in the field of stellar (coronal) x ray emission to work within their ROSAT group. In return, members of the cool star research group at JILA were given the opportunity to collaborate on projects involving ROSAT all-sky survey data. Both sides have benefitted (and still benefit) from this arrangement since MPE suffers from a shortage of researchers who are interested in x ray emission from 'normal' stars and white dwarfs. MPE has also drawn upon experience in optical identification of x ray sources from the Einstein Extended Medium Sensitivity Survey in planning their own identification strategies for the ROSAT all-sky survey. The JILA cool stars group has benefitted since access to all-sky survey data has expanded the scope of their already extensive research programs involving multiwavelength observations of late-type stars. ROSAT was successfully launched on 1 June 1990 and conducted the bulk of the survey from 30 July 1990 to 25 January 1991. Data gaps in the survey have subsequently been made up. At the time of this writing (February 1992), the survey data have been processed once with the Standard Analysis Software System (SASS). A second processing will soon begin with improvements made to the SASS to correct errors and bugs found while carrying out scientific projects with data

  9. The ROSAT All-Sky Survey view of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pietsch, W.; Denner, K.; Kahabka, P.; Pakull, M.; Schaeidt, S.

    1996-01-01

    During the Rosat all sky survey, centered on the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), 516 X-ray sources were detected. The field was covered from July 1990 to January 1991. The X-ray parameters of the sources, involving position, count rates, hardness ratios, extent, and time variability during the observations, are discussed. Identifications with objects from optical, radio and infrared wavelength allow the LMC candidates to be separated from the foreground stars and the background objects.

  10. The Southern Twenty-centimeter All-sky Polarization Survey (STAPS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haverkorn, Marijke; Gaensler, Bryan; McConnell, David; McClure-Griffiths, Naomi; Carretti, Ettore; Kesteven, Michael; Heiles, Carl

    2008-04-01

    The Southern Twenty-centimeter All-sky Polarization Survey (STAPS) is proposed as a piggyback project on the S-band Polarization All-sky Survey (P560). STAPS will survey the polarized radio continuum sky from 1300 to 1800MHz at 15' resolution to probe Galactic magnetism through Faraday rotation, mostly at higher latitudes where Faraday rotation is modest. Combination of STAPS with S-PASS will significantly enhance the quality of obtainable rotation measures, especially at high latitudes. Furthermore, STAPS is envisioned to be an essential part of a global effort to map the polarized radio sky at almost contiguous frequencies from 80MHz to 2400MHz. With this frequency coverage, individual RM components along sightlines can be deconvolved with unprecedented RM resolution and dynamic range, enabling three-dimensional mapping of the Galactic magnetic field. The 1.4GHz H-OH receiver used for STAPS is to be placed off-axis next to the 2.3GHz S-PASS receiver, so that data of both surveys can be simultaneously taken. Calculations of the radiation and instrumental polarization patterns across the beam for the off-axis receiver indicate that the expected instrumental polarization is between 0.3% and 0.9% (without corrections). We request zero observing hours this semester.

  11. The Southern Twenty-centimeter All-sky Polarization Survey (STAPS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haverkorn, Marijke; Gaensler, Bryan; McConnell, David; McClure-Griffiths, Naomi; Carretti, Ettore; Kesteven, Michael; Wolleben, Maik; Heiles, Carl

    2009-10-01

    This is the fourth semester proposal for the large project P624, the Southern Twenty-centimeter All-sky Polarization Survey (STAPS), a 1.4GHz broadband all-sky survey which started as a piggy-back survey on the 2.3GHz survey S-PASS (P560). STAPS/S-PASS take data in long azimuth scans at fixed elevation. Starting times of scans are determined exactly, so that scans cover adjacent bands across the sky, eventually resulting in a Nyquist-coverage of the southern sky. The science goals of STAPS focus on the Galactic interstellar medium and magnetism. Using rotation measure synthesis, we can disentangle synchrotron emitting and Faraday rotating sources along the line of sight, allowing a new view of the polarized radio sky. The data will be used to advance models of the large-scale Galactic magnetic field, for characterization of depolarization and interstellar turbulence and for studies of magnetism in discrete structures such as supernova remnants. On- and off-axis instrumental polarization will be characterized and removed. Initial calibration indicates on-axis instrumental polarization of about one percent, which is expected to go down using more sophisticated calibration methods.

  12. The Southern Twenty-centimeter All-sky Polarization Survey (STAPS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haverkorn, Marijke; Gaensler, Bryan; McConnell, David; McClure-Griffiths, Naomi; Carretti, Ettore; Kesteven, Michael; Wolleben, Maik; Heiles, Carl

    2009-04-01

    This is the third semester proposal for the large project P624, the Southern Twenty-centimeter All-sky Polarization Survey (STAPS), a 1.4GHz broadband all-sky survey piggy-backing on the 2.3GHz survey S-PASS (P560). STAPS/S-PASS take data in long azimuth scans at fixed elevation. Starting times of scans are determined exactly, so that scans cover adjacent bands across the sky, eventually resulting in a Nyquist-coverage of the southern sky. The science goals of STAPS focus on the Galactic interstellar medium and magnetism. Using rotation measure synthesis, we can disentangle synchrotron emitting and Faraday rotating sources along the line of sight, allowing a new view of the polarized radio sky. The data will be used to advance models of the large-scale Galactic magnetic field, for characterization of depolarization and interstellar turbulence and for studies of magnetism in discrete structures such as supernova remnants. On- and off-axis instrumental polarization will be characterized and removed. Initial calibration indicates on-axis instrumental polarization of about one percent, which is expected to go down using more sophisticated calibration methods.

  13. Observation of the Coma cluster of galaxies with ROSAT during the all-sky survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Briel, U. G.; Henry, J. P.; Boehringer, H.

    1992-01-01

    The Coma cluster of galaxies was observed with the position sensitive proportional counter (PSPC) during the ROSAT all sky survey. We find evidence for substructure in this cluster. Diffuse X-ray emission is detected from the regions of the NGC 4839 and 4911 subgroups at 6 percent and 1 percent of the total cluster emission respectively. There may be emission associated with the NGC 4874 and 4889 subgroups as well. The NGC 4839 group appears to be in the process of merging with the cluster. These X-ray data show that at least some of the groups previously found in projection are in fact physical objects possessing potential wells deep enough to trap their own X-ray gas. Because of the unlimited field of view of the all sky survey and the low background of the PSPC, we were able to measure the azimuthally averaged surface brightness of Coma out to approximately 100 arcmin, twice as far as was previously possible. Given the validity of our mass models, these new X-ray data imply that within 5/h(50) Mpc the binding mass of the Coma cluster is 1.8 +/- 0.6 x 10 exp 15/h(50) solar mass, and the fraction of cluster mass contained in hot gas is 0.30 +/- 0.14h(50) exp -3/2. Furthermore, the binding mass is more centrally concentrated than is the X-ray gas.

  14. PHOTOMETRY OF TYPE II CEPHEID CANDIDATES FROM THE NORTHERN PART OF THE ALL SKY AUTOMATED SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, Edward G.; Hemen, Brian; Rogalla, Danielle; Thacker-Lynn, Lauren E-mail: bhemen1@bigred.unl.edu E-mail: lthacke1@bigred.unl.edu

    2009-06-15

    We have obtained VR photometry of 282 Cepheid variable star candidates from the northern part of the All Sky Automated Survey (ASAS). These together with data from the ASAS and the Northern Sky Variability Survey (NSVS) were used to redetermine the periods of the stars. We divided the stars into four groups based on location in a plot of mean color, (V-R), versus period. Two of the groups fell within the region of the diagram containing known type II Cepheids and yielded 14 new highly probable type II Cepheids. The properties of the remaining stars in these two groups are discussed but their nature remains uncertain. Unexplained differences exist between the sample of stars studied here and a previous sample drawn from the NSVS by Akerlof et al. This suggests serious biases in the identification of variables in different surveys.

  15. Clustering of ROSAT All-Sky Survey AGNs Through Cross-Correlation Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krumpe, Mirko; Miyaji, Takamitsu; Coil, Alison

    2010-07-01

    We investigate the clustering propertiesof ~1550 low-redshift broad-line AGNs detected in the ROSAT All-Sky Survey (RASS) through a cross-correlation function (CCF) with ~46000 Luminous Red Galaxies (LRGs) in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). Using this approach, we avoid small-number statistics and systematic errors caused by the variation of the Galactic absorption compared to a direct measurement of the AGN auto-correlation function (ACF). We compute the ACF of low-z RASS-AGN based on the CCF for the total X-ray sample ( = 0.25) and found a correlation length of r0 = 4.3-0.4+0.4 h-1 Mpc. Furthermore, we discovered an X-ray luminosity dependence of the clustering signal, i.e. high luminosity AGN cluster stronger than low luminosity AGN. We have also applied a Halo Occupation Distribution (HOD) model directly to our AGN-LRG CCF.

  16. The effect of radiation on the IRAS all-sky survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolff, D. M.

    1984-01-01

    The Infrared Astronomical Satellite (IRAS) is in a sun synchronous, 'near' polar orbit at an altitude of 900 km. The primary objective of IRAS is related to the conduction of an all-sky survey in the wavelength range from 8 microns to 120 microns. The present investigation is concerned with three components of the radiation environment encountered by IRAS, taking into account the high energy protons in the South Atlantic Anomaly, high energy electrons in the horns of the Van Allen belts, and cosmic rays. The effect of radiation on the returned data stream is studied, and attention is given to the steps which were taken to minimize the impact of radiation on the completeness of the survey.

  17. PROPERTIES OF LARGE-AMPLITUDE VARIABLE STARS DETECTED WITH TWO MICRON ALL SKY SURVEY PUBLIC IMAGES

    SciTech Connect

    Kouzuma, Shinjirou; Yamaoka, Hitoshi

    2009-11-15

    We present a catalog of variable stars in the near-infrared wavelength detected with overlapping regions of the Two Micron All Sky Survey public images, and discuss their properties. The investigated region is in the direction of the Galactic center (-30 deg. {approx}< l {approx}< 20 deg., |b| {approx}< 20 deg.), which covers the entire bulge. We have detected 136 variable stars, of which six are already known and 118 are distributed in the |b| {<=} 5 deg. region. Additionally, 84 variable stars have optical counterparts in Digitized Sky Survey images. The three diagrams (color-magnitude, light variance, and color-color diagrams) indicate that most of the detected variable stars should be large-amplitude and long-period variables such as Mira variables or OH/IR stars. The number density distribution of the detected variable stars implies that they trace the bar structure of the Galactic bulge.

  18. Meteor Shower Forecast Improvements from a Survey of All-Sky Network Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moorhead, Althea V.; Sugar, Glenn; Brown, Peter G.; Cooke, William J.

    2015-01-01

    Meteoroid impacts are capable of damaging spacecraft and potentially ending missions. In order to help spacecraft programs mitigate these risks, NASA's Meteoroid Environment Office (MEO) monitors and predicts meteoroid activity. Temporal variations in near-Earth space are described by the MEO's annual meteor shower forecast, which is based on both past shower activity and model predictions. The MEO and the University of Western Ontario operate sister networks of all-sky meteor cameras. These networks have been in operation for more than 7 years and have computed more than 20,000 meteor orbits. Using these data, we conduct a survey of meteor shower activity in the "fireball" size regime using DBSCAN. For each shower detected in our survey, we compute the date of peak activity and characterize the growth and decay of the shower's activity before and after the peak. These parameters are then incorporated into the annual forecast for an improved treatment of annual activity.

  19. THE 70 MONTH SWIFT-BAT ALL-SKY HARD X-RAY SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    Baumgartner, W. H.; Tueller, J.; Markwardt, C. B.; Skinner, G. K.; Barthelmy, S.; Gehrels, N.; Evans, P. A.

    2013-08-15

    We present the catalog of sources detected in 70 months of observations with the Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) hard X-ray detector on the Swift gamma-ray burst observatory. The Swift-BAT 70 month survey has detected 1171 hard X-ray sources (more than twice as many sources as the previous 22 month survey) in the 14-195 keV band down to a significance level of 4.8{sigma}, associated with 1210 counterparts. The 70 month Swift-BAT survey is the most sensitive and uniform hard X-ray all-sky survey and reaches a flux level of 1.03 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -11} erg s{sup -1} cm{sup -2} over 50% of the sky and 1.34 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -11} erg s{sup -1} cm{sup -2} over 90% of the sky. The majority of new sources in the 70 month survey continue to be active galactic nuclei, with over 700 in the catalog. As part of this new edition of the Swift-BAT catalog, we also make available eight-channel spectra and monthly sampled light curves for each object detected in the survey in the online journal and at the Swift-BAT 70 month Web site.

  20. CRATES: An All-Sky Survey of Flat-Spectrum Radio Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Healey, Stephen E.; Romani, Roger W.; Taylor, Gregory B.; Sadler, Elaine M.; Ricci, Roberto; Murphy, Tara; Ulvestad, James S.; Winn, Joshua N.; /MIT

    2007-02-20

    We have assembled an 8.4 GHz survey of bright, flat-spectrum ({alpha} > -0.5) radio sources with nearly uniform extragalactic (|b| > 10{sup o}) coverage for sources brighter than S{sub 4.8 GHz} = 65 mJy. The catalog is assembled from existing observations (especially CLASS and the Wright et al. PMN-CA survey), augmented by reprocessing of archival VLA and ATCA data and by new observations to fill in coverage gaps. We refer to this program as CRATES, the Combined Radio All-sky Targeted Eight GHz Survey. The resulting catalog provides precise positions, sub-arcsecond structures, and spectral indices for some 11,000 sources. We describe the morphology and spectral index distribution of the sample and comment on the survey's power to select several classes of interesting sources, especially high energy blazars. Comparison of CRATES with other high-frequency surveys also provides unique opportunities for identification of high-power radio sources.

  1. VizieR Online Data Catalog: AAVSO Photometric All Sky Survey (APASS) DR9 (Henden+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henden, A. A.; Templeton, M.; Terrell, D.; Smith, T. C.; Levine, S.; Welch, D.

    2016-01-01

    The AAVSO Photometric All Sky Survey (APASS) project is designed to bridge the gap between the shallow Tycho2 two-bandpass photometric catalog that is complete to V=11 and the deeper, but less spatially-complete catalogs like SDSS or PanSTARRS. It can be used for calibration of a specific field; for obtaining spectral information about single sources, determining reddening in a small area of the sky; or even obtaining current-epoch astrometry for rapidly moving objects. The survey is being performed at two locations: near Weed, New Mexico in the Northern Hemisphere; and at CTIO in the Southern Hemisphere. Each site consists of dual bore-sighted 20cm telescopes on a single mount, designed to obtain two bandpasses of information simultaneously. Each telescope covers 9 square degrees of sky with 2.5arcsec pixels, with the main survey taken with B,V,g',r',i' filters and covering the magnitude range 10survey; a team of professional astronomers participate in the data analysis. The project was initially funded by the Robert Martin Ayers Sciences Fund, with a follow-on grant from the National Science Foundation. (1 data file).

  2. Active galaxies observed during the Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer all-sky survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, H. L.; Fruscione, A.; Carone, T. E.

    1995-01-01

    We present observations of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) obtained with the Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer (EUVE) during the all-sky survey. A total of 13 sources were detected at a significance of 2.5 sigma or better: seven Seyfert galaxies, five BL Lac objects, and one quasar. The fraction of BL Lac objects is higher in our sample than in hard X-ray surveys but is consistent with the soft X-ray Einstein Slew Survey, indicating that the main reason for the large number of BL Lac objects in the extreme ulktraviolet (EUV) and soft X-ray bands is their steeper X-ray spectra. We show that the number of AGNs observed in both the EUVE and ROSAT Wide Field Camera surveys can readily be explained by modelling the EUV spectra with a simple power law in the case of BL Lac objects and with an additional EUV excess in the case of Seyferts and quasars. Allowing for cold matter absorption in Seyfert galaxy hosts drive up the inferred average continuum slope to 2.0 +/- 0.5 (at 90% confidence), compared to a slope of 1.0 usually found from soft X-ray data. If Seyfert galaxies without EUV excesses form a significant fraction of the population, then the average spectrum of those with bumps should be even steeper. We place a conservative limit on neutral gas in BL Lac objects: N(sub H) less than 10(exp 20)/sq cm.

  3. The Southern Twenty-centimeter All-sky Polarization Survey (STAPS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haverkorn, Marijke; Gaensler, Bryan; McConnell, David; McClure-Griffiths, Naomi; Carretti, Ettore; Kesteven, Michael; Wolleben, Maik; Heiles, Carl

    2008-10-01

    The Southern Twenty-centimeter All-sky Polarization Survey (STAPS) is a piggyback project on the S-PASS survey (P560). STAPS surveys the polarized radio continuum sky from 1300 to 1800MHz at 15' resolution to probe Galactic magnetism through Faraday rotation, mostly at higher latitudes where Faraday rotation is modest. Combination of STAPS with S-PASS will significantly enhance the quality of obtainable rotation measures, especially at high latitudes. Furthermore, STAPS is envisioned to be an essential part of a global effort to map the polarized radio sky at almost contiguous frequencies from 80MHz to 2400MHz (also P617, PI Wolleben). With this frequency coverage, individual RM components along sightlines can be deconvolved with unprecedented RM resolution and dynamic range, enabling three-dimensional mapping of the Galactic magnetic field. The 1.4GHz H-OH receiver used for STAPS is placed off-axis next to the 2.3GHz S-PASS receiver, allowing simultaneous datataking in both surveys. The first observing run last semester was encouraging. On-the-fly checking of data looked good, including good performance of the quarter-wave plate across the band.

  4. VizieR Online Data Catalog: HI Jodrell All Sky Survey (Lang+, 2003)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, R. H.; Boyce, P. J.; Kilborn, V. A.; Minchin, R. F.; Disney, M. J.; Jordan, C. A.; Grossi, M.; Garcia, D. A.; Freeman, K. C.; Phillipps, S.; Wright, A. E.

    2003-09-01

    Details are presented of the H I Jodrell All Sky Survey (HIJASS). HIJASS is a blind neutral hydrogen (H I) survey of the northern sky ({delta}>22{deg}), being conducted using the multibeam receiver on the Lovell Telescope (full width at half-maximum beamwidth 12-arcmin) at Jodrell Bank. HIJASS covers the velocity range -3500 to 10000 km/s, with a velocity resolution of 18.1km/s and spatial positional accuracy of ~2.5arcmin. Thus far about 1115 deg2 of sky have been surveyed. The average rms noise during the early part of the survey was around 16mJy/beam Following the first phase of the Lovell Telescope upgrade (in 2001), the rms noise is now around 13mJy/beam. We describe the methods of detecting galaxies within the HIJASS data and of measuring their H I parameters. The properties of the resulting H I-selected sample of galaxies are described. Of the 222 sources so far confirmed, 170 (77 per cent) are clearly associated with a previously catalogued galaxy. A further 23 sources (10 per cent) lie close (within 6 arcmin) to a previously catalogued galaxy for which no previous redshift exists. A further 29 sources (13 per cent) do not appear to be associated with any previously catalogued galaxy. (1 data file).

  5. The Leiden/Dwingeloo and Villa-Elisa All-Sky Galactic HI Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartmann, D.

    The Leiden/Dwingeloo survey of Galactic Neutral Hydrogen was published in 1997 (Hartmann & Burton 1997). It covers the sky north of δ = -30°, sampled with the 36 arcmin beam of the Dwingeloo 25-m radio telescope. The velocity coverage is -450 <= vLSR <= +400 kms at 1 kms channel spacing, and the 1-σ sensitivity is better than 0.07 K. The contribution of stray radiation was calculated for each individual profile and removed prior to the 'standard' data reduction. At high galactic latitudes, stray radiation can amount to 50% of the total emission observed. Observations for the southern sky were recently completed. The 30-m radio telescope of the IAR in Villa-Elisa, Argentina, was used to map the sky south of δ = -25°, with nearly identical observational parameters to those of the L/D survey. We are currently in the process of correcting these spectra for stray radiation. The combination of both efforts will amount to an all-sky dataset of Galactic Neutral Hydrogen that supersedes previous surveys by at least an order of magnitude in one or more observational parameters. Details will be presented of the observing strategies, and the data reduction techniques will be described, with strong emphasis on the method of stray-radiation removal.

  6. Neutrino constraints from future nearly all-sky spectroscopic galaxy surveys

    SciTech Connect

    Carbone, Carmelita; Cimatti, Andrea; Verde, Licia; Wang, Yun E-mail: liciaverde@icc.ub.edu E-mail: a.cimatti@unibo.it

    2011-03-01

    We examine whether future, nearly all-sky galaxy redshift surveys, in combination with CMB priors, will be able to detect the signature of the cosmic neutrino background and determine the absolute neutrino mass scale. We also consider what constraints can be imposed on the effective number of neutrino species. In particular we consider two spectroscopic strategies in the near-IR, the so-called ''slitless'' and ''multi-slit'' approaches, whose examples are given by future space-based galaxy surveys, as EUCLID for the slitless case, or SPACE, JEDI, and possibly WFIRST in the future, for the multi-slit case. We find that, in combination with Planck, these galaxy probes will be able to detect at better than 3-sigma level and measure the mass of cosmic neutrinos: a) in a cosmology-independent way, if the sum of neutrino masses is above 0.1 eV; b) assuming spatial flatness and that dark energy is a cosmological constant, otherwise. We find that the sensitivity of such surveys is well suited to span the entire range of neutrino masses allowed by neutrino oscillation experiments, and to yield a clear detection of non-zero neutrino mass. The detection of the cosmic relic neutrino background with cosmological experiments will be a spectacular confirmation of our model for the early Universe and a window into one of the oldest relic components of our Universe.

  7. Radio pulsar style timing of eclipsing binary stars from the All Sky Automated Survey catalogue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozłowski, S. K.; Konacki, M.; Sybilski, P.

    2011-09-01

    The light-time effect (LTE) is observed whenever the distance between the observer and any kind of periodic event changes in time. The usual cause of this change in the distance is the reflex motion about the system's barycentre due to the gravitational influence of one or more additional bodies. We analyse 5032 eclipsing contact (EC) and eclipsing detached (ED) binaries from the All Sky Automated Survey (ASAS) catalogue to detect variations in the times of eclipses which possibly can be due to the LTE effect. To this end we use an approach known from the radio pulsar timing where a template radio pulse of a pulsar is used as a reference to measure the times of arrivals of the collected pulses. In our analysis, as a template for a photometric time series from the ASAS, we use a best-fitting trigonometric series representing the light curve of a given EC or ED. Subsequently, an observed minus calculated (O-C) diagram is built by comparing the template light curve with light curves obtained from subsets of a given time series. Most of the variations we detect in O-C diagrams correspond to a linear period change. Three of the O-C diagrams show evidence of more than one complete LTE orbit. For these objects we obtain preliminary orbital solutions. Our results demonstrate that the timing analysis employed in radio pulsar timing can be effectively used to study large data sets from photometric surveys.

  8. Extragalactic Transients Discovered by the All-Sky Automated Survey for SuperNovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren-Son Holoien, Thomas; ASAS-SN Team

    2015-01-01

    Even in the modern era, only human eyes scan the entire optical sky for the violent, variable, and transient events that shape our universe. The "All Sky Automated Survey for SuperNovae" (ASAS-SN or "Assassin") is changing this by monitoring the extra-galactic sky down to V~17 mag every 2-3 days using multiple telescopes in the northern and southern hemispheres, hosted by Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope Network. The primary goal of ASAS-SN is a complete survey of bright, nearby supernovae (SNe), and since April 2013 ASAS-SN has discovered over 40 new Type-Ia SNe and over 15 new core collapse SNe, including roughly half of all the SNe currently visible with V<17 mag. ASAS-SN also discovers many other interesting extragalactic transients, the most exciting of which was the recent tidal disruption event (TDE) ASASSN-14ae at ~200 Mpc, the closest TDE ever discovered at optical wavelengths. The brightness of these nearby events allows detailed follow-up at many wavelengths. Here we present some of these data on recent ASAS-SN extragalactic transients.

  9. High-velocity Clouds in the Galactic All Sky Survey. I. Catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moss, V. A.; McClure-Griffiths, N. M.; Murphy, T.; Pisano, D. J.; Kummerfeld, J. K.; Curran, J. R.

    2013-11-01

    We present a catalog of high-velocity clouds (HVCs) from the Galactic All Sky Survey (GASS) of southern sky neutral hydrogen, which has 57 mK sensitivity and 1 km s-1 velocity resolution and was obtained with the Parkes Telescope. Our catalog has been derived from the stray-radiation-corrected second release of GASS. We describe the data and our method of identifying HVCs and analyze the overall properties of the GASS population. We catalog a total of 1693 HVCs at declinations <0°, including 1111 positive velocity HVCs and 582 negative velocity HVCs. Our catalog also includes 295 anomalous velocity clouds (AVCs). The cloud line-widths of our HVC population have a median FWHM of ~19 km s-1, which is lower than that found in previous surveys. The completeness of our catalog is above 95% based on comparison with the HIPASS catalog of HVCs upon which we improve by an order of magnitude in spectral resolution. We find 758 new HVCs and AVCs with no HIPASS counterpart. The GASS catalog will shed unprecedented light on the distribution and kinematic structure of southern sky HVCs, as well as delve further into the cloud populations that make up the anomalous velocity gas of the Milky Way.

  10. HIGH-VELOCITY CLOUDS IN THE GALACTIC ALL SKY SURVEY. I. CATALOG

    SciTech Connect

    Moss, V. A.; Kummerfeld, J. K.; McClure-Griffiths, N. M.; Murphy, T.; Pisano, D. J.; Curran, J. R.

    2013-11-01

    We present a catalog of high-velocity clouds (HVCs) from the Galactic All Sky Survey (GASS) of southern sky neutral hydrogen, which has 57 mK sensitivity and 1 km s{sup –1} velocity resolution and was obtained with the Parkes Telescope. Our catalog has been derived from the stray-radiation-corrected second release of GASS. We describe the data and our method of identifying HVCs and analyze the overall properties of the GASS population. We catalog a total of 1693 HVCs at declinations <0°, including 1111 positive velocity HVCs and 582 negative velocity HVCs. Our catalog also includes 295 anomalous velocity clouds (AVCs). The cloud line-widths of our HVC population have a median FWHM of ∼19 km s{sup –1}, which is lower than that found in previous surveys. The completeness of our catalog is above 95% based on comparison with the HIPASS catalog of HVCs upon which we improve by an order of magnitude in spectral resolution. We find 758 new HVCs and AVCs with no HIPASS counterpart. The GASS catalog will shed unprecedented light on the distribution and kinematic structure of southern sky HVCs, as well as delve further into the cloud populations that make up the anomalous velocity gas of the Milky Way.

  11. Multifrequency observations of KAZ 102 during the ROSAT all-sky survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Treves, A.; Fink, H. H.; Malkan, M.; Wilkes, B. J.; Baganoff, F.; Heidt, J.; Pian, E.; Sadun, A.; Schaeidt, S.; Bonnell, J. T.

    1995-01-01

    The bright quasar Kaz 102, which lies in the vicinity of the North Ecliptic Pole, was monitored during the ROSAT All Sky Survey for 121.5 days from 1990 July 30 to 1991 January 25. In the course of the survey, optical photometry with various filters was peformed at several epochs, together with UV (IUE) and optical spectrophotometry. The spectral energy distribution in the 3 x 10(exp 14) -3 x 10(exp 17) Hz range is obtained simultaneously among the various frequencies to less than or = 1 day. No clear case of variability can be made in the X-rays, while in the optical and UV variability of 10%-20% is apparent. An analysis of IUE and Einstein archives indicates a doubling timescale of years for the UV and soft X-ray flux. The X-ray photon index, which in 1979 was rather flat (Gamma = 0.8(+0.6 -0.4), in 1990/1991 was found to be Gamma = 2.22 +/- 0.13, a typical value for radio-quiet quasars in this energy range. The overall energy distribution and the variability are discussed.

  12. Meteor shower forecast improvements from a survey of all-sky network observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moorhead, Althea V.; Sugar, Glenn; Brown, Peter G.; Cooke, William J.

    2015-11-01

    Meteoroid impacts are capable of damaging spacecraft and potentially ending missions. In order to help spacecraft programs mitigate these risks, NASA’s Meteoroid Environment Office (MEO) monitors and predicts meteoroid activity. Temporal variations in near-Earth space are described by the MEO’s annual meteor shower forecast, which is based on both past shower activity and model predictions.The MEO and the University of Western Ontario operate sister networks of all-sky meteor cameras. These networks have been in operation for more than 7 years and have computed more than 20,000 meteor orbits. Using these data, we conduct a survey of meteor shower activity in the “fireball” size regime using DBSCAN. For each shower detected in our survey, we compute the date of peak activity and characterize the growth and decay of the shower’s activity before and after the peak. These parameters are then incorporated into the annual forecast for an improved treatment of annual activity.

  13. A 408 MHz all-sky continuum survey. I - Observations at southern declinations and for the North Polar region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haslam, C. G. T.; Klein, U.; Salter, C. J.; Stoffel, H.; Wilson, W. E.; Cleary, M. N.; Cooke, D. J.; Thomasson, P.

    1981-07-01

    The observation, data reduction and calibration of two large area radio continuum surveys at 408 MHz are described in detail. The resolution of both is close to 0.85 deg. One covers the complete southern sky, the other the north polar regions and, together with existing observations, they form the data-base for the first all-sky continuum survey of better than one degree resolution. Sample maps of astronomical interest are presented and possible uses of the 408 MHz survey are discussed. The full set of maps will appear in a companion all-sky atlas.

  14. A Two Micron All Sky Survey Analysis of the Stability of Southern Bok Globules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Racca, Germán A.; Vilas-Boas, José W. S.; de la Reza, Ramiro

    2009-10-01

    We used near-infrared Two Micron All Sky Survey data to construct visual extinction maps of a sample of Southern Bok globules utilizing the NICE method. We derived radial extinction profiles of dense cores identified in the globules and analyzed their stability against gravitational collapse with isothermal Bonnor-Ebert spheres. The frequency distribution of the stability parameter (ξmax) of these cores shows that a large number of them are located in stable states, followed by an abrupt decrease of cores in unstable states. This decrease is steeper for globules with associated IRAS point sources than for starless globules. Moreover, globules in stable states have a Bonnor-Ebert temperature of T = 15 ± 6 K, while the group of critical plus unstable globules has a different temperature of T = 10 ± 3 K. Distances were estimated to all the globules studied in this work and the spectral class of the IRAS sources was calculated. No variations were found in the stability parameters of the cores and the spectral class of their associated IRAS sources. On the basis of 13CO J = 1 - 0 molecular line observations, we identified and modeled a blue-asymmetric line profile toward a globule of the sample, obtaining an upper limit infall speed of 0.25 km s-1. Based on a Ph.D. thesis made at Observatório Nacional, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

  15. THE DIFFUSE SOFT EXCESS EMISSION IN THE COMA CLUSTER FROM THE ROSAT ALL-SKY SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    Bonamente, M.; Lieu, R.; Bulbul, E.

    2009-05-10

    ROSAT All-Sky Survey (RASS) data near the North Galactic Pole was analyzed in order to study the large-scale distribution of soft X-ray emission from the Coma cluster. These ROSAT data constitute the only available X-ray observations of Coma that feature an in situ-temporally and spatially contiguous-background, with unlimited and continuous radial coverage. These unique characteristics of the RASS data are used to deliver a final assessment on whether the soft excess previously detected in the Coma cluster is due to background subtraction errors, or not. This paper confirms the presence of soft X-ray excess associated with Coma, and reports the detection of 1/4 keV band excess out to 5 Mpc from the cluster center, the largest soft excess halo discovered to date. We propose that the emission is related to filaments that converge toward Coma, and generated either by nonthermal radiation caused by accretion shocks, or by thermal emission from the filaments themselves.

  16. Extragalactic Transients Discovered by the All-Sky Automated Survey for Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Jonathan; Warren-Son Holoien, Thomas; ASAS-SN

    2016-01-01

    Even in the modern era, only human eyes can scan the entire optical sky for the violent, variable, and transient events that shape our universe. The "All-Sky Automated Survey for Supernovae" (ASAS-SN or "Assassin") is changing this by monitoring the extra-galactic sky down to V~17 mag every 2-3 days using multiple telescopes, hosted by Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope Network, in the northern and southern hemispheres. The primary goal of ASAS-SN is to discover bright, nearby supernovae (SNe), we are discovering more than 60% of supernovae with V<17. Since June 2013, we have discovered 224 supernovae, 133 in 2015 alone (as of September 30, 2015). ASAS-SN has also discovered many other interesting extragalactic transients, including the three closest tidal disruption events (TDEs) ever discovered at optical wavelengths. The nearby nature of ASASSN discoveries allows detailed follow-up across a wide wavelength coverage; here we present some of these data on recent ASAS-SN extragalactic transients.

  17. Studies of gravitational lens systems discovered in the Cosmic Lens All-Sky Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rusin, David Joseph

    2001-11-01

    This thesis describes research conducted on and inspired by the Cosmic Lens All-Sky Survey (CLASS), which searches for new cases of gravitational lensing among compact radio sources. CLASS aims to provide the largest and best-studied sample of lens systems for use in constraining the properties of galaxy mass distributions, determining the Hubble parameter and placing limits on the cosmological constant. The goal of this thesis was to complete observations of the CLASS sample, discover and thoroughly investigate new lenses, and apply them to interesting astrophysical problems. We begin with a detailed overview of the CLASS project, including scientific goals, the radio source sample, survey observations, candidate selection and follow-ups. Results are then presented from the third phase of the CLASS survey (CLASS-3), which yielded three new gravitational lens systems. 130850+054 and 131152+199 both consist of a pair of lensed images. 131359+154 features six images of a single source, and is the first arcsecond-scale system in which a source is lensed into more than four images. We also present observations and modeling of the CLASS-2 gravitational lens B2319+051. We use the absence of detectable central images in deep radio maps of CLASS lens systems to place powerful constraints on the inner mass profiles of leasing galaxies. These analyses imply that the profile slopes cannot be much shallower than isothermal. Finally, we consider the relative frequency of two and four-image lens systems, and demonstrate that there is a statistically significant overdensity of quads in the CLASS sample. We investigate a range of factors that may be increasing the frequency of radio quads, including external shear fields, mass distributions flatter than the light, shallow leasing mass profiles, finite core radii, satellite galaxies, and alterations to the luminosity function for faint flat-spectrum radio sources. Surprisingly, none of these mechanisms provide a particularly

  18. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Second ROSAT all-sky survey (2RXS) source catalog (Boller+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boller, T.; Freyberg, M. J.; Truemper, J.; Haberl, F.; Voges, W.; Nandra, K.

    2016-03-01

    We have re-analysed the photon event files from the ROSAT all-sky survey. The main goal was to create a catalogue of point-like sources, which is referred to as the 2RXS source catalogue. We improved the reliability of detections by an advanced detection algorithm and a complete screening process. New data products were created to allow timing and spectral analysis. Photon event files with corrected astrometry and Moon rejection (RASS-3.1 processing) were made available in FITS format. The 2RXS catalogue will serve as the basic X-ray all-sky survey catalogue until eROSITA data become available. (2 data files).

  19. The 60-month all-sky BAT Survey of AGN and the Anisotropy of Nearby AGN

    SciTech Connect

    Ajello, M.; Alexander, D.M.; Greiner, J.; Madejski, G.M.; Gehrels, N.; Burlon, D.; /Garching, Max Planck Inst., MPE

    2012-04-02

    Surveys above 10 keV represent one of the the best resources to provide an unbiased census of the population of Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN). We present the results of 60 months of observation of the hard X-ray sky with Swift/BAT. In this timeframe, BAT detected (in the 15-55 keV band) 720 sources in an all-sky survey of which 428 are associated with AGN, most of which are nearby. Our sample has negligible incompleteness and statistics a factor of {approx}2 larger over similarly complete sets of AGN. Our sample contains (at least) 15 bona-fide Compton-thick AGN and 3 likely candidates. Compton-thick AGN represent a {approx}5% of AGN samples detected above 15 keV. We use the BAT dataset to refine the determination of the LogN-LogS of AGN which is extremely important, now that NuSTAR prepares for launch, towards assessing the AGN contribution to the cosmic X-ray background. We show that the LogN-LogS of AGN selected above 10 keV is now established to a {approx}10% precision. We derive the luminosity function of Compton-thick AGN and measure a space density of 7.9{sub -2.9}{sup +4.1} x 10{sup -5} Mpc{sup -3} for objects with a de-absorbed luminosity larger than 2 x 10{sup 42} erg s{sup -1}. As the BAT AGN are all mostly local, they allow us to investigate the spatial distribution of AGN in the nearby Universe regardless of absorption. We find concentrations of AGN that coincide spatially with the largest congregations of matter in the local ({le} 85 Mpc) Universe. There is some evidence that the fraction of Seyfert 2 objects is larger than average in the direction of these dense regions.

  20. C-Band All-Sky Survey: a first look at the Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irfan, M. O.; Dickinson, C.; Davies, R. D.; Copley, C.; Davis, R. J.; Ferreira, P. G.; Holler, C. M.; Jonas, J. L.; Jones, Michael E.; King, O. G.; Leahy, J. P.; Leech, J.; Leitch, E. M.; Muchovej, S. J. C.; Pearson, T. J.; Peel, M. W.; Readhead, A. C. S.; Stevenson, M. A.; Sutton, D.; Taylor, Angela C.; Zuntz, J.

    2015-04-01

    We present an analysis of the diffuse emission at 5 GHz in the first quadrant of the Galactic plane using two months of preliminary intensity data taken with the C-Band All-Sky Survey (C-BASS) northern instrument at the Owens Valley Radio Observatory, California. Combining C-BASS maps with ancillary data to make temperature-temperature plots, we find synchrotron spectral indices of β = -2.65 ± 0.05 between 0.408 and 5 GHz and β = -2.72 ± 0.09 between 1.420 and 5 GHz for -10° < |b| < -4°, 20° < l < 40°. Through the subtraction of a radio recombination line free-free template, we determine the synchrotron spectral index in the Galactic plane (|b| < 4°) to be β = -2.56 ± 0.07 between 0.408 and 5 GHz, with a contribution of 53 ± 8 per cent from free-free emission at 5 GHz. These results are consistent with previous low-frequency measurements in the Galactic plane. By including C-BASS data in spectral fits, we demonstrate the presence of anomalous microwave emission (AME) associated with the H II complexes W43, W44 and W47 near 30 GHz, at 4.4σ, 3.1σ and 2.5σ, respectively. The CORNISH (Co-Ordinated Radio `N' Infrared Survey for High mass star formation) VLA 5-GHz source catalogue rules out the possibility that the excess emission detected around 30 GHz may be due to ultracompact H II regions. Diffuse AME was also identified at a 4σ level within 30° < l < 40°, -2° < b < 2° between 5 and 22.8 GHz.

  1. Planck's dusty GEMS: The brightest gravitationally lensed galaxies discovered with the Planck all-sky survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cañameras, R.; Nesvadba, N. P. H.; Guery, D.; McKenzie, T.; König, S.; Petitpas, G.; Dole, H.; Frye, B.; Flores-Cacho, I.; Montier, L.; Negrello, M.; Beelen, A.; Boone, F.; Dicken, D.; Lagache, G.; Le Floc'h, E.; Altieri, B.; Béthermin, M.; Chary, R.; de Zotti, G.; Giard, M.; Kneissl, R.; Krips, M.; Malhotra, S.; Martinache, C.; Omont, A.; Pointecouteau, E.; Puget, J.-L.; Scott, D.; Soucail, G.; Valtchanov, I.; Welikala, N.; Yan, L.

    2015-09-01

    We present an analysis of CO spectroscopy and infrared-to-millimetre dust photometry of 11 exceptionally bright far-infrared (FIR) and sub-mm sources discovered through a combination of the Planck all-sky survey and follow-up Herschel-SPIRE imaging - "Planck's Dusty Gravitationally Enhanced subMillimetre Sources". Each source has a secure spectroscopic redshift z = 2.2-3.6 from multiple lines obtained through a blind redshift search with EMIR at the IRAM 30-m telescope. Interferometry was obtained at IRAM and the SMA, and along with optical/near-infrared imaging obtained at the CFHT and the VLT reveal morphologies consistent with strongly gravitationally lensed sources, including several giant arcs. Additional photometry was obtained with JCMT/SCUBA-2 and IRAM/GISMO at 850 μm and 2 mm, respectively. The SEDs of our sources peak near either the 350 μm or 500 μm bands of SPIRE with peak flux densities between 0.35 and 1.14 Jy. All objects are extremely bright isolated point sources in the 18'' beam of SPIREat 250 μm, with apparent FIR luminosities of up to 3 × 1014 L⊙ (not correcting for the lensing effect). Their morphologies, sizes, CO line widths, CO luminosities, dust temperatures, and FIR luminosities provide additional empirical evidence that these are amongst the brightest strongly gravitationally lensed high-redshift galaxies on the sub-mm sky. Our programme extends the successful wide-area searches for strongly gravitationally lensed high-redshift galaxies (carried out with the South Pole Telescope and Herschel) towards even brighter sources, which are so rare that their systematic identification requires a genuine all-sky survey like Planck. Six sources are above the ≃600 mJy 90% completeness limit of the Planck catalogue of compact sources (PCCS) at 545 and 857 GHz, which implies that these must literally be amongst the brightest high-redshift FIR and sub-mm sources on the extragalactic sky. We discuss their dust masses and temperatures, and use

  2. Properties of eclipsing binaries from all-sky surveys - I. Detached eclipsing binaries in ASAS, NSVS, and LINEAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee ( ), Chien-Hsiu

    2015-11-01

    Eclipsing binaries provide a unique opportunity to measure fundamental properties of stars. With the advent of all-sky surveys, thousands of eclipsing binaries have been reported, yet their light curves are not fully exploited. The goal of this work is to make use of the eclipsing binary light curves delivered by all-sky surveys. We attempt to extract physical parameters of the binary systems from their light curves and colour. Inspired by the work of Devor et al., we use the Detached Eclipsing Binary Light curve fitter (DEBIL) and the Method for Eclipsing Component Identification (MECI) to derive basic properties of the binary systems reported by the All Sky Automated Survey, the Northern Sky Variability Survey, and the Lincoln Near Earth Asteroids Research. We derive the mass, fractional radius, and age for 783 binary systems. We report a subsample of eccentric systems and compare their properties to the tidal circularization theory. With MECI, we are able to estimate the distance of the eclipsing binary systems and use them to probe the structure of the Milky Way. Following the approach of Devor et al., we demonstrate that DEBIL and MECI are instrumental to investigate eclipsing binary light curves in the era of all-sky surveys, and provide estimates of stellar parameters of both binary components without spectroscopic information.

  3. All Sky Automated Survey for SuperNovae (ASAS-SN or "Assassin")

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shappee, Benjamin; Prieto, J.; Stanek, K. Z.; Kochanek, C. S.; Holoien, T.; Jencson, J.; Basu, U.; Beacom, J. F.; Szczygiel, D.; Pojmanski, G.; Brimacombe, J.; Dubberley, M.; Elphick, M.; Foale, S.; Hawkins, E.; Mullins, D.; Rosing, W.; Ross, R.; Walker, Z.

    2014-01-01

    Even in the modern era, only human eyes scan the entire optical sky for the violent, variable, and transient events that shape our universe. The "All Sky Automated Survey for Supernovae" (ASAS-SN or "Assassin") is changing this by surveying the extragalactic sky roughly once a week, and within a year ASAS-SN will triple in size. We began running our real-time search for variable sources in late April 2013 with our first unit, "Brutus". Brutus presently consists of two telescopes on a common mount hosted by Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope Network in the Faulkes Telescope North enclosure on Mount Haleakala, Hawaii. Each telescope consists of a 14-cm Nikon telephoto lens and has a 4.47 by 4.47 degree field-of-view. On a typical clear night, it can survey 5000+ square degrees. The data are reduced in real-time, and we can search for transient candidates about an hour after the data are taken using an automated difference imaging pipeline. We are now meeting, and frequently exceeding, our current depth goal of 16 mag, corresponding to the apparent brightness at maximum light of core-collapse SNe within ~30 Mpc and SNe Ia out to ~100 Mpc. Brutus will shortly expand to have four cameras instead of two, and a second unit, "Cassius", with two cameras, should commence operations in early 2014 on Cerro Tololo, Chile. With these expansions, ASAS-SN will be able to observe the entire extragalactic sky every 2-3 nights. ASAS-SN has already discovered 10+ nearby SNe, 100+ outbursts from CVs and novae, 15+ M-dwarf and other stellar flares, and AGN outbursts which have resulted in 35+ ATel and CBET telegrams and 3 publications. In particular, ASAS-SN discovered one of the most extreme M-dwarf Flares ever detected (delta 9 mag). Furthermore, after triggering on an outburst in NGC 2617 we found that the AGN had changed from a Type 1.8 into a Type 1 Seyfert. After monitoring the transient with Swift and ground-based telescopes for 70 days, we clearly determined that the X

  4. Data Analysis for Continuous Gravitational Waves: Deepest All-Sky Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pletsch, Holger J.

    2009-11-01

    Direct detection of gravitational waves would not only validate Einstein's theory of General Relativity but also constitute an important new astronomical tool. Continuous gravitational-wave (CW) signals are expected for instance from rapidly rotating neutron stars. Most such stars are estimated to be electromagnetically invisible, but might be detected and studied via gravitational waves. This dissertation is concerned with the development, study and application of data- analysis techniques to detect CW signals from previously unknown sources through all-sky surveys over broadest possible ranges of putative source frequencies and frequency time-derivatives. An all-sky CW search is presented using 510 hours of data from the fourth science run (S4) of the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO), covering frequencies of 50 to 1500 Hz and linear drifts in frequency. The main computational work of the search is distributed over hundreds of thousands of computers via the public volunteer computing project "Einstein@Home". This enormous computing capacity allows the exploration of a wide parameter space, despite of using comparably long coherent integration times of 30 hours, subdividing the 510 hours of data into 17 segments. To enhance the sensitivity of the search, in a post-processing stage the coherent-analysis results from the 17 data segments are combined through a highly efficient coincidence scheme. Moreover, the sensitivity of the search is estimated, along with the fraction of parameter space vetoed because of contamination by instrumental artifacts. In a further Einstein@Home CW search the previous S4 analysis is extended to use 840 hours of early fifth-science-run (S5) LIGO data, which are examined in 28 coherent segments of 30 hours. The major part of the post-processing is again related to efficiently combining the 28 coherently-analyzed segments. Despite probing a slightly larger parameter space, this analysis achieves 3 times better

  5. Measuring the X-ray luminosities of SDSS DR7 clusters from ROSAT All Sky Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lei; Yang, Xiaohu; Shen, Shiyin; Mo, H. J.; van den Bosch, Frank C.; Luo, Wentao; Wang, Yu; Lau, Erwin T.; Wang, Q. D.; Kang, Xi; Li, Ran

    2014-03-01

    We use ROSAT All Sky Survey broad-band X-ray images and the optical clusters identified from Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7 to estimate the X-ray luminosities around ˜65 000 candidate clusters with masses ≳ 1013 h- 1 M⊙ based on an optical to X-ray (OTX) code we develop. We obtain a catalogue with X-ray luminosity for each cluster. This catalogue contains 817 clusters (473 at redshift z ≤ 0.12) with signal-to-noise ratio >3 in X-ray detection. We find about 65 per cent of these X-ray clusters have their most massive member located near the X-ray flux peak; for the rest 35 per cent, the most massive galaxy is separated from the X-ray peak, with the separation following a distribution expected from a Navarro-Frenk-White profile. We investigate a number of correlations between the optical and X-ray properties of these X-ray clusters, and find that the cluster X-ray luminosity is correlated with the stellar mass (luminosity) of the clusters, as well as with the stellar mass (luminosity) of the central galaxy and the mass of the halo, but the scatter in these correlations is large. Comparing the properties of X-ray clusters of similar halo masses but having different X-ray luminosities, we find that massive haloes with masses ≳ 1014 h- 1 M⊙ contain a larger fraction of red satellite galaxies when they are brighter in X-ray. An opposite trend is found in central galaxies in relative low-mass haloes with masses ≲ 1014 h- 1 M⊙ where X-ray brighter clusters have smaller fraction of red central galaxies. Clusters with masses ≳ 1014 h- 1 M⊙ that are strong X-ray emitters contain many more low-mass satellite galaxies than weak X-ray emitters. These results are also confirmed by checking X-ray clusters of similar X-ray luminosities but having different characteristic stellar masses. A cluster catalogue containing the optical properties of member galaxies and the X-ray luminosity is available at http://gax.shao.ac.cn/data/Group.html.

  6. Two Micron All Sky Survey Photometric Redshift Catalog: A Comprehensive Three-dimensional Census of the Whole Sky

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilicki, Maciej; Jarrett, Thomas H.; Peacock, John A.; Cluver, Michelle E.; Steward, Louise

    2014-01-01

    Key cosmological applications require the three-dimensional (3D) galaxy distribution on the entire celestial sphere. These include measuring the gravitational pull on the Local Group, estimating the large-scale bulk flow, and testing the Copernican principle. However, the largest all-sky redshift surveys—the 2MASS Redshift Survey and IRAS Point Source Catalog Redshift Survey—have median redshifts of only z = 0.03 and sample the very local universe. All-sky galaxy catalogs exist that reach much deeper—SuperCOSMOS in the optical, the Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS) in the near-IR, and WISE in the mid-IR—but these lack complete redshift information. At present, the only rapid way toward larger 3D catalogs covering the whole sky is through photometric redshift techniques. In this paper we present the 2MASS Photometric Redshift catalog (2MPZ) containing one million galaxies, constructed by cross-matching Two Micron All Sky Survey Extended Source Catalog (2MASS XSC), WISE, and SuperCOSMOS all-sky samples and employing the artificial neural network approach (the ANNz algorithm), trained on such redshift surveys as the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, 6dFGS, and 2dFGRS. The derived photometric redshifts have errors nearly independent of distance, with an all-sky accuracy of σ z = 0.015 and a very small percentage of outliers. In this way, we obtain redshift estimates with a typical precision of 12% for all the 2MASS XSC galaxies that lack spectroscopy. In addition, we have made an early effort toward probing the entire 3D sky beyond 2MASS, by pairing up WISE with SuperCOSMOS and training the ANNz on GAMA redshift data currently reaching to z med ~ 0.2. This has yielded photo-z accuracies comparable to those in the 2MPZ. These all-sky photo-z catalogs, with a median z ~ 0.1 for the 2MPZ, and significantly deeper for future WISE-based samples, will be the largest and most complete of their kind for the foreseeable future.

  7. Sub-MeV all sky survey with a compact Si/CdTe Compton telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakazawa, Kazuhiro; Takahashi, Tadayuki; Watanabe, Shin; Ichinohe, Yuto; Takeda, Shin'ichiro; Enoto, Teruaki; Fukazawa, Yasushi; Kamae, Tuneyoshi; Kokubun, Motohide; Makishima, Kazuo; Mitani, Takefumi; Mizuno, Tsunefumi; Nomachi, Masaharu; Tajima, Hiroyasu; Takashima, Takeshi; Tamagawa, Toru; Terada, Yukikatsu; Tashiro, Makoto; Uchiyama, Yasunobu; Yoshimitsu, Tetsuo

    2014-07-01

    Recent progress in wide field of view or all-sky observations such as Swift/BAT hard X-ray monitor and Fermi GeV gamma-ray observatory has opened up a new era of time-domain high energy astro-physics addressing new insight in, e.g., particle acceleration in the universe. MeV coverage with comparable sensitivity, i.e. 1 ~ 10 mCrab is missing and a new MeV all-sky observatory is needed. These new MeV mission tend to be large, power- consuming and hence expensive, and its realization is yet to come. A compact sub-MeV (0.2-2 MeV) all-sky mission is proposed as a path finder for such mission. It is based on a Si/CdTe semiconductor Compton telescope technology employed in the soft gamma-ray detector onboard ASTRO-H, to be launched in to orbit on late 2015. The mission is kept as small as 0:5 X 0:5 X 0:4 m3, 150 kg in weight and 200 W in power in place of the band coverage above a few MeV, in favor of early realization as a sub-payload to other large platforms, such as the international space station.

  8. AKARI Infrared Camera Survey of the Large Magellanic Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimonishi, Takashi; Kato, Daisuke; Ita, Yoshifusa; Onaka, Takashi

    2015-08-01

    The Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) is one of the closest external galaxies to the Milky Way and has been playing a central role in various fields of modern astronomy and astrophysics. We conducted an unbiased near- to mid-infrared imaging and spectroscopic survey of the LMC with the infrared satellite AKARI. An area of about 10 square degrees of the LMC was observed by five imaging bands (each centered at 3.2, 7, 11, 15, and 24 micron) and the low-resolution slitless prism spectroscopy mode (2--5 micron, R~20) equipped with the Infrared Camera on board AKARI. Based on the data obtained in the survey, we constructed the photometric and spectroscopic catalogues of point sources in the LMC. The photometric catalogue includes about 650,000, 90,000, 49,000, 17,000, 7,000 sources at 3.2, 7, 11, 15, and 24 micron, respectively (Ita et al. 2008, PASJ, 60, 435; Kato et al. 2012, AJ, 144, 179), while the spectroscopic catalogue includes 1,757 sources (Shimonishi et al. 2013, AJ, 145, 32). Both catalogs are publicly released and available through a website (AKARI Observers Page, http://www.ir.isas.ac.jp/AKARI/Observation/). The catalog includes various infrared sources such as young stellar objects, asymptotic giant branch stars, giants/supergiants, and many other cool or dust-enshrouded stars. A large number of near-infrared spectral data, coupled with complementary broadband photometric data, allow us to investigate infrared spectral features of sources by comparison with their spectral energy distributions. Combined use of the present AKARI LMC catalogues with other infrared catalogues such as SAGE and HERITAGE possesses scientific potential that can be applied to various astronomical studies. In this presentation, we report the details of the AKARI photometric and spectroscopic catalogues of the LMC.

  9. Mid-Infrared All-Sky Survey with the Infrared Camera (IRC) on Board the ASTRO-F Satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishihara, D.; Wada, T.; Onaka, T.; Matsuhara, H.; Kataza, H.; Ueno, M.; Fujishiro, N.; Kim, W.; Watarai, H.; Uemizu, K.; Murakami, H.; Matsumoto, T.; Yamamura, I.

    2006-02-01

    An all-sky survey in two mid-infrared bands covering wavelengths from 6 to 12 and 14 to 26 μm, with a spatial resolution of ~9.4"-10", will be performed with the Infrared Camera (IRC) on board the ASTRO-F infrared astronomical satellite. The expected detection limit for point sources is 80-130 mJy (5 σ). The all-sky survey will provide data with a detection limit and a spatial resolution an order of magnitude deeper and higher, respectively, than those of the Infrared Astronomical Satellite survey. The IRC is optimally designed for deep imaging in staring observations. It employs 256 × 256 Si:As IBC infrared focal plane arrays for the two mid-infrared channels. In order to make observations with the IRC during the scanning observations for the all-sky survey, a new method of operation for the arrays has been developed-``scan mode'' operation. In the scan mode, only 256 pixels in a single row aligned in the cross-scan direction on the array are used as the scan detector, and they are sampled every 44 ms. Special care has been taken to stabilize the temperature of the array in scan mode, which enables the user to achieve a low readout noise, comparable to that in the imaging mode (20-30 e-). The accuracy of the position determination and the flux measurement for point sources is examined both in computer simulations and laboratory tests with the flight model camera and moving artificial point sources. In this paper we present the scan mode operation of the array, the results of the computer simulation and the laboratory performance test, and the expected performance of the IRC all-sky survey observations.

  10. DISCOVERIES FROM A NEAR-INFRARED PROPER MOTION SURVEY USING MULTI-EPOCH TWO MICRON ALL-SKY SURVEY DATA

    SciTech Connect

    Kirkpatrick, J. Davy; Cutri, Roc M.; Looper, Dagny L.; Burgasser, Adam J.; Schurr, Steven D.; Cushing, Michael C.; Cruz, Kelle L.; Sweet, Anne C.; Knapp, Gillian R.; Barman, Travis S.; Bochanski, John J.; Roellig, Thomas L.; McLean, Ian S.; McGovern, Mark R.; Rice, Emily L.

    2010-09-15

    We have conducted a 4030 deg{sup 2} near-infrared proper motion survey using multi-epoch data from the Two Micron All-Sky Survey (2MASS). We find 2778 proper motion candidates, 647 of which are not listed in SIMBAD. After comparison to Digitized Sky Survey images, we find that 107 of our proper motion candidates lack counterparts at B, R, and I bands and are thus 2MASS-only detections. We present results of spectroscopic follow-up of 188 targets that include the infrared-only sources along with selected optical-counterpart sources with faint reduced proper motions or interesting colors. We also establish a set of near-infrared spectroscopic standards with which to anchor near-infrared classifications for our objects. Among the discoveries are six young field brown dwarfs, five 'red L' dwarfs, three L-type subdwarfs, twelve M-type subdwarfs, eight 'blue L' dwarfs, and several T dwarfs. We further refine the definitions of these exotic classes to aid future identification of similar objects. We examine their kinematics and find that both the 'blue L' and 'red L' dwarfs appear to be drawn from a relatively old population. This survey provides a glimpse of the kinds of research that will be possible through time-domain infrared projects such as the UKIDSS Large Area Survey, various VISTA surveys, and WISE, and also through z- or y-band enabled, multi-epoch surveys such as Pan-STARRS and LSST.

  11. A LIMIT ON THE NUMBER OF ISOLATED NEUTRON STARS DETECTED IN THE ROSAT ALL-SKY-SURVEY BRIGHT SOURCE CATALOG

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, Monica L.; Rutledge, Robert E.; Letcavage, Ryan; Shevchuk, Andrew S. H.; Fox, Derek B. E-mail: rutledge@physics.mcgill.c E-mail: ahs148@psu.ed

    2010-05-10

    Using new and archival observations made with the Swift satellite and other facilities, we examine 147 X-ray sources selected from the ROSAT All-Sky-Survey Bright Source Catalog (RASS/BSC) to produce a new limit on the number of isolated neutron stars (INSs) in the RASS/BSC, the most constraining such limit to date. Independent of X-ray spectrum and variability, the number of INSs is {<=}48 (90% confidence). Restricting attention to soft (kT{sub eff} < 200 eV), non-variable X-ray sources-as in a previous study-yields an all-sky limit of {<=}31 INSs. In the course of our analysis, we identify five new high-quality INS candidates for targeted follow-up observations. A future all-sky X-ray survey with eROSITA, or another mission with similar capabilities, can be expected to increase the detected population of X-ray-discovered INSs from the 8-50 in the BSC, to (for a disk population) 240-1500, which will enable a more detailed study of neutron star population models.

  12. High sensitivity all sky X-ray monitor and survey with MAXI

    SciTech Connect

    Isobe, N.; Mihara, T.; Kohama, M.; Suzuki, M.; Matsuoka, M.; Ueno, S.; Tomida, H.; Yoshida, A.; Yamaoka, K.; Tsunemi, H.; Miyata, E.; Negoro, H.; Nakajima, M.; Morii, M.

    2007-07-12

    MAXI is an all sky X-ray monitor to be mounted on the Japanese Experimental Module in the International Space Station (ISS). It scans almost all over the sky every 96 minutes, in the course of the orbital motion of the ISS. MAXI is designed to have a sensitivity, significantly higher than the previous X-ray monitors, and then, to detect X-ray sources as faint as 1 mCrab in a week observation. Therefore, MAXI is expected to create a novel catalogue of not only the stable X-ray sources but also the highly variable ones in the sky, especially active galactic nuclei for the first time. If MAXI detects X-ray phenomena, alerts will be quickly made through the Internet.

  13. Mid-infrared all-sky survey with the infrared camera (IRC) on board the ASTRO-F

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishihara, Daisuke; Wada, Takehiko; Onaka, Takashi; Matsuhara, Hideo; Kataza, Hirokazu; Ueno, Munetaka; Fujishiro, Naofumi; Kim, Woojung; Watarai, Hidenori; Uemizu, Kazunori; Murakami, Hiroshi; Matsumoto, Toshio; Yamamura, Issei

    2004-10-01

    An all-sky survey in two mid-infrared bands which cover wavelengths of 5-12um and 12-26μm with a spatial resolution of ~9" is planned to be performed with the Infrared Camera (IRC) on board the ASTRO-F infrared astronomical satellite. The expected detection limits for point sources are few tens mJy. The all-sky survey will provide the data with sensitivities more than one order of magnitude deeper and with spatial resolutions an order of magnitude higher than the Infrared Astronomical Satellite (IRAS) survey. The IRC is optimally designed for deep imaging in pointing observations. It employs 256x256 Si:As IBC infrared focal plane arrays (FPA) for the two mid-infrared channels. In order to make observations with the IRC during the survey mode of the ASTRO-F, a new operation method for the arrays has been developed - the scan mode operation. In the scan mode, only 256 pixels in a single row aligned in the cross-scan direction on the array are used as the scan detector and sampled every 44ms. Special cares have been made to stabilize the temperature of the array in the scan mode, which enables to achieve a low readout noise compatible with the imaging mode (~30 e-). The flux calibration method in the scan mode observation is also investigated. The performance of scan mode observations has been examined in computer simulations as well as in laboratory simulations by using the flight model camera and moving artificial point sources. In this paper we present the scan mode operation method of the array, the results of laboratory performance tests, the results of the computer simulation, and the expected performance of the IRC all-sky survey observations.

  14. X-RAY-EMITTING STARS IDENTIFIED FROM THE ROSAT ALL-SKY SURVEY AND THE SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    Agueeros, Marcel A.; Newsom, Emily R.; Anderson, Scott F.; Hawley, Suzanne L.; Silvestri, Nicole M.; Szkody, Paula; Covey, Kevin R.; Posselt, Bettina; Margon, Bruce; Voges, Wolfgang

    2009-04-15

    The ROSAT All-Sky Survey (RASS) was the first imaging X-ray survey of the entire sky. Combining the RASS Bright and Faint Source Catalogs yields an average of about three X-ray sources per square degree. However, while X-ray source counterparts are known to range from distant quasars to nearby M dwarfs, the RASS data alone are often insufficient to determine the nature of an X-ray source. As a result, large-scale follow-up programs are required to construct samples of known X-ray emitters. We use optical data produced by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) to identify 709 stellar X-ray emitters cataloged in the RASS and falling within the SDSS Data Release 1 footprint. Most of these are bright stars with coronal X-ray emission unsuitable for SDSS spectroscopy, which is designed for fainter objects (g > 15 [mag]). Instead, we use SDSS photometry, correlations with the Two Micron All Sky Survey and other catalogs, and spectroscopy from the Apache Point Observatory 3.5 m telescope to identify these stellar X-ray counterparts. Our sample of 707 X-ray-emitting F, G, K, and M stars is one of the largest X-ray-selected samples of such stars. We derive distances to these stars using photometric parallax relations appropriate for dwarfs on the main sequence, and use these distances to calculate L{sub X} . We also identify a previously unknown cataclysmic variable (CV) as a RASS counterpart. Separately, we use correlations of the RASS and the SDSS spectroscopic catalogs of CVs and white dwarfs (WDs) to study the properties of these rarer X-ray-emitting stars. We examine the relationship between (f{sub X} /f{sub g} ) and the equivalent width of the H{beta} emission line for 46 X-ray-emitting CVs and discuss tentative classifications for a subset based on these quantities. We identify 17 new X-ray-emitting DA (hydrogen) WDs, of which three are newly identified WDs. We report on follow-up observations of three candidate cool X-ray-emitting WDs (one DA and two DB (helium) WDs

  15. The Lunar Occultation Observer (LOCO) -- A Nuclear Astrophysics All-Sky Survey Mission Concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, R. S.; Bonamente, M.; Burgess, J. M.; Jenke, P.; Lawrence, D. J.; O'Brien, S.; Orr, M. R.; Paciesas, W. S.; Young, C. A.

    2009-03-01

    The Lunar Occultation Observer (LOCO) is a new γ-ray astrophysics mission concept expected to have unprecedented sensitivity in the nuclear regime. Operating in lunar orbit, LOCO will utilize lunar occultation imaging to survey and probe the cosmos.

  16. RELIABLE IDENTIFICATIONS OF ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI FROM THE WISE, 2MASS, AND ROSAT ALL-SKY SURVEYS

    SciTech Connect

    Edelson, R.; Malkan, M.

    2012-05-20

    We have developed the ''S{sub IX}'' statistic to identify bright, highly likely active galactic nucleus (AGN) candidates solely on the basis of Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE), Two Micron All-Sky Survey (2MASS), and ROSAT all-sky survey (RASS) data. This statistic was optimized with data from the preliminary WISE survey and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, and tested with Lick 3 m Kast spectroscopy. We find that sources with S{sub IX} < 0 have a {approx}>95% likelihood of being an AGN (defined in this paper as a Seyfert 1, quasar, or blazar). This statistic was then applied to the full WISE/2MASS/RASS dataset, including the final WISE data release, to yield the ''W2R'' sample of 4316 sources with S{sub IX} < 0. Only 2209 of these sources are currently in the Veron-Cetty and Veron (VCV) catalog of spectroscopically confirmed AGNs, indicating that the W2R sample contains nearly 2000 new, relatively bright (J {approx}< 16) AGNs. We utilize the W2R sample to quantify biases and incompleteness in the VCV catalog. We find that it is highly complete for bright (J < 14), northern AGNs, but the completeness drops below 50% for fainter, southern samples and for sources near the Galactic plane. This approach also led to the spectroscopic identification of 10 new AGNs in the Kepler field, more than doubling the number of AGNs being monitored by Kepler. The W2R sample contains better than 1 bright AGN every 10 deg{sup 2}, permitting construction of AGN samples in any sufficiently large region of sky.

  17. Reliable Identifications of Active Galactic Nuclei from the WISE, 2MASS, and ROSAT All-Sky Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edelson, R.; Malkan, M.

    2012-05-01

    We have developed the ''S IX'' statistic to identify bright, highly likely active galactic nucleus (AGN) candidates solely on the basis of Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE), Two Micron All-Sky Survey (2MASS), and ROSAT all-sky survey (RASS) data. This statistic was optimized with data from the preliminary WISE survey and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, and tested with Lick 3 m Kast spectroscopy. We find that sources with S IX < 0 have a gsim95% likelihood of being an AGN (defined in this paper as a Seyfert 1, quasar, or blazar). This statistic was then applied to the full WISE/2MASS/RASS dataset, including the final WISE data release, to yield the ''W2R'' sample of 4316 sources with S IX < 0. Only 2209 of these sources are currently in the Veron-Cetty and Veron (VCV) catalog of spectroscopically confirmed AGNs, indicating that the W2R sample contains nearly 2000 new, relatively bright (J <~ 16) AGNs. We utilize the W2R sample to quantify biases and incompleteness in the VCV catalog. We find that it is highly complete for bright (J < 14), northern AGNs, but the completeness drops below 50% for fainter, southern samples and for sources near the Galactic plane. This approach also led to the spectroscopic identification of 10 new AGNs in the Kepler field, more than doubling the number of AGNs being monitored by Kepler. The W2R sample contains better than 1 bright AGN every 10 deg2, permitting construction of AGN samples in any sufficiently large region of sky.

  18. RXTE All-Sky Slew Survey. Catalog of X-Ray Sources at B Greater Than 10 deg

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Revnivtsev, M.; Sazonov, S.; Jahoda, K.; Gilfanov, M.

    2004-01-01

    We report results of a serendipitous hard X-ray (3-20 keV), nearly all-sky (absolute value of b greater than l0 deg.) survey based on RXTE/PCA observations performed during satellite reorientations in 1996-2002. The survey is 80% (90%) complete to a 4(sigma) limiting flux of approx. = 1.8 (2.5) x 10(exp -l1) erg/s sq cm in the 3-20 keV band. The achieved sensitivity in the 3-8 keV and 8-20 keV subbands is similar to and an order of magnitude higher than that of the previously record HEAO-1 A1 and HEAO-1 A4 all-sky surveys, respectively. A combined 7 x 10(exp 3) sq. deg area of the sky is sampled to flux levels below l0(exp -11) erg/ s sq cm (3-20 keV). In total 294 sources are detected and localized to better than 1 deg. 236 (80%) of these can be confidently associated with a known astrophysical object; another 22 likely result from the superposition of 2 or 3 closely located known sources. 35 detected sources remain unidentified, although for 12 of these we report a likely soft X-ray counterpart from the ROSAT all-sky survey bright source catalog. Of the reliably identified sources, 63 have local origin (Milky Way, LMC or SMC), 64 are clusters of galaxies and 100 are active galactic nuclei (AGN). The fact that the unidentified X-ray sources have hard spectra suggests that the majority of them are AGN, including highly obscured ones (N(sub H) greater than l0(exp 23)/sq cm). For the first time we present a log N-log S diagram for extragalactic sources above 4 x l0(exp -12) erg/ s sq cm at 8-20 keV. Key words. cosmo1ogy:observations - diffuse radiation - X-rays general

  19. A serendipitous all sky survey for bright objects in the outer solar system

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, M. E.; Drake, A. J.; Djorgovski, S. G.; Graham, M. J.; Mahabal, A.; Donalek, C.; Bannister, M. T.; Schmidt, B. P.; McNaught, R.; Larson, S.; Christensen, E.; Beshore, E.

    2015-02-01

    We use seven year's worth of observations from the Catalina Sky Survey and the Siding Spring Survey covering most of the northern and southern hemisphere at galactic latitudes higher than 20° to search for serendipitously imaged moving objects in the outer solar system. These slowly moving objects would appear as stationary transients in these fast cadence asteroids surveys, so we develop methods to discover objects in the outer solar system using individual observations spaced by months, rather than spaced by hours, as is typically done. While we independently discover eight known bright objects in the outer solar system, the faintest having V=19.8±0.1, no new objects are discovered. We find that the survey is nearly 100% efficient at detecting objects beyond 25 AU for V≲19.1 (V≲18.6 in the southern hemisphere) and that the probability that there is one or more remaining outer solar system object of this brightness left to be discovered in the unsurveyed regions of the galactic plane is approximately 32%.

  20. The BANYAN All-Sky Survey for Brown Dwarf Members of Young Moving Groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gagné, Jonathan; Lafrenière, David; Doyon, René; Faherty, Jacqueline K.; Malo, Lison; Cruz, Kelle L.; Artigau, Étienne; Burgasser, Adam J.; Naud, Marie-Eve; Bouchard, Sandie; Gizis, John E.; Albert, Loïc

    2016-01-01

    We describe in this work the BASS survey for brown dwarfs in young moving groups of the solar neighborhood, and summarize the results that it generated. These include the discovery of the 2MASS J01033563-5515561 (AB)b and 2MASS J02192210-3925225 B young companions near the deuterium-burning limit as well as 44 new low-mass stars and 69 new brown dwarfs with a spectroscopically confirmed low gravity. Among those, ~20 have estimated masses within the planetary regime, one is a new L4 γ bona fide member of AB Doradus, three are TW Hydrae candidates with later spectral types (L1-L4) than all of its previously known members and six are among the first contenders for low-gravity >= L5 β/γ brown dwarfs, reminiscent of WISEP J004701.06+680352.1, PSO J318.5338-22.8603 and VHS J125601.92-125723.9 b. Finally, we describe a future version of this survey, BASS-Ultracool, that will specifically target >= L5 candidate members of young moving groups. First experimentations in designing the survey have already led to the discovery of a new T dwarf bona fide member of AB Doradus, as well as the serendipitous discoveries of an L9 subdwarf and an L5 + T5 brown dwarf binary.

  1. The Infrared Properties of Sources Matched in the WISE All-Sky and Herschel Atlas Surveys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bond, Nicholas A.; Benford, Dominic J.; Gardner, Jonathan P.; Eisenhardt, Peter; Amblard, Alexandre; Temi, Pasquale; Fleuren, Simone; Blain, Andrew W.; Dunne, Loretta; Smith, Daniel J.; Maddox, Steve J.; Hoyos, Carlos; Dye, Simon; Baes, Maarten; Bonfield, David; Bourne, Nathan; Bridge,Carrie

    2012-01-01

    We describe the infrared properties of sources detected over approx. 36 deg2 of sky in the GAMA 15-hr equatorial field, using data from both the Herschel Astrophysical Terahertz Large-Area Survey (H-ATLAS) and Wide-field Infrared Survey (WISE). With 5(sigma) point-source depths of 34 and 0.048 mJy at 250 microns and 3.4 microns, respectively, we are able to identify 50.6% of the H-ATLAS sources in the WISE survey, corresponding to a surface density of approx. 630 deg-2. Approximately two-thirds of these sources have measured spectroscopic or optical/near-IR photometric redshifts of z < 1. For sources with spectroscopic redshifts at z < 0.3, we find a linear correlation between the infrared luminosity at 3.4 microns and that at 250 microns, with +/-50% scatter over approx. 1.5 orders of magnitude in luminosity, approx. 10(exp 9) - 10(exp 10.5) Stellar Luminosity. By contrast, the matched sources without previously measured redshifts (r > or approx. 20.5) have 250-350 microns flux density ratios that suggest either high-redshift galaxies (z > or approx. 1.5) or optically faint low-redshift galaxies with unusually low temperatures (T < or approx. 20). Their small 3.4-250 microns flux ratios favor a high-redshift galaxy population, as only the most actively star-forming galaxies at low redshift (e.g., Arp 220) exhibit comparable flux density ratios. Furthermore, we find a relatively large AGN fraction (approx. 30%) in a 12 microns flux-limited subsample of H-ATLAS sources, also consistent with there being a significant population of high-redshift sources in the no-redshift sample.

  2. The Infrared Properties of Sources Matched in the Wise All-Sky and Herschel ATLAS Surveys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bond, Nicholas A.; Benford, Dominic J.; Gardner, Jonathan P.; Amblard, Alexandre; Fleuren, Simone; Blain, Andrew W.; Dunne, Loretta; Smith, Daniel J. B.; Maddox, Steve J.; Hoyos, Carlos; Auld, Robbie; Bales, Maarten; Bonfield, David; Bourne, Nathan; Bridge, Carrie; Buttiglione, Sara; Cava, Antonio; Clements, David; Cooray, Asantha; Dariush, Ali; deZotti, Gianfranco; Driver, Simon; Tsai, Chao-Wei; Wright, Edward L.; Yan, Lin

    2012-01-01

    We describe the infrared properties of sources detected over approx 36 sq deg of sky in the GAMA 15-hr equatorial field, using data from both the Herschel Astrophysical Terahertz Large-Area Survey (HATLAS) and Wide-field Infrared Survey (WISE). With 5sigma point-source depths of 34 and 0.048 mJy at 250 micron and 3.4 micron, respectively, we are able to identify 50.6% of the H-ATLAS sources in the WISE survey, corresponding to a surface density of approx 630 deg(exp -2). Approximately two-thirds of these sources have measured spectroscopic or optical/near-IR photometric redshifts of z < 1. For sources with spectroscopic redshifts at z < 0.3, we find a linear correlation between the infrared luminosity at 3.4 micron and that at 250 micron, with +/- 50% scatter over approx 1.5 orders of magnitude in luminosity, approx 10(exp 9) - 10(exp 10.5) Solar Luminosity By contrast, the matched sources without previously measured redshifts (r approx > 20.5) have 250-350 micron flux density ratios that suggest either high-redshift galaxies (z approx > 1.5) or optically faint low-redshift galaxies with unusually low temperatures (T approx < 20). Their small 3.4-250 micron flux ratios favor a high-redshift galaxy population, as only the most actively star-forming galaxies at low redshift (e.g., Arp 220) exhibit comparable flux density ratios. Furthermore, we find a relatively large AGN fraction (approx 30%) in a 12 micron flux-limited subsample of H-ATLAS sources, also consistent with there being a significant population of high-redshift sources in the no-redshift sample

  3. INTEGRAL/IBIS 7-year All-Sky Hard X-ray Survey. I. Image reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krivonos, R.; Revnivtsev, M.; Tsygankov, S.; Sazonov, S.; Vikhlinin, A.; Pavlinsky, M.; Churazov, E.; Sunyaev, R.

    2010-09-01

    This paper is the first in a series devoted to the hard X-ray whole sky survey performed by the INTEGRAL observatory over seven years. Here we present an improved method for image reconstruction with the IBIS coded mask telescope. The main improvements are related to the suppression of systematic effects that strongly limit sensitivity in the region of the Galactic plane (GP), especially in the crowded field of the Galactic center (GC). We extended the IBIS/ISGRI background model to take into account the Galactic ridge X-ray emission (GRXE). To suppress residual systematic artifacts on a reconstructed sky image, we applied nonparametric sky image filtering based on wavelet decomposition. The implemented modifications of the sky reconstruction method decrease the systematic noise in the ~20 Ms deep field of GC by ~44%, and practically remove it from the high-latitude sky images. New observational data sets, along with an improved reconstruction algorithm, allow us to conduct the hard X-ray survey with the best currently available minimal sensitivity 3.7 × 10-12 erg s-1 cm-2 ~ 0.26 mCrab in the 17-60 keV band at a 5σ detection level. The survey covers 90% of the sky down to the flux limit of 6.2 × 10-11 erg s-1 cm-2 (~4.32 mCrab) and 10% of the sky area down to the flux limit of 8.6 × 10-12 erg s-1 cm-2 (~0.60 mCrab). Based on observations with INTEGRAL, an ESA project with the instruments and science data center funded by ESA member states (especially the PI countries: Denmark, France, Germany, Italy, Switzerland, Spain), Czech Republic, and Poland, and with the participation of Russia and the USA.

  4. Point Source All Sky

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    This panoramic view encompasses the entire sky as seen by Two Micron All-Sky Survey. The measured brightnesses of half a billion stars (points) have been combined into colors representing three distinct wavelengths of infrared light: blue at 1.2 microns, green at 1.6 microns, and red at 2.2 microns. This image is centered on the core of our own Milky Way galaxy, toward the constellation of Sagittarius. The reddish stars seemingly hovering in the middle of the Milky Way's disc -- many of them never observed before -- trace the densest dust clouds in our galaxy. The two faint smudges seen in the lower right quadrant are our neighboring galaxies, the Small and Large Magellanic Clouds.

  5. The C-Band All-Sky Survey (C-BASS): design and implementation of the northern receiver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, O. G.; Jones, Michael E.; Blackhurst, E. J.; Copley, C.; Davis, R. J.; Dickinson, C.; Holler, C. M.; Irfan, M. O.; John, J. J.; Leahy, J. P.; Leech, J.; Muchovej, S. J. C.; Pearson, T. J.; Stevenson, M. A.; Taylor, Angela C.

    2014-03-01

    The C-Band All-Sky Survey is a project to map the full sky in total intensity and linear polarization at 5 GHz. The northern component of the survey uses a broad-band single-frequency analogue receiver fitted to a 6.1-m telescope at the Owens Valley Radio Observatory in California, USA. The receiver architecture combines a continuous-comparison radiometer and a correlation polarimeter in a single receiver for stable simultaneous measurement of both total intensity and linear polarization, using custom-designed analogue receiver components. The continuous-comparison radiometer measures the temperature difference between the sky and temperature-stabilized cold electrical reference loads. A cryogenic front-end is used to minimize receiver noise, with a system temperature of ≈30 K in both linear polarization and total intensity. Custom cryogenic notch filters are used to counteract man-made radio frequency interference. The radiometer 1/f noise is dominated by atmospheric fluctuations, while the polarimeter achieves a 1/f noise knee frequency of 10 mHz, similar to the telescope azimuthal scan frequency.

  6. CONSTRUCTION OF A CALIBRATED PROBABILISTIC CLASSIFICATION CATALOG: APPLICATION TO 50k VARIABLE SOURCES IN THE ALL-SKY AUTOMATED SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    Richards, Joseph W.; Starr, Dan L.; Miller, Adam A.; Bloom, Joshua S.; Brink, Henrik; Crellin-Quick, Arien; Butler, Nathaniel R.

    2012-12-15

    With growing data volumes from synoptic surveys, astronomers necessarily must become more abstracted from the discovery and introspection processes. Given the scarcity of follow-up resources, there is a particularly sharp onus on the frameworks that replace these human roles to provide accurate and well-calibrated probabilistic classification catalogs. Such catalogs inform the subsequent follow-up, allowing consumers to optimize the selection of specific sources for further study and permitting rigorous treatment of classification purities and efficiencies for population studies. Here, we describe a process to produce a probabilistic classification catalog of variability with machine learning from a multi-epoch photometric survey. In addition to producing accurate classifications, we show how to estimate calibrated class probabilities and motivate the importance of probability calibration. We also introduce a methodology for feature-based anomaly detection, which allows discovery of objects in the survey that do not fit within the predefined class taxonomy. Finally, we apply these methods to sources observed by the All-Sky Automated Survey (ASAS), and release the Machine-learned ASAS Classification Catalog (MACC), a 28 class probabilistic classification catalog of 50,124 ASAS sources in the ASAS Catalog of Variable Stars. We estimate that MACC achieves a sub-20% classification error rate and demonstrate that the class posterior probabilities are reasonably calibrated. MACC classifications compare favorably to the classifications of several previous domain-specific ASAS papers and to the ASAS Catalog of Variable Stars, which had classified only 24% of those sources into one of 12 science classes.

  7. The MEarth project: an all-sky survey for transiting Earth-like exoplanets orbiting nearby M-dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irwin, Jonathan; Berta-Thompson, Zachory K.; Charbonneau, David; Dittmann, Jason; Newton, Elisabeth R.

    2015-01-01

    The MEarth project is an operational all-sky survey searching for transiting Earth-like exoplanets around 3,000 of the closest mid-to-late M-dwarfs. These will be among the best planets in their size class for atmospheric characterization using present day and near-future instruments such as HST, JWST and ground-based Extremely Large Telescopes (ELTs), by virtue of the large observational signal sizes afforded by their small and bright host stars. We present an update on the status and recent scientific results of the survey from our two observing stations: MEarth-North at Fred Lawrence Whipple Observatory, Mount Hopkins, Arizona, and MEarth-South at Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory, Chile. MEarth-North discovered the transiting mini-Neptune exoplanet GJ 1214b, which currently has the best-studied atmosphere of any exoplanet in its size class. In addition to searching for planets, we actively pursue stellar astrophysics topics and characterization of the target star sample using MEarth data and supplementary spectroscopic follow-up. This has included measuring astrometric parallaxes for more than 1500 nearby stars, the discovery of 6 new low-mass eclipsing binaries amenable to direct measurement of the masses and radii of their components, and rotation periods, spectral classifications, metallicities and activity indices for hundreds of stars. The MEarth light curves themselves also provide a detailed record of the photometric behavior of the target stars, which include the most favorable and interesting targets to search for small and potentially habitable planets. This will be a valuable resource for all future surveys searching for planets around these stars. All light curves gathered during the survey are made publicly available after one year.The MEarth project gratefully acknowledges funding from the David and Lucile Packard Fellowship for Science and Engineering, the National Science Foundation under grants AST-0807690, AST-1109468, and AST-1004488

  8. Construction of a Calibrated Probabilistic Classification Catalog: Application to 50k Variable Sources in the All-Sky Automated Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richards, Joseph W.; Starr, Dan L.; Miller, Adam A.; Bloom, Joshua S.; Butler, Nathaniel R.; Brink, Henrik; Crellin-Quick, Arien

    2012-12-01

    With growing data volumes from synoptic surveys, astronomers necessarily must become more abstracted from the discovery and introspection processes. Given the scarcity of follow-up resources, there is a particularly sharp onus on the frameworks that replace these human roles to provide accurate and well-calibrated probabilistic classification catalogs. Such catalogs inform the subsequent follow-up, allowing consumers to optimize the selection of specific sources for further study and permitting rigorous treatment of classification purities and efficiencies for population studies. Here, we describe a process to produce a probabilistic classification catalog of variability with machine learning from a multi-epoch photometric survey. In addition to producing accurate classifications, we show how to estimate calibrated class probabilities and motivate the importance of probability calibration. We also introduce a methodology for feature-based anomaly detection, which allows discovery of objects in the survey that do not fit within the predefined class taxonomy. Finally, we apply these methods to sources observed by the All-Sky Automated Survey (ASAS), and release the Machine-learned ASAS Classification Catalog (MACC), a 28 class probabilistic classification catalog of 50,124 ASAS sources in the ASAS Catalog of Variable Stars. We estimate that MACC achieves a sub-20% classification error rate and demonstrate that the class posterior probabilities are reasonably calibrated. MACC classifications compare favorably to the classifications of several previous domain-specific ASAS papers and to the ASAS Catalog of Variable Stars, which had classified only 24% of those sources into one of 12 science classes.

