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Sample records for akinesia deformation sequence

  1. Identification of a Dutch founder mutation in MUSK causing fetal akinesia deformation sequence.

    PubMed

    Tan-Sindhunata, M Brigita; Mathijssen, Inge B; Smit, Margriet; Baas, Frank; de Vries, Johanna I; van der Voorn, J Patrick; Kluijt, Irma; Hagen, Marleen A; Blom, Eveline W; Sistermans, Erik; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne; Waisfisz, Quinten; Weiss, Marjan M; Groffen, Alexander J

    2015-09-01

    Fetal akinesia deformation sequence (FADS) refers to a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of disorders with congenital malformations related to impaired fetal movement. FADS can result from mutations in CHRNG, CHRNA1, CHRND, DOK7 and RAPSN; however, these genes only account for a minority of cases. Here we identify MUSK as a novel cause of lethal FADS. Fourteen affected fetuses from a Dutch genetic isolate were traced back to common ancestors 11 generations ago. Homozygosity mapping in two fetuses revealed MUSK as a candidate gene. All tested cases carried an identical homozygous variant c.1724T>C; p.(Ile575Thr) in the intracellular domain of MUSK. The carrier frequency in the genetic isolate was 8%, exclusively found in heterozygous carriers. Consistent with the established role of MUSK as a tyrosine kinase that orchestrates neuromuscular synaptogenesis, the fetal myopathy was accompanied by impaired acetylcholine receptor clustering and reduced tyrosine kinase activity at motor nerve endings. A functional assay in myocytes derived from human fetuses confirmed that the variant blocks MUSK-dependent motor endplate formation. Taken together, the results strongly support a causal role of this founder mutation in MUSK, further expanding the gene set associated with FADS and offering new opportunities for prenatal genetic testing. PMID:25537362

  2. Identification of a Dutch founder mutation in MUSK causing fetal akinesia deformation sequence

    PubMed Central

    Tan-Sindhunata, M Brigita; Mathijssen, Inge B; Smit, Margriet; Baas, Frank; de Vries, Johanna I; van der Voorn, J Patrick; Kluijt, Irma; Hagen, Marleen A; Blom, Eveline W; Sistermans, Erik; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne; Waisfisz, Quinten; Weiss, Marjan M; Groffen, Alexander J

    2015-01-01

    Fetal akinesia deformation sequence (FADS) refers to a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of disorders with congenital malformations related to impaired fetal movement. FADS can result from mutations in CHRNG, CHRNA1, CHRND, DOK7 and RAPSN; however, these genes only account for a minority of cases. Here we identify MUSK as a novel cause of lethal FADS. Fourteen affected fetuses from a Dutch genetic isolate were traced back to common ancestors 11 generations ago. Homozygosity mapping in two fetuses revealed MUSK as a candidate gene. All tested cases carried an identical homozygous variant c.1724T>C; p.(Ile575Thr) in the intracellular domain of MUSK. The carrier frequency in the genetic isolate was 8%, exclusively found in heterozygous carriers. Consistent with the established role of MUSK as a tyrosine kinase that orchestrates neuromuscular synaptogenesis, the fetal myopathy was accompanied by impaired acetylcholine receptor clustering and reduced tyrosine kinase activity at motor nerve endings. A functional assay in myocytes derived from human fetuses confirmed that the variant blocks MUSK-dependent motor endplate formation. Taken together, the results strongly support a causal role of this founder mutation in MUSK, further expanding the gene set associated with FADS and offering new opportunities for prenatal genetic testing. PMID:25537362

  3. De novo TUBB2B mutation causes fetal akinesia deformation sequence with microlissencephaly: An unusual presentation of tubulinopathy.

    PubMed

    Laquerriere, Annie; Gonzales, Marie; Saillour, Yoann; Cavallin, Mara; Joyē, Nicole; Quēlin, Chloé; Bidat, Laurent; Dommergues, Marc; Plessis, Ghislaine; Encha-Razavi, Ferechte; Chelly, Jamel; Bahi-Buisson, Nadia; Poirier, Karine

    2016-04-01

    Tubulinopathies are increasingly emerging major causes underlying complex cerebral malformations, particularly in case of microlissencephaly often associated with hypoplastic or absent corticospinal tracts. Fetal akinesia deformation sequence (FADS) refers to a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of disorders with congenital malformations related to impaired fetal movement. We report on an early foetal case with FADS and microlissencephaly due to TUBB2B mutation. Neuropathological examination disclosed virtually absent cortical lamination, foci of neuronal overmigration into the leptomeningeal spaces, corpus callosum agenesis, cerebellar and brainstem hypoplasia and extremely severe hypoplasia of the spinal cord with no anterior and posterior horns and almost no motoneurons. At the cellular level, the p.Cys239Phe TUBB2B mutant leads to tubulin heterodimerization impairment, decreased ability to incorporate into the cytoskeleton, microtubule dynamics alteration, with an accelerated rate of depolymerization. To our knowledge, this is the first case of microlissencephaly to be reported presenting with a so severe and early form of FADS, highlighting the importance of tubulin mutation screening in the context of FADS with microlissencephaly. PMID:26732629

  4. Deficiency of the myogenic factor MyoD causes a perinatally lethal fetal akinesia

    PubMed Central

    Crinnion, Laura A; Murphy, Helen; Newbould, Melanie; Harrison, Sally M; Lascelles, Carolina; Antanaviciute, Agne; Carr, Ian M; Sheridan, Eamonn; Bonthron, David T; Smith, Audrey

    2016-01-01

    Background Lethal fetal akinesia deformation sequence (FADS) describes a clinically and genetically heterogeneous phenotype that includes fetal akinesia, intrauterine growth retardation, arthrogryposis and developmental anomalies. Affected babies die as a result of pulmonary hypoplasia. We aimed to identify the underlying genetic cause of this disorder in a family in which there were three affected individuals from two sibships. Methods Autosomal-recessive inheritance was suggested by a family history of consanguinity and by recurrence of the phenotype between the two sibships. We performed exome sequencing of the affected individuals and their unaffected mother, followed by autozygosity mapping and variant filtering to identify the causative gene. Results Five autozygous regions were identified, spanning 31.7 Mb of genomic sequence and including 211 genes. Using standard variant filtering criteria, we excluded all variants as being the likely pathogenic cause, apart from a single novel nonsense mutation, c.188C>A p.(Ser63*) (NM_002478.4), in MYOD1. This gene encodes an extensively studied transcription factor involved in muscle development, which has nonetheless not hitherto been associated with a hereditary human disease phenotype. Conclusions We provide the first description of a human phenotype that appears to result from MYOD1 mutation. The presentation with FADS is consistent with a large body of data demonstrating that in the mouse, MyoD is a major controller of precursor cell commitment to the myogenic differentiation programme. PMID:26733463

  5. Pure psychic akinesia with bilateral lesions of basal ganglia.

    PubMed Central

    Laplane, D; Baulac, M; Widlöcher, D; Dubois, B

    1984-01-01

    Three patients showed dramatic psychic akinesia after recovery from toxic encephalopathy. They had no or only mild motor disorders. The spontaneous psychic akinesia was reversible when the patient was stimulated, as if there was a loss of self psychic activation. Intellectual capacities were normal. Two patients had stereotyped behaviours resembling compulsions. In all patients CT cans showed bilateral lesions in the basal ganglia, mainly within the globus pallidus. Images PMID:6726263

  6. The "eye of the tiger" sign in pure akinesia with gait freezing.

    PubMed

    Erro, Roberto; Amboni, Marianna; Vitale, Carmine; Longo, Katia; Rocco, Mariangela; Russo, Carmela; Pappatà, Sabina; Brunetti, Arturo; Barone, Paolo

    2011-08-01

    The "eye of the tiger" is a neuroradiologic sign due to iron deposition in the globus pallidus: it appears as diffuse low signal intensity with a central area of high signal intensity confined to the globus pallidus. The "eye of the tiger" sign has been associated with neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation type 1 (NBIA1), a condition caused by mutations in the gene encoding pantothenate kinase 2 (PANK2). However, the specificity of this neuroradiologic sign has been already challenged and it has been described in other neurodegenerative diseases. Here, we report the first case of a patient suffering from pure akinesia with gait freezing with the "eye of the tiger" sign in T2-weighted MRI sequences. All clinical, laboratory and radiologic data excluded other diagnosis and genetic testing excluded PANK2 mutations suggesting that the "eye of the tiger" is not specific for NBIA1 and may also occur in other movement disorders. PMID:21544665

  7. Deformation of slopes damaged during the 2015 Nepal earthquake sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosser, N. J.; Brain, M.; Densmore, A.; Jordan, C.; Williams, J.; Kincey, M.; Oven, K.

    2015-12-01

    The 2015 Nepal Earthquake Sequence (EQS; the Gorkha EQ (eqG), Mw 7.8 [25/04/15]; the Kodari EQ (eqK), Mw 6.7 [26/05/15]; and Dolakha EQ (eqD), Mw 7.3 [12/05/15], plus associated aftershocks) triggered widespread landsliding, strongly evident in satellite imagery. In addition to the observed failures, pervasive ground cracking has been widely reported in Nepal. This is indicative of hillslope 'damage' (weakening) and, hence, the onset of shear surface development in as-yet unfailed slopes - a phenomenon previously observed in areas subjected to high-magnitude earthquake ground shaking and subsequent ongoing landsliding. Recent work on the efficacy of earthquakes in triggering landslides has proposed that the occurrence of failures is a function of damage accumulated in the slope. We present a unique field monitoring dataset on continuing slope deformation from hillslopes damaged during the 2015 Nepal EQS, in response to precipitation and continuing seismicity. Our study site is the Upper Bhote Koshi (UBK), with sites chosen from a chronology of landslide inventories captured from remotely sensed imagery since the Gorkha earthquake. Instruments were deployed during the monsoon on new and pre-existing landslides, and across cracked ground to monitoring precipitation inputs, slope-scale (micro-)seismicity, and slope displacements. Using our dataset, we draw preliminary conclusions on how the spatially-variable legacy of damage accumulated during high-magnitude earthquake-induced ground shaking events is manifest in patterns, rates and styles of post-seismic slope deformation.

  8. Effect of deformation path sequence on the behavior of nanoscale copper bicrystal interfaces.

    SciTech Connect

    Spearot, Douglas E.; Jacob, Karl I.; Plimpton, Steven James; McDowell, David Lynn

    2005-06-01

    Molecular dynamics calculations are performed to study the effect of deformation sequence and history on the inelastic behavior of copper interfaces on the nanoscale. An asymmetric 45 deg tilt bicrystal interface is examined, representing an idealized high-angle grain boundary interface. The interface model is subjected to three different deformation paths: tension then shear, shear then tension, and combined proportional tension and shear. Analysis shows that path-history dependent material behavior is confined within a finite layer of deformation around the bicrystal interface. The relationships between length scale and interface properties, such as the thickness of the path-history dependent layer and the interface strength, are discussed in detail.

  9. Parkinson's disease-like forelimb akinesia induced by BmK I, a sodium channel modulator.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hongyan; Wang, Ziyi; Jin, Jiahui; Pei, Xiao; Zhao, Yuxiao; Wu, Hao; Lin, Weide; Tao, Jie; Ji, Yonghua

    2016-07-15

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder and characterized by motor disabilities which are mostly linked with high levels of synchronous oscillations in the basal ganglia neurons. Voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs) play a vital role in the abnormal electrical activity of neurons in the globus pallidus (GP) and the subthalamic nucleus (STN) in PD. BmK I, a α-like toxin purified from the Chinese scorpion Buthus martensi Karsch, has been identified a site-3-specific modulator of VGSCs. The present study shows that forelimb akinesia can be induced by the injection of BmK I into the globus pallidus (GP) in rats. In addition, BmK I cannot produce neuronal damage in vivo and in vitro at 24h after treatment, indicating that the forelimb akinesia does not result from neuronal damage. Electrophysiological studies further revealed that the inactivated Na(+) currents were showed to be more vulnerably modulated by BmK I than the activated Na(+) currents in human neuron-like SHSY5Y cells. Furthermore, the modulation of BmK I on inactivation was preferentially attributed to fast inactivation rather than slow inactivation. Therefore, the PD-like forelimb akinesia may result from the modulation of sodium channels in neuron by BmK I. These findings not only suggest that BmK I may be an effective and novel molecule for the study of pathogenesis in PD but also support the idea that VGSCs play a crucial role in the motor disabilities in PD. PMID:27108049

  10. Glaciotectonic deformation and reinterpretation of the Worth Point stratigraphic sequence: Banks Island, NT, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaughan, Jessica M.; England, John H.; Evans, David J. A.

    2014-05-01

    Hill-hole pairs, comprising an ice-pushed hill and associated source depression, cluster in a belt along the west coast of Banks Island, NT. Ongoing coastal erosion at Worth Point, southwest Banks Island, has exposed a section (6 km long and ˜30 m high) through an ice-pushed hill that was transported ˜ 2 km from a corresponding source depression to the southeast. The exposed stratigraphic sequence is polydeformed and comprises folded and faulted rafts of Early Cretaceous and Late Tertiary bedrock, a prominent organic raft, Quaternary glacial sediments, and buried glacial ice. Three distinct structural domains can be identified within the stratigraphic sequence that represent proximal to distal deformation in an ice-marginal setting. Complex thrust sequences, interfering fold-sets, brecciated bedrock and widespread shear structures superimposed on this ice-marginally deformed sequence record subsequent deformation in a subglacial shear zone. Analysis of cross-cutting relationships within the stratigraphic sequence combined with OSL dating indicate that the Worth Point hill-hole pair was deformed during two separate glaciotectonic events. Firstly, ice sheet advance constructed the hill-hole pair and glaciotectonized the strata ice-marginally, producing a proximal to distal deformation sequence. A glacioisostatically forced marine transgression resulted in extensive reworking of the strata and the deposition of a glaciomarine diamict. A readvance during this initial stage redeformed the strata in a subglacial shear zone, overprinting complex deformation structures and depositing a glaciotectonite ˜20 m thick. Outwash channels that incise the subglacially deformed strata record a deglacial marine regression, whereas aggradation of glaciofluvial sand and gravel infilling the channels record a subsequent marine transgression. Secondly, a later, largely non-erosive ice margin overrode Worth Point, deforming only the most surficial units in the section and depositing a

  11. Analysis on the dynamic deformations of the images from digital film sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markowski, Tomasz

    2015-06-01

    Image sequences, in particular digital video sequences, are characterised by the features which result in their high potential as measurement data. However, as early as at the stage of visual assessment of digital film images, originating, in particular, from amateur cameras, occurrence of some deformations may be observed, which may highly influence the results of measurements performed using these images; such deformations differ from deformations occurred in the case of static photographic images. It results both, by the method of image recording, using an electronic shutter and interlaced or progressive scanning, as well as the method of file recording and compression. It is worth to notice the systematic nature of such deformations, which highly depend on mutual motions of a camera and recorded objects. The objective of presented research works was to develop the mathematical description of image deformations, as a function of motion parameters. This would allow for adaptation of the camera calibration process to the demands of sequential imaging, as well as for modification of algorithms of measurements using self-calibration, and, as a result, minimisation of deformations. Another objective was to analyse the influence of deformations, typical for digital film images, on the results of measurements performed using these images, by means of series of experiments, which were based on multiple calibration of static and a moving camera, also with the use of a spatial test field. The first part was made by developing formulas based on some geometric relations, using some simplifications. On the stage of experimental research a certain degree of compatibility of experimental results and theoretical assumptions were confirmed.

  12. A machine learning approach for deformable guide-wire tracking in fluoroscopic sequences.

    PubMed

    Pauly, Olivier; Heibel, Hauke; Navab, Nassir

    2010-01-01

    Deformable guide-wire tracking in fluoroscopic sequences is a challenging task due to the low signal to noise ratio of the images and the apparent complex motion of the object of interest. Common tracking methods are based on data terms that do not differentiate well between medical tools and anatomic background such as ribs and vertebrae. A data term learned directly from fluoroscopic sequences would be more adapted to the image characteristics and could help to improve tracking. In this work, our contribution is to learn the relationship between features extracted from the original image and the tracking error. By randomly deforming a guide-wire model around its ground truth position in one single reference frame, we explore the space spanned by these features. Therefore, a guide-wire motion distribution model is learned to reduce the intrisic dimensionality of this feature space. Random deformations and the corresponding features can be then automatically generated. In a regression approach, the function mapping this space to the tracking error is learned. The resulting data term is integrated into a tracking framework based on a second-order MAP-MRF formulation which is optimized by QPBO moves yielding high-quality tracking results. Experiments conducted on two fluoroscopic sequences show that our approach is a promising alternative for deformable tracking of guide-wires. PMID:20879418

  13. Deep brain stimulation of the posterior hypothalamic nucleus reverses akinesia in bilaterally 6-hydroxydopamine-lesioned rats.

    PubMed

    Young, C K; Koke, S J; Kiss, Z H; Bland, B H

    2009-08-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the basal ganglia motor circuitry is a highly effective treatment for the debilitating motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD). However, recent findings have indicated promising potential for PD therapy with DBS in brain structures outside the basal ganglia. For example, high frequency stimulation of the posterior hypothalamic nucleus (PH) can reverse haloperidol-induced akinesia in rats [Jackson J, Young CK, Hu B, Bland BH (2008) High frequency stimulation of the posterior hypothalamic nucleus restores movement and reinstates hippocampal-striatal theta coherence following haloperidol-induced catalepsy. Exp Neurol 213:210-219]. In the current study, we used the bilateral 6-hydroxydopamine lesion model of Parkinsonian akinesia in male Long-Evans rats to further explore the efficacy of PH DBS. The application of PH DBS in lesioned animals reversed akinesia in an active avoidance paradigm with increased latency compared to pre-lesion performance. The dramatic reversal of akinesia in two models of rodent Parkinsonism by PH DBS warrants further exploration of its therapeutic potential. PMID:19401216

  14. Stepping test in mice: a reliable approach in determining forelimb akinesia in MPTP-induced Parkinsonism.

    PubMed

    Blume, Shannon R; Cass, Daryn K; Tseng, Kuei Y

    2009-09-01

    Currently existing behavioral measures for motor impairments in rodent models with bilateral dopamine depletion have demonstrated to be difficult to assess due to the degree of task complexity. There is clearly a need for a behavioral test that is simplistic in design and does not require the animal to learn a specific task, in particular for mice. Here we adapted the stepping test, originally designed for assessing asymmetric motor deficits in rats (Olsson, M., Nikkhah, G., Bentlage, C., Bjorklund, A., 1995. Forelimb akinesia in the rat Parkinson model: differential effects of dopamine agonists and nigral transplants as assessed by a new stepping test. J. Neurosci. 15, 3863-3875; Schallert, T., De Ryck, M., Whishaw, I.Q., Ramirez, V.D., Teitelbaum, P., 1979. Excessive bracing reactions and their control by atropine and l-DOPA in an animal analog of Parkinsonism. Exp. Neurol. 64, 33-43), into a mouse-friendly version for bilateral dopamine lesion induced by subacute MPTP injection. We found that MPTP-treated mice exhibit a significant and persistent reduction in the number of adjusting steps when compared to saline-treated animals. Typically, MPTP-induced stepping deficit becomes apparent by the fourth MPTP injection. The number of adjusting steps continues to decline throughout the injections, and by day 10 from the last MPTP injection, the stepping deficit observed is associated with approximately 65% TH positive cells loss in the SN. Importantly, L-DOPA administration significantly improved stepping performance in MPTP-treated mice. Thus, stepping test in mice is a reliable and simple behavioral measure for assessing forelimb akinesia induced by systemic MPTP. PMID:19460369

  15. Bradykinesia-Akinesia Incoordination Test: Validating an Online Keyboard Test of Upper Limb Function

    PubMed Central

    Noyce, Alastair J.; Nagy, Anna; Acharya, Shami; Hadavi, Shahrzad; Bestwick, Jonathan P.; Fearnley, Julian; Lees, Andrew J.; Giovannoni, Gavin

    2014-01-01

    Background The Bradykinesia Akinesia Incoordination (BRAIN) test is a computer keyboard-tapping task that was developed for use in assessing the effect of symptomatic treatment on motor function in Parkinson's disease (PD). An online version has now been designed for use in a wider clinical context and the research setting. Methods Validation of the online BRAIN test was undertaken in 58 patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) and 93 age-matched, non-neurological controls. Kinesia scores (KS30, number of key taps in 30 seconds), akinesia times (AT30, mean dwell time on each key in milliseconds), incoordination scores (IS30, variance of travelling time between key presses) and dysmetria scores (DS30, accuracy of key presses) were compared between groups. These parameters were correlated against total motor scores and sub-scores from the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS). Results Mean KS30, AT30 and IS30 were significantly different between PD patients and controls (p≤0.0001). Sensitivity for 85% specificity was 50% for KS30, 40% for AT30 and 29% for IS30. KS30, AT30 and IS30 correlated significantly with UPDRS total motor scores (r = −0.53, r = 0.27 and r = 0.28 respectively) and motor UPDRS sub-scores. The reliability of KS30, AT30 and DS30 was good on repeated testing. Conclusions The BRAIN test is a reliable, convenient test of upper limb motor function that can be used routinely in the outpatient clinic, at home and in clinical trials. In addition, it can be used as an objective longitudinal measurement of emerging motor dysfunction for the prediction of PD in at-risk cohorts. PMID:24781810

  16. Geological structures and deformation sequence of the eastern Gyeonggi massif, central Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kihm, You Hong; Hwang, Jae Ha

    2010-05-01

    The Gyeonggi massif, situated between the Nangrim and Yeongnam massifs of the Korean Peninsula, is a Precambrian terrane consists primarily of Archean to Proterozoic crystalline basement. Although the Gyeonggi massif has been suspected as an eastern extension of the Qinling-Dabie collision belt of China, a structural data about the Gyeonggi massif are very short, especially about the eastern part of the Gyeonggi massif. This study focused the deformation sequence of the eastern part of Gyeonggi massif and comparison with that of western part of Gyeonggi massif. At least, five phases of deformational events can be recognized. The first phase of deformation produced gneissic and schistose structures with intrafolial and recumbent folds. During the second phase of deformation, mylonite, mineral lineation, intrafolial recumbent folds and irregular folds were formed. The Bangsan Anticline (BSA) and its sub-order folds were produced by the third phase of deformation. SE-vergent thrust and south-vergent kink folds resulted from the forth and fifth phases of deformation, respectively. Axis of the BSA can be traced over 5km and the representative orientations of two limbs of the BSA are N17°W/32°SE, N29°E/25°NW, respectively. Interlimb angle of the BSA is measured as 128° and can be classified into open fold. Structural transect analysis of regional foliation shows that axis of the BSA is located about 4.6km toward East from longitude 127°53'45″E. If the BSA is correlated with very large-scale NS-trending folds occurred in the western part of the Gyeonggi massif based on characteristics of fold structure, the third phase of deformation can be interpreted in age from the Late Proterozoic to the Early Paleozoic (750~390 Ma). Mylonite of the study area cannot be correlated to the Gyeonggi Shear Zone, which was suggested as post-collisional top-to-the-north extensional structure. The SE-vergent thrust of the forth phase of deformation is probably correlated to the

  17. Deformation history and load sequence effects on cumulative fatigue damage and life predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colin, Julie

    Fatigue loading seldom involves constant amplitude loading. This is especially true in the cooling systems of nuclear power plants, typically made of stainless steel, where thermal fluctuations and water turbulent flow create variable amplitude loads, with presence of mean stresses and overloads. These complex loading sequences lead to the formation of networks of microcracks (crazing) that can propagate. As stainless steel is a material with strong deformation history effects and phase transformation resulting from plastic straining, such load sequence and variable amplitude loading effects are significant to its fatigue behavior and life predictions. The goal of this study was to investigate the effects of cyclic deformation on fatigue behavior of stainless steel 304L as a deformation history sensitive material and determine how to quantify and accumulate fatigue damage to enable life predictions under variable amplitude loading conditions for such materials. A comprehensive experimental program including testing under fully-reversed, as well as mean stress and/or mean strain conditions, with initial or periodic overloads, along with step testing and random loading histories was conducted on two grades of stainless steel 304L, under both strain-controlled and load-controlled conditions. To facilitate comparisons with a material without deformation history effects, similar tests were also carried out on aluminum 7075-T6. Experimental results are discussed, including peculiarities observed with stainless steel behavior, such as a phenomenon, referred to as secondary hardening characterized by a continuous increase in the stress response in a strain-controlled test and often leading to runout fatigue life. Possible mechanisms for secondary hardening observed in some tests are also discussed. The behavior of aluminum is shown not to be affected by preloading, whereas the behavior of stainless steel is greatly influenced by prior loading. Mean stress relaxation in

  18. Deformations and cyclic fatigue resistance of nickel-titanium instruments inside a sequence

    PubMed Central

    Gambarini, Gianluca; Plotino, Gianluca; Piasecki, Lucila; Al-Sudani, Dina; Testarelli, Luca; Sannino, Gianpaolo

    2015-01-01

    Summary Aim To compare the effect of brushing motion on torsional and cyclic fatigue resistance of TF Adaptive instruments after clinical use. Methods 20 packs of TFA small sequence (SybronEndo, Orange, CA, USA) were used for this study and divided into two groups. Each instrument prepared one resin tooth, consisting in 4 canals with a complex anatomy. In group A, no brushing motion was performed. In group B, after the green instrument reached the working length, brushing motion with circumferential filing was performed for 15 seconds in each canal (overall 1 minute). All the instruments were then subjected to cyclic fatigue test and mean values and standard deviation for time to fracture were evaluated. Data were subjected to one-way analysis of variance and Bonferroni t-test procedure with a significance set at P < 0.05. Results No instruments were broken during preparation of root canals. Two TF Adaptive green and 5 yellow showed unwinding after intracanal clinical use. No statistically significant differences were found between green instruments of both groups (P > 0.05), while a statistically significant difference was found between the yellow instruments (P < 0.05), with group B showing an higher resistance to cyclic fatigue. Conclusions A prolonged passive brushing motion did not adversely affected mechanical resistance of the instrument used for this purpose. Resistance to both deformations and cyclic fatigue of the second instrument within the TFA small sequence was enhanced by the coronal flaring provided by the brushing action of the first instrument used. PMID:26161246

  19. Pharmacologically distinct pramipexole-mediated akinesia vs. risk-taking in a rat model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Holtz, Nathan A; Tedford, Stephanie E; Persons, Amanda L; Grasso, Salvatore A; Napier, T Celeste

    2016-10-01

    Pramipexole and ropinirole are dopamine agonists that are efficacious in treating motor disturbances of neuropathologies, e.g., Parkinson's disease and restless legs syndrome. A significant portion of treated patients develop impulsive/compulsive behaviors. Current treatment is dose reduction or switching to an alternative dopamine replacement, both of which can undermine the motor benefits. Needed is a preclinical model that can assist in identifying adjunct treatments to dopamine agonist therapy that reduce impulsive/compulsive behaviors without interfering with motor benefits of the dopamine agonist. Toward that objective, the current study implemented a rat model of Parkinson's disease to behaviorally profile chronically administered pramipexole. This was accomplished with male Sprague-Dawley rats wherein (i) 6-hydroxydopamine-induced lesions of the dorsolateral striatum produced Parkinson's disease-like akinesia, measured in the forelimbs, (ii) intracranial self-stimulation-mediated probability discounting indicated impulsivity/risk-taking, and (iii) two doses of pramipexole were continuously administered for 14-28days via osmotic minipumps to mirror the chronic, stable exposure achieved with extended release formulations. The atypical antidepressant, mirtazapine, is known to reduce behaviors associated with drug addiction in rats; thus, we demonstrated model utility here by determining the effects of mirtazapine on pramipexole-induced motor improvements versus probability discounting. We observed that forelimb akinesia subsequent to striatal lesions was attenuated by both pramipexole doses tested (0.3 and 1.2mg/kg/day) within 4h of pump implant dispensing 0.3mg/kg/day and 1h by 1.2mg/kg/day. By contrast, 12-14days of infusion with 0.3mg/kg/day did not alter discounting, but increases were obtained with 1.2mg/kg/day pramipexole, with 67% of 1.2mg/kg/day-treated rats meeting categorical criteria for 'high risk-taking'. Insertion of a second minipump delivering

  20. Postseismic deformation following the June 2000 earthquake sequence in the south Iceland seismic zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Arnadottir, T.; Jonsson, Sigurjon; Pollitz, F.F.; Jiang, W.; Feigl, K.L.

    2005-01-01

    We observe postseismic deformation on two spatiotemporal scales following Mw = 6.5 earthquakes in the south Iceland seismic zone on 17 and 21 June 2000. We see a rapidly decaying deformation transient lasting no more than 2 months and extending about 5 km away from the two main shock ruptures. This local, month-scale transient is captured by several radar interferograms and is also observed at a few campaign GPS sites located near the faults. A slower transient with a characteristic timescale of about a year is detected only by GPS measurements. The month-scale deformation pattern has been explained by poroelastic rebound due to postearthquake pore pressure changes. In contrast, the year-scale deformation can be explained by either afterslip at 8-14 km depth or viscoelastic relaxation of the lower crust and upper mantle in response to the coseismic stress changes. The optimal viscoelastic models have lower crustal viscosities of 0.5-1 ?? 1019 Pa s and upper mantle viscosity of ???3 ?? 1018 Pa s. Because of the limitations of our GPS campaign data, we consider both afterslip and viscoelastic relaxation as plausible mechanisms explaining the deformation field. Both types of postseismic deformation models suggest that the areas of large coseismic stress increase east of the 17 June and west of the 21 June ruptures continue to be loaded by the postseismic deformation. Copyright 2005 by the American Geophysical Union.

  1. Sequence-dependent Kink-and-Slide Deformations of Nucleosomal DNA Facilitated by Histone Arginines Bound in the Minor Groove

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Difei; Ulyanov, Nikolai B.; Zhurkin, Victor B.

    2010-01-01

    In addition to bending and twisting deformabilities, the lateral displacements of the DNA axis (Kink-and-Slide) play an important role in DNA wrapping around the histone core (M. Y. Tolstorukov, A. V. Colasanti, D. M. McCandlish, W. K. Olson, V. B. Zhurkin, J. Mol. Biol. 371, 725-738 (2007)). Here, we show that these Kink-and-Slide deformations are likely to be stabilized by the arginine residues of histones interacting with the minor groove of DNA. The arginines are positioned asymmetrically in the minor groove, being closer to one strand. The asymmetric arginine-DNA interactions facilitate lateral displacement of base pairs across the DNA grooves, thus leading to a stepwise accumulation of the superhelical pitch of nucleosomal DNA. To understand the sequence dependence of such Kink-and-Slide deformations, we performed all-atom calculations of DNA hexamers with the YR and RY steps in the center. We found that when the unrestrained DNA deformations are allowed, the YR steps tend to bend into the major groove, and RY steps bend into the minor groove. However, when the nucleosomal Kink-and-Slide deformation is considered, the YR steps prove to be more favorable for bending into the minor groove. Overall, the Kink-and-Slide deformation energy of DNA increases in the order TA < CA < CG < GC < AC < AT. We propose a simple stereochemical model accounting for this sequence dependence. Our results agree with experimental data indicating that the TA step most frequently occurs in the minor-groove kink positions in the most stable nucleosomes. Our computations demonstrate that the Kink-and-Slide distortion is accompanied by the BI to BII transition. This fact, together with irregularities in the two-dimensional (Roll, Slide) energy contour maps, suggest that the Kink-and-Slide deformations represent a nonharmonic behavior of the duplex. This explains the difference between the two estimates of the DNA deformation energy in nucleosome – the earlier one made using knowledge

  2. The role of mechanical heterogeneities in evaporite sequence during deformation initiated by basement fault activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamuszek, Marta; Dabrowski, Marcin; Burliga, Stanisław

    2016-04-01

    Kłodawa Salt Structure (KSS) situated in the centre of the Polish Zechstein Basin started to rise above a basement fault in the Early Triassic. Geological studies of the KSS revealed significant differences in the deformation patterns between the PZ1-PZ2 (intensely deformed) and PZ3-PZ4 (less deformed) cycle evaporites. These two older and two younger cycle evaporite complexes are separated by the thick Main Anhydrite (A3) bed. We use numerical simulations to assess the impact of a thick anhydrite bed on intrasalt deformation. In our models, the overburden consists of clastic sediments. A normal fault located in the rigid basement beneath the salt is activated due to model extension. At the same time, the sedimentation process takes place. The evaporites consist of a salt bed intercalated with a thick anhydrite layer of varying position and geometry. To understand the role of anhydrite layer, we run comparative simulations, in which no anhydrite layer is present. In the study, we use our own numerical codes implemented in MATLAB combined with the MILAMIN and MUTILS numerical packages. Our investigations revealed a significant influence of the anhydrite on deformation style in the evaporate series. The supra-anhydrite domain is characterized by weaker deformation and lower rates of salt flow in comparison to the sub-anhydrite domain. The highest contrast in the rate of salt flow between the two domains is observed in the case of the anhydrite layer situated close to the bottom of the salt complex. The thick anhydrite layer additionally diminishes the deformation rate in the supra-anhydrite domain and can lead to detachment of the basement deformation from its overlay. Our numerical simulations showed that the presence of the A3 Main Anhydrite bed could be the dominant factor responsible for the decoupling of deformation in the KSS salt complex.

  3. Tracking of facial deformations in multi-image sequences with elimination of rigid motion of the head

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jokinen, Olli

    2013-10-01

    The paper deals with measurement of human facial deformations from synchronized image sequences taken with multiple calibrated cameras from different viewpoints. SIFT (Scale Invariant Feature Transform) keypoints are utilized as image feature points in the first place to determine spatial and temporal correspondences between images. If no temporal match is found for an image point by keypoint matching, then the tracking of the point is switched to least squares matching provided the point has one or more spatial corresponding points in the other views of the previous frame. For this purpose, a new method based on affine multi-image least squares matching is proposed where multiple spatial and temporal template images are simultaneously matched against each search image and part of the spatial template images also change during adjustment. A new method based on analyzing temporal changes in the image coordinates of the tracked points in multiple views is then presented for detecting the 3-D points which move only rigidly between consecutive frames. These points are used to eliminate the effect of rigid motion of the head and to obtain the changes in the 3-D points and in the corresponding image points due to pure deformation of the face. The methods are thoroughly tested with three multi-image sequences of four cameras including also quite large changes of facial deformations. The test results prove that the proposed affine multi-image least squares matching yields better results than another method using only fixed templates of the previous frame. The elimination of the effect of rigid motion works well and the points where the face is deforming can be correctly detected and the true deformation estimated. A method based on a novel adaptive threshold is also proposed for automated extraction and tracking of circular targets on a moving calibration object.

  4. SU-E-J-216: A Sequence Independent Approach for Quantification of MR Image Deformations From Brachytherapy Applicators

    SciTech Connect

    Wieringen, N van; Heerden, L van; Gurney-Champion, O; Kesteren, Z van; Houweling, A; Pieters, B; Bel, A

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: MRI is increasingly used as a single imaging modality for brachytherapy treatment planning. The presence of a brachytherapy applicator may cause distortions in the images, especially at higher field strengths. Our aim is to develop a procedure to quantify these distortions theoretically for any MR-sequence and to verify the estimated deformations for clinical sequences. Methods: Image distortions due to perturbation of the B0-field are proportional to the ratio of the induced frequency shift and the read-out bandwidth of the applied sequence. By reconstructing a frequency-shift map from the phase data from a multi-echo sequence, distortions can be calculated for any MR-sequence. Verification of this method for estimating distortions was performed by acquiring images with opposing read-out directions and consequently opposing distortions. The applicator shift can be determined by rigidly matching these images. Clinically, T2W-TSE-images are used for this purpose. For pre-clinical tests, EPI-sequences with narrow read-out bandwidth (19.5–47.5Hz), consequently large distortions, were added to the set of clinical MRsequences. To quantify deformations of the Utrecht Interstitial CT/MR applicator (Elekta Brachytherapy) on a Philips Ingenia 3T MRI, pre-clinical tests were performed in a phantom with the applicator in water, followed by clinical validation. Results: Deformations observed in the narrow bandwidth EPI-images were well predicted using the frequency-shift, the latter giving an overestimation up to 30%/up to 1 voxel. For clinically applied MR-sequences distortions were well below the voxel size. In patient setup distortions determined from the frequency-shift map were at sub-voxel level (<0.7mm). Using T2W-images larger distortions were found (1–2mm). This discrepancy was caused by patient movement between/during acquisition of the T2W-images with opposing read-out directions. Conclusion: Phantom experiments demonstrated the feasibility of a

  5. Active deformation and engineering analysis of CFRP mirror of various lay-up sequences within quasi-isotropic laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Chunmei; Yu, Xia; Guo, Peiji

    2014-08-01

    A regularization stiffness coefficient method was verified further to optimize lay-up sequences of quasi-isotropic laminates for carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) composite mirrors. Firstly, the deformation due to gravity of 1G and temperature difference of 20-100°C and the modal were analyzed by finite element method (FEM). Secondly, the influence of angle error of ply stacking on quasi-isotropic of bending stiffness was evaluated. Finally, an active support system of 49 actuators in circular arrangement is designed for a 500mm CFRP mirror, and its goal is to deform the spherical CFRP mirror to a parabolic. Therefore, the response functions of the actuators were gotten, and the surface form errors and stresses were calculated and analyzed. The results show that the CFRP mirrors designed by the method have a better symmetrical bending deformation under gravity and thermal load and a higher fundamental frequency, and the larger n the better symmetry (for π/n quasi-isotropic laminates); the method reduces the sensitivity to misalignment of ply orientation for symmetric bending, and the mirror's maximum von Mises stress and maximum shear stress are less compared to those laminates not optimized in lay-up sequence.

  6. Pedogenic slickensides, indicators of strain and deformation processes in red bed sequences of the Appalachian foreland

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, M.B. ); Nickelsen, R.P. )

    1989-01-01

    Pedogenic slickensides are convex-concave slip surfaces that form during expansion/contraction in expansive clay soils such as Vertisols. In the central Appalachians, they occur near the tops of fining-upward cycles in Paleozoic red beds such as the Bloomsburg, Catskill, and Mauch Chunk Formations. Pedogenic slickensides are found in association with other pedogenic (or paleosol) features such as clay-skinned peds, in situ calcareous nodules, and root impressions. Repeated movements along these shear planes during pedogenesis produce strongly aligned clay particles adjacent to pedogenic slickensides; as a result, they are preserved as discrete fractures throughout diagenesis, compaction, and superimposed tectonic deformation. During whole-rock deformation, pedogenic slickensides segregate penetratively deformed rocks into independent, foliate packets and serve as discontinuities that are followed by later structural features. Because the original morphology of pedogenic slickensides is known, they can be used as crude strain markers.

  7. A deformation partitioning approach to resolving the sequence of fold events and the orientations in which they formed across multiply deformed large-scale regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, T. H.; Sanislav, I. V.

    2011-07-01

    Regional distributions of axial plane trends retain information on the orientation in which successive generations formed because multi-scale partitioning results in most orogenic belts preserving subsequently undeformed portions of all large-scale folds. At depths greater than ˜10 km within orogens, successions of regional folds are accompanied by the sequential development of crenulation hinges in pelites, which are commonly overgrown early during their development by successive generations of porphyroblasts. Consequently, the original trends of the axial planes of these folds are preserved within the distribution of foliation inflection/intersection axes within porphyroblasts (FIAs). Peaks in the distribution of FIA trends in western Maine predominantly coincide with peaks in the distribution of trends of the axial planes of macroscopic and regional folds. The WNW-ESE (˜420 Ma), N-S (408 ± 10 Ma), W-E (388 ± 9 Ma), WSW-ENE (372 ± 5 Ma), SW-NE (353 ± 4 Ma) succession of FIA peaks defines the sequence of folds and accords with map scale overprinting relationships. This quantitative approach to interpreting fold successions in multiply deformed terrains resolves timing where overprinting criteria are rare, uncertain or obliterated by younger events in portions of the orogen. Significantly, lengthy detailed histories of structural development can be extracted from a small area containing porphyroblastic rocks and applied to very large-scale regions.

  8. Detection of crustal deformation from the Landers earthquake sequence using continuous geodetic measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bock, Yehuda; Agnew, Duncan C.; Fang, Peng; Genrich, Joachim F.; Hager, Bradford H.; Herring, Thomas A.; Hudnut, Kenneth W.; King, Robert W.; Larsen, Shawn; Minster, J.-B.

    1993-01-01

    The first measurements are reported for a major earthquake by a continuously operating GPS network, the permanent GPS Genetic ARRY (PGGA) in southern California. The Landers and Big Bear earthquakes of June 28, 1992 were monitored by daily observations. Ten weeks of measurements indicate significant coseismic motion at all PGGA sites, significant postseismic motion at one site for two weeks after the earthquakes, and no significant preseismic motion. These measurements demonstrate the potential of GPS monitoring for precise detection of precursory and aftershock seismic deformation in the near and far field.

  9. Deformational sequence of a portion of the Michipicoten greenstone belt, Chabanel Township, Ontario

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shrady, C. H.; Mcgill, G. E.

    1986-01-01

    Detailed mapping at a scale of one inch = 400 feet is being carried out within a fume kill, having excellent exposure, located in the southwestern portion of the Michipicoten Greenstone Belt near Wawa, Ontario. The rocks are metasediments and metavolcanics of lower greenschist facies. U-Pb geochronology indicates that they are at least 2698 + or - 11 Ma old. The lithologic packages strike northeast to northwest, but the dominant strike is approximately east-west. Sedimentary structures and graded bedding are well preserved, aiding in the structural interpretation of this multiply deformed area. At least six phases of deformation within a relatively small area of the Michipicoten Greenstone Belt have been tentatively identified. These include the following structural features in approximate order of occurrence: (0) soft-sediment structures; (1) regionally overturned rocks, flattened pebbles, bedding parallel cleavage, and early, approximately bedding parallel faults; (2) northwest to north striking cleavage; (3) northeast striking cleavage and associated folds, and at least some late movement on approximately bedding parallel faults; (4) north-northwest and northeast trending faults; and (5) diabase dikes and associated fracture cleavages. Minor displacement of the diabase dikes occurs on faults that appear to be reactivated older structures.

  10. Detection of crustal deformation from the Landers earthquake sequence using continuous geodetic measurements

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bock, Y.; Agnew, D.C.; Fang, P.; Genrich, J.F.; Hager, B.H.; Herring, T.A.; Hudnut, K.W.; King, R.W.; Larsen, S.; Minster, J.-B.; Stark, K.; Wdowinski, S.; Wyatt, F.K.

    1993-01-01

    The measurement of crustal motions in technically active regions is being performed increasingly by the satellite-based Global Positioning System (GPS)1,2, which offers considerable advantages over conventional geodetic techniques3,4. Continuously operating GPS arrays with ground-based receivers spaced tens of kilometres apart have been established in central Japan5,6 and southern California to monitor the spatial and temporal details of crustal deformation. Here we report the first measurements for a major earthquake by a continuously operating GPS network, the Permanent GPS Geodetic Array (PGGA)7,9 in southern California. The Landers (magnitude Mw of 7.3) and Big Bear (Mw 6.2) earthquakes of 28 June 1992 were monitored by daily observations. Ten weeks of measurements, centred on the earthquake events, indicate significant coseismic motion at all PGGA sites, significant post-seismic motion at one site for two weeks after the earthquakes, and no significant preseismic motion. These measurements demonstrate the potential of GPS monitoring for precise detection of precursory and aftershock seismic deformation in the near and far field.

  11. Coeval brittle and ductile structures associated with extreme deformation partitioning in a multilayer sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Druguet, Elena; Alsop, G. Ian; Carreras, Jordi

    2009-05-01

    An investigation on the effects of a strong rheological contrast in the deformation of layered anisotropic rocks is presented. The study focuses on the geometric and kinematic analysis of complex structures developed within and adjacent to a thin marble-metapsammite multilayer unit from the Cap de Creus tectonometamorphic belt (NE Spain). Zones of high ductile strain localise in the marble layers, which exhibit complex folds, whereas metapsammites show mostly brittle (boudinage) structures. These structures strongly contrast with coeval retrogressive discrete shear zones developed in the surrounding migmatitic schists. The extreme strain partitioning is due to the rheological contrast between different lithological layers. In addition, the specific orientation of this multilayer unit induces a reversal of local kinematics with regard to bulk kinematics. Consequently, caution should be exercised when interpreting regional tectonics in highly partitioned domains associated with rheological heterogeneities.

  12. Generation of synthetic image sequences for the verification of matching and tracking algorithms for deformation analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bethmann, F.; Jepping, C.; Luhmann, T.

    2013-04-01

    This paper reports on a method for the generation of synthetic image data for almost arbitrary static or dynamic 3D scenarios. Image data generation is based on pre-defined 3D objects, object textures, camera orientation data and their imaging properties. The procedure does not focus on the creation of photo-realistic images under consideration of complex imaging and reflection models as they are used by common computer graphics programs. In contrast, the method is designed with main emphasis on geometrically correct synthetic images without radiometric impact. The calculation process includes photogrammetric distortion models, hence cameras with arbitrary geometric imaging characteristics can be applied. Consequently, image sets can be created that are consistent to mathematical photogrammetric models to be used as sup-pixel accurate data for the assessment of high-precision photogrammetric processing methods. In the first instance the paper describes the process of image simulation under consideration of colour value interpolation, MTF/PSF and so on. Subsequently the geometric quality of the synthetic images is evaluated with ellipse operators. Finally, simulated image sets are used to investigate matching and tracking algorithms as they have been developed at IAPG for deformation measurement in car safety testing.

  13. The 1979 Homestead Valley earthquake sequence, California: control of aftershocks and postseismic deformation.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stein, R.S.; Lisowski, M.

    1983-01-01

    The coseismic slip and geometry of the March 15, 1979, Homestead Valley, California, earthquake sequence are well constrained by precise horizontal and vertical geodetic observations and by data from a dense local seismic network. These observations indicate 0.52 + or - 0.10 m of right-lateral slip and 0.17 + or - 0.04 m of reverse slip on a buried vertical 6-km-long and 5-km-deep fault and yield a mean static stress drop of 7.2 + or -1.3 MPa. The largest shock had Ms = 5.6. Observations of the ground rupture revealed up to 0.1 m of right-lateral slip on two mapped faults that are subparallel to the modeled seismic slip plane. In the 1.9 years since the earthquakes, geodetic network displacements indicate that an additional 60+ or -10 mm of postseismic creep took place. The rate of postseismic shear strain (0.53 + or - 0.13 mu rad/yr) measured within a 30 X 30-km network centered on the principal events was anomalously high compared to its preearthquake value and the postseismic rate in the adjacent network. This transient cannot be explained by postseismic slip on the seismic fault but rather indicates that broadside release of strain followed the earthquake sequence. -Authors

  14. Surface deformation and stress interactions during the 2007-2010 sequence of earthquake, dyke intrusion and eruption in northern Tanzania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biggs, Juliet; Chivers, Michael; Hutchinson, Michael C.

    2013-10-01

    Magma movement and fault slip alter the magnitude and orientation of the stress in the surrounding crust. Observations of a sequence of events clustered in space and time provide information about the triggering mechanism and stress interactions between magma intrusion, earthquakes and eruptions. We investigate the syn- and post-intrusion stress changes associated with the 2007 Gelei dyke intrusion episode and subsequent eruption of nearby Oldonyo Lengai. Previous studies produced a kinematic model of the 2007 June-August sequence involving ˜1 m slip on a normal fault followed by the intrusion of the 7-10-km long Gelei dyke, collapse of a shallow graben and the deflation of the Gelei magma chamber. Immediately following this, the volcano Oldoinyo Lengai (<10 km away) experienced a new phase of explosive activity lasting for several months. Here, we present new geodetic observations covering Gelei and Oldoinyo Lengai in 2008 September-2010. We show continued slip on graben-bounding faults above the Gelei dyke. The eruption of Oldoinyo Lengai was accompanied by the intrusion of a 4 km-long E-W-trending dyke followed by deflation of a shallow source directly below the summit of the volcano. Next, we use stress calculations to investigate a number of hypotheses linking these events. (1) Before the onset of surface deformation, a dyke sufficiently deep and narrow to be geodetically undetectable could still have produced sufficient stress changes to trigger slip on the normal fault (i.e. the sequence could have been magmatically driven). (2) Stresses at the dyke tip would have been sufficient to overcome the effect of continued slip on the normal fault, allowing the dyke to propagate upwards into a region of clamping. (3) The Gelei sequence would have produced a significant stress change on the chamber beneath Oldoinyo Lengai. These static stress calculations allow us to discuss the roles played by dynamic stress, deeper magmatic changes and background stresses

  15. Coseismic ground deformations related to the 2009 L’Aquila seismic sequence (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montone, P.; Working Group, E.

    2009-12-01

    On April 6, 2009 an earthquake of Mw=6.3 occurred in the central Apennines (Abruzzi region), rupturing a SW-dipping normal fault for a total length of about 18 km. It severely hit an area of ~2000 km2 around L’Aquila town causing 300 fatalities and thousands injured. The mainshock was followed by two major aftershocks on April 7 (Mw=5.6) and April 9 (Mw=5.4). The seismic sequence is confined in the upper 10-12 km, with the exception of April 7 earthquake with a depth of about 15 km. The focal mechanisms of the main events clearly show NW-oriented normal faulting consistent with the NE-SW trending extensional regime of the central Apennines. In this work we present the data collected during the post-earthquake field campaigns performed by the Emergeo working group (INGV prompt geological survey team). The seismic sequence produced a widespread and diversified set of geological surface effects consisting of rock falls, soil compactions and mobilization of loose deposits as well as open tectonic fractures with or without throw along pre-existing faults. Particularly, as a result of the mainshock, surface faulting occurred along the SW-dipping Paganica normal fault with a continuous extent of ~2.5 km. Ruptures consist of extensional cracks (i.e. fissures) and flexural or normal fault scarps with an orientation of N130°-N140°. Small and sporadic tectonic slip took place along the NW and SE prolongation of the Paganica fault and along its antithetic normal faults. The continuity of the Paganica ruptures, the agreement between their average trend and the focal plane solutions, the consistency with the slip distribution at depth, their location and similarity in the geometrical organization with respect to the long term evidence of the Paganica fault, lead us to interpret them as the primary surface expression of the seismogenic fault at depth. The limited extent and the small throw of the surface ruptures in comparison to the size of the Paganica compound fault scarp

  16. Microstructural analysis of the Greater Himalayan Sequence, Annapurna-Dhaulagiri Himalaya, central Nepal: Channel Flow and Orogen-parallel deformation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsons, A. J.; Phillips, R. J.; Lloyd, G. E.; Searle, M. P.; Law, R. D.

    2014-12-01

    Knowledge of deformation processes that occur in the lithosphere during orogenesis can be gained from microstructural analysis of exhumed terranes and shear zones. Here, we use Crystallographic Preferred Orientation (CPO) and Anisotropy of Magnetic Susceptibility (AMS) data to reveal the kinematic evolution of the metamorphic core of the Himalayan orogen, the Greater Himalayan Sequence (GHS). The Himalayan orogen is commonly explained with models of channel flow, which describe the GHS as a partially molten, rheologically weak mid crustal channel. Extrusion of the channel was facilitated by coeval reverse- and normal-sense shear zones, at the lower and upper channel margins respectively. Whilst many thermobarometric studies support the occurrence of channel flow, the spatial and temporal distribution of strain within the GHS is one aspect of the model that is yet to be fully resolved. We present a quantified strain proxy profile for the GHS in the Annapurna-Dhaulagiri region of central Nepal and compare our results with the kinematic predictions of the channel flow model. Samples were collected along a NS transect through the Kali Gandaki valley of central Nepal for CPO and AMS analysis. Variations in CPO strength are used as a proxy for relative strain magnitude, whilst AMS data provide a proxy for strain ellipsoid shape. Combining this information with field and microstructural observations and thermobarometric constraints reveals the kinematic evolution of the GHS in this region. Low volumes of leucogranite and sillimanite bearing rocks and evidence of reverse-sense overprinting normal-sense shearing at the top of the GHS suggest that channel flow was not as intense as model predictions. Additionally, observed EW mineral lineations and oblate strain ellipsoid proxies in the Upper GHS, indicative of three dimensional flattening and orogen parallel stretching, cannot be explained by current channel flow models. Whilst the results do not refute the occurrence of

  17. Effect of the sequence of tube rolling in a tube bundle of a shell and tube heat exchanger on the stress-deformed state of the tube sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tselishchev, M. F.; Plotnikov, P. N.; Brodov, Yu. M.

    2015-11-01

    Rolling the tube sheet of a heat exchanger with U-shaped tubes, as exemplified by the vapor cooler GP-24, was simulated. The simulation was performed using the finite element method with account of elas- tic-plastic properties of the tube and tube sheet materials. The simulation consisted of two stages; at the first stage, maximum and residual contact stress in the conjunction of a separate tube and the tube sheet was determined using the "equivalent sleeve" model; at the second stage, the obtained contact stress was applied to the hole surface in the tube sheet. Thus, different tube rolling sequences were simulated: from the center to the periphery of the tube sheet and from the periphery to the center along a spiral line. The studies showed that the tube rolling sequence noticeably influences the value of the tube sheet residual deflection for the same rolling parameters of separate tubes. Residual deflection of the tube sheet in different planes was determined. It was established that the smallest residual deflection corresponds to the tube rolling sequence from the periphery to the center of the tube sheet. The following dependences were obtained for different rolling sequences: maximum deformation of the tube sheet as a function of the number of rolled tubes, residual deformation of the tube sheet along its surface, and residual deflection of the tube sheet as a function of the rotation angle at the periphery. The preferred sequence of tube rolling for minimizing the tube sheet deformation is indicated.

  18. The Emilia 2012 seismic sequence: hints on incipient basement-involved deformation in the foreland of the Northern Apennines (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Argnani, Andrea; Carannante, Simona; Massa, Marco; D'Alema, Ezio; Lovati, Sara

    2015-04-01

    The deformation front of the Northern Apennines is buried under the sediments of the Po Plain and was formed mainly during the Pliocene. The remarkably arcuate shape of the thrust front contrasts with the linear northwestern trend of the pede-Apennines, where recent deformation is documented by both geological and geodetic evidence. This study presents new geological and seismological data that are used to assess the structural style of the Ferrara Arc, a sector of the Northern Apennine front that was hit by two strong earthquakes on May 20 (MW 6.1) and May 29 (MW 6.0), 2012. The proposed interpretation is based on a dense grid of commercial seismic profiles and exploration wells, and high-quality relocation of ~5,300 earthquakes (the Emilia sequence). The seismicity was used to calibrate new one-dimensional and three-dimensional local Vp and Vs velocity models for the area. On the basis of these new models, the initial sparse hypocenters were then relocated in absolute mode and adjusted using the double-difference relative location algorithm. Seismicity distribution is elongated in the W-NW to E-SE directions, reaching a depth of 10-12 km. The aftershocks of the May 20 mainshock appear to be distributed on a rupture surface that dips ~45° SSW, and the surface projection indicates an area ~10 km wide and 23 km long. The aftershocks of the May 29 second mainshock followed a steep rupture surface that is well constrained within the investigated volume, whereby the surface projection of the blind source indicates an area ~6 km wide and 33 km long. The analysed multichannel seismic profiles highlight the presence of relevant lateral variations in the structural style of the Ferrara folds that developed during the Pliocene and Pleistocene, and also show the occurrence of a Mesozoic extensional fault system in the Ferrara arc, which in places has been seismically reactivated. These geological and seismological observations suggest that the 2012 Emilia earthquakes were

  19. Deformation of Aztec Sandstone at Valley of Fire of Nevada: failure modes, sequence of deformation, structural products and their interplay with paleo fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aydin, A.

    2014-12-01

    The Valley of Fire State Park, 60 km NE of Las Vegas, is a beacon of knowledge for deformation of Aztec Sandstone, a cross-bedded quartz arenite deposited in the Aztec-Navajo-Nugget erg in early Jurassic. It displays great diversity of physical properties, different localization types and micromechanics. The two deformation episodes, the Sevier folding & thrusting and the Basin & Range extension affected the area. The appearance of compaction bands marks the earliest deformation structure and their distribution, orientation, and dimension are controlled by the depositional architecture and loading. The earliest shear structures in the area are the Muddy Mountain, Summit, and Willow Tank thrusts and numerous small-scale bed-parallel faults. They altogether produced several kilometers of E-SE transport and shortening in the late Cretaceous and display numerous shear bands in its damage zone within the Aztec Sandstone. Shear bands also occur along dune boundaries and cross-bed interfaces. These observations indicate that the early deformation of the sandstone was accommodated by strain localization with various kinematics. The younger generation of faults in the area is of mid-Miocene age, and crops out pervasively. It includes a series of small offset normal faults (less than a few ten meters) which can be identified at steep cliff faces. These faults are highly segmented and are surrounded by a dense population of splay fractures. A large number of these splays were later sheared sequentially resulting in a well-defined network of left- and right-lateral strike-slip faults with slip magnitudes up to a few kilometers in the Park. The formation mechanisms of both the normal and strike-slip faults can be characterized as the sliding along planes of initial weaknesses and the accompanying cataclastic deformation. Some of the initial weak planes are associated with the depositional elements such as interdune boundaries and cross-bed interfaces while others are joint

  20. Inter- and Post-Seismic Ground Deformation of the 2012 Emilia Seismic Sequence By Means of COSMO-Skymed and Ers-Envisat InSAR Time Series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pezzo, G.; Tolomei, C.; Salvi, S.; Atzori, S.; Merryman Boncori, J. P.

    2014-12-01

    On May 20, 2012, a moderate earthquake of local magnitude, M 5.9 started a seismic sequence in the central Po Plain of Northern Italy. The mainshock occurred in an area where seismicity of comparable magnitude has neither been recorded nor reported in the historical record over the last 1,000 years. On May 29, 2012 a second large earthquake of M 5.8 occurred 12 km WSW of the mainshock, starting a new seismic sequence in the western area; a total of seven earthquakes with M >5 occurred in the area between May 20 and June 3, 2012. After the first mainshock, a COSMO-SkyMed acquisition plan was going to provide data over a wide area of the Emilia Region covering both the epicentral region and the adjacent West and East areas, and was later extended up to December 31th, 2013 to monitor the post-seismic deformation. Using multitemporal SBAS InSAR technique we measured co and post-seismic deformations; . we used COSMO-SkyMed image datasets spanning the time period 2012-2013, along both ascending and descending orbit. Moreover we studied the pre-seismic (inter-seismic) phase by means of ERS1/2 and ASAR-Envisat data covering the 1992-2010 temporal interval. In this framework the Emilia seismic sequence represents a very interesting case for the study of the complete seismic cycle.

  1. The use of sequences of pillars to engineer fluid cross-sectional shape via inertial flow deformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amini, Hamed; Masaeli, Mahdokht; Sollier, Elodie; Xie, Yu; Ganapathysubramanian, Baskar; Stone, Howard A.; di Carlo, Dino

    2012-11-01

    Control of fluid streams is useful in biological processing, chemical reaction engineering, and creating structured materials. We use cylindrical pillars to induce significant deformations in laminar flow. Numerical simulations predict that as fluid passes centrally positioned pillars in a straight microchannel, the fluid parcels near the channel centerline move towards the side walls, while fluid parcels near the top and bottom walls move towards the center. This inertial phenomenon (1 <~ Re <~ 100) in effect creates a set of net rotational secondary flows within the channel. The existence of four dominant operating modes (based on the number and direction of the induced secondary flows) is also demonstrated. We show how using the basic deformations on miscible co-flows of water and fluorescent dye we can manipulate and shape the cross-section of the colored stream. Hierarchical flow deformation operations can be integrated to execute sophisticated programs and render complex flow-shapes. We can numerically predict the deformation near a single pillar with high precision and accordingly, predict the total transformation function of any potential program. Consequently, a user can use a library of pre-simulated motions and engineer a flow-shape of interest quickly, at a low cost, and with high accuracy, an ability which we demonstrate.

  2. An experimental approach to non - extensive statistical physics and Epidemic Type Aftershock Sequence (ETAS) modeling. The case of triaxially deformed sandstones using acoustic emissions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stavrianaki, K.; Vallianatos, F.; Sammonds, P. R.; Ross, G. J.

    2014-12-01

    Fracturing is the most prevalent deformation mechanism in rocks deformed in the laboratory under simulated upper crustal conditions. Fracturing produces acoustic emissions (AE) at the laboratory scale and earthquakes on a crustal scale. The AE technique provides a means to analyse microcracking activity inside the rock volume and since experiments can be performed under confining pressure to simulate depth of burial, AE can be used as a proxy for natural processes such as earthquakes. Experimental rock deformation provides us with several ways to investigate time-dependent brittle deformation. Two main types of experiments can be distinguished: (1) "constant strain rate" experiments in which stress varies as a result of deformation, and (2) "creep" experiments in which deformation and deformation rate vary over time as a result of an imposed constant stress. We conducted constant strain rate experiments on air-dried Darley Dale sandstone samples in a variety of confining pressures (30MPa, 50MPa, 80MPa) and in water saturated samples with 20 MPa initial pore fluid pressure. The results from these experiments used to determine the initial loading in the creep experiments. Non-extensive statistical physics approach was applied to the AE data in order to investigate the spatio-temporal pattern of cracks close to failure. A more detailed study was performed for the data from the creep experiments. When axial stress is plotted against time we obtain the trimodal creep curve. Calculation of Tsallis entropic index q is performed to each stage of the curve and the results are compared with the ones from the constant strain rate experiments. The Epidemic Type Aftershock Sequence model (ETAS) is also applied to each stage of the creep curve and the ETAS parameters are calculated. We investigate whether these parameters are constant across all stages of the curve, or whether there are interesting patterns of variation. This research has been co-funded by the European Union

  3. GPS constraints on the Mw = 7.5 Ometepec earthquake sequence, southern Mexico: coseismic and post-seismic deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, Shannon E.; DeMets, Charles; Cabral-Cano, Enrique; Kostoglodov, Vladimir; Walpersdorf, Andrea; Cotte, Nathalie; Brudzinski, Michael; McCaffrey, Robert; Salazar-Tlaczani, Luis

    2014-10-01

    We use continuous GPS measurements from 31 stations in southern Mexico to model coseismic slip and post-seismic deformation from the 2012 March 20 Mw = 7.5 Ometepec earthquake, the first large thrust earthquake to occur below central Mexico during the modern GPS era. Coseismic offsets ranging from ˜280 mm near the epicentre to 5 mm or less at sites far from the epicentre are fit best by a rupture focused between ˜15 and 35 km depth, consistent with an independent seismological estimate. The corresponding geodetic moment of 1.4 × 1020 N·m is within 10 per cent of two independent seismic estimates. Transient post-seismic motion recorded by GPS sites as far as 300 km from the rupture has a different horizontal deformation gradient and opposite sense of vertical motion than do the coseismic offsets. A forward model of viscoelastic relaxation as a result of our new coseismic slip solution incorrectly predicts uplift in areas where post-seismic subsidence was recorded and indicates that viscoelastic deformation was no more than a few per cent of the measured post-seismic deformation. The deformation within 6 months of the earthquake was thus strongly dominated by fault afterslip. The post-seismic GPS time-series are well fit as logarithmically decaying fault afterslip on an area of the subduction interface up to 10 times larger than the earthquake rupture zone, extending as far as 220 km inland. Afterslip had a cumulative geodetic moment of 2.0 × 1020 N·m, ˜40 per cent larger than the Ometepec earthquake. Tests for the shallow and deep limits for the afterslip require that it included much of the earthquake rupture zone as well as regions of the subduction interface where slow slip events and non-volcanic tremor have been recorded and areas even farther downdip on the flat interface. Widespread afterslip below much of central Mexico suggests that most of the nearly flat subduction interface in this region is conditionally stable and thus contributes measurable

  4. GPS Constraints on the Mw=7.5 Ometepec Earthquake Sequence, Southern Mexico: Coseismic and Postseismic Deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, S. E.; DeMets, C.; Cabral, E.; Kostoglodov, V.; Walpersdorf, A.; Cotte, N.; Brudzinski, M. R.; McCaffrey, R.; Salazar-Tlaczani, L.

    2014-12-01

    We use continuous GPS measurements from 31 stations in southern Mexico to model coseismic slip and postseismic deformation from the 20 March 2012 Mw=7.5 Ometepec earthquake, the first large thrust earthquake to occur below central Mexico during the modern GPS era. Coseismic offsets ranging from ~280 mm near the epicenter to 5 mm or less at sites far from the epicenter are fit best by a rupture focused between ~15 km and 35 km depth, consistent with an independent seismological estimate. Transient postseismic motion recorded by GPS sites as far as 300 km from the rupture has a different horizontal deformation gradient and opposite sense of vertical motion than do the coseismic offsets. A forward model of viscoelastic relaxation as a result of our new coseismic slip solution incorrectly predicts uplift in areas where postseismic subsidence was recorded and indicates that viscoelastic deformation was no more than a few percent of the measured postseismic deformation. The deformation within six months of the earthquake was thus strongly dominated by fault afterslip. The postseismic GPS time series are well fit as logarithmically decaying fault afterslip on an area of the subduction interface up to 10 times larger than the earthquake rupture zone, extending as far as 220 km inland. Afterslip had a cumulative geodetic moment of 2.0×1020 N·m, ~40% larger than the Ometepec earthquake. Tests for the shallow and deep limits for the afterslip require that it included much of the earthquake rupture zone as well as regions of the subduction interface where slow slip events and non-volcanic tremor have been recorded and areas even farther downdip on the flat interface. We examine whether aftershocks accommodated a significant fraction of the shallow postseismic slip, but find that the energy released by aftershocks accounted for no more than 10% of the postseismic moment release at any depth. Widespread afterslip below much of central Mexico suggests that most of the nearly

  5. Centimeter-scale surface deformation caused by the 2011 Mineral, Virginia, earthquake sequence at the Carter farm site—Subsidiary structures with a quaternary history

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harrison, Richard W.; Schindler, J. Stephen; Pavich, Milan J.; Horton, J. Wright; Carter, Mark W.

