Science.gov

Sample records for al appl phys

  1. Comment on “Theoretical analysis of high-field transport in graphene on a substrate” [J. Appl. Phys. 116, 034507 (2014)

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, Michael L. P.; Arora, Vijay K.

    2014-12-21

    In a recent article, Serov et al. [J. Appl. Phys. 116, 034507 (2014)] claim: “This study represents the first time that the high-field behavior in graphene on a substrate was investigated taking into account intrinsic graphene properties,” ignoring the most recent anisotropic distribution function [V. K. Arora et al., J. Appl. Phys. 112, 114330 (2012)] also published in J. Appl. Phys., targeting the same experimental data [V. E. Dorgan et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 97, 082112 (2010)]. The claim of Serov et al. of being first is refuted and many shortcomings of the hydrodynamic model for a highly quantum and degenerate graphene nanolayer are pointed out.

  2. Comment on "Temperature dependence of atomic vibrations in mono-layer graphene" [J. Appl. Phys. 118, 074302 (2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Susi, T.; Kotakoski, J.

    2016-02-01

    In an interesting recent study [Allen et al., J. Appl. Phys. 118, 074302 (2015)] (see also their Erratum [Allen et al., J. Appl. Phys. 118, 159902 (2015)]), Allen and co-workers measured the mean square amplitudes of graphene lattice vibrations between 100 and 1300 K and used a simplified theoretical approximation for the acoustic phonon modes to evaluate the maximum phonon wavelengths supported by the lattice. By fitting their data using the smallest wave-vector as the fitting parameter, they found this to be significantly smaller than the physical size of the graphene crystallites.

  3. Comment on “Temperature dependence of atomic vibrations in mono-layer graphene” [J. Appl. Phys. 118, 074302 (2015)

    SciTech Connect

    Susi, T. Kotakoski, J.

    2016-02-14

    In an interesting recent study [Allen et al., J. Appl. Phys. 118, 074302 (2015)] (see also their Erratum [Allen et al., J. Appl. Phys. 118, 159902 (2015)]), Allen and co-workers measured the mean square amplitudes of graphene lattice vibrations between 100 and 1300 K and used a simplified theoretical approximation for the acoustic phonon modes to evaluate the maximum phonon wavelengths supported by the lattice. By fitting their data using the smallest wave-vector as the fitting parameter, they found this to be significantly smaller than the physical size of the graphene crystallites.

  4. Comment on 'Energy transfer in nanowire solar cells with photon-harvesting shells' [J. Appl. Phys. 105, 124509 (2009)

    SciTech Connect

    Markvart, T.; Danos, L.; Greef, R.

    2010-07-15

    In a recent article, Peters et al. [J. Appl. Phys. 105, 124509 (2009)] claim to have observed photosensitization of crystalline silicon by energy transfer from an optically absorbing thin polymer film. We show that this claim is not justified. Their experimental design is not adequate to establish enhanced photoexcitation of silicon; moreover, the theoretical arguments in their interpretation do not stand up to scrutiny.

  5. Comment on "Analysis of single-layer metamaterial absorber with reflection theory" [J. Appl. Phys. 117, 154906 (2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tung, Nguyen Thanh

    2016-03-01

    In a recent paper, Xiong et al. [J. Appl. Phys. 117, 154906 (2015)] presented the simulated results of a Jerusalem-cross structure in an attempt to elaborate their proposed reflection theory for metamaterial absorbers. Noting that even at non-resonant frequencies the real part of the permeability shows an over-high average value and its imaginary part drops abruptly from positivity to negativity, we argue that their simulated results are unphysical, resulting from an incomplete understanding of the retrieval procedure.

  6. Comment on ``Modeling shock waves in orthotropic elastic materials'' [J. Appl. Phys. 104, 044904 (2008)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukyanov, Alexander A.

    2010-09-01

    This comment identifies two main problems with the paper Vignjevic et al. [J. Appl. Phys. 104, 044904 (2008)] related to shock waves modeling in composites. (1) The authors claim that they have proposed two different stress decompositions based on the assumption that the stress tensor is split into two components: one component is due to volumetric strain and the other is due to deviatoric strain. Following this, the authors defined a pressure as the state of stress resulting only from volumetric deformation. However, neither the first nor second decomposition of the stress tensor proposed by the authors provides a procedure for separating the material volumetric compression from the deviatoric strain tensor which results in a state of stress corresponding to volumetric deformation. Furthermore, the uniquely correct decomposition of the stress tensor based on the same second order material tensors has already been published (see, for example, [Int. J. Plast. 24, 140 (2008)]). Also, the second decomposition of the stress tensor includes serious mistakes and inconsistencies. (2) In addition, the numerical simulation results proposed by the authors cannot be justified. An analytical calculation of the Hugoniot stress levels and the acoustic speed of sound through the thickness orientation for a selected carbon-fiber epoxy composite show that the stress decompositions and material properties reported by the authors do not agree with the experimental data for this material and, more importantly, contradict the shock wave stability requirements.

  7. Comment on ``Amorphization and defect recombination in ion implanted silicon carbide'' [J. Appl. Phys. 81, 7181 (1997)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heera, V.

    1998-04-01

    It is demonstrated that the simplified analysis of Rutherford backscattering\\channeling data on damage production in SiC performed by Grimaldi et al. [J. Appl. Phys. 81, 7181 (1997)] cannot be used to calculate the atomic displacement energy. The value of 12 eV at which the authors arrive is much too small. Moreover, their conclusion of similar displacement energies in Si and SiC is essentially wrong. The general reasons for that are discussed and illustrated by an example.

  8. Comment on "Size-efficient metamaterial absorber at low frequencies: Design, fabrication, and characterization" [J. Appl. Phys. 117, 243105 (2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lulu; Liu, Shaobin; Zhang, HaiFeng; Kong, Xiangkun; Yang, Hua; Ding, Guowen; Xu, Ce; Wang, Lingling; Shi, Wei

    2016-06-01

    In a recent article, Khuyen et al. [J. Appl. Phys. 117, 243105 (2015)] proposed a metamaterial perfect absorber (MPA) with a self-asymmetric structure and claimed that it could produce dual-band "perfect absorption." In this report, we demonstrate that the self-asymmetric structure is not a true MPA. The cross-polarization reflection, which is induced by coupling between the induced magnetic field and the incident electric field, is ignored in calculation of absorptivity of that structure. The real absorption rate of this structure is below 60%, which indicates that the structure cannot be called a perfect absorber.

  9. Comment on "In situ imaging of ultra-fast loss of nanostructure in nanoparticle aggregates" [J. Appl. Phys. 115, 084903 (2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levitas, Valery I.; Hwang, Yong Seok

    2016-02-01

    One of the conclusions of a recent article by Egan et al. [J. Appl. Phys. 115, 084903 (2014)] was that since the melt-dispersion mechanism (MDM) of the reaction of aluminum nanoparticles was not observed in their experiments, this mechanism is very unlikely. Our main point here is to demonstrate that, in fact, these experiments do not disprove the MDM.

  10. Comment on "Unexpected size effect in the thermopower of thin-film stripes" [J. Appl. Phys. 110, 083709 (2011)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szakmany, Gergo P.; Orlov, Alexei O.; Bernstein, Gary H.; Porod, Wolfgang

    2014-06-01

    In a recent article, Sun et al. [J. Appl. Phys. 110, 083709 (2011)] claim to measure a size-dependent thermoelectric effect in a micron-scale single-metal thermocouple. In this Comment, we demonstrate that the observed phenomenon is not due to a size-dependent Seebeck effect as claimed, but is rather wire-size-dependent heat transport that causes unequal heating at the bonding pads. As a result, the bonding pads are at two different temperatures, and the observed voltage corresponds to a thermoelectric effect of a parasitic thermocouple formed between their metal structure and the bonding-pad wires. We provide simulations and suggest a control experiment based on their structure that supports our contention that the observation depends on width-dependent heat transport in the wires.

  11. Comment on ``Three-dimensional photonic-crystal emitter for thermal photovoltaic power generation'' [Appl. Phys. Lett. 83, 380 (2003)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trupke, Thorsten; Würfel, Peter; Green, Martin A.

    2004-03-01

    In a recent article, Lin et al. [Appl. Phys. Lett. 83, 380 (2003)] reported on the light-emitting properties of three-dimensional tungsten photonic crystals and their potential applications as improved thermal emitters in thermophotovoltaic (TPV) systems. Their findings have attracted considerable interest throughout the media and the application of this type of materials has been praised as a potential superior future energy source; e.g., in waste heat-driven electrical generators (http://www.photonics.com). The results of the theoretical modeling in the work of Lin et al. suggest that a TPV system can achieve higher heat to electric energy conversion efficiencies in combination with a three-dimensional tungsten photonic crystal than with any conventional selective thermal emitter. These theoretical results are based on the experimental observation that the photonic crystal, when heated to a given temperature, emits more radiation in certain spectral regimes than a black body of the same temperature. This experimental observation shall briefly be discussed here.

  12. Comment on “Shape transition of unstrained flattest single-walled carbon nanotubes under pressure” [J. Appl. Phys. 115, 044512 (2014)

    SciTech Connect

    Vassilev, Vassil M. Djondjorov, Peter A.; Mladenov, Ivaïlo M.

    2015-05-21

    Recently, Mu et al. [J. Appl. Phys. 115, 044512 (2014)] have developed an analytic approach to describe some special shapes of a single-wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) under hydrostatic pressure. These authors have found approximate analytic expressions for the parametric equations of the tube cross section profile and its curvature at the convex-to-concave transition pressure using a shell-like 2D continuum model describing the shapes of such nanotubes. In this comment, we provide additional insight into this problem taking into account the exact analytic representation of the shapes that a SWCNT attains when subjected to hydrostatic pressure according to the very same continuum model.

  13. Comment on "The physics origin of the hierarchy of bodies in space" [J. Appl. Phys. 119, 094901 (2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swartz, C. H.

    2016-09-01

    A recent paper [A. Bejan and R. W. Wagstaff, J. Appl. Phys. 119, 094901 (2016)] concludes that bodies of the same size suspended uniformly in space are in a state of high internal tension. The tension is then relieved by rearrangement of the bodies into a non-uniform distribution of mass. In this Comment, it is shown that the conclusions are based upon calculations which are in error, and that the amount of tension is not in fact decreased by such a rearrangement.

  14. Response to “Comment on ‘Twin symmetry texture of energetically condensed niobium thin films on sapphire substrate’ ” [J. Appl. Phys. 112, 016101 (2012)

    DOE PAGES

    Zhao, X.; Philips, L.; Reece, C. E.; ...

    2012-07-01

    Welander is correct about the misidentified crystal-directions in the top-view sapphire lattice (Fig. 4 [Zhao et al., J. Appl. Phys. 110, 033523 (2011)]). He is also correct about the misorientation of the pole figures in Fig. 4. In Fig. 1 of this response, we have corrected these errors. Perhaps because of these errors, Welander misconstrued our discussion of the Nbcrystal growth as claiming a new 3D registry. That was not our intention. Rather, we wished to highlight the role of energetic condensation that drives low-defect crystal growth by a combination of non-equilibrium sub-plantation that disturbs the substrate lattice and thermalmore » annealing that annihilates defects and promotes large-grain crystal growth.« less

  15. Response to Comment on '#28;Twin Symmetry Texture of Energetically Condensed 2 Niobium Thin Films on Sapphire Substrate' #29; [J. Appl. Phys. 110, 033523(2011)

    SciTech Connect

    Xin Zhao, Charles Reece, Phillips Larry, Mahadevan Krishnan, Kang Seo

    2012-07-01

    Welander commented that in our article [J. Appl. Phys. 110, 033523(2011)] , Zhao et al claim to have found a new three-dimensional (3D) relationship for niobium-on-sapphire epitaxy”. Welander might have misunderstood the purpose of our article, which was to show that energetic condensation of Nb on sapphire drives crystal growth that is quite distinct from the type of epitaxy encountered in lower energy deposition. Welander is correct about the misidentified crystal-directions in the top-view sapphire lattice (Fig.4[ref.1]). He is also correct about the misorientation of the pole figures in Fig4[ref.1]. In Fig.1 of this response, we have corrected these errors. Perhaps because of these errors, Welander misconstrued our discussion of the Nb crystal growth as claiming a new 3D registry. That was not our intention. Rather, we wished to highlight the role of energetic condensation that drives low-defect crystal growth by a combination of non-equilibrium sub-plantation that disturbs the substrate lattice and thermal annealing that annihilates defects and promotes large-grain crystal growth.

  16. Comment on ``Monte Carlo investigation of current voltage and avalanche noise in GaN double-drift impact diodes'' [J. Appl. Phys. 97, 043709 (2005)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dash, G. N.

    2005-11-01

    The avalanche noise behavior of impact avalanche transit-time (IMPATT) diodes has been modeled by Reklaitis and Reggiani [J. Appl. Phys. 97, 043709 (2005)]. They have obtained general agreement of their results with those of McIntyre [IEEE Trans. Electron Devices ED-13, 164 (1966)]. However, McIntyre's theory predicts the opposite noise behavior from that observed in the IMPATT diode. Hence the applicability of the noise model of Reklaitis and Reggiani to IMPATT diode is questionable.

  17. Comment on “Diffusion of n-type dopants in germanium” [Appl. Phys. Rev. 1, 011301 (2014)

    SciTech Connect

    Cowern, N. E. B. Simdyankin, S.; Goss, J. P.; Napolitani, E.; De Salvador, D.; Bruno, E.; Mirabella, S.; Ahn, C.; Bennett, N. S.

    2015-09-15

    The authors of the above paper call into question recent evidence on the properties of self-interstitials, I, in Ge [Cowern et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 155501 (2013)]. We show that this judgment stems from invalid model assumptions during analysis of data on B marker-layer diffusion during proton irradiation, and that a corrected analysis fully supports the reported evidence. As previously stated, I-mediated self-diffusion in Ge exhibits two distinct regimes of temperature, T: high-T, dominated by amorphous-like mono-interstitial clusters—i-morphs—with self-diffusion entropy ≈30 k, and low-T, where transport is dominated by simple self-interstitials. In a transitional range centered on 475 °C both mechanisms contribute. The experimental I migration energy of 1.84 ± 0.26 eV reported by the Münster group based on measurements of self-diffusion during irradiation at 550 °C < T < 680 °C further establishes our proposed i-morph mechanism.

  18. Reply to ``Comments on `Effects of using the more accurate intrinsic concentration on bipolar transistor modeling' '' [J. Appl. Phys. 68, 5911 (1990)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liou, J. J.

    1991-10-01

    This reply addresses the issues raised by Rode and Rosenbaum regarding the bipolar junction transistor model developed in the subject paper [J. Appl. Phys. 68, 5911(1990)]. The error associated with Eq. (4) in the subject paper is discussed and corrected, the value of the space-charge-region recombination time used is specified, and the results are recalculated. It is shown that the error in Eq. (4) does not alter notably the trends of the current gain calculated using the two different intrinsic concentrations.

  19. Comment on “Magnetic field mediated low-temperature resistivity upturn in electron-doped La{sub 1−x}Hf{sub x}MnO{sub 3} manganite oxides” [J. Appl. Phys. 112, 123710 (2012)

    SciTech Connect

    Rozenberg, E.

    2014-01-21

    In a recent paper, Guo et al. [J. Appl. Phys. 112, 123710 (2012)] reported on characteristic features of the temperature (T) and magnetic field (H) dependences of electrical resistivity (ρ) in polycrystalline La{sub 1−x}Hf{sub x}MnO{sub 3} (x = 0.2 and 0.3) manganites. In particular, shallow minima were observed at some T{sub min} below 100 K on ρ(T) curves. Application of an external H ≤ 5 T leads first to a decrease in the T{sub min} value, while this value increases notably at H > 0.75 T. The authors attributed this complex behavior to competitive electron-electron interaction and Kondo-like spin dependent scattering of carriers. It is shown in the comment that such interpretation is very questionable due to the fundamental inapplicability of this approach for analysis of low-T conductivity in polycrystalline manganites. It seems that the most likely reason for the appearance of the low temperature minima on ρ(T) curves and their evolution upon field application is the well known grain boundary effects in magnetically and structurally inhomogeneous samples.

  20. Comment on "A study of vertical and in-plane electron mobility due to interface roughness scattering at low temperature in InAs-GaSb superlattices" [J. Appl. Phys. 114, 053712 (2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szmulowicz, F.

    2014-04-01

    The purpose of this comment is to point out that the paper by Safa, Asgari, and Faraone [J. Appl. Phys. 114, 053712 (2013)] (SAF) on electronic transport in superlattices contains a number of errors in physics and execution. By dealing with a finite number of periods and forcing the wave function to be zero at the upper and lower boundaries of the superlattice stack, SAF have turned the system into a quantum well for which the momentum along the growth axis is not a good quantum number, so that the bands in the growth direction are flat and the corresponding carrier velocities and vertical mobilities are zero. A number of other errors allow the authors to get nonzero results and to reach conclusions that qualitatively mirror those of Szmulowicz, Haugan, Elhamri, and Brown [Phys. Rev. B 84, 155307 (2011)].

  1. 78 FR 22298 - United States v. Apple, Inc., et al.; Public Comments and Response on Proposed Final Judgment

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-15

    ... States v. Apple, Inc., et al., Civil Action No. 12-CV-2826 (DLC), which was filed in the United States.... Civil Action No. 12-CV-2826 (DLC) ECF Case Response by Plaintiff United States to Public Comments on...

  2. 78 FR 33437 - United States v. Apple, Inc., et al.; Public Comments and Response on Proposed Final Judgment

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-04

    ... Macmillan in United States v. Apple, Inc., et al., Civil Action No. 12-CV-2826 (DLC), which was filed in the...., Defendants. Civil Action No. 12-CV-2826 (DLC) ECF Case Response by Plaintiff United States to Public...

  3. 77 FR 44271 - United States v. Apple, Inc., et al.; Public Comments and Response on Proposed Final Judgment

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-27

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Antitrust Division United States v. Apple, Inc., et al.; Public Comments and Response on Proposed Final Judgment Pursuant to the Antitrust Procedures and Penalties Act, 15 U.S.C. 16(b)-(h), the United States hereby publishes below the United...

  4. Comment on "Fluid modeling of a high-voltage nanosecond pulsed xenon microdischarge" [Phys. Plasmas 23, 073513 (2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koulakis, J.; Bataller, A.; Pree, S.; Putterman, S.

    2016-11-01

    Simulations of sparks in 10 atmosphere Xenon gas by Levko and Raja [Phys. Plasmas 23, 073513 (2016)] are unable to reproduce the experimental fact of their opacity to visible light [Bataller et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 105, 223501 (2014)]. Levko and Raja have argued the discrepancy is due to enhanced ionization from the probing laser radiation and/or cathode field emission. Having observed comparable opacity in similar systems without probing lasers and without electrodes, we instead argue that the enhanced ionization is a thermodynamic result of dense plasma screening effects that lower the effective ionization potential. Levko and Raja do not adequately address these density effects in their spark discharge simulations.

  5. Study of Row Phase Dependent Skew Quadrupole Fields in Apple-II Type EPUs at the ALS

    SciTech Connect

    Steier, C.; Marks, S.; Prestemon, Soren; Robin, David; Schlueter, Ross; Wolski, Andrzej

    2004-05-07

    Since about 5 years, Apple-II type Elliptically Polarizing Undulators (EPU) have been used very successfully at the ALS to generate high brightness photon beams with arbitrary polarization. However, both EPUs installed so far cause significant changes of the vertical beamsize, especially when the row phase is changed to change the polarization of the photons emitted. Detailed measurements indicate this is caused by a row phase dependent skew quadrupole term in the EPUs. Magnetic measurements revealed the same effect for the third EPU to be installed later this year. All measurements to identify and quantify the effect with beam will be presented, as well as some results of magnetic bench measurements and numeric field simulations.

  6. Comment on “Maxwell's equations and electromagnetic Lagrangian density in fractional form” [J. Math. Phys. 53, 033505 (2012)

    SciTech Connect

    Rabei, Eqab M.; Al-Jamel, A.; Widyan, H.; Baleanu, D.

    2014-03-15

    In a recent paper, Jaradat et al. [J. Math. Phys. 53, 033505 (2012)] have presented the fractional form of the electromagnetic Lagrangian density within the Riemann-Liouville fractional derivative. They claimed that the Agrawal procedure [O. P. Agrawal, J. Math. Anal. Appl. 272, 368 (2002)] is used to obtain Maxwell's equations in the fractional form, and the Hamilton's equations of motion together with the conserved quantities obtained from fractional Noether's theorem are reported. In this comment, we draw the attention that there are some serious steps of the procedure used in their work are not applicable even though their final results are correct. Their work should have been done based on a formulation as reported by Baleanu and Muslih [Phys. Scr. 72, 119 (2005)].

  7. Comment on "Maxwell's equations and electromagnetic Lagrangian density in fractional form" [J. Math. Phys. 53, 033505 (2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabei, Eqab M.; Al-Jamel, A.; Widyan, H.; Baleanu, D.

    2014-03-01

    In a recent paper, Jaradat et al. [J. Math. Phys. 53, 033505 (2012)] have presented the fractional form of the electromagnetic Lagrangian density within the Riemann-Liouville fractional derivative. They claimed that the Agrawal procedure [O. P. Agrawal, J. Math. Anal. Appl. 272, 368 (2002)] is used to obtain Maxwell's equations in the fractional form, and the Hamilton's equations of motion together with the conserved quantities obtained from fractional Noether's theorem are reported. In this comment, we draw the attention that there are some serious steps of the procedure used in their work are not applicable even though their final results are correct. Their work should have been done based on a formulation as reported by Baleanu and Muslih [Phys. Scr. 72, 119 (2005)].

  8. Polarity Control and Growth of Lateral Polarity Structures in AlN

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-05-10

    the broadening are negligible and can be simply explained with the difference in the strain level.18 Low temperature (5 K ) photoluminescence spectra...temperature Raman spectra of the Al-polar and N-polar domains recorded in z(xx)z geometry. FIG. 5. Low temperature (5 K ) photoluminescence spectra of the Al...Sitar, Appl. Phys. Lett. 92(4), 041911–041913 (2008). 3S. Rajan, A. Chini, M. H. Wong, J. S. Speck, and U. K . Mishra, J. Appl. Phys. 102(4), 044501

  9. The Phys4Entry database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laricchiuta, Annarita

    2012-10-01

    The Phys4Entry DB is a database of state-selected dynamical information for elementary processes relevant to the state-to-state kinetic modeling of planetary-atmosphere entry conditions. The DB is intended to the challenging goal of complementing the information in the existing web-access databases, collecting and validating data of collisional dynamics of elementary processes involving ground and excited chemical species, with resolution on the electronic, vibrational and rotational degrees of freedom. Four relevant classes of elementary processes are considered, i.e. electron-molecule collisions, atom/molecule-molecule collisions, atom/molecule surface interaction and photon-induced processes, constructing a taxonomy for process classification. Data populating the DB are largely originated by the coordinated research activity done in the frame of the Phys4Entry FP7 project, considering different theoretical approaches from quantum to semi-classical or quasi-classical molecular dynamics. Nevertheless the results, obtained in the Bari plasma chemistry labs in years of research devoted to the construction of reliable state-to-state kinetic models for hydrogen and air plasmas, are also transferred to the DB. Two DB interfaces have been created for different roles allowed to different actions: the contributor, uploading new processes, and the inquirer, submitting queries, to access the complete information about the records, through a graphical tool, displaying energy or roto-vibrational dependence of dynamical data, or through the export action to download ascii datafiles. The DB is expected to have a significant impact on the modeling community working also in scientific fields different from the aerothermodynamics (i.e. fusion, environment, ), making practicable the state-to-state approach.

  10. Apple Germplasm

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Plant Genetic Resources Unit (PGRU) in Geneva, NY part of the USDA-ARS National Plant Germplasm System. The PGRU maintains 55 species of apple (Malus) in both field and seed collections. The main field collection of apples has 2621 diverse clones grafted onto EMLA 9 rootstock. Ninety-seven p...

  11. Current Collapse Induced in AlGaN/GaN High-Electron-Mobility Transistors by Bias Stress

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-08-25

    structure where the traps causing current collapse can be passivated by forming H-defect complexes. Hierro et al.7 have shown, for example, that deep...Lett. 75, 4016 ~1999!. 7 A. Hierro , S. A. Ringel, M. Hansen, J. S. Speck, U. K. Mishra, and S. P. DenBaars, Appl. Phys. Lett. 77, 1499 ~2000!. 8 S. J

  12. Combustion Synthesis Reaction Behavior of Cold-Rolled Ni/Al and Ti/Al Multilayers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-04-01

    6   Figure 4 . Combustion synthesis process of the cold-rolled Ni/Al multilayer foils: (a) reaction front of the displacement of the reaction...Reactive Nanostructured Foil Used as a Heat Source for Joining Titanium . J. Appl. Phys. 2004, 96 ( 4 ), 2336–2342. 16. Wang, J.; Besnoin, E...2011 2. REPORT TYPE Final 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) January 2006–January 2008 4 . TITLE AND SUBTITLE Combustion Synthesis Reaction Behavior of

  13. Newton's Apple

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hendry, Archibald W.

    2007-01-01

    Isaac Newton may have seen an apple fall, but it was Robert Hooke who had a better idea of where it would land. No one really knows whether or not Isaac Newton actually saw an apple fall in his garden. Supposedly it took place in 1666, but it was a tale he told in his old age more than 60 years later, a time when his memory was failing and his…

  14. Summary of PhysPAG Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritz, Steven M.

    2013-01-01

    The Physics of the Cosmos (PCOS) Program Analysis Group (PhysPAG) provides an important interface between the scientific community and NASA in matters related to PCOS objectives, and also provides opportunities for community discussions. An Executive Committee facilitates the work of several subgroups, including an Inflation Probe Science Analysis Group (IPSAG), an X-ray group (XRSAG) , a gamma-ray,group (GRSAG), a gravitational wave group (GWSAG), and a cosmic-ray group (CRSAG). In addition to identifying opportunities and issues, these groups also help articulate technology needs. Membership in all the SAGs is completely open, with information and newsletter signups available on the PhysPAG pages at the PCOS program website. The PhysPAG reports to the Astrophysics Subcommittee of the NASA Advisory Council. A summary of PhysPAG activities will be given, along with time for questions and discussion.

  15. Summary of PhysPAG Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nousek, John A.

    2014-01-01

    The Physics of the Cosmos Program Analysis Group (PhysPAG) is responsible for solicitiing and coordinating community input for the development and execution of NASA's Physics of the Cosmos (PCOS) program. In this session I will report on the activity of the PhysPAG, and solicit community involvement in the process of defining PCOS objectives, planning SMD architecture, and prioritizing PCOS activities. I will also report on the activities of the PhysPAG Executive Committee, which include the chairs of the Science Analysis Groups/ Science Interest Groups which fall under the PhysPAG sphere of interest. Time at the end of the presentation willl be reserved for questions and discussion from the community.

  16. Traveling Apples.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowland Unified School District, Rowland Heights, CA.

    Teacher-developed materials for a basic computer literacy and utilization program for elementary students in grades 3-6 are included in this 4-part packet, which was originally prepared for use with or without the Apple IIe "traveling" microcomputers shared by 15 Rowland Unified School District elementary schools. Implementation…

  17. Summary of PhysPAG Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritz, Steven M.

    2012-01-01

    The Physics of the Cosmos (PCOS) Program Analysis Group (PhysPAG) provides an important interface between the scientific community and NASA in matters related to PCOS objectives. An Executive Committee facilitates the work of several subgroups, including a Technology Science Analysis Group and an Inflation Probe Science Analysis Group. Work is also starting in areas of X-ray, gamma-ray, and gravitational wave astrophysics. The PAG reports to the Astrophysics Subcommittee of the NASA Advisory Council. A summary of PhysPAG activities will be given, along with time for questions and discussion.

  18. Cancer chemopreventive potential of apples, apple juice, and apple components.

    PubMed

    Gerhauser, Clarissa

    2008-10-01

    Apples ( MALUS sp., Rosaceae) are a rich source of nutrient as well as non-nutrient components and contain high levels of polyphenols and other phytochemicals. Main structural classes of apple constituents include hydroxycinnamic acids, dihydrochalcones, flavonols (quercetin glycosides), catechins and oligomeric procyanidins, as well as triterpenoids in apple peel and anthocyanins in red apples. Several lines of evidence suggest that apples and apple products possess a wide range of biological activities which may contribute to health beneficial effects against cardiovascular disease, asthma and pulmonary dysfunction, diabetes, obesity, and cancer (reviewed by Boyer and Liu, Nutr J 2004). The present review will summarize the current knowledge on potential cancer preventive effects of apples, apple juice and apple extracts (jointly designated as apple products). In brief, apple extracts and components, especially oligomeric procyanidins, have been shown to influence multiple mechanisms relevant for cancer prevention in IN VITRO studies. These include antimutagenic activity, modulation of carcinogen metabolism, antioxidant activity, anti-inflammatory mechanisms, modulation of signal transduction pathways, antiproliferative and apoptosis-inducing activity, as well as novel mechanisms on epigenetic events and innate immunity. Apple products have been shown to prevent skin, mammary and colon carcinogenesis in animal models. Epidemiological observations indicate that regular consumption of one or more apples a day may reduce the risk for lung and colon cancer.

  19. Expanding the PhysTEC Coalition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stein, Fredrick

    2003-04-01

    The Physics Teacher Education Coalition (PhysTEC) is a community of physics departments representing scientists and educators at institutions dedicated to improving the science preparation of future K-12 teachers. Now in its second year, PhysTEC requires physics and education faculty to work together to provide an education for future teachers that emphasizes interactive engagement and a student-centered approach to learning science. The first six Coalition members are the physics departments at Ball State University, Oregon State University, University of Arizona, University of Arkansas, Western Michigan University, and Xavier University of Louisiana. PhysTEC is creating a broad, active Coalition of physics departments that have implemented or are interested in implementing one or more of the PhysTEC Program Components. · A long-term, active collaboration among the physics department, the department of education, and the local schools. · A Teacher-in-Residence (TIR) program that provides for a full-time participant in assisting faculty in course revisions. · The redesign of physics courses based on results from physics education research. · The redesign of elementary and secondary science methods courses with an emphasis on inquiry-based teaching and learning. · The establishment of a mentoring program to provide a valuable induction experience for novice science teachers. · The participation of physics faculty in the improvement and expansion of school experiences. www.phystec.org

  20. Relaxation of compressively strained AlGaN by inclined threading dislocations.

    SciTech Connect

    Follstaedt, David Martin; Lee, Stephen Roger; Crawford, Mary Hagerott; Provencio, Paula Polyak; Allerman, Andrew Alan; Floro, Jerrold Anthony

    2005-06-01

    Transmission electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction were used to assess the microstructure and strain of Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1?x}N(x = 0.61-0.64) layers grown on AlN. The compressively-strained AlGaN is partially relaxed by inclined threading dislocations, similar to observations on Si-doped AlGaN by P. Cantu, F. Wu, P. Waltereit, S. Keller, A. E. Romanov, U. K. Mishra, S. P. DenBaars, and J. S. Speck [Appl. Phys. Lett. 83, 674 (2003) ]; however, in our material, the dislocations bend before the introduction of any Si. The bending may be initiated by the greater lattice mismatch or the lower dislocation density of our material, but the presence of Si is not necessarily required. The relaxation by inclined dislocations is quantitatively accounted for with the model of A. E. Romanov and J. S. Speck [Appl. Phys. Lett. 83, 2569 (2003)], and we demonstrate the predicted linear dependence of relaxation on layer thickness. Notably, such relaxation was not found in tensile strained AlGaN grown on GaN [J. A. Floro, D. M. Follstaedt, P. Provencio, S. J. Hearne, and S. R. Lee, J. Appl. Phys. 96, 7087 (2004)], even though the same mechanism appears applicable.

  1. The apple genome: ripe for harvest

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An international consortium of plant report sequencing of the cultivated apple (Malus x domestica) genome (Velasco et al., this issue). Apples are among the most widely grown and consumed fruits in temperate regions of the world. This is in part due to years of extensive breeding and selection the ...

  2. Relaxation of compressively-strained AlGaN by inclined threading dislocations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Follstaedt, D. M.; Lee, S. R.; Provencio, P. P.; Allerman, A. A.; Floro, J. A.; Crawford, M. H.

    2005-09-01

    Transmission electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction were used to assess the microstructure and strain of AlxGa1-xN(x=0.61-0.64) layers grown on AlN. The compressively-strained AlGaN is partially relaxed by inclined threading dislocations, similar to observations on Si-doped AlGaN by P. Cantu, F. Wu, P. Waltereit, S. Keller, A. E. Romanov, U. K. Mishra, S. P. DenBaars, and J. S. Speck [Appl. Phys. Lett. 83, 674 (2003)]; however, in our material, the dislocations bend before the introduction of any Si. The bending may be initiated by the greater lattice mismatch or the lower dislocation density of our material, but the presence of Si is not necessarily required. The relaxation by inclined dislocations is quantitatively accounted for with the model of A. E. Romanov and J. S. Speck [Appl. Phys. Lett. 83, 2569 (2003)], and we demonstrate the predicted linear dependence of relaxation on layer thickness. Notably, such relaxation was not found in tensile strained AlGaN grown on GaN [J. A. Floro, D. M. Follstaedt, P. Provencio, S. J. Hearne, and S. R. Lee, J. Appl. Phys. 96, 7087 (2004)], even though the same mechanism appears applicable.

  3. Are Red Apples Sweeter Than Green Apples?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fraser, Chris

    1999-01-01

    Describes how a classroom observation of apples led to the development of a science project. Discusses the correlation between the greenness and the acidity of apples. Finds that the greener the apple, the lower its pH, and thus the more acidic and less sweet it tastes. (Author/CCM)

  4. Response to 'Comment on 'Undamped electrostatic plasma waves''[Phys. Plasmas 20, 034701 (2013)

    SciTech Connect

    Valentini, F.; Perrone, D.; Veltri, P.; Califano, F.; Pegoraro, F.; Morrison, P. J.; O'Neil, T. M.

    2013-03-15

    Numerical and experimental evidence is given for the occurrence of the plateau states and concomitant corner modes proposed in Valentini et al.[Phys. Plasmas 19, 092103 (2012)]. It is argued that these states provide a better description of reality for small amplitude off-dispersion disturbances than the conventional Bernstein-Greene-Kruskal or cnoidal states such as those proposed in Schamel [Phys. Plasmas 20, 034701 (2013)].

  5. Self-Aligned ALD AlOx T-gate Insulator for Gate Leakage Current Suppression in SiNx-Passivated AlGaN/GaN HEMTs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    blanket-deposited between the source and drain, as has been demonstrated by Ye et al. [21]. Similiarly, Saadat and co-workers have used ALD-deposited HfOx...been reported previously by Saadat et al. [22] and noted to be indicative of slow trapping centers in the oxide and at the oxide/semiconductor...gate dielectric. Appl Phys Lett 2005;86:063501–3. [22] Saadat OI, Chung JW, Piner EL, Palacios T. Gate-first AlGaN/GaN HEMT technology for high-frequency

  6. Response to "Comment on `Effective thermal conductivity in thermoelectric materials'" [J. Appl. Phys. 113, 204904 (2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baranowski, Lauryn L.; Jeffrey Snyder, G.; Toberer, Eric S.

    2014-03-01

    It is commonly claimed that achieving maximum power from a thermoelectric generator necessitates electrical load matching conditions instead of the operating condition derived for maximum generator efficiency. Here, we explain why the electrical load matching claim for maximum power in a design optimization is flawed and show that the load condition derived for maximum efficiency always produces more power. Finally, we consider a CPM generator, and prove that the electrical condition for maximum efficiency is indeed the electrical condition for maximum power, maximum power density, maximum power/cost of thermoelectric material, and maximum power/weight of thermoelectric material, when the leg length of the thermoelectric generator is a design variable.

  7. Elementary, My Dear Apple.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schilling, Robert

    1981-01-01

    A review of "Elementary, My Dear Apple," a commercial software package for the Apple II microcomputer. The package contains four computer programs which present elementary-level spelling, math, and economics learning activities in game-like formats. (SJL)

  8. Comment on “Effects of damping solitary wave in a viscosity bounded plasma” [Phys. Plasmas 21, 022118 (2014)

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, Uday Narayan Chatterjee, Prasanta; Roychoudhury, Rajkumar

    2015-07-15

    Recently Gun Li et al. discussed “Effects of damping solitary wave in a viscosity bounded plasma” [Phys. Plasmas 21, 022118 (2014)]. The paper contains some serious errors which have been pointed out in this Comment.

  9. The Apple IIc.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freiberger, Paul

    1984-01-01

    Description of the portable Apple IIc includes its flat panel display; a new microprocessor, the 65CO2; its new design language; layout; documentation, including interactive tutorials; software support; and cost. Apple IIc's competitors and its new printer, the Scribe, are also discussed. (MBR)

  10. Thermoelectric properties of Fe and Al co-added Ge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, Takayuki; Kurosaki, Ken; Yusufu, Aikebaier; Ohishi, Yuji; Muta, Hiroaki; Yamanaka, Shinsuke

    2017-04-01

    The polycrystalline bulk samples of Fe and Al co-added Ge were synthesized by melt-spinning followed by spark plasma sintering and the thermoelectric properties were examined. Here, Al acts as a p-type dopant, while Fe is expected to form FeGe2 as precipitates. Since the lattice mismatch between Ge and FeGe2 is small (<4%), they would coherently connect with each other, reducing the thermal conductivity without affecting the electrical transport. In this study, a reduction in thermal conductivity was achieved by dispersing the FeGe2 precipitates in the Al-doped Ge matrix, while they had little influences on both the carrier mobility and the Seebeck coefficient. As the results, the maximum ZT value of 0.13 was obtained at 773 K, which is three times higher than that of single-crystal Ge reported by the authors’ group [Y. Ohishi et al., Jpn. J. Appl. Phys. 55, 051301 (2016)].

  11. Apple rootstock evaluation for apple replant disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Twenty-nine rootstocks from the Cornell-Geneva rootstock breeding program, some Budagovski rootstocks, M.9T337 and M.26EMLA were screened for apple replant disease (ARD) tolerance at Geneva, New York in 2008. Bench grafted rootstocks were planted in pots with two types of soil –clay loam and sandy l...

  12. AlInN HEMT Grown on SiC by Metalorganic Vapor Phase Epitaxy for Millimeter-Wave Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-10-01

    Grand- jean, V. Darakchieva, B . Monemar, M. Lorenz, and G. Ramm, J. Appl. Phys. 103(9), 093714 (2008). [10] J. W. Chung, O. I. Saadat , J. M. Tirado, X...5 19a. NAME OF RESPONSIBLE PERSON a. REPORT unclassified b . ABSTRACT unclassified c. THIS PAGE unclassified Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8-98...1350 S. Guo et al.: AlInN HEMT grown on SiC by MOVPE for millimeter-wave applications p h ys ic a ssp status solid i a Figure 4 (a) Mobility and ( b

  13. Comment on "The universal instability in general geometry" [Phys. Plasmas 22, 090706 (2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smolyakov, A. I.; Yagi, M.; Kishimoto, Y.

    2016-11-01

    It is pointed out that the destabilization mechanism recently discussed by Helander and Plunk in relation to the universal instability was studied previously by Smolyakov et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 89, 125005 (2002)]. Moreover, the contribution of the trapped particles as discussed by Helander and Plunk is closely related to the mechanism of the ubiquitous instability previously studied by Coppi and Pegoraro [Nucl. Fusion 17, 969 (1977)].

  14. The Diminishing Apple.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Catherine

    2002-01-01

    Introduces the Apple Ocean activity which teaches about the diminishing natural resources of the earth including drinkable water, habitable land, and productive areas while working with fractions, ratios, and proportions. (YDS)

  15. Study of the Linewidths of Excitonic Luminescence Transitions in AlGaN Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bajaj, K. K.; Coli, Giuliano; Li, J.; Lin, Jingyu; Jiang, H. X.

    2001-03-01

    We have investigated the linewidth of excitonic photoluminescence transitions at 10 K and as a function of Al concentration in AlGaN alloys grown by low-pressure metal organic chemical vapor deposition on (0001) oriented sapphire substrates, with low-temperature GaN buffer layers. Al composition ranged from 0 to 35 percent. By means of a lineshape analysis of the excitonic transition we identify the contribution of the compositional disorder in the alloy to the excitonic linewidth and find that the values of the excitonic linewidths in our samples are considerably smaller than those reported recently[1]. These values of the excitonic linewidths, as expected, increase as a function of Al concentration and agree very well with those calculated by a model presented by Lee and Bajaj[2]. [1] G. Steude, B.K. Meyer, A. Göldner, A. Hoffmann, F. Bertram, J.Christen, H. Amano and I. Akasaki, Appl. Phys. Lett 74, 2456 (1999) [2] S. M. Lee and K. K. Bajaj, J. Appl. Phys. 73, 1788 (1993)

  16. Research-based resources on PhysPort

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayre, Eleanor

    2017-01-01

    PhysPort (http://physport.org) is a website that supports physics faculty in implementing research-based teaching practices in their classrooms. We provide expert recommendations and practical information about teaching methods and assessment. The PhysPort Data Explorer is an intuitive online tool for physics faculty to analyze their assessment data. Faculty upload their students' responses using our secure interface. The Data Explorer matches their pre/post data, scores it, compares it to national data, and graphs it in an interactive and intuitive manner. The Periscope collection on Physport brings together classroom video of students working groups with professional development materials for faculty, pre-service teachers, and learning assistants. To support PhysPort's development efforts, we conduct research on faculty needs around teaching and assessment, secondary analysis of published PER studies, and primary analysis of assessment data. In this talk, I'll introduce some of PhysPort's research-based resources and the research results which support them.

  17. About APPLE II Operation

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, T.; Zimoch, D.

    2007-01-19

    The operation of an APPLE II based undulator beamline with all its polarization states (linear horizontal and vertical, circular and elliptical, and continous variation of the linear vector) requires an effective description allowing an automated calculation of gap and shift parameter as function of energy and operation mode. The extension of the linear polarization range from 0 to 180 deg. requires 4 shiftable magnet arrrays, permitting use of the APU (adjustable phase undulator) concept. Studies for a pure fixed gap APPLE II for the SLS revealed surprising symmetries between circular and linear polarization modes allowing for simplified operation. A semi-analytical model covering all types of APPLE II and its implementation will be presented.

  18. Determination of amygdalin in apple seeds, fresh apples and processed apple juices.

    PubMed

    Bolarinwa, Islamiyat F; Orfila, Caroline; Morgan, Michael R A

    2015-03-01

    Cyanogenic glycosides are natural plant toxicants. Action by endogenous plant enzymes can release hydrogen cyanide causing potential toxicity issues for animals including humans. We have quantified amygdalin in seeds from different apple varieties, determined the effects of processing on the amygdalin content of apple juice and quantified amygdalin in commercially-available apple juices. Amygdalin contents of seeds from fifteen varieties of apples ranged from 1 mg g(-1) to 4 mg g(-1). The amygdalin content of commercially-available apple juice was low, ranging from 0.01 to 0.04 mg ml(-1) for pressed apple juice and 0.001-0.007 mg ml(-1) for long-life apple juice. Processing led to juice with low amygdalin content, ranging from 0.01 mg ml(-1) to 0.08 mg ml(-1). The results presented show that the amygdalin contents of commercially-available apple juices are unlikely to present health problems to consumers.

  19. Comment on 'Nonlinear properties of small amplitude dust ion acoustic solitary waves' [Phys. Plasmas 7, 3594 (2000)

    SciTech Connect

    Duha, S. S.; Mamun, A. A.

    2008-10-15

    The aim of this comment is to show how the model equations used by Ghosh et al. [Phys. Plasmas 7, 3594 (2000)] are completely inconsistent, and to provide a guideline for a consistent dusty plasma model which is appropriate for the study of the nonlinear properties of the dust ion acoustic solitary waves.

  20. Erratum: “Hamiltonian magnetohydrodynamics: Lagrangian, Eulerian, and dynamically accessible stability—Theory” [Phys. Plasmas 20, 092104 (2013)

    SciTech Connect

    Andreussi, T.; Morrison, P. J.; Pegoraro, F.

    2015-03-15

    An algebraic mistake in the rendering of the Energy Casimir stability condition for a symmetric magnetohydrodynamics plasma configuration with flows made in the article Andreussi et al. “Hamiltonian magnetohydrodynamics: Lagrangian, Eulerian, and dynamically accessible stability—Theory,” Phys. Plasmas 20, 092104 (2013) is corrected.

  1. Response to 'Comment on 'Nonlinear properties of small amplitude dust ion acoustic solitary waves'' [Phys. Plasmas 15, 104703 (2008)

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, M. R.; Sarkar, S.; Khan, Manoranjan; Ghosh, Samiran

    2008-10-15

    The objections are not justified. It should have been noted that ion charge number z{sub i}=1 throughout the referred paper [Ghosh et al., Phys. Plasmas 7, 3594 (2000)]. There is no inconsistency in the formulation of the referred paper as explained in the text.

  2. Stripe-teeth metamaterial Al- and Nb-based rectennas (Presentation Recording)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osgood, Richard M.; Giardini, Stephen A.; Carlson, Joel B.; Joghee, Prabhuram; O'Hayre, Ryan P.; Diest, Kenneth; Rothschild, Mordechai

    2015-09-01

    Unlike a semiconductor, where the absorption is limited by the band gap, a "microrectenna array" could theoretically very efficiently rectify any desired portion of the infrared frequency spectrum (25 - 400 THz). We investigated vertical metal-insulator-metal (MIM) diodes that rectify vertical high-frequency fields produced by a metamaterial planar stripe-teeth Al or Au array (above the diodes), similar to stripe arrays that have demonstrated near-perfect absorption in the infrared due to critical coupling [1]. Using our design rules that maximize asymmetry (and therefore the component of the electric field pointed into the substrate, analogous to Second Harmonic Generation), we designed, fabricated, and analyzed these metamaterial-based microrectenna arrays. NbOx and Al2O3 were produced by anodization and ALD, respectively. Smaller visible-light Pt-NbOx-Nb rectennas have produced output power when illuminated by visible (514 nm) light [2]. The resonances of these new Au/NbOx/Nb and Al/Al2O3/Al microrectenna arrays, with larger dimensions and more complex nanostructures than in Ref. 1, were characterized by microscopic FTIR microscopy and agreed well with FDTD models, once the experimental refractive index values were entered into the model. Current-voltage measurements were carried out, showed that the Al/Al2O3/Al diodes have very large barrier heights and breakdown voltages, and were compared to our model of the MIM diode. We calculate expected THz-rectification using classical [3] and quantum [4] rectification models, and compare to measurements of direct current output, under infrared illumination. [1] C. Wu, et. al., Phys. Rev. B 84 (2011) 075102. [2] R. M. Osgood III, et. al., Proc. SPIE 8096, 809610 (2011). [3] A. Sanchez, et. al., J. Appl. Phys. 49 (1978) 5270. [4] J. R. Tucker and M. J. Feldman, Rev. of Mod. Phys. 57, (1985)1055.

  3. The Apple III.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ditlea, Steve

    1982-01-01

    Describes and evaluates the features, performance, peripheral devices, available software, and capabilities of the Apple III microcomputer. The computer's operating system, its hardware, and the commercially produced software it accepts are discussed. Specific applications programs for financial planning, accounting, and word processing are…

  4. Apple mosaic virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Apple mosaic virus (ApMV), a member of the ilarvirus group, naturally infects Betula, Aesculus, Humulus, and several crop genera in the family Rosaceae (Malus, Prunus, Rosa and Rubus). ApMV was first reported in Rubus in several blackberry and raspberry cultivars in the United States and subsequentl...

  5. Comment on ``The application of the thermodynamic perturbation theory to study the hydrophobic hydration'' [J. Chem. Phys. 139, 024101 (2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graziano, Giuseppe

    2013-09-01

    It is shown that the behaviour of the hydration thermodynamic functions obtained in the 3D Mercedes-Benz model of water by Mohoric et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 139, 024101 (2013)] is not qualitatively correct with respect to experimental data for a solute whose diameter is 1.5-fold larger than that of a water molecule. It is also pointed out that the failure is due to the fact that the used 3D Mercedes-Benz model of water [A. Bizjak, T. Urbic, V. Vlachy, and K. A. Dill, J. Chem. Phys. 131, 194504 (2009)] does not reproduce in a quantitatively correct manner the peculiar temperature dependence of water density.