  9. Ashra (All-sky Survey High Resolution Air-shower detector)Current Status on Mauna Loa, Hawai`i

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, John; Fox, R. A.; Sasaki, M.; Asaoka, Y.; Ashra Collaboration

    2008-09-01

    Now in its third year of on-site activities, Ashra is commencing full testing of its array of Cherenkov and Nitrogen Fluorescence detectors. The All-sky Survey High Resolution Air-shower detector is located on the northern upper slopes of Mauna Loa at the 11,000 ft elevation level. Utilizing a clear view of 80% of the sky and an unobstructed view of Mauna Kea, anglular resolution of 1.2 arcmin, sensitive to the blue to UV light with the use of image intensifier and CMOS technology, Ashra is in a unique position for studying the sources of High Energy Cosmic Ray sources (GRB, etc) as well as potential observations of earth-grazing neutrino interactions. 2004 saw the successful deployment of a prototype detector on Haleakala, with confirmed detection of several GRBs. Since the summer of 2005, steady progress was made in constructing and installation of detectors and their weather-proofed housings. UH-Hilo undergraduate students provided summer interns for this international collaboration between ICRR Univ. Tokyo, Univ. Hawai`i-Hilo, Univ Hawai`i-Manoa, Ibaraki Univ., Toho Univ. Chiba Univ., Kanagawa Univ., Nagoya Univ. & Tokyo Institute of Technology.

  10. A galaxy model from two micron all sky survey star counts in the whole sky, including the plane

    SciTech Connect

    Polido, P.; Jablonski, F.; Lépine, J. R. D.

    2013-11-20

    We use the star count model of Ortiz and Lépine to perform an unprecedented exploration of the most important Galactic parameters comparing the predicted counts with the Two Micron All Sky Survey observed star counts in the J, H, and K{sub S} bands for a grid of positions covering the whole sky. The comparison is made using a grid of lines of sight given by the HEALPix pixelization scheme. The resulting best-fit values for the parameters are: 2120 ± 200 pc for the radial scale length and 205 ± 40 pc for the scale height of the thin disk, with a central hole of 2070{sub −800}{sup +2000} pc for the same disk, 3050 ± 500 pc for the radial scale length and 640 ± 70 pc for the scale height of the thick disk, 400 ± 100 pc for the central dimension of the spheroid, 0.0082 ± 0.0030 for the spheroid to disk density ratio, and 0.57 ± 0.05 for the oblate spheroid parameter.

  11. GALACTIC ALL-SKY SURVEY HIGH-VELOCITY CLOUDS IN THE REGION OF THE MAGELLANIC LEADING ARM

    SciTech Connect

    For, Bi-Qing; Staveley-Smith, Lister; McClure-Griffiths, N. M.

    2013-02-10

    We present a catalog of high-velocity clouds in the region of the Magellanic Leading Arm. The catalog is based on neutral hydrogen (H I) observations from the Parkes Galactic All-Sky Survey. Excellent spectral resolution allows clouds with narrow-line components to be resolved. The total number of detected clouds is 419. We describe the method of cataloging and present the basic parameters of the clouds. We discuss the general distribution of the high-velocity clouds and classify the clouds based on their morphological type. The presence of a significant number of head-tail clouds and their distribution in the region is discussed in the context of Magellanic System simulations. We suggest that ram-pressure stripping is a more important factor than tidal forces for the morphology and formation of the Magellanic Leading Arm and that different environmental conditions might explain the morphological difference between the Magellanic Leading Arm and Magellanic Stream. We also discuss a newly identified population of clouds that forms the LA IV and a new diffuse bridge-like feature connecting the LA II and III complexes.

  12. The Highest L(sub X)/L(sub opt) Sources in the ROSAT All-Sky Survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kulkarni, Shrinivas R.

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of our program was to identify new and interesting soft X-ray sources from the Bright Source Catalog of the ROSAT All-Sky Survey. Our intent was to use XMM to observe a sample of BSC objects that had been identified as less than 10% likely to be associated with any object in the USNO-A2.0 catalog (Rutledge et al. 2000). We requested a single 5-ks pointing for each of 32 sources in this category in order to make a systematic examination of the properties of these sources. Ultimately, we hoped to identify new isolated neutron stars from within this population. Our requested observations were scheduled for execution at the end of Cycle 2, for two of our targets only (selected by sky position). A two-target sample does not allow for the statistical investigation that we originally proposed; however, based on the identification of the BSC object in the XMM data, an improved position, and reevaluation of likely off-band counterparts, it does enable a source-by-source evaluation of whether the BSC object is an isolated neutron star (INS).

  13. GASS: The Parkes Galactic All-Sky Survey. Update: improved correction for instrumental effects and new data release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalberla, P. M. W.; Haud, U.

    2015-06-01

    Context. The Galactic All-Sky Survey (GASS) is a survey of Galactic atomic hydrogen (H i) emission in the southern sky observed with the Parkes 64-m Radio Telescope. The first data release (GASS I) concerned survey goals and observing techniques, the second release (GASS II) focused on stray radiation and instrumental corrections. Aims: We seek to remove the remaining instrumental effects and present a third data release. Methods: We use the HEALPix tessellation concept to grid the data on the sphere. Individual telescope records are compared with averages on the nearest grid position for significant deviations. All averages are also decomposed into Gaussian components with the aim of segregating unacceptable solutions. Improved priors are used for an iterative baseline fitting and cleaning. In the last step we generate 3D FITS data cubes and examine them for remaining problems. Results: We have removed weak, but systematic baseline offsets with an improved baseline fitting algorithm. We have unraveled correlator failures that cause time dependent oscillations; errors cause stripes in the scanning direction. The remaining problems from radio frequency interference (RFI) are spotted. Classifying the severeness of instrumental errors for each individual telescope record (dump) allows us to exclude bad data from averages. We derive parameters that allow us to discard dumps without compromising the noise of the resulting data products too much. All steps are reiterated several times: in each case, we check the Gaussian parameters for remaining problems and inspect 3D FITS data cubes visually. We find that in total ~1.5% of the telescope dumps need to be discarded in addition to ~0.5% of the spectral channels that were excluded in GASS II. Conclusions: The new data release (GASS III) facilitates data products with improved quality. A new web interface, compatible with the previous version, is available for download of GASS III FITS cubes and spectra.

  14. AGN and QSOs in the eROSITA All-Sky Survey. II. The large-scale structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolodzig, Alexander; Gilfanov, Marat; Hütsi, Gert; Sunyaev, Rashid

    2013-10-01

    The four-year X-ray all-sky survey (eRASS) of the eROSITA telescope aboard the Spektrum-Roentgen-Gamma satellite will detect about 3 million active galactic nuclei (AGN) with a median redshift of z ≈ 1 and a typical luminosity of L0.5-2.0 keV ~ 1044 ergs-1. We show that this unprecedented AGN sample, complemented with redshift information, will supply us with outstanding opportunities for large-scale structure research. For the first time, detailed redshift- and luminosity-resolved studies of the bias factor for X-ray selected AGN will become possible. The eRASS AGN sample will not only improve the redshift- and luminosity resolution of these studies, but will also expand their luminosity range beyond L0.5-2.0 keV ~ 1044 ergs-1, thus enabling a direct comparison of the clustering properties of luminous X-ray AGN and optical quasars. These studies will dramatically improve our understanding of the AGN environment, triggering mechanisms, the growth of supermassive black holes and their co-evolution with dark matter halos. The eRASS AGN sample will become a powerful cosmological probe. It will enable detecting baryonic acoustic oscillations (BAOs) for the first time with X-ray selected AGN. With the data from the entire extragalactic sky, BAO will be detected at a ≳10σ confidence level in the full redshift range and with ~8σ confidence in the 0.8 < z < 2.0 range, which is currently not covered by any existing BAO surveys. To exploit the full potential of the eRASS AGN sample, photometric and spectroscopic surveys of large areas and a sufficient depth will be needed.

  15. The SRG/eROSITA All-Sky Survey: A new era of large-scale structure studies with AGN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolodzig, Alexander; Gilfanov, Marat; Hütsi, Gert; Sunyaev, Rashid

    2015-08-01

    The four-year X-ray All-Sky Survey (eRASS) of the eROSITA telescope aboard the Spektrum-Roentgen-Gamma (SRG) satellite will detect about 3 million active galactic nuclei (AGN) with a median redshift of z~1 and typical luminosity of L0.5-2.0keV ~ 1044 erg/s. We demonstrate that this unprecedented AGN sample, complemented with redshift information, will supply us with outstanding opportunities for large-scale structure (LSS) studies.We show that with this sample of X-ray selected AGN, it will become possible for the first time to perform detailed redshift- and luminosity-resolved studies of the AGN clustering. This enable us to put strong constraints on different AGN triggering/fueling models as a function of AGN environment, which will dramatically improve our understanding of super-massive black hole growth and its correlation with the co-evolving LSS.Further, the eRASS AGN sample will become a powerful cosmological probe. We demonstrate for the first time that, given the breadth and depth of eRASS, it will become possible to convincingly detect baryonic acoustic oscillations (BAOs) with ~8σ confidence in the 0.8 < z < 2.0 range, currently uncovered by any existing BAO survey.Finally, we discuss the requirements for follow-up missions and demonstrate that in order to fully exploit the potential of the eRASS AGN sample, photometric and spectroscopic surveys of large areas and a sufficient depth will be needed.

  16. THE 60 MONTH ALL-SKY BURST ALERT TELESCOPE SURVEY OF ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS AND THE ANISOTROPY OF NEARBY AGNs

    SciTech Connect

    Ajello, M.; Madejski, G. M.; Alexander, D. M.; Greiner, J.; Burlon, D.; Gehrels, N.

    2012-04-10

    Surveys above 10 keV represent one of the best resources to provide an unbiased census of the population of active galactic nuclei (AGNs). We present the results of 60 months of observation of the hard X-ray sky with Swift/Burst Alert Telescope (BAT). In this time frame, BAT-detected (in the 15-55 keV band) 720 sources in an all-sky survey of which 428 are associated with AGNs, most of which are nearby. Our sample has negligible incompleteness and statistics a factor of {approx}2 larger over similarly complete sets of AGNs. Our sample contains (at least) 15 bona fide Compton-thick AGNs and 3 likely candidates. Compton-thick AGNs represent {approx}5% of AGN samples detected above 15 keV. We use the BAT data set to refine the determination of the log N-log S of AGNs which is extremely important, now that NuSTAR prepares for launch, toward assessing the AGN contribution to the cosmic X-ray background. We show that the log N-log S of AGNs selected above 10 keV is now established to {approx}10% precision. We derive the luminosity function of Compton-thick AGNs and measure a space density of 7.9{sup +4.1}{sub -2.9} Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -5} Mpc{sup -3} for objects with a de-absorbed luminosity larger than 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 42} erg s{sup -1}. As the BAT AGNs are all mostly local, they allow us to investigate the spatial distribution of AGNs in the nearby universe regardless of absorption. We find concentrations of AGNs that coincide spatially with the largest congregations of matter in the local ({<=}85 Mpc) universe. There is some evidence that the fraction of Seyfert 2 objects is larger than average in the direction of these dense regions.

  17. The 60 Month All-Sky Burst Alert Telescope Survey of Active Galactic Nucleus and the Anisotropy of Nearby AGNs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ajello, M.; Alexander, D. M.; Greiner, J.; Madejeski, G. M.; Gehrels, N.; Burlon, D.

    2014-01-01

    Surveys above 10 keV represent one of the best resources to provide an unbiased census of the population of active galactic nuclei (AGNs). We present the results of 60 months of observation of the hard X-ray sky with Swift/Burst Alert Telescope (BAT). In this time frame, BAT-detected (in the 15-55 keV band) 720 sources in an all-sky survey of which 428 are associated with AGNs, most of which are nearby. Our sample has negligible incompleteness and statistics a factor of approx. 2 larger over similarly complete sets of AGNs. Our sample contains (at least) 15 bona fide Compton-thick AGNs and 3 likely candidates. Compton-thick AGNs represent approx. 5% of AGN samples detected above 15 keV. We use the BAT data set to refine the determination of the log N-log S of AGNs which is extremely important, now that NuSTAR prepares for launch, toward assessing the AGN contribution to the cosmic X-ray background. We show that the log N-log S of AGNs selected above 10 keV is now established to approx. 10% precision. We derive the luminosity function of Compton-thick AGNs and measure a space density of 7.9(+4.1/-2.9)× 10(exp -5)/cubic Mpc for objects with a de-absorbed luminosity larger than 2 × 10(exp 42) erg / s. As the BAT AGNs are all mostly local, they allow us to investigate the spatial distribution of AGNs in the nearby universe regardless of absorption. We find concentrations of AGNs that coincide spatially with the largest congregations of matter in the local (much < 85 Mpc) universe. There is some evidence that the fraction of Seyfert 2 objects is larger than average in the direction of these dense regions..

  18. A Survey of All-sky Imaging Measurements of Bore- and "Wall"-like Disturbances in Mesospheric Nightglow.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, S. M.

    2004-05-01

    All-sky imagers regularly record quasi-monochromatic (QM) gravity wave activity in the various night-time mesospheric emissions (Taylor et al., 1995; Wu and Killeen, 1996; Swenson et al., 1999; Smith et al., 2000, for example). There is, however, a distinct class of uncommon events - sudden and very bright all-sky airglow emission enhancements or depletions followed by a series of propagating waves that are phase-locked to the leading front and lasting several hours. Very few cases have been reported in the literature and they appear to consist of two distinct types of disturbances: "wall" events and bores. This paper will present and discuss observations of these two types of wave events recorded by the Boston University all-sky imagers at four separate locations: Millstone Hill (MA), Arecibo Observatory (PR), McDonald Observatory (TX), and El Leoncito (Argentina). A comparison of these events with those reported in the literature will also be made.

  19. INFRARED SPECTRA AND PHOTOMETRY OF COMPLETE SAMPLES OF PALOMAR-GREEN AND TWO MICRON ALL SKY SURVEY QUASARS

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Yong; Rieke, G. H.; Su, K. Y. L.; Ogle, P. M.; Balog, Z.

    2014-10-01

    As a step toward a comprehensive overview of the infrared (IR) diagnostics of the central engines and host galaxies of quasars at low redshift, we present Spitzer Space Telescope spectroscopic (5-40 μm) and photometric (24, 70, and 160 μm) measurements of all Palomar-Green (PG) quasars at z < 0.5 and Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS) quasars at z < 0.3. We supplement these data with Herschel measurements at 160 μm. The sample is composed of 87 optically selected PG quasars and 52 near-IR-selected 2MASS quasars. Here we present the data, measure the prominent spectral features, and separate emission due to star formation from that emitted by the dusty circumnuclear torus. We find that the mid-IR (5-30 μm) spectral shape for the torus is largely independent of quasar IR luminosity with scatter in the spectral energy distribution (SED) shape of ≲0.2 dex. Except for the silicate features, no large difference is observed between PG (unobscured—silicate emission) and 2MASS (obscured—silicate absorption) quasars. Only mild silicate features are observed in both cases. When in emission, the peak wavelength of the silicate feature tends to be longer than 9.7 μm, possibly indicating effects on grain properties near the active galactic nucleus. The IR color is shown to correlate with the equivalent width of the aromatic features, indicating that the slope of the quasar mid- to far-IR SED is to first order driven by the fraction of radiation from star formation in the IR bands.

  20. AGN and Starbursts in Dusty Galaxy Mergers: Insights from the Great Observatories All-sky LIRG Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzarella, Joseph M.

    2014-07-01

    The Great Observatories All-sky LIRG Survey (GOALS) is combining imaging and spectroscopic data from the Herschel, Spitzer, Hubble, GALEX, Chandra, and XMM-Newton space telescopes augmented with extensive ground-based observations in a multiwavelength study of approximately 180 Luminous Infrared Galaxies (LIRGs) and 20 Ultraluminous Infrared Galaxies (ULIRGs) that comprise a statistically complete subset of the 60μm-selected IRAS Revised Bright Galaxy Sample. The objects span the full range of galaxy environments (giant isolated spirals, wide and close pairs, minor and major mergers, merger remnants) and nuclear activity types (Seyfert 1, Seyfert 2, LINER, starburst/HII), with proportions that depend strongly on the total infrared luminosity. I will review the science motivations and present highlights of recent results selected from over 25 peer-reviewed journal articles published recently by the GOALS Team. Statistical investigations include detection of high-ionization Fe K emission indicative of deeply embedded AGN, comparison of UV and far-IR properties, investigations of the fraction of extended emission as a function of wavelength derived from mid-IR spectroscopy, mid-IR spectral diagnostics and spectral energy distributions revealing the relative contributions of AGN and starbursts to powering the bolometric luminosity, and quantitative structure analyses that delineate the evolution of stellar bars and nuclear stellar cusps during the merger process. Multiwavelength dissections of individual systems have unveiled large populations of young star clusters and heavily obscured AGN in early-stage (II Zw 96), intermediate-stage (Mrk 266, Mrk 273), and late-stage (NGC 2623, IC 883) mergers. A recently published study that matches numerical simulations to the observed morphology and gas kinematics in mergers has placed four systems on a timeline spanning 175-260 million years after their first passages, and modeling of additional (U)LIRGs is underway. A very

  1. AKARI: space infrared cooled telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onaka, Takashi; Salama, Alberto

    2009-12-01

    AKARI, formerly known as ASTRO-F, is the second Japanese space mission to perform infrared astronomical observations. AKARI was launched on 21 February 2006 (UT) and brought into a sun-synchronous polar orbit at an altitude of 700 km by a JAXA M-V rocket. AKARI has a telescope with a primary-mirror aperture size of 685 mm together with two focal-plane instruments on board: the Infrared Camera (IRC), which covers the spectral range 2-26 μm and the Far-Infrared Surveyor (FIS), which operates in the range 50-180 μm. The telescope mirrors are made of sandwich-type silicon carbide, specially developed for AKARI. The focal-plane instruments and the telescope are cooled by a unique cryogenic system that kept the telescope at 6K for 550 days with 180 l super-fluid liquid Helium (LHe) with the help of mechanical coolers on board. Despite the small telescope size, the cold environment and the state-of-the-art detectors enable very sensitive observations at infrared wavelengths. To take advantage of the characteristics of the sun-synchronous polar orbit, AKARI performed an all-sky survey during the LHe holding period in four far-infrared bands with FIS and two mid-infrared bands with IRC, which surpasses the IRAS survey made in 1983 in sensitivity, spatial resolution, and spectral coverage. AKARI also made over 5,000 pointing observations at given targets in the sky for approximately 10 min each, for deep imaging and spectroscopy from 2 to 180 μm during the LHe holding period. The LHe ran out on 26 August 2007, since which date the telescope and instrument are still kept around 40K by the mechanical cooler on board, and near-infrared imaging and spectroscopic observations with IRC are now being continued in pointing mode.

  2. VizieR Online Data Catalog: AKARI NEP Deep Survey revised catalog (Murata+, 2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murata, K.; Matsuhara, H.; Wada, T.; Arimatsu, K.; Oi, N.; Takagi, T.; Oyabu, S.; Goto, T.; Ohyama, Y.; Malkan, M.; Pearson, C.; Malek, K.; Solarz, A.

    2013-09-01

    This is the revised catalogue of the AKARI North Ecliptic Pole Deep survey. The survey was carried out with the InfraRed Camera (IRC) onboard AKARI which has a comprehensive mid-IR wavelength coverage in nine photometric bands at 2-24 micron. For mid-IR source extraction we used a detection image while for near-IR source detection we used optical to near-IR ground-based catalogue which is based on CFHT/MegaCam z', CFHT/WIRCam Ks and Subaru/Scam z' band detection. Here we present an AKARI source with the identification from the ground-based catalogue. For objects with multiple counterparts, all of these were listed in the catalogue with an upper limit for the AKARI flux. The magnitudes are given in the AB system. (1 data file).

  3. Surveying Galaxy Evolution in the Far-Infrared: A Far-Infrared All-Sky Survey Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benford, D. J.; Amato, M. J.; Dwek, E.; Freund, M. M.; Gardner, J. P.; Kashlinsky, A.; Leisawitz, D. T.; Mather, J. C.; Moseley, S. H.; Shafer, R. A.

    2004-01-01

    Half of the total luminosity in the Universe is emitted at rest wavelengths approximately 80-100 microns. At the highest known galaxy redshifts (z greater than or equal to 6) this energy is redshifted to approximately 600 microns. Quantifying the evolution of galaxies at these wavelengths is crucial to our understanding of the formation of structure in the Universe following the big bang. Surveying the whole sky will find the rare and unique objects, enabling follow-up observations. SIRCE, the Survey of Infrared Cosmic Evolution, is such a mission concept under study at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center. A helium-cooled telescope with ultrasensitive detectors can image the whole sky to the confusion limit in 6 months. Multiple wavelength bands permit the extraction of photometric redshifts, while a large telescope yields a low confusion limit. We discuss the implications of such a survey for galaxy formation and evolution, large-scale structure, star formation, and the structure of interstellar dust.

  4. Radio emission from dusty galaxies observed by AKARI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pepiak, A.; Pollo, A.; Takeuchi, T. T.; Solarz, A.; Jurusik, W.

    2014-10-01

    We probe radio-infrared correlation for two samples of extragalactic sources from the local Universe from the AKARI All-Sky Catalogue. The first, smaller sample (1053 objects) was constructed by the cross-correlation of the AKARI/FIS All-Sky Survey Bright Source Catalogue, the AKARI IRC All-Sky Survey Point Source Catalogue and the NRAO VLA Sky Survey, i.e. it consists of sources detected in the mid- and far-infrared by AKARI, and at the 1.4 GHz radio frequency by NRAO. The second, larger sample (13,324 objects) was constructed by the cross-correlation of only the AKARI/FIS All-Sky Survey Bright Source Catalogue and the NRAO VLA Sky Survey, i.e. it consists of sources detected in the far-infrared and radio, without a condition to be detected in the mid-infrared. Additionally, all objects in both samples were identified as galaxies in the NED and/or SIMBAD databases, and a part of them is known to host active galactic nuclei (AGNs). For the present analysis, we have restricted our samples only to sources with known redshift z. In this paper, we analyse the far-infrared-radio correlation for both of these samples. We compare the ratio of infrared and radio emission from normal star-forming dusty galaxies and AGNs in both samples. For the smaller sample we obtained =2.14 for AGNs and =2.27 for normal galaxies, while for the larger sample =2.15 for AGNs and =2.22 for normal galaxies. An average value of the slope in both samples is ~2.2, which is consistent with the previous measurements from the literature.

  5. Toward long-term all-sky time domain surveys-SINDICS: a prospective concept for a Seismic INDICes Survey of half a million red giants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michel, Eric; Haywood, Misha; Mosser, Benoit; García, Rafael A.; Babusiaux, Carine; Ballot, Jérôme; Samadi, Reza; Katz, David; Belkacem, Kevin; Bernardi, Pernelle; Buey, Tristan

    2015-09-01

    CoRoT and Kepler have brought a new and deep experience in long-term photometric surveys and how to use them. This is true for exoplanets characterizing, stellar seismology and beyond for studying several other phenomena, like granulation or activity. Based on this experience, it has been possible to propose new generation projects, like TESS and PLATO, with more specific scientific objectives and more ambitious observational programs in terms of sky coverage and/or duration of the observations. In this context and as a prospective exercise, we explore here the possibility to set up an all-sky survey optimized for seismic indices measurement, providing masses, radii and evolution stages for half a million solar-type pulsators (subgiants and red giants), in our galactic neighborhood and allowing unprecedented stellar population studies.

  6. Concept of a small satellite for sub-MeV and MeV all sky survey: the CAST mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakazawa, Kazuhiro; Takahashi, Tadayuki; Ichinohe, Yuto; Takeda, Shin'ichiro; Tajima, Hiroyasu; Kamae, Tuneyoshi; Kokubun, Motohide; Takashima, Takeshi; Tashiro, Makoto; Tamagawa, Toru; Terada, Yukikatsu; Nomachi, Masaharu; Fukazawa, Yasushi; Makishima, Kazuo; Mizuno, Tsunefumi; Mitani, Takefumi; Yoshimitsu, Tetsuo; Watanabe, Shin

    2012-09-01

    MeV and sub-MeV energy band from ~200 keV to ~2 MeV contains rich information of high-energy phenomena in the universe. The CAST (Compton Telescope for Astro and Solar Terrestrial) mission is planned to be launched at the end of 2010s, and aims at providing all-sky map in this energy-band for the first time. It is made of a semiconductor Compton telescope utilizing Si as a scatterer and CdTe as an absorber. CAST provides allsky sub-MeV polarization map for the first time, as well. The Compton telescope technology is based on the design used in the Soft Gamma-ray Detector (SGD) onboard ASTRO-H, characterized by its tightly stacked semiconductor layers to obtain high Compton reconstruction efficiency. The CAST mission is currently planned as a candidate for the small scientific satellite series in ISAS/JAXA, weighting about 500 kg in total. Scalable detector design enables us to consider other options as well. Scientific outcome of CAST is wide. It will provide new information from high-energy sources, such as AGN and/or its jets, supernova remnants, magnetors, blackhole and neutron-star binaries and others. Polarization map will tell us about activities of jets and reflections in these sources, as well. In addition, CAST will simultaneously observe the Sun, and depending on its attitude, the Earth.

  7. BANYAN. V. A SYSTEMATIC ALL-SKY SURVEY FOR NEW VERY LATE-TYPE LOW-MASS STARS AND BROWN DWARFS IN NEARBY YOUNG MOVING GROUPS

    SciTech Connect

    Gagné, Jonathan; Lafrenière, David; Doyon, René; Malo, Lison; Artigau, Étienne

    2015-01-10

    We present the BANYAN All-Sky Survey (BASS) catalog, consisting of 228 new late-type (M4-L6) candidate members of nearby young moving groups (YMGs) with an expected false-positive rate of ∼13%. This sample includes 79 new candidate young brown dwarfs and 22 planetary-mass objects. These candidates were identified through the first systematic all-sky survey for late-type low-mass stars and brown dwarfs in YMGs. We cross-matched the Two Micron All Sky Survey and AllWISE catalogs outside of the galactic plane to build a sample of 98,970 potential ≥M5 dwarfs in the solar neighborhood and calculated their proper motions with typical precisions of 5-15 mas yr{sup –1}. We selected highly probable candidate members of several YMGs from this sample using the Bayesian Analysis for Nearby Young AssociatioNs II tool (BANYAN II). We used the most probable statistical distances inferred from BANYAN II to estimate the spectral type and mass of these candidate YMG members. We used this unique sample to show tentative signs of mass segregation in the AB Doradus moving group and the Tucana-Horologium and Columba associations. The BASS sample has already been successful in identifying several new young brown dwarfs in earlier publications, and will be of great interest in studying the initial mass function of YMGs and for the search of exoplanets by direct imaging; the input sample of potential close-by ≥M5 dwarfs will be useful to study the kinematics of low-mass stars and brown dwarfs and search for new proper motion pairs.

  8. BANYAN. V. A Systematic All-sky Survey for New Very Late-type Low-mass Stars and Brown Dwarfs in Nearby Young Moving Groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gagné, Jonathan; Lafrenière, David; Doyon, René; Malo, Lison; Artigau, Étienne

    2015-01-01

    We present the BANYAN All-Sky Survey (BASS) catalog, consisting of 228 new late-type (M4-L6) candidate members of nearby young moving groups (YMGs) with an expected false-positive rate of ~13%. This sample includes 79 new candidate young brown dwarfs and 22 planetary-mass objects. These candidates were identified through the first systematic all-sky survey for late-type low-mass stars and brown dwarfs in YMGs. We cross-matched the Two Micron All Sky Survey and AllWISE catalogs outside of the galactic plane to build a sample of 98,970 potential >=M5 dwarfs in the solar neighborhood and calculated their proper motions with typical precisions of 5-15 mas yr-1. We selected highly probable candidate members of several YMGs from this sample using the Bayesian Analysis for Nearby Young AssociatioNs II tool (BANYAN II). We used the most probable statistical distances inferred from BANYAN II to estimate the spectral type and mass of these candidate YMG members. We used this unique sample to show tentative signs of mass segregation in the AB Doradus moving group and the Tucana-Horologium and Columba associations. The BASS sample has already been successful in identifying several new young brown dwarfs in earlier publications, and will be of great interest in studying the initial mass function of YMGs and for the search of exoplanets by direct imaging; the input sample of potential close-by >=M5 dwarfs will be useful to study the kinematics of low-mass stars and brown dwarfs and search for new proper motion pairs.

  9. Hyperluminous reddened broad-line quasars at z ˜ 2 from the VISTA Hemisphere Survey and WISE all-sky survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerji, Manda; McMahon, Richard G.; Hewett, Paul C.; Gonzalez-Solares, Eduardo; Koposov, Sergey E.

    2013-02-01

    We present the first sample of spectroscopically confirmed heavily reddened broad-line quasars selected using the new near-infrared VISTA Hemisphere Survey and Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) all-sky survey. Observations of four candidates with (J - K) > 2.5 and K ≤ 16.5 over ˜180 deg2 lead to confirmation that two are highly dust-reddened broad-line Type 1 quasars at z ˜ 2. The typical dust extinctions are AV ˜ 2-2.5 mag. We measure black hole masses of ˜109 M⊙ and extinction-corrected bolometric luminosities of ˜1047 erg s-1, making them some of the brightest Type 1 quasars currently known. Despite this, these quasars lie well below the detection limits of wide-field optical surveys like the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) with iAB > 22. We also present WISE photometry at 3-22 μm, for our full sample of spectroscopically confirmed reddened quasars including those selected from the UKIDSS Large Area Survey. We demonstrate that the rest-frame infrared spectral energy distributions of these reddened quasars are similar to ultraviolet-luminous Type 1 quasars with significant hot dust emission and starburst quasar hosts like Mrk 231. The average 12-μm flux density of our reddened quasars is similar to that of the recently discovered hyperluminous infrared galaxy (HyLIRG) WISE 1814+3412 (z = 2.452) at similar redshifts, with two of our reddened quasars also having comparable 22-μm flux densities to this extreme HyLIRG. These optically faint, heavily reddened broad-line quasars are therefore among the most mid-infrared-luminous galaxies at z ˜ 2, now being discovered using WISE.

  10. GOALS, STRATEGIES AND FIRST DISCOVERIES OF AO327, THE ARECIBO ALL-SKY 327 MHz DRIFT PULSAR SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    Deneva, J. S.; Stovall, K.; Martinez, J. G.; Jenet, F.; McLaughlin, M. A.; Bates, S. D.; Bagchi, M.; Freire, P. C. C.

    2013-09-20

    We report initial results from AO327, a drift survey for pulsars with the Arecibo telescope at 327 MHz. The first phase of AO327 will cover the sky at declinations of –1° to 28°, excluding the region within 5° of the Galactic plane, where high scattering and dispersion make low-frequency surveys sub-optimal. We record data from a 57 MHz bandwidth with 1024 channels and 125 μs sampling time. The 60 s transit time through the AO327 beam means that the survey is sensitive to very tight relativistic binaries even with no acceleration searches. To date we have detected 44 known pulsars with periods ranging from 3 ms to 2.21 s and discovered 24 new pulsars. The new discoveries include 3 ms pulsars, three objects with periods of a few tens of milliseconds typical of young as well as mildly recycled pulsars, a nuller, and a rotating radio transient. Five of the new discoveries are in binary systems. The second phase of AO327 will cover the sky at declinations of 28°-38°. We compare the sensitivity and search volume of AO327 to the Green Bank North Celestial Cap survey and the GBT350 drift survey, both of which operate at 350 MHz.

  11. THE ALL-SKY GEOS RR Lyr SURVEY WITH THE TAROT TELESCOPES: ANALYSIS OF THE BLAZHKO EFFECT

    SciTech Connect

    Le Borgne, J.-F.; Klotz, A.; Poretti, E.; Boeer, M.; Butterworth, N.; Dvorak, S.; Dumont, M.; Hambsch, F.-J.; Vandenbroere, J.; Hund, F.; Kugel, F.; Vilalta, J. M.

    2012-08-15

    We used the GEOS database to study the Blazhko effect of galactic RRab stars. The database is continuously enriched by maxima supplied by amateur astronomers and by a dedicated survey by means of the two TAROT robotic telescopes. The same value of the Blazhko period is observed at different values of the pulsation periods and different values of the Blazhko periods are observed at the same value of the pulsation period. There are clues suggesting that the Blazhko effect is changing from one cycle to the next. The secular changes in the pulsation and Blazhko periods of Z CVn are anticorrelated. The diagrams of magnitudes against phases of the maxima clearly show that the light curves of Blazhko variables can be explained as modulated signals, both in amplitude and in frequency. The closed curves describing the Blazhko cycles in such diagrams have different shapes, reflecting the phase shifts between the epochs of the brightest maximum and the maximum O - C. Our sample shows that both clockwise and counterclockwise directions are possible for similar shapes. The improved observational knowledge of the Blazhko effect, in addition to some peculiarities of the light curves, has yet to be explained by a satisfactory physical mechanism.

  12. AKARI far-infrared maps of the zodiacal dust bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ootsubo, Takafumi; Doi, Yasuo; Takita, Satoshi; Nakagawa, Takao; Kawada, Mitsunobu; Kitamura, Yoshimi; Matsuura, Shuji; Usui, Fumihiko; Arimatsu, Ko

    2016-04-01

    Zodiacal emission is thermal emission from interplanetary dust. Its contribution to the sky brightness is non-negligible in the region near the ecliptic plane, even in the far-infrared (far-IR) wavelength regime. We analyze zodiacal emission observed by the AKARI far-IR all-sky survey, which covers 97% of the entire sky at arcminute-scale resolution in four photometric bands, with central wavelengths of 65, 90, 140, and 160 μm. AKARI detected small-scale structures in the zodiacal dust cloud, including the asteroidal dust bands and the circumsolar ring, at far-IR wavelengths. Although the smooth component of the zodiacal emission structure in the far-IR sky can be reproduced well by models based on existing far-IR observations, previous zodiacal emission models have discrepancies in the small-scale structures compared with observations. We investigate the geometry of the small-scale dust-band structures in the AKARI far-IR all-sky maps and construct template maps of the asteroidal dust bands and the circumsolar ring components based on the AKARI far-IR maps. In the maps, ± 1.4°, ± 2.1°, and ± 10° asteroidal dust-band structures are detected in the 65 μm and 90 μm bands. A possible ± 17° band may also have been detected. No evident dust-band structures are identified in either the 140 μm or the 160 μm bands. By subtracting the dust-band templates constructed in this paper, we can achieve a similar level of flux calibration of the AKARI far-IR all-sky maps in the |β| < 40° region to that in the region for |β| > 40°.

  13. AKARI far-infrared maps of the zodiacal dust bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ootsubo, Takafumi; Doi, Yasuo; Takita, Satoshi; Nakagawa, Takao; Kawada, Mitsunobu; Kitamura, Yoshimi; Matsuura, Shuji; Usui, Fumihiko; Arimatsu, Ko

    2016-06-01

    Zodiacal emission is thermal emission from interplanetary dust. Its contribution to the sky brightness is non-negligible in the region near the ecliptic plane, even in the far-infrared (far-IR) wavelength regime. We analyze zodiacal emission observed by the AKARI far-IR all-sky survey, which covers 97% of the entire sky at arcminute-scale resolution in four photometric bands, with central wavelengths of 65, 90, 140, and 160 μm. AKARI detected small-scale structures in the zodiacal dust cloud, including the asteroidal dust bands and the circumsolar ring, at far-IR wavelengths. Although the smooth component of the zodiacal emission structure in the far-IR sky can be reproduced well by models based on existing far-IR observations, previous zodiacal emission models have discrepancies in the small-scale structures compared with observations. We investigate the geometry of the small-scale dust-band structures in the AKARI far-IR all-sky maps and construct template maps of the asteroidal dust bands and the circumsolar ring components based on the AKARI far-IR maps. In the maps, ± 1.4°, ± 2.1°, and ± 10° asteroidal dust-band structures are detected in the 65 μm and 90 μm bands. A possible ± 17° band may also have been detected. No evident dust-band structures are identified in either the 140 μm or the 160 μm bands. By subtracting the dust-band templates constructed in this paper, we can achieve a similar level of flux calibration of the AKARI far-IR all-sky maps in the |β| < 40° region to that in the region for |β| > 40°.

  14. The AKARI Far-Infrared Surveyor young stellar object catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tóth, L. Viktor; Marton, Gábor; Zahorecz, Sarolta; Balázs, Lajos G.; Ueno, Munetaka; Tamura, Motohide; Kawamura, Akiko; Kiss, Zoltán T.; Kitamura, Yoshimi

    2014-02-01

    We demonstrate the use of the AKARI all-sky survey photometric data in the study of galactic star formation. Our aim was to select young stellar objects (YSOs) in the AKARI Far-Infrared Surveyor (FIS) Bright Source Catalogue. We used AKARI/FIS and Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) data to derive mid- and far-infrared colors of YSOs. Classification schemes based on quadratic discriminant analysis (QDA) have been given for YSOs and the training catalog for QDA was the whole-sky selection of previously known YSOs (i.e., listed in the SIMBAD database). A new catalog of AKARI FIS YSO candidates including 44001 sources has been prepared; the reliability of the classification is over 90%, as tested in comparison to known YSOs. As much as 76% of our YSO candidates are from previously uncatalogued types. The vast majority of these sources are Class I and II types according to the Lada classification. The distribution of AKARI FIS YSOs is well correlated with that of the galactic ISM; local over-densities were found on infrared loops and towards the cold clumps detected by Planck.

  15. THEMIS / All-Sky Imagers

    NASA Video Gallery

    A collection of ground-based All-Sky Imagers (ASI) make up another important component of the THEMIS mission. It is sometimes referred to as the sixth THEMIS satellite. Imagery from each camera is ...

  16. OPTICAL IMAGES AND SOURCE CATALOG OF AKARI NORTH ECLIPTIC POLE WIDE SURVEY FIELD

    SciTech Connect

    Jeon, Yiseul; Im, Myungshin; Lee, Induk; Ibrahimov, Mansur; Lee, Hyung Mok; Lee, Myung Gyoon E-mail: mim@astro.snu.ac.k

    2010-09-15

    We present the source catalog and the properties of the B-, R-, and I-band images obtained to support the AKARI North Ecliptic Pole Wide (NEP-Wide) survey. The NEP-Wide is an AKARI infrared imaging survey of the north ecliptic pole covering a 5.8 deg{sup 2} area over 2.5-6 {mu}m wavelengths. The optical imaging data were obtained at the Maidanak Observatory in Uzbekistan using the Seoul National University 4k x 4k Camera on the 1.5 m telescope. These images cover 4.9 deg{sup 2} where no deep optical imaging data are available. Our B-, R-, and I-band data reach the depths of {approx}23.4, {approx}23.1, and {approx}22.3 mag (AB) at 5{sigma}, respectively. The source catalog contains 96,460 objects in the R band, and the astrometric accuracy is about 0.''15 at 1{sigma} in each R.A. and decl. direction. These photometric data will be useful for many studies including identification of optical counterparts of the infrared sources detected by AKARI, analysis of their spectral energy distributions from optical through infrared, and the selection of interesting objects to understand the obscured galaxy evolution.

  17. The All Sky Automated Survey. The Catalog of Bright Variable Stars in the I-band, South of Declination +28o

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sitek, M.; Pojmański, G.

    2014-06-01

    This paper presents the results of our extensive search for the bright variable stars in approximately 30 000 square degrees of the south sky in the I-band data collected by 9o×9o camera of the All Sky Automated Survey between 2002 and 2009. Lists of over 27 000 variable stars brighter than 9 mag at maximum light, with amplitudes ranging from 0.02 mag to 7 mag and variability time-scales from hours to years, as well as corresponding light curves are provided. Automated classification algorithm based on stellar properties (period, Fourier coefficients, 2MASS J, H, K, colors, ASAS V-band data) was used to roughly classify objects. Despite low spatial resolution of the ASAS data (≍15'') we cross-identified all objects with other available data sources. Coordinates of the most probable 2MASS counterparts are provided. 27 705 stars brighter than I=9 mag were found to be variable, of which 7842 objects were detected to be variable for the first time. Brief statistics and discussion of the presented data is provided. All the photometric data is available over the Internet at http://www.astrouw.edu.pl/ gp/asas/AsasBrightI.html

  18. Extended Source/Galaxy All Sky 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    This panoramic view encompasses the entire sky and reveals the distribution of galaxies beyond the Milky Way galaxy, which astronomers call extended sources, as observed by Two Micron All-Sky Survey. The image is assembled from a database of over 1.6 million galaxies listed in the survey's All-Sky Survey Extended Source Catalog,; more than half of the galaxies have never before been catalogued. The colors represent how the many galaxies appear at three distinct wavelengths of infrared light (blue at 1.2 microns, green at 1.6 microns, and red at 2.2 microns). Quite evident are the many galactic clusters and superclusters, as well as some streamers composing the large-scale structure of the nearby universe. The blue overlay represents the very close and bright stars from our own Milky Way galaxy. In this projection, the bluish Milky Way lies predominantly toward the upper middle and edges of the image.

  19. The "All Sky Camera Network"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caldwell, Andy

    2005-01-01

    In 2001, the "All Sky Camera Network" came to life as an outreach program to connect the Denver Museum of Nature and Science (DMNS) exhibit "Space Odyssey" with Colorado schools. The network is comprised of cameras placed strategically at schools throughout Colorado to capture fireballs--rare events that produce meteorites. Meteorites have great…

  20. VizieR Online Data Catalog: 20cm survey of the AKARI SEP (ATCA-ADFS) (White+, 2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, G. J.; Hatsukade, B.; Pearson, C.; Takagi, T.; Sedgwick, C.; Matsuura, S.; Matsuhara, H.; Serjeant, S.; Nakagawa, T.; Lee, H. M.; Oyabu, S.; Jeong, W.-S.; Shirahata, M.; Kohno, K.; Yamamura, I.; Hanami, H.; Goto, T.; Makiuti, S.; Clements, D. L.; Malek, K.; Khan, S. A.

    2013-08-01

    The AKARI ADF-S survey was primarily made in the far-infrared at wavelengths of 65, 90, 140, 160um over a 12deg2 area with the AKARI Far-Infrared Surveyor (FIS) instrument, with shallower mid-infrared coverage at 9, 18um using the AKARI Infrared Camera (IRC) instrument. In addition to the wide survey, deeper mid-infrared pointed observations, using the IRC, covering ~0.8deg2 and reaching 5σ sensitivities of 16, 16, 74, 132, 280 and 580uJy at 3.2, 4.6, 7, 11, 15, 24um were also carried out. The radio observations were collected over a 13d period in 2007 July using the ATCA operated at 1.344 and 1.432GHz. (1 data file).

  1. AKARI INFRARED CAMERA SURVEY OF THE LARGE MAGELLANIC CLOUD. II. THE NEAR-INFRARED SPECTROSCOPIC CATALOG

    SciTech Connect

    Shimonishi, Takashi; Onaka, Takashi; Kato, Daisuke; Sakon, Itsuki; Ita, Yoshifusa; Kawamura, Akiko; Kaneda, Hidehiro

    2013-02-01

    We performed a near-infrared spectroscopic survey toward an area of {approx}10 deg{sup 2} of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) with the infrared satellite AKARI. Observations were carried out as part of the AKARI Large-area Survey of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LSLMC). The slitless multi-object spectroscopic capability of the AKARI/IRC enabled us to obtain low-resolution (R {approx} 20) spectra in 2-5 {mu}m for a large number of point sources in the LMC. As a result of the survey, we extracted about 2000 infrared spectra of point sources. The data are organized as a near-infrared spectroscopic catalog. The catalog includes various infrared objects such as young stellar objects (YSOs), asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars, supergiants, and so on. It is shown that 97% of the catalog sources have corresponding photometric data in the wavelength range from 1.2 to 11 {mu}m, and 67% of the sources also have photometric data up to 24 {mu}m. The catalog allows us to investigate near-infrared spectral features of sources by comparison with their infrared spectral energy distributions. In addition, it is estimated that about 10% of the catalog sources are observed at more than two different epochs. This enables us to study a spectroscopic variability of sources by using the present catalog. Initial results of source classifications for the LSLMC samples are presented. We classified 659 LSLMC spectra based on their near-infrared spectral features by visual inspection. As a result, it is shown that the present catalog includes 7 YSOs, 160 C-rich AGBs, 8 C-rich AGB candidates, 85 O-rich AGBs, 122 blue and yellow supergiants, 150 red super giants, and 128 unclassified sources. Distributions of the classified sources on the color-color and color-magnitude diagrams are discussed in the text. Continuous wavelength coverage and high spectroscopic sensitivity in 2-5 {mu}m can only be achieved by space observations. This is an unprecedented large-scale spectroscopic survey toward the

  2. The first source counts at 18 μm from the AKARI NEP Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearson, Chris P.; Serjeant, S.; Oyabu, S.; Matsuhara, H.; Wada, T.; Goto, T.; Takagi, T.; Lee, H. M.; Im, M.; Ohyama, Y.; Kim, S. J.; Murata, K.

    2014-10-01

    We present the first galaxy counts at 18 μm using the Japanese AKARI satellite's survey at the North Ecliptic Pole (NEP), produced from the images from the NEP-Deep and NEP-Wide surveys covering 0.6 and 5.8 deg2, respectively. We describe a procedure using a point source filtering algorithm to remove background structure and a minimum variance method for our source extraction and photometry that delivers the optimum signal to noise for our extracted sources, confirming this by comparison with standard photometry methods. The final source counts are complete and reliable over three orders of magnitude in flux density, resulting in sensitivities (80 per cent completeness) of 0.15 and 0.3 mJy for the NEP-Deep and NEP-Wide surveys, respectively, a factor of 1.3 deeper than previous catalogues constructed from this field. The differential source counts exhibit a characteristic upturn from Euclidean expectations at around a milliJansky and a corresponding evolutionary bump between 0.2-0.4 mJy consistent with previous mid-infrared surveys with ISO and Spitzer at 15 and 24 μm. We compare our results with galaxy evolution models confirming the striking divergence from the non-evolving scenario. The models and observations are in broad agreement implying that the source counts are consistent with a strongly evolving population of luminous infrared galaxies at redshifts higher than unity. Integrating our source counts down to the limit of the NEP survey at the 150 μJy level we calculate that AKARI has resolved approximately 55 per cent of the 18 μm cosmic infrared background relative to the predictions of contemporary source count models.

  3. Orbital and physical parameters of eclipsing binaries from the All-Sky Automated Survey catalogue. III. Two new low-mass systems with rapidly evolving spots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hełminiak, K. G.; Konacki, M.; Złoczewski, K.; Ratajczak, M.; Reichart, D. E.; Ivarsen, K. M.; Haislip, J. B.; Crain, J. A.; Foster, A. C.; Nysewander, M. C.; Lacluyze, A. P.

    2011-03-01

    Aims: We present the results of our spectroscopic and photometric analysis of two newly discovered low-mass detached eclipsing binaries found in the All-Sky Automated Survey (ASAS) catalogue: ASAS J093814-0104.4 and ASAS J212954-5620.1. Methods: Using the Grating Instrument for Radiation Analysis with a Fibre-Fed Echelle (GIRAFFE) on the 1.9-m Radcliffe telescope at the South African Astronomical Observatory (SAAO) and the University College London Echelle Spectrograph (UCLES) on the 3.9-m Anglo-Australian Telescope, we obtained high-resolution spectra of both objects and derived their radial velocities (RVs) at various orbital phases. The RVs of both objects were measured with the two-dimensional cross-correlation technique (TODCOR) using synthetic template spectra as references. We also obtained V and I band photometry using the 1.0-m Elizabeth telescope at SAAO and the 0.4-m Panchromatic Robotic Optical Monitoring and Polarimetry Telescopes (PROMPT) located at the Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory (CTIO). The orbital and physical parameters of the systems were derived with PHOEBE and JKTEBOP codes. We compared our results with several sets of widely-used isochrones. Results: Our multi-epoch photometric observations demonstrate that both objects show significant out-of-eclipse modulations, which vary in time. We believe that this effect is caused by stellar spots, which evolve on time scales of tens of days. For this reason, we constructed our models on the basis of photometric observations spanning short time scales (less than a month). Our modeling indicates that (1) ASAS J093814-0104.04 is a main sequence active system with nearly-twin components with masses of M1 = 0.771 ± 0.033 M⊙, M2 = 0.768 ± 0.021 M⊙ and radii of R1 = 0.772 ± 0.012 R⊙ and R2 = 0.769 ± 0.013 R⊙. (2) ASAS J212954-5620.1 is a main sequence active binary with component masses of M1 = 0.833 ± 0.017 M⊙, M2 = 0.703 ± 0.013 M⊙ and radii of R1 = 0.845 ± 0.012 R⊙ and R2

  4. Cryogenic silicon carbide mirrors for infrared astronomical telescopes: lessons learnt from AKARI for SPICA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onaka, Takashi; Kaneda, Hidehiro; Kawada, Mitsunobu; Enya, Keigo; Nakagawa, Takao

    2013-09-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) has good thermal conductivity, high stiffness, and a relatively low specific density, all of which are advantageous to the application to telescopes operating at cryogenic temperatures. The first Japanese astronomical infrared space mission AKARI, which was launched in 2006 February and completed the second generation all-sky survey at 6 bands from mid- to far-infrared, employed a 700mm cryogenic telescope made of specially developed SiC. It was a sandwich-type of SiC composed of a lightweight porous core and a dense chemical vapor deposition (CVD) coat to decrease the specific density and facilitate machining for achieving the required surface figure accuracy. Measurements with an interferometer of 160-mm sample mirrors demonstrated that the AKARI mirror SiC had good thermal stability down to cryogenic temperatures (~6K), while the mirror support of the compact design became the primary source of the wave-front errors of the AKARI telescope. Taking the advantage of the heritage of the AKARI telescope development as well as ESA's Herschel telescope, we are planning the next infrared space mission SPICA (Space Infrared Telescope for Cosmology and Astrophysics) of a 3.2m cooled telescope in participation of ESA using SiC-based materials. In this presentation, we summarize the development of AKARI SiC telescope and present the development activities of the SPICA telescope from the point of view of SiC being as the mirror material for cryogenic space infrared telescopes.

  5. AKARI INFRARED CAMERA SURVEY OF THE LARGE MAGELLANIC CLOUD. I. POINT-SOURCE CATALOG

    SciTech Connect

    Kato, Daisuke; Onaka, Takashi; Shimonishi, Takashi; Sakon, Itsuki; Ita, Yoshifusa; Tanabe, Toshihiko; Takahashi, Hidenori; Kaneda, Hidehiro; Kawamura, Akiko; Wada, Takehiko; Usui, Fumihiko; Koo, Bon-Chul; Matsuura, Mikako E-mail: onaka@astron.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp

    2012-12-01

    We present a near- to mid-infrared point-source catalog of five photometric bands at 3.2, 7, 11, 15, and 24 {mu}m for a 10 deg{sup 2} area of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) obtained with the Infrared Camera on board the AKARI satellite. To cover the survey area the observations were carried out at three separate seasons from 2006 May to June, 2006 October to December, and 2007 March to July. The 10{sigma} limiting magnitudes of the present survey are 17.9, 13.8, 12.4, 9.9, and 8.6 mag at 3.2, 7, 11, 15, and 24 {mu}m, respectively. The photometric accuracy is estimated to be about 0.1 mag at 3.2 {mu}m and 0.06-0.07 mag in the other bands. The position accuracy is 0.''3 at 3.2, 7, and 11 {mu}m and 1.''0 at 15 and 24 {mu}m. The sensitivities at 3.2, 7, and 24 {mu}m are roughly comparable to those of the Spitzer SAGE LMC point-source catalog, while the AKARI catalog provides the data at 11 and 15 {mu}m, covering the mid-infrared spectral range contiguously. Two types of catalog are provided: a Catalog and an Archive. The Archive contains all the detected sources, while the Catalog only includes the sources that have a counterpart in the Spitzer SAGE point-source catalog. The Archive contains about 650,000, 140,000, 97,000, 43,000, and 52,000 sources at 3.2, 7, 11, 15, and 24 {mu}m, respectively. Based on the catalog, we discuss the luminosity functions at each band, the color-color diagram, and the color-magnitude diagram using the 3.2, 7, and 11 {mu}m band data. Stars without circumstellar envelopes, dusty C-rich and O-rich stars, young stellar objects, and background galaxies are located at distinct regions in the diagrams, suggesting that the present catalog is useful for the classification of objects toward the LMC.

  6. HECTOSPEC AND HYDRA SPECTRA OF INFRARED LUMINOUS SOURCES IN THE AKARI NORTH ECLIPTIC POLE SURVEY FIELD

    SciTech Connect

    Shim, Hyunjin; Im, Myungshin; Jeon, Yiseul; Kim, Seong Jin; Lee, Hyung Mok; Ko, Jongwan; Karouzos, Marios; Papovich, Casey; Willmer, Christopher; Weiner, Benjamin J.

    2013-08-15

    We present spectra of 1796 sources selected in the AKARI North Ecliptic Pole Wide Survey field, obtained with MMT/Hectospec and WIYN/Hydra, for which we measure 1645 redshifts. We complemented the generic flux-limited spectroscopic surveys at 11 {mu}m and 15 {mu}m, with additional sources selected based on the MIR and optical colors. In MMT/Hectospec observations, the redshift identification rates are {approx}80% for objects with R < 21.5 mag. On the other hand, in WIYN/Hydra observations, the redshift identification rates are {approx}80% at R magnitudes brighter than 19 mag. The observed spectra were classified through the visual inspection or from the line diagnostics. We identified 1128 star-forming or absorption-line-dominated galaxies, 198 Type-1 active galactic nuclei (AGNs), 8 Type-2 AGNs, 121 Galactic stars, and 190 spectra in unknown category due to low signal-to-noise ratio. The spectra were flux-calibrated but to an accuracy of 0.1-0.18 dex for most of the targets and worse for the remainder. We derive star formation rates (SFRs) from the mid-infrared fluxes or from the optical emission lines, showing that our sample spans an SFR range of 0.1 to a few hundred M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}. We find that the extinction inferred from the difference between the IR and optical SFR increases as the IR luminosity increases but with a large scatter.

  7. AN XMM-NEWTON SURVEY OF THE SOFT X-RAY BACKGROUND. II. AN ALL-SKY CATALOG OF DIFFUSE O VII AND O VIII EMISSION INTENSITIES

    SciTech Connect

    Henley, David B.; Shelton, Robin L.

    2012-10-15

    We present an all-sky catalog of diffuse O VII and O VIII line intensities, extracted from archival XMM-Newton observations. This catalog supersedes our previous catalog, which covered the sky between l = 120 Degree-Sign and l = 240 Degree-Sign . We attempted to reduce the contamination from near-Earth solar wind charge exchange (SWCX) emission by excluding times of high solar wind proton flux from the data. Without this filtering, we were able to extract measurements from 1868 observations. With this filtering, nearly half of the observations became unusable, and only 1003 observations yielded measurements. The O VII and O VIII intensities are typically {approx}2-11 and {approx}<3 photons cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} sr{sup -1} (line unit, L.U.), respectively, although much brighter intensities were also recorded. Our data set includes 217 directions that have been observed multiple times by XMM-Newton. The time variation of the intensities from such directions may be used to constrain SWCX models. The O VII and O VIII intensities typically vary by {approx}<5 and {approx}<2 L.U. between repeat observations, although several intensity enhancements of >10 L.U. were observed. We compared our measurements with models of the heliospheric and geocoronal SWCX. The heliospheric SWCX intensity is expected to vary with ecliptic latitude and solar cycle. We found that the observed oxygen intensities generally decrease from solar maximum to solar minimum, both at high ecliptic latitudes (which is as expected) and at low ecliptic latitudes (which is not as expected). The geocoronal SWCX intensity is expected to depend on the solar wind proton flux incident on the Earth and on the sightline's path through the magnetosheath. The intensity variations seen in directions that have been observed multiple times are in poor agreement with the predictions of a geocoronal SWCX model. We found that the oxygen lines account for {approx}40%-50% of the 3/4 keV X-ray background that is not due to

  8. WATER MASER SURVEY ON AKARI AND IRAS SOURCES: A SEARCH FOR ''LOW-VELOCITY'' WATER FOUNTAINS

    SciTech Connect

    Yung, Bosco H. K.; Nakashima, Jun-ichi; Kwok, Sun; Imai, Hiroshi; Deguchi, Shuji; Henkel, Christian

    2013-05-20

    We present the results of a 22 GHz H{sub 2}O maser survey toward a new sample of asymptotic giant branch (AGB) and post-AGB star candidates. Most of the objects are selected for the first time based on the AKARI data, which have high flux sensitivity in the mid-infrared ranges. We aim at finding H{sub 2}O maser sources in the transient phase between the AGB and post-AGB stages of evolution, where the envelopes start to develop large deviations from spherical symmetry. The observations were carried out with the Effelsberg 100 m radio telescope. Among 204 observed objects, 63 detections (36 new) were obtained. We found four objects that may be ''water fountain'' sources (IRAS 15193+3132, IRAS 18056-1514, OH 16.3-3.0, and IRAS 18455+0448). They possess an H{sub 2}O maser velocity coverage much smaller than those in other known water fountains. However, the coverage is still larger than that of the 1612 MHz OH maser. It implies that there is an outflow with a higher velocity than the envelope expansion velocity (typically {<=}25 km s{sup -1}), meeting the criterion of the water fountain class. We suggest that these candidates are possibly oxygen-rich late AGB or early post-AGB stars in a stage of evolution immediately after the spherically symmetric AGB mass loss has ceased.

  9. AKARI NEAR-INFRARED SPECTROSCOPIC SURVEY FOR CO{sub 2} IN 18 COMETS

    SciTech Connect

    Ootsubo, Takafumi; Kawakita, Hideyo; Hamada, Saki; Kobayashi, Hitomi; Yamaguchi, Mitsuru; Usui, Fumihiko; Nakagawa, Takao; Ueno, Munetaka; Ishiguro, Masateru; Sekiguchi, Tomohiko; Watanabe, Jun-ichi; Sakon, Itsuki; Shimonishi, Takashi; Onaka, Takashi

    2012-06-10

    We conducted a spectroscopic survey of cometary volatiles with the Infrared Camera on board the Japanese infrared satellite AKARI in the wavelength range from 2.5 to 5 {mu}m. In our survey, 18 comets, including both the Oort cloud comets and the Jupiter-family comets, were observed in the period from 2008 June to 2010 January, most of which were observed at least twice. The prominent emission bands in the observed spectra are the fundamental vibrational bands of water (H{sub 2}O) at 2.7 {mu}m and carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) at 4.3 {mu}m. The fundamental vibrational band of carbon monoxide (CO) around 4.7 {mu}m and the broad emission feature, probably related to carbon-hydrogen-bearing molecules, can also be recognized around the 3.3-3.5-{mu}m region in some of the comets. With respect to H{sub 2}O, gas production rate ratios of CO{sub 2} have been derived in 17 comets, except for the comet 29P/Schwassmann-Wachmann 1. Our data set provides the largest homogeneous database of CO{sub 2}/H{sub 2}O production rate ratios in comets obtained so far. The CO{sub 2}/H{sub 2}O production rate ratios are considered to reflect the composition of cometary ice when a comet is observed at a heliocentric distance within {approx}2.5 AU, since H{sub 2}O ice fully sublimates there. The CO{sub 2}/H{sub 2}O ratio in cometary ice spans from several to {approx}30% among the comets observed at <2.5 AU (13 out of the 17 comets). Alternatively, the ratio of CO/CO{sub 2} in the comets seems to be smaller than unity based on our observations, although we only obtain upper limits for CO in most of the comets.

  10. Extended Source/Galaxy All Sky 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    This panoramic view of the entire sky reveals the distribution of galaxies beyond our Milky Way galaxy, which astronomers call extended sources, as observed by Two Micron All-Sky Survey. The image is constructed from a database of over 1.6 million galaxies listed in the survey's Extended Source Catalog; more than half of the galaxies have never before been catalogued. The image is a representation of the relative brightnesses of these million-plus galaxies, all observed at a wavelength of 2.2 microns.

    The brightest and nearest galaxies are represented in blue, and the faintest, most distant ones are in red. This color scheme gives insights into the three dimensional large-scale structure of the nearby universe with the brightest, closest clusters and superclusters showing up as the blue and bluish-white features. The dark band in this image shows the area of the sky where our Milky Way galaxy blocks our view of distant objects, which, in this projection, lies predominantly along the edges of the image.

  11. AKARI North Ecliptic Pole Deep Survey. Revision of the catalogue via a new image analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murata, K.; Matsuhara, H.; Wada, T.; Arimatsu, K.; Oi, N.; Takagi, T.; Oyabu, S.; Goto, T.; Ohyama, Y.; Malkan, M.; Pearson, C.; Małek, K.; Solarz, A.

    2013-11-01

    Context. We present the revised near- to mid-infrared catalogue of the AKARI North Ecliptic Pole deep survey. The survey has the unique advantage of continuous filter coverage from 2 to 24 μm over nine photometric bands, but the initial version of the survey catalogue leaves room for improvement in the image analysis stage; the original images are strongly contaminated by the behaviour of the detector and the optical system. Aims: The purpose of this study is to devise new image analysis methods and to improve the detection limit and reliability of the source extraction. Methods: We removed the scattered light and stray light from the Earth limb, and corrected for artificial patterns in the images by creating appropriate templates. We also removed any artificial sources due to bright sources by using their properties or masked them out visually. In addition, for the mid-infrared source extraction, we created detection images by stacking all six bands. This reduced the sky noise and enabled us to detect fainter sources more reliably. For the near-infrared source catalogue, we considered only objects with counterparts from ground-based catalogues to avoid fake sources. For our ground-based catalogues, we used catalogues based on the CFHT/MegaCam z' band, CFHT/WIRCam Ks band and Subaru/Scam z' band. Objects with multiple counterparts were all listed in the catalogue with a merged flag for the AKARI flux. Results: The detection limits of all mid-infrared bands were improved by ~20%, and the total number of detected objects was increased by ~2000 compared with the previous version of the catalogue; it now has 9560 objects. The 5σ detection limits in our catalogue are 11, 9, 10, 30, 34, 57, 87, 93, and 256 μJy in the N2, N3, N4, S7, S9W, S11, L15, L18W, and L24 bands, respectively. The astrometric accuracies of these band detections are 0.48, 0.52, 0.55, 0.99, 0.95, 1.1, 1.2, 1.3, and 1.6 arcsec, respectively. The false-detection rate of all nine bands was decreased

  12. Far Infrared All-Sky Survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richards, Paul L.

    1998-01-01

    Precise measurements of the angular power spectrum of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) anisotropy will revolutionize cosmology. These measurements will discriminate between competing cosmological models and, if the standard inflationary scenario is correct, will determine each of the fundamental cosmological parameters with high precision. The astrophysics community has recognized this potential: the orbital experiments MAP and PLANCK, have been approved to measure CMB anisotropy. Balloon-borne experiments can realize much of this potential before these missions are launched. Additionally, properly designed balloon-borne experiments can complement MAP in frequency and angular resolution and can give the first realistic test of the instrumentation proposed for the high frequency instrument on PLANCK. The MAXIMA experiment is part of the MAXIMA/BOOMERANG collaboration which is doing balloon observations of the angular power spectrum of the Cosmic Microwave Background from l = 10 to l = 800. These experiments are designed to use the benefits of both North American and Antarctic long-duration ballooning to full advantage. We have developed several new technologies that together allow the power spectrum to be measured with unprecedented combination of angular resolution, beam throw, sensitivity, sky coverage and control of systematic effects. These technologies are the basis for the high frequency instrument for the PLANCK mission. Our measurements will strongly discriminate between models of the origin and evolution of structure in the universe and, for many models, will determine the value of the basic cosmological parameters to high precision.

  13. Auroral all-sky camera calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigernes, F.; Holmen, S. E.; Biles, D.; Bjørklund, H.; Chen, X.; Dyrland, M.; Lorentzen, D. A.; Baddeley, L.; Trondsen, T.; Brändström, U.; Trondsen, E.; Lybekk, B.; Moen, J.; Chernouss, S.; Deehr, C. S.

    2014-09-01

    A two-step procedure to calibrate the spectral sensitivity to visible light of auroral all-sky cameras is outlined. Center pixel response is obtained by the use of a Lambertian surface and a standard 45W tungsten lamp. Screen brightness is regulated by the distance between the lamp and the screen. All-sky flat-field correction is carried out with a 1 m diameter integrating sphere. A transparent Lexan dome at the exit port of the sphere is used to simulate observing conditions at the Kjell Henriksen Observatory (KHO). A certified portable low brightness source from Keo Scientific Ltd. was used to test the procedure. Transfer lamp certificates in units of Rayleigh per Ångstrøm (R Å-1) are found to be within a relative error of 2%. An all-sky camera flat-field correction method is presented with only 6 required coefficients per channel.

  14. Auroral all-sky camera calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigernes, F.; Holmen, S. E.; Biles, D.; Bjørklund, H.; Chen, X.; Dyrland, M.; Lorentzen, D. A.; Baddeley, L.; Trondsen, T.; Brändström, U.; Trondsen, E.; Lybekk, B.; Moen, J.; Chernouss, S.; Deehr, C. S.

    2014-12-01

    A two-step procedure to calibrate the spectral sensitivity to visible light of auroral all-sky cameras is outlined. Center pixel response is obtained by the use of a Lambertian surface and a standard 45 W tungsten lamp. Screen brightness is regulated by the distance between the lamp and the screen. All-sky flat-field correction is carried out with a 1 m diameter integrating sphere. A transparent Lexan dome at the exit port of the sphere is used to simulate observing conditions at the Kjell Henriksen Observatory (KHO). A certified portable low brightness source from Keo Scientific Ltd was used to test the procedure. Transfer lamp certificates in units of Rayleigh per Ångstrøm (R/Å) are found to be within a relative error of 2%. An all-sky camera flat-field correction method is presented with only 6 required coefficients per channel.

  15. Hyperspectral all-sky imaging of auroras.

    PubMed

    Sigernes, Fred; Ivanov, Yuriy; Chernouss, Sergey; Trondsen, Trond; Roldugin, Alexey; Fedorenko, Yury; Kozelov, Boris; Kirillov, Andrey; Kornilov, Ilia; Safargaleev, Vladimir; Holmen, Silje; Dyrland, Margit; Lorentzen, Dag; Baddeley, Lisa

    2012-12-01

    A prototype auroral hyperspectral all-sky camera has been constructed and tested. It uses electro-optical tunable filters to image the night sky as a function of wavelength throughout the visible spectrum with no moving mechanical parts. The core optical system includes a new high power all-sky lens with F-number equal to f/1.1. The camera has been tested at the Kjell Henriksen Observatory (KHO) during the auroral season of 2011/2012. It detects all sub classes of aurora above ~½ of the sub visual 1kR green intensity threshold at an exposure time of only one second. Supervised classification of the hyperspectral data shows promise as a new method to process and identify auroral forms. PMID:23262713

  16. All Sky Observations with BATSE and GBM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson-Hodge, Colleen A.

    2008-01-01

    The Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) on board the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO) monitored the entire sky from 1991-2000. I will review highlights of BATSE observations including gamma ray bursts, black hole candidates, accreting pulsars, and active galaxies. On 2008 June 11, the Fermi Gamma Ray Space Telescope was launched. The Gamma ray Burst Monitor (GBM) on board Fermi continues the all-sky monitoring legacy started with BATSE. I will review early results and planned observations with GBM.

  17. J- AND H-BAND IMAGING OF AKARI NORTH ECLIPTIC POLE SURVEY FIELD

    SciTech Connect

    Jeon, Yiseul; Im, Myungshin; Kang, Eugene; Lee, Hyung Mok; Matsuhara, Hideo E-mail: mim@astro.snu.ac.kr

    2014-10-01

    We present the J- and H-band source catalog covering the AKARI North Ecliptic Pole field. Filling the gap between the optical data from other follow-up observations and mid-infrared (MIR) data from AKARI, our near-infrared (NIR) data provides contiguous wavelength coverage from optical to MIR. For the J- and H-band imaging, we used the FLoridA Multi-object Imaging Near-ir Grism Observational Spectrometer on the Kitt Peak National Observatory 2.1m telescope covering a 5.1 deg{sup 2} area down to a 5σ depth of ∼21.6 mag and ∼21.3 mag (AB) for the J and H bands with an astrometric accuracy of 0.''14 and 0.''17 for 1σ in R.A. and decl. directions, respectively. We detected 208,020 sources for the J band and 203,832 sources for the H band. This NIR data is being used for studies including the analysis of the physical properties of infrared sources such as stellar mass and photometric redshifts, and will be a valuable data set for various future missions.

  18. OT2_sserje01_2: THE HERSCHEL-AKARI NEP DEEP SURVEY: the cosmological history of stellar mass assembly and black hole accretion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serjeant, S.

    2011-09-01

    We propose a far-IR and submm mapping survey of the premier AKARI deep field in the North Ecliptic Pole, in PACS/SPIRE parallel mode. This is the only major deep infrared field not yet covered by Herschel guaranteed or open time key projects. The outstanding and unparalleled continuous mid-IR photometric coverage from AKARI, far better than equivalent Spitzer surveys, enables a wide range of galaxy evolution diagnostics unachievable in any other survey field (including Herschel HerMES/PEP fields), by spanning the wavelengths of redshifted PAH and silicate features and the peak energy output of AGN dust tori. The investment by AKARI in the NEP represents ~10 percent of the entire pointed observations available throughout the lifetime of AKARI. Our proposal remedies the remarkable omission from Herschel's legacy surveys of the premier extragalactic deep field from another IR space telescope. We will simultaneously identify and find photometric redshifts for the Herschel point source population, make stacking analysis detections of the galaxies which dominate the submm extragalactic background light as a function of redshift, determine the bolometric power outputs of the galaxies that dominate the submm background, compare the UV/optical/mid-IR continuum/PAH/far-IR/submm/radio star formation rate estimator in the most comprehensive IR survey data set to date, and track the coupled stellar mass assembly and black hole accretion throughout most of the history of the Universe. In OT1 the HOTAC concluded "The science output from the proposed survey will be outstanding [...] The panel was convinced that these observations should be done" but it since became clear that priority 2 time is very unlikely to be executed, so we request reclassification to priority 1.

  19. All sky monitoring network with amateur telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Zhonghua; Xu, Chun

    2012-09-01

    We describe here a multiband all sky monitoring system under construction using amateur resources. The system consists of a data management center and a network of telescopes. The total number of telescopes in this network can be huge and all the telescopes are not affected by their local weather or their operability so this network is capable of monitoring the whole night sky simultaneously in many different bands. The telescopes in the network can be operated on an individual basis or on a coordinated mode. The data taken by the telescopes in the network are sent to the data management center via internet where calibration, data fusion, data analysis are performed.

  20. HHEBBES! All sky camera system: status update

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bettonvil, F.

    2015-01-01

    A status update is given of the HHEBBES! All sky camera system. HHEBBES!, an automatic camera for capturing bright meteor trails, is based on a DSLR camera and a Liquid Crystal chopper for measuring the angular velocity. Purpose of the system is to a) recover meteorites; b) identify origin/parental bodies. In 2015, two new cameras were rolled out: BINGO! -alike HHEBBES! also in The Netherlands-, and POgLED, in Serbia. BINGO! is a first camera equipped with a longer focal length fisheye lens, to further increase the accuracy. Several minor improvements have been done and the data reduction pipeline was used for processing two prominent Dutch fireballs.

  1. The All Sky Young Association (ASYA): a New Young Association

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres, C. A. O.; Quast, G. R.; Montes, D.

    2016-01-01

    To analyze the SACY (Search for Associations Containing Young stars) survey we developed a method to find young associations and to define their high probability members. These bona fide members enable to obtain the kinematical and the physical properties of each association in a proper way. Recently we noted a concentration in the UV plane and we found a new association we are calling ASYA (All Sky Young Association) for its overall distribution in the sky with a total of 38 bonafide members and an estimated age of 110 Myr, the oldest young association found in the SACY survey. We present here its kinematical, space and Li distributions and its HR diagram.

  2. A Hexapod Design for All-sky Sidereal Tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pál, András; Mészáros, László; Jaskó, Attila; Mező, György; Csépány, Gergely; Vida, Krisztián; Oláh, Katalin

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, we describe a hexapod-based telescope mount system intended to provide sidereal tracking for the Fly's Eye Camera project—an upcoming moderate, 21″ pixel-1 resolution all-sky survey. By exploiting such a kind of meter-sized telescope mount, we get a device that is both capable of compensating for the apparent rotation of the celestial sphere and the same design can be used independently from the actual geographical location. Our construction is the sole currently operating hexapod telescope mount performing dedicated optical imaging survey with a sub-arcsecond tracking precision.

  3. Star formation and dust extinction properties of local galaxies as seen from AKARI and GALEX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakurai, A.; Takeuchi, T. T.; Yuan, F.-T.; Buat, V.; Burgarella, D.

    2013-03-01

    An accurate estimation of the star formation-related properties of galaxies is crucial for understanding the evolution of galaxies. In galaxies, ultraviolet (UV) light emitted by recently formed massive stars is attenuated by dust, which is also produced by star formation (SF) activity, and is re-emitted at mid- and far- infrared (IR) wavelengths. In this study, we investigate the star formation rate (SFR) and dust extinction using UV and IR data. We selected local galaxies which are detected at AKARI FIS 90 μm and matched the IRAS IIFSC z 60 μm select catalog. We measured FUV and NUV flux densities from GALEX images. We examined the SF and extinction of Local galaxies using four bands of AKARI. Then, we calculated FUV and total IR luminosities, and obtained the SF luminosity, L SF, the total luminosity related to star formation activity, and the SFR. We find that in most galaxies, L SF is dominated by L dust. We also find that galaxies with higher SF activity have a higher fraction of their SF hidden by dust. In fact, the SF of galaxies with SFRs > 20 M⊙ yr-1 is almost completely hidden by dust. Our results boast a significantly higher precision with respect to previously published works, due to the use of much larger object samples from the AKARI and GALEX all sky surveys.

  4. Orbital and physical parameters of eclipsing binaries from the All-Sky Automated Survey catalogue - IV. A 0.61 + 0.45 M⊙ binary in a multiple system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hełminiak, K. G.; Konacki, M.; RóŻyczka, M.; KałuŻny, J.; Ratajczak, M.; Borkowski, J.; Sybilski, P.; Muterspaugh, M. W.; Reichart, D. E.; Ivarsen, K. M.; Haislip, J. B.; Crain, J. A.; Foster, A. C.; Nysewander, M. C.; LaCluyze, A. P.

    2012-09-01

    We present the orbital and physical parameters of a newly discovered low-mass detached eclipsing binary from the All-Sky Automated Survey (ASAS) data base: ASAS J011328-3821.1 A, which is a member of a visual binary system with the secondary component separated by about 1.4 arcsec. The radial velocities have been calculated from the high-resolution spectra obtained with the 1.9-m Radcliffe telescope/Grating Instrument for Radiation Analysis with a Fibre-Fed Echelle (GIRAFFE) spectrograph, the 3.9-m Anglo-Australian Telescope (AAT)/University College London Echelle Spectrograph (UCLES) and the 3.0-m Shane telescope/Hamilton Spectrograph (HamSpec) on the basis of the TODCOR technique and the positions of the Hα emission lines. For the analysis, we have used V- and I-band photometry obtained with the 1.0-m Elizabeth telescope and the 0.41-m Panchromatic Robotic Optical Monitoring and Polarimetry Telescopes (PROMPT), supplemented with the publicly available ASAS light curve of the system. We have found that ASAS J011328-3821.1 A is composed of two late-type dwarfs, which have masses of M1 = 0.612 ± 0.030 M⊙ and M2 = 0.445 ± 0.019 M⊙ and radii of R1 = 0.596 ± 0.020 R⊙ and R2 = 0.445 ± 0.024 R⊙. Both show a substantial level of activity, which manifests in strong Hα and Hβ emission and the presence of cool spots. The influence of the third light on the eclipsing pair properties has also been evaluated and the photometric properties of component B have been derived. A comparison with several popular stellar evolution models shows that the system is on its main-sequence evolution stage and that it is probably more metal-rich than the Sun. We have also found several clues to suggest that component B itself is a binary composed of two nearly identical ˜0.5-M⊙ stars.

  5. Explanatory Supplement to the WISE All-Sky Release Products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2012-01-01

    The Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE; Wright et al. 2010) surveyed the entire sky at 3.4, 4.6, 12 and 22 microns in 2010, achieving 5-sigma point source sensitivities per band better than 0.08, 0.11, 1 and 6 mJy in unconfused regions on the ecliptic. The WISE All-Sky Data Release, conducted on March 14, 2012, incorporates all data taken during the full cryogenic mission phase, 7 January 2010 to 6 August 20l0,that were processed with improved calibrations and reduction algorithms. Release data products include: (1) an Atlas of 18,240 match-filtered, calibrated and coadded image sets; (2) a Source Catalog containing positions and four-band photometry for over 563 million objects, and (3) an Explanatory Supplement. Ancillary products include a Reject Table that contains 284 million detections that were not selected for the Source Catalog because they are low signal-to-noise ratio or spurious detections of image artifacts, an archive of over 1.5 million sets of calibrated WISE Single-exposure images, and a database of 9.4 billion source extractions from those single images, and moving object tracklets identified by the NEOWISE program (Mainzer et aI. 2011). The WISE All-Sky Data Release products supersede those from the WISE Preliminary Data Release (Cutri et al. 2011). The Explanatory Supplement to the WISE All-Sky Data Release Products is a general guide for users of the WISE data. The Supplement contains an overview of the WISE mission, facilities, and operations, a detailed description of WISE data processing algorithms, a guide to the content and formals of the image and tabular data products, and cautionary notes that describe known limitations of the All-Sky Release products. Instructions for accessing the WISE data products via the services of the NASA/IPAC Infrared Science Archive are provided. The Supplement also provides analyses of the achieved sky coverage, photometric and astrometric characteristics and completeness and reliability of the All-Sky

  6. A New Sample of Obscured AGNs Selected from the XMM-Newton and AKARI Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terashima, Yuichi; Hirata, Yoshitaka; Awaki, Hisamitsu; Oyabu, Shinki; Gandhi, Poshak; Toba, Yoshiki; Matsuhara, Hideo

    2015-11-01

    We report a new sample of obscured active galactic nuclei (AGNs) selected from the XMM-Newton serendipitous source and AKARI point-source catalogs. We match X-ray sources with infrared (18 and 90 μm) sources located at | b| \\gt 10^\\circ to create a sample consisting of 173 objects. Their optical classifications and absorption column densities measured by X-ray spectra are compiled and study efficient selection criteria to find obscured AGNs. We apply the criteria (1) X-ray hardness ratio defined by using the 2-4.5 keV and 4.5-12 keV bands > -0.1 and (2) EPIC-PN count rate (CR) in the 0.2-12 keV to infrared flux ratio CR/{F}90\\lt 0.1 or CR/{F}18\\lt 1, where F18 and F90 are infrared fluxes at 18 and 90 μm in Jy, respectively, to search for obscured AGNs. X-ray spectra of 48 candidates, for which no X-ray results have been published, are analyzed and X-ray evidence for the presence of obscured AGNs such as a convex shape X-ray spectrum indicative of absorption of {N}{{H}} ˜ 1022-24 cm-2, a very flat continuum, or a strong Fe-K emission line with an equivalent width of \\gt 700 {{eV}} is found in 26 objects. Six of them are classified as Compton-thick AGNs, and four are represented by either Compton-thin or Compton-thick spectral models. The success rate of finding obscured AGNs combining our analysis and the literature is 92% if the 18 μm condition is used. Of the 26 objects, 4 are optically classified as an H ii nucleus and are new “elusive AGNs” in which star formation activity likely overwhelms AGN emission in the optical and infrared bands.

  7. Effects of High-Energy Ionizing Particles on the Si:As Mid-Infrared Detector Array on Board the AKARI Satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mouri, A.; Kaneda, H.; Ishihara, D.; Oyabu, S.; Yamagishi, M.; Mori, T.; Onaka, T.; Wada, T.; Kataza, H.

    2011-05-01

    We evaluate the effects of high-energy ionizing particles on the Si:As impurity band conduction (IBC) mid-infrared detector on board AKARI, the Japanese infrared astronomical satellite. IBC-type detectors are known to be little influenced by ionizing radiation. However, we find that the detector is significantly affected by in-orbit ionizing radiation even after spikes induced by ionizing particles are removed. The effects are described as changes mostly in the offset of detector output, but not in the gain. We conclude that the changes in the offset are caused mainly by increase in dark current. We establish a method to correct these ionizing radiation effects. The method is essential to improve the quality and to increase the sky coverage of the AKARI mid-infrared all-sky-survey map.

  8. The All Sky Camera Fireball Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenyon, D. A.; Watson, W. T.

    2005-05-01

    A fireball (or bolide) is another name for a very bright meteor due to atmospheric entry of space debris, both natural and man-made. This paper will discuss the technology, methods and results from an All-Sky video camera and custom electronics to record fireball events that occur over Northern California. Images and links to videos will also be presented. The data was captured with Sandia Fireball Network cameras. These systems are operated by the Sierra College Astronomy Dept. and a private observatory in Nevada City, CA. These cameras are automated system which operates from just before dusk to just after dawn. The systems are video cameras, which have a 180o field of view. There is a custom signal processor and memory system, called the Sentinel system, which buffers a few seconds of continuous sky video. The processor compares each video frame to the previous, and when it detects an event (fireball), a few seconds of video (before and after the event) are sent to a host UNIX system. Only data relevant to motion is downloaded to the computer. The system provides a method of recording and study for meteor shower activity. Second, all events captured by both cameras provide the potential to compute the pre-earth encounter orbit, but also to estimate the impact corridor of any meteorites the fireball might have produced. Our experience thus far shows that they occur about once a day and a very bright one every few weeks. The cameras began regular operation around mid-April 2004. To date, no fragments have been recovered from detected events.