    2016-01-01

    Centimeter-scale ground-surface deformation was produced by the August 23, 2011, magnitude (M) 5.8 earthquake that occurred in Mineral, Virginia. Ground-surface deformation also resulted from the earthquake aftershock sequence. This deformation occurred along a linear northeast-trend near Pendleton, Virginia. It is approximately 10 kilometers (km) northeast of the M5.8 epicenter and near the northeastern periphery of the epicentral area as defined by aftershocks. The ground-surface deformation extends over a distance of approximately 1.4 km and consists of parallel, small-scale (a few centimeters (cm) in amplitude) linear ridges and swales. Individual ridge and swale features are discontinuous and vary in length across a zone that ranges from about 20 meters (m) to less than 5 m in width. At one location, three fence posts and adjoining rails were vertically misaligned. Approximately 5 cm of uplift on one post provides a maximum estimate of vertical change from pre-earthquake conditions along the ridge and swale features. There was no change in the alignment of fence posts, indicating that deformation was entirely vertical. A broad monoclinal flexure with approximately 1 m of relief was identified by transit survey across surface deformation at the Carter farm site. There, surface deformation overlies the Carter farm fault, which is a zone of brittle faulting and fracturing along quartz veins, striking N40°E and dipping approximately 75°SE. Brecciation and shearing along this fault is interpreted as Quaternary in age because it disrupts the modern B-soil horizon. However, deformation is confined to saprolitized schist of the Ordovician Quantico Formation and the lowermost portion of overlying residuum, and is absent in the uppermost residuum and colluvial layer at the ground surface. Because there is a lack of surface shearing and very low relief, landslide processes were not a causative mechanism for the surface deformation. Two possible tectonic models and one

  6. Molecular Dynamics Investigations of the Local Structural Characteristics of DNA Oligonucleotides: Studies of Helical Axis Deformations, Conformational Sequence Dependence and Modified Nucleoside Perturbations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Louise-May, Shirley

    The present DNA studies investigate the local structure of DNA oligonucleotides in order to characterize helical axis deformations, sequence dependent fine structure and modified nucleoside perturbations of selected oligonucleotide sequences. The molecular dynamics method is used to generate an ensemble of energetically feasible DNA conformations which can then be analyzed for dynamical conformational properties, some of which can be compared to experimentally derived values. A theory and graphical presentation for the analysis of helical deformations of DNA based on the configurational statistics of polymers, called "Persistence Analysis", was designed. The results of the analysis on prototype forms, static crystal structures and two solvated MD simulations of the sequence d(CGCGAATTCGCG) indicate that all of the expected features of bending can be sensitively and systematically identified by this approach. Comparison of the relative performance of three molecular dynamics potential functions commonly used for dynamical modeling of biological macromolecules; CHARMm, AMBER and GROMOS was investigated via in vacuo MD simulations on the dodecamer sequence d(CGCGAATTCGCG)_2 with respect to the conformational properties of each dynamical model and their ability to support A and B families of DNA. Vacuum molecular dynamics simulations using the CHARMm force field carried out on simple homo- and heteropolymers of DNA led to the conclusion that sequence dependent fine structure appears to be well defined for adenine-thymine rich sequences both at the base pair and base step level whereas much of the the fine structure found in cytosine -guanine rich sequences appears to be context dependent. The local conformational properties of the homopolymer poly (dA) -poly (dT) revealed one dynamical model which was found in general agreement with fiber models currently available. Investigation of the relative structural static and dynamical effect of the misincorporation of

  7. Deformation along the western Indian plate boundary: new constraints from differential and multi-aperture InSAR data inversion for the 2008, Baluchistan (Western Pakistan) seismic sequence.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pezzo, Giuseppe; Merryman Boncori, John Peter; Atzori, Simone; Antonioli, Andrea; Salvi, Stefano

    2014-05-01

    We use Synthetic Aperture Radar Differential Interferometry (DInSAR) and Multi-Aperture Interferometry (MAI) to constrain the sources of the three largest events of the 2008 Baluchistan (western Pakistan) seismic sequence, namely two Mw 6.4 events only 12 hours apart and an Mw 5.7event occurred 40 days later. The sequence took place in the Quetta Syntaxis, the most seismically active region of Baluchistan, tectonically located between the colliding Indian Plate and the Afghan block of the Eurasian Plate. Elastic dislocation modelling of the surface displacements, derived from ascending and descending ENVISAT ASAR acquisitions, yields slip distributions with peak values of 80 cm and 70 cm for the two main events on a pair of strike-slip near-vertical faults, and values up to 50 cm for the largest aftershock on a NE-SW strike-slip fault. The MAI measurements, with their high sensitivity to the north-south motion component, are crucial in this area to resolve the fault plane ambiguity of moment tensors. We also studied the relationships between the largest earthquakes of the sequence by means of the Coulomb Failure Function to verify the agreement of our source modelling with the stress variations induced by the October 28 earthquake on the October 29 fault plane, and the stress variations induced by the two mainshocks on the December 09 fault plane. Our results provide insight into the deformation style of the Quetta Syntaxis, suggesting that right-lateral slip released at intermediate depths on large NW fault planes is compatible with contemporaneous left-lateral activation on NE-SW minor faults at shallower depths, in agreement with a bookshelf deformation mechanism.

  8. Tertiary sequence of deformation in a thin-skinned/thick-skinned collision belt: The Zagros Folded Belt (Fars, Iran)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mouthereau, F.; Tensi, J.; Bellahsen, N.; Lacombe, O.; de Boisgrollier, T.; Kargar, S.

    2007-10-01

    We describe how thin-skinned/thick-skinned deformation in the Zagros Folded Belt interacted in time and space. Homogeneous fold wavelengths (15.8 ± 5.3 km), tectono-sedimentary evidence for simultaneous fold growth in the past 5.5 ± 2.5 Ma, drainage network organization, and homogeneous peak differential stresses (40 ± 15 MPa) together point to buckling as the dominant process responsible for cover folding. Basin analysis reveals that basement inversion occurred ˜20 Ma ago as the Arabia/Eurasian plate convergence reduced and accumulation of Neogene siliciclastics in foreland basin started. By 10 Ma, ongoing contraction occurred by underplating of Arabian crustal units beneath the Iranian plate. This process represents 75% of the total shortening. It is not before 5 Ma that the Zagros foreland was incorporated into the southward propagating basement thrust wedge. Folds rejuvenated by 3-2 Ma because of uplift driven by basement shortening and erosion. Since then, folds grew at 0.3—0.6 mm/yr and forced the rivers to flow axially. A total shortening of 65-78 km (16-19%) is estimated across the Zagros. This corresponds to shortening rates of 6.5-8 km/Ma consistent with current geodetic surveys. We point out that although thin-skinned deformation in the sedimentary cover may be important, basement-involved shortening should not be neglected as it requires far less shortening. Moreover, for such foreland folded belts involving basement shortening, underplating may be an efficient process accommodating a significant part of the plate convergence.

  9. The sequence of moderate-size earthquakes at the junction of the Ligurian basin and the Corsica margin (western Mediterranean): The initiation of an active deformation zone revealed?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larroque, Christophe; Delouis, Bertrand; Sage, Françoise; Régnier, Marc; Béthoux, Nicole; Courboulex, Françoise; Deschamps, Anne

    2016-04-01

    A new seismically active zone is found in the southern part of the Ligurian basin, 80-km west of Corsica (western Mediterranean). The activity began in February 2011 with a foreshock (ML 4) and a mainshock (ML 5.3) 5 days later, followed by numerous aftershocks. We first analyze the fore- and mainshock in detail. We compare the results obtained using classical methods (linear location in a 1D medium and focal mechanisms from P and S polarities) and new approaches (non-linear location in a 3D medium and waveform modeling for determining the seismic moment and the focal mechanism). Both methods provided similar results for location, depth (in the range of 6-13 km) and focal mechanisms, which reveal reverse faulting with nodal planes oriented N-S and NE-SW. We then locate 27 of the aftershocks in the 3D model and find a 10-km-long NE-SW alignment with a depth between 7 and 16 km. In 2012 and 2013, three other moderate-size events (ML 3.8, 4 and 4.5) occurred and confirm that this zone is still active. The epicentral area is located in the oceanic domain of the Ligurian Basin. From analysis of the bathymetry and high-resolution multi-channel seismic profiles, no morphologic anomaly at surface and no inherited fault in the shallow ~ 4 km depth were imaged, which suggest that no significant deformation occurred in the area since 5 Ma. Thus, the structure(s) activated during the 2011-2013 sequence remain unknown. In light of these results, we point out a notable difference on both sides of the Ligurian Basin: the northern margin, close to the alpine chain, suffered strong earthquakes and large cumulated deformation since 5 Ma, while the southern margin, close to the Corsica-Sardinia continental block, is poorly deformed since 5 Ma.

  10. Deformation of the western Indian Plate boundary: insights from differential and multi-aperture InSAR data inversion for the 2008 Baluchistan (Western Pakistan) seismic sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pezzo, Giuseppe; Merryman Boncori, John Peter; Atzori, Simone; Antonioli, Andrea; Salvi, Stefano

    2014-07-01

    In this study, we use Differential Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry (DInSAR) and multi-aperture interferometry (MAI) to constrain the sources of the three largest events of the 2008 Baluchistan (western Pakistan) seismic sequence, namely two Mw 6.4 events only 12 hr apart and an Mw 5.7 event that occurred 40 d later. The sequence took place in the Quetta Syntaxis, the most seismically active region of Baluchistan, tectonically located between the colliding Indian Plate and the Afghan Block of the Eurasian Plate. Surface displacements estimated from ascending and descending ENVISAT ASAR acquisitions were used to derive elastic dislocation models for the sources of the two main events. The estimated slip distributions have peak values of 120 and 130 cm on a pair of almost parallel and near-vertical faults striking NW-SE, and of 50 cm and 60 cm on two high-angle faults striking NE-SW. Values up to 50 cm were found for the largest aftershock on an NE-SW fault located between the sources of the main shocks. The MAI measurements, with their high sensitivity to the north-south motion component, are crucial in this area to accurately describe the coseismic displacement field. Our results provide insight into the deformation style of the Quetta Syntaxis, suggesting that right-lateral slip released at shallow depths on large NW fault planes is compatible with left-lateral activation on smaller NE-SW faults.

  11. Extreme ductile deformation of fine-grained salt by coupled solution-precipitation creep and microcracking: Microstructural evidence from perennial Zechstein sequence (Neuhof salt mine, Germany)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Závada, Prokop; Desbois, Guillaume; Schwedt, Alexander; Lexa, Ondrej; Urai, Janos L.

    2012-04-01

    Microstructural study revealed that the ductile flow of intensely folded fine-grained salt exposed in an underground mine (Zechstein-Werra salt sequence, Neuhof mine, Germany) was accommodated by coupled activity of solution-precipitation (SP) creep and microcracking of the halite grains. The grain cores of the halite aggregates contain remnants of sedimentary microstructures with straight and chevron shaped fluid inclusion trails (FITs) and are surrounded by two concentric mantles reflecting different events of salt precipitation. Numerous intra-granular or transgranular microcracks originate at the tips of FITs and propagate preferentially along the interface between sedimentary cores and the surrounding mantle of reprecipitated halite. These microcracks are interpreted as tensional Griffith cracks. Microcracks starting at grain boundary triple junctions or grain boundary ledges form due to stress concentrations generated by grain boundary sliding (GBS). Solid or fluid inclusions frequently alter the course of the propagating microcracks or the cracks terminate at these inclusions. Because the inner mantle containing the microcracks is corroded and is surrounded by microcrack-free outer mantle, microcracking is interpreted to reflect transient failure of the aggregate. Microcracking is argued to play a fundamental role in the continuation and enhancement of the SP-GBS creep during halokinesis of the Werra salt, because the transgranular cracks (1) provide the ingress of additional fluid in the grain boundary network when cross-cutting the FITs and (2) decrease grain size by splitting the grains. More over, the ingress of additional fluids into grain boundaries is also provided by non-conservative grain boundary migration that advanced into FITs bearing cores of grains. Described readjustments of the microstructure and mechanical and chemical feedbacks for the grain boundary diffusion flow in halite-brine system are proposed to be comparable to other rock-fluid or

  12. Active Crustal Deformation in the Area of San Carlos, Baja California Sur, Mexico as Shown by Data of Local Earthquake Sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munguía, Luis; González-Escobar, Mario; Navarro, Miguel; Valdez, Tito; Mayer, Sergio; Aguirre, Alfredo; Wong, Victor; Luna, Manuel

    2015-12-01

    We analyzed earthquakes of sequences that occurred at different times near San Carlos, a town of approximately 5000 inhabitants. The seismic sequences happened during March-April 1989, October 2000-June 2001, and 5-15 February 2004 at about 200 km west of the Pacific-North America plate boundary. The strong shaking from initial earthquakes of the first two sequences prompted the installation of temporary seismic stations in the area. With data recorded by these stations, we found an earthquake distribution that is consistent with the northwest segment of the Santa Margarita fault. Both the focal depth, that seemed to increase in E-NE direction, and a composite fault-plane solution, obtained from polarity data of the small earthquakes, were also consistent with the main characteristics of that fault. We also found that our normal-faulting mechanism (east side down) was quite similar to centroid moment tensor solutions for earthquakes with M w 5.4 and 5.3 that occurred in the area in February 2004. It is likely, then, that these larger earthquakes also occurred along the Santa Margarita Fault. To get some insight into the regional stress pattern, we compared the above mechanisms with mechanisms reported for other earthquakes of the Pacific margin of Baja California Sur and the Gulf of California regions. We observed that focal mechanisms of the two regions have T axes of stress that plunge sub horizontally in E-NE average direction. The corresponding P axes have N-NW average trend, but for the Pacific earthquakes these axes plunge at angles that are ~35° larger than those for the Gulf earthquakes. These more vertically inclined P axes of compressive stress mean substantial oblique fault motions. The mixture of oblique and strike-slip components of fault motions, as the focal mechanisms show, confirms a transtensional stress regime for the region. Before this research, we knew little about the seismicity and styles of faulting in the area. Now we know that

  13. Haglund's Deformity

    MedlinePlus

    ... Is Haglund’s Deformity? Haglund’s deformity is a bony enlargement on the back of the heel. The soft ... the Achilles tendon becomes irritated when the bony enlargement rubs against shoes. This often leads to painful ...

  14. Madelung Deformity.

    PubMed

    Kozin, Scott H; Zlotolow, Dan A

    2015-10-01

    Madelung deformity of the wrist is more common in females and is often associated with Leri Weill dyschondrosteosis, a mesomelic form of dwarfism. Patients with Madelung deformity often report wrist deformity resulting from the prominence of the relatively long ulna. The typical Madelung deformity is associated with a Vickers ligament that creates a tether across the volar-ulnar radial physis that restricts growth across this segment. The distal radius deforms in the coronal (increasing radial inclination) and the sagittal (increasing volar tilt) planes. There is lunate subsidence and the proximal carpal row adapts to the deformity by forming an upside-down pyramid shape or triangle. Treatment depends on the age at presentation, degree of deformity, and magnitude of symptoms. Mild asymptomatic deformity warrants a period of nonsurgical management with serial x-ray examinations because the natural history is unpredictable. Many patients never require surgical intervention. Progressive deformity in the young child with considerable growth potential remaining requires release of Vickers ligament and radial physiolysis to prevent ongoing deterioration Concomitant ulnar epiphysiodesis may be necessary. Advanced asymptomatic deformity in older children with an unacceptable-appearing wrist or symptomatic deformity are indications for surgery. A dome osteotomy of the radius allows 3-dimensional correction of the deformity. Positive radiographic and clinical results after dome osteotomy have been reported. PMID:26341718

  15. Deformation of a continental margin sequence under a thrust sheet: complex stress history in a high pressure cell revealed by vein systems in the Oman Mountains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Virgo, Simon; Urai, Janos L.; Grobe, Arne

    2016-04-01

    Seven deformation phases can be mapped in mesozoic carbonates of the Jebel Akhdar mountains in North Oman. These include an early horizontal NE-SW directed extension that produced bedding confined vein sets with evidence for anticlockwise rotation of the stress field over time, interpreted to have developed during the thrust sheet emplacement. It is followed by a phase of top-NE bedding parallel shearing which rotates these veins on the North side of the mountains. The next phase is normal to oblique slip faults followed by at least two phases of strike-slip deformation. A "background" ductile deformation (maximum burial temperatures of 250 °C) is shown bu deformed fossils and diagenetic concretions. Each of these phases is consistently documented by a large number of observations of overprinting in nearly continuous outcrops. Each deformation phase produces vein sets that do not only differ in orientation but also in occurrence and appearance. Early vein sets exhibit a high stratigraphic variability, but are laterally very stable. With the onset of faulting, the stratigraphic variability decreases and the lateral variability becomes more significant. Even though the area offers excellent outcrop conditions with nearly 100% exposure, it is virtually impossible to find two outcrops that exhibit the same vein patterns. This has interesting implications for vein system analysis and is due to two reasons: (1) the stratigraphic and lateral variability of occurrence and orientation of each vein set cause different combination of vein sets do develop in different layers (2) Intersecting vein sets can show very different interaction such as crosscutting and reactivation, depending on the mechanical properties of the host rock and the veins.

  16. Postural & striatal deformities in Parkinson`s disease: Are these rare?

    PubMed

    Pandey, Sanjay; Garg, Hitesh

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson`s disease (PD) is the most common neurodegenerative disease and is characterized by tremor, rigidity and akinesia. Diagnosis is clinical in the majority of the patients. Patients with PD may have stooped posture but some of them develop different types of postural and striatal deformities. Usually these deformities are more common in atypical parkinsonian disorders such as progressive supranuclear palsy and multisystem atrophy. But in many studies it has been highlighted that these may also be present in approximately one third of PD patients leading to severe disability. These include antecollis or dropped head, camptocormia, p0 isa syndrome, scoliosis, striatal hands and striatal toes. The pathogenesis of these deformities is a complex combination of central and peripheral influences such as rigidity, dystonia and degenerative skeletal changes. Duration of parkinsonism symptoms is an important risk factor and in majority of the patients these deformities are seen in advanced statge of the disease. The patients with such symptoms may initially respond to dopaminergic medications but if not intervened they may become fixed and difficult to treat. Pain and restriction of movement are most common clinical manifestations and these may mimick symptoms of musculoskeletal disorders like rheumatoid arthritis. Early diagnosis is important as the patients may respond to adjustment in dopaminergic medications. Recent advances such as deep brain stimulation (DBS) and ultrasound guided botulinum toxin injection are helpful in management of these deformities in patients with PD. PMID:26997007

  17. Spinal deformity.

    PubMed

    Bunnell, W P

    1986-12-01

    Spinal deformity is a relatively common disorder, particularly in teenage girls. Early detection is possible by a simple, quick visual inspection that should be a standard part of the routine examination of all preteen and teenage patients. Follow-up observation will reveal those curvatures that are progressive and permit orthotic treatment to prevent further increase in the deformity. Spinal fusion offers correction and stabilization of more severe degrees of scoliosis. PMID:3786010

  18. Quaternary deformation

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, R.D. Jr.

    1990-01-01

    Displaced or deformed rock units and landforms record the past 2 m.y. of faulting, folding, uplift, and subsidence in California. Properly interpreted, such evidence provides a quantitative basis for predicting future earthquake activity and for relating many diverse structures and landforms to the 5 cm/yr of horizontal motion at the boundary between the North American and Pacific plates. Modern techniques of geologic dating and expanded research on earthquake hazards have greatly improved our knowledge of the San Andreas fault system. Much of this new knowledge has been gained since 1965, and that part which concerns crustal deformation during the past 2 m.y. is briefly summarized here.

  19. Madelung deformity.

    PubMed

    Ghatan, Andrew C; Hanel, Douglas P

    2013-06-01

    Madelung deformity is a rare congenital anomaly of the wrist caused by asymmetric growth at the distal radial physis secondary to a partial ulnar-sided arrest. The deformity is characterized by ulnar and palmar curvature of the distal radius, positive ulnar variance, and proximal subsidence of the lunate. It more commonly occurs in females than males and typically affects both wrists. The deformity can occur in isolation or as part of a genetic syndrome. The pattern of inheritance varies, with some cases following a pseudoautosomal pattern and many others lacking a clear family history. Nonsurgical management is typically advocated in asymptomatic patients. Few studies exist on the natural history of the condition; however, extensor tendon ruptures have been reported in severe and chronic cases. Stiffness, pain, and patient concerns regarding wrist cosmesis have been cited as indications for surgery. Various techniques for surgical management of Madelung deformity have been described, but clear evidence to support the use of any single approach is lacking. PMID:23728962

  20. Winnetka deformation zone: Surface expression of coactive slip on a blind fault during the Northridge earthquake sequence, California. Evidence that coactive faulting occurred in the Canoga Park, Winnetka, and Northridge areas during the 17 January 1994, Northridge, California earthquake

    SciTech Connect

    Cruikshank, K.M.; Johnson, A.M.; Fleming, R.W.; Jones, R.L.

    1996-12-31

    Measurements of normalized length changes of streets over an area of 9 km{sup 2} in San Fernando Valley of Los Angeles, California, define a distinctive strain pattern that may well reflect blind faulting during the 1994 Northridge earthquake. Strain magnitudes are about 3 {times} 10{sup {minus}4}, locally 10{sup {minus}3}. They define a deformation zone trending diagonally from near Canoga Park in the southwest, through Winnetka, to near Northridge in the northeast. The deformation zone is about 4.5 km long and 1 km wide. The northwestern two-thirds of the zone is a belt of extension of streets, and the southeastern one-third is a belt of shortening of streets. On the northwest and southeast sides of the deformation zone the magnitude of the strains is too small to measure, less than 10{sup {minus}4}. Complete states of strain measured in the northeastern half of the deformation zone show that the directions of principal strains are parallel and normal to the walls of the zone, so the zone is not a strike-slip zone. The magnitudes of strains measured in the northeastern part of the Winnetka area were large enough to fracture concrete and soils, and the area of larger strains correlates with the area of greater damage to such roads and sidewalks. All parts of the pattern suggest a blind fault at depth, most likely a reverse fault dipping northwest but possibly a normal fault dipping southeast. The magnitudes of the strains in the Winnetka area are consistent with the strains produced at the ground surface by a blind fault plane extending to depth on the order of 2 km and a net slip on the order of 1 m, within a distance of about 100 to 500 m of the ground surface. The pattern of damage in the San Fernando Valley suggests a fault segment much longer than the 4.5 km defined by survey data in the Winnetka area. The blind fault segment may extend several kilometers in both directions beyond the Winnetka area. This study of the Winnetka area further supports

  1. Understanding the impact of grain structure in austenitic stainless steel from a nanograined regime to a coarse-grained regime on osteoblast functions using a novel metal deformation-annealing sequence.

    PubMed

    Misra, R D K; Nune, C; Pesacreta, T C; Somani, M C; Karjalainen, L P

    2013-04-01

    Metallic biomedical devices with nanometer-sized grains (NGs) provide surfaces that are different from their coarse-grained (CG) (tens of micrometer) counterparts in terms of increased fraction of grain boundaries (NG>50%; CG<2-3%). The novel concept of 'phase-reversion' involving a controlled deformation-annealing sequence is used to obtain a wide range of grain structures, starting from the NG regime to the CG regime, to demonstrate that the grain structure significantly impacts cellular interactions and osteoblast functions. The uniqueness of this concept is the ability to address the critical aspect of cellular activity in nanostructured materials, because a range of grain sizes from NG to CG are obtained in a single material using an identical set of parameters. This is in addition to a high strength/weight ratio and superior wear and corrosion resistance. These multiple attributes are important for the long-term stability of biomedical devices. Experiments on the interplay between grain structure from the NG regime to CG in austenitic stainless steel on osteoblast functions indicated that cell attachment, proliferation, viability, morphology and spread varied with grain size and were favorably modulated on the NG and ultrafine-grain structure. Furthermore, immunofluorescence studies demonstrated stronger vinculin signals associated with actin stress fibers in the outer regions of the cells and cellular extensions on the NG surface. The differences in the cellular response with change in grain structure are attributed to grain structure and degree of hydrophilicity. The study lays the foundation for a new branch of nanostructured materials for biomedical applications. PMID:23232208

  2. Learning deformation and structure simultaneously: in situ endograft deformation analysis.

    PubMed

    Langs, Georg; Paragios, Nikos; Desgranges, Pascal; Rahmouni, Alain; Kobeiter, Hicham

    2011-02-01

    The learning of the shape and appearance behavior of complex anatomical structures is of growing importance in the successful use of medical imaging data. We propose a method to simultaneously learn a model of shape variation and the behavioral structure of objects in volumetric data sets. The algorithm performs a group-wise registration of a set of examples, and accounts for the heterogeneous deformation or variability properties of the data. We use the method for the in situ analysis of endograft deformation in the thoracic aorta during the cardiac cycle. The method is based on an emerging model of the shape variation, which is learned autonomously from a gated computed tomography sequence. It automatically adapts to the highly non-uniform elasticity properties of the structure during learning. The resulting deformation model is used for the measurement of global and local characteristics of the endograft movement. The method allows for the in situ localization of the stent during the cardiac cycle, and the measurement of its deformation. Furthermore, it makes the comparison of different endograft designs possible, and can serve as a basis for fitting a physical model of the endograft- and vessel surface to individual patients. The latter is essential for long-term risk assessment of the impact of endografts in highly mobile areas. We evaluate the approach on 10 data sets from patients that underwent endograft placement after traumatic ruptures of the thoracic aorta. PMID:20675181

  3. Deformations in VLBI antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, T. A.; Thomsen, P.

    1988-01-01

    A study is presented of deformations in antennas with the emphasis on their influence on VLBI measurements. The GIFTS structural analysis program has been used to model the VLBI antenna in Fairbanks (Alaska). The report identifies key deformations and studies the effect of gravity, wind, and temperature. Estimates of expected deformations are given.

  4. Deformable Nanolaminate Optics

    SciTech Connect

    Olivier, S S; Papavasiliou, A P; Barbee, T W; Miles, R R; Walton, C C; Cohn, M B; Chang, K

    2006-05-12

    We are developing a new class of deformable optic based on electrostatic actuation of nanolaminate foils. These foils are engineered at the atomic level to provide optimal opto-mechanical properties, including surface quality, strength and stiffness, for a wide range of deformable optics. We are combining these foils, developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), with commercial metal processing techniques to produce prototype deformable optics with aperture sizes up to 10 cm and actuator spacing from 1 mm to 1 cm and with a range of surface deformation designed to be as much as 10 microns. The existing capability for producing nanolaminate foils at LLNL, coupled with the commercial metal processing techniques being used, enable the potential production of these deformable optics with aperture sizes of over 1 m, and much larger deformable optics could potentially be produced by tiling multiple deformable segments. In addition, based on the fabrication processes being used, deformable nanolaminate optics could potentially be produced with areal densities of less than 1 kg per square m for applications in which lightweight deformable optics are desirable, and deformable nanolaminate optics could potentially be fabricated with intrinsically curved surfaces, including aspheric shapes. We will describe the basic principles of these devices, and we will present details of the design, fabrication and characterization of the prototype deformable nanolaminate optics that have been developed to date. We will also discuss the possibilities for future work on scaling these devices to larger sizes and developing both devices with lower areal densities and devices with curved surfaces.

  5. Gravitational Redshift of Deformed Neutron Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romero, Alexis; Zubairi, Omair; Weber, Fridolin

    2015-04-01

    Non-rotating neutron stars are generally treated in theoretical studies as perfect spheres. Such a treatment, however, may not be correct if strong magnetic fields are present and/or the pressure of the matter in the cores of neutron stars is non-isotropic, leading to neutron stars which are deformed. In this work, we investigate the impact of deformation on the gravitational redshift of neutron stars in the framework of general relativity. Using a parameterized metric to model non-spherical mass distributions, we derive an expression for the gravitational redshift in terms of the mass, radius, and deformity of a neutron star. Numerical solutions for the redshifts of sequences of deformed neutron stars are presented and observational implications are pointed out. This research is funded by the NIH through the Maximizing Access to Research Careers (MARC), under Grant Number: 5T34GM008303-25 and through the National Science Foundation under grant PHY-1411708.

  6. Multiscale Graphene Topographies Programmed by Sequential Mechanical Deformation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Po-Yen; Sodhi, Jaskiranjeet; Qiu, Yang; Valentin, Thomas M; Steinberg, Ruben Spitz; Wang, Zhongying; Hurt, Robert H; Wong, Ian Y

    2016-05-01

    Multigenerational graphene oxide architectures can be programmed by specific sequences of mechanical deformations. Each new deformation results in a progressively larger set of features decorated by smaller preexisting patterns, indicating a structural "memory." It is shown that these multiscale architectures are superhydrophobic and display excellent functionality as electrochemical electrodes. PMID:26996525

  7. Deformable bearing seat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moreman, O. S., III (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A deformable bearing seat is described for seating a bearing assembly in a housing. The seat includes a seating surface in the housing having a first predetermined spheroidal contour when the housing is in an undeformed mode. The seating surface is deformable to a second predetermined spherically contoured surface when the housing is in a deformed mode. The seat is particularly adaptable for application to a rotating blade and mounting ring assembly in a gas turbine engine.

  8. Deformed discrete symmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arzano, Michele; Kowalski-Glikman, Jerzy

    2016-09-01

    We construct discrete symmetry transformations for deformed relativistic kinematics based on group valued momenta. We focus on the specific example of κ-deformations of the Poincaré algebra with associated momenta living on (a sub-manifold of) de Sitter space. Our approach relies on the description of quantum states constructed from deformed kinematics and the observable charges associated with them. The results we present provide the first step towards the analysis of experimental bounds on the deformation parameter κ to be derived via precision measurements of discrete symmetries and CPT.

  9. Fluctuations as stochastic deformation.

    PubMed

    Kazinski, P O

    2008-04-01

    A notion of stochastic deformation is introduced and the corresponding algebraic deformation procedure is developed. This procedure is analogous to the deformation of an algebra of observables like deformation quantization, but for an imaginary deformation parameter (the Planck constant). This method is demonstrated on diverse relativistic and nonrelativistic models with finite and infinite degrees of freedom. It is shown that under stochastic deformation the model of a nonrelativistic particle interacting with the electromagnetic field on a curved background passes into the stochastic model described by the Fokker-Planck equation with the diffusion tensor being the inverse metric tensor. The first stochastic correction to the Newton equations for this system is found. The Klein-Kramers equation is also derived as the stochastic deformation of a certain classical model. Relativistic generalizations of the Fokker-Planck and Klein-Kramers equations are obtained by applying the procedure of stochastic deformation to appropriate relativistic classical models. The analog of the Fokker-Planck equation associated with the stochastic Lorentz-Dirac equation is derived too. The stochastic deformation of the models of a free scalar field and an electromagnetic field is investigated. It turns out that in the latter case the obtained stochastic model describes a fluctuating electromagnetic field in a transparent medium. PMID:18517590

  10. Fluctuations as stochastic deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazinski, P. O.

    2008-04-01

    A notion of stochastic deformation is introduced and the corresponding algebraic deformation procedure is developed. This procedure is analogous to the deformation of an algebra of observables like deformation quantization, but for an imaginary deformation parameter (the Planck constant). This method is demonstrated on diverse relativistic and nonrelativistic models with finite and infinite degrees of freedom. It is shown that under stochastic deformation the model of a nonrelativistic particle interacting with the electromagnetic field on a curved background passes into the stochastic model described by the Fokker-Planck equation with the diffusion tensor being the inverse metric tensor. The first stochastic correction to the Newton equations for this system is found. The Klein-Kramers equation is also derived as the stochastic deformation of a certain classical model. Relativistic generalizations of the Fokker-Planck and Klein-Kramers equations are obtained by applying the procedure of stochastic deformation to appropriate relativistic classical models. The analog of the Fokker-Planck equation associated with the stochastic Lorentz-Dirac equation is derived too. The stochastic deformation of the models of a free scalar field and an electromagnetic field is investigated. It turns out that in the latter case the obtained stochastic model describes a fluctuating electromagnetic field in a transparent medium.

  11. Resurgent deformation quantisation

    SciTech Connect

    Garay, Mauricio; Goursac, Axel de; Straten, Duco van

    2014-03-15

    We construct a version of the complex Heisenberg algebra based on the idea of endless analytic continuation. The algebra would be large enough to capture quantum effects that escape ordinary formal deformation quantisation. -- Highlights: •We construct resurgent deformation quantisation. •We give integral formulæ. •We compute examples which show that hypergeometric functions appear naturally in quantum computations.

  12. Deformation mechanisms in experimentally deformed Boom Clay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desbois, Guillaume; Schuck, Bernhard; Urai, Janos

    2016-04-01

    Bulk mechanical and transport properties of reference claystones for deep disposal of radioactive waste have been investigated since many years but little is known about microscale deformation mechanisms because accessing the relevant microstructure in these soft, very fine-grained, low permeable and low porous materials remains difficult. Recent development of ion beam polishing methods to prepare high quality damage free surfaces for scanning electron microscope (SEM) is opening new fields of microstructural investigation in claystones towards a better understanding of the deformation behavior transitional between rocks and soils. We present results of Boom Clay deformed in a triaxial cell in a consolidated - undrained test at a confining pressure of 0.375 MPa (i.e. close to natural value), with σ1 perpendicular to the bedding. Experiments stopped at 20 % strain. As a first approximation, the plasticity of the sample can be described by a Mohr-Coulomb type failure envelope with a coefficient of cohesion C = 0.117 MPa and an internal friction angle ϕ = 18.7°. After deformation test, the bulk sample shows a shear zone at an angle of about 35° from the vertical with an offset of about 5 mm. We used the "Lamipeel" method that allows producing a permanent absolutely plane and large size etched micro relief-replica in order to localize and to document the shear zone at the scale of the deformed core. High-resolution imaging of microstructures was mostly done by using the BIB-SEM method on key-regions identified after the "Lamipeel" method. Detailed BIB-SEM investigations of shear zones show the following: the boundaries between the shear zone and the host rock are sharp, clay aggregates and clastic grains are strongly reoriented parallel to the shear direction, and the porosity is significantly reduced in the shear zone and the grain size is smaller in the shear zone than in the host rock but there is no evidence for broken grains. Comparison of microstructures

  13. Dominant simple-shear deformation during peak metamorphism for the lower portion of the Greater Himalayan Sequence in West Nepal: New implications for hybrid channel flow-type mechanisms in the Dolpo region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frassi, Chiara

    2015-12-01

    I conducted new vorticity and deformation temperatures studies to test competing models of the exhumation of the mid-crustal rocks exposed in the Dolpo region (West Nepal). My results indicate that the Main Central Thrust is located ∼5 km structurally below the previous mapped locations. Deformation temperature increasing up structural section from ∼450 °C to ∼650 °C and overlap with peak metamorphic temperature indicating that penetrative shearing was responsible for the exhumation of the GHS occurred at "close" to peak metamorphic conditions. I interpreted the telescoping and the inversion of the paleo-isotherms at the base of the GHS as produced mainly by a sub-simple shearing (Wm = 0.88-1) pervasively distributed through the lower portion of the GHS. My results are consistent with hybrid channel flow-type models where the boundary between lower and upper portions of the GHS, broadly corresponding to the tectonometamorphic discontinuity recently documented in west Nepal, represents the limit between buried material, affected by dominant simple shearing, and exhumed material affected by a general flow dominates by pure shearing. This interpretation is consistent with the recent models suggesting the simultaneous operation of channel flow- and critical wedge-type processes at different structural depth.

  14. Principles of rock deformation

    SciTech Connect

    Nicolas, A.

    1987-01-01

    This text focuses on the recent achievements in the analysis of rock deformation. It gives an analytical presentation of the essential structures in terms of kinetic and dynamic interpretation. The physical properties underlying the interpretation of rock structures are exposed in simple terms. Emphasized in the book are: the role of fluids in rock fracturing; the kinematic analysis of magnetic flow structures; the application of crystalline plasticity to the kinematic and dynamic analysis of the large deformation imprinted in many metamorphic rocks.

  15. Deformations of 3-algebras

    SciTech Connect

    Figueroa-O'Farrill, Jose Miguel

    2009-11-15

    We phrase deformations of n-Leibniz algebras in terms of the cohomology theory of the associated Leibniz algebra. We do the same for n-Lie algebras and for the metric versions of n-Leibniz and n-Lie algebras. We place particular emphasis on the case of n=3 and explore the deformations of 3-algebras of relevance to three-dimensional superconformal Chern-Simons theories with matter.

  16. Polygonal deformation bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonellini, Marco; Mollema, Pauline Nella

    2015-12-01

    We report for the first time the occurrence of polygonal faults in sandstone, which is compelling given that layer-bound polygonal fault systems have been observed so far only in fine-grained sediments such as clay and chalk. The polygonal faults are shear deformation bands that developed under shallow burial conditions via strain hardening in dm-wide zones. The edges of the polygons are 1-5 m long. The shear deformation bands are organized as conjugate faults along each edge of the polygon and form characteristic horst-like structures. The individual deformation bands have slip magnitudes ranging from a few mm to 1.5 cm; the cumulative average slip magnitude in a zone is up to 10 cm. The deformation bands heaves, in aggregate form, accommodate a small isotropic horizontal extension (strain <0.005). The individual shear deformation bands show abutting T-junctions, veering, curving, and merging where they mechanically interact. Crosscutting relationships are rare. The interactions of the deformation bands are similar to those of mode I opening fractures. The documented fault networks have important implications for evaluating the geometry of km-scale polygonal fault systems in the subsurface, top seal integrity, as well as constraining paleo-tectonic stress regimes.

  17. Uncertainty estimation in reconstructed deformable models

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, K.M.; Cunningham, G.S.; McKee, R.

    1996-12-31

    One of the hallmarks of the Bayesian approach to modeling is the posterior probability, which summarizes all uncertainties regarding the analysis. Using a Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) technique, it is possible to generate a sequence of objects that represent random samples drawn from the posterior distribution. We demonstrate this technique for reconstructions of two-dimensional objects from noisy projections taken from two directions. The reconstructed object is modeled in terms of a deformable geometrically-defined boundary with a constant interior density yielding a nonlinear reconstruction problem. We show how an MCMC sequence can be used to estimate uncertainties in the location of the edge of the reconstructed object.

  18. Experimental Deformation of Magnetite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Till, J. L.; Rybacki, E.; Morales, L. F. G.

    2015-12-01

    Magnetite is an important iron ore mineral and the most prominent Fe-oxide phase in the Earth's crust. The systematic occurrence of magnetite in zones of intense deformation in oceanic core complexes suggests that it may play a role in strain localization in some silicate rocks. We performed a series of high-temperature deformation experiments on synthetic magnetite aggregates and natural single crystals to characterize the rheological behavior of magnetite. As starting material, we used fine-grained magnetite powder that was hot isostatically pressed at 1100°C for several hours, resulting in polycrystalline material with a mean grain size of around 40 μm and containing 3-5% porosity. Samples were deformed to 15-20% axial strain under constant load (approximating constant stress) conditions in a Paterson-type gas apparatus for triaxial deformation at temperatures between 900 and 1100°C and 300 MPa confining pressure. The aggregates exhibit typical power-law creep behavior. At high stresses, samples deformed by dislocation creep exhibit stress exponents close to 3, revealing a transition to near-Newtonian creep with stress exponents around 1.3 at lower stresses. Natural magnetite single crystals deformed at 1 atm pressure and temperatures between 950°C and 1150 °C also exhibit stress exponents close to 3, but with lower flow stresses and a lower apparent activation energy than the aggregates. Such behavior may result from the different oxygen fugacity buffers used. Crystallographic-preferred orientations in all polycrystalline samples are very weak and corroborate numerical models of CPO development, suggesting that texture development in magnetite may be inherently slow compared with lower symmetry phases. Comparison of our results with experimental deformation data for various silicate minerals suggests that magnetite should be weaker than most silicates during ductile creep in dry igneous rocks.

  19. Crustal deformation and earthquakes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, S. C.

    1984-01-01

    The manner in which the Earth's surface deforms during the cycle of stress accumulation and release along major faults is investigated. In an investigation of the crustal deformation associated with a thin channel asthenosphere displacements are reduced from those computed for a half space asthenosphere. A previous finding by other workers that displacements are enhanced when flow is confined to a thin channel is based on several invalid approximations. The major predictions of the finite element model are that the near field postseismic displacements and strain rates are less than those for a half space asthenosphere and that the postseismic strain rates at intermediate distances are greater (in magnitude). The finite width of the asthenosphere ceases to have a significant impact on the crustal deformation pattern when its magnitude exceeds about three lithosphere thicknesses.

  20. Interfacial Bubble Deformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seymour, Brian; Shabane, Parvis; Cypull, Olivia; Cheng, Shengfeng; Feitosa, Klebert

    Soap bubbles floating at an air-water experience deformations as a result of surface tension and hydrostatic forces. In this experiment, we investigate the nature of such deformations by taking cross-sectional images of bubbles of different volumes. The results show that as their volume increases, bubbles transition from spherical to hemispherical shape. The deformation of the interface also changes with bubble volume with the capillary rise converging to the capillary length as volume increases. The profile of the top and bottom of the bubble and the capillary rise are completely determined by the volume and pressure differences. James Madison University Department of Physics and Astronomy, 4VA Consortium, Research Corporation for Advancement of Science.

  1. Vaporization of Deforming Droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yanxing; Chen, Xiaodong; Ma, Dongjun; Yang, Vigor

    2012-11-01

    Droplet deformation is one of the most important factors influencing the evaporation rate. In the present study, high-fidelity numerical simulations of single evaporating droplets with deformation are carried out over a wide range of the Reynolds and Weber numbers. The formulation is based on a complete set of conservation equations for both the liquid and surrounding gas phases. A modified volume-of-fluid (VOF) technique that takes into account heat and mass transfer is used to track the behavior of the liquid/gas interface. Special attention is given to the property conservation, which can be realized by using an iterative algorithm that enforces a divergence constraint in cells containing the interface. The effect of the ambient flow on droplet dynamics and evaporation are investigated systematically. Various underlying mechanisms dictating the droplet characteristics in different deformation regimes are identified. Correlations for the droplet evaporation rate are established in terms of the Reynolds and Weber numbers.

  2. Deformation and failure mechanisms in metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newaz, G.; Majumdar, B. S.

    1991-01-01

    An investigation was undertaken to determine the key deformation mechanisms and their interaction leading to failure of both 0 degree and 90 degree Ti 15-3/SCS-6 laminae under monotonic loading. The experimental results suggest that inelastic deformation in the 0-degree lamina is dominated by plastic deformation and that in the 90-degree lamina is dominated by both fiber-matrix debonding and plasticity. The loading-unloading response, monitoring of Poisson's ratio and microscopy were utilized to identify the key deformation mechanisms. The sequence of deformation mechanisms leading to failure are identified for both the 0 and the 90-degree specimens. The threshold strains for plasticity or damage which are referred to as 'microdeformation' in the 0 deg and 90 deg laminae are approximately 0.004 and 0.002, respectively, at room temperature. These strain levels may be considered critical in initiation based structural design with these composites.

  3. Plate motion and deformation

    SciTech Connect

    Minster, B.; Prescott, W.; Royden, L.

    1991-02-01

    Our goal is to understand the motions of the plates, the deformation along their boundaries and within their interiors, and the processes that control these tectonic phenomena. In the broadest terms, we must strive to understand the relationships of regional and local deformation to flow in the upper mantle and the rheological, thermal and density structure of the lithosphere. The essential data sets which we require to reach our goal consist of maps of current strain rates at the earth's surface and the distribution of integrated deformation through time as recorded in the geologic record. Our success will depend on the effective synthesis of crustal kinematics with a variety of other geological and geophysical data, within a quantitative theoretical framework describing processes in the earth's interior. Only in this way can we relate the snapshot of current motions and earth structure provided by geodetic and geophysical data with long-term processes operating on the time scales relevant to most geological processes. The wide-spread use of space-based techniques, coupled with traditional geological and geophysical data, promises a revolution in our understanding of the kinematics and dynamics of plate motions over a broad range of spatial and temporal scales and in a variety of geologic settings. The space-based techniques that best address problems in plate motion and deformation are precise space-geodetic positioning -- on land and on the seafloor -- and satellite acquisition of detailed altimetric and remote sensing data in oceanic and continental areas. The overall science objectives for the NASA Solid Earth Science plan for the 1990's, are to Understand the motion and deformation of the lithosphere within and across plate boundaries'', and to understand the dynamics of the mantle, the structure and evolution of the lithosphere, and the landforms that result from local and regional deformation. 57 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Lobster claw deformity.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Ashish; Agrawal, Rahul; Singh, Rajat; Agrawal, Romi; Agrawal, Seema

    2014-01-01

    Endogenous erythroid colony (EEC) syndrome comprise of three cardinal features, i.e. ectrodactyly, ectodermal dysplasia and cleft lip. EEC itself has three different forms. Ectrodactyly (absence of one or more digits) can be present with clefting in the proximal portion of hand or foot known as split hand foot malformation (SHFM) or lobster claw deformity. SHFM can be of four types depending upon the different responsible chromosomal loci. SHFM-4 can be present as pure limb malformation (non-syndromic form). In this article, describes a rare case report of lobster claw deformity patient. PMID:24992861

  5. Nanolaminate deformable mirrors

    DOEpatents

    Papavasiliou, Alexandros P.; Olivier, Scot S.

    2009-04-14

    A deformable mirror formed out of two layers of a nanolaminate foil attached to a stiff substrate is introduced. Deformation is provided by an electrostatic force between two of the layers. The internal stiffness of the structure allows for high-spatial-frequency shapes. The nanolaminate foil of the present invention allows for a high-quality mirror surface. The device achieves high precision in the vertical direction by using foils with accurately controlled thicknesses, but does not require high precision in the lateral dimensions, allowing such mirrors to be fabricated using crude lithography techniques. Such techniques allow structures up to about the meter scale to be fabricated.

  6. Nanolaminate deformable mirrors

    DOEpatents

    Papavasiliou, Alexandros P.; Olivier, Scot S.

    2010-04-06

    A deformable mirror formed out of two layers of a nanolaminate foil attached to a stiff substrate is introduced. Deformation is provided by an electrostatic force between two of the layers. The internal stiffness of the structure allows for high-spatial-frequency shapes. The nanolaminate foil of the present invention allows for a high-quality mirror surface. The device achieves high precision in the vertical direction by using foils with accurately controlled thicknesses, but does not require high precision in the lateral dimensions, allowing such mirrors to be fabricated using crude lithography techniques. Such techniques allow structures up to about the meter scale to be fabricated.

  7. Nail Deformities and Injuries.

    PubMed

    Tucker, James Rory J

    2015-12-01

    A variety of nail deformities commonly presents in the primary care office. An understanding of nail anatomy coupled with inspection of the nails at routine office visits can reveal undetected disorders. Some problems are benign, and treatment should be attempted by the primary care provider, such as onychomycosis, paronychia, or ingrown toenails. For conditions such as benign melanonychia, longitudinal ridges, isolated Beau lines, and onycholysis, clinicians may offer reassurance to patients who are concerned about the change in their nails. For deformities such as early pterygium or clubbing, a thorough evaluation and referral to an appropriate specialist may be warranted. PMID:26612379

  8. Effects of coupled structural and diagenetic processes on deformation localization and flow properties of deformation bands in sandstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elliott, Sara; Eichhubl, Peter; Landry, Chris

    2014-05-01

    Deformation bands tend to restrict flow perpendicular to the bands through the combined effects of porosity reduction, mechanical grain size reduction, and preferred cementation relative to the adjacent host rock. Thus, deformation bands may impart a permeability anisotropy to reservoir rocks. Deformation bands that occur in association with reservoir scale faults can impact reservoir-scale fluid flow and fault seal behavior. Using a combination of textural imaging including SEM-based cathodoluminescence imaging, compositional analysis, and lab petrophysics, this study is designed to (1) assess the effects of coupled chemical and mechanical processes leading to deformation localization in deformation bands and (2) to quantify the effect of these processes on single and multiphase fluid flow. While the effects of mechanical processes including grain translation, rotation, and breakage have been described in detail, chemical reactions affecting flow properties have received less attention. Such chemical reactions include the precipitation of carbonate and quartz cement, dissolution and albitization of feldspar, and the neoformation and infiltration of clay minerals. It is shown that the mechanical process of deformation localization is strongly controlled by chemical processes including pre-kinematic pore-filling cement, syn-kinematic cement filling intra- and transgranular fractures, and stress-enhanced dissolution reactions. Prekinematic cements reduce the strength contrast between grain and aggregate thus favoring deformation localization into narrow, well defined deformation bands. Prekinematic cementation and compaction may even favor thoroughgoing opening mode fractures and prevent localization of deformation into deformation band. Synkinematic cements within deformation bands will result in local strain hardening of bands and thus oppose further deformation localization with increasing strain. Examples will be presented from the Mesozoic clastic sequence of

  9. Deformation twins in Hornblende

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rooney, T.P.; Riecker, R.E.; Ross, M.

    1970-01-01

    Hornblende deformation twins with twin planes parallel to (101) are produced experimentally in single crystals by compression parallel to the c axis. Twinning occurs at confining pressures from 5 to 15 kilobars and temperatures from 400?? to 600??C (strain rate, 10-5 per second).

  10. Transfer involving deformed nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Rasmussen, J.O.; Guidry, M.W.; Canto, L.F.

    1985-03-01

    Results are reviewed of 1- and 2-neutron transfer reactions at near-barrier energies for deformed nuclei. Rotational angular momentum and excitation patterns are examined. A strong tendency to populating high spin states within a few MeV of the yrast line is noted, and it is interpreted as preferential transfer to rotation-aligned states. 16 refs., 12 figs.

  11. MEMS Actuated Deformable Mirror

    SciTech Connect

    Papavasiliou, A; Olivier, S; Barbee, T; Walton, C; Cohn, M

    2005-11-10

    This ongoing work concerns the creation of a deformable mirror by the integration of MEMS actuators with Nanolaminate foils through metal compression boning. These mirrors will use the advantages of these disparate technologies to achieve dense actuation of a high-quality, continuous mirror surface. They will enable advanced adaptive optics systems in large terrestrial telescopes. While MEMS actuators provide very dense actuation with high precision they can not provide large forces typically necessary to deform conventional mirror surfaces. Nanolaminate foils can be fabricated with very high surface quality while their extraordinary mechanical properties enable very thin, flexible foils to survive the rigors of fabrication. Precise metal compression bonding allows the attachment of the fragile MEMS actuators to the thin nanolaminate foils without creating distortions at the bond sites. This paper will describe work in four major areas: (1) modeling and design, (2) bonding development, (3) nanolaminate foil development, (4) producing a prototype. A first-principles analytical model was created and used to determine the design parameters. A method of bonding was determined that is both strong, and minimizes the localized deformation or print through. Work has also been done to produce nanolaminate foils that are sufficiently thin, flexible and flat to be deformed by the MEMS actuators. Finally a prototype was produced by bonding thin, flexible nanolaminate foils to commercially available MEMS actuators.

  12. Degenerative Spinal Deformity.

    PubMed

    Ailon, Tamir; Smith, Justin S; Shaffrey, Christopher I; Lenke, Lawrence G; Brodke, Darrel; Harrop, James S; Fehlings, Michael; Ames, Christopher P

    2015-10-01

    Degenerative spinal deformity afflicts a significant portion of the elderly and is increasing in prevalence. Recent evidence has revealed sagittal plane malalignment to be a key driver of pain and disability in this population and has led to a significant shift toward a more evidence-based management paradigm. In this narrative review, we review the recent literature on the epidemiology, evaluation, management, and outcomes of degenerative adult spinal deformity (ASD). ASD is increasing in prevalence in North America due to an aging population and demographic shifts. It results from cumulative degenerative changes focused in the intervertebral discs and facet joints that occur asymmetrically to produce deformity. Deformity correction focuses on restoration of global alignment, especially in the sagittal plane, and decompression of the neural elements. General realignment goals have been established, including sagittal vertical axis <50 mm, pelvic tilt <22°, and lumbopelvic mismatch <±9°; however, these should be tailored to the patient. Operative management, in carefully selected patients, yields satisfactory outcomes that appear to be superior to nonoperative strategies. ASD is characterized by malalignment in the sagittal and/or coronal plane and, in adults, presents with pain and disability. Nonoperative management is recommended for patients with mild, nonprogressive symptoms; however, evidence of its efficacy is limited. Surgery aims to restore global spinal alignment, decompress neural elements, and achieve fusion with minimal complications. The surgical approach should balance the desired correction with the increased risk of more aggressive maneuvers. In well-selected patients, surgery yields excellent outcomes. PMID:26378361

  13. [Babies with cranial deformity].

    PubMed

    Feijen, Michelle M W; Claessens, Edith A W M Habets; Dovens, Anke J Leenders; Vles, Johannes S; van der Hulst, Rene R W J

    2009-01-01

    Plagiocephaly was diagnosed in a baby aged 4 months and brachycephaly in a baby aged 5 months. Positional or deformational plagio- or brachycephaly is characterized by changes in shape and symmetry of the cranial vault. Treatment options are conservative and may include physiotherapy and helmet therapy. During the last two decades the incidence of positional plagiocephaly has increased in the Netherlands. This increase is due to the recommendation that babies be laid on their backs in order to reduce the risk of sudden infant death syndrome. We suggest the following: in cases of positional preference of the infant, referral to a physiotherapist is indicated. In cases of unacceptable deformity of the cranium at the age 5 months, moulding helmet therapy is a possible treatment option. PMID:19857299

  14. Partially segmented deformable mirror

    DOEpatents

    Bliss, Erlan S.; Smith, James R.; Salmon, J. Thaddeus; Monjes, Julio A.

    1991-01-01

    A partially segmented deformable mirror is formed with a mirror plate having a smooth and continuous front surface and a plurality of actuators to its back surface. The back surface is divided into triangular areas which are mutually separated by grooves. The grooves are deep enough to make the plate deformable and the actuators for displacing the mirror plate in the direction normal to its surface are inserted in the grooves at the vertices of the triangular areas. Each actuator includes a transducer supported by a receptacle with outer shells having outer surfaces. The vertices have inner walls which are approximately perpendicular to the mirror surface and make planar contacts with the outer surfaces of the outer shells. The adhesive which is used on these contact surfaces tends to contract when it dries but the outer shells can bend and serve to minimize the tendency of the mirror to warp.

  15. Partially segmented deformable mirror

    DOEpatents

    Bliss, E.S.; Smith, J.R.; Salmon, J.T.; Monjes, J.A.

    1991-05-21

    A partially segmented deformable mirror is formed with a mirror plate having a smooth and continuous front surface and a plurality of actuators to its back surface. The back surface is divided into triangular areas which are mutually separated by grooves. The grooves are deep enough to make the plate deformable and the actuators for displacing the mirror plate in the direction normal to its surface are inserted in the grooves at the vertices of the triangular areas. Each actuator includes a transducer supported by a receptacle with outer shells having outer surfaces. The vertices have inner walls which are approximately perpendicular to the mirror surface and make planar contacts with the outer surfaces of the outer shells. The adhesive which is used on these contact surfaces tends to contract when it dries but the outer shells can bend and serve to minimize the tendency of the mirror to warp. 5 figures.

  16. Probing deformed quantum commutators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, Matteo A. C.; Giani, Tommaso; Paris, Matteo G. A.

    2016-07-01

    Several quantum gravity theories predict a minimal length at the order of magnitude of the Planck length, under which the concepts of space and time lose their physical meaning. In quantum mechanics, the insurgence of such a minimal length can be described by introducing a modified position-momentum commutator, which in turn yields a generalized uncertainty principle, where the uncertainty on position measurements has a lower bound. The value of the minimal length is not predicted by theories and must be estimated experimentally. In this paper, we address the quantum bound to the estimability of the minimal uncertainty length by performing measurements on a harmonic oscillator, which is analytically solvable in the deformed algebra induced by the deformed commutation relations.

  17. Ice deformation near SHEBA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindsay, R. W.

    2002-10-01

    The deformation rate of sea ice is a key parameter for determining the evolution of the ice thickness distribution. It determines the rate of new ice formation through opening and the rate of ridging through closing and shear. An extensive suite of ground-based and satellite-based measurements of ice motion is used to construct a daily time series of the ice velocity and deformation in the vicinity of the Surface Heat Budget of the Arctic Ocean (SHEBA) ice camp that is suitable for forcing a model of the ice thickness distribution. The velocity is interpolated to a square grid that remains centered on the camp, has a spacing of 25 km, is 400 km on a side, and is determined for a 371-day period from 2 October 1997 to 7 October 1998. Velocity measurements from buoys, Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR), Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSMI), and Radarsat Geophysical Processing System (RGPS) are merged using optimal interpolation and a Kalman filter approach. The deformation rate is taken directly from the RGPS measurements when available. The daily total deformation rate measured on a scale of 100 km near the camp averaged 2.21% d-1, and the standard deviation was 1.78% d-1. The divergence was positive in the early winter and negative through most of the spring and summer. There were two major opening/closing events, one in January and one at the end of July. The net divergence over the year was very near zero. The vorticity indicated a net rotation of 87° over the year, with the winter showing strong anticyclonic turning and the summer showing strong cyclonic turning.

  18. Covariant deformed oscillator algebras

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quesne, Christiane

    1995-01-01

    The general form and associativity conditions of deformed oscillator algebras are reviewed. It is shown how the latter can be fulfilled in terms of a solution of the Yang-Baxter equation when this solution has three distinct eigenvalues and satisfies a Birman-Wenzl-Murakami condition. As an example, an SU(sub q)(n) x SU(sub q)(m)-covariant q-bosonic algebra is discussed in some detail.

  19. Deformation of Wrinkled Graphene

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The deformation of monolayer graphene, produced by chemical vapor deposition (CVD), on a polyester film substrate has been investigated through the use of Raman spectroscopy. It has been found that the microstructure of the CVD graphene consists of a hexagonal array of islands of flat monolayer graphene separated by wrinkled material. During deformation, it was found that the rate of shift of the Raman 2D band wavenumber per unit strain was less than 25% of that of flat flakes of mechanically exfoliated graphene, whereas the rate of band broadening per unit strain was about 75% of that of the exfoliated material. This unusual deformation behavior has been modeled in terms of mechanically isolated graphene islands separated by the graphene wrinkles, with the strain distribution in each graphene island determined using shear lag analysis. The effect of the size and position of the Raman laser beam spot has also been incorporated in the model. The predictions fit well with the behavior observed experimentally for the Raman band shifts and broadening of the wrinkled CVD graphene. The effect of wrinkles upon the efficiency of graphene to reinforce nanocomposites is also discussed. PMID:25765609

  20. Treatment of Madelung's deformity.

    PubMed

    Saffar, P; Badina, A

    2015-12-01

    Treatment of Madelung's deformity is still controversial. We reviewed retrospectively 19 patients with Madelung's deformity (two bilateral, 21 cases) who underwent surgery to the radius and ulna to improve range of motion, decrease pain and improve appearance of the wrist. Nineteen patients underwent 21 distal radial osteotomy procedures using three different techniques: subtraction, addition or dome osteotomy. Ulnar shortening and redirection of the distal ulna was performed in 12 cases; a long oblique osteotomy was used in 10 of these cases. The Sauvé-Kapandji technique was performed in five cases, an ulnar distal epiphysiodesis in two cases and a combination of osteotomy and epiphysiodesis in one case. The aim was to reduce the distal radial slope and to restore the orientation and congruity of the distal radio-ulnar joint and to improve its function. Pain was reduced as a result of the procedure: more than 75% of the cases had no or intermittent pain at the review. Pronation improved from 63° to 68° (P=0.467, not significant) and supination improved from 48° to 72° on average (P=0.034, significant). Grip strength increased from 11 to 18 kgf (P=0.013, significant). Madelung's deformity is not always a benign condition and it responds well to corrective osteotomies. PMID:26525609

  1. Deformable micro torque swimmer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishikawa, Takuji; Tanaka, Tomoyuki; Omori, Toshihiro; Imai, Yohsuke

    2015-11-01

    We investigated the deformation of a ciliate swimming freely in a fluid otherwise at rest. The cell body was modeled as a capsule with a hyper elastic membrane enclosing Newtonian fluid. Thrust forces due to the ciliary beat were modeled as torques distributed above the cell body. Effects of the membrane elasticity, the aspect ratio of cell's reference shape and the density difference between the cell and the surrounding fluid were investigated. The results showed that the cell deformed like heart shape when Capillary number (Ca) was sufficiently large, and the swimming velocity decreased as Ca was increased. The gravity effect on the membrane tension suggested that the upwards and downwards swimming velocities of Paramecium might be reglated by the calcium ion channels distributed locally around the anterior end. Moreover, the gravity induced deformation made a cell directed vertically downwards, which resulted in a positive geotaxis like behavior with physical origin. These results are important to understand physiology of ciliate's biological responses to mechanical stimuli.

  2. Supertransvectants, cohomology, and deformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben Fraj, Nizar; Laraiedh, Ismail; Omri, Salem

    2013-02-01

    Over the (1, N)-dimensional real superspace, N = 2, 3, we classify {osp}(N|2)-invariant binary differential operators acting on the superspaces of weighted densities, where {osp}(N|2) is the orthosymplectic Lie superalgebra. This result allows us to compute the first differential {osp}(N|2)-relative cohomology of the Lie superalgebra K(N) of contact vector fields with coefficients in the superspace of linear differential operators acting on the superspaces of weighted densities. We classify generic formal {osp}(3|2)-trivial deformations of the K(3)-module structure on the superspaces of symbols of differential operators. We prove that any generic formal {osp}(3|2)-trivial deformation of this K(3)-module is equivalent to its infinitesimal part. This work is the simplest generalization of a result by the first author et al. [Basdouri, I., Ben Ammar, M., Ben Fraj, N., Boujelbene, M., and Kammoun, K., "Cohomology of the Lie superalgebra of contact vector fields on {K}^{1|1} and deformations of the superspace of symbols," J. Nonlinear Math. Phys. 16, 373 (2009), 10.1142/S1402925109000431].

  3. Nanoscale Deformable Optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strauss, Karl F.; Sheldon, Douglas J.

    2011-01-01

    Several missions and instruments in the conceptual design phase rely on the technique of interferometry to create detectable fringe patterns. The intimate emplacement of reflective material upon electron device cells based upon chalcogenide material technology permits high-speed, predictable deformation of the reflective surface to a subnanometer or finer resolution with a very high degree of accuracy. In this innovation, a layer of reflective material is deposited upon a wafer containing (perhaps in the millions) chalcogenic memory cells with the reflective material becoming the front surface of a mirror and the chalcogenic material becoming a means of selectively deforming the mirror by the application of heat to the chalcogenic material. By doing so, the mirror surface can deform anywhere from nil to nanometers in spots the size of a modern day memory cell, thereby permitting realtime tuning of mirror focus and reflectivity to mitigate aberrations caused elsewhere in the optical system. Modern foundry methods permit the design and manufacture of individual memory cells having an area of or equal to the Feature (F) size of the design (assume 65 nm). Fabrication rules and restraints generally require the instantiation of one memory cell to another no closer than 1.5 F, or, for this innovation, 90 nm from its neighbor in any direction. Chalcogenide is a semiconducting glass compound consisting of a combination of chalcogen ions, the ratios of which vary according to properties desired. It has been shown that the application of heat to cells of chalcogenic material cause a large alteration in resistance to the range of 4 orders of magnitude. It is this effect upon which chalcogenidebased commercial memories rely. Upon removal of the heat source, the chalcogenide rapidly cools and remains frozen in the excited state. It has also been shown that the chalcogenide expands in volume because of the applied heat, meaning that the coefficient of expansion of chalcogenic

  4. Repetitive Sequences

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Repetitive sequences, or repeats, account for a substantial portion of the eukaryotic genomes. These sequences include very different types of DNA with respect to mode of origin, function, structure, and genomic distribution. Two large families of repetitive sequences can be readily recognized, ta...

  5. Distributed deformation measurement of large space deployable mechanism based on FBG sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Yanfang; Zhou, Zude; Liu, Yi; Liu, Mingyao; Li, Ruiya; Li, Tianliang

    2015-10-01

    Space deployable mechanisms are widely used, important and multi-purpose components in aerospace fields. In order to ensure the mechanism in normal situation after unfolded, detecting the deformation caused by huge temperature difference in real-time is necessary. This paper designed a deployable mechanism setup, completed its distributed deformation measurement by means of fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors and BP neural network, proved the mechanism distributed strain takes place sequence and FBG sensor is capable for space deployable mechanisms deformation measuring.

