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Sample records for akt extracellular signal-regulated

  1. Extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 and Akt contribute to triclosan-stimulated proliferation of JB6 Cl 41-5a cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yuanfeng; Beland, Frederick A; Chen, Si; Fang, Jia-Long

    2015-08-01

    Triclosan is a broad spectrum anti-bacterial agent widely used in many personal care products, household items, medical devices, and clinical settings. Human exposure to triclosan is mainly through oral and dermal routes. In previous studies, we found that sub-chronic dermal exposure of B6C3F1 mice to triclosan induced epidermal hyperplasia and focal necrosis; however, the mechanisms for these responses remain elusive. In this study, using mouse epidermis-derived JB6 Cl 41-5a cells, we found that triclosan stimulated cell growth in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. Enhanced cell proliferation was demonstrated by a substantial increase in the percentage of BrdU-positive cells, an elevation in the protein levels of cyclin D1 and cyclin A, and a reduction in the protein level of p27(Kip1). Western blotting analysis revealed that triclosan induced the activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2), c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNK), p38, and Akt. Pre-treatment of the cells with PD184352, an inhibitor of the upstream kinase MEK1/2, or with wortmannin, an inhibitor of phosphoinositide 3-kinase, blocked triclosan-mediated phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and Akt, respectively, and substantially suppressed triclosan-stimulated cell proliferation, whereas the JNK inhibitor SP600125 or the p38 inhibitor SB203580 had little to no effect on triclosan-stimulated cell proliferation. The phosphorylation activation of ERK1/2 and Akt was further confirmed on the skin of mice dermally administered triclosan. These data suggest that the activation of ERK1/2 and Akt is involved in triclosan-stimulated proliferation of JB6 Cl 41-5a cells.

  2. Lithium protection of phencyclidine-induced neurotoxicity in developing brain: the role of phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase/Akt and mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase/extracellular signal-regulated kinase signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Xia, Yan; Wang, Cheng Z; Liu, Jie; Anastasio, Noelle C; Johnson, Kenneth M

    2008-09-01

    Phencyclidine (PCP) and other N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonists have been shown to be neurotoxic to developing brains and to result in schizophrenia-like behaviors later in development. Prevention of both effects by antischizophrenic drugs suggests the validity of PCP neurodevelopmental toxicity as a heuristic model of schizophrenia. Lithium is used for the treatment of bipolar and schizoaffective disorders and has recently been shown to have neuroprotective properties. The present study used organotypic corticostriatal slices taken from postnatal day 2 rat pups to investigate the protective effect of lithium and the role of the phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI-3K)/Akt and mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (MEK/ERK) pathways in PCP-induced cell death. Lithium pretreatment dose-dependently reduced PCP-induced caspase-3 activation and DNA fragmentation in layers II to IV of the cortex. PCP elicited time-dependent inhibition of the MEK/ERK and PI-3K/Akt pathways, as indicated by dephosphorylation of ERK1/2 and Akt. The proapoptotic factor glycogen synthase kinase (GSK)-3beta was also dephosphorylated at serine 9 and thus activated. Lithium prevented PCP-induced inhibition of the two pathways and activation of GSK-3beta. Furthermore, blocking either PI-3K/Akt or MEK/ERK pathway abolished the protective effect of lithium, whereas inhibiting GSK-3beta activity mimicked the protective effect of lithium. However, no cross-talk between the two pathways was found. Finally, specific GSK-3beta inhibition did not prevent PCP-induced dephosphorylation of Akt and ERK. These data strongly suggest that the protective effect of lithium against PCP-induced neuroapoptosis is mediated through independent stimulation of the PI-3K/Akt and ERK pathways and suppression of GSK-3beta activity.

  3. Differential Modulation of Brainstem Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinase/Akt and Extracellular Signal-Regulated Kinase 1/2 Signaling Underlies WIN55,212-2 Centrally Mediated Pressor Response in Conscious Rats

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Badr Mostafa

    2012-01-01

    Our recent study demonstrated that central cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1R) activation caused dose-related pressor response in conscious rats, and reported studies implicated the brainstem phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt-extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) pathway in blood pressure control. Therefore, in this study, we tested the hypothesis that the modulation of brainstem PI3K/Akt-ERK1/2 signaling plays a critical role in the central CB1R-mediated pressor response. In conscious freely moving rats, the pressor response elicited by intracisternal (i.c.) (R)-(+)-[2,3-dihydro-5-methyl-3[(4-morpholinyl)methyl]pyrrolo[1,2,3-de]-1,4-benzoxazinyl]-(1-naphthalenyl) methanone mesylate salt (WIN55,212-2) (15 μg) was associated with significant increases in ERK1/2 phosphorylation in the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM) and the nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS). In contrast, Akt phosphorylation was significantly reduced in the same neuronal pools. Pretreatment with the selective CB1R antagonist N-(piperidin-1-yl)-5-(4-iodophenyl)-1-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)-4-methyl-1H-pyrazole-3-carboxamide (AM251) (30 μg i.c.) attenuated the neurochemical responses elicited by central CB1R activation. Furthermore, pretreatment with the ERK/mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase inhibitor 2′-amino-3′-methoxyflavone (PD98059) (5 μg i.c.) abrogated WIN55,212-2-evoked increases in blood pressure and neuronal ERK1/2 phosphorylation but not the reduction in Akt phosphorylation. On the other hand, prior PI3K inhibition with wortmannin (0.4 μg i.c.) exacerbated the WIN55,212-2 (7.5 and 15 μg i.c.) dose-related increases in blood pressure and ERK1/2 phosphorylation in the RVLM. The present neurochemical and integrative studies yield new insight into the critical role of two brainstem kinases, PI3K and ERK1/2, in the pressor response elicited by central CB1R activation in conscious rats. PMID:21946192

  4. β2-Glycoprotein I Inhibits Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor-Induced Angiogenesis by Suppressing the Phosphorylation of Extracellular Signal-Regulated Kinase 1/2, Akt, and Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Wen-Chin; Chiou, Tzeon-Jye; Chung, Meng-Ju; Chiang, An-Na

    2016-01-01

    Angiogenesis is the process of new blood vessel formation, and it plays a key role in various physiological and pathological conditions. The β2-glycoprotein I (β2-GPI) is a plasma glycoprotein with multiple biological functions, some of which remain to be elucidated. This study aimed to identify the contribution of 2-GPI on the angiogenesis induced by vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), a pro-angiogenic factor that may regulate endothelial remodeling, and its underlying mechanism. Our results revealed that β2-GPI dose-dependently decreased the VEGF-induced increase in endothelial cell proliferation, using the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) and the bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation assays. Furthermore, incubation with both β2-GPI and deglycosylated β2-GPI inhibited the VEGF-induced tube formation. Our results suggest that the carbohydrate residues of β2-GPI do not participate in the function of anti-angiogenesis. Using in vivo Matrigel plug and angioreactor assays, we show that β2-GPI remarkably inhibited the VEGF-induced angiogenesis at a physiological concentration. Moreover, β2-GPI inhibited the VEGF-induced phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2), Akt, and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS). In summary, our in vitro and in vivo data reveal for the first time that β2-GPI inhibits the VEGF-induced angiogenesis and highlights the potential for β2-GPI in anti-angiogenic therapy. PMID:27579889

  5. β2-Glycoprotein I Inhibits Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor-Induced Angiogenesis by Suppressing the Phosphorylation of Extracellular Signal-Regulated Kinase 1/2, Akt, and Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Wen-Chin; Chiou, Tzeon-Jye; Chung, Meng-Ju; Chiang, An-Na

    2016-01-01

    Angiogenesis is the process of new blood vessel formation, and it plays a key role in various physiological and pathological conditions. The β2-glycoprotein I (β2-GPI) is a plasma glycoprotein with multiple biological functions, some of which remain to be elucidated. This study aimed to identify the contribution of 2-GPI on the angiogenesis induced by vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), a pro-angiogenic factor that may regulate endothelial remodeling, and its underlying mechanism. Our results revealed that β2-GPI dose-dependently decreased the VEGF-induced increase in endothelial cell proliferation, using the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) and the bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation assays. Furthermore, incubation with both β2-GPI and deglycosylated β2-GPI inhibited the VEGF-induced tube formation. Our results suggest that the carbohydrate residues of β2-GPI do not participate in the function of anti-angiogenesis. Using in vivo Matrigel plug and angioreactor assays, we show that β2-GPI remarkably inhibited the VEGF-induced angiogenesis at a physiological concentration. Moreover, β2-GPI inhibited the VEGF-induced phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2), Akt, and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS). In summary, our in vitro and in vivo data reveal for the first time that β2-GPI inhibits the VEGF-induced angiogenesis and highlights the potential for β2-GPI in anti-angiogenic therapy. PMID:27579889

  6. Oscillatory Dynamics of the Extracellular Signal-regulated Kinase Pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Shankaran, Harish; Wiley, H. S.

    2010-12-01

    The extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathway is a central signaling pathway in development and disease and is regulated by multiple negative and positive feedback loops. Recent studies have shown negative feedback from ERK to upstream regulators can give rise to biochemical oscillations with a periodicity of between 15-30 minutes. Feedback due to the stimulated transcription of negative regulators of the ERK pathway can also give rise to transcriptional oscillations with a periodicity of 1-2h. The biological significance of these oscillations is not clear, but recent evidence suggests that transcriptional oscillations participate in developmental processes, such as somite formation. Biochemical oscillations are more enigmatic, but could provide a mechanism for encoding different types of inputs into a common signaling pathway.

  7. Interleukin 2 activates extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase 2

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    Interleukin 2 (IL-2) stimulated activation of the 42-kD extracellular signal-regulated kinase 2 (Erk2) in murine IL-3-dependent cells, expressing either high or intermediate affinity IL-2 receptors. Activation was both rapid, occurring within 5 min of IL-2 addition, and prolonged, remaining elevated for 30 min. Activation of Erk2 appeared to be necessary for IL-2 stimulation of proliferation, as deletion of a region of the cytoplasmic domain of the IL-2 receptor beta chain, essential for IL-2 stimulation of proliferation, abolished Erk2 activation by IL-2. Furthermore, cells that had been deprived of cytokine for 24 h were then refractory to IL-2 stimulation of both Erk2 activity and proliferation. However, elevation of Erk2 activity was not sufficient to stimulate proliferation, as protein kinase C activation stimulated Erk2 activity but not DNA synthesis. Also, cells exposed to IL-2 in the presence of rapamycin showed full Erk2 activation but not DNA synthesis. These data suggest that IL-2 must stimulate both Erk2 activity and a further pathway(s) to trigger cell proliferation. PMID:8376945

  8. Shift from extracellular signal-regulated kinase to AKT/cAMP response element-binding protein pathway increases survival-motor-neuron expression in spinal-muscular-atrophy-like mice and patient cells.

    PubMed

    Branchu, Julien; Biondi, Olivier; Chali, Farah; Collin, Thibault; Leroy, Felix; Mamchaoui, Kamel; Makoukji, Joelle; Pariset, Claude; Lopes, Philippe; Massaad, Charbel; Chanoine, Christophe; Charbonnier, Frédéric

    2013-03-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), a recessive neurodegenerative disease, is characterized by the selective loss of spinal motor neurons. No available therapy exists for SMA, which represents one of the leading genetic causes of death in childhood. SMA is caused by a mutation of the survival-of-motor-neuron 1 (SMN1) gene, leading to a quantitative defect in the survival-motor-neuron (SMN) protein expression. All patients retain one or more copies of the SMN2 gene, which modulates the disease severity by producing a small amount of stable SMN protein. We reported recently that NMDA receptor activation, directly in the spinal cord, significantly enhanced the transcription rate of the SMN2 genes in a mouse model of very severe SMA (referred as type 1) by a mechanism that involved AKT/CREB pathway activation. Here, we provide the first compelling evidence for a competition between the MEK/ERK/Elk-1 and the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/AKT/CREB signaling pathways for SMN2 gene regulation in the spinal cord of type 1 SMA-like mice. The inhibition of the MEK/ERK/Elk-1 pathway promotes the AKT/CREB pathway activation, leading to (1) an enhanced SMN expression in the spinal cord of SMA-like mice and in human SMA myotubes and (2) a 2.8-fold lifespan extension in SMA-like mice. Furthermore, we identified a crosstalk between ERK and AKT signaling pathways that involves the calcium-dependent modulation of CaMKII activity. Together, all these data open new perspectives to the therapeutic strategy for SMA patients. PMID:23467345

  9. Both mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)/extracellular-signal-regulated kinases (ERK) 1/2 and phosphatidylinositide-3-OH kinase (PI3K)/Akt pathways regulate activation of E-twenty-six (ETS)-like transcription factor 1 (Elk-1) in U138 glioblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Mut, Melike; Lule, Sevda; Demir, Ozlem; Kurnaz, Isil Aksan; Vural, Imran

    2012-02-01

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF) and its receptor (EGFR) have been shown to play a significant role in the pathogenesis of glioblastoma. In our study, the EGFR was stimulated with EGF in human U138 glioblastoma cells. We show that the activated mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)/extracellular-signal-regulated kinases (ERK) 1/2 pathway phosphorylated the E twenty-six (ETS)-like transcription factor 1 (Elk-1) mainly at serine 383 residue. Mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK) 1/2 inhibitor, UO126 and ERK inhibitor II, FR180204 blocked the Elk-1 phosphorylation and activation. The phosphatidylinositide-3-OH kinase (PI3K)/Akt pathway was also involved in the Elk-1 activation. Activation of the Elk-1 led to an increased survival and a proliferative response with the EGF stimulation in the U138 glioblastoma cells. Knocking-down the Elk-1 using an RNA interference technique caused a decrease in survival of the unstimulated U138 glioblastoma cells and also decreased the proliferative response to the EGF stimulation. The Elk-1 transcription factor was important for the survival and proliferation of U138 glioblastoma cells upon the stimulation of EGFR with EGF. The MAPK/ERK1/2 and PI3K/Akt pathways regulated this response via activation of the Elk-1 transcription factor. The Elk-1 may be one of the convergence points for pathways located downstream of EGFR in glioblastoma cells. Utilization of the Elk-1 as a therapeutic target may lead to a novel strategy in treatment of glioblastoma.

  10. Protein kinase B and extracellular signal-regulated kinase contribute to the chondroprotective effect of morroniside on osteoarthritis chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Liang; Zeng, Guoqing; Liu, Zejun; Zhang, Bing; Cui, Xu; Zhao, Honghai; Zheng, Xinpeng; Song, Gang; Kang, Jian; Xia, Chun

    2015-01-01

    Despite extensive studies on the multifaceted roles of morroniside, the main active constituent of iridoid glycoside from Corni Fructus, the effect of morroniside on osteoarthritis (OA) chondrocytes remains poorly understood. Here, we investigated the influence of morroniside on cultured human OA chondrocytes and a rat experimental model of OA. The results showed that morroniside enhanced the cell viability and the levels of proliferating cell nuclear antigen expression (PCNA), type II collagen and aggrecan in human OA chondrocytes, indicating that morroniside promoted chondrocyte survival and matrix synthesis. Furthermore, different doses of morroniside activated protein kinase B (AKT) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) in human OA chondrocytes, and in turn, triggered AKT/S6 and ERK/P70S6K/S6 pathway, respectively. The PI3K/AKT inhibitor LY294002 or the MEK/ERK inhibitor U0126 attenuated the effect of morroniside on human OA chondrocytes, indicating that the activation of AKT and ERK contributed to the regulation of morroniside in human OA chondrocytes. In addition, the intra-articular injection of morroniside elevated the level of proteoglycans in cartilage matrix and the thickness of articular cartilage in a rat experimental model of OA, with the increase of AKT and ERK activation. As a consequence, morroniside has chondroprotective effect on OA chondrocytes, and may have the therapeutic potential for OA treatment. PMID:25754021

  11. Pre-LTP requires extracellular signal-regulated kinase in the ACC

    PubMed Central

    Yamanaka, Manabu; Tian, Zhen; Darvish-Ghane, Soroush

    2016-01-01

    The extracellular signal-regulated kinase is an important protein kinase for cortical plasticity. Long-term potentiation in the anterior cingulate cortex is believed to play important roles in chronic pain, fear, and anxiety. Previous studies of extracellular signal-regulated kinase are mainly focused on postsynaptic form of long-term potentiation (post-long-term potentiation). Little is known about the relationship between extracellular signal-regulated kinase and presynaptic long-term potentiation (pre-long-term potentiation) in cortical synapses. In this study, we examined whether pre-long-term potentiation in the anterior cingulate cortex requires the activation of presynaptic extracellular signal-regulated kinase. We found that p42/p44 mitogen-activated protein kinase inhibitors, PD98059 and U0126, suppressed the induction of pre-long-term potentiation. By contrast, these inhibitors did not affect the maintenance of pre-long-term potentiation. Using pharmacological inhibitors, we found that pre-long-term potentiation recorded for 1 h did not require transcriptional or translational processes. Our results strongly indicate that the activation of presynaptic extracellular signal-regulated kinase is required for the induction of pre-long-term potentiation, and this involvement may explain the contribution of extracellular signal-regulated kinase to mood disorders. PMID:27178245

  12. Follicle-stimulating Hormone Activates Extracellular Signal-regulated Kinase but Not Extracellular Signal-regulated Kinase Kinase through a 100-kDa Phosphotyrosine Phosphatase*

    PubMed Central

    Cottom, Joshua; Salvador, Lisa M.; Maizels, Evelyn T.; Reierstad, Scott; Park, Youngkyu; Carr, Daniel W.; Davare, Monika A.; Hell, Johannes W.; Palmer, Stephen S.; Dent, Paul; Kawakatsu, Hisaaki; Ogata, Masato; Hunzicker-Dunn, Mary

    2006-01-01

    In this report we sought to elucidate the mechanism by which the follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) receptor signals to promote activation of the p42/p44 extracellular signal-regulated protein kinases (ERKs) in granulosa cells. Results show that the ERK kinase MEK and upstream intermediates Raf-1, Ras, Src, and L-type Ca2+ channels are already partially activated in vehicle-treated cells and that FSH does not further activate them. This tonic stimulatory pathway appears to be restrained at the level of ERK by a 100-kDa phosphotyrosine phosphatase that associates with ERK in vehicle-treated cells and promotes dephosphorylation of its regulatory Tyr residue, resulting in ERK inactivation. FSH promotes the phosphorylation of this phosphotyrosine phosphatase and its dissociation from ERK, relieving ERK from inhibition and resulting in its activation by the tonic stimulatory pathway and consequent translocation to the nucleus. Consistent with this premise, FSH-stimulated ERK activation is inhibited by the cell-permeable protein kinase A-specific inhibitor peptide Myr-PKI as well as by inhibitors of MEK, Src, a Ca2+ channel blocker, and chelation of extracellular Ca2+. These results suggest that FSH stimulates ERK activity in immature granulosa cells by relieving an inhibition imposed by a 100-kDa phosphotyrosine phosphatase. PMID:12493768

  13. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase is autonomous from the dominant extrasynaptic NMDA receptor extracellular signal-regulated kinase shutoff pathway.

    PubMed

    Mulholland, P J; Luong, N T; Woodward, J J; Chandler, L J

    2008-01-24

    NMDA receptors bidirectionally modulate extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) through the coupling of synaptic NMDA receptors to an ERK activation pathway that is opposed by a dominant ERK shutoff pathway thought to be coupled to extrasynaptic NMDA receptors. In the present study, synaptic NMDA receptor activation of ERK in rat cortical cultures was partially inhibited by the highly selective NR2B antagonist Ro25-6981 (Ro) and the less selective NR2A antagonist NVP-AAM077 (NVP). When Ro and NVP were added together, inhibition appeared additive and equal to that observed with the NMDA open-channel blocker MK-801. Consistent with a selective coupling of extrasynaptic NMDA receptors to the dominant ERK shutoff pathway, pre-block of synaptic NMDA receptors with MK-801 did not alter the inhibitory effect of bath-applied NMDA on ERK activity. Lastly, in contrast to a complete block of synaptic NMDA receptor activation of ERK by extrasynaptic NMDA receptors, activation of extrasynaptic NMDA receptors had no effect upon ERK activation by brain-derived neurotrophic factor. These results suggest that the synaptic NMDA receptor ERK activation pathway is coupled to both NR2A and NR2B containing receptors, and that the extrasynaptic NMDA receptor ERK inhibitory pathway is not a non-selective global ERK shutoff.

  14. Calcium-independent activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 by cyclic strain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ikeda, M.; Takei, T.; Mills, I.; Sumpio, B. E.

    1998-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated that cyclic strain induces extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) activation in endothelial cells (EC). The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of Ca2+ on the activation of ERK1/2. Bovine aortic EC were pretreated with a chelator of extracellular Ca2+, ethylaneglycol-bis(aminoethylether)-tetra-acetate (EGTA), a depleter of Ca2+ pools, 2,5-Di-(tert-butyl)-1,4-benzohydroquinone (BHQ), or a Ca2+ channel blocker, GdCl3, and subjected to an average 10 % strain at a rate of 60 cycles/min for 10 min. BHQ and GdCl3 did not inhibit the strain-induced ERK1/2 activation. Chelation of normal extracellular Ca2+ (1.8 mM) medium with EGTA (3 mM) acutely stimulated baseline phosphorylation and activation of ERK1/2, thereby obscuring any strain-induced activation of ERK1/2. However, in EC preincubated for 24 hours in Ca2+-free medium, elevated baseline phosphorylation was minimally activated by EGTA (200 microM) such that cyclic strain stimulated ERK1/2 in the presence or absence of BHQ. These results suggest a Ca2+ independence of the ERK1/2 signaling pathway by cyclic strain. Copyright 1998 Academic Press.

  15. Extracellular signal-regulated kinase phosphorylation in forebrain neurones contributes to osmoregulatory mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Dine, Julien; Ducourneau, Vincent R R; Fénelon, Valérie S; Fossat, Pascal; Amadio, Aurélie; Eder, Matthias; Israel, Jean-Marc; Oliet, Stéphane H R; Voisin, Daniel L

    2014-01-01

    Vasopressin secretion from the magnocellular neurosecretory cells (MNCs) is crucial for body fluid homeostasis. Osmotic regulation of MNC activity involves the concerted modulation of intrinsic mechanosensitive ion channels, taurine release from local astrocytes as well as excitatory inputs derived from osmosensitive forebrain regions. Extracellular signal-regulated protein kinases (ERK) are mitogen-activated protein kinases that transduce extracellular stimuli into intracellular post-translational and transcriptional responses, leading to changes in intrinsic neuronal properties and synaptic function. Here, we investigated whether ERK activation (i.e. phosphorylation) plays a role in the functioning of forebrain osmoregulatory networks. We found that within 10 min after intraperitoneal injections of hypertonic saline (3 m, 6 m) in rats, many phosphoERK-immunopositive neurones were observed in osmosensitive forebrain regions, including the MNC containing supraoptic nuclei. The intensity of ERK labelling was dose-dependent. Reciprocally, slow intragastric infusions of water that lower osmolality reduced basal ERK phosphorylation. In the supraoptic nucleus, ERK phosphorylation predominated in vasopressin neurones vs. oxytocin neurones and was absent from astrocytes. Western blot experiments confirmed that phosphoERK expression in the supraoptic nucleus was dose dependent. Intracerebroventricular administration of the ERK phosphorylation inhibitor U 0126 before a hyperosmotic challenge reduced the number of both phosphoERK-immunopositive neurones and Fos expressing neurones in osmosensitive forebrain regions. Blockade of ERK phosphorylation also reduced hypertonically induced depolarization and an increase in firing of the supraoptic MNCs recorded in vitro. It finally reduced hypertonically induced vasopressin release in the bloodstream. Altogether, these findings identify ERK phosphorylation as a new element contributing to the osmoregulatory mechanisms of

  16. Extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 activation in endothelial cells exposed to cyclic strain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ikeda, M.; Takei, T.; Mills, I.; Kito, H.; Sumpio, B. E.

    1999-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK1/ERK2) are activated and might play a role in enhanced proliferation and morphological change induced by strain. Bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC) were subjected to an average of 6 or 10% strain at a rate of 60 cycles/min for up to 4 h. Cyclic strain caused strain- and time-dependent phosphorylation and activation of ERK1/ERK2. Peak phosphorylation and activation of ERK1/ERK2 induced by 10% strain were at 10 min. A specific ERK1/ERK2 kinase inhibitor, PD-98059, inhibited phosphorylation and activation of ERK1/ERK2 but did not inhibit the increased cell proliferation and cell alignment induced by strain. Treatment of BAEC with 2,5-di-tert-butyl-1, 4-benzohydroquinone, to deplete inositol trisphosphate-sensitive calcium storage, and gadolinium chloride, a Ca2+ channel blocker, did not inhibit the activation of ERK1/ERK2. Strain-induced ERK1/ERK2 activation was partly inhibited by the protein kinase C inhibitor calphostin C and completely inhibited by the tyrosine kinase inhibitor genistein. These data suggest that 1) ERK1/ERK2 are not critically involved in the strain-induced cell proliferation and orientation, 2) strain-dependent activation of ERK1/ERK2 is independent of intracellular and extracellular calcium mobilization, and 3) protein kinase C activation and tyrosine kinase regulate strain-induced activation of ERK1/ERK2.

  17. Learned stressor resistance requires extracellular signal-regulated kinase in the prefrontal cortex

    PubMed Central

    Christianson, John P.; Flyer-Adams, Johanna G.; Drugan, Robert C.; Amat, Jose; Daut, Rachel A.; Foilb, Allison R.; Watkins, Linda R.; Maier, Steven F.

    2014-01-01

    Behaviorally controllable stressors confer protection from the neurochemical and behavioral consequences of future uncontrollable stressors, a phenomenon termed “behavioral immunization”. Recent data implicate protein synthesis within the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) as critical to behavioral immunization. Adult, male Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to a series of controllable tailshocks and 1 week later to uncontrollable tailshocks, followed 24 h later by social exploration and shuttlebox escape tests. To test the involvement of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) and the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) cascade in behavioral immunization, either D-AP5 or the MEK inhibitor U0126 was injected to the prelimbic (PL) or infralimbic (IL) mPFC prior to controllable stress exposure. Phosphorylated ERK and P70S6K, regulators of transcription and translation, were quantified by Western blot or immunohistochemistry after controllable or uncontrollable tailshocks. Prior controllable stress prevented the social exploration and shuttlebox performance deficits caused by the later uncontrollable stressor, and this effect was blocked by injections of D-AP5 into mPFC. A significant increase in phosphorylated ERK1 and ERK2, but not P70S6K, occurred within the PL and IL in rats exposed to controllable stress, but not to uncontrollable stress. However, U0126 only prevented behavioral immunization when injected to the PL. We provide evidence that NMDAR and ERK dependent signaling within the PL region is required for behavioral immunization, a learned form of stressor resistance. PMID:25324750

  18. Sex differences in fear extinction and involvements of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK).

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Shingo; Matsuzawa, Daisuke; Ishii, Daisuke; Tomizawa, Haruna; Sutoh, Chihiro; Shimizu, Eiji

    2015-09-01

    Stress-related disorders, such as post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and panic disorders, are disproportionately prevalent in females. However, the biological mechanism underlying these sex differences in the prevalence rate remains unclear. In the present study, we examined sex differences in fear memory, fear extinction, and spontaneous recovery of fear. We investigated the presence of sex differences in recent and remote fear memory in mice using contextual fear conditioning, as well as sex differences in spontaneous recovery of fear memory using a consecutive fear extinction paradigm. We examined the number of fear extinction days required to prevent spontaneous recovery of fear in either sex. We investigated whether ovariectomy affected fear extinction and spontaneous recovery. We also measured the activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1 and 2 in the dorsal hippocampus and the medial prefrontal cortex following fear extinction sessions. In our results, we found no sex difference in recent or remote fear memory. However, females required more fear extinction sessions compared to males to prevent spontaneous recovery. Within-extinction freezing also differed between males and females. Moreover, females required more extinction sessions than males to increase ERK2 phosphorylation in the dorsal hippocampus. Our data suggest that contextual fear extinction was unstable in females compared to males and that such sex differences may be related to the ERK2 phosphorylation in the hippocampus. PMID:26079214

  19. Lovastatin inhibits the extracellular-signal-regulated kinase pathway in immortalized rat brain neuroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Cerezo-Guisado, Maria Isabel; GarcíA-Román, Natalia; García-MaríN, Luis Jesús; Álvarez-Barrientos, Alberto; Bragado, Maria Julia; Lorenzo, Maria Jesús

    2006-01-01

    We have shown previously that lovastatin, a 3-hydroxy-3-methyl- glutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitor, induces apoptosis in spontaneously immortalized rat brain neuroblasts. In the present study, we analysed the intracellular signal transduction pathways by which lovastatin induces neuroblast apoptosis. We showed that lovastatin efficiently inhibited Ras activation, which was associ-ated with a significant decrease in ERK1/2 (extracellular-signal-regulated kinase 1/2) phosphorylation. Lovastatin also decreased CREB phosphorylation and CREB-mediated gene expression. The effects of lovastatin on the Ras/ERK1/2/CREB pathway were time- and concentration-dependent and fully prevented by meva-lonate. In addition, we showed that two MEK [MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase)/ERK kinase] inhibitors, PD98059 and PD184352, were poor inducers of apoptosis in serum-treated neuroblasts. However, these inhibitors significantly increased apop-tosis induced by lovastatin treatment. Furthermore, we showed that pharmacological inhibition of both MEK and phosphoinos-itide 3-kinase activities was able to induce neuroblast apoptosis with similar efficacy as lovastatin. Our results suggest that lovast-atin triggers neuroblast apoptosis by regulating several signalling pathways, including the Ras/ERK1/2 pathway. These findings might also contribute to elucidate the intracellular mechanisms involved in the central nervous system side effects associated with statin therapy. PMID:16952276

  20. Sex differences in fear extinction and involvements of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK).

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Shingo; Matsuzawa, Daisuke; Ishii, Daisuke; Tomizawa, Haruna; Sutoh, Chihiro; Shimizu, Eiji

    2015-09-01

    Stress-related disorders, such as post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and panic disorders, are disproportionately prevalent in females. However, the biological mechanism underlying these sex differences in the prevalence rate remains unclear. In the present study, we examined sex differences in fear memory, fear extinction, and spontaneous recovery of fear. We investigated the presence of sex differences in recent and remote fear memory in mice using contextual fear conditioning, as well as sex differences in spontaneous recovery of fear memory using a consecutive fear extinction paradigm. We examined the number of fear extinction days required to prevent spontaneous recovery of fear in either sex. We investigated whether ovariectomy affected fear extinction and spontaneous recovery. We also measured the activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1 and 2 in the dorsal hippocampus and the medial prefrontal cortex following fear extinction sessions. In our results, we found no sex difference in recent or remote fear memory. However, females required more fear extinction sessions compared to males to prevent spontaneous recovery. Within-extinction freezing also differed between males and females. Moreover, females required more extinction sessions than males to increase ERK2 phosphorylation in the dorsal hippocampus. Our data suggest that contextual fear extinction was unstable in females compared to males and that such sex differences may be related to the ERK2 phosphorylation in the hippocampus.

  1. Cadmium activates extracellular signal-regulated kinase 5 in HK-2 human renal proximal tubular cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kondo, Mio; Inamura, Hisako; Matsumura, Ken-ichi; Matsuoka, Masato

    2012-05-11

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cadmium exposure induces ERK5 phosphorylation in HK-2 renal proximal tubular cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer BIX02189 treatment suppresses cadmium-induced ERK5 but not ERK1/2 phosphorylation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer BIX02189 treatment suppresses cadmium-induced CREB and c-Fos phosphorylation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ERK5 activation by cadmium exposure may play an anti-apoptotic role in HK-2 cells. -- Abstract: We examined the effects of cadmium chloride (CdCl{sub 2}) exposure on the phosphorylation and functionality of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 5 (ERK5), a recently identified member of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) family, in HK-2 human renal proximal tubular cells. Following exposure to CdCl{sub 2}, ERK5 phosphorylation increased markedly, but the level of total ERK5 was unchanged. ERK5 phosphorylation following CdCl{sub 2} exposure was rapid and transient, similar to the time course of ERK1/2 phosphorylation. Treatment of HK-2 cells with the MAPK/ERK kinase 5 inhibitor, BIX02189, suppressed CdCl{sub 2}-induced ERK5 but not ERK1/2 phosphorylation. The CdCl{sub 2}-induced increase of phosphorylated cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) and activating transcription factor-1 (ATF-1), as well as the accumulation of mobility-shifted c-Fos protein, were suppressed by BIX02189 treatment. Furthermore, BIX02189 treatment enhanced cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase and increased the level of cytoplasmic nucleosomes in HK-2 cells exposed to CdCl{sub 2}. These findings suggest that ERK5 pathway activation by CdCl{sub 2} exposure might induce the phosphorylation of cell survival-transcription factors, such as CREB, ATF-1, and c-Fos, and may exert a partial anti-apoptotic role in HK-2 cells.

  2. Extracellular signal regulated kinase 5 mediates signals triggered by the novel tumor promoter palytoxin

    SciTech Connect

    Charlson, Aaron T.; Zeliadt, Nicholette A.; Wattenberg, Elizabeth V.

    2009-12-01

    Palytoxin is classified as a non-12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-type skin tumor because it does not bind to or activate protein kinase C. Palytoxin is thus a novel tool for investigating alternative signaling pathways that may affect carcinogenesis. We previously showed that palytoxin activates three major members of the mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) family, extracellular signal regulated kinase 1 and 2 (ERK1/2), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), and p38. Here we report that palytoxin also activates another MAPK family member, called ERK5, in HeLa cells and in keratinocytes derived from initiated mouse skin (308 cells). By contrast, TPA does not activate ERK5 in these cell lines. The major cell surface receptor for palytoxin is the Na+,K+-ATPase. Accordingly, ouabain blocked the ability of palytoxin to activate ERK5. Ouabain alone did not activate ERK5. ERK5 thus represents a divergence in the signaling pathways activated by these two agents that bind to the Na+,K+-ATPase. Cycloheximide, okadaic acid, and sodium orthovanadate did not mimic the effect of palytoxin on ERK5. These results indicate that the stimulation of ERK5 by palytoxin is not simply due to inhibition of protein synthesis or inhibition of serine/threonine or tyrosine phosphatases. Therefore, the mechanism by which palytoxin activates ERK5 differs from that by which it activates ERK1/2, JNK, and p38. Finally, studies that used pharmacological inhibitors and shRNA to block ERK5 action indicate that ERK5 contributes to palytoxin-stimulated c-Fos gene expression. These results suggest that ERK5 can act as an alternative mediator for transmitting diverse tumor promoter-stimulated signals.

  3. Caveolin-1 regulates shear stress-dependent activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, H.; Go, Y. M.; Darji, R.; Choi, J. W.; Lisanti, M. P.; Maland, M. C.; Jo, H.

    2000-01-01

    Fluid shear stress activates a member of the mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase family, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), by mechanisms dependent on cholesterol in the plasma membrane in bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC). Caveolae are microdomains of the plasma membrane that are enriched with cholesterol, caveolin, and signaling molecules. We hypothesized that caveolin-1 regulates shear activation of ERK. Because caveolin-1 is not exposed to the outside, cells were minimally permeabilized by Triton X-100 (0.01%) to deliver a neutralizing, polyclonal caveolin-1 antibody (pCav-1) inside the cells. pCav-1 then bound to caveolin-1 and inhibited shear activation of ERK but not c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase. Epitope mapping studies showed that pCav-1 binds to caveolin-1 at two regions (residues 1-21 and 61-101). When the recombinant proteins containing the epitopes fused to glutathione-S-transferase (GST-Cav(1-21) or GST-Cav(61-101)) were preincubated with pCav-1, only GST-Cav(61-101) reversed the inhibitory effect of the antibody on shear activation of ERK. Other antibodies, including m2234, which binds to caveolin-1 residues 1-21, had no effect on shear activation of ERK. Caveolin-1 residues 61-101 contain the scaffolding and oligomerization domains, suggesting that binding of pCav-1 to these regions likely disrupts the clustering of caveolin-1 or its interaction with signaling molecules involved in the shear-sensitive ERK pathway. We suggest that caveolae-like domains play a critical role in the mechanosensing and/or mechanosignal transduction of the ERK pathway.

  4. The role of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase signaling pathway in mood modulation.

    PubMed

    Einat, Haim; Yuan, Peixiong; Gould, Todd D; Li, Jianling; Du, JianHua; Zhang, Lei; Manji, Husseini K; Chen, Guang

    2003-08-13

    The neurobiological underpinnings of mood modulation, molecular pathophysiology of manic-depressive illness, and therapeutic mechanism of mood stabilizers are largely unknown. The extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathway is activated by neurotrophins and other neuroactive chemicals to produce their effects on neuronal differentiation, survival, regeneration, and structural and functional plasticity. We found that lithium and valproate, commonly used mood stabilizers for the treatment of manic-depressive illness, stimulated the ERK pathway in the rat hippocampus and frontal cortex. Both drugs increased the levels of activated phospho-ERK44/42, activated phospho-ribosomal protein S6 kinase-1 (RSK1) (a substrate of ERK), phospho-CREB (cAMP response element-binding protein) and phospho-B cell lymphoma protein-2 antagonist of cell death (substrates of RSK), and BDNF. Inhibiting the ERK pathway with the blood-brain barrier-penetrating mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAP kinase)/ERK kinase (MEK) kinase inhibitor SL327, but not with the nonblood-brain barrier-penetrating MEK inhibitor U0126, decreased immobility time and increased swimming time of rats in the forced-swim test. SL327, but not U0126, also increased locomotion time and distance traveled in a large open field. The behavioral changes in the open field were prevented with chronic lithium pretreatment. SL327-induced behavioral changes are qualitatively similar to the changes induced by amphetamine, a compound that induces relapse in remitted manic patients and mood elevation in normal subjects. These data suggest that the ERK pathway may mediate the antimanic effects of mood stabilizers.

  5. Involvement of Extracellular Signal Regulated Kinases in Traumatic Brain Injury-Induced Depression in Rodents

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Jinn-Rung; Cheng, Yi-Hsuan; Chen, Yi-Shion

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is the most common cause of death and acquired disability among children and young adults in the developed countries. In clinical studies, the incidence of depression is high after TBI, and the mechanisms behind TBI-induced depression remain unclear. In the present study, we subjected rats to a moderate fluid percussion into the closed cranial cavity to induce TBI. After 3 days of recovery, injured rats were given a forced swim test (FST) and novelty-suppressed feeding tests. We found that TBI rats exhibited increased duration of immobility and longer latency to begin chewing food in a new environment compared with sham-operated rats. Western blot analysis showed that TBI led to a decrease in the phosphorylated levels of extracellular signal regulated kinases (ERK1/2) and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK). Fluoxetine, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI), significantly reduced the duration of immobility when administered once per day for 14 days. Consistent with behavioral tests, fluoxetine treatment reversed TBI-induced decrease in p-ERK1/2 and p-p38 MAPK levels. Pre-treatment with a selective tryptophan hydroxylase inhibitor para-chlorophenylalanine (PCPA) blocked the antidepressant effect of fluoxetine. PCPA also prevented the effect of fluoxetine on ERK1/2 phosphorylation without affecting p38 MAPK phosphorylation. Pre-treatment with ERK inhibitor SL327 but not p38 MAPK inhibitor SB203580 prevented the antidepressant effect of fluoxetine. These results suggest that ERK1/2 plays a critical role in TBI-induced depression. PMID:23360216

  6. Extracellular Signal-Regulated Kinase-2 within the Ventral Tegmental Area Regulates Responses to Stress

    PubMed Central

    Iñiguez, Sergio D.; Vialou, Vincent; Warren, Brandon L.; Cao, Jun-Li; Alcantara, Lyonna F.; Davis, Lindsey C.; Manojlovic, Zarko; Neve, Rachael L.; Russo, Scott J.; Han, Ming-Hu; Nestler, Eric J.; Bolaños-Guzmán, Carlos A.

    2010-01-01

    Neurotrophic factors and their signaling pathways have been implicated in the neurobiological adaptations in response to stress and the regulation of mood-related behaviors. A candidate signaling molecule implicated in mediating these cellular responses is the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/2), although its functional role in mood regulation remains to be fully elucidated. Here we show that acute (1 d) or chronic (4 weeks) exposure to unpredictable stress increases phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and of two downstream targets (ribosomal S6 kinase and mitogen- and stress-activated protein kinase 1) within the ventral tegmental area (VTA), an important substrate for motivated behavior and mood regulation. Using herpes simplex virus-mediated gene transfer to assess the functional significance of this ERK induction, we show that overexpressing ERK2 within the VTA increases susceptibility to stress as measured in the forced swim test, responses to unconditioned nociceptive stimuli, and elevated plus maze in Sprague Dawley male rats, and in the tail suspension test and chronic social defeat stress procedure in C57BL/6 male mice. In contrast, blocking ERK2 activity in the VTA produces stress-resistant behavioral responses in these same assays and also blocks a chronic stress-induced reduction in sucrose preference. The effects induced by ERK2 blockade were accompanied by decreases in the firing frequency of VTA dopamine neurons, an important electrophysiological hallmark of resilient-like behavior. Together, these results strongly implicate a role for ERK2 signaling in the VTA as a key modulator of responsiveness to stress and mood-related behaviors. PMID:20519540

  7. Inhibition of protein kinase Akt1 by apoptosis signal-regulating kinase-1 (ASK1) is involved in apoptotic inhibition of regulatory volume increase.

    PubMed

    Subramanyam, Muthangi; Takahashi, Nobuyuki; Hasegawa, Yuichi; Mohri, Tatsuma; Okada, Yasunobu

    2010-02-26

    Most animal cell types regulate their cell volume after an osmotic volume change. The regulatory volume increase (RVI) occurs through uptake of NaCl and osmotically obliged water after osmotic shrinkage. However, apoptotic cells undergo persistent cell shrinkage without showing signs of RVI. Persistence of the apoptotic volume decrease is a prerequisite to apoptosis induction. We previously demonstrated that volume regulation is inhibited in human epithelial HeLa cells stimulated with the apoptosis inducer. Here, we studied signaling mechanisms underlying the apoptotic inhibition of RVI in HeLa cells. Hypertonic stimulation was found to induce phosphorylation of a Ser/Thr protein kinase Akt (protein kinase B). Shrinkage-induced Akt activation was essential for RVI induction because RVI was suppressed by an Akt inhibitor, expression of a dominant negative form of Akt, or small interfering RNA-mediated knockdown of Akt1 (but not Akt2). Staurosporine, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, or a Fas ligand inhibited both RVI and hypertonicity-induced Akt activation in a manner sensitive to a scavenger for reactive oxygen species (ROS). Any of apoptosis inducers also induced phosphorylation of apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 (ASK1) in a ROS-dependent manner. Suppression of (ASK1) expression blocked the effects of apoptosis, in hypertonic conditions, on both RVI induction and Akt activation. Thus, it is concluded that in human epithelial cells, shrinkage-induced activation of Akt1 is involved in the RVI process and that apoptotic inhibition of RVI is caused by inhibition of Akt activation, which results from ROS-mediated activation of ASK1. PMID:20048146

  8. Analysis of AKT and ERK1/2 protein kinases in extracellular vesicles isolated from blood of patients with cancer

    PubMed Central

    van der Mijn, Johannes C.; Sol, Nik; Mellema, Wouter; Jimenez, Connie R.; Piersma, Sander R.; Dekker, Henk; Schutte, Lisette M.; Smit, Egbert F.; Broxterman, Henk J.; Skog, Johan; Tannous, Bakhos A.; Wurdinger, Thomas; Verheul, Henk M. W.

    2014-01-01

    Background Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are small nanometre-sized vesicles that are circulating in blood. They are released by multiple cells, including tumour cells. We hypothesized that circulating EVs contain protein kinases that may be assessed as biomarkers during treatment with tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Methods EVs released by U87 glioma cells, H3255 and H1650 non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells were profiled by tandem mass spectrometry. Total AKT/protein kinase B and extracellular signal regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) levels as well as their relative phosphorylation were measured by western blot in isogenic U87 cells with or without mutant epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFRvIII) and their corresponding EVs. To assess biomarker potential, plasma samples from 24 healthy volunteers and 42 patients with cancer were used. Results In total, 130 different protein kinases were found to be released in EVs including multiple drug targets, such as mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), AKT, ERK1/2, AXL and EGFR. Overexpression of EGFRvIII in U87 cells results in increased phosphorylation of EGFR, AKT and ERK1/2 in cells and EVs, whereas a decreased phosphorylation was noted upon treatment with the EGFR inhibitor erlotinib. EV samples derived from patients with cancer contained significantly more protein (p=0.0067) compared to healthy donors. Phosphorylation of AKT and ERK1/2 in plasma EVs from both healthy donors and patients with cancer was relatively low compared to levels in cancer cells. Preliminary analysis of total AKT and ERK1/2 levels in plasma EVs from patients with NSCLC before and after sorafenib/metformin treatment (n=12) shows a significant decrease in AKT levels among patients with a favourable treatment response (p<0.005). Conclusion Phosphorylation of protein kinases in EVs reflects their phosphorylation in tumour cells. Total AKT protein levels may allow monitoring of kinase inhibitor responses in patients with cancer. PMID:25491250

  9. Extracellular Signal-Regulated Kinase Is a Direct Target of the Anti-Inflammatory Compound Amentoflavone Derived from Torreya nucifera

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Jueun; Rho, Ho Sik; Yang, Yanyan; Yoon, Ju Young; Lee, Jongsung; Hong, Yong Deog; Kim, Hyeon Chung; Choi, Sun Shim; Kim, Tae Woong; Shin, Song Seok; Cho, Jae Youl

    2013-01-01

    Amentoflavone is a biflavonoid compound with antioxidant, anticancer, antibacterial, antiviral, anti-inflammatory, and UV-blocking activities that can be isolated from Torreya nucifera, Biophytum sensitivum, and Selaginella tamariscina. In this study, the molecular mechanism underlying amentoflavone's anti-inflammatory activity was investigated. Amentoflavone dose dependently suppressed the production of nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) in RAW264.7 cells stimulated with the TLR4 ligand lipopolysaccharide (LPS; derived from Gram-negative bacteria). Amentoflavone suppressed the nuclear translocation of c-Fos, a subunit of activator protein (AP)-1, at 60 min after LPS stimulation and inhibited the activity of purified and immunoprecipitated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), which mediates c-Fos translocation. In agreement with these results, amentoflavone also suppressed the formation of a molecular complex including ERK and c-Fos. Therefore, our data strongly suggest that amentoflavone's immunopharmacological activities are due to its direct effect on ERK. PMID:23970815

  10. Involvement of Extracellular Signal-Regulated Kinase 5 in Kinin B1 Receptor Upregulation in Isolated Human Umbilical Veins.

    PubMed

    Kilstein, Yael; Nowak, Wanda; Errasti, Andrea Emilse; Feás, Antía Andrea Barcia; Armesto, Arnaldo Raúl; Pelorosso, Facundo Germán; Rothlin, Rodolfo Pedro

    2016-04-01

    The upregulated kinin B1 receptors exert a pivotal role in modulating inflammatory processes. In isolated human umbilical veins (HUVs), kinin B1 receptor is upregulated as a function of in vitro incubation time and proinflammatory stimuli. The aim of this study was to evaluate, using functional and biochemical methods, the involvement of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 5 (ERK5), p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) on the kinin B1 receptor upregulation process in HUV. Real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis revealed for the first time that kinin B1 receptor mRNA expression closely parallels the functional sensitization to kinin B1 receptor selective agonist des-Arg(10)-kallidin (DAKD) in HUV. Moreover, the selective inhibition of ERK5, p38 MAPK, and JNK, but not ERK1/2, produced a dose-dependent rightward shift of the concentration-response curves to DAKD after 5-hour incubation and a reduction in kinin B1 receptor mRNA expression. Biochemical analyses showed that ERK5, p38 MAPK, and JNK phosphorylation is maximal during the first 2 hours postisolation, followed by a significant reduction in the last 3 hours. None of the treatments modified the responses to serotonin, an unrelated agonist, suggesting a specific effect on kinin B1 receptor upregulation. The present work provides for the first time pharmacologic evidence indicating that ERK5 plays a significant role on kinin B1 receptor upregulation. Furthermore, we confirm the relevance of p38 MAPK and JNK as well as the lack of effect of ERK1/2 in this process. This study may contribute to a better understanding of MAPK involvement in inflammatory and immunologic diseases.

  11. Extracellular Signal-Regulated Kinase Activates Topoisomerase IIα through a Mechanism Independent of Phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Shapiro, Paul S.; Whalen, Anne M.; Tolwinski, Nicholas S.; Wilsbacher, Julie; Froelich-Ammon, Stacie J.; Garcia, Marileila; Osheroff, Neil; Ahn, Natalie G.

    1999-01-01

    The mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases, extracellular signal-related kinase 1 (ERK1) and ERK2, regulate cellular responses by mediating extracellular growth signals toward cytoplasmic and nuclear targets. A potential target for ERK is topoisomerase IIα, which becomes highly phosphorylated during mitosis and is required for several aspects of nucleic acid metabolism, including chromosome condensation and daughter chromosome separation. In this study, we demonstrated interactions between ERK2 and topoisomerase IIα proteins by coimmunoprecipitation from mixtures of purified enzymes and from nuclear extracts. In vitro, diphosphorylated active ERK2 phosphorylated topoisomerase IIα and enhanced its specific activity by sevenfold, as measured by DNA relaxation assays, whereas unphosphorylated ERK2 had no effect. However, activation of topoisomerase II was also observed with diphosphorylated inactive mutant ERK2, suggesting a mechanism of activation that depends on the phosphorylation state of ERK2 but not on its kinase activity. Nevertheless, activation of ERK by transient transfection of constitutively active mutant MAP kinase kinase 1 (MKK1) enhanced endogenous topoisomerase II activity by fourfold. Our findings indicate that ERK regulates topoisomerase IIα in vitro and in vivo, suggesting a potential target for the MKK/ERK pathway in the modulation of chromatin reorganization events during mitosis and in other phases of the cell cycle. PMID:10207078

  12. Albumin-induced apoptosis of glomerular parietal epithelial cells is modulated by extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2

    PubMed Central

    Ohse, Takamoto; Krofft, Ron D.; Wu, Jimmy S.; Eddy, Allison A.; Pippin, Jeffrey W.; Shankland, Stuart J.

    2012-01-01

    Background. The biological role(s) of glomerular parietal epithelial cells (PECs) is not fully understood in health or disease. Given its location, PECs are constantly exposed to low levels of filtered albumin, which is increased in nephrotic states. We tested the hypothesis that PECs internalize albumin and increased uptake results in apoptosis. Methods. Confocal microscopy of immunofluorescent staining and immunohistochemistry were used to demonstrate albumin internalization in PECs and to quantitate albumin uptake in normal mice and rats as well as experimental models of membranous nephropathy, minimal change disease/focal segmental glomerulosclerosis and protein overload nephropathy. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis was performed on immortalized cultured PECs exposed to fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-labeled albumin in the presence of an endosomal inhibitor or vehicle. Apoptosis was measured by Hoechst staining in cultured PECs exposed to bovine serum albumin. Levels of phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 and 2 (p-ERK1/2) were restored by retroviral infection of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MEK) 1/2 and reduced by U0126 in PECs exposed to high albumin levels in culture and apoptosis measured by Hoechst staining. Results. PECs internalized albumin normally, and this was markedly increased in all of the experimental disease models (P < 0.05 versus controls). Cultured immortalized PECs also internalize FITC-labeled albumin, which was reduced by endosomal inhibition. A consequence of increased albumin internalization was PEC apoptosis in vitro and in vivo. Candidate signaling pathways underlying these events were examined. Data showed markedly reduced levels of phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) in PECs exposed to high albumin levels in nephropathy and in culture. A role for ERK1/2 in limiting albumin-induced apoptosis was shown by restoring p-ERK1/2 by retroviral infection, which reduced

  13. Antimelanogenic effect of ginsenoside Rg3 through extracellular signal-regulated kinase-mediated inhibition of microphthalmia-associated transcription factor

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung Jae; Lee, Woo Jin; Chang, Sung Eun; Lee, Ga-Young

    2015-01-01

    Background Panax ginseng has been used to prolong longevity and is believed to be useful for improving skin complexion. Ginsenosides are the most active components isolated from ginseng, and ginsenoside Rg3 (G-Rg3) in particular has been demonstrated to possess antioxidative, antitumorigenic, and anti-inflammatory properties. The aim of this study was to examine the ability of G-Rg3 to inhibit melanogenesis. Methods The effects of G-Rg3 on melanin contents and the protein levels of tyrosinase, microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF), and tyrosinase-related protein 1 (TRP1) were evaluated. Melanogenesis-regulating signaling molecules such as Akt and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) were also examined to explore G-Rg3-induced antimelanogenic mechanisms. Results G-Rg3 was found to significantly inhibit the synthesis of melanin in normal human epidermal melanocytes and B16F10 cells in a dose-dependent manner. The activity of cellular tyrosinase and the expression of MITF, tyrosinase, and TRP1 were all reduced, whereas ERK was strongly activated. PD98059 (a specific inhibitor of ERK) attenuated the G-Rg3-induced inhibition of melanin synthesis and tyrosinase activity. Conclusion Taken together, these results showed that G-Rg3 induces the activation of ERK, which accounts for its antimelanogenic effects. G-Rg3 may be a promising safe skin-whitening agent, adding to the long list of uses of P. ginseng for the enhancement of skin beauty. PMID:26199555

  14. Dopamine D1 Receptors Regulate Protein Synthesis-Dependent Long-Term Recognition Memory via Extracellular Signal-Regulated Kinase 1/2 in the Prefrontal Cortex

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nagai, Taku; Takuma, Kazuhiro; Kamei, Hiroyuki; Ito, Yukio; Nakamichi, Noritaka; Ibi, Daisuke; Nakanishi, Yutaka; Murai, Masaaki; Mizoguchi, Hiroyuki; Nabeshima, Toshitaka; Yamada, Kiyofumi

    2007-01-01

    Several lines of evidence suggest that extracellular signal-regulated kinase1/2 (ERK1/2) and dopaminergic system is involved in learning and memory. However, it remains to be determined if the dopaminergic system and ERK1/2 pathway contribute to cognitive function in the prefrontal cortex (PFC). The amount of phosphorylated ERK1/2 was increased in…

  15. Akt-mTORC1 signaling regulates Acly to integrate metabolic input to control of macrophage activation

    PubMed Central

    Covarrubias, Anthony J; Aksoylar, Halil Ibrahim; Yu, Jiujiu; Snyder, Nathaniel W; Worth, Andrew J; Iyer, Shankar S; Wang, Jiawei; Ben-Sahra, Issam; Byles, Vanessa; Polynne-Stapornkul, Tiffany; Espinosa, Erika C; Lamming, Dudley; Manning, Brendan D; Zhang, Yijing; Blair, Ian A; Horng, Tiffany

    2016-01-01

    Macrophage activation/polarization to distinct functional states is critically supported by metabolic shifts. How polarizing signals coordinate metabolic and functional reprogramming, and the potential implications for control of macrophage activation, remains poorly understood. Here we show that IL-4 signaling co-opts the Akt-mTORC1 pathway to regulate Acly, a key enzyme in Ac-CoA synthesis, leading to increased histone acetylation and M2 gene induction. Only a subset of M2 genes is controlled in this way, including those regulating cellular proliferation and chemokine production. Moreover, metabolic signals impinge on the Akt-mTORC1 axis for such control of M2 activation. We propose that Akt-mTORC1 signaling calibrates metabolic state to energetically demanding aspects of M2 activation, which may define a new role for metabolism in supporting macrophage activation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.11612.001 PMID:26894960

  16. Extracellular signal regulated kinase and GEF-H1 mediate depolarization-induced Rho activation and paracellular permeability increase

    PubMed Central

    Waheed, Faiza; Speight, Pam; Kawai, Glenn; Dan, Qinghong; Kapus, András; Szászi, Katalin

    2011-01-01

    Plasma membrane depolarization activates the Rho/Rho kinase (ROK) pathway and thereby enhances myosin light chain (MLC) phosphorylation, which in turn is thought to be a key regulator of paracellular permeability. However, the upstream mechanisms that couple depolarization to Rho activation and permeability changes are unknown. Here we show that three different depolarizing stimuli (high extracellular [K+], the lipophilic cation tetraphenylphosphonium or L-alanine, which is taken up by electrogenic Na+-cotransport) all provoke robust phosphorylation of Extracellular Signal Regulated Kinase (ERK) in LLC-PK1 and MDCK cells. Importantly, inhibition of ERK prevented the depolarization-induced activation of Rho. Searching for the underlying mechanism, we have identified GEF-H1 as the ERK-regulated critical exchange factor, responsible for the depolarization-induced Rho activation. This conclusion is based on our findings that a) depolarization activated GEF-H1, but not p115RhoGEF; b) siRNA-mediated GEF-H1 silencing eliminated the activation of the Rho pathway; c) ERK inhibition prevented the activation of GEF-H1. Moreover, we found that the Na+/K+ pump inhibitor ouabain also caused ERK, GEF-H1 and Rho activation, partially due to its depolarizing effect. Regarding functional consequences of this newly identified pathway, we found that depolarization increased paracellular permeability in LLC-PK1 and MDCK cells, and this effect was mitigated by inhibiting myosin using blebbistatin or a dominant negative (phosphorylation-incompetent) MLC. Taken together, we propose, that the ERK/GEF-H1/Rho/ROK/pMLC pathway could be a central mechanism whereby electrogenic transmembrane transport processes control myosin phosphorylation and regulate paracellular transport in the tubular epithelium. PMID:20237148

  17. 6-demethoxynobiletin, a nobiletin-analog citrus flavonoid, enhances extracellular signal-regulated kinase phosphorylation in PC12D cells.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Junko; Nemoto, Kiyomitsu; Yokosuka, Akihito; Mimaki, Yoshihiro; Degawa, Masakuni; Ohizumi, Yasushi

    2013-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that nobiletin, a polymethoxylated flavone isolated from citrus peels, has the potential to improve cognitive dysfunction in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). Recent studies suggest that the generation of intraneuronal amyloid-beta (Aβ) oligomers is an early event in the pathogenesis of AD. Aβ oligomers cause deficits in the regulation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signaling which is critical for consolidation of the memory. Our previous studies revealed that nobiletin activated ERK signaling and subsequent cyclic AMP response element-dependent transcription. In this study, the effects of five nobiletin analogs, 6-demethoxynobiletin, tangeretin, 5-demethylnobiletin, sinensetin, and 6-demethoxytangeretin, isolated from citrus peels were assessed on ERK phosphorylation in PC12D cells, and the structure-activity relationships were examined. PC12D cells were treated with nobiletin or its analogs, and the cell extracts were analyzed by Western blotting using an antibody specific to phosphorylated ERK. 6-Demethoxynobiletin markedly enhanced ERK phosphorylation in a concentration-dependent manner. These results may be useful in developing drugs and functional foods using citrus peels for the treatment of dementia including AD.

  18. Extracellular Signal-Regulated Kinase 2-Dependent Phosphorylation Induces Cytoplasmic Localization and Degradation of p21Cip1▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Chae Young; Lee, Cheolju; Kwon, Ki-Sun

    2009-01-01

    p21Cip1 is an inhibitor of cell cycle progression that promotes G1-phase arrest by direct binding to cyclin-dependent kinase and proliferating cell nuclear antigen. Here we demonstrate that mitogenic stimuli, such as epidermal growth factor treatment and oncogenic Ras transformation, induce p21Cip1 downregulation at the posttranslational level. This downregulation requires the sustained activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 2 (ERK2), which directly interacts with and phosphorylates p21Cip1, promoting p21Cip1 nucleocytoplasmic translocation and ubiquitin-dependent degradation, thereby resulting in cell cycle progression. ERK1 is not likely involved in this process. Phosphopeptide analysis of in vitro ERK2-phosphorylated p21Cip1 revealed two phosphorylation sites, Thr57 and Ser130. Double mutation of these sites abolished ERK2-mediated p21Cip1 translocation and degradation, thereby impairing ERK2-dependent cell cycle progression at the G1/S transition. These results indicate that ERK2 activation transduces mitogenic signals, at least in part, by downregulating the cell cycle inhibitory protein p21Cip1. PMID:19364816

  19. Neuropeptide Y and extracellular signal-regulated kinase mediate injury-induced neuroregeneration in mouse olfactory epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Cuihong; Hegg, Colleen Cosgrove

    2011-01-01

    In the olfactory epithelium (OE), injury induces ATP release, and subsequent activation of P2 purinergic receptors by ATP promotes neuroregeneration by increasing basal progenitor cell proliferation. The molecular mechanisms underlying ATP-induced increases in OE neuroregeneration have not been established. In the present study, the roles of neuroproliferative factors neuropeptide Y (NPY) and fibroblast growth factor2 (FGF2), and p44/42 extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) on ATP-mediated increases of neuroregeneration in the OE were investigated. ATP increased basal progenitor cell proliferation in the OE via activation of P2 purinergic receptors in vitro and in vivo as monitored by incorporation of 5′-ethynyl-2′-deoxyuridine, a thymidine analog, into DNA, and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) protein levels. ATP induced p44/42 ERK activation in globose basal cells (GBC) but not horizontal basal cells (HBC). ATP differentially regulated p44/42 ERK over time in the OE both in vitro and in vivo with transient inhibition (5–15 min) followed by activation (30 min – 1 hr) of p44/42 ERK. In addition, ATP indirectly activated p44/42 ERK in the OE via ATP-induced NPY release and subsequent activation of NPY Y1 receptors in the basal cells. There were no synergistic effects of ATP and NPY or FGF2 on OE neuroregeneration. These data clearly have implications for the pharmacological modulation of neuroregeneration in the olfactory epithelium. PMID:22154958

  20. Protein Kinase C and Extracellular Signal-Regulated Kinase Regulate Movement, Attachment, Pairing and Egg Release in Schistosoma mansoni

    PubMed Central

    Ressurreição, Margarida; De Saram, Paulu; Kirk, Ruth S.; Rollinson, David; Emery, Aidan M.; Page, Nigel M.; Davies, Angela J.; Walker, Anthony J.

    2014-01-01

    Protein kinases C (PKCs) and extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERKs) are evolutionary conserved cell signalling enzymes that coordinate cell function. Here we have employed biochemical approaches using ‘smart’ antibodies and functional screening to unravel the importance of these enzymes to Schistosoma mansoni physiology. Various PKC and ERK isotypes were detected, and were differentially phosphorylated (activated) throughout the various S. mansoni life stages, suggesting isotype-specific roles and differences in signalling complexity during parasite development. Functional kinase mapping in adult worms revealed that activated PKC and ERK were particularly associated with the adult male tegument, musculature and oesophagus and occasionally with the oesophageal gland; other structures possessing detectable activated PKC and/or ERK included the Mehlis' gland, ootype, lumen of the vitellaria, seminal receptacle and excretory ducts. Pharmacological modulation of PKC and ERK activity in adult worms using GF109203X, U0126, or PMA, resulted in significant physiological disturbance commensurate with these proteins occupying a central position in signalling pathways associated with schistosome muscular activity, neuromuscular coordination, reproductive function, attachment and pairing. Increased activation of ERK and PKC was also detected in worms following praziquantel treatment, with increased signalling associated with the tegument and excretory system and activated ERK localizing to previously unseen structures, including the cephalic ganglia. These findings support roles for PKC and ERK in S. mansoni homeostasis, and identify these kinase groups as potential targets for chemotherapeutic treatments against human schistosomiasis, a neglected tropical disease of enormous public health significance. PMID:24921927

  1. Proteomic and functional genomic landscape of receptor tyrosine kinase and ras to extracellular signal-regulated kinase signaling.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Adam A; Tucker, George; Singh, Rohit; Yan, Dong; Vinayagam, Arunachalam; Hu, Yanhui; Binari, Richard; Hong, Pengyu; Sun, Xiaoyun; Porto, Maura; Pacifico, Svetlana; Murali, Thilakam; Finley, Russell L; Asara, John M; Berger, Bonnie; Perrimon, Norbert

    2011-10-25

    Characterizing the extent and logic of signaling networks is essential to understanding specificity in such physiological and pathophysiological contexts as cell fate decisions and mechanisms of oncogenesis and resistance to chemotherapy. Cell-based RNA interference (RNAi) screens enable the inference of large numbers of genes that regulate signaling pathways, but these screens cannot provide network structure directly. We describe an integrated network around the canonical receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK)-Ras-extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signaling pathway, generated by combining parallel genome-wide RNAi screens with protein-protein interaction (PPI) mapping by tandem affinity purification-mass spectrometry. We found that only a small fraction of the total number of PPI or RNAi screen hits was isolated under all conditions tested and that most of these represented the known canonical pathway components, suggesting that much of the core canonical ERK pathway is known. Because most of the newly identified regulators are likely cell type- and RTK-specific, our analysis provides a resource for understanding how output through this clinically relevant pathway is regulated in different contexts. We report in vivo roles for several of the previously unknown regulators, including CG10289 and PpV, the Drosophila orthologs of two components of the serine/threonine-protein phosphatase 6 complex; the Drosophila ortholog of TepIV, a glycophosphatidylinositol-linked protein mutated in human cancers; CG6453, a noncatalytic subunit of glucosidase II; and Rtf1, a histone methyltransferase.

  2. Activation of the Extracellular Signal-Regulated Kinase Signaling Is Critical for Human Umbilical Cord Mesenchymal Stem Cell Osteogenic Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chen-Shuang; Zheng, Zhong; Su, Xiao-Xia; Wang, Fei; Ling, Michelle; Zou, Min; Zhou, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells (hUCMSCs) are recognized as candidate progenitor cells for bone regeneration. However, the mechanism of hUCMSC osteogenesis remains unclear. In this study, we revealed that mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) signaling is involved in hUCMSC osteogenic differentiation in vitro. Particularly, the activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNK) and p38 signaling pathways maintained a consistent level in hUCMSCs through the entire 21-day osteogenic differentiation period. At the same time, the activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK) signaling significantly increased from day 5, peaked at day 9, and declined thereafter. Moreover, gene profiling of osteogenic markers, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity measurement, and alizarin red staining demonstrated that the application of U0126, a specific inhibitor for ERK activation, completely prohibited hUCMSC osteogenic differentiation. However, when U0126 was removed from the culture at day 9, ERK activation and osteogenic differentiation of hUCMSCs were partially recovered. Together, these findings demonstrate that the activation of ERK signaling is essential for hUCMSC osteogenic differentiation, which points out the significance of ERK signaling pathway to regulate the osteogenic differentiation of hUCMSCs as an alternative cell source for bone tissue engineering. PMID:26989682

  3. Pleiotrophin promotes microglia proliferation and secretion of neurotrophic factors by activating extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 pathway.

    PubMed

    Miao, Jiayin; Ding, Minghui; Zhang, Aiwu; Xiao, Zijian; Qi, Weiwei; Luo, Ning; Di, Wei; Tao, Yuqian; Fang, Yannan

    2012-12-01

    Pleiotrophin (PTN) is an effective neuroprotective factor and its expression is strikingly increased in microglia after ischemia/reperfusion injury. However, whether PTN could provide neurotrophic support to neurons by regulating microglia function is not clear. In this study, we demonstrated that the expression of PTN was induced in microglia after oxygen-glucose deprivation/reperfusion. PTN promoted the proliferation of microglia by enhancing the G1 to S phase transition. PTN also stimulated the secretion of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) and nerve growth factor (NGF) in microglia, but did not upregulate the expression of proinflammatory factors such as TNF-α, IL-1β and iNOS. Mechanistically, we found that PTN increased the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2 in microglia in both concentration-dependent and time-dependent manners. In addition, ERK1/2 inhibitor U0126 abolished the proliferation and G1 to S phase transition of microglia stimulated by PTN, and inhibited the production of BDNF, CNTF and NGF induced by PTN. In conclusion, our results demonstrated that PTN-ERK1/2 pathway plays important role in regulating microglia growth and secretion of neurotrophic factors. These findings provide new insight into the neuroprotective role of PTN and suggest that PTN is a new target for therapeutic intervention of stroke.

  4. Glucagon receptor activates extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase 1/2 via cAMP-dependent protein kinase

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Youwei; Cypess, Aaron M.; Muse, Evan D.; Wu, Cui-Rong; Unson, Cecilia G.; Merrifield, R. B.; Sakmar, Thomas P.

    2001-01-01

    We prepared a stable cell line expressing the glucagon receptor to characterize the effect of Gs-coupled receptor stimulation on extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) activity. Glucagon treatment of the cell line caused a dose-dependent increase in cAMP concentration, activation of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA), and transient release of intracellular calcium. Glucagon treatment also caused rapid dose-dependent phosphorylation and activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase/ERK kinase (MEK1/2) and ERK1/2. Inhibition of either PKA or MEK1/2 blocked ERK1/2 activation by glucagon. However, no significant activation of several upstream activators of MEK, including Ras, Rap1, and Raf, was observed in response to glucagon treatment. In addition, chelation of intracellular calcium reduced glucagon-mediated ERK1/2 activation. In transient transfection experiments, glucagon receptor mutants that bound glucagon but failed to increase intracellular cAMP and calcium concentrations showed no glucagon-stimulated ERK1/2 phosphorylation. We conclude that glucagon-induced MEK1/2 and ERK1/2 activation is mediated by PKA and that an increase in intracellular calcium concentration is required for maximal ERK activation. PMID:11517300

  5. Homocysteine-NMDA receptor mediated activation of extracellular-signal regulated kinase leads to neuronal cell death

    PubMed Central

    Poddar, Ranjana; Paul, Surojit

    2009-01-01

    Hyper-homocysteinemia is an independent risk factor for stroke and neurological abnormalities. However the underlying cellular mechanisms by which elevated homocysteine can promote neuronal death is not clear. In the present study we have examined the role of NMDA receptor mediated activation of the extracellular-signal regulated mitogen activated protein (ERK MAP) kinase pathway in homocysteine-dependent neurotoxicity. The study demonstrates that in neurons L-homocysteine-induced cell death is mediated through activation of NMDA receptors. The study also shows that homocysteine-dependent NMDA receptor stimulation and resultant Ca2+ influx leads to rapid and sustained phosphorylation of ERK MAP kinase. Inhibition of ERK phosphorylation attenuates homocysteine mediated neuronal cell death thereby demonstrating that activation of ERK MAP kinase signaling pathway is an intermediate step that couples homocysteine mediated NMDA receptor stimulation to neuronal death. The findings also show that cAMP response-element binding protein (CREB), a pro-survival transcription factor and a downstream target of ERK, is only transiently activated following homocysteine exposure. The sustained activation of ERK but a transient activation of CREB together suggest that exposure to homocysteine initiates a feedback loop that shuts off CREB signaling without affecting ERK phosphorylation and thereby facilitates homocysteine mediated neurotoxicity. PMID:19508427

  6. The inactivation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase by glucagon-like peptide-1 contributes to neuroprotection against oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Shingo; Numakawa, Tadahiro; Adachi, Naoki; Yoon, Hyung Shin; Odaka, Haruki; Ooshima, Yoshiko; Kunugi, Hiroshi

    2016-03-11

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), an insulinotropic peptide secreted from enteroendocrine cells, has been known to have a neuroprotective effect. However, it is not fully understood the intracellular mediator of GLP-1 signaling in neuronal cells. In the present study, we examined the change in intracellular signaling of cortical neurons after GLP-1 application and luminal glucose stimulation in vitro and in vivo. GLP-1 receptor was highly expressed in cultured cortical neurons and brain tissues including the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus. The activation of GLP-1 receptor (5min) significantly decreased levels of phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (pERK), which is involved in neuronal cell survival and death, in cultured cortical neurons. Oral glucose administration also rapidly reduced pERK levels in the prefrontal cortex, while intraperitoneal glucose injection did not show such an effect. Further, GLP-1 attenuated hydrogen peroxide-induced cell death and hyperactivity of ERK in cultured cortical neurons. It is possible that increased GLP-1 by luminal glucose stimulation affects cortical system including the maintenance of neuronal cell survival. PMID:26827720

  7. Regulation of Autophagic Activation by Rta of Epstein-Barr Virus via the Extracellular Signal-Regulated Kinase Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lee-Wen; Wang, Wen-Hung; Chang, Pey-Jium; Chiu, Ya-Fang; Hung, Chen-Chia; Lin, Ying-Ju; Liou, Jieh-Yuan; Tsai, Wan-Ju; Hung, Chia-Ling

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Autophagy is an intracellular degradation pathway that provides a host defense mechanism against intracellular pathogens. However, many viruses exploit this mechanism to promote their replication. This study shows that lytic induction of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) increases the membrane-bound form of LC3 (LC3-II) and LC3-containing punctate structures in EBV-positive cells. Transfecting 293T cells with a plasmid that expresses Rta also induces autophagy, revealing that Rta is responsible for autophagic activation. The activation involves Atg5, a key component of autophagy, but not the mTOR pathway. The expression of Rta also activates the transcription of the genes that participate in the formation of autophagosomes, including LC3A, LC3B, and ATG9B genes, as well as those that are involved in the regulation of autophagy, including the genes TNF, IRGM, and TRAIL. Additionally, treatment with U0126 inhibits the Rta-induced autophagy and the expression of autophagy genes, indicating that the autophagic activation is caused by the activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signaling by Rta. Finally, the inhibition of autophagic activity by an autophagy inhibitor, 3-methyladenine, or Atg5 small interfering RNA, reduces the expression of EBV lytic proteins and the production of viral particles, revealing that autophagy is critical to EBV lytic progression. This investigation reveals how an EBV-encoded transcription factor promotes autophagy to affect viral lytic development. PMID:25122800

  8. NPNT is Expressed by Osteoblasts and Mediates Angiogenesis via the Activation of Extracellular Signal-regulated Kinase

    PubMed Central

    Kuek, Vincent; Yang, Zhifan; Chim, Shek Man; Zhu, Sipin; Xu, Huazi; Chow, Siu To; Tickner, Jennifer; Rosen, Vicki; Erber, Wendy; Li, Xiucheng; An, Qin; Qian, Yu; Xu, Jiake

    2016-01-01

    Angiogenesis plays an important role in bone development and remodeling and is mediated by a plethora of potential angiogenic factors. However, data regarding specific angiogenic factors that are secreted within the bone microenvironment to regulate osteoporosis is lacking. Here, we report that Nephronectin (NPNT), a member of the epidermal growth factor (EGF) repeat superfamily proteins and a homologue of EGFL6, is expressed in osteoblasts. Intriguingly, the gene expression of NPNT is reduced in the bone of C57BL/6J ovariectomised mice and in osteoporosis patients. In addition, the protein levels of NPNT and CD31 are also found to be reduced in the tibias of OVX mice. Exogenous addition of mouse recombinant NPNT on endothelial cells stimulates migration and tube-like structure formation in vitro. Furthermore, NPNT promotes angiogenesis in an ex vivo fetal mouse metatarsal angiogenesis assay. We show that NPNT stimulates the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) and p38 mitogen-activated kinase (MAPK) in endothelial cells. Inhibition of ERK1/2 impaired NPNT-induced endothelial cell migration, tube-like structure formation and angiogenesis. Taken together, these results demonstrate that NPNT is a paracrine angiogenic factor and may play a role in pathological osteoporosis. This may lead to new targets for treatment of bone diseases and injuries. PMID:27782206

  9. Induction of interleukin-8 by Naegleria fowleri lysates requires activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase in human astroglial cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jong-Hyun; Sohn, Hae-Jin; Lee, Sang-Hee; Kwon, Daeho; Shin, Ho-Joon

    2012-08-01

    Naegleria fowleri is a pathogenic free-living amoeba which causes primary amoebic meningoencephalitis in humans and experimental animals. To investigate the mechanisms of such inflammatory diseases, potential chemokine gene activation in human astroglial cells was investigated following treatment with N. fowleri lysates. We demonstrated that N. fowleri are potent inducers for the expression of interleukin-8 (IL-8) genes in human astroglial cells which was preceded by activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK). In addition, N. fowleri lysates induces the DNA binding activity of activator protein-1 (AP-1), an important transcription factor for IL-8 induction. The specific mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase/ERK inhibitor, U0126, blocks N. fowleri-mediated AP-1 activation and subsequent IL-8 induction. N. fowleri-induced IL-8 expression requires activation of ERK in human astroglial cells. These findings indicate that treatment of N. fowleri on human astroglial cells leads to the activation of AP-1 and subsequent expression of IL-8 which are dependent on ERK activation. These results may help understand the N. fowleri-mediated upregulation of chemokine and cytokine expression in the astroglial cells.

  10. Resting extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase 1/2 expression following a continuum of chronic resistance exercise training paradigms.

    PubMed

    Galpin, Andrew J; Fry, Andrew C; Nicoll, Justin X; Moore, Christopher A; Schilling, Brian K; Thomason, Donald B

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) moderates skeletal muscle growth; however, chronic responses of this protein to unique resistance exercise (RE) paradigms are yet to be explored. The purpose of this investigation was to describe the long-term response of ERK1/2 following circuit weight training (CWT), recreationally weight training (WT), powerlifting (PL) and weightlifting (WL). Independent t-tests were used to determine differences in trained groups compared to sedentary controls. Total ERK1/2 content was lower in PL and WL compared to their controls (p ≤ 0.05). Specific trained groups displayed large (WL: pERK/total-ERK; d = 1.25) and moderate (CWT: total ERK1/2; d = 0.54) effect sizes for altered kinase expression compared to controls. The results indicate ERK1/2 expression is down-regulated after chronic RE in well-trained weightlifters and powerlifters. Lower expression of this protein may be a method in which anabolism is tightly regulated after many years of high-intensity RE. PMID:27396416

  11. Porcine circovirus type 2 replication is impaired by inhibition of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signaling pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Wei Li; Liu Jue

    2009-03-30

    Postweaning multisystemic wasting syndrome, which is primarily caused by porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2), is an emerging and important swine disease. We have recently shown that PCV2 induces nuclear factor kappa B activation and its activation is required for active replication, but the other cellular factors involved in PCV2 replication are not well defined. The extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) which served as an important component of cellular signal transduction pathways has been shown to regulate many viral infections. In this report, we show that PCV2 activates ERK1/2 in PCV2-infected PK15 cells dependent on viral replication. The PCV2-induced ERK1/2 leads to phosphorylation of the ternary complex factor Elk-1, which kinetically paralleled ERK1/2 activation. Inhibition of ERK activation with U0126, a specific MEK1/2 inhibitor, significantly reduced viral progeny release. Investigations into the mechanism of ERK1/2 regulation revealed that inhibition of ERK activation leads to decreased viral transcription and lower virus protein expression. These data indicate that the ERK signaling pathway is involved in PCV2 infection and beneficial to PCV2 replication in the cultured cells.

  12. Inhibition of host extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) activation decreases new world alphavirus multiplication in infected cells

    SciTech Connect

    Voss, Kelsey; Amaya, Moushimi; Mueller, Claudius; Roberts, Brian; Kehn-Hall, Kylene; Bailey, Charles; Petricoin, Emanuel; Narayanan, Aarthi

    2014-11-15

    New World alphaviruses belonging to the family Togaviridae are classified as emerging infectious agents and Category B select agents. Our study is focused on the role of the host extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) in the infectious process of New World alphaviruses. Infection of human cells by Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV) results in the activation of the ERK-signaling cascade. Inhibition of ERK1/2 by the small molecule inhibitor Ag-126 results in inhibition of viral multiplication. Ag-126-mediated inhibition of VEEV was due to potential effects on early and late stages of the infectious process. While expression of viral proteins was down-regulated in Ag-126 treated cells, we did not observe any influence of Ag-126 on the nuclear distribution of capsid. Finally, Ag-126 exerted a broad-spectrum inhibitory effect on New World alphavirus multiplication, thus indicating that the host kinase, ERK, is a broad-spectrum candidate for development of novel therapeutics against New World alphaviruses. - Highlights: • VEEV infection activated multiple components of the ERK signaling cascade. • Inhibition of ERK activation using Ag-126 inhibited VEEV multiplication. • Activation of ERK by Ceramide C6 increased infectious titers of TC-83. • Ag-126 inhibited virulent strains of all New World alphaviruses. • Ag-126 treatment increased percent survival of infected cells.

  13. Stimulation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases and proliferation in the human gastric cancer cells KATO-III by obestatin.

    PubMed

    Pazos, Yolanda; Alvarez, Carlos J P; Camiña, Jesus P; Casanueva, Felipe F

    2007-12-01

    Obestatin, the ghrelin-associated peptide, activates cell proliferation in the gastric cancer cell line KATO-III. The results showed that this peptide induced cell proliferation by mitogen-activated kinase kinase/extracellular signal-regulated kinases1/2 (ERK1/2) phosphorylation. A sequential analysis of the obestatin transmembrane signalling pathway indicated that the ERK1/2 activity is partially blocked after preincubation of the cells with pertussis toxin, as well as by wortmannin (an inhibitor of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)), staurosporine (an inhibitor of protein kinase C (PKC)) and 4-amino-5-(4-chlorophenyl)-7-(t-butyl)pyrazolo[3,4-d]pyrimidine (PP2, which inhibits the non receptor tyrosine kinase Src). Upon administration of obestatin, the intracellular levels of phospho-PKCepsilon- and theta-isoenzymes rise with similar time-courses, from which PKCepsilon appears to be the responsible for ERK1/2 response. Based on the experimental data, a signalling pathway involving the consecutive activation of G(i), PI3K, novel PKCepsilon and Src for ERK1/2 activation is proposed. These results point to a functionally active peptide that regulates proliferation of the gastric cancer cells KATO-III. PMID:18365868

  14. c-Src regulates cell cycle proteins expression through protein kinase B/glycogen synthase kinase 3 beta and extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 pathways in MCF-7 cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiang; Du, Liying; Feng, Renqing

    2013-07-01

    We have demonstrated that c-Src suppression inhibited the epithelial to mesenchymal transition in human breast cancer cells. Here, we investigated the role of c-Src on the cell cycle progression using siRNAs and small molecule inhibitor 4-amino-5-(4-chlorophenyl)-7-(t-butyl)pyrazolo[3,4-d]pyrimidine (PP2). Western blot analysis demonstrated the down-regulation of cyclin D1 and cyclin E and up-regulation of p27 Kip1 after c-Src suppression by PP2. Incubation of cells in the presence of PP2 significantly blocked the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2), protein kinase B (AKT), and glycogen synthase kinase 3 beta (GSK3β). Specific pharmacological inhibitors of MEK1/2/ERK1/2 and phosphatidylinositide 3-kinase/AKT pathways were used to demonstrate the relationship between the signal cascade and cell cycle proteins expression. The expression of cyclin D1 and cyclin E were decreased after inhibition of ERK1/2 or AKT activity, whereas the p27 Kip1 expression was increased. In addition, knockdown of c-Src by siRNAs reduced cell proliferation and phosphorylation of ERK1/2, AKT, and GSK3β. After c-Src depletion by siRNAs, we observed significant down-regulation of cyclin D1 and cyclin E, and up-regulation of p27 Kip1. These results suggest that c-Src suppression by PP2 or siRNAs may regulate the progression of cell cycle through AKT/GSK3β and ERK1/2 pathways.

  15. Extracellular signal-regulated kinase and phosphoinositol-3 kinase mediate IGF-1 induced proliferation of fetal sheep cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Sundgren, Nathan C; Giraud, George D; Schultz, Jess M; Lasarev, Michael R; Stork, Philip J S; Thornburg, Kent L

    2003-12-01

    Growth of the fetal heart involves cardiomyocyte enlargement, division, and maturation. Insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) is implicated in many aspects of growth and is likely to be important in developmental heart growth. IGF-1 stimulates the IGF-1 receptor (IGF1R) and downstream signaling pathways, including extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and phosphoinositol-3 kinase (PI3K). We hypothesized that IGF-1 stimulates cardiomyocyte proliferation and enlargement through stimulation of the ERK cascade and stimulates cardiomyocyte differentiation through the PI3K cascade. In vivo administration of Long R3 IGF-1 (LR3 IGF-1) did not stimulate cardiomyocyte hypertrophy but led to a decreased percentage of cells that were binucleated in vivo. In culture, LR3 IGF-1 increased myocyte bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) uptake by three- to five-fold. The blockade of either ERK or PI3K signaling (by UO-126 or LY-294002, respectively) completely abolished BrdU uptake stimulated by LR3 IGF-1. LR3 IGF-1 did not increase footprint area, but as expected, phenylephrine stimulated an increase in binucleated cardiomyocyte size. We conclude that 1) IGF-1 through IGF1R stimulates cardiomyocyte division in vivo; hyperplastic growth is the most likely explanation of IGF-1 stimulated heart growth in vivo; 2) IGF-1 through IGF1R does not stimulate binucleation in vitro or in vivo; 3) IGF-1 through IGF1R does not stimulate hypertrophy either in vivo or in vitro; and 4) IGF-1 through IGF1R requires both ERK and PI3K signaling for proliferation of near-term fetal sheep cardiomyocytes in vitro. PMID:12947030

  16. Resveratrol upregulates Egr-1 expression and activity involving extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase and ternary complex factors

    SciTech Connect

    Rössler, Oliver G.; Glatzel, Daniel; Thiel, Gerald

    2015-03-01

    Many intracellular functions have been attributed to resveratrol, a polyphenolic phytoalexin found in grapes and in other plants. Here, we show that resveratrol induces the expression of the transcription factor Egr-1 in human embryonic kidney cells. Using a chromosomally embedded Egr-1-responsive reporter gene, we show that the Egr-1 activity was significantly elevated in resveratrol-treated cells, indicating that the newly synthesized Egr-1 protein was biologically active. Stimulus-transcription coupling leading to the resveratrol-induced upregulation of Egr-1 expression and activity requires the protein kinases Raf and extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase ERK, while MAP kinase phosphatase-1 functions as a nuclear shut-off device that interrupts the signaling cascade connecting resveratrol stimulation with enhanced Egr-1 expression. On the transcriptional level, Elk-1, a key transcriptional regulator of serum response element-driven gene transcription, connects the intracellular signaling cascade elicited by resveratrol with transcription of the Egr-1 gene. These data were corroborated by the observation that stimulation of the cells with resveratrol increased the transcriptional activation potential of Elk-1. The SRE as well as the GC-rich DNA binding site of Egr-1 function as resveratrol-responsive elements. Thus, resveratrol regulates gene transcription via activation of the stimulus-regulated protein kinases Raf and ERK and the stimulus-responsive transcription factors TCF and Egr-1. - Highlights: • The plant polyphenol resveratrol upregulates Egr-1 expression and activity. • The stimulation of Egr-1 requires the protein kinases ERK and Raf. • Resveratrol treatment upregulates the transcriptional activation potential of Elk-1. • Resveratrol-induced stimulation of Egr-1 requires ternary complex factors. • Two distinct resveratrol-responsive elements were identified.