  6. Apple Strength Issues

    SciTech Connect

    Syn, C

    2009-12-22

    Strength of the apple parts has been noticed to decrease, especially those installed by the new induction heating system since the LEP campaign started. Fig. 1 shows the ultimate tensile strength (UTS), yield strength (YS), and elongation of the installed or installation-simulated apples on various systems. One can clearly see the mean values of UTS and YS of the post-LEP parts decreased by about 8 ksi and 6 ksi respectively from those of the pre-LEP parts. The slight increase in elongation seen in Fig.1 can be understood from the weak inverse relationship between the strength and elongation in metals. Fig.2 shows the weak correlation between the YS and elongation of the parts listed in Fig. 1. Strength data listed in Figure 1 were re-plotted as histograms in Figs. 3 and 4. Figs. 3a and 4a show histograms of all UTS and YS data. Figs. 3b and 4b shows histograms of pre-LEP data and Figs. 3c and 4c of post-LEP data. Data on statistical scatter of tensile strengths have been rarely published by material suppliers. Instead, only the minimum 'guaranteed' strength data are typically presented. An example of strength distribution of aluminum 7075-T6 sheet material, listed in Fig. 5, show that its scatter width of both UTS and YS for a single sheet can be about 6 ksi and for multi-lot scatter can be as large as 11 ksi even though the sheets have been produced through well-controlled manufacturing process. By approximating the histograms shown in Figs. 3 and 4 by a Gaussian or similar type of distribution curves, one can plausibly see the strength reductions in the later or more recent apples. The pre-LEP data in Figs. 3b and 4b show wider scatter than the post-LEP data in Figs. 3c and 4c and seem to follow the binomial distribution of strength indicating that the apples might have been made from two different lots of material, either from two different vendors or from two different melts of perhaps slightly different chemical composition by a single vendor. The post

  7. Comment on ''Terrestrial gamma-ray flashes caused by neutron bursts above thunderclouds''[J. Appl. Phys. 105, 083301 (2009)

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, David M.

    2011-01-15

    Paiva presented in these pages an argument that terrestrial gamma-ray flashes (TGFs) are created by the interaction of lightning-generated neutrons with nitrogen nuclei in air. I show that this model cannot produce the observed energy spectrum of TGFs, while the generally accepted model of bremsstrahlung from relativistic electrons fits the data well.

  8. Corrected Article: "Experimental observation of nonspherically-decaying radiation from a rotating superluminal source" [J. Appl. Phys. 96, 4614 (2004)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ardavan, A.; Hayes, W.; Singleton, J.; Ardavan, H.; Fopma, J.; Halliday, D.

    2004-12-01

    We describe the experimental implementation of a superluminal (i.e., faster than light in vacuo) polarization current distribution that both oscillates and undergoes centripetal acceleration. Theoretical treatments predict that the radiation emitted by each volume element of the superluminally moving distribution pattern will comprise a Čerenkov-like envelope with two sheets that meet along a cusp. Correspondingly, the emission from the experimental machine is found to be tightly beamed in both the azimuthal and polar directions. The beaming is frequency independent and has a sharply defined and unchanging geometry determined only by the speed and path of the moving distribution pattern, i.e., by the parameters governing the structure of the Čerenkov-like envelopes. In addition, over a restricted range of angles, we detect the presence of cusps in the emitted radiation. These, which are due to the focusing of wave fronts on a propagating space curve, result in the reception, during a short time period, of radiation emitted over a considerably longer period of (retarded) source time. The intensity of the radiation at these angles was observed to decline more slowly with increasing distance from the source than would the emission from a conventional antenna. The angular distribution of the emitted radiation and the properties associated with the cusps are in good quantitative agreement with theoretical models of superluminal sources once the effect of reflections from the earth's surface are taken into account. In particular, the prediction that the beaming and the slow decay should extend into the far zone has been tested to several hundred Fresnel distances (Rayleigh ranges). The excellent agreement between the theoretical calculations and the data suggests that the apparatus achieves precise and reproducible control of the polarization current and that similar machines could be of general interest for studying and utilizing the novel effects associated with superluminal electrodynamics.

  9. Comment on 'A planar refractive x-ray lens made of nanocrystalline diamond'[J. Appl. Phys. 108, 123107 (2010)

    SciTech Connect

    Kroon, R. E.

    2013-05-28

    The material LuAG (lutetium aluminium garnet) has been confused with LAG (lanthanum aluminium garnet). In general, aluminium garnet phases only occur for the smaller trivalent metal cations and LAG is not known to have been synthesized.

  10. Apple Image Processing Educator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gunther, F. J.

    1981-01-01

    A software system design is proposed and demonstrated with pilot-project software. The system permits the Apple II microcomputer to be used for personalized computer-assisted instruction in the digital image processing of LANDSAT images. The programs provide data input, menu selection, graphic and hard-copy displays, and both general and detailed instructions. The pilot-project results are considered to be successful indicators of the capabilities and limits of microcomputers for digital image processing education.

  11. The PhysTEC Teacher Education Program at FIU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramer, Laird

    2010-10-01

    The FIU PhysTEC Project is an integral component of the Physics Department's educational transformation that has led to more than a ten-fold increase in majors. The transformation seeks to increase the quality and quantity of physics majors and future physics teachers, including those from historically underrepresented groups. Elements of the efforts include transformed introductory physics courses, establishment of a physics research and learning community, engagement of stakeholders spanning high school through the university administration, and advocacy by a physics education research group. The PhysTEC Project supports future physics teachers through a Learning Assistant program coupled to newly revised secondary education programs. The Learning Assistant program is an experiential program that recruits new students into teaching careers while providing a mechanism for transforming courses - undergraduates experience the rewards and intellectual challenges of teaching through providing interactive engagement learning experiences for their peers in introductory physics courses. Students that continue in the program enroll in a multidisciplinary teacher preparation program and may receive significant financial support. FIU is a minority-serving urban public research institution in Miami, Florida serving over 39,000 students, of which 64% are Hispanic, 13% are Black, and 56% are women. Programmatic strategies and impacts of the program will be provided.

  12. Polyphenol profiles of apple juices.

    PubMed

    Kahle, Kathrin; Kraus, Michael; Richling, Elke

    2005-08-01

    Focusing on 17 constituents, the polyphenol profiles of juices freshly made from various dessert (n = 4) and cider apple cultivars (n = 7) as well as commercially available apple juices (n = 24) were investigated using high-performance liquid chromatography-photodiode array detection (HPLC-DAD) and (HPLC)-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry (ESI(neg)-MS/MS) analyses. Significant differences in the total polyphenol content as well as the profiles of the apple cultivars under study were observed. For dessert apples the total polyphenol content ranged from 154 to 178 mg/L, whereas for 'old' German cider apple cultivars 261-970 mg/L were determined. Boskoop showed the highest (970 mg/L) and Granny Smith the lowest (154 mg/L) polyphenol content of the freshly prepared samples under study. Hydroxycinnamic acids, with chlorogenic acid as dominating constituent, ranged from 57 to 68 mg/L as well as from 134-593 mg/L in juices made from dessert apples and that from cider apples, respectively. Dessert apple juices showed lower contents of dihydrochalcones (10-35 mg/L) and flavan-3-ols (50-95 mg/L) compared to that of cider apples (34-171 mg/L and 70-393 mg/L, respectively). Quercetin and its derivatives were found from 0.4-4 mg/L and 0.4-27 mg/L in juices made from dessert apples and that of cider apples, respectively. Compared with freshly made juices, lower contents of polyphenols were determined in the commercial samples under study. Amounts ranging from 110-459 mg/L, dominated by chlorogenic acid with concentrations from 53-217 mg/L, were determined. Information about cultivar-typical apple polyphenol content and profile is important for bioactivity studies and, consequently, essential for the development of consumer-relevant products with particular nutritional functionalities.

  13. Probing and modelling the localized self-mixing in a GaN/AlGaN field-effect terahertz detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, J. D.; Qin, H.; Lewis, R. A.; Sun, Y. F.; Zhang, X. Y.; Cai, Y.; Wu, D. M.; Zhang, B. S.

    2012-04-01

    In our previous work [Sun et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 100, 013506 (2012)], we inferred the existence of localized self-mixing in an antenna-coupled field-effect terahertz detector. In this Letter, we report a quasistatic self-mixing model taking into account the localized terahertz fields and its verification by comparing the simulated results with the experimental data in a two-dimensional space of the gate voltage and the drain/source bias. The model well describes the detector characteristics: not only the magnitude, but also the polarity, of the photocurrent can be tuned. The existence of strongly localized self-mixing in such detectors is confirmed.

  14. The PhysTec Project of APS, AIP, and AAPT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jansen, Henri

    2002-04-01

    We will describe the development of the PhysTEC program at Oregon State University. The goal of this program is to enhance the number of secondary physics teachers and to improve the physics training of primary teachers and secondary teachers in related fields. Key elements of the plan include: (1) a seamless five-year program leading to a M.S. in science education and a B.S. in physics with a specialty in physics education, which takes advantage of our unique undergraduate physics curriculum (the Paradigms project); (2) a teacher-in-residence with joint duties in the Department of Physics and the Department of Science and Math Education; (3) inquiry-based and pedagogically-oriented lab and recitation sections in calculus-based introductory physics; (4) an inquiry-based physical science course for preservice elementary teachers; (5) outreach projects that enhance the preservice experience and support the methods and pedagogy training offered elsewhere in the curriculum.

  15. Volatility of patulin in apple juice.

    PubMed

    Kryger, R A

    2001-08-01

    Patulin is a mycotoxin produced by certain fungi, such as those found commonly on apples. The patulin content of apple juice is a regulatory concern because patulin is a suspected carcinogen and mutagen. A simple model of the apple juice concentration process was carried out to examine the possible contamination of patulin in apple aroma, a distillate produced commercially in the concentration of apple juice. The results show no evidence for patulin volatility, and document a reduction in patulin content by at least a factor of 250 in the apple distillate obtained from apple juice. Furthermore, a survey of several commercial apple aroma samples found no evidence of patulin content.

  16. Comment on "Fe2: As simple as a Herculean labour. Neutral (Fe2), cationic (Fe2+), and anionic (Fe2-) species" [J. Chem. Phys. 142, 244304 (2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoyer, Chad E.; Li Manni, Giovanni; Truhlar, Donald G.; Gagliardi, Laura

    2016-01-01

    A recent paper on Fe2 [A. Kalemos, J. Chem. Phys. 142, 244304 (2015)] critiqued our previous work on the system [Hoyer et al., J. Chem. Phys. 141, 204309 (2014)]. In this comment, we explain the nature of our previously reported potential energy curve for Fe2 and we discuss our computed properties for Fe2. Additionally, we fix a labeling error that was present in our previous work, although this error is unrelated to the main point of discussion.

  17. Management of apple anthracnose canker

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Apple anthracnose (caused by Neofabraea malicorticis anamorph Cryptosporiopsis curvispora) is a fungal disease that causes cankers on trees and ‘Bull’s-eye rot’ on fruit. In western Washington, it is the canker phase of apple anthracnose that is considered most serious as it can result in death of ...

  18. Tropical Soda Apple (Solanum viarum)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tropical soda apple (Solanum viarum Dunal), a perennial shrub, is a Federal Noxious Weed that continues to spread at an alarming rate in the southeastern United States. Information is provided on the impact of tropical soda apple on agricultural and natural areas, federal regulations for restricted...

  19. Apple rootstock resistance to drought

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Water for irrigation will likely be less available in apple-growing regions due to climate change and competition with human needs other than agriculture. Apple cultivars and rootstocks may differ in water use necessary for acceptable cropping. In two greenhouse experiments in 2014 and 2015, roots...

  20. The gravity apple tree

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espinosa Aldama, Mariana

    2015-04-01

    The gravity apple tree is a genealogical tree of the gravitation theories developed during the past century. The graphic representation is full of information such as guides in heuristic principles, names of main proponents, dates and references for original articles (See under Supplementary Data for the graphic representation). This visual presentation and its particular classification allows a quick synthetic view for a plurality of theories, many of them well validated in the Solar System domain. Its diachronic structure organizes information in a shape of a tree following similarities through a formal concept analysis. It can be used for educational purposes or as a tool for philosophical discussion.

  1. The domestication and evolutionary ecology of apples.

    PubMed

    Cornille, Amandine; Giraud, Tatiana; Smulders, Marinus J M; Roldán-Ruiz, Isabel; Gladieux, Pierre

    2014-02-01

    The cultivated apple is a major fruit crop in temperate zones. Its wild relatives, distributed across temperate Eurasia and growing in diverse habitats, represent potentially useful sources of diversity for apple breeding. We review here the most recent findings on the genetics and ecology of apple domestication and its impact on wild apples. Genetic analyses have revealed a Central Asian origin for cultivated apple, together with an unexpectedly large secondary contribution from the European crabapple. Wild apple species display strong population structures and high levels of introgression from domesticated apple, and this may threaten their genetic integrity. Recent research has revealed a major role of hybridization in the domestication of the cultivated apple and has highlighted the value of apple as an ideal model for unraveling adaptive diversification processes in perennial fruit crops. We discuss the implications of this knowledge for apple breeding and for the conservation of wild apples.

  2. Reply to: Comment on: polarity effects and apparent ion recombination in microionization chambers [Med. Phys. 43(5) 2141-2152 (2016)].

    PubMed

    Miller, Jessica R; Hooten, Brian D; Micka, John A; DeWerd, Larry A

    2017-03-01

    We would like to thank Dr. Brivio et al. [Med. Phys.] for their comment on our recent paper. Miller et al. [Med. Phys. 43 (2016) 2141-2152] determined the primary cause of voltage-dependent polarity effects in microchambers to be a potential difference between the guard and collecting electrodes. In their comment, Brivio et al., offer an explanation for the cause of such potential differences. Brivio et al. attribute the potential difference to the disparity in the work functions between guard and collecting electrodes composed of different materials. However, all of the microchambers investigated in Miller et al. contained a guard and collecting electrode which were composed of the same material. Therefore, the explanation offered by Brivio et al. that "the electric potential perturbation arises from the work function difference of the disparate materials electrodes" does not explain the polarity effects exhibited by the microchambers investigated in Miller et al., all of which contain electrodes composed of the same materials.

  3. PREFACE: Prospects in Neutrino Physics 2013 - NuPhys2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2015-04-01

    The first "Prospects in Neutrino Physics 2013 - NuPhys2013" conference was held at the Institute of Physics, IoP, London, 19-20 December 2013 and was attended by about 130 delegates from institutions worldwide. Lunch and coffee breaks allowed discussions among delegates and speakers to take place in an informal setting. This conference is unique in discussing the worldwide strategy to address unresolved issues in neutrino physics, and shape the future directions of particle physics. We discussed the current status and focussed especially on the prospects of future experiments, their performance and physics reach. It is particularly timely due to the recent measurements in neutrino physics and planned worldwide experiments. The following topics were addressed: • Theory and Phenomenology Perspectives • Future Long and Short Baseline Neutrino Oscillation Experiments • Reactor neutrino and flux • Neutrinoless double beta decays • Solar, atmospheric, supernova neutrinos • Neutrino cosmology in which both the phenomenological and experimental aspects were equally addressed. World-leading experts in the different neutrino areas were invited to give review talks. To encourage and facilitate the participation of early-career researchers and PhD students, a poster session formed a key aspect of this meeting. The conference was organized by Francesca Di Lodovico and Silvia Pascoli. It was sponsored by the IoP through their Topic Research Meeting Grant, and also supported by Durham IPPP, ERC-207282, FP7 invisibles project, Queen Mary University of London.

  4. 7 CFR 33.5 - Apples.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Apples. 33.5 Section 33.5 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... ISSUED UNDER AUTHORITY OF THE EXPORT APPLE ACT Definitions § 33.5 Apples. Apples mean fresh whole...

  5. 7 CFR 33.5 - Apples.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Apples. 33.5 Section 33.5 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... ISSUED UNDER AUTHORITY OF THE EXPORT APPLE ACT Definitions § 33.5 Apples. Apples mean fresh whole...

  6. 7 CFR 33.5 - Apples.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Apples. 33.5 Section 33.5 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... ISSUED UNDER AUTHORITY OF THE EXPORT APPLE ACT Definitions § 33.5 Apples. Apples mean fresh whole...

  7. 7 CFR 33.5 - Apples.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Apples. 33.5 Section 33.5 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... ISSUED UNDER AUTHORITY OF THE EXPORT APPLE ACT Definitions § 33.5 Apples. Apples mean fresh whole...

  8. 7 CFR 33.5 - Apples.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Apples. 33.5 Section 33.5 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... ISSUED UNDER AUTHORITY OF THE EXPORT APPLE ACT Definitions § 33.5 Apples. Apples mean fresh whole...

  9. Internal quantum efficiency in yellow-amber light emitting AlGaN-InGaN-GaN heterostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Ngo, Thi Huong; Gil, Bernard; Valvin, Pierre; Damilano, Benjamin; Lekhal, Kaddour; De Mierry, Philippe

    2015-09-21

    We determine the internal quantum efficiency of strain-balanced AlGaN-InGaN-GaN hetero-structures designed for yellow-amber light emission, by using a recent model based on the kinetics of the photoluminescence decay initiated by Iwata et al. [J. Appl. Phys. 117, 075701 (2015)]. Our results indicate that low temperature internal quantum efficiencies sit in the 50% range and we measure that adding an AlGaN layer increases the internal quantum efficiency from 50% up to 57% with respect to the GaN-InGaN case. More dramatic, it almost doubles from 2.5% up to 4.3% at room temperature.

  10. onHigh-peak-power strain-compensated GaInAs/AlInAs quantum cascade lasers (λ ˜4.6 μm) based on a slightly diagonal active region design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Q.; Lösch, R.; Bronner, W.; Hugger, S.; Fuchs, F.; Aidam, R.; Wagner, J.

    2008-12-01

    Employing a "slightly diagonal" active region design for the quantum cascade lasers compared to a reference sample based on the conventional vertical transition design [R. Köhler et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 76, 1092 (2000)], we have improved the maximum operation temperature, room-temperature maximum peak power per facet, and room-temperature slope efficiency from 320 K, 200 mW, and 570 mW/A to higher than 360 K, 3.2 W, and 2200 mW/A, respectively, for the device size of 16 μm×3 mm with as-cleaved facets operated in pulsed mode.

  11. Preface: phys. stat. sol. (b) 241/9

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morawetz, Klaus

    2004-07-01

    Modelling and Simulation in Molecular Systems, Mesoscopic Structures, and Material Science was the title of a workshop held at the University of Technology in Chemnitz from 21 to 23 April 2004. This workshop coincided with the 50th birthday of Michael Schreiber. Therefore, the idea to publish a special issue is supported by two good reasons. First, a topical collection is appropriate for giving an overview about a field and to initiate further studies. This is one intention of the present issue. Second, the birthday is a suitable occasion for reflecting on the status of the different fields where Michael Schreiber has been active himself. Motivated by the characteristic name of the workshop (MS4), which expresses the broad range of his activities, the contributions are grouped into three main chapters: Disorder and Interaction, Phase Transitions and Criticality, and Transport Properties.The first part starts with the currently intensively discussed topic of composite Fermions in the paper by B. Kramer et al. This method of rewriting correlations as new quasiparticles has amongst other things the merit of explaining such exciting phenomena as the fractional quantum Hall effect. The methodological questions of Ward identities, causality, and conservation laws are the focus of the systematic investiga-tion in the second article by V. Janis et al. which concentrates on the problem of disorder and configura-tional averaging. The interplay between disorder and correlation is treated in the third contribution by C. Schuster et al., where different theoretical methods are tested on the problem of Friedel oscillations within the one-dimensional Heisenberg and Hubbard model. In the next contribution, M. Berciu et al. focus on localization as one consequence of disorder. The localized and extended electronic states are treated, together with the magnetic degrees of freedom, like spin waves. One of the astonishing consequence of localiza-tion is the observation of resonant

  12. Investigation of stopping power for deuterons in partially ionized warm Al plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    He, Bin Wang, Jian-Guo

    2014-06-15

    The stopping powers for deuterons in Al plasmas with a fixed density of 0.02 g/cm{sup 3} and the temperatures at 4.5, 13, and 17 eV are studied in detail for a wide projectile energy range with different models. Comparison of these models indicates that our model is totally in best agreement with the experimental data and the main reason for this is that our calculation for the inelastic processes should be the most reliable. It is found that the difference between our model and the local density approximation model (Wang et al., Phys. Plasmas 5, 2977 (1998)) is mainly due to the quite different physical picture behind them. In Mehlhorn's model (J. Appl. Phys. 52, 6522 (1981)), the Bethe equation is found to overestimate the inelastic stopping in Al plasmas, meanwhile, it is gradually close to our results with temperature decreasing. The model by classical dielectric function with the choice of the maximum of the momentum transfer associated with the temperature is found not suitable to describe the stopping in warm plasmas. With temperature increasing the stopping due to plasma wave rises up which rapidly exceeds the inelastic stopping in warm Al plasmas.

  13. Comment on ``Unified explanation of the anomalous dynamic properties of highly asymmetric polymer blends'' [J. Chem. Phys. 138, 054903 (2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colmenero, J.

    2013-05-01

    In a recent paper by Ngai and Capaccioli ["Unified explanation of the anomalous dynamic properties of highly asymmetric polymer blends," J. Chem. Phys. 138, 054903 (2013), 10.1063/1.4789585] the authors claimed that the so-called coupling model (CM) provides a unified explanation of all dynamical anomalies that have been reported for dynamically asymmetric blends over last ten years. Approximately half of the paper is devoted to chain-dynamic properties involving un-entangled polymers. According to the authors, the application of the CM to these results is based on the existence of a crossover at a time tc ≈ 1-2 ns of the magnitudes describing chain-dynamics. Ngai and Capaccioli claimed that the existence of such a crossover is supported by the neutron scattering and MD-simulation results, corresponding to the blend poly(methyl methacrylate)/poly(ethylene oxide), by Niedzwiedz et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 168301 (2007), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.98.168301] and Brodeck et al. [Macromolecules 43, 3036 (2010), 10.1021/ma902820a], respectively. Being one of the authors of these two papers, I will demonstrate here that there is no evidence supporting such a crossover in the data reported in these papers.

  14. Apple (Malus x domestica).

    PubMed

    Dandekar, Abhaya M; Teo, Gianni; Uratsu, Sandra L; Tricoli, David

    2006-01-01

    Apple (Malus x domestica) is one of the most consumed fruit crops in the world. The major production areas are the temperate regions, however, because of its excellent storage capacity it is transported to distant markets covering the four corners of the earth. Transformation is a key to sustaining this demand - permitting the potential enhancement of existing cultivars as well as to investigate the development of new cultivars resistant to pest, disease, and storage problems that occur in the major production areas. In this paper we describe an efficient Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation protocol that utilizes leaf tissues from in vitro grown plants. Shoot regeneration is selected with kanamycin using the selectable kanamycin phosphotransferase (APH(3)II) gene and the resulting transformants confirmed using the scorable uidA gene encoding the bacterial beta-glucuronidase (GUS) enzyme via histochemical staining. Transformed shoots are propagated, rooted to create transgenic plants that are then introduced into soil, acclimatized and transferred to the greenhouse from where they are taken out into the orchard for field-testing.

  15. The APPL "Learning Map"

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    Root Learning, a learning consulting organization with a background in strategic planning, recognizes the knowledge gap that frequently exists between a leadership team and the rest of an organization. Team members supposedly working toward the same goal don't always have the same vision as to where the organization is headed, and they may not understand how the piece they are accountable for fits into the big picture. To address these complex problems, Root Learning utilizes the age-old tools of sarcasm, metaphor and graphics (much in the same way that ASK uses a traditional storytelling format.) The company is best known for creating "Learning Maps" like this one: humorous drawings based on the inner workings of an organization. Their purpose is to put complex topics on the table, to stimulate discussion, and to ultimately give team members a common vision of where the organization is going and what role they personally play in getting there. APPL knows how effective it is to incorporate new and engaging techniques into its knowledge sharing programs. By collaborating with Root Learning, we were able to expand the knowledge of the organization and add one more of these techniques to our repertoire.

  16. Effect of Humidity on the Interaction of Dimethyl Methylphosphonate (DMMP) Vapor with SiO2 and Al2O3 Surfaces, Studied Using Infrared Attenuated Total Reflection Spectroscopy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    V.; Yates, J. T., Jr. Surf. Sci. 2002, 518, 39. (84) Chang, C.-L.; Engelhard, M. H.; Ramanathan , S. Appl . Phys. Lett. 2008, 92, 263103. (85) Wang, S...R.; Newton, N. G. Appl . Surf. Sci. 2001, 181, 296. (48) Bermudez, V. M. J. Phys. Chem. C 2009, 113, 1917. (49) Kaplan, D.; Nir, I.; Shmueli, L...E.; Chabal, Y. J. J. Phys. Chem. B 2001, 105, 3903. (56) Sperline, R. P. Appl . Spectrosc. 1991, 45, 677. (57) Harrick, N. J. Internal Reflection

  17. Preface: phys. stat. sol. (a) 202/12

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neumann, Wolfgang; Stutzmann, Martin; Hildebrandt, Stefan

    2005-09-01

    The present special issue contains a collection of Original Papers dedicated to Professor Johannes Heydenreich on the occasion of his 75th birthday.Johannes Heydenreich, born on 20 June 1930 in Plauen/Vogtland near Dresden, studied physics at the Pädagogische Hochschule Potsdam, where he obtained his first academic degree Dipl. Phys. in 1958. He received his doctoral degree at the Martin Luther University in Halle in 1961 and the Habilitation degree in 1969. Already during his studies in Potsdam, he showed an interest in electron microscopy due to the influence of his teacher and supervisor Prof. Picht, one of the pioneers in electron optics. His interests were strengthened when Johannes Heydenreich did the experimental work for his Diploma degree at the Institute for Experimental Physics of the University of Halle, where he met Prof. Heinz Bethge for the first time. This was the beginning of a fruitful and longstanding collaboration. In 1962 Johannes Heydenreich joined the team of the later Institute for Solid State Physics and Electron Microscopy of the Academy of Sciences of the GDR, in Halle, for which the basis was laid by Prof. Bethge in 1960.Heydenreich has been working as Assistant Director for many years and played a decisive role in introducing and organising the various techniques of electron microscopy in the institute.The research activities of Prof. Heydenreich covered a broad spectrum over the years. At the beginning of his career he made significant contributions in the field of electron mirror microscopy. After that, his main interests were focused on transmission electron microscopy, ranging from diffraction contrast analysis of crystal defects to high-resolution electron microscopy and image processing. His favourite field was studies of defect-induced phenomena in advanced materials. The so-called Bethge-Heydenreich, the book Electron Microscopy in Solid State Physics, published at first in a German edition in 1982 and later in a revised

  18. Response to ``Comment on `Slow Debye-type peak observed in the dielectric response of polyalcohols' '' [J. Chem. Phys. 134, 037101 (2011)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergman, R.; Jansson, H.; Swenson, J.

    2011-01-01

    In our recent article [R. Bergman et al., J. Chem. Phys. 132, 044504 (2010)] we investigated some polyalcohols, i.e., glycerol, xylitol, and sorbitol by dielectric spectroscopy. In the study, a low-frequency peak of Debye character that normally is hidden by the large low-frequency dispersion due to conductivity was revealed by analyzing the real part of the permittivity and by using a thin Teflon film to suppress the low-frequency dispersion. We agree with the comment by Paluch et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 134, 037101 (2011)] that the Teflon film setup will indeed create a peak due to the dc conductivity. However, due to the fact that the location of the peak was almost identical in measurement with and without Teflon, we unfortunately mainly showed the data measured with Teflon, despite that it could also be observed in the real part of the permittivity without using the Teflon setup, as shown in our original article [R. Bergman et al., J. Chem. Phys. 132, 044504 (2010)]. Here, we show that the low-frequency peak of Debye character can also be observed by subtracting the dc conductivity. Furthermore, we show that the modulus representation used in Paluch et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 134, 037101 (2011).] is also not suitable for detecting processes hidden by the conductivity.

  19. Physics of the Cosmos Program Analysis Group (PhysPAG) Report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nousek, John A.

    2015-01-01

    The Physics of the Cosmos Program Analysis Group (PhysPAG) serves as a forum for soliciting and coordinating input and analysis from the scientific community in support of the PCOS program objectives. I will outline the activities of the PhysPAG over the past year, since the last meeting during the AAS meeting in National Harbor, and mention the activities of the PhysPAG related Scientific Interest Groups.

  20. Parameter estimation uncertainty: Comparing apples and apples?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hart, D.; Yoon, H.; McKenna, S. A.

    2012-12-01

    that M-NSMC can provide a computationally efficient and practical solution for predictive uncertainty analysis in highly nonlinear and complex subsurface flow and transport models. This material is based upon work supported as part of the Center for Frontiers of Subsurface Energy Security, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences under Award Number DE-SC0001114. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  1. Classification of patterns representing Apples and Oranges in three-qubit system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Manu Pratap; Radhey, Kishori; Saraswat, V. K.; Kumar, Sandeep

    2017-01-01

    The study of the classification of Apples and Oranges in a warehouse has been undertaken in a three-qubit system using the method of repeated iterations in Grover's algorithm and Ventura's algorithm separately. Operator describing an inversion about average has been constructed as a square matrix of order eight, the phase inversion operators and corresponding iteration operators for patterns separately representing Apples and Oranges have been derived, and various possible superpositions as the choice for search states for the classification of these patterns have been obtained for starting states consisting of two patterns and a single pattern, respectively. It has been demonstrated that on the second iteration of the exclusion superposition by the corresponding iteration operators, the patterns Apples and Oranges, respectively, are most suitably classified using the Grover's algorithm. The probabilities of classifications of Apples have also been calculated by using Ventura's algorithm (Ventura and Martinez in Inf Sci 124:273-296, 2000; Found Phys Lett 12:547-559, 1999) for all the possible superpositions as the search states, and the results have been compared with those of Grover's algorithm and it has been demonstrated that in general for classification of a given pattern (Apples) in three-qubit system, the Grover's and Ventura's algorithms are effective in the cases where the number of patterns in the stored database is larger or smaller, respectively.

  2. Cryptosporidiosis associated with ozonated apple cider.

    PubMed

    Blackburn, Brian G; Mazurek, Jacek M; Hlavsa, Michele; Park, Jean; Tillapaw, Matt; Parrish, MaryKay; Salehi, Ellen; Franks, William; Koch, Elizabeth; Smith, Forrest; Xiao, Lihua; Arrowood, Michael; Hill, Vince; da Silva, Alex; Johnston, Stephanie; Jones, Jeffrey L

    2006-04-01

    We linked an outbreak of cryptosporidiosis to ozonated apple cider by using molecular and epidemiologic methods. Because ozonation was insufficient in preventing this outbreak, its use in rendering apple cider safe for drinking is questioned.

  3. Connecting your Apple to Octopus 7600's

    SciTech Connect

    Barton, G.W. Jr.

    1983-01-17

    In UCID-19588, Communicating between the Apple and the Wang, we described how to take Apple DOS text files and send them to the Wang, and how to return Wang files to the Apple. It is also possible to use your Apple as an Octopus terminal, and to exchange files with Octopus 7600's. Presumably, you can also talk to the Crays, or any other part of the system. This connection has another virtue. It eliminates one of the terminals in your office.

  4. Loading Appleworks into the Apple IIGS Computer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlenker, Richard M.

    This step-by-step guide to loading AppleWorks V2.0 into the Apple IIGS computer provides instructions for energizing the computer and monitor, inserting the disk, using the Apple-control-reset function, and loading the program. Seven sample screen displays are included. (MES)

  5. What's an Adam's Apple? (For Kids)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Happens in the Operating Room? What's an Adam's Apple? KidsHealth > For Kids > What's an Adam's Apple? A A A You're at the high ... the throat. This is what's called an Adam's apple. Everyone's larynx grows during puberty, but a girl's ...

  6. Questions and Answers: Apple Juice and Arsenic

    MedlinePlus

    ... in its juice than any other company. Does organic apple juice have less arsenic than non-organic apple juice? The FDA is unaware of any ... States. Is the arsenic in apple juice predominantly organic or inorganic? Due to limited data available to ...

  7. Ensuring the genetic diversity of apples

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Apples (Malus × domestica Borkh.) are a nutritious source of antioxidants, polyphenolics, vitamins, and fiber. Many of the apple cultivars that are currently produced were identified over a century ago and do not offer resistance to pathogens and tolerance to climatic threats. Apple breeding program...

  8. Recombinant DNA technology in apple.

    PubMed

    Gessler, Cesare; Patocchi, Andrea

    2007-01-01

    This review summarizes the achievements of almost 20 years of recombinant DNA technology applied to apple, grouping the research results into the sections: developing the technology, insect resistance, fungal disease resistance, self-incompatibility, herbicide resistance, fire blight resistance, fruit ripening, allergens, rooting ability, and acceptance and risk assessment. The diseases fire blight, caused by Erwinia amylovora, and scab, caused by Venturia inaequalis, were and still are the prime targets. Shelf life improvement and rooting ability of rootstocks are also relevant research areas. The tools to create genetically modified apples of added value to producers, consumers, and the environment are now available.

  9. Preface: phys. stat. sol. (b) 242/9

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez, Maria

    2005-07-01

    The XVII Latin American Symposium on Solid State Physics took place in the conference rooms of the Convent San Francisco de Asis, in the heart of the Old Havana. The sixteen previous editions were organized in eight different countries; the last two were in Colombia (Cartagena, 1999) and Venezuela (Merida, 2002). After eighteen years the meeting came back to Havana in 2004.The program topics included: Surfaces and interfaces analysis; Spintronics; Magnetism; Materials and energy; Ab-initio methods, simulations and modeling in solids; Nanophysics, nanomaterials and nanotechnology; New materials, properties and applications; Preparation of materials, thin films and characterization; High temperature superconductivity; Techniques of structural analysis in solids. The program included 6 plenary talks, 13 invited talks, 58 oral presentations (in eight sessions) and 200 poster contributions (in four poster sessions).The meeting attracted more than 200 participants from 14 countries. The physica status solidi Young Researcher Award sponsored by Wiley-VCH was conferred at the meeting. This prize was divided between two participants: Clara Calderón (Study of electrical transport properties of ZnO thin films used as front contact of solar cells) from Colombia and Aim?? Pelaiz Barranco (AC behavior in lanthanum modified PZT ferroelectric ceramics) from Cuba. Special Mentions went to Val??rie Halté (Femtosec-ond dynamics of transmission of gold arrays of sub-wavelength holes) from France, Erick Larramendi Cancio (Cd desorption induced by Zn exposure during atomic layer epitaxy of CdxZn1-xTe) and Julio Cesar Rimada Herrera (Quantum and conversion efficiency calculation of AlGaAs/GaAs multiple quantum well solar cells) from Cuba.Nanostructures and in general low dimensional physics related to different systems was a very hot topic during the meeting. Some talks and presentations were devoted to optoelectronic materials and devices. Characterization of solids by different

  10. Preface: phys. stat. sol (a) 203/9

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duewski, P.; Bristowe, P.; Maurice, J.-L.; Komninou, P.

    2006-07-01

    This special issue contains a selection of papers that were presented at a symposium on Interfacial Processes and Properties of Advanced Materials (IPAM05) held at the E-MRS Fall Meeting, Warsaw, Poland on 5-7 September 2005. The symposium was conceived and inspired by the success of its predecessor (IPAM04) held at the University of Caen, France in June 2004.The symposium attracted over sixty contributions and was organized around five areas: Interfaces and dislocations in compound semiconductors, Gate oxide interfaces, Interfaces and defects in electroceramics, Metal-metal interfaces and interfacial modeling, and Interfaces in nano-structured and amorphous thin-film systems. The focus was on the influence of buried interfaces on the functionality of various electronic and opto-electronic devices such as lasers, ferroelectric memories, CMOS and magnetic disks. Therefore the materials addressed at the symposium included compound semiconductors (e.g. GaN, CdTe, ZnO), perovskites (e.g. SrTiO3), dielectrics (e.g. HfO2, SiO2, Al2O3), and metals (e.g. Fe/V superlattices). The aim of the symposium was to bring together leading interface experts, both experimental and theoretical, to explore the connection between interfacial properties (atomic and electronic structure, segregation, diffusion, kinetics) and materials performance in a device application. Papers were presented that described the use of a variety of sophisticated experimental techniques to explore the interfacial properties including HRTEM, X-ray high-resolution diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, STM, AFM, PL spectroscopy, SIMS and electrical and magnetic measurements. The theoretical work included applications of density functional theory, atomistic simulations, dislocation theory and finite element modeling. The program stimulated many exciting and productive discussions between experimentalists and theorists. The ultimate objective was to improve our knowledge of the role of interfaces on the properties of

  11. Hexagonal AlN: Dimensional-crossover-driven band-gap transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bacaksiz, C.; Sahin, H.; Ozaydin, H. D.; Horzum, S.; Senger, R. T.; Peeters, F. M.

    2015-02-01

    Motivated by a recent experiment that reported the successful synthesis of hexagonal (h ) AlN [Tsipas et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 103, 251605 (2013), 10.1063/1.4851239], we investigate structural, electronic, and vibrational properties of bulk, bilayer, and monolayer structures of h -AlN by using first-principles calculations. We show that the hexagonal phase of the bulk h -AlN is a stable direct-band-gap semiconductor. The calculated phonon spectrum displays a rigid-layer shear mode at 274 cm-1 and an Eg mode at 703 cm-1, which are observable by Raman measurements. In addition, single-layer h -AlN is an indirect-band-gap semiconductor with a nonmagnetic ground state. For the bilayer structure, A A' -type stacking is found to be the most favorable one, and interlayer interaction is strong. While N -layered h -AlN is an indirect-band-gap semiconductor for N =1 -9 , we predict that thicker structures (N ≥10 ) have a direct band gap at the Γ point. The number-of-layer-dependent band-gap transitions in h -AlN is interesting in that it is significantly different from the indirect-to-direct crossover obtained in the transition-metal dichalcogenides.

  12. A Response to Michael W. Apple's "Theory, Research, and the Critical Scholar/Activist"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leonardo, Zeus

    2010-01-01

    Michael Apple's prescient review of Anyon et al.'s "Theory and Educational Research" reminds the educational community of the importance of purpose. In his own work, he has been consistent in--actually, insistent on--emphasizing the struggle over political projects. This is not an issue concerning only the Left as the scapegoat for the disparaging…

  13. Dry bin filler for apples

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A unique dry bin filler for apples using a sequenced tray was developed to reduce bruising in packing operations. Research and commercial trials in West Virginia, Pennsylvania, and Washington State demonstrated the ability to fill bins evenly and with low damage. Cultivars with different bruising su...

  14. Apple phytochemicals and their health benefits.

    PubMed

    Boyer, Jeanelle; Liu, Rui Hai

    2004-05-12

    Evidence suggests that a diet high in fruits and vegetables may decrease the risk of chronic diseases, such as cardiovascular disease and cancer, and phytochemicals including phenolics, flavonoids and carotenoids from fruits and vegetables may play a key role in reducing chronic disease risk. Apples are a widely consumed, rich source of phytochemicals, and epidemiological studies have linked the consumption of apples with reduced risk of some cancers, cardiovascular disease, asthma, and diabetes. In the laboratory, apples have been found to have very strong antioxidant activity, inhibit cancer cell proliferation, decrease lipid oxidation, and lower cholesterol. Apples contain a variety of phytochemicals, including quercetin, catechin, phloridzin and chlorogenic acid, all of which are strong antioxidants. The phytochemical composition of apples varies greatly between different varieties of apples, and there are also small changes in phytochemicals during the maturation and ripening of the fruit. Storage has little to no effect on apple phytochemicals, but processing can greatly affect apple phytochemicals. While extensive research exists, a literature review of the health benefits of apples and their phytochemicals has not been compiled to summarize this work. The purpose of this paper is to review the most recent literature regarding the health benefits of apples and their phytochemicals, phytochemical bioavailability and antioxidant behavior, and the effects of variety, ripening, storage and processing on apple phytochemicals.

  15. Apple phytochemicals and their health benefits

    PubMed Central

    Boyer, Jeanelle; Liu, Rui Hai

    2004-01-01

    Evidence suggests that a diet high in fruits and vegetables may decrease the risk of chronic diseases, such as cardiovascular disease and cancer, and phytochemicals including phenolics, flavonoids and carotenoids from fruits and vegetables may play a key role in reducing chronic disease risk. Apples are a widely consumed, rich source of phytochemicals, and epidemiological studies have linked the consumption of apples with reduced risk of some cancers, cardiovascular disease, asthma, and diabetes. In the laboratory, apples have been found to have very strong antioxidant activity, inhibit cancer cell proliferation, decrease lipid oxidation, and lower cholesterol. Apples contain a variety of phytochemicals, including quercetin, catechin, phloridzin and chlorogenic acid, all of which are strong antioxidants. The phytochemical composition of apples varies greatly between different varieties of apples, and there are also small changes in phytochemicals during the maturation and ripening of the fruit. Storage has little to no effect on apple phytochemicals, but processing can greatly affect apple phytochemicals. While extensive research exists, a literature review of the health benefits of apples and their phytochemicals has not been compiled to summarize this work. The purpose of this paper is to review the most recent literature regarding the health benefits of apples and their phytochemicals, phytochemical bioavailability and antioxidant behavior, and the effects of variety, ripening, storage and processing on apple phytochemicals. PMID:15140261

  16. Apples prevent mammary tumors in rats.

    PubMed

    Liu, Rui Hai; Liu, Jiaren; Chen, Bingqing

    2005-03-23

    Regular consumption of fruits and vegetables has been consistently shown to be associated with reduced risk of developing chronic diseases such as cancer and cardiovascular disease. Apples are commonly consumed and are the major contributors of phytochemicals in human diets. It was previously reported that apple extracts exhibit strong antioxidant and antiproliferative activities and that the major part of total antioxidant activity is from the combination of phytochemicals. Phytochemicals, including phenolics and flavonoids, are suggested to be the bioactive compounds contributing to the health benefits of apples. Here it is shown that whole apple extracts prevent mammary cancer in a rat model in a dose-dependent manner at doses comparable to human consumption of one, three, and six apples a day. This study demonstrated that whole apple extracts effectively inhibited mammary cancer growth in the rat model; thus, consumption of apples may be an effective strategy for cancer protection.

  17. Comment on ``Study of dielectric relaxations of anhydrous trehalose and maltose glasses'' [J. Chem. Phys. 134, 014508 (2011)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaminski, K.; Wlodarczyk, P.; Paluch, M.

    2011-10-01

    Very recently Kwon et al. [H.-J. Kwon, J.-A. Seo, H. K. Kim, and Y. H. Hwang, J. Chem. Phys. 134, 014508 (2011)] published an article on the study of dielectric relaxation in trehalose and maltose glasses. They carried out broadband dielectric measurements at very wide range of temperatures covering supercooled liquid as well as glassy state of both saccharides. It is worth to mention that authors have also applied a new method for obtaining anhydrous glasses of trehalose and maltose that enables avoiding their caramelization. Four relaxation processes were identified in dielectric spectra of both saccharides. The slower one was identified as structural relaxation process the next one, not observed by the others, was assigned as Johari-Goldstein (JG) β-relaxation, while the last two secondary modes were of the same nature as found by Kaminski et al. [K. Kaminski, E. Kaminska, P. Wlodarczyk, S. Pawlus, D. Kimla, A. Kasprzycka, M. Paluch, J. Ziolo, W. Szeja, and K. L. Ngai, J. Phys. Chem. B 112, 12816 (2008)]. In this comment we show that the authors mistakenly assigned the slowest relaxation process as structural mode of disaccharides. We have proven that this relaxation process is an effect of formation of thin layer of air or water between plate of capacitor and sample. The same effect can be observed if plates of capacitor are oxidized. Thus, we concluded that their slowest mode is connected to the dc conduction process while their β JG process is primary relaxation of trehalose and maltose.

  18. Association Between Apple Consumption and Physician Visits

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Matthew A.; Bynum, Julie P.W.; Sirovich, Brenda E.

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Fruit consumption is believed to have beneficial health effects, and some claim, “An apple a day keeps the doctor away.” OBJECTIVE To examine the relationship between eating an apple a day and keeping the doctor away. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS A cross-sectional study of a nationally representative sample of the noninstitutionalized US adult population. A total of 8728 adults 18 years and older from the 2007–2008 and 2009–2010 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey completed a 24-hour dietary recall questionnaire and reported that the quantity of food they ate was reflective of their usual daily diet. EXPOSURES Daily apple eaters (consuming the equivalent of at least 1 small apple daily, or 149 g of raw apple) vs non–apple eaters, based on the reported quantity of whole apple consumed during the 24-hour dietary recall period. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES The primary outcome measure was success at “keeping the doctor away,” measured as no more than 1 visit (self-reported) to a physician during the past year; secondary outcomes included successful avoidance of other health care services (ie, no overnight hospital stays, visits to a mental health professional, or prescription medications). RESULTS Of 8399 eligible study participants who completed the dietary recall questionnaire, we identified 753 adult apple eaters (9.0%)—those who typically consume at least 1 small apple per day. Compared with the 7646 non–apple eaters (91.0%), apple eaters had higher educational attainment, were more likely to be from a racial or ethnic minority, and were less likely to smoke (P < .001 for each comparison). Apple eaters were more likely, in the crude analysis, to keep the doctor (and prescription medications) away: 39.0% of apple eaters avoided physician visits vs 33.9%of non–apple eaters (P = .03). After adjusting for sociodemographic and health-related characteristics, however, the association was no longer statistically significant

  19. Mercury residues in south Florida apple snails (Pomacea paludosa)

    SciTech Connect

    Eisemann, J.D.; Beyer, W.N.; Morton, A.; Bennetts, R.E.

    1997-05-01

    Mercury concentrations in the sediments of south Florida wetlands have increased three fold in the last century. Because south Florida is home to many endemic and endangered species, it is important to understand the potential impacts of mercury in this ecosystem`s food web. Recent research by Malley et al. has shown mollusks to be sensitive indicators of methyl mercury which can reflect small differences in background methyl mercury concentrations. In this study, we attempted to determine if the apple snail (Pomacea paludosa) or its eggs are good indicators of bioavailable mercury. Then, using the apple snail as an indicator, we attempted to determine geographic differences in the concentrations of mercury in south Florida. 12 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  20. Occurrence of Apple stem grooving virus in commercial apple seedlings and analysis of its coat protein sequence

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Virus infections are responsible for reduced yield and quality in many crops, and are especially problematic in vegetatively-propagated crops such as apple. Three major viruses (Apple stem grooving virus (ASGV), Apple chlorotic leaf spot virus and Apple stem pitting virus) affect apple trees in Kore...

  1. Comment on ``Heat transfer in vacuum packaged microelectromechanical system devices'' [Phys. Fluids 20, 017103 (2008)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sone, Yoshio

    2009-11-01

    It is pointed out that the solution of a free molecular gas in a bounded domain proposed as speculation in Sec. II of Cai [Phys. Fluids 20, 017103 (2008)] and in Sec. II of Cai and Liu [Phys. Fluids 20, 067105 (2008)] and its result of the vanishing of flow velocity were rigorously derived under a more general situation and boundary condition more than 20 years ago.

  2. Apple cuticle: the perfect interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curry, Eric; Arey, Bruce

    2010-06-01

    The domestic apple might well be called an 'extreme' fruit. In the arid Northwest United States, the fruit often tolerates surface temperatures ranging from -2 °C in the early spring to 50 °C in the heat of summer, and again to -2 °C during controlled postharvest storage for up to 12 months. During its 18-month existence, the apple maintains a cuticle that is dynamic and environmentally responsive to protect against 1) cellular water loss during desiccation stress and 2) excessive uptake of standing surface moisture. Physiological disorders of the peel such as russeting, cracking, splitting, flecking and lenticel marking, develop as epidermal cells respond to rapid changes in ambient conditions at specific developmental stages during the growing season. Resultant market losses underlie research investigating the nature of apple cuticle growth and development. Ultrastructural analysis of the pro-cuticle using scanning electron microscopy indicates an overlapping network of lipid-based distally-elongating microtubules--produced by and connected to epidermal cells--which co-polymerize to form an organic solvent-insoluble semi-permeable cutin matrix. Microtubule elongation, aggregation, and polymerization function together as long as the fruit continues to enlarge. The nature of lipid transport from the epidermal cells through the cell wall to become part of the cuticular matrix was explored using an FEI Helios NanoLabTM DualBeamTM focused ion beam/scanning electron microscope on chemically- and cryo-fixed peel tissue from mature or freshly harvested apples. Based on microtubule dimensions, regular projections found at the cell/cuticle interface suggest an array of microtubule-like structures associated with the epidermal cell.

  3. Orienting apples for imaging using their inertial properties and random apple loading

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The inability to control apple orientation during imaging has hindered development of automated systems for sorting apples for defects such as bruises and for safety issues such as fecal contamination. Recently, a potential method for orienting apples based on their inertial properties was discovere...

  4. h -AlN-Mg(OH)2 van der Waals bilayer heterostructure: Tuning the excitonic characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bacaksiz, C.; Dominguez, A.; Rubio, A.; Senger, R. T.; Sahin, H.

    2017-02-01

    Motivated by recent studies that reported the successful synthesis of monolayer Mg (OH) 2 [Suslu et al., Sci. Rep. 6, 20525 (2016), 10.1038/srep20525] and hexagonal (h -)AlN [Tsipas et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 103, 251605 (2013), 10.1063/1.4851239], we investigate structural, electronic, and optical properties of vertically stacked h -AlN and Mg (OH) 2 , through ab initio density-functional theory (DFT), many-body quasiparticle calculations within the GW approximation and the Bethe-Salpeter equation (BSE). It is obtained that the bilayer heterostructure prefers the A B' stacking having direct band gap at the Γ with Type-II band alignment in which the valance band maximum and conduction band minimum originate from different layer. Regarding the optical properties, the imaginary part of the dielectric function of the individual layers and heterobilayer are investigated. The heterobilayer possesses excitonic peaks, which appear only after the construction of the heterobilayer. The lowest three exciton peaks are analyzed in detail by means of band decomposed charge density and the oscillator strength. Furthermore, the wave function calculation shows that the first peak of the heterobilayer originates from spatially indirect exciton where the electron and hole localized at h -AlN and Mg (OH) 2 , respectively, which is important for the light harvesting applications.

