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Sample records for al arch neurol

  1. Intraplate deformation of the Al Qarqaf Arch and the southern sector of the Ghadames Basin (SW Libya)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carruba, Stefano; Perotti, Cesare; Rinaldi, Marco; Bresciani, Ilenia; Bertozzi, Giuseppe

    2014-09-01

    The structural evolution of the Al Qarqaf Arch (Libya) and the southern sector of the Ghadames Basin were reconstructed by the integration of remote sensing analysis, 2D seismic lines, well log data and geological maps. The Al Qarqaf Arch (Libya) is a wide, gentle warping of pre-Cambrian and Palaeozoic rocks that forms the southern boundary of the Ghadames Basin, a large Palaeozoic intracratonic basin of the Saharan Platform. Surface and subsurface analyses revealed the presence of different phases of intracratonic deformations, related to the Al Qarqaf Arch uplift and Ghadames Basin development. Extensional tectonic phases prevailed in the study area up until the Devonian, while compressional folding and structural inversion affected the region during Late Carboniferous and Mesozoic, indicating that compressional horizontal stresses affected the plate interior, giving rise to intraplate tectonics. Three major unconformities (Intra-Silurian, Silurian-Devonian transition and Upper Carboniferous unconformities) outline these tectonic events related to the upwarping of the arch and the downwarping of the basin.

  2. Double aortic arch

    MedlinePlus

    Aortic arch anomaly; Double arch; Congenital heart defect - double aortic arch; Birth defect heart - double aortic arch ... aorta is a single arch that leaves the heart and moves leftward. In double aortic arch, some ...

  3. The AL 333-160 fourth metatarsal from Hadar compared to that of humans, great apes, baboons and proboscis monkeys: non-conclusive evidence for pedal arches or obligate bipedality in Hadar hominins.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, P J; Sarmiento, E E; Meldrum, D J

    2012-10-01

    Based on comparisons to non-statistically representative samples of humans and two great ape species (i.e. common chimpanzees Pan troglodytes and lowland gorillas Gorilla gorilla), Ward et al. (2011) concluded that a complete hominin fourth metatarsal (4th MT) from Hadar, AL 333-160, belonged to a committed terrestrial biped with fixed transverse and longitudinal pedal arches, which was no longer under selection favoring substantial arboreal behaviors. According to Ward et al., the Hadar 4th MT had (1) a torsion value indicating a transverse arch, (2) sagittal plane angles between the diaphyseal long axis and the planes of the articular surfaces indicating a longitudinal arch, and (3) a narrow mediolateral to dorsoplantar base ratio, an ectocuneiform facet, and tarsal articular surface contours all indicating a rigid foot without an ape-like mid-tarsal break. Comparisons of the Hadar 4th MT characters to those of statistically representative samples of humans, all five great ape species, baboons and proboscis monkeys show that none of the correlations Ward et al. make to localized foot function were supported by this analysis. The Hadar 4th MT characters are common to catarrhines that have a midtarsal break and lack fixed transverse or longitudinal arches. Further comparison of the AL 333-160 4th MT length, and base, midshaft and head circumferences to those of catarrhines with field collected body weights show that this bone is uniquely short with a large base. Its length suggests the AL 333-160 individual was a poor leaper with limited arboreal behaviors and lacked a longitudinal arch, i.e. its 4th MT long axis was usually held perpendicular to gravity. Its large base implies cuboid-4th MT joint mobility. A relatively short 4th MT head circumference indicates AL 333-160 had small proximal phalanges with a restricted range of mobility. Overall, AL 333-160 is most similar to the 4th MT of eastern gorillas, a slow moving quadruped that sacrifices arboreal behaviors

  4. The AL 333-160 fourth metatarsal from Hadar compared to that of humans, great apes, baboons and proboscis monkeys: non-conclusive evidence for pedal arches or obligate bipedality in Hadar hominins.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, P J; Sarmiento, E E; Meldrum, D J

    2012-10-01

    Based on comparisons to non-statistically representative samples of humans and two great ape species (i.e. common chimpanzees Pan troglodytes and lowland gorillas Gorilla gorilla), Ward et al. (2011) concluded that a complete hominin fourth metatarsal (4th MT) from Hadar, AL 333-160, belonged to a committed terrestrial biped with fixed transverse and longitudinal pedal arches, which was no longer under selection favoring substantial arboreal behaviors. According to Ward et al., the Hadar 4th MT had (1) a torsion value indicating a transverse arch, (2) sagittal plane angles between the diaphyseal long axis and the planes of the articular surfaces indicating a longitudinal arch, and (3) a narrow mediolateral to dorsoplantar base ratio, an ectocuneiform facet, and tarsal articular surface contours all indicating a rigid foot without an ape-like mid-tarsal break. Comparisons of the Hadar 4th MT characters to those of statistically representative samples of humans, all five great ape species, baboons and proboscis monkeys show that none of the correlations Ward et al. make to localized foot function were supported by this analysis. The Hadar 4th MT characters are common to catarrhines that have a midtarsal break and lack fixed transverse or longitudinal arches. Further comparison of the AL 333-160 4th MT length, and base, midshaft and head circumferences to those of catarrhines with field collected body weights show that this bone is uniquely short with a large base. Its length suggests the AL 333-160 individual was a poor leaper with limited arboreal behaviors and lacked a longitudinal arch, i.e. its 4th MT long axis was usually held perpendicular to gravity. Its large base implies cuboid-4th MT joint mobility. A relatively short 4th MT head circumference indicates AL 333-160 had small proximal phalanges with a restricted range of mobility. Overall, AL 333-160 is most similar to the 4th MT of eastern gorillas, a slow moving quadruped that sacrifices arboreal behaviors

  5. Dental arch asymmetry

    PubMed Central

    Al-Zubair, Nabil Muhsen

    2014-01-01

    Objective: This study was conducted to assess the dental arch asymmetry in a Yemeni sample aged (18-25) years. Materials and Methods: The investigation involved clinical examination of 1479 adults; only 253 (129 females, 124 males) out of the total sample were selected to fulfill the criteria for the study sample. Study models were constructed and evaluated to measure mandibular arch dimensions. Three linear distances were utilized on each side on the dental arch: Incisal-canine distance, canine-molar distance and incisal-molar distance, which represent the dental arch segmental measurements. Results: When applying “t-test” at P < 0.05, no significant differences were found between the right and left canine-molar, incisal-canine and incisal-molar distances in both dental arches for both sexes. The greater variation (0.30 mm) was observed between right and left canine-molar distance in the maxillary dental arch in male and the smaller (0.04 mm) in the mandibular dental arch between the right and left canine-molar distance in females. Conclusion: The findings of the present study revealed a symmetrical pattern of dental arches, since the right and left sides showed no statistically significant difference. In general, it can be observed that the measurements related to the central incisors and canines have the widest range of reading and give the impression that the location of central incisor and canines to each other and to other teeth is the strongest factor in determining the dental arch asymmetry. PMID:24966774

  6. VIEW TO THE SOUTHEAST. SPANDREL ARCHES OF THE KELLER BRIDGE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW TO THE SOUTHEAST. SPANDREL ARCHES OF THE KELLER BRIDGE ARE SEEN ON THE LEFT; THE SUPERSTRUCTURE OF THE TENNESSEE RIVER RISES ABOVE THE KELLER AND OBSCURES ITS ARCHES. - Keller Memorial Bridge, Spanning Tennessee River at U.S. Highway 31, Decatur, Morgan County, AL

  7. Arching Solar Prominence

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA’s STEREO (Ahead) spacecraft watched as an eruptive prominence rose up and arched out in a horseshoe shape far above the Sun’s surface (Aug. 25, 2010). The image and movie show the action in a...

  8. BRIDGE ABUTMENTS WITH ARCH SEGMENTS ON RIVER BOTTOM. ARCHES COLLAPSED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    BRIDGE ABUTMENTS WITH ARCH SEGMENTS ON RIVER BOTTOM. ARCHES COLLAPSED AROUND EIGHT YEARS BEFORE THIS DATE. - Whittlesey Road Bridge, Spanning Black River at Whittlesey Road, Lyons Falls, Lewis County, NY

  9. 9. DETAIL OF EAST ARCH, FROM ROADWAY, SHOWING ARCH RIB, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. DETAIL OF EAST ARCH, FROM ROADWAY, SHOWING ARCH RIB, ARTICULATED HANGER AND GUARDRAIL. VIEW TO SOUTHEAST. - Rock Valley Bridge, Spanning North Timber Creek at Old U.S. Highway 30, Marshalltown, Marshall County, IA

  10. 10. DETAIL OF WEST ARCH, FROM ROADWAY, SHOWING ARCH RIB, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. DETAIL OF WEST ARCH, FROM ROADWAY, SHOWING ARCH RIB, HANGERS AND GUARDRAIL. VIEW TO SOUTH. - Rock Valley Bridge, Spanning North Timber Creek at Old U.S. Highway 30, Marshalltown, Marshall County, IA

  11. Dental Arch Wire

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Straightening teeth is an arduous process requiring months, often years, of applying corrective pressure by means of arch wires-better known as brace-which may have to be changed several times in the course of treatment. A new method has been developed by Dr. George Andreasen, orthodontist and dental scientist at the University of Iowa. The key is a new type of arch wire material, called Nitinol, with exceptional elasticity which helps reduce the required number of brace changes. An alloy of nickel and titanium, Nitinol was originally developed for aerospace applications by the Naval Ordnance Laboratory, now the Naval Surface Weapons Laboratory, White Oaks, Maryland. NASA subsequently conducted additional research on the properties of Nitinol and on procedures for processing the metal.

  12. Burmese Arched Harp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williamson, Robert M.

    Our knowledge of the history, construction, and tunings of the Burmese arched harp (saùng gauk) comes from a variety of sources. Conversations with master harpists, together with recordings made of their performances between 1960 and 1980, provide richly detailed examples of the effect of Western music on a non-Western musical tradition. Scholars' essays and conference proceedings complement these first-hand accounts, expanding our understanding of Burmese music and musical instruments.

  13. The ARCHES Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motch, C.; Arches Consortium

    2015-09-01

    The Astronomical Resource Cross-matching for High Energy Studies (ARCHES) project is a FP7-Space funded programme started in 2013 and involving the Observatoire Astronomique de Strasbourg including the CDS (France), the Leibniz- Institut für Astrophysik Potsdam (Germany), the University of Leicester (UK), the Universidad de Cantabria (IFCA, Spain) and the Instituto Nacional de Tecnica Aeroespacial (Spain). ARCHES will provide the international astronomical community with well-characterised multi-wavelength data in the form of spectral energy distributions (SEDs) for large samples of objects extracted from the 3XMM X-ray catalogue of serendipitous sources. The project develops new tools implementing fully probabilistic simultaneous cross-correlation of several catalogues and a multi-wavelength finder for clusters of galaxies. SEDs are based on an enhanced version of the 3XMM catalogue and on a careful selection of the most relevant multi-wavelength archival catalogues. In order to ensure the largest audience, SEDs will be distributed to the international community through CDS services and through the Virtual Observatory. These enhanced resources are tested in the framework of several science cases. More information may be found at http://www.arches-fp7.eu/

  14. Double arch mirror study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vukobratovich, D.; Hillman, D.

    1983-01-01

    The development of a method of mounting light weight glass mirrors for astronomical telescopes compatible with the goals of the Shuttle Infrared Telescope Facility (SIRTF) was investigated. A 20 in. diameter double arch lightweight mirror previously fabricated was modified to use a new mount configuration. This mount concept was developed and fabricated. The mounting concept of the double mounting mirror is outlined. The modifications made to the mirror, fabrication of the mirror mount, and room temperature testing of the mirror and mount and the extension of the mirror and mount concept to a full size (40 in. diameter) primary mirror for SIRTF are discussed.

  15. 35. ALTERNATE DESIGN USING THROUGH ARCH SPANS, WITH ARCH REPEATED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    35. ALTERNATE DESIGN USING THROUGH ARCH SPANS, WITH ARCH REPEATED BETWEEN TOWER LEGS, AND ASHLAR MASONRY WALLS AND PYLONS Pen-and-ink drawing by project architect Alfred Eichler, 1934. - Sacramento River Bridge, Spanning Sacramento River at California State Highway 275, Sacramento, Sacramento County, CA

  16. The ARCHES project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motch, C.; Arches Consortium

    2014-07-01

    ARCHES (Astronomical Resource Cross-matching for High Energy Studies) is a FP7-Space funded project started in 2013 and involving the Observatoire Astronomique de Strasbourg including the CDS (France), the Leibniz-Institut fuer Astrophysik Potsdam (Germany), the University of Leicester (UK), the Universidad de Cantabria (IFCA, Spain) and the Instituto Nacional de Técnica Aeroespacial (Madrid, Spain). ARCHES aims at providing the international astronomical community with well-characterised multi-wavelength data in the form of spectral energy distributions (SEDs) for large sets of objects extracted from the 3XMM catalogue. The project develops new tools implementing fully probabilistic simultaneous cross-correlation of several catalogues. SEDs are based on an enhanced version of the 3XMM catalogue and on a careful selection of the most relevant multi-wavelength archival catalogues. In order to ensure the largest audience, SEDs will be distributed to the international community through CDS services and through the Virtual Observatory. These enhanced resources are currently tested in the framework of several science cases. An integrated cluster finder is developed at Potsdam, AGN science is studied at Leicester and IFCA while populations of Galactic X-ray sources are investigated at Strasbourg and Madrid.

  17. Arches showing UV flaring activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fontenla, J. M.

    1988-01-01

    The UVSP data obtained in the previous maximum activity cycle show the frequent appearance of flaring events in the UV. In many cases these flaring events are characterized by at least two footpoints which show compact impulsive non-simultaneous brightenings and a fainter but clearly observed arch developes between the footpoints. These arches and footpoints are observed in line corresponding to different temperatures, as Lyman alpha, N V, and C IV, and when observed above the limb display large Doppler shifts at some stages. The size of the arches can be larger than 20 arcsec.

  18. Equivalent Imperfections In Arched Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dallemule, Marian

    2015-09-01

    There are currently three design methods to verify the in-plane buckling of an arched structure: substitute member method, the method of equivalent imperfection with recommendations for arched bridges, and the equivalent unique global and local initial imperfection method (EUGLI), which uses the critical elastic buckling mode as an imperfection. The latter method is included in the EN 1993-1-1 cl. 5.3.2 (11) since 2002; however, to this day it is neither utilized in the design practice nor is it incorporated in ordinary structural analysis software. The main purpose of this article is to show the application of the proposed methods in a step-by-step manner to the numerical example considered and to compare these design methods for various arched structures. Verification of the in-plane buckling of an arch is explained in detail.

  19. Stability of clogging arches in a silo submitted to vertical vibrations.

    PubMed

    Lozano, C; Zuriguel, I; Garcimartín, A

    2015-06-01

    We present experimental results on the endurance of arches that block the outlet of a two-dimensional silo when subjected to vertical vibration. In a recent paper [C. Lozano et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 109, 068001 (2012)], it was shown that the arch resistance against vibrations is determined by the maximum angle among those formed between each particle in the bridge and its two neighbors: the larger the maximum angle is, the weaker the bridge. It has also been reported that the breaking time distribution shows a power-law tail with an exponent that depends on the outlet size, the vibration intensity, and the load [I. Zuriguel et al., Sci. Rep. 4, 7324 (2014)]. Here we connect these previous works, demonstrating the importance of the maximum angle in the arch on the exponent of the breaking time distribution. Besides, we find that the acceleration needed to break an arch does not depend on the ramp rate of the applied acceleration, but it does depend on the outlet size above which the arch is formed. We also show that high frequencies of vibration reveal a change in the behavior of the arches that endure very long times. These arches have been identified as a subset with special geometrical features. Therefore, arches that cannot be broken by means of a given external excitation might exist. PMID:26172701

  20. Stability of clogging arches in a silo submitted to vertical vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lozano, C.; Zuriguel, I.; Garcimartín, A.

    2015-06-01

    We present experimental results on the endurance of arches that block the outlet of a two-dimensional silo when subjected to vertical vibration. In a recent paper [C. Lozano et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 109, 068001 (2012), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.109.068001], it was shown that the arch resistance against vibrations is determined by the maximum angle among those formed between each particle in the bridge and its two neighbors: the larger the maximum angle is, the weaker the bridge. It has also been reported that the breaking time distribution shows a power-law tail with an exponent that depends on the outlet size, the vibration intensity, and the load [I. Zuriguel et al., Sci. Rep. 4, 7324 (2014), 10.1038/srep07324]. Here we connect these previous works, demonstrating the importance of the maximum angle in the arch on the exponent of the breaking time distribution. Besides, we find that the acceleration needed to break an arch does not depend on the ramp rate of the applied acceleration, but it does depend on the outlet size above which the arch is formed. We also show that high frequencies of vibration reveal a change in the behavior of the arches that endure very long times. These arches have been identified as a subset with special geometrical features. Therefore, arches that cannot be broken by means of a given external excitation might exist.

  1. Stability of clogging arches in a silo submitted to vertical vibrations.

    PubMed

    Lozano, C; Zuriguel, I; Garcimartín, A

    2015-06-01

    We present experimental results on the endurance of arches that block the outlet of a two-dimensional silo when subjected to vertical vibration. In a recent paper [C. Lozano et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 109, 068001 (2012)], it was shown that the arch resistance against vibrations is determined by the maximum angle among those formed between each particle in the bridge and its two neighbors: the larger the maximum angle is, the weaker the bridge. It has also been reported that the breaking time distribution shows a power-law tail with an exponent that depends on the outlet size, the vibration intensity, and the load [I. Zuriguel et al., Sci. Rep. 4, 7324 (2014)]. Here we connect these previous works, demonstrating the importance of the maximum angle in the arch on the exponent of the breaking time distribution. Besides, we find that the acceleration needed to break an arch does not depend on the ramp rate of the applied acceleration, but it does depend on the outlet size above which the arch is formed. We also show that high frequencies of vibration reveal a change in the behavior of the arches that endure very long times. These arches have been identified as a subset with special geometrical features. Therefore, arches that cannot be broken by means of a given external excitation might exist.

  2. Pseudoaneurysm of the aortic arch

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yuan-Qiang; Yao, Feng; Shang, An-Dong; Pan, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Pseudoaneurysm of the aortic arch is uncommonly associated with cancer, and is extremely rare in pulmonary cancer. Here, we report an unusual and successfully treated case of aortic arch pseudoaneurysm in a male patient with lung squamous cell carcinoma. Methods: A 64-year-old male patient was admitted to the Emergency Department, presenting with massive hemoptysis (>500 mL blood during the 12 hours prior to treatment). The diagnosis of aortic arch pseudoaneurysm was confirmed after inspection of computed tomographic angiography and three-dimensional reconstruction. We processed the immediate endovascular stent-grafting for this patient. Results: This patient recovered with no filling or enlargement of the pseudoaneurysm, no episodes of hemoptysis, and no neurological complications during the 4-week follow-up period. Conclusion: Herein, we compare our case with other cancer-related pseudoaneurysms in the medical literature and summarize the clinical features and treatment of this unusual case. PMID:27495079

  3. Ambient resonance of rock arches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starr, Alison Margaret

    Resonant frequencies of structural elements are related to fundamental material properties of mass and stiffness, and monitoring over time can thus serve as an indirect indictor of internal mechanical change. Until now, however, this methodology has not been applied to natural rock structures such as arches and towers. We evaluated the resonance characteristics of four rock arches in southeastern Utah, combining in-situ ambient vibration measurements with numerical modal analysis. At each location, we measured the spectral and polarization attributes of ambient vibrations using up to two broadband seismometers. Ambient vibration spectra measured on the arches showed clear peaks at distinct frequencies (typically between 1-10 Hz), which we interpret as resonant frequencies, as opposed to the relatively flat spectra recorded on nearby bedrock. Polarization analysis helped us identify the orientations of vibration and explore resonant mode shapes. We then verified the measured resonant frequencies through 3D finite-element numerical modal analysis, and in most cases we were able to match the fundamental along with several higher-order modes. Repeat occupation and short-term continuous ambient vibration monitoring were aimed at assessing daily and seasonal changes in resonant frequencies, which in turn may provide evidence of internal mechanical change; Mesa Arch in Canyonlands National Park served as the main focus for our repeat measurements. Results revealed that minor, reversible changes in resonant frequencies can be created by thermal effects, i.e., changes in bulk material stiffness as the arch expands and contracts on daily and seasonal time scales. No irreversible change in the resonant frequency of Mesa Arch was detected over the period of this study. Our research provides the first step towards monitoring the long-term structural health of natural rock arches as they change through time or in the wake of a damaging event. We have shown that the resonance

  4. Comparison of Commercially Available Arch Wires with Normal Dental Arch in a Group of Iranian Population

    PubMed Central

    Hedayati, Zohreh; Fakhri, Farnaz; Moshkel Gosha, Vahid

    2015-01-01

    Statement of the Problem The stability of orthodontic treatment depends on preserving the patient’s pretreatment arch form and arch size during and after treatment. Purpose This investigation was aimed to study the size and shape of Iranian mandibular dental arch and evaluate the correlation of their average dental arch with commercially available preformed rectangular nickel-titanium arch wires. Materials and Method In this study, 148 subjects were selected among students of Shiraz University of Medical Sciences. The inclusion criteria were having Angle class I in molar and canine relationships, and normal growth pattern. Intercanine and intermolar widths were measured after scanning their mandibular dental casts. Three main arch form templates; square, ovoid and tapered (Orthoform TM; 3M, Unitek, CA, USA) and 12 commercially available preformed mandibular nickel-titanium arch wires were scanned. Intercanine and intermolar widths of arch wires were compared with dental arch widths of the study samples. Arch width, arch form and the most appropriate arch wire were determined for each cast. Student’s t-test was used to compare arch widths and arch depths of male and female subjects. Coefficient of variance was used to determine the variability of indices in the study samples. Results Most preformed arch wires were wider than the average width of the normal Iranian dental arch. The most frequent arch form in Iranian population was tapered. Inter molar width was the only statistically significant variable between males and females. Conclusion Variation in available preformed arch wires does not entirely cover the range of diversity of the normal dental arch of our population. Narrow arch wires with a tapered shape are better consistent with the Iranian lower arch. PMID:26046106

  5. Trouble-shooting dual arch impressions II.

    PubMed

    Kaplowitz, G J

    1997-09-01

    Dual arch impression procedures can produce accurate impressions and bite registrations for the fabrication of single crowns. To accomplish this, the dentist must select an appropriately sized and shaped tray, appropriate impression material and a dual arch impression procedure suitable for each case. Dual arch impression procedures can save impression material and chair time.

  6. The Algebra of the Arches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buerman, Margaret

    2007-01-01

    Finding real-world examples for middle school algebra classes can be difficult but not impossible. As we strive to accomplish teaching our students how to solve and graph equations, we neglect to teach the big ideas of algebra. One of those big ideas is functions. This article gives three examples of functions that are found in Arches National…

  7. Palmar arch reconstruction using dorsal venous arch of foot for revascularisation of multiple digits

    PubMed Central

    Krishnakumar, K. S.; Petkar, Kiran; Lateef, Sameer; Rasalkar, Jyoti; Arun, T. J.; Suresh, V.

    2014-01-01

    A case of trauma causing total loss of superficial and deep palmar arches of hand with ischemia of all the digits was managed using dorsal venous arch of the foot to reconstruct the palmar arch. The ends of the venous arch were anastomosed to radial and ulnar arteries and the tributaries to the arch were coapted to the cut ends of the common digital vessels and princeps pollicis. The surgery yielded gratifying results, successfully revascularising all the digits. PMID:24987216

  8. [The cartilaginous differentiation of the second arch in the human. From the traditional to the actual theory. Personal contribution].

    PubMed

    Vázquez, José Francisco Rodríguez

    2007-01-01

    Classically, the cartilaginous formation of the second pharyngeal arch has been described as a continuous structure wich will be the primary skeleton of the arch. Actually this theory has experimented a deep change Rodríguez Vázquez, 2005, and Rodríguez Vázquez et al. 2006, have a new cartilaginous differentiation model in the second pharyngeal arch and thus of its derivates in the human craniofacial development. The stapes and Reichert's cartilage have been formed by independent anlages. The cartilaginous differentiation model of the second arch, has allowed us to know and interpret the variations and classify them.

  9. Revisiting impressions using dual-arch trays.

    PubMed

    Small, Bruce W

    2012-01-01

    Making routine perfect impressions is the goal of any restorative dentist. Using dual-arch trays is an easy, repeatable way to accomplish that goal, as long as each step is done before the next and each step is performed perfectly. This column reviewed several articles that support the metal dual-arch concept and provided some clinical tips that might help restorative dentists. The dual-arch technique does have its limits and is meant for one or two teeth in a quadrant when there are other teeth to occlude with. Also, if the case involves anterior guidance, a full-arch impression maybe advisable.

  10. Cervical aortic arch and a new type of double aortic arch. Report of a case.

    PubMed Central

    Cornali, M; Reginato, E; Azzolina, G

    1976-01-01

    A case of cervical aortic arch is reported. To the best of our knowledge, it is the first to be associated with a serious intracardiac anomaly. In addition, it is part of a new type of double aortic arch, caused by failure of reabsorption of both dorsal aortic roots and persistence of the fourth right and second (or third) left branchial arches. PMID:971387

  11. Arch size distribution in a two-dimensional pile of disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguirre, M. A.; Pugnaloni, L. A.; Divoux, T.; Grande, J. G.

    2009-06-01

    Arch formation in a granular pile is a dynamical process. Staring at a static pile one cannot identify such structures. Indeed, it is necessary to know which grains are in contact, but also to access the whole history of the packing formation to distinguish the contacts which really sustain arches. In a recent article, arch formation has been studied numerically [Arévalo et al., Phys. Rev. E 74, 021303 (2006)]. Here, we report preliminary results of an experiment which consists of a time-resolved study of arch formation during the deposition of a disk assembly. The whole experiment is horizontally set. A conveyor belt makes it possible to tune the disk deposition-rate and thus to follow entirely the deposition dynamics. We compare our experimental findings to the previously cited numerical study.

  12. Maxillary and mandibular anterior crown width/height ratio and its relation to various arch perimeters, arch length, and arch width groups

    PubMed Central

    Shahid, Fazal; Alam, Mohammad Khursheed; Khamis, Mohd Fadhli

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the maxillary and mandibular anterior crown width/height ratio and its relation to various arch perimeters, arch length, and arch width (intercanine, interpremolar, and intermolar) groups. Materials and Methods: The calculated sample size was 128 subjects. The crown width/height, arch length, arch perimeter, and arch width of the maxilla and mandible were obtained via digital calliper (Mitutoyo, Japan). A total of 4325 variables were measured. The sex differences in the crown width and height were evaluated. Analysis of variance was applied to evaluate the differences between arch length, arch perimeter, and arch width groups. Results: Males had significantly larger mean values for crown width and height than females (P ≤ 0.05) for maxillary and mandibular arches, both. There were no significant differences observed for the crown width/height ratio in various arch length, arch perimeter, and arch width (intercanine, interpremolar, and intermolar) groups (P ≤ 0.05) in maxilla and mandible, both. Conclusions: Our results indicate sexual disparities in the crown width and height. Crown width and height has no significant relation to various arch length, arch perimeter, and arch width groups of maxilla and mandible. Thus, it may be helpful for orthodontic and prosthodontic case investigations and comprehensive management. PMID:26929686

  13. Arching in tapped deposits of hard disks.

    PubMed

    Pugnaloni, Luis A; Valluzzi, Marcos G; Valluzzi, Lucas G

    2006-05-01

    We simulate the tapping of a bed of hard disks in a rectangular box by using a pseudodynamic algorithm. In these simulations, arches are unambiguously defined and we can analyze their properties as a function of the tapping amplitude. We find that an order-disorder transition occurs within a narrow range of tapping amplitudes as has been seen by others. Arches are always present in the system although they exhibit regular shapes in the ordered regime. Interestingly, an increase in the number of arches does not always correspond to a reduction in the packing fraction. This is in contrast with what is found in three-dimensional systems.

  14. The origin and significance of secondary flows in the aortic arch.

    PubMed

    Black, M M; Hose, D R; Lawford, P V

    1995-01-01

    This paper comprises a study of the secondary flow patterns that can develop in the human aortic arch. Clinical evidence of these secondary flows has been obtained by Kilner et al. using magnetic resonance velocity mapping techniques. Some of their results are presented for comparison in this paper. Four difference parametric models of the aortic arch have been analysed using computational fluid dynamic techniques. Both steady and transient flow conditions have been considered and two different commercially available software packages were used, namely FIDAP and FLOTRAN. A satisfactory comparison of the theoretical analysis with the results, both in vivo and in vitro, obtained by Kilner et al. for their out-of-plane inlet model was found. The theoretical analysis can now be extended to analyse the effect of different configurations and orientations of artificial aortic valves on the resulting aortic arch flow patterns.

  15. Trouble-shooting dual arch impressions.

    PubMed

    Kaplowitz, G J

    1996-02-01

    Dual arch impression techniques enable the dentist to capture an impression of the prepared tooth, the opposing teeth and the occlusal registration in one procedure. This saves chair time and impression material.

  16. Glowing Solar Material Arches Up and Out

    NASA Video Gallery

    An elongated, streaming arch of solar material rose up at the sun’s edge before breaking apart in this animation of imagery captured by NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory on April 28, 2016. While so...

  17. Integrated exploration locates Cincinnati arch dolomite breccias

    SciTech Connect

    Tedesco, S.A. )

    1994-11-28

    Dolomite breccias or chimneys are prolific reservoirs found along the Cincinnati arch and adjacent basins from Tennessee to Ontario. An integrated approach using seismic and surface geochemistry, augmented by subsurface geology and magnetics, has led to a dramatic increase in the number of these fields being discovered in the past 10 years. Historically the reservoirs have been found by random drilling. The paper describes the geology of the arch, breccia characteristics, and case histories of discoveries using this integrated approach.

  18. Free vibrations of spatial Timoshenko arches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caliò, I.; Greco, A.; D'Urso, D.

    2014-09-01

    This paper addresses the evaluation of the exact natural frequencies and vibration modes of structures obtained by assemblage of plane circular arched Timoshenko beams. The exact dynamic stiffness matrix of the single circular arch, in which both the in-plane and out-of-plane motions are taken into account, is derived in an useful dimensionless form by revisiting the mathematical approach already adopted by Howson and Jemah (1999 [18]), for the in plane and the out-of-plan natural frequencies of curved Timoshenko beams. The knowledge of the exact dynamic stiffness matrix of the single arch makes the direct evaluation of the exact global dynamic stiffness matrix of spatial arch structures possible. Furthermore, it allows the exact evaluation of the frequencies and the corresponding vibration modes, for the distributed parameter model, through the application of the Wittrick and Williams algorithm. Consistently with the dimensionless form proposed in the derivation of the equations of motion and the dynamic stiffness matrix, an original and extensive parametric analysis on the in-plane and out-of-plane dynamic behaviour of the single arch, for a wide range of structural and geometrical dimensionless parameters, has been performed. Moreover, some numerical applications, relative to the evaluation of exact frequencies and the corresponding mode shapes in spatial arched structures, are reported. The exact solution has been numerically validated by comparing the results with those obtained by a refined finite element simulation.

  19. Modified Arch-First Technique Performed on a Beating Heart for an Arch Aneurysm with Atheromatous Plaques

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    A shaggy aorta with unstable atheromatous plaques has a high risk of neurologic complications in cases of arch aneurysm. We report the use of a modified arch-first technique involving arch replacement for a beating heart after reconstruction of supra-aortic vessels while maintaining normal blood pressure. The procedure was performed in a patient who had an arch aneurysm, complicated by an aberrant right subclavian artery (ARSA) and a shaggy aorta ascending to the aortic arch. This modified arch-first technique is an alternative surgical approach that is used for arch aneurysms involving a shaggy aorta, in order to prevent embolic debris-related complications. PMID:23825510

  20. Vibration of axially loaded circular arches

    SciTech Connect

    Sabir, A.B.; Djoudi, M.S.

    1996-11-01

    The work in the present paper is devoted to the determination of the buckling loads and natural frequencies of axially loaded arch structures. The finite element method is employed using a strain based arch element. The element is based on the conventional Euler curved beam type of strain displacement relationship and satisfies the exact representation of rigid body modes. The sub-space iteration technique is used to determine the eigenvalues and corresponding eigenvectors of the governing transcendental equation. The buckling of a pinned arch subjected to a uniform lateral pressure is first considered. The work is then extended to produce a comprehensive set of results for the vibration of axially loaded arches which are either pinned or fixed at both ends. The first symmetric and anti symmetric modes of vibration are determined and the effect of the axial load on these frequencies is investigated. The practical problem of an arch with a backfill is then considered and the effect of the elastic packing due to this backfill on the natural frequencies is determined.

  1. Immediate implants in anterior maxillary arch

    PubMed Central

    Anitha, K.; Kumar, S. Senthil; Babu, M. R. Ramesh; Candamourty, Ramesh; Thirumurugan

    2014-01-01

    Aim: The aim of the study was to evaluate the osseo-integration and soft tissue status of the endosseous implants placed in immediate extraction socket. Methodology: Seven patients (4 males and 3 females) aged 20-30 years were selected for the study. Nine implants were placed in seven patients in the maxillary arch. All the patients were clinically αnd thoroughly examined. Under local anesthesia, the indicated tooth was extracted. The extracted socket was prepared using standard drills with palatal wall as guide. The longest and widest implants were placed (Hi-Tec Implants). All implants showed good primary stability. The implants used in the study were tapered design endosseous implants with Threaded implants (TI) unit plasma-sprayed surface. Surgical re-entry (secondary surgery) was performed to remove the healing cap after 6 months for supra crestal fabrication. All patients were reviewed periodically at 3rd and 6th month interval and the following clinical parameters including modified plaque index (mPlI), modified bleeding index (mBI), probing depth (PD), attachment level (AL), and distance between the implant shoulder and mucosal margin (DIM), distance between the implant shoulder and first bone-implant contact, and Clinical Mobility Index were recorded. The results were computed and subjected to statistical evaluation. Results: The mPlI, mBI, PD, AL, and DIM were evaluated around the implants at baseline, 3rd and 6th month intervals and analyzed statistically by Friedman T-test. The results of the above were shown to be statistically non-significant. The distance between the implant shoulder and first bone implant contact was evaluated around the implants at base line, 3rd and 6th month intervals. The results proved to be statistically significant (0.01) implying that there was a bone apposition around the implants. Conclusion: During the course of the study, soft tissue status around implants was found to be healthy. Osseointegration as assessed by

  2. South Arch volcanic field9d\

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lipman, P.W.; Clague, D.A.; Moore, J.G.; Holcomb, R.T.

    1989-01-01

    Several young lava fields were imaged by GLORIA sidescan sonar along the Hawaiian Arch south of Hawaii. The largest, 35 by 50 km across, includes a central area characterized by high sonar backscatter and composed of several flow lobes radiating from a vent area. Reflection profiling and sea-floor photography indicate that the central lobes are flat sheet flows bounded by pillowed margins; thin surface sediment and thin palagonite rinds on lava surfaces suggest ages of 1-10 ka. Vents are localized along the arch crest near bases of Cretaceous seamounts. Two dredged flows are basanite and alkalic basalt, broadly similar to rejuvenated-stage and some pre-shield alkalic lavas on the Hawaiian Ridge. Arch volcanism represents peripheral leakage of melt from the Hawaiian hot spot over much larger areas than previously recognized. -Authors

  3. 2. STONE ARCH BRIDGE. TIMBERS ON THE UPSTREAM FACE OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. STONE ARCH BRIDGE. TIMBERS ON THE UPSTREAM FACE OF THE PIER PROTECTED THE STONEWORK FROM DAMAGE FROM ICE FLOWS, BARGES, ETC. - Lockport Historic District, Stone Arch Bridge, Spanning Des Plaines River at Ninth Street, Lockport, Will County, IL

  4. 5. TOP OF ARCH AND VIADUCT. NOTE THAT STONES OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. TOP OF ARCH AND VIADUCT. NOTE THAT STONES OF ARCH HAVE BEEN DRAFTED FINISH AROUND THE EDGE) AND THE KEYSTONE HAS BEEN ROUGHLY POINTED. - Valley Railroad, Folly Mills Creek Viaduct, Interstate 81, Staunton, Staunton, VA

  5. Isolated bilateral fractures of zygomatic arches: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Ho, V

    1994-12-01

    Isolated unilateral fractures of the zygomatic arch are uncommon. Isolated bilateral fractures of the zygomatic arches are even more rare. Indeed a search of the literature failed to find any previous report of this fracture pattern.

  6. View of Highway 140 west of Arch Rock. Note stone ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of Highway 140 west of Arch Rock. Note stone wall at right and formed concrete wall at center. Looking north-northwest - All Year Highway, Between Arch Rock & Yosemite Valley, El Portal, Mariposa County, CA

  7. 8. GENERAL ELEVATION OF BRIDGE AFTER CONCRETE FOR ARCHES HAS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. GENERAL ELEVATION OF BRIDGE AFTER CONCRETE FOR ARCHES HAS BEEN POURED BUT BEFORE FALSEWORK HAS BEEN REMOVED. TAKEN JAN 7, 1928. - Marsh Rainbow Arch Bridge, West Eighth Street North, Newton, Jasper County, IA

  8. 2. LONGITUDINAL VIEW OF THE CONCRETE ARCH (ONEWAY BRIDGE), LOOKING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. LONGITUDINAL VIEW OF THE CONCRETE ARCH (ONE-WAY BRIDGE), LOOKING NORTHEAST. - Washington Water Power Company Post Falls Power Plant, Concrete Arch Bridge, West of intersection of Spokane & Fourth Streets, Post Falls, Kootenai County, ID

  9. VIEW FROM DOWN STREAM OF ARCH IN ELEVATION. NOTE FINISHED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW FROM DOWN STREAM OF ARCH IN ELEVATION. NOTE FINISHED INTERIOR ARCH. SSW BY 205 DEGREES - Chasm Brook Bridge, Spanning Chasm Brook on West Sargent Mountain Carriage Road, Bar Harbor, Hancock County, ME

  10. Arches and contact forces in a granular pile.

    PubMed

    Carlevaro, C M; Pugnaloni, L A

    2012-06-01

    Assemblies of granular particles mechanically stable under their own weight contain arches. These are structural units identified as sets of mutually stable grains. It is generally assumed that these arches shield the weight above them and should bear most of the stress in the system. We test such hypothesis by studying the stress born by in-arch and out-of-arch grains. We show that, indeed, particles in arches withstand larger stresses. In particular, the isotropic stress tends to be larger for in-arch grains whereas the anisotropic component is marginally distinguishable between the two types of particles. The contact force distributions demonstrate that an exponential tail (compatible with the maximization of entropy under no extra constraints) is followed only by the out-of-arch contacts. In-arch contacts seem to be compatible with a Gaussian distribution consistent with a recently introduced approach that takes into account constraints imposed by the local force balance on grains.

  11. 21. AN IMAGE OF THE FIRST LARGE, ELLIPTICAL RING ARCH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    21. AN IMAGE OF THE FIRST LARGE, ELLIPTICAL RING ARCH ON THE WEST END OF THE BRIDGE. THE PARKWAY PASSES BENEATH A MINOR ARCH BEYOND. - Main Street Bridge, Spanning East Fork Whitewater River, Richmond, Wayne County, IN

  12. 20. WEST CONFEDERATE AVENUE BRIDGE SPANNING CODON'S RUN, ARCH DETAIL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. WEST CONFEDERATE AVENUE BRIDGE SPANNING CODON'S RUN, ARCH DETAIL SHOWING BRICK ARCH FOR MAIN SPAN AND STONE VOUSSOIRS. VIEW W. - Gettysburg National Military Park Tour Roads, Gettysburg, Adams County, PA

  13. GENERAL VIEW OF THE ARCH AS SEEN AT SUNSET FROM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    GENERAL VIEW OF THE ARCH AS SEEN AT SUNSET FROM THE PARK, LOOKING SOUTHEAST - Jefferson National Expansion Memorial Arch, Mississippi River between Washington & Poplar Streets, Saint Louis, Independent City, MO

  14. 4. GENERAL VIEW OF THE ARCH FROM THE NORTHWEST SHOWING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. GENERAL VIEW OF THE ARCH FROM THE NORTHWEST SHOWING THE PARK GROUND IN THE FOREGROUND - Jefferson National Expansion Memorial Arch, Mississippi River between Washington & Poplar Streets, Saint Louis, Independent City, MO

  15. 3. View locking east of 591 foot steel arch of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. View locking east of 591 foot steel arch of bridge. Arch consists of Pratt trusses divided into twenty-four, 24 foot, 7 inch panels. It was fabricated by the King Iron Bridge Company of Cleveland whose circular plaque can be seen where the arch meets the roadway. The steel arch was erected by the Berro construction Co. of Chicago. - Detroit Superior High Level Bridge, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

  16. Modal Analysis of Landscape and Double-O Arches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, J. R.; Dorsey, A.; Wood, J. R.; Thorne, M. S.; Bilderback, E.

    2014-12-01

    We combine in-situ ambient vibration measurements with 3D numerical modeling to study the resonance characteristics of two prominent arches in Arches National Park, Utah: Landscape Arch and Double-O Arch. We placed broadband seismometers on each arch and recorded up to three hours of ambient seismic data. Identified spectral peaks are interpreted to represent resonant frequencies of the arches, and further studied for their polarization attributes. We developed 3D models of each site using ground-based photogrammetry in order to perform numerical modal analyses. Assigning representative material properties, we are able to match the measured fundamental frequency of each arch, as well as certain higher-order resonant frequencies. Landscape Arch is the longest arch in North America and is remarkably slender, while Double-O Arch is a prominent visitor attraction. Repeat ambient vibration measurements over time will be used to assess changes in resonance characteristics, which in turn provide evidence of internal mechanical change. Our goal is to understand how the arches respond to their environment, and ultimately be able to assess progressive damage of these iconic features.

  17. Crater-Like Ulceration of Aortic Arch.

    PubMed

    Simon, Caterina; Calabrese, Alice; Canu, Gianluca; Merlo, Maurizio; Galletti, Lorenzo

    2014-12-01

    We report the case of a 78-year-old female who presented to our hospital with signs of hemorrhagic shock and breathlessness. A transthoracic echocardiography demonstrated pericardial effusion. Computed tomography of the chest showed a penetrating atherosclerotic ulcer of the aortic arch with an intramural hematoma of the ascending and descending aorta. Endovascular repair with stent-grafting was urgently performed and a pericardial window placement was done to reduce mediastinal bleeding. PMID:26798748

  18. Crater-Like Ulceration of Aortic Arch.

    PubMed

    Simon, Caterina; Calabrese, Alice; Canu, Gianluca; Merlo, Maurizio; Galletti, Lorenzo

    2014-12-01

    We report the case of a 78-year-old female who presented to our hospital with signs of hemorrhagic shock and breathlessness. A transthoracic echocardiography demonstrated pericardial effusion. Computed tomography of the chest showed a penetrating atherosclerotic ulcer of the aortic arch with an intramural hematoma of the ascending and descending aorta. Endovascular repair with stent-grafting was urgently performed and a pericardial window placement was done to reduce mediastinal bleeding.

  19. [Single coronary artery and right aortic arch].

    PubMed

    Martínez-Quintana, Efrén; Rodríguez-González, Fayna

    2015-01-01

    Coronary anomalies are mostly asymptomatic and diagnosed incidentally during coronary angiography or echocardiography. However, they must be taken into account in the differential diagnosis of angina, dyspnea, syncope, acute myocardial infarction or sudden death in young patients. The case is presented of two rare anomalies, single coronary artery originating from right sinus of Valsalva and right aortic arch, in a 65 year-old patient with atherosclerotic coronary artery disease treated percutaneously.

  20. [Single coronary artery and right aortic arch].

    PubMed

    Martínez-Quintana, Efrén; Rodríguez-González, Fayna

    2015-01-01

    Coronary anomalies are mostly asymptomatic and diagnosed incidentally during coronary angiography or echocardiography. However, they must be taken into account in the differential diagnosis of angina, dyspnea, syncope, acute myocardial infarction or sudden death in young patients. The case is presented of two rare anomalies, single coronary artery originating from right sinus of Valsalva and right aortic arch, in a 65 year-old patient with atherosclerotic coronary artery disease treated percutaneously. PMID:25304052

  1. Oblique slip in Laramide foreland arches

    SciTech Connect

    Erslev, E.A.; Selvig, B.; Molzer, P. . Dept. of Earth Resources)

    1993-03-01

    Don Wise was one of the first structural geologists to recognize the complex, four-dimensional (space and time) nature of basement-involved faulting in the Rocky Mountain foreland. His focus on both small scale kinematic indicators and regional tectonic hypotheses has provided a launching point for many Rocky Mountain geologists. The implications of the anastomosing patterns of Laramide foreland arches on models of regional stress and strain have provoked considerable debate. Hypotheses range from those invoking multiple stages of lateral compression from different directions to single-stage models necessitating a component of strike-slip motion in east-west and north-south arches. These hypotheses were tested using slickenline analysis of minor faulting in structures with different orientations. In Wyoming, structures paralleling the dominant northwest structural trend have slickenlines in the NE-SW vertical plane, consistent with shortening and compression in this direction. The east-west Owl Creek and Casper Mountain structures also have NE-SW trending slickenlines, indicating slip oblique to these arches. In Colorado, minor faults in the north-south margin of the northeastern Front Range also indicate oblique slip, with shortening in the NE-SW quadrant. The actual trend of the slickenlines is more easterly, however, suggesting a change of slip trajectory with latitude, not time, possibly in response to identation by the Colorado Plateau.

  2. Jurassic stratigraphy of the Wiggins Arch, Mississippi

    SciTech Connect

    Rhodes, J.A.; Maxwell, G.B. )

    1993-09-01

    Mobil and Shell jointly explored the Wiggins arch area in southern Mississippi from 1985 to 1991. The effort concentrated on the Jurassic Norphlet and Smackover formations. Two wells were drilled into Paleozoic crystalline rocks and one well into the Pine Hill formation. Two of these wells were located on the southern side of the Wiggins arch and provide significant data for interpreting Jurassic stratigraphy. The Mobil No. 1 U.S.A. well encountered a complete Jurassic section, but with some significantly different facies than those encountered by wells to the north. A granite wash section is the equivalent to the Frisco City formation previously only found 100 mi to the north-northeast. All 300 ft of Smackover is crystalline dolomite. The Norphlet section is entirely granite wash. The Pine Hill anhydrite is unusually thick and interpreted to be equivalent to the Louann Salt. Correlations to other wells on the Wiggins arch, particularly the Conoco No. 1 Higgins, indicate that the Jurassic can be divided into three transgressive events separated by the Norphlet/Pine Hill and Frisco City/Buckner regressive events.

  3. The Impact of Subject Age, Gender, and Arch Length on Attitudes of Syrian Dentists towards Shortened Dental Arches.

    PubMed

    Nassani, Mohammad Zakaria; Al-Nahhal, Tammam Ibrahim; Kujan, Omar; Tarakji, Bassel; Kay, Elizabeth Jane

    2015-01-01

    Objective. This study aimed to investigate the impact of subject age, gender, and arch length on dentists' attitudes towards unrestored shortened dental arches. Materials and Methods. 93 Syrian dentists were interviewed and presented with 24 scenarios for male and female subjects of different ages and shortened dental arches of varying length. Participants were asked to indicate on a standardized visual analogue scale how they would value the health of the mouth if the posterior space was left unrestored. Results. A value of 0.0 represented the worst possible health state for a mouth and 1.0 represented the best. The highest mean value (0.73) was assigned to a shortened dental arch with missing second molar teeth in the mouth of a 70-year-old subject. A 35-year-old female subject with an extremely shortened dental arch (all molar and premolar teeth are missing) attracted the lowest mean value (0.26). The statistical analysis indicated a significant decrease in the value placed on unrestored shortened dental arches as the number of remaining teeth decreased (p < 0.008). While subject gender had almost no impact on dentists' attitudes towards shortened dental arches, the scenarios for the older shortened dental arch subjects attracted significantly higher values compared to the scenarios for the younger subjects (p < 0.017). Conclusion. Subject age and arch length affect dentists' attitudes towards shortened dental arches, but subject gender does not.

  4. Dental arch shape: a statistical analysis using conic sections.

    PubMed

    Sampson, P D

    1981-05-01

    This report addresses two problems in the study of the shape of human dental arches; (1) the description of arch shape by mathematical functions and (2) the description of variation among the dental arch shapes in a population. A new algorithm for fitting conic sections is used to model the maxillary dental arches of a sample of sixty-six subjects. A statistical model for shapes represented by arcs of conic sections is demonstrated on the sample of sixty-six dental arches. It permits the definition of an "average shape" and the graphic representation of variation in shape. The model and methods of analysis presented should help dental scientists to better define and quantify "normal" or "ideal" shapes and "normal ranges of variation" for the shape of the dental arch.

  5. 2. DETAIL VIEW OF MIDDLE ARCH SPAN, LOOKING NORTHWEST. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. DETAIL VIEW OF MIDDLE ARCH SPAN, LOOKING NORTHWEST. - Cumberland & Pennsylvania Railroad, Wills Creek Bridge, Spanning Wills Creek 587 feet West of Eckhart Junction, Cumberland, Allegany County, MD

  6. 66. CORBELS, BLIND ARCHES & SHIELDS, COMMONS EAST WALL, LOOKING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    66. CORBELS, BLIND ARCHES & SHIELDS, COMMONS EAST WALL, LOOKING EAST - Smithsonian Institution Building, 1000 Jefferson Drive, between Ninth & Twelfth Streets, Southwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  7. ARCH TYPE MAGAZINE # 2131. INTERIOR LOOKING TOWARD ENTRY. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    ARCH TYPE MAGAZINE # 2131. INTERIOR LOOKING TOWARD ENTRY. - Naval Magazine Lualualei, Headquarters Branch, Magazine Type, Various roads in northern & eastern portions of installation, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  8. 4. North elevation, arch CD. View south Ashton Viaduct, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. North elevation, arch C-D. View south - Ashton Viaduct, State Route 116 (Washington Highway) spanning Blackstone River, Blackstone Canal, & Providence & Worcester Railroad, Ashton, Providence County, RI

  9. Mathematical model of a moment-less arch

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a mathematical model for predicting the geometrical shapes of rigid, two-pin, moment-less arches of constant cross section. The advancement of this work lies in the inclusion of arch self-weight and the ability to produce moment-less arch forms for any span/rise ratio, and any ratio of uniformly distributed load per unit span, w, to uniformly distributed arch weight per unit arch length, q. The model is used to derive the shapes of two classical ‘moment-less’ arch forms: parabolic and catenary, prior to demonstrating a general case, not restricted by the unrealistic load assumptions (absence of q, in the case of a parabolic form, or no w, in the case of a catenary arch). Using the same value of span/rise ratio, and w/q>1, the behaviour of the moment-less and parabolic arches under permanent loading, (w+q), is analysed. Results show the former to be developing much lower stresses than its parabolic rival, even when there are relatively small differences in the two geometries; for a medium span/rise ratio of 4 and w/q=2, differences in the parabolic and moment-less arch geometries would, in practical terms, be viewed as insignificant, but the stresses in them are different. PMID:27436970

  10. 2. Elkmont, deck view of corrugated arched bridge. Great ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Elkmont, deck view of corrugated arched bridge. - Great Smoky Mountains National Park Roads & Bridges, Elkmont Vehicle Bridge, Spanning Little River at Elkmont Campground, Gatlinburg, Sevier County, TN

  11. 3. Elkmont, underside detail of corrugated arched bridge. Great ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Elkmont, underside detail of corrugated arched bridge. - Great Smoky Mountains National Park Roads & Bridges, Elkmont Vehicle Bridge, Spanning Little River at Elkmont Campground, Gatlinburg, Sevier County, TN

  12. Giant aortic arch aneurysm complicating Kawasaki's disease

    PubMed Central

    Hakim, Kaouthar; Boussada, Rafik; Chaker, Lilia; Ouarda, Fatma

    2014-01-01

    Kawasaki disease (KD) is a common acute vasculitis in pediatric population that usually involves small- and middle-sized arteries, commonly coronary arteries. Although the incidence and natural course of coronary aneurysms after KD are well documented in studies, related reports on peripheral arterial and aortic aneurysms are scarce. We report the occurrence of a giant aortic aneurysm involving the horizontal part of aortic arch in a 28-month-old boy diagnosed with KD. This complication was managed by steroids therapy in the beginning. Because of mechanical complication and potential risk of rupture, surgery was undertaken. PMID:25298695

  13. The Geologic Story of Arches National Park

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lohman, Stanley William

    1975-01-01

    According to former Superintendent Bates Wilson (1956), Prof. Lawrence M. Gould, of the University of Michigan, was the first to recognize the geologic and scenic values of the Arches area in eastern Utah and to urge its creation as a national monument. Mrs. Faun McConkie Tanner told me that Professor Gould, who had done a thesis problem in the nearby La Sal Mountains, was first taken through the area by Marv Turnbow, third owner of Wolfe cabin. (See p. 12.) When Professor Gould went into ecstasy over the beautiful scenery, Turnbow replied, 'I didn't know there was anything unusual about it.'

  14. Three-dimensional dental arch and palatal form changes after extraction and nonextraction treatment. Part 1. Arch length and area.

    PubMed

    Heiser, Wolfgang; Niederwanger, Andreas; Bancher, Beatrix; Bittermann, Gabriele; Neunteufel, Nikolaus; Kulmer, Siegfried

    2004-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate changes in arch length, arch area, and irregularity index in patients treated with and without premolar extractions. Records collected at pretreatment, at bracket removal, at the end of retention, and 5 years out of retention were examined. Stone casts were mounted on an articulator with an anatomic face-bow and a central wax record, and measurements were made with a 3-dimensional digitizer. In general, the maxillary arch exhibited less relapse tendency than did the mandibular arch for both patient groups. In general, the extraction group showed the same relapse tendency as the nonextraction group.