  17. Effects of Chronic Sleep Deprivation on the Extracellular Signal-Regulated Kinase Pathway in the Temporomandibular Joint of Rats

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Peihuan; Wu, Longmei; Zhu, Guoxiong; Zhao, Huaqiang

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To examine the possible involvement and regulatory mechanisms of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathway in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) of rats subjected to chronic sleep deprivation (CSD). Methods Rats were subjected to CSD using the modified multiple platform method (MMPM). The serum levels of corticosterone (CORT) and adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) were tested and histomorphology and ultrastructure of the TMJ were observed. The ERK and phospho-ERK (p-ERK) expression levels were detected by Western blot analysis, and the MMP-1, MMP-3, and MMP-13 expression levels were detected by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and Western blotting. Results The elevated serum CORT and ACTH levels confirmed that the rats were under CSD stress. Hematoxylin and eosin (HE) staining and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) showed pathological alterations in the TMJ following CSD; furthermore, the p-ERK was activated and the mRNA and protein expression levels of MMP-1, MMP-3, and MMP-13 were upregulated after CSD. In the rats administered with the selective ERK inhibitor U0126, decreased tissue destruction was observed. Phospho-ERK activation was visibly blocked and the MMP-1, MMP-3, and MMP-13 mRNA and protein levels were lower than the corresponding levels in the CSD without U0126 group. Conclusion These findings indicate that CSD activates the ERK pathway and upregulates the MMP-1, MMP-3, and MMP-13 mRNA and protein levels in the TMJ of rats. Thus, CSD induces ERK pathway activation and causes pathological alterations in the TMJ. ERK may be associated with TMJ destruction by promoting the expression of MMPs. PMID:25226519

  18. Cue-elicited reward-seeking requires extracellular signal-regulated kinase activation in the nucleus accumbens.

    PubMed

    Shiflett, Michael W; Martini, Ross P; Mauna, Jocelyn C; Foster, Rebecca L; Peet, Eloise; Thiels, Edda

    2008-02-01

    The motivation to seek out rewards can come under the control of stimuli associated with reward delivery. The ability of cues to motivate reward-seeking behavior depends on the nucleus accumbens (NAcc). The molecular mechanisms in the NAcc that underlie the ability of a cue to motivate reward-seeking are not well understood. We examined whether extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), an important intracellular signaling pathway in learning and memory, has a role in these motivational processes. We first examined p42 ERK (ERK2) activation in the NAcc after rats were trained to associate an auditory stimulus with food delivery and found that, as a consequence of training, presentation of the auditory cue itself was sufficient to increase ERK2 activation in the NAcc. To examine whether inhibition of ERK in the NAcc prevents cue-induced reward-seeking, we infused an inhibitor of ERK, U0126, into the NAcc before assessing rats' instrumental responding in the presence versus absence of the conditioned cue. We found that, whereas vehicle-infused rats showed increased instrumental responding during cue presentation, rats infused with U0126 showed a profound impairment in cue-induced instrumental responding. In contrast, intra-NAcc U0126 infusion had no effect on rats' food-reinforced instrumental responding or their ability to execute conditioned approach behavior. Our results demonstrate learning-related changes in ERK signaling in the NAcc, and that disruption of ERK activation in this structure interferes with the incentive-motivational effects of conditioned stimuli. The molecular mechanisms described here may have implications for cue-elicited drug craving after repeated exposure to drugs of abuse.

  19. The noble gas argon modifies extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 signaling in neurons and glial cells.

    PubMed

    Fahlenkamp, Astrid V; Rossaint, Rolf; Haase, Hajo; Al Kassam, Hussam; Ryang, Yu-Mi; Beyer, Cordian; Coburn, Mark

    2012-01-15

    Recently, the noble gas argon has been identified as a potent neuroprotective agent, but little is known about its cellular effects. In this in vitro study, we investigated argon's influence on the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2, a ubiquitous enzyme with numerous functions in cell proliferation and survival. Primary neuronal and astroglial cell cultures and the microglial cell line BV-2 were exposed to 50 vol.% argon. Further possible effects were studied following stimulation of microglia with 50 ng/ml LPS. ERK 1/2 activation was assessed by phosphorylation state-specific western blotting, cytokine levels by real-time PCR and western blotting. Total phosphotyrosine phosphatase activity was examined with p-nitrophenylphosphate. After 30 min exposure, argon significantly activated ERK 1/2 signaling in microglia. Enhanced phosphorylation of ERK 1/2 was also found in astrocytes and neurons following argon exposure, but it lacked statistical significance. In microglia, argon did not substantially interfere with LPS-induced ERK1/2 activation and inflammatory cytokine induction. Addition of the MEK-Inhibitor U0126 abolished the induced ERK 1/2 phosphorylation. Cellular phosphatase activity and the inactivation of phosphorylated ERK 1/2 were not altered by argon. In conclusion, argon enhanced ERK 1/2 activity in microglia via the upstream kinase MEK, probably through a direct mode of activation. ERK 1/2 signaling in astrocytes and neurons in vitro was also influenced, although not with statistical significance. Whether ERK 1/2 activation by argon affects cellular functions like differentiation and survival in the brain in vivo will have to be determined in future experiments.

  20. Phosphorylation of Extracellular Signal-Regulated Kinase in medullary and upper cervical cord neurons following noxious tooth pulp stimulation.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Kohei; Asano, Masatake; Kitagawa, Junichi; Ogiso, Bunnai; Ren, Ke; Oki, Hidero; Matsumoto, Mitsuhiko; Iwata, Koichi

    2006-02-01

    The phosphorylated Extracellular Signal-regulated Kinase (pERK) and Fos expression and masticatory muscle activity were analyzed in rats with capsaicin-induced acute inflammation of the tooth pulp in order to clarify the role of the spinal trigeminal nucleus and upper cervical spinal cord in tooth pulp pain. Digastric and masseteric muscle activities were significantly increased following capsaicin injection into the molar tooth pulp but not after vehicle treatment. The pERK-like immunoreactive (LI) neurons were observed in the subnuclei interpolaris-caudalis transition (Vi/Vc) zone, the paratrigeminal nucleus (Pa5) and the superficial laminae of the caudal Vc/C2 zone. The pERK expression was detected as early as 2 min and peaked at 5 min after capsaicin or vehicle injection. The pERK expression in the Vi/Vc zone and Pa5 was bilateral, whereas it was predominantly ipsilateral in the caudal Vc/C2 zone. The capsaicin treatment of the whisker pad produced pERK expression in the rostro-caudal middle portion of the ipsilateral Vc, but small number of pERK-LI cells were observed after vehicle treatment. The pERK expression was similar in the Vi/Vc zone following capsaicin injection into the upper or lower molar tooth pulp, whereas the pERK expression was in the lateral portion of the caudal Vc/C2 zone after upper molar injection and restricted to the medial portion of the Vc/C2 zone after the lower molar capsaicin. These data were confirmed with Western blots. There were differences in the distribution of Fos protein-like immunoreactive (LI) cells and pERK-LI cells following tooth pulp stimulation. After capsaicin application into the upper molar tooth pulp, no pERK-LI cells were observed in the ventral part of the Vi/Vc zone, whereas many Fos protein-LI cells were expressed in this region. The difference in the distribution pattern of pERK- and Fos protein-LI cells in the Vi/Vc zone suggests their differential temporal expression profiles after capsaicin. The present

  1. Intracellular transactivation of epidermal growth factor receptor by α1A-adrenoceptor is mediated by phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase independently of activation of extracellular signal regulated kinases 1/2 and serine-threonine kinases in Chinese hamster ovary cells.

    PubMed

    Ulu, Nadir; Henning, Robert H; Guner, Sahika; Zoto, Teuta; Duman-Dalkilic, Basak; Duin, Marry; Gurdal, Hakan

    2013-10-01

    Transactivation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) by α1-adrenoceptor (α1-AR) is implicated in contraction and hypertrophy of vascular smooth muscle (VSM). We examine whether all α1-AR subtypes transactivate EGFR and explore the mechanism of transactivation. Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells stably expressing one subtype of α1-AR were transiently transfected with EGFR. The transactivation mechanism was examined both by coexpression of a chimeric erythropoietin (EPO)-EGFR with an extracellular EPO and intracellular EGFR domain, and by pharmacologic inhibition of external and internal signaling routes. All three α1-AR subtypes transactivated EGFR, which was dependent on the increase in intracellular calcium. The EGFR kinase inhibitor AG1478 [4-(3'-chloroanilino)-6,7-dimethoxyquinazoline] abrogated α1A-AR and α1D-AR induced phosphorylation of EGFR, but both the inhibition of matrix metalloproteinases by GM6001 [(R)-N4-hydroxy-N(1)-[(S)-2-(1H-indol-3-yl)-1-methylcarbamoyl-ethyl]-2-isobutyl-succinamide] or blockade of EGFR by cetuximab did not. Stimulation of α1A-AR and α1D-AR also induced phosphorylation of EPO-EGFR chimeric receptors. Moreover, α1A-AR stimulation enhanced phosphorylation of extracellular signal regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2 and serine-threonine kinases (Akt), which were both unaffected by AG1478, indicating that ERK1/2 and Akt phosphorylation is independent of EGFR transactivation. Accordingly, inhibitors of ERK1/2 or Akt did not influence the α1A-AR-mediated EGFR transactivation. Inhibition of calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CaMKII), phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K), and Src, however, did block EGFR transactivation by α1A-AR and α1D-AR. These findings demonstrate that all α1-AR subtypes transactivate EGFR, which is dependent on an intracellular signaling route involving an increase in calcium and activation of CaMKII, PI3K, and Src, but not the of ERK1/2 and Akt pathways.

  2. Leptin stimulates endothelin-1 expression via extracellular signal-regulated kinase by epidermal growth factor receptor transactivation in rat aortic smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Chao, Hung-Hsing; Hong, Hong-Jye; Liu, Ju-Chi; Lin, Jia-Wei; Chen, Yen-Ling; Chiu, Wen-Ta; Wu, Chieh-Hsi; Shyu, Kou-Gi; Cheng, Tzu-Hurng

    2007-11-14

    Obesity is a major risk factor for the development of hypertension. Recent studies have suggested that leptin, a 167-amino acid peptide hormone produced by white adipose tissue, is related to the pathogenesis of obesity-related hypertension. However, the signaling mechanisms underlying the effects of leptin remain to be extensively examined. In this study, we found that leptin induced extracellular signal-regulated kinase phosphorylation and endothelin-1 expression in rat aortic smooth muscle cells. Both PD98059 and U0126, inhibitors of the upstream activator of mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase, inhibited augmentation of endothelin-1 expression stimulated with leptin. Leptin induced significant tyrosine phosphorylation of epidermal growth factor receptor, which was significantly attenuated by two inhibitors, an epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor, AG1478, and a broad-spectrum matrix metalloproteinase inhibitor, GM6001. This indicates that the pathway of epidermal growth factor receptor transactivation induced by leptin is dependent on proteolytically released epidermal growth factor receptor ligands. Pretreatment of cells with AG1478 significantly reduced the degree of phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase and endothelin-1 expression. Our results reveal that epidermal growth factor receptor transactivation is involved in the leptin signaling pathway in vascular smooth muscle cells, which may be related to the increased risk of hypertension and other cardiovascular diseases in obese subjects. PMID:17678888

  3. Involvement of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/2)-p53-p21 axis in mediating neural stem/progenitor cell cycle arrest in co-morbid HIV-drug abuse exposure.

    PubMed

    Malik, Shaily; Saha, Rinki; Seth, Pankaj

    2014-06-01

    Neurological complications in opioid abusing Human Immunodeficiency Virus-1 (HIV-1) patients suggest enhanced neurodegeneration as compared to non-drug abusing HIV-1 infected population. Neural precursor cells (NPCs), the multipotent cells of the mammalian brain, are susceptible to HIV-1 infection and as opiates also perturb their growth kinetics, detailed mechanistic studies for their co-morbid exposure are highly warranted. Using a well characterized in vitro model of human fetal brain-derived neural precursor cells, we investigated alterations in NPC properties at both acute and chronic durations. Chronic morphine and Tat treatment attenuated proliferation in NPCs, with cells stalled at G1-phase of the cell cycle. Furthermore HIV-Tat and morphine exposure increased activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase-1/2 (ERK1/2), enhanced levels of p53 and p21, and decreased cyclin D1 and Akt levels in NPCs. Regulated by ERK1/2 and p53, p21 was found to be indispensible for Tat and morphine mediated cell cycle arrest. Our study elaborates on the cellular and molecular machinery in NPCs and provides significant mechanistic details into HIV-drug abuse co-morbidity that may have far reaching clinical consequences both in pediatric as well as adult neuroAIDS.

  4. Constitutive hypophosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases-1/2 and down-regulation of c-Jun in human gastric adenocarcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, William Ka Kei; Sung, Joseph Joe Yiu; Yu Le; Li Zhijie; Chu, Kent Man; Cho, C.H.

    2008-08-22

    Hyperphosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated protein kinases-1/2 (ERK1/2) is known to promote cancer cell proliferation. We therefore investigated the constitutive phosphorylation levels of ERK1/2 and the expression of its downstream targets c-Fos, c-Jun, and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in biopsied human gastric cancer tissues. Results showed that ERK1/2 phosphorylation and c-Jun expression were significantly lowered in gastric cancer compared with the non-cancer adjacent tissues. The expression of c-Fos, however, was not altered while COX-2 was significantly up-regulated. To conclude, we demonstrate that hypophosphorylation of ERK1/2 may occur in gastric cancer. Such discovery may have implication in the application of pathway-directed therapy for this malignant disease.

  5. Sex differences in social interaction behaviors in rats are mediated by extracellular signal-regulated kinase 2 expression in the medial prefrontal cortex

    PubMed Central

    Carrier, Nicole; Kabbaj, Mohamed

    2012-01-01

    Considerable sex differences occur in the incidence and prevalence of anxiety disorders where women are more anxious than men, particularly in situations where social interaction is required. In preclinical studies, the social interaction test represents a valid animal model to study sex differences in social anxiety. Indeed, female rats engage less in conspecific interactions than their male counterparts, which are behaviors indicative of higher social anxiety in female rats. In this work, we implicated extracellular signal regulated kinase 2 (ERK2) in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) in mediating social interaction. Indeed, female rats’ had lower ERK2 expression compared to male rats, and overexpression of ERK2 in the mPFC increases their social interaction to the level seen in their male counterparts. These data indicate that the sexually dimorphic expression of ERK2 mediates social anxiety-like behaviors. PMID:22521590

  6. Extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 control claudin-2 expression in Madin-Darby canine kidney strain I and II cells.

    PubMed

    Lipschutz, Joshua H; Li, Shixiong; Arisco, Amy; Balkovetz, Daniel F

    2005-02-01

    The tight junction of the epithelial cell determines the characteristics of paracellular permeability across epithelium. Recent work points toward the claudin family of tight junction proteins as leading candidates for the molecular components that regulate paracellular permeability properties in epithelial tissues. Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) strain I and II cells are models for the study of tight junctions and based on transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) contain "tight" and "leaky" tight junctions, respectively. Overexpression studies suggest that tight junction leakiness in these two strains of MDCK cells is conferred by expression of the tight junction protein claudin-2. Extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2 activation by hepatocyte growth factor treatment of MDCK strain II cells inhibited claudin-2 expression and transiently increased TER. This process was blocked by the ERK 1/2 inhibitor U0126. Transfection of constitutively active mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular signal-regulated kinase kinase into MDCK strain II cells also inhibited claudin-2 expression and increased TER. MDCK strain I cells have higher levels of active ERK 1/2 than do MDCK strain II cells. U0126 treatment of MDCK strain I cells decreased active ERK 1/2 levels, induced expression of claudin-2 protein, and decreased TER by approximately 20-fold. U0126 treatment also induced claudin-2 expression and decreased TER in a high resistance mouse cortical collecting duct cell line (94D). These data show for the first time that the ERK 1/2 signaling pathway negatively controls claudin-2 expression in mammalian renal epithelial cells and provide evidence for regulation of tight junction paracellular transport by alterations in claudin composition within tight junction complexes.

  7. Albumin stimulates p44/p42 extracellular-signal-regulated mitogen-activated protein kinase in opossum kidney proximal tubular cells.

    PubMed

    Dixon, R; Brunskill, N J

    2000-03-01

    The presence of protein in the urine of patients with renal disease is an adverse prognostic feature. It has therefore been suggested that proteinuria per se may be responsible for the development of renal tubulo-interstitial scarring and fibrosis, and disturbances in tubular cell growth and proliferation. We have used the opossum kidney proximal tubular cell line to investigate the effects of albumin on cell growth. The effect of albumin on cell proliferation was investigated by cell counting and measurement of [(3)H]thymidine incorporation. We studied the effect of recombinant human albumin on the activity of p44/p42 extracellular-signal-regulated mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAP kinase ) using an in vitro kinase assay, and immunoblotting with antibodies against active extracellular-signal-regulated kinase (ERK). The effects of the ERK inhibitor PD98059 were also examined. Recombinant human albumin was found to stimulate proliferation of opossum kidney cells in a dose-dependent manner, with maximal stimulation at a concentration of 1 mg/ml. In addition, recombinant human albumin activated ERK in a time-dependent (maximal after 5 min) and dose-dependent (maximal at 1 mg/ml) fashion. These effects on cell proliferation and ERK activity were inhibited by PD98059, and were not reproduced by ovalbumin or mannitol. The data therefore indicate that albumin is able to stimulate growth and proliferation of proximal tubular cells that is dependent on the ERK family of MAP kinases. The potential importance of this pathway in the development of renal disease is discussed. PMID:10677388

  8. The vaccinia virus O1 protein is required for sustained activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 and promotes viral virulence.

    PubMed

    Schweneker, Marc; Lukassen, Susanne; Späth, Michaela; Wolferstätter, Michael; Babel, Eveline; Brinkmann, Kay; Wielert, Ursula; Chaplin, Paul; Suter, Mark; Hausmann, Jürgen

    2012-02-01

    Sustained activation of the Raf/MEK/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathway in infected cells has been shown to be crucial for full replication efficiency of orthopoxviruses in cell culture. In infected cells, this pathway is mainly activated by the vaccinia virus growth factor (VGF), an epidermal growth factor (EGF)-like protein. We show here that chorioallantois vaccinia virus Ankara (CVA), but not modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA), induced sustained activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) in infected human 293 cells, although both viruses direct secretion of functional VGF. A CVA mutant lacking the O1L gene (CVA-ΔO1L) demonstrated that the O1 protein was required for sustained upregulation of the ERK1/2 pathway in 293 cells as well as in other mammalian cell lines. The highly conserved orthopoxvirus O1L gene encodes a predicted 78-kDa protein with a hitherto-unknown function. CVA-ΔO1L showed reduced plaque size and an attenuated cytopathic effect (CPE) in infected cell cultures and reduced virulence and spread from lungs to ovaries in intranasally infected BALB/c mice. Reinsertion of an intact O1L gene into MVA, which in its original form harbors a fragmented O1L open reading frame (ORF), restored ERK1/2 activation in 293 cells but did not increase replication and spread of MVA in human or other mammalian cell lines. Thus, the O1 protein was crucial for sustained ERK1/2 activation in CVA- and MVA-infected human cells, complementing the autocrine function of VGF, and enhanced virulence in vivo.

  9. Augmentation of RANTES-induced extracellular signal-regulated kinase mediated signaling and T cell adhesion by elastase-treated fibronectin.

    PubMed

    Brill, A; Hershkoviz, R; Vaday, G G; Chowers, Y; Lider, O

    2001-06-15

    T cells migrating across extracellular matrix (ECM) barriers toward their target, the inflammatory site, should respond to chemoattractant cytokines and to the degradation of ECM by specific enzymes. In this study, we examined the effects of RANTES and ECM proteins treated with human leukocyte elastase on T cell activation and adhesion to the ECM. We found that human peripheral blood T cells briefly suspended with RANTES (0.1-100 ng/ml) had increased phosphorylation of their intracellular extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), a mitogen-activated protein kinase involved in the activation of several intracellular downstream effector molecules implicated in cell adhesion and migration. Consequently, a small portion (12-20%) of the responding cells adhered to fibronectin (FN). However, when the T cells were exposed to RANTES in the presence of native immobilized FN, laminin, or collagen type I, ERK phosphorylation was partially inhibited, suggesting that this form of the ECM proteins can down-regulate RANTES-induced intracellular signaling. In contrast, when the T cells were exposed to RANTES in the presence of elastase-treated immobilized FN, but not to elastase-treated laminin, ERK phosphorylation was markedly increased. Furthermore, a large percentage (30%) of RANTES-activated T cells adhered to the enzymatically treated FN in a beta1 integrin-dependent fashion. Thus, while migrating along chemotactic gradients within the ECM, T cells can adapt their adhesive performance according to the level of cleavage induced by enzymes to the matrix. PMID:11390457

  10. Spatial Phosphoprotein Profiling Reveals a Compartmentalized Extracellular Signal-regulated Kinase Switch Governing Neurite Growth and Retraction

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yingchun; Yang, Feng; Fu, Yi; Huang, Xiahe; Wang, Wei; Jiang, Xining; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Zhao, Rui; Monroe, Matthew E.; Pertz, Olivier C.; Purvine, Samuel O.; Orton, Daniel J.; Jacobs, Jon M.; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Klemke, Richard L.

    2011-05-20

    Abstract - Brain development and spinal cord regeneration require neurite sprouting and growth cone navigation in response to extension and collapsing factors present in the extracellular environment. These external guidance cues control neurite growth cone extension and retraction processes through intracellular protein phosphorylation of numerous cytoskeletal, adhesion, and polarity complex signaling proteins. However, the complex kinase/substrate signaling networks that mediate neuritogenesis have not been investigated. Here, we compare the neurite phosphoproteome under growth and retraction conditions using neurite purification methodology combined with mass spectrometry. More than 4000 non-redundant phosphorylation sites from 1883 proteins have been annotated and mapped to signaling pathways that control kinase/phosphatase networks, cytoskeleton remodeling, and axon/dendrite specification. Comprehensive informatics and functional studies revealed a compartmentalized ERK activation/deactivation cytoskeletal switch that governs neurite growth and retraction, respectively. Our findings provide the first system-wide analysis of the phosphoprotein signaling networks that enable neurite growth and retraction and reveal an important molecular switch that governs neuritogenesis.

  11. Agonist-induced activation of histamine H3 receptor signals to extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 through PKC-, PLD-, and EGFR-dependent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Lai, Xiangru; Ye, Lingyan; Liao, Yuan; Jin, Lili; Ma, Qiang; Lu, Bing; Sun, Yi; Shi, Ying; Zhou, Naiming

    2016-04-01

    The histamine H3 receptor (H3R), abundantly expressed in the central and the peripheral nervous system, has been recognized as a promising target for the treatment of various important CNS diseases including narcolepsy, Alzheimer's disease, and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. The H3R acts via Gi/o -proteins to inhibit adenylate cyclase activity and modulate MAPK activity. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms for H3R mediation of the activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) remain to be elucidated. In this study, using HEK293 cells stably expressing human H3R and mouse primary cortical neurons endogenously expressing mouse H3R, we found that the H3R-mediated activation of ERK1/2 was significantly blocked by both the pertussis toxin and the MEK1/2 inhibitor U0126. Upon stimulation by H3R agonist histamine or imetit, H3R was shown to rapidly induce ERK1/2 phosphorylation via PLC/PKC-, PLDs-, and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) transactivation-dependent pathways. Furthermore, it was also indicated that while the βγ-subunits play a key role in H3R-activated ERK1/2 phosphorylation, β-arrestins were not required for ERK1/2 activation. In addition, when the cultured mouse cortical neurons were exposed to oxygen and glucose deprivation conditions (OGD), imetit exhibited neuroprotective properties through the H3R. Treatment of cells with the inhibitor UO126 abolished these protective effects. This suggests a possible neuroprotective role of the H3R-mediated ERK1/2 pathway under hypoxia conditions. These observations may provide new insights into the pharmacological effects and the physiological functions modulated by the H3R-mediated activation of ERK1/2. Histamine H3 receptors are abundantly expressed in the brain and play important roles in various CNS physiological functions. However, the underlying mechanisms for H3R-induced activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2 remain largely unknown. Here

  12. Agonist-induced activation of histamine H3 receptor signals to extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 through PKC-, PLD-, and EGFR-dependent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Lai, Xiangru; Ye, Lingyan; Liao, Yuan; Jin, Lili; Ma, Qiang; Lu, Bing; Sun, Yi; Shi, Ying; Zhou, Naiming

    2016-04-01

    The histamine H3 receptor (H3R), abundantly expressed in the central and the peripheral nervous system, has been recognized as a promising target for the treatment of various important CNS diseases including narcolepsy, Alzheimer's disease, and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. The H3R acts via Gi/o -proteins to inhibit adenylate cyclase activity and modulate MAPK activity. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms for H3R mediation of the activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) remain to be elucidated. In this study, using HEK293 cells stably expressing human H3R and mouse primary cortical neurons endogenously expressing mouse H3R, we found that the H3R-mediated activation of ERK1/2 was significantly blocked by both the pertussis toxin and the MEK1/2 inhibitor U0126. Upon stimulation by H3R agonist histamine or imetit, H3R was shown to rapidly induce ERK1/2 phosphorylation via PLC/PKC-, PLDs-, and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) transactivation-dependent pathways. Furthermore, it was also indicated that while the βγ-subunits play a key role in H3R-activated ERK1/2 phosphorylation, β-arrestins were not required for ERK1/2 activation. In addition, when the cultured mouse cortical neurons were exposed to oxygen and glucose deprivation conditions (OGD), imetit exhibited neuroprotective properties through the H3R. Treatment of cells with the inhibitor UO126 abolished these protective effects. This suggests a possible neuroprotective role of the H3R-mediated ERK1/2 pathway under hypoxia conditions. These observations may provide new insights into the pharmacological effects and the physiological functions modulated by the H3R-mediated activation of ERK1/2. Histamine H3 receptors are abundantly expressed in the brain and play important roles in various CNS physiological functions. However, the underlying mechanisms for H3R-induced activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2 remain largely unknown. Here

  13. Inhibition of either phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt or the mitogen/extracellular-regulated kinase, MEK/ERK, signaling pathways suppress growth of breast cancer cell lines, but MEK/ERK signaling is critical for cell survival.

    PubMed

    Ripple, Maureen O; Kalmadi, Sahana; Eastman, Alan

    2005-09-01

    The phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt and mitogen/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (MEK)/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signaling pathways are important integrators of growth and survival signals originating from extracellular stimuli. We assessed the importance of these signaling pathways in the growth and survival of 8 breast cell lines (MCF10A, an immortalized line; and 7 cancer cell lines). The cell lines expressed variable levels of both phosphorylated ERK and phosphorylated Akt, but these were unchanged by incubation in serum-free medium. Despite continued activity of these pathways, the cells arrested growth in the absence of serum demonstrating that additional pathways are required for growth. Incubation with the PI3K inhibitor LY294002 suppressed growth of all cell lines, but most remained viable for at least 7-14 days. This long-term survival may be attributable to recovery of phospho-Akt by 24-48 h despite the continued presence of active LY294002, suggesting that alternate pathways may be activating Akt. In contrast, incubation with the MEK inhibitor U0126 not only arrested growth, but also killed all the cell lines within 2-4 days in the absence of serum; the presence of serum only slighted extended viability, except in MCF10A and MDA-MB-468 cells, in which serum provided significantly greater protection. It is likely that these signaling pathways control the level of pro-and anti-apoptotic proteins, yet assessment of Bcl-2 and Bcl-X showed dramatic reduction in level only when large numbers of cells were dead suggesting this may be a consequence rather than cause of death. Overall, the results demonstrate that the MEK/ERK pathway represents the more critical pathway for cell survival of these breast cancer cell lines, and suggest this pathways represents the better target for cancer therapy.

  14. Regulation of extracellular-signal regulated kinase and c-Jun N-terminal kinase by G-protein-linked muscarinic acetylcholine receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Wylie, P G; Challiss, R A; Blank, J L

    1999-01-01

    Extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERKs) and c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNKs, or stress-activated protein kinases) are activated by diverse extracellular signals and mediate a variety of cellular responses, including mitogenesis, differentiation, hypertrophy, inflammatory reactions and apoptosis. We have examined the involvement of Ca2+ and protein kinase C (PKC) in ERK and JNK activation by the human G-protein-coupled m2 and m3 muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChR) expressed in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. We show that the Ca2+-mobilizing m3 AChR is efficiently coupled to JNK and ERK activation, whereas the m2 AChR activates ERK but not JNK. Activation of JNK in CHO-m3 cells by the agonist methacholine (MCh) was delayed in onset and more sustained relative to that of ERK in either CHO-m2 or CHO-m3 cells. The EC50 values for MCh-induced ERK activation in both cell types were essentially identical and similar to that for JNK activation in CHO-m3 cells, suggesting little amplification of the response. Agonist-stimulated Ins(1,4,5)P3 accumulation in CHO-m3 cells was insensitive to pertussis toxin (PTX), consistent with a Gq/phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C-beta mediated pathway, whereas a significant component of ERK and JNK activation in CHO-m3 cells was PTX-sensitive, indicating Gi/o involvement. Using manipulations that prevent receptor-mediated extracellular Ca2+ influx and intracellular Ca2+-store release, we also show that ERK activation by m2 and m3 receptors is Ca2+-independent. In contrast, a significant component (>50%) of JNK activation mediated by the m3 AChR was dependent on Ca2+, mainly derived from extracellular influx. PKC inhibition and down-regulation studies suggested that JNK activation was negatively regulated by PKC. Conversely, ERK activation by both m2 and m3 AChRs required PKC, suggesting a novel mechanism for PKC activation by PTX-sensitive m2 AChRs. In summary, mAChRs activate JNK and ERK via divergent mechanisms

  15. A novel mechanism involving four-and-a-half LIM domain protein-1 and extracellular signal-regulated kinase-2 regulates titin phosphorylation and mechanics.

    PubMed

    Raskin, Anna; Lange, Stephan; Banares, Katherine; Lyon, Robert C; Zieseniss, Anke; Lee, Leonard K; Yamazaki, Katrina G; Granzier, Henk L; Gregorio, Carol C; McCulloch, Andrew D; Omens, Jeffrey H; Sheikh, Farah

    2012-08-24

    Understanding mechanisms underlying titin regulation in cardiac muscle function is of critical importance given recent compelling evidence that highlight titin mutations as major determinants of human cardiomyopathy. We previously identified a cardiac biomechanical stress-regulated complex at the cardiac-specific N2B region of titin that includes four-and-a-half LIM domain protein-1 (Fhl1) and components of the mitogen-activated protein signaling cascade, which impacted muscle compliance in Fhl1 knock-out cardiac muscle. However, direct regulation of these molecular components in mediating titin N2B function remained unresolved. Here we identify Fhl1 as a novel negative regulator of titin N2B levels and phosphorylation-mediated mechanics. We specifically identify titin N2B as a novel substrate of extracellular signal regulated-kinase-2 (Erk2) and demonstrate that Fhl1 directly interferes with Erk2-mediated titin-N2B phosphorylation. We highlight the critical region in titin-N2B that interacts with Fhl1 and residues that are dependent on Erk2-mediated phosphorylation in situ. We also propose a potential mechanism for a known titin-N2B cardiomyopathy-causing mutation that involves this regulatory complex. These studies shed light on a novel mechanism regulating titin-N2B mechano-signaling as well as suggest that dysfunction of these pathways could be important in cardiac disease states affecting muscle compliance.

  16. Tissue kallikrein induces SH-SY5Y cell proliferation via epidermal growth factor receptor and extracellular signal-regulated kinase1/2 pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Zhengyu; Yang, Qi; Cui, Mei; Liu, Yanping; Wang, Tao; Zhao, Hong; Dong, Qiang

    2014-03-28

    Highlights: • TK promotes EGFR phosphorylation in SH-SY5Y cells. • TK activates ERK1/2 and p38 phosphorylation in SH-SY5Y cells. • TK mediates SH-SY5Y cell proliferation via EGFR and ERK1/2 pathway. - Abstract: Tissue kallikrein (TK) is well known to take most of its biological functions through bradykinin receptors. In the present study, we found a novel signaling pathway mediated by TK through epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) in human SH-SY5Y cells. We discovered that TK facilitated the activation of EGFR, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2 and p38 cascade. Interestingly, not p38 but ERK1/2 phosphorylation was severely compromised in cells depleted of EGFR. Nevertheless, impairment of signaling of ERK1/2 seemed not to be restricted to EGFR phosphorylation. We also observed that TK stimulation could induce SH-SY5Y cell proliferation, which was reduced by EGFR down-regulation or ERK1/2 inhibitor. Overall, our findings provided convincing evidence that TK could mediate cell proliferation via EGFR and ERK1/2 pathway in vitro.

  17. Spinal neurons that contain gastrin-releasing peptide seldom express Fos or phosphorylate extracellular signal-regulated kinases in response to intradermal chloroquine

    PubMed Central

    Gutierrez-Mecinas, Maria; Polgár, Erika; Todd, Andrew J

    2016-01-01

    Background Gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP) is thought to play a role in the itch evoked by intradermal injection of chloroquine. Although some early studies suggested that GRP was expressed in pruriceptive primary afferents, it is now thought that GRP in the spinal cord is derived mainly from a population of excitatory interneurons in lamina II, and it has been suggested that these are involved in the itch pathway. To test this hypothesis, we used the transcription factor Fos and phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK) to look for evidence that interneurons expressing GRP were activated following intradermal injection of chloroquine into the calf, in mice that express enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) in these cells. Results Injection of chloroquine resulted in numerous Fos- or phospho-ERK (pERK) positive cells in the somatotopically appropriate part of the superficial dorsal horn. The proportion of all neurons in this region that showed Fos or pERK was 18% and 21%, respectively. However, among the GRP–EGFP, only 7% were Fos-positive and 3% were pERK-positive. As such, GRP–EGFP cells were significantly less likely than other neurons to express Fos or to phosphorylate ERK. Conclusions Both expression of Fos and phosphorylation of ERK can be used to identify dorsal horn neurons activated by chloroquine injection. However, these results do not support the hypothesis that interneurons expressing GRP are critical components in the itch pathway. PMID:27270268

  18. The Novel Anticancer Drug Hydroxytriolein Inhibits Lung Cancer Cell Proliferation via a Protein Kinase Cα- and Extracellular Signal-Regulated Kinase 1/2-Dependent Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Guardiola-Serrano, Francisca; Beteta-Göbel, Roberto; Rodríguez-Lorca, Raquel; Ibarguren, Maitane; López, David J; Terés, Silvia; Alvarez, Rafael; Alonso-Sande, María; Busquets, Xavier; Escribá, Pablo V

    2015-08-01

    Membrane lipid therapy is a novel approach to rationally design or discover therapeutic molecules that target membrane lipids. This strategy has been used to design synthetic fatty acid analogs that are currently under study in clinical trials for the treatment of cancer. In this context, and with the aim of controlling tumor cell growth, we have designed and synthesized a hydroxylated analog of triolein, hydroxytriolein (HTO). Both triolein and HTO regulate the biophysical properties of model membranes, and they inhibit the growth of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines in vitro. The molecular mechanism underlying the antiproliferative effect of HTO involves regulation of the lipid membrane structure, protein kinase C-α and extracellular signal-regulated kinase activation, the production of reactive oxygen species, and autophagy. In vivo studies on a mouse model of NSCLC showed that HTO, but not triolein, impairs tumor growth, which could be associated with the relative resistance of HTO to enzymatic degradation. The data presented explain in part why olive oil (whose main component is the triacylglycerol triolein) is preventive but not therapeutic, and they demonstrate a potent effect of HTO against cancer. HTO shows a good safety profile, it can be administered orally, and it does not induce nontumor cell (fibroblast) death in vitro or side effects in mice, reflecting its specificity for cancer cells. For these reasons, HTO is a good candidate as a drug to combat cancer that acts by regulating lipid structure and function in the cancer cell membrane.

  19. Nerve Growth Factor Regulates Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 2 via Extracellular Signal-Regulated Kinase Signaling To Enhance Neurite Outgrowth in Developing Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Matthew R.; Johnson, William M.; Pilat, Jennifer M.; Kiselar, Janna; DeFrancesco-Lisowitz, Alicia; Zigmond, Richard E.

    2015-01-01

    Neurite outgrowth is key to the formation of functional circuits during neuronal development. Neurotrophins, including nerve growth factor (NGF), increase neurite outgrowth in part by altering the function and expression of Ca2+-permeable cation channels. Here we report that transient receptor potential vanilloid 2 (TRPV2) is an intracellular Ca2+-permeable TRPV channel upregulated by NGF via the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway to augment neurite outgrowth. TRPV2 colocalized with Rab7, a late endosome protein, in addition to TrkA and activated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) in neurites, indicating that the channel is closely associated with signaling endosomes. In line with these results, we showed that TRPV2 acts as an ERK substrate and identified the motifs necessary for phosphorylation of TRPV2 by ERK. Furthermore, neurite length, TRPV2 expression, and TRPV2-mediated Ca2+ signals were reduced by mutagenesis of these key ERK phosphorylation sites. Based on these findings, we identified a previously uncharacterized mechanism by which ERK controls TRPV2-mediated Ca2+ signals in developing neurons and further establish TRPV2 as a critical intracellular ion channel in neuronal function. PMID:26416880

  20. Emblica officinalis exerts wound healing action through up-regulation of collagen and extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK1/2).

    PubMed

    Sumitra, Miriyala; Manikandan, Panchatcharam; Gayathri, Vinaya Subramani; Mahendran, Panchatcharam; Suguna, Lonchin

    2009-01-01

    During wound healing, the wound site is rich in oxidants, such as hydrogen peroxide, mostly contributed by neutrophils and macrophages. Ascorbic acid and tannins of low molecular weight, namely emblicanin A (2,3-di-O-galloyl-4,6-(S)-hexahydroxydiphenoyl-2-keto-glucono-delta-lactone) and emblicanin B (2,3,4,6-bis-(S)-hexahydroxydiphenoyl-2-keto-glucono-delta-lactone) present in Emblica officinalis (emblica), have been shown to exhibit a very strong antioxidant action. We proposed that addition of these antioxidants to the wound microenvironment would support the repair process. The present investigation was undertaken to determine the efficacy of emblica on dermal wound healing in vivo. Full-thickness excision wounds were made on the back of the rat and topical application of emblica accelerated wound contraction and closure. Emblica increased cellular proliferation and cross-linking of collagen at the wound site, as evidenced by an increase in the activity of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2, along with an increase in DNA, type III collagen, acid-soluble collagen, aldehyde content, shrinkage temperature and tensile strength. Higher levels of tissue ascorbic acid, alpha-tocopherol, reduced glutathione, superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase support the fact that emblica application promotes antioxidant activity at the wound site. In summary, this study provides firm evidence to support that topical application of emblica represents a feasible and productive approach to support dermal wound healing. PMID:19152656

  1. Research progress of the role and mechanism of extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase 5 (ERK5) pathway in pathological pain*

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Li-na; Sun, Li-hong; Wang, Min; Yan, Min

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase 5 (ERK5), also known as big mitogen-activated protein kinase 1 (MAPK1), is an important member of ERK family, which is a subfamily of the large MAPK family. ERK5 is expressed in many tissues, including the dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons and the spinal cord. In this review, we focus on elaborating ERK5-associated pathway in pathological pain, in which the ERK5/CREB (cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)-response element-binding protein) pathway plays a crucial role in the transduction of pain signal and contributes to pain hypersensitivity. ERK5 activation in the spinal dorsal horn occurs mainly in microglia. The activation of ERK5 can be mediated by N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors. We also elaborate the relationship between ERK5 activation and nerve growth factor-tyrosine kinase A (NGF-TrkA), and the connection between ERK5 activation and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in pathological pain in detail. PMID:27704743

  2. Role of phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase, calcitonin gene-related peptide and cyclooxygenase-2 in experimental rat models of migraine.

    PubMed

    Dong, Xiaomeng; Hu, Yaozhi; Jing, Long; Chen, Jinbo

    2015-08-01

    Although migraine is a common neurological condition, the pathomechanism is not yet fully understood. Activation of the trigeminovascular system (TVS) has an important function in this disorder and neurogenic inflammation and central sensitization are important mechanisms underlying this condition. Nitroglycerin (NTG) infusion in rats closely mimics a universally accepted human model of migraine. Electrical stimulation of the trigeminal ganglion (ESTG) of rats can also activate TVS during a migraine attack. Numerous studies have revealed that phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (p-ERK), calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) are involved in pain and nociceptive pathways. However, few studies have examined whether p-ERK, CGRP and COX-2 are involved in neurogenic inflammation and central sensitization. In the present study, the expression of p-ERK, CGRP and COX-2 was detected in the dura mater, trigeminal ganglion (TG) and spinal trigeminal nucleus caudalis in NTG-induced rats and ESTG models by immunohistochemistry. The three areas considered were crucial components of the TVS. The selective COX-2 inhibitor nimesulide was used in ESTG rats to examine the association between p-ERK, CGRP and COX-2. The results demonstrated that p‑ERK, CGRP and COX-2 mediated neurogenic inflammation and central sensitization in migraine. In addition, the expression of p-ERK and CGRP was attenuated by the COX-2 inhibitor.

  3. Extracellular signal-regulated kinase 2 (ERK2) phosphorylation sites and docking domain on the nuclear pore complex protein Tpr cooperatively regulate ERK2-Tpr interaction.

    PubMed

    Vomastek, Tomás; Iwanicki, Marcin P; Burack, W Richard; Tiwari, Divya; Kumar, Devanand; Parsons, J Thomas; Weber, Michael J; Nandicoori, Vinay Kumar

    2008-11-01

    Identifying direct substrates of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) and understanding how those substrates are selected is central to understanding how these ubiquitously activated enzymes generate diverse biological responses. In previous work, we identified several new candidate substrates for the MAPK ERK2 (extracellular signal-regulated kinase 2), including the nuclear pore complex protein Tpr (translocated promoter region). In this report, we identify sites on Tpr for ERK2 phosphorylation and binding and demonstrate their functional interaction. ERK2 phosphorylation and dimerization are necessary for ERK2-Tpr binding, and this occurs through a DEF (docking site for ERK2, FXF) domain on Tpr. Surprisingly, the DEF domain and the phosphorylation sites displayed positive cooperativity to promote ERK2 binding to Tpr, in contrast to substrates where phosphorylation reduces binding. Ectopic expression or depletion of Tpr resulted in decreased movement of activated ERK2 from the cytoplasm to the nucleus, implying a role for Tpr in ERK2 translocation. Collectively, the data provide direct evidence that a component of the nuclear pore complex is a bona fide substrate of ERK2 in vivo and that activated ERK2 stably associates with this substrate after phosphorylation, where it could play a continuing role in nuclear pore function. We propose that Tpr is both a substrate and a scaffold for activated ERKs.

  4. Matrine-induced apoptosis of human nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells via in vitro vascular endothelial growth factor-A/extracellular signal-regulated kinase1/2 pathway inactivation.

    PubMed

    Xie, M; He, G; Wang, R; Shi, S; Chen, J; Ye, Y; Xie, L; Yi, X; Tang, A

    2014-07-01

    Matrine, a main active extract from Sophora flavescens Ait, has been demonstrated to exert anticancer effects on various cancer cell lines, such as malignant melanoma, breast cancer, and lung cancer. However, it is currently unclear whether matrine could also elicit an inhibitory effect on growth of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC), let alone the possible molecular mechanisms. Therefore, in a previous study, we investigated matrine-induced proliferation inhibition and apoptosis in NPC cells. It was shown that proliferation of human NPC cells (CNE1 and CNE2) was significantly diminished by matrine in a dose- and time-dependent manner, and apoptosis was induced in both 2 NPC cells, particularly in CNE2 cells. Moreover, the increased apoptosis rate in matrine-treated CNE2 cells confirmed the proapoptotic activity of matrine. We further found that matrine treatment dose- and time-dependently reduced the levels of vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF-A), and inactivated extracellular signal-regulated kinase1/2 (ERK1/2), followed by increased expression of downstream target caspase-3. Overall, we conclude that matrine could induce apoptosis of human NPC cells via VEGF-A/ERK1/2 pathway, which supports the potential use of matrine in clinically treating NPC.

  5. Resistin-induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy is inhibited by apelin through the inactivation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase signaling pathway in H9c2 embryonic rat cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Jian-Wei; Zheng, Xian; Cheng, Guan-Chang; Ye, Qun-Hui; Deng, Yong-Zhi; Wu, Lin

    2016-01-01

    It has been reported that resistin induces, whereas apelin inhibits cardiac hypertrophy. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms of apelin inhibiting resistin-induced cardiac hypertrophy remain unclear. The aim of the current study is to investigate the effects of apelin on resistin-induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy and elucidate the underlying molecular mechanism. H9c2 cells were used in the present study, and cell surface area and protein synthesis were evaluated. Reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction was performed to analyze the expression levels of hypertrophic markers, brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) and β-myosin heavy chain (β-MHC). In addition, western blotting was conducted to examine phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2. Following treatment of H9c2 cells with resistin, cell surface area, protein synthesis, and BNP and β-MHC mRNA expression levels were increased. Subsequent to co-treatment of H9c2 cells with apelin and resistin, lead to the inhibition of resistin-induced hypertrophic effects by apelin. In addition, treatment with resistin increased phosphorylation of ERK1/2, whereas pretreatment with apelin decreased phosphorylation of ERK1/2, which was increased by resistin. These results indicate that resistin-induced cardiac hypertrophy is inhibited by apelin via inactivation of ERK1/2 cell signaling.

  6. Distinct roles for extracellular-signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK) mitogen-activated protein kinases and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase in the regulation of Mcl-1 synthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Schubert, K M; Duronio, V

    2001-01-01

    Alterations in the expression of various Bcl-2 family members may act as one means by which a cell's survival may be regulated. The mechanism by which cytokines regulate expression of Bcl-2 family members was examined in the haemopoietic cell line TF-1. Cytokine-induced Mcl-1 protein expression was shown to be controlled through a pathway dependent upon phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI 3-kinase). The cytokine-induced increase in mRNA transcription was not dependent upon PI 3-kinase, thus dissociating the immediate-early transcription factors responsible for Mcl-1 transcription from the PI 3-kinase signalling pathway. In contrast, Mcl-1 mRNA levels were dependent upon MEK [mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)/extracellular-signal-regulated protein kinase kinase] activation, suggesting a role for the Ras/MEK/MAPK pathway in Mcl-1 transcription. Activation of PI 3-kinase was shown to be necessary to stimulate Mcl-1 protein translation. This was not due to any effect on prolonging the half-life of the protein. Finally, the lipid second messenger ceramide was shown to cause a reduction in Mcl-1 protein translation, probably via its ability to inhibit protein kinase B activation, providing further clues regarding the death-inducing effect of this lipid. PMID:11368774

  7. Retinoic acid receptors inhibit AP1 activation by regulating extracellular signal-regulated kinase and CBP recruitment to an AP1-responsive promoter.

    PubMed

    Benkoussa, Madjid; Brand, Céline; Delmotte, Marie-Hélène; Formstecher, Pierre; Lefebvre, Philippe

    2002-07-01

    Retinoids exhibit antineoplastic activities that may be linked to retinoid receptor-mediated transrepression of activating protein 1 (AP1), a heterodimeric transcription factor composed of fos- and jun-related proteins. Here we show that transcriptional activation of an AP1-regulated gene through the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)-extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathway (MAPK(ERK)) is characterized, in intact cells, by a switch from a fra2-junD dimer to a junD-fosB dimer loading on its promoter and by simultaneous recruitment of ERKs, CREB-binding protein (CBP), and RNA polymerase II. All-trans-retinoic acid (atRA) receptor (RAR) was tethered constitutively to the AP1 promoter. AP1 transrepression by retinoic acid was concomitant to glycogen synthase kinase 3 activation, negative regulation of junD hyperphosphorylation, and to decreased RNA polymerase II recruitment. Under these conditions, fra1 loading to the AP1 response element was strongly increased. Importantly, CBP and ERKs were excluded from the promoter in the presence of atRA. AP1 transrepression by retinoids was RAR and ligand dependent, but none of the functions required for RAR-mediated transactivation was necessary for AP1 transrepression. These results indicate that transrepressive effects of retinoids are mediated through a mechanism unrelated to transcriptional activation, involving the RAR-dependent control of transcription factors and cofactor assembly on AP1-regulated promoters.

  8. Regulation of dopamine D2 receptor-mediated extracellular signal-regulated kinase signaling and spine formation by GABAA receptors in hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Dong-Hoon; Yoon, Sehyoun; Kim, Donghoon; Kim, Hyun; Baik, Ja-Hyun

    2015-01-23

    Dopamine (DA) signaling via DA receptors is known to control hippocampal activity that contributes to learning, memory, and synaptic plasticity. In primary hippocampal neuronal culture, we observed that dopamine D2 receptors (D2R) co-localized with certain subtypes of GABAA receptors, namely α1, β3, and γ2 subunits, as revealed by double immunofluorocytochemical analysis. Treatment with the D2R agonist, quinpirole, was shown to elicit an increase in phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) in hippocampal neurons. This phosphorylation was inhibited by pretreatment with the GABAA receptor agonist, muscimol. Furthermore, treatment of hippocampal neurons with quinpirole increased the dendritic spine density and this regulation was totally blocked by pretreatment with a MAP kinase kinase (MEK) inhibitor (PD98059), D2R antagonist (haloperidol), or by the GABAA receptor agonist, muscimol. These results suggest that D2R-mediated ERK phosphorylation can control spine formation and that the GABAA receptor negatively regulates the D2R-induced spine formation through ERK signaling in hippocampal neurons, thus indicating a potential role of D2R in the control of hippocampal neuronal excitability. PMID:25483619

  9. Differential expression of extracellular-signal-regulated kinase 5 (ERK5) in normal and degenerated human nucleus pulposus tissues and cells

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, Weiguo; Fang, Dejian; Ye, Dongping; Zou, Longqiang; Shen, Yan; Dai, Libing; Xu, Jiake

    2014-07-11

    Highlights: • ERK5 involved in NP cells. • ERK5 involved in NP tissue. • It was important modulator. - Abstract: Extracellular-signal-regulated kinase 5 (ERK5) is a member of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) family and regulates a wide variety of cellular processes such as proliferation, differentiation, necrosis, apoptosis and degeneration. However, the expression of ERK5 and its role in degenerated human nucleus pulposus (NP) is hitherto unknown. In this study, we observed the differential expression of ERK5 in normal and degenerated human nucleus pulposus tissues by using immunohistochemical staining and Western blot. Treatment of NP cells with Pro-inflammatory cytokine, TNF-α decreased ERK5 gene expression as well as NP marker gene expression; including the type II collagen and aggrecan. Suppression of ERK5 gene expression in NP cells by ERK5 siRNA resulted in decreased gene expression of type II collagen and aggrecan. Furthermore, inhibition of ERK5 activation by BIX02188 (5 μM) decreased the gene expression of type II collagen and aggrecan in NP cells. Our results document the expression of ERK5 in degenerated nucleus pulposus tissues, and suggest a potential involvement of ERK5 in human degenerated nucleus pulposus.

  10. Cold-Inducible RNA-Binding Protein Bypasses Replicative Senescence in Primary Cells through Extracellular Signal-Regulated Kinase 1 and 2 Activation▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Artero-Castro, Ana; Callejas, Francisco B.; Castellvi, Josep; Kondoh, Hiroshi; Carnero, Amancio; Fernández-Marcos, Pablo J.; Serrano, Manuel; Ramón y Cajal, Santiago; Lleonart, Matilde E.

    2009-01-01

    Embryonic stem cells are immortalized cells whose proliferation rate is comparable to that of carcinogenic cells. To study the expression of embryonic stem cell genes in primary cells, genetic screening was performed by infecting mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) with a cDNA library from embryonic stem cells. Cold-inducible RNA-binding protein (CIRP) was identified due to its ability to bypass replicative senescence in primary cells. CIRP enhanced extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) phosphorylation, and treatment with an MEK inhibitor decreased the proliferation caused by CIRP. In contrast to CIRP upregulation, CIRP downregulation decreased cell proliferation and resulted in inhibition of phosphorylated ERK1/2 inhibition. This is the first evidence that ERK1/2 activation, through the same mechanism as that described for a Val12 mutant K-ras to induce premature senescence, is able to bypass senescence in the absence of p16INK4a, p21WAF1, and p19ARF upregulation. Moreover, these results show that CIRP functions by stimulating general protein synthesis with the involvement of the S6 and 4E-BP1 proteins. The overall effect is an increase in kinase activity of the cyclin D1-CDK4 complex, which is in accordance with the proliferative capacity of CIRP MEFs. Interestingly, CIRP mRNA and protein were upregulated in a subgroup of cancer patients, a finding that may be of relevance for cancer research. PMID:19158277

  11. Uric acid induces oxidative stress and growth inhibition by activating adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase and extracellular signal-regulated kinase signal pathways in pancreatic β cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yongneng; Yamamoto, Tetsuya; Hisatome, Ichiro; Li, Youfeng; Cheng, Weijie; Sun, Ning; Cai, Bozhi; Huang, Tianliang; Zhu, Yuzhang; Li, Zhi; Jing, Xubin; Zhou, Rui; Cheng, Jidong

    2013-08-15

    Hyperuricaemia is a disorder of purine metabolism, and is strongly associated with insulin resistance and abnormal glucose metabolism. As the producer of insulin, pancreatic β cells might be affected by elevated serum uric acid levels and contribute to the disregulated glucose metabolism. In this study, we investigated the effect of high uric acid on rat pancreatic β cell function. Under high uric acid condition, proliferation of pancreatic β cells was inhibited, production of reactive oxygen species increased, and glucose stimulated insulin secretion was also compromised. Further examination on signal transduction pathways revealed that uric acid-induced ROS is involved in the activation of adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK), and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK). Pharmacological inhibition of ERK activation rescued β cells from growth inhibition. More importantly, activation of ERK induced by uric acid is significantly diminished by AMPK inhibitor, indicating ERK as a downstream target of AMPK in response to high uric acid condition. We also investigated the transportation channel for uric acid into pancreatic β cells. While major urate transporter URAT1 is not expressed in β cells, organic anion transporter (OAT) inhibitor successfully blocked the activation of ERK by uric acid. Our data indicate that high uric acid levels induce oxidative damage and inhibit growth of rat pancreatic β cells by activating the AMPK and ERK signal pathways. Hyperuricemia may contribute to abnormal glucose metabolism by causing oxidative damage and function inhibition of pancreatic β cells.

  12. Mesenchymal stem cells cultured under hypoxia escape from senescence via down-regulation of p16 and extracellular signal regulated kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, Yonghui; Kato, Tomohisa; Furu, Moritoshi; Nasu, Akira; Kajita, Yoichiro; Mitsui, Hiroto; Ueda, Michiko; Aoyama, Tomoki; Nakayama, Tomitaka; Nakamura, Takashi; Toguchida, Junya

    2010-01-15

    Hypoxia has been considered to affect the properties of tissue stem cells including mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Effects of long periods of exposure to hypoxia on human MSCs, however, have not been clearly demonstrated. MSCs cultured under normoxic conditions (20% pO{sub 2}) ceased to proliferate after 15-25 population doublings, while MSCs cultured under hypoxic conditions (1% pO{sub 2}) retained the ability to proliferate with an additional 8-20 population doublings. Most of the MSCs cultured under normoxic conditions were in a senescent state after 100 days, while few senescent cells were found in the hypoxic culture, which was associated with a down-regulation of p16 gene expression. MSCs cultured for 100 days under hypoxic conditions were superior to those cultured under normoxic conditions in the ability to differentiate into the chondro- and adipogenic, but not osteogenic, lineage. Among the molecules related to mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathways, extracellular signal regulated kinase (ERK) was significantly down-regulated by hypoxia, which helped to inhibit the up-regulation of p16 gene expression. Therefore, the hypoxic culture retained MSCs in an undifferentiated and senescence-free state through the down-regulation of p16 and ERK.

  13. Insulin, insulin-like growth factor-I, and platelet-derived growth factor activate extracellular signal-regulated kinase by distinct pathways in muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Tsakiridis, T; Tsiani, E; Lekas, P; Bergman, A; Cherepanov, V; Whiteside, C; Downey, G P

    2001-10-19

    We have investigated the signaling pathways initiated by insulin, insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-I), and platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) leading to activation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) in L6 myotubes. Insulin but not IGF-I or PDGF-induced ERK activation was abrogated by Ras inhibition, either by treatment with the farnesyl transferase inhibitor FTP III, or by actin disassembly by cytochalasin D, previously shown to inhibit Ras activation. The protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitor bisindolylmaleimide abolished PDGF but not IGF-I or insulin-induced ERK activation. ERK activation by insulin, IGF-I, or PDGF was unaffected by the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase inhibitor wortmannin but was abolished by the MEK inhibitor PD98059. In contrast, activation of the pathway involving phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3k), protein kinase B, and glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3) was mediated similarly by all three receptors, through a PI 3-kinase-dependent but Ras- and actin-independent pathway. We conclude that ERK activation is mediated by distinct pathways including: (i) a cytoskeleton- and Ras-dependent, PKC-independent, pathway utilized by insulin, (ii) a PKC-dependent, cytoskeleton- and Ras-independent pathway used by PDGF, and (iii) a cytoskeleton-, Ras-, and PKC-independent pathway utilized by IGF-I.

  14. Extracellular signal-regulated kinase pathway play distinct role in acetochlor-mediated toxicity and intrinsic apoptosis in A549 cells.

    PubMed

    Zerin, Tamanna; Song, Ho-Yeon; Kim, Yong-Sik

    2015-02-01

    Acetochlor (ACETO), a member of the chloroacetanilide family of herbicides, is widely used globally and is very frequently detected in watersheds of agricultural lands and fresh water streams. The human health consequences of environmental exposure to ACETO are unknown. This study was designed to elucidate the effect and molecular mechanisms of ACETO on human alveolar A549 cells. Established assays of cell viability and cytotoxicity were performed to detect the potential effects of ACETO on A549 cells. ACETO generated reactive oxygen species, which may have been crucial to apoptosis-mediated cytotoxicity. ACETO-treatment showed a concentration dependent up-regulation of pro-apoptotic proteins including Bax, Bak, BID and Bad, but a differential level of expression of anti-apoptotic proteins were observed, leading to the release of cytochrome c from mitochondria to the cytoplasm as well as activation of caspase-3, and cleavage of caspase-9 and PARP. ACETO also induced activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK). Inhibition of the expression of ERK by PD98059 partially reversed ACETO-induced cytotoxicity, apoptosis and the expression of caspase-3, -9 and PARP in A549 cells. Comparative evaluation of the results indicates that the principal mechanism underlying ACETO-mediated cytotoxicity is likely to be through ERK-mediated intrinsic pathway of apoptosis. PMID:25291404

  15. Resistin-induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy is inhibited by apelin through the inactivation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase signaling pathway in H9c2 embryonic rat cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Jian-Wei; Zheng, Xian; Cheng, Guan-Chang; Ye, Qun-Hui; Deng, Yong-Zhi; Wu, Lin

    2016-01-01

    It has been reported that resistin induces, whereas apelin inhibits cardiac hypertrophy. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms of apelin inhibiting resistin-induced cardiac hypertrophy remain unclear. The aim of the current study is to investigate the effects of apelin on resistin-induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy and elucidate the underlying molecular mechanism. H9c2 cells were used in the present study, and cell surface area and protein synthesis were evaluated. Reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction was performed to analyze the expression levels of hypertrophic markers, brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) and β-myosin heavy chain (β-MHC). In addition, western blotting was conducted to examine phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2. Following treatment of H9c2 cells with resistin, cell surface area, protein synthesis, and BNP and β-MHC mRNA expression levels were increased. Subsequent to co-treatment of H9c2 cells with apelin and resistin, lead to the inhibition of resistin-induced hypertrophic effects by apelin. In addition, treatment with resistin increased phosphorylation of ERK1/2, whereas pretreatment with apelin decreased phosphorylation of ERK1/2, which was increased by resistin. These results indicate that resistin-induced cardiac hypertrophy is inhibited by apelin via inactivation of ERK1/2 cell signaling. PMID:27699016

  16. Muscle-Derived Extracellular Signal-Regulated Kinases 1 and 2 Are Required for the Maintenance of Adult Myofibers and Their Neuromuscular Junctions

    PubMed Central

    Seaberg, Bonnie; Henslee, Gabrielle; Wang, Shuo; Paez-Colasante, Ximena; Landreth, Gary E.

    2015-01-01

    The Ras–extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) pathway appears to be important for the development, maintenance, aging, and pathology of mammalian skeletal muscle. Yet no gene targeting of Erk1/2 in muscle fibers in vivo has been reported to date. We combined a germ line Erk1 mutation with Cre-loxP Erk2 inactivation in skeletal muscle to produce, for the first time, mice lacking ERK1/2 selectively in skeletal myofibers. Animals lacking muscle ERK1/2 displayed stunted postnatal growth, muscle weakness, and a shorter life span. Their muscles examined in this study, sternomastoid and tibialis anterior, displayed fragmented neuromuscular synapses and a mixture of modest fiber atrophy and loss but failed to show major changes in fiber type composition or absence of cell surface dystrophin. Whereas the lack of only ERK1 had no effects on the phenotypes studied, the lack of myofiber ERK2 explained synaptic fragmentation in the sternomastoid but not the tibialis anterior and a decrease in the expression of the acetylcholine receptor (AChR) epsilon subunit gene mRNA in both muscles. A reduction in AChR protein was documented in line with the above mRNA results. Evidence of partial denervation was found in the sternomastoid but not the tibialis anterior. Thus, myofiber ERK1/2 are differentially required for the maintenance of myofibers and neuromuscular synapses in adult mice. PMID:25605336

  17. Caffeic acid improves cell viability and protects against DNA damage: involvement of reactive oxygen species and extracellular signal-regulated kinase

    PubMed Central

    Li, Y.; Chen, L.J.; Jiang, F.; Yang, Y.; Wang, X.X.; Zhang, Z.; Li, Z.; Li, L.

    2015-01-01

    Hormesis is an adaptive response to a variety of oxidative stresses that renders cells resistant to harmful doses of stressing agents. Caffeic acid (CaA) is an important antioxidant that has protective effects against DNA damage caused by reactive oxygen species (ROS). However, whether CaA-induced protection is a hormetic effect remains unknown, as is the molecular mechanism that is involved. We found that a low concentration (10 μM) of CaA increased human liver L-02 cell viability, attenuated hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-mediated decreases in cell viability, and decreased the extent of H2O2-induced DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). In L-02 cells exposed to H2O2, CaA treatment reduced ROS levels, which might have played a protective role. CaA also activated the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signal pathway in a time-dependent manner. Inhibition of ERK by its inhibitor U0126 or by its specific small interfering RNA (siRNA) blocked the CaA-induced improvement in cell viability and the protective effects against H2O2-mediated DNA damage. This study adds to the understanding of the antioxidant effects of CaA by identifying a novel molecular mechanism of enhanced cell viability and protection against DNA damage. PMID:25831202

  18. Oxytocin in the regulation of social behaviours in medial amygdala-lesioned mice via the inhibition of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase signalling pathway.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu; Zhao, Shanshan; Wu, Zhe; Feng, Yu; Zhao, Chuansheng; Zhang, Chaodong

    2015-05-01

    The neuropeptide oxytocin (OXT) has been implicated in the pathophysiology of behavioural deficits among patients with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). However, the molecular mechanisms underlying its role in ASD remain unclear. In the present study, a murine model with ASD-like phenotypes was induced by intra-medial amygdala injection of N-methyl-d-aspartate, and it was used to investigate the role of OXT in behaviour regulation. Behavioural tests were performed to verify the ASD-like phenotypes of N-methyl-d-aspartate-treated mice, and the results showed that mice with bilateral medial amygdala lesions presented significant behavioural deficits, including impaired learning and memory and increased anxiety and depression. We also observed a notably decreased level of OXT in both the plasma and the hypothalamus of medial amygdala-lesioned mice, and the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) was activated. Further studies demonstrated that the administration of OXT alleviated ASD-like symptoms and significantly inhibited phosphorylation of ERK; the inhibitory effect was similar to that of U0126, an ERK signalling inhibitor. In addition, OXT administration modulated the expression of downstream proteins of the ERK signalling pathway, such as cyclic adenosine monophosphate response element binding and c-fos. Taken together, our data indicate that OXT plays an important role in ameliorating behavioural deficits in an ASD-like mouse model, which was mediated by inhibiting the ERK signalling pathway and its downstream proteins.

  19. Overexpression of KAI1 induces autophagy and increases MiaPaCa-2 cell survival through the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Chun-Yan; Yan, Jun; Yang, Yue-Feng; Xiao, Feng-Jun; Li, Qing-Fang; Zhang, Qun-Wei; Wang, Li-Sheng; Guo, Xiao-Zhong; Wang, Hua

    2011-01-21

    Research highlights: {yields} We first investigate the effects of KAI1 on autophagy in MiaPaCa-2 cells. {yields} Our findings demonstrate that KAI1 induces autophagy, which in turn inhibits KAI1-induced apoptosis. {yields} This study also supplies a possible novel therapeutic method for the treatment of pancreatic cancer using autophagy inhibitors. -- Abstract: KAI1, a metastasis-suppressor gene belonging to the tetraspanin family, is known to inhibit cancer metastasis without affecting the primary tumorigenicity by inhibiting the epidermal growth factor (EGF) signaling pathway. Recent studies have shown that hypoxic conditions of solid tumors induce high-level autophagy and KAI1 expression. However, the relationship between autophagy and KAI1 remains unclear. By using transmission electron microscopy, confocal microscopy, and Western blotting, we found that KAI1 can induce autophagy in a dose- and time-dependent manner in the human pancreatic cell line MiaPaCa-2. KAI1-induced autophagy was confirmed by the expression of autophagy-related proteins LC3 and Beclin 1. KAI1 induces autophagy through phosphorylation of extracellular signal-related kinases rather than that of AKT. KAI1-induced autophagy protects MiaPaCa-2 cells from apoptosis and proliferation inhibition partially through the downregulation of poly [adenosine diphosphate (ADP)-ribose] polymerase (PARP) cleavage and caspase-3 activation.

  20. Corticotrigeminal Projections from the Insular Cortex to the Trigeminal Caudal Subnucleus Regulate Orofacial Pain after Nerve Injury via Extracellular Signal-Regulated Kinase Activation in Insular Cortex Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jian; Li, Zhi-Hua; Feng, Ban; Zhang, Ting; Zhang, Han; Li, Hui; Chen, Tao; Cui, Jing; Zang, Wei-Dong; Li, Yun-Qing

    2015-01-01

    Cortical neuroplasticity alterations are implicated in the pathophysiology of chronic orofacial pain. However, the relationship between critical cortex excitability and orofacial pain maintenance has not been fully elucidated. We recently demonstrated a top-down corticospinal descending pain modulation pathway from the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) to the spinal dorsal horn that could directly regulate nociceptive transmission. Thus, we aimed to investigate possible corticotrigeminal connections that directly influence orofacial nociception in rats. Infraorbital nerve chronic constriction injury (IoN-CCI) induced significant orofacial nociceptive behaviors as well as pain-related negative emotions such as anxiety/depression in rats. By combining retrograde and anterograde tract tracing, we found powerful evidence that the trigeminal caudal subnucleus (Vc), especially the superficial laminae (I/II), received direct descending projections from granular and dysgranular parts of the insular cortex (IC). Extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), an important signaling molecule involved in neuroplasticity, was significantly activated in the IC following IoN-CCI. Moreover, in IC slices from IoN-CCI rats, U0126, an inhibitor of ERK activation, decreased both the amplitude and the frequency of spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents (sEPSCs) and reduced the paired-pulse ratio (PPR) of Vc-projecting neurons. Additionally, U0126 also reduced the number of action potentials in the Vc-projecting neurons. Finally, intra-IC infusion of U0126 obviously decreased Fos expression in the Vc, accompanied by the alleviation of both nociceptive behavior and negative emotions. Thus, the corticotrigeminal descending pathway from the IC to the Vc could directly regulate orofacial pain, and ERK deactivation in the IC could effectively alleviate neuropathic pain as well as pain-related negative emotions in IoN-CCI rats, probably through this top–down pathway. These findings may

  1. Phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)-1/2 Is associated with the downregulation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-γ during polymicrobial sepsis.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Jennifer M; Hake, Paul W; Denenberg, Alvin; Nowell, Marchele; Piraino, Giovanna; Zingarelli, Basilia

    2010-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-γ is a ligand-activated transcription factor and regulates inflammation. Posttranslational modifications regulate the function of PPARγ, potentially affecting inflammation. PPARγ contains a mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) site, and phosphorylation by extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)-1/2 leads to inhibition of PPARγ. This study investigated the kinetics of PPARγ expression and activation in parenchymal and immune cells in sepsis using the MAPK/ERK kinase (MEK)-1 inhibitor, an upstream kinase of ERK1/2. Adult male Sprague Dawley rats were subjected to polymicrobial sepsis by cecal ligation and puncture. Rats received intraperitoneal injection of vehicle or the MEK1 inhibitor PD98059 (5 mg/kg) 30 min before cecal ligation and puncture. Rats were euthanized at 0, 1, 3, 6 and 18 h after cecal ligation and puncture. Control animals used were animals at time 0 h. Lung, plasma and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were collected for biochemical assays. In vehicle-treated rats, polymicrobial sepsis resulted in significant lung injury. In the lung and PBMCs, nuclear levels of PPARγ were decreased and associated with an increase in phosphorylated PPARγ and phosphorylated ERK1/2 levels. Treatment with the MEK1 inhibitor increased the antiinflammatory plasma adipokine adiponectin, restored PPARγ expression in PBMCs and lung, and decreased lung injury. The inflammatory effects of sepsis cause changes in PPARγ expression and activation, in part, because of phosphorylation of PPARγ by ERK1/2. This phosphorylation can be reversed by ERK1/2 inhibition, thereby improving lung injury.

  2. Ice Plant (Mesembryanthemum crystallinum) Extract Promotes Lipolysis in Mouse 3T3-L1 Adipocytes Through Extracellular Signal-Regulated Kinase Activation.

    PubMed

    Drira, Riadh; Matsumoto, Taku; Agawa, Masashi; Sakamoto, Kazuichi

    2016-03-01

    The antiobesity effect of ice plant (IP) (Mesembryanthemum crystallinum), a salt-resistant African plant, has recently attracted increased attention. IP is rich in pinitol, which lowers blood sugar, and myo-inositol, which prevents fatty liver disease. Furthermore, IP can potentially prevent or reduce the symptoms of metabolic syndrome. However, the details of the physiological mechanisms and mechanisms of action of IP are unclear. A previous study by our group demonstrated the capability of IP extract to prevent adipogenesis in 3T3-L1 preadipocytes. In this study, we analyzed the physiological function of IP extract on lipolysis in 3T3-L1 cells and the underlying mechanisms of this process. We found that the release of glycerol from cells treated with IP extract increased in an IP dose-dependent manner. IP extract exhibited cytotoxic activity at concentrations above 4 mg/mL. Real-time polymerase chain reaction and western blotting showed that IP extract downregulated peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR-)γ, hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL), and adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL) in a concentration-dependent manner, but did not affect HSL-Ser563, HSL-Ser660, or perilipin phosphorylation. Although the cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA)-specific inhibitor H89 did not affect IP extract-induced lipolysis, the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/2) inhibitor U0126 significantly abrogated IP extract-activated glycerol release. Furthermore, IP extract strongly enhanced ERK1/2 phosphorylation at the concentrations used in the study. These results suggest that IP extract augments lipolysis by enhancing ERK phosphorylation. PMID:26390196

  3. Corticotrigeminal Projections from the Insular Cortex to the Trigeminal Caudal Subnucleus Regulate Orofacial Pain after Nerve Injury via Extracellular Signal-Regulated Kinase Activation in Insular Cortex Neurons.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian; Li, Zhi-Hua; Feng, Ban; Zhang, Ting; Zhang, Han; Li, Hui; Chen, Tao; Cui, Jing; Zang, Wei-Dong; Li, Yun-Qing

    2015-01-01

    Cortical neuroplasticity alterations are implicated in the pathophysiology of chronic orofacial pain. However, the relationship between critical cortex excitability and orofacial pain maintenance has not been fully elucidated. We recently demonstrated a top-down corticospinal descending pain modulation pathway from the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) to the spinal dorsal horn that could directly regulate nociceptive transmission. Thus, we aimed to investigate possible corticotrigeminal connections that directly influence orofacial nociception in rats. Infraorbital nerve chronic constriction injury (IoN-CCI) induced significant orofacial nociceptive behaviors as well as pain-related negative emotions such as anxiety/depression in rats. By combining retrograde and anterograde tract tracing, we found powerful evidence that the trigeminal caudal subnucleus (Vc), especially the superficial laminae (I/II), received direct descending projections from granular and dysgranular parts of the insular cortex (IC). Extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), an important signaling molecule involved in neuroplasticity, was significantly activated in the IC following IoN-CCI. Moreover, in IC slices from IoN-CCI rats, U0126, an inhibitor of ERK activation, decreased both the amplitude and the frequency of spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents (sEPSCs) and reduced the paired-pulse ratio (PPR) of Vc-projecting neurons. Additionally, U0126 also reduced the number of action potentials in the Vc-projecting neurons. Finally, intra-IC infusion of U0126 obviously decreased Fos expression in the Vc, accompanied by the alleviation of both nociceptive behavior and negative emotions. Thus, the corticotrigeminal descending pathway from the IC to the Vc could directly regulate orofacial pain, and ERK deactivation in the IC could effectively alleviate neuropathic pain as well as pain-related negative emotions in IoN-CCI rats, probably through this top-down pathway. These findings may help

  4. The effect of active and passive intravenous cocaine administration on the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) activity in the rat brain.

    PubMed

    Miszkiel, Joanna; Detka, Jan; Cholewa, Joanna; Frankowska, Małgorzata; Nowak, Ewa; Budziszewska, Bogusława; Przegaliński, Edmund; Filip, Małgorzata

    2014-08-01

    According to a current hypothesis of learning processes, recent papers pointed out to an important role of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), in drug addiction. We employed the Western blotting techniques to examine the ERK activity immediately after cocaine iv self-administration and in different drug-free withdrawal periods in rats. To distinguish motivational vs. pharmacological effects of the psychostimulant intake, a "yoked" procedure was used. Animals were decapitated after 14 daily cocaine self-administration sessions or on the 1st, 3rd or 10th extinction days. At each time point the activity of the ERK was assessed in several brain structures, including the prefrontal cortex, hippocampus, dorsal striatum and nucleus accumbens. Passive, repeated iv cocaine administration resulted in a 45% increase in ERK phosphorylation in the hippocampus while cocaine self-administration did not change brain ERK activity. On the 1st day of extinction, the activity of the ERK in the prefrontal cortex was decreased in rats with a history of cocaine chronic intake: by 66% for "active" cocaine group and by 35% for "yoked" cocaine group. On the 3rd day the reduction in the ERK activity (25-34%) was observed in the hippocampus for both cocaine-treated groups, and also in the nucleus accumbens for "yoked" cocaine group (40%). On the 10th day of extinction there was no significant alteration in ERK activity in any group of rats. Our findings suggest that cortical ERK is involved in cocaine seeking behavior in rats. They also indicate the time and regional adaptations in this enzyme activity after cocaine withdrawal. PMID:24948065

  5. Phospholipase A(2) activation by poultry particulate matter is mediated through extracellular signal-regulated kinase in lung epithelial cells: regulation of interleukin-8 release.

    PubMed

    Kotha, Sainath R; Piper, Melissa G; Patel, Rishi B; Sliman, Sean; Malireddy, Smitha; Zhao, Lingying; Baran, Christopher P; Nana-Sinkam, Patrick S; Wewers, Mark D; Romberger, Debra; Marsh, Clay B; Parinandi, Narasimham L

    2013-11-01

    The mechanisms of poultry particulate matter (PM)-induced agricultural respiratory disorders are not thoroughly understood. Hence, it is hypothesized in this article that poultry PM induces the release of interleukin-8 (IL-8) by lung epithelial cells that is regulated upstream by the concerted action of cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK). To test this hypothesis, the widely used cultured human lung epithelial cells (A549) were chosen as the model system. Poultry PM caused a significant activation of PLA2 in A549 cells, which was attenuated by AACOCF3 (cPLA2 inhibitor) and PD98059 (ERK-1/2 upstream inhibitor). Poultry PM induced upstream ERK-1/2 phosphorylation and downstream cPLA2 serine phosphorylation, in a concerted fashion, in cells with enhanced association of ERK-1/2 and cPLA2. The poultry PM-induced cPLA2 serine phosphorylation and IL-8 release were attenuated by AACOCF3, PD98059, and by transfection with dominant-negative ERK-1/2 DNA in cells. The poultry PM-induced IL-8 release by the bone marrow-derived macrophages of cPLA2 knockout mice was significantly lower. For the first time, this study demonstrated that the poultry PM-induced IL-8 secretion by human lung epithelial cells was regulated by cPLA2 activation through ERK-mediated serine phosphorylation, suggesting a mechanism of airway inflammation among poultry farm workers.

  6. Contribution of phospholipase D in endothelin-1-mediated extracellular signal-regulated kinase activation and proliferation in rat uterine leiomyoma cells.

    PubMed

    Robin, Philippe; Chouayekh, Sondes; Bole-Feysot, Christine; Leiber, Denis; Tanfin, Zahra

    2005-01-01

    Endothelin (ET)-1 is a mitogenic factor in numerous cell types, including rat myometrial cells. In the present study, we investigated the potential role of ET-1 in the proliferation of tumoral uterine smooth muscle cells (ELT-3 cells). We found that ET-1 exerted a more potent mitogenic effect in ELT-3 cells than in normal myometrial cells, as indicated by the increase in [3H]thymidine incorporation, cell number, and bromodeoxyuridine incorporation. The ET-1 was more efficient than platelet-derived growth factor and epidermal growth factor to stimulate proliferation. The ET-1-mediated cell proliferation was inhibited in the presence of U0126, a specific inhibitor of (mitogen-activated protein kinase ERK kinase), indicating that extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) activation is involved. Additionally, ET-1 induced the activation of phospholipase (PL) D, leading to the synthesis of phosphatidic acid (PA). The ET-1-induced activation of PLD was twofold higher in ELT-3 cells compared to that in normal cells. The two cell types expressed mRNA for PLD1a and PLD2, whereas PLD1b was expressed only in ELT-3 cells. The exposure of cells to butan-1-ol reduced ET-1-mediated production of PA by PLD and partially inhibited ERK activation and DNA synthesis. Addition of exogenous PLD or PA in the medium reproduced the effect of ET-1 on ERK activation and cell proliferation. Collectively, these data indicate that ET-1 is a potent mitogenic factor in ELT-3 cells via a signaling pathway involving a PLD-dependent activation of ERK. This highlights the potential role of ET-1 in the development of uterine leiomyoma, and it reinforces the role of PLD in tumor growth. PMID:15355882

  7. The Ras/Raf/MEK/extracellular signal-regulated kinase pathway induces autocrine-paracrine growth inhibition via the leukemia inhibitory factor/JAK/STAT pathway.

    PubMed

    Park, Jong-In; Strock, Christopher J; Ball, Douglas W; Nelkin, Barry D

    2003-01-01

    Sustained activation of the Ras/Raf/MEK/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathway can lead to cell cycle arrest in many cell types. We have found, with human medullary thyroid cancer (MTC) cells, that activated Ras or c-Raf-1 can induce growth arrest by producing and secreting an autocrine-paracrine factor. This protein was purified from cell culture medium conditioned by Raf-activated MTC cells and was identified by mass spectrometry as leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF). LIF expression upon Raf activation and subsequent activation of JAK-STAT3 was also observed in small cell lung carcinoma cells, suggesting that this autocrine-paracrine signaling may be a common response to Ras/Raf activation. LIF was sufficient to induce growth arrest and differentiation of MTC cells. This effect was mediated through the gp130/JAK/STAT3 pathway, since anti-gp130 blocking antibody or dominant-negative STAT3 blocked the effects of LIF. Thus, LIF expression provides a novel mechanism allowing Ras/Raf signaling to activate the JAK-STAT3 pathway. In addition to this cell-extrinsic growth inhibitory pathway, we find that the Ras/Raf/MEK/ERK pathway induces an intracellular growth inhibitory signal, independent of the LIF/JAK/STAT3 pathway. Therefore, activation of the Ras/Raf/MEK/ERK pathway can lead to growth arrest and differentiation via at least two different signaling pathways. This use of multiple pathways may be important for "fail-safe" induction and maintenance of cell cycle arrest.

  8. The Ras/Raf/MEK/Extracellular Signal-Regulated Kinase Pathway Induces Autocrine-Paracrine Growth Inhibition via the Leukemia Inhibitory Factor/JAK/STAT Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jong-In; Strock, Christopher J.; Ball, Douglas W.; Nelkin, Barry D.

    2003-01-01

    Sustained activation of the Ras/Raf/MEK/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathway can lead to cell cycle arrest in many cell types. We have found, with human medullary thyroid cancer (MTC) cells, that activated Ras or c-Raf-1 can induce growth arrest by producing and secreting an autocrine-paracrine factor. This protein was purified from cell culture medium conditioned by Raf-activated MTC cells and was identified by mass spectrometry as leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF). LIF expression upon Raf activation and subsequent activation of JAK-STAT3 was also observed in small cell lung carcinoma cells, suggesting that this autocrine-paracrine signaling may be a common response to Ras/Raf activation. LIF was sufficient to induce growth arrest and differentiation of MTC cells. This effect was mediated through the gp130/JAK/STAT3 pathway, since anti-gp130 blocking antibody or dominant-negative STAT3 blocked the effects of LIF. Thus, LIF expression provides a novel mechanism allowing Ras/Raf signaling to activate the JAK-STAT3 pathway. In addition to this cell-extrinsic growth inhibitory pathway, we find that the Ras/Raf/MEK/ERK pathway induces an intracellular growth inhibitory signal, independent of the LIF/JAK/STAT3 pathway. Therefore, activation of the Ras/Raf/MEK/ERK pathway can lead to growth arrest and differentiation via at least two different signaling pathways. This use of multiple pathways may be important for “fail-safe” induction and maintenance of cell cycle arrest. PMID:12509453

  9. MicroRNAs 206 and 21 Cooperate To Promote RAS–Extracellular Signal-Regulated Kinase Signaling by Suppressing the Translation of RASA1 and SPRED1

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Sriganesh B.; Lin, Chen-Chung; Farrugia, Mark K.; McLaughlin, Sarah L.; Ellis, Emily J.; Brundage, Kathleen M.; Salkeni, Mohamad A.

    2014-01-01

    Despite the low prevalence of activating point mutation of RAS or RAF genes, the RAS–extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathway is implicated in breast cancer pathogenesis. Indeed, in triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC), there is recurrent genetic alteration of pathway components. Using short hairpin RNA (shRNA) methods, we observed that the zinc finger transcription factor Krüppel-like factor 4 (KLF4) can promote RAS-ERK signaling in TNBC cells. Endogenous KLF4 bound to the promoter regions and promoted the expression of two microRNAs (miRs), miR-206 and miR-21 (i.e., miR-206/21). Antisense-mediated knockdown (anti-miR) revealed that miR-206/21 coordinately promote RAS-ERK signaling and the corresponding cell phenotypes by inhibiting translation of the pathway suppressors RASA1 and SPRED1. In TNBC cells, including cells with mutation of RAS, the suppression of either RASA1 or SPRED1 increased the levels of GTP-bound, wild-type RAS and activated ERK 1/2. Unlike the control cells, treatment of RASA1- or SPRED1-suppressed cells with anti-miR-206/21 had little or no impact on the level of activated ERK 1/2 or on cell proliferation and failed to suppress tumor initiation. These results identify RASA1 and SPRED1 mRNAs as latent RAS-ERK pathway suppressors that can be upregulated in tumor cells by anti-miR treatment. Consequently, KLF4-regulated miRs are important for the maintenance of RAS-ERK pathway activity in TNBC cells. PMID:25202123

  10. Intracerebroventricular administration of ouabain, a Na/K-ATPase inhibitor, activates tyrosine hydroxylase through extracellular signal-regulated kinase in rat striatum.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hyun Sook; Kim, Se Hyun; Park, Hong Geun; Kim, Yong Sik; Ahn, Yong Min

    2011-11-01

    Alteration in dopamine neurotransmission has been reported to be involved in the mania of bipolar disorder. Tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) is the rate-limiting enzyme that is crucial for dopamine biosynthesis, and its activity is tightly regulated by phosphorylation at multiple N-terminal serine residues. Previously, we have reported that intracerebroventricular (ICV) injection of ouabain, a selective Na/K-ATPase inhibitor, induces hyperactivity in rats that mimics manic symptoms related to the activation of extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase1/2 (ERK1/2), which plays crucial roles in the modulation of TH phosphorylation. In this study, we investigated the effects of ICV injection of ouabain on TH phosphorylation in rat striatum and the involvement of ERK1/2 in ouabain-induced TH activation. ICV ouabain induced an acute dose-dependent increase in locomotor activity and in TH phosphorylation in rat striatum. TH phosphorylation at Ser19 was significantly increased with 100, 500, and 1000μM ouabain, and phosphorylation at Ser31 and Ser40 was significantly increased with 500 and 1000μM. We also found that ICV pretreatment with U0126, a specific MEK1/2 inhibitor, attenuated the 1000μM ouabain-induced increase in TH phosphorylation at Ser19, Ser31, and Ser40, as well as the hyperactivity of rats. Moreover, the increased phosphorylation of TH (Ser19, Ser31, and Ser40) was maintained until 8h after single administration ouabain was accompanied by increased phosphorylation of ERK1/2 (Thr202/Tyr204) and p90RSK (Thr359/Ser363). These findings imply that TH activation of the ERK1/2 signal pathway could play an important role in ouabain-induced hyperactivity of rats, a mania model. PMID:21871514

  11. Microtubule integrity regulates src-like and extracellular signal-regulated kinase activities in human pro-monocytic cells. Importance for interleukin-1 production.

    PubMed

    Schmid-Alliana, A; Menou, L; Manié, S; Schmid-Antomarchi, H; Millet, M A; Giuriato, S; Ferrua, B; Rossi, B

    1998-02-01

    We have demonstrated previously that microtubule depolymerization by colchicine in human monocytes induces selective production of interleukin-1 (IL-1) (Manié, S., Schmid-Alliana, A., Kubar, J., Ferrua, B., and Rossi, B. (1993) J. Biol. Chem. 268, 13675-13681). Here, we provide evidence that disruption of the microtubule structure rapidly triggers extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) activation, whereas it was without effect on SAPK2 activity, which is commonly acknowledged to control pro-inflammatory cytokine production. This process involves the activation of the entire cascade including Ras, Raf-1, MEK1/2, ERK1, and ERK2. Activation of ERKs is followed by their nuclear translocation. Although other SAPK congeners might be activated upon microtubule depolymerization, the activation of ERK1 and ERK2 is mandatory for IL-1 production as shown by the blocking effect of PD 98059, a specific MEK1/2 inhibitor. Additionally, we provide evidence that microtubule disruption also induces the activation of c-Src and Hck activities. The importance of Src kinases in the mediation of the colchicine effect is underscored by the fact that CP 118556, a specific inhibitor of Src-like kinase, abrogates both the colchicine-induced ERK activation and IL-1 production. This is the first evidence that ERK activation is an absolute prerequisite for induction of this cytokine. Altogether, our data lend support to a model where the status of microtubule integrity controls the level of Src activities that subsequently activate the ERK kinase cascade, thus leading to IL-1 production.

