Science.gov

Sample records for al bull seismol

  1. Exploring Essential Conditions: A Commentary on Bull et al. (2008)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borthwick, Arlene; Hansen, Randall; Gray, Lucy; Ziemann, Irina

    2008-01-01

    The editorial by Bull et al. (2008) on connections between informal and formal learning made explicit one element of solving what Koehler and Mishra (2008) termed a "wicked problem." This wicked (complex, ill-structured) problem involves working with teachers for effective integration of technology in support of student learning. The…

  2. Seismo-Live: Training in Seismology with Jupyter Notebooks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krischer, Lion; Tape, Carl; Igel, Heiner

    2016-04-01

    Seismological training tends to occur within the isolation of a particular institution with a limited set of tools (codes, libraries) that are often not transferrable outside. Here, we propose to overcome these limitations with a community-driven library of Jupyter notebooks dedicated to training on any aspect of seismology for purposes of education and outreach, on-site or archived tutorials for codes, classroom instruction, and research. A Jupyter notebook (jupyter.org) is an open-source interactive computational environment that allows combining code execution, rich text, mathematics, and plotting. It can be considered a platform that supports reproducible research, as all inputs and outputs may be stored. Text, external graphics, equations can be handled using Markdown (incl. LaTeX) format. Jupyter notebooks are driven by standard web browsers, can be easily exchanged in text format, or converted to other documents (e.g. PDF, slide shows). They provide an ideal format for practical training in seismology. A pilot-platform was setup with a dedicated server such that the Jupyter notebooks can be run in any browser (PC, notepad, smartphone). We show the functionalities of the Seismo-Live platform with examples from computational seismology, seismic data access and processing using the ObsPy library, seismic inverse problems, and others. The current examples are all using the Python programming language but any free language can be used. Potentially, such community platforms could be integrated with the EPOS-IT infrastructure and extended to other fields of Earth sciences.

  3. Connecting Informal and Formal Learning Experiences in the Age of Participatory Media: Commentary on Bull et al. (2008)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenhow, Christine

    2008-01-01

    The recent editorial in this journal by Bull et al. ("Connecting Informal and Formal Learning Experiences in the Age of Participatory Media" Vol 8, Iss 2) discussed the challenges of bridging formal learning practices and informal learning opportunities within the context of today's Web-enhanced world. In this commentary, Christine…

  4. Adapting Bulls to Florida

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The adaptation of bulls used for natural breeding purposes to the Gulf Coast region of the United States including all of Florida is an important topic. Nearly 40% of the U.S. cow/calf population resides in the Gulf Coast and Southeast. Thus, as A.I. is relatively rare, the number of bulls used for ...

  5. MALLEABLE IRON BULL LADLE, HOLDS IRON AFTER IT IS TAPPED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    MALLEABLE IRON BULL LADLE, HOLDS IRON AFTER IT IS TAPPED OUT OF THE CUPOLA UNTIL IT NEEDED BY POURERS ON THE CONVEYOR LINES WHO FILL MOBILE LADLES ATTACHED TO OVERHEAD RAIL SYSTEMS AS THE BULL LADLE TIPS. - Stockham Pipe & Fittings Company, Malleable Foundry, 4000 Tenth Avenue North, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  6. Red Bull Stratos Presentation

    NASA Video Gallery

    Red Bull Stratos High Performance Director Andy Walshe & Technical Project Director Art Thompson share the Stratos story with JSC. Supported by a team of experts, Felix Baumgartner reached 128,100 ...

  7. Mechanical bull thumb

    SciTech Connect

    Ginthner, T.P.; Schabel, S.I.

    1981-11-01

    Two patients suffered intra-articular fractures of the thumb while attempting to ride a mechanical bull. The mechanism of injury in these patients and the riding technique which leads to fracture are discussed.

  8. POURING IRON FROM BULL LADLE INTO MOBILE LADLES USED TO ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    POURING IRON FROM BULL LADLE INTO MOBILE LADLES USED TO FILL MOLDS ON CONVEYOR LINES AFTER FERRO-SILICON IS ADDED TO ENHANCE DUCTILITY AND FLUIDITY. - Southern Ductile Casting Company, Casting, 2217 Carolina Avenue, Bessemer, Jefferson County, AL

  9. POURING IRON FROM ELECTRIC FURNACE INTO BULL LADLE AFTER MAGNESIUM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    POURING IRON FROM ELECTRIC FURNACE INTO BULL LADLE AFTER MAGNESIUM HAD BEEN ADDED TO GENERATE DUCTILE IRON WHEN IT COOLS IN THE MOLD. - Southern Ductile Casting Company, Casting, 2217 Carolina Avenue, Bessemer, Jefferson County, AL

  10. Prediction of bull fertility.

    PubMed

    Utt, Matthew D

    2016-06-01

    Prediction of male fertility is an often sought-after endeavor for many species of domestic animals. This review will primarily focus on providing some examples of dependent and independent variables to stimulate thought about the approach and methodology of identifying the most appropriate of those variables to predict bull (bovine) fertility. Although the list of variables will continue to grow with advancements in science, the principles behind making predictions will likely not change significantly. The basic principle of prediction requires identifying a dependent variable that is an estimate of fertility and an independent variable or variables that may be useful in predicting the fertility estimate. Fertility estimates vary in which parts of the process leading to conception that they infer about and the amount of variation that influences the estimate and the uncertainty thereof. The list of potential independent variables can be divided into competence of sperm based on their performance in bioassays or direct measurement of sperm attributes. A good prediction will use a sample population of bulls that is representative of the population to which an inference will be made. Both dependent and independent variables should have a dynamic range in their values. Careful selection of independent variables includes reasonable measurement repeatability and minimal correlation among variables. Proper estimation and having an appreciation of the degree of uncertainty of dependent and independent variables are crucial for using predictions to make decisions regarding bull fertility. PMID:26791329

  11. 9 CFR 78.14 - Rodeo bulls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Interstate Movement of Cattle Because of Brucellosis § 78.14 Rodeo bulls. (a) A rodeo bull that is test... date of being tested, may be moved interstate only if the bull meets the requirements for cattle...

  12. Performance, growth, and maturity of Nellore bulls.

    PubMed

    Costa e Silva, Luiz Fernando; Valadares Filho, Sebastião de Campos; Detmann, Edenio; Rotta, Polyana Pizzi; Zanetti, Diego; Villadiego, Faider Alberto Castaño; Pellizzoni, Samantha Gusmão; Pereira, Rafael Moura Guimarães

    2013-03-01

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate the dry matter intake (DMI), digestibility, average daily gain (ADG), microbial efficiency, empty body weight (EBW) gain, and body composition of Nellore bulls. Additionally, Nellore bull maturity was estimated, and the prediction equation for DMI, suggested by the Brazilian nutrient requirements system (BR CORTE; Azevêdo et al. 2010), was evaluated. Thirty-three Nellore bulls, with a mean initial weight of 259 ± 25 kg and age of 14 ± 1 months, were used in this study. Five animals were slaughtered at the beginning of the experiment (control group), and the remaining 28 were divided into 4 groups, each slaughtered at 42-day intervals. Their diet was composed of corn silage and concentrate (55:45). The power model was used to estimate muscle tissue, bone tissue, crude protein (CP), mineral matter (MM), and water present in the empty body, while the exponential model was used to estimate adipose tissue and ether extract (EE) present in the empty body. When expressed in kilograms per day, differences were observed (P < 0.05) only for the intake of EE and neutral detergent fiber as a function of feedlot time periods. Although there was a difference in relation to nutrient intake, it did not affect (P > 0.05) digestibility, with the exception of EE digestibility. The equation suggested by BR CORTE correctly estimates the DMI of Nellore bulls. ADG was not affected (P > 0.05) by time spent in the feedlot. No differences were observed (P > 0.05) for microbial efficiency; a mean value of 142 g microbial crude protein/kg total digestible nutrients was achieved. The muscle and bone tissues, CP, MM, and water present in the empty body increased as the animal grew, although at a lower rate. The adipose tissue and EE present in the empty body increased their deposition rate when the animal reached its mature weight. Maturity is defined as when an animal reaches 22 % EE in the empty body, which

  13. Status of Oregon's Bull Trout.

    SciTech Connect

    Buchanan, David V.; Hanson, Mary L.; Hooton, Robert M.

    1997-10-01

    Limited historical references indicate that bull trout Salvelinus confluentus in Oregon were once widely spread throughout at least 12 basins in the Klamath River and Columbia River systems. No bull trout have been observed in Oregon's coastal systems. A total of 69 bull trout populations in 12 basins are currently identified in Oregon. A comparison of the 1991 bull trout status (Ratliff and Howell 1992) to the revised 1996 status found that 7 populations were newly discovered and 1 population showed a positive or upgraded status while 22 populations showed a negative or downgraded status. The general downgrading of 32% of Oregon's bull trout populations appears largely due to increased survey efforts and increased survey accuracy rather than reduced numbers or distribution. However, three populations in the upper Klamath Basin, two in the Walla Walla Basin, and one in the Willamette Basin showed decreases in estimated population abundance or distribution.

  14. Effects of bull elk demographics on age categories of harem bulls

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bender, L.C.

    2002-01-01

    Many management strategies for elk (Cervus elaphus) emphasize increasing numbers of mature bulls in the population. These strategies are usually assumed to enhance productivity via increased breeding by mature bulls. I compared age classes of harem bulls during the peak of the rut under 4 bull harvest strategies that resulted in different bull:cow ratios, mature bull:cow ratios, bull mortality rates, and proportions of mature bulls in the autumn (pre-hunting season) population. Proportions of harems held by differing age classes of bulls [mature (P84% of harems only in populations where mature bull:cow ratios exceeded 21:100 in the autumn population. Interaction of mature bull ratios in the autumn population, harem size, and bull selectivity in the harvest strategy must be considered if increased breeding by mature harem bulls is a management goal.

  15. View of 200ton derrick interior support beneath it's bull wheel ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of 200-ton derrick interior support beneath it's bull wheel and mast centerline from from southeast. - Marshall Space Flight Center, Saturn V Dynamic Test Facility, East Test Area, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  16. 29 CFR 1918.84 - Bulling cargo.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... shall be done with the bull line led directly from the heel block. However, bulling may be done from the..., falling, or being pulled from their stationary attachment. (e) Falls led from cargo booms of vessels...

  17. Laparoscopic cryptorchidectomy in standing bulls

    PubMed Central

    KANEKO, Yasuyuki; TORISU, Shidow; KITAHARA, Go; HIDAKA, Yuichi; SATOH, Hiroyuki; ASANUMA, Taketoshi; MIZUTANI, Shinya; OSAWA, Takeshi; NAGANOBU, Kiyokazu

    2015-01-01

    Laparoscopic cryptorchidectomy without insufflation was applied in 10 standing bulls aged 3 to 15 months. Nine bulls were preoperatively pointed out intra-abdominal testes by computed tomography. Preoperative fasting for a minimum of 24 hr provided laparoscopic visualization of intra-abdominal area from the kidney to the inguinal region. Surgical procedure was interrupted by intra-abdominal fat and testis size. It took 0.6 to 1.5 hr in 4 animals weighing 98 to 139 kg, 0.8 to 2.8 hr in 4 animals weighing 170 to 187 kg, and 3 and 4 hr in 2 animals weighing 244 and 300 kg to complete the cryptorchidectomy. In conclusion, standing gasless laparoscopic cryptorchidectomy seems to be most suitable for bulls weighing from 100 to 180 kg. PMID:25715955

  18. Bull Trout Population Assessment in the Columbia River Gorge : Annual Report 2000.

    SciTech Connect

    Byrne, Jim; McPeak, Ron

    2001-02-01

    We summarized existing knowledge regarding the known distribution of bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) across four sub-basins in the Columbia River Gorge in Washington. The Wind River, Little White Salmon River, White Salmon River, and the Klickitat River sub-basins were analyzed. Cold water is essential to the survival, spawning, and rearing of bull trout. We analyzed existing temperature data, installed Onset temperature loggers in the areas of the four sub-basins where data was not available, and determined that mean daily water temperatures were <15 C and appropriate for spawning and rearing of bull trout. We snorkel surveyed more than 74 km (46.25 mi.) of rivers and streams in the four sub-basins (13.8 km at night and 60.2 km during the day) and found that night snorkeling was superior to day snorkeling for locating bull trout. Surveys incorporated the Draft Interim Protocol for Determining Bull Trout Presence (Peterson et al. In Press). However, due to access and safety issues, we were unable to randomly select sample sites nor use block nets as recommended. Additionally, we also implemented the Bull Trout/Dolly Varden sampling methodology described in Bonar et al. (1997). No bull trout were found in the Wind River, Little White Salmon, or White Salmon River sub-basins. We found bull trout in the West Fork Klickitat drainage of the Klickitat River Sub-basin. Bull trout averaged 6.7 fish/100m{sup 2} in Trappers Creek, 2.6 fish/100m{sup 2} on Clearwater Creek, and 0.4 fish/100m{sup 2} in Little Muddy Creek. Bull trout was the only species of salmonid encountered in Trappers Creek and dominated in Clearwater Creek. Little Muddy Creek was the only creek where bull trout and introduced brook trout occurred together. We found bull trout only at night and typically in low flow regimes. A single fish, believed to be a bull trout x brook trout hybrid, was observed in the Little Muddy Creek. Additional surveys are needed in the West Fork Klickitat and mainstem

  19. Changes in the use of young bulls

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Availability of genomic information since 2008 has increased accuracy of genetic evaluations for young bulls in Holstein (HO), Jersey (JE), and Brown Swiss (BS). As a result, AI organizations have been aggressively promoting young bulls and producers have been using young bulls more extensively. Num...

  20. The 1000 bull genome project

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To meet growing global demands for high value protein from milk and meat, rates of genetic gain in domestic cattle must be accelerated. At the same time, animal health and welfare must be considered. The 1000 bull genomes project supports these goals by providing annotated sequence variants and ge...

  1. Gobbledygook and the golden bull.

    PubMed

    1987-12-19

    Once again the Department of Health and Social Security is among the main contenders for this year's Golden Bull Awards. This is not an acknowledgement of its [Illegible word] entrepreneurialism, or even a rosette for being on target. It's a booby prize for producing gobbledygook. PMID:27319524

  2. Bull Trout Distribution and Abundance in the Waters on and Bordering the Warm Springs Indian Reservation, 2000 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Brun, Christopher

    2000-01-01

    The range of bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) in the Deschutes River basin has decreased from historic levels due to many factors including dam construction, habitat degradation, brook trout introduction and eradication efforts. While the bull trout population appears to be stable in the Metolius River-Lake Billy Chinook system they have been largely extirpated from the upper Deschutes River (Buchanan et al. 1997). Little was known about bull trout in the lower Deschutes basin until BPA funded project No.9405400 began during 1998. In this progress report we describe the findings from the third year (2000) of the multi-year study aimed at determining the life history, genetics, habitat needs and limiting factors of bull trout in the lower Deschutes subbasin. Juvenile bull trout and brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) relative abundance was assessed in the Warm Springs River and Shitike Creek by night snorkeling. In the Warm Springs R. juvenile bull trout were slightly more numerous than brook trout, however, both were found in low densities. Relative densities of both species declined from 1999 observations. Juvenile bull trout vastly out numbered brook trout in Shitike Cr. Relative densities of juvenile bull trout increased while brook trout abundance was similar to 1999 observations in eight index reaches. The utility of using index reaches to monitor trends in juvenile bull trout and brook trout relative abundance was assessed in the Warm Springs R. for the second year. Mean relative densities of both species, within the index reaches was slightly higher than what was observed in a 2.4 km control reach. Mill Creek was surveyed for the presence of juvenile bull trout. The American Fisheries Society ''Interim protocol for determining bull trout presence'' methodology was field tested. No bull trout were found in the 2 km survey area.

  3. Neuroretinitis following bull ant sting.

    PubMed

    Ullrich, Katja; Saha, Niladri; Lake, Stewart

    2012-01-01

    Cat scratch disease causes the majority of cases of neuroretinitis. Neuroretinitis is characterised by clinical features of papillitis, macular oedema and macular star. We report a case study of infection with Bartonella henselae most likely transmitted by a bull ant sting. The patient presented with blurred vision and reduced visual acuity after being stung by an ant in her garden some 7 days earlier. Further testing revealed positive serology to B henselae and the patient improved with appropriate treatment. PMID:22865803

  4. Does toxic fescue decrease bull fertility?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Knowledge of the detrimental effects of toxic tall fescue on bull reproductive performance is minimal. In natural breeding, reduced bull performance could decrease the pregnancy rate of the cowherd. Scientists from ARS in Booneville, AR, and the University of Arkansas investigated the influence of f...

  5. Factors affecting spermatozoa morphology in beef bulls

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this study was to evaluate factors affecting sperm morphology of bulls (n=908) collected at 320 days of age. Bulls were a composite breed (50% Red Angus, 25% Charolais, and 25% Tarentaise) born from 2002 to 2008 to dams fed levels of feed during mid and late gestation that were expe...

  6. Yearling Bull Breeding Soundness Examination: Special Considerations.

    PubMed

    Schrag, Nora; Larson, Robert L

    2016-07-01

    Accurate assessment of yearling bulls is important for the bottom line of all interested parties: the buyer, the seller, and the veterinarian performing the BSE. Special considerations and current research are highlighted and their application to the evaluation of yearling bulls is discussed. PMID:27324452

  7. Impact of bull development on reproductive success

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The herd bull influences overall herd fertility more than any other single animal. However, a bull must be developed properly and have reached puberty to be fertile. Puberty is defined by an ejaculate containing a minimum of 50 x 106 total sperm with at least 10% progressive motility; however, this ...

  8. The Knobbed Acrosome Defect in Beef Bulls

    PubMed Central

    Barth, Albert D.

    1986-01-01

    The knobbed acrosome defect was found at levels of 25 to 100 percent of spermatozoa from 16 of 2054 beef bulls. The incidence of this defect appeared to be particularly high in the Charolais breed. Pedigree analysis of some of the affected Charolais bulls indicated there may be a genetic predisposition for this sperm defect. In eosin-nigrosin stained semen smears the most common form of the abnormality was a flattened or indented apex of the sperm head. A refractile bead at the apex of the sperm head was seen less commonly. Electron microscopy of the spermatozoa from one bull showed that the abnormality was similar to the knobbed sperm defect previously described in Friesian bulls. A breeding trial confirmed that bulls producing spermatozoa with a high incidence of knobbed acrosomes are infertile. ImagesFigure 2 and 3.Figure 4.Figure 5.Figure 6 and 7.Figure 8.Figure 9.Figure 10. PMID:17422706

  9. Sperm macromolecules associated with bull fertility.

    PubMed

    Kaya, Abdullah; Memili, Erdoğan

    2016-06-01

    Bull fertility, ability of the sperm to fertilize and activate the egg that sustain embryo development, is vitally important for effective and efficient production of cattle. Fertility is a complex trait with low heritability. Despite recent advances in genomic selection and possibility of enormous paternal benefits to profitable cattle production, there exist no reliable tests for evaluating semen quality and predicting bull fertility. This review focuses on sperm macromolecules such as transcripts, proteins and the epigenome, i.e., the functional genome that are associated with bull fertility. Generating new information in these systems is important beyond agriculture because such progress advances the fundamental science of the mammalian male gamete while at the same time introduces biotechnology into livestock production. Sperm macromolecules and epigenome markers associated with bull fertility can be used alone or in combination with the current SNP microarrays to determine sperm quality and to indicate bull fertility. PMID:26925808

  10. Effects of open-entry spike-bull, limited-entry branched-bull harvesting on elk composition in Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bender, L.C.; Fowler, P.E.; Bernatowicz, J.A.; Musser, J.L.; Stream, L.E.

    2002-01-01

    The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife implemented an open-entry spike-bull, limited-entry branched-bull elk (Cervus elaphus) harvest strategy in the Blue Mountains (1989), Yakima (1994), and Colockum (1994) herd areas of Washington state with goals of increasing numbers of adult bulls to increase breeding efficiency and possibly calf recruitment. Numbers of total bulls/100 cows (x??=5.4) and branched bulls/100 cows (x??=5.3) increased with the change in harvest strategy, while yearling bulls/100 cows remained unchanged; calves/100 cows declined (x??=-8.6). Calves/100 cows were always negatively correlated with both total bulls/100 cows and branched bulls/100 cows in each area; correlations were significant in 5 of 9 comparisons with total-bull ratios and 5 of 9 comparisons with branched-bull ratios. Open-entry spike-bull, limited-entry branched-bull harvesting can be used to increase total-bull and branched-bulls ratios in hunted elk populations. However, the increased ratios of bulls and branched bulls were unimportant in influencing calf recruitment, likely because of the importance of female condition on production and survival of young.

  11. Prevalence of Tritrichomonas foetus in several subpopulations of Alabama beef bulls.

    PubMed

    Rodning, S P; Wolfe, D F; Carson, R L; Wright, J C; Stockdale, H D; Pacoli, M E; Busby, H C; Rowe, S E

    2008-01-15

    The objective of this study was to estimate the prevalence of Tritrichomonas foetus infections in Alabama (USA) beef bulls through prospective and retrospective surveys. The prospective survey included 240 Alabama beef bulls that were sampled between January 2005 and March 2006. Preputial smegma was collected from the 240 bulls with a dry pipette and cultured in an InPouch TF T. foetus culture pouch (BioMed Diagnostics; White City, OR, USA). The samples were evaluated microscopically once a day for 6 days for growth resembling T. foetus. To avoid false-positives due to fecal trichomonads, all suspect cultures were sent to both the Alabama Department of Agriculture Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory in Auburn, AL, USA and the Auburn University College of Veterinary Medicine Parasitology Laboratory (Auburn, AL, USA) for polymerase chain reaction (PCR) confirmatory assays. Of the 240 bulls cultured in the prospective survey, 3 (1.25%) cultures were considered suspect on microscopic evaluation. However, PCR-based assays were negative for T. foetus, suggesting that the samples most likely contained fecal trichomonads. The retrospective analysis included 374 T. foetus cultures performed at the Alabama Department of Agriculture Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory between October 2002 and March 2005. Of the 374 bulls included in the retrospective analysis, only 1 (0.27%) was confirmed positive by a PCR-based assay. PMID:17981321

  12. Breeding soundness evaluations of 3,648 yearling beef bulls using the 1993 Society for Theriogenology guidelines.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, S P; Spitzer, J C; Hopkins, F M; Higdon, H L; Bridges, W C

    2002-09-01

    Our objective was to perform a retrospective analysis of breeding soundness evaluations (BSEs) as classified by the 1993 Society for Theriogenology (SFT) guidelines [Chenoweth et al., Guidelines for using the bull breeding soundness evaluation form, in: Theriogenology Handbook, 1993, pp. B-10]. Data included BSE information obtained from five performance-testing stations in South Carolina (SC1, SC2, SC3) and Tennessee (TN1, TN2) from 1986 through 1999 on 3648 Angus, Brangus, Charolais, Chianina, Gelbvieh, Limousin, Polled Hereford, Santa Gertrudis, Simbrah, and Simmental bulls. Analyses were simplified by classifying all bulls as either satisfactory or unsatisfactory potential breeders. Of the 3648 bulls evaluated, 76.2% were classified as satisfactory potential breeders. Of all bulls evaluated, 4.0% were unsatisfactory due to inadequate spermatozoal motility, 7.0% due to inadequate spermatozoal morphology and 2.6% due to a combination of inadequate motility and morphology. Unsatisfactory classifications due to non-spermatozoal parameters out of all bulls were 10.2%, with 7.1% for inadequate scrotal circumference and 3.1% for physical abnormalities. For satisfactory and unsatisfactory bulls, respectively, means and standard deviations were 35.8 +/- 2.7 and 33.0 +/- 4.1 cm (P < 0.001) for scrotal circumference, 63 +/- 18 and 35 +/- 24% (P < 0.001) for percent motility, and 86 +/- 7 and 63 +/- 21% (P < 0.001) for percent normal morphology. PMID:12212894

  13. Critical swimming speeds of wild bull trout

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mesa, M.G.; Weiland, L.K.; Zydlewski, G.B.

    2004-01-01

    We estimated the critical swimming speeds (Ucrit) of wild bull trout at 6??, 11??, and 15??C in laboratory experiments. At 11??C, 5 fish ranging from 11 to 19 cm in length had a mean Ucrit of 48.24 cm/s or 3.22 body lengths per second (BL/s). Also at 11??C , 6 fish from 32 to 42 cm had a mean Ucrit of 73.99 cm/s or 2.05 BL/s. At 15??C, 5 fish from 14 to 23 cm had a mean Ucrit of 54.66 cm/s or 2.88 BL/s. No fish successfully swam at 6??C. Swim speed was significantly influenced by fish length. Many bull trout performed poorly in our enclosed respirometers: of 71 Ucrit tests we attempted, only the 16 described above were successful. Bull trout that refused to swim held station within tunnels by using their pectoral fins as depressors, or they rested and later became impinged against a downstream screen. Several common techniques did not stimulate consistent swimming activity in these fish. Our estimates of U crit for bull trout provide an understanding of their performance capacity and will be useful in modeling efforts aimed at improving fish passage structures. We recommend that fishway or culvert designers concerned with bull trout passage maintain velocities within their structures at or below our estimates of Ucrit, thus taking a conservative approach to ensuring that these fish can ascend migratory obstacles safely.

  14. Initial analysis of sperm DNA methylome in Holstein bulls

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aberrant DNA methylation patterns have been associated with abnormal semen parameters, idiopathic male infertility and early embryonic loss in mammals. Using Holstein bulls with high (Bull1) or low (Bull2) fertility rates, we created two representative sperm DNA methylomes at a single-base resolutio...

  15. Bull Trout Population and Habitat Surveys in the Middle Fork Willamette and McKenzie Rivers, Annual Report 2002.

    SciTech Connect

    Seals, Jason; Reis, Kelly

    2003-10-01

    Bull trout in the Willamette River Basin were historically distributed throughout major tributaries including the Middle Fork Willamette and McKenzie rivers. Habitat degradation, over-harvest, passage barriers, fish removal by rotenone, and hybridization and competition with non-native brook trout are all likely factors that have led to the decline of bull trout in the Willamette Basin (Ratliff and Howell 1992). The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service listed the Columbia River bull trout population segment as Threatened under the federal Endangered Species Act in 1998. Four bull trout populations were isolated in the upper Willamette River following the construction of flood control dams on the South Fork McKenzie River, McKenzie River, and Middle Fork Willamette River that created Cougar, Trail Bridge, and Hills Creek reservoirs. Buchanan et al. (1997) described the population in the main stem McKenzie as 'of special concern', the South Fork McKenzie population as 'high risk of extinction', the population above Trail Bridge Reservoir as 'high risk of extinction', and bull trout in the Middle Fork Willamette as 'probably extinct'. Various management efforts such as strict angling regulations and passage improvement projects have been implemented to stabilize and rehabilitate bull trout habitat and populations in the McKenzie River over the past 10 years. Since 1997, bull trout fry from Anderson Creek on the upper McKenzie River have been transferred to the Middle Fork Willamette basin above Hills Creek Reservoir in an attempt to re-establish a reproducing bull trout population. This project was developed in response to concerns over the population status and management of bull trout in the McKenzie and Middle Fork Willamette Rivers by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife during the early 1990s. The project was conducted under measure 9.3G(2) of the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program to monitor the status, life history, habitat needs, and limiting factors for

  16. 9 CFR 78.14 - Rodeo bulls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Rodeo bulls. 78.14 Section 78.14 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE INTERSTATE TRANSPORTATION OF ANIMALS (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS BRUCELLOSIS Restrictions...

  17. 9 CFR 78.14 - Rodeo bulls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Rodeo bulls. 78.14 Section 78.14 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE INTERSTATE TRANSPORTATION OF ANIMALS (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS BRUCELLOSIS Restrictions...

  18. Optimizing age of bull at first use in relation to fertility of Murrah breeding bulls

    PubMed Central

    Mir, M. A.; Chakravarty, A. K.; Gupta, A. K.; Naha, B. C.; Jamuna, V.; Patil, C. S.; Singh, A. P.

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The aim of the present investigation was to optimize the age at first use (AAFU) of semen of Murrah breeding bulls, which will help in early selection of bulls under progeny testing program for improving the reproductive performance in the herd. Materials and Methods: The data on AAFU, conception rate based on first A.I. (CRFAI), overall conception rate (OCR), and birth weight (B.WT) of 57 Murrah bulls during 1993-2014 at NDRI center pertaining to 14 sets of Network Project on Buffalo Improvement at ICAR-National Dairy Research Institute, Karnal, Haryana, India were adjusted for significant environmental influences and subsequently analyzed. Simple and multiple regression models were used for prediction of CRFAI and OCR of Murrah breeding bulls. Comparative evaluation of three developed models (I-III) showed that Model III, having AAFU and B.WT, fulfill the accuracy of model as revealed by high coefficient of determination, low mean sum of squares due to error, low conceptual predictive value, and low Bayesian information criterion. Results: The results revealed that the average predicted CRFAI was highest (39.95%) at <3.5 years and lowest (34.87%) at >4.5 years of age at first A.I/use. Similarly, average predicted OCR was highest (41.05%) at <3.5 years and lowest (39.42%) at >4.5 years of age at first A.I/use of Murrah bulls. Conclusion: In organized herd under progeny testing program, Murrah bulls should be used at young age, i.e. prior to 3.5 years, which is expected to result in 5.08% better CRFAI and 1.63% better OCR in comparison to Murrah bulls used after 4.5 years of age. PMID:27047126

  19. Bull heading to kill live gas wells

    SciTech Connect

    Oudeman, P.; Avest, D. ter; Grodal, E.O.; Asheim, H.A.; Meissner, R.J.H.

    1994-12-31

    To kill a live closed-in gas well by bull heading down the tubing, the selected pump rate should be high enough to ensure efficient displacement of the gas into the formation (i.e., to avoid the kill fluid bypassing the gas). On the other hand, the pressures that develop during bull heading at high rate must not exceed wellhead pressure rating, tubing or casing burst pressures or the formation breakdown gradient, since this will lead, at best, to a very inefficient kill job. Given these constraints, the optimum kill rate, requited hydraulic horsepower, density and type of kill fluids have to be selected. For this purpose a numerical simulator has been developed, which predicts the sequence of events during bull heading. Pressures and flow rates in the well during the kill job are calculated, taking to account slip between the gas and kill fluid, hydrostatic and friction pressure drop, wellbore gas compression and leak-off to the formation. Comparison with the results of a dedicated field test demonstrates that these parameters can be estimated accurately. Example calculations will be presented to show how the simulator can be used to identify an optimum kill scenario.

  20. Effect of zeranol on sexual development of crossbred bulls.

    PubMed

    Godfrey, R W; Randel, R D; Rouquette, F M

    1989-07-01

    Three groups of 1/2 Simmental X 1/4 Brahman X 1/4 Hereford bull calves were used during two different years to study effects of zeranol on sexual development. At 154 d of age, half the calves were implanted with 36 mg zeranol and half, not implanted, served as controls. Implanted calves were reimplanted at 90-d intervals throughout the trial (9 mo) each year. Trial 1 was conducted with 24 calves and Trial 2 was conducted the following year with 10 bulls. Twenty-four days after weaning (200 d of age) and at 28-d intervals thereafter, bulls in drylot in Trial 1 were weighted, scrotal circumference (SC) was measured and an ejaculate of semen was collected by electroejaculation to determine puberty. At these times, bulls were given 200 micrograms of GnRH i.m. and blood was collected at 0, 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 h after GnRH. Serum concentrations of LH and testosterone (TEST) were determined. At slaughter, testis weight, length and circumference and pubertal status were recorded. Bulls implanted with zeranol had smaller SC than control bulls during the entire 9-mo period (P less than .0001). More control bulls reached puberty than did implanted bulls (82.4 vs 23.5%, respectively; P less than .001). Control bulls had larger testis measurements at slaughter (P less than .0001). Implants did not alter total weight gain or ADG (P greater than .10).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2768123

  1. Efficacy of ipronidazole against trichomoniasis in beef bulls.

    PubMed

    Skirrow, S; BonDurant, R; Farley, J; Correa, J

    1985-08-15

    Preputial smegma samples from 195 beef bulls were collected repeatedly and cultured for Tritrichomonas foetus. Seventy-five (38.5%) of these bulls were positive for trichomonads on at least 1 culture. Sensitivity of the culture procedure (number of positive cultures/number of total cultures from known-positive bulls) was 81.6%. Storage of preputial smegma in lactated Ringer's solution at 5 C for 24 hours resulted in a 14% loss of sensitivity. Seventy-three of the 75 infected bulls were available for treatment and were alloted randomly to 2 groups. Bulls in both groups were treated with procaine penicillin (7,000 IU/kg, IM) for 2 days before ipronidazole treatment. Thirty grams of ipronidazole powder was dissolved in 60 ml of sterile water, and was given IM to group 1 bulls. Group 2 bulls were given a similar 30-g ipronidazole solution IM on day 1, and were given 15 g of ipronidazole dissolved in 30 ml of sterile water on days 2 and 3. Efficacy of treatment (ie, negative cultures of preputial smegma for trichomonads for 6 consecutive weeks after treatment) was 92.8% for the 42 bulls treated once and 100% for the 31 bulls treated 3 times. PMID:4030475

  2. Comparison of milk production of the progeny of BLAD-carrier and healthy Holstein bulls in Hungary.

    PubMed

    Jánosa, A; Baranyai, B; Dohy, J

    1999-01-01

    'Bovine Leukocyte Adhesion Deficiency' (BLAD) is a recessive monofactorial, lethal inheritable defect occurring in Holstein-Friesian cattle and often passed on by well-known top bulls. The aim of this study was to find a relationship between the BLAD genotype of bulls, their genetic evaluation for milk and their daughters' milk production. BLAD-carrier and healthy bulls were compared on the basis of their breeding value published in November 1997. The first 100 bulls ranked according to the Total Production Index (TPI) were used, including nine BLAD carriers with 2,835 daughters and 77 healthy sires with 21,950 female progenies. For 14 bulls the BLAD genotype was not indicated. The healthy animals significantly outperformed the BLAD carriers, which result contradicts our earlier findings (Dohy et al., 1996; Jánosa and Dohy, 1997). In a BLAD elimination programme, the identification of BLAD carriers and properly planned mating are of great importance in order to avoid 'inter se' mating of BLAD-carrier top animals which can be of significant influence in Holstein breeding. PMID:10497821

  3. A tremendous expansion of copy number in crossbred bulls ( × ).

    PubMed

    Zhang, G W; Guan, J Q; Luo, Z G; Zhang, W X; Wang, L; Luo, X L; Zuo, F Y

    2016-04-01

    Crossbreeding between cattle () and yak () exhibits significant hybrid advantages in milk yield and meat production. By contrast, cattle-yak F hybrid bulls are sterile. Copy number variations (CNV) of multicopy gene families in male-specific regions of the mammalian Y chromosome (MSY) affect human and animal fertility. The present study investigated CNV of (), (), (), and () in 5 yak breed bulls ( = 63), cattle-yak F ( = 22) and F ( = 2) hybrid bulls, and Chinese Yellow (CY) cattle bulls ( = 10) by quantitative real-time PCR. showed restricted amplification in yak bulls in that the average geometric mean copy number (CN) was estimated to be 4 copies. The most compelling finding is that there is a tremendous expansion of CN in F hybrids (385 copies; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 351-421) and F hybrids (356 copies) compared with the male parent breed CY cattle (142 copies; 95% CI = 95-211). Copy numbers of and were also extensively expanded on the Y chromosome in yak and CY cattle bulls. The geometric mean CN of and were estimated to be 123 (95% CI = 114-132) and 250 copies (95% CI = 233-268) in yak bulls and 71 (95% CI = 61-82) and 133 (95% CI = 107-164) copies in CY cattle, respectively. Yak and CY cattle have 2 copies of the gene on the Y chromosome. Similarly to gene, the F and F hybrid bulls have higher CN of , , and than CY cattle ( < 0.01). These results indicated that the MSY of yak and cattle-yak crossbred hybrids was fundamentally different from cattle MSY in the context of genomic organization. Based on the model of cattle-yak F and F hybrid bull sterility, the CNV of may serve as a potential risk factor for crossbred bull ( × ) infertility. To our knowledge, this is the first study to examine differences in multicopy genes in MSY between yak and cattle-yak bulls. PMID:27135999

  4. Sire conception rate: New national AI bull fertility evaluation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bull fertility evaluations called Estimated Relative Conception Rate (ERCR) were provided to the industry by Dairy Records Management Systems (DRMS) from 1986 to November 2005. In May 2006, AIPL assumed responsibility for evaluation of U.S. bull fertility. As an initial step, AIPL implemented the ER...

  5. Reliability of genomic predictions for North American dairy bulls

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genetic progress will increase when breeders examine genotypes instead of only pedigrees and phenotypes. Genotypes for 39,835 markers and August 2003 genetic evaluations for 2609 Holstein bulls born before 1998 were used to predict January 2008 daughter deviations for 510 bulls born 2001-2. Genotype...

  6. Short communication: Use of young bulls in the United States

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The availability of genomic evaluations since 2008 has resulted in many changes to dairy cattle breeding programs. One such change has been the increased contribution of young bulls (0.8 to 3.9 yr old) to those programs. The increased use of young bulls was investigated using pedigree data and b...

  7. Bull Trout Distribution and Abundance in the Waters on and Bordering the Warm Springs Reservation : 2002 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Brun, Christopher V.; Dodson, Rebekah

    2003-03-01

    The range of bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) in the Deschutes River basin has decreased from historic levels due to many factors including dam construction, habitat degradation, brook trout introduction and eradication efforts. While the bull trout population appears to be healthy in the Metolius River-Lake Billy Chinook system they have been largely extirpated from the upper Deschutes River (Buchanan et al. 1997). Little was known about bull trout in the lower Deschutes basin until BPA funded project No.9405400 began during 1998. In this progress report we describe the findings to date from this multi-year study aimed at determining the life history, habitat needs and limiting factors of bull trout in the lower Deschutes subbasin. Juvenile bull trout and brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) relative abundance has been assessed in the Warm Springs River and Shitike Creek since 1999. In the Warm Springs R. the relative densities of juvenile bull trout and brook trout were .003 fish/m{sup 2} and .001 fish/m{sup 2} respectively during 2002. These densities were the lowest recorded in the Warm Springs River during the period of study. In Shitike Cr. the relative densities of juvenile bull trout and brook trout were .025 fish/m{sup 2} and .01 fish/m{sup 2} respectively during 2002. The utility of using index reaches to monitor trends in juvenile bull trout and brook trout relative abundance in the Warm Springs R. has been assessed since 1999. During 2002 the mean relative densities of juvenile bull trout within the 2.4 km study area was higher than what was observed in four index reaches. However, the mean relative densities of brook trout was slightly higher in the index reaches than what was observed in the 2.4 km study area. Habitat use by both juvenile bull trout and brook trout was determined in the Warm Springs R. Juvenile bull trout and brook trout were most abundant in pools and glides. However pools and glides comprised less than 20% of the available habitat

  8. Bull Trout Distribution and Abundance in the Waters on and Bordering the Warm Springs Indian Reservation, 2001 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Brun, Christopher V.

    2002-01-01

    The range of bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) in the Deschutes River basin has decreased from historic levels due to many factors including dam construction, habitat degradation, brook trout introduction and eradication efforts. While the bull trout population appears to be stable in the Metolius River-Lake Billy Chinook system they have been largely extirpated from the upper Deschutes River (Buchanan et al. 1997). Little was known about bull trout in the lower Deschutes basin until BPA funded project No.9405400 began during 1998. In this progress report we describe the findings from the fourth year (2001) of the multi-year study aimed at determining the life history, habitat needs and limiting factors of bull trout in the lower Deschutes subbasin. Juvenile bull trout and brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) relative abundance was assessed in the Warm Springs River and Shitike Creek by night snorkeling. In the Warm Springs R. juvenile bull trout were slightly more numerous than brook trout, however, both were found in low densities. Relative densities of both species were the lowest observed since surveys began in 1999. Relative densities of juvenile bull trout and brook trout increased in Shitike Cr. Juvenile bull trout vastly out numbered brook trout in Shitike Cr. The utility of using index reaches to monitor trends in juvenile bull trout and brook trout relative abundance was assessed in the Warm Springs R. for the third year. Mean relative densities of juvenile bull trout within the index reaches was slightly higher than what was observed in the 2.4 km control reach. However, the mean relative density of brook trout in the 2.4 km control reach was slightly higher than what was observed in within the index reaches. Habitat use by both juvenile bull trout and brook trout was determined in the Warm Springs R. Juvenile bull trout and brook trout occupied pools more frequently than glides, riffles and rapids. However, pools accounted for only a small percentage

  9. Homeopathic treatment for infertility in a prize Nelore bull.

    PubMed

    Lobreiro, J

    2007-01-01

    Treatments for infertility in bulls are not described in homeopathic literature. A few treatments, such as changing the protein content of the diet, giving extra minerals, etc have been proposed. This case report describes homeopathic treatment for infertility in a prize bull. A Nelore bull, considered infertile for 3 years, was treated with homeopathic Pulsatilla nigricans 200 CH. Decreased total sperm defects, increased sperm motility and a very impressive increased number of doses of semen produced were observed. The bull relapsed after treatment was withdrawn, but again responded when it was resumed. Since only one animal was observed one cannot assume that the observed changes were due only to this treatment. Further studies may establish the real benefits of a homeopathic medicine in bull infertility. PMID:17227749

  10. Evaluation of the Life History of Native Salmonids in the Malheur River Basin; Cooperative Bull Trout/Redband Trout Research Project, 1999-2000 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Schwabe, Lawrence; Tiley, Mark; Perkins, Raymond R.

    2000-11-01

    The purpose of this study is to document the seasonal distribution of adult/sub-adult bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) in the Malheur River basin. Due to the decline of bull trout in the Columbia Basin, the United States Fish and Wildlife Service listed bull trout as a threatened species in June 1998. Past land management activities; construction of dams; and fish eradication projects in the North Fork and Middle Fork Malheur River by poisoning have worked in concert to cumulatively impact native species in the Malheur Basin (Bowers et. al. 1993). Survival of the remaining bull trout populations is severely threatened (Buchanan 1997). 1999 Research Objects are: (1) Document the migratory patterns of adult/sub-adult bull trout in the North Fork Malheur River; (2) Determine the seasonal bull trout use of Beulah Reservoir and bull trout entrainment; and (3) Timing and location of bull trout spawning in the North Fork Malheur River basin. The study area includes the Malheur basin from the mouth of the Malheur River located near Ontario, Oregon to the headwaters of the North Fork Malheur River (Map 1). All fish collected and most of the telemetry effort was done on the North Fork Malheur River subbasin (Map 2). Fish collection was conducted on the North Fork Malheur River at the tailwaters of Beulah Reservoir (RK 29), Beulah Reservoir (RK 29-RK 33), and in the North Fork Malheur River at Crane Crossing (RK 69) to the headwaters of the North Fork Malheur. Radio telemetry was done from the mouth of the Malheur River in Ontario, Oregon to the headwaters of the North Fork Malheur. This report will reflect all migration data collected from 3/1/99 to 12/31/99.

  11. Bull Trout (Salvelinus Confluentus) Population and Habitat Surveys in the McKenzie and Middle Fork Willamette Basins, 2000 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, Greg

    2000-11-28

    Prior to 1978, Dolly Varden Salvelinus malma were classified into an anadromous and interior form. Cavender (1978) classified the interior form as a distinct species, Salvelinus confluentus, the bull trout. Bull trout are large char weighing up to 18 kg and growing to over one meter in length (Goetz 1989). They are distinguished by a broad flat head, large downward curving maxillaries that extend beyond the eye, a well developed fleshy knob and a notch in the lower terminus of the snout, and light colored spots normally smaller than the pupil of the eye (Cavender 1978). Bull trout are found throughout northwestern North America from lat. 41{sup o}N to lat. 60{sup o}N. In Oregon, bull trout were once distributed throughout 12 basins in the Klamath and Columbia River systems including the Clackamas, Santiam, McKenzie and Middle Fork Willamette sub-basins west of the Cascades (Buchanan et al. 1997). However, it is believed bull trout have been extirpated from west of the Cascades with the exception of the McKenzie sub-basin. Before 1963, bull trout in the McKenzie sub-basin were a contiguous population from the mouth to Tamolitch Falls. Following the construction of Cougar and Trail Bridge Reservoirs there are three isolated populations: (1) mainstem McKenzie and tributaries from the mouth to Trail Bridge Reservoir. (2) mainstem McKenzie and tributaries above Trail Bridge Reservoir to Tamolitch Falls. (3) South Fork McKenzie and tributaries above Cougar Reservoir. The study area includes the three aforementioned McKenzie populations, and the Middle Fork Willamette and tributaries above Hills Creek Reservoir. We monitored bull trout populations in the McKenzie and Middle Fork Willamette basins using a combination of sampling techniques including: spawning surveys, standard pool counts, juvenile trapping, radio tracking, electronic fish counters, and a modified Hankin and Reeves protocol to estimate juvenile abundance and density. In addition, we continued to

  12. Fertility management of bulls to improve beef cattle productivity.

    PubMed

    Thundathil, Jacob C; Dance, Alysha L; Kastelic, John P

    2016-07-01

    Global demand for animal proteins is increasing, necessitating increased efficiency of global food production. Improving reproductive efficiency of beef cattle, especially bull fertility, is particularly critical, as one bull can breed thousands of females (by artificial insemination). Identifying the genetic basis of male reproductive traits that influence male and female fertility, and using this information for selection, would improve herd fertility. Early-life selection of elite bulls by genomic approaches and feeding them to optimize postpubertal reproductive potential are essential for maximizing profitability. Traditional bull breeding soundness evaluation, or systematic analysis of frozen semen, eliminates bulls or semen samples that are grossly abnormal. However, semen samples classified as satisfactory on the basis of traditional approaches differ in fertility. Advanced sperm function assays developed for assessing compensatory and noncompensatory (submicroscopic) sperm traits can predict such variations in bull fertility. New knowledge on epigenetic modulations of sperm DNA, messenger RNA, and proteins is fundamental to refine and expand sperm function assays. Sexed semen, plus advanced reproductive technologies (e.g., ovum pickup and in vitro production of embryos) can maximize the efficiency of beef cattle production. This review is focused on genetic considerations for bull selection, physiology of reproductive development, breeding soundness evaluation, recent advances in assessing frozen semen, and existing and emerging uses of sexed semen in beef cattle production. PMID:27173954

  13. Bull Trout (Salvelinus Confluentus) Population and Habitat Surveys in the McKenzie and Middle Fork Willamette Basins, 2001 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, Greg

    2003-02-01

    Prior to 1978, bull trout were commonly known as dolly varden (Salvelinus malma) and were classified into an anadromous and interior form. Cavender (1978) described the interior form as a distinct species, classifying it as Salvelinus confluentus, the bull trout. Bull trout are large char weighing up to 18 kg and growing to over one meter in length (Goetz 1994). They are distinguished by a broad flat head, large downward curving maxillaries that extend beyond the eye, a fleshy knob and a notch in the lower terminus of the snout, and light colored spots normally smaller than the pupil of the eye (Cavender 1978). Bull trout are found throughout northwestern North America from latitude 41{sup o}N to 60{sup o}N. In Oregon, bull trout were once distributed throughout 12 basins in the Klamath and Columbia River systems including the Clackamas, Santiam, McKenzie and Middle Fork Willamette subbasins west of the Cascades (Buchanan et al. 1997). However, it is likely that bull trout have been extirpated from west of the Cascades with the exception of the McKenzie sub-basin. McKenzie River bull trout were a contiguous population from the mouth to Tamolitch Falls prior to 1963. Three populations were isolated following the construction of Cougar and Trail Bridge Reservoirs which include the mainstem McKenzie and tributaries from the mouth to Trail Bridge Reservoir, mainstem McKenzie and tributaries above Trail Bridge Reservoir to Tamolitch Falls, and the South Fork McKenzie and tributaries above Cougar Reservoir. On June 10, 1998 the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) listed the Columbia River bull trout population segment as Threatened under the federal Endangered Species Act and Buchanan et al. (1997) listed the bull trout population in the mainstem McKenzie as ''of special concern'', the South Fork McKenzie population as ''high risk of extinction,'' and the population above Trail Bridge Reservoir as ''high risk of extinction.'' Bull trout in the Middle Fork Willamette

  14. Quantifying the distribution of nanodiamonds in pre-Younger Dryas to recent age deposits along Bull Creek, Oklahoma Panhandle, USA

    PubMed Central

    Bement, Leland C.; Madden, Andrew S.; Carter, Brian J.; Simms, Alexander R.; Swindle, Andrew L.; Alexander, Hanna M.; Fine, Scott; Benamara, Mourad

    2014-01-01

    High levels of nanodiamonds (nds) have been used to support the transformative hypothesis that an extraterrestrial (ET) event (comet explosion) triggered Younger Dryas changes in temperature, flora and fauna assemblages, and human adaptations [Firestone RB, et al. (2007) Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 104(41):16016–16021]. We evaluate this hypothesis by establishing the distribution of nds within the Bull Creek drainage of the Beaver River basin in the Oklahoma panhandle. The earlier report of an abundance spike of nds in the Bull Creek I Younger Dryas boundary soil is confirmed, although no pure cubic diamonds were identified. The lack of hexagonal nds suggests Bull Creek I is not near any impact site. Potential hexagonal nds at Bull Creek were found to be more consistent with graphene/graphane. An additional nd spike is found in deposits of late Holocene through the modern age, indicating nds are not unique to the Younger Dryas boundary. Nd distributions do not correlate with depositional environment, pedogenesis, climate perturbations, periods of surface stability, or cultural activity. PMID:24449875

  15. Quantifying the distribution of nanodiamonds in pre-Younger Dryas to recent age deposits along Bull Creek, Oklahoma Panhandle, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bement, Leland C.; Madden, Andrew S.; Carter, Brian J.; Simms, Alexander R.; Swindle, Andrew L.; Alexander, Hanna M.; Fine, Scott; Benamara, Mourad

    2014-02-01

    High levels of nanodiamonds (nds) have been used to support the transformative hypothesis that an extraterrestrial (ET) event (comet explosion) triggered Younger Dryas changes in temperature, flora and fauna assemblages, and human adaptations [Firestone RB, et al. (2007) Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 104(41):16016-16021]. We evaluate this hypothesis by establishing the distribution of nds within the Bull Creek drainage of the Beaver River basin in the Oklahoma panhandle. The earlier report of an abundance spike of nds in the Bull Creek I Younger Dryas boundary soil is confirmed, although no pure cubic diamonds were identified. The lack of hexagonal nds suggests Bull Creek I is not near any impact site. Potential hexagonal nds at Bull Creek were found to be more consistent with graphene/graphane. An additional nd spike is found in deposits of late Holocene through the modern age, indicating nds are not unique to the Younger Dryas boundary. Nd distributions do not correlate with depositional environment, pedogenesis, climate perturbations, periods of surface stability, or cultural activity.