  5. Response to 'Comment on 'Solitary waves and double layers in an ultra-relativistic degenerate dusty electron-positron-ion plasma' '[Phys. Plasmas 19, 064703 (2012)

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, N.

    2012-06-15

    The investigation of the occurrence of nonlinear electrostatic waves (viz., solitary waves and double layers) in degenerate plasmas was the main concern of the article presented by Roy et al.[Phys. Plasmas 19, 033705 (2012)]. The equations of state used in the article were the limits explained by Chandrasekhar [Mon. Not. R. Astron. Soc. 170, 405 (1935)]. It was designated as 'misleading' by some authors, which is opposed in this reply with explanation.

  6. Comment on 'Nonplanar dust-ion acoustic Gardner solitons in a dusty plasma with q-nonextensive electron velocity distribution' [Phys. Plasmas 19, 033703 (2012)

    SciTech Connect

    Mannan, A.; Tanjia, F.; Yasmin, S.

    2013-04-15

    The basic characteristics of cylindrical and spherical dust-ion acoustic Gardner solitary waves in a dusty plasma with q-nonextensive electron velocity distribution have been represented by Ghosh et al.[Phys. Plasmas 19, 033703 (2012)]. In this manuscript, they use the double layer stationary solution of the standard Gardner equation but they explain the whole article in terms of Gardner solitons which is completely incorrect.

  7. Interface states at the SiN/AlGaN interface on GaN heterojunctions for Ga and N-polar material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeluri, Ramya; Swenson, Brian L.; Mishra, Umesh K.

    2012-02-01

    Dielectric passivation is important to improve the stability and reliability of gallium nitride based semiconductor devices. We need to characterize various dielectrics and their interfaces to nitrides accurately to be able to exploit the benefits efficiently. Earlier, B. L. Swenson and U. K. Mishra [J. Appl. Phys. 106, 064902 (2009)] have detailed a photo-assisted high frequency CV characterization technique for the Ga-polar SiN/GaN interface that gives an accurate value of interface state density (Dit) across the bandgap of the dielectric. In this work, we extend the technique to study the interface states at the SiN/AlGaN interface on GaN for Ga and N polar material. This simulates the AlGaN/GaN HEMT structure. A MIS-type structure comprised of a metal on SiN on an AlGaN/GaN heterojunction was used for the study. For a structure with 1 nm AlGaN interlayer, a peak interface state density of 2.8 × 1012 cm-2 eV-1 was measured. For Ga polar devices, the measured Dit decreases with increasing AlGaN thickness. In the N-polar case, the measured Dit increases with increasing AlGaN thickness. The variations of measured Dit with AlGaN thickness, in both cases, can be explained by screening from the accumulation charge at the AlGaN/GaN interface.

  8. Comment on 'The diatomic dication CuZn{sup 2+} in the gas phase' [J. Chem. Phys. 135, 034306 (2011)

    SciTech Connect

    Fiser, Jiri; Diez, Reinaldo Pis; Franzreb, Klaus; Alonso, Julio A.

    2013-02-21

    In this Comment, the density functional theory (DFT) calculations carried out by Diez et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 135, 034306 (2011)] are revised within the framework of the coupled-cluster single double triple method. These more sophisticated calculations allow us to show that the {sup 2}{Sigma}{sup +} electronic ground state of CuZn{sup 2+}, characterized as the metastable ground state by DFT calculations, is a repulsive state instead. The {sup 2}{Delta} and {sup 2}{Pi} metastable states of CuZn{sup 2+}, on the other hand, should be responsible for the formation mechanism of the dication through the near-resonant electron transfer CuZn{sup +}+ Ar{sup +}{yields} CuZn{sup 2+}+ Ar reaction.

  9. Dry etching of Al-rich AlGaAs with silicon nitride masks for photonic crystal fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiuyu; Togano, Yuji; Hashimura, Kentaro; Morifuji, Masato; Kondow, Masahiko

    2015-04-01

    We investigate inductively coupled plasma (ICP) deep dry etching of Al0.8Ga0.2As for photonic crystal (PC) fabrication using a Cl2/BCl3/CH4 gas mixture. On the basis of our previous report [Y. Kitabayashi et al., Jpn. J. Appl. Phys. 52, 04CG07 (2013)], we obtained a PC structure having air holes deeper than 1.5 µm and a diameter of 120 nm by adjusting the gas flow rate and increasing the process pressure. In this study, silicon nitride (SiNx) and SiO2 were both used as the mask layer. Furthermore, samples with SiNx and SiO2 masks for ICP deep dry etching were also fabricated and compared. The vertical profile of the PC structure with the SiNx mask layer displayed a rounded shape that was caused by the charge up in the mask layer. Then, a thinner mask layer was used to ease the effects of mask retardation and charge up. As a result, a PC structure with a SiNx mask layer having air holes deeper than 1.7 µm and a diameter of 190 nm was successfully fabricated.

  10. Historic American apple cultivars: Identification and availability

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Apples have been important throughout the centuries in North America. Historic books, publications, and nursery catalogs were surveyed to identify apple cultivars that were propagated and grown in the United States prior to 1908. We collected synonym, introduction date, and original source country i...

  11. Unique characteristics of Geneva apple rootstocks

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Geneva® apple rootstock breeding program has been operating since the early 1970’s. It is a unique program in that it had access to important germplasm resources that later became the USDA ARS apple collection in Geneva, NY. This genetic diversity allowed for the achievement of one of the proj...

  12. Production of alcohol from apple pomace

    SciTech Connect

    Hang, Y.D.; Lee, C.Y.; Woodams, E.E.; Cooley, H.J.

    1981-12-01

    Production of ethyl alcohol from apple pomace with a Montrachet strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is described. More than 43 grams of the ethyl alcohol could be produced per kg of apple pomace fermented at 30 degrees Celcius in 24 hours. The fermentation efficiency of this process was approximately 89%. (Refs. 9).

  13. 9,250 Apples for the Teacher.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Uston, Ken

    1983-01-01

    Discusses Apple Computer Inc.'s plan to donate an Apple IIe to eligible elementary/secondary schools in California, dealer incentives for conducting orientation sessions for school personnel, and school uses of the computer (including peer tutoring and teacher education). Also discusses similar efforts of other microcomputer manufacturers. (JN)

  14. SED/Apple Computer, Inc., Partnership Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stoll, Peter F.

    1991-01-01

    In 1990, the New York State Education Department (SED), Apple Computer, Inc., Boards of Cooperative Educational Services (BOCES), and school districts formed a partnership to explore the contribution technology can make to schools based on Apple Computer's Learning Society and SED's Long-Range Plan for Technology in Elementary and Secondary…

  15. [Toxicity and apple production in southern Brazil].

    PubMed

    Klanovicz, Jó

    2010-03-01

    The article explores the links between the controversial apprehension of contaminated apples in southern Brazil in 1989 and the reactions of the apple industry to press reports on the use of pesticides in Brazilian orchards. The issue is framed within a broader analysis of the notions of toxicity and 'danger' surrounding the consumption of healthier food and the idea of 'food security,' notions that have begun taking hold in public and private life. It is argued that apple growers' responses to the problem can be better understood through a historical reading of the interactions between the biology of the apple tree, the agroecology of this monoculture, and the structures, actors, and discourses of the human and non-human groups in Brazil's apple-producing region.

  16. Comment on “Two-dimensional positive column structure in a discharge tube with radius discontinuity” [Phys. Plasmas 21, 113503 (2014)

    SciTech Connect

    Demidova, M. V.; Kudryavtsev, A. A.; Kurlyandskaya, I. P.; Saifutdinov, A. I.; Stepanova, O. M.

    2015-09-15

    Zobnin et al. have published a paper [Phys. Plasmas, 21, 113503 (2014)] on a topic of discharge physics in the presence of a sharp change in cylindrical discharge geometry. In the comment it is pointed out that for untrapped electrons a full kinetic equation, which includes dependences on spatial coordinates and energies, has to be used for the electron velocity distribution function determination. It is also unclear what probe theories Zobnin et al. have used in their paper for the calculation of electron current to the discharge tube wall.

  17. Fractal dynamics of human gait: a reassessment of the 1996 data of Hausdorff et al.

    PubMed

    Delignières, Didier; Torre, Kjerstin

    2009-04-01

    We propose in this paper a reassessment of the original data of Hausdorff et al. (Hausdorff JM, Purdon PL, Peng C-K, Ladin Z, Wei JY, Goldberger AR. J Appl Physiol 80: 1448-1457, 1996). We confirm, using autoregressive fractionally integrated moving average modeling, the presence of genuine fractal correlations in stride interval series in self-paced conditions. In contrast with the conclusions of the authors, we show that correlations did not disappear in metronomic conditions. The series of stride intervals presented antipersistent correlations, and 1/f fluctuations were evidenced in the asynchronies to the metronome. We show that the super central pattern generator model (West B, Scafetta N. Phys Rev E Stat Nonlin Soft Matter Phys 67: 051917, 2003) allows accounting for the experimentally observed correlations in both self-paced and metronomic conditions, by the simple setting of the coupling strength parameter. We conclude that 1/f fluctuations in gait are not overridden by supraspinal influences when walking is paced by a metronome. The source of 1/f noise is still at work in this condition, but expressed differently under the influence of a continuous coupling process.

  18. Reduced rate brassica seed meal amendment efficacy is apple rootstock genotype-dependent

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Brassica seed meal formulations have been shown to provide effect control of the biologically complex disease phenomenon termed apple replant disease (Mazzola et al., 2015). The seed meal formulation when used at an application rate of 3 ton ac-1 provided disease control that was in some instances ...

  19. Susceptibility of fruit from diverse apple and crabapple germplasm to attack from apple maggot (Diptera: Tephritidae).

    PubMed

    Myers, Clayton T; Reissig, W Harvey; Forsline, Phillip L

    2008-02-01

    Apple maggot, Rhagoletis pomonella (Walsh) (Diptera: Tephritidae), is a pest of major concern to apple, Malus x domestica (Borkh.) production in eastern North America. Host plant resistance to apple maggot among apple germplasm has been previously evaluated among a small number of exotic Malus accessions and domestic hybrid selections. However, a large number of exotic accessions housed in USDA collections have never been evaluated for their susceptibility to apple pests. Additionally, previous reports of resistance need to be confirmed under both field conditions and with more rigorous laboratory evaluations. Thus, studies were conducted to evaluate the susceptibility of a number of Malus accessions housed at the USDA Plant Genetic Resources Unit "core" collection. Contrary to earlier published reports, these results suggest that some selections previously described as "resistant" are in fact susceptible to both oviposition damage and larval feeding damage by apple maggot. One domestic, disease-resistant apple accession, 'E36-7' is resistant to survival of apple maggot larvae except when the fruit is nearly ripe in late fall. This is the first report of an apple cultivar that is confirmed to be resistant to larval feeding of apple maggot. Although adults can successfully oviposit on all accessions examined, larval survival was zero in a number of small-fruited crabapple accessions classified as resistant in previous studies and also in two accessions, Malus tschonoskii (Maxim) C. K. Schneid. and M. spectabilis (Aiton) Borkh., that have not been previously evaluated.

  20. Erratum: "Influence of heavy metal materials on magnetic properties of Pt/Co/heavy metal tri-layered structures" [Appl. Phys. Lett. 110, 012405 (2017)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Boyu; Cao, Anni; Qiao, Junfeng; Tang, Minghong; Cao, Kaihua; Zhao, Xiaoxuan; Eimer, Sylvain; Si, Zhizhong; Lei, Na; Wang, Zhaohao; Lin, Xiaoyang; Zhang, Zongzhi; Wu, Mingzhong; Zhao, Weisheng

    2017-03-01

    Pt/Co/heavy metal (HM) tri-layered structures with interfacial perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA) are currently under intensive research for several emerging spintronic effects, such as spinorbit torque, domain wall motion, and room temperature skyrmions. HM materials are used as capping layers to generate the structural asymmetry and enhance the interfacial effects. For instance, the Pt/Co/Ta structure attracts a lot of attention as it may exhibit large Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction. However, the dependence of magnetic properties on different capping materials has not been systematically investigated. In this paper, we experimentally show the interfacial PMA and damping constant for Pt/Co/HM tri-layered structures through time-resolved magneto-optical Kerr effect measurements as well as magnetometry measurements, where the capping HM materials are W, Ta, and Pd. We found that the Co/HM interface plays an important role on the magnetic properties. In particular, the magnetic multilayers with a W capping layer features the lowest effective damping value, which may be attributed to the different spin-orbit coupling and interfacial hybridization between Co and HM materials. Our findings allow a deep understanding of the Pt/Co/HM tri-layered structures. Such structures could lead to a better era of data storage and processing devices.

  1. Comment on 'Mapping of localized spin-wave excitations by near-field Brillouin light scattering' [Appl. Phys. Lett. 97, 152502 (2010)].

    SciTech Connect

    Giovannini, L.; Montoncello, F.; Nizzoli, F.; Vavassori, P.; Grimsditch, M.

    2011-11-04

    The authors reported in their letter some outstanding experimental results of spin excitations in nano-particles investigated by near-field Brillouin scattering. They conclude from their observations that existing theories -- in particular micromagnetic simulations -- do not correctly describe the behavior of the spin modes. Since excellent agreement has been reported between spin-wave mode frequencies obtained from Brillouin scattering experiments and those obtained from micromagnetic-based simulations, it is somewhat surprising that the simulations should fail for the particles investigated in Ref. 1. In the literature, there is also evidence of various kinds and degrees of mode localization when exchange competes with dipolar interactions. When dipolar long-range interactions are taken into account, the eigenmodes can be seen as the superposition of plane waves, leading to different localizations and in particular to the appearence of bulk-dead modes. We have simulated the normal modes of the particles used in Ref. 1, with the dynamical matrix method; the results are shown in Fig. 1 for different values of the applied field. In addition to the lowest frequency non-localized mode (1-BA), several localized modes are present. Large particles exhibit modes with oscillations along the field direction;8 for such modes, we use the label n-BA-loc, with n the number of nodes. While the profile of the pure end-mode, i.e., 0-BA-loc, has its maximum at the edge with the amplitude monotonously decreasing toward the interior of the ellipse, as correctly described by the authors, the localized modes with n > 0, not considered by them, do not have this characteristic: see inset of Fig. 1. Based on Fig. 1, we believe that the assumption that the mode they observe is 'the' localized spin mode is not correct. Instead, we believe that the mode detected in the experiment at H > 700 Oe is a combinations (due to non-linear excitation conditions of the experiment) of several n-BA-loc modes, with n?>?0. In this picture, the sharp peaks of the n-BA-loc modes are smoothed in the experimental measurements, thanks to the superposition of modes with different nodal lines. Finally, at 350 Oe, the measured profile and frequency suggest that the mode seen in the experiment may be well due to the 1-BA mode. The observed change in mode profile at 350 Oe is substantiated by the frequency behavior shown in Fig. 3(b) of Ref. 1, where it can be observed that the frequency of the low-field point does not lie on the same curve as the high-field points. In summary, before concluding that micromagnetic-based simulations of spin wave modes in nano-particles are unreliable, we believe that it is necessary to await either the simulation of large particles using small cell sizes or for more exhaustive experiments reaching lower frequencies on particles of varying size. The comparison of calculations with experiment would greatly benefit if the authors were to provide the field dependence of all the modes detected in their experiment (in order to achieve a proper assignment).

  2. Addendum to ''Phase selection and transition in Hf-rich hafnia-titania nanolaminates'' (on SiO{sub 2}) [J. Appl. Phys. 109, 123523 (2011)]: Hafnon formation

    SciTech Connect

    Cisneros-Morales, Massiel Cristina; Aita, Carolyn Rubin

    2012-05-15

    Continued investigation of hafnia-titania nanolaminates on silica substrates after long term annealing shows that hafnon (HfSiO{sub 4}) is formed, in addition to the previously reported phases. Here, a 293 nm-thick stack of 5 nm HfO{sub 2}-4 nm TiO{sub 2} bilayers (0.51 mole fraction HfO{sub 2}) is sputter deposited on fused SiO{sub 2} and annealed in air at 1173 K for up to 192 h and then at 1273 K for up to 96 h. X-ray diffraction shows that hafnon crystallizes after 24 h at 1273 K. Micro-Raman spectroscopy/microscopy shows that hafnon crystallization is heterogeneous. No film-substrate reaction is observed for single layer HfO{sub 2} on SiO{sub 2} annealed under similar conditions. We suggest the nanolaminate's complex annealed microstructure provides fast diffusion paths that enable hafnon formation.

  3. 7 CFR 33.50 - Apples for processing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Apples for processing. 33.50 Section 33.50 Agriculture... ISSUED UNDER AUTHORITY OF THE EXPORT APPLE ACT Interpretive Rules § 33.50 Apples for processing. The terms “apples for processing” as used in § 33.12 of this part apply only and is restricted to...

  4. 7 CFR 33.50 - Apples for processing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Apples for processing. 33.50 Section 33.50 Agriculture... ISSUED UNDER AUTHORITY OF THE EXPORT APPLE ACT Interpretive Rules § 33.50 Apples for processing. The terms “apples for processing” as used in § 33.12 of this part apply only and is restricted to...

  5. 7 CFR 33.50 - Apples for processing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Apples for processing. 33.50 Section 33.50 Agriculture... ISSUED UNDER AUTHORITY OF THE EXPORT APPLE ACT Interpretive Rules § 33.50 Apples for processing. The terms “apples for processing” as used in § 33.12 of this part apply only and is restricted to...

  6. 7 CFR 33.50 - Apples for processing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Apples for processing. 33.50 Section 33.50 Agriculture... ISSUED UNDER AUTHORITY OF THE EXPORT APPLE ACT Interpretive Rules § 33.50 Apples for processing. The terms “apples for processing” as used in § 33.12 of this part apply only and is restricted to...

  7. 7 CFR 33.50 - Apples for processing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Apples for processing. 33.50 Section 33.50 Agriculture... ISSUED UNDER AUTHORITY OF THE EXPORT APPLE ACT Interpretive Rules § 33.50 Apples for processing. The terms “apples for processing” as used in § 33.12 of this part apply only and is restricted to...

  8. On the effect of the barrier widths in the InAs/AlSb/GaSb single-barrier interband tunneling structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, J. F.; Yang, L.; Wu, M. C.; Chu, S. N. G.; Cho, A. Y.

    1990-10-01

    The dependence of the interband tunneling current on AlSb barrier widths is studied in the InAs/AlSb/GaSb single-barrier diode structures. The experimental results show that the peak current density displays an exponential dependence on the barrier width. The Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin approximation combined with the kṡp two-band model were used in analyzing the energy level in the AlSb barrier through which the peak tunneling currents occur. The energy level thus obtained (0.48±0.10 eV above the valence band edge of the AlSb) agrees with the valence-band offset (0.40±0.15 eV) between the AlSb and the GaSb obtained by x-ray photoemission measurement reported by Gualtieri et al. [Appl. Phys. Lett. 49, 1037 (1986)]. By adjusting the barrier width properly, we obtained a high peak current density of 24 kA/cm2 (with a peak-to-valley ratio of 1.4) and a high peak-to-valley ratio of 4.5 (with a peak current density of 3.5 kA/cm2) at room temperature. In addition, the peak-current voltages for different AlSb barrier widths were calculated and compared with the measured results.

  9. Comment on: “Quantum exam” [Phys. Lett. A 350 (2006) 174

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Jie; Zhang, Shou

    2007-01-01

    In the Letter [B.A. Nguyen, Phys. Lett. A 350 (2006) 174], a quantum exam protocol was presented. Here we show a cheating protocol, by which any student can get the other students' solution without being detected. Then we propose a possible modified protocol against this attacking strategy.

  10. Comment on ``Derivation of paleoclassical key hypothesis'' [Phys. Plasmas 14, 040701 (2007)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thyagaraja, A.; Roach, C. M.; Hazeltine, R. D.

    2008-01-01

    The paleoclassical hypothesis, derived in Callen [Phys. Plasmas 14, 040701 (2007)], proposes that electron guiding centers experience additional diffusion which is absent from neoclassical theory. This is claimed to be associated with the diffusion of poloidal magnetic flux, and to be most significant in cold resistive plasmas. In this comment we explain why the paleoclassical hypothesis contradicts electrodynamics.

  11. Reply to the 'Comment on "trans-1,2-Disiloxybenzocyclobutene, an adequate partner for the auto-oxidation: EPR/spin trapping and theoretical studies"' by H.-G. Korth, P. Mulder and T. Paul, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2017, 19, C6CP04187F.

    PubMed

    Carissan, Yannick; Nava, Paola; Tuccio, Béatrice; Commeiras, Laurent; Parrain, Jean-Luc

    2017-01-25

    The proposal and the comments made by Korth et al. on a biradical intermediate along the isomerization path of the reaction of trans-1,2-tert-butyldimethyldisilyloxybenzocyclobutene 1 with dioxygen are unsuitable in our case. The mechanism scenario that we proposed is in agreement with our experimental observations. Moreover, new calculations were able to give an answer to the crucial question, "is the biradical an intermediate or a transition state?" together with the localization of the two radicals. This full article is a response to the "Comment on "trans-1,2-Disiloxybenzocyclobutene, an adequate partner for the auto-oxidation: EPR/spin trapping and theoretical studies" by J. Drujon et al., Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 2014, 16, 7513".

  12. Susceptibility of fruit from diverse apple and crabapple germplasm to attack from apple maggot, Rhagoletis pomonella (Walsh) (Diptera: Tephritidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Apple maggot, Rhagoletis pomonella (Walsh) is a pest of major concern to apple, Malus x domestica (Borkh.) production in eastern North America. Host-plant resistance to apple maggot among apple germplasm has been previously evaluated among a small number of exotic Malus accessions and domestic hyb...

  13. Evaluation of Reference Genes for the Relative Quantification of Apple stem grooving virus and Apple mosaic virus in Apple Trees.

    PubMed

    Gadiou, S; Kundu, J K

    2012-06-01

    A SYBR Green(®)-based one step RT-qPCR assay was developed for the detection and quantification of Apple stem grooving virus (ASGV) and Apple mosaic virus (ApMV). The RT-qPCR assay employed seven plant-expressed genes-glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), 18S ribosomal RNA, ubiquitin, ribosomal protein S19, Rubisco, RNA polymerase subunit II and β-actin-as internal reference housekeeping genes in a relative quantification system in three apple cultivars (i.e. Idared, Champion, Fragrance). The average expression stability (M) found by GeNorm software suggest that GAPDH and S19 were the most stable reference genes. We propose employing GAPDH and S19 as housekeeping genes for accurate quantification of ASGV and ApMV in apple leaf samples. The detection limit for both viruses was found around 70 copies of viral genome by one-step RT-qPCR.

  14. ICP-AES determination of minor- and major elements in apples after microwave assisted digestion.

    PubMed

    Juranović Cindrić, Iva; Krizman, Ivona; Zeiner, Michaela; Kampić, Štefica; Medunić, Gordana; Stingeder, Gerhard

    2012-12-15

    The aim of this paper was to determine the content of minor and major elements in apples by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). Prior to ICP-AES measurement, dried apples were digested in a microwave assisted digestion system. The differences in the measured element concentrations after application of open and closed microwave system as sample preparation procedures are discussed. In whole apples, flesh and peel Ag, Al, Ba, Ca, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, K, Mg, Mn, Na, Ni, Pb, Sr and Zn were analysed after optimisation and validating the analytical method using ICP-AES. The accuracy of the method determined by spiking experiments was very good (recoveries 88-115%) and the limits of detection of elements of interest were from 0.01 up to 14.7 μg g(-1). The reference ranges determined in all apple samples are 39-47 mg g(-1) for K, 9-14 mg g(-1) for Na, 3-7 mg g(-1) for Mg, 3-7 μg g(-1) for Zn, 0.7-2.8 μg g(-1) for Sr. The range of Mn in peel 4-6 μg g(-1) is higher compared to whole apple from 0.7 to 1.7 μg g(-1). Cd is found only in peel, in the concentration range of 0.4-1.1 μg g(-1).

  15. Precipitation Under Cyclic Strain in Solution-Treated Al-4wt%Cu II: Precipitation Behavior

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-02-01

    Physics A. 37:1, 31-36, (1985). 4. JB Murphy, Acta Met. 9, 563 (1961). 5. MS Anand, SP Muraka and RP Agarwala. J appl . Phys. 36, 3860 (1965). 6. M...Interphase Boundaries.” Metals Sci. J. 2, 155-158. (1968). 10. Ramanathan Sankaran. Misfit Dislocation Structures, Growth Kinetics, and Morphology of

  16. Goldstone Apple Valley Radio Telescope Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ibe, Mary; MacLaren, Dave

    2003-01-01

    Describes the Goldstone Apple Valley Radio Telescope (GAVRT) project as a way of teaching astronomy concepts to middle school students. The project provides students opportunities to work with professional scientists. (SOE)

  17. Biochemistry of Apple Aroma: A Review.

    PubMed

    Espino-Díaz, Miguel; Sepúlveda, David Roberto; González-Aguilar, Gustavo; Olivas, Guadalupe I

    2016-12-01

    Flavour is a key quality attribute of apples defined by volatile aroma compounds. Biosynthesis of aroma compounds involves metabolic pathways in which the main precursors are fatty and amino acids, and the main products are aldehydes, alcohols and esters. Some enzymes are crucial in the production of volatile compounds, such as lipoxygenase, alcohol dehydrogenase, and alcohol acyltransferase. Composition and concentration of volatiles in apples may be altered by pre- and postharvest factors that cause a decline in apple flavour. Addition of biosynthetic precursors of volatile compounds may be a strategy to promote aroma production in apples. The present manuscript compiles information regarding the biosynthesis of volatile aroma compounds, including metabolic pathways, enzymes and substrates involved, factors that may affect their production and also includes a wide number of studies focused on the addition of biosynthetic precursors in their production.

  18. Biochemistry of Apple Aroma: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Espino-Díaz, Miguel; Sepúlveda, David Roberto; González-Aguilar, Gustavo

    2016-01-01

    Summary Flavour is a key quality attribute of apples defined by volatile aroma compounds. Biosynthesis of aroma compounds involves metabolic pathways in which the main precursors are fatty and amino acids, and the main products are aldehydes, alcohols and esters. Some enzymes are crucial in the production of volatile compounds, such as lipoxygenase, alcohol dehydrogenase, and alcohol acyltransferase. Composition and concentration of volatiles in apples may be altered by pre- and postharvest factors that cause a decline in apple flavour. Addition of biosynthetic precursors of volatile compounds may be a strategy to promote aroma production in apples. The present manuscript compiles information regarding the biosynthesis of volatile aroma compounds, including metabolic pathways, enzymes and substrates involved, factors that may affect their production and also includes a wide number of studies focused on the addition of biosynthetic precursors in their production. PMID:28115895

  19. Ergonomic evaluation of the Apple Adjustable Keyboard

    SciTech Connect

    Tittiranonda, P.; Burastero, S.; Shih, M.; Rempel, D.

    1994-05-01

    This study presents an evaluation of the Apple Adjustable Keyboard based on subjective preference and observed joint angles during typing. Thirty five keyboard users were asked to use the Apple adjustable keyboard for 7--14 days and rate the various characteristics of the keyboard. Our findings suggest that the most preferred opening angles range from 11--20{degree}. The mean ulnar deviation on the Apple Adjustable keyboard is 11{degree}, compared to 16{degree} on the standard keyboard. The mean extension was decreased from 24{degree} to 16{degree} when using the adjustable keyboard. When asked to subjectively rate the adjustable keyboard in comparison to the standard, the average subject felt that the Apple Adjustable Keyboard was more comfortable and easier to use than the standard flat keyboard.

  20. Production of apple snail for space diet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamashita, Masamichi; Motoki, Shigeru; Space Agriculture Task Force, J.; Katayama, Naomi

    For food production in space at recycling bio-elements under closed environment, appropriate organisms should be chosen to drive the closed materials recycle loop. We propose a combination of green algae, photosynthetic protozoa, and aquatic plants such as Wolffia spp., for the primary producer fixing solar energy to chemical form in biomass, and apple snail, Pomacea bridgesii, which converts this biomass to animal meat. Because of high proliferation rate of green algae or protozoa compared to higher plants, and direct conversion of them to apple snail, the efficiency of food production in this combination is high, in terms of energy usage, space for rearing, and yield of edible biomass. Furthermore, green algae and apple snail can form a closed ecological system with exchanging bio-elements between two member, i.e. excreta of snail turn to fertilizer of algae, and grown algae become feed for snail. Since apple snail stays in water or on wet substrate, control of rearing is easy to make. Mass production technology of apple snail has been well established to utilize it as human food. Nutrients of apple snail are also listed in the standard tables of food composition in Japan. Nutrients for 100 g of apple snail canned in brine are energy 340 kJ, protein 16.5 g, lipid 1.0 g, cholesterol 240 mg, carbohydrate 0.8 g, Ca 400 mg, Fe 3.9 mg, Zn 1.5 mg. It is rich in minerals, especially Ca and Fe. Vitamin contents are quite low, but K 0.005 mg, B2 0.09 mg, B12 0.0006 mg, folate 0.001 mg, and E 0.6 mg. The amino acid score of apple snail could not be found in literature. Overall, apple snail provides rich protein and animal lipid such as cholesterol. It could be a good source of minerals. However, it does not give enough vitamin D and B12 , which are supposed to be supplemented by animal origin foods. In terms of acceptance in food culture, escargot is a gourmet menu in French dishes, and six to ten snail, roughly 50 g, are served for one person. Apple snail reaches to 30 g

  1. Addendum and Erratum: Nature of vibrational excitations in vitreous silica [Phys. Rev. B 56, 8605 (1997)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shcheblanov, Nikita S.; Povarnitsyn, Mikhail E.; Taraskin, Sergei N.; Elliott, Stephen R.

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this paper is to clarify details of the projectional analysis for atomic vibrations in vitreous silica presented in a paper by Taraskin and Elliott [Phys. Rev. B 56, 8605 (1997), 10.1103/PhysRevB.56.8605]. The description of the stretching and bending modes has been discussed in detail while a description of the rotational modes and the procedure of their calculation have not been given in full detail. We specify the method for calculating the rotational modes omitted in the paper. We also correct a misprint in the expression for the B2(E ) mode which, unfortunately, has been reproduced in the vibrational analysis of the E mode in some publications.

  2. Chemistry Teacher Education Coalition: Extending the PhysTEC Model to Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirchhoff, Mary

    2012-02-01

    The American Association of Employment in Education reports that chemistry, like physics, faces ``some shortage'' of educators. Inspired by the success of the Physics Teacher Education Coalition (PhysTEC), the American Chemical Society (ACS) is developing the Chemistry Teacher Education Coalition (CTEC) to actively engage chemistry departments in the preparation of future chemistry teachers. Engaging chemistry departments in teacher preparation would increase the number and diversity of well-prepared high school chemistry teachers while catalyzing cultural change within chemistry departments. Many features of PhysTEC, such as a grant competition to create model teacher preparation programs and regular conferences, are directly applicable to chemistry. This presentation will provide an overview of ACS efforts to launch a successful CTEC initiative.

  3. Improving Science Teacher Preparation through the APS PhysTEC and NSF Noyce Programs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Tasha; Tyler, Micheal; van Duzor, Andrea; Sabella, Mel

    2013-03-01

    Central to the recruitment of students into science teaching at a school like CSU, is a focus on the professional nature of teaching. The purpose of this focus is twofold: it serves to change student perceptions about teaching and it prepares students to become teachers who value continued professional development and value the science education research literature. The Noyce and PhysTEC programs at CSU place the professional nature of teaching front and center by involving students in education research projects, paid internships, attendance at conferences, and participation in a new Teacher Immersion Institute and a Science Education Journal Reading Class. This poster will focus on specific components of our teacher preparation program that were developed through these two programs. In addition we will describe how these new components provide students with diverse experiences in the teaching of science to students in the urban school district. Supported by the NSF Noyce Program (0833251) and the APS PhysTEC Program.

  4. Fabrication and characterization of InAlN/GaN-based double-channel high electron mobility transistors for electronic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, JunShuai; Zhang, JinCheng; Zhang, Kai; Zhao, Yi; Zhang, LinXia; Ma, XiaoHua; Li, XiaoGang; Meng, FanNa; Hao, Yue

    2012-06-01

    In our previous work [J. S. Xue et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 100, 013507 (2012)], superior electron-transport properties are obtained in InAlN/GaN/InAlN/GaN double-channel (DC) heterostructures grown by pulsed metal organic chemical vapor deposition (PMOCVD). In this paper, we present a detailed fabrication and systematic characterization of high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs) fabricated on these heterostructures. The device exhibits distinct DC behavior concerning with both static-output and small-signal performance, demonstrating an improved maximum drain current density of 1059 mA/mm and an enhanced transconductance of 223 mS/mm. Such enhancement of device performance is attributed to the achieved low Ohmic contact resistance as low as 0.33 ± 0.05 Ω.mm. Moreover, very low gate diode reverse leakage current is observed due to the high quality of InAlN barrier layer deposited by PMOCVD. A current gain frequency of 10 GHz and a maximum oscillation frequency 21 GHz are also observed, which are comparable to the state-of-the-art AlGaN/GaN-based DC HEMT found in the literature. The results demonstrate the great potential of PMOCVD for application in InAlN-related device's epitaxy.

  5. Comment on Weakly dissipative dust-ion acoustic wave modulation (J. Plasma Phys. 82, 905820104, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kourakis, I.; Elkamash, I. S.

    2016-10-01

    In a recent article (J. Plasma Phys., vol. 82, 2009, 905820104), weakly dissipative dust-ion acoustic wave modulation in dusty plasmas was considered. It is shown in this Comment that the analysis therein involved severe fallacies, and is in fact based on an erroneous plasma fluid model, which fails to satisfy an equilibrium condition, among other shortcomings. The subsequent analysis therefore is dubious and of limited scientific value.

  6. Comment on ``Multireference configuration-interaction calculations for positronium halides'' [J. Chem. Phys. 122, 054302 (2005)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitroy, J.; Bromley, M. W. J.

    2005-07-01

    Large-scale configuration-interaction calculations of the binding energies and annihilation rates of the positronium halides, PsF, PsCl, PsBr, and PsI [S. L. Saito, J. Chem. Phys. 122 054302 (2005)], have made erroneous predictions about the structures of these atoms. The predictions were based on small annihilation rates, which result from using a small basis and additionally invalid estimates of the contributions from single-particle orbitals with ℓ >8 .

  7. Apple quality, storage, and washing treatments affect patulin levels in apple cider.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Lauren S; Beacham-Bowden, Tina; Keller, Susanne E; Adhikari, Chaitali; Taylor, Kirk T; Chirtel, Stewart J; Merker, Robert I

    2003-04-01

    Patulin is a mycotoxin produced primarily by Penicillium expansum, a mold responsible for rot in apples and other fruits. The growth of this fungus and the production of patulin are common in fruit that has been damaged. However, patulin can be detected in visibly sound fruit. The purpose of this project was to determine how apple quality, storage, and washing treatments affect patulin levels in apple cider. Patulin was not detected in cider pressed from fresh tree-picked apples (seven cultivars) but was found at levels of 40.2 to 374 microg/liter in cider pressed from four cultivars of fresh ground-harvested (dropped) apples. Patulin was not detected in cider pressed from culled tree-picked apples stored for 4 to 6 weeks at 0 to 2 degrees C but was found at levels of 0.97 to 64.0 microg/liter in cider pressed from unculled fruit stored under the same conditions. Cider from controlled-atmosphere-stored apples that were culled before pressing contained 0 to 15.1 microg of patulin per liter, while cider made from unculled fruit contained 59.9 to 120.5 microg of patulin per liter. The washing of ground-harvested apples before pressing reduced patulin levels in cider by 10 to 100%, depending on the initial patulin levels and the type of wash solution used. These results indicate that patulin is a good indicator of the quality of the apples used to manufacture cider. The avoidance of ground-harvested apples and the careful culling of apples before pressing are good methods for reducing patulin levels in cider.

  8. Survey of apple chlorotic leaf spot virus and apple stem grooving virus occurrence in Korea and frequency of mixed infections in apple

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Due to the absence of knowledge of the distribution of Apple stem grooving virus (ASGV) and Apple chlorotic leaf spot virus (ACLSV) in apples in Korea, we carried out a survey for these viruses in Gyeongsang and Chungcheong provinces in 2014. A total of 65 samples were collected and tested by RT-PCR...

  9. Constructing AppleWorks Word Processing Files for the Apple IIe Computer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlenker, Richard M.

    This step-by-step guide to constructing word processing files using the AppleWorks software on the Apple IIe computer covers (1) loading the program; (2) adding files to the desktop; (3) selecting the word processor option; (4) naming the file; (5) setting tabs; (6) selecting print options; and (7) saving the file. Sixteen sample screen displays…

  10. Constructing AppleWorks Data Base Files for the Apple IIe Computer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlenker, Richard M.

    This step-by-step guide to creating database files using the AppleWorks software on the Apple IIe computer covers (1) loading the program; (2) adding files to the desktop; (3) selecting the database option; (4) naming the file; (5) naming categories or fields; (6) inserting data; (7) changing database file formats; (8) altering the file layout;…

  11. Printing AppleWorks V2.0 Spreadsheet Files Using the Apple IIGS Computer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlenker, Richard M.

    This guide was developed as a "how to" training device for printing AppleWorks version 2.0 spreadsheet files using the Apple IIGS computer with two disk drives. Step-by-step instructions are provided for loading spreadsheet files; selecting the print option; printing entire files; and for printing specific rows, columns, or blocks of the…

  12. Printing AppleWorks V2.0 Word Processing Files Using the Apple IIGS Computer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlenker, Richard M.

    This guide was developed as a "how to" training device for printing AppleWorks version 2.0 word processor files using the Apple IIGS computer with two disk drives. Step-by-step instructions are provided for loading the word processor files, selecting the print option, printing files, and obtaining additional help. For each step, a…

  13. HPLC-DAD-MS Profiling of Polyphenols Responsible for the Yellow-Orange Color in Apple Juices of Different French Cider Apple Varieties.

    PubMed

    Le Deun, Erell; Van der Werf, Remmelt; Le Bail, Gildas; Le Quéré, Jean-Michel; Guyot, Sylvain

    2015-09-09

    The pigments responsible for the yellow-orange coloration of apple juices have remained largely unknown up to now. Four French cider apple juices were produced in conditions similar to those used in the cider-making industry. The oxidized juices, characterized using the CIE L a b parameters, displayed various colors depending on the apple variety and native phenolic composition. HPLC-DAD-MS revealed contrasting pigment profiles related to oxidized tanning and nontanning molecules. The latter were divided into two groups according to their polarity and their visible spectra. With regard to phenolic classes, flavanol monomers and hydroxycinnamic acids played an essential role in the formation of oxidation products. Interestingly, dihydrochalcones appeared to include precursors of some yellow compounds. Indeed, the yellow pigment phloretin xyloglucoside oxidation product (PXGOPj), derived from phloretin xyloglucoside, was clearly identified in apple juices as a xyloglucose analogue of the yellow pigment phloridzin oxidation product (POPj), previously characterized in a model solution by Le Guernevé et al. (Tetrahedron Lett. 2004, 45 (35), 6673-6677).

  14. The history of Newton's apple tree

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keesing, R. G.

    1998-05-01

    This article contains a brief introduction to Newton's early life to put into context the subsequent events in this narrative. It is followed by a summary of accounts of Newton's famous story of his discovery of universal gravitation which was occasioned by the fall of an apple in the year 1665/6. Evidence of Newton's friendship with a prosperous Yorkshire family who planted an apple tree arbour in the early years of the eighteenth century to celebrate his discovery is presented. A considerable amount of new and unpublished pictorial and documentary material is included relating to a particular apple tree which grew in the garden of Woolsthorpe Manor (Newton's birthplace) and which blew down in a storm before the year 1816. Evidence is then presented which describes how this tree was chosen to be the focus of Newton's account. Details of the propagation of the apple tree growing in the garden at Woolsthorpe in the early part of the last century are then discussed, and the results of a dendrochronological study of two of these trees is presented. It is then pointed out that there is considerable evidence to show that the apple tree presently growing at Woolsthorpe and known as 'Newton's apple tree' is in fact the same specimen which was identified in the middle of the eighteenth century and which may now be 350 years old. In conclusion early results from a radiocarbon dating study being carried out at the University of Oxford on core samples from the Woolsthorpe tree lend support to the contention that the present tree is one and the same as that identified as Newton's apple tree more than 200 years ago. Very recently genetic fingerprinting techniques have been used in an attempt to identify from which sources the various 'Newton apple trees' planted throughout the world originate. The tentative result of this work suggests that there are two separate varieties of apple tree in existence which have been accepted as 'the tree'. One may conclude that at least some of

  15. Investigations of the structural stability of highly strained [(Al)GaIn]As/Ga (PAs) multiple quantum wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marschner, T.; Lutgen, S.; Volk, M.; Stolz, W.; Göbel, E. O.

    1996-10-01

    The structural stability of highly strained [(Al)GaIn]As/Ga (PAs) strained layer superlattice (SLS) structures as a function of the average lattice mismatch is investigated. The SLS structures, grown by metalorganic vapor-phase epitaxy, are studied by using high-resolution x-ray diffraction. The range of stable SLS structures obtained experimentally is compared to a recent theoretical model assuming strain relaxation by formation of misfit dislocations [D. C. Houghton, M. Davies, and M. Dion, Appl. Phys. Lett. 64, 505 (1994)]. In particular, the influence of the surface migration length of the group-III species on the growth surface is investigated by varying the Al concentration in the compressively strained [(Al)GaIn]As layers. Structurally stable [(Al)GaIn]As/Ga(PAs) SLS structures having a total layer thickness of 1 μm and an average lattice mismatch of up to (Δd/d)⊥=1.2×10-2 have been realized. These values exceed by far the values of the misfit dislocation model. This behavior indicates that surface morphology changes rather than misfit dislocation formation are the primary cause for the instability of highly strained SLSs.

  16. Comment on “Generalized dispersion relation for electron Bernstein waves in a non-Maxwellian magnetized anisotropic plasma” [Phys. Plasmas 17, 102114 (2010)

    SciTech Connect

    Sharifi, M. Parvazian, A.

    2015-02-15

    In a recent paper [Deeba et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 102114 (2010)], a generalized dielectric constant for the electron Bernstein waves using non-Maxwellian distribution functions was derived in a collisionless, uniform magnetized plasma. Using the Neumann series expansion for the products of Bessel functions, Deeba, Ahmad, and Murtaza derived the dispersion relations for both kappa and the generalized (r, q) distributions in a straightforward manner. However, their results are questionable, since the Neumann series expansion for the products of Bessel functions is valid for small argument, while for perpendicular propagation, it is necessary to evaluate special integrands for small as well as large arguments.

  17. Comment on “The two dimensional motion of a particle in an inverse square potential: Classical and quantum aspects” [J. Math. Phys. 54, 053509 (2013)

    SciTech Connect

    Bietenholz, Wolfgang Chryssomalakos, Chryssomalis Salgado, Marcelo

    2015-10-15

    We comment on a fatal flaw in the analysis contained in the work of Martínez-y-Romero et al., [J. Math. Phys. 54, 053509 (2013)], which concerns the motion of a point particle in an inverse square potential, and show that most conclusions reached there are wrong. In particular, the manifestly senseless claim that, in the attractive potential case, no bounded orbits exist for negative energies, is traced to a sign error. Several more mistakes, both in the classical and the quantum cases, are pointed out.

  18. Comment on ``The two dimensional motion of a particle in an inverse square potential: Classical and quantum aspects'' [J. Math. Phys. 54, 053509 (2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bietenholz, Wolfgang; Chryssomalakos, Chryssomalis; Salgado, Marcelo

    2015-10-01

    We comment on a fatal flaw in the analysis contained in the work of Martínez-y-Romero et al., [J. Math. Phys. 54, 053509 (2013)], which concerns the motion of a point particle in an inverse square potential, and show that most conclusions reached there are wrong. In particular, the manifestly senseless claim that, in the attractive potential case, no bounded orbits exist for negative energies, is traced to a sign error. Several more mistakes, both in the classical and the quantum cases, are pointed out.

  19. Comment on ``Molecular dynamics simulation study of nonconcatenated ring polymers in a melt. I. Statics'' [J. Chem. Phys. 134, 204904 (2011)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wittmer, J. P.; Meyer, H.; Johner, A.; Obukhov, S.; Baschnagel, J.

    2013-12-01

    Recent computational studies on melts of nonconcatenated rings suggest compact configurations of fractal dimension df = 3. This begs the question of whether the irregular surfaces of these compact rings may be characterized by a fractal surface dimension ds < 3. We revisit the scaling analysis of the form factor by Halverson et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 134, 204904 (2011)] implying ds ≈ 2.8. Our analysis suggests that this conclusion might be due to the application of the Generalized Porod Law at large wavevectors where length scales other than the total chain size do matter. We present an alternative "decorated Gaussian loop" model which does not require ds < 3.

  20. A Comprehensive Review of Apples and Apple Components and Their Relationship to Human Health12

    PubMed Central

    Hyson, Dianne A.

    2011-01-01

    There has been an increasing appreciation and understanding of the link between dietary fruit and vegetable intake and improved health in humans. The widespread and growing intake of apples and apple juice/products and their rich phytochemical profile suggest their important potential to affect the health of the populations consuming them. This review summarizes current clinical, in vitro, and in vivo data and builds upon earlier published reports that apple may reduce the risk of chronic disease by various mechanisms, including antioxidant, antiproliferative, and cell signaling effects. Exposure to apples and apple products has been associated with beneficial effects on risk, markers, and etiology of cancer, cardiovascular disease, asthma, and Alzheimer’s disease. Recent work suggests that these products may also be associated with improved outcomes related to cognitive decline of normal aging, diabetes, weight management, bone health, pulmonary function, and gastrointestinal protection. PMID:22332082

  1. Cisgenic apple trees; development, characterization, and performance

    PubMed Central

    Krens, Frans A.; Schaart, Jan G.; van der Burgh, Aranka M.; Tinnenbroek-Capel, Iris E. M.; Groenwold, Remmelt; Kodde, Linda P.; Broggini, Giovanni A. L.; Gessler, Cesare; Schouten, Henk J.

    2015-01-01

    Two methods were developed for the generation of cisgenic apples. Both have been successfully applied producing trees. The first method avoids the use of any foreign selectable marker genes; only the gene-of-interest is integrated between the T-DNA border sequences. The second method makes use of recombinase-based marker excision. For the first method we used the MdMYB10 gene from a red-fleshed apple coding for a transcription factor involved in regulating anthocyanin biosynthesis. Red plantlets were obtained and presence of the cisgene was confirmed. Plantlets were grafted and grown in a greenhouse. After 3 years, the first flowers appeared, showing red petals. Pollination led to production of red-fleshed cisgenic apples. The second method used the pM(arker)F(ree) vector system, introducing the scab resistance gene Rvi6, derived from apple. Agrobacterium-mediated transformation, followed by selection on kanamycin, produced genetically modified apple lines. Next, leaves from in vitro material were treated to activate the recombinase leading to excision of selection genes. Subsequently, the leaf explants were subjected to negative selection for marker-free plantlets by inducing regeneration on medium containing 5-fluorocytosine. After verification of the marker-free nature, the obtained plants were grafted onto rootstocks. Young trees from four cisgenic lines and one intragenic line, all containing Rvi6, were planted in an orchard. Appropriate controls were incorporated in this trial. We scored scab incidence for three consecutive years on leaves after inoculations with Rvi6-avirulent strains. One cisgenic line and the intragenic line performed as well as the resistant control. In 2014 trees started to overcome their juvenile character and formed flowers and fruits. The first results of scoring scab symptoms on apple fruits were obtained. Apple fruits from susceptible controls showed scab symptoms, while fruits from cisgenic and intragenic lines were free of scab

  2. 40 CFR 407.20 - Applicability; description of the apple products subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2011-07-01 2009-07-01 true Applicability; description of the apple... SOURCE CATEGORY Apple Products Subcategory § 407.20 Applicability; description of the apple products... apples into apple products. The processing of apples into caustic peeled or dehydrated products...

  3. 40 CFR 407.20 - Applicability; description of the apple products subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2014-07-01 2012-07-01 true Applicability; description of the apple... SOURCE CATEGORY Apple Products Subcategory § 407.20 Applicability; description of the apple products... apples into apple products. The processing of apples into caustic peeled or dehydrated products...

  4. 40 CFR 407.10 - Applicability; description of the apple juice subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2011-07-01 2009-07-01 true Applicability; description of the apple... SOURCE CATEGORY Apple Juice Subcategory § 407.10 Applicability; description of the apple juice... apples into apple juice or apple cider. When a plant is subject to effluent limitations covering...