  15. Standardizing Foot-Type Classification Using Arch Index Values

    PubMed Central

    Weil, Rich; de Boer, Emily

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: The lack of a reliable classification standard for foot type makes drawing conclusions from existing research and clinical decisions difficult, since different foot types may move and respond to treatment differently. The purpose of this study was to determine interrater agreement for foot-type classification based on photo-box-derived arch index values. Method: For this correlational study with two raters, a sample of 11 healthy volunteers with normal to obese body mass indices was recruited from both a community weight-loss programme and a programme in physical therapy. Arch index was calculated using AutoCAD software from footprint photographs obtained via mirrored photo-box. Classification as high-arched, normal, or low-arched foot type was based on arch index values. Reliability of the arch index was determined with intra-class correlations; agreement on foot-type classification was determined using quadratic weighted kappa (κw). Results: Average arch index was 0.215 for one tester and 0.219 for the second tester, with an overall range of 0.017 to 0.370. Both testers classified 6 feet as low-arched, 9 feet as normal, and 7 feet as high-arched. Interrater reliability for the arch index was ICC=0.90; interrater agreement for foot-type classification was κw=0.923. Conclusions: Classification of foot type based on arch index values derived from plantar footprint photographs obtained via mirrored photo-box showed excellent reliability in people with varying BMI. Foot-type classification may help clinicians and researchers subdivide sample populations to better differentiate mobility, gait, or treatment effects among foot types. PMID:23729964

  16. Clinical Evaluation of Efficacy of CIA and CNA Intrusion Arches

    PubMed Central

    Vora, Sambhav; Pandey, Vinisha

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives Excessive overbite is one of the most common problems that confront the orthodontist. Deep bite can be due to infraocclusion of posterior teeth, supraocclusion of anterior teeth or a combination of the two. Correction of same can be carried out by extrusion of molars, intrusion of incisors or by a combination of both respectively. Various intrusion arches are recommended for correcting deep bite by true intrusion of anterior teeth, Utility arches, Segmental arch, Connecticut Intrusion Arch (CIA) and Connecticut New Arch (CNA). The purpose of this study was to evaluate clinical efficacy of CIA and CNA intrusion arches. Materials and Methods Tracings recorded from pre and post-treatment lateral cephalograms of 25 patients treated by CIA (Group I) and another 25 patients treated by CNA (Group II) intrusion arches in deep bite cases after four months of treatment were analysed and findings were recorded. Statistical Analysis Paired t-test was used to compare pre and post-treatment changes within Groups I and II and unpaired t-test was used to compare treatment changes between Group I and Group II. A P-value of < 0.05 was set for statistical significance. Results Findings of this study demonstrate that an average of 1mm of intrusion takes place with CIA intrusion arch and 1.3mm with CNA intrusion arch in a period of 4 months. Both intrusion arches do not affect the position of molar in vertical or anteroposterior plane. Interpretation & Conclusion Both CIA and CNA intrusion arches are effective in bringing about intrusion of lower incisors. PMID:26501008

  17. Blood flow characteristics in the aortic arch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prahl Wittberg, Lisa; van Wyk, Stevin; Mihaiescu, Mihai; Fuchs, Laszlo; Gutmark, Ephraim; Backeljauw, Philippe; Gutmark-Little, Iris

    2012-11-01

    The purpose with this study is to investigate the flow characteristics of blood in the aortic arch. Cardiovascular diseases are associated with specific locations in the arterial tree. Considering atherogenesis, it is claimed that the Wall Shear Stress (WSS) along with its temporal and spatial gradients play an important role in the development of the disease. The WSS is determined by the local flow characteristics, that in turn depends on the geometry as well as the rheological properties of blood. In this numerical work, the time dependent fluid flow during the entire cardiac cycle is fully resolved. The Quemada model is applied to account for the non-Newtonian properties of blood, an empirical model valid for different Red Blood Cell loading. Data obtained through Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging have been used in order to reconstruct geometries of the the aortic arch. Here, three different geometries are studied out of which two display malformations that can be found in patients having the genetic disorder Turner's syndrome. The simulations show a highly complex flow with regions of secondary flow that is enhanced for the diseased aortas. The financial support from the Swedish Research Council (VR) and the Sweden-America Foundation is gratefully acknowledged.

  18. Anatomical Variant of Atlas : Arcuate Foramen, Occpitalization of Atlas, and Defect of Posterior Arch of Atlas

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Objective We sought to examine anatomic variations of the atlas and the clinical significance of these variations. Methods We retrospectively reviewed 1029 cervical 3-dimensional (3D) CT images. Cervical 3D CT was performed between November 2011 and August 2014. Arcuate foramina were classified as partial or complete and left and/or right. Occipitalization of the atlas was classified in accordance with criteria specified by Mudaliar et al. Posterior arch defects of the atlas were classified in accordance with criteria specified by Currarino et al. Results One hundred and eight vertebrae (108/1029, 10.5%) showed an arcuate foramen. Bilateral arcuate foramina were present in 41 of these vertebrae and the remaining 67 arcuate foramina were unilateral (right 31, left 36). Right-side arcuate foramina were partial on 18 sides and complete on 54 sides. Left-side arcuate foramina were partial on 24 sides and complete on 53 sides. One case of atlas assimilation was found. Twelve patients (12/1029, 1.17%) had a defect of the atlantal posterior arch. Nine of these patients (9/1029, 0.87%) had a type A posterior arch defect. We also identified one type B, one type D, and one type E defect. Conclusion Preoperative diagnosis of occipitalization of the atlas and arcuate foramina using 3D CT is of paramount importance in avoiding neurovascular injury during surgery. It is important to be aware of posterior arch defects of the atlas because they may be misdiagnosed as a fracture. PMID:26819687

  19. 13. Historic photograph: November 1925. Bridge No. 148, Kenyon Arch ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. Historic photograph: November 1925. Bridge No. 148, Kenyon Arch Bridge, photograph No. 148004. View northeast along Sherman Avenue, south of the Kenyon Arch Bridge. Hussey Photograph Collection, Rhode Island State Archives, Providence, Rhode Island. - Kenyon Village, Kenyon School Road, Sherman Avenue, & Lewiston Avenue, Richmond (historical), Providence County, RI

  20. 1. ORIGINAL STONE ARCH BRIDGE OVER THE DES PLAINES RIVER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. ORIGINAL STONE ARCH BRIDGE OVER THE DES PLAINES RIVER AT NINTH STREET IN LOCKPORT. THE BRIDGE WAS BUILT ABOUT 1865. NOTE METAL CLAMP ON THE NEAR PIER AND THE 20TH CENTURY REINFORCED CONCRETE ADDITION. - Lockport Historic District, Stone Arch Bridge, Spanning Des Plaines River at Ninth Street, Lockport, Will County, IL

  1. 11. DETAIL, ARCH BARREL AND RING, FROM SOUTHWEST, SHOWING CUT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. DETAIL, ARCH BARREL AND RING, FROM SOUTHWEST, SHOWING CUT STONE MASONRY RINGSTONE VOUSSOIRS WITH '1902' KEYSTONE, CONCRETE PARAPET, CONCRETE APRON AT BASE OF BRIDGE UNDER ARCH, AND PORTION OF TIMBER GRILLAGE - Boston Street Bridge, Spanning Harris Creek Sewer at Boston Street, Baltimore, Independent City, MD

  2. Adult presentation with vascular ring due to double aortic arch.

    PubMed

    Kafka, Henryk; Uebing, Anselm; Mohiaddin, Raad

    2006-11-01

    This is a case report on the use of cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging to diagnose vascular ring due to double aortic arch in an adult presenting with an abnormal chest X-ray. The experience in this case and the literature review identify the benefits of using cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging to clarify complex aortic arch anatomy.

  3. 3. DETAIL VIEW OF ONE ARCH SPAN, LOOKING NW ALONG ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. DETAIL VIEW OF ONE ARCH SPAN, LOOKING NW ALONG EAST BANK OF SUSQUEHANNA RIVER. NOTE FLOOD STAGE MARKINGS ON PIER, ALSO LONGITUDINAL CONSTRUCTION JOINT IN ARCH BARREL. - Philadelphia & Reading Railroad, Susquehanna River Bridge, Spanning Susquehanna River, North of I-83 Bridge, Harrisburg, Dauphin County, PA

  4. 10. COPY OF OBLIQUE PHOTOGRAPH SHOWING ARCH HANGAR AT RIGHT, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. COPY OF OBLIQUE PHOTOGRAPH SHOWING ARCH HANGAR AT RIGHT, BUILDING 8200 (OBSERVATION TOWER) AT LEFT, AND B-52 AIRCRAFT PARKED ALONG APRON IN BACKGROUND, DATED OCTOBER 1967, PHOTOGRAPH FROM BASE MASTER PLAN LOCATED AT AIR FORCE BASE CONVERSION AGENCY, LORING AIR FORCE BASE, MAINE. - Loring Air Force Base, Arch Hangar, East of Arizona Road near southern end of runway, Limestone, Aroostook County, ME

  5. 12. AN IMAGE OF THE ARCH ENTRADOS LOOKING SOUTH FROM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. AN IMAGE OF THE ARCH ENTRADOS LOOKING SOUTH FROM THE NORTH SIDE OF U.S. 40. THIS DETAIL CLEARLY SHOWS THE FOUR LONGITUDINAL ARCH CASTINGS AND THE GHOSTS OF THE BOARDS USED AS FORMS. - Vandalia Railroad Bridge, Spanning U.S. Route 40, Indianapolis, Marion County, IN

  6. 15. Arched, concrete bridge along elevated rightofway of Shaker Rapid ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. Arched, concrete bridge along elevated right-of-way of Shaker Rapid Transit through the east side of city of Cleveland, labelled: 'View Toward West Along Northerly Side Arches at E. 90th St. and Westerly.' 1914. - Shaker Heights Rapid Transit Line, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

  7. 5. CLOSEUP VIEW TO WEST SHOWING UNDERSIDE OF ARCH; THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. CLOSE-UP VIEW TO WEST SHOWING UNDERSIDE OF ARCH; THE DAKOTA APARTMENT BUILDING ON WEST 72ND AND CENTRAL PARK WEST IS VISIBLE UNDER THE ARCH TO THE LEFT - Central Park Bridges, Bow Bridge, Spanning Lake, Central Park, New York County, NY

  8. 20. VIEW OF STEEL ARCH, SHOWING UNDERSIDE OF BRIDGE DECK ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. VIEW OF STEEL ARCH, SHOWING UNDERSIDE OF BRIDGE DECK AT EAST END, TYPICAL FLOOR BEAM DETAILS AND IRVING DECKING, X-BRACING AND PENETRATION OF ARCH LOWER CHORD THROUGH DECK, LOOKING NORTHWEST. GAS LINE IS CARRIED ON FLOOR BEAM OUTRIGGERS. NEW BRIDGE IS AT LEFT - Notre Dame Bridge, Spanning Merrimack River on Bridge Street, Manchester, Hillsborough County, NH

  9. 4. PORTAL VIEW OF THE CONCRETE ARCH (ONEWAY BRIDGE) THAT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. PORTAL VIEW OF THE CONCRETE ARCH (ONE-WAY BRIDGE) THAT EXITS THE MIDDLE CHANNEL ISLAND AND POST FALLS POWER PLANT, LOOKING EAST. - Washington Water Power Company Post Falls Power Plant, Concrete Arch Bridge, West of intersection of Spokane & Fourth Streets, Post Falls, Kootenai County, ID

  10. 1. CONTEXTUAL VIEW, LOOKING DOWNSTREAM (NORTHERLY) OF THE CONCRETE ARCH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. CONTEXTUAL VIEW, LOOKING DOWNSTREAM (NORTHERLY) OF THE CONCRETE ARCH ('ONE-WAY BRIDGE') THAT PROVIDES PRIVATE (WWP) ACCESS TO THE MIDDLE CHANNEL OF THE POST FALLS POWER PLANT. - Washington Water Power Company Post Falls Power Plant, Concrete Arch Bridge, West of intersection of Spokane & Fourth Streets, Post Falls, Kootenai County, ID

  11. 3. PORTAL VIEW OF THE CONCRETE ARCH (ONEWAY BRIDGE) THAT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. PORTAL VIEW OF THE CONCRETE ARCH (ONE-WAY BRIDGE) THAT PROVIDES ACCESS TO THE MIDDLE CHANNEL DAM AND POWER PLANT, LOOKING WEST. - Washington Water Power Company Post Falls Power Plant, Concrete Arch Bridge, West of intersection of Spokane & Fourth Streets, Post Falls, Kootenai County, ID

  12. Copy image of "'Under the Great Arch' of Refectory Bridge ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Copy image of "'Under the Great Arch' of Refectory Bridge connecting the Dining Room with the Practice House, Delta, and the Villa. The Refectory Cloister is seen beyond the arch"; a similar, but recent, view can be seen in MD-1109-A-16. (NPS view book, p. 25) - National Park Seminary, Main, Linden Lane, Silver Spring, Montgomery County, MD

  13. 145. Camp Creek Bridge. This is a Roman spandrel arch ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    145. Camp Creek Bridge. This is a Roman spandrel arch bridge built in 1939. View shows the stone arch stones and the stone facing on the headwall and wing wall. Looking north-northwest. - Blue Ridge Parkway, Between Shenandoah National Park & Great Smoky Mountains, Asheville, Buncombe County, NC

  14. Elemental composition of background soils from Arches National Park, Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Gladney, E.S.; Ferenbaugh, R.W. ); Belnap, J. )

    1993-05-01

    Background elemental data on soil composition at Arches National Park are reported. The enrichment factor analysis of the soil data from Arches National Park provides some interpretation of the current elemental status of soils at the park. These data provide a basis for determining changes in elemental enrichment status in the future.

  15. Minimally Invasive Techniques for Total Aortic Arch Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Faulds, Jason; Sandhu, Harleen K; Estrera, Anthony L; Safi, Hazim J

    2016-01-01

    The cumulative experience with endovascular aortic repair in the descending thoracic and infrarenal aorta has led to increased interest in endovascular aortic arch reconstruction. Open total arch replacement is a robust operation that can be performed with excellent results. However, it requires cardiopulmonary bypass and circulatory arrest and, therefore, may not be tolerated by all patients. Minimally invasive techniques have been considered as an alternative and include hybrid arch debranching, parallel stent graft deployment in the chimney and snorkel configurations, and complete endovascular branched reconstruction with multi-branched devices. This review discusses the evolving use of endovascular techniques in the management of aortic arch pathology and considers their relevance in an era of safe and durable open aortic arch reconstruction.

  16. Minimally Invasive Techniques for Total Aortic Arch Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Faulds, Jason; Sandhu, Harleen K.; Estrera, Anthony L.; Safi, Hazim J.

    2016-01-01

    The cumulative experience with endovascular aortic repair in the descending thoracic and infrarenal aorta has led to increased interest in endovascular aortic arch reconstruction. Open total arch replacement is a robust operation that can be performed with excellent results. However, it requires cardiopulmonary bypass and circulatory arrest and, therefore, may not be tolerated by all patients. Minimally invasive techniques have been considered as an alternative and include hybrid arch debranching, parallel stent graft deployment in the chimney and snorkel configurations, and complete endovascular branched reconstruction with multi-branched devices. This review discusses the evolving use of endovascular techniques in the management of aortic arch pathology and considers their relevance in an era of safe and durable open aortic arch reconstruction. PMID:27127562

  17. Origin of arches in the northwestern Gulf of Mexico basin

    SciTech Connect

    Laubach, S.E.; Jackson, M.L.W. )

    1990-07-01

    The San Marcos and Sabine arches are prominent north- to northwest-trending basement uplifts in the northwestern Gulf of Mexico basin that may be late Mesozoic to Cenozoic foreland or intraplate folds rather than domes over plutons or buoyant basement blocks. These arches are subparallel to and contemporaneous with orogenic episodes in the northwest-trending fold-thrust belt of Mexico. Arch movement was also contemporaneous with rapid convergence between the North American and Pacific plates. Arch development in the gulf as a result of tectonic compression is plausible in view of increasing recognition of wide zones of foreland and intraplate deformation in continents. Current tectonic models of the development of the gulf inaccurately predict gradual, decelerating subsidence when these arches were most active.

  18. Ambient resonance of Mesa Arch, Canyonlands National Park, Utah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starr, Alison M.; Moore, Jeffrey R.; Thorne, Michael S.

    2015-08-01

    We analyzed the resonance characteristics of a prominent natural arch in Canyonlands National Park, Mesa Arch, as measured from ambient seismic data. Evaluating spectral and polarization attributes, we distinguished the first four resonant frequencies of the arch, 2.9, 6.0, 6.9, and 8.5 Hz, as well as basic properties of the associated mode shapes. We then affirmed experimental data using 3-D numerical modal analysis, providing estimates of material properties and clarifying vibrational mode shapes. Monitoring resonant frequencies over time, we searched for shifts associated with changing environmental conditions and long-term progressive damage. We measured ~3% direct daily variation in resonant frequency associated with changing rock temperature, thermal stress, and stiffening of the rock matrix. Independent tilt data showed similar diurnal cycles associated with thermoelastic stresses and deformation of the arch. We observed no permanent resonant frequency shifts related to irreversible damage of Mesa Arch during our study period.

  19. Critical Transitions in Early Embryonic Aortic Arch Patterning and Hemodynamics

    PubMed Central

    Kowalski, William J.; Dur, Onur; Wang, Yajuan; Patrick, Michael J.; Tinney, Joseph P.; Keller, Bradley B.; Pekkan, Kerem

    2013-01-01

    Transformation from the bilaterally symmetric embryonic aortic arches to the mature great vessels is a complex morphogenetic process, requiring both vasculogenic and angiogenic mechanisms. Early aortic arch development occurs simultaneously with rapid changes in pulsatile blood flow, ventricular function, and downstream impedance in both invertebrate and vertebrate species. These dynamic biomechanical environmental landscapes provide critical epigenetic cues for vascular growth and remodeling. In our previous work, we examined hemodynamic loading and aortic arch growth in the chick embryo at Hamburger-Hamilton stages 18 and 24. We provided the first quantitative correlation between wall shear stress (WSS) and aortic arch diameter in the developing embryo, and observed that these two stages contained different aortic arch patterns with no inter-embryo variation. In the present study, we investigate these biomechanical events in the intermediate stage 21 to determine insights into this critical transition. We performed fluorescent dye microinjections to identify aortic arch patterns and measured diameters using both injection recordings and high-resolution optical coherence tomography. Flow and WSS were quantified with 3D computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Dye injections revealed that the transition in aortic arch pattern is not a uniform process and multiple configurations were documented at stage 21. CFD analysis showed that WSS is substantially elevated compared to both the previous (stage 18) and subsequent (stage 24) developmental time-points. These results demonstrate that acute increases in WSS are followed by a period of vascular remodeling to restore normative hemodynamic loading. Fluctuations in blood flow are one possible mechanism that impacts the timing of events such as aortic arch regression and generation, leading to the variable configurations at stage 21. Aortic arch variations noted during normal rapid vascular remodeling at stage 21 identify a

  20. Determining shapes and dimensions of dental arches for the use of straight-wire arches in lingual technique

    PubMed Central

    Kairalla, Silvana Allegrini; Scuzzo, Giuseppe; Triviño, Tarcila; Velasco, Leandro; Lombardo, Luca; Paranhos, Luiz Renato

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: This study aims to determine the shape and dimension of dental arches from a lingual perspective, and determine shape and size of a straight archwire used for lingual Orthodontics. METHODS: The study sample comprised 70 Caucasian Brazilian individuals with normal occlusion and at least four of Andrew's six keys. Maxillary and mandibular dental casts were digitized (3D) and the images were analyzed by Delcam Power SHAPET 2010 software. Landmarks on the lingual surface of teeth were selected and 14 measurements were calculated to determine the shape and size of dental arches. RESULTS: Shapiro-Wilk test determined small arch shape by means of 25th percentile (P25%) - an average percentile for the medium arch; and a large one determined by means of 75th percentile (P75%). T-test revealed differences between males and females in the size of 12 dental arches. CONCLUSION: The straight-wire arch shape used in the lingual straight wire technique is a parabolic-shaped arch, slightly flattened on its anterior portion. Due to similarity among dental arch sizes shown by males and females, a more simplified diagram chart was designed. PMID:25715725

  1. [Total arch replacement for right aortic arch with Kommerell diverticulum and aberrant left subclavian artery].

    PubMed

    Yoshida, S; Aomi, S; Ozawa, H; Maeda, T; Kawai, A; Nishida, H; Endo, M; Koyanagi, H

    2003-05-01

    A 57-year-old man suspected of having angina pectoris underwent coronary angiography and comprehensive examination, which revealed a right-side aortic arch accompanying Kommerell diverticulum and a aberrant left subclavian artery. Esophagography indicated that the esophagus was compressed on its right posterior side and the computed tomography (CT) revealed that the posterior side of the tracheal was compressed, however, the patient experienced no difficulty in breathing, hoarseness of voice or dysphasia. The size of the aortic diverticulum was less than 5 cm and the patient showed no symptom, however, if it was left untreated, there was a risk of rupture in the future. Also the esophagus and tracheal may develop complications due to prolonged compression. Therefore, we decided that the case required surgical operation. Total arch replacement was performed through mediastinotomy and right posterolateral in the 4th intercostal. The postoperative condition was good, and the patient was discharged without any complications.

  2. Role of fracture localization in arch formation, Arches National Park, Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Cruikshank, K.M.; Aydin, A. )

    1994-07-01

    Spectacular rock fins on the flanks of Salt Valley anticline in southeast Utah are formed by erosion along zones of joints. Within a rock fin, arches form where intense fracturing is localized. Fracture localization is controlled by shear displacement along existing horizontal or vertical discontinuities. Horizontal discontinuities may be shale layers, shale lenses, or bedding planes, whereas vertical discontinuities are usually preexisting joint segments. The roof and overall shape of an arch is controlled by existing shale layers, interfaces between sandstones of different properties, or secondary fractures due to shear on vertical joints. Joints that bound rock fins are related to the formation of the diapir-cored Salt Valley anticline. Shear displacement along existing discontinuities, which localizes intense fracturing, is probably related to the growth of Salt Valley anticline and its subsequent collapse due to dissolution of the anticlines salt core. 31 refs., 11 figs.

  3. Dental arch diameters and relationships to oral habits.

    PubMed

    Aznar, T; Galán, A F; Marín, I; Domínguez, A

    2006-05-01

    The objective was to analyze variations in dental arch width in relation to oral habits. Maxillary and mandibular intercanine and intermolar distance were determined in relation to certain oral habits in 1297 children (ages 3 to 6 years). After an oral examination, the parents of each child completed a questionnaire about oral habits, including the use of a dummy or a bottle (or both), finger sucking, mouth breathing, breast- or bottle-feeding, and duration of these habits. Data were subjected to statistical analysis by the chi-square test for qualitative variables and analysis of variance for quantitative variables with homogeneous variances. Statistical significance was P < .05. In general, the maxillary arch was larger than the mandibular arch with regard to both the intercanine and the intermolar distances and more significantly so in boys. In relation to age, a significant increase was found only for the mandibular intercanine distance (P = .001). When arch width was analyzed in relation to various oral habits, the maxillary intercanine distance was less in children who used a dummy, especially one of a round design (P = .003). The maxillary intercanine distance was also less in children who breathed through their mouth (P = .002). In most cases, dummy use and mouth breathing were associated with a reduction in the intercanine distance in the maxillary arch. A dummy habit leads to a reduction in maxillary arch width, and mouth breathing causes a reduction in the size of both arches.

  4. Right Aortic Arch and Coarctation: A Rare Association

    PubMed Central

    Ismat, Fraz A.; Weinberg, Paul M.; Rychik, Jack; Karl, Tom R.; Fogel, Mark A.

    2006-01-01

    Objectives Understand anatomical and clinical correlatives to coarctation in right aortic arch. Background Coarctation of the aorta is rare in patients with a functional right aortic arch. We reviewed a single institutional experience, examining associated diagnoses, diagnostic methodology, and surgical approaches. Methods A retrospective study was performed of our echocardiographic, magnetic resonance imaging, catheterization, and surgical databases from 1988 to 2001. Results Of 240 patients with right aortic arch, 10 (4.1%) had coarctation, constituting 1.9% of all native coarctations (n = 524). Nine (90%) had long-segment hypoplasia. Six (60%) had an aberrant left subclavian artery or retroesophageal diverticulum, 3 (30%) had mirror image branching, and 1 (10%) had a double arch with an atretic left arch. Other congenital heart defects were seen in 6 (60%) comprising 3 with ventricular septal defects, and one each with double-outlet right ventricle, cor triatriatum, and pulmonary valve abnormality. No patients with long-segment hypoplasia had bicuspid aortic valve. Six (60%) had vascular rings, and 5 (50%) had other associated syndromes. Magnetic resonance imaging and/or echocardiography successfully diagnosed all of these patients. Although long-segment right aortic arch coarctation courses behind the trachea posteriorly, only 2 needed an extra-anatomic (jump) graft; the remainders were repaired with patch angioplasty. Conclusion Coarctation with right aortic arch is rare, constituting 4.1% of all patients with right aortic arch, compared with 5–8% of patients with left aortic arch and congenital heart disease. Nearly all had long-segment hypoplasia without bicuspid aortic valve, and half were part of other syndrome complexes. This association can be diagnosed noninvasively and can often be repaired by patch angioplasty. PMID:17330153

  5. The Diversity of High- and Intermediate-Velocity Clouds: Complex C versus IV Arch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richter, Philipp; Sembach, Kenneth R.; Wakker, Bart P.; Savage, Blair D.; Tripp, Todd M.; Murphy, Edward M.; Kalberla, Peter M. W.; Jenkins, Edward B.

    2001-09-01

    We present Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) and Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) observations of interstellar ultraviolet absorption lines in the Galactic high-velocity cloud Complex C and the Intermediate-Velocity Arch (IV Arch) in the direction of the quasar PG 1259+593 (l=120.6d, b=+58.1d). Absorption lines from C II, N I, N II, O I, Al II, Si II, P II, S II, Ar I, Fe II, and Fe III are used to study the atomic abundances in these two halo clouds at VLSR~-130 km s-1 (Complex C) and -55 km s-1 (IV Arch). The O I/H I ratio provides the best measure of the overall metallicity in the diffuse interstellar medium because ionization effects do not alter the ratio, and oxygen is at most only lightly depleted from the gas into dust grains. For Complex C, we find an oxygen abundance of 0.093+0.125-0.047 times solar, consistent with the idea that Complex C represents the infall of low-metallicity gas onto the Milky Way. In contrast, the oxygen abundance in the IV Arch is 0.98+1.21-0.46 times solar, which indicates a Galactic origin. We report the detection of an intermediate-velocity absorption component at +60 km s-1 that is not seen in H I 21 cm emission. The clouds along the PG 1259+593 sight line have a variety of properties, proving that multiple processes are responsible for the creation and circulation of intermediate and high-velocity gas in the Milky Way halo. Partly based on observations with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555.

  6. First Branchial Arch Fistula: A Rarity and a Surgical Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Rajkumar, J.S.; Anirudh, J.R.; Akbar, S.; Joshi, Niraj

    2016-01-01

    Although 2nd Branchial arch fistulae (from incomplete closure of Cervical sinus of His) are well known, 1st arch fistulae are much rarer (<10%) and are usually not tackled comprehensively. We present a case of a rare first branchial arch fistula of the type II Arnot classification, which presented with two external openings of more than 20 years duration. Patient had a successful resection of all the concerned fistulous tract. Review of literature and the surgical challenges of the procedure are presented herewith. PMID:27504352

  7. The assessment of crowding without the need to record arch perimeter. Part I: Arches with acceptable alignment.

    PubMed

    Battagel, J M

    1996-05-01

    A simplified, mathematically determined technique for calculating arch perimeter (the overlap method) is described and its validity in determining an accurate assessment of crowding is tested. Indices, expressed in millimetres of crowding or spacing, were computed for both the whole arch and the labial segment alone. Study casts of 36 individuals with clinically acceptable lower arches were used to validate the method. The degree of crowding or spacing calculated was compared with a "clinical' assessment of each arch, in which the irregularity was measured directly using a steel ruler. Various calculation schemes were tested. Depending on exactly how the overlap was determined, the results varied slightly. Although the arches showed acceptable alignment, it was preferable to include a strategy for normalizing the positions of any rotated teeth before the overlaps were calculated. Repositioning any bucco-lingually displaced teeth into the line of the arch, however, was not useful. For the complete arch good agreement with the clinical assessment was reached on 31 occasions and for the labial segment, all but one appraisals were within 0.5 mm of each other. In the remaining instances (five complete arches and one labial segment), the degree of crowding or spacing was between 0.5 and 1 mm of the clinical assessment. Considering that clinical measurement of minor degrees of crowding and spacing cannot be precise, these results were considered acceptable. The method was easy to use, relying only on the recording of mesio-distal tooth widths and was acceptably reproducible. The technique would therefore appear to provide a valid yet simple research tool with which to record the degree of crowding. Its ability to cope with irregular and crowded arches will be the subject of a subsequent review.

  8. 11. Southern bridge abutment and arches, taken from old bridge ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. Southern bridge abutment and arches, taken from old bridge abutment looking south. - Presumpscot Falls Bridge, Spanning Presumptscot River at Allen Avenue extension, 0.75 mile west of U.S. Interstate 95, Falmouth, Cumberland County, ME

  9. 10. VIEW OF THE ARCHED TRIPARTITE STEEL SASH WINDOW OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. VIEW OF THE ARCHED TRIPARTITE STEEL SASH WINDOW OF THE 2ND FLOOR WITH CAST IRON MOLDED PANEL BELOW AT FRONT ELEVATION. - Pacific Telephone & Telegraph Company Building, 1519 Franklin Street, Oakland, Alameda County, CA

  10. 41. VIEW EAST OF ARCH AND PASSAGEWAY MARKED '1905' THROUGH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    41. VIEW EAST OF ARCH AND PASSAGEWAY MARKED '1905' THROUGH BUILDING 48; BUILDING 7 IS AT LEFT CENTER, BUILDING 6 IS AT EXTREME RIGHT OF PHOTOGRAPH - Scovill Brass Works, 59 Mill Street, Waterbury, New Haven County, CT

  11. SPRINGING OF THE ARCH, SOUTH END OF BRIDGE, STATEN ISLAND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    SPRINGING OF THE ARCH, SOUTH END OF BRIDGE, STATEN ISLAND SIDE (CONTACT PRINT MADE FROM 5 1/4" X 4 1/2" NEGATIVE) - Bayonne Bridge, Spanning Kill Van Kull between Bayonne & Staten Island, Bayonne, Hudson County, NJ

  12. Halfcellar underneath original house showing fireplace relieving arch at northwest ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Half-cellar underneath original house showing fireplace relieving arch at northwest end; enclosed "cheese" room to right - Scheetz Farm, House, 7161 Camp Hill Road, Fort Washington, Montgomery County, PA

  13. Northern approach stone arch permits access to park in panther ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Northern approach stone arch permits access to park in panther hollow below. - Schenley Park Bridge over Panther Hollow, Spanning Panther Hollow at Panther Hollow Road, Pittsburgh, Allegheny County, PA

  14. 5. DETAIL VIEW OF PORTION OF EAST ELEVATION SHOWING ARCHED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. DETAIL VIEW OF PORTION OF EAST ELEVATION SHOWING ARCHED WINDOW AND DOOR OPENINGS - Presidio Water Treatment Plant, Filtration Plant, East of Lobos Creek at Baker Beach, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  15. Arch & Chord Joint Detail; Crossbracing Center Joint Detail; Chord, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Arch & Chord Joint Detail; Crossbracing Center Joint Detail; Chord, Panel Post, Tie & Diagonal Brace Joint Detail; Chord, Panel Post, Tie & Crossbracing Joint Detail - Dunlapsville Covered Bridge, Spanning East Fork Whitewater River, Dunlapsville, Union County, IN

  16. PALMDALE WATER COMPANY, LITTLE ROCK DAM: REINFORCEMENT, SECTION THROUGH ARCH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    PALMDALE WATER COMPANY, LITTLE ROCK DAM: REINFORCEMENT, SECTION THROUGH ARCH RING, AMENDED SHEET 6; SEPTEMBER, 1922. Palmdale Water District files - Little Rock Creek Dam, Little Rock Creek, Littlerock, Los Angeles County, CA

  17. 80. LITTLE ROCK DAM: DIMENSIONS, SECTION THROUGH ARCH RING, AMENDED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    80. LITTLE ROCK DAM: DIMENSIONS, SECTION THROUGH ARCH RING, AMENDED SHEET 5; SEPTEMBER, 1922. Palmdale Water District files. - Little Rock Creek Dam, Little Rock Creek, Littlerock, Los Angeles County, CA

  18. Oblique view of arches and ironwork on south breezeway ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Oblique view of arches and ironwork on south breezeway - National Home for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers, Pacific Branch, Mental Health Buildings, 11301 Wilshire Boulevard, West Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  19. View of south entrance to #157 through south breezeway arches ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of south entrance to #157 through south breezeway arches - National Home for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers, Pacific Branch, Mental Health Buildings, 11301 Wilshire Boulevard, West Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  20. 14. BRIDGE ABUTMENT AND ARCH TRUSS MOUNTING PLATE SHOWING EYEBAR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. BRIDGE ABUTMENT AND ARCH TRUSS MOUNTING PLATE SHOWING EYE-BAR CONNECTION AND EYE-BAR PIN LOCATION - Spruce Street Bridge, East Spruce Street, 500 Block, spanning Power Canal, Sault Ste. Marie, Chippewa County, MI

  1. Arch construction at south end, looking east with Phoenix Iron ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Arch construction at south end, looking east with Phoenix Iron Company foundry in background. - Gay Street Bridge, Spanning French Creek at Gay Street (State Route 113), Phoenixville, Chester County, PA

  2. Detail view of keystone sculpted head in the arched passage ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail view of keystone sculpted head in the arched passage to the lobby vestibule - United States Department of Commerce, Bounded by Fourteenth, Fifteenth, and E streets and Constitution Avenue, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  3. 22. STEEL ARCH SEGMENT AND VENT IN OFFICE, ROOM 2351, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    22. STEEL ARCH SEGMENT AND VENT IN OFFICE, ROOM 2351, SECOND FLOOR, NORTH SIDE. - Hughes Aircraft Company, Processing & Electronics Building, 6775 Centinela Avenue, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  4. 6. (1r) Arches EF, DE. View southeast Ashton Viaduct, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. (1-r) Arches E-F, D-E. View southeast - Ashton Viaduct, State Route 116 (Washington Highway) spanning Blackstone River, Blackstone Canal, & Providence & Worcester Railroad, Ashton, Providence County, RI

  5. 5. Railroad tracks, (lr) arches EF, DE, CD, BC. View ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. Railroad tracks, (l-r) arches E-F, D-E, C-D, B-C. View southwest - Ashton Viaduct, State Route 116 (Washington Highway) spanning Blackstone River, Blackstone Canal, & Providence & Worcester Railroad, Ashton, Providence County, RI

  6. 1. South elevation, (lr) arches CD and DE. View north ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. South elevation, (l-r) arches C-D and D-E. View north - Ashton Viaduct, State Route 116 (Washington Highway) spanning Blackstone River, Blackstone Canal, & Providence & Worcester Railroad, Ashton, Providence County, RI

  7. 7. (lr) Arches DE, CD, BC. View southwest Ashton ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. (l-r) Arches D-E, C-D, B-C. View southwest - Ashton Viaduct, State Route 116 (Washington Highway) spanning Blackstone River, Blackstone Canal, & Providence & Worcester Railroad, Ashton, Providence County, RI

  8. 64. Detail view looking NW at masonry approach arches on ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    64. Detail view looking NW at masonry approach arches on the Brooklyn side. Jet Lowe, photographer, 1982. - Brooklyn Bridge, Spanning East River between Park Row, Manhattan and Sands Street, Brooklyn, New York County, NY

  9. Detail of windows in arched opening on left of east ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail of windows in arched opening on left of east elevation; camera facing west. - Mare Island Naval Shipyard, Rubber Shop, California Avenue, west side across from Dry Dock 1 near Ninth Street, Vallejo, Solano County, CA

  10. DETAIL OF GABLE END WITH ARCHED WINDOW, SHOWING SOFFIT OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL OF GABLE END WITH ARCHED WINDOW, SHOWING SOFFIT OF OVERHANG; CAMERA FACING NORTH - Mare Island Naval Shipyard, Transportation Building & Gas Station, Third Street, south side between Walnut Avenue & Cedar Avenue, Vallejo, Solano County, CA

  11. 44. VIEW THROUGH UPPER PORTION OF EAST TOWER ARCH, LOOKING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    44. VIEW THROUGH UPPER PORTION OF EAST TOWER ARCH, LOOKING WEST AT ROADWAY AND SUSPENSION CABLES. - Wheeling Suspension Bridge, Spanning East channel of Ohio River at U.S. Route 40, Wheeling, Ohio County, WV

  12. 11. DETAIL OF WEST WEB, FROM STREAMBANK, SHOWING ARCH RIB, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. DETAIL OF WEST WEB, FROM STREAMBANK, SHOWING ARCH RIB, HANGERS, FLOOR BEAMS AND GUARDRAIL. VIEW TO NORTHEAST. - Rock Valley Bridge, Spanning North Timber Creek at Old U.S. Highway 30, Marshalltown, Marshall County, IA

  13. 12. DETAIL OF NORTH ABUTMENT, FROM BENEATH, SHOWING ARCH RIB ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. DETAIL OF NORTH ABUTMENT, FROM BENEATH, SHOWING ARCH RIB AND FLOOR BEAM. VIEW TO NORTHEAST. - Rock Valley Bridge, Spanning North Timber Creek at Old U.S. Highway 30, Marshalltown, Marshall County, IA

  14. 23. Upstream view of buttress and arch form work and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    23. Upstream view of buttress and arch form work and construction. Photographer unknown, 1927. Source: MWD. - Waddell Dam, On Agua Fria River, 35 miles northwest of Phoenix, Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ

  15. 65. Close up view of downstream face of arch, buttress ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    65. Close up view of downstream face of arch, buttress ties and roadway support work. Photographer Mark Durben. Source: Salt River Project. - Waddell Dam, On Agua Fria River, 35 miles northwest of Phoenix, Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ

  16. 19. Upstream face of arches and buttresses at west end. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. Upstream face of arches and buttresses at west end. Photographer unknown, January 29, 1927. Source: MWD. - Waddell Dam, On Agua Fria River, 35 miles northwest of Phoenix, Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ

  17. 19. COPY OF ENGRAVING OF 'WROUGHT IRON ARCH TRUSS BRIDGE,' ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. COPY OF ENGRAVING OF 'WROUGHT IRON ARCH TRUSS BRIDGE,' PAT. DEC. 10, 1867 BY OHIO BRIDGE COMPANY, CLEVELAND, OHIO. (COURTESY OF OHIO HISTORICAL SOCIETY ARCHIVES, COLUMBUS, OHIO) - Tioronda Bridge, South Avenue spanning Fishkill Creek, Beacon, Dutchess County, NY

  18. 16. TAILRACE ARCH FROM 1814 MILL BROKEN THROUGH DURING EXCAVATION ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. TAILRACE ARCH FROM 1814 MILL BROKEN THROUGH DURING EXCAVATION FOR A SURFACE WATER RUNOFF POLLUTION TRAP, SUBSEQUENTLY FILLED. - Boston Manufacturing Company, 144-190 Moody Street, Waltham, Middlesex County, MA

  19. 28. Brick apartment buildings with arched window openings, string courses, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    28. Brick apartment buildings with arched window openings, string courses, a brick cornice, and an interrupted brick frieze. - Butte Historic District, Bounded by Copper, Arizona, Mercury & Continental Streets, Butte, Silver Bow County, MT

  20. 11. Detail of laminated arch beams, radiators, pews and portion ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. Detail of laminated arch beams, radiators, pews and portion of the office to the left of the sanctuary, facing north - Mountain Home Air Force Base, Base Chapel, 350 Willow Street, Cantonment Area, Mountain Home, Elmore County, ID

  1. A case of neonatal arterial thrombosis mimicking interrupted aortic arch

    PubMed Central

    Gürsu, Hazım Alper; Varan, Birgül; Oktay, Ayla; Özkan, Murat

    2015-01-01

    Neonatal arterial thrombosis is a very rare entity with clinical findings resembling coarctation of aorta or interrupted aortic arch. A two day-old male newborn was admitted to a different hospital with difficulty in sucking and sleepiness. On echocardiographic examination, a diagnosis of interrupted aortic arch was made and he was treated with prostoglandin E2. When the patient presented to our center, physical examination revealed that his feet were bilaterally cold. The pulses were not palpable and there were ecchymotic regions in the lower extremities. Echocardiography ruled out interrupted aortic arch. Computerized tomographic angiography revealed a large thrombosis and total occlusion of the abdominal aorta. Since there was no response to treatment with tissue plasminogen activator, we performed thrombectomy. Homozygous Factor V Leiden and Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase mutations were found in this patient. Neonatal aortic thrombosis which is observed very rarely and fatal should be considered in the differential diagnosis of coarctation of aorta and interrupted aortic arch. PMID:26265897

  2. 6. View southeast, west elevation, showing north arch span abutment ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. View southeast, west elevation, showing north arch span abutment and central pier with nose on upstream side - Edna Dean Proctor Bridge, Spanning Contoacook River at State Route 114, Henniker, Merrimack County, NH

  3. 10. DETAIL OF UNDERSIDE OF ARCH, SHOWING LOWER CHORDS, VERTICALS, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. DETAIL OF UNDERSIDE OF ARCH, SHOWING LOWER CHORDS, VERTICALS, LATERAL BRACES AND ABUTMENTS, VIEW TO SOUTHEAST. - Navajo Bridge, Spanning Colorado River at U.S. Highway 89 Alternate, Page, Coconino County, AZ

  4. BLDG 2 INTERIOR SHOWING ARCHES IN HALL BY MAIN ENTRY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    BLDG 2 INTERIOR SHOWING ARCHES IN HALL BY MAIN ENTRY - Naval Magazine Lualualei, Headquarters Branch, Police Station, Kolekole Road & Constitution Street intersection, north side of main quad, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  5. 20. WHEELPIT AREA LOOKING SOUTHWEST, WITH TAILRACE ENTRANCE ARCH BELOW ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. WHEELPIT AREA LOOKING SOUTHWEST, WITH TAILRACE ENTRANCE ARCH BELOW SLAB, IN FOUNDATION WALL AT LEFT; ANOTHER VIEW OF THE LONGITUDINAL BEAMS SPANNING WHEELPIT. - Boston Manufacturing Company, 144-190 Moody Street, Waltham, Middlesex County, MA

  6. Detail perspective view of the Ten Mile Creek Bridge arch, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail perspective view of the Ten Mile Creek Bridge arch, decorative cantilevered balustrade, and floor beams. - Ten Mile Creek Bridge, Spanning Ten Mile Creek on Oregon Coast Highway, Yachats, Lincoln County, OR

  7. Detail view highlighting the series of pointed arch windows along ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail view highlighting the series of pointed arch windows along the North Carrollton facade - Reformed Episcopal Church of the Rock of Ages, 1210 West Lanvale Street, Baltimore, Independent City, MD

  8. Cellar: Detail of paired relieving arch and remains of herringbone ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Cellar: Detail of paired relieving arch and remains of herringbone brick pattern from earlier cooking fireplace at back, southeast wall looking southeast - Kingston-Upon-Hill, Kitts Hummock Road, Dover, Kent County, DE

  9. NASA's SDO Watches Magnetic Arches Tower Over Sun's Surface

    NASA Video Gallery

    Massive arches of solar material brighten and stream over an active region on the sun’s surface in this animation of imagery captured by NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory, or SDO, on Sept. 29, 2016...

  10. NASA’s SDO Captures Cascading Magnetic Arches

    NASA Video Gallery

    A dark solar filament above the sun's surface became unstable and erupted on Dec. 16-17, 2015, generating a cascade of magnetic arches. A small eruption to the upper right of the filament was likel...

  11. 5. BUILDING 0503, INTERIOR WOODEN ARCHES. Looking south from entrance. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. BUILDING 0503, INTERIOR WOODEN ARCHES. Looking south from entrance. - Edwards Air Force Base, South Base Sled Track, Earth Covered Bunker Types, North of Sled Track, Lancaster, Los Angeles County, CA

  12. 36. DETAIL, ALTERNATE DESIGN USING THROUGH ARCH SPANS Pencil drawing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    36. DETAIL, ALTERNATE DESIGN USING THROUGH ARCH SPANS Pencil drawing by project architect Alfred Eichler, ca. 1934. - Sacramento River Bridge, Spanning Sacramento River at California State Highway 275, Sacramento, Sacramento County, CA

  13. Detail of arched window on north portion of south wing, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail of arched window on north portion of south wing, showing stone foundation; camera facing north. - Mare Island Naval Shipyard, Smithery, California Avenue, west side at California Avenue & Eighth Street, Vallejo, Solano County, CA

  14. Detail of arched window by main entry on west elevation; ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail of arched window by main entry on west elevation; showing Stone Foundation; camera facing east. - Mare Island Naval Shipyard, Smithery, California Avenue, west side at California Avenue & Eighth Street, Vallejo, Solano County, CA

  15. 4. VIEW NORTH, DETAIL SHOWING TERRA COTTA ROUND ARCH AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. VIEW NORTH, DETAIL SHOWING TERRA COTTA ROUND ARCH AND STRING COURSE AT FOURTH FLOOR LEVEL AND FRIEZE AT FIFTH FLOOR LEVEL - West Lexington Street, Number 308 (Commercial Building), 308 West Lexington Street, Baltimore, Independent City, MD

  16. Arched entry to privy stall in base of Smokestack ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Arched entry to privy stall in base of Smokestack - Central of Georgia Railway, Savannah Repair Shops & Terminal Facilities, Combination Smokestack, Water Tank & Privies, Bounded by West Broad, Jones, West Boundary & Hull Streets, Savannah, Chatham County, GA

  17. Close view of the Constitution Avenue elevation to show arched ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Close view of the Constitution Avenue elevation to show arched gateways and pedimented pavilion ("Commerce and Communication" sculpted pediment) - Interstate Commerce Commission, Constitution Avenue between Twelfth and Fourteenth streets, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  18. 11. VIEW NORTHEAST, DETAIL OF WEST ELEVATION OF TAILRACE ARCH; ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. VIEW NORTHEAST, DETAIL OF WEST ELEVATION OF TAILRACE ARCH; BREAK IN MASONRY OF PARAPET PROBABLY INDICATES RAISING OF THE LEVEL OF THE ROADWAY AT THE NORTH END - Windham Road Bridge, Windham Road, spanning Willimantic River, Windham, Windham County, CT

  19. Detail view of bracket, arched window and eagle from building ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail view of bracket, arched window and eagle from building 18 section. Jet Lowe, Haer staff photographer, summer 1995 - Naval Base Philadelphia-Philadelphia Naval Shipyard, Machine Shops, League Island, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  20. 1. VIEW SOUTHWARD FROM SOUTHWEST CORNER FRONT AND ARCH STREETS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. VIEW SOUTHWARD FROM SOUTHWEST CORNER FRONT AND ARCH STREETS (2. N. Front Street starts at left) - North Front Street Area Study, 2-66 North Front Street (Commercial Buildings), Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  1. 13. Detail of second story window arch, front side, left ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. Detail of second story window arch, front side, left of north entrance - Oklahoma State University, Boys Dormitory, Northwest corner of Hester Street & Athletic Avenue, Stillwater, Payne County, OK

  2. LOOKING WEST, BETWEEN READING DEPOT BRIDGE AND SKEW ARCH BRIDGE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    LOOKING WEST, BETWEEN READING DEPOT BRIDGE AND SKEW ARCH BRIDGE (HAER No. PA-116). - Philadelphia & Reading Railroad, Reading Depot Bridge, North Sixth Street at Woodward Street, Reading, Berks County, PA

  3. 7. VAL CONCRETE 'A' FRAME STRUCTURE SHOWING CAMERA TOWER ARCHED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. VAL CONCRETE 'A' FRAME STRUCTURE SHOWING CAMERA TOWER ARCHED OPENING FOR ROADWAY AND COUNTERWEIGHT SLOPE TAKEN FROM RESERVOIR LOOKING WEST. - Variable Angle Launcher Complex, Variable Angle Launcher, CA State Highway 39 at Morris Reservior, Azusa, Los Angeles County, CA

  4. ABUTMENT. NOTE HOW ARCHES BUTT AGAINST A CONCRETE PAD ADDED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    ABUTMENT. NOTE HOW ARCHES BUTT AGAINST A CONCRETE PAD ADDED IN 1968. NOTE ALSO IRON TIE ROD AT LOWER CHORD. - Dreibelbis Station Bridge, Spanning Maiden Creek, Balthaser Road (TR 745), Lenhartsville, Berks County, PA

  5. 69. INTERIOR VIEW OF ARCH OF BRIDGE OVER ORIGINAL HEADRACE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    69. INTERIOR VIEW OF ARCH OF BRIDGE OVER ORIGINAL HEADRACE (now in basement in front of north wing) (4' x 5' negative) - Fairmount Waterworks, East bank of Schuylkill River, Aquarium Drive, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  6. 1. Elkmont vehicle bridge at Elkmont Campground, galvanized corrugated arch. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Elkmont vehicle bridge at Elkmont Campground, galvanized corrugated arch. - Great Smoky Mountains National Park Roads & Bridges, Elkmont Vehicle Bridge, Spanning Little River at Elkmont Campground, Gatlinburg, Sevier County, TN

  7. 11. DETAIL VIEW OF BRIDGE DECK, SHOWING ENDPANEL VERTICAL, ARCH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. DETAIL VIEW OF BRIDGE DECK, SHOWING END-PANEL VERTICAL, ARCH SEGMENT, LOWER CHORD AND FLOOR SYSTEM, LOOKING NORTHEAST - Davis Bridge, Spanning Upper Iowa River at County Road 16, Lime Springs, Howard County, IA

  8. Observations of double arch formation in the Bering Strait

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torgerson, Lenora J.; Stringer, William J.

    1985-10-01

    During the time that ice is present in the Bering Strait, it is constantly moving, both northward and southward, subject to wind and current stresses. There were, however, several times in the last decade when the ice was prevented from travelling through the Strait. The blockage of ice was due to the formation of fairly stable double arches that extended across the Strait. Six episodes of double arch formation, resulting in ice blockage in the Bering Strait, were recorded on NOAA satellite imagery spanning the last eleven years; one additional episode was seen on Landsat imagery. All of the incidences of double arching occurred between February and May. In the most extreme case the arches prevented the southward flow of ice through the Strait for at least 27 days during April and May 1980.

  9. Growth and hemodynamics after early embryonic aortic arch occlusion*

    PubMed Central

    Lindsey, Stephanie E.; Menon, Prahlad G.; Kowalski, William J.; Shekhar, Akshay; Yalcin, Huseyin C.; Nishimura, Nozomi; Schaffer, Chris B.; Butcher, Jonathan T.; Pekkan, Kerem

    2015-01-01

    The majority of severe clinically significant forms of congenital heart disease (CHD) is associated with great artery lesions, including hypoplastic, double, right or interrupted aortic arch morphologies. While fetal and neonatal interventions are advancing, their potential ability to restore cardiac function, optimal timing, location, and intensity required for intervention remain largely unknown. We here combine computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations with in vivo experiments to test how individual pharyngeal arch artery hemodynamics alters as a result of local interventions to obstruct individual arch artery flow. Simulated isolated occlusions within each pharyngeal arch artery were created with image derived three-dimensional (3D) reconstructions of normal chick pharyngeal arch anatomy at Hamburger-Hamilton (HH) developmental stages HH18 and HH24. Acute flow redistributions were then computed using in vivo measured subject-specific aortic sinus inflow velocity profiles. A kinematic vascular growth-rendering algorithm was then developed and implemented to test the role of changing local wall shear stress patterns in downstream 3D morphogenesis of arch arteries. CFD simulations predicted that altered pressure gradients and flow redistributions were most sensitive to occlusion of the IVth arches. To evaluate these simulations experimentally, a novel in vivo experimental model of pharyngeal arch occlusion was developed and implemented using two-photon microscopy guided femtosecond laser based photodisruption surgery. The right IVth arch was occluded at HH18, and resulting diameter changes were followed for up to 24 hours. Pharyngeal arch diameter responses to acute hemodynamic changes were predicted qualitatively but poorly quantitatively. Chronic growth and adaptation to hemodynamic changes however were predicted in a subset of arches. Our findings suggest that this complex biodynamic process is governed through more complex forms of mechanobiological

  10. NASA ARCH- A FILE ARCHIVAL SYSTEM FOR THE DEC VAX

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, P. J.

    1994-01-01

    The function of the NASA ARCH system is to provide a permanent storage area for files that are infrequently accessed. The NASA ARCH routines were designed to provide a simple mechanism by which users can easily store and retrieve files. The user treats NASA ARCH as the interface to a black box where files are stored. There are only five NASA ARCH user commands, even though NASA ARCH employs standard VMS directives and the VAX BACKUP utility. Special care is taken to provide the security needed to insure file integrity over a period of years. The archived files may exist in any of three storage areas: a temporary buffer, the main buffer, and a magnetic tape library. When the main buffer fills up, it is transferred to permanent magnetic tape storage and deleted from disk. Files may be restored from any of the three storage areas. A single file, multiple files, or entire directories can be stored and retrieved. archived entities hold the same name, extension, version number, and VMS file protection scheme as they had in the user's account prior to archival. NASA ARCH is capable of handling up to 7 directory levels. Wildcards are supported. User commands include TEMPCOPY, DISKCOPY, DELETE, RESTORE, and DIRECTORY. The DIRECTORY command searches a directory of savesets covering all three archival areas, listing matches according to area, date, filename, or other criteria supplied by the user. The system manager commands include 1) ARCHIVE- to transfer the main buffer to duplicate magnetic tapes, 2) REPORTto determine when the main buffer is full enough to archive, 3) INCREMENT- to back up the partially filled main buffer, and 4) FULLBACKUP- to back up the entire main buffer. On-line help files are provided for all NASA ARCH commands. NASA ARCH is written in DEC VAX DCL for interactive execution and has been implemented on a DEC VAX computer operating under VMS 4.X. This program was developed in 1985.

  11. Resolving mandibular arch discrepancy through utilization of leeway space

    PubMed Central

    Vyas, Matrishva B.; Hantodkar, Navin

    2011-01-01

    Space management through utilization of leeway space represents one of the most critical aspects of interceptive orthodontic treatment in mixed dentition based on its potential to prevent crowding in the permanent dentition. Lingual arch is the most frequently used space maintaining device for preserving leeway. Case reports of patients in whom potential space discrepancy in mandibular arch was managed through preservation and utilization of leeway space are presented. PMID:21957388

  12. Parascapular mass revealing primary tuberculosis of the posterior arch

    PubMed Central

    Arbault, Anais; Ornetti, Paul; Chevallier, Olivier; Avril, Julien; Pottecher, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    We report the case of a parascapular abscess revealing primary tuberculosis of the posterior arch in a 31-year-old man. Sectional imaging is essential in order to detect the different lesions of this atypical spinal tuberculosis as osteolysis of the posterior arch extendible to vertebral body, osteocondensation, epidural extension which is common in this location, and high specificity of a zygapophysial, costo-vertebral or transverse arthritis.

  13. Clarifying the anatomy of the fifth arch artery

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Saurabh Kumar; Gulati, Gurpreet Singh; Anderson, Robert H

    2016-01-01

    The artery allegedly forming in the fifth pharyngeal arch has increasingly been implicated as responsible for various vascular malformations in patients with congenitally malformed hearts. Observations from studies on developing embryos, however, have failed to provide support to substantiate several of these inferences such that the very existence of the fifth arch artery remains debatable. To the best of our knowledge, in only a solitary human embryo has a vascular channel been found that truly resembled the artery of the fifth arch. Despite the meager evidence to support its existence, the fifth arch artery has been invoked to explain the morphogenesis of double-barreled aorta, some unusual forms of aortopulmonary communications, and abnormalities of the brachiocephalic arteries. In most of these instances, the interpretations have proved fallible when examined in the light of existing knowledge of cardiac development. In our opinion, there are more plausible alternative explanations for the majority of these descriptions. Double-barreled aorta is more likely to result from retention of the recently identified dorsal collateral channels while abnormalities of brachiocephalic arteries are better explained on the basis of extensive remodeling of aortic arches during fetal development. Some examples of aortopulmonary communications, nonetheless, may well represent persistence of the developing artery of the fifth pharyngeal arch. We here present one such case — a patient with tetralogy of Fallot and pulmonary atresia, in whom the fifth arch artery provided a necessary communication between the ascending aorta and the pulmonary arteries. In this light, we discuss the features we consider to be essential before attaching the tag of “fifth arch artery” to a candidate vascular channel. PMID:27011696

  14. Conservative management of aortic arch injury following penetrating trauma.

    PubMed

    Mohammed, R K; Cheung, S; Parikh, S P; Asgaria, K

    2015-04-01

    Aortic arch injuries following penetrating trauma are typically lethal events with high mortality rates. Traditionally, the standard of care for patients presenting with penetrating injury and aortic involvement has included surgical intervention. We report the case of a 31-year-old man who was managed non-operatively after sustaining multiple stab wounds to the left chest and presenting with mid aortic arch injury.