  12. Inhibition of Adipocyte Differentiation by Phytoestrogen Genistein Through a Potential Downregulation of Extracellular Signal-Regulated Kinases 1/2 Activity

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Qing-Chuan; Li, Ya-Lin; Qin, Yan-Fang; Quarles, L. Darryl; Xu, Kang-Kang; Li, Rong; Zhou, Hong-Hao; Xiao, Zhou-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    In the current study, we investigated the effects of genistein on adipogenic differentiation of mouse bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cell (BMSC) cultures and its potential signaling pathway. The terminal adipogenic differentiation was assessed by western-blotting analysis of adipogenic-specific proteins such as PPARγ, C/EBPα, and aP2 and the formation of adipocytes. Treatment of mouse BMSC cultures with adipogenic cocktail resulted in sustained activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1/2), which are members of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) family, at the early phase of adipogenesis (from days 3 to 9). Inhibition of ERK1/2 activation by PD98059, a specific MEK inhibitor, reversed the induced adipogenic differentiation. Genistein dose-dependently decreased the phosphorylation of ERK1/2 in mouse BMSC cultures. Genistein incubation for the entire culture period, as well as that applied during the early phase of the culture period, significantly inhibited the adipogenic differentiation of mouse BMSC cultures. While genistein was incubated at the late stage (after day 9), no inhibitory effect on adipogenic differentiation was observed. BMSC cultures treated with genistein in the presence of fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2), an activator of the ERK1/2 signaling pathway, expressed normal levels of ERK1/2 activity, and, in so doing, are capable of undergoing adipogenesis. Our results suggest that activation of the ERK1/2 signaling pathway during the early phase of adipogenesis (from days 3 to 9) is essential to adipogenic differentiation of BMSC cultures, and that genistein inhibits the adipogenic differentiation through a potential downregulation of ERK1/2 activity at this early phase of adipogenesis. PMID:18384126

  13. The amiloride-sensitive epithelial sodium channel alpha-subunit is transcriptionally down-regulated in rat parotid cells by the extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase pathway.

    PubMed

    Zentner, M D; Lin, H H; Wen, X; Kim, K J; Ann, D K

    1998-11-13

    Previous studies have shown that an inducible Raf-1 kinase protein, DeltaRaf-1:ER, activates the mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK)-signaling pathway, which is required for the transformation of the rat salivary epithelial cell line, Pa-4. Differential display polymerase chain reaction was employed to search for mRNAs repressed by DeltaRaf-1:ER activation. Through this approach, the gene encoding the alpha-subunit of the amiloride-sensitive epithelial sodium channel (alpha-ENaC) was identified as a target of activated Raf-1 kinases. alpha-ENaC down-regulation could also be seen in cells treated with 12-O-tetradecanoyl-1-phorbol-13-acetate (TPA), indicating that the repression of steady-state alpha-ENaC mRNA level was dependent upon the activity of protein kinase C, the target of TPA, as well. Pretreatment of cells with a specific inhibitor of the ERK kinase pathway, PD 98059, markedly abolished the down-regulation of alpha-ENaC expression, consistent with the hypothesis that the ERK kinase-signaling pathway is involved in TPA-mediated repression. Moreover, through the use of transient transfection assays with alpha-ENaC-reporter and activated Raf expression construct(s), we provide the first evidence that activation of the ERK pathway down-regulates alpha-ENaC expression at the transcriptional level. Elucidating the molecular programming that modulates the expression of the alpha-subunit may provide new insights into the modulation of sodium reabsorption across epithelia. PMID:9804854

  14. Extracellular-signal regulated kinase 8 of Trypanosoma brucei uniquely phosphorylates its proliferating cell nuclear antigen homolog and reveals exploitable properties.

    PubMed

    Valenciano, Ana L; Knudsen, Giselle M; Mackey, Zachary B

    2016-10-17

    The Trypanosoma brucei subspecies T. brucei gambiense and T. brucei rhodesiense are vector-borne pathogens that cause sleeping sickness also known as Human African Trypanosomiasis (HAT), which is fatal if left untreated. The drugs that treat HAT are ineffective and cause toxic side effects. One strategy for identifying safer and more effective HAT drugs is to therapeutically exploit essential gene targets in T. brucei. Genes that make up a basic mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) network are present in T. brucei. Tb927.10.5140 encodes an essential MAPK that is homologous to the human extracellular-signal regulated kinase 8 (HsERK8) which forms a tight complex with the replication factor proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) to stabilize intracellular PCNA levels. Here we demonstrate that (TbPCNA) is uniquely phos-phorylated on serine (S) and threonine (T) residues in T. brucei and that TbERK8 phosphorylates TbPCNA at each of these residues. The ability of an ERK8 homolog to phosphorylate a PCNA homolog is a novel biochemical property that is first demonstrated here in T. brucei and may be unique to this pathogen. We demonstrate that the potent HsERK8 inhibitor Ro318220, has an IC50 for TbERK8 that is several hundred times higher than its reported IC50 for HsERK8. This indicated that the active sites of TbERK8 and HsERK8 can be selectively inhibited, which provides a rational basis for discovering inhibitors that specifically target this essential parasite MAPK to kill the parasite.

  15. Extracellular-signal regulated kinase 8 of Trypanosoma brucei uniquely phosphorylates its proliferating cell nuclear antigen homolog and reveals exploitable properties

    PubMed Central

    Valenciano, Ana L.; Knudsen, Giselle M.; Mackey, Zachary B.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The Trypanosoma brucei subspecies T. brucei gambiense and T. brucei rhodesiense are vector-borne pathogens that cause sleeping sickness also known as Human African Trypanosomiasis (HAT), which is fatal if left untreated. The drugs that treat HAT are ineffective and cause toxic side effects. One strategy for identifying safer and more effective HAT drugs is to therapeutically exploit essential gene targets in T. brucei. Genes that make up a basic mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) network are present in T. brucei. Tb927.10.5140 encodes an essential MAPK that is homologous to the human extracellular-signal regulated kinase 8 (HsERK8) which forms a tight complex with the replication factor proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) to stabilize intracellular PCNA levels. Here we demonstrate that (TbPCNA) is uniquely phos-phorylated on serine (S) and threonine (T) residues in T. brucei and that TbERK8 phosphorylates TbPCNA at each of these residues. The ability of an ERK8 homolog to phosphorylate a PCNA homolog is a novel biochemical property that is first demonstrated here in T. brucei and may be unique to this pathogen. We demonstrate that the potent HsERK8 inhibitor Ro318220, has an IC50 for TbERK8 that is several hundred times higher than its reported IC50 for HsERK8. This indicated that the active sites of TbERK8 and HsERK8 can be selectively inhibited, which provides a rational basis for discovering inhibitors that specifically target this essential parasite MAPK to kill the parasite. PMID:27589575

  16. Xenin-induced feeding suppression is not mediated through the activation of central extracellular signal-regulated kinase signaling in mice.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun Ran; Lew, Pei San; Spirkina, Alexandra; Mizuno, Tooru M

    2016-10-01

    Xenin is a gut hormone that reduces food intake by partly acting through the hypothalamus via neurotensin receptor 1 (Ntsr1). However, specific signaling pathways that mediate xenin-induced feeding suppression are not fully understood. Activation of Ntsr1 leads to the activation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK). Hypothalamic ERK participates in the regulation of food intake by mediating the effect of hormonal signals. Therefore, we hypothesized that the anorectic effect of xenin is mediated by hypothalamic ERK signaling. To address this hypothesis, we compared levels of phosphorylation of ERK1/2 (pERK1/2) in the hypothalamus of both control and xenin-treated mice. The effect of xenin on ERK1/2 phosphorylation was also examined in mouse hypothalamic neuronal cell lines with or without Ntsr1. We also examined the effect of the blockade of central ERK signaling on xenin-induced feeding suppression in mice. The intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of xenin caused a significant increase in the number of pERK1/2-immunoreactive cells in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus. The majority of pERK1/2-positive cells expressed neuronal nuclei (NeuN), a marker for neurons. Xenin treatment increased pERK1/2 levels in one cell line expressing Ntsr1 but not another line without Ntsr1 expression. Both i.p. and intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) injections of xenin reduced food intake in mice. The i.c.v. pre-treatment with U0126, a selective inhibitor of ERK1/2 upstream kinases, did not affect xenin-induced reduction in food intake. These findings suggest that although xenin activates ERK signaling in subpopulations of hypothalamic neurons, xenin does not require the activation of hypothalamic ERK signaling pathway to elicit feeding suppression. PMID:27316340

  17. Mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular signal-regulated kinase 2 regulates cytoskeletal organization and chemotaxis via catalytic and microtubule-specific interactions.

    PubMed Central

    Reszka, A A; Bulinski, J C; Krebs, E G; Fischer, E H

    1997-01-01

    The extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERKs) 1 and 2 are mitogen-activated protein kinases that act as key components in a signaling cascade linking growth factor receptors to the cytoskeleton and the nucleus. ERK2 mutants have been used to alter cytoskeletal regulation in Chinese hamster ovary cells without affecting cell growth or feedback signaling. Mutation of the unique loop L6 (residues 91-95), which is in a portion of the molecule that is cryptic upon the binding of ERK2 to the microtubules (MTs), generated significant morphological alterations. Most notable phenotypes were observed after expression of a combined mutant incorporating changes to both L6 and the TEY phosphorylation lip, including a 70% increase in cell spreading. Actin stress fibers in these cells, which normally formed a single broad parallel array, were arranged in three or more orientations or in fan-like arrays. MTs, which ordinarily extend longitudinally from the centrosome, spread radially, covering a larger surface area. Single, but not the double, mutations of the Thr and Tyr residues of the TEY phosphorylation lip caused a ca. 25% increase in cell spreading, accompanied by a threefold increase in chemotactic cell migration. Mutation of Lys-52 triggered a 48% increase in cell spreading but no alteration to chemotaxis. These findings suggest that wild-type ERK2 inhibits the organization of the cytoskeleton, the spreading of the cell, and chemotactic migration. This involves control of the orientation of actin and MTs and the positioning of focal adhesions via regulatory interactions that may occur on the MTs. Images PMID:9243503

  18. Targeting of the orphan receptor GPR35 by pamoic acid: a potent activator of extracellular signal-regulated kinase and β-arrestin2 with antinociceptive activity.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Pingwei; Sharir, Haleli; Kapur, Ankur; Cowan, Alan; Geller, Ellen B; Adler, Martin W; Seltzman, Herbert H; Reggio, Patricia H; Heynen-Genel, Susanne; Sauer, Michelle; Chung, Thomas D Y; Bai, Yushi; Chen, Wei; Caron, Marc G; Barak, Larry S; Abood, Mary E

    2010-10-01

    Known agonists of the orphan receptor GPR35 are kynurenic acid, zaprinast, 5-nitro-2-(3-phenylproplyamino) benzoic acid, and lysophosphatidic acids. Their relatively low affinities for GPR35 and prominent off-target effects at other pathways, however, diminish their utility for understanding GPR35 signaling and for identifying potential therapeutic uses of GPR35. In a screen of the Prestwick Library of drugs and drug-like compounds, we have found that pamoic acid is a potent GPR35 agonist. Pamoic acid is considered by the Food and Drug Administration as an inactive compound that enables long-acting formulations of numerous drugs, such as the antihelminthics oxantel pamoate and pyrantel pamoate; the psychoactive compounds hydroxyzine pamoate (Vistaril) and imipramine pamoate (Tofranil-PM); and the peptide hormones triptorelin pamoate (Trelstar) and octreotide pamoate (OncoLar). We have found that pamoic acid induces a G(i/o)-linked, GPR35-mediated increase in the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2, recruitment of β-arrestin2 to GPR35, and internalization of GPR35. In mice, it attenuates visceral pain perception, indicating an antinociceptive effect, possibly through GPR35 receptors. We have also identified in collaboration with the Sanford-Burnham Institute Molecular Libraries Probe Production Center new classes of GPR35 antagonist compounds, including the nanomolar potency antagonist methyl-5-[(tert-butylcarbamothioylhydrazinylidene)methyl]-1-(2,4-difluorophenyl)pyrazole-4-carboxylate (CID2745687). Pamoic acid and potent antagonists such as CID2745687 present novel opportunities for expanding the chemical space of GPR35, elucidating GPR35 pharmacology, and stimulating GPR35-associated drug development. Our results indicate that the unexpected biological functions of pamoic acid may yield potential new uses for a common drug constituent. PMID:20826425

  19. Antidepressants increase glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor production through monoamine-independent activation of protein tyrosine kinase and extracellular signal-regulated kinase in glial cells.

    PubMed

    Hisaoka, Kazue; Takebayashi, Minoru; Tsuchioka, Mami; Maeda, Natsuko; Nakata, Yoshihiro; Yamawaki, Shigeto

    2007-04-01

    Recent studies show that neuronal and glial plasticity are important for therapeutic action of antidepressants. We previously reported that antidepressants increase glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) production in rat C6 glioma cells (C6 cells). Here, we found that amitriptyline, a tricyclic antidepressant, increased both GDNF mRNA expression and release, which were selectively and completely inhibited by mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase inhibitors. Indeed, treatment of amitriptyline rapidly increased extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) activity, as well as p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase and c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase activities. Furthermore, different classes of antidepressants also rapidly increased ERK activity. The extent of acute ERK activation and GDNF release were significantly correlated to each other in individual antidepressants, suggesting an important role of acute ERK activation in GDNF production. Furthermore, antidepressants increased the acute ERK activation and GDNF mRNA expression in normal human astrocytes as well as C6 cells. Although 5-hydroxytryptamine (serotonin) (5-HT), but not noradrenaline or dopamine, increased ERK activation and GDNF release via 5-HT2A receptors, ketanserin, a 5-HT2A receptor antagonist, did not have any effect on the amitriptyline-induced ERK activation. Thus, GDNF production by amitriptyline was independent of monoamine. Both of the amitriptyline-induced ERK activation and GDNF mRNA expression were blocked by genistein, a general protein tyrosine kinase (PTK) inhibitor. Actually, we found that amitriptyline acutely increased phosphorylation levels of several phosphotyrosine-containing proteins. Taken together, these findings indicate that ERK activation through PTK regulates antidepressant-induced GDNF production and that the GDNF production in glial cells may be a novel action of the antidepressant, which is independent of monoamine. PMID:17210798

  20. PI3K/Akt and Stat3 signaling regulated by PTEN control of the cancer stem cell population, proliferation and senescence in a glioblastoma cell line.

    PubMed

    Moon, Seok-Ho; Kim, Dae-Kwan; Cha, Young; Jeon, Iksoo; Song, Jihwan; Park, Kyung-Soon

    2013-03-01

    Malignant gliomas are the most common primary brain tumor in adults. A number of genes have been implicated in glioblastoma including mutation and deletion of PTEN. PTEN is a regulator of PI3K-mediated Akt signaling pathways and has been recognized as a therapeutic target in glioblastoma. To achieve potent therapeutic inhibition of the PI3K-Akt pathway in glioblastoma, it is essential to understand the interplay between the regulators of its activation. Here, ectopic expression of PTEN in the U-87MG human glioblastoma-astrocytoma cell line is shown to result in the depletion of glioblastoma stem cells (GSCs) and to cause growth retardation and senescence. These effects are likely to be associated with PTEN-mediated cooperative perturbation of Akt and Stat3 signals. Using an in vivo rat model of glioblastoma, we showed that PTEN-overexpressing U-87MG cells failed to induce tumor formation, while untreated U-87MG cells did so. Furthermore, cells expressing the phosphorylated form of Stat3 were completely absent from the brain of rats implanted with PTEN-overexpressing U-87MG cells. Based on these results, PTEN appears to function as a crucial inhibitor of GSCs and as an inducer of senescence, suggesting that functional enhancement of the PTEN pathway will be useful to provide a therapeutic strategy for targeting glioblastoma. PMID:23314408

  1. Glycoprotein nonmetastatic melanoma protein B extracellular fragment shows neuroprotective effects and activates the PI3K/Akt and MEK/ERK pathways via the Na+/K+-ATPase

    PubMed Central

    Ono, Yoko; Tsuruma, Kazuhiro; Takata, Masafumi; Shimazawa, Masamitsu; Hara, Hideaki

    2016-01-01

    Glycoprotein nonmetastatic melanoma protein B (GPNMB) plays important roles in various types of cancer and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). The details of GPNMB function and its interacting protein have not been clarified. Therefore, to identify GPNMB binding partners on the cell membrane, we used membrane protein library/BLOTCHIP-MS technology, which enables us to analyze all cell membrane proteins as binding partners of the GPNMB extracellular fragment. As a result of a comprehensive search, we identified the alpha subunits of Na+/K+-ATPase (NKA) as a possible binding partner. We confirmed the interaction between the GPNMB extracellular fragment and NKA by immunoprecipitation and immunostaining in NSC-34 cells. Indeed, endogenous GPNMB extracellular fragment bound to and colocalized with NKA alpha subunits. Furthermore, exogenous GPNMB extracellular fragment, i.e., human recombinant GPNMB, also bound to and colocalized with NKA alpha subunits. Additionally, we found that the GPNMB extracellular fragment had neuroprotective effects and activated the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)-extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) kinase (MEK)/ERK pathways via NKA. These findings indicated that NKA may act as a novel “receptor” for the GPNMB extracellular fragment, offering additional molecular targets for the treatment of GPNMB-related diseases, including various types of cancer and ALS. PMID:26988030

  2. Green fluorescent protein tagging of extracellular signal-regulated kinase and p38 pathways reveals novel dynamics of pathway activation during primary and metastatic growth.

    PubMed

    Aguirre-Ghiso, Julio A; Ossowski, Liliana; Rosenbaum, Sarah K

    2004-10-15

    We describe a novel approach that allows detection of primary and metastatic cells in vivo in which either the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) or the p38 pathway is activated. Our recent findings showed that ERK and p38 kinases regulate, respectively, programs dictating cell proliferation (high ERK-to-p38 ratio) or growth arrest and dormancy (low ERK-to-p38 ratio) in vivo. Thus, we were able to use green fluorescent protein (GFP) to reflect ERK and p38 activities and, consequently, the proliferative state of cancer cells. This was accomplished by transfecting tumorigenic T-HEp3 and HT1080 cells, and dormant D-HEp3 cells, with plasmids coding for Elk-GAL4 or CHOP-GAL4 fusion proteins that, when phosphorylated by either ERK or p38, respectively, transactivated a GFP-reporter gene. The fate of these cells was examined in culture, in primary sites, and in spontaneous metastasis in chick embryos and nude mice. In culture GFP level was directly proportional to the previously established levels of ERK or p38 activation. In contrast, during the first 24 hours of in vivo inoculation, both the tumorigenic and the dormant cells strongly activated the p38 pathway. However, in the tumorigenic cells, p38 activity was rapidly silenced, correcting the ERK/p38 imbalance and contributing to high ERK activity throughout the entire period of tumor growth. In contrast, in the small nodules formed by dormant cells, the level of ERK activity was dramatically reduced, whereas p38 activity remained high. Strong activation of ERK was evident in metastatic sites, whereas p38 activation was silenced in this anatomic location as well. These results show that it is possible to directly measure cancer cell response to microenvironment with this reporter system and that only proliferation-competent cells have the ability to rapidly adapt ERK and p38 signaling for proliferative success. This approach allows isolation and further characterization of metastatic cells with specific

  3. Sulfur Dioxide Inhibits Extracellular Signal-regulated Kinase Signaling to Attenuate Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Proliferation in Angiotensin II-induced Hypertensive Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Hui-Juan; Huang, Ya-Qian; Chen, Qing-Hua; Tian, Xiao-Yu; Liu, Jia; Tang, Chao-Shu; Jin, Hong-Fang; Du, Jun-Bao

    2016-01-01

    Background: Clarifying the mechanisms underlying vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) proliferation is important for the prevention and treatment of vascular remodeling and the reverse of hyperplastic lesions. Previous research has shown that the gaseous signaling molecule sulfur dioxide (SO2) inhibits VSMC proliferation, but the mechanism for the inhibition of the angiotensin II (AngII)-induced VSMC proliferation by SO2 has not been fully elucidated. This study was designed to investigate if SO2 inhibited VSMC proliferation in mice with hypertension induced by AngII. Methods: Thirty-six male C57 mice were randomly divided into control, AngII, and AngII + SO2 groups. Mice in AngII group and AngII + SO2 group received a capsule-type AngII pump implanted under the skin of the back at a slow-release dose of 1000 ng·kg−1·min−1. In addition, mice in AngII + SO2 received intraperitoneal injections of SO2 donor. Arterial blood pressure of tail artery was determined. The thickness of the aorta was measured by elastic fiber staining, and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and phosphorylated-extracellular signal-regulated kinase (P-ERK) were detected in aortic tissues. The concentration of SO2 in serum and aortic tissue homogenate supernatant was measured using high-performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence determination. In the in vitro study, VSMC of A7R5 cell lines was divided into six groups: control, AngII, AngII + SO2, PD98059 (an inhibitor of ERK phosphorylation), AngII + PD98059, and AngII + SO2 + PD98059. Expression of PCNA, ERK, and P-ERK was determined by Western blotting. Results: In animal experiment, compared with the control group, AngII markedly increased blood pressure (P < 0.01) and thickened the aortic wall in mice (P < 0.05) with an increase in the expression of PCNA (P < 0.05). SO2, however, reduced the systemic hypertension and the wall thickness induced by AngII (P < 0.05). It inhibited the increased expression of PCNA and P

  4. Integration of Apoptosis Signal-Regulating Kinase 1-Mediated Stress Signaling with the Akt/Protein Kinase B-IκB Kinase Cascade

    PubMed Central

    Puckett, Mary C.; Goldman, Erinn H.; Cockrell, Lisa M.; Huang, Bei; Kasinski, Andrea L.; Du, Yuhong; Wang, Cun-Yu; Lin, Anning; Ichijo, Hidenori; Khuri, Fadlo

    2013-01-01

    Cellular processes are tightly controlled through well-coordinated signaling networks that respond to conflicting cues, such as reactive oxygen species (ROS), endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress signals, and survival factors to ensure proper cell function. We report here a direct interaction between inhibitor of κB kinase (IKK) and apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 (ASK1), unveiling a critical node at the junction of survival, inflammation, and stress signaling networks. IKK can be activated by growth factor stimulation or tumor necrosis factor alpha engagement. IKK forms a complex with and phosphorylates ASK1 at a sensor site, Ser967, leading to the recruitment of 14-3-3, counteracts stress signal-triggered ASK1 activation, and suppresses ASK1-mediated functions. An inhibitory role of IKK in JNK signaling has been previously reported to depend on NF-κB-mediated gene expression. Our data suggest that IKK has a dual role: a transcription-dependent and a transcription-independent action in controlling the ASK1-JNK axis, coupling IKK to ROS and ER stress response. Direct phosphorylation of ASK1 by IKK also defines a novel IKK phosphorylation motif. Because of the intimate involvement of ASK1 in diverse diseases, the IKK/ASK1 interface offers a promising target for therapeutic development. PMID:23530055

  5. TNFα Signaling Regulates Cystic Epithelial Cell Proliferation through Akt/mTOR and ERK/MAPK/Cdk2 Mediated Id2 Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Julie X.; Fan, Lucy X.; Li, Xiaoyan; Calvet, James P.; Li, Xiaogang

    2015-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) is present in cyst fluid and promotes cyst growth in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). However, the cross-talk between TNFα and PKD associated signaling pathways remains elusive. In this study, we found that stimulation of renal epithelial cells with TNFα or RANKL (receptor activator of NF-κB ligand), a member of the TNFα cytokine family, activated either the PI3K pathway, leading to AKT and mTOR mediated the increase of Id2 protein, or MAPK and Cdk2 to induce Id2 nuclear translocation. The effects of TNFα/RANKL on increasing Id2 protein and its nuclear translocation caused significantly decreased mRNA and protein levels of the Cdk inhibitor p21, allowing increased cell proliferation. TNFα levels increase in cystic kidneys in response to macrophage infiltration and thus might contribute to cyst growth and enlargement during the progression of disease. As such, this study elucidates a novel mechanism for TNFα signaling in regulating cystic renal epithelial cell proliferation in ADPKD. PMID:26110849

  6. Rapid activation of sodium-proton exchange and extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase in fibroblasts by G protein-coupled 5-HT1A receptor involves distinct signalling cascades.

    PubMed Central

    Garnovskaya, M N; Mukhin, Y; Raymond, J R

    1998-01-01

    These experiments tested the hypothesis that signalling elements involved in the activation of the extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK) mediate rapid activation of sodium-proton exchange (NHE) in fibroblasts when both signals are initiated by a single G protein-coupled receptor, the 5-HT1A receptor. Similarities between the two processes were comparable concentration-response curves and time-courses, and overlapping sensitivity to some pharmacological inhibitors of tyrosine kinases (staurosporine and genistein), and phosphoinositide 3'-kinase (wortmannin and LY204002). Activation of NHE was much more sensitive to the phosphatidylcholine-specific phospholipase inhibitor (D609) than was ERK. Neither pathway was sensitive to manoeuvres designed to block PKC. In contrast, Src or related kinases appear to be required to activate ERK, but not NHE. Transfection of cDNA constructs encoding inactive mutant phosphoinositide 3'-kinase, Grb2, Sos, Ras, and Raf molecules were successful in attenuating ERK, but had essentially no effect upon NHE activation. Finally, PD98059, an inhibitor of mitogen activated/extracellular signal regulated kinase kinase, blocked ERK but not NHE activation. Thus, in CHO fibroblast cells, activation by the 5-HT1A receptor of ERK and NHE share a number of overlapping features. However, our studies do not support a major role for ERK, when activated by the 5-HT1A receptor, as a short-term upstream regulator of NHE activity. PMID:9461547

  7. Ghrelin augments murine T-cell proliferation by activation of the phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase, extracellular signal-regulated kinase and protein kinase C signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jun Ho; Patel, Kalpesh; Tae, Hyun Jin; Lustig, Ana; Kim, Jie Wan; Mattson, Mark P; Taub, Dennis D

    2014-12-20

    Thymic atrophy occurs during normal aging, and is accelerated by exposure to chronic stressors that elevate glucocorticoid levels and impair the naïve T cell output. The orexigenic hormone ghrelin was recently shown to attenuate age-associated thymic atrophy. Here, we report that ghrelin enhances the proliferation of murine CD4+ primary T cells and a CD4+ T-cell line. Ghrelin induced activation of the ERK1/2 and Akt signaling pathways, via upstream activation of phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase and protein kinase C, to enhance T-cell proliferation. Moreover, ghrelin induced expression of the cell cycle proteins cyclin D1, cyclin E, cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (CDK2) and retinoblastoma phosphorylation. Finally, ghrelin activated the above-mentioned signaling pathways and stimulated thymocyte proliferation in young and older mice in vivo. PMID:25447526

  8. Ghrelin augments murine T-cell proliferation by activation of the phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase, extracellular signal-regulated kinase and protein kinase C signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jun Ho; Patel, Kalpesh; Tae, Hyun Jin; Lustig, Ana; Kim, Jie Wan; Mattson, Mark P.; Taub, Dennis D.

    2014-01-01

    Thymic atrophy occurs during normal aging, and is accelerated by exposure to chronic stressors that elevate glucocorticoid levelsand impair the naïve T cell output. The orexigenic hormone ghrelin was recently shown to attenuate age-associated thymic atrophy. Here, we report that ghrelin enhances the proliferation of murine CD4+ primary T cells and a CD4+ T-cell line. Ghrelin induced activation of the ERK1/2 and Akt signaling pathways, via upstream activation of phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase and protein kinase C, to enhance T-cell proliferation. Moreover, ghrelin induced expression of the cell cycle proteins cyclin D1, cyclin E, cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (CDK2) and retinoblastoma phosphorylation. Finally, ghrelin activated the above-mentioned signaling pathways and stimulated thymocyte proliferation in young and older mice in vivo. PMID:25447526

  9. Shock wave treatment enhances cell proliferation and improves wound healing by ATP release-coupled extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) activation.

    PubMed

    Weihs, Anna M; Fuchs, Christiane; Teuschl, Andreas H; Hartinger, Joachim; Slezak, Paul; Mittermayr, Rainer; Redl, Heinz; Junger, Wolfgang G; Sitte, Harald H; Rünzler, Dominik

    2014-09-26

    Shock wave treatment accelerates impaired wound healing in diverse clinical situations. However, the mechanisms underlying the beneficial effects of shock waves have not yet been fully revealed. Because cell proliferation is a major requirement in the wound healing cascade, we used in vitro studies and an in vivo wound healing model to study whether shock wave treatment influences proliferation by altering major extracellular factors and signaling pathways involved in cell proliferation. We identified extracellular ATP, released in an energy- and pulse number-dependent manner, as a trigger of the biological effects of shock wave treatment. Shock wave treatment induced ATP release, increased Erk1/2 and p38 MAPK activation, and enhanced proliferation in three different cell types (C3H10T1/2 murine mesenchymal progenitor cells, primary human adipose tissue-derived stem cells, and a human Jurkat T cell line) in vitro. Purinergic signaling-induced Erk1/2 activation was found to be essential for this proliferative effect, which was further confirmed by in vivo studies in a rat wound healing model where shock wave treatment induced proliferation and increased wound healing in an Erk1/2-dependent fashion. In summary, this report demonstrates that shock wave treatment triggers release of cellular ATP, which subsequently activates purinergic receptors and finally enhances proliferation in vitro and in vivo via downstream Erk1/2 signaling. In conclusion, our findings shed further light on the molecular mechanisms by which shock wave treatment exerts its beneficial effects. These findings could help to improve the clinical use of shock wave treatment for wound healing.

  10. IGF-I stimulates IL-8 production in the promyelocytic cell line HL-60 through activation of extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Kooijman, Ron; Coppens, Astrid; Hooghe-Peters, Elisabeth

    2003-12-01

    Interleukin (IL)-8 serves as a major chemoattractant for neutrophils and has also been proposed to affect cancer progression. In the present study, we show that IGF-I stimulates IL-8 mRNA expression and IL-8 secretion in the leukemic cell line HL-60. Stimulation of IL-8 expression was completely attenuated by two inhibitors of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) kinase (MEK), which phosphorylates the MAPKs extracellular-regulated kinase (ERK)1 and ERK2, and by the c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) inhibitor SP600125. In contrast, inhibitors of p38 MAPK and phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI3K) did not abrogate the effect of IGF-I. We also show that IGF-I stimulates the activation of ERK1 and ERK2, but we could not detect any effect of IGF-I on the phosphorylation of p38, JNK(p46) or JNK(p54). Collectively, our results suggest that basal JNK activity and activation of the MEK-ERK pathway are required for upregulation of IL-8 by IGF-I in HL-60 cells.

  11. The cooked meat carcinogen 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine activates the extracellular signal regulated kinase mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway.

    PubMed

    Creton, Stuart K; Zhu, Huijun; Gooderham, Nigel J

    2007-12-01

    During the cooking of meat, mutagenic and carcinogenic heterocyclic amines are formed, the most abundant of which, 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4-5-b]pyridine (PhIP), induces tumors of the prostate, colon, and mammary gland in rats. Humans consuming cooked meat are exposed to PhIP on a daily basis, yet few studies have assessed the effects of PhIP at dietary relevant concentrations. In addition to its genotoxic properties, recent studies have shown that PhIP can activate estrogen receptor-mediated signaling pathways at doses that are similar to those that may be present in the body following consumption of a cooked meat meal. In the present study, we examined whether such doses of PhIP can affect estrogen receptor-independent signal transduction via the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) extracellular signal-related kinase (ERK) pathway to influence proliferation and migration in the human mammary epithelial cell line MCF10A and the prostate cancer cell line PC-3. At doses shown to have a proliferative effect on MCF10A cells (10(-11)-10(-7) mol/L), PhIP induced a rapid, transient increase in phosphorylation of both MAPK/ERK kinase 1/2 and ERKs. Inhibition of this pathway significantly reduced the PhIP-induced proliferation of MCF10A cells and the migration of PC-3 cells. The data presented here show that levels of PhIP that approximate to human dietary exposure stimulate cellular signaling pathways and result in increased growth and migration, processes linked to the promotion and progression of neoplastic disease. These findings provide strong evidence that PhIP acts as a tumor initiator and promoter and that dietary exposure to this compound could contribute to carcinogenesis in humans.

  12. Quantitative relationship among integrin-ligand binding, adhesion, and signaling via focal adhesion kinase and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 2.

    PubMed

    Asthagiri, A R; Nelson, C M; Horwitz, A F; Lauffenburger, D A

    1999-09-17

    Because integrin-mediated signals are transferred through a physical architecture and synergistic biochemical network whose properties are not well defined, quantitative relationships between extracellular integrin-ligand binding events and key intracellular responses are poorly understood. We begin to address this by quantifying integrin-mediated FAK and ERK2 responses in CHO cells for varied alpha(5)beta(1) expression level and substratum fibronectin density. Plating cells on fibronectin-coated surfaces initiated a transient, biphasic ERK2 response, the magnitude and kinetics of which depended on integrin-ligand binding properties. Whereas ERK2 activity initially increased with a rate proportional to integrin-ligand bond number for low fibronectin density, the desensitization rate was independent of integrin and fibronectin amount but proportional to the ERK2 activity level with an exponential decay constant of 0.3 (+/- 0.08) min(-1). Unlike the ERK2 activation time course, FAK phosphorylation followed a superficially disparate time course. However, analysis of the early kinetics of the two signals revealed them to be correlated. The initial rates of FAK and ERK2 signal generation exhibited similar dependence on fibronectin surface density, with both rates monotonically increasing with fibronectin amount until saturating at high fibronectin density. Because of this similar initial rate dependence on integrin-ligand bond formation, the disparity in their time courses is attributed to differences in feedback regulation of these signals. Whereas FAK phosphorylation increased to a steady-state level as new integrin-ligand bond formation continued during cell spreading, ERK2 activity was decoupled from the integrin-ligand stimulus and decayed back to a basal level. Accordingly, we propose different functional metrics for representing these two disparate dynamic signals: the steady-state tyrosine phosphorylation level for FAK and the integral of the pulse response for

  13. PI3K/Akt1 signalling specifies foregut precursors by generating regionalized extra-cellular matrix

    PubMed Central

    Villegas, S Nahuel; Rothová, Michaela; Barrios-Llerena, Martin E; Pulina, Maria; Hadjantonakis, Anna-Katerina; Le Bihan, Thierry; Astrof, Sophie; Brickman, Joshua M

    2013-01-01

    During embryonic development signalling pathways act repeatedly in different contexts to pattern the emerging germ layers. Understanding how these different responses are regulated is a central question for developmental biology. In this study, we used mouse embryonic stem cell (mESC) differentiation to uncover a new mechanism for PI3K signalling that is required for endoderm specification. We found that PI3K signalling promotes the transition from naïve endoderm precursors into committed anterior endoderm. PI3K promoted commitment via an atypical activity that delimited epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Akt1 transduced this activity via modifications to the extracellular matrix (ECM) and appropriate ECM could itself induce anterior endodermal identity in the absence of PI3K signalling. PI3K/Akt1-modified ECM contained low levels of Fibronectin (Fn1) and we found that Fn1 dose was key to specifying anterior endodermal identity in vivo and in vitro. Thus, localized PI3K activity affects ECM composition and ECM in turn patterns the endoderm. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.00806.001 PMID:24368729

  14. Extracellular signal-regulated kinase and c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase activation by mechanical stretch is integrin-dependent and matrix-specific in rat cardiac fibroblasts.

    PubMed Central

    MacKenna, D A; Dolfi, F; Vuori, K; Ruoslahti, E

    1998-01-01

    Integrins, which connect the cytoskeleton to the extracellular matrix and mediate a variety of signaling cascades, may transduce mechanical stimuli into biochemical signals. We studied integrin- and matrix-dependent activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK2), c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK1), and p38 in response to 4% static biaxial stretch in rat cardiac fibroblasts. ERK2 and JNK1, but not p38, were rapidly activated by stretch when the fibroblasts were allowed to synthesize their own matrices. When the cells were limited to specific matrix substrates, ERK2 and JNK1 were differentially activated: ERK2 was only activated when the cells were plated on fibronectin, while JNK1 was activated when the cells were plated on fibronectin, vitronectin, or laminin. Plating cells on collagen before stretching did not activate either kinase. Adhesion to all matrices was integrin-dependent because it could be blocked by inhibitors of specific integrins. ERK2 activation could be blocked with a combination of anti-alpha4 and -alpha5 antibodies and an arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) peptide, while the antibodies or peptide used separately failed to block ERK2 activation. This result suggests that at least two integrins, alpha4beta1 and an RGD-directed, non-alpha5beta1 integrin, activate ERK2 in response to mechanical stimulation. Activation of JNK1 could not be blocked with the inhibitors, suggesting that an RGD-independent integrin or integrins other than alpha4beta1 can activate JNK1 in cells adherent to fibronectin. This study demonstrates that integrins act as mechanotransducers, providing insight into potential mechanisms for in vivo responses to mechanical stimuli. PMID:9435301

  15. Nerve Growth Factor Regulation of Cyclin D1 in PC12 Cells through a p21RAS Extracellular Signal-regulated Kinase Pathway Requires Cooperative Interactions between Sp1 and Nuclear Factor-κB

    PubMed Central

    Marampon, Francesco; Casimiro, Mathew C.; Fu, Maofu; Powell, Michael J.; Popov, Vladimir M.; Lindsay, Jaime; Zani, Bianca M.; Ciccarelli, Carmela; Watanabe, Genichi; Lee, Richard J.

    2008-01-01

    The PC12 pheochromocytoma cell line responds to nerve growth factor (NGF) by exiting from the cell cycle and differentiating to induce extending neurites. Cyclin D1 is an important regulator of G1/S phase cell cycle progression, and it is known to play a role in myocyte differentiation in cultured cells. Herein, NGF induced cyclin D1 promoter, mRNA, and protein expression via the p21RAS pathway. Antisense- or small interfering RNA to cyclin D1 abolished NGF-mediated neurite outgrowth, demonstrating the essential role of cyclin D1 in NGF-mediated differentiation. Expression vectors encoding mutants of the Ras/mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway, and chemical inhibitors, demonstrated NGF induction of cyclin D1 involved cooperative interactions of extracellular signal-regulated kinase, p38, and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase pathways downstream of p21RAS. NGF induced the cyclin D1 promoter via Sp1, nuclear factor-κB, and cAMP-response element/activated transcription factor sites. NGF induction via Sp1 involved the formation of a Sp1/p50/p107 complex. Cyclin D1 induction by NGF governs differentiation and neurite outgrowth in PC12 cells. PMID:18367547

  16. Epidermal growth factor-induced cyclooxygenase-2 expression in oral squamous cell carcinoma cell lines is mediated through extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 and p38 but is Src and nuclear factor-kappa B independent.

    PubMed

    Husvik, Camilla; Bryne, Magne; Halstensen, Trond S

    2009-10-01

    The intracellular signalling cascade(s) mediating epidermal growth factor (EGF)-induced cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression is poorly defined in oral carcinomas. Investigation of two different oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) cell lines with high EGF-induced COX-2 expression revealed, however, that this expression was dependent on two mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways [extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) and p38] because combined inhibition of these pathways was needed to abolish EGF-induced COX-2 expression. Surprisingly, inhibition of phosphoinositide-3 kinase (PI3K) increased EGF-induced COX-2 expression in the basaloid OSCC cell line (C12), suggesting a PI3K-controlled, inhibitory COX-2-regulating pathway. Neither the transcription factor nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB), nor Src, was involved in EGF-induced COX-2 expression. The results suggest that EGF-induced COX-2 expression is regulated by several pathways, and emphasizes that individual tumors use different strategies for intracellular signalling. PMID:19758248

  17. Activation of G proteins and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 phosphorylation via human dopamine D4.4 receptors: differential pathway-dependent potencies of receptor agonists.

    PubMed

    Heusler, Peter; Bruins Slot, Liesbeth; Rauly-Lestienne, Isabelle; Palmier, Christiane; Tardif, Stéphanie; Tourette, Amélie; Ailhaud, Marie-Christine; Cussac, Didier

    2009-01-01

    Agonist activity at recombinant human dopamine D4.4 receptors was compared in stably transfected CHO cells using two functional readouts: G protein activation by [35S]GTPgammaS binding and phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (pERK1/2). Results with a large series of agonists reveal markedly higher relative agonist efficacy in the pERK1/2 assay compared with [35S]GTPgammaS binding, while potencies were generally higher in the latter readout. Whereas efficacies were highly correlated when comparing both tests, potencies determined using the pERK1/2 assay were neither correlated with those for G protein activation nor with binding affinities. In order to examine if these differences may be attributable to distinct assay conditions (5 min incubation for pERK1/2 compared with binding equilibrium conditions for [35S]GTPgammaS), selected compounds were tested in a modified short-duration [35S]GTPgammaS binding assay. In these experiments, potencies were generally reduced; however, compounds exhibiting comparably high potency in the pERK1/2 assay were not affected by this duration-dependent potency shift. We conclude that assay parameters such as signal amplification and incubation time have to be considered with respect to the appropriate choice of experimental approaches that best reflect agonist activity at dopamine D4 receptors in vivo.

  18. Regulation of expression of ABCB1 and LRP genes by mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular signal-regulated kinase pathway and its role in generation of side population cells in canine lymphoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Tomiyasu, Hirotaka; Watanabe, Manabu; Goto-Koshino, Yuko; Fujino, Yasuhito; Ohno, Koichi; Sugano, Sumio; Tsujimoto, Hajime

    2013-06-01

    The concept of the cancer stem cell (CSC) has been recognized as key for elucidation of the mechanisms that confer the multidrug resistance (MDR) phenotype to tumor cells, and the side population (SP) fraction has been shown to be enriched by cells with the CSC phenotype. The purpose of the present study was to identify the mechanism that induces a difference of phenotype between the SP and the remaining major population (MP) using two canine lymphoma cell lines. Expression levels of ABCB1 and LRP genes, which encode efflux pumps, were significantly higher in the SP than in the MP. Microarray analysis revealed up-regulation of the expression of transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) type II receptor in SP compared with MP, and the mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (MAPK/ERK) pathway was more up-regulated in the SP than in the MP. Stimulation of the MAPK/ERK pathway significantly increased the mRNA expression of both ABCB1 and LRP genes. These results indicate increased expression of the efflux pumps through the MAPK/ERK pathway in SP cells.

  19. PKC-dependent extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 pathway is involved in the inhibition of Ib on AngiotensinII-induced proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Yu; Yan Tianhua; Wang Qiujuan Wang Wei; Xu Jinyi; Wu Xiaoming; Ji Hui

    2008-10-10

    AngiotensinII (AngII) induces vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) proliferation, which plays an important role in the development and progression of hypertension. AngII-induced cellular events have been implicated, in part, in the activation of protein kinase C (PKC) and extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2). In the present study, we investigated the effect of Ib, a novel nonpeptide AngII receptor type 1 (AT{sub 1}) antagonist, on the activation of PKC and ERK1/2 in VSMC proliferation induced by AngII. MTT, and [{sup 3}H]thymidine incorporation assay showed that AngII-induced VSMC proliferation was inhibited significantly by Ib. The specific binding of [{sup 125}I]AngII to AT{sub 1} receptors was blocked by Ib in a concentration-dependent manner with IC{sub 50} value of 0.96 nM. PKC activity assay and Western blot analysis demonstrated that Ib significantly inhibited the activation of PKC and phosphorylation of ERK1/2 induced by AngII, respectively. Furthermore, AngII-induced ERK1/2 activation was obviously blocked by GF109203X, a PKC inhibitor. These findings suggest that the suppression of Ib on AngII-induced VSMC proliferation may be attributed to its inhibitory effect on PKC-dependent ERK1/2 pathway.

  20. Icariin inhibits oxidized low-density lipoprotein-induced proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells by suppressing activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 and expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yanwu; Liu, Kai; Yan, Mengtong; Zhang, Yang; Wang, Yadi; Ren, Liqun

    2016-03-01

    Icariin, a flavonoid isolated from the traditional Chinese herbal medicine Epimedium brevicornum Maxim, has been shown to possess anti-inflammatory, anti‑oxidant and anti-atherosclerotic activities in vivo and in vitro. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of icariin on oxidized low‑density lipoprotein (ox-LDL)-induced proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) and the possible underlying mechanism. VSMCs were cultured and pre‑treated with various concentrations of icariin (0, 10, 20 or 40 µm) prior to stimulation by ox‑LDL (50 µg/ml). Cell proliferation was evaluated by an MTT assay. Flow cytometry was used to study the influence of icariin on the cell cycle. Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) expression and phosphorylation levels of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2 were detected by western blot analysis. The results indicated that icariin significantly inhibited ox‑LDL‑induced proliferation of VSMCs and phosphorylation of ERK1/2. Furthermore, icariin also blocked the ox‑LDL‑induced cell‑cycle progression at G1/S‑interphase and downregulated the expression of PCNA in VSMCs. In conclusion, the present study indicated for the first time that icariin reduced the amount of ox‑LDL‑induced proliferation of VSMCs through suppression of PCNA expression and inactivation of ERK1/2.

  1. Differential effects of cocaine on extracellular signal-regulated kinase phosphorylation in nuclei of the extended amygdala and prefrontal cortex of psychogenetically selected Roman high- and low-avoidance rats.

    PubMed

    Giorgi, Osvaldo; Corda, Maria G; Sabariego, Marta; Giugliano, Valentina; Piludu, Maria A; Rosas, Michela; Acquas, Elio

    2015-05-01

    Roman high (RHA)- and low (RLA)-avoidance rats are selectively bred for rapid vs. poor acquisition of active avoidance, respectively, and differ markedly in emotional reactivity, coping style, and behavioral and neurochemical responses to morphine and psychostimulants. Accordingly, acute cocaine induces more robust increments in locomotion and dopamine output in the nucleus accumbens shell (AcbSh) of RHA than of RLA rats. Cocaine induces short- and long-term neuronal plasticity via activation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathway. This study compares the effects of acute cocaine on ERK phosphorylation (pERK) in limbic brain areas of Roman rats. In RHA but not RLA rats, cocaine (5 mg/kg) increased pERK in the infralimbic prefrontal cortex and AcbSh, two areas involved in its acute effects, but did not modify pERK in the prelimbic prefrontal cortex and Acb core, which mediate the chronic effects of cocaine. Moreover, cocaine failed to affect pERK immunolabeling in the bed nucleus of stria terminalis pars lateralis and central amygdala of either line but increased it in the basolateral amygdala of RLA rats. These results extend to pERK expression previous findings on the greater sensitivity to acute cocaine of RHA vs. RLA rats and confirm the notion that genetic factors influence the differential responses of the Roman lines to addictive drugs. Moreover, they support the view that the Roman lines are a useful tool to investigate the molecular underpinnings of individual vulnerability to drug addiction.

  2. New Role for Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor-Induced Extracellular Signal-Regulated Kinase 1/2 in Histone Modification and Retinoic Acid Receptor α Recruitment to Gene Promoters: Relevance to Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia Cell Differentiation ▿

    PubMed Central

    Cassinat, B.; Zassadowski, F.; Ferry, C.; Llopis, L.; Bruck, N.; Lainey, E.; Duong, V.; Cras, A.; Despouy, G.; Chourbagi, O.; Beinse, G.; Fenaux, P.; Rochette Egly, C.; Chomienne, C.

    2011-01-01

    The induction of the granulocytic differentiation of leukemic cells by all-trans retinoic acid (RA) has been a major breakthrough in terms of survival for acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) patients. Here we highlight the synergism and the underlying novel mechanism between RA and the granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) to restore differentiation of RA-refractory APL blasts. First, we show that in RA-refractory APL cells (UF-1 cell line), PML-RA receptor alpha (RARα) is not released from target promoters in response to RA, resulting in the maintenance of chromatin repression. Consequently, RARα cannot be recruited, and the RA target genes are not activated. We then deciphered how the combination of G-CSF and RA successfully restored the activation of RA target genes to levels achieved in RA-sensitive APL cells. We demonstrate that G-CSF restores RARα recruitment to target gene promoters through the activation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)/mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway and the subsequent derepression of chromatin. Thus, combinatorial activation of cytokines and RARs potentiates transcriptional activity through epigenetic modifications induced by specific signaling pathways. PMID:21262770

  3. Novel human neutrophil agonistic properties of arsenic trioxide: involvement of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase and/or c-jun NH2-terminal MAPK but not extracellular signal-regulated kinases-1/2.

    PubMed

    Binet, François; Girard, Denis

    2008-12-01

    Arsenic trioxide (ATO) is known for treating acute promyelocytic leukemia and for inducing apoptosis and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) in promyelocytes and cancer cells. We recently reported that ATO induces neutrophil apoptosis. The aim of this study was to establish whether or not ATO recruits MAPKs in neutrophils, as well as to further investigate its agonistic properties. We found that ATO activates p38 and that, unlike H2O2, this response was not inhibited by exogenous catalase. Also, we demonstrated that ATO-induced p38 activation occurs before H2O2 generation and without a calcium burst. We next established that ATO recruits c-jun NH2-terminal (JNK) but not extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 and 2 (Erk-1/2). Using pharmacological inhibitors, we found that the proapoptotic activity of ATO occurs by a MAPK-independent mechanism. In contrast, the ability of ATO to enhance adhesion, migration, phagocytosis, release, and activity of gelatinase and degranulation of secretory, specific, and gelatinase, but not azurophilic granules, is dependent upon activation of p38 and/or JNK. This is the first study establishing that ATO possesses important agonistic properties in human neutrophils. Given the central role of neutrophils in various inflammatory disorders, we propose that ATO might have broader therapeutic implications in clinics, especially for regulating inflammation.

  4. Ras-Guanine Nucleotide-Releasing Factor 1 (Ras-GRF1) Controls Activation of Extracellular Signal-Regulated Kinase (ERK) Signaling in the Striatum and Long-Term Behavioral Responses to Cocaine

    PubMed Central

    Fasano, Stefania; D’Antoni, Angela; Orban, Paul C.; Valjent, Emmanuel; Putignano, Elena; Vara, Hugo; Pizzorusso, Tommaso; Giustetto, Maurizio; Yoon, Bongjune; Soloway, Paul; Maldonado, Rafael; Caboche, Jocelyne; Brambilla, Riccardo

    2010-01-01

    Background Ras-extracellular signal-regulated kinase (Ras-ERK) signaling is central to the molecular machinery underlying cognitive functions. In the striatum, ERK1/2 kinases are co-activated by glutamate and dopamine D1/5 receptors, but the mechanisms providing such signaling integration are still unknown. The Ras-guanine nucleotide-releasing factor 1 (Ras-GRF1), a neuronal specific activator of Ras-ERK signaling, is a likely candidate for coupling these neurotransmitter signals to ERK kinases in the striatonigral medium spiny neurons (MSN) and for modulating behavioral responses to drug abuse such as cocaine. Methods We used genetically modified mouse mutants for Ras-GRF1 as a source of primary MSN cultures and organotypic slices, to perform both immunoblot and immunofluorescence studies in response to glutamate and dopamine receptor agonists. Mice were also subjected to behavioral and immunohistochemical investigations upon treatment with cocaine. Results Phosphorylation of ERK1/2 in response to glutamate, dopamine D1 agonist, or both stimuli simultaneously is impaired in Ras-GRF1– deficient striatal cells and organotypic slices of the striatonigral MSN compartment. Consistently, behavioral responses to cocaine are also affected in mice deficient for Ras-GRF1 or overexpressing it. Both locomotor sensitization and conditioned place preference are significantly attenuated in Ras-GRF1– deficient mice, whereas a robust facilitation is observed in overexpressing transgenic animals. Finally, we found corresponding changes in ERK1/2 activation and in accumulation of FosB/ΔFosB, a well-characterized marker for long-term responses to cocaine, in MSN from these animals. Conclusions These results strongly implicate Ras-GRF1 in the integration of the two main neurotransmitter inputs to the striatum and in the maladaptive modulation of striatal networks in response to cocaine. PMID:19446794

  5. The D1 dopamine receptor agonist, SKF83959, attenuates hydrogen peroxide-induced injury in RGC-5 cells involving the extracellular signal-regulated kinase/p38 pathways

    PubMed Central

    Li, Guang-Yu; Li, Ting; Fan, Bin; Zheng, Yong-Chen

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Oxidative stress is widely implicated in the death of retinal ganglion cells associated with various optic neuropathies. Agonists of the dopamine D1 receptor have recently been found to be potentially neuroprotective against oxidative stress–induced injury. The goal of this study was to investigate whether SKF83959, a next-generation high-affinity D1 receptor agonist, could protect retinal ganglion cell 5 (RGC-5) cells from H2O2-induced damage and the molecular mechanism involved. Methods We examined expression of the D1 receptor in RGC-5 cells with reverse-transcription–PCR and immunoblotting and assessed neuroprotection using propidium iodide staining and the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay. In addition, we monitored the activation and involvement of members of mitogen-activated protein kinase family, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), p38 and c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase, with western blot and specific inhibitors. Results We found that the D1 receptor was expressed in RGC-5 cells, but the sequence analysis suggested this cell line is from mouse and not rat origin. SKF83959 exhibited a remarkable neuroprotective effect on H2O2-damaged RGC-5 cells, which was blocked by the specific D1 receptor antagonist, SCH23390. ERK and p38 were activated by SKF83959, and pretreatment with their inhibitors U0126 and SB203580, respectively, significantly blunted the SKF83959-induced cytoprotection. However, the specific c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase inhibitor, SP600125, had no effect on the SKF83959-induced protection. Conclusions We conclude that SKF83959 attenuates hydrogen peroxide–induced injury in RGC-5 cells via a mechanism involving activation of the ERK and p38 pathways and the D1 receptor is a potential molecular target for developing neuroprotective drugs. PMID:23233790

  6. Nobiletin induces inhibitions of Ras activity and mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase/extracellular signal-regulated kinase signaling to suppress cell proliferation in C6 rat glioma cells.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Koichi; Yokosuka, Akihito; Mimaki, Yoshihiro; Fukunaga, Kohji; Yamakuni, Tohru

    2013-01-01

    Ras, a small G-protein, physiologically directs cell proliferation and cell cycle via regulation of mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK)/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signaling cascade. Dysregulation of Ras/MEK/ERK signaling has been reported to cause tumorigenesis and gliomas. Nobiletin, a citrus flavonoid, has been shown to have anti-tumor cells action. However, it remains elusive whether nobiletin could affect Ras activity. In this study, we provide the first evidence that nobiletin suppresses the proliferation by inhibiting Ras activity in C6 glioma cells, a rat glioma cell line. First, Ras pull-down assay showed that nobiletin inhibits Ras activity in a concentration-dependent manner in C6 cells. Second, farnesyltransferase inhibitor I, a Ras inhibitor, and U0126, a MEK inhibitor, induced an inhibition of the cell proliferation in C6 cells, while the cell proliferation was inhibited by nobiletin as well. Third, western blotting revealed that nobiletin showed inhibitory effects on MEK and ERK phopsphorylation levels in a concentration-dependent manner. Finally, such an inhibitory effect on the level of ERK phosphorylation by nobiletin was appreciably prevented by Gö6976, a selective inhibitor of conventional protein kinase Cs (PKCs) showing Ca(2+)-sensitivity, while GF109203X, a general inhibitor for PKCs, and BAPTA, a cell-permeable Ca(2+) chelator, to a lesser extent, suppressed a reduction of the phosphorylation. These findings suggest that the proliferation of C6 cells is Ras- and MEK/ERK signaling-dependent, and that nobiletin suppresses the cell proliferation by inhibiting Ras activity and MEK/ERK signaling cascade probably via a Ca(2+)-sensitive PKC-dependent mechanism. Thus, the natural compound has potential to be a therapeutic agent for glioma.

  7. Mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 1/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (MEK-1/ERK) inhibitors sensitize reduced glucocorticoid response mediated by TNF{alpha} in human epidermal keratinocytes (HaCaT)

    SciTech Connect

    Onda, Kenji . E-mail: knjond@ps.toyaku.ac.jp; Nagashima, Masahiro; Kawakubo, Yo; Inoue, Shota; Hirano, Toshihiko; Oka, Kitaro

    2006-12-08

    Glucocorticoids (GCs) are essential drugs administered topically or systematically for the treatment of autoimmune skin diseases such as pemphigus. However, a certain proportion of patients does not respond well to GCs. Although studies on the relationship between cytokines and GC insensitivity in local tissues have attracted attention recently, little is known about the underlying mechanism(s) for GC insensitivity in epidermal keratinocytes. Here, we report that tumor necrosis factor (TNF) {alpha} reduces GC-induced transactivation of endogenous genes as well as a reporter plasmid which contains GC responsive element (GRE) in human epidermal keratinocyte cells (HaCaT). The GC insensitivity by TNF{alpha} was not accompanied by changes in mRNA expressions of GR isoforms ({alpha} or {beta}). However, we observed that mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase-1/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (MEK-1/ERK) inhibitors (PD98059 and U0126) significantly sensitized the GC-induced transactivation of anti-inflammatory genes (glucocorticoid-induced leucine zipper (GILZ) and mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatase (MKP)-1) and FK506 binding protein (FKBP) 51 gene in the presence of TNF{alpha}. Additionally, we observed that TNF{alpha} reduced prednisolone (PSL)-dependent nuclear translocation of GR, which was restored by pre-treatment of MEK-1 inhibitors. This is the first study demonstrating a role of the MEK-1/ERK cascade in TNF{alpha}-mediated GC insensitivity. Our data suggest that overexpression of TNF{alpha} leads to topical GC insensitivity by reducing GR nuclear translocation in keratinocytes, and our findings also suggest that inhibiting the MEK-1/ERK cascade may offer a therapeutic potential for increasing GC efficacy in epidermis where sufficient inflammatory suppression is required.

  8. α-Mangostin suppresses lipopolysaccharide-induced invasion by inhibiting matrix metalloproteinase-2/9 and increasing E-cadherin expression through extracellular signal-regulated kinase signaling in pancreatic cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    YUAN, JIANGTAO; WU, YAOLU; LU, GUIFANG

    2013-01-01

    Invasion and metastasis are major factors in the poor prognosis of pancreatic cancer, which remains one of the most aggressive and lethal diseases worldwide. α-mangostin, a major xanthone compound identified in the pericarp of mangosteen (Garcinia mangostana, Linn; GML), possesses unique biological activities, including antioxidant, antitumor and anti-inflammatory effects. Whether α-mangostin is able to inhibit the invasive ability of pancreatic cancer cells has not been elucidated. In the present study, α-mangostin was shown to inhibit the invasive ability of the pancreatic cancer cell lines MIAPaCa-2 and BxPC-3. The results showed that α-mangostin inhibited the growth of the pancreatic cancer cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. At concentrations of <5 μM, α-mangostin had no significant effects on cytotoxicity, but significantly inhibited the invasion and migration of pancreatic cancer cells and the expression of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and MMP-9, while increasing the expression of E-cadherin. The present data also showed that α-mangostin exerted an inhibitory effect on the phosphorylation of extracellular-signal-regulated kinase (ERK). Furthermore, the reduction of ERK phosphorylation by small interfering RNA (siRNA) potentiated the effect of α-mangostin. Taken together, the data suggest that α-mangostin inhibited the invasion and metastasis of pancreatic cancer cells by reducing MMP-2 and MMP-9 expression, increasing E-cadherin expression and suppressing the ERK signaling pathway. The present study suggests that α-mangostin may be a promising agent against pancreatic cancer. PMID:23833675

  9. Nicotine shifts the temporal activation of hippocampal protein kinase A and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 to enhance long-term, but not short-term, hippocampus-dependent memory.

    PubMed

    Gould, Thomas J; Wilkinson, Derek S; Yildirim, Emre; Poole, Rachel L F; Leach, Prescott T; Simmons, Steven J

    2014-03-01

    Acute nicotine enhances hippocampus-dependent learning through nicotine binding to β2-containing nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs), but it is unclear if nicotine is targeting processes involved in short-term memory (STM) leading to a strong long-term memory (LTM) or directly targeting LTM. In addition, the molecular mechanisms involved in the effects of nicotine on learning are unknown. Previous research indicates that protein kinase A (PKA), extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2), and protein synthesis are crucial for LTM. Therefore, the present study examined the effects of nicotine on STM and LTM and the involvement of PKA, ERK1/2, and protein synthesis in the nicotine-induced enhancement of hippocampus-dependent contextual learning in C57BL/6J mice. The protein synthesis inhibitor anisomycin impaired contextual conditioning assessed at 4 h but not 2 h post-training, delineating time points for STM (2 h) and LTM (4 h and beyond). Nicotine enhanced contextual conditioning at 4, 8, and 24 h but not 2 h post-training, indicating nicotine specifically enhances LTM but not STM. Furthermore, nicotine did not rescue deficits in contextual conditioning produced by anisomycin, suggesting that the nicotine enhancement of contextual conditioning occurs through a protein synthesis-dependent mechanism. In addition, inhibition of dorsal hippocampal PKA activity blocked the effect of acute nicotine on learning, and nicotine shifted the timing of learning-related PKA and ERK1/2 activity in the dorsal and ventral hippocampus. Thus, the present results suggest that nicotine specifically enhances LTM through altering the timing of PKA and ERK1/2 signaling in the hippocampus, and suggests that the timing of PKA and ERK1/2 activity could contribute to the strength of memories.

  10. Suppression of Mitochondrial Biogenesis through Toll-Like Receptor 4–Dependent Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Kinase/Extracellular Signal-Regulated Kinase Signaling in Endotoxin-Induced Acute Kidney Injury

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Joshua A.; Stallons, L. Jay; Collier, Justin B.; Chavin, Kenneth D.

    2015-01-01

    Although disruption of mitochondrial homeostasis and biogenesis (MB) is a widely accepted pathophysiologic feature of sepsis-induced acute kidney injury (AKI), the molecular mechanisms responsible for this phenomenon are unknown. In this study, we examined the signaling pathways responsible for the suppression of MB in a mouse model of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced AKI. Downregulation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α), a master regulator of MB, was noted at the mRNA level at 3 hours and protein level at 18 hours in the renal cortex, and was associated with loss of renal function after LPS treatment. LPS-mediated suppression of PGC-1α led to reduced expression of downstream regulators of MB and electron transport chain proteins along with a reduction in renal cortical mitochondrial DNA content. Mechanistically, Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) knockout mice were protected from renal injury and disruption of MB after LPS exposure. Immunoblot analysis revealed activation of tumor progression locus 2/mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (TPL-2/MEK/ERK) signaling in the renal cortex by LPS. Pharmacologic inhibition of MEK/ERK signaling attenuated renal dysfunction and loss of PGC-1α, and was associated with a reduction in proinflammatory cytokine (e.g., tumor necrosis factor-α [TNF-α], interleukin-1β) expression at 3 hours after LPS exposure. Neutralization of TNF-α also blocked PGC-1α suppression, but not renal dysfunction, after LPS-induced AKI. Finally, systemic administration of recombinant tumor necrosis factor-α alone was sufficient to produce AKI and disrupt mitochondrial homeostasis. These findings indicate an important role for the TLR4/MEK/ERK pathway in both LPS-induced renal dysfunction and suppression of MB. TLR4/MEK/ERK/TNF-α signaling may represent a novel therapeutic target to prevent mitochondrial dysfunction and AKI produced by sepsis. PMID:25503387

  11. Depletion of Serotonin and Selective Inhibition of 2B Receptor Suppressed Tumor Angiogenesis by Inhibiting Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase and Extracellular Signal-Regulated Kinase 1/2 Phosphorylation12

    PubMed Central

    Asada, Masanori; Ebihara, Satoru; Yamanda, Shinsuke; Niu, Kaijun; Okazaki, Tatsuma; Sora, Ichiro; Arai, Hiroyuki

    2009-01-01

    The effects of serotonin (5-HT) on tumor growth are inconsistent. We investigated whether a decreased level of 5-HT affected tumor growth using 5-HT transporter knockout (5-HTT-/-) mice, which showed 5-HT depletion. When cancer cells were injected subcutaneously into both 5-HTT-/- and 5-HTT+/+ mice, the tumor growth was markedly attenuated in 5-HTT-/- mice. Serotonin levels in the blood, forebrain, and tumors of 5-HTT-/- mice bearing tumors were significantly smaller than those of their 5-HTT+/+ littermates. However, 5-HT did not increase cancer cells' proliferation in vitro. When we applied 5-HTT inhibitors to the wild mice bearing tumors, they did not inhibit tumor growth. The endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) expressions in tumors were reduced in 5-HTT-/- mice compared with 5-HTT+/+ mice. Stimulations with 5-HT (1–50 µM) induced eNOS expressions in human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) in a concentration-dependent manner. When we measured activations of multiple signaling pathways by using a high-throughput phosphospecific antibodies platform, 5-HT stimulated the extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) in HUVEC. Moreover, we found that the physiological level of 5-HT induced phosphorylation of both ERK1/2 and eNOS in HUVEC. Human umbilical vein endothelial cell expressed both 5-HT2B and 5-HT2C receptors. SB204741, a specific 5-HT2B receptor inhibitor, blocked 5-HT-induced ERK1/2 and eNOS phosphorylations, whereas RS102221, a specific 5-HT2C receptor inhibitor, did not in HUVEC. SB204741 reduced microvessel density in tumors and inhibited the proliferation of HUVEC in vitro. These results suggest that regulation of 5-HT and 5-HT receptors, especially the 5-HT2B receptor, may serve as a therapeutic strategy in cancer therapy. PMID:19308295

  12. Proliferative effect of histamine on MA-10 Leydig tumor cells mediated through HRH2 activation, transient elevation in cAMP production, and increased extracellular signal-regulated kinase phosphorylation levels.

    PubMed

    Pagotto, Romina María; Monzón, Casandra; Moreno, Marcos Besio; Pignataro, Omar Pedro; Mondillo, Carolina

    2012-06-01

    Mast cells (MC) occur normally in the testis with a species-specific distribution, yet their precise role remains unclear. Testicular MC express histidine decarboxylase (HDC), the unique enzyme responsible for histamine (HA) generation. Evidence to date supports a role for HA as a local regulator of steroidogenesis via functional H₁ and H₂ receptor subtypes (HRH1 and HRH2, respectively) present in Leydig cells. Given that HA is a well-known modulator of physiological and pathological proliferation in many different cell types, we aimed in the present study to evaluate whether HA might contribute to the regulation of Leydig cell number as well as to the control of androgen production. Herein, we demonstrate, to our knowledge for the first time, that MA-10 Leydig tumor cells, but not normal immature Leydig cells (ILC), exhibit a proliferative response upon stimulation with HA that involves HRH2 activation, transient elevation of cAMP levels, and increased extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) phosphorylation. Our results also reveal that MA-10 cells show significantly heightened HDC expression compared to normal ILC or whole-testicular lysate and that inhibition of HDC activity decreases MA-10 cell proliferation, suggesting a possible correlation between autocrine overproduction of HA and abnormally increased proliferation in Leydig cells. The facts that germ cells are also both source and target of HA and that multiple testicular cells are susceptible to HA action underline the importance of the present study, which we hope will serve as a first step for further research into regulation of non-MC-related HDC expression within the testis and its significance for testicular function.

  13. Social defeat stress promotes tumor growth and angiogenesis by upregulating vascular endothelial growth factor/extracellular signal-regulated kinase/matrix metalloproteinase signaling in a mouse model of lung carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiao; Liu, Bao-Jun; Ji, Shumeng; Wu, Jing-Feng; Xu, Chang-Qing; Du, Yi-Jie; You, Xiao-Fang; Li, Bei; Le, Jing-Jing; Xu, Hai-Lin; Duan, Xiao-Hong; Dong, Jing-Cheng

    2015-07-01

    Numerous epidemiological and experimental animal studies have indicated that chronic psychological stress may promote tumor development. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms by which chronic stress promotes tumorigenesis remain to be fully elucidated and animal models have not yet been well established. In the present study, an established mouse model of repeated social defeat stress (RSDS), was generated and used to investigate the effect of stress on tumor growth and metastasis. C57BL/6 mice were exposed to RSDS for 10 days, followed by subcutaneousl inoculation with Lewis lung carcinoma cells for seven days. The tumor weight and volume as well as the number of the lung metastatic nodules were then determined. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) serum levels were measured using ELISAs. In addition, expression levels of VEGF receptor (VEGFR) and L1 cell adhesion molecule (L1CAM) messenger (m)RNA were confirmed using reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Furthermore, protein expression levels of phosphorlyated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (pERK), matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and MMP-9 were examined using western blot analysis. The results showed that RSDS significantly increased the weight and the volume of the primary tumor as well as the number of the lung metastatic nodules. Serum VEGF levels were significantly higher in the tumor-stress group compared with those of the unstressed tumor mice. In addition, tumors in stressed animals demonstrated markedly enhanced expression of VEGFR-2 and L1CAM mRNA as well as pERK, MMP-2 and MMP-9 protein expression. In conclusion, these results suggested that RSDS contributed to lung cancer progression, angiogenesis and metastasis, which was partially associated with increased VEGF secretion and therefore the activation of the ERK signaling pathway, resulting in the induction of MMP-2 and MMP-9 protein expression. PMID:25824133

  14. Differential regulation of extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase 1 and Jun N-terminal kinase 1 by Ca2+ and protein kinase C in endothelin-stimulated Rat-1 cells.

    PubMed Central

    Cadwallader, K; Beltman, J; McCormick, F; Cook, S

    1997-01-01

    The extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK) and Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) signalling cascades transduce signals from the cell cytoplasm to the nucleus, where they regulate gene expression. The activation of ERK1 by lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) and endothelin 1 (Et-1) was compared in Rat-1 cells. Both stimulated DNA synthesis to a similar degree but, in contrast with LPA, Et-1 did not stimulate sustained ERK1 activation, a signal that is thought to be important for the proliferation of fibroblasts. Et-1, but not LPA, was able to activate JNK1; pharmacological analysis revealed that the same EtA receptor mediates DNA synthesis, ERK1 and JNK1 activation. However, activation of JNK1 required higher concentrations of Et-1 than was required for stimulation of ERK1 or DNA synthesis. Signalling to ERK1 and JNK1 was partly inhibited by pertussis toxin, suggesting that both pathways are regulated in part by Gi or G0 proteins. Activation of JNK1 by Et-1 lagged behind ERK1 activation but was not dependent on it because PD98059, an inhibitor of mitogen-activated protein kinase (or ERK) kinase, was without effect on JNK1 activation. In contrast with recent studies, activation of protein kinase C (PKC) or Ca2+ fluxes inhibited activation of JNK1 but not ERK1; furthermore inhibition of PKC or sequestration of Ca2+ potentiated JNK1 activation by Et-1 but not by anisomycin, and again had little effect on ERK1 activation. These results demonstrate that the same G-protein-coupled receptor can activate both the ERK and JNK signal pathways but the two kinase cascades seem to be separate, parallel pathways that are differentially regulated by PKC and Ca2+. The results are discussed in terms of the role of ERK and JNK in proliferative signalling. PMID:9032468

  15. Pdx-1 activates islet α- and β-cell proliferation via a mechanism regulated by transient receptor potential cation channels 3 and 6 and extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2.

    PubMed

    Hayes, Heather L; Moss, Larry G; Schisler, Jonathan C; Haldeman, Jonathan M; Zhang, Zhushan; Rosenberg, Paul B; Newgard, Christopher B; Hohmeier, Hans E

    2013-10-01

    The homeodomain transcription factor Pdx-1 has important roles in pancreatic development and β-cell function and survival. In the present study, we demonstrate that adenovirus-mediated overexpression of Pdx-1 in rat or human islets also stimulates cell replication. Moreover, cooverexpression of Pdx-1 with another homeodomain transcription factor, Nkx6.1, has an additive effect on proliferation compared to either factor alone, implying discrete activating mechanisms. Consistent with this, Nkx6.1 stimulates mainly β-cell proliferation, whereas Pdx-1 stimulates both α- and β-cell proliferation. Furthermore, cyclins D1/D2 are upregulated by Pdx-1 but not by Nkx6.1, and inhibition of cdk4 blocks Pdx-1-stimulated but not Nkx6.1-stimulated islet cell proliferation. Genes regulated by Pdx-1 but not Nkx6.1 were identified by microarray analysis. Two members of the transient receptor potential cation (TRPC) channel family, TRPC3 and TRPC6, are upregulated by Pdx-1 overexpression, and small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated knockdown of TRPC3/6 or TRPC6 alone inhibits Pdx-1-induced but not Nkx6.1-induced islet cell proliferation. Pdx-1 also stimulates extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) phosphorylation, an effect partially blocked by knockdown of TRPC3/6, and blockade of ERK1/2 activation with a MEK1/2 inhibitor partially impairs Pdx-1-stimulated proliferation. These studies define a pathway by which overexpression of Pdx-1 activates islet cell proliferation that is distinct from and additive to a pathway activated by Nkx6.1.

  16. Diallyl trisulfide-induced apoptosis in human prostate cancer cells involves c-Jun N-terminal kinase and extracellular-signal regulated kinase-mediated phosphorylation of Bcl-2.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Dong; Choi, Sunga; Johnson, Daniel E; Vogel, Victor G; Johnson, Candace S; Trump, Donald L; Lee, Yong J; Singh, Shivendra V

    2004-07-22

    Garlic-derived organosulfides (OSCs) including diallyl trisulfide (DATS) are highly effective in affording protection against chemically induced cancer in animals. Evidence is also mounting to indicate that some naturally occurring OSCs can suppress proliferation of cancer cells by causing apoptosis, but the sequence of events leading to proapoptotic effect of OSCs is poorly defined. Using PC-3 and DU145 human prostate cancer cells as a model, we now demonstrate that DATS is a significantly more potent apoptosis inducer than diallyl sulfide (DAS) or diallyl disulfide (DADS). DATS-induced apoptosis in PC-3 cells was associated with phosphorylation of Bcl-2, reduced Bcl-2 : Bax interaction, and cleavage of procaspase-9 and -3. Bcl-2 overexpressing PC-3 cells were significantly more resistant to apoptosis induction by DATS compared with vector-transfected control cells. DATS treatment resulted in activation of extracellular-signal regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) and c-jun N-terminal kinase 1 (JNK1) and/or JNK2, but not p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase. Phosphorylation of Bcl-2 in DATS-treated PC-3 cells was fully blocked in the presence of JNK-specific inhibitor SP600125. Moreover, JNK inhibitor afforded significant protection against DATS-induced apoptosis in both cells. DATS-induced Bcl-2 phosphorylation and apoptosis were partially attenuated by pharmacological inhibition of ERK1/2 using PD98059 or U0126. Overexpression of catalase inhibited DATS-mediated activation of JNK1/2, but not ERK1/2, and apoptosis induction in DU145 cells suggesting involvement of hydrogen peroxide as a second messenger in DATS-induced apoptosis. In conclusion, our data point towards important roles for Bcl-2, JNK and ERK in DATS-induced apoptosis in human prostate cancer cells.

  17. β-Hydroxybutyric acid inhibits growth hormone-releasing hormone synthesis and secretion through the GPR109A/extracellular signal-regulated 1/2 signalling pathway in the hypothalamus.

    PubMed

    Fu, S-P; Liu, B-R; Wang, J-F; Xue, W-J; Liu, H-M; Zeng, Y-L; Huang, B-X; Li, S-N; Lv, Q-K; Wang, W; Liu, J-X

    2015-03-01

    β-Hydroxybutyric acid (BHBA) has recently been shown to regulate hormone synthesis and secretion in the hypothalamus. However, little is known about the effects of BHBA-mediated hormone regulation or the detailed mechanisms by which BHBA regulates growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) synthesis and secretion. In the present study, we examined the expression of the BHBA receptor GPR109A in primary hypothalamic cell cultures. We hypothesised that BHBA regulates GHRH via GPR109A and its downstream signals. Initial in vivo studies conducted in rats demonstrated that GHRH mRNA expression in the hypothalamus was strongly inversely correlated with BHBA levels in the cerebrospinal fluid during postnatal development (r = -0.89, P < 0.01). Furthermore, i.c.v. administration of BHBA acutely decreased GHRH mRNA expression in rats. Further in vitro studies revealed a decrease in GHRH synthesis and secretion in primary hypothalamic cells after treatment with BHBA; this effect was inhibited when hypothalamic cells were pretreated with pertussis toxin (PTX). BHBA had no effect on GHRH synthesis and secretion in GT1-7 cells, which do not exhibit cell surface expression of GPR109A. Furthermore, BHBA acutely decreased the transcription of the homeobox gene for Gsh-1 in the hypothalamus in both in vivo and in vitro, and this effect was also inhibited by PTX in vitro. In primary hypothalamic cells, BHBA activated the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2, p38 and c-Jun N-terminal kinase mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) kinases, as shown by western blot analysis. Moreover, inhibition of ERK1/2 with U0126 attenuated the BHBA-mediated reduction in Gsh-1 expression and GHRH synthesis and secretion. These results strongly suggest that BHBA directly regulates GHRH synthesis and secretion via the GPR109A/ERK1/2 MAPK pathway, and also that Gsh-1 is essential for this function.

  18. Muscarine enhances soluble amyloid precursor protein secretion in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y by a pathway dependent on protein kinase C(alpha), src-tyrosine kinase and extracellular signal-regulated kinase but not phospholipase C.

    PubMed

    Canet-Aviles, Rosa-Maria; Anderton, Mark; Hooper, Nigel M; Turner, Anthony J; Vaughan, Peter F T

    2002-06-15

    The signalling pathways by which muscarine and epidermal growth factor (EGF) regulate the secretion of the alpha-secretase cleavage product (sAPPalpha) of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) were examined in the human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y. Using specific inhibitors it was found that over 80% of sAPPalpha secretion, enhanced by muscarine, occurred via the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/2) member of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) family and was dependent on protein kinase Calpha (PKCalpha) and a member of the Src family of non-receptor tyrosine kinases (Src-TK). In contrast the stimulation of sAPPalpha secretion by EGF was not affected by inhibitors of PKC nor Src-TK but was dependent on ERK1/2. In addition muscarine-enhanced sAPPalpha secretion and ERK1/2 activation were inhibited 60 and 80%, respectively, by micromolar concentrations of the phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase (PI-3K) inhibitor wortmannin. In comparison wortmannin decreased EGF stimulation of sAPPalpha secretion and ERK 1/2 activation by approximately 40%. Unexpectedly, U73122, an inhibitor of phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C, did not inhibit muscarine enhancement of sAPPalpha secretion. These data are discussed in relation to a pathway for the enhancement of sAPPalpha secretion by muscarine which involves the activation of a Src-TK by G-protein beta/gamma-subunits leading to activation of PKCalpha, and ERK1/2 by a mechanism not involving phospholipase C. PMID:12191495

  19. Cytosolic retention of phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase and a Rho-associated kinase-mediated signal impair expression of p21(Cip1/Waf1) in phorbol 12-myristate-13- acetate-induced apoptotic cells.

    PubMed

    Lai, Jin-Mei; Wu, Sulin; Huang, Duen-Yi; Chang, Zee-Fen

    2002-11-01

    In response to treatment with phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA), the half-population of erythromyeloblast D2 cells, a cytokine-independent variant of TF-1 cells, displayed adhesion and differentiated into a monocyte/macrophage-like morphology, while the other half-population remained in suspension and underwent apoptosis. Expression of the cell cycle inhibitor p21(Cip1/Waf1) was induced after PMA treatment in the adherent cells but not in the proapoptotic cells. We investigated the mechanism responsible for the impairment of p21(Cip1/Waf1) induction in PMA-induced proapoptotic cells. We demonstrated that in PMA-induced adherent cells, upregulation of p21(Cip1/Waf1) requires the activation and nuclear translocation of phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (phospho-ERK). Although ERK was phosphorylated to comparable levels in PMA-induced proapoptotic and adherent cells, nuclear distribution of phospho-ERK was seen only in the adherent, not in the proapoptotic cells. We also found that only PMA-induced proapoptotic cells contained the phosphorylated form of myosin light chain, which is dependent on Rho-associated kinase (ROCK) activation, and that expression of a dominant-active form of ROCK suppressed activation of the p21(Cip1/Waf1) promoter during PMA induction. Finally, we demonstrated that inhibition of ROCK restores nuclear distribution of phospho-ERK and activation of p21(Cip1/Waf1) expression. Based on these findings, we propose that a ROCK-mediated signal is involved in interfering with the process of ERK-mediated p21(Cip1/Waf1) induction in PMA-induced proapoptotic TF-1 and D2 cells.

  20. Hepatitis B virus HBx protein induces transcription factor AP-1 by activation of extracellular signal-regulated and c-Jun N-terminal mitogen-activated protein kinases.

    PubMed Central

    Benn, J; Su, F; Doria, M; Schneider, R J

    1996-01-01

    The HBx protein of hepatitis B virus is a dual-specificity activator of transcription, stimulating signal transduction pathways in the cytoplasm and transcription factors in the nucleus, when expressed in cell lines in culture. In the cytoplasm, HBx was shown to stimulate the Ras-Raf-mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAP kinase) cascade, which is essential for activation of transcription factor AP-1. Here we show that HBx protein stimulates two independently regulated members of the MAP kinase family when expressed transiently in cells. HBx protein stimulates the extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERKs) and the c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNKs). HBx activation of ERKs and JNKs leads to induction and activation of AP-1 DNA binding activity involving transient de novo synthesis of c-Fos protein and prolonged synthesis of c-Jun, mediated by N-terminal phosphorylation of c-Jun carried out by HBx-activated JNK. New c-Jun synthesis was blocked by coexpression with a dominant-negative MAP kinase kinase (MEK kinase, MEKK-1), confirming that HBx stimulates the prolonged synthesis of c-Jun by activating JNK signalling pathways. Activation of the c-fos gene was blocked by coexpression with a Raf-C4 catalytic mutant, confirming that HBx induces c-Fos by acting on Ras-Raf linked pathways. HBx activation of ERK and JNK pathways resulted in prolonged accumulation of AP-1-c-Jun dimer complexes. HBx activation of JNK and sustained activation of c-jun, should they occur in the context of hepatitis B virus infection, might play a role in viral transformation and pathogenesis. PMID:8764004

  1. Inorganic pyrophosphate generation by transforming growth factor-beta-1 is mainly dependent on ANK induction by Ras/Raf-1/extracellular signal-regulated kinase pathways in chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Cailotto, Frederic; Bianchi, Arnaud; Sebillaud, Sylvie; Venkatesan, Narayanan; Moulin, David; Jouzeau, Jean-Yves; Netter, Patrick

    2007-01-01

    ANK is a multipass transmembrane protein transporter thought to play a role in the export of intracellular inorganic pyrophosphate and so to contribute to the pathophysiology of chondrocalcinosis. As transforming growth factor-beta-1 (TGF-beta1) was shown to favor calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate deposition, we investigated the contribution of ANK to the production of extracellular inorganic pyrophosphate (ePPi) by chondrocytes and the signaling pathways involved in the regulation of Ank expression by TGF-beta1. Chondrocytes were exposed to 10 ng/mL of TGF-beta1, and Ank expression was measured by quantitative polymerase chain reaction and Western blot. ePPi was quantified in cell supernatants. RNA silencing was used to define the respective roles of Ank and PC-1 in TGF-beta1-induced ePPi generation. Finally, selective kinase inhibitors and dominant-negative/overexpression plasmid strategies were used to explore the contribution of several signaling pathways to Ank induction by TGF-beta1. TGF-beta1 strongly increased Ank expression at the mRNA and protein levels, as well as ePPi production. Using small interfering RNA technology, we showed that Ank contributed approximately 60% and PC-1 nearly 20% to TGF-beta1-induced ePPi generation. Induction of Ank by TGF-beta1 required activation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathway but not of p38-mitogen-activated protein kinase or of protein kinase A. In line with the general protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitor calphostin C, Gö6976 (a Ca2+-dependent PKC inhibitor) diminished TGF-beta1-induced Ank expression by 60%, whereas a 10% inhibition was observed with rottlerin (a PKCdelta inhibitor). These data suggest a regulatory role for calcium in TGF-beta1-induced Ank expression. Finally, we demonstrated that the stimulatory effect of TGF-beta1 on Ank expression was inhibited by the suppression of the Ras/Raf-1 pathway, while being enhanced by their constitutive activation. Transient overexpression of Smad 7, an

  2. Extracellular matrix secreted by senescent fibroblasts induced by UVB promotes cell proliferation in HaCaT cells through PI3K/AKT and ERK signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Kang, Jian; Chen, Wenqi; Xia, Jiping; Li, Yanhua; Yang, Bo; Chen, Bin; Sun, Weiling; Song, Xiuzu; Xiang, Wenzhong; Wang, Xiaoyong; Wang, Fei; Bi, Zhigang; Wan, Yinsheng

    2008-06-01

    Chronic exposure to solar ultraviolet radiation (UV) induces photoaging, and ultimately photocarcinogenesis. Senescent human skin fibroblasts (HSFs) in UVB stress-induced premature senescence (UVB-SIPS) share a similar extracellular matrix (ECM) phenotype with other types of senescent fibroblast. ECM from senescent fibroblasts induced by a variety of stresses has been shown to promote preneoplastic and neoplastic epithelial cell growth, a potential mechanism in carcinogenesis. We undertook this study to explore whether the extracellular matrices from UVB-induced senescent fibroblasts have any effect on the proliferation of HaCaT cells. The results showed that ECM secreted from HSFs in UVB-SIPS has 13.15 and 29.27% more stimulatory effect on proliferation than ECM secreted from presenescent HSFs and non-ECM, respectively. ECM from fibroblasts in UVB-SIPS activates FAK, ERK, and AKT in HaCaT cells. ERK and PI3K/AKT inhibitors inhibit ECM-induced ERK, AKT activation and cell proliferation. Cytochalasin D, a destructive agent of the cytoskeleton, inhibits ECM-induced FAK activation and cell proliferation in HaCaT cells. Collectively, we conclude that ECM secreted from HSFs in UVB-SIPS promotes cell proliferation via ERK and PI3K/AKT pathways and modulation of FAK and cytoskeletal proteins in HaCaT cells. Pharmacological manipulation of those signaling components may lead to the prevention and treatment of skin cancer induced by chronic solar exposure.

  3. Neuregulin 1-induced AKT and ERK phosphorylation in patients with fragile X syndrome (FXS) and intellectual disability associated with obstetric complications.

    PubMed

    Kovács, Tamás; Bánsági, Boglárka; Kelemen, Oguz; Kéri, Szabolcs

    2014-09-01

    Animal models of fragile X syndrome (FXS) suggest the impairment of the intracellular AKT messenger system, which is activated by neuregulin 1 (NRG1), a key regulator of neurodevelopment. We investigated NRG1-induced activation of the AKT and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) systems by the measurement of the phosphorylated AKT/ERK to total AKT/ERK ratio in peripheral B lymphoblasts of patients with FXS, IQ-matched controls with intellectual disability (obstetric complications, preterm birth, perinatal hypoxia, and low birth weight), and typically developed healthy participants. Results revealed that patients with FXS displayed decreased AKT but normal ERK activation after the administration of NRG1. IQ-matched controls with intellectual disability displayed intact AKT/ERK activation. In conclusion, FXS, but not intellectual disability associated with obstetric complications, is associated with decreased NRG1-induced AKT phosphorylation.