  5. 40 CFR 407.20 - Applicability; description of the apple products subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Applicability; description of the apple... SOURCE CATEGORY Apple Products Subcategory § 407.20 Applicability; description of the apple products... apples into apple products. The processing of apples into caustic peeled or dehydrated products...

  6. 40 CFR 407.20 - Applicability; description of the apple products subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true Applicability; description of the apple... SOURCE CATEGORY Apple Products Subcategory § 407.20 Applicability; description of the apple products... apples into apple products. The processing of apples into caustic peeled or dehydrated products...

  7. 40 CFR 407.10 - Applicability; description of the apple juice subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2014-07-01 2012-07-01 true Applicability; description of the apple... SOURCE CATEGORY Apple Juice Subcategory § 407.10 Applicability; description of the apple juice... apples into apple juice or apple cider. When a plant is subject to effluent limitations covering...

  8. 40 CFR 407.10 - Applicability; description of the apple juice subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Applicability; description of the apple... SOURCE CATEGORY Apple Juice Subcategory § 407.10 Applicability; description of the apple juice... apples into apple juice or apple cider. When a plant is subject to effluent limitations covering...

  9. 40 CFR 407.20 - Applicability; description of the apple products subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... apple products subcategory. 407.20 Section 407.20 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... PROCESSING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Apple Products Subcategory § 407.20 Applicability; description of the apple... processing of apples into apple products. The processing of apples into caustic peeled or dehydrated...

  10. 40 CFR 407.10 - Applicability; description of the apple juice subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... apple juice subcategory. 407.10 Section 407.10 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... SOURCE CATEGORY Apple Juice Subcategory § 407.10 Applicability; description of the apple juice... apples into apple juice or apple cider. When a plant is subject to effluent limitations covering...

  11. 40 CFR 407.10 - Applicability; description of the apple juice subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true Applicability; description of the apple... SOURCE CATEGORY Apple Juice Subcategory § 407.10 Applicability; description of the apple juice... apples into apple juice or apple cider. When a plant is subject to effluent limitations covering...

  12. Using the PhysX engine for Physics-based Virtual Surgery with Force Feedback

    PubMed Central

    Maciel, Anderson; Halic, Tansel; Lu, Zhonghua; Nedel, Luciana P.; De, Suvranu

    2010-01-01

    Background The development of modern surgical simulators is highly challenging as they must support complex simulation environments. The demand for higher realism in such simulators has driven researchers to adopt physics-based models which are computationally very demanding. This poses a major problem since real time interactions must permit graphical updates of 30 Hz and a much higher rate of 1 kHz for force feedback (haptics). Recently several physics engines have been developed which offer multi-physics simulation capabilities including rigid and deformable bodies, cloth and fluids. While such physics engines provide unique opportunities for the development of surgical simulators, their higher latencies, compared to what is necessary for real time graphics and haptics, offer significant barriers to their use in interactive simulation environments. Methods In this work, we propose solutions to this problem and demonstrate how a multimodal surgical simulation environment may be developed based on NVIDIA’s PhysX physics library. Hence, models that are undergoing relatively low frequency updates in PhysX can exist in an environment that demands much higher frequency updates for haptics. We use a collision handling layer to interface between the physical response provided by PhysX and the haptic rendering device to provide both real time tissue response and force feedback. Results Our simulator integrates a bimanual haptic interface for force-feedback and per-pixel shaders for graphics realism in real time. To demonstrate the effectiveness of our approach, we present the simulation of the Laparoscopic Adjustable Gastric Banding (LAGB) procedure as a case study. Conclusions To develop complex and realistic surgical trainers with realistic organ geometries and tissue properties demands stable physics-based deformation methods which are not always compatible with the interaction level required for such trainers. We have shown that combining different modeling

  13. Comment on 'General nonlocality in quantum fields'[J. Math. Phys. 49, 033513 (2008)

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Haijun

    2010-05-15

    In a recent paper [H.-J. Wang, J. Math. Phys. 49, 033513 (2008)] a complex-geometry model was proposed to interpret the interaction of electromagnetism and the interaction between quarks while the nonlocal effects are involved. In that theoretical frame, from the metric matrix one can obtain a determinant-form condition to describe qualitatively the typical characteristics for the aforementioned interactions. In this comment we attempt to extend this kind of qualitative description to weak interaction by finding out an appropriate metric tensor for it.

  14. Comment on ``Quasirelativistic theory equivalent to fully relativistic theory'' [J. Chem. Phys. 123, 241102 (2005)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filatov, Michael

    2006-09-01

    The connection between the exact quasirelativistic approach developed in the title reference [W. Kutzelnigg and W. Liu, J. Chem. Phys. 123, 241102 (2005)] and the method of elimination of the small component in matrix form developed previously by Dyall is explicitly worked out. An equation that links Hermitian and non-Hermitian formulations of the exact quasirelativistic theory is derived. Besides establishing a kinship between the existing formulations, the proposed equation can be employed for the derivation of new formulations of the exact quasirelativistic theory.

  15. Comment on 'Thermodynamic cycles and the calculation of p Ka' [Chem. Phys. Lett. 367 (2003) 145

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Silva, Clarissa O.; da Silva, Edilson C.; Nascimento, Marco A. C.

    2003-11-01

    In a recent Letter, Pliego [Chem. Phys. Lett. 367 (2003) 145] has raised some questions about the methodology that we have employed for calculating p Ka values in aqueous solutions. In this comment we show that the problem with Pliego's analysis is the fact that he used Ben-Naim's definition of Δ Gsol for both the solute and the solvent, which implies that the concentration, for both components, should be equal to 1 M. For the solute, this is a reference state fully compatible with the quantum description, but for the solvent this choice is unphysical, as discussed in the Letter.

  16. Biotechnology and apple breeding in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Igarashi, Megumi; Hatsuyama, Yoshimichi; Harada, Takeo; Fukasawa-Akada, Tomoko

    2016-01-01

    Apple is a fruit crop of significant economic importance, and breeders world wide continue to develop novel cultivars with improved characteristics. The lengthy juvenile period and the large field space required to grow apple populations have imposed major limitations on breeding. Various molecular biological techniques have been employed to make apple breeding easier. Transgenic technology has facilitated the development of apples with resistance to fungal or bacterial diseases, improved fruit quality, or root stocks with better rooting or dwarfing ability. DNA markers for disease resistance (scab, powdery mildew, fire-blight, Alternaria blotch) and fruit skin color have also been developed, and marker-assisted selection (MAS) has been employed in breeding programs. In the last decade, genomic sequences and chromosome maps of various cultivars have become available, allowing the development of large SNP arrays, enabling efficient QTL mapping and genomic selection (GS). In recent years, new technologies for genetic improvement, such as trans-grafting, virus vectors, and genome-editing, have emerged. Using these techniques, no foreign genes are present in the final product, and some of them show considerable promise for application to apple breeding. PMID:27069388

  17. Goldstone-Apple Valley Radio Telescope System Theory of Operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephan, George R.

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this learning module is to enable learners to describe how the Goldstone-Apple Valley Radio Telescope (GAVRT) system functions in support of Apple Valley Science and Technology Center's (AVSTC) client schools' radio astronomy activities.

  18. Prediction and diagnosis of apple fruit physiological disorders

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Apple postharvest physiological disorders, characterized by peel or flesh necrosis, result in significant yearly financial losses in commercial operations. Stakeholders have identified the need for effective, consistent control measures for apple postharvest physiological disorders and the developme...

  19. Using the Apple II as a Laboratory Instrument.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Jong, Marvin L.; Layman, John W.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses using Apple II microcomputers for measuring resistance, temperature, and light intensity. Also discusses digital input and output and timing techniques. Although focusing on Apple II, the circuits and programs described may be applicable to other microcomputers. (JN)

  20. Production of fuels and chemicals from apple pomace

    SciTech Connect

    Hang, Y.D.

    1987-03-01

    Nearly 36 million tons of apples are produced annually in the US. Approximately 45% of the total US apple production is used for processing purposes. The primary by-product of apple processing is apple pomace. It consists of the presscake resulting from pressing apples for juice or cider, including the presscake obtained in pressing peel and core wastes generated in the manufacture of apple sauce or slices. More than 500 food processing plants in the US produce a total of about 1.3 million metric tons of apple pomace each year, and it is likely that annual disposal fees exceed $10 million. Apple pomace has the potential to be used for the production of fuels (ethanol and biogas containing 60% methane) and food-grade chemicals. These uses will be reviewed in this article.

  1. Hybrid density functional theory studies of AlN and GaN under uniaxial strain.

    PubMed

    Qin, Lixia; Duan, Yifeng; Shi, Hongliang; Shi, Liwei; Tang, Gang

    2013-01-30

    The structural stability, spontaneous polarization, piezoelectric response, and electronic structure of AlN and GaN under uniaxial strain along the [0001] direction are systematically investigated using HSE06 range-separated hybrid functionals. Our results exhibit interesting behavior. (i) AlN and GaN share the same structural transition from wurtzite to a graphite-like phase at very large compressive strains, similarly to other wurtzite semiconductors. Our calculations further reveal that this well-known phase transition is driven by the transverse-acoustic soft phonon mode associated with elastic instabilities. (ii) The applied tensile strain can either drastically suppress or strongly enhance the polarization and piezoelectricity, based on the value of the strain. Furthermore, large enhancements of polarization and piezoelectricity close to the phase-transition regions at large compressive strains are predicted, similar to those previously predicted in ferroelectric fields. Our calculations indicate that such colossal enhancements are strongly correlated to phase transitions when large atomic displacements are generated by external strains. (iii) Under the same strain, AlN and GaN have significantly different electronic properties: both wurtzite and graphite-like AlN always display direct band structures, while the the bandgap of wurtzite GaN is always direct and that of graphite-like GaN always indirect. Furthermore, the bandgap of graphite-like AlN is greatly enhanced by large compressive strain, but that of wurtzite GaN is not sensitive to compressive strain. Our results are drastically different from those for equibiaxial strain (Duan et al 2012 Appl. Phys. Lett. 100 022104).

  2. Hybrid density functional theory studies of AlN and GaN under uniaxial strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Lixia; Duan, Yifeng; Shi, Hongliang; Shi, Liwei; Tang, Gang

    2013-01-01

    The structural stability, spontaneous polarization, piezoelectric response, and electronic structure of AlN and GaN under uniaxial strain along the [0001] direction are systematically investigated using HSE06 range-separated hybrid functionals. Our results exhibit interesting behavior. (i) AlN and GaN share the same structural transition from wurtzite to a graphite-like phase at very large compressive strains, similarly to other wurtzite semiconductors. Our calculations further reveal that this well-known phase transition is driven by the transverse-acoustic soft phonon mode associated with elastic instabilities. (ii) The applied tensile strain can either drastically suppress or strongly enhance the polarization and piezoelectricity, based on the value of the strain. Furthermore, large enhancements of polarization and piezoelectricity close to the phase-transition regions at large compressive strains are predicted, similar to those previously predicted in ferroelectric fields. Our calculations indicate that such colossal enhancements are strongly correlated to phase transitions when large atomic displacements are generated by external strains. (iii) Under the same strain, AlN and GaN have significantly different electronic properties: both wurtzite and graphite-like AlN always display direct band structures, while the the bandgap of wurtzite GaN is always direct and that of graphite-like GaN always indirect. Furthermore, the bandgap of graphite-like AlN is greatly enhanced by large compressive strain, but that of wurtzite GaN is not sensitive to compressive strain. Our results are drastically different from those for equibiaxial strain (Duan et al 2012 Appl. Phys. Lett. 100 022104).

  3. Enhanced recovery of Salmonella from apple cider and apple juice with universal preenrichment broth.

    PubMed

    Hammack, Thomas S; Johnson, Mildred L; Jacobson, Andrew P; Andrews, Wallace H

    2002-01-01

    A comparison was made of the relative efficiencies of Universal Preenrichment (UP) broth and lactose broth for the recovery of a variety of Salmonella serovars from pasteurized and unpasteurized apple cider and pasteurized apple juice. Bulk portions of juice were contaminated with single Salmonella serovars at high and low levels of 0.4 and 0.04 CFU/mL, respectively. The juice was aged for a minimum of 5 days at 2-5 degrees C. On the day analysis was initiated, each of 20 test portions (25 mL) of the contaminated juice was preenriched in UP broth and in lactose broth. The Bacteriological Analytical Manual Salmonella culture method was followed thereafter. For pasteurized apple cider, UP broth recovered significantly (p < 0.05) more Salmonella-positive test portions than did lactose broth (112 and 75, respectively). For unpasteurized apple cider, UP broth recovered significantly more Salmonella-positive test portions than did lactose broth (326 and 221, respectively). For pasteurized apple juice, UP broth recovered more Salmonella-positive test portions than did lactose broth (93 and 81, respectively). However, this difference was not statistically significant. These results indicate that UP broth should replace lactose broth for the analysis of pasteurized and unpasteurized apple cider and pasteurized apple juice.

  4. Phase Breaking in InAs/AlGaSb Open Quantum Dot Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maemoto, T.; Kitamura, Y.; Ueda, K.; Sasa, S.; Inoue, M.; Ishibashi, K.; Aoyagi, Y.

    2002-03-01

    We report on phase breaking times in InAs/AlGaAs open quantum dot structures in ballistic transport regimes. These results are compared with the results of InAs quantum wires and lateral surface superlattices [1]. The open dot structures with sub-micron scale have been fabricated by electron beam lithography and split-gate technique. Fluctuations of magnetoresistance have been observed at 4.2 K from low magnetic fields below 1 T, which were not seen in the conventional devices. The large-period fluctuations can be analyzed from the semi-classical scattering trajectory depending on the geometrical feature of the devices. In addition to these large-period conductance fluctuations, the short-period fluctuations have been also observed even at 4.2K. These fluctuations may result from the complex modes of the interference electron waves possibly characterized by highly characteristic wave function scarring [2]. From the analyses of correlation functions of these magneto-oscillations [3], the phase breaking times of the present InAs/AlGaSb open quantum dot structures were estimated to be 20-50 ps. [1] T. Maemoto, M. Ichiu, A. Ohya, S. Sasa, M. Inoue, K. Ishibashi, Y. Aoyagi, Physica B 272, 110 (1999). [2] R. Akis, D. K. Ferry, and J. P. Bird, Phys. Rev. Lett. 79, 123 (1997). [3] K. Ishibashi, J. P. Bird, D. K. Ferry, M. Lakrimi, A. D. Grassie, K. M. Hutchings, Y. Ochiai, T. Sugano and Y. Aoyagi, Jpn. J. Appl. Phys. 34, 6966 (1995).

  5. 7 CFR 33.12 - Apples not subject to regulation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Apples not subject to regulation. 33.12 Section 33.12... REGULATIONS REGULATIONS ISSUED UNDER AUTHORITY OF THE EXPORT APPLE ACT Exemptions § 33.12 Apples not subject... this part, transport or receive for transportation to any foreign destination: (a) A quantity of...

  6. 7 CFR 33.12 - Apples not subject to regulation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Apples not subject to regulation. 33.12 Section 33.12... REGULATIONS REGULATIONS ISSUED UNDER AUTHORITY OF THE EXPORT APPLE ACT Exemptions § 33.12 Apples not subject... this part, transport or receive for transportation to any foreign destination: (a) A quantity of...

  7. 7 CFR 33.12 - Apples not subject to regulation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Apples not subject to regulation. 33.12 Section 33.12... REGULATIONS REGULATIONS ISSUED UNDER AUTHORITY OF THE EXPORT APPLE ACT Exemptions § 33.12 Apples not subject... this part, transport or receive for transportation to any foreign destination: (a) A quantity of...

  8. 7 CFR 33.12 - Apples not subject to regulation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Apples not subject to regulation. 33.12 Section 33.12... REGULATIONS REGULATIONS ISSUED UNDER AUTHORITY OF THE EXPORT APPLE ACT Exemptions § 33.12 Apples not subject... this part, transport or receive for transportation to any foreign destination: (a) A quantity of...

  9. 7 CFR 33.12 - Apples not subject to regulation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Apples not subject to regulation. 33.12 Section 33.12... REGULATIONS REGULATIONS ISSUED UNDER AUTHORITY OF THE EXPORT APPLE ACT Exemptions § 33.12 Apples not subject... this part, transport or receive for transportation to any foreign destination: (a) A quantity of...

  10. Transcriptomic analysis of apple fruit ripening and texture attributes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Molecular events regulating cultivar-specific apple fruit ripening and sensory quality are largely unknown. Such knowledge is essential for genomic-assisted apple breeding and postharvest quality management. The ripening behavior and texture attributes of two apple cultivars, ‘Pink Lady’ and ‘Honey...

  11. Identification of external inoculum sources of apple replant pathogens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Apple replant disease (ARD) is an important disease world-wide and occurs when old apple orchards are replanted with apple. The disease is mainly caused by biological agents, since fumigation alleviates symptom development. The main ARD causative agents are fungi (Rhizoctonia solani AG-5 and AG-6, a...

  12. Cold Acclimation Improves Regrowth of Cryopreserved Apple Shoot Tips

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cryopreservation is important for preserving the genetic resources of apple germplasm in Kazakhstan, the center of origin for apples. In this study of five apple genotypes [Malus domestica Borkh. and Malus sieversii (Ledeb.) M. Roem] we determined cold hardiness and the effect of cold acclimation o...

  13. Alar and Apples: Newspaper Coverage of a Major Risk Issue.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friedman, Sharon M.; And Others

    A study reviewed coverage in 13 newspapers during 1989 of the issue of spraying the pesticide Alar on apples. Using VU/TEXT, a newspaper database, 297 articles in 13 newspapers that included the specified code words "Alar" with or without "apple" or "apples" were retrieved and analyzed using a 33-question coding…

  14. Comment on ‘To stack or not to stack: Performance of a new density functional for the uracil and thymine dimers’ [Chem. Phys. Lett. 459 (2008) 164

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Mourik, Tanja

    2009-04-01

    A Letter by Gu et al. [J. Gu, J. Wang, J. Leszczynski, Y. Xie, H.F. Schaefer III, Chem. Phys. Lett. 459 (2008) 164] presented MP2/6-31+G(d) and MP2/TZVPP stacking energies for the uracil and thymine dimers, with the aim to assess the performance of the new M06-2X density functional. However, the stacking energies were not corrected for the basis set superposition error (BSSE). Here we show that correction for this error dramatically changes the results. BSSE correction severely reduces the stacking energy of the thymine dimer, whereas the stacked uracil dimer structure considered by Gu et al. is not even a minimum on the MP2/6-31+G(d) potential energy surface.

  15. Growth and characterization of (In,Ga,Mn)As and (In,Al,Mn)As epilayers and heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maksimov, O.; Sheu, B. L.; Schiffer, P.; Samarth, N.

    2004-03-01

    Lattice-matched III-Mn-V semiconductors on InP (001) substrates provide an attractive route toward the design of more magnetically concentrated ferromagnetic semiconductor alloys [1]. Here, we report the low temperature molecular beam epitaxy of (In_0.5Ga_0.5)_1-xMn_xAs and (In_0.5Al_0.5)_1-xMn_xAs epilayers, heterostructures and superlattices. Electron and x-ray diffraction studies show that the samples have structural quality similar to that of the more extensively studied (In,Mn)As and (Ga,Mn)As ferromagnetic semiconductors. Electron probe microanalysis measurements indicate that up to ˜ 11 % of Mn can be incorporated in the alloys. Magnetization measurements with a superconducting quantum interference device show that (In_0.5Ga_0.5)_0.89Mn_0.11As and (In_0.5Al_0.5)_0.89Mn_0.11As epilayers have a Curie temperature (T_C) ranging up to 95 K and 25 K, respectively. The consistently lower values of TC in (In_0.5Al_0.5)_1-xMn_xAs compared to (In_0.5Ga_0.5)_1-xMn_xAs are attributed to a reduced hole density caused by an enhanced acceptor activation energy. Work supported by grants from DARPA, ONR and NSF. 1. S. Ohya, H. Kobayashi, M. Tanaka, Appl. Phys. Lett. 83, 2175 (2003).

  16. Dynamical spin injection into a two-dimensional electron gas in an AlGaAs/GaAs structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohtomo, Kenro; Ando, Yuichiro; Shinjo, Teruya; Uemura, Tetsuya; Shiraishi, Masashi

    A two-dimensional electron system in a GaAs-based heterostructure is the attractive platform for spintronics since it has high mobility and spin-orbit interaction can be modulated by the gate voltage1. Thus, it is a possible platform to realize electric gate-controlled spin transistor2. However, room-temperature spin transport through GaAs-based heterostructure has yet to be shown. We report first spin transport through the quantum well at GaAs/AlGaAs interface at room temperature. We used spin pumping under ferromagnetic resonance to inject spins from the Ni80Fe20 to the GaAs/AlGaAs quantum well. Generated spin current propagated through the 1 μm channel and was detected using spin-charge conversion inverse spin Hall effect in the Pt electrode. In agreement with spin pumping theory, polarity of the spin transport signal was reversed together with magnetization of the Ni80Fe20. This first demonstration of spin transport through a quantum well at a semiconductor heterostructure interface at room temperature opens a way to realize Datta-Das spin-based transistor.1 J. Nitta, et al., PRL 78, 1335 (1997). 2 S. Datta and B. Das, Appl. Phys. Lett. 56, 665 (1990).

  17. Exercising AppleWorks V2.0 Data Base Print Options with the Apple IIgs Computer. First Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlenker, Richard M.

    This is a step-by-step guide to using the AppleWorks software on the Apple IIGS computer to print AppleWorks database files in two types of formats--labels and tables. Steps covered for printing labels include naming the report, arranging or sorting, deleting a category, inserting a category, printing the category name and entry, selecting…

  18. Developing Simple Financial Records Using the AppleWorks Spreadsheet Subprogram, Apple IIe or GS Computers, and a Duodisk Drive.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlenker, Richard M.

    This manual is a "how to" training device for developing simple financial records using the AppleWorks spreadsheet subprogram with an Apple IIe or Apple IIGS Computer which has a Duodisk or two disk drives. The manual provides step-by-step directions, and includes 34 figures depicting the computer screen at the various stages of the…

  19. Setting Up Letters Using the AppleWorks Word Processor Subprogram and Apple IIe or GS Computers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlenker, Richard M.

    This manual is a "how to" training device for setting up letter word processing files using the AppleWorks program with an Apple IIe or Apple IIGS computer which has a Duodisk or two disk drives and an 80-column card. The manual provides step-by-step directions, and includes 16 figures depicting the computer screen at the various stages…

  20. Developing Inventory Records Using the AppleWorks Data Base Subprogram and Apple IIe or GS Computers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlenker, Richard M.

    This manual is a "how to" training device for developing inventory records in the AppleWorks program using an Apple IIe or Apple IIGS Computer with Duodisk or two disk drives and an 80-column card. The manual provides step-by-step directions, and includes 17 figures depicting the computer screen at the various stages of the inventory…

  1. Developing Simple Budgets Using the AppleWorks Spreadsheet Subprogram, Apple IIe or GS Computers, and a Single Disk Drive.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlenker, Richard M.

    This manual is a "how to" training device for developing spreadsheet files in the AppleWorks program using an Apple IIe or Apple IIGS Computer with a single disk drive. The manual provides step-by-step directions, and includes 36 figures depicting the computer screen at the various stages of the spreadsheet development sequence. (EW)

  2. Building Parts Inventory Files Using the AppleWorks Data Base Subprogram and Apple IIe or GS Computers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlenker, Richard M.

    This manual is a "how to" training device for building database files using the AppleWorks program with an Apple IIe or Apple IIGS Computer with Duodisk or two disk drives and an 80-column card. The manual provides step-by-step directions, and includes 25 figures depicting the computer screen at the various stages of the database file…

  3. Free galactose concentrations in fresh and stored apples (Malus domestica) and processed apple products.

    PubMed

    Scaman, Christine H; Jim, Vickie Jin Wai; Hartnett, Carol

    2004-02-11

    Gas chromatography was used to quantitate free galactose in Braeburn, Fuji, Red Delicious, and Spartan apples during cold storage, after thermal processing of apple slices and in juice produced using clarification and/or liquifaction enzymes. Spartan had significantly higher galactose levels as compared to Red Delicious apples, but changes in galactose in all varieties during 9 months of cold storage were insignificant. Blanching and canning decreased galactose levels, but doubling the thermal processing during canning increased the free galactose concentration detected in plant tissue. An enzymatic liquefaction aid used to prepare apple juice dramatically increased the free galactose content while a clarification aid caused only a slight increase due to its selective action on soluble pectin. These findings provide useful information for dietitians to base diet recommendations for galactosemic patients.

  4. Comment on "Diffusion by a random velocity field" [Phys. Fluids 13, 22 (1970)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saad, Tony; Sutherland, James C.

    2016-11-01

    This comment aims at addressing a mass conservation issue in a paper published in the physics of fluids. The paper [R. H. Kraichnan, "Diffusion by a random velocity field," Phys. Fluids 13(1), 22 (1970)] introduces a novel method to generate synthetic isotropic turbulence for computational purposes. The method has been used in the literature to generate inlet boundary conditions and to model aeroacoustic noise as well as for validation and verification purposes. However, the technique uses a continuous formulation to derive the mass conservation constraint. In this comment, we argue that the continuous constraint is invalid on a discrete grid and provide an alternative derivation using the discrete divergence. In addition, we present an analysis to quantify the impact of a pressure projection on the kinetic energy of a non-solenoidal velocity field.

  5. Comment on ``Global thermodynamics of hydrophobic cavitation, dewetting, and hydration'' [J. Chem. Phys. 123, 184504 (2005)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graziano, Giuseppe

    2006-07-01

    It is pointed out that in a Ben-Amotz in a recent article [J. Chem. Phys.123, 184504 (2005)] attributed a noncorrect meaning to the entropy convergence temperature, claiming that the latter corresponds to the temperature at which the hydration entropy of a series of solutes crosses zero. A short resumé of the entropy convergence phenomenon and of the provided statistical mechanical analyses is accomplished. In addition, it is brought out that the different temperature dependence of the cavity entropy change on increasing the cavity diameter, pointed out by Ben-Amotz, originates from the assumption that the work of cavity creation should be proportional to the experimental surface tension of liquid water for cavities large on a molecular scale.

  6. Bioanalytical characterization of apple juice from 88 grafted and nongrafted apple varieties grown in Upper Austria.

    PubMed

    Lanzerstorfer, Peter; Wruss, Jürgen; Huemer, Stefan; Steininger, Andrea; Müller, Ulrike; Himmelsbach, Markus; Borgmann, Daniela; Winkler, Stephan; Höglinger, Otmar; Weghuber, Julian

    2014-02-05

    The compositional characteristics of untreated pure juice prepared from 88 apple varieties grown in the region of Eferding/Upper Austria were determined. Many of the analyzed varieties are noncommercial, old varieties not present in the market. The aim of the study was to quantitate the mineral, phosphate, trace elements, and polyphenolic content in order to identify varieties that are of particular interest for a wider distribution. Great variations among the investigated varieties could be found. This holds especially true for the total polyphenolic content (TPC) ranging from 103.2 to 2,275.6 mg/L. A clear dependence of the antioxidant capacity on the TPC levels was detected. Bioinformatics was employed to find specific interrelationships, such as Mg²⁺/Mn²⁺ and PO₄³⁻/K⁺, between the analyzed bio- and phytochemical parameters. Furthermore, special attention was drawn on putative effects of grafting on the phytochemical composition of apple varieties. By grafting 27 different apple varieties on two trees grown close to each other, it could be shown that the apple fruits remain their characteristic phytochemical composition. Finally, apple juice prepared from selected varieties was further characterized by additional biochemical analysis including cytotoxicity, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibition, and α-amylase activity tests. Cytotoxicity and inhibition of EGFR activation were found to be dependent on the TPC, while α-amylase activity was reduced by the apple juices independent of the presence of polyphenolic substances. Taken together selected apple varieties investigated within this study might serve as preferable sources for the development of apple-based food with a strong focus on health beneficial effects.

  7. Pre- and postharvest fungal apple diseases

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The domesticated apple (Malus domestica) is the most significant pome fruit grown and consumed worldwide. China is the largest producer followed by the United States on a global scale. However, fungal plant pathogens cause significant economic losses in the field and in storage which negatively impa...

  8. Hormonal and anatomical effects of apple rootstocks

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In greenhouse experiments, two-year-old 'Fuji' apple scions (Malus ×domestica, 'Fuji') on size-controlling rootstocks (dwarfing to vigorous), were grown for one season and shoot growth was measured to confirm size-controlling effects. In the next season, xylem sap was collected to determine hydraul...

  9. Small bowel obstruction caused by dried apple

    PubMed Central

    Ooi, Sally; Hong, Khiem

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Small bowel obstruction in a virgin abdomen is an uncommon surgical condition. While malignancy, inflammatory bowel disease and foreign body are the main reported causes, undigested food bezoar causing bowel obstruction is a rare entity. We report a case of small bowel obstruction secondary to dried preserved apple having re-expanded within the gastrointestinal tract. Presentation of case A 69 year old male presented with severe abdominal distension, generalized abdominal tenderness and obstipation for 1 week. Small bowel obstruction (SBO) was confirmed on plain abdominal X-ray and CT imaging. An emergency explorative laparatomy identified a sausage-shaped intra-luminal foreign body obstructing the distal ileum. An enterotomy was performed which revealed a rehydrated, donut-shaped piece of dried apple. Discussion Swallowed items that pass through the pylorus rarely cause obstruction as they are usually small enough to pass through the rest of the bowel without difficulty. We postulate that in our patient that the dried apple was originally small enough to pass through the pylorus. However during small bowel, its’ highly absorbable nature resulted in an increase in size that prevented its’ passage through the ileocecal valve. A simple in-vitro experiment discovered that dried apple has a potential to reabsorb fluid and expand up to 35% of its initial size within 72 h. Conclusion This report illustrates the potential for dried food substances to cause intra-luminal SBO after significant expansion with rehydration. PMID:25841159

  10. NEWTON'S APPLE 14th Season Teacher's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wichmann, Sue, Ed.

    This guide was developed to help teachers use the 14th season of NEWTON'S APPLE in their classrooms and contains lessons formatted to follow the National Science Education Standards. The "Overview,""Main Activity," and "Try-This" sections were created with inquiry-based learning in mind. Each lesson page begins with…

  11. APPLE In-Service Programming for Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burns, Edward

    This book is designed to provide teachers with techniques for entering and modifying BASIC programs on Apple computers. The underlying theme is that a teacher need not become a programmer to benefit from being able to use and modify BASIC programs. The key to the successful use of software in the classroom is the ability to individualize software…

  12. Lessons learned from the Apple stores.

    PubMed

    Pinkney, Henry; Baum, Neil

    2012-01-01

    Medical practices have an opportunity to improve the services that they offer their patients. Practices can look at other businesses and industries for examples of outstanding customer service. This article will discuss the services provided by Apple, Inc., and how medical practices can learn from this industry giant and improve the services that they offer patients.

  13. Making Apple Computers Accessible to Blind Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Renouf, Andrew; Phillips, Susan

    The study examined the feasibility of adapting commercially available educational software to a speech synthesizer compatible with the Apple II for use with 15 visually impaired students 8 to 12 years old. Ss were pre-tested on measures of auditory discrimination, computer literacy, keyboard proficiency, spelling, and language. Ss then received…

  14. Some Aspects of Enzymatic Browning in Apples

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liffen, C. L.; Cleeve, H. N.

    1975-01-01

    Describes material modified from the Nuffield advanced chemistry course to make it meaningful and relevant to pupils in the middle school. Discusses a series of simple experiments on apple browning and summarizes the browning process and its control. (Author/GS)

  15. Metabolomic Change Precedes Apple Superficial Scald Symptoms

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Metabolic profiling of 621 metabolites was employed to characterize metabolomic changes associated with ‘Granny Smith’ apple superficial scald development following 1-MCP or DPA treatment. Partial least squares-discriminant analyses were used to link metabolites with scald, postharvest treatments, ...

  16. Transcriptional analysis of apple fruit proanthocyanidin biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Henry-Kirk, Rebecca A.

    2012-01-01

    Proanthocyanidins (PAs) are products of the flavonoid pathway, which also leads to the production of anthocyanins and flavonols. Many flavonoids have antioxidant properties and may have beneficial effects for human health. PAs are found in the seeds and fruits of many plants. In apple fruit (Malus × domestica Borkh.), the flavonoid biosynthetic pathway is most active in the skin, with the flavan-3-ols, catechin, and epicatechin acting as the initiating units for the synthesis of PA polymers. This study examined the genes involved in the production of PAs in three apple cultivars: two heritage apple cultivars, Hetlina and Devonshire Quarrenden, and a commercial cultivar, Royal Gala. HPLC analysis shows that tree-ripe fruit from Hetlina and Devonshire Quarrenden had a higher phenolic content than Royal Gala. Epicatechin and catechin biosynthesis is under the control of the biosynthetic enzymes anthocyanidin reductase (ANR) and leucoanthocyanidin reductase (LAR1), respectively. Counter-intuitively, real-time quantitative PCR analysis showed that the expression levels of Royal Gala LAR1 and ANR were significantly higher than those of both Devonshire Quarrenden and Hetlina. This suggests that a compensatory feedback mechanism may be active, whereby low concentrations of PAs may induce higher expression of gene transcripts. Further investigation is required into the regulation of these key enzymes in apple. Abbreviations:ANOVAanalysis of varianceANRanthocyanidin reductaseDADdiode array detectorDAFBdays after full bloomDFRdihydroflavonol reductaseLARleucoanthocyanidin reductaseLC-MSliquid chromatography/mass spectrometryPAproanthocyanidinqPCRreal-time quantitative PCR PMID:22859681

  17. The Geneva apple rootstock breeding program

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The ancient practice of clonal propagation of perennial fruit crops by means of grafting was transformed when humans realized that certain properties of selected root systems could be beneficial for increasing productivity of that fruit crop. Certain clonal apple rootstocks were recognized for their...

  18. Overexpressing MhNPR1 in transgenic Fuji apples enhances resistance to apple powdery mildew.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiu-Kong; Zhang, Ji-Yu; Zhang, Zhen; Du, Xiao-Li; Du, Bei-Bei; Qu, Shen-Chun

    2012-08-01

    Fuji is susceptible to fungal diseases like apple powdery mildew. Non-expressor of pathogenesis-related gene 1 (NPR1) plays a key role in regulating salicylic acid (SA)-mediated systemic acquired resistance (SAR). Previous studies show that overexpressing the Malus hupehensis-derived NPR1 (MhNPR1) gene in tobacco induces the transcript expression of pathogenesis-related genes (PRs) and resistance to the fungus Botrytis cinerea. In this study we introduced the MhNPR1 gene into the 'Fuji' apple via Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. Four transgenic apple lines were verified by PCR and RT-PCR. The semi-quantitative RT-PCR results showed that transcript overexpression of the MhNPR1 gene induced the expression of MdPRs and MdMLO genes known to interact with powdery mildew. Furthermore, the transgenic apple plants resisted infection by apple powdery mildew better than the wild-type plants. As a result, transcript overexpression of the MhNPR1 gene induced SAR and enhanced the Fuji apple's resistance to fungal disease.

  19. AL Amyloidosis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Definition of the disease AL amyloidosis results from extra-cellular deposition of fibril-forming monoclonal immunoglobulin (Ig) light chains (LC) (most commonly of lambda isotype) usually secreted by a small plasma cell clone. Most patients have evidence of isolated monoclonal gammopathy or smoldering myeloma, and the occurrence of AL amyloidosis in patients with symptomatic multiple myeloma or other B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders is unusual. The key event in the development of AL amyloidosis is the change in the secondary or tertiary structure of an abnormal monoclonal LC, which results in instable conformation. This conformational change is responsible for abnormal folding of the LC, rich in β leaves, which assemble into monomers that stack together to form amyloid fibrils. Epidemiology AL amyloidosis is the most common type of systemic amyloidois in developed countries with an estimated incidence of 9 cases/million inhabitant/year. The average age of diagnosed patients is 65 years and less than 10% of patients are under 50. Clinical description The clinical presentation is protean, because of the wide number of tissues or organs that may be affected. The most common presenting symptoms are asthenia and dyspnoea, which are poorly specific and may account for delayed diagnosis. Renal manifestations are the most frequent, affecting two thirds of patients at presentation. They are characterized by heavy proteinuria, with nephrotic syndrome and impaired renal function in half of the patients. Heart involvement, which is present at diagnosis in more than 50% of patients, leading to restrictive cardiopathy, is the most serious complication and engages prognosis. Diagnostic methods The diagnosis relies on pathological examination of an involved site showing Congo red-positive amyloid deposits, with typical apple-green birefringence under polarized light, that stain positive with an anti-LC antibody by immunohistochemistry and/or immunofluorescence. Due to the

  20. Comment on ``On the imaginary-real ratio rule of power spectra'' [J. Math. Phys. 50, 063301 (2009)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yong

    2010-04-01

    For the three-state ergodic Markov process, the condition of all the fluctuation spectra (i.e., power spectra) with respect to real observables being monotonic over [0,+∞) [Y. Chen, Fluct. Noise Lett. 7, L181 (2007) (Theorem 2.6)] is deduced from Theorem 1 of Qian and Xie [J. Math. Phys. 50, 063301 (2009)]. In addition, we present two examples using Theorem 3 of Qian and Xie [J. Math. Phys. 50, 063301 (2009)].

  1. Transcriptomics Analysis of Apple Leaves in Response to Alternaria alternata Apple Pathotype Infection

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Longming; Ni, Weichen; Liu, Shuai; Cai, Binhua; Xing, Han; Wang, Sanhong

    2017-01-01

    Alternaria blotch disease of apple (Malus × domestica Borkh.), caused by the apple pathotype of Alternaria alternata, is one of the most serious fungal diseases to affect apples. To develop an understanding of how apples respond to A. alternata apple pathotype (AAAP) infection, we examined the host transcript accumulation over the period between 0 and 72 h post AAAP inoculation. Large-scale gene expression analysis was conducted of the compatible interaction between “Starking Delicious” apple cultivar and AAAP using RNA-Seq and digital gene expression (DGE) profiling methods. Our results show that a total of 9080 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were detected (>two-fold and FDR < 0.001) by RNA-Seq. During the early phase of infection, 12 h post inoculation (HPI), AAAP exhibited limited fungal development and little change in the transcript accumulation status (950 DEGs). During the intermediate phase of infection, the period between 18 and 36 HPI, increased fungal development, active infection, and increased transcript accumulation were detected (4111 and 3838 DEGs detected at each time point, respectively). The majority of DEGs were detected by 72 HPI, suggesting that this is an important time point in the response of apples' AAAP infection. Subsequent gene ontology (GO) and pathway enrichment analyses showed that DEGs are predominately involved in biological processes and metabolic pathways; results showed that almost gene associated with photosynthesis, oxidation-reduction were down-regulated, while transcription factors (i.e., WRKY, MYB, NAC, and Hsf) and DEGs involved in cell wall modification, defense signaling, the synthesis of defense-related metabolites, including pathogenesis-related (PRs) genes and phenylpropanoid/cyanoamino acid /flavonoid biosynthesis, were activated during this process. Our study also suggested that the cell wall defensive vulnerability and the down-regulation of most PRs and HSP70s in “Starking Delicious” following AAAP

  2. PyDecay/GraphPhys: A Unified Language and Storage System for Particle Decay Process Descriptions

    SciTech Connect

    Dunietz, Jesse N.; /MIT /SLAC

    2011-06-22

    To ease the tasks of Monte Carlo (MC) simulation and event reconstruction (i.e. inferring particle-decay events from experimental data) for long-term BaBar data preservation and analysis, the following software components have been designed: a language ('GraphPhys') for specifying decay processes, common to both simulation and data analysis, allowing arbitrary parameters on particles, decays, and entire processes; an automated visualization tool to show graphically what decays have been specified; and a searchable database storage mechanism for decay specifications. Unlike HepML, a proposed XML standard for HEP metadata, the specification language is designed not for data interchange between computer systems, but rather for direct manipulation by human beings as well as computers. The components are interoperable: the information parsed from files in the specification language can easily be rendered as an image by the visualization package, and conversion between decay representations was implemented. Several proof-of-concept command-line tools were built based on this framework. Applications include building easier and more efficient interfaces to existing analysis tools for current projects (e.g. BaBar/BESII), providing a framework for analyses in future experimental settings (e.g. LHC/SuperB), and outreach programs that involve giving students access to BaBar data and analysis tools to give them a hands-on feel for scientific analysis.

  3. Electron and Composite Fermion Transport in MOCVD Grown GaAs/AlGaAs Heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zudov, M. A.; Du, R. R.; Simmons, J. A.; Chui, H. C.

    1996-03-01

    Previously, high quality fractional quantum Hall effect(FQHE) data was accessible only from MBE-grown heterostructures. Sandia National Labs has recently grown high purity MOCVD GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructure with 2DEG mobility of 2.0x10^6 cm^2/Vs[1]. Material parameters such as impurity potential profile, defects and interface quality are expected to be modified for MOCVD. While these are believed to affect predominantly the carrier scattering in 2DEG, their effects on quantum transport properties (in particular the experimental effective mass and spin g-factor of composite fermions) are also worth examination. We report on temperature-dependent Shubnikov -de Haas(SdH) oscillations near zero magnetic field, SdH near Landau level filling factor ν = 1/2, 3/2, and angular dependent magnetoresistance mesurements on the FQHE states around ν = 3/2 in high-density (up to 3.2x10^11 cm-2) MOCVD samples. Measurements were performed in a 20mK/20T ^3He-^4He mixture dilution refrigerator. Our results around ν = 3/2 conform to the same composite fermion level scheme obtained earlier for low-density MBE samples[2]. [1] H. C. Chui, B. E. Hammons, N. E. Harff, J. A. Simmons and M. E. Sherwin, to appear in Appl. Phys. Lett. [2] R. R. Du, A. S. Yeh, H. L. Stormer, D. C. Tsui, L. N. Pfeifer, K. W. West, Phys. Rev. Lett. 75, 3926(1995)

  4. Genetic Diversity of a Natural Population of Apple stem pitting virus Isolated from Apple in Korea.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Ju Yeon; Joa, Jae Ho; Choi, Kyung San; Do, Ki Seck; Lim, Han Cheol; Chung, Bong Nam

    2014-06-01

    Apple stem pitting virus (ASPV), of the Foveavirus genus in the family Betaflexiviridae, is one of the most common viruses of apple and pear trees. To examine variability of the coat protein (CP) gene from ASPV, eight isolates originating from 251 apple trees, which were collected from 22 apple orchards located in intensive apple growing areas of the North Gyeongsang and North Jeolla Provinces in Korea, were sequenced and compared. The nucleotide sequence identity of the CP gene of eight ASPV isolates ranged from 77.0 to 97.0%, while the amino acid sequence identity ranged from 87.7 to 98.5%. The N-terminal region of the viral CP gene was highly variable, whereas the C-terminal region was conserved. Genetic algorithm recombination detection (GARD) and single breakpoint recombination (SBP) analyses identified base substitutions between eight ASPV isolates at positions 54 and 57 and position 771, respectively. GABranch analysis was used to determine whether the eight isolates evolved due to positive selection. All values in the GABranch analysis showed a ratio of substitution rates at non-synonymous and synonymous sites (dNS/dS) below 1, suggestive of strong negative selection forces during ASPV CP history. Although negative selection dominated CP evolution in the eight ASPV isolates, SLAC and FEL tests identified four possible positive selection sites at codons 10, 22, 102, and 158. This is the first study of the ASPV genome in Korea.

  5. Ethylene binding site affinity in ripening apples

    SciTech Connect

    Blankenship, S.M. . Dept. of Horticultural Science); Sisler, E.C. )

    1993-09-01

    Scatchard plots for ethylene binding in apples (Malus domestica Borkh.), which were harvested weekly for 5 weeks to include the ethylene climacteric rise, showed C[sub 50] values (concentration of ethylene needed to occupy 50% of the ethylene binding sites) of 0.10, 0.11, 0.34, 0.40, and 0.57 [mu]l ethylene/liter[sup [minus]1], respectively, for each of the 5 weeks. Higher ethylene concentrations were required to saturate the binding sites during the climacteric rise than at other times. Diffusion of [sup 14]C-ethylene from the binding sites was curvilinear and did not show any indication of multiple binding sites. Ethylene was not metabolized by apple tissue.

  6. Integrated pest management of "Golden Delicious" apples.

    PubMed

    Simončič, A; Stopar, M; Velikonja Bolta, Š; Bavčar, D; Leskovšek, R; Baša Česnik, H

    2015-01-01

    Monitoring of plant protection product (PPP) residues in "Golden Delicious" apples was performed in 2011-2013, where 216 active substances were analysed with three analytical methods. Integrated pest management (IPM) production and improved IPM production were compared. Results were in favour of improved IPM production. Some active compounds determined in IPM production (boscalid, pyraclostrobin, thiacloprid and thiametoxam) were not found in improved IPM production. Besides that, in 2011 and 2012, captan residues were lower in improved IPM production. Risk assessment was also performed. Chronic exposure of consumers was low in general, but showed no major differences for IPM and improved IPM production for active substances determined in both types of production. Analytical results were compared with the European Union report of 2010 where 1.3% of apple samples exceeded maximum residue levels (MRLs), while MRL exceedances were not observed in this survey.

  7. Response time accuracy in Apple Macintosh computers.

    PubMed

    Neath, Ian; Earle, Avery; Hallett, Darcy; Surprenant, Aimée M

    2011-06-01

    The accuracy and variability of response times (RTs) collected on stock Apple Macintosh computers using USB keyboards was assessed. A photodiode detected a change in the screen's luminosity and triggered a solenoid that pressed a key on the keyboard. The RTs collected in this way were reliable, but could be as much as 100 ms too long. The standard deviation of the measured RTs varied between 2.5 and 10 ms, and the distributions approximated a normal distribution. Surprisingly, two recent Apple-branded USB keyboards differed in their accuracy by as much as 20 ms. The most accurate RTs were collected when an external CRT was used to display the stimuli and Psychtoolbox was able to synchronize presentation with the screen refresh. We conclude that RTs collected on stock iMacs can detect a difference as small as 5-10 ms under realistic conditions, and this dictates which types of research should or should not use these systems.

  8. UV inactivation of bacteria in apple cider.

    PubMed

    Geveke, David J

    2005-08-01

    Apple cider, inoculated with Escherichia coli and Listeria innocua, was processed using a simple UV apparatus. The apparatus consisted of a low-pressure mercury lamp surrounded by a coil of UV transparent tubing. Cider was pumped through the tubing at flow rates of 27 to 83 ml/min. The population of E. coli K-12 was reduced by 3.4 +/- 0.3 log after being exposed for 19 s at a treatment temperature of 25 degrees C. The population of L. innocua, which was more resistant to UV, was reduced by 2.5 +/- 0.1 log after being exposed for 58 s. The electrical energy for the process was 34 J/ml and is similar to that for conventional thermal processing. UV processing has the potential to improve the safety and extend the shelf life of apple cider.

  9. Exchange bias induced at a Co2FeAl0.5Si0.5/Cr interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, C. N. T.; Vick, A. J.; Inami, N.; Ono, K.; Frost, W.; Hirohata, A.

    2017-03-01

    In order to engineer the strength of an exchange bias in a cubic Heusler alloy layer, crystalline strain has been induced at a ferromagnet/antiferromagnet interface by their lattice mismatch in addition to the conventional interfacial exchange coupling between them. Such interfaces have been formed in (Co2FeAl0.5Si0.5(CFAS)/Cr)3 structures grown by ultrahigh vacuum molecular beam epitaxy. The magnetic and structural properties have been characterised to investigate the exchange interactions at the CFAS/Cr interfaces. Due to the interfacial lattice mismatch of 1.4%, the maximum offset of 18 Oe in a magnetisation curve has been measured for the case of a CFAS (2 nm)/Cr (0.9 nm) interface at 193 K. The half-metallic property of CFAS has been observed to remain unchanged, which agrees with the theoretical prediction by Culbert et al (2008 J. Appl. Phys. 103 07D707). Such a strain-induced exchange bias may provide insight of the interfacial interactions and may offer a wide flexibility in spintronic device design.

  10. Nanolabyrinthine ZrAlN thin films by self-organization of interwoven single-crystal cubic and hexagonal phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghafoor, Naureen; Johnson, Lars J. S.; Klenov, Dmitri O.; Demeulemeester, Jelly; Desjardins, Patrick; Petrov, Ivan; Hultman, Lars; Odén, Magnus

    2013-08-01

    Self-organization on the nanometer scale is a trend in materials research. Thermodynamic driving forces may, for example, yield chessboard patterns in metal alloys [Y. Ni and A. G. Khachaturyan, Nature Mater. 8, 410-414 (2009)], 10.1038/nmat2431 or nitrides [P. H. Mayrhofer, A. Hörling, L. Karlsson, J. Sjölén, T. Larsson, and C. Mitterer, Appl. Phys. Lett. 83, 2049 (2003)], 10.1063/1.1608464 during spinodal decomposition. Here, we explore the ZrN-AlN system, which has one of the largest positive enthalpies of mixing among the transition metal aluminum nitrides [D. Holec, R. Rachbauer, L. Chen, L. Wang, D. Luefa, and P. H. Mayrhofer, Surf. Coat. Technol. 206, 1698-1704 (2011), 10.1016/j.surfcoat.2011.09.019; B. Alling, A. Karimi, and I. Abrikosov, Surf. Coat. Technol. 203, 883-886 (2008)], 10.1016/j.surfcoat.2008.08.027. Surprisingly, a highly regular superhard (36 GPa) two-dimensional nanolabyrinthine structure of two intergrown single crystal phases evolves during magnetron sputter thin film synthesis of Zr0.64Al0.36N/MgO(001). The self-organization is surface driven and the synergistic result of kinetic limitations, where the enthalpy reduction balances both investments in interfacial and elastic energies.