  6. High-resolution dynamic speech imaging with deformation estimation.

    PubMed

    Maojing Fu; Barlaz, Marissa S; Shosted, Ryan K; Zhi-Pei Liang; Sutton, Bradley P

    2015-08-01

    Dynamic speech magnetic resonance imaging (DSMRI) is a promising technique for visualizing articulatory motion in real time. However, many existing applications of DSMRI have been limited by slow imaging speed and the lack of quantitative motion analysis. In this paper, we present a novel DS-MRI technique to simultaneously estimate dynamic image sequence of speech and the associated deformation field. Extending on our previous Partial Separability (PS) model-based methods, the proposed technique visualizes both speech motion and deformation with a spatial resolution of 2.2 × 2.2 mm(2) and a nominal frame rate of 100 fps. Also, the technique enables direct analysis of articulatory motion through the deformation fields. Effectiveness of the method is systematically examined via in vivo experiments. Utilizing the obtained high-resolution images and deformation fields, we also performed a phonetics study on Brazilian Portuguese to show the method's practical utility. PMID:26736572

  7. Formation and subdivision of deformation structures during plastic deformation.

    PubMed

    Jakobsen, Bo; Poulsen, Henning F; Lienert, Ulrich; Almer, Jonathan; Shastri, Sarvjit D; Sørensen, Henning O; Gundlach, Carsten; Pantleon, Wolfgang

    2006-05-12

    During plastic deformation of metals and alloys, dislocations arrange in ordered patterns. How and when these self-organization processes take place have remained elusive, because in situ observations have not been feasible. We present an x-ray diffraction method that provided data on the dynamics of individual, deeply embedded dislocation structures. During tensile deformation of pure copper, dislocation-free regions were identified. They showed an unexpected intermittent dynamics, for example, appearing and disappearing with proceeding deformation and even displaying transient splitting behavior. Insight into these processes is relevant for an understanding of the strength and work-hardening of deformed materials. PMID:16690859

  8. Ultrasoft, highly deformable microgels.

    PubMed

    Bachman, Haylee; Brown, Ashley C; Clarke, Kimberly C; Dhada, Kabir S; Douglas, Alison; Hansen, Caroline E; Herman, Emily; Hyatt, John S; Kodlekere, Purva; Meng, Zhiyong; Saxena, Shalini; Spears, Mark W; Welsch, Nicole; Lyon, L Andrew

    2015-03-14

    Microgels are colloidally stable, hydrogel microparticles that have previously been used in a range of (soft) material applications due to their tunable mechanical and chemical properties. Most commonly, thermo and pH-responsive poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (pNIPAm) microgels can be fabricated by precipitation polymerization in the presence of the co-monomer acrylic acid (AAc). Traditionally pNIPAm microgels are synthesized in the presence of a crosslinking agent, such as N,N'-methylenebisacrylamide (BIS), however, microgels can also be synthesized under 'crosslinker free' conditions. The resulting particles have extremely low (<0.5%), core-localized crosslinking resulting from rare chain transfer reactions. AFM nanoindentation of these ultralow crosslinked (ULC) particles indicate that they are soft relative to crosslinked microgels, with a Young's modulus of ∼10 kPa. Furthermore, ULC microgels are highly deformable as indicated by a high degree of spreading on glass surfaces and the ability to translocate through nanopores significantly smaller than the hydrodynamic diameter of the particles. The size and charge of ULCs can be easily modulated by altering reaction conditions, such as temperature, monomer, surfactant and initiator concentrations, and through the addition of co-monomers. Microgels based on the widely utilized, biocompatible polymer polyethylene glycol (PEG) can also be synthesized under crosslinker free conditions. Due to their softness and deformability, ULC microgels are a unique base material for a wide variety of biomedical applications including biomaterials for drug delivery and regenerative medicine. PMID:25648590

  9. Deformable spanners and applications

    PubMed Central

    Guibas, Leonidas J.; Nguyen, An

    2010-01-01

    For a set S of points in ℝd, an s-spanner is a subgraph of the complete graph with node set S such that any pair of points is connected via some path in the spanner whose total length is at most s times the Euclidean distance between the points. In this paper we propose a new sparse (1 + ε)-spanner with O(n/εd) edges, where ε is a specified parameter. The key property of this spanner is that it can be efficiently maintained under dynamic insertion or deletion of points, as well as under continuous motion of the points in both the kinetic data structures setting and in the more realistic blackbox displacement model we introduce. Our deformable spanner succinctly encodes all proximity information in a deforming point cloud, giving us efficient kinetic algorithms for problems such as the closest pair, the near neighbors of all points, approximate nearest neighbor search (aka approximate Voronoi diagram), well-separated pair decompositions, and approximate k-centers. PMID:21165161

  10. Deformable spanners and applications.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jie; Guibas, Leonidas J; Nguyen, An

    2006-08-01

    For a set S of points in ℝ(d), an s-spanner is a subgraph of the complete graph with node set S such that any pair of points is connected via some path in the spanner whose total length is at most s times the Euclidean distance between the points. In this paper we propose a new sparse (1 + ε)-spanner with O(n/ε(d)) edges, where ε is a specified parameter. The key property of this spanner is that it can be efficiently maintained under dynamic insertion or deletion of points, as well as under continuous motion of the points in both the kinetic data structures setting and in the more realistic blackbox displacement model we introduce. Our deformable spanner succinctly encodes all proximity information in a deforming point cloud, giving us efficient kinetic algorithms for problems such as the closest pair, the near neighbors of all points, approximate nearest neighbor search (aka approximate Voronoi diagram), well-separated pair decompositions, and approximate k-centers. PMID:21165161

  11. Measuring deformations with deflectometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wansong; Huke, Philipp; Burke, Jan; von Kopylow, Christoph; Bergmann, Ralf B.

    2014-07-01

    Phase-measuring deflectometry is a powerful method to measure reflective surfaces. It is relatively easy to extract slope and curvature information from the measured phase maps; however, retrieving shape information depends very sensitively on the calibration of the camera and the geometry of the measurement system. Whereas we have previously demonstrated shape uncertainties below 1 μm, the range below 100 nm is currently inaccessible to deflectometric shape measurement. On the other hand, the astounding sensitivity of deflectometry can be put to good use for deformation measurements. The evaluation of corresponding shape differences rather than absolute shapes is much less susceptible to system calibration errors and its resolution is given mostly by the measurement system's sensitivity. We give an overview of recent progress in difference deflectometry. Firstly we show results from solar mirror substrates under load to detect flaws with high sensitivity. Secondly we present a preliminary simulation study of achievable deformation-measurement uncertainties to assess the feasibility of deflectometric characterisation of actuator performance and gravity sag for the mirror segments of the European Extremely Large Telescope (E-ELT). Results for the relevant Zernike terms show reliable detection of Zernike coefficients at the 25 nm level. Random artefacts related to noise in the phase measurements are seen to translate into bogus Zernike terms, and we discuss possible mitigation techniques to enhance the sensitivity and accuracy further.

  12. Graphene Topographies: Multiscale Graphene Topographies Programmed by Sequential Mechanical Deformation (Adv. Mater. 18/2016).

    PubMed

    Chen, Po-Yen; Sodhi, Jaskiranjeet; Qiu, Yang; Valentin, Thomas M; Steinberg, Ruben Spitz; Wang, Zhongying; Hurt, Robert H; Wong, Ian Y

    2016-05-01

    P.-Y. Chen, R. H. Hurt, I. Y. Wong and co-workers demonstrate a hierarchical graphene surface architecture generated by using various sequences and combinations of extreme mechanical deformation, as shown in the false-colored SEM image. As described on page 3564, the sequential patterning approach enables the design of feature sizes and orientations across multiple length scales which are retained during mechanical deformations of similar extent. This results in sequence-dependent surface topographies with structural memory. PMID:27151628

  13. Learning Deformable Shape Manifolds

    PubMed Central

    Rivera, Samuel; Martinez, Aleix

    2011-01-01

    We propose an approach to shape detection of highly deformable shapes in images via manifold learning with regression. Our method does not require shape key points be defined at high contrast image regions, nor do we need an initial estimate of the shape. We only require sufficient representative training data and a rough initial estimate of the object position and scale. We demonstrate the method for face shape learning, and provide a comparison to nonlinear Active Appearance Model. Our method is extremely accurate, to nearly pixel precision and is capable of accurately detecting the shape of faces undergoing extreme expression changes. The technique is robust to occlusions such as glasses and gives reasonable results for extremely degraded image resolutions. PMID:22308002

  14. IBA in deformed nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Casten, R.F.; Warner, D.D.

    1982-01-01

    The structure and characteristic properties and predictions of the IBA in deformed nuclei are reviewed, and compared with experiment, in particular for /sup 168/Er. Overall, excellent agreement, with a minimum of free parameters (in effect, two, neglecting scale factors on energy differences), was obtained. A particularly surprising, and unavoidable, prediction is that of strong ..beta.. ..-->.. ..gamma.. transitions, a feature characteristically absent in the geometrical model, but manifest empirically. Some discrepancies were also noted, principally for the K=4 excitation, and the detailed magnitudes of some specific B(E2) values. Considerable attention is paid to analyzing the structure of the IBA states and their relation to geometric models. The bandmixing formalism was studied to interpret both the aforementioned discrepancies and the origin of the ..beta.. ..-->.. ..gamma.. transitions. The IBA states, extremely complex in the usual SU(5) basis, are transformed to the SU(3) basis, as is the interaction Hamiltonian. The IBA wave functions appear with much simplified structure in this way as does the structure of the associated B(E2) values. The nature of the symmetry breaking of SU(3) for actual deformed nuclei is seen to be predominantly ..delta..K=0 mixing. A modified, and more consistent, formalism for the IBA-1 is introduced which is simpler, has fewer free parameters (in effect, one, neglecting scale factors on energy differences), is in at least as good agreement with experiment as the earlier formalism, contains a special case of the 0(6) limit which corresponds to that known empirically, and appears to have a close relationship to the IBA-2. The new formalism facilitates the construction of contour plots of various observables (e.g., energy or B(E2) ratios) as functions of N and chi/sub Q/ which allow the parameter-free discussion of qualitative trajectories or systematics.

  15. On the nonlinear deformation geometry of Euler-Bernoulli beams. [rotary wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodges, D. H.; Ormiston, R. A.; Peters, D. A.

    1980-01-01

    Nonlinear expressions are developed to relate the orientation of the deformed beam cross section, torsion, local components of bending curvature, angular velocity, and virtual rotation to deformation variables. The deformed beam kinematic quantities are proven to be equivalent to those derived from various rotation sequences by identifying appropriate changes of variable based on fundamental uniqueness properties of the deformed beam geometry. The torsion variable used is shown to be mathematically analogous to an axial deflection variable commonly used in the literature. Rigorous applicability of Hamilton's principle to systems described by a class of quasi-coordinates that includes these variables is formally established.

  16. Interface stress development in the Cu/Ag nanostructured multilayered film during the tensile deformation

    SciTech Connect

    Su, R.; Nie, Z. H.; Zhang, Q. H.; Li, X. J.; Li, L. E-mail: ydwang@mail.neu.edu.cn; Zhou, X. T.; Wang, Y. D. E-mail: ydwang@mail.neu.edu.cn; Wu, Y. D.; Hui, X. D.; Wang, M. G.

    2014-12-01

    Cu/Ag nanostructured multilayered films (NMFs) with different stacking sequences were investigated by synchrotron X-ray diffraction during the tensile deformations for interface stress study. The lattice strains were carefully traced and the stress partition, which usually occurs in the multiphase bulk metallic materials during plastic deformations, was first quantitatively analyzed in the NMFs here. The interface stress of the Cu/Ag NMFs was carefully analyzed during the tensile deformation and the results revealed that the interface stress was along the loading direction and exhibited three-stage evolution. This tensile interface stress has a detrimental effect on the deformation, leading to the early fracture of the NMFs.

  17. Stroke amplifier for deformable mirrors

    PubMed Central

    Webb, Robert H.; Albanese, Marc J.; Zhou, Yaopeng; Bifano, Thomas; Burns, Stephen A.

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate a simple optical configuration that amplifies the usable stroke of a deformable mirror. By arranging for the wavefront to traverse the deformable mirror more than once, we correct it more than once. The experimental implementation of the idea demonstrates a doubling of 2.0 and 2.04 by two different means. PMID:15495423

  18. [Spectrum research on metamorphic and deformation of tectonically deformed coals].

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao-Shi; Ju, Yi-Wen; Hou, Quan-Lin; Lin, Hong

    2011-08-01

    The structural and compositive evolution of tectonically deformed coals (TDCs) and their influencing factors were investigated and analyzed in detail through Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and laser Raman spectra analysis. The TDC samples (0.7% < Ro,max <3.1%) were collected from Huaibei coalfield with different deformation mechanisms and intensity. The FTIR of TDCs shows that the metamorphism and the deformation affect the degradation and polycondensation process of macromolecular structure to different degree. The Raman spectra analysis indicates that secondary structure defects can be produced mainly by structural deformation, also the metamorphism influences the secondary structure defects and aromatic structure. Through comprehensive analysis, it was discussed that the ductile deformation could change to strain energy through the increase and accumulation of dislocation in molecular structure units of TDC, and it could make an obvious influence on degradation and polycondensation. While the brittle deformation could change to frictional heat energy and promote the metamorphism and degradation of TDC structure, but has less effect on polycondensation. Furthermore, degradation is the main reason for affecting the structural evolution of coal in lower metamorphic stage, and polycondensation is the most important controlling factor in higher metamorphic stage. Under metamorphism and deformation, the small molecules which break and fall off from the macromolecular tructure of TDC are preferentially replenished and embedded into the secondary structure defects or the residual aromatic rings were formed into aromatic structure by polycondensation. This process improved the stability of coal structure. It is easier for ductile deformation of coal to induce the secondary structure defects than brittle deformation. PMID:22007412

  19. Dna Sequencing

    DOEpatents

    Tabor, Stanley; Richardson, Charles C.

    1995-04-25

    A method for sequencing a strand of DNA, including the steps off: providing the strand of DNA; annealing the strand with a primer able to hybridize to the strand to give an annealed mixture; incubating the mixture with four deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates, a DNA polymerase, and at least three deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates in different amounts, under conditions in favoring primer extension to form nucleic acid fragments complementory to the DNA to be sequenced; labelling the nucleic and fragments; separating them and determining the position of the deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates by differences in the intensity of the labels, thereby to determine the DNA sequence.

  20. Perceptual transparency from image deformation.

    PubMed

    Kawabe, Takahiro; Maruya, Kazushi; Nishida, Shin'ya

    2015-08-18

    Human vision has a remarkable ability to perceive two layers at the same retinal locations, a transparent layer in front of a background surface. Critical image cues to perceptual transparency, studied extensively in the past, are changes in luminance or color that could be caused by light absorptions and reflections by the front layer, but such image changes may not be clearly visible when the front layer consists of a pure transparent material such as water. Our daily experiences with transparent materials of this kind suggest that an alternative potential cue of visual transparency is image deformations of a background pattern caused by light refraction. Although previous studies have indicated that these image deformations, at least static ones, play little role in perceptual transparency, here we show that dynamic image deformations of the background pattern, which could be produced by light refraction on a moving liquid's surface, can produce a vivid impression of a transparent liquid layer without the aid of any other visual cues as to the presence of a transparent layer. Furthermore, a transparent liquid layer perceptually emerges even from a randomly generated dynamic image deformation as long as it is similar to real liquid deformations in its spatiotemporal frequency profile. Our findings indicate that the brain can perceptually infer the presence of "invisible" transparent liquids by analyzing the spatiotemporal structure of dynamic image deformation, for which it uses a relatively simple computation that does not require high-level knowledge about the detailed physics of liquid deformation. PMID:26240313

  1. Perceptual transparency from image deformation

    PubMed Central

    Kawabe, Takahiro; Maruya, Kazushi; Nishida, Shin’ya

    2015-01-01

    Human vision has a remarkable ability to perceive two layers at the same retinal locations, a transparent layer in front of a background surface. Critical image cues to perceptual transparency, studied extensively in the past, are changes in luminance or color that could be caused by light absorptions and reflections by the front layer, but such image changes may not be clearly visible when the front layer consists of a pure transparent material such as water. Our daily experiences with transparent materials of this kind suggest that an alternative potential cue of visual transparency is image deformations of a background pattern caused by light refraction. Although previous studies have indicated that these image deformations, at least static ones, play little role in perceptual transparency, here we show that dynamic image deformations of the background pattern, which could be produced by light refraction on a moving liquid’s surface, can produce a vivid impression of a transparent liquid layer without the aid of any other visual cues as to the presence of a transparent layer. Furthermore, a transparent liquid layer perceptually emerges even from a randomly generated dynamic image deformation as long as it is similar to real liquid deformations in its spatiotemporal frequency profile. Our findings indicate that the brain can perceptually infer the presence of “invisible” transparent liquids by analyzing the spatiotemporal structure of dynamic image deformation, for which it uses a relatively simple computation that does not require high-level knowledge about the detailed physics of liquid deformation. PMID:26240313

  2. Opioids and rat erythrocyte deformability.

    PubMed

    Rhoads, D L; Wei, L X; Lin, E T; Rezvani, A; Way, E L

    1986-01-01

    In previous studies from this laboratory, it was noted that opioids in vitro reduced human red blood cell deformability. The effect was found to be dose-dependent, naloxone reversible and preferentially selective kappa ligands exhibited the highest potency. To extend these findings studies were carried out using rat erythrocytes. The time required for erythrocytes to pass through a 5.0 um pore membrane was determined and used as an index of deformability. Opioids added in vitro produced inhibition of deformability in a dose-dependent, naloxone reversible manner. Injecting naive animals with morphine or nalbuphine also produced dose related reductions in red cell deformability. The degree of inhibition produced by nalbuphine correlated well with its plasma concentrations as measured by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Chronic morphine treatment by pellet implantation resulted in the development of tolerance as evidenced by a loss in the ability of morphine in vitro to inhibit red cell deformability. Addition of naloxone resulted in a decrease in filtration time. Thus, the data confirm and extend previous findings on human red blood cells. In as much as previous data from this laboratory demonstrated that opioids inhibit calcium flux from erythrocytes by inhibiting calcium-ATPase and calcium efflux is necessary for normal deformability, it is concluded that opioids act to reduce red cell deformability by inhibition of the calcium pump. PMID:3123933

  3. Constraining Lithosphere Deformation Modes during Continental Breakup for the Iberia-Newfoundland Conjugate Margins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeanniot, L.; Kusznir, N. J.; Mohn, G.; Manatschal, G.

    2014-12-01

    How the lithosphere and asthenosphere deforms during continental rifting leading to breakup and sea-floor spreading initiation is poorly understood. Observations at present-day and fossil analogue rifted margins show a complex OCT architecture which cannot be explained by a single simplistic lithosphere deformation modes. This OCT complexity includes hyper-extended continental crust and lithosphere, detachments faults, exhumed mantle, continental slivers and scattered embryonic oceanic crust. We use a coupled kinematic-dynamic model of lithosphere and asthenosphere deformation to determine the sequence of lithosphere deformation modes leading to continental breakup for Iberia-Newfoundland conjugate margin profiles. We quantitatively calibrate the models using observed present-day water loaded subsidence and crustal thickness, together with subsidence history and the age of melt generation. Flow fields, representing a sequence of lithosphere deformation modes, are generated by a 2D finite element viscous flow model (FE-Margin), and used to advect lithosphere and asthenosphere temperature and material. FE-Margin is kinematically driven by divergent deformation in the upper 15-20 km of the lithosphere inducing passive upwelling below. Buoyancy enhanced upwelling (Braun et al. 2000) is also kinematically included. Melt generation by decompressional melting is predicted using the methodology of Katz et al., 2003. The extension magnitudes used in the lithosphere deformation models are taken from Sutra et al (2013). The best fit calibrated models of lithosphere deformation evolution for the Iberia-Newfoundland conjugate margins require (i) an initial broad region of lithosphere deformation and passive upwelling, (ii) lateral migration of deformation, (iii) an increase in extension rate with time, (iv) focussing of deformation and (v) buoyancy induced upwelling. The preferred calibrated models predict faster extension rates and earlier continental crustal rupture and

  4. Videogrammetric Model Deformation Measurement Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burner, A. W.; Liu, Tian-Shu

    2001-01-01

    The theory, methods, and applications of the videogrammetric model deformation (VMD) measurement technique used at NASA for wind tunnel testing are presented. The VMD technique, based on non-topographic photogrammetry, can determine static and dynamic aeroelastic deformation and attitude of a wind-tunnel model. Hardware of the system includes a video-rate CCD camera, a computer with an image acquisition frame grabber board, illumination lights, and retroreflective or painted targets on a wind tunnel model. Custom software includes routines for image acquisition, target-tracking/identification, target centroid calculation, camera calibration, and deformation calculations. Applications of the VMD technique at five large NASA wind tunnels are discussed.

  5. Metastable vacua and complex deformations

    SciTech Connect

    Tatar, Radu; Wetenhall, Ben

    2007-12-15

    We use the non-normalizable complex deformations to describe the stringy realizations of the metastable vacua in N=1, SU(N{sub c}) SUSY theories with N{sub f}>N{sub c} massive fundamental flavors. The consideration of the non-normalizable deformations requires a modified toric duality. The new approach considers the tachyon condensation between pairs of wrapped D5 branes and anti-D5 branes and the resulting mixing between some cycles in the geometry. We enlarge the class of metastable vacua to the case of branes-antibranes wrapped on cycles of deformed A{sub n} singularities.

  6. Experimental deformation tests on natural gypsum in simple shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barberini, V.; Burlini, L.; Rutter, E.; Dapiaggi, M.

    2003-04-01

    Gypsum, together with anhydrite and halite, is the main mineral forming evaporitic rocks. These rocks, interlayered within sedimentary sequences, play an important role in structural development in several ways on accounts of their particular physical properties. Evaporites are more plastic and less permeable compared to sandstones, limestones and shales. Moreover, gypsum starts to dehydrate at less than 100 °C. High plasticity at relatively low temperature, together with the possible presence of pressurised water, imply that, when sedimentary sequences are involved in thrust tectonics, deformation is often localised in evaporitic levels (Apennines, South Alpine region, Zagros, Gulf of Mexico, etc.); in some cases the deformation is accompanied by seismicity as in the Northern Apennines extensional systems. Low permeability of evaporitic rocks allow them to be a good sealing rock for oil reservoirs and a very efficient rock to localise waste disposal. In this framework, a set of experiments was performed on gypsum samples from Volterra (Tuscany, Italy) in order to investigate how gypsum behaves at increasing stress/strain conditions. Experimental deformation tests were performed at confining pressures up to 300 MPa, at different temperatures (20, 70, 90 and 130 °C) and at strain rates ranging between 1*10-4 and 5*10-6 s-1. In order to reach high shear strain values (up to gamma = 4), we used: 1) gypsum cores deformed using the newly developed torsion technique in a Paterson-type apparatus and 2) both gypsum slices and powder in sawcut assembly at 35°, deformed in a Heard-type triaxial apparatus. All the deformed samples have been studied both by optical microscopy, to investigate the evolution of the microstructure with strain, and by XRD analysis, to determine if and to what extent gypsum dehydrated during deformation. A peak in the shear stress value (60-120 MPa) was reached at shear strains between gamma = 0.2 and gamma = 1, followed by strain softening or

  7. ROCK DEFORMATION. Final Progress Report

    SciTech Connect

    2002-05-24

    The Gordon Research Conference (GRC) on ROCK DEFORMATION was held at II Ciocco from 5/19/02 thru 5/24/02. Emphasis was placed on current unpublished research and discussion of the future target areas in this field.

  8. M theory on deformed superspace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faizal, Mir

    2011-11-01

    In this paper we will analyze a noncommutative deformation of the Aharony-Bergman-Jafferis-Maldacena (ABJM) theory in N=1 superspace formalism. We will then analyze the Becchi-Rouet-Stora-Tyutin (BRST) and anti-BRST symmetries for this deformed ABJM theory, and its linear as well as nonlinear gauges. We will show that the sum of the gauge fixing term and the ghost term for this deformed ABJM theory can be expressed as a combination of the total BRST and the total anti-BRST variation, in Landau and nonlinear gauges. We will show that in Landau and Curci-Ferrari gauges deformed ABJM theory is invariant under an additional set of symmetry transformations. We will also discuss the effect that the addition of a bare mass term has on this theory.

  9. Carrier Deformability in Drug Delivery.

    PubMed

    Morilla, Maria Jose; Romero, Eder Lilia

    2016-01-01

    Deformability is a key property of drug carriers used to increase the mass penetration across the skin without disrupting the lipid barrier. Highly deformable vesicles proved to be more effective than conventional liposomes in delivering drugs into and across the mammalian skin upon topical non occlusive application. In the past five years, highly deformable vesicles have been used for local delivery of drugs on joint diseases, skin cancer, atopic dermatitis, would healing, psoriasis, scar treatment, fungal, bacteria and protozoa infections. Promising topical vaccination strategies rely also in this type of carriers. Here we provide an overview on the main structural and mechanical features of deformable vesicles, to finish with an extensive update on their latest preclinical applications. PMID:26675226

  10. Modelling magnetically deformed neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haskell, B.; Samuelsson, L.; Glampedakis, K.; Andersson, N.

    2008-03-01

    Rotating deformed neutron stars are important potential sources for ground-based gravitational wave interferometers such as LIGO, GEO600 and VIRGO. One mechanism that may lead to significant non-asymmetries is the internal magnetic field. It is well known that a magnetic star will not be spherical and, if the magnetic axis is not aligned with the spin axis, the deformation will lead to the emission of gravitational waves. The aim of this paper is to develop a formalism that would allow us to model magnetically deformed stars, using both realistic equations of state and field configurations. As a first step, we consider a set of simplified model problems. Focusing on dipolar fields, we determine the internal magnetic field which is consistent with a given neutron star model and calculate the associated deformation. We discuss the relevance of our results for current gravitational wave detectors and future prospects.

  11. Promoting research in rock deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirby, Steve

    In response to informal discussions at the 1988 AGU Spring Meeting in Baltimore, Md., a dinner colloquium was held December 5, 1988, in San Francisco. Our purpose was to explore ways of promoting basic research in rock deformation, for which no professional organization exists that spans the full range of research interests. In spite of an informal distribution of announcements of the meeting, 54 people attended.Rock deformation is the materials science of the crystalline and amorphous materials that make up the solid Earth. As such, it includes not only the physical processes responsible for brittle and ductile deformation but also the important chemical processes that influence time-dependent inelastic deformation. Consequently, there is a continuing need to engage interest and collaboration from materials scientists, mineral physicists, metallurgists, surface chemists, and geochemists in the study of the inelastic mechanical behavior of these complex materials.

  12. Deformations in chiral liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibaev, Petr; Reddy, Kathryn; Bateman, Daniel; Iljin, Andrey

    2014-03-01

    Deformations and their relaxation in chiral liquid crystals are studied experimentally and theoretically in planar geometry for liquid crystalline mixtures of varying viscosities. It is shown by both methods that shear deformation in liquid crystals results in the inclination and extension of cholesteric helix in samples with high viscosity. Stretching deformation results in shrinking cholesteric helix. This leads to a possibility of detecting deformations on a nanometer scale by observing changes in selective reflection spectra. Theoretical model takes into account elastic strain of physical network formed by the entanglements between components of liquid crystalline mixture, viscosity of the matrix and elasticity of the liquid crystalline subsystem. This allows to model mechanical response of the matrix with different viscosities to stretching and shear of various amplitudes. It is shown that relaxation of the cholesteric helix takes much shorter time than mechanical relaxation of the mixtures. The model perfectly agrees with experimental data. The model is compared with theoretical model describing behavior of elastomers.

  13. Variable focal length deformable mirror

    DOEpatents

    Headley, Daniel; Ramsey, Marc; Schwarz, Jens

    2007-06-12

    A variable focal length deformable mirror has an inner ring and an outer ring that simply support and push axially on opposite sides of a mirror plate. The resulting variable clamping force deforms the mirror plate to provide a parabolic mirror shape. The rings are parallel planar sections of a single paraboloid and can provide an on-axis focus, if the rings are circular, or an off-axis focus, if the rings are elliptical. The focal length of the deformable mirror can be varied by changing the variable clamping force. The deformable mirror can generally be used in any application requiring the focusing or defocusing of light, including with both coherent and incoherent light sources.

  14. Shear deformation in granular materials

    SciTech Connect

    Bardenhagen, S.G.; Brackbill, J.U.; Sulsky, D.L.

    1998-12-31

    An investigation into the properties of granular materials is undertaken via numerical simulation. These simulations highlight that frictional contact, a defining characteristic of dry granular materials, and interfacial debonding, an expected deformation mode in plastic bonded explosives, must be properly modeled. Frictional contact and debonding algorithms have been implemented into FLIP, a particle in cell code, and are described. Frictionless and frictional contact are simulated, with attention paid to energy and momentum conservation. Debonding is simulated, with attention paid to the interfacial debonding speed. A first step toward calculations of shear deformation in plastic bonded explosives is made. Simulations are performed on the scale of the grains where experimental data is difficult to obtain. Two characteristics of deformation are found, namely the intermittent binding of grains when rotation and translation are insufficient to accommodate deformation, and the role of the binder as a lubricant in force chains.

  15. Anatomy of gravitationally deformed slopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chigira, Masahiro; Yamasaki, Shintaro; Hariyama, Takehiro

    2010-05-01

    Deep-seated gravitational slope deformation is the deformation of rocks as well as slope surfaces, but the internal structures have not been well observed and described before. This is mainly due to the difficulty in obtaining undisturbed samples from underground. We analyzed the internal deformational structures of gravitationally deformed slopes by using high quality drilled cores obtained by hybrid drilling technique, which has been recently developed and can recover very fragile materials that could not be taken by the conventional drilling techniques. Investigated slopes were gravitationally deformed out-facing slopes of pelitic schist and shale. The slope surfaces showed deformational features of small steps, depressions, knobs, and linear depressions, but had no major main scarp and landslide body with well-defined outline. This is indicative of slow, deep-seated gravitational deformation. Most of these small deformational features are hidden by vegetations, but they are detected by using airborne laser scanner. Drilled cores showed that the internal deformation is dominated by the slip and tearing off along foliations. Slippage along foliations is conspicuous in pelitic schist: Pelitic schist is sheared, particularly along black layers, which are rich in graphite and pyrite. Graphite is known to be a solid lubricant in material sciences, which seems to be why shearing occurs along the black layers. Rock mass between two slip layers is sheared, rotated, fractured, and pulverized; undulation of bedding or schistosity could be the nucleation points of fracturing. Tearing off along foliations is also the major deformation mode, which forms jagged morphology of rock fragments within shear zones. Rock fragments with jagged surface are commonly observed in "gouge", which is very different from tectonic gouge. This probably reflects the low confining pressures during their formation. Microscopic to mesoscopic openings along fractures are commonly observed with

  16. Measurement of deformations by NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bytchenkoff, Dimitri; Rodts, Stéphane

    2015-12-01

    Two NMR data acquisition protocols together with corresponding data processing algorithms for locating macroscopic objects, measuring distances between them or monitoring their displacements or deformations with microscopic precision are presented and discussed. The performance of the methods is demonstrated by applying them to the measurement of deformations of a freely supported beam under loading. We believe that our methods will find their applications in mechanics, civil engineering and medicine.

  17. Mixing of discontinuously deforming media.

    PubMed

    Smith, L D; Rudman, M; Lester, D R; Metcalfe, G

    2016-02-01

    Mixing of materials is fundamental to many natural phenomena and engineering applications. The presence of discontinuous deformations-such as shear banding or wall slip-creates new mechanisms for mixing and transport beyond those predicted by classical dynamical systems theory. Here, we show how a novel mixing mechanism combining stretching with cutting and shuffling yields exponential mixing rates, quantified by a positive Lyapunov exponent, an impossibility for systems with cutting and shuffling alone or bounded systems with stretching alone, and demonstrate it in a fluid flow. While dynamical systems theory provides a framework for understanding mixing in smoothly deforming media, a theory of discontinuous mixing is yet to be fully developed. New methods are needed to systematize, explain, and extrapolate measurements on systems with discontinuous deformations. Here, we investigate "webs" of Lagrangian discontinuities and show that they provide a template for the overall transport dynamics. Considering slip deformations as the asymptotic limit of increasingly localised smooth shear, we also demonstrate exactly how some of the new structures introduced by discontinuous deformations are analogous to structures in smoothly deforming systems. PMID:26931594

  18. Three-dimensional measurement of CFRP deformation during high-speed impact loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Masayoshi; Tanabe, Yasuhiro; Yoshimura, Akinori; Ogasawara, Toshio

    2011-08-01

    The deformation of carbon fiber reinforced plastics (CFRPs) caused by projectile impact governs the absorption or dissipation of kinetic energy of the projectile. However, three-dimensional (3D) numerical information about the CFRP deformations caused by the projectile impact is not yet available. Therefore, a 3D measurement was conducted to evaluate the deformation process and deformation behavior of the CFRPs under high-velocity projectile impact, and to subsequently evaluate the performance of the CFRPs. CFRPs having two different stacking sequences were used as the specimens. For measuring the deformation, a high-speed stereovision system comprised of two high-speed video cameras was adopted. An SUJ-2 sphere projectile was impacted against a specimen plate using a light-gas accelerator at an impact velocity of approximately 175 m/s, and the deformation was recorded by synchronously capturing the images using this system. The captured images were converted to stereo images by a 3D correlation method. The stereo images clearly revealed numerical differences in the deformation of the CFRPs having different stacking sequences. The result accuracy of the 3D measurement was verified by comparing their results with the direct measurement results. Moreover, the stereo images corresponded to the results from a numerical simulation of the CFRP deformations, which both qualitatively and quantitatively confirms the validity of the simulation. This 3D measurement method is a powerful and useful tool for evaluating the performance of CFRPs during high-velocity projectile impact.

  19. Microstructures and deformation mechanisms of experimentally deformed gabbro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yongsheng; He, Changrong

    2015-04-01

    The natural gabbro samples were deformed at temperature ranging from 700 to 1150 °C with strain rate steps of 1 × 10-4, 2.5 × 10-5, 6.3 × 10-6 s-1. The mechanical data show that sample experiences gradual transition from semi-brittle flow to plastic flow, corresponding to a systematically decreasing stress exponent n with the increasing temperature ranging from 16.5 to 4.1 (He et al. Sci China (D) 46(7):730-742, 2003). We investigate microstructures and deformation mechanisms of experimentally deformed gabbro under transmission electron microscope in this study. For low temperature of 700 °C to 950 °C, the deformation is mainly accommodated with dislocation glide and mechanical twinning, corresponding to stress exponent lager than 5, which means semi-brittle deformation. Whereas with higher temperature up to 1000 °C-1150 °C, the deformation is accommodated mainly with dislocation glide and climb corresponding to stress exponent of 4.1, which means plastic deformation. Evidence of dislocation climb has been found as dislocation walls in plagioclase. The observed slip system in plagioclase is (001)1/2[110] and that in clinopyroxene are (100)[001] and (010)[001]. The (010)[001] slip system in clinopyroxene is newly found in this work. Melt was found at temperature of 950 °C-1050 °C. The melt glass distributed both in melt thin film between two grain boundaries and melt tubules of triangular along three grain boundaries at temperature of 950 °C-1000 °C. The melt triangular interconnected to the melt film at temperature of 1050 °C-1150 °C, where the melt chemical composition differentiated into iron-rich dark dots and silicate-rich matrix.

  20. Near real-time skin deformation mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kacenjar, Steve; Chen, Suzie; Jafri, Madiha; Wall, Brian; Pedersen, Richard; Bezozo, Richard

    2013-02-01

    A novel in vivo approach is described that provides large area mapping of the mechanical properties of the skin in human patients. Such information is important in the understanding of skin health, cosmetic surgery[1], aging, and impacts of sun exposure. Currently, several methods have been developed to estimate the local biomechanical properties of the skin, including the use of a physical biopsy of local areas of the skin (in vitro methods) [2, 3, and 4], and also the use of non-invasive methods (in vivo) [5, 6, and 7]. All such methods examine localized areas of the skin. Our approach examines the local elastic properties via the generation of field displacement maps of the skin created using time-sequence imaging [9] with 2D digital imaging correlation (DIC) [10]. In this approach, large areas of the skin are reviewed rapidly, and skin displacement maps are generated showing the contour maps of skin deformation. These maps are then used to precisely register skin images for purposes of diagnostic comparison. This paper reports on our mapping and registration approach, and demonstrates its ability to accurately measure the skin deformation through a described nulling interpolation process. The result of local translational DIC alignment is compared using this interpolation process. The effectiveness of the approach is reported in terms of residual RMS, image entropy measures, and differential segmented regional errors.

  1. Parametric Deformation of Discrete Geometry for Aerodynamic Shape Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, George R.; Aftosmis, Michael J.; Nemec, Marian

    2012-01-01

    We present a versatile discrete geometry manipulation platform for aerospace vehicle shape optimization. The platform is based on the geometry kernel of an open-source modeling tool called Blender and offers access to four parametric deformation techniques: lattice, cage-based, skeletal, and direct manipulation. Custom deformation methods are implemented as plugins, and the kernel is controlled through a scripting interface. Surface sensitivities are provided to support gradient-based optimization. The platform architecture allows the use of geometry pipelines, where multiple modelers are used in sequence, enabling manipulation difficult or impossible to achieve with a constructive modeler or deformer alone. We implement an intuitive custom deformation method in which a set of surface points serve as the design variables and user-specified constraints are intrinsically satisfied. We test our geometry platform on several design examples using an aerodynamic design framework based on Cartesian grids. We examine inverse airfoil design and shape matching and perform lift-constrained drag minimization on an airfoil with thickness constraints. A transport wing-fuselage integration problem demonstrates the approach in 3D. In a final example, our platform is pipelined with a constructive modeler to parabolically sweep a wingtip while applying a 1-G loading deformation across the wingspan. This work is an important first step towards the larger goal of leveraging the investment of the graphics industry to improve the state-of-the-art in aerospace geometry tools.

  2. Perioperative Assessment of Myocardial Deformation

    PubMed Central

    Duncan, Andra E.; Alfirevic, Andrej; Sessler, Daniel I.; Popovic, Zoran B.; Thomas, James D.

    2014-01-01

    Evaluation of left ventricular performance improves risk assessment and guides anesthetic decisions. However, the most common echocardiographic measure of myocardial function, the left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF), has important limitations. LVEF is limited by subjective interpretation which reduces accuracy and reproducibility, and LVEF assesses global function without characterizing regional myocardial abnormalities. An alternative objective echocardiographic measure of myocardial function is thus needed. Myocardial deformation analysis, which performs quantitative assessment of global and regional myocardial function, may be useful for perioperative care of surgical patients. Myocardial deformation analysis evaluates left ventricular mechanics by quantifying strain and strain rate. Strain describes percent change in myocardial length in the longitudinal (from base to apex) and circumferential (encircling the short-axis of the ventricle) direction and change in thickness in the radial direction. Segmental strain describes regional myocardial function. Strain is a negative number when the ventricle shortens longitudinally or circumferentially and is positive with radial thickening. Reference values for normal longitudinal strain from a recent meta-analysis using transthoracic echocardiography are (mean ± SD) −19.7 ± 0.4%, while radial and circumferential strain are 47.3 ± 1.9 and −23.3 ± 0.7%, respectively. The speed of myocardial deformation is also important and is characterized by strain rate. Longitudinal systolic strain rate in healthy subjects averages −1.10 ± 0.16 sec−1. Assessment of myocardial deformation requires consideration of both strain (change in deformation), which correlates with LVEF, and strain rate (speed of deformation), which correlates with rate of rise of left ventricular pressure (dP/dt). Myocardial deformation analysis also evaluates ventricular relaxation, twist, and untwist, providing new and noninvasive methods to

  3. Analysis of Mining Terrain Deformation Characteristics with Deformation Information System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blachowski, Jan; Milczarek, Wojciech; Grzempowski, Piotr

    2014-05-01

    Mapping and prediction of mining related deformations of the earth surface is an important measure for minimising threat to surface infrastructure, human population, the environment and safety of the mining operation itself arising from underground extraction of useful minerals. The number of methods and techniques used for monitoring and analysis of mining terrain deformations is wide and increasing with the development of geographical information technologies. These include for example: terrestrial geodetic measurements, global positioning systems, remote sensing, spatial interpolation, finite element method modelling, GIS based modelling, geological modelling, empirical modelling using the Knothe theory, artificial neural networks, fuzzy logic calculations and other. The aim of this paper is to introduce the concept of an integrated Deformation Information System (DIS) developed in geographic information systems environment for analysis and modelling of various spatial data related to mining activity and demonstrate its applications for mapping and visualising, as well as identifying possible mining terrain deformation areas with various spatial modelling methods. The DIS concept is based on connected modules that include: the spatial database - the core of the system, the spatial data collection module formed by: terrestrial, satellite and remote sensing measurements of the ground changes, the spatial data mining module for data discovery and extraction, the geological modelling module, the spatial data modeling module with data processing algorithms for spatio-temporal analysis and mapping of mining deformations and their characteristics (e.g. deformation parameters: tilt, curvature and horizontal strain), the multivariate spatial data classification module and the visualization module allowing two-dimensional interactive and static mapping and three-dimensional visualizations of mining ground characteristics. The Systems's functionality has been presented on

  4. Preferred orientation in experimentally deformed stishovite: implications for deformation mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaercher, P. M.; Zepeda-Alarcon, E.; Prakapenka, V.; Kanitpanyacharoen, W.; Smith, J.; Sinogeikin, S. V.; Wenk, H. R.

    2014-12-01

    The crystal structure of the high pressure SiO2 polymorph stishovite has been studied in detail, yet little is known about its deformation mechanisms. Information about how stishovite deforms under stress is important for understanding subduction of quartz-bearing crustal rocks into the mantle. Particularly, stishovite is elastically anisotropic and thus development of crystallographic preferred orientation (CPO) during deformation may contribute to seismic anomalies in the mantle. We converted a natural sample of flint to stishovite in a laser heated diamond anvil cell and compressed the stishovite aggregate up to 38 GPa. Diffraction patterns were collected in situ in radial geometry at the Advanced Light Source (ALS) and the Advanced Photon Source (APS) to examine development of CPO during deformation. We find that (001) poles preferentially align with the compression direction and infer deformation mechanisms leading to the observed CPO with visco-plastic self consistent (VPSC) polycrystal plasticity models. Our results show pyramidal and basal slip are most likely active at high pressure and ambient temperature, in agreement with transmission electron microscopy (TEM) studies of rutile (TiO2) and paratellurite (TeO2), which are isostructural to stishovite. Conversely other TEM studies of stishovite done at higher temperature suggest dominant prismatic slip. This indicates that a variety of slip systems may be active in stishovite, depending on conditions. As a result, stishovite's contribution to the seismic signature in the mantle may vary as a function of pressure and temperature and thus depth.

  5. [Sequencing babies?].

    PubMed

    Jordan, Bertrand

    2015-10-01

    An extension of newborn screening to genome sequencing is now feasible but raises a number of scientific, organisational and ethical issues. This is being explored in discussions and in several funded trials, in order to maximize benefits and avoid some identified risks. As some companies are already offering such a service, this is quite an urgent matter. PMID:26481033

  6. Residual deformations in ocular tissues

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ruoya; Raykin, Julia; Gleason, Rudolph L.; Ethier, C. Ross

    2015-01-01

    Residual deformations strongly influence the local biomechanical environment in a number of connective tissues. The sclera is known to be biomechanically important in healthy and diseased eyes, such as in glaucoma. Here, we study the residual deformations of the sclera, as well as the adjacent choroid and retina. Using freshly harvested porcine eyes, we developed two approaches of quantifying residual deformations in the spherically shaped tissues of interest. The first consisted of punching discs from the posterior wall of the eye and quantifying the changes in the area and eccentricity of these samples. The second consisted of cutting a ring from the equatorial sclera and making stress-relieving cuts in it. Measurements of curvature were made before and after the stress-relieving cuts. Using the first approach, we observed a 42% areal contraction of the choroid, but only modest contractions of the sclera and retina. The observed contractions were asymmetric. In the second approach, we observed an opening of the scleral rings (approx. 10% decrease in curvature). We conclude that residual bending deformations are present in the sclera, which we speculate may be due to radially heterogeneous growth and remodelling of the tissue during normal development. Further, residual areal deformations present in the choroid may be due to the network of elastic fibres in this tissue and residual deformations in the constituent vascular bed. Future studies of ocular biomechanics should attempt to include effects of these residual deformations into mechanical models in order to gain a better understanding of the biomechanics of the ocular wall. PMID:25740853

  7. Deformation of second and third quantization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faizal, Mir

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, we will deform the second and third quantized theories by deforming the canonical commutation relations in such a way that they become consistent with the generalized uncertainty principle. Thus, we will first deform the second quantized commutator and obtain a deformed version of the Wheeler-DeWitt equation. Then we will further deform the third quantized theory by deforming the third quantized canonical commutation relation. This way we will obtain a deformed version of the third quantized theory for the multiverse.

  8. Quartz c-axis evidence for deformation characteristics in the Sanandaj-Sirjan metamorphic belt, Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samani, Babak

    2013-05-01

    Quartz c-axis fabric, finite strain, and kinematic vorticity analyses were carried out in well-exposed quartz mylonites to investigate the heterogeneous nature of ductile deformation within the Eghlid deformed area in the High Pressure-Low Temperature (HP-LT) Sanandaj-Sirjan metamorphic belt (Zagros Mountains, Iran). This belt belongs to a sequence of tectonometamorphic complexes with low- to high-grade metamorphic rocks affected by a polyphase deformation history. Asymmetric quartz c-axis fabrics (type I) confirm a localized top-to-the-southeast sense of shear. Quantitative finite strain analysis in the XZ, XY and YZ principal planes of the finite strain ellipsoid demonstrate that the strain ratio increases towards the thrust planes of the Zagros Thrust System. Kinematic vorticity analysis of deformed quartz grains showed sequential variation in the kinematic vorticity number from ˜0.5 to ˜0.8 between the thrust sheets. Such vorticity numbers show that both simple and pure shear components contribute to the deformation. Our results show that simple shear dominated deformation near the thrust faults, and pure shear dominated deformation far from them. Quartz c-axis opening angles suggest deformation temperatures range between 450° ± 50 °C and 600° ± 50 °C, which yield greenschist to amphibolite facies conditions during ductile deformation.

  9. MSLICE Sequencing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crockett, Thomas M.; Joswig, Joseph C.; Shams, Khawaja S.; Norris, Jeffrey S.; Morris, John R.

    2011-01-01

    MSLICE Sequencing is a graphical tool for writing sequences and integrating them into RML files, as well as for producing SCMF files for uplink. When operated in a testbed environment, it also supports uplinking these SCMF files to the testbed via Chill. This software features a free-form textural sequence editor featuring syntax coloring, automatic content assistance (including command and argument completion proposals), complete with types, value ranges, unites, and descriptions from the command dictionary that appear as they are typed. The sequence editor also has a "field mode" that allows tabbing between arguments and displays type/range/units/description for each argument as it is edited. Color-coded error and warning annotations on problematic tokens are included, as well as indications of problems that are not visible in the current scroll range. "Quick Fix" suggestions are made for resolving problems, and all the features afforded by modern source editors are also included such as copy/cut/paste, undo/redo, and a sophisticated find-and-replace system optionally using regular expressions. The software offers a full XML editor for RML files, which features syntax coloring, content assistance and problem annotations as above. There is a form-based, "detail view" that allows structured editing of command arguments and sequence parameters when preferred. The "project view" shows the user s "workspace" as a tree of "resources" (projects, folders, and files) that can subsequently be opened in editors by double-clicking. Files can be added, deleted, dragged-dropped/copied-pasted between folders or projects, and these operations are undoable and redoable. A "problems view" contains a tabular list of all problems in the current workspace. Double-clicking on any row in the table opens an editor for the appropriate sequence, scrolling to the specific line with the problem, and highlighting the problematic characters. From there, one can invoke "quick fix" as described

  10. Mixing of discontinuously deforming media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, L. D.; Rudman, M.; Lester, D. R.; Metcalfe, G.

    2016-02-01

    Mixing of materials is fundamental to many natural phenomena and engineering applications. The presence of discontinuous deformations—such as shear banding or wall slip—creates new mechanisms for mixing and transport beyond those predicted by classical dynamical systems theory. Here, we show how a novel mixing mechanism combining stretching with cutting and shuffling yields exponential mixing rates, quantified by a positive Lyapunov exponent, an impossibility for systems with cutting and shuffling alone or bounded systems with stretching alone, and demonstrate it in a fluid flow. While dynamical systems theory provides a framework for understanding mixing in smoothly deforming media, a theory of discontinuous mixing is yet to be fully developed. New methods are needed to systematize, explain, and extrapolate measurements on systems with discontinuous deformations. Here, we investigate "webs" of Lagrangian discontinuities and show that they provide a template for the overall transport dynamics. Considering slip deformations as the asymptotic limit of increasingly localised smooth shear, we also demonstrate exactly how some of the new structures introduced by discontinuous deformations are analogous to structures in smoothly deforming systems.

  11. Transverse deformations of extreme horizons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Carmen; Lucietti, James

    2016-04-01

    We consider the inverse problem of determining all extreme black hole solutions to the Einstein equations with a prescribed near-horizon geometry. We investigate this problem by considering infinitesimal deformations of the near-horizon geometry along transverse null geodesics. We show that, up to a gauge transformation, the linearised Einstein equations reduce to an elliptic PDE for the extrinsic curvature of a cross-section of the horizon. We deduce that for a given near-horizon geometry there exists a finite dimensional moduli space of infinitesimal transverse deformations. We then establish a uniqueness theorem for transverse deformations of the extreme Kerr horizon. In particular, we prove that the only smooth axisymmetric transverse deformation of the near-horizon geometry of extreme Kerr, such that cross-sections of the horizon are marginally trapped surfaces, corresponds to that of the extreme Kerr black hole. Furthermore, we determine all smooth and biaxisymmetric transverse deformations of the near-horizon geometry of the five-dimensional extreme Myers-Perry black hole with equal angular momenta. We find a three parameter family of solutions such that cross-sections of the horizon are marginally trapped, which is more general than the known black hole solutions. We discuss the possibility that they correspond to new five-dimensional vacuum black holes.

  12. Quantifying torso deformity in scoliosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ajemba, Peter O.; Kumar, Anish; Durdle, Nelson G.; Raso, V. James

    2006-03-01

    Scoliosis affects the alignment of the spine and the shape of the torso. Most scoliosis patients and their families are more concerned about the effect of scoliosis on the torso than its effect on the spine. There is a need to develop robust techniques for quantifying torso deformity based on full torso scans. In this paper, deformation indices obtained from orthogonal maps of full torso scans are used to quantify torso deformity in scoliosis. 'Orthogonal maps' are obtained by applying orthogonal transforms to 3D surface maps. (An 'orthogonal transform' maps a cylindrical coordinate system to a Cartesian coordinate system.) The technique was tested on 361 deformed computer models of the human torso and on 22 scans of volunteers (8 normal and 14 scoliosis). Deformation indices from the orthogonal maps correctly classified up to 95% of the volunteers with a specificity of 1.00 and a sensitivity of 0.91. In addition to classifying scoliosis, the system gives a visual representation of the entire torso in one view and is viable for use in a clinical environment for managing scoliosis.

  13. Insertion Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Mahillon, Jacques; Chandler, Michael

    1998-01-01

    Insertion sequences (ISs) constitute an important component of most bacterial genomes. Over 500 individual ISs have been described in the literature to date, and many more are being discovered in the ongoing prokaryotic and eukaryotic genome-sequencing projects. The last 10 years have also seen some striking advances in our understanding of the transposition process itself. Not least of these has been the development of various in vitro transposition systems for both prokaryotic and eukaryotic elements and, for several of these, a detailed understanding of the transposition process at the chemical level. This review presents a general overview of the organization and function of insertion sequences of eubacterial, archaebacterial, and eukaryotic origins with particular emphasis on bacterial elements and on different aspects of the transposition mechanism. It also attempts to provide a framework for classification of these elements by assigning them to various families or groups. A total of 443 members of the collection have been grouped in 17 families based on combinations of the following criteria: (i) similarities in genetic organization (arrangement of open reading frames); (ii) marked identities or similarities in the enzymes which mediate the transposition reactions, the recombinases/transposases (Tpases); (iii) similar features of their ends (terminal IRs); and (iv) fate of the nucleotide sequence of their target sites (generation of a direct target duplication of determined length). A brief description of the mechanism(s) involved in the mobility of individual ISs in each family and of the structure-function relationships of the individual Tpases is included where available. PMID:9729608

  14. Deformation processes in forging ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cannon, R. M.; Rhodes, W. H.

    1973-01-01

    The deformation processes involved in the forging of refractory ceramic oxides were investigated. A combination of mechanical testing and forging was utilized to investigate both the flow and fracture processes involved. Deformation studies of very fine grain Al203 revealed an apparent transition in behavior, characterized by a shift in the strain rate sensitivity from 0.5 at low stresses to near unity at higher stresses. The behavior is indicative of a shift in control between two dependent mechanisms, one of which is indicated to be cation limited diffusional creep with significant boundary enhancement. The possible contributions of slip, indicated by crystallographic texture, interface control of the diffusional creep and inhomogeneous boundary sliding are also discussed. Additional experiments indicated an independence of deformation behavior on MgO doping and retained hot pressing impurities, at least for ultrafine grained material, and also an independence of test atmosphere.

  15. Shock metamorphism of deformed quartz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gratz, Andrew J.; Christie, John; Tyburczy, James; Ahrens, Thomas; Pongratz, Peter

    1988-01-01

    The effect produced by shock loading (to peak pressures of 12 and 24) on deformed synthetic quartz containing a dislocation and abundant bubbles and small inclusions was investigated, and the relationships between preexisting dislocation density shock lamellae in the target material were examined. The resultant material was found to be inhomogeneously deformed and extremely fractured. Results of TEM examinations indicate that no change in dislocation density was caused by shock loading except in regions containing shock lamellae, where the dislocation density was lowered. The shock-induced defects tend to nucleate on and be controlled by preexisting stress concentrators; shock lamellae, glassy veins, and most curviplanar defects form in tension, presumably during release. An extremely mobile silica fluid is formed and injected into fractures during release, which forcibly removes crystalline fragments from vein walls. It is concluded that shock deformation in quartz is dominated by fracture and melting.

  16. Chaetal deformities in aquatic oligochaeta

    SciTech Connect

    Brinkhurst, R.O.; Wetzel, M.J.

    1994-12-31

    Gross deformities in the chaetae of specimens of the tubificid Potamothrix hammoniensis were described by Milbrink from Lake Vaenern, Sweden. This lake is one of the most mercury-polluted major lakes of the world. Statistical tests showed a highly significant correlation between the incidence of deformities and the mercury concentration in the sediments. Changes in the pulp and paper mill process led to marked reduction in specimens with deformities. Similarly modified specimens of various species have been observed at a number of sites contaminated with heavy metals or oil residues in North America. Experimental work on chaetal form has demonstrated changes due to conductivity which have also been observed in saline inland waters. These experiments suggest that chaetae may be shed and replaced by worms every few days. EDX observation of chaetae indicated that metals may accumulate in them, and so provide a potential depuration mechanism. Independent physiological studies suggest that worms may be capable of regulating their metal levels.

  17. Finite Deformation of Magnetoelastic Film

    SciTech Connect

    Barham, Matthew Ian

    2011-05-31

    A nonlinear two-dimensional theory is developed for thin magnetoelastic lms capable of large deformations. This is derived directly from three-dimensional theory. Signi cant simpli cations emerge in the descent from three dimensions to two, permitting the self eld generated by the body to be computed a posteriori. The model is specialized to isotropic elastomers with two material models. First weak magnetization is investigated leading to a free energy where magnetization and deformation are un-coupled. The second closely couples the magnetization and deformation. Numerical solutions are obtained to equilibrium boundary-value problems in which the membrane is subjected to lateral pressure and an applied magnetic eld. An instability is inferred and investigated for the weak magnetization material model.

  18. Microstructure of deformed graywacke sandstones

    SciTech Connect

    Dengler, L.A.

    1980-03-05

    Microsctures in low-permeability graywacke sandstones were studied by optical and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). SEM specimens were prepared by ion-bombardment of thick polished samples. The undeformed rock contains grains in a matrix composed primarily of authigenic chlorite and kaolinite. Chlorite platelets are randomly arranged in face-to-edge relation to one another. Kaolinite occurs as pseudohexagonal crystals stacked face-to-face in pore filling books. Uniaxial-stress experiments covered a range of confining pressures from .1 to 600 MPa. Below 50 MPa confining pressure, intergranular fracturing occurs within the fault zone and near the sample's cylindrical surface. Between 100 and 300 MPa confining pressure, fault zones contain highly fractured grains, gauge and slickensides on grain surfaces. At 600 MPa, the sample contains a diffuse shear zone of highly fractured grains and no well-defined fault. In all samples, the distribution of microcracks is heterogeneous. Different clay minerals exhibit different modes of deformation. Chlorite structure responds to applied stress by compaction, reducing both pore size and volume. Chlorite platelets are plastically deformed in even the least strained samples. Kaolinite does not deform plastically in any of the samples examined. Deformation of kaolinite is restricted to toppling of the book structure. Dilatant crack growth was studied in two samples unloaded prior to failure. Uniaxially-strained samples deform primarily along grain boundaries, producing intergranular cracks and realignment of chlorite platelets. Intragranular crack density is linearly related to axial-strain, although grains are less fractured than in uniaxially-stressed samples tested at equivalent mean pressures. Cracks are rarely longer than a grain diameter. Nuclear-explosively deformed samples were recovered after the Rio Blanco gas stimulation experiment. (JGB)

  19. Fourth order deformed general relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuttell, Peter D.; Sakellariadou, Mairi

    2014-11-01

    Whenever the condition of anomaly freedom is imposed within the framework of effective approaches to loop quantum cosmology, one seems to conclude that a deformation of general covariance is required. Here, starting from a general deformation we regain an effective gravitational Lagrangian including terms up to fourth order in extrinsic curvature. We subsequently constrain the form of the corrections for the homogeneous case, and then investigate the conditions for the occurrence of a big bounce and the realization of an inflationary era, in the presence of a perfect fluid or scalar field.

  20. Deformation properties of lead isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolokonnikov, S. V.; Borzov, I. N.; Lutostansky, Yu. S.; Saperstein, E. E.

    2016-01-01

    The deformation properties of a long lead isotopic chain up to the neutron drip line are analyzed on the basis of the energy density functional (EDF) in the FaNDF0 Fayans form. The question of whether the ground state of neutron-deficient lead isotopes can have a stable deformation is studied in detail. The prediction of this deformation is contained in the results obtained on the basis of the HFB-17 and HFB-27 Skyrme EDF versions and reported on Internet. The present analysis reveals that this is at odds with experimental data on charge radii and magnetic moments of odd lead isotopes. The Fayans EDF version predicts a spherical ground state for all light lead isotopes, but some of them (for example, 180Pb and 184Pb) prove to be very soft—that is, close to the point of a phase transition to a deformed state. Also, the results obtained in our present study are compared with the predictions of some other Skyrme EDF versions, including SKM*, SLy4, SLy6, and UNE1. By and large, their predictions are closer to the results arising upon the application of the Fayans functional. For example, the SLy4 functional predicts, in just the same way as the FaNDF0 functional, a spherical shape for all nuclei of this region. The remaining three Skyrme EDF versions lead to a deformation of some light lead isotopes, but their number is substantially smaller than that in the case of the HFB-17 and HFB-27 functionals. Moreover, the respective deformation energy is substantially lower, which gives grounds to hope for the restoration of a spherical shape upon going beyond the mean-field approximation, which we use here. Also, the deformation properties of neutron-rich lead isotopes are studied up to the neutron drip line. Here, the results obtained with the FaNDF0 functional are compared with the predictions of the HFB-17, HFB-27, SKM*, and SLy4 Skyrme EDF versions. All of the EDF versions considered here predict the existence of a region where neutron-rich lead isotopes undergo

  1. Microwave Tomography Using Deformable Mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arunachalam, Kavitha; Udpa, Lalita; Udpa, Satish S.

    2008-09-01

    Microwave tomography aims to reconstruct the spatial distribution of the electrical property of penetrable objects using field measurements acquired from multiple views at single or multiple frequencies. This paper presents a novel microwave tomography technique to image penetrable scatterers using deformable mirrors. The deformable mirror consists of a continuum of radiating elements that yields multi-view field measurements for noninvasive characterization of the spatial dielectric property of the scatterer in the microwave regime. Computational feasibility of the proposed technique is presented for heterogeneous two dimensional dielectric scatterers.

  2. Deforming baryons into confining strings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartnoll, Sean A.; Portugues, Rubén

    2004-09-01

    We find explicit probe D3-brane solutions in the infrared of the Maldacena-Nuñez background. The solutions describe deformed baryon vertices: q external quarks are separated in spacetime from the remaining N-q. As the separation is taken to infinity we recover known solutions describing infinite confining strings in N=1 gauge theory. We present results for the mass of finite confining strings as a function of length. We also find probe D2-brane solutions in a confining type IIA geometry, the reduction of a G2 holonomy M theory background. The relation between these deformed baryons and confining strings is not as straightforward.

  3. Controllable objective with deformable mirrors

    SciTech Connect

    Agafonov, V V; Safronov, A G

    2004-03-31

    A new optical device - an objective with deformable mirrors and parameters controlled in the dynamic regime is proposed. The computer simulation of the objective is performed. The dependences of some parameters of the objective on the control voltage are determined. The simulation showed that the ranges of control of the rear focal segment and the focal distance for the objective with the focal distance 602 mm were 1057 and 340 mm, respectively, which is substantially greater than in the control of an equivalent deformable mirror. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  4. Analytical volcano deformation source models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lisowski, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Primary volcanic landforms are created by the ascent and eruption of magma. The ascending magma displaces and interacts with surrounding rock and fluids as it creates new pathways, flows through cracks or conduits, vesiculates, and accumulates in underground reservoirs. The formation of new pathways and pressure changes within existing conduits and reservoirs stress and deform the surrounding rock. Eruption products load the crust. The pattern and rate of surface deformation around volcanoes reflect the tectonic and volcanic processes transmitted to the surface through the mechanical properties of the crust.

  5. Cavity coalescence in superplastic deformation

    SciTech Connect

    Stowell, M.J.; Livesey, D.W.; Ridley, N.

    1984-01-01

    An analysis of the probability distribution function of particles randomly dispersed in a solid has been applied to cavitation during superplastic deformation and a method of predicting cavity coalescence developed. Cavity size distribution data were obtained from two microduplex nickel-silver alloys deformed superplastically to various extents at elevated temperature, and compared to theoretical predictions. Excellent agreement occurred for small void sizes but the model underestimated the number of voids in the largest size groups. It is argued that the discrepancy results from a combination of effects due to non-random cavity distributions and to enhanced growth rates and incomplete spheroidization of the largest cavities.

  6. Neutron scattering on deformed nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, L. F.; Haight, R. C.; Pohl, B. A.; Wong, C.; Lagrange, Ch.

    1985-01-01

    Measurements of neutron elastic and inelastic differential cross sections around 14 MeV for 9Be, C, 181Ta, 232Th, 238U, and 239Pu have been analyzed using a coupled channel (CC) formalism for deformed nuclei and phenomenological global optical model potentials (OMP). For the actinide targets these results are compared with the predictions of a semi-microscopic calculation using Jeukenne, Lejeune, and Mahaux (JLM) microscopic OMP and a deformed ground state nuclear density. The overall agreement between calculations and the measurements is reasonably good even for the very light nuclei, where the quality of the fits is better than those obtained with spherical OMP.

  7. Quasiequilibrium models for triaxially deformed rotating compact stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xing; Markakis, Charalampos; Sugiyama, Noriyuki; Uryū, Kōji

    2008-12-01

    Quasiequilibrium models of rapidly rotating triaxially deformed stars are computed in general relativistic gravity, assuming a conformally flat spatial geometry (Isenberg-Wilson-Mathews formulation) and a polytropic equation of state. Highly deformed solutions are calculated on the initial slice covered by spherical coordinate grids, centered at the source, in all angular directions up to a large truncation radius. Constant rest mass sequences are calculated from nearly axisymmetric to maximally deformed triaxial configurations. Selected parameters are to model (proto-) neutron stars; the compactness is M/R=0.001, 0.1, 0.14, and 0.2 for polytropic index n=0.3 and M/R=0.001, 0.1, 0.12, and 0.14 for n=0.5, where M/R refers to that of a nonrotating spherical star having the same rest mass. We confirmed that the triaxial solutions exist for these parameters as in the case of Newtonian polytropes. However, it is also found that the triaxial sequences become shorter for higher compactness, and those disappear at a certain large compactness for the n=0.5 case. In the scenario of the contraction of proto-neutron stars being subject to strong viscosity and rapid cooling, it is plausible that, once the viscosity driven secular instability sets in during the contraction, the proto-neutron stars are always maximally deformed triaxial configurations, as long as the compactness and the equation of state parameters allow such triaxial sequences. Detection of gravitational waves from such sources may be used as another probe for the nuclear equation of state.

  8. Space-based monitoring of ground deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nobakht Ersi, Fereydoun; Safari, Abdolreza; Gamse, Sonja

    2016-07-01

    Ground deformation monitoring is valuable to understanding of the behaviour of natural phenomena. Space-Based measurement systems such as Global Positioning System are useful tools for continuous monitoring of ground deformation. Ground deformation analysis based on space geodetic techniques have provided a new, more accurate, and reliable source of information for geodetic positioning which is used to detect deformations of the Ground surface. This type of studies using displacement fields derived from repeated measurments of space-based geodetic networks indicates how crucial role the space geodetic methods play in geodynamics. The main scope of this contribution is to monitor of ground deformation by obtained measurements from GPS sites. We present ground deformation analysis in three steps: a global congruency test on daily coordinates of permanent GPS stations to specify in which epochs deformations occur, the localization of the deformed GPS sites and the determination of deformations.

  9. Electrostatics of Deformable Lipid Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Vorobyov, Igor; Bekker, Borislava; Allen, Toby W.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract It was recently demonstrated that significant local deformations of biological membranes take place due to the fields of charged peptides and ions, challenging the standard model of membrane electrostatics. The ability of ions to retain their immediate hydration environment, combined with the lack of sensitivity of permeability to ion type or even ion pairs, led us to question the extent to which hydration energetics and electrostatics control membrane ion permeation. Using the arginine analog methyl-guanidinium as a test case, we find that although hydrocarbon electronic polarizability causes dramatic changes in ion solvation free energy, as well as a significant change (∼0.4 V) in the membrane dipole potential, little change in membrane permeation energetics occurs. We attribute this to compensation of solvation terms from polar and polarizable nonpolar components within the membrane, and explain why the dipole potential is not fully sensed in terms of the locally deformed bilayer interface. Our descriptions provide a deeper understanding of the translocation process and allow predictions for poly-ions, ion pairs, charged lipids, and lipid flip-flop. We also report simulations of large hydrophobic-ion-like membrane defects and the ionophore valinomycin, which exhibit little membrane deformation, as well as hydrophilic defects and the ion channel gramicidin A, to provide parallels to membranes deformed by unassisted ion permeation. PMID:20550903

  10. Studies of normal deformation in {sup 151}Dy

    SciTech Connect

    Nisius, D.; Janssens, R.V.F.; Crowell, B.