  4. Lactoferrin inhibits dexamethasone-induced chondrocyte impairment from osteoarthritic cartilage through up-regulation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 and suppression of FASL, FAS, and Caspase 3

    SciTech Connect

    Tu, Yihui; Xue, Huaming; Francis, Wendy; Davies, Andrew P.; Pallister, Ian; Kanamarlapudi, Venkateswarlu; Xia, Zhidao

    2013-11-08

    Highlights: •Dex exerts dose-dependant inhibition of HACs viability and induction of apoptosis. •Dex-induced impairment of chondrocytes was attenuated by rhLF. •ERK and FASL/FAS signaling are involved in the effects of rhLF. •OA patients with glucocorticoid-induced cartilage damage may benefit from treatment with rhLF. -- Abstract: Dexamethasone (Dex) is commonly used for osteoarthritis (OA) with excellent anti-inflammatory and analgesic effect. However, Dex also has many side effects following repeated use over prolonged periods mainly through increasing apoptosis and inhibiting proliferation. Lactoferrin (LF) exerts significantly anabolic effect on many cells and little is known about its effect on OA chondrocytes. Therefore, the aim of this study is to investigate whether LF can inhibit Dex-induced OA chondrocytes apoptosis and explore its possible molecular mechanism involved in. MTT assay was used to determine the optimal concentration of Dex and recombinant human LF (rhLF) on chondrocytes at different time and dose points. Chondrocytes were then stimulated with Dex in the absence or presence of optimal concentration of rhLF. Cell proliferation and viability were evaluated using MTT and LIVE/DEAD assay, respectively. Cell apoptosis was evaluated by multi-parameter apoptosis assay kit using both confocal microscopy and flow cytometry, respectively. The expression of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), FAS, FASL, and Caspase-3 (CASP3) at the mRNA and protein levels were examined by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and immunocytochemistry, respectively. The optimal concentration of Dex (25 μg/ml) and rhLF (200 μg/ml) were chosen for the following experiments. rhLF significantly reversed the detrimental effect of Dex on chondrocytes proliferation, viability, and apoptosis. In addition, rhLF significantly prevented Dex-induced down-regulation of ERK and up-regulation of FAS, FASL, and CASP3. These findings demonstrated that rhLF acts as

  5. Operant ethanol self-administration increases extracellular-signal regulated protein kinase (ERK) phosphorylation in reward-related brain regions: selective regulation of positive reinforcement in the prefrontal cortex of C57BL/6J mice

    PubMed Central

    Faccidomo, Sara; Salling, Michael C; Galunas, Christina; Hodge, Clyde W

    2015-01-01

    Rationale Extracellular-signal regulated protein kinase (ERK1/2) is activated by ethanol in reward-related brain regions. Accordingly, systemic inhibition of ERK1/2 potentiates ethanol reinforcement. However, the brain region(s) that mediate this effect are unknown. Objective To pharmacologically inhibit ERK1/2 in the medial prefrontal cortex (PFC), nucleus accumbens (NAC) and amygdala (AMY) prior to ethanol or sucrose self-administration, and evaluate effects of operant ethanol self-administration on ERK1/2 phosphorylation (pERK1/2). Methods Male C57BL/6J mice were trained to lever press on a fixed-ratio-4 schedule of 9% ethanol+2% sucrose (ethanol) or 2% sucrose (sucrose) reinforcement. Mice were sacrificed immediately after the 30th self-administration session and pERK1/2 immunoreactivity was quantified in targeted brain regions. Additional groups of mice were injected with SL 327 (0–1.7 μg/side) in PFC, NAC or AMY prior to self-administration. Results pERK1/2 immunoreactivity was significantly increased by operant ethanol (g/kg=1.21 g/kg; BAC=54.9 mg/dl) in the PFC, NAC (core and shell), and AMY (central nucleus) as compared to sucrose. Microinjection of SL 327 (1.7 μg) into the PFC selectively increased ethanol self-administration. Intra-NAC injection of SL 327 had no effect on ethanol- but suppressed sucrose-reinforced responding. Intra-AMY microinjection of SL 327 had no effect on either ethanol- or sucrose-reinforced responding. Locomotor activity was unaffected under all conditions. Conclusions Operant ethanol self-administration increases pERK1/2 activation in the PFC, NAC and AMY. However, ERK1/2 activity only in the PFC mechanistically regulates ethanol self-administration. These data suggest that ethanol-induced activation of ERK1/2 in the PFC is a critical pharmacological effect that mediates the reinforcing properties of the drug. PMID:26123321

  6. Farnesoid X receptor activation by chenodeoxycholic acid induces detoxifying enzymes through AMP-activated protein kinase and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2-mediated phosphorylation of CCAAT/enhancer binding protein β.

    PubMed

    Noh, Kyoung; Kim, Young Mi; Kim, Young Woo; Kim, Sang Geon

    2011-08-01

    Farnesoid X receptor (FXR) regulates redox homeostasis and elicits a cytoprotective effect. CCAAT/enhancer binding protein-β (C/EBPβ) plays a role in regulating the expression of hepatocyte-specific genes and contributes to hepatocyte protection and liver regeneration. In view of the role of FXR in xenobiotic metabolism and hepatocyte survival, this study investigated the potential of FXR to activate C/EBPβ for the induction of detoxifying enzymes and the responsible regulatory pathway. Chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA), a major component in bile acids, activates FXR. In HepG2 cells, CDCA treatment activated C/EBPβ, as shown by increases in its phosphorylation, nuclear accumulation, and expression. 3-(2,6-Dichlorophenyl)-4-(3'-carboxy-2-chlorostilben-4-yl-)oxymethyl-5-isopropyl-isoxazole (GW4064), a synthetic FXR ligand, had similar effects. In addition, CDCA enhanced luciferase gene transcription from the construct containing -1.65-kb GSTA2 promoter, which contained C/EBP response element (pGL-1651). Moreover, CDCA treatment activated AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), which led to extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) activation, as evidenced by the results of experiments using a dominant-negative mutant of AMPKα and chemical inhibitor. The activation of ERK1/2 was responsible for the activating phosphorylation of C/EBPβ. FXR knockdown attenuated the ability of CDCA to activate AMPK and ERK1/2 and phosphorylate C/EBPβ. Consistently, enforced expression of FXR promoted the phosphorylation of AMPKα, ERK1/2, and C/EBPβ, verifying that C/EBPβ phosphorylation elicited by CDCA results from the activation of AMPK and ERK1/2 by FXR. In mice, CDCA treatment activated C/EBPβ with the induction of detoxifying enzymes in the liver. Our results demonstrate that CDCA induces antioxidant and xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes by activating C/EBPβ through AMPK-dependent ERK1/2 pathway downstream of FXR.

  7. Association between GRB2/Sos and insulin receptor substrate 1 is not sufficient for activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases by interleukin-4: implications for Ras activation by insulin.

    PubMed

    Pruett, W; Yuan, Y; Rose, E; Batzer, A G; Harada, N; Skolnik, E Y

    1995-03-01

    Insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS-1) mediates the activation of a variety of signaling pathways by the insulin and insulin-like growth factor 1 receptors by serving as a docking protein for signaling molecules with SH2 domains. We and others have shown that in response to insulin stimulation IRS-1 binds GRB2/Sos and have proposed that this interaction is important in mediating Ras activation by the insulin receptor. Recently, it has been shown that the interleukin (IL)-4 receptor also phosphorylates IRS-1 and an IRS-1-related molecule, 4PS. Unlike insulin, however, IL-4 fails to activate Ras, extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERKs), or mitogen-activated protein kinases. We have reconstituted the IL-4 receptor into an insulin-responsive L6 myoblast cell line and have shown that IRS-1 is tyrosine phosphorylated to similar degrees in response to insulin and IL-4 stimulation in this cell line. In agreement with previous findings, IL-4 failed to activate the ERKs in this cell line or to stimulate DNA synthesis, whereas the same responses were activated by insulin. Surprisingly, IL-4's failure to activate ERKs was not due to a failure to stimulate the association of tyrosine-phosphorylated IRS-1 with GRB2/Sos; the amounts of GRB2/Sos associated with IRS-1 were similar in insulin- and IL-4-stimulated cells. Moreover, the amounts of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase activity associated with IRS-1 were similar in insulin- and IL-4-stimulated cells. In contrast to insulin, however, IL-4 failed to induce tyrosine phosphorylation of Shc or association of Shc with GRB2. Thus, ERK activation correlates with Shc tyrosine phosphorylation and formation of an Shc/GRB2 complex. Thus, ERK activation correlates with Shc tyrosine phosphorylation and formation of an Shc/GRB2 complex. Previous studies have indicated that activation of ERks in this cell line is dependent upon Ras since a dominant-negative Ras (Asn-17) blocks ERK activation by insulin. Our findings, taken in the context

  8. Angiotensin II Signaling in Human Preadipose Cells: Participation of ERK1,2-Dependent Modulation of Akt

    PubMed Central

    Dünner, Natalia; Quezada, Carolina; Berndt, F. Andrés; Cánovas, José; Rojas, Cecilia V.

    2013-01-01

    The renin-angiotensin system expressed in adipose tissue has been implicated in the modulation of adipocyte formation, glucose metabolism, triglyceride accumulation, lipolysis, and the onset of the adverse metabolic consequences of obesity. As we investigated angiotensin II signal transduction mechanisms in human preadipose cells, an interplay of extracellular-signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1,2) and Akt/PKB became evident. Angiotensin II caused attenuation of phosphorylated Akt (p-Akt), at serine 473; the p-Akt/Akt ratio decreased to 0.5±0.2-fold the control value without angiotensin II (p<0.001). Here we report that the reduction of phosphorylated Akt associates with ERK1,2 activities. In the absence of angiotensin II, inhibition of ERK1,2 activation with U0126 or PD98059 resulted in a 2.1±0.5 (p<0.001) and 1.4±0.2-fold (p<0.05) increase in the p-Akt/Akt ratio, respectively. In addition, partial knockdown of ERK1 protein expression by the short hairpin RNA technique also raised phosphorylated Akt in these cells (the p-Akt/Akt ratio was 1.5±0.1-fold the corresponding control; p<0.05). Furthermore, inhibition of ERK1,2 activation with U0126 prevented the reduction of p-Akt/Akt by angiotensin II. An analogous effect was found on the phosphorylation status of Akt downstream effectors, the forkhead box (Fox) proteins O1 and O4. Altogether, these results indicate that angiotensin II signaling in human preadipose cells involves an ERK1,2-dependent attenuation of Akt activity, whose impact on the biological functions under its regulation is not fully understood. PMID:24098385

  9. Epidermal growth factor stimulates proliferation and migration of porcine trophectoderm cells through protooncogenic protein kinase 1 and extracellular-signal-regulated kinases 1/2 mitogen-activated protein kinase signal transduction cascades during early pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Wooyoung; Kim, Jinyoung; Bazer, Fuller W; Song, Gwonhwa

    2013-12-01

    For successful implantation and establishment of early epitheliochorial placentation, porcine conceptuses require histotroph, including nutrients and growth factors, secreted by or transported into the lumen of the uterus. Epidermal growth factor (EGF), an essential component of histotroph, is known to have potential growth-promoting activities on the conceptus and uterine endometrium. However, little is known about its effects to transactivate cell signaling cascades responsible for proliferation, growth and differentiation of conceptus trophectoderm. In the present study, therefore, we determined that EGFR mRNA and protein were abundant in endometrial luminal and glandular epithelia, stratum compactum stroma and conceptus trophectoderm on days 13-14 of pregnancy, but not in any other cells of the uterus or conceptus. In addition, primary porcine trophectoderm (pTr) cells treated with EGF exhibited increased abundance of phosphorylated (p)-AKT1, p-ERK1/2 MAPK and p-P90RSK over basal levels within 5min, and effect that was maintained to between 30 and 120min. Immunofluorescence microscopy revealed abundant amounts of p-ERK1/2 MAPK and p-AKT1 proteins in the nucleus and, to a lesser extent, in the cytoplasm of pTr cells treated with EGF as compared to control cells. Furthermore, the abundance of p-AKT1 and p-ERK1/2 MAPK proteins was inhibited in control and EGF-treated pTr cells transfected with EGFR siRNA. Compared to the control siRNA transfected pTr cells, pTr cells transfected with EGFR siRNA exhibited an increase in expression of IFND and TGFB1, but there was no effect of expression of IFNG. Further, EGF stimulated proliferation and migration of pTr cells through activation of the PI3K-AKT1 and ERK1/2 MAPK-P90RSK cell signaling pathways. Collectively, these results support the hypothesis that EGF coordinately activates multiple cell signaling pathways critical to proliferation, migration and survival of trophectoderm cells that are critical to development of

  10. Reciprocal Regulation of AKT and MAP Kinase Dictates Virus-Host Cell Fusion ▿

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Nishi R.; Mani, Prashant; Nandwani, Neha; Mishra, Rajakishore; Rana, Ajay; Sarkar, Debi P.

    2010-01-01

    Viruses of the Paramyxoviridae family bind to their host cells by using hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN), which enhances fusion protein (F)-mediated membrane fusion. Although respiratory syncytial virus and parainfluenza virus 5 of this family are suggested to trigger host cell signaling during infection, the virus-induced intracellular signals dictating virus-cell fusion await elucidation. Using an F- or HN-F-containing reconstituted envelope of Sendai virus, another paramyxovirus, we revealed the role and regulation of AKT1 and Raf/MEK/ERK cascades during viral fusion with liver cells. Our observation that extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) activation promotes viral fusion via ezrin-mediated cytoskeletal rearrangements, whereas AKT1 attenuates fusion by promoting phosphorylation of F protein, indicates a counteractive regulation of viral fusion by reciprocal activation of AKT1 and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades, establishing a novel conceptual framework for a therapeutic strategy. PMID:20164223

  11. Oncostatin M and leukaemia inhibitory factor trigger signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 pathways but result in heterogeneous cellular responses in trophoblast cells.

    PubMed

    Chaiwangyen, Wittaya; Ospina-Prieto, Stephanie; Morales-Prieto, Diana M; Pereira de Sousa, Francisco Lazaro; Pastuschek, Jana; Fitzgerald, Justine S; Schleussner, Ekkehard; Markert, Udo R

    2016-04-01

    Leukaemia inhibitory factor (LIF) and oncostatin M (OSM) are pleiotropic cytokines present at the implantation site that are important for the normal development of human pregnancy. These cytokines share the cell membrane receptor subunit gp130, resulting in similar functions. The aim of this study was to compare the response to LIF and OSM in several trophoblast models with particular regard to intracellular mechanisms and invasion. Four trophoblast cell lines with different characteristics were used: HTR-8/SVneo, JEG-3, ACH-3P and AC1-M59 cells. Cells were incubated with LIF, OSM (both at 10ngmL(-1)) and the signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) 3 inhibitor S3I-201 (200µM). Expression and phosphorylation of STAT3 (tyr(705)) and extracellular regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2 (thr(202/204)) and the STAT3 DNA-binding capacity were analysed by Western blotting and DNA-binding assays, respectively. Cell viability and invasiveness were assessed by the methylthiazole tetrazolium salt (MTS) and Matrigel assays. Enzymatic activity of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and MMP-9 was investigated by zymography. OSM and LIF triggered phosphorylation of STAT3 and ERK1/2, followed by a significant increase in STAT3 DNA-binding activity in all tested cell lines. Stimulation with LIF but not OSM significantly enhanced invasion of ACH-3P and JEG-3 cells, but not HTR-8/SVneo or AC1-M59 cells. Similarly, STAT3 inhibition significantly decreased the invasiveness of only ACH-3P and JEG-3 cells concomitant with decreases in secreted MMP-2 and MMP-9. OSM shares with LIF the capacity to activate ERK1/2 and STAT3 pathways in all cell lines tested, but their resulting effects are dependent on cell type. This suggests that LIF and OSM may partially substitute for each other in case of deficiencies or therapeutic interventions. PMID:25247600

  12. Sevoflurane Post-conditioning Protects Primary Rat Cortical Neurons Against Oxygen-Glucose Deprivation/Resuscitation: Roles of Extracellular Signal-Regulated Kinase 1/2 and Bid, Bim, Puma.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Limin; Zhao, Xiaochun; Jiang, Xiaojing

    2015-08-01

    Temporal post-conditioning to induce neuroprotection against brain ischemia-reperfusion injury insult is considered to be an effective intervention, but the exact mechanisms of sevoflurane post-conditioning are poorly understood. Extracellular signal-related kinases 1/2 (Erk1/2) play a pivotal role in the cell growth and proliferation. The essential axis of activator Bid, Bim, Puma (BH3s) and BAX, BAK in activating the mitochondrial death program might offer common ground for cell death signal. We hypothesized that, sevoflurane post-conditioning might inhibit the expression of Bid, Bim and Puma and is activated by phosphor-Erk1/2 to reduce neuronal death. To test this hypothesis, we exposed primary cultured cortical neurons to oxygen-glucose deprivation for 1 h and resuscitation for 24 h (OGD/R). The assays of MTT, propidium iodide uptake, JC-1 fluorescence and western blot demonstrated that OGD/R exposure reduced cell viability, increased cell death, decreased mitochondrial membrane potential and the expressions of Bid, Bim, and Puma. Inhibition of Erk1/2 phosphorylation could partially attenuate 2 % of sevoflurane post-conditioning mediated increase in neuronal viability and mitochondrial membrane potential, and also a decrease in cell death and expression of Bid, Bim and Puma after OGD/R treatment. The results demonstrated that, the protection of sevoflurane post-conditioning markedly reducing death of cortical neurons exposed to OGD/R could be correlated with down-regulation of Bid, Bim and Puma expression mediated by phosphorylation/activation of Erk1/2.

  13. ACTIVATION OF EXTRACELLULAR-SIGNAL REGULATED KINASE (ERK1/2) BY FLUID SHEAR IS CA2+- AND ATP-DEPENDENT IN MC3T3-E1 OSTEOBLASTS

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Dawei; Genetos, Damian C.; Shao, Ying; Geist, Derik J.; Li, Jiliang; Ke, Hua Zhu; Turner, Charles H.; Duncan, Randall L.

    2010-01-01

    To determine the role of Ca2+ signaling in activation of the Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase (MAPK) pathway, we subjected MC3T3-E1 pre-osteoblastic cells to inhibitors of Ca2+ signaling during application of fluid shear stress (FSS). FSS only activated ERK1/2, rapidly inducing phosphorylation within 5 minutes of the onset of shear. Phosphorylation of ERK1/2 (pERK1/2) was significantly reduced when Ca2+i was chelated with BAPTA or when Ca2+ was removed from the flow media. Inhibition of both the L-type voltage-sensitive Ca2+ channel and the mechanosensitive cation-selective channel blocked FSS-induced pERK1/2. Inhibition of phospholipase C with U73122 significantly reduced pERK1/2. This inhibition did not result from block of intracellular Ca2+ release, but a loss of PKC activation. Recent data suggests a role of ATP release and purinergic receptor activation in mechanotransduction. Apyrase-mediated hydrolysis of extracellular ATP completely blocked FSS-induced phosphorylation of ERK1/2, while addition of exogenous ATP to static cells mimicked the effects of FSS on pERK1/2. Two P2 receptors, P2Y2 and P2X7, have been associated with the anabolic responses of bone to mechanical loading. Using both iRNA techniques and primary osteoblasts isolated from P2X7 knockout mice, we found that the P2X7, but not the P2Y2, purinergic receptor was involved in ERK1/2 activation under FSS. These data suggest that FSS-induced ERK1/2 phosphorylation requires Ca2+-dependent ATP release, however both increased Ca2+i and PKC activation are needed for complete activation. Further, this ATP-dependent ERK1/2 phosphorylation is mediated through P2X7, but not P2Y2, purinergic receptors. PMID:18291742

  14. Aloe-emodin suppresses esophageal cancer cell TE1 proliferation by inhibiting AKT and ERK phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Xiaobin; Zhao, Jimin; Tian, Fang; Jiang, Yanan; Lu, Jing; Ma, Junfen; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Jin, Guoguo; Huang, Youtian; Dong, Zigang; Liu, Kangdong; Dong, Ziming

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant AKT and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) activation is often observed in various human cancers. Both AKT and ERK are important in the phosphoinositide 3-kinase/AKT and mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase/ERK signaling pathways, which play vital roles in cell proliferation, differentiation and survival. Compounds that are able to block these pathways have therefore a promising use in cancer treatment and prevention. The present study revealed that AKT and ERK are activated in esophageal cancer TE1 cells. Aloe-emodin, an anthraquinone present in aloe latex, can suppress TE1 cell proliferation and anchor-independent cell growth. Aloe-emodin can also reduce the number of TE1 cells in S phase. Protein analysis indicated that aloe-emodin inhibits the phosphorylation of AKT and ERK in a dose-dependent manner. Overall, the present data indicate that aloe-emodin can suppress TE1 cell growth by inhibiting AKT and ERK phosphorylation, and suggest its clinical use for cancer therapy.

  15. Aloe-emodin suppresses esophageal cancer cell TE1 proliferation by inhibiting AKT and ERK phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Xiaobin; Zhao, Jimin; Tian, Fang; Jiang, Yanan; Lu, Jing; Ma, Junfen; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Jin, Guoguo; Huang, Youtian; Dong, Zigang; Liu, Kangdong; Dong, Ziming

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant AKT and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) activation is often observed in various human cancers. Both AKT and ERK are important in the phosphoinositide 3-kinase/AKT and mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase/ERK signaling pathways, which play vital roles in cell proliferation, differentiation and survival. Compounds that are able to block these pathways have therefore a promising use in cancer treatment and prevention. The present study revealed that AKT and ERK are activated in esophageal cancer TE1 cells. Aloe-emodin, an anthraquinone present in aloe latex, can suppress TE1 cell proliferation and anchor-independent cell growth. Aloe-emodin can also reduce the number of TE1 cells in S phase. Protein analysis indicated that aloe-emodin inhibits the phosphorylation of AKT and ERK in a dose-dependent manner. Overall, the present data indicate that aloe-emodin can suppress TE1 cell growth by inhibiting AKT and ERK phosphorylation, and suggest its clinical use for cancer therapy. PMID:27602169

  16. Aerosol delivery of kinase-deficient Akt1 attenuates Clara cell injury induced by naphthalene in the lungs of dual luciferase mice.

    PubMed

    Minai-Tehrani, Arash; Park, Young-Chan; Hwang, Soon-Kyung; Kwon, Jung-Taek; Chang, Seung-Hee; Park, Sung-Jin; Yu, Kyeong-Nam; Kim, Ji-Eun; Shin, Ji-Young; Kim, Ji-Hye; Kang, Bitna; Hong, Seong-Ho; Cho, Myung-Haing

    2011-12-01

    Conventional lung cancer therapies are associated with poor survival rates; therefore, new approaches such as gene therapy are required for treating cancer. Gene therapies for treating lung cancer patients can involve several approaches. Among these, aerosol gene delivery is a potentially more effective approach. In this study, Akt1 kinase-deficient (KD) and wild-type (WT) Akt1 were delivered to the lungs of CMV-LucR-cMyc-IRES-LucF dual reporter mice through a nose only inhalation system using glucosylated polyethylenimine and naphthalene was administrated to the mice via intraperitoneal injection. Aerosol delivery of Akt1 WT and naphthalene treatment increased protein levels of downstream substrates of Akt signaling pathway while aerosol delivery of Akt1 KD did not. Our results showed that naphthalene affected extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) protein levels, ERK-related signaling, and induced Clara cell injury. However, Clara cell injury induced by naphthalene was considerably attenuated in mice exposed to Akt1 KD. Furthermore, a dual luciferase activity assay showed that aerosol delivery of Akt1 WT and naphthalene treatment enhanced cap-dependent protein translation, while reduced cap-dependent protein translation was observed after delivering Akt1 KD. These studies demonstrated that our aerosol delivery is compatible for in vivo gene delivery. PMID:22122896

  17. The forced swimming-induced behavioural immobility response involves histone H3 phospho-acetylation and c-Fos induction in dentate gyrus granule neurons via activation of the N-methyl-D-aspartate/extracellular signal-regulated kinase/mitogen- and stress-activated kinase signalling pathway.

    PubMed

    Chandramohan, Yalini; Droste, Susanne K; Arthur, J Simon C; Reul, Johannes M H M

    2008-05-01

    The hippocampus is involved in learning and memory. Previously, we have shown that the acquisition of the behavioural immobility response after a forced swim experience is associated with chromatin modifications and transcriptional induction in dentate gyrus granule neurons. Given that both N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors and the extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK) 1/2 signalling pathway are involved in neuroplasticity processes underlying learning and memory, we investigated in rats and mice whether these signalling pathways regulate chromatin modifications and transcriptional events participating in the acquisition of the immobility response. We found that: (i) forced swimming evoked a transient increase in the number of phospho-acetylated histone H3-positive [P(Ser10)-Ac(Lys14)-H3(+)] neurons specifically in the middle and superficial aspects of the dentate gyrus granule cell layer; (ii) antagonism of NMDA receptors and inhibition of ERK1/2 signalling blocked forced swimming-induced histone H3 phospho-acetylation and the acquisition of the behavioural immobility response; (iii) double knockout (DKO) of the histone H3 kinase mitogen- and stress-activated kinases (MSK) 1/2 in mice completely abolished the forced swimming-induced increases in histone H3 phospho-acetylation and c-Fos induction in dentate granule neurons and the behavioural immobility response; (iv) blocking mineralocorticoid receptors, known not to be involved in behavioural immobility in the forced swim test, did not affect forced swimming-evoked histone H3 phospho-acetylation in dentate neurons; and (v) the pharmacological manipulations and gene deletions did not affect behaviour in the initial forced swim test. We conclude that the forced swimming-induced behavioural immobility response requires histone H3 phospho-acetylation and c-Fos induction in distinct dentate granule neurons through recruitment of the NMDA/ERK/MSK 1/2 pathway.

  18. Implication of the calcium sensing receptor and the Phosphoinositide 3-kinase/Akt pathway in the extracellular calcium-mediated migration of RAW 264.7 osteoclast precursor cells.

    PubMed

    Boudot, Cédric; Saidak, Zuzana; Boulanouar, Abdel Krim; Petit, Laurent; Gouilleux, Fabrice; Massy, Ziad; Brazier, Michel; Mentaverri, Romuald; Kamel, Saïd

    2010-05-01

    While the processes involved in the formation, maturation and apoptosis of osteoclasts have been investigated extensively in previous studies, little is known about the mechanisms responsible for the localization and homing of osteoclast precursor cells to the bone environment in order to initiate the bone remodeling process. Recent studies have suggested that the extracellular Ca(2+) (Ca(2+)(o)) concentration gradient present near the bone environment may be one of the participating factors, producing a chemoattractant effect on osteoclast precursors. Using the murine osteoclast precursor cells of the monocyte-macrophage lineage, the RAW 264.7 cell line, we have shown that Ca(2+)(o) increases the migration of these cells in a directional manner. The participation of the calcium sensing receptor (CaR) in this effect was tested by knocking down its expression through RNA interference, which resulted in an abolition of the migratory response. By the use of specific pathway inhibitors and western blot analysis, the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt and phospholipase Cbeta pathways were shown to be implicated in the migratory effect. The implication of the Akt pathway in the Ca(2+)(o)-induced chemoattraction of RAW 264.7 cells was also confirmed by transducing the cells with the fusion protein TAT-dominant negative-Akt, which decreased the migratory effect. In contrast, the MAPK pathways (ERK1/2, p38 and JNK) were not involved in the production of the migratory effect. We conclude that through the activation of the CaR and subsequent signaling via the PI3K/Akt pathway, Ca(2+)(o) produces a chemoattractant effect on the osteoclast precursor RAW 264.7 cells. These results suggest that the Ca(2+)(o) gradient present near the bone may be one of the initiating factors for the homing of osteoclast precursors to bone, thus possibly playing a role in the initiation of bone remodeling. PMID:20149906

  19. Dopamine D2 receptor-mediated Akt/PKB signalling: initiation by the D2S receptor and role in quinpirole-induced behavioural activation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Han-Ting; Ruan, Nan-Yu; Chen, Jin-Chung; Lin, Tzu-Yung

    2012-09-24

    The short and long isoforms of the dopamine D2 receptor (D2S and D2L respectively) are highly expressed in the striatum. Functional D2 receptors activate an intracellular signalling pathway that includes a cAMP-independent route involving Akt/GSK3 (glycogen synthase kinase 3). To investigate the Akt/GSK3 response to the seldom-studied D2S receptor, we established a rat D2S receptor-expressing cell line [HEK (human embryonic kidney)-293/rD2S]. We found that in HEK-293/rD2S cells, the D2/D3 agonists bromocriptine and quinpirole significantly induced Akt and GSK3 phosphorylation, as well as ERK1/2 (extracellular-signal-regulated kinase 1/2) activation. The D2S receptor-induced Akt signals were profoundly inhibited by the internalization blockers monodansyl cadaverine and concanavalin A. Activation of the D2S receptor in HEK-293/rD2S cells appeared to trigger Akt/phospho-Akt translocation to the cell membrane. In addition to our cell culture experiments, we studied D2 receptor-dependent Akt in vivo by systemic administration of the D2/D3 agonist quinpirole. The results show that quinpirole evoked Akt-Ser473 phosphorylation in the ventral striatum. Furthermore, intra-accumbens administration of wortmannin, a PI3K (phosphoinositide 3-kinase) inhibitor, significantly suppressed the quinpirole-evoked behavioural activation. Overall, we demonstrate that activation of the dopamine D2S receptor stimulates Akt/GSK3 signalling. In addition, in vivo Akt activity in the ventral striatum appears to play an important role in systemic D2/D3 agonist-induced behavioural activation.

  20. Dopamine D2 receptor-mediated Akt/PKB signalling: initiation by the D2S receptor and role in quinpirole-induced behavioural activation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Han-Ting; Ruan, Nan-Yu; Chen, Jin-Chung; Lin, Tzu-Yung

    2012-01-01

    The short and long isoforms of the dopamine D2 receptor (D2S and D2L respectively) are highly expressed in the striatum. Functional D2 receptors activate an intracellular signalling pathway that includes a cAMP-independent route involving Akt/GSK3 (glycogen synthase kinase 3). To investigate the Akt/GSK3 response to the seldom-studied D2S receptor, we established a rat D2S receptor-expressing cell line [HEK (human embryonic kidney)-293/rD2S]. We found that in HEK-293/rD2S cells, the D2/D3 agonists bromocriptine and quinpirole significantly induced Akt and GSK3 phosphorylation, as well as ERK1/2 (extracellular-signal-regulated kinase 1/2) activation. The D2S receptor-induced Akt signals were profoundly inhibited by the internalization blockers monodansyl cadaverine and concanavalin A. Activation of the D2S receptor in HEK-293/rD2S cells appeared to trigger Akt/phospho-Akt translocation to the cell membrane. In addition to our cell culture experiments, we studied D2 receptor-dependent Akt in vivo by systemic administration of the D2/D3 agonist quinpirole. The results show that quinpirole evoked Akt-Ser473 phosphorylation in the ventral striatum. Furthermore, intra-accumbens administration of wortmannin, a PI3K (phosphoinositide 3-kinase) inhibitor, significantly suppressed the quinpirole-evoked behavioural activation. Overall, we demonstrate that activation of the dopamine D2S receptor stimulates Akt/GSK3 signalling. In addition, in vivo Akt activity in the ventral striatum appears to play an important role in systemic D2/D3 agonist-induced behavioural activation. PMID:22909302

  1. Hydrogen peroxide induces murine macrophage chemokine gene transcription via extracellular signal-regulated kinase- and cyclic adenosine 5'-monophosphate (cAMP)-dependent pathways: involvement of NF-kappa B, activator protein 1, and cAMP response element binding protein.

    PubMed

    Jaramillo, Maritza; Olivier, Martin

    2002-12-15

    Hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) has been shown to act as a second messenger that activates chemokine expression. In the present study, we investigated the mechanisms underlying this cellular regulation in the murine macrophage cell line B10R. We report that H(2)O(2) increases mRNA expression of various chemokines, macrophage-inflammatory protein (MIP)-1alpha/CC chemokine ligand (CCL)3, MIP-1beta/CCL4, MIP-2/CXC chemokine ligand 2, and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1/CCL2, by activating the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathway and the nuclear translocation of the transcription factors NF-kappaB, AP-1, and CREB. Blockage of the ERK pathway with specific inhibitors against mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 1/2 and ERK1/ERK2 completely abolished both the H(2)O(2)-mediated chemokine up-regulation and the activation of all NF studied. Similarly, selective inhibition of cAMP and NF-kappaB strongly down-regulated the induction of all chemokine transcripts as well as CREB and NF-kappaB activation, respectively. Of interest, we detected a significant decrease of NF-kappaB, AP-1, and CREB DNA binding activities by reciprocal competition for these binding sites when either specific cold oligonucleotides (NF-kappaB, AP-1, and CREB) or Abs against various transcription factor subunits (p50, p65, c-Fos, Jun B, c-Jun, and CREB-1) were added. These findings indicate that cooperation between ERK- and cAMP-dependent pathways seems to be required to achieve the formation of an essential transcriptional factor complex for maximal H(2)O(2)-dependent chemokine modulation. Finally, experiments performed with actinomycin D suggest that H(2)O(2)-mediated MIP-1beta mRNA up-regulation results from transcriptional control, whereas that of MIP-1alpha, MIP-2, and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 is due to both gene transcription activation and mRNA posttranscriptional stabilization.

  2. Gardenamide A Protects RGC-5 Cells from H₂O₂-Induced Oxidative Stress Insults by Activating PI3K/Akt/eNOS Signaling Pathway.

    PubMed

    Wang, Rikang; Peng, Lizhi; Zhao, Jiaqiang; Zhang, Laitao; Guo, Cuiping; Zheng, Wenhua; Chen, Heru

    2015-01-01

    Gardenamide A (GA) protects the rat retinal ganglion (RGC-5) cells against cell apoptosis induced by H₂O₂. The protective effect of GA was completely abrogated by the specific phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor LY294002, and the specific protein kinase B (Akt) inhibitor Akt VIII respectively, indicating that the protective mechanism of GA is mediated by the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway. The specific extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/2) inhibitor PD98059 could not block the neuroprotection of GA. GA attenuated the levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and malondialdehyde (MDA) induced by H₂O₂. Western blotting showed that GA promoted the phosphorylation of ERK1/2, Akt and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), respectively, and effectively reversed the H₂O₂-inhibited phosphorylation of these three proteins. LY294002 completely inhibited the GA-activated phosphorylation of Akt, while only partially inhibiting eNOS. This evidence implies that eNOS may be activated directly by GA. PD98059 attenuated only partially the GA-induced phosphorylation of ERK1/2 with/without the presence of H₂O₂, indicating that GA may activate ERK1/2 directly. All these results put together confirm that GA protects RGC-5 cells from H₂O₂ insults via the activation of PI3K/Akt/eNOS signaling pathway. Whether the ERK1/2 signaling pathway is involved requires further investigations.

  3. Bimatoprost protects retinal neuronal damage via Akt pathway.

    PubMed

    Takano, Norihito; Tsuruma, Kazuhiro; Ohno, Yuta; Shimazawa, Masamitsu; Hara, Hideaki

    2013-02-28

    Worldwide, prostaglandin analogs, such as bimatoprost, have become the major therapeutic class for medical treatment of glaucoma because of their efficacy and generally well tolerated systemic safety profile. However, the detailed mechanism of the direct action of bimatoprost on retinal ganglion cells (RGC) has rarely been understood. Thus, in this study, we elucidated the mechanism of the protective effects of bimatoprost on RGC against oxidative stress. To examine the protective effects of bimatoprost, cultured RGC with various concentrations of bimatoprost (in both free acid and amide form) were exposed to l-buthionin-(S,R)-sulfoximine (BSO) plus glutamate or serum depletion in vitro and intravitreal injection of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) was used to induce retinal damage in vivo. To elucidate the protective mechanism of bimatoprost, we used western blot analysis to investigate the phosphorylation of Akt and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK). Bimatoprost significantly reduced BSO plus glutamate- and serum deprivation-induced death in concentration-dependent manners. Bimatoprost induced activation of Akt and ERK, and a phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase inhibitor, LY294002, attenuated the protective effect of bimatoprost. On the other hand, a mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase inhibitor, U0126, exhibited protective effect unexpectedly. Moreover, ERK was more phosphorylated by attenuation of Akt activity in cultured RGC. In an in vivo study, bimatoprost reduced NMDA-induced RGC death. Taken together, these findings indicate that bimatoprost has protective effects on in vitro and in vivo retinal damage, suggesting that the mechanism underlying may be via the Akt pathway, which may modulate the ERK pathway.

  4. Akt2 Regulates Expression of the Actin-Bundling Protein Palladin

    PubMed Central

    Chin, Y. Rebecca; Toker, Alex

    2010-01-01

    The PI 3-K/Akt pathway is responsible for key aspects of tumor progression, and is frequently hyperactivated in cancer. We have recently identified palladin, an actin-bundling protein that functions to control the actin cytoskeleton, as an Akt1-specific substrate that inhibits breast cancer cell migration. Here we have identified a role for Akt isoforms in the regulation of palladin expression. Akt2, but not Akt1, enhances palladin expression by maintaining protein stability and upregulating transcription. These data reveal that Akt signaling regulates the stability of palladin, and further supports the notion that Akt isoforms have distinct and specific roles in tumorigenesis. PMID:21050850

  5. TIMP-2 Interaction with MT1-MMP Activates the AKT Pathway and Protects Tumor Cells from Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Valacca, Cristina; Tassone, Evelyne; Mignatti, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Membrane-type 1 matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP), a transmembrane proteinase with an extracellular catalytic domain and a short cytoplasmic tail, degrades a variety of extracellular matrix (ECM) components. In addition, MT1-MMP activates intracellular signaling through proteolysis-dependent and independent mechanisms. We have previously shown that binding of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-2 (TIMP-2) to MT1-MMP controls cell proliferation and migration, as well as tumor growth in vivo by activating the Ras—extracellular signal regulated kinase-1 and -2 (ERK1/2) pathway through a mechanism that requires the cytoplasmic but not the proteolytic domain of MT1-MMP. Here we show that in MT1-MMP expressing cells TIMP-2 also induces rapid and sustained activation of AKT in a dose- and time-dependent manner and by a mechanism independent of the proteolytic activity of MT1-MMP. Fibroblast growth factor receptor-1 mediates TIMP-2 induction of ERK1/2 but not of AKT activation; however, Ras activation is necessary to transduce the TIMP-2-activated signal to both the ERK1/2 and AKT pathways. ERK1/2 and AKT activation by TIMP-2 binding to MT1-MMP protects tumor cells from apoptosis induced by serum starvation. Conversely, TIMP-2 upregulates apoptosis induced by three-dimensional type I collagen in epithelial cancer cells. Thus, TIMP-2 interaction with MT1-MMP provides tumor cells with either pro- or anti-apoptotic signaling depending on the extracellular environment and apoptotic stimulus. PMID:26331622

  6. PTEN Contributes to Profound PI3K/Akt Signaling Pathway Deregulation in Dystrophin-Deficient Dog Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Feron, Marie; Guevel, Laetitia; Rouger, Karl; Dubreil, Laurence; Arnaud, Marie-Claire; Ledevin, Mireille; Megeney, Lynn A.; Cherel, Yan; Sakanyan, Vehary

    2009-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is the most common and severe form of muscular dystrophy, and although the genetic basis of this disease is well defined, the overall mechanisms that define its pathogenesis remain obscure. Alterations in individual signaling pathways have been described, but little information is available regarding their putative implications in Duchenne muscular dystrophy pathogenesis. Here, we studied the status of various major signaling pathways in the Golden Retriever muscular dystrophy dog that specifically reproduces the full spectrum of human pathology. Using antibody arrays, we found that Akt1, glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK3β), 70-kDa ribosomal protein S6 kinase (p70S6K), extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2, and p38δ and p38γ kinases all exhibited decreased phosphorylation in muscle from a 4-month-old animal with Golden Retriever muscular dystrophy, revealing a deep alteration of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt and mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways. Immunohistochemistry analysis revealed the presence of muscle fibers exhibiting a cytosolic accumulation of Akt1, GSK3β, and phosphatidylinositol-3,4,5-trisphosphate 3-phosphatase (PTEN), an enzyme counteracting PI3K-mediated Akt activation. Enzymatic assays established that these alterations in phosphorylation and expression levels were associated with decreased Akt and increased GSK3β and PTEN activities. PTEN/GSK3β-positive fibers were also observed in muscle sections from 3- and 36-month-old animals, indicating long-term PI3K/Akt pathway alteration. Collectively, our data suggest that increased PTEN expression and activity play a central role in PI3K/Akt/GSK3β and p70S6K pathway modulation, which could exacerbate the consequences of dystrophin deficiency. PMID:19264909

  7. Crosstalk Between MAPK/ERK and PI3K/AKT Signal Pathways During Brain Ischemia/Reperfusion

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jing; Du, Ting; Li, Baoman; Rong, Yan; Verkhratsky, Alexei

    2015-01-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is linked to the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/protein kinase B (AKT) and Raf/mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/2) signaling pathways. During brain ischemia/reperfusion, EGFR could be transactivated, which stimulates these intracellular signaling cascades that either protect cells or potentiate cell injury. In the present study, we investigated the activation of EGFR, PI3K/AKT, and Raf/MAPK/ERK1/2 during ischemia or reperfusion of the brain using the middle cerebral artery occlusion model. We found that EGFR was phosphorylated and transactivated during both ischemia and reperfusion periods. During ischemia, the activity of PI3K/AKT pathway was significantly increased, as judged from the strong phosphorylation of AKT; this activation was suppressed by the inhibitors of EGFR and Zn-dependent metalloproteinase. Ischemia, however, did not induce ERK1/2 phosphorylation, which was dependent on reperfusion. Coimmunoprecipitation of Son of sevenless 1 (SOS1) with EGFR showed increased association between the receptor and SOS1 in ischemia, indicating the inhibitory node downstream of SOS1. The inhibitory phosphorylation site of Raf-1 at Ser259, but not its stimulatory phosphorylation site at Ser338, was phosphorylated during ischemia. Furthermore, ischemia prompted the interaction between Raf-1 and AKT, while both the inhibitors of PI3K and AKT not only abolished AKT phosphorylation but also restored ERK1/2 phosphorylation. All these findings suggest that Raf/MAPK/ERK1/2 signal pathway is inhibited by AKT via direct phosphorylation and inhibition at Raf-1 node during ischemia. During reperfusion, we observed a significant increase of ERK1/2 phosphorylation but no change in AKT phosphorylation. Inhibitors of reactive oxygen species and phosphatase and tensin homolog restored AKT phosphorylation but abolished ERK1/2 phosphorylation, suggesting that the reactive oxygen species

  8. Isorhamnetin inhibits cell proliferation and induces apoptosis in breast cancer via Akt and mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    HU, SHAN; HUANG, LIMING; MENG, LIWEI; SUN, HE; ZHANG, WEI; XU, YINGCHUN

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cause of female cancer-associated mortality. Although treatment options, including chemotherapy, radiotherapy and surgery have led to a decline in the mortality rates associated with breast cancer, drug resistance remains one of the predominant causes for poor prognosis and high recurrence rates. The present study investigated the potential effects of the natural product, isorhamnetin on breast cancer, and examined the effects of isorhamnetin on the Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)/MAPK kinase (MEK) signaling cascades, which are two important signaling pathways for endocrine therapy resistance in breast cancer. The results of the present study indicate that isorhamnetin inhibits cell proliferation and induces cell apoptosis. In addition, isorhamnetin was observed to inhibit the Akt/mTOR and the MEK/extracellular signal-regulated kinase phosphorylation cascades. The inhibition of these two signaling pathways was attenuated by the two Akt and MEK1 inhibitors, but not by the nuclear factor-κB inhibitor. Furthermore, epidermal growth factor inhibited the effects of isorhamnetin via activation of the Akt and MEK signaling pathways. These results indicate that isorhamnetin exhibits antitumor effects in breast cancer, which are mediated by the Akt and MEK signaling pathways. PMID:26502751

  9. Isorhamnetin inhibits cell proliferation and induces apoptosis in breast cancer via Akt and mitogen‑activated protein kinase kinase signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Hu, Shan; Huang, Liming; Meng, Liwei; Sun, He; Zhang, Wei; Xu, Yingchun

    2015-11-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cause of female cancer-associated mortality. Although treatment options, including chemotherapy, radiotherapy and surgery have led to a decline in the mortality rates associated with breast cancer, drug resistance remains one of the predominant causes for poor prognosis and high recurrence rates. The present study investigated the potential effects of the natural product, isorhamnetin on breast cancer, and examined the effects of isorhamnetin on the Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)/MAPK kinase (MEK) signaling cascades, which are two important signaling pathways for endocrine therapy resistance in breast cancer. The results of the present study indicate that isorhamnetin inhibits cell proliferation and induces cell apoptosis. In addition, isorhamnetin was observed to inhibit the Akt/mTOR and the MEK/extracellular signal-regulated kinase phosphorylation cascades. The inhibition of these two signaling pathways was attenuated by the two Akt and MEK1 inhibitors, but not by the nuclear factor-κB inhibitor. Furthermore, epidermal growth factor inhibited the effects of isorhamnetin via activation of the Akt and MEK signaling pathways. These results indicate that isorhamnetin exhibits antitumor effects in breast cancer, which are mediated by the Akt and MEK signaling pathways. PMID:26502751

  10. Eupatilin induces human renal cancer cell apoptosis via ROS-mediated MAPK and PI3K/AKT signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Wei-Feng; Wang, Xiao-Hong; Pan, Bin; Li, Feng; Kuang, Lu; Su, Ze-Xuan

    2016-01-01

    Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/AKT and mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling cascades have significant roles in cell proliferation, survival, angiogenesis and metastasis of tumor cells. Eupatilin, one of the major compounds present in Artemisia species, has been demonstrated to have antitumor properties. However, the effect of eupatilin in renal cell carcinoma (RCC) remains to be elucidated. Therefore, the present study investigated the biological effects and mechanisms of eupatilin in RCC cell apoptosis. The results of the present study demonstrated that eupatilin significantly induced cell apoptosis and enhanced the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in 786-O cells. In addition, eupatilin induced phosphorylation of p38α (Thr180/Tyr182), extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 and c-Jun N-terminal kinase 1/2 (Thr183/Tyr185), and decreased the phosphorylation of PI3K and AKT in 786-O cells in a concentration-dependent manner. Furthermore, the ROS inhibitor N-acetyl-L-cysteine was able to rescue the MAPK activation and PI3K/AKT inhibition induced by eupatilin. Taken together, the results of the present study provide evidence that inhibition of eupatilin induces apoptosis in human RCC via ROS-mediated activation of the MAPK signaling pathway and inhibition of the PI3K/AKT signaling pathway. Thus, eupatilin may serve as a potential therapeutic agent for the treatment of human RCC. PMID:27698876

  11. Eupatilin induces human renal cancer cell apoptosis via ROS-mediated MAPK and PI3K/AKT signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Wei-Feng; Wang, Xiao-Hong; Pan, Bin; Li, Feng; Kuang, Lu; Su, Ze-Xuan

    2016-01-01

    Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/AKT and mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling cascades have significant roles in cell proliferation, survival, angiogenesis and metastasis of tumor cells. Eupatilin, one of the major compounds present in Artemisia species, has been demonstrated to have antitumor properties. However, the effect of eupatilin in renal cell carcinoma (RCC) remains to be elucidated. Therefore, the present study investigated the biological effects and mechanisms of eupatilin in RCC cell apoptosis. The results of the present study demonstrated that eupatilin significantly induced cell apoptosis and enhanced the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in 786-O cells. In addition, eupatilin induced phosphorylation of p38α (Thr180/Tyr182), extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 and c-Jun N-terminal kinase 1/2 (Thr183/Tyr185), and decreased the phosphorylation of PI3K and AKT in 786-O cells in a concentration-dependent manner. Furthermore, the ROS inhibitor N-acetyl-L-cysteine was able to rescue the MAPK activation and PI3K/AKT inhibition induced by eupatilin. Taken together, the results of the present study provide evidence that inhibition of eupatilin induces apoptosis in human RCC via ROS-mediated activation of the MAPK signaling pathway and inhibition of the PI3K/AKT signaling pathway. Thus, eupatilin may serve as a potential therapeutic agent for the treatment of human RCC.

  12. Halofuginone inhibits Smad3 phosphorylation via the PI3K/Akt and MAPK/ERK pathways in muscle cells: Effect on myotube fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Roffe, Suzy; Hagai, Yosey; Pines, Mark; Halevy, Orna

    2010-04-01

    Halofuginone, a novel inhibitor of Smad3 phosphorylation, has been shown to inhibit muscle fibrosis and to improve cardiac and skeletal muscle functions in the mdx mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Here, we demonstrate that halofuginone promotes the phosphorylation of Akt and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) family members in a C2 muscle cell line and in primary myoblasts derived from wild-type and mdx mice diaphragms. Halofuginone enhanced the association of phosphorylated Akt and MAPK/extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK) with the non-phosphorylated form of Smad3, accompanied by a reduction in Smad3 phosphorylation levels. This reduction was reversed by inhibitors of the phosphoinositide 3'-kinase/Akt (PI3K/Akt) and MAPK/ERK pathways, suggesting their specific role in mediating halofuginone's inhibitory effect on Smad3 phosphorylation. Halofuginone enhanced Akt, MAPK/ERK and p38 MAPK phosphorylation and inhibited Smad3 phosphorylation in myotubes, all of which are crucial for myotube fusion. In addition, halofuginone increased the association Akt and MAPK/ERK with Smad3. As a consequence, halofuginone promoted myotube fusion, as reflected by an increased percentage of C2 and mdx myotubes containing high numbers of nuclei, and this was reversed by specific inhibitors of the PI3K and MAPK/ERK pathways. Together, the data suggest a role, either direct or via inhibition of Smad3 phosphorylation, for Akt or MAPK/ERK in halofuginone-enhanced myotube fusion, a feature which is crucial to improving muscle function in muscular dystrophies.

  13. Mitochondrial retrograde signaling regulates neuronal function

    PubMed Central

    Cagin, Umut; Duncan, Olivia F.; Gatt, Ariana P.; Dionne, Marc S.; Sweeney, Sean T.; Bateman, Joseph M.

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondria are key regulators of cellular homeostasis, and mitochondrial dysfunction is strongly linked to neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s. Mitochondria communicate their bioenergetic status to the cell via mitochondrial retrograde signaling. To investigate the role of mitochondrial retrograde signaling in neurons, we induced mitochondrial dysfunction in the Drosophila nervous system. Neuronal mitochondrial dysfunction causes reduced viability, defects in neuronal function, decreased redox potential, and reduced numbers of presynaptic mitochondria and active zones. We find that neuronal mitochondrial dysfunction stimulates a retrograde signaling response that controls the expression of several hundred nuclear genes. We show that the Drosophila hypoxia inducible factor alpha (HIFα) ortholog Similar (Sima) regulates the expression of several of these retrograde genes, suggesting that Sima mediates mitochondrial retrograde signaling. Remarkably, knockdown of Sima restores neuronal function without affecting the primary mitochondrial defect, demonstrating that mitochondrial retrograde signaling is partly responsible for neuronal dysfunction. Sima knockdown also restores function in a Drosophila model of the mitochondrial disease Leigh syndrome and in a Drosophila model of familial Parkinson’s disease. Thus, mitochondrial retrograde signaling regulates neuronal activity and can be manipulated to enhance neuronal function, despite mitochondrial impairment. PMID:26489648

  14. AG and UAG induce β-casein expression via activation of ERK1/2 and AKT pathways

    PubMed Central

    Li, Sunan; Liu, Juxiong; Lv, Qingkang; Zhang, Chuan; Xu, Shiyao; Yang, Dongxue; Huang, Bingxu; Zeng, Yalong; Gao, Yingjie

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The ghrelin peptides were found to circulate in two major forms: acylated ghrelin (AG) and unacylated ghrelin (UAG). Previous studies showed that AG regulates β-casein (CSN2) expression in mammary epithelial cells. However, little is known about the mechanisms by which AG regulates CSN2 gene and protein expression. Evidence suggests that UAG has biological activity through GHSR1a-independent mechanisms. Here, we investigated the possible GHSR1a-mediated effect of UAG on the expression of CSN2 in primary bovine mammary epithelial cells (pbMECs) isolated from lactating cow. We found that both AG and UAG increase the expression of CSN2 in a dose-dependent manner in pbMECs in comparison with the control group. Increased expression of CSN2 was blocked by [D-Lys3]-GHRP-6 (an antagonist of the GHSR1a) and NF449 (a Gs-α subunit inhibitor) in pbMECs. In addition, both AG and UAG activated AKT/protein kinase B (AKT) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) pathways, whereas [D-Lys3]-GHRP-6 and NF449 inhibited the phosphorylation of AKT and ERK1/2 in pbMECs respectively. Blockade of ERK1/2 and AKT signaling pathways prevented the expression of CSN2 induced by AG or UAG. Finally, we found that both AG and UAG cause cell proliferation through identical signaling pathways. Taken together, these results demonstrate that both AG and UAG act on ERK1/2 and AKT signaling pathways to facilitate the expression of CSN2 in a GHSR1a-dependent manner. PMID:26873999

  15. A novel signaling pathway associated with Lyn, PI 3-kinase and Akt supports the proliferation of myeloma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Iqbal, Mohd S.; Tsuyama, Naohiro; Obata, Masanori; Ishikawa, Hideaki

    2010-02-12

    Interleukin-6 (IL-6) is a growth factor for human myeloma cells. We have recently found that in myeloma cells the activation of both signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) 3 and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2 is not sufficient for the IL-6-induced proliferation, which further requires the activation of the src family kinases, such as Lyn. Here we showed that the Lyn-overexpressed myeloma cell lines had the higher proliferative rate with IL-6 and the enhanced activation of the phosphatidylinositol (PI) 3-kinase and Akt. The IL-6-induced phosphorylation of STAT3 and ERK1/2 was not up-regulated in the Lyn-overexpressed cells, indicating that the Lyn-PI 3-kinase-Akt pathway is independent of these pathways. The PI 3-kinase was co-precipitated with Lyn in the Lyn-overexpressed cells of which proliferation with IL-6 was abrogated by the specific inhibitors for PI 3-kinase or Akt, suggesting that the activation of the PI 3-kinase-Akt pathway associated with Lyn is indeed related to the concomitant augmentation of myeloma cell growth. Furthermore, the decreased expression of p53 and p21{sup Cip1} proteins was observed in the Lyn-overexpressed cells, implicating a possible downstream target of Akt. This study identifies a novel IL-6-mediated signaling pathway that certainly plays a role in the proliferation of myeloma cells and this novel mechanism of MM tumor cell growth associated with Lyn would eventually contribute to the development of MM treatment.

  16. Sorafenib downregulates ERK/Akt and STAT3 survival pathways and induces apoptosis in a human neuroblastoma cell line.

    PubMed

    Chai, Hong; Luo, Annie Z; Weerasinghe, Priya; Brown, Robert E

    2010-04-23

    Neuroblastoma is a common solid tumor in children and its tumorigenicity is enhanced by the expression of survival pathways such as Akt and signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3). Sorafenib is a multikinase inhibitor that also inhibits STAT3 signaling and induces apoptosis. In this study, we will examine the efficacy of sorafenib on a human neuroblastoma cell line (SK-N-AS) and also investigate its possible mechanisms. After cells reached 50-60% confluence, they were treated with various concentrations of sorafenib (0, 0.1, 1, 5, 10 and 20 microM) for different periods of time. The cell viability and apoptosis were determined by MTS colorimetric assay and TUNEL, respectively. Phosphorylation of Akt1/2/3 (p-Akt1/2/3), extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (p-ERK1/2), STAT3 (p-STAT3), and AMP-activated protein kinase alpha subunit (p-AMPKalpha) were determined with Western blot. The results indicate that as early as 2 hours post-treatment, cell viability was significantly decreased at 10 microM concentration. In 24 hours or longer treatment groups, sorafenib at 5 microM and above significantly decreased cell viability. TUNEL assay showed a significant increased of apoptosis in 5 and 20 microM treatment groups 24 hours after treatment. Western blots showed a decrease of p-ERK1/2, p-Akt1/2/3, p-STAT3, and p-AMPKalpha expression levels in various sorafenib treatment groups. Our results indicate that sorafenib significantly decreased cell viability and increased apoptosis in human neuroblastoma cell line in association with down-regulation of p-ERK1/2, p-Akt, p-STAT3 survival pathways. These data suggested potential clinical application of sorafenib in the treatment of neuroblastoma.

  17. Over-expression of astrocytic ET-1 attenuates neuropathic pain by inhibition of ERK1/2 and Akt(s) via activation of ETA receptor.

    PubMed

    Hung, Victor K L; Tai, Lydia W; Qiu, Qiu; Luo, Xin; Wong, K L; Chung, Sookja K; Cheung, C W

    2014-05-01

    A differential role of endothelin-1 (ET-1) in pain processing has recently been suggested. However, the function of central ET-1 in neuropathic pain (NP) has not been fully elucidated to date. We report here the action of endogenous central ET-1 in sciatic nerve ligation-induced NP (SNL-NP) in a transgenic animal model that over-expresses ET-1 in the astrocytes (GET-1 mice). We hypothesized that the over-expression of astrocytic ET-1 would exert anti-allodynic and anti-hyperalgesic effects in NP, as demonstrated by mechanical threshold and plantar withdrawal latency using the von Frey filament and heat stimuli. In our animal model, GET-1 mice showed an increase in the withdrawal threshold and latency in response to the mechanical and thermal stimuli, respectively, in pain behavior tests after SNL. ET-1 and endothelin type A receptor (ETA-R) levels were increased significantly in L4-L6 segments of the spinal cord (ipsilateral to SNL) of GET-1 mice at 7 and 21days after surgery. Moreover, intrathecal administration of a specific ETA-R antagonist, BQ-123, attenuated the anti-allodynic and anti-hyperalgesic phenotype in GET-1 mice. The effects of BQ-123 on the mRNA expression of extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) and protein kinase B/serine protein kinase (Akt(s)) were assessed in the ipsilateral L4-L6 segments harvested 30min after BQ-123 administration on day 7 after surgery. Phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and Akt(s) in the ipsilateral spinal cord of GET-1 mice was reduced following SNL, whereas no reduction was observed after intrathecal injection of BQ-123. In conclusion, our results showed that the xover-expression of astrocytic ET-1 reduced SNL-induced allodynia and hyperalgesia by inhibiting the activation of ERK1/2 and Akt(s) via the ETA-R-mediated pathway.

  18. Metastatic function of BMP-2 in gastric cancer cells: The role of PI3K/AKT, MAPK, the NF-{kappa}B pathway, and MMP-9 expression

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Myoung Hee; Oh, Sang Cheul; Kang, Han Na; Kim, Jung Lim; Kim, Jun Suk

    2011-07-15

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) have been implicated in tumorigenesis and metastatic progression in various types of cancer cells, but the role and cellular mechanism in the invasive phenotype of gastric cancer cells is not known. Herein, we determined the roles of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/AKT, extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK), nuclear factor (NF)-{kappa}B, and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) expression in BMP-2-mediated metastatic function in gastric cancer. We found that stimulation of BMP-2 in gastric cancer cells enhanced the phosphorylation of AKT and ERK. Accompanying activation of AKT and ERK kinase, BMP-2 also enhanced phosphorylation/degradation of I{kappa}B{alpha} and the nuclear translocation/activation of NF-{kappa}B. Interestingly, blockade of PI3K/AKT and ERK signaling using LY294002 and PD98059, respectively, significantly inhibited BMP-2-induced motility and invasiveness in association with the activation of NF-{kappa}B. Furthermore, BMP-2-induced MMP-9 expression and enzymatic activity was also significantly blocked by treatment with PI3K/AKT, ERK, or NF-{kappa}B inhibitors. Immunohistochemistry staining of 178 gastric tumor biopsies indicated that expression of BMP-2 and MMP-9 had a significant positive correlation with lymph node metastasis and a poor prognosis. These results indicate that the BMP-2 signaling pathway enhances tumor metastasis in gastric cancer by sequential activation of the PI3K/AKT or MAPK pathway followed by the induction of NF-{kappa}B and MMP-9 activity, indicating that BMP-2 has the potential to be a therapeutic molecular target to decrease metastasis.

  19. Shikonin induces apoptosis of HaCaT cells via the mitochondrial, Erk and Akt pathways

    PubMed Central

    JING, HUILING; SUN, WENYAN; FAN, JINGHUA; ZHANG, YANMIN; YANG, JIAO; JIA, JINJING; LI, JICHANG; GUO, JIAQI; LUO, SUJU; ZHENG, YAN

    2016-01-01

    Shikonin, which is a major ingredient of the traditional Chinese herb Lithospermum erythrorhizon, possesses various biological functions, including antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory, and antitumor activities. The present study aimed to determine the molecular mechanisms underlying the effects of shikonin on HaCaT cell apoptosis. Treatment with shikonin significantly inhibited the viability of HaCaT cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner, and promoted cell cycle arrest at G0/G1 phase and apoptosis. In addition, shikonin treatment reduced the mitochondrial membrane potential and induced reactive oxygen species generation. The results of a western blot analysis demonstrated that shikonin significantly activated caspase 3 expression, downregulated B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) expression, and upregulated Bcl-2-associated X protein and Bcl-2 homologous antagonist killer expression in a dose-dependent manner in HaCaT cells. Furthermore, shikonin decreased extracellular signal-regulated kinase (Erk) and Akt phosphorylation. These results indicated that shikonin may exert its anti-proliferative effects by inducing apoptosis via activation of the mitochondrial signaling pathway and inactivation of the Akt and Erk pathways in HaCaT cells. Therefore, the present study suggested that shikonin may have potential as a component of therapeutic strategies for the treatment of skin diseases. PMID:26935874

  20. Acidic pH stimulates the production of the angiogenic CXC chemokine, CXCL8 (interleukin-8), in human adult mesenchymal stem cells via the extracellular signal-regulated kinase, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, and NF-kappaB pathways.

    PubMed

    Bischoff, David S; Zhu, Jian-Hua; Makhijani, Nalini S; Yamaguchi, Dean T

    2008-07-01

    Blood vessel injury results in limited oxygen tension and diffusion leading to hypoxia, increased anaerobic metabolism, and elevated production of acidic metabolites that cannot be easily removed due to the reduced blood flow. Therefore, an acidic extracellular pH occurs in the local microenvironment of disrupted bone. The potential role of acidic pH and glu-leu-arg (ELR(+)) CXC chemokines in early events in bone repair was studied in human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) treated with medium of decreasing pH (7.4, 7.0, 6.7, and 6.4). The cells showed a reciprocal increase in CXCL8 (interleukin-8, IL-8) mRNA levels as extracellular pH decreased. At pH 6.4, CXCL8 mRNA was induced >60x in comparison to levels at pH 7.4. hMSCs treated with osteogenic medium (OGM) also showed an increase in CXCL8 mRNA with decreasing pH; although, at a lower level than that seen in cells grown in non-OGM. CXCL8 protein was secreted into the medium at all pHs with maximal induction at pH 6.7. Inhibition of the G-protein-coupled receptor alpha, G(alphai), suppressed CXCL8 levels in response to acidic pH; whereas phospholipase C inhibition had no effect on CXCL8. The use of specific mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signal transduction inhibitors indicated that the pH-dependent increase in CXCL8 mRNA is due to activation of ERK and p38 pathways. The JNK pathway was not involved. NF-kappaB inhibition resulted in a decrease in CXCL8 levels in hMSCs grown in non-OGM. However, OGM-differentiated hMSCs showed an increase in CXCL8 levels when treated with the NF-kappaB inhibitor PDTC, a pyrrolidine derivative of dithiocarbamate.

  1. Lico A Enhances Nrf2-Mediated Defense Mechanisms against t-BHP-Induced Oxidative Stress and Cell Death via Akt and ERK Activation in RAW 264.7 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Hongming; Ren, Hua; Wang, Lidong; Chen, Wei; Ci, Xinxin

    2015-01-01

    Licochalcone A (Lico A) exhibits various biological properties, including anti-inflammatory and antioxidant activities. In this study, we investigated the antioxidative potential and mechanisms of Lico A against tert-butyl hydroperoxide- (t-BHP-) induced oxidative damage in RAW 264.7 cells. Our results indicated that Lico A significantly inhibited t-BHP-induced cytotoxicity, apoptosis, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and reduced glutathione (GSH) depletion but increased the glutamate-cysteine ligase modifier (GCLM) subunit and the glutamate-cysteine ligase catalytic (GCLC) subunit genes expression. Additionally, Lico A dramatically upregulated the antioxidant enzyme heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) and nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), which were associated with inducing Nrf2 nuclear translocation, decreasing Keap1 protein expression and increasing antioxidant response element (ARE) promoter activity. Lico A also obviously induced the activation of serine/threonine kinase (Akt) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), but PI3K/Akt and ERK inhibitors treatment displayed clearly decreased levels of LicoA-induced Nrf2 nuclear translocation and HO-1 expression, respectively. Furthermore, Lico A treatment markedly attenuated t-BHP-induced oxidative damage, which was reduced by treatment with PI3K/Akt, ERK, and HO-1 inhibitors. Therefore, Lico A might have a protective role against t-BHP-induced cytotoxicity by modulating HO-1 and by scavenging ROS via the activation of the PI3K/Akt and ERK/Nrf2 signaling pathways. PMID:26576227

  2. Activation of Akt/FoxO and inactivation of MEK/ERK pathways contribute to induction of neuroprotection against transient global cerebral ischemia by delayed hypoxic postconditioning in adult rats.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Lixuan; Li, Danfang; Liang, Donghai; Wu, Baoxing; Zhu, Pingping; Wang, Yanmei; Sun, Weiwen; Xu, En

    2012-10-01

    Ischemic postconditioning, a series of mechanical interruptions of blood flow immediately after reperfusion, has been described in brain studies. However, hypoxic postconditioning (HPC) has never been reported in transient global cerebral ischemia (tGCI) adult rat model. The purpose of this study is to explore the effects of neuroprotection by delayed HPC against tGCI in adult rats and investigate underlying mechanisms involving the Akt/Forkhead transcription factor, class O (FoxO) and mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK)/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathways. Postconditioning with 60-120 min hypoxia significantly reduced cell death in hippocampal CA1 subregion after 10 min of tGCI. Postconditioning was effective only when applied 1-2 days after tGCI. Nevertheless, the combination of hypoxic preconditioning and postconditioning provided no additive protection. Additionally, postconditioning increased phosphorylation of Akt and FoxOs after tGCI. Inhibiting phosphorylation of Akt and FoxOs with LY294002 suppressed the postconditioning-induced neuroprotection. In addition, postconditioning blocked the increase of MEK and ERK phosphorylation after tGCI. Inhibiting phosphorylation of MEK and ERK with U0126 attenuated neuronal damage after tGCI. These results suggest that delayed HPC exerts neuroprotection against tGCI-induced injury in adult rats. The activation of Akt/FoxO and inactivation of MEK/ERK pathways by postconditioning contributed to the induction of neuroprotection against tGCI.

  3. Xenon-delayed postconditioning attenuates spinal cord ischemia/reperfusion injury through activation AKT and ERK signaling pathways in rats.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shiyao; Yang, Yanwei; Jin, Mu; Hou, Siyu; Dong, Xiuhua; Lu, Jiakai; Cheng, Weiping

    2016-09-15

    Previous studies have shown that xenon-delayed postconditioning for up to 2h after reperfusion provides protection against spinal cord ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury in rats. This study was designed to determine the roles of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)-Akt and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) in this neuroprotection. The rats were randomly assigned to the following nine groups (n=16∗9): 1) I/R+N2 group, 2) I/R+Xe group, 3) I/R+PD98059+N2 group (ERK blocking agent), 4) I/R+wortmannin+N2 group (PI3K-Akt blocking agent), 5) I/R+PD98059+Xe group, 6) I/R+wortmannin+Xe group, 7) I/R+DMSO+Xe group (dimethyl sulfoxide, vehicle control), 8) I/R+DMSO+N2 group, and 9) sham group (no spinal cord ischemia and no xenon). Spinal cord ischemia was induced for 25min in male Sprague-Dawley rats. Neurological function was assessed using the Basso, Beattie, and Bresnahan (BBB) open-field locomotor scale at 6, 12, 24 and 48h after reperfusion. Histological examination of the lumbar spinal cord was performed using Nissl staining and TUNEL staining at 4 (n=8) and 48 (n=8)h after reperfusion. Western blotting was performed to evaluate p-Akt and p-ERK expression in the spinal cord at 4 (n=8) and 48 (n=8) h after reperfusion. Compared with the sham group, all rats in the I/R groups had lower BBB scores, fewer normal motor neurons, more apoptotic neurons and lower p-Akt and p-ERK levels at each time point (P<0.05). Compared with the I/R group, rats in the I/R+Xe group had higher neurological scores, more normal motor neurons, fewer apoptotic neurons and significantly higher levels of p-Akt and p-ERK at each time point (P<0.05). Compared with the I/R+Xe group, the I/R+PD98059+Xe and I/R+wortmannin+Xe groups showed worse neurological outcomes and less p-Akt and p-ERK at each time point (P<0.05). These results suggest that xenon-delayed postconditioning improves neurological outcomes to spinal cord I/R injury in rats through the activation of the AKT and ERK signaling

  4. Xenon-delayed postconditioning attenuates spinal cord ischemia/reperfusion injury through activation AKT and ERK signaling pathways in rats.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shiyao; Yang, Yanwei; Jin, Mu; Hou, Siyu; Dong, Xiuhua; Lu, Jiakai; Cheng, Weiping

    2016-09-15

    Previous studies have shown that xenon-delayed postconditioning for up to 2h after reperfusion provides protection against spinal cord ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury in rats. This study was designed to determine the roles of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)-Akt and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) in this neuroprotection. The rats were randomly assigned to the following nine groups (n=16∗9): 1) I/R+N2 group, 2) I/R+Xe group, 3) I/R+PD98059+N2 group (ERK blocking agent), 4) I/R+wortmannin+N2 group (PI3K-Akt blocking agent), 5) I/R+PD98059+Xe group, 6) I/R+wortmannin+Xe group, 7) I/R+DMSO+Xe group (dimethyl sulfoxide, vehicle control), 8) I/R+DMSO+N2 group, and 9) sham group (no spinal cord ischemia and no xenon). Spinal cord ischemia was induced for 25min in male Sprague-Dawley rats. Neurological function was assessed using the Basso, Beattie, and Bresnahan (BBB) open-field locomotor scale at 6, 12, 24 and 48h after reperfusion. Histological examination of the lumbar spinal cord was performed using Nissl staining and TUNEL staining at 4 (n=8) and 48 (n=8)h after reperfusion. Western blotting was performed to evaluate p-Akt and p-ERK expression in the spinal cord at 4 (n=8) and 48 (n=8) h after reperfusion. Compared with the sham group, all rats in the I/R groups had lower BBB scores, fewer normal motor neurons, more apoptotic neurons and lower p-Akt and p-ERK levels at each time point (P<0.05). Compared with the I/R group, rats in the I/R+Xe group had higher neurological scores, more normal motor neurons, fewer apoptotic neurons and significantly higher levels of p-Akt and p-ERK at each time point (P<0.05). Compared with the I/R+Xe group, the I/R+PD98059+Xe and I/R+wortmannin+Xe groups showed worse neurological outcomes and less p-Akt and p-ERK at each time point (P<0.05). These results suggest that xenon-delayed postconditioning improves neurological outcomes to spinal cord I/R injury in rats through the activation of the AKT and ERK signaling

  5. Zinc promotes proliferation and activation of myogenic cells via the PI3K/Akt and ERK signaling cascade

    SciTech Connect

    Ohashi, Kazuya; Nagata, Yosuke; Wada, Eiji; Zammit, Peter S.; Shiozuka, Masataka; Matsuda, Ryoichi

    2015-05-01

    Skeletal muscle stem cells named muscle satellite cells are normally quiescent but are activated in response to various stimuli, such as injury and overload. Activated satellite cells enter the cell cycle and proliferate to produce a large number of myogenic progenitor cells, and these cells then differentiate and fuse to form myofibers. Zinc is one of the essential elements in the human body, and has multiple roles, including cell growth and DNA synthesis. However, the role of zinc in myogenic cells is not well understood, and is the focus of this study. We first examined the effects of zinc on differentiation of murine C2C12 myoblasts and found that zinc promoted proliferation, with an increased number of cells incorporating EdU, but inhibited differentiation with reduced myogenin expression and myotube formation. Furthermore, we used the C2C12 reserve cell model of myogenic quiescence to investigate the role of zinc on activation of myogenic cells. The number of reserve cells incorporating BrdU was increased by zinc in a dose dependent manner, with the number dramatically further increased using a combination of zinc and insulin. Akt and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) are downstream of insulin signaling, and both were phosphorylated after zinc treatment. The zinc/insulin combination-induced activation involved the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt and ERK cascade. We conclude that zinc promotes activation and proliferation of myogenic cells, and this activation requires phosphorylation of PI3K/Akt and ERK as part of the signaling cascade. - Highlights: • Zinc has roles for promoting proliferation and inhibition differentiation of C2C12. • Zinc promotes activation of reserve cells. • Insulin and zinc synergize activation of reserve cells. • PI3K/Akt and ERK cascade affect zinc/insulin-mediated activation of reserve cells.

  6. Fucoidan/FGF-2 induces angiogenesis through JNK- and p38-mediated activation of AKT/MMP-2 signalling.

    PubMed

    Kim, Beom Su; Park, Ji-Yun; Kang, Hyo-Jin; Kim, Hyung-Jin; Lee, Jun

    2014-08-01

    Angiogenesis is an important biological process in tissue development and repair. Fucoidan has previously been shown to potentiate in vitro tube formation in the presence of basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF-2). However, the underlying molecular mechanism remains largely unknown. This study was designed to investigate the action of fucoidan in angiogenesis in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and to explore fucoidan-signalling pathways. First, we evaluated the effect of fucoidan on cell proliferation. Matrigel-based tube formation and wound healing assays were performed to investigate angiogenesis. Matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) mRNA expression and activity levels were analysed by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and zymography, respectively. Additionally, phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) and protein kinase B (AKT) was detected by Western blot. The results indicate that fucoidan treatment significantly increased cell proliferation in the presence of FGF-2. Moreover, compared to the effect of FGF-2 alone, fucoidan and FGF-2 had a greater effect on tube formation and cell migration, and this effect was found to be synergistic. Furthermore, fucoidan enhanced the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), p38, and AKT. MMP-2 activation was also significantly increased. Specific inhibitors of p38 (SB203580) and JNK (SP600125) inhibited tube formation and wound healing, while an ERK inhibitor (PD98059) did not. MMP-2 activation and AKT phosphorylation were also attenuated and associated with the suppression of p38 and JNK phosphorylation, but not with that of ERK. These results indicate that fucoidan, in the presence of FGF-2, induces angiogenesis through AKT/MMP-2 signalling by activating p38 and JNK. These findings provide basic molecular information on the effect of fucoidan on angiogenesis in the presence of FGF-2.

  7. Hepatocyte growth factor induces Mcl-1 in primary human hepatocytes and inhibits CD95-mediated apoptosis via Akt.

    PubMed

    Schulze-Bergkamen, Henning; Brenner, Dirk; Krueger, Andreas; Suess, Dorothee; Fas, Stefanie C; Frey, Christian R; Dax, Andreas; Zink, Dorothea; Büchler, Peter; Müller, Martina; Krammer, Peter H

    2004-03-01

    CD95 (APO-1/Fas)-mediated apoptosis of hepatocytes plays a central role in the pathophysiology of various human liver diseases. Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) was shown to exert antiapoptotic functions in rodent hepatocytes. We previously showed that primary human hepatocytes (PHH) are a valuable tool for the investigation of apoptotic processes in liver cells. In this study, we analyzed the influence of HGF on CD95-mediated apoptosis of PHH and its molecular determinants. HGF significantly inhibited CD95-mediated apoptosis of PHH as well as cleavage of caspase-8 and poly (ADP-ribose)polymerase. HGF transcriptionally induced the expression of the anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family member myeloid cell leukemia-1 (Mcl-1). In contrary, HGF did not alter the expression levels of Bcl-2 or Bcl-x(L). HGF activated survival pathways such as the phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI3K)/Akt pathway, the mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) kinase/ERK and the signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) pathway. Notably, HGF triggered serine(727)--but not tyrosine(705)--phosphorylation of STAT3. Pretreatment of PHH with the PI3K inhibitor LY294002 as well as adenoviral transduction of dominant negative Akt1 prevented HGF-mediated Mcl-1 induction and reversed the antiapoptotic effects of HGF. In conclusion, HGF confers survival of PHH by activation of the PI3K/Akt pathway. PI3K/Akt activation by HGF results in the induction of antiapoptotic proteins such as Mcl-1. Thus, application of HGF may be a therapeutic approach to prevent CD95-mediated hepatocellular damage in human liver diseases. PMID:14999683

  8. Doxorubicin and cyclophosphamide induce cognitive dysfunction and activate the ERK and AKT signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Salas-Ramirez, Kaliris Y; Bagnall, Ciara; Frias, Leslie; Abdali, Syed A; Ahles, Tim A; Hubbard, Karen

    2015-10-01

    Chemotherapy is associated with long-term cognitive deficits in breast cancer survivors. Studies suggest that these impairments result in the loss of cognitive reserve and/or induce a premature aging of the brain. This study has been aimed to determine the potential underlying mechanisms that induce cognitive impairments by chemotherapeutic agents commonly used in breast cancer. Intact and ovariectomized (OVX) female rats were treated intravenously with either saline or a combination of cyclophosphamide (40 mg/kg) and doxorubicin (4 mg/kg). All subjects were tested for anxiety, locomotor activity, working, visual and spatial memory consecutively. Although anxiety and visual memory were not affected, chemotherapy significantly decreased locomotor activity and impaired working and spatial memory in female rats, independent of their hormonal status. The cognitive deficits observed are hippocampal dependent. Therefore, as a first step to identity the potential signaling pathways involved in this cognitive dysfunction, the protein levels of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (Erk1/2), Akt (neuroprotectant) BDNF and (structural protein) PSD95 in hippocampal lysates were measured. Erk1/2 and Akt pathways are known to modulate synaptic plasticity, neuronal survival, aging and cancer. We found an increased activation of Erk1/2 and Akt as well as an increase in the protein levels of PSD95 in OVX female rodents. However, OVX females had a higher overall BDNF level, independent of chemotherapy. These studies provide additional evidence that commonly used chemotherapeutic agents affect cognitive function and impact synaptic plasticity/aging molecules which may be part of the underlying biology explaining cognitive change and can be potential therapeutic targets.

  9. beta-Sitosterol induces G2/M arrest, endoreduplication, and apoptosis through the Bcl-2 and PI3K/Akt signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Moon, Dong-Oh; Kim, Mun-Ock; Choi, Yung Hyun; Kim, Gi-Young

    2008-06-18

    beta-Sitosterol (SITO) is a potentially valuable candidate for cancer chemotherapy, however the cellular and molecular mechanisms responsible for its anti-cancer activity are unknown. Therefore, we attempted to elucidate the mechanisms responsible for SITO-induced anti-proliferation in human leukemia cells. Treatment with SITO increased caspase-3 activation and DNA fragmentation in U937 and HL60 cells. This effect was associated with significant G2/M arrest and endoreduplication. We also demonstrated that SITO treatment significantly increases levels of polymeric alpha-tubulin and promoted microtubule polymerization. We next elucidated that ectopic expression of Bcl-2 accelerates endoreduplication in U937 cells. Furthermore, the specific Bcl-2 inhibitor, HA14-1, prevented endoreduplication through G2 phase arrest. Interestingly, SITO treatment did not significantly promote endoreduplication or decrease cell viability in Bcl-2 null K562 cells. SITO treatment also induced a gradual increase of phosphatidyl-inositol 3-kinase (PI3K) and Akt phosphorylation. Treatment with the selective PI3K/Akt inhibitor LY29004 completely blocked endoreduplication and apoptosis in the presence of SITO. In addition, treatment with SITO-induced phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK), however significance of ERK activation in the execution of apoptosis and endoreduplication is unknown. These results suggest that SITO induces endoreduplication by promoting spindle microtubule dynamics through the Bcl-2 and PI3K/Akt signaling pathways.

  10. Effect of Thyrotropin on Osteopontin, Integrin αvβ3, and VCAM-1 in the Endothelium via Activation of Akt

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Yumeng; Jiang, Fengwei; Lai, Yaxin; Wang, Haoyu; Liu, Aihua; Wang, Chuyuan; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Teng, Weiping; Shan, Zhongyan

    2016-01-01

    Numerous epidemiological studies have shown that subclinical hypothyroidism (SCH) can impair endothelial function and cause dyslipidemia. Studies have evaluated the effects of thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) on endothelial cells, but the mechanism underlying the proatherosclerotic effect of increased TSH levels remains unclear. In the present study, SCH rat models were established in thyroidectomized Wistar rats that were given l-T4 daily. The results showed that in vivo, the expression of osteopontin (OPN) vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM-1), and levels of integrin αvβ3 in the aortic tissue in SCH and Hypothyroidism (CH) groups was higher than in the control group. However, the effect in the SCH group was higher than in the CH group. In vitro, results showed that different concentration and time gradients of TSH stimulation could increase the expression of OPN, VCAM-1, and integrin αvβ3, and this was accompanied by extracellular signal regulated kinase 1/2 (Erk1/2) and Akt activation in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). TSH induced elevation of these proatherosclerotic factors was partially suppressed by a specific Akt inhibitor but not by a specific Erk inhibitor. Findings suggested that the endothelial dysfunction caused by SCH was related to increased proatherosclerotic factors induced by TSH via Akt activation. PMID:27657042

  11. The antihypertension drug doxazosin inhibits tumor growth and angiogenesis by decreasing VEGFR-2/Akt/mTOR signaling and VEGF and HIF-1α expression.

    PubMed

    Park, Mi Sun; Kim, Boh-Ram; Dong, Seung Myung; Lee, Seung-Hoon; Kim, Dae-Yong; Rho, Seung Bae

    2014-07-15

    Doxazosin is an α1 adrenergic receptor blocker that also exerts antitumor effects. However, the underlying mechanisms by which it modulates PI3K/Akt intracellular signaling are poorly understood. In this study, we reveal that doxazosin functions as a novel antiangiogenic agent by inhibiting vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-induced cell migration and proliferation. It also inhibited VEGF-induced capillary-like structure tube formation in vitro. Doxazosin inhibited the phosphorylation of VEGF receptor-2 (VEGFR-2) and downstream signaling, including PI3K, Akt, 3-phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase 1 (PDK1), mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), and hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1α). However, it had no effect on VEGF-induced extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) phosphorylation. Furthermore, doxazosin reduced tumor growth and suppressed tumor vascularization in a xenograft human ovarian cancer model. These results provide evidence that doxazosin functions in the endothelial cell system to modulate angiogenesis by inhibiting Akt and mTOR phosphorylation and interacting with VEGFR-2.

  12. Alpha-chaconine-reduced metastasis involves a PI3K/Akt signaling pathway with downregulation of NF-kappaB in human lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells.

    PubMed

    Shih, Yuan-Wei; Chen, Pin-Shern; Wu, Cheng-Hsun; Jeng, Ya-Fang; Wang, Chau-Jong

    2007-12-26

    Alpha-chaconine, isolated from Solanum tuberosum Linn., is a naturally occurring steroidal glycoalkaloid in potato sprouts. Some reports demonstrated that alpha-chaconine had various anticarcinogenic properties. The aim of this study is to investigate the inhibitory effect of alpha-chaconine on lung adenocarcinoma cell metastasis in vitro. We chose the highly metastatic A549 cells, which were treated with various concentrations of alpha-chaconine to clarify the potential of inhibiting A549 cells invasion and migration. Data showed that alpha-chaconine inhibited A549 cell invasion/migration according to wound healing assay and Boyden chamber assay. Our results also showed that alpha-chaconine could inhibit phosphorylation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and Akt, whereas it did not affected phosphorylation of extracellular signal regulating kinase (ERK) and p38. In addition, alpha-chaconine significantly decreased the nuclear level of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kappaB) and the binding ability of NF-kappaB. These results suggested that alpha-chaconine inhibited A549 cell metastasis by a reduction of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) activities involving suppression of phosphoinositide 3-kinase/Akt/NF-kappaB (PI3K/Akt/NF-kappaB) signaling pathway. Inhibiting metastasis by alpha-chaconine might offer a pivotal mechanism for its effective chemotherapeutic action.

  13. Autocrine insulin-like growth factor-I signaling promotes growth and survival of human acute myeloid leukemia cells via the phosphoinositide 3-kinase/Akt pathway.

    PubMed

    Doepfner, K T; Spertini, O; Arcaro, A

    2007-09-01

    Insulin-like growth factor (IGF) signaling plays an important role in various human cancers. Therefore, the role of insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) signaling in growth and survival of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells was investigated. Expression of the IGF-I receptor (IGF-IR) and its ligand IGF-I were detected in a panel of human AML blasts and cell lines. IGF-I and insulin promoted the growth of human AML blasts in vitro and activated the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt and the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (Erk) pathways. IGF-I-stimulated growth of AML blasts was blocked by an inhibitor of the PI3K/Akt pathway. Moreover, downregulation of the class Ia PI3K isoforms p110beta and p110delta by RNA interference impaired IGF-I-stimulated Akt activation, cell growth and survival in AML cells. Proliferation of a panel of AML cell lines and blasts isolated from patients with AML was inhibited by the IGF-IR kinase inhibitor NVP-AEW541 or by an IGF-IR neutralizing antibody. In addition to its antiproliferative effects, NVP-AEW541 sensitized primary AML blasts and cell lines to etoposide-induced apoptosis. Together, our data describe a novel role for autocrine IGF-I signaling in the growth and survival of primary AML cells. IGF-IR inhibitors in combination with chemotherapeutic agents may represent a novel approach to target human AML.

  14. Epidermal growth factor receptor regulates MT1-MMP and MMP-2 synthesis in SiHa cells via both PI3-K/AKT and MAPK/ERK pathways.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zongfeng; Song, Tiefang; Jin, Yinglan; Pan, Jiaqi; Zhang, Liying; Wang, Lingdi; Li, Peiling

    2009-08-01

    Matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP-2) and membrane type 1 matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP) have been identified as important participants in tumor invasion, metastasis, and angiogenesis. Membrane type 1 matrix metalloproteinase has also been recognized as a major activator of MMP-2. The purpose of this study was to investigate epidermal growth factor (EGF) mediating signal pathways in the regulation of MMP-2 and MT1-MMP in SiHa cells, a cervical cancer cell line. We showed here that EGF induced the expression of MT1-MMP and inhibited the expression of MMP-2 at both the mRNA and protein levels. Membrane type 1 matrix metalloproteinase induction was blocked by mitogen-activated protein kinase or extracellular signal-regulated kinase inhibitors PD98059 and U0126 but not by phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI3-K) inhibitors LY294002 and wortmannin. Interestingly, the mitogen-activated protein kinase or extracellular signal-regulated kinase inhibitors PD98059 and U0126 actually increased MMP-2 mRNA and protein synthesis, whereas the PI3-K inhibitors LY294002 and wortmannin further suppressed the expression of MMP-2. Our results suggest that EGF receptor up-regulated the expression of MT1-MMP and down-regulated the synthesis of MMP-2 through the mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular signal-regulated kinase pathway while concomitantly transmitting a mild positive regulatory signal to the expression of MMP-2 via the PI3-K/AKT pathway in SiHa cells. Furthermore, we found that EGF elevated the activity of MMP-2 in culture media.