  16. Evidence of excretion of Schmallenberg virus in bull semen

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Schmallenberg virus (SBV) is a novel orthobunyavirus, discovered in Germany in late 2011. It mainly infects cattle, sheep and goats and could lead to congenital infection, causing abortion and fetal abnormalities. SBV is transmitted by biting midges from the Culicoides genus and there is no evidence that natural infection occurs directly between ruminants. Here, we could detect SBV RNA in infected bull semen using qRT-PCR (three bulls out of seven tested positive; 29 positive semen batches out of 136). We also found that highly positive semen batches from SBV infected bulls can provoke an acute infection in IFNAR-/- mice, suggesting the potential presence of infectious virus in the semen of SBV infected bulls. PMID:24708245

  17. TRAM HOUSE INTERIOR, LOOKING SOUTHEAST. NOTE TRACTION CABLE BULL WHEEL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    TRAM HOUSE INTERIOR, LOOKING SOUTHEAST. NOTE TRACTION CABLE BULL WHEEL AND DEPARTING BUCKET "12," STILL ON RAIL AND JUST PRIOR TO ENGAGING TRACTION CABLE. - Shenandoah-Dives Mill, 135 County Road 2, Silverton, San Juan County, CO

  18. 13. Bull Wheel Core Showing Name of Manufacturer (National Supply ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. Bull Wheel Core Showing Name of Manufacturer (National Supply Co.), Looking Southwest - David Renfrew Oil Rig, East side of Connoquenessing Creek, 0.4 mile North of confluence with Thorn Creek, Renfrew, Butler County, PA

  19. 26. UPPER STATION, LOWER FLOOR, BULL WHEEL. Monongahela Incline ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    26. UPPER STATION, LOWER FLOOR, BULL WHEEL. - Monongahela Incline Plane, Connecting North side of Grandview Avenue at Wyoming Street with West Carson Street near Smithfield Street, Pittsburgh, Allegheny County, PA

  20. 28. UPPER STATION, LOWER FLOOR, BULL WHEEL ROOM, SAFETY BRAKE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    28. UPPER STATION, LOWER FLOOR, BULL WHEEL ROOM, SAFETY BRAKE ADJUSTING MACHINERY. - Monongahela Incline Plane, Connecting North side of Grandview Avenue at Wyoming Street with West Carson Street near Smithfield Street, Pittsburgh, Allegheny County, PA

  1. 27. UPPER STATION, LOWER FLOOR, BULL WHEEL, BRAKE AIR CYLINDER. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    27. UPPER STATION, LOWER FLOOR, BULL WHEEL, BRAKE AIR CYLINDER. - Monongahela Incline Plane, Connecting North side of Grandview Avenue at Wyoming Street with West Carson Street near Smithfield Street, Pittsburgh, Allegheny County, PA

  2. VIEW OF DOWNSTREAM SIDE OF BULL CREEK DAM AND BRIDGE, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF DOWNSTREAM SIDE OF BULL CREEK DAM AND BRIDGE, WITH LATER HEADGATE ADDITION THROUGH SPILLWAY. LOOKING WEST - Tumalo Irrigation District, Tumalo Project, West of Deschutes River, Tumalo, Deschutes County, OR

  3. Subfertility Problems Leading to Disposal of Breeding Bulls

    PubMed Central

    Khatun, Marzina; Kaur, Simarjeet; Kanchan; Mukhopadhyay, C. S.

    2013-01-01

    Subfertility problems are encountered frequently in the cattle and buffalo bulls commercially maintained for semen production in dairy farms and under field conditions for natural insemination. Reports are scarce on the incidence of subfertility in breeding bulls, especially in India. The objective of the present study was to assess the incidence of the male reproductive anomalies leading to disposal of bovine bulls at GADVASU dairy farm, Ludhiana, Punjab (India). Data on frequency of various subfertility and disposal pattern of bulls maintained at the dairy farm, GADVASU, were collected for 12 yrs (1999 to 2010) and compiled from different record registers. Percentage of bulls that produced freezable semen (out of reserved ones) was less in cattle (25.641%) as compared to that of buffalo (30.4%). Various subfertility traits like poor libido and unacceptable seminal profile were found to be the significant reasons (p<0.01) for culling of the breeding bulls. Inadequate sex drive and poor semen quality were the main contributing factors for bull disposal in cattle whereas poor semen freezability was most frequently observed in buffalo bulls. All the male reproductive traits were significantly different (p<0.05) for the periods of birth, except for semen volume, initial motility (IM), age at last semen collection (ALSC) and age at disposal. The ages at first and last semen collection as well as freezing (i.e. AFSC, ALSC and AFSF, ALSF, respectively) and age at disposal (AD) were higher in buffalo. The spermatological parameters and semen production period (SPP) were higher in cattle. The age at first semen donation and breeding period could be reduced by introducing the bulls to training at an early age. The results revealed an increasing trend in individual motility (IM) while semen volume, AFSC, AFSF, AD, FSPP, SPP, ALSC and ALSF showed a decreasing, however, not a definite trend, over the periods. The semen donation traits like, AFSF, of the cattle and buffalo

  4. Tritrichomonas foetus: prevalence study in naturally mating bulls in Switzerland.

    PubMed

    Bernasconi, Ch; Bodmer, M; Doherr, M G; Janett, F; Thomann, A; Spycher, C; Iten, C; Hentrich, B; Gottstein, B; Müller, N; Frey, C F

    2014-03-01

    Switzerland is officially free from bovine Tritrichomonas foetus. While bulls used for artificial insemination (AI) are routinely examined for this pathogen, bulls engaged in natural mating, as well as aborted fetuses, are only very sporadically investigated, indicating that the disease awareness for bovine tritrichomoniasis is low. Natural mating in cattle is becoming increasingly popular in Switzerland. Accordingly, a re-introduction/re-occurrence of T. foetus in cattle seems possible either via resurgence from a yet unknown bovine reservoir, or via importation of infected cattle. The low disease awareness for bovine tritrichomoniasis might favor an unnoticed re-establishment of T. foetus in the Swiss cattle population. The aim of our study was thus to search for the parasite, and if found, to assess the prevalence of bovine T. foetus in Switzerland. We included (1) bulls over two years of age used in natural mating and sent to slaughter, (2) bulls used for natural service in herds with or without fertility problems and (3) aborted fetuses. Furthermore, the routinely examined bulls used for AI (4) were included in this study. In total, 1362 preputial samples from bulls and 60 abomasal fluid samples of aborted fetuses were analyzed for the presence of T. foetus by both in vitro cultivation and molecular analyses. The parasite could not be detected in any of the samples, indicating that the maximal prevalence possibly missed was about 0.3% (95% confidence). Interestingly, in preputial samples of three bulls of category 1, apathogenic Tetratrichomonas sp. was identified, documenting a proof-of-principle for the methodology used in this study. PMID:24447668

  5. The sequential appearance of sperm abnormalities after scrotal insulation or dexamethasone treatment in bulls.

    PubMed Central

    Barth, A D; Bowman, P A

    1994-01-01

    Scrotal insulation and dexamethasone treatment were used as a model to compare the effect of testicular heating and stress on spermatogenesis. Insulation was applied to the scrotum of eight bulls (insulated) for a period of four days, eight bulls were treated daily for seven days with 20 mg dexamethasone injected intramuscularly, and four bulls were untreated controls. Semen from four bulls in each group was collected and evaluated over a six-week period after treatment. Blood samples for testosterone analysis were taken hourly for eight hours at the beginning and the end of the six-week period from the control bulls and before and after treatment from the four insulated and four dexamethasone-treated bulls that were not used for semen collection. At the end of the last blood sampling period, the four bulls in each group were castrated for the collection of testicular tissue for the determination of testosterone concentrations. Basal, peak episodic, and mean serum testosterone concentrations among control bulls, pre and postinsulated bulls, and pretreatment samples of dexamethasone-treated bulls were not different (p > 0.05); however, bulls that had received dexamethasone treatments had significantly lower basal, peak episodic, and mean testosterone concentrations (p < 0.05). Tissue concentrations of testosterone in control, insulated, and dexamethasone-treated bulls were not significantly different but tended to be lower in dexamethasone-treated bulls (p > 0.13). The spermiograms of the control bulls varied insignificantly over the six-week sampling period; however, there was a marked increase in sperm defects in insulated and dexamethasone-treated bulls. The types of sperm defects and the temporal relationships of rises and declines of sperm defects were quite similar for both treatments. All bulls recovered to approximately pretreatment levels of sperm defects by six weeks after the initiation of treatment. Results indicate that two of the most common types of

  6. Relationship of nonreturn rates of dairy bulls to binding affinity of heparin to sperm

    SciTech Connect

    Marks, J.L.; Ax, R.L.

    1985-08-01

    The binding of the glycosaminoglycan (3H) heparin to bull spermatozoa was compared with nonreturn rates of dairy bulls. Semen samples from five bulls above and five below an average 71% nonreturn rate were used. Samples consisted of first and second ejaculates on a single day collected 1 d/wk for up to 5 consecutive wk. Saturation binding assays using (TH) heparin were performed to quantitate the binding characteristics of each sample. Scatchard plot analyses indicated a significant difference in the binding affinity for (TH) heparin between bulls of high and low fertility. Dissociation constants were 69.0 and 119.3 pmol for bulls of high and low fertility, respectively. In contrast, the number of binding sites for (TH) heparin did not differ significantly among bulls. Differences in binding affinity of (TH) heparin to bull sperm might be used to predict relative fertility of dairy bulls.

  7. Effects of epidural lidocaine anesthesia on bulls during electroejaculation.

    PubMed Central

    Falk, A J; Waldner, C L; Cotter, B S; Gudmundson, J; Barth, A D

    2001-01-01

    Two experiments were conducted to determine whether caudal epidural lidocaine anesthesia reduces a stress response to electroejaculation. In the 1st experiment, changes in cortisol and progesterone concentrations in serial blood samples were used to assess the stress response to restraint (control), transrectal massage, caudal epidural injection of saline, electroejaculation after caudal epidural injection of lidocaine, and electroejaculation without epidural lidocaine. In the 2nd experiment, behavioral responses were subjectively scored in bulls that were electroejaculated with or without caudal epidural lidocaine anesthesia. Cortisol and progesterone concentrations were significantly elevated after electroejaculation, whether or not bulls received caudal epidural anesthesia. Elevations in cortisol and progesterone were lower and fewer bulls vocalized during electroejaculation when given caudal epidural anesthesia; however, the differences were not significant. PMID:11272454

  8. "As if Reviewing His Life": Bull Lodge's Narrative and the Mediation of Self-Representation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gone, Joseph P.

    2006-01-01

    In 1980, on behalf of the Gros Ventre people, George P. Horse Capture published "The Seven Visions of Bull Lodge, as Told by His Daughter, Garter Snake." "The Seven Visions" describes a lifetime of personal encounters with Powerful other-than-human Persons by the noted Gros Ventre warrior and ritual leader, Bull Lodge (ca. 1802-86). Bull Lodge…

  9. 75 FR 2269 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Revised Designation of Critical Habitat for Bull...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-14

    ...-history form of bull trout is unique to the Coastal-Puget Sound population (64 FR 58921; November 1, 1999... Jarbidge, Coastal-Puget Sound, and Saint Mary- Belly River bull trout populations (69 FR 35767). On..., Coastal-Puget Sound, and Saint Mary-Belly River populations of bull trout (70 FR 56212). Please refer...

  10. The influence of temperament, transportation stress, and endotoxin challenge on body composition traits in Brahman bulls

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study was designed to determine the influence of temperament of bulls on ultrasound body composition traits in response to transportation and an endotoxin challenge. Purebred Brahman bulls were selected from a pool of 60 bulls based on temperament scores measured at weaning (n=8 each: calm, int...

  11. Assessment of semen quality in pure and crossbred Jersey bulls

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Umesh; Gawande, Ajay P.; Sahatpure, Sunil K.; Patil, Manoj S.; Lakde, Chetan K.; Bonde, Sachin W.; Borkar, Pradnyankur L.; Poharkar, Ajay J.; Ramteke, Baldeo R.

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To compare the seminal attributes of neat, pre-freeze (at equilibration), and post-freeze (24 h after freezing) semen in pure and crossbred Jersey bulls. Materials and Methods: Total 36 ejaculates (3 ejaculates from each bull) were collected from 6 pure Jersey and 6 crossbred Jersey bulls and evaluated for various seminal attributes during neat, pre-freeze, and post-freeze semen. Results: The mean (±standard error [SE]) values of neat semen characteristics in pure and crossbred Jersey bulls were recorded such as volume (ml), color, consistency, mass activity (scale: 0-5), and sperm concentration (millions/ml). The extended semen was further investigated at pre-freeze and post-freeze stages and the mean (±SE) values recorded at neat, pre-freeze, and post-freeze semen were compared between pure and crossbred Jersey bulls; sperm motility (80.55±1.70%, 62.77±1.35%, 46.11±1.43% vs. 80.00±1.80%, 65.00±1.66%, 47.22±1.08%), live sperm count (83.63±1.08%, 71.72±1.09%, 58.67±1.02% vs. 80.00±1.08%, 67.91±1.20%, 51.63±0.97%), total abnormal sperm count (8.38±0.32%, 12.30±0.39%, 16.75±0.42% vs. 9.00±0.45%, 12.19±0.48%, 18.11±0.64%), hypo-osmotic swelling (HOS) reacted spermatozoa (71.88±0.77%, 62.05±0.80%, 47.27±1.05% vs. 72.77±1.02%, 62.11±0.89%, 45.94±1.33%), acrosome integrity (89.05±0.83%, 81.33±0.71%, 71.94±0.86% vs. 86.55±0.57%, 78.66±0.42%, 69.38±0.53%), and DNA integrity (99.88±0.07%, 100, 99.66±0.11% vs. 99.94±0.05%, 100, 99.44±0.18%,). The volume, color, consistency, sperm concentration, and initial motility in pure and crossbred Jersey bulls did not differ significantly (p>0.05). The mass activity was significantly (p<0.05) higher in pure Jersey as compare to crossbred Jersey bulls. Live sperm percentage and acrosome integrity was significantly (p<0.01) higher in pure Jersey bulls as compared to crossbred Jersey bulls. However, no statistical difference (p>0.05) was observed in abnormal sperm; HOS reacted spermatozoa and DNA

  12. Can you believe those genomic evaluations for young bulls?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Breeders began selecting on official genomic tests for U.S. Holstein and Jersey bulls, cows, and heifers in January 2009. Statistical properties of genomic evaluations, traditional evaluations, and parent averages were validated using data from November 2004 to predict January 2009 daughter merit, w...

  13. Sitting Bull, The Story of an American Indian.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knoop, Faith Yingling

    Sitting Bull was a complex man, living in complicated times. A Hunkpapa Sioux, he grew up on the Great Plains of South Dakota. His early years, as described in this biography, were taken up with the hunt, forays against Crow Indians, and his development as a warrior and leader through the Vision Quest and Sun Dance. A man of considerable talents,…

  14. TRAM HOUSE INTERIOR, LOOKING SOUTH. NOTE HORIZONTAL, IDLER, BULL WHEEL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    TRAM HOUSE INTERIOR, LOOKING SOUTH. NOTE HORIZONTAL, IDLER, BULL WHEEL TO REVERSE DIRECTION OF TRACTION CABLE. TRAM CABLE DRIVE MOTOR (NO LONGER EXTANT) WAS AT MINE END OF TRAM. - Shenandoah-Dives Mill, 135 County Road 2, Silverton, San Juan County, CO

  15. Cultural Connections: Bowl with Frieze of Lions Attacking Bulls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Arts: The Art Education Magazine for Teachers, 2004

    2004-01-01

    This article gives a brief description of the piece of art titled "Bowl with Frieze of Lions Attacking Bulls" which is thought to be the product of a court or palace of the Neo-Assyrian period and dates to the late seventh to eighth century BC, between the reigns of Sargon and Ashurbanipal. The article highlights the piece's most notable cultural…

  16. Increased use of young bulls in dairy cattle breeding programs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Availability of genomic evaluations since 2008 has provided many benefits with regard to improving the rate of genetic gain in dairy cattle breeding programs, one of which is a greater accuracy for young animals. As a result, AI organizations have been aggressively promoting young bulls and producer...

  17. The Bull's-Eye Values Survey: A Psychometric Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lundgren, Tobias; Luoma, Jason B.; Dahl, JoAnne; Strosahl, Kirk; Melin, Lennart

    2012-01-01

    Two studies were conducted to develop and evaluate an instrument intended to identify and measure personal values, values attainment, and persistence in the face of barriers. Study 1 describes a content validity approach to the construction and preliminary validation of the Bull's Eye Values Survey (BEVS), using a sample of institutionalized…

  18. Training Tribal Lay Advocates at Sitting Bull College

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shelley, W. L.

    2015-01-01

    Students in Sitting Bull College's lay advocate program develop a well-rounded understanding of the law, enabling them to represent defendants in tribal courts. The program offers legal training for its students--and illustrates how American Indian nations can broaden legal representation for Native defendants in tribal courts. It is one of only…

  19. Bulls, Goats, and Pedagogy: Engaging Students in Overseas Development Aid

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miles, William F. S.

    2009-01-01

    This article illustrates the profound learning that occurs--for students and instructor alike--when a class on third-world development attempts to undertake foreign aid. With undergraduate, graduate, and departmental money, I purchased bulls and carts for farmers, and goats for widows, in two West African villages. Such experiential learning…

  20. The effect of selected staining techniques on bull sperm morphometry.

    PubMed

    Banaszewska, Dorota; Andraszek, Katarzyna; Czubaszek, Magdalena; Biesiada-Drzazga, Barbara

    2015-08-01

    Sperm morphometry has some value as an indicator of reproductive capacity in males. In laboratory practice a variety of slide-staining methods are used during morphological evaluation of semen to predict male fertility. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of staining of semen using four different techniques on the morphometry of the bull sperm cell. The material for the study consisted of semen collected from test bulls of the Black-and-White variety of Holstein-Friesians. The results obtained in the study indicate differences in the dimensions of bull sperm heads when different slide staining techniques were used. The most similar results for sperm head dimensions were obtained in the case of SpermBlue(®) and eosin+gentian violet complex, although statistically significant differences were found between all the staining techniques. Extreme values were noted for the other staining techniques - lowest for the Papanicolaou and highest for silver nitrate, which may indicate more interference in the cell by the reagents used in the staining process. However, silver nitrate staining was best at identifying the structures of the sperm cell. Hence it is difficult to determine which of the staining methods most faithfully reveals the dimensions and shape of the bull sperm. PMID:26149220

  1. The White Bull effect: abusive coauthorship and publication parasitism

    PubMed Central

    Kwok, L

    2005-01-01

    Junior researchers can be abused and bullied by unscrupulous senior collaborators. This article describes the profile of a type of serial abuser, the White Bull, who uses his academic seniority to distort authorship credit and who disguises his parasitism with carefully premeditated deception. Further research into the personality traits of such perpetrators is warranted. PMID:16131560

  2. Relationships among temperament, behavior, and growth during performance testing of bulls.

    PubMed

    Lockwood, S A; Kattesh, H G; Krawczel, P D; Kirkpatrick, F D; Saxton, A M; Rhinehart, J D; Wilkerson, J B

    2015-12-01

    Excitable cattle are dangerous to personnel and have reduced individual performance. The aim of this study was to 1) identify objective criteria for evaluating bull temperament and 2) examine relationships among temperament, behavior, and performance of bulls during an 84-d performance test. Angus bulls ( = 60) were reared in 6 pens based on BW and age. Pen scores (PS; 1 = docile and 5 = very aggressive) were assigned on d -1, 27, 55, and 83. Exit velocity (EV), BW, time to exit the chute, and order through the chute were recorded on d 0, 28, 56, and 84. The ADG was calculated for the 84-d test period, and ultrasound data and frame score calculations were recorded on d 84. Dataloggers measured steps taken, lying time, number of lying bouts, and lying bout duration of bulls ( = 27; 3 pens) from d 3 to 28 and d 59 to 84. Bulls with a d -1 PS of 1 or 2 were categorized as calm (PScalm; = 40), whereas bulls with a PS of 3 or 4 were categorized as excitable (PSexcitable; = 20). Bulls were separated into 2 groups based on the bottom 20 EV (EVcalm) and top 20 EV (EVexcitable) on d 0. Mixed model ANOVA (SAS 9.3) was used to compare groups for the two temperament assessment methods, behavior, and growth performance. Mean EV decreased ( < 0.05) by d 84. Total lying time from d 3 to 28 was greater ( < 0.05) for PScalm bulls when compared with PSexcitable bulls. However, total lying time from d 59 to 84 was greater ( < 0.05) for EVexcitable bulls when compared with EVcalm bulls. Regardless of initial contemporary group assignment, all bulls exited the chute slower ( < 0.001) on d 84 than on d 0. The PSexcitable bulls had greater ( < 0.01) frame scores and greater ADG than PScalm bulls. The PSexcitable bulls had more ( < 0.01) backfat than PScalm bulls. However, ribeye area was smaller ( < 0.01) in EVexcitable bulls than EVcalm bulls. Based on these results, bulls appeared to have habituated over the testing period. Additionally, the potential lack of innate temperament

  3. Multiscale hydrogeomorphic influences on bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) spawning habitat

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bean, Jared R; Wilcox, Andrew C.; Woessner, William W; Muhlfeld, Clint C.

    2015-01-01

    We investigated multiscale hydrogeomorphic influences on the distribution and abundance of bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) spawning in snowmelt-dominated streams of the upper Flathead River basin, northwestern Montana. Within our study reaches, bull trout tended to spawn in the finest available gravel substrates. Analysis of the mobility of these substrates, based on one-dimensional hydraulic modeling and calculation of dimensionless shear stresses, indicated that bed materials in spawning reaches would be mobilized at moderate (i.e., 2-year recurrence interval) high-flow conditions, although the asynchronous timing of the fall–winter egg incubation period and typical late spring – early summer snowmelt high flows in our study area may limit susceptibility to redd scour under current hydrologic regimes. Redd occurrence also tended to be associated with concave-up bedforms (pool tailouts) with downwelling intragravel flows. Streambed temperatures tracked stream water diurnal temperature cycles to a depth of at least 25 cm, averaging 6.1–8.1 °C in different study reaches during the spawning period. Ground water provided thermal moderation of stream water for several high-density spawning reaches. Bull trout redds were more frequent in unconfined alluvial valley reaches (8.5 versus 5.0 redds·km−1 in confined valley reaches), which were strongly influenced by hyporheic and groundwater – stream water exchange. A considerable proportion of redds were patchily distributed in confined valley reaches, however, emphasizing the influence of local physical conditions in supporting bull trout spawning habitat. Moreover, narrowing or “bounding” of these alluvial valley segments did not appear to be important. Our results suggest that geomorphic, thermal, and hydrological factors influence bull trout spawning occurrence at multiple spatial scales.

  4. Monitor and Protect Wigwam River Bull Trout for Koocanusa Reservoir; White River Bull Trout Enumeration Project Summary, Progress Report 2003.

    SciTech Connect

    Cope, R.

    2004-02-01

    This report summarizes the first year of a three-year bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) enumeration project on the White River and is a co-operative initiative of the British Columbia Ministry of Water, Land, and Air Protection and Bonneville Power Administration. The White River has been identified as an important bull trout spawning tributary of the upper Kootenay River in southeastern British Columbia. The objective was to collect information on the returning adult spawning population to the White River through the use of a fish fence and traps, and to conduct redd surveys at the conclusion of spawning to provide an index of spawning escapement and distribution. The fence was installed on September 9th, 2003 and was operated continuously (i.e. no high-water or breaching events) until the fence was removed on October 9th, 2003. Estimation of the spawning population of White River bull trout was incomplete. This was due to a larger and more protracted out-migration than expected. As a result, the bull trout spawning population of the White River was estimated to be somewhere above 899 fish. In comparison, this represents approximately one third the population estimate of the 2003 Wigwam River bull trout spawning population. Based on redd index data, the number of bull trout per redd was over twice that of the Wigwam River or Skookumchuck Creek. This was expected as the index sites on the Wigwam River and Skookumchuck Creek cover the majority of the spawning area. This is not true on the White River. From previous redd counts, it is known that there are approximately twice as many redds in Blackfoot Creek as there are in the index site. Additionally, given the large size of the White River watershed and in particular, the large number of tributaries, there is a high likelihood that important bull trout spawning areas remain unidentified. Both floy tag and radio-telemetry data for the White River bull trout have identified extensive life history migrations

  5. Temporary Restoration of Bull Trout Passage at Albeni Falls Dam

    SciTech Connect

    Paluch, Mark; Scholz, Allan; McLellan, Holly; Olson, Jason

    2009-07-13

    This study was designed to monitor movements of bull trout that were provided passage above Albeni Falls Dam, Pend Oreille River. Electrofishing and angling were used to collect bull trout below the dam. Tissue samples were collected from each bull trout and sent to the U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service Abernathy Fish Technology Center Conservation Genetics Lab, Washington. The DNA extracted from tissue samples were compared to a catalog of bull trout population DNA from the Priest River drainage, Lake Pend Oreille tributaries, and the Clark Fork drainage to determine the most probable tributary of origin. A combined acoustic radio or radio tag was implanted in each fish prior to being transported and released above the dam. Bull trout relocated above the dam were able to volitionally migrate into their natal tributary, drop back downstream, or migrate upstream to the next dam. A combination of stationary radio receiving stations and tracking via aircraft, boat, and vehicle were used to monitor the movement of tagged fish to determine if the spawning tributary it selected matched the tributary assigned from the genetic analysis. Seven bull trout were captured during electrofishing surveys in 2008. Of these seven, four were tagged and relocated above the dam. Two were tagged and left below the dam as part of a study monitoring movements below the dam. One was immature and too small at the time of capture to implant a tracking tag. All four fish released above the dam passed by stationary receivers stations leading into Lake Pend Oreille and no fish dropped back below the dam. One of the radio tags was recovered in the tributary corresponding with the results of the genetic test. Another fish was located in the vicinity of its assigned tributary, which was impassable due to low water discharge at its mouth. Two fish have not been located since entering the lake. Of these fish, one was immature and not expected to enter its natal tributary in the fall of 2008. The other

  6. Geochemical Indicators of Urban Development in Tributaries and Springs along the Bull Creek Watershed, Austin, TX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senison, J. J.; Banner, J. L.; Reyes, D.; Sharp, J. M.

    2012-12-01

    Urbanization can cause significant changes to both flow and water quality in streams and tributaries. In the Austin, Texas, area, previous studies have demonstrated that streamwater strontium isotope compositions (87Sr/86Sr) correlate with measures of urbanization when comparing non-urbanized streams to their urban counterparts. The inclusion of municipal water into natural surface water is inferred from the mean 87Sr/86Sr value found in urbanized streams, which falls between the high value in treated municipal water and the lower values found in local surface streams sourcing from non-urbanized catchments. Fluoride is added to municipal tap water in the treatment process, and a correlation between 87Sr/86Sr and fluoride is observed in streamwater sampled from the watersheds around Austin. These relationships represent some of the principal findings reported in Christian et al. (2011). Current research is testing the hypothesis that municipal water influx in urban areas is a primary modifier of stream- and spring-water chemistry in a single watershed that contains a strong gradient in land use. We compare 87Sr/86Sr and other chemical constituents with potential contributing endmembers, such as municipal tap water and wastewater, local soil and rock leachates, and land use within the Bull Creek watershed. As a consequence of the history of land development, some Bull Creek tributaries are sourced and flow almost entirely in fully-developed areas, whereas others are located in protected natural areas. Thirteen tributaries were monitored and classified as either urbanized or non-urbanized based upon land use within the tributary catchment. Springs in the Bull Creek watershed were also sampled and are similarly classified. The Bull Creek watershed is composed of Lower Cretaceous limestone with significantly lower 87Sr/86Sr than that of municipal water taken from the Lower Colorado River, which is underlain in part by Precambrian rocks upstream of Austin. There are

  7. Bull breeding soundness, semen evaluation and cattle productivity.

    PubMed

    Chenoweth, P J; McPherson, F J

    2016-06-01

    The bull breeding soundness evaluation (BBSE) has evolved as a cost-effective veterinary procedure which provides benefits such as risk-reduction and improvements in strategic bull usage, herd fertility and economics. Semen evaluation is an important component of the BBSE when performed appropriately; a consideration that is increasingly addressed by third party andrology laboratories. The combination of competent physical/reproductive exams (including scrotal circumference measurements) and semen evaluations can contribute greatly to the fertility and economics of individual herds as well as adding to understanding of those factors which affect cattle fertility. Despite such advantages, there remain challenges in achieving full acceptance of BBSEs, particularly by the dairy industry and in developing countries. PMID:27091815

  8. Detection of Campylobacter fetus in artificial insemination bulls with a transport enrichment medium.

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, M M; Ruckerbauer, G M; Eaglesome, M D; Boisclair, W E

    1983-01-01

    One hundred and five bulls from an artificial insemination unit were tested for the presence of Campylobacter fetus subspecies venerealis. The method involved the inoculation of preputial samples into a new transport enrichment medium prior to culture and immunofluorescence tests. Seventeen bulls (16%) were found to be either positive or suspected carriers of C. fetus at one or more sampling times. The average age of these 17 bulls was about two years greater than the average age of all the bulls in the unit. A combined treatment of vaccination and dihydrostreptomycin sulfate injection suppressed or eliminated the organism from carrier bulls. The use of transport enrichment medium has increased our capability and effectiveness to monitor the presence of C. fetus in artificial insemination bulls. PMID:6357410

  9. Inconsistent identification of pit bull-type dogs by shelter staff.

    PubMed

    Olson, K R; Levy, J K; Norby, B; Crandall, M M; Broadhurst, J E; Jacks, S; Barton, R C; Zimmerman, M S

    2015-11-01

    Shelter staff and veterinarians routinely make subjective dog breed identification based on appearance, but their accuracy regarding pit bull-type breeds is unknown. The purpose of this study was to measure agreement among shelter staff in assigning pit bull-type breed designations to shelter dogs and to compare breed assignments with DNA breed signatures. In this prospective cross-sectional study, four staff members at each of four different shelters recorded their suspected breed(s) for 30 dogs; there was a total of 16 breed assessors and 120 dogs. The terms American pit bull terrier, American Staffordshire terrier, Staffordshire bull terrier, pit bull, and their mixes were included in the study definition of 'pit bull-type breeds.' Using visual identification only, the median inter-observer agreements and kappa values in pair-wise comparisons of each of the staff breed assignments for pit bull-type breed vs. not pit bull-type breed ranged from 76% to 83% and from 0.44 to 0.52 (moderate agreement), respectively. Whole blood was submitted to a commercial DNA testing laboratory for breed identification. Whereas DNA breed signatures identified only 25 dogs (21%) as pit bull-type, shelter staff collectively identified 62 (52%) dogs as pit bull-type. Agreement between visual and DNA-based breed assignments varied among individuals, with sensitivity for pit bull-type identification ranging from 33% to 75% and specificity ranging from 52% to 100%. The median kappa value for inter-observer agreement with DNA results at each shelter ranged from 0.1 to 0.48 (poor to moderate). Lack of consistency among shelter staff indicated that visual identification of pit bull-type dogs was unreliable. PMID:26403955

  10. Enhanced early-life nutrition promotes hormone production and reproductive development in Holstein bulls.

    PubMed

    Dance, Alysha; Thundathil, Jacob; Wilde, Randy; Blondin, Patrick; Kastelic, John

    2015-02-01

    Holstein bull calves often reach artificial insemination centers in suboptimal body condition. Early-life nutrition is reported to increase reproductive performance in beef bulls. The objective was to determine whether early-life nutrition in Holstein bulls had effects similar to those reported in beef bulls. Twenty-six Holstein bull calves were randomly allocated into 3 groups at approximately 1 wk of age to receive a low-, medium-, or high-nutrition diet, based on levels of energy and protein, from 2 to 31 wk of age. Calves were on their respective diets until 31 wk of age, after which they were all fed a medium-nutrition diet. To evaluate secretion profiles and concentrations of blood hormones, a subset of bulls was subjected to intensive blood sampling every 4 wk from 11 to 31 wk of age. Testes of all bulls were measured once a month; once scrotal circumference reached 26cm, semen collection was attempted (by electroejaculation) every 2 wk to confirm puberty. Bulls were maintained until approximately 72 wk of age and then slaughtered at a local abattoir. Testes were recovered and weighed. Bulls fed the high-nutrition diet were younger at puberty (high=324.3 d, low=369.3 d) and had larger testes for the entire experimental period than bulls fed the low-nutrition diet. Bulls fed the high-nutrition diet also had an earlier and more substantial early rise in LH than those fed the low-nutrition diet and had increased concentrations of insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) earlier than the bulls fed the low-nutrition diet. Furthermore, we detected a temporal association between increased IGF-I concentrations and an early LH rise in bulls fed the high-nutrition diet. Therefore, we inferred that IGF-I had a role in regulating the early gonadotropin rise (in particular, LH) and thus reproductive development of Holstein bulls. Overall, these results support our hypothesis that Holstein bull calves fed a high-nutrition diet reach puberty earlier and have larger testes than

  11. Bull Trout Life History, Genetics, Habitat Needs, and Limiting Factors in Central and Northeast Oregon. Annual Report 1996.

    SciTech Connect

    Bellerud, Blane L.; Gunckel, Stephanie; Hemmingsen, Alan R.; Buchanan, David V.; Howell, Philip J.

    1997-10-01

    This study is part of a multi-year research project studying aspects of bull trout life history, ecology and genetics. This report covers the activities of the project in 1996. Results and analysis are presented in the following five areas: (1) analysis of the genetic structure of Oregon bull trout populations; (2) distribution and habitat use of bull trout and brook trout in streams containing both species; (3) bull trout spawning surveys; (4) summary and analysis of historical juvenile bull trout downstream migrant trap catches in the Grande Ronde basin; and (5) food habits and feeding behavior of bull trout alone and in sympatry with brook trout.

  12. Monitor and Protect Wigwam River Bull Trout for Koocanusa Reservoir : Summary of the Skookumchuck Creek Bull Trout Enumeration Project Final Report 2000-2002.

    SciTech Connect

    Baxter, Jeremy; Baxter, James S.

    2002-12-01

    This report summarizes the third and final year of a bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) enumeration project on Skookumchuck Creek in southeastern British Columbia. The fence and traps were operated from September 6th to October 11th 2002 in order to enumerate post-spawning bull trout. During the study period a total of 309 bull trout were captured at the fence. In total, 16 fish of undetermined sex, 114 males and 179 females were processed at the fence. Length and weight data, as well as recapture information, were collected for these fish. An additional 41 bull trout were enumerated upstream of the fence by snorkeling prior to fence removal. Coupled with the fence count, the total bull trout enumerated during the project was 350 individuals. Several fish that were tagged in the lower Bull River were recaptured in 2002, as were repeat and alternate year spawners previously enumerated in past years at the fence. A total of 149 bull trout redds were enumerated on the ground in 2002, of which 143 were in the 3.0 km index section (river km 27.5-30.5) that has been surveyed over the past six years. The results of the three year project are summarized, and population characteristics are discussed.

  13. Distribution and Movement of Bull Trout in the Upper Jarbidge River Watershed, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Allen, M. Brady; Connolly, Patrick J.; Mesa, Matthew G.; Charrier, Jodi; Dixon, Chris

    2010-01-01

    In 2006 and 2007, we surveyed the occurrence of bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus), the relative distributions of bull trout and redband trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), and stream habitat conditions in the East and West Forks of the Jarbidge River in northeastern Nevada and southern Idaho. We installed passive integrated transponder (PIT) tag interrogation systems at strategic locations within the watershed, and PIT-tagged bull trout were monitored to evaluate individual fish growth, movement, and the connectivity of bull trout between streams. Robust bull trout populations were found in the upper portions of the East Fork Jarbidge River, the West Fork Jarbidge River, and in the Pine, Jack, Dave, and Fall Creeks. Small numbers of bull trout also were found in Slide and Cougar Creeks. Bull trout were numerically dominant in the upper portions of the East Fork Jarbidge River, and in Fall, Dave, Jack, and Pine Creeks, whereas redband trout were numerically dominant throughout the rest of the watershed. The relative abundance of bull trout was notably higher at altitudes above 2,100 m. This study was successful in documenting bull trout population connectivity within the West Fork Jarbidge River, particularly between West Fork Jarbidge River and Pine Creek. Downstream movement of bull trout to the confluence of the East Fork and West Fork Jarbidge River both from Jack Creek (rkm 16.6) in the West Fork Jarbidge River and from Dave Creek (rkm 7.5) in the East Fork Jarbidge River was detected. Although bull trout exhibited some downstream movement during the spring and summer, much of their emigration occurred in the autumn, concurrent with decreasing water temperatures and slightly increasing flows. The bull trout that emigrated were mostly age-2 or older, but some age-1 fish also emigrated. Upstream movement by bull trout was detected less than downstream movement. The overall mean annual growth rate of bull trout in the East Fork and West Fork Jarbidge River was 36 mm

  14. Evaluation of bull prolificacy on commercial beef cattle ranches using DNA paternity analysis.

    PubMed

    Van Eenennaam, A L; Weber, K L; Drake, D J

    2014-06-01

    SNP-based DNA testing was used to assign paternity to 5,052 calves conceived in natural service multisire breeding pastures from 3 commercial ranches in northern California representing 15 calf crops over 3 yr. Bulls present for 60 to 120 d at a 25:1 cow to bull ratio in both fall and spring breeding seasons in ∼40 ha or smaller fenced breeding pastures sired a highly variable (P < 0.001) number of calves (Ncalf), ranging from 0 (4.4% of bulls present in any given breeding season) to 64 calves per bull per breeding season, with an average of 18.9 ± 13.1. There was little variation in Ncalf among ranches (P = 0.90), years (P = 0.96), and seasons (P = 0.94). Bulls varied widely (P < 0.01) in the average individual 205-d adjusted weaning weight (I205) of progeny, and I205 varied between years (P < 0.01) and seasons (P < 0.01) but not ranches (P = 0.29). The pattern for cumulative total 205-d adjusted weaning weight of all progeny sired by a bull (T205) was highly correlated to Ncalf, with small differences between ranches (P = 0.35), years (P = 0.66), and seasons (P = 0.20) but large differences (P < 0.01) between bulls, ranging from an average of 676 to 8,838 kg per bull per calf crop. The peak Ncalf occurred at about 5 yr of age for bulls ranging from 2 to 11 yr of age. Weekly conception rates as assessed by date of calving varied significantly and peaked at wk 3 of the calving season. The distribution of calves born early in the calving season was disproportionately skewed toward the highly prolific bulls. The DNA paternity testing of the subset of those calves born in wk 3 of the calving season was highly predictive of overall bull prolificacy and may offer a reduced-cost DNA-based option for assessing prolificacy. Prolificacy of young bulls in their first breeding season was positively linearly related (P < 0.05) to subsequent breeding seasons, explaining about 20% of the subsequent variation. Prolificacy was also positively linearly related (P < 0.05) to

  15. Adaptive Management of Bull Trout Populations in the Lemhi Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peterson, James T.; Tyre, Andrew J.; Converse, Sarah J.; Bogich, Tiffany L.; Miller, Damien; Post van der Burg, Max; Thomas, Carmen; Thompson, Ralph J.; Wood, Jeri; Brewer, Donna; Runge, Michael C.

    2011-01-01

    The bull trout Salvelinus confluentus, a stream-living salmonid distributed in drainages of the northwestern United States, is listed as threatened under the Endangered Species Act because of rangewide declines. One proposed recovery action is the reconnection of tributaries in the Lemhi Basin. Past water use policies in this core area disconnected headwater spawning sites from downstream habitat and have led to the loss of migratory life history forms. We developed an adaptive management framework to analyze which types of streams should be prioritized for reconnection under a proposed Habitat Conservation Plan. We developed a Stochastic Dynamic Program that identified optimal policies over time under four different assumptions about the nature of the migratory behavior and the effects of brook trout Salvelinus fontinalis on subpopulations of bull trout. In general, given the current state of the system and the uncertainties about the dynamics, the optimal policy would be to connect streams that are currently occupied by bull trout. We also estimated the value of information as the difference between absolute certainty about which of our four assumptions were correct, and a model averaged optimization assuming no knowledge. Overall there is little to be gained by learning about the dynamics of the system in its current state, although in other parts of the state space reducing uncertainties about the system would be very valuable. We also conducted a sensitivity analysis; the optimal decision at the current state does not change even when parameter values are changed up to 75% of the baseline values. Overall, the exercise demonstrates that it is possible to apply adaptive management principles to threatened and endangered species, but logistical and data availability constraints make detailed analyses difficult.

  16. The complete mitochondrial DNA of the bull shark (Carcharhinus leucas).

    PubMed

    Diaz-Jaimes, Pindaro; Uribe-Alcocer, Manuel; Hinojosa-Alvarez, Silvia; Sandoval-Laurrabaquio, Nadia; Adams, Douglas H; García De León, Francisco J

    2016-01-01

    The bull shark mitochondrial structure is similar to that of other elasmobranchs; it has a total length of 16,100 bp, the base composition of the genomes was as follows: A (31.35%), T (31.35%), C (24.38%) and G (12.90%). It contains 13 protein-coding genes and 23 tRNA genes. The tRNA genes range from 70-72 bp. Gene order is the same as in other vertebrates and teleosts. PMID:24810063

  17. Multicystic renal dysplasia in a Japanese black bull.

    PubMed

    Ushigaki, K; Uchida, K; Murakami, T; Yamaguchi, R; Tateyama, S

    1999-07-01

    Multicystic renal dysplasia was found in a 6-day-old Japanese black bull. Grossly, both kidneys were markedly small (2.0 x 3.5 cm) with numerous cysts ranging from 1 to 8 mm in diameter. Histopathologically, both kidneys consisted of many irregularly enlarged cysts, immature glomeruli, small ducts and anomalous stromal connective tissues containing focal persistent mesenchyme characterized by a proliferation of stellate cells with myxomatous area. These features are compatible with those of multicystic renal dysplasia in humans and other mammals. PMID:10458111

  18. 77 FR 55139 - Safety Zone; Chicago Red Bull Flugtag, Lake Michigan, Chicago, IL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-07

    ... Security FR Federal Register NPRM Notice of Proposed Rulemaking A. Regulatory History and Information The... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Chicago Red Bull Flugtag, Lake Michigan... restrict vessels from a portion of Lake Michigan for the Red Bull Flugtag event. This temporary safety...

  19. 75 FR 17106 - Safety Zone; Red Bull Air Race, Detroit River, Detroit, MI

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-05

    ..., 2008 issue of the Federal Register (73 FR 3316). Public Meeting We do not now plan to hold a public... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Red Bull Air Race, Detroit River, Detroit... vessels from portions of the Detroit River during the Red Bull Air Race. This temporary safety zone...

  20. 75 FR 30708 - Safety Zone; Red Bull Air Race, Detroit River, Detroit, MI

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-02

    ... Federal Register (75 FR 17106). We received zero comments on the proposed rule. No public meeting was... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Red Bull Air Race, Detroit River, Detroit... from portions of the Detroit River during the Red Bull Air Race. This temporary safety zone...

  1. Does bovine besnoitiosis affect the sexual function of chronically infected bulls?

    PubMed

    Esteban-Gil, A; Jacquiet, P; Florentin, S; Decaudin, A; Berthelot, X; Ronsin, P; Grisez, C; Prevot, F; Alzieu, J P; Marois, M; Corboz, N; Peglion, M; Vilardell, C; Liénard, E; Bouhsira, E; Castillo, J A; Franc, M; Picard-Hagen, N

    2016-09-15

    Bovine besnoitiosis is a reemerging disease in Europe. The clinically Besnoitia besnoiti infection in bulls is characterized by fever, nasal discharge, and orchitis in the acute phase and by scleroderma in the chronic phase. However, in many bulls, B besnoiti infection remains at a subclinical stage. Bull infertility is an economically relevant consequence of besnoitiosis infection. It is not clear, however, if semen quality returns to normal levels when infected animals have clinically recovered. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between chronic besnoitiosis and bull sexual function in a region of eastern France, where the disease is reemerging, by comparing semen quality and genital lesions in 11 uninfected, 17 subclinically infected, and 12 clinically infected bulls. The presence of anti-B besnoiti antibodies was detected by Western blot test. Semen was collected by electroejaculation. Bulls clinically infected with B besnoiti showed significantly more genital tract alterations than uninfected or subclinically infected bulls. No relationship was evidenced between besnoitiosis infectious status and semen quality, whereas a significant relationship was noted between genital lesions and semen score. This means that in the absence of moderate to severe genital lesions, chronic bovine besnoitiosis is unlikely to alter semen quality. However, as the presence of infected animals could lead to spread of the disease, culling or separation of clinically infected bulls from the remaining healthy animals is strongly recommended. PMID:27264738

  2. SELECTION DIFFERENTIALS FROM NATIONAL HOLSTEIN BULL PROGENY TEST PROGRAMS ESTIMATED FROM INTERNATIONAL DATA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genetic progress in dairy cattle is largely determined by the merit of bulls used to sire the next generation. Overall bull merit is influenced by three factors: merit of parents, accuracy of progeny test (PT), and intensity of subsequent selection. The objective of this study was to calculate the p...