  11. Comment on ``Glass transition in pure and doped amorphous solid water: An ultrafast microcalorimetry study'' [J. Chem. Phys. 125, 094501 (2006)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johari, G. P.

    2007-10-01

    On investigating the data of Chonde et al. [J. Chem. Phys.125, 094501 (2006)], we find that (i) the relaxation time of the test liquid toluene used for determining the ultrafast scans' reliability was mistaken by several decades and incorrectly plotted, (ii) extrinsic effects had led to an exceptionally broad endotherm showing an enthalpy relaxation occurring implausibly at 500ps time scale, (iii) enthalpy relaxation times at structural unfreezing and at crystallization temperatures were assumed to be the same, equal to the reciprocal of the heating rate, and (iv) the data for water were incorrectly analyzed. An appropriate analysis would alter their conclusion and would be useful for discussing other ultrafast scans and nanocalorimetry data.

  12. Evaluation of apple juice quality using spectral fluorescence signatures.

    PubMed

    Poryvkina, L; Tsvetkova, N; Sobolev, I

    2014-01-01

    In current work the method of in vivo evaluation of apple juice degree of naturalness based on Spectral Fluorescence Signature (SFS) is proposed. SFS spectra of intact apple juice were measured as excitation-emission matrix by specially designed compact spectrofluorimeter with front-face optical layout - Instant Screener Compact (LDI AS, Estonia). The data were analysed using PCA method with a view to evaluate the information of polyphenol's content in different commercial juices. Results of PCA analysis have shown a clear separation of juice reconstituted from concentrate, unclarified pasteurised juice and personally squeezed apple juice at the two dimensional PCs space. For implementation of apple juice analysis into spectrofluorimeter software the k-Nearest Neighbor (kNN) Search technique was used. The implemented model was tested using 19 different samples of apple juice. Results of test demonstrate that SFS-PCA-kNN method can provide quick nondestructive analysis of naturalness degree of commercial apple juice.

  13. Sustainability of three apple production systems.

    PubMed

    Reganold, J P; Glover, J D; Andrews, P K; Hinman, H R

    2001-04-19

    Escalating production costs, heavy reliance on non-renewable resources, reduced biodiversity, water contamination, chemical residues in food, soil degradation and health risks to farm workers handling pesticides all bring into question the sustainability of conventional farming systems. It has been claimed, however, that organic farming systems are less efficient, pose greater health risks and produce half the yields of conventional farming systems. Nevertheless, organic farming became one of the fastest growing segments of US and European agriculture during the 1990s. Integrated farming, using a combination of organic and conventional techniques, has been successfully adopted on a wide scale in Europe. Here we report the sustainability of organic, conventional and integrated apple production systems in Washington State from 1994 to 1999. All three systems gave similar apple yields. The organic and integrated systems had higher soil quality and potentially lower negative environmental impact than the conventional system. When compared with the conventional and integrated systems, the organic system produced sweeter and less tart apples, higher profitability and greater energy efficiency. Our data indicate that the organic system ranked first in environmental and economic sustainability, the integrated system second and the conventional system last.

  14. Transparent and opaque Schottky contacts on undoped In0.52Al0.48As grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Wei; Berger, Paul R.; Hunsperger, Robert G.; Zydzik, G.; Rhodes, W. W.; O'Bryan, H. M.; Sivco, D.; Cho, A. Y.

    1995-06-01

    The Schottky barrier height was measured for five different materials on undoped In0.52Al0.48As grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). Of the materials tested, two were transparent conductors, indium-tin-oxide (ITO), and cadmium tin oxide (CTO) and for comparison, three were opaque metals (Au, Ti, and Pt). The barrier heights were measured using I-V measurements. Due to the high series resistance created by the undoped In0.52Al0.48As, the Norde method [J. Appl. Phys. 50, 5052 (1979)] was used to plot the I-V characteristics and extract the Schottky barrier height. The Schottky barrier heights were determined to be 0.639, 0.637, 0.688, 0.640, and 0.623 eV for ITO, CTO, Au, Ti, and Pt, respectively. Previously published results for Schottky barriers on In0.52Al0.48As are compared with our measurements.

  15. Transport and capture properties of Auger-generated high-energy carriers in (AlInGa)N quantum well structures

    SciTech Connect

    Nirschl, A.; Binder, M.; Schmid, M.; Karow, M. M.; Pietzonka, I.; Lugauer, H.-J.; Zeisel, R.; Sabathil, M.; Galler, B.; Bougeard, D.

    2015-07-21

    Recent photoluminescence experiments presented by M. Binder et al. [Appl. Phys. Lett. 103, 071108 (2013)] demonstrated the visualization of high-energy carriers generated by Auger recombination in (AlInGa)N multi quantum wells. Two fundamental limitations were deduced which reduce the detection efficiency of Auger processes contributing to the reduction in internal quantum efficiency: the transfer probability of these hot electrons and holes in a detection well and the asymmetry in type of Auger recombination. We investigate the transport and capture properties of these high-energy carriers regarding polarization fields, the transfer distance to the generating well, and the number of detection wells. All three factors are shown to have a noticeable impact on the detection of these hot particles. Furthermore, the investigations support the finding that electron-electron-hole exceeds electron-hole-hole Auger recombination if the densities of both carrier types are similar. Overall, the results add to the evidence that Auger processes play an important role in the reduction of efficiency in (AlInGa)N based LEDs.

  16. Getting Started with AppleWorks Data Base. First Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlenker, Richard M.

    This manual is a hands-on teaching tool for beginning users of the AppleWorks database software. It was developed to allow Apple IIGS users who are generally familiar with their machine and its peripherals to build a simple AppleWorks database file using version 2.0 or 2.1 of the program, and to store, print, and manipulate the file. The materials…

  17. The Venturia Apple Pathosystem: Pathogenicity Mechanisms and Plant Defense Responses

    PubMed Central

    Jha, Gopaljee; Thakur, Karnika; Thakur, Priyanka

    2009-01-01

    Venturia inaequalis is the causal agent of apple scab, a devastating disease of apple. We outline several unique features of this pathogen which are useful for molecular genetics studies intended to understand plant-pathogen interactions. The pathogenicity mechanisms of the pathogen and overview of apple defense responses, monogenic and polygenic resistance, and their utilization in scab resistance breeding programs are also reviewed. PMID:20150969

  18. Erratum: Studying the precision of ray tracing techniques with Szekeres models [Phys. Rev. D 92, 023532 (2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koksbang, S. M.; Hannestad, S.

    2015-09-01

    This erratum serves to give corrections of two errors made in Koksbang and Hannestad [Phys. Rev. D, 92, 023532 (2015)]. One error consists of having used the expression for the Doppler convergence for a flat background to study the convergence on curved backgrounds. The other error which was made, is a typo in the numerical code used to study the convergence in onion models with curved backgrounds. After correcting this typo, the results of Sec. VI A in Koksbang and Hannestad [Phys. Rev. D, 92, 023532 (2015)] were recomputed. Contrary to the original results, the new results show that the ray-tracing scheme studied in Koksbang and Hannestad [Phys. Rev. D, 92, 023532 (2015)] can reproduce the exact results in LTB onion models very well. The corrections and new results are described more elaborately below.

  19. Oviposition preference of Oriental fruit moth [Grapholita molesta (Busck), Lepidoptera: Tortricidae] for apple cultivars

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Oviposition preferences and apple cultivar selection by fruit pests may impact integrated pest management in apple orchards. Experiments were conducted to study oviposition preferences of Oriental fruit moth ( Grapholita molesta [Busck], Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) on ten commercially important apple ...

  20. Developing Data Base Files Using the AppleWorks Data Base Subprogram and Apple IIe or GS Computers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlenker, Richard M.

    Developed around the technology of the Apple duodisk drive, five and one-fourth inch floppy disks, and the 1.3 version of the AppleWorks program, this manual is designed for use as a "how to" training device in developing database files. The guide is meant to be used with Apple IIe or IIGS computers which have a duodisk or two disk…

  1. A Nonlinear Thermomechanical Model of Spinel Ceramics Applied to Aluminum Oxynitride (AlON)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    that strain hardening ceases above some saturation stress 29,44,45; however, from the preceding argu- ments, it may be reasonable to assume that during...Microdamage in Polycrystalline Ceramics Under Dynamic Compression and Tension,” J. Appl. Phys., 98, p. 023505. 15 Kraft , R. H., Molinari, J. F., Ramesh, K...D DANDEKAR M GREENFIELD C HOPPEL R KRAFT R LEAVY B LOVE M RAFTENBERG T WEERASOORIYA C WILLIAMS RDRL WMP C

  2. Comments on ''theory of dissipative density-gradient-driven turbulence in the tokamak edge'' (Phys. Fluids 28, 1419 (1985))

    SciTech Connect

    Krommes, J.A.

    1985-11-01

    The author critiques the model of tokamak edge turbulence by P.W. Terry and P.H. Diamond (Phys. Fluids 28, 1419, 1985). The critique includes a discussion of the physical basis, consistency and quantitative accuracy of the Terry-Diamond model. 19 refs. (WRF)

  3. Comment on "On the Crooks fluctuation theorem and the Jarzynski equality" [J. Chem. Phys. 129, 091101 (2008)].

    PubMed

    Adib, Artur B

    2009-06-28

    It has recently been argued that a self-consistency condition involving the Jarzynski equality (JE) and the Crooks fluctuation theorem (CFT) is violated for a simple Brownian process [L. Y. Chen, J. Chem. Phys.129, 091101 (2008)]. This note adopts the definitions in the original formulation of the JE and CFT and demonstrates the contrary.

  4. Comment on "Soret motion in non-ionic binary molecular mixtures" [J. Chem. Phys. 135, 054102 (2011)].

    PubMed

    Semenov, Semen N; Schimpf, Martin E

    2012-09-28

    The material transport equations derived in the article by Leroyer and Würger [J. Chem. Phys. 135, 054102 (2011)] do not adequately provide a description of material transport in liquid binary systems. An alternate approach based on non-equilibrium thermodynamics is presented.

  5. Apples in the Apple Library--How One Library Took a Byte.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ertel, Monica

    1983-01-01

    Summarizes automation of a specialized library at Apple Computer, Inc., describing software packages chosen for the following functions: word processing/text editing; cataloging and circulation; reference; and in-house databases. Examples of each function and additional sources of information on software and equipment mentioned in the article are…

  6. Reading Michael Apple--The Sociological Imagination at Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ball, Stephen J.

    2007-01-01

    This article discusses Michael Apple's contribution to the sociology of education and education policy analysis and the politics of education. It focuses on ways of "reading" Apple as an intellectual and an activist and looks at the trajectory of his work over a long and illustrious career.

  7. Chapter 11. Quality evaluation of apple by computer vision

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Apple is one of the most consumed fruits in the world, and there is a critical need for enhanced computer vision technology for quality assessment of apples. This chapter gives a comprehensive review on recent advances in various computer vision techniques for detecting surface and internal defects ...

  8. Interview with Michael Apple: The Biography of a Public Intellectual

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peters, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    Michael W. Apple is the John Bascom Professor of Curriculum and Instruction and Educational Policy Studies in the Departments of Curriculum and Instruction (CI) and Educational Policy Studies (EPS) at the University of Wisconsin-Madison School of Education where he has taught since 1970. Michael Apple is one of the foremost educational theorists…

  9. Sugar apple emerges as tempting treat for Florida Growers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Sugar Apple, Annona squamosa, is described as a potential alternative crop for the Florida east coast. Sugar Apple is highly productive of fruit on bushes from seed beginning at about 1-2 years of age, and produces a very flavorful and highly sought after tropical fruit. Several cultivars of Sug...

  10. Apple anthracnose canker life cycle and disease cycle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Apple anthracnose [caused by Neofabraea malicorticis (H.S. Jacks) anamorph Cryptosporiopsis curvispora (Peck)] is a fungal disease that impacts apple production. The pathogen produces cankers on trees as well as a rot on the fruit known as ‘Bull’s-eye rot’. The cankers cause severe damage to trees...

  11. Morphological and chemical characterization of the kei apple (Dovyalis spp)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dovyalis (Tropical apple) is an exotic fruit originated in Africa, reddish-orange color and high acidity. Tropical apricot or Kei apple (Dovyalis hebecarpa X D. abyssinica) P.I. 112086, is a natural cross which resulted from a mixed planting of D. hebecarpa and D. abyssinica at the Subtropical Horti...

  12. Apple juice greatly reduces systemic exposure to atenolol

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Hyewon; Jang, In-Jin; Lee, SeungHwan; Ohashi, Kyoichi; Kotegawa, Tsutomu; Ieiri, Ichiro; Cho, Joo-Youn; Yoon, Seo Hyun; Shin, Sang-Goo; Yu, Kyung-Sang; Lim, Kyoung Soo

    2013-01-01

    AIM Fruit juice reduces the plasma concentrations of several β-adrenoceptor blockers, likely by inhibiting OATP2B1-mediated intestinal absorption. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of apple juice on the pharmacokinetics of atenolol. METHODS Twelve healthy Korean volunteers with genotypes of SLCO2B1 c.1457C> T (*1/*1 (n= 6) and *3/*3 (n= 6)) were enrolled in this study. In a three-phase, one-sequence crossover study, the pharmacokinetics (PK) of atenolol was evaluated after administration of 50 mg atenolol. Subjects received atenolol with either 300 ml water, 1200 ml apple juice or 600 ml apple juice. RESULTS Apple juice markedly reduced the systemic exposure to atenolol. The geometric mean ratios (95% confidence intervals) of apple juice : water were 0.18 (0.13, 0.25, 1200 ml) and 0.42 (0.30, 0.59, 600 ml) for the AUC(0,tlast). In this study, the PK parameters of atenolol responded in a dose-dependent manner to apple juice. CONCLUSIONS Apple juice markedly reduced systemic exposure to atenolol. The genetic variation of SLCO2B1 c.1457C>T had a minimal effect on the pharmacokinetics of atenolol when the drug was administered with water or apple juice. PMID:22574741

  13. Cytology of infection of apple leaves by Diplocarpon mali

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Diplocarpon mali, the causal agent of Marssonina leaf blotch of apple, causes severe defoliation during the growing season. Little information is available on the mode of infection and infection process. In this study, the infection strategies of D. mali in apple leaves were investigated using fluor...

  14. Formatting Data Disks for Use with the Apple IIe Computer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlenker, Richard M.

    This step-by-step guide to formatting disks using the AppleWorks software on the Apple IIe computer covers (1) loading the program; (2) formatting the disk; (3) volume naming; and (4) exiting the format options. Eleven sample screen displays illustrate the steps. (MES)

  15. Genome to phenome mapping in apple using historical data

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Apple (Malus domestica) is one of the world’s most valuable fruit crops. Its large size and long juvenile phase make it a particularly promising candidate for marker-assisted selection (MAS). However, advances in MAS in apple have been limited by a lack of phenotype and genotype data from sufficien...

  16. Unraveling apple fruit metabolism: Storage management opportunities and beyond

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Apple fruit has become a staple fruit commodity in many markets worldwide, making year-round availability crucial to retail chains. Consequently, apple storage practices have become increasingly sophisticated to meet rising quality expectations of fresh taste and a blemish free appearance. Modern ...

  17. Apple-products phytochemicals and processing: a review.

    PubMed

    Soler, Carla; Soriano, José M; Mañes, Jordi

    2009-05-01

    Epidemiological studies have linked the consumption of apples with reduced risk of some cancers, cardiovascular disease, asthma, and diabetes. Extensive research exists on apples and the health benefits of their beverages and phytochemicals. The purpose of this paper is to review the most recent literature in this area focusing on phytochemicals, phytochemical bioavailability and antioxidant behavior.

  18. Sources and availability of Sphaeropsis pyriputrescens inoculum in apple orchards

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sphaeropsis pyriputrescens (SP) is the cause of Sphaeropsis rot, a recently reported postharvest fruit rot disease of apple. Infections of apple fruit by the fungus occur in the orchard, and symptoms develop during storage or in the market. SP also is the cause of a twig dieback and canker disease o...

  19. Classworks: AppleWorks for the Classroom. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Rick

    This book provides a brief and succinct introduction to AppleWorks and is designed for use by teachers who are already familiar with the three AppleWorks tools: the word processor, the database, and the spreadsheet. "Classworks" (developed for grades 8 and 9) emphasizes computer work in which the teacher serves as troubleshooter,…

  20. Gene expression profiles of auxin metabolism in maturing apple fruit

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Variation exists among apple genotypes in fruit maturation and ripening patterns that influences at-harvest fruit firmness and postharvest storability. Based on the results from our previous large-scale transcriptome profiling on apple fruit maturation and well-documented auxin-ethylene crosstalk, t...

  1. Apple peels as a value-added food ingredient.

    PubMed

    Wolfe, Kelly L; Liu, Rui Hai

    2003-03-12

    There is some evidence that chronic diseases, such as cancer and cardiovascular disease, may occur as a result of oxidative stress. Apple peels have high concentrations of phenolic compounds and may assist in the prevention of chronic diseases. Millions of pounds of waste apple peels are generated in the production of applesauce and canned apples in New York State each year. We proposed that a valuable food ingredient could be made using the peels of these apples if they could be dried and ground to a powder without large losses of phytochemicals. Rome Beauty apple peels were treated with citric acid dips, ascorbic acid dips, and blanches before being oven-dried at 60 degrees C. Only blanching treatments greatly preserved the phenolic compounds, and peels blanched for 10 s had the highest total phenolic content. Rome Beauty apple peels were then blanched for 10 s and dried under various conditions (oven-dried at 40, 60, or 80 degrees C, air-dried, or freeze-dried). The air-dried and freeze-dried apple peels had the highest total phenolic, flavonoid, and anthocyanin contents. On a fresh weight basis, the total phenolic and flavonoid contents of these samples were similar to those of the fresh apple peels. Freeze-dried peels had a lower water activity than air-dried peels on a fresh weight basis. The optimal processing conditions for the ingredient were blanching for 10s and freeze-drying. The process was scaled up, and the apple peel powder ingredient was characterized. The total phenolic content was 3342 +/- 12 mg gallic acid equivalents/100 g dried peels, the flavonoid content was 2299 +/- 52 mg catechin equivalents/100 g dried peels, and the anthocyanin content was 169.7 +/- 1.6 mg cyanidin 3-glucoside equivalents/100 g dried peels. These phytochemical contents were a significantly higher than those of the fresh apple peels if calculated on a fresh weight basis (p < 0.05). The apple peel powder had a total antioxidant activity of 1251 +/- 56 micromol vitamin C

  2. A Real-Time Apple Grading System Using Multicolor Space

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    This study was focused on the multicolor space which provides a better specification of the color and size of the apple in an image. In the study, a real-time machine vision system classifying apples into four categories with respect to color and size was designed. In the analysis, different color spaces were used. As a result, 97% identification success for the red fields of the apple was obtained depending on the values of the parameter “a” of CIE L*a*b*color space. Similarly, 94% identification success for the yellow fields was obtained depending on the values of the parameter y of CIE XYZ color space. With the designed system, three kinds of apples (Golden, Starking, and Jonagold) were investigated by classifying them into four groups with respect to two parameters, color and size. Finally, 99% success rate was achieved in the analyses conducted for 595 apples. PMID:24574880

  3. Alar and apples: newspapers, risk and media responsibility.

    PubMed

    Friedman, S M; Villamil, K; Suriano, R A; Egolf, B P

    1996-01-01

    During 1989, a major environmental and health risk issue, the spraying of Alar on apples, created a furor among the American people. After hearing charges from the Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC) that eating Alar-laden apples significantly increased a child's risk of developing cancer, numbers of school districts dropped apples from their menus and parents poured apple juice down the drains. Apple sales plummeted. The NRDC's charges, which were disseminated by a well-planned and effective public relations campaign, brought counter-charges from the US environmental Protection Agency, which accused the NRDC of basing its study on poor data, among other things. The core of the dispute was in the risk figures and risk interpretations being used by each organization.

  4. Prevalence of Escherichia coli in apple cider manufactured in Connecticut.

    PubMed

    Dingman, D W

    1999-06-01

    Cider samples obtained from 11 cider mills operating in Connecticut during the 1997 to 1998 production season were tested for the presence of Escherichia coli. Cider production began in mid August and continued through March, with peak production in September and October. Of 314 cider samples tested, 11 (4%) were found to contain E. coli. Of the 11 mills, 6 (55%) tested positive for E. coli in the cider at least once during the production year. E. coli was first observed in cider samples produced in mid to late October and was not detected in samples made after January. A trend was observed for cider to decrease in acidity and increase in Brix (soluble sugars) throughout the production season. No correlation between pH and soluble sugars of cider and the presence of E. coli was detected. Eight mills used both dropped apples and tree-picked apples, whereas three mills used tree-picked apples only. The use of dropped apples in cider production began 5 weeks before the first detection of E. coli in cider. E. coli was isolated from cider samples produced using dropped apples and from samples produced using only tree-picked apples. No direct correlation between the use of dropped apples or tree-picked apples and the presence of E. coli in the cider was observed. An association between the time of apple harvest and the appearance of E. coli in cider was noted. For mills providing adequate records, all contaminated cider was produced from apples harvested between mid October and mid November.

  5. Patulin surveillance in apple cider and juice marketed in Michigan.

    PubMed

    Harris, Kerri L; Bobe, Gerd; Bourquin, Leslie D

    2009-06-01

    Patulin is the most common mycotoxin found in apples and apple juices. The objective of this study was to determine the concentrations of patulin in (i) apple cider produced and marketed by Michigan apple cider mills during the fall seasons of 2002 to 2003 and 2003 to 2004 and (ii) apple juice and cider, including shelf-stable products, marketed in retail grocery stores in Michigan throughout 2005 and 2006. End product samples (n=493) obtained from 104 Michigan apple cider mills were analyzed for patulin concentration by using solid-phase extraction followed by high-performance liquid chromatography. Patulin was detected (> or =4 microg/liter) in 18.7% of all cider mill samples, with 11 samples (2.2%) having patulin concentrations of > or =50 microg/liter. A greater percentage of cider samples obtained from mills using thermal pasteurization contained detectable patulin (28.4%) than did those from mills using UV light radiation (13.5%) or no pathogen reduction treatment (17.0%). Among retail grocery store samples (n=159), 23% of apple juice and cider samples contained detectable patulin, with 18 samples (11.3%) having patulin concentrations of > or =50 microg/liter. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) action level for patulin is 50 microg/kg. Some apple juice samples obtained from retail grocery stores had exceptionally high patulin concentrations, ranging up to 2700 microg/liter. Collectively, these results indicate that most apple cider and juice test samples from Michigan were below the FDA action level for patulin but that certain apple cider and juice processors have inadequate controls over patulin concentrations in final products. The industry, overall, should focus on improved quality of fruit used in juice production and improve culling procedures to reduce patulin concentrations.

  6. Compact Magnetic Antennas for Directional Excitation of Surface Plasmons

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-07-01

    Steininger, G.; Koch, M.; von Plessen, G.; Feldmann, J. Launching surface plasmons into nanoholes in metal films. Appl. Phys. Lett. 2000, 76, 140−142...plasmons at single nanoholes in Au films. Appl. Phys. Lett. 2004, 85, 467−469. (14) Baudrion, A.-L.; et al. Coupling efficiency of light to surface

  7. Characteristics and performance of four new apple rootstock from the Cornell-USDA apple rootstock breeding program

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In 2010, the apple rootstock breeding program at Geneva, NY released 4 new apple rootstocks (Geneva® 210, Geneva® 214, Geneva® 890 and Geneva® 969). G.210 is a semi-dwarfing rootstock with vigor similar to M.7, with high productivity similar to M.9 and resistance to fire blight, phytophthora root ro...

  8. Dw2 a new dwarfing locus in apple rootstocks and relationship to induction of early bearing in apple scions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The ability of certain apple rootstocks to dwarf their scions has been known for centuries and spurred a revolution in apple production. In this investigation, several breeding populations, in multiple replicated field and pot experiments were used to ascertain the degree of dwarfing of segregating...

  9. Obtaining Help with AppleWorks V2.0 Word Processing Files Using the Apple IIGS Computer. First Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlenker, Richard M.

    This guide was developed as a "how to" training device for obtaining help with AppleWorks version 2.0 word processing files using the Apple IIGS computer with two disk drives. Step-by-step instructions are provided for program loading; selecting the help list; and using the help list to copy text, delete text, find parts of a document,…

  10. Merging Spreadsheet and Word Processing Files Using AppleWorks V2.0 and the Apple IIGS Computer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlenker, Richard M.

    This guide was developed as a "how to" training device for merging spreadsheet and word processing files using AppleWorks version 2.0 and the Apple IIGS computer with two disk drives. Step-by-step instructions are provided for loading spreadsheet and word processor files, transferring spreadsheet files to the clipboard, merging…

  11. Using AppleWorks V2.0 To Construct Spreadsheet Files for the Apple IIGS Computer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlenker, Richard M.

    This guide was developed as a "how to" training device for constructing spreadsheet files using AppleWorks version 2.0 and the Apple IIGS computer with two disk drives. Step-by-step instructions are provided for program loading, selecting the spreadsheet option, setting column widths, naming columns and fields, entering category…

  12. Merging Data Base and Word Processing Files Using AppleWorks V2.0 and the Apple IIGS Computer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlenker, Richard M.

    This guide was developed as a "how to" training device for merging database and word processing files using AppleWorks version 2.0 and the Apple IIGS computer with two disk drives. Step-by-step instructions are provided for loading database files, transferring database files to the clipboard, merging database files into word processor…

  13. Converting Spreadsheet Files into Data Base Files Using AppleWorks V2.0 and the Apple IIGS Computer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlenker, Richard M.

    This guide was developed as a "how to" training device for converting spreadsheet files into database files using AppleWorks version 2.0 on the Apple IIGS computer with two disk drives. Step-by-step instructions are provided for loading spreadsheet files, transferring spreadsheet files to the monitor, printing spreadsheet files, and…

  14. Economic analysis of a self-propelled apple harvest and in-field sorting machine for the apple industry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The U.S. apple industry, which generated more than $2.7 billion revenue at the farm gate in 2013, is facing critical challenges in decreased availability of labor and increased labor and production cost. To address these challenges, a self-propelled apple harvest and automated in-field sorting machi...

  15. 2015 Progress Report – Evaluation of the Cornell-Geneva Apple Rootstocks and Other Promising Apple Rootstocks

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A number of new apple rootstocks from the Cornell/USDA apple rootstock breeding project, located at Geneva, NY which are resistant to fire blight are rapidly becoming available to the industry. These rootstocks are also dwarfing, tolerant to replant disease and productive. Data on cumulative yield...

  16. Genetic control of biennial bearing in apple

    PubMed Central

    Guitton, Baptiste; Kelner, Jean-Jacques; Velasco, Riccardo; Gardiner, Susan E.; Chagné, David; Costes, Evelyne

    2012-01-01

    Although flowering in mature fruit trees is recurrent, floral induction can be strongly inhibited by concurrent fruiting, leading to a pattern of irregular fruiting across consecutive years referred to as biennial bearing. The genetic determinants of biennial bearing in apple were investigated using the 114 flowering individuals from an F1 population of 122 genotypes, from a ‘Starkrimson’ (strong biennial bearer)בGranny Smith’ (regular bearer) cross. The number of inflorescences, and the number and the mass of harvested fruit were recorded over 6 years and used to calculate 26 variables and indices quantifying yield, precocity of production, and biennial bearing. Inflorescence traits exhibited the highest genotypic effect, and three quantitative trait loci (QTLs) on linkage group (LG) 4, LG8, and LG10 explained 50% of the phenotypic variability for biennial bearing. Apple orthologues of flowering and hormone-related genes were retrieved from the whole-genome assembly of ‘Golden Delicious’ and their position was compared with QTLs. Four main genomic regions that contain floral integrator genes, meristem identity genes, and gibberellin oxidase genes co-located with QTLs. The results indicated that flowering genes are less likely to be responsible for biennial bearing than hormone-related genes. New hypotheses for the control of biennial bearing emerged from QTL and candidate gene co-locations and suggest the involvement of different physiological processes such as the regulation of flowering genes by hormones. The correlation between tree architecture and biennial bearing is also discussed. PMID:21963613

  17. Bierman {ital et al.}Reply:

    SciTech Connect

    Bierman, J.D.; Chan, P.; Liang, J.F.; Kelly, M.P.; Sonzogni, A.A.; Vandenbosch, R.

    1997-05-01

    reply to the Comment by C.H.Dasso et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 78,XXX(1997). A Reply to the Comment by C.H. Dasso and J. Fern{acute a}ndez-Niello. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  18. Kinetics of patulin degradation in model solution, apple cider and apple juice by ultraviolet radiation.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yan; Koutchma, Tatiana; Warriner, Keith; Shao, Suqin; Zhou, Ting

    2013-08-01

    Patulin is a mycotoxin produced by a wide range of molds involved in fruit spoilage, most commonly by Penicillium expansum and is a health concern for both consumers and manufacturers. The current study evaluated feasibility of monochromatic ultraviolet (UV) radiation at 253.7 nm as a possible commercial application for the reduction of patulin in fresh apple cider and juice. The R-52G MINERALIGHT® UV bench top lamp was used for patulin destruction. It was shown that 56.5%, 87.5%, 94.8% and 98.6% reduction of patulin can be achieved, respectively, in the model solution, apple cider, apple juice without ascorbic acid addition and apple juice with ascorbic acid addition in 2-mm thickness sample initially spiked by 1 mg·L(-1) of patulin after UV exposure for 40 min at UV irradiance of 3.00 mW·cm(-2). A mathematic model to compare the degradation rate and effective UV dose was developed. The effective UV doses that were directly absorbed by patulin for photochemical reaction were 430, 674, 724 and 763 mJ·cm(-3), respectively. The fluence-based decimal reduction time was estimated to 309.3, 31.3, 28.9 and 5.1 mW·cm(-2)·min, respectively, in four media mentioned above. The degradation of patulin followed the first-order reaction model. The time-based and fluence-based reaction rate constants were determined to predict patulin degradation. The time-based reaction rate constant of samples treated in dynamic regime with constant stirring (model solution: 2.95E-4 s(-1), juice: 4.31E-4 s(-1)) were significantly higher than samples treated in static regime (model solution: 2.79E-4 s(-1), juice: 3.49E-4 s(-1), p < 0.05) when applied UV irradiance and sample thickness were consistent. The reaction rate constant of patulin degradation in apple juice was significantly higher than model solution (p < 0.05). Although further investigations are still needed, the results of this study demonstrated that UV radiation may be an effective method for

  19. Inactivation of Escherichia coli O157:H7 in apple juice and apple cider by trans-cinnamaldehyde.

    PubMed

    Baskaran, Sangeetha Ananda; Amalaradjou, Mary Anne Roshni; Hoagland, Thomas; Venkitanarayanan, Kumar

    2010-06-30

    This study investigated the antimicrobial effect of low concentrations of trans-cinnamaldehyde (TC) on Escherichia coli O157:H7 in apple juice and apple cider. A five-strain mixture of E. coli O157:H7 was inoculated into apple juice or cider at approximately 6.0 log CFU/ml, followed by the addition of TC (0%v/v, 0.025%v/v, 0.075%v/v and 0.125%v/v). The inoculated apple juice samples were incubated at 23 degrees C and 4 degrees C for 21 days, whereas the cider samples were stored only at 4 degrees C. The pH of apple juice and cider, and E. coli O157:H7 counts were determined on days 0, 1, 3, 5, 7, 14 and 21. TC was effective (P<0.05) in inactivating E. coli O157:H7 in apple juice and apple cider. At 23 degrees C, 0.125 and 0.075%v/v TC completely inactivated E. coli O157:H7 in apple juice (negative by enrichment) on days 1 and 3, respectively. At 4 degrees C, 0.125 and 0.075%v/v TC decreased the pathogen counts in the juice and cider to undetectable levels on days 3 and 5, respectively. Results indicate that low concentrations of TC could be used as an effective antimicrobial to inactivate E. coli O157:H7 in apple juice and apple cider.

  20. 7 CFR 319.56-27 - Apples from Japan and the Republic of Korea.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Apples from Japan and the Republic of Korea. 319.56-27... § 319.56-27 Apples from Japan and the Republic of Korea. Any variety of Malus domestica apples may be imported into the United States from Japan, and Fuji variety apples may be imported into the United...

  1. 7 CFR 319.56-27 - Apples from Japan and the Republic of Korea.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Apples from Japan and the Republic of Korea. 319.56-27... § 319.56-27 Apples from Japan and the Republic of Korea. Any variety of Malus domestica apples may be imported into the United States from Japan, and Fuji variety apples may be imported into the United...

  2. 7 CFR 319.56-27 - Apples from Japan and the Republic of Korea.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Apples from Japan and the Republic of Korea. 319.56-27... § 319.56-27 Apples from Japan and the Republic of Korea. Any variety of Malus domestica apples may be imported into the United States from Japan, and Fuji variety apples may be imported into the United...

  3. 7 CFR 319.56-27 - Apples from Japan and the Republic of Korea.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Apples from Japan and the Republic of Korea. 319.56-27... § 319.56-27 Apples from Japan and the Republic of Korea. Any variety of Malus domestica apples may be imported into the United States from Japan, and Fuji variety apples may be imported into the United...

  4. Use of cyclodextrin-based polymer for patulin analysis in apple juice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Penicillium expansum, one of the patulin producing fungi that causes decay on apple, is recognized as the main source of patulin contamination on apple and apple products. The widely used method for patulin analysis in apple juice is liquid-liquid extraction with ethyl acetate followed by HPLC-UV or...

  5. Creating, Storing, and Dumping Low and High Resolution Graphics on the Apple IIe Microcomputer System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fletcher, Richard K., Jr.

    This description of procedures for dumping high and low resolution graphics using the Apple IIe microcomputer system focuses on two special hardware configurations that are commonly used in schools--the Apple Dot Matrix Printer with the Apple Parallel Interface Card, and the Imagewriter Printer with the Apple Super Serial Interface Card. Special…

  6. Gene expression profiles for two auxin transporters during apple fruit maturation and ripening

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The maturation and ripening patterns of apple varieties differ greatly due to their long history of cultivation, self-incompatible nature and the high-level heterozygosity of the apple genome. The ripening season across elite apple cultivars can span more than three months. Apple maturation and ripe...

  7. Comment on 'Power loss in open cavity diodes and a modified Child-Langmuir law' [Phys. Plasmas 12, 093102 (2005)

    SciTech Connect

    Swanekamp, S. B.; Ottinger, P. F.

    2007-09-15

    In this Comment, it is shown that no modification of the Child-Langmuir law [Phys. Rev.32, 492 (1911); Phys. Rev. 2, 450 (1913)] is necessary to treat the space-charge-limited flow from a diode with an open boundary as reported in Phys. Plasmas 12, 093102 (2005). The open boundary condition in their simulations can be represented by a voltage source and a resistor whose value is the vacuum-wave impedance of the opening. The diode can be represented as a variable resistor whose value depends on the voltage drop across the diode (as measured by the line integral of E across the diode gap). This is a simple voltage-divider circuit whose analysis shows that the real diode voltage drops as the vacuum-wave impedance increases. Furthermore, it is shown that in equilibrium, the voltage drop between the anode and cathode is independent of the path chosen for the line integral of the electric field so that E=-{nabla}{phi} is valid. In this case, the equations of electrostatics are applicable. This clearly demonstrates that the electric field is electrostatic and static fields DO NOT RADIATE. It is shown that the diode voltage drops as the vacuum wave impedance increases and the current drops according to the Child-Langmuir law. Therefore, the observed drop in circuit current can be explained by a real drop in voltage across the diode and not an effective drop as claimed by the authors.

  8. QTL analysis of soft scald in two apple populations

    PubMed Central

    McClure, Kendra A; Gardner, Kyle M; Toivonen, Peter MA; Hampson, Cheryl R; Song, Jun; Forney, Charles F; DeLong, John; Rajcan, Istvan; Myles, Sean

    2016-01-01

    The apple (Malus×domestica Borkh.) is one of the world’s most widely grown and valuable fruit crops. With demand for apples year round, storability has emerged as an important consideration for apple breeding programs. Soft scald is a cold storage-related disorder that results in sunken, darkened tissue on the fruit surface. Apple breeders are keen to generate new cultivars that do not suffer from soft scald and can thus be marketed year round. Traditional breeding approaches are protracted and labor intensive, and therefore marker-assisted selection (MAS) is a valuable tool for breeders. To advance MAS for storage disorders in apple, we used genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS) to generate high-density genetic maps in two F1 apple populations, which were then used for quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping of soft scald. In total, 900 million DNA sequence reads were generated, but after several data filtering steps, only 2% of reads were ultimately used to create two genetic maps that included 1918 and 2818 single-nucleotide polymorphisms. Two QTL associated with soft scald were identified in one of the bi-parental populations originating from parent 11W-12-11, an advanced breeding line. This study demonstrates the utility of next-generation DNA sequencing technologies for QTL mapping in F1 populations, and provides a basis for the advancement of MAS to improve storability of apples. PMID:27651916

  9. The effect of apple feeding on markers of colon carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Poulsen, Morten; Mortensen, Alicja; Binderup, Mona-Lise; Langkilde, Søren; Markowski, Jaroslaw; Dragsted, Lars Ove

    2011-01-01

    Regular consumption of fruits and vegetables is associated with reduced risks of certain cancers and other diseases in observational studies and animal models of human diseases. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether feeding of rats with whole raw apple has potentially chemopreventive properties by affecting markers of colon cancer. The end-point was preneoplastic changes in the colon known as aberrant crypt foci (ACF). Rats initiated with the colon carcinogen 1,2-dimethylhydrazine dihydrochloride (DMH) were given 0, 5, or 10 g apple/day for 13 wk. The group fed 5 g apple but not 10 g had a significantly lower number of ACF (P = 0.009) compared to the initiated control. DNA damage evaluated by the comet assay was significantly increased in leucocytes of DMH-treated animals (P = 0.021). No antigenotoxic effect of apple feeding was apparent in the colon. Apple feeding tended to lower DNA damage in the liver (P = 0.136 in DMH-initiated and P = 0.284 in noninitiated rats). Liver alanine aminotransferase was significantly increased in rats fed apples (P = 0.008 in DMH-initiated and P = 0.019 in noninitiated rats). In conclusion, feeding whole fresh apple may affect the occurrence of preneoplastic changes in the rat colon, but the effect was not gradual.

  10. Fixed precision sampling plans for white apple leafhopper (Homoptera: Cicadellidae) on apple.

    PubMed

    Beers, Elizabeth H; Jones, Vincent P

    2004-10-01

    Constant precision sampling plans for the white apple leafhopper, Typhlocyba pomaria McAtee, were developed so that it could be used as an indicator species for system stability as new integrated pest management programs without broad-spectrum pesticides are developed. Taylor's power law was used to model the relationship between the mean and the variance, and Green's constant precision sequential sample equation was used to develop sampling plans. Bootstrap simulations of the sampling plans showed greater precision (D = 0.25) than the desired precision (Do = 0.3), particularly at low mean population densities. We found that by adjusting the Do value in Green's equation to 0.4, we were able to reduce the average sample number by 25% and provided an average D = 0.31. The sampling plan described allows T. pomaria to be used as reasonable indicator species of agroecosystem stability in Washington apple orchards.

  11. Comparison between volatile emissions from transgenic apples and from two representative classically bred apple cultivars.

    PubMed

    Vogler, Ute; Rott, Anja S; Gessler, Cesare; Dorn, Silvia

    2010-02-01

    While most risk assessments contrast a transgenic resistant to its isogenic line, an additional comparison between the transgenic line and a classically bred cultivar with the same resistance gene would be highly desirable. Our approach was to compare headspace volatiles of transgenic scab resistant apple plants with two representative cultivars (the isogenic 'Gala' and the scab resistance gene-containing 'Florina'). As modifications in volatile profiles have been shown to alter plant relationships with non-target insects, we analysed headspace volatiles from apple plants subjected to different infection types by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Marked differences were found between healthy and leafminer (Phyllonorycter blancardella) infested genotypes, where emissions between the transgenic scab resistant line and the two cultivars differed quantitatively in four terpenes and an aromatic compound. However, these modified odour emissions were in the range of variability of the emissions recorded for the two standard cultivars that proved to be crucial references.

  12. Patulin reduction in apple juice from concentrate by UV radiation and comparison of kinetic degradation models between apple juice and apple cider.

    PubMed

    Assatarakul, Kitipong; Churey, John J; Manns, David C; Worobo, Randy W

    2012-04-01

    Patulin, a mycotoxin produced by several genera of fungi, including Byssochlamys, Aspergillus, and Penicillium, has been an important concern in apple cider and apple juice due to its toxicity and health consequences. In this study, the effects of UV on the patulin level, physical and chemical properties, and sensory attributes in apple juice from concentrate were investigated. Kinetic modeling of patulin reduction by UV radiation in apple juice from concentrate was calculated and compared with the degradation rate observed previously in apple cider. From an initial patulin contamination of approximately 1,000 ppb (μg/liter), the UV exposure, ranging from 14.2 mJ/cm(2) (one pass) to 99.4 mJ/cm(2) (seven passes), was successful in reducing patulin levels by 72.57% ± 2.76% to 5.14% ± 0.70%, respectively. Patulin reduction by UV radiation followed first-order kinetic modeling in a fashion similar to first-order microbial inactivation. An exponential correlation between UV exposure and the percentage of patulin remaining was observed, giving an r(2) value of 0.9950. Apple juice was repeatedly exposed to 14.2 mJ/cm(2) for each treatment, and patulin levels were significantly decreased when compared with the level obtained with the previous UV exposure treatment. While there were no significant differences in the percentages of titratable acidity and ascorbic acid (P > 0.05), there were minor yet random sampling differences in pH and degrees Brix (1 °Brix is 1 g of sucrose in 100 g of solution; the °Brix represents the soluble solids content of the solution as percentage by weight [%, wt/wt]) (P ≤ 0.05). A significant difference (P ≤ 0.05) in sensory perception for the finished apple juice was detected between the control and the full seven-pass UV radiation treatment using an experienced consumer panel and a triangle test. Patulin reduction by UV radiation from both the current study and a previous study involving apple cider was compared, which showed that

  13. Mapping of the apple scab-resistance gene Vb.

    PubMed

    Erdin, N; Tartarini, S; Broggini, G A L; Gennari, F; Sansavini, S; Gessler, C; Patocchi, A

    2006-10-01

    Apple scab, caused by the fungus Venturia inaequalis, is the major production constraint in temperate zones with humid springs. Normally, its control relies on frequent and regular fungicide applications. Because this control strategy has come under increasing criticism, major efforts are being directed toward the breeding of scab-resistant apple cultivars. Modern apple breeding programs include the use of molecular markers, making it possible to combine several different scab-resistance genes in 1 apple cultivar (pyramiding) and to speed up the breeding process. The apple scab-resistance gene Vb is derived from the Siberian crab apple 'Hansen's baccata #2', and is 1 of the 6 "historical" major apple scab-resistance genes (Vf, Va, Vr, Vbj, Vm, and Vb). Molecular markers have been published for all these genes, except Vr. In testcross experiments conducted in the 1960s, it was reported that Vb segregated independently from 3 other major resistance genes, including Vf. Recently, however, Vb and Vf have both been mapped on linkage group 1, a result that contrasts with the findings from former testcross experiments. In this study, simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers were used to identify the precise position of Vb in a cross of 'Golden Delicious' (vbvb) and 'Hansen's baccata #2' (Vbvb). A genome scanning approach, a fast method already used to map apple scab-resistance genes Vr2 and Vm, was used, and the Vb locus was identified on linkage group 12, between the SSR markers Hi02d05 and Hi07f01. This finding confirms the independent segregation of Vb from Vf. With the identification of SSR markers linked to Vb, another major apple scab-resistance gene has become available; breeders can use it to develop durable resistant cultivars with several different resistance genes.

  14. Diagnosing ALS

    MedlinePlus

    ... that a person diagnosed with ALS seek a second opinion from an ALS "expert" - someone who diagnoses and treats many ALS patients and has training in this medical specialty. The ALS Association maintains a list of recognized experts in the field of ALS. See ALS Association Certified Centers of ...

  15. Vitiligo and alopecia areata: apples and oranges?

    PubMed

    Harris, John E

    2013-12-01

    Vitiligo and alopecia areata are common autoimmune diseases of the skin. Vitiligo is caused by the destruction of melanocytes and results in the appearance of white patches on any part of the body, while alopecia areata is characterized by patchy hair loss primarily on the scalp, but may also involve other areas as well. At first glance, the two diseases appear to be quite different, targeting different cell types and managed using different treatment approaches. However, the immune cell populations and cytokines that drive each disease are similar, they are closely associated within patients and their family members, and vitiligo and alopecia areata have common genetic risk factors, suggesting that they share a similar pathogenesis. Like apples and oranges, vitiligo and alopecia areata have some obvious differences, but similarities abound. Recognizing both similarities and differences will promote research into the pathogenesis of each disease, as well as the development of new treatments.

  16. Cell Biology Apps for Apple Devices

    PubMed Central

    Stark, Louisa A.

    2012-01-01

    Apps for touch-pad devices hold promise for guiding and supporting learning. Students may use them in the classroom or on their own for didactic instruction, just-in-time learning, or review. Since Apple touch-pad devices (i.e., iPad and iPhone) have a substantial share of the touch-pad device market (Campbell, 2012), this Feature will explore cell biology apps available from the App Store. My review includes iPad and iPhone apps available in June 2012, but does not include courses, lectures, podcasts, audiobooks, texts, or other books. I rated each app on a five-point scale (1 star = lowest; 5 stars = highest) for educational and production values; I also provide an overall score. PMID:22949420

  17. Cell biology apps for Apple devices.

    PubMed

    Stark, Louisa A

    2012-01-01

    Apps for touch-pad devices hold promise for guiding and supporting learning. Students may use them in the classroom or on their own for didactic instruction, just-in-time learning, or review. Since Apple touch-pad devices (i.e., iPad and iPhone) have a substantial share of the touch-pad device market (Campbell, 2012), this Feature will explore cell biology apps available from the App Store. My review includes iPad and iPhone apps available in June 2012, but does not include courses, lectures, podcasts, audiobooks, texts, or other books. I rated each app on a five-point scale (1 star = lowest; 5 stars = highest) for educational and production values; I also provide an overall score.

  18. Metabolomic change precedes apple superficial scald symptoms.

    PubMed

    Rudell, David R; Mattheis, James P; Hertog, Maarten L A T M

    2009-09-23

    Untargeted metabolic profiling was employed to characterize metabolomic changes associated with 'Granny Smith' apple superficial scald development following 1-MCP or DPA treatment. Partial least-squares discriminant analyses were used to link metabolites with scald, postharvest treatments, and storage duration. Models revealed metabolomic differentiation between untreated controls and fruit treated with DPA or 1-MCP within 1 week following storage initiation. Metabolic divergence between controls and DPA-treated fruit after 4 weeks of storage preceded scald symptom development by 2 months. alpha-Farnesene oxidation products with known associations to scald, including conjugated trienols, 6-methyl-5-hepten-2-one, and 6-methyl-5-hepten-2-ol, were associated with presymptomatic as well as scalded control fruit. Likewise, a large group of putative triterpenoids with mass spectral features similar to those of ursolic acid and beta-sitosterol were associated with control fruit and scald. Results demonstrate that extensive metabolomic changes associated with scald precede actual symptom development.

  19. Highly efficient virus-induced gene silencing in apple and soybean by apple latent spherical virus vector and biolistic inoculation.

    PubMed

    Yamagishi, Noriko; Yoshikawa, Nobuyuki

    2013-01-01

    Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) is an effective tool for the analysis of the gene function in plants within a short time. However, in woody fruit tree like apple, some of Solanum crops, and soybean, it is generally difficult to inoculate virus vector by conventional inoculation methods. Here, we show efficient VIGS in apple and soybean by Apple latent spherical virus (ALSV) vector and biolistic inoculation. The plants inoculated with ALSV vectors by particle bombardment showed uniform silenced phenotypes of target genes within 2-3 weeks post inoculation.

  20. Can an Apple a Day Keep COPD Away?

    MedlinePlus

    ... news/fullstory_163759.html Can an Apple a Day Keep COPD Away? See which fruits, veggies may ... more servings of certain fruits and vegetables a day were 35 percent less likely to develop COPD ...