  15. Monitoring system of arch bridge for safety network management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joo, Bong Chul; Yoo, Young Jun; Lee, Chin Hyung; Park, Ki Tae; Hwang, Yoon Koog

    2010-03-01

    Korea has constructed the safety management network monitoring test systems for the civil infrastructure since 2006 which includes airport structure, irrigation structure, railroad structure, road structure, and underground structure. Bridges among the road structure include the various superstructure types which are Steel box girder bridge, suspension bridge, PSC-box-girder bridge, and arch bridge. This paper shows the process of constructing the real-time monitoring system for the arch bridge and the measured result by the system. The arch type among various superstructure types has not only the structural efficiency but the visual beauty, because the arch type superstructure makes full use of the feature of curve. The main measuring points of arch bridges composited by curved members make a difference to compare with the system of girder bridges composited by straight members. This paper also shows the method to construct the monitoring system that considers the characteristic of the arch bridge. The system now includes strain gauges and thermometers, and it will include various sensor types such as CCTV, accelerometers and so on additionally. For the long term and accuracy monitoring, the latest optical sensors and equipments are applied to the system.

  16. Comparison of arch forms between Turkish and North American

    PubMed Central

    Celebi, Ahmet A.; Keklik, Hakan; Tan, Enes; Ucar, Faruk I.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: The aim of this study was to clarify the morphological differences in the mandibular arches of Turkish and North American white subjects. Methods: The sample included 132 Turkish (34 Class I, 58 Class II, and 40 Class III) and 160 North American (60 Class I, 50 Class II, and 50 Class III) subjects. The most facial portion of 13 proximal contact areas was digitized from photocopied images of patients' mandibular dental arches. Clinical bracket points were calculated for each tooth based on mandibular tooth thickness data. Four linear and two proportional measurements were taken. The subjects were grouped according to arch form types (tapered, ovoid and square) in order to have frequency distribution compared between ethnic groups in each Angle classification. Results: The Turkish group showed significantly lower molar depth and more significant molar width-depth (W/D) ratio in all three Angle classifications. On the other hand, the Turkish group also showed a significantly larger intercanine width in Class III malocclusion and intermolar width in Class II malocclusion. The most frequent arch forms seen were the ovoid arch form in the Turkish group and the tapered form in the white group. Conclusions: Our results demonstrate that when treating Turkish patients, one should expect to use preformed ovoid arch form orthodontic wires in a significant percentage of patients. PMID:27275615

  17. Optimization of shallow arches against instability using sensitivity derivatives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamat, Manohar P.

    1987-01-01

    The author discusses the problem of optimization of shallow frame structures which involve a coupling of axial and bending responses. A shallow arch of a given shape and of given weight is optimized such that its limit point load is maximized. The cross-sectional area, A(x) and the moment of inertia, I(x) of the arch obey the relationship I(x) = rho A(x) sup n, n = 1,2,3 and rho is a specified constant. Analysis of the arch for its limit point calculation involves a geometric nonlinear analysis which is performed using a corotational formulation. The optimization is carried out using a second-order projected Lagrangian algorithm and the sensitivity derivatives of the critical load parameter with respect to the areas of the finite elements of the arch are calculated using implicit differentation. Results are presented for an arch of a specified rise to span ratio under two different loadings and the limitations of the approach for the intermediate rise arches are addressed.

  18. Hybrid Endovascular Repair in Aortic Arch Pathologies: A Retrospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Xiaohui; Guo, Wei; Liu, Xiaoping; Yin, Tai; Jia, Xin; Xiong, Jiang; Zhang, Hongpeng; Wang, Lijun

    2010-01-01

    The aortic arch presents specific challenges to endovascular repair. Hybrid repair is increasingly evolving as an alternative option for selected patients, and promising initial results have been reported. The aim of this study was to introduce our experiences and evaluate mid-term results of supra aortic transpositions for extended endovascular repair of aortic arch pathologies. From December 2002 to January 2008, 25 patients with thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections involving the aortic arch were treated with hybrid endovascular treatment in our center. Of the 25 cases, 14 were atherosclerotic thoracic aortic aneurysms and 11 were thoracic aortic dissection. The hybrid repair method included total-arch transpositions (15 cases) or hemi-arch transpositions (10 cases), and endovascular procedures. All hybrid endovascular procedures were completed successfully. Three early residual type-I endoleaks and one type-II endoleak were observed. Stroke occurred in three patients (8%) during the in-hospital stage. The perioperative mortality rate was 4%; one patients died post-operatively from catheter related complications. The average follow-up period was 15 ± 5.8 months (range, 1–41 months). The overall crude survival rate at 15 months was 92% (23/25). During follow-up, new late endoleaks and stent-raft related complications were not observed. One case (4%) developed a unilateral lower limb deficit at 17 days and was readmitted to hospital. In conclusion, the results are encouraging for endovascular aortic arch repair in combination with supra-aortic transposition in high risk cases. Aortic endografting offers good mid-term results. Mid-term results of the hybrid approach in elderly patients with aortic arch pathologies are satisfying. PMID:21151464

  19. Intermaxillary fixation screws versus Erich arch bars in mandibular fractures: A comparative study and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Qureshi, Ahtesham Ahmad; Reddy, Umesh K.; Warad, N. M.; Badal, Sheeraz; Jamadar, Amjad Ali; Qurishi, Nilofar

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Various techniques have been employed from time to time to achieve maxillomamdibular fixation. Although arch bars provide an effective and versatile means of maxillomandibular fixation, their use is not without shortcomings. However the introduction of intermaxillary fixation screws (IMF) has eliminated many of these issues of arch bars. The aim of the present study was to compare the advantages and disadvantages of intermaxillary fixation screws over the Erich arch bars in mandibular fractures. Materials and Methods: Sixty dentulous patients who reported to Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Al-Ameen Dental College and Hospital, Bijapur with mandibular fractures and required intermaxillary fixation as a part of treatment plan followd by open reduction and internal fixation under GA were selected and randomly divided into 2 groups of 30 patients each that is Group A and Group B. Group A included patients who received intermaxillary fixation with Erich arch bars. Group B includes patients who received intermaxillary fixation with IMF Screws. The parameters compared in both the groups included, surgical time taken, gloves perforation, post-operative occlusion, IMF stability, oral hygiene, patient acceptance and comfort and non-vitality characteristics. Results: The average surgical time taken and gloves perforations were more in Group A,the patient acceptance and oral hygiene was better in Group B, there was not much statistically significant difference in postoperative occlusion and IMF stability in both groups. Accidental root perforation was the only limitation of IMF screws. Conclusion: Intermaxillary fixation with IMF screws is more efficacious compared to Erich arch bars in the treatment of mandibular fractures. PMID:27563602

  20. Dental arch size in healthy human permanent dentitions: ethnic differences as assessed by discriminant analysis.

    PubMed

    Ferrario, V F; Sforza, C; Colombo, A; Carvajal, R; Duncan, V; Palomino, H

    1999-01-01

    Race and ethnicity variably influence the form of the human craniofacial complex. In the present study, the effects of ethnicity and sex on the global size of normal adult dental arches were analyzed. The dental arches of 47 northern Chilean mestizos (25 men, 22 women) and 95 northern Italian Caucasians (50 men, 45 women) were cast in stone. All subjects had a complete dentition in both arches. In all models the coordinates of dental cusp tips were digitized using an image analyzer. The center of gravity of each tooth was computed and arches were interpolated using a polynomial model (y = ax + bx2 + cx3 + dx4). In all arches, the intercanine, intermolar, and mid-intercanine to mid-intermolar distances were computed from the dental centers of gravity. These arch distances were entered in a linear discriminant function analysis. The polynomial model accurately interpolated data points in all instances, and most of the dental arch form was determined by the first and second degree coefficients. On average, Italian Caucasian arches were smaller than Chilean mestizo arches. Male mean distances were larger than female distances regardless of ethnic group or arch. The linear discriminant analysis performed between male and female arches within ethnic groups was significant only for both Italian Caucasian arches, but the percentage errors for the classification of a new individual were very high (about 30%). Conversely, Italian Caucasian arches could always be discriminated from Chilean mestizo arches of the same sex with a much smaller error.

  1. Branched and fenestrated options to treat aortic arch aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Maurel, Blandine; Mastracci, Tara M; Spear, Rafaelle; Hertault, Adrien; Azzaoui, Richard; Sobocinski, Jonathan; Haulon, Stephan

    2016-10-01

    Conventional surgical repair of aortic arch aneurysms using cardiopulmonary bypass and hypothermic circulatory arrest remains the gold standard, however it is associated with a substantial mortality and morbidity rate, especially in the elderly. Hybrid techniques avoid aortic cross-clamping and circulatory arrest, but are of limited use and are only applicable to selected patients. The development of new devices to treat aortic arch aneurysms endovascularly has the potential to offer a treatment modality to patients unfit for an open repair. We present the challenges specific to endovascular arch repair based on our experience and the literature available from the first experience in 1999 to the third generation graft currently commonly used. Following an initial learning curve associated with the use of the third generation arch branch device, along with careful patient selection and operator experience, early results are promising. Technical success was achieved in all cases, there was no early mortality and strokes were noted in 11%. As with branched and fenestrated technology for thoracoabdominal aneurysm repair, the use of total endovascular repair for arch pathology will require an evolution in endovascular practice and device design. However, at present, the early use of the latest generation device offers a novel approach to patients who previously had no surgical options. PMID:27332680

  2. Muscular axillary arch accompanying variation of the musculocutaneous nerve: axillary arch

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Soo-Jung; Lee, Hyunsu; Choi, In-Jang

    2016-01-01

    Continuous attention has been developed on the anatomical variations of the axilla in anatomist and surgeon due to their clinical importance. The axillary region is an anatomical space between the lateral part of the chest wall and the medial aspect of the upper limb. During the routine dissection of embalmed cadavers, we found variant muscular slip originating from the lateral border of tendinous part of the latissimus dorsi and continuing 9 cm more crossing the axilla. And then, it inserted into the superior margin of the insertion of the pectoralis major. We considered this muscular variation as axillary arch muscle. Correct identification of the relevant anatomy and subsequent simple surgical division is curative, paying special attention to anatomical variations in this region and its clinical importance due to its close relationship to the neurovascular elements of the axilla. PMID:27382519

  3. Some mice feature 5th pharyngeal arch arteries and double-lumen aortic arch malformations.

    PubMed

    Geyer, Stefan H; Weninger, Wolfgang J

    2012-01-01

    A 5th pair of pharyngeal arch arteries (PAAs) has never been identified with certainty in mice. Murines in general are considered to not develop a 5th pair. If true, the significance of the mouse as a model for researching the genesis of malformations of the great intrathoracic arteries is limited. We aimed to investigate whether mouse embryos develop a 5th pair of PAAs and to identify malformations known to be caused by defective remodelling of the 5th PAAs. We employed the high-resolution episcopic microscopy method for creating digital volume data and three-dimensional (3D) computer models of the great intrathoracic arteries of 30 mouse embryos from days 12-12.5 post conception and 180 mouse fetuses from days 14.5 and 15.5 post conception. The 3D models of the fetuses were screened for the presence of a double-lumen aortic arch malformation. We identified such a malformation in 1 fetus. The 3D models of the embryos were analysed for the presence of 5th PAAs. Six of the 30 embryos (20%) showed a 5th PAA bilaterally, and an additional 9 (30%) showed a 5th PAA unilaterally. Our results prove that some mice do develop a 5th pair of PAAs. They also show that malformations which occur rarely in humans and result from defective remodelling of the left 5th PAA can be identified in mice as well. Thus, the mouse does represent an excellent model for researching the mechanisms driving PAA remodelling and the genesis of malformations of the great intrathoracic arteries.

  4. Ascending Aortic Slide for Interrupted Aortic Arch Repair.

    PubMed

    Urencio, Miguel; Dodge-Khatami, Ali; Greenleaf, Chris E; Aru, Giorgio; Salazar, Jorge D

    2016-09-01

    For repair of interrupted aortic arch, unfavorable anatomy challenges a tension-free anastomosis. We describe a useful alternative surgical technique used in five neonates/infants, involving splitting the ascending aorta from the sinotubular junction to the arch origin, leftward and posterior "sliding" of the flap with anastomosis to the distal arch creating a native tissue bridge, and reconstruction with a patch. With wide interruption gaps between proximal and distal aortic portions, the ascending aortic slide is a safe and reproducible technique, providing a tension-free native tissue bridge with potential for growth, and a scaffold for patch augmentation in biventricular hearts, or for Norwood stage I in univentricular palliation. PMID:27587504

  5. Numerical Modelling of Soil Arching in a Shallow Backfill Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szajna, Waldemar St.

    2015-03-01

    The paper presents the application of the finite element method into the modelling of soil arching. The phenomenon plays fundamental role in soil-shell flexible structures behaviour. To evaluate the influence of arching on a pressure reduction, a plain strain trapdoor under a shallow layer of backfill was simulated. The Coulomb-Mohr plasticity condition and the nonassociated flow rule were used for the soil model. The research examines the impact of the internal friction angle and the influence of the backfill layer thickness on the value of soil arching. The carried out analyses indicate that the reduction of pressures acting on a structure depends on the value of the internal friction angle, which confirms the earlier research. For a shallow backfill layer however, the reduction is only a local phenomenon and can influence only a part of the structure.

  6. Management of hypoplastic aortic arch associated with neonatal coarctation.

    PubMed

    Caspi, J; Ilbawi, M N; Muster, A; Roberson, D; Arcilla, R

    1994-12-01

    Controversy still exists as to whether hypoplastic aortic arch frequently associated with neonatal coarctation, should be enlarged at the time of coarctation repair. To determine the indications for and the outcome of repair of hypoplastic aortic arch, pre- and postoperative angiograms/echocardigraphy of 77 cases with isolated (n = 25, Group 1) or complex (n = 52, Group 2) neonatal coarctation operated upon between 1/80 and 12/89 were reviewed. Age was 5-14 days (mean 8 +/- 1.6). Aortic arch/ascending aorta diameter ratio (AR/AA) as a measure of the degree of aortic arch hypoplasia was 0.39-0.64 (0.52 +/- 0.04) in isolated and 0.15-0.47 (0.34 +/- 0.06) in complex coarctation (p < 0.05). Left subclavian flap aortoplasty was used in 72 patients; alone in 25, in combination with pulmonary artery banding in 43 patients, and simultaneously with intracardiac repair in 4 patients. Extensive reconstruction of aortic arch and coarctation with synthetic patch was performed in the remaining 5 patients (AR/AO = 0.16 +/- 0.03) using cardiopulmonary by-pass at the time of intracardiac repair. Operative mortality was 2/76 (2.5%). Follow-up is 6.6 +/- 1.4 years. Recoarctation occurred in 3 patients (4%). AR/AA increased to 0.86 +/- 0.1 in isolated (p < 0.05 vs preoperative) and to 0.7 +/- 0.1 in complex coarctation (p < 0.05 vs preoperative). In the majority of cases, hypoplastic aortic arch associated with coarctation grows satisfactorily following simple repair of coarctation with no significant residual narrowing.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  7. The development and evolution of the pharyngeal arches

    PubMed Central

    GRAHAM, ANTHONY

    2001-01-01

    A muscularised pharynx, with skeletal support, serving the dual functions of feeding and respiration, is a fundamental vertebrate characteristic. Embryologically, the pharyngeal apparatus has its origin in a series of bulges that form on the lateral surface of the embryonic head, the pharyngeal arches, whose development is complex. These structures are composed of a number of disparate embryonic cell types: ectoderm, endoderm, neural crest and mesoderm, whose development must be coordinated to generate the functional adult apparatus. In the past, most studies have emphasised the role played by the neural crest, which generates the skeletal elements of the arches, in directing pharyngeal arch development, but it has also become apparent that the endoderm plays a prominent role in directing arch development. Neural crest cells are not required for arch formation, their regionalisation nor to some extent their sense of identity. Furthermore, the endoderm is the major site of expression of a number of important signalling molecules, and this tissue has been shown to be responsible for promoting the formation of particular components of the arches. Thus vertebrate pharyngeal morphogenesis can now be seen to be a more complex process than was previously believed, and must result from an integration of both neural crest and endodermal patterning mechanisms. Interestingly, this also mirrors the fact that the evolutionary origin of pharyngeal segmentation predates that of the neural crest, which is an exclusively vertebrate characteristic. As such, the evolution of the vertebrate pharynx is also likely to have resulted from an integration between these 2 patterning systems. Alterations in the interplay between neural crest and endodermal patterning are also likely to be responsible for the evolutionary that occurred to the pharyngeal region during subsequent vertebrate evolution. PMID:11523815

  8. 10. VIEW SHOWING THE ARCH FORMS. THE INTRADOS FORM IS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. VIEW SHOWING THE ARCH FORMS. THE INTRADOS FORM IS COMMONLY LIFTED 3 TO 4 DAYS AFTER POURING. REINFORCING STEEL IS THEN PLACED AND THE EXTRADOS FORM RAISED TO POSITION. THE OPERATING OF MOVING FORMS, PLACING STEEL AND CONCRETE FOR EACH ARCH LIFT REQUIRES, ON AVERAGE, EIGHT DAYS. NOTE THE TWO LINES OF WATER PIPE ON THE EXTRADOS FORM. THESE PIPES ARE FILLED WITH SPRAY NOZZLES WHICH ARE IN PRACTICALLY CONTINUOUS OPERATION EXCEPT WHEN WORK IS BEING DONE ON THE FORMS. August 9, 1938 - Bartlett Dam, Verde River, Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ

  9. Prosthetic procedure for simultaneous immediate loading of opposing edentulous arches.

    PubMed

    Biscaro, Leonello; Ferlin, Paolo; Becattelli, Alberto; Vigolo, Paolo

    2014-10-01

    For patients with complete edentulism, a significant problem is the transfer of diagnostic data to the definitive casts when an immediate loading technique is used. This article presents a prosthetic procedure to allow simultaneous treatment of opposing edentulous arches with immediate implant loading. This technique uses 2 occlusal acrylic resin devices to transfer the diagnostic cast information to the definitive casts. Esthetic and functional fixed dental prostheses are fabricated from diagnostic information acquired in the presurgical phase without any impression or recording of the maxillomandibular relationship during or after surgery. This methodology is applicable when the simultaneous immediate loading of implants in 2 edentulous arches is indicated.

  10. The shortened dental arch: a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Armellini, Debora; von Fraunhofer, J Anthony

    2004-12-01

    The functional demands of patients are highly variable and individual, requiring dental treatment to be tailored to the individual's needs and adaptive capability. The World Health Organization indicates that a functional, esthetic, natural dentition has at least 20 teeth, while the literature indicates that dental arches comprising the anterior and premolar regions meet the requirements of a functional dentition. The English-language peer-reviewed literature pertaining to the short dental arch (SDA) was identified through the Medline search engine covering the period between 1966 and the present and critically reviewed. This treatment option for the partially dentate patient may provide oral functionality, improved oral hygiene, comfort, and, possibly, reduced costs.

  11. Stabilization of medial longitudinal foot arch by peroneus longus transfer.

    PubMed

    Lui, T H

    2016-06-01

    The mechanical integrity of the medial longitudinal arch depends on the dynamic support of muscles and the static support of ligaments. Although the posterior tibial tendon is the main dynamic stabilizer of the arch, the static structures provide the most support especially while the person is standing. After rupture of the posterior tibial tendon, the spring ligament may be compromised under increased stress and leads to talar derotation and peritalar subluxation. Surgical repair of the spring ligament has become an important adjunct to treating posterior tibial tendon abnormalities. A technique of peroneus longus transfer to augment the static stabilizers of the medial column is described in this article. PMID:27058034

  12. [Right aortic arch, Kommerell's diverticulum and aberrant left subclavian artery].

    PubMed

    Simón-Yarza, I; Viteri-Ramírez, G; Etxano, J; Roblero, P Slon; Ferreira, M; Alemañ, G Bastarrika

    2011-01-01

    The right aberrant subclavian artery or "arteria lusoria" is the most common anatomical variant of the embryonic development of the aorta and its branches, with a presence in 0.5-2% of the population. Less frequently, a right aortic arch with aberrant left subclavian artery may be present. These anatomical variations should be included in the differential diagnosis of superior mediastinal widening seen on chest radiographs. In this report, we present a right aortic arch with left aberrant subclavian artery dilated at its origin (Kommerell's diverticulum) as a cause of superior mediastinal widening detected incidentally on a chest radiograph.

  13. Quantifying the dynamic evolution of individual arched magnetic flux tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stenson, E. V.; Bellan, P. M.

    2012-12-01

    Highly dynamic arched ‘loops’ of plasma were created in the laboratory with a magnetized plasma gun. The magnetic structure of the loops was found to be consistent with that of an expanding flux tube subject to a kink instability. High-speed flows were found to transport plasma along the loop axis, from both footpoints toward the apex of the arched loop. Two complementary MHD models were used to explain the expansion and axial flows, both of which scale in proportion to a ‘toroidal Alfven speed’.

  14. Percutaneous Pediculoplasty for Vertebral Hemangioma Involving the Neural Arch: A Case Report

    SciTech Connect

    Fuwa, Sokun Numaguchi, Yuji; Kobayashi, Nobuo; Saida, Yukihisa

    2008-01-15

    Vertebral hemangiomas occasionally involve the neural arch and they can be symptomatic. We report a case of symptomatic vertebral hemangioma mainly involving the unilateral neural arch which was successfully treated with percutaneous pediculoplasty using a single-needle technique.

  15. 4. 3/4 VIEW OF ARCH OVER ROADWAY AT SOUTH END ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. 3/4 VIEW OF ARCH OVER ROADWAY AT SOUTH END OF SPAN, LOOKING SW, SHOWING RIBBED ARCH CONSTRUCTION. - Philadelphia & Reading Railroad, Peacock's Lock Viaduct, Spanning Schuykill River at Reading Railroad, Reading, Berks County, PA

  16. Comparison of arch form between ethnic Malays and Malaysian Aborigines in Peninsular Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    Xinwei, Eunice Soh; Lim, Sheh Yinn; Jamaludin, Marhazlinda; Mohamed, Nor Himazian; Yusof, Zamros Yuzaidi Mohd; Shoaib, Lily Azura; Nik Hussein, Nik Noriah

    2012-01-01

    Objective To determine and compare the frequency distribution of various arch shapes in ethnic Malays and Malaysian Aborigines in Peninsular Malaysia and to investigate the morphological differences of arch form between these two ethnic groups. Methods We examined 120 ethnic Malay study models (60 maxillary, 60 mandibular) and 129 Malaysian Aboriginal study models (66 maxillary, 63 mandibular). We marked 18 buccal tips and incisor line angles on each model, and digitized them using 2-dimensional coordinate system. Dental arches were classified as square, ovoid, or tapered by printing the scanned images and superimposing Orthoform arch templates on them. Results The most common maxillary arch shape in both ethnic groups was ovoid, as was the most common mandibular arch shape among ethnic Malay females. The rarest arch shape was square. Chi-square tests, indicated that only the distribution of the mandibular arch shape was significantly different between groups (p = 0.040). However, when compared using independent t-tests, there was no difference in the mean value of arch width between groups. Arch shape distribution was not different between genders of either ethnic group, except for the mandibular arch of ethnic Malays. Conclusions Ethnic Malays and Malaysian Aborigines have similar dental arch dimensions and shapes. PMID:23112931

  17. 48. Readying arch of bridge 5600006P for concrete pout. Railroad ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    48. Readying arch of bridge 5600-006P for concrete pout. Railroad iron for arch support is secured by bedding rails in concrete. - Vicksburg National Military Park Roads & Bridges, Melan Arch Bridges, Spanning various tributaries at Confederate Avenue, Vicksburg, Warren County, MS

  18. 10. MARBLE BRIDGE MIDSPAN OF EAST ARCH. THE PLATE READS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. MARBLE BRIDGE MIDSPAN OF EAST ARCH. THE PLATE READS MORRIS RUN BRIDGE, 1908, C.F. MOYER, C.Y. STRADLINGS, S.M. FITE, COMMRR'S, S.B. TWINING CO. CONTR, W. CADWALLADER CLERK. - Morris Run Bridge, Rickert Road (TR 417) spanning Morris Run in Hilltown Township, Dublin, Bucks County, PA

  19. How to Perfuse: Concepts of Cerebral Protection during Arch Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Habertheuer, Andreas; Wiedemann, Dominik; Kocher, Alfred; Laufer, Guenther; Vallabhajosyula, Prashanth

    2015-01-01

    Arch surgery remains undoubtedly among the most technically and strategically challenging endeavors in cardiovascular surgery. Surgical interventions of thoracic aneurysms involving the aortic arch require complete circulatory arrest in deep hypothermia (DHCA) or elaborate cerebral perfusion strategies with varying degrees of hypothermia to achieve satisfactory protection of the brain from ischemic insults, that is, unilateral/bilateral antegrade cerebral perfusion (ACP) and retrograde cerebral perfusion (RCP). Despite sophisticated and increasingly individualized surgical approaches for complex aortic pathologies, there remains a lack of consensus regarding the optimal method of cerebral protection and circulatory management during the time of arch exclusion. Many recent studies argue in favor of ACP with various degrees of hypothermic arrest during arch reconstruction and its advantages have been widely demonstrated. In fact ACP with more moderate degrees of hypothermia represents a paradigm shift in the cardiac surgery community and is widely adopted as an emergent strategy; however, many centers continue to report good results using other perfusion strategies. Amidst this important discussion we review currently available surgical strategies of cerebral protection management and compare the results of recent European multicenter and single-center data. PMID:26713319

  20. 3D Stretchable Arch Ribbon Array Fabricated via Grayscale Lithography.

    PubMed

    Pang, Yu; Shu, Yi; Shavezipur, Mohammad; Wang, Xuefeng; Mohammad, Mohammad Ali; Yang, Yi; Zhao, Haiming; Deng, Ningqin; Maboudian, Roya; Ren, Tian-Ling

    2016-01-01

    Microstructures with flexible and stretchable properties display tremendous potential applications including integrated systems, wearable devices and bio-sensor electronics. Hence, it is essential to develop an effective method for fabricating curvilinear and flexural microstructures. Despite significant advances in 2D stretchable inorganic structures, large scale fabrication of unique 3D microstructures at a low cost remains challenging. Here, we demonstrate that the 3D microstructures can be achieved by grayscale lithography to produce a curved photoresist (PR) template, where the PR acts as sacrificial layer to form wavelike arched structures. Using plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) process at low temperature, the curved PR topography can be transferred to the silicon dioxide layer. Subsequently, plasma etching can be used to fabricate the arched stripe arrays. The wavelike silicon dioxide arch microstructure exhibits Young modulus and fracture strength of 52 GPa and 300 MPa, respectively. The model of stress distribution inside the microstructure was also established, which compares well with the experimental results. This approach of fabricating a wavelike arch structure may become a promising route to produce a variety of stretchable sensors, actuators and circuits, thus providing unique opportunities for emerging classes of robust 3D integrated systems.

  1. Double arch mirror study. Part 2: Engineering analysis report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iraninejad, B.; Vukobratovich, D.

    1983-01-01

    A method of mounting a cryogenically cooled, lightweight, double arch, class mirror for infrared, astronomical telescopes was developed. A 50 cm, fused silica mirror was modified for use in a new mount configuration. The flexures and the finite element analysis of the mirror stresses are reported.

  2. 12. DETAIL VIEW OF BUTTRESS 8 AND HALF OF ARCH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. DETAIL VIEW OF BUTTRESS 8 AND HALF OF ARCH 7. THE IMPRESSIONS OF THE WOODEN FORMS ARE VISIBLE ON THE CONCRETE. ALSO VISIBLE IS THE PLACEMENT OF THE DAM DIRECTLY ON BEDROCK. - Hume Lake Dam, Sequioa National Forest, Hume, Fresno County, CA

  3. 3D Stretchable Arch Ribbon Array Fabricated via Grayscale Lithography

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Yu; Shu, Yi; Shavezipur, Mohammad; Wang, Xuefeng; Mohammad, Mohammad Ali; Yang, Yi; Zhao, Haiming; Deng, Ningqin; Maboudian, Roya; Ren, Tian-Ling

    2016-01-01

    Microstructures with flexible and stretchable properties display tremendous potential applications including integrated systems, wearable devices and bio-sensor electronics. Hence, it is essential to develop an effective method for fabricating curvilinear and flexural microstructures. Despite significant advances in 2D stretchable inorganic structures, large scale fabrication of unique 3D microstructures at a low cost remains challenging. Here, we demonstrate that the 3D microstructures can be achieved by grayscale lithography to produce a curved photoresist (PR) template, where the PR acts as sacrificial layer to form wavelike arched structures. Using plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) process at low temperature, the curved PR topography can be transferred to the silicon dioxide layer. Subsequently, plasma etching can be used to fabricate the arched stripe arrays. The wavelike silicon dioxide arch microstructure exhibits Young modulus and fracture strength of 52 GPa and 300 MPa, respectively. The model of stress distribution inside the microstructure was also established, which compares well with the experimental results. This approach of fabricating a wavelike arch structure may become a promising route to produce a variety of stretchable sensors, actuators and circuits, thus providing unique opportunities for emerging classes of robust 3D integrated systems. PMID:27345766

  4. View looking to the arched entrances that divide the Departmental ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View looking to the arched entrances that divide the Departmental Auditorium from the Interstate Commerce Commission (east) and U.S. Customs Agency (originally Labor Department to the west) - Departmental Auditorium, Constitution Avenue between Twelfth and Fourteenth Streets, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  5. 7. DETAIL, LOOKING SOUTH, INTERIOR OF SOUTH ARCH, SHOWING DRAINAGE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. DETAIL, LOOKING SOUTH, INTERIOR OF SOUTH ARCH, SHOWING DRAINAGE HOLE IN THE WEST END OF THE SOUTH WALL AND VERTICAL QUARRY DRILLING HOLES ON THE STONE FACE - Mulladay Hollow Bridge, Spanning Mulladay Hollow Creek at County Road No.61, Eureka Springs, Carroll County, AR

  6. 13. VIEW OF DOWNSTREAM ELEVATION SHOWING CONSTRUCTION OF THE ARCH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. VIEW OF DOWNSTREAM ELEVATION SHOWING CONSTRUCTION OF THE ARCH NEAR THE TOP AND THE SPILLWAY OF BIG TUJUNGA DAM, TAKEN ON APRIL 22, 1931, (PHOTOGRAPHER UNKNOWN). PICTURE WAS DEVELOPED FROM COPY NEGATIVES WHICH WERE TAKEN ON JUNE 5, 1973, BY PHOTOGRAPHER GATSON OF L.A. COUNTY PUBLIC WORKS. - Big Tujunga Dam, 809 West Big Tujunga Road, Sunland, Los Angeles County, CA

  7. 1. GORGE HIGH DAM. THIS THIN ARCH DAM WITH A ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. GORGE HIGH DAM. THIS THIN ARCH DAM WITH A GRAVITY SECTION IS THE THIRD DAM BUILT BY SEATTLE CITY LIGHT TO PROVIDE WATER FOR GORGE POWERHOUSE AND WAS COMPLETED IN 1961, 1989. - Skagit Power Development, Gorge High Dam, On Skagit River, 2.9 miles upstream from Newhalem, Newhalem, Whatcom County, WA

  8. 6. OPEN HEARTH NO. 4 TRESTLE. THE ARCH WITH THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. OPEN HEARTH NO. 4 TRESTLE. THE ARCH WITH THE GATE IS KNOWN AS THE HOLE IN THE WALL BY FORMER STEELWORKERS. FOR YEARS THE HOLE IN THE WALL PROVIDED ACCESS TO THE INTERIOR OF THE MILL AND TO THE PAYMASTER'S OFFICE. (Martin Stupich) - U.S. Steel Homestead Works, Open Hearth Steelmaking Plant, Along Monongahela River, Homestead, Allegheny County, PA

  9. INTERIOR DETAIL, SECONDSTORY JOISTS, SUBFLOORING, AND FIREPLACE HEARTH RELIEVING ARCH. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR DETAIL, SECOND-STORY JOISTS, SUBFLOORING, AND FIREPLACE HEARTH RELIEVING ARCH. THESE FEATURES WERE MADE VISIBLE AFTER A 2002 FAILURE OF WHAT WAS LIKELY THE ORIGINAL EIGHTEENTH-CENTURY CEILING PLASTER IN THE SOUTHWEST CABINET - The Woodlands, 4000 Woodlands Avenue, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  10. Arch Venture Partners' investment considerations for CBRNE products and opportunities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crandell, K.; Lazarus, S.; Gardner, P. J.

    2008-04-01

    ARCH is interested in building leading, highly-valued companies from leading research. Toward that end we value innovations created by the leading researchers in the world, many of which are funded to solve critical scientific challenges including those in the instrumentation and CBRNE area. The most important CBRNE innovations we have seen at ARCH are breakthroughs involving significant unaddressed technology risk and have the potential for broad proprietary intellectual property as a result. The model ARCH has evolved in instrumentation is to look for a breakthrough innovation, with strong intellectual property and continue to strengthen the patent estate through the life of the company. ARCH looks to build companies around leading interdisciplinary scientific and engineering teams, and we favor platform technology that can be applied to multiple market applications both commercial and government. As part of a strategy to build a great company, addressing important CBRNE challenges can help a company strengthen its technical team and its IP estate. This supports a focus on early low volume markets on the way toward addressing a fuller portfolio of applications. Experienced Venture Capitalists can help this process by identifying important executive talent, partners and applications, offering financial syndication strength, and helping shape the company's strategy to maximize the ultimate value realized.

  11. 3D Stretchable Arch Ribbon Array Fabricated via Grayscale Lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Yu; Shu, Yi; Shavezipur, Mohammad; Wang, Xuefeng; Mohammad, Mohammad Ali; Yang, Yi; Zhao, Haiming; Deng, Ningqin; Maboudian, Roya; Ren, Tian-Ling

    2016-06-01

    Microstructures with flexible and stretchable properties display tremendous potential applications including integrated systems, wearable devices and bio-sensor electronics. Hence, it is essential to develop an effective method for fabricating curvilinear and flexural microstructures. Despite significant advances in 2D stretchable inorganic structures, large scale fabrication of unique 3D microstructures at a low cost remains challenging. Here, we demonstrate that the 3D microstructures can be achieved by grayscale lithography to produce a curved photoresist (PR) template, where the PR acts as sacrificial layer to form wavelike arched structures. Using plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) process at low temperature, the curved PR topography can be transferred to the silicon dioxide layer. Subsequently, plasma etching can be used to fabricate the arched stripe arrays. The wavelike silicon dioxide arch microstructure exhibits Young modulus and fracture strength of 52 GPa and 300 MPa, respectively. The model of stress distribution inside the microstructure was also established, which compares well with the experimental results. This approach of fabricating a wavelike arch structure may become a promising route to produce a variety of stretchable sensors, actuators and circuits, thus providing unique opportunities for emerging classes of robust 3D integrated systems.

  12. 10. View looking S at large arched opening that led ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. View looking S at large arched opening that led from area where Jamaican Train was fired to steam engine and cane mill. - Hacienda Azucarera La Esperanza, Mill (Ruins), 2.65 miles North of PR Route 2 Bridge Over Manati River, Manati, Manati Municipio, PR

  13. 18. Upstream face of arches, concrete placing tower is at ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. Upstream face of arches, concrete placing tower is at far right. Tower at center was used to convey material. Photographer unknown, January 29, 1927. Source: MWD. - Waddell Dam, On Agua Fria River, 35 miles northwest of Phoenix, Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ

  14. Persistent right aortic arch in a yearling horse.

    PubMed Central

    Butt, T D; MacDonald, D G; Crawford, W H; Dechant, J E

    1998-01-01

    A 14-month-old filly with chronic pharyngitis was diagnosed with incomplete esophageal constriction and megaesophagus due to a persistent right aortic arch. This report is unusual because clinical signs of respiratory dysfunction secondary to chronic regurgitation occurred prior to the recognition of dysphagia. PMID:9818140

  15. 3D Stretchable Arch Ribbon Array Fabricated via Grayscale Lithography.

    PubMed

    Pang, Yu; Shu, Yi; Shavezipur, Mohammad; Wang, Xuefeng; Mohammad, Mohammad Ali; Yang, Yi; Zhao, Haiming; Deng, Ningqin; Maboudian, Roya; Ren, Tian-Ling

    2016-01-01

    Microstructures with flexible and stretchable properties display tremendous potential applications including integrated systems, wearable devices and bio-sensor electronics. Hence, it is essential to develop an effective method for fabricating curvilinear and flexural microstructures. Despite significant advances in 2D stretchable inorganic structures, large scale fabrication of unique 3D microstructures at a low cost remains challenging. Here, we demonstrate that the 3D microstructures can be achieved by grayscale lithography to produce a curved photoresist (PR) template, where the PR acts as sacrificial layer to form wavelike arched structures. Using plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) process at low temperature, the curved PR topography can be transferred to the silicon dioxide layer. Subsequently, plasma etching can be used to fabricate the arched stripe arrays. The wavelike silicon dioxide arch microstructure exhibits Young modulus and fracture strength of 52 GPa and 300 MPa, respectively. The model of stress distribution inside the microstructure was also established, which compares well with the experimental results. This approach of fabricating a wavelike arch structure may become a promising route to produce a variety of stretchable sensors, actuators and circuits, thus providing unique opportunities for emerging classes of robust 3D integrated systems. PMID:27345766

  16. Detail of typical subdeck of granite pier showing humanscale arched ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail of typical subdeck of granite pier showing human-scale arched openings in pies. Note remnants of fender system. View north - New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad, Fort Point Channel Rolling Lift Bridge, Spanning Fort Point Channel, Boston, Suffolk County, MA

  17. 12. VIEW OF UPSTREAM ELEVATION SHOWING CONSTRUCTION OF THE ARCHES ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. VIEW OF UPSTREAM ELEVATION SHOWING CONSTRUCTION OF THE ARCHES TAKEN ON NOVEMBER 21, 1928 (PHOTOGRAPHER UNKNOWN). PICTURE WAS DEVELOPED FROM COPY NEGATIVES WHICH WERE TAKEN ON 6/5/1973 BY PHOTOGRAPHER GATSON OF L.A. COUNTY PUBLIC WORKS. - Big Dalton Dam, 2600 Big Dalton Canyon Road, Glendora, Los Angeles County, CA

  18. 27. Spans 25, detail view, eastern spring of northern arch ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    27. Spans 2-5, detail view, eastern spring of northern arch rib of Span 5 at east abutment, showing exposed structural steel; view to southwest. - Fifth Street Bridge, Spanning MBTA Fitchburg Commuter Rail Line tracks, Conrail Fitchburg Secondary Line & North Nashua River, Fitchburg, Worcester County, MA

  19. A leiomyoma arising from the deep palmar arterial arch.

    PubMed

    Yagi, K; Hamada, Y; Yasui, N

    2006-12-01

    Vascular leiomyomas, or angioleiomyomas, are benign tumours originating from smooth non-striated muscle. Leiomyomas in the hand are uncommon and their pre-operative diagnosis is difficult. We report a 65 year-old woman who developed a vascular leiomyoma arising from the deep palmar arterial arch.

  20. 46. PAGE TWO OF PLANS FOR THE THREE ORIGINAL ARCHED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    46. PAGE TWO OF PLANS FOR THE THREE ORIGINAL ARCHED PEDESTRIAN BRIDGES OVER GRAND CANAL AT 25TH AVENUE, CARROLL CANAL AT GRAND CANAL COURT, AND EASTERN CANAL AT LINNIE CANAL COURT Plan Sheet B-191 (delineator unknown, April 1924) - Venice Canals, Community of Venice, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  1. 45. PAGE ONE OF PLANS FOR THE THREE ORIGINAL ARCHED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    45. PAGE ONE OF PLANS FOR THE THREE ORIGINAL ARCHED PEDESTRIAN BRIDGES OVER GRAND CANAL AT 25TH AVENUE, CARROLL CANAL AT GRAND CANAL COURT, AND EASTERN CANAL AT LINNIE CANAL COURT Plan Sheet B-190 (delineator unknown, April 1924) - Venice Canals, Community of Venice, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  2. Bare Metal Stenting for Endovascular Exclusion of Aortic Arch Thrombi

    SciTech Connect

    Mahnken, Andreas H.; Hoffman, Andras; Autschbach, Ruediger; Damberg, Anneke L. M.

    2013-08-01

    BackgroundAortic thrombi in the ascending aorta or aortic arch are rare but are associated with a relevant risk of major stroke or distal embolization. Although stent grafting is commonly used as a treatment option in the descending aorta, only a few case reports discuss stenting of the aortic arch for the treatment of a thrombus. The use of bare metal stents in this setting has not yet been described.MethodsWe report two cases of ascending and aortic arch thrombus that were treated by covering the thrombus with an uncovered stent. Both procedures were performed under local anesthesia via a femoral approach. A femoral cutdown was used in one case, and a total percutaneous insertion was possible in the second case.ResultsBoth procedures were successfully performed without any periprocedural complications. Postoperative recovery was uneventful. In both cases, no late complications or recurrent embolization occurred at midterm follow-up, and control CT angiography at 1 respectively 10 months revealed no stent migration, freely perfused supra-aortic branches, and no thrombus recurrence.ConclusionTreating symptomatic thrombi in the ascending aorta or aortic arch with a bare metal stent is feasible. This technique could constitute a minimally invasive alternative to a surgical intervention or complex endovascular therapy with fenestrated or branched stent grafts.

  3. 26. VIEW SHOWING NEEDLE VALVE TRASH RACK NEARING COMPLETION. ARCHES ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    26. VIEW SHOWING NEEDLE VALVE TRASH RACK NEARING COMPLETION. ARCHES VISIBLE IN THIS PICTURE ARE 8, 9, 10, AND 11, WHICH HAVE BEEN COMPLETED TO SPRINGING LINE ELEVATIONS 1700, 1744, 1766 AND 1766 RESPECTIVELY. January 1, 1939 - Bartlett Dam, Verde River, Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ

  4. Detail view of the concrete arched balustrade railing and bushhammered ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail view of the concrete arched balustrade railing and bush-hammered inset posts - North Fork Butter Creek Bridge, Spanning North Fork Butter Creek Bridge at Milepost 76.63 on Heppner Highway (Oregon Route 74), Pilot Rock, Umatilla County, OR

  5. Southeast view of the no. 1 outside diameter submerged arch ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Southeast view of the no. 1 outside diameter submerged arch welder of the saw line in bay 8 of the main pipe mill building. - U.S. Steel National Tube Works, Main Pipe Mill Building, Along Monongahela River, McKeesport, Allegheny County, PA

  6. 3. West end. Note arched basement entrance at north half ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. West end. Note arched basement entrance at north half of west endwall. Sand tower (MN-99-E) at right. View to east. - Duluth & Iron Range Rail Road Company Shops, Oil House, Southwest of downtown Two Harbors, northwest of Agate Bay, Two Harbors, Lake County, MN

  7. Towering Magnetic Arches Seen by NASA’s SDO

    NASA Video Gallery

    Arches of magnetic field lines towered over the sun’s edge as a pair of active regions began to rotate into view in this video captured by NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory on April 5-6, 2016. Acti...

  8. Resonant Frequency Monitoring at Mesa Arch, Canyonlands National Park

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorsey, A.; Moore, J. R.; Thorne, M. S.; Culp, J.

    2014-12-01

    The national parks of southern Utah are home to a number of spectacular landmarks that draw visitors from across the world. However, there is currently no methodology in place to evaluate the structural health of these structures as they change through time or in the wake of a damaging event. Our study combines in-situ ambient vibration measurements with 3D numerical modeling to monitor the resonance characteristics of Mesa Arch, a prominent arch in Canyonlands National Park. We measure spectral and polarization attributes of ambient vibrations using two broadband seismometers: one placed on the arch and the other located at a distance of ~100 m for reference. Repeat measurements, ranging in duration from 1 hour to 3 days, are aimed at assessing short- and long-term changes in resonance characteristics, which in turn provide evidence of internal mechanical change. Numerical modal analysis, executed by inputting geometric and representative material properties of the arch into 3D modeling software, allows us to match the measured fundamental frequency as well as higher-order modes. Preliminary results suggest minor variations in resonant frequencies are predominantly controlled by thermal effects, i.e. changes in bulk material stiffness as the rock expands and contracts.

  9. 35. Photo of concrete arch culvert constructed by Puget Sound ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    35. Photo of concrete arch culvert constructed by Puget Sound Construction Company, 1911, for the Northern Pacific Railroad, over flume. Photo by Brian C. Morris, Puget Power, 1989. - Puget Sound Power & Light Company, White River Hydroelectric Project, 600 North River Avenue, Dieringer, Pierce County, WA

  10. Three-dimensional stiffness of the carpal arch.

    PubMed

    Gabra, Joseph N; Li, Zong-Ming

    2016-01-01

    The carpal arch of the wrist is formed by irregularly shaped carpal bones interconnected by numerous ligaments, resulting in complex structural mechanics. The purpose of this study was to determine the three-dimensional stiffness characteristics of the carpal arch using displacement perturbations. It was hypothesized that the carpal arch would exhibit an anisotropic stiffness behavior with principal directions that are oblique to the conventional anatomical axes. Eight (n=8) cadavers were used in this study. For each specimen, the hamate was fixed to a custom stationary apparatus. An instrumented robot arm applied three-dimensional displacement perturbations to the ridge of trapezium and corresponding reaction forces were collected. The displacement-force data were used to determine a three-dimensional stiffness matrix using least squares fitting. Eigendecomposition of the stiffness matrix was used to identify the magnitudes and directions of the principal stiffness components. The carpal arch structure exhibited anisotropic stiffness behaviors with a maximum principal stiffness of 16.4±4.6N/mm that was significantly larger than the other principal components of 3.1±0.9 and 2.6±0.5N/mm (p<0.001). The principal direction of the maximum stiffness was pronated within the cross section of the carpal tunnel which is accounted for by the stiff transverse ligaments that tightly bind distal carpal arch. The minimal principal stiffness is attributed to the less constraining articulation between the trapezium and scaphoid. This study provides advanced characterization of the wrist׳s three-dimensional structural stiffness for improved insight into wrist biomechanics, stability, and function.

  11. The effect of clinical use and sterilization on selected orthodontic arch wires.

    PubMed

    Smith, G A; von Fraunhofer, J A; Casey, G R

    1992-08-01

    The effect of clinical use and various sterilization/disinfection protocols on three types of nickel-titanium, and one type each of beta-titanium and stainless steel arch wire was evaluated. The sterilization/disinfection procedures included disinfection alone or in concert with steam autoclave, dry heat, or cold solution sterilization. No clinically significant differences were found between new and used arch wires. The direction of load application to the arch wire and the particular segment of arch wire tested was found to cause substantial differences in generated loads for certain arch wire types.

  12. Mathematical definition of the shape of dental arches in human permanent healthy dentitions.

    PubMed

    Ferrario, V F; Sforza, C; Miani, A; Tartaglia, G

    1994-08-01

    Dental arch shape was studied in 50 men and 45 women aged 20-27 years with sound dentitions. Maxillary and mandibular arches were reconstructed by a fourth-order polynomial and a 'mixed' elliptical (anterior teeth), plus parabolic (post-canine teeth) interpolation of buccal cusp tips (central incisor to second molar). The maxillary arch resulted wider than the mandibular arch regardless of gender. Gender differences were found especially in the maxillary arch, where they reflect more a size discrepancy than a shape difference. The polynomial interpolation allowed the evaluation of arch asymmetry, which resulted negligible in all the subjects. The elliptical plus parabolic interpolation gave mean plots which were well superimposable to the ones obtained by the polynomial interpolation. These curves are geometrically simple and can be used for the mathematical description of dental arch shape in non-patient subjects. Moreover, they allow separate analysis of teeth with a different functional meaning.

  13. Computational Study of Growth and Remodeling in the Aortic Arch

    PubMed Central

    Alford, Patrick W.; Taber, Larry A.

    2009-01-01

    Opening angles (OAs) are associated with growth and remodeling in arteries. One curiosity has been the relatively large OAs found in the aortic arch of some animals. Here, we use computational models to explore the reasons behind this phenomenon. The artery is assumed to contain a smooth muscle/collagen phase and an elastin phase. In the models, growth and remodeling of smooth muscle/collagen depends on wall stress and fluid shear stress. Remodeling of elastin, which normally turns over very slowly, is neglected. The results indicate that OAs generally increase with longitudinal curvature (torus model), earlier elastin production during development, and decreased wall stiffness. Correlating these results with available experimental data suggests that all of these effects may contribute to the large OAs in the aortic arch. The models also suggest that the slow turnover rate of elastin limits longitudinal growth. These results should promote increased understanding of the causes of residual stress in arteries. PMID:18792831

  14. Post Flare Giant Arches and Run-Away Reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, Matthew; Seaton, Daniel B.; Savage, Sabrina; Bryans, Paul

    2016-05-01

    The nature of post-flare giant arches and their relation to regular post flare loops has long been debated, especially in the context of how post-flare giant arches can sustain their growth for such long periods. In this presentation we discuss how magnetic reconnection can be sustained to such great heights, and the role the background corona plays in maintaining this growth. We use observations from 14 October 2014, when the SWAP EUV solar telescope on-board the PROBA2 spacecraft observed an eruption that led to the formation of perhaps the largest post-eruptive loop system seen in the solar corona in solar cycle 24. These loops grew to a height of approximately 400000 km (>0.5 solar-radii). We provide evidence of on-going reconnection, through observations spanning from the chromosphere to the middle corona, and discuss how only certain conditions can maintain prolonged growth.

  15. Statistical analysis of arch shape with conic sections.

    PubMed

    Sampson, P D

    1983-06-01

    Arcs of conic sections are used to model the shapes of human dental arches and to provide a basis for the statistical and graphical analysis of a population of shapes. The Bingham distribution, an elliptical distribution on a hypersphere, is applied in order to model the coefficients of the conic arcs. It provides a definition of an 'average shape' and it quantifies variation in shape. Geometric envelopes of families of conic arcs whose coefficients satisfy a quadratic constraint are used to depict the distribution of shapes in the plane and to make graphical inferences about the average shape. The methods are demonstrated with conic arcs fitted to a sample of 66 maxillary dental arches.

  16. The Arches Cluster: Extended Structure and Tidal Radius

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosek, Matthew W., Jr.; Lu, Jessica R.; Anderson, Jay; Ghez, Andrea M.; Morris, Mark R.; Clarkson, William I.

    2015-11-01

    At a projected distance of ˜26 pc from Sgr A*, the Arches cluster provides insight into star formation in the extreme Galactic center (GC) environment. Despite its importance, many key properties, such as the cluster’s internal structure and orbital history, are not well known. We present an astrometric and photometric study of the outer region of the Arches cluster (R > 6.″25) using Hubble Space Telescope WFC3IR. Using proper motions, we calculate membership probabilities for stars down to F153M = 20 mag (˜2.5 M⊙) over a 120″ × 120″ field of view, an area 144 times larger than previous astrometric studies of the cluster. We construct the radial profile of the Arches to a radius of 75″ (˜3 pc at 8 kpc), which can be well described by a single power law. From this profile we place a 3σ lower limit of 2.8 pc on the observed tidal radius, which is larger than the predicted tidal radius (1-2.5 pc). Evidence of mass segregation is observed throughout the cluster, and no tidal tail structures are apparent along the orbital path. The absence of breaks in the profile suggests that the Arches has not likely experienced its closest approach to the GC between ˜0.2 and 1 Myr ago. If accurate, this constraint indicates that the cluster is on a prograde orbit and is located in front of the sky plane that intersects Sgr A*. However, further simulations of clusters in the GC potential are required to interpret the observed profile with more confidence.

  17. Complex Atheromatosis of the Aortic Arch in Cerebral Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Capmany, Ramón Pujadas; Ibañez, Montserrat Oliveras; Pesquer, Xavier Jané

    2010-01-01

    In many stroke patients it is not possible to establish the etiology of stroke. However, in the last two decades, the use of transesophageal echocardiography in patients with stroke of uncertain etiology reveals atherosclerotic plaques in the aortic arch, which often protrude into the lumen and have mobile components in a high percentage of cases. Several autopsy series and retrospective studies of cases and controls have shown an association between aortic arch atheroma and arterial embolism, which was later confirmed by prospectively designed studies. The association with ischemic stroke was particularly strong when atheromas were located proximal to the ostium of the left subclavian artery, when the plaque was ≥ 4 mm thick and particularly when mobile components are present. In these cases, aspirin might not prevent adequately new arterial ischemic events especially stroke. Here we review the evidence of aortic arch atheroma as an independent risk factor for stroke and arterial embolism, including clinical and pathological data on atherosclerosis of the thoracic aorta as an embolic source. In addition, the impact of complex plaques (≥ 4 mm thick, or with mobile components) on increasing the risk of stroke is also reviewed. In non-randomized retrospective studies anticoagulation was superior to antiplatelet therapy in patients with stroke and aortic arch plaques with mobile components. In a retrospective case-control study, statins significantly reduced the relative risk of new vascular events. However, given the limited data available and its retrospective nature, randomized prospective studies are needed to establish the optimal secondary prevention therapeutic regimens in these high risk patients. PMID:21804777

  18. Controlled localized buckling responses of orthodontic arch wires.

    PubMed

    Nikolai, R J; Chung, A Y

    1999-09-01

    The orthodontic arch wire is often activated locally, in transverse bending and/or longitudinal torsion, to engage an individual malaligned tooth. Arch wires with substantial flexibilities and elastic ranges in bending are available. Several clinical reports of distal displacements of molars with appliances activated by locally buckling the arch wire have appeared in the recent published literature. This article contains an explanation of buckling or "column" action and the postbuckling response of a wire, and a report of the results of a controlled, in-vitro study of a sample of 256 wire segments subjected to activation-deactivation, buckling-postbuckling-unbuckling cycles. Continuous force-displacement diagrams were obtained from mechanical tests run at oral temperature. Four orthodontics-relevant, mechanical characteristics were quantified from each diagram, and each specimen was subjected to posttest evaluation for inelastic behavior. Although the deformation of the buckled wire is, in fact, bending, the force-displacement diagrams obtained differed substantially from their familiar counterparts generated in transverse bending. Judging from the force magnitudes induced as the deactivation half-cycles commenced as well as the deactivation rates, not all of the 8 wires seem to be clinically suitable for activation initiated by buckling. Magnitudes of springback were substantial from activations as large as 6 mm, and only 2 of the 8 wires exhibited full deactivations less than 80% of their activating displacements. This relatively new mode of arch wire activation that enables delivery to the dentition of mesiodistal pushing forces has substantial potential for clinical application from several biomechanical standpoints. PMID:10474103

  19. Influence of edentulism on human orbit and zygomatic arch shape.

    PubMed

    Williams, Shanna E; Slice, Dennis E

    2014-04-01

    Edentulism, or tooth loss, seriously alters the appearance of the lower facial skeleton. The aim of this study was to determine if complete maxillary edentulism also impacts the curvature shape of the orbits and zygomatic arches in elderly adults. The study was conducted on 80 crania comprising two cross-sectional populations of elderly African- and European-Americans (60-80 years old). Forty of the crania possessed intact dentition; the remaining 40 exhibited complete edentulism with tooth socket resorption. Three-dimensional semilandmarks representing the curvature of the orbits and zygomatic arches were collected using a hand-held digitizer. Each craniofacial region's semilandmarks were aligned into a common coordinate system via generalized Procrustes superimposition. Regional variation in shape was explored via principal component analysis, multivariate analysis of variance, discriminant function analysis, cross-validation, and vector plots. Shape differences between the edentulous and dentate groups were detected in both the orbits (P = 0.0022) and zygomatic arches (P = 0.0026). Ancestry and sex differences were also identified in both regions. Orbit data correctly classified dentate crania 65% of the time and edentulous crania 72.5% of the time. Zygomatic arch data correctly classified 75% dentate and 60% of edentulous crania. The individual curves constituting each region also exhibited shape alteration with tooth loss, with the exception of the inferior zygomatic curve. Vector plots revealed patterns of superoinferior expansion, and medial and lateral recession depending on the region examined. These results suggest a relationship exists between maxillary edentulism and changes in the surrounding craniofacial structures.