  3. Prevalence of Tritrichomonas foetus infection in beef bulls in northwestern Spain.

    PubMed

    Martín-Gómez, S; González-Paniello, R; Pereira-Bueno, J; Ortega-Mora, L M

    1998-02-28

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the prevalence of Tritrichomonas foetus infection in beef bulls in north-western Spain. The study area comprised of 350 herds (5909 cows and 102 bulls) managed under extensive or semi-extensive systems where natural mating alone or alternated with artificial insemination are used. The targets of this survey were bulls of 1 year of age or older. Preputial smegma samples were taken from 70 bulls (68.6% of bull population) servicing a total of 184 herds (52.6%) and 4136 cows (69.9%). Data collected at sampling included farm location, herd size, age, breed, private or communal bull and previous infertility problems in the herd. The percentage of infected bulls was 2.9% (2 of 70). Age of infected bulls was 5 and 7 years and both were of the local breed, Asturiana de los Valles. These results confirm the presence of T. foetus infection in Spain and the necessity to include this disease in the differential diagnosis of reproductive failure in rangeland grazing cattle. PMID:9637229

  4. Use of NMR and NMR Prediction Software to Identify Components in Red Bull Energy Drinks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simpson, Andre J.; Shirzadi, Azadeh; Burrow, Timothy E.; Dicks, Andrew P.; Lefebvre, Brent; Corrin, Tricia

    2009-01-01

    A laboratory experiment designed as part of an upper-level undergraduate analytical chemistry course is described. Students investigate two popular soft drinks (Red Bull Energy Drink and sugar-free Red Bull Energy Drink) by NMR spectroscopy. With assistance of modern NMR prediction software they identify and quantify major components in each…

  5. Invited Review: Reliability of Genomic Predictions for North American Holstein Bulls

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genetic progress will increase when breeders examine genotypes instead of only pedigrees and phenotypes. Genotypes for 38,416 markers and August 2003 genetic evaluations for 3,576 Holstein bulls born before 1999 were used to predict January 2008 daughter deviations for 1,759 bulls born from 1999 thr...

  6. 7 CFR 59.102 - Mandatory daily reporting for cows and bulls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Mandatory daily reporting for cows and bulls. 59.102... (CONTINUED) LIVESTOCK MANDATORY REPORTING Cattle Reporting § 59.102 Mandatory daily reporting for cows and bulls. (a) In General. The corporate officers or officially designated representatives of each cow...

  7. 7 CFR 59.102 - Mandatory daily reporting for cows and bulls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Mandatory daily reporting for cows and bulls. 59.102... (CONTINUED) LIVESTOCK MANDATORY REPORTING Cattle Reporting § 59.102 Mandatory daily reporting for cows and bulls. (a) In General. The corporate officers or officially designated representatives of each cow...

  8. 7 CFR 59.102 - Mandatory daily reporting for cows and bulls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Mandatory daily reporting for cows and bulls. 59.102... (CONTINUED) LIVESTOCK MANDATORY REPORTING Cattle Reporting § 59.102 Mandatory daily reporting for cows and bulls. (a) In General. The corporate officers or officially designated representatives of each cow...

  9. 7 CFR 59.102 - Mandatory daily reporting for cows and bulls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Mandatory daily reporting for cows and bulls. 59.102... (CONTINUED) LIVESTOCK MANDATORY REPORTING Cattle Reporting § 59.102 Mandatory daily reporting for cows and bulls. (a) In General. The corporate officers or officially designated representatives of each cow...

  10. Effect of supplemental trace mineral level and form on peripubertal bulls

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objectives were to determine if different supplemental trace mineral levels and /or forms (sulfate and metal amino acid complexes) influence age at puberty, semen quality, endocrine status and scrotal circumference in peripubertal bulls. Fifty crossbred, peripubertal bulls were blocked by age (...

  11. Foucault and Colonial Strategy in Douglas C. Jones' "Arrest Sitting Bull"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Peter G.

    2004-01-01

    "Arrest Sitting Bull," a novel written by Douglas C. Jones that relates the personal stories of individuals involved in the military and the political domination of the Sioux Indian during the period leading to the Sitting Bull killing is described. The incessant quest to establish and maintain control and the integral roles played by fear and…

  12. Associations between endotoxin-induced metabolic changes and temperament in Brahman bulls

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The influence of temperament on the alteration of metabolic parameters in response to a lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge was investigated. Brahman bulls were selected for this study based on temperament score. Bulls were fitted with indwelling jugular catheters for serial sampling to evaluate peri...

  13. Influence of temperament and transportation on physiological and endocrinological parameters in bulls

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study measured physiological, immunological, and endocrinological responses to transportation. Based on temperament score (TS), the 7 most calm (TS = 0.84 +/- 0.03) and 8 most temperamental (TS = 3.37 +/- 0.18) Brahman bulls were selected from our research herd. Prior to transportation, bulls w...

  14. Monitor and Protect Wigwam River Bull Trout for Koocanusa Reservoir : Summary of the Skookumchuck Creek Bull Trout Enumeration Project, Annual Report 2001.

    SciTech Connect

    Baxter, James S.; Baxter, Jeremy

    2002-03-01

    This report summarizes the second year of a bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) enumeration project on Skookumchuck Creek in southeastern British Columbia. An enumeration fence and traps were installed on the creek from September 6th to October 12th 2001 to enable the capture of post-spawning bull trout emigrating out of the watershed. During the study period, a total of 273 bull trout were sampled through the enumeration fence. Length and weight were determined for all bull trout captured. In total, 39 fish of undetermined sex, 61 males and 173 females were processed through the fence. An additional 19 bull trout were observed on a snorkel survey prior to the fence being removed on October 12th. Coupled with the fence count, the total bull trout enumerated during this project was 292 fish. Several other species of fish were captured at the enumeration fence including westslope cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarki lewisi), Rocky Mountain whitefish (Prosopium williamsoni), and kokanee (O. nerka). A total of 143 bull trout redds were enumerated on the ground in two different locations (river km 27.5-30.5, and km 24.0-25.5) on October 3rd. The majority of redds (n=132) were observed in the 3.0 km index section (river km 27.5-30.5) that has been surveyed over the past five years. The additional 11 redds were observed in a 1.5 km section (river km 24.0-25.5). Summary plots of water temperature for Bradford Creek, Sandown Creek, Buhl Creek, and Skookumchuck Creek at three locations suggested that water temperatures were within the temperature range preferred by bull trout for spawning, egg incubation, and rearing.

  15. Relationship between the nuclear morphology of the sperm of 10 bulls and their fertility.

    PubMed

    Vieytes, A L; Cisale, H O; Ferrari, M R

    2008-11-22

    The relationships between the fertility and nuclear morphology, chromatin maturity and chromatin condensation of the sperm of three bulls with a calving rate over a year of more than 65 per cent, four bulls with a calving rate between 65 per cent and 35 per cent, and three bulls with a calving rate of less than 35 per cent were studied. The sperm nuclei were stained with the Feulgen reaction, and chromatin condensation and maturation were evaluated in situ by staining with toluidine blue and acid aniline blue. Nuclear chromatin decondensation was induced with dithiothreitol; this showed that in the bulls with low fertility, more than 35 per cent of nuclei were decondensed, and that one of them had the lowest percentage of normal nuclei (64.9 per cent) and stronger positive reactions to the acid aniline blue and toluidine blue stains than the other bulls. PMID:19029109

  16. Sprint swimming performance of wild bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mesa, M.G.; Phelps, J.; Weiland, L.K.

    2008-01-01

    We conducted laboratory experiments to determine the sprint swimming performance of wild juvenile and adult bull trout Salvelinus confluentus. Sprint swimming speeds were estimated using high-speed digital video analysis. Thirty two bull trout were tested in sizes ranging from about 10 to 31 cm. Of these, 14 fish showed at least one motivated, vigorous sprint. When plotted as a function of time, velocity of fish increased rapidly with the relation linear or slightly curvilinear. Their maximum velocity, or Vmax, ranged from 1.3 to 2.3 m/s, was usually achieved within 0.8 to 1.0 s, and was independent of fish size. Distances covered during these sprints ranged from 1.4 to 2.4 m. Our estimates of the sprint swimming performance are the first reported for this species and may be useful for producing or modifying fish passage structures that allow safe and effective passage of fish without overly exhausting them. ?? 2008 by the Northwest Scientific Association. All rights reserved.

  17. Functional changes and motility characteristics of Japanese Black bull spermatozoa separated by Percoll.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, K; Geshi, M; Yamauchi, N; Nagai, T

    2003-07-15

    Spermatozoa from two Japanese Black bulls (Bull-ATF and Bull-KTG) were separated by centrifugation at 700 x g for 15min in modified TALP with or without 45-90% Percoll. Control washed spermatozoa and those collected from the bottom of 45 and 90% Percoll fractions were examined for viability and membrane integrity (using Hoechst bis-benzimide 33258 or propidium iodide and 6-carboxyfluorescein diacetate (PI-CFDA)), acrosomal status (using fluorescence isothiocyanate (FITC) conjugated Pisum Sativum agglutinin (PSA) and Peanut agglutinin (PNA), Naphthol Yellow S and Erythrosin B (NE) or triple staining (TS)), capacitation status (using chlortetracycline (CTC)), motility characteristics (using a computer-assisted sperm motion analysis system (CASA)) and for in vitro fertility. Percoll-separated spermatozoa showed greater viability and membrane integrity than controls, as determined by supravital staining. Differences were observed in the results regarding viability and acrosomal status of spermatozoa among sperm staining methods. Bull-ATF, which showed significantly greater in vitro fertility than Bull-KTG (P<0.05), showed a significantly higher rate of CTC-B-pattern (capacitated) spermatozoa (P<0.01) than Bull-KTG. The motility characteristics of control washed spermatozoa and those separated by 45-90% Percoll were analyzed by CASA. More motile and progressively motile spermatozoa were observed in the fraction at the bottom of the 90% Percoll solution than in the 45% Percoll fraction or in controls (P<0.01). Moreover, the spermatozoa of Bull-KTG, which showed lower in vitro fertility than Bull-ATF, did not show significant differences in motility from those of Bull-ATF. These results provided basic information about Japanese Black bull spermatozoa, and suggested that spermatozoa with greater motility and viability can be obtained by Percoll separation than without separation. However, Percoll separation did not enhance their in vitro fertility. PMID:12695052

  18. Relationship between scrotal infrared temperature patterns and natural-mating fertility in beef bulls.

    PubMed

    Lunstra, D D; Coulter, G H

    1997-03-01

    The infrared temperature pattern (IRT) of the scrotal surface was recorded for 73 yearling beef bulls and a color video thermogram of the pattern of each bull was recorded. The average scortal surface temperature, temperature at the top and bottom of the scrotum, scortal temperature gradient, and thermal class (normal, questionable, or abnormal scortal surface thermal pattern) were recorded for each thermogram. Thirty-seven bulls had a normal temperature pattern (51%), 20 had a questionable pattern (27%), and 16 had an abnormal temperature pattern (22%). Bulls exhibiting abnormal scrotal temperature patterns had lower (P < .05) percentages of sperm exhibiting normal head and tail morphology and had a higher (P < .01) percentage of sperm with proximal droplets than did bulls with normal or questionable thermogram patterns. Thirty bulls with acceptable testis size and semen quality and representing the three thermal classes were each exposed single-sire to approximately 18 heifers during a 45-d pasture breeding period. Pregnancy rate was lower (P < .01) for bulls with abnormal scrotal temperature patterns (68 +/- 4%, n = 8) than for bulls with normal (83 +/- 4%, n = 13) and questionable temperature patterns (85 +/- 4%, n = 9), and pregnancy rate was related significantly to all four major characteristics (surface, top, and bottom temperatures and temperature gradient) of scortal thermograms. Data indicated that bulls with abnormal scortal temperature patterns exhibited a reduced ability to maintain an effective thermal gradient from top to bottom of the testes and that bulls with abnormal scrotal temperature patterns achieved reduced pregnancy rates when used for natural mating. PMID:9078495

  19. Effect of supplemental trace mineral level and form on peripubertal bulls.

    PubMed

    Geary, T W; Kelly, W L; Spickard, D S; Larson, C K; Grings, E E; Ansotegui, R P

    2016-05-01

    Objectives were to determine if supplemental trace mineral levels and/or forms (sulfate and metal amino acid complexes) influence age at puberty, semen quality, endocrine status, and scrotal circumference in peripubertal bulls. Fifty peripubertal bulls were blocked by age and scrotal circumference and assigned to one of five treatments: (1) 1x sulfate form (1S); (2) 1x complexed form (1C); (3) 1S+1C (2SC); (4) 1S + 2 × 1 C (3SCC); and (5) 3 × 1S (3S). Each 1x supplementation level contained 360 mg Zn, 125 mg Cu, 200mg Mn and 12.5mg Co. Liver biopsies were collected on d -21 and 100, and scrotal circumference, semen, and blood samples were collected on d -14, 14, 42, 70, and 98. All bulls were deficient in Cu yet adequate in Zn on d -21. Following 100 d on treatment, liver Zn concentrations decreased (P<0.01) and liver Cu concentrations increased (P<0.01) in bulls regardless of treatment. Day 100 liver Zn concentrations were similar (P=0.50) across treatments, but liver Cu concentrations were greater (P=0.07) in 3SCC and 3S bulls compared to 1C and 1S bulls, whereas 2SC bulls were intermediate. Bulls fed complexed minerals tended to reach puberty after fewer (P=0.11) days on treatment (43.9 ± 5.7 d) than bulls fed only sulfate minerals (58.5 ± 6.7 d). Supplementing complexed Cu and Zn to prepubertal bulls may lower the age at puberty, however, no differences (P ≥ 0.40) in semen characteristics or scrotal measurements (P ≥ 0.11) were observed. PMID:26968246

  20. Associations between endotoxin-induced metabolic changes and temperament in Brahman bulls.

    PubMed

    Burdick Sanchez, N C; Carroll, J A; Randel, R D; Vann, R C; Welsh, T H

    2014-02-01

    The influence of temperament on the alteration of metabolic parameters in response to a lipopolysaccharide(LPS) challenge was investigated. Brahman bulls were selected based on temperament score. Bulls (10 months; 211±5kg BW; n = 6, 8 and 7 for Calm, Intermediate and Temperamental groups, respectively) were fitted with indwelling jugular catheters to evaluate peripheral blood concentrations of glucose, blood urea nitrogen (BUN),non-esterified fatty acids (NEFA), insulin, epinephrine and cortisol before and after LPS administration (0.5 μg/kg BW LPS). Feed intake was also recorded. Intermediate bulls consumed more feed than the Temperamental bulls during the challenge (p = 0.046). Pre-LPS glucose (p = 0.401) and BUN (p = 0.222) did not differ among the temperament groups. However, pre-LPS insulin (p = 0.023) was lower, whereas pre-LPS NEFA (p < 0.001),cortisol (p < 0.001) and epinephrine (p < 0.001) were greater in Temperamental than in Calm and Intermediate bulls. Post-LPS glucose was increased in Calm and Intermediate bulls but not in Temperamental bulls(p < 0.001). Insulin concentrations post-LPS were greater in Calm than in Intermediate and Temperamental bulls (p < 0.001). Concentrations of NEFA post-LPS were greater in Temperamental than in Calm and Intermediate bulls (p < 0.001). Serum BUN concentration increased post-LPS, with values being greater in Calm and Intermediate than in Temperamental bulls (p = 0.012). Collectively, these data demonstrate that animal temperament is related to the metabolic responses of Brahman bulls following a provocative endotoxin challenge.Specifically, Temperamental bulls may preferentially utilize an alternate energy source (i.e. NEFA) to a greater degree than do bulls of Calm and Intermediate temperaments. The use of circulating NEFA from lipolysis may reduce the negative metabolic consequences of an immune response by allowing for a prompt answer to increasing energy demands required during immunological challenge, compared

  1. Comparative endocrinology of testicular, adrenal and thyroid function in captive Asian and African elephant bulls.

    PubMed

    Brown, Janine L; Somerville, Malia; Riddle, Heidi S; Keele, Mike; Duer, Connie K; Freeman, Elizabeth W

    2007-04-01

    Concentrations of serum testosterone, cortisol, thyroxine (free and total T4), triiodothyronine (free and total T3) and thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) were measured to assess adrenal and thyroid function as they relate to testicular activity and musth in captive elephants. Blood samples were collected approximately weekly from Asian (n=8) and African (n=12) bulls at seven facilities for periods of 4 months to 9.5 years. Age ranges at study onset were 8-50 years for Asian and 10-21 years for African elephants. Based on keeper logs, seven Asian and three African bulls exhibited behavioral and/or physical (temporal gland secretion, TGS, or urine dribbling, UD) signs of musth, which lasted 2.8+/-2.5 months in duration. Serum testosterone was elevated during musth, with concentrations often exceeding 100 ng/ml. Patterns of testosterone secretion and musth varied among bulls with no evidence of seasonality (P>0.05). Only three bulls at one facility exhibited classic, well-defined yearly musth cycles. Others exhibited more irregular cycles, with musth symptoms often occurring more than once a year. A number of bulls (1 Asian, 9 African) had consistently low testosterone (<10 ng/ml) and never exhibited significant TGS or UD. At facilities with multiple bulls (n=3), testosterone concentrations were highest in the oldest, most dominant male. There were positive correlations between testosterone and cortisol for six of seven Asian and all three African males that exhibited musth (range, r=0.23-0.52; P<0.05), but no significant correlations for bulls that did not (P>0.05). For the three bulls that exhibited yearly musth cycles, TSH was positively correlated (range, r=0.22-0.28; P<0.05) and thyroid hormones (T3, T4) were negatively correlated (range, r=-0.25 to -0.47; P<0.05) to testosterone secretion. In the remaining bulls, there were no clear relationships between thyroid activity and musth status. Overall mean testosterone and cortisol concentrations increased with age

  2. Growth, puberty, and carcass characteristics of Brahman-, Senepol-, and Tuli-sired F1 Angus bulls.

    PubMed

    Chase, C C; Chenoweth, P J; Larsen, R E; Hammond, A C; Olson, T A; West, R L; Johnson, D D

    2001-08-01

    Postweaning growth, sexual development, libido, and carcass data were collected from two consecutive calf crops using 31 Brahman x Angus (B x A), 41 Senepol x Angus (S x A), and 38 Tuli x Angus (T x A) F1 bulls. Following weaning (by mid-September) and preconditioning, at the start of the study (late September) bulls were fed concentrate (three times each week at a rate equivalent to 4.5 kg/d) on bahiagrass pasture for approximately 250 d. At the start of the study and at 28-d intervals, BW, hip height, and scrotal circumference (SC) were measured. Concurrently at 28-d intervals, when the SC of a bull was > or = 23 cm, semen collection was attempted using electroejaculation. Ejaculates were evaluated for presence of first spermatozoa (FS), 50 x 10(6) sperm with at least 10% motility (PU), and 500 x 10(6) sperm with at least 50% motility (PP). After all bulls reached PP they were subjected to two libido tests. Carcass data were collected on all bulls (n = 110) and Warner-Bratzler shear (WBS) force values were assessed on a subset (n = 80). For both years, B x A bulls were heavier (P < 0.05) and taller (P < 0.05) than S x A and T x A bulls at the start and end of the study. However, breed type did not influence (P > 0.10) gain in BW or hip height during the study. Scrotal circumference of T x A bulls was larger (P < 0.05) than that of B x A or S x A bulls at the start of the study, but there was no effect (P > 0.10) of breed type by the end of the study. At PU and PP, B x A bulls were older (P < 0.05), heavier (P < 0.05), and taller (P < 0.05) and had larger (P < 0.05) SC than S x A and T x A bulls. Tuli x Angus bulls were younger (P < 0.05) than S x A bulls at PU and PP but had similar SC. Libido scores tended (P < 0.10) to be lower for B x A than for S x A and T x A bulls. Breed type affected (P < 0.05) carcass traits; B x A bulls had the heaviest (P < 0.05) hot carcass weight, greatest (P < 0.05) dressing percentage, larger (P < 0.05) longissimus muscle area than

  3. Diet overlap of top-level predators in recent sympatry: bull trout and nonnative lake trout

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Guy, Christopher S.; McMahon, Thomas E.; Fredenberg, Wade A.; Smith, Clinton J.; Garfield, David W.; Cox, Benjamin S.

    2011-01-01

    The establishment of nonnative lake trout Salvelinus namaycush in lakes containing lacustrine–adfluvial bull trout Salvelinus confluentus often results in a precipitous decline in bull trout abundance. The exact mechanism for the decline is unknown, but one hypothesis is related to competitive exclusion for prey resources. We had the rare opportunity to study the diets of bull trout and nonnative lake trout in Swan Lake, Montana during a concomitant study. The presence of nonnative lake trout in Swan Lake is relatively recent and the population is experiencing rapid population growth. The objective of this study was to evaluate the diets of bull trout and lake trout during the early expansion of this nonnative predator. Diets were sampled from 142 bull trout and 327 lake trout during the autumn in 2007 and 2008. Bull trout and lake trout had similar diets, both consumed Mysis diluviana as the primary invertebrate, especially at juvenile stages, and kokanee Oncorhynchus nerka as the primary vertebrate prey, as adults. A diet shift from primarily M. diluviana to fish occurred at similar lengths for both species, 506 mm (476–545 mm, 95% CI) for bull trout and 495 mm (470–518 mm CI) for lake trout. These data indicate high diet overlap between these two morphologically similar top-level predators. Competitive exclusion may be a possible mechanism if the observed overlap remains similar at varying prey densities and availability.

  4. Monitor and Protect Wigwam River Bull Trout for Koocanusa Reservoir : Summary of the Skookumchuck Creek Bull Trout Enumeration Project, Annual Report 2000.

    SciTech Connect

    Baxter, James S.; Baxter, Jeremy

    2001-02-01

    An enumeration fence and traps were installed on Skookumchuck Creek from September 7 th to October 16 th to enable the capture of post-spawning bull trout emigrating out of the watershed. During the study period, a total of 252 bull trout were sampled through the enumeration fence. Length, weight, and sex were determined for all but one of the 252 bull trout captured. In total, one fish of undetermined sex, 63 males and 188 females were processed through the fence. A total of 67 bull trout were observed on a snorkel survey prior to the fence being removed on October 16 th . Coupled with the fence count, the total bull trout count during this project was 319 fish. Several other species of fish were captured at the enumeration fence including westslope cutthroat trout, Rocky Mountain whitefish, kokanee, sucker, and Eastern brook trout. Redds were observed during ground surveys in three different locations (river km 27.5- 28.5, km 29-30, and km 24-25). The largest concentration of redds were noted in the upper two sections which have served as the index sections over the past four years. A total of 197 bull trout redds were enumerated on the ground on October 4 th . The majority of redds (n=189) were observed in the 3.0 km index section (river km 27.5-30.5) that has been surveyed over the past four years. The additional 8 redds were observed in a 1.5 km section (river km 24.0-25.5). Summary plots of water temperature for Bradford Creek, Sandown Creek, Skookumchuck Creek at km 39.5, and Skookumchuck Creek at the fence site suggested that water temperatures were within the range preferred by bull trout for spawning, egg incubation, and rearing.

  5. Wigwam River Juvenile Bull Trout and Fish Habitat Monitoring Program : 2000 Data Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Cope, R.S.; Morris, K.J.

    2001-03-01

    The Wigwam River bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) and fish habitat monitoring program is a trans-boundary initiative implemented by the British Columbia Ministry of Environment, Lands and Parks (MOE), in cooperation with Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). The Wigwam River is an important fisheries stream located in southeastern British Columbia that supports healthy populations of both bull trout and Westslope cutthroat trout (Figure 1.1). This river has been characterized as the single most important bull trout spawning stream in the Kootenay Region (Baxter and Westover 2000, Cope 1998). In addition, the Wigwam River supports some of the largest Westslope cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarki lewisi) in the Kootenay Region. These fish are highly sought after by anglers (Westover 1999a, 1999b). Bull trout populations have declined in many areas of their range within Montana and throughout the northwest including British Columbia. Bull trout were blue listed as vulnerable in British Columbia by the B.C. Conservation Data Center (Cannings 1993) and although there are many healthy populations of bull trout in the East Kootenays they remain a species of special concern. Bull trout in the United States portion of the Columbia River were listed as threatened in 1998 under the Endangered Species Act by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. The upper Kootenay River is within the Kootenai sub-basin of the Mountain Columbia Province, one of the eleven Eco-provinces that make up the Columbia River Basin. MOE applied for and received funding from BPA to assess and monitor the status of wild, native stocks of bull trout in tributaries to Lake Koocanusa (Libby Reservoir) and the upper Kootenay River. This task is one of many that was undertaken to ''Monitor and Protect Bull Trout for Koocanusa Reservoir'' (BPA Project Number 2000-04-00).

  6. Wigwam River Juvenile Bull Trout and Fish Habitat Monitoring Program : 2002 Data Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Cope, R.S.

    2003-03-01

    The Wigwam River bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) and fish habitat monitoring program is a trans-boundary initiative implemented by the British Columbia Ministry of Water, Land, and Air Protection (MWLAP), in cooperation with Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). The Wigwam River is an important fisheries stream located in southeastern British Columbia that supports healthy populations of both bull trout and Westslope cutthroat trout (Figure 1). This river has been characterized as the single most important bull trout spawning stream in the Kootenay Region (Baxter and Westover 2000, Cope 1998). In addition, the Wigwam River supports some of the largest Westslope cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarki lewisi) in the Kootenay Region. These fish are highly sought after by anglers (Westover 1999a, 1999b). Bull trout populations have declined in many areas of their range within Montana and throughout the northwest including British Columbia. Bull trout were blue listed as vulnerable in British Columbia by the B.C. Conservation Data Center (Cannings 1993) and although there are many healthy populations of bull trout in the East Kootenay they remain a species of special concern. Bull trout in the United States portion of the Columbia River were listed as threatened in 1998 under the Endangered Species Act by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. The upper Kootenay River is within the Kootenai sub-basin of the Mountain Columbia Province, one of the eleven Eco-provinces that make up the Columbia River Basin. MWLAP applied for and received funding from BPA to assess and monitor the status of wild, native stocks of bull trout in tributaries to Lake Koocanusa (Libby Reservoir) and the upper Kootenay River. This task is one of many that were undertaken to ''Monitor and Protect Bull Trout for Koocanusa Reservoir'' (BPA Project Number 2000-04-00).

  7. Effects of selection for scrotal circumference in Limousin bulls on reproductive and growth traits of progeny.

    PubMed

    Moser, D W; Bertrand, J K; Benyshek, L L; McCann, M A; Kiser, T E

    1996-09-01

    Nine pairs of Limousin bulls from nine contemporary groups were acquired, with each pair consisting of one large scrotal circumference (SC) bull and one small SC bull. Average adjusted yearling scrotal circumferences were 36.3 cm (SD 1.6 cm) and 28.5 cm (SD .9 cm) for large SC (LP) and small SC (SP) bulls, respectively. In addition to the phenotypic grouping, non-parent SC EPD were used to group bulls into high (HE, > .53 cm), average (AE), and low (LE, < -.61 cm) lines. Each bull was mated to a randomly assigned group of 15 to 20 Brangus x Hereford cows each yr for 1 to 3 yr. Birth weights, weaning and yearling weights and heights, and ultrasound measurements for backfat and ribeye measurements were taken on 407 progeny. Blood samples were collected on 210 heifer progeny when they averaged 11, 13, and 15 mo of age to determine whether they had reached puberty. When subjected to a breeding soundness exam (BSE), LP bulls scored higher (P < .01) for motility as well as total BSE score. The LP calves had heavier birth weights (P < .05) and greater testicular mass at weaning (P < .01) than SP calves. The HE and AE bull calves had greater (P < .02) testicular mass than did the LE bull calves. A greater (P < .05) percentage of HE heifers had reached puberty by the 11- and 13-mo measurements than either the AE or LE heifers. The HE heifers reached puberty at a younger age than AE (P < .01) or LE (P < .001) heifers. Selection using SC EPD was more effective than phenotypic selection in reducing age at puberty in daughters. PMID:8880405

  8. Temporary Restoration of Bull Trout Passage at Albeni Falls Dam, 2008 Progress Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Bellgraph, Brian J.

    2009-03-31

    The goal of this project is to provide temporary upstream passage of bull trout around Albeni Falls Dam on the Pend Oreille River, Idaho. Our specific objectives are to capture fish downstream of Albeni Falls Dam, tag them with combination acoustic and radio transmitters, release them upstream of Albeni Falls Dam, and determine if genetic information on tagged fish can be used to accurately establish where fish are located during the spawning season. In 2007, radio receiving stations were installed at several locations throughout the Pend Oreille River watershed to detect movements of adult bull trout; however, no bull trout were tagged during that year. In 2008, four bull trout were captured downstream of Albeni Falls Dam, implanted with transmitters, and released upstream of the dam at Priest River, Idaho. The most-likely natal tributaries of bull trout assigned using genetic analyses were Grouse Creek (N = 2); a tributary of the Pack River, Lightning Creek (N = 1); and Rattle Creek (N = 1), a tributary of Lightning Creek. All four bull trout migrated upstream from the release site in Priest River, Idaho, were detected at monitoring stations near Dover, Idaho, and were presumed to reside in Lake Pend Oreille from spring until fall 2008. The transmitter of one bull trout with a genetic assignment to Grouse Creek was found in Grouse Creek in October 2008; however, the fish was not found. The bull trout assigned to Rattle Creek was detected in the Clark Fork River downstream from Cabinet Gorge Dam (approximately 13 km from the mouth of Lightning Creek) in September but was not detected entering Lightning Creek. The remaining two bull trout were not detected in 2008 after detection at the Dover receiving stations. This report details the progress by work element in the 2008 statement of work, including data analyses of fish movements, and expands on the information reported in the quarterly Pisces status reports.

  9. Evidence for reproductive philopatry in the bull shark Carcharhinus leucas.

    PubMed

    Tillett, B J; Meekan, M G; Field, I C; Thorburn, D C; Ovenden, J R

    2012-05-01

    Reproductive philopatry in bull sharks Carcharhinus leucas was investigated by comparing mitochondrial (NADH dehydrogenase subunit 4, 797 base pairs and control region genes 837 base pairs) and nuclear (three microsatellite loci) DNA of juveniles sampled from 13 river systems across northern Australia. High mitochondrial and low microsatellite genetic diversity among juveniles sampled from different rivers (mitochondrial φ(ST) = 0·0767, P < 0·05; microsatellite F(ST) = -0·0022, P > 0·05) supported female reproductive philopatry. Genetic structure was not further influenced by geographic distance (P > 0·05) or long-shore barriers to movement (P > 0·05). Additionally, results suggest that C. leucas in northern Australia has a long-term effective population size of 11 000-13 000 females and has undergone population bottlenecks and expansions that coincide with the timing of the last ice-ages. PMID:22551174

  10. Mitochondrial genome of the bull shark Carcharhinus leucas (Carcharhiniformes: Carcharhinidae).

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiao; Liu, Min; Peng, Zaiqing; Shi, Xiaofang

    2015-01-01

    The bull shark Carcharhinus leucas is a large elasmobranch species widespread in tropical and warm oceans, rivers and lakes. We first determine the complete mitogenome of C. leucas in this article. It is 16,704 bp in length, consists 37 genes and one control region with the typical gene order in vertebrates. The ND6 gene used the rare AGG as stop codon. The 22 tRNA genes ranged from 67 to 75 bp. The tRNA-Ser2 lacks the dihydrouridine arm and cannot form the typical cloverleaf structure. The control region is 1066 bp in length with high A+T and low G contents. PMID:24409857

  11. Growth and reproductive development from weaning through 20 months of age among breeds of bulls in subtropical Florida.

    PubMed

    Chase, C C; Chenoweth, P J; Larsen, R E; Olson, T A; Hammond, A C; Menchaca, M A; Randel, R D

    1997-02-01

    To determine the effect of breed on growth and reproductive development, weaned bulls in each of 2 yr were managed as a single group for approximately a year. In Year 1, the study group consisted of 24 Angus, 24 Brahman, 20 Hereford and 14 Senepol bulls, while in Year 2, it contained 25 Angus, 17 Brahman. 13 Romosinuano and 9 Nellore x Brahman bulls. Body and testicular growth measurements were recorded at 6-wk intervals. At approximately 1 yr of age and quarterly thereafter (4 periods), bulls were evaluated for libido, pubertal status, and GnRH-induced LH and testosterone secretion. Significant breed-by-age interactions occurred for most growth measurements. Brahman bulls (Bos indicus ) were (P < 0.05) older and heavier at puberty than Angus, Hereford, Senepol and Romosinuano bulls (Bos taurus ). Libido scores were lowest for Brahman and Nell ore x Brahman bulls (Bos indicus ). highest for Angus and Hereford bulls (temperate Bos taurus breeds) and intermediate for Senepol and Romosinuano bulls (tropical Bos taurus breeds; P < 0.05). Differences were not consistent among breeds or between years for GnRH-induced LH secretion. In both years, basal testosterone concentrations and areas under the GnRH-induced testosterone curve were higher (P < 0.05) for Angus and Hereford bulls (temperate breeds) than for Brahman, Senepol, Romosinuano and Nellore x Brahman bulls (tropical breeds). In conclusion, reproductive development of Senepol and Romosinuano bulls (tropical Bos taurus breeds) was more similar to Angus and Hereford bulls (temperate Bos taurus breeds) than to Brahman and Nellore x Brahman bulls (Bos indicus ). PMID:16728024

  12. Seminal plasma proteome of electroejaculated Bos indicus bulls.

    PubMed

    Rego, J P A; Crisp, J M; Moura, A A; Nouwens, A S; Li, Y; Venus, B; Corbet, N J; Corbet, D H; Burns, B M; Boe-Hansen, G B; McGowan, M R

    2014-07-01

    The present study describes the seminal plasma proteome of Bos indicus bulls. Fifty-six, 24-month old Australian Brahman sires were evaluated and subjected to electroejaculation. Seminal plasma proteins were separated by 2-D SDS-PAGE and identified by mass spectrometry. The percentage of progressively motile and morphologically normal sperm of the bulls were 70.4 ± 2.3 and 64 ± 3.2%, respectively. A total of 108 spots were identified in the 2-D maps, corresponding to 46 proteins. Binder of sperm proteins accounted for 55.8% of all spots detected in the maps and spermadhesins comprised the second most abundant constituents. Other proteins of the Bos indicus seminal plasma include clusterin, albumin, transferrin, metalloproteinase inhibitor 2, osteopontin, epididymal secretory protein E1, apolipoprotein A-1, heat shock 70 kDa protein, glutathione peroxidase 3, cathelicidins, alpha-enolase, tripeptidyl-peptidase 1, zinc-alpha-2-glycoprotein, plasma serine protease inhibitor, beta 2-microglobulin, proteasome subunit beta type-4, actin, cathepsins, nucleobinding-1, protein S100-A9, hemoglobin subunit alpha, cadherin-1, angiogenin-1, fibrinogen alpha and beta chain, ephirin-A1, protein DJ-1, serpin A3-7, alpha-2-macroglobulin, annexin A1, complement factor B, polymeric immunoglobulin receptor, seminal ribonuclease, ribonuclease-4, prostaglandin-H2 d-isomerase, platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase, and phosphoglycerate kinase 1. In conclusion, this work uniquely portrays the Bos indicus seminal fluid proteome, based on samples from a large set of animals representing the Brahman cattle of the tropical Northern Australia. Based on putative biochemical attributes, seminal proteins act during sperm maturation, protection, capacitation and fertilization. PMID:24889044

  13. Development and evaluation of a bioenergetics model for bull trout

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mesa, Matthew G.; Welland, Lisa K.; Christiansen, Helena E.; Sauter, Sally T.; Beauchamp, David A.

    2013-01-01

    We conducted laboratory experiments to parameterize a bioenergetics model for wild Bull Trout Salvelinus confluentus, estimating the effects of body mass (12–1,117 g) and temperature (3–20°C) on maximum consumption (C max) and standard metabolic rates. The temperature associated with the highest C max was 16°C, and C max showed the characteristic dome-shaped temperature-dependent response. Mass-dependent values of C max (N = 28) at 16°C ranged from 0.03 to 0.13 g·g−1·d−1. The standard metabolic rates of fish (N = 110) ranged from 0.0005 to 0.003 g·O2·g−1·d−1 and increased with increasing temperature but declined with increasing body mass. In two separate evaluation experiments, which were conducted at only one ration level (40% of estimated C max), the model predicted final weights that were, on average, within 1.2 ± 2.5% (mean ± SD) of observed values for fish ranging from 119 to 573 g and within 3.5 ± 4.9% of values for 31–65 g fish. Model-predicted consumption was within 5.5 ± 10.9% of observed values for larger fish and within 12.4 ± 16.0% for smaller fish. Our model should be useful to those dealing with issues currently faced by Bull Trout, such as climate change or alterations in prey availability.

  14. In vitro assessment of sperm from bulls of high and low field fertility.

    PubMed

    Al Naib, A; Hanrahan, J P; Lonergan, P; Fair, S

    2011-07-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the reasons for differences in field fertility of bulls following insemination with frozen-thawed semen. The study was carried out in two separate parts over two years and comparisons were made between 5 high and 4 low fertility Holstein Friesian bulls as determined by their either 90 day non-return rate (Year 1) or calving rate (Year 2). Two high fertility Limousin bulls were included in Year 1 for comparative purposes. The ability of sperm from each bull to penetrate artificial mucus was assessed (Year 1 = 7 replicates; Year 2 = 5 replicates). Glass capillary tubes (2 per bull per replicate) were filled with artificial mucus and incubated with sperm stained in 1% Hoechst 33342 for 30 min at 37 °C. The number of sperm were subsequently counted at 10 mm intervals along the tube between 40 and 80 mm markers. Sperm mitochondrial activity of each bull was assessed by the MTT (3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide) assay (4 replicates in each year). Sperm were incubated with MTT for 1 h at 37 °C following which the absorbance of formazan was read using a spectrophotometer. Sperm viability after thawing was assessed for each bull using a live/dead sperm viability kit (Year 1 = 3 replicates; Year 2 = 4 replicates). A minimum of 250 cells were assessed per bull in each replicate and classified as either live or dead. Finally, the ability of sperm to fertilize oocytes in vitro and their ability to develop to blastocyst stage embryos were assessed (5 replicates in each year involving 220 to 306 oocytes per bull). Data transformation to normalize residuals was required for mucus sperm penetration (square root) and IVF (cleavage and blastocyst rate) results (arcsin). The mean number of sperm counted at each 10 mm mark between 40 and 80 mm was higher in the high fertility (56.0; 95% CI 39.5 to 75.3) compared to the low fertility (42.9; 95% CI 29.3 to 59.1) Holstein Friesian bulls but the difference did not

  15. Longitudinal strain bull's eye plot patterns in patients with cardiomyopathy and concentric left ventricular hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dan; Hu, Kai; Nordbeck, Peter; Ertl, Georg; Störk, Stefan; Weidemann, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Despite substantial advances in the imaging techniques and pathophysiological understanding over the last decades, identification of the underlying causes of left ventricular hypertrophy by means of echocardiographic examination remains a challenge in current clinical practice. The longitudinal strain bull's eye plot derived from 2D speckle tracking imaging offers an intuitive visual overview of the global and regional left ventricular myocardial function in a single diagram. The bull's eye mapping is clinically feasible and the plot patterns could provide clues to the etiology of cardiomyopathies. The present review summarizes the longitudinal strain, bull's eye plot features in patients with various cardiomyopathies and concentric left ventricular hypertrophy and the bull's eye plot features might serve as one of the cardiac workup steps on evaluating patients with left ventricular hypertrophy. PMID:27165726

  16. Alternatives for evaluating daughter performance of progeny-test bulls between official evaluations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In August 2007, USDA changed from calculating official genetic evaluations quarterly to triannually to coincide with the schedule for international evaluations. Industry cooperators requested that unofficial interim evaluations be initiated between official evaluations for progeny-test (PT) bulls to...

  17. Bulls grazing Kentucky 31 tall fescue exhibit impaired growth, semen quality, and decreased semen freezing potential

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Serum prolactin (PRL) and testosterone concentrations, body weight, body composition, semen quality, and semen freezing potential for bulls grazing the toxic tall fescue (Lolium arundinaceum [Schreb.] Darbysh. ¼ Schedonorous arundinaceum [Schreb.] Dumort.) cultivar Kentucky 31 (E+) compared with a n...

  18. Bull Trout Life History, Genetics, Habitat Needs, and Limiting Fact in Central and Northeast Oregon. Annual Report 1999.

    SciTech Connect

    Hemmingsen, Alan R.; Gunckel, Stephanie L.; Howell, Philip J.

    2001-08-01

    This section describes work accomplished in 1999 that continued to address two objectives of this project. These objectives are (1) determine the distribution of juvenile and adult bull trout Salvelinus confluentus and habitats associated with that distribution, and (2) determine fluvial and resident bull trout life history patterns. Completion of these objectives is intended through studies of bull trout in the Grande Ronde, Walla Walla, and John Day basins. These basins were selected because they provide a variety of habitats, from relatively degraded to pristine, and bull trout populations were thought to vary from relatively depressed to robust. In all three basins we used radio telemetry to determine the seasonal movements of bull trout. In the John Day and Walla Walla basins we also used traps to capture migrant bull trout. With these traps, we intended to determine the timing of bull trout movements both upstream and downstream, determine the relative abundance, size and age of migrant fish, and capture bull trout to be implanted with radio transmitters. In the John Day basin, we captured adult and juvenile bull trout from the upper John Day River and its tributaries, Call Creek, Reynolds Creek, and Roberts Creek. In the Walla Walla basin, we captured adult and juvenile bull trout from Mill Creek.

  19. Traumatic Brain Injury Due to Bull Assault in a Girl: a Case Report

    PubMed Central

    ALVIS-MIRANDA, Hernando Raphael; CASTELLAR-LEONES, Sandra Milena; VELÁSQUEZ-LOPERENA, Dufays Danith; VILLA-DELGADO, Rosmery; ALCALA-CERRA, Gabriel; MOSCOTE-SALAZAR, Luis Rafael

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Traumatic brain injury is a common condition in the emergency services, affecting the pediatric and adult population significantly. Patterns of head injury as well as management principles in children are important differences compared to adults. Traumatic brain injury by bull rush is usually seen in adults but has not been described in children-report a pediatric cranial trauma present bull rush, which to our knowledge is the first report in the literature of this nature. PMID:24790672

  20. Monitor and Protect Wigwam River Bull Trout for Koocanusa Reservoir; Skookumchuck Creek Juvenile Bull Trout and Fish Habitat Monitoring Program, Annual Report 2002.

    SciTech Connect

    Cope, R.

    2003-06-01

    The Skookumchuck Creek juvenile bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) and fish habitat-monitoring program is a co-operative initiative of the British Columbia Ministry of Water, Land, and Air Protection and Bonneville Power Administration. This project was commissioned in planning for fish habitat protection and forest development within the Skookumchuck Creek watershed and was intended to expand upon similar studies initiated within the Wigwam River from 2000 to 2002. The broad intent is to develop a better understanding of juvenile bull trout and Westslope cutthroat trout recruitment and the ongoing hydrologic and morphologic processes, especially as they relate to spawning and rearing habitat quality. The 2002 project year represents the first year of a long-term bull trout-monitoring program with current studies focused on collecting baseline information. This report provides a summary of results obtained to date. Bull trout represented 72.4% of the catch. Fry dominated the catch because site selection was biased towards electrofishing sample sites which favored high bull trout fry capture success. The mean density of all juvenile bull trout was estimated to be 6.6 fish/100m{sup 2}. This represents one-half the densities reported for the 2002 Wigwam River enumeration program, even though enumeration of bull trout redds was an order of magnitude higher for the Wigwam River. Typically, areas with combined fry and juvenile densities greater than 1.5 fish per 100 m{sup 2} are cited as critical rearing areas. Trends in abundance appeared to be related to proximity to spawning areas, bed material size, and water depth. Cover components utilized by juvenile and adult bull trout and cutthroat trout were interstices, boulder, depth, overhead vegetation and LWD. The range of morphological stream types encompass the stable and resilient spectrum (C3(1), C3 and B3c). The Skookumchuck can be generalized as a slightly entrenched, meandering, riffle-pool, cobble dominated

  1. Associations between sperm abnormalities, breed, age, and scrotal circumference in beef bulls

    PubMed Central

    Menon, Ajitkumar G.; Barkema, Herman W.; Wilde, Randy; Kastelic, John P.; Thundathil, Jacob C.

    2011-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine the associations of breed, age, and scrotal circumference (SC), and their interaction, on the prevalence of sperm abnormalities in beef bulls in Alberta, Canada, and the percentage of satisfactory potential breeders identified during breeding soundness examination solely due to normal sperm morphology. Eosin-nigrosin stained semen smears and evaluation reports of 1642 bull breeding soundness evaluations were procured from 6 veterinary clinics in Alberta. Sperm morphology was determined for at least 100 sperm per bull. The most common defects were detached head [4.86% ± 5.71%; mean ± standard deviation (s)], distal midpiece reflex (6.19% ± 9.13%), and bent tail (1.01% ± 1.54%). Although breed, age, and SC did not significantly affect the prevalence of head or midpiece defects, morphologically normal or abnormal sperm, tail defects were more prevalent in Angus and Hereford bulls compared with other breeds. Overall, solely on the basis of sperm morphology, 1363 (83.0%) bulls were classified as satisfactory potential breeders and the remainder 279 (17.0%) as unsatisfactory (> 30% abnormal sperm, > 20% defective heads, or both). Although not significantly different, the breed with the highest percentage of satisfactory potential breeders was Limousin (90.6%) and the lowest was Hereford (78.8%). That 17% of bulls subjected to breeding soundness evaluation were designated as unsatisfactory solely on the basis of sperm morphology highlights its importance. PMID:22468020

  2. Are brown trout replacing or displacing bull trout populations in a changing climate?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Al-Chokhachy, Robert K.; Schmetterling, David A.; Clancy, Chris; Saffel, Pat; Kovach, Ryan; Nyce, Leslie; Liermann, Brad; Fredenberg, Wade A.; Pierce, Ron

    2016-01-01

    Understanding how climate change may facilitate species turnover is an important step in identifying potential conservation strategies. We used data from 33 sites in western Montana to quantify climate associations with native bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) and non-native brown trout (Salmo trutta) abundance and population growth rates (λ). We estimated λ using exponential growth state space models and delineated study sites based on bull trout use for either Spawning and Rearing (SR) or Foraging, Migrating, and Overwintering (FMO) habitat. Bull trout abundance was negatively associated with mean August stream temperatures within SR habitat (r = -0.75). Brown trout abundance was generally highest at temperatures between 12 and 14°C. We found bull trout λ were generally stable at sites with mean August temperature below 10°C but significantly decreasing, rare, or extirpated at 58% of the sites with temperatures exceeding 10°C. Brown trout λ were highest in SR and sites with temperatures exceeding 12°C. Declining bull trout λs at sites where brown trout were absent suggests brown trout are likely replacing bull trout in a warming climate.