  1. Despite Raves for IBook, Tide Still Turns against Apple.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blumenstyk, Goldie

    2001-01-01

    Describes how Apple's latest laptop computer, the IBook, may have many admirers, but that few believe the company will ever regain prominence in higher education. Issues include increased competition from other computer vendors and software availability (EV)

  2. [Nondestructive discrimination of waxed apples based on hyperspectral imaging technology].

    PubMed

    Gao, Jun-Feng; Zhang, Hai-Liang; Kong, Wen-Wen; He, Yong

    2013-07-01

    The potential of hyperspectral imaging technology was evaluated for discriminating three types of waxed apples. Three types of apples smeared with fruit wax, with industrial wax, and not waxed respectively were imaged by a hyperspectral imaging system with a spectral range of 308-1 024 nm. ENVI software processing platform was used for extracting hyperspectral image object of diffuse reflection spectral response characteristics. Eighty four of 126 apple samples were selected randomly as calibration set and the rest were prediction set. After different preprocess, the related mathematical models were established by using the partial least squares (PLS), the least squares support vector machine (LS-SVM) and BP neural network methods and so on. The results showed that the model of MSC-SPA-LSSVM was the best to discriminate three kinds of waxed apples with 100%, 100% and 92.86% correct prediction respectively.

  3. Apple Can Act as Anti-Aging on Yeast Cells

    PubMed Central

    Palermo, Vanessa; Mattivi, Fulvio; Silvestri, Romano; La Regina, Giuseppe; Falcone, Claudio; Mazzoni, Cristina

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, epidemiological and biochemical studies have shown that eating apples is associated with reduction of occurrence of cancer, degenerative, and cardiovascular diseases. This association is often attributed to the presence of antioxidants such as ascorbic acid (vitamin C) and polyphenols. The substances that hinder the presence of free radicals are also able to protect cells from aging. In our laboratory we used yeast, a unicellular eukaryotic organism, to determine in vivo efficacy of entire apples and their components, such as flesh, skin and polyphenolic fraction, to influence aging and oxidative stress. Our results indicate that all the apple components increase lifespan, with the best result given by the whole fruit, indicating a cooperative role of all apple components. PMID:22970337

  4. Is there room for improving the nutraceutical composition of apple?

    PubMed

    Farneti, Brian; Masuero, Domenico; Costa, Fabrizio; Magnago, Pierluigi; Malnoy, Mickael; Costa, Guglielmo; Vrhovsek, Urska; Mattivi, Fulvio

    2015-03-18

    In this study, we assessed the main bioactive compounds of a broad apple germplasm collection, composed by 247 accessions of wild (97) and domesticated (150) species. Among the stilbenes, trans- and cis-piceid were found to be ubiquitary components of both wild and cultivated apples. Apple was suggested to be the second dietary source of resveratrols. Results confirmed that the selection pressure of breeding and domestication did not uniformly affect all the phytochemicals contained in apples. For instance, organic acids (malic and ascorbic acid) and some phenolics (stilbenes, hydroxycinnamic acids, and dihydrochalcones) were significantly influenced by selection, while some relevant flavonoids (flavonols and flavan-3-ols) and triterpenoids (ursolic, oleanolic, and betulinic acids) were not. This comprehensive screening will assist in the selection of Malus accessions with specific nutraceutical traits suitable to establish innovative breeding strategies or to patent new functional foods and beverages.

  5. Effect of sonication on eliminating of phorate in apple juice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Zhe; Chen, Fang; Zhang, Hui; Hu, Xiaosong

    2012-01-01

    The degradation of phorate in apple juice by sonication was investigated in the present study. Results showed that sonication was effective in eliminating phorate in apple juice, and the ultrasonic power and sonication time significantly influenced the degradation of phorate (p<0.05). The degradation of phorate followed the first-order kinetics model well. Phorate-oxon and phorate sulfoxide were identified as the degradation products of phorate by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Moreover, the toxicity of apple juice samples spiked with phorate was significantly reduced by sonication (p<0.05). The quality indexes of apple juice including pH, titratable acidity (TA), electrical conductivity (EC), total soluble solids (TSS), and the contents of sucrose, glucose and fructose were not affected by sonication, and no visible difference in color was observed between the sonicated samples and the control.

  6. A study of ethylene in apple, red raspberry, and cherry.

    PubMed

    Blanpied, G D

    1972-04-01

    High ethylene levels were associated with flower abscission in apple (Malus sylvestris) and cherry (Prunus avium and Prunus cerasus), "June drop" of immature cherries, and harvest drop of apple and red raspberry (Rubus idaeus). However, an increase in ethylene content was not associated with June drop of apples and harvest drop of cherries. During the period of fruit ripening on the plant, the largest increases in ethylene occurred in apple flesh and red raspberry receptacular tissue. Ethylene remained low throughout the period of sweet and tart cherry ripening. The data obtained indicated marked ethylene gradients between adjacent tissues. Increases of ethylene in some tissues may have resulted from ethylene diffusion from adjacent tissues containing high levels of ethylene.

  7. How to Plant Apple Trees to Reduce Replant Disease in Apple Orchard: A Study on the Phenolic Acid of the Replanted Apple Orchard

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Chengmiao; Xiang, Li; Wang, Gongshuai; Wang, Yanfang; Shen, Xiang; Chen, Xuesen; Mao, Zhiquan

    2016-01-01

    Apple replant disease (ARD) is an important problem in the production of apple. The phenolic acid is one of the causes of ARD. How phenolic acid affects the ARD was not well known. In this study, we analyzed the type, concentration and annual dynamic variation of phenolic acid in soil from three replanted apple orchards using an accelerated solvent extraction system with high performance liquid chromatography (ASE-HPLC). We found that the type and concentration of phenolic acid were significantly differed among different seasons, different sampling positions and different soil layers. Major types of phenolic acid in three replanted apple orchards were phlorizin, benzoic acid and vanillic aldehyde. The concentration of phenolic acid was highest in the soil of the previous tree holes and it was increased from the spring to autumn. Moreover, phenolic acid was primarily distributed in 30–60 cm soil layer in the autumn, while it was most abundant in 0–30 cm soil layer in the spring. Our results suggest that phlorizin, benzoic acid and vanillic aldehyde may be the key phenolic acid that brought about ARD in the replanted apple orchard. PMID:27907081

  8. Phosphorous acid residues in apples after foliar fertilization: results of field trials.

    PubMed

    Malusà, E; Tosi, L

    2005-06-01

    The levels of phosphorous acid residues in apples after foliar fertilization with P fertilizers and after treatment with a phosphonate fungicide (Fosetyl-Al) were determined and compared. Two field trials and a glasshouse experiment, using different genotypes and plants of different age, were carried out and monitored over a three-year period. Phosphorous acid residues were found in apples after application of foliar P fertilizers. Concentrations of the residues ranged between 0.02 and 14 mg kg(-1) depending on the phosphorous acid content in the fertilizer used and the plant size and yield. The treatments induced an accumulation of the residue in the course of the experiments, which in some cases reached a level exceeding the maximum limit set by EU legislation. Residues were also detected in other plant organs, i.e., roots and buds. Plants treated with Fosetyl-Al contained phosphorous acid residues in their fruits and buds two years after the suspension of the treatment, suggesting a long-term persistence of the substance in plant storage organs. A second experiment, involving treatment of trees with seven foliar fertilizers of different composition, also induced accumulation of phosphorous acid residues in fruits. It is concluded that a wide array of foliar products containing phosphorous acid, even as a minor component, could mimic the residue effect of phosphonate fungicide treatments.

  9. Apple juice inhibits human low density lipoprotein oxidation.

    PubMed

    Pearson, D A; Tan, C H; German, J B; Davis, P A; Gershwin, M E

    1999-01-01

    Dietary phenolic compounds, ubiquitous in vegetables and fruits and their juices possess antioxidant activity that may have beneficial effects on human health. The phenolic composition of six commercial apple juices, and of the peel (RP), flesh (RF) and whole fresh Red Delicious apples (RW), was determined by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), and total phenols were determined by the Folin-Ciocalteau method. HPLC analysis identified and quantified several classes of phenolic compounds: cinnamates, anthocyanins, flavan-3-ols and flavonols. Phloridzin and hydroxy methyl furfural were also identified. The profile of phenolic compounds varied among the juices. The range of concentrations as a percentage of total phenolic concentration was: hydroxy methyl furfural, 4-30%; phloridzin, 22-36%; cinnamates, 25-36%; anthocyanins, n.d.; flavan-3-ols, 8-27%; flavonols, 2-10%. The phenolic profile of the Red Delicious apple extracts differed from those of the juices. The range of concentrations of phenolic classes in fresh apple extracts was: hydroxy methyl furfural, n.d.; phloridzin, 11-17%; cinnamates, 3-27%; anthocyanins, n.d.-42%; flavan-3-ols, 31-54%; flavonols, 1-10%. The ability of compounds in apple juices and extracts from fresh apple to protect LDL was assessed using an in vitro copper catalyzed human LDL oxidation system. The extent of LDL oxidation was determined as hexanal production using static headspace gas chromatography. The apple juices and extracts, tested at 5 microM gallic acid equivalents (GAE), all inhibited LDL oxidation. The inhibition by the juices ranged from 9 to 34%, and inhibition by RF, RW and RP was 21, 34 and 38%, respectively. Regression analyses revealed no significant correlation between antioxidant activity and either total phenolic concentration or any specific class of phenolics. Although the specific components in the apple juices and extracts that contributed to antioxidant activity have yet to be identified, this study

  10. Analysis and evaluation of a fruit bin for apples.

    PubMed

    Alam, Md Ashraful; Yadama, Vikram; Cofer, William F; Englund, Karl R

    2014-12-01

    A fruit bin is an essential part of apple harvesting, storage, and transport. The lateral pressure distribution on the bin walls by apples in the bin are not well understood, thus making it harder to predict the behavior of the vertical walls of the bin. In this study, a bin was loaded with apples and deflections of the base and a vertical wall were experimentally measured and then modeled using finite element methods to understand typical static load distribution. One of the factors determining the accuracy of an analytical model is accurate representation of load distribution on the structure. A mathematical model was used to validate the lateral pressure distribution applied by the apples on the vertical walls and the bottom plate of the bin. The effect of unit weight of an apple and the angle of repose of apples on load distribution in the bin has been analyzed. Angle of repose is found to be a significant parameter for the lateral pressure distribution on the bin walls. A nonlinear lateral pressure distribution was observed along the depth from top to bottom of the bin. The resulting finite element model allows for comparison of deformation behavior of fruit bins constructed with a variety of materials, such as plywood, wood plastic composites, or a thermoplastic polymer. Although this study dealt with bins for apples, the sensitivity analyses for a range of unit weights and angles of repose for apples makes the analysis results versatile for use with other kinds of fruits and vegetables that fall within the reported range of unit weight and angle of repose.

  11. Translocation of Paclobutrazol, a Gibberellin Biosynthesis Inhibitor, in Apple Seedlings

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shiow Y.; Sun, Tung; Faust, Miklos

    1986-01-01

    The [(2RS,3RS)-1-(4-chlorophenyl)-4,4-dimethyl-2-(1,2,4-triazol-1- yl)-pentan-3-ol] (paclobutrazol, PP333) measured in apple seedlings (`York Imperial' Malus domestica Borkh) was confirmed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Data showed that paclobutrazol was taken up through roots and transported primarily in the xylem through the stems and accumulated in leaves. No detectable basipetal movement of paclobutrazol in apple seedlings was found. PMID:16664976

  12. Potential sources of microbial contamination in unpasteurized apple cider.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Luis; Henderson, John; Fabri, Martha; Oke, Moustapha

    2006-01-01

    A study was conducted to identify possible sources of microbial contamination and to assess the effect of good cleaning and sanitation practices on the microbial quality and safety of unpasteurized apple cider. Raw unwashed apples, washed apples, cleaning water, fresh cider, and finished cider samples were collected from five Ontario producers over 4 months and microbiologically tested. Total coliforms were found in 31, 71 and 38% of the unwashed apple, water, and washed apple samples, respectively. Escherichia coli was found in 40% of the water samples from one producer alone. The washing step was identified as a potential source of contamination, possibly due to water in the dump tanks seldom being refreshed, and because scrubbers, spray nozzles, and conveyors were not properly cleaned and sanitized. Higher total coliform counts (P < 0.0001) and prevalence (P < 0.0001) in fresh cider compared with those in unwashed apples and washed apples indicated considerable microbial buildup along the process, possibly explained by the lack of appropriate equipment sanitation procedures. Results showed that producers who had better sanitary practices in place had lower (P < 0.001) total coliform prevalence than the rest of the producers. Overall results show that good sanitation procedures are associated with improved microbial quality of fresh cider in terms of total coliforms and that operators who pasteurize and/or UV treat their product should still be required to have a sound good manufacturing practices program in place to prevent recontamination. Cryptosporidium parvum, an important pathogen for this industry, was found in different sample types, including washed apples, water, and fresh and finished cider.

  13. Erratum to "Multi-modal fission in collinear ternary cluster decay of 252Cf(sf,fff)" [Phys. Lett. B 746 (2015) 223

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Oertzen, W.; Nasirov, A. K.; Tashkodjaev, R. B.

    2016-11-01

    The scale of the ordinate axis of Fig. 4 on page 226 of PLB 746 (2015) 223 was incorrect. The new version of Fig. 4 (which is "Fig. 1" in the present note) with the correct ordinate axis is given here (upper part). The lower part shows the previous version. Five potential wells and barriers are shown. Considering a sequential process two barriers are relevant for the decay, with equal barriers for the symmetric cases with a smaller fragment at the center (in these cases only one barrier is shown). For the asymmetric case of 70Ni + 50Ca + 132Sn, two different barriers appear, denoted as (B1) and (B2), which correspond to the interactions of the middle cluster 50Ca with the outer nuclei 70Ni and 132Sn, respectively. In a sequential mechanism the separation of 132Sn from the other part via the barrier B2 having the smaller height, is favoured for the first step. For the second step the barrier (B1) between Ni and Ca, appears at smaller distances (dot-dashed curve) and is higher. The order of the barriers of the five channels is unchanged, compared to the figure in Ref. W. von Oertzen et al., Phys. Lett. B 746 (2015) 223.

  14. Corrigendum to "Multi-modal Fission in Collinear Ternary Cluster decay of 252Cf(sf,fff)" [Phys. Lett. B 746 (2015) 223

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Oertzen, W.; Nasirov, A. K.; Tashkodjaev, R. B.

    2017-02-01

    The scale of the ordinate axis of Fig. 4 on page 226 of PLB 746 (2015) 223 was incorrect. The new version of Fig. 4 (which is "Fig. 1" in the present note) with the correct ordinate axis is given here (upper part). The lower part shows the previous version. Five potential wells and barriers are shown. Considering a sequential process, two barriers are relevant for the sequential decay, with equal barriers for the symmetric cases with a smaller fragment at the center (in these cases only one barrier is shown). For the asymmetric case of 70Ni + 50Ca + 132Sn, two different barriers appear, denoted as (B1) and (B2), which correspond to the interactions of the middle cluster 50Ca with the outer nuclei 70Ni and 132Sn, respectively. In a sequential mechanism the separation of 132Sn from the other part via the barrier B2 has the smaller height, thus it is favored for the first step. For the second step the barrier (B1) between Ni and Ca, appears at smaller distances (dot-dashed curve) and is higher. The order of the barriers of the five channels is unchanged, compared to the figure in Ref. W. von Oertzen et al., Phys. Lett. B 746 (2015) 223.

  15. Blank Computer Floppy Disk Formatting Using the AppleWorks Program, Apple IIe or GS Computers and a Duodisk or Two Disk Drives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlenker, Richard M.

    This manual is a "how to" training device for formatting blank floppy disks in the AppleWorks program using an Apple IIe or Apple IIGS Computer with Duodisk or two disk drives. The manual provides step-by-step directions, and includes 11 figures depicting the computer screen at the various stages of the formatting sequence. (EW)

  16. Developing Simple Grade Books Using the AppleWorks Spreadsheet Subprogram, Apple IIe or GS Computers, and a Duodisk or Two Disk Drives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlenker, Richard M.

    This manual is a "how to" training device for developing grade books using the AppleWorks spreadsheet subprogram with an Apple IIe or Apple IIGS Computer which has a Duodisk or two disk drives and an 80-column card. The manual provides step-by-step directions, and includes 41 figures depicting the computer screen at the various stages of…

  17. Comment on “On the quantum theory of molecules” [J. Chem. Phys. 137, 22A544 (2012)

    SciTech Connect

    Sutcliffe, Brian T.; Woolley, R. Guy

    2014-01-21

    In our previous paper [B. T. Sutcliffe and R. G. Woolley, J. Chem. Phys. 137, 22A544 (2012)] we argued that the Born-Oppenheimer approximation could not be based on an exact transformation of the molecular Schrödinger equation. In this Comment we suggest that the fundamental reason for the approximate nature of the Born-Oppenheimer model is the lack of a complete set of functions for the electronic space, and the need to describe the continuous spectrum using spectral projection.

  18. Modeling apple surface temperature dynamics based on weather data.

    PubMed

    Li, Lei; Peters, Troy; Zhang, Qin; Zhang, Jingjin; Huang, Danfeng

    2014-10-27

    The exposure of fruit surfaces to direct sunlight during the summer months can result in sunburn damage. Losses due to sunburn damage are a major economic problem when marketing fresh apples. The objective of this study was to develop and validate a model for simulating fruit surface temperature (FST) dynamics based on energy balance and measured weather data. A series of weather data (air temperature, humidity, solar radiation, and wind speed) was recorded for seven hours between 11:00-18:00 for two months at fifteen minute intervals. To validate the model, the FSTs of "Fuji" apples were monitored using an infrared camera in a natural orchard environment. The FST dynamics were measured using a series of thermal images. For the apples that were completely exposed to the sun, the RMSE of the model for estimating FST was less than 2.0 °C. A sensitivity analysis of the emissivity of the apple surface and the conductance of the fruit surface to water vapour showed that accurate estimations of the apple surface emissivity were important for the model. The validation results showed that the model was capable of accurately describing the thermal performances of apples under different solar radiation intensities. Thus, this model could be used to more accurately estimate the FST relative to estimates that only consider the air temperature. In addition, this model provides useful information for sunburn protection management.

  19. ALS Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... toward a world without ALS! Walk to Defeat ALS® Walk to Defeat ALS® draws people of all ... We need your help. I Will Advocate National ALS Registry The National ALS Registry is a congressionally ...

  20. CLIPS, AppleEvents, and AppleScript: Integrating CLIPS with commercial software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Compton, Michael M.; Wolfe, Shawn R.

    1994-01-01

    Many of today's intelligent systems are comprised of several modules, perhaps written in different tools and languages, that together help solve the user's problem. These systems often employ a knowledge-based component that is not accessed directly by the user, but instead operates 'in the background' offering assistance to the user as necessary. In these types of modular systems, an efficient, flexible, and eady-to-use mechanism for sharing data between programs is crucial. To help permit transparent integration of CLIPS with other Macintosh applications, the AI Research Branch at NASA Ames Research Center has extended CLIPS to allow it to communicate transparently with other applications through two popular data-sharing mechanisms provided by the Macintosh operating system: Apple Events (a 'high-level' event mechanism for program-to-program communication), and AppleScript, a recently-released scripting language for the Macintosh. This capability permits other applications (running on either the same or a remote machine) to send a command to CLIPS, which then responds as if the command were typed into the CLIPS dialog window. Any result returned by the command is then automatically returned to the program that sent it. Likewise, CLIPS can send several types of Apple Events directly to other local or remote applications. This CLIPS system has been successfully integrated with a variety of commercial applications, including data collection programs, electronics forms packages, DBMS's, and email programs. These mechanisms can permit transparent user access to the knowledge base from within a commercial application, and allow a single copy of the knowledge base to service multiple users in a networked environment.

  1. Al2O3 nanocrystals embedded in amorphous Lu2O3 high-k gate dielectric for floating gate memory application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, C. L.; Chan, M. Y.; Lee, P. S.; Darmawan, P.; Setiawan, Y.

    2007-04-01

    The integration of nanoparticles has high potential in technological applications and opens up possibilities of the development of new devices. Compared to the conventional floating gate memory, a structure containing nanocrystals embedded in dielectrics shows high potential to produce a memory with high endurance, low operating voltage, fast write-erase speeds and better immunity to soft errors [S. Tiwari, F. Rana, H. Hanafi et al. 1996 Appl.Phys. Lett. 68, 1377]. A significant improvement on data retention [J. J. Lee, X. Wang et al. 2003 Proceedings of the VLSI Technol. Symposium, p33] can be observed when discrete nanodots are used instead of continuous floating gate as charge storage nodes because local defect related leakage can be reduced efficiently. Furthermore, using a high-k dielectric in place of the conventional SiO2 based dielectric, nanodots flash memory is able to achieve significantly improved programming efficiency and data retention [A. Thean and J. -P. Leburton, 2002 IEEE Potentials 21, 35; D. W. Kim, T. Kim and S. K. Banerjee, 2003 IEEE Trans. Electron Devices 50, 1823]. We have recently successfully developed a method to produce nanodots embedded in high-k gate dielectrics [C. L. Yuan, P. Darmawan, Y. Setiawan and P. S. Lee, 2006 Electrochemical and Solid-State Letters 9, F53; C. L. Yuan, P. Darmawan, Y. Setiawan and P. S. Lee, 2006 Europhys. Lett. 74, 177]. In this paper, we fabricated the memory structure of Al2O3 nanocrystals embedded in amorphous Lu2O3 high k dielectric using pulsed laser ablation. The mean size and density of the Al2O3 nanocrystals are estimated to be about 5 nm and 7x1011 cm-2, respectively. Good electrical performances in terms of large memory window and good data retention were observed. Our preparation method is simple, fast and economical.

  2. Susceptibility of fruit from diverse apple and crabapple germplasm to attack from plum curculio, Conotrachelus nenuphar (Herbst) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plum curculio, Conotrachelus nenuphar (Herbst) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) is an important apple pest that significantly hinders sustainable apple production in eastern North America. The potential for host plant resistance to plum curculio among apple (Malus) germplasm has never been rigorously ev...

  3. New SRC APPLE ll Variable Polarization Beamline

    SciTech Connect

    M Severson; M Bissen; M Fisher; G Rogers; R Reininger; M Green; D Eisert; B Tredinnick

    2011-12-31

    SRC has recently commissioned a new Varied Line-Spacing Plane Grating Monochromator (VLS-PGM) utilizing as its source a 1 m long APPLE II insertion device in short-straight-section 9 of the Aladdin storage ring. The insertion device reliably delivers horizontal, vertical, and right and left circularly polarized light to the beamline. Measurements from an in situ polarimeter can be used for undulator corrections to compensate for depolarizing effects of the beamline. The beamline has only three optical elements and covers the energy range from 11.1 to 270 eV using two varied line-spacing gratings. A plane mirror rotates to illuminate the gratings at the correct angle to cancel the defocus term at all photon energies. An exit slit and elliptical-toroid refocusing mirror complete the beamline. Using a 50 {mu}m exit slit, the beamline provides moderate to high resolution, with measured flux in the mid 10{sup 12} (photons/s/200 mA) range, and a spot size of 400 {mu}m horizontal by 30 {mu}m vertical.

  4. Comment on “Stationary self-focusing of Gaussian laser beam in relativistic thermal quantum plasma” [Phys. Plasmas 20, 072703 (2013)

    SciTech Connect

    Habibi, M.; Ghamari, F.

    2014-06-15

    Patil and Takale in their recent article [Phys. Plasmas 20, 072703 (2013)], by evaluating the quantum dielectric response in thermal quantum plasma, have modeled the relativistic self-focusing of Gaussian laser beam in a plasma. We have found that there are some important shortcomings and fundamental mistakes in Patil and Takale [Phys. Plasmas 20, 072703 (2013)] that we give a brief description about them and refer readers to important misconception about the use of the Fermi temperature in quantum plasmas, appearing in Patil and Takale [Phys. Plasmas 20, 072703 (2013)].

  5. Arsenic and lead in juice: apple, citrus, and apple-base.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Denise; Hooper, Cassandra; Shi, Xingyi

    2012-12-01

    Exposure limits for arsenic and lead in drinking water have long been established by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and new regulations regarding the presence of these contaminants in bottled water went into effect in California in 2009. No comparable exposure limits or regulations are available, however, for juices and other beverages that may contain arsenic and lead. In the study described in this article, 20 apple juices (or ciders), 15 apple-containing juices, one grape, and one citrus juice were analyzed for arsenic and lead. Arsenic was detected in all juices while lead was detected in more than 94% of juices analyzed. Twelve samples (32%) demonstrated arsenic levels nearly at or above the drinking water exposure limit of 10 parts per billion. No juices contained lead above drinking water exposure limits. Expanding drinking water limits to include juices (and other frequently consumed beverages) would better protect consumers while regular testing of these juices would better inform consumers of the risks posed by specific juices and brands.

  6. 3D surface reconstruction of apples from 2D NIR images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Bin; Jiang, Lu; Cheng, Xuemei; Tao, Yang

    2005-11-01

    Machine vision methods are widely used in apple defect detection and quality grading applications. Currently, 2D near-infrared (NIR) imaging of apples is often used to detect apple defects because the image intensity of defects is different from normal apple parts. However, a drawback of this method is that the apple calyx also exhibits similar image intensity to the apple defects. Since an apple calyx often appears in the NIR image, the false alarm rate is high with the 2D NIR imaging method. In this paper, a 2D NIR imaging method is extended to a 3D reconstruction so that the apple calyx can be differentiated from apple defects according to their different 3D depth information. The Lambertian model is used to evaluate the reflectance map of the apple surface, and then Pentland's Shape-From-Shading (SFS) method is applied to reconstruct the 3D surface information of the apple based on Fast Fourier Transform (FFT). Pentland's method is directly derived from human perception properties, making it close to the way human eyes recover 3D information from a 2D scene. In addition, the FFT reduces the computation time significantly. The reconstructed 3D apple surface maps are shown in the results, and different depths of apple calyx and defects are obtained correctly.

  7. Magnetic structures and excitations in a multiferroic Y-type hexaferrite BaSrCo2Fe11AlO22

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakajima, Taro; Tokunaga, Yusuke; Matsuda, Masaaki; Dissanayake, Sachith; Fernandez-Baca, Jaime; Kakurai, Kazuhisa; Taguchi, Yasujiro; Tokura, Yoshinori; Arima, Taka-hisa

    2016-11-01

    We have investigated magnetic orders and excitations in a Y-type hexaferrite BaSrCo2Fe11AlO22 (BSCoFAO), which was reported to exhibit spin-driven ferroelectricity at room temperature [S. Hirose, K. Haruki, A. Ando, and T. Kimura, Appl. Phys. Lett. 104, 022907 (2014), 10.1063/1.4862432]. By means of magnetization, electric polarization, and neutron-diffraction measurements using single-crystal samples, we establish a H -T magnetic phase diagram for magnetic field perpendicular to the c axis (H⊥c). This system exhibits an alternating longitudinal conical (ALC) magnetic structure in the ground state, and it turns into a non-co-planar commensurate magnetic order with spin-driven ferroelectricity under H⊥c. The field-induced ferroelectric phase remains as a metastable state after removing magnetic field below ˜250 K. This metastability is the key to understanding of magnetic field reversal of the spin-driven electric polarization in this system. Inelastic polarized neutron-scattering measurements in the ALC phase reveal a magnetic excitation at around 7.5 meV, which is attributed to spin components oscillating in a plane perpendicular to the cone axis. This phasonlike excitation is expected to be an electric-field active magnon, i.e., electromagnon excitation, in terms of the magnetostriction mechanism.

  8. Comment on ``Numerical calculation of the temperature distribution and evolution of the field-ion emitter under pulsed and continuous-wave laser irradiation'' [J. Appl. Phys. 59, 1334 (1986)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gipson, G. Steven

    1987-08-01

    A recent paper having to do with numerical calculations of the temperature distribution in field emitters is criticized for an error in the governing heat-conduction equation used to formulate the finite difference algorithm. The correct form of the equation is derived retaining a possibly significant nonlinear term in the final formula.

  9. Comment on “A case study on the scaling of 1/f noise: La{sub 2∕3}Sr{sub 1∕3}MnO{sub 3} thin films” [J. Appl. Phys. 113, 094901 (2013)

    SciTech Connect

    Barone, C. Pagano, S.; Méchin, L.; Guillet, B.; Routoure, J.-M.

    2014-03-21

    The problem of non-standard scaling of the 1/f noise in thin manganite films was revisited in the above paper, suggesting the quantum theory of fundamental flicker noise for the interpretation of the unusual dependence of the normalized Hooge parameter on the sample volume. Experimental evidence has been reported, showing that in these materials such volume dependence is, instead, an artifact of extrinsic noise sources, e.g., contact noise. Moreover, the proposed theoretical model implies a linear temperature dependence of the Hooge parameter, which is against the experimental data reported here. Based on these arguments, it is possible to conclude that the quantum theory of fundamental flicker noise cannot be applied to the case of La{sub 2∕3}Sr{sub 1∕3}MnO{sub 3} thin films.

  10. Comment on "Exponential ionic drift: fast switching and low volatility of thin-film memristors" by D.B. Strukov and R.S. Williams in Appl. Phys. A (2009) 94: 515-519

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meuffels, P.; Schroeder, H.

    2011-10-01

    In a recent publication (see title), it was proposed that—instead of the average macroscopic electric field—one should use the local or LORENTZ field inside dielectrics to calculate high-field ionic drift mobilities. This incorrect proposition seems now to start circulating even though it has been clearly shown in the past that the standard equations for ionic conduction in solids are by no way subject to any corrections for local or LORENTZ field effects. It is thus worth to recall some basic assumptions with regard to ion migration in crystalline solids. We believe that the clarification of this issue is of great importance for the large and still growing community of researchers dealing with resistive switching and memristive effects.

  11. Comment on “Towards high efficiency thin-film crystalline silicon solar cells: The roles of light trapping and non-radiative recombinations” [J. Appl. Phys. 115, 094501 (2014)

    SciTech Connect

    Abenante, L.

    2015-01-14

    In the above paper, an analytical approach including a new solution to the differential diffusion equation in illuminated quasi-neutral regions (QNR) is exploited to calculate the short-circuit current density (J{sub sc}), open-circuit voltage (V{sub oc}), fill factor (FF), and efficiency (η) of light-trapping (LT) c-Si solar cells with a given structure. Comparisons with numerical results calculated by the Silvaco ATLAS device simulator in the same LT cells show that the analytical results are systematically overestimated. According to the authors, the inaccuracies in J{sub sc}, V{sub oc}, and η are due to the fact that assuming ideal collection from space-charge region (SCR) and using the superposition approximation introduce systematic errors into analytical models. In this comment, an analytical approach using reported solutions to the transport equations in QNR and SCR, where ideal collection from SCR is assumed and the superposition approximation is used, is shown to agree with both the Silvaco and PC1d numerical approaches in calculating J{sub sc}, V{sub oc}, and η, in the same LT devices as considered in the commented paper. Reasons for the inaccuracies detected in the commented paper are suggested.

  12. Factors affecting growth of foodborne pathogens on minimally processed apples.

    PubMed

    Alegre, Isabel; Abadias, Maribel; Anguera, Marina; Oliveira, Marcia; Viñas, Inmaculada

    2010-02-01

    Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella and Listeria innocua increased by more than 2 log(10) units over a 24 h period on fresh-cut 'Golden Delicious' apple plugs stored at 25 and 20 degrees C. L. innocua reached the same final population level at 10 degrees C meanwhile E. coli and Salmonella only increased 1.3 log(10) units after 6 days. Only L. innocua was able to grow at 5 degrees C. No significant differences were observed between the growth of foodborne pathogens on fresh-cut 'Golden Delicious', 'Granny Smith' and 'Shampion' apples stored at 25 and 5 degrees C. The treatment of 'Golden Delicious' and 'Granny Smith' apple plugs with the antioxidants, ascorbic acid (2%) and NatureSeal (6%), did not affect pathogen growth. The effect of passive modified atmosphere packaging (MAP) on the growth of E. coli, Salmonella and L. innocua on 'Golden Delicious' apple slices was also tested. There were no significant differences in growth of pathogens in MAP conditions compared with air packaging of 'Golden Delicious' apple plugs, but the growth of mesophilic and psychrotrophic microorganisms was inhibited. These results highlight the importance of avoiding contamination of fresh-cut fruit with foodborne pathogens and the maintenance of the cold chain during storage until consumption.

  13. Native fructose extracted from apple improves glucose tolerance in mice.

    PubMed

    Dray, C; Colom, A; Guigné, C; Legonidec, S; Guibert, A; Ouarne, F; Valet, P

    2009-12-01

    Fructose is one of the most abundant monosaccharide in nature. It is also the sweetest naturally occurring carbohydrate. Since decades, fructose used for food preparations is not provided by fruit or vegetable but by a chemical process of starch or inulin conversion. We processed a new method of fructose extraction from apple and investigated the acute and long term effect of this carbohydrate on glucose metabolism in C57Bl6/j mice. By using the glycemic index (GI), we have shown that one of the sugars obtained from apple, FructiLight, has a very low impact on glycemic and insulin response during acute treatment compared to other sugars. This carbohydrate, essentially constituted by fructose, has also beneficial properties when administrated for long term treatment. Indeed, as two other sugars extracted from apple (FructiSweetApple and FructiSweet67), FructiLight exposure during 21 weeks in beverage has promoted an enhancement of glucose tolerance compared to glucose treatment without affecting food intake and weight. All these results indicate that apple-extracted sugars and more precisely fructose from these fruits could be a promising way to produce new food and sweet beverages.

  14. Laser scatter feature of surface defect on apples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Xiuqin; Ying, Yibin; Cen, YiKe; Huang, Haibo

    2006-10-01

    A machine vision system for real-time fruit quality inspection was developed. The system consists of a chamber, a laser projector, a TMS-7DSP CCD camera (PULNIX Inc.), and a computer. A Meteor-II/MC frame grabber (Matrox Graphics Inc.) was inserted into the slot of the computer to grab fruit images. The laser projector and the camera were mounted at the ceiling of the chamber. An apple was put in the chamber, the spot of the laser projector was projected on the surface of the fruit, and an image was grabbed. 2 breed of apples was test, Each apple was imaged twice, one was imaged for the normal surface, and the other for the defect. The red component of the images was used to get the feature of the defect and the sound surface of the fruits. The average value, STD value and comentropy Value of red component of the laser scatter image were analyzed. The Standard Deviation value of red component of normal is more suitable to separate the defect surface from sound surface for the ShuijinFuji apples, but for bintang apples, there is more work need to do to separate the different surface with laser scatter image.

  15. Comment on “Deterministic six states protocol for quantum communication” [Phys. Lett. A 358 (2006) 85

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Orany, Faisal A. A.

    2010-02-01

    In [J.S. Shaari, M. Lucamarini, M.R.B. Wahiddin, Phys. Lett. A 358 (2006) 85] the deterministic six states protocol (6DP) for quantum communication has been developed. This protocol is based on three mutually unbiased bases and four encoding operators. Information is transmitted between the users via two qubits from different bases. Three attacks have been studied; namely intercept-resend attack (IRA), double-CNOT attack (2CNOTA) and quantum man-in-the-middle attack. In this Letter, we show that the IRA and 2CNOTA are not properly addressed. For instance, we show that the probability of detecting Eve in the control mode of the IRA is 70% instead of 50% in the previous study. Moreover, in the 2CNOTA, Eve can only obtain 50% of the data not all of it as argued earlier.

  16. Multiple plant hormones and cell wall metabolism regulate apple fruit maturation patterns and texture attributes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Molecular events regulating apple fruit ripening and sensory quality are largely unknown. Such knowledge is essential for genomic-assisted apple breeding and postharvest quality management. In this study, a parallel transcriptome profile analysis, scanning electron microscopic (SEM) examination and...

  17. Transcriptome profiling analysis of cultivar-specific apple fruit ripening and texture attributes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Molecular events regulating cultivar-specific apple fruit ripening and sensory quality are largely unknown. Such knowledge is essential for genomic-assisted apple breeding and postharvest quality management. In this study, transcriptome profile analysis, scanning electron microscopic examination an...

  18. Transcriptomic events associated with internal browning of apple during postharvest storage

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Although apple (Malus x domestica) is of economic importance, little information is available about the transriptomic profiling of postharvest disorders, particularly internal browning. This study aimed to explore changes in the apple transcriptome associated with development of flesh browning durin...

  19. Rootstock-regulated gene expression patterns associated with fire blight resistance in apple

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Desirable apple varieties are clonally propagated by grafting vegetative scions onto rootstocks. Rootstocks influence many phenotypic traits of the scion, including resistance to pathogens such as Erwinia amylovora, which causes fire blight, the most serious bacterial disease of apple....

  20. Notes on "Soliton solutions by Darboux transformation and some reductions for a new Hamiltonian lattice hierarchy" [Phys. Scr. 82 (2010) 015008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xi-Xiang

    We demonstrate that the Darboux transformation in the paper "Soliton solutions by Darboux transformation and some reductions for a new Hamiltonian lattice hierarchy" [Phys. Scr. 82 (2010) 015008] is incorrect, and establish a correct Darboux transformation.

  1. The genome of the domesticated apple (Malus × domestica Borkh.).

    PubMed

    Velasco, Riccardo; Zharkikh, Andrey; Affourtit, Jason; Dhingra, Amit; Cestaro, Alessandro; Kalyanaraman, Ananth; Fontana, Paolo; Bhatnagar, Satish K; Troggio, Michela; Pruss, Dmitry; Salvi, Silvio; Pindo, Massimo; Baldi, Paolo; Castelletti, Sara; Cavaiuolo, Marina; Coppola, Giuseppina; Costa, Fabrizio; Cova, Valentina; Dal Ri, Antonio; Goremykin, Vadim; Komjanc, Matteo; Longhi, Sara; Magnago, Pierluigi; Malacarne, Giulia; Malnoy, Mickael; Micheletti, Diego; Moretto, Marco; Perazzolli, Michele; Si-Ammour, Azeddine; Vezzulli, Silvia; Zini, Elena; Eldredge, Glenn; Fitzgerald, Lisa M; Gutin, Natalia; Lanchbury, Jerry; Macalma, Teresita; Mitchell, Jeff T; Reid, Julia; Wardell, Bryan; Kodira, Chinnappa; Chen, Zhoutao; Desany, Brian; Niazi, Faheem; Palmer, Melinda; Koepke, Tyson; Jiwan, Derick; Schaeffer, Scott; Krishnan, Vandhana; Wu, Changjun; Chu, Vu T; King, Stephen T; Vick, Jessica; Tao, Quanzhou; Mraz, Amy; Stormo, Aimee; Stormo, Keith; Bogden, Robert; Ederle, Davide; Stella, Alessandra; Vecchietti, Alberto; Kater, Martin M; Masiero, Simona; Lasserre, Pauline; Lespinasse, Yves; Allan, Andrew C; Bus, Vincent; Chagné, David; Crowhurst, Ross N; Gleave, Andrew P; Lavezzo, Enrico; Fawcett, Jeffrey A; Proost, Sebastian; Rouzé, Pierre; Sterck, Lieven; Toppo, Stefano; Lazzari, Barbara; Hellens, Roger P; Durel, Charles-Eric; Gutin, Alexander; Bumgarner, Roger E; Gardiner, Susan E; Skolnick, Mark; Egholm, Michael; Van de Peer, Yves; Salamini, Francesco; Viola, Roberto

    2010-10-01

    We report a high-quality draft genome sequence of the domesticated apple (Malus × domestica). We show that a relatively recent (>50 million years ago) genome-wide duplication (GWD) has resulted in the transition from nine ancestral chromosomes to 17 chromosomes in the Pyreae. Traces of older GWDs partly support the monophyly of the ancestral paleohexaploidy of eudicots. Phylogenetic reconstruction of Pyreae and the genus Malus, relative to major Rosaceae taxa, identified the progenitor of the cultivated apple as M. sieversii. Expansion of gene families reported to be involved in fruit development may explain formation of the pome, a Pyreae-specific false fruit that develops by proliferation of the basal part of the sepals, the receptacle. In apple, a subclade of MADS-box genes, normally involved in flower and fruit development, is expanded to include 15 members, as are other gene families involved in Rosaceae-specific metabolism, such as transport and assimilation of sorbitol.

  2. Exogenous melatonin improves Malus resistance to Marssonina apple blotch.

    PubMed

    Yin, Lihua; Wang, Ping; Li, Mingjun; Ke, Xiwang; Li, Cuiying; Liang, Dong; Wu, Shan; Ma, Xinli; Li, Chao; Zou, Yangjun; Ma, Fengwang

    2013-05-01

    We examined whether exogenously applied melatonin could improve resistance to Marssonina apple blotch (Diplocarpon mali) by apple [Malus prunifolia (Willd.) Borkh. cv. Donghongguo]. This serious disease leads to premature defoliation in the main regions of apple production. When plants were pretreated with melatonin, resistance was increased in the leaves. We investigated the potential roles for melatonin in modulating levels of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), as well the activities of antioxidant enzymes and pathogenesis-related proteins during these plant-pathogen interactions. Pretreatment enabled plants to maintain intracellular H2O2 concentrations at steady-state levels and enhance the activities of plant defence-related enzymes, possibly improving disease resistance. Because melatonin is safe and beneficial to animals and humans, exogenous pretreatment might represent a promising cultivation strategy to protect plants against this pathogen infection.

  3. Comment on "Droplet shaped anode double layer and electron sheath formation in magnetically constricted anode" [Phys. Plasmas 23, 013502 (2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruenwald, J.

    2016-02-01

    This comment aims at clarifying some points in the very recent work of Chauhan et al. who presented an experimental study of a fireball (FB) configuration in a magnetized plasma, similar to R. L. Stenzel et al., Plasma Sources Sci. Technol. 21, 015012 (2012).

  4. Deep Sequencing Analysis of Apple Infecting Viruses in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Cho, In-Sook; Igori, Davaajargal; Lim, Seungmo; Choi, Gug-Seoun; Hammond, John; Lim, Hyoun-Sub; Moon, Jae Sun

    2016-01-01

    Deep sequencing has generated 52 contigs derived from five viruses; Apple chlorotic leaf spot virus (ACLSV), Apple stem grooving virus (ASGV), Apple stem pitting virus (ASPV), Apple green crinkle associated virus (AGCaV), and Apricot latent virus (ApLV) were identified from eight apple samples showing small leaves and/or growth retardation. Nucleotide (nt) sequence identity of the assembled contigs was from 68% to 99% compared to the reference sequences of the five respective viral genomes. Sequences of ASPV and ASGV were the most abundantly represented by the 52 contigs assembled. The presence of the five viruses in the samples was confirmed by RT-PCR using specific primers based on the sequences of each assembled contig. All five viruses were detected in three of the samples, whereas all samples had mixed infections with at least two viruses. The most frequently detected virus was ASPV, followed by ASGV, ApLV, ACLSV, and AGCaV which were withal found in mixed infections in the tested samples. AGCaV was identified in assembled contigs ID 1012480 and 93549, which showed 82% and 78% nt sequence identity with ORF1 of AGCaV isolate Aurora-1. ApLV was identified in three assembled contigs, ID 65587, 1802365, and 116777, which showed 77%, 78%, and 76% nt sequence identity respectively with ORF1 of ApLV isolate LA2. Deep sequencing assay was shown to be a valuable and powerful tool for detection and identification of known and unknown virome in infected apple trees, here identifying ApLV and AGCaV in commercial orchards in Korea for the first time. PMID:27721694

  5. Deep Sequencing Analysis of Apple Infecting Viruses in Korea.

    PubMed

    Cho, In-Sook; Igori, Davaajargal; Lim, Seungmo; Choi, Gug-Seoun; Hammond, John; Lim, Hyoun-Sub; Moon, Jae Sun

    2016-10-01

    Deep sequencing has generated 52 contigs derived from five viruses; Apple chlorotic leaf spot virus (ACLSV), Apple stem grooving virus (ASGV), Apple stem pitting virus (ASPV), Apple green crinkle associated virus (AGCaV), and Apricot latent virus (ApLV) were identified from eight apple samples showing small leaves and/or growth retardation. Nucleotide (nt) sequence identity of the assembled contigs was from 68% to 99% compared to the reference sequences of the five respective viral genomes. Sequences of ASPV and ASGV were the most abundantly represented by the 52 contigs assembled. The presence of the five viruses in the samples was confirmed by RT-PCR using specific primers based on the sequences of each assembled contig. All five viruses were detected in three of the samples, whereas all samples had mixed infections with at least two viruses. The most frequently detected virus was ASPV, followed by ASGV, ApLV, ACLSV, and AGCaV which were withal found in mixed infections in the tested samples. AGCaV was identified in assembled contigs ID 1012480 and 93549, which showed 82% and 78% nt sequence identity with ORF1 of AGCaV isolate Aurora-1. ApLV was identified in three assembled contigs, ID 65587, 1802365, and 116777, which showed 77%, 78%, and 76% nt sequence identity respectively with ORF1 of ApLV isolate LA2. Deep sequencing assay was shown to be a valuable and powerful tool for detection and identification of known and unknown virome in infected apple trees, here identifying ApLV and AGCaV in commercial orchards in Korea for the first time.

  6. Using the Apple LaserWriter at ANL

    SciTech Connect

    Errion, S.M.; Thommes, M.M. Caruthers, C.M.

    1987-09-01

    Using the Apple LaserWriter at ANL (ANL/TM 452) explains how Argonne computer users (with CMS, MVS, or VAX/VMS accounts) can print quality text and graphics on the Apple LaserWriter. Currently, applications at Argonne that are compatible with the Apple LaserWriter include Waterloo Script, CA/ISSCO graphics software (i.e., Cuechart, Tellagraf, and Disspla), SAS/Graph, ANSYS (version 4.2), and some personal computer test and graphics software. This manual does not attempt to cover use of the Apple LaserWriter with other applications, though some information on the handling of PostScript-compatible files may be valid for other applications. Refer to the documentation of those applications to learn how they work with the Apple LaserWriter. Most of the information in this manual applies to the Allied Linotype L300P typesetter in Building 222. However, the typesetter is not a high volume output device and should be used primarily for high quality (1250 and 2500 dots per inch) final copy output for Laboratory publications prior to making printing plates. You should print all drafts and proof pages on LaserWriers or other printers compatible with the PostScript page description language. Consult with Graphic Arts (at extension 2-5603) to determine the availability of the typesetter for printing the final copy of your document or graphics application. Since the Apple LaserWriter itself produces good quality output (300 dots per inch), we expect that most internal documents consisting of test or graphics will continue to be printed at LaserWriters distributed throughout the Laboratory. 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. EFFICACY OF METAMITRON IN APPLE THINNING IN SERBIA.

    PubMed

    Stevanovic, M; Dolovac, N; Marisavljevic, D; Andjelkovic, A; Radivojevic, L; Aleksic, G; Gavrilovic, V

    2015-01-01

    The thinning of fruits is a required pomotechnical measure in intensive fruit production which ensures the production of good quality fruits and high yields. Metamitron, known as inhibitor of photosynthesis, has been successfully used in the thinning of apple fruits. This study had the aim to determine the efficacy of metamitron on the thinning of apple fruits in the agroecological conditions of Serbia and to evaluate the possibility of its practical application. Two varieties of apples that are widely grown in Serbia, dared and Golden Delicious, have been chosen for this research. The experiments were carried out during 2011 and 2012 according to the EPPO PP 1/158 (3) method. Metamitron has shown a good efficacy in the thinning of apple fruits. The effect of metamitron on the thinning of apple fruits depends on multiple factors, pri- marily the application dose, time of application, apple variety, but also on the number of fruits developed. The best efficacy on the Idared variety was in plots where metamitron was applied at a dose of 1.1 kg ha⁻¹, once (in the growth stage when the fruits were 8 mm in diameter) or twice (in the growth stages when the fruits were 8 mm and 12 mm in diameter), when the number of developed fruits per tree is smaller, or 1.65 kg ha⁻¹ applied once when the fruits are 12 mm in size when a larger number of fruits per tree is developed. On the Golden Delicious variety, the best efficacy was in treatments when metamitron was applied twice (in the growth stages when the fruits were 8 mm and 12 mm in diameter) in quantities of 1.1 kg ha⁻¹, when less fruits per tree were formed or 1.65 kg ha⁻¹, applied once or twice when a larger number of fruits per tree were formed.

  8. 7 CFR 319.56-20 - Apples and pears from Australia (including Tasmania) and New Zealand.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Apples and pears from Australia (including Tasmania... Fruits and Vegetables § 319.56-20 Apples and pears from Australia (including Tasmania) and New Zealand. Apples and pears from Australia (including Tasmania) and New Zealand may be imported only in...

  9. 7 CFR 319.56-20 - Apples and pears from Australia (including Tasmania) and New Zealand.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Apples and pears from Australia (including Tasmania... Fruits and Vegetables § 319.56-20 Apples and pears from Australia (including Tasmania) and New Zealand. Apples and pears from Australia (including Tasmania) and New Zealand may be imported only in...