  20. Surgical treatment for right aortic arch with Kommerell's diverticulum.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Noboru; Oi, Masaya; Maruta, Kazuto; Iizuka, Hirofumi; Kawaura, Hiroyuki

    2013-12-01

    Kommerell's diverticulum causes compression of the esophagus between the aberrant origin of the left subclavian artery and ascending aorta, leading to dysphagia or dyspnea. We describe 3 cases of successful surgical treatment of right aortic arch with Kommerell's diverticulum and aberrant origin of the left subclavian artery, using a right anterolateral partial sternotomy. This allows both resection of the Kommerell's diverticulum as well as reconstruction of the aberrant origin of the left subclavian artery anatomically.

  1. Double arch mirror study. Part 3: Fabrication and test report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vukobratovich, D.; Hillman, D.

    1983-01-01

    A method of mounting a cryogenically cooled, lightweight, double arch, glass mirror was developed for infrared, astronomical telescopes such as the Space Infrared Telescope Facility (SIRTF). A 50 cm, fused silica mirror which was previously fabricated was modified for use with a new mount configuration. This mount concept was developed. The modification of the mirror, the fabrication of the mirror mount, and the room temperature testing of the mounted mirror are reported. A design for a SIRTF class primary mirror is suggested.

  2. Disentangling the Free-Fall Arch Paradox in Silo Discharge.

    PubMed

    Rubio-Largo, S M; Janda, A; Maza, D; Zuriguel, I; Hidalgo, R C

    2015-06-12

    Several theoretical predictions of the mass flow rate of granular media discharged from a silo are based on the spontaneous development of a free-fall arch region, the existence of which is still controversial. In this Letter, we study experimentally and numerically the particle flow through an orifice placed at the bottom of 2D and 3D silos. The implementation of a coarse-grained technique allows a thorough description of all the kinetic and micromechanical properties of the particle flow in the outlet proximities. Though the free-fall arch does not exist as traditionally understood--a region above which particles have negligible velocity and below which particles fall solely under gravity action--we discover that the kinetic pressure displays a well-defined transition in a position that scales with the outlet size. This universal scaling explains why the free-fall arch picture has served as an approximation to describe the flow rate in the discharge of silos.

  3. Space maintainer effects on intercanine arch width and length.

    PubMed

    Dincer, M; Haydar, S; Unsal, B; Turk, T

    1996-01-01

    In order to investigate the effects of space maintainers in intercanine arch width and length, twenty cases, characterized with the early loss of mandibular primary molars were selected and divided into two groups. The treatment group used removable space maintainers, while the other ten cases served as the control group. The first dental casts of the treatment and control groups were obtained when the primary canines were in the mouth. After the eruption of permanent canines second dental casts were obtained in both groups. Six measurements were made on the dental casts of each patient. No parameter was found to be statistically significant in the treatment group. In the control group the increase in intercanine arch width and perimeter were found to be statistically significant. Also the increase at the buccal and lingual bone measurements were found to be statistically significant. These results showed that space maintainers might cease the increase in intercanine arch width and length during the transition period between the primary and permanent canines.

  4. The effect of foot arch on plantar pressure distribution during standing.

    PubMed

    Periyasamy, R; Anand, Sneh

    2013-07-01

    The aim of this study was to explore how foot type affects plantar pressure distribution during standing. In this study, 32 healthy subjects voluntarily participated and the subject feet were classified as: normal feet (n = 23), flat feet (n = 14) and high arch feet (n = 27) according to arch index (AI) values obtained from foot pressure intensity image analysis. Foot pressure intensity images were acquired by a pedopowergraph system to obtain a foot pressure distribution parameter-power ratio (PR) during standing in eight different regions of the foot. Contact area and mean PR were analysed in hind foot, mid-foot and fore foot regions. One-way analysis of variance was used to determine statistical differences between groups. The contact area and mean PR value beneath the mid-foot was significantly increased in the low arch foot when compared to the normal arch foot and high arch foot (p < 0.001) in both feet. However, subjects with low-arch feet had significantly higher body mass index (BMI) compared to subjects with high-arch feet (p < 0.05) and subjects with normal arch feet (p < 0.05) in both feet. In addition, subjects with low-arch feet had significant differences in arch index (AI) value as compared to subjects with high-arch feet (p < 0.001) and subjects with normal arch feet (p < 0.05) in both feet. Mean mid-foot PR value were positively (r = 0.54) correlated with increased arch index (AI) value. A significant (p < 0.05) change was obtained in PR value beneath the mid-foot of low arch feet when compared with other groups in both feet. The findings suggest that there is an increased mid-foot PR value in the low arch foot as compared to the normal arch foot and high arch foot during standing. Therefore, individuals with low arch feet could be at high risk for mid-foot collapse and Charcot foot problems, indicating that foot type should be assessed when determining an individual's risk for foot injury.

  5. Foxi transcription factors promote pharyngeal arch development by regulating formation of FGF signaling centers.

    PubMed

    Edlund, Renée K; Ohyama, Takahiro; Kantarci, Husniye; Riley, Bruce B; Groves, Andrew K

    2014-06-01

    The bones of the vertebrate face develop from transient embryonic branchial arches that are populated by cranial neural crest cells. We have characterized a mouse mutant for the Forkhead family transcription factor Foxi3, which is expressed in branchial ectoderm and endoderm. Foxi3 mutant mice are not viable and display severe branchial arch-derived facial skeleton defects, including absence of all but the most distal tip of the mandible and complete absence of the inner, middle and external ear structures. Although cranial neural crest cells of Foxi3 mutants are able to migrate, populate the branchial arches, and display some elements of correct proximo-distal patterning, they succumb to apoptosis from embryonic day 9.75 onwards. We show this cell death correlates with a delay in expression of Fgf8 in branchial arch ectoderm and a failure of neural crest cells in the arches to express FGF-responsive genes. Zebrafish foxi1 is also expressed in branchial arch ectoderm and endoderm, and morpholino knock-down of foxi1 also causes apoptosis of neural crest in the branchial arches. We show that heat shock induction of fgf3 in zebrafish arch tissue can rescue cell death in foxi1 morphants. Our results suggest that Foxi3 may play a role in the establishment of signaling centers in the branchial arches that are required for neural crest survival, patterning and the subsequent development of branchial arch derivatives.

  6. The Foot’s Arch and the Energetics of Human Locomotion

    PubMed Central

    Stearne, Sarah M.; McDonald, Kirsty A.; Alderson, Jacqueline A.; North, Ian; Oxnard, Charles E.; Rubenson, Jonas

    2016-01-01

    The energy-sparing spring theory of the foot’s arch has become central to interpretations of the foot’s mechanical function and evolution. Using a novel insole technique that restricted compression of the foot’s longitudinal arch, this study provides the first direct evidence that arch compression/recoil during locomotion contributes to lowering energy cost. Restricting arch compression near maximally (~80%) during moderate-speed (2.7 ms−1) level running increased metabolic cost by + 6.0% (p < 0.001, d = 0.67; unaffected by foot strike technique). A simple model shows that the metabolic energy saved by the arch is largely explained by the passive-elastic work it supplies that would otherwise be done by active muscle. Both experimental and model data confirm that it is the end-range of arch compression that dictates the energy-saving role of the arch. Restricting arch compression had no effect on the cost of walking or incline running (3°), commensurate with the smaller role of passive-elastic mechanics in these gaits. These findings substantiate the elastic energy-saving role of the longitudinal arch during running, and suggest that arch supports used in some footwear and orthotics may increase the cost of running. PMID:26783259

  7. ARCHES: Advancing Research & Capacity in Hydrologic Education and Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milewski, A.; Fryar, A. E.; Durham, M. C.; Schroeder, P.; Agouridis, C.; Hanley, C.; Rotz, R. R.

    2013-12-01

    Educating young scientists and building capacity on a global scale is pivotal towards better understanding and managing our water resources. Based on this premise the ARCHES (Advancing Research & Capacity in Hydrologic Education and Science) program has been established. This abstract provides an overview of the program, links to access information, and describes the activities and outcomes of student participants from the Middle East and North Africa. The ARCHES program (http://arches.wrrs.uga.edu) is an integrated hydrologic education approach using online courses, field programs, and various hands-on workshops. The program aims to enable young scientists to effectively perform the high level research that will ultimately improve quality of life, enhance science-based decision making, and facilitate collaboration. Three broad, interlinked sets of activities are incorporated into the ARCHES program: (A1) the development of technical expertise, (A2) the development of professional contacts and skills, and (A3) outreach and long-term sustainability. The development of technical expertise (A1) is implemented through three progressive instructional sections. Section 1: Students were guided through a series of online lectures and exercises (Moodle: http://wrrs.uga.edu/moodle) covering three main topics (Remote Sensing, GIS, and Hydrologic Modeling). Section 2: Students participated in a hands-on workshop hosted at the University of Georgia's Water Resources and Remote Sensing Laboratory (WRRSL). Using ENVI, ArcGIS, and ArcSWAT, students completed a series of lectures and real-world applications (e.g., Development of Hydrologic Models). Section 3: Students participated in field studies (e.g., measurements of infiltration, recharge, streamflow, and water-quality parameters) conducted by U.S. partners and international collaborators in the participating countries. The development of professional contacts and skills (A2) was achieved through the promotion of networking

  8. Temporospatial cell interactions regulating mandibular and maxillary arch patterning.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, C A; Tucker, A S; Sharpe, P T

    2000-01-01

    The cellular origin of the instructive information for hard tissue patterning of the jaws has been the subject of a long-standing controversy. Are the cranial neural crest cells prepatterned or does the epithelium pattern a developmentally uncommitted population of ectomesenchymal cells? In order to understand more about how orofacial patterning is controlled we have investigated the temporal signalling interactions and responses between epithelium and mesenchymal cells in the mandibular and maxillary primordia. We show that within the mandibular arch, homeobox genes that are expressed in different proximodistal spatial domains corresponding to presumptive molar and incisor ectomesenchymal cells are induced by signals from the oral epithelium. In mouse, prior to E10, all ectomesenchyme cells in the mandibular arch are equally responsive to epithelial signals such as Fgf8, indicating that there is no pre-specification of these cells into different populations and suggesting that patterning of the hard tissues of the mandible is instructed by the epithelium. By E10.5, ectomesenchymal cell gene expression domains are still dependent on epithelial signals but have become fixed and ectopic expression cannot be induced. At E11 expression becomes independent of epithelial signals such that removal of the epithelium does not affect spatial ectomesenchymal expression. Significantly, however, the response of ectomesenchyme cells to epithelial regulatory signals was found to be different in the mandibular and maxillary primordium. Thus, whereas both mandibular and maxillary arch epithelia could induce Dlx2 and Dlx5 expression in the mandible and Dlx2 expression in the maxilla, neither could induce Dlx5 expression in the maxilla. Reciprocal cell transplantations between mandibular and maxillary arch ectomesenchymal cells revealed intrinsic differences between these populations of cranial neural crest-derived cells. Research in odontogenesis has shown that the oral epithelium

  9. Developmental evidence for serial homology of the vertebrate jaw and gill arch skeleton.

    PubMed

    Gillis, J Andrew; Modrell, Melinda S; Baker, Clare V H

    2013-01-01

    Gegenbaur's classical hypothesis of jaw-gill arch serial homology is widely cited, but remains unsupported by either palaeontological evidence (for example, a series of fossils reflecting the stepwise transformation of a gill arch into a jaw) or developmental genetic data (for example, shared molecular mechanisms underlying segment identity in the mandibular, hyoid and gill arch endoskeletons). Here we show that nested expression of Dlx genes--the 'Dlx code' that specifies upper and lower jaw identity in mammals and teleosts--is a primitive feature of the mandibular, hyoid and gill arches of jawed vertebrates. Using fate-mapping techniques, we demonstrate that the principal dorsal and ventral endoskeletal segments of the jaw, hyoid and gill arches of the skate Leucoraja erinacea derive from molecularly equivalent mesenchymal domains of combinatorial Dlx gene expression. Our data suggest that vertebrate jaw, hyoid and gill arch cartilages are serially homologous, and were primitively patterned dorsoventrally by a common Dlx blueprint.

  10. Aberrant left subclavian artery associated with a Kommerell's diverticulum and a left-sided aortic arch.

    PubMed

    Yu, Pey-Jen; Balsam, Leora B; Mussa, Firas F; DeAnda, Abe

    2012-09-01

    Kommerell's diverticulum is most commonly associated with either an aberrant left subclavian artery from a right-sided aortic arch or an aberrant right subclavian artery from a left-sided aortic arch. We describe an exceedingly rare case of an aberrant left subclavian artery arising from a Kommerell's diverticulum in a patient with a left-sided aortic arch, the "nonaberrant aberrant left subclavian artery."

  11. 13. Photocopy of a photographca. 1896showing wooden arch bridge over ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. Photocopy of a photograph--ca. 1896--showing wooden arch bridge over the North Fork of the San Joaquin River northeast of Fresno, CA. This structure was designed by Eastwood as part of the San Joaquin Electric Company's hydro-electric plant; it is a design that indicates his interest in the structural capabilities of the arch before he began building multiple arch dams. Courtesy Mr. Charles Allan Whitney. - Little Rock Creek Dam, Little Rock Creek, Littlerock, Los Angeles County, CA

  12. [Diagnosis and follow-up of reduction of fractures of the zygomatic arch].

    PubMed

    Friedrich, R E; Volkenstein, R J

    1994-08-01

    Ultrasound and standard x-ray investigations before and after the reduction of the fractures were performed in 17 patients with zygomatic arch fractures. The ultrasound investigation of the bone surface is recommended as an additional diagnostic tool in the diagnosis and control of the reduction of zygomatic arch fractures. Intraoperative ultrasound imaging under sterile conditions is easy to apply and enables the surgeon to optimise therapeutic results. In 5 cases based on an intraoperative sonogram further reductions of zygomatic arch fractures were carried out. In another referred patient the diagnosis of a zygomatic arch fracture was excluded by ultrasound and confirmed by standard x-ray examinations.

  13. Kinematic differences between normal and low arched feet in children using the Heidelberg foot measurement method.

    PubMed

    Twomey, D; McIntosh, A S; Simon, J; Lowe, K; Wolf, S I

    2010-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the kinematics of normal arched and low arched feet in children and use this data to quantify the differences between the two foot types during walking gait. Multi-segment foot motion was measured, using the Heidelberg foot measurement method (HFMM), for 25 normal arched feet and 27 low arched feet in 9-12-year-old children. The kinematic differences in the foot between the two groups during walking were relatively small, except for the medial arch and forefoot supination angles. The magnitude of the medial arch angle was approximately 10 degrees greater in the low arched group than the normal arched group throughout the gait cycle. There was a significant difference found in the forefoot supination angle (p<0.03), relative to the midfoot, between the two groups at initial heel strike, and maximum and minimum values throughout the gait cycle. The values for the normal group were significantly higher in all these angles indicating that the forefoot of the low arched foot remains less pronated during the gait cycle. There was no significant difference in the motion of the rearfoot between the two foot types. The results of this study provide normative values for children's feet and highlight the mechanical differences in flexible flat feet in this age group. This data contributes to knowledge on foot kinematics in children and will be valuable for future research on the structure, function and potential treatment of the flexible flat foot.

  14. Out-of-plane free vibration analysis of a cable-arch structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, H. J.; Zhao, Y. Y.; Zhu, H. P.

    2013-02-01

    Cable-arch structure has been widely used in many long-span structures such as cable roofs and cable-stayed arch bridges, but its dynamics is still not well understood. In this paper, the out-of-plane dynamic behavior of a cable-arch structure is investigated. The equations governing the out-of-plane free vibration of the structure are derived using d'Alembert's principle. A transfer matrix method is used to solve the governing equations and determine the frequencies of the out-of-plane vibration. The theories are then used to study two specific cases: free vibration of a model cable-arch and simulation of an arch erection process. The effects of some key parameters of cable and arch, such as tension of cable and radius, open-angle and shape of arch, are examined. The results indicate that in-plane and spatial cables can largely improve the out-of-plane dynamic behavior of arch structures, which are further verified by analyzing the out-of-plane buckling of cable-arch structures. The present work should be valuable and significant not only for the fundamental research but also engineering design of roofs and bridges.

  15. Ball motion and sliding friction in an arched outer race ball bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamrock, B. J.

    1973-01-01

    The motion of the ball and sliding friction in an arched outer race ball bearing under thrust loads is determined. Fatigue life evaluations were made. The analysis is applied to a 150 millimeter bore ball bearing. The results indicated that for high speed-light load applications the arched bearing has significant improvement in fatigue life over that of a conventional bearing. An arching of 0.254 mm (0.01 in.) was found to be an optimal. For an arched bearing it was also found that a considerable amount of spinning occurs at the outer race contacts.

  16. Ball motion and sliding friction in an arched outer-race ball bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamrock, B. J.

    1974-01-01

    The motion of the ball and sliding friction in an arched outer-race ball bearing under thrust load is analyzed. Fatigue life evaluations were made. The analysis is applied to a 150-millimeter-bore ball bearing. The results indicated that for high-speed light-load applications the arched bearing has significant improvement in fatigue life over that of a conventional bearing. An arching of 0.254 mm (0.01 in.) was found to be optimal. Also, for an arched bearing a considerable amount of spinning occurs at the outer-race contacts.

  17. New classification of lingual arch form in normal occlusion using three dimensional virtual models

    PubMed Central

    Park, Kyung Hee; Bayome, Mohamed; Park, Jae Hyun; Lee, Jeong Woo; Baek, Seung-Hak

    2015-01-01

    Objective The purposes of this study were 1) to classify lingual dental arch form types based on the lingual bracket points and 2) to provide a new lingual arch form template based on this classification for clinical application through the analysis of three-dimensional virtual models of normal occlusion sample. Methods Maxillary and mandibular casts of 115 young adults with normal occlusion were scanned in their occluded positions and lingual bracket points were digitized on the virtual models by using Rapidform 2006 software. Sixty-eight cases (dataset 1) were used in K-means cluster analysis to classify arch forms with intercanine, interpremolar and intermolar widths and width/depth ratios as determinants. The best-fit curves of the mean arch forms were generated. The remaining cases (dataset 2) were mapped into the obtained clusters and a multivariate test was performed to assess the differences between the clusters. Results Four-cluster classification demonstrated maximum intercluster distance. Wide, narrow, tapering, and ovoid types were described according to the intercanine and intermolar widths and their best-fit curves were depicted. No significant differences in arch depths existed among the clusters. Strong to moderate correlations were found between maxillary and mandibular arch widths. Conclusions Lingual arch forms have been classified into 4 types based on their anterior and posterior dimensions. A template of the 4 arch forms has been depicted. Three-dimensional analysis of the lingual bracket points provides more accurate identification of arch form and, consequently, archwire selection. PMID:25798413

  18. Earthquake safety assessment of concrete arch and gravity dams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Gao; Hu, Zhiqiang

    2005-12-01

    Based on research studies currently being carried out at Dalian University of Technology, some important aspects for the earthquake safety assessment of concrete dams are reviewed and discussed. First, the rate-dependent behavior of concrete subjected to earthquake loading is examined, emphasizing the properties of concrete under cyclic and biaxial loading conditions. Second, a modified four-parameter Hsieh-Ting-Chen viscoplastic consistency model is developed to simulate the rate-dependent behavior of concrete. The earthquake response of a 278m high arch dam is analyzed, and the results show that the strain-rate effects become noticeable in the inelastic range. Third, a more accurate non-smooth Newton algorithm for the solution of three-dimensional frictional contact problems is developed to study the joint opening effects of arch dams during strong earthquakes. Such effects on two nearly 300m high arch dams have been studied. It was found that the canyon shape has great influence on the magnitude and distribution of the joint opening along the dam axis. Fourth, the scaled boundary finite element method presented by Song and Wolf is employed to study the dam-reservoir-foundation interaction effects of concrete dams. Particular emphases were placed on the variation of foundation stiffness and the anisotropic behavior of the foundation material on the dynamic response of concrete dams. Finally, nonlinear modeling of concrete to study the damage evolution of concrete dams during strong earthquakes is discussed. An elastic-damage mechanics approach for damage prediction of concrete gravity dams is described as an example. These findings are helpful in understanding the dynamic behavior of concrete dams and promoting the improvement of seismic safety assessment methods.

  19. Syndromes of the first and second pharyngeal arches: A review.

    PubMed

    Passos-Bueno, Maria Rita; Ornelas, Camila C; Fanganiello, Roberto D

    2009-08-01

    Our aim in this review is to discuss currently known mechanisms associated with three important syndromes of the first and second pharyngeal arches: Treacher Collins syndrome (TCS), Oculo-auriculo-vertebral syndrome (AOVS) and Auriculo-Condylar syndrome (ACS) or question mark ear syndrome. TCS and ACS are autosomal dominant diseases, with nearly complete penetrance and wide spectrum of clinical variability. The phenotype of the latter has several overlapping features with OAVS, but OAVS may exist in both sporadic and autosomal dominant forms. Mutations in the TCOF1 gene are predicted to cause premature termination codons, leading to haploinsuficiency of the protein treacle and causing TCS. Low amount of treacle leads ultimately to a reduction in the number of cranial neural crest cells migrating to the first and second pharyngeal arches. Other than TCS, the genes associated with ACS and OAVS are still unknown. The first locus for ACS was mapped by our group to 1p21-23 but there is genetic heretogeneity. Genetic heterogeneity is also present in OAVS. Based on the molecular analysis of balanced translocation in an OAVS patient, it has been suggested that abnormal expression of BAPX1 possibly due to epigenetic disregulation might be involved with the etiology of OAVS. Involvement of environmental events has also been linked to the causation of OAVS. Identification of factors leading to these disorders are important for a comprehensive delineation of the molecular pathways underlying the craniofacial development from the first and the second pharyngeal arches, for genetic counseling and to open alternative strategies for patient treatment.

  20. Zygomatic arch fracture in a 40-year-old woman.

    PubMed

    Ramponi, Denise; White, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    This case describes an injury to a 40-year-old woman, employed as a softball team coach, who presented to an emergency department (ED) after sustaining a line drive hit to the right side of the face with a softball during practice. Upon arrival to the ED, the patient complained of moderate pain, swelling, and bruising over the right side of her midface area. After evaluation in the ED, the patient received a diagnosis of a zygomatic arch fracture that was further managed by an occupational medicine nurse practitioner, a plastic surgeon, and an ear, nose, and throat (ENT) physician specialist.

  1. Designing light responsive bistable arches for rapid, remotely triggered actuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Matthew L.; Shankar, M. Ravi; Backman, Ryan; Tondiglia, Vincent P.; Lee, Kyung Min; McConney, Michael E.; Wang, David H.; Tan, Loon-Seng; White, Timothy J.

    2014-03-01

    Light responsive azobenzene functionalized polymer networks enjoy several advantages as actuator candidates including the ability to be remotely triggered and the capacity for highly tunable control via light intensity, polarization, wavelength and material alignments. One signi cant challenge hindering these materials from being employed in applications is their often relatively slow actuation rates and low power densities, especially in the absence of photo-thermal e ects. One well known strategy employed in nature for increasing actuation rate and power output is the storage and quick release of elastic energy (e.g., the Venus ytrap). Using nature as inspiration we have conducted a series of experiments and developed an equilibrium mechanics model for investigating remotely triggered snap-through of bistable light responsive arches made from glassy azobenzene functionalized polymers. After brie y discussing experimental observations we consider in detail a geometrically exact, planar rod model of photomechanical snap-through. Theoretical energy release characteristics and unique strain eld pro les provide insight toward design strategies for improved actuator performance. The bistable light responsive arches presented here are potentially a powerful option for remotely triggered, rapid motion from apparently passive structures in applications such as binary optical switches and positioners, surfaces with morphing topologies, and impulse locomotion in micro or millimeter scale robotics.

  2. archAR: an archaeological augmented reality experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiley, Bridgette; Schulze, Jürgen P.

    2015-03-01

    We present an application for Android phones or tablets called "archAR" that uses augmented reality as an alternative, portable way of viewing archaeological information from UCSD's Levantine Archaeology Laboratory. archAR provides a unique experience of flying through an archaeological dig site in the Levantine area and exploring the artifacts uncovered there. Using a Google Nexus tablet and Qualcomm's Vuforia API, we use an image target as a map and overlay a three-dimensional model of the dig site onto it, augmenting reality such that we are able to interact with the plotted artifacts. The user can physically move the Android device around the image target and see the dig site model from any perspective. The user can also move the device closer to the model in order to "zoom" into the view of a particular section of the model and its associated artifacts. This is especially useful, as the dig site model and the collection of artifacts are very detailed. The artifacts are plotted as points, colored by type. The user can touch the virtual points to trigger a popup information window that contains details of the artifact, such as photographs, material descriptions, and more.

  3. Behaviour of Steel Arch Stabilized by a Textile Membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svoboda, O.; Machacek, J.

    2015-11-01

    Behaviour of the slender steel arch supporting textile membranes in a membrane structure with respect to in-plane and out-of plane stability is investigated in the paper. In the last decades the textile membranes have been widely used to cover both common and exclusive structures due to progress in new membrane materials with eminent properties. Nevertheless, complex analysis of such membranes in interaction with steel structure (carbon/stainless steel perimeter or supporting elements) is rather demanding, even with specialized software. Laboratory model of a large membrane structure simulating a shelter roof of a concert stage was tested and the resulting stress/deflection values are presented. The model of a reasonable size was provided with prestressed membrane of PVC coated polyester fabric Ferrari® Précontraint 702S and tested under various loadings. The supporting steel structure consisted of two steel arch tubes from S355 grade steel and perimeter prestressed cables. The stability behaviour of the inner tube was the primary interest of the investigation. The SOFiSTiK software was used to analyse the structural behaviour in 3D. Numerical non-linear analysis of deflections and internal forces of the structure under symmetrical and asymmetrical loadings covers various membrane prestressing and specific boundary conditions. The numerical results are validated using test results. Finally, the preliminary recommendations for appropriate numerical modelling and stability design of the supporting structure are presented.

  4. Variations in the superficial palmar arch of the hand.

    PubMed

    Bataineh, Ziad M; Habbal, Omar; Moqattash, Satei T

    2009-01-01

    Variations in the pattern of the hand blood supply are frequently encountered. Awareness and identification of such variations is crucial during hand surgery. Thirty formaline fixed hands of male and female cadavers were dissected. All arteries contributing to the superficial palmar arch (SPA) of the hand were verified. In addition to the frequently encountered types of SPA, three very rare cases were described. In the first case, the superficial branch of the radial artery passed superficial to the thenar muscles with a diameter larger than that of the ulnar artery. In addition to the common palmar digital artery to the second web space, it gave the princeps pollicis and radialis indicis arteries. In the second case, the SPA was formed by the ulnar artery and was completed by a small branch from the deep branch of the radial artery. The palmar digital artery to the ulnar side of the fifth finger and the common palmar digital artery to the fourth web space arose from a common trunk. In the third case, incomplete SPA was formed by the median artery which only gave the princeps pollicis and radialis indicis arteries, while the ulnar artery supplied the rest of the hand except the ulnar side of the third finger and the second web space which were supplied by the deep palmar arch. Therefore, sound knowledge of the pattern of the blood supply of the hand by various techniques is crucial to avoid possible complications during hand surgery.

  5. Building problem solving environments with the arches framework

    SciTech Connect

    Debardeleben, Nathan; Sass, Ron; Stanzione, Jr., Daniel; Ligon, Ill, Walter

    2009-01-01

    The computational problems that scientists face are rapidly escalating in size and scope. Moreover, the computer systems used to solve these problems are becoming significantly more complex than the familiar, well-understood sequential model on their desktops. While it is possible to re-train scientists to use emerging high-performance computing (HPC) models, it is much more effective to provide them with a higher-level programming environment that has been specialized to their particular domain. By fostering interaction between HPC specialists and the domain scientists, problem-solving environments (PSEs) provide a collaborative environment. A PSE environment allows scientists to focus on expressing their computational problem while the PSE and associated tools support mapping that domain-specific problem to a high-performance computing system. This article describes Arches, an object-oriented framework for building domain-specific PSEs. The framework was designed to support a wide range of problem domains and to be extensible to support very different high-performance computing targets. To demonstrate this flexibility, two PSEs have been developed from the Arches framework to solve problem in two different domains and target very different computing platforms. The Coven PSE supports parallel applications that require large-scale parallelism found in cost-effective Beowulf clusters. In contrast, RCADE targets FPGA-based reconfigurable computing and was originally designed to aid NASA Earth scientists studying satellite instrument data.

  6. [Acute forearm compartment syndrome after total arch replacement].

    PubMed

    Kigawa, Ikutaro; Miyairi, Takeshi; Tanaka, Satona; Unai, Shinya; Miura, Sumio; Ohno, Takayuki; Fukuda, Sachito; Takamoto, Shinichi

    2011-06-01

    A 61-year-old female presented with shortness of breath and was found to have moderate aortic regurgitation with annulo-aortic ectasia and an aneurysm involving the aortic arch. She underwent Bentall operation and total arch replacement with a branched prosthesis. The patient developed hypesthesia and paresis of the left forearm one day after the surgery. Computed tomography revealed complete occlusion of the left subclavian artery (LSA). An emergency operation was performed 15 hours after the initial operation. A new bypass graft to the axillary artery was placed since the LSA was occluded by the wide arterial dissection. However, her left forearm showed rapid swelling within a few hours. Under the diagnosis of acute compartment syndrome (ACS) of the forearm, emergency decompression fasciotomy was performed. She was discharged with a mild dysfunction of her forearm and hand 40 days after the operation. The rapid progression of ACS was thought to have been associated with not only the severe and prolonged ischemia but also the venous obstruction caused by the ligation of left brachiocephalic vein during the initial operation. Immediate and complete decompression, including the deep compartment of the forearm, was essential to achieve a full functional recovery from ACS.

  7. [The value of ultrasonography in the diagnosis of zygomatic arch fractures].

    PubMed

    Friedrich, R E; Volkenstein, R J

    1991-01-01

    In 15 cases ultrasonograms were used to verify the result of a zygomatic fracture reduction and were correlated to conventional x-ray films. Both the pre- and postoperative ultrasonograms demonstrated all fractures of the zygomatic arch. Ultrasonographic imaging of the non-exposed bone surfaces enables the operator to monitor the reduction of zygomatic arch fractures intraoperatively, and thus optimize the treatment results.

  8. "Roller coaster maneuver via lateral orbital approach" for reduction of isolated zygomatic arch fractures.

    PubMed

    Pilanci, Ozgur; Basaran, Karaca; Datli, Asli; Kuvat, Samet Vasfi

    2013-11-01

    Numerous techniques have been reported for the reduction of zygomatic arch fractures. In this article, we aimed to describe a technique we named as "roller coaster maneuver via lateral orbital approach" to closed reduction of the isolated-type zygomatic arch fractures. Surgical outcomes of 14 patients treated with this method were outlined. PMID:24220411

  9. Clinical Advantages and Limitations of Monolithic Zirconia Restorations Full Arch Implant Supported Reconstruction: Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Carames, Joao; Yu, Yung Cheng Paul; Pérez, Alejandro; Kang, Mary

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. The purpose of this retrospective case series is to evaluate the clinical advantages and limitations of monolithic zirconia restorations for full arch implant supported restorations and report the rate of complications up to 2 years after insertion. Materials and Methods. Fourteen patients received implant placement for monolithic zirconia full arch reconstructions. Four implants were placed in seven arches, eleven arches received six implants, two arches received seven implants, two arches received eight implants, and one arch received nine implants. Results. No implant failures or complications were reported for an implant survival rate of 100% with follow-up ranging from 3 to 24 months. Conclusions. Monolithic zirconia CAD-/CAM-milled framework restorations are a treatment option for full arch restorations over implants, showing a 96% success rate in the present study. Some of the benefits are accuracy, reduced veneering porcelain, and minimal occlusal adjustments. The outcome of the present study showed high success in function, aesthetics, phonetics, and high patient satisfaction. PMID:26124835

  10. Dental arch asymmetry in young healthy human subjects evaluated by Euclidean distance matrix analysis.

    PubMed

    Ferrario, V F; Sforza, C; Miani, A; Serrao, G

    1993-03-01

    Form differences between biological structures can be evaluated using several approaches. A recently proposed method (Euclidean distance matrix analysis; EDMA) seems to be able to differentiate between size and shape differences. Here it has been applied to study the asymmetry of mandibular and maxillary arches in 50 men and 45 women with sound dentitions. The centres of gravity (centroids) of the occlusal surfaces of all permanent teeth (right second molar to left second molar) were individualized on the dental casts of subjects. The form of the right and left maxillary and mandibular hemi-arches was separately assessed by calculating all the possible linear distances between pairs of teeth within arch and side. Side differences were tested by EDMA. In men, the maxillary and the mandibular arches were both symmetrical (i.e. there were no significant differences in size or shape between the left and right hemi-arches). In women, the mandibular arch was symmetrical, but in the maxillary arch the two antimeres had a significantly different shape. No size differences were found between the left and right female hemi-arches.

  11. 49 CFR 230.61 - Arch tubes, water bar tubes, circulators and thermic siphons.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... MAINTENANCE STANDARDS Boilers and Appurtenances Washing Boilers § 230.61 Arch tubes, water bar tubes, circulators and thermic siphons. (a) Frequency of cleaning. Each time the boiler is washed, arch tubes and... for the service intended at the MAWP specified on the boiler specification FRA Form No. 4, they...

  12. 49 CFR 230.61 - Arch tubes, water bar tubes, circulators and thermic siphons.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... MAINTENANCE STANDARDS Boilers and Appurtenances Washing Boilers § 230.61 Arch tubes, water bar tubes, circulators and thermic siphons. (a) Frequency of cleaning. Each time the boiler is washed, arch tubes and... for the service intended at the MAWP specified on the boiler specification FRA Form No. 4, they...

  13. 49 CFR 230.61 - Arch tubes, water bar tubes, circulators and thermic siphons.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... MAINTENANCE STANDARDS Boilers and Appurtenances Washing Boilers § 230.61 Arch tubes, water bar tubes, circulators and thermic siphons. (a) Frequency of cleaning. Each time the boiler is washed, arch tubes and... for the service intended at the MAWP specified on the boiler specification FRA Form No. 4, they...

  14. 49 CFR 230.61 - Arch tubes, water bar tubes, circulators and thermic siphons.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... MAINTENANCE STANDARDS Boilers and Appurtenances Washing Boilers § 230.61 Arch tubes, water bar tubes, circulators and thermic siphons. (a) Frequency of cleaning. Each time the boiler is washed, arch tubes and... for the service intended at the MAWP specified on the boiler specification FRA Form No. 4, they...

  15. 49 CFR 230.61 - Arch tubes, water bar tubes, circulators and thermic siphons.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... MAINTENANCE STANDARDS Boilers and Appurtenances Washing Boilers § 230.61 Arch tubes, water bar tubes, circulators and thermic siphons. (a) Frequency of cleaning. Each time the boiler is washed, arch tubes and... for the service intended at the MAWP specified on the boiler specification FRA Form No. 4, they...

  16. Atresia of the Aortic Arch in 4-Year-Old Child: A Clinical Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Nigro Stimato, Vittoria; Didier, Dominique; Beghetti, Maurice; Tissot, Cécile

    2015-01-01

    Atresia of the aortic arch is a rare congenital heart defect with a high mortality when associated with other intracardiac defects. Cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) provides the exact anatomy of the aortic arch and collateral circulation and is useful to diagnose-associated aortic arch anomalies. This report describes the case of a 4-year-old child with atresia of the aortic arch, referred to our institution with the diagnosis of aortic coarctation and bicuspid aortic valve. On clinical exam, the femoral pulses were not palpable and there was a significant differential blood pressure between the upper and lower limbs. The echocardiography showed a severely stenotic bicuspid aortic valve but was limited for the exact description of the aortic arch. CMR showed absence of lumen continuity between the ascending and descending aorta distal to the left subclavian artery, extending over 5 mm, with the presence of a bend in the arch and diverticulum on either side of the zone of discontinuity, suggesting the diagnosis atresia of the aortic arch rather than coarctation or interruption. The patient benefited from a successful surgical commissurotomy of the aortic valve and reconstruction of the aortic arch with a homograft. The post-operative CMR confirmed the good surgical result. This case emphasizes the utility of CMR to provide good anatomical information to establish the exact diagnosis and the operative strategy. PMID:25853109

  17. Outcomes of Concomitant Total Aortic Arch Replacement with Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting

    PubMed Central

    Komiya, Tatsuhiko; Tsuneyoshi, Hiroshi; Shimamoto, Takeshi

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Total aortic arch replacement is a highly invasive procedure. Here, we have investigated patient outcomes following total aortic arch replacement with or without coronary artery bypass grafting. Methods: One hundred and eighty-one patients underwent total aortic arch replacement without coronary artery bypass grafting, and 65 underwent with coronary artery bypass grafting. We compared preoperative, operative, and postoperative factors and analyzed survival outcomes. We used univariate and multivariate analyses to determine factors associated with long-term mortality. Results: Cardiopulmonary bypass and surgical times were significantly longer in the concomitant total aortic arch replacement with coronary artery bypass grafting group. Hospital mortality was 3.3% in the total aortic arch replacement group and 7.7% in the concomitant total aortic arch replacement with coronary artery bypass grafting group. Perioperative myocardial infarction was not seen in either group. There were no significant differences in mortality between the groups. Multivariate analysis revealed preoperative age, ischemic heart disease, and estimated glemerular filtration rate (eGFR) as risk factors affecting long-term mortality, whereas concomitant total aortic arch replacement with coronary artery bypass grafting was not a risk factor. Conclusion: Although patients’ backgrounds should be considered, total aortic arch replacement can be concomitantly performed with coronary artery bypass grafting surgery without additional mortality risk. PMID:27237968

  18. The shortened dental arch: prevalence and normative treatment needs in a sample of older Canadian adults.

    PubMed

    Hawkins, R J

    1998-01-01

    The concept of the shortened dental arch (SDA) was used to classify the dentition status and normative treatment needs of older adults. From 1982 to 1992, a descriptive survey was conducted in North York, Canada, of 1531 dentate adults aged 65 and over; 69% were nursing home residents. Based on the SDA concept, a "good" guadrant was defined as one which contained all premolar and anterior teeth. A "good" arch was defined as one which had two "good" quadrants. Only 6.3% of nursing home subjects and 7.5% of independently living subjects were classified as having "good" upper and lower arches; these subjects were considered to have a "functional dentition" by the criteria of the SDA concept. For subjects of both residence types, a higher percentage had a "good" lower arch (20%, 30%) as compared with a "good" upper arch (9%, 13%), and a higher proportion of non-denture wearers had "good" arches and quadrants compared with denture wearers. The most common reason for failure to meet SDA criteria was due to the loss of one or more upper premolar teeth; loss of lower canines was least frequently the reason. For subjects of both residence types, normative need for tooth extraction and prosthetic care was significantly associated with having no "good" arches. This was found for both denture wearers and non-denture wearers. Among non-denture wearers of both residence types, the need for urgent care was significantly associated with having no "good" arches.

  19. [Extended aortic arch replacement through gull-wing approach to Kommerell's diverticulum and aneurysmal right-sided aortic arch with aberrant left subclavian artery].

    PubMed

    Yasuhara, Kiyomitsu; Obayashi, Tamiyuki; Koyano, Tetsuya; Okonogi, Shuichi

    2011-09-01

    The patient was a 76-year-old man. He was referred to our hospital to treat Kommerell's diverticulum and aneurysmal right-sided aortic arch with aberrant left subclavian artery. We performed extended aortic arch replacement using gull-wing approach. He was discharged uneventfully without any complication. Gull-wing approach method has an advantage of wide surgical field and may be useful for extensive thoracic aortic disease.

  20. Cretaceous and Tertiary compressional tectonics as cause of Sabine arch, eastern Texas and northwestern Louisiana

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, M.L.W.; Laubach, S.E.

    1988-09-01

    The Sabine arch is a large (12,000 mi/sup 2/ or 31,080 km/sup 2/) low-amplitude anticline centered on the Texas-Louisiana border. A basement-cored feature formed in the Jurassic, the arch has been interpreted as (1) a Jurassic horst that persisted throughout the Cretaceous as a topographic relict of rifting, (2) a dome caused by deep-seated Cretaceous plutonism, and (3) a fold caused by regional tectonism. Using regional maps and cross sections derived from 811 well logs, they tested models of the Sabine arch origin by establishing arch movement history. Their results show that the horst and plutonic dome models do not adequately explain the cause of the Sabine arch.

  1. Imaging a boa constrictor--the incomplete double aortic arch syndrome.

    PubMed

    Narayan, Rajeev L; Kanwar, Anubhav; Jacobi, Adam; Sanz, Javier

    2012-11-01

    Incomplete double aortic arch is a rare anomaly resulting from atresia rather than complete involution in the distal left arch resulting in a non-patent fibrous cord between the left arch and descending thoracic aorta. This anatomic anomaly may cause symptomatic vascular rings, leading to stridor, wheezing, or dysphagia, requiring surgical transection of the fibrous cord. Herein, we describe an asymptomatic 59 year-old man presenting for contrast-enhanced CT angiography to assess cardiac anatomy prior to radiofrequency ablation, who was incidentally found to have an incomplete double aortic arch with hypoplasia of the left arch segment and an aortic diverticulum. Recognition of this abnormality by imaging is important to inform both corrective surgery in symptomatic patients, as well as assist in the planning of percutaneous coronary and vascular interventions.

  2. A shared role for sonic hedgehog signalling in patterning chondrichthyan gill arch appendages and tetrapod limbs.

    PubMed

    Gillis, J Andrew; Hall, Brian K

    2016-04-15

    Chondrichthyans (sharks, skates, rays and holocephalans) possess paired appendages that project laterally from their gill arches, known as branchial rays. This led Carl Gegenbaur to propose that paired fins (and hence tetrapod limbs) originally evolved via transformation of gill arches. Tetrapod limbs are patterned by asonic hedgehog(Shh)-expressing signalling centre known as the zone of polarising activity, which establishes the anteroposterior axis of the limb bud and maintains proliferative expansion of limb endoskeletal progenitors. Here, we use loss-of-function, label-retention and fate-mapping approaches in the little skate to demonstrate that Shh secretion from a signalling centre in the developing gill arches establishes gill arch anteroposterior polarity and maintains the proliferative expansion of branchial ray endoskeletal progenitor cells. These findings highlight striking parallels in the axial patterning mechanisms employed by chondrichthyan branchial rays and paired fins/limbs, and provide mechanistic insight into the anatomical foundation of Gegenbaur's gill arch hypothesis. PMID:27095494

  3. Abnormal aortic arch morphology in Turner syndrome patients is a risk factor for hypertension.

    PubMed

    De Groote, Katya; Devos, Daniël; Van Herck, Koen; Demulier, Laurent; Buysse, Wesley; De Schepper, Jean; De Wolf, Daniël

    2015-09-01

    Hypertension in Turner syndrome (TS) is a multifactorial, highly prevalent and significant problem that warrants timely diagnosis and rigorous treatment. The objective of this study was to investigate the association between abnormal aortic arch morphology and hypertension in adult TS patients. This was a single centre retrospective study in 74 adult TS patients (age 29.41 ± 8.91 years) who underwent a routine cardiac MRI. Patients were assigned to the hypertensive group (N = 31) if blood pressure exceeded 140/90 mmHg and/or if they were treated with antihypertensive medication. Aortic arch morphology was evaluated on MRI images and initially assigned as normal (N = 54) or abnormal (N = 20), based on the curve of the transverse arch and the distance between the left common carotid-left subclavian artery. We additionally used a new more objective method to describe aortic arch abnormality in TS by determination of the relative position of the highest point of the transverse arch (AoHP). Logistic regression analysis showed that hypertension is significantly and independently associated with age, BMI and abnormal arch morphology, with a larger effect size for the new AoHP method than for the classical method. TS patients with hypertension and abnormal arch morphology more often had dilatation of the ascending aorta. There is a significant association between abnormal arch morphology and hypertension in TS patients, independent of age and BMI, and not related to other structural heart disease. We suggest that aortic arch morphology should be included in the risk stratification for hypertension in TS and propose a new quantitative method to express aortic arch morphology.

  4. Frontal plane multi-segment foot kinematics in high- and low-arched females during dynamic loading tasks.

    PubMed

    Powell, Douglas W; Long, Benjamin; Milner, Clare E; Zhang, Songning

    2011-02-01

    The functions of the medial longitudinal arch have been the focus of much research in recent years. Several studies have shown kinematic differences between high- and low-arched runners. No literature currently compares the inter-segmental foot motion of high- and low-arched recreational athletes. The purpose of this study was to examine inter-segmental foot motion in the frontal plane during dynamic loading activities in high- and low-arched female athletes. Inter-segmental foot motions were examined in 10 high- and 10 low-arched female recreational athletes. Subjects performed five barefooted trials in each of the following randomized movements: walking, running, downward stepping and landing. Three-dimensional kinematic data were recorded. High-arched athletes had smaller peak ankle eversion angles in walking, running and downward stepping than low-arched athletes. At the rear-midfoot joint high-arched athletes reached peak eversion later in walking and downward stepping than the low-arched athletes. The high-arched athletes had smaller peak mid-forefoot eversion angles in walking, running and downward stepping than the low-arched athletes. The current findings show that differences in foot kinematics between the high- and low-arched athletes were in position and not range of motion within the foot.

  5. Reassessing the Dlx code: the genetic regulation of branchial arch skeletal pattern and development

    PubMed Central

    Depew, Michael J; Simpson, Carol A; Morasso, Maria; Rubenstein, John LR

    2005-01-01

    The branchial arches are meristic vertebrate structures, being metameric both between each other within the rostrocaudal series along the ventrocephalic surface of the embryonic head and within each individual arch: thus, just as each branchial arch must acquire a unique identity along the rostrocaudal axis, each structure within the proximodistal axis of an arch must also acquire a unique identity. It is believed that regional specification of metameric structures is controlled by the nested expression of related genes resulting in a regional code, a principal that is though to be demonstrated by the regulation of rostrocaudal axis development in animals exerted by the nested HOM-C/Hox homeobox genes. The nested expression pattern of the Dlx genes within the murine branchial arch ectomesenchyme has more recently led to the proposal of a Dlx code for the regional specification along the proximodistal axis of the branchial arches (i.e. it establishes intra-arch identity). This review re-examines this hypothesis, and presents new work on an allelic series of Dlx loss-of-function mouse mutants that includes various combinations of Dlx1, Dlx2, Dlx3, Dlx5 and Dlx6. Although we confirm fundamental aspects of the hypothesis, we further report a number of novel findings. First, contrary to initial reports, Dlx1, Dlx2 and Dlx1/2 heterozygotes exhibit alterations of branchial arch structures and Dlx2−/− and Dlx1/2−/− mutants have slight alterations of structures derived from the distal portions of their branchial arches. Second, we present evidence for a role for murine Dlx3 in the development of the branchial arches. Third, analysis of compound Dlx mutants reveals four grades of mandibular arch transformations and that the genetic interactions of cis first-order (e.g. Dlx5 and Dlx6), trans second-order (e.g. Dlx5 and Dlx2) and trans third-order paralogues (e.g. Dlx5 and Dlx1) result in significant and distinct morphological differences in mandibular arch development

  6. Angioleiomyoma of the Plantar-Medial Arch: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Baarini, Omar; Gilheany, Mark

    2016-07-01

    An angioleiomyoma is a benign soft tissue tumour that arises from smooth muscle layer of blood vessels. The true aetiology of these masses is largely unknown and quite often may not be associated with pain. This paper illustrates the occurrence of an angioleiomyoma in the medial arch of the foot, a previously unreported location. Significant delay occurred in the patient being referred for specialist consultation, after attending numerous general practitioners for management. This highlighted the need for ongoing publication for case reports of this nature. The patient underwent excision with no recurrence of the lesion reported at 12 months. Often masses of this type may be left alone. However, when symptomatic simple excision will suffice where no other surrounding complication exists and where the mass is well encapsulated in the sub cutaneous area. PMID:27630899

  7. Ortner's syndrome: Cardiovocal syndrome caused by aortic arch pseudoaneurysm.

    PubMed

    Al Kindi, Adil H; Al Kindi, Faiza A; Al Abri, Qasim S; Al Kemyani, Nasser A

    2016-10-01

    72-year-old hypertensive presented with two weeks history of left sided chest pain and hoarseness. Workup demonstrated a pseudoaneurysm in the lesser curvature of the distal aortic arch opposite the origin of the left subclavian artery from a penetrating atherosclerotic ulcer. Following a left carotid-subclavian bypass, endovascular stenting of the aorta was performed excluding the pseudoaneurysm. Patient had excellent angiographic results post-stenting. Follow up at 12 weeks demonstrated complete resolution of his symptoms and good stent position with no endo-leak. Ortner's syndrome describes vocal changes caused by cardiovascular pathology. It should be included in the differential diagnosis of patients with cardiovascular risk factors presenting with hoarseness. This case demonstrates the use of endovascular stents to treat the causative pathology with resolution of symptoms. In expert hands, it represents low risk, minimally invasive therapeutic strategy with excellent early results in patients who are high risk for open procedure. PMID:27688676

  8. Angioleiomyoma of the Plantar-Medial Arch: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Gilheany, Mark

    2016-01-01

    An angioleiomyoma is a benign soft tissue tumour that arises from smooth muscle layer of blood vessels. The true aetiology of these masses is largely unknown and quite often may not be associated with pain. This paper illustrates the occurrence of an angioleiomyoma in the medial arch of the foot, a previously unreported location. Significant delay occurred in the patient being referred for specialist consultation, after attending numerous general practitioners for management. This highlighted the need for ongoing publication for case reports of this nature. The patient underwent excision with no recurrence of the lesion reported at 12 months. Often masses of this type may be left alone. However, when symptomatic simple excision will suffice where no other surrounding complication exists and where the mass is well encapsulated in the sub cutaneous area. PMID:27630899

  9. Relationship between lumbar changes and modifications in the plantar arch in women with low back pain

    PubMed Central

    Borges, Cláudia dos Santos; Fernandes, Luciane Fernanda Rodrigues Martinho; Bertoncello, Dernival

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE : Evaluate the probable relationship among plantar arch, lumbar curvature, and low back pain. METHODS : Fifteen healthy women were assessed taking in account personal data and anthropometric measurements, photopodoscopic evaluation of the plantar arch, and biophotogrammetric postural analysis of the patient (both using the SAPO software), as well as evaluation of lumbar pain using a Visual Analog Scale (VAS). The average age of the participants was 30.45 (±6.25) years. RESULTS : Of the feet evaluated, there were six individuals with flat feet, five with high arch, and four with normal feet. All reported algic syndrome in the lumbar spine, with the highest VAS values for the volunteers with high arch. Correlation was observed between the plantar arch and the angle of the lumbar spine (r = -0.71, p = 0.004) Conclusion: High arch was correlated with more intense algic syndrome, while there was moderate positive correlation between flat foot and increased lumbar curvature, and between high arch and lumbar correction. Level of Evidence IV. Case Series. PMID:24453656

  10. Long-term changes in arch form after orthodontic treatment and retention.

    PubMed

    de la Cruz, A; Sampson, P; Little, R M; Artun, J; Shapiro, P A

    1995-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the long-term stability of orthodontically induced changes in maxillary and mandibular arch form. Dental casts were evaluated before treatment, after treatment, and a minimum of 10 years after retention for 45 patients with Class I and 42 Class II, Division 1 malocclusions who received four first premolar extraction treatment. Computer generated arch forms were used to assess changes in arch shape over time. Buccal cusp tips of first molars, premolars, and canines plus mesial, distal, and central incisal aspects of incisors were marked, photocopied, and digitized in a standardized manner. An algorithm was used to fit conic sections to the digitized points. The shape of the fitted conics at each time period was described by calculating the parameter eccentricity; a small value represented a more rounded shape and a larger value represented a more tapered shape. Findings demonstrated a rounding of arch form during treatment followed by a change to more tapered. Arch form tended to return toward the pretreatment shape after retention. The greater the treatment change, the greater the tendency for postretention change. However, individual variation was considerable. The patient's pretreatment arch form appeared to be the best guide to future arch form stability, but minimizing treatment change was no guarantee of postretention stability.

  11. Footprint-based estimates of arch structure are confounded by body composition in adults.

    PubMed

    Wearing, Scott C; Grigg, Nicole L; Lau, Hin C; Smeathers, James E

    2012-08-01

    Previous research employing indirect measures of arch structure, such as those derived from footprints, have indicated that obesity results in a "flatter" foot type. In the absence of radiographic measures, however, definitive conclusions regarding the osseous alignment of the foot cannot be made. We determined the effect of body mass index (BMI) on radiographic and footprint-based measures of arch structure. The research was a cross-sectional study in which radiographic and footprint-based measures of foot structure were made in 30 subjects (10 males, 20 female) in addition to standard anthropometric measures of height, weight, and BMI. Multiple (univariate) regression analysis demonstrated that both BMI (β = 0.39, t(26) = 2.12, p = 0.04) and radiographic arch alignment (β = 0.51, t(26) = 3.32, p < 0.01) were significant predictors of footprint-based measures of arch height after controlling for all variables in the model (R(2) = 0.59, F(3,26) = 12.3, p < 0.01). In contrast, radiographic arch alignment was not significantly associated with BMI (β = -0.03, t(26) = -0.13, p = 0.89) when Arch Index and age were held constant (R(2) = 0.52, F(3,26) = 9.3, p < 0.01). Adult obesity does not influence osseous alignment of the medial longitudinal arch, but selectively distorts footprint-based measures of arch structure. Footprint-based measures of arch structure should be interpreted with caution when comparing groups of varying body composition.

  12. The Role of Arch Compression and Metatarsophalangeal Joint Dynamics in Modulating Plantar Fascia Strain in Running.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Kirsty A; Stearne, Sarah M; Alderson, Jacqueline A; North, Ian; Pires, Neville J; Rubenson, Jonas

    2016-01-01

    Elastic energy returned from passive-elastic structures of the lower limb is fundamental in lowering the mechanical demand on muscles during running. The purpose of this study was to investigate the two length-modulating mechanisms of the plantar fascia, namely medial longitudinal arch compression and metatarsophalangeal joint (MPJ) excursion, and to determine how these mechanisms modulate strain, and thus elastic energy storage/return of the plantar fascia during running. Eighteen runners (9 forefoot and 9 rearfoot strike) performed three treadmill running trials; unrestricted shod, shod with restricted arch compression (via an orthotic-style insert), and barefoot. Three-dimensional motion capture and ground reaction force data were used to calculate lower limb kinematics and kinetics including MPJ angles, moments, powers and work. Estimates of plantar fascia strain due to arch compression and MPJ excursion were derived using a geometric model of the arch and a subject-specific musculoskeletal model of the plantar fascia, respectively. The plantar fascia exhibited a typical elastic stretch-shortening cycle with the majority of strain generated via arch compression. This strategy was similar in fore- and rear-foot strike runners. Restricting arch compression, and hence the elastic-spring function of the arch, was not compensated for by an increase in MPJ-derived strain. In the second half of stance the plantar fascia was found to transfer energy between the MPJ (energy absorption) and the arch (energy production during recoil). This previously unreported energy transfer mechanism reduces the strain required by the plantar fascia in generating useful positive mechanical work at the arch during running.