  3. Use of Bayesian Inference to Correlate In Vitro Embryo Production and In Vivo Fertility in Zebu Bulls

    PubMed Central

    Sudano, Mateus José; Crespilho, André Maciel; Fernandes, Claudia Barbosa; Junior, Alicio Martins; Papa, Frederico Ozanam; Rodrigues, Josemar; Machado, Rui; Landim-Alvarenga, Fernanda Da Cruz

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this experiment was to test in vitro embryo production (IVP) as a tool to estimate fertility performance in zebu bulls using Bayesian inference statistics. Oocytes were matured and fertilized in vitro using sperm cells from three different Zebu bulls (V, T, and G). The three bulls presented similar results with regard to pronuclear formation and blastocyst formation rates. However, the cleavage rates were different between bulls. The estimated conception rates based on combined data of cleavage and blastocyst formation were very similar to the true conception rates observed for the same bulls after a fixed-time artificial insemination program. Moreover, even when we used cleavage rate data only or blastocyst formation data only, the estimated conception rates were still close to the true conception rates. We conclude that Bayesian inference is an effective statistical procedure to estimate in vivo bull fertility using data from IVP. PMID:21547211

  4. Detection of Neospora caninum in the semen and blood of naturally infected bulls.

    PubMed

    Ferre, Ignacio; Aduriz, Gorka; Del-Pozo, Itziar; Regidor-Cerrillo, Javier; Atxaerandio, Raquel; Collantes-Fernández, Esther; Hurtado, Ana; Ugarte-Garagalza, Carlos; Ortega-Mora, Luis Miguel

    2005-03-15

    A prospective study was designed to investigate the presence of Neospora caninum in semen and blood of eight bulls seropositive to N. caninum using nested-PCR procedures. Positive semen and blood samples were bioassayed in a BALB/c nu/nu mouse model. Specific anti-N. caninum serological and interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) responses were also studied. In parallel, five seronegative bulls acted as non-infected controls. All bulls were located in a collaborating AI centre and monitored for 22 weeks. Six of eight seropositive bulls showed N. caninum DNA in their semen and/or blood samples at some time during the course of the study. In all positive semen samples, we consistently found Neospora-DNA in the cell fraction and not in seminal plasma. Parasite load, as determined by a real-time PCR in nested-PCR positive semen samples, ranged from 1 to 10 parasites/ml. We found no association between the presence of N. caninum DNA in semen and blood. N. caninum could not be detected in the BALB/c nu/nu mice inoculated with PCR-positive semen or blood samples. Specific IgG antibody levels in seropositive bulls fluctuated over time, at times falling below cut-off level. The response was predominantly IgG2, with significant differences compared to control bulls (P < 0.05). The overall mean specific IFN-gamma response in seropositive bulls was also higher than those observed in the control group (P < 0.05), although extensive variation in individual responses was observed among bulls and over time. No significant association was found between bulls showing Neospora DNA in semen, blood, or both, and specific IgG, IgG1, IgG2, IgM and IgA levels or IFN-gamma response. This study is the first to report the presence of Neospora DNA in semen and blood of naturally-infected bulls. Our observations indicate intermittent presence of N. caninum in blood and semen and shedding in semen in low numbers. PMID:15725454

  5. Exposure of prepubertal beef bulls to cycling females does not enhance sexual development.

    PubMed

    Miller, N A; Fike, K E

    2014-08-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether continuous, long-term, fenceline exposure of prepubertal beef bulls to cycling beef females reduced age at puberty and influenced the percentage of bulls that passed an initial breeding soundness examination (BSE). Bulls (Angus, n = 37; Simmental, n = 22; Hereford, n = 10; Simmental × Angus, n = 8) at an average age of 202 ± 21.5 days were given either continuous fenceline and visual exposure to cycling females (exposed, n = 41) or no exposure (control, n = 36). Estrus was induced in cycling beef females so at least three females were in standing estrus each week during the 182 days of exposure to bulls. Scrotal circumference (SC), body weight, and blood samples were collected every 28 days. When bulls had SC of 26 cm or more, semen samples were obtained monthly via electroejaculation until puberty was achieved (≥50 × 10(6) sperm/mL with at least 10% progressive motility). Behavioral observations were conducted twice monthly: once when females were in estrus and once during diestrus. Homosexual mounting, flehmen responses, and number of times near penned females were recorded for each observation period. Breeding soundness examinations were conducted when the average age of bulls was 364 ± 21.5 days. Normal sperm morphology of at least 70% and sperm motility of at least 30% were required to pass the BSE. Age, body weight, and SC at puberty did not differ between exposed and control bulls (320 ± 28 and 311 ± 29 days; 466.2 ± 12.2 and 437.7 ± 13.5 kg; and 34.4 ± 2.5 and 34.9 ± 2.5 cm, respectively). Percentage of bulls passing their initial BSE did not differ between treatments (exposed, 87.8%; control, 75.0%). Treatment, month, and female estrous stage interacted (P = 0.05) to affect the number of mount attempts and flehmen responses. Exposed bulls entered the cow area more times (P < 0.001) during estrus than diestrus in Months 1, 2, and 3. We concluded that bulls given continuous, long

  6. Leptin mRNA expresses in the bull reproductive organ.

    PubMed

    Abavisani, A; Baghbanzadeh, A; Shayan, P; Tajik, P; Dehghani, H; Mirtorabi, M

    2009-12-01

    Leptin, a 167-amino acid hormone, is secreted mainly by fat tissue. It has some powerful effects on the regulation of metabolism and reproductive function through endocrine and probably paracrine mechanisms. The contribution rate of leptin function on the male reproductive system is not still clear. Characterization of leptin expression in reproductive organs will suggest that in addition to its endocrine action, leptin has also paracrine/autocrine effects on reproduction. The expression of functional leptin receptor mRNA has been already recognized in testis of rodents, human and cattle. Thus, the aim of the present study was to investigate the presence of leptin mRNA in the bovine testis, because it will be the first step for understanding of its paracrine/autocrine effects on the male reproductive organs in cattle. The present study was the first to showed leptin mRNA expression in the testis of Holstein cattle using reverse transcription and polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis. RT-PCR products were amplified with nested PCR using inner leptin primer pairs to emphasis the first results. Besides, bovine beta actin gene was acted as an internal positive control as well as RNA purification marker. Our findings suggest that in addition to its endocrine actions at the hypothalamic-pituitary axis, leptin can has an autocrine and/or paracrine role in bull testicular function. PMID:19466574

  7. Improved assay for measuring heparin binding to bull sperm

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, D.J.; Ax, R.L.

    1988-01-01

    The binding of heparin to sperm has been used to study capacitation and to rank relative fertility of bulls. Previous binding assays were laborious, used 10/sup 7/ sperm per assay point, and required large amounts of radiolabeled heparin. A modified heparin-binding assay is described that used only 5 x 10/sup 4/ cells per incubation well and required reduced amounts of (/sup 3/H) heparin. The assay was performed in 96-well Millititer plates, enabling easy incubation and filtering. Dissociation constants and concentrations of binding sites did not differ if analyzed by Scatchard plots, Woolf plots, or by log-logit transformed weighted nonlinear least squares regression, except in the case of outliers. In such cases, Scatchard analysis was more sensitive to outliers. Nonspecific binding was insignificant using nonlinear logistic fit regression and a proportion graph. The effects were tested of multiple free-thawing of sperm in either a commercial egg yolk extender, 40 mM Tris buffer with 8% glycerol, or 40 mM Tris buffer without glycerol. Freeze-thawing in extender did not affect the dissociation constant or the concentration of binding sites. However, freeze-thawing three times in 40 mM Tris reduced the concentration of binding sites and lowered the dissociation constant (raised the affinity). The inclusion of glycerol in the 40 mM Tris did not significantly affect the estimated dissociation constant or the concentration of binding sites as compared to 40 mM Tris without glycerol.

  8. Normal SPECT thallium-201 bull's-eye display: gender differences

    SciTech Connect

    Eisner, R.L.; Tamas, M.J.; Cloninger, K.; Shonkoff, D.; Oates, J.A.; Gober, A.M.; Dunn, D.W.; Malko, J.A.; Churchwell, A.L.; Patterson, R.E.

    1988-12-01

    The bull's-eye technique synthesizes three-dimensional information from single photon emission computed tomographic S TI images into two dimensions so that a patient's data can be compared quantitatively against a normal file. To characterize the normal database and to clarify differences between males and females, clinical data and exercise electrocardiography were used to identify 50 males and 50 females with less than 5% probability of coronary artery disease. Results show inhomogeneity of the S TI distributions at stress and delay: septal to lateral wall count ratios are less than 1.0 in both females and males; anterior to inferior wall count ratios are greater than 1.0 in males but are approximately equal to 1.0 in females. Washout rate is faster in females than males at the same peak exercise heart rate and systolic blood pressure, despite lower exercise time. These important differences suggest that quantitative analysis of single photon emission computed tomographic S TI images requires gender-matched normal files.

  9. [Fattening bull raising--alternative housing on slatted floors].

    PubMed

    Zerbe, F; Niemann, G; Scheithauer, E

    2008-03-01

    Rubber topped slatted floor gives more lying comfort to intensive fed fattening bulls, reduces risks of integument lesions as well as increases their locomotion comfort. On the other side there are more fissured alterations and defects in the sole and heel horn due to lack of sufficient wear away which often made the bearing surface to be overgrown. Overgrown claws are also seen on solid slatted floors, but these horn parts were normally grated down in short time that frequently goes along with abrasions of the claw peak and the wall horn as well. The current experiences of our study show favour to the use of a floor that combines hard and soft qualities. Weak claw performance and health has a link to a bad state of cleanness of the pens and the animals as well and must be assessed with regard to permanent wetness on the grounds. Animals out of greater pens are less dirty because the solid floor becomes sooner dry than in cases with higher crowding degrees of animals. More space per animal and higher comfort gives chance for higher daily weight gain. The recordings and evaluations of this project are still in progress. PMID:18444469

  10. Use of cover habitat by bull trout Salvelinus confluentus and lake trout Salvelinus namaycush in a laboratory environment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meeuwig, Michael H.; Guy, Christopher S.; Fredenberg, Wade A.

    2011-01-01

    Lacustrine-adfluvial bull trout, Salvelinus confluentus, migrate from spawning and rearing streams to lacustrine environments as early as age 0. Within lacustrine environments, cover habitat pro- vides refuge from potential predators and is a resource that is competed for if limiting. Competitive inter- actions between bull trout and other species could result in bull trout being displaced from cover habitat, and bull trout may lack evolutionary adaptations to compete with introduced species, such as lake trout, Salvelinus namaycush. A laboratory experiment was performed to examine habitat use and interactions for cover by juvenile (i.e., <80 mm total length) bull trout and lake trout. Differences were observed between bull trout and lake trout in the proportion of time using cover (F1,22.6=20.08, P<0.001) and bottom (F1,23.7 = 37.01, P < 0.001) habitat, with bull trout using cover and bottom habitats more than lake trout. Habitat selection ratios indicated that bull trout avoided water column habitat in the presence of lake trout and that lake trout avoided bottom habitat. Intraspecific and interspecific agonistic interactions were infrequent, but approximately 10 times greater for intraspecific inter- actions between lake trout. Results from this study provide little evidence that juvenile bull trout and lake trout compete for cover, and that species-specific differences in habitat use and selection likely result in habitat partitioning between these species.

  11. Natural or Artificial? Habitat-Use by the Bull Shark, Carcharhinus leucas

    PubMed Central

    Werry, Jonathan M.; Lee, Shing Y.; Lemckert, Charles J.; Otway, Nicholas M.

    2012-01-01

    Background Despite accelerated global population declines due to targeted and illegal fishing pressure for many top-level shark species, the impacts of coastal habitat modification have been largely overlooked. We present the first direct comparison of the use of natural versus artificial habitats for the bull shark, Carcharhinus leucas, an IUCN ‘Near-threatened’ species - one of the few truly euryhaline sharks that utilises natural rivers and estuaries as nursery grounds before migrating offshore as adults. Understanding the value of alternate artificial coastal habitats to the lifecycle of the bull shark is crucial for determining the impact of coastal development on this threatened but potentially dangerous species. Methodology/Findings We used longline surveys and long-term passive acoustic tracking of neonate and juvenile bull sharks to determine the ontogenetic value of natural and artificial habitats to bull sharks associated with the Nerang River and adjoining canals on the Gold Coast, Australia. Long-term movements of tagged sharks suggested a preference for the natural river over artificial habitat (canals). Neonates and juveniles spent the majority of their time in the upper tidal reaches of the Nerang River and undertook excursions into adjoining canals. Larger bull sharks ranged further and frequented the canals closer to the river mouth. Conclusions/Significance Our work suggests with increased destruction of natural habitats, artificial coastal habitat may become increasingly important to large juvenile bull sharks with associated risk of attack on humans. In this system, neonate and juvenile bull sharks utilised the natural and artificial habitats, but the latter was not the preferred habitat of neonates. The upper reaches of tidal rivers, often under significant modification pressure, serve as nursery sites for neonates. Analogous studies are needed in similar systems elsewhere to assess the spatial and temporal generality of this research

  12. Evaluation of sperm DNA damage in bulls by TUNEL assay as a parameter of semen quality

    PubMed Central

    TAKEDA, Kumiko; UCHIYAMA, Kyoko; KINUKAWA, Masashi; TAGAMI, Takahiro; KANEDA, Masahiro; WATANABE, Shinya

    2015-01-01

    Sperm DNA damage affects the conception rate resulting from human assisted reproduction technology. The objective of this study was to adapt the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay to provide a quality parameter for bull semen based on the detection of sperm DNA damage. Fresh semen was collected from two Japanese Black bulls (A, B) several times over the course of a year, and the percentage of TUNEL-positive spermatozoa (sperm TUNEL index) was determined. Individual differences in semen were detected using the sperm TUNEL index in these bulls (P < 0.01). The sperm TUNEL index of cryopreserved semen obtained from test-mated Japanese Black (n = 30, including two bulls with a conception rate lower than 10%) and Holstein (n = 34) bulls were analyzed. The average sperm TUNEL index and conception rate resulting from artificial insemination (AI) were 4.7% and 55.7% for Japanese Black, and 4.9% and 39.5% for Holstein, respectively. A weak negative correlation between sperm TUNEL index and conception rate was observed in Holstein bulls (P < 0.05). Semen samples from six bulls with more than 10% sperm TUNEL index were studied, and these samples showed low sperm viability. However, semen resulting in a very low conception rate did not have a high sperm TUNEL index. Although it would be difficult to predict a low conception rate resulting from AI using the sperm TUNEL index alone, the index can be used as an additional parameter to provide a more comprehensive description of semen quality. PMID:25739957

  13. Nucléation, ascension et éclatement d'une bulle de champagne

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liger-Belair, G.

    2006-03-01

    People have long been fascinated by bubbles and foams dynamics, and since the pioneering work of Leonardo da Vinci in the early 16th century, this subject has generated a huge bibliography. However, only quite recently, much interest was devoted to bubbles in Champagne wines and carbonated beverages. Since the time of the benedictine monk dom Pierre Perignon (1638-1715), champagne is the wine of celebration. This fame is largely linked to the elegance of its effervescence and foaming properties. In this book, the latest results about the chemical physics behind the bubbling properties of Champagne and sparkling wines are collected and fully illustrated. The first chapter is devoted to the history of champagne and to a presentation of the tools of the physical chemistry of interfaces needed for a whole comprehension of the book. Then, the three main steps of a fleeting champagne bubble's life are presented in chronological order, that is, the bubble nucleation on the glass wall (Chap.2), the bubble ascent and growth through the liquid matrix (Chap.3), and the bursting of bubbles at the liquid surface (Chap.4), which constitutes the most intriguing, functional, and visually appealing step. L'objectif général de ce travail consacré à l'étude des processus physicochimiques liés à l'effervescence des vins de Champagne était de décortiquer les différentes étapes de la vie d'une bulle de champagne en conditions réelles de consommation, dans une flûte. Nous résumons ci-après les principaux résultats obtenus pour chacune des étapes de la vie de la bulle, depuis sa naissance sur les parois d'une flûte, jusqu'à son éclatement en surface. Nucléation À l'aide d'une caméra rapide munie d'un objectif de microscope, nous avons pu mettre à mal une idée largement répandue. Ce ne sont pas les anfractuosités de la surface du verre ou de la flûte qui sont responsable de la nucléation hétérogène des bulles, mais des particules adsorbées sur les parois du

  14. Effect of age on spermiogram of Holstein Friesian × Sahiwal crossbred bulls.

    PubMed

    Mandal, D K; Kumar, M; Tyagi, S

    2010-04-01

    This study was conducted on 94 Frieswal (5/8 Holstein Friesian 3/8 Sahiwal) crossbred bulls of three different grades, categorized based on their semen freezability visualising Group 1 (consistently freezable semen producer bulls, N = 11), Group 2 (inconsistent freezable, N = 16) and Group 3 (Non freezable, N = 67). Each group was further divided into two classes that is young (up to 30 months) and adult (31 to 70 months) bulls depending upon their age. Sperm morphology was studied by using the eosin-nigrosin staining technique. Bulls age significantly (P < 0.01) affected semen quality and sperm morphology. In adult bulls, semen volume, mass activity and sperm concentration were 36%, 17.56% and 19.6%, respectively, higher than young. Initial progressive motility (%) and livability showed significant (P < 0.01) improvement with the advancement of age (43.37 ± 1.21 and 67.71 ± 1.11, respectively, in young; 53.02 ± 1.11 and 74.17 ± 1.03, respectively, in adult). In young bulls, sperm head, mid piece, tail abnormality and total abnormal sperm percent (12.38 ± 0.92, 4.87 ± 0.24, 11.01 ± 0.60 and 28.26 ± 1.34, respectively) were 1.85, 1.27, 1.20 and 1.44 folds higher than that of their mature stage (6.69 ± 0.64, 3.82 ± 0.32, 9.14 ± 0.64 and 19.66 ± 1.31, respectively). Significant reduction (P < 0.01) in micro cephalic sperm, free heads, bent mid piece, looped mid piece and proximal protoplasmic droplets were observed at mature age as compared with their younger stage. In bulls of consistent freezing category, abnormal sperm heads significantly decreased from 4.40 ± 0.31% to 3.28 ± 0.02% on maturity. Similarly, in inconsistent freezing grade bulls sperm head abnormality (9.28 ± 0.75% to 5.13 ± 1.20%) and total abnormal sperm percent (24.89 ± 1.43 to 18.73 ± 3.40) was decreased over the age. On the contrary, in non-freezing category bulls' sperm morphology did not show significant (P > 0.05) improvement with age advancement, rather some abnormalities

  15. Effects of dietary energy on sexual maturation and sperm production in Holstein bulls.

    PubMed

    Harstine, B R; Maquivar, M; Helser, L A; Utt, M D; Premanandan, C; DeJarnette, J M; Day, M L

    2015-06-01

    In prepubertal bulls and heifers of dairy and beef breeds, puberty can be induced to occur earlier than typical with targeted high-energy diets due to precocious activation of the endocrine mechanisms that regulate puberty. Precocious activation of puberty in bulls intended for use in the AI industry has the potential to hasten and perhaps increase sperm production. It was hypothesized that feeding bulls a high-energy diet beginning at 8 wk of age would advance the prepubertal rise in LH and lead to advanced testicular maturation and age at puberty. From 58 to 230 ± 0.3 d of age, Holstein bulls received either a high-energy diet (HE;n = 9; targeted ADG 1.5 kg/d) or a control diet (CONT;n = 10; targeted ADG 0.75 kg/d). Thereafter, all bulls were fed a similar diet. The HE treatment increased LH secretion at 125 d of age, testosterone concentrations from 181 to 210 d, and scrotal circumference (SC) from 146 to 360 d of age relative to the CONT treatment. Beginning at 241 ± 5 d of age, semen collection (artificial vagina) was attempted every 14 d in bulls from the HE (n = 8) and CONT (n = 7) treatment until each bull attained puberty (ejaculate containing 50 × 10 spermatozoa with 10% motility). To assess semen production as mature bulls, semen was collected thrice weekly beginning at 541 ± 5 d of age until slaughter at 569 ± 5 d of age. After slaughter, epididymal and testicular measurements were collected and testicular tissue was fixed to determine seminiferous tubule diameter. Age at puberty did not differ between treatments (310 ± 35 d). Although testis and epididymal weight and testis volume were greater (P < 0.05) in the HE than the CONT treatment, sperm production of mature bulls did not differ between treatments. Diameter of seminiferous tubules also did not differ between treatments. We conclude that the HE advanced aspects of sexual maturation and increased testes size, but this was not reflected in hastened puberty or sperm production in the present

  16. Wigwam River Juvenile Bull Trout and Fish Habitat Monitoring Program : 2001 Data Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Cope, R.S.; Morris, K.J.; Bisset, J.E.

    2002-03-01

    The Wigwam River juvenile bull trout and fish habitat monitoring program is a co-operative initiative of the British Columbia Ministry of Water, Land, and Air Protection and Bonneville Power Administration. The Wigwam River has been characterized as the single most important bull trout spawning stream in the Kootenay Region. This report provides a summary of results obtained during the second year (2001) of the juvenile bull trout enumeration and fish habitat assessment program. This project was commissioned in planning for fish habitat protection and forest development within the upper Wigwam River valley. The broad intent is to develop a better understanding of juvenile bull trout and Westslope cutthroat trout recruitment and the ongoing hydrologic and morphologic processes in the upper Wigwam River, especially as they relate to spawning and rearing habitat quality. Five permanent sampling sites were established August 2000 in the Wigwam river drainage (one site on Bighorn Creek and four sites on the mainstem Wigwam River). At each site, juvenile (0{sup +}, 1{sup +} and 2{sup +} age classes) fish densities and stream habitat conditions were measured over two stream meander wavelengths. Bull trout represented 95.1% of the catch and the mean density of juvenile bull trout was estimated to be 20.7 fish/100m{sup 2} (range 0.9 to 24.0 fish/100m{sup 2}). This compares to 17.2 fish/100m{sup 2} (+20%) for the previous year. Fry (0{sup +}) dominated the catch and this was a direct result of juvenile bull trout ecology and habitat partitioning among life history stages. Site selection was biased towards sample sites which favored high bull trout fry capture success. Comparison of fry density estimates replicated across both the preliminary survey (1997) and the current study (Cope and Morris 2001) illustrate the stable nature of these high densities. Bull trout populations have been shown to be extremely susceptible to habitat degradation and over-harvest and are

  17. Marine Habitat Use by Anadromous Bull Trout from the Skagit River, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hayes, Michael C.; Rubin, Steve P.; Reisenbichler, Reginald; Goetz, Fred A.; Jeanes, Eric; McBride, Aundrea

    2011-01-01

    Acoustic telemetry was used to describe fish positions and marine habitat use by tagged bull trout Salvelinus confluentus from the Skagit River, Washington. In March and April 2006, 20 fish were captured and tagged in the lower Skagit River, while 15 fish from the Swinomish Channel were tagged during May and June. Sixteen fish tagged in 2004 and 2005 were also detected during the study. Fish entered Skagit Bay from March to May and returned to the river from May to August. The saltwater residency for the 13 fish detected during the out-migration and return migration ranged from 36 to 133 d (mean ± SD, 75 ± 22 d). Most bull trout were detected less than 14 km (8.5 ± 4.4 km) from the Skagit River, and several bay residents used the Swinomish Channel while migrating. The bull trout detected in the bay were associated with the shoreline (distance from shore, 0.32 ± 0.27 km) and occupied shallow-water habitats (mean water column depth, Zostera sp.) vegetation classes made up more than 70% of the area used by bull trout. Our results will help managers identify specific nearshore areas that may require further protection to sustain the unique anadromous life history of bull trout.

  18. Changes in mean scrotal circumference in performance tested Swedish beef bulls over time

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background There is a growing interest in beef cattle breeding in Sweden. The majority of the females are bred naturally, which is why it is important to choose healthy fertile bulls to obtain good reproduction and profitability. The breeding soundness evaluation includes measurement of scrotal circumference (SC). Our aim was to analyze if the SC of performance tested beef bulls has changed over the years. In total, 1332 bulls (Angus, Charolais, Hereford and Simmental) from 13 batches (1997-2010) were included in the study. Case book entries from final evaluation of the bulls, 11-13 months old, were compiled and analyzed. Results An overall mean SC of 34.7 cm independent of breed and age was found which is above the set minimum level. Only eleven bulls did not reach the minimum level. An increase in SC of 0.06-0.07 cm/year was shown for all breeds. In all (1997-2010), the increase of the average SC (independent of breed and age) was approximately 1 cm. The positive trend was apparent for all breeds but only statistically significant for the Charolais breed. Conclusions In conclusion, our results indicated an increase in the SC over time, which improves the possibilities to obtain performance tested beef sires in Sweden with the potential for achieving better fertility results. PMID:23241352

  19. Failure to establish infection with Tetratrichomonas sp. in the reproductive tracts of heifers and bulls.

    PubMed

    Cobo, Eduardo Rubén; Cantón, Germán; Morrell, Eleonora; Cano, Dora; Campero, Carlos Manuel

    2004-02-26

    Experimental infection of the reproductive tracts of heifers and bulls with Tetratrichomonas sp. isolated from preputial smegma of virgin bulls was attempted. Nine heifers and four bulls were challenged by inoculation of 7 x 10(6) Tetratrichomonas sp. into the vaginal lumen and preputial cavity, respectively. Vaginal mucus and preputial smegma samples were collected and cultured for Tetratrichomonas sp. Heifers were slaughtered in groups of three at 2, 9 and 21 days after inoculation. Two heifers and two bulls infected with Tritrichomonas foetus and two uninfected heifers were used as controls for the model infection. Tetratrichomonas sp. were only isolated in vaginal mucus of 7/9 inoculated heifers at 6h post-inoculation, and genital secretions taken at slaughter time from vagina, uterus and oviduct were cultural negative. Bulls challenged with Tetratrichomonas sp. remained cultural negative. Since Tetratrichomonas sp. survived only a few hours in the female genitalia and did not survive in the male genitalia after experimental challenge, Tetratrichomonas sp. did not colonize the genital tract. These were likely trichomonads from the digestive tract. Collection of clean samples without fecal contamination from the reproductive tract is proposed as a measure to avoid Tetratrichomonas sp. transitory genital infection. PMID:15019152

  20. Ruptured urinary bladder attributable to urethral compression by a haematoma after vertebral fracture in a bull

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In male cattle, rupture of the urinary bladder is usually associated with urethral obstruction by uroliths. Less common causes include urethral compression or stricture. This case report describes the findings in a young Limousion breeding bull with rupture of the urinary bladder because of urethral compression by a haematoma after coccygeal fracture. Case presentation The bull had been introduced into a 40-head Red-Holstein herd one week before being injured. One week after introduction to the herd, the bull had an acute onset of anorexia and he was referred to the clinic. There was marked abdominal distension, reduced skin turgor and enophthalmus. The serum concentration of urea and creatinine was increased. Ultrasonographic examination revealed severe ascites and abdominocentesis yielded clear yellow fluid with high urea and creatinine concentrations, which supported a diagnosis of uroperitoneum. The bull was euthanatized because of a poor prognosis. Postmortem examination revealed a comminuted fracture of the first two coccygeal vertebrae associated with a massive haematoma that obstructed entire pelvic cavity. The haematoma compressed the urethra thereby preventing outflow of urine, which resulted in a 5-cm tear ventrally at the neck of the bladder. It was assumed that the newly-introduced bull had sustained the vertebral fractures when he was mounted by a cow. Conclusions The present case study serves to expand the differential diagnosis of urinary bladder rupture. Therefore, in addition to obstructive urolithiasis, compression and stricture of the urethra might be considered in male cattle with uroperitoneum. PMID:24666697

  1. Beef quality traits of heifer in comparison with steer, bull and cow at various feeding environments.

    PubMed

    Venkata Reddy, Bandugula; Sivakumar, Allur S; Jeong, Dawoon W; Woo, Yang-Byung; Park, Sang-June; Lee, So-Young; Byun, Ji-Yeon; Kim, Chang-Ho; Cho, Soo-Hyun; Hwang, Inho

    2015-01-01

    The present review has been focused largely on the sex type differences in beef quality among heifers, cows, steers and bulls in various feeding environments. Genetic groups, feeding systems and gender are the major factors that change carcass characteristics and fatty acid profiles of cattle. Studies identified that heifer beef has super characteristics in eating quality and a better healthy composition in fatty acids than steer, cow and bull. Diet influences the variation of fatty acid profile; particularly the level of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) interacts with breed and sex. Animals finished in pasture systems were reported to show better ratios of PUFA/ saturated fatty acids and n-6/n-3. Carcasses of roughage-fed beef are lighter and have less marbling and lower quality grades but have higher cutability than carcasses of grain-fed bulls. Heifers and cows are reported to deposit more fat than steers and bulls. Among males, lower production of testosterone by steers favors more fat thickness compared with bulls. Marbling greatly varies among cattle belonging to different sexes, and particularly, females have genetic makeup that efficiently controls deposition. The current review identified that heifers can be a premium beef brand, while steer beef currently take a large part of market share across the world. PMID:25236779

  2. [The effect of flavomycin on the fattening performance of bulls].

    PubMed

    Alert, H J; Poppe, S; Lohner, M

    1993-01-01

    An experiment with 36 fattening friesian bulls was conducted to investigate the effect of flavomycin (50 mg/d.animal). The additional flavomycin significantly enhanced the apparent digestibility of the organic matter, crude fibre and NFE. The animals in the experimental group consumed significantly more feed than the controls until the 56th day of the experiment. No appreciable differences between the two groups occurred thereafter. The daily gain of the animals in the experimental group was always higher than that of the controls except from day 140 to day 168 of the experiment. The mean daily gain for the animals in the control group was 949 g, whereas for those in the control group it was 916 g. This difference is statistically significant. The daily gains of the experimental animals were 3.5% higher than those of the controls. The animals receiving flavomycin tended to need a lower energy input than the controls. The control animals had a mean requirement of 3.80 kEFr/kg gain compared with 3.68 kEFr/kg for the experimental animals. This corresponds to a 3.2% improvement in energy conversion. As far as slaughter performance was concerned, the additional flavomycin had no effect on carcase composition, organ weight and chemical composition. Only the internal fat fraction was increased somewhat by flavomycin. The flavomycin had no influence on the fatty acid composition in the rumen. In particular, the ratio of acetic acid to propionic acid was unchanged. A trend to a slight increase in the total fatty acid concentration was observed. The treatment did not affect the number of protozoa in the rumen. PMID:8517777

  3. Bull Trout Life History, Genetics, Habitat Needs, and Limiting Factors in Central and Northeast Oregon, Annual Report 2000.

    SciTech Connect

    Hemmingsen, Alan R.; Gunckel, Stephanie L.; Sankovich, Paul M.; Howell, Philip J.

    2001-11-01

    This section describes work accomplished in 2000 that continued to address two objectives of this project. These objectives are (1) determine the distribution of juvenile and adult bull trout Salvelinus confluentus and habitats associated with that distribution, and (2) determine fluvial and resident bull trout life history patterns. Completion of these objectives is intended through studies of bull trout in the Grande Ronde, Walla Walla, and John Day basins. These basins were selected because they provide a variety of habitats, from relatively degraded to pristine, and bull trout populations were thought to vary from relatively depressed to robust. In all three basins we continued to monitor the movements of bull trout with radio transmitters applied in 1998 (Hemmingsen, Bellerud, Gunckel and Howell 2001) and 1999 (Hemmingsen, Gunckel and Howell 2001). No new radio transmitters were applied to bull trout of the upper John Day River subbasin, Mill Creek (Walla Walla Basin), or the Grande Ronde Basin in 2000. We did implant radio transmitters in two bull trout incidentally captured in the John Day River near the confluence of the North Fork John Day River. In Mill Creek, we used traps to capture migrant bull trout to obtain data for the third successive year in this stream. With these traps, we intended to determine the timing of bull trout movements both upstream and downstream, and to determine the relative abundance, size and age of migrant fish. Because we captured migrant bull trout with traps for three years in the upper John Day River and its tributaries (Hemmingsen, Bellerud, Buchanan, Gunckel, Shappart and Howell 2001; Hemmingsen, Bellerud, Gunckel and Howell 2001; Hemmingsen, Gunckel and Howell 2001) and traps were no longer needed to capture bull trout for radio-tagging, no traps were operated in the John Day Basin in 2000.

  4. Evaluate Bull Trout Movements in the Tucannon and Lower Snake Rivers, 2002-2003 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Faler, Michael P.; Mendel, Glen W.; Fulton, Carl

    2004-04-01

    We collected 279 adult bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) in the Tucannon River during the Spring and Fall of 2003. Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT) tags were inserted in 191 of them, and we detected existing PIT tags in an additional 31bull trout. Thirty five of these were also surgically implanted with radio-tags, and we monitored the movements of these fish throughout the year. Fourteen radio-tags were recovered shortly after tagging, and as a result, 21 remained in the river through December 31, 2003. Four bull trout that were radio-tagged in spring 2002 were known to survive and carry their tags through the spring and/or summer of 2003. One of these fish spent the winter near river mile (RM) 13.0; the other 3 over-wintered in the vicinity of the Tucannon Hatchery between RM 34 and 36. Twenty-one radio tags from bull trout tagged in 2002 were recovered during the spring and summer, 2003. These tags became stationary the winter of 2002/2003, and were recovered between RM 11 and 55. We were unable to recover the remaining 15 tags from 2002. During the month of July, radio-tagged bull trout exhibited a general upstream movement into the upper reaches of the Tucannon subbasin. We observed some downstream movements of radio-tagged bull trout in mid to late September and throughout October. By late November and early December, radio tagged bull trout were relatively stationary, and were distributed from the headwaters downstream to river mile 6.4, near Lower Monumental Pool. As in 2002, we did not conduct work associated with objectives 2, 3, or 4 of this study, because we were unable to monitor migratory movement of radio-tagged bull trout into the Federal hydropower system on the mainstem Snake River. Transmission tests of submerged ATS model F1830 radio-tags in Lower Granite Pool showed that audible detection and individual tag identification was possible at depths of 20 and 30 ft. Tests were conducted using an ATS R-4000 Receiver equipped with an ''H

  5. Influence of social dominance on production, welfare and the quality of meat from beef bulls.

    PubMed

    Miranda-de la Lama, G C; Pascual-Alonso, M; Guerrero, A; Alberti, P; Alierta, S; Sans, P; Gajan, J P; Villarroel, M; Dalmau, A; Velarde, A; Campo, M M; Galindo, F; Santolaria, M P; Sañudo, C; María, G A

    2013-08-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effect of social dominance on some indicators of welfare, production and meat quality of young bulls. A total of 60 bulls of the Gasconne breed, 9 months old, housed indoors were used. Indices of success order were calculated to reflect social dominance of each bull into three ranking categories (low, middle and high). Blood samples were taken to measure cortisol, lactate, glucose, creatine kinase, non-esterified fatty acid and neutrophil/lymphocyte ratio (N/L). M. longissimus samples were analysed in terms of pH, water holding capacity (WHC), texture, colour and sensorial attributes. Social rank influenced cattle stress response, which had an effect on productive performance but not on meat quality traits, with the exception of the sensory traits. These results emphasize the importance of implementing best management practices during pre-harvest handling of cattle in order to modulate any possible risk factor for social stress. PMID:23618738

  6. Vasoconstrictive responses of the testicular and caudal arteries in bulls exposed to ergot alkaloids from tall fescue

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Color Doppler ultasonography was used to evaluate vasoconstrictive responses of the testicular artery in yearling bulls to ergot alkaloids. Ergot alkaloid-induced constriction of the testicular artery could disrupt thermoregulation of the testes and reduce bull fertility. Luminal areas of the test...

  7. 75 FR 25794 - Regulated Navigation Area: Red Bull Air Race World Championship, Upper New York Bay, Lower Hudson...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-10

    ..., 2008, issue of the Federal Register (73 FR 3316). Public Meeting We do not now plan to hold a public... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA08 Regulated Navigation Area: Red Bull Air Race World... State Park, New Jersey and Ellis Island, New Jersey and New York for the Red Bull Air Race...

  8. Bull Trout Population Assessment in the White Salmon and Klickitat Rivers, Columbia River Gorge, Washington, 2001 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Thiesfeld, Steven L.; McPeak, Ronald H.; McNamara, Brian S.; Honanie, Isadore

    2002-01-01

    We utilized night snorkeling and single pass electroshocking to determine the presence or absence of bull trout Salvelinus confluentus in 26 stream reaches (3,415 m) in the White Salmon basin and in 71 stream reaches (9,005 m) in the Klickitat River basin during summer and fall 2001. We did not find any bull trout in the White Salmon River basin. In the Klickitat River basin, bull trout were found only in the West Fork Klickitat River drainage. We found bull trout in two streams not previously reported: Two Lakes Stream and an unnamed tributary to Fish Lake Stream (WRIA code number 30-0550). We attempted to capture downstream migrant bull trout in the West Fork Klickitat River by fishing a 1.5-m rotary screw trap at RM 4.3 from July 23 through October 17. Although we caught other salmonids, no bull trout were captured. The greatest limiting factor for bull trout in the West Fork Klickitat River is likely the small amount of available habitat resulting in a low total abundance, and the isolation of the population. Many of the streams are fragmented by natural falls, which are partial or complete barriers to upstream fish movement. To date, we have not been able to confirm that the occasional bull trout observed in the mainstem Klickitat River are migrating upstream into the West Fork Klickitat River.

  9. Influence of toxic endophyte-infected fescue on sperm characteristics and endocrine factors of yearling Brahman-influenced bulls

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sixteen (mean age = 1.1 +/- 0.1 yr; mean BW = 478 +/- 34 kg) Brahman-influenced bulls were used to determine the influence of fescue type on sperm characteristics and serum concentrations of prolactin, cortisol, and testosterone. Bulls were blocked by BW, scrotal circumference (SC), and pregrazing...

  10. Effects of slaughter weight and carcass electrical stimulation on the quality and palatability of beef from young purebred bulls.

    PubMed

    Solomon, M B; West, R L; Hentges, J F

    1986-12-01

    Seventy-eight purebred Angus and Brahman bulls (10 to 18 mo at slaughter) were used to determine the effects of slaughter weight (60, 80, 90 or 100% of the average mature-cow weight for the respective breed) and carcass electrical stimulation (500 V, 20 2-s impulses on the right side) on carcass and meat characteristics. Angus bulls grazed summer forage (millet) after weaning, while Brahman bulls were fed to stimulate gains achieved on forage by Angus bulls. Bulls were then placed in the feedlot for finishing to their designated slaughter weight (293, 381, 412 and 463 kg for Angus and 316, 420, 463 and 516 kg for Brahman). Coarse dark band formation and lean color problems normally associated with bullock carcasses were either eliminated or reduced by stimulation. Increasing slaughter weight from 60 to 90% was associated with an increase in panel tenderness scores for loin steaks. However, increasing slaughter weight from 90 to 100% little change was detected. On the other hand, shear values for loin steaks decreased with increasing slaughter weight. Stimulation increased the tenderness of loin steaks as determined by both panel scores and shear values, and of bottom round steaks (shear-force values). The data from this study suggest that meat from the bulls slaughtered at lighter weights was generally tough, but was improved when bulls were fed to heavier, yet acceptable weights. This research encourages implementation of electrical stimulation on carcasses from young bulls to improve quality-indicating factors. PMID:3818464

  11. 76 FR 68523 - Utah Southern Railroad Company, LLC-Change in Operators Exemption-Iron Bull Railroad Company, LLC

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-04

    ... Surface Transportation Board Utah Southern Railroad Company, LLC--Change in Operators Exemption--Iron Bull... of exemption under 49 CFR 1150.31 to change operators from Iron Bull Railroad Company (IBRC) to USRC... near Iron Springs, Utah, and milepost 14.7 at or near Iron Mountain, Utah, a distance of 14.6 miles...

  12. Temperament dictates endotoxin-induced metabolic changes in Brahman bulls

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We previously reported that animal temperament influences the rectal temperature response, sickness behavior scores, serum concentrations of epinephrine (Burdick et al., 2011; Innate Immunity), and serum cytokine concentrations (Hulbert et al., 2009; J. Anim. Sci. 86 (Suppl 2):527) following a provo...

  13. The effects of Red Bull energy drink compared with caffeine on cycling time-trial performance.

    PubMed

    Quinlivan, Alannah; Irwin, Christopher; Grant, Gary D; Anoopkumar-Dukie, Sheilandra; Skinner, Tina; Leveritt, Michael; Desbrow, Ben

    2015-10-01

    This study investigated the ergogenic effects of a commercial energy drink (Red Bull) or an equivalent dose of anhydrous caffeine in comparison with a noncaffeinated control beverage on cycling performance. Eleven trained male cyclists (31.7 ± 5.9 y 82.3 ± 6.1 kg, VO2max = 60.3 ± 7.8 mL · kg-1 · min-1) participated in a double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover-design study involving 3 experimental conditions. Participants were randomly administered Red Bull (9.4 mL/kg body mass [BM] containing 3 mg/kg BM caffeine), anhydrous caffeine (3 mg/kg BM given in capsule form), or a placebo 90 min before commencing a time trial equivalent to 1 h cycling at 75% peak power output. Carbohydrate and fluid volumes were matched across all trials. Performance improved by 109 ± 153 s (2.8%, P = .039) after Red Bull compared with placebo and by 120 ± 172 s (3.1%, P = .043) after caffeine compared with placebo. No significant difference (P > .05) in performance time was detected between Red Bull and caffeine treatments. There was no significant difference (P > .05) in mean heart rate or rating of perceived exertion among the 3 treatments. This study demonstrated that a moderate dose of caffeine consumed as either Red Bull or in anhydrous form enhanced cycling time-trial performance. The ergogenic benefits of Red Bull energy drink are therefore most likely due to the effects of caffeine, with the other ingredients not likely to offer additional benefit. PMID:25710190

  14. Effect of ruminally undegradable protein from fish meal on growth and reproduction of peripuberal Brahman bulls.

    PubMed

    Rocha, A; Carpena, M; Triplett, B; Forrest, D W; Randel, R D

    1995-04-01

    Thirty-nine Brahman bulls (301.7 +/- 4.1 d; 202.7 +/- 4.7 kg) were allotted to one of two treatments and fed soybean meal (SBM)- or fish meal (FIS)-based supplements and hay to examine the effects of source of protein on growth and reproductive development. The fish meal supplement had 72% ruminally undegradable protein (RUP) and the soybean meal supplement had 47% RUP. Bulls assigned to the FIS treatment had higher (P < .01) total weight gain (81.2 +/- 1.4 vs 71.2 +/- 2.2 kg), higher (P < .01) ADG (.97 +/- .02 vs .85 +/- .03 kg), and better (P < .05) feed:gain ratio (7.6 +/- .1 vs 8.6 +/- .1 feed/BW gain for FIS vs SBM, respectively). Age at first motile spermatozoa was not affected (P > .05) by source of protein (429.9 +/- 9.6 vs 427.2 +/- 9.5 d, for bulls receiving FIS or SBM supplements, respectively). Likewise, age at puberty (473.3 +/- 21.7 d vs 465.9 +/- 12.9 d for bulls receiving FIS and SBM supplements, respectively) was similar for both treatment groups. There were no differences between treatments in scrotal circumference at those stages. At puberty semen quality was similar for bulls receiving FIS or SBM treatments, and no differences existed in LH and testosterone concentrations between treatments. We conclude that fish meal supplement increased growth but did not alter reproductive parameters in Brahman bulls. PMID:7628971

  15. Evaluate Bull Trout Movements in the Tucannon and Lower Snake Rivers, 2001-2002 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Faler, Michael P.; Mendel, Glen W.; Fulton, Carl

    2003-06-01

    We collected, radio-tagged, and PIT-tagged 41 bull trout at the Tucannon River Hatchery trap from May 17, through June 14, 2002. An additional 65 bull trout were also collected and PIT tagged by June 24, at which time we ceased PIT tagging operations because water temperatures were reaching 16.0 C or higher on a regular basis. Six radio-tags were recovered shortly after tagging, and as a result, 35 remained in the river through November 30, 2002. During the month of July, radio-tagged bull trout exhibited a general upstream movement into the upper reaches of the Tucannon Subbasin. We began to observe some downstream movements of radio-tagged bull trout in mid to late September and throughout October. These movements appeared to be associated with post spawning migrations. As of November 30, radio tagged bull trout were relatively stationary, and distributed from the headwaters downstream to river mile 11.3, near Pataha Creek. None of the radio-tagged bull trout left the Tucannon Subbasin and entered the federal hydropower system on the mainstem Snake River. We conducted some initial transmission tests of submerged radio tags at depths of 25, 35, 45, and 55 ft. in Lower Monumental Pool to test our capability of detection at these depths. Equipment used included Lotek model MCFT-3A transmitters, an SRX 400 receiver, a 4 element Yagi antenna, and a Lotek ''H'' antenna. Test results indicated that depth transmission of these tags was poor; only the transmitter placed at 25 ft. was audibly detectable.

  16. Design and validation of a self-administered test to assess bullying (bull-M) in high school Mexicans: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Bullying (Bull) is a public health problem worldwide, and Mexico is not exempt. However, its epidemiology and early detection in our country is limited, in part, by the lack of validated tests to ensure the respondents’ anonymity. The aim of this study was to validate a self-administered test (Bull-M) for assessing Bull among high-school Mexicans. Methods Experts and school teachers from highly violent areas of Ciudad Juarez (Chihuahua, México), reported common Bull behaviors. Then, a 10-item test was developed based on twelve of these behaviors; the students’ and peers’ participation in Bull acts and in some somatic consequences in Bull victims with a 5-point Likert frequency scale. Validation criteria were: content (CV, judges); reliability [Cronbach’s alpha (CA), test-retest (spearman correlation, rs)]; construct [principal component (PCA), confirmatory factor (CFA), goodness-of-fit (GF) analysis]; and convergent (Bull-M vs. Bull-S test) validity. Results Bull-M showed good reliability (CA = 0.75, rs = 0.91; p < 0.001). Two factors were identified (PCA) and confirmed (CFA): “bullying me (victim)” and “bullying others (aggressor)”. GF indices were: Root mean square error of approximation (0.031), GF index (0.97), and normalized fit index (0.92). Bull-M was as good as Bull-S for measuring Bull prevalence. Conclusions Bull-M has a good reliability and convergent validity and a bi-modal factor structure for detecting Bull victims and aggressors; however, its external validity and sensitivity should be analyzed on a wider and different population. PMID:23577755

  17. Breed and other effects on reproductive traits and breeding soundness categorization in young beef bulls in Florida.

    PubMed

    Chenoweth, P J; Chase, C C; Thatcher, M J; Wilcox, C J; Larsen, R E

    1996-11-01

    Yearling, grass-fed, beef bulls at the USDA Subtropical Agricultural Research Station, Brooksville, Florida, were assessed for physical and semen traits in January, April, July and October of 1991 (Trial 1) and 1992 (Trial 2). Bulls were given a breeding soundness evaluation (BSE) using revised semen and scrotal circumference (SC) criteria. In Trial 1, the bulls consisted of Angus (n = 15), Brahman (n = 14), Hereford (n = 15) and Senepol (n = 14). In Trial 2, the breeds were Angus (n = 15), Brahman (n = 16), Romosinuano (n = 13) and Nellore x Brahman (n = 9). Trial bulls generally showed delayed growth compared with grain-fed bulls in temperate environments. Breed influenced semen traits (percentage sperm motility, normal spermatozoa and those with primary abnormalities) in both trials. Temperate Bos taurus breeds (Angus, Hereford) were generally superior to Bos indicus breeds (Brahman, Nellore x Brahman). Tropically-adapted Bos taurus breeds (Senepol, Romosinuano) were intermediate for those traits tested. In general, tropically-adapted Bos taurus breeds were more similar in reproductive development to temperate Bos taurus than to Bos indicus breeds. Breed by test period interactions occurred and were mainly influenced by delayed sexual maturity of Bos indicus bulls. Qualitative semen traits increased with bull age, particularly from 12 to 18 mo. Scrotal circumference development was slower in the Bos indicus breeds. Bulls of satisfactory BSE status at 18.1 to 22 mo of age were 73.9% in Trial 1 and 58.5% in Trial 2. Brahman bulls had the least satisfactory BSE scores in both years (Trial 1, 44.4%; Trial 2, 22.2%). Most bulls failed to achieve satisfactory BSE status due to a small SC relative to age (Trial 1, 66%; Trial 2, 72%). The most efficacious use of the BSE was > or = 15 mo in Bos taurus bulls and > 18 mo for Bos indicus bulls. Although the BSE has proven to be useful for the assessment of young, pasture-raised bulls in semi-tropical environments, use of SC

  18. The effect of sea transport from Ireland to the Lebanon on inflammatory, adrenocortical, metabolic and behavioural responses of bulls.