  9. A-STAR: The All-Sky Transient Astrophysics Reporter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osborne, J. P.; O'Brien, P.; Evans, P.; Fraser, G. W.; Martindale, A.; Atteia, J.-L.; Cordier, B.; Mereghetti, S.

    2013-07-01

    The small mission A-STAR (All-Sky Transient Astrophysics Reporter) aims to locate the X-ray counterparts to ALIGO and other gravitational wave detector sources, to study the poorly-understood low luminosity gamma-ray bursts, and to find a wide variety of transient high-energy source types, A-STAR will survey the entire available sky twice per 24 hours. The payload consists of a coded mask instrument, Owl, operating in the novel low energy band 4-150 keV, and a sensitive wide-field focussing soft X-ray instrument, Lobster, working over 0.15-5 keV. A-STAR will trigger on ~100 GRBs/yr, rapidly distributing their locations.

  10. AN ALL-SKY CATALOG OF BRIGHT M DWARFS

    SciTech Connect

    Lepine, Sebastien; Gaidos, Eric

    2011-10-15

    We present an all-sky catalog of M dwarf stars with apparent infrared magnitude J < 10. The 8889 stars are selected from the ongoing SUPERBLINK survey of stars with proper motion {mu} > 40 mas yr{sup -1}, supplemented on the bright end with the Tycho-2 catalog. Completeness tests which account for kinematic (proper motion) bias suggest that our catalog represents {approx}75% of the estimated {approx}11, 900 M dwarfs with J < 10 expected to populate the entire sky. Our catalog is, however, significantly more complete for the northern sky ({approx}90%) than it is for the south ({approx}60%). Stars are identified as cool, red M dwarfs from a combination of optical and infrared color cuts, and are distinguished from background M giants and highly reddened stars using either existing parallax measurements or, if such measurements are lacking, using their location in an optical-to-infrared reduced proper motion diagram. These bright M dwarfs are all prime targets for exoplanet surveys using the Doppler radial velocity or transit methods; the combination of low-mass and bright apparent magnitude should make possible the detection of Earth-size planets on short-period orbits using currently available techniques. Parallax measurements, when available, and photometric distance estimates are provided for all stars, and these place most systems within 60 pc of the Sun. Spectral type estimated from V - J color shows that most of the stars range from K7 to M4, with only a few late M dwarfs, all within 20 pc. Proximity to the Sun also makes these stars good targets for high-resolution exoplanet imaging searches, especially if younger objects can be identified on the basis of X-ray or UV excess. For that purpose, we include X-ray flux from ROSAT and FUV/NUV ultraviolet magnitudes from GALEX for all stars for which a counterpart can be identified in those catalogs. Additional photometric data include optical magnitudes from Digitized Sky Survey plates and infrared magnitudes from

  11. Feasibility of polarized all-sky imaging for aerosol characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreuter, A.; Blumthaler, M.

    2012-12-01

    Polarized all-sky distribution measurements contain radiative information about aerosol properties. We investigate the method of all-sky imaging for aerosol property retrieval and propose a technical frame work for image processing and analysis. Using Zernike polynomials, we decompose the relative Stokes parameter distributions, which efficiently captures the information content. The resulting feature vector is well suited for all-sky imaging, independent of calibration and robust against noise. It can be directly used in existing algorithms or alternative types of retrieval methods of aerosol optical properties in the future. By modeling possible aerosol scenarios we investigate the influence of different aerosol types in terms of the first two principal components describing the maximal variances. In this representation we show that the feature vector from a polarized all-sky imager is suitable for aerosol classification with respect to size and single scatter albedo.

  12. The Status of the NASA All Sky Fireball Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooke, William J.; Moser, Danielle E.

    2011-01-01

    Established by the NASA Meteoroid Environment Office, the NASA All Sky Fireball Network consists of 6 meteor video cameras in the southern United States, with plans to expand to 15 cameras by 2013. As of mid-2011, the network had detected 1796 multi-station meteors, including meteors from 43 different meteor showers. The current status of the NASA All Sky Fireball Network is described, alongside preliminary results.

  13. A Digital Backend for the Low Frequency All Sky Monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dartez, L. P.

    2014-04-01

    The Low Frequency All Sky Monitor (LoFASM) is a distributed array of dipole antennas that are sensitive to radio frequencies from 10 to 88 MHz. The primary science goals of LoFASM are the detection and study of low-frequency radio transients, a high priority science goal as deemed by the National Research Council's decadal survey. LoFASM consists of antennas and front-end electronics that were originally developed for the Long Wavelength Array (LWA) by the U.S. Naval Research Lab, the University of New Mexico, Virginia Tech, and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. LoFASM, funded by the U.S. Department of Defense, will initially consist of four stations, each consisting of 12 dual-polarization dipole antennas. In a single station, RF signals from each of the individual LoFASM dipoles are combined in phase in order to synthesize LoFASM's beam. The LoFASM RF signals are phased up so that the resulting beam is sensitive to radio emission that originates from the zenith and RF signals approaching from the horizon are attenuated. Digitally, this is achieved using a full Stokes 100MHz correlating spectrometer constructed using field programmable gate array (FPGA) technology. In this thesis I will describe the design and usage of the LoFASM Correlator.

  14. Mid-infrared luminosity function of local star-forming galaxies in the North Ecliptic Pole-Wide survey field of AKARI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Seong Jin; Lee, Hyung Mok; Jeong, Woong-Seob; Goto, Tomotsugu; Matsuhara, Hideo; Im, Myungshin; Shim, Hyunjin; Kim, Min Gyu; Lee, Myung Gyoon

    2015-12-01

    We present mid-infrared (MIR) luminosity functions (LFs) of local (z < 0.3) star-forming (SF) galaxies in the AKARI's North Ecliptic Pole (NEP)-Wide survey field. In order to derive more accurate LF, we used spectroscopic sample only. Based on the NEP-Wide point source catalogue containing a large number of infrared (IR) sources distributed over the wide (5.4 deg2) field, we incorporated the spectroscopic redshift (z) data for ˜1790 selected targets obtained by optical follow-up surveys with MMT/Hectospec and WIYN/Hydra. The AKARI's continuous 2-24 μm wavelength coverage as well as photometric data from optical u* band to near-infrared H band with the spectroscopic redshifts for our sample galaxies enable us to derive accurate spectral energy distributions (SEDs) in the MIR. We carried out SED fit analysis and employed 1/Vmax method to derive the MIR (e.g. 8, 12, and 15 μm rest-frame) LFs. We fit our 8 μm LFs to the double power-law with the power index of α = 1.53 and β = 2.85 at the break luminosity 4.95 × 109 L⊙. We made extensive comparisons with various MIR LFs from several literatures. Our results for local galaxies from the NEP region are generally consistent with other works for different fields over wide luminosity ranges. The comparisons with the results from the NEP-Deep data as well as other LFs imply the luminosity evolution from higher redshifts towards the present epoch.

  15. The onion universe: all sky lightcone simulations in spherical shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fosalba, Pablo; Gaztañaga, Enrique; Castander, Francisco J.; Manera, Marc

    2008-11-01

    Galaxy surveys provide a large-scale view of the universe that typically has a limited line of sight or redshift resolution. The lack of radial accuracy in these surveys can be modelled by picturing the universe as a set of concentric radial shells of finite width around the observer, i.e. an onion-like structure. We present a new N-body simulation with 20483 particles developed at the Marenostrum supercomputer with the GADGET-2 code. Using the lightcone output we build a set of angular maps that mimic this onion-like representation of the universe. The onion maps are a highly compressed version of the raw data (i.e. a factor of >1000 smaller size for arcminute resolution maps) and they provide a new and powerful tool to exploit large-scale structure observations. We introduce two basic applications of these maps that are especially useful for constraining dark energy properties: the baryon acoustic oscillations (BAOs) in the galaxy power spectrum and all-sky maps of the weak lensing distortion. In particular, from the matter density maps, we determine the smallest scale where linear theory and the Gaussianity of the error analysis applies. Using the weak lensing maps, we measure the convergence power spectra and compare it to halo fit predictions. We also discuss mass resolution effects and error determinations. As a further application, we compute the variance and higher order moments of the maps. We show that sampling variance on scales of few degrees is quite large, resulting in a significant (25 per cent at 10 arcmin scales) bias in the variance. We caution that current lensing surveys such as the COSMOS HST should take into account this bias and extra sampling error in their clustering analyses and inferred cosmological parameter constraints. Finally, we test the importance of projection effects in the weak lensing mass reconstruction. On the mean, the mass calibration works well but it exhibits a large non-Gaussian scatter what could induce a large bias in

  16. Efficient Selection and Classification of Infrared Excess Emission Stars Based on AKARI and 2MASS Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Ya Fang; Zeng Li, Jin; Rector, Travis A.; Mallamaci, Carlos C.

    2013-05-01

    The selection of young stellar objects (YSOs) based on excess emission in the infrared is easily contaminated by post-main-sequence stars and various types of emission line stars with similar properties. We define in this paper stringent criteria for an efficient selection and classification of stellar sources with infrared excess emission based on combined Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS) and AKARI colors. First of all, bright dwarfs and giants with known spectral types were selected from the Hipparcos Catalogue and cross-identified with the 2MASS and AKARI Point Source Catalogues to produce the main-sequence and the post-main-sequence tracks, which appear as expected as tight tracks with very small dispersion. However, several of the main-sequence stars indicate excess emission in the color space. Further investigations based on the SIMBAD data help to clarify their nature as classical Be stars, which are found to be located in a well isolated region on each of the color-color (C-C) diagrams. Several kinds of contaminants were then removed based on their distribution in the C-C diagrams. A test sample of Herbig Ae/Be stars and classical T Tauri stars were cross-identified with the 2MASS and AKARI catalogs to define the loci of YSOs with different masses on the C-C diagrams. Well classified Class I and Class II sources were taken as a second test sample to discriminate between various types of YSOs at possibly different evolutionary stages. This helped to define the loci of different types of YSOs and a set of criteria for selecting YSOs based on their colors in the near- and mid-infrared. Candidate YSOs toward IC 1396 indicating excess emission in the near-infrared were employed to verify the validity of the new source selection criteria defined based on C-C diagrams compiled with the 2MASS and AKARI data. Optical spectroscopy and spectral energy distributions of the IC 1396 sample yield a clear identification of the YSOs and further confirm the criteria defined

  17. EFFICIENT SELECTION AND CLASSIFICATION OF INFRARED EXCESS EMISSION STARS BASED ON AKARI AND 2MASS DATA

    SciTech Connect

    Huang Yafang; Li Jinzeng; Rector, Travis A.; Mallamaci, Carlos C.

    2013-05-15

    The selection of young stellar objects (YSOs) based on excess emission in the infrared is easily contaminated by post-main-sequence stars and various types of emission line stars with similar properties. We define in this paper stringent criteria for an efficient selection and classification of stellar sources with infrared excess emission based on combined Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS) and AKARI colors. First of all, bright dwarfs and giants with known spectral types were selected from the Hipparcos Catalogue and cross-identified with the 2MASS and AKARI Point Source Catalogues to produce the main-sequence and the post-main-sequence tracks, which appear as expected as tight tracks with very small dispersion. However, several of the main-sequence stars indicate excess emission in the color space. Further investigations based on the SIMBAD data help to clarify their nature as classical Be stars, which are found to be located in a well isolated region on each of the color-color (C-C) diagrams. Several kinds of contaminants were then removed based on their distribution in the C-C diagrams. A test sample of Herbig Ae/Be stars and classical T Tauri stars were cross-identified with the 2MASS and AKARI catalogs to define the loci of YSOs with different masses on the C-C diagrams. Well classified Class I and Class II sources were taken as a second test sample to discriminate between various types of YSOs at possibly different evolutionary stages. This helped to define the loci of different types of YSOs and a set of criteria for selecting YSOs based on their colors in the near- and mid-infrared. Candidate YSOs toward IC 1396 indicating excess emission in the near-infrared were employed to verify the validity of the new source selection criteria defined based on C-C diagrams compiled with the 2MASS and AKARI data. Optical spectroscopy and spectral energy distributions of the IC 1396 sample yield a clear identification of the YSOs and further confirm the criteria defined

  18. All sky scanning cloud monitor for NLOT site survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, T. K.; Parihar, Padmakar; Kemkar, P. M. M.

    2015-04-01

    Monitoring local sky for the cloud is one of important task before setting-up a new observatory. Here we present the design, implementation and initial results of a scanning type cloud monitor developed in Indian Institute of Astrophysics, Bangalore, India. The new cloud monitor is expected to be used in search for a potential site for India's National Large Optical Telescope project. The instrument works on the principle of detection of the Infrared radiations from the clouds. A number of thermopile sensors are arranged in the form of a circular array and are rotated in azimuth to cover the whole sky. An analog circuit was designed and fabricated to amplify the weak output of the thermopile. A customized data acquisition devise is developed for recording the output of the sensors on SD card. LabVIEW based data analysis software is developed to process raw data as well as to generate the cloud map of the sky.

  19. Data indexing techniques for the EUVE all-sky survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, J.; Saba, V.; Dobson, C.

    1992-01-01

    This poster describes techniques developed for manipulating large full-sky data sets for the Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer project. The authors have adapted the quatrilateralized cubic sphere indexing algorithm to allow us to efficiently store and process several types of large data sets, such as full-sky maps of photon counts, exposure time, and count rates. A variation of this scheme is used to index sparser data such as individual photon events and viewing times for selected areas of the sky, which are eventually used to create EUVE source catalogs.

  20. The NASA Fireball Network All-Sky Cameras

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suggs, Rob M.

    2011-01-01

    The construction of small, inexpensive all-sky cameras designed specifically for the NASA Fireball Network is described. The use of off-the-shelf electronics, optics, and plumbing materials results in a robust and easy to duplicate design. Engineering challenges such as weather-proofing and thermal control and their mitigation are described. Field-of-view and gain adjustments to assure uniformity across the network will also be detailed.

  1. The MAMBA Thermal Infrared All-Sky Camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pier, Edward Alan; Tinn Chee Jim, Kevin; Lewis, Peter

    2015-08-01

    We are developing a system to continually and simultaneously monitor infrared atmospheric extinction along all lines of sight. This system combines a next generation radiometrically calibrated thermal all-sky camera, a weather station, and a neural net trained on historic Radiosonde profiles. Oceanit Laboratories, Inc. will market this system as an off the shelf unit. Custom-built thermal all sky cameras have previously been used on Haleakala, Cerro Tololo, and elsewhere. Except for RASICAM on Cerro Tololo, they have not been radiometrically calibrated and have been used only for qualitative cloud monitoring. The new system will have improved sky coverage, resolution, and noise properties with respect to RASICAM, and simulations show it will be able to infer atmospheric transmittance to within a few percent. The all sky camera will combine an equiresolution optical design with an off-the-shelf thermal detector and in field blackbody calibration sources to provide uniform sensitivity and radiometric accuracy across the sky at relatively low cost. Our goal is to make such systems ubiqitous at observatories around the world.

  2. Spectral energy distributions of an AKARI-SDSS-GALEX sample of galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buat, V.; Giovannoli, E.; Takeuchi, T. T.; Heinis, S.; Yuan, F.-T.; Burgarella, D.; Noll, S.; Iglesias-Páramo, J.

    2011-05-01

    Context. The nearby universe remains the best laboratory to understand the physical properties of galaxies and is a reference for any comparison with high redshift observations. The all sky (or very large) surveys that have been performed from the ultraviolet (UV) to the far-infrared (far-IR) provide us with large datasets of very large wavelength coverage to perform a reference study. Aims: We investigate the dust attenuation characteristics, as well as the star formation rate (SFR) calibrations of a sample of nearby galaxies observed over 13 bands from 0.15 to 160 μm. Methods: A sample of 363 galaxies is built from the AKARI /FIS all sky survey cross-correlated with the SDSS and GALEX surveys. Broad-band spectral energy distributions are fitted with the CIGALE code optimized to analyse variations in the dust attenuation curves and SFR measurements and based on an energetic budget between the stellar and dust emission. Results: Our galaxy sample is primarily selected in far-IR and mostly constituted of massive, actively star-forming galaxies. There is some evidence for a dust attenuation law that is slightly steeper than that used for starburst galaxies but we are unable to constrain the presence or not of a bump at 220 nm. We confirm that a time-dependent dust attenuation is necessary to perform the best fits. Various calibrations of the dust attenuation in the UV as a function of UV-optical colours are discussed. A calibration of the current SFR combining UV and total IR emissions is proposed with an accurate estimate of dust heating by old stars. For the whole sample, 17% of the total dust luminosity is unrelated to the recent star formation.

  3. Computational Challenges of the AARTFAAC All-sky Monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huizinga, Folkert

    2014-04-01

    The AARTFAAC project will provide the LOFAR telescope with a fully commensal, continuously operational, all-sky transient monitoring system. This is achieved by real-time correlation of up to 288 wide-field antennae from the LOFAR core, followed by a high-performance calibration and imaging pipeline which feeds results to the existing LOFAR transient detection system. This poses formidable computational challenges, which have been addressed by the development of a heterogeneous system including FPGAs, GPUs and CPUs. I will describe the system architecture with a particular emphasis on the implementation of, and first performance results from, the calibration and imaging pipeline.

  4. All-Sky Monitoring of Variable Sources with Fermi GBM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson-Hodge, Colleen A.; Finger, Mark; Camero-Arranz, Ascension; Becklen, Elif; Jenke, Peter; Cpe. K/ K/; Steele, Iain; Case, Gary; Cherry, Mike; Rodi, James; Bhat, Narayana

    2011-01-01

    Using the Gamma ray Burst Monitor (GBM) on Fermi, we monitor the transient hard X-ray/soft gamma ray sky. The twelve GBM NaI detectors span 8 keV to 1 MeV, while the two BGO detectors span 150 keV to 40 MeV. We use the Earth occultation technique to monitor a number of sources, including X-ray binaries, AGN, and solar flaring activity. Our monitoring reveals predictable and unpredictable phenomena such as transient outbursts and state changes. With GBM we also track the pulsed flux and spin frequency of accretion powered pulsars using epoch-folding techniques. Searches for quasi-periodic oscillations and X-ray bursts are also possible with GBM all-sky monitoring. Highlights from the Earth Occultation and Pulsar projects will be presented including our recent surprising discovery of variations in the total flux from the Crab. Inclusion of an all-sky monitor is crucial for a successful future X-ray timing mission.

  5. The Sondrestrom Research Facility All-sky Imagers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kendall, E. A.; Grill, M.; Gudmundsson, E.; Stromme, A.

    2010-12-01

    The Sondrestrom Upper Atmospheric Research Facility is located near Kangerlussuaq, Greenland, just north of the Arctic Circle and 100 km inland from the west coast of Greenland. The facility is operated by SRI International in Menlo Park, California, under the auspices of the U.S. National Science Foundation. Operating in Greenland since 1983, the Sondrestrom facility is host to more than 20 instruments, the majority of which provide unique and complementary information about the arctic upper atmosphere. Together these instruments advance our knowledge of upper atmospheric physics and determine how the tenuous neutral gas interacts with the charged space plasma environment. The suite of instrumentation supports many disciplines of research - from plate tectonics to auroral physics and space weather. The Sondrestrom facility has recently acquired two new all-sky imagers. In this paper, we present images from both new imagers, placing them in context with other instruments at the site and detailing to the community how to gain access to this new data set. The first new camera replaces the intensified auroral system which has been on site for nearly three decades. This new all-sky imager (ASI), designed and assembled by Keo Scientific Ltd., employs a medium format 180° fisheye lens coupled to a set of five 3-inch narrowband interference filters. The current filter suite allows operation at the following wavelengths: 750 nm, 557.7 nm, 777.4 nm, 630.0 nm, and 732/3 nm. Monochromatic images from the ASI are acquired at a specific filter and integration time as determined by a unique configuration file. Integrations as short as 0.5 sec can be commanded for exceptionally bright features. Preview images are posted to the internet in near real-time, with final images posted weeks later. While images are continuously collected in a "patrol mode," users can request special collection sequences for targeted experiments. The second new imager installed at the Sondrestrom

  6. Bright debris disk candidates detected with the AKARI/FAR-infrared surveyor

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Qiong; Wang, Tinggui; Jiang, Peng E-mail: twang@ustc.edu.cn

    2014-07-01

    We cross-correlate the Hipparcos main-sequence star catalog with the AKARI/FIS catalog and identify 136 stars (at >90% reliability) with far-infrared detections in at least one band. After rejecting 57 stars classified as young stellar objects, Be stars and other type stars with known dust disks or with potential contaminations, and 4 stars without infrared excess emission, we obtain a sample of 75 candidate stars with debris disks. Stars in our sample cover spectral types from B to K with most being early types. This represents a unique sample of luminous debris disks that derived uniformly from an all-sky survey with a spatial resolution factor of four better than the previous such survey by IRAS. Moreover, by collecting the infrared photometric data from other public archives, almost three-quarters of them have infrared excesses in more than one band, allowing an estimate of the dust temperatures. We fit the blackbody model to the broadband spectral energy distribution of these stars to derive the statistical distribution of the disk parameters. Four B stars with excesses in four or more bands require a double blackbody model, with the high one around 100 or 200 K and the low one around 40-50 K.

  7. Bright Debris Disk Candidates Detected with the AKARI/Far-infrared Surveyor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qiong; Wang, Tinggui; Jiang, Peng

    2014-07-01

    We cross-correlate the Hipparcos main-sequence star catalog with the AKARI/FIS catalog and identify 136 stars (at >90% reliability) with far-infrared detections in at least one band. After rejecting 57 stars classified as young stellar objects, Be stars and other type stars with known dust disks or with potential contaminations, and 4 stars without infrared excess emission, we obtain a sample of 75 candidate stars with debris disks. Stars in our sample cover spectral types from B to K with most being early types. This represents a unique sample of luminous debris disks that derived uniformly from an all-sky survey with a spatial resolution factor of four better than the previous such survey by IRAS. Moreover, by collecting the infrared photometric data from other public archives, almost three-quarters of them have infrared excesses in more than one band, allowing an estimate of the dust temperatures. We fit the blackbody model to the broadband spectral energy distribution of these stars to derive the statistical distribution of the disk parameters. Four B stars with excesses in four or more bands require a double blackbody model, with the high one around 100 or 200 K and the low one around 40-50 K.

  8. All Sky Imager Network for Science and Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhatt, A.; Kendall, E. A.; Zalles, D. R.; Baumgardner, J. L.; Marshall, R. A.; Kaltenbacher, E.

    2012-12-01

    A new all sky imager network for space weather monitoring and education outreach has been developed by SRI International. The goal of this program is to install sensitive, low-light all-sky imagers across the continental United States to observe upper atmospheric airglow and aurora in near real time. While aurora borealis is often associated with the high latitudes, during intense geomagnetic storms it can extend well into the continental United States latitudes. Observing auroral processes is instrumental in understanding the space weather, especially in the times of increasing societal dependence on space-based technologies. Under the THEMIS satellite program, Canada has installed a network of all-sky imagers across their country to monitor aurora in real-time. However, no comparable effort exists in the United States. Knowledge of the aurora and airglow across the entire United States in near real time would allow scientists to quickly assess the impact of a geomagnetic storm in concert with data from GPS networks, ionosondes, radars, and magnetometers. What makes this effort unique is that we intend to deploy these imagers at high schools across the country. Selected high-schools will necessarily be in rural areas as the instrument requires dark night skies. At the commencement of the school year, we plan to give an introductory seminar on space weather at each of these schools. Science nuggets developed by SRI International in collaboration with the Center for GeoSpace Studies and the Center for Technology in Learning will be available for high school teachers to use during their science classes. Teachers can use these nuggets as desired within their own curricula. We intend to develop a comprehensive web-based interface that will be available for students and scientific community alike to observe data across the network in near real time and also to guide students towards complementary space weather data sets. This interface will show the real time extent of

  9. All-sky reconstruction of the primordial scalar potential & implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorn, Sebastian; Greiner, Maksim; Ensslin, Torsten A.

    2015-08-01

    An essential quantity required to understand the physics of the early Universe is the primordial scalar potential and its statistics. We present an inexpensive all-sky reconstruction of the potential from CMB temperature data as well as an extension including polarization data. This has been achieved by applying a fully parallelized Bayesian inference method that separates the whole inverse problem into many, each of them solved by an optimal linear filter. Once explicitly having the potential, its statistics and underlying physics can be directly obtained avoiding expensive CMB analyses. This reconstruction, for instance, allows to infer the spatial structure of magnetic fields within the recombination epoch, the potential seeds of large-scale magnetic fields nowadays.

  10. Results from the Ariel 5 All-Sky Monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holt, S. S.

    1976-01-01

    Results are summarized for the first year of operation of the Ariel 5 All-Sky Monitor. The monitor is described in detail, and representative observations of the transient sources A1524-62, Cen X-mas, A0535+26, and A0620-00 are discussed. It is shown that the transients are largely confined to the galactic plane and that about 100 such sources per year can be expected in the Galaxy. Long-term observations of Sco X-1, Cyg X-3, and Cyg X-1 are reported which illustrate that the large intensity variations in Sco X-1 appear to correlate on time scales greater than one Ariel 5 orbit, that Cyg X-3 has a widely varying intensity, and that the predominant feature of the intensity variation in Cyg X-1 is a minimum near superior conjunction.

  11. Estimation of aerosol optical properties from all-sky imagers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazantzidis, Andreas; Tzoumanikas, Panagiotis; Salamalikis, Vasilios; Wilbert, Stefan; Prahl, Christoph

    2015-04-01

    Aerosols are one of the most important constituents in the atmosphere that affect the incoming solar radiation, either directly through absorbing and scattering processes or indirectly by changing the optical properties and lifetime of clouds. Under clear skies, aerosols become the dominant factor that affect the intensity of solar irradiance reaching the ground. It has been shown that the variability in direct normal irradiance (DNI) due to aerosols is more important than the one induced in global horizontal irradiance (GHI), while the uncertainty in its calculation is dominated by uncertainties in the aerosol optical properties. In recent years, all-sky imagers are used for the detection of cloud coverage, type and velocity in a bouquet of applications including solar irradiance resource and forecasting. However, information about the optical properties of aerosols could be derived with the same instrumentation. In this study, the aerosol optical properties are estimated with the synergetic use of all-sky images, complementary data from the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) and calculations from a radiative transfer model. The area of interest is Plataforma Solar de Almería (PSA), Tabernas, Spain and data from a 5 month period are analyzed. The proposed methodology includes look-up-tables (LUTs) of diffuse sky radiance of Red (R), Green (G) and Blue (B) channels at several zenith and azimuth angles and for different atmospheric conditions (Angström α and β, single scattering albedo, precipitable water, solar zenith angle). Based on the LUTS, results from the CIMEL photometer at PSA were used to estimate the RGB radiances for the actual conditions at this site. The methodology is accompanied by a detailed evaluation of its robustness, the development and evaluation of the inversion algorithm (derive aerosol optical properties from RGB image values) and a sensitivity analysis about how the pre-mentioned atmospheric parameters affect the results.

  12. MAXI: all-sky observation from the International Space Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mihara, Tatehiro; Sugizaki, Mutsumi; Matsuoka, Masaru; Tomida, Hiroshi; Ueno, Shiro; Negoro, Hitoshi; Yoshida, Atsumasa; Tsunemi, Hiroshi; Nakajima, Motoki; Ueda, Yoshihiro; Yamauchi, Makoto

    2014-07-01

    Monitor of All-sky X-ray Image (MAXI) is mounted on the International Space Station (ISS). Since 2009 it has been scanning the whole sky in every 92 minutes with ISS rotation. Due to high particle background at high latitude regions the carbon anodes of three GSC cameras were broken. We limit the GSC operation to low-latitude region around equator. GSC is suffering a double high background from Gamma-ray altimeter of Soyuz spacecraft. MAXI issued the 37-month catalog with 500 sources above ~0.6 mCrab in 4-10 keV. MAXI issued 133 to Astronomers Telegram and 44 to Gammaray burst Coordinated Network so far. One GSC camera had a small gas leak by a micrometeorite. Since 2013 June, the 1.4 atm Xe pressure went down to 0.6 atm in 2014 May 23. By gradually reducing the high voltage we keep using the proportional counter. SSC with X-ray CCD has detected diffuse soft X-rays in the all-sky, such as Cygnus super bubble and north polar spur, as well as it found a fast soft X-ray nova MAXI J0158-744. Although we operate CCD with charge-injection, the energy resolution is degrading. In the 4.5 years of operation MAXI discovered 6 of 12 new black holes. The long-term behaviors of these sources can be classified into two types of the outbursts, 3 Fast Rise Exponential Decay (FRED) and 3 Fast Rise and Flat Top (FRFT). The cause of types is still unknown.

  13. Game: GRB and All-Sky Monitor Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amati, Lorenzo; Campana, Riccardo; Evangelista, Yuri; Feroci, Marco; Fuschino, Fabio; Labanti, Claudio; Salvaterra, Ruben; Stratta, Giulia; Tagliaferri, Gianpiero; Frontera, Filippo; Guidorzi, Cristiano; Rosati, Piero; Titarchuk, Lev; Braga, João Penacchioni, Ana; Ruffini, Remo; Izzo, Luca; Zampa, Nicola; Vacchi, Andrea; Santangelo, Andrea; Hudec, Rene; Gomboc, Andreja; Rodic, Tomaz

    2015-01-01

    We describe the GRB and All-sky Monitor Experiment (GAME) mission submitted by a large international collaboration (Italy, Germany, Czech Repubblic, Slovenia, Brazil) in response to the 2012 ESA call for a small mission opportunity for a launch in 2017 and presently under further investigation for subsequent opportunities. The general scientific objective is to perform measurements of key importance for GRB science and to provide the wide astrophysical community of an advanced X-ray all-sky monitoring system. The proposed payload was based on silicon drift detectors (~1-50 keV), CdZnTe (CZT) detectors (~15-200 keV) and crystal scintillators in phoswich (NaI/CsI) configuration (~20 keV-20 MeV), three well established technologies, for a total weight of ~250 kg and a required power of ~240 W. Such instrumentation allows a unique, unprecedented and very powerful combination of large field of view (3-4 sr), a broad energy energy band extending from ˜1 keV up to ˜20 MeV, an energy resolution as good as ~250 eV in the 1-30 keV energy range, a source location accuracy of ~1 arcmin. The mission profile included a launch (e.g., by Vega) into a low Earth orbit, a baseline sky scanning mode plus pointed observations of regions of particular interest, data transmission to ground via X-band (4.8 Gb/orbit, Alcantara and Malindi ground stations), and prompt transmission of GRB / transient triggers.

  14. GAME: GRB and All-sky Monitor Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amati, Lorenzo; Campana, Riccardo; Evangelista, Yuri; Feroci, Marco; Fuschino, Fabio; Labanti, Claudio; Salvaterra, Ruben; Stratta, Giulia; Tagliaferri, Gianpiero; Frontera, Filippo; Guidorzi, Cristiano; Rosati, Piero; Titarchuk, Lev; Braga, João; Penacchioni, Ana; Ruffini, Remo; Izzo, Luca; Zampa, Nicola; Vacchi, Andrea; Santangelo, Andrea; Hudec, Rene; Gomboc, Andreja; Rodic, Tomaz

    2014-05-01

    We describe the GRB and all-sky monitor experiment (GAME) mission submitted by a large international collaboration (Italy, Germany, Czech Republic, Slovenia, Brazil) in response to the 2012 ESA call for a small mission opportunity for a launch in 2017 and presently under further investigation for subsequent opportunities. The general scientific objective is to perform measurements of key importance for GRB science and to provide the wide astrophysical community of an advanced X-ray all-sky monitoring system. The proposed payload was based on silicon drift detectors ( 1-50 keV), CdZnTe (CZT) detectors ( 15-200 keV) and crystal scintillators in phoswich (NaI/CsI) configuration ( 20 keV-20 MeV), three well established technologies, for a total weight of 250 kg and a required power of 240 W. Such instrumentation allows a unique, unprecedented and very powerful combination of large field of view (3-4 sr), a broad energy band extending from 1 keV up to 20 MeV, an energy resolution as good as 250 eV in the 1-30 keV energy range, a source location accuracy of 1 arcmin. The mission profile included a launch (e.g. by Vega) into a low Earth orbit, a baseline sky scanning mode plus pointed observations of regions of particular interest, data transmission to ground via X-band (4.8 Gb/orbit, Alcantara and Malindi ground stations), and prompt transmission of GRB/transient triggers.

  15. All-sky homogeneity of precipitable water vapour over Paranal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Querel, Richard R.; Kerber, Florian

    2014-08-01

    A Low Humidity and Temperature Profiling (LHATPRO) microwave radiometer, manufactured by Radiometer Physics GmbH (RPG), is used to monitor sky conditions over ESO's Paranal observatory in support of VLT science operations. The unit measures several channels across the strong water vapour emission line at 183 GHz, necessary for resolving the low levels of precipitable water vapour (PWV) that are prevalent on Paranal (median ~2.4 mm). The instrument consists of a humidity profiler (183-191 GHz), a temperature profiler (51-58 GHz), and an infrared camera (~10 μm) for cloud detection. We present, for the first time, a statistical analysis of the homogeneity of all-sky PWV using 21 months of periodic (every 6 hours) all-sky scans from the radiometer. These data provide unique insight into the spatial and temporal variation of atmospheric conditions relevant for astronomical observations, particularly in the infrared. We find the PWV over Paranal to be remarkably homogeneous across the sky down to 27.5° elevation with a median variation of 0.32 mm (peak to valley) or 0.07 mm (rms). The homogeneity is a function of the absolute PWV but the relative variation is fairly constant at 10-15% (peak to valley) and 3% (rms). Such variations will not be a significant issue for analysis of astronomical data. Users at ESO can specify PWV - measured at zenith - as an ambient constraint in service mode to enable, for instance, very demanding observations in the infrared that can only be conducted during periods of very good atmospheric transmission and hence low PWV. We conclude that in general it will not be necessary to add another observing constraint for PWV homogeneity to ensure integrity of observations. For demanding observations requiring very low PWV, where the relative variation is higher, the optimum support could be provided by observing with the LHATPRO in the same line-of-sight simultaneously. Such a mode of operations has already been tested but will have to be

  16. Explanatory Supplement to the WISE All-Sky Data Release Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cutri, R. M.; Wright, E. L.; Conrow, T.; Bauer, J.; Benford, D.; Brandenburg, H.; Dailey, J.; Eisenhardt, P. R. M.; Evans, T.; Fajardo-Acosta, S.; Fowler, J.; Gelino, C.; Grillmair, C.; Harbut, M.; Hoffman, D.; Jarrett, T.; Kirkpatrick, J. D.; Leisawitz, D.; Liu, W.; Mainzer, A.; Marsh, K.; Masci, F.; McCallon, H.; Padgett, D.; Ressler, M. E.; Royer, D.; Skrutskie, M. F.; Stanford, S. A.; Wyatt, P. L.; Tholen, D.; Tsai, C. W.; Wachter, S.; Wheelock, S. L.; Yan, L.; Alles, R.; Beck, R.; Grav, T.; Masiero, J.; McCollum, B.; McGehee, P.; Papin, M.; Wittman, M.

    2012-03-01

    The Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE; Wright et al. 2010) surveyed the entire sky at 3.4, 4.6, 12 and 22 microns in 2010, achieving 5-sigma point source sensitivities per band better than 0.08, 0.11, 1 and 6 mJy in unconfused regions on the ecliptic. The WISE All-Sky Data Release, conducted on March 14, 2012, incorporates all data taken during the full cryogenic mission phase, 7 January 2010 to 6 August 2010, that were processed with improved calibrations and reduction algorithms. Release data products include: (1) an Atlas of 18,240 match-filtered, calibrated and coadded image sets; (2) a Source Catalog containing positions and four-band photometry for over 563 million objects, and (3) an Explanatory Supplement. Ancillary products include a Reject Table that contains 284 million detections that were not selected for the Source Catalog because they are low signal-to-noise ratio or spurious detections of image artifacts, an archive of over 1.5 million sets of calibrated WISE Single-exposure images, and a database of 9.4 billion source extractions from those single-images, and moving object tracklets identified by the NEOWISE program (Mainzer et al. 2011). The WISE All-Sky Data Release products supersede those from the WISE Preliminary Data Release (Cutri et al. 2011). The Explanatory Supplement to the WISE All-Sky Data Release Products is a general guide for users of the WISE data. The Supplement contains an overview of the WISE mission, facilities, and operations, a detailed description of WISE data processing algorithms, a guide to the content and formats of the image and tabular data products, and cautionary notes that describe known limitations of the All-Sky Release products. Instructions for accessing the WISE data products via the services of the NASA/IPAC Infrared Science Archive are provided. The Supplement also provides analyses of the achieved sky coverage, photometric and astrometric characteristics and completeness and reliability of the All-Sky

  17. Progress on the Low Frequency All Sky Monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, James; Jenet, Fredrick; Craig, Joseph; Creighton, Teviet David; Percy Dartez, Louis; Ford, Anthony J.; Hernandez, Andrés; Hicks, Brian; Hinojosa, Jesus; Jaramillo, Ricardo; Kassim, Namir E.; Lazio, Joseph; Lunsford, Grady; Miller, Rossina B.; Ray, Paul S.; Rivera, Jesus; Taylor, Gregory B.; Teitelbaum, Lawrence; CenterAdvanced Radio Astronomy, University of Texas at Brownsville, University of New Mexico, Naval Research Laboratory, Jet Propulsion Laborator

    2015-01-01

    The Low Frequency All Sky Monitor (LoFASM) is a system of geographically separated radio arrays dedicated to the study of radio transients. LoFASM consists of four stations, each comprised of 12 cross-dipole antennas designed to operate between 10-88MHz. The antennas and front end electronics for LoFASM were designed by the Naval Research Laboratory for the Long Wavelength Array (LWA) project (cf. Hicks et al. PASP 124, 1090 (2012)). All four stations are currently operational and in the commissioning stage . Over the last 3 years, undergraduate and graduate students from the University of Texas at Brownsville's Center for Advanced Radio Astronomy have been establishing these stations around the continental US, consisting of sites located in Port Mansfield, Texas, the LWA North Arm site of the LWA1 Radio Observatory in New Mexico, adjacent to the North Arm of the Very Large Array, the Green Bank Radio Observatory, West Virginia, and the Goldstone Deep Space Communications Complex, California. In combination with the establishment of these sites was the development of the analog hardware, which consists of custom RF splitter/combiners and a custom amplifier and filter chain designed at Center for Advanced Radio Astronomy (CARA). This poster will expound on progress in site installation and the development of the analog signal chain, specifically the redesigned analog receiving system.

  18. Progress on the Low Frequency All Sky Monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, Anthony; Jenet, F.; Craig, J.; Creighton, T. D.; Dartez, L. P.; Hicks, B.; Hinojosa, J.; Jaramillo, R.; Kassim, N. E.; Lunsford, G.; Miller, R. B.; Murray, J.; Ray, P. S.; Rivera, J.; Taylor, G. B.

    2013-01-01

    The Low Frequency All Sky Monitor is a system of geographically separated radio arrays dedicated to the study of radio transients. LoFASM consists of four stations, each comprised of 12 cross-dipole antennas designed to operate between 5-88MHz. The antennas and front end electronics for LoFASM were designed by the Naval Research Laboratory for the Long Wavelength Array project. Over the last year, undergraduate students from the University of Texas at Brownsville’s Center for Advanced Radio Astronomy have been establishing these stations around the continental US, consisting of sites located in Port Mansfield, Texas, the LWA North Arm site of the LWA1 Radio Observatory in New Mexico, adjacent to the North Arm of the Very Large Array, the Green Bank Radio Observatory, West Virginia, and NASA’s Goldstone tracking complex in California. In combination with the establishment of these sites was the development of the analog hardware, which consists of commercial off-the-shelf RF splitter/combiners and a custom amplifier and filter chain designed by colleagues at the University of New Mexico. This poster will expound on progress in site installation and development of the analog signal chain.

  19. Next generation x-ray all-sky monitor

    SciTech Connect

    Priedhorsky, W. C.; Peele, A. G.; Nugent, K. A.

    1997-01-10

    We set forth a conceptual design for x-ray all-sky monitor based on lobster-eye wide-field telescopes. This instrument, suitable for a small satellite, would monitor the flux of objects as faint as 2x10{sup -15} W/m{sup 2} (0.5-2.4 keV) on a daily basis with a signal-to-noise of 5. Sources would be located to 1-2 arc-minutes. Detailed simulations show that crosstalk from the cruciform lobster images would not significantly compromise performance. At this sensitivity limit, we could monitor not just x-ray binaries but fainter classes of x-ray sources. Hundreds of active galactic nuclei, coronal sources, and cataclysmic variables could be tracked on a daily basis. Large numbers of fast transients should be visible, including gamma-ray bursts and the soft x-ray breakout of nearby type II supernovae. Long-term x-ray measurements will advance our understanding of the geometries and perhaps masses of AGN, and coronal energy sources in stars.

  20. Algorithms for ice halo detection in all-sky images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Michelle; Greenslit, Morton; Boyd, Sylke

    The effect of cirrus clouds on the radiation budget of the atmosphere depends not only on optical depth and frequency of occurrence, but also on the composition of the clouds. Ice halo phenomena signal the presence of hexagonal crystal habits. Long-term observations on frequency, duration, and type of halo appearances can give ground-based insight into the behavior of cirrus composition. We are capturing images of the entire sky at 30 second intervals using an all-sky camera. We have created a program that analyzes these images for the presence of halos. The algorithm removes the lens distortion, excludes low-level clouds from further analysis, measures the radial RGB color channel intensity, and uses this radial intensity to assess for ice halo presence. We will present our algorithms for image analysis, including removing the lens distortion and low-level clouds, as well as the algorithm to assign a halo probability. We will also present our observation results for the year 2015. Supported by HHMI and UROP.

  1. All-sky interferometry with spherical harmonic transit telescopes

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, J. Richard; Pen, Ue-Li; Sigurdson, Kris; Sitwell, Michael; Stebbins, Albert

    2014-02-01

    In this paper, we describe the spherical harmonic transit telescope through the use of a novel formalism for the analysis of transit radio telescopes. This all-sky approach bypasses the curved-sky complications of traditional interferometry and so is particularly well-suited to the analysis of wide-field radio interferometers. It enables compact and computationally efficient representations of the data and its statistics, which allow new ways of approaching important problems like map-making and foreground removal. In particular, we show how it enables the use of the Karhunen-Loève transform as a highly effective foreground filter, suppressing realistic foreground residuals for our fiducial example by at least a factor 20 below the 21 cm signal, even in highly contaminated regions of the sky. This is despite the presence of the mode-mixing inherent in real-world instruments with frequency-dependent beams. We show, using Fisher forecasting, that foreground cleaning has little effect on power spectrum constraints compared to hypothetical foreground-free measurements. Beyond providing a natural real-world data analysis framework for 21 cm telescopes now under construction and future experiments, this formalism allows accurate power spectrum forecasts to be made that include the interplay of design constraints and realistic experimental systematics with 21st century 21 cm science.

  2. Progress on the Low Frequency All Sky Monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, James; Jenet, F.; Craig, J.; Creighton, T. D.; Dartez, L. P.; Ford, A. J.; Hicks, B.; Hinojosa, J.; Jaramillo, R.; Kassim, N. E.; Lunsford, G.; Miller, R. B.; Ray, P. S.; Rivera, J.; Taylor, G. B.

    2014-01-01

    The Low Frequency All Sky Monitor is a system of geographically separated radio arrays dedicated to the study of radio transients. LoFASM consists of four stations, each comprised of 12 crossed dipole antennas designed to operate between 10 - 88 MHz. The antennas and front end electronics for LoFASM were designed by the Naval Research Laboratory for the Long Wavelength Array project. Over the past year undergraduate students from the University of Texas at Brownsville have established LoFASM stations in Port Mansfield, Texas, at the LWA1 North Arm site in New Mexico, at the National Radio Astronomy Observatory in Green Bank, West Virginia, and NASA’s Goldstone tracking complex in California. In combination with the establishment of these stations was the development of the analog hardware, which consists of custom RF power dividers/combiners, and a new custom amplifier and filter receiving system, which was developed and built in house. This poster will expound on progress in site installation and development of the analog signal chain, specifically the redesigned analog receiving system.

  3. The All-sky Kinematics of Diffuse Galactic H-alpha Emission from WHAM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eagon, Andrew; Haffner, L. Matthew; Benjamin, Robert A.

    2016-01-01

    WHAM-SS (Wisconsin H-alpha Mapper Sky Survey) is the first all-sky velocity-resolved survey of the faint optical emisison line radiation from the diffuse ionized gas of the Milky Way Galaxy. With an angular resolution of one degree, velocity resolution of 12 km/s, and velocity range of 200 km/s, it allows for the study of the kinematics of the ionized gas across the Galaxy. We present first results on the all-sky velocity distribution of this gas. We show the results of Gaussian decomposition of line profiles as well as first and second moment maps both in the disk and at high latitude, and compare our results with some simple models for the density and velocity field of this gas. As in Haffner et al. (2003), we find that the high-latitude sky is characterized by a low velocity "infall" (toward the plane) in H-alpha, although there are also regions of outflow. We also present the variation in line widths as a function of direction and show how these widths correlate with different structures in the warm ionized medium. This program was supported by NSF Award AST-1108911 (for WHAM) and NSF Award AST-1004881 for the Wisconsin REU program in Astrophysics.

  4. WATCHDOG: A Comprehensive All-sky Database of Galactic Black Hole X-ray Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tetarenko, B. E.; Sivakoff, G. R.; Heinke, C. O.; Gladstone, J. C.

    2016-02-01

    With the advent of more sensitive all-sky instruments, the transient universe is being probed in greater depth than ever before. Taking advantage of available resources, we have established a comprehensive database of black hole (and black hole candidate) X-ray binary (BHXB) activity between 1996 and 2015 as revealed by all-sky instruments, scanning surveys, and select narrow-field X-ray instruments on board the INTErnational Gamma-Ray Astrophysics Laboratory, Monitor of All-Sky X-ray Image, Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer, and Swift telescopes; the Whole-sky Alberta Time-resolved Comprehensive black-Hole Database Of the Galaxy or WATCHDOG. Over the past two decades, we have detected 132 transient outbursts, tracked and classified behavior occurring in 47 transient and 10 persistently accreting BHs, and performed a statistical study on a number of outburst properties across the Galactic population. We find that outbursts undergone by BHXBs that do not reach the thermally dominant accretion state make up a substantial fraction (∼40%) of the Galactic transient BHXB outburst sample over the past ∼20 years. Our findings suggest that this “hard-only” behavior, observed in transient and persistently accreting BHXBs, is neither a rare nor recent phenomenon and may be indicative of an underlying physical process, relatively common among binary BHs, involving the mass-transfer rate onto the BH remaining at a low level rather than increasing as the outburst evolves. We discuss how the larger number of these “hard-only” outbursts and detected outbursts in general have significant implications for both the luminosity function and mass-transfer history of the Galactic BHXB population.

  5. Globular Cluster Membership Probabilities from All-Sky Proper Motion Catalogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rees, Richard F.; Cudworth, Kyle M.

    2014-06-01

    Recent all-sky catalogs such as UCAC4 (Zacharias et al. 2013, AJ, 145:44) and PPMXL (Roeser et al. 2010, AJ, 139, 2440) contain proper motions with errors of 1-10 mas/yr. This precision is sufficient to determine membership probabilities for stars in the fields of globular clusters if the cluster motion is reasonably different from the field star motion. We use membership probabilities for stars in the field of the globular cluster NGC 6397 derived from very high precision relative proper motions 0.2 mas/yr errors) from long-focus plates to test membership probabilities derived from UCAC4 and PPMXL motions. We also explore the use of UCAC4 and PPMXL to search for cluster members beyond the small field of the long-focus plates.This publication makes use of data products from the Two Micron All Sky Survey, which is a joint project of the University of Massachusetts and the Infrared Processing and Analysis Center/California Institute of Technology, funded by NASA and the NSF. This research has made use of the VizieR catalogue access tool, CDS, Strasbourg, France. This research has been partially supported by the NSF.

  6. MEETING THE COOL NEIGHBORS. X. ULTRACOOL DWARFS FROM THE 2MASS ALL-SKY DATA RELEASE

    SciTech Connect

    Neill Reid, I.; Cruz, Kelle L.; Sweet, Anne; Kirkpatrick, J. Davy; Lowrance, Patrick; Allen, Peter R.; Mungall, F.; Liebert, James E-mail: kelle@astro.caltech.edu

    2008-09-15

    Using data from the 2 Micron All Sky Survey All-Sky Point Source Catalogue, we have extended our census of nearby ultracool dwarfs to cover the full celestial sphere above Galactic latitude of 15 deg. Starting with an initial catalog of 2,139,484 sources, we have winnowed the sample to 467 candidate late-type M or L dwarfs within 20 pc of the Sun. Fifty-four of those sources already have spectroscopic observations confirming them as late-type dwarfs. We present optical spectroscopy of 376 of the remaining 413 sources, and identify 44 as ultracool dwarfs with spectroscopic distances less than 20 pc. Twenty-five of the 37 sources that lack optical data have near-infrared spectroscopy. Combining the present sample with our previous results and data from the literature, we catalog 94 L dwarf systems within 20 pc. We discuss the distribution of activity, as measured by H{alpha} emission, in this volume-limited sample. We have coupled the present ultracool catalog with data for stars in the northern 8 pc sample and recent (incomplete) statistics for T dwarfs to provide a snapshot of the current 20 pc census as a function of spectral type.

  7. Star-galaxy separation strategies for WISE-2MASS all-sky infrared galaxy catalogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovács, András; Szapudi, István

    2015-04-01

    We combine photometric information of the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) and Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS) all-sky infrared data bases, and demonstrate how to produce clean and complete galaxy catalogues for future analyses. Adding 2MASS colours to WISE photometry improves star-galaxy separation efficiency substantially at the expense of losing a small fraction of the galaxies. We find that 93 per cent of the WISE objects within W1 < 15.2 mag have a 2MASS match, and that a class of supervised machine learning algorithms, support vector machines (SVM), are efficient classifiers of objects in our multicolour data set. We constructed a training set from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey PhotoObj table with known star-galaxy separation, and determined redshift distribution of our sample from the Galaxy and Mass Assembly spectroscopic survey. Varying the combination of photometric parameters input into our algorithm we show that W1WISE - J2MASS is a simple and effective star-galaxy separator, capable of producing results comparable to the multidimensional SVM classification. We present a detailed description of our star-galaxy separation methods, and characterize the robustness of our tools in terms of contamination, completeness, and accuracy. We explore systematics of the full sky WISE-2MASS galaxy map, such as contamination from moon glow. We show that the homogeneity of the full sky galaxy map is improved by an additional J2MASS < 16.5 mag flux limit. The all-sky galaxy catalogue we present in this paper covers 21 200 deg2 with dusty regions masked out, and has an estimated stellar contamination of 1.2 per cent and completeness of 70.1 per cent among 2.4 million galaxies with zmed ≈ 0.14. WISE-2MASS galaxy maps with well controlled stellar contamination will be useful for spatial statistical analyses, including cross-correlations with other cosmological random fields, such as the cosmic microwave background. The same techniques also yield a

  8. Maximizing the Performance of Automated Low Cost All-sky Cameras

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bettonvil, F.

    2011-01-01

    Thanks to the wide spread of digital camera technology in the consumer market, a steady increase in the number of active All-sky camera has be noticed European wide. In this paper I look into the details of such All-sky systems and try to optimize the performance in terms of accuracy of the astrometry, the velocity determination and photometry. Having autonomous operation in mind, suggestions are done for the optimal low cost All-sky camera.

  9. An all-sky sample of intermediate-mass star-forming regions

    SciTech Connect

    Lundquist, Michael J.; Kobulnicky, Henry A.; Alexander, Michael J.; Kerton, Charles R.; Arvidsson, Kim

    2014-04-01

    We present an all-sky sample of 984 candidate intermediate-mass Galactic star-forming regions that are color selected from the Infrared Astronomical Satellite (IRAS) Point Source Catalog and morphologically classify each object using mid-infrared Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) images. Of the 984 candidates, 616 are probable star-forming regions (62.6%), 128 are filamentary structures (13.0%), 39 are point-like objects of unknown nature (4.0%), and 201 are galaxies (20.4%). We conduct a study of four of these regions, IRAS 00259+5625, IRAS 00420+5530, IRAS 01080+5717, and IRAS 05380+2020, at Galactic latitudes |b| > 5° using optical spectroscopy from the Wyoming Infrared Observatory, along with near-infrared photometry from the Two-Micron All Sky Survey, to investigate their stellar content. New optical spectra, color-magnitude diagrams, and color-color diagrams reveal their extinctions, spectrophotometric distances, and the presence of small stellar clusters containing 20-78 M {sub ☉} of stars. These low-mass diffuse star clusters contain ∼65-250 stars for a typical initial mass function, including one or more mid-B stars as their most massive constituents. Using infrared spectral energy distributions we identify young stellar objects near each region and assign probable masses and evolutionary stages to the protostars. The total infrared luminosity lies in the range 190-960 L {sub ☉}, consistent with the sum of the luminosities of the individually identified young stellar objects.

  10. An improved source-subtracted and destriped 408-MHz all-sky map

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remazeilles, M.; Dickinson, C.; Banday, A. J.; Bigot-Sazy, M.-A.; Ghosh, T.

    2015-08-01

    The all-sky 408 MHz map of Haslam et al. is one the most important total-power radio surveys. It has been widely used to study diffuse synchrotron radiation from our Galaxy and as a template to remove foregrounds in cosmic microwave background data. However, there are a number of issues associated with it that must be dealt with, including large-scale striations and contamination from extragalactic radio sources. We have re-evaluated and reprocessed the rawest data available to produce a new and improved 408-MHz all-sky map. We first quantify the positional accuracy (≈7 arcmin) and effective beam (56.0 ± 1.0 arcmin) of the four individual surveys from which it was assembled. Large-scale striations associated with 1/f noise in the scan direction are reduced to a level ≪1 K using a Fourier-based filtering technique. The most important improvement results from the removal of extragalactic sources. We have used an iterative combination of two techniques - two-dimensional Gaussian fitting and minimum curvature spline surface inpainting - to remove the brightest sources (≳2 Jy), which provides a significant improvement over previous versions of the map. We quantify the impact with power spectra and a template fitting analysis of foregrounds to the WMAP data. The new map is publicly available and is recommended as the template of choice for large-scale diffuse Galactic synchrotron emission. We also provide a higher resolution map with small-scale fluctuations added, assuming a power-law angular power spectrum down to the pixel scale (1.7 arcmin). This should prove useful in simulations used for studying the feasibility of detecting H I fluctuations from the Epoch of Reionization.

  11. Planck 2013 results. XI. All-sky model of thermal dust emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Planck Collaboration; Abergel, A.; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Alves, M. I. R.; Aniano, G.; Armitage-Caplan, C.; Arnaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Atrio-Barandela, F.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartlett, J. G.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoît, A.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernard, J.-P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bobin, J.; Bock, J. J.; Bonaldi, A.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Boulanger, F.; Bridges, M.; Bucher, M.; Burigana, C.; Butler, R. C.; Cardoso, J.-F.; Catalano, A.; Chamballu, A.; Chary, R.-R.; Chiang, H. C.; Chiang, L.-Y.; Christensen, P. R.; Church, S.; Clemens, M.; Clements, D. L.; Colombi, S.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Combet, C.; Couchot, F.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B. P.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Danese, L.; Davies, R. D.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Delouis, J.-M.; Désert, F.-X.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Draine, B. T.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Falgarone, E.; Finelli, F.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Fraisse, A. A.; Franceschi, E.; Galeotta, S.; Ganga, K.; Ghosh, T.; Giard, M.; Giardino, G.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gratton, S.; Gregorio, A.; Grenier, I. A.; Gruppuso, A.; Guillet, V.; Hansen, F. K.; Hanson, D.; Harrison, D. L.; Helou, G.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W. A.; Hornstrup, A.; Hovest, W.; Huffenberger, K. M.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jaffe, T. R.; Jewell, J.; Joncas, G.; Jones, W. C.; Juvela, M.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kisner, T. S.; Knoche, J.; Knox, L.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lähteenmäki, A.; Lamarre, J.-M.; Lasenby, A.; Laureijs, R. J.; Lawrence, C. R.; Leonardi, R.; León-Tavares, J.; Lesgourgues, J.; Levrier, F.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maffei, B.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Maris, M.; Marshall, D. J.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Massardi, M.; Matarrese, S.; Matthai, F.; Mazzotta, P.; McGehee, P.; Melchiorri, A.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Mitra, S.; Miville-Deschênes, M.-A.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J. A.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Netterfield, C. B.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; Osborne, S.; Oxborrow, C. A.; Paci, F.; Pagano, L.; Pajot, F.; Paladini, R.; Paoletti, D.; Pasian, F.; Patanchon, G.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Perrotta, F.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pierpaoli, E.; Pietrobon, D.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Ponthieu, N.; Popa, L.; Poutanen, T.; Pratt, G. W.; Prézeau, G.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J.-L.; Rachen, J. P.; Reach, W. T.; Rebolo, R.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Ricciardi, S.; Riller, T.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Roudier, G.; Rowan-Robinson, M.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Rusholme, B.; Sandri, M.; Santos, D.; Savini, G.; Scott, D.; Seiffert, M. D.; Shellard, E. P. S.; Spencer, L. D.; Starck, J.-L.; Stolyarov, V.; Stompor, R.; Sudiwala, R.; Sunyaev, R.; Sureau, F.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A.-S.; Sygnet, J.-F.; Tauber, J. A.; Tavagnacco, D.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Tucci, M.; Tuovinen, J.; Türler, M.; Umana, G.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Verstraete, L.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Vittorio, N.; Wade, L. A.; Wandelt, B. D.; Welikala, N.; Ysard, N.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.

    2014-11-01

    This paper presents an all-sky model of dust emission from the Planck 353, 545, and 857 GHz, and IRAS 100 μm data. Using a modified blackbody fit to the data we present all-sky maps of the dust optical depth, temperature, and spectral index over the 353-3000 GHz range. This model is a good representation of the IRAS and Planck data at 5' between 353 and 3000 GHz (850 and 100 μm). It shows variations of the order of 30% compared with the widely-used model of Finkbeiner, Davis, and Schlegel. The Planck data allow us to estimate the dust temperature uniformly over the whole sky, down to an angular resolution of 5', providing an improved estimate of the dust optical depth compared to previous all-sky dust model, especially in high-contrast molecular regions where the dust temperature varies strongly at small scales in response to dust evolution, extinction, and/or local production of heating photons. An increase of the dust opacity at 353 GHz, τ353/NH, from the diffuse to the denser interstellar medium (ISM) is reported. It is associated with a decrease in the observed dust temperature, Tobs, that could be due at least in part to the increased dust opacity. We also report an excess of dust emission at H i column densities lower than 1020 cm-2 that could be the signature of dust in the warm ionized medium. In the diffuse ISM at high Galactic latitude, we report an anticorrelation between τ353/NH and Tobs while the dust specific luminosity, i.e., the total dust emission integrated over frequency (the radiance) per hydrogen atom, stays about constant, confirming one of the Planck Early Results obtained on selected fields. This effect is compatible with the view that, in the diffuse ISM, Tobs responds to spatial variations of the dust opacity, due to variations of dust properties, in addition to (small) variations of the radiation field strength. The implication is that in the diffuse high-latitude ISM τ353 is not as reliable a tracer of dust column density as we

  12. Albedo distribution of main-belt asteroids based on IRAS, AKARI, and WISE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usui, F.; Hasegawa, S.; Ishiguro, M.; Mueller, T.; Ootsubo, T.

    2014-07-01

    survey of the entire sky. To date, there are two other infrared astronomical satellites dedicated to all-sky survey: the Japanese infrared satellite AKARI [2], and the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE; [3]). Based on the all-sky survey data obtained by IRAS, AKARI, and WISE, the largest asteroid catalogs containing size and albedo data were constructed (e.g., [4--6] and their series of papers). The total number of asteroids with size and albedo measured by these three infrared surveyors is 138,285 (more than 20 % of currently known asteroids), and size and albedo measured by all three surveyors for 1,993 commonly detected asteroids are in good agreement (within ±10 % for diameter and ±22 % for albedo at 1σ deviation level) [7]. In addition, several outstanding works have provided the taxonomic classification of asteroids (e.g., [8--11]), based on ground-based spectroscopic observations in optical and near-infrared wavelengths. Along with these taxonomic classifications, size and albedo data also contribute to our understanding of asteroid compositions. In general, the albedo of C-type asteroids is considered as low and that of S-type asteroids is high (e.g., [12]). The relationship between taxonomic types and albedo is, however, complex and type determinations cannot be made on the basis of albedo values alone. Recently albedos of C- and S-type asteroids are found to vary widely, especially for sizes smaller than several tens of km [13]. In this talk, we present the details of a data compilation including size, albedo, and taxonomy of MBAs, and discuss the compositional distribution in the main belt regions. We found that the heliocentric distribution of the mean albedo of asteroids in each taxonomic type is found to be nearly flat, in spite of albedo transition process like space weathering. In the total distribution, on the other hand, the mean albedo value gradually decreases with increasing the semimajor axis, presumably due to the compositional mixing of

  13. (abstract) An All Sky Cirrus Confusion Noise Map for WIRE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gautier, T. N.

    1996-01-01

    The Wide Field Infrared Explorer (WIRE) is a Small Explorer (SMEX) satellite scheduled for launch in 1998 which will carry out a sky survey of at least 100 square degrees in the wavelength regions of 9-15(micro)m and 21-27(micro)m with spatial resolution of approximately 20 arcsec and sensitivity exceeding 0.6mJy. At this sensitivity level WIRE observations can be seriously affected by the confusion noise contribution from the infrared cirrus emission, so the WIRE survey must be planned with some knowledge of the expected level of cirrus confusion. Production of a cirrus confusion noise map with 0.5 degree resolution based on the spatial power spectral density of the cirrus emission in the IRAS ISSA data is in progess using the method described by Gauthier, et al. Spectrally resolved power spectra density data is obtained from the ISSA maps with a wavelet transform technique.

  14. Towards an All-Sky 32 GHz Celestial Reference Frame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horiuchi, S.; Phillips, C.; Jacobs, Christopher S.; Sotuela, I.; García-Miró, C.

    2012-07-01

    We have been developing a celestial reference frame catalogue at 32 GHz using 34m Beam Wave Guide antennas of NASA Deep Space Network to complement the current IAU standard S/X-band ICRF2. However, the DSN VLBI network alone can only cover limited part of the full sky, missing in the declination range from -45 to -90 degree. To extend the 32 GHz catalogue, we recently initiated a project to survey candidate catalogue sources in the southern sky using Canberra DSS-34 antenna in conjunction with two elements of LBA that can observe at 32 GHz, the Mopra telescope and ATCA. We formed a list of 144 new 32 GHz candidate catalogue sources at -90 < Dec. < -45 deg. as target sources of this pilot survey. We selected those sources as expected to be reasonably strong and compact for our purpose, considering estimated flux densities at 32 GHz based on the results of the ATCA 20 GHz (AT20G) survey with 8.6 GHz flux density measurements, as well as characteristics of the X-band unresolved components based on the RFC2011c version catalogue sources. The candidate list of 144 sources includes 46 ICRF2 sources with 29 "Defining" objects. This would allow cross-checking with the S/X results of ICRF2. The ultimate goal of our project is to establish a reference source catalogue at 32 GHz for the south polar cap region, which has never been covered in existing catalogues at that frequency. The catalogue can be used for future space navigation as well as astronomical and geodetic observations with southern radio telescope arrays such as ATCA and LBA.

  15. Astronomical surveys and big data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mickaelian, Areg M.

    Recent all-sky and large-area astronomical surveys and their catalogued data over the whole range of electromagnetic spectrum, from γ -rays to radio waves, are reviewed, including such as Fermi-GLAST and INTEGRAL in γ -ray, ROSAT, XMM and Chandra in X-ray, GALEX in UV, SDSS and several POSS I and POSS II-based catalogues (APM, MAPS, USNO, GSC) in the optical range, 2MASS in NIR, WISE and AKARI IRC in MIR, IRAS and AKARI FIS in FIR, NVSS and FIRST in radio range, and many others, as well as the most important surveys giving optical images (DSS I and II, SDSS, etc.), proper motions (Tycho, USNO, Gaia), variability (GCVS, NSVS, ASAS, Catalina, Pan-STARRS), and spectroscopic data (FBS, SBS, Case, HQS, HES, SDSS, CALIFA, GAMA). An overall understanding of the coverage along the whole wavelength range and comparisons between various surveys are given: galaxy redshift surveys, QSO/AGN, radio, Galactic structure, and Dark Energy surveys. Astronomy has entered the Big Data era, with Astrophysical Virtual Observatories and Computational Astrophysics playing an important role in using and analyzing big data for new discoveries.

  16. Evrystats for Evryplanets: planets from the first all-sky gigapixel scale telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fors, Octavi; Law, Nicholas Michael; Ratzloff, Jeffrey; del Ser, Daniel; Wulfken, Philip J.; Kavanaugh, Dustin

    2015-08-01

    The Evryscope (Law et al. 2015) is a 24-camera hemispherical all-sky gigapixel telescope (8,000 sq.deg. FoV) with rapid cadence (2mins exposure, 4sec readout) deployed at CTIO May 2015. Ground-based single-station transiting surveys typically suffer from light curve sparsity and suboptimal efficiency because of their limited field of view (FoV), resulting in incomplete and biased detections. In contrast, the Evryscope offers 97% survey efficiency and one of the single-station most continuous and simultaneous monitoring of millions of stars (only limited by the day-night window). This unique facility is capable of addressing new and more extensive planetary populations, but brings with it new data analysis challenges. The system will:1) for the first time, continuously monitor every 2mins a set of ~1000 bright white dwarfs (WD). This will allow us to put constraints on the habitable planet fraction of Ceres-size planetesimals at the level of 30%, only in a survey timescales of a few weeks. 2) search for rocky planets in the habitable zone around ~5,000 bright, nearby M-dwarfs. 3) Synergies between Evryscope and upcoming exoplanets missions (e.g. TESS, PLATO) are also promising for target pre-imaging characterization, and increasing the giant planet yield by recovering multiple transits from objects seen as single eclipses from space. 4) all-sky 2-min cadence of rare microlensing events of nearby stars. 5) double the census of giant planets around ~70,000 nearby, bright (g<10) solar-type stars, whose atmospheres can be characterized by follow-up observations. We are developing new data analysis algorithms to address the above scientific goals: from detecting the extremely short and faint transits around WDs, to disentangle planetary signals from very bright stars, and to combine space-based light curves with the Evryscope's ones. We will present the first results from the Evryscope, achieved during first light in 2015.

  17. SPACE: the SPectroscopic, All-Sky Cosmic Explorer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cimatti, A.; Robberto, M.; Baugh, C.; Beckwith, S. W. V.; Content, R.; Daddi, E.; deLucia, G.; Garilli, B.; Guzzo, L.; Kauffmann, G.; Lehnert, M.; Maccagni, D.; Martinez-Sansigre, A.; Pasian, F.; Reid, I. N.; Rosati, P.; Salvaterra, R.; Stiavelli, M.; Wang, Y.; ZapateroOsorio, M.; Balcells, M.; Bersanelli, M.; Gardner, J.P.; Kimble, R.; Clampin, M.

    2007-01-01

    We describe the scientific motivations, the mission concept and the instrumentation of SPACE, a class-M mission proposed for concept study at the first call of the ESA Cosmic-Vision 2015-2025 planning cycle. SPACE aims at producing the largest three-dimensional evolutionary map of the Universe over the past 10 billion years by taking near-IR spectra and measuring redshifts of more than half a billion galaxies at 0 < z < 2 down to AB approximately 23 over 37r sr of the sky. In addition, SPACE will also target a smaller sky field, performing a deep spectroscopic survey of millions of galaxies to AB approximately 26 and at 2 < z < l0+. Owing to the depth, redshift range, volume coverage and quality of its spectra, SPACE will reveal with unique sensitivity most of the fundamental cosmological signatures, including the power spectrum of density fluctuations and its turnover, the baryonic acoustic oscillations imprinted when matter and radiation decoupled, the distance-luminosity relation of cosmological supernovae, the evolution of the cosmic expansion rate, the growth rate of cosmic large-scale structure, the large scale distribution of galaxies. The datasets from the SPACE mission will represent a long lasting legacy that will be data mined for many years to come.

  18. All-sky observations with HAWC: latest results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arteaga-Velázquez, J. C.; HAWC Collaboration

    2015-08-01

    The High Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) observatory is a ground-based air- shower detector designed to study cosmic rays and gamma rays with energies from 100 GeV up to 100 TeV. HAWC simultaneously surveys 2sr of the northern sky with a high duty cycle > 90% in search for photons from point and extended sources, diffuse emission, transient events and other astrophysical phenomena at multi-TeV scales against the background of cosmic rays. In fact, the study of this background will open also the possibility of doing cosmic ray physics in the GeV — TeV regime and even to perform solar studies at HAWC. The observatory will consist of a densely packed array of 300 water Cherenkov tanks (4.5 m tall and 7.3 m diameter with 4 photomultipliers each) distributed on a 22 000 m2 surface. Deployment started in March 2012 on a plateau situated on the Sierra Negra Volcano in the state of Puebla, Mexico, at an altitude of 4100 m. Construction is expected to be finished by the first months of 2015. In the mean time, HAWC has been taking data with a partial array and preliminary results have been already obtained. In this contribution, the results from the latest HAWC observations will be presented.

  19. All-Sky Cataloging and Analysis of Interstellar Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hojaev, Alisher S.

    2015-08-01

    Recent quick instrumental progress provides possibilities to careful study the interstellar medium (ISM) in the Galaxy and in the nearest galaxies (M31, LMC, SMC, etc.). Significant enough baryon mass of the galactic and extragalactic ISM is concentrated in the clouds with molecular content in the densest parts. The molecular clouds (MoC) are closely related to cold dust-gas clouds, particularly HI ones and should play a key-role in the star forming processes as well as in the dynamics of the Galaxy. These arguments show the importance of counting and surveying of the MoC populations. In order to attempt to solve at least some problems of the physics and evolution of the MoC system in the Galaxy (as well as in other galaxies), its impact on the dynamics and evolution of the Galaxy itself, and to extend the results to the MoC systems in other galaxies we drafted a consolidated composite catalog of molecular and dust-gas clouds based on the recent data. Online data banks and services such as VizieR, SIMBAD at CDS as well as original publications were used. In our Galaxy there are about 200 large molecular clouds, more than 2500 smaller cold dark clouds (including clumps and cores this value exceeds approximately 5000 objects) observed in 11 kpc Solar neighborhood. The general catalog has been divided into 3 sub-catalogs: 1)large and giant MoC; 2) MoC with moderate masses and sizes; 3) small MoC including the clumps and cores. All main catalogs and subcatalogs contain the coordinates, sizes, distances, masses and other physical parameters (density, temperature, radial velocity, etc.) that are available for the different clouds. Statistical and correlation analyses of the data has been performed, the spatial distribution is drawn and the total number is estimated, the dynamic model of formation and evolution of MoC system is proposed. Our results are compared and discussed with data of other investigations as well as the ways to complete and improve the catalog data

  20. SPACE: the spectroscopic all-sky cosmic explorer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cimatti, A.; Robberto, M.; Baugh, C.; Beckwith, S. V. W.; Content, R.; Daddi, E.; De Lucia, G.; Garilli, B.; Guzzo, L.; Kauffmann, G.; Lehnert, M.; Maccagni, D.; Martínez-Sansigre, A.; Pasian, F.; Reid, I. N.; Rosati, P.; Salvaterra, R.; Stiavelli, M.; Wang, Y.; Zapatero Osorio, M.; Balcells, M.; Bersanelli, M.; Bertoldi, F.; Blaizot, J.; Bottini, D.; Bower, R.; Bulgarelli, A.; Burgasser, A.; Burigana, C.; Butler, R. C.; Casertano, S.; Ciardi, B.; Cirasuolo, M.; Clampin, M.; Cole, S.; Comastri, A.; Cristiani, S.; Cuby, J.-G.; Cuttaia, F.; de Rosa, A.; Sanchez, A. Diaz; di Capua, M.; Dunlop, J.; Fan, X.; Ferrara, A.; Finelli, F.; Franceschini, A.; Franx, M.; Franzetti, P.; Frenk, C.; Gardner, Jonathan P.; Gianotti, F.; Grange, R.; Gruppioni, C.; Gruppuso, A.; Hammer, F.; Hillenbrand, L.; Jacobsen, A.; Jarvis, M.; Kennicutt, R.; Kimble, R.; Kriek, M.; Kurk, J.; Kneib, J.-P.; Le Fevre, O.; Macchetto, D.; MacKenty, J.; Madau, P.; Magliocchetti, M.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Masetti, N.; McLure, R.; Mennella, A.; Meyer, M.; Mignoli, M.; Mobasher, B.; Molinari, E.; Morgante, G.; Morris, S.; Nicastro, L.; Oliva, E.; Padovani, P.; Palazzi, E.; Paresce, F.; Perez Garrido, A.; Pian, E.; Popa, L.; Postman, M.; Pozzetti, L.; Rayner, J.; Rebolo, R.; Renzini, A.; Röttgering, H.; Schinnerer, E.; Scodeggio, M.; Saisse, M.; Shanks, T.; Shapley, A.; Sharples, R.; Shea, H.; Silk, J.; Smail, I.; Spanó, P.; Steinacker, J.; Stringhetti, L.; Szalay, A.; Tresse, L.; Trifoglio, M.; Urry, M.; Valenziano, L.; Villa, F.; Villo Perez, I.; Walter, F.; Ward, M.; White, R.; White, S.; Wright, E.; Wyse, R.; Zamorani, G.; Zacchei, A.; Zeilinger, W. W.; Zerbi, F.

    2009-03-01

    We describe the scientific motivations, the mission concept and the instrumentation of SPACE, a class-M mission proposed for concept study at the first call of the ESA Cosmic-Vision 2015-2025 planning cycle. SPACE aims to produce the largest three-dimensional evolutionary map of the Universe over the past 10 billion years by taking near-IR spectra and measuring redshifts for more than half a billion galaxies at 0 < z < 2 down to AB~23 over 3 π sr of the sky. In addition, SPACE will also target a smaller sky field, performing a deep spectroscopic survey of millions of galaxies to AB~26 and at 2 < z < 10 +. These goals are unreachable with ground-based observations due to the ≈500 times higher sky background (see e.g. Aldering, LBNL report number LBNL-51157, 2001). To achieve the main science objectives, SPACE will use a 1.5 m diameter Ritchey-Chretien telescope equipped with a set of arrays of Digital Micro-mirror Devices covering a total field of view of 0.4 deg2, and will perform large-multiplexing multi-object spectroscopy (e.g. ≈6000 targets per pointing) at a spectral resolution of R~400 as well as diffraction-limited imaging with continuous coverage from 0.8 to 1.8 μm. Owing to the depth, redshift range, volume coverage and quality of its spectra, SPACE will reveal with unique sensitivity most of the fundamental cosmological signatures, including the power spectrum of density fluctuations and its turnover. SPACE will also place high accuracy constraints on the dark energy equation of state parameter and its evolution by measuring the baryonic acoustic oscillations imprinted when matter and radiation decoupled, the distance-luminosity relation of cosmological supernovae, the evolution of the cosmic expansion rate, the growth rate of cosmic large-scale structure, and high- z galaxy clusters. The datasets from the SPACE mission will represent a long lasting legacy for the whole astronomical community whose data will be mined for many years to come.

  1. Planck intermediate results. XXIX. All-sky dust modelling with Planck, IRAS, and WISE observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Planck Collaboration; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Alves, M. I. R.; Aniano, G.; Arnaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartolo, N.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernard, J.-P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bonaldi, A.; Bonavera, L.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Boulanger, F.; Burigana, C.; Butler, R. C.; Calabrese, E.; Cardoso, J.-F.; Catalano, A.; Chamballu, A.; Chiang, H. C.; Christensen, P. R.; Clements, D. L.; Colombi, S.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Couchot, F.; Crill, B. P.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Danese, L.; Davies, R. D.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Draine, B. T.; Ducout, A.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Elsner, F.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Falgarone, E.; Finelli, F.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Fraisse, A. A.; Franceschi, E.; Frejsel, A.; Galeotta, S.; Galli, S.; Ganga, K.; Ghosh, T.; Giard, M.; Gjerløw, E.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Guillet, V.; Hansen, F. K.; Hanson, D.; Harrison, D. L.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Holmes, W. A.; Hovest, W.; Huffenberger, K. M.; Hurier, G.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jaffe, T. R.; Jones, W. C.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kisner, T. S.; Kneissl, R.; Knoche, J.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lamarre, J.-M.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Lawrence, C. R.; Leonardi, R.; Levrier, F.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maffei, B.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Maris, M.; Marshall, D. J.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Matarrese, S.; Mazzotta, P.; Melchiorri, A.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Miville-Deschênes, M.-A.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J. A.; Naselsky, P.; Natoli, P.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; Oxborrow, C. A.; Pagano, L.; Pajot, F.; Paladini, R.; Paoletti, D.; Pasian, F.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Perrotta, F.; Pettorino, V.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Ponthieu, N.; Popa, L.; Pratt, G. W.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J.-L.; Rachen, J. P.; Reach, W. T.; Rebolo, R.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Roudier, G.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Rusholme, B.; Sandri, M.; Santos, D.; Scott, D.; Spencer, L. D.; Stolyarov, V.; Sudiwala, R.; Sunyaev, R.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A.-S.; Sygnet, J.-F.; Tauber, J. A.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Tucci, M.; Umana, G.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Wade, L. A.; Wandelt, B. D.; Wehus, I. K.; Ysard, N.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.

    2016-02-01

    We present all-sky modelling of the high resolution Planck, IRAS, and WISE infrared (IR) observations using the physical dust model presented by Draine & Li in 2007 (DL, ApJ, 657, 810). We study the performance and results of this model, and discuss implications for future dust modelling. The present work extends the DL dust modelling carried out on nearby galaxies using Herschel and Spitzer data to Galactic dust emission. We employ the DL dust model to generate maps of the dust mass surface density ΣMd, the dust optical extinction AV, and the starlight intensity heating the bulk of the dust, parametrized by Umin. The DL model reproduces the observed spectral energy distribution (SED) satisfactorily over most of the sky, with small deviations in the inner Galactic disk and in low ecliptic latitude areas, presumably due to zodiacal light contamination. In the Andromeda galaxy (M31), the present dust mass estimates agree remarkably well (within 10%) with DL estimates based on independent Spitzer and Herschel data. We compare the DL optical extinction AV for the diffuse interstellar medium (ISM) with optical estimates for approximately 2 × 105 quasi-stellar objects (QSOs) observed inthe Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). The DL AV estimates are larger than those determined towards QSOs by a factor of about 2, which depends on Umin. The DL fitting parameter Umin, effectively determined by the wavelength where the SED peaks, appears to trace variations in the far-IR opacity of the dust grains per unit AV, and not only in the starlight intensity. These results show that some of the physical assumptions of the DL model will need to be revised. To circumvent the model deficiency, we propose an empirical renormalization of the DL AV estimate, dependent of Umin, which compensates for the systematic differences found with QSO observations. This renormalization, made to match the AV estimates towards QSOs, also brings into agreement the DL AV estimates with those derived for

  2. On how to extend the NIR Tully-Fisher relation to be truly all-sky

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Said, K.; Kraan-Korteweg, R. C.; Jarrett, T. H.

    2015-02-01

    Dust extinction and stellar confusion by the Milky Way reduce the efficiency of detecting galaxies at low Galactic latitudes, creating the so-called Zone of Avoidance (ZoA). This stands as a stumbling block in charting the distribution of galaxies and cosmic flow fields, and therewith our understanding of the local dynamics in the Universe (cosmic microwave background dipole, convergence radius of bulk flows). For instance, ZoA galaxies are generally excluded from the whole-sky Tully-Fisher (TF) surveys (|b| ≤ 5°) even if catalogued. We show here that by fine-tuning the near-infrared (NIR) TF relation, there is no reason not to extend peculiar velocity surveys deeper into the ZoA. Accurate axial ratios (b/a) are crucial to both the TF sample selection and the resulting TF distances. We simulate the effect of dust extinction on the geometrical properties of galaxies. As expected, galaxies appear rounder with increasing obscuration level, even affecting existing TF samples. We derive correction models and demonstrate that we can reliably reproduce the intrinsic axial ratio from the observed value up to extinction level of about AJ ≃ 3 mag (AV ˜ 11 mag); we also recover a fair fraction of galaxies that otherwise would fall out of an uncorrected inclination limited galaxy sample. We present a re-calibration of the 2MTF (The Two Micron All Sky Survey Tully-Fisher Survey) relation in the NIR J, H, and Ks bands for isophotal rather than total magnitudes, using their same calibration sample. Both TF relations exhibit similar scatter at high Galactic latitudes. However, the isophotal TF relation results in a significant improvement in the scatter for galaxies in the ZoA, and low surface brightness galaxies in general, because isophotal apertures are more robust in the face of significant stellar confusion.

  3. Results from the Ariel-5 all-sky X-ray monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holt, S. S.

    1975-01-01

    A summary of results obtained from the first year of Ariel-5 all-sky monitor operation is presented. Transient source observations, as well as the results of long term studies of Sco X-1, Cyg X-3, and Cyg X-1 are described. By example, the included results are indicative of the temporal effects to which the all-sky monitor remains sensitive as it begins its second year of observation.

  4. INFORMATION ON THE MILKY WAY FROM THE 2MASS ALL SKY STAR COUNT: BIMODAL COLOR DISTRIBUTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Chan-Kao; Lai, Shao-Yu; Peng, Ting-Hung; Ko, Chung-Ming E-mail: cmko@astro.ncu.edu.tw

    2012-11-10

    The J - K{sub s} color distributions (CDs) with a bin size of 0.05 mag has been carried out for the entire Milky Way using the Two Micron All Sky Survey Point Source Catalog (2MASS PSC). The CDs are bimodal, with a red peak at 0.8 < J - K{sub s} < 0.85 and a blue peak at 0.3 < J - K{sub s} < 0.4. The colors of the red peak are more or less the same for the whole sky, but those of the blue peak depend on Galactic latitude (J - K{sub s} {approx} 0.35 at low Galactic latitudes and 0.35 < J - K{sub s} < 0.4 for other sky areas). The blue peak dominates the bimodal CDs at low Galactic latitudes and becomes comparable with the red peak in other sky regions. In order to explain the bimodal distribution and the global trend shown by the all-sky 2MASS CDs, we assemble an empirical Hertzsprung-Russell (H-R) diagram, which is composed of observational-based near-infrared H-R diagrams and color-magnitude diagrams, and incorporate a Milky Way model. In the empirical H-R diagram, the main-sequence turn-off for stars in the thin disk is relatively bluer, (J - K{sub s} ){sub 0} = 0.31, compared with that of the thick disk which is (J - K{sub s} ){sub 0} = 0.39. The age of the thin/thick disk is roughly estimated to be around 4-5/8-9 Gyr according to the color-age relation of the main-sequence turn-off. In general, the 2MASS CDs can be treated as a tool to measure the age of the stellar population of the Milky Way in a statistical manner and to our knowledge it is the first attempt to do so.