  10. 7 CFR 319.56-20 - Apples and pears from Australia (including Tasmania) and New Zealand.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Apples and pears from Australia (including Tasmania... Fruits and Vegetables § 319.56-20 Apples and pears from Australia (including Tasmania) and New Zealand. Apples and pears from Australia (including Tasmania) and New Zealand may be imported only in...

  11. 7 CFR 319.56-22 - Apples and pears from certain countries in Europe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Apples and pears from certain countries in Europe. 319... Vegetables § 319.56-22 Apples and pears from certain countries in Europe. (a) Importations allowed. The... applicable provisions of this subpart: (1) Apples from Belgium, Denmark, France, Germany, Great...

  12. 7 CFR 319.56-20 - Apples and pears from Australia (including Tasmania) and New Zealand.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Apples and pears from Australia (including Tasmania... Fruits and Vegetables § 319.56-20 Apples and pears from Australia (including Tasmania) and New Zealand. Apples and pears from Australia (including Tasmania) and New Zealand may be imported only in...

  13. 7 CFR 319.56-22 - Apples and pears from certain countries in Europe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Apples and pears from certain countries in Europe. 319... Vegetables § 319.56-22 Apples and pears from certain countries in Europe. (a) Importations allowed. The... applicable provisions of this subpart: (1) Apples from Belgium, Denmark, France, Germany, Great...

  14. 78 FR 11173 - Kasugamycin; Receipt of Application for Emergency Exemption for Use on Apples in Michigan...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-15

    ... AGENCY Kasugamycin; Receipt of Application for Emergency Exemption for Use on Apples in Michigan... kasugamycin (CAS No. 6980-18-3) to treat up to 10,000 acres of apples to control fire blight. The applicant... kasugamycin on apples to control fire blight. Information in accordance with 40 CFR part 166 was submitted...

  15. Teaching Bad Apples: A Fun Way to Tackle Difficult Teaching Situations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turcotte, Nathaniel; Betrus, Anthony

    2016-01-01

    "Teaching Bad Apples" is a game developed in 2014 for current and future teachers. It plays much like "Apples to Apples" or "Cards Against Humanity," with each player in turn reading a situation card, followed by the other players choosing their response cards. Each situation, however dramatic or bizarre, is…

  16. 7 CFR 319.56-27 - Fuji variety apples from Japan and the Republic of Korea.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fuji variety apples from Japan and the Republic of... and Vegetables § 319.56-27 Fuji variety apples from Japan and the Republic of Korea. Fuji variety apples may be imported into the United States from Japan and the Republic of Korea only in...

  17. 7 CFR 319.56-22 - Apples and pears from certain countries in Europe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Apples and pears from certain countries in Europe. 319... Vegetables § 319.56-22 Apples and pears from certain countries in Europe. (a) Importations allowed. The... applicable provisions of this subpart: (1) Apples from Belgium, Denmark, France, Germany, Great...

  18. Biodiversity of Total Phenolics, Antioxidant Capacity, and Juice Quality in Apple Cider Taxa

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Apples are known to contain antioxidants that may play an important role in human health by providing protection against reactive free radicals affecting a wide range of biological molecules including nucleic acids, lipids, and proteins. While fresh apple juice is a main product of processed apples,...

  19. Effect of home processing on the distribution and reduction of pesticide residues in apples.

    PubMed

    Kong, Z; Shan, W; Dong, F; Liu, X; Xu, J; Li, M; Zheng, Y

    2012-08-01

    The effect of home processing (washing, peeling, coring and juicing) on residue levels of chlorpyrifos, β-cypermethrin, tebuconazole, acetamiprid and carbendazim in apple segments was investigated. The pesticide residues were determined by UPLC-MS/MS and GC with a flame photometric (FPD) and electron capture detection (ECD). The results indicated that the pesticide residue levels in the apple peel and core were higher compared with in the apple flesh. After peeled and cored apple was processed into apple juice and pomace, chlorpyrifos, β-cypermethrin and tebuconazole were concentrated in the apple pomace. However, residues of acetamiprid and carbendazim were exceptions. The apple pomace was free of acetamiprid, which was mainly present in the apple juice. After washing the mean loss of chlorpyrifos, β-cypermethrin, tebuconazole, acetamiprid and carbendazim from apples under recommended dosage and twofold higher dosage were 17-21%, 6.7-7.1%, 13-32%, 42-67% and 47-50%, respectively. The pesticide residues were significantly reduced in the edible part of the apple except for β-cypermethrin during peeling and coring process. The removal effect of apple juicing was found to be the most pronounced on β-cypermethrin residue, which was reduced in the range of 81-84%, and the reductions of chlorpyrifos, tebuconazole, acetamiprid and carbendazim upon apple juicing were in the range of 15-36%.

  20. 75 FR 60817 - Non-Frozen Concentrated Apple Juice From China

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-01

    ... COMMISSION Non-Frozen Concentrated Apple Juice From China AGENCY: United States International Trade... concentrated apple juice from China. SUMMARY: The Commission hereby gives notice that it has instituted a... whether revocation of the antidumping duty order on non-frozen concentrated apple juice from China...

  1. Occurrence and phenotypes of pyrimethanil resistance in penicillium expansum from apple in Washington state

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Penicillium expansum is the primary cause of blue mold of apple. Pyrimethanil is a recently registered postharvest fungicide for control of postharvest diseases in apple. To monitor pyrimethanil resistance, 779 isolates of P. expansum were collected from decayed apple fruit in 2010 and 2011 from fiv...

  2. Field Evaluation of Apple Rootstocks for Orchard Performance and Fire Blight Resistance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In 2002, apple rootstock trials using three scion cultivars were established at Geneva, NY to evaluate 64 apple (Malus X domestica) rootstocks for horticultural performance and fire blight resistance. Field trials compared several elite Geneva® apple rootstocks, which were bred for tolerance to fir...

  3. Choosing between an Apple and a Chocolate Bar: the Impact of Health and Taste Labels

    PubMed Central

    Forwood, Suzanna E.; Walker, Alexander D.; Hollands, Gareth J.; Marteau, Theresa M.

    2013-01-01

    Increasing the consumption of fruit and vegetables is a central component of improving population health. Reasons people give for choosing one food over another suggest health is of lower importance than taste. This study assesses the impact of using a simple descriptive label to highlight the taste as opposed to the health value of fruit on the likelihood of its selection. Participants (N=439) were randomly allocated to one of five groups that varied in the label added to an apple: apple; healthy apple; succulent apple; healthy and succulent apple; succulent and healthy apple. The primary outcome measure was selection of either an apple or a chocolate bar as a dessert. Measures of the perceived qualities of the apple (taste, health, value, quality, satiety) and of participant characteristics (restraint, belief that tasty foods are unhealthy, BMI) were also taken. When compared with apple selection without any descriptor (50%), the labels combining both health and taste descriptors significantly increased selection of the apple (’healthy & succulent’ 65.9% and ‘succulent & healthy’ 62.4%), while the use of a single descriptor had no impact on the rate of apple selection (‘healthy’ 50.5% and ‘succulent’ 52%). The strongest predictors of individual dessert choice were the taste score given to the apple, and the lack of belief that healthy foods are not tasty. Interventions that emphasize the taste attributes of healthier foods are likely to be more effective at achieving healthier diets than those emphasizing health alone. PMID:24155964

  4. Apple Seeks To Regain Its Stature in World of Academic Computing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Jeffrey R.; Blumenstyk, Goldie

    1998-01-01

    Managers of Apple Computer, the company that pioneered campus personal computing and later lost most of its share of the market, are again focusing energies on academic buyers. Campus technology officials, even those fond of Apples, are greeting the company's efforts with caution. Some feel it may be too late for Apple to regain a significant…

  5. First report of Penicillium carneum causing blue mold on stored apples in the United States

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Blue mold decay occurs during long term storage of apples and is predominantly caused by Penicillium expansum Link. Apples harvested in 2010 were stored in controlled atmosphere at a commercial Pennsylvania apple packing and storage facility, and were examined for occurrence of decay in May 2011. ...

  6. SuperPILOT: A Comprehensive Computer-Assisted Instruction Programming Language for the Apple II Computer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Falleur, David M.

    This presentation describes SuperPILOT, an extended version of Apple PILOT, a programming language for developing computer-assisted instruction (CAI) with the Apple II computer that includes the features of its early PILOT (Programmed Inquiry, Learning or Teaching) ancestors together with new features that make use of the Apple computer's advanced…

  7. Detection of drought tolerant genes within seedling apple rootstocks in Syria

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This investigation was conducted to detect the drought tolerant genes (four genes) within seedling apple rootstocks derived from five apple genotypes, including Syrian apple cultivars. The results showed that the gene MdPepPro (a cyclophilin) was found in all studied genotypes and their progenies e...

  8. Language Arts, Social Studies and Science. Apple IIGS Computer Appleworks Data Base Training Mini Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlenker, Richard M.; And Others

    These training minicourse materials include class schedules, a description of class composition, class outlines, and a list of handouts for using AppleWorks database applications with the Apple IIGS computer in language arts, social studies, and science. Classes for each content area include introductions to the Apple IIGS computer, to the…

  9. Dumping Low and High Resolution Graphics on the Apple IIe Microcomputer System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fletcher, Richard K., Jr.; Ruckman, Frank, Jr.

    This paper discusses and outlines procedures for obtaining a hard copy of the graphic output of a microcomputer or "dumping a graphic" using the Apple Dot Matrix Printer with the Apple Parallel Interface Card, and the Imagewriter Printer with the Apple Super Serial Interface Card. Hardware configurations and instructions for high…

  10. ALS - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - ALS ... The following organizations are good resources for information on amyotrophic lateral sclerosis : Muscular Dystrophy Association -- www.mda.org/disease/amyotrophic-lateral-sclerosis National Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) ...

  11. Catch a falling apple: Isaac Newton and myths of genius.

    PubMed

    Fara, P

    1999-01-01

    Newton has become a legendary figure belonging to the distant past rather than a historical person who lived at a specific time. Historians and scientists have constantly reinterpreted many anecdotal tales describing Newton's achievements and behaviour, but the most famous concerns the falling apple in his country garden. Newton's apple conjures up multiple allegorical resonances, and examining its historical accuracy is less important than uncovering the mythical truths embedded within this symbol. Because interest groups fashion different collective versions of the past, analysing mythical tales can reveal fundamental yet conflicting attitudes towards science and its practices.

  12. Ocular toxicity by seeds of Annona squamosa (custard apple)

    PubMed Central

    Nagaraja, Harsha; Kugar, Thungappa; Shivanna, Yathish; Agrawal, Archita; Shetty, Rohit

    2016-01-01

    Custard apple seeds have been used in native medicine from time immemorial for the management of head lice and skin exfoliation. We report six consecutive patients who developed toxic keratoconjunctivitis within 6–12 h of ocular exposure to custard apple seeds. The use of topical steroid worsens the toxicity and predisposes to the development of microbial keratitis in such cases. Patients showed a good response to primary treatment with topical fortified antibiotics and lubricants. This case series highlights the need to educate the patients regarding the potential toxic effects of the custard seeds and the treating physicians about possible deleterious effects on using topical steroid. PMID:27688289

  13. [Unhealthy weight loss. Erosion by apple cider vinegar].

    PubMed

    Gambon, D L; Brand, H S; Veerman, E C I

    2012-12-01

    Erosive tooth wear was diagnosed in the dentition of a 15-year-old girl with a Moroccan background. After an anamnesis, extensive analysis of possible risk factors and a study of the pattern of erosion, it was concluded that the erosive tooth wear was induced by daily consumption of a glass of apple cider vinegar Further investigation revealed that in North-African culture, women have used apple cider vinegar to achieve weight loss for generations. Bodybuilders are also known to make use of this method of weight reduction.

  14. Growth of Listeria monocytogenes within a Caramel-Coated Apple Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Golden, Max C.; Wanless, Brandon J.; Bedale, Wendy; Czuprynski, Charles

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT A 2014 multistate listeriosis outbreak was linked to consumption of caramel-coated apples, an unexpected and previously unreported vehicle for Listeria monocytogenes. This outbreak was unanticipated because both the pH of apples (<4.0) and the water activity of the caramel coating (<0.80) are too low to support Listeria growth. In this study, Granny Smith apples were inoculated with approximately 4 log10 CFU of L. monocytogenes (a cocktail of serotype 4b strains associated with the outbreak) on each apple’s skin, stem, and calyx. Half of the apples had sticks inserted into the core, while the remaining apples were left intact. Apples were dipped into hot caramel and stored at either 7°C or 25°C for up to 11 or 28 days, respectively. Data revealed that apples with inserted sticks supported significantly more L. monocytogenes growth than apples without sticks under both storage conditions. Within 3 days at 25°C, L. monocytogenes populations increased >3 log10 in apples with sticks, whereas only a 1-log10 increase was observed even after 1 week for caramel-coated apples without sticks. When stored at 7°C, apples with sticks exhibited an approximately 1.5-log10 increase in L. monocytogenes levels at 28 days, whereas no growth was observed in apples without sticks. We infer that insertion of a stick into the apple accelerates the transfer of juice from the interior of the apple to its surface, creating a microenvironment at the apple-caramel interface where L. monocytogenes can rapidly grow to levels sufficient to cause disease when stored at room temperature. PMID:26463161

  15. Comment on ``Modified nonequilibrium molecular dynamics for fluid flows with energy conservation'' [J. Chem. Phys. 106, 5615 (1997)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Denis J.; Searles, Debra J.; Hoover, Wm. G.; Hoover, C. G.; Holian, Brad Lee; Posch, Harald A.; Morriss, Gary P.

    1998-03-01

    In their recent paper and the associated Response to this Comment, Tuckerman et al. dispute the form of the Liouville equation, as proposed by Liouville in 1838. They go on to introduce a definition of the entropy which is at variance with Boltzmann's H-function and with Gibbs' definition of entropy. They argue that their "entropy" is a constant of the motion, equal to its initial equilibrium value regardless of the imposition of external fields. We argue that the analysis of Tuckerman et al. is incorrect and that issues raised by Tuckerman et al. are not at all new but have already been correctly incorporated into nonequilibrium statistical mechanics.

  16. Revisiting Deng et al.'s Multiparty Quantum Secret Sharing Protocol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Tzonelih; Hwang, Cheng-Chieh; Yang, Chun-Wei; Li, Chuan-Ming

    2011-09-01

    The multiparty quantum secret sharing protocol [Deng et al. in Chin. Phys. Lett. 23: 1084-1087, 2006] is revisited in this study. It is found that the performance of Deng et al.'s protocol can be much improved by using the techniques of block-transmission and decoy single photons. As a result, the qubit efficiency is improved 2.4 times and only one classical communication, a public discussion, and two quantum communications between each agent and the secret holder are needed rather than n classical communications, n public discussions, and 3n/2 quantum communications required in the original scheme.

  17. Comment on ``Preserving the Boltzmann ensemble in replica-exchange molecular dynamics'' [J. Chem. Phys. 129, 164112 (2008)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuda, Ikuo

    2010-03-01

    A brief discussion of the ergodic description of constant temperature molecular dynamics (MD) is provided; the discussion is based on the analysis of criticisms raised in a recent paper [B. Cooke and S. C. Schmidler, J. Chem. Phys.129, 164112 (2008)]. In the paper, the following criticisms relating to the basic concepts of constant temperature MD are made in mathematical manners: (I) the Nosé-Hoover (NH) equation is not measure-preserving; (II) NH system and NH chain system are not ergodic under the Boltzmann measure; and (III) the Nosé Hamiltonian system as well as the Nosé-Poincaré Hamiltonian system is not ergodic. In this comment, I show the necessity for the reconsideration of these criticisms. The NH equation is measure-preserving, where the measure carries the Boltzmann-Gibbs density; this fact provides the compatibility between MD equation and the Boltzmann-Gibbs distribution. The arguments advanced in support of the above criticisms are unsound; ergodicities of those systems are still not theoretically judged. I discuss exact ergodic-theoretical expressions appropriate for constant temperature MD, and explain the reason behind the incorrect recognitions.

  18. 75 FR 5763 - Certain Non-Frozen Apple Juice Concentrate from the People's Republic of China: Initiation of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-04

    ... International Trade Administration Certain Non-Frozen Apple Juice Concentrate from the People's Republic of... the antidumping duty order on certain non-frozen apple juice concentrate (``apple juice'') from the... Villanueva, Program Manager, New Shipper Review: Certain Non-Frozen Apple Juice Concentrate from the...

  19. Experimental investigation on light propagation through apple tissue structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Askoura, Mohamed Lamine; Piron, Vianney; Vaudelle, Fabrice; L'Huillier, Jean-Pierre; Madieta, Emmanuel; Mehinagic, Emira

    2015-07-01

    The interaction of light with biological materials, such as fruits and vegetables, is a complex process which involves both absorption, and scattering events at different scales. Measuring the optical properties of a fruit allows understanding the physical and chemical characteristics. In this paper, an optical bench based on the use of a continuous laser source and a CCD camera was developed to study the light diffusion inside apple tissue structures. The method refers to the well-known steady-state spatially resolved method. First, the optoelectronics system was tested with a tissue phantom in order to show the optimal sensing range required to obtain the best estimated optical properties. Second, experimental results were obtained using peeled and unpeeled apples as interrogated tissues. The data were confronted with a diffusion model in order to extract the optical properties at two wavelengths of 633, and 852 nm. To better understand the effect of the apple tissue structures, investigations into the propagation of light through a half cut apple were also performed.

  20. Diversity in wild apple species of Chinese origin

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Malus collection in the USDA-ARS National Plant Germplasm System has twelve wild species of apple collected from China at the Plant Genetic Resources Unit (PGRU) in Geneva, NY. Between 8 and 148 individual trees represent each species. The assignment of seedling trees to specific species has be...

  1. Metagenomic approach to tracking microorganisms on apples - a case study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An understanding to the microflora species composition and frequency on apple trees is important in understanding the potential for biocontrol to succeed. Ultraviolet radiation (UV) is an environmental factor that limits microbial growth and SurroundTM particle film and is highly reflective of UV r...

  2. Geographical classification of apple based on hyperspectral imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Zhiming; Huang, Wenqian; Chen, Liping; Zhao, Chunjiang; Peng, Yankun

    2013-05-01

    Attribute of apple according to geographical origin is often recognized and appreciated by the consumers. It is usually an important factor to determine the price of a commercial product. Hyperspectral imaging technology and supervised pattern recognition was attempted to discriminate apple according to geographical origins in this work. Hyperspectral images of 207 Fuji apple samples were collected by hyperspectral camera (400-1000nm). Principal component analysis (PCA) was performed on hyperspectral imaging data to determine main efficient wavelength images, and then characteristic variables were extracted by texture analysis based on gray level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM) from dominant waveband image. All characteristic variables were obtained by fusing the data of images in efficient spectra. Support vector machine (SVM) was used to construct the classification model, and showed excellent performance in classification results. The total classification rate had the high classify accuracy of 92.75% in the training set and 89.86% in the prediction sets, respectively. The overall results demonstrated that the hyperspectral imaging technique coupled with SVM classifier can be efficiently utilized to discriminate Fuji apple according to geographical origins.

  3. Storage Test on Apple Juice After Ultrasound Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Fasolato, Luca; Balzan, Stefania; De Nardi, Roberta; Marchesini, Giorgio; Cardazzo, Barbara; Novelli, Enrico

    2014-01-01

    Apple juice, for its sensory and nutritional qualities, is consumed by people of all ages. Apples are an excellent source of several phenolic compounds and the presence of polyphenols is recognized for their health promoting antioxidant properties. Thermal pasteurization of fruit juices is the conventional method used for their preservation. Therefore, this constitutes the most extensively available methods for the inactivation of microorganisms in fruit juices but it causes side effects on their flavour and nutritional quality. Consumers tend to prefer recently extracted juices with fresh taste and minimal flavor or vitamin losses. To meet consumers’ demand, among the novel technologies that involve non-thermal processes, power ultrasound have been investigated as an alternative to conventional heat treatments. Objective of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of the use of ultrasound in an attempt to maintain the organoleptic characteristics typical of a natural apple juice. In particular, it was evaluated the action on the microflora residing and shelf life of the product through microbiological and sensory analyses. Juice treated with ultrasound highlighted a reduction of aerobic mesophilic counts and psychrophilic bacteria respectively about 3 and 5 log CFU/mL and an enhanced yeast growth. The general opinion expressed by the panelist was in favour of the sonicated juice. This preliminary study showed that non-thermal methods such as power ultrasound technology may give new opportunities to develop fresh-like apple juice. PMID:27800306

  4. Newton's Apple: 15th Season. Free Educational Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Twin Cities Public Television, St. Paul, MN.

    This guide helps teachers use the 15th season of the television program "Newton's Apple" in the classroom and lists show segments on asthma, car engines, glacier climbing, glass blowing, glaucoma, gliders, gold mine, greenhouse effect, kids on Mars, lightning, "Lost World" dinosaurs, mammoth dig, NASA robots, Novocain (TM),…

  5. The Multilingual Apple: Languages in New York City. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garcia, Ofelia, Ed.; Fishman, Joshua A., Ed.

    This collection of papers tells the story of how languages other than English have contributed to making New York City a culturally vibrant and linguistically diverse city. Part 1, "Introduction to the Multilingual Apple," features "New York's Multilingualism: World Languages and Their Role in a U.S. City" (Ofelia Garcia). Part…

  6. Distribution of apple fruit epidermal non-polar metabolites

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Apple peel epidermis provides a resilient protective barrier against external stimuli while, also, comprising much of what is considered as fruit appearance and related phenotypic components. This dynamic structure is subject to many changes throughout the production and supply chain that can impac...

  7. An Apple for Your IBM PC--The Quadlink Board.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owen, G. Scott

    1984-01-01

    Describes nature and installation of the QUADLINK board which allows Apple software to be run on IBM PC microcomputers. Although programs tested ran without problems, users should test their own programs since there are some copy protection schemes that can baffle the board. (JN)

  8. A Computerized Weather Station for the Apple IIe.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lorson, Mark V.

    Predicting weather conditions is a topic of interest for students who want to make plans for outside activities. This paper discusses the development of an inexpensive computer-interfaced classroom weather station using an Apple IIe computer that provides the viewer with up to the minute digital readings of inside and outside temperature,…

  9. Is It Still an Apple for the Teacher? Plenary Address.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deninger, Michael L.

    1985-01-01

    Questionnaires on computer use were completed by 74 residential schools, 25 day schools, 207 day classes, and 4 colleges for the deaf. Results revealed a continued trend in use of Apple microcomputers in deaf education, with computer technology for the deaf growing at a rate similar to that of general education. (CL)

  10. Successful biological control of tropical soda apple in Florida

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tropical soda apple, Solanum viarum, is a small shrub native to tropical regions of Brazil, Paraguay, and Argentina. This weed was first found in Florida in 1988. In May 2003, a leaf feeding beetle, Gratiana boliviana, from South America was released in Florida as a biological control agent of tro...

  11. Scientific Applications of the Apple Game Port: Part II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ratzlaff, Kenneth

    1984-01-01

    The Apple game port has two types of inputs: the paddle input and the button input. Scientific applications of these input-output units are discussed, examining analog inputs (potentiometers, thermistors, and photoresistors), single bit digital inputs, and single-bit outputs. (JN)

  12. The Network Advantage in Education for the Apple Macintosh.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Durance, Carl M.; Fenton, Shirley L.

    1986-01-01

    "Waterloo MacJANET," a local area network developed by the University of Waterloo for the Apple Macintosh computer, provides an environment appropriate for developing students' computer-related skills, minimizing both the human and the computing resources needed to support such courses. The system also serves as an efficient distributor…

  13. Development of a strategy to conserve worldwide apple genetic resources

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Access to diverse apple (Malus) genetic resources is critical for future breeding efforts and improved production of this important tree fruit species. Wild Malus species offer desirable sources of resistance to pathogens as well as tolerance to abiotic stress. Novel cultivars may have unique alleli...

  14. A strategy to conserve worldwide apple genetic resources: Survey results

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Access to diverse apple (Malus) genetic resources is critical for future breeding efforts and improved production of this important tree fruit genus. Wild Malus species offer desirable sources of resistance to pathogens as well as tolerance to abiotic stress. Novel cultivars may have unique allelic ...

  15. Maintenance of Microcomputers. Manual and Apple II Session, IBM Session.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coffey, Michael A.; And Others

    This guide describes maintenance procedures for IBM and Apple personal computers, provides information on detecting and diagnosing problems, and details diagnostic programs. Included are discussions of printers, terminals, disks, disk drives, keyboards, hardware, and software. The text is supplemented by various diagrams. (EW)

  16. Blossom thinning in apple and peach with an essential oil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The essential oil, eugenol, and a eugenol based herbicide (Matran EC) were applied to apple and peach trees during bloom to evaluate the thinning effect of these materials. Several additional bloom thinners including ammonium thiosulfate (ATS), liquid lime sulfur, and sulfcarbamide were included in...

  17. Computers in Astronomy: Astronomy on an Apple Macintosh.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mosley, John E.

    1987-01-01

    Presents a review of computer programs written for the Apple Macintosh computer that teach astronomy. Reviews general programs, along with some which deal more specifically with sky travel, star charting, the solar system, Halley's Comet, and stargazing. Includes the name and address of each producer. (TW)

  18. Newton's Apple 13th Season. Free Educational Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Twin Cities Public Television, St. Paul, MN.

    This educational materials packet was designed to help teachers use the Public Broadcasting Service's (PBS) program called "Newton's Apple" in the classroom. This book contains information on how these materials support the latest science standards; an index to the 13th season lesson pages and an index to the past three seasons; a…

  19. Apple Stack Cake for Dessert: Appalachian Regional Foods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shortridge, Barbara G.

    2005-01-01

    How is the culture of Appalachia conveyed through its foods? Local experts in Appalachian counties were asked to create a hypothetical menu for a meal that was representative of their home region. Fried chicken and ham were the preferred main dishes and dessert selections focused on apple pie and peach or blackberry cobbler. Virtually everyone…

  20. Ultrastructure study of apple meristem cells during cryopreservation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The ultrastructure of apple (Malus x domestica Borkh.) meristem cells was studied before and after cold acclimation (CA) and during the steps of PVS2 vitrification. We compared cells of in vitro grown shoots of two cultivars, Grushovka Vernenskaya and Voskhod. Cells of the two cultivars were simila...

  1. Ultrastructure Study of Apple Meristem Cells During Cryopreservation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The ultrastructure of apple (Malus x domestica Borkh.) meristem cells was studied before and after cold acclimation (CA) and during the steps of PVS2 vitrification. We compared cells of in vitro grown shoots of two cultivars, Grushovka Vernenskaya and Voskhod. Cells of the two cultivars were simila...

  2. Response of light brown apple moth to oxygenated phosphine fumigation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The light brown apple moth (LBAM), Epiphyas postvittana (Walker), poses a serious threat to California agriculture and is currently quarantined by several major trading partners. Fumigation is the only tool to assure pest-free postharvest vegetable and fruit products. However, current fumigants for ...

  3. Apple fruit responses following exposure to nitric oxide

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Exogenous nitric oxide (.NO) applied as gas or generated from .NO releasing compounds has physiological activity in cut apple fruit tissues. Studies were conducted to characterize .NO production by whole fruit as well as to assess responses of whole fruit to exogenous .NO. .NO and ethylene product...

  4. Development and application of multispectral algorithms for defect apple inspection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This research developed and evaluated the multispectral algorithm derived from hyperspectral line-scan imaging system which equipped with an electron-multiplying-charge-coupled-device camera and an imaging spectrograph for the detection of defect Red Delicious apples. The algorithm utilized the fluo...

  5. Power ultrasound treatment of Listeria monocytogenes in apple cider.

    PubMed

    Baumann, Adam R; Martin, Scott E; Feng, Hao

    2005-11-01

    Inactivation experiments with Listeria monocytogenes 10403S, an ultrasound-resistant strain, were conducted at sublethal (20, 30, and 40 degrees C) and lethal (50, 55, and 60 degrees C) temperatures in saline solution (pH 7.0), acidified saline solution (pH 3.4), and apple cider (pH 3.4) with and without application of ultrasound (20 kHz, 457 mW.ml(-l)). The survival of recoverable L. monocytogenes 10403S in apple cider was evaluated, and the effects of temperature, ultrasound, pH, and food matrix on inactivation were studied. Application of ultrasound increased the inactivation rate at both sublethal and lethal temperatures. Additional death of L. monocytogenes 10403S was due to low acidity at the lethal temperatures. The reduction in surviving L. monocytogenes 10403S followed first order kinetics at sublethal temperatures, but at lethal temperatures, a two-section linear model described the inactivation behavior. The bactericidal effect of thermosonication was additive in apple cider. The survival tests of L. monocytogenes 10403S in apple cider indicated the possibility of using a mild treatment condition in combination with ultrasound to achieve a 5-log reduction in number of listerial cells.

  6. Biochemical characteristics and biological properties of Annurca apple cider.

    PubMed

    Fratianni, Florinda; De Giulio, Alfonso; Sada, Alfonso; Nazzaro, Filomena

    2012-01-01

    Our work aimed to investigate the phenolic composition and antioxidant capacity of the de-alcoholized extract of cider obtained from the Annurca apple (Malus domestica var. Annurca). The antimicrobial effect of the extract against different pathogens, including Chronobacter sakazakii, was also examined. The extract's potential anti-quorum-sensing (AQS) activity was assessed using the test microorganism Chromobacterium violaceum. Biochemical analysis of the extract using ultra-performance liquid chromatography revealed catechin and caffeic acid as the most abundant polyphenols present, which represented about 35.5% and 36.6% of the total phenolics identified, respectively. An antioxidant capacity was also found (50% effective concentraiton=10 μL). The extract exhibited clear antimicrobial activity against all strains used in the experiments. Escherichia coli and Bacillus cereus were the most sensitive bacteria to the antimicrobial activity. The extract also inhibited the growth of the emergent pathogen strain C. sakazakii. The AQS activity of apple cider is reported here for the first time. In conclusion, our results demonstrate some biological properties of the apple cider and contribute to reinforcing the potential of the apple and its derivatives as functional components of the diet.

  7. Blossom thinning in apple and peach with an essential oil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A series of experiments were conducted with apple (Malus xdomestica) and peach [Prunus persica (L.) Batsch] from 2003-2008 to evaluate the flower thinning efficacy of eugenol and a eugenol-based essential oil. Flower thinning effects by hand defoliation and alternative chemical agents were compared...

  8. In vitro bioaccessibility of copper, iron, zinc and antioxidant compounds of whole cashew apple juice and cashew apple fibre (Anacardium occidentale L.) following simulated gastro-intestinal digestion.

    PubMed

    de Lima, Ana Cristina Silva; Soares, Denise Josino; da Silva, Larissa Morais Ribeiro; de Figueiredo, Raimundo Wilane; de Sousa, Paulo Henrique Machado; de Abreu Menezes, Eveline

    2014-10-15

    Considering the lack of research studies about nutrients' bioaccessibility in cashew apple, in this study the whole cashew apple juice and the cashew apple fibre were submitted to simulated in vitro gastrointestinal digestion. The samples were analysed before and after digestion and had their copper, iron, zinc, ascorbic acid, total extractable phenols and total antioxidant activity assessed. As a result, for the whole cashew apple juice, the content of copper and iron minerals bioaccessible fraction were 15% and 11.5% and for zinc this level was 3.7%. Regarding the cashew apple fibre, the bioaccessible fraction for these minerals was lower than 5%. The ascorbic acid, total extractable polyphenols and total antioxidant activity bioaccessible fraction for whole cashew apple juice showed bioaccessibility percentages of 26.2%, 39% and 27%, respectively, while for the cashew apple fibre, low bioaccessibles levels were found. The bioacessible percentage of zinc, ascorbic acid and total extractable polyphenols were higher in cashew apple juice than cashew apple fibre.

  9. New Hampshire Apple Orchards as a Source of Arsenic Contamination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, C. K.; Renshaw, C. E.; Feng, X.; Sturup, S.

    2002-05-01

    Concern about high trace metal contamination in New Hampshire water supplies has focused attention on the fate of both natural and anthropogenic trace metals in the environment. We investigate apple orchards as a possible source of As in surface water and groundwater of New Hampshire. Lead arsenate sprays were widely used as fungicides and insecticides in apple orchards for more than a century and they represent the largest single anthropogenic input of arsenic into the environment. The applied As may 1) have remained in the surface soil, 2) have moved downward in the soil column and become stored in deeper soil horizons and/or regional groundwater system, or 3) have been transported as a result of overland surface runoff and/or erosion to surface reservoirs. We examine these pathways using two types of samples collected from a Southern New Hampshire apple orchard: soil profiles from apple orchards having different pesticide application (sprayed or not sprayed with lead arsenate) and land use (tilled or untilled) history, and stream sediment cores that may have accumulated sediments transported from nearby apple orchards. Preliminary analyses provide the following observations. First, apple orchards which used lead arsenate pesticides contain significantly elevated As and Pb concentrations (up to 80æg/g and 600æg/g, and about 1 and 2 orders of magnitude above the background levels, respectively) in the surface soils. Second, As and Pb are generally limited to the upper 10-15 cm of soil, showing little evidence of downward transport. This suggests that As is largely chemically immobile in the soil environment and that the main mechanism for As removal from its source may be physical erosion. We hypothesize that, if left undisturbed, lead arsenate remains immobile in the soil column. However, any disturbances that increase physical erosion of the soil may mobilize the arsenic and lead and concentrate these metals in nearby stream and lake sediments. We test this

  10. Characterization of cider apples on the basis of their fatty acid profiles.

    PubMed

    Blanco-Gomis, Domingo; Mangas Alonso, Juan J; Margolles Cabrales, Inmaculada; Arias Abrodo, Pilar

    2002-02-27

    In the current study, the fatty acids composition of 30 monovarietal apple juices from six cider apple varieties belonging to two categories was analyzed. The different apple juices were obtained from three consecutive harvests (1997, 1998, and 1999). The fatty acids concentration in apple juice together with chemometric techniques such as principal components analysis (PCA), soft independent modeling of class analogy (SIMCA), and linear discriminant analysis (LDA), allowed us to differentiate apple juices on the basis of the sweet or sharp category to which the cider apple variety belongs. Fatty acids such as the unsaturated oleic and linoleic acids, and saturated caprylic, capric, stearic, and palmitic acids were related to the sweet cider apple category, while pentadecanoic acid is related to the sharp class.

  11. Physical and sensory properties of ready to eat apple chips produced by osmo-convective drying.

    PubMed

    Velickova, Elena; Winkelhausen, Eleonora; Kuzmanova, Slobodanka

    2014-12-01

    The low cost raw material, apple variety Idared, was turned into value-added product, apple chips. The apple chips were produced in a two-step process consisting of osmotic treatment and conventional drying. Osmotic treatment was carried out in 40 % glucose solution at room temperature, followed by convective drying at 105 °C, till reaching water activity of 0.3. Mechanical properties of the apple chips measured by compression and penetration tests were correlated with the sorption properties. The low browning index, 25.5 and high whitening index, 63.7, proved the good retention of the color of the apple chips. The instrumental characteristics of the apple chips were correlated with the sensory characteristics of the product. The new product was accepted by the 95 % of the panelists. The stored apple chips under modified atmosphere showed no significant changes in the quality parameters over 6 month period.

  12. Nondestructive Detection of the Internalquality of Apple Using X-Ray and Machine Vision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Fuzeng; Yang, Liangliang; Yang, Qing; Kang, Likui

    The internal quality of apple is impossible to be detected by eyes in the procedure of sorting, which could reduce the apple’s quality reaching market. This paper illustrates an instrument using X-ray and machine vision. The following steps were introduced to process the X-ray image in order to determine the mould core apple. Firstly, lifting wavelet transform was used to get a low frequency image and three high frequency images. Secondly, we enhanced the low frequency image through image’s histogram equalization. Then, the edge of each apple's image was detected using canny operator. Finally, a threshold was set to clarify mould core and normal apple according to the different length of the apple core’s diameter. The experimental results show that this method could on-line detect the mould core apple with less time consuming, less than 0.03 seconds per apple, and the accuracy could reach 92%.

  13. Portable programming on parallel/networked computers using the Application Portable Parallel Library (APPL)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quealy, Angela; Cole, Gary L.; Blech, Richard A.

    1993-01-01

    The Application Portable Parallel Library (APPL) is a subroutine-based library of communication primitives that is callable from applications written in FORTRAN or C. APPL provides a consistent programmer interface to a variety of distributed and shared-memory multiprocessor MIMD machines. The objective of APPL is to minimize the effort required to move parallel applications from one machine to another, or to a network of homogeneous machines. APPL encompasses many of the message-passing primitives that are currently available on commercial multiprocessor systems. This paper describes APPL (version 2.3.1) and its usage, reports the status of the APPL project, and indicates possible directions for the future. Several applications using APPL are discussed, as well as performance and overhead results.

  14. New biotechnological tools to accelerate scab-resistance trait transfer to apple.

    PubMed

    Cusin, Roberta; Revers, Luís Fernando; Maraschin, Felipe Dos Santos

    2017-02-13

    Apple is a fruit crop cultivated worldwide. Apple orchards are exposed to a diverse set of environmental and biological factors that affect the productivity and sustainability of the culture. Many of the efforts and costs for apple production rely on reducing the incidence of fungal diseases, and one of the main diseases is apple scab caused by the fungus Venturia inaequalis. The economic impact of scab on apple productivity has guided many breeding programs to search for cultivars resistant to apple scab. Introgression from wild relatives has been successful to some extent, and genetic engineering for resistant cultivars has even been employed. This review presents the techniques used to the present time to obtain pathogen-resistant apple cultivars and introduces new biotechnological approaches based on plant plasmids that show promising results for delivering genetic traits with a short-term perspective.

  15. Growth of Single Crystals and Fabrication of GaN and AlN Wafers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-03-01

    formed primarily by sublimation was undertaken by Aoki and Ogino [50]. They compared the 15 reaction between the ammonia and gallium in an open...Aoki, M. Sano, and T. Ogino , Sago Shikenso Nempo, 34 (1975) 125. 51. S. Sakai, S. Kurai, K. Nishino, K. Wada, H. Sato, and Y. Naoi, Mat. Res. Soc. Proc...34 Plenum, New York (1992). 105. T. Ogino and M. Aoki, J. Appl. Phys. 19 (1980) 2395. 106. E. Kaldis, and M. Piechotka, in D. T. J. Hurle (Ed.) "Handbook

  16. Electron Induced Conductivity of Al2O3 as Pertaining to Thermionic Integrated Circuits.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-12-01

    Vacuum ", Appl. Phys. Let. V.24, No.2, pp. 54-56, 15 January 1974. 16. Criss, J. D., and Srivastava, K. D., " High Speed Photography of Surface Flashover of...was 1.28x10’ rads(Si)/sec. The substrate appears to have broken down due to surface flashover . Surface flashover is generated when a high voltage is...Solid Insulators Under Impulse Voltages in Vacuum ", a~p Ph s .Let*. V. 21, No. 11, pp.

  17. Response to "Comment on `Construction of the landscape for multi-stable systems: Potential landscape, quasi-potential, A-type integral and beyond"' [J. Chem. Phys. 145, 147104 (2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Peijie; Li, Tiejun

    2016-10-01

    The uniqueness issue of SDE decomposition theory proposed by Ao and his co-workers has recently been discussed. A comprehensive study to investigate connections among different landscape theories [J. Chem. Phys. 144, 094109 (2016)] has pointed out that the decomposition is generally not unique, while Ao et al. recently argue that such conclusions are "incorrect" because the uniqueness of the decomposition for Ornstein-Uhlenbeck (O-U) process has been claimed before. In this response, we will demonstrate that the claimed "uniqueness" of the O-U process decomposition is invalid to serve as a counterexample according to the original definition of SDE decomposition. The absence of effective and concrete boundary conditions in previous SDE decomposition papers will be pointed out, and some other issues in the comment will also be responded.

  18. Placental immune response to apple allergen in allergic mothers.

    PubMed

    Abelius, Martina Sandberg; Enke, Uta; Varosi, Frauke; Hoyer, Heike; Schleussner, Ekkehard; Jenmalm, Maria C; Markert, Udo R

    2014-12-01

    The immunological milieu in the placenta may be crucial for priming the developing foetal immune system. Early imbalances may promote the establishment of immune-mediated diseases in later life, including allergies. The initial exposure to allergens seems to occur in utero, but little is known about allergen-induced placental cytokine and chemokine release. The release of several cytokines and chemokines from placenta tissue after exposure to mast cell degranulator compound 48/80 or apple allergen in placentas from allergic and healthy mothers was to be analysed. Four placentas from women with apple allergy and three controls were applied in a placental perfusion model with two separate cotyledons simultaneously perfused with and without apple allergen (Mal d 1). Two control placentas were perfused with compound 48/80. In outflow, histamine was quantified spectrophotofluorometrically, IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-10, TNF and IFN-γ by a cytometric multiplex bead array and IL-13 and CXCL10, CXCL11, CCL17 and CCL22 with an in-house multiplex Luminex assay. Compound 48/80 induced a rapid release of histamine, CXCL10, CXCL11, CCL17 and CCL22, but not of the other factors. Apple allergen induced a time-dependent release of IL-6 and TNF, but not of histamine, in placentas of women with apple allergy compared with the unstimulated cotyledon. CCL17 levels were slightly increased after allergen stimulation in control placentas. Allergens can induce placental cytokines and chemokines distinctly in allergic and healthy mothers. These mediators may affect the prenatal development of the immune system and modify the risk of diseases related to immune disorders in childhood such as allergies.

  19. Analyses of Expressed Sequence Tags from Apple1

    PubMed Central

    Newcomb, Richard D.; Crowhurst, Ross N.; Gleave, Andrew P.; Rikkerink, Erik H.A.; Allan, Andrew C.; Beuning, Lesley L.; Bowen, Judith H.; Gera, Emma; Jamieson, Kim R.; Janssen, Bart J.; Laing, William A.; McArtney, Steve; Nain, Bhawana; Ross, Gavin S.; Snowden, Kimberley C.; Souleyre, Edwige J.F.; Walton, Eric F.; Yauk, Yar-Khing

    2006-01-01

    The domestic apple (Malus domestica; also known as Malus pumila Mill.) has become a model fruit crop in which to study commercial traits such as disease and pest resistance, grafting, and flavor and health compound biosynthesis. To speed the discovery of genes involved in these traits, develop markers to map genes, and breed new cultivars, we have produced a substantial expressed sequence tag collection from various tissues of apple, focusing on fruit tissues of the cultivar Royal Gala. Over 150,000 expressed sequence tags have been collected from 43 different cDNA libraries representing 34 different tissues and treatments. Clustering of these sequences results in a set of 42,938 nonredundant sequences comprising 17,460 tentative contigs and 25,478 singletons, together representing what we predict are approximately one-half the expressed genes from apple. Many potential molecular markers are abundant in the apple transcripts. Dinucleotide repeats are found in 4,018 nonredundant sequences, mainly in the 5′-untranslated region of the gene, with a bias toward one repeat type (containing AG, 88%) and against another (repeats containing CG, 0.1%). Trinucleotide repeats are most common in the predicted coding regions and do not show a similar degree of sequence bias in their representation. Bi-allelic single-nucleotide polymorphisms are highly abundant with one found, on average, every 706 bp of transcribed DNA. Predictions of the numbers of representatives from protein families indicate the presence of many genes involved in disease resistance and the biosynthesis of flavor and health-associated compounds. Comparisons of some of these gene families with Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) suggest instances where there have been duplications in the lineages leading to apple of biosynthetic and regulatory genes that are expressed in fruit. This resource paves the way for a concerted functional genomics effort in this important temperate fruit crop. PMID:16531485

  20. Apple replant disease and the –omics: interaction of apple rootstock metabolome and the soil microbiome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Apple replant disease (ARD) negatively impacts tree health and reduces crop yield in new orchard plantings. Use of tolerant rootstock cultivars can diminish the growth limiting effects of ARD; however specific rootstock attributes enabling ARD tolerance are not understood. Systems biology tools were...

  1. Comment on "Ion distribution function in a plasma with uniform electric field" [Phys. Plasmas 19, 113703 (2012)].

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mustafaev, Alex; Sukhomlinov, Vladimir; Timofeev, Nikolay

    2016-08-01

    The comparison between experimental data of ion distribution function at the parent gas plasma obtained by the authors and results of calculations presented by Lampe et al. are considered. It is shown that the experimental and calculated angular distributions of ions in the case at least of argon differ considerably. The analysis of Lampe et al. assumptions showed that the main reasons of these discrepancies were the assumptions of ion distribution function independence on field orientation and independence of charge exchange cross-section on the relative velocity of ion and atom.

  2. Comments on “Thermal relic abundances of particles with velocity-dependent interactions” [Phys. Lett. B 687 (2010) 275

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iminniyaz, Hoernisa

    2013-06-01

    We reexamine the effect of kinetic decoupling on the relic density of the non-relativistic particles whose annihilation rate is increased by Sommerfeld enhancement. I claim that the result in Dent et al. (2010) [1] is wrong in the case of kinetic decoupling for small coupling constant α.

  3. Comment on "Scaling properties of information-theoretic quantities in density functional reactivity theory" by C. Rong, T. Lu, P. W. Ayers, P. K. Chattaraj and S. Liu, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2015, 17, 4977-4988.

    PubMed

    Bohórquez, Hugo J

    2015-12-21

    The scaling properties of density functionals are key for fundamentally understanding density functional theory. Accordingly, the dependence of density functionals on the number of particles is of paramount relevance. The numerical exploration by Rong et al. addressed N-scaling for a set of quantum information quantities; they found linear relationships between each one of them and the electronic population for atoms, molecules, and atoms in molecules. The main motivation for their computational work was that the theoretical scaling of these quantities is unknown; however, these scaling properties can be analytically determined. Here I reveal the derivation of the N-scaling rules for the quantities studied by Rong et al. by following the procedure introduced in Comput. Theor. Chem., 2015, 1053, 38. In addition, a new atomic scaling rule explains the linear relationship between atomic populations and atomic values of the same quantum information quantities.

  4. Special issue: diagnostics of atmospheric pressure microplasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruggeman, Peter; Czarnetzki, Uwe; Tachibana, Kunihide

    2013-11-01

    applications. Diagnostics are pivotal to both the development of models and the optimization and exploration of novel applications. Consequently, this special issue is focused on the various aspects and challenges for diagnostics in microplasmas. In addition, previous special issues on the topic of microplasmas have already covered many aspects of source development, applications and modelling [28-31]. The reader who wishes to access additional background information on microplasmas is referred to the following review papers [32-35]. We would like to thank all the contributors and the editorial staff who were of tremendous support in the preparation of this special issue. It is our sincere hope that you enjoy reading this special issue and that it will be a reference and helpful guidance for young researchers embarking in the field of microplasmas. The continued effort to increase our understanding of plasmas by modelling and diagnostics is of key importance for plasma science and the development of novel technologies. References [1] Eden J G, Park S-J, Herring C M and Bulson J M 2011 J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 44 224011 [2] Lucas N, Ermel V, Kurrat M and Buttgenbach S 2008 J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 41 215202 [3] Karnassios V 2004 Spectrochim. Acta B 59 909-28 [4] Mariotti D and Sankaran RM 2010 J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 43 323001 [5] Sakai O and Tachibana K 2012 Plasma Sources Sci. Technol. 21 013001 [6] Starikovskaia S M 2006 Plasma assisted ignition and combustion J. Phys. D.: Appl. Phys. 39 R265-99 [7] Fridman G, Friedman G, Gutsol A, Shekhter A B, Vasilets V N and Fridman A 2008 Plasma Process. Polym. 5 503-33 [8] Eden G et al 2013 IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci. 41 661-75 [9] Siemens W 1857 Poggendorffs. Ann. Phys. Chem. 102 66-122 [10] Bruggeman P and Brandenburg R 2013 J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 46 464001 [11] Montello A et al 2013 J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 46 464002 [12] Schröder D et al 2013 J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 46 464003 [13] Verreycken T et al 2013 J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 46

  5. Aphis pomi (Hemiptera: Aphididae) population development, shoot characteristics, and antibiosis resistance in different apple genotypes.

    PubMed

    Stoeckli, Sibylle; Mody, Karsten; Dorn, Silvia

    2008-08-01

    In high-value crops such as apple, Malus X domestica (Borkh.), insecticidal pest control is of high relevance. The use of resistant apple cultivars can increase the sustainability of pest management in apple orchards. Besides variation in plant chemistry that may influence plant resistance by antibiosis or antixenosis, plant growth characteristics also can affect plant susceptibility to pests such as aphids. Variable susceptibility to the apple aphid, Aphis pomi De Geer (Hemiptera: Aphididae), has been described for different apple cultivars. These observations were based on phenotypic surveys and no information on genetically based apple resistance to A. pomi is yet available. The objective of this study was to relate shoot growth characteristics with aphid population development, and to assess the genetic background of apple antibiosis-based resistance to A. pomi by quantitative trait loci (QTL) analysis. Aphid population development was repeatedly studied in the field in sleeve cages attached to 200 apple trees of different genotypes. Aphid population development was positively correlated to shoot length and growth, and it also was affected by climatic conditions. Indications for antibiosis-based resistance to A. pomi remained weak in the studied apple genotypes, and the only detected putative QTL on linkage group 11 of'Fiesta' apples was not stable for the different replications of the experiment. This lack of quantifiable resistance may be partly explained by environmental conditions related to aphid development in sleeve cages.