  13. The Role of Arch Compression and Metatarsophalangeal Joint Dynamics in Modulating Plantar Fascia Strain in Running.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Kirsty A; Stearne, Sarah M; Alderson, Jacqueline A; North, Ian; Pires, Neville J; Rubenson, Jonas

    2016-01-01

    Elastic energy returned from passive-elastic structures of the lower limb is fundamental in lowering the mechanical demand on muscles during running. The purpose of this study was to investigate the two length-modulating mechanisms of the plantar fascia, namely medial longitudinal arch compression and metatarsophalangeal joint (MPJ) excursion, and to determine how these mechanisms modulate strain, and thus elastic energy storage/return of the plantar fascia during running. Eighteen runners (9 forefoot and 9 rearfoot strike) performed three treadmill running trials; unrestricted shod, shod with restricted arch compression (via an orthotic-style insert), and barefoot. Three-dimensional motion capture and ground reaction force data were used to calculate lower limb kinematics and kinetics including MPJ angles, moments, powers and work. Estimates of plantar fascia strain due to arch compression and MPJ excursion were derived using a geometric model of the arch and a subject-specific musculoskeletal model of the plantar fascia, respectively. The plantar fascia exhibited a typical elastic stretch-shortening cycle with the majority of strain generated via arch compression. This strategy was similar in fore- and rear-foot strike runners. Restricting arch compression, and hence the elastic-spring function of the arch, was not compensated for by an increase in MPJ-derived strain. In the second half of stance the plantar fascia was found to transfer energy between the MPJ (energy absorption) and the arch (energy production during recoil). This previously unreported energy transfer mechanism reduces the strain required by the plantar fascia in generating useful positive mechanical work at the arch during running. PMID:27054319

  14. The Role of Arch Compression and Metatarsophalangeal Joint Dynamics in Modulating Plantar Fascia Strain in Running

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, Kirsty A.; Stearne, Sarah M.; Alderson, Jacqueline A.; North, Ian; Pires, Neville J.; Rubenson, Jonas

    2016-01-01

    Elastic energy returned from passive-elastic structures of the lower limb is fundamental in lowering the mechanical demand on muscles during running. The purpose of this study was to investigate the two length-modulating mechanisms of the plantar fascia, namely medial longitudinal arch compression and metatarsophalangeal joint (MPJ) excursion, and to determine how these mechanisms modulate strain, and thus elastic energy storage/return of the plantar fascia during running. Eighteen runners (9 forefoot and 9 rearfoot strike) performed three treadmill running trials; unrestricted shod, shod with restricted arch compression (via an orthotic-style insert), and barefoot. Three-dimensional motion capture and ground reaction force data were used to calculate lower limb kinematics and kinetics including MPJ angles, moments, powers and work. Estimates of plantar fascia strain due to arch compression and MPJ excursion were derived using a geometric model of the arch and a subject-specific musculoskeletal model of the plantar fascia, respectively. The plantar fascia exhibited a typical elastic stretch-shortening cycle with the majority of strain generated via arch compression. This strategy was similar in fore- and rear-foot strike runners. Restricting arch compression, and hence the elastic-spring function of the arch, was not compensated for by an increase in MPJ-derived strain. In the second half of stance the plantar fascia was found to transfer energy between the MPJ (energy absorption) and the arch (energy production during recoil). This previously unreported energy transfer mechanism reduces the strain required by the plantar fascia in generating useful positive mechanical work at the arch during running. PMID:27054319

  15. Origin and structural development of the LaSalle Arch, Louisiana

    SciTech Connect

    Lawless, P.N. )

    1990-05-01

    The LaSalle arch is a basement high separating the Louisiana and Mississippi interior salt basins. Using reflection seismic data, an area located on the southern end of the LaSalle arch was shown to be composed of relict Paleozoic continental crust that was left behind and partially rifted during the breakup of Pangea during the Triassic. Rifting preferentially occurred to the north of a Paleozoic thrust fault nose, and crustal extension took place in a northeast-southwest direction. The LaSalle arch, as seen in post-Triassic stratigraphy, formed by a two-part process. The western limb developed syndepositionally due to differential subsidence, and the eastern limb developed due to relative regional tilting to the east after deposition of the Claibornian Sparta Formation. The LaSalle arch acted as only a minor impediment to sediment transport with a very low relief except during the Tayloran Stage of the Upper Cretaceous. A single truncational unconformity in post-Triassic stratigraphy is present in the Taylora Demopolis Formation, indicating a period of relatively major uplift by the LaSalle arch. This contrast, with the Sabine arch in eastern Texas; the Sabine arch experienced uplift during the Eagle Fordian and Sabinian stages. A recently proposed hypothesis calling for overthrusting in the Western Cordillera as the mechanism for uplift on the Sabine arch cannot explain movement of the LaSalle arch because horizontal stress would predict synchronous uplift of basement highs. A more satisfactory uplift mechanism calls upon lateral heat flow from the mantle as the driving force for uplift.

  16. Ultraviolet Events Observed in Active Regions. 2; An Interpretation of Flaring Arches and Associated Small Flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fontenla, J.; Rovira, M.; Tandberg-Hanssen, E.

    1997-01-01

    We analyze Hz, UV, and X-ray emissions in and around the spectacular arch system seen in the corona on 1980 March 27 during the Solar Maximum Mission. The flaring of the arch plasma is studied, and its dependence on triggering mechanisms related to the observed small limb flare in the arch footpoint is analyzed. To drive these events, we propose a mechanism in which small electric current circuits and the localized magnetic free energy are continuously generated at a magnetic null by a pressure gradient, which then compress or expand the plasma. This free energy dissipates by Joule effect and upward transport.

  17. Feeding an infant with high arched palate by high flow rate bottle nipple.

    PubMed

    Eren, Abdulkadir; Bilgin, Huseyin; Kara, Semra

    2015-01-01

    For infants with high arched palate, feeding is one of the most immediate challenges faced by parents and caretakers. General suggestions for feeding in infants with cleft palate may be adapted to infants with high arched palate. These include oral feeding facilitation techniques and special feeding tools. Here we present a newborn with a high arched palate and serious feeding problems who was fed easily by a large size and a large hole nipple, ordinarily used for infants older than 6 months, instead of specialized feeding equipment.

  18. Influence of Process Parameters on Forming of Arched Aircraft Skin with Aluminum Alloy 2024

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Huajun; Zhang, Shuangjie; Gao, Ying

    To solve these problems such as easily springback and hardly controlling the loading direction when arched aircraft skin is formed, stretch forming of steel plate with aluminium alloy 2024 was simulated by the finite element software Abaqus, and the shape of the stretch forming die was the arc with radius 350mm. The influence of process parameters, such as stretch forming track and dangling length on forming of arched aircraft skin was researched, and the reasonable range of stretch forming length track and dangling length was given. The results have significance for research the forming law of arched aircraft skin.

  19. Anomalous Origin of the Left Vertebral Artery from the Aortic Arch

    PubMed Central

    Einstein, Evan H.; Song, Linda H.; Villela, Natalia L. A.; Fasani-Feldberg, Gregory B.; Jacobs, Jonathan L.; Kim, Dolly O.; Nathawat, Akshay; Patel, Devika; Bender, Roger B.; Peters, Daniel F.

    2016-01-01

    Anatomic anomalies of the aortic arch have implications for clinical practice if their significance is understood. Our case study involves a cadaveric finding of the left vertebral artery originating directly from the aortic arch. Although this anatomical variation has been documented, the prevalence of this anomaly may be generally underestimated. After noting this anomaly, we analyzed 27 cases and found that four female cadavers had the left vertebral artery originating from the aortic arch rather than the left subclavian artery. With a prevalence rate of 14.8%, it would seem that this anomaly is more significant than previously thought, which could have implications for surgical practice. PMID:27757404

  20. Hybrid Endovascular Repair for an Arch Aneurysm Combined with Aberrant Right Subclavian Artery

    PubMed Central

    Higashiue, Shinichi; Kuroyanagi, Satoshi; Furuya, Onichi; Naito, Shiho; Kojima, Saburo

    2015-01-01

    This report describes a hybrid endovascular approach to a 9.3-cm saccular aneurysm of the left sided aortic arch combined with an aberrant right subclavian artery. The two-step procedure consisted of a bilateral carotid-subclavian bypass, followed by an ascending aorta-bicarotid bypass and completed by an endovascular exclusion of the aneurysm by covering the whole aortic arch and its branches. The patient had no postoperative complications and was discharged 10 postoperative day. Hybrid procedures may be useful in complex aortic arch pathologies and may reduce postoperative complications in comparison with conventional open surgery. PMID:25848437

  1. Primary complete repair of partial double aortic arch and Kommerell diverticulum.

    PubMed

    Kleine, Peter; Balci, Mustafa; Moritz, Anton

    2011-02-01

    Tracheal and esophageal stenosis caused by double aortic arch and Kommerell diverticulum is a rare but important pathologic entity in adult patients. Clinical symptoms are caused by esophageal or tracheal stenosis, or both. The present article describes a surgical method of complete repair with division of the rudimentary left arch, resection of the diverticulum, and transposition of the left subclavian artery. This method was transferred from pediatric patients and led to excellent clinical results in 2 consecutive adult patients compared with the previous technique with division of the left arch alone.

  2. Congenital Anomalies of the Aortic Arch: Evaluation with the Use of Multidetector Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Büyükbayraktar, Fatma Gül; Ölçer, Tülay; Cumhur, Turhan

    2009-01-01

    Congenital anomalies of the aortic arch have clinical importance, as the anomalies may be associated with vascular rings or other congenital cardiovascular diseases. Multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) angiography enables one to display the detailed anatomy of vascular structures and the spatial relationships with adjacent organs; this ability is the greatest advantage of the use of MDCT angiography in comparison to other imaging modalities in the evaluation of the congenital anomalies of the aortic arch. In this review article, we illustrate 16-slice MDCT angiography appearances of congenital anomalies of the aortic arch. PMID:19270864

  3. Arched-outer-race ball-bearing analysis considering centrifugal forces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamrock, B. J.; Anderson, W. J.

    1972-01-01

    A first-order thrust load analysis that considers centrifugal forces but which neglects gyroscopics, elastohydrodynamics, and thermal effects was performed. The analysis was applied to a 150-mm-bore angular-contact ball bearing. Fatigue life, contact loads, and contact angles are shown for conventional and arched bearings. The results indicate that an arched bearing is highly desirable for high-speed applications. In particular, at an applied load of 4448 n (1000 lb) and a DN value of 3 million (20,000 rpm) the arched bearing shows an improvement in life of 306 percent over that of a conventional bearing.

  4. [Traumatic injury of the proximal aortic arch after blunt chest trauma;report of a case].

    PubMed

    Kato, Masanori; Sugimura, Yukiharu

    2015-02-01

    We report a rare case of an proximal aortic arch injury caused by blunt chest trauma. A 48-year-old woman was transferred to our hospital because of traffic accident. Computed tomography (CT) showed a small ulcer-like projection (ULP) at the proximal part of the aortic arch. An elective surgery for aortic repair was performed because of significant enlargement of the ULP in the aortic arch revealed by follow-up CT. The patient's postoperative course was uneventful, and she was discharged on the 14th postoperative day.

  5. Maxillary versus mandibular arch form differences in human permanent dentition assessed by Euclidean-distance matrix analysis.

    PubMed

    Ferrario, V F; Sforza, C; Miani, A; Tartaglia, G

    1994-02-01

    Euclidean-distance matrix analysis (EDMA) was used to analyse the dental arch form in 50 men and 45 women aged 20-27 yr with sound dentitions. Fourteen landmarks, corresponding to the centres of gravity (centroids) of the occlusal surfaces of all permanent teeth (right second molar to left second molar), were identified on the dental casts of subjects. All the possible linear distances between pairs of teeth were computed and maxillary/mandibular arch differences within sex were tested by EDMA. In both sexes, the maxillary arch was larger than the mandibular arch; arch shape was also significantly different. All teeth contributed to the shape difference between arches regardless of gender. EDMA also separated the influence of anterior and posterior teeth in the determination of upper/lower arch characteristics.

  6. Dental arch changes associated with rapid maxillary expansion: A retrospective model analysis study

    PubMed Central

    D’Souza, Ivor M; Kumar, H. C. Kiran; Shetty, K. Sadashiva

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Transverse deficiency of the maxilla is a common clinical problem in orthodontics and dentofacial orthopedics. Transverse maxillary deficiency, isolated or associated with other dentofacial deformities, results in esthetic and functional impairment giving rise to several clinical manifestations such as asymmetrical facial growth, positional and functional mandibular deviations, altered dentofacial esthetics, adverse periodontal responses, unstable dental tipping, and other functional problems. Orthopedic maxillary expansion is the preferred treatment approach to increase the maxillary transverse dimension in young patients by splitting of the mid palatal suture. This orthopedic procedure has lately been subject of renewed interest in orthodontic treatment mechanics because of its potential for increasing arch perimeter to alleviate crowding in the maxillary arch without adversely affecting facial profile. Hence, the present investigation was conducted to establish a correlation between transverse expansion and changes in the arch perimeter, arch width and arch length. Methods: For this purpose, 10 subjects (five males, five females) were selected who had been treated by rapid maxillary expansion (RME) using hyrax rapid palatal expander followed by fixed mechanotherapy (PEA). Pretreatment (T1), postexpansion (T2), and posttreatment (T3) dental models were compared for dental changes brought about by RME treatment and its stability at the end of fixed mechanotherapy. After model measurements were made, the changes between T1–T2, T2–T3 and T1–T3 were determined for each patient. The mean difference between T1–T2, T2–T3 and T1–T3 were compared to assess the effects of RME on dental arch measurements. Results are expressed as mean ± standard deviation and are compared by repeated measures analysis of variance followed by a post-hoc test. Arch perimeter changes are correlated with changes in arch widths at the canine, premolar and molar regions

  7. 21. VIEW FROM INTERIOR OF 2ND FLOOR ARCHED WINDOW WITH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    21. VIEW FROM INTERIOR OF 2ND FLOOR ARCHED WINDOW WITH HOLLOW STEEL SASH AND POLISHED PLATE WIRE GLASS. THIS WINDOW IS AT THE FRONT OF THE BUILDING. - Pacific Telephone & Telegraph Company Building, 1519 Franklin Street, Oakland, Alameda County, CA

  8. Arch of the foot and postural balance in young judokas and peers.

    PubMed

    Jankowicz-Szymanska, Agnieszka; Mikolajczyk, Edyta; Wardzala, Robert

    2015-09-01

    Twenty-nine male judocas and nontraining peers participated in this study. The arch of the foot (as Clarke's angular values) was measured under non-weight-bearing conditions in two-leg and one-leg stands. Postural balance was assessed by the Flamingo balance test. Judocas presented better static balance and higher arches of the foot. Significant differences in Clarke's angular values in a sitting and standing on two-leg position were found in both groups. After transition to a one-leg stand, the height of the arches of the foot in nontraining participants was still significantly decreased. Weight bearing did not affect Clarke's angular values in judokas. A correlation was found between the Flamingo test and Clarke's angle. Better balance was observed in adolescents with higher arch of the foot. PMID:26110217

  9. 2. South elevation, (1r) arches CD and DE. View north ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. South elevation, (1-r) arches C-D and D-E. View north - Ashton Viaduct, State Route 116 (Washington Highway) spanning Blackstone River, Blackstone Canal, & Providence & Worcester Railroad, Ashton, Providence County, RI

  10. 3. South elevation, (1r) arches DE and EF. View north ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. South elevation, (1-r) arches D-E and E-F. View north - Ashton Viaduct, State Route 116 (Washington Highway) spanning Blackstone River, Blackstone Canal, & Providence & Worcester Railroad, Ashton, Providence County, RI

  11. 13. Photograph of archItectural competition drawing; original in the possession ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. Photograph of archItectural competition drawing; original in the possession of the Pennsylvania Hospital. John Haviland, architect, December 1833. PLAN OF THE BASEMENT - Pennsylvania Hospital, Eighth & Ninth, Pine & Spruce Streets, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  12. Exterior building details of Building D, west façade: brick arch ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Exterior building details of Building D, west façade: brick arch lintel over historic entry that was brick infilled; easterly view - San Quentin State Prison, Building 22, Point San Quentin, San Quentin, Marin County, CA

  13. Right aortic arch with aberrant left innominate artery arising from Kommerell's diverticulum*

    PubMed Central

    Faistauer, Ângela; Torres, Felipe Soares; Faccin, Carlo Sasso

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of an uncommon thoracic aorta anomaly-right aortic arch with aberrant left innominate artery arising from Kommerell's diverticulum-that went undiagnosed until adulthood. PMID:27777481

  14. A novel case of L-transposition with a right-dominant double aortic arch.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, David J; Glatz, Jenifer; Weinberg, Paul M; Gillespie, Matthew J

    2009-01-01

    We describe a case of congenitally corrected transposition with a double aortic arch. This unique combination of lesions highlights the importance of a complete anatomic assessment prior to referral for surgery. PMID:19664032

  15. Collapse displacements for a mechanism of spreading-induced supports in a masonry arch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coccia, Simona; Di Carlo, Fabio; Rinaldi, Zila

    2015-09-01

    Masonry arch systems and vaulted structures constitute a structural typology widely spread in the historical building heritage. Small displacements of the supports, due to different causes, among which subsidence of foundation systems or movements of underlying structures can lead the masonry arch to a condition of collapse because of gradual change in its geometry. This paper presents a tool, based on a kinematic approach, for the computation of the magnitude of the displacements that cause the collapse of circular arches subject to dead loads, and allows the evaluation of the related thrust value. A parametric study has been carried out in order to develop a deeper understanding of the influence of the involved parameters. In addition, analytic formulations of the maximum allowed displacement and the associated thrust are proposed. Finally, a case study related to the behavior of a masonry arch on spreading-induced abutments is undertaken and discussed.

  16. 10. DETAIL VIEW OF BRIDGE DECK, SHOWING TYPICAL VERTICAL/OUTRIDER, ARCH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. DETAIL VIEW OF BRIDGE DECK, SHOWING TYPICAL VERTICAL/OUTRIDER, ARCH SEGMENT AND DIAGONALS, LOOKING NORTH - Davis Bridge, Spanning Upper Iowa River at County Road 16, Lime Springs, Howard County, IA

  17. APPLICATION EFFECT OF SHEAR PANEL DAMPERS TO SEISMIC RETROFIT OF A NETWORK ARCH BRIDGE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugioka, Koichi; Shima, Kenji; Matsushita, Hiroaki

    This article describes seismic response control design using shear panel dampers for a network arch bridge. Three-dimensional non-linear dynamic time history analyses were carried out considering site-specific earthquake ground motions, to examine the correlation between shear panel damper arrangements and seismic response reductions. Different effects on seismic response reduction were significantly confirmed by the shear panel damper arrangements, and also compared between two arch bridges with different natural periods.

  18. Dentures as Learning Materials for Maxillomandibular Fixation by Erich Arch Bars.

    PubMed

    Aksam, Ersin; Aksam, Berrak

    2016-03-01

    Maxillomandibular fixation with Erich arch bars is an economic method for handling mandibular fractures. Unfortunately, this method has some disadvantages, such as long operating time, periodontal trauma, and risk of puncture injury to the operator. To overcome these disadvantages, we propose teaching the pits and pearls of maxillomandibular fixation with Erich arch bars to trainees using dentures of a patient. Experiencing the method on dentures will shorten the learning curve.

  19. Continuum analysis of common branching patterns in the human arch of the aorta.

    PubMed

    Zamir, M; Sinclair, P

    1990-01-01

    A model is proposed for describing common variations in the arrangement of branches on the arch of the human aorta, and the model is used to analyze data from 123 human arches. The analysis allows the observed variations to fall freely along a continuous spectrum, rather than be confined to discrete categories as is commonly done at present. The results thus describe these variations in a more natural way and throw some new light on their likely source.

  20. Stress analysis in a layered aortic arch model under pulsatile blood flow

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Feng; Watanabe, Masahiro; Matsuzawa, Teruo

    2006-01-01

    Background Many cardiovascular diseases, such as aortic dissection, frequently occur on the aortic arch and fluid-structure interactions play an important role in the cardiovascular system. Mechanical stress is crucial in the functioning of the cardiovascular system; therefore, stress analysis is a useful tool for understanding vascular pathophysiology. The present study is concerned with the stress distribution in a layered aortic arch model with interaction between pulsatile flow and the wall of the blood vessel. Methods A three-dimensional (3D) layered aortic arch model was constructed based on the aortic wall structure and arch shape. The complex mechanical interaction between pulsatile blood flow and wall dynamics in the aortic arch model was simulated by means of computational loose coupling fluid-structure interaction analyses. Results The results showed the variations of mechanical stress along the outer wall of the arch during the cardiac cycle. Variations of circumferential stress are very similar to variations of pressure. Composite stress in the aortic wall plane is high at the ascending portion of the arch and along the top of the arch, and is higher in the media than in the intima and adventitia across the wall thickness. Conclusion Our analysis indicates that circumferential stress in the aortic wall is directly associated with blood pressure, supporting the clinical importance of blood pressure control. High stress in the aortic wall could be a risk factor in aortic dissections. Our numerical layered aortic model may prove useful for biomechanical analyses and for studying the pathogeneses of aortic dissection. PMID:16630365

  1. Integrated Design and Production Reference Integration with ArchGenXML V1.00

    SciTech Connect

    Barter, R H

    2004-07-20

    ArchGenXML is a tool that allows easy creation of Zope products through the use of Archetypes. The Integrated Design and Production Reference (IDPR) should be highly configurable in order to meet the needs of a diverse engineering community. Ease of configuration is key to the success of IDPR. The purpose of this paper is to describe a method of using a UML diagram editor to configure IDPR through ArchGenXML and Archetypes.

  2. Siphon flows in isolated magnetic flux tubes. 3: The equilibrium path of the flux tube arch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, John H.; Montesinis, Benjamin

    1989-01-01

    The arched equilibrium path of a thin magnetic flux tube in a plane-stratified, nonmagnetic atmosphere is calculated for cases in which the flux tube contains a steady siphon flow. The large scale mechanical equilibrium of the flux tube involves a balance among the magnetic buoyancy force, the net magnetic tension force due to the curvature of the flux tube axis, and the inertial (centrifugal) force due to the siphon flow along curved streamlines. The ends of the flux tube are assumed to be pinned down by some other external force. Both isothermal and adiabatic siphon flows are considered for flux tubes in an isothermal external atmosphere. For the isothermal case, in the absence of a siphon flow the equilibrium path reduces to the static arch calculated by Parker (1975, 1979). The presence of a siphon flow causes the flux tube arch to bend more sharply, so that magnetic tension can overcome the additional straightening effect of the inertial force, and reduces the maximum width of the arch. The curvature of the arch increases as the siphon flow speed increases. For a critical siphon flow, with supercritical flow in the downstream leg, the arch is asymmetric, with greater curvature in the downstream leg of the arch. Adiabatic flow have qualitatively similar effects, except that adiabatic cooling reduces the buoyancy of the flux tube and thus leads to significantly wider arches. In some cases the cooling is strong enough to create negative buoyancy along sections of the flux tube, requiring upward curvature of the flux tube path along these sections and sometimes leading to unusual equilibrium paths of periodic, sinusoidal form.

  3. Evaluation of arch width variations among different skeletal patterns in South Indian population

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Mandava; Kannampallil, Senny Thomas; Talapaneni, Ashok Kumar; George, Suja Ani; Shetty, Sharath Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Background: Anterior cranial base can be taken as a reference line (SN) to determine the steepness of mandibular plane. Subjects with high mandibular plane angle tend to have a long face and one with low MP-SN angle has a shorter face. Objective: This study was done to investigate if dental arch widths correlated with vertical facial types and if there are any differences in arch widths between untreated male and female adults in South Indian population. Materials and Methods: Lateral cephalogram and dental casts were obtained from 180 untreated South Indian adults (90 males and 90 females) above 18 year old with no cross bite, minimal crowding and spacing. The angle between the anterior cranial base and the mandibular plane was measured on lateral cephalogram of each patient. Dental casts were used to obtain comprehensive dental measurements including maxillary and mandibular inter canine, inter premolar and inter molar widths, as well as amount of crowding or spacing. Results: The results showed that male arch widths were significantly larger than those of females (P < 0.05) and there was a significant decrease in inter arch width as the MP-SN angle increased in untreated adult South Indian population. The results obtained in our study when compared with studies done in other population groups showed that there is difference in inter arch widths according to ethnicity and race. Conclusion: It was concluded that the dental arch width is associated with gender, race and vertical facial morphology. Thus using individualized arch wires according to each patient's pre treatment arch form and width is suggested during orthodontic treatment. PMID:23633842

  4. Right-sided Aortic Arch with Aberrant Left Subclavian Artery from Kommerell's Diverticulum.

    PubMed

    Mubarak, M Y; Kamarul, A T; Noordini, M D

    2011-09-01

    A previously healthy 52-year-old man had a chest radiograph for medical check-up and found to have a right-sided aortic arch. Computed tomography of the thorax revealed a right-sided aortic arch with aberrant left subclavian artery originated from Kommerell's diverticulum. Barium swallow examination showed compression of the posterior wall of the esophagus. He was asymptomatic and no surgical intervention was performed.

  5. Aortic Arch Aneurysms: Treatment with Extra anatomical Bypass and Endovascular Stent-Grafting

    SciTech Connect

    Kato, Noriyuki; Shimono, Takatsugu; Hirano, Tadanori; Mizumoto, Toru; Ishida, Masaki; Fujii, Hideki; Yada, Isao; Takeda, Kan

    2002-10-15

    Endovascular repair of thoracic aortic aneurysms is emerging as an attractive alternative to surgical graft replacement. However,patients with aortic arch aneurysms are often excluded from the target of endovascular repair because of lack of suitable landing zones, especially at the proximal ones. In this paper we describe our method for treating patients with aortic arch aneurysms using a combination of extra anatomical bypass surgery and endovascular stent-grafting.

  6. Correlation Between Dental Arch Width and Sagittal Dento-Skeletal Morphology in Untreated Adults

    PubMed Central

    Shahroudi, Atefe Saffar; Etezadi, Tahura

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Dental arch form is one of the most important characteristics of dentition. However, this dimension usually receives less attention in diagnosis or treatment planning and orthodontic patients are traditionally classified with regard to their sagittal characteristics. The objectives of this study were to investigate if a relationship exists between the dental arch width (transverse dimension) and sagittal skeletal and dental parameters in orthodontic patients. Materials and Methods: Dental casts and lateral cephalograms of 108 consecutive untreated Iranian patients (47 males and 61 females) between 16 and 31 years of age were evaluated. Arch width (AW) parameters including upper and lower inter-molar width (UIMW and LIMW) and upper and lower inter-canine width (UICW and LICW) were measured by a digital caliper. Sagittal parameters included SNA and SNB angle and Wits’ appraisal obtained from lateral cephalograms in addition to upper and lower arch length (UAL and LAL) obtained from dental casts. The correlation between the aforementioned parameters was evaluated applying Pearson correlation coefficients. Molar and canine relationship according to Angle’s classification was also recorded and the means of all parameters were compared between three occlusal relationship classes and two gender groups by means of two-way ANOVA. Results: According to statistical analysis a significant positive correlation between sagittal parameters and arch width measures exists between SNA and UICW and between LICW and LAL. Upper and lower ICW were significantly correlated, the relationship between upper and lower IMW and between UAL and LAL were significant. Among sagittal measures, both UAL and LAL were correlated with the ANB angle. The means of arch width parameters in three occlusal classes were not significantly different. Conclusion: The only significant correlation between arch width and sagittal parameters existed between UICW and SNA angle and between LICW and

  7. A remnant left aortic arch and a right aortic arch as well as Kommerell's diverticulum with an aberrant left subclavian artery.

    PubMed

    Akita, Masafumi; Urashima, Kyoko

    2011-01-01

    We report the case of a 63-year-old woman who had dysphagia and dyspnea for one year. Enhanced computed tomography revealed that she had an ascending aortic dorsal projection and a right aortic arch as well as Kommerell's diverticulum (KD) with an aberrant left subclavian artery (LSA). Her KD compressed her trachea and esophagus. We cut her aorta just distal to the KD and performed an ascending and total arch replacement through a midsternotomy. The LSA was reconstructed in front of her trachea. Her dysphagia and dyspnea disappeared following the operation and her postoperative course was uneventful.

  8. Relationship of difficult forceps delivery to dental arches and occlusion.

    PubMed

    Pirttiniemi, P; Grön, M; Alvesalo, L; Heikkinen, T; Osborne, R

    1994-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between the extensive use of forceps procedures during delivery and later occlusal characteristics. The work uses data collected in National Collaborative Perinatal Research Project (USA), in which more than 60,000 pregnancies and the children's health were followed by regular medical tests and examinations. Of these, a subsample of 2,074 children participated in dental examinations, including the production of dental casts with wax bites to register occlusion. A total of 84 children, 55 boys and 29 girls, were coded as having undergone difficult or very difficult forceps deliveries. A control group was matched by age, sex, race, and site of dental examination. The results show a significant increase in asymmetric molar occlusion (P < 0.005) and canine relations (P < 0.001) in the study group. The sagittal length of the mandibular arch was increased in the difficult forceps delivery group (P < 0.01). In conclusion, difficult forceps procedures are associated with a later asymmetric occlusion.

  9. Goal-directed-perfusion in neonatal aortic arch surgery

    PubMed Central

    Purbojo, Ariawan; Muench, Frank; Juengert, Joerg; Rueffer, André

    2016-01-01

    Reduction of mortality and morbidity in congenital cardiac surgery has always been and remains a major target for the complete team involved. As operative techniques are more and more standardized and refined, surgical risk and associated complication rates have constantly been reduced to an acceptable level but are both still present. Aortic arch surgery in neonates seems to be of particular interest, because perfusion techniques differ widely among institutions and an ideal form of a so called “total body perfusion (TBP)” is somewhat difficult to achieve. Thus concepts of deep hypothermic circulatory arrest (DHCA), regional cerebral perfusion (RCP/with cardioplegic cardiac arrest or on the perfused beating heart) and TBP exist in parallel and all carry an individual risk for organ damage related to perfusion management, chosen core temperature and time on bypass. Patient safety relies more and more on adequate end organ perfusion on cardiopulmonary bypass, especially sensitive organs like the brain, heart, kidney, liver and the gut, whereby on adequate tissue protection, temperature management and oxygen delivery should be visualized and monitored. PMID:27709094

  10. Addition of zygomatic arch resection in decompressive craniectomy.

    PubMed

    Martin, Arvind G; Abdullah, Johari Yap; Jaafar, Azlan; Ghani, Abdul Rahman Izaini; Rajion, Zainul A; Abdullah, Jafri Malin

    2015-04-01

    Decompressive craniectomy (DC) is a surgical option in managing uncontrolled raised intracranial pressure refractory to medical therapy. The authors evaluate the addition of zygomatic arch (ZA) resection with standard DC and analyze the resulting increase in brain volume using three-dimensional volumetric CT scans. Measurements of brain expansion dimension morphometrics from CT images were also analyzed. Eighteen patients were selected and underwent DC with ZA resection. The pre- and post-operative CT images were analyzed for volume and dimensional changes. CT images of 29 patients previously operated on at the same center were retrieved from the picture archiving and communication system (PACS) and were similarly studied. The findings obtained from the two groups were compared and analyzed. Analysis from three-dimensional CT volumetric techniques revealed an significant increase of 27.97ml (95% confidence interval [CI]: 39.98-180.36; p=0.048) when compared with standard DC. Brain expansion analysis of maximum hemicraniectomy diameter revealed a mean difference of 0.82cm (95% CI: 0.25-1.38; p=0.006). Analysis of the ratio of maximum hemicraniectomy diameter to maximum anteroposterior diameter gave a mean difference of 0.04 (95% CI: 0.05-0.07; p=0.026). The addition of ZA resection to standard DC may prove valuable in terms of absolute brain volume gain. This technique is comparable to other maneuvers used to provide maximum brain expansion in the immediate post-operative period. PMID:25564264

  11. Geology of the Juanita Arch quadrangle, Mesa county, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shoemaker, Eugene M.

    1954-01-01

    The Juanita Arch quadrangle is one of eighteen 7 1/2-minute quadrangles covering the principal carnotite-producing area of southwestern Colorado. The geology of these quadrangles was mapped by the U.S. Geological Survey for the Atomic Energy Commission as part of a comprehensive study of carnotite deposits. The rocks exposed in the eighteen quadrangles consist of crystalline rocks of pre-Cambrian age and sedimentary rocks that range in age from late Paleozoic to Quaternary. Over much of the area the sedimentary rocks are flat lying, but in places the rocks are disrupted by high-angle faults and northwest-trending folds. Conspicuous among the folds are large anticlines having cores of intrusive salt and gypsum. Most of the carnotite deposits are confined to the Salt Wash sandstone member of the Jurassic Morrison formation. Within this sandstone, most of the deposits are spottily distributed through an arcuate zone known as the "Uravan Mineral Belt". Individual deposits range in size from irregular masses containing only a few tons of ore ro large, tabular masses containing many thousands of tons. The ore consists largely of sandstone selectively impregnated and in part replaced by uranium and vanadium minerals. Most of the deposits appear to be related to certain sedimentary structures in sandstone of favorable construction.

  12. The role of the endoderm in the development and evolution of the pharyngeal arches

    PubMed Central

    Graham, Anthony; Okabe, Masataka; Quinlan, Robyn

    2005-01-01

    The oro-pharyngeal apparatus has its origin in a series of bulges found on the lateral surface of the embryonic head, the pharyngeal arches. Significantly, the development of these structures is extremely complex, involving interactions between a number of disparate embryonic cell types: ectoderm, endoderm, mesoderm and neural crest, each of which generates particular components of the arches, and whose development must be co-ordinated to generate the functional adult oro-pharyngeal apparatus. In the past most studies have emphasized the role played by the neural crest, which generates the skeletal elements of the arches, in directing pharyngeal arch development. However, it is now apparent that the pharyngeal endoderm plays an important role in directing arch development. Here we discuss the role of the pharyngeal endoderm in organizing the development of the pharyngeal arches, and the mechanisms that act to pattern the endoderm itself and those which direct its morphogenesis. Finally, we discuss the importance of modification to the pharyngeal endoderm during vertebrate evolution. In particular, we focus on the emergence of the parathyroid gland, which we have recently shown to be the result of the internalization of the gills. PMID:16313389

  13. SOFIA/FORCAST Observations of the Arched Filamentary Region in the Galactic Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hankins, Matthew; Lau, Ryan M.; Morris, Mark; Herter, Terry L.

    2016-06-01

    Abstract: We present 19.7, 25.2, 31.5, and 37.1 μm maps of the Thermal Arched Filament region in the Galactic Center taken with the Faint Object Infrared Camera for the SOFIA Telescope (FORCAST) with an angular resolution of 3.2-3.8". We calculate the integrated infrared luminosity of the Arched Filaments and show that they are consistent with being heated by the nearby Arches cluster. Additionally, using our observations, we infer dust temperatures (75 - 90 K) across the Arched Filaments which are remarkably consistent over large spatial scales (˜ 25 pc). We discuss the possible geometric effects needed to recreate this temperature structure. Additionally, we compare the observed morphology of the Arches in the FORCAST maps with the Paschen-α emission in the region to study what fraction of the infrared emission may be coming from dust in the HII region versus the PDR beneath it. Finally, we use Spitzer/IRAC 8 μm data to look for spatial variations in PAH abundance in the rich UV environment of the young (~2-4 Myr) and massive Arches cluster.

  14. Size-dependent bistability of an electrostatically actuated arch NEMS based on strain gradient theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tajaddodianfar, Farid; Nejat Pishkenari, Hossein; Hairi Yazdi, Mohammad Reza; Maani Miandoab, Ehsan

    2015-06-01

    This paper deals with the investigation of the size-dependent nature of nonlinear dynamics, in a doubly clamped shallow nano-arch actuated by spatially distributed electrostatic force. We employ strain gradient theory together with the Euler-Bernoulli and shallow arch assumptions in order to derive the nonlinear partial differential equation governing the transverse motion of the arch with mid-plane stretching effects. Using the Galerkin projection method, we derive the lumped single degree of freedom model which is then used for the study of the size effects on the nonlinear snap-through and pull-in instabilities of the arch nano-electro-mechanical-system (NEMS). Moreover, using strain gradient theory, the size-dependent bistability and fundamental frequencies of the nano-arch are scrutinized, revealing that, despite what is predicted by the classical theory, the bistability region in the parameter space of the nano-structure shrinks as the structure scales down. Also, we show that the minimum initial elevation, required for bistability, increases as the nano-arch scales down.

  15. Analysis of the pedestrian arching at bottleneck based on a bypassing behavior model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Ming; Jia, Hongfei; Ran, Bin; Li, Jun

    2016-07-01

    A bypassing behavior model was proposed, in which the local optimal decision behavior in the strategy level was modeled in velocity-time domain, to describe how pedestrians bypass the local obstacles considering the relative speed. The model contains (1) pedestrian visual and contact information acquisition; (2) motion state prediction of the local obstacles based on the visual and contact information; (3) pedestrian bypass strategy modeling in the velocity-time domain; (4) moving and overlapping solution. In the numerical solution, velocity domain was divided into n equal angle, the value of n ranges from 2 to infinity, the Manhattan space was refined gradually to Euclid Space accordingly, in which the movement of pedestrians was described. The model was applied to the analysis of pedestrian arching at the bottleneck in the emergent evacuation situation. (1) The results showed that the formation of the pedestrian arching at the bottleneck was deformation pressure, because many pedestrians try to pass through the bottleneck simultaneously, even in the absence of friction, the pedestrian arching still occurs; (2) In the emergent situation, we are more concerned about the bottleneck attribution of resistance to form the arching, the calculation and simulation results showed that the probability of an arching and the bottleneck width is an exponential function relationship, so when the stampede occurs in the middle of the bottleneck, the probability of arching will increase exponentially.

  16. Rearfoot posture of Australopithecus sediba and the evolution of the hominin longitudinal arch

    PubMed Central

    Prang, Thomas C.

    2015-01-01

    The longitudinal arch is one of the hallmarks of the human foot but its evolutionary history remains controversial due to the fragmentary nature of the fossil record. In modern humans, the presence of a longitudinal arch is reflected in the angular relationships among the major surfaces of the human talus and calcaneus complex, which is also known as the rearfoot. A complete talus and calcaneus of Australopithecus sediba provide the opportunity to evaluate rearfoot posture in an early hominin for the first time. Here I show that A. sediba is indistinguishable from extant African apes in the angular configuration of its rearfoot, which strongly suggests that it lacked a longitudinal arch. Inferences made from isolated fossils support the hypothesis that Australopithecus afarensis possessed an arched foot. However, tali attributed to temporally younger taxa like Australopithecus africanus and Homo floresiensis are more similar to those of A. sediba. The inferred absence of a longitudinal arch in A. sediba would be biomechanically consistent with prior suggestions of increased midtarsal mobility in this taxon. The morphological patterns in talus and calcaneus angular relationships among fossil hominins suggest that there was diversity in traits associated with the longitudinal arch in the Plio-Pleistocene. PMID:26628197

  17. Stratigraphic variations in the Carboniferous section across the Arkansas-Oklahoma State Line Arch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engelhardt, Tyler D.

    The State Line Arch is represented by a structural high that trends through the study area in a loose alignment with the Arkansas-Oklahoma state line. Evidence of the arch extending further to the north includes a structural high and stratigraphic variation at an outcrop on Highway 59 near Evansville Mountain in Crawford County, Arkansas. The exact timing of the formation of the arch remains undetermined, but upper Devonian thinning at the top of the arch indicates the structure is pre-Mississippian. The reason for the development of the arch is poorly understood, but evidence linking Mississippian-aged Waulsortian mounds to Precambrian Spavinaw granite structures of northeastern Oklahoma and southwestern Missouri suggests Precambrian basement structures may extend into the study area. The structural nature of the arch provided an environment favorable to carbonate build-up during deposition of the Mississippian interval. A previously unidentified limestone unit measuring 175 feet thick likely represents the transgressive phase of a transgressive-regressive sequence responsible for the deposition of the Mayes Group of northeastern Oklahoma. Growth on the downthrown side of the Muldrow-Mulberry Fault system may indicate earlier movement than previous studies have suggested on the east-west trending normal faults of the Arkoma Basin. A possible roll-over anticline structure may exist to the south of the Muldrow-Mulberry fault system.

  18. Correlation between maxillary central incisor crown morphology and mandibular dental arch form in normal occlusion subjects.

    PubMed

    Paranhos, Luiz Renato; Lima, Carolina Souto; da Silva, Ricardo Henrique Alves; Daruge Júnior, Eduardo; Torres, Fernando Cesar

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the correlation between the morphology of the mandibular dental arch and the maxillary central incisor crown. Cast models from 51 Caucasian individuals, older than 15 years, with optimal occlusion, no previous orthodontic treatment, featuring 4 of the 6 keys to normal occlusion by Andrews (the first being mandatory) were observed. The models were digitalized using a 3D scanner, and images of the maxillary central incisor and mandibular dental arch were obtained. These were printed and placed in an album below pre-set models of arches and dental crowns, and distributed to 12 dental surgeons, who were asked to choose which shape was most in accordance with the models and crown presented. The Kappa test was performed to evaluate the concordance among evaluators while the chi-square test was used to verify the association between the dental arch and central incisor morphology, at a 5% significance level. The Kappa test showed moderate agreement among evaluators for both variables of this study, and the chi-square test showed no significant association between tooth shape and mandibular dental arch morphology. It may be concluded that the use of arch morphology as a diagnostic method to determine the shape of the maxillary central incisor is not appropriate. Further research is necessary to assess tooth shape using a stricter scientific basis.

  19. Rearfoot posture of Australopithecus sediba and the evolution of the hominin longitudinal arch.

    PubMed

    Prang, Thomas C

    2015-01-01

    The longitudinal arch is one of the hallmarks of the human foot but its evolutionary history remains controversial due to the fragmentary nature of the fossil record. In modern humans, the presence of a longitudinal arch is reflected in the angular relationships among the major surfaces of the human talus and calcaneus complex, which is also known as the rearfoot. A complete talus and calcaneus of Australopithecus sediba provide the opportunity to evaluate rearfoot posture in an early hominin for the first time. Here I show that A. sediba is indistinguishable from extant African apes in the angular configuration of its rearfoot, which strongly suggests that it lacked a longitudinal arch. Inferences made from isolated fossils support the hypothesis that Australopithecus afarensis possessed an arched foot. However, tali attributed to temporally younger taxa like Australopithecus africanus and Homo floresiensis are more similar to those of A. sediba. The inferred absence of a longitudinal arch in A. sediba would be biomechanically consistent with prior suggestions of increased midtarsal mobility in this taxon. The morphological patterns in talus and calcaneus angular relationships among fossil hominins suggest that there was diversity in traits associated with the longitudinal arch in the Plio-Pleistocene. PMID:26628197

  20. Gender identification and morphologic classification of tooth, arch and palatal forms in Saudi population

    PubMed Central

    Mohammad, Aljanakh; Koralakunte, Pavankumar Ravi

    2015-01-01

    Aims: To determine various tooth form, arch form, and palatal form with gender identification between males and females of the Saudi population. Materials and Methods: Irreversible hydrocolloid impressions were made of the maxillary teeth of 100 dentate male and female subjects to obtain study casts. A standardized procedure was adopted to photograph the maxillary dental arches and the maxillary central incisors on the study casts taken from each subject. The outline form of tooth, arch, and palatal form were determined using a standardized method. The average of six prosthodontist's evaluation was considered who classified the outline tracings visually. The statistical analysis was performed using Chi-Square and results tabulated. Results: The predominant tooth is combination form in males and ovoid form in females, the predominant arch is ovoid form in males and square form in females and the predominant palatal form are both U and V shaped in males and U-shaped in females. Conclusion: Except for the tooth form there was a significant difference with arch and palatal form among males and females of the population group studied. The determined tooth, arch and palatal forms are useful in selection and arrangement of artificial teeth among Saudi edentulous population group. Generalizing from the study is questionable as the sample size is small. Further studies should be conducted in a larger sample to confirm the study results PMID:26538903

  1. Carpal arch and median nerve changes during radioulnar wrist compression in carpal tunnel syndrome patients.

    PubMed

    Marquardt, Tamara L; Evans, Peter J; Seitz, William H; Li, Zong-Ming

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the morphological changes of the carpal arch and median nerve during the application of radiounlarly directed compressive force across the wrist in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome. Radioulnar compressive forces of 10 N and 20 N were applied at the distal level of the carpal tunnel in 10 female patients diagnosed with carpal tunnel syndrome. Immediately prior to force application and after 3 min of application, ultrasound images of the distal carpal tunnel were obtained. It was found that applying force across the wrist decreased the carpal arch width (p < 0.001) and resulted in increased carpal arch height (p < 0.01), increased carpal arch curvature (p < 0.001), and increased radial distribution of the carpal arch area (p < 0.05). It was also shown that wrist compression reduced the flattening of the median nerve, as indicated by changes in the nerve's circularity and flattening ratio (p < 0.001). This study demonstrated that the carpal arch can be non-invasively augmented by applying compressive force across the wrist, and that this strategy may decompress the median nerve providing symptom relief to patients with carpal tunnel syndrome. © 2015 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 34:1234-1240, 2016.

  2. Analysis of an arched outer-race ball bearing considering centrifugal forces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamrock, B. J.; Anderson, W. J.

    1972-01-01

    A Newton-Raphson method of iteration was used in evaluating the radial and axial projection of the distance between the ball center and the outer raceway groove curvature center (V and W). Fatigue life evaluations were made. The similar analysis of a conventional bearing can be directly obtained from the arched bearing analysis by simply letting the amount of arching be zero (g = 0) and not considering equations related to the unloaded half of the outer race. The analysis was applied to a 150-mm angular contact ball bearing. Results for life, contact loads, and angles are shown for a conventional bearing (g = 0) and two arched bearings (g = 0.127 mm (0.005 in.), and 0.254 mm (0.010 in.)). The results indicate that an arched bearing is highly desirable for high speed applications. In particular, for a DN value of 3 million (20,000 rpm) and an applied axial load of 4448 N (1000 lb), an arched bearing shows an improvement in life of 306 percent over that of a conventional bearing. At 4.2 million DN (28,000 rpm), the corresponding improvement is 340 percent. It was also found for low speeds, the arched bearing does not offer the advantages that it does for high speed applications.

  3. Carpal arch and median nerve changes during radioulnar wrist compression in carpal tunnel syndrome patients

    PubMed Central

    Marquardt, Tamara L.; Evans, Peter J.; Seitz, William H.; Li, Zong-Ming

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the morphological changes of the carpal arch and median nerve during the application of radiounlarly directed compressive force across the wrist in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome. Radioulnar compressive forces of 10 N and 20 N were applied at the distal level of the carpal tunnel in 10 female patients diagnosed with carpal tunnel syndrome. Immediately prior to force application and after 3 minutes of application, ultrasound images of the distal carpal tunnel were obtained. It was found that applying force across the wrist decreased the carpal arch width (p < 0.001) and resulted in increased carpal arch height (p < 0.01), increased carpal arch curvature (p < 0.001), and increased radial distribution of the carpal arch area (p < 0.05). It was also shown that wrist compression reduced the flattening of the median nerve, as indicated by changes in the nerve’s circularity and flattening ratio (p < 0.001). Statement of clinical significance This study demonstrated that the carpal arch can be non-invasively augmented by applying compressive force across the wrist, and that this strategy may decompress the median nerve providing symptom relief to patients with carpal tunnel syndrome. PMID:26662276

  4. Analysis of seismic disaster failure mechanism and dam-break simulation of high arch dam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jingkui; Zhang, Liaojun

    2014-06-01

    Based on a Chinese national high arch dam located in a meizoseismal region, a nonlinear numerical analysis model of the damage and failure process of a dam-foundation system is established by employing a 3-D deformable distinct element code (3DEC) and its re-development functions. The proposed analysis model considers the dam-foundation-reservoir coupling effect, influence of nonlinear contact in the opening and closing of the dam seam surface and abutment rock joints during strong earthquakes, and radiation damping of far field energy dissipation according to the actual workability state of an arch dam. A safety assessment method and safety evaluation criteria is developed to better understand the arch dam system disaster process from local damage to ultimate failure. The dynamic characteristics, disaster mechanism, limit bearing capacity and the entire failure process of a high arch dam under a strong earthquake are then analyzed. Further, the seismic safety of the arch dam is evaluated according to the proposed evaluation criteria and safety assessment method. As a result, some useful conclusions are obtained for some aspects of the disaster mechanism and failure process of an arch dam. The analysis method and conclusions may be useful in engineering practice.

  5. Depositional, diagenetic, and tectonic controls on Frontier Formation reservoir characteristics: Moxa Arch, southwestern Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Horne, J.C.

    1995-12-31

    The Frontier Formation of the Moxa Arch in Southwestern Wyoming provides an excellent example of the interplay among sedimentation, diagenesis, and tectonics on reservoir quality and performance. During the Cretaceous, thrust uplift and crustal loading occurred in the Sevier Orogenic Belt to the west of the foreland basin. The thrust sheets provided ample sediment to the Moxa Arch area during Frontier time. These sediments accumulated in wave-dominated deltaic, strandplain, coastalplain, and incised valley-fill depositional environments. The tectonic activity in the Sevier Orogenic Belt caused recurrent differential movement of orthogonally-shaped basement blocks along the Moxa Arch. These Movements created fractured lineaments at block boundaries. In addition, the recurrent movements of basement blocks influenced paleostructuring, diagenetic fluid migration paths, and sediment dispersal patterns of the Frontier. The depositional facies of Frontier sediments control the primary porosity and permeability trends of Frontier reservoirs along the Moxa Arch. Post depositional fractures caused by recurrent differential movements along zones of weakness at basement block boundaries secondarily enhance permeability and performance characteristics of Frontier reservoirs. Both the depositional facies and post-depositional fracturing of the Frontier influence the diagenetic trends affecting secondary porosity and permeability characteristics of Frontier reservoirs along the Moxa Arch. It is this complicated interplay of depositional, tectonic, and diagenetic influences that control the characteristics of Frontier reservoirs along the Moxa Arch.

  6. Triggers for the Collapse of Ice Shelves in Antarctica: Investigating Compressive Arch Failure with Numerical Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huth, A.; Smith, B. E.

    2015-12-01

    Antarctic ice shelves restrain, or buttress, grounded ice from flowing freely into the ocean by redistributing the force of the ice flow to pinning points (ice rises) at the ice front and shear margins at adjacent bay walls. This buttressing process typically defines a 'compressive arch' in the strain rate-field of the ice shelf, where the smallest principal component transitions from compressive inland of the arch to extensive seaward of the arch. If the compressive arch is breached due to iceberg calving at the ice front or thinning at the shear margins, the ice shelf will retreat irreversibly to a new stable configuration or collapse entirely. This retreat can compromise ice shelf buttressing, resulting in sea-level rise and ocean freshening as grounded ice flows unrestricted into the ocean. Here, we investigate the dynamics of compressive arch failure using Larsen C ice shelf as a test case for a larger study that will include several other ice shelves and projections for sea-level rise. We use satellite observations to develop a steady state model of Larsen C in Elmer/ICE, a finite element ice sheet/ice flow software package. We run calving and thinning simulations to determine the conditions needed to trigger ice shelf retreat via compressive arch failure and discuss the likelihood of these scenarios occurring in relation to extrapolations of current melt profiles and calving trends.

  7. Dental crowding in primary dentition and its relationship to arch and crown dimensions among preschool children of Davangere.

    PubMed

    Prabhakar, A R; Ravi, G R; Kurthukoti, Ameet J; Shubha, A B

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate dental crowding in the deciduous dentition and its relationship to the crown and the arch dimensions among preschool children of Davangere. Stratified randomized selection of one hundred, 3-4 year old healthy children with all primary teeth erupted was done and divided into two groups. One group had children with anterior crowding in both the arches while the other had spacing. Alginate impressions of the upper and lower arches were made and the study casts were obtained. The tooth and arch dimensions were determined. Mesiodistal dimensions of all the teeth were significantly larger in the crowded arch group. However, the buccolingual dimensions of the maxillary right central incisor, mandibular lateral incisors and the maxillary molars and the crown shape ratio of maxillary lateral incisors, mandibular canines and mandibular right second molar was statistically different. No significant correlation was found between the arch width and the presence of crowding of deciduous dentition. The arch depth of the spaced dentition was greater when compared to the crowded ones. The arch perimeter of the crowded arches was significantly less than the spaced arches.

  8. ALS Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... toward a world without ALS! Walk to Defeat ALS® Walk to Defeat ALS® draws people of all ... We need your help. I Will Advocate National ALS Registry The National ALS Registry is a congressionally ...