    1995-08-01

    The wealth of data collected in the study of superdeformation in {sup 151}Dy allowed for new information to be obtained on the normally deformed structures in this nucleus. At high spin several new yrast states have been identified for the first time. They were associated with single-particle excitations. Surprisingly, a sequence was identified with energy spacings characteristic of a rotational band of normal ({beta}2 {approximately} 0.2) deformation. The bandhead spin appears to be 15/2{sup -} and the levels extend up to a spin of 87/2{sup -}. A clear backbend is present at intermediate spins. While a similar band based on a bandhead of 6{sup +} is known in {sup 152}Dy, calculations suggest that this collective prolate band should not be seen in {sup 151}Dy. In the experiment described earlier in this report that is aimed at determining the deformations associated with the SD bands in this nucleus and {sup 152}Dy, the deformation associated with this band will be determined. This will provide further insight into the origin of this band.

  11. Stresses and deformations in angle-ply composite tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rousseau, Carl Q.; Hyer, Michael W.; Tompkins, Stephen S.

    1987-01-01

    The stress and deformations in angle-ply composite tubes subjected to axisymmetric thermal loading were investigated both experimentally and analytically. For the theoretical portion a generalized plane strain elasticity analysis was developed. The analysis included mechanical and thermal loading, and temperature-dependent material properties. The elasticity analysis was also used to study the effect of including a thin metallic coating on a graphite-epoxy tube. The stresses in the coatings were found to be quite high, exceeding the yield stress of aluminum. An important finding in the analytical studies was the fact that even tubes with a balanced-symmetric lamination sequence exhibit shear deformation, or twist. For the experimental portion an apparatus was developed to measure torsional and axial response in the temperature range of 140 to 360 K. Eighteen specimens were tested, combining three material systems, eight lamination sequences, and three off-axis ply orientation angles. For the twist response, agreement between analysis and experiment was found to be good. The axial response of the tubes tested was found to be greater than predicted by a factor of three. As a result, it is recommended that the thermally induced axial deformations be investigated, both experimentally and analytically.

  12. Direct Inversion of Postseismic Deformation for 3D Lithosphere Viscosity Structure and Fault Slip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hines, T.; Hetland, E. A.

    2014-12-01

    Geodetic measurements of postseismic deformation are rich signals with which the mechanical behavior of the lithosphere can be inferred, predominantly localized fault creep and distributed viscoelastic deformation. Numerous studies have used postseismic deformation to estimate the lithosphere's rheology but they are hindered by potentially computationally intensive forward problems with nonlinear relationships between surface deformation and the rheologic properties. As a result, most studies oversimplify the rheologic structure of the lithosphere and rely on forward estimation methods, such as grid or monte carlo searches. We present a novel method to simultaneously estimate patterns of fault slip and heterogeneous distribution of effective Maxwell viscoelasticity from postseismic deformation. Our method utilizes an approximation which linearizes the viscoelastic contribution to postseismic deformation with respect to the inverse relaxation time of discrete regions in the lithosphere, allowing the use of least squares techniques, akin to seismic tomographic methods. The validity of this approximation is inversely proportional to the time since the main rupture and holds for roughly as long as the lowest relaxation time in the lithosphere proximal to the coseismic rupture. Our estimation of both the slip history on a fault and the effective Maxwell relaxation times of the lithosphere takes a matter of minutes. We apply our method to postseismic deformation following the 2010 El Mayor earthquake, as well as the 1999 İzmit-Düzce earthquake sequence. We discuss the significance of both fault creep and three dimensional viscosity structure in describing postseismic deformation.

  13. Highly deformable bones: unusual deformation mechanisms of seahorse armor.

    PubMed

    Porter, Michael M; Novitskaya, Ekaterina; Castro-Ceseña, Ana Bertha; Meyers, Marc A; McKittrick, Joanna

    2013-06-01

    Multifunctional materials and devices found in nature serve as inspiration for advanced synthetic materials, structures and robotics. Here, we elucidate the architecture and unusual deformation mechanisms of seahorse tails that provide prehension as well as protection against predators. The seahorse tail is composed of subdermal bony plates arranged in articulating ring-like segments that overlap for controlled ventral bending and twisting. The bony plates are highly deformable materials designed to slide past one another and buckle when compressed. This complex plate and segment motion, along with the unique hardness distribution and structural hierarchy of each plate, provide seahorses with joint flexibility while shielding them against impact and crushing. Mimicking seahorse armor may lead to novel bio-inspired technologies, such as flexible armor, fracture-resistant structures or prehensile robotics. PMID:23470547

  14. Preferred orientation in experimentally deformed stishovite: implications for deformation mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaercher, Pamela M.; Zepeda-Alarcon, Eloisa; Prakapenka, Vitali B.; Kanitpanyacharoen, Waruntorn; Smith, Jesse S.; Sinogeikin, Stanislav; Wenk, Hans-Rudolf

    2015-04-01

    Although the crystal structure of the high-pressure SiO2 polymorph stishovite has been studied in detail, little is known about the development of crystallographic preferred orientation (CPO) during deformation in stishovite. Insight into CPO and associated deformation mechanics of stishovite would provide important information for understanding subduction of quartz-bearing crustal rocks into the mantle. To study CPO development, we converted a natural sample of flint to stishovite in a laser-heated diamond anvil cell and compressed the stishovite aggregate up to 38 GPa. We collected diffraction patterns in radial geometry to examine in situ development of crystallographic preferred orientation and find that (001) poles preferentially align with the compression direction. Viscoplastic self-consistent modeling suggests the most likely slip systems at high pressure and ambient temperature are pyramidal and basal slip.

  15. Clusterization and quadrupole deformation in nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Cseh, J.; Algora, A.; Antonenko, N. V.; Jolos, R. V.; Scheid, W.; Darai, J.; Hess, P. O.

    2006-04-26

    We study the interrelation of the clusterization and quadrupole deformation of atomic nuclei, by applying cluster models. Both the energetic stability and the exclusion principle is investigated. Special attention is paid to the relative orientations of deformed clusters.

  16. Application of Quaternions for Mesh Deformation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samareh, Jamshid A.

    2002-01-01

    A new three-dimensional mesh deformation algorithm, based on quaternion algebra, is introduced. A brief overview of quaternion algebra is provided, along with some preliminary results for two-dimensional structured and unstructured viscous mesh deformation.

  17. Reconstructing of a Sequence Using Similar Sequences

    1995-11-28

    SIMSEQ reconstructs sequences from oligos. Similar known sequences are used as a reference. At present, simulated data are being used to develop the algorithm. SIMSEQ generates an initial random sequence, then generates a second sequence that is 60 to 90 percent similar to the first. Next, the second sequence is chopped into its appropriate oligos. All possible sequences are reconstructed to determine the most similar. Those with the highest similarity are printed as output.

  18. Deformation of rock: A pressure-sensitive, dilatant material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ord, A.

    1991-12-01

    Permanent (plastic) deformation of rock materials in the brittle regime (cataclastic flow) is modelled here in terms of Mohr-Coulomb behaviour in which all three of the parameters cohesion, friction angle and dilation angle follow hardening (or softening) evolution laws with both plastic straining and increases in confining pressure. The physical basis for such behaviour is provided by a sequence of uniaxial shortening experiments performed by Edmond and Paterson (1972) at confining pressures up to 800 MPa on a variety of materials including Gosford sandstone and Carrara marble. These triaxial compression experiments are important for the large range of confining pressures covered, and for the careful recording of data during deformation, particularly volume change of the specimens. Both materials are pressure-sensitive and dilatant. It is therefore possible to derive from these experiments a set of material parameters which allow a preliminary description of the deformation behaviour in terms of a non-associated, Mohr-Coulomb constitutive model, thus providing the first constitutive modelling of geological materials in the brittle-ductile regime. These parameters are used as input to a finite difference, numerical code (FLAC) with the aim of investigating how closely this numerical model simulates real material behaviour upon breakdown of homogeneous deformation. The mechanical and macrostructural behaviour exhibited by the numerical model is in close agreement with the physical results in that the stress-strain curves are duplicated together with localization behaviour. The results of the modelling illustrate how the strength of the upper-crust may be described by two different but still pressure-dependent models: the linear shear stress/normal stress relationship of Amontons (that is, Byerlee's Law), and a non-linear, Mohr-Coulomb constitutive model. Both include parameters of friction and both describe brittle deformation behaviour. Consideration of the non

  19. Forecasting volcanic eruptions: the control of elastic-brittle deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilburn, Christopher; Robertson, Robert; Wall, Richard; Steele, Alexander

    2016-04-01

    At volcanoes reawakening after long repose, patterns of unrest normally reflect the elastic-brittle deformation of crust above a magma reservoir. Local fault movements, detected as volcano-tectonic (VT) earthquakes, increase in number with surface deformation, at first approximately exponentially and then linearly. The trends describe how crustal behaviour evolves from quasi-elastic deformation under an increasing stress to inelastic deformation under a constant stress. They have been quantified and verified against experiments for deformation in compression [1]. We have extended the analysis to extensional deformation. The results agree well with field data for crust being stretched by a pressurizing magmatic system [2]. They also provide new criteria for enhancing the definitions of alert levels and preferred times to eruption. The VT-deformation sequence is a field proxy for changes in deformation with applied stress. The transition from quasi-elastic to inelastic behaviour is characterised in extension by the ratio of differential failure stress SF to tensile strength σT. Unrest data from at least basaltic to andesitic stratovolcanoes, as well as large calderas, yield preferred values for SF/σT ≤ 4, coinciding with the range for tensile failure expected from established theoretical constraints (from Mohr-Coulomb-Griffiths failure). We thus associate the transition with the approach to tensile rupture at the wall of a pressurized magma reservoir. In particular, values of about 2 are consistent with the rupture of a cylindrical reservoir, such as a closed conduit within a volcanic edifice, whereas values of about 3 suggest an approximately spherical reservoir, such as may exist at deeper levels. The onset of inelastic behaviour reflects the emergence of self-accelerating crack growth under a constant stress. Applied to forecasting eruptions, it provides a new and objective criterion for raising alert levels during an emergency; it yields the classic linear

  20. Kirner's deformity: a case report and review.

    PubMed Central

    Scott, C. E.; Engber, W.

    1996-01-01

    Kirner's deformity is an uncommon "characteristic" palmo-radial curvature of the distal phalanx of the little finger. Splinting may be beneficial for pain relief and, if used early, may retard progression of the deformity. Disability is usually minimal and treatment to correct the deformity may be delayed to prevent recurrence. Images Figure 1A Figure 1B Figure 1C PMID:9129292

  1. Triaxial strongly deformed bands in {sup 160,161}Tm

    SciTech Connect

    Teal, C.; Lagergren, K.; Aguilar, A.; Riley, M. A.; Hartley, D. J.; Simpson, J.; Joss, D. T.; Carpenter, M. P.; Janssens, R. V. F.; Lauritsen, T.; Lister, C. J.; Zhu, S.; Garg, U.; Kondev, F. G.; Wang, X.; Ragnarsson, I.

    2008-07-15

    High-spin states in {sup 160,161}Tm were populated using the {sup 128}Te({sup 37}Cl, 5n and 4n) reactions at a beam energy of 170 MeV. Emitted {gamma} rays were detected in the Gammasphere spectrometer. Two rotational bands with high moments of inertia were discovered, one assigned to {sup 160}Tm, while the other tentatively assigned to {sup 161}Tm. These sequences display features similar to bands observed in neighboring Er, Tm, Yb, and Lu nuclei which have been discussed in terms of triaxial strongly deformed structures. Cranked Nilsson Strutinsky calculations have been performed that predict well-deformed triaxial shapes at high spin in {sup 160,161}Tm.

  2. New regions of nuclear deformation

    SciTech Connect

    Lister, C.J.; Gelletly, W.; Varley, B.J.; Price, H.G.; Olness, J.W.

    1983-01-01

    It has long been expected from general theoretical considerations that nuclei with Z and N far removed from major shell closures should exhibit considerable collectivity and maybe deformed in their groundstates. A number of calculations have recently attempted to quantify these expectations through detailed predictions of nuclear shapes across the periodic table. In this contribution we review predictions and experimental data for the regions with Z,N = (40,40), (40,64) and (64,64) which are all off the valley of stability. Emphasis is placed on the experimental techniques and data obtained from the first of these regions where the prediction of extremely large prolate deformation has been experimentally verified.

  3. Thermal deformation of helical gears

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yong; Fei, Ye-tai; Liu, Shan-lin

    2010-08-01

    The analytical equation for the thermal field of a helical gear under normal working condition in a stable thermal field is established using mathematical physics, and the thermal deformation of the gear can be computed using this equation. The variations of gear geometric parameters, such as radial dimension, tooth depth, spiral angle, pressure angle, flank clearance and etc., are investigated with respect to the temperature change. According to the analytical and computational results obtained using the equation, the thermal deformation of the gear is strongly dependent on the choice of parameters, which is also confirmed using simulation software (COMSOL Multiphysic software). This is significant for the improvement of the rotation precision and working efficiency of screw gears.

  4. Performance through Deformation and Instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertoldi, Katia

    2015-03-01

    Materials capable of undergoing large deformations like elastomers and gels are ubiquitous in daily life and nature. An exciting field of engineering is emerging that uses these compliant materials to design active devices, such as actuators, adaptive optical systems and self-regulating fluidics. Compliant structures may significantly change their architecture in response to diverse stimuli. When excessive deformation is applied, they may eventually become unstable. Traditionally, mechanical instabilities have been viewed as an inconvenience, with research focusing on how to avoid them. Here, I will demonstrate that these instabilities can be exploited to design materials with novel, switchable functionalities. The abrupt changes introduced into the architecture of soft materials by instabilities will be used to change their shape in a sudden, but controlled manner. Possible and exciting applications include materials with unusual properties such negative Poisson's ratio, phononic crystals with tunable low-frequency acoustic band gaps and reversible encapsulation systems.

  5. Variational approach and deformed derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weberszpil, J.; Helayël-Neto, J. A.

    2016-05-01

    Recently, we have demonstrated that there exists a possible relationship between q-deformed algebras in two different contexts of Statistical Mechanics, namely, the Tsallis' framework and the Kaniadakis' scenario, with a local form of fractional-derivative operators for fractal media, the so-called Hausdorff derivatives, mapped into a continuous medium with a fractal measure. Here, in this paper, we present an extension of the traditional calculus of variations for systems containing deformed-derivatives embedded into the Lagrangian and the Lagrangian densities for classical and field systems. The results extend the classical Euler-Lagrange equations and the Hamiltonian formalism. The resulting dynamical equations seem to be compatible with those found in the literature, specially with mass-dependent and with nonlinear equations for systems in classical and quantum mechanics. Examples are presented to illustrate applications of the formulation. Also, the conserved ​Noether current is worked out.

  6. Large Scale Nanolaminate Deformable Mirror

    SciTech Connect

    Papavasiliou, A; Olivier, S; Barbee, T; Miles, R; Chang, K

    2005-11-30

    This work concerns the development of a technology that uses Nanolaminate foils to form light-weight, deformable mirrors that are scalable over a wide range of mirror sizes. While MEMS-based deformable mirrors and spatial light modulators have considerably reduced the cost and increased the capabilities of adaptive optic systems, there has not been a way to utilize the advantages of lithography and batch-fabrication to produce large-scale deformable mirrors. This technology is made scalable by using fabrication techniques and lithography that are not limited to the sizes of conventional MEMS devices. Like many MEMS devices, these mirrors use parallel plate electrostatic actuators. This technology replicates that functionality by suspending a horizontal piece of nanolaminate foil over an electrode by electroplated nickel posts. This actuator is attached, with another post, to another nanolaminate foil that acts as the mirror surface. Most MEMS devices are produced with integrated circuit lithography techniques that are capable of very small line widths, but are not scalable to large sizes. This technology is very tolerant of lithography errors and can use coarser, printed circuit board lithography techniques that can be scaled to very large sizes. These mirrors use small, lithographically defined actuators and thin nanolaminate foils allowing them to produce deformations over a large area while minimizing weight. This paper will describe a staged program to develop this technology. First-principles models were developed to determine design parameters. Three stages of fabrication will be described starting with a 3 x 3 device using conventional metal foils and epoxy to a 10-across all-metal device with nanolaminate mirror surfaces.

  7. Deformation processes in forging ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cannon, R. M.; Rhodes, W. H.

    1972-01-01

    The deformation processes involved in the forging of refractory ceramic oxides were investigated. A combination of mechanical testing and forging are utilized to investigate both the flow and fracture processes involved. An additional hemisphere forging was done which failed prematurely. Analysis and comparison with available fracture data for AL2O3 indicated possible causes of the failure. Examination of previous forgings indicated an increase in grain boundary cavitation with increasing strain.

  8. Shape memory composite deformable mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riva, M.; Bettini, P.; Di Landro, L.; Sala, G.

    2009-03-01

    This paper deals with some of the critical aspects regarding Shape Memory Composite (SMC) design: firstly some technological aspects concerning embedding technique and their efficiency secondarily the lack of useful numerical tools for this peculiar design. It has been taken into account as a possible application a deformable panel which is devoted to act as a substrate for a deformable mirror. The activity has been mainly focused to the study of embedding technologies, activation and authority. In detail it will be presented the "how to" manufacturing of some smart panels with embedded NiTiNol wires in order to show the technology developed for SMC structures. The first part of the work compares non conventional pull-out tests on wires embedded in composites laminates (real condition of application), with standard pull-out in pure epoxy resin blocks. Considering the numerical approach some different modeling techniques to be implemented in commercial codes (ABAQUS) have been investigated. The Turner's thermo-mechanical model has been adopted for the modeling of the benchmark: A spherical panel devoted to work as an active substrate for a Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastic (CFRP) deformable mirror has been considered as a significant technological demonstrator and possible future application (f=240mm, r.o.c.=1996mm).

  9. Deformational injection rate measuring method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marčič, Milan

    2002-09-01

    After completing the diesel engine endurance testing, we detected various traces of thermal load on the walls of combustion chambers located in the engine pistons. The engines were fitted with ω combustion chambers. The thermal load of different intensity levels occurred where the spray of fuel, fuel vapor, and air interacted with the combustion chamber wall. The uneven thermal load distribution of the combustion chamber wall results from varying injection rates in each injection nozzle hole. The most widely applied controlling methods so far for injection rate measurement, such as the Zeuch and Bosch concepts, allow measurement of only the total injection rate in multihole nozzles, without providing any indication whatsoever of the injection rate differences in individual injection nozzle holes. The new deformational measuring method described in the article allows the injection rate to be measured in each hole of the multihole nozzle. The results of the measurements using this method showed that the differences occurred in injection rates of individual injection nozzle holes. These differences may be the cause of various thermal loads on the combustion chamber walls. The criterion for injection rate is the deformation of the membrane due to an increase in the fuel quantity in the measuring space and due to the pressure waves resulting from the fuel being injected into the measuring space. The membrane deformation is measured using strain gauges, glued to the membrane and forming the Wheatstone's bridge. We devoted special attention to the temperature compensation of the Wheatstone's bridge and the membrane, heated up during the measurements.

  10. Elastic deformations of bolalipid membranes.

    PubMed

    Galimzyanov, Timur R; Kuzmin, Peter I; Pohl, Peter; Akimov, Sergey A

    2016-02-17

    Archaeal membranes have unique mechanical properties that enable these organisms to survive under extremely aggressive environmental conditions. The so-called bolalipids contribute to this exceptional stability. They have two polar heads joined by two hydrocarbon chains. The two headgroups can face different sides of the membrane (O-shape conformation) or the same side (U-shape conformation). We have developed an elasticity theory for bolalipid membranes and show that the energetic contributions of (i) tilt deformations, (ii) area compression/stretching deformations, (iii) as well as those of Gaussian splay from the two membrane surfaces are additive, while splay deformations yield a cross-term. The presence of a small fraction of U-shaped molecules resulted in spontaneous membrane curvature. We estimated the tilt modulus to be approximately equal to that of membranes in eukaryotic cells. In contrast to conventional lipids, the bolalipid membrane possesses two splay moduli, one of which is estimated to be an order of magnitude larger than that of conventional lipids. The projected values of elastic moduli act to hamper pore formation and to decelerate membrane fusion and fission. PMID:26791255

  11. What is red cell deformability?

    PubMed

    Schmid-Schönbein, H; Gaehtgens, P

    1981-01-01

    Microscopic flow visualization of the process of red cell adaptation to flow shows that red cell deformation in flow is the consequence of a continuous viscous rather than an elastic deformation. This fluid drop-like adaptation primarily depends on: (a) the fluidity of the cytoplasm and (b) the favourable surface-area-to-volume ratio, with an excess of surface area allowing strong deformations without an increase in surface area (a real strain). (c) In contrast to previous notions, the modulus of shear elasticity of the membrane is probably less significant. After many attempts to differentiate the contribution of bending and shear stiffness to the elastic recovery of the normal biconcave cell shape have not produced equivocal results, we have changed the elastic shear modulus experimentally by cross-linking the spectrin using the membrane-permeant, bifunctional SH-reagent DIAMIDE, which allows to increase the elastic shear modulus in a dose-dependent manner. Despite a 25-fold decrease in compliance the DIAMIDE-treated cells have normal shape and show remarkably small changes in the rheological behaviour when tested in vitro and in vivo. PMID:6948373

  12. Shapeable sheet without plastic deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oppenheimer, Naomi; Witten, Thomas A.

    2015-11-01

    Randomly crumpled sheets have shape memory. In order to understand the basis of this form of memory, we simulate triangular lattices of springs whose lengths are altered to create a topography with multiple potential energy minima. We then deform these lattices into different shapes and investigate their ability to retain the imposed shape when the energy is relaxed. The lattices are able to retain a range of curvatures. Under moderate forcing from a state of local equilibrium, the lattices deform by several percent but return to their retained shape when the forces are removed. By increasing the forcing until an irreversible motion occurs, we find that the transitions between remembered shapes show cooperativity among several springs. For fixed lattice structures, the shape memory tends to decrease as the lattice is enlarged; we propose ways to counter this decrease by modifying the lattice geometry. We survey the energy landscape by displacing individual nodes. An extensive fraction of these nodes proves to be bistable; they retain their displaced position when the energy is relaxed. Bending the lattice to a stable curved state alters the pattern of bistable nodes. We discuss this shapeability in the context of other forms of material memory and contrast it with the shapeability of plastic deformation. We outline the prospects for making real materials based on these principles.

  13. Stochastic deformation of a thermodynamic symplectic structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazinski, P. O.

    2009-01-01

    A stochastic deformation of a thermodynamic symplectic structure is studied. The stochastic deformation is analogous to the deformation of an algebra of observables such as deformation quantization, but for an imaginary deformation parameter (the Planck constant). Gauge symmetries of thermodynamics and corresponding stochastic mechanics, which describes fluctuations of a thermodynamic system, are revealed and gauge fields are introduced. A physical interpretation to the gauge transformations and gauge fields is given. An application of the formalism to a description of systems with distributed parameters in a local thermodynamic equilibrium is considered.

  14. Stochastic deformation of a thermodynamic symplectic structure.

    PubMed

    Kazinski, P O

    2009-01-01

    A stochastic deformation of a thermodynamic symplectic structure is studied. The stochastic deformation is analogous to the deformation of an algebra of observables such as deformation quantization, but for an imaginary deformation parameter (the Planck constant). Gauge symmetries of thermodynamics and corresponding stochastic mechanics, which describes fluctuations of a thermodynamic system, are revealed and gauge fields are introduced. A physical interpretation to the gauge transformations and gauge fields is given. An application of the formalism to a description of systems with distributed parameters in a local thermodynamic equilibrium is considered. PMID:19256999

  15. Mesh deformation based on artificial neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stadler, Domen; Kosel, Franc; Čelič, Damjan; Lipej, Andrej

    2011-09-01

    In the article a new mesh deformation algorithm based on artificial neural networks is introduced. This method is a point-to-point method, meaning that it does not use connectivity information for calculation of the mesh deformation. Two already known point-to-point methods, based on interpolation techniques, are also presented. In contrast to the two known interpolation methods, the new method does not require a summation over all boundary nodes for one displacement calculation. The consequence of this fact is a shorter computational time of mesh deformation, which is proven by different deformation tests. The quality of the deformed meshes with all three deformation methods was also compared. Finally, the generated and the deformed three-dimensional meshes were used in the computational fluid dynamics numerical analysis of a Francis water turbine. A comparison of the analysis results was made to prove the applicability of the new method in every day computation.

  16. Crystal-plastic deformation and recrystallization of peridotite controlled by the seismic cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matysiak, Agnes K.; Trepmann, Claudia A.

    2012-03-01

    Deformed peridotites from the Balmuccia complex, Northern Italy, have been investigated by light and electron microscopy (SEM/EBSD, TEM). The peridotites show a heterogeneous and partly recrystallized microfabric associated with cataclastic shear zones. Intracrystalline deformation microstructures (undulatory extinction, crinkly deformation lamellae, deformation bands, kink bands) and recrystallized grains along intragranular zones in large original grains record a sequence with an initial stage of inhomogeneous glide-controlled deformation in the low-temperature plasticity regime associated with brittle deformation and a subsequent stage of recovery and recrystallization. The microstructural evidence of deformation of olivine in the low-temperature field indicates high stresses on the order of several hundred MPa and accordingly high strain rates. Subsequent recovery and recrystallization requires decreasing stresses and strain rates, as there is no evidence for a complex thermal history with increasing temperatures. A locally occurring foam structure in aggregates of recrystallized olivine indicates grain growth at very low differential stresses at a late stage. Such a stress history with transiently high and then decaying stresses is characteristic for coseismic deformation and postseismic creep just below the base of the seismogenic zone. The associated occurrence of pseudotachylytes and microstructures generated by crystal-plastic mechanisms is explained by semi-brittle behavior at transient high stresses and strain rates during coseismic loading at depths, where during postseismic relaxation and in interseismic periods the rocks are behaving by crystal-plastic flow. The consideration of high-stress deformation and subsequent recrystallization processes at decaying stresses in peridotites is especially relevant for earthquake-driven deformation in the mantle.

  17. Identification of genes related to beak deformity of chickens using digital gene expression profiling.

    PubMed

    Bai, Hao; Zhu, Jing; Sun, Yanyan; Liu, Ranran; Liu, Nian; Li, Dongli; Wen, Jie; Chen, Jilan

    2014-01-01

    Frequencies of up to 3% of beak deformity (normally a crossed beak) occur in some indigenous chickens in China, such as and Beijing-You. Chickens with deformed beaks have reduced feed intake, growth rate, and abnormal behaviors. Beak deformity represents an economic as well as an animal welfare problem in the poultry industry. Because the genetic basis of beak deformity remains incompletely understood, the present study sought to identify important genes and metabolic pathways involved in this phenotype. Digital gene expression analysis was performed on deformed and normal beaks collected from Beijing-You chickens to detect global gene expression differences. A total of >11 million cDNA tags were sequenced, and 5,864,499 and 5,648,877 clean tags were obtained in the libraries of deformed and normal beaks, respectively. In total, 1,156 differentially expressed genes (DEG) were identified in the deformed beak with 409 being up-regulated and 747 down-regulated in the deformed beaks. qRT-PCR using eight genes was performed to verify the results of DGE profiling. Gene ontology (GO) analysis highlighted that genes of the keratin family on GGA25 were abundant among the DEGs. Pathway analysis showed that many DEGs were linked to the biosynthesis of unsaturated fatty acids and glycerolipid metabolism. Combining the analyses, 11 genes (MUC, LOC426217, BMP4, ACAA1, LPL, ALDH7A1, GLA, RETSAT, SDR16C5, WWOX, and MOGAT1) were highlighted as potential candidate genes for beak deformity in chickens. Some of these genes have been identified previously, while others have unknown function with respect to thus phenotype. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first genome-wide study to investigate the transcriptome differences in the deformed and normal beaks of chickens. The DEGs identified here are worthy of further functional characterization. PMID:25198128

  18. Onset of Deformation in ^60Ni.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weintraub, W. D.; Jin, H. Q.; Reviol, W.; Riedinger, L. L.; Baktash, C.; Brinkman, M. J.; Dean, D. J.; Yu, C.-H.; Devlin, M.; Lafosse, D. R.; Sarantites, D. G.; Leddy, M.; Lee, I. Y.; Macchiavelli, A. O.; Rudolph, D.

    1998-04-01

    High-spin states in ^60Ni were populated using the ^28Si(^36Ar,4p) reaction with beam energy of 136 MeV. Gammasphere at LBNL was used in conjunction with Microball to measure gamma rays selected for the charged-particle exit channels of interest. A total of 2 billion events was recorded, with the 4p channel to ^60Ni representing approximately 11% of the data. In our analysis, the previously known level scheme(G. Moyat et al. al.), Nuclear Physics A318, 236 (1979). has been extended up to energy and spin of 20 MeV and 20 hbar. The multiplicity of levels up to I=10 are well explained by shell-model calculations including the g_9/2 single-particle orbital into the fp-shell configuration space. At higher spins, evidence for rotational-like behavior increases. Two apparently rotational structures have large M1 values and are perhaps shears bands, likely involving one g_9/2 particle. Furthermore, an E2 sequence with a larger moment of inertia is observed that could correspond to other deformed structures in the region, involving two g_9/2 particles. Comparisons to calculations will be given.

  19. Deformation energy of a toroidal nucleus and plane fragmentation barriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fauchard, C.; Royer, G.

    1996-02-01

    The path leading to pumpkin-like configurations and toroidal shapes is investigated using a one-parameter shape sequence. The deformation energy is determined within the analytical expressions obtained for the various shape-dependent functions and the generalized rotating liquid drop model taking into account the proximity energy and the temperature. With increasing mass and angular momentum, a potential well appears in the toroidal shape path. For the heaviest systems, the pocket is large and locally favourable with respect to the plane fragmentation barriers which might allow the formation of evanescent toroidal systems which would rapidly decay in several fragments to minimize the surface tension.

  20. The large deformation elastic response of woven Kevlar fabric

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, W.E.

    1991-01-01

    The large deformation elastic response of a plane woven Kevlar fabric is investigated analytically and experimentally. The analysis assumes the undeformed geometry to be a sequence of interlaced arcs of circles which reverse at each yarn midpoint, ad each yarn is modeled as an extensible elastical subject to certain compatibility conditions. Deflection-force relations for the fabric are determined in terms of the initial weave geometry and the elastic properties of the individual yarns. The theoretical results agree well with the results of experiments performed on a fabric woven from 400 denier Kevlar yarns under conditions of uniaxial loading in both warp and fill directions. 13 refs., 4 figs.

  1. Feasibility of Multimodal Deformable Registration for Head and Neck Tumor Treatment Planning

    SciTech Connect

    Fortunati, Valerio; Verhaart, René F.; Angeloni, Francesco; Lugt, Aad van der; Niessen, Wiro J.; Veenland, Jifke F.; Paulides, Margarethus M.; Walsum, Theo van

    2014-09-01

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of using deformable registration in clinical practice to fuse MR and CT images of the head and neck for treatment planning. Method and Materials: A state-of-the-art deformable registration algorithm was optimized, evaluated, and compared with rigid registration. The evaluation was based on manually annotated anatomic landmarks and regions of interest in both modalities. We also developed a multiparametric registration approach, which simultaneously aligns T1- and T2-weighted MR sequences to CT. This was evaluated and compared with single-parametric approaches. Results: Our results show that deformable registration yielded a better accuracy than rigid registration, without introducing unrealistic deformations. For deformable registration, an average landmark alignment of approximatively 1.7 mm was obtained. For all the regions of interest excluding the cerebellum and the parotids, deformable registration provided a median modified Hausdorff distance of approximatively 1 mm. Similar accuracies were obtained for the single-parameter and multiparameter approaches. Conclusions: This study demonstrates that deformable registration of head-and-neck CT and MR images is feasible, with overall a significanlty higher accuracy than for rigid registration.

  2. Subsurface deformation in hypervelocity cratering experiments into high-porosity tuffs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkler, Rebecca; Poelchau, Michael H.; Moser, Stefan; Kenkmann, Thomas

    2016-08-01

    Hypervelocity impact experiments on porous tuff targets were carried out to determine the effect of porosity on deformation mechanisms in the crater's subsurface. Blocks of Weibern Tuff with about 43% porosity were impacted by 2.5 mm and 12.0 mm diameter steel spheres with velocities between 4.8 km s-1 and 5.6 km s-1. The postimpact subsurface damage was quantified with computer tomography as well as with meso- and microscale analyses of the bisected crater subsurface. The intensity and style of deformation in mineral clasts and the tuff matrix were mapped and their decay with subsurface depth was determined. Subsurface deformation styles include pore space compaction, clast rotation, as well as microfracture formation. Evaluation of the deformation indicates near-surface energy coupling at a calculated depth of burial of ~2 projectile diameters (dp), which is in conflict with the crater shape, which displays a deep, central penetration tube. Subsurface damage extends to ~2 dp beneath the crater floor in the experiments with 2.5 mm projectiles and increases to ~3 dp for 12 mm projectiles. Based on overprinting relationships and the geometrical orientation of deformation features, a sequence of subsurface deformation events was derived (1) matrix compaction, (2) intragranular crack formation in clasts, (3) deformation band formation in the compacted matrix, (4) tensile fracturing.

  3. Does deformation saturate seismic anisotropy?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tatham, D. J.; Lloyd, G. E.; Butler, R. W.; Casey, M.

    2006-12-01

    The progressive simple shear deformation that characterizes ductile fault zones in the crust involves both rotation and intensification of the strain ellipsoid. These mathematic predictions have been confirmed repeatedly by finite strain determinations in outcrop studies of natural shear zones and used to test geodynamic models of mountain belts. Seismic anisotropy (SA) methods offer the opportunity to pursue these approaches in situ. First however, we must calibrate the magnitude and orientation of the SA ellipsoid against naturally deformed tectonites of known strain state and microstructure. Here we present data from a field analogue of mafic ductile crust in an amphibolite-facies shear zone developed in a deformed mafic dyke embedded within the Lewisian Gneiss (Badcall, NW Scotland). Deflection of pre-existing linear and planar elements and attenuation of the dyke into the shear zone are used to determine the strain gradient. Specimens collected along this gradient were used to establish the geometric fabric intensity defined by different minerals (hornblende grain alignment and ellipticity of plagioclase clots). Finally, petrophysical properties were calculated for the specimens using the SEM-EBSD measured populations of lattice preferred orientations (LPO) for all mineral phases. It is the hornblende-plagioclase LPO, combined in their modal proportions and modulated by the individual mineral single crystal elastic properties, which define the SA profile across the shear zone. Hornblende develops a strong preferred dimensional orientation and hence LPO at shear strains of about 2, whereas the plagioclase LPO remains close to random regardless of bulk strain. The modelled SA of the samples is dominated therefore by the amphibole LPO. Although the values of bulk shear strain vary across the shear zone (0 at the margins to greater than 12 in the centre), the calculated intensity of SA saturates at a shear strain of about 2. These results, if typical of large

  4. Deformable Mirrors Correct Optical Distortions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    By combining the high sensitivity of space telescopes with revolutionary imaging technologies consisting primarily of adaptive optics, the Terrestrial Planet Finder is slated to have imaging power 100 times greater than the Hubble Space Telescope. To this end, Boston Micromachines Corporation, of Cambridge, Massachusetts, received Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contracts from the Jet Propulsion Laboratory for space-based adaptive optical technology. The work resulted in a microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) deformable mirror (DM) called the Kilo-DM. The company now offers a full line of MEMS DMs, which are being used in observatories across the world, in laser communication, and microscopy.

  5. Deformation quantization of cosmological models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cordero, Rubén; García-Compeán, Hugo; Turrubiates, Francisco J.

    2011-06-01

    The Weyl-Wigner-Groenewold-Moyal formalism of deformation quantization is applied to cosmological models in the minisuperspace. The quantization procedure is performed explicitly for quantum cosmology in a flat minisuperspace. The de Sitter cosmological model is worked out in detail and the computation of the Wigner functions for the Hartle-Hawking, Vilenkin and Linde wave functions are done numerically. The Wigner function is analytically calculated for the Kantowski-Sachs model in (non)commutative quantum cosmology and for string cosmology with dilaton exponential potential. Finally, baby universes solutions are described in this context and the Wigner function is obtained.

  6. Tectonic deformation in southern California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, David D.

    1993-01-01

    Our objectives were to use modem geodetic data, especially those derived from space techniques like Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI), Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR), and the Global Positioning System (GPS) to infer crustal deformation in southern California and relate it to plate tectonics and earthquake hazard. To do this, we needed to collect some original data, write computer programs to determine positions of survey markers from geodetic observables, interpret time dependent positions in terms of velocity and earthquake caused episodic displacements, and construct a model to explain these velocities and displacements in terms of fault slip and plate movements.

  7. Formation Flying and Deformable Instruments

    SciTech Connect

    Rio, Yvon

    2009-05-11

    Astronomers have always attempted to build very stable instruments. They fight all that can cause mechanical deformation or image motion. This has led to well established technologies (autoguide, active optics, thermal control, tip/tilt correction), as well as observing methods based on the use of controlled motion (scanning, micro scanning, shift and add, chopping and nodding). Formation flying disturbs this practice. It is neither possible to reduce the relative motion to very small amplitudes, nor to control it at will. Some impacts on Simbol-X instrument design, and operation are presented.

  8. Deformational characteristics of thermoplastic elastomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Indukuri, Kishore K.

    This thesis focuses primarily on the structure-property relationships of poly (styrene-ethylene-butylene-styrene) triblock copolymer TPEs. First evidence for strain-induced crystallization occurring in certain SEBS block copolymers has been established using unique techniques like deformation calorimetry, combined in-situ small angle X-ray and wide angle X-ray diffraction (SAXD/WAXD). Also the ramifications of such strain-induced crystallization on the mechanical properties like cyclic hysteresis, stress relaxation/creep retention of these SEBS systems have been studied. In addition, the structural changes in the morphology of these systems on deformation have been investigated using combined SAXD/WAXD setup. Small angle X-ray diffraction probed the changes at the nano-scale of polystyrene (PS) cylinders, while wide angle X-ray diffraction probed the changes at molecular length scales of the amorphous/crystalline domains of the elastomeric mid-block in these systems. New structural features at both these length scales have been observed and incorporated into the overall deformation mechanisms of the material. Continuous processing techniques like extrusion have been used to obtain ultra long-range order and orientation in these SEBS systems. Thus well ordered crystal like hexagonal packing of cylinders, where in each element in this hexagonal lattice can be individually addressed without any grain boundaries can be realized using these robust techniques. The effect of long-range order/orientation on the mechanical properties has been studied. In addition, these well ordered systems serve as model systems for evaluating deformation mechanisms of these SEBS systems, where the relative contributions of each of the phases can be estimated. EPDM/i-PP thermoplastic vulcanizates (TPVs) have micron size scale phase separated morphologies of EPDM rubber dispersed in a semicrystalline i-PP matrix as a result of the dynamic vulcanization process. Confocal microscopy studies

  9. Dissipation in deforming chaotic billiards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnett, Alexander Harvey

    Chaotic billiards (hard-walled cavities) in two or more dimensions are paradigm systems in the fields of classical and quantum chaos. We study the dissipation (irreversible heating) rate in such billiard systems due to general shape deformations which are periodic in time. We are motivated by older studies of one-body nuclear dissipation and by anticipated mesoscopic applications. We review the classical and quantum linear response theories of dissipation rate and demonstrate their correspondence in the semiclassical limit. In both pictures, heating is a result of stochastic energy spreading. The heating rate can be expressed as a frequency-dependent friction coefficient μ(ω), which depends on billiard shape and deformation choice. We show that there is a special class of deformations for which μ vanishes as like a power law in the small- ω limit. Namely, for deformations which cause translations and dilations μ ~ ω4 whereas for those which cause rotations μ ~ ω2. This contrasts the generic case for which μ ~ ω4 We show how a systematic treatment of this special class leads to an improved version of the `wall formula' estimate for μ(0). We show that the special nature of dilation (a new result) is semiclassically equivalent to a quasi- orthogonality relation between the (undeformed) billiard quantum eigenstates on the boundary. This quasi- orthogonality forms the heart of a `scaling method' for the numerical calculation of quantum eigenstates, invented recently by Vergini and Saraceno. The scaling method is orders of magnitude more efficient than any other known billiard quantization method, however an adequate explanation for its success has been lacking until now. We explain the scaling method, its errors, and applications. We also present improvements to Heller's plane wave method. Two smaller projects conclude the thesis. Firstly, we give a new formalism for quantum point contact (QPC) conductance in terms of scattering cross-section in the half

  10. A two-dimensional deformable phantom for quantitatively verifying deformation algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Kirby, Neil; Chuang, Cynthia; Pouliot, Jean

    2011-08-15

    Purpose: The incorporation of deformable image registration into the treatment planning process is rapidly advancing. For this reason, the methods used to verify the underlying deformation algorithms must evolve equally fast. This manuscript proposes a two-dimensional deformable phantom, which can objectively verify the accuracy of deformation algorithms, as the next step for improving these techniques. Methods: The phantom represents a single plane of the anatomy for a head and neck patient. Inflation of a balloon catheter inside the phantom simulates tumor growth. CT and camera images of the phantom are acquired before and after its deformation. Nonradiopaque markers reside on the surface of the deformable anatomy and are visible through an acrylic plate, which enables an optical camera to measure their positions; thus, establishing the ground-truth deformation. This measured deformation is directly compared to the predictions of deformation algorithms, using several similarity metrics. The ratio of the number of points with more than a 3 mm deformation error over the number that are deformed by more than 3 mm is used for an error metric to evaluate algorithm accuracy. Results: An optical method of characterizing deformation has been successfully demonstrated. For the tests of this method, the balloon catheter deforms 32 out of the 54 surface markers by more than 3 mm. Different deformation errors result from the different similarity metrics. The most accurate deformation predictions had an error of 75%. Conclusions: The results presented here demonstrate the utility of the phantom for objectively verifying deformation algorithms and determining which is the most accurate. They also indicate that the phantom would benefit from more electron density heterogeneity. The reduction of the deformable anatomy to a two-dimensional system allows for the use of nonradiopaque markers, which do not influence deformation algorithms. This is the fundamental advantage of this

  11. The effect of strain path on the development of deformation structures in severely deformed aluminum alloys processed by ECAE[Equal Channel Angular Extrusion

    SciTech Connect

    Gholinia, A.; Prangnell, P.B.; Markushev, M.V.

    2000-03-14

    Equal channel angular extrusion (ECAE) has been used to investigate the formation of submicron grain structures in Al-alloys deformed to ultra-high plastic strains by different strain paths. The different strain paths were obtained by rotating billets through 0, 90, and 190{degree} between each extrusion cycle. High resolution EBSD analysis has been employed to measure the boundary misorientations within the deformation structures. This has highlighted great differences in the evolution of the deformed state, as a function of the strain path, even after effective strains as high as 16. It has been demonstrated that the most effective method of forming a submicron grain structure by severe plastic deformation is to maintain a constant strain path. Processing routes involving a 180{degree} rotation reverse the shear strain every second pass and this prevents the build up of significant number of new high angle boundaries. When a sample is processed with an alternative clockwise and anticlockwise 90{degree} rotation, between each extrusion cycle the billet is deformed on two shear planes, each of which experiences half the total strain, compared to the single shear plane when there is no rotation. This reduces the rate of formation of high angle boundaries. With a constant clockwise 90{degree} rotation the sample is also deformed on two alternate shear planes, but the total strain becomes redundant every fourth extrusion cycle. However, in this case each shear is reversed out of sequence after first deforming the billet on the alternate shear plane. This appears to be a much more effective means of forming new high angle boundaries than 180{degree} rotation, where the shear strain is immediately reversed each alternate cycle, but is still less efficient than deformation with a constant strain path.

  12. Deformation During Friction Stir Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Henry J.

    2002-01-01

    Friction Stir Welding (FSW) is a solid state welding process that exhibits characteristics similar to traditional metal cutting processes. The plastic deformation that occurs during friction stir welding is due to the superposition of three flow fields: a primary rotation of a radially symmetric solid plug of metal surrounding the pin tool, a secondary uniform translation, and a tertiary ring vortex flow (smoke rings) surrounding the tool. If the metal sticks to the tool, the plug surface extends down into the metal from the outer edge of the tool shoulder, decreases in diameter like a funnel, and closes up beneath the pin. Since its invention, ten years have gone by and still very little is known about the physics of the friction stir welding process. In this experiment, an H13 steel weld tool (shoulder diameter, 0.797 in; pin diameter, 0.312 in; and pin length, 0.2506 in) was used to weld three 0.255 in thick plates. The deformation behavior during friction stir welding was investigated by metallographically preparing a plan view sections of the weldment and taking Vickers hardness test in the key-hole region.

  13. Deformation parameters influencing prepreg tack

    SciTech Connect

    Ahn, K.J.; Seferis, J.C. ); Pelton, T.; Wilhelm, M. )

    1992-01-01

    A compression to tension apparatus and a methodology capable of measuring prepreg tack have been analyzed in detail in order to establish fundamental material and operating characteristics. Both intrinsic and extrinsic parameters influencing prepreg tack were identified and analyzed using commercially available carbon fiber/epoxy prepregs and mechanical testing equipment. Two different factors, (1) contact (or wetting) area of adjacent prepreg plies and (2) viscoelastic properties of the prepreg, were found to control prepreg tack. At low temperatures, contact area was the main deformation controlling step, while at high temperatures, the viscoelastic property of the prepreg was found to be dominant. Both interlaminar and intralaminar deformations were observed depending on the prepreg systems examined as well as the operating conditions of the test. In addition, hold time, hold pressure, loading rate, resin content, and out-time were also found to affect prepreg tack. Energy of separation, which may be viewed as a descriptor of prepreg tack, was observed to increase with increasing hold time, hold pressure, and loading rate. Energy of separation also showed a maximum value at a specific resin content for a specific prepreg system, while it decreased with increasing prepreg out-time due to prepreg surface characteristic change rather than bulk physical aging. Conclusively, it was observed that prepreg tack must be viewed as an extrinsic, bulk, but surface-sensitive, viscoelastic property which depends on material as well as operating conditions.

  14. Deformable human body model development

    SciTech Connect

    Wray, W.O.; Aida, T.

    1998-11-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). A Deformable Human Body Model (DHBM) capable of simulating a wide variety of deformation interactions between man and his environment has been developed. The model was intended to have applications in automobile safety analysis, soldier survivability studies and assistive technology development for the disabled. To date, we have demonstrated the utility of the DHBM in automobile safety analysis and are currently engaged in discussions with the U.S. military involving two additional applications. More specifically, the DHBM has been incorporated into a Virtual Safety Lab (VSL) for automobile design under contract to General Motors Corporation. Furthermore, we have won $1.8M in funding from the U.S. Army Medical Research and Material Command for development of a noninvasive intracranial pressure measurement system. The proposed research makes use of the detailed head model that is a component of the DHBM; the project duration is three years. In addition, we have been contacted by the Air Force Armstrong Aerospace Medical Research Laboratory concerning possible use of the DHBM in analyzing the loads and injury potential to pilots upon ejection from military aircraft. Current discussions with Armstrong involve possible LANL participation in a comparison between DHBM and the Air Force Articulated Total Body (ATB) model that is the current military standard.

  15. Thermocapillary motion of deformable drops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haj-Hariri, Hossein; Shi, Qingping; Borhan, Ali

    1994-01-01

    The thermocapillary motion of initially spherical drops/bubbles driven by a constant temperature gradient in an unbounded liquid medium is simulated numerically. Effects of convection of momentum and energy, as well as shape deformations, are addressed. The method used is based on interface tracking on a base cartesian grid, and uses a smeared color or indicator function for the determination of the surface topology. Quad-tree adaptive refinement of the cartesian grid is implemented to enhance the fidelity of the surface tracking. It is shown that convection of energy results in a slowing of the drop, as the isotherms get wrapped around the front of the drop. Shape deformation resulting from inertial effects affect the migration velocity. The physical results obtained are in agreement with the existing literature. Furthermore, remarks are made on the sensitivity of the calculated solutions to the smearing of the fluid properties. Analysis and simulations show that the migration velocity depends very strongly on the smearing of the interfacial force whereas it is rather insensitive to the smearing of other properties, hence the adaptive grid.

  16. Uniaxial deformation of a soft porous material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacMinn, Chris; Dufresne, Eric; Wettlaufer, John

    2015-11-01

    Compressing a porous material will decrease the volume of pore space, driving fluid out. Similarly, injecting fluid into a porous material will drive mechanical deformation, distorting the solid skeleton. This poromechanical coupling has applications ranging from cell and tissue mechanics to geomechanics and hydrogeology. The classical theory of linear poroelasticity captures this coupling by combining Darcy's law with linear elasticity and then further linearizing in the strain. This is a good model for very small deformations, but it becomes increasingly inappropriate as deformations grow larger, and moderate to large deformations are common in the context of phenomena such as swelling, damage, and extreme softness. Here, we compare the predictions of linear poroelasticity with those of a rigorous large-deformation framework in the context of two uniaxial model problems. We explore the error associated with the linear model in both steady and dynamic situations, as well as the impact of allowing the permeability to vary with the deformation.

  17. Protein transfer to membranes upon shape deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagis, L. M. C.; Bijl, E.; Antono, L.; de Ruijter, N. C. A.; van Valenberg, H.

    2013-05-01

    Red blood cells, milk fat droplets, or liposomes all have interfaces consisting of lipid membranes. These particles show significant shape deformations as a result of flow. Here we show that these shape deformations can induce adsorption of proteins to the membrane. Red blood cell deformability is an important factor in several diseases involving obstructions of the microcirculatory system, and deformation induced protein adsorption will alter the rigidity of their membranes. Deformation induced protein transfer will also affect adsorption of cells onto implant surfaces, and the performance of liposome based controlled release systems. Quantitative models describing this phenomenon in biomaterials do not exist. Using a simple quantitative model, we provide new insight in this phenomenon. We present data that show convincingly that for cells or droplets with diameters upwards of a few micrometers, shape deformations induce adsorption of proteins at their interface even at moderate flow rates.

  18. Ground deformation from ground-based SAR interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarchi, Dario; Casagli, Nicola; Fortuny-Guasch, Joaquim; Guerri, Letizia; Antonello, Giuseppe; Leva, Davide

    An in-depth analysis of the last two images acquired by the ground-based interferometric synthetic aperture radar system installed on Stromboli before the 5 April 2003 explosion allowed us to detect the precursory signals of the explosion related to ground deformation. In particular, it was possible to estimate the exact time of the explosion through the time domain analysis of raw data from the radar acquisition. This was interrupted by a blackout that occurred a few seconds after the event. The explosion onset time corresponds to a clear change in the intensity of the backscattered energy, related to the dense volcanic plume emission from the Crater. In addiction, the use of a particular interferometric processing technique for the last two acquisitions, consisting of the selection of synthetic sub-apertures from the main ones and creating with these a sequence of interferograms with a higher temporal resolution, detected precursory deformations starting 2 min before the explosion. These observations indicate the occurrence of an elastic deformation of a centimeter amplitude that affected the volcanic edifice progressively from the Crater down to the Sciara del Fuoco depression.

  19. Shotgun protein sequencing.

    SciTech Connect

    Faulon, Jean-Loup Michel; Heffelfinger, Grant S.

    2009-06-01

    A novel experimental and computational technique based on multiple enzymatic digestion of a protein or protein mixture that reconstructs protein sequences from sequences of overlapping peptides is described in this SAND report. This approach, analogous to shotgun sequencing of DNA, is to be used to sequence alternative spliced proteins, to identify post-translational modifications, and to sequence genetically engineered proteins.

  20. Integrable deformations of the XXZ spin chain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beisert, Niklas; Fiévet, Lucas; de Leeuw, Marius; Loebbert, Florian

    2013-09-01

    We consider integrable deformations of the XXZ spin chain for periodic and open boundary conditions. In particular, we classify all long-range deformations and study their impact on the spectrum. As compared to the XXX case, we have the z-spin at our disposal, which induces two additional deformations: the short-range magnetic twist and a new long-range momentum-dependent twist.

  1. Self-adjointness of deformed unbounded operators

    SciTech Connect

    Much, Albert

    2015-09-15

    We consider deformations of unbounded operators by using the novel construction tool of warped convolutions. By using the Kato-Rellich theorem, we show that unbounded self-adjoint deformed operators are self-adjoint if they satisfy a certain condition. This condition proves itself to be necessary for the oscillatory integral to be well-defined. Moreover, different proofs are given for self-adjointness of deformed unbounded operators in the context of quantum mechanics and quantum field theory.

  2. Deformation-Induced Anisotropy of Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peng, S. T. J.; Landel, R. F.

    1982-01-01

    New theory calculates anisotropies induced by large deformations in polymers. Theory was developed primarily for calculating anistropy of thermal expansivity, but is also applicable to thermal conductivity, elastic moduli and other properties. Theory assumes that in isotropic state, long polymer chains are randomly coiled and not oriented in particular direction. They acquire an orientation when material is deformed. As average molecular orientation increases with deformation, properties of bulk material exhibit averaging of the microscopic anistropies of the oriented molecular segments.

  3. Spatial and temporal variability of deformation in the Northern Apennines, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunderson, Kellen L.

    Knowing the spatial and temporal variabilty of deformation in mountain belts is essential for understanding discrepancies between geodetic and geologic measurements of deformation and for accurately assessing seismic hazards. High-resolution deformational histories for three transects of the Northern Apennine mountain front, Italy, obtained from dated synorogenic growth strata, elucidate the spatial and temporal variabilty of thrust fault deformation in the Apennines since 3.0 Ma. Inverse and forward modeling of growth strata exposed in the Stirone River section shows the Salsomaggiore thrust exhibits a high frequency slip rate variability at 40-500 kyr timescales that is likely related to strain partitioning on connected imbricate thrusts. A high-resolution age model for the Pleistocene Enza growth strata section, which contains sedimentary facies spanning both marine and terrestrial environments, shows that the growth strata exposed at the Apennine mountain front not only record unsteady deformation but also record variable surface processes that can obscure true deformational behavior. A comparison of mountain front deformation at all three transects shows that unsteady deformation was asynchronous along orogenic strike between 1.0-3.0 Ma. A shift to synchronized deformation at all three transects is observed after 1.0 Ma. This shift also corresponds to a kinematic reorganization of the Apennine wedge and the initiation of thick-skinned thrusting. This kinematic reorganization was driven by climatically-driven overfilling of the Po foreland beginning at ~1.4 Ma, which had the effect of lowering the Apennine orogenic wedge taper and causing the wedge to respond by initiating out-of-sequence, basement involved reverse faulting localized at the present day Apennine mountain front.

  4. Physics-based deformable tongue visualization.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yin; Guo, Xiaohu; Vick, Jennell; Torres, Luis G; Campbell, Thomas F

    2013-05-01

    In this paper, a physics-based framework is presented to visualize the human tongue deformation. The tongue is modeled with the Finite Element Method (FEM) and driven by the motion capture data gathered during speech production. Several novel deformation visualization techniques are presented for in-depth data analysis and exploration. To reveal the hidden semantic information of the tongue deformation, we present a novel physics-based volume segmentation algorithm. This is accomplished by decomposing the tongue model into segments based on its deformation pattern with the computation of deformation subspaces and fitting the target deformation locally at each segment. In addition, the strain energy is utilized to provide an intuitive low-dimensional visualization for the high-dimensional sequential motion. Energy-interpolation-based morphing is also equipped to effectively highlight the subtle differences of the 3D deformed shapes without any visual occlusion. Our experimental results and analysis demonstrate the effectiveness of this framework. The proposed methods, though originally designed for the exploration of the tongue deformation, are also valid for general deformation analysis of other shapes. PMID:23492381

  5. Deformation twinning: Influence of strain rate

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, G.T. III

    1993-11-01

    Twins in most crystal structures, including advanced materials such as intermetallics, form more readily as the temperature of deformation is decreased or the rate of deformation is increased. Both parameters lead to the suppression of thermally-activated dislocation processes which can result in stresses high enough to nucleate and grow deformation twins. Under high-strain rate or shock-loading/impact conditions deformation twinning is observed to be promoted even in high stacking fault energy FCC metals and alloys, composites, and ordered intermetallics which normally do not readily deform via twinning. Under such conditions and in particular under the extreme loading rates typical of shock wave deformation the competition between slip and deformation twinning can be examined in detail. In this paper, examples of deformation twinning in the intermetallics TiAl, Ti-48Al-lV and Ni{sub 3}A as well in the cermet Al-B{sub 4}C as a function of strain rate will be presented. Discussion includes: (1) the microstructural and experimental variables influencing twin formation in these systems and twinning topics related to high-strain-rate loading, (2) the high velocity of twin formation, and (3) the influence of deformation twinning on the constitutive response of advanced materials.

  6. Origami-enabled deformable silicon solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Rui; Huang, Hai; Liang, Hanshuang; Liang, Mengbing; Tu, Hongen; Xu, Yong; Song, Zeming; Jiang, Hanqing; Yu, Hongyu

    2014-02-24

    Deformable electronics have found various applications and elastomeric materials have been widely used to reach flexibility and stretchability. In this Letter, we report an alternative approach to enable deformability through origami. In this approach, the deformability is achieved through folding and unfolding at the creases while the functional devices do not experience strain. We have demonstrated an example of origami-enabled silicon solar cells and showed that this solar cell can reach up to 644% areal compactness while maintaining reasonable good performance upon cyclic folding/unfolding. This approach opens an alternative direction of producing flexible, stretchable, and deformable electronics.

  7. The sequence of sequencers: The history of sequencing DNA

    PubMed Central

    Heather, James M.; Chain, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    Determining the order of nucleic acid residues in biological samples is an integral component of a wide variety of research applications. Over the last fifty years large numbers of researchers have applied themselves to the production of techniques and technologies to facilitate this feat, sequencing DNA and RNA molecules. This time-scale has witnessed tremendous changes, moving from sequencing short oligonucleotides to millions of bases, from struggling towards the deduction of the coding sequence of a single gene to rapid and widely available whole genome sequencing. This article traverses those years, iterating through the different generations of sequencing technology, highlighting some of the key discoveries, researchers, and sequences along the way. PMID:26554401

  8. Constraining lithosphere deformation mode evolution for the Iberia-Newfoundland rifted margins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeanniot, Ludovic; Kusznir, Nick; Mohn, Geoffroy; Manatschal, Gianreto

    2015-04-01

    The deformation of lithosphere and asthenosphere and its evolution during continental rifting leading to breakup and seafloor spreading initiation is poorly understood. The resulting margin architecture and OCT structure is complex and diverse, and observations at magma poor margins includes hyper-extended continental crust and lithosphere, detachments faults, exhumed mantle, continental slivers and scattered embryonic oceanic crust. A coupled kinematic-dynamic model of lithosphere and asthenosphere deformation has been used to investigate the sequence of lithosphere deformation modes for 2 conjugate margin profiles for the Iberia-Newfoundland rifted margins. We use the observed water-loaded subsidence and crustal thickness, together with subsidence history and the age of melt generation, to test and constrain lithosphere and asthenosphere deformation models. A sequence of lithosphere deformation modes is represented by a succession of flow-fields, which are generated by a 2D finite element viscous flow model (FE-Margin), and is used to advect lithosphere and asthenosphere temperature and material. FE-Margin is kinematically driven by divergent deformation in the upper 15-20 km of the lithosphere inducing passive upwelling below. Buoyancy enhanced upwelling (e.g. Braun et al. 2000) is also kinematically included. The methodology of Katz et al., 2003 is used to predict melt generation by decompressional melting. The magnitude of extension used in the modelling is consistent with that proposed by Sutra et al (2013). The best fit calibrated models of lithosphere deformation evolution for the Iberia-Newfoundland conjugate margins require (i) an initial broad region of lithosphere deformation and passive upwelling, (ii) lateral migration of deformation, (iii) an increase in extension rate with time, (iv) focussing of deformation and (v) buoyancy induced upwelling. The preferred calibrated models predict faster extension rates and earlier continental crustal rupture and

  9. 2012 ROCK DEFORMATION: FEEDBACK PROCESSES IN ROCK DEFORMATION GORDON RESEARCH CONFERENCE, AUGUST 19-24, 2012

    SciTech Connect

    Kelemen, Peter

    2012-08-24

    Topics covered include: Failure At High Confining Pressure; Fluid-assisted Slip, Earthquakes & Fracture; Reaction-driven Cracking; Fluid Transport, Deformation And Reaction; Localized Fluid Transport And Deformation; Earthquake Mechanisms; Subduction Zone Dynamics And Crustal Growth.

  10. Madelung deformity and Madelung-type deformities: a review of the clinical and radiological characteristics.

    PubMed

    Ali, Sayed; Kaplan, Summer; Kaufman, Theresa; Fenerty, Sarah; Kozin, Scott; Zlotolow, Dan A

    2015-11-01

    Madelung deformity of the distal radius results from premature closure of the medial volar aspect of the distal radial physis, leading to increased volar tilt and increased inclination of the radial articular surface, triangulation of the carpus with proximal migration of the lunate and dorsal displacement of the distal ulna. The deformity is particularly common in Leri-Weill dyschondrosteosis, but it may also occur in isolation. True Madelung deformity can be differentiated from Madelung-type deformities by the presence of an anomalous radiolunate ligament (Vickers ligament). In this article, we will review the imaging characteristics of true Madelung deformity, including the common "distal radius" variant, the less common "entire radius" variant and "reverse" Madelung deformity. We will discuss the role of the Vickers ligament in disease pathogenesis and its use in differentiating true Madelung deformity from Madelung-type deformities arising from trauma or multiple hereditary exostoses. Surgical management of these patients will also be addressed. PMID:26135644

  11. Whole Genome Sequencing

    MedlinePlus

    ... you want to learn. Search form Search Whole Genome Sequencing You are here Home Testing & Services Testing ... the full story, click here . What is whole genome sequencing? Whole genome sequencing is the mapping out ...

  12. Quantitative comparisons of numerical models of brittle deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buiter, S.

    2009-04-01

    Numerical modelling of brittle deformation in the uppermost crust can be challenging owing to the requirement of an accurate pressure calculation, the ability to achieve post-yield deformation and localisation, and the choice of rheology (plasticity law). One way to approach these issues is to conduct model comparisons that can evaluate the effects of different implementations of brittle behaviour in crustal deformation models. We present a comparison of three brittle shortening experiments for fourteen different numerical codes, which use finite element, finite difference, boundary element and distinct element techniques. Our aim is to constrain and quantify the variability among models in order to improve our understanding of causes leading to differences between model results. Our first experiment of translation of a stable sand-like wedge serves as a reference that allows for testing against analytical solutions (e.g., taper angle, root-mean-square velocity and gravitational rate of work). The next two experiments investigate an unstable wedge in a sandbox-like setup which deforms by inward translation of a mobile wall. All models accommodate shortening by in-sequence formation of forward shear zones. We analyse the location, dip angle and spacing of thrusts in detail as previous comparisons have shown that these can be highly variable in numerical and analogue models of crustal shortening and extension. We find that an accurate implementation of boundary friction is important for our models. Our results are encouraging in the overall agreement in their dynamic evolution, but show at the same time the effort that is needed to understand shear zone evolution. GeoMod2008 Team: Markus Albertz, Michele Cooke, Susan Ellis, Taras Gerya, Luke Hodkinson, Kristin Hughes, Katrin Huhn, Boris Kaus, Walter Landry, Bertrand Maillot, Christophe Pascal, Anton Popov, Guido Schreurs, Christopher Beaumont, Tony Crook, Mario Del Castello and Yves Leroy

  13. Recent advances in the deformation processing of titanium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamirisakandala, S.; Bhat, R. B.; Vedam, B. V.

    2003-12-01

    Titanium (Ti) alloys are special-purpose materials used for several critical applications in aerospace as well as non-aerospace industries, and extensive deformation processing is necessary to shape-form these materials, which poses many challenges due to the microstructural complexities. Some of the recent developments in the deformation processing of Ti alloys and usefulness of integrating the material behavior information with simulation schemes while designing and optimizing manufacturing process schedules are discussed in this paper. Discussions are primarily focused on the most important alloy, Ti-6Al-4V and on developing a clear understanding on the influence of key parameters (e.g., oxygen content, starting microstructure, temperature, and strain rate) on the deformation behavior during hot working. These studies are very useful not only for obtaining controlled microstructures but also to design complex multi-step processing sequences to produce defect-free components. Strain-induced porosity (SIP) has been a serious problem during titanium alloy processing, and improved scientific understanding helps in seeking elegant solutions to avoid SIP. A novel high-speed processing technique for microstructural conversion in titanium has been described, which provides several benefits over the conventional slow-speed practices. The hot working behavior of some of the affordable α+β and β titanium alloys being developed recently—namely, Ti-5.5Al-1Fe, Ti-10V-2Fe-3Al, Ti-6.8Mo-4.5Fe-1.5Al, and Ti-10V-4.5Fe-1.5Al—has been analyzed, and the usefulness of the processing maps in optimizing the process parameters and design of hot working schedules in these alloys is demonstrated. Titanium alloys modified with small additions of boron are emerging as potential candidates for replacing structural components requiring high specific strength and stiffness. Efforts to understand the microstructural mechanisms during deformation processing of Ti-B alloys and the issues

  14. In situ spectroscopic study of the plastic deformation of amorphous silicon under nonhydrostatic conditions induced by indentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerbig, Y. B.; Michaels, C. A.; Bradby, J. E.; Haberl, B.; Cook, R. F.