  5. An all-sky support vector machine selection of WISE YSO candidates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marton, G.; Tóth, L. V.; Paladini, R.; Kun, M.; Zahorecz, S.; McGehee, P.; Kiss, Cs.

    2016-06-01

    We explored the AllWISE catalogue of the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) mission and identified Young Stellar Object (YSO) candidates. Reliable 2MASS and WISE photometric data combined with Planck dust opacity values were used to build our data set and to find the best classification scheme. A sophisticated statistical method, the support vector machine (SVM) is used to analyse the multidimensional data space and to remove source types identified as contaminants (extragalactic sources, main-sequence stars, evolved stars and sources related to the interstellar medium). Objects listed in the SIMBAD data base are used to identify the already known sources and to train our method. A new all-sky selection of 133 980 Class I/II YSO candidates is presented. The estimated contamination was found to be well below 1 per cent based on comparison with our SIMBAD training set. We also compare our results to that of existing methods and catalogues. The SVM selection process successfully identified >90 per cent of the Class I/II YSOs based on comparison with photometric and spectroscopic YSO catalogues. Our conclusion is that by using the SVM, our classification is able to identify more known YSOs of the training sample than other methods based on colour-colour and magnitude-colour selection. The distribution of the YSO candidates well correlates with that of the Planck Galactic Cold Clumps in the Taurus-Auriga-Perseus-California region.

  6. A SURVEY OF H{sub 2}O, CO{sub 2}, AND CO ICE FEATURES TOWARD BACKGROUND STARS AND LOW-MASS YOUNG STELLAR OBJECTS USING AKARI

    SciTech Connect

    Noble, J. A.; Fraser, H. J.; Aikawa, Y.; Pontoppidan, K. M.; Sakon, I.

    2013-10-01

    We present near-infrared spectroscopic observations of 19 molecular clouds made using the AKARI satellite, and the data reduction pipeline written to analyze those observations. The 2.5-5 μm spectra of 30 objects—22 field stars behind quiescent molecular clouds and 8 low-mass young stellar objects in cores—were successfully extracted using the pipeline. Those spectra are further analyzed to calculate the column densities of key solid phase molecular species, including H{sub 2}O, CO{sub 2}, CO, and OCN{sup –}. The profile of the H{sub 2}O ice band is seen to vary across the objects observed and we suggest that the extended red wing may be an evolutionary indicator of both dust and ice mantle properties. The observation of 22 spectra with fluxes as low as < 5 mJy toward background stars, including 15 where the column densities of H{sub 2}O, CO, and CO{sub 2} were calculated, provides valuable data that could help to benchmark the initial conditions in star-forming regions prior to the onset of star formation.

  7. VizieR Online Data Catalog: WATCHDOG: an all-sky database of Galactic BHXBs (Tetarenko+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tetarenko, B. E.; Sivakoff, G. R.; Heinke, C. O.; Gladstone, J. C.

    2016-03-01

    With the advent of more sensitive all-sky instruments, the transient universe is being probed in greater depth than ever before. Taking advantage of available resources, we have established a comprehensive database of black hole (and black hole candidate) X-ray binary (BHXB) activity between 1996 and 2015 as revealed by all-sky instruments, scanning surveys, and select narrow-field X-ray instruments on board the INTErnational Gamma-Ray Astrophysics Laboratory (INTEGRAL), Monitor of All-Sky X-ray Image (MAXI), Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE), and Swift telescopes; the Whole-sky Alberta Time-resolved Comprehensive black-Hole Database Of the Galaxy or WATCHDOG. Over the past two decades, we have detected 132 transient outbursts, tracked and classified behavior occurring in 47 transient and 10 persistently accreting BHs, and performed a statistical study on a number of outburst properties across the Galactic population. We find that outbursts undergone by BHXBs that do not reach the thermally dominant accretion state make up a substantial fraction (~40%) of the Galactic transient BHXB outburst sample over the past ~20 years. Our findings suggest that this "hard-only" behavior, observed in transient and persistently accreting BHXBs, is neither a rare nor recent phenomenon and may be indicative of an underlying physical process, relatively common among binary BHs, involving the mass-transfer rate onto the BH remaining at a low level rather than increasing as the outburst evolves. We discuss how the larger number of these "hard-only" outbursts and detected outbursts in general have significant implications for both the luminosity function and mass-transfer history of the Galactic BHXB population. (9 data files).

  8. Retrieval of the optical depth using an all-sky CCD camera.

    PubMed

    Olmo, Francisco J; Cazorla, Alberto; Alados-Arboledas, Lucas; López-Alvarez, Miguel A; Hernández-Andrés, Javier; Romero, Javier

    2008-12-01

    A new method is presented for retrieval of the aerosol and cloud optical depth using a CCD camera equipped with a fish-eye lens (all-sky imager system). In a first step, the proposed method retrieves the spectral radiance from sky images acquired by the all-sky imager system using a linear pseudoinverse algorithm. Then, the aerosol or cloud optical depth at 500 nm is obtained as that which minimizes the residuals between the zenith spectral radiance retrieved from the sky images and that estimated by the radiative transfer code. The method is tested under extreme situations including the presence of nonspherical aerosol particles. The comparison of optical depths derived from the all-sky imager with those retrieved with a sunphotometer operated side by side shows differences similar to the nominal error claimed in the aerosol optical depth retrievals from sunphotometer networks. PMID:19037341

  9. Remote and automatic small-scale observatories: experience with an all-sky fireball patrol camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bettonvil, Felix C. M.

    2014-07-01

    This paper describes the design of a remote, automatic all-sky camera for capturing bright meteor trails based on a DSLR camera combined with Liquid Crystal shutter technology for angular velocity measurement. Design, performance and first results are discussed, as well the up scaling towards a large autonomous network for accurate fireball orbit determination and meteorite recovery.

  10. VizieR Online Data Catalog: All-sky near-infrared extinction map (Juvela+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juvela, M.; Montillaud, J.

    2015-10-01

    An all-sky extinction map in units of J-band extinction (magnitudes). The map is given as a Healpix FITS file (NSIDE=4096, NESTED scheme) in Galactic projection. The map has been created with the NICER method, additionally using the information of local extinction gradients. The resolution is FWHM=3.0-arcmin. (2 data files).

  11. Coherently combining data between detectors for all-sky semi-coherent continuous gravitational wave searches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goetz, E.; Riles, K.

    2016-04-01

    We present a method for coherently combining short data segments from gravitational-wave detectors to improve the sensitivity of semi-coherent searches for continuous gravitational waves. All-sky searches for continuous gravitational waves from unknown sources are computationally limited. The semi-coherent approach reduces the computational cost by dividing the entire observation timespan into short segments to be analyzed coherently, then combined together incoherently. Semi-coherent analyses that attempt to improve sensitivity by coherently combining data from multiple detectors face a computational challenge in accounting for uncertainties in signal parameters. In this article, we lay out a technique to meet this challenge using summed Fourier transform coefficients. Applying this technique to one all-sky search algorithm called TwoSpect, we confirm that the sensitivity of all-sky, semi-coherent searches can be improved by coherently combining the short data segments, e.g., by up to 42% over a single detector for an all-sky search. For misaligned detectors, however, this improvement requires careful attention when marginalizing over unknown polarization parameters. In addition, care must be taken in correcting for differential detector velocity due to the Earth’s rotation for high signal frequencies and widely separated detectors.

  12. Photometric indicators of visual night sky quality derived from all-sky brightness maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duriscoe, Dan M.

    2016-09-01

    Wide angle or fisheye cameras provide a high resolution record of artificial sky glow, which results from the scattering of escaped anthropogenic light by the atmosphere, over the sky vault in the moonless nocturnal environment. Analysis of this record yields important indicators of the extent and severity of light pollution. The following indicators were derived through numerical analysis of all-sky brightness maps: zenithal, average all-sky, median, brightest, and darkest sky brightness. In addition, horizontal and vertical illuminance, resulting from sky brightness were computed. A natural reference condition to which the anthropogenic component may be compared is proposed for each indicator, based upon an iterative analysis of a high resolution natural sky model. All-sky brightness data, calibrated in the V band by photometry of standard stars and converted to luminance, from 406 separate data sets were included in an exploratory analysis. Of these, six locations representing a wide range of severity of impact from artificial sky brightness were selected as examples and examined in detail. All-sky average brightness is the most unbiased indicator of impact to the environment, and is more sensitive and accurate in areas of slight to moderate light pollution impact than zenith brightness. Maximum vertical illuminance provides an excellent indicator of impacts to wilderness character, as does measures of the brightest portions of the sky. Zenith brightness, the workhorse of field campaigns, is compared to the other indicators and found to correlate well with horizontal illuminance, especially at relatively bright sites. The median sky brightness describes a brightness threshold for the upper half of the sky, of importance to telescopic optical astronomy. Numeric indicators, in concert with all-sky brightness maps, provide a complete assessment of visual sky quality at a site.

  13. Evryscope Science: Exploring the Potential of All-Sky Gigapixel-Scale Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Law, Nicholas M.; Fors, Octavi; Ratzloff, Jeffrey; Wulfken, Philip; Kavanaugh, Dustin; Sitar, David J.; Pruett, Zachary; Birchard, Mariah N.; Barlow, Brad N.; Cannon, Kipp; Cenko, S. Bradley; Dunlap, Bart; Kraus, Adam; Maccarone, Thomas J.

    2015-03-01

    , or even gravitational wave detections from the Advanced LIGO/Virgo network, the array will return minute-by-minute light curves without needing pointing toward the event as it occurs. By coadding images, the system will reach V ~ 19 in 1-hr integrations, enabling the monitoring of faint objects. Finally, by recording all data, the Evryscope will be able to provide pre-event imaging at 2-minute cadence for bright transients and variable objects, enabling the first high-cadence searches for optical variability before, during and after all-sky events.

  14. MASCARA: the multi-site all-sky CAameRA: concept and first results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lesage, A.-L.; Spronck, J. F. P.; Stuik, R.; Bettonvil, F.; Pollaco, D.; Snellen, I. A. G.

    2014-07-01

    MASCARA, the Multi-site All-Sky CAmeRA, will consist of several fully-automated stations distributed across the globe. Its goal is to find exoplanets transiting the brightest stars, in the mV = 4 to 8 magnitude range, currently probed neither by space- nor by ground-based surveys. The nearby transiting planet systems that MASCARA is expected to discover will be key targets for future detailed planet atmosphere observations. The target population for MASCARA consists mostly of hot Jupiters. The main requirement set on MASCARA to detect these planets around stars down to magnitude 8 is to reach a minimum Signal-to-Noise Ratio of 100 within one hour of observation. Each MASCARA station consists of five low-noise off-the-shelf full-frame CCD cameras, fitted with standard Canon 24 mm , f/1.4 lenses, monitoring the near-entire sky down to magnitude 8 at that location. Measurements have demonstrated that the required Signal-to-Noise Ratio of 100, can be achieved in less than thirty minutes. MASCARA aims at deploying several stations world-wide to provide a nearly continuous coverage of the dark sky, at sub-minute cadence. While at the faint end MASCARA is limited mainly by photon noise, at the bright end scintillation and red noise become the limiting factors. Instrumental noise sources are reduced by placing the cameras in a fixed orientation and in a temperature controlled environment. By defocusing and allowing stars to drift over the detector, the impact of pixel-to-pixel variations on the photometry are minimized, while taking exposures at fixed sidereal times allows accurate cross-calibration of consecutive nights. The exposure time of 6.4 seconds gives rise to a high data acquisition rate of a MASCARA station, around 500GB per night. In order to minimize data transport and data storage requirements, the raw images are reduced to produce accurate light curves in nearly real time. The first MASCARA station will be integrated on La Palma during the summer of 2014

  15. Astronomical Surveys, Catalogs, Databases, and Archives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mickaelian, A. M.

    2016-06-01

    All-sky and large-area astronomical surveys and their cataloged data over the whole range of electromagnetic spectrum are reviewed, from γ-ray to radio, such as Fermi-GLAST and INTEGRAL in γ-ray, ROSAT, XMM and Chandra in X-ray, GALEX in UV, SDSS and several POSS I and II based catalogues (APM, MAPS, USNO, GSC) in optical range, 2MASS in NIR, WISE and AKARI IRC in MIR, IRAS and AKARI FIS in FIR, NVSS and FIRST in radio and many others, as well as most important surveys giving optical images (DSS I and II, SDSS, etc.), proper motions (Tycho, USNO, Gaia), variability (GCVS, NSVS, ASAS, Catalina, Pan-STARRS) and spectroscopic data (FBS, SBS, Case, HQS, HES, SDSS, CALIFA, GAMA). Most important astronomical databases and archives are reviewed as well, including Wide-Field Plate DataBase (WFPDB), ESO, HEASARC, IRSA and MAST archives, CDS SIMBAD, VizieR and Aladin, NED and HyperLEDA extragalactic databases, ADS and astro-ph services. They are powerful sources for many-sided efficient research using Virtual Observatory tools. Using and analysis of Big Data accumulated in astronomy lead to many new discoveries.

  16. The MICE Grand Challenge light-cone simulation - III. Galaxy lensing mocks from all-sky lensing maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fosalba, P.; Gaztañaga, E.; Castander, F. J.; Crocce, M.

    2015-02-01

    In Paper I of this series, we presented a new N-body light-cone simulation from the MICE Collaboration, the MICE Grand Challenge (MICE-GC), containing about 70 billion dark-matter particles in a (3 h-1 Gpc)3 comoving volume, from which we built halo and galaxy catalogues using a Halo Occupation Distribution and Halo Abundance Matching technique, as presented in the companion Paper II. Given its large volume and fine mass resolution, the MICE-GC simulation also allows an accurate modelling of the lensing observables from upcoming wide and deep galaxy surveys. In the last paper of this series (Paper III), we describe the construction of all-sky lensing maps, following the `Onion Universe' approach, and discuss their properties in the light-cone up to z = 1.4 with sub-arcminute spatial resolution. By comparing the convergence power spectrum in the MICE-GC to lower mass-resolution (i.e. particle mass ˜1011 h-1 M⊙) simulations, we find that resolution effects are at the 5 per cent level for multipoles ℓ ˜ 103 and 20 per cent for ℓ ˜ 104. Resolution effects have a much lower impact on our simulation, as shown by comparing the MICE-GC to recent numerical fits by Takahashi. We use the all-sky lensing maps to model galaxy lensing properties, such as the convergence, shear, and lensed magnitudes and positions, and validate them thoroughly using galaxy shear auto and cross-correlations in harmonic and configuration space. Our results show that the galaxy lensing mocks here presented can be used to accurately model lensing observables down to arcminute scales. Accompanying this series of papers, we make a first public data release of the MICE-GC galaxy mock, the MICECAT v1.0, through a dedicated web-portal for the MICE simulations, http://cosmohub.pic.es, to help developing and exploiting the new generation of astronomical surveys.

  17. Derivation of sky quality indicators from photometrically calibrated all-sky image mosaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duriscoe, Dan M.; Moore, Chadwick A.; Luginbuhl, Christian B.

    2015-08-01

    A large database of high resolution all-sky measurements of V-band night sky brightness at sites in U.S. National Parks and astronomical observatories is utilized to describe sky quality over a wide geographic area. Mosaics of photometrically calibrated V-band imagery are processed with a semi-automated procedure to reveal the effects of artificial sky glow through graphical presentation and numeric indicators of artificial sky brightness. Comparison with simpler methods such as the use of the Unihedron SQM and naked eye limiting magnitude reveal that areas near the horizon, which are not typically captured with single-channel measurements, contribute significantly to the indicators maximum vertical illuminance, maximum sky luminance, and average all-sky luminance. Distant sources of sky glow may represent future threats to areas of the sky nearer the zenith. Timely identification and quantification of these threats may allow mitigating strategies to be implemented.

  18. Validation of spectral sky radiance derived from all-sky camera images - a case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tohsing, K.; Schrempf, M.; Riechelmann, S.; Seckmeyer, G.

    2014-07-01

    Spectral sky radiance (380-760 nm) is derived from measurements with a hemispherical sky imager (HSI) system. The HSI consists of a commercial compact CCD (charge coupled device) camera equipped with a fish-eye lens and provides hemispherical sky images in three reference bands such as red, green and blue. To obtain the spectral sky radiance from these images, non-linear regression functions for various sky conditions have been derived. The camera-based spectral sky radiance was validated using spectral sky radiance measured with a CCD spectroradiometer. The spectral sky radiance for complete distribution over the hemisphere between both instruments deviates by less than 20% at 500 nm for all sky conditions and for zenith angles less than 80°. The reconstructed spectra of the wavelengths 380-760 nm between both instruments at various directions deviate by less than 20% for all sky conditions.

  19. Validation of spectral sky radiance derived from all-sky camera images - a case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tohsing, K.; Schrempf, M.; Riechelmann, S.; Seckmeyer, G.

    2014-01-01

    Spectral sky radiance (380-760 nm) is derived from measurements with a Hemispherical Sky Imager (HSI) system. The HSI consists of a commercial compact CCD (charge coupled device) camera equipped with a fish-eye lens and provides hemispherical sky images in three reference bands such as red, green and blue. To obtain the spectral sky radiance from these images non-linear regression functions for various sky conditions have been derived. The camera-based spectral sky radiance was validated by spectral sky radiance measured with a CCD spectroradiometer. The spectral sky radiance for complete distribution over the hemisphere between both instruments deviates by less than 20% at 500 nm for all sky conditions and for zenith angles less than 80°. The reconstructed spectra of the wavelength 380 nm to 760 nm between both instruments at various directions deviate by less then 20% for all sky conditions.

  20. All-sky imaging of transglobal thermospheric gravity waves generated by the March 2011 Tohoku Earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Steven M.; Martinis, Carlos R.; Baumgardner, Jeffrey; Mendillo, Michael

    2015-12-01

    We report on imaging measurements of thermospheric gravity wave signatures in 630 nm and 557.7 nm nightglow that suggest an association with the M = 9 Tohoku (Japan) earthquake on 11 March 2011. The propagating waves were recorded in all-sky images at the El Leoncito Observatory, Argentina (31.8°S, 69.3°W), which is located 17,080 km from the earthquake epicenter, almost at the global antipodal point.

  1. The GRB All-sky Spectrometer Experiment III: Upgrades and Commissioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banks, Zachary; Martinot, Zachary; Voigt, Elana; Pober, Jonathan; Morales, Miguel F.

    2015-01-01

    The GRB All-sky Spectrometer Experiment (GASE) is designed to detect low frequency radio emission following a gamma ray burst. GASE currently uses 8 dipole antennas to detect these emissions. This poster will discuss the commissioning and associated troubleshooting of setting up these antennas. This will include the challenges presented by having the instrument located here in Seattle such as water damage, corrosion, and RFI.

  2. Alaskan Auroral All-Sky Images on the World Wide Web

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stenbaek-Nielsen, H. C.

    1997-01-01

    In response to a 1995 NASA SPDS announcement of support for preservation and distribution of important data sets online, the Geophysical Institute, University of Alaska Fairbanks, Alaska, proposed to provide World Wide Web access to the Poker Flat Auroral All-sky Camera images in real time. The Poker auroral all-sky camera is located in the Davis Science Operation Center at Poker Flat Rocket Range about 30 miles north-east of Fairbanks, Alaska, and is connected, through a microwave link, with the Geophysical Institute where we maintain the data base linked to the Web. To protect the low light-level all-sky TV camera from damage due to excessive light, we only operate during the winter season when the moon is down. The camera and data acquisition is now fully computer controlled. Digital images are transmitted each minute to the Web linked data base where the data are available in a number of different presentations: (1) Individual JPEG compressed images (1 minute resolution); (2) Time lapse MPEG movie of the stored images; and (3) A meridional plot of the entire night activity.

  3. Monitoring the Sky with the Prototype All-Sky Imager on the LWA1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obenberger, K. S.; Taylor, G. B.; Hartman, J. M.; Clarke, T. E.; Dowell, J.; Dubois, A.; Dubois, D.; Henning, P. A.; Lazio, J.; Michalak, S.; Schinzel, F. K.

    2015-03-01

    We present a description of the Prototype All-Sky Imager (PASI), a backend correlator and imager of the first station of the Long Wavelength Array (LWA1). PASI cross-correlates a live stream of 260 dual-polarization dipole antennas of the LWA1, creates all-sky images, and uploads them to the LWA-TV website in near real time. PASI has recorded over 13,000hr of all-sky images at frequencies between 10 and 88MHz creating opportunities for new research and discoveries. We also report rate density and pulse energy density limits on transients at 38, 52, and 74MHz, for pulse widths of 5s. We limit transients at those frequencies with pulse energy densities of >2.7×10-23, >1.1×10-23, and >2.8×10-23Jm-2Hz-1 to have rate densities <1.2×10-4, <5.6×10-4, and <7.2×10-4 year-1deg-2.

  4. Monitoring the Low Frequency Sky with the LWA1 and the Prototype All-Sky Imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obenberger, Kenneth Steven; LWA Collaboration

    2015-01-01

    We present findings from the Prototype All-Sky Imager (PASI), a backend correlator of the first station of the Long Wavelength Array (LWA1). PASI cross-correlates a live stream of all 260 dual-polarization dipole antennas of the LWA1, creates all-sky images, and uploads them to the LWA-TV website in near real-time. PASI has recorded over 14,000 hours of all-sky images at frequencies between 10 and 88 MHz. These data have resulted in the discovery of radio emission from large meteors (Fireballs), and has been used to set improved limits on slow transients at 38, 52, and 74 MHz. PASI is also being used to characterize how the ionosphere affects low frequency transient astronomy. Construction of the LWA has been supported by the Office of Naval Research under Contract N00014-07-C-0147. Support for operations and continuing development of the LWA1 is provided by the National Science Foundation under grants AST-1139963 and AST-1139974 of the University Radio Observatory program.

  5. Simultaneous Observation of Wave Packet of the Atmospheric Gravity Waves by ISS-IMAP and All-sky Imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yukino, H.; Saito, A.; Sakanoi, T.; Otsuka, Y.

    2014-12-01

    The spatial scale of the atmospheric gravity wave in the mesosphere and the lower thermosphere was analyzed using the simultaneous observational data of ISS-IMAP and an all-sky imager at Hawaii. There are a plenty of previous studies that discuss the relationship between the wave structures of the mesospheric airglow and the tropospheric events. The problem of the ground-based observation of the airglow is that it cannot distinguish spatial variations from temporal variations for the structures whose scale size is larger than its field-of-view. ISS-IMAP started the observation in October, 2012 to survey the atmospheric gravity waves whose horizontal scale size is 50 km and longer. The spatial resolution of the VIsible-light and infrared Spectrum Imager (VISI) of ISS-IMAP/VISI imaging observation is from 10 km to 25 km. Simultaneous observations start from March 14, 2013. The atmospheric gravity waves that detected by VISI in 762 nm were compared with the observations of ground-based all-sky imagers in 557.7 nm. The generation and the propagation of the atmospheric gravity waves were investigated with this simultaneous observation. The relationship between the tropospheric events and the atmospheric gravity waves in the mesosphere is studied with the wide field-of-view observation by VISI/ISS-IMAP, and the continuous observation of the ground-based imagers. VISI frequently observed wave packets whose scale size is 1,000-2,000 km. These wave packets were observed by the ground-based imager as a series of waves whose wave length is 20-40 km, and that continue for 5-6 hours. The generation, the propagation and the distraction of the atmospheric gravity waves will be discussed in this presentation.

  6. AKARI/FIS Mapping of the ISM-Wind Bow Shock around α Orionis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueta, Toshiya; Izumiura, Hideyuki; Yamamura, Issei; Nakada, Yoshikazu; Matsuura, Mikako; Ita, Yoshifusa; Tanabé, Toshihiko; Fukushi, Hinako; Matsunaga, Noriyuki; Mito, Hiroyuki

    2008-12-01

    We present 10' × 50'scan maps around an M supergiant αOri at 65, 90, 140, and 160μm obtained with the AKARI Infrared Astronomy Satellite. Higher spatial resolution data with the exact analytic solution permit us to fit the de-projected shape of the stellar-wind bow shock around αOri to have a stand-off distance of 4'.8, position angle of 55° and inclination angle of 56°. The shape of the bow shock suggests that the velocity of αOri with respect to the local medium is v* = 40 nH-1/2, where nH is the hydrogen nucleus density at αOri. We found that the local medium is of nH = 1.5 to 1.9 cm-3 and the velocity of the local flow is at 11km s-1 by using the most recent astrometric solutions for αOri under the assumption that the medium local to αOri is moving away from the Orion OB 1 association. AKARI images may also reveal avortex ring due to instabilities on the surface of the bow shock, as demonstrated by numerical models. This research exemplifies the potential of AKARI All-Sky data as well as follow-up observations with Herschel Space Telescope and Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy for this avenue of research in revealing the nature of the interaction between the stellar wind and the interstellar medium.

  7. VizieR Online Data Catalog: AKARI Far-Infrared Surveyor YSO catalog (Toth+, 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toth, L. V.; Marton, G.; Zahorecz, S.; Balazs, L. G.; Ueno, M.; Tamura, M.; Kawamura, A.; Kiss, Z. T.; Kitamura, Y.

    2014-01-01

    AKARI FSC BSC data was combined with mid-IR photometric data from the WISE All-Sky Data Release. Classification was made with quadratic discriminant analysis based on the mid- and far-IR colours and brightness values. 44001 sources were classified as young stellar object candidate. For each candidate AKARI FIS ID, celestial position (RA2000, DEC2000), WISE magnitudes measured in passbands centered at 3.4, 4.6, 12 and 22um (W1, W2, W3, W4), their corresponding errors (eW1, eW2, eW3, eW4), FIS flux densities measured in passbands with nominal wavelengths of 65, 90, 140 and 160um (F65, F90, F140, F160) and the corresponding flux qualities (F_QUAL), the probability of being YSO, SIMBAD main type and subtypes, the angular distance between the FIS source and the matching SIMBAD object and the SIMBAD ID of the matching object are listed. (1 data file).

  8. The MOXE X-ray all-sky monitor for Spectrum-X-Gamma

    SciTech Connect

    In`t Zand, J.J.M.; Priedhorsky, W.C.; Moss, C.E.

    1994-08-01

    MOXE is an X-ray all-sky monitor to be flown on the Russian Spectrum-X-Gamma satellite, to be launched in a few years. It will monitor several hundred X-ray sources on a daily basis, and will be the first instrument to monitor most of the X-ray sky most of the time. MOXE will alert users of more sensitive instruments on Russia`s giant high energy astrophysics observatory and of other instruments to transient activity. MOXE consists of an array of 6 X-ray pinhole cameras, sensitive from 3 to 25 keV, which views 4{pi} steradians (except for a 20{degree} {times} 80{degree} patch which includes the Sun). The pinhole apertures of 0.625 {times} 2.556 cm{sup 2} imply an angular resolution of 2{degree}.4 {times} 9{degree}.7 (on-axis). The MOXE hardware program includes an engineering model, now delivered, and a flight model. The flight instrument will mass approximately 118 kg and draw 38 Watts. For a non-focusing all-sky instrument that is limited by sky background, the limiting sensitivity is a function only of detector area. MOXE, with 6,000 cm{sup 2} of detector area, will, for a 24 hrs exposure, have a sensitivity of approximately 2 mCrab. MOXE distinguishes itself with respect to other all-sky monitors in its high duty cycle, thus being particularly sensitive to transient phenomena with time scales between minutes and hours.

  9. Instrumentation for a next-generation x-ray all-sky monitor

    SciTech Connect

    Peele, A. G.

    1999-12-15

    We have proposed an x-ray all-sky monitor for a small satellite mission that will be ten times more sensitive than past monitors and that opens up a new band of the soft x-ray spectrum (0.1-3.0 keV) for study. We discuss three approaches to the construction of the optics. The first method, well within the reach of existing technology, is to approximate the lobster-eye geometry by building crossed arrays of planar reflectors, this gives great control over the reflecting surface but is limited in terms of resolution at the baseline 4 arc minute level. The second method is to use microchannel plates; this technology has the potential to greatly exceed the baseline resolution and sensitivity but is yet to be fully demonstrated. The third method, while still in its infancy, may yet prove to be the most powerful; this approach relies on photolithography to expose a substrate that can then be developed and replicated. The scientific case for this mission is almost too broad to state here. The instrument we describe will allow investigation of the long term light curves of thousands of AGN, it will detect thousands of transients, including GRBs and type II supernova, and the stellar coronae of hundreds of the brightest x-ray stars can be monitored. In addition the classical objectives of all-sky monitors--long-term all-sky archive and watchdog alert to new events--will be fulfilled at an unprecedented level. We also note that by opening up a little-explored band of the x-ray sky the opportunity for new discovery is presented. A satisfying example of entering new territory while still retaining the guarantee of expanding the domain of existing research.

  10. Instrumentation for a next-generation x-ray all-sky monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peele, A. G.

    1999-12-01

    We have proposed an x-ray all-sky monitor for a small satellite mission that will be ten times more sensitive than past monitors and that opens up a new band of the soft x-ray spectrum (0.1-3.0 keV) for study. We discuss three approaches to the construction of the optics. The first method, well within the reach of existing technology, is to approximate the lobster-eye geometry by building crossed arrays of planar reflectors, this gives great control over the reflecting surface but is limited in terms of resolution at the baseline 4 arc minute level. The second method is to use microchannel plates; this technology has the potential to greatly exceed the baseline resolution and sensitivity but is yet to be fully demonstrated. The third method, while still in its infancy, may yet prove to be the most powerful; this approach relies on photolithography to expose a substrate that can then be developed and replicated. The scientific case for this mission is almost too broad to state here. The instrument we describe will allow investigation of the long term light curves of thousands of AGN, it will detect thousands of transients, including GRBs and type II supernova, and the stellar coronae of hundreds of the brightest x-ray stars can be monitored. In addition the classical objectives of all-sky monitors-long-term all-sky archive and watchdog alert to new events-will be fulfilled at an unprecedented level. We also note that by opening up a little-explored band of the x-ray sky the opportunity for new discovery is presented. A satisfying example of entering new territory while still retaining the guarantee of expanding the domain of existing research.

  11. All-Sky Observational Evidence for An Inverse Correlation Between Dust Temperature and Emissivity Spectral Index

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liang, Z.; Fixsen, D. J.; Gold, B.

    2012-01-01

    We show that a one-component variable-emissivity-spectral-index model (the free- model) provides more physically motivated estimates of dust temperature at the Galactic polar caps than one- or two-component fixed-emissivity-spectral-index models (fixed- models) for interstellar dust thermal emission at far-infrared and millimeter wavelengths. For the comparison we have fit all-sky one-component dust models with fixed or variable emissivity spectral index to a new and improved version of the 210-channel dust spectra from the COBE-FIRAS, the 100-240 micrometer maps from the COBE-DIRBE and the 94 GHz dust map from the WMAP. The best model, the free-alpha model, is well constrained by data at 60-3000 GHz over 86 per cent of the total sky area. It predicts dust temperature (T(sub dust)) to be 13.7-22.7 (plus or minus 1.3) K, the emissivity spectral index (alpha) to be 1.2-3.1 (plus or minus 0.3) and the optical depth (tau) to range 0.6-46 x 10(exp -5) with a 23 per cent uncertainty. Using these estimates, we present all-sky evidence for an inverse correlation between the emissivity spectral index and dust temperature, which fits the relation alpha = 1/(delta + omega (raised dot) T(sub dust) with delta = -.0.510 plus or minus 0.011 and omega = 0.059 plus or minus 0.001. This best model will be useful to cosmic microwave background experiments for removing foreground dust contamination and it can serve as an all-sky extended-frequency reference for future higher resolution dust models.

  12. Fully-coherent all-sky search for gravitational-waves from compact binary coalescences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macleod, D.; Harry, I. W.; Fairhurst, S.

    2016-03-01

    We introduce a fully coherent method for searching for gravitational wave signals generated by the merger of black hole and/or neutron star binaries. This extends the coherent analysis previously developed and used for targeted gravitational wave searches to an all-sky, all-time search. We apply the search to one month of data taken during the fifth science run of the LIGO detectors. We demonstrate an increase in sensitivity of 25% over the coincidence search, which is commensurate with expectations. Finally, we discuss prospects for implementing and running a coherent search for gravitational wave signals from binary coalescence in the advanced gravitational wave detector data.

  13. EXTENDED HOT HALOS AROUND ISOLATED GALAXIES OBSERVED IN THE ROSAT ALL-SKY SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Michael E.; Bregman, Joel N.; Dai, Xinyu E-mail: jbregman@umich.edu

    2013-01-10

    We place general constraints on the luminosity and mass of hot X-ray-emitting gas residing in extended 'hot halos' around nearby massive galaxies. We examine stacked images of 2165 galaxies from the 2MASS Isolated Galaxy Catalog as well as subsets of this sample based on galaxy morphology and K-band luminosity. We detect X-ray emission at high confidence (ranging up to nearly 10{sigma}) for each subsample of galaxies. The average L{sub X} within 50 kpc is 1.0 {+-} 0.1 (statistical) {+-}0.2 (systematic) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 40} erg s{sup -1}, although the early-type galaxies are more than twice as luminous as the late-type galaxies. Using a spatial analysis, we also find evidence for extended emission around five out of seven subsamples (the full sample, the luminous galaxies, early-type galaxies, luminous late-type galaxies, and luminous early-type galaxies) at 92.7%, 99.3%, 89.3%, 98.7%, and 92.1% confidence, respectively. Several additional lines of evidence also support this conclusion and suggest that about 1/2 of the total emission is extended, and about 1/3 of the extended emission comes from hot gas. For the sample of luminous galaxies, which has the strongest evidence for extended emission, the average hot gas mass is 4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 9} M {sub Sun} within 50 kpc and the implied accretion rate is 0.4 M {sub Sun} yr{sup -1}.

  14. Star formation rates in isolated galaxies selected from the Two-Micron All-Sky Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melnyk, O.; Karachentseva, V.; Karachentsev, I.

    2015-08-01

    We have considered the star formation properties of 1616 isolated galaxies from the 2MASS XSC (Extended Source Catalog) selected sample (2MIG) with the far-ultraviolet GALEX magnitudes. This sample was then compared with corresponding properties of isolated galaxies from the Local Orphan Galaxies (LOG) catalogue and paired galaxies. We found that different selection algorithms define different populations of isolated galaxies. The population of the LOG catalogue, selected from non-clustered galaxies in the Local Supercluster volume, mostly consists of low-mass spiral and late-type galaxies. The specific star formation rate (SSFR) upper limit in isolated and paired galaxies does not exceed the value of ˜dex(-9.4). This is probably common for galaxies of differing activity and environment (at least at z < 0.06). The fractions of quenched galaxies are nearly twice as high in the paired galaxy sample as in the 2MIG isolated galaxy sample. From the behaviour of (S)SFR versus M* relations we deduced that the characteristic value influencing evolutionary processes is the galaxy mass. However, the environmental influence is notable: paired massive galaxies with logM* > 11.5 have higher (S)SFR than isolated galaxies. Our results suggest that the environment helps to trigger the star formation in the highest mass galaxies. We found that the fraction of AGN in the paired sample is only a little higher than in our isolated galaxy sample. We assume that AGN phenomenon is probably defined by secular galaxy evolution.

  15. The Lunar Occultation Observer (LOCO) - A Nuclear Astrophysics All-Sky Survey Mission Concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, R. S.; Bonamente, M.; Burgess, J. M.; Harmon, B. A.; Jenke, P.; Lawrence, D. J.; O'Brien, S.; Orr, M. R.; Paciesas, W. S.; Young, C. A.

    2008-07-01

    The Lunar Occultation Observer (LOCO) is a new lunar-based concept to probe the nuclear astrophysics regime. It will be a pioneering mission in high-energy astrophysics: the first to employ occultation as the principle detection and imaging method.

  16. All-sky search for periodic gravitational waves in the full S5 LIGO data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abadie, J.; Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T. D.; Abernathy, M.; Accadia, T.; Acernese, F.; Adams, C.; Adhikari, R.; Affeldt, C.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; Allen, G. S.; Amador Ceron, E.; Amariutei, D.; Amin, R. S.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Arai, K.; Arain, M. A.; Araya, M. C.; Aston, S. M.; Astone, P.; Atkinson, D.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Aylott, B. E.; Babak, S.; Baker, P.; Ballardin, G.; Ballmer, S.; Barker, D.; Barone, F.; Barr, B.; Barriga, P.; Barsotti, L.; Barsuglia, M.; Barton, M. A.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Bastarrika, M.; Basti, A.; Batch, J.; Bauchrowitz, J.; Bauer, Th. S.; Bebronne, M.; Behnke, B.; Beker, M. G.; Bell, A. S.; Belletoile, A.; Belopolski, I.; Benacquista, M.; Berliner, J. M.; Bertolini, A.; Betzwieser, J.; Beveridge, N.; Beyersdorf, P. T.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Birch, J.; Biswas, R.; Bitossi, M.; Bizouard, M. A.; Black, E.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blackburn, L.; Blair, D.; Bland, B.; Blom, M.; Bock, O.; Bodiya, T. P.; Bogan, C.; Bondarescu, R.; Bondu, F.; Bonelli, L.; Bonnand, R.; Bork, R.; Born, M.; Boschi, V.; Bose, S.; Bosi, L.; Bouhou, B.; Braccini, S.; Bradaschia, C.; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Branchesi, M.; Brau, J. E.; Breyer, J.; Briant, T.; Bridges, D. O.; Brillet, A.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Britzger, M.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, D. A.; Brummit, A.; Bulik, T.; Bulten, H. J.; Buonanno, A.; Burguet–Castell, J.; Burmeister, O.; Buskulic, D.; Buy, C.; Byer, R. L.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Calloni, E.; Camp, J. B.; Campsie, P.; Cannizzo, J.; Cannon, K.; Canuel, B.; Cao, J.; Capano, C. D.; Carbognani, F.; Caride, S.; Caudill, S.; Cavaglià, M.; Cavalier, F.; Cavalieri, R.; Cella, G.; Cepeda, C.; Cesarini, E.; Chaibi, O.; Chalermsongsak, T.; Chalkley, E.; Charlton, P.; Chassande-Mottin, E.; Chelkowski, S.; Chen, Y.; Chincarini, A.; Chiummo, A.; Cho, H.; Christensen, N.; Chua, S. S. Y.; Chung, C. T. Y.; Chung, S.; Ciani, G.; Clara, F.; Clark, D. E.; Clark, J.; Clayton, J. H.; Cleva, F.; Coccia, E.; Cohadon, P.-F.; Colacino, C. N.; Colas, J.; Colla, A.; Colombini, M.; Conte, A.; Conte, R.; Cook, D.; Corbitt, T. R.; Cordier, M.; Cornish, N.; Corsi, A.; Costa, C. A.; Coughlin, M.; Coulon, J.-P.; Couvares, P.; Coward, D. M.; Coyne, D. C.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Creighton, T. D.; Cruise, A. M.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, L.; Cuoco, E.; Cutler, R. M.; Dahl, K.; Danilishin, S. L.; Dannenberg, R.; D'Antonio, S.; Danzmann, K.; Dattilo, V.; Daudert, B.; Daveloza, H.; Davier, M.; Davies, G.; Daw, E. J.; Day, R.; Dayanga, T.; de Rosa, R.; Debra, D.; Debreczeni, G.; Degallaix, J.; Del Pozzo, W.; Del Prete, M.; Dent, T.; Dergachev, V.; Derosa, R.; Desalvo, R.; Dhurandhar, S.; di Fiore, L.; Diguglielmo, J.; di Lieto, A.; di Palma, I.; di Paolo Emilio, M.; di Virgilio, A.; Díaz, M.; Dietz, A.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Dorsher, S.; Drago, M.; Drever, R. W. P.; Driggers, J. C.; Du, Z.; Dumas, J.-C.; Dwyer, S.; Eberle, T.; Edgar, M.; Edwards, M.; Effler, A.; Ehrens, P.; Endrőczi, G.; Engel, R.; Etzel, T.; Evans, K.; Evans, M.; Evans, T.; Factourovich, M.; Fafone, V.; Fairhurst, S.; Fan, Y.; Farr, B. F.; Farr, W.; Fazi, D.; Fehrmann, H.; Feldbaum, D.; Ferrante, I.; Fidecaro, F.; Finn, L. S.; Fiori, I.; Fisher, R. P.; Flaminio, R.; Flanigan, M.; Foley, S.; Forsi, E.; Forte, L. A.; Fotopoulos, N.; Fournier, J.-D.; Franc, J.; Frasca, S.; Frasconi, F.; Frede, M.; Frei, M.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Fricke, T. T.; Friedrich, D.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fulda, P. J.; Fyffe, M.; Galimberti, M.; Gammaitoni, L.; Ganija, M. R.; Garcia, J.; Garofoli, J. A.; Garufi, F.; Gáspár, M. E.; Gemme, G.; Geng, R.; Genin, E.; Gennai, A.; Gergely, L. Á.; Ghosh, S.; Giaime, J. A.; Giampanis, S.; Giardina, K. D.; Giazotto, A.; Gill, C.; Goetz, E.; Goggin, L. M.; González, G.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Goßler, S.; Gouaty, R.; Graef, C.; Granata, M.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.; Gray, N.; Greenhalgh, R. J. S.; Gretarsson, A. M.; Greverie, C.; Grosso, R.; Grote, H.; Grunewald, S.; Guidi, G. M.; Guido, C.; Gupta, R.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Ha, T.; Hage, B.; Hallam, J. M.; Hammer, D.; Hammond, G.; Hanks, J.; Hanna, C.; Hanson, J.; Harms, J.; Harry, G. M.; Harry, I. W.; Harstad, E. D.; Hartman, M. T.; Haughian, K.; Hayama, K.; Hayau, J.-F.; Hayler, T.; Heefner, J.; Heidmann, A.; Heintze, M. C.; Heitmann, H.; Hello, P.; Hendry, M. A.; Heng, I. S.; Heptonstall, A. W.; Herrera, V.; Hewitson, M.; Hild, S.; Hoak, D.; Hodge, K. A.; Holt, K.; Hong, T.; Hooper, S.; Hosken, D. J.; Hough, J.; Howell, E. J.; Hughey, B.; Husa, S.; Huttner, S. H.; Huynh-Dinh, T.; Ingram, D. R.; Inta, R.; Isogai, T.; Ivanov, A.; Izumi, K.; Jacobson, M.; Jang, H.; Jaranowski, P.; Johnson, W. W.; Jones, D. I.; Jones, G.; Jones, R.; Ju, L.; Kalmus, P.; Kalogera, V.; Kamaretsos, I.; Kandhasamy, S.; Kang, G.; Kanner, J. B.; Katsavounidis, E.; Katzman, W.; Kaufer, H.; Kawabe, K.; Kawamura, S.; Kawazoe, F.; Kells, W.; Keppel, D. G.; Keresztes, Z.; Khalaidovski, A.; Khalili, F. Y.; Khazanov, E. A.; Kim, B.; Kim, C.; Kim, D.; Kim, H.; Kim, K.; Kim, N.; Kim, Y.-M.; King, P. J.; Kinsey, M.; Kinzel, D. L.; Kissel, J. S.; Klimenko, S.; Kokeyama, K.; Kondrashov, V.; Kopparapu, R.; Koranda, S.; Korth, W. Z.; Kowalska, I.; Kozak, D.; Kringel, V.; Krishnamurthy, S.; Krishnan, B.; Królak, A.; Kuehn, G.; Kumar, R.; Kwee, P.; Lam, P. K.; Landry, M.; Lang, M.; Lantz, B.; Lastzka, N.; Lawrie, C.; Lazzarini, A.; Leaci, P.; Lee, C. H.; Lee, H. M.; Leindecker, N.; Leong, J. R.; Leonor, I.; Leroy, N.; Letendre, N.; Li, J.; Li, T. G. F.; Liguori, N.; Lindquist, P. E.; Lockerbie, N. A.; Lodhia, D.; Lorenzini, M.; Loriette, V.; Lormand, M.; Losurdo, G.; Luan, J.; Lubinski, M.; Lück, H.; Lundgren, A. P.; MacDonald, E.; Machenschalk, B.; Macinnis, M.; MacLeod, D. M.; Mageswaran, M.; Mailand, K.; Majorana, E.; Maksimovic, I.; Man, N.; Mandel, I.; Mandic, V.; Mantovani, M.; Marandi, A.; Marchesoni, F.; Marion, F.; Márka, S.; Márka, Z.; Markosyan, A.; Maros, E.; Marque, J.; Martelli, F.; Martin, I. W.; Martin, R. M.; Marx, J. N.; Mason, K.; Masserot, A.; Matichard, F.; Matone, L.; Matzner, R. A.; Mavalvala, N.; Mazzolo, G.; McCarthy, R.; McClelland, D. E.; McGuire, S. C.; McIntyre, G.; McIver, J.; McKechan, D. J. A.; Meadors, G. D.; Mehmet, M.; Meier, T.; Melatos, A.; Melissinos, A. C.; Mendell, G.; Menendez, D.; Mercer, R. A.; Meshkov, S.; Messenger, C.; Meyer, M. S.; Miao, H.; Michel, C.; Milano, L.; Miller, J.; Minenkov, Y.; Mitrofanov, V. P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Mittleman, R.; Miyakawa, O.; Moe, B.; Moesta, P.; Mohan, M.; Mohanty, S. D.; Mohapatra, S. R. P.; Moraru, D.; Moreno, G.; Morgado, N.; Morgia, A.; Mori, T.; Mosca, S.; Mossavi, K.; Mours, B.; Mow-Lowry, C. M.; Mueller, C. L.; Mueller, G.; Mukherjee, S.; Mullavey, A.; Müller-Ebhardt, H.; Munch, J.; Murphy, D.; Murray, P. G.; Mytidis, A.; Nash, T.; Naticchioni, L.; Nawrodt, R.; Necula, V.; Nelson, J.; Newton, G.; Nishizawa, A.; Nocera, F.; Nolting, D.; Nuttall, L.; Ochsner, E.; O'Dell, J.; Oelker, E.; Ogin, G. H.; Oh, J. J.; Oh, S. H.; Oldenburg, R. G.; O'Reilly, B.; O'Shaughnessy, R.; Osthelder, C.; Ott, C. D.; Ottaway, D. J.; Ottens, R. S.; Overmier, H.; Owen, B. J.; Page, A.; Pagliaroli, G.; Palladino, L.; Palomba, C.; Pan, Y.; Pankow, C.; Paoletti, F.; Papa, M. A.; Parisi, M.; Pasqualetti, A.; Passaquieti, R.; Passuello, D.; Patel, P.; Pedraza, M.; Peiris, P.; Pekowsky, L.; Penn, S.; Peralta, C.; Perreca, A.; Persichetti, G.; Phelps, M.; Pickenpack, M.; Piergiovanni, F.; Pietka, M.; Pinard, L.; Pinto, I. M.; Pitkin, M.; Pletsch, H. J.; Plissi, M. V.; Poggiani, R.; Pöld, J.; Postiglione, F.; Prato, M.; Predoi, V.; Price, L. R.; Prijatelj, M.; Principe, M.; Privitera, S.; Prix, R.; Prodi, G. A.; Prokhorov, L.; Puncken, O.; Punturo, M.; Puppo, P.; Quetschke, V.; Raab, F. J.; Rabeling, D. S.; Rácz, I.; Radkins, H.; Raffai, P.; Rakhmanov, M.; Ramet, C. R.; Rankins, B.; Rapagnani, P.; Raymond, V.; Re, V.; Redwine, K.; Reed, C. M.; Reed, T.; Regimbau, T.; Reid, S.; Reitze, D. H.; Ricci, F.; Riesen, R.; Riles, K.; Robertson, N. A.; Robinet, F.; Robinson, C.; Robinson, E. L.; Rocchi, A.; Roddy, S.; Rodriguez, C.; Rodruck, M.; Rolland, L.; Rollins, J.; Romano, J. D.; Romano, R.; Romie, J. H.; Rosińska, D.; Röver, C.; Rowan, S.; Rüdiger, A.; Ruggi, P.; Ryan, K.; Ryll, H.; Sainathan, P.; Sakosky, M.; Salemi, F.; Samblowski, A.; Sammut, L.; Sancho de La Jordana, L.; Sandberg, V.; Sankar, S.; Sannibale, V.; Santamaría, L.; Santiago-Prieto, I.; Santostasi, G.; Sassolas, B.; Sathyaprakash, B. S.; Sato, S.; Saulson, P. R.; Savage, R. L.; Schilling, R.; Schlamminger, S.; Schnabel, R.; Schofield, R. M. S.; Schulz, B.; Schutz, B. F.; Schwinberg, P.; Scott, J.; Scott, S. M.; Searle, A. C.; Seifert, F.; Sellers, D.; Sengupta, A. S.; Sentenac, D.; Sergeev, A.; Shaddock, D. A.; Shaltev, M.; Shapiro, B.; Shawhan, P.; Shoemaker, D. H.; Sibley, A.; Siemens, X.; Sigg, D.; Singer, A.; Singer, L.; Sintes, A. M.; Skelton, G.; Slagmolen, B. J. J.; Slutsky, J.; Smith, J. R.; Smith, M. R.; Smith, N. D.; Smith, R. J. E.; Somiya, K.; Sorazu, B.; Soto, J.; Speirits, F. C.; Sperandio, L.; Stefszky, M.; Stein, A. J.; Steinert, E.; Steinlechner, J.; Steinlechner, S.; Steplewski, S.; Stochino, A.; Stone, R.; Strain, K. A.; Strigin, S.; Stroeer, A. S.; Sturani, R.; Stuver, A. L.; Summerscales, T. Z.; Sung, M.; Susmithan, S.; Sutton, P. J.; Swinkels, B.; Tacca, M.; Taffarello, L.; Talukder, D.; Tanner, D. B.; Tarabrin, S. P.; Taylor, J. R.; Taylor, R.; Thomas, P.; Thorne, K. A.; Thorne, K. S.; Thrane, E.; Thüring, A.; Titsler, C.; Tokmakov, K. V.; Toncelli, A.; Tonelli, M.; Torre, O.; Torres, C.; Torrie, C. I.; Tournefier, E.; Travasso, F.; Traylor, G.; Trias, M.; Tseng, K.; Ugolini, D.; Urbanek, K.; Vahlbruch, H.; Vajente, G.; Vallisneri, M.; van den Brand, J. F. J.; van den Broeck, C.; van der Putten, S.; van Veggel, A. A.; Vass, S.; Vasuth, M.; Vaulin, R.; Vavoulidis, M.; Vecchio, A.; Vedovato, G.; Veitch, J.; Veitch, P. J.; Veltkamp, C.; Verkindt, D.; Vetrano, F.; Viceré, A.; Villar, A. E.; Vinet, J.-Y.; Vitale, S.; Vitale, S.; Vocca, H.; Vorvick, C.; Vyatchanin, S. P.; Wade, A.; Waldman, S. J.; Wallace, L.; Wan, Y.; Wang, X.; Wang, Z.; Wanner, A.; Ward, R. L.; Was, M.; Wei, P.; Weinert, M.; Weinstein, A. J.; Weiss, R.; Wen, L.; Wen, S.; Wessels, P.; West, M.; Westphal, T.; Wette, K.; Whelan, J. T.; Whitcomb, S. E.; White, D.; Whiting, B. F.; Wilkinson, C.; Willems, P. A.; Williams, H. R.; Williams, L.; Willke, B.; Winkelmann, L.; Winkler, W.; Wipf, C. C.; Wiseman, A. G.; Wittel, H.; Woan, G.; Wooley, R.; Worden, J.; Yablon, J.; Yakushin, I.; Yamamoto, H.; Yamamoto, K.; Yang, H.; Yeaton-Massey, D.; Yoshida, S.; Yu, P.; Yvert, M.; Zadroźny, A.; Zanolin, M.; Zendri, J.-P.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, W.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, C.; Zotov, N.; Zucker, M. E.; Zweizig, J.

    2012-01-01

    We report on an all-sky search for periodic gravitational waves in the frequency band 50-800 Hz and with the frequency time derivative in the range of 0 through -6×10-9Hz/s. Such a signal could be produced by a nearby spinning and slightly nonaxisymmetric isolated neutron star in our Galaxy. After recent improvements in the search program that yielded a 10× increase in computational efficiency, we have searched in two years of data collected during LIGO’s fifth science run and have obtained the most sensitive all-sky upper limits on gravitational-wave strain to date. Near 150 Hz our upper limit on worst-case linearly polarized strain amplitude h0 is 1×10-24, while at the high end of our frequency range we achieve a worst-case upper limit of 3.8×10-24 for all polarizations and sky locations. These results constitute a factor of 2 improvement upon previously published data. A new detection pipeline utilizing a loosely coherent algorithm was able to follow up weaker outliers, increasing the volume of space where signals can be detected by a factor of 10, but has not revealed any gravitational-wave signals. The pipeline has been tested for robustness with respect to deviations from the model of an isolated neutron star, such as caused by a low-mass or long-period binary companion.

  17. Parameter-space metric for all-sky semicoherent searches for gravitational-wave pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wette, Karl

    2015-10-01

    The sensitivity of all-sky searches for gravitational-wave pulsars is primarily limited by the finite availability of computing resources. Semicoherent searches are a widely used method of maximizing sensitivity to gravitational-wave pulsars at fixed computing cost: the data from a gravitational-wave detector are partitioned into a number of segments, each segment is coherently analyzed, and the analysis results from each segment are summed together. The generation of template banks for the coherent analysis of each segment, and for the summation, requires knowledge of the metrics associated with the coherent and semicoherent parameter spaces respectively. We present a useful approximation to the semicoherent parameter-space metric, analogous to that presented in Wette and Prix [Phys. Rev. D 88, 123005 (2013)] for the coherent metric. The new semicoherent metric is compared to previous work in Pletsch [Phys. Rev. D 82, 042002 (2010)], and Brady and Creighton [Phys. Rev. D 61, 082001 (2000)]. We find that semicoherent all-sky searches require orders of magnitude more templates than previously predicted.

  18. Apache Point Observatory's All-Sky Camera: Observing Clouds in the Thermal Infrared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, K. S. J.; Brinkmann, J.; Carr, M.; Woods, D.; Finkbeiner, D. P.; Gunn, J. E.; Loomis, C. L.; Schlegel, D.; Snedden, S.

    2002-12-01

    Cloud cover at Apache Point Observatory is monitored by an all-sky camera system which images clouds in the thermal infrared. Even thin clouds, illuminated by thermal emission from the ground, can be detected. These same clouds are almost invisible at visual wavelengths, especially on moonless nights at this dark-sky observatory site. Our camera system uses an aluminum hyperboloidal mirror to provide a wide-angle view covering most of the sky; it is sensitive to radiation in the 8 to 12 micron wavelength interval. A cloud free atmosphere is fairly transparent in this window; clouds appear as bright structures against the darker sky background. Images are recorded at video rates, then summed and averaged in software to increase system sensitivity. Current all-sky images are available to on-site observers or through the Apache Point Observatory web pages. Cloud information is used to plan observing, make real-time observing decisions, and can provide useful estimates of atmospheric extinction and sky brightness at other wavelengths.

  19. Flat parameter-space metric for all-sky searches for gravitational-wave pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wette, Karl; Prix, Reinhard

    2013-12-01

    All-sky, broadband, coherent searches for gravitational-wave pulsars are computationally limited. It is therefore important to make efficient use of available computational resources, notably by minimizing the number of templates used to cover the signal parameter space of sky position and frequency evolution. For searches over the sky, however, the required template density (determined by the parameter-space metric) is different at each sky position, which makes it difficult in practice to achieve an efficient covering. Previous work on this problem has found various choices of sky and frequency coordinates that render the parameter-space metric approximately constant but that are limited to coherent integration times of either less than a few days or greater than several months. These limitations restrict the sensitivity achievable by hierarchical all-sky searches and hinder the development of follow-up pipelines for interesting gravitational-wave pulsar candidates. We present a new flat parameter-space metric approximation and associated sky and frequency coordinates, which do not suffer from these limitations. Furthermore, the new metric is numerically well conditioned, which facilitates its practical use.

  20. Lattice template placement for coherent all-sky searches for gravitational-wave pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wette, Karl

    2014-12-01

    All-sky, broadband, coherent searches for gravitational-wave pulsars are restricted by limited computational resources. Minimizing the number of templates required to cover the search parameter space, of sky position and frequency evolution, is one important way to reduce the computational cost of a search. We demonstrate a practical algorithm which, for the first time, achieves template placement with a minimal number of templates for an all-sky search, using the reduced supersky parameter-space metric of Wette and Prix [Phys. Rev. D 88, 123005 (2013)]. The metric prescribes a constant template density in the signal parameters, which permits that templates be placed at the vertices of a lattice. We demonstrate how to ensure complete coverage of the parameter space, including in particular at its boundaries. The number of templates generated by the algorithm is compared to theoretical estimates and to previous predictions by Brady et al. [Phys. Rev. D 57, 2101 (1998)]. The algorithm may be applied to any search parameter space with a constant template density, which includes semicoherent searches and searches targeting known low-mass x-ray binaries.

  1. All-Sky Search for Periodic Gravitational Waves in the Full S5 LIGO Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abadie, J.; Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T. D.; Abernathy, M.; Accadia, T.; Acernese, F.; Adams, C.; Adhikari, R.; Affeldt, C.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; Allen, G. S.; Amador Ceron, E.; Amariutei, D.; Amin, R. S.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Arai, K.; Arain, M. S.; Araya, M. C.; Aston, S. M.; Blackburn, L.; Camp, J. B.; Cannizzo, J.

    2011-01-01

    We report on an all-sky search for periodic gravitational waves in the frequency band 50-800 Hz and with the frequency time derivative in the range of 0 through -6 x 10(exp -9) Hz/s. Such a signal could be produced by a nearby spinning and slightly non-axisymmetric isolated neutron star in our galaxy. After recent improvements in the search program that yielded a 10x increase in computational efficiency, we have searched in two years of data. collected during LIGO's fifth science run and have obtained the most sensitive all-sky upper limits on gravitational wave strain to date. Near 150 Hz our upper limit on worst-case linearly polarized strain amplitude h(sub 0) is 1 x 10(exp -24), while at the high end of our frequency ra.nge we achieve a worst-case upper limit of 3.8 x 10(exp -24) for all polarizations and sky locations. These results constitute a factor of two improvement upop. previously published data. A new detection pipeline utilizing a Loosely Coherent algorithm was able to follow up weaker outliers, increasing the volume of space where signals can be detected by a factor of 10, but has not revealed any gravitational wave signals. The pipeline has been tested for robustness with respect to deviations from the model of an isolated neutron star, such as caused by a low-mass or long.period binary companion.

  2. Equatorial All Sky Imager Images from the Seychelles during the March 17th, 2015 geomagnetic storm.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curtis, B.

    2015-12-01

    An all sky imager was installed in the Seychelles earlier this year. The Seychelles islands are located northeast of Madagascar and east of Somalia in the equatorial Indian Ocean. The all sky imager is located on the island of Mahe (4.6667°S, 55.4667°E geographic), (10.55°S, 127.07°E geomagnetic), with filters of 557.7, 620.0, 630.0, 765.0 and 777.4 nm. Images with a 90 second exposure from Seychelles in 777.4nm and 630.0nm from the night before and night of the March 17th geomagnetic storm are discussed in comparison to solar wind measurements at ACE and the disturbance storm time (Dst) index. These images show line-of-sight intensities of photons received dependent on each filters wavelength. A time series of these images sometimes will show the movement of relatively dark areas, or depletions, in each emission. The depletion regions are known to cause scintillation in GPS signals. The direction and speed of movement of these depletions are related to changes observed in the solar wind.

  3. Comprehensive all-sky search for periodic gravitational waves in the sixth science run LIGO data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T. D.; Abernathy, M. R.; Acernese, F.; Ackley, K.; Adams, C.; Adams, T.; Addesso, P.; Adhikari, R. X.; Adya, V. B.; Affeldt, C.; Agathos, M.; Agatsuma, K.; Aggarwal, N.; Aguiar, O. D.; Aiello, L.; Ain, A.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; Allocca, A.; Altin, P. A.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Arai, K.; Araya, M. C.; Arceneaux, C. C.; Areeda, J. S.; Arnaud, N.; Arun, K. G.; Ascenzi, S.; Ashton, G.; Ast, M.; Aston, S. M.; Astone, P.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Babak, S.; Bacon, P.; Bader, M. K. M.; Baker, P. T.; Baldaccini, F.; Ballardin, G.; Ballmer, S. W.; Barayoga, J. C.; Barclay, S. E.; Barish, B. C.; Barker, D.; Barone, F.; Barr, B.; Barsotti, L.; Barsuglia, M.; Barta, D.; Bartlett, J.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Basti, A.; Batch, J. C.; Baune, C.; Bavigadda, V.; Bazzan, M.; Bejger, M.; Bell, A. S.; Berger, B. K.; Bergmann, G.; Berry, C. P. L.; Bersanetti, D.; Bertolini, A.; Betzwieser, J.; Bhagwat, S.; Bhandare, R.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Birch, J.; Birney, R.; Biscans, S.; Bisht, A.; Bitossi, M.; Biwer, C.; Bizouard, M. A.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blair, C. D.; Blair, D. G.; Blair, R. M.; Bloemen, S.; Bock, O.; Boer, M.; Bogaert, G.; Bogan, C.; Bohe, A.; Bond, C.; Bondu, F.; Bonnand, R.; Boom, B. A.; Bork, R.; Boschi, V.; Bose, S.; Bouffanais, Y.; Bozzi, A.; Bradaschia, C.; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Branchesi, M.; Brau, J. E.; Briant, T.; Brillet, A.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Brockill, P.; Broida, J. E.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, D. A.; Brown, D. D.; Brown, N. M.; Brunett, S.; Buchanan, C. C.; Buikema, A.; Bulik, T.; Bulten, H. J.; Buonanno, A.; Buskulic, D.; Buy, C.; Byer, R. L.; Cabero, M.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Cahillane, C.; Calderón Bustillo, J.; Callister, T.; Calloni, E.; Camp, J. B.; Cannon, K. C.; Cao, J.; Capano, C. D.; Capocasa, E.; Carbognani, F.; Caride, S.; Casanueva Diaz, J.; Casentini, C.; Caudill, S.; Cavaglià, M.; Cavalier, F.; Cavalieri, R.; Cella, G.; Cepeda, C. B.; Cerboni Baiardi, L.; Cerretani, G.; Cesarini, E.; Chan, M.; Chao, S.; Charlton, P.; Chassande-Mottin, E.; Cheeseboro, B. D.; Chen, H. Y.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, C.; Chincarini, A.; Chiummo, A.; Cho, H. S.; Cho, M.; Chow, J. H.; Christensen, N.; Chu, Q.; Chua, S.; Chung, S.; Ciani, G.; Clara, F.; Clark, J. A.; Cleva, F.; Coccia, E.; Cohadon, P.-F.; Colla, A.; Collette, C. G.; Cominsky, L.; Constancio, M.; Conte, A.; Conti, L.; Cook, D.; Corbitt, T. R.; Cornish, N.; Corsi, A.; Cortese, S.; Costa, C. A.; Coughlin, M. W.; Coughlin, S. B.; Coulon, J.-P.; Countryman, S. T.; Couvares, P.; Cowan, E. E.; Coward, D. M.; Cowart, M. J.; Coyne, D. C.; Coyne, R.; Craig, K.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Creighton, T.; Cripe, J.; Crowder, S. G.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, L.; Cuoco, E.; Dal Canton, T.; Danilishin, S. L.; D'Antonio, S.; Danzmann, K.; Darman, N. S.; Dasgupta, A.; Da Silva Costa, C. F.; Dattilo, V.; Dave, I.; Davier, M.; Davies, G. S.; Daw, E. J.; Day, R.; De, S.; DeBra, D.; Debreczeni, G.; Degallaix, J.; De Laurentis, M.; Deléglise, S.; Del Pozzo, W.; Denker, T.; Dent, T.; Dergachev, V.; De Rosa, R.; DeRosa, R. T.; DeSalvo, R.; Devine, R. C.; Dhurandhar, S.; Díaz, M. C.; Di Fiore, L.; Di Giovanni, M.; Di Girolamo, T.; Di Lieto, A.; Di Pace, S.; Di Palma, I.; Di Virgilio, A.; Dolique, V.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Doravari, S.; Douglas, R.; Downes, T. P.; Drago, M.; Drever, R. W. P.; Driggers, J. C.; Ducrot, M.; Dwyer, S. E.; Edo, T. B.; Edwards, M. C.; Effler, A.; Eggenstein, H.-B.; Ehrens, P.; Eichholz, J.; Eikenberry, S. S.; Engels, W.; Essick, R. C.; Etzel, T.; Evans, M.; Evans, T. M.; Everett, R.; Factourovich, M.; Fafone, V.; Fair, H.; Fairhurst, S.; Fan, X.; Fang, Q.; Farinon, S.; Farr, B.; Farr, W. M.; Favata, M.; Fays, M.; Fehrmann, H.; Fejer, M. M.; Fenyvesi, E.; Ferrante, I.; Ferreira, E. C.; Ferrini, F.; Fidecaro, F.; Fiori, I.; Fiorucci, D.; Fisher, R. P.; Flaminio, R.; Fletcher, M.; Fournier, J.-D.; Frasca, S.; Frasconi, F.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Frey, V.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fulda, P.; Fyffe, M.; Gabbard, H. A. G.; Gair, J. R.; Gammaitoni, L.; Gaonkar, S. G.; Garufi, F.; Gaur, G.; Gehrels, N.; Gemme, G.; Geng, P.; Genin, E.; Gennai, A.; George, J.; Gergely, L.; Germain, V.; Ghosh, Abhirup; Ghosh, Archisman; Ghosh, S.; Giaime, J. A.; Giardina, K. D.; Giazotto, A.; Gill, K.; Glaefke, A.; Goetz, E.; Goetz, R.; Gondan, L.; González, G.; Gonzalez Castro, J. M.; Gopakumar, A.; Gordon, N. A.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Gossan, S. E.; Gosselin, M.; Gouaty, R.; Grado, A.; Graef, C.; Graff, P. B.; Granata, M.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.; Greco, G.; Green, A. C.; Groot, P.; Grote, H.; Grunewald, S.; Guidi, G. M.; Guo, X.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, M. K.; Gushwa, K. E.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Hacker, J. J.; Hall, B. R.; Hall, E. D.; Hammond, G.; Haney, M.; Hanke, M. M.; Hanks, J.; Hanna, C.; Hannam, M. D.; Hanson, J.; Hardwick, T.; Harms, J.; Harry, G. M.; Harry, I. W.; Hart, M. J.; Hartman, M. T.; Haster, C.-J.; Haughian, K.; Heidmann, A.; Heintze, M. C.; Heitmann, H.; Hello, P.; Hemming, G.; Hendry, M.; Heng, I. S.; Hennig, J.; Henry, J.; Heptonstall, A. W.; Heurs, M.; Hild, S.; Hoak, D.; Hofman, D.; Holt, K.; Holz, D. E.; Hopkins, P.; Hough, J.; Houston, E. A.; Howell, E. J.; Hu, Y. M.; Huang, S.; Huerta, E. A.; Huet, D.; Hughey, B.; Husa, S.; Huttner, S. H.; Huynh-Dinh, T.; Indik, N.; Ingram, D. R.; Inta, R.; Isa, H. N.; Isac, J.-M.; Isi, M.; Isogai, T.; Iyer, B. R.; Izumi, K.; Jacqmin, T.; Jang, H.; Jani, K.; Jaranowski, P.; Jawahar, S.; Jian, L.; Jiménez-Forteza, F.; Johnson, W. W.; Jones, D. I.; Jones, R.; Jonker, R. J. G.; Ju, L.; Haris, K.; Kalaghatgi, C. V.; Kalogera, V.; Kandhasamy, S.; Kang, G.; Kanner, J. B.; Kapadia, S. J.; Karki, S.; Karvinen, K. S.; Kasprzack, M.; Katsavounidis, E.; Katzman, W.; Kaufer, S.; Kaur, T.; Kawabe, K.; Kéfélian, F.; Kehl, M. S.; Keitel, D.; Kelley, D. B.; Kells, W.; Kennedy, R.; Key, J. S.; Khalili, F. Y.; Khan, I.; Khan, S.; Khan, Z.; Khazanov, E. A.; Kijbunchoo, N.; Kim, Chi-Woong; Kim, Chunglee; Kim, J.; Kim, K.; Kim, N.; Kim, W.; Kim, Y.-M.; Kimbrell, S. J.; King, E. J.; King, P. J.; Kissel, J. S.; Klein, B.; Kleybolte, L.; Klimenko, S.; Koehlenbeck, S. M.; Koley, S.; Kondrashov, V.; Kontos, A.; Korobko, M.; Korth, W. Z.; Kowalska, I.; Kozak, D. B.; Kringel, V.; Krishnan, B.; Królak, A.; Krueger, C.; Kuehn, G.; Kumar, P.; Kumar, R.; Kuo, L.; Kutynia, A.; Lackey, B. D.; Landry, M.; Lange, J.; Lantz, B.; Lasky, P. D.; Laxen, M.; Lazzarini, A.; Lazzaro, C.; Leaci, P.; Leavey, S.; Lebigot, E. O.; Lee, C. H.; Lee, H. K.; Lee, H. M.; Lee, K.; Lenon, A.; Leonardi, M.; Leong, J. R.; Leroy, N.; Letendre, N.; Levin, Y.; Lewis, J. B.; Li, T. G. F.; Libson, A.; Littenberg, T. B.; Lockerbie, N. A.; Lombardi, A. L.; London, L. T.; Lord, J. E.; Lorenzini, M.; Loriette, V.; Lormand, M.; Losurdo, G.; Lough, J. D.; Lück, H.; Lundgren, A. P.; Lynch, R.; Ma, Y.; Machenschalk, B.; MacInnis, M.; Macleod, D. M.; Magaña-Sandoval, F.; Magaña Zertuche, L.; Magee, R. M.; Majorana, E.; Maksimovic, I.; Malvezzi, V.; Man, N.; Mandel, I.; Mandic, V.; Mangano, V.; Mansell, G. L.; Manske, M.; Mantovani, M.; Marchesoni, F.; Marion, F.; Márka, S.; Márka, Z.; Markosyan, A. S.; Maros, E.; Martelli, F.; Martellini, L.; Martin, I. W.; Martynov, D. V.; Marx, J. N.; Mason, K.; Masserot, A.; Massinger, T. J.; Masso-Reid, M.; Mastrogiovanni, S.; Matichard, F.; Matone, L.; Mavalvala, N.; Mazumder, N.; McCarthy, R.; McClelland, D. E.; McCormick, S.; McGuire, S. C.; McIntyre, G.; McIver, J.; McManus, D. J.; McRae, T.; McWilliams, S. T.; Meacher, D.; Meadors, G. D.; Meidam, J.; Melatos, A.; Mendell, G.; Mercer, R. A.; Merilh, E. L.; Merzougui, M.; Meshkov, S.; Messenger, C.; Messick, C.; Metzdorff, R.; Meyers, P. M.; Mezzani, F.; Miao, H.; Michel, C.; Middleton, H.; Mikhailov, E. E.; Milano, L.; Miller, A. L.; Miller, A.; Miller, B. B.; Miller, J.; Millhouse, M.; Minenkov, Y.; Ming, J.; Mirshekari, S.; Mishra, C.; Mitra, S.; Mitrofanov, V. P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Mittleman, R.; Moggi, A.; Mohan, M.; Mohapatra, S. R. P.; Montani, M.; Moore, B. C.; Moore, C. J.; Moraru, D.; Moreno, G.; Morriss, S. R.; Mossavi, K.; Mours, B.; Mow-Lowry, C. M.; Mueller, G.; Muir, A. W.; Mukherjee, Arunava; Mukherjee, D.; Mukherjee, S.; Mukund, N.; Mullavey, A.; Munch, J.; Murphy, D. J.; Murray, P. G.; Mytidis, A.; Nardecchia, I.; Naticchioni, L.; Nayak, R. K.; Nedkova, K.; Nelemans, G.; Nelson, T. J. N.; Neri, M.; Neunzert, A.; Newton, G.; Nguyen, T. T.; Nielsen, A. B.; Nissanke, S.; Nitz, A.; Nocera, F.; Nolting, D.; Normandin, M. E. N.; Nuttall, L. K.; Oberling, J.; Ochsner, E.; O'Dell, J.; Oelker, E.; Ogin, G. H.; Oh, J. J.; Oh, S. H.; Ohme, F.; Oliver, M.; Oppermann, P.; Oram, Richard J.; O'Reilly, B.; O'Shaughnessy, R.; Ottaway, D. J.; Overmier, H.; Owen, B. J.; Pai, A.; Pai, S. A.; Palamos, J. R.; Palashov, O.; Palomba, C.; Pal-Singh, A.; Pan, H.; Pankow, C.; Pannarale, F.; Pant, B. C.; Paoletti, F.; Paoli, A.; Papa, M. A.; Paris, H. R.; Parker, W.; Pascucci, D.; Pasqualetti, A.; Passaquieti, R.; Passuello, D.; Patricelli, B.; Patrick, Z.; Pearlstone, B. L.; Pedraza, M.; Pedurand, R.; Pekowsky, L.; Pele, A.; Penn, S.; Perreca, A.; Perri, L. M.; Phelps, M.; Piccinni, O. J.; Pichot, M.; Piergiovanni, F.; Pierro, V.; Pillant, G.; Pinard, L.; Pinto, I. M.; Pitkin, M.; Poe, M.; Poggiani, R.; Popolizio, P.; Post, A.; Powell, J.; Prasad, J.; Predoi, V.; Prestegard, T.; Price, L. R.; Prijatelj, M.; Principe, M.; Privitera, S.; Prix, R.; Prodi, G. A.; Prokhorov, L.; Puncken, O.; Punturo, M.; Puppo, P.; Pürrer, M.; Qi, H.; Qin, J.; Qiu, S.; Quetschke, V.; Quintero, E. A.; Quitzow-James, R.; Raab, F. J.; Rabeling, D. S.; Radkins, H.; Raffai, P.; Raja, S.; Rajan, C.; Rakhmanov, M.; Rapagnani, P.; Raymond, V.; Razzano, M.; Re, V.; Read, J.; Reed, C. M.; Regimbau, T.; Rei, L.; Reid, S.; Reitze, D. H.; Rew, H.; Reyes, S. D.; Ricci, F.; Riles, K.; Rizzo, M.; Robertson, N. A.; Robie, R.; Robinet, F.; Rocchi, A.; Rolland, L.; Rollins, J. G.; Roma, V. J.; Romano, J. D.; Romano, R.; Romanov, G.; Romie, J. H.; Rosińska, D.; Rowan, S.; Rüdiger, A.; Ruggi, P.; Ryan, K.; Sachdev, S.; Sadecki, T.; Sadeghian, L.; Sakellariadou, M.; Salconi, L.; Saleem, M.; Salemi, F.; Samajdar, A.; Sammut, L.; Sanchez, E. J.; Sandberg, V.; Sandeen, B.; Sanders, J. R.; Sassolas, B.; Sathyaprakash, B. S.; Saulson, P. R.; Sauter, O. E. S.; Savage, R. L.; Sawadsky, A.; Schale, P.; Schilling, R.; Schmidt, J.; Schmidt, P.; Schnabel, R.; Schofield, R. M. S.; Schönbeck, A.; Schreiber, E.; Schuette, D.; Schutz, B. F.; Scott, J.; Scott, S. M.; Sellers, D.; Sengupta, A. S.; Sentenac, D.; Sequino, V.; Sergeev, A.; Setyawati, Y.; Shaddock, D. A.; Shaffer, T.; Shahriar, M. S.; Shaltev, M.; Shapiro, B.; Shawhan, P.; Sheperd, A.; Shoemaker, D. H.; Shoemaker, D. M.; Siellez, K.; Siemens, X.; Sieniawska, M.; Sigg, D.; Silva, A. D.; Singer, A.; Singer, L. P.; Singh, A.; Singh, R.; Singhal, A.; Sintes, A. M.; Slagmolen, B. J. J.; Smith, J. R.; Smith, N. D.; Smith, R. J. E.; Son, E. J.; Sorazu, B.; Sorrentino, F.; Souradeep, T.; Srivastava, A. K.; Staley, A.; Steinke, M.; Steinlechner, J.; Steinlechner, S.; Steinmeyer, D.; Stephens, B. C.; Stone, R.; Strain, K. A.; Straniero, N.; Stratta, G.; Strauss, N. A.; Strigin, S.; Sturani, R.; Stuver, A. L.; Summerscales, T. Z.; Sun, L.; Sunil, S.; Sutton, P. J.; Swinkels, B. L.; Szczepańczyk, M. J.; Tacca, M.; Talukder, D.; Tanner, D. B.; Tápai, M.; Tarabrin, S. P.; Taracchini, A.; Taylor, R.; Theeg, T.; Thirugnanasambandam, M. P.; Thomas, E. G.; Thomas, M.; Thomas, P.; Thorne, K. A.; Thrane, E.; Tiwari, S.; Tiwari, V.; Tokmakov, K. V.; Toland, K.; Tomlinson, C.; Tonelli, M.; Tornasi, Z.; Torres, C. V.; Torrie, C. I.; Töyrä, D.; Travasso, F.; Traylor, G.; Trifirò, D.; Tringali, M. C.; Trozzo, L.; Tse, M.; Turconi, M.; Tuyenbayev, D.; Ugolini, D.; Unnikrishnan, C. S.; Urban, A. L.; Usman, S. A.; Vahlbruch, H.; Vajente, G.; Valdes, G.; van Bakel, N.; van Beuzekom, M.; van den Brand, J. F. J.; Van Den Broeck, C.; Vander-Hyde, D. C.; van der Schaaf, L.; van Heijningen, J. V.; van Veggel, A. A.; Vardaro, M.; Vass, S.; Vasúth, M.; Vaulin, R.; Vecchio, A.; Vedovato, G.; Veitch, J.; Veitch, P. J.; Venkateswara, K.; Verkindt, D.; Vetrano, F.; Viceré, A.; Vinciguerra, S.; Vine, D. J.; Vinet, J.-Y.; Vitale, S.; Vo, T.; Vocca, H.; Vorvick, C.; Voss, D. V.; Vousden, W. D.; Vyatchanin, S. P.; Wade, A. R.; Wade, L. E.; Wade, M.; Walker, M.; Wallace, L.; Walsh, S.; Wang, G.; Wang, H.; Wang, M.; Wang, X.; Wang, Y.; Ward, R. L.; Warner, J.; Was, M.; Weaver, B.; Wei, L.-W.; Weinert, M.; Weinstein, A. J.; Weiss, R.; Wen, L.; Weßels, P.; Westphal, T.; Wette, K.; Whelan, J. T.; Whiting, B. F.; Williams, R. D.; Williamson, A. R.; Willis, J. L.; Willke, B.; Wimmer, M. H.; Winkler, W.; Wipf, C. C.; Wittel, H.; Woan, G.; Woehler, J.; Worden, J.; Wright, J. L.; Wu, D. S.; Wu, G.; Yablon, J.; Yam, W.; Yamamoto, H.; Yancey, C. C.; Yu, H.; Yvert, M.; ZadroŻny, A.; Zangrando, L.; Zanolin, M.; Zendri, J.-P.; Zevin, M.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, M.; Zhang, Y.; Zhao, C.; Zhou, M.; Zhou, Z.; Zhu, X. J.; Zucker, M. E.; Zuraw, S. E.; Zweizig, J.; LIGO Scientific Collaboration; Virgo Collaboration

    2016-08-01

    We report on a comprehensive all-sky search for periodic gravitational waves in the frequency band 100-1500 Hz and with a frequency time derivative in the range of [-1.18 ,+1.00 ] ×1 0-8 Hz /s . Such a signal could be produced by a nearby spinning and slightly nonaxisymmetric isolated neutron star in our galaxy. This search uses the data from the initial LIGO sixth science run and covers a larger parameter space with respect to any past search. A Loosely Coherent detection pipeline was applied to follow up weak outliers in both Gaussian (95% recovery rate) and non-Gaussian (75% recovery rate) bands. No gravitational wave signals were observed, and upper limits were placed on their strength. Our smallest upper limit on worst-case (linearly polarized) strain amplitude h0 is 9.7 ×1 0-25 near 169 Hz, while at the high end of our frequency range we achieve a worst-case upper limit of 5.5 ×1 0-24 . Both cases refer to all sky locations and entire range of frequency derivative values.