  6. Dopant-assisted atmospheric pressure photoionization of patulin in apple juice and apple-based food with liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kai; Wong, Jon W; Mai, Huy; Trucksess, Mary W

    2014-05-07

    A dopant-assisted atmospheric pressure photoionization (APPI) with liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method was developed to determine patulin in apple juice and apple-based food. Different dopants, dopant flow rates, and LC separation conditions were evaluated. Using toluene as the dopant, the LC-APPI-MS/MS method achieved a linear calibration from 12.5 to 2000 μg/L (r(2) > 0.99). Matrix-dependent limits of quantitation (LOQs) were from 8 μg/L (solvent) to 12 μg/L (apple juice). [(13)C]-Patulin-fortified apple juice samples were directly analyzed by the LC-APPI-MS/MS method. Other apple-based food was fortified with [(13)C]-patulin, diluted using water (1% formic acid), centrifuged, and filtered, followed by LC-APPI-MS/MS analysis. In clear apple juice, unfiltered apple cider, applesauce, and apple-based baby food, average recoveries were 101 ± 6% (50 μg/kg), 103 ± 5% (250 μg/kg), and 102 ± 5% (1000 μg/kg) (av ± SD, n = 16). Using the suggested method, patulin was detected in 3 of 30 collected market samples with concentrations ranging from

  7. Consumption of apples is associated with a better diet quality and reduced risk of obesity in children: National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 2003-2010

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Most children do not meet the recommendation for fruit consumption. Apples are the second most commonly consumed fruit in the US; however, no studies have examined the association of total apple products, apples, apple sauce, and 100 % apple juice consumption on diet quality and weight/adiposity in ...

  8. Simulated photodetachment spectra of AlH2-

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mok, Daniel K. W.; Lee, Edmond P. F.; Chau, Foo-tim; Dyke, John M.

    2013-07-01

    We have carried out high-level ab initio calculations on AlH2 and its anion, as well as Franck-Condon factor calculations, which include anharmonicity and Duschinsky rotation, to simulate the photodetachment spectrum of AlH2-, with the aim of assigning the very recently reported photodetachment spectrum of AlH2- [X. Zhang, H. Wang, E. Collins, A. Lim, G. Ganteför, B. Kiran, H. Schnöckel, B. Eichhorn, and K. Bowen, J. Chem. Phys. 138, 124303 (2013)], 10.1063/1.4796200. However, our simulated spectra do not support the assignment of the reported experimental spectrum to AlH2-.

  9. A simplified extraction schema to for the analytical characterization of apple orchard soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sager, Manfred

    2014-05-01

    the minority elements Al-B-Ba-K-Na-S in the first factor, whereas Fe-Mn-Ti-La-Li-Sr-Y formed a group of its own. Both groups were rather independent from nutrient P as well as from the pedogenic oxides, obtained from Al-Fe-Mn-Ti released in oxalate. The oxalate soluble fraction was independent form available nutrient levels, and parted into 5 groups, of which one contained the anions B-S-Si, another one the contaminants As-Cd-Pb. Finally, the relations of these soil data to apple leaves from May and August, apple blossom leaves and apple fruits grown at these sites will be discussed, covering 50 varieties. The proposed method permits to obtain informations about common cations including trace elements, and the non-metals phosphorus, silicon, sulfur, boron and iodine simultaneously, which could be a gate to find new relations among them.

  10. Comment on 'Wave functions for a Duffin-Kemmer-Petiau particle in a time-dependent potential' [J. Math. Phys. 48, 073515 (2007)

    SciTech Connect

    Castro, L. B.; Castro, A. S. de

    2010-03-15

    It is shown that the paper 'Wave functions for a Duffin-Kemmer-Petiau particle in a time-dependent potential' by Merad and Bensaid [J. Math. Phys. 48, 073515 (2007)] is not correct in using inadvertently a non-Hermitian Hamiltonian in a formalism that does require Hermitian Hamiltonians.

  11. Note: Derivation of two-photon circular dichroism—Addendum to “Two-photon circular dichroism” [J. Chem. Phys. 62, 1006 (1975)

    SciTech Connect

    Friese, Daniel H.

    2015-09-07

    This addendum shows the detailed derivation of the fundamental equations for two-photon circular dichroism which are given in a very condensed form in the original publication [I. Tinoco, J. Chem. Phys. 62, 1006 (1975)]. In addition, some minor errors are corrected and some of the derivations in the original publication are commented.

  12. Comment on ``Barut-Girardello and Klauder-Perelomov coherent states for the Kravchuk functions'' [J. Math. Phys. 48, 112106 (2007)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fakhri, H.; Dehghani, A.

    2008-04-01

    We call attention to the misconstructions in a paper recently published in this journal [A. Chenaghlou and O. Faizy, J. Math. Phys. 48, 112106 (2007)]. It is shown that the constructed Barut-Girardello coherent states are problematic from the view points of the definition and the measure. The claimed coherencies for the Kravchuk functions cannot actually exist.

  13. Comment on: “From classical to modern ether-drift experiments: the narrow window for a preferred frame” [Phys. Lett. A 333 (2004) 355

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerra, Vasco; de Abreu, Rodrigo

    2007-02-01

    In a recent article [M. Consoli, E. Costanzo, Phys. Lett. A 333 (2004) 355], M. Consoli and E. Costanzo have investigated classical and modern aether drift experiments and explored the narrow window for detection of a preferred reference frame. This Letter proposes an easy to perform variant of Fizeau's experiment, which may confirm or deny Consoli Costanzo's claims.

  14. Comment on "Superposition of elliptic functions as solutions for a large number of nonlinear equations" [J. Math. Phys. 56, 032104 (2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yi; Li, Ji-Bin

    2015-08-01

    By using the method of planar dynamical systems, we solve exactly a nonlinear Schrödinger (NLS) equation discussed by Khare and Saxena [J. Math. Phys. 56, 032104 (2015)], and give the exact explicit parametric representations of all the traveling wave solutions.

  15. Collaboration for Education with the Apple Learning Interchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Patrick A.; Zimmerman, T.; Knierman, K. A.

    2006-12-01

    We present a progressive effort to deliver online education and outreach resources in collaboration with the Apple Learning Interchange, a free community for educators. We have created a resource site with astronomy activities, video training for the activities, and the possibility of interactive training through video chat services. Also in development is an online textbook for graduate and advanced undergraduate courses in stellar evolution, featuring an updatable and annotated text with multimedia content, online lectures, podcasts, and a framework for interactive simulation activities. Both sites will be highly interactive, combining online discussions, the opportunity for live video interaction, and a growing library of student work samples. This effort promises to provide a compelling model for collaboration between science educators and corporations. As scientists, we provide content knowledge and a compelling reason to communicate, while Apple provides technical expertise, a deep knowledge of online education, and a way for us to reach a wide audience of higher education, community outreach, and K-12 educators.

  16. Flavonoid and hydroxycinnamate profiles of english apple ciders.

    PubMed

    Marks, Serena C; Mullen, William; Crozier, Alan

    2007-10-17

    Seventeen phenolic compounds in 23 English apple ciders were identified and quantified by HPLC-PDA-MS (2). The total phenolic content of the ciders varied greatly ranging from 44 to 1559 mg/L. Four groups of compounds were identified, flavan-3-ols, hydroxycinnamates, flavonols, and dihydrochalcones. Hydroxycinnamates were the predominant group of phenolics in the majority of the ciders. Procyanidins were analyzed by HPLC after thiolysis, and total procyanidin content ranged from 8 to 722 mg/L and an average degree of polymerization of 2.5-3.5. This investigation of a wide range of ciders has shown a substantial variation in the profile and quantity of the phenolics. The analysis of single variety ciders highlighted the importance of using an apple cultivar with a high phenolic content to produce a phenolic-rich cider. Adaptations to the cider-making process could be used to increase the phenolic content with potential health benefits.

  17. Stimulation of Ethylene Production in Apple Tissue Slices by Methionine

    PubMed Central

    Lieberman, Morris; Kunishi, Alice; Mapson, L. W.; Wardale, D. A.

    1966-01-01

    Methionine can induce more than a 100% increase in ethylene production by apple tissue slices. The increased amount of ethylene derives from carbons 3 and 4 of methionine. Only post-climacteric fruit tissues are stimulated by methionine, and stimulation is optimum after 8 months' storage. Copper chelators such as sodium diethyl dithiocarbamate and cuprizone very markedly inhibit ethylene production by tissue slices. Carbon monoxide does not effect ethylene production by the slices. These data suggest that the mechanism for the conversion of methionine to ethylene, in apple tissues, is similar to the previously described model system for producing ethylene from methionine and reduced copper. Therefore, it is suggested that one of the ethylene-forming systems in tissues derives from methionine and proceeds to ethylene via a copper enzyme system which may be a peroxidase. PMID:16656267

  18. Colonic response to dietary fibre from carrot, cabbage, apple, bran.

    PubMed

    Cummings, J H; Branch, W; Jenkins, D J; Southgate, D A; Houston, H; James, W P

    1978-01-07

    Approximately 20 g/day of concentrated dietary fibre from carrot, cabbage, apple, bran, and guar gum was added to the controlled basal diet of nineteen healthy volunteers. Faecal weight increased by 12% on bran, 69% on cabbage, 59% on carrot, 40% on apple, and 20% on guar gum. These changes in faecal weight were correlated with an increased intake of pentose-containing polysaccharides from the fibre. On the basal diet there were pronounced individual differences in faecal weight, and from these the response of subjects to the fibre preparations could be predicted. Addition of fibre shortened mean transit-time through the gut and significantly diluted an inert marker in the faeces. Diet-induced changes in colonic function may explain international differences in the prevalence of colonic disease, whilst personal variation in the response to dietary fibre may determine individual susceptibility to large-bowel disease within a community.

  19. Active-passive path-length encoded (APPLE) Doppler OCT

    PubMed Central

    Wartak, Andreas; Haindl, Richard; Trasischker, Wolfgang; Baumann, Bernhard; Pircher, Michael; Hitzenberger, Christoph K.

    2016-01-01

    We present a novel active-passive path-length encoded (APPLE) swept source Doppler optical coherence tomography (DOCT) approach, enabling three-dimensional velocity vector reconstruction of moving particles without prior knowledge of the orientation of motion. The developed APPLE DOCT setup allows for non-invasive blood flow measurements in vivo and was primarily designed for quantitative human ocular blood flow investigations. The system’s performance was demonstrated by in vitro flow phantom as well as in vivo retinal vessel bifurcation measurements. Furthermore, total retinal blood flow – a biomarker aiding in diagnosis and monitoring of major ocular diseases such as glaucoma, diabetic retinopathy or central/branch retinal vein occlusion – was determined in the eyes of healthy human volunteers. PMID:28018739

  20. A new antioxidant beverage produced with green tea and apple.

    PubMed

    Rubio-Perez, Jose M; Vidal-Guevara, Maria L; Zafrilla, Pilar; Morillas-Ruiz, Juana M

    2014-08-01

    Green tea and apple are natural products with health benefits. These healthy properties are linked closely to the antioxidant compounds, mainly phenolic compounds. These antioxidant compounds have a potential for preventing and treating cancer, cardiovascular, inflammatory and neurodegenerative diseases in humans. The aim of the present work was to design a new beverage with high antioxidant power combining extracts of green tea and apple, studying the antioxidant composition and activity, organoleptic properties (colour) and stability status during storage at different temperatures. The majority compounds identified in the beverage were flavan-3-ols, being the (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate which had the highest concentration. After storage, floridzine was the compound with lower decrease of concentration. The new designed beverage had a good colour, and high antioxidant activity and stability at room temperature, so that the beverage needs no refrigeration, showing potential for the development of new healthy functional beverages.

  1. Slow softening of Kanzi apples (Malus×domestica L.) is associated with preservation of pectin integrity in middle lamella.

    PubMed

    Gwanpua, Sunny George; Verlinden, Bert E; Hertog, Maarten L A T M; Nicolai, Bart M; Hendrickx, Marc; Geeraerd, Annemie

    2016-11-15

    Kanzi is a recently developed apple cultivar that has an extremely low ethylene production, and maintains its crispiness during ripening. To identify key determinants of the slow softening behaviour of Kanzi apples, a comparative analysis of pectin biochemistry and tissue fracture pattern during different ripening stages of Kanzi apples was performed against Golden Delicious, a rapid softening cultivar. While substantial pectin depolymerisation and solubilisation was observed during softening in Golden Delicious apples, no depolymerisation or increased solubilisation was observed in Kanzi apples. Moreover, tissue failure during ripening was mainly by cell breakage in Kanzi apples and, in contrast, by cell separation in Golden Delicious apples. Kanzi apples had lower activity of beta-galactosidase, with no decline in the extent of branching of the pectin chain. A sudden decrease in firmness observed during senescence in Kanzi apples was not due to middle lamella dissolution, as tissue failure still occurred by cell breakage.

  2. A Tour of the Goldstone-Apple Valley Radio Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ardenski, Brooke; Stephan, George R.

    1997-01-01

    Goldstone-Apple Valley Radio Telescope (GAVRT) is located in a remote area of the Mojave Desert, 40 miles north of Barstow, California. The antenna, identified as DSS-12, is a 34-meter diameter dish, 11 times the diameter of a ten foot microwave dish used for satellite television. DSS-12 has been used by NASA to communicate with robotic space probes for more than thirty years.

  3. Histological effects of calcium chloride in stored apples

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mature apples, Malus domestica Borkh., cv. 'Golden Delicious' were immersed for 2 min in 0, 0.14, 0.27, or 0.41 mol L-1 (0, 2%, 4%, or 6%, respectively) aqueous solutions (w/v) of CaCl2 at 0 or 68.95 Kpa, and stored at 0°C. Histological samples of peel/cortex were taken at harvest and at four month...

  4. Apple Tree Dental: An Innovative Oral Health Solution.

    PubMed

    Jacobi, Deborah; Helgeson, Michael J

    2015-08-01

    The Surgeon General's Report on Oral Health called attention to the "silent epidemic" of dental disease. Older adults and other vulnerable people continue to suffer disproportionately from dental disease and inadequate access to care. As a society and as dental professionals, we face multiple challenges to care for our aging patients, parents and grandparents. Apple Tree Dental's community collaborative practice model illustrates a sustainable, patient-centered approach to overcoming barriers to care across the lifespan.

  5. Novel Engineered Compound Semiconductor Heterostructures for Advanced Electronics Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-06-22

    growth can also affect the electrical properties of carbon- doped InGaAs, and must be studied further.4,5 In addition, researchers need to attain higher...1991. 9. J.M. Dallesasse et al. Appl. Phys. Lett., vol. 58, p. 974, March 1991. 10. N. EI- Zein et al. J. Appl. Phys., vol. 70 p. 2031, August 1991...and Be-doped InGaP. J.M. Dallesasse, I. Szafranek, J.N. Baillargeon, N. El- Zein , N. Holonyak, Jr., G.E. Stillman, and K.Y. Cheng. J. Appl. Phys., 68

  6. Protection of epigallocatechin gallate against degradation during in vitro digestion using apple pomace as a carrier.

    PubMed

    Wu, Liangyu; Sanguansri, Luz; Augustin, Mary Ann

    2014-12-17

    Apple pomace, a byproduct of the apple juice processing industry, may be used as a matrix for carrying phytochemicals. High-pressure processing (600 MPa for 5 min) or heat treatment (121 °C for 5 min) of wet apple pomace can increase the shelf life of the pomace but may influence the carrier properties of the wet pomace for phytochemicals. We examined the effects of these processing treatments on the adsorption capacity of apple pomace for epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) and the stability of EGCG in simulated gastrointestinal fluids in vitro. Both processing treatments reduced the adsorption capacity but protected EGCG against degradation in the simulated gastrointestinal fluids. The extent of EGCG degradation in simulated gastrointestinal fluids in vitro in the presence of apple pomace was not influenced by gastric and intestinal enzymes, suggesting that pH had the overriding influence on EGCG degradation. This study showed the potential of apple pomace as a carrier for EGCG in functional food applications.

  7. Ursolic acid from apple pomace and traditional plants: A valuable triterpenoid with functional properties.

    PubMed

    Cargnin, Simone Tasca; Gnoatto, Simone Baggio

    2017-04-01

    Apple juice production generates a large amount of residue comprising mainly peels, seeds, and pulp, known as apple pomace. In the global context, Brazil ranks 11th in apple production and thousands of tons of apple pomace are produced every year. This by-product is little explored, since it is a rich and heterogeneous mixture, containing interesting phytochemical groups. Among them, ursolic acid (UA) has attracted attention because of its therapeutic potential. UA is a pentacyclic triterpene found too in several traditional plants, and has shown several functional properties such as antibacterial, antiprotozoal, anti-inflammatory and antitumor. Therefore, this review attempts to shed some light on the economical viability of apple and apple pomace as sources of bioactive compounds, highlighting the UA extraction, and its main functional properties published in the last 5years (2010-2015).

  8. Texture Studies and Compression Behaviour of Apple Flesh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, Bryony; Fonseca, Celia

    Compressive behavior of fruit flesh has been studied using mechanical tests and microstructural analysis. Apple flesh from two cultivars (Braeburn and Cox's Orange Pippin) was investigated to represent the extremes in a spectrum of fruit flesh types, hard and juicy (Braeburn) and soft and mealy (Cox's). Force-deformation curves produced during compression of unconstrained discs of apple flesh followed trends predicted from the literature for each of the "juicy" and "mealy" types. The curves display the rupture point and, in some cases, a point of inflection that may be related to the point of incipient juice release. During compression these discs of flesh generally failed along the centre line, perpendicular to the direction of loading, through a barrelling mechanism. Cryo-Scanning Electron Microscopy (cryo-SEM) was used to examine the behavior of the parenchyma cells during fracture and compression using a purpose designed sample holder and compression tester. Fracture behavior reinforced the difference in mechanical properties between crisp and mealy fruit flesh. During compression testing prior to cryo-SEM imaging the apple flesh was constrained perpendicular to the direction of loading. Microstructural analysis suggests that, in this arrangement, the material fails along a compression front ahead of the compressing plate. Failure progresses by whole lines of parenchyma cells collapsing, or rupturing, with juice filling intercellular spaces, before the compression force is transferred to the next row of cells.

  9. Development of complete hydrolysis of pectins from apple pomace.

    PubMed

    Wikiera, Agnieszka; Mika, Magdalena; Starzyńska-Janiszewska, Anna; Stodolak, Bożena

    2015-04-01

    Enzymatically extracted pectins have a more complex structure than those obtained by conventional methods. As a result, they are less susceptible to hydrolysis, which makes the precise determination of their composition difficult. The aim of the study was to develop a method of complete hydrolysis of enzymatically extracted apple pectins. Substrates were pectins isolated from apple pomace by the use of xylanase and multicatalytic preparation Celluclast and apple pomace. Hydrolysis was performed by a chemical method with 2M TFA at 100 °C and 120 °C and a combined acidic/enzymatic method. After hydrolysis, the contents of galacturonic acid and neutral sugars were measured by HPLC. Complete hydrolysis of polygalacturonic acid occurred after 2.5h incubation with 2M TFA at 120 °C. The efficient hydrolysis of neutral sugars in pectins was performed with 2M TFA at 100 °C for 2.5h. Monomers most susceptible to concentrated acid were rhamnose, mannose and arabinose.

  10. Postharvest treatments for the reduction of mancozeb in fresh apples.

    PubMed

    Hwang, E S; Cash, J N; Zabik, M J

    2001-06-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effectiveness of chlorine, chlorine dioxide, ozone, and hydrogen peroxyacetic acid (HPA) treatments on the degradation of mancozeb and ethylenethiourea (ETU) in apples. This study was based on model experiments at neutral pH and temperature. Fresh apples were treated with two different levels of mancozeb (1 and 10 microg/mL). Several of the treatments were effective in reducing or removing mancozeb and ETU residues on spiked apples. Mancozeb residues decreased 56-99% with chlorine and 36-87% with chlorine dioxide treatments. ETU was completely degraded by 500 ppm of calcium hypochlorite and 10 ppm of chlorine dioxide at a 1 ppm spike level. However, at a 10 ppm spike level, the effectiveness of ETU degradation was lower than observed at 1 ppm level. Mancozeb residues decreased 56-97% with ozone treatment. At 1 and 3 ppm of ozone, no ETU residue was detected at 1 ppm of spiked mancozeb after both 3 and 30 min. HPA was also effective in degrading the mancozeb residues, with 44-99% reduction depending on treatment time and HPA concentrations. ETU was completely degraded at 500 ppm of HPA after 30 min of reaction time. These treatments indicated good potential for the removal of pesticide residues on fruit and in processed products.

  11. [Application of fingerprint chromatogram in quality assessment of apple cider].

    PubMed

    Xu, Kangzhen; Song, Jirong; Ren, Yinghui; Ma, Haixia; Huang, Jie; Du, Xiaodan

    2007-01-01

    Fingerprints of 14 apple cider samples from different manufacturers were studied using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with an electrochemical detector (ECD). The analysis was carried out on a Zorbax SB-C18 column at 30 degrees C with 2% (v/v) methanol aqueous solution-4% (v/v) acetic acid aqueous solution as mobile phase at a flow rate of 0.8 mL/min. The electrochemical detector was set at 0.7 V. By calculating the relative retention times of certain peaks with chlorogenic acid as the reference standard, 8 common peaks in the samples were analyzed. Relative retention times for the common peaks of various samples were calculated, and the similarities of all the samples were figured out through each peak area with the vectorial angle cosine method and correlative coefficient method. The results indicated that apple cider products of the same manufacturer have good similarity, with the similarities greater than 92.7%. According to this experiment, effectual microcosmic information for apple cider analysis was gained through HPLC and ECD. Moreover, this test method will help the analysis and the control of product quality, the development of new products and the establishment of trade standard.

  12. Chemopreventive effect of apple and berry fruits against colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Jaganathan, Saravana Kumar; Vellayappan, Muthu Vignesh; Narasimhan, Gayathri; Supriyanto, Eko; Octorina Dewi, Dyah Ekashanti; Narayanan, Aqilah Leela T; Balaji, Arunpandian; Subramanian, Aruna Priyadarshini; Yusof, Mustafa

    2014-12-07

    Colon cancer arises due to the conversion of precancerous polyps (benign) found in the inner lining of the colon. Prevention is better than cure, and this is very true with respect to colon cancer. Various epidemiologic studies have linked colorectal cancer with food intake. Apple and berry juices are widely consumed among various ethnicities because of their nutritious values. In this review article, chemopreventive effects of these fruit juices against colon cancer are discussed. Studies dealing with bioavailability, in vitro and in vivo effects of apple and berry juices are emphasized in this article. A thorough literature survey indicated that various phenolic phytochemicals present in these fruit juices have the innate potential to inhibit colon cancer cell lines. This review proposes the need for more preclinical evidence for the effects of fruit juices against different colon cancer cells, and also strives to facilitate clinical studies using these juices in humans in large trials. The conclusion of the review is that these apple and berry juices will be possible candidates in the campaign against colon cancer.

  13. Anti-inflammatory procyanidins and triterpenes in 109 apple varieties.

    PubMed

    Andre, Christelle M; Greenwood, Jeffrey M; Walker, Edward G; Rassam, Maysoon; Sullivan, Michael; Evers, Danièle; Perry, Nigel B; Laing, William A

    2012-10-24

    We evaluated the potential of apple to reduce inflammation. Phenolic compounds and triterpenes were analyzed in 109 apple cultivars. Total phenolics ranged from 29 to 7882 μg g(-1) of fresh weight (FW) in the flesh and from 733 to 4868 μg g(-1) FW in the skin, with flavanols including epicatechin and procyanidins as major components. Ursolic (44.7 to 3522 μg g(-1) FW) and oleanolic (47.2 to 838 μg g(-1) FW) acids dominated the skin triterpene profile. Five chemically contrasting cultivars were fractionated and their immune-modulating activity measured using two cell-based assays targeting key points in the inflammation process. Cultivars exhibiting high contents of procyanidins were the most potent at inhibiting NF-κB while triterpene-rich fractions reduced the promoter activity of the gene of TNFα. This study provides new insights into how apple genetic diversity could be used to alleviate inflammation.

  14. Nutrient recovery from apple pomace waste by vermicomposting technology.

    PubMed

    Hanc, Ales; Chadimova, Zuzana

    2014-09-01

    The present work was focused on vermicomposting apple pomace waste and its mixtures with straw in volume proportions of 25%, 50%, and 75%. The feasibility was evaluated on the basis of agrochemical properties and earthworm biomass. Vermicomposting was able to reduce the weight and volume of the feedstock by 65% and 85%, respectively. The resulting vermicomposts were characterized by slightly acidic to neutral pH (5.9-6.9), and optimal EC (1.6-4.4mS/cm) and C:N ratios (13-14). The total content of nutrients increased during vermicomposting for all of the treatments with the following average final values: N=2.8%, P=0.85%, K=2.3%, and Mg=0.38%. The addition of straw to apple pomace did not enhance earthworm biomass, but did increase the available content of nutrients during vermicomposting. The data reveals that vermicomposting is a suitable technology for the decomposition of apple pomace waste into a value added product.

  15. Chemopreventive effect of apple and berry fruits against colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jaganathan, Saravana Kumar; Vellayappan, Muthu Vignesh; Narasimhan, Gayathri; Supriyanto, Eko; Octorina Dewi, Dyah Ekashanti; Narayanan, Aqilah Leela T; Balaji, Arunpandian; Subramanian, Aruna Priyadarshini; Yusof, Mustafa

    2014-01-01

    Colon cancer arises due to the conversion of precancerous polyps (benign) found in the inner lining of the colon. Prevention is better than cure, and this is very true with respect to colon cancer. Various epidemiologic studies have linked colorectal cancer with food intake. Apple and berry juices are widely consumed among various ethnicities because of their nutritious values. In this review article, chemopreventive effects of these fruit juices against colon cancer are discussed. Studies dealing with bioavailability, in vitro and in vivo effects of apple and berry juices are emphasized in this article. A thorough literature survey indicated that various phenolic phytochemicals present in these fruit juices have the innate potential to inhibit colon cancer cell lines. This review proposes the need for more preclinical evidence for the effects of fruit juices against different colon cancer cells, and also strives to facilitate clinical studies using these juices in humans in large trials. The conclusion of the review is that these apple and berry juices will be possible candidates in the campaign against colon cancer. PMID:25493015

  16. Physical and antibacterial properties of edible films formulated with apple skin polyphenols.

    PubMed

    Du, W-X; Olsen, C W; Avena-Bustillos, R J; Friedman, M; McHugh, T H

    2011-03-01

    Fruit and vegetable skins have polyphenolic compounds, terpenes, and phenols with antimicrobial and antioxidant activity. These flavoring plant essential oil components are generally regarded as safe. Edible films made from fruits or vegetables containing apple skin polyphenols have the potential to be used commercially to protect food against contamination by pathogenic bacteria. The main objective of this study was to evaluate physical properties as well as antimicrobial activities against Listeria monocytogenes, Escherichia coli O157:H7, and Salmonella enterica of apple skin polyphenols at 0% to 10% (w/w) concentrations in apple puree film-forming solutions formulated into edible films. Commercial apple skin polyphenol powder had a water activity of 0.44 and high total soluble phenolic compounds and antioxidant capacity (995.3 mg chlorogenic acid/100 g and 14.4 mg Trolox/g, respectively). Antimicrobial activities of edible film containing apple skin polyphenols were determined by the overlay method. Apple edible film with apple skin polyphenols was highly effective against L. monocytogenes. The minimum concentration need to inactive L. monocytogenes was 1.5%. However, apple skin polyphenols did not show any antimicrobial effect against E. coli O157:H7 and S. enterica even at 10% level. The presence of apple skin polyphenols reduced water vapor permeability of films. Apple skin polyphenols increased elongation of films and darkened the color of films. The results of the present study show that apple skin polyphenols can be used to prepare apple-based antimicrobial edible films with good physical properties for food applications by direct contact.

  17. Cold Environment Assessment Tool (CEAT) User’s Guide for Apple Mobile Devices

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-01

    CEAT) application (from here on also referred to as the “app”) for iOS (Apple mobile operating system) mobile devices (smart phones and tablets...ARL-TR-7324 ● JUNE 2015 US Army Research Laboratory Cold Environment Assessment Tool (CEAT) User’s Guide for Apple Mobile ...Tool (CEAT) User’s Guide for Apple Mobile Devices by David Sauter Computational and Information Sciences Directorate, ARL

  18. Infectivity of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts after storage of experimentally contaminated apples.

    PubMed

    Macarisin, Dumitru; Santín, Mónica; Bauchan, Gary; Fayer, Ronald

    2010-10-01

    Irrigation water and washing water have been inferred to be associated with contamination of fresh fruits and vegetables with pathogenic microorganisms infectious for humans. The objective of the present study was to determine whether apples experimentally contaminated with Cryptosporidium oocysts represent a food safety concern. Laser scanning confocal microscopy revealed no morphological changes in Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts attached to apples after 6 weeks of cold storage, suggesting that oocysts might remain viable and possibly infectious during prolonged storage. Mice were fed apple peels from experimentally contaminated apples to determine whether oocysts had remained infectious on apples stored for 4 weeks. All mice developed cryptosporidiosis. To evaluate the strength of oocyst attachment to apples, washing methods that have been reported to be helpful for recovery of oocysts from various foodstuffs were evaluated, except that the intensity of washing was increased in the present study. None of the tested washing methods succeeded in completely removing oocysts from the apple peel. The most efficient removal (37.5%) was achieved by rigorous manual washing in water with a detergent and by agitation in an orbital shaker with Tris-sodium dodecyl sulfate buffer. Glycine and phosphate-buffered saline buffers had no effect on oocyst removal. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that some oocysts were attached in deep natural crevices in the apple exocarp and others were attached to the smooth surface of the peel. Some oocysts were closely associated with what appeared to be an amorphous substance with which they might have been attached to the apple surface.

  19. Study of the cross-contamination and survival of Salmonella in fresh apples.

    PubMed

    Perez-Rodriguez, F; Begum, M; Johannessen, G S

    2014-08-01

    The present work aimed at studying the cross contamination of apples by Salmonella during the processing of commercial fresh apples and its survival capacity on apple at room temperature. For the first study, the typical process of fresh apples was simulated at laboratory scale in which an apple that was artificially contaminated by Salmonella at different concentration levels (8, 6 and 5 log cfu/apple) was introduced in one batch and processed including a simulated transport/washing step and drying step using sponges to simulate the porous material used in the industry. Results indicated that at 8 log cfu/apple, 50% fresh apples were contaminated after processing, with all analysed environmental samples being positive for the pathogen, consisting of washing water and sponges. However, at lower inoculum levels (5-6 log cfu/apple) no cross contamination was detected in apples, and only environmental samples showed contamination by Salmonella after processing including both water and sponges. Experiments on the survival of Salmonella on apple showed that the pathogen was capable to survive for 12 days, only showing a significant drop at the end of the experiment. Finally, two-class attribute sampling plans were assessed as tool to detect Salmonella in different contamination scenarios in fresh apple. This analysis indicated that with the highest inoculum level, a total of 16 apples would be needed to reach 95% of detecting Salmonella (i.e. lot rejection). In turn, when low levels were assessed (5-6 log cfu/apple), a large number of apples (n=1021) would have to be sampled to obtain the same confidence level (95%). If the environment is sampled (i.e. water and sponges), a lower number of samples would be needed to detect the pathogen. However, the feasibility of environmental sampling has not been assessed from a practical point of view. Overall, the results in this study evidenced that cross contamination by Salmonella might occur during processing of fresh apples

  20. Mapping the sensory perception of apple using descriptive sensory evaluation in a genome wide association study

    PubMed Central

    Amyotte, Beatrice; Bowen, Amy J.; Banks, Travis; Rajcan, Istvan; Somers, Daryl J.

    2017-01-01

    Breeding apples is a long-term endeavour and it is imperative that new cultivars are selected to have outstanding consumer appeal. This study has taken the approach of merging sensory science with genome wide association analyses in order to map the human perception of apple flavour and texture onto the apple genome. The goal was to identify genomic associations that could be used in breeding apples for improved fruit quality. A collection of 85 apple cultivars was examined over two years through descriptive sensory evaluation by a trained sensory panel. The trained sensory panel scored randomized sliced samples of each apple cultivar for seventeen taste, flavour and texture attributes using controlled sensory evaluation practices. In addition, the apple collection was subjected to genotyping by sequencing for marker discovery. A genome wide association analysis suggested significant genomic associations for several sensory traits including juiciness, crispness, mealiness and fresh green apple flavour. The findings include previously unreported genomic regions that could be used in apple breeding and suggest that similar sensory association mapping methods could be applied in other plants. PMID:28231290

  1. Apple App Store as a Business Model Supporting U.S. Navy Requirements

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-10-25

    Apple App Store as a Business Model Supporting U.S. Navy Requirements 25 October 2011 by Lt. Col. (Ret.) Brad R. Naegle, Senior Lecturer...DATES COVERED 00-00-2011 to 00-00-2011 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Apple App Store as a Business Model Supporting U.S. Navy Requirements 5a...in the public sector is the Apple App Store. As of October 2011, Apple lists more than 425,000 applications available. The purpose of this research is

  2. Cost-benefit trade-offs of bird activity in apple orchards.

    PubMed

    Peisley, Rebecca K; Saunders, Manu E; Luck, Gary W

    2016-01-01

    Birds active in apple orchards in south-eastern Australia can contribute positively (e.g., control crop pests) or negatively (e.g., crop damage) to crop yields. Our study is the first to identify net outcomes of these activities, using six apple orchards, varying in management intensity, in south-eastern Australia as a study system. We also conducted a predation experiment using real and artificial codling moth (Cydia pomonella) larvae (a major pest in apple crops). We found that: (1) excluding birds from branches of apple trees resulted in an average of 12.8% more apples damaged by insects; (2) bird damage to apples was low (1.9% of apples); and (3) when trading off the potential benefits (biological control) with costs (bird damage to apples), birds provided an overall net benefit to orchard growers. We found that predation of real codling moth larvae was higher than for plasticine larvae, suggesting that plasticine prey models are not useful for inferring actual predation levels. Our study shows how complex ecological interactions between birds and invertebrates affect crop yield in apples, and provides practical strategies for improving the sustainability of orchard systems.

  3. Cost-benefit trade-offs of bird activity in apple orchards

    PubMed Central

    Saunders, Manu E.; Luck, Gary W.

    2016-01-01

    Birds active in apple orchards in south–eastern Australia can contribute positively (e.g., control crop pests) or negatively (e.g., crop damage) to crop yields. Our study is the first to identify net outcomes of these activities, using six apple orchards, varying in management intensity, in south–eastern Australia as a study system. We also conducted a predation experiment using real and artificial codling moth (Cydia pomonella) larvae (a major pest in apple crops). We found that: (1) excluding birds from branches of apple trees resulted in an average of 12.8% more apples damaged by insects; (2) bird damage to apples was low (1.9% of apples); and (3) when trading off the potential benefits (biological control) with costs (bird damage to apples), birds provided an overall net benefit to orchard growers. We found that predation of real codling moth larvae was higher than for plasticine larvae, suggesting that plasticine prey models are not useful for inferring actual predation levels. Our study shows how complex ecological interactions between birds and invertebrates affect crop yield in apples, and provides practical strategies for improving the sustainability of orchard systems. PMID:27413639

  4. Loss of Body Weight and Fat and Improved Lipid Profiles in Obese Rats Fed Apple Pomace or Apple Juice Concentrate

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Kyung-Dong; Han, Chan-Kyu

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of apple pomace (AP) and apple juice concentrate (AC) supplementation on body weight and fat loss as well as lipid metabolism in obese rats fed a high-fat diet. Diet-induced obese rats were assigned to three groups (n=8 for each group): high fat diet (HFD) control, HFD containing 10% (w/w) AP, and HFD containing 10% (w/w) AC. There was also a normal diet group (n=8). After 5 weeks, body weight gain, adipose tissue weight, serum and hepatic lipid profiles, liver morphology, and adipocyte size were measured. Body weight gain, white adipose tissue (WAT) weight, serum total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and triglyceride concentrations, epididymal adipocyte size, and lesion scores were significantly lower and serum high-density lipoprotein cholesterol concentration and brown adipose tissue weights were significantly higher in the AP and AC groups compared with the HFD group. In addition, atherogenic indices in the AP and AC groups were significantly lower than in the HFD group. These results indicate that supplementing apple products such as AP and AC may help suppress body weight and WAT gain, as well as improve lipid profiles in diet-induced obese rats. PMID:23909905

  5. Triterpenoids isolated from apple peels have potent antiproliferative activity and may be partially responsible for apple's anticancer activity.

    PubMed

    He, Xiangjiu; Liu, Rui Hai

    2007-05-30

    Bioactivity-guided fractionation of apple peels was used to determine the chemical identity of bioactive constituents. Thirteen triterpenoids were isolated, and their chemical structures were identified. Antiproliferative activities of the triterpenoids against human HepG2 liver cancer cells, MCF-7 breast cancer cells, and Caco-2 colon cancer cells were evaluated. Most of the triterpenoids showed high potential anticancer activities against the three human cancer cell lines. Among the compounds isolated, 2alpha-hydroxyursolic acid, 2alpha-hydroxy-3beta-{[(2E)-3-phenyl-1-oxo-2-propenyl]oxy}olean-12-en-28-oic acid, and 3beta-trans-p-coumaroyloxy-2alpha-hydroxyolean-12-en-28-oic acid showed higher antiproliferative activity toward HepG2 cancer cells. Ursolic acid, 2alpha-hydroxyursolic acid, and 3beta-trans-p-coumaroyloxy-2alpha-hydroxyolean-12-en-28-oic acid exhibited higher antiproliferative activity against MCF-7 cancer cells. All triterpenoids tested showed antiproliferative activity against Caco-2 cancer cells, especially 2alpha-hydroxyursolic acid, maslinic acid, 2alpha-hydroxy-3beta-{[(2E)-3-phenyl-1-oxo-2-propenyl]oxy}olean-12-en-28-oic acid, and 3beta-trans-p-coumaroyloxy-2alpha-hydroxyolean-12-en-28-oic acid, which displayed much higher antiproliferative activities. These results showed the triterpenoids isolated from apple peels have potent antiproliferative activity and may be partially responsible for the anticancer activities of whole apples.

  6. Loss of body weight and fat and improved lipid profiles in obese rats fed apple pomace or apple juice concentrate.

    PubMed

    Cho, Kyung-Dong; Han, Chan-Kyu; Lee, Bog-Hieu

    2013-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of apple pomace (AP) and apple juice concentrate (AC) supplementation on body weight and fat loss as well as lipid metabolism in obese rats fed a high-fat diet. Diet-induced obese rats were assigned to three groups (n=8 for each group): high fat diet (HFD) control, HFD containing 10% (w/w) AP, and HFD containing 10% (w/w) AC. There was also a normal diet group (n=8). After 5 weeks, body weight gain, adipose tissue weight, serum and hepatic lipid profiles, liver morphology, and adipocyte size were measured. Body weight gain, white adipose tissue (WAT) weight, serum total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and triglyceride concentrations, epididymal adipocyte size, and lesion scores were significantly lower and serum high-density lipoprotein cholesterol concentration and brown adipose tissue weights were significantly higher in the AP and AC groups compared with the HFD group. In addition, atherogenic indices in the AP and AC groups were significantly lower than in the HFD group. These results indicate that supplementing apple products such as AP and AC may help suppress body weight and WAT gain, as well as improve lipid profiles in diet-induced obese rats.

  7. Effects of Apple Juice Concentrate, Blackcurrant Concentrate and Pectin Levels on Selected Qualities of Apple-Blackcurrant Fruit Leather

    PubMed Central

    Diamante, Lemuel M.; Li, Siwei; Xu, Qianqian; Busch, Janette

    2013-01-01

    A study was conducted to determine the effects of different levels of apple juice concentrate (AJC), blackcurrant concentrate (BCC) and pectin on the moisture content, water activity, color, texture and ascorbic acid content of apple-blackcurrant fruit leather using the response surface methodology. The results showed the moisture content increased with increasing pectin level and with greater increases at higher AJC and BCC levels while the water activity increased with increasing pectin level and with increasing AJC level, at low pectin levels, but with decreasing AJC, at high pectin levels. The chroma decreased with increasing pectin level and with lower values at the middle AJC level. The puncturing force decreased with increasing AJC level but with a lower value at the middle pectin level. Lastly, the ascorbic acid content increased with increasing BCC level regardless of AJC and pectin levels. There is a need to reduce the drying temperature or time of apple-blackcurrant fruit leather just enough to bring the water activity closer to 0.60, thereby increasing the moisture content resulting in higher product yield. PMID:28239127

  8. Climate change and apple farming in Indian Himalayas: a study of local perceptions and responses.

    PubMed

    Basannagari, Basavaraj; Kala, Chandra Prakash

    2013-01-01

    Apple farming is an important activity and profession of farmer communities in the Himalayan states of India. At present, the traditional apple farming is under stress due to changes in climate. The present study was undertaken in an Indian Himalayan state, Himachal Pradesh, with the major aim of studying perceptions of farmers on the effects of climate change on apple farming along the altitudinal gradient. Through questionnaire survey, the perceptions of farmers were recorded at low hills (<2500 m), mid-hills (2500-3000 m), and upper hills (>3000 m). At all elevation range the majority of farmers reported that there was increase in atmospheric temperature, and hence at low hills 72% farmers believed that this increase in temperature was responsible for decline in fruit size and so that the quality. Thirty five percent farmers at high hills and 30% at mid hills perceived frost as a major cause for damaging apple farming whereas at low hills 24% farmers perceived hailstorm as the major deterrent for apple farming. The majority of farmers, along the altitude (92% at high hills, 79% at mid hills and 83% at low hills), reported decrease in snowfall. The majority of farmers at low altitude and mid altitude reported decline in apple farming whereas 71% farmers at high hill areas refused decline in apple farming. About 73-83% farmers admitted delay in apple's harvesting period. At mid hills apple scab and at low hills pest attack on apple crops are considered as the indicators of climate change. The change in land use practices was attributed to climate change and in many areas the land under apple farming was replaced for production of coarse grains, seasonal vegetables and other horticulture species. Scientific investigation claiming changes in Indian Himalayan climate corroborates perceptions of farmers, as examined during the present study.

  9. PR genes of apple: identification and expression in response to elicitors and inoculation with Erwinia amylovora

    PubMed Central

    Bonasera, Jean M; Kim, Jihyun F; Beer, Steven V

    2006-01-01

    Background In the past decade, much work has been done to dissect the molecular basis of the defence signalling pathway in plants known as Systemic Acquired Resistance (SAR). Most of the work has been carried out in model species such as Arabidopsis, with little attention paid to woody plants. However within the range of species examined, components of the pathway seem to be highly conserved. In this study, we attempted to identify downstream components of the SAR pathway in apple to serve as markers for its activation. Results We identified three pathogenesis related (PR) genes from apple, PR-2, PR-5 and PR-8, which are induced in response to inoculation with the apple pathogen, Erwinia amylovora, but they are not induced in young apple shoots by treatment with known elicitors of SAR in herbaceous plants. We also identified three PR-1-like genes from apple, PR-1a, PR-1b and PR-1c, based solely on sequence similarity to known PR-1 genes of model (intensively researched) herbaceous plants. The PR-1-like genes were not induced in response to inoculation with E. amylovora or by treatment with elicitors; however, each showed a distinct pattern of expression. Conclusion Four PR genes from apple were partially characterized. PR-1a, PR-2, PR-5 and PR-8 from apple are not markers for SAR in young apple shoots. Two additional PR-1-like genes were identified through in-silico analysis of apple ESTs deposited in GenBank. PR-1a, PR-1b and PR-1c are not involved in defence response or SAR in young apple shoots; this conclusion differs from that reported previously for young apple seedlings. PMID:17029637

  10. Comment on “General rotating quantum vortex filaments in the low-temperature Svistunov model of the local induction approximation” [Phys. Fluids 26, 065105 (2014)

    SciTech Connect

    Hietala, Niklas Hänninen, Risto

    2014-11-15

    Van Gorder considers a formulation of the local induction approximation, which allows the vortex to move in the direction of the reference axis [“General rotating quantum vortex filaments in the low-temperature Svistunov model of the local induction approximation,” Phys. Fluids 26, 065105 (2014)]. However, in his analytical and numerical study he does not use it. A mistake in the torsion of a helical vortex is also corrected.

  11. Response to “Comment on ‘Stationary self-focusing of Gaussian laser beam in relativistic thermal quantum plasma’” [Phys. Plasmas 21, 064701 (2014)

    SciTech Connect

    Patil, S. D.; Takale, M. V.

    2014-06-15

    Habibi and Ghamari have presented a Comment on our paper [Phys. Plasmas 20, 072703 (2013)] by examining quantum dielectric response in thermal quantum plasma. They have modeled the relativistic self-focusing of Gaussian laser beam in cold and warm quantum plasmas and reported that self-focusing length does not change in both situations. In this response, we have reached the following important conclusions about the comment itself.

  12. Comment on ``Measurement of the ion drag force on falling dust particles and its relation to the void formation in complex (dusty) plasmas'' [Phys. Plasmas 10, 1278 (2003)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khrapak, S. A.; Ivlev, A. V.; Morfill, G. E.; Thomas, H. M.; Zhdanov, S. K.; Konopka, U.; Thoma, M. H.; Quinn, R. A.

    2003-11-01

    It is shown that the quantitative interpretation of recent experiments to determine the ion drag force in complex (dusty) plasmas [C. Zafiu, A. Melzer, and A. Piel, Phys. Plasmas 9, 4794 (2002); 10, 1278 (2003)] is not correct. A comparison of different models of the ion drag force is carried out to illustrate the complexity of this issue and to highlight the current level of the research.

  13. 'Scarlett Spur Red Delicious' apple volatile production accompanying physiological disorder development during low pO2 controlled atmosphere storage

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Apple (Malus domestica Borkh.) fruit volatile production is regulated by a variety of factors including storage conditions. Although controlled atmosphere (CA) technology extends apple fruit storage life, improper storage conditions can adversely affect volatile production and increase the risk of ...

  14. Evaluating bruise susceptibility of ’Golden Delicious’ apples using hyperspectral scattering technique

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This research evaluated the potential of hyperspectral scattering technique for predicting the bruise susceptibility of apples. Spectral scattering images between 500 and 1,000 nm were acquired for 300 ‘Golden Delicious’ apples over a time period of three weeks after harvest, using a hyperspectral i...

  15. 76 FR 11454 - Kasugamycin; Receipt of Application for Emergency Exemption for Use on Apples in Michigan...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-02

    ... AGENCY Kasugamycin; Receipt of Application for Emergency Exemption for Use on Apples in Michigan... kasugamycin (CAS No. 6980-18-3) to treat up to 10,000 acres of apples to control fire blight. The applicant... Agriculture has requested the Administrator to issue a specific exemption for the use of kasugamycin on...

  16. How Much Cranberry Juice Is in Cranberry-Apple Juice? A General Chemistry Spectrophotometric Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edionwe, Etinosa; Villarreal, John R.; Smith, K. Christopher

    2011-01-01

    A laboratory experiment that spectrophotometrically determines the percent of cranberry juice in cranberry-apple juice is described. The experiment involves recording an absorption spectrum of cranberry juice to determine the wavelength of maximum absorption, generating a calibration curve, and measuring the absorbance of cranberry-apple juice.…

  17. A simple multispectral imaging algorithm for detection of defects on red delicious apples

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Purpose: A multispectral algorithm for detection and differentiation of defect and normal Red Delicious apples was developed from analysis of a series of hyperspectral line-scan images. Methods: A fast line-scan hyperspectral imaging system mounted on a conventional apple sorting machine was used t...

  18. Scaling up: Taking the Academic Pathways of People Learning Engineering Survey (APPLES) National. Research Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donaldson, Krista M.; Chen, Helen L.; Toye, George; Clark, Mia; Sheppard, Sheri D.

    2008-01-01

    The Academic Pathways of People Learning Engineering Survey (APPLES) was deployed for a second time in spring 2008 to undergraduate engineering students at 21 US universities. The goal of the second deployment of APPLES was to corroborate and extend findings from the Academic Pathways Study (APS; 2003-2007) and the first deployment of APPLES…

  19. First report of Gymnosporangium yamadae, Japanese apple rust, on Malus from North America

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plants in the genus Malus Mill. are used in temperate regions for fruit crops such as apple and as ornamental landscape plants. Gymnosporangium yamadae Miyabe ex G. Yamada, cause of Japanese apple rust, is known to attack several economically important species of Malus in Asia. In August 2004 and Ju...

  20. Newton's Apple Teachers Guides. Seasons 9-10-11-12: A Collection of Lessons and Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Twin Cities Public Television, St. Paul, MN.

    Newton's Apple is a PBS family science program that explores basic science through high-energy, hands-on demonstrations. This volume is a collection of the teacher's guides from four seasons of Newton's Apple which were originally broadcast from 1991 through 1994. Each of the four seasons in the volume contains 26 lessons and a combination of…