    2015-12-01

    Indentation-induced plastic deformation of amorphous silicon (a-Si) thin films was studied by in situ Raman imaging of the deformed contact region of an indented sample, employing a Raman spectroscopy-enhanced instrumented indentation technique. Quantitative analyses of the generated in situ Raman maps provide unique insight into the phase behavior of as-implanted a-Si. In particular, the occurrence and evolving spatial distribution of changes in the a-Si structure caused by processes, such as polyamorphization and crystallization, induced by indentation loading were measured. The experimental results are linked with previously published papers on the plastic deformation of a-Si under hydrostatic compression and shear deformation to establish a sequence for the development of deformation of a-Si under indentation loading. The sequence involves three distinct deformation mechanisms of a-Si: (1) reversible deformation, (2) increase in coordination defects (onset of plastic deformation), and (3) phase transformation. Estimated conditions for the occurrence of these mechanisms are given with respect to relevant intrinsic and extrinsic parameters, such as indentation stress, volumetric strain, and bond angle distribution (a measure for the structural order of the amorphous network). The induced volumetric strains are accommodated solely by reversible deformation of the tetrahedral network when exposed to small indentation stresses. At greater indentation stresses, the increased volumetric strains in the tetrahedral network lead to the formation of predominately fivefold coordination defects, which seems to mark the onset of irreversible or plastic deformation of the a-Si thin film. Further increase in the indentation stress appears to initiate the formation of sixfold coordinated atomic arrangements. These sixfold coordinated arrangements may maintain their amorphous tetrahedral structure with a high density of coordination defects or nucleate as a new crystalline

  15. In situ spectroscopic study of the plastic deformation of amorphous silicon under non-hydrostatic conditions induced by indentation

    PubMed Central

    Gerbig, Y.B; Michaels, C.A.; Bradby, J.E.; Haberl, B.; Cook, R.F.

    2016-01-01

    Indentation-induced plastic deformation of amorphous silicon (a-Si) thin films was studied by in situ Raman imaging of the deformed contact region of an indented sample, employing a Raman spectroscopy-enhanced instrumented indentation technique. Quantitative analyses of the generated in situ Raman maps provide unique, new insight into the phase behavior of as-implanted a-Si. In particular, the occurrence and evolving spatial distribution of changes in the a-Si structure caused by processes, such as polyamorphization and crystallization, induced by indentation loading were measured. The experimental results are linked with previously published work on the plastic deformation of a-Si under hydrostatic compression and shear deformation to establish a sequence for the development of deformation of a-Si under indentation loading. The sequence involves three distinct deformation mechanisms of a-Si: (1) reversible deformation, (2) increase in coordination defects (onset of plastic deformation), and (3) phase transformation. Estimated conditions for the occurrence of these mechanisms are given with respect to relevant intrinsic and extrinsic parameters, such as indentation stress, volumetric strain, and bond angle distribution (a measure for the structural order of the amorphous network). The induced volumetric strains are accommodated solely by reversible deformation of the tetrahedral network when exposed to small indentation stresses. At greater indentation stresses, the increased volumetric strains in the tetrahedral network lead to the formation of predominately five-fold coordination defects, which seems to mark the onset of irreversible or plastic deformation of the a-Si thin film. Further increase in the indentation stress appears to initiate the formation of six-fold coordinated atomic arrangements. These six-fold coordinated arrangements may maintain their amorphous tetrahedral structure with a high density of coordination defects or nucleate as a new crystalline

  16. Quantifying cortical surface harmonic deformation with stereovision during open cranial neurosurgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Songbai; Fan, Xiaoyao; Roberts, David W.; Paulsen, Keith D.

    2012-02-01

    Cortical surface harmonic motion during open cranial neurosurgery is well observed in image-guided neurosurgery. Recently, we quantified cortical surface deformation noninvasively with synchronized blood pressure pulsation (BPP) from a sequence of stereo image pairs using optical flow motion tracking. With three subjects, we found the average cortical surface displacement can reach more than 1 mm and in-plane principal strains of up to 7% relative to the first image pair. In addition, the temporal changes in deformation and strain were in concert with BPP and patient respiration [1]. However, because deformation was essentially computed relative to an arbitrary reference, comparing cortical surface deformation at different times was not possible. In this study, we extend the technique developed earlier by establishing a more reliable reference profile of the cortical surface for each sequence of stereo image acquisitions. Specifically, fast Fourier transform (FFT) was applied to the dynamic cortical surface deformation, and the fundamental frequencies corresponding to patient respiration and BPP were identified, which were used to determine the number of image acquisitions for use in averaging cortical surface images. This technique is important because it potentially allows in vivo characterization of soft tissue biomechanical properties using intraoperative stereovision and motion tracking.

  17. Deformed ellipsoidal diffraction grating blank

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decew, Alan E., Jr.

    1994-01-01

    The Deformed Ellipsoidal Grating Blank (DEGB) is the primary component in an ultraviolet spectrometer. Since one of the major concerns for these instruments is throughput, significant efforts are made to reduce the number of components and subsequently reflections. Each reflection results in losses through absorption and scattering. It is these two sources of photon loss that dictated the requirements for the DEGB. The first goal is to shape the DEGB in such a way that the energy at the entrance slit is focused as well as possible on the exit slit. The second goal is to produce a surface smooth enough to minimize the photon loss due to scattering. The program was accomplished in three phases. The first phase was the fabrication planning. The second phase was the actual fabrication and initial testing. The last phase was the final testing of the completed DEGB.

  18. Deformable Surface Spatial Light Modulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hess, K.; Dandliker, R.; Thalmann, R.

    1987-05-01

    A spatial light modulator (SLM) based on a deformable gel surface is presented. It has remarkable optical properties and its construction and operation are comparatively simple. It can be optically addressed through a photoconductor layer. The surface relief pattern is read out by total reflection and a schlieren optical system. The device provides good wavefront quality (X/10 over the whole aperture of 30 x 50 mm2) and has a spatial resolution of 10 line pairs/mm. Contrast ratios for modulation up to 40:1 were measured. The input sensitivity is typically 0.3 mW/cm2. The rise and decay times are both approximately 20 ms. Besides its primary application as a light valve in large screen TV projection, it can be used in optical information processing systems, e.g., as an incoherent-to-coherent transducer. Combined with a CRT, the SLM can be addressed electronically.

  19. Coordinate cytokine regulatory sequences

    DOEpatents

    Frazer, Kelly A.; Rubin, Edward M.; Loots, Gabriela G.

    2005-05-10

    The present invention provides CNS sequences that regulate the cytokine gene expression, expression cassettes and vectors comprising or lacking the CNS sequences, host cells and non-human transgenic animals comprising the CNS sequences or lacking the CNS sequences. The present invention also provides methods for identifying compounds that modulate the functions of CNS sequences as well as methods for diagnosing defects in the CNS sequences of patients.

  20. Science sequence design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koskela, P. E.; Bollman, W. E.; Freeman, J. E.; Helton, M. R.; Reichert, R. J.; Travers, E. S.; Zawacki, S. J.

    1973-01-01

    The activities of the following members of the Navigation Team are recorded: the Science Sequence Design Group, responsible for preparing the final science sequence designs; the Advanced Sequence Planning Group, responsible for sequence planning; and the Science Recommendation Team (SRT) representatives, responsible for conducting the necessary sequence design interfaces with the teams during the mission. The interface task included science support in both advance planning and daily operations. Science sequences designed during the mission are also discussed.

  1. Developing a Virtual Rock Deformation Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, W.; Ougier-simonin, A.; Lisabeth, H. P.; Banker, J. S.

    2012-12-01

    Experimental rock physics plays an important role in advancing earthquake research. Despite its importance in geophysics, reservoir engineering, waste deposits and energy resources, most geology departments in U.S. universities don't have rock deformation facilities. A virtual deformation laboratory can serve as an efficient tool to help geology students naturally and internationally learn about rock deformation. Working with computer science engineers, we built a virtual deformation laboratory that aims at fostering user interaction to facilitate classroom and outreach teaching and learning. The virtual lab is built to center around a triaxial deformation apparatus in which laboratory measurements of mechanical and transport properties such as stress, axial and radial strains, acoustic emission activities, wave velocities, and permeability are demonstrated. A student user can create her avatar to enter the virtual lab. In the virtual lab, the avatar can browse and choose among various rock samples, determine the testing conditions (pressure, temperature, strain rate, loading paths), then operate the virtual deformation machine to observe how deformation changes physical properties of rocks. Actual experimental results on the mechanical, frictional, sonic, acoustic and transport properties of different rocks at different conditions are compiled. The data acquisition system in the virtual lab is linked to the complied experimental data. Structural and microstructural images of deformed rocks are up-loaded and linked to different deformation tests. The integration of the microstructural image and the deformation data allows the student to visualize how forces reshape the structure of the rock and change the physical properties. The virtual lab is built using the Game Engine. The geological background, outstanding questions related to the geological environment, and physical and mechanical concepts associated with the problem will be illustrated on the web portal. In

  2. Statistical field theories deformed within different calculi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olemskoi, A. I.; Borysov, S. S.; Shuda, I. A.

    2010-09-01

    Within the framework of basic-deformed and finite-difference calculi, as well as deformation procedures proposed by Tsallis, Abe, and Kaniadakis and generalized by Naudts, we develop field-theoretical schemes of statistically distributed fields. We construct a set of generating functionals and find their connection with corresponding correlators for basic-deformed, finite-difference, and Kaniadakis calculi. Moreover, we introduce pair of additive functionals, which expansions into deformed series yield both Green functions and their irreducible proper vertices. We find as well formal equations, governing by the generating functionals of systems which possess a symmetry with respect to a field variation and are subjected to an arbitrary constrain. Finally, we generalize field-theoretical schemes inherent in concrete calculi in the Naudts manner. From the physical point of view, we study dependences of both one-site partition function and variance of free fields on deformations. We show that within the basic-deformed statistics dependence of the specific partition function on deformation has in logarithmic axes symmetrical form with respect to maximum related to deformation absence; in case of the finite-difference statistics, the partition function takes non-deformed value; for the Kaniadakis statistics, curves of related dependences have convex symmetrical form at small curvatures of the effective action and concave form at large ones. We demonstrate that only moment of the second order of free fields takes non-zero values to be proportional to inverse curvature of effective action. In dependence of the deformation parameter, the free field variance has linearly arising form for the basic-deformed distribution and increases non-linearly rapidly in case of the finite-difference statistics; for more complicated case of the Kaniadakis distribution, related dependence has double-well form.

  3. Intraoperative measurement of indenter-induced brain deformation: a feasibility study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Songbai; Fan, Xiaoyao; Roberts, David W.; Paulsen, Keith D.

    2014-03-01

    Accurate measurement of soft tissue material properties is critical for characterizing its biomechanical behaviors but can be challenging especially for the human brain in vivo. In this study, we investigated the feasibility of inducing and detecting cortical surface deformation intraoperatively for patients undergoing open skull neurosurgeries. A custom diskshaped indenter made of high-density tungsten (diameter of 15 mm with a thickness of 6 mm) was used to induce deformation on the brain cortical surface immediately after dural opening. Before and after placing the indenter, sequences (typically 250 frames at 15 frames-per-second, or ~17 seconds) of high-resolution stereo image pairs were acquired to capture the harmonic motion of the exposed cortical surface as due to blood pressure pulsation and respiration. For each sequence with the first left image serving as a baseline, an optical-flow motion-tracking algorithm was used to detect in-sequence cortical surface deformation. The resulting displacements of the exposed features within the craniotomy were spatially averaged to identify the temporal frames corresponding to motion peak magnitudes. Corresponding image pairs were then selected to reconstruct full-field three-dimensional (3D) cortical surfaces before and after indentation, respectively, from which full 3D displacement fields were obtained by registering their projection images. With one clinical patient case, we illustrate the feasibility of the technique in detecting indenter-induced cortical surface deformation in order to allow subsequent processing to determine material properties of the brain in vivo.

  4. Deformed Palmprint Matching Based on Stable Regions.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiangqian; Zhao, Qiushi

    2015-12-01

    Palmprint recognition (PR) is an effective technology for personal recognition. A main problem, which deteriorates the performance of PR, is the deformations of palmprint images. This problem becomes more severe on contactless occasions, in which images are acquired without any guiding mechanisms, and hence critically limits the applications of PR. To solve the deformation problems, in this paper, a model for non-linearly deformed palmprint matching is derived by approximating non-linear deformed palmprint images with piecewise-linear deformed stable regions. Based on this model, a novel approach for deformed palmprint matching, named key point-based block growing (KPBG), is proposed. In KPBG, an iterative M-estimator sample consensus algorithm based on scale invariant feature transform features is devised to compute piecewise-linear transformations to approximate the non-linear deformations of palmprints, and then, the stable regions complying with the linear transformations are decided using a block growing algorithm. Palmprint feature extraction and matching are performed over these stable regions to compute matching scores for decision. Experiments on several public palmprint databases show that the proposed models and the KPBG approach can effectively solve the deformation problem in palmprint verification and outperform the state-of-the-art methods. PMID:26390453

  5. Solute transport through a deforming porous medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, Glen P.; Smith, David W.

    2002-06-01

    Solute transport through a porous medium is typically modelled assuming the porous medium is rigid. However, many applications exist where the porous medium is deforming, including, municipal landfill liners, mine tailings dams, and land subsidence. In this paper, mass balance laws are used to derive the flow and transport equations for a deforming porous medium. The equations are derived in both spatial and material co-ordinate systems. Solute transport through an engineered landfill liner is used as an illustrative example to show the differences between the theory for a rigid porous medium, and small and large deformation analysis of a deforming porous medium. It is found that the large deformation model produces shorter solute breakthrough times, followed by the small deformation model, and then the rigid porous medium model. It is also found that it is important to include spatial and temporal void ratio variations in the large deformation analysis. It is shown that a non-linear large deformation model may greatly reduce the solute breakthrough time, compared to a standard transport analysis typically employed by environmental engineers.

  6. Madelung Deformity and Extensor Tendon Rupture.

    PubMed

    Shahcheraghi, Gholam Hossain; Peyman, Maryam; Mozafarian, Kamran

    2015-07-01

    Extensor tendon rupture in chronic Madelung deformity, as a result of tendon attrition on the dislocated distal ulna, is a rare occurrence. It is, however, seen more often in rheumatoid arthritis. There are few case reports in the English-language literature on this issue. We report a case of multiple tendon ruptures in a previously undiagnosed Madelung deformity. PMID:26161772

  7. Inflated Soft Actuators with Reversible Stable Deformations.

    PubMed

    Hines, Lindsey; Petersen, Kirstin; Sitti, Metin

    2016-05-01

    Most soft robotic systems are currently dependent on bulky compressors or pumps. A soft actuation method is presented combining hyperelastic membranes and dielectric elastomer actuators to switch between stable deformations of sealed chambers. This method is capable of large repeatable deformations, and has a number of stable states proportional to the number of actuatable membranes in the chamber. PMID:27008455

  8. Interactive multigrid refinement for deformable image registration.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Wu; Xie, Yaoqin

    2013-01-01

    Deformable image registration is the spatial mapping of corresponding locations between images and can be used for important applications in radiotherapy. Although numerous methods have attempted to register deformable medical images automatically, such as salient-feature-based registration (SFBR), free-form deformation (FFD), and demons, no automatic method for registration is perfect, and no generic automatic algorithm has shown to work properly for clinical applications due to the fact that the deformation field is often complex and cannot be estimated well by current automatic deformable registration methods. This paper focuses on how to revise registration results interactively for deformable image registration. We can manually revise the transformed image locally in a hierarchical multigrid manner to make the transformed image register well with the reference image. The proposed method is based on multilevel B-spline to interactively revise the deformable transformation in the overlapping region between the reference image and the transformed image. The resulting deformation controls the shape of the transformed image and produces a nice registration or improves the registration results of other registration methods. Experimental results in clinical medical images for adaptive radiotherapy demonstrated the effectiveness of the proposed method. PMID:24232828

  9. Measuring Viscoelastic Deformation with an Optical Mouse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ng, T. W.

    2004-01-01

    The feasibility of using an optical mouse to track the viscoelastic deformation of low-density polyethylene films that have a fixed attached load is presented. It is seen that using an optical mouse and with rudimentary experiment paraphernalia and arrangement, it is possible to get good measurements of viscoelastic deformation.

  10. Plate-tectonic mechanism of Laramide deformation.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hamilton, W.

    1981-01-01

    The Laramide compressive deformation of the craton was caused by a clockwise rotation of about 2-4o of the Colorado Plateau region relative to the continental interior, during late Late Cretaceous and early Tertiary time. Late Paleozoic and Neogene deformation of the craton also were produced by motion of a southwestern subplate relative to the continental interior. -from Author

  11. Nanoplasmonic ruler to measure lipid vesicle deformation.

    PubMed

    Jackman, Joshua A; Špačková, Barbora; Linardy, Eric; Kim, Min Chul; Yoon, Bo Kyeong; Homola, Jiří; Cho, Nam-Joon

    2016-01-01

    A nanoplasmonic ruler method is presented in order to measure the deformation of adsorbed, nm-scale lipid vesicles on solid supports. It is demonstrated that single adsorbed vesicles undergo greater deformation on silicon oxide over titanium oxide, offering direct experimental evidence to support membrane tension-based theoretical models of supported lipid bilayer formation. PMID:26466086

  12. Online Deformable Object Tracking Based on Structure-Aware Hyper-Graph.

    PubMed

    Du, Dawei; Qi, Honggang; Li, Wenbo; Wen, Longyin; Huang, Qingming; Lyu, Siwei

    2016-08-01

    Recent advances in online visual tracking focus on designing part-based model to handle the deformation and occlusion challenges. However, previous methods usually consider only the pairwise structural dependences of target parts in two consecutive frames rather than the higher order constraints in multiple frames, making them less effective in handling large deformation and occlusion challenges. This paper describes a new and efficient method for online deformable object tracking. Different from most existing methods, this paper exploits higher order structural dependences of different parts of the tracking target in multiple consecutive frames. We construct a structure-aware hyper-graph to capture such higher order dependences, and solve the tracking problem by searching dense subgraphs on it. Furthermore, we also describe a new evaluating data set for online deformable object tracking (the Deform-SOT data set), which includes 50 challenging sequences with full annotations that represent realistic tracking challenges, such as large deformations and severe occlusions. The experimental result of the proposed method shows considerable improvement in performance over the state-of-the-art tracking methods. PMID:27214901

  13. A low-dimensional deformation model for cancer cells in flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, A. M.; Berny-Lang, M. A.; Liao, S.; Kanso, E.; Kuhn, P.; McCarty, O. J. T.; Newton, P. K.

    2012-08-01

    A low-dimensional parametric deformation model of a cancer cell under shear flow is developed. The model is built around an experiment in which MDA-MB-231 adherent cells are subjected to flow with increasing shear. The cell surface deformation is imaged using differential interference contrast microscopy imaging techniques until the cell releases into the flow. We post-process the time sequence of images using an active shape model from which we obtain the principal components of deformation. These principal components are then used to obtain the parameters in an empirical constitutive equation determining the cell deformations as a function of the fluid normal and shear forces imparted. The cell surface is modeled as a 2D Gaussian interface which can be deformed with three active parameters: H (height), σx (x-width), and σy (y-width). Fluid forces are calculated on the cell surface by discretizing the surface with regularized Stokeslets, and the flow is driven by a stochastically fluctuating pressure gradient. The Stokeslet strengths are obtained so that viscous boundary conditions are enforced on the surface of the cell and the surrounding plate. We show that the low-dimensional model is able to capture the principal deformations of the cell reasonably well and argue that active shape models can be exploited further as a useful tool to bridge the gap between experiments, models, and numerical simulations in this biological setting.

  14. Microstructural evolution in ultra-fine grained copper processed by severe plastic deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Anuj

    Equal Channel Angular Pressing (ECAP) is a severe plastic deformation technique that was used to produce ultra-fine grained copper. The microstructure was optimized using different deformation sequences. A steady state grain size of 200--500 nm was routinely obtained after eight passes (with an effective strain of ˜1 per pass). This resulted in a random texture evidenced by EBSD results. The mechanical response was obtained under quasi-static and dynamic conditions. The evolution of microstructure upon repeated ECAP passes was characterized by TEM and EBSD techniques. The features of grain refinement process were captured using analytical models. The minimum grain size obtained, 200--500 nm, was quantitatively explained by means of grain boundary rotation and grain boundary mobility calculations at the temperature reached in deformation process (˜360 K). The ultra-fine grained structure produced in Cu by ECAP was found to be thermally unstable. The microstructure recrystallized upon being dynamically deformed due to the adiabatic temperature rise imparted by plastic deformation. This was observed in three modes of high-strain rate plastic deformation experiments: cylindrical and hat-shaped specimens in Hopkinson bar experiments and cylindrical specimens in reverse Taylor impact experiments.

  15. Deformation Mechanisms of Antigorite Serpentinite at Subduction Zone Conditions Determined from Experimentally and Naturally Deformed Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auzende, A. L.; Escartin, J.; Walte, N.; Guillot, S.; Hirth, G.; Frost, D. J.

    2014-12-01

    The rheology of serpentinite, and particularly that of antigorite-bearing rocks, is of prime importance for understanding subduction zone proceses, including decoupling between the downwelling slab and the overriding plate, exhumation of high-pressure rocks, fluids pathways and, more generally, mantle wedge dynamics. We present results from deformation-DIA experiments on antigorite serpentinite performed under conditions relevant of subduction zones (1-3.5 GPa ; 400-650°C). We complemented our study with a sample deformed in a Griggs-type apparatus at 1 GPa and 400°C (Chernak and Hirth, EPSL, 2010), and with natural samples from Cuba and the Alps deformed under blueschist/eclogitic conditions. Our observations on experimental samples of antigorite deformed within its stability field show that deformation is dominated by cataclastic flow; we can only document a minor contribution of plastic deformation. In naturally deformed samples, deformation-related plastic structures largely dominate strain accommodation, but we also document a minor contribution of brittle deformation. When dehydration occurs in experiments, plasticity increases, and is coupled to local embrittlement attributed to hydraulic fracturating due to the migration of dehydration fluids. Our results thus show that semibrittle deformation operates within and above the stability field of antigorite. We also document that the corrugated structure of antigorite has a control on the strain accommodation mechanisms under subduction conditions, with preferred inter and intra-cracking along (001) and gliding along both a and b. Deformation dominated by brittle processes, as observed in experiments, may occur during deformation at elevated (seismic?) strain rates, while plastic deformation, as observed in naturally deformed rocks, may correspond instead to low strain rates instead (aseismic creep?). We also discuss the role of antigorite rheology and mode of deformation on fluid transport.

  16. Deformation Measurements of Smart Aerodynamic Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleming, Gary A.; Burner, Alpheus

    2005-01-01

    Video Model Deformation (VMD) and Projection Moire Interferometry (PMI) were used to acquire wind tunnel model deformation measurements of the Northrop Grumman-built Smart Wing tested in the NASA Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel. The F18-E/F planform Smart Wing was outfitted with embedded shape memory alloys to actuate a seamless trailing edge aileron and flap, and an embedded torque tube to generate wing twist. The VMD system was used to obtain highly accurate deformation measurements at three spanwise locations along the main body of the wing, and at spanwise locations on the flap and aileron. The PMI system was used to obtain full-field wing shape and deformation measurements over the entire wing lower surface. Although less accurate than the VMD system, the PMI system revealed deformations occurring between VMD target rows indistinguishable by VMD. This paper presents the VMD and PMI techniques and discusses their application in the Smart Wing test.

  17. Strong crystal size effect on deformation twinning.

    PubMed

    Yu, Qian; Shan, Zhi-Wei; Li, Ju; Huang, Xiaoxu; Xiao, Lin; Sun, Jun; Ma, Evan

    2010-01-21

    Deformation twinning in crystals is a highly coherent inelastic shearing process that controls the mechanical behaviour of many materials, but its origin and spatio-temporal features are shrouded in mystery. Using micro-compression and in situ nano-compression experiments, here we find that the stress required for deformation twinning increases drastically with decreasing sample size of a titanium alloy single crystal, until the sample size is reduced to one micrometre, below which the deformation twinning is entirely replaced by less correlated, ordinary dislocation plasticity. Accompanying the transition in deformation mechanism, the maximum flow stress of the submicrometre-sized pillars was observed to saturate at a value close to titanium's ideal strength. We develop a 'stimulated slip' model to explain the strong size dependence of deformation twinning. The sample size in transition is relatively large and easily accessible in experiments, making our understanding of size dependence relevant for applications. PMID:20090749

  18. Deformation measurements of smart aerodynamic surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleming, Gary A.; Burner, Alpheus W.

    1999-10-01

    Video Model Deformation (VMD) and Projection Moire Interferometry (PMI) were used to acquire wind tunnel model deformation measurements of the Northrop Grumman-built Smart Wing tested in the NASA Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel. The F18-E/F platform Smart Wing was outfitted with embedded shape memory alloys to actuate a seamless trailing edge aileron and flat, and an embedded torque tube to generate wing twist. The VMD system was used to obtain highly accurate deformation measurements at three spanwise locations along the main body of the wing, and at spanwise locations on the flap and aileron. The PMI system was used to obtain full-field wing shape and deformation measurements over the entire wing lower surface. Although less accurate than the VMD system, the PMI system revealed deformations occurring between VMD target rows indistinguishable by VMD. This paper presents the VMD and PMI techniques and discusses their application in the Smart Wing test.

  19. CubeSat deformable mirror demonstration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cahoy, Kerri; Marinan, Anne; Kerr, Caitlin; Cheng, Kezi; Jamil, Sara

    2012-09-01

    The goal of the CubeSat Deformable Mirror Demonstration (DeMi) is to characterize the performance of a small deformable mirror over a year in low-Earth orbit. Small form factor deformable mirrors are a key technology needed to correct optical system aberrations in high contrast, high dynamic range space telescope applications such as space-based coronagraphic direct imaging of exoplanets. They can also improve distortions and reduce bit error rates for space-based laser communication systems. While follow-on missions can take advantage of this general 3U CubeSat platform to test the on-orbit performance of several different types of deformable mirrors, this first design accommodates a 32-actuator Boston Micromachines MEMS deformable mirror.

  20. Scoliosis and tibiotarsal deformities in broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Droual, R; Bickford, A A; Farver, T B

    1991-01-01

    The incidence and degree of scoliosis were investigated in broiler chickens with and without intertarsal deformities associated with slipped gastrocnemius tendons. In both groups, the incidence of scoliosis was similar and there was a significant tendency for scoliosis to be convex on the right side. However, scoliosis was significantly greater in birds with intertarsal deformities, and in a significant proportion of these the joint with a slipped tendon was on the convex side of scoliosis. In birds with deformities, inequalities between right and left tibiotarsi were significantly greater, and tibiotarsi with greater length, narrower condyles and trochleae, and shallower trochlear grooves were significantly more often on the convex side of scoliosis. Significant positive correlations were found between scoliosis and rotational and bending deformities of the distal tibiotarsus on the convex side of scoliosis. These findings suggest a cause-and-effect relationship between scoliosis and tibiotarsal deformities associated with slipped tendons. PMID:2029256

  1. Deformation-based surface morphometry applied to gray matter deformation.

    PubMed

    Chung, Moo K; Worsley, Keith J; Robbins, Steve; Paus, Tomás; Taylor, Jonathan; Giedd, Jay N; Rapoport, Judith L; Evans, Alan C

    2003-02-01

    We present a unified statistical approach to deformation-based morphometry applied to the cortical surface. The cerebral cortex has the topology of a 2D highly convoluted sheet. As the brain develops over time, the cortical surface area, thickness, curvature, and total gray matter volume change. It is highly likely that such age-related surface changes are not uniform. By measuring how such surface metrics change over time, the regions of the most rapid structural changes can be localized. We avoided using surface flattening, which distorts the inherent geometry of the cortex in our analysis and it is only used in visualization. To increase the signal to noise ratio, diffusion smoothing, which generalizes Gaussian kernel smoothing to an arbitrary curved cortical surface, has been developed and applied to surface data. Afterward, statistical inference on the cortical surface will be performed via random fields theory. As an illustration, we demonstrate how this new surface-based morphometry can be applied in localizing the cortical regions of the gray matter tissue growth and loss in the brain images longitudinally collected in the group of children and adolescents. PMID:12595176

  2. Inelastic deformation and dislocation structure of a nickel alloy - Effects of deformation and thermal histories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, K. S.; Page, R. A.

    1988-01-01

    Inelastic deformation behavior of the cast Ni-base alloy, B1900 + Hf, was investigated using data from step-temperature tensile tests and thermomechanical cyclic tests in the temperature ranges 538-760 C and 760-982 C. The deformation results were correlated with the dislocation structures of deformed specimens, identified by TEM. It was found that, in the 760-982 C temperature range, there are no thermal history effects in the inelastic deformation behavior of B1900 + Hf. In the 538-760 range, anomalous cyclic hardening and, possibly, thermal history effects were observed in thermomechanically deformed alloy, caused by sessile (010) dislocations in the gamma-prime phase.

  3. The properties of Q-deformed hyperbolic and trigonometric functions in quantum deformation

    SciTech Connect

    Deta, U. A. E-mail: utamadeta@unesa.ac.id; Suparmi

    2015-09-30

    Quantum deformation has been studied due to its relation with applications in nuclear physics, conformal field theory, and statistical-quantum theory. The q-deformation of hyperbolic function was introduced by Arai. The application of q-deformed functions has been widely used in quantum mechanics. The properties of this two kinds of system explained in this paper including their derivative. The graph of q-deformed functions presented using Matlab. The special case is given for modified Poschl-Teller plus q-deformed Scarf II trigonometry potentials.

  4. The properties of Q-deformed hyperbolic and trigonometric functions in quantum deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deta, U. A.; Suparmi

    2015-09-01

    Quantum deformation has been studied due to its relation with applications in nuclear physics, conformal field theory, and statistical-quantum theory. The q-deformation of hyperbolic function was introduced by Arai. The application of q-deformed functions has been widely used in quantum mechanics. The properties of this two kinds of system explained in this paper including their derivative. The graph of q-deformed functions presented using Matlab. The special case is given for modified Poschl-Teller plus q-deformed Scarf II trigonometry potentials.

  5. Large Deformations of a Soft Porous Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacMinn, Christopher W.; Dufresne, Eric R.; Wettlaufer, John S.

    2016-04-01

    Compressing a porous material will decrease the volume of the pore space, driving fluid out. Similarly, injecting fluid into a porous material can expand the pore space, distorting the solid skeleton. This poromechanical coupling has applications ranging from cell and tissue mechanics to geomechanics and hydrogeology. The classical theory of linear poroelasticity captures this coupling by combining Darcy's law with Terzaghi's effective stress and linear elasticity in a linearized kinematic framework. Linear poroelasticity is a good model for very small deformations, but it becomes increasingly inappropriate for moderate to large deformations, which are common in the context of phenomena such as swelling and damage, and for soft materials such as gels and tissues. The well-known theory of large-deformation poroelasticity combines Darcy's law with Terzaghi's effective stress and nonlinear elasticity in a rigorous kinematic framework. This theory has been used extensively in biomechanics to model large elastic deformations in soft tissues and in geomechanics to model large elastoplastic deformations in soils. Here, we first provide an overview and discussion of this theory with an emphasis on the physics of poromechanical coupling. We present the large-deformation theory in an Eulerian framework to minimize the mathematical complexity, and we show how this nonlinear theory simplifies to linear poroelasticity under the assumption of small strain. We then compare the predictions of linear poroelasticity with those of large-deformation poroelasticity in the context of two uniaxial model problems: fluid outflow driven by an applied mechanical load (the consolidation problem) and compression driven by a steady fluid throughflow. We explore the steady and dynamical errors associated with the linear model in both situations, as well as the impact of introducing a deformation-dependent permeability. We show that the error in linear poroelasticity is due primarily to kinematic

  6. Polyphase deformation of a Paleozoic metamorphosed subduction-accretionary complex in Beishan Orogen, southern Altaids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Dongfang; Xiao, Wenjiao

    2014-05-01

    The Lebaquan Complex in central Beishan plays a significant role in understanding the subduction-accretion-collision processes of the Beishan orogenic collage, southern Altaids. This complex is a polyphase deformed upper greenschist to lower amphibolite facies metamorphic rock assemblages composed of metasedimentary sequence, gneissic plutons, metacherts, amphibolites and marbles, with multiple generations of syn-tectonic leucogranite-pegmatite and post-tectonic mafic dykes. Lithologic and geochemical characteristics show the Lebaquan Complex is a forearc-arc complex. Four stages of deformation can be recognized for the Lebaquan Complex. The D1 deformation is defined by pervasively developed foliations (S1) defined by alternative metamorphic layering and intrafolia isoclinal folds of quartz veins (F1). The D2 deformation is indicated by crenulation cleavage (S2) mainly developed in the schists, extensively-developed tight to open folds and asymmetric folds (F2) and pinch and swell structures. The D3 deformation is characterized by high-strain ductile shearing, which modified earlier structures. Small-scale asymmetric folds, σ-type porphyroclasts and S-C fabrics indicate dextral sense of shearing in east-west direction. The D4 deformation is represented by ductile to brittle structures including open/gentle folds, kink folds and small scale thrust faults which overprint earlier deformations. The overall deformation of this complex indicates a geodynamic setting change from initial north-south directed strong compression to later east-west directed transpression and finally extension. LA-ICP-MS zircon U-Pb dating was performed on key lithologies. Youngest age peak of detrital zircons from a garnet-mica-quartz schist is ~424 Ma, constraining the depositional age for the protolith of the metasedimentary sequence. A syn-deformation leucogranitic dyke that underwent D2 but did not experience D1 and a post-deformation mafic dyke that intrudes all the lithologies were

  7. Tracking of object deformations in color and depth video: deformation models and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordt, Andreas; Reinhold, Stefan; Koch, Reinhard

    2015-05-01

    The research on deformation tracking based on color image data has continuously gained a wide interest in the last 15 years. In addition, using depth sensors such as the Microsoft Kinect, allows to mitigate the ambiguity problems that arise when trying to solve the deformation tracking tasks on color images only, by adding depth information. However, the fusion of color and depth data is not straight forward, and the deformation tracking task is still ill-posed due to the lack of a general deformation model. The problem is usually circumvented by providing special deformation functions for the task at hand, e.g., skeleton-based for reconstructing people or triangle-based for tracking planar surfaces. In this article we summarize the Analysis by Synthesis (AbS) approach for deformation tracking in depth and color video and show some successful applications of specialized deformation functions. To overcome the issues with NURBS based deformation tracking we propose a new geodesic RBF-based deformation model, which can adapt to any surface topology and shape, while keeping the number of deformation parameters low. Example deformations for objects of different topologies are given, showing the versatility and efficiency of the proposed model.

  8. Deformation mechanisms of antigorite serpentinite at subduction zone conditions determined from experimentally and naturally deformed rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auzende, Anne-Line; Escartin, Javier; Walte, Nicolas P.; Guillot, Stéphane; Hirth, Greg; Frost, Daniel J.

    2015-02-01

    We performed deformation-DIA experiments on antigorite serpentinite at pressures of 1-3.5 GPa and temperatures of between 400 and 650 °C, bracketing the stability of antigorite under subduction zone conditions. For each set of pressure-temperature (P-T) conditions, we conducted two runs at strain rates of 5 ×10-5 and 1 ×10-4 s-1. We complemented our study with a sample deformed in a Griggs-type apparatus at 1 GPa and 400 °C (Chernak and Hirth, 2010), and with natural samples from Cuba and the Alps deformed under blueschist/eclogitic conditions. Optical and transmission electron microscopies were used for microstructural characterization and determination of deformation mechanisms. Our observations on experimentally deformed antigorite prior to breakdown show that deformation is dominated by cataclastic flow with observable but minor contribution of plastic deformation (microkinking and (001) gliding mainly expressed by stacking disorder mainly). In contrast, in naturally deformed samples, plastic deformation structures are dominant (stacking disorder, kinking, pressure solution), with minor but also perceptible contribution of brittle deformation. When dehydration occurs in experiments, plasticity increases and is coupled to local embrittlement that we attribute to antigorite dehydration. In dehydrating samples collected in the Alps, embrittlement is also observed suggesting that dehydration may contribute to intermediate-depth seismicity. Our results thus show that semibrittle deformation operates within and above the stability field of antigorite. However, the plastic deformation recorded by naturally deformed samples was likely acquired at low strain rates. We also document that the corrugated structure of antigorite controls the strain accommodation mechanisms under subduction conditions, with preferred inter- and intra-grain cracking along (001) and gliding along both a and b. We also show that antigorite rheology in subduction zones is partly controlled

  9. The generalized quaternion sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deveci, Ömür

    2016-04-01

    In this work, we define the recurrence sequence by using the relation matrix of the generalized quaternion group and then, we obtain miscellaneous properties of this sequence. Also, we obtain the cyclic groups and the semigroups which are produced by generating matrix of the sequence defined when read modulo m. Furthermore, we study this sequence modulo m, and then we derive the relationship among the order the cyclic groups obtained and the periods of the sequence defined.

  10. Deformability-based capsule sorting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Goff, Anne; Munier, Nadege; Maire, Pauline; Edwards-Levy, Florence; Salsac, Anne-Virginie

    2015-11-01

    Many microfluidic devices have been developed for cancer diagnosis applications, most of which relying on costly antibodies. Since some cancer cells display abnormal mechanical properties, new sorting tools based on mechanical sensing are of particular interest. We present a simple, passive pinched flow microfluidic system for capsule sorting. The device consists of a straight microchannel containing a cylindrical obstacle. Thanks to a flow-focusing module placed at the channel entrance, capsules arrive well-centered in the vicinity of the obstacle. Pure size-sorting can be achieved at low shear rate. When increasing the shear rate, capsules are deformed in the narrow space between the pillar and the wall. The softer the capsule, the more tightly it wraps around the obstacle. After the obstacle, streamlines diverge, allowing for the separation between soft capsules, that follow central streamlines, and stiff capsules, that drift away from the obstacle with a wider angle. This proves that we have developed a flexible multipurpose sorting microsystem based on a simple design.

  11. Capillary deformations of bendable films.

    PubMed

    Schroll, R D; Adda-Bedia, M; Cerda, E; Huang, J; Menon, N; Russell, T P; Toga, K B; Vella, D; Davidovitch, B

    2013-07-01

    We address the partial wetting of liquid drops on ultrathin solid sheets resting on a deformable foundation. Considering the membrane limit of sheets that can relax compression through wrinkling at negligible energetic cost, we revisit the classical theory for the contact of liquid drops on solids. Our calculations and experiments show that the liquid-solid-vapor contact angle is modified from the Young angle, even though the elastic bulk modulus (E) of the sheet is so large that the ratio between the surface tension γ and E is of molecular size. This finding indicates a new elastocapillary phenomenon that stems from the high bendability of very thin elastic sheets rather than from material softness. We also show that the size of the wrinkle pattern that emerges in the sheet is fully predictable, thus resolving a puzzle in modeling "drop-on-a-floating-sheet" experiments and enabling a quantitative, calibration-free use of this setup for the metrology of ultrathin films. PMID:23863002

  12. Mathematical textbook of deformable neuroanatomies.

    PubMed Central

    Miller, M I; Christensen, G E; Amit, Y; Grenander, U

    1993-01-01

    Mathematical techniques are presented for the transformation of digital anatomical textbooks from the ideal to the individual, allowing for the representation of the variabilities manifest in normal human anatomies. The ideal textbook is constructed on a fixed coordinate system to contain all of the information currently available about the physical properties of neuroanatomies. This information is obtained via sensor probes such as magnetic resonance, as well as computed axial and emission tomography, along with symbolic information such as white- and gray-matter tracts, nuclei, etc. Human variability associated with individuals is accommodated by defining probabilistic transformations on the textbook coordinate system, the transformations forming mathematical translation groups of high dimension. The ideal is applied to the individual patient by finding the transformation which is consistent with physical properties of deformable elastic solids and which brings the coordinate system of the textbook to that of the patient. Registration, segmentation, and fusion all result automatically because the textbook carries symbolic values as well as multisensor features. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 PMID:8265653

  13. Weak associativity and deformation quantization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kupriyanov, V. G.

    2016-09-01

    Non-commutativity and non-associativity are quite natural in string theory. For open strings it appears due to the presence of non-vanishing background two-form in the world volume of Dirichlet brane, while in closed string theory the flux compactifications with non-vanishing three-form also lead to non-geometric backgrounds. In this paper, working in the framework of deformation quantization, we study the violation of associativity imposing the condition that the associator of three elements should vanish whenever each two of them are equal. The corresponding star products are called alternative and satisfy important for physical applications properties like the Moufang identities, alternative identities, Artin's theorem, etc. The condition of alternativity is invariant under the gauge transformations, just like it happens in the associative case. The price to pay is the restriction on the non-associative algebra which can be represented by the alternative star product, it should satisfy the Malcev identity. The example of nontrivial Malcev algebra is the algebra of imaginary octonions. For this case we construct an explicit expression of the non-associative and alternative star product. We also discuss the quantization of Malcev-Poisson algebras of general form, study its properties and provide the lower order expression for the alternative star product. To conclude we define the integration on the algebra of the alternative star products and show that the integrated associator vanishes.

  14. Crustal deformation: Earth vs Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turcotte, D. L.

    1989-01-01

    It is timely to consider the possible tectonic regimes on Venus both in terms of what is known about Venus and in terms of deformation mechanisms operative on the earth. Plate tectonic phenomena dominate tectonics on the earth. Horizontal displacements are associated with the creation of new crust at ridges and destruction of crust at trenches. The presence of plate tectonics on Venus is debated, but there is certainly no evidence for the trenches associated with subduction on the earth. An essential question is what kind of tectonics can be expected if there is no plate tectonics on Venus. Mars and the Moon are reference examples. Volcanic constructs appear to play a dominant role on Mars but their role on Venus is not clear. On single plate planets and satellites, tectonic structures are often associated with thermal stresses. Cooling of a planet leads to thermal contraction and surface compressive features. Delamination has been propsed for Venus by several authors. Delamination is associated with the subduction of the mantle lithosphere and possibly the lower crust but not the upper crust. The surface manifestations of delamination are unclear. There is some evidence that delamination is occurring beneath the Transverse Ranges in California. Delamination will certainly lead to lithospheric thinning and is likely to lead to uplift and crustal thinning.

  15. Mathematical textbook of deformable neuroanatomies.

    PubMed

    Miller, M I; Christensen, G E; Amit, Y; Grenander, U

    1993-12-15

    Mathematical techniques are presented for the transformation of digital anatomical textbooks from the ideal to the individual, allowing for the representation of the variabilities manifest in normal human anatomies. The ideal textbook is constructed on a fixed coordinate system to contain all of the information currently available about the physical properties of neuroanatomies. This information is obtained via sensor probes such as magnetic resonance, as well as computed axial and emission tomography, along with symbolic information such as white- and gray-matter tracts, nuclei, etc. Human variability associated with individuals is accommodated by defining probabilistic transformations on the textbook coordinate system, the transformations forming mathematical translation groups of high dimension. The ideal is applied to the individual patient by finding the transformation which is consistent with physical properties of deformable elastic solids and which brings the coordinate system of the textbook to that of the patient. Registration, segmentation, and fusion all result automatically because the textbook carries symbolic values as well as multisensor features. PMID:8265653

  16. Capillary Deformations of Bendable Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schroll, R. D.; Adda-Bedia, M.; Cerda, E.; Huang, J.; Menon, N.; Russell, T. P.; Toga, K. B.; Vella, D.; Davidovitch, B.

    2013-07-01

    We address the partial wetting of liquid drops on ultrathin solid sheets resting on a deformable foundation. Considering the membrane limit of sheets that can relax compression through wrinkling at negligible energetic cost, we revisit the classical theory for the contact of liquid drops on solids. Our calculations and experiments show that the liquid-solid-vapor contact angle is modified from the Young angle, even though the elastic bulk modulus (E) of the sheet is so large that the ratio between the surface tension γ and E is of molecular size. This finding indicates a new elastocapillary phenomenon that stems from the high bendability of very thin elastic sheets rather than from material softness. We also show that the size of the wrinkle pattern that emerges in the sheet is fully predictable, thus resolving a puzzle in modeling “drop-on-a-floating-sheet” experiments and enabling a quantitative, calibration-free use of this setup for the metrology of ultrathin films.

  17. Evaluating a robust contour tracker on echocardiographic sequences.

    PubMed

    Jacob, G; Noble, J A; Mulet-Parada, M; Blake, A

    1999-03-01

    In this paper we present an evaluation of a robust visual image tracker on echocardiographic image sequences. We show how the tracking framework can be customized to define an appropriate shape space that describes heart shape deformations that can be learnt from a training data set. We also investigate energy-based temporal boundary enhancement methods to improve image feature measurement. Results are presented demonstrating real-time tracking on real normal heart motion data sequences and abnormal synthesized and real heart motion data sequences. We conclude by discussing some of our current research efforts. PMID:10709697

  18. Models of the Dynamic Deformations of Polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merzhievsky, Lev; Voronin, Mihail; Korchagina, Anna

    2013-06-01

    In the process of deformation under the influence of external loading polymeric mediums show the complicated behavior connected with features of their structure. For amorphous polymers distinguish three physical conditions - glasslike, highlyelastic and viscoplastic. To each of the listed conditions there corresponds to mikro - meso- and macrostructural mechanisms of irreversible deformation. In the report the review of results of construction of models for the description of dynamic and shock-wave deformation of the polymers which are based on developed authors representations about mechanisms of irreversible deformation is made. Models include the formulation of the equations of conservation laws, considering effect of a relaxation of shear stresses in the process of deformation. For closing of models the equations of states with nonspherical tensor of deformations and relation for time of a relaxation of shear stresses are constructed. With using of the formulated models a number of problems of dynamic and shock wave deformations has been solved. The results are compared with corresponding experimental date. Development of the used approach are in summary discussed. To taking into account memory and fractal properties of real polymers is supposed of derivatives and integrals of a fractional order to use. Examples of constitutive equations with derivatives of a fractional order are presented. This work is supported by the Integration project of the Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Science 64 and grant RFBR 12-01-00726.

  19. Ultrasound evaluation of foot deformities in infants.

    PubMed

    Miron, Marie-Claude; Grimard, Guy

    2016-02-01

    Foot deformity in infants is the most common congenital musculoskeletal condition. A precise diagnosis can sometimes be impossible to establish clinically. Radiologic imaging plays a major role in the evaluation of musculoskeletal abnormalities. However conventional imaging techniques, such as plain radiographs of the foot, are of very little help in this age group because of the lack of ossification of the tarsal bones. US presents a significant advantage because it permits the visualization of cartilaginous structures. This leads to the detailed assessment of foot deformities in infants. Furthermore, US can also be used as a dynamic imaging modality. Different scanning views are beneficial to evaluate the complete anatomy of the foot; depending on the suspected clinical diagnosis, some planes are more informative to display the pathological features of a specific deformity. We describe the US findings of five of the most common foot deformities referred to our pediatric orthopedic clinic (clubfoot, simple metatarsus adductus, skewfoot, and oblique and vertical talus). For each deformity we propose a specific imaging protocol based on US to provide an accurate diagnosis. US is a complementary tool to the clinical examination for determining the diagnosis and the severity of the deformity and also for monitoring the efficacy of treatment. Radiologists investigating foot deformities in infants should consider using US for the detailed assessment of the foot in this age group. PMID:26459012

  20. Salient region preservation for image deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yong; Lai, Jianhuang; Yuen, Pong C.; Xie, Xiaohua

    2014-11-01

    We present an interactive image deformation method which preserves the local shapes of salient objects in the concerned image during the deformation. The proposed method falls into the moving least squares (MLS) framework, but notably differs from the original MLS deformation method. First, a saliency-related distance is developed to replace the original Euclidean distance in the weight definition. Second, the original affine matrix is decomposed into a single rotation matrix and a symmetric matrix by using a singular value decomposition, then the free parameters of these matrices are interpolated according to the saliency information. Furthermore, for the line-based MLS deformation, the closed-form solution of weight cannot be found directly when using the proposed saliency-based distance. To address this problem, we propose a method using an exponential transformation to regulate the weight where the regulation factor is also correlated to saliency information. All these revisions lead a saliency-sensitive mapping which creates a deformation change in the nonvital parts of image while preserving the local shapes of salient parts. Experimental results show that the proposed deformation outperforms the original MLS deformation in terms of visual performance.

  1. A Deformable Atlas of the Laboratory Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hongkai; Stout, David B.; Chatziioannou, Arion F.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose This paper presents a deformable mouse atlas of the laboratory mouse anatomy. This atlas is fully articulated and can be positioned into arbitrary body poses. The atlas can also adapt body weight by changing body length and fat amount. Procedures A training set of 103 micro-CT images was used to construct the atlas. A cage-based deformation method was applied to realize the articulated pose change. The weight-related body deformation was learned from the training set using a linear regression method. A conditional Gaussian model and thin-plate spline mapping were used to deform the internal organs following the changes of pose and weight. Results The atlas was deformed into different body poses and weights, and the deformation results were more realistic compared to the results achieved with other mouse atlases. The organ weights of this atlas matched well with the measurements of real mouse organ weights. This atlas can also be converted into voxelized images with labeled organs, pseudo CT images and tetrahedral mesh for phantom studies. Conclusions With the unique ability of articulated pose and weight changes, the deformable laboratory mouse atlas can become a valuable tool for preclinical image analysis. PMID:25049072

  2. Motion of deformable ring made of IPMC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Firouzeh, Amir; Alasty, Aria; Ozmaeian, Masoumeh

    2011-11-01

    In this paper application of Ionic Polymer Metal Composite (IPMC) as actuator in a deformable ring capable of locomotion is studied. Such a deformable ring moves as a result of gravitational force acting on its body when its shape changes. It can be used in exploration, search and rescue missions in future, where using conventional robots with rigid bodies and actuators is impossible. Large deformation induced by small stimulating voltage, low stiffness the sensing characteristics that in future work can be used in feedback control make IPMC a good choice for such an application. In this work first a model for IPMC is introduce that can be used in simulating deformation of IPMC in different arrangements of actuators. Since in this research we used our own fabricated IPMC, next we present characterization tests and identification results for model's parameters. Then using this model in simulation possibility of generating locomotion using body deformation in a ring made of IPMC is confirmed. Finally result of experiment on deformable ring is presented and possibility of implementation of the proposed design is confirmed. Based on this work, more accurate models can be developed to get better compatibility between experiment and simulation results. Also by modifying fabrication techniques, a deformable ring with faster and steadier movement can be made in future.

  3. Motion of deformable ring made of IPMC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Firouzeh, Amir; Alasty, Aria; Ozmaeian, Masoumeh

    2012-04-01

    In this paper application of Ionic Polymer Metal Composite (IPMC) as actuator in a deformable ring capable of locomotion is studied. Such a deformable ring moves as a result of gravitational force acting on its body when its shape changes. It can be used in exploration, search and rescue missions in future, where using conventional robots with rigid bodies and actuators is impossible. Large deformation induced by small stimulating voltage, low stiffness the sensing characteristics that in future work can be used in feedback control make IPMC a good choice for such an application. In this work first a model for IPMC is introduce that can be used in simulating deformation of IPMC in different arrangements of actuators. Since in this research we used our own fabricated IPMC, next we present characterization tests and identification results for model's parameters. Then using this model in simulation possibility of generating locomotion using body deformation in a ring made of IPMC is confirmed. Finally result of experiment on deformable ring is presented and possibility of implementation of the proposed design is confirmed. Based on this work, more accurate models can be developed to get better compatibility between experiment and simulation results. Also by modifying fabrication techniques, a deformable ring with faster and steadier movement can be made in future.

  4. Deformed symmetries from quantum relational observables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girelli, Florian; Poulin, David

    2007-05-01

    Deformed Special Relativity (DSR) is a candidate phenomenological theory to describe the Quantum Gravitational (QG) semi-classical regime. A possible interpretation of DSR can be derived from the notion of deformed reference frame. Observables in (quantum) General Relativity can be constructed from (quantum) reference frame - a physical observable is then a relation between a system of interest and the reference frame. We present a toy model and study an example of such quantum relational observables. We show how the intrinsic quantum nature of the reference frame naturally leads to a deformation of the symmetries, comforting DSR to be a good candidate to describe the QG semi-classical regime.

  5. Marginal deformations of nonrelativistic field theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallayev, Davron; Vázquez-Poritz, Justin F.; Zhang, Zhibai

    2014-11-01

    We construct the supergravity duals of marginal deformations of a (0, 2) Landau-Ginsburg theory that describes the supersymmetric lowest Landau level. These deformations preserve supersymmetry and it is proposed that they are associated with the introduction of a phase in the (0, 2) superpotential. We also consider marginal deformations of various field theories that exhibit Schrödinger symmetry and Lifshitz scaling. This includes countably infinite examples with dynamical exponent z =2 based on the Sasaki-Einstein spaces Yp ,q and Lp ,q ,r, as well as an example with general dynamical exponent z ≥1 .

  6. Postearthquake deformation analysis of wildlife site

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, W.H. ); Morgenstern, N.R.; Robertson, P.K. . Dept. of Civil Engineering)

    1994-02-01

    Postearthquake deformations of the Wildlife site, Imperial Valley, Calif., following the 1987 Superstition Hills earthquake, have been interpreted by finite-element deformation analyses. The analyses consider the stress redistribution and reconsolidation caused by the development of liquefaction. The stress redistribution analysis was conducted under fully undrained condition to consider the effects of strain-softening behavior of liquefied materials. The reconsolidation analysis was conducted using Biot's theory to consider the effects of dissipation of excess pore-water pressures. The results reveal that the delayed pore-water pressure response and deformation may be due to the redistribution of stresses and pore-water pressures.

  7. Deformations of GR and BH thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasnov, Kirill

    2016-08-01

    In four space–time dimensions General Relativity can be non-trivially deformed. Deformed theories continue to describe two propagating degrees of freedom, as GR. We study Euclidean black hole thermodynamics of these deformations. We use the recently developed formulation that works with {{SO}}(3) connections as well as certain matrices M of auxiliary fields. We show that the black hole entropy is given by one quarter of the horizon area as measured by the Lie algebra valued two-form MF, where F is the connection curvature. This coincides with the horizon area as measured by the metric only for the case of General Relativity.

  8. Liquid Droplets on a Highly Deformable Membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulman, Rafael D.; Dalnoki-Veress, Kari

    2015-11-01

    We examine the deformation produced by microdroplets atop thin elastomeric and glassy free-standing films. Because of the Laplace pressure, the droplets deform the elastic membrane thereby forming a bulge. Thus, two angles define the droplet or membrane geometry: the angles the deformed bulge and the liquid surface make with the film. These angles are measured as a function of the film tension, and are in excellent agreement with a force balance at the contact line. Finally, we find that if the membrane has an anisotropic tension, the droplets are no longer spherical but become elongated along the direction of high tension.

  9. Optical tweezer for probing erythrocyte membrane deformability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Manas; Soni, Harsh; Sood, A. K.

    2009-12-01

    We report that the average rotation speed of optically trapped crenated erythrocytes is direct signature of their membrane deformability. When placed in hypertonic buffer, discocytic erythrocytes are subjected to crenation. The deformation of cells brings in chirality and asymmetry in shape that makes them rotate under the scattering force of a linearly polarized optical trap. A change in the deformability of the erythrocytes, due to any internal or environmental factor, affects the rotation speed of the trapped crenated cells. Here we show how the increment in erythrocyte membrane rigidity with adsorption of Ca++ ions can be exhibited through this approach.

  10. Preparing for Routine Satellite Global Volcano Deformation Observations: The Volcano Deformation Database Task Force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pritchard, M. E.; Jay, J.; Andrews, B. J.; Cooper, J.; Henderson, S. T.; Delgado, F.; Biggs, J.; Ebmeier, S. K.

    2014-12-01

    Satellite Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) has greatly expanded the number volcanoes that can be monitored for ground deformation - the number of known deforming volcanoes has increased almost five-fold since 1997 (to more than 213 volcanoes in 2014). However, from 1992-2014, there are still gaps in global volcano surveillance and only a fraction of the 1400 subaerial Holocene volcanoes have frequent observations in this time period. Starting in 2014, near global observations of volcano deformation should begin with the Sentinel satellites from the European Space Agency, ALOS-2 from the Japanese Space Agency, and eventually NISAR from the Indian Space Agency and NASA. With more frequent observations, more volcano deformation episodes are sure to be observed, but evaluating the significance of the observed deformation is not always straightforward -- how can we determine if deformation will lead to eruption? To answer this question, an international task force has been formed to create an inventory of volcano deformation events as part of the Global Volcano Model (http://globalvolcanomodel.org/gvm-task-forces/volcano-deformation-database/). We present the first results from our global study focusing on volcanoes that have few or no previous studies. In some cases, there is a lack of SAR data (for example, volcanoes of the South Sandwich Islands). For others, observations either show an absence of deformation or possible deformation that requires more data to be verified. An example of a deforming volcano that has few past studies is Pagan, an island in the Marianas Arc comprised of 2 stratovolcanoes within calderas. Our new InSAR measurements from both the ALOS and Envisat satellites show deformation near the 1981 May VEI 4 lava flow eruption on North Pagan at 2-3 cm/year between 2004-2010. Another example of a newly observed volcano is Karthala volcano in the Comoros. InSAR observations between 2004-2010 span four eruptions, only one of which is

  11. Deformation-induced {alpha}{sub 2} {yields} {gamma} phase transformation in TiAl alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, C.L.; Lu, W.; Sun Dai; He, L.L.; Ye, H.Q.

    2010-11-15

    Deformation-induced {alpha}{sub 2} {yields} {gamma} phase transformation in high Nb containing TiAl alloys was investigated using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HREM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). The dislocations appearing at the tip of deformation-induced {gamma} plate (DI-{gamma}) and the stacking sequence change of the {alpha}{sub 2} matrix were two key evidences for determining the occurrence of the deformation-induced {alpha}{sub 2} {yields} {gamma} phase transformation. Compositional analysis revealed that the product phase of the room-temperature transformation was not standard {gamma} phase; on the contrary, the product phase of the high-temperature transformation was standard {gamma} phase.

  12. Evidence against pervasively deformed bed material beneath rapidly moving lobes of the southern Laurentide Ice Sheet

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clayton, L.; Mickelson, D.M.; Attig, J.W.

    1989-01-01

    During the Wisconsin Glaciation, the ice lobes of the southern part of the Laurentide Ice Sheet moved rapidly as the result of elevated subglacial water pressure. The rapid movement was probably not accompanied by wide-spread pervasive deformation of unfrozen material under the ice. The till stratigraphy of much of this area is well known, and it is clear that the stratigraphic sequence is generally intact. Therefore, such deformation, if it occurred, would have been restricted to the till sheet that was currently being deposited. However, this seems unlikely as well, because the till of the region commonly contains lenses and clasts of unlithified bedded sand that should have been destroyed by pervasive shearing. If unfrozen deformed-till layers were widely present, they must have been confined to the thin upper parts of till sheets. ?? 1989.

  13. Simultaneous deformations of a Lie algebroid and its Lie subalgebroid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Xiang

    2014-10-01

    Deformation problem is an interesting problem in mathematical physics. In this paper, we show that the deformations of a Lie algebroid are governed by a differential graded Lie algebra; and under certain regularity assumptions, an L∞-algebra can be constructed to govern the deformations of its Lie subalgebroid. Furthermore, by applying Y. Frégier and M. Zambon's result (0000, Thm. 3), these structures can be combined together to govern the simultaneous deformations. Applications of our results include deformations of a foliation, deformations of a Lie subalgebra, deformations of a complex structure, and deformations of a homomorphism of Lie algebroids.

  14. Deformation Behavior of Nanoporous Metals

    SciTech Connect

    Biener, J; Hodge, A M; Hamza, A V

    2007-11-28

    of free surfaces can no longer be neglected. As the material becomes more and more constraint by the presence of free surfaces, length scale effects on plasticity become more and more important and bulk properties can no longer be used to describe the material properties. Even the elastic properties may be affected as the reduced coordination of surface atoms and the concomitant redistribution of electrons may soften or stiffen the material. If, and to what extend, such length scale effects control the mechanical behavior of nanoporous materials depends strongly on the material and the characteristic length scale associated with its plastic deformation. For example, ductile materials such as metals which deform via dislocation-mediated processes can be expected to exhibit pronounced length scale effects in the sub-micron regime where free surfaces start to constrain efficient dislocation multiplication. In this chapter we will limit our discussion to our own area of expertise which is the mechanical behavior of nanoporous open-cell gold foams as a typical example of nanoporous metal foams. Throughout this chapter we will review our current understanding of the mechanical properties of nanoporous open-cell foams including both experimental and theoretical studies.

  15. Deformable Mirror Materials Issue Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Rudd, R E

    2008-05-27

    It was a pleasure to speak with you and Dr. Olivier Guyon about your project to develop a coronagraph and in particular about materials science considerations in the development of the deformable mirror (DM) for the coronagraph. The coronagraph application will demand more of a DM than previous applications with regard to precision, and since the characterization and modeling tools are currently under development, you asked me to comment on materials issues that might impact the DM design and testing. I have not conducted research on this question, and my own research on modeling MEMS has not included DM systems. I am only in a position to discuss some general considerations that may help in developing a research plan for the DM system. As I understand it, the relevant points about the DM system are as follows. The DM surface needs to be positioned to less than 1 {angstrom} RMS of the desired shape, and be stable to 0.3 {angstrom} RMS for an hour. In the ultimate application in space the stability requirements may be greater. For example, the DM shape can be set using a bright star and then allow the coronagraph to be turned to a dim star to collect data for several hours, counting on the mirror shape to be stable. The DM is made of a polysilicon membrane coated with one or more metal layers for the reflective surface and actuated by 32x32 or 64x64 electrostatic actuators on the back side. The uncertainty in the position of any one actuator should be at the few-picometer level or less averaged over the 300-{micro}m region of the actuator. Currently, experiments are conducted that can characterize the surface shape to the 1 nm level, and it is anticipated that the experiments will be able to characterize the shape at the sub-Angstrom level but not in the immediate future. Regarding stability, under relatively large deformations (10's of nm), the DM mirror surface shows no hysteresis at the measurable nm level. Let me begin by saying that I am not aware of any

  16. Seismic evidence for Messinian salt deformation and fluid circulation on the South Balearic margin (Western Mediterranean)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wardell, Nigel; Camerlenghi, Angelo; Urgeles, Roger; Geletti, Riccardo; Tinivella, Umberta; Giustiniani, Michela; Accettella, Daniela

    2014-05-01

    The south Balearic margin is characterized by an abrupt tectonically-controlled transition between a steep continental slope (Emile Baudot escarpment) and the Algero-Balearic abyssal plain, in which Messinain salt-induced deformation affects the seafloor morphology. Multichannel seismic profiles, multibeam bathymetry, and shallow seismic data demonstrate that the extent of salt deformation does not coincide with the bathymetric plain-slope transition. Instead, deformation occurs south of linear structure in the abyssal plain located some tens of kilometres from the base of the slope. The quality of the multi-channel seismic record in the deep water deformed area is severely decreased by the three dimensional character of the salt structures. However, the abyssal plain near the base of the slope reveals details on the Messinian sequence, its structure, post-Messinan deformation, and relation with subsurface fluids. The analysis of part of the EUROFLEETS SALTFLU multichannel seismic data set has included detailed RMS velocity analysis, post-stack and pre-stack time migration. An anomalously thick (up to 800 ms twt) acoustically laminated unit comprising the Messinian Upper Unit (UU) is present near the base of the slope and is characterized by syn-sedimentary gentle symmetric folding. The crests of such folds are affected by small-offset, layer-bound fractures and faults propagating from the upper part to the UU to the Plio-Quaternary sequence. Amplitude anomalies, polarity inversion and at times acoustic blanking reveal the presence of fluids (presumably gas) within the Messinian sequence. A clear seismic evidence for the Mobile Unit (MU, or salt layer) is missing in this area. Seismic evidence for the MU exists south of the linear structural boundary, where salt induced deformation has created vertical displacements of several hundreds of metres, diapiric growth, and at least two salt/mud piercement structures at the seafloor. In the highly deformed area, the UU

  17. Variations in deformation styles within the central Maine terrane: An example from the Presidential Range, NH

    SciTech Connect

    Eusden, J.D. Jr.; Garesche, J.; Johnson, A.; Maconochie, J.M. . Dept. of Geology)

    1993-03-01

    The Silurian and Devonian cover rocks of the Central Maine Terrane in the northern Appalachians are a complex, highly metamorphosed, stratigraphy that has been equally, if not more complexly, deformed. Correlations of regional deformation sequences (be they Acadian and/or Alleghanian) have been difficult, controversial, and elusive. This stems from the common observation that across-strike and strike-parallel variations in deformation sequences appear to be the norm rather than the exception in this belt. Enormous variations in structural style have been routinely observed in a detailed, five-year study of the well-exposed outcrops above treeline in the Presidential Range. Domains of different structural styles have been mapped in the northern, central and southern portions of the range. The northern domain, including Mts. Madison, Adams, and Jefferson, is composed of various members of the Devonian Littleton Formation. The map pattern is dominated by three macroscopic F1 synclines that face and are interpreted to verge northeasterly. The central domain, which includes Mt. Clay and much of Great Gulf, is interpreted to be a klippe of presumably Silurian gneisses probably correlative to the Rangeley, Smalls Falls, and Madrid Formations. A stratigraphic discontinuity, interpreted as the Greenough Spring thrust fault, separates this domain from the others and truncates the early fold structures of all domains. Within the Klippe there is evidence for an early phase of deformation but no folds related to it have been mapped. The map pattern is dominated by second phase folds that deform the early schistosity. The Greenough Spring thrust fault, and the second phase folds within it are refolded by a late phase of deformation which is characterized by a macroscopic, overturned synform.

  18. A numerical model of deformation and fluid-flow in an evolving thrust wedge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strayer, Luther M.; Hudleston, Peter J.; Lorig, Loren J.