  4. First low frequency all-sky search for continuous gravitational wave signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aasi, J.; Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T. D.; Abernathy, M. R.; Acernese, F.; Ackley, K.; Adams, C.; Adams, T.; Addesso, P.; Adhikari, R. X.; Adya, V. B.; Affeldt, C.; Agathos, M.; Agatsuma, K.; Aggarwal, N.; Aguiar, O. D.; Ain, A.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; Allocca, A.; Amariutei, D. V.; Andersen, M.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Arai, K.; Araya, M. C.; Arceneaux, C. C.; Areeda, J. S.; Arnaud, N.; Ashton, G.; Aston, S. M.; Astone, P.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Babak, S.; Baker, P. T.; Baldaccini, F.; Ballardin, G.; Ballmer, S. W.; Barayoga, J. C.; Barclay, S. E.; Barish, B. C.; Barker, D.; Barone, F.; Barr, B.; Barsotti, L.; Barsuglia, M.; Bartlett, J.; Barton, M. A.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Basti, A.; Batch, J. C.; Baune, C.; Bavigadda, V.; Behnke, B.; Bejger, M.; Belczynski, C.; Bell, A. S.; Berger, B. K.; Bergman, J.; Bergmann, G.; Berry, C. P. L.; Bersanetti, D.; Bertolini, A.; Betzwieser, J.; Bhagwat, S.; Bhandare, R.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Birch, J.; Birney, R.; Biscans, S.; Bitossi, M.; Biwer, C.; Bizouard, M. A.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blair, C. D.; Blair, D.; Bloemen, S.; Bock, O.; Bodiya, T. P.; Boer, M.; Bogaert, G.; Bojtos, P.; Bond, C.; Bondu, F.; Bonnand, R.; Bork, R.; Born, M.; Boschi, V.; Bose, Sukanta; Bradaschia, C.; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Branchesi, M.; Branco, V.; Brau, J. E.; Briant, T.; Brillet, A.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Brockill, P.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, D. A.; Brown, D.; Brown, D. D.; Brown, N. M.; Buchanan, C. C.; Buikema, A.; Bulik, T.; Bulten, H. J.; Buonanno, A.; Buskulic, D.; Buy, C.; Byer, R. L.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Calderón Bustillo, J.; Calloni, E.; Camp, J. B.; Cannon, K. C.; Cao, J.; Capano, C. D.; Capocasa, E.; Carbognani, F.; Caride, S.; Casanueva Diaz, J.; Casentini, C.; Caudill, S.; Cavaglià, M.; Cavalier, F.; Cavalieri, R.; Celerier, C.; Cella, G.; Cepeda, C.; Cerboni Baiardi, L.; Cerretani, G.; Cesarini, E.; Chakraborty, R.; Chalermsongsak, T.; Chamberlin, S. J.; Chao, S.; Charlton, P.; Chassande-Mottin, E.; Chen, X.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, C.; Chincarini, A.; Chiummo, A.; Cho, H. S.; Cho, M.; Chow, J. H.; Christensen, N.; Chu, Q.; Chua, S.; Chung, S.; Ciani, G.; Clara, F.; Clark, J. A.; Cleva, F.; Coccia, E.; Cohadon, P.-F.; Colla, A.; Collette, C. G.; Colombini, M.; Constancio, M.; Conte, A.; Conti, L.; Cook, D.; Corbitt, T. R.; Cornish, N.; Corsi, A.; Costa, C. A.; Coughlin, M. W.; Coughlin, S. B.; Coulon, J.-P.; Countryman, S. T.; Couvares, P.; Coward, D. M.; Cowart, M. J.; Coyne, D. C.; Coyne, R.; Craig, K.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Cripe, J.; Crowder, S. G.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, L.; Cuoco, E.; Canton, T. Dal; Damjanic, M. D.; Danilishin, S. L.; D'Antonio, S.; Danzmann, K.; Darman, N. S.; Dattilo, V.; Dave, I.; Daveloza, H. P.; Davier, M.; Davies, G. S.; Daw, E. J.; Day, R.; DeBra, D.; Debreczeni, G.; Degallaix, J.; De Laurentis, M.; Deléglise, S.; Del Pozzo, W.; Denker, T.; Dent, T.; Dereli, H.; Dergachev, V.; De Rosa, R.; DeRosa, R. T.; DeSalvo, R.; Dhurandhar, S.; Díaz, M. C.; Di Fiore, L.; Di Giovanni, M.; Di Lieto, A.; Di Palma, I.; Di Virgilio, A.; Dojcinoski, G.; Dolique, V.; Dominguez, E.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Doravari, S.; Douglas, R.; Downes, T. P.; Drago, M.; Drever, R. W. P.; Driggers, J. C.; Du, Z.; Ducrot, M.; Dwyer, S. E.; Edo, T. B.; Edwards, M. C.; Edwards, M.; Effler, A.; Eggenstein, H.-B.; Ehrens, P.; Eichholz, J. M.; Eikenberry, S. S.; Essick, R. C.; Etzel, T.; Evans, M.; Evans, T. M.; Everett, R.; Factourovich, M.; Fafone, V.; Fairhurst, S.; Fang, Q.; Farinon, S.; Farr, B.; Farr, W. M.; Favata, M.; Fays, M.; Fehrmann, H.; Fejer, M. M.; Feldbaum, D.; Ferrante, I.; Ferreira, E. C.; Ferrini, F.; Fidecaro, F.; Fiori, I.; Fisher, R. P.; Flaminio, R.; Fournier, J.-D.; Franco, S.; Frasca, S.; Frasconi, F.; Frede, M.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Fricke, T. T.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fulda, P.; Fyffe, M.; Gabbard, H. A. G.; Gair, J. R.; Gammaitoni, L.; Gaonkar, S. G.; Garufi, F.; Gatto, A.; Gehrels, N.; Gemme, G.; Gendre, B.; Genin, E.; Gennai, A.; Gergely, L. Á.; Germain, V.; Ghosh, A.; Ghosh, S.; Giaime, J. A.; Giardina, K. D.; Giazotto, A.; Gleason, J. R.; Goetz, E.; Goetz, R.; Gondan, L.; González, G.; Gonzalez, J.; Gopakumar, A.; Gordon, N. A.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Gossan, S. E.; Gosselin, M.; Goßler, S.; Gouaty, R.; Graef, C.; Graff, P. B.; Granata, M.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.; Greco, G.; Groot, P.; Grote, H.; Grover, K.; Grunewald, S.; Guidi, G. M.; Guido, C. J.; Guo, X.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, M. K.; Gushwa, K. E.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Hacker, J. J.; Hall, B. R.; Hall, E. D.; Hammer, D.; Hammond, G.; Haney, M.; Hanke, M. M.; Hanks, J.; Hanna, C.; Hannam, M. D.; Hanson, J.; Hardwick, T.; Harms, J.; Harry, G. M.; Harry, I. W.; Hart, M. J.; Hartman, M. T.; Haster, C.-J.

    2016-02-01

    In this paper we present the results of the first low frequency all-sky search of continuous gravitational wave signals conducted on Virgo VSR2 and VSR4 data. The search covered the full sky, a frequency range between 20 and 128 Hz with a range of spin-down between -1.0 ×10-10 and +1.5 ×10-11 Hz /s , and was based on a hierarchical approach. The starting point was a set of short fast Fourier transforms, of length 8192 s, built from the calibrated strain data. Aggressive data cleaning, in both the time and frequency domains, has been done in order to remove, as much as possible, the effect of disturbances of instrumental origin. On each data set a number of candidates has been selected, using the FrequencyHough transform in an incoherent step. Only coincident candidates among VSR2 and VSR4 have been examined in order to strongly reduce the false alarm probability, and the most significant candidates have been selected. The criteria we have used for candidate selection and for the coincidence step greatly reduce the harmful effect of large instrumental artifacts. Selected candidates have been subject to a follow-up by constructing a new set of longer fast Fourier transforms followed by a further incoherent analysis, still based on the FrequencyHough transform. No evidence for continuous gravitational wave signals was found, and therefore we have set a population-based joint VSR2-VSR4 90% confidence level upper limit on the dimensionless gravitational wave strain in the frequency range between 20 and 128 Hz. This is the first all-sky search for continuous gravitational waves conducted, on data of ground-based interferometric detectors, at frequencies below 50 Hz. We set upper limits in the range between about 1 0-24 and 2 ×10-23 at most frequencies. Our upper limits on signal strain show an improvement of up to a factor of ˜2 with respect to the results of previous all-sky searches at frequencies below 80 Hz.

  5. The Low Frequency All Sky Monitor for the Study of Radio Transients: Array Configuration and Sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Rossina B.; Jenet, F. A.; Hicks, B.; Kassim, N. E.; Ray, P. S.; Taylor, G. B.

    2012-01-01

    The forthcoming Low Frequency All Sky Monitor (LoFASM), will be an array of dipoles working between 10-88 MHz adapted from the Long Wavelength Array (LWA) design. This array will offer significant advantages over other projects for the study of radio transients, but its effectiveness will depend on the geometric details of the array. This poster presents the results of theoretical sensitivity calculations for a single 12 antenna array. An optimal configuration was found that can effectively block terrestrial signals incident from the horizon at certain "resonant" frequencies. This configuration will allow LoFASM to operate in regions with relatively high radio frequency interference. We also discuss possible transient sources that could be studied by this instrument.

  6. A ROACH Based Data Acquisition System for the Low Frequency All Sky Monitor (LoFASM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dartez, Louis P.; Jenet, F.; Cohen, S.; Creighton, T. D.; Ford, A.; Garcia, A.; Hicks, B.; Hinojosa, J.; Kassim, N. E.; Longoria, C.; Lunsford, G.; Mata, A.; Miller, R. B.; Price, R. H.; Quintero, L.; Ray, P. S.; Reser, J.; Rivera, J.; Stovall, K.; Taylor, G. B.

    2013-01-01

    The Low Frequency All Sky Monitor (LoFASM) is a distributed array of dipole antennas that are sensitive to radio frequencies from 5 to 88 MHz. The primary science goals will be the detection and study of low-frequency radio transients. LoFASM consists of antennas and front end electronics that were originally developed for the Long Wavelength Array (LWA) by the U.S. Naval Research Lab, the University of New Mexico, Virginia Tech, and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. LoFASM, funded by the U.S. Department of Defense, will initially consist of 4 stations, each consisting of 12 dual-polarization dipole antenna stands. The signals received by LoFASM are digitized and processed using Reconfigurable Open Architecture Computing Hardware (ROACH) boards. This poster will describe the LoFASM project with an emphasis on the ROACH data processing pipe-line.

  7. Matching of the Continuous Gravitational Wave in an All Sky Search

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahay, S. K.

    We investigate the matching of continuous gravitational wave (CGW) signals in an all sky search with reference to Earth based laser interferometric detectors. We consider the source location as the parameters of the signal manifold and templates corresponding to different source locations. It has been found that the matching of signals from locations in the sky that differ in their co-latitude and longitude by π radians decreases with source frequency. We have also made an analysis with the other parameters affecting the symmetries. We observe that it may not be relevant to take care of the symmetries in the sky locations for the search of CGW from the output of LIGO-I, GEO600 and TAMA detectors.

  8. Timing Analysis of Unusual GRB 090709A Observed by Suzaku Wide-band All sky Monitor

    SciTech Connect

    Iwakiri, W.; Terada, Y.; Tashiro, M. S.; Ohno, M.; Nakagawa, Y. E.; Yoshida, A.; Yamaoka, K.; Makishima, K.

    2010-10-15

    A result of a joint timing analysis is presented for prompt emission of long-duration (T90 = 81 s) GRB 090709A with Swift Burst Alert Telescope (Swift/BAT), Suzaku Wide-band All-sky Monitor (Suzaku/WAM) and Konus-Wind over an energy range from 15 keV to 5 MeV. It was reported that multi-peaked GRB 090709A exhibited a possible periodic behavior with a period of about 8 s which is comparable to typical time scale of soft gamma-ray repeaters. However, the periodicity is still marginal in detailed analysis with Swift/BAT and GRB090709A exhibited a typical afterglow[1][2]. To investigate significance of the periodicity more quantitatively, we performed a detailed timing analysis on all the lightcurves obtained with Suzaku/WAM, Swift/BAT, and Konus-Wind evaluating their underlying trend, red noise and white noise.

  9. A Radiometric All-Sky Infrared Camera (RASICAM) for DES/CTIO

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, Peter M.; Rogers, Howard; Schindler, Rafe H.; /SLAC

    2010-08-25

    A novel radiometric all-sky infrared camera [RASICAM] has been constructed to allow automated real-time quantitative assessment of night sky conditions for the Dark Energy Camera [DECam] located on the Blanco Telescope at the Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory in Chile. The camera is optimized to detect the position, motion and optical depth of thin, high (8-10km) cirrus clouds and contrails by measuring their apparent temperature above the night sky background. The camera system utilizes a novel wide-field equiresolution catadioptic mirror system that provides sky coverage of 2{pi} azimuth and 14-90{sup o} from zenith. Several new technological and design innovations allow the RASICAM system to provide unprecedented cloud detection and IR-based photometricity quantification. The design of the RASICAM system is presented.

  10. Imaging science at Amazon rainforest, Brazil, using an all-sky imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calderaro, G. L.; Pimenta, A. A.; Manzi, A. O.

    2015-12-01

    Near-simultaneous all-sky (160 degrees field of view) observations of the OI 630.0 nm, OI777.4 nm, OI557.7 nm and 589 nm nightglow emissions are being carried out on a routine basis at ZF-2 Cuireiras Biological Reserve (2.59 degrees S, 60.22 degrees W, altitude 87 m), Amazonas state, Brazil, since July 2015. In the thermosphere-ionosphere, three types of phenomena are studied using 630.0 nm and 777.4 nm observations: (1) brightness waves (BW) associated with the midnight temperature maximum (MTM), (2) electron density enhancement associated with plasma blobs and MSTID with characteristics matching a Perkins-instability. In the mesosphere we study gravity waves events, probably generated by lower atmospheric due to treetops of the Amazon rainforest.

  11. VizieR Online Data Catalog: All-sky extinction maps (Juvela+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juvela, M.; Montillaud, J.

    2015-10-01

    All-sky extinction maps in units of J-band extinction (magnitudes). Data are given as Healpix FITS files (NSIDE=2048, NESTED scheme) in Galactic projection. The maps have been created either with the NICER or the NICEST method and at a resolution of either 3.0, 4.5, or 12.0-arcmin (FWHM). The different versions (M1, M2a, M2b) correspond to different assumptions of intrinsic stellar colours. These were M1 (average statistics at high latitudes, |b|>60°) and two versions, M2a and M2b, based on Besancon model of the Galactic distribution of stars with different intrinsic colours (M2a using the intrinsic colours, M2b colours further reddened by a simple model of diffuse extinction). (2 data files).

  12. MOXE: An x-ray all-sky monitor for Soviet Spectrum-X-Gamma Mission

    SciTech Connect

    Priedhorsky, W.; Fenimore, E.E.; Moss, C.E.; Kelley, R.L.; Holt, S.S.

    1989-01-01

    We are developing a Monitoring X-Ray Equipment (MOXE) for the Soviet Spectrum-X-Gamma Mission. MOXE is an X-ray all-sky monitor based on array of pinhole cameras, to be provided via a collaboration between Goddard Space Flight Center and Los Alamos National Laboratory. Our objectives are to alert other observers on Spectrum-X-Gamma and other platforms of interesting transient activity, and to synoptically monitor the X-ray sky and study long-term changes in X-ray binaries. MOXE will be sensitive to sources as faint as 2 milliCrab (5/sigma/) in 1 day, and cover the 2-20 keV band. 30 refs., 4 figs.

  13. MOXE: An X-ray all-sky monitor for Soviet Spectrum-X-Gamma Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Priedhorsky, W.; Fenimore, E. E.; Moss, C. E.; Kelley, R. L.; Holt, S. S.

    1989-01-01

    A Monitoring Monitoring X-Ray Equipment (MOXE) is being developed for the Soviet Spectrum-X-Gamma Mission. MOXE is an X-ray all-sky monitor based on array of pinhole cameras, to be provided via a collaboration between Goddard Space Flight Center and Los Alamos National Laboratory. The objectives are to alert other observers on Spectrum-X-Gamma and other platforms of interesting transient activity, and to synoptically monitor the X-ray sky and study long-term changes in X-ray binaries. MOXE will be sensitive to sources as faint as 2 milliCrab (5 sigma) in 1 day, and cover the 2 to 20 KeV band.

  14. Implementing an all-sky x-ray camera on space station

    SciTech Connect

    Priedhorsky, W.; Brandt, S.; Borozdin, K.; Black, K.

    1999-01-22

    A pinhole camera is an elegant but effective approach to an x-ray all-sky monitor. It is an ideal astrophysical instrument for the Space Station, because it does not require pointing, is robust against contamination, and requires modest resources (120 kg, 50 Watts, 10 kpbs). Nonetheless, it would be more sensitive than any previous all-sky x-ray monitor. By continuously monitoring the entire unocculted sky, this instrument would be sensitive to changes at all timescales. Besides monitoring the brightest few hundred x-ray sources, including about a dozen active galactic nuclei, this instrument would be uniquely sensitive to fast transients, unlike any scanning instrument. We would expect to detect several hundred events per year with timescales from a minute to a day, and better understand their correlation with magnetic activity on nearby stars. We would also expect to detect about 50 gamma-ray bursts per year and locate them to 1 square degree, independently verifying the BATSE sky distribution. We discuss the issues involved in flying this instrument on the Space Station. These include the management of image data from a continuously scanning 2-dimensional field, autonomous determination of aspect using x-ray image data, the detection and exclusion of solar panel occultation from the data, the optimum integration of a very wide-field instrument onto an EXPRESS pallet, safety validation of already-built hardware, and thermal considerations for a very low-power instrument. We conclude that Space Station is an attractive platform to conduct wide-field x-ray astronomy.

  15. Implementing an all-sky x-ray camera on space station

    SciTech Connect

    Priedhorsky, W.; Brandt, S.; Borozdin, K. Black, K.

    1999-01-01

    A pinhole camera is an elegant but effective approach to an x-ray all-sky monitor. It is an ideal astrophysical instrument for the Space Station, because it does not require pointing, is robust against contamination, and requires modest resources (120 kg, 50 Watts, 10 kpbs). Nonetheless, it would be more sensitive than any previous all-sky x-ray monitor. By continuously monitoring the entire unocculted sky, this instrument would be sensitive to changes at all timescales. Besides monitoring the brightest few hundred x-ray sources, including about a dozen active galactic nuclei, this instrument would be uniquely sensitive to fast transients, unlike any scanning instrument. We would expect to detect several hundred events per year with timescales from a minute to a day, and better understand their correlation with magnetic activity on nearby stars. We would also expect to detect about 50 gamma-ray bursts per year and locate them to 1 square degree, independently verifying the BATSE sky distribution. We discuss the issues involved in flying this instrument on the Space Station. These include the management of image data from a continuously scanning 2-dimensional field, autonomous determination of aspect using x-ray image data, the detection and exclusion of solar panel occultation from the data, the optimum integration of a very wide-field instrument onto an EXPRESS pallet, safety validation of already-built hardware, and thermal considerations for a very low-power instrument. We conclude that Space Station is an attractive platform to conduct wide-field x-ray astronomy. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  16. Planck 2013 results. XXI. Power spectrum and high-order statistics of the Planck all-sky Compton parameter map

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Planck Collaboration; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Armitage-Caplan, C.; Arnaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Atrio-Barandela, F.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartlett, J. G.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoît, A.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernard, J.-P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bobin, J.; Bock, J. J.; Bonaldi, A.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Bridges, M.; Bucher, M.; Burigana, C.; Butler, R. C.; Cardoso, J.-F.; Carvalho, P.; Catalano, A.; Challinor, A.; Chamballu, A.; Chiang, H. C.; Chiang, L.-Y.; Christensen, P. R.; Church, S.; Clements, D. L.; Colombi, S.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Comis, B.; Couchot, F.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B. P.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Da Silva, A.; Danese, L.; Davies, R. D.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Delouis, J.-M.; Désert, F.-X.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Dolag, K.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Finelli, F.; Flores-Cacho, I.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Franceschi, E.; Galeotta, S.; Ganga, K.; Génova-Santos, R. T.; Giard, M.; Giardino, G.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gratton, S.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Hansen, F. K.; Hanson, D.; Harrison, D.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W. A.; Hornstrup, A.; Hovest, W.; Huffenberger, K. M.; Hurier, G.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jaffe, T. R.; Jones, W. C.; Juvela, M.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kisner, T. S.; Kneissl, R.; Knoche, J.; Knox, L.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lacasa, F.; Lagache, G.; Lähteenmäki, A.; Lamarre, J.-M.; Lasenby, A.; Laureijs, R. J.; Lawrence, C. R.; Leahy, J. P.; Leonardi, R.; León-Tavares, J.; Lesgourgues, J.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maffei, B.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Marcos-Caballero, A.; Maris, M.; Marshall, D. J.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Massardi, M.; Matarrese, S.; Matthai, F.; Mazzotta, P.; Melchiorri, A.; Melin, J.-B.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Mitra, S.; Miville-Deschênes, M.-A.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Moss, A.; Munshi, D.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Netterfield, C. B.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; Osborne, S.; Oxborrow, C. A.; Paci, F.; Pagano, L.; Pajot, F.; Paoletti, D.; Partridge, B.; Pasian, F.; Patanchon, G.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Perrotta, F.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pierpaoli, E.; Pietrobon, D.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Ponthieu, N.; Popa, L.; Poutanen, T.; Pratt, G. W.; Prézeau, G.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J.-L.; Rachen, J. P.; Rebolo, R.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Ricciardi, S.; Riller, T.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Rossetti, M.; Roudier, G.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Rusholme, B.; Sandri, M.; Santos, D.; Savini, G.; Scott, D.; Seiffert, M. D.; Shellard, E. P. S.; Spencer, L. D.; Starck, J.-L.; Stolyarov, V.; Stompor, R.; Sudiwala, R.; Sunyaev, R.; Sureau, F.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A.-S.; Sygnet, J.-F.; Tauber, J. A.; Tavagnacco, D.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Tucci, M.; Tuovinen, J.; Umana, G.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Varis, J.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Vittorio, N.; Wade, L. A.; Wandelt, B. D.; White, S. D. M.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.

    2014-11-01

    We have constructed the first all-sky map of the thermal Sunyaev-Zeldovich (tSZ) effect by applying specifically tailored component separation algorithms to the 100 to 857 GHz frequency channel maps from the Planck survey. This map shows an obvious galaxy cluster tSZ signal that is well matched with blindly detected clusters in the Planck SZ catalogue. To characterize the signal in the tSZ map we have computed its angular power spectrum. At large angular scales (ℓ < 60), the major foreground contaminant is the diffuse thermal dust emission. At small angular scales (ℓ > 500) the clustered cosmic infrared background and residual point sources are the major contaminants. These foregrounds are carefully modelled and subtracted. We thus measure the tSZ power spectrum over angular scales 0.17° ≲ θ ≲ 3.0° that were previously unexplored. The measured tSZ power spectrum is consistent with that expected from the Planck catalogue of SZ sources, with clear evidence of additional signal from unresolved clusters and, potentially, diffuse warm baryons. Marginalized band-powers of the Planck tSZ power spectrum and the best-fit model are given. The non-Gaussianity of the Compton parameter map is further characterized by computing its 1D probability distribution function and its bispectrum. The measured tSZ power spectrum and high order statistics are used to place constraints on σ8.

  17. Planck all-sky thermal dust polarization: Witnessing how the magnetic field shapes the Milky Way ISM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernard, Jean-Philippe

    2015-08-01

    I will summarize the findings of the analysis of the Planck polarization results, which have been published recently. These include all sky polarization maps at wavelengths above 850 microns, dominated at the shortest wavelengths by polarized emission from thermal dust. These maps reveal the large-scale organization of the magnetic field as projected on the plane of the sky. Unlike previous synchrotron maps of the Milky Way, they trace for the first time the magnetic field geometry in the thin molecular disk of our Galaxy, where most star formation occurs. Even at the modest angular resolution of Planck (5’), the magnetic field preferentially aligns with the filamentary structure of the ISM and it can be followed down to the scale of star forming molecular complexes. The large-scale polarized emission allows a detailed investigation of the magnetic field geometry in the solar neighborhood, which reveals unexpected and intricate filamentary structures, where the magnetic field changes orientation abruptly, tracing discontinuities at edges of magnetic domains with more homogeneous properties. The data also reveals regions with an unexpectedly large dust polarization fraction, providing strong constraints on current dust models. I will discuss future prospects for studying the impact of the magnetic field in nearby galaxies such as the Magellanic Clouds using this data and ground-based follow-up surveys, in particular in the framework of future polarization observations with ALMA in external galaxies.

  18. The infrared luminosities of ˜332 000 SDSS galaxies predicted from artificial neural networks and the Herschel Stripe 82 survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellison, Sara L.; Teimoorinia, Hossein; Rosario, David J.; Mendel, J. Trevor

    2016-01-01

    The total infrared (IR) luminosity (LIR) can be used as a robust measure of a galaxy's star formation rate (SFR), even in the presence of an active galactic nucleus (AGN), or when optical emission lines are weak. Unfortunately, existing all sky far-IR surveys, such as the Infrared Astronomical Satellite (IRAS) and AKARI, are relatively shallow and are biased towards the highest SFR galaxies and lowest redshifts. More sensitive surveys with the Herschel Space Observatory are limited to much smaller areas. In order to construct a large sample of LIR measurements for galaxies in the nearby Universe, we employ artificial neural networks (ANNs), using 1136 galaxies in the Herschel Stripe 82 sample as the training set. The networks are validated using two independent data sets (IRAS and AKARI) and demonstrated to predict the LIR with a scatter σ ˜ 0.23 dex, and with no systematic offset. Importantly, the ANN performs well for both star-forming galaxies and those with an AGN. A public catalogue is presented with our LIR predictions which can be used to determine SFRs for 331 926 galaxies in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), including ˜129 000 SFRs for AGN-dominated galaxies for which SDSS SFRs have large uncertainties.

  19. All-sky Meteor Orbit System AMOS and preliminary analysis of three unusual meteor showers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tóth, Juraj; Kornoš, Leonard; Zigo, Pavol; Gajdoš, Štefan; Kalmančok, Dušan; Világi, Jozef; Šimon, Jaroslav; Vereš, Peter; Šilha, Jiří; Buček, Marek; Galád, Adrián; Rusňák, Patrik; Hrábek, Peter; Ďuriš, František; Rudawska, Regina

    2015-12-01

    All-sky Meteor Orbit System (AMOS) is a semi-autonomous video observatory for detection of transient events on the sky, mostly the meteors. Its hardware and software development and permanent placement on several locations in Slovakia allowed the establishment of Slovak Video Meteor Network (SVMN) monitoring meteor activity above the Central Europe. The data reduction, orbital determination and additional results from AMOS cameras - the SVMN database - as well as from observational expeditions on Canary Islands and in Canada provided dynamical and physical data for better understanding of mutual connections between parent bodies of asteroids and comets and their meteoroid streams. We present preliminary results on exceptional and rare meteor streams such as September ɛ Perseids (SPE) originated from unknown long periodic comet on a retrograde orbit, suspected asteroidal meteor stream of April α Comae Berenicids (ACO) in the orbit of meteorites Příbram and Neuschwanstein and newly observed meteor stream Camelopardalids (CAM) originated from Jupiter family comet 209P/Linear.

  20. Event Study of the Peak Auroral Emission Altitude from All-sky Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sangalli, L.; Gustavsson, B.; Partamies, N. J.; Kauristie, K.

    2011-12-01

    The MIRACLE network monitors auroral activity in the Fennoscandian sector of Europe. Network stations cover the range of 55° to 57° magnetic latitude North and span two hours in magnetic local time. Some of the MIRACLE network stations include digital all-sky cameras (ASC). Some of the ASCs currently in use are: systems with an image intensifier in front of a CCD (iCCD), systems with electron multiplying CCD (emCCD). Both iCCD and emCCD cameras in the MIRACLE network operate at three different wavelengths: 427.8 nm, 557.7 nm and 630.0 nm. Each wavelength is selected using narrow band filters on a filter wheel placed in front of the CCD. Our goal is to evaluate the peak auroral emission altitude using ASC images at different stations pairs for a set of auroral event in order to evaluate the altitude of peak auroral emissions for different auroral structures. We adapted the AIDA software package developed by Björn Gustavsson in Kiruna for ASC images. Position calibrated images at two (or more) ASC stations are for optical triangulation of a set of auroral structures.

  1. Einstein@Home all-sky search for periodic gravitational waves in LIGO S5 data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aasi, J.; Abadie, J.; Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T. D.; Abernathy, M.; Accadia, T.; Acernese, F.; Adams, C.; Adams, T.; Addesso, P.; Adhikari, R.; Affeldt, C.; Agathos, M.; Agatsuma, K.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; Allocca, A.; Amador Ceron, E.; Amariutei, D.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Arai, K.; Araya, M. C.; Ast, S.; Aston, S. M.; Astone, P.; Atkinson, D.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Aylott, B. E.; Babak, S.; Baker, P.; Ballardin, G.; Ballmer, S.; Bao, Y.; Barayoga, J. C. B.; Barker, D.; Barone, F.; Barr, B.; Barsotti, L.; Barsuglia, M.; Barton, M. A.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Bastarrika, M.; Basti, A.; Batch, J.; Bauchrowitz, J.; Bauer, Th. S.; Bebronne, M.; Beck, D.; Behnke, B.; Bejger, M.; Beker, M. G.; Bell, A. S.; Bell, C.; Belopolski, I.; Benacquista, M.; Berliner, J. M.; Bertolini, A.; Betzwieser, J.; Beveridge, N.; Beyersdorf, P. T.; Bhadbade, T.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Birch, J.; Biswas, R.; Bitossi, M.; Bizouard, M. A.; Black, E.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blackburn, L.; Blair, D.; Bland, B.; Blom, M.; Bock, O.; Bodiya, T. P.; Bogan, C.; Bond, C.; Bondarescu, R.; Bondu, F.; Bonelli, L.; Bonnand, R.; Bork, R.; Born, M.; Boschi, V.; Bose, S.; Bosi, L.; Bouhou, B.; Braccini, S.; Bradaschia, C.; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Branchesi, M.; Brau, J. E.; Breyer, J.; Briant, T.; Bridges, D. O.; Brillet, A.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Britzger, M.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, D. A.; Bulik, T.; Bulten, H. J.; Buonanno, A.; Burguet-Castell, J.; Buskulic, D.; Buy, C.; Byer, R. L.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Cagnoli, G.; Calloni, E.; Camp, J. B.; Campsie, P.; Cannon, K.; Canuel, B.; Cao, J.; Capano, C. D.; Carbognani, F.; Carbone, L.; Caride, S.; Caudill, S.; Cavaglià, M.; Cavalier, F.; Cavalieri, R.; Cella, G.; Cepeda, C.; Cesarini, E.; Chalermsongsak, T.; Charlton, P.; Chassande-Mottin, E.; Chen, W.; Chen, X.; Chen, Y.; Chincarini, A.; Chiummo, A.; Cho, H. S.; Chow, J.; Christensen, N.; Chua, S. S. Y.; Chung, C. T. Y.; Chung, S.; Ciani, G.; Clara, F.; Clark, D. E.; Clark, J. A.; Clayton, J. H.; Cleva, F.; Coccia, E.; Cohadon, P.-F.; Colacino, C. N.; Colla, A.; Colombini, M.; Conte, A.; Conte, R.; Cook, D.; Corbitt, T. R.; Cordier, M.; Cornish, N.; Corsi, A.; Costa, C. A.; Coughlin, M.; Coulon, J.-P.; Couvares, P.; Coward, D. M.; Cowart, M.; Coyne, D. C.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Creighton, T. D.; Cruise, A. M.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, L.; Cuoco, E.; Cutler, R. M.; Dahl, K.; Damjanic, M.; Danilishin, S. L.; D'Antonio, S.; Danzmann, K.; Dattilo, V.; Daudert, B.; Daveloza, H.; Davier, M.; Daw, E. J.; Day, R.; Dayanga, T.; De Rosa, R.; DeBra, D.; Debreczeni, G.; Degallaix, J.; Del Pozzo, W.; Dent, T.; Dergachev, V.; DeRosa, R.; Dhurandhar, S.; Di Fiore, L.; Di Lieto, A.; Di Palma, I.; Di Paolo Emilio, M.; Di Virgilio, A.; Díaz, M.; Dietz, A.; Dietz, A.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Doravari, S.; Dorsher, S.; Drago, M.; Drever, R. W. P.; Driggers, J. C.; Du, Z.; Dumas, J.-C.; Dwyer, S.; Eberle, T.; Edgar, M.; Edwards, M.; Effler, A.; Ehrens, P.; Endrőczi, G.; Engel, R.; Etzel, T.; Evans, K.; Evans, M.; Evans, T.; Factourovich, M.; Fafone, V.; Fairhurst, S.; Farr, B. F.; Favata, M.; Fazi, D.; Fehrmann, H.; Feldbaum, D.; Ferrante, I.; Ferrini, F.; Fidecaro, F.; Finn, L. S.; Fiori, I.; Fisher, R. P.; Flaminio, R.; Foley, S.; Forsi, E.; Fotopoulos, N.; Fournier, J.-D.; Franc, J.; Franco, S.; Frasca, S.; Frasconi, F.; Frede, M.; Frei, M. A.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Fricke, T. T.; Friedrich, D.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fujimoto, M.-K.; Fulda, P. J.; Fyffe, M.; Gair, J.; Galimberti, M.; Gammaitoni, L.; Garcia, J.; Garufi, F.; Gáspár, M. E.; Gelencser, G.; Gemme, G.; Genin, E.; Gennai, A.; Gergely, L. Á.; Ghosh, S.; Giaime, J. A.; Giampanis, S.; Giardina, K. D.; Giazotto, A.; Gil-Casanova, S.; Gill, C.; Gleason, J.; Goetz, E.; González, G.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Goßler, S.; Gouaty, R.; Graef, C.; Graff, P. B.; Granata, M.; Grant, A.; Gray, C.; Greenhalgh, R. J. S.; Gretarsson, A. M.; Griffo, C.; Grote, H.; Grover, K.; Grunewald, S.; Guidi, G. M.; Guido, C.; Gupta, R.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Hallam, J. M.; Hammer, D.; Hammond, G.; Hanks, J.; Hanna, C.; Hanson, J.; Harms, J.; Harry, G. M.; Harry, I. W.; Harstad, E. D.; Hartman, M. T.; Haughian, K.; Hayama, K.; Hayau, J.-F.; Heefner, J.; Heidmann, A.; Heitmann, H.; Hello, P.; Hendry, M. A.; Heng, I. S.; Heptonstall, A. W.; Herrera, V.; Heurs, M.; Hewitson, M.; Hild, S.; Hoak, D.; Hodge, K. A.; Holt, K.; Holtrop, M.; Hong, T.; Hooper, S.; Hough, J.; Howell, E. J.; Hughey, B.; Husa, S.; Huttner, S. H.; Huynh-Dinh, T.; Ingram, D. R.; Inta, R.; Isogai, T.; Ivanov, A.; Izumi, K.; Jacobson, M.; James, E.; Jang, Y. J.; Jaranowski, P.; Jesse, E.; Johnson, W. W.; Jones, D. I.; Jones, R.; Jonker, R. J. G.; Ju, L.; Kalmus, P.; Kalogera, V.; Kandhasamy, S.; Kang, G.; Kanner, J. B.; Kasprzack, M.; Kasturi, R.; Katsavounidis, E.; Katzman, W.; Kaufer, H.; Kaufman, K.; Kawabe, K.; Kawamura, S.; Kawazoe, F.; Keitel, D.; Kelley, D.; Kells, W.; Keppel, D. G.; Keresztes, Z.; Khalaidovski, A.; Khalili, F. Y.; Khazanov, E. A.; Kim, B. K.; Kim, C.; Kim, H.; Kim, K.; Kim, N.; Kim, Y. M.; King, P. J.; Kinzel, D. L.; Kissel, J. S.; Klimenko, S.; Kline, J.; Kokeyama, K.; Kondrashov, V.; Koranda, S.; Korth, W. Z.; Kowalska, I.; Kozak, D.; Kringel, V.; Krishnan, B.; Królak, A.; Kuehn, G.; Kumar, P.; Kumar, R.; Kurdyumov, R.; Kwee, P.; Lam, P. K.; Landry, M.; Langley, A.; Lantz, B.; Lastzka, N.; Lawrie, C.; Lazzarini, A.; Leaci, P.; Lee, C. H.; Lee, H. K.; Lee, H. M.; Leong, J. R.; Leonor, I.; Leroy, N.; Letendre, N.; Lhuillier, V.; Li, J.; Li, T. G. F.; Lindquist, P. E.; Litvine, V.; Liu, Y.; Liu, Z.; Lockerbie, N. A.; Lodhia, D.; Logue, J.; Lorenzini, M.; Loriette, V.; Lormand, M.; Losurdo, G.; Lough, J.; Lubinski, M.; Lück, H.; Lundgren, A. P.; Macarthur, J.; Macdonald, E.; Machenschalk, B.; MacInnis, M.; Macleod, D. M.; Mageswaran, M.; Mailand, K.; Majorana, E.; Maksimovic, I.; Malvezzi, V.; Man, N.; Mandel, I.; Mandic, V.; Mantovani, M.; Marchesoni, F.; Marion, F.; Márka, S.; Márka, Z.; Markosyan, A.; Maros, E.; Marque, J.; Martelli, F.; Martin, I. W.; Martin, R. M.; Marx, J. N.; Mason, K.; Masserot, A.; Matichard, F.; Matone, L.; Matzner, R. A.; Mavalvala, N.; Mazzolo, G.; McCarthy, R.; McClelland, D. E.; McGuire, S. C.; McIntyre, G.; McIver, J.; Meadors, G. D.; Mehmet, M.; Meier, T.; Melatos, A.; Melissinos, A. C.; Mendell, G.; Menéndez, D. F.; Mercer, R. A.; Meshkov, S.; Messenger, C.; Meyer, M. S.; Miao, H.; Michel, C.; Milano, L.; Miller, J.; Minenkov, Y.; Mingarelli, C. M. F.; Mitrofanov, V. P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Mittleman, R.; Moe, B.; Mohan, M.; Mohapatra, S. R. P.; Moraru, D.; Moreno, G.; Morgado, N.; Morgia, A.; Mori, T.; Morriss, S. R.; Mosca, S.; Mossavi, K.; Mours, B.; Mow-Lowry, C. M.; Mueller, C. L.; Mueller, G.; Mukherjee, S.; Mullavey, A.; Müller-Ebhardt, H.; Munch, J.; Murphy, D.; Murray, P. G.; Mytidis, A.; Nash, T.; Naticchioni, L.; Necula, V.; Nelson, J.; Neri, I.; Newton, G.; Nguyen, T.; Nishizawa, A.; Nitz, A.; Nocera, F.; Nolting, D.; Normandin, M. E.; Nuttall, L.; Ochsner, E.; O'Dell, J.; Oelker, E.; Ogin, G. H.; Oh, J. J.; Oh, S. H.; Oldenberg, R. G.; O'Reilly, B.; O'Shaughnessy, R.; Osthelder, C.; Ott, C. D.; Ottaway, D. J.; Ottens, R. S.; Overmier, H.; Owen, B. J.; Page, A.; Palladino, L.; Palomba, C.; Pan, Y.; Paoletti, F.; Paoletti, R.; Papa, M. A.; Parisi, M.; Pasqualetti, A.; Passaquieti, R.; Passuello, D.; Pedraza, M.; Penn, S.; Perreca, A.; Persichetti, G.; Phelps, M.; Pichot, M.; Pickenpack, M.; Piergiovanni, F.; Pierro, V.; Pihlaja, M.; Pinard, L.; Pinto, I. M.; Pitkin, M.; Pletsch, H. J.; Plissi, M. V.; Poggiani, R.; Pöld, J.; Postiglione, F.; Poux, C.; Prato, M.; Predoi, V.; Prestegard, T.; Price, L. R.; Prijatelj, M.; Principe, M.; Privitera, S.; Prix, R.; Prodi, G. A.; Prokhorov, L. G.; Puncken, O.; Punturo, M.; Puppo, P.; Quetschke, V.; Quitzow-James, R.; Raab, F. J.; Rabeling, D. S.; Rácz, I.; Radkins, H.; Raffai, P.; Rakhmanov, M.; Ramet, C.; Rankins, B.; Rapagnani, P.; Raymond, V.; Re, V.; Reed, C. M.; Reed, T.; Regimbau, T.; Reid, S.; Reitze, D. H.; Ricci, F.; Riesen, R.; Riles, K.; Roberts, M.; Robertson, N. A.; Robinet, F.; Robinson, C.; Robinson, E. L.; Rocchi, A.; Roddy, S.; Rodriguez, C.; Rodruck, M.; Rolland, L.; Rollins, J. G.; Romano, J. D.; Romano, R.; Romie, J. H.; Rosińska, D.; Röver, C.; Rowan, S.; Rüdiger, A.; Ruggi, P.; Ryan, K.; Salemi, F.; Sammut, L.; Sandberg, V.; Sankar, S.; Sannibale, V.; Santamaría, L.; Santiago-Prieto, I.; Santostasi, G.; Saracco, E.; Sathyaprakash, B. S.; Saulson, P. R.; Savage, R. L.; Schilling, R.; Schnabel, R.; Schofield, R. M. S.; Schulz, B.; Schutz, B. F.; Schwinberg, P.; Scott, J.; Scott, S. M.; Seifert, F.; Sellers, D.; Sentenac, D.; Sergeev, A.; Shaddock, D. A.; Shaltev, M.; Shapiro, B.; Shawhan, P.; Shoemaker, D. H.; Sidery, T. L.; Siemens, X.; Sigg, D.; Simakov, D.; Singer, A.; Singer, L.; Sintes, A. M.; Skelton, G. R.; Slagmolen, B. J. J.; Slutsky, J.; Smith, J. R.; Smith, M. R.; Smith, R. J. E.; Smith-Lefebvre, N. D.; Somiya, K.; Sorazu, B.; Speirits, F. C.; Sperandio, L.; Stefszky, M.; Steinert, E.; Steinlechner, J.; Steinlechner, S.; Steplewski, S.; Stochino, A.; Stone, R.; Strain, K. A.; Strigin, S. E.; Stroeer, A. S.; Sturani, R.; Stuver, A. L.; Summerscales, T. Z.; Sung, M.; Susmithan, S.; Sutton, P. J.; Swinkels, B.; Szeifert, G.; Tacca, M.; Taffarello, L.; Talukder, D.; Tanner, D. B.; Tarabrin, S. P.; Taylor, R.; ter Braack, A. P. M.; Thomas, P.; Thorne, K. A.; Thorne, K. S.; Thrane, E.; Thüring, A.; Titsler, C.; Tokmakov, K. V.; Tomlinson, C.; Toncelli, A.; Tonelli, M.; Torre, O.; Torres, C. V.; Torrie, C. I.; Tournefier, E.; Travasso, F.; Traylor, G.; Tse, M.; Ugolini, D.; Vahlbruch, H.; Vajente, G.; van den Brand, J. F. J.; Van Den Broeck, C.; van der Putten, S.; van Veggel, A. A.; Vass, S.; Vasuth, M.; Vaulin, R.; Vavoulidis, M.; Vecchio, A.; Vedovato, G.; Veitch, J.; Veitch, P. J.; Venkateswara, K.; Verkindt, D.; Vetrano, F.; Viceré, A.; Villar, A. E.; Vinet, J.-Y.; Vitale, S.; Vocca, H.; Vorvick, C.; Vyatchanin, S. P.; Wade, A.; Wade, L.; Wade, M.; Waldman, S. J.; Wallace, L.; Wan, Y.; Wang, M.; Wang, X.; Wanner, A.; Ward, R. L.; Was, M.; Weinert, M.; Weinstein, A. J.; Weiss, R.; Welborn, T.; Wen, L.; Wessels, P.; West, M.; Westphal, T.; Wette, K.; Whelan, J. T.; Whitcomb, S. E.; White, D. J.; Whiting, B. F.; Wiesner, K.; Wilkinson, C.; Willems, P. A.; Williams, L.; Williams, R.; Willke, B.; Wimmer, M.; Winkelmann, L.; Winkler, W.; Wipf, C. C.; Wiseman, A. G.; Wittel, H.; Woan, G.; Wooley, R.; Worden, J.; Yablon, J.; Yakushin, I.; Yamamoto, H.; Yamamoto, K.; Yancey, C. C.; Yang, H.; Yeaton-Massey, D.; Yoshida, S.; Yvert, M.; Zadrożny, A.; Zanolin, M.; Zendri, J.-P.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, C.; Zotov, N.; Zucker, M. E.; Zweizig, J.; Anderson, D. P.

    2013-02-01

    This paper presents results of an all-sky search for periodic gravitational waves in the frequency range [50,1190]Hz and with frequency derivative range of ˜[-20,1.1]×10-10Hzs-1 for the fifth LIGO science run (S5). The search uses a noncoherent Hough-transform method to combine the information from coherent searches on time scales of about one day. Because these searches are very computationally intensive, they have been carried out with the Einstein@Home volunteer distributed computing project. Postprocessing identifies eight candidate signals; deeper follow-up studies rule them out. Hence, since no gravitational wave signals have been found, we report upper limits on the intrinsic gravitational wave strain amplitude h0. For example, in the 0.5 Hz-wide band at 152.5 Hz, we can exclude the presence of signals with h0 greater than 7.6×10-25 at a 90% confidence level. This search is about a factor 3 more sensitive than the previous Einstein@Home search of early S5 LIGO data.

  2. Cepheids in open clusters: an 8D all-sky census

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Richard I.; Eyer, Laurent; Mowlavi, Nami

    2013-09-01

    Cepheids in Galactic open clusters (CCs) are of great importance as zero-point calibrators of the Galactic Cepheid period-luminosity relationship (PLR). We perform an eight-dimensional all-sky census that aims to identify new bona fide CCs and provides a ranking of membership confidence for known CC candidates according to membership probabilities. The probabilities are computed for combinations of known Galactic open clusters and classical Cepheid candidates, based on spatial, kinematic and population-specific membership constraints. Data employed in this analysis are taken largely from published literature and supplemented by a year-round observing programme on both hemispheres dedicated to determining systemic radial velocities of Cepheids. In total, we find 23 bona fide CCs, 5 of which are candidates identified for the first time, including an overtone-Cepheid member in NGC 129. We discuss a subset of CC candidates in detail, some of which have been previously mentioned in the literature. Our results indicate unlikely membership for seven Cepheids that have been previously discussed in terms of cluster membership. We furthermore revisit the Galactic PLR using our bona fide CC sample and obtain a result consistent with the recent calibration by Turner. However, our calibration remains limited mainly by cluster uncertainties and the small number of long-period calibrators. In the near future, Gaia will enable our study to be carried out in much greater detail and accuracy, thanks to data homogeneity and greater levels of completeness.

  3. All-sky search for long-duration gravitational wave transients with initial LIGO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T. D.; Abernathy, M. R.; Acernese, F.; Ackley, K.; Adams, C.; Adams, T.; Addesso, P.; Adhikari, R. X.; Adya, V. B.; Affeldt, C.; Agathos, M.; Agatsuma, K.; Aggarwal, N.; Aguiar, O. D.; Ain, A.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; Allocca, A.; Amariutei, D. V.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Arai, K.; Araya, M. C.; Arceneaux, C. C.; Areeda, J. S.; Arnaud, N.; Arun, K. G.; Ashton, G.; Ast, M.; Aston, S. M.; Astone, P.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Babak, S.; Baker, P. T.; Baldaccini, F.; Ballardin, G.; Ballmer, S. W.; Barayoga, J. C.; Barclay, S. E.; Barish, B. C.; Barker, D.; Barone, F.; Barr, B.; Barsotti, L.; Barsuglia, M.; Barta, D.; Bartlett, J.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Basti, A.; Batch, J. C.; Baune, C.; Bavigadda, V.; Bazzan, M.; Behnke, B.; Bejger, M.; Belczynski, C.; Bell, A. S.; Bell, C. J.; Berger, B. K.; Bergman, J.; Bergmann, G.; Berry, C. P. L.; Bersanetti, D.; Bertolini, A.; Betzwieser, J.; Bhagwat, S.; Bhandare, R.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Birch, J.; Birney, R.; Biscans, S.; Bisht, A.; Bitossi, M.; Biwer, C.; Bizouard, M. A.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blair, C. D.; Blair, D.; Blair, R. M.; Bloemen, S.; Bock, O.; Bodiya, T. P.; Boer, M.; Bogaert, G.; Bogan, C.; Bohe, A.; Bojtos, P.; Bond, C.; Bondu, F.; Bonnand, R.; Bork, R.; Boschi, V.; Bose, S.; Bozzi, A.; Bradaschia, C.; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Branchesi, M.; Brau, J. E.; Briant, T.; Brillet, A.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Brockill, P.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, D. A.; Brown, D.; Brown, D. D.; Brown, N. M.; Buchanan, C. C.; Buikema, A.; Bulik, T.; Bulten, H. J.; Buonanno, A.; Buskulic, D.; Buy, C.; Byer, R. L.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Cahillane, C.; Bustillo, J. Calderón; Callister, T.; Calloni, E.; Camp, J. B.; Cannon, K. C.; Cao, J.; Capano, C. D.; Capocasa, E.; Carbognani, F.; Caride, S.; Diaz, J. Casanueva; Casentini, C.; Caudill, S.; Cavaglià, M.; Cavalier, F.; Cavalieri, R.; Cella, G.; Cepeda, C.; Baiardi, L. Cerboni; Cerretani, G.; Cesarini, E.; Chakraborty, R.; Chalermsongsak, T.; Chamberlin, S. J.; Chan, M.; Chao, S.; Charlton, P.; Chassande-Mottin, E.; Chen, H. Y.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, C.; Chincarini, A.; Chiummo, A.; Cho, H. S.; Cho, M.; Chow, J. H.; Christensen, N.; Chu, Q.; Chua, S.; Chung, S.; Ciani, G.; Clara, F.; Clark, J. A.; Cleva, F.; Coccia, E.; Cohadon, P.-F.; Colla, A.; Collette, C. G.; Constancio, M.; Conte, A.; Conti, L.; Cook, D.; Corbitt, T. R.; Cornish, N.; Corsi, A.; Cortese, S.; Costa, C. A.; Coughlin, M. W.; Coughlin, S. B.; Coulon, J.-P.; Countryman, S. T.; Couvares, P.; Coward, D. M.; Cowart, M. J.; Coyne, D. C.; Coyne, R.; Craig, K.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Cripe, J.; Crowder, S. G.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, L.; Cuoco, E.; Canton, T. Dal; Danilishin, S. L.; D'Antonio, S.; Danzmann, K.; Darman, N. S.; Dattilo, V.; Dave, I.; Daveloza, H. P.; Davier, M.; Davies, G. S.; Daw, E. J.; Day, R.; DeBra, D.; Debreczeni, G.; Degallaix, J.; De Laurentis, M.; Deléglise, S.; Del Pozzo, W.; Denker, T.; Dent, T.; Dereli, H.; Dergachev, V.; DeRosa, R.; De Rosa, R.; DeSalvo, R.; Dhurandhar, S.; Díaz, M. C.; Di Fiore, L.; Di Giovanni, M.; Di Lieto, A.; Di Palma, I.; Di Virgilio, A.; Dojcinoski, G.; Dolique, V.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Doravari, S.; Douglas, R.; Downes, T. P.; Drago, M.; Drever, R. W. P.; Driggers, J. C.; Du, Z.; Ducrot, M.; Dwyer, S. E.; Edo, T. B.; Edwards, M. C.; Effler, A.; Eggenstein, H.-B.; Ehrens, P.; Eichholz, J. M.; Eikenberry, S. S.; Engels, W.; Essick, R. C.; Etzel, T.; Evans, M.; Evans, T. M.; Everett, R.; Factourovich, M.; Fafone, V.; Fair, H.; Fairhurst, S.; Fan, X.; Fang, Q.; Farinon, S.; Farr, B.; Farr, W. M.; Favata, M.; Fays, M.; Fehrmann, H.; Fejer, M. M.; Ferrante, I.; Ferreira, E. C.; Ferrini, F.; Fidecaro, F.; Fiori, I.; Fisher, R. P.; Flaminio, R.; Fletcher, M.; Fournier, J.-D.; Franco, S.; Frasca, S.; Frasconi, F.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Frey, V.; Fricke, T. T.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fulda, P.; Fyffe, M.; Gabbard, H. A. G.; Gair, J. R.; Gammaitoni, L.; Gaonkar, S. G.; Garufi, F.; Gatto, A.; Gaur, G.; Gehrels, N.; Gemme, G.; Gendre, B.; Genin, E.; Gennai, A.; George, J.; Gergely, L.; Germain, V.; Ghosh, A.; Ghosh, S.; Giaime, J. A.; Giardina, K. D.; Giazotto, A.; Gill, K.; Glaefke, A.; Goetz, E.; Goetz, R.; Gondan, L.; González, G.; Castro, J. M. Gonzalez; Gopakumar, A.; Gordon, N. A.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Gossan, S. E.; Gosselin, M.; Gouaty, R.; Graef, C.; Graff, P. B.; Granata, M.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.; Greco, G.; Green, A. C.; Groot, P.; Grote, H.; Grunewald, S.; Guidi, G. M.; Guo, X.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, M. K.; Gushwa, K. E.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Hacker, J. J.; Hall, B. R.; Hall, E. D.; Hammond, G.; Haney, M.; Hanke, M. M.; Hanks, J.; Hanna, C.; Hannam, M. D.; Hanson, J.; Hardwick, T.; Harms, J.; Harry, G. M.; Harry, I. W.

    2016-02-01

    We present the results of a search for long-duration gravitational wave transients in two sets of data collected by the LIGO Hanford and LIGO Livingston detectors between November 5, 2005 and September 30, 2007, and July 7, 2009 and October 20, 2010, with a total observational time of 283.0 days and 132.9 days, respectively. The search targets gravitational wave transients of duration 10-500 s in a frequency band of 40-1000 Hz, with minimal assumptions about the signal waveform, polarization, source direction, or time of occurrence. All candidate triggers were consistent with the expected background; as a result we set 90% confidence upper limits on the rate of long-duration gravitational wave transients for different types of gravitational wave signals. For signals from black hole accretion disk instabilities, we set upper limits on the source rate density between 3.4 ×1 0-5 and 9.4 ×1 0-4 Mpc-3 yr-1 at 90% confidence. These are the first results from an all-sky search for unmodeled long-duration transient gravitational waves.

  4. The Low Frequency All Sky Monitor for the Study of Radio Transients: Prototype Hardware Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivera, Jesus; Ford, A. J.; Jenet, F. A.; Stovall, K.; Cohen, S. C.; Dartez, L.; Garcia, A., Jr.; Hinojosa, J.; Longoria, C.; Lunsford, G.; Mata, A.; Miller, R. B.; Reser, J. S.; Hicks, B. C.; Kassim, N. E.; Ray, P. S.; Taylor, G. B.

    2012-01-01

    In radio astronomy, the low frequency band (< 88 MHz) is one of the least explored regions of the electromagnetic spectrum. The Low Frequency All Sky Monitor (LoFASM), built from technology designed for the Long Wavelength Array (LWA), will be dedicated to the continuous, long-term monitoring of this band. The primary science goal of this project will be the study of radio transients, bursts of radio radiation that can last for a wide range of time scales from micro-seconds to several days. The full LoFASM project will consist of three independent antenna arrays, or "stations,” separated by several thousand kilometers, observing coincident parts of the sky, allowing fast discrimination of local and astronomical signals. The sensitivity and geographical distribution of the LoFASM antennas will offer significant advantages for the study of radio transients compared to previous and ongoing programs. This poster describes the analog and digital hardware implemented in the prototype system which has been developed by undergraduate students working at UTB's Center for Advanced Radio Astronomy.

  5. A fast all-sky radiative transfer model and its implications for solar energy research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Y.; Sengupta, M.

    2015-12-01

    Radiative transfer models simulating broadband solar radiation, e.g. Rapid Radiation Transfer Model (RRTM) and its GCM applications, have been widely used by atmospheric scientists to model solar resource for various energy applications such as operational forecasting. Due to the complexity of solving the radiative transfer equation, simulating solar radiation under cloudy conditions can be extremely time consuming though many approximations, e.g. two-stream approach and delta-M truncation scheme, have been utilized. To provide a new option to approximate solar radiation, we developed a Fast All-sky Radiation Model for Solar applications (FARMS) using simulated cloud transmittance and reflectance from 16-stream RRTM model runs. The solar irradiances at the land surface were simulated by combining parameterized cloud properties with a fast clear-sky radiative transfer model. Using solar radiation measurements from the US Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) central facility in Oklahoma as a benchmark against the model simulations, we were able to demonstrate that the accuracy of FARMS was comparable to the two-stream approach. However, FARMS is much more efficient since it does not explicitly solve the radiative transfer equation for each individual cloud condition. We further explored the use of FARMS to promote solar resource assessment and forecasting research through the increased ability to accommodate higher spatial and temporal resolution calculations for the next generation of satellite and numerical weather prediction (NWP) models.

  6. Coordinated analysis of data. [all sky photography observations of the ATS 5 satellite of auroras

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mende, S. B.

    1974-01-01

    All Sky Cameras (ASCA) observations were made at the field line conjugate of the ATS-5 Satellite. The field of view of these cameras covered the region of the magnetosphere from L=5 to L=ll at the approximate longitude of the ATS field line conjugate. Definite statements are made concerning the correlation of the auroras observed by the ASCA's and the magnetospheric trapped fluxes. No auroras are observed at the field line conjugate, on quiet days when the hot plasma does not penetrate into the magnetosphere far enough to reach the ATS-5 orbit. On more disturbed days, when the ATS-5 enters the plasma sheet containing plasma clouds, an equatorward motion of the lowest latitude auroral arc is observed. Significant qualitative correlation between the ASCA data and the trapped fluxes is observed when a local plasma injection event occurs near ATS-5. The clearest signature of the injection event is magnetic and is most pronounced as a recovery of a negative bay at the ATS-5 magnetometer. The most significant correlations are observed with the intensification of the diffuse uniform glow which intensifies during the injection event.

  7. The Quadrilateralized Spherical Cube and Quad-Tree For All Sky Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Richard A.; Stemwedel, Sally W.

    The quadrilateralized spherical cube (Chan & O'Neill 1975 and O'Neill & Laubscher 1976) is a geometrical projection well suited for mapping all sky data, as well as to the use of the quad-tree nearest neighbor (rather than rasterized) storage scheme for the the archiving and retrieval of data. The celestial sphere is projected onto the six faces of a cube in a tangent plane projection. The lines of latitude and longitude on each face are then curved such that, when the cube face is divided into equally spaced rows and columns of pixels, each pixel is equal in area on the sky to every other pixel. The maps thus preserve photometric integrity. The changes in lines of latitude and longitude result in only minimal distortion of the shape of objects on a single face. The quad-tree pixel numbering scheme, being hierarchical, permits arbitrarily high resolution and allows comparison of maps at differing resolutions in a particularly elegant and straight forward manner. We present the basic geometry of the quadrilateralized spherical cube, the form of the quad-tree structure, and suggest FITS structures and keywords for use in displaying, storing, and transporting data in this form.

  8. All-sky monitor observations of the decay of A0620-00 (Nova monocerotis 1975)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaluzienski, L. J.; Holt, S. S.; Boldt, E. A.; Serlemitsos, P. J.

    1976-01-01

    The All-Sky X-ray Monitor onboard Ariel 5 has observed the 3-6 keV decline of the bright transient X-ray source A0620-00 on a virtually continuous basis during the period September 1975 - March 1976. The source behavior on timescales 100 minutes is characterized by smooth, exponential decays interrupted by substantial increases in October and February. The latter increase was an order-of-magnitude rise above the extrapolated exponential fall-off, and was followed by a final rapid decline. Upper limits of 2.5% and 10% were found for any periodicities in the range 0d.2 - 10d during the early and later decay phases, respectively. A probable correlation between the optical and 3-6 keV emission from A0620-00 was noted, effectively ruling out models involving traditional optical novae in favor of Roche-lobe overflow in a binary system. The existing data on the transient X-ray sources is consistent with two distinct luminosity-lifetime classes of these objects.

  9. Characterization of exceptionally strong mesospheric wave events using all-sky and zenith airglow observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Steven M.; Scheer, Jürgen; Reisin, Esteban R.; Baumgardner, Jeffrey; Mendillo, Michael

    2006-09-01

    Two unusually clear mesospheric gravity wave events were observed by the Boston University all-sky imager and the Argentine airglow spectrometer on two consecutive nights at the El Leoncito Observatory, Argentina (31.8°S, 69.3°W), during August 2001. Both events exhibited brightness amplitudes an order of magnitude above typical values. The first event had the appearance of a large-amplitude (>60% in OH(6-2), 22% in O2, and 37% in O(1S) emissions (peak to peak), compared to 1-5% typically), upward propagating gravity wave with pronounced nonlinear behavior. The waves also showed noticeably curved wavefronts, indicating that they had originated from a relatively small source region within ˜180 km of El Leoncito. Estimates of the vertical flux of horizontal energy and momentum for the wave event in the OH and O2 emissions were very large compared to typical values, and they also indicated a high degree of flux divergence over the nominal 8 km altitude between the two layers. The second event occurred on the following night and exhibited a frontal morphology and behavior consistent with an internal ducted gravity wave showing nonlinear behavior akin to a mesospheric bore. The disturbance also had several interesting characteristics; in particular, the propagation speed decreased during its passage across the sky. In addition, a strong vertical temperature gradient due to the semidiurnal tide appeared to influence the occurrence of the bore event.

  10. First all-sky search for continuous gravitational waves from unknown sources in binary systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aasi, J.; Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T.; Abernathy, M. R.; Accadia, T.; Acernese, F.; Ackley, K.; Adams, C.; Adams, T.; Addesso, P.; Adhikari, R. X.; Affeldt, C.; Agathos, M.; Aggarwal, N.; Aguiar, O. D.; Ain, A.; Ajith, P.; Alemic, A.; Allen, B.; Allocca, A.; Amariutei, D.; Andersen, M.; Anderson, R.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Arai, K.; Araya, M. C.; Arceneaux, C.; Areeda, J.; Aston, S. M.; Astone, P.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Austin, L.; Aylott, B. E.; Babak, S.; Baker, P. T.; Ballardin, G.; Ballmer, S. W.; Barayoga, J. C.; Barbet, M.; Barish, B. C.; Barker, D.; Barone, F.; Barr, B.; Barsotti, L.; Barsuglia, M.; Barton, M. A.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Basti, A.; Batch, J. C.; Bauchrowitz, J.; Bauer, Th. S.; Behnke, B.; Bejger, M.; Beker, M. G.; Belczynski, C.; Bell, A. S.; Bell, C.; Bergmann, G.; Bersanetti, D.; Bertolini, A.; Betzwieser, J.; Beyersdorf, P. T.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Birch, J.; Biscans, S.; Bitossi, M.; Bizouard, M. A.; Black, E.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blackburn, L.; Blair, D.; Bloemen, S.; Blom, M.; Bock, O.; Bodiya, T. P.; Boer, M.; Bogaert, G.; Bogan, C.; Bond, C.; Bondu, F.; Bonelli, L.; Bonnand, R.; Bork, R.; Born, M.; Boschi, V.; Bose, Sukanta; Bosi, L.; Bradaschia, C.; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Branchesi, M.; Brau, J. E.; Briant, T.; Bridges, D. O.; Brillet, A.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, D. A.; Brown, D. D.; Brückner, F.; Buchman, S.; Bulik, T.; Bulten, H. J.; Buonanno, A.; Burman, R.; Buskulic, D.; Buy, C.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Calderón Bustillo, J.; Calloni, E.; Camp, J. B.; Campsie, P.; Cannon, K. C.; Canuel, B.; Cao, J.; Capano, C. D.; Carbognani, F.; Carbone, L.; Caride, S.; Castiglia, A.; Caudill, S.; Cavaglià, M.; Cavalier, F.; Cavalieri, R.; Celerier, C.; Cella, G.; Cepeda, C.; Cesarini, E.; Chakraborty, R.; Chalermsongsak, T.; Chamberlin, S. J.; Chao, S.; Charlton, P.; Chassande-Mottin, E.; Chen, X.; Chen, Y.; Chincarini, A.; Chiummo, A.; Cho, H. S.; Chow, J.; Christensen, N.; Chu, Q.; Chua, S. S. Y.; Chung, S.; Ciani, G.; Clara, F.; Clark, J. A.; Cleva, F.; Coccia, E.; Cohadon, P.-F.; Colla, A.; Collette, C.; Colombini, M.; Cominsky, L.; Constancio, M.; Conte, A.; Cook, D.; Corbitt, T. R.; Cordier, M.; Cornish, N.; Corpuz, A.; Corsi, A.; Costa, C. A.; Coughlin, M. W.; Coughlin, S.; Coulon, J.-P.; Countryman, S.; Couvares, P.; Coward, D. M.; Cowart, M.; Coyne, D. C.; Coyne, R.; Craig, K.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Creighton, T. D.; Crowder, S. G.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, L.; Cuoco, E.; Dahl, K.; Dal Canton, T.; Damjanic, M.; Danilishin, S. L.; D'Antonio, S.; Danzmann, K.; Dattilo, V.; Daveloza, H.; Davier, M.; Davies, G. S.; Daw, E. J.; Day, R.; Dayanga, T.; Debreczeni, G.; Degallaix, J.; Deléglise, S.; Del Pozzo, W.; Denker, T.; Dent, T.; Dereli, H.; Dergachev, V.; De Rosa, R.; DeRosa, R. T.; DeSalvo, R.; Dhurandhar, S.; Díaz, M.; Di Fiore, L.; Di Lieto, A.; Di Palma, I.; Di Virgilio, A.; Donath, A.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Doravari, S.; Dossa, S.; Douglas, R.; Downes, T. P.; Drago, M.; Drever, R. W. P.; Driggers, J. C.; Du, Z.; Dwyer, S.; Eberle, T.; Edo, T.; Edwards, M.; Effler, A.; Eggenstein, H.; Ehrens, P.; Eichholz, J.; Eikenberry, S. S.; Endrőczi, G.; Essick, R.; Etzel, T.; Evans, M.; Evans, T.; Factourovich, M.; Fafone, V.; Fairhurst, S.; Fang, Q.; Farinon, S.; Farr, B.; Farr, W. M.; Favata, M.; Fehrmann, H.; Fejer, M. M.; Feldbaum, D.; Feroz, F.; Ferrante, I.; Ferrini, F.; Fidecaro, F.; Finn, L. S.; Fiori, I.; Fisher, R. P.; Flaminio, R.; Fournier, J.-D.; Franco, S.; Frasca, S.; Frasconi, F.; Frede, M.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Fricke, T. T.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fulda, P.; Fyffe, M.; Gair, J.; Gammaitoni, L.; Gaonkar, S.; Garufi, F.; Gehrels, N.; Gemme, G.; Genin, E.; Gennai, A.; Ghosh, S.; Giaime, J. A.; Giardina, K. D.; Giazotto, A.; Gill, C.; Gleason, J.; Goetz, E.; Goetz, R.; Gondan, L.; González, G.; Gordon, N.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Gossan, S.; Goßler, S.; Gouaty, R.; Gräf, C.; Graff, P. B.; Granata, M.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.; Greenhalgh, R. J. S.; Gretarsson, A. M.; Groot, P.; Grote, H.; Grover, K.; Grunewald, S.; Guidi, G. M.; Guido, C.; Gushwa, K.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Hammer, D.; Hammond, G.; Hanke, M.; Hanks, J.; Hanna, C.; Hanson, J.; Harms, J.; Harry, G. M.; Harry, I. W.; Harstad, E. D.; Hart, M.; Hartman, M. T.; Haster, C.-J.; Haughian, K.; Heidmann, A.; Heintze, M.; Heitmann, H.; Hello, P.; Hemming, G.; Hendry, M.; Heng, I. S.; Heptonstall, A. W.; Heurs, M.; Hewitson, M.; Hild, S.; Hoak, D.; Hodge, K. A.; Holt, K.; Hooper, S.; Hopkins, P.; Hosken, D. J.; Hough, J.; Howell, E. J.; Hu, Y.; Huerta, E.; Hughey, B.; Husa, S.; Huttner, S. H.; Huynh, M.; Huynh-Dinh, T.; Ingram, D. R.; Inta, R.; Isogai, T.; Ivanov, A.; Iyer, B. R.; Izumi, K.; Jacobson, M.; James, E.; Jang, H.

    2014-09-01

    We present the first results of an all-sky search for continuous gravitational waves from unknown spinning neutron stars in binary systems using LIGO and Virgo data. Using a specially developed analysis program, the TwoSpect algorithm, the search was carried out on data from the sixth LIGO science run and the second and third Virgo science runs. The search covers a range of frequencies from 20 Hz to 520 Hz, a range of orbital periods from 2 to ˜2,254 h and a frequency- and period-dependent range of frequency modulation depths from 0.277 to 100 mHz. This corresponds to a range of projected semimajor axes of the orbit from ˜0.6×10-3 ls to ˜6,500 ls assuming the orbit of the binary is circular. While no plausible candidate gravitational wave events survive the pipeline, upper limits are set on the analyzed data. The most sensitive 95% confidence upper limit obtained on gravitational wave strain is 2.3×10-24 at 217 Hz, assuming the source waves are circularly polarized. Although this search has been optimized for circular binary orbits, the upper limits obtained remain valid for orbital eccentricities as large as 0.9. In addition, upper limits are placed on continuous gravitational wave emission from the low-mass x-ray binary Scorpius X-1 between 20 Hz and 57.25 Hz.

  11. BRIGHT 22 μm EXCESS CANDIDATES FROM THE WISE ALL-SKY CATALOG AND THE HIPPARCOS MAIN CATALOG

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Chao-Jian; Wu, Hong; Lam, Man-I; Yang, Ming; Gao, Liang; Wen, Xiao-Qing; Li, Shuo; Zhang, Tong-Jie

    2013-10-01

    In this paper, we present a catalog that includes 141 bright candidates (≤10.27 mag, V band) showing an excess of infrared (IR) at 22 μm. Of these 141 candidates, 38 stars are known IR-excess stars or disks, 23 stars are double or multiple stars, and 4 are Be stars while the remaining more than 70 stars are identified as 22 μm excess candidates in our work. The criterion for selecting candidates is K{sub s} – [22]{sub μm}. All these candidates are selected from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer all-sky data cross-correlated with the Hipparcos main catalog and the likelihood-ratio technique is employed. Considering the effect of background, we introduce the IRAS 100 μm level to exclude the high background. We also estimate the coincidence probability of these sources. In addition, we present the optical to mid-IR spectral energy distributions and optical images for all the candidates, and give the observed optical spectra of six stars with the National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences' 2.16 m telescope. To measure for the amount of dust around each star, the fractional luminosity is also provided. We also test whether our method of selecting IR-excess stars can be used to search for extra-solar planets; we cross-match our catalog with known IR-excess stars with planets but found no matches. Finally, we give the fraction of stars showing excess IR for different spectral types of main-sequence stars.

  12. All-sky search for periodic gravitational waves in LIGO S4 data

    SciTech Connect

    Abbott, B.; Abbott, R.; Adhikari, R.; Agresti, J.; Anderson, S. B.; Araya, M.; Armandula, H.; Ballmer, S.; Barish, B. C.; Bhawal, B.; Billingsley, G.; Black, E.; Blackburn, K.; Bork, R.; Boschi, V.; Busby, D.; Cardenas, L.; Cepeda, C.; Chatterji, S.; Coyne, D.

    2008-01-15

    We report on an all-sky search with the LIGO detectors for periodic gravitational waves in the frequency range 50-1000 Hz and with the frequency's time derivative in the range -1x10{sup -8} Hz s{sup -1} to zero. Data from the fourth LIGO science run (S4) have been used in this search. Three different semicoherent methods of transforming and summing strain power from short Fourier transforms (SFTs) of the calibrated data have been used. The first, known as StackSlide, averages normalized power from each SFT. A 'weighted Hough' scheme is also developed and used, which also allows for a multi-interferometer search. The third method, known as PowerFlux, is a variant of the StackSlide method in which the power is weighted before summing. In both the weighted Hough and PowerFlux methods, the weights are chosen according to the noise and detector antenna-pattern to maximize the signal-to-noise ratio. The respective advantages and disadvantages of these methods are discussed. Observing no evidence of periodic gravitational radiation, we report upper limits; we interpret these as limits on this radiation from isolated rotating neutron stars. The best population-based upper limit with 95% confidence on the gravitational-wave strain amplitude, found for simulated sources distributed isotropically across the sky and with isotropically distributed spin axes, is 4.28x10{sup -24} (near 140 Hz). Strict upper limits are also obtained for small patches on the sky for best-case and worst-case inclinations of the spin axes.

  13. Time Domain X-ray Astronomy with "All-Sky" Focusing Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorenstein, Paul

    2016-04-01

    The largest and most diverse types of temporal variations in all of astronomy occur in the soft, i.e. 0.5 to 10 keV, X-ray band. They range from millisecond QPO’s in compact binaries to year long flares from AGNs due to the absorption of a star by a SMBH, and the appearance of transient sources at decadal intervals. Models predict that at least some gravitational waves will be accompanied by an X-ray flare. A typical GRB produces more photons/sq. cm. in the soft band than it does in the Swift BAT 15 to 150 keV band. In addition the GRB X-ray fluence and knowledge of the details of the onset of the X-ray afterglow is obtained by observing the seamless transition from the active burst phase that has been attributed to internal shocks to the afterglow phases that has been attributed to external shocks. Detecting orphan X-ray afterglows will augment the event rate. With high sensitivity detectors some GRB identifications are likely to be with the youngest, most distant galaxies in the universe. Previous all-sky X-ray monitors have been non focusing limited field of view scanning instruments. An “All-Sky” (actually several ster FOV), focusing lobster-eye X-ray telescope will have much more grasp than the previous instruments and will allow a wide range of topics to be studied simultaneously. Two types of lobster-eye telescopes have been proposed. One type focuses in one dimension and uses a coded mask for resolution in the second. The other type focuses in two dimensions but has less effective area and less bandwidth. Both types are compatible with a Probe mission.

  14. All Sky Search for Gravitational-Wave Bursts in the Second Joint LIGO-Virgo Run

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abadie, J.; Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T. D.; Abernathy, M.; Accadia, T.; Acernese, F.; Adams, C.; Adhikari, R.; Affeldt, C.; Agathos, M.; Agatsuma, K.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; Ceron, E. Amador; Amariutei, D.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Arai, K.; Arain, M. A.; Araya, M. C.; Aylott, B. E.; Blackburn, L.; Camp, J. B.; Cannizzo, J.

    2012-01-01

    We present results from a search for gravitational-wave bursts in the data collected by the LIGO and Virgo detectors between July 7, 2009 and October 20, 2010: data are analyzed when at least two of the three LIGO-Virgo detectors are in coincident operation, with a total observation time of 207 days. The analysis searches for transients of duration approx. < 1 s over the frequency band 64-5000 Hz, without other assumptions on the signal wa.veform, polarization, direction or occurrence time. All identified events are c.onsistent with the expected accidental background. We set frequentist upper limits on the rate of gravitational-wave bursts by combining this search with the previous LIGOVirgo search on the data collected "between November 2005 and October 2007. The upper limit on the rate of strong gravita.tional-wave bursts at the Earth is 1.3 events per year at 90% confidence. We also present upper limits on source rate density per yea.r and Mpc3 for sample popula.tions of standard-candle sources. As in the previous joint run, typical sensitivities of the search in terms of the root-sum-squared strain amplitude for these waveforms lie in the range approx 5 x 10(exp -22 Hz(exp-1/2) approx 1 X 10(exp -20) Hz(exp -1/2) . The combination of the two joint runs entails the most sensitive all-sky search for generic gravitational-wave bursts and synthesizes the results achieved by the initial generation of interferometric detectors.

  15. All-sky search for periodic gravitational waves in LIGO S4 data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbott, B.; Abbott, R.; Adhikari, R.; Agresti, J.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; Amin, R.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Arain, M.; Araya, M.; Armandula, H.; Ashley, M.; Aston, S.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Babak, S.; Ballmer, S.; Bantilan, H.; Barish, B. C.; Barker, C.; Barker, D.; Barr, B.; Barriga, P.; Barton, M. A.; Bayer, K.; Belczynski, K.; Betzwieser, J.; Beyersdorf, P. T.; Bhawal, B.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Biswas, R.; Black, E.; Blackburn, K.; Blackburn, L.; Blair, D.; Bland, B.; Bogenstahl, J.; Bogue, L.; Bork, R.; Boschi, V.; Bose, S.; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Brau, J. E.; Brinkmann, M.; Brooks, A.; Brown, D. A.; Bullington, A.; Bunkowski, A.; Buonanno, A.; Burmeister, O.; Busby, D.; Byer, R. L.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Camp, J. B.; Cannizzo, J.; Cannon, K.; Cantley, C. A.; Cao, J.; Cardenas, L.; Casey, M. M.; Castaldi, G.; Cepeda, C.; Chalkley, E.; Charlton, P.; Chatterji, S.; Chelkowski, S.; Chen, Y.; Chiadini, F.; Chin, D.; Chin, E.; Chow, J.; Christensen, N.; Clark, J.; Cochrane, P.; Cokelaer, T.; Colacino, C. N.; Coldwell, R.; Conte, R.; Cook, D.; Corbitt, T.; Coward, D.; Coyne, D.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Creighton, T. D.; Croce, R. P.; Crooks, D. R. M.; Cruise, A. M.; Cumming, A.; Dalrymple, J.; D'Ambrosio, E.; Danzmann, K.; Davies, G.; Debra, D.; Degallaix, J.; Degree, M.; Demma, T.; Dergachev, V.; Desai, S.; Desalvo, R.; Dhurandhar, S.; Díaz, M.; Dickson, J.; di Credico, A.; Diederichs, G.; Dietz, A.; Doomes, E. E.; Drever, R. W. P.; Dumas, J.-C.; Dupuis, R. J.; Dwyer, J. G.; Ehrens, P.; Espinoza, E.; Etzel, T.; Evans, M.; Evans, T.; Fairhurst, S.; Fan, Y.; Fazi, D.; Fejer, M. M.; Finn, L. S.; Fiumara, V.; Fotopoulos, N.; Franzen, A.; Franzen, K. Y.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Fricke, T.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fyffe, M.; Galdi, V.; Garofoli, J.; Gholami, I.; Giaime, J. A.; Giampanis, S.; Giardina, K. D.; Goda, K.; Goetz, E.; Goggin, L. M.; González, G.; Gossler, S.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.; Gray, M.; Greenhalgh, J.; Gretarsson, A. M.; Grosso, R.; Grote, H.; Grunewald, S.; Guenther, M.; Gustafson, R.; Hage, B.; Hammer, D.; Hanna, C.; Hanson, J.; Harms, J.; Harry, G.; Harstad, E.; Hayler, T.; Heefner, J.; Heng, I. S.; Heptonstall, A.; Heurs, M.; Hewitson, M.; Hild, S.; Hirose, E.; Hoak, D.; Hosken, D.; Hough, J.; Howell, E.; Hoyland, D.; Huttner, S. H.; Ingram, D.; Innerhofer, E.; Ito, M.; Itoh, Y.; Ivanov, A.; Jackrel, D.; Johnson, B.; Johnson, W. W.; Jones, D. I.; Jones, G.; Jones, R.; Ju, L.; Kalmus, P.; Kalogera, V.; Kasprzyk, D.; Katsavounidis, E.; Kawabe, K.; Kawamura, S.; Kawazoe, F.; Kells, W.; Keppel, D. G.; Khalili, F. Ya.; Kim, C.; King, P.; Kissel, J. S.; Klimenko, S.; Kokeyama, K.; Kondrashov, V.; Kopparapu, R. K.; Kozak, D.; Krishnan, B.; Kwee, P.; Lam, P. K.; Landry, M.; Lantz, B.; Lazzarini, A.; Lee, B.; Lei, M.; Leiner, J.; Leonhardt, V.; Leonor, I.; Libbrecht, K.; Lindquist, P.; Lockerbie, N. A.; Longo, M.; Lormand, M.; Lubiński, M.; Lück, H.; Machenschalk, B.; Macinnis, M.; Mageswaran, M.; Mailand, K.; Malec, M.; Mandic, V.; Marano, S.; Márka, S.; Markowitz, J.; Maros, E.; Martin, I.; Marx, J. N.; Mason, K.; Matone, L.; Matta, V.; Mavalvala, N.; McCarthy, R.; McClelland, D. E.; McGuire, S. C.; McHugh, M.; McKenzie, K.; McNabb, J. W. C.; McWilliams, S.; Meier, T.; Melissinos, A.; Mendell, G.; Mercer, R. A.; Meshkov, S.; Messenger, C. J.; Meyers, D.; Mikhailov, E.; Mitra, S.; Mitrofanov, V. P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Mittleman, R.; Miyakawa, O.; Mohanty, S.; Moreno, G.; Mossavi, K.; Mowlowry, C.; Moylan, A.; Mudge, D.; Mueller, G.; Mukherjee, S.; Müller-Ebhardt, H.; Munch, J.; Murray, P.; Myers, E.; Myers, J.; Nash, T.; Newton, G.; Nishizawa, A.; Numata, K.; O'Reilly, B.; O'Shaughnessy, R.; Ottaway, D. J.; Overmier, H.; Owen, B. J.; Pan, Y.; Papa, M. A.; Parameshwaraiah, V.; Patel, P.; Pedraza, M.; Penn, S.; Pierro, V.; Pinto, I. M.; Pitkin, M.; Pletsch, H.; Plissi, M. V.; Postiglione, F.; Prix, R.; Quetschke, V.; Raab, F.; Rabeling, D.; Radkins, H.; Rahkola, R.; Rainer, N.; Rakhmanov, M.; Ramsunder, M.; Rawlins, K.; Ray-Majumder, S.; Re, V.; Rehbein, H.; Reid, S.; Reitze, D. H.; Ribichini, L.; Riesen, R.; Riles, K.; Rivera, B.; Robertson, N. A.; Robinson, C.; Robinson, E. L.; Roddy, S.; Rodriguez, A.; Rogan, A. M.; Rollins, J.; Romano, J. D.; Romie, J.; Route, R.; Rowan, S.; Rüdiger, A.; Ruet, L.; Russell, P.; Ryan, K.; Sakata, S.; Samidi, M.; Sancho de La Jordana, L.; Sandberg, V.; Sannibale, V.; Saraf, S.; Sarin, P.; Sathyaprakash, B. S.; Sato, S.; Saulson, P. R.; Savage, R.; Savov, P.; Schediwy, S.; Schilling, R.; Schnabel, R.; Schofield, R.; Schutz, B. F.; Schwinberg, P.; Scott, S. M.; Searle, A. C.; Sears, B.; Seifert, F.; Sellers, D.; Sengupta, A. S.; Shawhan, P.; Shoemaker, D. H.; Sibley, A.; Siemens, X.; Sigg, D.; Sinha, S.; Sintes, A. M.; Slagmolen, B. J. J.; Slutsky, J.; Smith, J. R.; Smith, M. R.; Somiya, K.; Strain, K. A.; Strom, D. M.; Stuver, A.; Summerscales, T. Z.; Sun, K.-X.; Sung, M.; Sutton, P. J.; Takahashi, H.; Tanner, D. B.; Tarallo, M.; Taylor, R.; Taylor, R.; Thacker, J.; Thorne, K. A.; Thorne, K. S.; Thüring, A.; Tokmakov, K. V.; Torres, C.; Torrie, C.; Traylor, G.; Trias, M.; Tyler, W.; Ugolini, D.; Ungarelli, C.; Urbanek, K.; Vahlbruch, H.; Vallisneri, M.; van den Broeck, C.; Varvella, M.; Vass, S.; Vecchio, A.; Veitch, J.; Veitch, P.; Villar, A.; Vorvick, C.; Vyachanin, S. P.; Waldman, S. J.; Wallace, L.; Ward, H.; Ward, R.; Watts, K.; Webber, D.; Weidner, A.; Weinert, M.; Weinstein, A.; Weiss, R.; Wen, S.; Wette, K.; Whelan, J. T.; Whitbeck, D. M.; Whitcomb, S. E.; Whiting, B. F.; Wilkinson, C.; Willems, P. A.; Williams, L.; Willke, B.; Wilmut, I.; Winkler, W.; Wipf, C. C.; Wise, S.; Wiseman, A. G.; Woan, G.; Woods, D.; Wooley, R.; Worden, J.; Wu, W.; Yakushin, I.; Yamamoto, H.; Yan, Z.; Yoshida, S.; Yunes, N.; Zanolin, M.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, C.; Zotov, N.; Zucker, M.; Zur Mühlen, H.; Zweizig, J.

    2008-01-01

    We report on an all-sky search with the LIGO detectors for periodic gravitational waves in the frequency range 50 1000 Hz and with the frequency’s time derivative in the range -1×10-8Hzs-1 to zero. Data from the fourth LIGO science run (S4) have been used in this search. Three different semicoherent methods of transforming and summing strain power from short Fourier transforms (SFTs) of the calibrated data have been used. The first, known as StackSlide, averages normalized power from each SFT. A “weighted Hough” scheme is also developed and used, which also allows for a multi-interferometer search. The third method, known as PowerFlux, is a variant of the StackSlide method in which the power is weighted before summing. In both the weighted Hough and PowerFlux methods, the weights are chosen according to the noise and detector antenna-pattern to maximize the signal-to-noise ratio. The respective advantages and disadvantages of these methods are discussed. Observing no evidence of periodic gravitational radiation, we report upper limits; we interpret these as limits on this radiation from isolated rotating neutron stars. The best population-based upper limit with 95% confidence on the gravitational-wave strain amplitude, found for simulated sources distributed isotropically across the sky and with isotropically distributed spin axes, is 4.28×10-24 (near 140 Hz). Strict upper limits are also obtained for small patches on the sky for best-case and worst-case inclinations of the spin axes.