  15. Fucoidan/FGF-2 induces angiogenesis through JNK- and p38-mediated activation of AKT/MMP-2 signalling

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Beom Su; Park, Ji-Yun; Kang, Hyo-Jin; Kim, Hyung-Jin; Lee, Jun

    2014-08-08

    Graphical abstract: Schematic diagram of the angiogenic activity mechanism by FGF-2/fucoidan treatment in HUVECs. Fucoidan enhances the FGF-2-induced phosphorylation of p38, JNK, and ERK MAPKs. However, p38 and JNK were involved in AKT phosphorylation and MMP-2 activation and resulted in enhanced angiogenic activity, such as tube formation and migration, in HUVECs. - Highlights: • The angiogenic activity of fucoidan in HUVECs was explored. • Fucoidan enhanced HUVEC proliferation, migration, and tube formation. • Fucoidan enhanced angiogenesis through p38 and JNK but not ERK in HUVECs. • Fucoidan targeted angiogenesis-mediated AKT/MMP-2 signalling in HUVECs. - Abstract: Angiogenesis is an important biological process in tissue development and repair. Fucoidan has previously been shown to potentiate in vitro tube formation in the presence of basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF-2). However, the underlying molecular mechanism remains largely unknown. This study was designed to investigate the action of fucoidan in angiogenesis in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and to explore fucoidan-signalling pathways. First, we evaluated the effect of fucoidan on cell proliferation. Matrigel-based tube formation and wound healing assays were performed to investigate angiogenesis. Matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) mRNA expression and activity levels were analysed by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and zymography, respectively. Additionally, phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) and protein kinase B (AKT) was detected by Western blot. The results indicate that fucoidan treatment significantly increased cell proliferation in the presence of FGF-2. Moreover, compared to the effect of FGF-2 alone, fucoidan and FGF-2 had a greater effect on tube formation and cell migration, and this effect was found to be synergistic. Furthermore, fucoidan enhanced the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK

  16. Canonical Wnt signalling regulates epithelial patterning by modulating levels of laminins in zebrafish appendages

    PubMed Central

    Nagendran, Monica; Arora, Prateek; Gori, Payal; Mulay, Aditya; Ray, Shinjini; Jacob, Tressa; Sonawane, Mahendra

    2015-01-01

    The patterning and morphogenesis of body appendages – such as limbs and fins – is orchestrated by the activities of several developmental pathways. Wnt signalling is essential for the induction of limbs. However, it is unclear whether a canonical Wnt signalling gradient exists and regulates the patterning of epithelium in vertebrate appendages. Using an evolutionarily old appendage – the median fin in zebrafish – as a model, we show that the fin epithelium exhibits graded changes in cellular morphology along the proximo-distal axis. This epithelial pattern is strictly correlated with the gradient of canonical Wnt signalling activity. By combining genetic analyses with cellular imaging, we show that canonical Wnt signalling regulates epithelial cell morphology by modulating the levels of laminins, which are extracellular matrix components. We have unravelled a hitherto unknown mechanism involved in epithelial patterning, which is also conserved in the pectoral fins – evolutionarily recent appendages that are homologous to tetrapod limbs. PMID:25519245

  17. Crosstalk between intracellular and extracellular signals regulating interneuron production, migration and integration into the cortex

    PubMed Central

    Peyre, Elise; Silva, Carla G.; Nguyen, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    During embryogenesis, cortical interneurons are generated by ventral progenitors located in the ganglionic eminences of the telencephalon. They travel along multiple tangential paths to populate the cortical wall. As they reach this structure they undergo intracortical dispersion to settle in their final destination. At the cellular level, migrating interneurons are highly polarized cells that extend and retract processes using dynamic remodeling of microtubule and actin cytoskeleton. Different levels of molecular regulation contribute to interneuron migration. These include: (1) Extrinsic guidance cues distributed along migratory streams that are sensed and integrated by migrating interneurons; (2) Intrinsic genetic programs driven by specific transcription factors that grant specification and set the timing of migration for different subtypes of interneurons; (3) Adhesion molecules and cytoskeletal elements/regulators that transduce molecular signalings into coherent movement. These levels of molecular regulation must be properly integrated by interneurons to allow their migration in the cortex. The aim of this review is to summarize our current knowledge of the interplay between microenvironmental signals and cell autonomous programs that drive cortical interneuron porduction, tangential migration, and intergration in the developing cerebral cortex. PMID:25926769

  18. Neuronal Nitric Oxide Signaling Regulates Erection Recovery after Cavernous Nerve Injury

    PubMed Central

    Sezen, Sena F.; Lagoda, Gwen; Burnett, Arthur L.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose NO is the major neuronal mediator of penile erection, but its role in EF status after CN injury is uncertain. This study aimed to determine the function of neuronal NO signaling in the pathobiology of EF recovery after partial CN injury using both genetic and pharmacologic mouse experimental paradigms. Materials and Methods EF was evaluated in WT and nNOS−/− mice (n=5–7/group) at 1, 3 and 7 days after UCI or sham injury and at day 7 in WT mice treated with the NO synthase inhibitor, L-NAME at baseline and for 6 days following UCI. Apoptosis in the penis was evaluated by Western blot analysis of p-Akt-S473, 3-NT, and caspase-3 expressions after BCI. Results ICP was significantly decreased at 1, 3 and 7 days in WT mice but only at day 1 in nNOS−/− mice after UCI compared with sham treatment values (p<0.05). L-NAME-treated WT mice had improved EF compared with the vehicle-treated group response at day 7 following UCI (p<0.05). p-Akt-S473 expression in penes was significantly decreased in vehicle-treated (p<0.05) but not L-NAME-treated WT mice. 3-NT expression in penes was significantly decreased in L-NAME-treated WT and vehicle-treated nNOS−/− mice (p<0.05). Caspase-3 expression in penes was significantly increased in vehicle-treated (p<0.05) but not L-NAME-treated WT mice and vehicle-treated nNOS−/− mice. Conclusions Neuronal NO signaling regulates EF recovery early after partial CN injury, exerting an inhibitory role via induction of apoptotic changes in penile tissue. Therapeutic strategies to improve EF recovery after RP may consider targeting pathogenic sites of NO neurobiology. PMID:22177198

  19. Dyrk1A, a serine/threonine kinase, is involved in ERK and Akt activation in the brain of hyperhomocysteinemic mice.

    PubMed

    Abekhoukh, Sabiha; Planque, Chris; Ripoll, Clémentine; Urbaniak, Paulina; Paul, Jean-Louis; Delabar, Jean-Maurice; Janel, Nathalie

    2013-02-01

    Hyperhomocysteinemia due to cystathionine beta synthase (CBS) deficiency is associated with diverse brain disease. Whereas the biological actions linking hyperhomocysteinemia to the cognitive dysfunction are not well understood, we tried to establish relationships between hyperhomocysteinemia and alterations of signaling pathways. In the brain of CBS-deficient mice, a murine model of hyperhomocysteinemia, we previously found an activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathway and an increase of Dyrk1A, a serine/threonine kinase involved in diverse functions ranging from development and growth to apoptosis. We then investigated the relationship between Dyrk1A and the signaling pathways initiated by receptor tyrosine kinases (RTK), the ERK and PI3K/Akt pathways. We found a significant increase of phospho-ERK, phospho-MEK, and phospho-Akt in the brain of CBS-deficient and Dyrk1a-overexpressing mice. This increase was abolished when CBS-deficient and Dyrk1A-transgenic mice were treated with harmine, an inhibitor of Dyrk1A kinase activity, which emphasizes the role of Dyrk1A activity on ERK and Akt activation. Sprouty 2 protein level, a negative feedback loop modulator that limits the intensity and duration of RTK activation, is decreased in the brain of CBS-deficient mice, but not in the brain of Dyrk1A transgenic mice. Furthermore, a reduced Dyrk1A and Grb2 binding on sprouty 2 and an increased interaction of Dyrk1A with Grb2 were found in the brain of Dyrk1A transgenic mice. The consequence of Dyrk1A overexpression on RTK activation seems to be a decreased interaction of sprouty 2/Grb2. These observations demonstrate ERK and Akt activation induced by Dyrk1A in the brain of hyperhomocysteinemic mice and open new perspectives to understand the basis of the cognitive defects in hyperhomocysteinemia. PMID:22923366

  20. Down-regulation of ERK1/2 and AKT-mediated X-ray repair cross-complement group 1 protein (XRCC1) expression by Hsp90 inhibition enhances the gefitinib-induced cytotoxicity in human lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Tung, Chun-Liang; Jian, Yi-Jun; Syu, Jhan-Jhang; Wang, Tai-Jing; Chang, Po-Yuan; Chen, Chien-Yu; Jian, Yun-Ting; Lin, Yun-Wei

    2015-05-15

    Gefitinib (Iressa(R), ZD1839) is a selective epidermal growth factor receptor-tyrosine kinase inhibitor (EGFR-TKI) that blocks growth factor-mediated cell proliferation and extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2) and AKT signaling activation. It has been shown that inhibition of Hsp90 function can enhance antitumor activity of EGFR-TKI. XRCC1 is an important scaffold protein in base excision repair, which could be regulated by ERK1/2 and AKT pathways. However, the role of ERK1/2 and AKT-mediated XRCC1 expression in gefitinib alone or combination with an Hsp90 inhibitor-induced cytotoxicity in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells has not been identified. In this study, gefitinib treatment decreased XRCC1 mRNA and protein expression through ERK1/2 and AKT inactivation in two NSCLC cells, A549 and H1975. Knocking down XRCC1 expression by transfection with small interfering RNA of XRCC1 enhanced the cytotoxicity and cell growth inhibition of gefitinib. Combining treatment of gefitinib with an Hsp90 inhibitor resulted in enhancing the reduction of XRCC1 protein and mRNA levels in gefitinib-exposed A549 and H1975 cells. Compared to a single agent alone, gefitinib combined with an Hsp90 inhibitor resulted in cytotoxicity and cell growth inhibition synergistically in NSCLC cells. Furthermore, transfection with constitutive active MKK1 or AKT vectors rescued the XRCC1 protein level as well as the cell survival suppressed by an Hsp90 inhibitor and gefitinib. These findings suggested that down-regulation of XRCC1 can enhance the sensitivity of gefitinib for NSCLC cells. PMID:25662161

  1. Down-regulation of ERK1/2 and AKT-mediated X-ray repair cross-complement group 1 protein (XRCC1) expression by Hsp90 inhibition enhances the gefitinib-induced cytotoxicity in human lung cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Tung, Chun-Liang; Jian, Yi-Jun; Syu, Jhan-Jhang; Wang, Tai-Jing; Chang, Po-Yuan; Chen, Chien-Yu; Jian, Yun-Ting; Lin, Yun-Wei

    2015-05-15

    Gefitinib (Iressa{sup R}, ZD1839) is a selective epidermal growth factor receptor-tyrosine kinase inhibitor (EGFR-TKI) that blocks growth factor-mediated cell proliferation and extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2) and AKT signaling activation. It has been shown that inhibition of Hsp90 function can enhance antitumor activity of EGFR-TKI. XRCC1 is an important scaffold protein in base excision repair, which could be regulated by ERK1/2 and AKT pathways. However, the role of ERK1/2 and AKT-mediated XRCC1 expression in gefitinib alone or combination with an Hsp90 inhibitor-induced cytotoxicity in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells has not been identified. In this study, gefitinib treatment decreased XRCC1 mRNA and protein expression through ERK1/2 and AKT inactivation in two NSCLC cells, A549 and H1975. Knocking down XRCC1 expression by transfection with small interfering RNA of XRCC1 enhanced the cytotoxicity and cell growth inhibition of gefitinib. Combining treatment of gefitinib with an Hsp90 inhibitor resulted in enhancing the reduction of XRCC1 protein and mRNA levels in gefitinib-exposed A549 and H1975 cells. Compared to a single agent alone, gefitinib combined with an Hsp90 inhibitor resulted in cytotoxicity and cell growth inhibition synergistically in NSCLC cells. Furthermore, transfection with constitutive active MKK1 or AKT vectors rescued the XRCC1 protein level as well as the cell survival suppressed by an Hsp90 inhibitor and gefitinib. These findings suggested that down-regulation of XRCC1 can enhance the sensitivity of gefitinib for NSCLC cells. - Highlights: • Gefitinib treatment decreased XRCC1 mRNA and protein expression in NSCLC cells. • Knocking down XRCC1 expression enhanced the cytotoxic effect of gefitinib. • Gefitinib combined with an Hsp90 inhibitor resulted in synergistically cytotoxicity.

  2. Fluid shear stress suppresses TNF-α-induced apoptosis in MC3T3-E1 cells: Involvement of ERK5-AKT-FoxO3a-Bim/FasL signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Bin, Geng; Bo, Zhang; Jing, Wang; Jin, Jiang; Xiaoyi, Tan; Cong, Chen; Liping, An; Jinglin, Ma; Cuifang, Wang; Yonggang, Chen; Yayi, Xia

    2016-05-01

    TNF-α is known to induce osteoblasts apoptosis, whereas mechanical stimulation has been shown to enhance osteoblast survival. In the present study, we found that mechanical stimulation in the form of fluid shear stress (FSS) suppresses TNF-α induced apoptosis in MC3T3-E1 cells. Extracellular signal-regulated kinase 5 (ERK5) is a member of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) family that has been implicated in cell survival. We also demonstrated that FSS imposed by flow chamber in vitro leads to a markedly activation of ERK5, which was shown to be protective against TNF-α-induced apoptosis, whereas the transfection of siRNA against ERK5 (ERK5-siRNA) reversed the FSS-medicated anti-apoptotic effects. An initial FSS-mediated activation of ERK5 that phosphorylates AKT to increase its activity, and a following forkhead box O 3a (FoxO3a) was phosphorylated by activated AKT. Phosphorylated FoxO3a is sequestered in the cytoplasm, and prevents it from translocating to nucleus where it can increase the expression of FasL and Bim. The inhibition of AKT-FoxO3a signalings by a PI3K (PI3-kinase)/AKT inhibitor (LY294002) or the transfection of ERK5-siRNA led to the nuclear translocation of non-phosphorylated FoxO3a, and increased the protein expression of FasL and Bim. In addition, the activation of caspase-3 by TNF-α was significantly inhibited by aforementioned FSS-medicated mechanisms. In brief, the activation of ERK5-AKT-FoxO3a signaling pathways by FSS resulted in a decreased expression of FasL and Bim and an inhibition of caspase-3 activation, which exerts a protective effect that prevents osteoblasts from apoptosis.

  3. Anti-Müllerian Hormone Signaling Regulates Epithelial Plasticity and Chemoresistance in Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Beck, Tim N; Korobeynikov, Vladislav A; Kudinov, Alexander E; Georgopoulos, Rachel; Solanki, Nehal R; Andrews-Hoke, Magda; Kistner, Timothy M; Pépin, David; Donahoe, Patricia K; Nicolas, Emmanuelle; Einarson, Margret B; Zhou, Yan; Boumber, Yanis; Proia, David A; Serebriiskii, Ilya G; Golemis, Erica A

    2016-07-19

    Anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH) and its type II receptor AMHR2, both previously thought to primarily function in gonadal tissue, were unexpectedly identified as potent regulators of transforming growth factor (TGF-β)/bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling and epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in lung cancer. AMH is a TGF-β/BMP superfamily member, and AMHR2 heterodimerizes with type I receptors (ALK2, ALK3) also used by the type II receptor for BMP (BMPR2). AMH signaling regulates expression of BMPR2, ALK2, and ALK3, supports protein kinase B-nuclear factor κB (AKT-NF-κB) and SMAD survival signaling, and influences BMP-dependent signaling in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). AMH and AMHR2 are selectively expressed in epithelial versus mesenchymal cells, and loss of AMH/AMHR2 induces EMT. Independent induction of EMT reduces expression of AMH and AMHR2. Importantly, EMT associated with depletion of AMH or AMHR2 results in chemoresistance but sensitizes cells to the heat shock protein 90 (HSP90) inhibitor ganetespib. Recognition of this AMH/AMHR2 axis helps to further elucidate TGF-β/BMP resistance-associated signaling and suggests new strategies for therapeutic targeting of EMT. PMID:27396341

  4. The Neuroprotection of Liraglutide Against Ischaemia-induced Apoptosis through the Activation of the PI3K/AKT and MAPK Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Huili; Zhang, Yusheng; Shi, Zhongshan; Lu, Dan; Li, Tingting; Ding, Yan; Ruan, Yiwen; Xu, Anding

    2016-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is an incretin hormone that increases glucose-dependent insulin secretion to reduce the glucose level. Liraglutide, a long-acting GLP-1 analogue, has been found to have neuroprotective action in various experimental models. However, the protective mechanisms of liraglutide in ischaemic stroke remain unclear. Here, we demonstrated that liraglutide significantly decreased the infarct volume, improved neurologic deficits, and lowered stress-related hyperglycaemia without causing hypoglycaemia in a rat model of middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). Liraglutide inhibited cell apoptosis by reducing excessive reactive oxygen species (ROS) and improving the function of mitochondria in neurons under oxygen glucose deprivation (OGD) in vitro and MCAO in vivo. Liraglutide up-regulated the phosphorylation of protein kinase B (AKT) and extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK) and inhibited the phosphorylation of c-jun-NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38. Moreover, the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor LY294002 and/or the ERK inhibitor U0126 counteracted the protective effect of liraglutide. Taken together, these results suggest that liraglutide exerts neuroprotective action against ischaemia-induced apoptosis through the reduction of ROS and the activation of the PI3K/AKT and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways. Therefore, liraglutide has therapeutic potential for patients with ischaemic stroke, especially those with Type 2 diabetes mellitus or stress hyperglycaemia. PMID:27240461

  5. Statins inhibited the MIP-1α expression via inhibition of Ras/ERK and Ras/Akt pathways in myeloma cells.

    PubMed

    Tsubaki, Masanobu; Mashimo, Kenji; Takeda, Tomoya; Kino, Toshiki; Fujita, Arisa; Itoh, Tatsuki; Imano, Motohiro; Sakaguchi, Katsuhiko; Satou, Takao; Nishida, Shozo

    2016-03-01

    Macrophage inflammatory protein-1alpha (MIP-1α) is detected at high concentrations in patients with multiple myeloma. It is thought to play an important role in the etiology of multiple myeloma and osteolysis. Thus, inhibiting MIP-1α expression may be useful in developing therapeutic treatments for multiple myeloma-induced osteolysis. In this study, we investigated the potential of statins to inhibit mRNA expression and secretion of MIP-1α in mouse myeloma cells (MOPC-31C). We found that statins inhibited the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced MIP-1α mRNA expression and protein secretion in MOPC-31C cells. This inhibition was reversed when farnesyl pyrophosphate (FPP) and geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate (GGPP), intermediates of the mevalonate pathway, were combined with statins. Furthermore, statins reduced the GTP form of Ras, a phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2), and phosphorylated Akt. Our results indicate that statins inhibit biosynthesis of FPP and GGPP and thereby down regulate signal transduction of Ras/ERK and Ras/Akt pathways. The net effect suppresses LPS-induced MIP-1α mRNA expression and protein secretion in MOPC-31C cells. Thus, statins hold great promise for developing effective therapies against myeloma-induced osteolysis.

  6. Caffeine inhibits adipogenesis through modulation of mitotic clonal expansion and the AKT/GSK3 pathway in 3T3-L1 adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ah-Reum; Yoon, Bo Kyung; Park, Hyounkyoung; Seok, Jo Woon; Choi, Hyeonjin; Yu, Jung Hwan; Choi, Yoonjeong; Song, Su Jin; Kim, Ara; Kim, Jae-Woo

    2016-02-01

    Caffeine has been proposed to have several beneficial effects on obesity and its related metabolic diseases; however, how caffeine affects adipocyte differentiation has not been elucidated. In this study, we demonstrated that caffeine suppressed 3T3-L1 adipocyte differentiation and inhibited the expression of CCAAT/enhancer binding protein (C/EBP)α and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)γ, two main adipogenic transcription factors. Anti-adipogenic markers, such as preadipocyte secreted factor (Pref)-1 and Krüppel-like factor 2, remained to be expressed in the presence of caffeine. Furthermore, 3T3-L1 cells failed to undergo typical mitotic clonal expansion in the presence of caffeine. Investigation of hormonal signaling revealed that caffeine inhibited the activation of AKT and glycogen synthase kinase (GSK) 3 in a dose-dependent manner, but not extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK). Our data show that caffeine is an anti-adipogenic bioactive compound involved in the modulation of mitotic clonal expansion during adipocyte differentiation through the AKT/GSK3 pathway. [BMB Reports 2016; 49(2): 111-115].

  7. A novel compound DSC suppresses lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammatory responses by inhibition of Akt/NF-κB signalling in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xin-Hua; Pan, Li-Long; Jia, Yao-Ling; Wu, Dan; Xiong, Qing-Hui; Wang, Yang; Zhu, Yi-Zhun

    2013-05-15

    A novel compound [4-(2-acetoxy-3-((R)-3-(benzylthio)-1-methoxy-1-oxopropan-2-ylamino)-3-oxopropyl)-1,2-phenylene diacetate (DSC)], derived from Danshensu, exerted cytoprotective effects by anti-oxidative and anti-apoptotic activities in vitro. Herein, we reported the protective effects of DSC on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammatory responses in murine RAW264.7 macrophages and the underlying mechanisms. We showed that DSC concentration-dependently attenuated nitric oxide (NO) production and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression with less cytotoxicity. Signal transduction studies indicated that DSC significantly inhibited LPS-induced phosphorylation of Akt, but not c-Jun N-terminal kinase 1/2, p38, or extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2. Meanwhile, LPS-induced nuclear translocation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) p65 was decreased by DSC. Furthermore, a phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor LY294002 significantly suppressed LPS-induced NF-κB p65 nuclear translocation, iNOS expression, and NO production, which was also mimicked by pretreatment with DSC. These results suggested that DSC attenuated LPS-induced inflammatory response in macrophages, at least in part, through suppression of PI3K/Akt signaling and NF-κB activation.

  8. Tamoxifen inhibits tumor cell invasion and metastasis in mouse melanoma through suppression of PKC/MEK/ERK and PKC/PI3K/Akt pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuoka, Hiroshi; Tsubaki, Masanobu; Yamazoe, Yuzuru; Ogaki, Mitsuhiko; Satou, Takao; Itoh, Tatsuki; Kusunoki, Takashi; Nishida, Shozo

    2009-07-15

    In melanoma, several signaling pathways are constitutively activated. Among these, the protein kinase C (PKC) signaling pathways are activated through multiple signal transduction molecules and appear to play major roles in melanoma progression. Recently, it has been reported that tamoxifen, an anti-estrogen reagent, inhibits PKC signaling in estrogen-negative and estrogen-independent cancer cell lines. Thus, we investigated whether tamoxifen inhibited tumor cell invasion and metastasis in mouse melanoma cell line B16BL6. Tamoxifen significantly inhibited lung metastasis, cell migration, and invasion at concentrations that did not show anti-proliferative effects on B16BL6 cells. Tamoxifen also inhibited the mRNA expressions and protein activities of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). Furthermore, tamoxifen suppressed phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) and Akt through the inhibition of PKC{alpha} and PKC{delta} phosphorylation. However, other signal transduction factor, such as p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38MAPK) was unaffected. The results indicate that tamoxifen suppresses the PKC/mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK)/ERK and PKC/phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI3K)/Akt pathways, thereby inhibiting B16BL6 cell migration, invasion, and metastasis. Moreover, tamoxifen markedly inhibited not only developing but also clinically evident metastasis. These findings suggest that tamoxifen has potential clinical applications for the treatment of tumor cell metastasis.

  9. Biphasic activation of PI3K/Akt and MAPK/Erk1/2 signaling pathways in bovine herpesvirus type 1 infection of MDBK cells.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Liqian; Ding, Xiuyan; Zhu, Xiaofang; Meng, Songshu; Wang, Jianye; Zhou, Hong; Duan, Qiangde; Tao, Jie; Schifferli, Dieter M; Zhu, Guoqiang

    2011-04-14

    Many viruses have been known to control key cellular signaling pathways to facilitate the virus infection. The possible involvement of signaling pathways in bovine herpesvirus type 1 (BoHV-1) infection is unknown. This study indicated that infection of MDBK cells with BoHV-1 induced an early-stage transient and a late-stage sustained activation of both phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt and mitogen activated protein kinases/extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (MAPK/Erk1/2) signaling pathways. Analysis with the stimulation of UV-irradiated virus indicated that the virus binding and/or entry process was enough to trigger the early phase activations, while the late phase activations were viral protein expression dependent. Biphasic activation of both pathways was suppressed by the selective inhibitor, Ly294002 for PI3K and U0126 for MAPK kinase (MEK1/2), respectively. Furthermore, treatment of MDBK cells with Ly294002 caused a 1.5-log reduction in virus titer, while U0126 had little effect on the virus production. In addition, the inhibition effect of Ly294002 mainly occurred at the post-entry stage of the virus replication cycle. This revealed for the first time that BoHV-1 actively induced both PI3K/Akt and MAPK/Erk1/2 signaling pathways, and the activation of PI3K was important for fully efficient replication, especially for the post-entry stage.

  10. Camptothecin inhibits platelet-derived growth factor-BB-induced proliferation of rat aortic vascular smooth muscle cells through inhibition of PI3K/Akt signaling pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Eun-Seok; Kang, Shin-il; Yoo, Kyu-dong; Lee, Mi-Yea; Yoo, Hwan-Soo; Hong, Jin-Tae; Shin, Hwa-Sup; Kim, Bokyung; Yun, Yeo-Pyo

    2013-04-15

    The abnormal proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) in arterial wall is a major cause of vascular disorders such as atherosclerosis and restenosis after angioplasty. In this study, we investigated not only the inhibitory effects of camptothecin (CPT) on PDGF-BB-induced VSMC proliferation, but also its molecular mechanism of this inhibition. CPT significantly inhibited proliferation with IC50 value of 0.58 μM and the DNA synthesis of PDGF-BB-stimulated VSMCs in a dose-dependent manner (0.5–2 μM ) without any cytotoxicity. CPT induced the cell cycle arrest at G0/G1 phase. Also, CPT decreased the expressions of G0/G1-specific regulatory proteins including cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK)2, cyclin D1 and PCNA in PDGF-BB-stimulated VSMCs. Pre-incubation of VSMCs with CPT significantly inhibited PDGF-BB-induced Akt activation, whereas CPT did not affect PDGF-receptor beta phosphorylation, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2 phosphorylation and phospholipase C (PLC)-γ1 phosphorylation in PDGF-BB signaling pathway. Our data showed that CPT pre-treatment inhibited VSMC proliferation, and that the inhibitory effect of CPT was enhanced by LY294002, a PI3K inhibitor, on PDGF-BB-induced VSMC proliferation. In addition, inhibiting the PI3K/Akt pathway by LY294002 significantly enhanced the suppression of PCNA expression and Akt activation by CPT. These results suggest that the anti-proliferative activity of CPT is mediated in part by downregulating the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway. - Highlights: ► CPT inhibits proliferation of PDGF-BB-induced VSMC without cytotoxicity. ► CPT arrests the cell cycle in G0/G1 phase by downregulation of cyclin D1 and CDK2. ► CPT significantly attenuates Akt phosphorylation in PDGF-BB signaling pathway. ► LY294002 enhanced the inhibitory effect of CPT on VSMC proliferation. ► Thus, CPT is mediated by downregulating the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway.

  11. Akt isoforms in vascular disease.

    PubMed

    Yu, Haixiang; Littlewood, Trevor; Bennett, Martin

    2015-08-01

    The mammalian serine/threonine Akt kinases comprise three closely related isoforms: Akt1, Akt2 and Akt3. Akt activation has been implicated in both normal and disease processes, including in development and metabolism, as well as cancer and cardiovascular disease. Although Akt signalling has been identified as a promising therapeutic target in cancer, its role in cardiovascular disease is less clear. Importantly, accumulating evidence suggests that the three Akt isoforms exhibit distinct tissue expression profiles, localise to different subcellular compartments, and have unique modes of activation. Consistent with in vitro findings, genetic studies in mice show distinct effects of individual Akt isoforms on the pathophysiology of cardiovascular disease. This review summarises recent studies of individual Akt isoforms in atherosclerosis, vascular remodelling and aneurysm formation, to provide a comprehensive overview of Akt function in vascular disease.

  12. Akt isoforms in vascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Haixiang; Littlewood, Trevor; Bennett, Martin

    2015-01-01

    The mammalian serine/threonine Akt kinases comprise three closely related isoforms: Akt1, Akt2 and Akt3. Akt activation has been implicated in both normal and disease processes, including in development and metabolism, as well as cancer and cardiovascular disease. Although Akt signalling has been identified as a promising therapeutic target in cancer, its role in cardiovascular disease is less clear. Importantly, accumulating evidence suggests that the three Akt isoforms exhibit distinct tissue expression profiles, localise to different subcellular compartments, and have unique modes of activation. Consistent with in vitro findings, genetic studies in mice show distinct effects of individual Akt isoforms on the pathophysiology of cardiovascular disease. This review summarises recent studies of individual Akt isoforms in atherosclerosis, vascular remodelling and aneurysm formation, to provide a comprehensive overview of Akt function in vascular disease. PMID:25929188

  13. Aristolochia Manshuriensis Kom Inhibits Adipocyte Differentiation by Regulation of ERK1/2 and Akt Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Kwak, Dong Hoon; Lee, Ji-Hye; Kim, Taesoo; Ahn, Hyo Sun; Cho, Won-Kyung; Ha, Hyunil; Hwang, Youn-Hwan; Ma, Jin Yeul

    2012-01-01

    Aristolochia manshuriensis Kom (AMK) is a traditional medicinal herb used for the treatment of arthritis, rheumatism, hepatitis, and anti-obesity. Because of nephrotoxicity and carcinogenicity of AMK, there are no pharmacological reports on anti-obesity potential of AMK. Here, we showed AMK has an inhibitory effect on adipocyte differentiation of 3T3-L1 cells along with significantly decrease in the lipid accumulation by downregulating several adipocyte-specific transcription factors including peroxisome proliferation-activity receptor γ (PPAR-γ), CCAAT/enhancer binding protein α (C/EBP-α) and C/EBP-β, which are critical for adipogenesis in vitro. AMK also markedly activated the extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) pathway including Ras, Raf1, and mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 1 (MEK1), and significantly suppressed Akt pathway by inhibition of phosphoinositide-dependent kinase 1 (PDK1). Aristolochic acid (AA) and ethyl acetate (EtOAc) fraction of AMK with AA were significantly inhibited TG accumulation, and regulated two pathway (ERK1/2 and Akt) during adipocyte differentiation, and was not due to its cytotoxicity. These two pathways were upstream of PPAR-γ and C/EBPα in the adipogenesis. In addition, gene expressions of secreting factors such as fatty acid synthase (FAS), adiponectin, lipopreotein lipase (LPL), and aP2 were significantly inhibited by treatment of AMK during adipogenesis. We used the high-fat diet (HFD)-induced obesity mouse model to determine the inhibitory effects of AMK on obesity. Oral administration of AMK (62.5 mg/kg/day) significantly decreased the fat tissue weight, total cholesterol (TC), and low density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C) concentration in the blood. The results of this study suggested that AMK inhibited lipid accumulation by the down-regulation of the major transcription factors of the adipogensis pathway including PPAR-γ and C/EBP-α through regulation of Akt pathway and ERK 1

  14. Increased Akt signaling in the mosquito fat body increases adult survivorship

    PubMed Central

    Arik, Anam J.; Hun, Lewis V.; Quicke, Kendra; Piatt, Michael; Ziegler, Rolf; Scaraffia, Patricia Y.; Badgandi, Hemant; Riehle, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    Akt signaling regulates diverse physiologies in a wide range of organisms. We examine the impact of increased Akt signaling in the fat body of 2 mosquito species, the Asian malaria mosquito Anopheles stephensi and the yellow fever mosquito Aedes aegypti. Overexpression of a myristoylated and active form of A. stephensi and Ae. aegypti Akt in the fat body of transgenic mosquitoes led to activation of the downstream signaling molecules forkhead box O (FOXO) and p70 S6 kinase in a tissue and blood meal–specific manner. In both species, increased Akt signaling in the fat body after blood feeding significantly increased adult survivorship relative to nontransgenic sibling controls. In A. stephensi, survivorship was increased by 15% to 45%, while in Ae. aegypti, it increased 14% to 47%. Transgenic mosquitoes fed only sugar, and thus not expressing active Akt, had no significant difference in survivorship relative to nontransgenic siblings. Expression of active Akt also increased expression of fat body vitellogenin, but the number of viable eggs did not differ significantly between transgenic and nontransgenic controls. This work demonstrates a novel mechanism of enhanced survivorship through increased Akt signaling in the fat bodies of multiple mosquito genera and provides new tools to unlock the molecular underpinnings of aging in eukaryotic organisms.—Arik, A. J., Hun, L. V., Quicke, K., Piatt, M., Ziegler, R., Scaraffia, P. Y., Badgandi H., Riehle, M. A. Increased Akt signaling in the mosquito fat body increases adult survivorship. PMID:25550465

  15. GDF15 regulates Kv2.1-mediated outward K+ current through the Akt/mTOR signalling pathway in rat cerebellar granule cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chang-Ying; Huang, An-Qi; Zhou, Meng-Hua; Mei, Yan-Ai

    2014-01-01

    GDF15 (growth/differentiation factor 15), a novel member of the TGFβ (transforming growth factor β) superfamily, plays critical roles in the central and peripheral nervous systems, but the signal transduction pathways and receptor subtypes involved are not well understood. In the present paper, we report that GDF15 specifically increases the IK (delayed-rectifier outward K+ current) in rat CGNs (cerebellar granule neurons) in time- and concentration-dependent manners. The GDF15-induced amplification of the IK is mediated by the increased expression and reduced lysosome-dependent degradation of the Kv2.1 protein, the main α-subunit of the IK channel. Exposure of CGNs to GDF15 markedly induced the phosphorylation of ERK (extracellular-signal-regulated kinase), Akt and mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin), but the GDF15-induced IK densities and increased expression of Kv2.1 were attenuated only by Akt and mTOR, and not ERK, inhibitors. Pharmacological inhibition of the Src-mediated phosphorylation of TGFβR2 (TGFβ receptor 2), not TGFβR1, abrogated the effect of GDF15 on IK amplification and Kv2.1 induction. Immunoprecipitation assays showed that GDF15 increased the tyrosine phosphorylation of TGFβRII in the CGN lysate. The results of the present study reveal a novel regulation of Kv2.1 by GDF15 mediated through the TGFβRII-activated Akt/mTOR pathway, which is a previously uncharacterized Smad-independent mechanism of GDF15 signalling. PMID:24597762

  16. Astaxanthin Inhibits Acetaldehyde-Induced Cytotoxicity in SH-SY5Y Cells by Modulating Akt/CREB and p38MAPK/ERK Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Tingting; Zhao, Yan; Zhang, Xia; Lin, Xiaotong

    2016-01-01

    Excessive alcohol consumption can lead to brain tissue damage and cognitive dysfunction. Acetaldehyde, the most toxic metabolite of ethanol, mediates the brain tissue damage and cognitive dysfunction induced by chronic excessive alcohol consumption. In this study, the effect of astaxanthin, a marine bioactive compound, on acetaldehyde-induced cytotoxicity was investigated in SH-SY5Y cells. It was found that astaxanthin protected cells from apoptosis by ameliorating the effect of acetaldehyde on the expression of Bcl-2 family proteins, preventing the reduction of anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2 and the increase of pro-apoptotic protein Bak induced by acetaldehyde. Further analyses showed that astaxanthin treatment inhibited acetaldehyde-induced reduction of the levels of activated Akt and cyclic AMP-responsive element binding protein (CREB). Astaxanthin treatment also prevented acetaldehyde-induced increase of the level of activated p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and decrease of the level of activated extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERKs). Activation of Akt/CREB pathway promotes cell survival and is involved in the upregulation of Bcl-2 gene. P38MAPK plays a critical role in apoptotic events while ERKs mediates the inhibition of apoptosis. Thus, astaxanthin may inhibit acetaldehyde-induced apoptosis through promoting the activation of Akt/CREB and ERKs and blocking the activation of p38MAPK. In addition, astaxanthin treatment suppressed the oxidative stress induced by acetaldehyde and restored the antioxidative capacity of SH-SY5Y cells. Therefore, astaxanthin may protect cells against acetaldehyde-induced cytotoxicity through maintaining redox balance and modulating apoptotic and survival signals. The results suggest that astaxanthin treatment may be beneficial for preventing neurotoxicity associated with acetaldehyde and excessive alcohol consumption. PMID:26978376

  17. PTEN permits acute increases in D3-phosphoinositide levels following TCR stimulation but inhibits distal signaling events by reducing the basal activity of Akt.

    PubMed

    Seminario, Maria-Cristina; Precht, Patricia; Bunnell, Stephen C; Warren, Sarah E; Morris, Christa M; Taub, Dennis; Wange, Ronald L

    2004-11-01

    Phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) is important in TCR signaling. PI3K generates phosphatidylinositol 3, 4, 5-trisphosphate (PI-3,4,5-P3), which regulates membrane localization and/or activity of multiple signaling proteins. PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homologue deleted on chromosome 10) opposes PI3K, reversing this reaction. Maintaining the balance between these two enzymes is important for normal T cell function. Here we use the PTEN-null Jurkat T cell line to address the role of PTEN in modulating proximal and distal TCR-signaling events. PTEN expression at levels that restored low basal Akt phosphorylation (an indicator of PI-3,4,5-P3 levels), but which were not themselves cytotoxic, had minimal effect on TCR-stimulated activation of phospholipase Cgamma1 and Ca2+ flux, but reduced the duration of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (Erk) activation. Distal signaling events, including nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) activation, CD69 expression and IL-2 production, were all inhibited by PTEN expression. Notably, PTEN did not block TCR-stimulated PI-3,4,5-P3 accumulation. The effect of PTEN on distal TCR signaling events was strongly correlated with the loss of the constitutive Akt activation and glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK3) inhibition that is typical of Jurkat cells, and could be reversed by expression of activated Akt or pharmacologic inhibition of GSK3. These results suggest that PTEN acts in T cells primarily to control basal PI-3,4,5-P3 levels, rather than opposing PI3K acutely during TCR stimulation.

  18. Anti-adipogenic effect of epiberberine is mediated by regulation of the Raf/MEK1/2/ERK1/2 and AMPKα/Akt pathways.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jae Sue; Kim, Ji-Hye; Ali, Md Yousof; Jung, Hee Jin; Min, Byung-Sun; Choi, Ran Joo; Kim, Gun-Do; Jung, Hyun Ah

    2015-12-01

    It has been reported that alkaloids derived from Coptis chinensis exert anti-adipogenic activity on 3T3-L1 adipocytes by downregulating peroxisome proliferation-activity receptor-γ (PPAR-γ) and CCAAT/enhancer binding protein-α (C/EBP-α). However, the signaling-based mechanism of the inhibitory role of epiberberine in the early stages of 3T3-L1 adipocyte differentiation is uncharacterized. Here, we show that epiberberine had inhibitory effects on adipocyte differentiation and significantly decreased lipid accumulation by downregulating an adipocyte-specific transcription factor, sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1 (SREBP-1). Furthermore, we observed that epiberberine markedly suppressed the differentiation-mediated phosphorylation of components of both the Raf/mitogen-activated protein kinase 1 (MEK1)/extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) and AMP-activated protein kinase-α1 (AMPKα)/Akt pathways. In addition, gene expression of fatty acid synthase (FAS) was significantly inhibited by treatment with epiberberine during adipogenesis. These results indicate that the anti-adipogenic mechanism of epiberberine is associated with inhibition of phosphorylation of Raf/MEK1/ERK1/2 and AMPKα/Akt, followed by downregulation of the major transcription factors of adipogenesis, such as PPAR-γ, C/EBP-α, and SREBP-1, and FAS. Taken together, this study suggests that the anti-adipogenic effect of epiberberine is mediated by downregulation of the Raf/MEK1/ERK1/2 and AMPKα/Akt pathways during 3T3-L1 adipocyte differentiation. Moreover, the anti-adipogenic effects of epiberberine were not accompanied by modulation of β-catenin.

  19. Cross talk Initiated by Endothelial Cells Enhances Migration and Inhibits Anoikis of Squamous Cell Carcinoma Cells through STAT3/Akt/ERK Signaling12

    PubMed Central

    Neiva, Kathleen G; Zhang, Zhaocheng; Miyazawa, Marta; Warner, Kristy A; Karl, Elisabeta; Nör, Jacques E

    2009-01-01

    It is well known that cancer cells secrete angiogenic factors to recruit and sustain tumor vascular networks. However, little is known about the effect of endothelial cell-secreted factors on the phenotype and behavior of tumor cells. The hypothesis underlying this study is that endothelial cells initiate signaling pathways that enhance tumor cell survival and migration. Here, we observed that soluble mediators from primary human dermal microvascular endothelial cells induce phosphorylation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3), Akt, and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) in a panel of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) cells (OSCC-3, UM-SCC-1, UM-SCC-17B, UM-SCC-74A). Gene expression analysis demonstrated that interleukin-6 (IL- 6), interleukin-8 (CXCL8), and epidermal growth factor (EGF) are upregulated in endothelial cells cocultured with HNSCC. Blockade of endothelial cell-derived IL-6, CXCL8, or EGF by gene silencing or neutralizing antibodies inhibited phosphorylation of STAT3, Akt, and ERK in tumor cells, respectively. Notably, activation of STAT3, Akt, and ERK by endothelial cells enhanced migration and inhibited anoikis of tumor cells. We have previously demonstrated that Bcl-2 is upregulated in tumor microvessels in patients with HNSCC. Here, we observed that Bcl-2 signaling induces expression of IL-6, CXCL8, and EGF, providing a mechanism for the upregulation of these cytokines in tumor-associated endothelial cells. This study expands the contribution of endothelial cells to the pathobiology of tumor cells. It unveils a new mechanism in which endothelial cells function as initiators of molecular crosstalks that enhance survival and migration of tumor cells. PMID:19484147

  20. Resveratrol exerts growth inhibitory effects on human SZ95 sebocytes through the inactivation of the PI3-K/Akt pathway.

    PubMed

    Kim, So Young; Hyun, Moo Yeol; Go, Kyung Chan; Zouboulis, Christos C; Kim, Beom Joon

    2015-04-01

    Resveratrol is known to be a naturally produced polyphenol that is able to reduce cell proliferation in several types of cancer cells and adipocytes. However, the antiproliferative effects of resveratrol on the growth of human sebocytes are not yet clear. In the present study, we investigated possible cellular pathways associated with these growth inhibitory effects on human SZ95 sebocytes. Our results revealed that resveratrol inhibited the proliferation of sebocytes, and that this resulted in disruption of the cell cycle. The inactivation of extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK), Akt and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-γ was also shown to be involved in the inhibition of sebocyte growth by resveratrol. To examine the antiproliferative effects of resveratrol, we determined the levels of cell cycle control proteins. Resveratrol inhibited cyclin D1 synthesis, whereas it stimulated p21WAF1/CIP1 (p21) and p27KIP1 (p27) synthesis. In addition, we demonstrated that the resveratrol-mediated cell cycle arrest resulted in an increase in the proportion of cells in the sub-G0/G1 phase. Moreover, we found that the growth inhibitory effects of resveratrol were enhanced by treatment with LY294002 [a phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3-K) inhibitor] more so than by treatment with PD98059 (a MEK inhibitor), which indicates that resveratrol exerts its inhibitory effects on sebocyte proliferation through the inhibition of Akt. Linoleic acid (LA) is a well-established lipid inducer in sebocytes and is known to stimulate sebocyte differentiation through the upregulation of PPAR-γ. In this study, resveratrol was found to decrease the lipid content and PPAR-γ expression during LA-stimulated lipogenesis. Our results indicate that resveratrol plays a critical role in the inhibition of sebocyte growth through the inactivation of the Akt pathway. The present data suggest that resveratrol may be used as a therapeutic agent for the treatment of acne vulgaris.

  1. γ-Enolase C-terminal peptide promotes cell survival and neurite outgrowth by activation of the PI3K/Akt and MAPK/ERK signalling pathways.

    PubMed

    Hafner, Anja; Obermajer, Nataša; Kos, Janko

    2012-04-15

    γ-Enolase, a glycolytic enzyme, is expressed specifically in neurons. It exerts neurotrophic activity and has been suggested to regulate growth, differentiation, survival and regeneration of neurons. In the present study, we investigated the involvement of γ-enolase in PI3K (phosphoinositide 3-kinase)/Akt and MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase)/ERK (extracellular-signal-regulated kinase) signalling, the two pathways triggered predominantly by neurotrophic factors. Whereas the PI3K/Akt pathway, rather than the MAPK/ERK pathway, is involved in γ-enolase-enhanced cell survival, γ-enolase-stimulated neurite outgrowth requires both pathways, i.e. the activation of both PI3K and ERK1/2, leading to subsequent expression of the growth-cone-specific protein GAP-43 (growth-associated protein of 43 kDa). MEK (MAPK/ERK kinase) and PI3K inhibition blocked or attenuated the neurite outgrowth associated with dynamic remodelling of the actin-based cytoskeleton. We show that γ-enolase-mediated PI3K activation regulates RhoA kinase, a key regulator of actin cytoskeleton organization. Moreover, the inhibition of RhoA downstream effector ROCK (Rho-associated kinase) results in enhanced γ-enolase-induced neurite outgrowth, accompanied by actin polymerization and its redistribution to growth cones. Our results show that γ-enolase controls neuronal survival, differentiation and neurite regeneration by activating the PI3K/Akt and MAPK/ERK signalling pathways, resulting in downstream regulation of the molecular and cellular processes of cytoskeleton reorganization and cell remodelling, activation of transcriptional factors and regulation of the cell cycle.

  2. Lipid rafts as major platforms for signaling regulation in cancer.

    PubMed

    Mollinedo, Faustino; Gajate, Consuelo

    2015-01-01

    Cell signaling does not apparently occur randomly over the cell surface, but it seems to be integrated very often into cholesterol-rich membrane domains, termed lipid rafts. Membrane lipid rafts are highly ordered membrane domains that are enriched in cholesterol, sphingolipids and gangliosides, and behave as major modulators of membrane geometry, lateral movement of molecules, traffic and signal transduction. Because the lipid and protein composition of membrane rafts differs from that of the surrounding membrane, they provide an additional level of compartmentalization, serving as sorting platforms and hubs for signal transduction proteins. A wide number of signal transduction processes related to cell adhesion, migration, as well as to cell survival and proliferation, which play major roles in cancer development and progression, are dependent on lipid rafts. Despite lipid rafts harbor mainly critical survival signaling pathways, including insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I)/phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt signaling, recent evidence suggests that these membrane domains can also house death receptor-mediated apoptotic signaling. Recruitment of this death receptor signaling pathway in membrane rafts can be pharmacologically modulated, thus opening up the possibility to regulate cell demise with a therapeutic use. The synthetic ether phospholipid edelfosine shows a high affinity for cholesterol and accumulates in lipid rafts in a number of malignant hematological cells, leading to an efficient in vitro and in vivo antitumor activity by inducing translocation of death receptors and downstream signaling molecules to these membrane domains. Additional antitumor drugs have also been shown to act, at least in part, by recruiting death receptors in lipid rafts. The partition of death receptors together with downstream apoptotic signaling molecules in membrane rafts has led us to postulate the concept of a special liquid-ordered membrane platform coined as

  3. Insulin signaling regulates neurite growth during metamorphic neuronal remodeling.

    PubMed

    Gu, Tingting; Zhao, Tao; Hewes, Randall S

    2014-01-15

    Although the growth capacity of mature neurons is often limited, some neurons can shift through largely unknown mechanisms from stable maintenance growth to dynamic, organizational growth (e.g. to repair injury, or during development transitions). During insect metamorphosis, many terminally differentiated larval neurons undergo extensive remodeling, involving elimination of larval neurites and outgrowth and elaboration of adult-specific projections. Here, we show in the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster (Meigen), that a metamorphosis-specific increase in insulin signaling promotes neuronal growth and axon branching after prolonged stability during the larval stages. FOXO, a negative effector in the insulin signaling pathway, blocked metamorphic growth of peptidergic neurons that secrete the neuropeptides CCAP and bursicon. RNA interference and CCAP/bursicon cell-targeted expression of dominant-negative constructs for other components of the insulin signaling pathway (InR, Pi3K92E, Akt1, S6K) also partially suppressed the growth of the CCAP/bursicon neuron somata and neurite arbor. In contrast, expression of wild-type or constitutively active forms of InR, Pi3K92E, Akt1, Rheb, and TOR, as well as RNA interference for negative regulators of insulin signaling (PTEN, FOXO), stimulated overgrowth. Interestingly, InR displayed little effect on larval CCAP/bursicon neuron growth, in contrast to its strong effects during metamorphosis. Manipulations of insulin signaling in many other peptidergic neurons revealed generalized growth stimulation during metamorphosis, but not during larval development. These findings reveal a fundamental shift in growth control mechanisms when mature, differentiated neurons enter a new phase of organizational growth. Moreover, they highlight strong evolutionarily conservation of insulin signaling in neuronal growth regulation.

  4. Nobiletin, a Polymethoxylated Flavone, Inhibits Glioma Cell Growth and Migration via Arresting Cell Cycle and Suppressing MAPK and Akt Pathways.

    PubMed

    Lien, Li-Ming; Wang, Meng-Jiy; Chen, Ray-Jade; Chiu, Hou-Chang; Wu, Jia-Lun; Shen, Ming-Yi; Chou, Duen-Suey; Sheu, Joen-Rong; Lin, Kuan-Hung; Lu, Wan-Jung

    2016-02-01

    Nobiletin, a bioactive polymethoxylated flavone (5,6,7,8,3(') ,4(') -hexamethoxyflavone), is abundant in citrus fruit peel. Although nobiletin exhibits antitumor activity against various cancer cells, the effect of nobiletin on glioma cells remains unclear. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of nobiletin on the human U87 and Hs683 glioma cell lines. Treating glioma cells with nobiletin (20-100 µm) reduced cell viability and arrested the cell cycle in the G0/G1 phase, as detected using a 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay and propidium iodide (PI) staining, respectively; however, nobiletin did not induce cell apoptosis according to PI-annexin V double staining. Data from western blotting showed that nobiletin significantly attenuated the expression of cyclin D1, cyclin-dependent kinase 2, cyclin-dependent kinase 4, and E2 promoter-binding factor 1 (E2F1) and the phosphorylation of Akt/protein kinase B and mitogen-activated protein kinases, including p38, extracellular signal-regulated kinase, and c-Jun N-terminal kinase. Our data also showed that nobiletin inhibited glioma cell migration, as detected by both functional wound healing and transwell migration assays. Altogether, the present results suggest that nobiletin inhibits mitogen-activated protein kinase and Akt/protein kinase B pathways and downregulates positive regulators of the cell cycle, leading to subsequent suppression of glioma cell proliferation and migration. Our findings evidence that nobiletin may have potential for treating glioblastoma multiforme.

  5. A Novel Compound Rasatiol Isolated from Raphanus sativus Has a Potential to Enhance Extracellular Matrix Synthesis in Dermal Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Roh, Seok-Seon; Park, Seung-Bae; Park, Seong-Mo; Choi, Byoung Wook; Lee, Min-Ho; Hwang, Yul-Lye; Kim, Chang Hun; Jeong, Hyun-Ah; Kim, Chang Deok

    2013-01-01

    Background The fibrous proteins of extracellular matrix (ECM) produced by dermal fibroblast contributes to the maintenance of connective tissue integrity. Objective This study is carried out to identify the bioactive ingredient from natural products that enhances ECM production in dermal fibroblasts. Methods Bioassay-directed fractionation was used to isolate the active ingredient from natural extracts. The effects of rasatiol (isolated from Raphanus sativus) on ECM production in primary cultured human dermal fibroblasts was investigated by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay and western blot analysis. Results Rasatiol accelerated fibroblast growth in a dose-dependent manner and increased the production of type 1 collagen, fibronectin and elastin. Phosphorylation of p42/44 extracellular signal-regulated kinase, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, and Akt was remarkably increased by rasatiol, indicating that enhanced ECM production is linked to the activation of intracellular signaling cascades. Conclusion These results indicate that rasatiol stimulates the fibrous components of ECM production, and may be applied to the maintenance of skin texture. PMID:24003274

  6. A natural diarylheptanoid promotes neuronal differentiation via activating ERK and PI3K-Akt dependent pathways.

    PubMed

    Tang, G; Dong, X; Huang, X; Huang, X-J; Liu, H; Wang, Y; Ye, W-C; Shi, L

    2015-09-10

    Neuronal differentiation is a critical developmental process that determines accurate synaptic connection and circuit wiring. A wide variety of naturally occurring compounds have been shown as promising drug leads for the generation and differentiation of neurons. Here we report that a diarylheptanoid from the plant Alpinia officinarum, 7-(4-hydroxyphenyl)-1-phenyl-4E-hepten-3-one (Cpd 1), exhibited potent activities in neuronal differentiation and neurite outgrowth. Cpd 1 induced differentiation of neuroblastoma Neuro-2a cells into a neuron-like morphology, and accelerated the establishment of axon-dendrite polarization of cultured hippocampal neurons. Moreover, Cpd 1 promoted neurite extension in both Neuro-2a cells and neurons. We showed that the effects of Cpd 1 on neuronal differentiation and neurite growth were specifically dependent on the activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERKs) and phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)-Akt signaling pathways. Importantly, intraperitoneal administration of Cpd 1 promoted the differentiation of new-born progenitor cells into mature neurons in the adult hippocampal dentate gyrus. Collectively, this study identifies a naturally occurring diarylheptanoid with beneficial effects on neuronal differentiation and neurite outgrowth in vitro and in vivo.

  7. Acetaldehyde Induces Cytotoxicity of SH-SY5Y Cells via Inhibition of Akt Activation and Induction of Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Tingting; Zhao, Yan; Zhang, Xia

    2016-01-01

    Excessive alcohol consumption can lead to brain tissue damage and cognitive dysfunction. It has been shown that heavy drinking is associated with an earlier onset of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease. Acetaldehyde, the most toxic metabolite of ethanol, is speculated to mediate the brain tissue damage and cognitive dysfunction induced by the chronic excessive consumption of alcohol. However, the exact mechanisms by which acetaldehyde induces neurotoxicity are not totally understood. In this study, we investigated the cytotoxic effects of acetaldehyde in SH-SY5Y cells and found that acetaldehyde induced apoptosis of SH-SY5Y cells by downregulating the expression of antiapoptotic Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL and upregulating the expression of proapoptotic Bax. Acetaldehyde treatment led to a significant decrease in the levels of activated Akt and cyclic AMP-responsive element binding protein (CREB). In addition, acetaldehyde induced the activation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) while inhibiting the activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERKs, p44/p42MAPK). Meanwhile, acetaldehyde treatment caused an increase in the production of reactive oxygen species and elevated the oxidative stress in SH-SY5Y cells. Therefore, acetaldehyde induces cytotoxicity of SH-SY5Y cells via promotion of apoptotic signaling, inhibition of cell survival pathway, and induction of oxidative stress. PMID:26649137

  8. Acetaldehyde Induces Cytotoxicity of SH-SY5Y Cells via Inhibition of Akt Activation and Induction of Oxidative Stress.

    PubMed

    Yan, Tingting; Zhao, Yan; Zhang, Xia

    2016-01-01

    Excessive alcohol consumption can lead to brain tissue damage and cognitive dysfunction. It has been shown that heavy drinking is associated with an earlier onset of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease. Acetaldehyde, the most toxic metabolite of ethanol, is speculated to mediate the brain tissue damage and cognitive dysfunction induced by the chronic excessive consumption of alcohol. However, the exact mechanisms by which acetaldehyde induces neurotoxicity are not totally understood. In this study, we investigated the cytotoxic effects of acetaldehyde in SH-SY5Y cells and found that acetaldehyde induced apoptosis of SH-SY5Y cells by downregulating the expression of antiapoptotic Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL and upregulating the expression of proapoptotic Bax. Acetaldehyde treatment led to a significant decrease in the levels of activated Akt and cyclic AMP-responsive element binding protein (CREB). In addition, acetaldehyde induced the activation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) while inhibiting the activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERKs, p44/p42MAPK). Meanwhile, acetaldehyde treatment caused an increase in the production of reactive oxygen species and elevated the oxidative stress in SH-SY5Y cells. Therefore, acetaldehyde induces cytotoxicity of SH-SY5Y cells via promotion of apoptotic signaling, inhibition of cell survival pathway, and induction of oxidative stress.

  9. Unsaturated fatty acids promote proliferation via ERK1/2 and Akt pathway in bovine mammary epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yonezawa, Tomo Haga, Satoshi; Kobayashi, Yosuke; Katoh, Kazuo; Obara, Yoshiaki

    2008-03-21

    GPR40 has recently been identified as a G protein-coupled cell-surface receptor for long-chain fatty acids (LCFAs). The mRNA of the bovine ortholog of GPR40 (bGPR40) was detected by RT-PCR in cloned bovine mammary epithelial cells (bMEC) and in the bovine mammary gland at various stages of lactation. Oleate and linoleate caused an increase in intracellular Ca{sup 2+} concentrations in these cells, and significantly reduced forskolin-induced cAMP concentrations. Phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2 and Akt kinase, which regulates cell proliferation and survival, was rapidly increased by oleate. Incubation with oleate and linoleate for 24 h significantly promoted cell proliferation. Moreover, in serum-free medium, oleate significantly stimulated cell proliferation during a 7-day culture. These results suggest that bGPR40 mediates LCFA signaling in mammary epithelial cells and thereby plays an important role in cell proliferation and survival.

  10. Cytokinin signaling regulates pavement cell morphogenesis in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongjiang; Xu, Tongda; Lin, Deshu; Wen, Mingzhang; Xie, Mingtang; Duclercq, Jérôme; Bielach, Agnieszka; Kim, Jungmook; Reddy, G Venugopala; Zuo, Jianru; Benková, Eva; Friml, Jiří; Guo, Hongwei; Yang, Zhenbiao

    2013-02-01

    The puzzle piece-shaped Arabidopsis leaf pavement cells (PCs) with interdigitated lobes and indents is a good model system to investigate the mechanisms that coordinate cell polarity and shape formation within a tissue. Auxin has been shown to coordinate the interdigitation by activating ROP GTPase-dependent signaling pathways. To identify additional components or mechanisms, we screened for mutants with abnormal PC morphogenesis and found that cytokinin signaling regulates the PC interdigitation pattern. Reduction in cytokinin accumulation and defects in cytokinin signaling (such as in ARR7-over-expressing lines, the ahk3cre1 cytokinin receptor mutant, and the ahp12345 cytokinin signaling mutant) enhanced PC interdigitation, whereas over-production of cytokinin and over-activation of cytokinin signaling in an ARR20 over-expression line delayed or abolished PC interdigitation throughout the cotyledon. Genetic and biochemical analyses suggest that cytokinin signaling acts upstream of ROPs to suppress the formation of interdigitated pattern. Our results provide novel mechanistic understanding of the pathways controlling PC shape and uncover a new role for cytokinin signaling in cell morphogenesis.

  11. Butein sensitizes HeLa cells to cisplatin through the AKT and ERK/p38 MAPK pathways by targeting FoxO3a

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, LIRUI; YANG, XIAOFENG; LI, XU; LI, CHEN; ZHAO, LE; ZHOU, YUANYUAN; HOU, HUILIAN

    2015-01-01

    Drug resistance remains a major challenge in cancer therapy. Butein, a polyphenolic compound, has been shown to exhibit anticancer activity through the inhibition of the activation of the protein kinase B (PKB/AKT) and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways, which are two pathways known to be involved in resistance to cisplatin. Hence, we hypotheiszed that butein may be a chemosensitizer to cisplatin. In the present study, we demonstrated that butein synergistically enhanced the growth inhibitory and apoptosis-inducing effects of cisplatin on HeLa cells. Moreover, the combination of butein and cisplatin led to G1 phase arrest. We then aimed to explore the underlying mechanisms. We found that butein inhibited the activation of AKT, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERKs) and p38 kinases in the presence of cisplatin. The use of the AKT inhibitor, LY294002, in combination with cisplatin, induced an increase in apoptosis compared to treatment with cisplatin alone, although this effect was not as prominent as that exerted by butein in combination with cisplatin. Of note, the inhibition of ERK or p38 MAPK by U0126 or SB203580, respectively, decreased the apoptosis induced by cisplatin; however, enhanced apoptotic effects were observed with the use of ERK/p38 MAPK inhibitor in combination with butein. These data suggest that the AKT and ERK/p38 MAPK pathways are involved in the synergistic effects of butein and cisplatin. Furthermore, co-treatment with butein and cisplatin promoted the nuclear translocation and expression of forkhead box O3a (FoxO3 or FoxO3a). FoxO3a may be the key molecule on which these pathways converge and is thus implicated in the synergistic effects of butein and cisplatin. This was further confirmed by the RNAi-mediated suppression of FoxO3a. FoxO3a target genes involved in cell cycle progression and apoptosis were also investigated, and combined treatment with butein and cisplatin resulted in the downregulation of cyclin D1 and Bcl

  12. Vascular endothelial growth factor signaling regulates the segregation of artery and vein via ERK activity during vascular development

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Se-Hee; Schmitt, Christopher E.; Woolls, Melissa J.; Holland, Melinda B.; Kim, Jun-Dae; Jin, Suk-Won

    2013-01-25

    Highlights: ► VEGF-A signaling regulates the segregation of axial vessels. ► VEGF-A signaling is mediated by PKC and ERK in this process. ► Ectopic activation of ERK is sufficient to rescue defects in vessel segregation. -- Abstract: Segregation of two axial vessels, the dorsal aorta and caudal vein, is one of the earliest patterning events occur during development of vasculature. Despite the importance of this process and recent advances in our understanding on vascular patterning during development, molecular mechanisms that coordinate the segregation of axial vessels remain largely elusive. In this report, we find that vascular endothelial growth factor-A (Vegf-A) signaling regulates the segregation of dorsal aorta and axial vein during development. Inhibition of Vegf-A pathway components including ligand Vegf-A and its cognate receptor Kdrl, caused failure in segregation of axial vessels in zebrafish embryos. Similarly, chemical inhibition of Mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (Map2k1)/Extracellular-signal-regulated kinases (Erk) and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinases (PI3 K), which are downstream effectors of Vegf-A signaling pathway, led to the fusion of two axial vessels. Moreover, we find that restoring Erk activity by over-expression of constitutively active MEK in embryos with a reduced level of Vegf-A signaling can rescue the defects in axial vessel segregation. Taken together, our data show that segregation of axial vessels requires the function of Vegf-A signaling, and Erk may function as the major downstream effector in this process.

  13. Helicobacter pylori neutrophil-activating protein induces release of histamine and interleukin-6 through G protein-mediated MAPKs and PI3K/Akt pathways in HMC-1 cells.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Chung-Che; Kuo, Ting-Yu; Hong, Zhi-Wei; Yeh, Ying-Chieh; Shih, Kuo-Shun; Du, Shin-Yi; Fu, Hua-Wen

    2015-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori neutrophil-activating protein (HP-NAP) activates several innate leukocytes including neutrophils, monocytes, and mast cells. It has been reported that HP-NAP induces degranulation and interleukin-6 (IL-6) secretion of rat peritoneal mast cells. However, the molecular mechanism is not very clear. Here, we show that HP-NAP activates human mast cell line-1 (HMC-1) cells to secrete histamine and IL-6. The secretion depends on pertussis toxin (PTX)-sensitive heterotrimeric G proteins but not on Toll-like receptor 2. Moreover, HP-NAP induces PTX-sensitive G protein-mediated activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2), p38-mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK), and Akt in HMC-1 cells. Inhibition of ERK1/2, p38 MAPK, or phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) suppresses HP-NAP-induced release of histamine and IL-6 from HMC-1 cells. Thus, the activation of HMC-1 cells by HP-NAP is through Gi-linked G protein-coupled receptor-mediated MAPKs and PI3K/Akt pathways.

  14. Bisphosphonates and statins inhibit expression and secretion of MIP-1α via suppression of Ras/MEK/ERK/AML-1A and Ras/PI3K/Akt/AML-1A pathways.

    PubMed

    Tsubaki, Masanobu; Takeda, Tomoya; Sakamoto, Kotaro; Shimaoka, Hirotaka; Fujita, Arisa; Itoh, Tatsuki; Imano, Motohiro; Mashimo, Kenji; Fujiwara, Daiichiro; Sakaguchi, Katsuhiko; Satou, Takao; Nishida, Shozo

    2015-01-01

    Osteolytic bone disease in multiple myeloma (MM) is associated with upregulated osteoclast activity. Macrophage inflammatory protein-1α (MIP-1α) is crucially involved in the development of osteolytic bone lesions in MM. We previously reported that minodronate inhibited lipopolysaccharide-induced MIP-1α secretion in mouse myeloma cells. However, it remains unknown whether bisphosphonates and statins inhibit MIP-1α secretion by human MM cells. In present study, we investigated whether bisphosphonates and statins had any inhibitory effect on MIP-1α secretion by human myeloma cells and the mechanism underlying this effect. In this study, we found that bisphosphonates and statins inhibited MIP-1α mRNA and MIP-1α secretion and suppressed extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) and Akt phosphorylation by inhibiting Ras prenylation. Moreover, bisphosphonates and statins suppressed the expression of acute myeloid leukemia-1A (AML-1A) mRNA, a MIP-1α transcription factor. These results indicate that bisphosphonates and statins suppress the Ras/mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase/ERK/AML-1A and Ras/phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase/Akt/AML-1A pathways, thereby inhibiting MIP-1α secretion by MM cells. Therefore, use of MIP-1α expression inhibitors such as bisphosphonates and statins may provide a new therapeutic approach to inhibiting tumour progression and bone destruction in MM patients.

  15. Tissue plasminogen activator induces microglial inflammation via a noncatalytic molecular mechanism involving activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases and Akt signaling pathways and AnnexinA2 and Galectin-1 receptors.

    PubMed

    Pineda, David; Ampurdanés, Coral; Medina, Manel G; Serratosa, Joan; Tusell, Josep Maria; Saura, Josep; Planas, Anna M; Navarro, Pilar

    2012-04-01

    Inflammatory responses mediated by glial cells play a critical role in many pathological situations related to neurodegeneration such as Alzheimer's disease. Tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) is a serine protease which best-known function is fibrinolysis, but it is also involved in many other physiological and pathological events as microglial activation. Here, we found that tPA is required for Aβ-mediated microglial inflammatory response and tumor necrosis factor-α release. We further investigated the molecular mechanism responsible for tPA-mediated microglial activation. We found that tPA induces a catalytic-independent rapid and sustained activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2, Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), Akt, and p38 signaling pathways. Inhibition of ERK1/2 and JNK resulted in a strong inhibition of microglial activation, whereas Akt inhibition led to increased inflammatory response, suggesting specific functions for each signaling pathway in the regulation of microglial activation. Furthermore, we demonstrated that AnnexinA2 and Galectin-1 receptors are involved in tPA signaling and inflammatory response in glial cells. This study provides new evidences supporting that tPA plays a cytokine-like role in glial activation by triggering receptor-mediated intracellular signaling circuits and opens new therapeutic strategies for the treatment of neurological disorders in which neuroinflammation plays a pathogenic role.

  16. Rutin, A Natural Flavonoid Protects PC12 Cells Against Sodium Nitroprusside-Induced Neurotoxicity Through Activating PI3K/Akt/mTOR and ERK1/2 Pathway.

    PubMed

    Wang, Rikang; Sun, Yongbing; Huang, Hesong; Wang, Lan; Chen, Jinlong; Shen, Wei

    2015-09-01

    Free radicals induced neural damage is implicated in CNS diseases and rutin isolated form Lonicera japonica are reported to have neuroprotective activity. Previously, we confirmed that rutin exerted neuroprotective effect against sodium nitroprusside (SNP)-induced cell death in PC12 cells. However, the neuroprotective mechanism of rutin is still not fully uncovered. Here, we found that rutin significantly decreased SNP-induced reactive oxygen species in PC12 cells. Rutin reversed the declined GSH/GSSG ratio and mitochondrial membrane potential induced by SNP. Moreover, rutin activated both the protein Akt/mTOR and the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/2) signaling pathways and the neuroprotective effects of rutin were blocked by either the specific PI3K inhibitor LY294002 or the MAPK pathway inhibitor PD98059. In summary, these results demonstrated that the neuroprotective effects of rutin might be through activating both the PI3K/Akt/mTOR and ERK1/2 signaling pathways. Our findings support that rutin may have therapeutic potential for the treatment of CNS diseases related to NO neurotoxicity. PMID:26255195

  17. Host mTORC1 Signaling Regulates Andes Virus Replication

    PubMed Central

    McNulty, Shannon; Flint, Mike; Nichol, Stuart T.

    2013-01-01

    Hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS) is a severe respiratory disease characterized by pulmonary edema, with fatality rates of 35 to 45%. Disease occurs following infection with pathogenic New World hantaviruses, such as Andes virus (ANDV), which targets lung microvascular endothelial cells. During replication, the virus scavenges 5′-m7G caps from cellular mRNA to ensure efficient translation of viral proteins by the host cell cap-dependent translation machinery. In cells, the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) regulates the activity of host cap-dependent translation by integrating amino acid, energy, and oxygen availability signals. Since there is no approved pharmacological treatment for HPS, we investigated whether inhibitors of the mTOR pathway could reduce hantavirus infection. Here, we demonstrate that treatment with the FDA-approved rapamycin analogue temsirolimus (CCI-779) blocks ANDV protein expression and virion release but not entry into primary human microvascular endothelial cells. This effect was specific to viral proteins, as temsirolimus treatment did not block host protein synthesis. We confirmed that temsirolimus targeted host mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) and not a viral protein, as knockdown of mTORC1 and mTORC1 activators but not mTOR complex 2 components reduced ANDV replication. Additionally, primary fibroblasts from a patient with tuberous sclerosis exhibited increased mTORC1 activity and increased ANDV protein expression, which were blocked following temsirolimus treatment. Finally, we show that ANDV glycoprotein Gn colocalized with mTOR and lysosomes in infected cells. Together, these data demonstrate that mTORC1 signaling regulates ANDV replication and suggest that the hantavirus Gn protein may modulate mTOR and lysosomal signaling during infection, thus bypassing the cellular regulation of translation. PMID:23135723

  18. Hedgehog signaling regulates liver sinusoidal endothelial cell capillarisation

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Guanhua; Choi, Steve S.; Syn, Wing-Kin; Michelotti, Gregory A.; Swiderska-Syn, Marzena; Karaca, Gamze; Chan, Isaac S.; Chen, Yuping; Diehl, Anna Mae

    2013-01-01

    Objective Vascular remodeling during liver damage involves loss of healthy liver sinusoidal endothelial cell (LSEC) phenotype via capillarisation. Hedgehog (Hh) signaling regulates vascular development and increases during liver injury. Therefore, we examined its role in capillarisation. Design Primary LSEC were cultured for 5 days to induce capillarisation. Pharmacologic, antibody-mediated, and genetic approaches were used to manipulate Hh signaling. Effects on mRNA and protein expression of Hh-regulated genes and capillarisation markers were evaluated by qRT-PCR and immunoblot. Changes in LSEC function were assessed by migration and tube forming assay, and gain/loss of fenestrae was examined by electron microscopy. Mice with acute or chronic liver injury were treated with Hh inhibitors; effects on capillarisation were assessed by immunohistochemistry. Results Freshly isolated LSEC expressed Hh ligands, Hh receptors, and Hh ligand antagonist Hhip. Capillarisation was accompanied by repression of Hhip and increased expression of Hh-regulated genes. Treatment with Hh agonist further induced expression of Hh ligands and Hh-regulated genes, and up-regulated capillarisation-associated genes; whereas Hh signaling antagonist or Hh ligand neutralizing antibody each repressed expression of Hh target genes and capillarisation markers. LSEC isolated from SmoloxP/loxP transgenic mice that had been infected with adenovirus expressing Cre-recombinase to delete Smoothened showed over 75% knockdown of Smoothened. During culture, Smoothened-deficient LSEC had inhibited Hh signaling, less induction of capillarisation-associated genes, and retention of fenestrae. In mice with injured livers, inhibiting Hh signaling prevented capillarisation. Conclusions LSEC produce and respond to Hh ligands, and use Hh signaling to regulate complex phenotypic changes that occur during capillarisation. PMID:22362915

  19. Stability and function of adult vasculature is sustained by Akt/Jagged1 signalling axis in endothelium.

    PubMed

    Kerr, Bethany A; West, Xiaoxia Z; Kim, Young-Woong; Zhao, Yongzhong; Tischenko, Miroslava; Cull, Rebecca M; Phares, Timothy W; Peng, Xiao-Ding; Bernier-Latmani, Jeremiah; Petrova, Tatiana V; Adams, Ralf H; Hay, Nissim; Naga Prasad, Sathyamangla V; Byzova, Tatiana V

    2016-01-01

    The signalling pathways operational in quiescent, post-development vasculature remain enigmatic. Here we show that unlike neovascularization, endothelial Akt signalling in established vasculature is crucial not for endothelial cell (EC) survival, but for sustained interactions with pericytes and vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) regulating vascular stability and function. Inducible endothelial-specific Akt1 deletion in adult global Akt2KO mice triggers progressive VSMC apoptosis. In hearts, this causes a loss of arteries and arterioles and, despite a high capillary density, diminished vascular patency and severe cardiac dysfunction. Similarly, endothelial Akt deletion induces retinal VSMC loss and basement membrane deterioration resulting in vascular regression and retinal atrophy. Mechanistically, the Akt/mTOR axis controls endothelial Jagged1 expression and, thereby, Notch signalling regulating VSMC maintenance. Jagged1 peptide treatment of Akt1ΔEC;Akt2KO mice and Jagged1 re-expression in Akt-deficient endothelium restores VSMC coverage. Thus, sustained endothelial Akt1/2 signalling is critical in maintaining vascular stability and homeostasis, thereby preserving tissue and organ function. PMID:26971877

  20. Stability and function of adult vasculature is sustained by Akt/Jagged1 signalling axis in endothelium

    PubMed Central

    Kerr, Bethany A.; West, Xiaoxia Z.; Kim, Young-Woong; Zhao, Yongzhong; Tischenko, Miroslava; Cull, Rebecca M.; Phares, Timothy W.; Peng, Xiao-Ding; Bernier-Latmani, Jeremiah; Petrova, Tatiana V.; Adams, Ralf H.; Hay, Nissim; Naga Prasad, Sathyamangla V.; Byzova, Tatiana V.

    2016-01-01

    The signalling pathways operational in quiescent, post-development vasculature remain enigmatic. Here we show that unlike neovascularization, endothelial Akt signalling in established vasculature is crucial not for endothelial cell (EC) survival, but for sustained interactions with pericytes and vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) regulating vascular stability and function. Inducible endothelial-specific Akt1 deletion in adult global Akt2KO mice triggers progressive VSMC apoptosis. In hearts, this causes a loss of arteries and arterioles and, despite a high capillary density, diminished vascular patency and severe cardiac dysfunction. Similarly, endothelial Akt deletion induces retinal VSMC loss and basement membrane deterioration resulting in vascular regression and retinal atrophy. Mechanistically, the Akt/mTOR axis controls endothelial Jagged1 expression and, thereby, Notch signalling regulating VSMC maintenance. Jagged1 peptide treatment of Akt1ΔEC;Akt2KO mice and Jagged1 re-expression in Akt-deficient endothelium restores VSMC coverage. Thus, sustained endothelial Akt1/2 signalling is critical in maintaining vascular stability and homeostasis, thereby preserving tissue and organ function. PMID:26971877

  1. Integrin signalling regulates YAP and TAZ to control skin homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Elbediwy, Ahmed; Vincent-Mistiaen, Zoé I.; Spencer-Dene, Bradley; Stone, Richard K.; Boeing, Stefan; Wculek, Stefanie K.; Cordero, Julia; Tan, Ee H.; Ridgway, Rachel; Brunton, Val G.; Sahai, Erik; Gerhardt, Holger; Behrens, Axel; Malanchi, Ilaria; Sansom, Owen J.; Thompson, Barry J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The skin is a squamous epithelium that is continuously renewed by a population of basal layer stem/progenitor cells and can heal wounds. Here, we show that the transcription regulators YAP and TAZ localise to the nucleus in the basal layer of skin and are elevated upon wound healing. Skin-specific deletion of both YAP and TAZ in adult mice slows proliferation of basal layer cells, leads to hair loss and impairs regeneration after wounding. Contact with the basal extracellular matrix and consequent integrin-Src signalling is a key determinant of the nuclear localisation of YAP/TAZ in basal layer cells and in skin tumours. Contact with the basement membrane is lost in differentiating daughter cells, where YAP and TAZ become mostly cytoplasmic. In other types of squamous epithelia and squamous cell carcinomas, a similar control mechanism is present. By contrast, columnar epithelia differentiate an apical domain that recruits CRB3, Merlin (also known as NF2), KIBRA (also known as WWC1) and SAV1 to induce Hippo signalling and retain YAP/TAZ in the cytoplasm despite contact with the basal layer extracellular matrix. When columnar epithelial tumours lose their apical domain and become invasive, YAP/TAZ becomes nuclear and tumour growth becomes sensitive to the Src inhibitor Dasatinib. PMID:26989177

  2. 1,2,3,4,6-penta-O-galloyl-β-D-glucose protects PC12 Cells from MPP(+)-mediated cell death by inducing heme oxygenase-1 in an ERK- and Akt-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hong; Li, Hongge; Cao, Fei; Zhen, Lan; Bai, Jing; Yuan, Shijin; Mei, Yuanwu

    2012-10-01

    This study examined the ability of 1,2,3,4,6-penta-O-galloyl-β-D-glucose (β-PGG) to induce the expression of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) in the PC12 cells and its regulation in the PC12 cells. One week before treatment with the drug, nerve growth factor (NGF) was added to the cultures at a final concentration of 50 ng/mL to induce neuronal differentiation. After drug treatment, HO-1 gene transcription was analyzed by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Expression of HO-1 and NF-E2-related factor2 (Nrf2) and activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and Akt were detected by Western blotting. The viability of the PC12 cells treated with different medicines was examined by MTT assay. The oxidative stress in the PC12 cells was evaluated qualitatively and quantitatively by DCFH-DA. The results showed that β-PGG up-regulated HO-1 expression and this increased expression provided neuroprotection against MPP(+)-induced oxidative injury. Moreover, β-PGG induced Nrf2 nuclear translocation, which was found to be upstream of β-PGG-induced HO-1 expression, and the activation of ERK and Akt, a pathway that is involved in β-PGG-induced Nrf2 nuclear translocation, HO-1 expression and neuroprotection. In conclusion, β-PGG up-regulates HO-1 expression by stimulating Nrf2 nuclear translocation in an ERK- and Akt-dependent manner, and HO-1 expression by β-PGG may provide the PC12 cells with an acquired antioxidant defense capacity to survive the oxidative stress.

  3. Antiviral Potential of ERK/MAPK and PI3K/AKT/mTOR Signaling Modulation for Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus Infection as Identified by Temporal Kinome Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ork, Britini; Hart, Brit J.; Holbrook, Michael R.; Frieman, Matthew B.; Traynor, Dawn; Johnson, Reed F.; Dyall, Julie; Olinger, Gene G.; Hensley, Lisa E.

    2014-01-01

    Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) is a lineage C betacoronavirus, and infections with this virus can result in acute respiratory syndrome with renal failure. Globally, MERS-CoV has been responsible for 877 laboratory-confirmed infections, including 317 deaths, since September 2012. As there is a paucity of information regarding the molecular pathogenesis associated with this virus or the identities of novel antiviral drug targets, we performed temporal kinome analysis on human hepatocytes infected with the Erasmus isolate of MERS-CoV with peptide kinome arrays. bioinformatics analysis of our kinome data, including pathway overrepresentation analysis (ORA) and functional network analysis, suggested that extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)/mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and phosphoinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/serine-threonine kinase (AKT)/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling responses were specifically modulated in response to MERS-CoV infection in vitro throughout the course of infection. The overrepresentation of specific intermediates within these pathways determined by pathway and functional network analysis of our kinome data correlated with similar patterns of phosphorylation determined through Western blot array analysis. In addition, analysis of the effects of specific kinase inhibitors on MERS-CoV infection in tissue culture models confirmed these cellular response observations. Further, we have demonstrated that a subset of licensed kinase inhibitors targeting the ERK/MAPK and PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathways significantly inhibited MERS-CoV replication in vitro whether they were added before or after viral infection. Taken together, our data suggest that ERK/MAPK and PI3K/AKT/mTOR signaling responses play important roles in MERS-CoV infection and may represent novel drug targets for therapeutic intervention strategies. PMID:25487801

  4. Compensation of the AKT signaling by ERK signaling in transgenic mice hearts overexpressing TRIM72

    SciTech Connect

    Ham, Young-Mi; Mahoney, Sarah Jane

    2013-06-10

    The AKT and ERK signaling pathways are known to be involved in cell hypertrophy, proliferation, survival and differentiation. Although there is evidence for crosstalk between these two signaling pathways in cellulo, there is less evidence for cross talk in vivo. Here, we show that crosstalk between AKT and ERK signaling in the hearts of TRIM72-overexpressing transgenic mice (TRIM72-Tg) with alpha-MHC promoter regulates and maintains their heart size. TRIM72, a heart- and skeletal muscle-specific protein, downregulates AKT-mTOR signaling via IRS-1 degradation and reduces the size of rat cardiomyocytes and the size of postnatal TRIM72-Tg hearts. TRIM72 expression was upregulated by hypertrophic inducers in cardiomyocytes, while IRS-1 was downregulated by IGF-1. TRIM72 specifically regulated IGF-1-dependent AKT-mTOR signaling, resulting in a reduction of the size of cardiomyocytes. Postnatal TRIM72-Tg hearts were smaller than control-treated hearts with inhibition of AKT-mTOR signaling. However, adult TRIM72-Tg hearts were larger than of control despite the suppression of AKT-mTOR signaling. Activation of ERK, PKC-α, and JNK were observed to be elevated in adult TRIM72-Tg, and these signals were mediated by ET-1 via the ET receptors A and B. Altogether, these results suggest that AKT signaling regulates cardiac hypertrophy in physiological conditions, and ERK signaling compensates for the absence of AKT signaling during TRIM72 overexpression, leading to pathological hypertrophy. -- Highlights: • TRIM72 inhibits AKT signaling through ubiquitination of IRS-1 in cardiac cells. • TRIM72 regulates the size of cardiac cells. • TRIM72 regulates size of postnatal TRIM72-overexpressing transgenic mice hearts. • Adult TRIM72-overexpressing transgenic mice hearts showed cardiac dysfunction. • Adult TRIM72 transgenic mice hearts showed higher expression of endothelin receptors.

  5. Calcitriol transmembrane signalling: regulation of rat muscle phospholipase D activity.

    PubMed

    Facchinetti, M M; Boland, R; de Boland, A R

    1998-01-01

    In rat skeletal muscle, calcitriol, the hormonal form of vitamin D3, rapidly stimulates the biphasic formation of diacylglycerol (DAG), the second phase being independent of phosphoinositide hydrolysis driven by phospholipase C. In this work we showed that the effect of calcitriol on the second phase of DAG formation was totally inhibited in the absence of extracellular Ca2+ and by the Ca2+-channel blockers nifedipine and verapamil, whereas the Ca2+ ionophore A23184, similar to calcitriol, increased DAG formation by 100%. GTPgammaS, which activates G protein-mediated signals, mimicked the effects of the hormone while GDPbetaS, an inhibitor of G proteins, suppressed calcitriol-induced DAG formation. To elucidate the metabolic pathway of the late phase of DAG production, we examined the contribution of phospholipase D (PLD), which acts on phosphatidylcholine (PC) generating phosphatidic acid that is converted to DAG by a phosphatidate phosphohydrolase. In [3H]arachidonate-labeled muscle, calcitriol increased [3H]phosphatidylethanol (PEt) formation in the presence of ethanol, a reaction specific for PLD. The effects of the hormone were time- and dose-dependent with maximum PEt levels achieved at 10(-9) M. The phorbol ester TPA also stimulated PEt formation. The combination of calcitriol and TPA was more effective than either compound alone. In rat muscle, calcitriol increased PKC activity in a time-dependent fashion. Bisindolymaleimide, a selective inhibitor of the enzyme, completely suppressed TPA-induced PEt and attenuated the effects of the hormone. These results provide the first evidence concerning calcitriol stimulation of the hydrolysis of PC in a mammalian tissue through a phospholipase D catalyzed mechanism involving Ca2+, protein kinase C, and G proteins.

  6. Allicin inhibits oxidative stress-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and apoptosis by promoting PI3K/AKT and CREB/ERK signaling in osteoblast cells

    PubMed Central

    DING, GUOLIANG; ZHAO, JIANQUAN; JIANG, DIANMING

    2016-01-01

    Osteoporosis is a disease of the skeleton that is characterized by the loss of bone mass and degeneration of bone microstructure, resulting in an increased risk of fracture. Oxidative stress, which is known to promote oxidative damage to mitochondrial function and also cell apoptosis, has been recently indicated to be implicated in osteoporosis. However, there are few agents that counteract oxidative stress in osteoporosis. In the present study, the protective effects of allicin against the oxidative stress-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and apoptosis were investigated in murine osteoblast-like MC3T3-E1 cells. The results demonstrated that allicin counteracted the reduction of cell viability and induction of apoptosis caused by hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) exposure. The inhibition of apoptosis by allicin was confirmed by the inhibition of H2O2-induced cytochrome c release and caspase-3 activation. Moreover, the inhibition of apoptosis by allicin was identified to be associated with the counteraction of H2O2-induced mitochondrial dysfunction. In addition, allicin was demonstrated to be able to significantly ameliorate the repressed phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/AKT and cyclic adenosine monophosphate response element-binding protein (CREB)/extracellular-signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signaling pathways by H2O2, which may also be associated with the anti-oxidative stress effects of allicin. In conclusion, allicin protects osteoblasts from H2O2-induced oxidative stress and apoptosis in MC3T3-E1 cells by improving mitochondrial function and the activation of PI3K/AKT and CREB/ERK signaling. The present study implies a promising role of allicin in oxidative stress-associated osteoporosis. PMID:27284348

  7. Estrogen modulation of the ethanol-evoked myocardial oxidative stress and dysfunction via DAPK3/Akt/ERK activation in male rats

    SciTech Connect

    El-Mas, Mahmoud M. Abdel-Rahman, Abdel A.

    2015-09-15

    Evidence suggests that male rats are protected against the hypotensive and myocardial depressant effects of ethanol compared with females. We investigated whether E{sub 2} modifies the myocardial and oxidative effects of ethanol in male rats. Conscious male rats received ethanol (0.5, 1 or 1.5 g/kg i.v.) 30-min after E{sub 2} (1 μg/kg i.v.) or its vehicle (saline), and hearts were collected at the conclusion of hemodynamic measurements for ex vivo molecular studies. Ethanol had no effect in vehicle-treated rats, but it caused dose-related reductions in LV developed pressure (LVDP), end-diastolic pressure (LVEDP), rate of rise in LV pressure (dP/dt{sub max}) and systolic (SBP) and diastolic (DBP) blood pressures in E{sub 2}-pretreated rats. These effects were associated with elevated (i) indices of reactive oxygen species (ROS), (ii) malondialdehyde (MDA) protein adducts, and (iii) phosphorylated death-associated protein kinase-3 (DAPK3), Akt, and extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK1/2). Enhanced myocardial anti-oxidant enzymes (heme oxygenase-1, catalase and aldehyde dehydrogenase 2) activities were also demonstrated. In conclusion, E{sub 2} promotes ethanol-evoked myocardial oxidative stress and dysfunction in male rats. The present findings highlight the risk of developing myocardial dysfunction in men who consume alcohol while receiving E{sub 2} for specific medical conditions. - Highlights: • Ethanol lowers blood pressure and causes LV dysfunction in E{sub 2}-treated rats. • E{sub 2}/ethanol aggravates cardiac oxidative state via of DAPK3/Akt/ERK activation. • E{sub 2}/ethanol causes a feedback increase in cardiac HO-1, catalase and ALDH2. • Alcohol might increase risk of myocardial dysfunction in men treated with E{sub 2}.

  8. Beta-sitosterol-induced-apoptosis is mediated by the activation of ERK and the downregulation of Akt in MCA-102 murine fibrosarcoma cells.