    PubMed

    Earley, B; McDonnell, B; Murray, M; Prendiville, D J; Crowe, M A

    2011-12-01

    The objective was to investigate the effect of sea transport on the physiological, behavioural and performance responses of bulls. One-hundred and eleven bulls (mean body weight (standard error of the mean) 429 (5.7 kg)) were randomly assigned to one of three treatments; control (C; n=54) bulls were housed in 6 pens at Teagasc, Grange Research Centre at a stocking density of (1), 1.7 m(2)/head (C1.7; 3 pens) and (2), 3.4 m(2)/head (C3.4; 3 pens) and (3), transported (T) bulls (n=57) were penned at a space allowance of 1.7 m(2)/head (6 pens) and allocated to one of five decks on the shipping vessel. C and T bulls were subjected to the same live weight (d -2), blood sampling and rectal temperature (d -1) measurements pre-transport and on d 3, d 6, d 9 and d 11 of the study. T bulls had greater (P<0.05) live weight gain (+4.4%) compared with C1.7 bulls (-2.0%) and C3.4 (+0.13%)). Time spent lying was greater (P<0.05) among C1.7 and C3.4 bulls (9.9% and 53.3%, respectively) compared with T bulls (45.8%). Rectal body temperature was not different (P>0.05) among treatment groups throughout the study. At d 11, neutrophil % was greater (P<0.05) in transported bulls on decks 1, 2, 4 and 5 compared with C1.7 and C3.4 treatments. Plasma cortisol concentrations were not different (P>0.05) between control and transported bulls. Plasma creatine kinase (CK) activity was lower (P<0.05) among C3.4 and T bulls on decks 2, 3, 4 and 5 compared with d 3 values. In conclusion, the welfare of bulls transported by sea on the sea journey was not adversely affected. Housing control bulls at a reduced space allowance (1.7 m(2)) had a negative effect on live weight gain. PMID:21067787

  19. Mineral resources of the Bull Mountain Wilderness Study Area, Garfield and Wayne counties, Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Dubiel, R.F.; Bromfield, C.S.; Church, S.E.; Kemp, W.M.; Larson, M.J.; Peterson, F.

    1988-01-01

    The US Geological Survey and the US Bureau of Mines conducted studies to appraise the mineral resources and mineral resource potential of the Bull Mountain Wilderness Study Area. The study area contains sedimentary rocks ranging in age from Jurassic and Triassic( ) to Cretaceous that have been intruded by Tertiary igneous stocks, lacoliths, and bysmaliths. No mines or prospects or identified resources are present within the study area. The northern half of the Bull Mountain Wilderness Study Area has a high mineral resource potential for gypsum, and the entire study area has a low resource potential for uranium and vanadium, coal, oil and gas, and geothermal energy.

  20. Kootenai River Fisheries Investigations; Rainbow and Bull Trout Recruitment, 2002-2003 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Walters, Jody P.

    2004-01-01

    Rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss provide the most important sport fishery in the Kootenai River, Idaho, but densities and catch rates are low. Low recruitment is one possible factor limiting the rainbow trout population. Bull trout Salvelinus confluentus also exist in the Kootenai River, but little is known about this population. Research reported here addresses the following objectives for the Kootenai River, Idaho: increase rainbow trout recruitment, identify rainbow and bull trout spawning tributaries and migration timing, establish baseline data on bull trout redd numbers in tributaries, and improve the rainbow trout population size structure. Six adult rainbow trout were moved to spawning habitat upstream of a potential migration barrier on Caboose Creek, but numbers of redds and age-0 out-migrants did not appear to increase relative to a reference stream. Measurements taken on the Moyie River indicated the gradient is inadequate to deliver suitable flows to a proposed rainbow trout spawning channel. Summer water temperatures measured in the Deep Creek drainage sometimes exceeded 24 C, higher than those reported as suitable for rainbow trout. Radio-tagged rainbow trout were located in Boulder Creek during the spring spawning season, and bull trout were located in the Moyie River and O'Brien Creek, Montana in the fall. Bull trout spawning migration timing was related to increases in Kootenai River flows. Bull trout redd surveys documented 19 redds on Boulder Creek and North and South Callahan creeks. Fall 2002 electrofishing showed that the Kootenai River rainbow trout proportional stock density was 54, higher than prior years when more liberal fishing regulations were in effect. Boulder Creek produces the highest number of age-0 rainbow trout out-migrants upstream of Bonners Ferry, but the survival rate of these out-migrants upon reaching the Kootenai River is unknown. Determining juvenile survival rates and sources of mortality could aid management efforts

  1. Inactivation of calcium current in bull-frog atrial myocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, D L; Giles, W R; Hume, J R; Shibata, E F

    1988-01-01

    1. A single-microelectrode technique has been used to study the voltage dependence and the kinetics of inactivation and reactivation of a tetrodotoxin-resistant inward current (ICa) in single cells from bull-frog atrium. 2. In most cases the kinetics of both inactivation and reactivation can be well described as a single-exponential process. 3. Several different observations indicate that inactivation of ICa in these cells is controlled by both voltage-dependent and current-dependent processes, as has been demonstrated previously in heart (Kass & Sanguinetti, 1984; Lee, Marban & Tsien, 1985) and in other tissues (Hagiwara & Byerly, 1981; Tsien, 1983; Eckert & Chad, 1984). 4. Evidence in favour of a voltage-dependent inactivation mechanism included: (a) In paired-pulse measurements of steady-state inactivation ('f infinity') a 'conventional' steady-state f infinity vs. membrane potential (Vm) relationship was obtained in the range of membrane potentials from -60 to 0 mV. (b) Increasing [Ca2+]o from 2.5 to 7.5 mM, which resulted in a 2-3-fold increase in ICa, did not produce any significant increase in the amount of inactivation. (c) Using a 'gapped' double-pulse protocol non-monotonic U-shaped inactivation relationships were obtained, i.e. positive to approximately +20 mV some removal of inactivation occurred. However, f never approached a value near 1.00 at very depolarized potentials; it reached a maximum between 0.5 and 0.6. (d) In constant [Ca2+]o and at fixed Vm, the kinetics of ICa inactivation were independent of peak size of ICa. This was demonstrated by: (i) varying the holding potential (-90 to -30 mV), (ii) using paired-pulse 'recovery' protocols, and (iii) partial block by La3+ (1-10 microM) and Cd2+ (0.1 mM). (e) Influx of Ca2+ ions was not an obligatory prerequisite for development of inactivation. In all ionic conditions (Ca2+, Sr2+, Ba2+, Na+-free and Ca2+-free Ringer solutions) currents displayed inactivation phenomena, although the extent and

  2. Identification of polymorphisms in the promoter region of the bovine heat shock protein gene and associations with bull calf weaning weight

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Our objective was to evaluate the relationship between genotypic variation of the bovine HSP-70 promoter and bull calf weaning weights and serum concentrations of HSP-70 at weaning. Blood samples were collected from 33 crossbred bull calves. Calves were sired by Angus bulls and had Brahman-cross dam...

  3. Evaluate Bull Trout Movements in the Tucannon and Lower Snake Rivers, 2004 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Faler, Michael P.; Mendel, Glen W.; Fulton, Carl

    2005-11-01

    We sampled and released 313 bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) from the Tucannon River in 2004. Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT) tags were inserted in 231 of these individuals, and we detected existing PIT tags in an additional 44 bull trout. Twenty-five of these were also surgically implanted with radio-tags, and we monitored the movements of these fish throughout the year. Ten bull trout that were radio-tagged in 2003 were known to survive and carry their tags through the spring of 2004. One of these fish outmigrated into the Snake River in the fall, and remained undetected until February, when it's tag was located near the confluence of Alkali Flat Creek and the Snake River. The remaining 9 fish spent the winter between Tucannon River miles 2.1 (Powers Road) and 36.0 (Tucannon Fish Hatchery). Seven of these fish retained their tags through the summer, and migrated to known spawning habitat prior to September 2004. During June and July, radio-tagged bull trout again exhibited a general upstream movement into the upper reaches of the Tucannon subbasin. As in past years, we observed some downstream movements of radio-tagged bull trout in mid to late September and throughout October, suggesting post spawning outmigrations. By late November and early December, radio tagged bull trout were relatively stationary, and were distributed from river mile 42 at Camp Wooten downstream to river mile 17, near the Highway 12 bridge. As in previous years, we did not collect data associated with objectives 2, 3, or 4 of this study, because we were unable to monitor migratory movement of radio-tagged bull trout into the vicinity of the hydropower dams on the main stem Snake River. Transmission tests of submerged Lotek model NTC-6-2 nano-tags in Lower Granite Pool showed that audible detection and individual tag identification was possible at depths of 20, 30, and 40 ft. We were able to maintain tag detection and code separation at all depths from both a boat and 200 ft. above

  4. Bull Trout Life History, Genetics, Habitat Needs, and Limiting Factors in Central and Northeast Oregon, Annual Report 2001.

    SciTech Connect

    Hemmingsen, Alan R.; Gunckel, Stephanie L.; Sankovich, Paul M.; Howell, Philip J.

    2002-12-01

    Bull trout Salvelinus confluentus exhibit a number of life history strategies. Stream-resident bull trout complete their life cycle in their natal tributaries. Migratory bull trout spawn in tributary streams where juvenile fish usually spend from one to four years before migrating to either a larger river (fluvial) or lake (adfluvial) where they rear before returning to the tributary stream to spawn (Fraley and Shepard 1989). These migratory forms occur where conditions allow movement from spawning locations to downstream waters that provide greater foraging opportunities (Dunham and Rieman 1999). Resident and migratory forms may occur together, and either form can produce resident or migratory offspring (Rieman and McIntyre 1993). The ability to migrate is important to the persistence of local bull trout populations (Rieman and McIntyre 1993). The identification of migratory corridors can help focus habitat protection efforts. Determining the life history form(s) that comprise local populations, the timing of seasonal movements, and the geographic extent of these movements are critical to bull trout protection and recovery efforts. This section describes work accomplished in 2001 that continued to address two objectives of this project. These objectives are (1) determine the distribution of juvenile and adult bull trout and habitats associated with that distribution, and (2) determine fluvial and resident bull trout life history patterns. Completion of these objectives is intended through studies of bull trout in the Grande Ronde, Walla Walla, and John Day basins. These basins were selected because they provide a variety of habitats, from relatively degraded to pristine, and bull trout populations were thought to vary from relatively depressed to robust. In the Grande Ronde and Walla Walla basins, we continued to monitor the movements of bull trout with radio transmitters applied in 1998 (Hemmingsen, Bellerud, Gunckel and Howell 2001) and 1999 (Hemmingsen, Gunckel

  5. Kinetics of fertilization and development, and sex ratio of bovine embryos produced using the semen of different bulls.

    PubMed

    Alomar, M; Tasiaux, H; Remacle, S; George, F; Paul, D; Donnay, I

    2008-08-01

    The between bulls variation in in vitro fertility and the shift of sex ratio towards male embryos are two problems affecting the in vitro production (IVP) of bovine embryos. Our objective was to evaluate the kinetics of fertilization, embryo development and the sex ratio of the resulting embryos using the frozen/thawed semen of four different bulls. In a first experiment, the kinetics of pronucleus (PN) formation was evaluated at 8, 12 and 18 h post-insemination (hpi). Based upon the pronuclei sizes and the distance between the two pronuclei, inseminated oocytes were classified in three PN stages. Differences between bulls were observed at each time point, but were more important at 12 hpi. At 8 and 12 hpi bull III showed a significantly faster PN evolution by comparison with the three other bulls (P<0.05), while at 18 hpi, the proportion of the three PN stages was similar to those of bulls I and IV, bull II being delayed. In a second experiment, the kinetics of in vitro embryo development was compared using time-lapse cinematography. The analysis of embryos reaching the blastocyst stage revealed significant differences in the mean time of first cleavage (range of 22.7-25.6h, P<0.05), while the lengths of the subsequent three cell cycles did not differ between bulls. The early mean time of first cleavage with bull III was associated with an early blastulation and a high blastocyst rate at Day 7, in opposition to what was observed with bull II showing a later timing of first cleavage (first cleavage 22.1 hpi versus 25.5 hpi; blastulation 140.4 hpi versus 152.5 hpi; D7 blastocyst rates: 31.3% versus 21.9%; P<0.05). In a third experiment, 65-76 Day 8 blastocysts per bull were sexed by PCR. Only blastocysts obtained with bull III showed a shift in sex ratio towards male embryos (76% male embryos; P<0.05). Such shift was already observed at the 2-cell and morula stages. In conclusion, the bull influences the kinetics of PN formation, of embryo development and the sex

  6. Relative sensitivity of bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) and rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) to acute copper toxicity.

    PubMed

    Hansen, James A; Lipton, Josh; Welsh, Paul G

    2002-03-01

    Bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) were recently listed as threatened in the United States under the federal Endangered Species Act. Past and present habitat for this species includes waterways contaminated with heavy metals released from mining activities. Because the sensitivity of this species to copper was previously unknown, we conducted acute copper toxicity tests with bull and rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) in side-by-side comparison tests. Bioassays were conducted using water at two temperatures (8 degrees C and 16 degrees C) and two hardness levels (100 and 220 mg/L as CaCO3). At a water hardness of 100 mg/L, both species were less sensitive to copper when tested at 16 degrees C compared to 8 degrees C. The two species had similar sensitivity to copper in 100-mg/ L hardness water, but bull trout were 2.5 to 4 times less sensitive than rainbow trout in 220-mg/L hardness water. However, when our results were viewed in the context of the broader literature on rainbow trout sensitivity to copper, the sensitivities of the two species appeared similar. This suggests that adoption of toxicity thresholds that are protective of rainbow trout would be protective of bull trout; however, an additional safety factor may be warranted because of the additional level of protection necessary for this federally threatened species. PMID:11878477

  7. The Effect of Sperm Morphology and Sire Fertility on Calving Rate of Finnish Ayrshire AI Bulls.

    PubMed

    Attia, S; Katila, T; Andersson, M

    2016-02-01

    Good-quality semen is a prerequisite for successful and profitable artificial insemination (AI) of modern dairy cattle. Fertility of the bulls is evaluated with andrological examinations and semen analyses, such as morphology. However, little attention has been paid to the inheritance of bull fertility. In this study, we correlated sperm morphology, birth year and station of 695 AI bulls with calving rate (CR). Sperm morphology was clearly associated with CR underlining the usefulness of morphological examination in the assessment of fertility. The correlation between the proportion of normal spermatozoa and CR was significant (p < 0.001). No significant differences were detected between stations or birth years. We also compared the CR of 695 AI bulls with the CR of their 27 sires to study the inheritance of fertility. Sire's CR did not correlate with the CR of the sons (p = 0.218). This result indicates that at least when sires of acceptable CR are used to produce sons for use in AI the inheritance of CR is not significantly correlated. PMID:26660630

  8. The use of integer programming to select bulls across breeding companies with volume price discounts.

    PubMed

    McConnel, M B; Galligan, D T

    2004-10-01

    Optimization programs are currently used to aid in the selection of bulls to be used in herd breeding programs. While these programs offer a systematic approach to the problem of semen selection, they ignore the impact of volume discounts. Volume discounts are discounts that vary depending on the number of straws purchased. The dynamic nature of volume discounts means that, in order to be adequately accounted for, they must be considered in the optimization routine. Failing to do this creates a missed economic opportunity because the potential benefits of optimally selecting and combining breeding company discount opportunities are not captured. To address these issues, an integer program was created which used binary decision variables to incorporate the effects of quantity discounts into the optimization program. A consistent set of trait criteria was used to select a group of bulls from 3 sample breeding companies. Three different selection programs were used to select the bulls, 2 traditional methods and the integer method. After the discounts were applied using each method, the integer program resulted in the lowest cost portfolio of bulls. A sensitivity analysis showed that the integer program also resulted in a low cost portfolio when the genetic trait goals were changed to be more or less stringent. In the sample application, a net benefit of the new approach over the traditional approaches was a 12.3 to 20.0% savings in semen cost. PMID:15377634

  9. Evaluation of carcass traits and meat characteristics of Guzerat-crossbred bulls.

    PubMed

    Diniz, Frederico B; Villela, Severino D J; Mourthé, Mário H F; Paulino, Pedro V R; Boari, Cleube A; Ribeiro, Julimar S; Barroso, Jorge A; Pires, Aldrin V; Martins, Paulo G M A

    2016-02-01

    Our objective was to evaluate carcass and meat characteristics of Guzerat-crossbred bulls finished in feedlot. Carcasses from 18 bulls, randomly selected from a larger group of 36 bulls, consisting of F1 Guzerat×Holstein ("Guzholstein"); F1 Guzerat×Nellore ("Guzonell"); and 1/2 Simmental+1/4 Guzerat+1/4 Nellore (Three-Cross; n=6 each group) were used. Cold carcass weight was greater (P=0.01) for Three-Cross compared with "Guzonell" and "Guzholstein". Three-Cross carcasses had greater (P<0.01) rib-eye-area and 100-kg-adjusted rib-eye-area among groups. Longissimus lumborum length did not differ (P>0.05) among groups, but depth was greater (P<0.01) for Three-Cross compared with other groups. "Guzholtein" had lesser (P=0.05) shear force compared with "Guzonell", with Three-Cross being intermediate. We conclude that "Guzholstein" is an adequate option for producers willing to finish this kind of genetic group, as it is comparable or better than Bos indicus crosses and B. indicus×Bos taurus bulls. PMID:26546913

  10. Candidate causative mutation on BTA18 associated with calving and conformation traits in Holstein bulls

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Complementing quantitative methods with sequence data analysis is a major goal of the post-genome era of biology. In this study, we analyzed Illumina HiSeq sequence data derived from 11 US Holstein bulls in order to identify putative causal mutations associated with calving and conformation traits. ...

  11. Temperature and competition between bull trout and brook trout: A test of the elevation refuge hypothesis.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We tested the elevation refuge hypothesis that colder water temperatures impart a competitive advantage to bull trout Salvelinus confluentus and thus account for increased biotic resistance to invasion and displacement by brook trout S. fontinalis in headwater streams. Growth, survival, and behavio...

  12. Portraits of the Postmodern Person in "Taxi Driver,""Raging Bull," and "The King of Comedy."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mortimer, Barbara

    1997-01-01

    Argues that a postmodern theory of identity (i.e., the subject as coherent, integrated, discoverable self is a fiction of modernity) links Martin Scorsese's major films. Examines "Taxi Driver,""Raging Bull," and "King of Comedy." Concludes that these films articulate a major cultural shift and chronicle a distinctively masculine identity crisis,…

  13. RESUMPTION OF POSTPARTUM LUTEAL FUNCTION OF PRIMIPAROUS, SUCKLED BEEF COWS EXPOSED CONTINUOUSLY TO BULL URINE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We tested the hypotheses that interval from urine exposure to resumption of luteal activity and proportions of cows that resume luteal activity by the end of the urine-exposure period do not differ between cows exposed to mature bull urine or steer urine. Thirty-eight Angus x Hereford cows, four mat...

  14. 7. BUILDING 604F, INTERIOR OF BULL PEN SHOWING TESTING STAND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. BUILDING 604-F, INTERIOR OF BULL PEN SHOWING TESTING STAND AND HEAVY WOOD LINING ON CONCRETE WALLS. STEEL PLATE ABOVE TEST STAND DEFLECTS SHRAPNEL, SCREEN FURTHER HELPS TO CONTAIN PARTICLES. ONLY SMALL EXPLOSIVES WERE TESTED HERE (GRENADES, MINES, BOMB FUZES, ETC.). - Picatinny Arsenal, 600 Area, Test Areas District, State Route 15 near I-80, Dover, Morris County, NJ

  15. Physical examination of the reproductive organs of range beef bulls in Mozambique.

    PubMed

    Rocha, A; Mackinnon, D; Mandlhate, F

    1986-03-01

    Physical examinations were performed on 3991 bulls reared in subtropical (75%) and tropical (25%) Mozambique. A culling rate of 16.3% (651 sires) was found. The range of culling rate between farms varied from 3 to 44%. The main culling reasons were a) epididymitis, b) atrophy and/or hypoplasia, and c) testicular fibrosis (contributing to 30.4, 20.9, and 15.2%, respectively, of the culled bulls). Epididymitis-vaginitis (epivag) syndrome was considered the main reason for the high incidence of epididymitis and testicular fibrosis. A highly significant difference (P<0.001) in culling rate for Simmental (37.7%) and Brahman (13.1%) bulls was found. A more comprehensive investigation of culling rate of different breeds used in the country is needed, as well as a program for controlling epivag in the more affected areas. Examining the reproductive organs of the beef bulls in Mozambique before the breeding season is very important to improve fertility in the beef herds. PMID:16726130

  16. Retention through Research: Sitting Bull College Builds STEM Program around Research Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guinn, Jeremy E.

    2011-01-01

    In 1996, faculty at Sitting Bull College (SBC, Fort Yates, North Dakota) developed its Environmental Science (ENS) Program, basing it on the scientific method and techniques students would need for employment in environmental technician positions with local and tribal agencies. Over the course of 15 years, this employment-based training evolved…

  17. Increased conception rates in beef cattle inseminated with nanopurified bull semen

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Reproductive performance is of paramount importance to the cattle industry. Since recent progress has been achieved by optimizing estrus and ovulation synchronization protocols in cows, improvements are desired to increase the fertility of bulls enrolled in artificial insemination (AI) programs. Thi...

  18. Luteinizing hormone-releasing immunization alters pituitary hormone synthesis and storage in bulls and steers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Objectives of this study were (1) to determine if trenbolone acetate (TBA) co-administered with LHRH immunization would suppress reproductive function in beef bulls and (2) to examine the effects of LHRH immunization and TBA treatment on pituitary function. To address these objectives 44 Angus x He...

  19. No detection of Besnoitia besnoiti DNA in the semen of chronically infected bulls.

    PubMed

    Esteban-Gil, A; Grisez, C; Prevot, F; Florentin, S; Decaudin, A; Picard-Hagen, N; Berthelot, X; Ronsin, P; Alzieu, J P; Marois, M; Corboz, N; Peglion, M; Vilardell, C; Liénard, E; Bouhsira, E; Castillo, J A; Franc, M; Jacquiet, P

    2014-06-01

    Bovine besnoitiosis is a chronic and debilitating disease observed in many European countries that may cause important economic losses in cattle. The recent widespread of the parasite in Europe had led the European Food Safety Authority to declare bovine besnoitiosis as a re-emerging disease in Europe. Many aspects of the epidemiology of bovine besnoitiosis such as the main routes of transmission are still unclear and need to be further studied. Among the different hypotheses, a sexual transmission has not yet been investigated. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the presence of Besnoitia besnoiti DNA in the semen of naturally infected bulls by using a highly sensitive method (real-time qPCR). Both pre-sperm and sperm fractions of 40 bulls, including seronegative (n = 11), seropositive subclinically (n = 17), and seropositive clinically (n = 12) infected animals, were collected by electroejaculation and analyzed by real-time qPCR. No B. besnoiti DNA was detected in 27 pre-sperm and 28 sperm fractions of the 40 examined bulls, suggesting that the transmission of B. besnoiti infection by the semen of chronically infected bulls is very unlikely. PMID:24802865

  20. Feeding behavior of feedlot-finished young bulls fed diets containing peanut cake.

    PubMed

    Correia, Bráulio Rocha; de Carvalho, Gleidson Giordano Pinto; Oliveira, Ronaldo Lopes; Pires, Aureliano José Viera; Ribeiro, Ossival Lolato; Silva, Robério Rodrigues; Leão, André Gustavo; Rodrigues, Carlindo Santos

    2015-08-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the feeding behavior of feedlot-finished young bulls fed diets containing peanut cake instead of soybean meal. A total of 32 Nellore young bulls with an initial body weight of 390 ± 43.5 kg were distributed in a completely randomized design. The animals were individually housed in stalls and fed Tifton 85 hay with four concentrate mixtures containing 0, 33, 66, or 100% peanut cake substituting for soybean meal. The diets were formulated to be isonitrogenous (with 15% crude protein) and isocaloric (with 65% total digestible nutrients), with a 40:60 forage:concentrate ratio, in the form of total mixed diet. The experimental period was 90 days, and data were collected every 28 days. Feeding behavior was assessed by means of observation and recording of the daily time spent feeding, ruminating, and idling, quantification of the periods and calculation of variables related to mastication characteristics as well as feeding and rumination efficiencies. Substitution of soybean meal for peanut cake in the diets caused a linear decrease in the intake of dry matter and neutral detergent fiber but did not affect the behavioral activities of the young bulls. Peanut cake may therefore replace up to 100% of soybean meal in the diet of feedlot-finished young Nellore bulls because it does not affect the feeding behavior of these animals. PMID:25982443

  1. Inferring Quantitative Trait Pathways Associated with Bull Fertility from a Genome-Wide Association Study

    PubMed Central

    Peñagaricano, Francisco; Weigel, Kent A.; Rosa, Guilherme J. M.; Khatib, Hasan

    2013-01-01

    Whole-genome association studies typically focus on genetic markers with the strongest evidence of association. However, single markers often explain only a small component of the genetic variance and hence offer a limited understanding of the trait under study. As such, the objective of this study was to perform a pathway-based association analysis in Holstein dairy cattle in order to identify relevant pathways involved in bull fertility. The results of a single-marker association analysis, using 1,755 bulls with sire conception rate data and genotypes for 38,650 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), were used in this study. A total of 16,819 annotated genes, including 2,767 significantly associated with bull fertility, were used to interrogate a total of 662 Gene Ontology (GO) terms and 248 InterPro (IP) entries using a test of proportions based on the cumulative hypergeometric distribution. After multiple-testing correction, 20 GO categories and one IP entry showed significant overrepresentation of genes statistically associated with bull fertility. Several of these functional categories such as small GTPases mediated signal transduction, neurogenesis, calcium ion binding, and cytoskeleton are known to be involved in biological processes closely related to male fertility. These results could provide insight into the genetic architecture of this complex trait in dairy cattle. In addition, this study shows that quantitative trait pathways inferred from single-marker analyses could enhance our interpretations of the results of genome-wide association studies. PMID:23335935

  2. Surgical treatment of a sloughed hoof by skin grafting in a young bull

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    Abstract A sloughed hoof in a young bull as a sequela of foot and mouth disease was treated by skin grafting. Skin blocks obtained from the craniolateral thoracic area of the same animal were placed in slit-like pockets created on the coronary band. New hoof formation was completed within 20 weeks. PMID:15206591

  3. Influence of temperament and transportation on physiological and endocrinological parameters in bulls

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study measured physiological, immunological, and endocrinological responses of Bos indicus cattle of differing temperaments to transportation. Based on temperament score (TS) the 7 most Calm (TS = 0.84 ± 0.03) and 8 most Temperamental (TS = 3.37 ± 0.18) Brahman bulls were selected from our rese...

  4. Relationship between temperament and transportation with rectal temperature and secretion of cortisol and epinephrine in bulls

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study investigated whether temperament influences rectal temperature and the secretion of cortisol and epinephrine in response to transportation. Brahman bulls were selected based on temperament score (average of exit velocity, EV, and pen score, PS) measured 28 days prior to weaning with the 8...

  5. Abomasal ulceration and abomaso-pleural fistula in an 11-month-old beefmaster bull

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Lais R. R.; Gill, Marjorie S.; Williams, Jamie; Johnson, Anthony J.; Angel, Kenneth L.; Mirza, Mustajab H.

    2002-01-01

    An 11-month-old, beefmaster bull presented with anorexia and signs of respiratory disease. Physical examination, thoracic ultrasonography and radiography, and pleural fluid analysis indicated pericarditis and septic neutrophilic pleuropneumonia. Postmortem findings were abomasal adherence to the diaphragm, a fibrotic fistulous tract connecting the abomasum and pleural cavity, granulomatous abomasitis, granulomatous pericarditis, and fibrinonecrotic pleuritis. PMID:11901596

  6. Detection of Paratuberculosis in Breeding Bulls at Pakistani Semen Production Units: A Continuous Source of Threat

    PubMed Central

    Abbas, Muhammad; Munir, Muhammad; Khaliq, Syed Abdul; Haq, Muhammad Ikram Ul; Tanveer Khan, Muhammad; Qureshi, Zafar ul Ahsan

    2011-01-01

    Paratuberculosis is a chronic bowel disease of ruminants caused by Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP). Its secretion through semen highlights the importance of paratuberculosis-free breeding bulls. The breeding and teaser bulls at three semen production units (SPUs) located in Punjab, Pakistan, were screened for the presence of antibodies against MAP. A total of 253 samples were collected from SPUs and a commercially available indirect screen ELISA (Is-ELISA) was applied. Is-ELISA detected antibodies in 20 (24.6%), 16 (22.8%), and 17 (16.6%) samples from SPU-I, SPU-II, and SPU-III, respectively. Collectively, seroprevalence of 20.0% (47/235) in breeding bulls and 33.3% (6/18) in teaser bulls was observed, and thus it poses a potential threat of disease spread to a high number of heifers and cows through artificial insemination. Therefore, this paper highlights the presence of the disease for the first time at SPUs and triggers attempts to ascertain the prevalence of paratuberculosis throughout the country. PMID:23738098

  7. Eating quality of beef from free-range and confined Podolian young bulls.

    PubMed

    Braghieri, A; Pacelli, C; Piazzolla, N; Girolami, A; Napolitano, F

    2013-12-01

    The purpose of the present study was to assess the effect of grazing on meat quality of young Podolian bulls by using 6 free-ranging (FR) and 6 confined (CON) animals slaughtered at 18 mo of age (Exp. 1). A second experiment (Exp. 2) was performed the subsequent year where the age at slaughter was 15 mo of age (6 animals/group). Quantitative descriptive sensory analysis, water-holding capacity (WHC; thawing, centrifugation, and cooking losses), and shear force (only in Exp. 2) were evaluated on LM, aged 8 d. Both experiments showed that CON animals produced beef with greater overall beef flavor (P < 0.01 and P < 0.05 in Exp. 1 and 2, respectively) and odor intensities (P < 0.10 and P < 0.05 in Exp. and 1 and 2, respectively) and increased malondialdehyde contents (P < 0.01 and P < 0.05 in Exp. 1 and 2, respectively). In Exp. 2 beef from FR bulls showed higher sensory tenderness as compared with CON bulls (P < 0.05) and a lower shear force (P < 0.05). In Exp. 1, beef obtained from FR bulls showed lower centrifugation and greater thawing losses compared with samples from bulls from group CON (P < 0.05) whereas rearing system did not affect any WHC variables in Exp. 2. The results obtained from the 2 experiments were generally consistent. The different results occasionally observed (e.g., sensory tenderness and WHC) is attributed to the different ages at slaughter used in the 2 experiments (18 and 15 mo). In particular, at an earlier age at slaughter (15 mo) the effect of FR on meat quality was beneficial on sensory tenderness and mechanical properties. Therefore, given the additional costs of maintaining the bulls for another 3 mo when slaughtered at 18 mo of age, a reduced age at slaughter of FR bulls may be suggested to avoid the decrement of herbage mass availability inducing the consumption of high amounts of concentrate. PMID:24126271

  8. Kootenai River Fisheries Investigations; Rainbow and Bull Trout Recruitment, 2003-2004 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Walters, Jody P.

    2005-08-01

    Rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss provide the most important sport fishery in the Kootenai River, Idaho, but densities and catch rates are low. Low recruitment is one possible factor limiting the rainbow trout population. Bull trout Salvelinus confluentus also exist in the Kootenai River, but little is known about this population. Research reported here addresses the following objectives for the Kootenai River, Idaho: identify sources of rainbow and bull trout recruitment, monitor the rainbow trout population size structure to evaluate regulation changes initiated in 2002, and identify factors potentially limiting rainbow trout recruitment. A screw trap was used to estimate juvenile redband and bull trout out-migration from the Callahan Creek drainage, and electrofishing was conducted to estimate summer densities of bull trout rearing in the Idaho portion of the drainage. An estimated 1,132 juvenile redband trout and 68 juvenile bull trout out-migrated from Callahan Creek to the Kootenai River from April 7 through July 15, 2003. Densities of bull trout {ge} age-1 in North and South Callahan creeks ranged from 1.6 to 7.7 fish/100m{sup 2} in August. Bull trout redd surveys were conducted in North and South Callahan creeks, Boulder Creek, and Myrtle Creek. Thirty-two bull trout redds were located in North Callahan Creek, while 10 redds were found in South Callahan Creek. No redds were found in the other two streams. Modeling of culverts in the Deep Creek drainage identified two as upstream migration barriers, preventing rainbow trout from reaching spawning and rearing habitat. Water temperature monitoring in Deep Creek identified two sites where maximum temperatures exceeded those suitable for rainbow trout. Boulder Creek produces the most rainbow trout recruits to the Kootenai River in Idaho upstream of Deep Creek, but may be below carrying capacity for rearing rainbow trout due to nutrient limitations. Monthly water samples indicate Boulder Creek is nutrient limited

  9. A High Percentage of Beef Bull Pictures in Semen Catalogues Have Feet and Lower Legs that Are Not Visible.

    PubMed

    Franks, Marcy K; Grandin, Temple

    2015-01-01

    A total of 1379 beef bull pictures were surveyed to determine visibility of feet and legs from four American semen company websites. Five different breeds were represented: Angus, Red Angus, Hereford (polled and horned), Simmental, and Charolais. In addition to visibility, data on other variables were collected to establish frequencies and correlations. These included breed, color, material that obscured visibility, such as grass, picture taken at livestock show or outside, semen company, photographer, video, and age of bull. A foot and leg visibility score was given to each bull picture. Only 19.4% of the pictures had fully visible feet and legs. Both the hooves and dewclaws were hidden on 32.5% of the pictures. Correlation between bull's birthdate and the first four visibility scores was statistically significant (P < 0.0001). As age increased the feet and legs were more likely to be visible in the bull's picture. This may possibly be due to greater availability of both photo editing software and digital photography. One positive finding was that 6% of the bulls had a video of the bull walking which completely showed his feet and legs. PMID:26479372

  10. Laboratory diagnosis and transmissibility of bovine viral diarrhea virus from a bull with a persistent testicular infection.

    PubMed

    Newcomer, Benjamin W; Toohey-Kurth, Kathy; Zhang, Yan; Brodersen, Bruce W; Marley, M Shonda; Joiner, Kellye S; Zhang, Yijing; Galik, Patricia K; Riddell, Kay P; Givens, M Daniel

    2014-06-01

    Recently, in the United States, a dairy bull was diagnosed as the second confirmed case of persistent testicular infection (PTI) with bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV). The first objective of this study was to evaluate the testing methodologies currently used by the artificial insemination industry in order to improve the detection of bulls with PTI. This study evaluated the impact of multiple factors ([1] sample tested, [2] sample handling, [3] assay used, and [4] assay methodology) on the sensitivity of detection of BVDV. The second objective of this study was to evaluate the transmissibility of BVDV from the bull through casual or sexual contact. Results from this study indicate that straws of semen should be transported to the diagnostic laboratory in liquid nitrogen dry shippers. PCR proved to be a more sensitive assay than virus isolation; however, certain PCR protocols exhibited greater diagnostic sensitivity than others. Insemination with cryopreserved semen from this infected bull caused viral transmission to a seronegative heifer resulting in viremia and seroconversion. After 42 months of age, the bull appeared to clear the infection. In conclusion, this bull validates that natural exposure to a 1a strain of BVDV can result in a unique PTI causing contamination of semen with detectable infectious virus. Appropriate handling and testing of samples is necessary in order to detect bulls exhibiting PTI. Additionally, PTI with BVDV may potentially be cleared after an extended duration. PMID:24656648

  11. Seminal plasma protein concentrations vary with feed efficiency and fertility-related measures in young beef bulls.

    PubMed

    Montanholi, Y R; Fontoura, A B P; Diel de Amorim, M; Foster, R A; Chenier, T; Miller, S P

    2016-06-01

    Fertility-associated proteins (FAP) found in seminal plasma indicate sexual maturity, which appears to be influenced by feed efficiency in cattle. This study characterized FAP via proteomics and verified associations of these proteins with feed efficiency, body composition and fertility-related measures in yearling beef bulls. Assessments including testicular ultrasonography, infrared thermography, seminal quality, seminal plasma proteomics, carcass composition, and reproductive organ biometry were obtained. From a population of 31 bulls, the seven most and least feed efficient (efficient, inefficient) bulls were used for categorical comparisons. Correlations between FAP, productive performance and fertility-related measures were determined. These traits were also correlated with orthogonal factors summarized from the FAP. Efficient bulls had increased epididymal sperm-binding protein-1 and decreased concentration of protein-C inhibitor compared to inefficient bulls. Correlations between FAP with age, body size, body composition, reproductive organ biometry, scrotal temperature, and seminiferous tubule maturity are reported. Acrosin and cathepsin D increased with development of the testes and osteopontin increased with greater numbers of mature seminiferous tubules. Phosphoglycerate kinase-2 was higher in animals with a higher scrotum temperature and a higher prevalence of sperm morphology defects. The principal factor indicated that FAP variability concentrations were positively correlated with age, reproductive organ biometry, body size and composition. Our results indicate that FAP changes with body size and sexual development, and demonstrates differences in the proteomics of bulls with diverging feed efficiency. This is related to the delay in the sexual maturity of efficient young bulls. PMID:27288339

  12. Carcass Composition and Cuts of Bulls and Steers Fed with Three Concentrate Levels in the Diets.

    PubMed

    do Prado, Ivanor Nunes; Passetti, Rodrigo Augusto Cortêz; Rivaroli, Dayane Cristina; Ornaghi, Mariana Garcia; de Souza, Kennyson Alves; Carvalho, Camila Barbosa; Perotto, Daniel; Moletta, José Luiz

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, weight, carcass dressing, weights of the primary cuts, weights of the physical components of the primary cuts, and weights of the main commercial cuts of 66 Purunã animals, of which 33 were bulls and 33 were steers were evaluated. These animals, with an average age of 19 months at the beginning of the experiment, were finished in a feedlot system during 116 days, and were fed with diets containing three levels of concentrate (0.8%, 1.1%, and 1.4% of body weight). The concentrate was formulated with 25% soybean meal, 73% ground corn grain, 1% of a mineral mix, and 1% of limestone. The interaction between sexual groups and the concentrate level was not significant for any of the variables. Likewise, no effect of the concentrate level was detected on the same variable traits. The bulls demonstrated higher hot carcass weights (265.1 vs 221.7 kg) and a higher proportion of forequarter (38.4% vs 36.1%) however the steers presented with higher proportions of side (19.7% vs 18.5%) and hindquarter (44.2% vs 43.1%). The bulls produced higher yields of muscle in the three primary cuts, there by resulting in higher yields of edible portions of the carcass. The bulls also produced higher weights of tenderloin, knuckle, topside, flat, eye round, rump, and rump cover. The finishing of young bulls in feedlot is to be recommended, since the animals produce carcasses with higher amounts of edible meat and higher yields of commercial cuts, thus allowing for a better price for the carcass. Low concentrate level could be used due to the lower cost of production for farmers. PMID:26194216

  13. Growth and muscle development characteristics of purebred Angus and Brahman bulls.

    PubMed

    Solomon, M B; West, R L; Hentges, J F

    1986-01-01

    Thirty-eight purebred bulls (10 to 17 mo of age) were used to determine the effects of breed (Angus or Brahman) and slaughter weight (60, 80, 90 or 100% of the average mature dam's weight for the respective breed) on growth and muscle development characteristics. Angus bulls grazed summer forage after weaning whereas Brahman bulls were fed to simulate gains achieved on forage by Angus. Bulls were then placed in a confinement feedlot for finishing to their appropriate slaughter weight (293, 369, 411, and 469 kg for Angus and 307, 427, 464 and 520 kg for Brahman). No major differences due to breed were found for predicted carcass composition. The LD muscle from Brahman bulls contained more total DNA (2.27 v. 1.19 g), more total protein (768.22 v. 593.59 g) and generally less total lipid (70.56 v. 101.26 g) when expressed on a total muscle (wet tissue) basis. The percentages and areas for all three muscle fiber types were not affected by breed. As carcass weight increased, muscle weights, total protein, lipid, protein:DNA and muscle fiber size for the three fiber types increased. Total DNA content increased only up to the 90% weight group and then leveled off. The percentage of alpha R fibers decreased while the percentage of alpha W fibers increased with increasing carcass weight. These data suggest that slaughtering animals based on a percentage of their dam's mature weight seems to be a practical method for making comparisons of animals on an equivalent compositional basis. Moreover, it appears that histochemical and biochemical evaluations of skeletal muscle can successfully identify what point in the growth cycle an animal is in. PMID:3732867

  14. Conventional and fluorescent based semen quality assessment in Karan Fries bulls

    PubMed Central

    Panmei, A.; Gupta, A. K.; Shivahre, P. R.; Bhakat, M.; Upadhyay, A.

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The present study was carried out on semen ejaculates of 15 Karan Fries (KF) bulls maintained at Artificial Breeding Research Centre, National Dairy Research Institute, Karnal, India with an objective to evaluate the relationship between the conventional and fluorescent based semen quality analysis of the bulls. Materials and Methods: A total of 96 ejaculates were collected from 15 KF (Holstein Friesian [HF] crossbred) bulls. Semen were evaluated for color, volume, mass activity (MA) and percentage of individual motility (IM), sperm concentration, percent live spermatozoa, hypo-osmotic swelling test and acrosome integrity, chromatin integrity, sperm viability, and membrane integrity. Data were analyzed using SPSS software package for descriptive analysis. The correlation between rankings of sires based on conventional and fluorescent semen parameters were calculated by Spearman’s rank correlation coefficient. Results: The average ejaculates volume (ml), sperm concentration (106/ml), MA, IM (%), live (%), morphological abnormalities (%), host (%), acrosome integrity (%), chromomycin A3 (CMA3) (%), SYBR-PI (%), and fluorescent isothiocyanate-peanut agglutinin (FITC-PNA) (%) were 4.57±0.36, 1162.98±97.93, 2.95±0.09, 60.8±1.22, 71.41±2.10, 9.31±1.15, 65.5±1.81, 86.6±1.59, 3.53±0.43, 65.39±2.23 and 74.47±2.53, respectively. Rank correlations were found to be significant for SYBR-PI and FITC-PNA with most of the parameters evaluated by conventional methods. Overall, among conventional criteria, IM revealed ranking of bulls almost similar to that of fluorescent criteria. Conclusion: Overview of our results indicated that, among conventional criteria, MA and IM revealed ranking of bulls almost similar to that of fluorescent criteria. PMID:27047025

  15. Genetic diversity is related to climatic variation and vulnerability in threatened bull trout

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kovach, Ryan; Muhlfeld, Clint C.; Wade, Alisa A.; Hand, Brian K.; Whited, Diane C.; DeHaan, Patrick W.; Al-Chokhachy, Robert K.; Luikart, Gordon

    2015-01-01

    Understanding how climatic variation influences ecological and evolutionary processes is crucial for informed conservation decision-making. Nevertheless, few studies have measured how climatic variation influences genetic diversity within populations or how genetic diversity is distributed across space relative to future climatic stress. Here, we tested whether patterns of genetic diversity (allelic richness) were related to climatic variation and habitat features in 130 bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) populations from 24 watersheds (i.e., ~4–7th order river subbasins) across the Columbia River Basin, USA. We then determined whether bull trout genetic diversity was related to climate vulnerability at the watershed scale, which we quantified on the basis of exposure to future climatic conditions (projected scenarios for the 2040s) and existing habitat complexity. We found a strong gradient in genetic diversity in bull trout populations across the Columbia River Basin, where populations located in the most upstream headwater areas had the greatest genetic diversity. After accounting for spatial patterns with linear mixed models, allelic richness in bull trout populations was positively related to habitat patch size and complexity, and negatively related to maximum summer temperature and the frequency of winter flooding. These relationships strongly suggest that climatic variation influences evolutionary processes in this threatened species and that genetic diversity will likely decrease due to future climate change. Vulnerability at a watershed scale was negatively correlated with average genetic diversity (r = −0.77;P < 0.001); watersheds containing populations with lower average genetic diversity generally had the lowest habitat complexity, warmest stream temperatures, and greatest frequency of winter flooding. Together, these findings have important conservation implications for bull trout and other imperiled species. Genetic diversity is already

  16. Carcass Composition and Cuts of Bulls and Steers Fed with Three Concentrate Levels in the Diets

    PubMed Central

    do Prado, Ivanor Nunes; Passetti, Rodrigo Augusto Cortêz; Rivaroli, Dayane Cristina; Ornaghi, Mariana Garcia; de Souza, Kennyson Alves; Carvalho, Camila Barbosa; Perotto, Daniel; Moletta, José Luiz

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, weight, carcass dressing, weights of the primary cuts, weights of the physical components of the primary cuts, and weights of the main commercial cuts of 66 Purunã animals, of which 33 were bulls and 33 were steers were evaluated. These animals, with an average age of 19 months at the beginning of the experiment, were finished in a feedlot system during 116 days, and were fed with diets containing three levels of concentrate (0.8%, 1.1%, and 1.4% of body weight). The concentrate was formulated with 25% soybean meal, 73% ground corn grain, 1% of a mineral mix, and 1% of limestone. The interaction between sexual groups and the concentrate level was not significant for any of the variables. Likewise, no effect of the concentrate level was detected on the same variable traits. The bulls demonstrated higher hot carcass weights (265.1 vs 221.7 kg) and a higher proportion of forequarter (38.4% vs 36.1%) however the steers presented with higher proportions of side (19.7% vs 18.5%) and hindquarter (44.2% vs 43.1%). The bulls produced higher yields of muscle in the three primary cuts, there by resulting in higher yields of edible portions of the carcass. The bulls also produced higher weights of tenderloin, knuckle, topside, flat, eye round, rump, and rump cover. The finishing of young bulls in feedlot is to be recommended, since the animals produce carcasses with higher amounts of edible meat and higher yields of commercial cuts, thus allowing for a better price for the carcass. Low concentrate level could be used due to the lower cost of production for farmers. PMID:26194216

  17. Chronological age and breed-type effects on carcass characteristics and palatability of bull beef.

    PubMed

    Riley, R R; Smith, G C; Cross, H R; Savell, J W; Long, C R; Cartwright, T C

    1986-01-01

    Bulls (n = 115) of four slaughter ages (9, 12, 15 or 18 months) and of 15 genotypes were studied. In this analysis, each bullock was assigned to one of four breed groups-British and British crosses, Brahman and Brahman crosses. Jersey and Jersey crosses or Holstein and Holstein crosses. Slaughter age had an (P < 0·01) effect on marbling score, longissimus muscle area, fat thickness and yield grade while breed group had an (P < 0·01) effect on marbling score and quality grade. In general, British and British cross bullocks produced carcasses with the thickest subcutaneous fat, the highest marbling score and the highest USDA quality grade while Jersey and Jersey cross bullocks yielded carcasses with the lowest weight, smallest longissimus muscle area and the lowest USDA quality grade of the four breed-type groups. Increases in chronological age (from 9 to 18 months) were generally associated with a decrease in USDA maturity score, and increases in marbling score, USDA quality grade, longissimus muscle area, subcutaneous fat thickness and USDA yield grade. Shear force values decreased as bulls matured from 9 to 18 months of age. The meat from Brahman-type bulls had higher shear force values (P < 0·01) than that from bulls of the other breed groups. Steaks from British-type carcasses received the highest numerical ratings for sustained juiciness and flavor while steaks from the Brahman-type carcasses were assigned the lowest numerical ratings for juiciness. Breed-type had a greater effect on tenderness of bull beef than did chronological age. PMID:22055275

  18. The effects of antibiotic additions to extenders on fresh and frozen-thawed bull semen.

    PubMed

    Gloria, Alessia; Contri, Alberto; Wegher, Laura; Vignola, Giorgio; Dellamaria, Debora; Carluccio, Augusto

    2014-11-10

    Reproduction in dairy cows is based around the use of cryopreserved semen. Antibiotics are utilized to control bacterial contamination and growth in cryopreserved bull semen. The antibiotic resistance of some bacteria required the evaluation of new antibiotic combinations with a high level of antibacterial effectiveness and a negligible effect on spermatozoa. In this research, we studied the effect of the fluorinate carboxyquinolone ofloxacin and the combination of ceftiofur/tylosin on bull spermatozoa and in-field bacterial growth. In Experiment 1, the toxicity of different levels of ofloxacin and ceftiofur/tylosin was tested by the incubation of bull spermatozoa and the evaluation of sperm kinetic parameters, membranes and acrosome integrity after dilution, and at 60 and 120 min after incubation. The data reported in this study reveals that both antibiotic combinations, at all concentrations, seem to have a negligible effect on spermatozoa with respect to all of the parameters examined (p>0.05). Furthermore, progressive motility was significantly higher for sperm diluted with both antibiotic combinations compared with samples without antibiotics (p<0.01). In Experiment 2, the ability of ofloxacin or ceftiofur/tylosin to control bacterial growth during bovine semen cryopreservation was compared with the combination of gentamicin/tylosin/spectinomycin/lincomycin. A significant reduction in progressive motility was found in cooled semen with respect to all of the antibiotic treatments (p<0.05). However, the membrane integrity was found to significantly rise in frozen samples with, compared to samples without, antibiotics (p<0.05). In a bull, gentamicin, tylosin, spectinomycin, and lincomycin failed to control bacterial growth in the cryopreserved sample, while no such growth was found in samples extended with ceftiofur/tylosin or ofloxacin. In conclusion, both ceftiofur/tylosin and ofloxacin can be safely added to bull seminal extenders, and both can protect

  19. A Comparison of Spatial and Movement Patterns between Sympatric Predators: Bull Sharks (Carcharhinus leucas) and Atlantic Tarpon (Megalops atlanticus)

    PubMed Central

    Hammerschlag, Neil; Luo, Jiangang; Irschick, Duncan J.; Ault, Jerald S.