  9. Selective cerebro-myocardial perfusion in complex congenital aortic arch pathology: a novel technique.

    PubMed

    De Rita, Fabrizio; Lucchese, Gianluca; Barozzi, Luca; Menon, Tiziano; Faggian, Giuseppe; Mazzucco, Alessandro; Luciani, Giovanni Battista

    2011-11-01

    Simultaneous cerebro-myocardial perfusion has been described in neonatal and infant arch surgery, suggesting a reduction in cardiac morbidity. Here reported is a novel technique for selective cerebral perfusion combined with controlled and independent myocardial perfusion during surgery for complex or recurrent aortic arch lesions. From April 2008 to April 2011, 10 patients with arch pathology underwent surgery (two hypoplastic left heart syndrome [HLHS], four recurrent arch obstruction, two aortic arch hypoplasia + ventricular septal defect [VSD], one single ventricle + transposition of the great arteries + arch hypoplasia, one interrupted aortic arch type B + VSD). Median age was 63 days (6 days-36 years) and median weight 4.0 kg (1.6-52). Via midline sternotomy, an arterial cannula (6 or 8 Fr for infants) was directly inserted into the innominate artery or through a polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) graft (for neonates <2.0 kg). A cardioplegia delivery system was inserted into the aortic root. Under moderate hypothermia, ascending and descending aorta were cross-clamped, and "beating heart and brain" aortic arch repair was performed. Arch repair was composed of patch augmentation in five, end-to-side anastomosis in three, and replacement in two patients. Average cardiopulmonary bypass time was 163 ± 68 min (71-310). In two patients only (one HLHS, one complex single ventricle), a period of cardiac arrest was required to complete intracardiac repair. In such cases, antegrade blood cardioplegia was delivered directly via the same catheter used for selective myocardial perfusion. Average time of splanchnic ischemia during cerebro-myocardial perfusion was 39 ± 18 min (17-69). Weaning from cardiopulmonary bypass was achieved without inotropic support in three and with low dose in seven patients. One patient required veno-arterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. Four patients, body weight <3.0 kg, needed delayed sternal closure. No neurologic dysfunction was noted

  10. Selective cerebro-myocardial perfusion in complex congenital aortic arch pathology: a novel technique.

    PubMed

    De Rita, Fabrizio; Lucchese, Gianluca; Barozzi, Luca; Menon, Tiziano; Faggian, Giuseppe; Mazzucco, Alessandro; Luciani, Giovanni Battista

    2011-11-01

    Simultaneous cerebro-myocardial perfusion has been described in neonatal and infant arch surgery, suggesting a reduction in cardiac morbidity. Here reported is a novel technique for selective cerebral perfusion combined with controlled and independent myocardial perfusion during surgery for complex or recurrent aortic arch lesions. From April 2008 to April 2011, 10 patients with arch pathology underwent surgery (two hypoplastic left heart syndrome [HLHS], four recurrent arch obstruction, two aortic arch hypoplasia + ventricular septal defect [VSD], one single ventricle + transposition of the great arteries + arch hypoplasia, one interrupted aortic arch type B + VSD). Median age was 63 days (6 days-36 years) and median weight 4.0 kg (1.6-52). Via midline sternotomy, an arterial cannula (6 or 8 Fr for infants) was directly inserted into the innominate artery or through a polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) graft (for neonates <2.0 kg). A cardioplegia delivery system was inserted into the aortic root. Under moderate hypothermia, ascending and descending aorta were cross-clamped, and "beating heart and brain" aortic arch repair was performed. Arch repair was composed of patch augmentation in five, end-to-side anastomosis in three, and replacement in two patients. Average cardiopulmonary bypass time was 163 ± 68 min (71-310). In two patients only (one HLHS, one complex single ventricle), a period of cardiac arrest was required to complete intracardiac repair. In such cases, antegrade blood cardioplegia was delivered directly via the same catheter used for selective myocardial perfusion. Average time of splanchnic ischemia during cerebro-myocardial perfusion was 39 ± 18 min (17-69). Weaning from cardiopulmonary bypass was achieved without inotropic support in three and with low dose in seven patients. One patient required veno-arterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. Four patients, body weight <3.0 kg, needed delayed sternal closure. No neurologic dysfunction was noted

  11. Multi-Detector Row Computed Tomographic Evaluation of a Rare Type of Complete Vascular Ring: Double Aortic Arch with Atretic Left Arch Distal to the Origin of Left Subclavian Artery

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Ying-Ying; Fu, Yun-Ching; Wei, Hao-Ji; Chen, Clayton Chi-Chang

    2013-01-01

    Double aortic arch with an atretic left arch distal to the origin of left subclavian artery was diagnosed with multi-detector row computed tomography (MDCT) in two children with dysphagia. This rare type of complete vascular ring is clinically important because it may be confused with right aortic arch in mirror imaging. Anatomic details of this rare type of complete vascular ring demonstrated on MDCT facilitated appropriate surgical treatment. PMID:24043984

  12. Role of aortic arch vascular mechanics in cardiovagal baroreflex sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Klassen, Stephen A; Chirico, Daniele; Dempster, Kylie S; Shoemaker, J Kevin; O'Leary, Deborah D

    2016-07-01

    Cardiovagal baroreflex sensitivity (cvBRS) measures the efficiency of the cardiovagal baroreflex to modulate heart rate in response to increases or decreases in systolic blood pressure (SBP). Given that baroreceptors are located in the walls of the carotid sinuses (CS) and aortic arch (AA), the arterial mechanics of these sites are important contributors to cvBRS. However, the relative contribution of CS and AA mechanics to cvBRS remains unclear. This study employed sex differences as a model to test the hypothesis that differences in cvBRS between groups would be explained by the vascular mechanics of the AA but not the CS. Thirty-six young, healthy, normotensive individuals (18 females; 24 ± 2 yr) were recruited. cvBRS was measured using transfer function analysis of the low-frequency region (0.04-0.15 Hz). Ultrasonography was performed at the CS and AA to obtain arterial diameters for the measurement of distensibility. Local pulse pressure (PP) was taken at the CS using a hand-held tonometer, whereas AA PP was estimated using a transfer function of brachial PP. Both cvBRS (25 ± 11 vs. 19 ± 7 ms/mmHg, P = 0.04) and AA distensibility (16.5 ± 6.0 vs. 10.5 ± 3.8 mmHg(-1) × 10(-3), P = 0.02) were greater in females than males. Sex differences in cvBRS were eliminated after controlling for AA distensibility (P = 0.19). There were no sex differences in CS distensibility (5.32 ± 2.3 vs. 4.63 ± 1.3 mmHg(-1) × 10(-3), P = 0.32). The present data demonstrate that AA mechanics are an important contributor to differences in cvBRS.

  13. ArchPRED: a template based loop structure prediction server.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Fuentes, Narcis; Zhai, Jun; Fiser, András

    2006-07-01

    ArchPRED server (http://www.fiserlab.org/servers/archpred) implements a novel fragment-search based method for predicting loop conformations. The inputs to the server are the atomic coordinates of the query protein and the position of the loop. The algorithm selects candidate loop fragments from a regularly updated loop library (Search Space) by matching the length, the types of bracing secondary structures of the query and by satisfying the geometrical restraints imposed by the stem residues. Subsequently, candidate loops are inserted in the query protein framework where their side chains are rebuilt and their fit is assessed by the root mean square deviation (r.m.s.d.) of stem regions and by the number of rigid body clashes with the environment. In the final step remaining candidate loops are ranked by a Z-score that combines information on sequence similarity and fit of predicted and observed [/psi] main chain dihedral angle propensities. The final loop conformation is built in the protein structure and annealed in the environment using conjugate gradient minimization. The prediction method was benchmarked on artificially prepared search datasets where all trivial sequence similarities on the SCOP superfamily level were removed. Under these conditions it was possible to predict loops of length 4, 8 and 12 with coverage of 98, 78 and 28% with at least of 0.22, 1.38 and 2.47 A of r.m.s.d. accuracy, respectively. In a head to head comparison on loops extracted from freshly deposited new protein folds the current method outperformed in a approximately 5:1 ratio an earlier developed database search method. PMID:16844985

  14. Oil exploration in Central Arabian Arch using Landsat images

    SciTech Connect

    Sabins, F.F.

    1996-12-31

    Beginning in 1988, the Chevron Remote Sensing Research Group and Aramco digitally processed and interpreted seven Landsat thematic mapper images of the Central Arabian Arch for two purposes: 1. Map geology at 1:250,000 scale; 2. Identify anomalies that may be surface expression of structural traps. The well-exposed outcrops are predominantly marine strata of Mesozoic age with regional dips to east and southeast at less than 2{degrees}. This structural setting lacks the patterns of arcuate and offset beds that characterize folds and faults in more strongly deformed terrains. Therefore we developed a model to predict the image expression of structures in this homoclinal terrain. We based the model on oil fields in the Arabian Gulf region that are drape anticlines overlying high-angle faults that offset basement rocks and Palecizoic strata. The anticlines grade upward into structural terraces caused by flattening of the regional dip. Erosion of the terraces produces subtle topographic and stratigraphic anomalies that are recognizable on the images. The model was used to interpret a number of image anomalies. We field-checked the anomalies and eliminated a few. Aramco then acquired seismic data for several of the more promising anomalies that confirmed the presence of subsurface structure. Drilling resulted in discovery of Raghib and Dilam fields that produce from the Unayzah Sandstone (Permian). Initial production in the discovery and development wells ranges from 3000 to 4300 BOPD with gravity of 44 to 46{degrees} API. The source of this high-quality oil is the Qusaiba Shale (Silurian). The new discoveries are approximately 100 km from the nearest fields. Less than two years elapsed from beginning of digital image processing to completion of the discovery wells.

  15. Oil exploration in Central Arabian Arch using Landsat images

    SciTech Connect

    Sabins, F.F. )

    1996-01-01

    Beginning in 1988, the Chevron Remote Sensing Research Group and Aramco digitally processed and interpreted seven Landsat thematic mapper images of the Central Arabian Arch for two purposes: 1. Map geology at 1:250,000 scale; 2. Identify anomalies that may be surface expression of structural traps. The well-exposed outcrops are predominantly marine strata of Mesozoic age with regional dips to east and southeast at less than 2[degrees]. This structural setting lacks the patterns of arcuate and offset beds that characterize folds and faults in more strongly deformed terrains. Therefore we developed a model to predict the image expression of structures in this homoclinal terrain. We based the model on oil fields in the Arabian Gulf region that are drape anticlines overlying high-angle faults that offset basement rocks and Palecizoic strata. The anticlines grade upward into structural terraces caused by flattening of the regional dip. Erosion of the terraces produces subtle topographic and stratigraphic anomalies that are recognizable on the images. The model was used to interpret a number of image anomalies. We field-checked the anomalies and eliminated a few. Aramco then acquired seismic data for several of the more promising anomalies that confirmed the presence of subsurface structure. Drilling resulted in discovery of Raghib and Dilam fields that produce from the Unayzah Sandstone (Permian). Initial production in the discovery and development wells ranges from 3000 to 4300 BOPD with gravity of 44 to 46[degrees] API. The source of this high-quality oil is the Qusaiba Shale (Silurian). The new discoveries are approximately 100 km from the nearest fields. Less than two years elapsed from beginning of digital image processing to completion of the discovery wells.

  16. Elephant trunk technique for hybrid aortic arch repair.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Yuji

    2014-03-01

    The original elephant trunk technique was developed by Borst in 1983 for the treatment of aortic arch aneurysms. This technique reduced operative risks, but was associated with cumulative mortality rates of 6.9 % for the first stage and 7.5 % for the second stage. Patients also waited a long time between two major surgical procedures. Only 50.4 % of patients underwent the second-stage surgery, and there was a significant interval mortality rate of 10.7 %. With the advent of stent-graft techniques, two different hybrid elephant trunk techniques were developed. One technique is first-stage elephant trunk graft placement followed by second-stage endovascular completion. The conventional elephant trunk graft provides a good landing zone for the stent-graft, and endovascular completion is a useful alternative to conventional second-stage surgery. This method has few major complications, and a postoperative paraplegia rate of 1.1 %. The other technique is the frozen elephant trunk technique. This technique eliminates the need for subsequent endovascular completion, and is particularly useful for the treatment of acute type A dissection because it can achieve a secure seal. However, it is associated with a higher rate of spinal cord ischemia than other methods such as the original elephant trunk technique. The left subclavian artery (LSA) is often lost when performing a hybrid elephant trunk procedure. Revascularization of the LSA should be performed to prevent arm ischemia and neurological complications such as paraplegia or stroke, although the level of evidence for this recommendation is low. PMID:23943042

  17. Tectonic evolution of a Laramide transverse structural zone: Sweetwater Arch, south central Wyoming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weil, Arlo Brandon; Yonkee, Adolph; Schultz, Mary

    2016-05-01

    Structural, anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS), and paleomagnetic data record patterns of layer-parallel shortening (LPS), vertical-axis rotation, and regional fault-fold evolution across the Sweetwater Arch, a major west to WNW trending, basement-cored Laramide uplift in Wyoming. The southern arch flank is bounded by a WNW striking reverse fault zone that imbricated basement and cover rocks, the northern flank is bounded by a west striking fault zone with a component of strike-slip and NW trending en echelon folds, and the eastern plunge transitions into an area of multiple-trending faults and folds. Synorogenic strata record major arch uplift from Maastrichtian to Early Eocene time, followed by arch collapse. LPS, with development of systematic minor fault sets and AMS lineations, preceded large-scale folding. LPS directions, estimated from both minor fault and AMS data, were oriented WSW along the northern flank, subparallel to Laramide regional shortening, but were refracted to the SSW along the southern flank, and to the west along the eastern arch plunge. Additional minor faults developed along steep fold limbs during continued shortening, with directions remaining SSW along the southern flank but becoming more variable along the eastern plunge where an increasingly heterogeneous stress field developed as additional faults were activated along basement heterogeneities. Vertical-axis rotation was limited along the arch flanks, whereas the eastern plunge underwent counterclockwise rotation. Deflections in shortening directions were partly related to basement heterogeneities, including weak supracrustal belts on the arch flanks, a strong granitic core, and local reactivation of Precambrian shear zones.

  18. Aortic arch thrombectomy in a 2.8 kilogram neonate--a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Omeje, Ikenna; Ram, Awat; Kostolny, Martin

    2013-02-01

    Aortic arch thrombus is a rare occurrence in neonates. In the few described cases, this has mainly been associated with sepsis or early postnatal interventions, such as insertion of umbilical arterial line. We describe a case of occlusive aortic arch thrombus in a neonate who presented with signs of critical coarctation and successfully underwent surgical thrombectomy on deep hypothermic circulatory arrest. We also present a review of the most recently published cases of aortic arch thrombus in neonates and the treatment options employed.

  19. Hybrid repair of a Kommerell diverticulum associated with a right aortic arch and a left descending aorta.

    PubMed

    Kawajiri, Hiroyuki; Shimizu, Hideyuki; Yoshitake, Akihiro; Yozu, Ryohei

    2012-12-01

    This report describes the first successful case of a hybrid endovascular approach for management of aneurysmal Kommerell diverticulum arising from the left descending aorta in a right aortic arch. This patient also had dilatation of the ascending aorta and a small aortic arch aneurysm. This three-step procedure consisted of (1) ascending aorta replacement with total debranching using a handmade quarto-branched composite graft; (2) endovascular exclusion of Kommerell diverticulum and the aortic arch aneurysm by covering the whole aortic arch; and (3) coil embolization against the root of the left subclavian artery. The patient had no complications at 16 months after completion.

  20. Influences on Early and Medium-Term Survival Following Surgical Repair of the Aortic Arch

    PubMed Central

    Bashir, Mohamad; Field, Mark; Shaw, Matthew; Fok, Matthew; Harrington, Deborah; Kuduvalli, Manoj; Oo, Aung

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: It is now well established by many groups that surgery on the aortic arch may be achieved with consistently low morbidity and mortality along with relatively good survival compared to estimated natural history for a number of aortic arch pathologies. The objectives of this study were to: 1) report, compare, and analyze our morbidity and mortality outcomes for hemiarch and total aortic arch surgery; 2) examine the survival benefit of hemiarch and total aortic arch surgery compared to age- and sex-matched controls; and 3) define factors which influence survival in these two groups and, in particular, identify those that are modifiable and potentially actionable. Methods: Outcomes from patients undergoing surgical resection of both hemiarch and total aortic arch at the Liverpool Heart and Chest Hospital between June 1999 and December 2012 were examined in a retrospective analysis of data collected for The Society for Cardiothoracic Surgeons (UK). Results: Over the period studied, a total of 1240 patients underwent aortic surgery, from which 287 were identified as having undergone hemi to total aortic arch surgery under deep or moderate hypothermic circulatory arrest. Twenty three percent of patients' surgeries were nonelective. The median age at the time of patients undergoing elective hemiarch was 64.3 years and total arch was 65.3 years (P = 0.25), with 40.1% being female in the entire group. A total of 140 patients underwent elective hemiarch replacement, while 81 underwent elective total arch replacement. Etiology of the aortic pathology was degenerative in 51.2% of the two groups, with 87.1% requiring aortic valve repair in the elective hemiarch group and 64.2% in the elective total arch group (P < 0.001). Elective in-hospital mortality was 2.1% in the hemiarch group and 6.2% (P = 0.15) in the total arch group with corresponding rates of stroke (2.9% versus 4.9%, P = 0.47), renal failure (4.3% versus 6.2%, P = 0.54), reexploration for bleeding (4

  1. Loss of unc45a precipitates arteriovenous shunting in the aortic arches

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Matthew J.; Pham, Van N.; Vogel, Andreas M.; Weinstein, Brant M.; Roman, Beth L.

    2008-01-01

    Aortic arch malformations are common congenital disorders that are frequently of unknown etiology. To gain insight into the factors that guide branchial aortic arch development, we examined the process by which these vessels assemble in wild type zebrafish embryos and in kurzschlusstr12 (kus tr12) mutants. In wild type embryos, each branchial aortic arch first appears as an island of angioblasts in the lateral pharyngeal mesoderm, then elaborates by angiogenesis to connect to the lateral dorsal aorta and ventral aorta. In kustr12 mutants, angioblast formation and initial sprouting are normal, but aortic arches 5 and 6 fail to form a lumenized connection to the lateral dorsal aorta. Blood enters these blind-ending vessels from the ventral aorta, distending the arteries and precipitating fusion with an adjacent vein. This arteriovenous malformation (AVM), which shunts nearly all blood directly back to the heart, is not genetically programmed, as its formation correlates with blood flow and aortic arch enlargement. By positional cloning, we have identified a nonsense mutation in unc45a in kustr12 mutants. Our results are the first to ascribe a role for Unc45a, a putative myosin chaperone, in vertebrate development, and identify a novel mechanism by which an AVM can form. PMID:18462713

  2. Role of the tranverse arch in stiffness of the human foot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dias, Marcelo A.; Singh, Dhiraj K.; Bandi, Mahesh M.; Venkadesan, Madhusudhan; Mandre, Shreyas

    2015-03-01

    Human ancestors evolved from walking, around 6 million years (Ma) ago, to regular endurance running, around 2 Ma ago. Simultaneously, the feet evolved from a relatively flat structure like that of current day Chimpanzees (or our hands), to the modern human foot with two arches, a longitudinal and a transversal arch. The feet play a crucial role in locomotion by providing sufficient stiffness for propulsion, and being soft and pliable to absorb impacts and store energy elastically. Here we show that the transverse arch could play a central role in stiffness modulation. We first treat the foot as an elastic shell that is with intrinsic curvature. Calculations, numerics and physical experiments all show that for a foot-like shell, the stiffness has a power-law dependence on transverse curvature beyond a critical value. On the other hand, for purely longitudinally curved feet, or transverse curvature below the critical value, lead to low stiffness like a flat plate. Discrete realizations of a continuum shell, more closely resembling the human foot, also exhibit curvature induced stiffening. These results shed light on the role of the quintessentially human feature of a doubly arched foot, and suggest mechanical consequences of disorders such as a collapsed arch. HFSP RGY0091/2013.

  3. Rearfoot alignment and medial longitudinal arch configurations of runners with symptoms and histories of plantar fasciitis

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, Ana Paula; Trombini-Souza, Francis; Tessutti, Vitor; Lima, Fernanda Rodrigues; de Camargo Neves Sacco, Isabel; João, Sílvia Maria Amado

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate and compare rearfoot alignment and medial longitudinal arch index during static postures in runners, with and without symptoms and histories of plantar fasciitis (PF). INTRODUCTION: PF is the third most common injury in runners but, so far, its etiology remains unclear. In the literature, rearfoot misalignment and conformations of the longitudinal plantar arch have been described as risk factors for the development of PF. However, in most of the investigated literature, the results are still controversial, mainly regarding athletic individuals and the effects of pain associated with these injuries. METHODS: Forty-five runners with plantar fasciitis (30 symptomatic and 15 with previous histories of injuries) and 60 controls were evaluated. Pain was assessed by a visual analogue scale. The assessment of rearfoot alignment and the calculations of the arch index were performed by digital photographic images. RESULTS: There were observed similarities between the three groups regarding the misalignments of the rearfoot valgus. The medial longitudinal arches were more elevated in the group with symptoms and histories of PF, compared to the control runners. CONCLUSIONS: Runners with symptoms or histories of PF did not differ in rearfoot valgus misalignments, but showed increases in the longitudinal plantar arch during bipedal static stance, regardless of the presence of pain symptoms. PMID:21808870

  4. Children with flat feet have weaker toe grip strength than those having a normal arch

    PubMed Central

    Tashiro, Yuto; Fukumoto, Takahiko; Uritani, Daisuke; Matsumoto, Daisuke; Nishiguchi, Shu; Fukutani, Naoto; Adachi, Daiki; Hotta, Takayuki; Morino, Saori; Shirooka, Hidehiko; Nozaki, Yuma; Hirata, Hinako; Yamaguchi, Moe; Aoyama, Tomoki

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated the relationship between toe grip strength and foot posture in children. [Subjects and Methods] A total of 619 children participated in this study. The foot posture of the participants was measured using a foot printer and toe grip strength was measured using a toe grip dynamometer. Children were classified into 3 groups; flatfoot, normal, and high arch, according to Staheli’s arch index. The differences in demographic data and toe grip strength among each foot posture group were analyzed by analysis of variance. Additionally, toe grip strength differences were analyzed by analysis of covariance, adjusted to body mass index, age, and gender. [Results] The number of participants classified as flatfoot, normal, and high arch were 110 (17.8%), 468 (75.6%), and 41 (6.6%), respectively. The toe grip strength of flatfoot children was significantly lower than in normal children, as shown by both analysis of variance and analysis of covariance. [Conclusion] A significant difference was detected in toe grip strength between the low arch and normal foot groups. Therefore, it is suggested that training to increase toe grip strength during childhood may prevent the formation of flat feet or help in the development of arch. PMID:26696732

  5. Analysis of the dynamic response of eccentric, disposable, and arch-shaped bracing systems to earthquakes

    SciTech Connect

    Shiah, G.C.

    1988-01-01

    This research investigates the dynamic response of the split K braced frame (SKBF), disposable knee braced frame (DKBF), and arch shape braced frame (ASBF) subjected to earthquake loads and the influence of shear, rotatory inertia, and axial force on the frequencies and mode shapes of the vibrating built-in beams. An asymmetric braced model is introduced to study the elastic stability of the arch shaped braced frame. The influence of the axial force on the natural frequencies and the mode shapes of the higher modes of the vibrating built-in beam are also studied. The earthquake loads are simulated by the random process using several built-up computer models. In these generated artificial earthquake models, the Autoregressive/Moving-Average (ARMA) models are used to analyze the San Fernando 1971 and El Centro 1941 earthquake loads. The energy-dissipating plates are used as the devices in the arch-shaped bracing frame in this study for the absorption of the earthquake energy. It is shown that the arch-shaped frame has a uniform story drift variation compared to split-K braced frame. The disposable knee braced frame has small story drift, and the arch-braced frame has no floor damages during earthquakes.

  6. Medial Longitudinal Arch Angle Presents Significant Differences Between Foot Types: A Biplane Fluoroscopy Study.

    PubMed

    Balsdon, Megan E R; Bushey, Kristen M; Dombroski, Colin E; LeBel, Marie-Eve; Jenkyn, Thomas R

    2016-10-01

    The structure of the medial longitudinal arch (MLA) affects the foot's overall function and its ability to dissipate plantar pressure forces. Previous research on the MLA includes measuring the calcaneal-first metatarsal angle using a static sagittal plane radiograph, a dynamic height-to-length ratio using marker clusters with a multisegment foot model, and a contained angle using single point markers with a multisegment foot model. The objective of this study was to use biplane fluoroscopy to measure a contained MLA angle between foot types: pes planus (low arch), pes cavus (high arch), and normal arch. Fifteen participants completed the study, five from each foot type. Markerless fluoroscopic radiostereometric analysis (fRSA) was used with a three-dimensional model of the foot bones and manually matching those bones to a pair of two-dimensional radiographic images during midstance of gait. Statistically significant differences were found between barefoot arch angles of the normal and pes cavus foot types (p = 0.036), as well as between the pes cavus and pes planus foot types (p = 0.004). Dynamic walking also resulted in a statistically significant finding compared to the static standing trials (p = 0.014). These results support the classification of individuals following a physical assessment by a foot specialist for those with pes cavus and planus foot types. The differences between static and dynamic kinematic measurements were also supported using this novel method.

  7. Frontier formation stratigraphy on the Moxa Arch, Green River Basin, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Hamlin, H.S.

    1996-04-01

    Frontier Formation terrigenous clastics record early Late Cretaceous shoreline progradation and cyclic marine and nonmarine sedimentation in a foreland basin. In this study well-log correlations and studies of core were used to establish the stratigraphic framework of the Frontier along the Moxa Arch, a north-trending intrabasin structure in the western Green River Basin. Regional marine flooding surfaces and surfaces of erosion were traced along the Moxa Arch, which is subparallel to Frontier depositional strike, and from the north end of the Moxa Arch eastward to the Rock Springs Uplift. Nonmarine facies composed of fluvial channel-fill sandstone and interchannel mudstone form lowstand depositional systems tracts overlying subaerial erosion surfaces, whereas marine shoreface sandstones in progradational parasequence sets form highstand depositional systems tracts. Lowstand system tracts are separated from overlying highstand systems tracts by maximum flooding surfaces. Transgressive systems tracts composted of retrogradational parasequence sets are generally thin or missing. By tracing systems tracts from the Moxa Arch westward to outcrops in the Thrust Belt, correlations were made between subsurface and outcrop members of the Frontier Formation. Outcrop chronostratigraphy was then used to compare local sequence development to a global sea-level record. On the Moxa Arch, variations in both depositional thickness and erosional truncation along strike indicate that tectonically controlled subsidence and sediment input were important controls on sequence development and masked the influence of most reported third-order eustatic sea-level fluctuations. More accurate reservoir characterization and attribute prediction are possible within this stratigraphic framework.

  8. [The practical aspects of using "superelastic" arch wires in the edgewise technic].

    PubMed

    Linge, L; Dahm, S

    1994-12-01

    Ever increasing refinements in orthodontic treatment and the corresponding increase in technical demands are challenges to both the dentist in his/her practice and to the manufacturers of orthodontic materials. One interesting development has been the introduction of "super-elastic" arch wires, which have now been on the market for some years. Such arch wires are characterized by an excellent "shape memory", various levels of super-elasticity, a remarkable hysteresis, and temperature sensitivity. On the basis of findings from temperature controlled tests of arch wires in a "Lloyd 1000 R" testing machine, the following conclusions can be drawn. Shape memory can, from a clinical point of view, be regarded as being a positive feature. "Super-elasticity" is of lesser value, because conventional activation of edgewise arches rarely reaches the level of deformation necessary for super-elasticity to be called into play. Hysteresis and temperature sensitivity make a biomechanical control of the arch wires difficult. Reducing active forces by chilling the archwire brings relief to sore teeth. Whether this possibly leads to an improvement in blood circulation in the periodontal tissue, which would be biologically advantageous, should be made the subject of further research.

  9. Study on Optimal Grouting Timing for Controlling Uplift Deformation of a Super High Arch Dam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Peng; Zhu, Xiaoxu; Li, Qingbin; Liu, Hongyuan; Yu, Yongjun

    2016-01-01

    A grouting model is developed for use during the grouting of the complex foundation of a super high arch dam. The purpose as to determine the optimal grouting timing and appropriate grouting pressure involved in controlling the uplift deformation of the dam. The model determines the optimal grouting time as the height of the arch dam increases with the concrete pouring, by checking the tensile stresses in the dam against standard specifications. The appropriate grouting pressures are given on the basis of the actual grouting pressures monitored during the upstream riverbed foundation grouting. An engineering procedure, applying the model, was then proposed and used during foundation grouting under the toe block of the Xiluodu super high-arch dam in south-western China. The quality of the foundation grouting was evaluated against the results from pressurized water permeability tests, acoustic wave velocity tests, elastic modulus tests and panoramic photographing of the rockmass on completion of the foundation grouting. The results indicated that the proposed grouting model can be applied to effectively reduce the uplift deformation and associated cracking risk for super high arch dams, and it can be concluded that the proposed engineering grouting procedure is a valuable tool for improving foundation grouting under the toe blocks of a super high arch dam.

  10. Human dental arch shape evaluated by euclidean-distance matrix analysis.

    PubMed

    Ferrario, V F; Sforza, C; Miani, A; Tartaglia, G

    1993-04-01

    Form differences between biological structures can be evaluated using several approaches. When landmark data are available, a recently proposed method (euclidean-distance matrix analysis) seems to be able to differentiate between size and shape differences. This method also localizes those areas which differ most between the two structures. We have applied it to analyze the sexual dimorphism in dental arch form in a sample of 50 men and 45 women. Subjects ranged in age between 20 and 27 years, and had sound dentitions. Fourteen landmarks, corresponding to the centers of gravity (centroids) of the occlusal surfaces of all permanent teeth (right second molar to left second molar), were individualized on the dental casts of subjects. All the possible linear distances between pairs of teeth were computed, thus creating four mean form matrices (one for each arch within sex). Gender differences were tested by using euclidean-distance matrix analysis. No significant differences were demonstrated in the shape of arches, while male arches proved to be slightly bigger than female arches.

  11. Paleostructural control of Dakota hydrocarbon accumulations on southern Moxa Arch, southwest Wyoming and northeast Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Blanke, S.J.; Reisser, K.D. )

    1990-05-01

    Production from the Lower Cretaceous Dakota Formation along the southern Moxa arch shows a number of anomalies in distribution and hydrocarbon character that can best be explained by complex interplay of the arch's depositional, structural, diagenetic, and thermal histories. The development of the Western Overthrust belt and its foreland basin largely controlled the orientation of the Dakota fluvial and deltaic systems. Differences in sandstone trends between the upper and lower Dakota resulted in different migration pathways and loci of oil and gas accumulations. Isochore mapping indicates that the onset of major structural growth of the Moxa arch began contemporaneous with deformation in the Overthrust belt during the Cretaceous Campanian. After early migration of hydrocarbons into the resulting structural/stratigraphic traps, subsequent diagenesis of Dakota sandstones, particularly in the downdip water legs of the reservoirs, effectively sealed the accumulations in their initial paleostructural position. Paleocene and Eocene structural compression reversed the original northward plunge of the arch and rotated it slightly to the east into its present structural configuration. Hydrodynamically driven convective heat flow has resulted in varying geothermal regimes within the area, increasing heat flow along most of the arch's crest, while cooling its southern portion. This phenomenon has affected gas-oil ratios and API gravities by enhancing or retarding thermal maturation of the trapped hydrocarbons.

  12. In vivo bone strain patterns in the zygomatic arch of macaques and the significance of these patterns for functional interpretations of craniofacial form.

    PubMed

    Hylander, W L; Johnson, K R

    1997-02-01

    It has been proposed that the mammalian facial skeleton is optimized for countering or dissipating masticatory stress. As optimized load-bearing structures by definition exhibit maximum strength with a minimum amount of material, this hypothesis predicts that during chewing and biting there should be relatively high and near uniform amounts of strain throughout the facial skeleton. If levels of strain in certain areas of the facial skeleton are relatively low during these behaviors, this indicates that the amount of bone mass in these areas could be significantly reduced without resulting in the danger of structural failure due to repeated masticatory loads. Furthermore, and by definition, this indicates that these areas are not optimized for countering masticatory stress, and instead their overall morphology and concentration of bone mass has most likely been selected or influenced mainly by factors unrelated to the dissipation or countering of chewing and biting forces. An analysis of in vivo bone strain along the lateral aspect of the zygomatic arch of macaques indicates the clear absence of a high and near uniform strain environment throughout its extent. Instead, there is a steep strain gradient along the zygomatic arch, with the highest strains along its anterior portion, intermediate strains along its middle portion, and the lowest strains along its posterior portion. These data, in combination with earlier published data (Hylander et al., 1991), indicate that levels of functional strains during chewing and biting are highly variable from one region of the face to the next, and therefore it is unlikely that all facial bones are especially designed so as to minimize bone tissue and maximize strength for countering masticatory loads. Thus, the functional significance of the morphology of certain facial bones need not necessarily bear any important or special relationship to routine and habitual cyclical mechanical loads associated with chewing or biting

  13. Radio wave propagation in arch-shaped tunnels: Measurements and simulations by asymptotic methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masson, E.; Combeau, P.; Cocheril, Y.; Berbineau, M.; Aveneau, L.; Vauzelle, R.

    2010-01-01

    Several wireless communication systems are developed for communication needs between train and ground and between trains in the railway or mass transit domains. They are developed for operational needs for security and comfort. In order to deploy these systems in specific environments, such as tunnels, straight or curved, rectangular or arch-shaped section, specific propagation models have to be developed. A modelisation of the radio wave propagation in straight arch-shaped tunnels is realized by using asymptotic methods, such as Ray Tracing and Ray Launching, combined with the tessellation of the arched section. A method of interpolation of the facets' normals was implemented in order to minimize the error made when using the tessellation. Results obtained are validated by comparison to the literature and to measurement results.

  14. The macroanatomical investigations on the aortic arch in porcupines (Hystrix cristata).

    PubMed

    Atalar, O; Yilmaz, S; Burma, O; Ilkay, E

    2003-12-01

    The anatomy of aortic arch in porcupine was studied. Angiography was applied to each of the three adult porcupines (two males, one female) following the injection of latex from the abdominal aorta for the examination of aortic arch. The results indicated that three arteries arose from aortic arch in porcupine. These were truncus brachiocephalicus, arteria carotis communis sinistra and arteria subclavia sinistra. The truncus brachiocephalicus in porcupine yielded arteria subclavia dextra and arteria carotis communis dextra. Truncus bicaroticus was absent. The origin of truncus costocervicalis (right) and arteria vertebralis (right) arose from a common root. Left or right axillary arteries seemed to be a continuation of subclavian arteries. The results of this study may contribute to the data in this area of science.

  15. [Operation for a giant pseudoaneurysm of the aortic arch without artificial circulation].

    PubMed

    Shlomin, V V; Didenko, Iu P; Puzdriak, P D; Drozhzhin, I G; Bondarenko, P B

    2016-01-01

    Presented herein is a variant of surgical management of a patient with a giant false aneurysm of the aortic arch in the posterior mediastinum. Using the technique of temporary bypass or temporary "debranching" made it possible to carry out a reconstructive intervention without the use of an artificial circulation apparatus. This technique also decreases the necessity of using heparin, thus diminishing the risk of blood loss both during the operation and in the postoperative period. The described variant of the operation for a false aneurysm of the aortic arch extends and supplements the surgeon's capabilities of performing interventions on the aortic arch in the absence of a possibility of using an artificial circulation apparatus both in a scheduled and emergency situation. PMID:27626263

  16. Aortic arch surgery with a single centrifugal pump for selective cerebral perfusion and systemic circulation.

    PubMed

    Iwata, Keiji; Shimazaki, Yasuhisa; Sakamoto, Tomohiko; Ueda, Hideki; Nakagawa, Masashi; Yamada, Hideto; Doi, Teruo; Ooue, Takuya

    2010-01-01

    In aortic arch surgery, two pumps are required for systemic perfusion and selective cerebral perfusion (SCP). A new technique with a single centrifugal pump for systemic perfusion and SCP was developed and its efficacy and safety evaluated. This technique was adopted for total arch replacement in 22 consecutive patients with true aneurysms (13) and aortic dissection (nine) from January 2005 to January 2008. Cerebral perfusion lines branched from the main perfusion line. During SCP, right radial arterial pressure was maintained at 50 mm Hg and left common carotid arterial pressure at 60 mm Hg, and the regional cerebral oxygen saturation (rSO(2)) values were maintained at approximately >80% of the baseline value. Two operative deaths (9%) occurred due to pneumonia and hemorrhage in the left lung, respectively. Stroke occurred in one patient (5%). This simple circuit system can thus be easily and safely applied for aortic arch surgery.

  17. Comprehensive three-dimensional analysis of right-sided aortic arch with multiple vascular anomalies

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Right-sided aortic arch is a rare congenital defect usually diagnosed incidentally in adults; it is often asymptomatic unless aneurismal disease develops. In half the cases, an aberrant left subclavian artery arises from a Kommerell’s diverticulum; in these cases, congenital heart anomaly is very rarely present. Case presentation We report a case of incidentally-detected right-sided aortic arch with multiple vascular anomalies including left subclavian artery originating from a Kommerell’s diverticulum, supra-sinus origin of coronary arteries and coronary arteriovenous fistula. Conclusion Through comprehensive 3-dimensional reconstruction of the aortic arch and surrounding structures we defined anatomical relationships, which is useful for follow-up and treatment. PMID:25138741

  18. Right-sided aortic arch with the retroesophageal left subclavian artery as the fourth branch

    PubMed Central

    Chai, Ok Hee; Han, Eui-Hyeog; Kim, Hyoung Tae

    2013-01-01

    We present a rare variation of the right-sided aortic arch with the retroesophageal left subclavian artery as the forth branch found in a cadaver of an 89-year-old Korean woman during a routine dissection. In this case, the first branch that arose from the ascending aorta was the left common carotid artery, which crossed ventral to the trachea in a left cephalic direction, followed by the right common carotid artery and then the right subclavian artery. Distal to these branches the aortic arch ran dorsally, passing between the esophagus and the vertebra. The left subclavian artery arose from the descending portion of the aortic arch, crossing over to the left upper extremity behind the esophagus. This anomaly was not accompanied by congenital heart disease. Accurate information regarding this variation is of great importance to surgeons for its early identification and preservation during interventions and to radiologists for precise interpretation of angiograms. PMID:23869265

  19. Performance of 75 millimeter-bore arched outer-race ball bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coe, H. H.; Hamrock, B. J.

    1976-01-01

    An investigation was performed to determine the operating characteristics of 75-mm bore, arched outer-race bearings, and to compare the data with those for a similar, but conventional, deep groove ball bearing. Further, results of an analytical study, made using a computer program developed previously, were compared with the experimental data. Bearings were tested up to 28,000 rpm shaft speed with a load of 2200 N (500 lb). The amount of arching was 0.13, 0.25, and 0.51 mm (.005, .010, and .020 in.). All bearings operated satisfactorily. The outer-race temperatures and the torques, however, were consistently higher for the arched bearings than for the conventional bearing.

  20. Vibration analysis of the Second Saikai Bridge—a concrete filled tubular (CFT) arch bridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshimura, Mistuhiro; Wu, Qingxiong; Takahashi, Kazuo; Nakamura, Shozo; Furukawa, Kazuyoshi

    2006-02-01

    Concrete-filled steel tubular (CFT) arch bridges have been rapidly developing in China since 1990. Research has focused on the static behavior, thermal stress and erection technique, however, and there has been very little research of natural vibrations and dynamic responses of these bridges. Japan's first CFT arch bridge in highway bridges, the Second Saikai Bridge, is now under construction in Nagasaki Prefecture. Furthermore, this bridge has a pedestrian bridge that is suspended under the girder, which is rare. Therefore, the natural vibration properties are examined, and the influence of pedestrian bridge structure on the natural vibration of main bridge is discussed first. Response analysis under a moving vehicle and pedestrian is carried out, and the response characteristics and response level are clarified. The natural vibrations and responses are compared to those of CFT arch bridges that have been constructed in China. Results show the fine performance of both main bridge and pedestrian bridge of the Second Saikai Bridge.

  1. The macroanatomical investigations on the aortic arch in porcupines (Hystrix cristata).

    PubMed

    Atalar, O; Yilmaz, S; Burma, O; Ilkay, E

    2003-12-01

    The anatomy of aortic arch in porcupine was studied. Angiography was applied to each of the three adult porcupines (two males, one female) following the injection of latex from the abdominal aorta for the examination of aortic arch. The results indicated that three arteries arose from aortic arch in porcupine. These were truncus brachiocephalicus, arteria carotis communis sinistra and arteria subclavia sinistra. The truncus brachiocephalicus in porcupine yielded arteria subclavia dextra and arteria carotis communis dextra. Truncus bicaroticus was absent. The origin of truncus costocervicalis (right) and arteria vertebralis (right) arose from a common root. Left or right axillary arteries seemed to be a continuation of subclavian arteries. The results of this study may contribute to the data in this area of science. PMID:14651485

  2. Subgross and macroscopic investigation of blood vessels originating from aortic arch in the chinchilla (Chinchilla lanigera).

    PubMed

    Ozdemir, V; Cevik-Demirkan, A; Türkmenoğlu, I

    2008-04-01

    A total of 10 adult, healthy, male chinchilla (Chinchilla lanigera) were used to investigate the vessels originating from aortic arch. Coloured latex was injected into the carotid arteries following conventional anatomical applications in all the chinchillas examined. The brachiocephalic trunk and the left subclavian artery arose from the aortic arch at the level of the second intercostal region in the thoracic cavity. The right and left subclavian arteries detached branches at the level of first intercostal region and divided into the following vessels: internal thoracic artery, dorsal scapular artery, vertebral artery, superficial cervical artery and axillar artery. The vessels originating from the aortic arch displayed some significant differences in chinchillas compared to rats, guinea pigs, rabbits, porcupines and other laboratory rodents. PMID:18005370

  3. Thoracic endovascular aortic repair for blunt thoracic aortic injuries in complex aortic arch vessels anatomies.

    PubMed

    Piffaretti, Gabriele; Carrafiello, Gianpaolo; Ierardi, Anna Maria; Mariscalco, Giovanni; Macchi, Edoardo; Castelli, Patrizio; Tozzi, Matteo; Franchin, Marco

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study is to report the use of thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) in blunt thoracic aortic injuries (BTAIs) presenting with complex anatomies of the aortic arch vessels. Two patients were admitted to our hospital for the management of BTAI. Anomalies were as follow: aberrant right subclavian artery (n = 1) and right-sided aortic arch with 5 vessels anatomy variant (n = 1). TEVAR was accomplished using parallel graft with periscope configuration in the patient with the aberrant right subclavian artery. At 12-month follow-up, computed tomography angiographies confirmed the exclusion of the BTAI, the stability of the endograft, the resolution of the pseudoaneurysm, and the patency of the parallel endograft. Aortic arch vessels variants and anomalies are not rare, and should be recognized and studied precisely to plan the most appropriate operative treatment. TEVAR proved to be effective even in complex anatomies.

  4. Transoral robotic surgery for removal of a second branchial arch cyst: a case report.

    PubMed

    Vidhyadharan, S; Krishnan, S; King, G; Morley, A

    2012-12-01

    Second branchial arch cysts are a common cause of cystic neck mass in adults. The type-IV variant of the second branchial arch cyst is uncommon and presents as a parapharyngeal space mass. It lies medial to the carotid sheath and it is not easily amenable to access by the traditional, trans-cervical approach to the parapharyngeal space. Trans-oral robotic surgery is a new application of the da Vinci robotic surgical system (Intuitive Surgical, Sunnyvale, CA, USA). The system has only recently been approved by the FDA for trans-oral robotic resection of oropharyngeal cancers. The technology has since been used for new trans-oral applications, including resection of parapharyngeal space tumours. This is a case report of successful trans-oral robotic resection of a type IV second branchial arch cyst in the parapharyngeal space. PMID:27628477

  5. ALS - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - ALS ... The following organizations are good resources for information on amyotrophic lateral sclerosis : Muscular Dystrophy Association -- mda.org/disease/amyotrophic-lateral-sclerosis National Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) Registry -- ...

  6. Externalized Guidewires to Facilitate Fenestrated Endograft Deployment in the Aortic Arch

    PubMed Central

    Joseph, George; Premkumar, Prabhu; Thomson, Viji; Varghese, Mithun; Selvaraj, Dheepak; Sahajanandan, Raj

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To describe a precannulated fenestrated endograft system utilizing externalized guidewires to facilitate aortic arch endovascular repair and to report its use in 2 patients with challenging anatomy. Technique: For distal arch repair, a fenestration for the left subclavian artery (LSA) is made onsite in a standard thoracic endograft tailored to the patient anatomy; it is precannulated with a nitinol guidewire (NGw), which is passed from the femoral artery and externalized from the left brachial artery prior to endograft delivery system introduction over a parallel stiff guidewire. Steps are then taken to remove guidewire intertwining, prevent NGw wrapping around the delivery system, and orient the LSA fenestration superiorly when the delivery system moves into the arch. Gentle traction on the ends of the NGw during endograft deployment facilitates proper fenestration alignment. A covered stent is deployed in the LSA fenestration. The technique is illustrated in a patient with congenital coarctation of the aorta and descending aortic aneurysm. For total arch repair, endograft fenestrations are made for all 3 arch branches; the left common carotid artery (LCCA) and LSA fenestrations are each cannulated with NGws, which travel together from the femoral artery, pass through a LSA snare loop, and are exteriorized from the LCCA. After endograft deployment, the innominate artery fenestration is separately cannulated using right brachial access. Placement of a parallel externalized hydrophilic guidewire passing through the LCCA fenestration (but not the LSA snare loop) and removal of the LCCA fenestration NGw allows exteriorization of the LSA fenestration NGw from the left brachial artery by pulling the LSA snare. Covered stents are deployed in all 3 fenestrations. The technique is presented in a patient with type B aortic dissection. Conclusion: Use of the precannulated fenestrated endograft system described is feasible and has the potential to make aortic arch

  7. Tectonic history of Sweetgrass Arch, Montana and Alberta-key to finding new hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Shepard, W. Shepard, B.

    1985-05-01

    The Sweetgrass arch of northwestern Montana and southern Alberta is a major ancient structural feature. Initial anticlinal emplacement occurred during the early Paleozoic and was parallel with the cratonic margin. Strong uplift followed by peneplanation occurred during the Late Jurassic and basal Cretaceous during the westward drifting of the North American plate following the breakup of Pangea. During Cretaceous and early Tertiary times, the Sweetgrass arch was quiescent, but was rejuvenated in mid to late Tertiary, upwarped by a basement flexure to its present structural configuration: a 200 mi (322 km) long, north-plunging anticline showing 10,000 ft (350 m) of structural relief. Midway down its plunge, the anticline is offset 30 mi (48 km) by a right-lateral transcurrent fault. During Late Cretaceous and early Tertiary, plutonic uplifts were emplaced on the east flank, forming traps for oil then migrating updip from the Williston and Alberta basins. Oil and gas accumulated in Mississippian, Jurassic, and basal Cretaceous reservoirs in structural and stratigraphic traps around these plutonic uplifts. Subsequent late Tertiary doming of the Sweetgrass arch tilted the earlier structural traps and drained them, resulting in remigration of much of the oil and gas to the crest of the arch. The tilting failed to destroy many of the stratigraphic traps. As a result, down the flanks of the Sweetgrass arch are many frozen stratigraphic traps including Cut Bank field, the largest single-pay stratigraphic trap in the north Rockies. On the crest are large structure accumulations of remigrated oil at Kevin Sunburst and Pondera. Evidence of remigration is recorded by live oil show tracks in the reservoirs and remnant gas caps throughout the area of earlier accumulations. A potential exists for finding new frozen traps on the flanks and remigrated oil accumulations on or near the crest of the Sweetgrass arch.

  8. Restoration of the maxillary arch using implants, natural teeth and the Konus crown: a case study.

    PubMed

    Sethi, A; Sochor, P

    1994-03-01

    Restoring the maxillary arch by using a suprastructure retained by a Konus crown means that the patient can remove the crown for oral hygiene. This construction enables large embrasure spaces to be avoided without compromising phonetics, that is, without adversely affecting the patient's speech. It also enables the dental surgeon to monitor the tooth and implant abutments and the soft tissues around them. In this article we demonstrate successful restoration of the maxillary arch by the use of Konus crowns on a combination of implants and natural teeth.

  9. Endovascular Treatment for Proximal Anastomotic Pseudoaneurysm after Total Arch Replacement in Behcet's Disease.

    PubMed

    Sakata, Tomoki; Ueda, Hideki; Watanabe, Michiko; Kohno, Hiroki; Tamura, Yusaku; Abe, Shinichiro; Inage, Yuichi; Ikeuchi, Hiroki; Kanda, Tomoyoshi; Fujii, Masahiko; Matsumiya, Goro

    2016-07-01

    A 17-year-old patient underwent total arch replacement for aortic arch aneurysm due to vascular Behcet's disease (BD). Follow-up computed tomography, performed 6 months after the operation, demonstrated pseudoaneurysm formation at the proximal anastomotic site. We performed endovascular treatment and used a short stent graft that was originally designed for abdominal aortic aneurysm. To avoid the occlusion of the coronary or brachiocephalic artery (BCA) due to stent graft migration, we used right ventricular rapid pacing and BCA ballooning. Thus, we believe that endovascular treatment can be used for anastomotic complications in the ascending aorta after open surgery for connective tissue disorders including BD. PMID:27174345

  10. Mathematical modeling and numerical analysis of thermal distribution in arch dams considering solar radiation effect.

    PubMed

    Mirzabozorg, H; Hariri-Ardebili, M A; Shirkhan, M; Seyed-Kolbadi, S M

    2014-01-01

    The effect of solar radiation on thermal distribution in thin high arch dams is investigated. The differential equation governing thermal behavior of mass concrete in three-dimensional space is solved applying appropriate boundary conditions. Solar radiation is implemented considering the dam face direction relative to the sun, the slop relative to horizon, the region cloud cover, and the surrounding topography. It has been observed that solar radiation changes the surface temperature drastically and leads to nonuniform temperature distribution. Solar radiation effects should be considered in thermal transient analysis of thin arch dams.

  11. Multidetector Computed Tomography for Congenital Anomalies of the Aortic Arch: Vascular Rings.

    PubMed

    García-Guereta, Luis; García-Cerro, Estefanía; Bret-Zurita, Montserrat

    2016-07-01

    The development of multidetector computed tomography has triggered a revolution in the study of the aorta and other large vessels and has replaced angiography in the diagnosis of congenital anomalies of the aortic arch, particularly vascular rings. The major advantage of multidetector computed tomography is that it permits clear 3-dimensional assessment of not only vascular structures, but also airway and esophageal compression. The current update aims to summarize the embryonic development of the aortic arch and the developmental anomalies leading to vascular ring formation and to discuss the current diagnostic and therapeutic role of multidetector computed tomography in this field.

  12. Correlation between interdental occlusal plane and plantar arches. An EMG study.

    PubMed

    Valentino, B; Melito, F; Aldi, B; Valentino, T

    2002-01-01

    The Authors carried out an experimental study on a homogeneous group of young people to provide evidence of functional correlation among masticatory muscles and, indirectly, between changes to the interdental occlusal plane and modifications of the plantar arches due to talipes valgus and flat foot. In the two analysed conditions, the masticatory muscles undergo different functional alterations. This is due to the fact that the mechanoreceptors in the tendons of the muscles governing the plantar arch configuration are stimulated in different ways during the activation of long osteoarthromuscular chains. Dental specialists will have to take these correlation into account when diagnosing TMJ disorders.

  13. Neonate with VACTERL Association and a Branchial Arch Anomaly without Hydrocephalus.

    PubMed

    Velazquez, Danitza; Pereira, Elaine; Havranek, Thomas

    2016-03-01

    VACTERL (vertebral anomalies, anal atresia, cardiac defect, tracheoesophageal fistula, renal anomaly, limb anomalies) is an association of anomalies with a wide spectrum of phenotypic expression. While the majority of cases are sporadic, there is evidence of an inherited component in a small number of patients as well as the potential influence of nongenetic risk factors (maternal diabetes mellitus). Presence of hydrocephalus has been reported in VACTERL patients (VACTERL-H) in the past, with some displaying branchial arch anomalies. We report the unique case of an infant of diabetic mother with VACTERL association and a branchial arch anomaly-in the absence of hydrocephalus.

  14. Properties of some statistics for AR-ARCH model with application to technical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xudong; Liu, Wei

    2009-03-01

    In this paper, we investigate some popular technical analysis indexes for AR-ARCH model as real stock market. Under the given conditions, we show that the corresponding statistics are asymptotically stationary and the law of large numbers hold for frequencies of the stock prices falling out normal scope of these technical analysis indexes under AR-ARCH, and give the rate of convergence in the case of nonstationary initial values, which give a mathematical rationale for these methods of technical analysis in supervising the security trends.

  15. Applications of ARCH and GARCH time series analysis methods in study of Earth rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hefty, J.; Kormonikova, M.; Bognár, T.

    Non-linear methods of Autoregressive Conditional Heteroskedasticity (ARCH) and Generalized Autoregressive Conditional Heteroskedasticity (GARCH) modelling are applied for analysis of short-term (periods <100 days) fluctuations of ERP. It is shown that 1-day sampled time series of x, y, and UT1R from 1993.0 to 1999.3 can be modelled as linear autoregressive process and non-linear time dependent variance. The latter is well modelled as GARCH(1,1) process for x and y and ARCH(2) process for UT1R.

  16. LOFT/FET complex. Construction view of abutment footings for arches of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    LOFT/FET complex. Construction view of abutment footings for arches of hangar (TAN-629). Tunnels between basement of hangar and control building (TAN-630) had to fit between arches. (Note concrete work taking place at hole at lower edge of view. This photo may document unexpected bubble in underlying lava rock. It was dumped full of concrete and a footing made. Source: Interview with John DeClue). Date: December 19, 1957. Photographer: Jack L. Anderson. INEEL negative no. 57-6203 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Area North, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  17. Vascular airway compression management in a case of aortic arch and descending thoracic aortic aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Alok; Dutta, Vikas; Negi, Sunder; Puri, G. D.

    2016-01-01

    Airway compression due to distal aortic arch and descending aortic aneurysm repair has been documented. This case of tracheal and left main stem bronchus compression due to aortic aneurysm occurred in a 42-year-old man. The airway compression poses a challenge for the anesthesiologist in airway management during aortic aneurysm repair surgery. The fiber-optic bronchoscope is very helpful in decision-making both preoperatively and postoperatively in such cases. We report a case of airway compression in a 42-year-old patient who underwent elective distal aortic arch and descending aortic aneurysm repair. PMID:27397474

  18. A right-sided aortic arch and aberrant left subclavian artery with proximal segment hypoplasia.

    PubMed

    Margolis, Justin; Bilfinger, Thomas; Labropoulos, Nicos

    2012-03-01

    The right-sided thoracic aortic arch is a rare congenital malformation occurring during embryologic development. A majority of the cases present with two anatomic variations, one of which is an aberrant left subclavian artery (LSA) originating off the distal descending aortic arch. This aberrant LSA courses across and compresses thoracic structures on its way to the left thoracic outlet. While this aberrant vessel causes mostly benign symptoms, patients may first present with rupture of a thoracic aneurysm. This thoracic aneurysm is commonly known as Kommerell's diverticulum. This paper presents a case of an aberrant LSA originating off Kommerell's diverticulum with a proximal long-segment hypoplasia, a very rare anatomic variation.

  19. Hybrid repair of right aortic arch aneurysm with a Kommerell's diverticulum.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Koyu; Yoshitaka, Hidenori; Chikazawa, Genta; Sakaguchi, Taichi; Totsugawa, Toshinori; Tamura, Kentaro

    2014-07-01

    We describe the case of a 74-year-old man who underwent a hybrid open and endovascular approach for repair of dissecting thoracic aortic aneurysm of a right aortic arch with aberrant left subclavian artery arising from a Kommerell's diverticulum. Total debranching using a tailored quadrifurcated graft and thoracic endovascular aneurysm repair for the transverse aortic lesion were performed. The procedures were successfully accomplished with complete exclusion of the aneurysm. This hybrid procedure for complex aortic arch disease may reduce perioperative complications compared to challenging conventional open approaches.

  20. Surgical repair for aortic dissection accompanying a right-sided aortic arch.

    PubMed

    Obitsu, Yukio; Koizumi, Nobusato; Iwahashi, Toru; Saiki, Naozumi; Shigematsu, Hiroshi

    2010-01-01

    Aortic anomaly in which a right-sided aortic arch associated with Kommerell's diverticulum and aberrant left subclavian artery is rare. The present report describes a patient with type-B aortic dissection accompanying aortic anomalies consisting of right-sided aortic arch and the left common carotid and left subclavian artery arising from Kommerell's diverticulum. As dissecting aortic aneurysm diameter increased rapidly, Single-stage surgical repair of extensive thoracic aorta was performed through median sternotomy and right posterolateral fifth intercostal thoracotomy, yielding favorable results. Our surgical procedures are discussed.