  16. Some new features of ionospheric plasma depletions over the Indian zone using all sky optical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, H. S. S.; Raizada, S.

    2000-08-01

    An all sky optical imaging system was operated from Sriharikota rocket range (SHAR) (14° N, 80° E, 5.5° N dip latitude) during January-March, 1993 to observe ionospheric plasma depletions through 630 nm and 777.4 nm night glow emissions. Strong plasma depletions were observed only on four nights viz., 14, 17, 19 and 21 February, 1993. Except the 17 February, which was a magnetically disturbed day, all the other nights pertained to magnetically quiet period. A number of plasma depletion parameters such as, degree of depletion, east-west extent, tilt with respect to the geomagnetic field, inter-depletion distance, drift velocity and plasma enhancements or brightness patterns were estimated. Some of the important results are: (a) It was found that the east-west extent of plasma depletions varied with the degree of depletion; for the 630 nm images the degree of depletion ranged between 6-9% per 100 km east-west extent and for 777.4 nm images it was 3% per 100 km east-west extent, (b) The average inter-depletion distance (IDD) was in the range of 1500±100 km during the magnetically disturbed period and 740±60 km during quiet periods. This is suggestive of gravity wave modulation of the bottom side of the F-region. While the large scale gravity waves (1500±100 km) of auroral origin could be responsible during magnetically disturbed period, smaller scale gravity waves (740±60 km) having their origin in the lower atmosphere could produce initial perturbation in the bottom side of the F-region, (c) Plasma depletions are observed to have an eastward tilt in the range of 10-15° with respect to the geomagnetic field. It has been suggested here that these tilts are associated with the variation of plasma drift with altitude, (d) plasma depletions are observed to be moving eastwards with drift velocities in the range of 40-190 ms-1, and (e) Strong plasma enhancements or brightness patterns were observed on three nights. The degree of enhancement was by a factor of 1

  17. AKARI MLHES Data Set Processing with FAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomasino, Rachael; Ueta, Toshiya; Yamamura, Issei

    2012-10-01

    The AKARI MLHES (excavating Mass Loss History in Extended dust shells of Evolved Stars) data set is the largest collection of the most sensitive far-infrared images of the cold extended circumstellar dust shells of evolved stars and it is the key to understanding the dusty mass loss phase of stellar evolution. This data will be processed with a new imaging tool kit FAST (FIS-AKARI Slow-scan Tools). This program allows for an interactive assessment of the data quality and on-the-fly corrections to the time-series data on pixel-by-pixel bases in order to manually correct glitches that would have been missed in the automated process. These corrections include: eliminate bad on-sky calibration sequences, flag out cosmic-rays and their after-effect affected time-series readings from the data stream and remove real sources from local sky-flat frames, among other options. These extra processes result in better-calibrated noise reduced images and would be by far the best detection limit among all existing far-infrared data of extended evolved star dust-shells. Suggestions to improve to the GUI interface and problems with the data visualization were recorded and plan to be implemented in subsequent versions.

  18. The Use of Weighting in Periodicity Searches in All-Sky Monitor Data: Applications to the GLAST LAT

    SciTech Connect

    Corbet, Robin; Dubois, Richard; /SLAC

    2009-06-25

    The light curves produced by all-sky monitors, such as the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer All-Sky Monitor and the Swift Burst Alert Telescope (BAT), generally have non-uniform error bars. In searching for periodic modulation in this type of data using power spectra it can be important to use appropriate weighting of data points to achieve the best sensitivity. It was recently demonstrated that for Swift BAT data a simple weighting scheme can actually sometimes reduce the sensitivity of the power spectrum depending on source brightness. Instead, a modified weighting scheme, based on the Cochran semi-weighted mean, gives improved results independent of source brightness. We investigate the benefits of weighting power spectra in period searches using simulated GLAST LAT observations of {gamma}-ray binaries.

  19. A catalogue of AKARI FIS BSC extragalactic objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marton, Gabor; Toth, L. Viktor; Gyorgy Balazs, Lajos

    2015-08-01

    We combined photometric data of about 70 thousand point sources from the AKARI Far-Infrared Surveyor Bright Source Catalogue with AllWISE catalogue data to identify galaxies. We used Quadratic Discriminant Analysis (QDA) to classify our sources. The classification was based on a 6D parameter space that contained AKARI [F65/F90], [F90/F140], [F140/F160] and WISE W1-W2 colours along with WISE W1 magnitudes and AKARI [F140] flux values. Sources were classified into 3 main objects types: YSO candidates, evolved stars and galaxies. The training samples were SIMBAD entries of the input point sources wherever an associated SIMBAD object was found within a 30 arcsecond search radius. The QDA resulted more than 5000 AKARI galaxy candidate sources. The selection was tested cross-correlating our AKARI extragalactic catalogue with the Revised IRAS-FSC Redshift Catalogue (RIFSCz). A very good match was found. A further classification attempt was also made to differentiate between extragalactic subtypes using Support Vector Machines (SVMs). The results of the various methods showed that we can confidently separate cirrus dominated objects (type 1 of RIFSCz). Some of our “galaxy candidate” sources are associated with 2MASS extended objects, and listed in the NASA Extragalactic Database so far without clear proofs of their extragalactic nature. Examples will be presented in our poster. Finally other AKARI extragalactic catalogues will be also compared to our statistical selection.

  20. All-sky imager observations near footprints of plasma sheet waves with kinetic ballooning-interchange signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panov, E. V.; Nakamura, R.; Sergeev, V. A.; Baumjohann, W.; Kubyshkina, M. V.

    2015-12-01

    We collected several THEMIS observations of plasma sheet oscillations with kinetic ballooning/interchange instability (BICI) signatures. Using an adapted model to find the location of THEMIS footprints, we identified all-sky imager (ASI) observations that may be associated with the waves. The ASI observations reveal a reach activity often being diffuse patchy aurora. We investigate the brightness and motion of the auroral patches and compare them with the BICI activity in the plasma sheet.

  1. Banks of templates for all-sky narrow-band searches of gravitational waves from spinning neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pisarski, Andrzej; Jaranowski, Piotr

    2015-07-01

    We construct efficient banks of templates suitable for all-sky narrow-band searches of almost monochromatic gravitational waves originating from spinning neutron stars in our Galaxy in data collected by interferometric detectors. We consider waves with one spindown parameter included, and we assume that both the position of the gravitational-wave source in the sky and the wave's frequency, together with spindown parameter, are unknown. In the construction we employ a simplified model of the signal with constant amplitude and phase which is a linear function of unknown parameters. Our template banks enable the usage of the fast Fourier transform algorithm in the computation of the maximum-likelihood {F}-statistic for nodes of the grids defining the bank, and fulfill an additional constraint needed to resample the data to barycentric time efficiently. All these template bank features were employed in the recent all-sky {F}-statistic-based search for continuous gravitational waves in Virgo VSR1 data (Aasi et al 2014 Class. Quantum Grav. 31 165014). Here we improve that template bank by constructing templates suitable for a larger range of search parameters and of smaller thicknesses for certain values of search parameters. One of our template banks has a thickness 12% smaller than that of the template bank used in the all-sky search of Virgo VSR1 data and only 4% larger than the thickness of the four-dimensional optimal lattice covering {A}4\\star .

  2. VizieR Online Data Catalog: All-sky spectrally matched Tycho2 stars (Pickles+, 2010)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pickles, A.; Depagne, E.

    2011-03-01

    We present fitted UBVRI-ZY and u'g'r'i'z' magnitudes, spectral types, and distances for 2.4 million stars, derived from synthetic photometry of a library spectrum that best matches the Tycho2 BTVT, NOMAD RN, and 2MASS JHK2/S catalog magnitudes. We present similarly synthesized multifilter magnitudes, types, and distances for 4.8 million stars with 2MASS and SDSS photometry to g<16 within the Sloan survey region, for Landolt and Sloan primary standards, and for Sloan northern (photometric telescope) and southern secondary standards. (17 data files).

  3. VizieR Online Data Catalog: All-sky spectrally matched Tycho2 stars (Pickles+, 2010)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pickles, A.; Depagne, E.

    2011-03-01

    We present fitted UBVRI-ZY and u'g'r'i'z' magnitudes, spectral types, and distances for 2.4 million stars, derived from synthetic photometry of a library spectrum that best matches the Tycho2 BTVT, NOMAD RN, and 2MASS JHK2/S catalog magnitudes. We present similarly synthesized multifilter magnitudes, types, and distances for 4.8 million stars with 2MASS and SDSS photometry to g<16 within the Sloan survey region, for Landolt and Sloan primary standards, and for Sloan northern (photometric telescope) and southern secondary standards. (16 data files).

  4. Optical and Sunyaev-Zel'dovich observations of a new sample of distant rich galaxy clusters in the ROSAT All Sky

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buddendiek, A.; Schrabback, T.; Greer, C. H.; Hoekstra, H.; Sommer, M.; Eifler, T.; Erben, T.; Erler, J.; Hicks, A. K.; High, F. W.; Hildebrandt, H.; Marrone, D. P.; Morris, R. G.; Muzzin, A.; Reiprich, T. H.; Schirmer, M.; Schneider, P.; von der Linden, A.

    2015-07-01

    Finding a sample of the most massive clusters with redshifts z > 0.6 can provide an interesting consistency check of the Λ cold dark matter (ΛCDM) model. Here, we present results from our search for clusters with 0.6 ≲ z ≲ 1.0 where the initial candidates were selected by cross-correlating the ROSAT All Sky Survey (RASS) faint and bright source catalogues with red galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey DR8. Our survey thus covers ≈ 10 000 deg2, much larger than previous studies of this kind. Deeper follow-up observations in three bands using the William Herschel Telescope and the Large Binocular Telescope were performed to confirm the candidates, resulting in a sample of 44 clusters for which we present richnesses and red sequence redshifts, as well as spectroscopic redshifts for a subset. At least two of the clusters in our sample are comparable in richness to RCS2-J232727.7-020437, one of the richest systems discovered to date. We also obtained new observations with the Combined Array for Research in Millimeter Astronomy for a subsample of 21 clusters. For 11 of those we detect the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect signature. The Sunyaev-Zel'dovich signal allows us to estimate M200 and check for tension with the cosmological standard model. We find no tension between our cluster masses and the ΛCDM model.

  5. Machine learning in infrared object classification - an all-sky selection of YSO candidates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marton, Gabor; Zahorecz, Sarolta; Toth, L. Viktor; Magnus McGehee, Peregrine; Kun, Maria

    2015-08-01

    Object classification is a fundamental and challenging problem in the era of big data. I will discuss up-to-date methods and their application to classify infrared point sources.We analysed the ALLWISE catalogue, the most recent public source catalogue of the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) to compile a reliable list of Young Stellar Object (YSO) candidates. We tested and compared classical and up-to-date statistical methods as well, to discriminate source types like extragalactic objects, evolved stars, main sequence stars, objects related to the interstellar medium and YSO candidates by using their mid-IR WISE properties and associated near-IR 2MASS data.In the particular classification problem the Support Vector Machines (SVM), a class of supervised learning algorithm turned out to be the best tool. As a result we classify Class I and II YSOs with >90% accuracy while the fraction of contaminating extragalactic objects remains well below 1%, based on the number of known objects listed in the SIMBAD and VizieR databases. We compare our results to other classification schemes from the literature and show that the SVM outperforms methods that apply linear cuts on the colour-colour and colour-magnitude space. Our homogenous YSO candidate catalog can serve as an excellent pathfinder for future detailed observations of individual objects and a starting point of statistical studies that aim to add pieces to the big picture of star formation theory.

  6. Stereoscopic determination of all-sky altitude map of aurora using two ground-based Nikon DSLR cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kataoka, R.; Miyoshi, Y.; Shigematsu, K.; Hampton, D.; Mori, Y.; Kubo, T.; Yamashita, A.; Tanaka, M.; Takahei, T.; Nakai, T.; Miyahara, H.; Shiokawa, K.

    2013-09-01

    A new stereoscopic measurement technique is developed to obtain an all-sky altitude map of aurora using two ground-based digital single-lens reflex (DSLR) cameras. Two identical full-color all-sky cameras were set with an 8 km separation across the Chatanika area in Alaska (Poker Flat Research Range and Aurora Borealis Lodge) to find localized emission height with the maximum correlation of the apparent patterns in the localized pixels applying a method of the geographical coordinate transform. It is found that a typical ray structure of discrete aurora shows the broad altitude distribution above 100 km, while a typical patchy structure of pulsating aurora shows the narrow altitude distribution of less than 100 km. Because of its portability and low cost of the DSLR camera systems, the new technique may open a unique opportunity not only for scientists but also for night-sky photographers to complementarily attend the aurora science to potentially form a dense observation network.

  7. The Evryscope: the first all-sky gigapixel-scale telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Law, Nicholas Michael; Fors, Octavi; Ratzloff, Jeffrey; Wulfken, Philip; del Ser, Daniel; Kavanaugh, Dustin

    2015-08-01

    Current time-domain wide-field sky surveys generally operate with few-degree-sized fields and take many individual images to cover large sky areas each night. We present the design and first results from the Evryscope ("wideseer"), which takes a different approach: using an array of 71mm telescopes to form a single, wide, field-of-view pointed at every part of the accessible sky simultaneously and continuously.The Evryscope is a gigapixel-scale imager which takes a 13"-pixel-sampling image covering 8,000 square degrees every two minutes. Its extremely large field of view overcomes the individual telescopes' modest apertures to produce an etendue ~10% of LSST's. The Evryscope, based at CTIO and with first light in May 2015, returns high-precision high-cadence light curves for every accessible star brighter than ~16th magnitude, and is searching for transiting giant planets around the brightest and most nearby stars, habitable planets around nearby M-dwarfs, and planetary occultations of white dwarfs. Its comprehensive nearby microlensing and eclipse-timing searches are sensitive to exoplanets inaccessible to other planet-finding methods, while the Evryscope will also provide comprehensive monitoring of outbursting young stars, white dwarf activity, and stellar activity of all types. When relatively rare transients events occur, such as gamma-ray bursts or nearby supernovae, the array will return minute-by-minute light curves without needing pointing towards the event as it occurs, and, because all data is recorded, can even search for pre-detection outbursts. We will present the system design, the results from the first few months of Evryscope operation, plans for more systems around the world, and an update on the Evryscope prototype telescopes we have been operating for the last three years in the Canadian High Arctic.

  8. The All Sky Automated Survey. Catalog of Variable Stars. III. 12h-18h Quarter of the Southern Hemisphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pojmanski, G.; Maciejewski, G.

    2004-06-01

    This paper describes the third part of the photometric data from the 9 arcdeg x 9arcdeg ASAS camera monitoring the whole southern hemisphere in V-band. Preliminary list of variable stars based on observations obtained since January 2001 is presented. Over 3200000 stars brighter than V=15 mag on 18000 frames were analyzed and 10453 were found to be variable (1718 eclipsing, 731 regularly pulsating, 849 Mira and 7155 other stars). Light curves have been classified using the improved automated algorithm, which now takes into account 2MASS colors and IRAS infrared fluxes. Basic photometric properties are presented in the tables and some examples of thumbnail light curves are printed for reference. All photometric data are available over the INTERNET at http://www.astrouw.edu.pl/\\gp/asas/asas.html or http://archive.princeton.edu/\\asas.

  9. The All Sky Automated Survey. The Catalog of Variable Stars. II. 6^h-12^h Quarter of the Southern Hemisphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pojmanski, G.

    2003-12-01

    This paper describes the second part of the photometric data from the 9 arcdeg times 9 arcdeg ASAS camera monitoring the whole southern hemisphere in the V-band. Preliminary list of variable stars based on observations obtained since January 2001 is presented. Over 2800000 stars brighter than V=15 mag on 18000 frames were analyzed and 11357 were found to be variable (2685 eclipsing, 907 regularly pulsating, 521 Mira and 7244 other, mostly SR, IRR and LPV stars). Periodic light curves have been classified using the automated algorithm, which now takes into account IRAS infrared fluxes. Basic photometric properties are presented in the tables and some examples of thumbnail light curves are printed for reference. All photometric data are available over the INTERNET at http://www.astrouw.edu.pl/~gp/asas/asas.html or http://archive.princeton.edu/~asas.

  10. First all-sky upper limits from LIGO on the strength of periodic gravitational waves using the Hough transform

    SciTech Connect

    Abbott, B.; Adhikari, R.; Agresti, J.; Anderson, S.B.; Araya, M.; Armandula, H.; Asiri, F.; Barish, B.C.; Barnes, M.; Barton, M.A.; Bhawal, B.; Billingsley, G.; Black, E.; Blackburn, K.; Bork, R.; Brown, D.A.; Busby, D.; Cardenas, L.; Chandler, A.; Chapsky, J.

    2005-11-15

    We perform a wide parameter-space search for continuous gravitational waves over the whole sky and over a large range of values of the frequency and the first spin-down parameter. Our search method is based on the Hough transform, which is a semicoherent, computationally efficient, and robust pattern recognition technique. We apply this technique to data from the second science run of the LIGO detectors and our final results are all-sky upper limits on the strength of gravitational waves emitted by unknown isolated spinning neutron stars on a set of narrow frequency bands in the range 200-400 Hz. The best upper limit on the gravitational-wave strain amplitude that we obtain in this frequency range is 4.43x10{sup -23}.

  11. An analysis of the FrequencyHough method for an all-sky search for continuous gravitational waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Andrew; Astone, Pia; LIGO Scientific Collaboration; Virgo Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    In this talk we present the Rome-Virgo hierarchical data analysis pipeline for all-sky searches of continuous gravitational wave signals, like those emitted by spinning neutron stars asymmetric with respect to the rotation axis, with unknown position, rotational frequency and spin-down. The core of the pipeline is an incoherent step based on a particularly efficient implementation of the Hough transform, that we call FrequencyHough, that maps the data time/frequency plane to the source frequency/spin-down plane for each fixed direction in the sky. We developed a narrow-band version of the pipeline centered at some reduced parameter space regions, which could be applied to mock data challenge analyses using LIGO or Virgo data. Examples will be shown.

  12. Ionospheric Studies From Low to Sub-Auroral Latitudes Using Geomagnetic Conjugate All-Sky Imagers and Satellite Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinis, C. R.; Macinnis, R.; Sullivan, C.; Baumgardner, J. L.; Pfaff, R. F., Jr.; Hairston, M. R.; Mendillo, M.; Taylor, M. J.; Moffat-Griffin, T.; Heelis, R. A.; Wroten, J.; Hickey, D.

    2014-12-01

    Magnetically conjugate all-sky imagers (ASIs) from low to sub-auroral latitudes are used to investigate inter-hemispheric coupling of ionospheric processes including medium scale travelling ionospheric disturbances (MSTIDs) and, at higher latitudes, stable auroral red (SAR) arcs. The chain of imagers operated by Boston University in the American sector provide thermosphere/ionosphere information through the observation of brightness patterns in 630.0 nm airglow simultaneously at both hemispheres. Complementary information was obtained from space-based satellite data (C/NOFS, DMSP, GPS and RBSP). This study aims to present a comprehensive analysis of thermosphere/ionosphere processes and their coupling mechanisms covering L-shell values from ~ 1.1 to ~3.

  13. First all-sky upper limits from LIGO on the strength of periodic gravitational waves using the Hough transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbott, B.; Abbott, R.; Adhikari, R.; Ageev, A.; Agresti, J.; Allen, B.; Allen, J.; Amin, R.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Araya, M.; Armandula, H.; Ashley, M.; Asiri, F.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Babak, S.; Balasubramanian, R.; Ballmer, S.; Barish, B. C.; Barker, C.; Barker, D.; Barnes, M.; Barr, B.; Barton, M. A.; Bayer, K.; Beausoleil, R.; Belczynski, K.; Bennett, R.; Berukoff, S. J.; Betzwieser, J.; Bhawal, B.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Black, E.; Blackburn, K.; Blackburn, L.; Bland, B.; Bochner, B.; Bogue, L.; Bork, R.; Bose, S.; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Brau, J. E.; Brown, D. A.; Bullington, A.; Bunkowski, A.; Buonanno, A.; Burgess, R.; Busby, D.; Butler, W. E.; Byer, R. L.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Camp, J. B.; Cannizzo, J.; Cannon, K.; Cantley, C. A.; Cardenas, L.; Carter, K.; Casey, M. M.; Castiglione, J.; Chandler, A.; Chapsky, J.; Charlton, P.; Chatterji, S.; Chelkowski, S.; Chen, Y.; Chickarmane, V.; Chin, D.; Christensen, N.; Churches, D.; Cokelaer, T.; Colacino, C.; Coldwell, R.; Coles, M.; Cook, D.; Corbitt, T.; Coyne, D.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Creighton, T. D.; Crooks, D. R. M.; Csatorday, P.; Cusack, B. J.; Cutler, C.; Dalrymple, J.; D'Ambrosio, E.; Danzmann, K.; Davies, G.; Daw, E.; Debra, D.; Delker, T.; Dergachev, V.; Desai, S.; Desalvo, R.; Dhurandhar, S.; Credico, A. Di; Díaz, M.; Ding, H.; Drever, R. W. P.; Dupuis, R. J.; Edlund, J. A.; Ehrens, P.; Elliffe, E. J.; Etzel, T.; Evans, M.; Evans, T.; Fairhurst, S.; Fallnich, C.; Farnham, D.; Fejer, M. M.; Findley, T.; Fine, M.; Finn, L. S.; Franzen, K. Y.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fyffe, M.; Ganezer, K. S.; Garofoli, J.; Giaime, J. A.; Gillespie, A.; Goda, K.; Goggin, L.; González, G.; Goßler, S.; Grandclément, P.; Grant, A.; Gray, C.; Gretarsson, A. M.; Grimmett, D.; Grote, H.; Grunewald, S.; Guenther, M.; Gustafson, E.; Gustafson, R.; Hamilton, W. O.; Hammond, M.; Hanson, J.; Hardham, C.; Harms, J.; Harry, G.; Hartunian, A.; Heefner, J.; Hefetz, Y.; Heinzel, G.; Heng, I. S.; Hennessy, M.; Hepler, N.; Heptonstall, A.; Heurs, M.; Hewitson, M.; Hild, S.; Hindman, N.; Hoang, P.; Hough, J.; Hrynevych, M.; Hua, W.; Ito, M.; Itoh, Y.; Ivanov, A.; Jennrich, O.; Johnson, B.; Johnson, W. W.; Johnston, W. R.; Jones, D. I.; Jones, G.; Jones, L.; Jungwirth, D.; Kalogera, V.; Katsavounidis, E.; Kawabe, K.; Kawamura, S.; Kells, W.; Kern, J.; Khan, A.; Killbourn, S.; Killow, C. J.; Kim, C.; King, C.; King, P.; Klimenko, S.; Koranda, S.; Kötter, K.; Kovalik, J.; Kozak, D.; Krishnan, B.; Landry, M.; Langdale, J.; Lantz, B.; Lawrence, R.; Lazzarini, A.; Lei, M.; Leonor, I.; Libbrecht, K.; Libson, A.; Lindquist, P.; Liu, S.; Logan, J.; Lormand, M.; Lubiński, M.; Lück, H.; Luna, M.; Lyons, T. T.; Machenschalk, B.; Macinnis, M.; Mageswaran, M.; Mailand, K.; Majid, W.; Malec, M.; Mandic, V.; Mann, F.; Marin, A.; Márka, S.; Maros, E.; Mason, J.; Mason, K.; Matherny, O.; Matone, L.; Mavalvala, N.; McCarthy, R.; McClelland, D. E.; McHugh, M.; McNabb, J. W. C.; Melissinos, A.; Mendell, G.; Mercer, R. A.; Meshkov, S.; Messaritaki, E.; Messenger, C.; Mikhailov, E.; Mitra, S.; Mitrofanov, V. P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Mittleman, R.; Miyakawa, O.; Miyoki, S.; Mohanty, S.; Moreno, G.; Mossavi, K.; Mueller, G.; Mukherjee, S.; Murray, P.; Myers, E.; Myers, J.; Nagano, S.; Nash, T.; Nayak, R.; Newton, G.; Nocera, F.; Noel, J. S.; Nutzman, P.; Olson, T.; O'Reilly, B.; Ottaway, D. J.; Ottewill, A.; Ouimette, D.; Overmier, H.; Owen, B. J.; Pan, Y.; Papa, M. A.; Parameshwaraiah, V.; Parameswaran, A.; Parameswariah, C.; Pedraza, M.; Penn, S.; Pitkin, M.; Plissi, M.; Prix, R.; Quetschke, V.; Raab, F.; Radkins, H.; Rahkola, R.; Rakhmanov, M.; Rao, S. R.; Rawlins, K.; Ray-Majumder, S.; Re, V.; Redding, D.; Regehr, M. W.; Regimbau, T.; Reid, S.; Reilly, K. T.; Reithmaier, K.; Reitze, D. H.; Richman, S.; Riesen, R.; Riles, K.; Rivera, B.; Rizzi, A.; Robertson, D. I.; Robertson, N. A.; Robinson, C.; Robison, L.; Roddy, S.; Rodriguez, A.; Rollins, J.; Romano, J. D.; Romie, J.; Rong, H.; Rose, D.; Rotthoff, E.; Rowan, S.; Rüdiger, A.; Ruet, L.; Russell, P.; Ryan, K.; Salzman, I.; Sandberg, V.; Sanders, G. H.; Sannibale, V.; Sarin, P.; Sathyaprakash, B.; Saulson, P. R.; Savage, R.; Sazonov, A.; Schilling, R.; Schlaufman, K.; Schmidt, V.; Schnabel, R.; Schofield, R.; Schutz, B. F.; Schwinberg, P.; Scott, S. M.; Seader, S. E.; Searle, A. C.; Sears, B.; Seel, S.; Seifert, F.; Sellers, D.; Sengupta, A. S.; Shapiro, C. A.; Shawhan, P.; Shoemaker, D. H.; Shu, Q. Z.; Sibley, A.; Siemens, X.; Sievers, L.; Sigg, D.; Sintes, A. M.; Smith, J. R.; Smith, M.; Smith, M. R.; Sneddon, P. H.; Spero, R.; Spjeld, O.; Stapfer, G.; Steussy, D.; Strain, K. A.; Strom, D.; Stuver, A.; Summerscales, T.; Sumner, M. C.; Sung, M.; Sutton, P. J.; Sylvestre, J.; Takamori, A.

    2005-11-01

    We perform a wide parameter-space search for continuous gravitational waves over the whole sky and over a large range of values of the frequency and the first spin-down parameter. Our search method is based on the Hough transform, which is a semicoherent, computationally efficient, and robust pattern recognition technique. We apply this technique to data from the second science run of the LIGO detectors and our final results are all-sky upper limits on the strength of gravitational waves emitted by unknown isolated spinning neutron stars on a set of narrow frequency bands in the range 200-400Hz. The best upper limit on the gravitational-wave strain amplitude that we obtain in this frequency range is 4.43×10-23.

  14. Orientation variation of dayside auroral arc alignments obtained from all-sky observation at yellow river station, Svalbard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Qi; Yang, Hui-Gen; Lu, Quan-Ming; Hu, Ze-Jun; Han, De-Sheng; Wang, Qian

    2016-05-01

    The orientations of dayside auroral arc alignments were calculated for over 40,000 images from all-sky observation at Yellow River Station, Svalbard. For each arc, its "orientation" and "tilt" are defined as the angle the arc alignment makes with the dusk-dawn direction and the local east-west direction, respectively. The mean arc orientation increases linearly with the increasing magnetic local time (MLT). There is a reversal point of the arc tilt located at near 10.5 MLT. Compared with the mean orientation, auroral arc alignment tilts to morning side in the higher latitude and tilts to evening side in the lower latitude in the prenoon sector, whereas it is the opposite in the postnoon sector. We further studied the effects of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) on the location of the arc tilt reversal point. We found that the reversal position shifts toward the midday for negative By.

  15. Global atmospheric downward longwave radiation over land surface under all-sky conditions from 1973 to 2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Kaicun; Liang, Shunlin

    2009-10-01

    In this article, we first evaluate two widely accepted methods to estimate global atmospheric downward longwave radiation (Ld) under both clear and cloudy conditions, using meteorological observations from 1996 to 2007 at 36 globally distributed sites, operated by the Surface Radiation Budget Network (SURFRAD), AmeriFlux, and AsiaFlux Projects. The breakdown of locations is North America (20 sites), Asia (12 sites), Australia (2 sites), Africa (1 site), and Europe (1 site). Latitudes for these sites range from 0° at the equator to ±50°; elevation ranges from 98 to 4700 m, and six different land cover types are represented (deserts, semideserts, croplands, grasslands, forests, and wetlands). The evaluation shows that the instantaneous Ld under all-sky conditions is estimated with an average bias of 2 W m-2 (0.6%), an average standard deviation (SD) of 20 W m-2 (6%), and an average correlation coefficient (R) of 0.86. Daily Ld under all-sky conditions is estimated with a SD of 12 W m-2 (3.7%) and an average R of 0.93. These results suggest that these two methods could be applied to most of the Earth's land surfaces. Accordingly, we applied them to globally available meteorological observations to estimate decadal variation in Ld. The decadal variations in global Ld under both clear and cloudy conditions at about 3200 stations from 1973 to 2008 are presented. We found that daily Ld increased at an average rate of 2.2 W m-2 per decade from 1973 to 2008. The rising trend results from increases in air temperature, atmospheric water vapor, and CO2 concentration.

  16. Statistical Comparison of Gravity Wave Characteristics Obtained from Airglow All-Sky Observation at Mt. Bohyun, Korea and Shigaraki, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Tae-Yong; Kwak, Young-Sil; Kim, Yong-Ha

    2015-12-01

    Previously, all-sky airglow images observed at Shigaraki (34.9° N, 136.1° E), Japan, during 2004 and 2005 were analyzed in relation to those observed at Mt. Bohyun (36.2° N, 128.9° E) for a comparison of their gravity wave characteristics (Kim et al. 2010). By applying the same selection criteria of waves and cloud coverages as in the case of Mt. Bohyun all-sky images, we derived apparent wavelengths, periods, phase velocities, and monthly occurrence rates of gravity waves at Shigaraki in this study. The distributions of wavelengths, periods, and speeds derived for Shigaraki were found to be roughly similar to those for Mt. Bohyun. However, the overall occurrence rates of gravity waves at Shigaraki were 36% and 34% for OI 557.7 nm and OH Meinel band airglow layers, respectively, which were significantly higher than those at Mt. Bohyun. The monthly occurrence rates did not show minima near equinox months, unlike those for Mt. Bohyun. Furthermore, the seasonal preferential directions that were clearly apparent for Mt. Bohyun were not seen in the wave propagation trends for Shigaraki. These differences between the two sites imply different origins of the gravity waves near the Korean peninsula and the Japanese islands. The gravity waves over the Japanese islands may originate from sources at various altitudes; therefore, wind filtering may not be effective in causing any seasonal preferential directions in the waves in the airglow layers. Our analysis of the Shigaraki data supports recent theoretical studies, according to which gravity waves can be generated from in situ sources, such as mesosphere wind shear or secondary wave formation, in the mesosphere.

  17. AKARI Observation of the Sub-degree Scale Fluctuation of the Near-infrared Background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, H. J.; Lee, Hyung Mok; Matsumoto, T.; Jeong, W.-S.; Lee, Myung Gyoon; Pyo, J.

    2015-07-01

    We report spatial fluctuation analysis of the sky brightness in the near-infrared from observations toward the north ecliptic pole (NEP) by the AKARI at 2.4 and 3.2 μm. As a follow-up study of our previous work on the Monitor field of AKARI, we used NEP deep survey data, which covered a circular area of about 0.4 square degrees, in order to extend fluctuation analysis at angular scales up to 1000″. We found residual fluctuation over the estimated shot noise at larger angles than the angular scale of the Monitor field. The excess fluctuation of the NEP deep field smoothly connects with that of the Monitor field at angular scales of a few hundred arcseconds and extends without any significant variation to larger angular scales up to 1000″. By comparing excess fluctuations at two wavelengths, we confirm a blue spectral feature similar to the result of the Monitor field. We find that the result of this study is consistent with Spitzer Space Telescope observations at 3.6 μm. The origin of the excess fluctuation in the near-infrared background remains to be determined, but we could exclude zodiacal light, diffuse Galactic light, and unresolved faint galaxies at low redshift based on the comparison with mid- and far-infrared brightness, ground-based near-infrared images.

  18. Ground-based search for the brightest transiting planets with the Multi-site All-Sky CAmeRA: MASCARA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snellen, Ignas A. G.; Stuik, Remko; Navarro, Ramon; Bettonvil, Felix; Kenworthy, Matthew; de Mooij, Ernst; Otten, Gilles; ter Horst, Rik; le Poole, Rudolf

    2012-09-01

    The Multi-site All-sky CAmeRA MASCARA is an instrument concept consisting of several stations across the globe, with each station containing a battery of low-cost cameras to monitor the near-entire sky at each location. Once all stations have been installed, MASCARA will be able to provide a nearly 24-hr coverage of the complete dark sky, down to magnitude 8, at sub-minute cadence. Its purpose is to find the brightest transiting exoplanet systems, expected in the V=4-8 magnitude range - currently not probed by space- or ground-based surveys. The bright/nearby transiting planet systems, which MASCARA will discover, will be the key targets for detailed planet atmosphere observations. We present studies on the initial design of a MASCARA station, including the camera housing, domes, and computer equipment, and on the photometric stability of low-cost cameras showing that a precision of 0.3-1% per hour can be readily achieved. We plan to roll out the first MASCARA station before the end of 2013. A 5-station MASCARA can within two years discover up to a dozen of the brightest transiting planet systems in the sky.

  19. The Design of the Low Frequency All Sky Monitor (LoFASM) for the Study of Radio Transients and Student Training

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenet, Fredrick; Cohen, S.; Dartez, L. P.; Ford, A.; Garcia, A.; Hinojosa, J.; Longoria, C.; Lunsford, G.; Mata, A.; Miller, R. B.; Reser, J.; Rivera, J.; Stovall, K.; Creighton, T. D.; Hicks, B.; Price, R. H.; Taylor, G. B.

    2013-01-01

    The Astronomy and Astrophysics Decadal Survey (Astro2010) identified transient science and time-domain studies as one of the most promising discovery areas of the coming decade. The Low Frequency All Sky Monitor (LoFASM) is a new distributed radio array designed specifically to search for and to study transient radio phenomena in the 5-88 MHz frequency range. LoFASM consists of four stations, each made up of 12 cross dipole-antennas. The stations were constructed by undergraduates at the University of Texas at Brownsville's Center for Advanced Radio Astronomy. LoFASM utilizes the same antennas and front-end electronics developed for the Long Wavelength Array (LWA) project by the Naval Research Laboratory. The stations are located at Port Mansfield, Texas, the LWA North Arm site of the LWA1 Radio Observatory in New Mexico, the Green Bank Radio Observatory, West Virginia, and NASA's Goldstone tracking center in California. Having the stations in these geographically distinct regions allows for the immediate discrimination between bonafide astronomical transient events and radio frequency interference. In this presentation, we will give an overview of LoFASM's design and capabilities as well as the project's primary scientific objectives

  20. AKARI Observations of Minor Bodies in the Outer Solar System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekiguchi, T.; Ootsubo, T.; Hasegawa, S.; Usui, F.; Cruikshank, D. P.; Dalle Ore, C. M.; Müller, T. G.

    2012-05-01

    Akari (Astro-F) is an infrared satellite developed by JAXA. We performed Far-IR photometric observations of 4 centaurs, 12 TNOs with FIS, and Near-IR Spectroscopic observations of a naked cometary nucleus object, P/2006 HR30 in 2-5.5 um with the IRC.

  1. Hydrogen and the First Stars: First Results from the SCI-HI 21-cm all-sky spectrum experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voytek, Tabitha; Peterson, Jeffrey; Lopez-Cruz, Omar; Jauregui-Garcia, Jose-Miguel; SCI-HI Experiment Team

    2015-01-01

    The 'Sonda Cosmologica de las Islas para la Deteccion de Hidrogeno Neutro' (SCI-HI) experiment is an all-sky 21-cm brightness temperature spectrum experiment studying the cosmic dawn (z~15-35). The experiment is a collaboration between Carnegie Mellon University (CMU) and Instituto Nacional de Astrofísica, Óptica y Electrónica (INAOE) in Mexico. Initial deployment of the SCI-HI experiment occurred in June 2013 on Guadalupe; a small island about 250 km off of the Pacific coast of Baja California in Mexico. Preliminary measurements from this deployment have placed the first observational constraints on the 21-cm all-sky spectrum around 70 MHz (z~20), see Voytek et al (2014).Neutral Hydrogen (HI) is found throughout the universe in the cold gas that makes up the intergalactic medium (IGM). HI can be observed through the spectral line at 21 cm (1.4 GHz) due to hyperfine structure. Expansion of the universe causes the wavelength of this spectral line to stretch at a rate defined by the redshift z, leading to a signal which can be followed through time.Now the strength of the 21-cm signal in the IGM is dependent only on a small number of variables; the temperature and density of the IGM, the amount of HI in the IGM, the UV energy density in the IGM, and the redshift. This means that 21-cm measurements teach us about the history and structure of the IGM. The SCI-HI experiment focuses on the spatially averaged 21-cm spectrum, looking at the temporal evolution of the IGM during the cosmic dawn before reionization.Although the SCI-HI experiment placed first constraints with preliminary data, this data was limited to a narrow frequency regime around 60-85 MHz. This limitation was caused by instrumental difficulties and the presence of residual radio frequency interference (RFI) in the FM radio band (~88-108 MHz). The SCI-HI experiment is currently undergoing improvements and we plan to have another deployment soon. This deployment would be to Socorro and Clarion, two

  2. Data analysis of gravitational-wave signals from spinning neutron stars. V. A narrow-band all-sky search

    SciTech Connect

    Astone, Pia; Borkowski, Kazimierz M.; Jaranowski, Piotr; Pietka, Maciej; Krolak, Andrzej

    2010-07-15

    We present theory and algorithms to perform an all-sky coherent search for periodic signals of gravitational waves in narrow-band data of a detector. Our search is based on a statistic, commonly called the F-statistic, derived from the maximum-likelihood principle in Paper I of this series. We briefly review the response of a ground-based detector to the gravitational-wave signal from a rotating neuron star and the derivation of the F-statistic. We present several algorithms to calculate efficiently this statistic. In particular our algorithms are such that one can take advantage of the speed of fast Fourier transform in calculation of the F-statistic. We construct a grid in the parameter space such that the nodes of the grid coincide with the Fourier frequencies. We present interpolation methods that approximately convert the two integrals in the F-statistic into Fourier transforms so that the fast Fourier transform algorithm can be applied in their evaluation. We have implemented our methods and algorithms into computer codes and we present results of the Monte Carlo simulations performed to test these codes.

  3. All-sky LIGO search for periodic gravitational waves in the early fifth-science-run data.

    PubMed

    Abbott, B P; Abbott, R; Adhikari, R; Ajith, P; Allen, B; Allen, G; Amin, R S; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Arain, M A; Araya, M; Armandula, H; Armor, P; Aso, Y; Aston, S; Aufmuth, P; Aulbert, C; Babak, S; Baker, P; Ballmer, S; Bantilan, H; Barish, B C; Barker, C; Barker, D; Barr, B; Barriga, P; Barsotti, L; Barton, M A; Bartos, I; Bassiri, R; Bastarrika, M; Behnke, B; Benacquista, M; Betzwieser, J; Beyersdorf, P T; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Biswas, R; Black, E; Blackburn, J K; Blackburn, L; Blair, D; Bland, B; Bodiya, T P; Bogue, L; Bork, R; Boschi, V; Bose, S; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; Brau, J E; Brinkmann, M; Brooks, A F; Brown, D A; Brunet, G; Bullington, A; Buonanno, A; Burmeister, O; Byer, R L; Cadonati, L; Cagnoli, G; Camp, J B; Cannizzo, J; Cannon, K C; Cao, J; Cardenas, L; Cardoso, V; Caride, S; Casebolt, T; Castaldi, G; Caudill, S; Cavaglià, M; Cepeda, C; Chalkley, E; Charlton, P; Chatterji, S; Chelkowski, S; Chen, Y; Christensen, N; Clark, D; Clark, J; Clayton, J H; Cokelaer, T; Conte, R; Cook, D; Corbitt, T R C; Cornish, N; Coyne, D C; Creighton, J D E; Creighton, T D; Cruise, A M; Cumming, A; Cunningham, L; Cutler, R M; Danzmann, K; Daudert, B; Davies, G; Debra, D; Degallaix, J; Dergachev, V; Desai, S; Desalvo, R; Dhurandhar, S; Díaz, M; Dickson, J; Dietz, A; Donovan, F; Dooley, K L; Doomes, E E; Drever, R W P; Duke, I; Dumas, J-C; Dwyer, J; Echols, C; Edgar, M; Effler, A; Ehrens, P; Ely, G; Espinoza, E; Etzel, T; Evans, M; Evans, T; Fairhurst, S; Faltas, Y; Fan, Y; Fazi, D; Fejer, M M; Finn, L S; Flasch, K; Foley, S; Forrest, C; Fotopoulos, N; Franzen, A; Frei, Z; Freise, A; Frey, R; Fricke, T T; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V V; Fyffe, M; Garofoli, J A; Gholami, I; Giaime, J A; Giampanis, S; Giardina, K D; Goda, K; Goetz, E; Goggin, L M; González, G; Gossler, S; Gouaty, R; Grant, A; Gras, S; Gray, C; Gray, M; Greenhalgh, R J S; Gretarsson, A M; Grimaldi, F; Grosso, R; Grote, H; Grunewald, S; Guenther, M; Gustafson, E K; Gustafson, R; Hage, B; Hallam, J M; Hanna, C; Hanson, J; Harms, J; Harry, G M; Harstad, E D; Haughian, E; Hayama, K; Hayler, T; Heefner, J; Heng, I S; Heptonstall, A; Hewitson, M; Hild, S; Hirose, E; Hoak, D; Holt, K; Hosken, D; Hough, J; Huttner, S H; Ingram, D; Ito, M; Ivanov, A; Johnson, B; Johnson, W W; Jones, D I; Jones, G; Jones, R; Ju, L; Kalmus, P; Kalogera, V; Kamat, S; Kanner, J; Kasprzyk, D; Katsavounidis, E; Kawabe, K; Kawamura, S; Kawazoe, F; Kells, W; Keppel, D G; Khalaidovski, A; Khalili, F Ya; Khan, R; Khazanov, E; King, P; Kissel, J S; Klimenko, S; Kocsis, B; Kokeyama, K; Kondrashov, V; Kopparapu, R; Koranda, S; Kozak, D; Kozhevatov, I; Krishnan, B; Kwee, P; Landry, M; Lantz, B; Lazzarini, A; Lei, M; Leonor, I; Li, C; Lin, H; Lindquist, P E; Littenberg, T B; Lockerbie, N A; Lodhia, D; Lormand, M; Lu, P; Lubinski, M; Lucianetti, A; Lück, H; Machenschalk, B; Macinnis, M; Mageswaran, M; Mailand, K; Mandel, I; Mandic, V; Márka, S; Márka, Z; Markosyan, A; Markowitz, J; Maros, E; Martin, I W; Martin, R M; Marx, J N; Mason, K; Matichard, F; Matone, L; Matzner, R; Mavalvala, N; McCarthy, R; McClelland, D E; McGuire, S C; McHugh, M; McIntyre, G; McKechan, D; McKenzie, K; Mehmet, M; Melissinos, A; Mendell, G; Mercer, R A; Meshkov, S; Messenger, C J; Meyers, D; Miller, A; Miller, J; Minelli, J; Mitra, S; Mitrofanov, V P; Mitselmakher, G; Mittleman, R; Miyakawa, O; Moe, B; Mohanty, S D; Moreno, G; Mors, K; Mossavi, K; Mowlowry, C; Mueller, G; Muhammad, D; Mukherjee, S; Mukhopadhyay, H; Mullavey, A; Müller-Ebhardt, H; Munch, J; Murray, P G; Myers, E; Myers, J; Nash, T; Nelson, J; Newton, G; Nishizawa, A; Numata, K; Ochsner, E; O'Dell, J; Ogin, G; O'Reilly, B; O'Shaughnessy, R; Ottaway, D J; Ottens, R S; Overmier, H; Owen, B J; Pan, Y; Pankow, C; Papa, M A; Parameshwaraiah, V; Patel, P; Pedraza, M; Penn, S; Perraca, A; Petrie, T; Pinto, I M; Pitkin, M; Pletsch, H J; Plissi, M V; Postiglione, F; Principe, M; Prix, R; Quetschke, V; Raab, F J; Rabeling, D S; Radkins, H; Raffai, P; Rainer, N; Rakhmanov, M; Ramsunder, M; Reed, T; Rehbein, H; Reid, S; Reitze, D H; Riesen, R; Riles, K; Rivera, B; Robertson, N A; Robinson, C; Robinson, E L; Roddy, S; Rogan, A M; Rollins, J; Romano, J D; Romie, J H; Rowan, S; Rüdiger, A; Ruet, L; Russell, P; Ryan, K; Sakata, S; Sancho de la Jordana, L; Sandberg, V; Sannibale, V; Santamaria, L; Saraf, S; Sarin, P; Sathyaprakash, B S; Sato, S; Saulson, P R; Savage, R; Savov, P; Scanlan, M; Schediwy, S W; Schilling, R; Schnabel, R; Schofield, R; Schutz, B F; Schwinberg, P; Scott, J; Scott, S M; Searle, A C; Sears, B; Seifert, F; Sellers, D; Sengupta, A S; Sergeev, A; Shapiro, B; Shawhan, P; Shoemaker, D H; Sibley, A; Siemens, X; Sigg, D; Sinha, S; Sintes, A M; Slagmolen, B J J; Slutsky, J; Smith, J R; Smith, M R; Smith, N D; Somiya, K; Sorazu, B; Stein, L C; Strain, K A; Stuver, A; Summerscales, T Z; Sun, K-X; Sung, M; Sutton, P J; Takahashi, H; Tanner, D B; Taylor, R; Taylor, R; Thacker, J; Thorne, K A; Thorne, K S; Thüring, A; Tokmakov, K V; Torres, C; Torrie, C; Traylor, G; Trias, M; Ugolini, D; Urbanek, K; Vahlbruch, H; Van Den Broeck, C; van der Sluys, M V; van Veggel, A A; Vass, S; Vaulin, R; Vecchio, A; Veitch, J D; Veitch, P; Villar, A; Vorvick, C; Vyachanin, S P; Waldman, S J; Wallace, L; Ward, H; Ward, R L; Weinert, M; Weinstein, A J; Weiss, R; Wen, L; Wen, S; Wette, K; Whelan, J T; Whitcomb, S E; Whiting, B F; Wilkinson, C; Willems, P A; Williams, H R; Williams, L; Willke, B; Wilmut, I; Winkler, W; Wipf, C C; Wiseman, A G; Woan, G; Wooley, R; Worden, J; Wu, W; Yakushin, I; Yamamoto, H; Yan, Z; Yoshida, S; Zanolin, M; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Zhao, C; Zotov, N; Zucker, M E; Zur Mühlen, H; Zweizig, J

    2009-03-20

    We report on an all-sky search with the LIGO detectors for periodic gravitational waves in the frequency range 50-1100 Hz and with the frequency's time derivative in the range -5 x 10{-9}-0 Hz s{-1}. Data from the first eight months of the fifth LIGO science run (S5) have been used in this search, which is based on a semicoherent method (PowerFlux) of summing strain power. Observing no evidence of periodic gravitational radiation, we report 95% confidence-level upper limits on radiation emitted by any unknown isolated rotating neutron stars within the search range. Strain limits below 10{-24} are obtained over a 200-Hz band, and the sensitivity improvement over previous searches increases the spatial volume sampled by an average factor of about 100 over the entire search band. For a neutron star with nominal equatorial ellipticity of 10{-6}, the search is sensitive to distances as great as 500 pc. PMID:19392186

  4. All Sky Camera, LIDAR and Electric Field Meter: Auxiliary instruments for the ASTRI SST-2M prototype

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leto, Giuseppe; Zanmar Sanchez, Ricardo; Bellassai, Giancarlo; Bruno, Pietro; Maccarone, Maria Concetta; Martinetti, Eugenio

    2015-03-01

    ASTRI SST-2M is the end-to-end prototype telescope of the Italian National Institute of Astrophysics, INAF, designed to investigate the 10-100 TeV band in the framework of the Cherenkov Telescope Array, CTA. The ASTRI SST-2M telescope has been installed in Italy in September 2014, at the INAF observing station located at Serra La Nave on Mount Etna. The telescope is foreseen to be completed and fully operative in spring 2015 including auxiliary instrumentation needed to support both operations and data analysis. In this contribution we present the current status of a sub-set of the auxiliary instruments that are being used at the Serra La Nave site, namely an All Sky Camera, an Electric Field Meter and a Raman Lidar devoted, together with further instrumentation, to the monitoring of the atmospheric and environmental conditions. The data analysis techniques under development for these instruments could be applied at the CTA sites, where similar auxiliary instrumentation will be installed.

  5. Cloud Screening and Quality Control Algorithm for Star Photometer Data: Assessment with Lidar Measurements and with All-sky Images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramirez, Daniel Perez; Lyamani, H.; Olmo, F. J.; Whiteman, D. N.; Navas-Guzman, F.; Alados-Arboledas, L.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the development and set up of a cloud screening and data quality control algorithm for a star photometer based on CCD camera as detector. These algorithms are necessary for passive remote sensing techniques to retrieve the columnar aerosol optical depth, delta Ae(lambda), and precipitable water vapor content, W, at nighttime. This cloud screening procedure consists of calculating moving averages of delta Ae() and W under different time-windows combined with a procedure for detecting outliers. Additionally, to avoid undesirable Ae(lambda) and W fluctuations caused by the atmospheric turbulence, the data are averaged on 30 min. The algorithm is applied to the star photometer deployed in the city of Granada (37.16 N, 3.60 W, 680 ma.s.l.; South-East of Spain) for the measurements acquired between March 2007 and September 2009. The algorithm is evaluated with correlative measurements registered by a lidar system and also with all-sky images obtained at the sunset and sunrise of the previous and following days. Promising results are obtained detecting cloud-affected data. Additionally, the cloud screening algorithm has been evaluated under different aerosol conditions including Saharan dust intrusion, biomass burning and pollution events.

  6. LOBSTER-ISS: an imaging x-ray all-sky monitor for the International Space Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraser, George W.; Brunton, Adam N.; Bannister, Nigel P.; Pearson, James F.; Ward, Martin; Stevenson, Tim J.; Watson, D. J.; Warwick, Bob; Whitehead, S.; O'Brian, Paul; White, Nicholas; Jahoda, Keith; Black, Kevin; Hunter, Stanley D.; Deines-Jones, Phil; Priedhorsky, William C.; Brumby, Steven P.; Borozdin, Konstantin N.; Vestrand, T.; Fabian, A. C.; Nugent, Keith A.; Peele, Andrew G.; Irving, Thomas H.; Price, Steve; Eckersley, Steve; Renouf, Ian; Smith, Mark; Parmar, Arvind N.; McHardy, I. M.; Uttley, P.; Lawrence, A.

    2002-01-01

    We describe the design of Lobster-ISS, an X-ray imaging all-sky monitor (ASM) to be flown as an attached payload on the International Space Station. Lobster-ISS is the subject of an ESA Phase-A study which will begin in December 2001. With an instantaneous field of view 162 x 22.5 degrees, Lobster-ISS will map almost the complete sky every 90 minute ISS orbit, generating a confusion-limited catalogue of ~250,000 sources every 2 months. Lobster-ISS will use focusing microchannel plate optics and imaging gas proportional micro-well detectors; work is currently underway to improve the MCP optics and to develop proportional counter windows with enhanced transmission and negligible rates of gas leakage, thus improving instrument throughput and reducing mass. Lobster-ISS provides an order of magnitude improvement in the sensitivity of X-ray ASMs, and will, for the first time, provide continuous monitoring of the sky in the soft X-ray region (0.1-3.5 keV). Lobster-ISS provides long term monitoring of all classes of variable X-ray source, and an essential alert facility, with rapid detection of transient X-ray sources such as Gamma-Ray Burst afterglows being relayed to contemporary pointed X-ray observatories. The mission, with a nominal lifetime of 3 years, is scheduled for launch on the Shuttle c.2009.

  7. Searching for Variability in the Gamma-ray Sky using the Fermi All-sky Variability Analysis (FAVA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kocevski, Daniel; Buehler, Rolf; Ajello, Marco; Giomi, Matteo; Fermi LAT Collaboration

    2016-01-01

    We present the results of the second Fermi All-sky Variability Analysis (FAVA) catalog, consisting of a search for week long variability above 100 MeV using the new Pass 8 data selection. The catalog includes over 2000 flares, spanning 6 years of the Fermi mission, with hundreds of flares that are not associated with any known catalog source. FAVA was designed to efficiently search for variable sources over a wide range of energies and timescales. Unlike a traditional likelihood analysis, the analysis performed by FAVA uses the mission averaged emission as a background, and is as such independent of any model for the diffuse gamma-ray emission. This makes the FAVA analysis especially sensitive to variable sources in the Galactic plane. This analysis is also computationally inexpensive, allowing for blind searches for flux variations over the entire sky. We will present some of the interesting flares identified through this analysis, and highlight those that are typically missed through traditional analysis methods. We will also present the new public FAVA webpage, which is designed to alert the community of new gamma-ray flares in real time and allow users to create relative flux light curves for any position on the sky; a task that is currently computationally intensive to perform over long intervals using traditional analysis tools.

  8. Statistical characteristics of gravity waves observed by an all-sky airglow imager at Maui, HI and Cerro Pachon, Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Bing; Liu, Alan Z.

    2016-07-01

    Many long-term observations, such as airglow imaging, have shown that gravity waves exist in the mesopause region most of the time. These waves deposit momentum and energy into the background atmosphere when dissipating, and thus exert strong influence to the atmosphere. In this study, we focus on (1) the climatology of gravity waves characteristics, (2) the intermittency of gravity wave momentum flux and (3) the duration/lifespan of gravity wave events. These properties have important implications for gravity wave parameterizations. This study is based on multi-year all sky OH airglow observations obtained at Maui, HI (20.7° N, 156.3° W) and the Andes Lidar Observatory in Chile (30.3° S, 70.7° W). The statistical distribution of intrinsic wave parameters and the momentum flux are analyzed. The probability density functions of gravity wave momentum flux and duration can be described by simple functions and are related to the gravity wave intermittency. The probability distributions of the two sites have some similarity but with noticeable differences, indicating different effects of the background flow and wave source on the gravity wave intermittency in the mesopause region.

  9. Observation of MSTIDs in Geomagnetic Conjugate Points, observed by all-sky images of OI 630.0 nm emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefanello, Michel; Schuch, Nelson Jorge; Sarzi Machado, Cristiano; Pimenta, Alexandre; Vestena Bilibio, Anderson; Amorim, Danielle; Andrioli, Vania Fatima

    Medium Scale Traveling Ionospheric Disturbances (MSTIDs) are characterized as wave-like structures which propagate in the ionospheric F region of low and medium latitudes. Its origin is attributed to electrodynamics instabilities processes explained by Perkins Plasma Instability Theory. This study presents an observation of simultaneous occurrence of Medium Scale Traveling Ionospheric Disturbance (MSTID) in both hemispheres, during geomagnetically quiet nights. All-sky images of OI 630.0 nm emission were obtained with two imagers localized in geomagnetic conjugate points: Southern Space Observatory (29.4ºS, 53.8ºW), in São Martinho da Serra, Southern Brazil, and Arecibo Observatory (18.3ºN, 66.7ºW), in Puerto Rico. Using two digisondes installed at Falkland Islands (51.4ºS, 57.5ºW) and Puerto Rico (18.5ºN, 67.1ºW), it was investigated the behavior of F region during the occurrence the MSTIDs. Data from GPS receivers installed at Santa Maria (29.7ºS, 53.7ºW) and Virgin Islands (17.7ºN, 64.7ºW) were employed to calculate the variation of the Total Electronic Content (TEC). The analysis of TEC allows to identify the occurrence of ionospheric irregularities, such as MSTIDs.

  10. Ground-based All-sky Mid-infrared and Visible Imagery for Purposes of Characterizing Cloud Properties

    SciTech Connect

    Klebe, Dimitri; Blatherwick, R. D.; Morris, Victor R.

    2014-02-24

    This paper describes the All Sky Infrared Visible Analyzer (ASIVA), a multi-purpose visible and infrared sky imaging and analysis instrument whose primary functionality is to provide radiometrically calibrated imagery in the mid-infrared (mid-IR) atmospheric window. This functionality enables the determination of diurnal hemispherical cloud fraction (HCF) and estimates of sky/cloud temperature from which one can derive estimates of cloud emissivity and cloud height. This paper describes the calibration methods and performance of the ASIVA instrument with particular emphasis on data products being developed for the meteorological community. Data presented here were collected during a field campaign conducted at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Southern Great Plains (SGP) Climate Research Facility from May 21 to July 27, 2009. The purpose of this campaign was to determine the efficacy of IR technology in providing reliable nighttime HCF data. Significant progress has been made in the analysis of the campaign data over the past several years and the ASIVA has proven to be an excellent instrument for determining HCF as well as several other important cloud properties.

  11. Implementation of an F-statistic all-sky search for continuous gravitational waves in Virgo VSR1 data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aasi, J.; Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T.; Abernathy, M. R.; Accadia, T.; Acernese, F.; Ackley, K.; Adams, C.; Adams, T.; Addesso, P.; Adhikari, R. X.; Affeldt, C.; Agathos, M.; Aggarwal, N.; Aguiar, O. D.; Ain, A.; Ajith, P.; Alemic, A.; Allen, B.; Allocca, A.; Amariutei, D.; Andersen, M.; Anderson, R.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Arai, K.; Araya, M. C.; Arceneaux, C.; Areeda, J.; Aston, S. M.; Astone, P.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Austin, L.; Aylott, B. E.; Babak, S.; Baker, P. T.; Ballardin, G.; Ballmer, S. W.; Barayoga, J. C.; Barbet, M.; Barish, B. C.; Barker, D.; Barone, F.; Barr, B.; Barsotti, L.; Barsuglia, M.; Barton, M. A.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Basti, A.; Batch, J. C.; Bauchrowitz, J.; Bauer, Th S.; Behnke, B.; Bejger, M.; Beker, M. G.; Belczynski, C.; Bell, A. S.; Bell, C.; Bergmann, G.; Bersanetti, D.; Bertolini, A.; Betzwieser, J.; Beyersdorf, P. T.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Birch, J.; Biscans, S.; Bitossi, M.; Bizouard, M. A.; Black, E.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blackburn, L.; Blair, D.; Bloemen, S.; Blom, M.; Bock, O.; Bodiya, T. P.; Boer, M.; Bogaert, G.; Bogan, C.; Bond, C.; Bondu, F.; Bonelli, L.; Bonnand, R.; Bork, R.; Born, M.; Borkowski, K.; Boschi, V.; Bose, Sukanta; Bosi, L.; Bradaschia, C.; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Branchesi, M.; Brau, J. E.; Briant, T.; Bridges, D. O.; Brillet, A.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, D. A.; Brown, D. D.; Brückner, F.; Buchman, S.; Bulik, T.; Bulten, H. J.; Buonanno, A.; Burman, R.; Buskulic, D.; Buy, C.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Calderón Bustillo, J.; Calloni, E.; Camp, J. B.; Campsie, P.; Cannon, K. C.; Canuel, B.; Cao, J.; Capano, C. D.; Carbognani, F.; Carbone, L.; Caride, S.; Castiglia, A.; Caudill, S.; Cavalier, F.; Cavalieri, R.; Celerier, C.; Cella, G.; Cepeda, C.; Cesarini, E.; Chakraborty, R.; Chalermsongsak, T.; Chamberlin, S. J.; Chao, S.; Charlton, P.; Chassande Mottin, E.; Chen, X.; Chen, Y.; Chincarini, A.; Chiummo, A.; Cho, H. S.; Chow, J.; Christensen, N.; Chu, Q.; Chua, S. S. Y.; Chung, S.; Ciani, G.; Clara, F.; Clark, J. A.; Cleva, F.; Coccia, E.; Cohadon, P. F.; Colla, A.; Collette, C.; Colombini, M.; Cominsky, L.; Conte, A.; Cook, D.; Corbitt, T. R.; Cordier, M.; Cornish, N.; Corpuz, A.; Corsi, A.; Costa, C. A.; Coughlin, M. W.; Coughlin, S.; Coulon, J. P.; Countryman, S.; Couvares, P.; Coward, D. M.; Cowart, M.; Coyne, D. C.; Coyne, R.; Craig, K.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Crowder, S. G.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, L.; Cuoco, E.; Dahl, K.; Dal Canton, T.; Damjanic, M.; Danilishin, S. L.; D'Antonio, S.; Danzmann, K.; Dattilo, V.; Daveloza, H.; Davier, M.; Davies, G. S.; Daw, E. J.; Day, R.; Dayanga, T.; Debreczeni, G.; Degallaix, J.; Deléglise, S.; Del Pozzo, W.; Denker, T.; Dent, T.; Dereli, H.; Dergachev, V.; De Rosa, R.; DeRosa, R. T.; DeSalvo, R.; Dhurandhar, S.; Díaz, M.; Di Fiore, L.; Di Lieto, A.; Di Palma, I.; Di Virgilio, A.; Donath, A.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Doravari, S.; Dorosh, O.; Dossa, S.; Douglas, R.; Downes, T. P.; Drago, M.; Drever, R. W. P.; Driggers, J. C.; Du, Z.; Dwyer, S.; Eberle, T.; Edo, T.; Edwards, M.; Effler, A.; Eggenstein, H.; Ehrens, P.; Eichholz, J.; Eikenberry, S. S.; Endrőczi, G.; Essick, R.; Etzel, T.; Evans, M.; Evans, T.; Factourovich, M.; Fafone, V.; Fairhurst, S.; Fang, Q.; Farinon, S.; Farr, B.; Farr, W. M.; Favata, M.; Fehrmann, H.; Fejer, M. M.; Feldbaum, D.; Feroz, F.; Ferrante, I.; Ferrini, F.; Fidecaro, F.; Finn, L. S.; Fiori, I.; Fisher, R. P.; Flaminio, R.; Fournier, J. D.; Franco, S.; Frasca, S.; Frasconi, F.; Frede, M.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Fricke, T. T.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fulda, P.; Fyffe, M.; Gair, J.; Gammaitoni, L.; Gaonkar, S.; Garufi, F.; Gehrels, N.; Gemme, G.; Genin, E.; Gennai, A.; Ghosh, S.; Giaime, J. A.; Giardina, K. D.; Giazotto, A.; Gill, C.; Gleason, J.; Goetz, E.; Goetz, R.; Gondan, L.; González, G.; Gordon, N.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Gossan, S.; Goßler, S.; Gouaty, R.; Gräf, C.; Graff, P. B.; Granata, M.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.; Greenhalgh, R. J. S.; Gretarsson, A. M.; Groot, P.; Grote, H.; Grover, K.; Grunewald, S.; Guidi, G. M.; Guido, C.; Gushwa, K.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Hammer, D.; Hammond, G.; Hanke, M.; Hanks, J.; Hanna, C.; Hanson, J.; Harms, J.; Harry, G. M.; Harry, I. W.; Harstad, E. D.; Hart, M.; Hartman, M. T.; Haster, C. J.; Haughian, K.; Heidmann, A.; Heintze, M.; Heitmann, H.; Hello, P.; Hemming, G.; Hendry, M.; Heng, I. S.; Heptonstall, A. W.; Heurs, M.; Hewitson, M.; Hild, S.; Hoak, D.; Hodge, K. A.; Holt, K.; Hooper, S.; Hopkins, P.; Hosken, D. J.; Hough, J.; Howell, E. J.; Hu, Y.; Huerta, E.; Hughey, B.; Husa, S.; Huttner, S. H.; Huynh, M.; Huynh Dinh, T.; Ingram, D. R.; Inta, R.; Isogai, T.; Ivanov, A.; Iyer, B. R.; Izumi, K.; Jacobson, M.; James, E.; Jang, H.; Jaranowski, P.; Ji, Y.

    2014-08-01

    We present an implementation of the F-statistic to carry out the first search in data from the Virgo laser interferometric gravitational wave detector for periodic gravitational waves from a priori unknown, isolated rotating neutron stars. We searched a frequency f0 range from 100 Hz to 1 kHz and the frequency dependent spindown f1 range from -1.6({{f}_{0}}/100\\;Hz)\\times {{10}^{-9}} Hz s-1 to zero. A large part of this frequency-spindown space was unexplored by any of the all-sky searches published so far. Our method consisted of a coherent search over two-day periods using the ℱ-statistic, followed by a search for coincidences among the candidates from the two-day segments. We have introduced a number of novel techniques and algorithms that allow the use of the fast Fourier transform (FFT) algorithm in the coherent part of the search resulting in a fifty-fold speed-up in computation of the F-statistic with respect to the algorithm used in the other pipelines. No significant gravitational wave signal was found. The sensitivity of the search was estimated by injecting signals into the data. In the most sensitive parts of the detector band more than 90% of signals would have been detected with dimensionless gravitational-wave amplitude greater than 5\\times {{10}^{-24}}.

  12. Suzaku Wide-band All-sky Monitor measurements of duration distributions of gamma-ray bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohmori, Norisuke; Yamaoka, Kazutaka; Ohno, Masanori; Sugita, Satoshi; Kinoshita, Ryuuji; Nishioka, Yusuke; Hurley, Kevin; Hanabata, Yoshitaka; Tashiro, Makoto; Enomoto, Junichi; Fujinuma, Takeshi; Fukazawa, Yasushi; Iwakiri, Wataru; Kawano, Takafumi; Kokubun, Motohide; Makishima, Kazuo; Matsuoka, Shunsuke; Nagayoshi, Tsutomu; Nakagawa, Yujin E.; Nakaya, Souhei; Nakazawa, Kazuhiro; Takahashi, Tadayuki; Takeda, Sawako; Terada, Yukikatsu; Urata, Yuji; Yabe, Seiya; Yasuda, Tetsuya; Yamauchi, Makoto

    2016-03-01

    We report on the T90 and T50 duration distributions and their relations with spectral hardness using 1464 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), which were observed by the Suzaku Wide-band All-sky Monitor (WAM) from 2005 August 4 to 2010 December 29. The duration distribution is clearly bimodal in three energy ranges (50-120, 120-250, and 250-550 keV), but is unclear in the 550-5000 keV range, probably because of the limited sample size. The WAM durations decrease with energy according to a power-law index of -0.058(-0.034, +0.033). The hardness-duration relation reveals the presence of short-hard and long-soft GRBs. The short:long event ratio tends to be higher with increasing energy. We compared the WAM distribution with ones measured by eight other GRB instruments. The WAM T90 distribution is very similar to those of INTEGRAL/SPI-ACS and Granat/PHEBUS, and least likely to match the Swift/BAT distribution. The WAM short:long event ratio (0.25:0.75) is much different from Swift/BAT (0.08:0.92), but is almost the same as CGRO/BATSE (0.25:0.75). To explain this difference for BAT, we examined three effects: BAT trigger types, energy dependence of the duration, and detection sensitivity differences between BAT and WAM. As a result, we found that the ratio difference could be explained mainly by energy dependence including soft extended emissions for short GRBs and much better sensitivity for BAT which can detect weak/long GRBs. The reason for the same short:long event ratio for BATSE and WAM was confirmed by calculation using the trigger efficiency curve.

  13. Suzaku Wide-band All-sky Monitor measurements of duration distributions of gamma-ray bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohmori, Norisuke; Yamaoka, Kazutaka; Ohno, Masanori; Sugita, Satoshi; Kinoshita, Ryuuji; Nishioka, Yusuke; Hurley, Kevin; Hanabata, Yoshitaka; Tashiro, Makoto S.; Enomoto, Junichi; Fujinuma, Takeshi; Fukazawa, Yasushi; Iwakiri, Wataru; Kawano, Takafumi; Kokubun, Motohide; Makishima, Kazuo; Matsuoka, Shunsuke; Nagayoshi, Tsutomu; Nakagawa, Yujin E.; Nakaya, Souhei; Nakazawa, Kazuhiro; Takahashi, Tadayuki; Takeda, Sawako; Terada, Yukikatsu; Urata, Yuji; Yabe, Seiya; Yasuda, Tetsuya; Yamauchi, Makoto

    2016-06-01

    We report on the T90 and T50 duration distributions and their relations with spectral hardness using 1464 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), which were observed by the Suzaku Wide-band All-sky Monitor (WAM) from 2005 August 4 to 2010 December 29. The duration distribution is clearly bimodal in three energy ranges (50-120, 120-250, and 250-550 keV), but is unclear in the 550-5000 keV range, probably because of the limited sample size. The WAM durations decrease with energy according to a power-law index of -0.058(-0.034, +0.033). The hardness-duration relation reveals the presence of short-hard and long-soft GRBs. The short:long event ratio tends to be higher with increasing energy. We compared the WAM distribution with ones measured by eight other GRB instruments. The WAM T90 distribution is very similar to those of INTEGRAL/SPI-ACS and Granat/PHEBUS, and least likely to match the Swift/BAT distribution. The WAM short:long event ratio (0.25:0.75) is much different from Swift/BAT (0.08:0.92), but is almost the same as CGRO/BATSE (0.25:0.75). To explain this difference for BAT, we examined three effects: BAT trigger types, energy dependence of the duration, and detection sensitivity differences between BAT and WAM. As a result, we found that the ratio difference could be explained mainly by energy dependence including soft extended emissions for short GRBs and much better sensitivity for BAT which can detect weak/long GRBs. The reason for the same short:long event ratio for BATSE and WAM was confirmed by calculation using the trigger efficiency curve.

  14. Observation of the distribution of heavy neutral atoms in the IBEX-Lo all-sky maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, J.; Kucharek, H.; Moebius, E.

    2014-12-01

    We investigate the spatial distribution of heavy energetic neutral atoms, mostly oxygen and neon, in the sky maps taken with the Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) in 2009 - 2011. The IBEX-Lo sensor, one of two highly sensitive single-pixel cameras on the IBEX spacecraft, measures neutral particles within an energy range from 0.01 to 2 keV. In the time-of-flight detector of IBEX-Lo these neutral atoms can be identified as hydrogen or heavier atoms, such as oxygen. These measurements have provided all-sky maps of neutral hydrogen and oxygen. The dominant feature in these maps is the interstellar oxygen and neon gas flow. Its peak location is approximately consistent with the interstellar helium gas flow (Möbius et al., 2009, Science, 326, 969). The flow distribution is distributed over 210° - 240° ecliptic longitude and -6° - 12° ecliptic latitude. Another prominent feature in the oxygen sky maps at 0.2 to 0.8 keV is an extended tail of the oxygen signal toward lower longitude and higher positive latitude (180° - 210° ecliptic longitude and 0° - 24° ecliptic latitude). The measured peak rates in the extended tail is 3 - 5% of the maximum count rate in the primary oxygen and neon gas flow, but is four times higher than any other surrounding oxygen signals. The extended tail may indicate the secondary component of the interstellar oxygen, which is likely generated by charge exchange between local O+ ions and interstellar neutral H in the outer heliosheath. In this poster, we will discuss these two most prominent features in the oxygen sky maps and their implications for the source and the mechanism generating an extended tail in the oxygen signal.

  15. All-sky search for gravitational-wave bursts in the second joint LIGO-Virgo run

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abadie, J.; Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T. D.; Abernathy, M.; Accadia, T.; Acernese, F.; Adams, C.; Adhikari, R.; Affeldt, C.; Agathos, M.; Agatsuma, K.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; Amador Ceron, E.; Amariutei, D.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Arai, K.; Arain, M. A.; Araya, M. C.; Aston, S. M.; Astone, P.; Atkinson, D.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Aylott, B. E.; Babak, S.; Baker, P.; Ballardin, G.; Ballmer, S.; Barayoga, J. C. B.; Barker, D.; Barone, F.; Barr, B.; Barsotti, L.; Barsuglia, M.; Barton, M. A.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Bastarrika, M.; Basti, A.; Batch, J.; Bauchrowitz, J.; Bauer, Th. S.; Bebronne, M.; Beck, D.; Behnke, B.; Bejger, M.; Beker, M. G.; Bell, A. S.; Belletoile, A.; Belopolski, I.; Benacquista, M.; Berliner, J. M.; Bertolini, A.; Betzwieser, J.; Beveridge, N.; Beyersdorf, P. T.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Birch, J.; Biswas, R.; Bitossi, M.; Bizouard, M. A.; Black, E.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blackburn, L.; Blair, D.; Bland, B.; Blom, M.; Bock, O.; Bodiya, T. P.; Bogan, C.; Bondarescu, R.; Bondu, F.; Bonelli, L.; Bonnand, R.; Bork, R.; Born, M.; Boschi, V.; Bose, S.; Bosi, L.; Bouhou, B.; Braccini, S.; Bradaschia, C.; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Branchesi, M.; Brau, J. E.; Breyer, J.; Briant, T.; Bridges, D. O.; Brillet, A.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Britzger, M.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, D. A.; Bulik, T.; Bulten, H. J.; Buonanno, A.; Burguet–Castell, J.; Buskulic, D.; Buy, C.; Byer, R. L.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Calloni, E.; Camp, J. B.; Campsie, P.; Cannizzo, J.; Cannon, K.; Canuel, B.; Cao, J.; Capano, C. D.; Carbognani, F.; Carbone, L.; Caride, S.; Caudill, S.; Cavaglià, M.; Cavalier, F.; Cavalieri, R.; Cella, G.; Cepeda, C.; Cesarini, E.; Chaibi, O.; Chalermsongsak, T.; Charlton, P.; Chassande-Mottin, E.; Chelkowski, S.; Chen, W.; Chen, X.; Chen, Y.; Chincarini, A.; Chiummo, A.; Cho, H. S.; Chow, J.; Christensen, N.; Chua, S. S. Y.; Chung, C. T. Y.; Chung, S.; Ciani, G.; Clara, F.; Clark, D. E.; Clark, J.; Clayton, J. H.; Cleva, F.; Coccia, E.; Cohadon, P.-F.; Colacino, C. N.; Colas, J.; Colla, A.; Colombini, M.; Conte, A.; Conte, R.; Cook, D.; Corbitt, T. R.; Cordier, M.; Cornish, N.; Corsi, A.; Costa, C. A.; Coughlin, M.; Coulon, J.-P.; Couvares, P.; Coward, D. M.; Cowart, M.; Coyne, D. C.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Creighton, T. D.; Cruise, A. M.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, L.; Cuoco, E.; Cutler, R. M.; Dahl, K.; Danilishin, S. L.; Dannenberg, R.; D'Antonio, S.; Danzmann, K.; Dattilo, V.; Daudert, B.; Daveloza, H.; Davier, M.; Daw, E. J.; Day, R.; Dayanga, T.; De Rosa, R.; DeBra, D.; Debreczeni, G.; Del Pozzo, W.; del Prete, M.; Dent, T.; Dergachev, V.; DeRosa, R.; DeSalvo, R.; Dhurandhar, S.; Di Fiore, L.; Di Lieto, A.; Di Palma, I.; Di Paolo Emilio, M.; Di Virgilio, A.; Díaz, M.; Dietz, A.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Drago, M.; Drever, R. W. P.; Driggers, J. C.; Du, Z.; Dumas, J.-C.; Dwyer, S.; Eberle, T.; Edgar, M.; Edwards, M.; Effler, A.; Ehrens, P.; Endrőczi, G.; Engel, R.; Etzel, T.; Evans, K.; Evans, M.; Evans, T.; Factourovich, M.; Fafone, V.; Fairhurst, S.; Fan, Y.; Farr, B. F.; Fazi, D.; Fehrmann, H.; Feldbaum, D.; Feroz, F.; Ferrante, I.; Fidecaro, F.; Finn, L. S.; Fiori, I.; Fisher, R. P.; Flaminio, R.; Flanigan, M.; Foley, S.; Forsi, E.; Forte, L. A.; Fotopoulos, N.; Fournier, J.-D.; Franc, J.; Frasca, S.; Frasconi, F.; Frede, M.; Frei, M.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Fricke, T. T.; Friedrich, D.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fujimoto, M.-K.; Fulda, P. J.; Fyffe, M.; Gair, J.; Galimberti, M.; Gammaitoni, L.; Garcia, J.; Garufi, F.; Gáspár, M. E.; Gemme, G.; Geng, R.; Genin, E.; Gennai, A.; Gergely, L. Á.; Ghosh, S.; Giaime, J. A.; Giampanis, S.; Giardina, K. D.; Giazotto, A.; Gil-Casanova, S.; Gill, C.; Gleason, J.; Goetz, E.; Goggin, L. M.; González, G.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Goßler, S.; Gouaty, R.; Graef, C.; Graff, P. B.; Granata, M.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.; Gray, N.; Greenhalgh, R. J. S.; Gretarsson, A. M.; Greverie, C.; Grosso, R.; Grote, H.; Grunewald, S.; Guidi, G. M.; Guido, C.; Gupta, R.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Ha, T.; Hallam, J. M.; Hammer, D.; Hammond, G.; Hanks, J.; Hanna, C.; Hanson, J.; Harms, J.; Hardt, A.; Harry, G. M.; Harry, I. W.; Harstad, E. D.; Hartman, M. T.; Haughian, K.; Hayama, K.; Hayau, J.-F.; Heefner, J.; Heidmann, A.; Heintze, M. C.; Heitmann, H.; Hello, P.; Hendry, M. A.; Heng, I. S.; Heptonstall, A. W.; Herrera, V.; Hewitson, M.; Hild, S.; Hoak, D.; Hodge, K. A.; Holt, K.; Holtrop, M.; Hong, T.; Hooper, S.; Hosken, D. J.; Hough, J.; Howell, E. J.; Hughey, B.; Husa, S.; Huttner, S. H.; Huynh-Dinh, T.; Ingram, D. R.; Inta, R.; Isogai, T.; Ivanov, A.; Izumi, K.; Jacobson, M.; James, E.; Jang, Y. J.; Jaranowski, P.; Jesse, E.; Johnson, W. W.; Jones, D. I.; Jones, G.; Jones, R.; Ju, L.; Kalmus, P.; Kalogera, V.; Kandhasamy, S.; Kang, G.; Kanner, J. B.; Kasturi, R.; Katsavounidis, E.; Katzman, W.; Kaufer, H.; Kawabe, K.; Kawamura, S.; Kawazoe, F.; Kelley, D.; Kells, W.; Keppel, D. G.; Keresztes, Z.; Khalaidovski, A.; Khalili, F. Y.; Khazanov, E. A.; Kim, B. K.; Kim, C.; Kim, H.; Kim, K.; Kim, N.; Kim, Y. M.; King, P. J.; Kinzel, D. L.; Kissel, J. S.; Klimenko, S.; Kokeyama, K.; Kondrashov, V.; Koranda, S.; Korth, W. Z.; Kowalska, I.; Kozak, D.; Kranz, O.; Kringel, V.; Krishnamurthy, S.; Krishnan, B.; Królak, A.; Kuehn, G.; Kumar, R.; Kwee, P.; Lam, P. K.; Landry, M.; Lantz, B.; Lastzka, N.; Lawrie, C.; Lazzarini, A.; Leaci, P.; Lee, C. H.; Lee, H. K.; Lee, H. M.; Leong, J. R.; Leonor, I.; Leroy, N.; Letendre, N.; Li, J.; Li, T. G. F.; Liguori, N.; Lindquist, P. E.; Liu, Y.; Liu, Z.; Lockerbie, N. A.; Lodhia, D.; Lorenzini, M.; Loriette, V.; Lormand, M.; Losurdo, G.; Lough, J.; Luan, J.; Lubinski, M.; Lück, H.; Lundgren, A. P.; Macdonald, E.; Machenschalk, B.; MacInnis, M.; Macleod, D. M.; Mageswaran, M.; Mailand, K.; Majorana, E.; Maksimovic, I.; Man, N.; Mandel, I.; Mandic, V.; Mantovani, M.; Marandi, A.; Marchesoni, F.; Marion, F.; Márka, S.; Márka, Z.; Markosyan, A.; Maros, E.; Marque, J.; Martelli, F.; Martin, I. W.; Martin, R. M.; Marx, J. N.; Mason, K.; Masserot, A.; Matichard, F.; Matone, L.; Matzner, R. A.; Mavalvala, N.; Mazzolo, G.; McCarthy, R.; McClelland, D. E.; McGuire, S. C.; McIntyre, G.; McIver, J.; McKechan, D. J. A.; McWilliams, S.; Meadors, G. D.; Mehmet, M.; Meier, T.; Melatos, A.; Melissinos, A. C.; Mendell, G.; Mercer, R. A.; Meshkov, S.; Messenger, C.; Meyer, M. S.; Miao, H.; Michel, C.; Milano, L.; Miller, J.; Minenkov, Y.; Mitrofanov, V. P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Mittleman, R.; Miyakawa, O.; Moe, B.; Mohan, M.; Mohanty, S. D.; Mohapatra, S. R. P.; Moraru, D.; Moreno, G.; Morgado, N.; Morgia, A.; Mori, T.; Morriss, S. R.; Mosca, S.; Mossavi, K.; Mours, B.; Mow–Lowry, C. M.; Mueller, C. L.; Mueller, G.; Mukherjee, S.; Mullavey, A.; Müller-Ebhardt, H.; Munch, J.; Murphy, D.; Murray, P. G.; Mytidis, A.; Nash, T.; Naticchioni, L.; Necula, V.; Nelson, J.; Neri, I.; Newton, G.; Nguyen, T.; Nishizawa, A.; Nitz, A.; Nocera, F.; Nolting, D.; Normandin, M. E.; Nuttall, L.; Ochsner, E.; O'Dell, J.; Oelker, E.; Ogin, G. H.; Oh, J. J.; Oh, S. H.; O'Reilly, B.; O'Shaughnessy, R.; Osthelder, C.; Ott, C. D.; Ottaway, D. J.; Ottens, R. S.; Overmier, H.; Owen, B. J.; Page, A.; Pagliaroli, G.; Palladino, L.; Palomba, C.; Pan, Y.; Pankow, C.; Paoletti, F.; Papa, M. A.; Parisi, M.; Pasqualetti, A.; Passaquieti, R.; Passuello, D.; Patel, P.; Pedraza, M.; Peiris, P.; Pekowsky, L.; Penn, S.; Perreca, A.; Persichetti, G.; Phelps, M.; Pichot, M.; Pickenpack, M.; Piergiovanni, F.; Pietka, M.; Pinard, L.; Pinto, I. M.; Pitkin, M.; Pletsch, H. J.; Plissi, M. V.; Poggiani, R.; Pöld, J.; Postiglione, F.; Prato, M.; Predoi, V.; Prestegard, T.; Price, L. R.; Prijatelj, M.; Principe, M.; Privitera, S.; Prix, R.; Prodi, G. A.; Prokhorov, L. G.; Puncken, O.; Punturo, M.; Puppo, P.; Quetschke, V.; Quitzow-James, R.; Raab, F. J.; Rabeling, D. S.; Rácz, I.; Radkins, H.; Raffai, P.; Rakhmanov, M.; Rankins, B.; Rapagnani, P.; Raymond, V.; Re, V.; Redwine, K.; Reed, C. M.; Reed, T.; Regimbau, T.; Reid, S.; Reitze, D. H.; Ricci, F.; Riesen, R.; Riles, K.; Robertson, N. A.; Robinet, F.; Robinson, C.; Robinson, E. L.; Rocchi, A.; Roddy, S.; Rodriguez, C.; Rodruck, M.; Rolland, L.; Rollins, J. G.; Romano, J. D.; Romano, R.; Romie, J. H.; Rosińska, D.; Röver, C.; Rowan, S.; Rüdiger, A.; Ruggi, P.; Ryan, K.; Sainathan, P.; Salemi, F.; Sammut, L.; Sandberg, V.; Sannibale, V.; Santamaría, L.; Santiago-Prieto, I.; Santostasi, G.; Sassolas, B.; Sathyaprakash, B. S.; Sato, S.; Saulson, P. R.; Savage, R. L.; Schilling, R.; Schnabel, R.; Schofield, R. M. S.; Schreiber, E.; Schulz, B.; Schutz, B. F.; Schwinberg, P.; Scott, J.; Scott, S. M.; Seifert, F.; Sellers, D.; Sentenac, D.; Sergeev, A.; Shaddock, D. A.; Shaltev, M.; Shapiro, B.; Shawhan, P.; Shoemaker, D. H.; Sibley, A.; Siemens, X.; Sigg, D.; Singer, A.; Singer, L.; Sintes, A. M.; Skelton, G. R.; Slagmolen, B. J. J.; Slutsky, J.; Smith, J. R.; Smith, M. R.; Smith, R. J. E.; Smith-Lefebvre, N. D.; Somiya, K.; Sorazu, B.; Soto, J.; Speirits, F. C.; Sperandio, L.; Stefszky, M.; Stein, A. J.; Stein, L. C.; Steinert, E.; Steinlechner, J.; Steinlechner, S.; Steplewski, S.; Stochino, A.; Stone, R.; Strain, K. A.; Strigin, S. E.; Stroeer, A. S.; Sturani, R.; Stuver, A. L.; Summerscales, T. Z.; Sung, M.; Susmithan, S.; Sutton, P. J.; Swinkels, B.; Tacca, M.; Taffarello, L.; Talukder, D.; Tanner, D. B.; Tarabrin, S. P.; Taylor, J. R.; Taylor, R.; Thomas, P.; Thorne, K. A.; Thorne, K. S.; Thrane, E.; Thüring, A.; Tokmakov, K. V.; Tomlinson, C.; Toncelli, A.; Tonelli, M.; Torre, O.; Torres, C.; Torrie, C. I.; Tournefier, E.; Travasso, F.; Traylor, G.; Tseng, K.; Tucker, E.; Ugolini, D.; Vahlbruch, H.; Vajente, G.; van den Brand, J. F. J.; Van Den Broeck, C.; van der Putten, S.; van Veggel, A. A.; Vass, S.; Vasuth, M.; Vaulin, R.; Vavoulidis, M.; Vecchio, A.; Vedovato, G.; Veitch, J.; Veitch, P. J.; Veltkamp, C.; Verkindt, D.; Vetrano, F.; Viceré, A.; Villar, A. E.; Vinet, J.-Y.; Vitale, S.; Vocca, H.; Vorvick, C.; Vyatchanin, S. P.; Wade, A.; Wade, L.; Wade, M.; Waldman, S. J.; Wallace, L.; Wan, Y.; Wang, M.; Wang, X.; Wang, Z.; Wanner, A.; Ward, R. L.; Was, M.; Weinert, M.; Weinstein, A. J.; Weiss, R.; Wen, L.; Wessels, P.; West, M.; Westphal, T.; Wette, K.; Whelan, J. T.; Whitcomb, S. E.; White, D. J.; Whiting, B. F.; Wilkinson, C.; Willems, P. A.; Williams, L.; Williams, R.; Willke, B.; Winkelmann, L.; Winkler, W.; Wipf, C. C.; Wiseman, A. G.; Wittel, H.; Woan, G.; Wooley, R.; Worden, J.; Yakushin, I.; Yamamoto, H.; Yamamoto, K.; Yancey, C. C.; Yang, H.; Yeaton-Massey, D.; Yoshida, S.; Yu, P.; Yvert, M.; Zadrożny, A.; Zanolin, M.; Zendri, J.-P.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, W.; Zhao, C.; Zotov, N.; Zucker, M. E.; Zweizig, J.