    PubMed

    Moon, Dong-Oh; Lee, Kyeong-Jun; Choi, Yung Hyun; Kim, Gi-Young

    2007-08-01

    Beta-sitosterol (SITO) is a potential candidate for cancer chemotherapy, however, little is known about the cellular and molecular mechanisms in cancer cells. We herein identified how SITO induces anti-proliferation and cell death in MCA-102 fibrosarcoma cells. SITO exposure induced-apoptosis and the cell death resulted from a significant loss of the Bcl-2 and the inhibitor of apoptosis protein (IAP) family (XIAP, cIAP-1 and cIAP-2), and increased Bax with an alteration of p53 and p21. SITO-induced cell death significantly also increased caspase activity and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) cleavage, and caspase-3 inhibitor z-DEVD-fmk significantly inhibited SITO-induced cell death. These data suggest that the activation of caspase-3 is associated with SITO-induced-apoptosis. Treatment with SITO also induced phosphorylation of extracellular-signal regulating kinase (ERK) and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MARK), but not c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK). A specific ERK inhibitor PD98059 significantly blocks SITO-induced-apoptosis, whereas a JNK inhibitor SP600125 has no affect. A p38 MAPK inhibitor SB203580 very slightly suppressed cell death. The induction of apoptosis was also accompanied by an inactivation of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt, and PI3K inhibitor LY29004 significantly increases SITO-induced cell death. These findings provide evidence demonstrating that the proapoptotic effect of SITO is mediated through the activation of ERK and the block of the PI3K/Akt signal pathway in MCA-102 cells. Therefore, SITO has a strong potential as a therapeutic agent for preventing cancers such as fibrosarcoma.

  9. Apoptosis Induction of Human Prostate Carcinoma DU145 Cells by Diallyl Disulfide via Modulation of JNK and PI3K/AKT Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Dong Yeok; Kim, Gi-Young; Lee, Jun Hyuk; Choi, Byung Tae; Yoo, Young Hyun; Choi, Yung Hyun

    2012-01-01

    Diallyl disulfide (DADS), a sulfur compound derived from garlic, has various biological properties, such as anticancer, antiangiogenic and anti-inflammatory effects. However, the mechanisms of action underlying the compound’s anticancer activity have not been fully elucidated. In this study, the apoptotic effects of DADS were investigated in DU145 human prostate carcinoma cells. Our results showed that DADS markedly inhibited the growth of the DU145 cells by induction of apoptosis. Apoptosis was accompanied by modulation of Bcl-2 and inhibitor of apoptosis protein (IAP) family proteins, depolarization of the mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP, ΔΨm) and proteolytic activation of caspases. We also found that the expression of death-receptor 4 (DR4) and Fas ligand (FasL) proteins was increased and that the level of intact Bid proteins was down-regulated by DADS. Moreover, treatment with DADS induced phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), including extracellular-signal regulating kinase (ERK), p38 MAPK and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK). A specific JNK inhibitor, SP600125, significantly blocked DADS-induced-apoptosis, whereas inhibitors of the ERK (PD98059) and p38 MAPK (SB203580) had no effect. The induction of apoptosis was also accompanied by inactivation of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt and the PI3K inhibitor LY29004 significantly increased DADS-induced cell death. These findings provide evidence demonstrating that the proapoptotic effect of DADS is mediated through the activation of JNK and the inhibition of the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway in DU145 cells. PMID:23203057

  10. Anticancer Activity of Buttermilk Against SW480 Colon Cancer Cells is Associated with Caspase-Independent Cell Death and Attenuation of Wnt, Akt, and ERK Signaling.

    PubMed

    Kuchta-Noctor, Anna M; Murray, Brian A; Stanton, Catherine; Devery, Rosaleen; Kelly, Phil M

    2016-10-01

    Buttermilk is a rich source of milk fat globule membrane (MFGM) fragments assembled from bioactive polar lipids and proteins that originate from bovine mammary epithelial cells. The objective of this study was to examine growth-modulatory effects of experimental buttermilks varying in sphingolipid and phospholipid composition on a colon cancer cell line of human origin. Buttermilks were prepared from washed and unwashed cream using gravity or centrifugation. Compositional analysis showed that sphingomyelin (SM) (10.4-29.5%) and lactosylceramide (LacCer) (1.2-44.3%) were the predominant sphingolipids detected. Experimental samples inhibited in vitro growth of SW480 colon cancer cells in a dose-dependent manner. Antiproliferative activity was selective toward cancer cells. A fraction enriched in LacCer (44.3%), obtained by microfiltration induced caspase-independent cell death as evident by phosphatidylserine externalization, increased percentage of degraded DNA, and loss of mitochondrial membrane potential in SW480 cells. This fraction downregulated growth-signaling pathways mediated by β-catenin, phosphorylated Akt (serine/threonine-specific protein kinase), ERK1/2 (extracellular signal-regulated kinase), and c-myc. This study is to our knowledge the first to screen buttermilk samples that vary in polar lipid composition for antiproliferative activity in vitro. PMID:27472445

  11. Estrogen modulation of the ethanol-evoked myocardial oxidative stress and dysfunction via DAPK3/Akt/ERK activation in male rats.

    PubMed

    El-Mas, Mahmoud M; Abdel-Rahman, Abdel A

    2015-09-15

    Evidence suggests that male rats are protected against the hypotensive and myocardial depressant effects of ethanol compared with females. We investigated whether E2 modifies the myocardial and oxidative effects of ethanol in male rats. Conscious male rats received ethanol (0.5, 1 or 1.5g/kg i.v.) 30-min after E2 (1μg/kg i.v.) or its vehicle (saline), and hearts were collected at the conclusion of hemodynamic measurements for ex vivo molecular studies. Ethanol had no effect in vehicle-treated rats, but it caused dose-related reductions in LV developed pressure (LVDP), end-diastolic pressure (LVEDP), rate of rise in LV pressure (dP/dtmax) and systolic (SBP) and diastolic (DBP) blood pressures in E2-pretreated rats. These effects were associated with elevated (i) indices of reactive oxygen species (ROS), (ii) malondialdehyde (MDA) protein adducts, and (iii) phosphorylated death-associated protein kinase-3 (DAPK3), Akt, and extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK1/2). Enhanced myocardial anti-oxidant enzymes (heme oxygenase-1, catalase and aldehyde dehydrogenase 2) activities were also demonstrated. In conclusion, E2 promotes ethanol-evoked myocardial oxidative stress and dysfunction in male rats. The present findings highlight the risk of developing myocardial dysfunction in men who consume alcohol while receiving E2 for specific medical conditions.

  12. Dihydrotestosterone induces SREBP-1 expression and lipogenesis through the phosphoinositide 3-kinase/Akt pathway in HaCaT cells

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects and mechanisms of dihydrotestosterone (DHT)-induced expression of sterol regulatory element binding protein-1 (SREBP-1), and the synthesis and secretion of lipids, in HaCaT cells. HaCaT cells were treated with DHT and either the phosphoinositide 3-kinase inhibitor LY294002 or the extracellular-signal-regulated kinase (ERK) inhibitor PD98059. Real time-PCR, Western blot, Oil Red staining and flow cytometry were employed to examine the mRNA and protein expressions of SREBP-1, the gene transcription of lipid synthesis, and lipid secretion in HaCaT cells. Findings We found that DHT upregulated mRNA and protein expressions of SREBP-1. DHT also significantly upregulated the transcription of lipid synthesis-related genes and increased lipid secretion, which can be inhibited by the addition of LY294002. Conclusions Collectively, these results indicate that DHT induces SREBP-1 expression and lipogenesis in HaCaT cells via activation of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase/Akt Pathway. PMID:23153363

  13. AKT mediated glycolytic shift regulates autophagy in classically activated macrophages.

    PubMed

    Matta, Sumit Kumar; Kumar, Dhiraj

    2015-09-01

    Autophagy is considered as an innate defense mechanism primarily due to its role in the targeting of intracellular pathogens for lysosomal degradation. Here we report inhibition of autophagy as an adaptive response in classically activated macrophages that helps achieve high cellular ROS production and cell death-another hallmark of innate mechanisms. We show prolonged classical activation of Raw 264.7 macrophages by treating them with IFN-γ and LPS inhibited autophagy. The inhibition of autophagy was dependent on nitric oxide (NO) production which activated the AKT-mTOR signaling, the known negative regulators of autophagy. Autophagy inhibition in these cells was accompanied with a shift to aerobic glycolysis along with a decline in the mitochondrial membrane potential (MOMP). The decline in MOMP coupled with autophagy inhibition led to increased mitochondrial content and considerably elevated cellular ROS, eventually causing cell death. Next, using specific siRNA mediated knockdowns we show AKT was responsible for the glycolytic shift and autophagy inhibition in activated macrophages. Surprisingly, AKT knockdown in activated macrophages also rescued them from cell death. Finally we show that AKT mediated autophagy inhibition in the activated macrophages correlated with the depletion of glucose from the extracellular medium, and glucose supplementation not only rescued autophagy levels and reversed other phenotypes of activated macrophages, but also inhibited cell death. Thus we report here a novel link between AKT mediated glycolytic metabolism and autophagy in the activated macrophages, and provide a possible mechanism for sustained macrophage activation in vivo.

  14. Activation of PI3K/Akt pathway limits JNK-mediated apoptosis during EV71 infection.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hua; Li, Fengqi; Pan, Ziye; Wu, Zhijun; Wang, Yanhong; Cui, Yudong

    2014-11-01

    Apoptosis is frequently induced to inhibit virus replication during infection of Enterovirus 71 (EV71). On the contrary, anti-apoptotic pathway, such as PI3K/Akt pathway, is simultaneously exploited by EV71 to accomplish the viral life cycle. The relationship by which EV71-induced apoptosis and PI3K/Akt signaling pathway remains to be elucidated. In this study, we demonstrated that EV71 infection altered Bax conformation and triggered its redistribution from the cytosol to mitochondria in RD cells. Subsequently, cytochrome c was released from mitochondria to cytosol. We also found that c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) was activated during EV71 infection. The JNK specific inhibitor significantly inhibited Bax activation and cytochrome c release, suggesting that EV71-induced apoptosis was involved into a JNK-dependent manner. Meanwhile, EV71-induced Akt phosphorylation involved a PI3K-dependent mechanism. Inhibition of the PI3K/Akt pathway enhanced JNK phosphorylation and the JNK-mediated apoptosis upon EV71 infection. Moreover, PI3K/Akt pathway phosphorylated apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 (ASK1) and negatively regulated the ASK1 activity. Knockdown of ASK1 significantly decreased JNK phosphorylation, which implied that ASK1 phosphorylation by Akt inhibited ASK1-mediated JNK activation. Collectively, these data reveal that activation of the PI3K/Akt pathway limits JNK-mediated apoptosis by phosphorylating and inactivating ASK1 during EV71 infection.

  15. Extracellular ATP

    PubMed Central

    Chivasa, Stephen; Tomé, Daniel FA; Murphy, Alex M; Hamilton, John M; Lindsey, Keith; Carr, John P

    2009-01-01

    Living organisms acquire or synthesize high energy molecules, which they frugally conserve and use to meet their cellular metabolic demands. Therefore, it is surprising that ATP, the most accessible and commonly utilized chemical energy carrier, is actively secreted to the extracellular matrix of cells. It is now becoming clear that in plants this extracellular ATP (eATP) is not wasted, but harnessed at the cell surface to signal across the plasma membrane of the secreting cell and neighboring cells to cxontrol gene expression and influence plant development. Identification of the gene/protein networks regulated by eATP-mediated signaling should provide insight into the physiological roles of eATP in plants. By disrupting eATP-mediated signaling, we have identified pathogen defense genes as part of the eATP-regulated gene circuitry, leading us to the discovery that eATP is a negative regulator of pathogen defense in plants.1 Previously, we reported that eATP is a key signal molecule that modulates programmed cell death in plants.2 A complex picture is now emerging, in which eATP-mediated signaling cross-talks with signaling mediated by the major plant defense hormone, salicylic acid, in the regulation of pathogen defense and cell death. PMID:20009563

  16. Insulin reveals Akt signaling as a novel regulator of norepinephrine transporter trafficking and norepinephrine homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, Sabrina D.; Matthies, Heinrich J.G.; Owens, Anthony W.; Sathananthan, Vidiya; Bibus Christianson, Nicole S.; Kennedy, J. Phillip; Lindsley, Craig W.; Daws, Lynette C.; Galli, Aurelio

    2010-01-01

    Noradrenergic signaling in the central nervous system plays an essential role in circuits involving attention, mood, memory, and stress as well as providing pivotal support for autonomic function in the peripheral nervous system. The high affinity norepinephrine (NE) transporter (NET) is the primary mechanism by which noradrenergic synaptic transmission is terminated. Data indicates that NET function is regulated by insulin, a hormone critical for the regulation of metabolism. Given the high co-morbidity of metabolic disorders such as diabetes and obesity with mental disorders such as depression and schizophrenia we sought to determine how insulin signaling regulates NET function and thus noradrenergic homeostasis. Here, we show that acute insulin treatment, through the downstream kinase protein kinase B (Akt), significantly decreases NET surface expression in mouse hippocampal slices and superior cervical ganglion neuron (SCGN) boutons (sites of synaptic NE release). In vivo manipulation of insulin/Akt signaling, with streptozotocin (STZ), a drug that induces a Type 1-like diabetic state in mice, also results in aberrant NET function and NE homeostasis. Notably, we also demonstrate that Akt inhibition or stimulation, independent of insulin, is capable of altering NET surface availability. These data suggest that aberrant states of Akt signaling such as in diabetes and obesity have the potential to alter NET function and noradrenergic tone in the brain. Furthermore, they provide one potential molecular mechanism by which Akt, a candidate gene for mood disorders such as schizophrenia and depression, can impact brain monoamine homeostasis. PMID:20739551

  17. MYOCARDIAL AKT: THE OMNIPRESENT NEXUS

    PubMed Central

    Sussman, Mark A.; Völkers, Mirko; Fischer, Kimberlee; Bailey, Brandi; Cottage, Christopher T.; Din, Shabana; Gude, Natalie; Avitabile, Daniele; Alvarez, Roberto; Sundararaman, Balaji; Quijada, Pearl; Mason, Matt; Konstandin, Mathias H.; Malhowski, Amy; Cheng, Zhaokang; Khan, Mohsin; McGregor, Michael

    2013-01-01

    One of the greatest examples of integrated signal transduction is revealed by examination of effects mediated by AKT kinase in myocardial biology. Positioned at the intersection of multiple afferent and efferent signals, AKT exemplifies a molecular sensing node that coordinates dynamic responses of the cell in literally every aspect of biological responses. The balanced and nuanced nature of homeostatic signaling is particularly essential within the myocardial context, where regulation of survival, energy production, contractility, and response to pathological stress all flow through the nexus of AKT activation or repression. Equally important, the loss of regulated AKT activity is primarily the cause or consequence of pathological conditions leading to remodeling of the heart and eventual decompensation. This review presents an overview compendium of the complex world of myocardial AKT biology gleaned from more than a decade of research. Summarization of the widespread influence that AKT exerts upon myocardial responses leaves no doubt that the participation of AKT in molecular signaling will need to be reckoned with as a seemingly omnipresent regulator of myocardial molecular biological responses. PMID:21742795

  18. Ephrin-B1 forward signaling regulates craniofacial morphogenesis by controlling cell proliferation across Eph–ephrin boundaries

    PubMed Central

    Bush, Jeffrey O.; Soriano, Philippe

    2010-01-01

    Mutations in the X-linked human EPHRIN-B1 gene result in cleft palate and other craniofacial anomalies as part of craniofrontonasal syndrome (CFNS), but the molecular and developmental mechanisms by which ephrin-B1 controls the underlying developmental processes are not clear. Here we demonstrate that ephrin-B1 plays an intrinsic role in palatal shelf outgrowth in the mouse by regulating cell proliferation in the anterior palatal shelf mesenchyme. In ephrin-B1 heterozygous mutants, X inactivation generates ephrin-B1-expressing and -nonexpressing cells that sort out, resulting in mosaic ephrin-B1 expression. We now show that this process leads to mosaic disruption of cell proliferation and post-transcriptional up-regulation of EphB receptor expression through relief of endocytosis and degradation. The alteration in proliferation rates resulting from ectopic Eph–ephrin expression boundaries correlates with the more severe dysmorphogenesis of ephrin-B1+/− heterozygotes that is a hallmark of CFNS. Finally, by integrating phosphoproteomic and transcriptomic approaches, we show that ephrin-B1 controls proliferation in the palate by regulating the extracellular signal-regulated kinase/mitogen-activated protein kinase (ERK/MAPK) signal transduction pathway. PMID:20844017

  19. Transmembrane-Bound IL-15-Promoted Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition in Renal Cancer Cells Requires the Src-Dependent Akt/GSK-3β/β-Catenin Pathway.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Huaqin; Meng, Xiaoxin; Guo, Wenjie; Cai, Peifen; Li, Wanshuai; Li, Qian; Wang, Weicheng; Sun, Yang; Xu, Qiang; Gu, Yanhong

    2015-05-01

    Intrarenal interleukin-15 (IL-15) plays a major role controlling epithelial survival and polarization both in physiological and pathologic conditions. Herein, we confirmed that human renal cell carcinomas (RCCs) express a membrane-bound IL-15 isoform displaying an unusual molecular weight of 27 kDa. Its stimulation with soluble IL-15 receptor α chain (s-IL-15Rα) triggers epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) process as shown by the down-regulation of E-cadherin and zona occludens 1 and the up-regulation of vimentin and N-cadherin and promotes the migratory and invasive properties of RCC. S-IL-15Rα treatment triggered the Src/PI3K/Akt/GSK-3β pathway and promoted β-catenin nuclei translocation. Deactivation of this pathway by using Src-specific inhibitor PP2, PI3K inhibitor LY294002, and AKT inhibitor MK2206 hampered β-catenin nuclei translocation and suppressed EMT, migration, and invasion of RCC. S-IL-15Rα treatment also enhanced Src-dependent phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (Erk1/2). FAK knockdown significantly decreased the migration and invasion of RCC, which suggest that Src-FAK signaling was involved in s-IL-15Rα-favored migration and invasion of RCC. At the same time, inhibitors of Erk1/2 also significantly decreased the migration and invasion of RCC but could not reverse s-IL-15Rα-induced EMT. Taken together, our results reveal that Src-dependent PI3K/Akt/GSK3b/β-catenin pathway is required for s-IL-15Ra-dependent induction of EMT in RCC, while Src-FAK and Src-Erk1/2 signaling were involved in s-IL-15Rα-promoted migration and invasion properties of RCC. Our study provides a better understanding of IL-15 signaling in RCC tumor progression, which may lead to novel targeted therapies and provide some suggestions when using IL-15 in clinic. PMID:26025664

  20. A Homogeneous Polysaccharide from Fructus Schisandra chinensis (Turz.) Baill Induces Mitochondrial Apoptosis through the Hsp90/AKT Signalling Pathway in HepG2 Cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yonglin; Shi, Songshan; Wang, Huijun; Li, Ning; Su, Juan; Chou, Guixin; Wang, Shunchun

    2016-06-28

    According to the potential anti-hepatoma therapeutic effect of Schisandra chinensis polysaccharides presented in previous studies, a bioactive constituent, homogeneous Schisandra chinensis polysaccharide-0-1 (SCP-0-1), molecular weight (MW) circa 69.980 kDa, was isolated and purified. We assessed the efficacy of SCP-0-1 against human hepatocellular liver carcinoma (HepG2) cells to investigate the effects of its antitumour activity and molecular mechanisms. Anticancer activity was evaluated using microscopy, 3-[4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay, Hoechst 33258 staining, acridine orange (AO) staining, flow cytometry (FCM), and cell-cycle analysis. SCP-0-1 inhibited the HepG2 cells' growth via inducing apoptosis and second gap/mitosis (G2/M) arrest dose-dependently, with a half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) value of 479.63 µg/mL. Western blotting of key proteins revealed the apoptotic and autophagic potential of SCP-0-1. Besides, SCP-0-1 upregulated Bcl-2 Associated X Protein (Bax) and downregulated B-cell leukemia/lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) in the HepG2 cells. The expression of caspase-3, -8, and -9; poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP); cytochrome c (Cyt C); tumor protein 53 (p53); survivin; sequestosome 1 (p62); microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain-3B (LC3B); mitogen-activated protein kinase p38 (p38); extracellular regulated protein kinases (ERK); c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK); protein kinase B (AKT); and heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) were evaluated using Western blotting. Our findings demonstrate a novel mechanism through which SCP-0-1 exerts its antiproliferative activity and induces mitochondrial apoptosis rather than autophagy. The induction of mitochondrial apoptosis was attributed to the inhibition of the Hsp90/AKT signalling pathway in an extracellular signal-regulated kinase-independent manner. The results also provide initial evidence on a molecular basis that SCP-0-1 can be used as an anti

  1. A Homogeneous Polysaccharide from Fructus Schisandra chinensis (Turz.) Baill Induces Mitochondrial Apoptosis through the Hsp90/AKT Signalling Pathway in HepG2 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yonglin; Shi, Songshan; Wang, Huijun; Li, Ning; Su, Juan; Chou, Guixin; Wang, Shunchun

    2016-01-01

    According to the potential anti-hepatoma therapeutic effect of Schisandra chinensis polysaccharides presented in previous studies, a bioactive constituent, homogeneous Schisandra chinensis polysaccharide-0-1 (SCP-0-1), molecular weight (MW) circa 69.980 kDa, was isolated and purified. We assessed the efficacy of SCP-0-1 against human hepatocellular liver carcinoma (HepG2) cells to investigate the effects of its antitumour activity and molecular mechanisms. Anticancer activity was evaluated using microscopy, 3-[4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay, Hoechst 33258 staining, acridine orange (AO) staining, flow cytometry (FCM), and cell-cycle analysis. SCP-0-1 inhibited the HepG2 cells’ growth via inducing apoptosis and second gap/mitosis (G2/M) arrest dose-dependently, with a half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) value of 479.63 µg/mL. Western blotting of key proteins revealed the apoptotic and autophagic potential of SCP-0-1. Besides, SCP-0-1 upregulated Bcl-2 Associated X Protein (Bax) and downregulated B-cell leukemia/lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) in the HepG2 cells. The expression of caspase-3, -8, and -9; poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP); cytochrome c (Cyt C); tumor protein 53 (p53); survivin; sequestosome 1 (p62); microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain-3B (LC3B); mitogen-activated protein kinase p38 (p38); extracellular regulated protein kinases (ERK); c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK); protein kinase B (AKT); and heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) were evaluated using Western blotting. Our findings demonstrate a novel mechanism through which SCP-0-1 exerts its antiproliferative activity and induces mitochondrial apoptosis rather than autophagy. The induction of mitochondrial apoptosis was attributed to the inhibition of the Hsp90/AKT signalling pathway in an extracellular signal-regulated kinase-independent manner. The results also provide initial evidence on a molecular basis that SCP-0-1 can be used as an anti

  2. Activation of EGFR/ERBB2 via pathways involving ERK1/2, P38 MAPK, AKT and FOXO enhances recovery of diabetic hearts from ischemia-reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Akhtar, Saghir; Yousif, Mariam H M; Chandrasekhar, Bindu; Benter, Ibrahim F

    2012-01-01

    This study characterized the effects of diabetes and/or ischemia on epidermal growth factor receptor, EGFR, and/or erbB2 signaling pathways on cardiac function. Isolated heart perfusion model of global ischemia was used to study the effect of chronic inhibition or acute activation of EGFR/erbB2 signaling on cardiac function in a rat model of type-1 diabetes. Induction of diabetes with streptozotocin impaired recovery of cardiac function (cardiac contractility and hemodynamics) following 40 minutes of global ischemia in isolated hearts. Chronic treatment with AG825 or AG1478, selective inhibitors of erbB2 and EGFR respectively, did not affect hyperglycemia but led to an exacerbation whereas acute administration of the EGFR ligand, epidermal growth factor (EGF), led to an improvement in cardiac recovery in diabetic hearts. Diabetes led to attenuated dimerization and phosphorylation of cardiac erbB2 and EGFR receptors that was associated with reduced signaling via extracellular-signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2), p38 mitogen activated protein (MAP) kinase and AKT (protein kinase B). Ischemia was also associated with reduced cardiac signaling via these molecules whereas EGF-treatment opposed diabetes and/or ischemia induced changes in ERK1/2, p38 MAP kinase, and AKT-FOXO signaling. Losartan treatment improved cardiac function in diabetes but also impaired EGFR phosphorylation in diabetic heart. Co-administration of EGF rescued Losartan-mediated reduction in EGFR phosphorylation and significantly improved cardiac recovery more than with either agent alone. EGFR/erbB2 signaling is an important cardiac survival pathway whose activation, particularly in diabetes, ischemia or following treatment with drugs that inhibit this cascade, significantly improves cardiac function. These findings may have clinical relevance particularly in the treatment of diabetes-induced cardiac dysfunction.

  3. Wogonin inhibits the proliferation and invasion, and induces the apoptosis of HepG2 and Bel7402 HCC cells through NF‑κB/Bcl-2, EGFR and EGFR downstream ERK/AKT signaling.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaodong; Tian, Shuo; Liu, Mei; Jian, Lingyan; Zhao, Limei

    2016-10-01

    The anticancer effects of the natural flavonoid, wogonin, have been reported. However, its molecular mechanisms of action have not yet been fully explored. In the present study, we aimed to examine the molecular mechanisms of action of wogonin and its effects on the biological behavior of the HepG2 and Bel7402 hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cell lines. We also examined the effects of wogonin on nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB)/Bcl-2 and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling, as well as on downstream pathways of EGFR, namely extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)/AKT signaling. We found that treatment with wogonin inhibited the proliferation and invasion, and induced the apoptosis of the HepG2 and Bel7402 cells. In addition, treatment with wogonin decreased cyclin D1, cyclin E, CDK4/6, Bcl-2 and matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP2) expression, and promoted the cleavage of caspase-3 and caspase-9 in a concentration-dependent manner. Further experiments revealed that wogonin inhibited NF-κB/Bcl-2 signaling by decreasing the IκB and p65 phosphorylation levels. Wogonin also inhibited the activation of the EGFR (Tyr845) signaling pathway, and that of downstream pathways of EGFR, namely ERK/AKT/MMP2 signaling. The depletion of EGFR by siRNA partly abolished the inhibitory effects of wogonin on cyclin D1, MMP2 expression. On the whole, our our findings demonstrate that wogonin effectively suppresses the proliferation, invasion and survival of HCC cells through the modulation of the NF-κB and EGFR signaling pathways.

  4. Anti-inflammatory effects of egg white combined with chalcanthite in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated BV2 microglia through the inhibition of NF-κB, MAPK and PI3K/Akt signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Choi, Eun A; Park, Hye Young; Yoo, Hwa-Seung; Choi, Yung Hyun

    2013-01-01

    Egg white-chalcanthite (EWCC) is a mixture of egg white and chalcanthite prepared by roasting chalcanthite (which is a natural mineral mainly composed of CuSO4•5H2O) to the point of dehydration, pulverizing the dehydrated chalcanthite and then mixing the pulverized chalcanthite to react with egg white to trigger a reaction. When egg white-chalcanthite is prepared in this manner, the toxicity of chalcanthite is neutralized by the egg white, so that the toxicity is reduced or removed and the pharmaceutical properties are increased. However, the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying the pharmacological activity of EWCC remain poorly understood. In this study, we investigated the inhibitory effects of EWCC on the production of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced pro-inflammatory mediators in BV2 microglia. Our data indicated that the EWCC treatment significantly inhibited the excessive production of nitric oxide and prostaglandin E2 in LPS-stimulated BV2 microglia in a concentration-dependent manner without causing cytotoxicity. It also attenuated the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase, cyclooxygenase-2 and pro-inflammatory cytokines, including interleukin-1β and tumor necrosis factor-α. Moreover, EWCC exhibited anti-inflammatory properties by the suppression of nuclear factor‑κB (NF-κB) activation by blocking IκB-α degradation, downregulation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase, c-Jun N-terminal kinase, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt pathways. Our results indicate that the inhibitory effects of EWCC on LPS-stimulated inflammatory mediator production in BV2 microglia are associated with the suppression of the NF-κB, MAPK and PI3K/Akt signaling pathways. These findings suggest that EWCC may offer a substantial therapeutic potential for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases that are accompanied by microglial activation. PMID:23128312

  5. PI3K/Akt is involved in brown adipogenesis mediated by growth differentiation factor-5 in association with activation of the Smad pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Hinoi, Eiichi; Iezaki, Takashi; Fujita, Hiroyuki; Watanabe, Takumi; Odaka, Yoshiaki; Ozaki, Kakeru; Yoneda, Yukio

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • Akt is preferentially phosphorylated in BAT and sWAT of aP2-GDF5 mice. • PI3K/Akt signaling is involved in GDF5-induced brown adipogenesis. • PI3K/Akt signaling regulates GDF5-induced Smad5 phosphorylation. - Abstract: We have previously demonstrated promotion by growth differentiation factor-5 (GDF5) of brown adipogenesis for systemic energy expenditure through a mechanism relevant to activating the bone morphological protein (BMP) receptor/mothers against decapentaplegic homolog (Smad)/peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma co-activator 1α (PGC-1α) pathway. Here, we show the involvement of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt pathway in brown adipogenesis mediated by GDF5. Overexpression of GDF5 in cells expressing adipocyte protein-2 markedly accelerated the phosphorylation of Smad1/5/8 and Akt in white and brown adipose tissues. In brown adipose tissue from heterozygous GDF5{sup Rgsc451} mutant mice expressing a dominant-negative (DN) GDF5 under obesogenic conditions, the basal phosphorylation of Smad1/5/8 and Akt was significantly attenuated. Exposure to GDF5 not only promoted the phosphorylation of both Smad1/5/8 and Akt in cultured brown pre-adipocytes, but also up-regulated Pgc1a and uncoupling protein-1 expression in a manner sensitive to the PI3K/Akt inhibitor Ly294002 as well as retroviral infection with DN-Akt. GDF5 drastically promoted BMP-responsive luciferase reporter activity in a Ly294002-sensitive fashion. Both Ly294002 and DN-Akt markedly inhibited phosphorylation of Smad5 in the nuclei of brown pre-adipocytes. These results suggest that PI3K/Akt signals play a role in the GDF5-mediated brown adipogenesis through a mechanism related to activation of the Smad pathway.

  6. Cinnamtannin D1 from Rhododendron formosanum Induces Autophagy via the Inhibition of Akt/mTOR and Activation of ERK1/2 in Non-Small-Cell Lung Carcinoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Way, Tzong-Der; Tsai, Shang-Jie; Wang, Chao-Min; Jhan, Yun-Lian; Ho, Chi-Tang; Chou, Chang-Hung

    2015-12-01

    In our previous study, ursolic acid present in the leaves of Rhododendron formosanum was found to possess antineoplastic activity. We further isolated and unveiled a natural product, cinnamtannin D1 (CNT D1), an A-type procyanidin trimer in R. formosanum also exhibiting anticancer efficacy that induced G1 arrest (83.26 ± 3.11% for 175 μM CNT D1 vs 69.28 ± 1.15% for control, p < 0.01) and autophagy in non-small-cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) cells. We found that CNT D1-mediated autophagy was via the noncanonical pathway, being beclin-1-independent but Atg5 (autophagy-related genes 5)-dependent. Inhibition of autophagy with a specific inhibitor enhanced cell death, suggesting a cytoprotective function for autophagy in CNT D1-treated NSCLC cells. Moreover, CNT D1 inhibited the Akt/mammalian target of the rapamycin (mTOR) pathway and activated the extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2) pathway, resulting in induction of autophagy.

  7. Silencing p110{beta} prevents rapid depletion of nuclear pAkt

    SciTech Connect

    Ye, Zhi-wei; Ghalali, Aram; Hoegberg, Johan; Stenius, Ulla

    2011-12-02

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer p110{beta} was essential for the statin- and ATP-induced depletion of nuclear pAkt and an associated inhibition of growth. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer p110{beta} knock-out inhibited statin-induced changes in binding between FKBP51, pAkt and PTEN. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Data supports the hypothesis that nuclear pAkt is important for anti-cancer effects of statins. -- Abstract: The p110{beta} subunit in the class IA PI3K family may act as an oncogene and is critical for prostate tumor development in PTEN knockout mice. We tested the possible involvement of p110{beta} in a recently described rapid depletion of phosphorylated Akt (pAkt) in the nucleus. Previous work showed that this down-regulation is induced by extracellular ATP or by statins and is mediated by the purinergic receptor P2X7. Here, we used p110{beta} knock out mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) and siRNA-treated cancer cells. We found that p110{beta} is essential for ATP- or statin-induced nuclear pAkt depletion in MEFs and in several cancer cell lines including prostate cancer cells. ATP, statin or the selective P2X7 agonist BzATP also inhibited cell growth, and this inhibition was not seen in p110{beta} knock out cells. We also found that p110{beta} was necessary for statin-induced changes in binding between FKBP51, pAkt and PTEN. Our data show that p110{beta} is essential for the ATP- and statin-induced effects and support a role of nuclear pAkt in cancer development. They also provide support for a chemopreventive effect of statins mediated by depletion of nuclear pAkt.

  8. Receptor tyrosine kinase signaling regulates replication of the peste des petits ruminants virus.

    PubMed

    Chaudhary, K; Chaubey, K K; Singh, S V; Kumar, N

    2015-03-01

    In this study, we found out that blocking the receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) signaling in Vero cells by tryphostin AG879 impairs the in vitro replication of the peste des petits ruminants virus (PPRV). A reduced virus replication in Trk1-knockdown (siRNA) Vero cells confirmed the essential role of RTK in the virus replication, in particular a specific regulation of viral RNA synthesis. These data represent the first evidence that the RTK signaling regulates replication of a morbillivirus. PMID:25790054

  9. Peroxiredoxin 1 suppresses apoptosis via regulation of the apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 signaling pathway in human oral leukoplakia

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, MIN; NIU, WENWEN; ZHANG, JIANFEI; GE, LIHUA; YANG, JING; SUN, ZHENG; TANG, XIAOFEI

    2015-01-01

    Peroxiredoxin 1 (Prx1) has a significant role in several malignant types of tumor. However, the role of Prx1 in oral leukoplakia (OLK) has remained to be elucidated. OLK is a common precancerous lesion of the oral mucosa that has a very high malignant transformation rate. The aim of the present study was to investigate the roles of Prx1, and its association with apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 (ASK1) and p38 in OLK. A total of 20 OLK samples and 10 normal oral mucosa samples were obtained from patients at the Beijing Stomatological Hospital (Beijing, China). The messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein expression levels of Prx1, ASK1 and p38 were determined by polymerase chain reaction and western blot analysis, respectively. Flow cytometry was used to detect cell apoptosis. The interaction between Prx1 and ASK1 was examined in H2O2-treated DOK cells by glutathione-S-transferase pull-down assays and by co-immunoprecipitation in vitro. Compared with those of the normal oral mucosa, the mRNA levels of Prx1, ASK1 and p38 were elevated in OLK tissues (P<0.05). The protein expression levels of Prx1, phosphorylated-ASK1 (p-ASK1) and p-p38 were also significantly enhanced in OLK tissues compared with those of the normal mucosa (P<0.05). In Prx1-knockdown DOK cells, ASK1 and p38 were activated, leading to enhanced levels of apoptosis in response to H2O2. No clear interaction between Prx1 and ASK1 was detected in H2O2-treated DOK cells. Prx1 was suggested to be involved in OLK pathogenesis by providing resistance against extracellular damages from oxidative stress via inhibition of the ASK1-induced apoptotic signaling pathway. Targeting Prx1 may provide a novel therapeutic strategy for the treatment of patients with OLK. PMID:26622762

  10. Differential regulation of proliferation and neuronal differentiation in adult rat spinal cord neural stem/progenitors by ERK1/2, Akt, and PLCγ

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Wai Si; Sideris, Alexandra; Sutachan, Jhon J.; Montoya G, Jose V.; Blanck, Thomas J. J.; Recio-Pinto, Esperanza

    2013-01-01

    Proliferation of endogenous neural stem/progenitor cells (NSPCs) has been identified in both normal and injured adult mammalian spinal cord. Yet the signaling mechanisms underlying the regulation of adult spinal cord NSPCs proliferation and commitment toward a neuronal lineage remain undefined. In this study, the role of three growth factor-mediated signaling pathways in proliferation and neuronal differentiation was examined. Adult spinal cord NSPCs were enriched in the presence of fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2). We observed an increase in the number of cells expressing the microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP2) over time, indicating neuronal differentiation in the culture. Inhibition of the mitogen-activated protein kinase or extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) kinase 1 and 2/ERK 1 and 2 (MEK/ERK1/2) or the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt pathways suppressed active proliferation in adult spinal cord NSPC cultures; whereas neuronal differentiation was negatively affected only when the ERK1/2 pathway was inhibited. Inhibition of the phospholipase Cγ (PLCγ) pathway did not affect proliferation or neuronal differentiation. Finally, we demonstrated that the blockade of either the ERK1/2 or PLCγ signaling pathways reduced neurite branching of MAP2+ cells derived from the NSPC cultures. Many of the MAP2+ cells expressed synaptophysin and had a glutamatergic phenotype, indicating that over time adult spinal cord NSPCs had differentiated into mostly glutamatergic neurons. Our work provides new information regarding the contribution of these pathways to the proliferation and neuronal differentiation of NSPCs derived from adult spinal cord cultures, and emphasizes that the contribution of these pathways is dependent on the origin of the NSPCs. PMID:23986655

  11. Akt inhibitors as an HIV-1 infected macrophage-specific anti-viral therapy

    PubMed Central

    Chugh, Pauline; Bradel-Tretheway, Birgit; Monteiro-Filho, Carlos MR; Planelles, Vicente; Maggirwar, Sanjay B; Dewhurst, Stephen; Kim, Baek

    2008-01-01

    Background Unlike CD4+ T cells, HIV-1 infected macrophages exhibit extended life span even upon stress, consistent with their in vivo role as long-lived HIV-1 reservoirs. Results Here, we demonstrate that PI3K/Akt inhibitors, including clinically available Miltefosine, dramatically reduced HIV-1 production from long-living virus-infected macrophages. These PI3K/Akt inhibitors hyper-sensitize infected macrophages to extracellular stresses that they are normally exposed to, and eventually lead to cell death of infected macrophages without harming uninfected cells. Based on the data from these Akt inhibitors, we were able to further investigate how HIV-1 infection utilizes the PI3K/Akt pathway to establish the cytoprotective effect of HIV-1 infection, which extends the lifespan of infected macrophages, a key viral reservoir. First, we found that HIV-1 infection activates the well characterized pro-survival PI3K/Akt pathway in primary human macrophages, as reflected by decreased PTEN protein expression and increased Akt kinase activity. Interestingly, the expression of HIV-1 or SIV Tat is sufficient to mediate this cytoprotective effect, which is dependent on the basic domain of Tat – a region that has previously been shown to bind p53. Next, we observed that this interaction appears to contribute to the downregulation of PTEN expression, since HIV-1 Tat was found to compete with PTEN for p53 binding; this is known to result in p53 destabilization, with a consequent reduction in PTEN protein production. Conclusion Since HIV-1 infected macrophages display highly elevated Akt activity, our results collectively show that PI3K/Akt inhibitors may be a novel therapy for interfering with the establishment of long-living HIV-1 infected reservoirs. PMID:18237430

  12. The Akt switch model: Is location sufficient?

    PubMed

    Gray, Catheryn W; Coster, Adelle C F

    2016-06-01

    Akt/PKB is a biochemical regulator that functions as an important cross-talk node between several signalling pathways in the mammalian cell. In particular, Akt is a key mediator of glucose transport in response to insulin. The phosphorylation (activation) of only a small percentage of the Akt pool of insulin-sensitive cells results in maximal translocation of glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) to the plasma membrane (PM). This enables the diffusion of glucose into the cell. The dysregulation of Akt signalling is associated with the development of diabetes, cancer and cardiovascular disease. Akt is synthesised in the cytoplasm in the inactive state. Under the influence of insulin, it moves to the PM, where it is phosphorylated to form pAkt. Although phosphorylation occurs only at the PM, pAkt is found in many cellular locations, including the PM, the cytoplasm, and the nucleus. Indeed, the spatial distribution of pAkt within the cell appears to be an important determinant of downstream regulation. Here we present a simple, linear, four-compartment ordinary differential equation (ODE) model of Akt activation that tracks both the biochemical state and the physical location of Akt. This model embodies the main features of the activation of this important cross-talk node and is consistent with the experimental data. In particular, it allows different downstream signalling motifs without invoking separate feedback pathways. Moreover, the model is computationally tractable, readily analysed, and elucidates some of the apparent anomalies in insulin signalling via Akt. PMID:26992575

  13. 14-3-3ζ up-regulates hypoxia-inducible factor-1α in hepatocellular carcinoma via activation of PI3K/Akt/NF-кB signal transduction pathway

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Yufu; Lv, Pengfei; Sun, Zhongyi; Han, Lei; Luo, Bichao; Zhou, Wenping

    2015-01-01

    14-3-3ζ protein, a member of 14-3-3 family, plays important roles in multiple cellular processes. Our previous study showed that 14-3-3ζ could bind to regulate the expression of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α), which is induced by hypoxia and a crucial factor for induction of tumor metastasis. Moreover, we also have confirmed the response of 14-3-3ζ to hypoxia in our unpublished data as well. Thus, in the present study, we attempted to reveal that whether the regulation effect of 14-3-3ζ on HIF-1α functioned in a similar pattern as hypoxia. Stable regulation of 14-3-3ζ in human HCC cell line SMMC-772 and HCC-LM3 was achieved. The regulation of 14-3-3ζ on HIF-1α mRNA transcription was evaluated by luciferase activity assay and quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR). The effect of 14-3-3ζ on the production of HIF-1α and pathways determining HIF-1α’s response to hypoxia was assessed using western blotting assay. Our results showed that regulation of 14-3-3ζ expression influenced the activity of HIF-1α, phosphatidyl inositol 3-kinase (PI3K), Akt, extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2), and nuclear factor kappa B (NF-кB). Blocking of these pathways using indicated inhibitors revealed that 14-3-3ζ enhanced the production of HIF-1α via the activation of PI3K/Akt/NF-кB pathway, which was identical to hypoxia induced HIF-1α expression. For the first time, our study described the key role of 14-3-3ζ in the HIF-1α production in HCC cells. And the molecule exerted its function on HIF-1α both by directly binding to it and via PI3K/Akt/NF-кB signal transduction pathway. PMID:26884855

  14. Statins and ATP regulate nuclear pAkt via the P2X7 purinergic receptor in epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Mistafa, Oras; Hoegberg, Johan; Stenius, Ulla

    2008-01-04

    Many studies have documented P2X7 receptor functions in cells of mesenchymal origin. P2X7 is also expressed in epithelial cells and its role in these cells remains largely unknown. Our data indicate that P2X7 regulate nuclear pAkt in epithelial cells. We show that low concentration of atorvastatin, a drug inhibiting HMG-CoA reductase and cholesterol metabolism, or the natural agonist extracellular ATP rapidly decreased the level of insulin-induced phosphorylated Akt in the nucleus. This effect was seen within minutes and was inhibited by P2X7 inhibitors. Experiments employing P2X7 siRNA and HEK293 cells heterologously expressing P2X7 and in vivo experiments further supported an involvement of P2X7. These data indicate that extracellular ATP and statins via the P2X7 receptor modulate insulin-induced Akt signaling in epithelial cells.

  15. PARP-inhibitor treatment prevents hypertension induced cardiac remodeling by favorable modulation of heat shock proteins, Akt-1/GSK-3β and several PKC isoforms.

    PubMed

    Deres, Laszlo; Bartha, Eva; Palfi, Anita; Eros, Krisztian; Riba, Adam; Lantos, Janos; Kalai, Tamas; Hideg, Kalman; Sumegi, Balazs; Gallyas, Ferenc; Toth, Kalman; Halmosi, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR) is a suitable model for studies of the complications of hypertension. It is known that activation of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase enzyme (PARP) plays an important role in the development of postinfarction as well as long-term hypertension induced heart failure. In this study, we examined whether PARP-inhibitor (L-2286) treatment could prevent the development of hypertensive cardiopathy in SHRs. 6-week-old SHR animals were treated with L-2286 (SHR-L group) or placebo (SHR-C group) for 24 weeks. Wistar-Kyoto rats were used as aged-matched, normotensive controls (WKY group). Echocardiography was performed, brain-derived natriuretic peptide (BNP) activity and blood pressure were determined at the end of the study. We detected the extent of fibrotic areas. The amount of heat-shock proteins (Hsps) and the phosphorylation state of Akt-1(Ser473), glycogen synthase kinase (GSK)-3β(Ser9), forkhead transcription factor (FKHR)(Ser256), mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPKs), and protein kinase C (PKC) isoenzymes were monitored. The elevated blood pressure in SHRs was not influenced by PARP-inhibitor treatment. Systolic left ventricular function and BNP activity did not differ among the three groups. L-2286 treatment decreased the marked left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy which was developed in SHRs. Interstitial collagen deposition was also decreased by L-2286 treatment. The phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2(Thr183-Tyr185), Akt-1(Ser473), GSK-3β(Ser9), FKHR(Ser256), and PKC ε(Ser729) and the level of Hsp90 were increased, while the activity of PKC α/βII(Thr638/641), ζ/λ(410/403) were mitigated by L-2286 administration. We could detect signs of LV hypertrophy without congestive heart failure in SHR groups. This alteration was prevented by PARP inhibition. Our results suggest that PARP-inhibitor treatment has protective effect already in the early stage of hypertensive myocardial remodeling. PMID

  16. G-CSF protects human brain vascular endothelial cells injury induced by high glucose, free fatty acids and hypoxia through MAPK and Akt signaling.

    PubMed

    Su, Jingjing; Zhou, Houguang; Tao, Yinghong; Guo, Jingchun; Guo, Zhuangli; Zhang, Shuo; Zhang, Yu; Huang, Yanyan; Tang, Yuping; Dong, Qiang; Hu, Renming

    2015-01-01

    Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) has been shown to play a neuroprotective role in ischemic stroke by mobilizing bone marrow (BM)-derived endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs), promoting angiogenesis, and inhibiting apoptosis. Impairments in mobilization and function of the BM-derived EPCs have previously been reported in animal and human studies of diabetes where there is both reduction in the levels of the BM-derived EPCs and its ability to promote angiogenesis. This is hypothesized to account for the pathogenesis of diabetic vascular complications such as stroke. Here, we sought to investigate the effects of G-CSF on diabetes-associated cerebral vascular defect. We observed that pretreatment of the cultured human brain vascular endothelial cells (HBVECs) with G-CSF largely prevented cell death induced by the combination stimulus with high glucose, free fatty acids (FFA) and hypoxia by increasing cell viability, decreasing apoptosis and caspase-3 activity. Cell ultrastructure measured by transmission electron microscope (TEM) revealed that G-CSF treatment nicely reduced combination stimulus-induced cell apoptosis. The results from fluorescent probe Fluo-3/AM showed that G-CSF greatly suppressed the levels of intracellular calcium ions under combination stimulus. We also found that G-CSF enhanced the expression of cell cycle proteins such as human cell division cycle protein 14A (hCdc14A), cyclinB and cyclinE, inhibited p53 activity, and facilitated cell cycle progression following combination stimulus. In addition, activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase1/2 (ERK1/2) and Akt, and deactivation of c-Jun N terminal kinase (JNK) and p38 were proved to be required for the pro-survival effects of G-CSF on HBVECs exposed to combination stimulus. Overall, G-CSF is capable of alleviating HBVECs injury triggered by the combination administration with high glucose, FFA and hypoxia involving the mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) and Akt signaling

  17. G-CSF Protects Human Brain Vascular Endothelial Cells Injury Induced by High Glucose, Free Fatty Acids and Hypoxia through MAPK and Akt Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Yinghong; Guo, Jingchun; Guo, Zhuangli; Zhang, Shuo; Zhang, Yu; Huang, Yanyan; Tang, Yuping; Dong, Qiang; Hu, Renming

    2015-01-01

    Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) has been shown to play a neuroprotective role in ischemic stroke by mobilizing bone marrow (BM)-derived endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs), promoting angiogenesis, and inhibiting apoptosis. Impairments in mobilization and function of the BM-derived EPCs have previously been reported in animal and human studies of diabetes where there is both reduction in the levels of the BM-derived EPCs and its ability to promote angiogenesis. This is hypothesized to account for the pathogenesis of diabetic vascular complications such as stroke. Here, we sought to investigate the effects of G-CSF on diabetes-associated cerebral vascular defect. We observed that pretreatment of the cultured human brain vascular endothelial cells (HBVECs) with G-CSF largely prevented cell death induced by the combination stimulus with high glucose, free fatty acids (FFA) and hypoxia by increasing cell viability, decreasing apoptosis and caspase-3 activity. Cell ultrastructure measured by transmission electron microscope (TEM) revealed that G-CSF treatment nicely reduced combination stimulus-induced cell apoptosis. The results from fluorescent probe Fluo-3/AM showed that G-CSF greatly suppressed the levels of intracellular calcium ions under combination stimulus. We also found that G-CSF enhanced the expression of cell cycle proteins such as human cell division cycle protein 14A (hCdc14A), cyclinB and cyclinE, inhibited p53 activity, and facilitated cell cycle progression following combination stimulus. In addition, activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase1/2 (ERK1/2) and Akt, and deactivation of c-Jun N terminal kinase (JNK) and p38 were proved to be required for the pro-survival effects of G-CSF on HBVECs exposed to combination stimulus. Overall, G-CSF is capable of alleviating HBVECs injury triggered by the combination administration with high glucose, FFA and hypoxia involving the mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) and Akt signaling

  18. Centipedegrass extract induces apoptosis through the activation of caspases and the downregulation of PI3K/Akt and MAPK phosphorylation in leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Bai, Hyoung-Woo; Badaboina, Srilatha; Park, Chul-Hong; Choi, Bo Yun; Na, Yun Hee; Chung, Byung Yeoup

    2015-02-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), which involves the blood and bone marrow, is the most common type of cancer in children younger than 5 years of age. Previous studies have investigated the effects of centipedegrass extract (CGE), which is mainly composed of maysin and its derivatives, and have demonstrated that it has various biological activities, including antioxidant and anti‑inflammatory activities, pancreatic lipase inhibitory activity, anti-adipogenic activity and insecticidal activity. To the best of our knowledge, this study is the first to investigate the anticancer effects of CGE in ALL cell lines and to elucidate the mechanisms underlying these effects. Cell viability was measured by thiazolyl blue tetrazolium blue (MTT) assay. Apoptosis, cell cycle progression and mitochondrial membrane potential (∆Ψm) were determined by flow cytometry. The effects of CGE on the phosphatidylinositol 3‑kinase (PI3K)/Akt pathway and mitogen‑activated protein kinases (MAPKs) were assessed by immunoblotting. PI3K, MAPK and caspase inhibitors were used to further confirm the molecular mechanisms involved. Our results clearly demonstrated that the proliferation of the ALL cells was significantly inhibited by CGE in a dose‑dependent manner. Apoptosis was accompanied by the induction of significant G1 cell cycle arrest. The resulting alteration of the ∆Ψm increased the activity of caspase‑3/7. The induction of apoptosis was enhanced by the combined treatment of CGE with a PI3K inhibitor or an extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) inhibitor, whereas the CGE‑induced apoptosis was inhibited in the presence of caspase inhibitors, such as z‑VAD‑fmk and z‑IETD‑fmk. Furthermore, CGE inhibited PI3K activity by decreasing the levels of phosphorylated (p‑)Akt, p‑BAD, and Bcl‑2 together with the levels of MAPKs, including p‑ERK and p‑JNK, but demonstrated no effects on p38 MAPK. Thus, our data suggest that CGE may be a novel natural

  19. Akt Regulates Axon Wrapping and Myelin Sheath Thickness in the PNS

    PubMed Central

    Baloui, Hasna; Meng, Xiaosong; Zhang, Yanqing; Deinhardt, Katrin; Dupree, Jeff L.; Einheber, Steven; Chrast, Roman

    2016-01-01

    The signaling pathways that regulate myelination in the PNS remain poorly understood. Phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate 3-kinase 1A, activated in Schwann cells by neuregulin and the extracellular matrix, has an essential role in the early events of myelination. Akt/PKB, a key effector of phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate 3-kinase 1A, was previously implicated in CNS, but not PNS myelination. Here we demonstrate that Akt plays a crucial role in axon ensheathment and in the regulation of myelin sheath thickness in the PNS. Pharmacological inhibition of Akt in DRG neuron-Schwann cell cocultures dramatically decreased MBP and P0 levels and myelin sheath formation without affecting expression of Krox20/Egr2, a key transcriptional regulator of myelination. Conversely, expression of an activated form of Akt in purified Schwann cells increased expression of myelin proteins, but not Krox20/Egr2, and the levels of activated Rac1. Transgenic mice expressing a membrane-targeted, activated form of Akt under control of the 2′,3′-cyclic nucleotide 3′-phosphodiesterase promoter, exhibited thicker PNS and CNS myelin sheaths, and PNS myelin abnormalities, such as tomacula and myelin infoldings/outfoldings, centered around the paranodes and Schmidt Lanterman incisures. These effects were corrected by rapamycin treatment in vivo. Importantly, Akt activity in the transgenic mice did not induce myelination of nonmyelinating Schwann cells in the sympathetic trunk or Remak fibers of the dorsal roots, although, in those structures, they wrapped membranes redundantly around axons. Together, our data indicate that Akt is crucial for PNS myelination driving axonal wrapping by unmyelinated and myelinated Schwann cells and enhancing myelin protein synthesis in myelinating Schwann cells. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Although the role of the key serine/threonine kinase Akt in promoting CNS myelination has been demonstrated, its role in the PNS has not been established and remains

  20. Circulating Extracellular RNA Markers of Liver Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Irene K.; Wang, Xue; Asmann, Yan W.; Haga, Hiroaki; Patel, Tushar

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims Although a key determinant of hepatic recovery after injury is active liver regeneration, the ability to detect ongoing regeneration is lacking. The restoration of liver mass after hepatectomy involves systemic changes with coordinated changes in gene expression guiding regenerative responses, activation of progenitor cells, and proliferation of quiescent hepatocytes. We postulated that these responses involve intercellular communication involving extracellular RNA and that these could represent biomarkers of active regenerative responses. Methods RNA sequencing was performed to identify temporal changes in serum extracellular non-coding RNA after partial hepatectomy in C57BL/6 male mice. Tissue expression of selected RNA was performed by microarray analysis and validated using qRT-PCR. Digital PCR was used to detect and quantify serum expression of selected RNA. Results A peak increase in extracellular RNA content occurred six hours after hepatectomy. RNA sequencing identified alterations in several small non-coding RNA including known and novel microRNAs, snoRNAs, tRNA, antisense and repeat elements after partial hepatectomy. Combinatorial effects and network analyses identified signal regulation, protein complex assembly, and signal transduction as the most common biological processes targeted by miRNA that altered. miR-1A and miR-181 were most significantly altered microRNA in both serum and in hepatic tissues, and their presence in serum was quantitated using digital PCR. Conclusions Extracellular RNA selectively enriched during acute regeneration can be detected within serum and represent biomarkers of ongoing liver regeneration in mice. The ability to detect ongoing active regeneration would improve the assessment of hepatic recovery from liver injury. PMID:27415797

  1. Hedgehog Signaling Regulates the Ciliary Transport of Odorant Receptors in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Gonzalo M; Alkhori, Liza; Hatano, Eduardo; Schultz, Sebastian W; Kuzhandaivel, Anujaianthi; Jafari, Shadi; Granseth, Björn; Alenius, Mattias

    2016-01-26

    Hedgehog (Hh) signaling is a key regulatory pathway during development and also has a functional role in mature neurons. Here, we show that Hh signaling regulates the odor response in adult Drosophila olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs). We demonstrate that this is achieved by regulating odorant receptor (OR) transport to and within the primary cilium in OSN neurons. Regulation relies on ciliary localization of the Hh signal transducer Smoothened (Smo). We further demonstrate that the Hh- and Smo-dependent regulation of the kinesin-like protein Cos2 acts in parallel to the intraflagellar transport system (IFT) to localize ORs within the cilium compartment. These findings expand our knowledge of Hh signaling to encompass chemosensory modulation and receptor trafficking.

  2. Dopamine Signaling Regulates Fat Content through β-Oxidation in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Barros, Alexandre Guimarães de Almeida; Bridi, Jessika Cristina; de Souza, Bruno Rezende; de Castro Júnior, Célio; de Lima Torres, Karen Cecília; Malard, Leandro; Jorio, Ado; de Miranda, Débora Marques; Ashrafi, Kaveh; Romano-Silva, Marco Aurélio

    2014-01-01

    The regulation of energy balance involves an intricate interplay between neural mechanisms that respond to internal and external cues of energy demand and food availability. Compelling data have implicated the neurotransmitter dopamine as an important part of body weight regulation. However, the precise mechanisms through which dopamine regulates energy homeostasis remain poorly understood. Here, we investigate mechanisms through which dopamine modulates energy storage. We showed that dopamine signaling regulates fat reservoirs in Caenorhabditis elegans. We found that the fat reducing effects of dopamine were dependent on dopaminergic receptors and a set of fat oxidation enzymes. Our findings reveal an ancient role for dopaminergic regulation of fat and suggest that dopamine signaling elicits this outcome through cascades that ultimately mobilize peripheral fat depots. PMID:24465759

  3. Hedgehog Signaling Regulates the Survival of Gastric Cancer Cells by Regulating the Expression of Bcl-2

    PubMed Central

    Han, Myoung-Eun; Lee, Young-Suk; Baek, Sun-Yong; Kim, Bong-Seon; Kim, Jae-Bong; Oh, Sae-Ock

    2009-01-01

    Gastric cancer is the second most common cause of cancer deaths worldwide. The underlying molecular mechanisms of its carcinogenesis are relatively poorly characterized. Hedgehog (Hh) signaling, which is critical for development of various organs including the gastrointestinal tract, has been associated with gastric cancer. The present study was undertaken to reveal the underlying mechanism by which Hh signaling controls gastric cancer cell proliferation. Treatment of gastric cancer cells with cyclopamine, a specific inhibitor of Hh signaling pathway, reduced proliferation and induced apoptosis of gastric cancer cells. Cyclopamine treatment induced cytochrome c release from mitochondria and cleavage of caspase 9. Moreover, Bcl-2 expression was significantly reduced by cyclopamine treatment. These results suggest that Hh signaling regulates the survival of gastric cancer cells by regulating the expression of Bcl-2. PMID:19742123

  4. Wnt signaling regulates multipolar-to-bipolar transition of migrating neurons in the cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Boitard, Michael; Bocchi, Riccardo; Egervari, Kristof; Petrenko, Volodymyr; Viale, Beatrice; Gremaud, Stéphane; Zgraggen, Eloisa; Salmon, Patrick; Kiss, Jozsef Z

    2015-03-01

    The precise timing of pyramidal cell migration from the ventricular germinal zone to the cortical plate is essential for establishing cortical layers, and migration errors can lead to neurodevelopmental disorders underlying psychiatric and neurological diseases. Here, we report that Wnt canonical as well as non-canonical signaling is active in pyramidal precursors during radial migration. We demonstrate using constitutive and conditional genetic strategies that transient downregulation of canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling during the multipolar stage plays a critical role in polarizing and orienting cells for radial migration. In addition, we show that reduced canonical Wnt signaling is triggered cell autonomously by time-dependent expression of Wnt5A and activation of non-canonical signaling. We identify ephrin-B1 as a canonical Wnt-signaling-regulated target in control of the multipolar-to-bipolar switch. These findings highlight the critical role of Wnt signaling activity in neuronal positioning during cortical development. PMID:25732825

  5. Wnt signaling regulates multipolar-to-bipolar transition of migrating neurons in the cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Boitard, Michael; Bocchi, Riccardo; Egervari, Kristof; Petrenko, Volodymyr; Viale, Beatrice; Gremaud, Stéphane; Zgraggen, Eloisa; Salmon, Patrick; Kiss, Jozsef Z

    2015-03-01

    The precise timing of pyramidal cell migration from the ventricular germinal zone to the cortical plate is essential for establishing cortical layers, and migration errors can lead to neurodevelopmental disorders underlying psychiatric and neurological diseases. Here, we report that Wnt canonical as well as non-canonical signaling is active in pyramidal precursors during radial migration. We demonstrate using constitutive and conditional genetic strategies that transient downregulation of canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling during the multipolar stage plays a critical role in polarizing and orienting cells for radial migration. In addition, we show that reduced canonical Wnt signaling is triggered cell autonomously by time-dependent expression of Wnt5A and activation of non-canonical signaling. We identify ephrin-B1 as a canonical Wnt-signaling-regulated target in control of the multipolar-to-bipolar switch. These findings highlight the critical role of Wnt signaling activity in neuronal positioning during cortical development.

  6. Spontaneous Hepatocellular Carcinoma after the Combined Deletion of Akt Isoforms.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qi; Yu, Wan-Ni; Chen, Xinyu; Peng, Xiao-Ding; Jeon, Sang-Min; Birnbaum, Morris J; Guzman, Grace; Hay, Nissim

    2016-04-11

    Akt is frequently hyperactivated in human cancers and is targeted for cancer therapy. However, the physiological consequences of systemic Akt isoform inhibition were not fully explored. We showed that while combined Akt1 and Akt3 deletion in adult mice is tolerated, combined Akt1 and Akt2 deletion induced rapid mortality. Akt2(-/-) mice survived hepatic Akt1 deletion but all developed spontaneous hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), which is associated with FoxO-dependent liver injury and inflammation. The gene expression signature of HCC-bearing livers is similar to aggressive human HCC. Consistently, neither Akt1(-/-) nor Akt2(-/-) mice are resistant to diethylnitrosamine-induced hepatocarcinogenesis, and Akt2(-/-) mice display a high incidence of lung metastasis. Thus, in contrast to other cancers, hepatic Akt inhibition induces liver injury that could promote HCC. PMID:26996309

  7. Motexafin gadolinium modulates levels of phosphorylated Akt and synergizes with inhibitors of Akt phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Jason; Sirisawad, Mint; Miller, Richard; Naumovski, Louie

    2006-05-01

    Motexafin gadolinium (MGd, Xcytrin) is a tumor-selective expanded porphyrin that targets oxidative stress-related proteins. MGd treatment of the follicular lymphoma-derived cell line HF-1 resulted in growth suppression and apoptosis whereas MGd treatment of the Burkitt's lymphoma-derived cell line Ramos resulted in growth suppression but not apoptosis. Because phosphorylation status of Akt/protein kinase B is regulated by oxidative stress, we monitored total and phosphorylated Akt (pAkt) in MGd-treated HF-1 and Ramos cells. Levels of pAkt increased within 30 minutes after MGd treatment of HF-1 but after 4 hours began to show a progressive decline to below baseline levels before cells underwent apoptosis. In MGd-treated Ramos cells, pAkt increased approximately 2-fold within 4 hours and remained persistently elevated. Because pAkt activates survival pathways, we determined if MGd-induced cell death could be enhanced by inhibiting phosphorylation of Akt. The addition of specific inhibitors of Akt phosphorylation (Akt inhibitor 1 or SH-5) reduced pAkt levels in MGd-treated HF-1 and Ramos cells and synergistically enhanced MGd-induced cell death. MGd was also evaluated in combination with celecoxib, an inhibitor of Akt phosphorylation, or docetaxel, a microtubule inhibitor that can decrease Akt phosphorylation. The combination of MGd/celecoxib or MGd/docetaxel resulted in decreased Akt phosphorylation and in synergistic cytotoxicity compared with either agent alone. These data point to a potential protective role for pAkt in MGd-induced apoptosis and suggest that MGd activity may be enhanced by combining it with agents that inhibit Akt phosphorylation.

  8. Blockade of Apoptosis Signal-Regulating Kinase 1 Attenuates Matrix Metalloproteinase 9 Activity in Brain Endothelial Cells and the Subsequent Apoptosis in Neurons after Ischemic Injury

    PubMed Central

    Cheon, So Y.; Cho, Kyoung J.; Kim, So Y.; Kam, Eun H.; Lee, Jong E.; Koo, Bon-Nyeo

    2016-01-01

    Conditions of increased oxidative stress including cerebral ischemia can lead to blood–brain barrier dysfunction via matrix metalloproteinase (MMP). It is known that MMP-9 in particular is released from brain endothelial cells is involved in the neuronal cell death that occurs after cerebral ischemia. In the intracellular signaling network, apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 (ASK1) is the main activator of the oxidative stress that is part of the pathogenesis of cerebral ischemia. ASK1 also promotes apoptotic cell death and brain infarction after ischemia and is associated with vascular permeability and the formation of brain edema. However, the relationship between ASK1 and MMP-9 after cerebral ischemia remains unknown. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to determine whether blocking ASK1 would affect MMP-9 activity in the ischemic brain and cultured brain endothelial cells. Our results showed that ASK1 inhibition efficiently reduced MMP-9 activity in vivo and in vitro. In endothelial cell cultures, ASK1 inhibition upregulated phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt/nuclear factor erythroid 2 [NF-E2]-related factor 2/heme oxygenase-1 signals and downregulated cyclooxygenase-2 signals after hypoxia/reperfusion. Additionally, in neuronal cell cultures, cell death occurred when neurons were incubated with endothelial cell-conditioned medium (EC-CM) obtained from the hypoxia/reperfusion group. However, after incubation with EC-CM and following treatment with the ASK1 inhibitor NQDI-1, neuronal cell death was efficiently decreased. We conclude that suppressing ASK1 decreases MMP-9 activity in brain endothelial cells, and leads to decreased neuronal cell death after ischemic injury.

  9. Blockade of Apoptosis Signal-Regulating Kinase 1 Attenuates Matrix Metalloproteinase 9 Activity in Brain Endothelial Cells and the Subsequent Apoptosis in Neurons after Ischemic Injury.

    PubMed

    Cheon, So Y; Cho, Kyoung J; Kim, So Y; Kam, Eun H; Lee, Jong E; Koo, Bon-Nyeo

    2016-01-01

    Conditions of increased oxidative stress including cerebral ischemia can lead to blood-brain barrier dysfunction via matrix metalloproteinase (MMP). It is known that MMP-9 in particular is released from brain endothelial cells is involved in the neuronal cell death that occurs after cerebral ischemia. In the intracellular signaling network, apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 (ASK1) is the main activator of the oxidative stress that is part of the pathogenesis of cerebral ischemia. ASK1 also promotes apoptotic cell death and brain infarction after ischemia and is associated with vascular permeability and the formation of brain edema. However, the relationship between ASK1 and MMP-9 after cerebral ischemia remains unknown. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to determine whether blocking ASK1 would affect MMP-9 activity in the ischemic brain and cultured brain endothelial cells. Our results showed that ASK1 inhibition efficiently reduced MMP-9 activity in vivo and in vitro. In endothelial cell cultures, ASK1 inhibition upregulated phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt/nuclear factor erythroid 2 [NF-E2]-related factor 2/heme oxygenase-1 signals and downregulated cyclooxygenase-2 signals after hypoxia/reperfusion. Additionally, in neuronal cell cultures, cell death occurred when neurons were incubated with endothelial cell-conditioned medium (EC-CM) obtained from the hypoxia/reperfusion group. However, after incubation with EC-CM and following treatment with the ASK1 inhibitor NQDI-1, neuronal cell death was efficiently decreased. We conclude that suppressing ASK1 decreases MMP-9 activity in brain endothelial cells, and leads to decreased neuronal cell death after ischemic injury. PMID:27642277

  10. Blockade of Apoptosis Signal-Regulating Kinase 1 Attenuates Matrix Metalloproteinase 9 Activity in Brain Endothelial Cells and the Subsequent Apoptosis in Neurons after Ischemic Injury

    PubMed Central

    Cheon, So Y.; Cho, Kyoung J.; Kim, So Y.; Kam, Eun H.; Lee, Jong E.; Koo, Bon-Nyeo

    2016-01-01

    Conditions of increased oxidative stress including cerebral ischemia can lead to blood–brain barrier dysfunction via matrix metalloproteinase (MMP). It is known that MMP-9 in particular is released from brain endothelial cells is involved in the neuronal cell death that occurs after cerebral ischemia. In the intracellular signaling network, apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 (ASK1) is the main activator of the oxidative stress that is part of the pathogenesis of cerebral ischemia. ASK1 also promotes apoptotic cell death and brain infarction after ischemia and is associated with vascular permeability and the formation of brain edema. However, the relationship between ASK1 and MMP-9 after cerebral ischemia remains unknown. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to determine whether blocking ASK1 would affect MMP-9 activity in the ischemic brain and cultured brain endothelial cells. Our results showed that ASK1 inhibition efficiently reduced MMP-9 activity in vivo and in vitro. In endothelial cell cultures, ASK1 inhibition upregulated phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt/nuclear factor erythroid 2 [NF-E2]-related factor 2/heme oxygenase-1 signals and downregulated cyclooxygenase-2 signals after hypoxia/reperfusion. Additionally, in neuronal cell cultures, cell death occurred when neurons were incubated with endothelial cell-conditioned medium (EC-CM) obtained from the hypoxia/reperfusion group. However, after incubation with EC-CM and following treatment with the ASK1 inhibitor NQDI-1, neuronal cell death was efficiently decreased. We conclude that suppressing ASK1 decreases MMP-9 activity in brain endothelial cells, and leads to decreased neuronal cell death after ischemic injury. PMID:27642277

  11. Aminofurazans as potent inhibitors of AKT kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Rouse, Meagan B.; Seefeld, Mark A.; Leber, Jack D.; McNulty, Kenneth C.; Sun, Lihui; Miller, William H.; Zhang, ShuYun; Minthorn, Elisabeth A.; Concha, Nestor O.; Choudhry, Anthony E.; Schaber, Michael D.; Heerding, Dirk A.

    2009-06-24

    AKT inhibitors containing an imidazopyridine aminofurazan scaffold have been optimized. We have previously disclosed identification of the AKT inhibitor GSK690693, which has been evaluated in clinical trials in cancer patients. Herein we describe recent efforts focusing on investigating a distinct region of this scaffold that have afforded compounds (30 and 32) with comparable activity profiles to that of GSK690693.

  12. mTORC2 Signaling Regulates Nox4-Induced Podocyte Depletion in Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Eid, Stéphanie; Boutary, Suzan; Braych, Kawthar; Sabra, Ramzi; Massaad, Charbel; Hamdy, Ahmed; Rashid, Awad; Moodad, Sarah; Block, Karen; Gorin, Yves; Abboud, Hanna E.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Aim: Podocyte apoptosis is a critical mechanism for excessive loss of urinary albumin that eventuates in kidney fibrosis. Oxidative stress plays a critical role in hyperglycemia-induced glomerular injury. We explored the hypothesis that mammalian target of rapamycin complex 2 (mTORC2) mediates podocyte injury in diabetes. Results: High glucose (HG)-induced podocyte injury reflected by alterations in the slit diaphragm protein podocin and podocyte depletion/apoptosis. This was paralleled by activation of the Rictor/mTORC2/Akt pathway. HG also increased the levels of Nox4 and NADPH oxidase activity. Inhibition of mTORC2 using small interfering RNA (siRNA)-targeting Rictor in vitro decreased HG-induced Nox1 and Nox4, NADPH oxidase activity, restored podocin levels, and reduced podocyte depletion/apoptosis. Inhibition of mTORC2 had no effect on mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) activation, described by our group to be increased in diabetes, suggesting that the mTORC2 activation by HG could mediate podocyte injury independently of mTORC1. In isolated glomeruli of OVE26 mice, there was a similar activation of the Rictor/mTORC2/Akt signaling pathway with increase in Nox4 and NADPH oxidase activity. Inhibition of mTORC2 using antisense oligonucleotides targeting Rictor restored podocin levels, reduced podocyte depletion/apoptosis, and attenuated glomerular injury and albuminuria. Innovation: Our data provide evidence for a novel function of mTORC2 in NADPH oxidase-derived reactive oxygen species generation and podocyte apoptosis that contributes to urinary albumin excretion in type 1 diabetes. Conclusion: mTORC2 and/or NADPH oxidase inhibition may represent a therapeutic modality for diabetic kidney disease. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 25, 703–719. PMID:27393154

  13. Striatal adenosine signaling regulates EAAT2 and astrocytic AQP4 expression and alcohol drinking in mice.

    PubMed

    Lee, Moonnoh R; Ruby, Christina L; Hinton, David J; Choi, Sun; Adams, Chelsea A; Young Kang, Na; Choi, Doo-Sup

    2013-02-01

    Adenosine signaling is implicated in several neuropsychiatric disorders, including alcoholism. Among its diverse functions in the brain, adenosine regulates glutamate release and has an essential role in ethanol sensitivity and preference. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying adenosine-mediated glutamate signaling in neuroglial interaction remain elusive. We have previously shown that mice lacking the ethanol-sensitive adenosine transporter, type 1 equilibrative nucleoside transporter (ENT1), drink more ethanol compared with wild-type mice and have elevated striatal glutamate levels. In addition, ENT1 inhibition or knockdown reduces glutamate transporter expression in cultured astrocytes. Here, we examined how adenosine signaling in astrocytes contributes to ethanol drinking. Inhibition or deletion of ENT1 reduced the expression of type 2 excitatory amino-acid transporter (EAAT2) and the astrocyte-specific water channel, aquaporin 4 (AQP4). EAAT2 and AQP4 colocalization was also reduced in the striatum of ENT1 null mice. Ceftriaxone, an antibiotic compound known to increase EAAT2 expression and function, elevated not only EAAT2 but also AQP4 expression in the striatum. Furthermore, ceftriaxone reduced ethanol drinking, suggesting that ENT1-mediated downregulation of EAAT2 and AQP4 expression contributes to excessive ethanol consumption in our mouse model. Overall, our findings indicate that adenosine signaling regulates EAAT2 and astrocytic AQP4 expressions, which control ethanol drinking in mice.

  14. Wnt-Lrp5 Signaling Regulates Fatty Acid Metabolism in the Osteoblast

    PubMed Central

    Frey, Julie L.; Li, Zhu; Ellis, Jessica M.; Zhang, Qian; Farber, Charles R.; Aja, Susan; Wolfgang, Michael J.; Clemens, Thomas L.

    2015-01-01

    The Wnt coreceptors Lrp5 and Lrp6 are essential for normal postnatal bone accrual and osteoblast function. In this study, we identify a previously unrecognized skeletal function unique to Lrp5 that enables osteoblasts to oxidize fatty acids. Mice lacking the Lrp5 coreceptor specifically in osteoblasts and osteocytes exhibit the expected reductions in postnatal bone mass but also exhibit an increase in body fat with corresponding reductions in energy expenditure. Conversely, mice expressing a high bone mass mutant Lrp5 allele are leaner with reduced plasma triglyceride and free fatty acid levels. In this context, Wnt-initiated signals downstream of Lrp5, but not the closely related Lrp6 coreceptor, regulate the activation of β-catenin and thereby induce the expression of key enzymes required for fatty acid β-oxidation. These results suggest that Wnt-Lrp5 signaling regulates basic cellular activities beyond those associated with fate specification and differentiation in bone and that the skeleton influences global energy homeostasis via mechanisms independent of osteocalcin and glucose metabolism. PMID:25802278

  15. TrkB/BDNF Signaling Regulates Photoreceptor Progenitor Cell Fate Decisions

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Brian A.; Sparrow, Janet; Cai, Bolin; Monroe, Julie; Mikawa, Takashi; Hempstead, Barbara L.

    2008-01-01

    Neurotrophins, via activation of Trk receptor tyrosine kinases, serve as mitogens, survival factors and regulators of arborization during retinal development. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and TrkB regulate neuronal arborization and survival in late retinal development. However, TrkB is expressed during early retinal developmet where its functions are unclear. To assess TrkB/BDNF actions in the early chick retina, replication-incompetent retroviruses were utilized to over-express a dominant negative truncated form of TrkB (trunc TrkB), or BDNF and effects were assessed at E15. Clones expressing trunc TrkB were smaller than controls, and proliferation and apoptosis assays suggest that decreased clone size correlated with increased cell death when BDNF/TrkB signaling was impaired. Analysis of clonal composition revealed that trunc TrkB over-expression decreased photoreceptor numbers (41%) and increased cell numbers in the middle third of the inner nuclear layer (INL) (23%). Conversely, BDNF over-expression increased photoreceptor numbers (25%) and decreased INL numbers (17%). Photoreceptors over-expressing trunc TrkB demonstrated no increase in apoptosis nor abnormalities in lamination suggesting that TrkB activation is not required for photoreceptor cell survival or migration. These studies suggest that TrkB signaling regulates commitment to and/or differentiation of photoreceptor cells from retinal progenitor cells, identifying a novel role for TrkB/BDNF in regulating cell fate decisions. PMID:17005175

  16. Bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling regulates mitotic checkpoint protein levels in human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Yan, Hualong; Zhu, Songcheng; Song, Chenlin; Liu, Naifa; Kang, Jiuhong

    2012-04-01

    Aberrant expression of mitotic checkpoint genes compromises mitotic checkpoint, leads to chromosome instability and tumorigenesis. However, the cell signals that control mitotic checkpoint gene expression have not been reported so far. In the present study we show that, in human breast cancer cells, chemical inhibition of Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs), but not Transforming Growth Factor-β (TGF-β), abrogates the mitotic arrest induced by nocodazole. Protein expression analysis reveals that inhibition of BMP signaling dramatically down regulates protein levels of mitotic checkpoint components BUB3, Hec1, TTK and MAD2, but inhibition of TGF-β has relatively minor effect on the expression of these proteins. Activation of BMP signaling specifically up regulates BUB3, and activation of Activin A signaling globally down regulates these proteins level. Furthermore, overexpressing MAD2, TTK, BUB3 or Hec1 significantly rescues the mitotic arrest defect caused by BMP inhibition. Our results demonstrated for the first time that TGF-β family cytokines are cellular signals regulating mitotic checkpoint and perturbations in intrinsic BMP signaling could lead to suppression of mitotic checkpoint signaling by downregulating key checkpoint proteins. The results suggest a possible mechanism by which dysregulation of TGF-β signaling causes mitotic checkpoint defects and drives tumorigenesis. The finding also provides a potential and more specific strategy for cancer prevention by targeting BMP and mitotic checkpoint connection. PMID:22234345

  17. Redox signaling regulated by an electrophilic cyclic nucleotide and reactive cysteine persulfides.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Shigemoto; Sawa, Tomohiro; Nishida, Motohiro; Ihara, Hideshi; Ida, Tomoaki; Motohashi, Hozumi; Akaike, Takaaki

    2016-04-01

    Reactive oxygen (oxidant) and free radical species are known to cause nonspecific damage of various biological molecules. The oxidant toxicology is developing an emerging concept of the physiological functions of reactive oxygen species in cell signaling regulation. Redox signaling is precisely modulated by endogenous electrophilic substances that are generated from reactive oxygen species during cellular oxidative stress responses. Among diverse electrophilic molecular species that are endogenously generated, 8-nitroguanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (8-nitro-cGMP) is a unique second messenger whose formation, signaling, and metabolism in cells was recently clarified. Most important, our current studies revealed that reactive cysteine persulfides that are formed abundantly in cells are critically involved in the metabolism of 8-nitro-cGMP. Modern redox biology involves frontiers of cell research and stem cell research; medical and clinical investigations of infections, cancer, metabolic syndrome, aging, and neurodegenerative diseases; and other fields. 8-Nitro-cGMP-mediated signaling and metabolism in cells may therefore be potential targets for drug development, which may lead to discovery of new therapeutic agents for many diseases. PMID:27095231

  18. Epithelial Notch signaling regulates lung alveolar morphogenesis and airway epithelial integrity

    PubMed Central

    Tsao, Po-Nien; Matsuoka, Chisa; Wei, Shu-Chen; Sato, Atsuyasu; Sato, Susumu; Hasegawa, Koichi; Chen, Hung-kuan; Ling, Thai-Yen; Mori, Munemasa; Cardoso, Wellington V.; Morimoto, Mitsuru

    2016-01-01

    Abnormal enlargement of the alveolar spaces is a hallmark of conditions such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and bronchopulmonary dysplasia. Notch signaling is crucial for differentiation and regeneration and repair of the airway epithelium. However, how Notch influences the alveolar compartment and integrates this process with airway development remains little understood. Here we report a prominent role of Notch signaling in the epithelial–mesenchymal interactions that lead to alveolar formation in the developing lung. We found that alveolar type II cells are major sites of Notch2 activation and show by Notch2-specific epithelial deletion (Notch2cNull) a unique contribution of this receptor to alveologenesis. Epithelial Notch2 was required for type II cell induction of the PDGF-A ligand and subsequent paracrine activation of PDGF receptor-α signaling in alveolar myofibroblast progenitors. Moreover, Notch2 was crucial in maintaining the integrity of the epithelial and smooth muscle layers of the distal conducting airways. Our data suggest that epithelial Notch signaling regulates multiple aspects of postnatal development in the distal lung and may represent a potential target for intervention in pulmonary diseases. PMID:27364009

  19. Apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 mediates denbinobin-induced apoptosis in human lung adenocarcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Chen-Tzu; Chen, Bing-Chang; Yu, Chung-Chi; Weng, Chih-Ming; Hsu, Ming-Jen; Chen, Chien-Chih; Chen, Mei-Chieh; Teng, Che-Ming; Pan, Shiow-Lin; Bien, Mauo-Ying; Shih, Chung-Hung; Lin, Chien-Huang

    2009-01-01

    In the present study, we explore the role of apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 (ASK1) in denbinobin-induced apoptosis in human lung adenocarcinoma (A549) cells. Denbinobin-induced cell apoptosis was attenuated by an ASK1 dominant-negative mutant (ASK1DN), two antioxidants (N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) and glutathione (GSH)), a c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) inhibitor (SP600125), and an activator protein-1 (AP-1) inhibitor (curcumin). Treatment of A549 cells with denbinobin caused increases in ASK1 activity and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, and these effects were inhibited by NAC and GSH. Stimulation of A549 cells with denbinobin caused JNK activation; this effect was markedly inhibited by NAC, GSH, and ASK1DN. Denbinobin induced c-Jun phosphorylation, the formation of an AP-1-specific DNA-protein complex, and Bim expression. Bim knockdown using a bim short interfering RNA strategy also reduced denbinobin-induced A549 cell apoptosis. The denbinobin-mediated increases in c-Jun phosphorylation and Bim expression were inhibited by NAC, GSH, SP600125, ASK1DN, JNK1DN, and JNK2DN. These results suggest that denbinobin might activate ASK1 through ROS production to cause JNK/AP-1 activation, which in turn induces Bim expression, and ultimately results in A549 cell apoptosis. PMID:19405983

  20. Selenium suppresses oxidative-stress-enhanced vascular smooth muscle cell calcification by inhibiting the activation of the PI3K/AKT and ERK signaling pathways and endoplasmic reticulum stress.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hongmei; Li, Xiaoming; Qin, Fei; Huang, Kaixun

    2014-03-01

    Vascular calcification is a prominent feature of many diseases, including atherosclerosis, and it has emerged as a powerful predictor of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. A number of studies have examined the association between selenium and risk of cardiovascular diseases, but little is known about the role of selenium in vascular calcification. To determine the role of selenium in regulating vascular calcification, we assessed the effect of sodium selenite on oxidative-stress-enhanced vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) calcification and the underlying mechanism. Oxidative stress induced by xanthine/xanthine oxidase increased apoptosis, as determined by Hoechst 33342 staining and annexin V/propidium iodide staining, and it enhanced osteoblastic differentiation and calcification of VSMCs, on the basis of alkaline phosphatase activity, the expression of Runx2 and type I collagen, and calcium deposition. These effects of oxidative stress were significantly inhibited by selenite. The following processes may explain the inhibitory effects of selenite: (1) selenite significantly suppressed oxidative stress, as evidenced by the decrease of the oxidative status of the cell and lipid peroxidation levels, as well as by the increase of the total protein thiol content and the activity of the antioxidant selenoenzyme glutathione peroxidase; (2) selenite significantly attenuated oxidative-stress-induced activation of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/AKT and extracellular-signal-regulated kinase signaling pathways, resulting in decreased osteoblastic differentiation of VSMCs; (3) selenite significantly inhibited oxidative-stress-activated endoplasmic reticulum stress, thereby leading to decreased apoptosis. Our results suggest a potential role of selenium in the prevention of vascular calcification, which may provide more mechanistic insights into the relationship between selenium and cardiovascular diseases.

  1. Umbilical cord tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells induce apoptosis in PC-3 prostate cancer cells through activation of JNK and downregulation of PI3K/AKT signaling

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Although mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have antitumor potential in hepatocellular carcinoma and breast cancer cells, the antitumor mechanism of human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells (hUCMSCs) in prostate cancer cells still remains unclear. Thus, in the present study, we elucidated the antitumor activity of hUCMSCs in PC-3 prostate cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. Methods hUCMSCs were isolated from Wharton jelly of umbilical cord and characterized via induction of differentiations, osteogenesis, and adipogenesis. Antitumor effects of UCMSCs on tumor growth were evaluated in a co-culture condition with PC-3 prostate cancer cells. PC-3 cells were subcutaneously (sc) injected into the left flank of nude mice, and UCMSCs were sc injected into the right flank of the same mouse. Results We found that hUCMSCs inhibited the proliferation of PC-3 cells in the co-culture condition. Furthermore, co-culture of hUCMSCs induced the cleavage of caspase 9/3 and PARP, activated c-jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK), and Bax, and attenuated the phosphorylation of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/ AKT, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), and the expression of survival genes such as Bcl-2, Bcl-xL, Survivin, Mcl-1, and cIAP-1 in PC-3 cells in Western blotting assay. Conversely, we found that treatment of specific JNK inhibitor SP600125 suppressed the cleavages of caspase 9/3 and PARP induced by hUCMSCs in PC-3 cells by Western blotting and immunofluorescence assay. The homing of hUCMSCs to, and TUNEL-positive cells on, the K562 xenograft tumor region were detected in Nu/nu-BALB/c mouse. Conclusions These results suggest that UCMSCs inhibit tumor growth and have the antitumor potential for PC-3 prostate cancer treatment. PMID:24739733

  2. Akt signaling dynamics in individual cells

    PubMed Central

    Gross, Sean M.; Rotwein, Peter

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The protein kinase Akt (for which there are three isoforms) is a key intracellular mediator of many biological processes, yet knowledge of Akt signaling dynamics is limited. Here, we have constructed a fluorescent reporter molecule in a lentiviral delivery system to assess Akt kinase activity at the single cell level. The reporter, a fusion between a modified FoxO1 transcription factor and clover, a green fluorescent protein, rapidly translocates from the nucleus to the cytoplasm in response to Akt stimulation. Because of its long half-life and the intensity of clover fluorescence, the sensor provides a robust readout that can be tracked for days under a range of biological conditions. Using this reporter, we find that stimulation of Akt activity by IGF-I is encoded into stable and reproducible analog responses at the population level, but that single cell signaling outcomes are variable. This reporter, which provides a simple and dynamic measure of Akt activity, should be compatible with many cell types and experimental platforms, and thus opens the door to new insights into how Akt regulates its biological responses. PMID:26040286

  3. Microtubules regulate GEF-H1 in response to extracellular matrix stiffness

    PubMed Central

    Heck, Jessica N.; Ponik, Suzanne M.; Garcia-Mendoza, Maria G.; Pehlke, Carolyn A.; Inman, David R.; Eliceiri, Kevin W.; Keely, Patricia J.