  1. Surgical repair for aortic dissection accompanying a right-sided aortic arch

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Aortic anomaly in which a right-sided aortic arch associated with Kommerell's diverticulum and aberrant left subclavian artery is rare. The present report describes a patient with type-B aortic dissection accompanying aortic anomalies consisting of right-sided aortic arch and the left common carotid and left subclavian artery arising from Kommerell's diverticulum. As dissecting aortic aneurysm diameter increased rapidly, Single-stage surgical repair of extensive thoracic aorta was performed through median sternotomy and right posterolateral fifth intercostal thoracotomy, yielding favorable results. Our surgical procedures are discussed. PMID:20459743

  2. Mathematical Modeling and Numerical Analysis of Thermal Distribution in Arch Dams considering Solar Radiation Effect

    PubMed Central

    Mirzabozorg, H.; Hariri-Ardebili, M. A.; Shirkhan, M.; Seyed-Kolbadi, S. M.

    2014-01-01

    The effect of solar radiation on thermal distribution in thin high arch dams is investigated. The differential equation governing thermal behavior of mass concrete in three-dimensional space is solved applying appropriate boundary conditions. Solar radiation is implemented considering the dam face direction relative to the sun, the slop relative to horizon, the region cloud cover, and the surrounding topography. It has been observed that solar radiation changes the surface temperature drastically and leads to nonuniform temperature distribution. Solar radiation effects should be considered in thermal transient analysis of thin arch dams. PMID:24695817

  3. High Palatoglossal Arch: A New Indication for Pre-prosthetic Surgery.

    PubMed

    Raikwar, Kanchan R; Ghodke, Monali; Garde, Janardan B; Suryavanshi, Rajendrakumar

    2016-07-01

    Pre-prosthetic surgery helps to overcome the challenge of prosthetic rehabilitation of the patient including restoration of the best masticatory function possible, combined with restoration or improvement of dental and facial esthetics. Maxillary denture prosthesis fabrication should include thorough examination of the soft palate and palatoglossal arch anatomy. This case report emphasizes on high palatoglossal arch as a rare and new cause of loss of posterior palatal seal and thereby retention of maxillary denture with rational, treated by pre-prosthetic surgery, ever reported in literature. PMID:27408462

  4. On the connection between ARCH time series and non-extensive statistical mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duarte Queirós, Sílvio M.

    2004-12-01

    The ARCH(1) is a generator of stochastic discrete time series, { ɛt}, widely used in finance and characterised by conditional time-varying (and correlated) second-order moment. It involves a parameter, β and a noise, η. In this work one presents, through an analytical result, that ARCH(1) stationary distributions are well approached by the distributions that maximise the entropy, S q= {1-∫[p(x)] q dx }/{1-q}. Using the generalised Kullback-Leibler relative entropy, Iq, one also quantifies the degree of dependence between variables ɛt and ɛt‧ and shows that the degree of dependence increases with parameter β.

  5. Neonate with VACTERL Association and a Branchial Arch Anomaly without Hydrocephalus

    PubMed Central

    Velazquez, Danitza; Pereira, Elaine; Havranek, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    VACTERL (vertebral anomalies, anal atresia, cardiac defect, tracheoesophageal fistula, renal anomaly, limb anomalies) is an association of anomalies with a wide spectrum of phenotypic expression. While the majority of cases are sporadic, there is evidence of an inherited component in a small number of patients as well as the potential influence of nongenetic risk factors (maternal diabetes mellitus). Presence of hydrocephalus has been reported in VACTERL patients (VACTERL-H) in the past, with some displaying branchial arch anomalies. We report the unique case of an infant of diabetic mother with VACTERL association and a branchial arch anomaly—in the absence of hydrocephalus. PMID:26929876

  6. [Distal Aortic Arch Aneurysm, Acute type B Aortic Dissection, and Acute Bilateral Limb Ischemia Treated by Two-stage Total Arch Replacement;Report of a Case].

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Kazunori; Itoh, Satoshi; Tajima, Yasushi; Kimura, Naoyuki; Yuri, Kohichi; Matumoto, Harunobu; Adachi, Kohichi; Yamaguchi, Atushi; Adachi, Hideo

    2015-05-01

    A 74-year-old female patient experienced sudden and severe pain in her lower back and both legs. Upon examination, her femoral pulses were weak, and her legs were pale. Computed tomography revealed a 66-mm thoracic aneurysm in the distal arch and type B aortic dissection. Stenosis was present from the terminal aorta to the iliac arteries. The left common iliac artery was occluded at its bifurcation, and both lower limbs were ischemic. We performed bilateral axillary-femoral artery bypass, which improved blood flow to both limbs. The next day, it was apparent that compartment syndrome had developed in the patient's left leg. Rehabilitation therapy was effective for the compartment syndrome, the patient's symptoms resolved, and she was discharged. We later performed two-stage total arch replacement, and the subsequent clinical course has been without incident.

  7. Maxillary Arch Dimensions and Spectral Characteristics of Children with Cleft Lip and Palate Who Produce Middorsum Palatal Stops

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zajac, David J.; Cevidanes, Lucia; Shah, Sonam; Haley, Katarina L.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was twofold: (a) to determine maxillary arch dimensions of children with repaired cleft lip and palate (CLP) who produced middorsum palatal stops and (b) to describe some spectral characteristics of middorsum palatal stops. Method: Maxillary arch width, length, and height dimensions and first spectral moments of…

  8. Defining the southwestern end of the Blytheville Arch, northeastern Arkansas: delimiting a seismic source zone in the New Madrid region

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crone, A.J.

    1998-01-01

    Vibroseis seismic-reflection profiles around the southwestern end of the Blytheville arch document the southwesternly extent of the arch and refine the length of a fault zone that coincides with the arch. The 74.3 km of newly interpreted profiles and previously described profiles form a network of lines across and around the southern end of the arch. The southwestern terminus of the arch is defined by the absence of significantly upwarped or extensively disrupted reflectors, which are diagnostic traits of the arch where it is well developed. The arch is 134 km long as documented here, which is only slightly longer than the length reported by previous studies. Differing opinions about the magnitude of the 1811-1812 New Madrid earthquakes could be partly explained by substantially longer seismic source zones, but this minor increase in source zone length does not reconcile the large differences in magnitude estimates of the events. If future earthquake ruptures associated with the arch are confined to areas of extensive deformation, then this well documented southwestern termination precludes a rupture substantially longer than ~134 km along the zone of seismicity that coincides with the axis of the Reelfoot rift.

  9. Possible role of Rhodotorula sp. in the formation of jarosite in the AMD environment of Muskau Arch, Poland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakus, Natalia; Chlebicki, Andrzej; Bożęcki, Piotr; Manecki, Maciej

    2016-04-01

    The Muskau Arch is situated in the west of Poland and in the east of Germany. This region is a belt formed by push and frontal moraines during the Middle-Polish (Riss) glaciation, especially during the Wartanian glaciation. The occurrence of glacier caused folding and forming the glacitectonic type of lignit deposits which were mined for over 150 years. Both open pit and underground mining methods has exposed metal sulfides (mainly pyrite) to air and water causing bio-oxidation. Due to this process the acidity of many reservoirs have increased significantly (pH values between 2 and 4). As a consequence of changes in the environment, new mineral phases precipitated from highly acid waters rich in, among others, various forms of Fe and S. Precipitation of ochreous minerals such as schwertmannite, goethite and jarosite was partly catalyzed by many various acidophilic and acid-tolerant microorganisms: bacteria, archaea and probably yeasts. Jarosite KFe33+(OH)6(SO4)2 can be precipitated both in abiotic conditions and as a by-product of the activity of living organisms. The example of biomineralization induced by fungi Purpureocillium lilacinum in similar AMD environment of Rio Tinto is reported (Oggerin et al, 2014). Recently, jarosite is also considered as a possible biosignature of life on Mars. The assessment of microbial participation in formation of jarosite is an elementary step in geomicrobiological and astrobiological research. Isolated by us Rhodotorula sp. is an unicellular pigmented yeast. Fungi from the genus Rhodotorula F.C. Harrison belong to Sporidiobolalas part of phylum Basidiomycota. They are common environmental inhabitants. Some species, known from Rio Tinto, can live in extreme acidic soils at pH of about 2 (Lopez-Archila et al, 2004). For the first time, authors isolated strain Rhodotorula sp. from surface precipitates in Ł ęknica region (Muskau Arch). This ochreous precipitate contains jarosite. The yeast might be an important factor in indirect

  10. Data Quality Analysis for the Bighorn Arch Seismic Array Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mancinelli, N. J.; Yang, Z.; Yeck, W. L.; Sheehan, A. F.

    2010-12-01

    We analyze background noise to assess the difference in station noise levels of different types of seismic sensors and the effects of deployed site locations, and to identify local noise sources, using the data from the Bighorn Arch Seismic Experiment (BASE). Project BASE is an EarthScope Flexible Array (FA) project and includes the deployment of 38 broadband seismometers (Guralp CMG3T), 173 short-period seismometers (L22 and CMG40T-1s), and 1850 high-frequency geophones with Reftek RT125 “Texans” in northern Wyoming, providing continuous dataset of various seismic sensor types and site locations in different geologic setups (basins and mountains). We carry out our analysis through a recently developed approach of using probability density function (PDF) to display the distribution of seismic power spectral density (PSD) [McNamara and Buland, 2004]. This new approach bypasses the tedious pre-screening for transient signals (earthquakes, mass recentering, calibration pulses, etc.) which is required by the traditional PSD analysis. Using the program PQLX, we were able to correlate specific noise sources—mine blasts, teleseisms, passing cars, etc—with features seen on PDF plots. We analyzed eight months of continuous BASE project broadband and short period data for this study. The power spectral density plots suggest that, of the 3 different instrument types used in the BASE project, the broadband CMG3T stations have the lowest background noise in the period range of 0.1-1 s while the short-period L22 stations have the highest background noise. As expected, stations located in the Bighorn Mountain Range are closer to the Low Noise Model [Peterson, 1993] than those located in the adjacent Bighorn Basin and Powder River Basin, particularly in the 0.1-1 s period range. This is mainly attributed to proximity to bedrock, though increased distance from cultural noise also contributes. At longer periods (1-100 s), the noise level of broadband instruments is lower

  11. Computational fluid dynamics modeling and analysis of the effect of 3-D distortion of the human aortic arch.

    PubMed

    Mori, Daisuke; Yamaguchi, Takami

    2002-06-01

    An idealized CFD model and a realistic one were used to investigate the effect of the 3-D distortion of the aortic arch on the blood flow and its pathophysiological significance with respect to the pathogenesis of the aortic aneurysm. From the results of the flow simulations, the distortion of the centerline of the pipe was shown to affect significantly the flow structure. A right-handed vortex at the descending arch, and a left-handed one at the end of the arch tended to develop in the realistic model. But the secondary flow did not become a single helix. The top of the arch was the region where complex spatial and temporal WSS distributed. It was also observed that the direction of WSS had a significant circumferential component at the top of the arch.

  12. Alignment of a buccally displaced maxillary canine in the late mixed dentition with a modified utility arch: a patient report.

    PubMed

    Leonardi, Rosalia; Licciardello, Valeria; Greco, Mariagrazia; Rossetti, Bruno; Barbato, Ersilia

    2010-01-01

    Maxillary canines and first molars are the most common ectopic teeth in young people. Ectopic buccal eruption of maxillary canines is strongly associated with lack of space or crowding in the dental arch. This report demonstrates the management of a buccally erupted maxillary canine in an 11-year, 8-month-old boy without sufficient space. The patient had a mostly dental Class II occlusion and was in the late mixed dentition, and the root development of his canines was consistent with his dental age. To correct the distal occlusion and gain space in the maxillary arch for the eruption of both canines, the patient received cervical headgear. To guide the maxillary left canine into occlusion, it was surgically exposed and a modified utility arch inserted. The result of this approach proves that a custom-designed utility arch allows the distal movement of a buccally displaced canine, while at the same time increasing the maxillary arch length.

  13. A quadrant tray and bite registration as an alternative to dual-arch impressions for fixed prosthetics: a clinical and dental laboratory technique.

    PubMed

    Hammond, Barry D; Myers, Michael L; Haywood, Van B

    2011-01-01

    To perform fixed prosthodontic procedures, dentists take a full-arch or quadrant impression and articulate the casts. The dual-arch impression technique is a popular quadrant technique for crown fabrication. The technique described in this article, which uses a quadrant impression and separate interocclusal record, offers several advantages over the traditional dual-arch method.

  14. 21. U.S. Route 60 elliptical spandrel arch grade separation structure, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    21. U.S. Route 60 elliptical spandrel arch grade separation structure, built in 1959. This view shows the east elevation. This structure type was used nearly exclusively at the parkway's primary access points where consideration of vertical and horizontal clearances as well as aesthetic concerns influenced design selection. - Blue Ridge Parkway, Between Shenandoah National Park & Great Smoky Mountains, Asheville, Buncombe County, NC

  15. 13. Detail of abutment/arch rib juncture. Northeast end of bridge, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. Detail of abutment/arch rib juncture. Northeast end of bridge, looking east to west. - Presumpscot Falls Bridge, Spanning Presumptscot River at Allen Avenue extension, 0.75 mile west of U.S. Interstate 95, Falmouth, Cumberland County, ME

  16. Hh signaling regulates patterning and morphogenesis of the pharyngeal arch-derived skeleton

    PubMed Central

    Swartz, Mary E.; Nguyen, Van; McCarthy, Neil Q.

    2012-01-01

    The proper function of the craniofacial skeleton requires the proper shaping of many individual skeletal elements. Neural crest cells generate much of the craniofacial skeleton and morphogenesis of skeletal elements occurs in transient, reiterated structures termed pharyngeal arches. The shape of individual elements depends upon intrinsic patterning within the neural crest as well as extrinsic signals to the neural crest from adjacent tissues within the arches. Hedgehog (Hh) signaling is known to play roles in craniofacial development, yet its involvement in intrinsic and extrinsic patterning of the craniofacial skeleton is still not well understood. Here, we show that morphogenetic movements of the pharyngeal arches and patterning of the neural crest require Hh signaling. Loss of Hh signaling, in smoothened (smo) mutants, disrupts the expression of some Dlx genes as well as other markers of dorsal/ventral patterning of the neural crest. Transplantation of wild-type neural crest cells into smo mutants rescues this defect, demonstrating that the neural crest requires reception of Hh signals for proper patterning. Despite the rescue, morphogenesis of the facial skeleton is not fully recovered. Through transplant analyses, we find two additional requirements for Hh signaling. The endoderm requires the reception of Hh signals for proper morphogenetic movements of the pharyngeal arches and the neural crest require the reception of Hh signaling for the activity of a reverse signal that maintains sonic hedgehog expression in the endoderm. Collectively, these results demonstrate that Hh signaling is essential to establish intrinsic and extrinsic patterning information for the craniofacial skeleton. PMID:22709972

  17. An Automatic Method for Geometric Segmentation of Masonry Arch Bridges for Structural Engineering Purposes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riveiro, B.; DeJong, M.; Conde, B.

    2016-06-01

    Despite the tremendous advantages of the laser scanning technology for the geometric characterization of built constructions, there are important limitations preventing more widespread implementation in the structural engineering domain. Even though the technology provides extensive and accurate information to perform structural assessment and health monitoring, many people are resistant to the technology due to the processing times involved. Thus, new methods that can automatically process LiDAR data and subsequently provide an automatic and organized interpretation are required. This paper presents a new method for fully automated point cloud segmentation of masonry arch bridges. The method efficiently creates segmented, spatially related and organized point clouds, which each contain the relevant geometric data for a particular component (pier, arch, spandrel wall, etc.) of the structure. The segmentation procedure comprises a heuristic approach for the separation of different vertical walls, and later image processing tools adapted to voxel structures allows the efficient segmentation of the main structural elements of the bridge. The proposed methodology provides the essential processed data required for structural assessment of masonry arch bridges based on geometric anomalies. The method is validated using a representative sample of masonry arch bridges in Spain.

  18. Critical Pedagogy: Constructing an Arch of Social Dreaming and a Doorway to Hope.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLaren, Peter

    1991-01-01

    Constructing an arch of social dreaming means developing a politics of difference that actively contests the devaluation of persons relegated as "others." In this connection, features of critical pedagogy, the role it plays in the struggle against current neoconservatism, and the importance of language are considered. (SLD)

  19. Persistent median artery in the carpal tunnel and anastomosis with superficial palmar arch.

    PubMed

    Bijannejad, Dariush; Azandeh, Saeed; Javadnia, Fatemeh; Gholami, Mohammad Reza; Gharravi, Anneh Mohammad; Zhaleh, Mohsen

    2016-01-01

    Persistent median artery (PMA) in present cadaver originated from the brachial artery and anastomosed with the superficial palmar arch (SPA). As the PMA may be the cause of carpal tunnel syndrome and SPA is the main source of arterial supply, knowledge of which are important for the hand surgical interventions. PMID:27583265

  20. Individual tooth macrowear pattern guides the reconstruction of Sts 52 (Australopithecus africanus) dental arches.

    PubMed

    Benazzi, Stefano; Kullmer, Ottmar; Schulz, Dieter; Gruppioni, Giorgio; Weber, Gerhard W

    2013-02-01

    The functional restoration of the occlusal relationship between maxillary and mandibular tooth rows is a major challenge in modern dentistry and maxillofacial surgery. Similar technical challenges are present in paleoanthropology when considering fragmented and deformed mandibular and maxillary fossils. Sts 52, an Australopithecus africanus specimen from Sterkfontein Member 4, represents a typical case where the original shape of the dental arches is no longer preserved. It includes a partial lower face (Sts 52a) and a fragmented mandible (Sts 52b), both incomplete and damaged to such an extent to thwart attempts at matching upper and lower dentitions. We show how the preserved macro wear pattern of the tooth crowns can be used to functionally reconstruct Sts 52's dental arches. High-resolution dental stone casts of Sts 52 maxillary and mandibular dentition were mounted and repositioned in a dental articulator. The occlusal relationship between antagonists was restored based on the analysis of the occlusal wear pattern of each preserved tooth, considering all dental contact movements represented in the occlusal compass. The reconstructed dental arches were three-dimensional surface scanned and their occlusal kinematics tested in a simulation. The outcome of this contribution is the first functional restoration of A. africanus dental arches providing new morphometric data for specimen Sts 52. It is noteworthy that the method described in this case study might be applied to several other fossil specimens.

  1. Multimodal optical measurement in vitro of surface deformations and wall thickness of the pressurized aortic arch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genovese, Katia; Humphrey, Jay D.

    2015-04-01

    Computational modeling of arterial mechanics continues to progress, even to the point of allowing the study of complex regions such as the aortic arch. Nevertheless, most prior studies assign homogeneous and isotropic material properties and constant wall thickness even when implementing patient-specific luminal geometries obtained from medical imaging. These assumptions are not due to computational limitations, but rather to the lack of spatially dense sets of experimental data that describe regional variations in mechanical properties and wall thickness in such complex arterial regions. In this work, we addressed technical challenges associated with in vitro measurement of overall geometry, full-field surface deformations, and regional wall thickness of the porcine aortic arch in its native anatomical configuration. Specifically, we combined two digital image correlation-based approaches, standard and panoramic, to track surface geometry and finite deformations during pressurization, with a 360-deg fringe projection system to contour the outer and inner geometry. The latter provided, for the first time, information on heterogeneous distributions of wall thickness of the arch and associated branches in the unloaded state. Results showed that mechanical responses vary significantly with orientation and location (e.g., less extensible in the circumferential direction and with increasing distance from the heart) and that the arch exhibits a nearly linear increase in pressure-induced strain up to 40%, consistent with other findings on proximal porcine aortas. Thickness measurements revealed strong regional differences, thus emphasizing the need to include nonuniform thicknesses in theoretical and computational studies of complex arterial geometries.

  2. [Antegrade unilateral perfusion of the brain through the brachiocephalic trunk in operations on the aortic arch].

    PubMed

    Kozlov, B N; Panfilov, D S; Kuznetsov, M S; Ponomarenko, I V; Nasrashvili, G G; Shipulin, V M

    2016-01-01

    Presented herein is a technique of unilateral antegrade perfusion of the brain in operations on the aortic arch. The method makes it possible to perform both systemic artificial circulation and adequate physiological perfusion of the brain, promoting minimization of the number of neurological complications. PMID:27100557

  3. Application of the Bolton Relay Device for Thoracic Endografting In or Near the Aortic Arch

    PubMed Central

    Riambau, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    Endovascular correction of aortic arch pathology remains a challenge, with a variety of techniques proposed over the years to minimize complications and enhance the probability of a successful result. A variety of approaches have been developed in order to deal with the aortic arch pathology and its idiosyncrasies. We review potential interventional techniques for the repair of aortic arch pathologies, beginning with conventional aortic arch surgery, followed by hybrid treatments and those along the endovascular spectrum (parallel and fenestrated endografts, scalloped endografts, and ascending and new branched endografts). We finish with an overview of all the Bolton Medical (Barcelona, Spain and Sunrise, FL, USA) thoracic platforms. Endovascular techniques show acceptable results in selected cases. Both proximal Bolton Relay configurations (with and without a bare stent) offer conformability and accuracy on deployment with very low rates of stroke. Fenestrated and scalloped designs are also useful for selected cases. Ascending and branched Bolton devices are very promising platforms for a serious, full endovascular approach to the aorta. PMID:26798752

  4. Effect of serial extraction alone on crowding: relationships between tooth width, arch length, and crowding.

    PubMed

    Yoshihara, T; Matsumoto, Y; Suzuki, J; Sato, N; Oguchi, H

    1999-12-01

    In this study, we examined the effect of serial extraction alone on crowding. We also investigated the relationships between tooth width, arch length, and irregularity index. Maxillary dental casts from 32 subjects who had undergone only serial extraction were analyzed at 3 stages: before deciduous canines extraction, after first premolars extraction, and at the end of the observation period. The mean of the irregularity index decreased significantly as serial extraction proceeded and further decreased during the observation period. In cases where the width of the incisor was more than 2 standard deviations above the means for the control subjects, there was a significant correlation between tooth width of the lateral incisors and irregularity index before extraction as well as a significant correlation between the summation of tooth widths of the central and lateral incisors and irregularity index at that time. There was a significant negative correlation between arch length discrepancy and irregularity index before extraction and also a significant correlation between arch length discrepancy and correction of the irregularity index from before deciduous canines extraction to after first premolars extraction. These results suggest that tooth width and arch length discrepancy might preferentially affect the degree of anterior crowding in cases of severe crowding. There was no aggravation of the average crowding level during the observation period in the present study. The present study quantitatively suggested that serial extraction was useful for the purpose of correcting crowding in most cases.

  5. Effects of basilar membrane arch and radial tension on the travelling wave in gerbil cochlea.

    PubMed

    Chan, Wei Xuan; Yoon, Yong-Jin

    2015-09-01

    The basilar membrane velocity of gerbil cochlea showed discrepancy between theoretical model and experimental measurements. We hypothesize that the reasons of such discrepancies are due to the arch towards the scala tympani and radial tension present in the basilar membrane of the gerbil cochlea. The arch changes the bending stiffness in the basilar membrane, reduces the effective fluid force on the membrane and increases the basilar membrane's inertia. The existence of the radial tension also dampens the acoustic travelling wave. In this paper, the wave number functions along the gerbil basilar membrane are calculated from experimentally measured physical parameters with the theoretical model as well as extracted from experimentally measured basilar membrane velocity with the wave number inversion formula. The two wave number functions are compared and the effects of the tension and membrane arch on the wave number are studied based on various parameters of the model. We found that the bending stiffness across the gerbil basilar membrane varies (1-2 orders along the cochlea in the section 2.2 mm-3 mm from base) more than the calculated value in the flat basilar membrane model and the radial tension increases the damping of the travelling wave in gerbil cochlea significantly (5 times more than that without radial tension). These effects of arch and radial tension in the basilar membrane elucidate the discrepancy between previous theoretical model and experimental measurements in gerbil cochlea.

  6. Carbon Dioxide in the Aortic Arch: Coronary Effects and Implications in a Swine Study

    SciTech Connect

    Culp, William C. Porter, Thomas R.; Culp, William C.; Vonk, Brian N.

    2003-04-15

    Purpose: CO{sub 2} angiography is considered dangerous in the aortic arch where bubbles may cause critical cerebral and cardiac ischemia. We investigated CO{sub 2}distribution, physiologic effects in the heart, methods of detection and treatments. Methods: Eight pigs had CO{sub 2}and iodinated contrast arch angiograms in supine and both lateral decubitus positions. An electrocardiogram, physiologic data and cardiac ultrasound were obtained. Therapies included precordial thumps and rolls to lateral decubitus positions. Results: Supine high descending aorta CO{sub 2} injections floated retrograde up the arch during diastole and preferentially filled the right coronary artery (RCA): mean score 3.5 (of 4), in nominate artery 2.4, left coronary artery 1.2; n = 17; p = 0.0001. Aortic root injections preferentially filled the RCA when the animal was supine, left coronary in the right decubitus position, and showed a diffuse pattern in the left decubitus position. Right decubitus rolls filled both coronaries causing several lethal arrhythmias. Precordialthumps successfully cleared CO{sub 2}. Ultrasound is a sensitive detector of myocardial CO{sub 2}. Conclusion: Arch distribution of CO{sub 2} primarily involves the RCA. Diagnostic ultrasound detects cardiac CO{sub 2} well. Precordial thumps are an effective treatment.

  7. Hh signaling regulates patterning and morphogenesis of the pharyngeal arch-derived skeleton.

    PubMed

    Swartz, Mary E; Nguyen, Van; McCarthy, Neil Q; Eberhart, Johann K

    2012-09-01

    The proper function of the craniofacial skeleton requires the proper shaping of many individual skeletal elements. Neural crest cells generate much of the craniofacial skeleton and morphogenesis of skeletal elements occurs in transient, reiterated structures termed pharyngeal arches. The shape of individual elements depends upon intrinsic patterning within the neural crest as well as extrinsic signals to the neural crest from adjacent tissues within the arches. Hedgehog (Hh) signaling is known to play roles in craniofacial development, yet its involvement in intrinsic and extrinsic patterning of the craniofacial skeleton is still not well understood. Here, we show that morphogenetic movements of the pharyngeal arches and patterning of the neural crest require Hh signaling. Loss of Hh signaling, in smoothened (smo) mutants, disrupts the expression of some Dlx genes as well as other markers of dorsal/ventral patterning of the neural crest. Transplantation of wild-type neural crest cells into smo mutants rescues this defect, demonstrating that the neural crest requires reception of Hh signals for proper patterning. Despite the rescue, morphogenesis of the facial skeleton is not fully recovered. Through transplant analyses, we find two additional requirements for Hh signaling. The endoderm requires the reception of Hh signals for proper morphogenetic movements of the pharyngeal arches and the neural crest require the reception of Hh signaling for the activity of a reverse signal that maintains sonic hedgehog expression in the endoderm. Collectively, these results demonstrate that Hh signaling is essential to establish intrinsic and extrinsic patterning information for the craniofacial skeleton.

  8. The impact of foot arch height on quality of life in 6-12 year olds

    PubMed Central

    Bouza Prego, Mª de los Ángeles; Requeijo Constenla, Ana; Saleta Canosa, Jesús Luis; Bautista Casasnovas, Adolfo; Tajes, Francisco Alonso

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To determine whether arch height has an effect on the health-related quality of life of schoolchildren. Methods: One hundred and thirteen schoolchildren attended an out-patient centre where self-reported data were recorded, their feet were classified into one of three groups according to their arch index (high, normal or low) and the scores obtained from the Foot Health Status Questionnaire (FHSQ - Spanish version) were compared. Results: The groups with high, low and normal arch recorded lower scores in Section One for the general foot health and footwear domains and higher scores in foot pain and foot function. In Section Two they obtained lower scores in general health and higher scores in physical activity, social capacity and vigour. Conclusions: Comparison of the scores obtained reveals that arch height has a negative impact on quality of life. Given the limited extent of available evidence in respect of the aetiology and treatment of foot diseases and deformities, these findings reveal the need to implement programmes to promote foot health and carry out further research into this commonly occurring disabling condition. PMID:25767305

  9. Haemodynamics in the mouse aortic arch computed from MRI-derived velocities at the aortic root.

    PubMed

    Van Doormaal, Mark A; Kazakidi, Asimina; Wylezinska, Marzena; Hunt, Anthony; Tremoleda, Jordi L; Protti, Andrea; Bohraus, Yvette; Gsell, Willy; Weinberg, Peter D; Ethier, C Ross

    2012-11-01

    Mice are widely used to investigate atherogenesis, which is known to be influenced by stresses related to blood flow. However, numerical characterization of the haemodynamic environment in the commonly studied aortic arch has hitherto been based on idealizations of inflow into the aorta. Our purpose in this work was to numerically characterize the haemodynamic environment in the mouse aortic arch using measured inflow velocities, and to relate the resulting shear stress patterns to known locations of high- and low-lesion prevalence. Blood flow velocities were measured in the aortic root of C57/BL6 mice using phase-contrast MRI. Arterial geometries were obtained by micro-CT of corrosion casts. These data were used to compute blood flow and wall shear stress (WSS) patterns in the arch. WSS profiles computed using realistic and idealized aortic root velocities differed significantly. An unexpected finding was that average WSS in the high-lesion-probability region on the inner wall was actually higher than the WSS in the low-probability region on the outer wall. Future studies of mouse aortic arch haemodynamics should avoid the use of idealized inflow velocity profiles. Lesion formation does not seem to uniquely associate with low or oscillating WSS in this segment, suggesting that other factors may also play a role in lesion localization. PMID:22764131

  10. Multimodal optical measurement in vitro of surface deformations and wall thickness of the pressurized aortic arch.

    PubMed

    Genovese, Katia; Humphrey, Jay D

    2015-04-01

    Computational modeling of arterial mechanics continues to progress, even to the point of allowing the study of complex regions such as the aortic arch. Nevertheless, most prior studies assign homogeneous and isotropic material properties and constant wall thickness even when implementing patient-specific luminal geometries obtained from medical imaging. These assumptions are not due to computational limitations, but rather to the lack of spatially dense sets of experimental data that describe regional variations in mechanical properties and wall thickness in such complex arterial regions. In this work, we addressed technical challenges associated with in vitro measurement of overall geometry, full-field surface deformations, and regional wall thickness of the porcine aortic arch in its native anatomical configuration. Specifically, we combined two digital image correlation-based approaches, standard and panoramic, to track surface geometry and finite deformations during pressurization, with a 360-deg fringe projection system to contour the outer and inner geometry. The latter provided, for the first time, information on heterogeneous distributions of wall thickness of the arch and associated branches in the unloaded state. Results showed that mechanical responses vary significantly with orientation and location (e.g., less extensible in the circumferential direction and with increasing distance from the heart) and that the arch exhibits a nearly linear increase in pressure-induced strain up to 40%, consistent with other findings on proximal porcine aortas. Thickness measurements revealed strong regional differences, thus emphasizing the need to include nonuniform thicknesses in theoretical and computational studies of complex arterial geometries.

  11. Intrinsic foot muscles have the capacity to control deformation of the longitudinal arch.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Luke A; Cresswell, Andrew G; Racinais, Sebastien; Whiteley, Rodney; Lichtwark, Glen

    2014-04-01

    The human foot is characterized by a pronounced longitudinal arch (LA) that compresses and recoils in response to external load during locomotion, allowing for storage and return of elastic energy within the passive structures of the arch and contributing to metabolic energy savings. Here, we examine the potential for active muscular contribution to the biomechanics of arch deformation and recoil. We test the hypotheses that activation of the three largest plantar intrinsic foot muscles, abductor hallucis, flexor digitorum and quadratus plantae is associated with muscle stretch in response to external load on the foot and that activation of these muscles (via electrical stimulation) will generate sufficient force to counter the deformation of LA caused by the external load. We found that recruitment of the intrinsic foot muscles increased with increasing load, beyond specific load thresholds. Interestingly, LA deformation and muscle stretch plateaued towards the maximum load of 150% body weight, when muscle activity was greatest. Electrical stimulation of the plantar intrinsic muscles countered the deformation that occurred owing to the application of external load by reducing the length and increasing the height of the LA. These findings demonstrate that these muscles have the capacity to control foot posture and LA stiffness and may provide a buttressing effect during foot loading. This active arch stiffening mechanism may have important implications for how forces are transmitted during locomotion and postural activities as well as consequences for metabolic energy saving.

  12. Rhinometric evaluation of nasal cavity geometry and its relation to the upper arch transverse distance.

    PubMed

    Paiva, João Batista; Alves, Adriana Silva; Ribeiro, Annelise Nazareth Cunha; Rino Neto, José; Fantini, Solange Mongeli de

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate children's respiratory patterns in the mixed dentition, by means of acoustic rhinometry, and its relation to the upper arch width development. Fifty patients were examined, 25 females and 25 males with mean age of eight years and seven months. All of them were submitted to acoustic rhinometry and upper and lower arch impressions to obtain plaster models. The upper arch analysis was accomplished by measuring the interdental transverse distance of the upper teeth, deciduous canines (measurement 1), deciduous first molars (measurement 2), deciduous second molars (measurement 3) and the first molars (measurement 4). The results showed that an increased left nasal cavity area in females means an increased interdental distance of the deciduous first molars and deciduous second molars and an increased interdental distance of the deciduous canines, deciduous first and second molars in males. It was concluded that there is a correlation between the nasal cavity area and the upper arch transverse distance in the anterior and mid maxillary regions for both genders. PMID:20027450

  13. Successful surgical treatment of mandibulo-zygomatic arch synostosis secondary to trauma in a dog

    PubMed Central

    Monteiro, Beatriz P.; Gibson, Thomas; Bratton, Alexandra

    2012-01-01

    This is a report of mandibulo-zygomatic arch synostosis in a dog 7 mo after trauma to the maxilla. Advanced diagnostic imaging was considered essential for characterization of the condition and treatment planning. Surgical excision of the bony proliferation and physiotherapy resulted in improved function within 6 wk. PMID:23024386

  14. C1 anterior arch preservation in transnasal odontoidectomy using three-dimensional endoscope: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Zenga, Francesco; Marengo, Nicola; Pacca, Paolo; Pecorari, Giancarlo; Ducati, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    Background: The transoral ventral corridor is the most common approach used to reach the craniovertebral junction (CVJ). Over the last decade, many case reports have demonstrated the transnasal corridor to the odontoid peg represents a practicable route to remove the tip of the odontoid process. The biomechanical consequences of the traditional odontoidectomy led to the necessity of a cervical spine stabilization. Preserving the inferior portion of the C1 anterior arch should prevent instability. Case Description: This is the first report in which the technique to remove the tip of the odontoid while preserving the C1 anterior arch is described by means of a three-dimensional (3D) endoscope. A 53-year-old man underwent a transnasal 3D endoscopic approach because of a complex CVJ malformation. The upper-medial portion of the C1 anterior arch was removed preserving its continuity, and the odontoidectomy was performed. After surgery, a dynamic X-ray scan showed no difference in CVJ motility in comparison with the preoperative one. Conclusions: The stereoscopic perception augmented the precision of the surgical gesture in the deep field. The importance of a 3D view relates to the depth of field, which a two-dimensional endoscopy cannot provide. This affects the preservation of the C1 anterior arch because of the presence of critical structures that are exposed to potential damage if not displayed. PMID:26759737

  15. Intrinsic foot muscles have the capacity to control deformation of the longitudinal arch

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Luke A.; Cresswell, Andrew G.; Racinais, Sebastien; Whiteley, Rodney; Lichtwark, Glen

    2014-01-01

    The human foot is characterized by a pronounced longitudinal arch (LA) that compresses and recoils in response to external load during locomotion, allowing for storage and return of elastic energy within the passive structures of the arch and contributing to metabolic energy savings. Here, we examine the potential for active muscular contribution to the biomechanics of arch deformation and recoil. We test the hypotheses that activation of the three largest plantar intrinsic foot muscles, abductor hallucis, flexor digitorum and quadratus plantae is associated with muscle stretch in response to external load on the foot and that activation of these muscles (via electrical stimulation) will generate sufficient force to counter the deformation of LA caused by the external load. We found that recruitment of the intrinsic foot muscles increased with increasing load, beyond specific load thresholds. Interestingly, LA deformation and muscle stretch plateaued towards the maximum load of 150% body weight, when muscle activity was greatest. Electrical stimulation of the plantar intrinsic muscles countered the deformation that occurred owing to the application of external load by reducing the length and increasing the height of the LA. These findings demonstrate that these muscles have the capacity to control foot posture and LA stiffness and may provide a buttressing effect during foot loading. This active arch stiffening mechanism may have important implications for how forces are transmitted during locomotion and postural activities as well as consequences for metabolic energy saving. PMID:24478287

  16. Prenatal diagnosis of the rare association of common arterial trunk and double aortic arch.

    PubMed

    Rock, Andrea; Eltayeb, Osama; Camarda, Joseph; Gotteiner, Nina

    2016-07-01

    Common arterial trunk with associated double aortic arch is a very rare constellation of congenital heart disease. Prenatal diagnosis allows for surgical repair prior to development of respiratory morbidity, which is otherwise described in all cases with this association. PMID:27386125

  17. The seismic response of concrete arch bridges (with focus on the Bixby Creek bridge Carmel, California)

    SciTech Connect

    Hoehler, M; McCallen, D; Noble, C

    1999-06-01

    The analysis, and subsequent retrofit, of concrete arch bridges during recent years has relied heavily on the use of computational simulation. For seismic analysis in particular, computer simulation, typically utilizing linear approximations of structural behavior, has become standard practice. This report presents the results of a comprehensive study of the significance of model sophistication (i.e. linear vs. nonlinear) and pertinent modeling assumptions on the dynamic response of concrete arch bridges. The study uses the Bixby Creek Bridge, located in California, as a case study. In addition to presenting general recommendations for analysis of this class of structures, this report provides an independent evaluation of the proposed seismic retrofit for the Bixby Creek Bridge. Results from the study clearly illustrate a reduction of displacement drifts and redistribution of member forces brought on by the inclusion of material nonlinearity. The analyses demonstrate that accurate modeling of expansion joints, for the Bixby Creek Bridge in particular, is critical to achieve representative modal and transient behavior. The inclusion of near-field displacement pulses in ground motion records was shown to significantly increase demand on the relatively softer, longer period Bixby Creek Bridge arch. Stiffer, shorter period arches, however, are more likely susceptible to variable support motions arising from the canyon topography typical for this class of bridges.

  18. Analysis of Yielding Steel Arch Support with Rock Bolts in Mine Roadways Stability Aspect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majcherczyk, Tadeusz; Niedbalski, Zbigniew; Małkowski, Piotr; Bednarek, łukasz

    2014-10-01

    The result of the search for new technological solutions in the field of support for roadways in coal mines has in recent years been the widespread use of steel arch with rockbolt support systems. The efficiency of these systems is affected among other things by the option of installing rock bolts after the actual driving the mine roadway, the increased load capacity that these systems can support, and their resistance to dynamic weight. Large variation in the way that these steel arch support can be connected using different types of rock bolts necessitates mining research revealing the effectiveness of such solutions. Although the steel arch with rockbolt support system is used in the majority of European coal mines, it is still not possible to apply templates of schemes due to the diversity of geological and mining conditions. Therefore, throughout a period of several years, the authors of this article conducted research in situ under conditions of different schemes related to connecting arched support frames with rock bolts, with only selected results being presented in the article. The measurements of convergence, load supported by the system frame, load supported by the rock bolts, and the stratification of roof rocks were analyzed, carried out in two roadways with yielding steel arch support in which strand bolts were applied. The article also proposes the index for working maintenance nuw, used in preliminarily assessing the stability of a given working with a limited number of data concerning geomechanical conditions. Additionally considered are empirical methods used in Poland for designing steel arch with rock bolt support systems. The results of mine research indicate that strengthening yielding steel support with strand bolts through steel beams maintains the stability of a roadway, even when exposed to the exploitation stress. Aside from the impact of exploitation, deformations of the support system are negligible, despite the fact that the tensile

  19. Total Aortic Arch Replacement: Superior Ventriculo-Arterial Coupling with Decellularized Allografts Compared with Conventional Prostheses

    PubMed Central

    Schmack, Bastian; Korkmaz, Sevil; Li, Shiliang; Chaimow, Nicole; Pätzold, Ines; Becher, Peter Moritz; Hartyánszky, István; Soós, Pál; Merkely, Gergő; Németh, Balázs Tamás; Istók, Roland; Veres, Gábor; Merkely, Béla; Terytze, Konstantin; Karck, Matthias; Szabó, Gábor

    2014-01-01

    Background To date, no experimental or clinical study provides detailed analysis of vascular impedance changes after total aortic arch replacement. This study investigated ventriculoarterial coupling and vascular impedance after replacement of the aortic arch with conventional prostheses vs. decellularized allografts. Methods After preparing decellularized aortic arch allografts, their mechanical, histological and biochemical properties were evaluated and compared to native aortic arches and conventional prostheses in vitro. In open-chest dogs, total aortic arch replacement was performed with conventional prostheses and compared to decellularized allografts (n = 5/group). Aortic flow and pressure were recorded continuously, left ventricular pressure-volume relations were measured by using a pressure-conductance catheter. From the hemodynamic variables end-systolic elastance (Ees), arterial elastance (Ea) and ventriculoarterial coupling were calculated. Characteristic impedance (Z) was assessed by Fourier analysis. Results While Ees did not differ between the groups and over time (4.1±1.19 vs. 4.58±1.39 mmHg/mL and 3.21±0.97 vs. 3.96±1.16 mmHg/mL), Ea showed a higher increase in the prosthesis group (4.01±0.67 vs. 6.18±0.20 mmHg/mL, P<0.05) in comparison to decellularized allografts (5.03±0.35 vs. 5.99±1.09 mmHg/mL). This led to impaired ventriculoarterial coupling in the prosthesis group, while it remained unchanged in the allograft group (62.5±50.9 vs. 3.9±23.4%). Z showed a strong increasing tendency in the prosthesis group and it was markedly higher after replacement when compared to decellularized allografts (44.6±8.3dyn·sec·cm−5 vs. 32.4±2.0dyn·sec·cm−5, P<0.05). Conclusions Total aortic arch replacement leads to contractility-afterload mismatch by means of increased impedance and invert ventriculoarterial coupling ratio after implantation of conventional prostheses. Implantation of decellularized allografts preserves vascular impedance

  20. Regulation of Dlx3 gene expression in visceral arches by evolutionarily conserved enhancer elements

    SciTech Connect

    Kenta Sumiyama; Frank H. Ruddle

    2003-04-01

    The mammalian Distal-less (Dlx) clusters (Dlx1-2, Dlx5-6, and Dlx3-7) have a nested expression pattern in developing visceral (branchial) arches. Genetic regulatory mechanisms controlling Dlx spatial expression within the visceral arches have not yet been defined. Here we show that an enhancer in the Dlx3-7 cluster can regulate the visceral arch specific expression pattern of the Dlx3 gene. We have used a 79-kb transgene construct containing the entire Dlx3-7 bigene cluster with a LacZ reporter inserted in frame in the first exon of the Dlx3 gene. Visceral arch expression is absent when a 4-kb element located within the Dlx3-7 intergenic region is deleted. A 245-bp element (I37-2) whose DNA sequence is highly conserved between human and mouse located within the 4kb-deleted region can drive visceral arch expression when fused to a hsp68-lacZ reporter transgene construct. Reporter expression is detected in 9.5 and 10.5 days postcoitum transgenic embryos in a manner consistent with the endogenous Dlx3 expression pattern in the mesenchyme of the first and second visceral arches. Thus the I37-2 element is both necessary and sufficient for Dlx3 expression. The I37-2 element contains several putative binding sites for several transcription factors including Dlx and other homeodomain proteins within the evolutionarily conserved region. Significantly, the I37-2 element shows a sequence-match including a Dlx binding site to a cis-element in the Dlx5-6 intermediate region designated mI56i [Zerucha, T., Stuhmer, T., Hatch, G., Park, B. K., Long, Q., Yu, G., Gambarotta, A., Schultz, J. R., Rubenstein, J. L. & Ekker, M. (2000) J. Neurosci. 20, 709-721], despite distant phylogenetic relationship between these clusters. Our results provide evidence for a concerted role for DLX auto- and cross-regulation in the establishment of a nested expression pattern for Dlx3-7 and Dlx5-6 clusters within the visceral arches.

  1. In Vitro Hemodynamic Investigation of the Embryonic Aortic Arch at Late Gestation

    PubMed Central

    Pekkan, Kerem; Dasi, Lakshmi P.; Nourparvar, Paymon; Yerneni, Srinivasu; Tobita, Kimimasa; Fogel, Mark A.; Keller, Bradley; Yoganathan, Ajit

    2013-01-01

    This study focuses on the dynamic flow through the fetal aortic arch driven by the concurrent action of right and left ventricles. We created a parametric pulsatile computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model of the fetal aortic junction with physiologic vessel geometries. To gain a better biophysical understanding an in vitro experimental fetal flow loop for flow visualization was constructed for identical CFD conditions. CFD and in vitro experimental results were comparable. Swirling flow during the acceleration phase of the cardiac cycle and unidirectional flow following mid-deceleration phase were observed in pulmonary arteries (PA), head-neck vessels, and descending aorta. Right-to-left (oxygenated) blood flowed through the ductus arteriosus (DA) posterior relative to the antegrade left ventricular outflow tract (LVOT) stream and resembled jet flow. LVOT and right ventricular outflow tract flow mixing had not completed until ~3.5 descending aorta diameters downstream of the DA insertion into the aortic arch. Normal arch model flow patterns were then compared to flow patterns of four common congenital heart malformations that include aortic arch anomalies. Weak oscillatory reversing flow through the DA junction was observed only for the Tetralogy of Fallot configuration. Pulmonary Atresia and Hypoplastic Left Heart Syndrome configurations demonstrated complex, abnormal flow patterns in the PAs and head-neck vessels. Aortic Coarctation resulted in large scale recirculating flow in the aortic arch proximal to the DA. Intravascular flow patterns spatially correlated with abnormal vascular structures consistent with the paradigm that abnormal intravascular flow patterns associated with congenital heart disease influence vascular growth and function. PMID:18466908

  2. Ideal or Young-Looking Brow Height and Arch Shape Preferred by Koreans.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Se Jin; Kim, Hun; Hwang, Kun; Kim, Seong Kee; Kim, Young Suk; Kim, Yeon Soo

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this study is to see which brow height and arch shape is preferred as ideal or young-looking by Koreans. A survey was conducted between June and Dec 2014 on 186 women who visited the brow bar ("Benefit" of Incheon city). They were asked to choose which they believed ideal and youngest amongst the 3 brow archetypes according to their height and 4 types of modification of Anastasia (rotation of medial and lateral arms), which was illustrated. Approximately half (52.5%) of the respondents answered that their brow matches them very well or well. Most (81.2%) believed there might be a method to yield an ideal brow archetype and almost all (97.3%) would change the brow shape if the expert advised. The most preferred ideal brow height was of a middle height (63.2%, the distance from the lateral canthus to the lateral end of eyebrow, which was 2/3 of the eye width). The most preferred ideal brow arch shape was the arched type (57.6% arches on a line drawn from the center of the nose through the center of the pupil). The most preferred young-looking brow height was of an upper height (46.2%, the distance from the lateral canthus to the lateral end of eyebrow was 3/4 of the eye width) followed by a middle height (39.7%). The most preferred young-looking brow arch shape was the head-up position (53.3%, medial arm of the brow was rotated upward to the horizontal plane). The result of this study might be useful in facial rejuvenation surgeries as well as in brow esthetics or tattooing of the eyebrows.

  3. When and how to replace the aortic arch for type A dissection.

    PubMed

    Di Bartolomeo, Roberto; Leone, Alessandro; Di Marco, Luca; Pacini, Davide

    2016-07-01

    Acute type A aortic dissection (AAAD) remains one of the most challenging diseases in cardiothoracic surgery and despite numerous innovations in medical and surgical management, early mortality remains high. The standard treatment of AAAD requires emergency surgery of the proximal aorta, preventing rupture and consequent cardiac tamponade. Resection of the primary intimal tear and repair of the aortic root and aortic valve are well-established surgical principles. However, the dissection in the aortic arch and descending untreated aorta remains. This injury is associated with the risk of subsequent false lumen dilatation potentially progressing to rupture, true lumen compression and distal malperfusion. Additionally, the dilatation of the aortic arch, the presence of a tear and retrograde dissection can all be considered indication for a total arch replacement in AAAD. In such cases a more aggressive strategy may be used, from the classic aortic arch operation to a single stage frozen elephant trunk (FET) technique or a two-stage approach such as the classical elephant trunk (ET) or the recent Lupiae technique. Although these are all feasible solutions, they are also complex and time demanding techniques requiring experience and expertise, with an in the length of cardiopulmonary bypass and both myocardial and visceral ischemia. Effective methods of cerebral, myocardial as well visceral protection are necessary to obtain acceptable results in terms of hospital mortality and morbidity. Moreover, a correct assessment of the anatomy of the dissection, through the preoperative angio CT scan, in addition to the clinical condition of the patients, remain the decision points for the best arch repair strategy to use in AAAD. PMID:27563552

  4. Comparison of invasive and non-invasive pressure gradients in aortic arch obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Wisotzkey, Bethany L.; Hornik, Christoph P.; Green, Amanda S.; Barker, Piers C. A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Aortic arch obstruction can be evaluated by catheter peak-to-peak gradient or by Doppler peak instantaneous pressure gradient. Previous studies have shown moderate correlation in discrete coarctation, but few have assessed correlation in patients with more complex aortic reconstruction. Methods We carried out retrospective comparison of cardiac catheterisations and pre- and post-catheterisation echocardiograms in 60 patients with native/recurrent coarctation or aortic reconstruction. Aortic arch obstruction was defined as peak-to-peak gradient ≥25 mmHg in patients with native/recurrent coarctation and ≥10 mmHg in aortic reconstruction. Results Diastolic continuation of flow was not associated with aortic arch obstruction in either group. Doppler peak instantaneous pressure gradient, with and without the expanded Bernoulli equation, weakly correlated with peak-to-peak gradient even in patients with a normal cardiac index (r=0.36, p=0.016, and r=0.49, p=0.001, respectively). Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis identified an area under the curve of 0.61 for patients with all types of obstruction, with a cut-off point of 45 mmHg correctly classifying 64% of patients with arch obstruction (sensitivity 39%, specificity 89%). In patients with aortic arch reconstruction who had a cardiac index ≥3 L/min/m2, a cut-off point of 23 mmHg correctly classified 69% of patients (71% sensitivity, 50% specificity) with an area under the curve of 0.82. Conclusion The non-invasive assessment of aortic obstruction remains challenging. The greatest correlation of Doppler indices was noted in patients with aortic reconstruction and a normal cardiac index. PMID:25602135

  5. When and how to replace the aortic arch for type A dissection

    PubMed Central

    Leone, Alessandro; Di Marco, Luca; Pacini, Davide

    2016-01-01

    Acute type A aortic dissection (AAAD) remains one of the most challenging diseases in cardiothoracic surgery and despite numerous innovations in medical and surgical management, early mortality remains high. The standard treatment of AAAD requires emergency surgery of the proximal aorta, preventing rupture and consequent cardiac tamponade. Resection of the primary intimal tear and repair of the aortic root and aortic valve are well-established surgical principles. However, the dissection in the aortic arch and descending untreated aorta remains. This injury is associated with the risk of subsequent false lumen dilatation potentially progressing to rupture, true lumen compression and distal malperfusion. Additionally, the dilatation of the aortic arch, the presence of a tear and retrograde dissection can all be considered indication for a total arch replacement in AAAD. In such cases a more aggressive strategy may be used, from the classic aortic arch operation to a single stage frozen elephant trunk (FET) technique or a two-stage approach such as the classical elephant trunk (ET) or the recent Lupiae technique. Although these are all feasible solutions, they are also complex and time demanding techniques requiring experience and expertise, with an in the length of cardiopulmonary bypass and both myocardial and visceral ischemia. Effective methods of cerebral, myocardial as well visceral protection are necessary to obtain acceptable results in terms of hospital mortality and morbidity. Moreover, a correct assessment of the anatomy of the dissection, through the preoperative angio CT scan, in addition to the clinical condition of the patients, remain the decision points for the best arch repair strategy to use in AAAD. PMID:27563552

  6. A review of the surgical management of right-sided aortic arch aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Barr, James G; Sepehripour, Amir H; Jarral, Omar A; Tsipas, Pantelis; Kokotsakis, John; Kourliouros, Antonios; Athanasiou, Thanos

    2016-07-01

    Aneurysms and dissections of the right-sided aortic arch are rare and published data are limited to a few case reports and small series. The optimal treatment strategy of this entity and the challenges associated with their management are not yet fully investigated and conclusive. We performed a systematic review of the literature to identify all patients who underwent surgical or endovascular intervention for right aortic arch aneurysms or dissections. The search was limited to the articles published only in English. We focused on presentation and critically assessed different management strategies and outcomes. We identified 74 studies that reported 99 patients undergoing surgical or endovascular intervention for a right aortic arch aneurysm or dissection. The median age was 61 years. The commonest presenting symptoms were chest or back pain and dysphagia. Eighty-eight patients had an aberrant left subclavian artery with only 11 patients having the mirror image variant of a right aortic arch. The commonest pathology was aneurysm arising from a Kommerell's diverticulum occurring in over 50% of the patients. Twenty-eight patients had dissections, 19 of these were Type B and 9 were Type A. Eighty-one patients had elective operations while 18 had emergency procedures. Sixty-seven patients underwent surgical treatment, 20 patients had hybrid surgical and endovascular procedures and 12 had totally endovascular procedure. There were 5 deaths, 4 of which were in patients undergoing emergency surgery and none in the endovascular repair group. Aneurysms and dissections of a right-sided aortic arch are rare. Advances in endovascular treatment and hybrid surgical and endovascular management are making this rare pathology amenable to these approaches and may confer improved outcomes compared with conventional extensive repair techniques.

  7. Ideal or Young-Looking Brow Height and Arch Shape Preferred by Koreans.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Se Jin; Kim, Hun; Hwang, Kun; Kim, Seong Kee; Kim, Young Suk; Kim, Yeon Soo

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this study is to see which brow height and arch shape is preferred as ideal or young-looking by Koreans. A survey was conducted between June and Dec 2014 on 186 women who visited the brow bar ("Benefit" of Incheon city). They were asked to choose which they believed ideal and youngest amongst the 3 brow archetypes according to their height and 4 types of modification of Anastasia (rotation of medial and lateral arms), which was illustrated. Approximately half (52.5%) of the respondents answered that their brow matches them very well or well. Most (81.2%) believed there might be a method to yield an ideal brow archetype and almost all (97.3%) would change the brow shape if the expert advised. The most preferred ideal brow height was of a middle height (63.2%, the distance from the lateral canthus to the lateral end of eyebrow, which was 2/3 of the eye width). The most preferred ideal brow arch shape was the arched type (57.6% arches on a line drawn from the center of the nose through the center of the pupil). The most preferred young-looking brow height was of an upper height (46.2%, the distance from the lateral canthus to the lateral end of eyebrow was 3/4 of the eye width) followed by a middle height (39.7%). The most preferred young-looking brow arch shape was the head-up position (53.3%, medial arm of the brow was rotated upward to the horizontal plane). The result of this study might be useful in facial rejuvenation surgeries as well as in brow esthetics or tattooing of the eyebrows. PMID:26167996

  8. Multilineage differentiation of ectomesenchymal cells isolated from the first branchial arch.

    PubMed

    Deng, M J; Jin, Y; Shi, J N; Lu, H B; Liu, Y; He, D W; Nie, X; Smith, A J

    2004-01-01

    Cranial neural crest-derived ectomesenchymal cells may be pluripotent stem cells that are capable of generating a range of phenotypes. The fate of these cells appears to be determined in part by intrinsic genetic programs and also by the influence of extracellular signals in the local environment. The extent of lineage determination once neural crest cells have migrated to the first branchial arch is not clear, although branchial arch pattern is not thought to be the result of crest predetermination. The aim of the present study was to test the hypothesis that ectomesenchymal cells of the first branchial arch show properties of pluripotent stem cells, the lineage of which may be directed by specific molecular signaling. Ectomesenchymal cells were enzymatically isolated from the mandibular processes of BALB/c mice and maintained in an undifferentiated state while cultured with leukemia inhibitory factor or induced to differentiate by lineage-specific induction factors or growth conditions, including transforming growth factor beta, forskolin, and a mineralization-promoting medium. Morphological observations and immunocytochemistry demonstrated that cells could be induced to differentiate into smooth muscle cells, glial cells, and osteoblasts, respectively. In the presence of the mineralization-promoting medium, alkaline phosphatase activity increased significantly and mineralization nodules formed. The data reported support the concept that many, although not all, first branchial arch-derived ectomesenchymal cells show properties of multipotent stem cells, the subsequent fate of which can be influenced by induction factors and growth conditions. Some cells, however, showed a degree of commitment with respect to their fate. The possible application of first branchial arch-derived stem cells to tissue engineering of the orofacial tissues should involve consideration of the developmental stage of cell harvesting and the desired cell fate.