    2012-01-01

    Background Predators can impact ecosystems through trophic cascades such that differential patterns in habitat use can lead to spatiotemporal variation in top down forcing on community dynamics. Thus, improved understanding of predator movements is important for evaluating the potential ecosystem effects of their declines. Methodology/Principal Findings We satellite-tagged an apex predator (bull sharks, Carcharhinus leucas) and a sympatric mesopredator (Atlantic tarpon, Megalops atlanticus) in southern Florida waters to describe their habitat use, abundance and movement patterns. We asked four questions: (1) How do the seasonal abundance patterns of bull sharks and tarpon compare? (2) How do the movement patterns of bull sharks and tarpon compare, and what proportion of time do their respective primary ranges overlap? (3) Do tarpon movement patterns (e.g., straight versus convoluted paths) and/or their rates of movement (ROM) differ in areas of low versus high bull shark abundance? and (4) Can any general conclusions be reached concerning whether tarpon may mitigate risk of predation by sharks when they are in areas of high bull shark abundance? Conclusions/Significance Despite similarities in diet, bull sharks and tarpon showed little overlap in habitat use. Bull shark abundance was high year-round, but peaked in winter; while tarpon abundance and fishery catches were highest in late spring. However, presence of the largest sharks (>230 cm) coincided with peak tarpon abundance. When moving over deep open waters (areas of high shark abundance and high food availability) tarpon maintained relatively high ROM in directed lines until reaching shallow structurally-complex areas. At such locations, tarpon exhibited slow tortuous movements over relatively long time periods indicative of foraging. Tarpon periodically concentrated up rivers, where tracked bull sharks were absent. We propose that tarpon trade-off energetic costs of both food assimilation and osmoregulation

  20. Effects of age and environmental factors on semen production and semen quality of Austrian Simmental bulls.

    PubMed

    Fuerst-Waltl, Birgit; Schwarzenbacher, Hermann; Perner, Christa; Sölkner, Johann

    2006-09-01

    More than 90% of the breeding stock of Austrian dual purpose Simmental cows is artificially inseminated. Knowledge of factors affecting sperm production and semen quality is of importance with regard to reproductive efficiency and thus genetic improvement as well as for the productivity and profitability of AI centers. Hence, semen data from two Austrian AI centres collected in the years 2000 and 2001 were evaluated. In total, 3625 and 3654 ejaculates from 147 and 127 AI bulls, respectively, were analysed regarding ejaculate volume, sperm concentration, percentage of viable spermatozoa in the ejaculate, total spermatozoa per ejaculate and motility. Effects accounted for were the bull (random), age of bull, collection interval, number of collection on collection day, bull handler, semen collector, temperature on day of semen collection, in the course of epididymal maturation (average temperature of days 1-11 before collection) and during spermatogenesis (average temperature of days 12-65 before collection). Age of bull significantly affected all traits (P<0.01 to P<0.001) except motility score in center 2. Ejaculate volume and total number of spermatozoa increased with age of bull while sperm concentration was lower in higher age classes (center 1). The collection team was also found to significantly influence semen quality traits. With increasing collection interval ejaculate volume and total number of spermatozoa increased significantly (P<0.05 to P<0.001) while collection intervals between 4-9 days and 1-6 days were superior with regard to sperm concentration and percentage of viable spermatozoa, respectively (P<0.10 to P<0.001). First ejaculates were superior with respect to ejaculate volumes, sperm concentrations and total number of spermatozoa per ejaculate (P<0.001). Temperature, either on day of semen collection or during epididymal maturation or spermatogenesis, had important but inconsistent effects on semen production and sperm quality. Overall, however

  1. [Possibilities of eliminating the effect of magnesite fly ash in beef bulls].

    PubMed

    Bíres, J; Bartko, P; Jencík, F; Weissová, T; Jesenská, M; Bíresová, M

    1995-02-01

    The objective of the paper was to test efficiency of feed ration enriched with calcium, phosphorus salts and fat concentrate for elimination of negative impacts of magnesite light ashes in beef bulls kept in an exposure area of magnesite works. For this purpose, 24 animals received a feed mix fortified with dicalcium phosphate at a rate of 100 g per head/day for eight months (P1 group) and another group of 24 bulls were administered a feed mix with an addition of 8% corn fat concentrate (P2 group). The other 24 animals were control (control group K). The clinical picture involved the occurrence of mild to profuse diarrheas which were alternately characteristic of all animal species in the first two months of the trial. Feed intake of the investigated groups was equal. Supplementation of feed ration with dicalcium phosphate and corn concentrate increased the weight gains of experimental animals in comparison with control bulls, the increase being 13.2 and 24.5%, resp. In comparison with the control bulls, the intake of the above supplements did not basically influence the dynamics of hematological profile indicators in the experimental bulls (Figs. 1-4). As for the parameters of hepatic profile, in the 3rd month of testing AST activity was positively influenced in both experimental groups if compared with the control group (P < 0.01), Fig. 5, and at the end of observation ALT activity in P2 group (P < 0.01), Fig. 6. Bilirubinemia dynamics did not change in the investigated groups after administration of either supplement (Fig. 9). ALP activity maintained statistically insignificantly higher values in the control animals in the second half of the trial, which demonstrated impairment of mineral metabolism in this group (Fig. 8). Significant differences in IgC levels between the control and experimental groups were confirmed in the 3rd month of the trial (P < 0.01), Fig. 12. In comparison with the control animals, the effect of dietary dicalcium phosphate

  2. Assessing the feasibility of native fish reintroductions: a framework and example applied to bull trout in the Clackamas River, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dunham, Jason B.; Gallo, Kirsten

    2008-01-01

    In a species conservation context, translocations can be an important tool, but they frequently fail to successfully establish new populations. We consider the case of reintroductions for bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus), a federally-listed threatened species with a widespread but declining distribution in western North America. Our specific objectives in this work were to: 1) develop a general framework for assessing the feasibility of reintroduction for bull trout, 2) provide a detailed example of implementing this framework to assess the feasibility of reintroducing bull trout in the Clackamas River, Oregon, and 3) discuss the implications of this effort in the more general context of fish reintroductions as a conservation tool. Review of several case histories and our assessment of the Clackamas River suggest that an attempt to reintroduce bull trout could be successful, assuming adequate resources are committed to the subsequent stages of implementation, monitoring, and evaluation.

  3. Genetic Inventory of Bull Trout and Westslope Cutthroat Trout in Pend Oreille Subbasin, 2003-2004 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, Jason; Maroney, Joseph R.; Andersen, Todd

    2004-11-01

    In 2003, the Kalispel Natural Resource Department (KNRD) collected tissue samples for genetic analysis from 209 bull trout and 1,276 westslope cutthroat. The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife developed and applied microsatellite DNA screening protocols for the analysis of bull trout at 13 loci and 24 loci for cutthroat trout. This project will continue collection and analysis of additional samples next year. At that time, a final annual report will be compiled for the three-year study that will describe the genetic characteristics for bull trout and westslope cutthroat trout. The extent of hybridization of bull trout (with brook trout) and westslope cutthroat trout (with Yellowstone cutthroat trout and rainbow trout) in the Priest Lake and Lower Pend Oreille subbasins will also be examined.

  4. Genetic Inventory of Bull Trout and Westslope Cutthroat Trout in the Pend Oreille Subbasin, 2002-2003 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Maroney, Joseph R.; Shaklee, James B.; Young, Sewall F.

    2003-10-01

    In 2002, the Kalispel Natural Resource Department (KNRD) collected tissue samples for genetic analysis from 280 bull trout and 940 westslope cutthroat. The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife developed and applied microsatellite DNA screening protocols for the analysis of bull trout at 13 loci and 24 loci for cutthroat trout. This project will continue collection and analysis of additional samples for the next 2 years. At that time, a final annual report will be compiled for the three-year study that will describe the genetic characteristics for bull trout and westslope cutthroat trout. The extent of hybridization of bull trout (with brook trout) and westslope cutthroat trout (with Yellowstone cutthroat trout and rainbow trout) in the Priest Lake and Lower Pend Oreille subbasins will also be examined.

  5. Carcass and meat quality characteristics of Brahman cross bulls and steers finished on tropical pastures in Costa Rica.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Julio; Unruh, John; Villarreal, Milton; Murillo, Olger; Rojas, Sailim; Camacho, Jorge; Jaeger, John; Reinhardt, Chris

    2014-03-01

    Forty-eight male calves (3/4 Brahman×1/4 Charolais) were used to determine carcass cutability and meat tenderness of Longissimus lumborum (LL), Gluteus medius (GM), Semitendinosus (ST) and Psoas major (PM) steaks from lighter weight carcasses of bulls and steers castrated at 3, 7, or 12 mo of age grown under tropical pasture conditions. Steaks from steers had lower (more tender) LL Warner-Bratzler shear force (WBSF) values than those from bulls. Steaks from steers castrated at 3 mo had lower GM WBSF than those from bulls. For PM steaks, those aged 28 d had lower WBSF than those aged 2d. Steaks aged 28 d had the lowest LL and GM WBSF and steaks aged 2d had the highest LL, GM, and ST WBSF. Castration at younger ages is recommended because it provides improvement in LL and GM tenderness over bulls with no differences in carcass traits or subprimal yields. PMID:24342184

  6. Bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) movement in relation to water temperature, season, and habitat features in Arrowrock Reservoir, Idaho, 2012

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Maret, Terry R.; Schultz, Justin E.

    2013-01-01

    Acoustic telemetry was used to determine spring to summer (April–August) movement and habitat use of bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) in Arrowrock Reservoir (hereafter “Arrowrock”), a highly regulated reservoir in the Boise River Basin of southwestern Idaho. Water management practices annually use about 86 percent of the reservoir water volume to satisfy downstream water demands. These practices might be limiting bull trout habitat and movement patterns. Bull trout are among the more thermally sensitive coldwater species in North America, and the species is listed as threatened throughout the contiguous United States under the Endangered Species Act. Biweekly water-temperature and dissolved-oxygen profiles were collected by the Bureau of Reclamation at three locations in Arrowrock to characterize habitat conditions for bull trout. Continuous streamflow and water temperature also were measured immediately upstream of the reservoir on the Middle and South Fork Boise Rivers, which influence habitat conditions in the riverine zones of the reservoir. In spring 2012, 18 bull trout ranging in total length from 306 to 630 millimeters were fitted with acoustic transmitters equipped with temperature and depth sensors. Mobile boat tracking and fixed receivers were used to detect released fish. Fish were tagged from March 28 to April 20 and were tracked through most of August. Most bull trout movements were detected in the Middle Fork Boise River arm of the reservoir. Fifteen individual fish were detected at least once after release. Water surface temperature at each fish detection location ranged from 6.0 to 16.2 degrees Celsius (°C) (mean=10.1°C), whereas bull trout body temperatures were colder, ranging from 4.4 to 11.6°C (mean=7.3°C). Bull trout were detected over deep-water habitat, ranging from 8.0 to 42.6 meters (m) (mean=18.1 m). Actual fish depths were shallower than total water depth, ranging from 0.0 to 24.5 m (mean=6.7 m). The last bull trout was

  7. Long-term Effects of Pyrethrin and Cyfluthrin, a Type II Synthetic Pyrethroid, Insecticide Applications on Bull Reproductive Parameters.

    PubMed

    Stewart, J L; Shipley, C F; Ireland, F A; Jarrell, V L; Timlin, C L; Shike, D W; Felix, T L

    2016-10-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine effects of cyfluthrin and pyrethrin spray products, used in combination with cyfluthrin topical and ear tag applications, on bull reproductive parameters over 18 weeks. Angus or Angus x Simmental bulls were randomly assigned to one of three treatment groups: (i) no exposure to pyrethrins/cyfluthrin (CONT; n = 10), (ii) cyfluthrin ear tag and topical applications (ET; n = 10), or (iii) cyfluthrin ear tag, topical, premise spray and pyrethrin fog spray applications (ET+S; n = 8). Bull body weight was measured every 3 week, and body condition score and scrotal circumference were recorded on weeks 0, 9 and 18. Semen and serum were collected every 3 weeks for sperm evaluation and testosterone measurement, respectively. There was a treatment × week interaction (p < 0.01) for sperm with primary defects; bulls in CONT group had a greater (p = 0.01) percentage of sperm with primary defects than bulls treated with insecticides at week 18. Overall and progressive sperm motility, normal sperm morphology, secondary sperm defects and serum testosterone concentrations changed (p < 0.01) over time in all bulls; however, treatment did not affect (p ≥ 0.13) any of these parameters. There were also no treatment effects (p ≥ 0.08) on bull body weight, body condition score or scrotal circumference. The use of pyrethrin- and cyfluthrin-based insecticides, regardless of application, did not negatively affect reproductive parameters in beef bulls when administered over 18 weeks. PMID:27411861

  8. Bull Trout life History, Genetics, Habitat Needs, and Limiting Factors in Central and Northeast Oregon, Annual Report 1995.

    SciTech Connect

    Hemmingsen, Alan R.; Buchanan, David V.; Howell, Philip J.

    1996-03-01

    To fulfill one objective of the present study, genetic characteristics of Oregon bull trout will be determined by analysis of mitochondrial and nuclear DNA. During 1995, the authors collected and sampled a total of 1,217 bull trout from 46 streams in the Columbia River Basin. DNA analysis of those samples will be conducted at University of Montana. They primarily sampled juvenile fish near natal areas to increase the likelihood of identifying discrete populations while minimizing risk of injury to large spawners. Fork lengths of all fish sampled ranged from 2.6 to 60.5 cm with a median of 12 cm. Eighty-four percent of all bull trout sampled were less than 19 cm while two percent were larger than 27 cm. Bull trout were collected by several methods, mostly by electrofishing. Eighty-six percent of all bull trout sampled were collected by electrofishing with a programmable waveform electrofisher. They observed injuries caused by electrofishing to 8% of that proportion. Based on preliminary analysis, no waveform combination used appeared less injurious than others. Highest voltages appeared less injurious than some that were lower. Frequency of electrofishing injury was significantly correlated to fork length over the range-from 4 to 26 cm. There were indications for substantial risk for such injury to bull trout larger than 26 cm. Other species found in association with bull trout included chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha, mountain whitefish Prosopium williamsoni, rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss, sculpins Cottus spp., cutthroat trout Oncorhynchus clarki, non-native brook trout Salvelinus fontinalis, and tailed frogs Ascaphus truei. Rainbow trout was the species most frequently associated with bull trout. No injury or mortality was observed for any of the associated species captured.

  9. Is That Dog a Pit Bull? A Cross-Country Comparison of Perceptions of Shelter Workers Regarding Breed Identification

    PubMed Central

    Hoffman, Christy L.; Harrison, Natalie; Wolff, London; Westgarth, Carri

    2014-01-01

    Bull breeds are commonly kept as companion animals, but the pit bull terrier is restricted by breed-specific legislation (BSL) in parts of the United States and throughout the United Kingdom. Shelter workers must decide which breed(s) a dog is. This decision may influence the dog's fate, particularly in places with BSL. In this study, shelter workers in the United States and United Kingdom were shown pictures of 20 dogs and were asked what breed each dog was, how they determined each dog's breed, whether each dog was a pit bull, and what they expected the fate of each dog to be. There was much variation in responses both between and within the United States and United Kingdom. UK participants frequently labeled dogs commonly considered by U.S. participants to be pit bulls as Staffordshire bull terriers. UK participants were more likely to say their shelters would euthanize dogs deemed to be pit bulls. Most participants noted using dogs' physical features to determine breed, and 41% affected by BSL indicated they would knowingly mislabel a dog of a restricted breed, presumably to increase the dog's adoption chances. PMID:24673506

  10. Danish Holsteins Favor Bull Offspring: Biased Milk Production as a Function of Fetal Sex, and Calving Difficulty

    PubMed Central

    Græsbøll, Kaare; Kirkeby, Carsten; Nielsen, Søren Saxmose; Christiansen, Lasse Engbo

    2015-01-01

    In a previous study from 2014 it was found that US Holstein cows that gave birth to heifer calves produced more milk than cows having bull calves. We wanted to assess whether this is also true for Danish cattle. Data from 578 Danish Holstein herds were analysed with a mixed effect model and contrary to the findings in the US, we found that cows produced higher volumes of milk if they had a bull calf compared to a heifer calf. We found a significantly higher milk production of 0.28% in the first lactation period for cows giving birth to a bull calf, compared to a heifer calf. This difference was even higher when cows gave birth to another bull calf, so having two bull calves resulted in a difference of 0.52% in milk production compared to any other combination of sex of the offspring. Furthermore, we found that farmer assisted calvings were associated with a higher milk yield. Cows with no farmer assistance or with veterinary assistance during the most recent calving produced less milk. There were also indications that dams would favor a bull fetus by decreasing milk production during the second pregnancy if the calf born in the first parity was a heifer. We hypothesize that size of calves is a confounding factor for milk production. However, calving weight was not available in the present data set to test this hypothesis. PMID:25874441

  11. Fragmentation of riverine systems: the genetic effects of dams on bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) in the Clark Fork River system.

    PubMed

    Neraas, L P; Spruell, P

    2001-05-01

    Migratory bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) historically spawned in tributaries of the Clark Fork River, Montana and inhabited Lake Pend Oreille as subadult and adult fish. However, in 1952 Cabinet Gorge Dam was constructed without fish passage facilities disrupting the connectivity of this system. Since the construction of this dam, bull trout populations in upstream tributaries have been in decline. Each year adult bull trout return to the base of Cabinet Gorge Dam when most migratory bull trout begin their spawning migration. However, the origin of these fish is uncertain. We used eight microsatellite loci to compare bull trout collected at the base of Cabinet Gorge Dam to fish sampled from both above and further downstream from the dam. Our data indicate that Cabinet Gorge bull trout are most likely individuals that hatched in above-dam tributaries, reared in Lake Pend Oreille, and could not return to their natal tributaries to spawn. This suggests that the risk of outbreeding depression associated with passing adults over dams in the Clark Fork system is minimal compared to the potential genetic and demographic benefits to populations located above the dams. PMID:11380874

  12. Who does Red Bull give wings to? Sensation seeking moderates sensitivity to subliminal advertisement.

    PubMed

    Bustin, Gaëlle M; Jones, Daniel N; Hansenne, Michel; Quoidbach, Jordi

    2015-01-01

    This study assessed whether subliminal priming of a brand name of a drink can affect people's choices for the primed brand, and whether this effect is moderated by personality traits. Participants with different levels of sensation seeking were presented subliminally with the words Red Bull or Lde Ublr. Results revealed that being exposed to Red Bull lead on average to small increases in participants' preferences for the primed brand. However, this effect was twice as strong for participants high in sensation seeking and did not occur for participants low in sensation seeking. Going beyond previous research showing that situational factors (e.g., thirst, fatigue…) can increase people's sensitivity to subliminal advertisement, our results suggest that some dispositional factors could have the same potentiating effect. These findings highlight the necessity of taking personality into account in non-conscious persuasion research. PMID:26150795

  13. Bovine Herpesvirus Type 1 in the Sperm of a Bull From a Herd With Fertility Problems

    PubMed Central

    Elazhary, M. A. S. Y.; Lamothe, P.; Silim, A.; Roy, R. S.

    1980-01-01

    A herd of 125 Holstein cows manifested fertility problems for two years. The number of services per pregnancy was 2.97, conception rate was 33% after the first service, and the average number of open days was 127. Abortions occurred in four cows over the last 12 months. The herd was not vaccinated against any disease. Natural service by a bull and artificial insemination were used for breeding the cows. Bovine herpesvirus type 1 was demonstrated in sperm heads from the bull by direct and indirect fluorescent antibody techniques, and the virus was isolated on cell cultures. The virus was also isolated from the uterine secretions of some cows and from two aborted fetuses. ImagesFigure 1. PMID:6266630

  14. Who does Red Bull give wings to? Sensation seeking moderates sensitivity to subliminal advertisement

    PubMed Central

    Bustin, Gaëlle M.; Jones, Daniel N.; Hansenne, Michel; Quoidbach, Jordi

    2015-01-01

    This study assessed whether subliminal priming of a brand name of a drink can affect people’s choices for the primed brand, and whether this effect is moderated by personality traits. Participants with different levels of sensation seeking were presented subliminally with the words Red Bull or Lde Ublr. Results revealed that being exposed to Red Bull lead on average to small increases in participants’ preferences for the primed brand. However, this effect was twice as strong for participants high in sensation seeking and did not occur for participants low in sensation seeking. Going beyond previous research showing that situational factors (e.g., thirst, fatigue…) can increase people’s sensitivity to subliminal advertisement, our results suggest that some dispositional factors could have the same potentiating effect. These findings highlight the necessity of taking personality into account in non-conscious persuasion research. PMID:26150795

  15. Associations between feed efficiency, sexual maturity and fertility-related measures in young beef bulls.

    PubMed

    Fontoura, A B P; Montanholi, Y R; Diel de Amorim, M; Foster, R A; Chenier, T; Miller, S P

    2016-01-01

    The beef industry has emphasized the improvement of feed utilization, as measured by modeling feed intake through performance traits to calculate residual feed intake (RFI). Evidence supports an inverse relationship between feed efficiency and reproductive function. The objective of this study was to determine the relationship of reproductive assessments and RFI unadjusted (RFI(Koch)) or adjusted for body composition (RFI(us)) and the relationship among fertility-related parameters. In total, 34 crossbred bulls were housed together for 112 days of performance evaluation, followed by assessment of scrotum IR imaging, scrotal circumference, testes ultrasonography and semen quality parameters at 377±33.4 days of age. Bulls were slaughtered at 389±34.0 days of age, and analyses of carcass composition, biometrics and histomorphometry of the testis and epididymis were conducted. Bulls were grouped into two subpopulations based on divergence of RFI, and within each RFI model either by including 50% of the population (Halves, high and low RFI, n=17) or 20.6% extremes of the population (Tails, high and low RFI, n=7). The means of productive performance and fertility-related measures were compared through these categories. Pearson's correlation was calculated among fertility-related measures. In the Halves subpopulation of the RFI(us), sperm of low-RFI bulls had decreased progressive motility (47.30% v. 59.90%) and higher abundance of tail abnormalities (4.30% v. 1.80%) than that of high-RFI bulls. In the Tails subpopulation of the RFI(Koch), low RFI displayed less variation in the scrotum surface temperature (0.62°C v. 1.16°C), decreased testis echogenicity (175.50 v 198.00 pixels) and larger (60.90 v. 56.80 mm(2)) but less-developed seminiferous tubules than high-RFI bulls. The evaluation of fertility-related parameters indicated that a higher percentage of immature seminiferous tubules was correlated with occurrence of sperm with distal droplets (r=0.59), a larger

  16. 77 FR 14965 - Special Local Regulations; Red Bull Candola, New River, Fort Lauderdale, FL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-14

    ...The Coast Guard is establishing special local regulations on the waters of the New River between the Esplanade Park and slightly east of the South Andrews Avenue Bascule Bridge in Fort Lauderdale, Florida for the Red Bull Candola rowing event. The event is scheduled to take place on April 14, 2012. The temporary special local regulation is necessary for the safety of the event participants,......

  17. 75 FR 63897 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Revised Designation of Critical Habitat for Bull...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-18

    ...We, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, are revising critical habitat for the bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) under the Endangered Species Act of 1973, as amended (Act). We are designating a total of 31,750.8 km (19,729.0 mi) of streams (which includes 1,213.2 km (754.0 mi) of marine shoreline) and are designating a total of 197,589.2 ha (488,251.7 ac) of reservoirs and lakes. The areas......

  18. Impact of nutritional programming on the growth, health, and sexual development of bull calves.

    PubMed

    Bollwein, H; Janett, F; Kaske, M

    2016-07-01

    The growth, health, and reproductive performance of bull calves are important prerequisites for a successful cattle breeding program. Therefore, several attempts have been made to improve these parameters via nutritional programming. Although an increase in energy uptake during the postweaning period (7-8 mo of age) of the calves leads to a faster growing rate, it has no positive effects on sexual development. In contrast, a high-nutrition diet during the prepubertal period (8-20 wk of age) reduced the age at puberty of the bulls and increased the size and/or weight of the testis and the epididymal sperm reserves. This faster sexual development is associated with an increased transient LH peak, which seems to be mediated by an increase in serum IGF-I concentrations. However, the exact mechanisms responsible for the interaction between nutrition and the subsequent development of the calves are not clear. The sexual development of bull calves depends not only on the nutrition of the calves after birth but also on the feed intake of their mothers during pregnancy. In contrast to the effects of the feed intake of the bull calves, a high-nutrition diet fed to the mother during the first trimester has negative effects on the reproductive performance of their offspring. In conclusion, it has been clearly demonstrated that growth, health, and reproductive performance can be improved by nutritional programming, but further studies are necessary to obtain a better understanding about the mechanisms responsible for this phenomenon. PMID:27345315

  19. Nutritional Evaluation of Young Bulls on Tropical Pasture Receiving Supplements with Different Protein:Carbohydrate Ratios

    PubMed Central

    Valente, E. E. L.; Paulino, M. F.; Barros, L. V.; Almeida, D. M.; Martins, L. S.; Cabral, C. H. A.

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this work was to evaluate the nutritional parameters of young bulls supplemented with different ratios of protein: carbohydrate on tropical pastures from 4 until 18 months old. Fifty-five non-castrated beef calves (138.3±3.4 kg, 90 to 150 d of age) were used. The calves (young bulls) were subjected to a 430-d experimental period encompassing 4 seasons. The treatments were as follows: control, only mineral mixture; HPHC, high protein and high carbohydrate supplement; HPLC, high protein and low carbohydrate supplement; LPHC, low protein and high carbohydrate supplement; and LPLC, low protein and low carbohydrate supplement. The amount of supplement was adjusted every 28 d. Dry matter (DM) intake was higher in the dry-to-rainy transition and rainy seasons for all nutritional plans. Non-supplemented animals had lower intakes of DM and total digestible nutrients (TDN) than supplemented young bulls in all seasons. Although differences in DM intake were not observed between supplemented animals, the supplements with high carbohydrate (HPHC and LPHC) had lower forage intake during suckling (rainy-to-dry transition season) and in the rainy season. However, the HPHC treatment animals had higher intake and digestibility of neutral detergent fiber. It can be concluded that supplementation with high protein levels (supplying 50% of the crude protein requirement) provide the best nutritional parameters for grazing young bulls in most seasons, increasing intake and digestibility of diet, and these effects are more intense when associated with high carbohydrate levels level (supplying 30% TDN requirement). PMID:25178297

  20. Leg lesions and cleanliness of finishing bulls kept in housing systems with different lying area surfaces.

    PubMed

    Schulze Westerath, H; Gygax, L; Mayer, C; Wechsler, B

    2007-07-01

    The influence of the quality of different lying surfaces on lesions and swellings at the joints as well as on the cleanliness of finishing bulls throughout the fattening period was studied. On 17 farms (623 bulls), pens with fully slatted concrete floors (CONCRETE), with rubber coated slats (RUBBER), with cubicles (CUBICLES, provided with five different types of soft lying mat) and with a littered lying area (STRAW) were compared. Bulls kept on STRAW developed the smallest lesion scores at the joints. In CUBICLES, there was a huge variability in the lesion scores depending on the type of lying mat, ranging from values comparable to STRAW up to and greater than the values for CONCRETE. The highest lesion scores at the carpal joints were found on CONCRETE, with intermediate values on RUBBER and in CUBICLES. At the tarsal joints, lesion scores were similar on CONCRETE and RUBBER and in the same range or worse on most mats in the CUBICLES. Swelling scores were highest on CONCRETE and intermediate on RUBBER and in CUBICLES compared to STRAW. In general, there was a steady increase in the lesion scores of the leg joints throughout the fattening period on CONCRETE, RUBBER and STRAW, whereas on some of the mats in CUBICLES these scores were at a high level from early on in the fattening period. Animals in all the housing systems were clean over the whole fattening period. Littering the lying area in CUBICLES affected neither the lesion scores nor the swelling scores at the joints nor animal cleanliness. In conclusion, both rubber coated slats and cubicles provided with soft lying mats were favourable with regard to the levels of lesions and swellings of the leg joints of finishing bulls compared to concrete slats. However, these levels were even lower in pens with a straw bedded lying area. PMID:16843018

  1. HSP90 expression correlation with the freezing resistance of bull sperm.

    PubMed

    Wang, Peng; Wang, Yan-Feng; Wang, Hong; Wang, Chun-Wei; Zan, Lin-Sen; Hu, Jian-Hong; Li, Qing-Wang; Jia, Yong-Hong; Ma, Guo-Ji

    2014-05-01

    To date, there has been little improvement in cryopreservation of bull sperm due to lack of understanding of the freezing mechanisms. Therefore, this study set out to investigate expression levels of fertility-associated proteins in bull sperm, and in particular the relationship between the 90 kDa heat-shock protein (HSP90) and the sperm characteristics after freezing-thawing. Semen was collected from eight Holstein bulls by artificial vagina. Characteristics of these fresh semen, including sperm motility, morphology, viability and concentration, were evaluated. Sperm quality was also assessed after freezing-thawing. Eight ejaculates were divided into two groups based on freezing resistance and sperm motility. Sperm proteins were extracted and sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) analysis and western blotting were performed. SDS-PAGE results showed that there was substantial diversity in 90 kDa proteins in the frozen-thawed sperm and HSP90 was confirmed as one of the 90 kDa proteins by western blot. This study indicated that HSP90 expression correlated positively with sperm quality. The amount of expressed 90 kDa proteins in the high freezing resistance (HFR) group was significantly higher than that in the low freezing resistance (LFR) group (P < 0.05). Thus, higher expression of HSP90 could probably lead to the higher motility and freezing resistance of sperm found after freezing-thawing. Therefore, we concluded that level of HSP90 expression could be used to predict reliably and simply the freezing resistance of bull sperm. PMID:23506739

  2. Association of heat shock protein 90 with motility of post-thawed sperm in bulls.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao-Gang; Hu, Shan; Han, Cong; Zhu, Qing-Chao; Yan, Guan-Jie; Hu, Jian-Hong

    2015-04-01

    The correlation between the 90 kDa heat-shock protein (HSP90) and sperm quality following the process of freezing-thawing in bulls has not been studied clearly. Therefore, the objective of the present was to clarify the relationship between HSP90 level and semen parameters during the process of cryopreservation in bulls. Semen samples from 5 Holstein bulls were obtained by artificial vagina. Characteristics of these semen at three stages (fresh, after equilibration and frozen-thawed), including motility, plasma membrane integrity and acrosome integrity were evaluated. The mRNA expression level of HSP90 at the three stages was evaluated by using quantitative Real-Time PCR. Meanwhile, the protein level of HSP90 expression at the three stages was detected according to Western blot. The results showed that sperm parameters evaluated in fresh semen was the highest in the three groups. Sperm parameters in semen after equilibration were lower than those in fresh semen (P>0.05) and higher than those in post-thawed semen (P<0.05). Sperm parameters in frozen-thawed semen were the lowest among the three groups (P<0.05). This study indicated that HSP90 expression is proportional to sperm quality. HSP90 expression level in fresh semen was significantly higher than that in frozen-thawed semen (P<0.05). Although no significant differences in HSP90 expression were observed between fresh semen and semen after equilibration (P>0.05). Results in this study suggest that HSP90 level in bull spermatozoa was gradually declined following the process of freezing-thawing, and might be associated with sperm motility, plasma membrane integrity and acrosome integrity. PMID:25578982

  3. Effects of red bull energy drink on repeated sprint performance in women athletes.

    PubMed

    Astorino, Todd A; Matera, Angela J; Basinger, Jency; Evans, Mindy; Schurman, Taylor; Marquez, Rodney

    2012-05-01

    Energy drinks are frequently consumed by athletes prior to competition to improve performance. This study examined the effect of Red Bull™ on repeated sprint performance in women athletes. Fifteen collegiate soccer players participated, with mean age, height, and body mass equal to 19.5±1.1 year, 168.4±5.8 cm, and 63.4±6.1 kg, respectively. After performing a familiarization trial, subjects performed three sets of eight bouts of the modified t test after ingestion of 255 mL of placebo or Red Bull 1 h pre-exercise in a randomized, placebo-controlled crossover design. Throughout testing, sprint time, heart rate (HR), and rating of perceived exertion (RPE) were continuously obtained. Repeated measures analysis of variance was used to examine differences in variables between drink conditions. Across athletes, t test time ranged from 10.4 to 12.7 s. Mean sprint time was similar (p>0.05) between Red Bull (11.31±0.61 s) and placebo (11.35±0.61 s). HR and RPE increased (p<0.05) during the bouts, but there was no effect (p>0.05) of Red Bull on either variable versus placebo. Findings indicate that 255 mL of Red Bull containing 1.3 mg/kg of caffeine and 1 g of taurine does not alter repeated sprint performance, RPE, or HR in women athletes versus placebo. One serving of this energy drink provides no ergogenic benefit for women athletes engaging in sprint-based exercise. PMID:21461905

  4. Kootenai River Fisheries Investigations; Rainbow and Bull Trout Recruitment, 1999 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Walters, Jody P.; Downs, Christopher C.

    2001-08-01

    Our 1999 objectives were to determine sources of rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss and bull trout Salvelinus confluentus spawning and recruitment in the Idaho reach of the Kootenai River. We used a rotary-screw trap to capture juvenile trout to determine age at out-migration and to estimate total out-migration from the Boundary Creek drainage to the Kootenai River. The out-migrant estimate for March through August 1999 was 1,574 (95% C. I. = 825-3,283) juvenile rainbow trout. Most juveniles out-migrated at age-2 and age-3. No out-migrating bull trout were caught. Five of 17 rainbow trout radio-tagged in Idaho migrated upstream into Montana waters during the spawning season. Five bull trout originally radio-tagged in O'Brien Creek, Montana in early October moved downstream into Idaho and British Columbia by mid-October. Annual angler exploitation for the rainbow trout population upstream of Bonners Ferry, Idaho was estimated to be 58%. Multi-pass depletion estimates for index reaches of Caboose, Curley, and Debt creeks showed 0.20, 0.01, and 0.13 rainbow trout juveniles/m{sup 2}, respectively. We estimated rainbow trout (180-415 mm TL) standing stock of 1.6 kg/ha for the Hemlock Bar reach (29.4 ha) of the Kootenai River, similar to the 1998 estimate. Recruitment of juvenile rainbow and bull trout from Idaho tributaries is not sufficient to be the sole source of subsequent older fish in the mainstem Kootenai River. These populations are at least partly dependent on recruitment from Montana waters. The low recruitment and high exploitation rate may be indicators of a rainbow trout population in danger of further decline.

  5. Effect of a β-agonist on meat quality and myofibrillar protein fragmentation in bulls.

    PubMed

    Fiems, L O; Buts, B; Boucqué, C V; Demeyer, D I; Cottyn, B G

    1990-01-01

    Three experiments were conducted to study the effect of cimaterol on meat quality and myofibrillar protein fragmentation of the Longissimus dorsi muscle. In two experiments (Experiments 1 and 2), conducted with 16 double-muscled Belgian white-blue bulls and 15 Charolais bulls, respectively, half of the animals received 60 μg cimaterol daily per kg liveweight in the diet, during 135 and 93 days, respectively. In a third experiment, 46 normal Belgian white-blue bulls received no or 4 ppm cimaterol in the diet for 246, 127 or 71 days on average. A withdrawal period of 6 days was always applied for cimaterol-treated animals. Ultimate pH, colour and waterholding capacity were not significantly affected. The effect of cimaterol on moisture content was variable, while protein content was increased and fat was reduced. Warner-Bratzler shear force values were increased by cimaterol P < 0·05 in Experiments 2 and 3 and P = 0·07 in Experiment 1). The lower tenderness cannot be explained by differences in sarcomere length or hydroxyproline content. Myofibrillar protein fragmentation was lower when cimaterol was fed, suggesting that cimaterol may reduce myofibrillar protein degradation via a lower activity of the proteolytic enzymes. Length of cimaterol administration only exerted minor effects on meat quality. PMID:22055115

  6. Prediction of breeding values for tenderness of market animals from measurements on bulls.

    PubMed

    Barkhouse, K L; Van Vleck, L D; Cundiff, L V; Koohmaraie, M; Lunstra, D D; Crouse, J D

    1996-11-01

    Data were tenderness measures on steaks from 237 bulls (Group II) slaughtered after producing freezable semen and on 1,431 related steers and heifers (market animals, Group I) from Angus, Hereford, Pinzgauer, Brahman, and Sahiwal crosses from the Germ Plasm Evaluation project at the U.S. Meat Animal Research Center. Tenderness was assessed through Warner-Bratzler Shear Force (SF), taste panel tenderness (TPT), marbling score (MS), and myofibrillar fragmentation index (MFI). For all traits, as fraction Bos indicus inheritance increased, implied tenderness decreased. Heritability estimates were generally not significantly different from zero. Genetic correlations generally indicated favorable associations among the traits. The range in predicted breeding values of bulls for market animal tenderness was small and from -.34 to .32 kg for market animal shear force. Because of low estimates of heritability for SF or TPT, results from this experiment indicate that selection based on tenderness of steaks sampled from intact or late castrate males slaughtered following collection of freezable quality semen would not be very effective in improving average tenderness of steaks from steers of heifer progeny. If a mean of heritability estimates reported in the literature of .27 for shear value was assumed for market steer and heifer progeny instead of .02 as found in the present study, then selection based on estimates of shear force in young bulls would be relatively more effective in improving shear force of market progeny. PMID:8923175

  7. Landscape influences on genetic differentiation among bull trout populations in a stream-lake network

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meeuwig, M.H.; Guy, C.S.; Kalinowski, S.T.; Fredenberg, W.A.

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the influence of landscape heterogeneity on genetic differentiation between migratory bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) populations in Glacier National Park, Montana. An information-theoretic approach was used to compare different conceptual models of dispersal associated with barriers, different models of isolation by distance, and the combined effects of barriers, waterway distance, patch size, and intra- and inter-drainage distribution of populations on genetic differentiation between bull trout populations. The effect of distance between populations on genetic differentiation was best explained by partitioning the effects of mainstem and tributary stream sections. Models that categorized barriers as having a one-way effect (i.e. allowed downstream dispersal) or a two-way effect were best supported. Additionally, patch size and the distribution of populations among drainages influenced genetic differentiation. Genetic differentiation between bull trout populations in Glacier National Park is linked to landscape features that restrict dispersal. However, this analysis illustrates that modelling variability within landscape features, such as dispersal corridors, will benefit landscape genetic analyses. Additionally, the framework used for evaluating the effects of barriers must consider not just barrier presence, but also potential asymmetries in barrier effects with respect to the organism under investigation.

  8. Production and quality of beef from young bulls fed diets supplemented with peanut cake.

    PubMed

    Correia, B R; Carvalho, G G P; Oliveira, R L; Pires, A J V; Ribeiro, O L; Silva, R R; Leão, A G; Simionato, J I; Carvalho, B M A

    2016-08-01

    Peanut cake is a biodiesel byproduct that has been tested as an alternative feed additive for use in cattle production. This study aimed to assess the importance of dietary peanut cake inclusion for young bull growth rate, beef production, and beef quality. In total, 32 Nellore young bulls individually housed in stalls with a mean initial body weight of 390±43.5kg were distributed in a completely randomized design for the experiment. The animals were fed Tifton 85 hay and one of four concentrate mixtures with 0, 33, 66 or 100% peanut cake instead of soybean meal. There was a linear reduction (P<0.05) in the slaughter weight and hot carcass weight and a quadratic effect (P<0.05) on the beef texture. No alterations occurred in the physicochemical characteristics of the longissimus thoracis; however, changes were observed (P<0.05) in the longissimus thoracis fatty acid profile. The replacement of soybean meal with peanut cake at levels up to 100% in the diet of feedlot-finished young bulls promotes a beneficial increase in the levels of PUFAs and the following nutraceutical compounds: conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) and Ω3 and Ω6 fatty acids. PMID:27050756

  9. Landscape influences on genetic differentiation among bull trout populations in a stream-lake network.

    PubMed

    Meeuwig, Michael H; Guy, Christopher S; Kalinowski, Steven T; Fredenberg, Wade A

    2010-09-01

    This study examined the influence of landscape heterogeneity on genetic differentiation between migratory bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) populations in Glacier National Park, Montana. An information-theoretic approach was used to compare different conceptual models of dispersal associated with barriers, different models of isolation by distance, and the combined effects of barriers, waterway distance, patch size, and intra- and inter-drainage distribution of populations on genetic differentiation between bull trout populations. The effect of distance between populations on genetic differentiation was best explained by partitioning the effects of mainstem and tributary stream sections. Models that categorized barriers as having a one-way effect (i.e. allowed downstream dispersal) or a two-way effect were best supported. Additionally, patch size and the distribution of populations among drainages influenced genetic differentiation. Genetic differentiation between bull trout populations in Glacier National Park is linked to landscape features that restrict dispersal. However, this analysis illustrates that modelling variability within landscape features, such as dispersal corridors, will benefit landscape genetic analyses. Additionally, the framework used for evaluating the effects of barriers must consider not just barrier presence, but also potential asymmetries in barrier effects with respect to the organism under investigation. PMID:20723065

  10. Data transformation for rank reduction in multi-trait MACE model for international bull comparison

    PubMed Central

    Tarres, Joaquim; Liu, Zengting; Ducrocq, Vincent; Reinhardt, Friedrich; Reents, Reinhard

    2008-01-01

    Since many countries use multiple lactation random regression test day models in national evaluations for milk production traits, a random regression multiple across-country evaluation (MACE) model permitting a variable number of correlated traits per country should be used in international dairy evaluations. In order to reduce the number of within country traits for international comparison, three different MACE models were implemented based on German daughter yield deviation data and compared to the random regression MACE. The multiple lactation MACE model analysed daughter yield deviations on a lactation basis reducing the rank from nine random regression coefficients to three lactations. The lactation breeding values were very accurate for old bulls, but not for the youngest bulls with daughters with short lactations. The other two models applied principal component analysis as the dimension reduction technique: one based on eigenvalues of a genetic correlation matrix and the other on eigenvalues of a combined lactation matrix. The first one showed that German data can be transformed from nine traits to five eigenfunctions without losing much accuracy in any of the estimated random regression coefficients. The second one allowed performing rank reductions to three eigenfunctions without having the problem of young bulls with daughters with short lactations. PMID:18400151

  11. Data transformation for rank reduction in multi-trait MACE model for international bull comparison.

    PubMed

    Tarres, Joaquim; Liu, Zengting; Ducrocq, Vincent; Reinhardt, Friedrich; Reents, Reinhard

    2008-01-01

    Since many countries use multiple lactation random regression test day models in national evaluations for milk production traits, a random regression multiple across-country evaluation (MACE) model permitting a variable number of correlated traits per country should be used in international dairy evaluations. In order to reduce the number of within country traits for international comparison, three different MACE models were implemented based on German daughter yield deviation data and compared to the random regression MACE. The multiple lactation MACE model analysed daughter yield deviations on a lactation basis reducing the rank from nine random regression coefficients to three lactations. The lactation breeding values were very accurate for old bulls, but not for the youngest bulls with daughters with short lactations. The other two models applied principal component analysis as the dimension reduction technique: one based on eigenvalues of a genetic correlation matrix and the other on eigenvalues of a combined lactation matrix. The first one showed that German data can be transformed from nine traits to five eigenfunctions without losing much accuracy in any of the estimated random regression coefficients. The second one allowed performing rank reductions to three eigenfunctions without having the problem of young bulls with daughters with short lactations. PMID:18400151

  12. Quality of bull spermatozoa after preparation by single-layer centrifugation.

    PubMed

    Goodla, Lavanya; Morrell, Jane M; Yusnizar, Yulnawati; Stålhammar, Hans; Johannisson, Anders

    2014-01-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate the effect of single-layer centrifugation (SLC) through a species-specific colloid (Androcoll-B; patent pending, J. M. Morrell) on bull sperm quality. Computer-assisted sperm analysis of motility and flow cytometric analysis of sperm viability (SYBR-14/propidium iodide staining), chromatin integrity (acridine orange staining), reactive oxygen species production [Hoechst 33258-hydroethidine-2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate (HO-HE-DCFDA) staining], mitochondrial membrane potential (staining with JC-1 probe), and protein tyrosine phosphorylation (specific antibody staining) were performed on unselected and SLC-selected sperm samples. Single-layer centrifugation of bull spermatozoa resulted in the selection of a sperm population that had high mitochondrial membrane potential, a higher content of phosphorylated protein, and more reactive oxygen species than control samples. Sperm chromatin damage was lower in the SLC samples although sperm viability and motility did not differ between SLC samples and controls. These observations suggest that SLC of bull semen in a soybean-containing extender improved some, but not all, parameters of sperm quality. PMID:24534497

  13. Mount St. Helens ash fall in the Bull Run watershed, Oregon, May-June 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Shulters, M.V.; Clifton, D.G.