    2012-06-01

    We present results from a search for gravitational-wave bursts in the data collected by the LIGO and Virgo detectors between July 7, 2009 and October 20, 2010: data are analyzed when at least two of the three LIGO-Virgo detectors are in coincident operation, with a total observation time of 207 days. The analysis searches for transients of duration ≲1s over the frequency band 64-5000 Hz, without other assumptions on the signal waveform, polarization, direction or occurrence time. All identified events are consistent with the expected accidental background. We set frequentist upper limits on the rate of gravitational-wave bursts by combining this search with the previous LIGO-Virgo search on the data collected between November 2005 and October 2007. The upper limit on the rate of strong gravitational-wave bursts at the Earth is 1.3 events per year at 90% confidence. We also present upper limits on source rate density per year and Mpc3 for sample populations of standard-candle sources. As in the previous joint run, typical sensitivities of the search in terms of the root-sum-squared strain amplitude for these waveforms lie in the range ˜5×10-22Hz-1/2 to ˜1×10-20Hz-1/2. The combination of the two joint runs entails the most sensitive all-sky search for generic gravitational-wave bursts and synthesizes the results achieved by the initial generation of interferometric detectors.

  16. Simultaneous DMSP, all-sky camera, and IMAGE FUV observations of the brightening arc at a substorm pseudo-breakup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yago, K.; Shiokawa, K.; Yumoto, K.; Baishev, D. G.; Solovyev, S. I.; Rich, F. J.

    2007-01-01

    Auroral particles, field-aligned currents, and plasma convections in the vicinity of the brightening arc at substorm onset are still not well understood, since it is very rare to have conjugate satellite measurements above the brightening arc. In this paper, we investigate the characteristics of auroral particles and fields associated with the brightening arc at a pseudo-onset of substorm on October 31, 2000, using ground all-sky TV images, IMAGE FUV auroral images, and particle, magnetic field, and plasma flow data obtained by the DMSP F12 satellite. The arc brightening at Tixie (66.0°MLAT), Russia, occurred at 1004 UT (18.75 MLT) coincident with a coherent Pi 2 pulsation at midlatitudes and with the DMSP crossing above the arc. The brightening arc did not develop on a global scale, indicating that this event is a pseudo auroral breakup, which occurred ~16 min before the major substorm expansion onset. IMAGE auroral images indicate that the longitude of the brightening center was ~2.5 h nightside of Tixie. The DMSP data show that the precipitating particles associated with the brightening arc correspond to an electron inverted-V structure at the equatorward edge of the electron precipitation region. The arc was located in the energetic (>1 keV) ion precipitation region, near the equatorward boundary of the upward region 1 field-aligned current, and at the peak of the sunward convection velocity. These facts indicate that the brightening arc at duskside of the onset local time was located in the inner plasma sheet at the inner edge of the region 1 current source in the sunward convection region.

  17. Pi2 modulation of aurora as observed by all-sky TV image and magnetometers on board two geosynchronous satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saka, O.; Hayashi, K.

    2007-12-01

    We analyzed the auroral event of January 24 1986 using all-sky TV images and magnetometer data from two geosynchronous satellites (Goes5 and Goes6) separated by 2 hours of local time. From those analyses we found that poleward expansion of aurora following the auroral onset by 1 min was accompanied by surface waves excited in the midnight sector. The surface waves demonstrated out-of-phase relation in the D component (dipole east) and in-phase relation in the V component (radial outward) at GOES5 and GOES6 meridians, respectively. The oscillations in V-D plane led to CCW polarizations in the dawn side of aurora and CW polarizations in the dusk side. Simultaneous observations of those polarization patterns by ground magnetometers in auroral zone suggested an FLR structure in the midnight magnetosphere. We found that auroras ignited between GOES5 and GOES6 meridians were intensified when the largest eastward and westward bending of field lines occurred in the dawn and dusk side of aurora. The latitudinal extent of auroral modulations by surface waves expanded in geomagnetic latitudes up to 70N. Surface waves excited in the midnight magnetosphere might act as possible wave energy sources for auroral acceleration regions in lower altitudes. Those surface waves may also be a driving source of slow shock that supplies kinetic energies (bulk plasma flow) directly to the acceleration regions. A slow shock model based on double adiabatic equations of state was constructed. This theoretical model showed that although slow shock cannot carry particles having pitch angle distributions that are peaked perpendicular to the field lines, slow shock carry particles having isotropic pitch angle distributions. It is supposed that magnetic mirror force is responsible for this effect.

  18. Analysis of close conjunctions between dayside polar cap airglow patches and flow channels by all-sky imager and DMSP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Boyi; Nishimura, Yukitoshi; Lyons, Larry R.; Zou, Ying; Carlson, Herbert C.; Frey, Harald U.; Mende, Stephen B.

    2016-09-01

    Recent imager and radar observations in the nightside polar cap have shown evidence that polar cap patches are associated with localized flow channels. To understand how flow channels propagate from the dayside auroral oval into the polar cap, we use an all-sky imager in Antarctica and DMSP (F13, F15, F16, F17 and F18) to determine properties of density and flows associated with dayside polar cap patches. We identified 50 conjunction events during the southern winter seasons of 2007-2011. In a majority (45) of events, longitudinally narrow flow enhancements directed anti-sunward are found to be collocated with the patches, have velocities (up to a few km/s) substantially larger than the large-scale background flows (~500 m/s) and have widths comparable to patch widths (~400 km). While the patches start with poleward moving auroral forms (PMAFs) as expected, many PMAFs propagate azimuthally away from the noon over a few hours of MLT, resulting in formation of polar cap patches quite far away from the noon, as early as ~6 MLT. The MLT separation from the noon is found to be proportional to the IMF |By|. Fast polar cap flows of >~1500 m/s are predominantly seen during large IMF |By| and small |Bz|. The presence of fast, anti-sunward flow channels associated with the polar cap patches suggests that the flow channels form in the dayside auroral oval through transient reconnection and can be the source of flow channels propagating into the polar cap.

  19. DETECTING VARIABILITY IN MASSIVE ASTRONOMICAL TIME-SERIES DATA. II. VARIABLE CANDIDATES IN THE NORTHERN SKY VARIABILITY SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, Min-Su; Yi, Hahn; Kim, Dae-Won; Chang, Seo-Won; Byun, Yong-Ik E-mail: yihahn@galaxy.yonsei.ac.kr E-mail: seowony@galaxy.yonsei.ac.kr

    2012-03-15

    We present variability analysis of data from the Northern Sky Variability Survey (NSVS). Using the clustering method, which defines variable candidates as outliers from large clusters, we cluster 16,189,040 light curves having data points at more than 15 epochs as variable and non-variable candidates in 638 NSVS fields. Variable candidates are selected depending on how strongly they are separated from the largest cluster and how rarely they are grouped together in eight-dimensional space spanned by variability indices. All NSVS light curves are also cross-correlated with IRAS, AKARI, Two Micron All Sky Survey, Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), and GALEX objects, as well as known objects in the SIMBAD database. The variability analysis and cross-correlation results are provided in a public online database, which can be used to select interesting objects for further investigation. Adopting conservative selection criteria for variable candidates, we find about 1.8 million light curves as possible variable candidates in the NSVS data, corresponding to about 10% of our entire NSVS sample. Multi-wavelength colors help us find specific types of variability among the variable candidates. Moreover, we also use morphological classification from other surveys such as SDSS to suppress spurious cases caused by blending objects or extended sources due to the low angular resolution of the NSVS.

  20. Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer All-Sky Monitor Detection of the Orbital Period of Scorpius X-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanderlinde, Keith W.; Levine, Alan M.; Rappaport, Saul A.

    2003-06-01

    The orbital period of Scorpius X-1 has been accepted as 0.787313 days since its discovery in archival optical photometric data by Gottlieb, Wright, & Liller. This period has apparently been confirmed multiple times in the years since in both photometric and spectroscopic optical observations, although to date only marginal evidence has been reported for modulation of the X-ray intensity at that period. We have used data taken with the All Sky Monitor on board the Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer over the past 6 years to search for such a modulation. A major difficulty in detecting the orbit in X-ray data is presented by the flaring behavior in this source, wherein the (1.5-12 keV) X-ray intensity can change by up to a factor of 2 within a fraction of a day. These flares contribute nearly white noise to Fourier transforms of the intensity time series and thereby tend to obscure weak modulations, i.e., of a few percent or less. We present herein a technique for substantially reducing the effects of the flaring behavior while, at the same time, retaining much of any periodic orbital modulation, provided only that the two temporal behaviors exhibit different spectral signatures. Through such a search, we have found evidence for orbital modulation at the ~1% level with a period of 0.78893 days. This period is equal within our accuracy to a period (0.78901 days) that differs by 1 cycle yr-1 from the accepted value and that was also detected by Gottlieb et al. at a strength nearly as great as that of the 0.787313 day periodicity. We note that many of the reported optical observations of Sco X-1 have been made within 1 or 2 months of early June, when Sco X-1 transits the meridian at midnight. All periodicity searches based only on such observations would have been subject to the same 1 cycle yr-1 alias that affected the search of Gottlieb and coworkers. These considerations lead us to suggest that the actual period may in fact be 0.78901 days and that further observations will

  1. All-sky and clear-sky downward surface solar radiation trends for Italy from homogenized instrumental time series (1959-2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manara, Veronica; Brunetti, Michele; Maugeri, Maurizio; Sanchez-Lorenzo, Arturo; Wild, Martin

    2016-04-01

    A dataset of 54 daily Italian downward surface solar radiation records (SSR) has been set up collecting data from different sources. The records have been quality checked and the dataset has been homogenized and completed by means of the neighboring records. Specifically, SSR records required an extensive homogenization procedure which led to adjust most of them, especially during the early period, in order to eliminate non climatic signals caused by changes either in the conditions of the corresponding meteorological station or by changes in the environment surrounding the station. The records were interpolated onto a regular grid and subjected to Principal Component Analysis that allowed identifying two regions: northern and southern Italy. The records of these areas were averaged in order to get all-sky regional SSR records for the 1959-2013 period. In addition, starting from the daily homogenized records, SSR series under clear-sky conditions were established for the 1959-2013 period with the same procedure used for the all-sky series, by considering only the days with a daily total cloud cover mean of 0 okta from corresponding ground-based cloudiness observations. All-sky SSR annual records show a decreasing tendency until the mid-1980s (i.e., dimming) followed by an increasing tendency (i.e. brightening) both for north and south Italy. The strength and the persistence of the tendencies are not the same in all seasons, however the overall picture of Italian SSR trends turns out in reasonable agreement with the dimming/brightening phases observed in many areas of the world. The clear-sky SSR records present stronger tendencies than all-sky SSR records, especially during the dimming period in all seasons and during the brightening period in winter and autumn. This could suggest that the variation of all-sky SSR caused by the increase/decrease in aerosol content has been partially masked by cloud cover variations, especially during the dimming period.

  2. Stellar mass - Metallicity Relation for AKARI-FMOS Infrared Luminous Galaxies at z~0.9

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oi, Nagisa; Matsuhara, Hideo; Goto, Tomo; Pearson, Chris; Buat, Véronique; Malkan, Matthew A.

    2015-08-01

    Heavy elements are synthesized in stars and returned into the interstellar medium reflecting the result of the past star formation activity in a galaxy. Thus, the gas phase metallicity is a key parameter in understanding the processes of the formation and the evolution of a galaxy. Many investigations of stellar mass (M*) and gas phase metallicity (Z) relation (MZ relation), which is more massive galaxies tend to be more metal-rich, and a fundamental relation (FMR), whereby galaxies define a tight surface in the three-dimensional space of M*, Z, and Star Formation Rate (SFR) have done up to z~3.3. However, this relation only holds to ultraviolet, optical, or near-infrared selected star forming galaxies. Since most of star formation activities in galaxies at high-z universe are hidden by dust, to fully understand the MZ relation and its evolution, it is critical to study dusty galaxies.Here, we investigate the MZ relation and FMR for infrared bright galaxies at z~0.9 discovered by AKARI NEP-Deep survey.We estimated the M* and Z from SED fitting using the AKARI NEP-Deep data with its follow-up multi-wavelength photometric data (from X-ray to FIR) and from Halpha-[NII] emission line ratio taken by Subaru/FMOS, respectively. We found that (1) the infrared bright galaxies at z~0.9 is already chemically evolved to the level of star-forming galaxies in the local universe, and (2) the metallicity of our sample is systematically larger than that of the FMR. The results suggest a possibility that metal was actively created in dusty galaxies up to z~1, then outflow blows out dust and gas, suddenly stopping the chemical evolution and star formation activity, and the galaxies end up being what they are today.

  3. Erratum: "Meeting the Cool Neighbors. X. Ultracool Dwarfs from the 2MASS All-Sky Data Release" (2008, AJ, 136, 1290)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reid, I. Neill; Cruz, Kelle L.; Kirkpatrick, J. Davy; Allen, Peter R.; Mungall, F.; Liebert, James; Lowrance, Patrick; Sweet, Anne

    2008-11-01

    IOP Publishing sincerely regrets that an error was made in the acknowledgements section of this article. This has been amended in the online journal and the corrected text is reproduced below. The NStars research described in this paper was partially supported by a grant awarded as part of the NASA Space Interferometry Mission Science Program, administered by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena. Support for K.L.C. is provided by NASA through the Spitzer Space Telescope Fellowship Program, through a contract issued by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology under a contract with NASA. P.R.A. acknowledges support from grant NAG5-11627 to Kevin Luhman from the NASA Long-Term Space Astrophysics program. This publication makes use of data products from the Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS), which is a joint project of the University of Massachusetts and the Infrared Processing and Analysis Center/California Institute of Technology, funded by NASA and the National Science Foundation. We acknowledge use of the NASA/IPAC Infrared Source Archive (IRSA), which is operated by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contract with NASA. We also acknowledge making extensive use of the SIMBAD database, maintained by Strasbourg Observatory, and of the ADS bibliographic service. This research has made extensive use of the M-, L-, and T-dwarf compendium housed at DwarfArchives.org and maintained by Chris Gelino, Davy Kirkpatrick, and Adam Burgasser. This program has also profited from extensive allocations of telescope time at both Kitt Peak Observatory and Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory (CTIO). We thank the National Optical Astronomy Observatory (NOAO) Telescope Allocation Committees for their support of this project and acknowledge the courteous and efficient assistance of the technical support staff: John Glaspey, Darryl Willmarth, Diane Harmer, Bill Gillespie, Hillary Mathis, and Hal Halbedel at KPNO, and

  4. Potential impacts of assimilating all-sky infrared satellite radiances from GOES-R on convection-permitting analysis and prediction of tropical cyclones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Fuqing; Minamide, Masashi; Clothiaux, Eugene E.

    2016-03-01

    The potential impacts of GOES-R satellite radiances on tropical cyclone analysis and prediction were examined through ensemble correlations between simulated infrared brightness temperatures and various model state variables. The impacts of assimilating GOES-R all-sky infrared brightness temperatures on tropical cyclone analysis and prediction were further demonstrated through a series of convection-permitting observing system simulation experiments using an ensemble Kalman filter under both perfect and imperfect model scenarios. Assimilation of the high temporal and spatial resolution infrared radiances not only constrained well the thermodynamic variables, including temperature, moisture, and hydrometeors, but also considerably reduced analysis and forecast errors in the wind fields. The potential of all-sky radiances is further demonstrated through an additional proof-of-concept experiment assimilating real-data infrared brightness temperatures from GOES 13 satellite which was operational in an enhanced scanning mode during Hurricane Karl (2010).

  5. Gravity wave activity observed in the mesosphere and ionosphere on September 16th 2015 by an all-sky imager and dTEC maps over Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wrasse, Cristiano M.; Gobbi, Delano; Buriti, Ricardo; Bageston, José Valentin; Medeiros, Amauri; Paulino, Igo; Cosme Alexandre Figueiredo, M.; Takahashi, Hisao; Azambuja, Rodrigo

    2016-07-01

    All-sky imager was used to observe the wave activity in the mesosphere and a ground network of GPS receivers were used to make detrended Total Electron Content (dTEC) maps to monitor the ionosphere. The wave activity was observed on September 16th 2015 over the southeast region in Brazil. The gravity wave characteristics and the atmospheric conditions for wave propagation will be presented and discussed. The gravity wave source was associated with strong tropospheric convection.

  6. RELEVANT ASPECTS OF MEDIUM-SCALE TIDs RELATED WITH MIDLATITUDES SPREAD- F OBSERVED BY ALL-SKY IMAGING SYSTEM IN THE SOUTHERN HEMISPHERE OVER TWO FULL SOLAR CYCLES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pimenta, A. A.

    2009-12-01

    Using ground-based measurements we investigate the occurrence of medium-scale TIDs (MSTIDs) in the OI 630 nm nightglow emission all-sky images in the Brazilian low latitudes region related with midlatitude Spread F, during over two full solar cycles. The OI 630 nm images obtained during these periods show thermospheric dark band structures (MSTIDs) in low latitudes region propagating from southeast to northwest. These dark patches moved with average speed of about 50-200 m/s. Only during low solar activity period (LSA), ascending solar activity period (ASA) and descending solar activity period the DBS occurrences were observed in the OI630 nm nightglow emission all-sky images. However, during high solar activity (HAS) we didn’t observe the DBS in the all-sky images. In addition, ionospheric data over two stations in Brazil, one at the magnetic equator (São Luís) and the other close to the southern crest of the equatorial ionization anomaly (Cachoeira Paulista) were used to study this kind of structures during high and low solar activity periods. It should be pointed out that these thermospheric/ionospheric events are not related to geomagnetic disturbed conditions. In this work, we present and discuss this phenomenon in the Brazilian sector over two full solar cycles under different solar activity conditions. A possible mechanism for generation of these dark band structures is presented.

  7. Amsterdam-ASTRON radio transient facility and analysis centre: towards a 24 x 7, all-sky monitor for the low-frequency array (LOFAR).

    PubMed

    Prasad, Peeyush; Wijnholds, Stefan J

    2013-06-13

    The Amsterdam-ASTRON Radio Transient Facility And Analysis Centre (AARTFAAC) project aims to implement an all-sky monitor (ASM), using the low-frequency array (LOFAR) telescope. It will enable real-time, 24 × 7 monitoring for low-frequency radio transients over most of the sky locally visible to the LOFAR at time scales ranging from seconds to several days, and rapid triggering of follow-up observations with the full LOFAR on detection of potential transient candidates. These requirements pose several implementation challenges: imaging of an all-sky field of view, low latencies of processing, continuous availability and autonomous operation of the ASM. The first of these has already resulted in the correlator for the ASM being the largest in the world in terms of the number of input data streams. We have carried out test observations using existing LOFAR infrastructure, in order to quantify and constrain crucial instrumental design criteria for the ASM. In this study, we present an overview of the AARTFAAC data-processing pipeline and illustrate some of the aforementioned challenges by showing all-sky images obtained from one of the test observations. These results provide quantitative estimates of the capabilities of the instrument. PMID:23630370

  8. AKARI Mapping of an Externally Heated Pre-Stellar Core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nutter, D.; Ward-Thompson, D.; Stamatellos, D.

    2009-12-01

    We present observations of the L1155C pre-stellar core in the Cepheus molecular cloud, taken using the FIS instrument on the AKARI satellite. We compare these data to SCUBA and ISOPHOT data. All of the data show a relation between the position of the emission peak and wavelength, which we interpret as a temperature gradient. We fit modified blackbody curves to the spectral energy distributions at two positions in the core and find that the core is approximately 2 K warmer at one edge than in the centre. We carry out radiative transfer modelling and include the effects from the nearby A6V star BD+67 1263. We generate a good fit to the observed data at all wavelengths, and demonstrate that the appearance of the core at different wavelengths can be explained by the observed temperature gradient, caused by BD+67 1263. Our findings illustrate very clearly that the apparent morphology of a pre-stellar core can be highly dependent on the wavelength of the observation, and that temperature gradients must be taken into account before converting images into column density distributions. This is important to note when interpreting AKARI and Spitzer data and will also be significant for Herschel data.

  9. Planck early results. XIX. All-sky temperature and dust optical depth from Planck and IRAS. Constraints on the "dark gas" in our Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Planck Collaboration; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Arnaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Balbi, A.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartlett, J. G.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoît, A.; Bernard, J.-P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bhatia, R.; Bock, J. J.; Bonaldi, A.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Boulanger, F.; Bucher, M.; Burigana, C.; Cabella, P.; Cardoso, J.-F.; Catalano, A.; Cayón, L.; Challinor, A.; Chamballu, A.; Chiang, L.-Y.; Chiang, C.; Christensen, P. R.; Clements, D. L.; Colombi, S.; Couchot, F.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B. P.; Cuttaia, F.; Dame, T. M.; Danese, L.; Davies, R. D.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Gasperis, G.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Delouis, J.-M.; Désert, F.-X.; Dickinson, C.; Dobashi, K.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Dörl, U.; Douspis, M.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Falgarone, E.; Finelli, F.; Forni, O.; Fosalba, P.; Frailis, M.; Franceschi, E.; Fukui, Y.; Galeotta, S.; Ganga, K.; Giard, M.; Giardino, G.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gratton, S.; Gregorio, A.; Grenier, I. A.; Gruppuso, A.; Hansen, F. K.; Harrison, D.; Helou, G.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W. A.; Hovest, W.; Hoyland, R. J.; Huffenberger, K. M.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jones, W. C.; Juvela, M.; Kawamura, A.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kisner, T. S.; Kneissl, R.; Knox, L.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lamarre, J.-M.; Lasenby, A.; Laureijs, R. J.; Lawrence, C. R.; Leach, S.; Leonardi, R.; Leroy, C.; Lilje, P. B.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; MacTavish, C. J.; Maffei, B.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Mann, R.; Maris, M.; Martin, P.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Matarrese, S.; Matthai, F.; Mazzotta, P.; McGehee, P.; Meinhold, P. R.; Melchiorri, A.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Miville-Deschênes, M.-A.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, A.; Naselsky, P.; Natoli, P.; Netterfield, C. B.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; O'Dwyer, I. J.; Onishi, T.; Osborne, S.; Pajot, F.; Paladini, R.; Paradis, D.; Pasian, F.; Patanchon, G.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Perrotta, F.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Ponthieu, N.; Poutanen, T.; Prézeau, G.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J.-L.; Reach, W. T.; Reinecke, M.; Renault, C.; Ricciardi, S.; Riller, T.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Rowan-Robinson, M.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Rusholme, B.; Sandri, M.; Santos, D.; Savini, G.; Scott, D.; Seiffert, M. D.; Shellard, P.; Smoot, G. F.; Starck, J.-L.; Stivoli, F.; Stolyarov, V.; Stompor, R.; Sudiwala, R.; Sygnet, J.-F.; Tauber, J. A.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Torre, J.-P.; Tristram, M.; Tuovinen, J.; Umana, G.; Valenziano, L.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Vittorio, N.; Wade, L. A.; Wandelt, B. D.; Wilkinson, A.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.

    2011-12-01

    An all sky map of the apparent temperature and optical depth of thermal dust emission is constructed using the Planck-HFI (350μm to 2 mm) andIRAS(100μm) data. The optical depth maps are correlated with tracers of the atomic (Hi) and molecular gas traced by CO. The correlation with the column density of observed gas is linear in the lowest column density regions at high Galactic latitudes. At high NH, the correlation is consistent with that of the lowest NH, for a given choice of the CO-to-H2 conversion factor. In the intermediate NH range, a departure from linearity is observed, with the dust optical depth in excess of the correlation. This excess emission is attributed to thermal emission by dust associated with a dark gas phase, undetected in the available Hi and CO surveys. The 2D spatial distribution of the dark gas in the solar neighbourhood (|bII| > 10°) is shown to extend around known molecular regions traced by CO. The average dust emissivity in the Hi phase in the solar neighbourhood is found to be τD/NHtot = 5.2×10-26 cm2 at 857 GHz. It follows roughly a power law distribution with a spectral index β = 1.8 all the way down to 3 mm, although the SED flattens slightly in the millimetre. Taking into account the spectral shape of the dust optical depth, the emissivity is consistent with previous values derived fromFIRAS measurements at high latitudes within 10%. The threshold for the existence of the dark gas is found at NHtot = (8.0±0.58)×1020 H cm-2 (AV = 0.4mag). Assuming the same high frequency emissivity for the dust in the atomic and the molecular phases leads to an average XCO = (2.54 ± 0.13) × 1020 H2 cm-2/(K km s-1). The mass of dark gas is found to be 28% of the atomic gas and 118% of the CO emitting gas in the solar neighbourhood. The Galactic latitude distribution shows that its mass fraction is relatively constant down to a few degrees from the Galactic plane. A possible explanation for the dark gas lies in a dark molecular phase, where

  10. PACT: a sensitive 100 keV-10 MeV all sky pairs and Compton telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laurent, P.; Tatischeff, V.; de Seréville, N.; Limousin, O.; Bertoli, W.; Bréelle, E.; Dolgorouky, Y.; Gostojic, A.; Hamadache, C.; Khalil, M.; Kiener, J.

    2014-07-01

    PACT is a Pair And Compton Telescope that aims to make a sensitive survey of the gamma-ray sky between 100 keV and 100 MeV. It will be devoted to the detection of radioactivity lines from present and past supernova explosions, the observation of thousands of new blazars, and the study of polarized radiations from gamma-ray bursts, pulsars and accreting black holes. It will reach a sensitivity of one to two orders of magnitude lower than COMPTEL/CGRO (e.g. about 50 times lower for the broad-band, survey sensitivity at 1 MeV after 5 years). The concept of PACT will be proposed for the AstroMeV mission in the framework of the M4 ESA Call. It is based upon three main components: a silicon-based gamma-ray tracker, a crystal-based calorimeter (e.g. CeBr3:Sr), and an anticoincidence detector made of plastic scintillator panels. Prototypes of these detector planes are currently tested in the laboratories.

  11. THE WISE BLAZAR-LIKE RADIO-LOUD SOURCES: AN ALL-SKY CATALOG OF CANDIDATE γ-RAY BLAZARS

    SciTech Connect

    D'Abrusco, R.; Paggi, A.; Smith, H. A.; Massaro, F.; Masetti, N.

    2014-11-01

    We present a catalog of radio-loud candidate γ-ray emitting blazars with WISE mid-infrared colors similar to the colors of confirmed γ-ray blazars. The catalog is assembled from WISE sources detected in all four WISE filters, with colors compatible with the three-dimensional locus of the WISE γ-ray emitting blazars, and which can be spatially cross-matched with radio sources from one of the three radio surveys: NVSS, FIRST, and/or SUMSS. Our initial WISE selection uses a slightly modified version of previously successful algorithms. We then select only the radio-loud sources using a measure of the radio-to-IR flux, the q {sub 22} parameter, which is analogous to the q {sub 24} parameter known in the literature but which instead uses the WISE band-four flux at 22 μm. Our final catalog contains 7855 sources classified as BL Lacs, FSRQs, or mixed candidate blazars; 1295 of these sources can be spatially re-associated as confirmed blazars. We describe the properties of the final catalog of WISE blazar-like radio-loud sources and consider possible contaminants. Finally, we discuss why this large catalog of candidate γ-ray emitting blazars represents a new and useful resource to address the problem of finding low-energy counterparts to currently unidentified high-energy sources.

  12. Study of nighttime Medium Scale Travelling Ionospheric Disturbances (MSTID's) in the ionospheric F-region using all-sky imager and digisonde data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefanello, M. B.; Machado, C. S.; Pimenta, A. A.; Schuch, N. J.

    2013-05-01

    The plasma irregularities are characterized by an abrupt variation in the ionospheric plasma density at F-region. The ionospheric irregularities may manifest as Travelling Ionospheric Disturbances (TID's), Plasma Bubbles, Blobs and Brightness Waves. Some irregularities can affect the propagation of electromagnetic waves in the ionosphere, interfering in the transmission of radio signals used in telecommunications and positioning systems such as GPS and satellite navigation. This work presents a study of nighttime Medium Scale Travelling Ionospheric Disturbances (MSTID's) using all-sky images in the OI 630.0 nm emission obtained with an all-sky imager installed at the Southern Space Observatory (29.4° S, 53.8° W) in São Martinho da Serra, RS. Also, data of a digisonde installed at Cachoeira Paulista Observatory (22.7° S, 45.0° W) and other at Falkland Islands (51.4° S, 57.5° W), were used in the present study. In this work we present events of MSTID's and the effects of the ionization on its propagation in the nighttime ionosphere.

  13. Studies of Transient X-Ray Sources with the Ariel 5 All-Sky Monitor. Ph.D. Thesis - Maryland Univ.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaluzienski, L. J.

    1977-01-01

    The All-Sky Monitor, an imaging X-ray detector launched aboard the Ariel 5 satellite, was used to obtain detailed light curves of three new sources. Additional data essential to the determination of the characteristic luminosities, rates of occurrence (and possible recurrence), and spatial distribution of these objects was also obtained. The observations are consistent with a roughly uniform galactic disk population consisting of at least two source sub-classes, with the second group (Type 2) at least an order of magnitude less luminous and correspondingly more frequent than the first (Type 1). While both subtypes are probably unrelated to the classical optical novae (or supernovae), they are most readily interpreted within the standard mass exchange X-ray binary model, with outbursts triggered by Roche-lobe overflow (Type 1) or enhancements in the stellar wind density of the companion (Type 2), respectively.

  14. THE FERMI ALL-SKY VARIABILITY ANALYSIS: A LIST OF FLARING GAMMA-RAY SOURCES AND THE SEARCH FOR TRANSIENTS IN OUR GALAXY

    SciTech Connect

    Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Albert, A.; Allafort, A.; Bechtol, K.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Bottacini, E.; Antolini, E.; Bonamente, E.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Bastieri, D.; Bellazzini, R.; Bregeon, J.; Bouvier, A.; Brandt, T. J.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P. E-mail: allafort@stanford.edu [Laboratoire Leprince-Ringuet, Ecole polytechnique, CNRS and others

    2013-07-01

    In this paper, we present the Fermi All-sky Variability Analysis (FAVA), a tool to systematically study the variability of the gamma-ray sky measured by the Large Area Telescope on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. For each direction on the sky, FAVA compares the number of gamma-rays observed in a given time window to the number of gamma-rays expected for the average emission detected from that direction. This method is used in weekly time intervals to derive a list of 215 flaring gamma-ray sources. We proceed to discuss the 27 sources found at Galactic latitudes smaller than 10 Degree-Sign and show that, despite their low latitudes, most of them are likely of extragalactic origin.

  15. PROBING THE DARK AGES AT z ∼ 20: THE SCI-HI 21 cm ALL-SKY SPECTRUM EXPERIMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Voytek, Tabitha C.; Natarajan, Aravind; Peterson, Jeffrey B.; Jáuregui García, José Miguel; López-Cruz, Omar

    2014-02-10

    We present first results from the SCI-HI experiment, which we used to measure the all-sky-averaged 21 cm brightness temperature in the redshift range 14.8 < z < 22.7. The instrument consists of a single broadband sub-wavelength size antenna and a sampling system for real-time data processing and recording. Preliminary observations were completed in 2013 June at Isla Guadalupe, a Mexican biosphere reserve located in the Pacific Ocean. The data was cleaned to excise channels contaminated by radio frequency interference, and the system response was calibrated by comparing the measured brightness temperature to the Global Sky Model of the Galaxy and by independent measurement of Johnson noise from a calibration terminator. We present our results, discuss the cosmological implications, and describe plans for future work.

  16. Relativistic electron precipitations in association with diffuse aurora: Conjugate observation of SAMPEX and the all-sky TV camera at Syowa Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurita, Satoshi; Kadokura, Akira; Miyoshi, Yoshizumi; Morioka, Akira; Sato, Yuka; Misawa, Hiroaki

    2015-06-01

    It has been believed that whistler mode waves can cause relativistic electron precipitations. It has been also pointed out that pitch angle scattering of ˜keV electrons by whistler mode waves results in diffuse auroras. Thus, it is natural to expect relativistic electron precipitations associated with diffuse auroras. Based on a conjugate observation between the SAMPEX spacecraft and the all-sky TV camera at Syowa Station, we report, for the first time, a case in which relativistic electron precipitations are associated with diffuse aurora. The SAMPEX observation shows that the precipitations of > 1 MeV electrons are well accompanied with those of > 150 and > 400 keV electrons. This indicates that electrons in the energy range from several keV to > 1 MeV precipitate into the atmosphere simultaneously. Our result supports the idea that whistler mode waves contribute to both generation of diffuse auroras and relativistic electron precipitations.

  17. A plasma bulk motion in the midnight magnetosphere during auroral breakup inferred from all-sky image and magnetic field observations at geosynchronous altitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saka, O.; Koga, D.; Hayashi, K.

    2007-07-01

    Auroral events that occurred on January 24, 1986 in central Canada were recorded by an all-sky TV imager. During these events, auroral breakup was confined to a region between two foot points of neighboring geosynchronous satellites, GOES5 and GOES6. We examined field line signatures at satellite locations in unique station distributions and concluded that field line observation indicated plasma motion in the equatorial plane. The plasma motion showed an earthward compression combined with bifurcation (duskward or dawnward displacement in dusk/dawn sectors). In addition, we were able to infer an elliptical circulation of plasmas in the equatorial plane at Pi2 periods. Appearance in opposite rotation beside the auroral region indicated excitation of surface waves. We were able to show that auroral breakups occurred at a meridian of bifurcation. We suggest that a high plasma pressure region occurring tailward of geosynchronous altitudes may drive those plasma motions.

  18. The Fermi All-Sky Variability Analysis: A List of Flaring Gamma-Ray Sources and the Search for Transients in our Galaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Albert, A.; Allafort, A.; Antolini, E.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G; Bastieri, D.; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Brandt, T. J.; Ferrara, E. C.; Guiriec, S.; Harding, A. K.; Hays, E.; Hewitt, J.; McEnery, J. E.; Nemmen, R.; Perkins, J. S.; Scargle, J. D; Thompson, D. J.; Troja, E.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we present the Fermi All-sky Variability Analysis (FAVA), a tool to systematically study the variability of the gamma-ray sky measured by the Large Area Telescope on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope.For each direction on the sky, FAVA compares the number of gamma-rays observed in a given time window to the number of gamma-rays expected for the average emission detected from that direction. This method is used in weekly time intervals to derive a list of 215 flaring gamma-ray sources. We proceed to discuss the 27 sources found at Galactic latitudes smaller than 10 and show that, despite their low latitudes, most of them are likely of extragalactic origin.

  19. Coordinated airglow observations between IMAP/VISI and a ground-based all-sky imager on concentric gravity wave in the mesopause

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perwitasari, S.; Sakanoi, T.; Yamazaki, A.; Otsuka, Y.; Hozumi, Y.; Akiya, Y.; Saito, A.; Shiokawa, K.; Kawamura, S.

    2015-11-01

    We present a study of concentric gravity waves (CGWs) event from the coordinated observation between Ionosphere, Mesosphere, upper Atmosphere, and Plasmasphere mapping (IMAP)/Visible and near-Infrared Spectral Imager (VISI), all-sky camera at Rikubetsu, Multi-functional Transport Satellite (MTSAT), Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission, and MF radar at Wakkanai combined with Modern-Era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Application data. IMAP/VISI is the first space-based imager that capable of imaging the airglow in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere region in the nadir-looking direction. Therefore, it has a unique ability to observe a great extend of CGWs propagation. Arc-like shaped, part of CGWs pattern was observed around the mesopause (~95 km) in the O2 762 nm airglow emission obtained by IMAP/VISI at 1204 UT on 18 October 2012. Similar patterns were also observed by the all-sky imager at Rikubetsu (43.5°N, 143.8°E) in OI 557.7 nm and OH band airglow emissions from ~1100 to 1200 UT. Horizontal wavelengths of the observed small-scale gravity waves are ~50 km (OH band and OI 557.7 nm) and ~67 km (O2 762 nm). The source is suggested to be a deep convective activity over Honshu Island which likely was an enhanced convective activity related to a typhoon in the south of Japan. The data showed that the CGWs could propagate up to ~1400-1500 km horizontally from the source to the mesopause but not farther away. Using atmospheric temperature profiles obtained by Thermospheric Ionosphere Mesosphere Energetics Dynamics/Sounding of the Atmosphere using Broadband Emission Radiometry, we conclude that this long-distance propagation of the waves could be caused by thermal duct in the middle atmosphere. The arc-like shaped instead of full circle pattern points out that the wind filtering effect is significant for the particular direction of wave propagation.

  20. All-sky imaging of meteor trails at 55.25 MHz with the first station of the Long Wavelength Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helmboldt, J. F.; Ellingson, S. W.; Hartman, J. M.; Lazio, T. J. W.; Taylor, G. B.; Wilson, T. L.; Wolfe, C. N.

    2014-03-01

    A new capability for high-sensitivity, all-sky monitoring of VHF meteor trail reflections with the first station of the Long Wavelength Array, or "LWA1," is described. LWA1 is a ˜100 m diameter HF/VHF array of 256 crossed-dipole antennas with a unique transient buffer mode that allows it to monitor for meteor trails via all-sky imaging with the same sensitivity as a single-dish antenna ≳ 40 m in diameter. To demonstrate this capability, we have used a 2 h observing run conducted in August 2012 aimed at detecting and characterizing meteor trail reflections of analog TV transmissions at 55.25 MHz. The analysis techniques described here allowed for a detection rate of ˜9500 trails per hour, including the detection of two meteor streams with radiants in the Aries/Perseus and Aquila/Hercules regions that were not previously reported in the literature. In addition, we have found a population of relatively long-duration (˜1 to a few minutes), typically faint trails. These trails have implied horizontal speeds of 15-130 m s-1, with a typical speed of ˜30 m s-1. We have also used high-resolution time series of the brightest trails to characterize decay times over a relatively large geographical area (10°×7° in longitude and latitude) and on short (˜5 min) time scales. Potential enhancements that could be enabled by the addition of more LWA stations are discussed.

  1. AKARI view of star formation in NGC 1313

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, T.; Kaneda, H.; Onaka, T.

    2013-06-01

    Context. In the southwest region of NGC 1313, patchy star-forming regions are found. In the neighborhood, is a giant supershell with a diameter of 3.2 kpc. However, the direct association between star-forming regions and the giant supershell is still unclear. Aims: We investigate the relation between the surface densities of the gas (Σgas) and star formation rate (ΣSFR) within the disk of NGC 1313 to obtain the spatial distribution of the star formation efficiency (SFE). Methods: NGC 1313 was observed with the Infrared Camera (IRC) and Far-Infrared Surveyor (FIS) onboard AKARI in ten bands at 3.2, 4.1, 7, 11, 15, 24, 65, 90, 140, and 160 μm. With these AKARI ten-band images, we spectrally decomposed the stellar and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAHs) components in addition to the cold (~20 K) and warm (~60 K) dust emission components. The cold and warm dust components were converted into the gas mass and the SFR. Results: The SFE shows high values in the regions around the giant supershell, with the highest SFE in the galaxy in the southern spiral arm region. A similar trend can be seen in the spatial distribution of the PAH abundance relative to big grains. We find a power-law dependence of the star formation rate per unit area on the column density ΣSFR proportional to ΣgasN. From a region-by-region analysis, the power-law index N for the northern spiral arm is found to be N ≃ 2.0, which is observed on typical spiral arms, whereas those for the southern spiral arm and giant supershell regions have an index of N ~ 1.6. Conclusions: The PAH abundance and the SFE show anomalously high values in regions around the giant supershell. The enhanced PAH abundance can be caused by shattering of big grains through slow shocks (40 km s-1). The power-law index N = 1.62 ± 0.06 obtained in the giant supershell region can be accounted for by the star formation scenario with collect-and-collapse in the expanding giant supershell. These pieces of evidence strongly

  2. AKARI NEAR-INFRARED SPECTROSCOPY OF LUMINOUS INFRARED GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jong Chul; Lee, Myung Gyoon; Hwang, Ho Seong

    2012-09-01

    We present the AKARI near-infrared (NIR; 2.5-5 {mu}m) spectroscopic study of 36 (ultra)luminous infrared galaxies ((U)LIRGs) at z = 0.01-0.4. We measure the NIR spectral features including the strengths of 3.3 {mu}m polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon emission and hydrogen recombination lines (Br{alpha} and Br{beta}), optical depths at 3.1 and 3.4 {mu}m, and NIR continuum slope. These spectral features are used to identify optically elusive, buried active galactic nuclei (AGNs). We find that half of the (U)LIRGs optically classified as non-Seyferts show AGN signatures in their NIR spectra. Using a combined sample of (U)LIRGs with NIR spectra in the literature, we measure the contribution of buried AGNs to the infrared luminosity from the spectral energy distribution fitting to the IRAS photometry. The contribution of these buried AGNs to the infrared luminosity is 5%-10%, smaller than the typical AGN contribution of (U)LIRGs including Seyfert galaxies (10%-40%). We show that NIR continuum slopes correlate well with WISE [3.4]-[4.6] colors, which would be useful for identifying a large number of buried AGNs using the WISE data.

  3. AKARI observations of the multiphase intergalactic medium of Stephan's Quintet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Toyoaki; Kaneda, Hidehiro; Onaka, Takashi; Kitayama, Tetsu

    2012-08-01

    Stephan's Quintet (SQ, HCG92) is a well studied compact group of galaxies with a disturbed intergalactic medium (IGM). An ``intruder'' galaxy NGC 7318b is currently colliding with the IGM at a relative velocity of 1000 km s-1, causing a large-scale shock front. We observed SQ with the Far-Infrared Surveyor (FIS) aboard AKARI in four far-infrared (far-IR) bands at 65, 90, 140, and 160μm. The 160μm image clearly shows an additional peak of emission overlying structure extending in the North-South direction along the shock ridge seen in the 140μm band, and in H2 and X-ray emission. Whereas most of the far-IR emission in the shocked region is from cold dust (20 K), the [CII]158μm emission - whose luminosity is comparable to that of the warm H2 gas - can significantly contribute to the single peak emission in the 160μm band. We conclude that the [CII] line emission comes from the warm H2 gas in the shock. Our result represents the first detection of shock-excited [CII] line emission.

  4. An Investigation of the Effects of Scan Separation on the Sensitivity of the SETI All Sky Survey for the Case of Gaussian Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lokshin, A.; Olsen, E. T.

    1984-01-01

    The scalloping problem for the case of Gaussian noise statistics is analyzed. The optimal weighting strategy for linearly combining two observations in adjacent beam areas is derived, and the sensitivity and scalloping for this weighting strategy are compared with those realized using a single observation or using equal weighting of two observations. The variation of the probability for detecting ETI signals with scan separation are calculated for the various weighting strategies, assuming that the transmitters are of equal strength and are uniformly distributed throughout space.

  5. Orbital and physical parameters of eclipsing binaries from the All-Sky Automated Survey catalogue. II. Two spotted M < 1 M_⊙ systems at different evolutionary stages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hełminiak, K. G.; Konacki, M.

    2011-02-01

    Aims: We present the results of our detailed spectroscopic and photometric analysis of two previously unknown <1 M_⊙ detached eclipsing binaries: ASAS J045304-0700.4 and ASAS J082552-1622.8. Methods: With the HIgh Resolution Echelle Spectrometer (HIRES) on the Keck-I telescope, we obtained spectra of both objects covering large fractions of orbits of the systems. We also obtained V and I band photometry with the 1.0-m Elizabeth telescope of the South African Astronomical Observatory (SAAO). The orbital and physical parameters of the systems were derived with the PHOEBE and JKTEBOP codes. We investigated the evolutionary status of both binaries with several sets of widely-used isochrones. Results: Our modelling indicates that (1) ASAS J045304-0700.4 is an old, metal-poor, active system with component masses of M1 = 0.8338 ± 0.0036 M⊙, M2 = 0.8280 ± 0.0040 M⊙ and radii of R1 = 0.848 ± 0.005 R⊙ and R2 = 0.833 ± 0.005 R⊙, which places it at the end of the Main Sequence evolution - a stage rarely observed for this type of stars. (2) ASAS J082552-1622.8 is a metal-rich, active binary with component masses of M1 = 0.7029 ± 0.0045 M⊙, M2 = 0.6872 ± 0.0049 M⊙ and radii of R1 = 0.694+0.007-0.011 R⊙ and R2 = 0.699+0.011-0.014 R⊙. Both systems show significant out-of-eclipse variations, probably owing to large, cold spots. We also investigated the influence of a third light in the second system. Light curves are only available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/cgi-bin/qcat?J/A+A/526/A29

  6. A TWO MICRON ALL SKY SURVEY VIEW OF THE SAGITTARIUS DWARF GALAXY. VI. s-PROCESS AND TITANIUM ABUNDANCE VARIATIONS ALONG THE SAGITTARIUS STREAM

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, Mei-Yin; Majewski, Steven R.; Patterson, Richard J.; Cunha, Katia; Smith, Verne V.; Martinez-Delgado, David; Geisler, Doug E-mail: srm4n@virginia.ed E-mail: cunha@noao.ed E-mail: ddelgado@iac.e

    2010-01-10

    We present high-resolution spectroscopic measurements of the abundances of the alpha element titanium (Ti) and s-process elements yttrium (Y) and lanthanum (La) for 59 candidate M giant members of the Sagittarius (Sgr) dwarf spheroidal (dSph) + tidal tail system pre-selected on the basis of position and radial velocity (RV). As expected, the majority of these stars show peculiar abundance patterns compared to those of nominal Milky Way (MW) stars, but as a group, the stars form a coherent picture of chemical enrichment of the Sgr dSph from [Fe/H] = -1.4 to solar abundance. This sample of spectra provides the largest number of Ti, La, and Y abundances yet measured for a dSph, and spans metallicities not typically probed by studies of the other, generally more metal-poor MW satellites. On the other hand, the overall [Ti/Fe], [Y/Fe], [La/Fe], and [La/Y] patterns with [Fe/H] of the Sgr stream plus Sgr core do, for the most part, resemble those seen in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) and other dSphs, only shifted by DELTA[Fe/H] approx +0.4 from the LMC and by approx+1 dex from the other dSphs; these relative shifts reflect the faster and/or more efficient chemical evolution of Sgr compared to the other satellites, and show that Sgr has had an enrichment history more like the LMC than the other dSphs. By tracking the evolution of the abundance patterns along the Sgr stream we can follow the time variation of the chemical make-up of dSph stars donated to the Galactic halo by Sgr. This evolution demonstrates that while the bulk of the stars currently in the Sgr dSph is quite unlike those of the Galactic halo, an increasing number of stars farther along the Sgr stream have abundances like MW halo stars, a trend that shows clearly how the Galactic halo could have been contributed by present-day satellite galaxies even if the present chemistry of those satellites is now different from typical halo field stars. Finally, we analyze the chemical abundances of a moving group of M giants among the Sgr leading arm stars at the North Galactic Cap, but having RVs unlike the infalling Sgr leading arm debris there. Through use of 'chemical fingerprinting', we conclude that these mostly receding northern hemisphere M giants also are Sgr stars, likely trailing arm debris overlapping the Sgr leading arm in the north.

  7. Dwarfs Cooler Than M: The Definition of Spectral Type L Using Discoveries form the 2-Micron All-Sky Survey (2MASS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirkpatrick, J.; Reid, I.; Liebert, J.; Cutri, R.; Nelson, B.; Beichan, C.; Dahn, C.; Monet, D.; Gizis, J.; Skrutskie, M.

    2000-01-01

    Because the TiO and VO bands, which dominate the far-optical portions of late-M spectra, disappear in these cooler dwarfs, we define a new spectral class L in wich metallic oxides are replaced by metallic hydrides and neutral alkali metals as the major spectroscopic signatures.

  8. The AKARI 2.5-5.0 μm Spectral Atlas of Type-1 Active Galactic Nuclei: Black Hole Mass Estimator, Line Ratio, and Hot Dust Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dohyeong; Im, Myungshin; Kim, Ji Hoon; Jun, Hyunsung David; Woo, Jong-Hak; Lee, Hyung Mok; Lee, Myung Gyoon; Nakagawa, Takao; Matsuhara, Hideo; Wada, Takehiko; Oyabu, Shinki; Takagi, Toshinobu; Ohyama, Youichi; Lee, Seong-Kook

    2015-01-01

    We present 2.5-5.0 μm spectra of 83 nearby (0.002 < z < 0.48) and bright (K < 14 mag) type-1 active galactic nuclei (AGNs) taken with the Infrared Camera on board AKARI. The 2.5-5.0 μm spectral region contains emission lines such as Brβ (2.63 μm), Brα (4.05 μm), and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (3.3 μm), which can be used for studying the black hole (BH) masses and star formation activity in the host galaxies of AGNs. The spectral region also suffers less dust extinction than in the ultra violet (UV) or optical wavelengths, which may provide an unobscured view of dusty AGNs. Our sample is selected from bright quasar surveys of Palomar-Green and SNUQSO, and AGNs with reverberation-mapped BH masses from Peterson et al. Using 11 AGNs with reliable detection of Brackett lines, we derive the Brackett-line-based BH mass estimators. We also find that the observed Brackett line ratios can be explained with the commonly adopted physical conditions of the broad line region. Moreover, we fit the hot and warm dust components of the dust torus by adding photometric data of SDSS, 2MASS, WISE, and ISO to the AKARI spectra, finding hot and warm dust temperatures of ~1100 K and ~220 K, respectively, rather than the commonly cited hot dust temperature of 1500 K.

  9. A-Train Aerosol Observations Preliminary Comparisons with AeroCom Models and Pathways to Observationally Based All-Sky Estimates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redemann, J.; Livingston, J.; Shinozuka, Y.; Kacenelenbogen, M.; Russell, P.; LeBlanc, S.; Vaughan, M.; Ferrare, R.; Hostetler, C.; Rogers, R.; Burton, S.; Torres, O.; Remer, L.; Stier, P.; Schutgens, N.

    2014-01-01

    We have developed a technique for combining CALIOP aerosol backscatter, MODIS spectral AOD (aerosol optical depth), and OMI AAOD (absorption aerosol optical depth) retrievals for the purpose of estimating full spectral sets of aerosol radiative properties, and ultimately for calculating the 3-D distribution of direct aerosol radiative forcing. We present results using one year of data collected in 2007 and show comparisons of the aerosol radiative property estimates to collocated AERONET retrievals. Use of the recently released MODIS Collection 6 data for aerosol optical depths derived with the dark target and deep blue algorithms has extended the coverage of the multi-sensor estimates towards higher latitudes. We compare the spatio-temporal distribution of our multi-sensor aerosol retrievals and calculations of seasonal clear-sky aerosol radiative forcing based on the aerosol retrievals to values derived from four models that participated in the latest AeroCom model intercomparison initiative. We find significant inter-model differences, in particular for the aerosol single scattering albedo, which can be evaluated using the multi-sensor A-Train retrievals. We discuss the major challenges that exist in extending our clear-sky results to all-sky conditions. On the basis of comparisons to suborbital measurements, we present some of the limitations of the MODIS and CALIOP retrievals in the presence of adjacent or underlying clouds. Strategies for meeting these challenges are discussed.

  10. Passive all-sky imaging radar in the HF regime with WWV and the first station of the Long Wavelength Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helmboldt, J. F.; Clarke, T. E.; Craig, J.; Dowell, J. D.; Ellingson, S. W.; Hartman, J. M.; Hicks, B. C.; Kassim, N. E.; Taylor, G. B.; Wolfe, C. N.

    2013-09-01

    We present a new passive, bistatic high-frequency (HF) radar system consisting of the transmitters for the radio station WWV and the dipole antenna array that comprises the first station of the Long Wavelength Array (LWA) or "LWA1." We demonstrate that these two existing facilities, which are operated for separate purposes, can be used together as a unique HF radar imager, capable of monitoring the entire visible sky. In this paper, we describe in detail the techniques used to develop all-sky radar capability at 10, 15, and 20 MHz. We show that this radar system can be a useful tool for probing ionospheric structure and its effect on over-the-horizon (OTH) geolocation. The LWA1+WWV radar system appears to be especially adept at detecting and characterizing structures associated with sporadic-E. In addition, we also demonstrate how this system may be used for long-distance, OTH mapping of terrain/ocean HF reflectivity. Finally, we discuss the potential improvements in the utility of these applications as more LWA stations are added.

  11. Sub-relativistic and relativistic electron precipitations above diffuse aurora: Conjugate observations of SAMPEX and the all sky TV camera at Syowa Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurita, S.; Kadokura, A.; Miyoshi, Y.; Sato, Y.; Misawa, H.; Morioka, A.

    2014-12-01

    It has been widely accepted that diffuse auroras are generated by electron precipitations in the energy range from a few keV to tens keV. Recent simulation results based on the quasi-linear theory showed that the scattering by whistler-mode waves plays an important role in the production of precipitating electrons responsible for diffuse auroras. A test particle simulation on electron-whistler interactions shows that relativistic electrons can be scattered into the loss cone simultaneously with the electrons in the energy range from a few keV to tens keV. Thus, it is expected that relativistic electrons precipitate into the atmosphere in association with diffuse auroras if whistler-mode waves contribute to generation of diffuse auroras. To examine this hypothesis, we investigated conjugate observations of SAMPEX and the all sky camera at Syowa Station on the dawn side, where diffuse auroras are frequently observed. In this study, we show a case study that relativistic electron (> 1 MeV) precipitations observed by SAMPEX are associated with the diffuse aurora observed at Syowa Station. The SAMPEX observation shows that the enhancement of precipitating relativistic electrons is well correlated with that of precipitating > 150 keV and > 400 keV electrons, indicating that electrons in the energy range from a few keV to > 1 MeV precipitate into the atmosphere simultaneously in association with the diffuse aurora. It is observational evidence that whistler mode waves contribute to generation of diffuse auroras.

  12. All-sky coherent search for continuous gravitational waves in 6-7 Hz band with a torsion-bar antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eda, Kazunari; Shoda, Ayaka; Kuwahara, Yuya; Itoh, Yousuke; Ando, Masaki

    2016-01-01

    A torsion-bar antenna (TOBA) is a low-frequency terrestrial gravitational wave (GW) antenna which consists of two orthogonal bar-shaped test masses. We upgraded the prototype TOBA and achieved the strain sensitivity 10^{-10} Hz^{-1/2} at around 1 Hz. We operated the upgraded TOBA (called the "Phase-II TOBA") located at Tokyo in Japan for 22.5 hours and performed an all-sky coherent search for continuous GWs using the mathcal {F}-statistic. We place upper limits on continuous GWs from electromagnetically unknown sources in the frequency range from 6 Hz to 7 Hz with the first derivative of frequency less than 7.62 × 10^{-11} Hz s^{-1} using data from the TOBA. As a result, no significant GW signals are found in the frequency band 6-7 Hz. The strictest upper limit on the dimensionless GW strain with a 95% confidence level in this band is 3.6 × 10^{-12} at 6.84 Hz.

  13. Direct Aerosol Radiative Forcing from Combined A-Train Observations - Preliminary Comparisons with AeroCom Models and Pathways to Observationally Based All-sky Estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redemann, J.; Livingston, J. M.; Shinozuka, Y.; Kacenelenbogen, M. S.; Russell, P. B.; LeBlanc, S. E.; Vaughan, M.; Ferrare, R. A.; Hostetler, C. A.; Rogers, R. R.; Burton, S. P.; Torres, O.; Remer, L. A.; Stier, P.; Schutgens, N.

    2014-12-01

    We describe a technique for combining CALIOP aerosol backscatter, MODIS spectral AOD (aerosol optical depth), and OMI AAOD (absorption aerosol optical depth) retrievals for the purpose of estimating full spectral sets of aerosol radiative properties, and ultimately for calculating the 3-D distribution of direct aerosol radiative forcing. We present results using one year of data collected in 2007 and show comparisons of the aerosol radiative property estimates to collocated AERONET retrievals. Use of the recently released MODIS Collection 6 data for aerosol optical depths derived with the dark target and deep blue algorithms has extended the coverage of the multi-sensor estimates towards higher latitudes. Initial calculations of seasonal clear-sky aerosol radiative forcing based on our multi-sensor aerosol retrievals compare well with over-ocean and top of the atmosphere IPCC-2007 model-based results, and with more recent assessments in the "Climate Change Science Program Report: Atmospheric Aerosol Properties and Climate Impacts" (2009). For the first time, we present comparisons of our multi-sensor aerosol direct radiative forcing estimates to values derived from a subset of models that participated in the latest AeroCom initiative. We discuss the major challenges that exist in extending our clear-sky results to all-sky conditions. On the basis of comparisons to suborbital measurements, we present some of the limitations of the MODIS and CALIOP retrievals in the presence of adjacent or underlying clouds. Strategies for meeting these challenges are discussed.

  14. Distortion of thermospheric air masses by horizontal neutral winds over Poker Flat Alaska measured using an all-sky scanning Doppler imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhadly, M. S.; Conde, M.

    2016-01-01

    An air mass transported by a wind field will become distorted over time by any gradients present in the wind field. To study this effect in Earth's thermosphere, we examine the behavior of a simple parameter that we describe here as the "distortion gradient." It incorporates all of the wind field's departures from uniformity and is thus capable of representing all contributions to the distortion or mixing of air masses. The distortion gradient is defined such that it is always positive, so averaging over time and/or space does not suppress small-scale features. Conventional gradients, by contrast, are signed quantities that would often average to zero. To analyze the climatological behavior of this distortion gradient, we used three years (2010, 2011, and 2012) of thermospheric F region wind observations from a high-latitude ground-based all-sky wavelength scanning Doppler Fabry-Perot interferometer located at Poker Flat Alaska. Climatological averaging of the distortion gradient allowed us to investigate its diurnal and seasonal (annual) behaviors at our observing location. Distortion was observed to be higher before local magnetic midnight and to be seasonally dependent. While maximum distortion occurred before local magnetic midnight under all geomagnetic conditions, the peak distortion occurred earlier under moderate geomagnetic conditions as compared to the quiet geomagnetic conditions and even earlier still when geomagnetic conditions were active. Peak distortion was stronger and appeared earlier when interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) was southward compared to northward. By contrast, we could not resolve any time-shift effect due to the IMF component tangential to Earth's orbit.

  15. OI 630.0 nm all-sky image observations of medium-scale traveling ionospheric disturbances at geomagnetic conjugate points

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefanello, M. B.; Muella, M. T. A. H.; Amorim, D. C. M.; Machado, C. S.; Bageston, J. V.; Pimenta, A. A.; Martinis, C.; Sullivan, C.; Bittencourt, J. A.; Schuch, N. J.

    2015-06-01

    This paper presents a medium-scale traveling ionospheric disturbance (MSTID) occurrence detected through the OI 630.0 nm emission all-sky images, obtained by ground-based imaging systems installed at close geomagnetic conjugate locations: one at the Southern Space Observatory-SSO/CRS/INPE-MCTI, (29.4°S, 53.8°W), in Sao Martinho da Serra, RS, Brazil, and another at the Arecibo Observatory (18.3°N, 66.7°W), in Puerto Rico. The images obtained show the optical signature of MSTIDs (low intensity regions of 630.0 nm airglow emission), propagating simultaneously in both hemispheres, during geomagnetically quiet conditions (Kp<3). Observations using digital ionosonde installed at Falkland Islands (51.4°S, 57.5°W) and Ramey, Puerto Rico (18.5°N, 67.1°W) show an abrupt upward motion of the ionospheric F region plasma and the occurrence of frequency-type spread-F that could be related to the MSTIDs observed optically. Using Global Positioning System (GPS) receiver data, we also obtained the rate of the Total Electronic Content (TEC) change (ROT) for two geomagnetically conjugated sites-Santa Maria (29.7°S, 53.7°W) and Virgin Islands (17.7° N, 64.7°W). The analysis of TEC allows us to identify an irregular ionization in the F layer associated with the passage of an MSTID. The possible effects of the South America Magnetic Anomaly (SAMA) on the electrodynamic processes that control the inter-hemispheric coupling that give origin to the conjugate MSTIDs are highlighted and discussed.

  16. Spectral Irradiance Calibration in the Infrared. X. A Self-Consistent Radiometric All-Sky Network of Absolutely Calibrated Stellar Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, Martin; Walker, Russell G.; Carter, Brian; Hammersley, Peter; Kidger, Mark; Noguchi, Kunio

    1999-04-01

    We start from our six absolutely calibrated continuous stellar spectra from 1.2 to 35 μm for K0, K1.5, K3, K5, and M0 giants. These were constructed as far as possible from actual observed spectral fragments taken from the ground, the Kuiper Airborne Observatory, and the IRAS Low Resolution Spectrometer, and all have a common calibration pedigree. From these we spawn 422 calibrated ``spectral templates'' for stars with spectral types in the ranges G9.5-K3.5 III and K4.5-M0.5 III. We normalize each template by photometry for the individual stars using published and/or newly secured near- and mid-infrared photometry obtained through fully characterized, absolutely calibrated, combinations of filter passband, detector radiance response, and mean terrestrial atmospheric transmission. These templates continue our ongoing effort to provide an all-sky network of absolutely calibrated, spectrally continuous, stellar standards for general infrared usage, all with a common, traceable calibration heritage. The wavelength coverage is ideal for calibration of many existing and proposed ground-based, airborne, and satellite sensors, particularly low- to moderate-resolution spectrometers. We analyze the statistics of probable uncertainties, in the normalization of these templates to actual photometry, that quantify the confidence with which we can assert that these templates truly represent the individual stars. Each calibrated template provides an angular diameter for that star. These radiometric angular diameters compare very favorably with those directly observed across the range from 1.6 to 21 mas.

  17. Space-based infrared surveys of small bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mommert, M.

    2014-07-01

    Most small bodies in the Solar System are too small and too distant to be spatially resolved, precluding a direct diameter derivation. Furthermore, measurements of the optical brightness alone only allow a rough estimate of the diameter, since the surface albedo is usually unknown and can have values between about 3 % and 60 % or more. The degeneracy can be resolved by considering the thermal emission of these objects, which is less prone to albedo effects and mainly a function of the diameter. Hence, the combination of optical and thermal-infrared observational data provides a means to independently derive an object's diameter and albedo. This technique is used in asteroid thermal models or more sophisticated thermophysical models (see, e.g., [1]). Infrared observations require cryogenic detectors and/or telescopes, depending on the actual wavelength range observed. Observations from the ground are additionally compromised by the variable transparency of Earth's atmosphere in major portions of the infrared wavelength ranges. Hence, space-based infrared telescopes, providing stable conditions and significantly better sensitivities than ground-based telescopes, are now used routinely to exploit this wavelength range. Two observation strategies are used with space-based infrared observatories: Space-based Infrared All-Sky Surveys. Asteroid surveys in the thermal infrared are less prone to albedo-related discovery bias compared to surveys with optical telescopes, providing a more complete picture of small body populations. The first space-based infrared survey of Solar System small bodies was performed with the Infrared Astronomical Satellite (IRAS) for 10 months in 1983. In the course of the 'IRAS Minor Planet Survey' [2], 2228 asteroids (3 new discoveries) and more than 25 comets (6 new discoveries) were observed. More recent space-based infrared all-sky asteroid surveys were performed by Akari (launched 2006) and the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE

  18. Searching for the Culprit of Anomalous Microwave Emission: An AKARI PAHrange Analysis of Probable Electric Dipole Emitting Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, A. C.; Onaka, T.; Sakon, I.; Ishihara, D.; Kaneda, H.; Lee, H. G.; Itoh, M.; Ohsawa, R.; Hammonds, M.

    In the march forward of interstellar medium inquiry, many new species of interstellar dust have been modelled and discovered. The modes by which these species interact and evolve are beginning to be understood, but in recent years a peculiar new feature has appeared in microwave surveys. Anomalous microwave emission (AME), appearing between 10 and 90Ghz, has been correlated with thermal dust emission, leading to the popular suggestion that this anomaly is electric dipole emission from spinning dust [2]. The observed frequencies suggest that spinning grains should be on the order of 10nm in size, hinting at poly-cyclic aromatic hydrocarbon molecules. We present data from AKARI/Infrared Camera [1], due to the effective PAH/Unidentified Infrared Band (UIR) coverage of its 9um survey to investigate their role within a few regions showing strong AME in the Planck low frequency data. We include the well studied Perseus and ρOphiuchi clouds . We use the IRAS/IRIS 100µm data to account for the overall dust temperature. We present our results as abundance maps for dust emitting around 9µm, and 100µm. Part of the AME in these regions may actually be attributed to thermal dust emission, or the star forming nature of these targets is masking the vibrational modes of PAHs which should be present there, suggesting further investigation for various galactic environments.

  19. Near to Mid-Infrared Observations of Recent Supernovae with Infrared Camera (IRC) onboard AKARI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakon, I.; Onaka, T.; Wada, T.; Usui, F.; Kaneda, H.; Ohyama, Y.; Oyabu, S.; Ishihara, D.; Tanabé, T.; Matsuhara, H.; Nakagawa, T.; Murakami, H.; Minezaki, T.; Yoshii, Y.; Nozawa, T.; Nomoto, K.; Tanaka, M.; Tominaga, N.; Kozasa, T.

    2009-12-01

    We present our latest results on near- to mid-infrared observations of supernovae within one year after the explosion with Infrared Camera (IRC) on board AKARI. In this project, we aim to explore the dust formation scenario in the ejecta of core-collapse supernovae. So far, observations of several recent supernovae including SN2006jc and SN2008ax have been carried out as part of the Directors Time of AKARI. At the same time, we have set about the near-infrared slit-less spectroscopic observations of nearby galaxies with high supernovae frequency in preparation for a future supernova in the AKARI Phase-3 Open Time Program “Near-infrared Slit-less Spectroscopy of Nearby Galaxies; Waiting for Supernovae Momentarily (NEWSY)” (P.I. Sakon, I.). The obtained near- to mid-infrared spectral energy distribution (SED) of early-time supernovae is quite valuable and unique to investigate the properties of dust formed around the massive star and will further deepen our knowledge on the origin of dust especially in the early universe.

  20. Understanding the Long-Term Spectral Variability of Cygnus X-1 with Burst and Transient Source Experiment and All-Sky Monitor Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zdziarski, Andrzej A.; Poutanen, Juri; Paciesas, William S.; Wen, Lin-Qing

    2002-01-01

    We present a comprehensive analysis of all observations of Cyg X-1 by the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE; 20-300 keV) and by the Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer all-sky monitor (ASM; 1.5-12 keV) until 2002 June, including approximately 1200 days of simultaneous data. We find a number of correlations between fluxes and hardnesses in different energy bands. In the hard (low) spectral state, there is a negative correlation between the ASM 1.5-12 keV flux and the hardness at any energy. In the soft (high) spectral state, the ASM flux is positively correlated with the ASM hardness but uncorrelated with the BATSE hardness. In both spectral states, the BATSE hardness correlates with the flux above 100 keV, while it shows no correlation with the 20-100 keV flux. At the same time, there is clear correlation between the BATSE fluxes below and above 100 keV. In the hard state, most of the variability can be explained by softening the overall spectrum with a pivot at approximately 50 keV. There is also another, independent variability pattern of lower amplitude where the spectral shape does not change when the luminosity changes. In the soft state, the variability is mostly caused by a variable hard (Comptonized) spectral component of a constant shape superposed on a constant soft blackbody component. These variability patterns are in agreement with the dependencies of the rms variability on the photon energy in the two states. We also study in detail recent soft states from late 2000 until 2002. The last of them has lasted thus far for more than 200 days. Their spectra are generally harder in the 1.5-5 keV band and similar or softer in the 3-12 keV band than the spectra of the 1996 soft state, whereas the rms variability is stronger in all the ASM bands. On the other hand, the 1994 soft state transition observed by BATSE appears very similar to the 1996 one. We interpret the variability patterns in terms of theoretical Comptonization

  1. THE AKARI 2.5-5.0 μm SPECTRAL ATLAS OF TYPE-1 ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI: BLACK HOLE MASS ESTIMATOR, LINE RATIO, AND HOT DUST TEMPERATURE

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Dohyeong; Im, Myungshin; Kim, Ji Hoon; Jun, Hyunsung David; Lee, Seong-Kook; Woo, Jong-Hak; Lee, Hyung Mok; Lee, Myung Gyoon; Nakagawa, Takao; Matsuhara, Hideo; Wada, Takehiko; Takagi, Toshinobu; Oyabu, Shinki; Ohyama, Youichi E-mail: mim@astro.snu.ac.kr

    2015-01-01

    We present 2.5-5.0 μm spectra of 83 nearby (0.002 < z < 0.48) and bright (K < 14 mag) type-1 active galactic nuclei (AGNs) taken with the Infrared Camera on board AKARI. The 2.5-5.0 μm spectral region contains emission lines such as Brβ (2.63 μm), Brα (4.05 μm), and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (3.3 μm), which can be used for studying the black hole (BH) masses and star formation activity in the host galaxies of AGNs. The spectral region also suffers less dust extinction than in the ultra violet (UV) or optical wavelengths, which may provide an unobscured view of dusty AGNs. Our sample is selected from bright quasar surveys of Palomar-Green and SNUQSO, and AGNs with reverberation-mapped BH masses from Peterson et al. Using 11 AGNs with reliable detection of Brackett lines, we derive the Brackett-line-based BH mass estimators. We also find that the observed Brackett line ratios can be explained with the commonly adopted physical conditions of the broad line region. Moreover, we fit the hot and warm dust components of the dust torus by adding photometric data of SDSS, 2MASS, WISE, and ISO to the AKARI spectra, finding hot and warm dust temperatures of ∼1100 K and ∼220 K, respectively, rather than the commonly cited hot dust temperature of 1500 K.

  2. AKARI—Infrared Satellite Mission—Present Status and Early Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onaka, Takashi

    2009-04-01

    AKARI, formerly known as ASTRO-F, is a satellite mission dedicated to infrared astronomy for the first time in Japan. It has a 685-mm aperture telescope with two focal-plane instruments cooled by liquid helium (LHe) and mechanical coolers on board for observations in the 2-180 μm infrared spectral range. AKARI was launched on 2006 February 21 (UT) into a sun-synchronous polar orbit and started observations in May, 2006. It carried 179 liter LHe that lasted for 550 days and observations with LHe were carried out for more than 15 months. During the LHe holding period, AKARI made all-sky survey observations with six bands from 9 to 160 μm, which surpass the IRAS all-sky survey data in the sensitivity, spatial resolution, and spectral coverage. Together with the all-sky observation, AKARI also made pointing observations for about 10 min at a given position of the sky to execute deep imaging and spectroscopy from near- to far-infrared. Both focal-plane instruments work successfully on orbit and more than 90% of the sky was observed in the all-sky survey. After LHe exhaustion, near-infrared observations are planned to continue. This paper reports the in-orbit performance of AKARI and its early observational results so far obtained.

  3. Dust attenuation up to z ≃ 2 in the AKARI North Ecliptic Pole Deep Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buat, V.; Oi, N.; Heinis, S.; Ciesla, L.; Burgarella, D.; Matsuhara, H.; Malek, K.; Goto, T.; Malkan, M.; Marchetti, L.; Ohyama, Y.; Pearson, C.; Serjeant, S.; Miyaji, T.; Krumpe, M.; Brunner, H.

    2015-05-01

    Aims: We aim to study the evolution of dust attenuation in galaxies selected in the infrared (IR) in the redshift range in which they are known to dominate the star formation activity in the universe. The comparison with other measurements of dust attenuation in samples selected using different criteria will give us a global picture of the attenuation at work in star-forming galaxies and its evolution with redshift. Methods: We selected galaxies in the mid-IR from the deep survey of the North Ecliptic Field performed by the AKARI satellite. Using multiple filters of IRC instrument, we selected more than 4000 galaxies from their rest-frame emission at 8 μm, from z ≃ 0.2 to ~2. We built spectral energy distributions from the rest-frame ultraviolet (UV) to the far-IR by adding ancillary data in the optical-near IR and from GALEX and Herschel surveys. We fit spectral energy distributions with the physically-motivated code CIGALE. We test different templates for active galactic nuclei (AGNs) and recipes for dust attenuation and estimate stellar masses, star formation rates, amount of dust attenuation, and AGN contribution to the total IR luminosity. We discuss the uncertainties affecting these estimates on a subsample of galaxies with spectroscopic redshifts. We also define a subsample of galaxies with an IR luminosity close to the characteristic IR luminosity at each redshift and study the evolution of dust attenuation of this selection representative of the bulk of the IR emission. Results: The AGN contribution to the total IR luminosity is found to be on average approximately 10%, with a slight increase with redshift. The determination of AGN contribution does not depend significantly on the assumed AGN templates except for galaxies detected in X-ray. The choice of attenuation law has a marginal impact on the determination of stellar masses and star formation rates. Dust attenuation in galaxies dominating the IR luminosity function is found to increase from z = 0

  4. Efficient Selection and Classification of Infrared Excess Emission Stars Based on AKARI and 2MASS Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jinzeng; Huang, Yafang

    2015-08-01

    The selection of young stellar objects (YSOs) based on excessive emission in the infrared is easily contaminated by post-main-sequence stars and various types of emission line stars with similar properties. We define here stringent criteria for an efficient selection and classification of stellar sources with infrared excess emission based on combined 2MASS and AKARI colors. First of all, bright dwarfs and giants with known spectral types were selected from the Hipparcos Catalogue and cross-identified with the 2MASS and AKARI Point Source Catalogues to produce the main-sequence and the post-main-sequence tracks, which appear as expected as tight tracks with very small dispersion. However, several of the main-sequence stars indicate excess emission in the color space. Further investigations based on the SIMBAD data help to clarify their nature as classical Be stars, which are found to be located in a well isolated region on each of the color-color (C-C) diagrams. Several kinds of contaminants were then removed based on their distribution on the C-C diagrams. A test sample of Herbig Ae/Be stars and classical T Tauri stars were cross-identified with the 2MASS and AKARI catalogs to define the loci of YSOs with different masses on the C-C diagrams. Well classified Class I and Class II sources were taken as a second test sample to discriminate between various types of YSOs at possibly different evolutionary stages. This helped to define the loci of different types of YSOs and a set of criteria for selecting YSOs based on their colors in the near- and mid-infrared. Candidate YSOs toward IC 1396 indicating excess emission in the near-infrared were employed to verify the validity of the new source selection criteria defined based on C-C diagrams compiled with the 2MASS and AKARI data. Optical spectroscopy and spectral energy distributions of the IC 1396 sample yield a clear identification of the YSOs and further confirm the criteria defined for exploring the nature and

  5. A 2MASS ALL-SKY VIEW OF THE SAGITTARIUS DWARF GALAXY. VII. KINEMATICS OF THE MAIN BODY OF THE SAGITTARIUS dSph

    SciTech Connect

    Frinchaboy, Peter M.; Majewski, Steven R.; Patterson, Richard J.; Munoz, Ricardo R.; Law, David R.; Lokas, Ewa L.; Kunkel, William E.; Johnston, Kathryn V. E-mail: srm4n@vigrinia.edu E-mail: rmunoz@das.uchile.cl E-mail: lokas@camk.edu.pl E-mail: kvj@astro.columbia.edu

    2012-09-01

    We have assembled a large-area spectroscopic survey of giant stars in the Sagittarius (Sgr) dwarf galaxy core. Using medium resolution (R {approx} 15,000), multifiber spectroscopy we have measured velocities of these stars, which extend up to 12 Degree-Sign from the galaxy's center (3.7 core radii or 0.4 times the King limiting radius). From these high-quality spectra we identify 1310 Sgr members out of 2296 stars surveyed, distributed across 24 different fields across the Sgr core. Additional slit spectra were obtained of stars bridging from the Sgr core to its trailing tail. Our systematic, large-area sample shows no evidence for significant rotation, a result at odds with the {approx}20 km s{sup -1} rotation required as an explanation for the bifurcation seen in the Sgr tidal stream; the observed small ({<=}4 km s{sup -1}) velocity trend primarily along the major axis is consistent with models of the projected motion of an extended body on the sky with no need for intrinsic rotation. The Sgr core is found to have a flat velocity dispersion (except for a kinematically colder center point) across its surveyed extent and into its tidal tails, a property that matches the velocity dispersion profiles measured for other Milky Way dwarf spheroidal (dSph) galaxies. We comment on the possible significance of this observed kinematical similarity for the dynamical state of the other classical Milky Way dSphs in light of the fact that Sgr is clearly a strongly tidally disrupted system.

  6. Hunting for Long-lived Protoplanetary Disks Observed with AKARI/FIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiong, LIU; Yao, LIU

    2015-10-01

    Twenty-one YSO (Young Stellar Object) candidates nearby the solar system have been identified through cross-correlating Hipparcos (High Precision Parallax Collecting Satellite) catalog with the AKARI/FIS YSO catalog, and the reliability is over 90%. The central objects cover the spectral types from B to M. The Hipparcos's accurate measurements of trigonometric parallaxes enable us to place these objects in the H-R diagram, which can be used to determine their ages by the isochrones of theoretical evolution trajectories. In this sample, two YSOs have been found to be older than 10 Myr. The spectral energy distributions (SEDs) from optical to infrared show that the two YSOs belong to the type II YSOs with protoplanetary disks. Furthermore, from the SED fitting, the ages of these two sources are constrained to be (14.1±4.2) Myr and (16.8±4.4) Myr, respectively. Therefore, two YSO candidates with long-lived protoplanetary disks have been detected in the AKARI/FIS data. The long-lived protoplanetary disks are closely related with the planet formation, and they are ideal birthplaces of protoplanets.

  7. Hunting for Long-lived Protoplanetary Disks Observed with AKARI/FIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Q.; Liu, Y.

    2015-03-01

    Twenty-one YSOs (Young Stellar Objects) in the solar neighbor have been identified through cross-correlating Hipparcos catalog with AKARI/FIS YSO catalog. The reliability of the match is over 90%. The central objects cover spectral types from B to M. The Hipparcos parallaxes enable us to place the objects in the H-R diagram, which can be used to determine their ages by isochrones. Among these objects, two YSOs have been found whose ages are larger than 10 Myr. The optical to infrared spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of these two YSOs are consistent with those of type II YSOs with protoplanetary disks. Furthermore, from the SED fitting, the ages of these two sources are constrained to (14.1±4.2) Myr and (16.8±4.4) Myr, respectively. Therefore, two YSO candidates with long-lived protoplanetary disks have been detected in AKARI/FIS. The presence of long-lived protoplanetary disks has significant implications for the formation of planets and their host stars.

  8. Search for Water in Outer Main Belt Based on AKARI Asteroid Catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usui, Fumihiko

    2012-06-01

    We propose a program to search water ice on the surface of asteroids in the outer main belt regions, which have high albedo measured with AKARI. The distribution of water in the main belt provides important information to understanding of the formation and evolution of the solar system, because water is a good indicator of temperature in the early solar nebula. The existence of water ice is a hot topic in the solar system studies today. Water ice is recently found in the outer region of the main asteroid belt and some of them are linked to the main belt comets. Brand-new albedo data brought by AKARI opens the possibility of detection of water ice on the C-type asteroids. Here we propose to make the spectroscopic observations with the Subaru telescope in the near-infrared wavelengths to detect water ice on these high-albedo C-type asteroids. Thanks to a large aperture of Subaru telescope and a high altitude of Mauna Kea, it can be only possible to observe a weak signal of the existence of water on the surface of asteroids with a certain S/N. In addition, using the imaging data taken prior to IRCS spectroscopic mode, we intend to seek any comet-like activities by investigating diffuseness of the asteroids, which can be detected by comparing the observed point-spread functions with those of field stars.