    2012-01-01

    Breast epithelial cells sense the stiffness of the extracellular matrix through Rho-mediated contractility. In turn, matrix stiffness regulates RhoA activity. However, the upstream signaling mechanisms are poorly defined. Here we demonstrate that the Rho exchange factor GEF-H1 mediates RhoA activation in response to extracellular matrix stiffness. We demonstrate the novel finding that microtubule stability is diminished by a stiff three-dimensional (3D) extracellular matrix, which leads to the activation of GEF-H1. Surprisingly, activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase/extracellular signal-regulated kinase pathway did not contribute to stiffness-induced GEF-H1 activation. Loss of GEF-H1 decreases cell contraction of and invasion through 3D matrices. These data support a model in which matrix stiffness regulates RhoA through microtubule destabilization and the subsequent release and activation of GEF-H1. PMID:22593214

  4. Activation of Erk1/2 and Akt following unilateral ureteral obstruction.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Peña, Ana B; Grande, Maria T; Eleno, Nélida; Arévalo, Miguel; Guerrero, Carmen; Santos, Eugerio; López-Novoa, José M

    2008-07-01

    Chronic unilateral ureteral obstruction is a well characterized model of renal injury leading to tubulointerstitial fibrosis and distinct patterns of cell proliferation and apoptosis in the obstructed kidney. In this study we assessed the contribution of the mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK)-ERK1/2 and the phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase (PI3K)-Akt pathways to early renal changes following unilateral obstruction. Increased activation of small Ras GTPase and its downstream effectors ERK1/2 and Akt was detected in ligated kidneys. The use of specific pharmacological inhibitors to either ERK1/2 or Akt activation led to decreased levels of fibroblast-myofibroblast markers in the interstitium while inhibition of PI3K reduced the number of proliferating cells and the amount of interstitial extracellular matrix deposition. Treatment with an ERK1/2 inhibitor diminished the number of apoptotic tubule and interstitial cells. Our results suggest a role for the MAPK-ERK1/2 and PI3K-Akt systems in early changes induced by ureteral obstruction and that inhibition of these signaling pathways may provide a novel approach to prevent progression of renal fibrosis.

  5. Signals Regulating the Expression of the Nuclear Gene Encoding Alternative Oxidase of Plant Mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Vanlerberghe, G. C.; McLntosh, L.

    1996-06-01

    Suspension cells of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L. cv Bright Yellow) were used to investigate signals regulating the expression of the nuclear gene Aox1 encoding the mitochondrial alternative oxidase (AOX) protein responsible for cyanide-resistant respiration in plants. We found that an increase in the tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediate citrate (either after its exogenous supply to cells or after inhibition of aconitase by monofluoroacetate) caused a rapid and dramatic increase in the steady-state level of Aox1 mRNA and AOX protein. This led to a large increase in the capacity for AOX respiration, defined as the amount of salicylhydroxamic acid-sensitive O2 uptake by cells in the presence of potassium cyanide. The results indicate that citrate may be an important signal metabolite regulating Aox1 gene expression. A number of other treatments were also identified that rapidly induced the level of Aox1 mRNA and AOX capacity. These included short-term incubation of cells with 10 mM acetate, 2 [mu]M antimycin A, 5 mM H2O2, or 1 mM cysteine. For some of these treatments, induction of AOX occurred without an increase in cellular citrate level, indicating that other signals (possibly related to oxidative stress conditions) are also important in regulating Aox1 gene expression. The signals influencing Aox1 gene expression are discussed with regard to the potential function(s) of AOX to modulate tricarboxylic acid cycle metabolism and/or to prevent the generation of active oxygen species by the mitochondrial electron transport chain. PMID:12226312

  6. Signals Regulating the Expression of the Nuclear Gene Encoding Alternative Oxidase of Plant Mitochondria.

    PubMed Central

    Vanlerberghe, G. C.; McLntosh, L.

    1996-01-01

    Suspension cells of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L. cv Bright Yellow) were used to investigate signals regulating the expression of the nuclear gene Aox1 encoding the mitochondrial alternative oxidase (AOX) protein responsible for cyanide-resistant respiration in plants. We found that an increase in the tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediate citrate (either after its exogenous supply to cells or after inhibition of aconitase by monofluoroacetate) caused a rapid and dramatic increase in the steady-state level of Aox1 mRNA and AOX protein. This led to a large increase in the capacity for AOX respiration, defined as the amount of salicylhydroxamic acid-sensitive O2 uptake by cells in the presence of potassium cyanide. The results indicate that citrate may be an important signal metabolite regulating Aox1 gene expression. A number of other treatments were also identified that rapidly induced the level of Aox1 mRNA and AOX capacity. These included short-term incubation of cells with 10 mM acetate, 2 [mu]M antimycin A, 5 mM H2O2, or 1 mM cysteine. For some of these treatments, induction of AOX occurred without an increase in cellular citrate level, indicating that other signals (possibly related to oxidative stress conditions) are also important in regulating Aox1 gene expression. The signals influencing Aox1 gene expression are discussed with regard to the potential function(s) of AOX to modulate tricarboxylic acid cycle metabolism and/or to prevent the generation of active oxygen species by the mitochondrial electron transport chain. PMID:12226312

  7. FGF signaling regulates the number of posterior taste papillae by controlling progenitor field size.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Camille I; Jheon, Andrew H; Mostowfi, Pasha; Charles, Cyril; Ching, Saunders; Thirumangalathu, Shoba; Barlow, Linda A; Klein, Ophir D

    2011-06-01

    The sense of taste is fundamental to our ability to ingest nutritious substances and to detect and avoid potentially toxic ones. Sensory taste buds are housed in papillae that develop from epithelial placodes. Three distinct types of gustatory papillae reside on the rodent tongue: small fungiform papillae are found in the anterior tongue, whereas the posterior tongue contains the larger foliate papillae and a single midline circumvallate papilla (CVP). Despite the great variation in the number of CVPs in mammals, its importance in taste function, and its status as the largest of the taste papillae, very little is known about the development of this structure. Here, we report that a balance between Sprouty (Spry) genes and Fgf10, which respectively antagonize and activate receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) signaling, regulates the number of CVPs. Deletion of Spry2 alone resulted in duplication of the CVP as a result of an increase in the size of the placode progenitor field, and Spry1(-/-);Spry2(-/-) embryos had multiple CVPs, demonstrating the redundancy of Sprouty genes in regulating the progenitor field size. By contrast, deletion of Fgf10 led to absence of the CVP, identifying FGF10 as the first inductive, mesenchyme-derived factor for taste papillae. Our results provide the first demonstration of the role of epithelial-mesenchymal FGF signaling in taste papilla development, indicate that regulation of the progenitor field size by FGF signaling is a critical determinant of papilla number, and suggest that the great variation in CVP number among mammalian species may be linked to levels of signaling by the FGF pathway. PMID:21655085

  8. Notch/Rbpjκ signaling regulates progenitor maintenance and differentiation of hypothalamic arcuate neurons

    PubMed Central

    Aujla, Paven K.; Naratadam, George T.; Xu, Liwen; Raetzman, Lori T.

    2013-01-01

    The hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (Arc), containing pro-opoiomelanocortin (POMC), neuropeptide Y (NPY) and growth hormone releasing hormone (GHRH) neurons, regulates feeding, energy balance and body size. Dysregulation of this homeostatic mediator underlies diseases ranging from growth failure to obesity. Despite considerable investigation regarding the function of Arc neurons, mechanisms governing their development remain unclear. Notch signaling factors such as Hes1 and Mash1 are present in hypothalamic progenitors that give rise to Arc neurons. However, how Notch signaling controls these progenitor populations is unknown. To elucidate the role of Notch signaling in Arc development, we analyzed conditional loss-of-function mice lacking a necessary Notch co-factor, Rbpjκ, in Nkx2.1-cre-expressing cells (Rbpjκ cKO), as well as mice with expression of the constitutively active Notch1 intracellular domain (NICD) in Nkx2.1-cre-expressing cells (NICD Tg). We found that loss of Rbpjκ results in absence of Hes1 but not of Hes5 within the primordial Arc at E13.5. Additionally, Mash1 expression is increased, coincident with increased proliferation and accumulation of Arc neurons at E13.5. At E18.5, Rbpjκ cKO mice have few progenitors and show increased numbers of differentiated Pomc, NPY and Ghrh neurons. By contrast, NICD Tg mice have increased hypothalamic progenitors, show an absence of differentiated Arc neurons and aberrant glial differentiation at E18.5. Subsequently, both Rbpjκ cKO and NICD Tg mice have changes in growth and body size during postnatal development. Taken together, our results demonstrate that Notch/Rbpjκ signaling regulates the generation and differentiation of Arc neurons, which contribute to homeostatic regulation of body size. PMID:23884446

  9. Endogenous GAS6 and Mer receptor signaling regulate prostate cancer stem cells in bone marrow

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Younghun; Decker, Ann M.; Wang, Jingcheng; Lee, Eunsohl; Kana, Lulia A.; Yumoto, Kenji; Cackowski, Frank C.; Rhee, James; Carmeliet, Peter; Buttitta, Laura; Morgan, Todd M.; Taichman, Russell S.

    2016-01-01

    GAS6 and its receptors (Tryo 3, Axl, Mer or “TAM”) are known to play a role in regulating tumor progression in a number of settings. Previously we have demonstrated that GAS6 signaling regulates invasion, proliferation, chemotherapy-induced apoptosis of prostate cancer (PCa) cells. We have also demonstrated that GAS6 secreted from osteoblasts in the bone marrow environment plays a critical role in establishing prostate tumor cell dormancy. Here we investigated the role that endogenous GAS6 and Mer receptor signaling plays in establishing prostate cancer stem cells in the bone marrow microenvironment. We first observed that high levels of endogenous GAS6 are expressed by disseminated tumor cells (DTCs) in the bone marrow, whereas relatively low levels of endogenous GAS6 are expressed in PCa tumors grown in a s.c. setting. Interestingly, elevated levels of endogenous GAS6 were identified in putative cancer stem cells (CSCs, CD133+/CD44+) compared to non-CSCs (CD133–/CD44–) isolated from PCa/osteoblast cocultures in vitro and in DTCs isolated from the bone marrow 24 hours after intracardiac injection. Moreover, we found that endogenous GAS6 expression is associated with Mer receptor expression in growth arrested (G1) PCa cells, which correlates with the increase of the CSC populations. Importantly, we found that overexpression of GAS6 activates phosphorylation of Mer receptor signaling and subsequent induction of the CSC phenotype in vitro and in vivo. Together these data suggest that endogenous GAS6 and Mer receptor signaling contribute to the establishment of PCa CSCs in the bone marrow microenvironment, which may have important implications for targeting metastatic disease. PMID:27028863

  10. Honokiol induces autophagy of neuroblastoma cells through activating the PI3K/Akt/mTOR and endoplasmic reticular stress/ERK1/2 signaling pathways and suppressing cell migration.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Poh-Shiow; Wang, Weu; Chang, Ya-An; Lin, Chien-Ju; Wang, Jhi-Joung; Chen, Ruei-Ming

    2016-01-01

    In children, neuroblastomas are the most common and deadly solid tumor. Our previous study showed that honokiol, a small-molecule polyphenol, can traverse the blood-brain barrier and kill neuroblastoma cells. In this study, we further investigated the mechanisms of honokiol-induced insults to neuroblastoma cells. Treatment of neuroblastoma neuro-2a cells with honokiol elevated the levels of microtubule-associated protein light chain 3 (LC3)-II and induced cell autophagy in time- and concentration-dependent manners. Interestingly, pretreatment with 3-methyladenine (3-MA), an inhibitor of autophagy, led to the simultaneous attenuation of honokiol-induced cell autophagy and apoptosis but did not influence cell necrosis. As to the mechanisms, exposure of neuro-2a cells to honokiol time-dependently decreased the amount of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K). Sequentially, honokiol downregulated phosphorylation of protein kinase B (Akt) and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) in neuro-2a cells. Furthermore, honokiol elevated the levels of glucose-regulated protein (GpR)78, an endoplasmic reticular stress (ERS)-associated protein, and amounts of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS). In contrast, reducing production of intracellular ROS using N-acetylcysteine, a scavenger of ROS, concurrently suppressed honokiol-induced cellular autophagy. Consequently, honokiol stimulated phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2. However, pretreatment of neuro-2a cells with PD98059, an inhibitor of ERK1/2, lowered honokiol-induced autophagy. The effects of honokiol on inducing autophagy and apoptosis of neuroblastoma cells were further confirmed using mouse neuroblastoma NB41A3 cells as our experimental model. Fascinatingly, treatment of neuroblastoma neuro-2a and NB41A3 cells with honokiol for 12 h did not affect cell autophagy or apoptosis but caused significant suppression of cell migration. Taken together, this study showed that honokiol can induce

  11. Exogenous spermine inhibits the proliferation of human pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells caused by chemically-induced hypoxia via the suppression of the ERK1/2- and PI3K/AKT-associated pathways

    PubMed Central

    WEI, CAN; LI, HONG-ZHU; WANG, YUE-HONG; PENG, XUE; SHAO, HONG-JIANG; LI, HONG-XIA; BAI, SHU-ZHI; LU, XIAO-XIAO; WU, LING-YUN; WANG, RUI; XU, CHANG-QING

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary vascular remodeling is a significant pathological feature of hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension (HPH), while pulmonary artery smooth muscle cell (PASMC) proliferation plays a leading role in pulmonary vascular remodeling. Spermine (Sp), a polyamine, plays a critical role in periodic cell proliferation and apoptosis. The present study was conducted to observe the association between hypoxia-induced PASMC proliferation and polyamine metabolism, and to explore the effects of exogenous Sp on PASMC poliferation and the related mechanisms. In the present study, PASMCs were cultured with cobalt chloride (CoCl2) to establish a hypoxia model, and Sp at various final concentrations (0.1, 1, 10 and 100 µM) was added to the medium of PASMCs 40 min prior to the induction of hypoxia. Cell proliferation was measured by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay, cell counting kit-8 assay and 5-bromo-2′-deoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation assay. Cell cycle progression was determined by flow cytometry, and the protein expression levels of spermidine/spermine N1-acetyltransferase (SSAT; the key enzyme in the terminal degradation of polyamine), ornithine decar boxylase (ODC; the key enzyme of polyamine biosynthesis), cyclin D1 and p27 were measured by western blot analysis. The results revealed that the proliferation of the PASMCs cultured with CoCl2 at 50 µM for 24 h markedly increased. The expression of ODC was decreased and the expression of SSAT was increased in the cells under hypoxic conditions. Exogenous Sp at concentrations of 1 and 10 µM significantly inhibited hypoxia induced PASMC proliferation, leading to cell cycle arrest at the G1/G0 phase. In addition, Sp decreased cyclin D1 expression, increased p27 expression, and suppressed the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2), phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) and protein kinase B (AKT); however, the above-metioned parameters were not markedly

  12. Reduction of metastasis, cell invasion, and adhesion in mouse osteosarcoma by YM529/ONO-5920-induced blockade of the Ras/MEK/ERK and Ras/PI3K/Akt pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Tsubaki, Masanobu; Satou, Takao; Itoh, Tatsuki; Imano, Motohiro; Ogaki, Mitsuhiko; Yanae, Masashi; Nishida, Shozo

    2012-03-15

    Osteosarcoma is one of the most common primary malignant bone tumors in children and adolescents. Some patients continue to have a poor prognosis, because of the metastatic disease. YM529/ONO-5920 is a nitrogen-containing bisphosphonate that has been used for the treatment of osteoporosis. YM529/ONO-5920 has recently been reported to induce apoptosis in various tumors including osteosarcoma. However, the mode of metastasis suppression in osteosarcoma by YM529/ONO-5920 is unclear. In the present study, we investigated whether YM529/ONO-5920 inhibited tumor cell migration, invasion, adhesion, or metastasis in the LM8 mouse osteosarcoma cell line. We found that YM529/ONO-5920 significantly inhibited metastasis, cell migration, invasion, and adhesion at concentrations that did not have antiproliferative effects on LM8 cells. YM529/ONO-5920 also inhibited the mRNA expression and protein activities of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). In addition, YM529/ONO-5920 suppressed phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) and the serine/threonine protein kinase B (Akt) by the inhibition of Ras prenylation. Moreover, U0126, a mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK) 1/2 inhibitor, and LY294002, a phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor, also inhibited LM8 cell migration, invasion, adhesion, and metastasis, as well as the mRNA expression and protein activities of MMP-1, MMP-2, MMP-9, and MT1-MMP. The results indicated that YM529/ONO-5920 suppressed the Ras/MEK/ERK and Ras/PI3K/Akt pathways, thereby inhibiting LM8 cell migration, invasion, adhesion, and metastasis. These findings suggest that YM529/ONO-5920 has potential clinical applications for the treatment of tumor cell metastasis in osteosarcoma. -- Highlights: ► We investigated whether YM529/ONO-5920 inhibited tumor metastasis in osteosarcoma. ► YM529/ONO-5920 inhibited metastasis, cell migration, invasion, and adhesion. ► YM529/ONO-5920 suppressed Ras signalings. ► YM529/ONO-5920

  13. Alisertib induces cell cycle arrest and autophagy and suppresses epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition involving PI3K/Akt/mTOR and sirtuin 1-mediated signaling pathways in human pancreatic cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Feng; Li, Hai; Yan, Xiao-Gang; Zhou, Zhi-Wei; Yi, Zhi-Gang; He, Zhi-Xu; Pan, Shu-Ting; Yang, Yin-Xue; Wang, Zuo-Zheng; Zhang, Xueji; Yang, Tianxing; Qiu, Jia-Xuan; Zhou, Shu-Feng

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the most aggressive cancer worldwide with poor response to current therapeutics. Alisertib (ALS), a potent and selective Aurora kinase A inhibitor, exhibits potent anticancer effects in preclinical and clinical studies; however, the effect and underlying mechanism of ALS in the pancreatic cancer treatment remain elusive. This study aimed to examine the effects of ALS on cell growth, autophagy, and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and to delineate the possible molecular mechanisms in human pancreatic cancer PANC-1 and BxPC-3 cells. The results showed that ALS exerted potent cell growth inhibitory, pro-autophagic, and EMT-suppressing effects in PANC-1 and BxPC-3 cells. ALS remarkably arrested PANC-1 and BxPC-3 cells in G2/M phase via regulating the expression of cyclin-dependent kinases 1 and 2, cyclin B1, cyclin D1, p21 Waf1/Cip1, p27 Kip1, and p53. ALS concentration-dependently induced autophagy in PANC-1 and BxPC-3 cells, which may be attributed to the inhibition of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/protein kinase B (Akt)/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK), and extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 (Erk1/2) but activation of 5′-AMP-dependent kinase signaling pathways. ALS significantly inhibited EMT in PANC-1 and BxPC-3 cells with an increase in the expression of E-cadherin and a decrease in N-cadherin. In addition, ALS suppressed the expression of sirtuin 1 (Sirt1) and pre-B cell colony-enhancing factor/visfatin in both cell lines with a rise in the level of acetylated p53. These findings show that ALS induces cell cycle arrest and promotes autophagic cell death but inhibits EMT in pancreatic cancer cells with the involvement of PI3K/Akt/mTOR, p38 MAPK, Erk1/2, and Sirt1-mediated signaling pathways. Taken together, ALS may represent a promising anticancer drug for pancreatic cancer treatment. More studies are warranted to investigate other molecular targets and

  14. Honokiol induces autophagy of neuroblastoma cells through activating the PI3K/Akt/mTOR and endoplasmic reticular stress/ERK1/2 signaling pathways and suppressing cell migration.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Poh-Shiow; Wang, Weu; Chang, Ya-An; Lin, Chien-Ju; Wang, Jhi-Joung; Chen, Ruei-Ming

    2016-01-01

    In children, neuroblastomas are the most common and deadly solid tumor. Our previous study showed that honokiol, a small-molecule polyphenol, can traverse the blood-brain barrier and kill neuroblastoma cells. In this study, we further investigated the mechanisms of honokiol-induced insults to neuroblastoma cells. Treatment of neuroblastoma neuro-2a cells with honokiol elevated the levels of microtubule-associated protein light chain 3 (LC3)-II and induced cell autophagy in time- and concentration-dependent manners. Interestingly, pretreatment with 3-methyladenine (3-MA), an inhibitor of autophagy, led to the simultaneous attenuation of honokiol-induced cell autophagy and apoptosis but did not influence cell necrosis. As to the mechanisms, exposure of neuro-2a cells to honokiol time-dependently decreased the amount of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K). Sequentially, honokiol downregulated phosphorylation of protein kinase B (Akt) and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) in neuro-2a cells. Furthermore, honokiol elevated the levels of glucose-regulated protein (GpR)78, an endoplasmic reticular stress (ERS)-associated protein, and amounts of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS). In contrast, reducing production of intracellular ROS using N-acetylcysteine, a scavenger of ROS, concurrently suppressed honokiol-induced cellular autophagy. Consequently, honokiol stimulated phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2. However, pretreatment of neuro-2a cells with PD98059, an inhibitor of ERK1/2, lowered honokiol-induced autophagy. The effects of honokiol on inducing autophagy and apoptosis of neuroblastoma cells were further confirmed using mouse neuroblastoma NB41A3 cells as our experimental model. Fascinatingly, treatment of neuroblastoma neuro-2a and NB41A3 cells with honokiol for 12 h did not affect cell autophagy or apoptosis but caused significant suppression of cell migration. Taken together, this study showed that honokiol can induce

  15. Alisertib induces cell cycle arrest and autophagy and suppresses epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition involving PI3K/Akt/mTOR and sirtuin 1-mediated signaling pathways in human pancreatic cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Feng; Li, Hai; Yan, Xiao-Gang; Zhou, Zhi-Wei; Yi, Zhi-Gang; He, Zhi-Xu; Pan, Shu-Ting; Yang, Yin-Xue; Wang, Zuo-Zheng; Zhang, Xueji; Yang, Tianxing; Qiu, Jia-Xuan; Zhou, Shu-Feng

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the most aggressive cancer worldwide with poor response to current therapeutics. Alisertib (ALS), a potent and selective Aurora kinase A inhibitor, exhibits potent anticancer effects in preclinical and clinical studies; however, the effect and underlying mechanism of ALS in the pancreatic cancer treatment remain elusive. This study aimed to examine the effects of ALS on cell growth, autophagy, and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and to delineate the possible molecular mechanisms in human pancreatic cancer PANC-1 and BxPC-3 cells. The results showed that ALS exerted potent cell growth inhibitory, pro-autophagic, and EMT-suppressing effects in PANC-1 and BxPC-3 cells. ALS remarkably arrested PANC-1 and BxPC-3 cells in G2/M phase via regulating the expression of cyclin-dependent kinases 1 and 2, cyclin B1, cyclin D1, p21 Waf1/Cip1, p27 Kip1, and p53. ALS concentration-dependently induced autophagy in PANC-1 and BxPC-3 cells, which may be attributed to the inhibition of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/protein kinase B (Akt)/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK), and extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 (Erk1/2) but activation of 5'-AMP-dependent kinase signaling pathways. ALS significantly inhibited EMT in PANC-1 and BxPC-3 cells with an increase in the expression of E-cadherin and a decrease in N-cadherin. In addition, ALS suppressed the expression of sirtuin 1 (Sirt1) and pre-B cell colony-enhancing factor/visfatin in both cell lines with a rise in the level of acetylated p53. These findings show that ALS induces cell cycle arrest and promotes autophagic cell death but inhibits EMT in pancreatic cancer cells with the involvement of PI3K/Akt/mTOR, p38 MAPK, Erk1/2, and Sirt1-mediated signaling pathways. Taken together, ALS may represent a promising anticancer drug for pancreatic cancer treatment. More studies are warranted to investigate other molecular targets and

  16. Autophagy-related Gene 7 (ATG7) and Reactive Oxygen Species/Extracellular Signal-regulated Kinase Regulate Tetrandrine-induced Autophagy in Human Hepatocellular Carcinoma*

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Ke; Chen, Chao; Zhan, Yao; Chen, Yan; Huang, Zebo; Li, Wenhua

    2012-01-01

    Tetrandrine, a bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloid isolated from the broadly used Chinese medicinal herb Stephaniae tetrandrae, exhibits potent antitumor effects and has the potential to be used as a cancer chemotherapeutic agent. We previously reported that high concentrations of tetrandrine induce apoptosis in liver cancer cells. Here, we found that in human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells, a low dose of tetrandrine (5 μm) induced the expression of LC3-II, resulted in the formation of acidic autophagolysosome vacuoles (AVOs), and caused a punctate fluorescence pattern with the GFP-LC3 protein, which all are markers for cellular autophagy. Tetrandrine induced the production of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), and treatment with ROS scavengers significantly abrogated the tetrandrine-induced autophagy. These results suggest that the generation of ROS plays an important role in promoting tetrandrine-induced autophagy. Tetrandrine-induced mitochondrial dysfunction resulted in ROS accumulation and autophagy. ROS generation activated the ERK MAP kinase, and the ERK signaling pathway at least partially contributed to tetrandrine-induced autophagy in HCC cells. Moreover, we found that tetrandrine transcriptionally regulated the expression of autophagy related gene 7 (ATG7), which promoted tetrandrine-induced autophagy. In addition to in vitro studies, similar results were also observed in vivo, where tetrandrine caused the accumulation of ROS and induced cell autophagy in a tumor xenograft model. Interestingly, tetrandrine treatment also induced autophagy in a ROS-dependent manner in C. elegans muscle cells. Therefore, these findings suggest that tetrandrine is a potent autophagy agonist and may be a promising clinical chemotherapeutic agent. PMID:22927446

  17. Extracellular Signal-regulated Kinase Activation Is Required for Serine 727 Phosphorylation of STAT3 in Schwann Cells in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyun Kyoung; Jung, Junyang; Lee, Sang Hwa; Seo, Su-Yeong; Suh, Duk Joon

    2009-01-01

    In the peripheral nerves, injury-induced cytokines and growth factors perform critical functions in the activation of both the MEK/ERK and JAK/STAT3 pathways. In this study, we determined that nerve injury-induced ERK activation was temporally correlated with STAT3 phosphorylation at the serine 727 residue. In cultured Schwann cells, we noted that ERK activation is required for the serine phosphorylation of STAT3 by neuropoietic cytokine interleukin-6 (IL-6). Serine phosphorylated STAT3 by IL-6 was transported into Schwann cell nuclei, thereby indicating that ERK may regulate the transcriptional activity of STAT3 via the induction of serine phosphorylation of STAT3. Neuregulin-1 (NRG) also induced the serine phosphorylation of STAT3 in an ERK-dependent fashion. In contrast with the IL-6 response, serine phosphorylated STAT3 induced by NRG was not detected in the nucleus, thus indicating the non-nuclear function of serine phosphorylated STAT3 in response to NRG. Finally, we determined that the inhibition of ERK prevented injury-induced serine phosphorylation of STAT3 in an ex-vivo explants culture of the sciatic nerves. Collectively, the results of this study show that ERK may be an upstream kinase for the serine phosphorylation of STAT3 induced by multiple stimuli in Schwann cells after peripheral nerve injury. PMID:19885032

  18. Activated extracellular signal-regulated kinases are necessary and sufficient to initiate tubulogenesis in renal tubular MDCK strain I cell cysts.

    PubMed

    Hellman, Nathan E; Greco, Andres J; Rogers, Katherine K; Kanchagar, Chitra; Balkovetz, Daniel F; Lipschutz, Joshua H

    2005-10-01

    A classic in vitro model of renal cyst and tubule formation utilizes the Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cell line, of which two strains exist. Most cyst and tubule formation studies that utilized MDCK cells have been performed with MDCK strain II cells. MDCK strain II cells form hollow cysts in a three-dimensional collagen matrix over 10 days and tubulate in response to hepatocyte growth factor, which increases levels of active (phosphorylated) ERK1/2. In this study, we demonstrate that MDCK strain I cells also form cysts when grown in a collagen matrix; however, MDCK strain I cell cysts spontaneously initiate the primary steps in tubulogenesis. Analysis of time-lapse microscopy of both MDCK strain I and strain II cell cysts during the initial stages of tubulogenesis demonstrates a highly dynamic process with cellular extensions and retractions occurring rapidly and continuously. MDCK strain I cell cysts can spontaneously initiate tubulogenesis mainly because of relatively higher levels of active ERK in MDCK strain I, compared with strain II, cells. The presence of either of two distinct inhibitors of ERK activation (UO126 and PD09059) prevents tubulogenesis from occurring spontaneously in MDCK strain I cell cysts and, in response to hepatocyte growth factor, in strain II cell cysts. The difference between MDCK strain I and strain II cell lines is likely explained by differing embryological origins, with strain I cells being of collecting duct, and hence ureteric bud, origin. Ureteric bud cells also have high levels of active ERK and spontaneously tubulate in our in vitro collagen gel system, with tubulogenesis inhibited by UO126 and PD09059. These results suggest that a seminal event in kidney development may be the activation of ERK in the mesonephric duct/ureteric bud cells destined to form the collecting tubules.

  19. Extracellular signal-regulated kinase 2 (ERK-2) mediated phosphorylation regulates nucleo-cytoplasmic shuttling and cell growth control of Ras-associated tumor suppressor protein, RASSF2

    SciTech Connect

    Kumari, Gita; Mahalingam, S.

    2009-10-01

    Ras GTPase controls the normal cell growth through binding with an array of effector molecules, such as Raf and PI3-kinase in a GTP-dependent manner. RASSF2, a member of the Ras association domain family, is known to be involved in the suppression of cell growth and is frequently down-regulated in various tumor tissues by promoter hypermethylation. In the present study, we demonstrate that RASSF2 shuttles between nucleus and cytoplasm by a signal-mediated process and its export from the nucleus is sensitive to leptomycin B. Amino acids between 240 to 260 in the C-terminus of RASSF2 harbor a functional nuclear export signal (NES), which is necessary and sufficient for efficient export of RASSF2 from the nucleus. Substitution of conserved Ile254, Val257 and Leu259 within the minimal NES impaired RASSF2 export from the nucleus. In addition, wild type but not the nuclear export defective RASSF2 mutant interacts with export receptor, CRM-1 and exported from the nucleus. Surprisingly, we observed nucleolar localization for the nuclear export defective mutant suggesting the possibility that RASSF2 may localize in different cellular compartments transiently in a cell cycle dependent manner and the observed nuclear localization for wild type protein may be due to faster export kinetics from the nucleolus. Furthermore, our data suggest that RASSF2 is specifically phosphorylated by MAPK/ERK-2 and the inhibitors of MAPK pathway impair the phosphorylation and subsequently block the export of RASSF2 from the nucleus. These data clearly suggest that ERK-2 mediated phosphorylation plays an important role in regulating the nucleo-cytoplasmic shuttling of RASSF2. Interestingly, nuclear import defective mutant of RASSF2 failed to induce cell cycle arrest at G1/S phase and apoptosis suggesting that RASSF2 regulates cell growth in a nuclear localization dependent manner. Collectively, these data provided evidence for the first time that MAPK/ERK-2 mediated phosphorylation regulates nucleo-cytoplasmic transport and cell growth arrest activity of RASSF2. Taken together, the present study suggests that active transport between nucleus and cytoplasm may constitute an important regulatory mechanism for RASSF2 function.

  20. Activating PIK3CA Mutations Induce an Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR)/Extracellular Signal-regulated Kinase (ERK) Paracrine Signaling Axis in Basal-like Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Young, Christian D; Zimmerman, Lisa J; Hoshino, Daisuke; Formisano, Luigi; Hanker, Ariella B; Gatza, Michael L; Morrison, Meghan M; Moore, Preston D; Whitwell, Corbin A; Dave, Bhuvanesh; Stricker, Thomas; Bhola, Neil E; Silva, Grace O; Patel, Premal; Brantley-Sieders, Dana M; Levin, Maren; Horiates, Marina; Palma, Norma A; Wang, Kai; Stephens, Philip J; Perou, Charles M; Weaver, Alissa M; O'Shaughnessy, Joyce A; Chang, Jenny C; Park, Ben Ho; Liebler, Daniel C; Cook, Rebecca S; Arteaga, Carlos L

    2015-07-01

    Mutations in PIK3CA, the gene encoding the p110α catalytic subunit of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) have been shown to transform human mammary epithelial cells (MECs). These mutations are present in all breast cancer subtypes, including basal-like breast cancer (BLBC). Using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS), we identified 72 protein expression changes in human basal-like MECs with knock-in E545K or H1047R PIK3CA mutations versus isogenic MECs with wild-type PIK3CA. Several of these were secreted proteins, cell surface receptors or ECM interacting molecules and were required for growth of PIK3CA mutant cells as well as adjacent cells with wild-type PIK3CA. The proteins identified by MS were enriched among human BLBC cell lines and pointed to a PI3K-dependent amphiregulin/EGFR/ERK signaling axis that is activated in BLBC. Proteins induced by PIK3CA mutations correlated with EGFR signaling and reduced relapse-free survival in BLBC. Treatment with EGFR inhibitors reduced growth of PIK3CA mutant BLBC cell lines and murine mammary tumors driven by a PIK3CA mutant transgene, all together suggesting that PIK3CA mutations promote tumor growth in part by inducing protein changes that activate EGFR. PMID:25953087

  1. Advanced glycation endproducts mediate pro-inflammatory actions in human gestational tissues via nuclear factor-kappaB and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2.

    PubMed

    Lappas, Martha; Permezel, Michael; Rice, Gregory E

    2007-05-01

    Processes of human labour include increased oxidative stress, formation of inflammatory mediators (e.g. cytokines) and uterotonic phospholipid metabolites (e.g. prostaglandins). In non-gestational tissues, advanced glycation endproducts (AGE) induce the expression of pro-inflammatory molecules through mitogen-activated protein kinase and nuclear factor kappaB (NF-kappaB)-dependent pathways. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate the effects of AGE on 8-isoprostane (a marker of oxidative stress), pro-inflammatory cytokine and prostaglandin release in human gestational tissues, and to define the signalling pathways involved. Human placenta and gestational membranes (amnion and choriodecidua combined; n=5) were incubated in the absence or presence of AGE-BSA (0.25, 0.5, 1 and 2 mg/ml) for 18 h. AGE significantly increased in vitro release of tumour necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin (IL)-1beta, IL-6, IL-8, prostaglandin (PG)E(2), PGF(2alpha) and 8-isoprostane from human placenta and gestational membranes. This was associated with a concomitant increase in NF-kappaB p65 activation and ERK 1/2 phosphorylation. AGE-stimulated 8-isoprostane, cytokine and prostaglandin production was significantly suppressed by the ERK 1/2 inhibitor U0126 and the NF-kappaB inhibitor BAY 11-7082. In conclusion, AGE mediates inflammatory actions in human gestational tissues. Protein kinases and the NF-kappaB pathway play an essential role in AGE signalling in human gestational tissues.

  2. 1-Bromopropane induces macrophage activation via extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 MAPK and NF-κB pathways.

    PubMed

    Han, Eun Hee; Hwang, Yong Pil; Lee, Kyung Jin; Jeong, Tae Cheon; Jeong, Hye Gwang

    2008-04-01

    1-Bromopropane (1-BP) has been used in the workplace as an alternative to ozone-depleting solvents. This study examined the effects of 1-BP on the production of nitric oxide (NO) and on proinflammatory cytokines, and analyzed the mechanisms involved in macrophages. 1-BP dose-dependently induced the production of NO and proinflammatory cytokines, such as IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α, and expression levels of these genes also increased in a dose-dependent manner. The NF-κB sites were identified in the promoter of the iNOS and proinflammatory cytokine genes. Transient transfection and electrophoretic mobility shift assays revealed that NF-κB-mediated the 1-BP-induced increase in the iNOS and proinflammatory cytokine expression levels. Pretreating the macrophages with the NF-κB inhibitor, BAY 11-7082, and the ERK inhibitor, PD98059, inhibited NO production and iNOS expression induced by 1-BP. This demonstrates that 1-BP stimulates macrophage activation via NF-κB transactivation and ERK1/2 MAP kinase phosphorylation. These results suggest that 1-BP has the potential to be inflammatory and that it has previously unrecognized immunomodulating activity.

  3. Lipin1 Regulates Skeletal Muscle Differentiation through Extracellular Signal-regulated Kinase (ERK) Activation and Cyclin D Complex-regulated Cell Cycle Withdrawal*

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Weihua; Zhu, Jing; Zhuang, Xun; Zhang, Xiping; Luo, Tao; Esser, Karyn A.; Ren, Hongmei

    2015-01-01

    Lipin1, an intracellular protein, plays critical roles in controlling lipid synthesis and energy metabolism through its enzymatic activity and nuclear transcriptional functions. Several mouse models of skeletal muscle wasting are associated with lipin1 mutation or altered expression. Recent human studies have suggested that children with homozygous null mutations in the LPIN1 gene suffer from rhabdomyolysis. However, the underlying pathophysiologic mechanism is still poorly understood. In the present study we examined whether lipin1 contributes to regulating muscle regeneration. We characterized the time course of skeletal muscle regeneration in lipin1-deficient fld mice after injury. We found that fld mice exhibited smaller regenerated muscle fiber cross-sectional areas compared with wild-type mice in response to injury. Our results from a series of in vitro experiments suggest that lipin1 is up-regulated and translocated to the nucleus during myoblast differentiation and plays a key role in myogenesis by regulating the cytosolic activation of ERK1/2 to form a complex and a downstream effector cyclin D3-mediated cell cycle withdrawal. Overall, our study reveals a previously unknown role of lipin1 in skeletal muscle regeneration and expands our understanding of the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying skeletal muscle regeneration. PMID:26296887

  4. DYNAMICS OF EXTRACELLULAR SIGNAL-REGULATED KINASE (ERK) ACTIVATION IN DEVELOPING CEREBELLAR GRANULE CELLS (CGC): A SYSTEMS BIOLOGY-ORIENTED STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of this study was to 1) characterize the dynamics of ERK activation in response to BDNF and NMDA; 2) use computational models to promote understanding of the signaling network underlying ERK activation.

  5. A requirement for extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) function in the activation of AP-1 by Ha-Ras, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate, and serum.

    PubMed Central

    Frost, J A; Geppert, T D; Cobb, M H; Feramisco, J R

    1994-01-01

    The role of ERK-1 and ERK-2 in wild-type (wt) Ha-Ras, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA), and serum-induced AP-1 activity was studied. Microinjection of ERK-specific substrate peptides inhibited the induction of AP-1 activity by all three stimuli, whereas a control peptide had no effect. By using eukaryotic expression constructs encoding wt ERK-1 and kinase-deficient mutants of ERKs 1 and 2, it was found that ERK-1 and ERK-2 activities are required for AP-1 activation stimulated by either wt Ha-Ras, PMA, or serum. Overexpression of ERK-1 augmented wt Ha-Ras stimulation of AP-1, while having no effect upon PMA or serum stimulation. Overexpression of either kinase-deficient ERK-1 or kinase-deficient ERK-2 partially inhibited AP-1 activation by wt Ha-Ras but had no effect on PMA or serum-induced activation. Coexpression of both interfering mutants abolished AP-1 induction by wt Ha-Ras, PMA, or serum. We conclude that ERKs are necessary components in the pathway leading to the activation of AP-1 stimulated by these agents. Images PMID:8170999

  6. Activating PIK3CA Mutations Induce an Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR)/Extracellular Signal-regulated Kinase (ERK) Paracrine Signaling Axis in Basal-like Breast Cancer*

    PubMed Central

    Young, Christian D.; Zimmerman, Lisa J.; Hoshino, Daisuke; Formisano, Luigi; Hanker, Ariella B.; Gatza, Michael L.; Morrison, Meghan M.; Moore, Preston D.; Whitwell, Corbin A.; Dave, Bhuvanesh; Stricker, Thomas; Bhola, Neil E.; Silva, Grace O.; Patel, Premal; Brantley-Sieders, Dana M.; Levin, Maren; Horiates, Marina; Palma, Norma A.; Wang, Kai; Stephens, Philip J.; Perou, Charles M.; Weaver, Alissa M.; O'Shaughnessy, Joyce A.; Chang, Jenny C.; Park, Ben Ho; Liebler, Daniel C.; Cook, Rebecca S.; Arteaga, Carlos L.

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in PIK3CA, the gene encoding the p110α catalytic subunit of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) have been shown to transform human mammary epithelial cells (MECs). These mutations are present in all breast cancer subtypes, including basal-like breast cancer (BLBC). Using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS), we identified 72 protein expression changes in human basal-like MECs with knock-in E545K or H1047R PIK3CA mutations versus isogenic MECs with wild-type PIK3CA. Several of these were secreted proteins, cell surface receptors or ECM interacting molecules and were required for growth of PIK3CA mutant cells as well as adjacent cells with wild-type PIK3CA. The proteins identified by MS were enriched among human BLBC cell lines and pointed to a PI3K-dependent amphiregulin/EGFR/ERK signaling axis that is activated in BLBC. Proteins induced by PIK3CA mutations correlated with EGFR signaling and reduced relapse-free survival in BLBC. Treatment with EGFR inhibitors reduced growth of PIK3CA mutant BLBC cell lines and murine mammary tumors driven by a PIK3CA mutant transgene, all together suggesting that PIK3CA mutations promote tumor growth in part by inducing protein changes that activate EGFR. PMID:25953087

  7. Activating PIK3CA Mutations Induce an Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR)/Extracellular Signal-regulated Kinase (ERK) Paracrine Signaling Axis in Basal-like Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Young, Christian D; Zimmerman, Lisa J; Hoshino, Daisuke; Formisano, Luigi; Hanker, Ariella B; Gatza, Michael L; Morrison, Meghan M; Moore, Preston D; Whitwell, Corbin A; Dave, Bhuvanesh; Stricker, Thomas; Bhola, Neil E; Silva, Grace O; Patel, Premal; Brantley-Sieders, Dana M; Levin, Maren; Horiates, Marina; Palma, Norma A; Wang, Kai; Stephens, Philip J; Perou, Charles M; Weaver, Alissa M; O'Shaughnessy, Joyce A; Chang, Jenny C; Park, Ben Ho; Liebler, Daniel C; Cook, Rebecca S; Arteaga, Carlos L

    2015-07-01

    Mutations in PIK3CA, the gene encoding the p110α catalytic subunit of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) have been shown to transform human mammary epithelial cells (MECs). These mutations are present in all breast cancer subtypes, including basal-like breast cancer (BLBC). Using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS), we identified 72 protein expression changes in human basal-like MECs with knock-in E545K or H1047R PIK3CA mutations versus isogenic MECs with wild-type PIK3CA. Several of these were secreted proteins, cell surface receptors or ECM interacting molecules and were required for growth of PIK3CA mutant cells as well as adjacent cells with wild-type PIK3CA. The proteins identified by MS were enriched among human BLBC cell lines and pointed to a PI3K-dependent amphiregulin/EGFR/ERK signaling axis that is activated in BLBC. Proteins induced by PIK3CA mutations correlated with EGFR signaling and reduced relapse-free survival in BLBC. Treatment with EGFR inhibitors reduced growth of PIK3CA mutant BLBC cell lines and murine mammary tumors driven by a PIK3CA mutant transgene, all together suggesting that PIK3CA mutations promote tumor growth in part by inducing protein changes that activate EGFR.

  8. Radiosensitization and downregulation of heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K (hnRNP K) upon inhibition of mitogen/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (MEK) in malignant melanoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Eder, Stefan; Lamkowski, Andreas; Priller, Markus; Port, Matthias; Steinestel, Konrad

    2015-01-01

    Background Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K (hnRNP K) is an important cofactor in the p53-mediated DNA damage response pathway upon ionizing radiation (IR) and exerts anti-apoptotic effects also independent of p53 pathway activation. Furthermore, hnRNP K is overexpressed in various neoplasms including malignant melanoma (MM). Here, we investigate the role of hnRNP K in the radioresistance of MM cells. Methods and results Our results show cytoplasmic expression of hnRNP K in human MM surgical specimens, but not in benign nevi, and a quick dose- and time-dependent upregulation in response to IR accompanied by cytoplasmic redistribution of the protein in the IPC-298 cellular tumor model carrying an activating NRAS mutation (p.Q61L). SiRNA-based knockdown of hnRNP K induced a delayed decline in γH2AX/53BP1-positive DNA repair foci upon IR. Pharmacological interference with MAPK signaling abrogated ERK phosphorylation, diminished cellular hnRNP K levels, impaired γH2AX/53BP1-foci repair and proliferative capability and increased apoptosis comparable to the observed hnRNP K knockdown phenotype in IPC-298 cells. Conclusion Our results indicate that pharmacological interference with MAPK signaling increases vulnerability of NRAS-mutant malignant melanoma cells to ionizing radiation along with downregulation of endogenous hnRNP K and point towards a possible use for combined MEK inhibition and localized radiation therapy of MM in the NRAS-mutant setting where BRAF inhibitors offer no clinical benefit. PMID:26136337

  9. Ras-mutant cancer cells display B-Raf binding to Ras that activates extracellular signal-regulated kinase and is inhibited by protein kinase A phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Li, Yanping; Takahashi, Maho; Stork, Philip J S

    2013-09-20

    The small G protein Ras regulates proliferation through activation of the mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase (ERK) cascade. The first step of Ras-dependent activation of ERK signaling is Ras binding to members of the Raf family of MAP kinase kinase kinases, C-Raf and B-Raf. Recently, it has been reported that in melanoma cells harboring oncogenic Ras mutations, B-Raf does not bind to Ras and does not contribute to basal ERK activation. For other types of Ras-mutant tumors, the relative contributions of C-Raf and B-Raf are not known. We examined non-melanoma cancer cell lines containing oncogenic Ras mutations and express both C-Raf and B-Raf isoforms, including the lung cancer cell line H1299 cells. Both B-Raf and C-Raf were constitutively bound to oncogenic Ras and contributed to Ras-dependent ERK activation. Ras binding to B-Raf and C-Raf were both subject to inhibition by the cAMP-dependent protein kinase PKA. cAMP inhibited the growth of H1299 cells and Ras-dependent ERK activation via PKA. PKA inhibited the binding of Ras to both C-Raf and B-Raf through phosphorylations of C-Raf at Ser-259 and B-Raf at Ser-365, respectively. These studies demonstrate that in non-melanocytic Ras-mutant cancer cells, Ras signaling to B-Raf is a significant contributor to ERK activation and that the B-Raf pathway, like that of C-Raf, is a target for inhibition by PKA. We suggest that cAMP and hormones coupled to cAMP may prove useful in dampening the effects of oncogenic Ras in non-melanocytic cancer cells through PKA-dependent actions on B-Raf as well as C-Raf.

  10. Gain-of-function Mutations in Transient Receptor Potential C6 (TRPC6) Activate Extracellular Signal-regulated Kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2)*

    PubMed Central

    Chiluiza, David; Krishna, Sneha; Schumacher, Valérie A.; Schlöndorff, Johannes

    2013-01-01

    Gain-of-function mutations in the canonical transient receptor potential 6 (TRPC6) gene are a cause of autosomal dominant focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS). The mechanisms whereby abnormal TRPC6 activity results in proteinuria remain unknown. The ERK1/2 MAPKs are activated in glomeruli and podocytes in several proteinuric disease models. We therefore examined whether FSGS-associated mutations in TRPC6 result in activation of these kinases. In 293T cells and cultured podocytes, overexpression of gain-of-function TRPC6 mutants resulted in increased ERK1/2 phosphorylation, an effect dependent upon channel function. Pharmacologic inhibitor studies implicated several signaling mediators, including calmodulin and calcineurin, supporting the importance of TRPC6-mediated calcium influx in this process. Through medium transfer experiments, we uncovered two distinct mechanisms for ERK activation by mutant TRPC6, a cell-autonomous, EGF receptor-independent mechanism and a non-cell-autonomous mechanism involving metalloprotease-mediated release of a presumed EGF receptor ligand. The inhibitors KN-92 and H89 were able to block both pathways in mutant TRPC6 expressing cells as well as the prolonged elevation of intracellular calcium levels upon carbachol stimulation seen in these cells. However, these effects appear to be independent of their effects on calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II and PKA, respectively. Phosphorylation of Thr-70, Ser-282, and Tyr-31/285 were not necessary for ERK activation by mutant TRPC6, although a phosphomimetic TRPC6 S282E mutant was capable of ERK activation. Taken together, these results identify two pathways downstream of mutant TRPC6 leading to ERK activation that may play a role in the development of FSGS. PMID:23645677

  11. Agonist-mediated activation of Bombyx mori diapause hormone receptor signals to extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 through Gq-PLC-PKC-dependent cascade.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xue; Yang, Jingwen; Shen, Zhangfei; Chen, Yajie; Shi, Liangen; Zhou, Naiming

    2016-08-01

    Diapause is a developmental strategy adopted by insects to survive in challenging environments such as the low temperatures of a winter. This unique process is regulated by diapause hormone (DH), which is a neuropeptide hormone that induces egg diapause in Bombyx mori and is involved in terminating pupal diapause in heliothis moths. An G protein-coupled receptor from the silkworm, B. mori, has been identified as a specific cell surface receptor for DH. However, the detailed information on the DH-DHR system and its mechanism(s) involved in the induction of embryonic diapause remains unknown. Here, we combined functional assays with various specific inhibitors to elucidate the DHR-mediated signaling pathways. Upon activation by DH, B. mori DHR is coupled to the Gq protein, leading to a significant increase of intracellular Ca(2+) and cAMP response element-driven luciferase activity in an UBO-QIC, a specific Gq inhibitor, sensitive manner. B. mori DHR elicited ERK1/2 phosphorylation in a dose- and time-dependent manner in response to DH. This effect was almost completely inhibited by co-incubation with UBO-QIC and was also significantly suppressed by PLC inhibitor U73122, PKC inhibitors Gö6983 and the Ca(2+) chelator EGTA. Moreover, DHR-induced activation of ERK1/2 was significantly attenuated by treatment with the Gβγ specific inhibitors gallein and M119K and the PI3K specific inhibitor Wortmannin, but not by the Src specific inhibitor PP2. Our data also demonstrates that the EGFR-transactivation pathway is not involved in the DHR-mediated ERK1/2 phosphorylation. Future efforts are needed to clarify the role of the ERK1/2 signaling pathway in the DH-mediated induction of B. mori embryonic diapause. PMID:27318251

  12. Angiogenic factor signaling regulates centrosome duplication in endothelial cells of developing blood vessels

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Sarah M.; Nevis, Kathleen R.; Park, Hannah L.; Rogers, Gregory C.; Rogers, Stephen L.; Cook, Jeanette G.

    2010-01-01

    Regulated vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) signaling is required for proper angiogenesis, and excess VEGF signaling results in aberrantly formed vessels that do not function properly. Tumor endothelial cells have excess centrosomes and are aneuploid, properties that probably contribute to the morphologic and functional abnormalities of tumor vessels. We hypothesized that endothelial cell centrosome number is regulated by signaling via angiogenic factors, such as VEGF. We found that endothelial cells in developing vessels exposed to elevated VEGF signaling display centrosome overduplication. Signaling from VEGF, through either MEK/ERK or AKT to cyclin E/Cdk2, is amplified in association with centrosome overduplication, and blockade of relevant pathway components rescued the centrosome overduplication defect. Endothelial cells exposed to elevated FGF also had excess centrosomes, suggesting that multiple angiogenic factors regulate centrosome number. Endothelial cells with excess centrosomes survived and formed aberrant spindles at mitosis. Developing vessels exposed to elevated VEGF signaling also exhibited increased aneuploidy of endothelial cells, which is associated with cellular dysfunction. These results provide the first link between VEGF signaling and regulation of the centrosome duplication cycle, and suggest that endothelial cell centrosome overduplication contributes to aberrant angiogenesis in developing vessel networks exposed to excess angiogenic factors. PMID:20664058

  13. Matrix adhesion and Ras transformation both activate a phosphoinositide 3-OH kinase and protein kinase B/Akt cellular survival pathway.

    PubMed Central

    Khwaja, A; Rodriguez-Viciana, P; Wennström, S; Warne, P H; Downward, J

    1997-01-01

    Upon detachment from the extracellular matrix, epithelial cells enter into programmed cell death, a phenomenon known as anoikis, ensuring that they are unable to survive in an inappropriate location. Activated ras oncogenes protect cells from this form of apoptosis. The nature of the survival signals activated by integrin engagement and usurped by oncogenic Ras are unknown: here we show that in both cases phosphoinositide 3-OH kinase (PI 3-kinase), but not Raf, mediates this protection, acting through protein kinase B/Akt (PKB/Akt). Constitutively activated PI 3-kinase or PKB/Akt block anoikis, while inhibition of PI 3-kinase abrogates protection by Ras, but not PKB/Akt. Inhibition of either PI 3-kinase or PKB/Akt induces apoptosis in adherent epithelial cells. Attachment of cells to matrix leads to rapid elevation of the levels of PI 3-kinase lipid products and PKB/Akt activity, both of which remain high in Ras-transformed cells even in suspension. PI 3-kinase acting through PKB/Akt is therefore implicated as a key mediator of the aberrant survival of Ras-transformed epithelial cells in the absence of attachment, and mediates matrix-induced survival of normal epithelial cells. PMID:9184223

  14. Emerging therapeutics for targeting Akt in cancer.

    PubMed

    Gdowski, Andrew; Panchoo, Marlyn; Treuren, Timothy Van; Basu, Alakananda

    2016-01-01

    The ultimate goal of cancer therapeutic research is to develop effective, targeted therapeutics that exploit the vulnerabilities of cancer cells. The three isoforms of Akt, also known as protein kinase B (PKB), are important mediators of various pathways that transmit mitogenic signals from the cell's exterior to the effector proteins of the cell's interior. Due to Akt\\\\\\\\\\\\\\'s importance in cell functions such as growth, proliferation and cell survival, many cancer cells rely on this pathway to aid in their survival. This dependence can lead to chemoresistance and selection of more adapted populations of cancer cells. Thus, it is important to understand the functional significance of isoform specificity and its relation to chemoresistance. In this review, we have summarized recent studies on Akt isoform specific regulation as well as each isoform's role in chemoresistance, emphasizing their potential as targets for cancer therapy. We have also condensed ongoing clinical studies involving various types of Akt inhibitors while highlighting the type of study, rationale and co-therapies involved in identifying Akt isoforms as promising therapeutic targets.

  15. Development of sulfonamide AKT PH domain inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Ahad, Ali Md.; Zuohe, Song; Du-Cuny, Lei; Moses, Sylvestor A.; Zhou, Li Li; Zhang, Shuxing; Powis, Garth; Meuillet, Emmanuelle J.; Mash, Eugene A.

    2011-01-01

    Disruption of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/AKT signaling pathway can lead to apoptosis in cancer cells. Previously we identified a lead sulfonamide that selectively bound to the pleckstrin homology (PH) domain of AKT and induced apoptosis when present at low micromolar concentrations. To examine the effects of structural modification, a set of sulfonamides related to the lead compound was designed, synthesized, and tested for binding to the expressed PH domain of AKT using a surface plasmon resonance-based competitive binding assay. Cellular activity was determined by means of an assay for pAKT production and a cell killing assay using BxPC3 cells. The most active compounds in the set are lipophilic and possess an aliphatic chain of the proper length. Results were interpreted with the aid of computational modeling. This paper represents the first structure-activity relationship (SAR) study of a large family of AKT PH domain inhibitors. Information obtained will be used in the design of the next generation of inhibitors of AKT PH domain function. PMID:21353784

  16. Extracellular calcium sensing and extracellular calcium signaling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, E. M.; MacLeod, R. J.; O'Malley, B. W. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    The cloning of a G protein-coupled extracellular Ca(2+) (Ca(o)(2+))-sensing receptor (CaR) has elucidated the molecular basis for many of the previously recognized effects of Ca(o)(2+) on tissues that maintain systemic Ca(o)(2+) homeostasis, especially parathyroid chief cells and several cells in the kidney. The availability of the cloned CaR enabled the development of DNA and antibody probes for identifying the CaR's mRNA and protein, respectively, within these and other tissues. It also permitted the identification of human diseases resulting from inactivating or activating mutations of the CaR gene and the subsequent generation of mice with targeted disruption of the CaR gene. The characteristic alterations in parathyroid and renal function in these patients and in the mice with "knockout" of the CaR gene have provided valuable information on the CaR's physiological roles in these tissues participating in mineral ion homeostasis. Nevertheless, relatively little is known about how the CaR regulates other tissues involved in systemic Ca(o)(2+) homeostasis, particularly bone and intestine. Moreover, there is evidence that additional Ca(o)(2+) sensors may exist in bone cells that mediate some or even all of the known effects of Ca(o)(2+) on these cells. Even more remains to be learned about the CaR's function in the rapidly growing list of cells that express it but are uninvolved in systemic Ca(o)(2+) metabolism. Available data suggest that the receptor serves numerous roles outside of systemic mineral ion homeostasis, ranging from the regulation of hormonal secretion and the activities of various ion channels to the longer term control of gene expression, programmed cell death (apoptosis), and cellular proliferation. In some cases, the CaR on these "nonhomeostatic" cells responds to local changes in Ca(o)(2+) taking place within compartments of the extracellular fluid (ECF) that communicate with the outside environment (e.g., the gastrointestinal tract). In others

  17. Anthocyanins protected hearts against ischemic injury by reducing MMP-2 activity via Akt/P38 pathways

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Jie; Du, Hong; Li, Weiwei; Liu, Fan; Lu, Jingchao; Yang, Xiuchun; Cui, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Growing evidences suggest that there are close associations between anthocyanins and cardiac protection. However, little is known about the detailed roles of anthocyanins in regulating extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling. Incubation of primary cultured fibroblasts with anthocyanins reduced both intracellular collagen expression and extracellular collagen secretion. Down-regulation of collagen production was also shown in infarcted cardiac tissues after permanent coronary artery ligation in mice treated with anthocyanins. The phosphorylation levels of Akt and/or P-38 were significantly increased by anthocyanins supplementation in primary cultured fibroblasts. Gelatin zymography analysis of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) activity in conditioned medium collected from fibroblasts demonstrated that anthocyanins treatment significantly reduced MMP-2 activity. These results demonstrated that anthocyanins play a role in mediating myocardial ECM remodeling and that the Akt/P-38 pathways mediate these protective effects on hearts. PMID:27158396

  18. PTEN regulates angiogenesis through PI3K/Akt/VEGF signaling pathway in human pancreatic cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jiachi; Sawai, Hirozumi; Ochi, Nobuo; Matsuo, Yoichi; Xu, Donghui; Yasuda, Akira; Takahashi, Hiroki; Wakasugi, Takehiro; Takeyama, Hiromitsu

    2009-11-01

    Phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) pathway exerts its effects through Akt, its downstream target molecule, and thereby regulates various cell functions including cell proliferation, cell transformation, apoptosis, tumor growth, and angiogenesis. Phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN) has been implicated in regulating cell survival signaling through the PI3K/Akt pathway. However, the mechanism by PI3K/PTEN signaling regulates angiogenesis and tumor growth in vivo remains to be elucidated. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) plays a pivotal role in tumor angiogenesis. The effect of PTEN on VEGF-mediated signal in pancreatic cancer is unknown. This study aimed to determine the effect of PTEN on both the expression of VEGF and angiogenesis. Toward that end, we used the siRNA knockdown method to specifically define the role of PTEN in the expression of VEGF and angiogenesis. We found that siRNA-mediated inhibition of PTEN gene expression in pancreatic cancer cells increase their VEGF secretion, up-modulated the proliferation, and migration of co-cultured vascular endothelial cell and enhanced tubule formation by HUVEC. In addition, PTEN modulated VEGF-mediated signaling and affected tumor angiogenesis through PI3K/Akt/VEGF/eNOS pathway.

  19. Activated AKT pathway promotes establishment of endometriosis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae Hoon; Yu, Yanni; Luo, Lily; Lydon, John P; Jeong, Jae-Wook; Kim, J Julie

    2014-05-01

    The pathogenesis of endometriosis remains unclear, and relatively little is known about the mechanisms that promote establishment and survival of the disease. Previously, we demonstrated that v-akt murine thymoma viral oncogene homolog (AKT) activity was increased in endometriosis tissues and cells from ovarian endometriomas and that this increase promoted cell survival as well as decreased levels of progesterone receptor. The objective of this study was to demonstrate a role for AKT in the establishment of ectopic lesions. First, a dose-dependent inhibition of AKT in stromal cells from human ovarian endometriomas (OSIS) as well as endometrial stromal cells from disease-free patients (ESC) with the allosteric AKT inhibitor MK-2206 was demonstrated by decreased levels of phosphorylated (p)(Ser473)-AKT. Levels of the AKT target protein, p(Ser256)-forkhead box O1 were increased in OSIS cells, which decreased with MK-2206 treatment, whereas levels of p(Ser9)-glycogen synthase kinase 3β did not change in response to MK-2206. Although MK-2206 decreased viability of both OSIS and ESC in a dose-dependent manner, proliferation of OSIS cells was differentially decreased significantly compared with ESC. Next, the role of hyperactive AKT in the establishment of ectopic lesions was studied using the bigenic, PR(cre/+)Pten(f/+) heterozygous mouse. Autologous implantation of uterine tissues was performed in these mice. After 4 weeks, an average of 4 ± 0.33 lesions per Pten(f/+) mouse and 7.5 ± 0.43 lesions in the PR(cre/+)Pten(f/+) mouse were found. Histological examination of the lesions showed endometrial tissue-like morphology, which was similar in both the Pten(f/+) and PR(cre/+)Pten(f/+) mice. Treatment of mice with MK-2206 resulted in a significantly decreased number of lesions established. Immunohistochemical staining of ectopic lesions revealed decreased p(Ser473)-AKT and the proliferation marker Ki67 from MK-2206-treated mice compared with vehicle-treated mice

  20. Signal regulation involved in sulfur dioxide-induced guard cell apoptosis in Hemerocallis fulva.

    PubMed

    Wei, Aili; Xin, Xiaojing; Wang, Yunshan; Zhang, Chao; Cao, Dongmei

    2013-12-01

    Chronic and acute exposure to SO₂ is associated with increased risks of various damages to plants. In the present study, epidermal strip experiment was employed to investigate SO₂-induced guard cells apoptosis and the signal regulation in Hemerocallis fulva. The results showed that with the increase of treatment concentrate of SO₂ derivates (a mixture of sodium sulfite and sodium bisulfite, 3:1, mmol L⁻¹/mmol L⁻¹, 1.0-5.0 mmol L⁻¹), the physiological activity of the guard cells declined and cell death occurred. While the concentration of SO₂ derivatives exceeded 2.0 mmol L⁻¹, the percentage of cell death increased significantly (P<0.05). Typical features of apoptosis including nuclear condensation, nuclear elongation, fragmentation etc. were found. Meanwhile, concomitant presence of nitric oxide (NO), reactive oxygen species (ROS) and Ca²⁺ level increment appeared. However, SO₂-induced cell death can be effectively blocked by either of the following substances with their respective optimal concentrations: antioxidant ascorbic acid (Asc; 0.05 mmol L⁻¹) or catalase (CAT; 200 U mL⁻¹), nitric oxide (NO) scavenger 2-(4-carboxyphenyl)-4, 4, 5, 5- tetramethylmidiazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide (c-PTIO; 0.20 mmol L⁻¹), nitrate reductase inhibitor NaN₃ (0.20 mmol L⁻¹), Ca²⁺ chelating agent EGTA (0.05 mmol L⁻¹) or plasma membrane Ca²⁺ channel blocker LaCl₃ (0.05 mmol L⁻¹). In addition to a significant decrease in cell death rate, a reduction in the levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), NO and Ca²⁺ was observed. Further study showed that compared to treatment with SO₂ alone, Asc treatment led to a decrease in NO and Ca²⁺ levels and NaN₃ treatment led to a decrease in ROS and Ca²⁺ levels, but the NO and ROS levels of the LaCl₃ treatment changed little. All results suggested that NO, ROS and Ca²⁺ were involved in the apoptosis induced by SO₂ in H. fulva. The process might be related to the burst of NO or ROS

  1. Inhibitor of apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 protects against acetaminophen-induced liver injury

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Yuchao; Ramachandran, Anup; Breckenridge, David G.; Liles, John T.; Lebofsky, Margitta; Farhood, Anwar; Jaeschke, Hartmut

    2015-07-01

    Metabolic activation and oxidant stress are key events in the pathophysiology of acetaminophen (APAP) hepatotoxicity. The initial mitochondrial oxidative stress triggered by protein adduct formation is amplified by c-jun-N-terminal kinase (JNK), resulting in mitochondrial dysfunction and ultimately cell necrosis. Apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 (ASK1) is considered the link between oxidant stress and JNK activation. The objective of the current study was to assess the efficacy and mechanism of action of the small-molecule ASK1 inhibitor GS-459679 in a murine model of APAP hepatotoxicity. APAP (300 mg/kg) caused extensive glutathione depletion, JNK activation and translocation to the mitochondria, oxidant stress and liver injury as indicated by plasma ALT activities and area of necrosis over a 24 h observation period. Pretreatment with 30 mg/kg of GS-459679 almost completely prevented JNK activation, oxidant stress and injury without affecting the metabolic activation of APAP. To evaluate the therapeutic potential of GS-459679, mice were treated with APAP and then with the inhibitor. Given 1.5 h after APAP, GS-459679 was still protective, which was paralleled by reduced JNK activation and p-JNK translocation to mitochondria. However, GS-459679 treatment was not more effective than N-acetylcysteine, and the combination of GS-459679 and N-acetylcysteine exhibited similar efficacy as N-acetylcysteine monotherapy, suggesting that GS-459769 and N-acetylcysteine affect the same pathway. Importantly, inhibition of ASK1 did not impair liver regeneration as indicated by PCNA staining. In conclusion, the ASK1 inhibitor GS-459679 protected against APAP toxicity by attenuating JNK activation and oxidant stress in mice and may have therapeutic potential for APAP overdose patients. - Highlights: • Two ASK1 inhibitors protected against acetaminophen-induced liver injury. • The ASK1 inhibitors protect when used as pre- or post-treatment. • Protection by ASK1 inhibitor is

  2. Signal regulation involved in sulfur dioxide-induced guard cell apoptosis in Hemerocallis fulva.

    PubMed

    Wei, Aili; Xin, Xiaojing; Wang, Yunshan; Zhang, Chao; Cao, Dongmei

    2013-12-01

    Chronic and acute exposure to SO₂ is associated with increased risks of various damages to plants. In the present study, epidermal strip experiment was employed to investigate SO₂-induced guard cells apoptosis and the signal regulation in Hemerocallis fulva. The results showed that with the increase of treatment concentrate of SO₂ derivates (a mixture of sodium sulfite and sodium bisulfite, 3:1, mmol L⁻¹/mmol L⁻¹, 1.0-5.0 mmol L⁻¹), the physiological activity of the guard cells declined and cell death occurred. While the concentration of SO₂ derivatives exceeded 2.0 mmol L⁻¹, the percentage of cell death increased significantly (P<0.05). Typical features of apoptosis including nuclear condensation, nuclear elongation, fragmentation etc. were found. Meanwhile, concomitant presence of nitric oxide (NO), reactive oxygen species (ROS) and Ca²⁺ level increment appeared. However, SO₂-induced cell death can be effectively blocked by either of the following substances with their respective optimal concentrations: antioxidant ascorbic acid (Asc; 0.05 mmol L⁻¹) or catalase (CAT; 200 U mL⁻¹), nitric oxide (NO) scavenger 2-(4-carboxyphenyl)-4, 4, 5, 5- tetramethylmidiazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide (c-PTIO; 0.20 mmol L⁻¹), nitrate reductase inhibitor NaN₃ (0.20 mmol L⁻¹), Ca²⁺ chelating agent EGTA (0.05 mmol L⁻¹) or plasma membrane Ca²⁺ channel blocker LaCl₃ (0.05 mmol L⁻¹). In addition to a significant decrease in cell death rate, a reduction in the levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), NO and Ca²⁺ was observed. Further study showed that compared to treatment with SO₂ alone, Asc treatment led to a decrease in NO and Ca²⁺ levels and NaN₃ treatment led to a decrease in ROS and Ca²⁺ levels, but the NO and ROS levels of the LaCl₃ treatment changed little. All results suggested that NO, ROS and Ca²⁺ were involved in the apoptosis induced by SO₂ in H. fulva. The process might be related to the burst of NO or ROS

  3. Slit/Robo1 signaling regulates neural tube development by balancing neuroepithelial cell proliferation and differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Guang; Li, Yan; Wang, Xiao-yu; Han, Zhe; Chuai, Manli; Wang, Li-jing; Ho Lee, Kenneth Ka; Geng, Jian-guo; Yang, Xuesong

    2013-05-01

    development by tightly coordinating cell proliferation and differentiation during neurulation. - Highlights: ► The role of Slit/Robo1 signaling was investigated with chick and mouse models. ► Disturbance of Slit/Robo1 signaling resulted in neural tube defects. ► Slit/Robo1 signaling regulated the proliferation of neural tube cells. ► Slit/Robo1 signaling modulated the differentiation of neural tube cells. ► Slit/Robo1 signaling balanced the proliferation and differentiation of neural tube.

  4. Embryonic liver fordin is involved in glucose glycolysis of hepatic stellate cell by regulating PI3K/Akt signaling

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Wei; Ye, Jin; Wang, Zhi-Jun

    2016-01-01

    AIM To investigate the role of embryonic liver fordin (ELF) in liver fibrosis by regulating hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) glucose glycolysis. METHODS The expression of ELF and the glucose glycolysis-related proteins were evaluated in activated HSCs. siRNA was used to silence ELF expression in activated HSCs in vitro and the subsequent changes in PI3K/Akt signaling and glucose glycolysis-related proteins were observed. RESULTS The expression of ELF increased remarkably in HSCs of the fibrosis mouse model and HSCs that were cultured for 3 wk in vitro. Glucose glycolysis-related proteins showed an obvious increase in the activated HSCs, such as phosphofructokinase, platelet and glucose transporter 1. ELF-siRNA, which perfectly silenced the expression of ELF in activated HSCs, led to the induction of glucose glycolysis-related proteins and extracellular matrix (ECM) components. Moreover, pAkt, which is an important downstream factor in PI3K/Akt signaling, showed a significant change in response to the ELF silencing. The expression of glucose glycolysis-related proteins and ECM components decreased remarkably when the PI3K/Akt signaling was blocked by Ly294002 in the activated HSCs. CONCLUSION ELF is involved in HSC glucose glycolysis by regulating PI3K/Akt signaling. PMID:27784964

  5. Signals regulating myelination in peripheral nerves and the Schwann cell response to injury

    PubMed Central

    Glenn, Thomas D.; Talbot, William S.

    2013-01-01

    In peripheral nerves, Schwann cells form myelin, which facilitates the rapid conduction of action potentials along axons in the vertebrate nervous system. Myelinating Schwann cells are derived from neural crest progenitors in a step-wise process that is regulated by extracellular signals and transcription factors. In addition to forming the myelin sheath, Schwann cells orchestrate much of the regenerative response that occurs after injury to peripheral nerves. In response to injury, myelinating Schwann cells dedifferentiate into repair cells that are essential for axonal regeneration, and then redifferentiate into myelinating Schwann cells to restore nerve function. Although this remarkable plasticity has long been recognized, many questions remain unanswered regarding the signaling pathways regulating both myelination and the Schwann cell response to injury. PMID:23896313

  6. A NPxY-independent {beta}5 integrin activation signal regulates phagocytosis of apoptotic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Sukhwinder; D'mello, Veera; Henegouwen, Paul van Bergen en; Birge, Raymond B.

    2007-12-21

    Integrin receptors are heterodimeric transmembrane receptors with critical functions in cell adhesion and migration, cell cycle progression, differentiation, apoptosis, and phagocytosis of apoptotic cells. Integrins are activated by intracellular signaling that alter the binding affinity for extracellular ligands, so-called inside to outside signaling. A common element for integrin activation involves binding of the cytoskeletal protein talin, via its FERM domain, to a highly conserved NPxY motif in the {beta} chain cytoplasmic tails, which is involved in long-range conformation changes to the extracellular domain that impinges on ligand affinity. When the human beta-5 ({beta}5) integrin cDNA was expressed in {alpha}v positive, {beta}5 and {beta}3 negative hamster CS-1 cells, it promoted NPxY-dependent adhesion to VTN-coated surfaces, phosphorylation of FAK, and concomitantly, {beta}5 integrin-EGFP protein was recruited into talin and paxillin-containing focal adhesions. Expression of a NPxY destabilizing {beta}5 mutant (Y750A) abrogated adhesion and {beta}5-Y750A-EGFP was excluded from focal adhesions at the tips of stress fibers. Surprisingly, expression of {beta}5 Y750A integrin had a potent gain-of-function effect on apoptotic cell phagocytosis, and further, a {beta}5-Y750A-EGFP fusion integrin readily bound MFG-E8-coated 10 {mu}m diameter microspheres developed as apoptotic cell mimetics. The critical sequences in {beta}5 integrin were mapped to a YEMAS motif just proximal to the NPxY motif. Our studies suggest that the phagocytic function of {beta}5 integrin is regulated by an unconventional NPxY-talin-independent activation signal and argue for the existence of molecular switches in the {beta}5 cytoplasmic tail for adhesion and phagocytosis.

  7. Calcium signaling regulates trafficking of familial hypocalciuric hypercalcemia (FHH) mutants of the calcium sensing receptor.

    PubMed

    Grant, Michael P; Stepanchick, Ann; Breitwieser, Gerda E

    2012-12-01

    Calcium-sensing receptors (CaSRs) regulate systemic Ca(2+) homeostasis. Loss-of-function mutations cause familial benign hypocalciuric hypercalcemia (FHH) or neonatal severe hyperparathyroidism (NSHPT). FHH/NSHPT mutations can reduce trafficking of CaSRs to the plasma membrane. CaSR signaling is potentiated by agonist-driven anterograde CaSR trafficking, leading to a new steady state level of plasma membrane CaSR, which is maintained, with minimal functional desensitization, as long as extracellular Ca(2+) is elevated. This requirement for CaSR signaling to drive CaSR trafficking to the plasma membrane led us to reconsider the mechanism(s) contributing to dysregulated trafficking of FHH/NSHPT mutants. We simultaneously monitored dynamic changes in plasma membrane levels of CaSR and intracellular Ca(2+), using a chimeric CaSR construct, which allowed explicit tracking of plasma membrane levels of mutant or wild-type CaSRs in the presence of nonchimeric partners. Expression of mutants alone revealed severe defects in plasma membrane targeting and Ca(2+) signaling, which were substantially rescued by coexpression with wild-type CaSR. Biasing toward heterodimerization of wild-type and FHH/NSHPT mutants revealed that intracellular Ca(2+) oscillations were insufficient to rescue plasma membrane targeting. Coexpression of the nonfunctional mutant E297K with the truncation CaSRΔ868 robustly rescued trafficking and Ca(2+) signaling, whereas coexpression of distinct FHH/NSHPT mutants rescued neither trafficking nor signaling. Our study suggests that rescue of FHH/NSHPT mutants requires a steady state intracellular Ca(2+) response when extracellular Ca(2+) is elevated and argues that Ca(2+) signaling by wild-type CaSRs rescues FHH mutant trafficking to the plasma membrane.

  8. Modified high-density lipoprotein modulates aldosterone release through scavenger receptors via extra cellular signal-regulated kinase and Janus kinase-dependent pathways.

    PubMed

    Saha, Sarama; Graessler, Juergen; Schwarz, Peter E H; Goettsch, Claudia; Bornstein, Stefan R; Kopprasch, Steffi

    2012-07-01

    Patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D) manifest significant abnormalities in lipoprotein structure and function. The deleterious impact of oxidative and glycoxidative modifications on HDL-mediated atheroprotective, antiinflammatory, and antioxidative phenomena has been well established. However, the biological effects of modified HDL on adrenal steroidogenesis-which could reveal a pathophysiological link to the overactivity of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system and its adverse cardiovascular consequences often observed in T2D-are not well delineated. We studied the role of modified HDL on aldosterone release from adrenocortical carcinoma cells (NCI-H295R). In vitro modifications of native HDL were performed in the presence of glucose for glycoxidized HDL (glycoxHDL) and sodium hypochlorite for oxidized HDL. Angiotensin II (AngII)-sensitized H295R cells were treated with lipoproteins for 24 h, and supernatant was used to measure aldosterone release. Both native and modified HDL augmented the steroid release from AngII-sensitized cells, with glycoxHDL having the greatest impact. Both the modified forms of HDL induced a significant increase in scavenger receptor expression and employed protein kinase C as well as extracellular signal-regulated kinase as downstream effectors of aldosterone release. Native HDL and modified HDL required Janus kinase-2 for combating increased demand in steroidogenesis. Therefore, our data support the hypothesis that diabetes-induced modification of HDL may promote adrenocortical aldosterone secretion via different signal transduction pathways. This significant influence on multiple signaling mechanisms could be targeted for future research to implement novel therapeutic trials.

  9. Bacterial extracellular lignin peroxidase

    DOEpatents

    Crawford, Donald L.; Ramachandra, Muralidhara

    1993-01-01

    A newly discovered lignin peroxidase enzyme is provided. The enzyme is obtained from a bacterial source and is capable of degrading the lignin portion of lignocellulose in the presence of hydrogen peroxide. The enzyme is extracellular, oxidative, inducible by lignin, larch wood xylan, or related substrates and capable of attacking certain lignin substructure chemical bonds that are not degradable by fungal lignin peroxidases.

  10. Akt inhibitors reduce glucose uptake independently of their effects on Akt.

    PubMed

    Tan, Shi-Xiong; Ng, Yvonne; James, David E

    2010-11-15

    The protein kinase Akt is involved in various cellular processes, including cell proliferation, growth and metabolism. Hyperactivation of Akt is commonly observed in human tumours and so this pathway has been the focus of targeted drug discovery. However, Akt also plays an essential role in other physiological processes, such as the insulin-regulated transport of glucose into muscle and fat cells. This process, which is essential for whole-body glucose homoeostasis in mammals, is thought to be mediated via Akt-dependent movement of GLUT4 glucose transporters to the plasma membrane. In the present study, we have investigated the metabolic side effects of non-ATP-competitive allosteric Akt inhibitors. In 3T3-L1 adipocytes, these inhibitors caused a decrease in the Akt signalling pathway concomitant with reduced glucose uptake. Surprisingly, a similar reduction in GLUT4 translocation to the plasma membrane was not observed. Further investigation revealed that the inhibitory effects of these compounds on glucose uptake in 3T3-L1 adipocytes were independent of the Akt signalling pathway. The inhibitors also inhibited glucose transport into other cell types, including human erythrocytes and T-47D breast cancer cells, suggesting that these effects are not specific to GLUT4. We conclude that these drugs may, at least in part, inhibit tumorigenesis through inhibition of tumour cell glucose transport.

  11. CUX1/Wnt signaling regulates Epithelial Mesenchymal Transition in EBV infected epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Malizia, Andrea P.; Lacey, Noreen; Walls, Dermot; Egan, Jim J.; Doran, Peter P.

    2009-07-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a refractory and lethal interstitial lung disease characterized by alveolar epithelial cells apoptosis, fibroblast proliferation and extra-cellular matrix protein deposition. EBV, localised to alveolar epithelial cells of pulmonary fibrosis patients is associated with a poor prognosis. A strategy based on microarray-differential gene expression analysis to identify molecular drivers of EBV-associated lung fibrosis was utilized. Alveolar epithelial cells were infected with EBV to identify genes whose expression was altered following TGF{beta}1-mediated lytic phase. EBV lytic reactivation by TGF{beta}1 drives a selective alteration in CUX1 variant (a) (NCBI accession number NM{sub 1}81552) expression, inducing activation of non-canonical Wnt pathway mediators, implicating it in Epithelial Mesenchymal Transition (EMT), the molecular event underpinning scar production in tissue fibrosis. The role of EBV in EMT can be attenuated by antiviral strategies and inhibition of Wnt signaling by using All-Trans Retinoic Acids (ATRA). Activation of non-canonical Wnt signaling pathway by EBV in epithelial cells suggests a novel mechanism of EMT via CUX1 signaling. These data present a framework for further description of the link between infectious agents and fibrosis, a significant disease burden.

  12. Activin a signaling regulates cell invasion and proliferation in esophageal adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Le Bras, Gregoire F.; Koumangoye, Rainelli B.; Romero-Morales, Alejandra I.; Quast, Laura L.; Zaika, Alexander I.; El-Rifai, Wael; Andl, Thomas; Andl, Claudia D.

    2015-01-01

    TGFβ signaling has been implicated in the metaplasia from squamous epithelia to Barrett's esophagus and, ultimately, esophageal adenocarcinoma. The role of the family member Activin A in Barrett's tumorigenesis is less well established. As tumorigenesis is influenced by factors in the tumor microenvironment, such as fibroblasts and the extracellular matrix, we aimed to determine if epithelial cell-derived Activin affects initiation and progression differently than Activin signaling stimulation from a mimicked stromal source. Using Barrett's esophagus cells, CPB, and the esophageal adenocarcinoma cell lines OE33 and FLO-1, we showed that Activin reduces colony formation only in CPB cells. Epithelial cell overexpression of Activin increased cell migration and invasion in Boyden chamber assays in CPB and FLO-1 cells, which exhibited mesenchymal features such as the expression of the CD44 standard form, vimentin, and MT1-MMP. When grown in organotypic reconstructs, OE33 cells expressed E-cadherin and Keratin 8. As mesenchymal characteristics have been associated with the acquisition of stem cell-like features, we analyzed the expression and localization of SOX9, showing nuclear localization of SOX9 in esophageal CPB and FLO-1 cells. In conclusion, we show a role for autocrine Activin signaling in the regulation of colony formation, cell migration and invasion in Barrett's tumorigenesis. PMID:26447543

  13. Confluence switch signaling regulates ECM composition and the plasmin proteolytic cascade in keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Botta, Adrien; Delteil, Frédéric; Mettouchi, Amel; Vieira, Andhira; Estrach, Soline; Négroni, Luc; Stefani, Caroline; Lemichez, E; Meneguzzi, Guerrino; Gagnoux-Palacios, Laurent

    2012-09-15

    In culture, cell confluence generates signals that commit actively growing keratinocytes to exit the cell cycle and differentiate to form a stratified epithelium. Using a comparative proteomic approach, we studied this 'confluence switch' and identified a new pathway triggered by cell confluence that regulates basement membrane (BM) protein composition by suppressing the uPA-uPAR-plasmin pathway. Indeed, confluence triggers adherens junction maturation and enhances TGF-β and activin A activity, resulting in increased deposition of PAI-1 and perlecan in the BM. Extracellular matrix (ECM)-accumulated PAI-1 suppresses the uPA-uPAR-plasmin pathway and further enhances perlecan deposition by inhibiting its plasmin-dependent proteolysis. We show that perlecan deposition in the ECM strengthens cell adhesion, inhibits keratinocyte motility and promotes additional accumulation of PAI-1 in the ECM at confluence. In agreement, during wound-healing, perlecan concentrates at the wound-margin, where BM matures to stabilize keratinocyte adhesion. Our results demonstrate that confluence-dependent signaling orchestrates not only growth inhibition and differentiation, but also controls ECM proteolysis and BM formation. These data suggest that uncontrolled integration of confluence-dependent signaling, might favor skin disorders, including tumorigenesis, not only by promoting cell hyperproliferation, but also by altering protease activity and deposition of ECM components.

  14. Receptor Tyrosine Kinase Signaling: Regulating Neural Crest Development One Phosphate at a Time

    PubMed Central

    Fantauzzo, Katherine A.; Soriano, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) bind to a subset of growth factors on the surface of cells and elicit responses with broad roles in developmental and postnatal cellular processes. Receptors in this subclass consist of an extracellular ligand-binding domain, a single transmembrane domain, and an intracellular domain harboring a catalytic tyrosine kinase and regulatory sequences that are phosphorylated either by the receptor itself or various interacting proteins. Once activated, RTKs bind signaling molecules and recruit effector proteins to mediate downstream cellular responses through various intracellular signaling pathways. In this chapter, we will highlight the role of a subset of RTK families in regulating the activity of neural crest cells (NCCs) and the development of their derivatives in mammalian systems. NCCs are migratory, multipotent cells that can be subdivided into four axial populations, cranial, cardiac, vagal and trunk. These cells migrate throughout the vertebrate embryo along defined pathways and give rise to unique cell types and structures. Interestingly, individual RTK families often have specific functions in a subpopulation of NCCs that contribute to the diversity of these cells and their derivatives in the mammalian embryo. We will additionally discuss current methods used to investigate RTK signaling, including genetic, biochemical, large-scale proteomic and biosensor approaches, which can be applied to study intracellular signaling pathways active downstream of this receptor subclass during NCC development. PMID:25662260

  15. Mitochondrial Akt Regulation of Hypoxic Tumor Reprogramming.

    PubMed

    Chae, Young Chan; Vaira, Valentina; Caino, M Cecilia; Tang, Hsin-Yao; Seo, Jae Ho; Kossenkov, Andrew V; Ottobrini, Luisa; Martelli, Cristina; Lucignani, Giovanni; Bertolini, Irene; Locatelli, Marco; Bryant, Kelly G; Ghosh, Jagadish C; Lisanti, Sofia; Ku, Bonsu; Bosari, Silvano; Languino, Lucia R; Speicher, David W; Altieri, Dario C

    2016-08-01

    Hypoxia is a universal driver of aggressive tumor behavior, but the underlying mechanisms are not completely understood. Using a phosphoproteomics screen, we now show that active Akt accumulates in the mitochondria during hypoxia and phosphorylates pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 1 (PDK1) on Thr346 to inactivate the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex. In turn, this pathway switches tumor metabolism toward glycolysis, antagonizes apoptosis and autophagy, dampens oxidative stress, and maintains tumor cell proliferation in the face of severe hypoxia. Mitochondrial Akt-PDK1 signaling correlates with unfavorable prognostic markers and shorter survival in glioma patients and may provide an "actionable" therapeutic target in cancer. PMID:27505672

  16. Rapid assembly of diverse and potent allosteric Akt inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhicai; Robinson, Ronald G; Fu, Sheng; Barnett, Stanley F; Defeo-Jones, Deborah; Jones, Raymond E; Kral, Astrid M; Huber, Hans E; Kohl, Nancy E; Hartman, George D; Bilodeau, Mark T

    2008-03-15

    This paper describes the rapid assembly of four different classes of potent Akt inhibitors from a common intermediate. Among them, a pyridopyrimidine series displayed the best intrinsic and cell potency against Akt1 and Akt2. This series also showed a promising pharmacokinetic profile and excellent selectivity over other closely related kinases.

  17. FGF signaling regulates Wnt ligand expression to control vulval cell lineage polarity in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Minor, Paul J.; He, Ting-Fang; Sohn, Chang Ho; Asthagiri, Anand R.; Sternberg, Paul W.