    1980-07-01

    On May 25-26, May 30-June 2, and June 12-13, 1980, strong, high-altitude winds from the north occurred during periods of volcanic-ash eruption at Mount St. Helens in southwestern Washington. As a result, ash fell in the Bull Run watershed, Oregon, some 50 miles to the south, the principal water-supply source for the Portland area. Samples from precipitation collectors and from stream sites in the Bull Run watershed were collected on several dates during May and June 1980. Analyses were made and are tabulated for pH, conductivity, acidity, sulfate, and nitrate plus nitrite. Field pH values of the precipitation ranged from 4.0 to 5.6 pH units and the stream samples from 6.7 to 7.5 units. Particle-size analyses for ash samples collected in the Bull Run watershed and Portland, Oregon, are also shown. Volcanic events, precipitation and high-altitude speeds for northerly winds are given for May 18-June 15, 1980. 6 references, 5 figures, 3 tables.

  14. Ultrastructural study of a tetratrichomonad species isolated from prepucial smegma of virgin bulls.

    PubMed

    Cobo, Eduardo Rubén; Campero, Carlos Manuel; Mariante, Rafael Meyer; Benchimol, Marlene

    2003-11-14

    We present observations on an unusual tetratrichomonad species isolated from preputial smegma of virgin bulls. Ultrastructural studies were performed using scanning and electron microscopy techniques. This protozoan presents four anterior flagella of unequal length and a recurrent one forming the undulating membrane. It shows one anterior nucleus, a Golgi complex, an axostyle, and a costa. The hydrogenosomes are rather elongated, seen in groups, and presenting different electron densities. Vacuoles of different sizes containing bacteria and material in process of digestion were frequently found. PCR was also used in order to compare the species herein described with other trichomonad species. The amplification products were seen only with primers TFR1 and TFR2 (specific to trichomonads), but not with TFR3 and TFR4 (specific to Tritrichomonas foetus), suggesting that although collected from the genital tract of the bull, this protist was not T. foetus. We propose that the appearance of these tetratrichomonads were probably due to the sodomy practiced among bulls. Concomitant contamination of preputial cavity with feces could explain the presence of the opportunistic organism. The observations presented here show the importance of the correct diagnostic when investigating samples obtained from the urogenital tract of cattle. We also suggest that this flagellate belongs to the species Tetratrichomonas buttreyi. PMID:14630428

  15. Analysis of the Liver Soluble Proteome from Bull Terriers Affected with Inherited Lethal Acrodermatitis

    PubMed Central

    Mouat, Michael F.; Mauldin, Elizabeth A.; Casal, Margret L.

    2012-01-01

    Lethal acrodermatitis (LAD) is a genetic disease affecting bull terrier dogs. The phenotype is similar to that for acrodermatitis enteropathica in humans, but is currently without treatment. The purpose of the research presented here is to determine the biochemical defects associated with LAD using proteomic methodologies. Two affected (male and female) and one unaffected (male) bull terrier pups were euthanized at 14 weeks of age, their livers dissected and prepared for two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2DE) and densitometry. Approximately 200 protein spots were observed. The density of the spots within each gel was normalized to the total spot volume of the gel; only those soluble liver protein spots that were consistently different in both of the livers of the affected pups compared to the unaffected pup were excised manually and submitted for MALDI mass spectrometry. Thirteen proteins were identified as differentially expressed in the affected, compared to the unaffected, pups. The proteins were involved in numerous cellular physiological functions, including chaperones, calcium binding, and energy metabolism, as well as being associated with the inflammatory response. Of note were haptoglobin, glutamine synthetase, prohibitin and keratin 10 which exhibited at least a 4-fold level of differential expression. These data represent the first proteomic analysis of this mutation. The differentially expressed proteins that were identified may be key in understanding the etiology of LAD, and may lead to diagnostic tools for its identification within the bull terrier population. PMID:17693109

  16. Upstream movement of residual hatchery steelhead into areas containing bull trout and cutthroat trout.

    SciTech Connect

    McMichael, Geoffrey A. ); Pearsons, Todd N.

    2000-11-01

    Hatchery-reared steelhead Oncorhynchus mykiss that do not emigrate as smolts shortly after release may negatively impact wild fish communities through ecological interactions. We used systematic, stratified snorkeling surveys to document the relative abundance of wild rainbow trout O. mykiss, bull trout Salvelinus confluentus, and westslope cutthroat trout O. clarki lewisi as well as the upstream limit of residual hatchery steelhead (hatchery-reared steelhead that had failed to emigrate before June 1). Our objective was to determine whether residual hatchery steelhead had migrated upstream from their release point into an area containing a threatened population of bull trout and cutthroat trout. Hatchery steelhead made up a larger portion of the salmonid community in the sites near their release location (mean= 52.5%, range= 29-79%), and constituted a lower proportion (mean= 4.8%, range= 0-14%) of the salmonid community as distance upstream of the release location increased. However, residual hatchery steelhead had migrated over 12 km upstream into an area containing a threatened stock of bull trout and westslope cutthroat trout O. clarki lewisi.

  17. Effects of radioactive caesium on bull testes after the Fukushima nuclear plant accident

    PubMed Central

    Yamashiro, Hideaki; Abe, Yasuyuki; Fukuda, Tomokazu; Kino, Yasushi; Kawaguchi, Isao; Kuwahara, Yoshikazu; Fukumoto, Motoi; Takahashi, Shintaro; Suzuki, Masatoshi; Kobayashi, Jin; Uematsu, Emi; Tong, Bin; Yamada, Takahisa; Yoshida, Satoshi; Sato, Eimei; Shinoda, Hisashi; Sekine, Tsutomu; Isogai, Emiko; Fukumoto, Manabu

    2013-01-01

    We aimed to investigate the effect of chronic radiation exposure associated with the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Plant accident on the testis from 2 bulls. Estimated dose of internal exposure in one bull was 0.7–1.2 mGy (134Cs) and 0.4–0.6 mGy (137Cs) and external exposure was 2.0 mGy (134Cs) and 0.8 mGy (137Cs) (196 days). Internal dose in the other was 3.2–6.1 mGy (134Cs) and 1.8–3.4 mGy (137Cs) and external dose was 1.3 mGy (134Cs) and 0.6 mGy (137Cs) (315 days). Sperm morphology and spermatogenesis were within normal ranges. 134, 137Cs radioactivity was detected but Cs was not detectable in the testis by electron probe microanalysis. Thus, adverse radiation-induced effects were not observed in bull testes following chronic exposure to the above levels of radiation for up to 10 months. Since we could analyse a limited number of testes, further investigation on the effects of ionizing radiation on spermatogenesis should be extended to more animals. PMID:24100305

  18. Rapid Communication: Cholesterol deficiency-associated APOB mutation impacts lipid metabolism in Holstein calves and breeding bulls.

    PubMed

    Gross, J J; Schwinn, A-C; Schmitz-Hsu, F; Menzi, F; Drögemüller, C; Albrecht, C; Bruckmaier, R M

    2016-04-01

    During the last months, the number of reports on Holstein calves suffering from incurable idiopathic diarrhea dramatically increased. Affected calves showed severe hypocholesterolemia and mostly died within days up to a few months after birth. This new autosomal monogenic recessive inherited fat metabolism disorder, termed cholesterol deficiency (CD), is caused by a loss of function mutation of the bovine gene. The objective of the present study was to investigate specific components of lipid metabolism in 6 homozygous for the mutation (CDS) and 6 normal Holstein calves with different genotypes. Independent of sex, CDS had significantly lower plasma concentrations of total cholesterol (TC), free cholesterol (FC), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), very-low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (VLDL-C), triacylglycerides (TAG), and phospholipids (PL) compared with homozygous wild-type calves ( < 0.05). Furthermore, we studied the effect of the genotype on cholesterol metabolism in adult Holstein breeding bulls of Swissgenetics. Among a total of 254 adult males, the homozygous mutant genotype was absent, 36 bulls were heterozygous carriers (CDC), and 218 bulls were homozygous wild-type (CDF). In CDC bulls, plasma concentrations of TC, FC, HDL-C, LDL-C, VLDL-C, TAG, and PL were lower compared with CDF bulls ( < 0.05). The ratios of FC:cholesteryl esters (CE) and FC:TC were higher in CDC bulls compared with CDF bulls, whereas the ratio of CE:TC was lower in CDC bulls compared with CDF bulls ( < 0.01). In conclusion, the CD-associated mutation was shown to affect lipid metabolism in affected Holstein calves and adult breeding bulls. Besides cholesterol, the concentrations of PL, TAG, and lipoproteins also were distinctly reduced in homozygous and heterozygous carriers of the mutation. Beyond malabsorption of dietary lipids, deleterious effects of apolipoprotein B deficiency on hepatic lipid metabolism, steroid

  19. Investigation of an outbreak of infectious pustular balanoposthitis in cattle breeding bulls at a frozen semen bank.

    PubMed

    Pandey, A B; Nandi, S; Tiwari, A K; Audarya, S D; Sharma, K; Pradhan, S K; Chauhan, R S

    2014-12-01

    Infectious pustular balanoposthitis (IPB) is one of the reproductive disorders caused by bovine herpesvirus 1 (BoHV1) that can be transmitted through artificial insemination. A herd of 63 breeding bulls at a frozen semen bank in Odisha state in India experienced a suspected outbreak of IPB, with 11 bulls showing clinical signs of the infection. Clinical signs were noticed in two bulls initially and a few days after in the other nine animals. Serum samples from 53 bulls were examined for anti-BoHV1 antibodies using a virus neutralisation test (VNT) and a competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (cELISA); the remaining ten bulls were not included in the study because it was difficult to restrain them at that time. Paired serum samples were collected 21 days apart from ten clinically affected bulls (the eleventh clinically affected bull was not included in the study for the reason stated above). In the neutralisation test, the paired serum samples showed a two- to fourfold increase in anti-BoHV1 antibody titre; in the cELISA, the paired samples were also found positive for anti-BoHV1 antibodies. Serum samples from 43 in-contact bulls were collected about day 22 after the first observation of clinical infection in the herd. Among these serum samples, a total of 30 were found positive for anti-BoHV1 antibodies in the VNT and a total of 30 were found positive in cELISA. Ten samples were positive in one test but not the other and 25 tested positive in both tests. In all, 35 serum samples from in-contact bulls tested positive in either one or both of the two types of test. An overall agreement of 76.74% was found in detection of anti-BoHV1 antibodies in the two tests. Sensitivity was higher than specificity in detection of anti-BoHV1 antibodies in the serum samples. The glycoprotein C region of the genomic DNA of BoHV1 was amplified from semen samples by polymerase chain reaction. The findings from the outbreak indicate that continuous monitoring of breeding bulls at

  20. Commentary: Expanding Notions of Acceptable Research Evidence in Educational Technology--A Response to Schrum et al.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dawson, Kara; Ferdig, Richard E.

    2006-01-01

    "Developing Acceptable Evidence in Educational Technology Research" (Schrum et al., 2005) and its precursor editorial, "A Proactive Approach to a Research Agenda for Educational Technology" (Bull, Knezek, Roblyer, Schrum, & Thompson, 2005), are unprecedented collaborative efforts by journal editors to influence research in…

  1. Prevalence of bovine genital campylobacteriosis and trichomonosis of bulls in northern Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background A survey was conducted to determine the prevalence of campylobacteriosis and trichomonosis, and their concurrence with brucellosis, in cattle in three states of northern Nigeria. Methods A total of 602 preputial samples was collected from bulls in 250 herds and tested using culture and identification. Various indigenous and exotic breeds were studied and four major management systems were encountered. Age of the cattle was estimated using dentition, farm records or cornual rings. Results The estimated true animal-level prevalence of Campylobacter fetus infection was 16.4% (95% CI: 13.0-20.7), of which 18.5% was C. f. fetus and 81.5% was C. f. venerealis. Of the latter, 92% were C. f. venerealis biovar intermedius strains. Animal-level prevalences in Adamawa, Kano and Kaduna states were 31.8%, 11.6% and 8.3% respectively, and were highest in bulls >7 years old (33.4%) and in the Gudali breed (28.8%). Of the 250 herds, 78 (25.5%, 95% CI: 19.4-32.7) had at least one infected bull, and herd prevalence was highest in the pastoral management system (43.5%). After adjustment for confounding using multivariable analysis, the odds of C. fetus infection were highest in Adamawa state (P < 0.01), in the pastoral management system (P < 0.01), and in bulls >7 years old (P = 0.01), and tended to be higher in Bos taurus breeds (P = 0.06). There was a strong positive association between the presence of campylobacteriosis and brucellosis (P < 0.01), both within bulls (OR = 8.3) and within herds (OR = 16.0). Trichomonosis was not detected in any herds. Conclusion Bovine genital campylobacteriosis is prevalent particularly in the pastoral management system in northern Nigeria, with C. f. venerealis biovar intermedius as the major aetiology. There was a strong positive correlation between the occurrence of campylobacteriosis and brucellosis. No evidence of trichomonosis was found in herds in this study. PMID:23927676

  2. Accuracy of direct genomic values in Holstein bulls and cows using subsets of SNP markers

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background At the current price, the use of high-density single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) genotyping assays in genomic selection of dairy cattle is limited to applications involving elite sires and dams. The objective of this study was to evaluate the use of low-density assays to predict direct genomic value (DGV) on five milk production traits, an overall conformation trait, a survival index, and two profit index traits (APR, ASI). Methods Dense SNP genotypes were available for 42,576 SNP for 2,114 Holstein bulls and 510 cows. A subset of 1,847 bulls born between 1955 and 2004 was used as a training set to fit models with various sets of pre-selected SNP. A group of 297 bulls born between 2001 and 2004 and all cows born between 1992 and 2004 were used to evaluate the accuracy of DGV prediction. Ridge regression (RR) and partial least squares regression (PLSR) were used to derive prediction equations and to rank SNP based on the absolute value of the regression coefficients. Four alternative strategies were applied to select subset of SNP, namely: subsets of the highest ranked SNP for each individual trait, or a single subset of evenly spaced SNP, where SNP were selected based on their rank for ASI, APR or minor allele frequency within intervals of approximately equal length. Results RR and PLSR performed very similarly to predict DGV, with PLSR performing better for low-density assays and RR for higher-density SNP sets. When using all SNP, DGV predictions for production traits, which have a higher heritability, were more accurate (0.52-0.64) than for survival (0.19-0.20), which has a low heritability. The gain in accuracy using subsets that included the highest ranked SNP for each trait was marginal (5-6%) over a common set of evenly spaced SNP when at least 3,000 SNP were used. Subsets containing 3,000 SNP provided more than 90% of the accuracy that could be achieved with a high-density assay for cows, and 80% of the high-density assay for young bulls

  3. Assessing the impact of natural service bulls and genotype by environment interactions on genetic gain and inbreeding in organic dairy cattle genomic breeding programs.

    PubMed

    Yin, T; Wensch-Dorendorf, M; Simianer, H; Swalve, H H; König, S

    2014-06-01

    The objective of the present study was to compare genetic gain and inbreeding coefficients of dairy cattle in organic breeding program designs by applying stochastic simulations. Evaluated breeding strategies were: (i) selecting bulls from conventional breeding programs, and taking into account genotype by environment (G×E) interactions, (ii) selecting genotyped bulls within the organic environment for artificial insemination (AI) programs and (iii) selecting genotyped natural service bulls within organic herds. The simulated conventional population comprised 148 800 cows from 2976 herds with an average herd size of 50 cows per herd, and 1200 cows were assigned to 60 organic herds. In a young bull program, selection criteria of young bulls in both production systems (conventional and organic) were either 'conventional' estimated breeding values (EBV) or genomic estimated breeding values (GEBV) for two traits with low (h 2=0.05) and moderate heritability (h 2=0.30). GEBV were calculated for different accuracies (r mg), and G×E interactions were considered by modifying originally simulated true breeding values in the range from r g=0.5 to 1.0. For both traits (h 2=0.05 and 0.30) and r mg⩾0.8, genomic selection of bulls directly in the organic population and using selected bulls via AI revealed higher genetic gain than selecting young bulls in the larger conventional population based on EBV; also without the existence of G×E interactions. Only for pronounced G×E interactions (r g=0.5), and for highly accurate GEBV for natural service bulls (r mg>0.9), results suggests the use of genotyped organic natural service bulls instead of implementing an AI program. Inbreeding coefficients of selected bulls and their offspring were generally lower when basing selection decisions for young bulls on GEBV compared with selection strategies based on pedigree indices. PMID:24703184

  4. Morphometric evaluation of seminiferous tubule and proportionate numerical analysis of Sertoli and spermatogenic cells indicate differences between crossbred and purebred bulls

    PubMed Central

    Tripathi, Utkarsh K.; Chhillar, Shivani; Kumaresan, A.; Aslam, M. K. Muhammad; Rajak, S. K.; Nayak, Samiksha; Manimaran, A.; Mohanty, T. K.; Yadav, Savita

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The present study compared the testicular cytology and histology between crossbred (Holstein–Friesian [HF] × Tharparkar) and purebred (HF and Tharparkar) bulls to find out differences if any. Materials and Methods: Four peripubertal bulls from each breed were utilized for the study. Through percutaneous needle aspiration biopsy, Sertoli and spermatogenic cells were extracted, and morphometry was studied. For histological studies, testicular tissues obtained through unilateral castration were utilized. Sertoli cells specific GATA4 antibody was used to study the population of Sertoli cells in the seminiferous tubule through immunofluorescence. Results: The testicular weight, volume, and scrotal circumference differed significantly among the breeds. The diameter and area of the seminiferous tubule was high in HF, followed by Karan Fries (KF), and Tharparkar bulls. However, the degree of compactness, based on qualitative evaluation, was high in Tharparkar followed by KF and HF bulls. The intensity of Leydig cells was higher in Tharparkar bulls followed by KF and HF. The proportion of Sertoli cells was higher (p<0.05) in HF and Tharparkar bulls compared to KF bulls. Conclusion: It may be concluded that variations exist in testicular components of the breeds studied and the proportion of Sertoli cells in relation to spermatogenic cells was significantly lower in crossbred bulls compared to purebred bulls. PMID:27047150

  5. Investigations of Bull Trout (Salvelinus Confluentus), Steelhead Trout (Oncorhynchus Mykiss), and Spring Chinook Salmon (O. Tshawytscha) Interactions in Southeast Washington Streams : 1991 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Steven W.

    1992-07-01

    Bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) are native to many tributaries of the Snake River in southeast Washington. The Washington Department of Wildlife (WDW) and the American Fisheries Society (AFS) have identified bull trout as a species of special concern which means that they may become threatened or endangered by relatively, minor disturbances to their habitat. Steelhead trout/rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and spring chinook salmon (O.tshawytscha) are also native to several tributaries of the Snake river in southeast Washington. These species of migratory fishes are depressed, partially due to the construction of several dams on the lower Snake river. In response to decreased run size, large hatchery program were initiated to produce juvenile steelhead and salmon to supplement repressed tributary stocks, a practice known as supplementation. There is a concern that supplementing streams with artificially high numbers of steelhead and salmon may have an impact on resident bull trout in these streams. Historically, these three species of fish existed together in large numbers, however, the amount of high-quality habitat necessary for reproduction and rearing has been severely reduced in recent years, as compared to historic amounts. The findings of the first year of a two year study aimed at identifying species interactions in southeast Washington streams are presented in this report. Data was collected to assess population dynamics; habitat utilization and preference, feeding habits, fish movement and migration, age, condition, growth, and the spawning requirements of bull trout in each of four streams. A comparison of the indices was then made between the study streams to determine if bull trout differ in the presence of the putative competitor species. Bull trout populations were highest in the Tucannon River (supplemented stream), followed by Mill Creek (unsupplemented stream). Young of the year bull trout utilized riffle and cascade habitat the most in all

  6. Breeding capacity, behavior and fertility of bulls with Brahman genetic influence during synchronized breeding of beef females.

    PubMed

    Williams, G L

    1988-07-01

    The objective of this experiment was to evaluate the feasibility of using bulls of Brahman-derived breeds for synchronized breeding of females treated with Syncro-Mate-B (SMB). Suckled, postpartum cows (n = 261) and virgin heifers (n = 227) were given the standard SMB treatment. Calves were removed from cows for 48 h beginning at implant removal, and individual bulls were placed in pens with 15 to 20 females (x = 1:15.7 ) for 48 h beginning at implant removal. Bulls (n = 31) were 18 to 36 mo of age and had scored satisfactorily on a breeding soundness evaluation (BSE). The mean +/- SEM percentage of females in estrus, percentage of estrous females serviced and percentage of total females serviced were 77.2 +/- 2.4, 72.9 +/- 2.9 and 55.7 +/- 3%, respectively. Total average services per bull was 23.6 +/- 1.6; however, average number of individuals serviced was only 8.6 +/- 0.42. Mean +/- SEM percentage of females conceiving of those serviced, percentage conceiving of those in estrus and percentage conceiving of total females available were 57.3 +/- 3.7, 40.6 +/- 2.6 and 32.6 +/- 2.5%, respectively. Mean BSE scores of eight Simbrah bulls tested immediately before and 5 d after synchronized breeding did not differ (P > 0.05). These data suggest that the conception rate of Brahman-influenced bulls servicing SMB-synchronized cows is within the normal range. However, the total number of individual females serviced and the total pregnancy rate under the protocol employed was low. This occurred because all estrous females were not inseminated, and some bulls exhibited unpredicted low fertility. PMID:16726447

  7. A High Percentage of Beef Bull Pictures in Semen Catalogues Have Feet and Lower Legs that Are Not Visible

    PubMed Central

    Franks, Marcy K.; Grandin, Temple

    2015-01-01

    Simple Summary When cattle breeders purchase semen from a website, the only way they can visually appraise a bull’s conformation is by looking at his photograph. Correct foot and leg structure is important to help reduce lameness. Only 19.4% of the bull pictures on four major websites had fully visible feet and lower legs. A possible explanation for this may be deliberate covering of feet and legs with photo editing software to cover up conformation defects. Visibility of feet and lower legs would help semen buyers avoid bulls with obvious feet or leg problems. Abstract A total of 1379 beef bull pictures were surveyed to determine visibility of feet and legs from four American semen company websites. Five different breeds were represented: Angus, Red Angus, Hereford (polled and horned), Simmental, and Charolais. In addition to visibility, data on other variables were collected to establish frequencies and correlations. These included breed, color, material that obscured visibility, such as grass, picture taken at livestock show or outside, semen company, photographer, video, and age of bull. A foot and leg visibility score was given to each bull picture. Only 19.4% of the pictures had fully visible feet and legs. Both the hooves and dewclaws were hidden on 32.5% of the pictures. Correlation between bull’s birthdate and the first four visibility scores was statistically significant (P < 0.0001). As age increased the feet and legs were more likely to be visible in the bull’s picture. This may possibly be due to greater availability of both photo editing software and digital photography. One positive finding was that 6% of the bulls had a video of the bull walking which completely showed his feet and legs. PMID:26479372

  8. Demonstration of Tritrichomonas foetus in the external genitalia and of specific antibodies in preputial secretions of naturally infected bulls.

    PubMed

    Rhyan, J C; Wilson, K L; Wagner, B; Anderson, M L; BonDurant, R H; Burgess, D E; Mutwiri, G K; Corbeil, L B

    1999-09-01

    Portions of penis and prepuce were collected from 24 bulls with current or recent Tritrichomonas foetus infection. Epididymides were collected from seven of the bulls, and seminal vesicles and prostate were collected from four. Following immunohistochemical staining with two monoclonal antibodies (34.7C4.4 and TF1.15) prepared against T. foetus surface antigens, trichomonads were identified in sections from 15 of the bulls. Organisms were most often located in penile crypts in the midshaft and caudal regions and less often in preputial crypts. Trichomonads were not observed in sections from other genitalia or in subepithelial tissue. T. foetus antigen, however, was present in the cytoplasm of some epithelial cells and the cytoplasm of some mononuclear cells in subepithelial lymphoid aggregates and follicles. Preputial smegma was collected from 16 T. foetus-infected bulls and from 16 control bulls with negative T. foetus cultures. Preputial antibody levels to TF1.17, a surface antigen of T. foetus, were determined by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Preputial secretions from infected bulls contained specific antibody of each isotype and subisotype tested. IgG1 responses were the greatest, IgM and IgA responses were approximately equal, and IgG2 responses were low. Each isotype and subisotype response in infected bulls was significantly greater than that in the controls. These results confirm previous speculation concerning anatomical sites of infection and suggest that parasite antigen can be taken up and processed locally, resulting in deposition of specific IgG1, IgG2, IgA, and IgM antibodies in the preputial cavity. PMID:10490208

  9. Integrated evaluation of scrotal temperature and testosteronemia after GnRH administration in young bulls with low semen production.

    PubMed

    Vencato, J; Cestaro, L; Vazzana, I; Carrer, G; Carlo, E; Dara, S; Stelletta, C

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the suitability of thermographic monitoring of scrotal surface temperature (SST) as a method to monitor testicular function. Yearling bulls (n = 23) with low semen production were selected. Scrotal surface temperature and serum testosterone (T) concentrations were evaluated before and after administration of 10.5 μg buserelin acetate IV. Thermographic images of scrotum were recorded at 0, 15, 30, 45 and 60 min post-GnRH, while blood sampling was only performed at 60 min post-GnRH. Bulls were divided in two groups: LowTemp bulls (n = 10) had a decreased SST at 60 min; HighTemp bulls (n = 13) had an increased SST. After 60 min, LowTemp bulls had higher T concentrations compared to HighTemp bulls: 14.32 ng/ml ± 0.53 vs 10.30 ± 1.37 ng/ml (mean ± SEM; p < 0.05), respectively. Reproductive performances in both groups improved after GnRH administration, resulting in an increased number of inseminating doses from each collection, which was higher in LowTemp bulls. Pearson correlation test showed a negative relationship between T and SST (r = -0.554). In conclusion, a decreased scrotal surface temperature 60 min after GnRH treatment was associated with improved semen production. PMID:24750418

  10. Evaluation of Bull Trout Movements in the Tucannon and Lower Snake Rivers, 2002-2006 Project Completion Summary.

    SciTech Connect

    Faler, Michael P.; Mendel, Glen; Fulton, Carl

    2008-11-20

    The Columbia River Distinct Population Segment of bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) was listed as threatened under the Endangered Species Act in 1998. One of the identified major threats to the species is fragmentation resulting from dams on over-wintering habitats of migratory subpopulations. A migratory subgroup in the Tucannon River appeared to utilize the Snake River reservoirs for adult rearing on a seasonal basis. As a result, a radio telemetry study was conducted on this subgroup from 2002-2006, to help meet Reasonable and Prudent Measures, and Conservation Recommendations associated with the lower Snake River dams in the FCRPS Biological Opinion, and to increase understanding of bull trout movements within the Tucannon River drainage. We sampled 1,109 bull trout in the Tucannon River; 124 of these were surgically implanted with radio tags and PIT tagged, and 681 were only PIT tagged. The remaining 304 fish were either recaptures, or released unmarked. Bull trout seasonal movements within the Tucannon River were similar to those described for other migratory bull trout populations. Bull trout migrated upstream in spring and early summer to the spawning areas in upper portions of the Tucannon River watershed. They quickly moved off the spawning areas in the fall, and either held or continued a slower migration downstream through the winter until early the following spring. During late fall and winter, bull trout were distributed in the lower half of the Tucannon River basin, down to and including the mainstem Snake River below Little Goose Dam. We were unable to adequately radio track bull trout in the Snake River and evaluate their movements or interactions with the federal hydroelectric dams for the following reasons: (1) none of our radio-tagged fish were detected attempting to pass a Snake River dam, (2) our radio tags had poor transmission capability at depths greater than 12.2 m, and (3) the sample size of fish that actually entered the Snake River

  11. Two-stage genome-wide association study identifies integrin beta 5 as having potential role in bull fertility

    PubMed Central

    Feugang, Jean M; Kaya, Abdullah; Page, Grier P; Chen, Lang; Mehta, Tapan; Hirani, Kashif; Nazareth, Lynne; Topper, Einko; Gibbs, Richard; Memili, Erdogan

    2009-01-01

    Background Fertility is one of the most critical factors controlling biological and financial performance of animal production systems and genetic improvement of lines. The objective of this study was to identify molecular defects in the sperm that are responsible for uncompensable fertility in Holstein bulls. We performed a comprehensive genome wide analysis of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) for bull fertility followed by a second-stage replication in additional bulls for a restricted set of markers. Results In the Phase I association study, we genotyped the genomic sperm DNA of 10 low-fertility and 10 high-fertility bulls using Bovine SNP Gene Chips containing approximately 10,000 random SNP markers. In these animals, 8,207 markers were found to be polymorphic, 97 of which were significantly associated with fertility (p < 0.01). In the Phase II study, we tested the four most significant SNP from the Phase I study in 101 low-fertility and 100 high-fertility bulls, with two SNPs (rs29024867 and rs41257187) significantly replicated. Rs29024867 corresponds to a nucleotide change of C → G 2,190 bp 3' of the collagen type I alpha 2 gene on chromosome 4, while the rs41257187 (C → T) is in the coding region of integrin beta 5 gene on chromosome 1. The SNP rs41257187 induces a synonymous (Proline → Proline), suggesting disequilibrium with the true causative locus (i), but we found that the incubation of bull spermatozoa with integrin beta 5 antibodies significantly decreased the ability to fertilize oocytes. Our findings suggest that the bovine sperm integrin beta 5 protein plays a role during fertilization and could serve as a positional or functional marker of bull fertility. Conclusion We have identified molecular markers associated with bull fertility and established that at least one of the genes harboring such variation has a role in fertility. The findings are important in understanding mechanisms of uncompensatory infertility in bulls, and in other

  12. Real-time risk assessment in seismic early warning and rapid response: a feasibility study in Bishkek (Kyrgyzstan)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picozzi, M.; Bindi, D.; Pittore, M.; Kieling, K.; Parolai, S.

    2013-04-01

    Earthquake early warning systems (EEWS) are considered to be an effective, pragmatic, and viable tool for seismic risk reduction in cities. While standard EEWS approaches focus on the real-time estimation of an earthquake's location and magnitude, innovative developments in EEWS include the capacity for the rapid assessment of damage. Clearly, for all public authorities that are engaged in coordinating emergency activities during and soon after earthquakes, real-time information about the potential damage distribution within a city is invaluable. In this work, we present a first attempt to design an early warning and rapid response procedure for real-time risk assessment. In particular, the procedure uses typical real-time information (i.e., P-wave arrival times and early waveforms) derived from a regional seismic network for locating and evaluating the size of an earthquake, information which in turn is exploited for extracting a risk map representing the potential distribution of damage from a dataset of predicted scenarios compiled for the target city. A feasibility study of the procedure is presented for the city of Bishkek, the capital of Kyrgyzstan, which is surrounded by the Kyrgyz seismic network by mimicking the ground motion associated with two historical events that occurred close to Bishkek, namely the 1911 Kemin ( M = 8.2; ±0.2) and the 1885 Belovodsk ( M = 6.9; ±0.5) earthquakes. Various methodologies from previous studies were considered when planning the implementation of the early warning and rapid response procedure for real-time risk assessment: the Satriano et al. (Bull Seismol Soc Am 98(3):1482-1494, 2008) approach to real-time earthquake location; the Caprio et al. (Geophys Res Lett 38:L02301, 2011) approach for estimating moment magnitude in real time; the EXSIM method for ground motion simulation (Motazedian and Atkinson, Bull Seismol Soc Am 95:995-1010, 2005); the Sokolov (Earthquake Spectra 161: 679-694, 2002) approach for estimating

  13. Genome-wide association study for sperm membrane integrity in frozen-thawed semen of Holstein-Friesian bulls.

    PubMed

    Kamiński, Stanisław; Hering, Dorota M; Oleński, Kamil; Lecewicz, Marek; Kordan, Władysław

    2016-07-01

    The aim of the study was to screen the entire bull genome to identify SNP markers and propose candidate genes potentially involved in the variation of sperm membrane integrity in Holstein-Friesian bulls. Two hundred eighty eight bulls kept in one AI center were included in the study. Each bull was genotyped for 54.001 Single Nucleotide Polymorpisms (SNP) by the Illumina BovineSNP50 BeadChip. Commercial straws of frozen-thawed semen were used for the evaluation of sperm plasma membrane integrity (SYBR-14/PI staining) and sperm mitochondrial function (JC1/PI staining). An additive model for Linear Regression Analysis was applied to estimate the effect of SNP marker for sperm membrane integrity (by the use of GoldenHelix SVS7 software). Five significant markers (encompassing 2,2 MB region located on chromosome 6) for SYBR-14/PI were found. Among them one marker-rs41570391 passed Bonferroni correction test. Within approximately 3 Mb genomic region including significant markers three candidate genes: SGMS2 (Sphingomyelin Synthase 2), TET2 (Methylcytosine dioxygenase 2) and GSTCD genes (Gluthatione S-transferase C terminal domain) were proposed as potentially involved in sperm membrane integrity in frozen-thawed semen of Holstein-Friesian bulls. PMID:27236378

  14. Influences of body size and environmental factors on autumn downstream migration of bull trout in the Boise River, Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Monnot, L.; Dunham, J.B.; Hoem, T.; Koetsier, P.

    2008-01-01

    Many fishes migrate extensively through stream networks, yet patterns are commonly described only in terms of the origin and destination of migration (e.g., between natal and feeding habitats). To better understand patterns of migration in bull trout,Salvelinus confluentus we studied the influences of body size (total length [TL]) and environmental factors (stream temperature and discharge) on migrations in the Boise River basin, Idaho. During the autumns of 2001-2003, we tracked the downstream migrations of 174 radio-tagged bull trout ranging in size from 21 to 73 cm TL. The results indicated that large bull trout (>30 cm) were more likely than small fish to migrate rapidly downstream after spawning in headwater streams in early autumn. Large bull trout also had a higher probability of arriving at the current terminus of migration in the system, Arrowrock Reservoir. The rate of migration by small bull trout was more variable and individuals were less likely to move into Arrowrock Reservoir. The rate of downstream migration by all fish was slower when stream discharge was greater. Temperature was not associated with the rate of migration. These findings indicate that fish size and environmentally related changes in behavior have important influences on patterns of migration. In a broader context, these results and other recent work suggest, at least in some cases, that commonly used classifications of migratory behavior may not accurately reflect the full range of behaviors and variability among individuals (or life stages) and environmental conditions. ?? Copyright by the American Fisheries Society 2008.

  15. Effect of castration on carcass quality and differential gene expression of longissimus muscle between steer and bull.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zheng-Kui; Gao, Xue; Li, Jun-Ya; Chen, Jin-Bao; Xu, Shang-Zhong

    2011-11-01

    The effect of castration on carcass quality was investigated by ten Chinese Simmental calves. Five calves were castrated randomly at 2 months old and the others were retained as normal intact bulls. All animals were slaughtered at 22 months old. The results showed that bulls carcass had higher weight (P < 0.05), dressing percentages and bigger longissimus muscle areas (P < 0.05) than steers. But steer meat had lower shear force values and was fatter (P < 0.05) than bull. Furthermore, in order to discover genes that were involved in determining steer meat quality, we compared related candidate gene expression in longissimus muscle between steer (tester) and bull (driver) using suppressive subtractive hybridization. Ten genes were identified as preferentially expressed in longissimus muscle of steer. The expression of four selected differentially expressed genes was confirmed by quantitative real-time PCR. Overall, a 1.96, 2.41, 2.89, 2.41-fold increase in expression level was observed in steer compared with bull for actin, gamma 2, smooth muscle, tropomyosin-2, insulin like growth factor 1 and hormone-sensitive lipase, respectively. These results implied that these differentially expressed genes could play an important role in the regulation of steer meat quality. PMID:21253852

  16. [PCB concentration in hair, blood, tissues and secretions of chronically exposed dairy cows, fattening bulls and calves].

    PubMed

    Klein, U; Nagorny, C; Forschner, E; Johannes, B; Drochner, W

    1994-05-01

    Fattening bulls (n = 8) and cows (n = 10) affected chronically with PCB were kept in barns on PCB-free feeding (silage, straw, concentrates). The cows were dried off. The kinetics of PCB-concentrations in hair, blood and feces were examined. Fattening bulls (mean 460 kg bw, german black and white and interbreeding german black and white and Simmental) with low (320 g) and medium (730 g) daily weight gain for a period of 5 months and 3 bulls with medium (640 g) weight gain within 18 months were examined. A drying off period of 3-5 months was recorded for the cows. The distribution of PCB in the carcass of some animals was registered in addition. The following results are to be emphasized: Reduction of PCB in the studied substrates in the fattening bulls depends on a high degree on daily weight gain. This is important in order to calculate biological half life times of PCB. By standardized weight gain of 10 kg in bulls, fed PCB-free diets for a 5 months period, a reduction of PCB-concentrations from 1 to 3% was found (hair and feces: 1%, blood 3%). Within a period of 18 months and with higher weights, in the examined substrates (blood, hair, feces) mean declines of the PCB-concentrations of 2% were found. On knowledge so far this value is an essential point to estimate biological half life times, because metabolic PCB-elimination is negligible.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8013297

  17. Swimming endurance of bull trout, lake trout, arctic char, and rainbow trout following challenge with Renibacterium salmoninarum

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jones, D.T.; Moffitt, C.M.

    2004-01-01

    We tested the swimming endurance of juvenile bull trout Salvelinus confluentus, lake trout S. namaycush, Arctic char S. alpinus, and rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss at 9??C and 15??C to determine whether sublethal infection from a moderate challenge of Renibacterium salmoninarum administered months before testing affected the length of time fish could maintain a swimming speed of 5-6 body lengths per second in an experimental flume. Rainbow trout and Arctic char swam longer in trials than did bull trout or lake trout, regardless of challenge treatment. When we tested fish 14-23 weeks postchallenge, we found no measurable effect of R. salmoninarum on the swimming endurance of the study species except for bull trout, which showed a mixed response. We conducted additional trials with bull trout 5-8 weeks postchallenge to determine whether increasing the challenge dose would affect swimming endurance and hematocrit. In those tests, bull trout with clinical signs of disease and those exposed to the highest challenge doses had significantly reduced swimming endurance compared with unchallenged control fish. Fish hematocrit levels measured at the end of all swimming endurance tests varied among species and between test temperatures, and patterns were not always consistent between challenged and control fish.

  18. Effect of long-term infusion of an LH-releasing hormone agonist on testicular function in bulls.

    PubMed

    von Rechenberg, W; Sandow, J; Klatt, P

    1986-05-01

    Continuous administration of LH-releasing hormone (LHRH) agonists is an effective method of suppressing testosterone secretion in the male. The effect of the LH-releasing hormone (LHRH) agonist, buserelin, administered to bulls by constant infusion from osmotic minipumps was studied. In one experiment with four treated and one control bull, 109 micrograms buserelin/day were administered for 22 days. Immediately after implantation, serum testosterone concentrations rose from below 35 nmol/l to 35-105 nmol/l, and all four buserelin-infused bulls showed increased testosterone secretion during the treatment period. After removal of the minipumps, testosterone concentrations decreased to pretreatment levels. In a second experiment bulls were infused for 42 days (four treated and one control), and identical results were obtained. Testosterone secretion was stimulated (52-87 nmol/l serum) during the entire treatment period. These results demonstrate that conditions for stimulation of the pituitary-testicular axis may vary between species. Infusion of low doses of LHRH-agonists in bulls has an extended stimulatory effect without immediate desensitization of gonadotrophin release. PMID:3086475

  19. Feed restriction and subsequent realimentation in Holstein Friesian bulls: I. Effect on animal performance; muscle, fat, and linear body measurements; and slaughter characteristics.

    PubMed

    Keogh, K; Waters, S M; Kelly, A K; Kenny, D A

    2015-07-01

    Holstein Friesian bulls (n = 75) were used to evaluate the effect of restricted and subsequent compensatory growth on muscular and skeletal growth as well as the recovery of carcass and noncarcass components. Fifteen bulls were slaughtered on Day 0 to provide baseline parameters for carcass and noncarcass measurements. Of the remaining 60 bulls, 30 were fed ad libitum (ADLIB) and 30 were fed a restricted (RES) diet to grow at 0.6 kg/d for 125 d, denoted as Period 1. After 125 d of differential feeding, 15 bulls from each group were slaughtered. The remaining bulls in both treatment groups were then offered ad libitum access to feed for a further 55 d (realimentation), denoted as Period 2, after which they were also slaughtered. All animals received the same diet composed of 70% concentrate and 30% grass silage throughout the experimental trial. As planned, feed intake was greater for ADLIB bulls in Period 1 (P < 0.001); however, there was no difference in feed intake during realimentation (P > 0.05). During Period 1, RES bulls gained 0.6 kg/d whereas ADLIB bulls grew at 1.9 kg/d. During realimentation in Period 2, RES bulls displayed accelerated growth, gaining 2.5 kg/d compared with 1.4 kg/d for ADLIB bulls (P < 0.001). This amounted to a live weight difference between treatment groups of 161 kg at the end of Period 1 after restricted feeding, which was then reduced to 84 kg at the end of Period 2 (P < 0.001). Restricted animals achieved a compensatory growth (or recovery) index of 48% within 55 d of realimentation. During Period 2, RES bulls displayed a better feed conversion ratio (P < 0.001) than ADLIB bulls, indicating better feed efficiency. Ultrasonically measured longissmus dorsi growth was greater for ADLIB bulls compared with RES bulls during Period 1; however, this was reversed during Period 2 (P < 0.001). Metabolically active organs such as the liver and components of the gastrointestinal tract were lighter in RES bulls at the end of Period 1, with no

  20. A highly concentrated diet increases biogas production and the agronomic value of young bull's manure.

    PubMed

    Mendonça Costa, Mônica Sarolli Silva de; Lucas, Jorge de; Mendonça Costa, Luiz Antonio de; Orrico, Ana Carolina Amorim

    2016-02-01

    The increasing demand for animal protein has driven significant changes in cattle breeding systems, mainly in feedlots, with the use of young bulls fed on diets richer in concentrate (C) than in forage (F). These changes are likely to affect animal manure, demanding re-evaluation of the biogas production per kg of TS and VS added, as well as of its agronomic value as a biofertilizer, after anaerobic digestion. Here, we determined the biogas production and agronomic value (i.e., the macronutrient concentration in the final biofertilizer) of the manure of young bulls fed on diets with more (80% C+20% F; 'HighC' diet) or less (65% C+35% F; 'LowC' diet) concentrate, evaluating the effects of temperature (25, 35, and 40°C) and the use of an inoculum, during anaerobic digestion. A total of 24 benchtop reactors were used, operating in a semi-continuous system, with a 40-day hydraulic retention time (HRT). The manure from animals given the HighC diet had the greatest potential for biogas production, when digested with the use of an inoculum and at 35 or 40°C (0.6326 and 0.6207m(3)biogas/kg volatile solids, or VS, respectively). We observed the highest levels of the macronutrients N, P, and K in the biofertilizer from the manure of animals given HighC. Our results show that the manure of young bulls achieves its highest potential for biogas production and agronomic value when animals are fed diets richer in concentrate, and that biogas production increases if digestion is performed at higher temperatures, and with the use of an inoculum. PMID:26452426

  1. Sexual behavior and its relationship with semen quality parameters in Sahiwal breeding bulls

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Shushant; Bhakat, M.; Mohanty, T. K.; Kumar, A.; Gupta, A. K.; Chakravarty, A. K.; Singh, P.