  9. A quantitative method for defining high-arched palate using the Tcof1(+/-) mutant mouse as a model.

    PubMed

    Conley, Zachary R; Hague, Molly; Kurosaka, Hiroshi; Dixon, Jill; Dixon, Michael J; Trainor, Paul A

    2016-07-15

    The palate functions as the roof of the mouth in mammals, separating the oral and nasal cavities. Its complex embryonic development and assembly poses unique susceptibilities to intrinsic and extrinsic disruptions. Such disruptions may cause failure of the developing palatal shelves to fuse along the midline resulting in a cleft. In other cases the palate may fuse at an arch, resulting in a vaulted oral cavity, termed high-arched palate. There are many models available for studying the pathogenesis of cleft palate but a relative paucity for high-arched palate. One condition exhibiting either cleft palate or high-arched palate is Treacher Collins syndrome, a congenital disorder characterized by numerous craniofacial anomalies. We quantitatively analyzed palatal perturbations in the Tcof1(+/-) mouse model of Treacher Collins syndrome, which phenocopies the condition in humans. We discovered that 46% of Tcof1(+/-) mutant embryos and new born pups exhibit either soft clefts or full clefts. In addition, 17% of Tcof1(+/-) mutants were found to exhibit high-arched palate, defined as two sigma above the corresponding wild-type population mean for height and angular based arch measurements. Furthermore, palatal shelf length and shelf width were decreased in all Tcof1(+/-) mutant embryos and pups compared to controls. Interestingly, these phenotypes were subsequently ameliorated through genetic inhibition of p53. The results of our study therefore provide a simple, reproducible and quantitative method for investigating models of high-arched palate.

  10. Asymptomatic Interrupted Aortic Arch, Severe Tricuspid Regurgitation, and Bicuspid Aortic Valve in a 76-Year-Old Woman

    PubMed Central

    Tajdini, Masih; Sardari, Akram; Forouzannia, Seyed Khalil; Baradaran, Abdolvahab; Hosseini, Seyed Mohammad Reza

    2016-01-01

    Interrupted aortic arch is a rare congenital abnormality with a high infancy mortality rate. The principal finding is loss of luminal continuity between the ascending and descending portions of the aorta. Because of the high mortality rate in infancy, interrupted aortic arch is very rare among adults. In this report, we describe the case of a 76-year-old woman with asymptomatic interrupted aortic arch, severe tricuspid regurgitation, and bicuspid aortic valve. To our knowledge, she is the oldest patient ever reported with this possibly unique combination of pathologic conditions. In addition to reporting her case, we review the relevant medical literature. PMID:27777532

  11. Incidence of Branching Patterns Variations of the Arch in Aortic Dissection in Chinese Patients

    PubMed Central

    Tapia, G. Pullas; Zhu, Xiaohua; Xu, Jing; Liang, Pan; Su, Gang; Liu, Hai; Liu, Yang; Shu, Liliang; Liu, Shuiqi; Huang, Chen

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Several authors have described anatomic variations of the aortic arch in 13% to 20% of the patients who do not have aortic disease. However, few studies have evaluated these patterns in the thoracic aortic dissection (TAD). In the authors’ knowledge, this is the first survey that specifically investigates the frequency of these variations in a broad, nonselected group of Chinese patients with aortic dissection. Furthermore, it compares this group with a group of patients without aortic disease. The objective of this study was to define the variation frequency of the aortic arch branches pattern using the tomographic studies of 525 Chinese patients with a diagnosis of TAD. The Stanford classification was used to set the site of the initial tear of the dissection. In addition, we performed an epidemiological analysis of the aortic arch anatomic variations in TAD, and its possible implications for surgical or endovascular treatment. The general hypothesis proposal asserted that Chinese patients with dissection of the aorta have a similar incidence of variations of the aortic arch to the patients without aortic disease. A retrospective study of cases and controls was carried out using the tomographic studies (CT) of all patients admitted to the First Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University, located at Henan-China, with a confirmed diagnosis of aortic dissection from January 2012 until December 2014. The group of cases consisted of 525 patients: 374 men and 151 women, with a mean age of 52.27 years (range, 20–89). The average age of the patients with Stanford A and B aortic dissection was 49.46 and 53.67, respectively. The control group consisted of 525 unselected patients without TAD who underwent a CT scan of the chest due to other indications. This group consisted of 286 men and 239 women, with a mean age of 53.60 years (range, 18–89). All the patients with aneurysm or dissection were excluded from the control group. We performed a statistical

  12. Surgical repair of distal arch psendoaneurysm from ruptured penetrating aortic ulcer with the frozen elephant trunk technique.

    PubMed

    Kokotsakis, John; Tassopoulos, Dimitrios; Ttofi, Jacob; Harling, Leanne; Ashrafian, Hutan; Velissarios, Konstantinos; Kratimenos, Theodore; Anagnostou, Stratos; Athanasiou, Thanos

    2014-04-05

    Ruptured Penetrating Ulcer and aortic arch pseudo-aneurysm is a rare condition but one which carries a high risk of rupture. We report the case of a 74-year-old man with aortic arch pseudo-aneurysm, in which a Frozen Elephant Trunk procedure was successfully performed. There were no postoperative complications at 6 months follow-up. The Computed Tomography Angiogram demonstrated thrombus formation in the pseudo-aneurysm lumen, with no endoleak on the stented part of the descending thoracic aorta and complete patency of all branches of aortic arch. This case demonstrates that the Frozen Elephant Trunk technique may be the treatment of choice when treating such complex aortic arch lesions provided there is no absolute contraindication to radical surgical intervention. However, long-term clinical efficacy and safety have yet to be confirmed.

  13. Difficulties in distinguishing between an atlas fracture and a congenital posterior atlas arch defect in postmortem analysis.

    PubMed

    Sanchis-Gimeno, Juan A; Blanco-Perez, Esther; Aparicio, Luis; Martinez-Soriano, Francisco; Martinez-Sanjuan, Vicente

    2014-09-01

    We found one atlas from a sample of 148 skeletons (0.67%) that presented different anatomical variations which made it difficult to determine whether the vertebra had an atlas fracture, an unusual Type B posterior atlas arch defect, or a combination of both. We carried out a stereomicroscopy, radiographic, and computerized tomography scan study that revealed that the dry atlas we found presented a very uncommon congenital Type B posterior atlas arch defect, simulating a fracture. In short, the present paper has revealed that differentiating Type B posterior atlas arch defects from fractures in post-mortem dry vertebrae is more difficult than expected. Thus we believe that it can be easier than expected to mistake Type B posterior arch defects for fractures and vice versa in postmortem studies. PMID:25037687

  14. Cephalic arch stenosis in dialysis patients: review of clinical relevance, anatomy, current theories on etiology and management.

    PubMed

    Sivananthan, Gajan; Menashe, Leo; Halin, Neil J

    2014-01-01

    Arteriovenous hemodialysis fistulas (AVFs) serve as a lifeline for many individuals with end-stage renal failure. A common cause of AVF failure is cephalic arch stenosis. Its high prevalence compounded with its resistance to treatment makes cephalic arch stenosis important to understand. Proposed etiologies include altered flow in a fistulized cephalic vein, external compression by fascia, the unique morphology of the cephalic arch, large number of valves in the cephalic outflow tract and biochemical changes that accompany renal failure. Management options are also in debate and include angioplasty, cutting balloon angioplasty, bare metal stents, stent grafts and surgical techniques including flow reduction with minimally invasive banding as well as more invasive venovenostomy with transposition surgeries for refractory cases. In this review, the evidence for the clinical relevance of cephalic arch stenosis, its etiology and management are summarized.

  15. Video-assisted thoracoscopic left lower lobectomy in a patient with lung cancer and a right aortic arch.

    PubMed

    Wada, Hideyuki; Hida, Yasuhiro; Kaga, Kichizo; Hase, Ryunosuke; Ohtaka, Kazuto; Muto, Jun; Reiko, Nakada-Kubota; Hirano, Satoshi; Matsui, Yoshiro

    2012-01-01

    A right aortic arch is a rare congenital anomaly, with a reported incidence of around 0.1%. A patient with a right aortic arch underwent video-assisted thoracic surgery left lower lobectomy and mediastinal lymph node dissection for squamous cell carcinoma. There was no aortic arch or descending aorta in the left thoracic cavity, but the esophagus. There was no anomaly in the location or branching of the pulmonary vessels, the bronchi, and the lobulation of the lungs. The vagus nerve was found at the level of the left pulmonary artery. The arterial ligament was found between the left subclavian artery and the left pulmonary artery. The recurrent laryngeal nerve was recurrent around the left subclavian artery. A Kommerell diverticulum was found at the origin of the left subclavian artery. The patient experienced no complications. We conclude that video-assisted thoracoscopic lobectomy with mediastinal dissection is feasible for treating lung cancer with a right aortic arch.

  16. MR angiography of the anomalous branching of aortic arch and left subclavian artery arising from Kommerell's diverticulum. Case report.

    PubMed

    Silit, E; Mutlu, H; Karaman, B; Basekim, C C

    2004-03-01

    We report the magnetic resonance (MR) angiographic findings of an asymptomatic case with abnormal branching of aortic arch and Kommerell's diverticulum, which to our knowledge has not been described previously.

  17. Endovascular repair of a type B aortic dissection with a right-sided aortic arch: case report

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Right-sided aortic arch is a rare anomaly, and aortic dissection involving a right-sided aortic arch is extremely rare. We report the case of a 65-year-old man with a right-sided aortic arch and a right descending aortic dissection and a stent-graft was accurately deployed without perioperative complications. There were no any complaints and complications after 18 months follow-up. The CTA demonstrated that the false lumen was largely thrombosed only with a mild type II endoleak and a mild descending aortic expansion. We feel that endovascular repair is feasible to patient of type B aortic dissection with a right-sided aortic arch. However, long-term clinical efficacy and safety have yet to be confirmed. PMID:23343010

  18. Assistant DNA recycling with nicking endonuclease and molecular beacon for signal amplification using a target-complementary arched structure.

    PubMed

    Gao, Fenglei; Lei, Jianping; Ju, Huangxian

    2013-05-11

    A simple and universal method for ultrasensitive "signal on" detection of DNA was developed with a target-complementary arched structure to release assistant DNA, which was recycled with nicking endonuclease to amplify the detectable fluorescent signal of molecular beacons.

  19. A case of balanced type double aortic arch diagnosed incidentally by transthoracic echocardiography in an asymptomatic adult patient.

    PubMed

    Seo, Han Seok; Park, Yong Hyun; Lee, Ju Hyoung; Hur, So Chong; Ko, Yu Jin; Park, So Yeon; Kim, Jun Hwan; Kim, Young Jung; Kim, So Yon; Kwon, Nak Hyun

    2011-09-01

    A 36-year-old male patient with no remarkable medical history was admitted to our hospital for a health check up. On chest radiography, bilateral aortic notches at the level of aortic arch were shown suggesting aortic arch anomaly without any clinical symptoms. Two aortic arches were almost same-in-size on suprasternal view of transthoracic echocardiography. In addition, multidetector computed tomography showed balanced type double aortic arch forming a complete vascular ring which encircled the trachea and esophagus. The trachea was slightly compressed by the vascular ring whereas the esophagus was intact. Nevertheless, the pulmonary function test was normal. The patient was discharged from hospital with instructions for periodic follow-up.

  20. Mycotic aortic arch aneurysm coexistent with constrictive pericarditis: is surgery a dangerous resort?

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Peter S. Y.; Yu, Simon C. H.; Chu, Cheuk-Man; Kwok, Micky W. T.; Lam, Yuk-Hoi; Underwood, Malcolm J.

    2016-01-01

    An elderly man presented with fever and evidence of Salmonella infection, and was diagnosed to have coexisting constrictive pericarditis and mycotic aneurysm of the aortic arch. Pericardiectomy was performed under cardiopulmonary bypass with good result. To avoid deep hypothermic circulatory arrest, an aorto-brachiocephalic bypass, instead of total arch replacement, was performed. This was followed by a staged carotid-carotid bypass, thoracic endovascular stent graft placement. He was subsequently treated with prolonged antibiotics, and inflammatory marker normalized afterwards. He was last seen well 2 years after the operation. Follow-up computer tomography (CT) scan at 18 months post-op showed no evidence of endoleak or fistulation. Our case demonstrated that a hybrid treatment of open pericardiectomy and aortic debranching followed by thoracic endovascular stent graft placement is feasible and associated with satisfactory mid-term outcome. PMID:27621905

  1. Ambient modal testing of a double-arch dam: the experimental campaign and model updating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Palacios, Jaime H.; Soria, José M.; Díaz, Iván M.; Tirado-Andrés, Francisco

    2016-09-01

    A finite element model updating of a double-curvature-arch dam (La Tajera, Spain) is carried out hereof using the modal parameters obtained from an operational modal analysis. That is, the system modal dampings, natural frequencies and mode shapes have been identified using output-only identification techniques under environmental loads (wind, vehicles). A finite element model of the dam-reservoir-foundation system was initially created. Then, a testing campaing was then carried out from the most significant test points using high-sensitivity accelerometers wirelessly synchronized. Afterwards, the model updating of the initial model was done using a Monte Carlo based approach in order to match it to the recorded dynamic behaviour. The updated model may be used within a structural health monitoring system for damage detection or, for instance, for the analysis of the seismic response of the arch dam- reservoir-foundation coupled system.

  2. Rehabilitation of maxillary arch with attachment-retained mesh-reinforced single complete denture.

    PubMed

    Vamsi Krishna, C H; Rao, A Kaleshwar; Sekhar, N Chandra; Shastry, Y Mahadev

    2014-02-26

    Fabrication of conventional complete dentures was one of the most commonly advised treatment options to mange edentulous patients since many years. One of the commonly encountered challenging tasks in prosthodontics is a clinical situation in which patients have maxillary completely edentulous arches opposing mandibular natural dentition. This situation can be effectively managed by retaining some of the natural teeth as overdenture abutments. Tooth supported overdenture retained by attachments will improve retention, support and stability, and reduces rate of ridge resorption along with psychological benefits to the patients by providing tactile sensation. The present case report describes management of patients with edentulous maxillary arch opposing natural mandibular dentition-rehabilitated attachment-retained mesh-reinforced overdenture.

  3. Principles of Antegrade Cerebral Perfusion During Arch Reconstruction in Newborns/Infants

    PubMed Central

    Fraser, Charles D.; Andropoulos, Dean B.

    2008-01-01

    Antegrade cerebral perfusion (ACP) is a cardiopulmonary bypass technique that uses special cannulation procedures to perfuse only the brain during neonatal and infant aortic arch reconstruction. It is used in lieu of deep hypothermic circulatory arrest (DHCA), and thus has the theoretical advantage of protecting the brain from hypoxic ischemic injury. Despite this, recent comparative studies have demonstrated no difference in neurodevelopmental outcomes with ACP vs. DHCA for neonatal arch repair. This article presents animal and human data demonstrating that ACP flows less than 30 ml/kg/min are inadequate for many patients, and may be the explanation for lack of outcome difference vs. DHCA. A technique for ACP, its physiologic basis, and a neuromonitoring strategy are presented, and then the results of an outcome study are reviewed demonstrating that with ACP technique at higher flows of 50–80 ml/kg/min guided by neuromonitoring, periventricular leukomalacia (PVL) is eliminated on postoperative brain MRI after neonatal cardiac surgery. PMID:18396227

  4. Clinical and Laboratory Steps for Fabricating a Complete-Arch Fixed Prosthesis Using CAD/CAM.

    PubMed

    Keerthi, Senthil; Proussaefs, Periklis; Lozada, Jaime

    2015-01-01

    The fabrication of a full-arch maxillary prosthesis has been associated with several prosthetic complications and difficulties. Even though it has been reported that phonetics, esthetics, and proper lip support are difficult to achieve, there is a scarcity in the literature regarding the clinical and laboratory procedures necessary to minimize these complications. This article provides clinical and laboratory steps that may enable the clinician to achieve more predictable restorative results when using computer-aided design/computer-assisted manufacture (CAD/CAM) to fabricate a full-arch maxillary implant-supported prosthesis. The technique presented here describes the use of an implant-retained diagnostic wax-up that is subsequently duplicated to an interim polymethylmethacrylate prosthesis using CAD/CAM before fabricating the definitive restoration.

  5. Mycotic aortic arch aneurysm coexistent with constrictive pericarditis: is surgery a dangerous resort?

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Peter S. Y.; Yu, Simon C. H.; Chu, Cheuk-Man; Kwok, Micky W. T.; Lam, Yuk-Hoi; Underwood, Malcolm J.

    2016-01-01

    An elderly man presented with fever and evidence of Salmonella infection, and was diagnosed to have coexisting constrictive pericarditis and mycotic aneurysm of the aortic arch. Pericardiectomy was performed under cardiopulmonary bypass with good result. To avoid deep hypothermic circulatory arrest, an aorto-brachiocephalic bypass, instead of total arch replacement, was performed. This was followed by a staged carotid-carotid bypass, thoracic endovascular stent graft placement. He was subsequently treated with prolonged antibiotics, and inflammatory marker normalized afterwards. He was last seen well 2 years after the operation. Follow-up computer tomography (CT) scan at 18 months post-op showed no evidence of endoleak or fistulation. Our case demonstrated that a hybrid treatment of open pericardiectomy and aortic debranching followed by thoracic endovascular stent graft placement is feasible and associated with satisfactory mid-term outcome.

  6. [Right patent ductus arteriosus with an ipsilateral aortic arch: percutaneous closure with amplatzer devices].

    PubMed

    Santiago, Justo; Acuña, Manuel; Arispe, Elizabeth; Camargo, Ronaldo; Neves, Juliana; Arnoni, Daniel; Fontes, Valmir F; Pedra, Carlos A

    2007-03-01

    The association of a right aortic arch with an ipsilateral patent ductus arteriosus is rare, especially when there are no other intracardiac anomalies. We report three female patients aged 26, 35 and 9 years with this combination in whom previous attempts at surgical closure by thoracotomy and sternotomy were unsuccessful and who subsequently underwent successful percutaneous closure of the defects using Amplatzer devices. In two patients, although angiography demonstrated the presence of type-A patent ductus arteriosus, it was not possible to determine the minimum diameter accurately and it was necessary to measure it using a sizing balloon. An Amplatzer duct occluder was used in two patients and an Amplatzer muscular ventricular septal defect occluder, in the other. In all patients, full closure was confirmed in the catheterization laboratory and the patients were discharged on the same day with no complications. Percutaneous closure of a right patent ductus arteriosus associated with a right aortic arch is feasible, safe and effective.

  7. A case report of persistent fifth aortic arch presenting with severe left ventricular dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Nakashima, Kouki; Oka, Norihiko; Hayashi, Hidenori; Shibata, Miyuki; Kitamura, Tadashi; Itatani, Keiichi; Miyaji, Kagami

    2014-01-01

    According to several previous reports on persistent fifth aortic arch (PFAA), the presentation of the patients was usually either very mild when diagnosed by physical examination including upper body systemic hypertension and systolic murmur, or severe with ductal shock in the neonatal period. In our case, the clinical course was unique with relatively mild narrowing at the distal PFAA and an interrupted fourth aortic arch. It can be classified as medium severity based on the timing of presentation to the hospital. In the present case, severe LV dysfunction suggested sustained narrowing at the junction between the PFAA and the descending aorta and insufficient development of collateral arteries.We experienced a case with PFAA with severe LV dysfunction. These findings suggest another differential diagnosis for severe LV dysfunction in infancy.

  8. Hand1 phosphoregulation within the distal arch neural crest is essential for craniofacial morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Firulli, Beth A; Fuchs, Robyn K; Vincentz, Joshua W; Clouthier, David E; Firulli, Anthony B

    2014-08-01

    In this study we examine the consequences of altering Hand1 phosphoregulation in the developing neural crest cells (NCCs) of mice. Whereas Hand1 deletion in NCCs reveals a nonessential role for Hand1 in craniofacial development and embryonic survival, altering Hand1 phosphoregulation, and consequently Hand1 dimerization affinities, in NCCs results in severe mid-facial clefting and neonatal death. Hand1 phosphorylation mutants exhibit a non-cell-autonomous increase in pharyngeal arch cell death accompanied by alterations in Fgf8 and Shh pathway expression. Together, our data indicate that the extreme distal pharyngeal arch expression domain of Hand1 defines a novel bHLH-dependent activity, and that disruption of established Hand1 dimer phosphoregulation within this domain disrupts normal craniofacial patterning.

  9. Mycotic aortic arch aneurysm coexistent with constrictive pericarditis: is surgery a dangerous resort?

    PubMed

    Yu, Peter S Y; Yu, Simon C H; Chu, Cheuk-Man; Kwok, Micky W T; Lam, Yuk-Hoi; Underwood, Malcolm J; Wong, Randolph H L

    2016-08-01

    An elderly man presented with fever and evidence of Salmonella infection, and was diagnosed to have coexisting constrictive pericarditis and mycotic aneurysm of the aortic arch. Pericardiectomy was performed under cardiopulmonary bypass with good result. To avoid deep hypothermic circulatory arrest, an aorto-brachiocephalic bypass, instead of total arch replacement, was performed. This was followed by a staged carotid-carotid bypass, thoracic endovascular stent graft placement. He was subsequently treated with prolonged antibiotics, and inflammatory marker normalized afterwards. He was last seen well 2 years after the operation. Follow-up computer tomography (CT) scan at 18 months post-op showed no evidence of endoleak or fistulation. Our case demonstrated that a hybrid treatment of open pericardiectomy and aortic debranching followed by thoracic endovascular stent graft placement is feasible and associated with satisfactory mid-term outcome. PMID:27621905

  10. Right Aortic Arch and Kommerell's Diverticulum Repaired without Reconstruction of Aberrant Left Subclavian Artery.

    PubMed

    Osawa, Hiroshi; Shinohara, Daisuke; Orii, Kouan; Hosaka, Shigeru; Fukuda, Shoji; Akashi, Okihiko; Furukawa, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    Right aortic arch with Kommerell's diverticulum is a very rare situation. Surgical treatment is recommended for symptomatic patients or asymptomatic patients with a large diverticulum. However planning the strategy of operation is difficult without a 3D imaging. We report a case of a 57-year-old man with right aortic arch, Kommerell's diverticulum, and aberrant left subclavian artery. After a 3D-CT imaging, the patient underwent descending aortic replacement without reconstruction of aberrant left subclavian artery. After operation, there was no signs or symptoms of ischemia of the left arm. If the reconstruction of the aberrant subclavian artery was too difficult, closing its orifice is an acceptable decision. It has been found advantageous because of a decrease blood loss and a shorter cardiopulmonary bypass duration. If an ischemia of the arm is noticed, additional reconstruction will have to be considered. 3D-CT imaging was very useful to have a proper orientation and plan for the operative strategy.

  11. Endovascular repair of ruptured aberrant left subclavian artery with right aortic arch.

    PubMed

    Motoki, Manabu; Hattori, Koji; Kato, Yasuyuki; Takahashi, Yosuke; Kotani, Shinsuke; Nishimura, Shinsuke; Shibata, Toshihiko

    2013-02-01

    Association of a right-sided aortic arch with an aberrant left subclavian artery is rare. We present a case of successful endovascular repair of a ruptured Kommerell diverticulum associated with a right-sided aortic arch and aberrant left subclavian artery. We treated a 47-year-old woman with a diagnosis of ruptured aberrant left subclavian artery with thoracic endovascular stent-grafts. The descending aorta above Kommerell diverticulum was a reverse-tapered configuration. We managed the rather hostile neck with an extra-large Palmaz stent. A left carotid-to-subclavian bypass with an 8-mm Dacron graft was also performed to restore left arm perfusion and prevent vertebrobasilar insufficiency.

  12. Arch-bridge Lift Process Monitoring by Using Packaged Optical Fibre Strain Sensors with Temperature Compensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mokhtar, M. R.; Sun, T.; Grattan, K. T. V.; Owens, K.; Kwasny, J.; Taylor, S. E.; Basheer, P. A. M.; Cleland, D.; Bai, Y.; Sonebi, M.; Davis, G.; Gupta, A.; Hogg, I.; Bell, B.; Doherty, W.; McKeague, S.; Moore, D.; Greeves, K.

    2011-08-01

    This paper presents a novel sensor design and packaging, specifically developed to allow fibre grating-based sensors to be used in harsh, in-the-field measurement conditions for accurate strain measurement, with full temperature compensation. After these sensors are carefully packaged and calibrated in the laboratory, they are installed onto the paragrid of a set of flat-packed concrete units, created specifically for forming a small-scale, lightweight and inexpensive flexi-arch bridge. During the arch-bridge lifting process, the sensors are used for real-time strain measurements to ensure the quality of the construction. During the work done, the sensors have demonstrated enhanced resilience when embedded in concrete structures, providing accurate and consistent strain measurements during the whole installation process and beyond into monitoring the integrity and use of the structure.

  13. Dinosaur tracks from the Cedar Mountain Formation (Lower Cretaceous), Arches National Park, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lockley, M.G.; White, D.; Kirkland, J.; Santucci, V.

    2004-01-01

    The seventh and largest known dinosaur tracksite from the Cedar Mountain Formation is reported from two important stratigraphic levels in the Ruby Ranch Member within the boundaries of Arches National Park. Previous reports of sites with a few isolated tracks are of limited utility in indicating the fauna represented by track makers. The Arches site reveals evidence of several theropod morphotypes, including a possible match for the coelurosaur Nedcolbertia and an apparently didactyl Utahraptor-like dromeosaurid. Sauropod tracks indicate a wide-gauge morphotype (cf. Brontopodus). Ornithischian tracks suggest the presence of an iguandontid-like ornithopod and a large ankylosaur. Dinosaur track diversity is high in comparison with other early Cretaceous vertebrate ichnofaunas, and it correlates well with faunal lists derived from skeletal remains, thus providing a convincing census of the known fauna. ?? Taylor and Francis Inc.

  14. Palatal and alveolar arch dimensions in 47,XXY (Klinefelter syndrome) men.

    PubMed

    Laine, T; Alvesalo, L

    1993-02-01

    Men with one extra X chromosome (47,XXY; Klinefelter syndrome) show a tendency to have a shallower but longer palate than normal (46,XY) men. The palate is also narrower than in 46,XY men. The mandible is clearly narrower but sagittally longer compared with the mandibles of 46,XY men. The present results indicate that the presence of one extra X chromosome in 47,XXY men is reflected in decreased growth of the maxilla transversely and vertically and of the mandible transversely. Increased length of the alveolar arches might be partly a compensation for the decreased width of the alveolar arch. This change might be associated with larger tooth sizes in 47,XXY men. Unbalanced appositional growth rather than disturbances in other orofacial growth mechanisms might be associated with the XXY sex chromosome pattern.

  15. Hand1 phosphoregulation within the distal arch neural crest is essential for craniofacial morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Firulli, Beth A.; Fuchs, Robyn K.; Vincentz, Joshua W.; Clouthier, David E.; Firulli, Anthony B.

    2014-01-01

    In this study we examine the consequences of altering Hand1 phosphoregulation in the developing neural crest cells (NCCs) of mice. Whereas Hand1 deletion in NCCs reveals a nonessential role for Hand1 in craniofacial development and embryonic survival, altering Hand1 phosphoregulation, and consequently Hand1 dimerization affinities, in NCCs results in severe mid-facial clefting and neonatal death. Hand1 phosphorylation mutants exhibit a non-cell-autonomous increase in pharyngeal arch cell death accompanied by alterations in Fgf8 and Shh pathway expression. Together, our data indicate that the extreme distal pharyngeal arch expression domain of Hand1 defines a novel bHLH-dependent activity, and that disruption of established Hand1 dimer phosphoregulation within this domain disrupts normal craniofacial patterning. PMID:25053435

  16. Modelling and numerical simulation of the human aortic arch under in vivo conditions.

    PubMed

    García-Herrera, Claudio M; Celentano, Diego J

    2013-11-01

    This work presents the modelling and simulation of the mechanical behaviour of the human aortic arch under in vivo conditions with pressure levels within the normal and hypertension physiological range. The cases studied correspond to young and aged arteries without cardiovascular pathologies. First, the tissue of these two groups is characterised via in vitro tensile test measurements that make it possible to derive the material parameters of a hyperelastic isotropic constitutive model. Then, these material parameters are used in the simulation of young and aged aortic arches subjected to in vivo normal and hypertension conditions. Overall, the numerical results were found not only to provide a realistic description of the mechanical behaviour of the vessel but also to be useful data that allow the adequate definition of stress/stretch-based criteria to predict its failure.

  17. Three-Dimensional Aquila Rift: Magnetized HI Arch Anchored by Molecular Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sofue, Yoshiaki; Nakanishi, Hiroyuki

    2016-09-01

    Three dimensional structure of the Aquila Rift of magnetized neutral gas is investigated by analyzing HI and CO line data. The projected distance on the Galactic plane of the HI arch of the Rift is r⊥ ˜ 250 pc from the Sun. The HI arch emerges at l ˜ 30°, reaches to altitudes as high as ˜500 pc above the plane at l ˜ 350°, and returns to the disk at l ˜ 270°. The extent of arch at positive latitudes is ˜1 kpc and radius is ˜100 pc. The eastern root is associated with the giant molecular cloud complex, which is the main body of the optically defined Aquila Rift. The HI and molecular masses of the Rift are estimated to be M_HI˜ 1.4× 10^5M_{⊙ bullet } and M_H_2˜ 3× 10^5M_{⊙ bullet }. Gravitational energies to lift the gases to their heights are Egrav: HI ˜ 1.4 × 1051 and E_{grav: H_2}˜ 0.3× 10^{51} erg, respectively. Magnetic field is aligned along the HI arch of the Rift, and the strength is measured to be B ˜ 10 μG using Faraday rotation measures of extragalactic radio sources. The magnetic energy is estimated to be Emag ˜ 1.2 × 1051 erg. A possible mechanism of formation of the Aquila Rift is proposed in terms of interstellar magnetic inflation by a sinusoidal Parker instability of wavelength of ˜2.5 kpc and amplitude ˜500 pc.

  18. Immediate loading with fixed full-arch prostheses in the maxilla: Review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Peñarrocha-Oltra, David; Covani, Ugo; Peñarrocha-Diago, Miguel

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To critically review the evidence-based literature on immediate loading of implants with fixed full-arch prostheses in the maxilla to determine 1) currently recommended performance criteria and 2) the outcomes that can be expected with this procedure. Study Desing: Studies from 2001 to 2011 on immediate loading with fixed full-arch maxillary prostheses were reviewed. Clinical series with at least 5 patients and 12 months of follow-up were included. Case reports, studies with missing data and repeatedly published studies were excluded. In each study the following was assessed: type of study, implant type, number of patients, number of implants, number of implants per patient, use of post-extraction implants, minimum implant length and diameter, type of prosthesis, time until loading, implant survival rate, prosthesis survival rate, marginal bone loss, complications andmean follow-up time. Criteria for patient selection, implant primary stability and bone regeneration were also studied. Results: Thirteen studies were included, reporting a total of 2484 immediately loaded implants in 365 patients. Currently accepted performance criteria regarding patient and implant selection, and surgical and prosthetic procedures were deduced from the reviewed articles. Implant survival rates went from 87.5% to 100%, prosthesis survival rates from 93.8% to 100% and radiographic marginal bone loss from 0.8 mm to 1.6 mm.No intraoperative complications and only minor prosthetic complications were reported. Conclusions: The literature on immediate loading with fixed full-arch prostheses in the maxilla shows that a successful outcome can be expected if adequate criteria are used to evaluate the patient, choose the implant and perform the surgical and prosthetic treatment. Lack of homogeneity within studies limits the relevance of the conclusions that can be drawn, and more controlled randomized studies are necessary to enable comparison between the immediate and the

  19. Mandibular dental arch changes associated with treatment of crowding using self-ligating and conventional brackets.

    PubMed

    Pandis, Nicholas; Polychronopoulou, Argy; Makou, Margarita; Eliades, Theodore

    2010-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of treatment of mandibular crowding with self-ligating and conventional brackets on dental arch variables. Fifty-six patients were selected from a pool of subjects satisfying the following inclusion criteria: non-extraction treatment in the mandibular or maxillary arches, eruption of all mandibular teeth, no spaces and an irregularity index greater than 2 mm in the mandibular arch, and no adjunct treatment such as etxra- or intraoral appliances. The patients were assigned to two groups: one group received treatment with the self-ligating bracket and the other with a conventional edgewise appliance, both with a 0.022 inch slot. Lateral cephalometric radiographs obtained at the beginning (T1) and end (T2) of treatment were used to assess the alteration in mandibular incisor inclination, and measurements of intercanine and intermolar widths were made on dental casts to investigate changes associated with the correction. The results were analysed with bivariate and multivariate linear regression analysis in order to examine the effect of the bracket systems on arch width or lower incisor inclination, adjusting for the confounding effect of demographic and clinical characteristics. An alignment-induced increase in the proclination of the mandibular incisors was observed for both groups; no difference was identified between self-ligating and conventional brackets with respect to this parameter. Likewise, an increase in intercanine and intermolar widths was noted for both bracket groups; the self-ligating group showed a higher intermolar width increase than the conventional group, whereas the amount of crowding and Angle classification were not significant predictors of post-treatment intermolar width. PMID:19959610

  20. Type B Aortic Dissection Repair Using a Thoraflex Hybrid Prosthesis in a Complex Aortic Arch Anatomy

    PubMed Central

    Ghanem, Moussa Abi; Gomez-Sanchez, Mario; Chaufour, Xavier; Marcheix, Bertrand

    2016-01-01

    Thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) is recognized as an attractive option to treat complicated Type B aortic dissection. Nevertheless, TEVAR is not always technically possible. We report the case of a 53-year-old male with complicated Type B aortic dissection, in the setting of a complex anomalous aortic arch anatomy with an aneurysmal aberrant right subclavian artery. He was successfully treated by the frozen elephant trunk technique using the Thoraflex hybrid graft.

  1. Non-isothermal elastoviscoplastic snap-through and creep buckling of shallow arches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simitses, G. J.; Riff, R.

    1987-01-01

    The problem of buckling of shallow arches under transient thermomechanical loads is investigated. The analysis is based on nonlinear geometric and constitutive relations, and is expressed in a rate form. The material constitutive equations are capable of reproducing all non-isothermal, elasto-viscoplastic characteristics. The solution scheme is capable of predicting response which includes pre and postbuckling with creep and plastic effects. The solution procedure is demonstrated through several examples which include both creep and snap-through behavior.

  2. Middle and Late Ordovician solitary rugose corals of the Cincinnati Arch region

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Elias, R.J.

    1983-01-01

    Middle Ordovician (Kirkfieldian) solitary rugose corals have been reported from the Tyrone Limestone of the High Bridge Group and the Curdsville Limestone Member of the Lexington Limestone in central Kentucky. Lambeophyllum? spp. A and B are recognized in the Tyrone Limestone. Grewingkia canadensis (Billings, 1862) and Streptelasma divaricans (Nicholson, 1875b) are the only solitary Rugosa known from the Upper Ordovician in the Cincinnati Arch region of Kentucky-Indiana-Ohio. Their earliest occurrence suggests introduction during an early Richmondian transgression. The two species have similar distributions; they favored normal marine waters of intermediate depth where calcium carbonate sediments accumulated and brachiopods and bryozoans thrived. G. canadensis probably lived in stable, low-energy environments, but the corals were transported during higher energy conditions before final deposition and rapid burial. S. divaricans was epifaunal on stabilized carbonate substrates during periods of nondeposition. Energy conditions remained low, and subsequent, usually argillaceous sediments often buried these corals in growth position. G. canadensis and S. divaricans attained their greatest diameter and length, respectively, on the southwestern side of the Cincinnati Arch region. The average number of septa in G. canadensis generally increased during Richmondian time, and simpler axial regions became more predominant in both species. These trends may be related to decreasing water depth. G. canadensis and S. divaricans are confined to the Richmond Solitary Coral Province, which formed a narrow belt extending from the Nashville Dome, along the Cincinnati Arch region to northern Michigan, and through southern Ontario and Quebec. The Red River-Stony Mountain Solitary Coral Province occupied the remainder of North America during the Richmondian. Because the taxa in these provinces are different, solitary corals cannot now be used to correlate strata outside the

  3. Three-dimensional dental arch curvature in human adolescents and adults.

    PubMed

    Ferrario, V F; Sforza, C; Poggio, C E; Serrao, G; Colombo, A

    1999-04-01

    The three-dimensional arrangement of dental cusps and incisal edges in human dentitions has been reported to fit the surface of a sphere (the curve of Monson), with a radius of about 4 inches in adults. The objective of the current study was to compare the three-dimensional curvature of the mandibular dental arch in healthy permanent dentitions of young adults and adolescents. The mandibular casts of 50 adults (aged 19 to 22 years) and 20 adolescents (aged 12 to 14 years) with highly selected sound dentitions that were free from temporomandibular joint problems were obtained. The three coordinates of cusp tips excluding the third molars were digitized with a three-dimensional digitizer, and used to derive a spherical model of the curvature of the occlusal surfaces. From the best interpolating sphere, the radii of the left and right curves of Spee (quasi-sagittal plane) and of molar curve of Wilson (frontal plane) were computed. Mandibular arch size (interdental distances) was also calculated. The occlusal curvature of the mandibular arch was not significantly influenced by sex, although a significant effect of age was found (Student t, P <.005). The radii of the overall sphere, right and left curves of Spee, and curve of Wilson in the molar area were about 101 mm in adults, and about 80 mm in adolescents. Arch size was not influenced by either sex or age. The different curvatures of the occlusal plane in adolescents and adults may be explained by a progressive rotation of the major axis of the teeth moving the occlusal plane toward a more buccal position. These dental movements should be performed in a frontal plane on an anteroposterior axis located next to the dental crown.

  4. Interrupted Aortic Arch Associated with Absence of Left Common Carotid Artery: Imaging with MDCT

    SciTech Connect

    Onbas, Omer Olgun, Hasim; Ceviz, Naci; Ors, Rahmi; Okur, Adnan

    2006-06-15

    Interrupted aortic arch (IAA) is a rare severe congenital heart defect defined as complete luminal and anatomic discontinuity between ascending and descending aorta. Although its association with various congenital heart defects has been reported, absence of left common carotid artery (CCA) in patients with IAA has not been reported previously. We report a case of IAA associated with the absence of left CCA which was clearly shown on multidetector-row spiral CT.

  5. Left-Sided Patent Ductus Arteriosus in a Right-Sided Aortic Arch

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    We present a 31-year-old female with repaired tetralogy of Fallot (TOF) and right-sided aortic arch (RAA) with left-sided patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) originating from the left brachiocephalic artery. This is a rare finding but most common site for a PDA in TOF and a RAA. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of this rare finding on MRI in the literature. PMID:25478277

  6. Double incomplete aortic arch and Kommerell's Diverticulum as a cause of chronic cough.

    PubMed

    Sierra-Galan, Lilia M; Shveid-Gerson, Daniela; Gomez-Garza, Gilberto; Rey-Rodriguez, Alejandro

    2015-01-01

    Vascular rings which can cause symptoms related the trachea and esophagus compression occur in less than 1% of all cardiovascular malformations. Double incomplete aortic arch with right-sided aorta and aberrant left subclavian artery is the rarest one, and its present in 0.04-0.1% of autopsy series. A case of this malformation with a Kommerell's Diverticulum is presented. This diverticulum has risk of severe complications such as dissection and/or rupture.

  7. Fixation of a severely resorbed mandible for complete arch screw-retained rehabilitation: A clinical report.

    PubMed

    Fabris, Vinicius; Bacchi, Atais

    2016-05-01

    Severely resorbed mandibles with placed endosteal dental implants can fracture. Therefore, techniques to reduce the risk or minimize the consequences of these fractures are needed. This clinical report presents a technique for placing a titanium plate in a severely resorbed mandible subjected to complete-arch implant therapy. The titanium plate is placed in the same surgical procedure as the implants, allowing immediate implant loading. This technique provides safe implant-supported treatment for patients with severe mandibular resorption.

  8. Thoracoscopic correction of a congenital persistent right aortic arch in a young cat

    PubMed Central

    Plesman, Rhea; Johnson, Matthew; Rurak, Sarah; Ambrose, Barbara; Shmon, Cindy

    2011-01-01

    A 9-week-old kitten was diagnosed with a congenital vascular ring anomaly by means of an esophageal contrast study. At 6 mo of age, a non-selective vascular study was used to diagnose a persistent right aortic arch (PRAA). Left-sided thoracoscopic surgery was performed, using a Liga-Sure vessel sealant device to seal and transect the ligamentum arteriosum. PMID:22467970

  9. A Staged Hybrid Procedure to Manage Complex Cerebral Hypoperfusion in Aortic Arch Aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Hernández Carbonell, Teresa; Haulon, Stephan; Prat, Alain; Martin-Gonzalez, Teresa; Tyrrell, Mark R; Sobocinski, Jonathan

    2015-10-01

    We report the management of a patient who had an open-surgical repair following traumatic avulsion of the supra-aortic trunks (SAT) 30 years prior to presentation with a large arch aneurysm and poor cerebral collaterals. "Simple" thoracic endovascular aneurysm repair (TEVAR) was not an option because it would have excluded the collateral circulation to the carotid and vertebral arteries. We devised a two-stage hybrid procedure to repair this challenging aneurysm.

  10. Surficial Geologic Map of The Loop and Druid Arch Quadrangles, Canyonlands National Park, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Billingsley, George H.; Block, Debra L.; Felger, Tracey J.

    2002-01-01

    This geologic map is a product of a cooperative project between the U.S. Geological Survey and the U.S. National Park Service to provide geologic information about this part of Canyonlands National Park, Utah. This digital map database contains bedrock data from previously published data that has been modified by the author. New mapping of the surficial deposits represents the general distribution of surficial deposits of the Druid Arch and The Loop 7.5-minute quadrangles.

  11. [Interruption of the aortic arch with no patent ductus arteriosus: is survival possible?].

    PubMed

    Boukhris, M; Hakim, K; Ouarda, F; M'saad, H; Boussaada, R

    2014-03-01

    Interruption of the aortic arch is a rare congenital disease. It is defined by the complete interruption between the ascending and descending aorta. A patent ductus arteriosus is necessary to maintain flow from the pulmonary to the descending aorta. Its closure leads to a cardiovascular collapse and this malformation is therefore duct-dependent. However, in rare cases, survival remains possible even after ductus arteriosus closure. We report such a case. PMID:24457106

  12. Siphon flows in isolated magnetic flux tubes. 3. The equilibrium path of the flux tube arch. Annual report, 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, J.H.; Montesinis, B.

    1989-09-01

    The arched equilibrium path of a thin magnetic flux tube in a plane-stratified, nonmagnetic atmosphere is calculated for cases in which the flux tube contains a steady siphon flow. The large scale mechanical equilibrium of the flux tube involves a balance among the magnetic buoyancy force, the net magnetic tension force due to the curvature of the flux tube axis, and the inertial (centrifugal) force due to the siphon flow along curved streamlines. The ends of the flux tube are assumed to be pinned down by some other external force. Both isothermal and adiabatic siphon flows are considered for flux tubes in an isothermal external atmosphere. For the isothermal case, in the absence of a siphon flow the equilibrium path reduces to the static arch calculated by Parker (1975, 1979). The presence of a siphon flow causes the flux tube arch to bend more sharply, so that magnetic tension can overcome the additional straightening effect of the inertial force, and reduces the maximum width of the arch. The curvature of the arch increases as the siphon flow speed increases. For a critical siphon flow, with supercritical flow in the downstream leg, the arch is asymmetric, with greater curvature in the downstream leg of the arch. Adiabatic flow have qualitatively similar effects, except that adiabatic cooling reduces the buoyancy of the flux tube and thus leads to significantly wider arches. In some cases the cooling is strong enough to create negative buoyancy along sections of the flux tube, requiring upward curvature of the flux tube path along these sections and sometimes leading to unusual equilibrium paths of periodic, sinusoidal form.

  13. Elastic energy within the human plantar aponeurosis contributes to arch shortening during the push-off phase of running.

    PubMed

    Wager, Justin C; Challis, John H

    2016-03-21

    During locomotion, the lower limb tendons undergo stretch and recoil, functioning like springs that recycle energy with each step. Cadaveric testing has demonstrated that the arch of the foot operates in this capacity during simple loading, yet it remains unclear whether this function exists during locomotion. In this study, one of the arch׳s passive elastic tissues (the plantar aponeurosis; PA) was investigated to glean insights about it and the entire arch of the foot during running. Subject specific computer models of the foot were driven using the kinematics of eight subjects running at 3.1m/s using two initial contact patterns (rearfoot and non-rearfoot). These models were used to estimate PA strain, force, and elastic energy storage during the stance phase. To examine the release of stored energy, the foot joint moments, powers, and work created by the PA were computed. Mean elastic energy stored in the PA was 3.1±1.6J, which was comparable to in situ testing values. Changes to the initial contact pattern did not change elastic energy storage or late stance PA function, but did alter PA pre-tensioning and function during early stance. In both initial contact patterns conditions, the PA power was positive during late stance, which reveals that the release of the stored elastic energy assists with shortening of the arch during push-off. As the PA is just one of the arch׳s passive elastic tissues, the entire arch may store additional energy and impact the metabolic cost of running. PMID:26944691

  14. The effects of early headgear treatment on dental arches and craniofacial morphology: a report of a 2 year randomized study.

    PubMed

    Mäntysaari, Raimo; Kantomaa, Tuomo; Pirttiniemi, Pertti; Pykäläinen, Aila

    2004-02-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the effects of early headgear treatment on dental arches and craniofacial morphology in children in the early mixed dentition. The total study group comprised 68 children of both sexes (40 boys and 28 girls) aged 7.6 years [standard deviation (SD) 0.3]. The children, who had a Class II tendency in occlusion and moderate crowding of the dental arches, were randomly divided into two groups of equal size, matched according to gender. In the headgear (HG) group, treatment was initiated immediately. The mean treatment time was 16 months. In the second group, which served as the control, only interceptive procedures were performed during the follow-up period. The records, which included dental casts and lateral cephalograms, were obtained after follow-up periods of 1 and 2 years. The lengths and the widths of the maxillary and mandibular dental arches were significantly increased in the HG group after the 2 year follow-up period. The mean increase in lower arch length and width was 2.4 mm (SD 1.7) and 2.2 mm (SD 1.2), respectively. On average, the space gain in the lower arch was half that of the upper arch. No significant changes were found in the arch dimensions of the control group. Maxillary growth restraint and labial tilting of the incisors were the most significant cephalometric findings in the HG group when compared with the controls. The use of headgear in the early mixed dentition is effective in the treatment of moderate crowding. It is noteworthy that significant space gain in the dimensions of the lower arch can be achieved by headgear application to the upper first molars.

  15. The Relationships between Foot Arch Volumes and Dynamic Plantar Pressure during Midstance of Walking in Preschool Children

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Hsun-Wen; Chieh, Hsiao-Feng; Lin, Chien-Ju; Su, Fong-Chin; Tsai, Ming-June

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study was to examine the correlation between the foot arch volume measured from static positions and the plantar pressure distribution during walking. Methods A total of 27 children, two to six years of age, were included in this study. Measurements of static foot posture were obtained, including navicular height and foot arch volume in sitting and standing positions. Plantar pressure, force and contact areas under ten different regions of the foot were obtained during walking. Results The foot arch index was correlated (r = 0.32) with the pressure difference under the midfoot during the foot flat phase. The navicular heights and foot arch volumes in sitting and standing positions were correlated with the mean forces and pressures under the first (r = −0.296∼−0.355) and second metatarsals (r = −0.335∼−0.504) and midfoot (r = −0.331∼−0.496) during the stance phase of walking. The contact areas under the foot were correlated with the foot arch parameters, except for the area under the midfoot. Conclusions The foot arch index measured in a static position could be a functional index to predict the dynamic foot functions when walking. The foot arch is a factor which will influence the pressure distribution under the foot. Children with a lower foot arch demonstrated higher mean pressure and force under the medial forefoot and midfoot, and lower contact areas under the foot, except for the midfoot region. Therefore, children with flatfoot may shift their body weight to a more medial foot position when walking, and could be at a higher risk of soft tissue injury in this area. PMID:24736650

  16. Elastic energy within the human plantar aponeurosis contributes to arch shortening during the push-off phase of running.

    PubMed

    Wager, Justin C; Challis, John H

    2016-03-21

    During locomotion, the lower limb tendons undergo stretch and recoil, functioning like springs that recycle energy with each step. Cadaveric testing has demonstrated that the arch of the foot operates in this capacity during simple loading, yet it remains unclear whether this function exists during locomotion. In this study, one of the arch׳s passive elastic tissues (the plantar aponeurosis; PA) was investigated to glean insights about it and the entire arch of the foot during running. Subject specific computer models of the foot were driven using the kinematics of eight subjects running at 3.1m/s using two initial contact patterns (rearfoot and non-rearfoot). These models were used to estimate PA strain, force, and elastic energy storage during the stance phase. To examine the release of stored energy, the foot joint moments, powers, and work created by the PA were computed. Mean elastic energy stored in the PA was 3.1±1.6J, which was comparable to in situ testing values. Changes to the initial contact pattern did not change elastic energy storage or late stance PA function, but did alter PA pre-tensioning and function during early stance. In both initial contact patterns conditions, the PA power was positive during late stance, which reveals that the release of the stored elastic energy assists with shortening of the arch during push-off. As the PA is just one of the arch׳s passive elastic tissues, the entire arch may store additional energy and impact the metabolic cost of running.

  17. Investigation of complete dental arches of 23 patients aged at least 75 years.

    PubMed

    Volpato, Beniamino; Di Carlo, Stefano; Shahinas, Jorida; Mencio, Francesca; Fusco, Raimondo; Pompa, Giorgio

    2011-03-01

    Numerous factors help to conserve the dentition of elderly patients, such as healthy food habits, a strong physical constitution, and a good quality of life. The aim of this study was to define a model that takes into account the integration of both the structural and functional aspects of a healthy dentition. Twenty-three patients aged at least 75 years were recruited. The patients were required to possess all of their dentition and have no prosthetic rehabilitations and be asymptomatic for temporomandibular joint disorders. Occlusal characteristics were measured and recorded using the criteria adopted by the US National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey: presence or absence of rotation of the upper arches, trend of the occlusal table, and distribution of occlusal contacts during movements. We believe that the following parameters are predictive of a condition of the dental arches' equilibrium: crowding and disalignment of the teeth, derotated position of the upper arches, absence of the curve of Spee, an occlusal plane trend contrary to spherical theory, and presence of group function on the working side and malocclusion on the nonworking side. We consider that these factors are merely the consequence of correct functioning within the framework of favorable environmental factors.

  18. Comparisons between complete and slice finite element models of a multiple arch and Buttress Dam

    SciTech Connect

    Nuss, L.K.

    1995-12-31

    Multiple arch and buttress dams are very complex structures commonly requiring analysis by finite element methods for seismic structural evaluation. Complete 3-dimensional finite element models are very expensive and time consuming. Therefore, simplified finite element models, which analyze only a portion or {open_quotes}slice{close_quotes} of the dam, are considered as a possible cost- and time-saving tool. A slice model includes only a repeatable and analytical representative section of buttresses and arches. Simplifying the analyses requires assumptions concerning the restraint conditions along the finite element boundaries, the portion of the dam to model, and the expanse of the model. These assumptions are critically important for obtaining reliable results from the analyses since the critical motion during an earthquake is in the cross-canyon direction of a multiple arch and buttress dam. Incorrect modeling of the slice model could induce too much restraint and produce unreliable results. This paper will compare the dynamic frequency, displacement, and stress results obtained from complete and slice finite element models.

  19. On the Chaotic Vibrations of Electrostatically Actuated Arch Micro/Nano Resonators: A Parametric Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tajaddodianfar, Farid; Hairi Yazdi, Mohammad Reza; Pishkenari, Hossein Nejat

    Motivated by specific applications, electrostatically actuated bistable arch shaped micro-nano resonators have attracted growing attention in the research community in recent years. Nevertheless, some issues relating to their nonlinear dynamics, including the possibility of chaos, are still not well known. In this paper, we investigate the chaotic vibrations of a bistable resonator comprised of a double clamped initially curved microbeam under combined harmonic AC and static DC distributed electrostatic actuation. A reduced order equation obtained by the application of the Galerkin method to the nonlinear partial differential equation of motion, given in the framework of Euler-Bernoulli beam theory, is used for the investigation in this paper. We numerically integrate the obtained equation to study the chaotic vibrations of the proposed system. Moreover, we investigate the effects of various parameters including the arch curvature, the actuation parameters and the quality factor of the resonator, which are effective in the formation of both static and dynamic behaviors of the system. Using appropriate numerical tools, including Poincaré maps, bifurcation diagrams, Fourier spectrum and Lyapunov exponents we scrutinize the effects of various parameters on the formation of chaotic regions in the parametric space of the resonator. Results of this work provide better insight into the problem of nonlinear dynamics of the investigated family of bistable micro/nano resonators, and facilitate the design of arch resonators for applications such as filters.

  20. Chapter 19: Geology and petroleum potential of the east Barents Sea Basins and Admiralty Arch

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Klett, T.R.; Pitman, J.K.

    2011-01-01

    The US Geological Survey (USGS) recently assessed the potential for undiscovered oil and gas resources of the East Barents Basins and Novaya Zemlya Basins and Admiralty Arch Provinces as part of the USGS Circum-Arctic Resource Appraisal. These two provinces are located NE of Scandinavia and the northwestern Russian Federation, on the Barents Sea Shelf between Novaya Zemlya to the east and the Barents Platform to the west. Three assessment units (AUs) were defined in the East Barents Basins for this study - Kolguyev Terrace Assessment Unit (AU), South Barents Basin and Ludlov Saddle AU, and North Barents Basin AU. A fourth, defined as Novaya Zemlya Basins and Admiralty Arch AU, is coincident with the Novaya Zemlya basins and Admiralty Arch Province. These AUs, all lying north of the Arctic Circle, were assessed for undiscovered, technically recoverable resources resulting in total estimated mean volumes of approximately 7.4 billion barrels of crude oil, 318 trillion cubic feet of natural gas and 1.4 billion barrels of natural gas liquids. ?? 2011 The Geological Society of London.