    2013-01-01

    The interpretation of extracellular cues leading to the polarization of intracellular components and asymmetric cell divisions is a fundamental part of metazoan organogenesis. The Caenorhabditis elegans vulva, with its invariant cell lineage and interaction of multiple cell signaling pathways, provides an excellent model for the study of cell polarity within an organized epithelial tissue. Here, we show that the fibroblast growth factor (FGF) pathway acts in concert with the Frizzled homolog LIN-17 to influence the localization of SYS-1, a component of the Wnt/β-catenin asymmetry pathway, indirectly through the regulation of cwn-1. The source of the FGF ligand is the primary vulval precursor cell (VPC) P6.p, which controls the orientation of the neighboring secondary VPC P7.p by signaling through the sex myoblasts (SMs), activating the FGF pathway. The Wnt CWN-1 is expressed in the posterior body wall muscle of the worm as well as in the SMs, making it the only Wnt expressed on the posterior and anterior sides of P7.p at the time of the polarity decision. Both sources of cwn-1 act instructively to influence P7.p polarity in the direction of the highest Wnt signal. Using single molecule fluorescence in situ hybridization, we show that the FGF pathway regulates the expression of cwn-1 in the SMs. These results demonstrate an interaction between FGF and Wnt in C. elegans development and vulval cell lineage polarity, and highlight the promiscuous nature of Wnts and the importance of Wnt gradient directionality within C. elegans. PMID:23946444

  18. Targeting AKT1-E17K and the PI3K/AKT Pathway with an Allosteric AKT Inhibitor, ARQ 092

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yi; Savage, Ronald E.; Eathiraj, Sudharshan; Meade, Justin; Wick, Michael J.; Hall, Terence; Abbadessa, Giovanni; Schwartz, Brian

    2015-01-01

    As a critical component in the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway, AKT has become an attractive target for therapeutic intervention. ARQ 092 and a next generation AKT inhibitor, ARQ 751 are selective, allosteric, pan-AKT and AKT1-E17K mutant inhibitors that potently inhibit phosphorylation of AKT. Biochemical and cellular analysis showed that ARQ 092 and ARQ 751 inhibited AKT activation not only by dephosphorylating the membrane-associated active form, but also by preventing the inactive form from localizing into plasma membrane. In endometrial PDX models harboring mutant AKT1-E17K and other tumor models with an activated AKT pathway, both compounds exhibited strong anti-tumor activity. Combination studies conducted in in vivo breast tumor models demonstrated that ARQ 092 enhanced tumor inhibition of a common chemotherapeutic agent (paclitaxel). In a large panel of diverse cancer cell lines, ARQ 092 and ARQ 751 inhibited proliferation across multiple tumor types but were most potent in leukemia, breast, endometrial, and colorectal cancer cell lines. Moreover, inhibition by ARQ 092 and ARQ 751 was more prevalent in cancer cell lines containing PIK3CA/PIK3R1 mutations compared to those with wt-PIK3CA/PIK3R1 or PTEN mutations. For both ARQ 092 and ARQ 751, PIK3CA/PIK3R1 and AKT1-E17K mutations can potentially be used as predictive biomarkers for patient selection in clinical studies. PMID:26469692

  19. PKR is a novel functional direct player that coordinates skeletal muscle differentiation via p38MAPK/AKT pathways.

    PubMed

    Alisi, A; Spaziani, A; Anticoli, S; Ghidinelli, M; Balsano, C

    2008-03-01

    Myogenic differentiation is a highly orchestrated multistep process controlled by extracellular growth factors that modulate largely unknown signals into the cell affecting the muscle-transcription program. P38MAPK-dependent signalling, as well as PI3K/Akt pathway, has a key role in the control of muscle gene expression at different stages during the myogenic process. P38MAPK affects the activities of transcription factors, such as MyoD and myogenin, and contributes, together with PI3K/Akt pathway, to control the early and late steps of myogenic differentiation. The aim of our work was to better define the role of PKR, a dsRNA-activated protein kinase, as potential component in the differentiation program of C2C12 murine myogenic cells and to correlate its activity with p38MAPK and PI3K/Akt myogenic regulatory pathways. Here, we demonstrate that PKR is an essential component of the muscle development machinery and forms a functional complex with p38MAPK and/or Akt, contributing to muscle differentiation of committed myogenic cells in vitro. Inhibition of endogenous PKR activity by a specific (si)RNA and a PKR dominant-negative interferes with the myogenic program of C2C12 cells, causing a delay in activation of myogenic specific genes and inducing the formation of thinner myofibers. In addition, the construction of three PKR mutants allowed us to demonstrate that both N and C-terminal regions of PKR are critical for the interaction with p38MAPK and Akt. The novel discovered complex permits PKR to timely regulate the inhibition/activation of p38MAPK and Akt, controlling in this way the different steps characterizing skeletal muscle differentiation.

  20. Switching Akt: from survival signaling to deadly response

    PubMed Central

    Los, Marek; Maddika, Subbareddy; Erb, Bettina; Schulze-Osthoff, Klaus

    2010-01-01

    Akt, a protein kinase hyperactivated in many tumors, plays a major role in both cell survival and resistance to tumor therapy. A recent study,(1) along with other evidences, shows interestingly, that Akt is not a single-function kinase, but may facilitate rather than inhibit cell death under certain conditions. This hitherto undetected function of Akt is accomplished by its ability to increase reactive oxygen species and to suppress antioxidant enzymes. The ability of Akt to down-regulate antioxidant defenses uncovers a novel Achilles’ heel, which could be exploited by oxidant therapies in order to selectively eradicate tumor cells that express high levels of Akt activity. PMID:19319914

  1. Dissociation of ERK and Akt signaling in endothelial cell angiogenic responses to {beta}-amyloid

    SciTech Connect

    Magrane, Jordi; Christensen, Rial A.; Rosen, Kenneth M.; Veereshwarayya, Vimal; Querfurth, Henry W. . E-mail: hquerf01@granite.tufts.edu

    2006-04-15

    Cerebrovascular deposits of {beta}-amyloid (A{beta}) peptides are found in Alzheimer's disease and cerebral amyloid angiopathy with stroke or dementia. Dysregulations of angiogenesis, the blood-brain barrier and other critical endothelial cell (EC) functions have been implicated in aggravating chronic hypoperfusion in AD brain. We have used cultured ECs to model the effects of {beta}-amyloid on the activated phosphorylation states of multifunctional serine/threonine kinases since these are differentially involved in the survival, proliferation and migration aspects of angiogenesis. Serum-starved EC cultures containing amyloid-{beta} peptides underwent a 2- to 3-fold increase in nuclear pyknosis. Under growth conditions with sublethal doses of {beta}-amyloid, loss of cell membrane integrity and inhibition of cell proliferation were observed. By contrast, cell migration was the most sensitive to A{beta} since inhibition was significant already at 1 {mu}M (P = 0.01, migration vs. proliferation). In previous work, intracellular A{beta} accumulation was shown toxic to ECs and Akt function. Here, extracellular A{beta} peptides do not alter Akt activation, resulting instead in proportionate decreases in the phosphorylations of the MAPKs: ERK1/2 and p38 (starting at 1 {mu}M). This inhibitory action occurs proximal to MEK1/2 activation, possibly through interference with growth factor receptor coupling. Levels of phospho-JNK remained unchanged. Addition of PD98059, but not LY294002, resulted in a similar decrease in activated ERK1/2 levels and inhibition of EC migration. Transfection of ERK1/2 into A{beta}-poisoned ECs functionally rescued migration. The marked effect of extracellular A{beta} on the migration component of angiogenesis is associated with inhibition of MAPK signaling, while Akt-dependent cell survival appears more affected by cellular A{beta}.

  2. Akting up in the GABA hypothesis of schizophrenia: Akt1 deficiency modulates GABAergic functions and hippocampus-dependent functions.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chia-Yuan; Chen, Yi-Wen; Wang, Tsu-Wei; Lai, Wen-Sung

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating evidence implies that both AKT1 and GABAA receptor (GABAAR) subunit genes are involved in schizophrenia pathogenesis. Activated Akt promotes GABAergic neuron differentiation and increases GABAAR expression on the plasma membrane. To elucidate the role of Akt1 in modulating GABAergic functions and schizophrenia-related cognitive deficits, a set of 6 in vitro and in vivo experiments was conducted. First, an Akt1/2 inhibitor was applied to evaluate its effect on GABAergic neuron-like cell formation from P19 cells. Inhibiting Akt resulted in a reduction in parvalbumin-positive neuron-like cells. In Akt1(-/-) and wild-type mice, seizures induced using pentylenetetrazol (a GABAAR antagonist) were measured, and GABAAR expression and GABAergic interneuron abundance in the brain were examined. Female Akt1(-/-) mice, but not male Akt1(-/-) mice, exhibited less pentylenetetrazol-induced convulsive activity than their corresponding wild-type controls. Reduced parvalbumin-positive interneuron abundance and GABAAR subunit expression, especially in the hippocampus, were also observed in female Akt1(-/-) mice compared to female wild-type mice. Neuromorphometric analyses revealed significantly reduced neurite complexity in hippocampal pyramidal neurons. Additionally, female Akt1(-/-) mice displayed increased hippocampal oscillation power and impaired spatial memory compared to female wild-type mice. Our findings suggest that Akt1 deficiency modulates GABAergic interneurons and GABAAR expression, contributing to hippocampus-dependent cognitive functional impairment.

  3. Akting up in the GABA hypothesis of schizophrenia: Akt1 deficiency modulates GABAergic functions and hippocampus-dependent functions.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chia-Yuan; Chen, Yi-Wen; Wang, Tsu-Wei; Lai, Wen-Sung

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating evidence implies that both AKT1 and GABAA receptor (GABAAR) subunit genes are involved in schizophrenia pathogenesis. Activated Akt promotes GABAergic neuron differentiation and increases GABAAR expression on the plasma membrane. To elucidate the role of Akt1 in modulating GABAergic functions and schizophrenia-related cognitive deficits, a set of 6 in vitro and in vivo experiments was conducted. First, an Akt1/2 inhibitor was applied to evaluate its effect on GABAergic neuron-like cell formation from P19 cells. Inhibiting Akt resulted in a reduction in parvalbumin-positive neuron-like cells. In Akt1(-/-) and wild-type mice, seizures induced using pentylenetetrazol (a GABAAR antagonist) were measured, and GABAAR expression and GABAergic interneuron abundance in the brain were examined. Female Akt1(-/-) mice, but not male Akt1(-/-) mice, exhibited less pentylenetetrazol-induced convulsive activity than their corresponding wild-type controls. Reduced parvalbumin-positive interneuron abundance and GABAAR subunit expression, especially in the hippocampus, were also observed in female Akt1(-/-) mice compared to female wild-type mice. Neuromorphometric analyses revealed significantly reduced neurite complexity in hippocampal pyramidal neurons. Additionally, female Akt1(-/-) mice displayed increased hippocampal oscillation power and impaired spatial memory compared to female wild-type mice. Our findings suggest that Akt1 deficiency modulates GABAergic interneurons and GABAAR expression, contributing to hippocampus-dependent cognitive functional impairment. PMID:27615800

  4. Akting up in the GABA hypothesis of schizophrenia: Akt1 deficiency modulates GABAergic functions and hippocampus-dependent functions

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Chia-Yuan; Chen, Yi-Wen; Wang, Tsu-Wei; Lai, Wen-Sung

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating evidence implies that both AKT1 and GABAA receptor (GABAAR) subunit genes are involved in schizophrenia pathogenesis. Activated Akt promotes GABAergic neuron differentiation and increases GABAAR expression on the plasma membrane. To elucidate the role of Akt1 in modulating GABAergic functions and schizophrenia-related cognitive deficits, a set of 6 in vitro and in vivo experiments was conducted. First, an Akt1/2 inhibitor was applied to evaluate its effect on GABAergic neuron-like cell formation from P19 cells. Inhibiting Akt resulted in a reduction in parvalbumin-positive neuron-like cells. In Akt1−/− and wild-type mice, seizures induced using pentylenetetrazol (a GABAAR antagonist) were measured, and GABAAR expression and GABAergic interneuron abundance in the brain were examined. Female Akt1−/− mice, but not male Akt1−/− mice, exhibited less pentylenetetrazol-induced convulsive activity than their corresponding wild-type controls. Reduced parvalbumin-positive interneuron abundance and GABAAR subunit expression, especially in the hippocampus, were also observed in female Akt1−/− mice compared to female wild-type mice. Neuromorphometric analyses revealed significantly reduced neurite complexity in hippocampal pyramidal neurons. Additionally, female Akt1−/− mice displayed increased hippocampal oscillation power and impaired spatial memory compared to female wild-type mice. Our findings suggest that Akt1 deficiency modulates GABAergic interneurons and GABAAR expression, contributing to hippocampus-dependent cognitive functional impairment. PMID:27615800

  5. Advanced Glycation End Products Affect Osteoblast Proliferation and Function by Modulating Autophagy Via the Receptor of Advanced Glycation End Products/Raf Protein/Mitogen-activated Protein Kinase/Extracellular Signal-regulated Kinase Kinase/Extracellular Signal-regulated Kinase (RAGE/Raf/MEK/ERK) Pathway.

    PubMed

    Meng, Hong-Zheng; Zhang, Wei-Lin; Liu, Fei; Yang, Mao-Wei

    2015-11-20

    The interaction between advanced glycation end products (AGEs) and receptor of AGEs (RAGE) is associated with the development and progression of diabetes-associated osteoporosis, but the mechanisms involved are still poorly understood. In this study, we found that AGE-modified bovine serum albumin (AGE-BSA) induced a biphasic effect on the viability of hFOB1.19 cells; cell proliferation was stimulated after exposure to low dose AGE-BSA, but cell apoptosis was stimulated after exposure to high dose AGE-BSA. The low dose AGE-BSA facilitates proliferation of hFOB1.19 cells by concomitantly promoting autophagy, RAGE production, and the Raf/MEK/ERK signaling pathway activation. Furthermore, we investigated the effects of AGE-BSA on the function of hFOB1.19 cells. Interestingly, the results suggest that the short term effects of low dose AGE-BSA increase osteogenic function and decrease osteoclastogenic function, which are likely mediated by autophagy and the RAGE/Raf/MEK/ERK signal pathway. In contrast, with increased treatment time, the opposite effects were observed. Collectively, AGE-BSA had a biphasic effect on the viability of hFOB1.19 cells in vitro, which was determined by the concentration of AGE-BSA and treatment time. A low concentration of AGE-BSA activated the Raf/MEK/ERK signal pathway through the interaction with RAGE, induced autophagy, and regulated the proliferation and function of hFOB1.19 cells.

  6. Cyclic AMP signaling reduces sirtuin 6 expression in non-small cell lung cancer cells by promoting ubiquitin-proteasomal degradation via inhibition of the Raf-MEK-ERK (Raf/mitogen-activated extracellular signal-regulated kinase/extracellular signal-regulated kinase) pathway.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eui-Jun; Juhnn, Yong-Sung

    2015-04-10

    The cAMP signaling system regulates various cellular functions, including metabolism, gene expression, and death. Sirtuin 6 (SIRT6) removes acetyl groups from histones and regulates genomic stability and cell viability. We hypothesized that cAMP modulates SIRT6 activity to regulate apoptosis. Therefore, we examined the effects of cAMP signaling on SIRT6 expression and radiation-induced apoptosis in lung cancer cells. cAMP signaling in H1299 and A549 human non-small cell lung cancer cells was activated via the expression of constitutively active Gαs plus treatment with prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), isoproterenol, or forskolin. The expression of sirtuins and signaling molecules were analyzed by Western blotting. Activation of cAMP signaling reduced SIRT6 protein expression in lung cancer cells. cAMP signaling increased the ubiquitination of SIRT6 protein and promoted its degradation. Treatment with MG132 and inhibiting PKA with H89 or with a dominant-negative PKA abolished the cAMP-mediated reduction in SIRT6 levels. Treatment with PGE2 inhibited c-Raf activation by increasing inhibitory phosphorylation at Ser-259 in a PKA-dependent manner, thereby inhibiting downstream MEK-ERK signaling. Inhibiting ERK with inhibitors or with dominant-negative ERKs reduced SIRT6 expression, whereas activation of ERK by constitutively active MEK abolished the SIRT6-depleting effects of PGE2. cAMP signaling also augmented radiation-induced apoptosis in lung cancer cells. This effect was abolished by exogenous expression of SIRT6. It is concluded that cAMP signaling reduces SIRT6 expression by promoting its ubiquitin-proteasome-dependent degradation, a process mediated by the PKA-dependent inhibition of the Raf-MEK-ERK pathway. Reduced SIRT6 expression mediates the augmentation of radiation-induced apoptosis by cAMP signaling in lung cancer cells.

  7. AKT3 promotes prostate cancer proliferation cells through regulation of Akt, B-Raf & TSC1/TSC2

    PubMed Central

    Tseng, Jen-Chih; Jiang, Shih Sheng; Kuo, Ying-Yu; Chen, Shyh-Chang; Wang, Chih-Ting; Chan, Tzu-Min; Liou, Jun-Yang; Wang, John; Chang, Wun-Shaing Wayne; Chang, Chung-Ho; Kung, Hsing-Jien; Chuu, Chih-Pin

    2015-01-01

    The qRT-PCR analysis of 139 clinical samples and analysis of 150 on-line database clinical samples indicated that AKT3 mRNA expression level was elevated in primary prostate tumors. Immunohistochemical staining of 65 clinical samples revealed that AKT3 protein expression was higher in prostate tumors of stage I, II, III as compared to nearby normal tissues. Plasmid overexpression of AKT3 promoted cell proliferation of LNCaP, PC-3, DU-145, and CA-HPV-10 human prostate cancer (PCa) cells, while knockdown of AKT3 by siRNA reduced cell proliferation. Overexpression of AKT3 increased the protein expression of total AKT, phospho-AKT S473, phospho-AKT T308, B-Raf, c-Myc, Skp2, cyclin E, GSK3β, phospho-GSK3β S9, phospho-mTOR S2448, and phospho-p70S6K T421/S424, but decreased TSC1 (tuberous sclerosis 1) and TSC2 (tuberous Sclerosis Complex 2) proteins in PC-3 PCa cells. Overexpression of AKT3 also increased protein abundance of phospho-AKT S473, phospho-AKT T308, and B-Raf but decreased expression of TSC1 and TSC2 proteins in LNCaP, DU-145, and CA-HPV-10 PCa cells. Oncomine datasets analysis suggested that AKT3 mRNA level was positively correlated to BRAF. Knockdown of AKT3 in DU-145 cells with siRNA increased the sensitivity of DU-145 cells to B-Raf inhibitor treatment. Knockdown of TSC1 or TSC2 promoted the proliferation of PCa cells. Our observations implied that AKT3 may be a potential therapeutic target for PCa treatment. PMID:26318033

  8. Synthetic sulfoglycolipids targeting the serine-threonine protein kinase Akt.

    PubMed

    Costa, Barbara; Dangate, Milind; Vetro, Maria; Donvito, Giulia; Gabrielli, Luca; Amigoni, Loredana; Cassinelli, Giuliana; Lanzi, Cinzia; Ceriani, Michela; De Gioia, Luca; Filippi, Giulia; Cipolla, Laura; Zaffaroni, Nadia; Perego, Paola; Colombo, Diego

    2016-08-15

    The serine-threonine protein kinase Akt, also known as protein kinase B, is a key component of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)-Akt-mTOR axis. Deregulated activation of this pathway is frequent in human tumors and Akt-dependent signaling appears to be critical in cell survival. PI3K activation generates 3-phosphorylated phosphatidylinositols that bind Akt pleckstrin homology (PH) domain. The blockage of Akt PH domain/phosphoinositides interaction represents a promising approach to interfere with the oncogenic potential of over-activated Akt. In the present study, phosphatidyl inositol mimics based on a β-glucoside scaffold have been synthesized as Akt inhibitors. The compounds possessed one or two lipophilic moieties of different length at the anomeric position of glucose, and an acidic or basic group at C-6. Docking studies, ELISA Akt inhibition assays, and cellular assays on different cell models highlighted 1-O-octadecanoyl-2-O-β-d-sulfoquinovopyranosyl-sn-glycerol as the best Akt inhibitor among the synthesized compounds, which could be considered as a lead for further optimization in the design of Akt inhibitors.

  9. Wnt5a-mediated non-canonical Wnt signalling regulates human endothelial cell proliferation and migration

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng Chingwen Yeh Juching; Fan Taiping; Smith, Stephen K.; Charnock-Jones, D. Stephen

    2008-01-11

    Cell to cell interaction is one of the key processes effecting angiogenesis and endothelial cell function. Wnt signalling is mediated through cell-cell interaction and is involved in many developmental processes and cellular functions. In this study, we investigated the possible function of Wnt5a and the non-canonical Wnt pathway in human endothelial cells. We found that Wnt5a-mediated non-canonical Wnt signalling regulated endothelial cell proliferation. Blocking this pathway using antibody, siRNA or a down-stream inhibitor led to suppression of endothelial cell proliferation, migration, and monolayer wound closure. We also found that the mRNA level of Wnt5a is up-regulated when endothelial cells are treated with a cocktail of inflammatory cytokines. Our findings suggest non-canonical Wnt signalling plays a role in regulating endothelial cell growth and possibly in angiogenesis.

  10. Tumors with AKT1E17K Mutations Are Rational Targets for Single Agent or Combination Therapy with AKT Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Davies, Barry R; Guan, Nin; Logie, Armelle; Crafter, Claire; Hanson, Lyndsey; Jacobs, Vivien; James, Neil; Dudley, Philippa; Jacques, Kelly; Ladd, Brendon; D'Cruz, Celina M; Zinda, Michael; Lindemann, Justin; Kodaira, Makoto; Tamura, Kenji; Jenkins, Emma L

    2015-11-01

    AKT1(E17K) mutations occur at low frequency in a variety of solid tumors, including those of the breast and urinary bladder. Although this mutation has been shown to transform rodent cells in culture, it was found to be less oncogenic than PIK3CA mutations in breast epithelial cells. Moreover, the therapeutic potential of AKT inhibitors in human tumors with an endogenous AKT1(E17K) mutation is not known. Expression of exogenous copies of AKT1(E17K) in MCF10A breast epithelial cells increased phosphorylation of AKT and its substrates, induced colony formation in soft agar, and formation of lesions in the mammary fat pad of immunodeficient mice. These effects were inhibited by the allosteric and catalytic AKT inhibitors MK-2206 and AZD5363, respectively. Both AKT inhibitors caused highly significant growth inhibition of breast cancer explant models with AKT1(E17K) mutation. Furthermore, in a phase I clinical study, the catalytic Akt inhibitor AZD5363 induced partial responses in patients with breast and ovarian cancer with tumors containing AKT1(E17K) mutations. In MGH-U3 bladder cancer xenografts, which contain both AKT1(E17K) and FGFR3(Y373C) mutations, AZD5363 monotherapy did not significantly reduce tumor growth, but tumor regression was observed in combination with the FGFR inhibitor AZD4547. The data show that tumors with AKT1(E17K) mutations are rational therapeutic targets for AKT inhibitors, although combinations with other targeted agents may be required where activating oncogenic mutations of other proteins are present in the same tumor.

  11. Effects of low-intensity pulsed ultrasound on integrin-FAK-PI3K/Akt mechanochemical transduction in rabbit osteoarthritis chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Kai; Xia, Peng; Lin, Qiang; Shen, Shihao; Gao, Mingxia; Ren, Shasha; Li, Xueping

    2014-07-01

    The effect of low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) on extracellular matrix (ECM) production via modulation of the integrin/focal adhesion kinase (FAK)/phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt pathway has been investigated in previous studies in normal chondrocytes, but not in osteoarthritis (OA). Therefore, we investigated the LIPUS-induced integrin β1/FAK/PI3K/Akt mechanochemical transduction pathway in a single study in rabbit OA chondrocytes. Normal and OA chondrocytes were exposed to LIPUS, and mRNA and protein expression of cartilage, metalloproteinases and integrin-FAK-PI3K/Akt signal pathway-related genes was determined by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and Western blotting, respectively. Compared with levels in normal chondrocytes, expression levels of ECM-related genes were significantly lower in OA chondrocytes and those of metalloproteinase-related genes were significantly higher. In addition, integrin β1 gene expression and the phosphorylation of FAK, PI3K and Akt were significantly higher in OA chondrocytes. The expression of all tested genes was significantly increased except for that of metalloproteinase, which was significantly decreased in the LIPUS-treated OA group compared to the untreated OA group. LIPUS may affect the integrin-FAK-PI3K/Akt mechanochemical transduction pathway and alter ECM production by OA chondrocytes. Our findings will aid the future development of a treatment or even cure for OA.

  12. Berberine induces dedifferentiation by actin cytoskeleton reorganization via phosphoinositide 3-kinase/Akt and p38 kinase pathways in rabbit articular chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Seon-Mi; Cho, Hongsik; Kim, Gwang-Hoon; Chung, Ki-Wha; Seo, Sung-Yum

    2016-01-01

    Osteoarthritis is a nonrheumatologic joint disease characterized by progressive degeneration of the cartilage extracellular matrix. Berberine (BBR) is an isoquinoline alkaloid used in traditional Chinese medicine, the majority of which is extracted from Huang Lian (Coptis chinensis). Although numerous studies have revealed the anticancer activity of BBR, its effects on normal cells, such as chondrocytes, and the molecular mechanisms underlying its actions remain elusive. Therefore, we examined the effects of BBR on rabbit articular chondrocytes, and the underlying molecular mechanisms, focusing on actin cytoskeletal reorganization. BBR induced dedifferentiation by inhibiting activation of phosphoinositide-3(PI3)-kinase/Akt and p38 kinase. Furthermore, inhibition of p38 kinase and PI3-kinase/Akt with SB203580 and LY294002, respectively, accelerated the BBR-induced dedifferentiation. BBR also caused actin cytoskeletal architecture reorganization and, therefore, we investigated if these effects were involved in the dedifferentiation. Disruption of the actin cytoskeleton by cytochalasin D reversed the BBR-induced dedifferentiation by activating PI3-kinase/Akt and p38 kinase. In contrast, the induction of actin filament aggregation by jasplakinolide accelerated the BBR-induced dedifferentiation via PI3-kinase/Akt inhibition and p38 kinase activation. Taken together, these data suggest that BBR strongly induces dedifferentiation, and actin cytoskeletal reorganization is a crucial requirement for this effect. Furthermore, the dedifferentiation activity of BBR appears to be mediated via PI3-kinase/Akt and p38 kinase pathways in rabbit articular chondrocytes. PMID:26851252

  13. Molecular dissection of AKT activation in lung cancer cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yanan; Du, Jinyan; Kwiatkowski, David J

    2013-01-01

    AKT is a critical signaling node downstream of PI3K, which is often activated in cancer. We analyzed the state of activation of AKT in 80 human non-small cell lung cancer cell lines under serum starvation conditions. We identified 13 lines which showed persistent AKT activation in the absence of serum. In 12 of the 13 lines, AKT activation could be attributed to loss of PTEN, activating mutation in EGFR or PIK3CA, or amplification of ERBB2. HCC2429 was the only cell line that had no alterations in those genes, but had high phospho-AKT(Ser473) levels under serum starvation conditions. However, the activation of AKT in HCC2429 was PI3K- and mTORC2-dependent based upon use of specific inhibitors. Kinome tyrosine phosphorylation profiling showed that both Notch and SRC were highly activated in this cell line. Despite the activation of Notch, AKT activation and cell survival were not affected by Notch inhibitors DAPT or Compound E. In contrast, SRC inhibitors PP2 and dasatinib both significantly decreased pAKT(Ser473) levels and reduced cell survival by inducing apoptosis. Further, a combination of SRC and mTOR inhibition synergistically blocked activation of AKT and induced apoptosis. Over-expression of SRC has been identified previously in human lung cancers, and these results suggest that a combination of SRC and mTOR inhibitors may have unique therapeutic benefit for a subset of lung cancers with these molecular features. PMID:23319332

  14. An optogenetic system for interrogating the temporal dynamics of Akt

    PubMed Central

    Katsura, Yoshihiro; Kubota, Hiroyuki; Kunida, Katsuyuki; Kanno, Akira; Kuroda, Shinya; Ozawa, Takeaki

    2015-01-01

    The dynamic activity of the serine/threonine kinase Akt is crucial for the regulation of diverse cellular functions, but the precise spatiotemporal control of its activity remains a critical issue. Herein, we present a photo-activatable Akt (PA-Akt) system based on a light-inducible protein interaction module of Arabidopsis thaliana cryptochrome2 (CRY2) and CIB1. Akt fused to CRY2phr, which is a minimal light sensitive domain of CRY2 (CRY2-Akt), is reversibly activated by light illumination in several minutes within a physiological dynamic range and specifically regulates downstream molecules and inducible biological functions. We have generated a computational model of CRY2-Akt activation that allows us to use PA-Akt to control the activity quantitatively. The system provides evidence that the temporal patterns of Akt activity are crucial for generating one of the downstream functions of the Akt-FoxO pathway; the expression of a key gene involved in muscle atrophy (Atrogin-1). The use of an optical module with computational modeling represents a general framework for interrogating the temporal dynamics of biomolecules by predictive manipulation of optogenetic modules. PMID:26423353

  15. Control of fibroblast fibronectin expression and alternative splicing via the PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway

    SciTech Connect

    White, Eric S.; Sagana, Rommel L.; Booth, Adam J.; Yan, Mei; Cornett, Ashley M.; Bloomheart, Christopher A.; Tsui, Jessica L.; Wilke, Carol A.; Moore, Bethany B.; Ritzenthaler, Jeffrey D.; Roman, Jesse; Muro, Andres F.

    2010-10-01

    Fibronectin (FN), a ubiquitous glycoprotein that plays critical roles in physiologic and pathologic conditions, undergoes alternative splicing which distinguishes plasma FN (pFN) from cellular FN (cFN). Although both pFN and cFN can be incorporated into the extracellular matrix, a distinguishing feature of cFN is the inclusion of an alternatively spliced exon termed EDA (for extra type III domain A). The molecular steps involved in EDA splicing are well-characterized, but pathways influencing EDA splicing are less clear. We have previously found an obligate role for inhibition of the tumor suppressor phosphatase and tensin homologue on chromosome 10 (PTEN), the primary regulator of the PI3K/Akt pathway, in fibroblast activation. Here we show TGF-{beta}, a potent inducer of both EDA splicing and fibroblast activation, inhibits PTEN expression and activity in mesenchymal cells, corresponding with enhanced PI3K/Akt signaling. In pten{sup -/-} fibroblasts, which resemble activated fibroblasts, inhibition of Akt attenuated FN production and decreased EDA alternative splicing. Moreover, inhibition of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) in pten{sup -/-} cells also blocked FN production and EDA splicing. This effect was due to inhibition of Akt-mediated phosphorylation of the primary EDA splicing regulatory protein SF2/ASF. Importantly, FN silencing in pten{sup -/-} cells resulted in attenuated proliferation and migration. Thus, our results demonstrate that the PI3K/Akt/mTOR axis is instrumental in FN transcription and alternative splicing, which regulates cell behavior.

  16. Trpc1 ion channel modulates phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt pathway during myoblast differentiation and muscle regeneration.

    PubMed

    Zanou, Nadège; Schakman, Olivier; Louis, Pierre; Ruegg, Urs T; Dietrich, Alexander; Birnbaumer, Lutz; Gailly, Philippe

    2012-04-27

    We previously showed in vitro that calcium entry through Trpc1 ion channels regulates myoblast migration and differentiation. In the present work, we used primary cell cultures and isolated muscles from Trpc1(-/-) and Trpc1(+/+) murine model to investigate the role of Trpc1 in myoblast differentiation and in muscle regeneration. In these models, we studied regeneration consecutive to cardiotoxin-induced muscle injury and observed a significant hypotrophy and a delayed regeneration in Trpc1(-/-) muscles consisting in smaller fiber size and increased proportion of centrally nucleated fibers. This was accompanied by a decreased expression of myogenic factors such as MyoD, Myf5, and myogenin and of one of their targets, the developmental MHC (MHCd). Consequently, muscle tension was systematically lower in muscles from Trpc1(-/-) mice. Importantly, the PI3K/Akt/mTOR/p70S6K pathway, which plays a crucial role in muscle growth and regeneration, was down-regulated in regenerating Trpc1(-/-) muscles. Indeed, phosphorylation of both Akt and p70S6K proteins was decreased as well as the activation of PI3K, the main upstream regulator of the Akt. This effect was independent of insulin-like growth factor expression. Akt phosphorylation also was reduced in Trpc1(-/-) primary myoblasts and in control myoblasts differentiated in the absence of extracellular Ca(2+) or pretreated with EGTA-AM or wortmannin, suggesting that the entry of Ca(2+) through Trpc1 channels enhanced the activity of PI3K. Our results emphasize the involvement of Trpc1 channels in skeletal muscle development in vitro and in vivo, and identify a Ca(2+)-dependent activation of the PI3K/Akt/mTOR/p70S6K pathway during myoblast differentiation and muscle regeneration.

  17. Trpc1 Ion Channel Modulates Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinase/Akt Pathway during Myoblast Differentiation and Muscle Regeneration*

    PubMed Central

    Zanou, Nadège; Schakman, Olivier; Louis, Pierre; Ruegg, Urs T.; Dietrich, Alexander; Birnbaumer, Lutz; Gailly, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    We previously showed in vitro that calcium entry through Trpc1 ion channels regulates myoblast migration and differentiation. In the present work, we used primary cell cultures and isolated muscles from Trpc1−/− and Trpc1+/+ murine model to investigate the role of Trpc1 in myoblast differentiation and in muscle regeneration. In these models, we studied regeneration consecutive to cardiotoxin-induced muscle injury and observed a significant hypotrophy and a delayed regeneration in Trpc1−/− muscles consisting in smaller fiber size and increased proportion of centrally nucleated fibers. This was accompanied by a decreased expression of myogenic factors such as MyoD, Myf5, and myogenin and of one of their targets, the developmental MHC (MHCd). Consequently, muscle tension was systematically lower in muscles from Trpc1−/− mice. Importantly, the PI3K/Akt/mTOR/p70S6K pathway, which plays a crucial role in muscle growth and regeneration, was down-regulated in regenerating Trpc1−/− muscles. Indeed, phosphorylation of both Akt and p70S6K proteins was decreased as well as the activation of PI3K, the main upstream regulator of the Akt. This effect was independent of insulin-like growth factor expression. Akt phosphorylation also was reduced in Trpc1−/− primary myoblasts and in control myoblasts differentiated in the absence of extracellular Ca2+ or pretreated with EGTA-AM or wortmannin, suggesting that the entry of Ca2+ through Trpc1 channels enhanced the activity of PI3K. Our results emphasize the involvement of Trpc1 channels in skeletal muscle development in vitro and in vivo, and identify a Ca2+-dependent activation of the PI3K/Akt/mTOR/p70S6K pathway during myoblast differentiation and muscle regeneration. PMID:22399301

  18. Preeclampsia and Extracellular Vesicles.

    PubMed

    Gilani, Sarwat I; Weissgerber, Tracey L; Garovic, Vesna D; Jayachandran, Muthuvel

    2016-09-01

    Preeclampsia is a hypertensive pregnancy disorder characterized by development of hypertension and proteinuria after 20 weeks of gestation that remains a leading cause of maternal and neonatal morbidity and mortality. While preeclampsia is believed to result from complex interactions between maternal and placental factors, the proximate pathophysiology of this syndrome remains elusive. Cell-to-cell communication is a critical signaling mechanism for feto-placental development in normal pregnancies. One mechanism of cellular communication relates to activated cell-derived sealed membrane vesicles called extracellular vesicles (EVs). The concentrations and contents of EVs in biological fluids depend upon their cells of origin and the stimuli which trigger their production. Research on EVs in preeclampsia has focused on EVs derived from the maternal vasculature (endothelium, vascular smooth muscle) and blood (erythrocytes, leukocytes, and platelets), as well as placental syncytiotrophoblasts. Changes in the concentrations and contents of these EVs may contribute to the pathophysiology of preeclampsia by accentuating the pro-inflammatory and pro-coagulatory states of pregnancy. This review focuses on possible interactions among placental- and maternal-derived EVs and their contents in the initiation and progression of the pathogenesis of preeclampsia. Understanding the contributions of EVs in the pathogenesis of preeclampsia may facilitate their use as diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers. PMID:27590522

  19. Extracellular Nucleotides Can Induce Chemokine (C-C motif) Ligand 2 Expression in Human Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jeung-Il; Kim, Hye-Young; Kim, Sun-Mi; Lee, Sae-A; Son, Yong-Hae; Eo, Seong-Kug; Rhim, Byung-Yong

    2011-01-01

    To understand the roles of purinergic receptors and cellular molecules below the receptors in the vascular inflammatory response, we determined if extracellular nucleotides up-regulated chemokine expression in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). Human aortic smooth muscle cells (AoSMCs) abundantly express P2Y1, P2Y6, and P2Y11 receptors, which all respond to extracellular nucleotides. Exposure of human AoSMCs to NAD+, an agonist of the human P2Y11 receptor, and NADP+ as well as ATP, an agonist for P2Y1 and P2Y11 receptors, caused increase in chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2 gene (CCL2) transcript and CCL2 release; however, UPT did not affect CCL2 expression. CCL2 release by NAD+ and NADP+ was inhibited by a concentration dependent manner by suramin, an antagonist of P2-purinergic receptors. NAD+ and NADP+ activated protein kinase C and enhanced phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinases and Akt. NAD+- and NADP+-mediated CCL2 release was significantly attenuated by SP6001250, U0126, LY294002, Akt inhibitor IV, RO318220, GF109203X, and diphenyleneiodium chloride. These results indicate that extracellular nucleotides can promote the proinflammatory VSMC phenotype by up-regulating CCL2 expression, and that multiple cellular elements, including phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, Akt, protein kinase C, and mitogen-activated protein kinases, are involved in that process. PMID:21461238

  20. Expression, activation, and role of AKT isoforms in the uterus.

    PubMed

    Fabi, François; Asselin, Eric

    2014-11-01

    The three isoforms of AKT: AKT1, AKT2, and AKT3, are crucial regulators of both normal and pathological cellular processes. Each of these isoforms exhibits a high level of homology and functional redundancy with each other. However, while being highly similar and structurally homologous, a rising amount of evidence is showing that each isoform possesses specific targets as well as preferential subcellular localization. The role of AKT has been studied extensively in reproductive processes, but isoform-specific roles are yet to be fully understood. This review will focus on the role of AKT in the uterus and its function in processes related to cell death and proliferation such as embryo implantation, decidualization, endometriosis, and endometrial cancer in an isoform-centric manner. In this review, we will cover the activation of AKT in various settings, localization of isoforms in subcellular compartments, and the effect of isoform expression on cellular processes. To fully understand the dynamic molecular processes taking place in the uterus, it is crucial that we better understand the physiological role of AKT isoforms as well as their function in the emergence of diseases.

  1. Knockdown of apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 affects ischaemia-induced astrocyte activation and glial scar formation.

    PubMed

    Cheon, So Yeong; Cho, Kyoung Joo; Song, Juhyun; Kim, Gyung Whan

    2016-04-01

    Reactive astrocytes play an essential role in determining the tissue response to ischaemia. Formation of a glial scar can block the neuronal outgrowth that is required for restoration of damaged tissue. Therefore, regulation of astrocyte activation is important; however, the mediator of this process has not been fully elucidated. Apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 (ASK1) is an early responder to oxidative stress, and plays a pivotal role in the intracellular signalling pathway of apoptosis, inflammation, and differentiation. To confirm whether ASK1 mediates astrocyte activation and leads to glial scar formation after cerebral ischaemia, we conducted in vivo and in vitro experiments. C57BL/6 mice were subjected to occlusion of the middle cerebral artery, and astrocyte cultures were exposed to oxygen-glucose deprivation. After silencing of ASK1 , astrocyte-associated genes were downregulated, as seen with the use of microarrays. The glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) level was decreased, and correlated with the reduction in the ASK1 level. In astrocytes, reduction in the ASK1 level decreased the activity of the p38 pathway, and the levels of transcription factors for GFAP and GFAP transcripts after hypoxia. In the chronic phase, ASK1 depletion reduced glial scar formation and conserved neuronal structure, which may lead to better functional recovery. These data suggest that ASK1 may be an important mediator of ischaemia-induced astrocyte activation and scar formation, and could provide a potential therapeutic target for treatment after ischaemic stroke. PMID:26797817

  2. Hedgehog signaling regulates E-cadherin expression for the maintenance of the actin cytoskeleton and tight junctions.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Chang; Ogle, Sally A; Schumacher, Michael A; Schilling, Neal; Tokhunts, Robert A; Orr-Asman, Melissa A; Miller, Marian L; Robbins, David J; Hollande, Frederic; Zavros, Yana

    2010-12-01

    In the stomach, strictly regulated cell adherens junctions are crucial in determining epithelial cell differentiation. Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) regulates epithelial cell differentiation in the adult stomach. We sought to identify whether Shh plays a role in regulating adherens junction protein E-cadherin as a mechanism for epithelial cell differentiation. Mouse nontumorigenic gastric epithelial (IMGE-5) cells treated with Hedgehog signaling inhibitor cyclopamine and anti-Shh 5E1 antibody or transduced with short hairpin RNA against Skinny Hedgehog (IMGE-5(Ski)) were cultured. A mouse model expressing a parietal cell-specific deletion of Shh (HKCre/Shh(KO)) was used to identify further changes in adherens and tight junctions. Inhibition of Hedgehog signaling in IMGE-5 cells caused loss of E-cadherin expression accompanied by disruption of F-actin cortical expression and relocalization of zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1). Loss of E-cadherin was also associated with increased proliferation in IMGE-5(Ski) cells and increased expression of the mucous neck cell lineage marker MUC6. Compared with membrane-expressed E-cadherin and ZO-1 protein in controls, dissociation of E-cadherin/β-catenin and ZO-1/occludin protein complexes was observed in HKCre/Shh(KO) mice. In conclusion, we demonstrate that Hedgehog signaling regulates E-cadherin expression that is required for the maintenance of F-actin cortical expression and stability of tight junction protein ZO-1.

  3. Orexin signaling regulates both the hippocampal clock and the circadian oscillation of Alzheimer’s disease-risk genes

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Zhixiong; Jiang, Weiliang; Zhang, Eric Erquan

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a circadian clock-related disease. However, it is not very clear whether pre-symptomatic AD leads to circadian disruption or whether malfunction of circadian rhythms exerts influence on development of AD. Here, we report a functional clock that exists in the hippocampus. This oscillator both receives input signals and maintains the cycling of the hippocampal Per2 gene. One of the potential inputs to the oscillator is orexin signaling, which can shorten the hippocampal clock period and thereby regulate the expression of clock-controlled-genes (CCGs). A 24-h time course qPCR analysis followed by a JTK_CYCLE algorithm analysis indicated that a number of AD-risk genes are potential CCGs in the hippocampus. Specifically, we found that Bace1 and Bace2, which are related to the production of the amyloid-beta peptide, are CCGs. BACE1 is inhibited by E4BP4, a repressor of D-box genes, while BACE2 is activated by CLOCK:BMAL1. Finally, we observed alterations in the rhythmic expression patterns of Bace2 and ApoE in the hippocampus of aged APP/PS1dE9 mice. Our results therefore indicate that there is a circadian oscillator in the hippocampus whose oscillation could be regulated by orexins. Hence, orexin signaling regulates both the hippocampal clock and the circadian oscillation of AD-risk genes. PMID:27796320

  4. S1P-Yap1 signaling regulates endoderm formation required for cardiac precursor cell migration in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Fukui, Hajime; Terai, Kenta; Nakajima, Hiroyuki; Chiba, Ayano; Fukuhara, Shigetomo; Mochizuki, Naoki

    2014-10-13

    To form the primary heart tube in zebrafish, bilateral cardiac precursor cells (CPCs) migrate toward the midline beneath the endoderm. Mutants lacking endoderm and fish with defective sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) signaling exhibit cardia bifida. Endoderm defects lead to the lack of foothold for the CPCs, whereas the cause of cardia bifida in S1P signaling mutants remains unclear. Here we show that S1P signaling regulates CPC migration through Yes-associated protein 1 (Yap1)-dependent endoderm survival. Cardia bifida seen in spns2 (S1P transporter) morphants and s1pr2 (S1P receptor-2) morphants could be rescued by endodermal expression of nuclear localized form of yap1. yap1 morphants had decreased expression of the Yap1/Tead target connective tissue growth factor a (Ctgfa) and consequently increased endodermal cell apoptosis. Consistently, ctgfa morphants showed defects of the endodermal sheet and cardia bifida. Collectively, we show that S1pr2/Yap1-regulated ctgfa expression is essential for the proper endoderm formation required for CPC migration.

  5. HEDGEHOG-GLI1 signaling regulates human glioma growth, cancer stem cell self-renewal and tumorigenicity

    PubMed Central

    Clement, Virginie; Sanchez, Pilar; de Tribolet, Nicolas; Radovanovic, Ivan; Altaba, Ariel Ruiz i

    2007-01-01

    Summary Cancer stem cells are rare tumor cells characterized by their ability to self-renew and to induce tumorigenesis. They are present in gliomas and may be responsible for the lethality of these incurable brain tumors. In the most aggressive and invasive type, glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), an average of ±1 year spans the period between detection and death (1). The resistence of gliomas to current therapies may be related to the existence of cancer stem cells (2–6). We find that human gliomas display a stemness signature and demonstrate that HEDGEHOG (HH)-GLI signaling regulates the expression of stemness genes in and the self-renewal of CD133+ glioma cancer stem cells. HH-GLI signaling is also required for sustained glioma growth and survival, displaying additive and synergistic effects with temozolomide, the current chemotherapeutic agent of choice, which does not affect glioma stem cell self-renewal. Finally, interference of HH-GLI signaling with cyclopamine or through lentiviral-mediated silencing demonstrates that the tumorigenicity of human gliomas in nude mice requires an active pathway. Our results reveal the essential role of HH-GLI signaling in controlling the behavior of human glioma cancer stem cells and offer new therapeutic possibilities. PMID:17196391

  6. Apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 mediates the inhibitory effect of hepatocyte nuclear factor-4α on hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Wen-Ping; Shi, Bin; Zhang, Xin; Xie, Wei-Fen

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies provided substantial evidence of a striking suppressive effect of hepatocyte nuclear factor 4α (HNF4α) on hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 (ASK1) is involved in death receptor-mediated apoptosis and may acts as a tumor suppressor in hepatocarcinogenesis. However, the status and function of ASK1 during HCC progression are unclear. In this study, we found that HNF4α increased ASK1 expression by directly binding to its promoter. ASK1 expression was dramatically suppressed and correlated with HNF4α levels in HCC tissues. Reduced ASK1 expression was associated with aggressive tumors and poor prognosis for human HCC. Moreover, ASK1 inhibited the malignant phenotype of HCC cells in vitro. Intratumoral ASK1 injection significantly suppressed the growth of subcutaneous HCC xenografts in nude mice. More interestingly, systemic ASK1 delivery strikingly inhibited the growth of orthotopic HCC nodules in NOD/SCID mice. In addition, inhibition of endogenous ASK1 partially reversed the suppressive effects of HNF4α on HCC. Collectively, this study highlights the suppressive effect of ASK1 on HCC and its biological significance in HCC development. These outcomes broaden the knowledge of ASK1 function in HCC progression, and provide a novel potential prognostic biomarker and therapeutic target for advanced HCC. PMID:27050273

  7. Integrin β1 mediates vaccinia virus entry through activation of PI3K/Akt signaling.

    PubMed

    Izmailyan, Roza; Hsao, Jye-Chian; Chung, Che-Sheng; Chen, Chein-Hung; Hsu, Paul Wei-Che; Liao, Chung-Lin; Chang, Wen

    2012-06-01

    Vaccinia virus has a broad range of infectivity in many cell lines and animals. Although it is known that the vaccinia mature virus binds to cell surface glycosaminoglycans and extracellular matrix proteins, whether additional cellular receptors are required for virus entry remains unclear. Our previous studies showed that the vaccinia mature virus enters through lipid rafts, suggesting the involvement of raft-associated cellular proteins. Here we demonstrate that one lipid raft-associated protein, integrin β1, is important for vaccinia mature virus entry into HeLa cells. Vaccinia virus associates with integrin β1 in lipid rafts on the cell surface, and the knockdown of integrin β1 in HeLa cells reduces vaccinia mature virus entry. Additionally, vaccinia mature virus infection is reduced in a mouse cell line, GD25, that is deficient in integrin β1 expression. Vaccinia mature virus infection triggers the activation of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt signaling, and the treatment of cells with inhibitors to block P13K activation reduces virus entry in an integrin β1-dependent manner, suggesting that integrin β1-mediates PI3K/Akt activation induced by vaccinia virus and that this signaling pathway is essential for virus endocytosis. The inhibition of integrin β1-mediated cell adhesion results in a reduction of vaccinia virus entry and the disruption of focal adhesion and PI3K/Akt activation. In summary, our results show that the binding of vaccinia mature virus to cells mimics the outside-in activation process of integrin functions to facilitate vaccinia virus entry into HeLa cells.

  8. Extracellular matrix and wound healing.

    PubMed

    Maquart, F X; Monboisse, J C

    2014-04-01

    Extracellular matrix has been known for a long time as an architectural support for the tissues. Many recent data, however, have shown that extracellular matrix macromolecules (collagens, elastin, glycosaminoglycans, proteoglycans and connective tissue glycoproteins) are able to regulate many important cell functions, such as proliferation, migration, protein synthesis or degradation, apoptosis, etc., making them able to play an important role in the wound repair process. Not only the intact macromolecules but some of their specific domains, that we called "Matrikines", are also able to regulate many cell activities. In this article, we will summarize main findings showing the effects of extracellular matrix macromolecules and matrikines on connective tissue and epithelial cells, particularly in skin, and their potential implication in the wound healing process. These examples show that extracellular matrix macromolecules or some of their specific domains may play a major role in wound healing. Better knowledge of these interactions may suggest new therapeutic targets in wound healing defects. PMID:24650524

  9. Integrin α3β1 regulates kidney collecting duct development via TRAF6-dependent K63-linked polyubiquitination of Akt

    PubMed Central

    Yazlovitskaya, Eugenia M.; Tseng, Hui-Yuan; Viquez, Olga; Tu, Tianxiang; Mernaugh, Glenda; McKee, Karen K.; Riggins, Karen; Quaranta, Vito; Pathak, Amrita; Carter, Bruce D.; Yurchenco, Peter; Sonnenberg, Arnoud; Böttcher, Ralph T.; Pozzi, Ambra; Zent, Roy

    2015-01-01

    The collecting system of the kidney develops from the ureteric bud (UB), which undergoes branching morphogenesis, a process regulated by multiple factors, including integrin–extracellular matrix interactions. The laminin (LM)-binding integrin α3β1 is crucial for this developmental program; however, the LM types and LM/integrin α3β1–dependent signaling pathways are poorly defined. We show that α3 chain–containing LMs promote normal UB branching morphogenesis and that LM-332 is a better substrate than LM-511 for stimulating integrin α3β1–dependent collecting duct cell functions. We demonstrate that integrin α3β1–mediated cell adhesion to LM-332 modulates Akt activation in the developing collecting system and that Akt activation is PI3K independent but requires decreased PTEN activity and K63-linked polyubiquitination. We identified the ubiquitin-modifying enzyme TRAF6 as an interactor with the integrin β1 subunit and regulator of integrin α3β1–dependent Akt activation. Finally, we established that the developmental defects of TRAF6- and integrin α3–null mouse kidneys are similar. Thus K63-linked polyubiquitination plays a previously unrecognized role in integrin α3β1–dependent cell signaling required for UB development and may represent a novel mechanism whereby integrins regulate signaling pathways. PMID:25808491

  10. Polymorphisms in the AKT1 and AKT2 genes and oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma risk in an Eastern Chinese population.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jinhong; Wang, Mengyun; He, Jing; Zhu, Meiling; Wang, Jiu-Cun; Jin, Li; Wang, Xiao-Feng; Yang, Ya-Jun; Xiang, Jia-Qing; Wei, Qingyi

    2016-04-01

    Ethnic Han Chinese are at high risk of developing oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). Aberrant activation of the AKT signalling pathway is involved in many cancers, including ESCC. Some single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes involved in this pathway may contribute to ESCC susceptibility. We selected five potentially functional SNPs in AKT1 (rs2494750, rs2494752 and rs10138277) and AKT2 (rs7254617 and rs2304186) genes and investigated their associations with ESCC risk in 1117 ESCC cases and 1096 controls in an Eastern Chinese population. None of individual SNPs exhibited an association with ESCC risk. However, the combined analysis of three AKT1 SNPs suggested that individuals carrying one of AKT1 variant genotypes had a decreased ESCC risk [adjusted odds ratio (OR) = 0.60, 95% CI = 0.42-0.87]. Further stratified analysis found that AKT1 rs2294750 SNP was associated with significantly decreased ESCC risk among women (adjusted OR = 0.63, 95% CI = 0.43-0.94) and non-drinkers (OR = 0.79, 95% CI = 0.64-0.99). Similar protective effects on women (adjusted OR = 0.56, 95% CI = 0.37-0.83) and non-drinker (adjusted OR = 0.75, 95% CI = 0.60-0.94) were also observed for the combined genotypes of AKT1 SNPs. Consistently, logistic regression analysis indicated significant gene-gene interactions among three AKT1 SNPs (P < 0.015). A three-AKT1 SNP haplotype (C-A-C) showed a significant association with a decreased ESCC risk (adjusted OR = 0.70, 95% CI = 0.52-0.94). Multifactor dimensionality reduction analysis confirmed a high-order gene-environment interaction in ESCC risk. Overall, we found that three AKT1 SNPs might confer protection against ESCC risk; nevertheless, these effects may be dependent on other risk factors. Our results provided evidence of important gene-environment interplay in ESCC carcinogenesis.

  11. The PI3K/Akt pathway: recent progress in the development of ATP-competitive and allosteric Akt kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Lindsley, Craig W; Barnett, Stanley F; Layton, Mark E; Bilodeau, Mark T

    2008-02-01

    This article describes recent advances in the development and biological evaluation of allosteric and ATP-competitive small molecule inhibitors for the serine/threonine kinase Akt (protein kinase B, PKB). Unregulated activation of the PI3K/Akt/PTEN pathway is a prominent feature of many human cancers and Akt is over-expressed or activated in all major cancers making Akt an exciting new target for cancer therapy. The development of Akt inhibitors has been complicated and hampered by the presence of three Akt isozymes, (Akt1, Akt2 and Akt3) which differ in function and tissue distribution, as well as a lack of Akt specific inhibitors. In the past 18 months, a large number of reports have appeared describing the discovery and development of allosteric Akt kinase inhibitors and classical ATP-competitive Akt kinase inhibitors. This review will discuss the PI3K/Akt/PTEN pathway, allosteric and ATP-competitive Akt kinase inhibitors, their biological evaluation and progress towards target validation.

  12. Heat-shock protein 70 modulates apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 in stressed hepatocytes of Mugil cephalus.

    PubMed

    Padmini, Ekambaram; Tharani, Jayachandran

    2014-10-01

    Oxidative stress causes damage at the cellular level and activates a number of signaling pathways. Heat-shock proteins (HSPs) play an important role in repair and protective mechanisms under cell response to stress conditions. HSP70 has been shown to act as an inhibitor of apoptosis. Apoptosis signal-regulating kinase-1 (ASK1) activity is regulated at multiple levels, one of which is through inhibition by cytosolic chaperons HSP70. The current study was aimed to investigate the alteration in signaling molecules that allow the fish to survive under stressed natural field conditions. The study also investigates the variation in biomolecular composition of hepatocytes by using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The impact of stress on hepatocytes was assessed by measuring the level of lipid peroxides (LPO), catalase activity (CAT) and assessing the changes in hepatocytes of Mugil cephalus inhabiting Kovalam and Ennore estuaries. The expression of HSP70 and ASK1 were analyzed by immunoblot analysis and ELISA, respectively. The spectral analysis showed variations in biomolecular composition of hepatocytes at a wave number region of 4,000-400 cm(-1). There was significant decrease of CAT activity (p < 0.01) (25 %) with significant increase of LPO (p < 0.001) (35 %) and HSP70 (p < 0.001) and insignificant increase of ASK1 (p < 0.05) (16 %) in fish hepatocytes inhabiting Ennore estuary than Kovalam estuary. In conclusion, the present study suggests that the survival of fish in the Ennore estuary under stressed condition may be due to the upregulation of HSP70 that mediates the altered signal pathway which promotes cellular resistance against apoptosis.

  13. Apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 is mediated in TNF-α-induced CCL2 expression in human synovial fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Tsou, Hsi-Kai; Chen, Hsien-Te; Chang, Chia-Hao; Yang, Wan-Yu; Tang, Chih-Hsin

    2012-11-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), a pro-inflammatory cytokine with a critical role in osteoarthritis (OA), was primarily produced by monocytes/macrophages and plays a crucial role in the inflammatory response. Here, we investigated the intracellular signaling pathways involved in TNF-α-induced monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1)/CCL2 expression in human synovial fibroblast cells. Stimulation of synovial fibroblasts (OASF) with TNF-α induced concentration- and time-dependent increases in CCL2 expression. TNF-α-mediated CCL2 production was attenuated by TNFR1 monoclonal antibody (Ab). Pretreatment with an apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 (ASK1) inhibitor (thioredoxin), JNK inhibitor (SP600125), p38 inhibitor (SB203580), or AP-1 inhibitor (curcumin or tanshinone IIA) also blocked the potentiating action of TNF-α. Stimulation of cells with TNF-α enhanced ASK1, JNK, and p38 activation. Treatment of OASF with TNF-α also increased the accumulation of phosphorylated c-Jun in the nucleus, AP-1-luciferase activity, and c-Jun binding to the AP-1 element on the CCL2 promoter. TNF-α-mediated AP-1-luciferase activity and c-Jun binding to the AP-1 element were inhibited by TNFR1 Ab, thioredoxin, SP600125, and SB203580. Our results suggest that the interaction between TNF-α and TNFR1 increases CCL2 expression in human synovial fibroblasts via the ASK1, JNK/p38, c-Jun, and AP-1 signaling pathway. PMID:22711527

  14. Heat-shock protein 70 modulates apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 in stressed hepatocytes of Mugil cephalus.

    PubMed

    Padmini, Ekambaram; Tharani, Jayachandran

    2014-10-01

    Oxidative stress causes damage at the cellular level and activates a number of signaling pathways. Heat-shock proteins (HSPs) play an important role in repair and protective mechanisms under cell response to stress conditions. HSP70 has been shown to act as an inhibitor of apoptosis. Apoptosis signal-regulating kinase-1 (ASK1) activity is regulated at multiple levels, one of which is through inhibition by cytosolic chaperons HSP70. The current study was aimed to investigate the alteration in signaling molecules that allow the fish to survive under stressed natural field conditions. The study also investigates the variation in biomolecular composition of hepatocytes by using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The impact of stress on hepatocytes was assessed by measuring the level of lipid peroxides (LPO), catalase activity (CAT) and assessing the changes in hepatocytes of Mugil cephalus inhabiting Kovalam and Ennore estuaries. The expression of HSP70 and ASK1 were analyzed by immunoblot analysis and ELISA, respectively. The spectral analysis showed variations in biomolecular composition of hepatocytes at a wave number region of 4,000-400 cm(-1). There was significant decrease of CAT activity (p < 0.01) (25 %) with significant increase of LPO (p < 0.001) (35 %) and HSP70 (p < 0.001) and insignificant increase of ASK1 (p < 0.05) (16 %) in fish hepatocytes inhabiting Ennore estuary than Kovalam estuary. In conclusion, the present study suggests that the survival of fish in the Ennore estuary under stressed condition may be due to the upregulation of HSP70 that mediates the altered signal pathway which promotes cellular resistance against apoptosis. PMID:24875452

  15. Transforming growth factor-beta/Smad3 signaling regulates insulin gene transcription and pancreatic islet beta-cell function.

    PubMed

    Lin, Huei-Min; Lee, Ji-Hyeon; Yadav, Hariom; Kamaraju, Anil K; Liu, Eric; Zhigang, Duan; Vieira, Anthony; Kim, Seong-Jin; Collins, Heather; Matschinsky, Franz; Harlan, David M; Roberts, Anita B; Rane, Sushil G

    2009-05-01

    Pancreatic islet beta-cell dysfunction is a signature feature of Type 2 diabetes pathogenesis. Consequently, knowledge of signals that regulate beta-cell function is of immense clinical relevance. Transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta signaling plays a critical role in pancreatic development although the role of this pathway in the adult pancreas is obscure. Here, we define an important role of the TGF-beta pathway in regulation of insulin gene transcription and beta-cell function. We identify insulin as a TGF-beta target gene and show that the TGF-beta signaling effector Smad3 occupies the insulin gene promoter and represses insulin gene transcription. In contrast, Smad3 small interfering RNAs relieve insulin transcriptional repression and enhance insulin levels. Transduction of adenoviral Smad3 into primary human and non-human primate islets suppresses insulin content, whereas, dominant-negative Smad3 enhances insulin levels. Consistent with this, Smad3-deficient mice exhibit moderate hyperinsulinemia and mild hypoglycemia. Moreover, Smad3 deficiency results in improved glucose tolerance and enhanced glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in vivo. In ex vivo perifusion assays, Smad3-deficient islets exhibit improved glucose-stimulated insulin release. Interestingly, Smad3-deficient islets harbor an activated insulin-receptor signaling pathway and TGF-beta signaling regulates expression of genes involved in beta-cell function. Together, these studies emphasize TGF-beta/Smad3 signaling as an important regulator of insulin gene transcription and beta-cell function and suggest that components of the TGF-beta signaling pathway may be dysregulated in diabetes.

  16. β-Catenin/CBP–Dependent Signaling Regulates TGF-β–Induced Epithelial to Mesenchymal Transition of Lens Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Taiyab, Aftab; Korol, Anna; Deschamps, Paula A.; West-Mays, Judith A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Transforming growth factor-β–induced epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT) is one of the main causes of posterior capsular opacification (PCO) or secondary cataract; however, the signaling events involved in TGF-β–induced PCO have not been fully characterized. Here, we focus on examining the role of β-catenin/cyclic AMP response element–binding protein (CREB)-binding protein (CBP) and β-catenin/T-cell factor (TCF)-dependent signaling in regulating cytoskeletal dynamics during TGF-β–induced EMT in lens epithelial explants. Methods Rat lens epithelial explants were cultured in medium M199 in the absence of serum. Explants were treated with TGF-β2 in the presence or absence of the β-catenin/CBP interaction inhibitor, ICG-001, or the β-catenin/TCF interaction inhibitor, PNU-74654. Western blot and immunofluorescence experiments were carried out and analyzed. Results An increase in the expression of fascin, an actin-bundling protein, was observed in the lens explants upon stimulation with TGF-β, and colocalized with F-actin filaments. Inhibition of β-catenin/CBP interactions, but not β-catenin/TCF interactions, led to a decrease in TGF-β–induced fascin and stress fiber formation, as well as a decrease in the expression of known markers of EMT, α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) and matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP9). In addition, inhibition of β-catenin/CBP–dependent signaling also prevented TGF-β–induced downregulation of epithelial cadherin (E-cadherin) in lens explants. Conclusions We show that β-catenin/CBP–dependent signaling regulates fascin, MMP9, and α-SMA expression during TGF-β–induced EMT. We demonstrate that β-catenin/CBP–dependent signaling is crucial for TGF-β–induced EMT in the lens. PMID:27787561

  17. DESC1, a novel tumor suppressor, sensitizes cells to apoptosis by downregulating the EGFR/AKT pathway in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Ng, Hoi Yan; Ko, Josephine Mun-Yee; Yu, Valen Zhuoyou; Ip, Joseph Chok Yan; Dai, Wei; Cal, Santiago; Lung, Maria Li

    2016-06-15

    Esophageal cancer is ranked as the eighth most common cancer and the sixth leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide. To identify candidate tumor suppressor genes related to esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) development, a cDNA microarray analysis was performed using paired tumor and nontumor tissue samples from ESCC patients. Differentially expressed in squamous cell carcinoma 1 (DESC1), which belongs to the Type II transmembrane serine protease family, was frequently downregulated in ESCC. This study aims to elucidate the molecular mechanism for the tumor suppressive function of DESC1 in ESCC. We show that DESC1 reduced cell viability and sensitized cells to apoptosis, when cells were under apoptotic stimuli. The proapoptotic effect of DESC1 was mediated through downregulating AKT1 activation and the restoration of AKT activation by the introduction of the constitutively active AKT, myr-AKT, abolished the apoptosis-sensitizing effect of DESC1. DESC1 also reduced EGFR protein level, which was abrogated when the proteolytic function of DESC1 was lost, suggesting that DESC1 cleaved EGFR and downregulated the EGFR/AKT pathway to favor apoptosis. The transmembrane localization and the structural domains provide an opportunity for DESC1 to interact with the extracellular environment. The importance of such interaction was highlighted by the finding that DESC1 reduced cell colony formation ability in three-dimensional culture. In line with this, DESC1 reduced tumor growth kinetics in the in vivo orthotopic tumorigenesis assay. Taken together, our novel findings suggest how DESC1 may suppress ESCC development by sensitizing cells to apoptosis under an apoptotic stimulus through downregulating the EGFR/AKT signaling pathway.

  18. Inhibition of PTEN and activation of Akt by menadione.

    PubMed

    Yoshikawa, Kyoko; Nigorikawa, Kiyomi; Tsukamoto, Mariko; Tamura, Namiko; Hazeki, Kaoru; Hazeki, Osamu

    2007-04-01

    Menadione (vitamin K(3)) has been shown to activate Erk in several cell lines. This effect has been shown to be due to the activation of EGF receptors (EGFR) as a result of inhibition of some protein tyrosine phosphatases. In the present study, we examined the effects of menadione on Akt in Chinese hamster ovary cells. The phosphorylation of Akt by menadione was not inhibited by AG1478, an inhibitor of EGFR. Menadione inhibited the lipid phosphatase activity of PTEN in a cell-free system. In an intact cell system, menadione inhibited the effect of transfected PTEN on Akt. Thus, one mechanism of its action was considered the accelerated activation of Akt through inhibition of PTEN. This was not the sole mechanism responsible for the EGFR-independent activation of Akt, because menadione attenuated the rate of Akt dephosphorylation even in PTEN-null PC3 cells. The decelerated inactivation of Akt, probably through inhibition of some tyrosine phosphatases, was considered another mechanism of its action.

  19. Allosteric Small-Molecule Inhibitors of the AKT Kinase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalafave, D. S.

    This research addresses computational design of small druglike molecules for possible anticancer applications. AKT and SGK are kinases that control important cellular functions. They are highly homologous, having similar activators and targets. Cancers with increased SGK activity may develop resistance to AKT-specific inhibitors. Our goal was to design new molecules that would bind both AKT and SGK, thus preventing the development of drug resistance. Most kinase inhibitors target the kinase ATP-binding site. However, the high similarity in this site among kinases makes it difficult to target specifically. Furthermore, mutations in this site can cause resistance to ATP-competitive kinase inhibitors. We used existing AKT inhibitors as initial templates to design molecules that could potentially bind the allosteric sites of both AKT and SGK. Molecules with no implicit toxicities and optimal drug-like properties were used for docking studies. Binding energies of the stable complexes that the designed molecules formed with AKT and SGK were calculated. Possible applications of the designed putative inhibitors against cancers with overexpressed AKT/SGK is discussed.

  20. AKT Pathway Genes Define 5 Prognostic Subgroups in Glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Smirnov, Ivan; Reiser, Mark; Misra, Anjan; Shapiro, William R.; Mills, Gordon B.; Kim, Seungchan; Feuerstein, Burt G.

    2014-01-01

    Activity of GFR/PI3K/AKT pathway inhibitors in glioblastoma clinical trials has not been robust. We hypothesized variations in the pathway between tumors contribute to poor response. We clustered GBM based on AKT pathway genes and discovered new subtypes then characterized their clinical and molecular features. There are at least 5 GBM AKT subtypes having distinct DNA copy number alterations, enrichment in oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes and patterns of expression for PI3K/AKT/mTOR signaling components. Gene Ontology terms indicate a different cell of origin or dominant phenotype for each subgroup. Evidence suggests one subtype is very sensitive to BCNU or CCNU (median survival 5.8 vs. 1.5 years; BCNU/CCNU vs other treatments; respectively). AKT subtyping advances previous approaches by revealing additional subgroups with unique clinical and molecular features. Evidence indicates it is a predictive marker for response to BCNU or CCNU and PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway inhibitors. We anticipate Akt subtyping may help stratify patients for clinical trials and augment discovery of class-specific therapeutic targets. PMID:24984002

  1. Suppression of Nkx3.2 by phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase signaling regulates cartilage development by modulating chondrocyte hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jeong-Ah; Im, Suhjean; Cantley, Lewis C.; Kim, Dae-Won

    2016-01-01

    Phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K) is a key regulator of diverse biological processes including cell proliferation, migration, survival, and differentiation. While a role of PI3K in chondrocyte differentiation has been suggested, its precise mechanisms of action are poorly understood. Here we show that PI3K signaling can down-regulate Nkx3.2 at both mRNA and protein levels in various chondrocyte cultures in vitro. In addition, we have intriguingly found that p85β, not p85α, is specifically employed as a regulatory subunit for PI3K-mediated Nkx3.2 suppression. Furthermore, we found that regulation of Nkx3.2 by PI3K requires Rac1–PAK1, but not Akt, signaling downstream of PI3K. Finally, using embryonic limb bud cultures, ex vivo long bone cultures, and p85β knockout mice, we demonstrated that PI3K-mediated suppression of Nkx3.2 in chondrocytes plays a role in the control of cartilage hypertrophy during skeletal development in vertebrates. PMID:26363466

  2. Hematopoietic Akt2 deficiency attenuates the progression of atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Rotllan, Noemi; Chamorro-Jorganes, Aránzazu; Araldi, Elisa; Wanschel, Amarylis C.; Aryal, Binod; Aranda, Juan F.; Goedeke, Leigh; Salerno, Alessandro G.; Ramírez, Cristina M.; Sessa, William C.; Suárez, Yajaira; Fernández-Hernando, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is the major cause of death and disability in diabetic and obese subjects with insulin resistance. Akt2, a phosphoinositide-dependent serine-threonine protein kinase, is highly express in insulin-responsive tissues; however, its role during the progression of atherosclerosis remains unknown. Thus, we aimed to investigate the contribution of Akt2 during the progression of atherosclerosis. We found that germ-line Akt2-deficient mice develop similar atherosclerotic plaques as wild-type mice despite higher plasma lipids and glucose levels. It is noteworthy that transplantation of bone marrow cells isolated from Akt2−/− mice to Ldlr−/− mice results in marked reduction of the progression of atherosclerosis compared with Ldlr−/− mice transplanted with wild-type bone marrow cells. In vitro studies indicate that Akt2 is required for macrophage migration in response to proatherogenic cytokines (monocyte chemotactic protein-1 and macrophage colony-stimulating factor). Moreover, Akt2−/− macrophages accumulate less cholesterol and have an alternative activated or M2-type phenotype when stimulated with proinflammatory cytokines. Together, these results provide evidence that macrophage Akt2 regulates migration, the inflammatory response and cholesterol metabolism and suggest that targeting Akt2 in macrophages might be beneficial for treating atherosclerosis.—Rotllan, N., Chamorro-Jorganes, A., Araldi, E., Wanschel, A. C., Aryal, B., Aranda, J. F., Goedeke, L., Salerno, A. G., Ramírez, C. M., Sessa,W. C., Suárez, Y., Fernández-Hernando, C. Hematopoietic Akt2 deficiency attenuates the progression of atherosclerosis. PMID:25392271

  3. Molecular mechanism underlying Akt activation in zinc-induced cardioprotection

    PubMed Central

    Lee, SungRyul; Chanoit, Guillaume; McIntosh, Rachel; Zvara, David A.; Xu, Zhelong

    2009-01-01

    Our previous study demonstrated that zinc prevents cardiac reperfusion injury by targeting the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP) via Akt and glycogen synthetase kinase 3β (GSK-3β). We aimed to address the mechanism by which zinc activates Akt. Treatment of H9c2 cells with ZnCl2 (10 μM) in the presence of the zinc ionophore pyrithione (4 μM) for 20 min enhanced Akt phosphorylation (Ser473), indicating that zinc can rapidly activate Akt. Zinc did not alter either phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN) phosphorylation and total PTEN protein levels or PTEN oxidation, implying that PTEN may not play a role in the action of zinc. However, zinc-induced Akt phosphorylation was blocked by both the nonselective receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) inhibitor genistein and the selective insulin-like growth factor-1 RTK (IGF-1RTK) inhibitor AG1024, indicating that zinc activates Akt via IGF-1RTK. Zinc-induced phosphorylation of protein tyrosine and Ser/Thr was also abolished by AG1024. In addition, zinc markedly enhanced phosphorylation of IGF-1 receptor (IGF-1R), which was again reversed by genistein and AG1024. A confocal imaging study revealed that AG1024 abolished the preventive effect of zinc on oxidant-induced mPTP opening, confirming that IGF-1RTK plays a role in zinc-induced cardioprotection. Furthermore, zinc decreased the activity of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A), a major protein Ser/Thr phosphatase, implying that protein Ser/Thr phosphatases may also play a role in the action of zinc on Akt activity. Taken together, these findings demonstrate that exogenous zinc activates Akt via IGF-1RTK and prevents the mPTP opening in cardiac cells. Inactivation of Ser/Thr protein phosphatases may also contribute to zinc-induced Akt activation. PMID:19525380

  4. Akt phosphorylation is essential for nuclear translocation and retention in NGF-stimulated PC12 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Truong Le Xuan Nguyen; Choi, Joung Woo; Lee, Sang Bae; Ye, Keqiang; Woo, Soo-Dong; Lee, Kyung-Hoon; Ahn, Jee-Yin . E-mail: jyahn@med.skku.ac.kr

    2006-10-20

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) elicits Akt translocation into the nucleus, where it phosphorylates nuclear targets. Here, we describe that Akt phosphorylation can promote the nuclear translocation of Akt and is necessary for its nuclear retention. Overexpression of Akt-K179A, T308A, S473A-mutant failed to show either nuclear translocation or nuclear Akt phosphorylation, whereas expression of wild-type counterpart elicited profound Akt phosphorylation and induced nuclear translocation under NGF stimulation. Employing the PI3K inhibitor and a variety of mutants PI3K, we showed that nuclear translocation of Akt was mediated by activation of PI3K, and Akt phosphorylation status in the nucleus required PI3K activity. Thus the activity of PI3K might contribute to the nuclear translocation of Akt, and that Akt phosphorylation is essential for its nuclear retention under NGF stimulation conditions.

  5. Repression of AKT signaling by ARQ 092 in cells and tissues from patients with Proteus syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lindhurst, Marjorie J.; Yourick, Miranda R.; Yu, Yi; Savage, Ronald E.; Ferrari, Dora; Biesecker, Leslie G.

    2015-01-01

    A somatic activating mutation in AKT1, c.49G>A, pGlu17Lys, that results in elevated AKT signaling in mutation-positive cells, is responsible for the mosaic overgrowth condition, Proteus syndrome. ARQ 092 is an allosteric pan-AKT inhibitor under development for treatment in cancer. We tested the efficacy of this drug for suppressing AKT signaling in cells and tissues from patients with Proteus syndrome. ARQ 092 reduced phosphorylation of AKT and downstream targets of AKT in a concentration-dependent manner in as little as two hours. While AKT signaling was suppressed with ARQ 092 treatment, cells retained their ability to respond to growth factor stimulation by increasing pAKT levels proportionally to untreated cells. At concentrations sufficient to decrease AKT signaling, little reduction in cell viability was seen. These results indicate that ARQ 092 can suppress AKT signaling and warrants further development as a therapeutic option for patients with Proteus syndrome. PMID:26657992

  6. Fasting and Systemic Insulin Signaling Regulate Phosphorylation of Brain Proteins That Modulate Cell Morphology and Link to Neurological Disorders.

    PubMed

    Li, Min; Quan, Chao; Toth, Rachel; Campbell, David G; MacKintosh, Carol; Wang, Hong Yu; Chen, Shuai

    2015-12-11

    Diabetes is strongly associated with cognitive decline, but the molecular reasons are unknown. We found that fasting and peripheral insulin promote phosphorylation and dephosphorylation, respectively, of specific residues on brain proteins including cytoskeletal regulators such as slit-robo GTPase-activating protein 3 (srGAP3) and microtubule affinity-regulating protein kinases (MARKs), in which deficiency or dysregulation is linked to neurological disorders. Fasting activates protein kinase A (PKA) but not PKB/Akt signaling in the brain, and PKA can phosphorylate the purified srGAP3. The phosphorylation of srGAP3 and MARKs were increased when PKA signaling was activated in primary neurons. Knockdown of PKA decreased the phosphorylation of srGAP3. Furthermore, WAVE1, a protein kinase A-anchoring protein, formed a complex with srGAP3 and PKA in the brain of fasted mice to facilitate the phosphorylation of srGAP3 by PKA. Although brain cells have insulin receptors, our findings are inconsistent with the down-regulation of phosphorylation of target proteins being mediated by insulin signaling within the brain. Rather, our findings infer that systemic insulin, through a yet unknown mechanism, inhibits PKA or protein kinase(s) with similar specificity and/or activates an unknown phosphatase in the brain. Ser(858) of srGAP3 was identified as a key regulatory residue in which phosphorylation by PKA enhanced the GAP activity of srGAP3 toward its substrate, Rac1, in cells, thereby inhibiting the action of this GTPase in cytoskeletal regulation. Our findings reveal novel mechanisms linking peripheral insulin sensitivity with cytoskeletal remodeling in neurons, which may help to explain the association of diabetes with neurological disorders such as Alzheimer disease.

  7. Fasting and Systemic Insulin Signaling Regulate Phosphorylation of Brain Proteins That Modulate Cell Morphology and Link to Neurological Disorders*

    PubMed Central

    Li, Min; Quan, Chao; Toth, Rachel; Campbell, David G.; MacKintosh, Carol; Wang, Hong Yu; Chen, Shuai

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes is strongly associated with cognitive decline, but the molecular reasons are unknown. We found that fasting and peripheral insulin promote phosphorylation and dephosphorylation, respectively, of specific residues on brain proteins including cytoskeletal regulators such as slit-robo GTPase-activating protein 3 (srGAP3) and microtubule affinity-regulating protein kinases (MARKs), in which deficiency or dysregulation is linked to neurological disorders. Fasting activates protein kinase A (PKA) but not PKB/Akt signaling in the brain, and PKA can phosphorylate the purified srGAP3. The phosphorylation of srGAP3 and MARKs were increased when PKA signaling was activated in primary neurons. Knockdown of PKA decreased the phosphorylation of srGAP3. Furthermore, WAVE1, a protein kinase A-anchoring protein, formed a complex with srGAP3 and PKA in the brain of fasted mice to facilitate the phosphorylation of srGAP3 by PKA. Although brain cells have insulin receptors, our findings are inconsistent with the down-regulation of phosphorylation of target proteins being mediated by insulin signaling within the brain. Rather, our findings infer that systemic insulin, through a yet unknown mechanism, inhibits PKA or protein kinase(s) with similar specificity and/or activates an unknown phosphatase in the brain. Ser858 of srGAP3 was identified as a key regulatory residue in which phosphorylation by PKA enhanced the GAP activity of srGAP3 toward its substrate, Rac1, in cells, thereby inhibiting the action of this GTPase in cytoskeletal regulation. Our findings reveal novel mechanisms linking peripheral insulin sensitivity with cytoskeletal remodeling in neurons, which may help to explain the association of diabetes with neurological disorders such as Alzheimer disease. PMID:26499801

  8. Regulation of Bax/mitochondria interaction by AKT.

    PubMed

    Simonyan, Lilit; Renault, Thibaud T; Novais, Maria João da Costa; Sousa, Maria João; Côrte-Real, Manuela; Camougrand, Nadine; Gonzalez, Cécile; Manon, Stéphen

    2016-01-01

    Bax-dependent mitochondrial permeabilization during apoptosis is controlled by multiple factors, including the phosphorylation by the protein kinase AKT. We used the heterologous co-expression of human Bax and AKT1 in yeast to investigate how the kinase modulates the different steps underlying Bax activation. We found that AKT activated Bax and increased its cellular content. Both effects were dependent on Ser184, but a phosphorylation of this residue did not fully explain the effects of AKT. Additional experiments with mutants substituted on Ser184 suggested that the regulation of Bax dynamic equilibrium between the cytosol and mitochondria might be more tightly regulated by Bcl-xL when Bax is phosphorylated. PMID:26763134

  9. Gq-mediated Akt translocation to the membrane: a novel PIP3-independent mechanism in platelets.

    PubMed

    Badolia, Rachit; Manne, Bhanu Kanth; Dangelmaier, Carol; Chernoff, Jonathan; Kunapuli, Satya P

    2015-01-01

    Akt is an important signaling molecule regulating platelet aggregation. Akt is phosphorylated after translocation to the membrane through Gi signaling pathways by a phosphatidylinositol-3,4,5-trisphosphate (PIP3)-dependent mechanism. However, Akt is more robustly phosphorylated by thrombin compared with adenosine 5'-diphosphate in platelets. This study investigated the mechanisms of Akt translocation as a possible explanation for this difference. Stimulation of washed human platelets with protease-activated receptor agonists caused translocation of Akt to the membrane rapidly, whereas phosphorylation occurred later. The translocation of Akt was abolished in the presence of a Gq-selective inhibitor or in Gq-deficient murine platelets, indicating that Akt translocation is regulated downstream of Gq pathways. Interestingly, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitors or P2Y12 antagonist abolished Akt phosphorylation without affecting Akt translocation to the membrane, suggesting that Akt translocation occurs through a PI3K/PIP3/Gi-independent mechanism. An Akt scaffolding protein, p21-activated kinase (PAK), translocates to the membrane after stimulation with protease-activated receptor agonists in a Gq-dependent manner, with the kinetics of translocation similar to that of Akt. Coimmunoprecipitation studies showed constitutive association of PAK and Akt, suggesting a possible role of PAK in Akt translocation. These results show, for the first time, an important role of the Gq pathway in mediating Akt translocation to the membrane in a novel Gi/PI3K/PIP3-independent mechanism.

  10. Gq-mediated Akt translocation to the membrane: a novel PIP3-independent mechanism in platelets

    PubMed Central

    Badolia, Rachit; Manne, Bhanu Kanth; Dangelmaier, Carol; Chernoff, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Akt is an important signaling molecule regulating platelet aggregation. Akt is phosphorylated after translocation to the membrane through Gi signaling pathways by a phosphatidylinositol-3,4,5-trisphosphate (PIP3)-dependent mechanism. However, Akt is more robustly phosphorylated by thrombin compared with adenosine 5′-diphosphate in platelets. This study investigated the mechanisms of Akt translocation as a possible explanation for this difference. Stimulation of washed human platelets with protease-activated receptor agonists caused translocation of Akt to the membrane rapidly, whereas phosphorylation occurred later. The translocation of Akt was abolished in the presence of a Gq-selective inhibitor or in Gq-deficient murine platelets, indicating that Akt translocation is regulated downstream of Gq pathways. Interestingly, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitors or P2Y12 antagonist abolished Akt phosphorylation without affecting Akt translocation to the membrane, suggesting that Akt translocation occurs through a PI3K/PIP3/Gi-independent mechanism. An Akt scaffolding protein, p21-activated kinase (PAK), translocates to the membrane after stimulation with protease-activated receptor agonists in a Gq-dependent manner, with the kinetics of translocation similar to that of Akt. Coimmunoprecipitation studies showed constitutive association of PAK and Akt, suggesting a possible role of PAK in Akt translocation. These results show, for the first time, an important role of the Gq pathway in mediating Akt translocation to the membrane in a novel Gi/PI3K/PIP3-independent mechanism. PMID:25331114

  11. Extracellular enzymes of Legionella pneumophila.

    PubMed Central

    Thorpe, T C; Miller, R D

    1981-01-01

    All strains of Legionella pneumophila tested produced detectable levels of extracellular protease, phosphatase, lipase, deoxyribonuclease, ribonuclease, and beta-lactamase activity. Weak starch hydrolysis was also demonstrated for all strains. Elastase, collagenase, phospholipase C, hyaluronidase, chondroitinase, neuraminidase, or coagulase were not detected in any of these laboratory-maintained strains. PMID:6268549

  12. Enhanced shedding of extracellular vesicles from amoeboid prostate cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jayoung; Morley, Samantha; Le, Minh; Bedoret, Denis; Umetsu, Dale T; Di Vizio, Dolores; Freeman, Michael R

    2014-01-01

    The gene encoding the cytoskeletal regulator DIAPH3 is lost at high frequency in metastatic prostate cancer, and DIAPH3 silencing evokes a transition to an amoeboid tumor phenotype in multiple cell backgrounds. This amoeboid transformation is accompanied by increased tumor cell migration, invasion, and metastasis. DIAPH3 silencing also promotes the formation of atypically large (>1 μm) membrane blebs that can be shed as extracellular vesicles (EV) containing bioactive cargo. Whether loss of DIAPH3 also stimulates the release of nano-sized EV (e.g., exosomes) is not established. Here we examined the mechanism of release and potential biological functions of EV shed from DIAPH3-silenced and other prostate cancer cells. We observed that stimulation of LNCaP cells with the prostate stroma-derived growth factor heparin-binding EGF-like growth factor (HB-EGF), combined with p38MAPK inhibition caused EV shedding, a process mediated by ERK1/2 hyperactivation. DIAPH3 silencing in DU145 cells also increased rates of EV production. EV isolated from DIAPH3-silenced cells activated AKT1 and androgen signaling, increased proliferation of recipient tumor cells, and suppressed proliferation of human macrophages and peripheral blood mononuclear cells. DU145 EV contained miR-125a, which suppressed AKT1 expression and proliferation in recipient human peripheral blood mononuclear cells and macrophages. Our findings suggest that EV produced as a result of DIAPH3 loss or growth factor stimulation may condition the tumor microenvironment through multiple mechanisms, including the proliferation of cancer cells and suppression of tumor-infiltrating immune cells. PMID:24423651

  13. A mathematical model of phosphorylation AKT in Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adi, Y. A.; Kusumo, F. A.; Aryati, L.; Hardianti, M. S.

    2016-04-01

    In this paper we consider a mathematical model of PI3K/AKT signaling pathways in phosphorylation AKT. PI3K/AKT pathway is an important mediator of cytokine signaling implicated in regulation of hematopoiesis. Constitutive activation of PI3K/AKT signaling pathway has been observed in Acute Meyloid Leukemia (AML) it caused by the mutation of Fms-like Tyrosine Kinase 3 in internal tandem duplication (FLT3-ITD), the most common molecular abnormality associated with AML. Depending upon its phosphorylation status, protein interaction, substrate availability, and localization, AKT can phosphorylate or inhibite numerous substrates in its downstream pathways that promote protein synthesis, survival, proliferation, and metabolism. Firstly, we present a mass action ordinary differential equation model describing AKT double phosphorylation (AKTpp) in a system with 11 equations. Finally, under the asumtion enzyme catalyst constant and steady state equilibrium, we reduce the system in 4 equation included Michaelis Menten constant. Simulation result suggested that a high concentration of PI3K and/or a low concentration of phospatase increased AKTpp activation. This result also indicates that PI3K is a potential target theraphy in AML.

  14. Akt2 Phosphorylates Ezrin to Trigger NHE3 Translocation and Activation*

    PubMed Central

    Shiue, Harn; Musch, Mark W.; Wang, Yingmin; Chang, Eugene B.; Turner, Jerrold R.

    2005-01-01

    Initiation of Na+-glucose cotransport in intestinal absorptive epithelia causes NHE3 to be translocated to the apical plasma membrane, leading to cytoplasmic alkalinization. We reported recently that this NHE3 translocation requires ezrin phosphorylation. However, the kinase that phosphorylates ezrin in this process has not been identified. Because Akt has also been implicated in NHE3 translocation, we investigated the hypothesis that Akt phosphorylates ezrin. After initiation of Na+-glucose cotransport, Akt is activated with kinetics that parallel those of ezrin phosphorylation. Inhibition of p38 MAP kinase, which blocks ezrin phosphorylation, also prevents Akt activation. Purified Akt directly phosphorylates recombinant ezrin at threonine 567 in vitro in an ATP-dependent manner. This in vitro phosphorylation can be prevented by Akt inhibitors. In intact cells, inhibition of either phosphoinositide 3-kinase, an upstream regulator of Akt, or inhibition of Akt itself using inhibitors validated in vitro prevents ezrin phosphorylation after initiation of Na+-glucose cotransport. Specific small interfering RNA knockdown of Akt2 prevented ezrin phosphorylation in intact cells. Pharmacological Akt inhibition or Akt2 knockdown also prevented NHE3 translocation and activation after initiation of Na+-glucose cotransport, confirming the functional role of