  9. FAR-INFRARED EMISSION FROM THE INTERGALACTIC MEDIUM IN STEPHAN'S QUINTET REVEALED BY AKARI

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Toyoaki; Kaneda, Hidehiro; Onaka, Takashi; Kitayama, Tetsu

    2011-04-10

    Stephan's Quintet (SQ, HCG92) was observed with the Far-Infrared Surveyor on board AKARI in four far-infrared (IR) bands at 65, 90, 140, and 160 {mu}m. The AKARI four-band images show far-IR emission in the intergalactic medium of SQ. In particular, the 160 {mu}m band image shows single peak emission in addition to the structure extending in the north-south direction along the shock ridge as seen in the 140 {mu}m band, H{sub 2} emission, and X-ray emission. Whereas most of the far-IR emission in the shocked region comes from the cold dust component, shock-powered [C II]158 {mu}m emission can significantly contribute to the emission in the 160 {mu}m band that shows a single peak at the shocked region. In the shocked region, the observed gas-to-dust mass ratio is in agreement with the Galactic one. The color temperature of the cold dust component ({approx}20 K) is lower than that in surrounding galaxies ({approx}30 K). We discuss a possible origin of the intergalactic dust emission.

  10. AKARI observations of dust processing in merger galaxies: NGC2782 and NGC7727

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onaka, Takashi; Nakamura, Tomohiko; Sakon, Itsuki; Ohsawa, Ryou; Mori, Tamami; Wu, Ronin; Kaneda, Hidehiro

    2015-08-01

    Dust grains are the major reservoir of heavy elements and play significant roles in the thermal balance and chemistry in the interstellar medium. Where dust grains are formed and how they evolve in the ISM are one of the key issues for the understanding of the material evolution in the Universe. Although theoretical studies have been made, very little is so far known observationally about the lifecycle of dust grains in the ISM and that associated with Galactic scale events. The lifecycle of very small carbonaceous grains that contain polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) or PAH-like atomic groups are of particular interest because they emit distinct band emission in the near- to mid-infrared region and they are thought to be most vulnerable to environmental conditions. PAHs may be formed in carbon-rich stars, while recent AKARI observations suggest that they may be formed by fragmentation of large carbonaceous grains in shocks in a supernova remnant or a galactic wind (Onaka et al. 2010, A&A, 514, 15; Seok et al. 2012, ApJ, 744, 160).Here we report results of AKARI observations of two mergers. NGC2782 (Arp 215) and NGC7727 (Arp 222). NGC2782 is a merger of 200Myr old. It shows a very long western tail of HI gas by a tidal interaction and the eastern tail that consists mainly of stellar components without an appreciable amount of gas and is thought to be a relic of the colliding low-mass galaxy whose gas component has been stripped off Smith 1994, AJ, 107, 1695. We found significant emission at the 7 μm band of the IRC onboard AKARI, which must come from PAH 6.2 and 7.7 μm bands, in the eastern tail. Based on dust model fitting, we found a low abundance of ~10nm size dust despite of the presence of PAHs, suggesting that PAHs may be formed from fragmentation of ~10nm carbonaceous dust grains. NGC7727 is a 1.2Gyr old merger and shows a SED similar to the NGC2782 tail in the northern tail of the merger event product, suggesting also the formation of PAHs from

  11. Spatial relationship of nighttime medium-scale traveling ionospheric disturbances and F region field-aligned irregularities observed with two spaced all-sky airglow imagers and the middle and upper atmosphere radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otsuka, Y.; Shiokawa, K.; Ogawa, T.; Yokoyama, T.; Yamamoto, M.

    2009-05-01

    We report simultaneous observations of medium-scale traveling ionospheric disturbances (MSTIDs) and field-aligned irregularities (FAIs) in the F region using two all-sky airglow imagers and the middle and upper atmosphere (MU) radar. MSTIDs propagating southwestward were observed simultaneously in 630-nm airglow images over Sakata (39.0°N, 139.9°E) and Shigaraki (34.9°N, 136.1°E), Japan, on the night of 16 June 2004. By using all-sky images over both sites, we estimated the altitude of the airglow layer to be 260 km by the triangulation method. During the MSTID event, FAIs in the F region were observed by making multibeam measurements with the MU radar at Shigaraki. In order to investigate the spatial relationship between the MSTIDs and FAIs, the FAIs were mapped onto the 630-nm airglow layer (altitude, 260 km) along the geomagnetic field lines. We found that FAIs with an intense (weak) signal-to-noise ratio coincided with the airglow depletion (enhancement) caused by the MSTIDs. FAI velocity obtained from a combination of the Doppler velocities on the three radar beams oscillated in the northwest-southeast direction, with an amplitude of approximately 82 m/s. The FAI velocity was northwestward (southeastward) at the airglow depletion (enhancement). The directions of the FAI velocity were consistent with those of the E × B drifts caused by the polarized electric fields associated with the MSTIDs. The northeastward polarized electric field at the airglow depletion region strengthened the background eastward effective electric field and drove the gradient drift instability generating FAIs. This might be the reason why the FAIs preferred to occur at the airglow depletion region.

  12. Extended Dust Shell of the Carbon Star U Hya Revealed by AKARI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueta, T.; Izumiura, H.; Yamamura, I.; Matsunaga, N.; Ita, Y.; Matsuura, M.; Nakada, Y.; Fukushi, H.; Mito, H.; Tanabé, T.; Hashimoto, O.

    2011-09-01

    We have observed the carbon-rich AGB star U Hya in the far-infrared (FIR) at 65, 90, 140, and 160 μm simultaneously, using the slow-scan observing mode of the Far-Infrared Surveyor (FIS) aboard the Japanese infrared astronomical satellite AKARI. Our aim is to probe the mass-loss history of U Hya in the last ˜104 years by investigating the distribution of cold dust in the extended circumstellar envelope using FIR maps at high spatial resolution. The observed hollow shell and model calculations suggest that the shell was formed as a direct consequence of a thermal pulse, two-wind interactions, a termination shock, or some combination of these processes.

  13. AKARI/AcuA PHYSICAL STUDIES OF THE CYBELE ASTEROID FAMILY

    SciTech Connect

    Kasuga, Toshihiro; Usui, Fumihiko; Hasegawa, Sunao; Kuroda, Daisuke; Ootsubo, Takafumi; Mueller, Thomas G.; Ishiguro, Masateru

    2012-06-15

    We present a study of 107 Cybele asteroids based on the archival database 'Asteroid Catalog Using AKARI (AcuA)' taken by the Infrared Astronomical Satellite. The database provides diameters D > 10 km, geometric albedos, and taxonomic information (75%) of the Cybeles. We find taxonomic diversity (mainly C-, D-, and P-type) in the population of 78 small Cybeles with diameters 10 km 80 km are mostly classified as C- or P-types (90%), with a power-law index of 2.39 {+-} 0.18. The total mass of Cybele asteroids is estimated to be {approx}10{sup -5} M{sub Earth}. We also discuss the origin and formation process of the Cybele asteroid family.

  14. INTERSTELLAR DUST PROPERTIES OF M51 FROM AKARI MID-INFRARED IMAGES

    SciTech Connect

    Egusa, Fumi; Wada, Takehiko; Arimatsu, Ko; Matsuhara, Hideo; Sakon, Itsuki; Onaka, Takashi

    2013-11-20

    Using mid-infrared (MIR) images of four photometric bands of the Infrared Camera on board the AKARI satellite, S7 (7 μm), S11 (11 μm), L15 (15 μm), and L24 (24 μm), we investigate the interstellar dust properties of the nearby pair of galaxies M51 with respect to their spiral arm structure. The arm and interarm regions are defined based on a spatially filtered stellar component model image and we measure the arm/interarm contrast for each band. The contrast is lowest in the S11 image, which we interpret as meaning that among the four AKARI MIR bands, the S11 image best correlates with the spatial distribution of dust grains including colder components. On the other hand, the L24 image, with the highest contrast, traces warmer dust heated by star forming activity. The surface brightness ratio between the bands, i.e., color, is measured over the disk of the main galaxy, M51a, at 300 pc resolution. We find that the distribution of S7/S11 is smooth and traces the global spiral arm pattern well while L15/S11 and L24/S11 peak at individual H II regions. This result indicates that the ionization state of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) is related to the spiral structure. Comparison with observational data and dust models also supports the importance of the variation in the PAH ionization state within the M51a disk. However, the mechanism driving this variation is not yet clear from the currently available datasets. Another suggestion from the comparison with the models is that the PAH fraction in the total dust mass is higher than previously estimated.

  15. AKARI OBSERVATION OF THE NORTH ECLIPTIC POLE (NEP) SUPERCLUSTER AT z = 0.087: MID-INFRARED VIEW OF TRANSITION GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Ko, Jongwan; Im, Myungshin; Lee, Hyung Mok; Lee, Myung Gyoon; Kim, Seong Jin; Jeon, Yiseul; Shim, Hyunjin; Hwang, Ho Seong; Willmer, Christopher N. A.; Weiner, Benjamin J.; Malkan, Matthew A.; Papovich, Casey; Matsuhara, Hideo; Takagi, Toshinobu; Oyabu, Shinki

    2012-02-01

    We present the mid-infrared (MIR) properties of galaxies within a supercluster in the north ecliptic pole region at z {approx} 0.087 observed with the AKARI satellite. We use data from the AKARI NEP-Wide (5.4 deg{sup 2}) IR survey and the CLusters of galaxies EVoLution studies (CLEVL) mission program. We show that near-IR (3 {mu}m)-mid-IR (11 {mu}m) color can be used as an indicator of the specific star formation rate and the presence of intermediate-age stellar populations. From the MIR observations, we find that red-sequence galaxies consist not only of passively evolving red early-type galaxies, but also of (1) 'weak-SFGs' (disk-dominated star-forming galaxies that have star formation rates lower by {approx}4 Multiplication-Sign than blue-cloud galaxies) and (2) 'intermediate-MXGs' (bulge-dominated galaxies showing stronger MIR dust emission than normal red early-type galaxies). These two populations can be a set of transition galaxies from blue, star-forming, late-type galaxies evolving into red, quiescent, early-type ones. We find that the weak-SFGs are predominant at intermediate masses (10{sup 10} M{sub Sun} < M{sub *} < 10{sup 10.5} M{sub Sun }) and are typically found in local densities similar to the outskirts of galaxy clusters. As much as 40% of the supercluster member galaxies in this mass range can be classified as weak-SFGs, but their proportion decreases to <10% at larger masses (M{sub *} > 10{sup 10.5} M{sub Sun }) at any galaxy density. The fraction of the intermediate-MXG among red-sequence galaxies at 10{sup 10} M{sub Sun} < M{sub *} < 10{sup 11} M{sub Sun} also decreases as the density and mass increase. In particular, {approx}42% of the red-sequence galaxies with early-type morphologies are classified as intermediate-MXGs at intermediate densities. These results suggest that the star formation activity is strongly dependent on the stellar mass, but that the morphological transformation is mainly controlled by the environment.

  16. VASAO: visible all sky adaptive optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veillet, Christian; Lai, Olivier; Salmon, Derrick; Pique, Jean-Paul

    2006-06-01

    Building on an extensive and successful experience in Adaptive Optics (AO) and on recent developments made in its funding nations, the Canada-France-Hawaii-Telescope Corporation (CFHT) is studying the VASAO concept: an integrated AO system that would allow diffraction limited imaging of the whole sky in the visible as well as in the infrared. At the core of VASAO, Pueo-Hou (the new Pueo) is built on Pueo, the current CFHT AO bonnette. Pueo will be refurbished and improved to be able to image the isoplanetic field at 700 nm with Strehl ratios of 30% or better, making possible imaging with a resolution of 50 milliarcseconds between 500 and 700nm, and at the telescope limit of diffraction above. The polychromatic tip-tilt laser guide star currently envisioned will be generated by a single 330nm mode-less laser, and the relative position of the 330nm and 589nm artificial stars created on the mesosphere by the 330nm excitation of the sodium layer will be monitored to provide the atmospheric tip-tilt along the line of sight, following the philosophy developed for the ELP-OA project. The feasibility study of VASAO will take most of 2006 in parallel with the development of a science case making the best possible use of the unique capabilities of the system, If the feasibility study is encouraging, VASAO development could start in 2007 for a full deployment on the sky by 2011-2012.

  17. Image stacking analysis of SDSS galaxies with AKARI Far-Infrared Surveyor maps at 65 μm, 90 μm, and 140 μm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okabe, Taizo; Kashiwagi, Toshiya; Suto, Yasushi; Matsuura, Shuji; Doi, Yasuo; Takita, Satoshi; Ootsubo, Takafumi

    2016-04-01

    We perform image stacking analysis of Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) photometric galaxies over the AKARI Far-Infrared Surveyor maps at 65 μm, 90 μm, and 140 μm. The resulting image profiles are decomposed into the central galaxy component (single term) and the nearby galaxy component (clustering term), as a function of the r-band magnitude, mr, of the central galaxy. We find that the mean far-infrared (FIR) flux of a galaxy with magnitude mr is well fitted with f^s_{90μ m}=13× 10^{0.306(18-m_{ r})} [mJy]. The FIR amplitude of the clustering term is consistent with that expected from the angular-correlation function of the SDSS galaxies, but galaxy morphology dependence needs to be taken into account for a more quantitative conclusion. We also fit the spectral energy distribution of stacked galaxies at 65 μm, 90 μm, and 140 μm, and derive a mean dust temperature of ˜30 K. This is consistent with the typical dust temperature of galaxies that are FIR luminous and individually detected.

  18. Ice Mapping Observations in Galactic Star-Forming Regions: the AKARI Legacy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraser, Helen Jane; Suutarinnen, Aleksi; Noble, Jennifer

    2015-08-01

    It is becoming increasingly clear that explaining the small-scale distribution of many gas-phase molecules relies on our interpretation of the complex inter-connectivity between gas- and solid-phase interstellar chemistries. Inputs to proto-stellar astrochemical models are required that exploit ice compositions reflecting the historical physical conditions in pre-stellar environments when the ices first formed. Such data are required to translate the near-universe picture of ice-composition to our understanding of the role of extra-galactic ices in star-formation at higher redshifts.Here we present the first attempts at multi-object ice detections, and the subsequent ice column density mapping. The AKARI space telescope was uniquely capable of observing all the ice features between 2 and 5 microns, thereby detecting H2O, CO and CO2 ices concurrently, through their stretching vibrational features. Our group has successfully extracted an unprecedented volume of ice spectra from AKARI, including sources with not more than 2 mJy flux at 3 microns, showing:(a) H2O CO and CO2 ices on 30 lines of sight towards pre-stellar and star-forming cores, which when combined with laboratory experiments indicate how the chemistries of these three ices are interlinked (Noble et al (2013)),(b) ice maps showing the spatial distribution of water ice across 12 pre-stellar cores, in different molecular clouds (Suutarinnen et al (2015)), and the distribution of ice components within these cores on 1000 AU scales (Noble et al (2015)),(c) over 200 new detections of water ice, mostly on lines of sight towards background sources (> 145), indicating that water ice column density has a minimum value as a function of Av, but on a cloud-by-cloud basis typically correlates with Av, and dust emissivity at 250 microns (Suutarinnen et al (2015)),(d) the first detections of HDO ice towards background stars (Fraser et al (2015)).We discuss whether these results support the picture of a generic chemical

  19. AKARI OBSERVATION OF THE FLUCTUATION OF THE NEAR-INFRARED BACKGROUND

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumoto, T.; Seo, H. J.; Lee, H. M.; Jeong, W.-S.; Pyo, J.; Matsuura, S.; Matsuhara, H.; Oyabu, S.; Wada, T.

    2011-12-01

    We report a search for fluctuations of the sky brightness toward the north ecliptic pole with the Japanese infrared astronomical satellite AKARI, at 2.4, 3.2, and 4.1 {mu}m. We obtained circular maps with 10' diameter fields of view, which clearly show a spatial structure on the scale of a few hundred arcseconds. A power spectrum analysis shows that there is a significant excess fluctuation at angular scales larger than 100'' that cannot be explained by zodiacal light, diffuse Galactic light, shot noise of faint galaxies, or clustering of low-redshift galaxies. These results are consistent with observations at 3.6 and 4.5 {mu}m by NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope. The fluctuating component observed at large angular scales has a blue stellar spectrum which is similar to that of the spectrum of the excess isotropic emission observed with the Infrared Telescope in Space. A significant spatial correlation between wavelength bands was found, and the slopes of the linear correlations are consistent with the spectrum of the excess fluctuation. These findings indicate that the detected fluctuation could be attributed to the first stars of the universe, i.e., Population III stars. The observed fluctuation provides an important constraint on the era of the first stars.

  20. AKARI IRC 2.5-5 μm spectroscopy of infrared galaxies over a wide luminosity range

    SciTech Connect

    Ichikawa, Kohei; Ueda, Yoshihiro; Imanishi, Masatoshi; Nakagawa, Takao; Shirahata, Mai; Kaneda, Hidehiro; Oyabu, Shinki

    2014-10-20

    We present the result of a systematic infrared 2.5-5 μm spectroscopic study of 22 nearby infrared galaxies over a wide infrared luminosity range (10{sup 10} L {sub ☉} < L {sub IR} < 10{sup 13} L {sub ☉}) obtained from the AKARI Infrared Camera (IRC). The unique band of the AKARI IRC spectroscopy enables us to access both the 3.3 μm polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) emission feature from star-forming activity and the continuum of torus-dust emission heated by an active galactic nucleus (AGN). Applying our AGN diagnostics to the AKARI spectra, we discover 14 buried AGNs. The large fraction of buried AGNs suggests that AGN activity behind the dust is almost ubiquitous in ultra-/luminous infrared galaxies (U/LIRGs). We also find that both the fraction and energy contribution of buried AGNs increase with infrared luminosity from 10{sup 10} L {sub ☉} to 10{sup 13} L {sub ☉}, including normal infrared galaxies with L {sub IR} < 10{sup 11} L {sub ☉}. The energy contribution from AGNs in the total infrared luminosity is only ∼7% in LIRGs and ∼20% in ULIRGs, suggesting that the majority of the infrared luminosity originates from starburst activity. Using the PAH emission, we investigate the luminosity relation between star formation and AGNs. We find that these infrared galaxies exhibit higher star formation rates than optically selected Seyfert galaxies with the same AGN luminosities, implying that infrared galaxies could be an early evolutionary phase of AGN.

  1. Detection of the Detached Dust Shell of U Antliae at Mid-infrared Wavelengths with AKARI/IRC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arimatsu, Ko; Izumiura, Hideyuki; Ueta, Toshiya; Yamamura, Issei; Onaka, Takashi

    2011-03-01

    We report mid-infrared (MIR) imaging observations of the carbon star U Ant made with the Infrared Camera (IRC) on board AKARI. Subtraction of the artifacts and extended point-spread function of the central star reveals the detached dust shell around the carbon star at MIR wavelengths (15 and 24 μm) for the first time. The observed radial brightness profiles of the MIR emission are well explained by two shells at 43'' and 50'' from the central star detected in optical scattered light observations. Combining Herschel/PACS, AKARI/FIS, and AKARI/IRC data, we obtain the infrared spectral energy distribution (SED) of the thermal emission from the detached shell of U Ant in a wide infrared spectral range of 15-160 μm. Thermal emission of amorphous carbon grains with a single temperature cannot account for the observed SED from 15 to 160 μm: it underestimates the emission at 15 μm. Alternatively, the observed SED is fitted by the model in which amorphous carbon grains in the two shells have different temperatures of 60 and 104 K, which allocates most dust mass in the shell at 50''. This supports the previous suggestion that the 43'' shell is gas-rich and the 50'' shell is dust-rich. We suggest a possibility that the segregation of the gas and dust resulting from the drift motion of submicron-sized dust grains relative to the gas and that the hot dust component associated with the gas-rich shell is composed of very small grains that are strongly coupled with the gas.

  2. DETECTION OF THE DETACHED DUST SHELL OF U ANTLIAE AT MID-INFRARED WAVELENGTHS WITH AKARI/IRC

    SciTech Connect

    Arimatsu, Ko; Onaka, Takashi; Izumiura, Hideyuki; Ueta, Toshiya; Yamamura, Issei

    2011-03-10

    We report mid-infrared (MIR) imaging observations of the carbon star U Ant made with the Infrared Camera (IRC) on board AKARI. Subtraction of the artifacts and extended point-spread function of the central star reveals the detached dust shell around the carbon star at MIR wavelengths (15 and 24 {mu}m) for the first time. The observed radial brightness profiles of the MIR emission are well explained by two shells at 43'' and 50'' from the central star detected in optical scattered light observations. Combining Herschel/PACS, AKARI/FIS, and AKARI/IRC data, we obtain the infrared spectral energy distribution (SED) of the thermal emission from the detached shell of U Ant in a wide infrared spectral range of 15-160 {mu}m. Thermal emission of amorphous carbon grains with a single temperature cannot account for the observed SED from 15 to 160 {mu}m: it underestimates the emission at 15 {mu}m. Alternatively, the observed SED is fitted by the model in which amorphous carbon grains in the two shells have different temperatures of 60 and 104 K, which allocates most dust mass in the shell at 50''. This supports the previous suggestion that the 43'' shell is gas-rich and the 50'' shell is dust-rich. We suggest a possibility that the segregation of the gas and dust resulting from the drift motion of submicron-sized dust grains relative to the gas and that the hot dust component associated with the gas-rich shell is composed of very small grains that are strongly coupled with the gas.

  3. Clustering of the AKARI NEP deep field 24 μm selected galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solarz, A.; Pollo, A.; Takeuchi, T. T.; Małek, K.; Matsuhara, H.; White, G. J.; Pȩpiak, A.; Goto, T.; Wada, T.; Oyabu, S.; Takagi, T.; Ohyama, Y.; Pearson, C. P.; Hanami, H.; Ishigaki, T.; Malkan, M.

    2015-10-01

    Aims: We present a method of selection of 24 μm galaxies from the AKARI north ecliptic pole (NEP) deep field down to 150 μJy and measurements of their two-point correlation function. We aim to associate various 24 μm selected galaxy populations with present day galaxies and to investigate the impact of their environment on the direction of their subsequent evolution. Methods: We discuss using of Support Vector Machines (SVM) algorithm applied to infrared photometric data to perform star-galaxy separation, in which we achieve an accuracy higher than 80%. The photometric redshift information, obtained through the CIGALE code, is used to explore the redshift dependence of the correlation function parameter (r0) as well as the linear bias evolution. This parameter relates galaxy distribution to the one of the underlying dark matter. We connect the investigated sources to their potential local descendants through a simplified model of the clustering evolution without interactions. Results: We observe two different populations of star-forming galaxies, at zmed ~ 0.25, zmed ~ 0.9. Measurements of total infrared luminosities (LTIR) show that the sample at zmed ~ 0.25 is composed mostly of local star-forming galaxies, while the sample at zmed ~ 0.9 is composed of luminous infrared galaxies (LIRGs) with LTIR ~ 1011.62 L⊙. We find that dark halo mass is not necessarily correlated with the LTIR: for subsamples with LTIR = 1011.15 L⊙ at zmed ~ 0.7 we observe a higher clustering length (r0 = 6.21 ± 0.78[ h-1Mpc ]) than for a subsample with mean LTIR = 1011.84 L⊙ at zmed ~ 1.1 (r0 = 5.86 ± 0.69h-1Mpc). We find that galaxies at zmed ~ 0.9 can be ancestors of present day L∗ early type galaxies, which exhibit a very high r0 ~ 8h-1 Mpc.

  4. Revised wavelength and spectral response calibrations for AKARI near-infrared grism spectroscopy: Cryogenic phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baba, Shunsuke; Nakagawa, Takao; Shirahata, Mai; Isobe, Naoki; Usui, Fumihiko; Ohyama, Youichi; Onaka, Takashi; Yano, Kenichi; Kochi, Chihiro

    2016-04-01

    We perform revised spectral calibrations for the AKARI near-infrared grism to correct quantitatively for the effect of the wavelength-dependent refractive index. The near-infrared grism covering the wavelength range of 2.5-5.0 μm, with a spectral resolving power of 120 at 3.6 μm, is found to be contaminated by second-order light at wavelengths longer than 4.9 μm, which is especially serious for red objects. First, we present the wavelength calibration considering the refractive index of the grism as a function of the wavelength for the first time. We find that the previous solution is positively shifted by up to 0.01 μm compared with the revised wavelengths at 2.5-5.0 μm. In addition, we demonstrate that second-order contamination occurs even with a perfect order-sorting filter owing to the wavelength dependence of the refractive index. Secondly, the spectral responses of the system from the first- and second-order light are simultaneously obtained from two types of standard objects with different colors. The response from the second-order light suggests leakage of the order-sorting filter below 2.5 μm. The relations between the output of the detector and the intensities of the first- and second-order light are formalized by a matrix equation that combines the two orders. The removal of the contaminating second-order light can be achieved by solving the matrix equation. The new calibration extends the available spectral coverage of the grism mode from 4.9 μm up to 5.0 μm. The revision can be used to study spectral features falling in these extended wavelengths, e.g., the carbon monoxide fundamental ro-vibrational absorption within nearby active galactic nuclei.

  5. AKARI observations of ice absorption bands towards edge-on YSOs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aikawa, Y.; Kamuro, D.; Sakon, I.; Itoh, Y.; Noble, J. A.; Pontoppidan, K. M., Fraser, H. J.; Terada, H.; Tamura, M.; Kandori, R.; Kawamura, A.; Ueno, M.

    2011-05-01

    Circumstellar disks and envelopes of low-mass YSOs contain significant amounts of ice. Such icy material will evolve to volatile components of planetary systems, such as comets in our solar system. In order to investigate the composition and evolution of circumstellar ice around low-mass YSOs, we have observed ice absorption bands towards eight YSOs ranging from class 0 to class II, among which seven are associated with edge-on disks. Slit-less spectroscopic observations are performed using the grism mode of Infrared Camera (IRC) on board AKARI, which enables us to obtain full NIR spectra from 2.5 μm to 5 μm, including the CO_2 band and the blue wing of the H_2O band, which are not accessible from the ground. We developed procedures to reduce the spectra of targets with nebulosity. The spectra are fitted with polynomial baselines to derive the absorption spectra. Then we fit the molecular absorption bands with the laboratory spectra from the database, considering the instrumental line profile and the spectral resolution of the dispersion element. Towards the Class 0-I sources, absorption bands of H_2O, CO_2, CO and XCN (OCN^-) are clearly detected. Weak features of 13CO_2, HDO, the C-H band, and gaseous CO are detected as well. OCS ice absorption is tentatively detected towards IRC-L1041-2. The detected features would mostly originate in the cold envelope, while CO gas and OCN^- could originate in the region close to the protostar. Towards class II stars, H_2O ice band is detected. We also detected H_2O ice, CO_2 ice and tentative CO gas features of the foreground component of class II stars.

  6. Dust Thermal Emission in a Suspected H2-Forming, Perseus-Arm Cloud via AKARI, IRAS, and SST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Aaron C.; Gibson, S. J.; Onaka, T.; Sakon, I.; Ohsawa, R.; Noriega-Crespo, A.; Reach, W. T.; Carey, S. J.; Miville-Deschenes, M.; Boulanger, F.; Brunt, C.; Taylor, A. R.; Martin, P. G.; Douglas, K. A.

    2013-01-01

    Formation of new stars requires the condensation of ambient neutral atomic hydrogen into the molecular phase. It is well known that stars form from molecular hydrogen clouds; less understood is how molecular clouds themselves begin to form. We use AKARI (MIR and FIS), HIRES (IRAS) and Spitzer (IRAC and MIPS) imaging photometry to probe thermal dust emission in a target cloud in the Perseus spiral arm, where the H1 to H2 transition appears to be underway. H2 formation in this region is indicated by strong HI self-absorption, variable CO emission, and significant ``excess'' infrared emission. We have sampled the dust spectral energy distribution (SED) at many positions on and off this cloud using AKARI, IRAS, and SST data. We present these SED plots with fits generated by the DustEM modeling program to provide some insight as to the nature of the dust composition, size distribution, and dominant heating mechanisms within this target and possibly other H2 forming regions.

  7. Participation in the north ecliptic pole sky survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henry, J. Patrick

    1992-01-01

    This grant supported research into the nature of the faintest x-ray sources found in the ROSAT All Sky Survey, with particular emphasis on distant clusters of galaxies. The project was broadened to include sources found in the ROSAT deep pointing at the North Ecliptic Pole. Progress on the research is briefly summarized.

  8. AKARI observations of ice absorption bands towards edge-on young stellar objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aikawa, Y.; Kamuro, D.; Sakon, I.; Itoh, Y.; Terada, H.; Noble, J. A.; Pontoppidan, K. M.; Fraser, H. J.; Tamura, M.; Kandori, R.; Kawamura, A.; Ueno, M.

    2012-02-01

    Context. Circumstellar disks and envelopes of low-mass young stellar objects (YSOs) contain significant amounts of ice. Such icy material will evolve to become volatile components of planetary systems, such as comets in our solar system. Aims: To investigate the composition and evolution of circumstellar ice around low-mass young stellar objects (YSOs), we observed ice absorption bands in the near infrared (NIR) towards eight YSOs ranging from class 0 to class II, among which seven are associated with edge-on disks. Methods: We performed slit-less spectroscopic observations using the grism mode of the InfraRed Camera (IRC) on board AKARI, which enables us to obtain full NIR spectra from 2.5 μm to 5 μm, including the CO2 band and the blue wing of the H2O band, which are inaccessible from the ground. We developed procedures to carefully process the spectra of targets with nebulosity. The spectra were fitted with polynomial baselines to derive the absorption spectra. The molecular absorption bands were then fitted with the laboratory database of ice absorption bands, considering the instrumental line profile and the spectral resolution of the grism dispersion element. Results: Towards the class 0-I sources (L1527, IRC-L1041-2, and IRAS 04302), absorption bands of H2O, CO2, CO, and XCN are clearly detected. Column density ratios of CO2 ice and CO ice relative to H2O ice are 21-28% and 13-46%, respectively. If XCN is OCN-, its column density is as high as 2-6% relative to H2O ice. The HDO ice feature at 4.1 μm is tentatively detected towards the class 0-I sources and HV Tau. Non-detections of the CH-stretching mode features around 3.5 μm provide upper limits to the CH3OH abundance of 26% (L1527) and 42% (IRAS 04302) relative to H2O. We tentatively detect OCS ice absorption towards IRC-L1041-2. Towards class 0-I sources, the detected features should mostly originate in the cold envelope, while CO gas and OCN- could originate in the region close to the protostar

  9. Extragalactic HI surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giovanelli, Riccardo; Haynes, Martha P.

    2015-12-01

    We review the results of HI line surveys of extragalactic sources in the local Universe. In the last two decades major efforts have been made in establishing on firm statistical grounds the properties of the HI source population, the two most prominent being the HI Parkes All Sky Survey and the Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA survey. We review the choices of technical parameters in the design and optimization of spectro-photometric "blind" HI surveys, which for the first time produced extensive HI-selected data sets. Particular attention is given to the relationship between optical and HI populations, the differences in their clustering properties and the importance of HI-selected samples in contributing to the understanding of apparent conflicts between observation and theory on the abundance of low mass halos. The last section of this paper provides an overview of currently ongoing and planned surveys which will explore the cosmic evolution of properties of the HI population.

  10. Extragalactic counterparts to Einstein slew survey sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schachter, Jonathan F.; Elvis, Martin; Plummer, David; Remillard, Ron

    1992-01-01

    The Einstein slew survey consists of 819 bright X-ray sources, of which 636 (or 78 percent) are identified with counterparts in standard catalogs. The importance of bright X-ray surveys is stressed, and the slew survey is compared to the Rosat all sky survey. Statistical techniques for minimizing confusion in arcminute error circles in digitized data are discussed. The 238 slew survey active galactic nuclei, clusters, and BL Lacertae objects identified to date and their implications for logN-logS and source evolution studies are described.

  11. The initial conditions of isolated star formation - IX. Akari mapping of an externally heated pre-stellar core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nutter, D.; Stamatellos, D.; Ward-Thompson, D.

    2009-07-01

    We present observations of L1155 and L1148 in the Cepheus molecular cloud, taken using the Far Infrared Surveyor (FIS) instrument on the Akari satellite. We compare these data to submillimetre data taken using the Submillimetre Common-User Bolometer Array (SCUBA) camera on the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope, and far-infrared data taken with the imaging photo-polarimeter (ISOPHOT) camera on board the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) satellite. The Akari data cover a similar spectral window and are consistent with the ISO data. All of the data show a relation between the position of the peak of emission and the wavelength for the core of L1155. We interpret this as a temperature gradient. We fit modified blackbody curves to the spectral energy distributions at two positions in the core and see that the central core in L1155 (L1155C) is approximately 2° warmer at one edge than it is in the centre. We consider a number of possible heating sources and conclude that the A6V star BD+67 1263 is the most likely candidate. This star is at a distance of 0.7pc from the front of L1155C in the plane of the sky. We carry out radiative transfer modelling of the L1155C core including the effects from the nearby star. We find that we can generate a good fit to the observed data at all wavelengths, and demonstrate that the different morphologies of the core at different wavelengths can be explained by the observed 2° temperature gradient. The L1148 core exhibits a similar morphology to that of L1155C, and the data are also consistent with a temperature gradient across the core. In this case, the most likely heating source is the star BD197053. Our findings illustrate very clearly that the apparent observed morphology of a pre-stellar core can be highly dependent on the wavelength of the observation, and that temperature gradients must be taken into account before converting images into column density distributions. This is important to note when interpreting Akari and Spitzer data

  12. DETECTION OF A NEARBY HALO DEBRIS STREAM IN THE WISE AND 2MASS SURVEYS

    SciTech Connect

    Grillmair, Carl J.; Cutri, Roc; Masci, Frank J.; Conrow, Tim; Sesar, Branimir; Eisenhardt, Peter R. M.; Wright, Edward L. E-mail: roc@ipac.caltech.edu E-mail: tim@ipac.caltech.edu E-mail: peter.r.eisenhardt@jpl.nasa.gov

    2013-06-01

    Combining the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer All-Sky Release with the Two Micron All Sky Survey Point Source Catalog, we detect a nearby, moderately metal-poor stellar debris stream spanning 24° across the southern sky. The stream, which we designate Alpheus, is at an estimated distance of ∼1.9 kpc. Its position, orientation, width, estimated metallicity, and, to some extent, its distance, are in approximate agreement with what one might expect of the leading tidal tail of the southern globular cluster NGC 288.

  13. Llaki and ñakary: idioms of distress and suffering among the highland Quechua in the Peruvian Andes.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Duncan; Kienzler, Hanna; Gamarra, Jeffrey

    2010-06-01

    This article examines some of the long-term health outcomes of extreme adversities and the ways in which social inequalities and idioms of distress are historically and socially produced in the Peruvian context. We describe how the highland Quechua of northern Ayacucho construct and experience expressions of distress and suffering such as pinsamientuwan (worrying thoughts, worries), ñakary (suffering) and llaki (sorrow, sadness), in a context of persistent social inequalities, social exclusion and a recent history of political violence. It is concluded that the multiple expressions of distress and suffering are closely related to past and current events, shaped by beliefs, core values and cultural norms and, in this process, transformed, recreated and invested with new meanings and attributions. PMID:20405314

  14. Revised calibration for near- and mid-infrared images from ˜4000 pointed observations with AKARI/IRC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egusa, Fumi; Usui, Fumihiko; Murata, Kazumi; Yamashita, Takuji; Yamamura, Issei; Onaka, Takashi

    2016-04-01

    The Japanese infrared astronomical satellite AKARI performed ˜4000 pointed observations for 16 months until the end of August 2007, when the telescope and instruments were cooled by liquid helium. Observation targets include solar system objects, Galactic objects, local galaxies, and galaxies at cosmological distances. We describe recent updates on calibration processes of near- and mid-infrared images taken by the Infrared Camera (IRC), which has nine photometric filters covering 2-27 μm continuously. Using the latest data reduction toolkit, we created calibrated and stacked images from each pointed observation. About 90% of the stacked images have a position accuracy better than 1{^''.}5. Uncertainties in aperture photometry estimated from a typical standard sky deviation of stacked images are a factor of ˜2-4 smaller than those of AllWISE at similar wavelengths. The processed images, together with documents such as process logs, as well as the latest toolkit are available online.

  15. Properties of Newly Formed Dust by SN 2006JC Based on Near- to Mid-Infrared Observation With AKARI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakon, I.; Onaka, T.; Wada, T.; Ohyama, Y.; Kaneda, H.; Ishihara, D.; Tanabé, T.; Minezaki, T.; Yoshii, Y.; Tominaga, N.; Nomoto, K.; Nozawa, T.; Kozasa, T.; Tanaka, M.; Suzuki, T.; Umeda, H.; Ohyabu, S.; Usui, F.; Matsuhara, H.; Nakagawa, T.; Murakami, H.

    2009-02-01

    We present our latest results on near- to mid-infrared (MIR) observation of supernova (SN) 2006jc at 200 days after the discovery using the Infrared Camera (IRC) on board AKARI. The near-infrared (2-5 μm) spectrum of SN 2006jc is obtained for the first time and is found to be well interpreted in terms of the thermal emission from amorphous carbon of 800 ± 10 K with the mass of 6.9 ± 0.5 × 10-5 M sun that was formed in the SN ejecta. This dust mass newly formed in the ejecta of SN 2006jc is in a range similar to those obtained for other several dust-forming core-collapse supernovae based on recent observations (i.e., 10-3-10-5 M sun). MIR photometric data with AKARI/IRC MIR-S/S7, S9W, and S11 bands have shown excess emission over the thermal emission by hot amorphous carbon of 800 K. This MIR excess emission is likely to be accounted for by the emission from warm amorphous carbon dust of 320 ± 10 K with the mass of 2.7+0.7 -0.5 × 10-3 M sun rather than by the band emission of astronomical silicate and/or silica grains. This warm amorphous carbon dust is expected to have been formed in the mass-loss wind associated with the Wolf-Rayet stellar activity before the SN explosion. Our result suggests that a significant amount of dust is condensed in the mass-loss wind prior to the SN explosion.

  16. AKARI IRC INFRARED 2.5-5 {mu}m SPECTROSCOPY OF A LARGE SAMPLE OF LUMINOUS INFRARED GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Imanishi, Masatoshi; Nakagawa, Takao; Shirahata, Mai; Ohyama, Yoichi; Onaka, Takashi

    2010-10-01

    We present the results of our systematic infrared 2.5-5 {mu}m spectroscopy of 60 luminous infrared galaxies (LIRGs) with infrared luminosities L{sub IR} = 10{sup 11}-10{sup 12} L{sub sun} and 54 ultraluminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs) with L{sub IR} {>=} 10{sup 12} L{sub sun}, using the AKARI Infrared Camera (IRC). AKARI IRC slit-less spectroscopy allows us to probe the full range of emission from these galaxies, including spatially extended components. The 3.3 {mu}m polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) emission features, hydrogen recombination emission lines, and various absorption features are detected and used to investigate the properties of these galaxies. Because of the relatively small effect of dust extinction in the infrared range, quantitative discussion of these dusty galaxy populations is possible. For sources with clearly detectable Br{beta} (2.63 {mu}m) and Br{alpha} (4.05 {mu}m) emission lines, the flux ratios are found to be similar to those predicted by case B theory. Starburst luminosities are estimated from both 3.3 {mu}m PAH and Br{alpha} emission, which roughly agree with each other. In addition to the detected starburst activity, a significant fraction of the observed sources display signatures of obscured active galactic nuclei (AGNs), such as low PAH equivalent widths, large optical depths of dust absorption features, and red continuum emission. The energetic importance of optically elusive buried AGNs in optically non-Seyfert galaxies tends to increase with increasing galaxy infrared luminosity, from LIRGs to ULIRGs.

  17. BRIGHTNESS AND FLUCTUATION OF THE MID-INFRARED SKY FROM AKARI OBSERVATIONS TOWARD THE NORTH ECLIPTIC POLE

    SciTech Connect

    Pyo, Jeonghyun; Jeong, Woong-Seob; Matsumoto, Toshio; Matsuura, Shuji

    2012-12-01

    We present the smoothness of the mid-infrared sky from observations by the Japanese infrared astronomical satellite AKARI. AKARI monitored the north ecliptic pole (NEP) during its cold phase with nine wave bands covering from 2.4 to 24 {mu}m, out of which six mid-infrared bands were used in this study. We applied power-spectrum analysis to the images in order to search for the fluctuation of the sky brightness. Observed fluctuation is explained by fluctuation of photon noise, shot noise of faint sources, and Galactic cirrus. The fluctuations at a few arcminutes scales at short mid-infrared wavelengths (7, 9, and 11 {mu}m) are largely caused by the diffuse Galactic light of the interstellar dust cirrus. At long mid-infrared wavelengths (15, 18, and 24 {mu}m), photon noise is the dominant source of fluctuation over the scale from arcseconds to a few arcminutes. The residual fluctuation amplitude at 200'' after removing these contributions is at most 1.04 {+-} 0.23 nW m{sup -2} sr{sup -1} or 0.05% of the brightness at 24 {mu}m and at least 0.47 {+-} 0.14 nW m{sup -2} sr{sup -1} or 0.02% at 18 {mu}m. We conclude that the upper limit of the fluctuation in the zodiacal light toward the NEP is 0.03% of the sky brightness, taking 2{sigma} error into account.

  18. Multiwavelength AGN Surveys and Studies (IAU S304)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mickaelian, Areg M.; Sanders, David B.

    2014-08-01

    1. Historical surveys: spectral and colorimetric surveys for AGN, surveys for UV-excess galaxies; 2. AGN from IR/submm surveys: 2MASS, IRAS, ISO, AKARI, SCUBA, SST, WISE, Herschel; 3. AGN from radio/mm surveys: NVSS, FIRST, ALMA, Planck, and others; 4. AGN from X-ray/gamma-ray surveys: ROSAT, ASCA, BeppoSAX, Chandra, XMM, INTEGRAL, Fermi, HESS, MAGIC, VERITAS, NuSTAR; 5. Multiwavelength AGN surveys, AGN statistics and cross-correlation of multiwavelength surveys; 6. Unification and other models of AGN, accretion modes, understanding of the structure of nearby AGN from IFUs on VLT and other telescopes; 7. AGN feedback in galaxies and clusters, AGN host galaxies and the AGN environments; 8. Binary AGN and Merging Super-Massive Black Holes; 9. Study of unique AGN, AGN variability and the Phenomena of Activity; 10. Future large projects; Author index.

  19. AKARI NEAR-INFRARED SPECTROSCOPIC OBSERVATIONS OF INTERSTELLAR ICES IN THE EDGE-ON STARBURST GALAXY NGC 253

    SciTech Connect

    Yamagishi, Mitsuyoshi; Kaneda, Hidehiro; Ishihara, Daisuke; Oyabu, Shinki; Onaka, Takashi; Shimonishi, Takashi; Suzuki, Toyoaki

    2011-04-10

    We present the spatially resolved near-infrared (2.5-5.0 {mu}m) spectra of the edge-on starburst galaxy NGC 253 obtained with the Infrared Camera on board AKARI. Near the center of the galaxy, we clearly detect the absorption features of interstellar ices (H{sub 2}O: 3.05 {mu}m, CO{sub 2}: 4.27 {mu}m, and XCN: 4.62 {mu}m) and the emission of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) at 3.29 {mu}m and the hydrogen recombination line Br{alpha} at 4.05 {mu}m. We find that the distributions of the ices differ from those of the PAH and gas. We calculate the column densities of the ices and derive the abundance ratios of N(CO{sub 2})/N(H{sub 2}O) = 0.17 {+-} 0.05. They are similar to those obtained around the massive young stellar objects in our Galaxy (0.17 {+-} 0.03), although a much stronger interstellar radiation field and higher dust temperature are expected near the center of NGC 253.

  20. LBA Calibrator Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Chris; Petrov, Leonid; Bertarini, Alessandra

    2009-07-01

    The Australian LBA (Long Baseline Array) has been used to observe a list of candidate flat spectrum radio sources with declination < -50° to determine their position with milliarcsec accuracy and determine their suitability as calibrators for phase referencing observations and as target for astrometry and geodesy observations. Currently more than 316 new millisecond positions have been determined with a final goal of around 1000 astrometric positions for a high density phase reference grid. The candidate list is based on the AT20G survey, an all-sky 20 GHz survey using an 8 GHz analog correlator for the ATCA. So far a detection rate of candidate source of 97% has been achieved.

  1. Sky surveys in the ultraviolet. [spaceborne astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carruthers, G. R.

    1978-01-01

    Instrumentation, results, and future prospects for sky surveys at UV wavelengths inaccessible from the ground are reviewed. Detectors and optical materials, coatings, and systems for UV surveys are discussed, previously performed UV sky surveys are recounted, and some specific results of these surveys are examined. The rationale for UV surveys is explained, and the detectors and instrumentation considered for future UV surveys are described. It is noted that for the wavelength range from 1000 to 2000 A, detectors and instrumentation are already available to provide an all-sky UV survey of moderate resolution (10 to 30 arcsec) and moderate sensitivity (reaching hot stars as faint as 18th visual magnitude in direct imagery and 11th magnitude spectrographically with 2-A resolution).

  2. Create and Publish a Hierarchical Progressive Survey (HiPS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernique, P.; Boch, T.; Pineau, F.; Oberto, A.

    2014-05-01

    Since 2009, the CDS promotes a method for visualizing based on the HEALPix sky tessellation. This method, called “Hierarchical Progressive Survey" or HiPS, allows one to display a survey progressively. It is particularly suited for all-sky surveys or deep fields. This visualization method is now integrated in several applications, notably Aladin, the SiTools/MIZAR CNES framework, and the recent HTML5 “Aladin Lite". Also, more than one hundred surveys are already available in this view mode. In this article, we will present the progress concerning this method and its recent adaptation to the astronomical catalogs such as the GAIA simulation.

  3. The LWA1 Northern Celestial Cap Pulsar Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, Alejandro; Stovall, K.; Jenet, F.; Cutchin, S.; Kassim, N. E.; Majid, W. A.; Ray, P. S.; Taylor, G. B.

    2013-01-01

    The LWA1 Northern Celestial Cap (LNCC) pulsar survey, which is targeting the frequency range from 30 to 62 MHz, will be the first part of an all sky pulsar/radio transient survey using the first station (LWA1) of the Long Wavelength Array (LWA) telescope. This poster will focus on the search parameters for the pipelines that will process the LNCC survey data. The current status of the survey will also be discussed as well as preliminary results. Based on simulations it is estimated that about 75 pulsars will be detected with perhaps as many as 10 of them being new pulsars.

  4. OBSERVATIONS OF THE OPTICAL TRANSIENT IN NGC 300 WITH AKARI/IRC: POSSIBILITIES OF ASYMMETRIC DUST FORMATION

    SciTech Connect

    Ohsawa, R.; Sakon, I.; Onaka, T.; Tanaka, M.; Moriya, T.; Nozawa, T.; Maeda, K.; Nomoto, K.; Tominaga, N.; Usui, F.; Matsuhara, H.; Nakagawa, T.; Murakami, H.

    2010-08-01

    We present the results of near-infrared (NIR) multi-epoch observations of the optical transient in the nearby galaxy NGC 300 (NGC 300-OT) at 398 and 582 days after the discovery with the Infrared Camera (IRC) on board AKARI. NIR spectra (2-5 {mu}m) of NGC 300-OT were obtained for the first time. They show no prominent emission nor absorption features, but are dominated by continuum thermal emission from the dust around NGC 300-OT. NIR images were taken in the 2.4, 3.2, and 4.1 {mu}m bands. The spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of NGC 300-OT indicate the dust temperature of 810 {+-} 14 K at 398 days and 670 {+-} 12 K at 582 days. We attribute the observed NIR emission to the thermal emission from dust grains formed in the ejecta of NGC 300-OT. The multi-epoch observations enable us to estimate the dust optical depth as {approx}>12 at 398 days and {approx}>6 at 582 days at 2.4 {mu}m by assuming an isothermal dust cloud. The observed NIR emission must be optically thick, unless the amount of dust grains increases with time. Little extinction at visible wavelengths reported in earlier observations suggests that the dust cloud around NGC 300-OT should be distributed inhomogeneously so as to not screen the radiation from the ejecta gas and the central star. The present results suggest the dust grains are not formed in a spherically symmetric geometry, but rather in a torus, a bipolar outflow, or clumpy cloudlets.

  5. FAR-INFRARED IMAGING OF POST-ASYMPTOTIC GIANT BRANCH STARS AND (PROTO)-PLANETARY NEBULAE WITH THE AKARI FAR-INFRARED SURVEYOR

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, N. L. J.; Garcia-Hernandez, D. A.; Manchado, A.

    2011-04-15

    By tracing the distribution of cool dust in the extended envelopes of post-asymptotic giant branch stars and (proto)-planetary nebulae ((P)PNe), we aim to recover, or constrain, the mass-loss history experienced by these stars in their recent past. The Far-Infrared Surveyor (FIS) instrument on board the AKARI satellite was used to obtain far-infrared maps for a selected sample of post-AGB stars and (P)PNe. We derived flux densities (aperture photometry) for 13 post-AGB stars and (P)PNe at four far-infrared wavelengths (65, 90, 140, and 160 {mu}m). Radial (azimuthally averaged) profiles are used to investigate the presence of extended emission from cool dust. No (detached) extended emission is detected for any target in our sample at levels significant with respect to background and cirrus emission. Only IRAS 21046+4739 reveals tentative excess emission between 30'' and 130''. Estimates of the total dust and gas mass from the obtained maps indicate that the envelope masses of these stars should be large in order to be detected with the AKARI FIS. Imaging with higher sensitivity and higher spatial resolution is needed to detect and resolve, if present, any cool compact or extended emission associated with these evolved stars.

  6. DIFFERENCE IN THE SPATIAL DISTRIBUTION BETWEEN H{sub 2}O AND CO{sub 2} ICES IN M 82 FOUND WITH AKARI

    SciTech Connect

    Yamagishi, Mitsuyoshi; Kaneda, Hidehiro; Ishihara, Daisuke; Oyabu, Shinki; Onaka, Takashi; Shimonishi, Takashi; Suzuki, Toyoaki; Minh, Young Chol

    2013-08-20

    With AKARI, we obtain the spatially resolved near-infrared (NIR) (2.5-5.0 {mu}m) spectra for the nearby starburst galaxy M 82. These spectra clearly show absorption features due to interstellar ices. Based on the spectra, we created the column density maps of H{sub 2}O and CO{sub 2} ices. As a result, we find that the spatial distribution of H{sub 2}O ice is significantly different from that of CO{sub 2} ice; H{sub 2}O ice is widely distributed, while CO{sub 2} ice is concentrated near the galactic center. Our result reveals for the first time variations in CO{sub 2}/H{sub 2}O ice abundance ratio on a galactic scale, suggesting that an ice-forming interstellar environment changes within a galaxy. We discuss the cause of the spatial variations in the ice abundance ratio, utilizing spectral information on the hydrogen recombination Br{alpha} and Br{beta} lines and the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon 3.3 {mu}m emission appearing in the AKARI NIR spectra.

  7. All-Sky Monitoring of Variable Sources with Fermi GBM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson-Hodge, Colleen A.; Cherry, Michael L.; Case, Gary L.; Camero-Arranz, Ascension; Chaplin, Vandiver; Connaughton, Valerie; Finger, Mark H.; Jenke, Pater; Rodi, James C.; Baumgartner, Wayne H.; Beklen, Elif; Bhat, P. Narayana; Briggs, Michael S.; Gehrels, Neil; Greiner, Jochen; Jahoda, Keith; Kippen, R. Marc; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Krimm, Hans A.; Kuulkers, Erik; Lund, Niels; Meegan, Charles A.; Natalucci, Lorenzo; Paciesas, William S.; Preece, Robert

    2011-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the monitoring of variable sources with the Fermi Gamma Ray Burst Monitor (GBM). It reviews the use of the Earth Occultation technique, the observations of the Crab Nebula with the GBM, and the comparison with other satellite's observations. The instruments on board the four satellites indicate a decline in the Crab from 2008-2010.

  8. Instrument for the monochromatic observation of all sky auroral images.

    PubMed

    Mende, S B; Eather, R H; Aamodt, E K

    1977-06-01

    To investigate the dynamics of auroras and faint upper atmospheric emissions, a new type of imaging instrument was developed. The instrument is a wide field of view, narrow-spectral-band imaging system using an intensified S.E.C. TV camera in a time exposure mode. Pictures were taken at very low light levels of a few photons per exposure per resolution element. These pictures are displayed in the form of a pseudocolor presentation in which the color represents spectral ratios of two of the observed auroral spectral emission features. The spectral ratios play an important part in the interpretation of auroral particle dynamics. A digital picture processing facility is also part of the system which enables the digital manppulation of the pictures at standard TV rates. As an example, hydrogen auroras can be displayed having been corrected for nonspectral background by subtracting a picture obtained by a suitable background filter. The instrumentation was calibrated in the laboratory and was used in several field xperiments. Elaborate exposure sequences were developed to extend the dynamic range and to cover the large range of auroral brightnesses in a fairly linear manner. PMID:20168774

  9. Project Argus: Pursuing Amateur All-Sky SETI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shuch, H. Paul

    Project Argus, a global effort of the non-profit SETI League, Inc., seeks to achieve continuous microwave monitoring of all four pi steradians of space, in real time. Initially, Project Argus was planned as the most ambitious SETI project ever undertaken without benefit of government support, ultimately to involve 5000 small radio telescopes worldwide, built, maintained and operated by private individuals (primarily radio amateurs and microwave experimenters), coordinated so as to miss no likely candidate signals, and providing independent verification of any interesting signals detected. Though prototype stations went into operation in 1996, andsecondgeneration stations by 2000, full sky coverage is yet to be achieved.

  10. XMM-Newton slew survey hard band sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saxton, R. D.; Read, A. M.; Warwick, R. S.; Esquej, M. P.

    2010-07-01

    The XMM-Newton slew survey has a flux limit of 4×10-12 ergs s-1 cm-2 in the hard (2-12 keV) energy band. This gives it the potential to fill in the gap in luminosity functions which currently exist between shallow all-sky surveys (HEAO-1 A2, Ariel V) and the medium deep surveys of ASCA, BeppoSax and latterly the 2XMM serendipitous catalogue. In this paper we explore the hard-band source population with a view to constructing luminosity distributions.

  11. AKARI observations of brown dwarfs. IV. Effect of elemental abundances on near-infrared spectra between 1.0 and 5.0 μm

    SciTech Connect

    Sorahana, S.; Yamamura, I.

    2014-09-20

    The detection of the CO{sub 2} absorption band at 4.2 μm in brown dwarf spectra by AKARI has made it possible to discuss CO{sub 2} molecular abundance in brown dwarf atmospheres. In our previous studies, we found an excess in the 4.2 μm CO{sub 2} absorption band of three brown dwarf spectra, and suggested that these deviations were caused by high C and O elemental abundances in their atmospheres. To validate this hypothesis, we have constructed a set of models of brown dwarf atmospheres with various elemental abundance patterns, and we investigate the variations of the molecular composition and the thermal structure, and how they affect the near-infrared spectra between 1.0 and 5.0 μm. The 4.2 μm CO{sub 2} absorption band in some late-L and T dwarfs taken by AKARI is stronger or weaker than predicted by corresponding models with solar abundance. By comparing the CO{sub 2} band in the model spectra to the observed near-infrared spectra, we confirm possible elemental abundance variations among brown dwarfs. We find that the band strength is especially sensitive to O abundance, but C is also needed to reproduce the entire near-infrared spectra. This result indicates that both the C and O abundances should increase and decrease simultaneously for brown dwarfs. We find that a weaker CO{sub 2} absorption band in a spectrum can also be explained by a model with lower 'C and O' abundances.

  12. First Scientific Results from the VISTA Hemisphere Survey (VHS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMahon, R. G.; Banerji, M.; Gonzalez, E.; Koposov, S. E.; Bejar, V. J.; Lodieu, N.; Rebolo, R.; VHS Collaboration

    2013-12-01

    The first Galactic and extragalactic results from the VISTA Hemisphere Survey (VHS) are presented. The aim of the VHS is to carry out a near-infrared survey which, when combined with other VISTA public surveys, will result in coverage of the whole southern celestial hemisphere (~20 000 square degrees) to a depth 30 times fainter than the Two Micron All Sky Survey in at least two wavebands (J and Ks). The VHS vision includes a deep optical survey over the same area and this is now being realised with the VST surveys and the Dark Energy Survey, which has recently started. A summary of the survey progress is presented, with some follow-up results on low-mass stars and high-redshift quasars.

  13. Pre-phase A: Development of a far-ultraviolet photometric- and spectroscopic-survey small-explorer experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Christopher

    1993-01-01

    We propose to perform a far ultraviolet photometric and spectroscopic survey covering the lambda lambda 1300-2000 band with a sensitivity comparable to that of the Palomar Sky Survey. This survey will proceed in three phases: an all-sky survey in three bands to 18-19.5(sup m), deep surveys of selected targets of interest in the same bands to 21-22(sup m), and a spectroscopic survey of 2 percent of the sky to 18(sup m) with a resolution of 3-20A. This mission, the Joint Ultraviolet Nightsky Observer (JUNO), can be performed by a Small-Explorer-class satellite.

  14. The VLT Survey Telescope ATLAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shanks, T.; Metcalfe, N.; Chehade, B.; Findlay, J. R.; Irwin, M. J.; Gonzalez-Solares, E.; Lewis, J. R.; Yoldas, A. Kupcu; Mann, R. G.; Read, M. A.; Sutorius, E. T. W.; Voutsinas, S.

    2015-08-01

    The VLT Survey Telescope ATLAS survey is an optical ugriz survey aiming to cover ≈4700 deg2 of the southern sky to similar depths as the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). From reduced images and object catalogues provided by the Cambridge Astronomical Surveys Unit, we first find that the median seeing ranges from 0.8 arcsec FWHM (full width at half-maximum) in i to 1.0 arcsec in u, significantly better than the 1.2-1.5 arcsec seeing for SDSS. The 5σ mag limit for stellar sources is rAB = 22.7 and in all bands these limits are at least as faint as SDSS. SDSS and ATLAS are more equivalent for galaxy photometry except in the z band where ATLAS has significantly higher throughput. We have improved the original ESO magnitude zero-points by comparing m < 16 star magnitudes with the AAVSO Photometric All-Sky Survey in gri, also extrapolating into u and z, resulting in zero-points accurate to ≈ ± 0.02 mag. We finally compare star and galaxy number counts in a 250 deg2 area with SDSS and other count data and find good agreement. ATLAS data products can be retrieved from the ESO Science Archive, while support for survey science analyses is provided by the OmegaCAM Science Archive, operated by the Wide-Field Astronomy Unit in Edinburgh.

  15. Comparing the 2MTF and 6dFGS Peculiar Velocity Surveys to models from redshift surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Springob, Christopher M.; Hong, Tao; Magoulas, Christina; Colless, Matthew; Staveley-Smith, Lister; Erdogdu, Pirin; Jones, D. Heath; Lucey, John R.; Masters, Karen; Mould, Jeremy R.; Jarrett, Tom; Koribalski, Baerbel; Macri, Lucas M.; Scrimgeour, Morag

    2015-01-01

    The 6dF Galaxy Survey (6dFGS) and 2MASS Tully-Fisher Survey (2MTF) are large galaxy peculiar velocity surveys of the local universe, providing distances and peculiar velocities for thousands of galaxies, derived via the Fundamental Plane and Tully-Fisher relations respectively. We compare these observed velocity fields to reconstructed peculiar velocity field models derived from redshift surveys such as the 2MASS Redshift Survey (2MRS) and the IRAS Point Source Redshift Survey (PSCz), addressing the question of whether the galaxy distribution traces the matter distribution, and whether the observed velocity fields include a "residual bulk flow" not predicted by the models. This research was conducted by the Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for All-sky Astrophysics (CAASTRO), through project number CE110001020.

  16. THE MASSIVE AND DISTANT CLUSTERS OF WISE SURVEY. II. INITIAL SPECTROSCOPIC CONFIRMATION OF z ∼ 1 GALAXY CLUSTERS SELECTED FROM 10,000 deg{sup 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Stanford, S. A.; Gonzalez, Anthony H.; Gettings, Daniel P.; Brodwin, Mark; Eisenhardt, Peter R. M.; Stern, Daniel; Wylezalek, Dominika

    2014-08-01

    We present optical and infrared imaging and optical spectroscopy of galaxy clusters which were identified as part of an all-sky search for high-redshift galaxy clusters, the Massive and Distant Clusters of WISE Survey (MaDCoWS). The initial phase of MaDCoWS combined infrared data from the all-sky data release of the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) with optical data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey to select probable z ∼ 1 clusters of galaxies over an area of 10,000 deg{sup 2}. Our spectroscopy confirms 19 new clusters at 0.7 < z < 1.3, half of which are at z > 1, demonstrating the viability of using WISE to identify high-redshift galaxy clusters. The next phase of MaDCoWS will use the greater depth of the AllWISE data release to identify even higher redshift cluster candidates.

  17. Are peculiar velocity surveys competitive as a cosmological probe?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koda, Jun; Blake, Chris; Davis, Tamara; Magoulas, Christina; Springob, Christopher M.; Scrimgeour, Morag; Johnson, Andrew; Poole, Gregory B.; Staveley-Smith, Lister

    2014-12-01

    Peculiar velocity surveys, which measure galaxy velocities directly from standard candles in addition to redshifts, can provide strong constraints on the growth rate of structure at low redshift. The improvement originates from the physical relationship between galaxy density and peculiar velocity, which substantially reduces cosmic variance. We use Fisher matrix forecasts to show that peculiar velocity data can improve the growth rate constraints by about a factor of 2 compared to density alone for surveys with galaxy number density of 10-2 (h-1 Mpc)-3, if we can use all the information for wavenumber k ≤ 0.2 h Mpc-1. In the absence of accurate theoretical models at k = 0.2 h Mpc- 1, the improvement over redshift-only surveys is even larger - around a factor of 5 for k ≤ 0.1 h Mpc-1. Future peculiar velocity surveys, Transforming Astronomical Imaging surveys through Polychromatic Analysis of Nebulae (TAIPAN), and the all-sky H I surveys, Widefield ASKAP L-band Legacy All-sky Blind Survey (WALLABY) and Westerbork Northern Sky H I Survey (WNSHS), can measure the growth rate to 3 per cent at z ˜ 0.025. Although the velocity subsample is about an order of magnitude smaller than the redshift sample from the same survey, it improves the constraint by 40 per cent compared to the same survey without velocity measurements. Peculiar velocity surveys can also measure the growth rate as a function of wavenumber with 15-30 per cent uncertainties in bins with widths Δk = 0.01 h Mpc-1 in the range k ≤ 0.1 h Mpc-1, which is a large improvement over galaxy density only. Such measurements on very large scales can detect signatures of modified gravity or non-Gaussianity through scale-dependent growth rate or galaxy bias. We test our modelling in detail using N-body simulations.

  18. Widely Extended [O III] 88μm Line Emission around the 30 Doradus Region Revealed with AKARI FIS-FTS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawada, Mitsunobu; Takahashi, Ai; Yasuda, Akiko; Kiriyama, Yuichi; Mori, Tatsuya; Mouri, Akio; Kaneda, Hidehiro; Okada, Yoko; Takahashi, Hidenori; Murakami, Noriko

    2011-08-01

    We present a distribution map of the far-infrared [O II] 88 μm line emission around the 30 Doradus (30 Dor) region in the Large Magellanic Cloud obtained with the Fourier Transform Spectrometer of the Far-Infrared Surveyor on board AKARI. The map reveals that the [O III] emission is widely distributed by more than 10' around the super star cluster R 136, implying that the 30 Dor region is affluent with interstellar radiation field that is hard enough to ionize O2+. The observed [O III] line intensities are as high as (1-2) × 10-6 W m-2 sr-1 on the peripheral regions 4'-5' away from the center of 30 Dor, which requires gas densities of 60-100 cm-3. However, the observed size of the distribution of the [O III] emission is too large to be explained by massive stars in the 30 Dor region enshrouded by clouds with a constant gas density of 102 cm-3. Therefore, the surrounding structure is likely to be highly clumpy. We also find a global correlation between the [O III] and the far-infrared continuum emission, suggesting that the gas and dust are well mixed in the highly ionized region where the dust survives in clumpy dense clouds shielded from energetic photons.

  19. Low-Resolution Spectrum of the Diffuse Galactic Light and 3.3 μm PAH Emission with the AKARI InfraRed Camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsumura, Kohji; Matsumoto, Toshio; Matsuura, Shuji; Sakon, Itsuki; Tanaka, Masahiro; Wada, Takehiko

    2013-12-01

    We first obtained the spectrum of the diffuse Galactic light (DGL) at general interstellar space in the 1.8-5.3μm wavelength region with the low-resolution prism spectroscopy mode of the AKARI Infra-Red Camera (IRC) NIR channel. The 3.3μm m PAH band is detected in the DGL spectrum at Galactic latitude |b| < 15˚, and its correlations with the Galactic dust and gas are confirmed. The correlation between the 3.3μm PAH band and the thermal emission from the Galactic dust is expressed not by a simple linear correlation, but by a relation with extinction. Using this correlation, the spectral shape of DGL at an optically thin region (5˚ < |b| < 15˚) was derived as a template spectrum. Assuming that the spectral shape of this template spectrum is uniform at any position, the DGL spectrum can be estimated by scaling this template spectrum using the correlation between the 3.3μm PAH band and the thermal emission from the Galactic dust.

  20. Generation of complete source samples from the Slew Survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schachter, Jonathan

    1992-01-01

    The Einstein Slew Survey consists of 819 bright X-ray sources, of which 636 (or 78 percent) are identified with counterparts in standard catalogs. We argue for the importance of bright X-ray surveys, and compare the slew results to the ROSAT all-sky survey. Also, we discuss statistical techniques for minimizing confusion in arcminute error circles in digitized data. We describe the 238 Slew Survey AGN, clusters, and BL Lac objects identified to date and their implications for logN-logS and source evolution studies. Also given is a catalog of 1075 sources detected in the Einstein Imaging Proportional Counter (IPC) Slew Survey of the X-ray sky. Five hundred fifty-four of these sources were not previously known as X-ray sources.

  1. A search for highly dispersed fast radio bursts in three Parkes multibeam surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crawford, F.; Rane, A.; Tran, L.; Rolph, K.; Lorimer, D. R.; Ridley, J. P.

    2016-08-01

    We have searched three Parkes multibeam 1.4 GHz surveys for the presence of fast radio bursts (FRBs) out to a dispersion measure (DM) of 5000 pc cm$^{-3}$. These surveys originally targeted the Magellanic Clouds (in two cases) and unidentified gamma-ray sources at mid-Galactic latitudes (in the third case) for new radio pulsars. In previous processing, none of these surveys were searched to such a high DM limit. The surveys had a combined total of 719 hr of Parkes multibeam on-sky time. One known FRB, 010724, was present in our data and was detected in our analysis but no new FRBs were found. After adding in the on-sky Parkes time from these three surveys to the on-sky time (7512 hr) from the five Parkes surveys analysed by Rane et al., all of which have now been searched to high DM limits, we improve the constraint on the all-sky rate of FRBs above a fluence level of 3.8 Jy ms at 1.4 GHz to $R = 3.3^{+3.7}_{-2.2} \\times 10^{3}$ events per day per sky (at the 99% confidence level). Future Parkes surveys that accumulate additional multibeam on-sky time (such as the ongoing high-resolution Parkes survey of the LMC) can be combined with these results to further constrain the all-sky FRB rate.

  2. A search for highly dispersed fast radio bursts in three Parkes multibeam surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crawford, F.; Rane, A.; Tran, L.; Rolph, K.; Lorimer, D. R.; Ridley, J. P.

    2016-08-01

    We have searched three Parkes multibeam 1.4 GHz surveys for the presence of fast radio bursts (FRBs) out to a dispersion measure (DM) of 5000 pc cm-3. These surveys originally targeted the Magellanic Clouds (in two cases) and unidentified gamma-ray sources at mid-Galactic latitudes (in the third case) for new radio pulsars. In previous processing, none of these surveys were searched to such a high DM limit. The surveys had a combined total of 719 h of Parkes multibeam on-sky time. One known FRB, 010724, was present in our data and was detected in our analysis but no new FRBs were found. After adding in the on-sky Parkes time from these three surveys to the on-sky time (7512 h) from the five Parkes surveys analysed by Rane et al., all of which have now been searched to high DM limits, we improve the constraint on the all-sky rate of FRBs above a fluence level of 3.8 Jy ms at 1.4 GHz to R = 3.3^{+3.7}_{-2.2} × 103 events per day per sky (at the 99 per cent confidence level). Future Parkes surveys that accumulate additional multibeam on-sky time (such as the ongoing high-resolution Parkes survey of the Large Magellanic Cloud) can be combined with these results to further constrain the all-sky FRB rate.

  3. A search for highly dispersed fast radio bursts in three Parkes multibeam surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crawford, F.; Rane, A.; Tran, L.; Rolph, K.; Lorimer, D. R.; Ridley, J. P.

    2016-05-01

    We have searched three Parkes multibeam 1.4 GHz surveys for the presence of fast radio bursts (FRBs) out to a dispersion measure (DM) of 5000 pc cm-3. These surveys originally targeted the Magellanic Clouds (in two cases) and unidentified gamma-ray sources at mid-Galactic latitudes (in the third case) for new radio pulsars. In previous processing, none of these surveys were searched to such a high DM limit. The surveys had a combined total of 719 hr of Parkes multibeam on-sky time. One known FRB, 010724, was present in our data and was detected in our analysis but no new FRBs were found. After adding in the on-sky Parkes time from these three surveys to the on-sky time (7512 hr) from the five Parkes surveys analysed by Rane et al., all of which have now been searched to high DM limits, we improve the constraint on the all-sky rate of FRBs above a fluence level of 3.8 Jy ms at 1.4 GHz to R = 3.3^{+3.7}_{-2.2} × 103 events per day per sky (at the 99% confidence level). Future Parkes surveys that accumulate additional multibeam on-sky time (such as the ongoing high-resolution Parkes survey of the LMC) can be combined with these results to further constrain the all-sky FRB rate.

  4. DETECTION OF PARENT H{sub 2}O AND CO{sub 2} MOLECULES IN THE 2.5-5 {mu}m SPECTRUM OF COMET C/2007 N3 (LULIN) OBSERVED WITH AKARI

    SciTech Connect

    Ootsubo, Takafumi; Usui, Fumihiko; Hasegawa, Sunao; Ueno, Munetaka; Wada, Takehiko; Matsuhara, Hideo; Nakagawa, Takao; Murakami, Hiroshi; Kawakita, Hideyo; Ishiguro, Masateru; Furusho, Reiko; Watanabe, Jun-ichi; Sekiguchi, Tomohiko; Ohyama, Youichi; Oyabu, Shinki; Onaka, Takashi

    2010-07-01

    Comet C/2007 N3 (Lulin) was observed with the Japanese infrared satellite AKARI in the near-infrared at a post-perihelion heliocentric distance of 1.7 AU. Observations were performed with the spectroscopic (2.5-5.0 {mu}m) and imaging (2.4, 3.2, and 4.1 {mu}m) modes on 2009 March 30 and 31 UT, respectively. AKARI images of the comet exhibit a sunward crescent-like shape coma and a dust tail extended toward the anti-solar direction. The 4.1 {mu}m image (CO/CO{sub 2} and dust grains) shows a distribution different from the 2.4 and 3.2 {mu}m images (H{sub 2}O and dust grains). The observed spectrum shows distinct bands at 2.66 and 4.26 {mu}m, attributed to H{sub 2}O and CO{sub 2}, respectively. This is the fifth comet in which CO{sub 2} has been directly detected in the near-infrared spectrum. In addition, CO at 4.67 {mu}m and a broad 3.2-3.6 {mu}m emission band from C-H bearing molecules were detected in the AKARI spectrum. The relative abundance ratios CO{sub 2}/H{sub 2}O and CO/H{sub 2}O derived from the molecular production rates are {approx}4%-5% and <2%, respectively. Comet Lulin belongs to the group that has relatively low abundances of CO and CO{sub 2} among all observed comets.

  5. BATSE imaging survey of the Galactic plane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grindlay, J. E.; Barret, D.; Bloser, P. F.; Zhang, S. N.; Robinson, C.; Harmon, B. A.

    1997-01-01

    The burst and transient source experiment (BATSE) onboard the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO) provides all sky monitoring capability, occultation analysis and occultation imaging which enables new and fainter sources to be searched for in relatively crowded fields. The occultation imaging technique is used in combination with an automated BATSE image scanner, allowing an analysis of large data sets of occultation images for detections of candidate sources and for the construction of source catalogs and data bases. This automated image scanner system is being tested on archival data in order to optimize the search and detection thresholds. The image search system, its calibration results and preliminary survey results on archival data are reported on. The aim of the survey is to identify a complete sample of black hole candidates in the galaxy and constrain the number of black hole systems and neutron star systems.

  6. Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ricker, G. R.; Clampin, M.; Latham, D. W.; Seager, S.; Vanderspek, R. K.; Villasenor, J. S.; Winn, J. N.

    2012-01-01

    The Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) will discover thousands of exoplanets in orbit around the brightest stars in the sky. In a two-year survey, TESS will monitor more than 500,000 stars for temporary drops in brightness caused by planetary transits. This first-ever spaceborne all-sky transit survey will identify planets ranging from Earth-sized to gas giants, around a wide range of stellar types and orbital distances. No ground-based survey can achieve this feat. A large fraction of TESS target stars will be 30-100 times brighter than those observed by Kepler satellite, and therefore TESS . planets will be far easier to characterize with follow-up observations. TESS will make it possible to study the masses, sizes, densities, orbits, and atmospheres of a large cohort of small planets, including a sample of rocky worlds in the habitable zones of their host stars. TESS will provide prime targets for observation with the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST), as well as other large ground-based and space-based telescopes of the future. TESS data will be released with minimal delay (no proprietary period), inviting immediate community-wide efforts to study the new planets. The TESS legacy will be a catalog of the very nearest and brightest main-sequence stars hosting transiting exoplanets, thus providing future observers with the most favorable targets for detailed investigations.

  7. MMT hypervelocity star survey. III. The complete survey

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Warren R.; Geller, Margaret J.; Kenyon, Scott J. E-mail: mgeller@cfa.harvard.edu

    2014-05-20

    We describe our completed spectroscopic survey for unbound hypervelocity stars (HVSs) ejected from the Milky Way. Three new discoveries bring the total number of unbound late B-type stars to 21. We place new constraints on the nature of the stars and on their distances using moderate resolution MMT spectroscopy. Half of the stars are fast rotators; they are certain 2.5-4 M {sub ☉} main sequence stars at 50-120 kpc distances. Correcting for stellar lifetime, our survey implies that unbound 2.5-4 M {sub ☉} stars are ejected from the Milky Way at a rate of 1.5 × 10{sup –6} yr{sup –1}. These unbound HVSs are likely ejected continuously over the past 200 Myr and do not share a common flight time. The anisotropic spatial distribution of HVSs on the sky remains puzzling. Southern hemisphere surveys like SkyMapper will soon allow us to map the all-sky distribution of HVSs. Future proper motion measurements with Hubble Space Telescope and Gaia will provide strong constraints on origin. Existing observations are all consistent with HVS ejections from encounters with the massive black hole in the Galactic center.

  8. THE GALEX NEARBY YOUNG-STAR SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, David R.; Faherty, Jacqueline K.; Zuckerman, B.; Kastner, Joel H.; Bessell, M. S.; Murphy, Simon J.

    2013-09-10

    We describe a method that exploits data from the Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) ultraviolet and Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer and Two Micron All Sky Survey infrared source catalogs, combined with proper motions and empirical pre-main sequence isochrones, to identify candidate nearby, young, low-mass stars. Applying our method across the full GALEX-covered sky, we identify 2031 mostly M-type stars that, for an assumed age of 10 (100) Myr, all lie within {approx}150 ({approx}90) pc of Earth. The distribution of M spectral subclasses among these {approx}2000 candidate young stars peaks sharply in the range M3-M4; these subtypes constitute 50% of the sample, consistent with studies of the M star population in the immediate solar neighborhood. We focus on a subset of 58 of these candidate young M stars in the vicinity of the Tucana-Horologium association. Only 20 of these 58 candidates were detected in the ROSAT All-Sky X-ray Survey-reflecting the greater sensitivity of GALEX for the purposes of identifying active nearby, young stars, particularly for stars of type M4 and later. Based on statistical analysis of the kinematics and/or spectroscopic followup of these 58 M stars, we find that 50% (29 stars) indeed have properties consistent with Tuc-Hor membership, while 12 are potential new members of the Columba association, and 2 may be AB Dor moving group members. Hence, {approx}75% of our initial subsample of 58 candidates are likely members of young (age {approx} 10-40 Myr) stellar moving groups within 100 pc, verifying that the stellar color- and kinematics-based selection algorithms described here can be used to efficiently isolate nearby, young, low-mass objects from among the field star population. Future studies will focus on characterizing additional subsamples selected from among this list of candidate nearby, young M stars.

  9. The Swift/BAT Hard X-ray Survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tueller, Jack; Markwardt, C. B.; Mushotzky, R. F.; Barthelmy, S. D.; Gehrels, N.; Krimm, A.; Skinner, G. K.; Falcone, A.; Kennea, J. A.

    2006-01-01

    The BAT instrument on Swift is a wide field (70 deg. '100 deg.) coded aperture instrument with a CdZnTe detector array sensitive to energies of 14-200 keV. Each day, the BAT survey typically covers 60% of the sky to a detection limit of 30 millicrab. BAT makes hard X-ray light curves of similar sensitivity and coverage to the X-ray light curves from XTE/ASM, but in an energy range where sources show remarkably different behavior. Integrating the BAT data produces an all sky map with a source detection limit at 15 months of a few 10(exp -11) ergs per square centimeter per second, depending on the exposure. This is the first uniform all-sky survey at energies high enough to be unaffected by absorption since HEAO 1 in 1977-8. BAT has detected greater than 200 AGN and greater than 180 galactic sources. At high galactic latitudes, the BAT sources are usually easy to identify, but many are heavily absorbed and there are a few quite surprising identifications. The BAT selected galaxies can be used to calculate LogN/LogS and the luminosity function for AGN which are complete and free from common systematics. Several crucial parameters for understanding the cosmic hard x-ray background are now determined.

  10. A WISE survey of circumstellar disks in Taurus

    SciTech Connect

    Esplin, T. L.; Luhman, K. L.; Mamajek, E. E.

    2014-04-01

    We have compiled photometry at 3.4, 4.6, 12, and 22 μm from the all-sky survey performed by the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) for all known members of the Taurus complex of dark clouds. Using these data and photometry from the Spitzer Space Telescope, we have identified members with infrared excess emission from circumstellar disks and have estimated the evolutionary stages of the detected disks, which include 31 new full disks and 16 new candidate transitional, evolved, evolved transitional, and debris disks. We have also used the WISE All-Sky Source Catalog to search for new disk-bearing members of Taurus based on their red infrared colors. Through optical and near-infrared spectroscopy, we have confirmed 26 new members with spectral types of M1-M7. The census of disk-bearing stars in Taurus should now be largely complete for spectral types earlier than ∼M8 (M ≳ 0.03 M {sub ☉}).

  11. Goldstone field test activities: Sky survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gulkis, S.; Olsen, E. T.

    1986-01-01

    The goals are to conduct a research and development program aimed at determining the most effective way to do SETI within the constraints of current technology and estimated budgets. The general search strategy adopted is that which is recommended by the SETI Science Working Group. The strategy for an all sky survey for SETI was further developed over the last year. Scan patterns, scan rates, and signal detection algorithms were developed. Spectral power measurement instrumentation was tested at the Venus Station of the Goldstone Deep Space Communication Complex. A specially designed radio frequency interference (RFI) measurement system was built and installed at the Venus Station. A data base management system for storage and retrieval of the RFI data was partially implemented on a VAX 750 computer at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory.

  12. New Mission Concept Study: Energetic X-Ray Imaging Survey Telescope (EXIST)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    This Report summarizes the activity carried out under the New Mission Concept (NMC) study for a mission to conduct a sensitive all-sky imaging survey in the hard x-ray (HX) band (approximately 10-600 keV). The Energetic X-ray Imaging Survey Telescope (EXIST) mission was originally proposed for this NMC study and was then subsequently proposed for a MIDEX mission as part of this study effort. Development of the EXIST (and related) concepts continues for a future flight proposal. The hard x-ray band (approximately 10-600 keV) is nearly the final band of the astronomical spectrum still without a sensitive imaging all-sky survey. This is despite the enormous potential of this band to address a wide range of fundamental and timely objectives - from the origin and physical mechanisms of cosmological gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) to the processes on strongly magnetic neutron stars that produce soft gamma-repeaters and bursting pulsars; from the study of active galactic nuclei (AGN) and quasars to the origin and evolution of the hard x-ray diffuse background; from the nature and number of black holes and neutron stars and the accretion processes onto them to the extreme non-thermal flares of normal stars; and from searches for expected diffuse (but relatively compact) nuclear line (Ti-44) emission in uncatalogued supernova remnants to diffuse non-thermal inverse Compton emission from galaxy clusters. A high sensitivity all-sky survey mission in the hard x-ray band, with imaging to both address source confusion and time-variable background radiations, is very much needed.

  13. The Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE): Mission Description and Initial On-Orbit Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, Edward L.; Eisenhardt, Peter R. M.; Mainzer, Amy; Ressler, Michael E.; Cutri, Roc M.; Jarrett, Thomas; Kirkpatrick, J. Davy; Padgett, Deborah; McMillan, Robert S.; Skrutskie,Michael; Stanford, S. A.; Cohen, Martin; Walker, Russell G.; Mather, John C.; Leisawitz, David; Gautier, Thomas N., III; McLean, Ian; Benford, Dominic; Lonsdale,Carol J.; Blain, Andrew; Mendez,Bryan; Irace, William R.; Duval, Valerie; Liu, Fengchuan; Royer, Don

    2010-01-01

    The all sky surveys done by the Palomar Observatory Schmidt, the European Southern Observatory Schmidt, and the United Kingdom Schmidt, the InfraRed Astronomical Satellite and the 2 Micron All Sky Survey have proven to be extremely useful tools for astronomy with value that lasts for decades. The Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer is mapping the whole sky following its launch on 14 December 2009. WISE began surveying the sky on 14 Jan 2010 and completed its first full coverage of the sky on July 17. The survey will continue to cover the sky a second time until the cryogen is exhausted (anticipated in November 2010). WISE is achieving 5 sigma point source sensitivities better than 0.08, 0.11, 1 and 6 mJy in unconfused regions on the ecliptic in bands centered at