    2001-06-01

    To investigate deformation and fluid-flow in an actively deforming tectonic wedge, we model the evolution of a large, two-dimensional (100 km long, 5 km thick), mechanically and hydrologically homogeneous and isotropic pile of sedimentary strata that is deformed to become a thrust wedge. We compare both 'dry' and 'wet' cases, in order to illustrate: (1) the relative importance of fluids on wedge evolution, and (2) the effect of brittle deformation on fluid-flow. We use an elastic-plastic constitutive relation, including a Mohr-Coulomb failure criterion and a non-associated flow rule, and coupled fluid flow, with bulk rock properties that approximate typical foreland sedimentary strata. Simulations are made both with and without dilation. The model is fully dynamic, but inertial forces remain small. Results show that deformation within the wedge is accommodated by reverse-slip movement on shear bands, which migrate in both directions through the wedge as both fore- and back-thrusts. The model has features predicted by the critical-taper theory: (1) overall wedge geometry; (2) crudely self-similar growth during evolution; (3) more intense deformation toward the rear of the wedge. The models show strong overall in-sequence faulting behavior with major thrusts isolating relatively undeformed packages, which are moved in a piggyback manner upon the active thrusts. Intermittent out-of-sequence faulting does however occur, in order to maintain the wedge taper. Fluid-flow in the deforming wedge is dominated by topography, but is also strongly affected by dilational plastic deformation. In all simulations, there is focused fluid flow within fault zones. When mechanical time-stepping is shut off (uncoupled), flow systems evolve to steady-state where inflow equals outflow. By subtracting the two 'states' we isolate the mechanical fluid response from the total coupled system response. The mechanical fluid response is manifest as contours of head and pressure difference and

  19. Probing deformed commutators with macroscopic harmonic oscillators

    PubMed Central

    Bawaj, Mateusz; Biancofiore, Ciro; Bonaldi, Michele; Bonfigli, Federica; Borrielli, Antonio; Di Giuseppe, Giovanni; Marconi, Lorenzo; Marino, Francesco; Natali, Riccardo; Pontin, Antonio; Prodi, Giovanni A.; Serra, Enrico; Vitali, David; Marin, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    A minimal observable length is a common feature of theories that aim to merge quantum physics and gravity. Quantum mechanically, this concept is associated with a nonzero minimal uncertainty in position measurements, which is encoded in deformed commutation relations. In spite of increasing theoretical interest, the subject suffers from the complete lack of dedicated experiments and bounds to the deformation parameters have just been extrapolated from indirect measurements. As recently proposed, low-energy mechanical oscillators could allow to reveal the effect of a modified commutator. Here we analyze the free evolution of high-quality factor micro- and nano-oscillators, spanning a wide range of masses around the Planck mass mP (≈22 μg). The direct check against a model of deformed dynamics substantially lowers the previous limits on the parameters quantifying the commutator deformation. PMID:26088965

  20. Large poroelastic deformation of a soft material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacMinn, Christopher W.; Dufresne, Eric R.; Wettlaufer, John S.

    2014-11-01

    Flow through a porous material will drive mechanical deformation when the fluid pressure becomes comparable to the stiffness of the solid skeleton. This has applications ranging from hydraulic fracture for recovery of shale gas, where fluid is injected at high pressure, to the mechanics of biological cells and tissues, where the solid skeleton is very soft. The traditional linear theory of poroelasticity captures this fluid-solid coupling by combining Darcy's law with linear elasticity. However, linear elasticity is only volume-conservative to first order in the strain, which can become problematic when damage, plasticity, or extreme softness lead to large deformations. Here, we compare the predictions of linear poroelasticity with those of a large-deformation framework in the context of two model problems. We show that errors in volume conservation are compounded and amplified by coupling with the fluid flow, and can become important even when the deformation is small. We also illustrate these results with a laboratory experiment.

  1. GEOPHYSICS. Layered deformation in the Taiwan orogen.

    PubMed

    Huang, T-Y; Gung, Y; Kuo, B-Y; Chiao, L-Y; Chen, Y-N

    2015-08-14

    The underthrusting of continental crust during mountain building is an issue of debate for orogens at convergent continental margins. We report three-dimensional seismic anisotropic tomography of Taiwan that shows a nearly 90° rotation of anisotropic fabrics across a 10- to 20-kilometer depth, consistent with the presence of two layers of deformation. The upper crust is dominated by collision-related compressional deformation, whereas the lower crust of Taiwan, mostly the crust of the subducted Eurasian plate, is dominated by convergence-parallel shear deformation. We interpret this lower crustal shearing as driven by the continuous sinking of the Eurasian mantle lithosphere when the surface of the subducted plate is coupled with the orogen. The two-layer deformation clearly defines the role of subduction in the formation of the Taiwan mountain belt. PMID:26273051

  2. On Isospectral Deformations of an Inhomogeneous String

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colville, Kale; Gomez, Daniel; Szmigielski, Jacek

    2016-07-01

    In this paper we consider a class of isospectral deformations of the inhomogeneous string boundary value problem. The deformations considered are generalizations of the isospectral deformation that has arisen in connection with the Camassa-Holm equation for the shallow water waves. It is proved that these new isospectral deformations result in evolution equations on the mass density whose form depends on how the string is tied at the endpoints. Moreover, it is shown that the evolution equations in this class linearize on the spectral side and hence can be solved by the inverse spectral method. In particular, the problem involving a mass density given by a discrete finite measure and arbitrary boundary conditions is shown to be solvable by Stieltjes' continued fractions.

  3. Deformed and twisted black holes with NUTs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krtouš, Pavel; Kubizňák, David; Frolov, Valeri P.; Kolář, Ivan

    2016-06-01

    We construct a new class of vacuum black hole solutions whose geometry is deformed and twisted by the presence of NUT charges. The solutions are obtained by ‘unspinning’ the general Kerr-NUT-(A)dS spacetimes, effectively switching off some of their rotation parameters. The resulting geometry has a structure of warped space with the Kerr-like Lorentzian part warped to a Euclidean metric of a deformed and/or twisted sphere, with the deformation and twist characterized by the ‘Euclidean NUT’ parameters. In the absence of NUTs, the solution reduces to a well known Kerr-(A)dS black hole with several rotations switched off. New geometries inherit the original symmetry of the Kerr-NUT-(A)dS family, namely, they possess the full Killing tower of hidden and explicit symmetries. As expected, for vanishing NUT, twist, and deformation parameters, the symmetry is further enlarged.

  4. Deformation stages of technical aluminum at reverse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaulina, O. Yu; Durnovtseva, A. N.; Shvagrukova, E. V.

    2016-02-01

    Durability and reliability of machines and mechanisms are determined, mainly, by their fatigue resistance as far as, in the most cases, variable load impacts on machine components. Accordingly, the problem of fatigue failure is extremely topical, still. Its complexity is connected with a wide range of factors. First of all, at cyclic load the compatibility relations of a material surface layer, which is loaded over the yield point and the elastic-loaded substrate layer, play a very important role. This fact determines involvement into plastic flow and failure of all the scale hierarchy of deformation structural levels. Reverse loading under the condition of the elastic-loaded substrate layer causes strong localization of plastic deformation in the surface layers. In the deformation localization areas the material reaches its limit state, when fatigue cracks arise and expand. The paper presents the mechanisms of fatigue deformation for technical aluminum at various fatigue stages.

  5. Digital deformation model for fisheye image rectification.

    PubMed

    Hou, Wenguang; Ding, Mingyue; Qin, Nannan; Lai, Xudong

    2012-09-24

    Fisheye lens can provide a wide view over 180°. It then has prominence advantages in three dimensional reconstruction and machine vision applications. However, the serious deformation in the image limits fisheye lens's usage. To overcome this obstacle, a new rectification method named DDM (Digital Deformation Model) is developed based on two dimensional perspective transformation. DDM is a type of digital grid representation of the deformation of each pixel on CCD chip which is built by interpolating the difference between the actual image coordinate and pseudo-ideal coordinate of each mark on a control panel. This method obtains the pseudo-ideal coordinate according to two dimensional perspective transformation by setting four mark's deformations on image. The main advantages are that this method does not rely on the optical principle of fisheye lens and has relatively less computation. In applications, equivalent pinhole images can be obtained after correcting fisheye lens images using DDM. PMID:23037373

  6. A ferrofluidic deformable mirror for ophthalmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macpherson, J. B.; Thibault, S.; Borra, E. F.; Ritcey, A. M.; Carufel, N.; Asselin, D.; Jerominek, H.; Campbell, M. C. W.

    2005-09-01

    Optical aberrations reduce the imaging quality of the human eye. In addition to degrading vision, this limits our ability to illuminate small points of the retina for therapeutic, surgical or diagnostic purposes. When viewing the rear of the eye, aberrations cause structures in the fundus to appear blurred, limiting the resolution of ophthalmoscopes (diagnostic instruments used to image the eye). Adaptive optics, such as deformable mirrors may be used to compensate for aberrations, allowing the eye to work as a diffraction-limited optical element. Unfortunately, this type of correction has not been widely available for ophthalmic applications because of the expense and technical limitations of current deformable mirrors. We present preliminary design and characterisation of a deformable mirror suitable for ophthalmology. In this ferrofluidic mirror, wavefronts are reflected from a fluid whose surface shape is controlled by a magnetic field. Challenges in design are outlined, as are advantages over traditional deformable mirrors.

  7. Probing deformed commutators with macroscopic harmonic oscillators.

    PubMed

    Bawaj, Mateusz; Biancofiore, Ciro; Bonaldi, Michele; Bonfigli, Federica; Borrielli, Antonio; Di Giuseppe, Giovanni; Marconi, Lorenzo; Marino, Francesco; Natali, Riccardo; Pontin, Antonio; Prodi, Giovanni A; Serra, Enrico; Vitali, David; Marin, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    A minimal observable length is a common feature of theories that aim to merge quantum physics and gravity. Quantum mechanically, this concept is associated with a nonzero minimal uncertainty in position measurements, which is encoded in deformed commutation relations. In spite of increasing theoretical interest, the subject suffers from the complete lack of dedicated experiments and bounds to the deformation parameters have just been extrapolated from indirect measurements. As recently proposed, low-energy mechanical oscillators could allow to reveal the effect of a modified commutator. Here we analyze the free evolution of high-quality factor micro- and nano-oscillators, spanning a wide range of masses around the Planck mass mP (≈ 22 μg). The direct check against a model of deformed dynamics substantially lowers the previous limits on the parameters quantifying the commutator deformation. PMID:26088965

  8. Defect characterization in plastically deformed gallium arsenide

    SciTech Connect

    Leipner, H.S.; Huebner, C.; Storbeck, O.; Polity, A.; Krause-Rehberg, R.

    1996-12-31

    The defect spectrum in plastically deformed GaAs is analyzed by positron lifetime measurements. Different types of defects, such as vacancy clusters or antisites, are identified and their thermal annealing behavior is studied.

  9. Dielectric elastomer membranes undergoing inhomogeneous deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Tianhu; Zhao, Xuanhe; Suo, Zhigang

    2009-10-01

    Dielectric elastomers are capable of large deformation subject to an electric voltage and are promising for use as actuators, sensors, and generators. Because of large deformation, nonlinear equations of states, and diverse modes of failure, modeling the process of electromechanical transduction has been challenging. This paper studies a membrane of a dielectric elastomer deformed into an out-of-plane axisymmetric shape, a configuration used in a family of commercial devices known as the universal muscle actuators. The kinematics of deformation and charging, together with thermodynamics, leads to equations that govern the state of equilibrium. Numerical results indicate that the field in the membrane can be very inhomogeneous, and that the membrane is susceptible to several modes of failure, including electrical breakdown, loss of tension, and rupture by stretch. Care is needed in the design to balance the requirements of averting various modes of failure while using the material efficiently.

  10. 7 CFR 51.319 - Seriously deformed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ..., CERTIFICATION, AND STANDARDS) United States Standards for Grades of Apples Definitions § 51.319 Seriously deformed. “Seriously deformed” means that the apple is so badly misshapen that its appearance is...

  11. 7 CFR 51.319 - Seriously deformed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ..., CERTIFICATION, AND STANDARDS) United States Standards for Grades of Apples Definitions § 51.319 Seriously deformed. “Seriously deformed” means that the apple is so badly misshapen that its appearance is...

  12. Laramide thrusting and Tertiary deformation Tierra Caliente, Michoacan and Guerrero States, southwestern Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, C.A.; Harrison, C.G.A. ); Lang, H. ); Barros, J.A.; Cabral-Cano, E.

    1990-05-01

    Field investigations and detailed interpretations of Landsat Thematic Mapper images are in progress to improve understanding of regional structure and tectonics of the southernmost extension of the North American cordillera. Two areas have been selected within the Ciudad Altamirano 1:250,000 topographical sheet for geologic mapping and structural interpretation at 1:50,000 scale. The authors results to date require modification of previous ideas concerning the style and timing of deformations, the role and timing of terrane accretion in the overall tectonic history of the region, and the importance of southern Mexico to investigations of the tectonic evolution of the plates in the region. The relative sequence of deformation in the area correlates well with variations in relative motion between North America and plates in the Pacific. Post-Campanian thrusts and generally eastward-verging folds deformed the Mesozoic sequence during the (Laramide equivalent) Hidalgoan orogeny, associated with high-velocity east-west convergence with the Farallon plate that began about 70 Ma. The resulting unconformity was covered by the Tertiary Balsas Formation, a thick sequence of mostly continental clastics. The Tertiary stratigraphy is regionally and sometimes locally variable, but it can be divided into two members. The lower member is relatively volcanic poor and more deformed, and it lies below a regionally significant mid-Tertiary unconformity, which may mark a change to northeast-directed convergence with the Farallon plate sometime prior to 40 Ma. Continued mid-Tertiary deformation in southern Mexico may be related to eastward movement of the Chortis block and the resulting truncation of the Pacific margin of Mexico. The authors also suggest a tentative correlation between the volcaniclastic member of the Lower Cretaceous San Lucas Formation and the protolith of the Roca Verde metamorphics to the east.

  13. Genome Sequence Databases (Overview): Sequencing and Assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Lapidus, Alla L.

    2009-01-01

    From the date its role in heredity was discovered, DNA has been generating interest among scientists from different fields of knowledge: physicists have studied the three dimensional structure of the DNA molecule, biologists tried to decode the secrets of life hidden within these long molecules, and technologists invent and improve methods of DNA analysis. The analysis of the nucleotide sequence of DNA occupies a special place among the methods developed. Thanks to the variety of sequencing technologies available, the process of decoding the sequence of genomic DNA (or whole genome sequencing) has become robust and inexpensive. Meanwhile the assembly of whole genome sequences remains a challenging task. In addition to the need to assemble millions of DNA fragments of different length (from 35 bp (Solexa) to 800 bp (Sanger)), great interest in analysis of microbial communities (metagenomes) of different complexities raises new problems and pushes some new requirements for sequence assembly tools to the forefront. The genome assembly process can be divided into two steps: draft assembly and assembly improvement (finishing). Despite the fact that automatically performed assembly (or draft assembly) is capable of covering up to 98% of the genome, in most cases, it still contains incorrectly assembled reads. The error rate of the consensus sequence produced at this stage is about 1/2000 bp. A finished genome represents the genome assembly of much higher accuracy (with no gaps or incorrectly assembled areas) and quality ({approx}1 error/10,000 bp), validated through a number of computer and laboratory experiments.

  14. Automated DNA Sequencing System

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, G.A.; Ekkebus, C.P.; Hauser, L.J.; Kress, R.L.; Mural, R.J.

    1999-04-25

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is developing a core DNA sequencing facility to support biological research endeavors at ORNL and to conduct basic sequencing automation research. This facility is novel because its development is based on existing standard biology laboratory equipment; thus, the development process is of interest to the many small laboratories trying to use automation to control costs and increase throughput. Before automation, biology Laboratory personnel purified DNA, completed cycle sequencing, and prepared 96-well sample plates with commercially available hardware designed specifically for each step in the process. Following purification and thermal cycling, an automated sequencing machine was used for the sequencing. A technician handled all movement of the 96-well sample plates between machines. To automate the process, ORNL is adding a CRS Robotics A- 465 arm, ABI 377 sequencing machine, automated centrifuge, automated refrigerator, and possibly an automated SpeedVac. The entire system will be integrated with one central controller that will direct each machine and the robot. The goal of this system is to completely automate the sequencing procedure from bacterial cell samples through ready-to-be-sequenced DNA and ultimately to completed sequence. The system will be flexible and will accommodate different chemistries than existing automated sequencing lines. The system will be expanded in the future to include colony picking and/or actual sequencing. This discrete event, DNA sequencing system will demonstrate that smaller sequencing labs can achieve cost-effective the laboratory grow.

  15. Dislocations: 75 years of Deformation Mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, Judy

    2009-01-01

    The selection of papers presented in this section reflect on themes to be explored at the "Dislocations: 75 years of Deformation Mechanisms" Symposium to be held at the Annual 2009 TMS meeting. The symposium was sponsored by the Mechanical Behavior of Materials Committee to give tribute to the evolution of a concept that has formed the basis of our mechanistic understanding of how crystalline solids plastically deform and how they fail.

  16. Deformability curve for K18 steel

    SciTech Connect

    Pospiech, J.

    1999-12-01

    The problem of the best utilization of plasticity in plastic working processes of metals, at low resistance to deformation and maximum utilization of capacity of installations has gained great importance, especially in recent years. Determination of plasticity of materials by the method of Kolmogorow is described. Variation of the stress factor for several plastic working processes is also described. Tests to plot the deformability curve (also referred to as reserve of plasticity curve) were selected and proved.

  17. Noncommutative scalar fields from symplectic deformation

    SciTech Connect

    Daoud, M.; Hamama, A.

    2008-02-15

    This paper is concerned with the quantum theory of noncommutative scalar fields in two dimensional space-time. It is shown that the noncommutativity originates from the the deformation of symplectic structures. The quantization is performed and the modes expansions of the fields, in the presence of an electromagnetic background, are derived. The Hamiltonian of the theory is given and the degeneracies lifting, induced by the deformation, is also discussed.

  18. Integrated dual-stage deformable mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffith, Mike; Laycock, Leslie; Archer, Nick; Myers, Richard; Kirby, Andrew; Doel, Peter; Brooks, David

    2010-07-01

    We present the results of a study on Dual-Stage Deformable Mirrors using Zonal Bimorph Deformable Mirror (ZBDM) technology. A high density 'tweeter' DM has been assembled onto a lower density, high dynamic range 'woofer' DM to generate an integrated mirror which offers both high resolution and dynamic range simultaneously. Such a device has the potential to significantly simplify the design of astronomical Adaptive Optics (AO) systems. The latest developments are presented, including the fabrication of a small scale demonstrator.

  19. Dynamics of continental deformation in Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vergnolle, M.; Calais, E.; Dong, L.

    2007-11-01

    The relevance of plate tectonics concepts to the description of deformation of large continental areas like Asia is subject to much debate. For some, the deformation of continents is better described by rigid motion of lithospheric blocks with strain concentrated along narrow fault zones. For others, it is better described by viscous flow of a continuously deforming solid in which faults play a minor role. Discriminating these end-member hypotheses requires spatially dense measurements of surface strain rates covering the whole deforming area. Here we revisit the issue of the forces and rheological structure that control present-day deformation in Asia. We use the "thin sheet" theory, with deformation driven by the balance of boundary and buoyancy stresses acting on a faulted lithosphere with laterally varying strength. Models are validated against a recent, homogeneous, GPS velocity field that covers most of Asia. In the models, deformation in compressional areas (Himalayas, Tien Shan, Altay) is well reproduced with strong coupling at the India/Eurasia plate contact, which allows for boundary forces to transfer into Asia. Southeastward motions observed in north and south China, however, require tensional, oceanward directed stresses, possibly generated by gravitational potential energy gradients across the Indonesian and Pacific subductions. Model and observed strain rates show that a large part of Asia undergoes no resolvable strain, with a kinematics apparently consistent with block- or plate-like motions. Internal strain, possibly continuous, is limited to high-elevation, mechanically weaker areas. Lateral variations of lithospheric strength appear to control the style of deformation in Asia, with a dynamics consistent with the thin sheet physical framework.

  20. Novel technologies for small deformable mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strachan, Mel; Myers, Richard; Cooke, Kevin; Hampshire, Joanne; Hough, Jim; Rowan, Sheila; van Veggel, Marielle; Kirk, Katherine; Hutson, David; Uzgur, Erman; Kim, Shin-Sung

    2010-07-01

    Adaptive optic requirements for instrumentation such as EAGLE for the European extremely large telescope present an enormous challenge to deformable mirror technology. We have developed a unique approach using fabricated arrays of multilayer actuator technology to address the requirements of actuator density and deflection. Our programme of work has uncovered a novel approach which has led to a built in test capability. We will present the outcomes of our work which we believe will lead to a compact deformable mirror.

  1. Extremal black hole initial data deformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aceña, Andrés; Gabach Clément, María E.

    2016-06-01

    We study deformations of axially symmetric initial data for Einstein-Maxwell equations satisfying time-rotation (t-ϕ) symmetry and containing one asymptotically cylindrical end and one asymptotically flat end. We find that the t-ϕ symmetry implies the existence of a family of deformed data having the same horizon structure. This result allows us to measure how close the solutions are to the Lichnerowicz equation when arising from nearby free data.

  2. Deformable mirror for short wavelength applications

    DOEpatents

    Chapman, Henry N.; Sweeney, Donald W.

    1999-01-01

    A deformable mirror compatible with short wavelength (extreme ultraviolet) radiation that can be precisely controlled to nanometer and subnanometer accuracy is described. Actuators are coupled between a reaction plate and a face plate which has a reflective coating. A control system adjusts the voltage supplied to the actuators; by coordinating the voltages supplied to the actuators, the reflective surface of the mirror can be deformed to correct for dimensional errors in the mirror or to produce a desired contour.

  3. Thermal elastic deformations of the planet Mercury

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, H.

    1971-01-01

    The variation in solar heating due to the resonance rotation of Mercury produces periodic elastic deformations on the surface of the planet. The thermal stress and strain fields under Mercury's surface are calculated after certain simplifications. It is shown that deformations penetrate to a greater depth than the variation of solar heating, and that the thermal strain on the surface of the planet pulsates with an amplitude of 0.004 and a period of 176 days.

  4. Thermal elastic deformations of the planet Mercury.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, H.-S.

    1972-01-01

    The variation in solar heating due to the resonance rotation of Mercury produces periodic elastic deformations on the surface of the planet. The thermal stress and strain fields under Mercury's surface are calculated after certain simplifications. It is found that deformations penetrate to a greater depth than the variation of solar heating, and that the thermal strain on the surface of the planet pulsates with an amplitude of .004 and a period of 176 days.

  5. Cratering motions and structural deformation in the rim of the Prairie Flat multiring explosion crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roddy, D. J.; Ullrich, G. W.; Sauer, F. M.; Jones, G. H. S.

    1977-01-01

    Cratering motions and structural deformation are described for the rim of the Prairie Flat multiring crater, 85.5 m across and 5.3 m deep, which was formed by the detonation of a 500-ton TNT surface-tangent sphere. The terminal displacement and motion data are derived from marker cans and velocity gages emplaced in drill holes in a three-dimensional matrix radial to the crater. The integration of this data with a detailed geologic cross section, mapped from deep trench excavations through the rim, provides a composite view of the general sequence of motions that formed a transiently uplifted rim, overturned flap, inverted stratigraphy, downfolded rim, and deformed strata in the crater walls. Preliminary comparisons with laboratory experimental cratering and with numerical simulations indicate that explosion craters of the Prairie Flat-type generated by surface and near-surface energy sources tend to follow predictable motion sequences and produce comparable structural deformation. More specifically, central uplift and multiring impact craters with morphologies and structures comparable to Prairie Flat are inferred to have experienced similar deformational histories of the rim, such as uplift, overturning, terracing, and downfolding.

  6. Compliant deformable mirror approach for wavefront improvement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, James H.; Penado, F. Ernesto

    2016-04-01

    We describe a compliant static deformable mirror approach to reduce the wavefront concavity at the Navy Precision Optical Interferometer (NPOI). A single actuator pressing on the back surface of just one of the relay mirrors deforms the front surface in a correcting convex shape. Our design uses the mechanical advantage gained from a force actuator sandwiched between a rear flexure plate and the back surface of the mirror. We superimpose wavefront contour measurements with our finite element deformed mirror model. An example analysis showed improvement from 210-nm concave-concave wavefront to 51-nm concave-concave wavefront. With our present model, a 100-nm actuator increment displaces the mirror surface by 1.1 nm. We describe the need for wavefront improvement that arises from the NPOI reconfigurable array, offer a practical design approach, and analyze the support structure and compliant deformable mirror using the finite element method. We conclude that a 20.3-cm-diameter, 1.9-cm-thick Zerodur® mirror shows that it is possible to deform the reflective surface and cancel out three-fourths of the wavefront deformation without overstressing the material.

  7. Probing Cell Deformability via Acoustically Actuated Bubbles.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yuliang; Nama, Nitesh; Li, Peng; Mao, Zhangming; Huang, Po-Hsun; Zhao, Chenglong; Costanzo, Francesco; Huang, Tony Jun

    2016-02-17

    An acoustically actuated, bubble-based technique is developed to investigate the deformability of cells suspended in microfluidic devices. A microsized bubble is generated by an optothermal effect near the targeted cells, which are suspended in a microfluidic chamber. Subsequently, acoustic actuation is employed to create localized acoustic streaming. In turn, the streaming flow results in hydrodynamic forces that deform the cells in situ. The deformability of the cells is indicative of their mechanical properties. The method in this study measures mechanical biomarkers from multiple cells in a single experiment, and it can be conveniently integrated with other bioanalysis and drug-screening platforms. Using this technique, the mean deformability of tens of HeLa, HEK, and HUVEC cells is measured to distinguish their mechanical properties. HeLa cells are deformed upon treatment with Cytochalasin. The technique also reveals the deformability of each subpopulation in a mixed, heterogeneous cell sample by the use of both fluorescent markers and mechanical biomarkers. The technique in this study, apart from being relevant to cell biology, will also enable biophysical cellular diagnosis. PMID:26715211

  8. Clinical Implications of Nasal Septal Deformities.

    PubMed

    Mladina, Ranko; Skitarelić, Neven; Poje, Gorazd; Šubarić, Marin

    2015-04-01

    The first attempts to systematize septal distortions have been given by Cottle who defined four groups of septal deformities: subluxation, large spurs, caudal deflection and tension septum. Fortunately, the variations of the septal deformities show a certain order, thus enabling more precise classification. Mladina was the first to make user-friendly classification of septal deformities in six basic types. He also described the seventh type, named "Passali deformity", which presents individually, but is always a well-defined combination between some of the previous six types. Mladina types of septal deformities (SD) are divided in two main groups: so called "vertical" deformities (types 1, 2, 3 and 4), and "horizontal" ones (types 5 and 6). This classification was immediately well accepted by rhinologists worldwide and started to be cited from the very beginning. Since then it has been continuously cited increasingly more often, thus making Mladina classification a gold standard whenever clinical researches on nasal septum are concerned. More than forty clinical studies based on this classification have been performed to date. It is extremely important to make a strict distinction between the types of SD since all of them play some specific role in the nasal and general physiology in man. PMID:26167337

  9. Quantum deformations of the flat space superstring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pachoł, Anna; van Tongeren, Stijn J.

    2016-01-01

    We discuss a quantum deformation of the Green-Schwarz superstring on flat space, arising as a contraction limit of the corresponding deformation of AdS5×S5 . This contraction limit turns out to be equivalent to a previously studied limit that yields the so-called mirror model—the model obtained from the light cone gauge fixed AdS5×S5 string by a double Wick rotation. Reversing this logic, the AdS5×S5 superstring is the double Wick rotation of a quantum deformation of the flat space superstring. This quantum deformed flat space string realizes symmetries of the timelike κ -Poincaré type and is T dual to dS5×H5, indicating interesting relations between symmetry algebras under T duality. Our results directly extend to AdS2×S2×T6 and AdS3×S3×T4 and beyond string theory to many (semi)symmetric space coset sigma models, such as a deformation of the four-dimensional Minkowski sigma model with timelike κ -Poincaré symmetry. We also discuss possible null and spacelike deformations.

  10. Bialgebra cohomology, deformations, and quantum groups.

    PubMed Central

    Gerstenhaber, M; Schack, S D

    1990-01-01

    We introduce cohomology and deformation theories for a bialgebra A (over a commutative unital ring k) such that the second cohomology group is the space of infinitesimal deformations. Our theory gives a natural identification between the underlying k-modules of the original and the deformed bialgebra. Certain explicit deformation formulas are given for the construction of quantum groups--i.e., Hopf algebras that are neither commutative nor cocommutative (whether or not they arise from quantum Yang-Baxter operators). These formulas yield, in particular, all GLq(n) and SLq(n) as deformations of GL(n) and SL(n). Using a Hodge decomposition of the underlying cochain complex, we compute our cohomology for GL(n). With this, we show that every deformation of GL(n) is equivalent to one in which the comultiplication is unchanged, not merely on elements of degree one but on all elements (settling in the strongest way a decade-old conjecture) and in which the quantum determinant, as an element of the underlying k-module, is identical with the usual one. PMID:11607053

  11. Membranotropic photobiomodulation on red blood cell deformability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Gang-Yue; Zhao, Yan-Ping; Liu, Timon C.; Liu, Song-Hao

    2007-05-01

    To assess modulation of laser on erythrocyte permeability and deformability via cell morphology changes, healthy human echinocytes with shrinking size and high plasmic viscosity due to cellular dehydration were treated with 1 mW, 2 mW, 3 mW, and 5 mW laser power exposure respectively. Image analyzing system on single intact erythrocyte was applied for measuring comprehensive cell morphological parameters (surface area, external membrane perimeter, circle index and elongation index) that were determined by the modulation of erythrocyte water permeability and deformability to detect relationship between erythrocyte water permeability alteration and deformability. Our preliminary experiment showed that exposure under light dose of 5 mW for 5 min could induce more active erythrocyte swelling and deformation. water channel aquaporin-1(AQP-1) was inhibited by the incubation of HgCl II in the presence and absence of 5 mW laser irradiation. The result suggested that osmotic water permeability is a primary factor in the procedure of erythrocyte deformability. In addition, no modulation of laser(5mW) on erythrocyte deformability had been found when the echinocytes were cultured with GDP-β-S (G protein inhibitor).

  12. Probing Cell Deformability via Acoustically Actuated Bubbles

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Yuliang; Nama, Nitesh; Li, Peng; Mao, Zhangming; Huang, Po-Hsun; Zhao, Chenglong; Costanzo, Francesco; Huang, Tony Jun

    2016-01-01

    An acoustically actuated, bubble-based technique is developed to investigate the deformability of cells suspended in microfluidic devices. A microsized bubble is generated by an optothermal effect near the targeted cells, which are suspended in a microfluidic chamber. Subsequently, acoustic actuation is employed to create localized acoustic streaming. In turn, the streaming flow results in hydrodynamic forces that deform the cells in situ. The deformability of the cells is indicative of their mechanical properties. The method in this study measures mechanical biomarkers from multiple cells in a single experiment, and it can be conveniently integrated with other bioanalysis and drug-screening platforms. Using this technique, the mean deformability of tens of HeLa, HEK, and HUVEC cells is measured to distinguish their mechanical properties. HeLa cells are deformed upon treatment with Cytochalasin. The technique also reveals the deformability of each subpopulation in a mixed, heterogeneous cell sample by the use of both fluorescent markers and mechanical biomarkers. The technique in this study, apart from being relevant to cell biology, will also enable biophysical cellular diagnosis. PMID:26715211

  13. Cellulases and coding sequences

    DOEpatents

    Li, Xin-Liang; Ljungdahl, Lars G.; Chen, Huizhong

    2001-01-01

    The present invention provides three fungal cellulases, their coding sequences, recombinant DNA molecules comprising the cellulase coding sequences, recombinant host cells and methods for producing same. The present cellulases are from Orpinomyces PC-2.

  14. Cellulases and coding sequences

    DOEpatents

    Li, Xin-Liang; Ljungdahl, Lars G.; Chen, Huizhong

    2001-02-20

    The present invention provides three fungal cellulases, their coding sequences, recombinant DNA molecules comprising the cellulase coding sequences, recombinant host cells and methods for producing same. The present cellulases are from Orpinomyces PC-2.

  15. Sequence information signal processor

    DOEpatents

    Peterson, John C.; Chow, Edward T.; Waterman, Michael S.; Hunkapillar, Timothy J.

    1999-01-01

    An electronic circuit is used to compare two sequences, such as genetic sequences, to determine which alignment of the sequences produces the greatest similarity. The circuit includes a linear array of series-connected processors, each of which stores a single element from one of the sequences and compares that element with each successive element in the other sequence. For each comparison, the processor generates a scoring parameter that indicates which segment ending at those two elements produces the greatest degree of similarity between the sequences. The processor uses the scoring parameter to generate a similar scoring parameter for a comparison between the stored element and the next successive element from the other sequence. The processor also delivers the scoring parameter to the next processor in the array for use in generating a similar scoring parameter for another pair of elements. The electronic circuit determines which processor and alignment of the sequences produce the scoring parameter with the highest value.

  16. DNA sequencing conference, 2

    SciTech Connect

    Cook-Deegan, R.M.; Venter, J.C.; Gilbert, W.; Mulligan, J.; Mansfield, B.K.

    1991-06-19

    This conference focused on DNA sequencing, genetic linkage mapping, physical mapping, informatics and bioethics. Several were used to study this sequencing and mapping. This article also discusses computer hardware and software aiding in the mapping of genes.

  17. Roles of repetitive sequences

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, G.I.

    1991-12-31

    The DNA of higher eukaryotes contains many repetitive sequences. The study of repetitive sequences is important, not only because many have important biological function, but also because they provide information on genome organization, evolution and dynamics. In this paper, I will first discuss some generic effects that repetitive sequences will have upon genome dynamics and evolution. In particular, it will be shown that repetitive sequences foster recombination among, and turnover of, the elements of a genome. I will then consider some examples of repetitive sequences, notably minisatellite sequences and telomere sequences as examples of tandem repeats, without and with respectively known function, and Alu sequences as an example of interspersed repeats. Some other examples will also be considered in less detail.

  18. Hip Arthroscopy for Challenging Deformities: Global Pincer Femoroacetabular Impingement

    PubMed Central

    Matsuda, Dean K.; Gupta, Nikhil; Hanami, Dylan

    2014-01-01

    Pincer femoroacetabular impingement occurs in focal or global forms, the latter having more generalized and typically more extreme acetabular overcoverage. Severe global deformities are often treated with open surgical dislocation of the hip. Arthroscopic technical challenges relate to difficulties with hip distraction; central-compartment access; and instrument navigation, acetabuloplasty, and chondrolabral surgery of the posterior acetabulum. Techniques addressing these challenges are introduced permitting dual-portal hip arthroscopy with central-compartment access, subtotal acetabuloplasty, and circumferential chondrolabral surgery. The modified midanterior portal in combination with a zone-specific sequence of acetabular rim reduction monitored with fluoroscopic templating enables precision subtotal acetabuloplasty. Guidelines for acetabular rim reduction include the following suggested radiographic endpoints: postoperative center-edge angle of 35°, a neutral posterior wall sign, and an anterior margin ratio of 0.5. Arthroscopic zone-specific chondrophobic rim preparation and circumferential labral reparative and reconstructive techniques and tools permit the arthroscopic treatment of these challenging deformities. PMID:24904760

  19. Challenges in structural analysis for deformed nuclear reactivity assessments.

    SciTech Connect

    Tallman, Tyler N.; Smith, Jeffrey A.; Villa, Daniel L.

    2010-09-01

    Launch safety calculations for past space reactor concepts have usually been limited to immersion of the reactor in water and/or sand, using nominal system geometries or in some cases simplified compaction scenarios. Deformation of the reactor core by impact during the accident sequence typically has not been considered because of the complexity of the calculation. Recent advances in codes and computing power have made such calculations feasible. The accuracy of such calculations depends primarily on the underlying structural analysis. Even though explicit structural dynamics is a mature field, nuclear reactors present significant challenges to obtain accurate deformation predictions. The presence of a working fluid is one of the primary contributors to challenges in these predictions. The fluid-structure interaction cannot be neglected because the fluid surrounds the nuclear fuel which is the most important region in the analysis. A detailed model of a small eighty-five pin reactor was built with the working fluid modeled as smoothed particle hydrodynamic (SPH) elements. Filling the complex volume covered by the working fluid with SPH elements required development of an algorithm which eliminates overlaps between hexahedral and SPH elements. The results with and without the working fluid were found to be considerably different with respect to reactivity predictions.

  20. FEM simulation of microstructure refinement during severe deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bylya, O. I.; Sarangi, M. K.; Ovchinnikova, N. V.; Vasin, R. A.; Yakushina, E. B.; Blackwell, P. L.

    2014-08-01

    The majority of methods of severe plastic deformation (SPD) used for producing ultra-fine grained (UFG) and nano materials involve the non-uniform distribution of strains in the workpiece. To make the refinement of grains uniform, interlinked operations are used in which either the orientation of the workpiece or the type of SPD is changed in some sequence. Each operation has its own set of control parameters affecting the output result. As a result, the optimization of the total chain of operations becomes very difficult, especially taking into account that each stage of material processing comes from the previous one with a certain non-uniformity of the structure. To deal with such types of problems the capability of tracing the transformation of the microstructure and accounting for its effect on mechanical properties in finite element modeling (FEM) is required. There are a number of detailed physical models of grain refinement and texture formation, but very often they are too complicated for practical engineering simulations. The mechanics of SPD are also studied and simulated in many works, but normally it is assumed that material is uniform, isotropic and its properties don't change during deformation. In this paper a microstructurally-coupled FE model of the SPD process is proposed. The question of selection and verification of macroscopic and microscopic constitutive relations is discussed. The results of a simulation made in QForm are analyzed and compared with some initial experimental data.

  1. Deformation and displacement of the Jura cover on its basement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mugnier, J. L.; Vialon, P.

    The sedimentary cover of the Internal Jura, displaced over its basement, conforms well with the model of a thin-skinned thrust sheet. The wedge-shaped sheet, which includes a thick sequence of molasse deposited ahead of the Alpine front, slid over the basement/cover interface. The Alpine crustal thrust sheets created a load at the south-east end of the overthrust European plate. Molasse was deposited on the bent plate, and the internal part of the basin was progressively affected by thrusting. This process also induced deformation and displacements in the foreland: gravity spreading in the internal molasse, and a forward motion by rigid slipping. Movement led to a horizontal push, causing deformation by indentation in the Internal Jura. In the plateaux of the External Jura, there is very little extension in the cover and minimal shortening in the basement. This shortening induced a décollement under the plateaux. Over the Bresse graben, gravity sliding occurred in the form of huge landslides. These contrasts in the origin of the Jura structures, along a median cross-section from Thonon to Arbois, are shown by geophysical data, construction of a balanced cross-section and calculations of realistic mechanical models for the bending of the foreland plate and for the motion of the cover sheet.

  2. Global synthesis of volcano deformation: Results of the Volcano Deformation Task Force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pritchard, M. E.; Jay, J.; Biggs, J.; Ebmeier, S. K.; Delgado, F.

    2013-12-01

    Ground deformation in volcanic regions is being observed more frequently -- the number of known deforming volcanoes has increased from 44 in 1997 to more than 210 in 2013 thanks in large part thanks to the availability of satellite InSAR observations. With the launch of new SAR satellites in the coming years devoted to global deformation monitoring, the number of well-studied episodes of volcano deformation will continue to increase. But evaluating the significance of the observed deformation is not always straightforward -- how often do deformation episodes lead to eruption? Are there certain characteristics of the deformation or the volcano that make the linkage between deformation and eruption more robust -- for example the duration or magnitude of the ground deformation and/or the composition and tectonic setting of the volcano? To answer these questions, a global database of volcano deformation events is needed. Recognizing the need for global information on volcano deformation and the opportunity to address it with InSAR and other techniques, we formed the Volcano Deformation Database Task force as part of Global Volcano Model. The three objectives of our organization are: 1) to compile deformation observations of all volcanoes globally into appropriate formats for WOVOdat and the Global Volcanism Program of the Smithsonian Institution. 2) document any relation between deformation events and eruptions for the Global assessment of volcanic hazard and risk report for 2015 (GAR15) for the UN. 3) to better link InSAR and other remote sensing observations to volcano observatories. We present the first results from our global study of the relation between deformation and eruptions, including case studies of particular eruptions. We compile a systematically-observed catalog of >500 volcanoes with observation windows up to 20 years. Of 90 volcanoes showing deformation, 40 erupted. The positive predictive value (PPV = 0.44) linking deformation and eruption on this

  3. Deformation-related recrystallization processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drury, Martyn R.; Urai, Janos L.

    1990-02-01

    Recrystallization is a common microstructural transformation that occurs during deformation, metamorphism and diagenesis of rocks. Studies on minerals and rock analogues have demonstrated that a wide range of recrystallization mechanisms can occur. The range of mechanisms is related to the various ways in which two basic processes, grain boundary migration and new grain boundary formation combine to transform the microstructure. Two recent papers (Drury et al., 1985; Urai et al., 1986) have proposed different schemes for the description of recrystallization mechanisms. The purpose of this paper is to provide a unified framework for the description of mechanisms. Recrystallization mechanisms are divided into three main types; rotation mechanisms which principally involve the formation of new grain boundaries; migration mechanisms which principally involve grain boundary migration; and general mechanisms which involve both basic processes. A further distinction is made on the basis of the continuity of the microstructural transformation with respect to time. Each of the three main types of mechanism can be divided into a number of sub-types depending on whether the processes of grain boundary migration, new grain boundary formation and new grain formation occur in a discontinuous or continuous manner with respect to time. As the terms continuous and discontinuous have been used in the metallurgical literature to signify the spatial continuity of the microstructural transformation, the terms discontinuai and continual are used to refer to the temporal continuity of the transformation. It is recommended that the following aspects should be specified, if possible, in a general description of recrystallization mechanisms: (1) How do the basic processes combine to transform the microstructure. (2) If new grain development occurs, what is the development mechanism, and does new grain formation occur in a continual or discontinuai manner. (3) If grain boundary migration is

  4. Constrained Deformable-Layer Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, H.

    2006-12-01

    The improvement on traveltime tomography depends on improving data coverage and tomographic methodology. The data coverage depends on the spatial distribution of sources and stations, as well as the extent of lateral velocity variation that may alter the raypaths locally. A reliable tomographic image requires large enough ray hit count and wide enough angular range between traversing rays over the targeted anomalies. Recent years have witnessed the advancement of traveltime tomography in two aspects. One is the use of finite frequency kernels, and the other is the improvement on model parameterization, particularly that allows the use of a priori constraints. A new way of model parameterization is the deformable-layer tomography (DLT), which directly inverts for the geometry of velocity interfaces by varying the depths of grid points to achieve a best traveltime fit. In contrast, conventional grid or cell tomography seeks to determine velocity values of a mesh of fixed-in-space grids or cells. In this study, the DLT is used to map crustal P-wave velocities with first arrival data from local earthquakes and two LARSE active surveys in southern California. The DLT solutions along three profiles are constrained using known depth ranges of the Moho discontinuity at 21 sites from a previous receiver function study. The DLT solutions are generally well resolved according to restoration resolution tests. The patterns of 2D DLT models of different profiles match well at their intersection locations. In comparison with existing 3D cell tomography models in southern California, the new DLT models significantly improve the data fitness. In comparison with the multi-scale cell tomography conducted for the same data, while the data fitting levels of the DLT and the multi-scale cell tomography models are compatible, the DLT provides much higher vertical resolution and more realistic description of the undulation of velocity discontinuities. The constraints on the Moho depth

  5. Microfluidic Cell Deformability Assay for Rapid and Efficient Kinase Screening with the CRISPR-Cas9 System.

    PubMed

    Han, Xin; Liu, Zongbin; Zhao, Li; Wang, Feng; Yu, Yang; Yang, Jianhua; Chen, Rui; Qin, Lidong

    2016-07-18

    Herein we report a CRISPR-Cas9-mediated loss-of-function kinase screen for cancer cell deformability and invasive potential in a high-throughput microfluidic chip. In this microfluidic cell separation platform, flexible cells with high deformability and metastatic propensity flowed out, while stiff cells remained trapped. Through deep sequencing, we found that loss of certain kinases resulted in cells becoming more deformable and invasive. High-ranking candidates identified included well-reported tumor suppressor kinases, such as chk2, IKK-α, p38 MAPKs, and DAPK2. A high-ranking candidate STK4 was chosen for functional validation and identified to play an important role in the regulation of cell deformability and tumor suppression. Collectively, we have demonstrated that CRISPR-based on-chip mechanical screening is a potentially powerful strategy to facilitate systematic genetic analyses. PMID:27258939

  6. Recovery of liver motion and deformation due to respiration using laparoscopic freehand 3D ultrasound system.

    PubMed

    Nakamoto, Masahiko; Hirayama, Hiroaki; Sato, Yoshinobu; Konishi, Kozo; Kakeji, Yoshihiro; Hashizume, Makoto; Tamura, Shinichi

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes a rapid method for intraoperative recovery of liver motion and deformation due to respiration by using a laparoscopic freehand 3D ultrasound (US) system. Using the proposed method, 3D US images of the liver can be extended to 4D US images by acquiring additional several sequences of 2D US images during a couple of respiration cycles. Time-varying 2D US images are acquired on several sagittal image planes and their 3D positions and orientations are measured using a laparoscopic ultrasound probe to which a miniature magnetic 3D position sensor is attached. During the acquisition, the probe is assumed to move together with the liver surface. In-plane 2D deformation fields and respiratory phase are estimated from the time-varying 2D US images, and then the time-varying 3D deformation fields on the sagittal image planes are obtained by combining 3D positions and orientations of the image planes. The time-varying 3D deformation field of the volume is obtained by interpolating the 3D deformation fields estimated on several planes. The proposed method was evaluated by in vivo experiments using a pig liver. PMID:17354794

  7. Intense salt deformation in the Levant Basin in the middle of the Messinian Salinity Crisis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gvirtzman, Zohar; Reshef, Moshe; Buch-Leviatan, Orna; Ben-Avraham, Zvi

    2013-10-01

    While numerous studies have shown that salt related deformation in the Levant Basin began in the Late Pliocene or Early Pleistocene, here we show that the first salt related deformation event occurred 3-4 myr earlier, in the middle of the Messinian Salinity Crisis. Considering that the entire crisis lasted only about 650 kyr and that halite deposition in the deep basin may have lasted only ∼50 kyr, this deformation event must have been very short. At some point after deposition of nearly half of the evaporitic sequence, the upper 200 m thick clastic-rich layer glided downdip and formed a series of steep contractional ridges on the deep basin floor. However, unlike the recent salt motion, which is derived from northwestward tilting of the Levant continental margin towards the Cyprus Arc and by basinward progradation of the Nile-derived overburden, the short intra-Messinian deformation event is enigmatic. It predates the Nile-derived overburden and its direction does not match northwestward tilting. We postulate that it may reflect the uplift of the Carmel block northeast of the study area and possibly the entire north Levant coast. In a wider view, intra-Messinian deformation is a circum-Mediterranean phenomenon, possibly reflecting reorganization of the Africa-Eurasia boundary.

  8. Intense salt deformation in the Levant Basin in the middle of the Messinian Salinity Crisis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gvirtzman, Zohar; Reshef, Moshe; Buch-Leviatan, Orna; Ben-Avraham, Zvi

    2014-05-01

    While numerous studies have shown that salt related deformation in the Levant Basin began in the Late Pliocene or Early Pleistocene, here we show that the first salt related deformation event occurred 3-4 myr earlier, in the middle of the Messinian Salinity Crisis. Considering that the entire crisis lasted only about 650 kyr and that halite deposition in the deep basin may have lasted only ~50 kyr, this deformation event must have been very short. At some point after deposition of nearly half of the evaporitic sequence, the upper 200 m thick clastic-rich layer glided downdip and formed a series of steep contractional ridges on the deep basin floor. However, unlike the recent salt motion, which is derived from northwestward tilting of the Levant continental margin towards the Cyprus Arc and by basinward progradation of the Nile-derived overburden, the short intra-Messinian deformation event is enigmatic. It predates the Nile-derived overburden and its direction does not match northwestward tilting. We postulate that it may reflect the uplift of the Carmel block northeast of the study area and possibly the entire north Levant coast. In a wider view, intra-Messinian deformation is a circum-Mediterranean phenomenon, possibly reflecting reorganization of the Africa-Euroasia boundary.

  9. Temporal-spatial modeling of fast-moving and deforming 3D objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xiaoliang; Wei, Youzhi

    1998-09-01

    This paper gives a brief description of the method and techniques developed for the modeling and reconstruction of fast moving and deforming 3D objects. A new approach using close-range digital terrestrial photogrammetry in conjunction with high speed photography and videography is proposed. A sequential image matching method (SIM) has been developed to automatically process pairs of images taken continuously of any fast moving and deforming 3D objects. Using the SIM technique a temporal-spatial model (TSM) of any fast moving and deforming 3D objects can be developed. The TSM would include a series of reconstructed surface models of the fast moving and deforming 3D object in the form of 3D images. The TSM allows the 3D objects to be visualized and analyzed in sequence. The SIM method, specifically the left-right matching and forward-back matching techniques are presented in the paper. An example is given which deals with the monitoring of a typical blast rock bench in a major open pit mine in Australia. With the SIM approach and the TSM model it is possible to automatically and efficiently reconstruct the 3D images of the blasting process. This reconstruction would otherwise be impossible to achieve using a labor intensive manual processing approach based on 2D images taken from conventional high speed cameras. The case study demonstrates the potential of the SIM approach and the TSM for the automatic identification, tracking and reconstruction of any fast moving and deforming 3D targets.

  10. 3D deformable image matching: a hierarchical approach over nested subspaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musse, Olivier; Heitz, Fabrice; Armspach, Jean-Paul

    2000-06-01

    This paper presents a fast hierarchical method to perform dense deformable inter-subject matching of 3D MR Images of the brain. To recover the complex morphological variations in neuroanatomy, a hierarchy of 3D deformations fields is estimated, by minimizing a global energy function over a sequence of nested subspaces. The nested subspaces, generated from a single scaling function, consist of deformation fields constrained at different scales. The highly non linear energy function, describing the interactions between the target and the source images, is minimized using a coarse-to-fine continuation strategy over this hierarchy. The resulting deformable matching method shows low sensitivity to local minima and is able to track large non-linear deformations, with moderate computational load. The performances of the approach are assessed both on simulated 3D transformations and on a real data base of 3D brain MR Images from different individuals. The method has shown efficient in putting into correspondence the principle anatomical structures of the brain. An application to atlas-based MRI segmentation, by transporting a labeled segmentation map on patient data, is also presented.

  11. Inelastic Deformation of Metal Matrix Composites. Part 1; Plasticity and Damage Mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Majumdar, B. S.; Newaz, G. M.

    1992-01-01

    The deformation mechanisms of a Ti 15-3/SCS6 (SiC fiber) metal matrix composite (MMC) were investigated using a combination of mechanical measurements and microstructural analysis. The objectives were to evaluate the contributions of plasticity and damage to the overall inelastic response, and to confirm the mechanisms by rigorous microstructural evaluations. The results of room temperature experiments performed on 0 degree and 90 degree systems primarily are reported in this report. Results of experiments performed on other laminate systems and at high temperatures will be provided in a forthcoming report. Inelastic deformation of the 0 degree MMC (fibers parallel to load direction) was dominated by the plasticity of the matrix. In contrast, inelastic deformations of the 90 degree composite (fibers perpendicular to loading direction) occurred by both damage and plasticity. The predictions of a continuum elastic plastic model were compared with experimental data. The model was adequate for predicting the 0 degree response; however, it was inadequate for predicting the 90 degree response largely because it neglected damage. The importance of validating constitutive models using a combination of mechanical measurements and microstructural analysis is pointed out. The deformation mechanisms, and the likely sequence of events associated with the inelastic deformation of MMCs, are indicated in this paper.

  12. A magnetic resonance imaging study of prostate deformation relative to implanted gold fiducial markers

    SciTech Connect

    Nichol, Alan M.; Brock, Kristy K.; Lockwood, Gina A.; Moseley, Douglas J.; Rosewall, Tara; Warde, Padraig R.; Catton, Charles N.; Jaffray, David A. . E-mail: david.jaffray@rmp.uhn.on.ca

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To describe prostate deformation during radiotherapy and determine the margins required to account for prostate deformation after setup to intraprostatic fiducial markers (FM). Methods and Materials: Twenty-five patients with T1c-T2c prostate cancer had three gold FMs implanted. The patients presented with a full bladder and empty rectum for two axial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans using a gradient recalled echo (GRE) sequence capable of imaging the FMs. The MRIs were done at the time of radiotherapy (RT) planning and a randomly assigned fraction. A single observer contoured the prostate surfaces. They were entered into a finite element model and aligned using the centroid of the three FMs. Results: During RT, the prostate volume decreased by 0.5%/fraction (p = 0.03) and the FMs in-migrated by 0.05 mm/fraction (p < 0.05). Prostate deformation was unrelated to differential bladder and bowel filling, but was related to a transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP) (p = 0.003). The standard deviation for systematic uncertainty of prostate surface contouring was 0.8 mm and for FM centroid localization was 0.4 mm. The standard deviation of random interfraction prostate deformation was 1.5 mm and for FM centroid variability was 1.1 mm. These uncertainties from prostate deformation can be incorporated into a margin recipe to determine the total margins required for RT. Conclusions: During RT, the prostate exhibited: volume decrease, deformation, and in-migration of FMs. Patients with TURPs were prone to prostate deformation.

  13. Career Academy Course Sequences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Markham, Thom; Lenz, Robert

    This career academy course sequence guide is designed to give teachers a quick overview of the course sequences of well-known career academy and career pathway programs from across the country. The guide presents a variety of sample course sequences for the following academy themes: (1) arts and communication; (2) business and finance; (3)…

  14. T. cacao Transcriptome Sequencing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To compliment the T. cacao genome sequencing initiative and to build a reference set of expressed genes for functional studies, a broad and state-of-the-art approach to transcriptome sequencing is underway. Using newly optimized methods, transcriptome sequencing libraries were prepared from RNA of o...

  15. Enhanced virome sequencing using targeted sequence capture

    PubMed Central

    Wylie, Todd N.; Wylie, Kristine M.; Herter, Brandi N.; Storch, Gregory A.

    2015-01-01

    Metagenomic shotgun sequencing (MSS) is an important tool for characterizing viral populations. It is culture independent, requires no a priori knowledge of the viruses in the sample, and may provide useful genomic information. However, MSS can lack sensitivity and may yield insufficient data for detailed analysis. We have created a targeted sequence capture panel, ViroCap, designed to enrich nucleic acid from DNA and RNA viruses from 34 families that infect vertebrate hosts. A computational approach condensed ∼1 billion bp of viral reference sequence into <200 million bp of unique, representative sequence suitable for targeted sequence capture. We compared the effectiveness of detecting viruses in standard MSS versus MSS following targeted sequence capture. First, we analyzed two sets of samples, one derived from samples submitted to a diagnostic virology laboratory and one derived from samples collected in a study of fever in children. We detected 14 and 18 viruses in the two sets, comprising 19 genera from 10 families, with dramatic enhancement of genome representation following capture enrichment. The median fold-increases in percentage viral reads post-capture were 674 and 296. Median breadth of coverage increased from 2.1% to 83.2% post-capture in the first set and from 2.0% to 75.6% in the second set. Next, we analyzed samples containing a set of diverse anellovirus sequences and demonstrated that ViroCap could be used to detect viral sequences with up to 58% variation from the references used to select capture probes. ViroCap substantially enhances MSS for a comprehensive set of viruses and has utility for research and clinical applications. PMID:26395152

  16. The interplay between deformation and volcanic activity: new data from the central sector of the Campi Flegrei caldera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isaia, Roberto; Sabatino, Ciarcia; Enrico, Iannuzzi; Ernesto, Prinzi; D'Assisi, Tramparulo Francesco; Stefano, Vitale

    2016-04-01

    The new excavation of a tunnel in the central sector of the Campi Flegrei caldera allowed us to collect new stratigraphic and structural data shedding light on the volcano-tectonic evolution of the last 10 ka. The analyzed sequences are composed by an alternation of volcanic, lacustrine, fluvial and marine sediments hosting several deformation structures such as faults, sedimentary dykes and fractures. A review of available well log togheter with the new data were used to perform a 3D reconstruction of paleo-surfaces resulted after the main volcanic and deformation episodes. Results show as the paleo-morphology was strictly controlled by faults and fractures that formed meso-scale channels and depressions subsequently filled by tephra and volcanoclastic sediments. The measured structures indicate an extensional deformation accompanying the ground uplift occurred in various stages of the caldera evolution. Stratigraphic relationships between structures and volcanic deposits further constrain the timing of the deformation phases. Presently an unrest phase of the Campi Flegrei caldera is marked by variations of different parameters such as ground deformation activities well recorded by GPS data, topographic leveling and satellite surveys. The results of this study provide further insight into the long term deformation pattern of the caldera and provide a key to interpret the ground deformation scenarios accompanying a possible resumption of volcanism.

  17. An analytical study of the effects of transverse shear deformation and anisotropy on natural vibration frequencies of laminated cylinders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jegley, Dawn C.

    1988-01-01

    Natural vibration frequencies of orthotropic and anisotropic simply supported right circular cylinders are predicted using a higher-order transverse-shear deformation theory. A comparison of natural vibration frequencies predicted by first-order transverse-shear deformation theory and the higher-order theory shows that an additional allowance for transverse shear deformation has a negligible effect on the lowest predicted natural vibration frequencies of laminated cylinders but significantly reduces the higher natural vibration frequencies. A parametric study of the effects of ply orientation on the natural vibration frequencies of laminated cylinders indicates that while stacking sequence affects natural vibration frequencies, cylinder geometry is more important in predicting transverse-shear deformation effects. Interaction curves for cylinders subjected to axial compressive loadings and low natural vibration frequencies indicate that transverse shearing effects are less important in predicting low natural vibration frequencies than in predicting axial compressive buckling loads. The effects of anisotropy are more important than the effects of transverse shear deformation for most strongly anisotropic laminated cylinders in predicting natural vibration frequencies. However, transverse-shear deformation effects are important in predicting high natural vibration frequencies of thick-walled laminated cylinders. Neglecting either anisotropic effects or transverse-shear deformation effects leads to non-conservative errors in predicted natural vibration frequencies.

  18. An analytical study of the effects of transverse shear deformation and anisotropy on natural vibation frequencies of laminated cylinders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jegley, Dawn C.

    1989-01-01

    Natural vibration frequencies of orthotropic and anisotropic simply supported right circular cylinders are predicted using a higher-order transverse-shear deformation theory. A comparison of natural vibration frequencies predicted by first-order transverse-shear deformation theory and the higher-order theory shows that an additional allowance for transverse shear deformation has a negligible effect on the lowest predicted natural vibration frequencies of laminated cylinders but significantly reduces the higher natural vibration frequencies. A parametric study of the effects of ply orientation on the natural vibration frequencies of laminated cylinders indicates that while stacking sequence affects natural vibration frequencies, cylinder geometry is more important in predicting transverse-shear deformation effects. Interaction curves for cylinders subjected to axial compressive loadings and low natural vibration frequencies indicate that transverse shearing effects are less important in predicting low natural vibration frequencies than in predicting axial compressive buckling loads. The effects of anisotropy are more important than the effects of transverse shear deformation for most strongly anisotropic laminated cylinders in predicting natural vibration frequencies. However, transverse-shear deformation effects are important in predicting high natural vibration frequencies of thick-walled laminated cylinders. Neglecting either anisotropic effects or transverse-shear deformation effects leads to non-conservative errors in predicted natural vibration frequencies.

  19. {Delta}I = 2 energy staggering in normal deformed dysprosium nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Riley, M.A.; Brown, T.B.; Archer, D.E.

    1996-12-31

    Very high spin states (I{ge}50{Dirac_h}) have been observed in {sup 155,156,157}Dy. The long regular band sequences, free from sharp backbending effects, observed in these dysprosium nuclei offer the possibility of investigating the occurence of any {Delta}I = 2 staggering in normal deformed nuclei. Employing the same analysis techniques as used in superdeformed nuclei, certain bands do indeed demonstrate an apparent staggering and this is discussed.

  20. Using crustal thickness and subsidence history on the Iberia-Newfoundland margins to constrain lithosphere deformation modes during continental breakup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeanniot, Ludovic; Kusznir, Nick; Manatschal, Gianreto; Mohn, Geoffroy

    2014-05-01

    Observations at magma-poor rifted margins such as Iberia-Newfoundland show a complex lithosphere deformation history during continental breakup and seafloor spreading initiation leading to complex OCT architecture with hyper-extended continental crust and lithosphere, exhumed mantle and scattered embryonic oceanic crust and continental slivers. Initiation of seafloor spreading requires both the rupture of the continental crust and lithospheric mantle, and the onset of decompressional melting. Their relative timing controls when mantle exhumation may occur; the presence or absence of exhumed mantle provides useful information on the timing of these events and constraints on lithosphere deformation modes. A single lithosphere deformation mode leading to continental breakup and sea-floor spreading cannot explain observations. We have determined the sequence of lithosphere deformation events for two profiles across the present-day conjugate Iberia-Newfoundland margins, using forward modelling of continental breakup and seafloor spreading initiation calibrated against observations of crustal basement thickness and subsidence. Flow fields, representing a sequence of lithosphere deformation modes, are generated by a 2D finite element viscous flow model (FeMargin), and used to advect lithosphere and asthenosphere temperature and material. FeMargin is kinematically driven by divergent deformation in the upper 15-20 km of the lithosphere inducing passive upwelling beneath that layer; extensional faulting and magmatic intrusions deform the topmost upper lithosphere, consistent with observations of deformation processes occurring at slow spreading ocean ridges (Cannat, 1996). Buoyancy enhanced upwelling, as predicted by Braun et al. (2000) is also kinematically included in the lithosphere deformation model. Melt generation by decompressional melting is predicted using the parameterization and methodology of Katz et al. (2003). The distribution of lithosphere deformation, the

  1. Brittle-viscous deformation of vein quartz under fluid-rich low greenschist facies conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kjøll, H. J.; Viola, G.; Menegon, L.; Sørensen, B. E.

    2015-01-01

    A coarse grained, statically crystallized quartz vein, embedded in a phyllonitic matrix, was studied by EBSD and optical microscopy to gain insights into the processes of strain localization in quartz deformed under low-grade conditions, broadly coincident with the frictional-viscous transition. The vein is from a high strain zone at the front of the Porsa Imbricate Stack in the Paleoproterozoic Repparfjord Tectonic Window in northern Norway. The vein was deformed under lower greenschist facies conditions during deformation along a large out-of-sequence phyllonitic thrust of Caledonian age. The host phyllonite formed at the expense of metabasalt wherein feldspar broke down to form interconnected layers of fine, synkinematic phyllosilicates. In the mechanically weak framework of the phyllonite, the studied quartz vein acted as a relatively rigid body deforming mainly by coaxial strain. Viscous deformation was initially accommodated by basal ⟨a⟩ slip of quartz during the development of a mesoscopic pervasive extensional crenulation cleavage. Under the prevailing boundary conditions, however, dislocation glide-accommodated deformation of quartz resulted inefficient and led to dislocation tangling and strain hardening of the vein. In response to hardening, to the progressive increase of fluid pressure and the increasing competence contrast between the vein and the weak foliated host phyllonite, quartz crystals began to deform frictionally along specific, optimally oriented lattice planes, creating microgouges along microfractures. These were, however, rapidly sealed by nucleation of new grains as transiently over pressured fluids penetrated the deforming system. The new nucleated grains grew initially by solution-precipitation and later by grain boundary migration. Due to the random initial orientation of the vein crystals, strain was accommodated differently in the individual crystals, leading to the development of remarkably different microstructures. Crystals

  2. Mantle exhumation and OCT architecture dependency on lithosphere deformation modes during continental breakup: Numerical experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeanniot, Ludovic; Kusznir, Nick; Manatschal, Gianreto; Cowie, Leanne

    2013-04-01

    components parameterised by the ratio Vz/Vx and the upper crustal pure-shear width W. Using numerical experiments, we explore temperature and material advection, decompression melt generation and subsidence for a sequence of 3 polyphase lithosphere deformation modes leading to continental breakup. Pure-shear widths exert a strong control on the timing of crustal rupture and melt initiation. Buoyant upwelling, while not changing the timing of crustal rupture, speeds up continental lithosphere thinning and melt initiation. The lateral migration of the deformation flow axis also has an important control on the rupture of continental crust and lithosphere, and melt initiation; rapid migration generates a broad region of thinned continental crust, with no melt initiation or rupture of the continental lithosphere. We believe lithosphere deformation leading to breakup is polyphase. The new FeMargin model, described above, is applied and tested to the Iberia-Newfoundland conjugate margin profiles as shown by Sutra et al. (2013).

  3. Significance of geometrical relationships between low-temperature intracrystalline deformation microstructures in naturally deformed quartz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derez, T.; Pennock, G.; Drury, M. R.; Sintubin, M.

    2013-12-01

    Although quartz is one of the most studied minerals in the Earth's crust when it comes to its rheology, the interpretation of intracrystalline deformation microstructures with respect to deformation conditions and mechanisms, remains highly contentious. Moreover, inconsistent use of terminology for both deformation microstructures and mechanisms makes a correct assessment of observations and interpretations in published material very difficult. With respect to low-temperature intracrystalline deformation microstructures in quartz, different conflicting genetic models have been proposed. Most probably, the lack of consensus means that there is no unique interpretation for these microstructures, primarily because their initiation and development depend on many ambient conditions. We extensively studied these intracrystalline deformation microstructures by means of optical microscopy, Hot-Cathodoluminescence, SEM-Cathodoluminescence and Electron Backscatter Diffraction Orientation Imaging, in vein quartz of the High-Ardenne slate belt (Belgium, France, Luxemburg, Germany), (de)formed in a low-temperature regime. Firstly, we propose a new, purely descriptive terminology for the low-temperature intracrystalline deformation microstructures in naturally deformed quartz: fine extinction bands (FEB), wide extinction bands (WEB) and strings. The strings can be further subdivided into blocky (BS), straight (SS) and recrystallised (RS) morphological types. FEBs have consistently been called deformation lamellae in quartz and planar slip bands in metals. WEBs have been called deformation bands, prismatic kink bands or type II kink bands. Strings have formerly been called shear bands, deformation bands or type I kink bands. No distinction between blocky and straight morphological string types had ever been made. Secondly, a survey of the pre-recrystallisation stages in the history of the intracrystalline deformation microstructures reveals that the different types of low

  4. Response of a low-subsiding intracratonic basin to long wavelength deformations: the Palaeocene-early Eocene period in the Paris Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briais, J.; Guillocheau, F.; Lasseur, E.; Robin, C.; Châteauneuf, J. J.; Serrano, O.

    2016-02-01

    The uppermost Cretaceous to early Palaeogene is a period of major deformations of the western part of the Eurasian plate with prominent basin inversions starting from the Coniacian onwards. These deformations occur in a complex geodynamic setting within both the context of the Africa-Eurasia convergence and the North Atlantic opening. While Mesozoic graben inversions have been extensively studied, particularly in Eastern Europe and the North Sea, more gentle deformations that affect thicker crust areas (intracratonic basins and emerged lands) are not as well documented. The objective of this study is to constrain the exact timing, type, and magnitude of the early Palaeogene deformations affecting the intracratonic Paris Basin and to integrate them at the western European scale. Low-amplitude deformations are attempted through a high-resolution reconstitution of its stratigraphic record based on well-dated outcrops and well-dated wells, and a high number of well-logs that are correlated using the "stacking pattern" sequence stratigraphic technique. Two orders of sequences are identified (third and fourth order) and correlated throughout the basin. Basin geometric and palaeogeographic reconstitutions are based on sediment thickness and facies analysis. Two-dimensional accommodation space measurements were taken in order to quantify the magnitude of the deformations. Three phases of deformation were recognized. 1. An intra-Maastrichtian-pre-Thanetian (59 Ma) deformation, with major uplift and erosion of the Cretaceous strata with two sub-periods of deformation: Maastrichtian-pre-middle-Danian and Upper Danian-pre-Thanetian long-wavelength deformations. This period of major deformation is coeval with Upper Cretaceous/pre-Danian compressive deformations linked to the Africa-Eurasia convergence in southern France and with volcanic activity from the North Atlantic to Massif Central and the Rhenish Shield during the Palaeocene. 2. An early Ypresian (55.1-54.3 Ma) medium

  5. Response of a low subsiding intracratonic basin to long wavelength deformations: the Palaeocene-early Eocene period in the Paris basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briais, J.; Guillocheau, F.; Lasseur, E.; Robin, C.; Châteauneuf, J. J.; Serrano, O.

    2015-12-01

    The uppermost Cretaceous to early Palaeogene is a period of major deformations of the western part of the Eurasian plate with prominent basin inversions starting from the Coniacian onwards. These deformations occur in a complex geodynamic setting within both the context of the Africa-Eurasia convergence and the North Atlantic opening. While Mesozoic graben inversions have been extensively studied, particularly in Eastern Europe and the North Sea, more gentle deformations that affect thicker crust areas (intracratonic basins and emerged lands) are not as well documented. The objective of this study is to constrain the exact timing, type and magnitude of the early Palaeogene deformations affecting the intracratonic Paris basin and to integrate them at the Western European scale. Relatively gentle deformations are attempted through a high-resolution reconstitution of its stratigraphic record based on outcrops and well-dated wells, and a high number of well-logs that are correlated using the "stacking pattern" sequence stratigraphic technique. Two orders of sequences are identified (third- and fourth-order) and correlated throughout the basin. Basin geometric and palaeogeographic reconstitutions are based on sediment thickness and facies analysis. Two-dimensional accommodation space measurements were taken in order to quantify the magnitude of the deformations. Three phases of deformation were recognized. 1. An intra-Maastrichtian-pre-Thanetian (59 Ma) deformation, with major uplift and erosion of the Cretaceous strata with two sub-periods of deformation: Maastrichtian-pre-middle-Danian and Upper Danian-pre-Thanetian long wavelength deformations. This period of major deformation is coeval with Upper Cretaceous-pre-Danian compressive deformations linked to the Africa-Eurasia convergence in southern France and with volcanic activity from the North Atlantic to Massif Central and the Rhenish Shield during the Palaeocene; 2. an early Ypresian (55.1-54.3 Ma) medium

  6. 14 CFR 23.305 - Strength and deformation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Strength and deformation. 23.305 Section 23... Strength and deformation. (a) The structure must be able to support limit loads without detrimental, permanent deformation. At any load up to limit loads, the deformation may not interfere with safe...

  7. 14 CFR 23.305 - Strength and deformation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Strength and deformation. 23.305 Section 23... Strength and deformation. (a) The structure must be able to support limit loads without detrimental, permanent deformation. At any load up to limit loads, the deformation may not interfere with safe...

  8. 14 CFR 23.305 - Strength and deformation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Strength and deformation. 23.305 Section 23... Strength and deformation. (a) The structure must be able to support limit loads without detrimental, permanent deformation. At any load up to limit loads, the deformation may not interfere with safe...

  9. 14 CFR 23.305 - Strength and deformation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Strength and deformation. 23.305 Section 23... Strength and deformation. (a) The structure must be able to support limit loads without detrimental, permanent deformation. At any load up to limit loads, the deformation may not interfere with safe...

  10. Molecular and Biological Characterization of Deformed Wing Virus of Honeybees (Apis mellifera L.)

    PubMed Central

    Lanzi, Gaetana; de Miranda, Joachim R.; Boniotti, Maria Beatrice; Cameron, Craig E.; Lavazza, Antonio; Capucci, Lorenzo; Camazine, Scott M.; Rossi, Cesare

    2006-01-01

    Deformed wing virus (DWV) of honeybees (Apis mellifera) is closely associated with characteristic wing deformities, abdominal bloating, paralysis, and rapid mortality of emerging adult bees. The virus was purified from diseased insects, and its genome was cloned and sequenced. The genomic RNA of DWV is 10,140 nucleotides in length and contains a single large open reading frame encoding a 328-kDa polyprotein. The coding sequence is flanked by a 1,144-nucleotide 5′ nontranslated leader sequence and a 317-nucleotide 3′ nontranslated region, followed by a poly(A) tail. The three major structural proteins, VP1 (44 kDa), VP2 (32 kDa), and VP3 (28 kDa), were identified, and their genes were mapped to the N-terminal section of the polyprotein. The C-terminal part of the polyprotein contains sequence motifs typical of well-characterized picornavirus nonstructural proteins: an RNA helicase, a chymotrypsin-like 3C protease, and an RNA-dependent RNA polymerase. The genome organization, capsid morphology, and sequence comparison data indicate that DWV is a member of the recently established genus Iflavirus. PMID:16641291

  11. Low autocorrelation binary sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Packebusch, Tom; Mertens, Stephan

    2016-04-01

    Binary sequences with minimal autocorrelations have applications in communication engineering, mathematics and computer science. In statistical physics they appear as groundstates of the Bernasconi model. Finding these sequences is a notoriously hard problem, that so far can be solved only by exhaustive search. We review recent algorithms and present a new algorithm that finds optimal sequences of length N in time O(N {1.73}N). We computed all optimal sequences for N≤slant 66 and all optimal skewsymmetric sequences for N≤slant 119.

  12. Uncorrectable sequences and telecommand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ekroot, Laura; Mceliece, R.; Dolinar, S.; Swanson, L.

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of a tail sequence for command link transmission units is to fail to decode, so that the command decoder will begin searching for the start of the next unit. A tail sequence used by several missions and recommended for this purpose by the Consultative Committee on Space Data Standards is analyzed. A single channel error can cause the sequence to decode. An alternative sequence requiring at least two channel errors before it can possibly decode is presented. (No sequence requiring more than two channel errors before it can possibly decode exists for this code.)

  13. Speckle Tracking in Intracardiac Echocardiography for the Assessment of Myocardial Deformation

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Yong; Clark, John W.; Khoury, Dirar S.

    2009-01-01

    Intracardiac echocardiography has proven to be useful for online anatomical imaging during catheterization. Our objective was to develop a speckle tracking method for myocardial motion estimation from intracardiac echocardiographic image sequences in order to provide a mean for regional functional imaging. Our approach was to solve two problems in motion estimation from two-dimensional intracardiac echocardiographic image sequences: non-rigid myocardial deformation and speckle decorrelation. To achieve robust noise resistance, we employed maximum likelihood estimation while fully exploiting ultrasound speckle statistics, and treated the maximization of motion probability as the minimization of an energy function. Non-rigid myocardial deformation was estimated by optimizing this energy function within a framework of parametric elastic registration. Evaluation of the method was carried out using a computer model that synthesized echocardiographic image sequences, and subsequently an animal model that provided continuous intracardiac echocardiographic images as well as reference measurements using sonomicrometry crystals. In conclusion, accurate estimation of regional myocardial deformation from intracardiac echocardiography by novel speckle tracking is feasible. This approach may have important clinical implications for multimodal imaging during catheterization. PMID:19272903

  14. Measurement of ship deformation based on ARX model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Xianglu; Qin, Shiqiao; Wang, Xingshu; Hu, Feng; Wu, Wei; Zheng, JiaXing

    2016-01-01

    Ship deformation is the main error source of partial reference. Such deformation can be estimated by laser gyro units and Kalman filter technology. For Kalman filter, deformation was divide into two parts, dynamic deformation, and static deformation. Traditionally, dynamic deformation is treated as AR2 model .In this paper, dynamic deformation is taken as a kind of ARX model. Based on actual data measured by Yuanwang-3 Space Survey Ship, simulation experiments are studied. Results show that the novel model can improve the measurement precision.

  15. Feasibility study of deformation modes of deforming composite materials using visioplasticity method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dwivedi, S. N.

    1981-01-01

    The impact resistance and the effect of impact on fiber reinforced composite materials was investigated. The visioplastic method for studying deformation modes and transient impact distribution is described and the basic equations used in the visioplastic method are presented. The subroutine for digitizing the input data and a computer program (STRESS) for calculating the strains and stresses of deforming projectiles are presented.

  16. Deformation Timescales of Porous Volcanic Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quane, S.; Friedlander, B.; Robert, G.; Lynn, H.

    2007-12-01

    We describe results from 20 high-temperature, constant strain rate and constant load deformation experiments on natural pyroclastic materials. Experiments were run unconfined and under variable H2O confining pressures at temperatures between 650 and 900 C. Starting materials comprised 4.3 cm diameter, 6 cm length cores of sintered Rattlesnake Tuff rhyolite ash with starting porosities of 70 percent. Experimental displacement was controlled to achieve total strain values between 10 and 90 percent. In thin section, the deformed experimental end products exhibit striking similarities to all facies of natural welded pyroclastic rocks including variably flattened pumice fiamme and systematically deformed bubble wall shards. To quantify the amount of strain accumulation, we placed three manually rounded 1 cm diameter pumice lapilli at different heights in each experimental product. Axial ratios (x-axis dimension/y-axis dimension) of the deformed lapilli (fiamme) show a systematic increase with increased deformation. To further quantify strain, we measured flattening ratios of originally spherical bubble wall shards. These analyses are compared to similar measurements on natural samples to evaluate current methods of quantifying deformation in welded pyroclastic facies. Stress-strain and strain-time experimental results indicate that the glassy, porous aggregates have a strain- dependent rheology; the effective viscosity of the mixture increases non-linearly with decreasing porosity. Temperature, rather than stress is the dominant factor controlling the rheology of these materials. Results also indicate that the presence of moderate H2O pressure allows for viscous deformation (e.g., welding) to occur at significantly lower temperatures than in anhydrous conditions. Results from these experiments are used to develop a constitutive relationship in which the effective viscosity of the experimental cores is predicted using melt viscosity, sample porosity and an empirically

  17. Surface Deformation in Imperial Valley, Southern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eneva, M.; Adams, D.; Falorni, G.; Morgan, J.

    2013-12-01

    The Imperial Valley in southern California is subjected to significant tectonic deformation resulting from the relative movement of the North American and Pacific plates. It is characterized by large earthquakes, frequent swarm activity, and aseismic events. High heat flow makes possible the operation of geothermal fields, some of which cause man-made surface displacements superimposed on the tectonic deformation. We apply radar interferometry (InSAR) to analyze Envisat ASAR data for the period 2003-2010. The SqueeSAR technique is used to obtain deformation time series and annual rates at numerous locations of permanent and distributed scatterers (PS and DS). SqueeSAR works very well in agricultural areas, where conventional differential InSAR (DinSAR) fails. We observe differential movements marking the Superstition Hills, San Andreas, and Imperial faults. The Imperial fault traverses agricultural fields, where DInSAR does not work and thus our SqueeSAR observations are the first for this fault (Fig. 1). We also observe steps in the deformation time series around the Superstition Hills fault from an October 2006 aseismic event and the April 2010 M7.2 earthquake south of the U.S.-Mexico border. Significant annual deformation rates are detected in the current geothermal fields. For example, subsidence of up to -50 mm/year is seen at the Salton Sea field (Fig. 2), and both subsidence and uplift are seen at Heber. We also determine the deformation baseline at prospective geothermal fields, thus making it possible in the future to distinguish between man-made and tectonic causes of surface deformation. Fig. 1. Line-of-sight (LOS) deformation indicates differential displacement on both sides of Imperial Fault. Movements away from the satellite are shown in yellow to red, and towards the satellite in blue. Larger deformation is associated with two geothermal fields, Heber (to the south-west) and East Mesa (to the east). Fig. 2. Subsidence in the Salton Sea geothermal

  18. Inter-relationships between deformation partitioning, metamorphism and tectonism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, T. H.; Rieuwers, M. T.; Cihan, M.; Evans, T. P.; Ham, A. P.; Welch, P. W.

    2013-03-01

    Thrusting from the east loaded the thick Pomfret dome stratigraphic sequence in Vermont to such an extent that by the time the first schistosity had formed it was 20 km deep. This occurred without garnet growth even though rock compositions were ideal for this phase to grow before they reached this depth. The rocks remained at this depth until garnet growth ceased ~ 50 million years later after 5 periods of FIA development (foliation intersection/inflection axes preserved within porphyroblasts). The first phase of the garnet growth in each sample from the Pomfret dome was overstepped in pressure, nucleating well above the incoming phase boundary for this phase at ~7 kbar for whatever FIA set was the first to develop. This was not the case 45 km S in the Chester dome where a thin stratigraphic sequence overlay a basement high of gneiss. Lateral ramping against this basement thinned the thrust sheet preventing overstepping. Frontal ramping to the WNW had the same effect. The pressure did not increase in both regions to ~ 7 kbars until FIA 2. Approximately 50% of the rocks sampled around the Pomfret dome did not grow garnet during FIA 0. PT pseudosections and overstepped garnet phase boundaries indicate that all would have grown garnet if the bulk composition and PT were the only controlling factors. If metastability alone was a factor the other 50% should have grown garnet during the development of FIA 1. They did not, and this pattern was repeated for FIAs 2 and 3. Why, where and when garnet first grew in this PT overstepped environment was recorded by the inclusion trail geometries in each sample; all grew at the start of crenulation-producing events. The variable partitioning of a succession of differently oriented crenulation deformations through the region from FIA to FIA controlled where garnet growth first occurred. Successive FIAs shifted the bulk shortening direction relative to competent rocks, deforming sites previously protected and protecting others. The

  19. A Refined Shear Deformation Plate Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yucheng

    2011-04-01

    An improved higher-order shear deformation theory of plates is presented in this paper. The theory is developed from the transverse shear deformation theory presented by Ambartsumian [11]. The present plate theory contains kinematics of higher-order displacement field of plates, a system of higher-order differential equilibrium equations in terms of the three generalized displacements of bending plates, and a system of boundary conditions at each edge of plate boundaries. The present shear deformation theory of plates is validated by applying it to solve torsional plates and simply supported plates. The obtained solutions using the present theory are compared with the solutions of other shear-deformation theories. A good agreement is achieved through these comparisons and the advantages of the present theory are clearly verified. The shear deformation plate theory presented here can be applied to the analysis of laminated composite plates to better predict their dynamic and static behaviors. The proposed theory should also be supplemented to the theory of finite element analysis for developing new shell elements.

  20. Deformed Maxwell Algebras and their Realizations

    SciTech Connect

    Gomis, Joaquim; Kamimura, Kiyoshi; Lukierski, Jerzy

    2009-12-15

    We study all possible deformations of the Maxwell algebra. In D = d+1not =3 dimensions there is only one-parameter deformation. The deformed algebra is isomorphic to so(d+1, 1)+so(d, 1) or to so(d, 2)+so(d, 1) depending on the signs of the deformation parameter. We construct in the dS(AdS) space a model of massive particle interacting with Abelian vector field via nonlocal Lorentz force. In D = 2+1 the deformations depend on two parameters b and k. We construct a phase diagram, with two parts of the (b, k) plane with so(3, 1)+so(2, 1) and so( 2, 2)+so(2, 1) algebras separated by a critical curve along which the algebra is isomorphic to Iso(2, 1)+so(2, 1). We introduce in D = 2+1 the Volkov-Akulov type model for a Abelian Goldstone-Nambu vector field described by a non-linear action containing as its bilinear term the free Chern-Simons Lagrangean.

  1. Surface patterning by using plastic deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takei, Atsushi; Jin, Lihua; Fujita, Hiroyuki

    2014-03-01

    We presents a method of surface patterning using plastic deformation. Localized deformation pattern is formed on a surface of a bi-layer system composed of elastic substrate and plastic thin film. With the stretch beyond the yield stress of the film, the film is deformed plastically, and the mismatch of the lengths between the film and the substrate is induced at the release of the stretch. Consequently, the mismatch induces buckling on the surface. With the stretch λ0 > 1.5, the deformation of the surface is localized unlike conventional wrinkle patterns. The localized deformations of the bi-layer system both in one-dimension and in two-dimension are analyzed through experiments and simulations. Besides the theoretical aspect, we present that our method achieves functional surfaces such as a hydrophobic surface in a simple manner, and also present that our method can be used for surface patterning of a wide variety of geometry such as a flat plane, fiber and micro -channel.

  2. Clinical Implications of Nasal Septal Deformities

    PubMed Central

    Mladina, Ranko; Skitarelić, Neven; Poje, Gorazd; Šubarić, Marin

    2015-01-01

    The first attempts to systematize septal distortions have been given by Cottle who defined four groups of septal deformities: subluxation, large spurs, caudal deflection and tension septum. Fortunately, the variations of the septal deformities show a certain order, thus enabling more precise classification. Mladina was the first to make user-friendly classification of septal deformities in six basic types. He also described the seventh type, named “Passali deformity”, which presents individually, but is always a well-defined combination between some of the previous six types. Mladina types of septal deformities (SD) are divided in two main groups: so called “vertical” deformities (types 1, 2, 3 and 4), and “horizontal” ones (types 5 and 6). This classification was immediately well accepted by rhinologists worldwide and started to be cited from the very beginning. Since then it has been continuously cited increasingly more often, thus making Mladina classification a gold standard whenever clinical researches on nasal septum are concerned. More than forty clinical studies based on this classification have been performed to date. It is extremely important to make a strict distinction between the types of SD since all of them play some specific role in the nasal and general physiology in man. PMID:26167337

  3. How 'hard' are hard-rock deformations?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Loon, A. J.

    2003-04-01

    The study of soft-rock deformations has received increasing attention during the past two decades, and much progress has been made in the understanding of their genesis. It is also recognized now that soft-rock deformations—which show a wide variety in size and shape—occur frequently in sediments deposited in almost all types of environments. In spite of this, deformations occurring in lithified rocks are still relatively rarely attributed to sedimentary or early-diagenetic processes. Particularly faults in hard rocks are still commonly ascribed to tectonics, commonly without a discussion about a possible non-tectonic origin at a stage that the sediments were still unlithified. Misinterpretations of both the sedimentary and the structural history of hard-rock successions may result from the negligence of a possible soft-sediment origin of specific deformations. It is therefore suggested that a re-evaluation of these histories, keeping the present-day knowledge about soft-sediment deformations in mind, may give new insights into the geological history of numerous sedimentary successions in which the deformations have not been studied from both a sedimentological and a structural point of view.

  4. Deformability of Tumor Cells versus Blood Cells.

    PubMed

    Shaw Bagnall, Josephine; Byun, Sangwon; Begum, Shahinoor; Miyamoto, David T; Hecht, Vivian C; Maheswaran, Shyamala; Stott, Shannon L; Toner, Mehmet; Hynes, Richard O; Manalis, Scott R

    2015-01-01

    The potential for circulating tumor cells (CTCs) to elucidate the process of cancer metastasis and inform clinical decision-making has made their isolation of great importance. However, CTCs are rare in the blood, and universal properties with which to identify them remain elusive. As technological advancements have made single-cell deformability measurements increasingly routine, the assessment of physical distinctions between tumor cells and blood cells may provide insight into the feasibility of deformability-based methods for identifying CTCs in patient blood. To this end, we present an initial study assessing deformability differences between tumor cells and blood cells, indicated by the length of time required for them to pass through a microfluidic constriction. Here, we demonstrate that deformability changes in tumor cells that have undergone phenotypic shifts are small compared to differences between tumor cell lines and blood cells. Additionally, in a syngeneic mouse tumor model, cells that are able to exit a tumor and enter circulation are not required to be more deformable than the cells that were first injected into the mouse. However, a limited study of metastatic prostate cancer patients provides evidence that some CTCs may be more mechanically similar to blood cells than to typical tumor cell lines. PMID:26679988

  5. Deformability of Tumor Cells versus Blood Cells

    PubMed Central

    Shaw Bagnall, Josephine; Byun, Sangwon; Begum, Shahinoor; Miyamoto, David T.; Hecht, Vivian C.; Maheswaran, Shyamala; Stott, Shannon L.; Toner, Mehmet; Hynes, Richard O.; Manalis, Scott R.

    2015-01-01

    The potential for circulating tumor cells (CTCs) to elucidate the process of cancer metastasis and inform clinical decision-making has made their isolation of great importance. However, CTCs are rare in the blood, and universal properties with which to identify them remain elusive. As technological advancements have made single-cell deformability measurements increasingly routine, the assessment of physical distinctions between tumor cells and blood cells may provide insight into the feasibility of deformability-based methods for identifying CTCs in patient blood. To this end, we present an initial study assessing deformability differences between tumor cells and blood cells, indicated by the length of time required for them to pass through a microfluidic constriction. Here, we demonstrate that deformability changes in tumor cells that have undergone phenotypic shifts are small compared to differences between tumor cell lines and blood cells. Additionally, in a syngeneic mouse tumor model, cells that are able to exit a tumor and enter circulation are not required to be more deformable than the cells that were first injected into the mouse. However, a limited study of metastatic prostate cancer patients provides evidence that some CTCs may be more mechanically similar to blood cells than to typical tumor cell lines. PMID:26679988

  6. Core Characteristics Deterioration due to Plastic Deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaido, Chikara; Arai, Satoshi

    This paper discusses the effect of plastic deformation at core manufacturing on the characteristics of cores where non-oriented electrical steel sheets are used as core material. Exciting field and iron loss increase proportionally to plastic deformation in the case of rP<10, where rP is a ratio of plastic deformation to that at yield point. In this region, anomalous eddy currents increase because plastic deformations of crystalline grains are distributed and then the flux distribution is induced. In the case of rP>20, the deterioration tend to saturate, and the increases in magnetic field and iron loss are 1000 to 1500A/m and 2 to 4W/kg. They are related to grain size, and high grade with larger grain may have lager field increase and smaller iron loss increase. Anomalous eddy current losses scarcely increase in this region. In actual motors, the plastic deformation affects iron loss increase although exciting current increases a little.

  7. An algorithmic approach to crustal deformation analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iz, Huseyin Baki

    1987-01-01

    In recent years the analysis of crustal deformation measurements has become important as a result of current improvements in geodetic methods and an increasing amount of theoretical and observational data provided by several earth sciences. A first-generation data analysis algorithm which combines a priori information with current geodetic measurements was proposed. Relevant methods which can be used in the algorithm were discussed. Prior information is the unifying feature of this algorithm. Some of the problems which may arise through the use of a priori information in the analysis were indicated and preventive measures were demonstrated. The first step in the algorithm is the optimal design of deformation networks. The second step in the algorithm identifies the descriptive model of the deformation field. The final step in the algorithm is the improved estimation of deformation parameters. Although deformation parameters are estimated in the process of model discrimination, they can further be improved by the use of a priori information about them. According to the proposed algorithm this information must first be tested against the estimates calculated using the sample data only. Null-hypothesis testing procedures were developed for this purpose. Six different estimators which employ a priori information were examined. Emphasis was put on the case when the prior information is wrong and analytical expressions for possible improvements under incompatible prior information were derived.

  8. Interfacial diffusion aided deformation during nanoindentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samanta, Amit; E, Weinan

    2016-07-01

    Nanoindentation is commonly used to quantify the mechanical response of material surfaces. Despite its widespread use, a detailed understanding of the deformation mechanisms responsible for plasticity during these experiments has remained elusive. Nanoindentation measurements often show stress values close to a material's ideal strength which suggests that dislocation nucleation and subsequent dislocation activity dominates the deformation. However, low strain-rate exponents and small activation volumes have also been reported which indicates high temperature sensitivity of the deformation processes. Using an order parameter aided temperature accelerated sampling technique called adiabatic free energy dynamics [J. B. Abrams and M. E. Tuckerman, J. Phys. Chem. B, 112, 15742 (2008)], and molecular dynamics we have probed the diffusive mode of deformation during nanoindentation. Localized processes such as surface vacancy and ad-atom pair formation, vacancy diffusion are found to play an important role during indentation. Our analysis suggests a change in the dominant deformation mode from dislocation mediated plasticity to diffusional flow at high temperatures, slow indentation rates and small indenter tip radii.

  9. Nanoscale buckling deformation in layered copolymer materials

    PubMed Central

    Makke, Ali; Perez, Michel; Lame, Olivier; Barrat, Jean-Louis

    2012-01-01

    In layered materials, a common mode of deformation involves buckling of the layers under tensile deformation in the direction perpendicular to the layers. The instability mechanism, which operates in elastic materials from geological to nanometer scales, involves the elastic contrast between different layers. In a regular stacking of “hard” and “soft” layers, the tensile stress is first accommodated by a large deformation of the soft layers. The inhibited Poisson contraction results in a compressive stress in the direction transverse to the tensile deformation axis. The hard layers sustain this transverse compression until buckling takes place and results in an undulated structure. Using molecular simulations, we demonstrate this scenario for a material made of triblock copolymers. The buckling deformation is observed to take place at the nanoscale, at a wavelength that depends on strain rate. In contrast to what is commonly assumed, the wavelength of the undulation is not determined by defects in the microstructure. Rather, it results from kinetic effects, with a competition between the rate of strain and the growth rate of the instability. PMID:22203970

  10. Survey of Reflection-Asymmetric Nuclear Deformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsen, Erik; Birge, Noah; Erler, Jochen; Nazarewicz, Witek; Perhac, Alex; Schunck, Nicolas; Stoitsov, Mario; Nuclei Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    Due to spontaneous symmetry breaking it is possible for a nucleus to have a deformed shape in its ground state. It is theorized that atoms whose nuclei have reflection-asymmetric or pear-like deformations could have non-zero electric dipole moments (EDMs). Such a trait would be evidence of CP-violation, a feature that goes beyond the Standard Model of Physics. It is the purpose of this project to predict which nuclei exhibit a reflection-asymmetric deformation and which of those would be the best candidates for an EDM measuring experiment. Using nuclear Density Functional Theory along with the new computer code AxialHFB and massively parallel computing we calculated ground state nuclear properties for thousands of even-even nuclei across the nuclear chart: from light to superheavy and from stable to short-lived systems. Six different Energy Density Functionals (EDFs) were used to assess systematic errors in our calculations. Overall, 140 even-even nuclei (near and among the lantanides and actinides and in the superheavy region near N = 184) were predicted by all 6 EDFs to have a pear-like deformation. The case of 112Xe also proved curious as it was predicted by 5 EDFs to have a pear-like deformation despite its proximity to the two-proton drip line. Deceased.

  11. Shape Function-Based Estimation of Deformation with Moving Cameras Attached to the Deforming Body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jokinen, O.; Ranta, I.; Haggrén, H.; Rönnholm, P.

    2016-06-01

    The paper presents a novel method to measure 3-D deformation of a large metallic frame structure of a crane under loading from one to several images, when the cameras need to be attached to the self deforming body, the structure sways during loading, and the imaging geometry is not optimal due to physical limitations. The solution is based on modeling the deformation with adequate shape functions and taking into account that the cameras move depending on the frame deformation. It is shown that the deformation can be estimated even from a single image of targeted points if the 3-D coordinates of the points are known or have been measured before loading using multiple cameras or some other measuring technique. The precision of the method is evaluated to be 1 mm at best, corresponding to 1:11400 of the average distance to the target.

  12. Indexing Similar DNA Sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Songbo; Lam, T. W.; Sung, W. K.; Tam, S. L.; Yiu, S. M.

    To study the genetic variations of a species, one basic operation is to search for occurrences of patterns in a large number of very similar genomic sequences. To build an indexing data structure on the concatenation of all sequences may require a lot of memory. In this paper, we propose a new scheme to index highly similar sequences by taking advantage of the similarity among the sequences. To store r sequences with k common segments, our index requires only O(n + NlogN) bits of memory, where n is the total length of the common segments and N is the total length of the distinct regions in all texts. The total length of all sequences is rn + N, and any scheme to store these sequences requires Ω(n + N) bits. Searching for a pattern P of length m takes O(m + m logN + m log(rk)psc(P) + occlogn), where psc(P) is the number of prefixes of P that appear as a suffix of some common segments and occ is the number of occurrences of P in all sequences. In practice, rk ≤ N, and psc(P) is usually a small constant. We have implemented our solution and evaluated our solution using real DNA sequences. The experiments show that the memory requirement of our solution is much less than that required by BWT built on the concatenation of all sequences. When compared to the other existing solution (RLCSA), we use less memory with faster searching time.

  13. Plastic deformation in a metallic granular chain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musson, Ryan W.; Carlson, William

    2016-03-01

    Solitary wave response was investigated in a metallic granular chain-piston system using LS-DYNA. A power law hardening material model was used to show that localized plastic deformation is present in a metallic granular chain for an impact velocity of 0.5 m/s. This loss due to plastic deformation was quantified via impulse, and it was shown that the loss scales nearly linearly with impact velocity. Therefore, metallic grains may not be suitable for devices that require high-amplitude solitary waves. There would be too much energy lost to plastic deformation. One can assume that ceramics will behave elastically; therefore, the response of an aluminum oxide granular chain was compared to that of a steel chain.

  14. Deformation of a holographic image in space

    SciTech Connect

    Schumann, W.; Cuche, D.

    1982-01-01

    In the preliminary part of this paper, the third-order aberrations (coma) of the points of a modified holographic image are investigated by means of the seocond-order terms in the transverse-ray equation. In the main part, however, the deformation of the holographic image as a whole (more precisely, the deformation of the vicinity of each point) is treated: First a duality concept is used; then it is outlined in such a way that the same third-order tensor as the one describing the coma appears in the deformation in space. This third-order tensor contains both the derivative and the square of the second-order tensor that describes the astigmatism.

  15. Yang-Baxter deformations of Minkowski spacetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jun-ichi, Sakamoto

    2016-01-01

    We discuss Yang-Baxter sigma deformations of 4D Minkowski spacetime proposed recently. To avoid the degeneracy of the standard bilinear form associated with the familiar coset ISO(1,3)/SO(1,3), we consider a slice of AdS5 in Poincaré coordinates by embedding the 4D Poincaré group into the 4D conformal group SO(2,4). With this procedure we present the metrics and B-fields as Yang-Baxter deformations which correspond to well-known backgrounds such as T-duals of Melvin backgrounds, Hashimoto-Sethi and Spradlin-Takayanagi-Volovich backgrounds, pp-waves, and T-duals of dS4 and AdS4. Finally we consider a deformation with a classical r-matrix of Drinfeld-Jimbo type and explicitly derive the associated metric and B-field.

  16. Decoherence of spin-deformed bosonic model

    SciTech Connect

    Dehdashti, Sh.; Mahdifar, A.; Bagheri Harouni, M.; Roknizadeh, R.

    2013-07-15

    The decoherence rate and some parameters affecting it are investigated for the generalized spin-boson model. We consider the spin-bosonic model when the bosonic environment is modeled by the deformed harmonic oscillators. We show that the state of the environment approaches a non-linear coherent state. Then, we obtain the decoherence rate of a two-level system which is in contact with a deformed bosonic environment which is either in thermal equilibrium or in the ground state. By using some recent realization of f-deformed oscillators, we show that some physical parameters strongly affect the decoherence rate of a two-level system. -- Highlights: •Decoherence of the generalized spin-boson model is considered. •In this model the environment consists of f-oscillators. •Via the interaction, the state of the environment approaches non-linear coherent states. •Effective parameters on decoherence are considered.

  17. Shape Determination for Deformed Electromagnetic Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Akcelik, Volkan; Ko, Kwok; Lee, Lie-Quan; Li, Zhenghai; Ng, Cho-Kuen; Xiao, Liling; /SLAC

    2007-12-10

    The measured physical parameters of a superconducting cavity differ from those of the designed ideal cavity. This is due to shape deviations caused by both loose machine tolerances during fabrication and by the tuning process for the accelerating mode. We present a shape determination algorithm to solve for the unknown deviations from the ideal cavity using experimentally measured cavity data. The objective is to match the results of the deformed cavity model to experimental data through least-squares minimization. The inversion variables are unknown shape deformation parameters that describe perturbations of the ideal cavity. The constraint is the Maxwell eigenvalue problem. We solve the nonlinear optimization problem using a line-search based reduced space Gauss-Newton method where we compute shape sensitivities with a discrete adjoint approach. We present two shape determination examples, one from synthetic and the other from experimental data. The results demonstrate that the proposed algorithm is very effective in determining the deformed cavity shape.

  18. Trilinolein improves erythrocyte deformability during cardiopulmonary bypass.

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, S K; Chan, P; Lee, T Y; Yung, J M; Hong, C Y

    1994-01-01

    The in vitro effect of trilinolein, a triglyceride with linoleic acid as the major fatty acid residue in the esterified positions of glycerol, on erythrocyte deformability was studied in blood samples collected from 12 patients before and after cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). Erythrocyte deformability was measured with a filtration method and expressed as red cell filtration rate (RFR). RFR was reduced after CPB and the reduction was time dependent. Trilinolein at a concentration of 10(-7) M significantly reversed the CPB-induced reduction of RFR when it was mixed with blood samples collected 30, 60 and 90 min from the start of CPB. This study confirmed the effect of CPB on erythrocyte deformability and showed that this damage could be significantly improved by mixing blood with trilinolein. PMID:8054252

  19. Modelling deformation and fracture in confectionery wafers

    SciTech Connect

    Mohammed, Idris K.; Charalambides, Maria N.; Williams, J. Gordon; Rasburn, John

    2015-01-22

    The aim of this research is to model the deformation and fracture behaviour of brittle wafers often used in chocolate confectionary products. Three point bending and compression experiments were performed on beam and circular disc samples respectively to determine the 'apparent' stress-strain curves in bending and compression. The deformation of the wafer for both these testing types was observed in-situ within an SEM. The wafer is modeled analytically and numerically as a composite material with a core which is more porous than the skins. X-ray tomography was used to generate a three dimensional volume of the wafer microstructure which was then meshed and used for quantitative analysis. A linear elastic material model, with a damage function and element deletion, was used and the XMT generated architecture was loaded in compression. The output from the FE simulations correlates closely to the load-deflection deformation observed experimentally.

  20. Computational field simulation of temporally deforming geometries

    SciTech Connect

    Boyalakuntla, K.; Soni, B.K.; Thornburg, H.J.

    1996-12-31

    A NURBS based moving grid generation technique is presented to simulate temporally deforming geometries. Grid generation for a complex configuration can be a time consuming process and temporally varying geometries necessitate the regeneration of such a grid for every time step. The Non Uniform Rational B Spline (NURBS) based control point information is used for geometry description. The parametric definition of the NURBS is utilized in the development of the methodology to generate well distributed grid in a timely manner. The numerical simulation involving temporally deforming geometry is accomplished by appropriately linking to a unsteady, multi-block, thin layer Navier-Stokes solver. The present method greatly reduces CPU requirements for time dependent remeshing, facilitating the simulation of more complex unsteady problems. This current effort is the first step towards multidisciplinary design optimization, which involves coupling aerodynamic heat transfer and structural analysis. Applications include simulation of temporally deforming bodies.

  1. Finite deformation of elasto-plastic solids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Osias, J. R.

    1973-01-01

    A theoretical basis is established for analysis of finite deformation of metals. The observation that finite deformation of such elastoplastic materials may be viewed as a process rather than an event leads to derivation of a complete initial and boundary value problem distinguished by its quasilinear nature. This feature of the formulation motivates adoption of an incremental approach to numerical problem solving. Numerical solution capability is established for problems of plane stress and plane strain. The validity of the theory and numerical analysis is demonstrated by consideration of a number of problems of homogeneous finite deformation for which analytic solutions are available. Subsequently the analysis is employed for the investigation of necking in flat metal tensile bars. The results of this investigation provide the first full numerical solutions for tensile necking in plane stress and plane strain. In addition a basis is provided for assessment of the validity of stress-strain relations inferred from tensile test data.

  2. Computing Fault Displacements from Surface Deformations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyzenga, Gregory; Parker, Jay; Donnellan, Andrea; Panero, Wendy

    2006-01-01

    Simplex is a computer program that calculates locations and displacements of subterranean faults from data on Earth-surface deformations. The calculation involves inversion of a forward model (given a point source representing a fault, a forward model calculates the surface deformations) for displacements, and strains caused by a fault located in isotropic, elastic half-space. The inversion involves the use of nonlinear, multiparameter estimation techniques. The input surface-deformation data can be in multiple formats, with absolute or differential positioning. The input data can be derived from multiple sources, including interferometric synthetic-aperture radar, the Global Positioning System, and strain meters. Parameters can be constrained or free. Estimates can be calculated for single or multiple faults. Estimates of parameters are accompanied by reports of their covariances and uncertainties. Simplex has been tested extensively against forward models and against other means of inverting geodetic data and seismic observations. This work

  3. Hamiltonian deformations of Gabor frames: First steps

    PubMed Central

    de Gosson, Maurice A.

    2015-01-01

    Gabor frames can advantageously be redefined using the Heisenberg–Weyl operators familiar from harmonic analysis and quantum mechanics. Not only does this redefinition allow us to recover in a very simple way known results of symplectic covariance, but it immediately leads to the consideration of a general deformation scheme by Hamiltonian isotopies (i.e. arbitrary paths of non-linear symplectic mappings passing through the identity). We will study in some detail an associated weak notion of Hamiltonian deformation of Gabor frames, using ideas from semiclassical physics involving coherent states and Gaussian approximations. We will thereafter discuss possible applications and extensions of our method, which can be viewed – as the title suggests – as the very first steps towards a general deformation theory for Gabor frames. PMID:25892903

  4. Modelling deformation and fracture in confectionery wafers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammed, Idris K.; Charalambides, Maria N.; Williams, J. Gordon; Rasburn, John

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this research is to model the deformation and fracture behaviour of brittle wafers often used in chocolate confectionary products. Three point bending and compression experiments were performed on beam and circular disc samples respectively to determine the 'apparent' stress-strain curves in bending and compression. The deformation of the wafer for both these testing types was observed in-situ within an SEM. The wafer is modeled analytically and numerically as a composite material with a core which is more porous than the skins. X-ray tomography was used to generate a three dimensional volume of the wafer microstructure which was then meshed and used for quantitative analysis. A linear elastic material model, with a damage function and element deletion, was used and the XMT generated architecture was loaded in compression. The output from the FE simulations correlates closely to the load-deflection deformation observed experimentally.

  5. Deformation behavior of metallic glass thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y. H.; Zhao, F.; Li, Y. L.; Chen, M. W.

    2012-09-01

    We report room-temperature deformation behavior of damage-free metallic glass films characterized by nanoindentation and atomic force microscopy. The glass films with thicknesses ranging from 5 μm down to ˜60 nm plastically deform by shear bands when subjected to both spherical and sharp Berkovich indenters. Importantly, we found that gallium contamination from focus ion beam (FIB) milling significantly suppresses shear band formation, indicating that the absence of shear bands in FIB milled samples may be caused by gallium irradiation damage, rather than sample size effect. Finite element simulation reveals that a high stress gradient at the film/substrate interface promotes the plastic deformation of the thin films but does not give rise to significant strain inhomogeneity.

  6. Experimental and simulation study of undesirable short-period deformation in piezoelectric deformable x-ray mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamori, Hiroki; Matsuyama, Satoshi; Imai, Shota; Kimura, Takashi; Sano, Yasuhisa; Kohmura, Yoshiki; Tamasaku, Kenji; Yabashi, Makina; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Yamauchi, Kazuto

    2012-05-01

    To construct adaptive x-ray focusing optics whose optical parameters can be varied while performing wavefront correction, ultraprecise piezoelectric deformable mirrors have been developed. We computationally and experimentally investigated undesirable short-period deformation caused by piezoelectric actuators adhered to the substrate during mirror deformation. Based on the results of finite element method analysis, shape measurements, and the observation of x-ray reflection images, a guideline is developed for designing deformable mirrors that do not have short-period deformation errors.

  7. Deformation of square objects and boudins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treagus, Susan H.; Lan, Labao

    2004-08-01

    Some geological objects, such as clasts and boudins, may have had original shapes close to square, that have been modified by ductile deformation. We demonstrate through finite element models presented here and in earlier papers that square objects in a matrix with contrasting viscosity can deform to a variety of curved shapes. The maximum shape change is where the square edges are parallel to the principal bulk strains. Competent objects with viscosity ratio to matrix ( m) of 2-20 become barrel shaped, showing concave 'fish mouth' shortened edges. Incompetent objects ( m<1) show a narrower variety of shapes with m, all becoming smoothed to bone, dumb-bell or lobate shapes, and losing the original corners. We compare the results for square objects with linear and non-linear rheology (power law, stress exponent n=1, 3 or 10), and with previous modelling with different object-matrix proportions. Competent objects with higher n values deform slightly less, and more irregularly, than linearly viscous ( n=1) objects, but the distinctions between n=3 and 10 are only slight. The differences are even slighter (in the opposite sense) for incompetent objects. The proportion of object to matrix is as important, if not more, in controlling the deformation and shape of these objects. The results are compared via graphs of object strain and concavity versus bulk strain. The concavity graph for competent square objects with linear viscosity up to very high strain can be compared with examples of ductile boudins with barrel or fish mouth shapes. Subject to a number of assumptions, this provides a method of estimating boudin-matrix viscosity ratios and post-boudinage ductile strain, of potential use in highly deformed rocks lacking other strain markers. The approach may also be suitable for deformed porphyroblasts, but is more difficult to apply to single clasts in breccias and conglomerates.

  8. Effects of oxidative stress on erythrocyte deformability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayer, Rainer; Wasser, Gerd

    1996-05-01

    Hemolysis as a consequence of open heart surgery is well investigated and explained by the oxidative and/or mechanical stress produced, e.g. by the heart lung machine. In Europe O3 is widely used by physicians, dedicated to alternative medicine. They apply O3 mostly by means of the Major Autohematotherapy (MAH, a process of removing 50 - 100 ml of blood, adding O3 gas to it and returning it to the patient's body). No controlled studies on the efficacy of O3 are available so far, but several anecdotal cases appear to confirm that MAH improves microcirculation, possibly due to increased RBC flexibility. Most methods established to estimate RBC deformability are hard to standardize and include high error of measurement. For our present investigation we used the method of laser diffraction in combination with image analysis. The variation coefficient of the measurement is less than 1%. Previous investigations of our group have shown, that mechanical stress decreases deformability, already at rather low levels of mechanical stress which do not include hemolysis. On the other hand exposure to O2, H2O2 or O3 does not alter the deformability of RBC and--except O3--does not induce considerably hemolysis. However this only holds true if deformability (shear rates 36/s - 2620/s) is determined in isotonic solutions. In hypertonic solutions O3 decreases RBC deformability, but improves it in hypotonic solutions. The results indicate that peroxidative stress dehydrates RBC and reduces their size. To explain the positive effect of O3 on the mechanical fragility of RBC we tentatively assume, that the reduction of RBC size facilitates the feed through small pore filters. In consequence, the size reduction in combination with undisturbed deformability at iso-osmolarity may have a beneficial effect on microcirculation.

  9. Non-rigid registration of medical images based on estimation of deformation states.

    PubMed

    Marami, Bahram; Sirouspour, Shahin; Capson, David W

    2014-11-21

    A unified framework for automatic non-rigid 3D-3D and 3D-2D registration of medical images with static and dynamic deformations is proposed in this paper. The problem of non-rigid image registration is approached as a classical state estimation problem using a generic deformation model for the soft tissue. The registration technique employs a dynamic linear elastic continuum mechanics model of the tissue deformation, which is discretized using the finite element method. In the proposed method, the registration is achieved through a Kalman-like filtering process, which incorporates information from the deformation model and a vector of observation prediction errors computed from an intensity-based similarity/distance metric between images. With this formulation, single and multiple-modality, 3D-3D and 3D-2D image registration problems can all be treated within the same framework. The performance of the proposed registration technique was evaluated in a number of different registration scenarios. First, 3D magnetic resonance (MR) images of uncompressed and compressed breast tissue were co-registered. 3D MR images of the uncompressed breast tissue were also registered to a sequence of simulated 2D interventional MR images of the compressed breast. Finally, the registration algorithm was employed to dynamically track a target sub-volume inside the breast tissue during the process of the biopsy needle insertion based on registering pre-insertion 3D MR images to a sequence of real-time simulated 2D interventional MR images. Registration results indicate that the proposed method can be effectively employed for the registration of medical images in image-guided procedures, such as breast biopsy in which the tissue undergoes static and dynamic deformations. PMID:25350234

  10. Non-rigid registration of medical images based on estimation of deformation states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marami, Bahram; Sirouspour, Shahin; Capson, David W.

    2014-11-01

    A unified framework for automatic non-rigid 3D-3D and 3D-2D registration of medical images with static and dynamic deformations is proposed in this paper. The problem of non-rigid image registration is approached as a classical state estimation problem using a generic deformation model for the soft tissue. The registration technique employs a dynamic linear elastic continuum mechanics model of the tissue deformation, which is discretized using the finite element method. In the proposed method, the registration is achieved through a Kalman-like filtering process, which incorporates information from the deformation model and a vector of observation prediction errors computed from an intensity-based similarity/distance metric between images. With this formulation, single and multiple-modality, 3D-3D and 3D-2D image registration problems can all be treated within the same framework. The performance of the proposed registration technique was evaluated in a number of different registration scenarios. First, 3D magnetic resonance (MR) images of uncompressed and compressed breast tissue were co-registered. 3D MR images of the uncompressed breast tissue were also registered to a sequence of simulated 2D interventional MR images of the compressed breast. Finally, the registration algorithm was employed to dynamically track a target sub-volume inside the breast tissue during the process of the biopsy needle insertion based on registering pre-insertion 3D MR images to a sequence of real-time simulated 2D interventional MR images. Registration results indicate that the proposed method can be effectively employed for the registration of medical images in image-guided procedures, such as breast biopsy in which the tissue undergoes static and dynamic deformations.

  11. Unlocking hidden genomic sequence

    PubMed Central

    Keith, Jonathan M.; Cochran, Duncan A. E.; Lala, Gita H.; Adams, Peter; Bryant, Darryn; Mitchelson, Keith R.

    2004-01-01

    Despite the success of conventional Sanger sequencing, significant regions of many genomes still present major obstacles to sequencing. Here we propose a novel approach with the potential to alleviate a wide range of sequencing difficulties. The technique involves extracting target DNA sequence from variants generated by introduction of random mutations. The introduction of mutations does not destroy original sequence information, but distributes it amongst multiple variants. Some of these variants lack problematic features of the target and are more amenable to conventional sequencing. The technique has been successfully demonstrated with mutation levels up to an average 18% base substitution and has been used to read previously intractable poly(A), AT-rich and GC-rich motifs. PMID:14973330

  12. Experimental deformation of a mafic rock - interplay between fracturing, reaction and viscous deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marti, Sina; Stünitz, Holger; Heilbronner, Renée; Plümper, Oliver; Drury, Martyn

    2016-04-01

    Deformation experiments were performed on natural Maryland Diabase (˜ 55% Plg, 42% Px, 3% accessories, 0.18 wt.-% H2O added) in a Griggs-type deformation apparatus in order to explore the brittle-viscous transition and the interplay between deformation and mineral reactions. Shear experiments at strain rates of ˜ 2e-5 /s are performed, at T=600, 700 and 800°C and confining pressures Pc=1.0 and 1.5 GPa. Deformation localizes in all experiments. Below 700°C, the microstructure is dominated by brittle deformation with a foliation formed by cataclastic flow and high strain accommodated along 3-5 major ultracataclasite shear bands. At 700°C, the bulk of the material still exhibits abundant microfractures, however, deformation localizes into an anastomosing network of shear bands (SB) formed from a fine-grained (<< 1 μm) mixture of newly formed Plg and Amph. These reaction products occur almost exclusively along syn-kinematic structures such as fractures and SB. Experiments at 800°C show extensive mineral reactions, with the main reaction products Amph+Plg (+Zo). Deformation is localized in broad C' and C SB formed by a fine-grained (0.1 - 0.8 μm) mixture of Plg+Amph (+Zo). The onset of mineral reactions in the 700°C experiments shows that reaction kinetics and diffusional mass transport are fast enough to keep up with the short experimental timescales. While in the 700°C experiments brittle processes kinematically contribute to deformation, fracturing is largely absent at 800°C. Diffusive mass transfer dominates. The very small grain size within SB favours a grain size sensitive deformation mechanism. Due to the presence of water (and relatively high supported stresses), dissolution-precipitation creep is interpreted to be the dominant strain accommodating mechanism. From the change of Amph coronas around Px clasts with strain, we can determine that Amph is re-dissolved at high stress sites while growing in low stress sites, showing the ability of Amph to

  13. Application of high resolution geophysical prospecting to assess the risk related to subsurface deformation in Mexico City

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Centeno-Salas, F. A.; Carreón-Freyre, D.; Flores-García, W. A.; Gutiérrez-Calderón, R. I.

    2015-11-01

    In the eastern sector of Mexico City the sub soil consists of high contrasting sequences (lacustrine and volcanic inter bedded deposits) that favor the development of erratic fracturing in the surface causing damage to the urban infrastructure. The high-resolution geophysical prospecting are useful tools for the assessment of ground deformation and fracturing associated with land subsidence phenomena. The GPR method allowed to evaluate the fracture propagation and deformation of vulcano-sedimentary sequences at different depths, the main electrical parameters are directly related with the gravimetric and volumetric water content and therefore with the plasticity of the near surface prospected sequences. The active seismology prospection consisted in a combination of Seismic Refraction (SR) and Multichannel Analysis of Surface Waves (MASW) for the estimation of the velocity of the mechanical compressive (P) and the shear (S) waves. The integration of both methods allowed to estimate the geomechanical parameters characterizing the studied sequence, the Poisson Ratio and the volumetric compressibility. The obtained mechanical parameters were correlated with laboratory measured parameters such as plasticity index, density, shear strength and compressibility and, GPR and seismic profiles were correlated with the mapped fracture systems in the study area. Once calibrated, the profiles allowed to identify the lithological contact between lacustrine and volcanic sequences, their variations of thicknesses in depth and to assess the deformation area in the surface. An accurate determination of the geometry of fracturing was of the most importance for the assessment of the geological risk in the study area.

  14. Spiderweb deformation induced by electrostatically charged insects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortega-Jimenez, Victor Manuel; Dudley, Robert

    2013-07-01

    Capture success of spider webs has been associated with their microstructure, ornamentation, and wind-induced vibrations. Indirect evidence suggests that statically charged objects can attract silk thread, but web deformations induced by charged insects have not yet been described. Here, we show under laboratory conditions that electrostatically charged honeybees, green bottle flies, fruit flies, aphids, and also water drops falling near webs of cross-spiders (Araneus diadematus) induce rapid thread deformation that enhances the likelihood of physical contact, and thus of prey capture.

  15. Reports on crustal movements and deformations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, S. C.; Peck, T.

    1981-01-01

    Studies of tectonic plate motions, regional crustal deformations, strain accumulation and release, deformations associated with earthquakes and fault motion, and micro-plate motion, were collected and are summarized. To a limited extent, papers dealing with global models of current plate motions and crustal stress are included. The data base is restricted to articles appearing in reveiwed technical journals during the years 1970-1980. The major journals searched include: Journal of Geophysical Research (solid earth), Tectonophysics, Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America, Geological Society of America Bulletin, Geophysical Journal of the Royal Astronomical Society, and the Journal of Geology.

  16. Deformable template models for emission tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Amit, Y. . Dept. of Statistics); Manbeck, K.M. . Div. of Applied Mathematics)

    1993-06-01

    The reconstruction of emission tomography data is an ill-posed inverse problem and, as such, requires some form of regularization. Previous efforts to regularize the restoration process have incorporated rather general assumptions about the isotope distribution within a patient's body. Here, the authors present a theoretical and algorithmic framework in which the notion of a deformable template can be used to identify and quantify brain tumors in pediatric patients. Patient data and computer simulation experiments are presented which illustrate the performance of the deformable template approach to single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT).

  17. Reciprocating motion of active deformable particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarama, M.; Ohta, T.

    2016-05-01

    Reciprocating motion of an active deformable particle in a homogeneous medium is studied theoretically. For generality, we employ a simple model derived from symmetry considerations for the center-of-mass velocity and elliptical and triangular deformations in two dimensions. We carry out, for the first time, a systematic investigation of the reciprocating motion of a self-propelled particle. It is clarified that spontaneous breaking of the front-rear asymmetry is essential for the reciprocating motion. Moreover, two routes are found for the formation of the reciprocating motion. One is a bifurcation from a motionless stationary state. The other is destabilisation of an oscillatory rectilinear motion.

  18. Strain localization during deformation of Westerly granite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brodsky, N. S.; Spetzler, H. A.

    1984-01-01

    A specimen of Westerly granite was cyclically loaded to near failure at 50 MPa confining pressure. Holographic interferometry provided detailed measurements of localized surface deformations during loading and unloading. The data are consistent with deformation occurring primarily elastically at low differential stress; in conjunction with one incipient fault zone between approximately 350 and 520 MPa differential stress; and in conjunction with a second incipient fault zone above 580 MPa and/or during creep. During unloading only one fault zone, that which is active at the intermediate stress levels during loading, is seen to recede.

  19. Management of post burn hand deformities

    PubMed Central

    Sabapathy, S. Raja; Bajantri, Babu; Bharathi, R. Ravindra

    2010-01-01

    The hand is ranked among the three most frequent sites of burns scar contracture deformity. One of the major determinants of the quality of life in burns survivors is the functionality of the hands. Burns deformities, although largely preventable, nevertheless do occur when appropriate treatment is not provided in the acute situation or when they are part of a major burns. Reconstructive procedures can greatly improve the function of the hands. Appropriate choice of procedures and timing of surgery followed by supervised physiotherapy can be a boon for a burns survivor. PMID:21321661

  20. Tritium deformation interactions in FCC austenitic steels

    SciTech Connect

    Chene, J.

    2008-07-15

    Hydrogen deformation interactions are known to control the environmental degradation effects (H and He embrittlement, stress corrosion cracking,...) associated with the presence of H and its isotopes in structural materials. Different types of interaction have been investigated: trapping on stress field and strain-induced defects, enhanced diffusion along dislocation networks, transport by moving dislocation. For several reasons, the quantification of these interactions is a major challenge in nuclear systems involving the presence of tritium: prevention of tritium-induced damage, tritium inventory, management of tritiated waste... This paper reports recent results on the quantitative characterization of tritium deformation interactions in fee materials. (authors)

  1. Spiderweb deformation induced by electrostatically charged insects

    PubMed Central

    Ortega-Jimenez, Victor Manuel; Dudley, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Capture success of spider webs has been associated with their microstructure, ornamentation, and wind-induced vibrations. Indirect evidence suggests that statically charged objects can attract silk thread, but web deformations induced by charged insects have not yet been described. Here, we show under laboratory conditions that electrostatically charged honeybees, green bottle flies, fruit flies, aphids, and also water drops falling near webs of cross-spiders (Araneus diadematus) induce rapid thread deformation that enhances the likelihood of physical contact, and thus of prey capture. PMID:23828093

  2. Tensile Deformation of Polyethylenes: Crystallinity Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crist, Buckley; Metaxas, Costas

    2004-03-01

    The crystalline fraction of polyethylene can be reduced by increasing the cooling rate, the molecular weight or the fraction of comonomer. All three methods have been used in this study of tensile deformation which shows that true stress - true strain behavior depends systematically on morphology. The dependence of uniaxial yield stress on crystal thickness is well understood in terms of dislocation nucleation. Post yield flow is dominated by the strain hardening rate that is larger in polyethylenes of lower crystallinity. Noncrystalline polymer evidently reduces the plastic compliance while providing for elastic (reversible) strains. These observations are examined in terms of old and new theories for deformation of semicrystalline polymers.

  3. Deformation of rapidly rotating compact stars.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Araujo, J. C. N.; de Freitas Pacheco, J. A.; Cattani, M.; Horvath, J. E.

    1995-09-01

    We have developed a numerical code to study the deformation (ɛ=(I_zz_-I_xx_)/I_zz_ where I_ii_ are the moments of inertia) of neutron stars in rapidly rotation in a fully general relativistic calculation. We have found that the deformation is larger, depending on the angular velocity, than is generally assumed for gravitational wave estimations. Calculations were performed by employing the Bethe-Johnson I EOS (equation of state) and a new set of models by the Frankfurt group including {LAMBDA} hyperons for several choices of their coupling constants to ordinary nucleons. Possible implications for gravitational wave searches are briefly discussed.

  4. Dislocation Mechanics of High-Rate Deformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armstrong, Ronald W.; Li, Qizhen

    2015-10-01

    Four topics associated with constitutive equation descriptions of rate-dependent metal plastic deformation behavior are reviewed in honor of previous research accomplished on the same issues by Professor Marc Meyers along with colleagues and students, as follow: (1) increasing strength levels attributed to thermally activated dislocation migration at higher loading rates; (2) inhomogeneous adiabatic shear banding; (3) controlling mechanisms of deformation in shock as compared with shock-less isentropic compression experiments and (4) Hall-Petch-based grain size-dependent strain rate sensitivities exhibited by nanopolycrystalline materials. Experimental results are reviewed on the topics for a wide range of metals.

  5. Software available for analyzing GPS deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crespi, Mattia; Riguzzi, Federica

    1998-06-01

    A FORTRAN 77 software package that analyzes Global Positioning System (GPS) deformation control networks is available free of charge. This package is able to simulate and adjust GPS networks. It can also perform onedimensional, two dimensional, and three-dimensional statistical analysis to study the significance of coordinate differences coming from two repeated surveys of the same network. In addition, the package computes displacement vectors with error and reliability ellipsoids, and it is suited for both engineering and geophysical applications. It has been used successfully in Italy to analyze small and large networks established for high precision engineering surveys and geodynamic deformation control [Acker et al., 1998; Anzidei et al., 1996].

  6. Carroll-type deformations in nonlinear elastodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, C.; Saccomandi, G.; Vergori, L.

    2014-05-01

    Classes of deformations in nonlinear elastodynamics with origins in the pioneering work of Carroll are investigated for a Mooney-Rivlin material subject to body forces corresponding to a nonlinear substrate potential. Exact representations are obtained which, inter alia, are descriptive of the propagation of circularly polarized waves and motions with oscillatory spatial dependence. It is shown that a description of slowly modulated waves leads to a novel class of generalized nonlinear Schrödinger equations. The latter class, in general, is not integrable. However, a procedure is presented whereby integrable Hamiltonian subsystems may be isolated for a broad class of deformations.

  7. Strain accommodation in inelastic deformation of glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murali, P.; Ramamurty, U.; Shenoy, Vijay B.

    2007-01-01

    Motivated by recent experiments on metallic glasses, we examine the micromechanisms of strain accommodation including crystallization and void formation during inelastic deformation of glasses by employing molecular statics simulations. Our atomistic simulations with Lennard-Jones-like potentials suggests that a softer short range interaction between atoms favors crystallization. Compressive hydrostatic strain in the presence of a shear strain promotes crystallization whereas a tensile hydrostatic strain is found to induce voids. The deformation subsequent to the onset of crystallization includes partial reamorphization and recrystallization, suggesting important atomistic mechanisms of plastic dissipation in glasses.

  8. Vertex finding with deformable templates at LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepanov, Nikita; Khanov, Alexandre

    1997-02-01

    We present a novel vertex finding technique. The task is formulated as a discrete-continuous optimisation problem in a way similar to the deformable templates approach for the track finding. Unlike the track finding problem, "elastic hedgehogs" rather than elastic arms are used as deformable templates. They are initialised by a set of procedures which provide zero level approximation for vertex positions and track parameters at the vertex point. The algorithm was evaluated using the simulated events for the LHC CMS detector and demonstrated good performance.

  9. Creep Deformation of B2 Alumindes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nathal, M. V.

    1991-01-01

    The creep resistance and elevated temperature deformation mechanisms in CoAl, FeAl, and NiAl are reviewed. The stress and temperature dependencies of the steady state creep rate, the primary creep behavior, the dislocation substructure, and the response during transient tests are used as the main indicators of the deformation processes. In single phase intermetallics, the influence of grain size, stoichiometry, and solid solution hardening have been examined. In addition, the effect of adding dispersoids, precipitates, and other types of reinforcements to improve creep strength are compared.

  10. Global deformation on the surface of Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bilotti, Frank; Connors, Chris; Suppe, John

    1992-01-01

    Large-scale mapping of tectonic structures on Venus shows that there is an organized global distribution to deformation. The structures we emphasize are linear compressive mountain belts, extensional rafted zones, and the small-scale but widely distributed wrinkle ridges. Ninety percent of the area of the planet's compressive mountain belts are concentrated in the northern hemisphere whereas the southern hemisphere is dominated by extension and small-scale compression. We propose that this striking concentration of fold belts in the northern hemisphere, along with the globe-encircling equatorial rift system, represents a global organization to deformation on Venus.

  11. The nanostructured origin of deformation twinning.

    PubMed

    Yu, Qian; Qi, Liang; Chen, Kai; Mishra, Raja K; Li, Ju; Minor, Andrew M

    2012-02-01

    We have revealed the fundamental embryonic structure of deformation twins using in situ mechanical testing of magnesium single crystals in a transmission electron microscope. This structure consists of an array of twin-related laths on the scale of several nanometers. A computational model demonstrates that this structure should be a generic feature at the incipient stage of deformation twinning when there are correlated nucleation events. Our results shed light on the origin of twinning-induced plasticity and transformation toughening, critical to the development of advanced structural alloys with high strength, ductility, and toughness. PMID:22239446

  12. The chi-Chi earthquake sequence: active, out-of-sequence thrust faulting in taiwan

    PubMed

    Kao; Chen

    2000-06-30

    We combined precise focal depths and fault plane solutions of more than 40 events from the 20 September 1999 Chi-Chi earthquake sequence with a synthesis of subsurface geology to show that the dominant structure for generating earthquakes in central Taiwan is a moderately dipping (20 degrees to 30 degrees ) thrust fault away from the deformation front. A second, subparallel seismic zone lies about 15 kilometers below the main thrust. These seismic zones differ from previous models, indicating that both the basal decollement and relic normal faults are aseismic. PMID:10875915

  13. Multiplexed Fragaria Chloroplast Genome Sequencing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A method to sequence multiple chloroplast genomes that uses the sequencing depth of ultra high throughput sequencing technologies was recently described. Sequencing complete chloroplast genomes can resolve phylogenetic relationships at low taxonomic levels and identify point mutations and indels tha...

  14. Late Tertiary reorganizations of deformation in northeastern Tibet constrained by stratigraphy and provenance data from eastern Longzhong Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shanpin; Li, Jijun; Stockli, Daniel F.; Song, Chunhui; Nie, Junsheng; Peng, Tingjiang; Wang, Xiuxi; He, Kuang; Hui, Zhengchuang; Zhang, Jun

    2015-08-01

    The deformation of the Tibetan Plateau is central to unraveling the process and mechanism of continental tectonics. Although most agree that crust shortening and plateau growth were protracted throughout the Cenozoic Indo-Asian collision, particular deformation histories relating to tectonic kinematics and dynamics are still incomplete due to sparseness of diagnostic geological information from plateau margin. Here we present combined investigation of stratigraphy, magnetostratigraphy, and provenance for the eastern margin of Longzhong Basin to show two reorganizations of basin formation and tectonic regime during the late Tertiary. First, the depocenter migrated from the dispersed Paleogene sequences to the Wushan-Tianshui foreland sequence during the earliest Miocene (circa 22 Ma), accompanied by shift of sedimentary provenance from double sources including the eastern Qilian block and eastern West Qinling terrain to single source within the West Qinling. It suggests reorganization of deformation from NW-SE extension to NE-SW contraction and initial uplift of the eastern West Qinling. Second, massive coarse-grained fluvial beds were revived in the Wushan Basin during the late Miocene (circa 10 Ma), associated by eastward depositional expansion and another shift of sedimentary provenance toward northeast. It reflects thrusting up of the northern edge of the West Qinling and Liupan Shan Mountains linked with relocation of crust shortening from NE-SW direction to ENE-WSW direction and accelerated deformation of northeastern Tibet. These transitions of deformation regimes imply variation of geodynamic mechanisms during the process of plateau growth.

  15. Pebbles from Barkerville and Slide Mountain terranes in a Quesnel terrane conglomerate: Evidence for pre-Jurassic deformation of the Barkerville and Slide Mountain terranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMullin, David W. A.; Greenwood, Hugh J.; Ross, John V.

    1990-10-01

    Rocks of the Quesnel Lake area belong to three terranes. These are, from east to west, the Barkerville terrane (a continental prism sequence), the Slide Mountain terrane (an ocean-floor sequence), and the Quesnel terrane (an island-arc-marginal basin sequence). The major deformation of these rocks occurred during the Jurassic. There has been renewed discussion recently as to whether the Barkerville terrane was deformed prior to the Jurassic. Two conglomerate localities within the Quesnel terrane contain clasts we identify as being derived from deformed rocks of the Barkerville and Slide Mountain terranes. These include gneiss, orthoquartzite, graphitic phyllite, and grit from the Barkerville, and serpentine-talc and chromite fragments from the Slide Mountain terrane. Some clasts inferred to be from the Barkerville terrane show two predeposition foliations, implying two phases of deformation prior to the deposition of the conglomerate (Middle Jurassic at the latest). One of these events may be deformation associated with the intrusion of Devonian granitoid bodies. Deformation must also have accompanied the emplacement of the Slide Mountain terrane some time between its deposition (Mississippian-Permian) and its erosion (Triassic-Jurassic).

  16. Urorectal septum malformation sequence in a newborn with VACTERL association.

    PubMed

    Patra, Soumya; Purkait, Radheshyam

    2012-02-01

    Urorectal septum malformation sequence (URSMS) is an extremely rare anomaly, consists of multiple system anomalies including ambiguous genitalia, absence of a perineal opening, an imperforate anus, and urological, colonic and lumbosacral defects. We describe a newborn with characteristic URSMS who also had features of congenital varus deformity of leg, polydactyly, tracheo-oesophageal fistula, cardiac defect, anal atresia and hydronephrosis in antenatal ultrasound characteristic of VACTERL association. PMID:22313652

  17. Microstructures in subglacial and proglacial sediments: understanding faults, folds and fabrics, and the influence of water on the style of deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Emrys; Merritt, Jon; Auton, Clive; Golledge, Nick

    2007-06-01

    Macroscopic field and micromorphological studies have been carried out on subglacially and proglacially deformed glacigenic sequences at a number of sites throughout Scotland, UK. Examination of microstructures (folds, faults, hydrofractures, plasmic fabrics) aided understanding of the deformation histories preserved in the sediments, but a similar range of structures were developed in both Subglacial and Proglacial settings. Discrimination between Subglacial and Proglacial deformation was only possible when micromorphological data was used in conjunction with larger-scale field observations. Variations in lithology and water content were controlling factors influencing the style and apparent intensity of deformation recorded. Changes in pore-water content and pressure during deformation can lead to liquefaction and hydrofracturing, with early-formed structures locally controlling the pattern of water escape. Liquefaction can also lead to homogenisation of the sediments and the destruction of earlier deformation structures, even at relatively low strains. Beds or zones of liquefied sand and silt may form highly 'lubricated' detachments within the sediment pile, resulting in a marked reduction in the amount of shear transmitted to underlying units. A multidisciplinary approach, involving sedimentological, geomorphological, stratigraphical and structural field observations, combined with micromorphological analysis, is recommended to confidently unravel the glacitectonic history and depositional environment of most deformed glacigenic sedimentary sequences.

  18. In Vivo Dynamic Deformation of Articular Cartilage in Intact Joints Loaded by Controlled Muscular Contractions.

    PubMed

    Abusara, Ziad; Von Kossel, Markus; Herzog, Walter

    2016-01-01

    When synovial joints are loaded, the articular cartilage and the cells residing in it deform. Cartilage deformation has been related to structural tissue damage, and cell deformation has been associated with cell signalling and corresponding anabolic and catabolic responses. Despite the acknowledged importance of cartilage and cell deformation, there are no dynamic data on these measures from joints of live animals using muscular load application. Research in this area has typically been done using confined and unconfined loading configurations and indentation testing. These loading conditions can be well controlled and allow for accurate measurements of cartilage and cell deformations, but they have little to do with the contact mechanics occurring in a joint where non-congruent cartilage surfaces with different material and functional properties are pressed against each other by muscular forces. The aim of this study was to measure in vivo, real time articular cartilage deformations for precisely controlled static and dynamic muscular loading conditions in the knees of mice. Fifty and 80% of the maximal knee extensor muscular force (equivalent to approximately 0.4N and 0.6N) produced average peak articular cartilage strains of 10.5±1.0% and 18.3±1.3% (Mean ± SD), respectively, during 8s contractions. A sequence of 15 repeat, isometric muscular contractions (0.5s on, 3.5s off) of 50% and 80% of maximal muscular force produced cartilage strains of 3.0±1.1% and 9.6±1.5% (Mean ± SD) on the femoral condyles of the mouse knee. Cartilage thickness recovery following mechanical compression was highly viscoelastic and took almost 50s following force removal in the static tests. PMID:26807930

  19. In Vivo Dynamic Deformation of Articular Cartilage in Intact Joints Loaded by Controlled Muscular Contractions

    PubMed Central

    Abusara, Ziad; Von Kossel, Markus; Herzog, Walter

    2016-01-01

    When synovial joints are loaded, the articular cartilage and the cells residing in it deform. Cartilage deformation has been related to structural tissue damage, and cell deformation has been associated with cell signalling and corresponding anabolic and catabolic responses. Despite the acknowledged importance of cartilage and cell deformation, there are no dynamic data on these measures from joints of live animals using muscular load application. Research in this area has typically been done using confined and unconfined loading configurations and indentation testing. These loading conditions can be well controlled and allow for accurate measurements of cartilage and cell deformations, but they have little to do with the contact mechanics occurring in a joint where non-congruent cartilage surfaces with different material and functional properties are pressed against each other by muscular forces. The aim of this study was to measure in vivo, real time articular cartilage deformations for precisely controlled static and dynamic muscular loading conditions in the knees of mice. Fifty and 80% of the maximal knee extensor muscular force (equivalent to approximately 0.4N and 0.6N) produced average peak articular cartilage strains of 10.5±1.0% and 18.3±1.3% (Mean ± SD), respectively, during 8s contractions. A sequence of 15 repeat, isometric muscular contractions (0.5s on, 3.5s off) of 50% and 80% of maximal muscular force produced cartilage strains of 3.0±1.1% and 9.6±1.5% (Mean ± SD) on the femoral condyles of the mouse knee. Cartilage thickness recovery following mechanical compression was highly viscoelastic and took almost 50s following force removal in the static tests. PMID:26807930

  20. Polyphase Alpine deformation at the northern edge of the Menderes Taurus block, North Konya, Central Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eren, Yasar

    2001-10-01

    Low-grade metamorphic rocks of Paleozoic-Mesozoic age to the north of Konya, consist of two different groups. The Silurian-Lower Permian Sizma Group is composed of reefal complex metacarbonates at the base, and flyschoid metaclastics at the top. Metaigneous rocks of various compositions occur as dykes, sills, and lava flows within this group. The ?Upper Permian-Mesozoic age Ardicli Group unconformably overlies the Sizma Group and is composed of, from bottom to top, coarse metaclastics, a metaclastic-metacarbonate alternation, a thick sequence of metacarbonate, and alternating units of metachert, metacarbonates and metaclastics. Although pre-Alpine overthrusts can be recognized in the Sizma Group, intense Alpine deformation has overprinted and obliterated earlier structures. Both the Sizma and Ardicli Groups were deformed, and metamorphosed during the Alpine orogeny. Within the study area evidence for four phases of deformation and folding is found. The first phase of deformation resulted in the major Ertugrul Syncline, overturned tight to isoclinal and minor folding, and penetrative axial planar cleavage developed during the Alpine crustal shortening at the peak of metamorphism. Depending on rock type, syntectonic crystallization, rotation, and flattening of grains and pressure solution were the main deformation mechanisms. During the F 2-phase, continued crustal shortening produced coaxial Type-3 refolded folds, which can generally be observed in outcrop with associated crenulation cleavage (S 2). Refolding of earlier folds by the noncoaxial F 3-folding event generated Type-2 interference patterns and the major Meydan Synform which is the largest map-scale structure within the study area. Phase 3 structures also include crenulation cleavage (S 3) and conjugate kink folds. Further shortening during phase 4 deformation also resulted in crenulation cleavage and conjugate kink folds. According to thin section observations, phases 2-4 crenulation cleavages are mainly

  1. Visualization of Sliding and Deformation of Orbital Fat During Eye Rotation

    PubMed Central

    Hötte, Gijsbert J.; Schaafsma, Peter J.; Botha, Charl P.; Wielopolski, Piotr A.; Simonsz, Huibert J.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Little is known about the way orbital fat slides and/or deforms during eye movements. We compared two deformation algorithms from a sequence of MRI volumes to visualize this complex behavior. Methods Time-dependent deformation data were derived from motion-MRI volumes using Lucas and Kanade Optical Flow (LK3D) and nonrigid registration (B-splines) deformation algorithms. We compared how these two algorithms performed regarding sliding and deformation in three critical areas: the sclera-fat interface, how the optic nerve moves through the fat, and how the fat is squeezed out under the tendon of a relaxing rectus muscle. The efficacy was validated using identified tissue markers such as the lens and blood vessels in the fat. Results Fat immediately behind the eye followed eye rotation by approximately one-half. This was best visualized using the B-splines technique as it showed less ripping of tissue and less distortion. Orbital fat flowed around the optic nerve during eye rotation. In this case, LK3D provided better visualization as it allowed orbital fat tissue to split. The resolution was insufficient to visualize fat being squeezed out between tendon and sclera. Conclusion B-splines performs better in tracking structures such as the lens, while LK3D allows fat tissue to split as should happen as the optic nerve slides through the fat. Orbital fat follows eye rotation by one-half and flows around the optic nerve during eye rotation. Translational Relevance Visualizing orbital fat deformation and sliding offers the opportunity to accurately locate a region of cicatrization and permit an individualized surgical plan. PMID:27540495

  2. Deforming Etna's Basement: Implications for Edifice stability.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakker, Richard; Benson, Philip; Vinciguerra, Sergio

    2013-04-01

    At over 3 kilometers in height, Mt. Etna (Italy) is the largest volcano of continental Europe. The volcano formed on top of the alpine fold and thrust belt, with basaltic outflows lying unconformably on top of an alternation between sandstones, limestones and clays. Presently Etna's eastern flank is moving with speeds up to 2cm/yr to the east [Tibaldi and Groppelli, 2002]. It is the sequence of layers below the volcano that is thought to provide a complex, structurally controlled, mechanism to the volcano deformation as a whole. This is due to the interplay of gravitational forces, volcanic pressurization, and regional tectonics, which combine to play a complex role that remains poorly understood, especially when the physical and mechanical properties of the rocks are considered. In this study, we concentrate on the rock mechanical component, and in particular the formation known as Comiso Limestone. This limestone forms of one of the key lithologies of Etna's basement. The formation has been suggested to be affected by thermal weakening [Heap et al., 2013]. Previous work on Comiso Limestone suggests brittle behavior for the range of temperatures (up to 760 ˚C) and a significant reduction in strength with higher temperatures. [Mollo et al., 2011]. Chiodini et al [2011], speculate carbonate assimilation. This implies that the Carbondioxide created by decarbonatization, is able to escape. Using an internally heated "Paterson" type pressure vessel, we recreated conditions at 2-4 km depth (50-100 MPa) and using an anomalously high geotherm, as expected in volcanic settings (ranging from room to 600 ˚C). With the addition of confining pressure, we show a brittle to ductile transition occurs at a relatively low temperature of 300 ˚C. A significant decrease in strength occurs when the rock is exposed to temperatures exceeding 400 ˚C. In addition, we observe a significant difference in mechanical behavior between vented and unvented situations when decarbonatization is

  3. Congruence analysis of point clouds from unstable stereo image sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jepping, C.; Bethmann, F.; Luhmann, T.

    2014-06-01

    This paper deals with the correction of exterior orientation parameters of stereo image sequences over deformed free-form surfaces without control points. Such imaging situation can occur, for example, during photogrammetric car crash test recordings where onboard high-speed stereo cameras are used to measure 3D surfaces. As a result of such measurements 3D point clouds of deformed surfaces are generated for a complete stereo sequence. The first objective of this research focusses on the development and investigation of methods for the detection of corresponding spatial and temporal tie points within the stereo image sequences (by stereo image matching and 3D point tracking) that are robust enough for a reliable handling of occlusions and other disturbances that may occur. The second objective of this research is the analysis of object deformations in order to detect stable areas (congruence analysis). For this purpose a RANSAC-based method for congruence analysis has been developed. This process is based on the sequential transformation of randomly selected point groups from one epoch to another by using a 3D similarity transformation. The paper gives a detailed description of the congruence analysis. The approach has been tested successfully on synthetic and real image data.

  4. Active Beam Shaping System and Method Using Sequential Deformable Mirrors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norman, Colin A. (Inventor); Pueyo, Laurent A. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    An active optical beam shaping system includes a first deformable mirror arranged to at least partially intercept an entrance beam of light and to provide a first reflected beam of light, a second deformable mirror arranged to at least partially intercept the first reflected beam of light from the first deformable mirror and to provide a second reflected beam of light, and a signal processing and control system configured to communicate with the first and second deformable mirrors. The first deformable mirror, the second deformable mirror and the signal processing and control system together provide a large amplitude light modulation range to provide an actively shaped optical beam.

  5. Structural concepts and techniques II. Basement-involved deformation

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, N.H.; Beaumont, E.A.

    1989-01-01

    This volume of text is part of a much larger treatise on petroleum geology developed as an information series for exploration and development of oil and gas fields. This volume contains papers related to extensional, compressional, and strike-slip deformation. Extensional deformation includes papers discussing crustal rifting and normal faulting. Compressional deformation includes papers discussing foreland deformation. In most cases, these papers use the Rocky Mountains as an example. Strike-slip deformation includes papers discussing strike-slip or wrench fault deformation processes and the consequent effects these processes have on folding, faulting, basin formation, and sedimentation.

  6. Modes of deformation of walled cells.

    PubMed

    Dumais, Jacques

    2013-11-01

    The bewildering morphological diversity found in cells is one of the starkest illustrations of life's ability to self-organize. Yet the morphogenetic mechanisms that produce the multifarious shapes of cells are still poorly understood. The shared similarities between the walled cells of prokaryotes, many protists, fungi, and plants make these groups particularly appealing to begin investigating how morphological diversity is generated at the cell level. In this review, I attempt a first classification of the different modes of surface deformation used by walled cells. Five modes of deformation were identified: inextensional bending, equi-area shear, elastic stretching, processive intussusception, and chemorheological growth. The two most restrictive modes-inextensional and equi-area deformations-are embodied in the exine of pollen grains and the wall-like pellicle of euglenoids, respectively. For these modes, it is possible to express the deformed geometry of the cell explicitly in terms of the undeformed geometry and other easily observable geometrical parameters. The greatest morphogenetic power is reached with the processive intussusception and chemorheological growth mechanisms that underlie the expansive growth of walled cells. A comparison of these two growth mechanisms suggests a possible way to tackle the complexity behind wall growth. PMID:24014868

  7. Measuring High Speed Deformation for Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wentzel, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    PDV (Photonic Doppler Velocimetry) has proven to be a reliable and versatile technique to observe rapid deformation of frangible joints. It will be a valuable technique in order to understand the physics of two-stage light gas guns and the material response to hypervelocity impact.

  8. Clusterization and Deformation in Heavy Nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Algora, A.; Cseh, J.; Darai, J.; Hess, P.O.; Antonenko, N.V.; Jolos, R.V.; Scheid, W.

    2005-11-21

    The deformation-dependence of clusterization in heavy nuclei is investigated. In particular, allowed and forbidden cluster-configurations are determined for the ground, superdeformed, and hyperdeformed states of some nuclei, based on a microscopic (effective SU(3)) selection rule. The stability of the different cluster configurations from the viewpoint of the binding energy and the dinuclear system model (DNS) is also investigated.

  9. Deformable Mirrors Capture Exoplanet Data, Reflect Lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2014-01-01

    To image and characterize exoplanets, Goddard Space Flight Center turned to deformable mirrors (DMs). Berkeley, California-based Iris AO, Inc. worked with Goddard through the SBIR program to improve the company’s microelectromechanical DMs, which are now being evaluated and used for biological research, industrial applications, and could even be used by drug manufacturers.

  10. Measuring Crustal Deformation in the American West.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jordan, Thomas H.; Minster, J. Bernard

    1988-01-01

    Suggests that there is a close relationship between deformation in the western United States and the large-scale motions of tectonic plates. Introduces very-long-baseline interferometry (VLBI) as one of the space-geodetic techniques, vector addition of the VLBI data and geological data, and a new geodetic network. (YP)

  11. MEMS deformable mirrors for astronomical adaptive optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornelissen, S. A.; Hartzell, A. L.; Stewart, J. B.; Bifano, T. G.; Bierden, P. A.

    2010-07-01

    We report on the development of high actuator count, micro-electromechanical (MEMS) deformable mirrors designed for high order wavefront correction in ground and space-based astronomical adaptive optics instruments. The design of these polysilicon, surface-micromachined MEMS deformable mirrors builds on technology that has been used extensively to correct for ocular aberrations in retinal imaging systems and for compensation of atmospheric turbulence in free-space laser communication. These light-weight, low power deformable mirrors have an active aperture of up to 25.2mm consisting of a thin silicon membrane mirror supported by an array of 140 to 4092 electrostatic actuators which exhibit no hysteresis and have sub-nanometer repeatability making them well suited for open-loop control applications such as Multi-Object Adaptive Optics (MOAO). The continuous membrane deformable mirrors, coated with a highly reflective metal film, are capable of up to 6μm of stroke, have a surface finish of <10nm RMS with a fill factor of 99.8%. Presented in this paper are device characteristics and performance test results, as well as reliability test data and device lifetime predictions that show that trillions of actuator cycles can be achieved without failures.

  12. Intraplate rotational deformation induced by faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dembo, Neta; Hamiel, Yariv; Granot, Roi

    2015-11-01

    Vertical axis rotations provide important constraints on the tectonic history of plate boundaries. Geodetic measurements can be used to calculate interseismic rotations, whereas paleomagnetic remanence directions provide constraints on the long-term rotations accumulated over geological timescales. Here we present a new mechanical modeling approach that links between intraplate deformational patterns of these timescales. We construct mechanical models of active faults at their locked state to simulate the presumed to be elastic interseismic deformation rate observed by GPS measurements. We then apply a slip to the faults above the locking depth to simulate the long-term deformation of the crust from which we derive the accumulated rotations. We test this approach in northern Israel along the Dead Sea Fault and Carmel-Gilboa fault system. We use 12 years of interseismic GPS measurements to constrain a slip model of the major faults found in this region. Next, we compare the modeled rotations against long-term rotations determined based on new primary magnetic remanence directions from 29 sites with known age. The distributional pattern of site mean declinations is in general agreement with the vertical axis rotations predicted by the mechanical model, both showing anomalously high rotations near fault tips and bending points. Overall, the results from northern Israel validate the effectiveness of our approach and indicate that rotations induced by motion along faults may act in parallel (or alone) to rigid block rotations. Finally, the new suggested method unravels important insights on the evolution (timing, magnitude, and style) of deformation along major faults.

  13. Three-dimensional deformation of orthodontic brackets

    PubMed Central

    Melenka, Garrett W; Nobes, David S; Major, Paul W

    2013-01-01

    Braces are used by orthodontists to correct the misalignment of teeth in the mouth. Archwire rotation is a particular procedure used to correct tooth inclination. Wire rotation can result in deformation to the orthodontic brackets, and an orthodontic torque simulator has been designed to examine this wire–bracket interaction. An optical technique has been employed to measure the deformation due to size and geometric constraints of the orthodontic brackets. Images of orthodontic brackets are collected using a stereo microscope and two charge-coupled device cameras, and deformation of orthodontic brackets is measured using a three-dimensional digital image correlation technique. The three-dimensional deformation of orthodontic brackets will be evaluated. The repeatability of the three-dimensional digital image correlation measurement method was evaluated by performing 30 archwire rotation tests using the same bracket and archwire. Finally, five Damon 3MX and five In-Ovation R self-ligating brackets will be compared using this technique to demonstrate the effect of archwire rotation on bracket design. PMID:23762201

  14. Recent plate motions and crustal deformation

    SciTech Connect

    Lisowski, M. )

    1991-01-01

    Reports by U.S. workers on geodetic measurements of recent plate motions or crustal deformation published in 1987-1990 are reviewed. The review begins with global plate motions, proceeds through plate boundaries in California, Alaska, and the Pacific Northwest, and finishes with volcanic phenomena, monument stability and longevity, and GPS relative position measurements. 184 refs.

  15. Transient Non Lin Deformation in Fractured Rock

    1998-10-14

    MATLOC is a nonlinear, transient, two-dimensional (planer and axisymmetric), thermal stress, finite-element code designed to determine the deformation within a fractured rock mass. The mass is modeled as a nonlinear anistropic elastic material which can exhibit stress-dependent bi-linear locking behavior.

  16. Joining of advanced materials by superplastic deformation

    DOEpatents

    Goretta, Kenneth C.; Routbort, Jules L.; Gutierrez-Mora, Felipe

    2008-08-19

    A method for utilizing superplastic deformation with or without a novel joint compound that leads to the joining of advanced ceramic materials, intermetallics, and cermets. A joint formed by this approach is as strong as or stronger than the materials joined. The method does not require elaborate surface preparation or application techniques.

  17. All Madelung deformities are not endocrine

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Ajay; Rai, Gopal K.; Akhtar, Javed; Phillip, Rajeev; Gutch, Manish; Arya, T. V. S.

    2013-01-01

    Madelung deformity is a rare inherited disorder associated with endocrine disorders like Turner's syndrome, pseudohypoparathyroidism, but can be seen with short stature homeobox deficiency conditions such as Leri-Weill dyschondrosteosis (LWD) and Langers mesomelic dysplasia. It has also been reported following trauma to the distal radius epiphysis neoplasia mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS) and achondroplasia. Madelung deformity is an abnormality of distal radial epiphysis where in progressive ulnar and volar tilt of the articular surface occurring in association with distal subluxation of ulna. A 13-year-old girl was referred to us for evaluation of bilateral deformity of wrist and short stature. There was ulnar deviation and dorsal tilt of bilateral hands without history of pain to the joint trauma and family history of similar illness. On X-ray, wrist showed malformed distal radial epiphysis with dorsal and ulnar shift and with increased length of phalanges suggestive of Madelung deformity. X-ray spine was normal. Ultrasound abdomen showed normal uterus and ovary and her follicle stimulating hormone. Luteinizing hormone was normal and so was urine MPS screening. Based on the above points the diagnosis of LWD was made. PMID:24251169

  18. All Madelung deformities are not endocrine.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ajay; Rai, Gopal K; Akhtar, Javed; Phillip, Rajeev; Gutch, Manish; Arya, T V S

    2013-10-01

    Madelung deformity is a rare inherited disorder associated with endocrine disorders like Turner's syndrome, pseudohypoparathyroidism, but can be seen with short stature homeobox deficiency conditions such as Leri-Weill dyschondrosteosis (LWD) and Langers mesomelic dysplasia. It has also been reported following trauma to the distal radius epiphysis neoplasia mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS) and achondroplasia. Madelung deformity is an abnormality of distal radial epiphysis where in progressive ulnar and volar tilt of the articular surface occurring in association with distal subluxation of ulna. A 13-year-old girl was referred to us for evaluation of bilateral deformity of wrist and short stature. There was ulnar deviation and dorsal tilt of bilateral hands without history of pain to the joint trauma and family history of similar illness. On X-ray, wrist showed malformed distal radial epiphysis with dorsal and ulnar shift and with increased length of phalanges suggestive of Madelung deformity. X-ray spine was normal. Ultrasound abdomen showed normal uterus and ovary and her follicle stimulating hormone. Luteinizing hormone was normal and so was urine MPS screening. Based on the above points the diagnosis of LWD was made. PMID:24251169

  19. Deformable mirror design of Subaru LGSAO system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oya, Shin; Guyon, Olivier; Watanabe, Makoto; Hayano, Yutaka; Takami, Hideki; Iye, Masanori; Arimoto, Nobuo; Colley, Stephen; Eldred, Michael; Kane, Thomas; Hattori, Masayuki; Saito, Yoshihiko; Kamata, Yukiko; Kobayashi, Naoto; Minowa, Yosuke; Goto, Miwa; Takato, Naruhisa

    2004-10-01

    As an upgrade plan of Subaru adaptive optics facility, laser-guide-star adaptive-optics (LGSAO) project is on going. One of key components of the project is a deformable mirror (DM). The DM for LGSAO is a bimorph type of PZT with 188 control elements. The specification of design is presented together with the analysis of stroke and vibration properties by FEM.

  20. Reports on crustal movements and deformations

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, S.C.; Peck, T.

    1983-05-01

    This Catalog of Reports on Crustal Movements and Deformation is a structured bibliography of scientific papers on the movements of the Earth crust. The catalog summarizes by various subjects papers containing data on the movement of the Earth's surface due to tectonic processes. In preparing the catalog we have included studies of tectonic plate motions, spreading and convergence, microplate rotation, regional crustal deformation strain accumulation and deformations associated with the earthquake cycle, and fault motion. We have also included several papers dealing with models of tectonic plate motion and with crustal stress. Papers which discuss tectonic and geologic history but which do not present rates of movements or deformations and papers which are primarily theoretical analyses have been excluded from the catalog. An index of authors cross-referenced to their publications also appears in the catalog. The catalog covers articles appearing in reviewed technical journals during the years 1970-1981. Although there are citations from about twenty journals most of the items come from the following publications: Journal of Geophysical Research, Tectonophysics, Geological Society of America Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America, Nature, Science, Geophysical Journal of the Royal Astronomical Society, Earth and Planetary Science Letters, and Geology.

  1. Anisotropic Hydraulic Permeability Under Finite Deformation

    PubMed Central

    Ateshian, Gerard A.; Weiss, Jeffrey A.

    2011-01-01

    The structural organization of biological tissues and cells often produces anisotropic transport properties. These tissues may also undergo large deformations under normal function, potentially inducing further anisotropy. A general framework for formulating constitutive relations for anisotropic transport properties under finite deformation is lacking in the literature. This study presents an approach based on representation theorems for symmetric tensor-valued functions and provides conditions to enforce positive semi-definiteness of the permeability or diffusivity tensor. Formulations are presented which describe materials that are orthotropic, transversely isotropic, or isotropic in the reference state, and where large strains induce greater anisotropy. Strain-induced anisotropy of the permeability of a solid-fluid mixture is illustrated for finite torsion of a cylinder subjected to axial permeation. It is shown that, in general, torsion can produce a helical flow pattern, rather than the rectilinear pattern observed when adopting a more specialized, unconditionally isotropic spatial permeability tensor commonly used in biomechanics. The general formulation presented in this study can produce both affine and non-affine reorientation of the preferred directions of material symmetry with strain, depending on the choice of material functions. This study addresses a need in the biomechanics literature by providing guidelines and formulations for anisotropic strain-dependent transport properties in porous-deformable media undergoing large deformations. PMID:21034145

  2. Optoelectronics Properties Tunability by Controlled Deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alharbi, F. H.; Serra, P.; Carignano, M. A.; Kais, S.

    2016-04-01

    Manipulating energy levels while controlling the electron localization is an essential step for many applications of confined systems. In this paper we demonstrate how to achieve electron localization and induce energy level oscillation in one-dimensional quantum systems by externally controlling the deformation of the system. From a practical point of view, the one-dimensional potentials can be realized using layered structures. In the analysis, we considered three different examples. The first one is a graded quantum well between confining infinite walls where the deformation is modeled by varying slightly the graded well. The second systems is a symmetric multiple quantum well between infinite walls under the effect of biasing voltage. The third system is a layered 2D hybrid perovskites where pressure is used to induce deformation. The calculations are conducted both numerically and analytically using the perturbation theory. It is shown that the obtained oscillations are associated with level avoided crossings and that the deformation results in changing the spatial localization of the electrons.

  3. Intermittent dislocation flow in viscoplastic deformation.

    PubMed

    Miguel, M C; Vespignani, A; Zapperi, S; Weiss, J; Grasso, J R

    2001-04-01

    The viscoplastic deformation (creep) of crystalline materials under constant stress involves the motion of a large number of interacting dislocations. Analytical methods and sophisticated 'dislocation dynamics' simulations have proved very effective in the study of dislocation patterning, and have led to macroscopic constitutive laws of plastic deformation. Yet, a statistical analysis of the dynamics of an assembly of interacting dislocations has not hitherto been performed. Here we report acoustic emission measurements on stressed ice single crystals, the results of which indicate that dislocations move in a scale-free intermittent fashion. This result is confirmed by numerical simulations of a model of interacting dislocations that successfully reproduces the main features of the experiment. We find that dislocations generate a slowly evolving configuration landscape which coexists with rapid collective rearrangements. These rearrangements involve a comparatively small fraction of the dislocations and lead to an intermittent behaviour of the net plastic response. This basic dynamical picture appears to be a generic feature in the deformation of many other materials. Moreover, it should provide a framework for discussing fundamental aspects of plasticity that goes beyond standard mean-field approaches that see plastic deformation as a smooth laminar flow. PMID:11287948

  4. Is microrheometry affected by channel deformation?

    PubMed

    Del Giudice, Francesco; Greco, Francesco; Netti, Paolo Antonio; Maffettone, Pier Luca

    2016-07-01

    Microrheometry is very important for exploring rheological behaviours of several systems when conventional techniques fail. Microrheometrical measurements are usually carried out in microfluidic devices made of Poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS). Although PDMS is a very cheap material, it is also very easy to deform. In particular, a liquid flowing in a PDMS device, in some circumstances, can effectively deform the microchannel, thus altering the flow conditions. The measure of the fluid relaxation time might be performed through viscoelasticity induced particle migration in microfluidics devices. If the channel walls are deformed by the flow, the resulting measured value of the relaxation time could be not reliable. In this work, we study the effect of channel deformation on particle migration in square-shaped microchannel. Experiments are carried out in several PolyEthylene Oxyde solutions flowing in two devices made of PDMS and Poly(methylmethacrylate) (PMMA). The relevance of wall rigidity on particle migration is investigated, and the corresponding importance of wall rigidity on the determination of the relaxation time of the suspending liquid is examined. PMID:27098237

  5. Deformation of a micro-torque swimmer

    PubMed Central

    Ishikawa, Takuji; Tanaka, Tomoyuki; Imai, Yohsuke; Omori, Toshihiro; Matsunaga, Daiki

    2016-01-01

    The membrane tension of some kinds of ciliates has been suggested to regulate upward and downward swimming velocities under gravity. Despite its biological importance, deformation and membrane tension of a ciliate have not been clarified fully. In this study, we numerically investigated the deformation of a ciliate swimming freely in a fluid otherwise at rest. The cell body was modelled as a capsule with a hyperelastic membrane enclosing a Newtonian fluid. Thrust forces due to the ciliary beat were modelled as torques distributed above the cell body. The effects of membrane elasticity, the aspect ratio of the cell's reference shape, and the density difference between the cell and the surrounding fluid were investigated. The results showed that the cell deformed like a heart shape, when the capillary number was sufficiently large. Under the influence of gravity, the membrane tension at the anterior end decreased in the upward swimming while it increased in the downward swimming. Moreover, gravity-induced deformation caused the cells to move gravitationally downwards or upwards, which resulted in a positive or negative geotaxis-like behaviour with a physical origin. These results are important in understanding the physiology of a ciliate's biological responses to mechanical stimuli. PMID:26997893

  6. Tidal deformations of a spinning compact object

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pani, Paolo; Gualtieri, Leonardo; Maselli, Andrea; Ferrari, Valeria

    2015-07-01

    The deformability of a compact object induced by a perturbing tidal field is encoded in the tidal Love numbers, which depend sensibly on the object's internal structure. These numbers are known only for static, spherically-symmetric objects. As a first step to compute the tidal Love numbers of a spinning compact star, here we extend powerful perturbative techniques to compute the exterior geometry of a spinning object distorted by an axisymmetric tidal field to second order in the angular momentum. The spin of the object introduces couplings between electric and magnetic deformations and new classes of induced Love numbers emerge. For example, a spinning object immersed in a quadrupolar, electric tidal field can acquire some induced mass, spin, quadrupole, octupole and hexadecapole moments to second order in the spin. The deformations are encoded in a set of inhomogeneous differential equations which, remarkably, can be solved analytically in vacuum. We discuss certain subtleties in defining the tidal Love numbers in general relativity, which are due to the difficulty in separating the tidal field from the linear response of the object in the solution, even in the static case. By extending the standard procedure to identify the linear response in the static case, we prove analytically that the Love numbers of a Kerr black hole remain zero to second order in the spin. As a by-product, we provide the explicit form for a slowly-rotating, tidally-deformed Kerr black hole to quadratic order in the spin, and discuss its geodesic and geometrical properties.

  7. Joining of advanced materials by superplastic deformation

    DOEpatents

    Goretta, Kenneth C.; Routbort, Jules L.; Gutierrez-Mora, Felipe

    2005-12-13

    A method for utilizing superplastic deformation with or without a novel joint compound that leads to the joining of advanced ceramic materials, intermetallics, and cermets. A joint formed by this approach is as strong as or stronger than the materials joined. The method does not require elaborate surface preparation or application techniques.

  8. Model the Deformation and Failure of Solids

    2001-10-19

    EMU models the deformation and failure of solids based on a reformulated theory of continuum mechanics known as the Peridynamic model. This approach allows dynamic fracture and other failure mechanisms to be simulated with a minimum of mesh effeces and without a need for supplementary kinetic relations for crack growth. Penetration by a rigid projectile is also included in the code.

  9. Subglacial till: the deforming glacier bed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Meer, Jaap J. M.; Menzies, John; Rose, James

    2003-07-01

    "Till is a sediment and is perhaps more variable than any sediment known by a single name." R.F. Flint 1957 Glacial and Pleistocene Geology Tills are commonly classified according to the perceived process of deposition. However, it is increasingly recognised that this classification, which is mainly based on macroscopic field data, has severe limitations. At the same time the concept of the deforming glacier bed has become more realistic as a framework for discussing tills and their properties, and this (tectonic) concept is irreconcilable with the existing (depositional) till classification scheme. Over the last 20 years large thin sections have been used to study tills, which has provided new insights into the textural and structural properties of tills. These results have revolutionised till sedimentology as they show that, in the main, subglacial tills possess deformational characteristics. Depositional properties are rare. Based on this new insight the process of subglacial till formation is discussed in terms of glacier/ice sheet basal velocity, clay, water and carbonate content and the variability of these properties in space and time. The end result of this discussion is: till, the deforming glacier bed. To distinguish subglacial till from depositional sediments the term 'tectomict' is proposed. Within the single framework of subglacial till as the deforming glacier bed, many textural, structural and geomorphological features of till beds can be more clearly and coherently explained and understood.

  10. Crustal deformation along the San Andreas, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Victor C.

    1992-03-01

    The goal is to achieve a better understanding of the regional and local deformation and crustal straining processes in western North America, particularly the effects of the San Andreas and nearby faults on the spatial and temporal crustal deformation behavior. Construction of theoretical models based on the mechanics of coupled elastic plate, viscoelastic foundation and large scale crack mechanics provide a rational basis for the interpretation of seismic and aseismic anomalies and expedite efforts in forecasting the stability of plate boundary deformation. Special focus is placed on the three dimensional time dependent surface deformation due to localized slippage in a elastic layer coupled to a visco-elastic substrate. The numerical analysis is based on a 3-D boundary element technique. Extension to visco-elastic coupling demands the derivation of 3-D time dependent Green's function. This method was applied to analyze the viscoelastic surface displacements due to a dislocated embedded patch. Surface uplift as a function of time and position are obtained. Comparisons between surface uplift for long and short dislocated patches are made.

  11. Postseismic Deformation in the Central Andaman Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puchakayala, J. P.; Smalley, R.; Bilham, R.; Lowry, A.; Batacharjee, A.

    2005-12-01

    The December 26, 2004 Sumatra-Andaman earthquake generated horizontal displacements at Port Blair totaling 3.08 m and vertical subsidence of 0.6-0.9m, indicating 1.6 m arc normal and 6.2±0.6 m dextral coseismic slip on the plate interface. Displacements occurred steadily beginning 10 minutes after the mainshock and were largely complete within 30 minutes after the mainshock. Although continuous GPS measurements were not initiated until 24 days after the mainshock by us and other groups, it is possible from these records to inferthat postseismic deformation in this interval did not exceed 10% of the coseismic displacements. Postseismic deformation continues at present at an exponentially decaying rate. Between January and June 2005, Port Blair has moved 4.5 cm south, 15 cm west and 10 cm up, suggesting postseismic slip downdip of the coseismic rupture and/or viscoelastic relaxation of the mantle. Elastic models of the region based on GPS coseismic slip observations provided by Center for Earth Science Studies (CESS) are consistent with reports of uplift from the islands: North Sentinel (50 km west of Port Blair) rose by 1.0±0.2 m, Port Blair and Middle Andaman subsided by about 1 m and Havelock Island (32 km east) showed no significant vertical deformation. We report data from five campaign sites in the Andaman Islands measured thrice since the earthquake that permit viscoelastic and afterslip models of postseismic deformation to be developed and assessed.

  12. Shear deformation in thick auxetic plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Teik-Cheng

    2013-08-01

    This paper aims to understand the effect of auxeticity on shear deformation in thick plates. Three models for the shear correction factor of plates as a function of Poisson’s ratio were proposed: an analytical model, a cubic fit model and a modified model. Of these three, the cubic fit model exhibits the best accuracy over the entire range of Poisson’s ratio from -1 to 0.5. The extent of shear deformation is herein investigated using the example of uniformly loaded circular plates. It was found that the maximum deformation of such plates based on Mindlin theory approximates to those according to Kirchhoff theory when the Poisson’s ratio of the plate material is highly negative. When the Poisson’s ratio of the plate material is -1 and the edge of the plate is simply supported, the calculation of the maximum deflection by Mindlin theory simplifies into that by Kirchhoff theory. These results suggest that auxeticity reduces shear deformation in thick plates, permitting the use of classical plate theory for thick plates only if the plate material is highly auxetic.

  13. Parachute deformity of the mitral valve

    PubMed Central

    Bett, J. H. N.; Stovin, P. G. I.

    1969-01-01

    A case of parachute deformity of the mitral valve, a rare congenital form of mitral stenosis characterized by insertion of the chordae tendineae into a single posterior papillary muscle, is described in an 11-year-old girl. The eleven other cases in the English literature are reviewed. Images PMID:5348334

  14. Interseismic deformation for normal fault earthquakes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reilinger, Robert

    1987-01-01

    Comparison between the coseismic vertical deformation associated with normal fault earthquakes and permanent deformation indicated by geologic structure indicates that large deformation must occur during the period between earthquakes. When sufficient geodetic and geologic information is available it is possible to estimate the spatial character of this interseismic deformation. A case in point is the 1983 Borah Peak, Idaho earthquake. This normal fault earthquake produced roughly 5 times as much basin subsidence as it did uplift of the adjacent mountain ranges. In contrast, geophysical and geological observations show that the basin is roughly as deep as the bounding range is high. A similar normal fault event in the Basin and Range, the 1959 Hebgen Lake earthquake, was also accompanied by substantially larger subsidence than uplift. In this case, postseismic geodetic measurements show broad regional uplift with a spatial pattern which is roughly consistent with that proposed for the Borah Peak event. Modeling suggests that postseismic viscoelastic relaxation and strain accumulation in an elastic lithosphere overlying a viscoelastic asthenosphere are possible physical mechanisms to generate interseismic uplift. These mechanisms may be the contemporary expression of those processes responsible for the high elevation of the Basin and Range Province.

  15. Conductance of AFM Deformed Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Svizhenko, Alexei; Maiti, Amitesh; Anatram, M. P.; Biegel, Bryan (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation provides information on the electrical conductivity of carbon nanotubes upon deformation by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The density of states and conductance were computed using four orbital tight-binding method with various parameterizations. Different chiralities develop bandgap that varies with chirality.

  16. Crustal deformation along the San Andreas, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Victor C.

    1992-01-01

    The goal is to achieve a better understanding of the regional and local deformation and crustal straining processes in western North America, particularly the effects of the San Andreas and nearby faults on the spatial and temporal crustal deformation behavior. Construction of theoretical models based on the mechanics of coupled elastic plate, viscoelastic foundation and large scale crack mechanics provide a rational basis for the interpretation of seismic and aseismic anomalies and expedite efforts in forecasting the stability of plate boundary deformation. Special focus is placed on the three dimensional time dependent surface deformation due to localized slippage in a elastic layer coupled to a visco-elastic substrate. The numerical analysis is based on a 3-D boundary element technique. Extension to visco-elastic coupling demands the derivation of 3-D time dependent Green's function. This method was applied to analyze the viscoelastic surface displacements due to a dislocated embedded patch. Surface uplift as a function of time and position are obtained. Comparisons between surface uplift for long and short dislocated patches are made.

  17. Monte Carlo dose mapping on deforming anatomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Hualiang; Siebers, Jeffrey V.

    2009-10-01

    This paper proposes a Monte Carlo-based energy and mass congruent mapping (EMCM) method to calculate the dose on deforming anatomy. Different from dose interpolation methods, EMCM separately maps each voxel's deposited energy and mass from a source image to a reference image with a displacement vector field (DVF) generated by deformable image registration (DIR). EMCM was compared with other dose mapping methods: energy-based dose interpolation (EBDI) and trilinear dose interpolation (TDI). These methods were implemented in EGSnrc/DOSXYZnrc, validated using a numerical deformable phantom and compared for clinical CT images. On the numerical phantom with an analytically invertible deformation map, EMCM mapped the dose exactly the same as its analytic solution, while EBDI and TDI had average dose errors of 2.5% and 6.0%. For a lung patient's IMRT treatment plan, EBDI and TDI differed from EMCM by 1.96% and 7.3% in the lung patient's entire dose region, respectively. As a 4D Monte Carlo dose calculation technique, EMCM is accurate and its speed is comparable to 3D Monte Carlo simulation. This method may serve as a valuable tool for accurate dose accumulation as well as for 4D dosimetry QA.

  18. Reports on crustal movements and deformations. [bibliography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, S. C.; Peck, T.

    1983-01-01

    This Catalog of Reports on Crustal Movements and Deformation is a structured bibliography of scientific papers on the movements of the Earth crust. The catalog summarizes by various subjects papers containing data on the movement of the Earth's surface due to tectonic processes. In preparing the catalog we have included studies of tectonic plate motions, spreading and convergence, microplate rotation, regional crustal deformation strain accumulation and deformations associated with the earthquake cycle, and fault motion. We have also included several papers dealing with models of tectonic plate motion and with crustal stress. Papers which discuss tectonic and geologic history but which do not present rates of movements or deformations and papers which are primarily theoretical analyses have been excluded from the catalog. An index of authors cross-referenced to their publications also appears in the catalog. The catalog covers articles appearing in reviewed technical journals during the years 1970-1981. Although there are citations from about twenty journals most of the items come from the following publications: Journal of Geophysical Research, Tectonophysics, Geological Society of America Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America, Nature, Science, Geophysical Journal of the Royal Astronomical Society, Earth and Planetary Science Letters, and Geology.

  19. Body Deformation Correction for SPECT Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Songxiang; McNamara, Joseph E.; Mitra, Joyeeta; Gifford, Howard C.; Johnson, Karen; Gennert, Michael A.; King, Michael A.

    2010-01-01

    Patient motion degrades the quality of SPECT studies. Body bend and twist are types of patient deformation, which may occur during SPECT imaging, and which has been generally ignored in SPECT motion correction strategies. To correct for these types of motion, we propose a deformation model and its inclusion within an iterative reconstruction algorithm. Two experiments were conducted to investigate the applicability of our model. In the first experiment, the return of the postmotion-compensation locations of markers on the body-surface of a volunteer to approximate their original coordinates is used to examine our method of estimating the parameters of our model and the parameters’ use in undoing deformation. The second experiment employed simulated projections of the MCAT phantom formed using an analytical projector which includes attenuation and distance-dependent resolution to investigate applications of our model in reconstruction. We demonstrate in the simulation studies that twist and bend can significantly degrade SPECT image quality visually. Our correction strategy is shown to be able to greatly diminish the degradation seen in the slices, provided the parameters are estimated accurately. We view this work as a first step towards being able to estimate and correct patient deformation based on information obtained from marker tracking data. PMID:20336188

  20. Deformation and Forming of Joined Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Carsley, John; Hovanski, Yuri; Clarke, Kester D.; Krajewski, Paul E.

    2014-09-23

    Introductory article to a set of invited papers from the TMS committee on shaping and forming. This paper introduces a set of papers that were prepared to discussing the deformation and forming of joined materials, and to announce an upcoming symposium at the 2015 MS&T meeting in Columbus Ohio.

  1. Relative Stability of Deformed Cube in Warm and Hot Deformed AA6022: Possible Role of Strain-Induced Boundary Migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raveendra, S.; Paranjape, H.; Mishra, S.; Weiland, H.; Doherty, R. D.; Samajdar, I.

    2009-09-01

    AA6022 samples were deformed at different temperatures and strain rates and to respective true strains of 1.0 and 2.0. Though the deformation was immediately followed by quenching, the as-deformed samples contained recrystallized grains. A convention was adopted, based on grain size and in-grain misorientation developments, to distinguish between the deformed and recrystallized grains/orientations. At the highest deformation temperature(s), a clear pattern of increase (with increase in strain) in deformed cube left\\{ {001} right\\}left< {100} rightrangle was established. Such a pattern could not be explained from Taylor type deformation texture simulations, even after allowing nonoctahedral as well as octahedral slip. Microstructural observations could link, statistically, the increased cube presence with the presence of thicker deformed cube bands. The process of thickening was hypothesized as strain-induced boundary migration (SIBM) of the deformed cube bands into the adjacent noncube.

  2. Lichenase and coding sequences

    DOEpatents

    Li, Xin-Liang; Ljungdahl, Lars G.; Chen, Huizhong

    2000-08-15

    The present invention provides a fungal lichenase, i.e., an endo-1,3-1,4-.beta.-D-glucanohydrolase, its coding sequence, recombinant DNA molecules comprising the lichenase coding sequences, recombinant host cells and methods for producing same. The present lichenase is from Orpinomyces PC-2.

  3. M&m Sequences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schultz, Harris S.; Shiflett, Ray C.

    2005-01-01

    Consider a sequence recursively formed as follows: Start with three real numbers, and then when k are known, let the (k +1)st be such that the mean of all k +1 equals the median of the first k. The authors conjecture that every such sequence eventually becomes stable. This article presents results related to their conjecture.

  4. Cosmetology: Scope and Sequence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nashville - Davidson County Metropolitan Public Schools, TN.

    This scope and sequence guide, developed for a cosmetology vocational education program, represents an initial step in the development of a systemwide articulated curriculum sequence for all vocational programs within the Metropolitan Nashville Public School System. It was developed as a result of needs expressed by teachers, parents, and the…

  5. Twin Mitochondrial Sequence Analysis.

    PubMed

    Bouhlal, Yosr; Martinez, Selena; Gong, Henry; Dumas, Kevin; Shieh, Joseph T C

    2013-09-01

    When applying genome-wide sequencing technologies to disease investigation, it is increasingly important to resolve sequence variation in regions of the genome that may have homologous sequences. The human mitochondrial genome challenges interpretation given the potential for heteroplasmy, somatic variation, and homologous nuclear mitochondrial sequences (numts). Identical twins share the same mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) from early life, but whether the mitochondrial sequence remains similar is unclear. We compared an adult monozygotic twin pair using high throughput-sequencing and evaluated variants with primer extension and mitochondrial pre-enrichment. Thirty-seven variants were shared between the twin individuals, and the variants were verified on the original genomic DNA. These studies support highly identical genetic sequence in this case. Certain low-level variant calls were of high quality and homology to the mitochondrial DNA, and they were further evaluated. When we assessed calls in pre-enriched mitochondrial DNA templates, we found that these may represent numts, which can be differentiated from mtDNA variation. We conclude that twin identity extends to mitochondrial DNA, and it is critical to differentiate between numts and mtDNA in genome sequencing, particularly since significant heteroplasmy could influence genome interpretation. Further studies on mtDNA and numts will aid in understanding how variation occurs and persists. PMID:24040623

  6. Sequences for Student Investigation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barton, Jeffrey; Feil, David; Lartigue, David; Mullins, Bernadette

    2004-01-01

    We describe two classes of sequences that give rise to accessible problems for undergraduate research. These problems may be understood with virtually no prerequisites and are well suited for computer-aided investigation. The first sequence is a variation of one introduced by Stephen Wolfram in connection with his study of cellular automata. The…

  7. Agriculture: Scope and Sequence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nashville - Davidson County Metropolitan Public Schools, TN.

    This guide, which was written as an initial step in the development of a systemwide articulated curriculum sequence for all vocational programs within the Metropolitan Nashville Public School System, outlines the suggested scope and sequence of a 3-year program in agriculture. The guide consists of a course description; general course objectives;…

  8. Myocardial deformation recovery from cine MRI using a nearly incompressible biventricular model.

    PubMed

    Bistoquet, Arnaud; Oshinski, John; Skrinjar, Oskar

    2008-02-01

    This paper presents a method for biventricular myocardial deformation recovery from cine MRI. The method is based on a deformable model that is nearly incompressible, a desirable property since the myocardium has been shown to be nearly incompressible. The model uses a matrix-valued radial basis function to represent divergence-free displacement fields, which is a first order approximation of incompressibility. This representation allows for deformation modeling of an arbitrary topologies with a relatively small number of parameters, which is suitable for representing the motion of the multi-chamber structure of the heart. The myocardium needs to be segmented in an initial frame after which the method automatically determines the tissue deformation everywhere in the myocardium throughout the cardiac cycle. Two studies were carried out to validate the method. In the first study the myocardial deformation was recovered from a 3D anatomical cine MRI sequence of a healthy volunteer and then validated against the manual segmentation of the biventricular wall and against the corresponding 3D tagged cine MRI sequence. The average volume agreement between the model and the manual segmentation had a false positive rate of 3.2%, false negative rate of 2.8% and true positive rate of 91.4%. The average distance between the model and manually determined intersections of perpendicular tag planes was 1.7mm (1.2 pixel). The same procedures was repeated on another set of 3D anatomical and tagged MRI scans of the same volunteer taken four months later. The recovered deformation was very similar to the one obtained from the first set of scans. In the second study the method was applied to 3D anatomical cine MRI scans of three patients with ventricular dyssynchrony and three age-matched healthy volunteers. The recovered strains of the normal subjects were clearly stronger than the recovered strains of the patients and they were similar to those reported by other researchers. The

  9. Protein sequence databases.

    PubMed

    Apweiler, Rolf; Bairoch, Amos; Wu, Cathy H

    2004-02-01

    A variety of protein sequence databases exist, ranging from simple sequence repositories, which store data with little or no manual intervention in the creation of the records, to expertly curated universal databases that cover all species and in which the original sequence data are enhanced by the manual addition of further information in each sequence record. As the focus of researchers moves from the genome to the proteins encoded by it, these databases will play an even more important role as central comprehensive resources of protein information. Several the leading protein sequence databases are discussed here, with special emphasis on the databases now provided by the Universal Protein Knowledgebase (UniProt) consortium. PMID:15036160

  10. Sequence History Update Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khanampompan, Teerapat; Gladden, Roy; Fisher, Forest; DelGuercio, Chris

    2008-01-01

    The Sequence History Update Tool performs Web-based sequence statistics archiving for Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO). Using a single UNIX command, the software takes advantage of sequencing conventions to automatically extract the needed statistics from multiple files. This information is then used to populate a PHP database, which is then seamlessly formatted into a dynamic Web page. This tool replaces a previous tedious and error-prone process of manually editing HTML code to construct a Web-based table. Because the tool manages all of the statistics gathering and file delivery to and from multiple data sources spread across multiple servers, there is also a considerable time and effort savings. With the use of The Sequence History Update Tool what previously took minutes is now done in less than 30 seconds, and now provides a more accurate archival record of the sequence commanding for MRO.

  11. Nucleosome dynamics: Sequence matters.

    PubMed

    Eslami-Mossallam, Behrouz; Schiessel, Helmut; van Noort, John

    2016-06-01

    About three quarter of all eukaryotic DNA is wrapped around protein cylinders, forming nucleosomes. Even though the histone proteins that make up the core of nucleosomes are highly conserved in evolution, nucleosomes can be very different from each other due to posttranslational modifications of the histones. Another crucial factor in making nucleosomes unique has so far been underappreciated: the sequence of their DNA. This review provides an overview of the experimental and theoretical progress that increasingly points to the importance of the nucleosomal base pair sequence. Specifically, we discuss the role of the underlying base pair sequence in nucleosome positioning, sliding, breathing, force-induced unwrapping, dissociation and partial assembly and also how the sequence can influence higher-order structures. A new view emerges: the physical properties of nucleosomes, especially their dynamical properties, are determined to a large extent by the mechanical properties of their DNA, which in turn depends on DNA sequence. PMID:26896338

  12. Deformation Monitoring of AN Active Fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostapchuk, A.

    2015-12-01

    The discovery of low frequency earthquakes, slow slip events and other deformation phenomena, new for geophysics, change our understanding of how the energy accumulated in the Earth's crust do release. The new geophysical data make one revise the underlying mechanism of geomechanical processes taking place in fault zones. Conditions for generating different slip modes are still unclear. The most vital question is whether a certain slip mode is intrinsic for a fault or may be controlled by external factors. This work presents the results of two and a half year deformation monitoring of a discontinuity in the zone of the Main Sayanskiy Fault. Main Sayanskiy Fault is right-lateral strike-slip fault. Observations were performed in the tunnel of Talaya seismic station (TLY), Irkutsk region, Russia. Measurements were carried out 70 m away from the entrance of the tunnel, the thickness of overlying rock was about 30 m. Inductive sensors of displacement were mounted at the both sides of a discontinuity, which recorded three components of relative fault side displacement with the accuracy of 0.2 mcm. Temperature variation inside the tunnel didn't exceed 0.5oC during the all period of observations. Important information about deformation properties of an active fault was obtained. A pronounced seasonality of deformation characteristics of discontinuity is observed in the investigated segment of rock. A great number of slow slip events with durations from several hours to several weeks were registered. Besides that alterations of fault deformation characteristics before the megathrust earthquake M9.0 Tohoku Oki 11 March 2011 and reaction to the event itself were detected. The work was supported by the Russian Science Foundation (grant no. 14-17-00719).

  13. Novel optical fiber sensor for deformation measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di, Haiting; Sun, Suping; Yu, Jianqiang; Liu, Renqiang

    2010-10-01

    A light intensity modulation optical fiber sensor, which can measure deformation directly, has been developed. A light leakage zone is introduced on one side of fiber to increase the sensitivity of fiber under deformation. The machining process of sensor is considered. Hand carving, milling and embossing methods are introduced to produce the light leakage zone respectively, and the comparison between these methods is carried out. To obtain the static curve of sensor, cantilevered beam, simple support beam and cylinders are used respectively to measure little and large deformation. The static characters of sensor, such as sensitivity and measurement range, are analyzed from the static curve. The experimental results show that the sensor can distinguish the direction of deformation (positive bending and negative bending). Positive bending increases the throughput of light, and is distinguishable from negative bending, which decreases the throughput. The output of sensor is linear with curvature when the curvature radius is larger than 60mm. The response of sensor is a cosine function with the direction of deformation and there is a maximum sensitivity direction (perpendicular to the light leakage zone plane and passing through the axis of the fiber) and a minimum sensitivity direction (parallel to light leakage zone plane and pass through the axis of the fiber). The dynamic responds of attenuation vibration and sawtooth input signal are studied. Comparison between the optical fiber sensor, untreated fiber and strain gauge shows that the sensor is 400 times of untreated fiber in sensitivity and is more advantageous in measurement of thin structures. The sensor is easily made by multi-mode plastic optical fiber and the detection equipments are very simple, therefore it is small in size, simple in structure and low in cost, which make the sensor can be widely used in various fields.

  14. Crustal deformation measurements in Guerrero, Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Larson, K.M.; Lowry, A.R.; Kostoglodov, V.; Hutton, W.; Sanchez, O.; Hudnut, K.; Suarez, G.

    2004-01-01

    GPS measurements of crustal deformation in Guerrero, southern Mexico, include surveys collected between 1992 and 2001 as well as continuous GPS measurements at a few sites. These geodetic observations are used to calculate interseismic deformation rates and assess the presence and possible location of transient deformation during the period encompassing 1992.25 to 2001.75. The data are used to examine transient deformation in 1998 previously described from data at a single site by Lowry et al. [2001]. Survey measurements and continuous data from a site near Popocate??petl volcano confirm the 1998 transient, and survey data also suggest another transient occurred following the 14 September 1995 (Mw = 7.3) Copala earthquake. All of the available GPS position estimates have been inverted for a combined model of slip during each event plus the steady state slip on the plate interface. Modeling of the steady state deformation rates confirms that the Guerrero seismic gap is partially frictionally locked at depths shallower than about 25 km and accumulating strain that may eventually be released in a great earthquake. The data also suggest that there is frictional coupling to much greater (>40 km) depths, which releases more frequently in aseismic slip events. The locations and sizes of the transient events are only partially constrained by the available data. However, the transient models which best fit the GPS coordinate time series suggest that aseismic slip was centered downdip of the seismogenic portion of the plate-bounding thrust in both events, and the moment release had equivalent magnitudes Mw = 7.1 + 1.3/-1.0 in 1995-1996 and 7.1 + 0.4/-0.1 in 1998. Copyright 2004 by the American Geophysical Union.

  15. Deformation of vortex patches by boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crosby, A.; Johnson, E. R.; Morrison, P. J.

    2013-02-01

    The deformation of two-dimensional vortex patches in the vicinity of fluid boundaries is investigated. The presence of a boundary causes an initially circular patch of uniform vorticity to deform. Sufficiently far away from the boundary, the deformed shape is well approximated by an ellipse. This leading order elliptical deformation is investigated via the elliptic moment model of Melander, Zabusky, and Styczek [J. Fluid Mech. 167, 95 (1986), 10.1017/S0022112086002744]. When the boundary is straight, the centre of the elliptic patch remains at a constant distance from the boundary, and the motion is integrable. Furthermore, since the straining flow acting on the patch is constant in time, the problem is that of an elliptic vortex patch in constant strain, which was analysed by Kida [J. Phys. Soc. Jpn. 50, 3517 (1981), 10.1143/JPSJ.50.3517]. For more complicated boundary shapes, such as a square corner, the motion is no longer integrable. Instead, there is an adiabatic invariant for the motion. This adiabatic invariant arises due to the separation in times scales between the relatively rapid time scale associated with the rotation of the patch and the slower time scale associated with the self-advection of the patch along the boundary. The interaction of a vortex patch with a circular island is also considered. Without a background flow, the conservation of angular impulse implies that the motion is again integrable. The addition of an irrotational flow past the island can drive the patch towards the boundary, leading to the possibility of large deformations and breakup.

  16. Experimental deformation of synthetic wet jadeite aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orzol, J.; StöCkhert, B.; Trepmann, C. A.; Rummel, F.

    2006-06-01

    Predictions on interplate coupling and shear heating in the deeper levels of subduction zones require an understanding of the rheology of eclogite. The strength of eclogite is probably limited by the flow strength of its major constituent omphacite, representing a solid solution between the clinopyroxene end-members diopside and jadeite. Here we report the results of deformation experiments on the end-member jadeite (NaAlSi2O6), carried out on fine-grained synthetic aggregates crystallized in the stability field of jadeite from a synthetic glass precursor. A standard procedure was established to yield samples with a uniform microstructure and an average grain size of approximately 10 μm. The presence of micropores and the detection of small amounts of freezable water by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) in both undeformed and deformed samples indicates the presence of a free aqueous fluid, hence wet conditions. Deformation experiments were carried out in a modified Griggs-type apparatus at a confining pressure of 2.5 GPa, temperatures between 800°C and 1100°C and at strain rates of 4 × 10-4 s-1 to 2 × 10-6 s-1. A molten eutectic CsCl/NaCl mixture was used as pressure medium. The microfabrics of the deformed samples and the mechanical data indicate deformation in the dislocation creep regime. The mechanical data are fit by a power law using a global inversion method, yielding an activation energy of Q = 326 ± 27 kJ mol-1, a stress exponent n = 3.7 ± 0.4, and a preexponential factor of ln A = -3.3 ± 2.0. Extrapolation of this flow law for synthetic jadeitite to low geological strain rates, and comparison with available flow laws for diopside, indicates jadeite to be significantly weaker than diopside in the dislocation creep regime.

  17. Spinal deformity in children treated for neuroblastoma

    SciTech Connect

    Mayfield, J.K.; Riseborough, E.J.; Jaffe, N.; Nehme, M.E.

    1981-02-01

    Of seventy-four children who were treated at a mean age of seventeen months for neuroblastoma and survived more than five years, fifty-six had spinal deformity due either to the disease or to the treatment after a mean follow-up of 12.9 years. Of these fifty-six, 50 per cent had post-radiation scoliosis, and 16 per cent had post-radiation kyphosis, most frequently at the thoracolumbar junction, at the time of follow-up. Two kyphotic thoracolumbar curve patterns were identified: an angular kyphosis with a short radius of curvature and its apex at the twelfth thoracic and first lumbar vertebrae, and a thoracic kyphosis with a long radius of curvature that extended into the lumbar spine. The post-radiation deformity - both the scoliosis and the kyphosis - progressed with growth, the scoliosis at a rate of 1 degree per year and the kyphosis at a rate of 3 degrees per year. Epidural spread of the neuroblastoma was associated with most of the cases of severe scoliosis and kyphosis. The deformity was due either to the laminectomy or to the paraplegia acting in conjunction with the radiation. Eighteen per cent of 419 children with this malignant disease survived more than five years, and of the survivors, 20 per cent had spinal deformity severe enough to warrant treatment. The factors associated with the development of spinal deformity in patient treated for neuroblastoma were: orthovoltage radiation exceeding 3000 rads, asymmetrical radiation of the spine, thoracolumbar kyphosis, and epidural spread of the tumor.

  18. Offshore Deformation Front in Miaoli Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiang, P.; Gwo-shyn, S.

    2015-12-01

    Taiwan is located at the junction of the Eurasian Plate and the Philippine Sea Plate. It's because arc-continent collision occurs in the western Taiwan, resulting in the orogeny has formed a fold-and-thrust belt, developing a series of thrusts aligned in north-south direction. The thrust faults, locating in the central island, are the oldest and have almost inactive. Westward to the island, the faults become younger, dipping angles are smaller, and motions were stronger. On the west side, the foot of the Taiwan Western Foothill is considered the youngest thrust faults located along west Taiwan. Scholars recognized them as so-called the deformation front, and they also believed that the deformation front is located in between the compressive terrain uplifted area and the extensional subsidence area. Therefore, this front line is on the boundary of two different tectonic zones. This study investigates the trace of the deformation front in Miaoli area. Previous studies suggested that the west side of Miaoli collision zone should be fault-bounded, and is located in the seabed. However, in the geological map, there is no geologic evidence that appears on land and so-called active faults related with this deformation front. In the near coast seafloor, according to the reflection earthquakes data from the Institute of Oceanography of NTU, we can only see the offshore strata have been uplifted, and the data also shows that seabed is only covered by thin layer of sediments. This study indicates that in offshore place within three kilometers, shallow formations show a special layer of slime which was extruded to be corrugated transversely. Accordingly, we believe that this slime layer should be pressurized and filled with muddy water. Such features should be further investigated with other geological and geophysical survey data to check if they belong to the structural product of the deformation front.

  19. Optimization of micropillar sequences for fluid flow sculpting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoecklein, Daniel; Wu, Chueh-Yu; Kim, Donghyuk; Di Carlo, Dino; Ganapathysubramanian, Baskar

    2016-01-01

    Inertial fluid flow deformation around pillars in a microchannel is a new method for controlling fluid flow. Sequences of pillars have been shown to produce a rich phase space with a wide variety of flow transformations. Previous work has successfully demonstrated manual design of pillar sequences to achieve desired transformations of the flow cross section, with experimental validation. However, such a method is not ideal for seeking out complex sculpted shapes as the search space quickly becomes too large for efficient manual discovery. We explore fast, automated optimization methods to solve this problem. We formulate the inertial flow physics in microchannels with different micropillar configurations as a set of state transition matrix operations. These state transition matrices are constructed from experimentally validated streamtraces for a fixed channel length per pillar. This facilitates modeling the effect of a sequence of micropillars as nested matrix-matrix products, which have very efficient numerical implementations. With this new forward model, arbitrary micropillar sequences can be rapidly simulated with various inlet configurations, allowing optimization routines quick access to a large search space. We integrate this framework with the genetic algorithm and showcase its applicability by designing micropillar sequences for various useful transformations. We computationally discover micropillar sequences for complex transformations that are substantially shorter than manually designed sequences. We also determine sequences for novel transformations that were difficult to manually design. Finally, we experimentally validate these computational designs by fabricating devices and comparing predictions with the results from confocal microscopy.

  20. Dynamic deformability of sickle red blood cells in microphysiological flow

    PubMed Central

    Alapan, Y.; Matsuyama, Y.; Little, J. A.; Gurkan, U. A.

    2016-01-01

    In sickle cell disease (SCD), hemoglobin molecules polymerize intracellularly and lead to a cascade of events resulting in decreased deformability and increased adhesion of red blood cells (RBCs). Decreased deformability and increased adhesion of sickle RBCs lead to blood vessel occlusion (vaso-occlusion) in SCD patients. Here, we present a microfluidic approach integrated with a cell dimensioning algorithm to analyze dynamic deformability of adhered RBC at the single-cell level in controlled microphysiological flow. We measured and compared dynamic deformability and adhesion of healthy hemoglobin A (HbA) and homozygous sickle hemoglobin (HbS) containing RBCs in blood samples obtained from 24 subjects. We introduce a new parameter to assess deformability of RBCs: the dynamic deformability index (DDI), which is defined as the time-dependent change of the cell’s aspect ratio in response to fluid flow shear stress. Our results show that DDI of HbS-containing RBCs were significantly lower compared to that of HbA-containing RBCs. Moreover, we observed subpopulations of HbS containing RBCs in terms of their dynamic deformability characteristics: deformable and non-deformable RBCs. Then, we tested blood samples from SCD patients and analyzed RBC adhesion and deformability at physiological and above physiological flow shear stresses. We observed significantly greater number of adhered non-deformable sickle RBCs than deformable sickle RBCs at flow shear stresses well above the physiological range, suggesting an interplay between dynamic deformability and increased adhesion of RBCs in vaso-occlusive events. PMID:27437432