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The study was conducted at Artificial Breeding Research Centre, NDRI, Karnal, to determine the sexual behavior and its relationship with semen quality parameters in Sahiwal breeding bulls. Materials and Methods: A total of 63 ejaculates were collected from six adult Sahiwal bulls (age ~47 mo and bwt ~466 kg), to study the relationship of sexual behavior and semen quality. The degree of association between different variables was estimated by Pearson’s correlation coefficient method. Results: The results depicted that, sexual aggressiveness showed significantly high positive correlation with libido score (LS) and sexual behavior score (SBS). Reaction time (RT) and total time taken in mounts (TTTM) had a significant negative correlation with LS and SBS. Penile erection score and penile protrusion score (PPS) both had a significant positive correlation with ejaculatory thrust score, mating ability score, and SBS. Results of correlation among seminal attributes and with sexual behavior depicted that ejaculate volume had positive significant correlation with initial progressive motility (IPM), sperm concentration (SCON), head abnormality, total abnormality, hypo-osmotic swelling test (HOST), acrosomal integrity (AI) whereas, mass activity had positive significant correlation with IPM, SCON, non-eosinophilic spermatozoa count (NESC), HOST, AI, RT and TTTM and IPM had positive significant correlation with SCON, NESC, HOST, AI, and TTTM, whereas and HOST had positive significant correlation with AI. Among seminal attributes, SCON had a positive significant correlation with PPS where as head abnormalities had a positive significant correlation with RT and TTTM. Conclusion: It can be concluded that the relationship of sexual behavior and semen quality parameters are reflecting that the sexual behavior of individual bulls is important to harvest good quality and quantity of semen as desired type of sexual preparation can be provided. PMID:27065641

  2. Reducing sperm concentration is critical to limiting the oxidative stress challenge in liquid bull semen.

    PubMed

    Murphy, C; Fahey, A G; Shafat, A; Fair, S

    2013-07-01

    Because of the short breeding season, the use of liquid bull semen is a viable option in seasonal grass-based dairy systems such as Ireland. Currently in Ireland, liquid bull semen contains approximately 5 million sperm per insemination dose and is used within 2.5d of collection. The hypothesis of this study was that reducing the sperm number per insemination dose would enable bull sperm to be stored for longer. Semen was collected at a commercial AI center and diluted to 1 (T1), 2 (T2), 3 (T3), 4 (T4), and 5 (T5) million sperm per 0.25-mL dose in caprogen diluent. On d 0.25 (6 h postcollection), 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 postcollection, viability, oxidative stress, and mitochondrial activity were assessed using flow cytometry and the fluorescent probes propidium iodide, CM-H2DCFDA, and rhodamine 123, respectively. On the same days, glucose consumption, total antioxidant capacity, and progressive linear motility were assessed. We observed an effect of day and treatment on sperm cell viability, with the highest percentage live found in T 0005 and the lowest in T 0025 on all days. Oxidative stress in live sperm increased with duration of storage and was affected by treatment, being highest in T 0025 and lowest in T 0005 on all days (d 5: 56.4±2.76% and 28.8±1.22%, respectively; mean ± SEM). Both the total antioxidant capacity and percentage of live sperm positive for rhodamine 123 were unaffected by treatment. The concentration of glucose in caprogen declined with time and was lowest in T 0025 and highest in T 0005 on d 5. In conclusion, higher concentrations of sperm have detrimental effects on sperm cell viability and increase oxidative stress but have no effect on the mitochondrial activity of sperm. PMID:23660140

  3. Alpha-linolenic acid supplementation in tris extender can improve frozen-thawed bull semen quality.

    PubMed

    Kaka, A; Wahid, H; Rosnina, Y; Yimer, N; Khumran, A M; Behan, A A; Ebrahimi, M

    2015-02-01

    The study was conducted to evaluate the effects of α-linolenic acid (ALA) on frozen-thawed quality and fatty acid composition of bull sperm. For that, twenty-four ejaculates obtained from three bulls were diluted in a Tris extender containing 0 (control), 3, 5, 10 and 15 ng/ml of ALA. Extended semen was incubated at 37°C for 15 min, to allow absorption of ALA by sperm cell membrane. The sample was chilled for 2 h, packed into 0.25-ml straws and frozen in liquid nitrogen for 24 h. Subsequently, straws were thawed and evaluated for total sperm motility (computer-assisted semen analysis), membrane functional integrity (hypo-osmotic swelling test), viability (eosin-nigrosin), fatty acid composition (gas chromatography) and lipid peroxidation (thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS)). A higher (p < 0.05) percentage of total sperm motility was observed in ALA groups 5 ng/ml (47.74 ± 07) and 10 ng/ml (44.90 ± 0.7) in comparison with control (34.53 ± 3.0), 3 ng/ml (34.40 ± 2.6) and 15 ng/ml (34.60 ± 2.9). Still, the 5 ng/ml ALA group presented a higher (p < 0.05) percentage of viable sperms (74.13 ± 0.8) and sperms with intact membrane (74.46 ± 09) than all other experimental groups. ALA concentration and lipid peroxidation in post-thawed sperm was higher in all treated groups when compared to the control group. As such, the addition of 5 ng/ml of ALA to Tris extender improved quality of frozen-thawed bull spermatozoa. PMID:25366298

  4. Feeding biomechanics and theoretical calculations of bite force in bull sharks (Carcharhinus leucas) during ontogeny.

    PubMed

    Habegger, Maria L; Motta, Philip J; Huber, Daniel R; Dean, Mason N

    2012-12-01

    Evaluations of bite force, either measured directly or calculated theoretically, have been used to investigate the maximum feeding performance of a wide variety of vertebrates. However, bite force studies of fishes have focused primarily on small species due to the intractable nature of large apex predators. More massive muscles can generate higher forces and many of these fishes attain immense sizes; it is unclear how much of their biting performance is driven purely by dramatic ontogenetic increases in body size versus size-specific selection for enhanced feeding performance. In this study, we investigated biting performance and feeding biomechanics of immature and mature individuals from an ontogenetic series of an apex predator, the bull shark, Carcharhinus leucas (73-285cm total length). Theoretical bite force ranged from 36 to 2128N at the most anterior bite point, and 170 to 5914N at the most posterior bite point over the ontogenetic series. Scaling patterns differed among the two age groups investigated; immature bull shark bite force scaled with positive allometry, whereas adult bite force scaled isometrically. When the bite force of C. leucas was compared to those of 12 other cartilaginous fishes, bull sharks presented the highest mass-specific bite force, greater than that of the white shark or the great hammerhead shark. A phylogenetic independent contrast analysis of anatomical and dietary variables as determinants of bite force in these 13 species indicated that the evolution of large adult bite forces in cartilaginous fishes is linked predominantly to the evolution of large body size. Multiple regressions based on mass-specific standardized contrasts suggest that the evolution of high bite forces in Chondrichthyes is further correlated with hypertrophication of the jaw adductors, increased leverage for anterior biting, and widening of the head. Lastly, we discuss the ecological significance of positive allometry in bite force as a possible

  5. Antioxidative effects of melatonin on kinetics, microscopic and oxidative parameters of cryopreserved bull spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Ashrafi, Iraj; Kohram, Hamid; Ardabili, Farhad Farrokhi

    2013-06-01

    Reactive oxygen species generated during the freeze-thawing process may reduce sperm quality. This study evaluates the effects of melatonin supplementation as an antioxidant in the semen extender on post-thaw parameters of bull spermatozoa. Melatonin was added to the citrate-egg yolk extender to yield six different final concentrations: 0, 0.1, 1, 2, 3 and 4mM. Ejaculates were collected from six proven Holstein bulls. Semen was diluted in the extender packaged in straws, which was frozen with liquid nitrogen. The semen extender supplemented with various doses of melatonin increased (p<0.05) total motility, progressive motility, linearity, sperm track straightness, lateral head displacement, viability, integrity of the sperm membrane and total normal morphology of sperm after the freeze-thawing process. The most effective concentration of melatonin in microscopic evaluations of the bull sperm freezing extender was 2mM. The highest (p<0.05) value of total antioxidant capacity (48.9±2.7) and the lowest value of lipid peroxidation (2.7±0.8) were achieved by inclusion of 3mM concentration of melatonin in the semen extender and the highest activity of catalase (0.7±0.1) was obtained by 2mM melatonin. Four millimolar concentration of melatonin were reduced (p<0.05) the progressive motility and straight linear velocity. In conclusion, supplementation of 2 or 3mM concentration of melatonin in the semen extender improved the quality of post-thawed semen, which may associate with a reduction in lipid peroxidation as well as an increase in the total antioxidant capacity and antioxidant enzyme activity. PMID:23664651

  6. Heritability of metabolic response to the intravenous glucose tolerance test in German Holstein Friesian bulls.

    PubMed

    Pieper, Laura; Staufenbiel, Rudolf; Christ, Jana; Panicke, Lothar; Müller, Uwe; Brockmann, Gudrun A

    2016-09-01

    Selection for improved health and welfare in farm animals is of increasing interest worldwide. Peripartum energy balance is a key factor for pathogenesis of diseases in dairy cows. The intravenous glucose tolerance test (ivGTT) can be used to study the metabolic response to a glucose stimulus. The aim of this study was to estimate heritability of ivGTT traits in German Holstein bulls. A total of 541 Holstein bulls aged 7 to 17 mo from 2 breeding stations were subjected to the ivGTT. Serum glucose concentrations were measured at 0, 7, 14, 21, 28, 35, 42, 49, 56, and 63 min relative to glucose infusion. The maximum increase in blood glucose concentration, glucose area equivalent, and blood glucose half-life period were calculated. Heritabilities were estimated using a univariate animal model including station-year-season and age as fixed effects, and animal additive genetic and residual as random effects. The estimated heritabilities were 0.19 for fasting glucose concentration, 0.43 for glucose area equivalent, 0.40 for glucose half-life period, 0.14 for the peak glucose concentration, and 0.12 for the maximum increase of blood glucose concentration. Correlations between ivGTT traits and breeding values for milk yield and composition were not found. The results indicate that heritability for response to glucose is high, which warrants further investigation of this trait for genetic improvement of metabolic disorders. Research is necessary to determine the target levels of ivGTT traits and potential associations between ivGTT traits in breeding bulls and periparturient diseases in their offspring. PMID:27394937

  7. Season of the year influences testosterone secretion in bulls administered luteinizing honrmone.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Severiano, H; Quintal-Franco, J; Vega-Murillo, V; Zanella, E; Wehrman, M E; Lindsey, B R; Melvin, E J; Kinder, J E

    2003-04-01

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate the secretion of testosterone (T) in bulls in response to the administration of varying doses of bovine LH (bLH) during the four seasons of the year. Five adult bulls (4 yr of age) were treated with an amount of bLH that was estimated to induce a 5 ng/mL amplitude pulse of LH in blood serum on five consecutive days around the spring equinox, summer solstice, fall equinox, and winter solstice. Five hours after this dose, bulls were treated with bLH in amounts that were estimated to induce a 0.25, 0.5, 1, 2, or 4 ng/mL amplitude LH pulse in blood serum in a Latin square design. Blood samples were collected for 5 h after administration of a dose of bLH that was estimated to induce the 5-ng amplitude LH pulse, and for 3 h after administration of the variable doses of bLH, and were then assayed for concentrations of T. Average concentrations and amplitude of T release after doses of bLH that were estimated to induce the 5-ng amplitude LH pulses were greater during the spring and summer than during the winter (P < 0.05). The area under the release curve (AUC) was greater during the spring than during the winter (P < 0.05). During the 3 h after treatment with the variable doses of bLH, T response was affected by dose (P < 0.001) and season (P < 0.001), but there was no dose x season interaction. Testosterone response increased in a dose-dependent fashion for all variables studied. The greatest average concentrations of T and AUC were observed in the spring compared with the fall and winter (P < 0.05). These data support our working hypothesis that testes of bulls are more responsive in releasing T in response to bLH stimulation in the spring and summer compared with the winter; however, there were no changes in sensitivity of the testes to LH during different seasons of the year as indicated by the lack of a dose of bLH x season interaction. PMID:12723092

  8. Bull serum albumin coated Au@Agnanorods as SERS probes for ultrasensitive osteosarcoma cell detection.

    PubMed

    Yue, Ji; Liu, Zhen; Cai, Xingyu; Ding, Xianting; Chen, Shouhui; Tao, Ke; Zhao, Tingbao

    2016-04-01

    Surface-Enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) has been widely used for imaging and sensing. However, limited reports are currently available on SERS-based cancer cell targeting strategy due to the challenge of synthesizing highly sensitive, reproducible and biocompatible SERS probe. Herein, we developed novel SERS probes, based on BSA (Bull Serum Albumin) coated gold-silver core-shell nanorods modified with Raman reporter 5,5-dithiobis 2-nitrobenzoic acid (DTNB) (Au@AgNRs@BSA@Anti-MICA), for in vitro cancer cell detection. Our results demonstrate that the SERS probe is very robust for cancer cell ultrasensitive detection with good biocompatibility and strong SERS signal. PMID:26838436

  9. Bull Trout Forage Investigations in Beulah Reservoir, Oregon - Annual Report for 2006

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rose, Brien P.; Mesa, Mathew G.

    2009-01-01

    Beulah Reservoir on the north fork of the Malheur River in northeastern Oregon provides irrigation water to nearby farms and ranches and supports an adfluvial population of bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus), which are listed as threatened under the Endangered Species Act. Water management in Beulah Reservoir results in seasonal and annual fluctuations of water volume that may affect forage availability for bull trout. Because no minimum pool requirements currently exist, the reservoir is occasionally reduced to run-of-river levels, which may decimate forage fish populations and ultimately affect bull trout. We sampled fish and aquatic insects in Beulah Reservoir in the spring, before the annual drawdown of 2006, and afterward, in the late fall. We also collected samples 1.5 years after the reservoir was dewatered for three consecutive summers. Overall, the moderate drawdown of 2006 (32 percent of full pool) did not drastically alter the fish community in Beulah Reservoir. We did document, however, decreases in abundance and sizes of chironomids in areas of the reservoir that were frequently dewatered, increased catch rates of fish with gillnets, and decreases in population estimates for smaller fishes after drawdown. In 2006, after the dewaterings of 2002-04, species composition was similar to that prior to the dewaterings, but the size distributions of most species were biased toward small juvenile or subyearling fishes and larger fishes were rare. Our results indicate that repeated reservoir drawdown reduces aquatic insect forage for bull trout and probably affects forage fish populations at least temporarily. The high catch rates of juvenile fishes 1.5 years after consecutive dewaterings suggests good reproductive success for any remaining adult fish, and shows that the fish community in Beulah Reservoir is resilient to such disturbances. There is, however, a period of time after serious drawdowns before significant numbers of juvenile fishes start to appear

  10. VULNERABILITY OF BULL TROUT TO EARLY LIFE STAGE TOXICITY OF 2,3,7,8-TETRACHLORODIBENZO-P-DIOXIN (TCDD) AND OTHER AHR AGONISTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Population declines of bull trout, Salvelinus confluentus, have occurred in recent decades throughout much of the species' natural range in the Columbia River watershed and other river systems in western Canada. Bull trout in the U.S. are now listed as threatened under the Endang...

  11. Adrenergic System Activation Mediates Changes in Cardiovascular and Psychomotoric Reactions in Young Individuals after Red Bull© Energy Drink Consumption

    PubMed Central

    Cavka, Ana; Stupin, Marko; Panduric, Ana; Plazibat, Ana; Cosic, Anita; Rasic, Lidija; Debeljak, Zeljko; Martinovic, Goran; Drenjancevic, Ines

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. To assess the effect of Red Bull© on (1) blood glucose and catecholamine levels, (2) cardiovascular and respiratory function changes before, during, and after exercise, (3) reaction time, (4) cognitive functions, and (5) response to mental stress test and emotions in young healthy individuals (N=38). Methods. Heart rate (HR) and arterial blood pressure (ABP), blood glucose, adrenaline, and noradrenalin plasma levels were measured before and after Red Bull© intake. Participants were subjected to 4 different study protocols by randomized order, before and 30 minutes after consumption of 500 mL of Red Bull©. Results. Mean ABP and HR were significantly increased at rest after Red Bull© intake. Blood glucose level and plasma catecholamine levels significantly increased after Red Bull© consumption. Heart rate, respiration rate, and respiratory flow rate were significantly increased during exercise after Red Bull© consumption compared to control condition. Intake of Red Bull© significantly improved reaction time, performance in immediate memory test, verbal fluency, and subject's attention as well as performance in mental stress test. Conclusion. This study demonstrated that Red Bull© has beneficial effect on some cognitive functions and effect on cardiovascular and respiratory system at rest and during exercise by increasing activity of the sympathetic nervous system. PMID:26124829

  12. Regional Differences of Proteins Expressing in Adipose Depots Isolated from Cows, Steers and Bulls as Identified by a Proteomic Approach.

    PubMed

    Cho, Jin Hyoung; Jeong, Jin Young; Lee, Ra Ham; Park, Mi Na; Kim, Seok-Ho; Park, Seon-Min; Shin, Jae-Cheon; Jeon, Young-Joo; Shim, Jung-Hyun; Choi, Nag-Jin; Seo, Kang Seok; Cho, Young Sik; Kim, MinSeok S; Ko, Sungho; Seo, Jae-Min; Lee, Seung-Youp; Chae, Jung-Il; Lee, Hyun-Jeong

    2016-08-01

    Adipose tissue in the loin muscle area of beef cattle as a marbling factor is directly associated with beef quality. To elucidate whether properties of proteins involved in depot specific adipose tissue were sex-dependent, we analyzed protein expression of intramuscular adipose tissue (IMAT) and omental adipose tissue (OMAT) from Hanwoo cows, steers, and bulls of Korean native beef cattle by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS)-based proteomic analysis, quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and western blot analysis. Two different adipose depots (i.e. intramuscular and omental) were collected from cows (n = 7), steers (n = 7), or bulls (n = 7). LC-MS/MS revealed a total of 55 and 35 proteins in IMAT and OMAT, respectively. Of the 55 proteins identified, 44, 40, and 42 proteins were confirmed to be differentially expressed in IMAT of cows, steers, and bulls, respectively. In OMAT of cows, steers, and bulls, 33, 33, and 22 were confirmed to be differentially expressed, respectively. Tropomyosin (TPM) 1, TPM 2, and TPM3 were subjected to verification by quantitative PCR and western blot analysis in IMAT and OMAT of Hanwoo cows, steers, and bulls as key factors closely associated with muscle development. Both mRNA levels and protein levels of TPM1, TPM2, and TPM3 in IMAT were lower in bulls compared to in cows or steers suggesting that they were positively correlated with marbling score and quality grade. Our results may aid the regulation of marbling development and improvement of meat quality grades in beef cattle. PMID:27165017

  13. Sero-prevalence of Contagious Bovine Pleuropneumonia (CBPP) in bulls originated from Borena pastoral area of Southern Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Alemayehu, Gezahegn; Leta, Samson; Hailu, Berhanu

    2015-06-01

    Contagious Bovine Pleuropneumonia (CBPP) is a highly infectious cattle disease, which is widespread in pastoral areas of Africa, and it imposes a major problem on Ethiopian livestock export market. Cross-sectional study was conducted in 2011 on bulls originated from Borena pastoral area to determine seroprevalence of CBPP. Forty batches of bulls containing 38,187 Borana bulls were tested using c-ELISA. Of the total 40 batches tested for the presence of antibodies, 25 (62.5 %) of them contained at least one seropositive bull. From the total of 38,187 bulls tested, 150 (0.4 %) bulls were positive. The number of seropositive animals increases as the herd size increases (P < 0.05). Both at herd and individual level, the highest CBPP prevalence was recorded in herd size >1000, and the difference was found statistically significant (P < 0.05). There was statistically significant (χ (2) = 23.73, df = 9, P = 0.005) difference of CBPP prevalence between months of the year. The present low prevalence of CBPP in the cattle feedlots indicates that the disease is decreasing progressively in Borena pastoral area, this might be associated with the ongoing mass vaccination campaign against economically important livestock diseases in pastoral areas. The decrease in the prevalence of CBPP offered a great opportunity to livestock producers and live animal and meat exporters by improving the demand of Ethiopian livestock on international market. Regular reintroduction of infected cattle from neighboring countries or herds where the disease remains endemic may change the disease dynamics again. Therefore, mass blanket vaccinations coupled with prompt diagnosis, isolation and stamping out of the outbreaks, intensive surveillance, followed by strict cattle movement control should be implemented by concerned parties. PMID:25863957

  14. Sensitivity and specificity of culture and PCR of smegma samples of bulls experimentally infected with Tritrichomonas foetus.

    PubMed

    Cobo, E R; Favetto, P H; Lane, V M; Friend, A; VanHooser, K; Mitchell, J; BonDurant, R H

    2007-10-01

    The sensitivity (Se) and specificity (Sp) of different testing schemes were estimated for detecting Tritrichomonas foetus (T. foetus) in smegma samples from experimentally infected bulls. Culture and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) on smegma samples were evaluated alone and in parallel testing. Mature dairy bulls (n=79) were intrapreputially inoculated with T. foetus (n=19); Campylobacter (C.) fetus venerealis (n=13); both T. foetus and C. fetus venerealis (n=11); Tetratrichomonas spp. (n=9); C. fetus fetus (n=8); or were not inoculated (n=19). For each bull, smegma samples were collected for 6 week post-inoculation and tested for T. foetus by In Pouch TF culture and PCR. Most T. foetus-inoculated bulls became infected, according to culture (86.7%), PCR (90.0%), and both tests together (93.3%). In T. foetus-inoculated bulls, both tests combined in parallel on a single sample had a Se (78.3%) and Sp (98.5%) similar to two cultures (Se 76.0%, Sp 98.5%) or two PCR (Se 78.0%, Sp 96.7%) sampled on consecutive weeks. The PCR on three consecutive weekly samples (Se 85.0%, Sp 95.4%) and both tests applied in parallel on three consecutive weekly samples (Se 87.5%, Sp 95.6%) were similar to the current gold-standard of six weekly cultures (Se 86.7% and Sp 97.5%). Both tests used in parallel six times had the highest Se (93.3%), with similar Sp (92.5%). Tetratrichomonas spp. were only sporadically detected by culture or PCR. In conclusion, we have proposed alternative strategies for T. foetus diagnostics (for the AI industry), including a combination of tests and repeat testing strategies that may reduce time and cost for bull surveillance. PMID:17681370

  15. BILL E. KUNKLE INTERDISCIPLINARY BEEF SYMPOSIUM: Does tall fescue toxicosis negatively impact bull growth and breeding potential?

    PubMed

    Pratt, S L; Andrae, J G

    2015-12-01

    The predominant cool-season forage in the southeastern United States is the tall fescue cultivar Kentucky 31 (KY31). Kentucky 31 possesses an endophyte (), which produces a family of toxins called ergot alkaloids. These toxins negatively affect the physiology of animals on consumption and result in the syndrome known as fescue toxicosis. Currently, the United States annually produces approximately 11.4 billion kg of beef, of which 25% originates in the southeastern region of the United States where forage systems frequently are tall fescue based. Cattle within this forage system exhibit reduced gains and reproductive performance. The result is a reduction in the nation's beef supply with annual revenue losses recently estimated at approximately US$1 billion. Our hypothesis is that exposure to these ergot alkaloids in conjunction with limited availability of nutrients decreases bull semen quality and fertility. Although the literature is clear that these toxins affect BW, body temperature, blood flow, hair growth, and female reproduction in cattle, their effect on bull reproduction and the mechanisms through which the toxins act are not well defined. Six studies published from 2004 to 2015 assessed bull growth, body composition, and semen quality of young beef bulls exposed to ergot alkaloids. If semen quality or fertility is altered, the mechanisms involved may be either direct effects of ergot alkaloids through neurotransmitter receptors or indirect effects such as inhibiting the release of prolactin (PRL). The possible effects of ergot alkaloids or PRL require establishing the presence or absence of dopamine, adrenergic, serotonin, or PRL receptors in the testis, epididymis, and sperm cell of the bull. The objective of this review is to relate our findings to the few previous studies conducted that evaluated the impact of fescue toxicosis on bull reproduction and to propose possible mechanisms of action for lowered semen quality. PMID:26641162

  16. Regional Differences of Proteins Expressing in Adipose Depots Isolated from Cows, Steers and Bulls as Identified by a Proteomic Approach

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Jin Hyoung; Jeong, Jin Young; Lee, Ra Ham; Park, Mi Na; Kim, Seok-Ho; Park, Seon-Min; Shin, Jae-Cheon; Jeon, Young-Joo; Shim, Jung-Hyun; Choi, Nag-Jin; Seo, Kang Seok; Cho, Young Sik; Kim, MinSeok S.; Ko, Sungho; Seo, Jae-Min; Lee, Seung-Youp; Chae, Jung-Il; Lee, Hyun-Jeong

    2016-01-01

    Adipose tissue in the loin muscle area of beef cattle as a marbling factor is directly associated with beef quality. To elucidate whether properties of proteins involved in depot specific adipose tissue were sex-dependent, we analyzed protein expression of intramuscular adipose tissue (IMAT) and omental adipose tissue (OMAT) from Hanwoo cows, steers, and bulls of Korean native beef cattle by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS)–based proteomic analysis, quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and western blot analysis. Two different adipose depots (i.e. intramuscular and omental) were collected from cows (n = 7), steers (n = 7), or bulls (n = 7). LC-MS/MS revealed a total of 55 and 35 proteins in IMAT and OMAT, respectively. Of the 55 proteins identified, 44, 40, and 42 proteins were confirmed to be differentially expressed in IMAT of cows, steers, and bulls, respectively. In OMAT of cows, steers, and bulls, 33, 33, and 22 were confirmed to be differentially expressed, respectively. Tropomyosin (TPM) 1, TPM 2, and TPM3 were subjected to verification by quantitative PCR and western blot analysis in IMAT and OMAT of Hanwoo cows, steers, and bulls as key factors closely associated with muscle development. Both mRNA levels and protein levels of TPM1, TPM2, and TPM3 in IMAT were lower in bulls compared to in cows or steers suggesting that they were positively correlated with marbling score and quality grade. Our results may aid the regulation of marbling development and improvement of meat quality grades in beef cattle. PMID:27165017

  17. Performance, carcass characteristics, and ruminal pH of Nellore and Angus young bulls fed a whole shelled corn diet.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, J R R; Chizzotti, M L; Schoonmaker, J P; Teixeira, P D; Lopes, R C; Oliveira, C V R; Ladeira, M M

    2016-06-01

    The objectives of this study were to test the interaction of breed (Nellore or Angus) and diet (whole shelled corn [WSC] or ground corn [GC] with silage) on growth performance, carcass characteristics, and ruminal pH of young bulls. Thirty-six bulls (18 Nellore and 18 Angus) with the range in age of 18 to 22 mo and BW of 381 ± 12 kg were used in a completely randomized design experiment with a 2 × 2 factorial arrangement of treatments (2 breeds and 2 diets). Experimental diets (DM basis) included 1) a GC diet containing 30% corn silage and 70% GC- and soybean meal-based concentrate and 2) a WSC diet containing 85% WSC and 15% of a soybean meal- and mineral-based pelleted supplement. An additional 8 bulls were slaughtered at the beginning of the experimental period for determination of initial carcass weight. The treatments were Nellore fed the GC diet, Nellore fed the WSC diet, Angus fed the GC diet, and Angus fed the WSC diet. Greater DMI ( < 0.01), ADG ( < 0.01), and G:F ( < 0.01) were observed in Angus bulls compared with Nellore bulls, regardless of diet. Lower average ruminal pH ( = 0.04), maximum ruminal pH (P = 0.02), and DMI ( < 0.01) were observed in bulls fed the WSC diet than in those fed the GC diet. In addition, bulls fed the WSC diet had greater G:F ( < 0.01). The WSC diet led to greater variation in DMI compared with the GC diet ( < 0.01). Omasum and large intestine percentage was affected by diets only in the Angus breed ( < 0.02) and were greater when bulls were fed the GC diet. The WSC diet without forage may be useful for feedlots because this diet promoted greater G:F than the GC diet, regardless of breed. However, special care must be exercised in feed management during adaptation and throughout the feeding of Nellore animals to avoid digestive disorders and fluctuations in DMI. PMID:27285921

  18. Effects of label-dose permethrin administration in yearling beef cattle: I. Bull reproductive function and testicular histopathology.

    PubMed

    Dohlman, Tyler M; Phillips, Patrick E; Madson, Darin M; Clark, Christopher A; Gunn, Patrick J

    2016-06-01

    Pyrethroid administration to a wide variety of laboratory animals has been shown to cause detrimental effects on male fertility, including sperm quality, by means of endocrine disruption. The objective of this experiment was to study the effects of a commercial, permethrin-containing pour-on product on reproductive variables and testicular histopathology of yearling beef bulls. Black Angus bulls (n = 60; aged 369 ± 17 days; 511 ± 33 kg; 6.2 ± 0.5 body condition scores) were assigned to either (1) saline control (CON) or (2) permethrin pour-on administered at label dose (PYR). Blood samples were collected, and industry standard breeding soundness examinations (BSE), via electroejaculation, were performed on all bulls at 5 days before and 14 days after treatment. Progressive sperm motility and eosin-nigrosin-stained sperm were analyzed using high-power phase-contrast microscopy. Plasma testosterone concentrations were analyzed via radioimmunoassay. Bulls were slaughtered at 34 days, and one testicle per bull was randomly collected for histologic examination. Change in sperm motility between BSEs was not different because of treatment; sperm morphology however improved across treatments, but PYR bulls had less improvement in percent of head (P < 0.001) sperm abnormalities compared to CON, resulting in less improvement of primary abnormalities (P = 0.04). Nonetheless, morphological differences did not change the overall outcome for satisfactory breeder status. Change in testosterone concentration did not differ because of treatment. Histopathologic examination identified that testicular degeneration and tubule diameter did not differ as a result of treatment. It should be noted, however, that degeneration score (higher score having more degeneration) was positively correlated with primary abnormalities (P < 0.01; r = 0.35) and negatively correlated with normal sperm cells (P < 0.001; r = -0.43). In summary, these data indicate that a single

  19. Relationship between the rumen microbiome and residual feed intake-efficiency of Brahman bulls stocked on bermudagrass pastures.

    PubMed

    McCann, Joshua C; Wiley, Leanne M; Forbes, T David; Rouquette, Francis M; Tedeschi, Luis O

    2014-01-01

    Residual feed intake (RFI) testing has increased selection pressure on biological efficiency in cattle. The objective of this study was to assess the association of the rumen microbiome in inefficient, positive RFI (p-RFI) and efficient, negative RFI (n-RFI) Brahman bulls grazing 'Coastal' bermudagrass [Cynodondactylon (L.) Pers.]under two levels of forage allowance (high and low stocking intensity). Sixteen Brahman bulls were previously fed in confinement for 70 d to determine the RFI phenotype. Bulls were then allotted 60 d stocking on bermudagrass pastures to estimate RFI using the n-alkane technique. At the conclusion of the grazing period, rumen liquid samples were collected from each bull by stomach tube to evaluate the rumen microbiome. Extraction of DNA, amplification of the V4-V6 region of the 16S rRNA gene, and 454 pyrosequencing were performed on each sample. After denoising the sequences, chimera checking, and quality trimming, 4,573 ± 1,287 sequences were generated per sample. Sequences were then assigned taxonomy from the Greengenes database using the RDP classifier. Overall, 67.5 and 22.9% of sequences were classified as Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes, respectively. Within the phylum Bacteroidetes, Prevotella was the most predominant genus and was observed in greater relative abundance in p-RFI bulls compared with n-RFI bulls (P = 0.01). In contrast, an unidentified Bacteroidales family was greater in relative abundance for n-RFI bulls than p-RFI (26.7 vs. 19.1%; P = 0.03). Ruminococcaceae was the third most abundant family in our samples, but it was not affected by RFI phenotype. No effect of stocking intensity was observed for bacterial taxa, but there was a tendency for alpha diversity and operational taxonomic unit richness to increase with lower stocking intensity. Results suggested the rumen microbiome of p-RFI Brahman bulls has greater levels of Prevotella, but the bacterial community composition was unaffected by stocking intensity

  20. Relationship between the Rumen Microbiome and Residual Feed Intake-Efficiency of Brahman Bulls Stocked on Bermudagrass Pastures

    PubMed Central

    McCann, Joshua C.; Wiley, Leanne M.; Forbes, T. David; Rouquette, Francis M.; Tedeschi, Luis O.

    2014-01-01

    Residual feed intake (RFI) testing has increased selection pressure on biological efficiency in cattle. The objective of this study was to assess the association of the rumen microbiome in inefficient, positive RFI (p-RFI) and efficient, negative RFI (n-RFI) Brahman bulls grazing ‘Coastal’ bermudagrass [Cynodondactylon (L.) Pers.]under two levels of forage allowance (high and low stocking intensity). Sixteen Brahman bulls were previously fed in confinement for 70 d to determine the RFI phenotype. Bulls were then allotted 60 d stocking on bermudagrass pastures to estimate RFI using the n-alkane technique. At the conclusion of the grazing period, rumen liquid samples were collected from each bull by stomach tube to evaluate the rumen microbiome. Extraction of DNA, amplification of the V4-V6 region of the 16S rRNA gene, and 454 pyrosequencing were performed on each sample. After denoising the sequences, chimera checking, and quality trimming, 4,573 ± 1,287 sequences were generated per sample. Sequences were then assigned taxonomy from the Greengenes database using the RDP classifier. Overall, 67.5 and 22.9% of sequences were classified as Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes, respectively. Within the phylum Bacteroidetes, Prevotella was the most predominant genus and was observed in greater relative abundance in p-RFI bulls compared with n-RFI bulls (P = 0.01). In contrast, an unidentified Bacteroidales family was greater in relative abundance for n-RFI bulls than p-RFI (26.7 vs. 19.1%; P = 0.03). Ruminococcaceae was the third most abundant family in our samples, but it was not affected by RFI phenotype. No effect of stocking intensity was observed for bacterial taxa, but there was a tendency for alpha diversity and operational taxonomic unit richness to increase with lower stocking intensity. Results suggested the rumen microbiome of p-RFI Brahman bulls has greater levels of Prevotella, but the bacterial community composition was unaffected by stocking intensity

  1. Peak discharge on Bull Creek and tributaries, Scurry and Borden Counties, Texas, flood of April 12, 13, 1954

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McDaniels, L.L.

    1954-01-01

    This report contains a description of the rainfall pattern producing the flood of April 12, 13, 1954, in the Bull Creek watershed, the results of indirect determinations of peak discharges and estimates of flows at several points in that watershed, and a comparison of the peak stage at the discontinued gaging station on Bull Creek near Ira, Tex., with other floods on record. Field work consisted of transit-stadia surveys at five locations to develop high-water profiles and cross-sections, performed within two weeks after flood occurred.

  2. Polymorphism of SREBP1 is associated with beef fatty acid composition in Simmental bulls.

    PubMed

    Xu, L; Zhang, L P; Yuan, Z R; Guo, L P; Zhu, M; Gao, X; Gao, H J; Li, J Y; Xu, S Z

    2013-01-01

    The sterol regulatory element binding factor 1 gene (SREBP1) plays an important role in the biosynthesis of fatty acids and cholesterol, and in lipid metabolism. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of genetic polymorphisms of SREBP1 on the fatty acid composition of muscle and carcass traits in Simmental bulls and Snow Dragon black cattle. The 84-bp insertion/deletion (indel) in intron 5 of the bovine SREBP1 gene was genotyped by polymerase chain reaction to investigate its associations with traits. The results showed that the 84-bp indel in intron 5 was significantly associated with palmitoleic acid (C16:1), stearic acid (C18:0), saturated fatty acids (SFA), triglycerides (TAG), and the C16 index in Simmental bulls (P < 0.05). Cattle with the LL genotype had higher palmitic acid (C16:1), triglycerides, and C16 index but lower stearic acid (C18:0) and SFA compared to those with the LS genotype (P < 0.05). In conclusion, the 84-bp indel of SREBP1 could be used as a genetic marker for selecting Simmental breeding stock for healthier fatty acid composition. PMID:24301949

  3. Uptake of human pharmaceuticals in bull sharks (Carcharhinus leucas) inhabiting a wastewater-impacted river.

    PubMed

    Gelsleichter, James; Szabo, Nancy J

    2013-07-01

    The presence of human pharmaceuticals in sewage-impacted ecosystems is a growing concern that poses health risks to aquatic wildlife. Despite this, few studies have investigated the uptake of active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs) in aquatic organisms. In this study, the uptake of 9 APIs from human drugs was examined and compared in neonate bull sharks (Carcharhinus leucas) residing in pristine (Myakka River) and wastewater-impacted (Caloosahatchee River) tributaries of Florida's Charlotte Harbor estuary. The synthetic estrogen used in human contraceptives (17α-ethynylestradiol) and 6 of the selective serotonin/norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (citalopram, fluoxetine, fluvoxamine, paroxetine, sertraline, venlafaxine) used in human antidepressants were observed at detectable and, in some cases, quantifiable levels in plasma of Caloosahatchee River sharks. Comparatively, only venlafaxine was detected in the plasma of a single Myakka River shark at a level below the limit of quantitation. These results suggest that sharks residing in wastewater-impacted habitats accumulate APIs, a factor that may pose special risks to C. leucas since it is one of few shark species to regularly occupy freshwater systems. Further research is needed to determine if the low levels of API uptake observed in Caloosahatchee River bull sharks pose health risks to these animals. PMID:23602972

  4. Biochemical and mass spectrometric characterization of soluble ecto-5'-nucleotidase from bull seminal plasma.

    PubMed Central

    Fini, Carlo; Talamo, Fabio; Cherri, Silvia; Coli, Marcello; Floridi, Ardesio; Ferrara, Lino; Scaloni, Andrea

    2003-01-01

    Ecto-5'-nucleotidase (ecto-5'-NT) is a glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored membrane-bound protein that is ubiquitous in mammalian tissues. It is a target for a number of therapeutic drugs since increased levels of the enzyme correlate with various disease states. In this investigation, we describe the properties of a soluble ecto-5'-NT derived from bull seminal plasma. The protein was highly heterogeneous as demonstrated by chromatofocusing and two-dimensional PAGE. Sequencing analyses revealed a truncated polypeptide lacking the glycosylphospatidylinositol attachment site, suggesting that it is produced post-translationally by cleavage at Gln(547) and/or Phe(548). Heterogeneity was largely due to differential glycosylation, especially in the oligosaccharides linked to Asn(403). Significant differences in substrate specificity were observed between isoforms and, on the basis of molecular-modelling studies, were interpreted in terms of variable glycosylation causing steric hindrance of the substrate-binding site. Thus the soluble forms of ecto-5'-NT found in bull seminal plasma are unique both biochemically and structurally, and have a putative role in signalling interactions with spermatozoa following ejaculation and capacitation in the female reproductive tract. PMID:12608891

  5. Sericin supplementation improves semen freezability of buffalo bulls by minimizing oxidative stress during cryopreservation.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Pradeep; Kumar, Dharmendra; Sikka, P; Singh, P

    2015-01-01

    The variety of mammalian cells has been successfully cryopreserved by use of the silk protein sericin due to its strong free-radical-scavenging and potent antioxidant activity. The present study was conducted to examine the protective role of sericin on buffalo spermatozoa during cryopreservation. Semen of four breeding bulls was collected twice a week using artificial vagina technique. The ejaculates of four bulls were pooled, divided into five equal fractions, diluted with the extender supplemented with different concentrations of sericin (0, 0.25, 0.5, 1.5 and 2%) and then cryopreserved. Post-thawed motility was objectively assessed by computer assisted sperm analyzer. Sperm plasma membrane integrity was assessed by hypo-osmotic swelling test (HOST). Malondialdehyde (MDA) concentration, glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activities were determined in frozen-thawed extended seminal plasma by spectrophotometry. The extender supplemented with 0.25, 0.5 and 1% sericin resulted in the higher sperm motility and GPx acivity. Furthermore, plasma membrane integrity and SOD activity were found to be higher (P<0.05) in group supplemented with 0.25 and 0.5% sericin (P<0.05). The MDA concentration was found to be significantly lower (P<0.05) in 0.25 and 0.5% sericin treated groups than control and other treated groups. In conclusion, the supplementation of 0.25-0.5% sericin in semen extender improves frozen-thawed semen quality through protecting sperm from oxidative stress. PMID:25497424

  6. A floral survey of cliff habitats along Bull Run at Manassas National Battlefield Park, Virginia, 2014

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stroh, Esther D.; Struckhoff, Matthew A.; Grabner, Keith W.

    2015-01-01

    Isolated patches of native vegetation in human-modified landscapes are important reservoirs of biological diversity because they may be the only places in which rare or native species can persist. Manassas National Battlefield Park, Virginia, is an island embedded in a matrix of intensively modified lands; it is becoming increasingly isolated due to growth of the greater Washington, D.C. area. A series of cliffs along Bull Run support an eastern white pine community disjunct from its more typical range in the Appalachian Mountains. Cliffs frequently support vegetation communities that differ from surrounding habitat. In this ecological context, the cliffs along Bull Run are islands of specialized habitat within an island of natural and semi-natural communities (the park), surrounded by a human-dominated landscape. A floral survey of these cliffs was a top priority identified by the National Park Service National Capital Region via the National Resource Preservation Program; in 2014, we completed a floral survey of 11 cliffs in the park. We recorded 282 species in 194 genera and 83 families, including 23 newly documented species for the park.

  7. Investigations of Bull Trout (Salvelinus Confluentus), Steelhead Trout (Oncorhynchus Mykiss), and Spring Chinook Salmon (O. Tshawytscha) Interactions in Southeast Washington Streams. Final Report 1992.

    SciTech Connect

    Underwood, Keith D.

    1995-01-01

    The goal of this two year study was to determine if supplementation with hatchery reared steelhead trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and spring chinook salmon (O. tshawytscha) negatively impacted wild native bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) through competitive interactions. Four streams with varying levels of fish supplementation activity were sampled in Southeast Washington. Tasks performed during this study were population density, relative abundance, microhabitat utilization, habitat availability, diet analysis, bull trout spawning ground surveys, radio telemetry of adult bull trout, and growth analysis. Results indicate that bull trout overlapped geographically with the supplemented species in each of the study streams suggesting competition among species was possible. Within a stream, bull trout and the supplemented species utilized dissimilar microhabitats and microhabitat utilization by each species was the same among streams suggesting that there was no shifts in microhabitat utilization among streams. The diet of bull trout and O. mykiss significantly overlapped in each of the study streams. The stream most intensely supplemented contained bull trout with the slowest growth and the non-supplemented stream contained bull trout with the fastest growth. Conversely, the stream most intensely supplemented contain steelhead with the fastest growth and the non-supplemented stream contained steelhead with the slowest growth. Growth indicated that bull trout may have been negatively impacted from supplementation, although other factors may have contributed. At current population levels, and current habitat quantity and quality, no impacts to bull trout as a result of supplementation with hatchery reared steelhead trout and spring chinook salmon were detected. Project limitations and future research recommendations are discussed.

  8. Long codas of coupled wave systems in seismic basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seligman, Thomas H.

    2002-11-01

    Quite some time ago it was pointed out that the damage patterns and Fourier spectra of the 1985 earthquake in Mexico City are only compatible with a resonant effect of horizontal waves with the approximate speed of sound waves in water [see Flores et al., Nature 326, 783 (1987)]. In a more recent paper it was pointed out that this indeed will occur with a very specific frequency selection for a coupled system of Raleigh waves at the interface of the bottom of the ancient lakebed with the more solid deposits, and an evanescent sound wave in the mud above [see J. Flores et al., Bull. Seismol. Soc. Am. 89, 14-21 (1999)]. In the present talk we shall go over these arguments again and show that strong reflection at the edges of the lake must occur to account for the strong magnification entailing necessarily a long coda, and that the mecanism can be understood in the same terms.

  9. On the continuing problem of inappropriate learning measures: Comment on Wulf et al. (2014) and Wulf et al. (2015).

    PubMed

    Fischman, Mark G

    2015-08-01

    Two recent studies in this journal (Wulf, Chiviacowsky, & Cardozo, 2014; Wulf, Chiviacowsky, & Drews, 2015) assessed the additive effects of autonomy support and enhanced expectancies (Wulf et al., 2014) and autonomy support and external focus (Wulf et al., 2015) on learning a novel throwing skill. Participants learned to throw with their non-dominant arm at a target consisting of nine concentric circles with a center bull's eye. More points were awarded for throws landing closer to the bull's eye, but the precise landing location within each circle was ignored. All throws landing anywhere within a specific circle received the same score. I comment on the inappropriateness of this assessment for determining performance variability, which is an important characteristic of skill learning. The standard errors reported by Wulf et al. (2014, 2015) are confusing or ambiguous to performance as measured in the task. They do not reflect the precision of performance that one might expect. This problem is not limited to the two studies in this commentary, but remains a continuing one in many studies of motor learning. Questions are also raised concerning the absence of any kinematic or kinetic measures of throwing performance in Wulf et al. (2014, 2015). PMID:26072360

  10. Short communication: Improving accuracy of Jersey genomic evaluations in the United States and Denmark by sharing reference population bulls

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effect on prediction accuracy for Jersey genomic evaluations in Denmark and the United States from using larger reference populations was assessed. Each country contributed genotypes from 1,157 Jersey bulls to the reference population of the other. Eight of 9 traits analyzed by Denmark (milk, fa...

  11. Response to "A Sketch of Politically Liberal Principles of Social Justice in Higher Education" by Barry L. Bull

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kimball, Bruce A.

    2012-01-01

    The author wishes to thank Barry Bull for his excellent and stimulating paper, and he would like to pose five questions or points for his consideration in response. In preface to his first question, the author wants to say that he finds cogent and persuasive the discussion in the section "Issues for Political Liberalism in Higher Education" of…

  12. Ultrastructural appearance of renal and other basement membranes in the Bull terrier model of autosomal dominant hereditary nephritis.

    PubMed

    Hood, J C; Savige, J; Seymour, A E; Dowling, J; Martinello, P; Colville, D; Sinclair, R; Naito, I; Jennings, G; Huxtable, C

    2000-08-01

    Bull terrier hereditary nephritis may represent a model for autosomal dominant Alport's syndrome because affected dogs have the typically lamellated glomerular basement membrane (GBM) and father-to-son disease transmission occurs. This study examined the ultrastructural appearance of the renal and extrarenal basement membranes and their composition in affected Bull terriers. Affected stillborn animals and puppies had subepithelial frilling and vacuolation of the GBM. In adult dogs, lamellation was common, and subepithelial frilling and vacuolation were less prominent. Foot-process effacement and mesangial matrix expansion occurred frequently. Basement membranes in the glomeruli, tubules, and Bowman's capsule were significantly thickened and often mineralized. Immunohistochemical examination showed alpha 1(IV) and alpha 2(IV) collagen chains in all renal basement membranes; alpha 3(IV), alpha 4(IV), and alpha 5(IV) chains in the GBM, distal tubular basement membrane, and Bowman's capsule; and the alpha 6(IV) chain in Bowman's capsule. Conversely, the basement membranes from the affected Bull terrier cornea, lens capsule, retina, skin, lung, and muscle had a normal ultrastructural appearance and were not thickened compared with membranes in normal age-matched dogs. The distribution of basement membrane abnormalities in Bull terrier hereditary nephritis may occur because the defective protein is present exclusively or more abundantly in the kidney and is structurally more important in the kidney or because of local intrarenal stresses. PMID:10922317

  13. Effects of different lairage times after long distance transportation on carcass and meat quality characteristics of Hungarian Simmental bulls.

    PubMed

    Teke, Bulent; Akdag, Filiz; Ekiz, Bulent; Ugurlu, Mustafa

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effects of three lairage times (24 h, 48 h and 72 h) on the meat quality of tame trained to lead Hungarian Simmental bulls subjected to long commercial transportation of approximately 1800 km. A total of 30 bulls, with an average age of 24 months, were used. During the lairage, bulls received 0.5 kg concentrate feed per animal per day and ad libitum access to the hay and water. As the lairage duration increased, the pH(ult) decreased (P<0.05). Bulls lairaged for 24 h had lower L*, b* and H* values than those lairaged for 48 h and 72 h (P<0.05). The effect of lairage time on WHC, cooking loss and Warner-Bratzler shear force values was not significant. The b* value was considered the best predictor of muscle pH(ult). In conclusion, 72 h quiet lairage time is recommended after transportation in order to prevent the adverse effects of transportation on meat quality. PMID:23916957

  14. Relationships Between Temperament and Transportation With Rectal Temperature and Serum Concentrations of Cortisol and Epinephrine in Bulls

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study investigated whether temperament influences rectal temperature and serum concentrations of cortisol and epinephrine in response to transportation. Brahman bulls were selected based on temperament score (average of exit velocity, EV, and pen score, PS) measured 28 days prior to weaning wit...

  15. Temperament influences endotoxin-induced changes in rectal temperature, sickness behavior, and plasma epinephrine concentrations in bulls

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study was designed to determine the influence of temperament on endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide; LPS) induced changes in body temperature and the secretion of cortisol and epinephrine. Purebred Brahman bulls were selected based on temperament score (average of exit velocity, EV, and pen score, PS...

  16. Effects of immunization against LHRH and treatment with trenbolone acetate on reproductive function of beef bulls and steers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objectives of this study were (1) to evaluate the ability of trenbolone acetate (TBA) administered in tandem with LHRH immunization to suppress reproductive function in beef bulls and (2) to examine the effects of LHRH and androgen (TBA) signaling on pituitary function. In order to address thes...

  17. 78 FR 20133 - Notice of Intent To Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement for the Proposed Bull Mountain Unit...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-03

    ... wells within the Bull Mountain Unit (146 natural gas wells and 4 water disposal wells) and to construct... days a week, to leave a message or question with the above individual. You will receive a reply during... bisected by State Highway 133. The proposal is to drill up to 146 natural gas wells and 4 water...

  18. Adjustment of deregressed values from cow evaluations to have the similar mean and variance as bull deregressed values

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Traditional evaluations of cows with genotypes have been adjusted since April 2010 to be compatible with evaluations of bulls to improve their accuracy in estimation SNP effects. This adjustment made them incomparable with traditional evaluations of cows. Recent work has improved the adjustment by u...

  19. The influence of temperament on transportation induced increases in body temperature and secretion of cortisol and epinephrine in bulls

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study was designed to determine the influence of temperament on rectal temperature (RT) and secretion of cortisol (CS) and epinephrine (E) in response to transportation. Purebred Brahman bulls were selected based on temperament score measured at weaning [n=8 each: Calm (C), Intermediate (I), an...

  20. Effect of supplementation of butylated hydroxytoluene on post-thaw sperm viability, motility and membrane integrity of Hariana bulls

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Akhil; Saxena, Atul; Swain, Dilip Kumar; Yadav, Dushyant; Yadav, Sanjay Singh; Kumar, Abhishek; Kumar, Anuj

    2015-01-01

    Aim: This study was aimed to see the beneficial effect of butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) as a semen additive of Hariana bull semen. Materials and Methods: The study was carried out in Hariana bulls. Twenty-four ejaculates from two bulls were used for this study. Each ejaculate was extended with standard glycerolated egg yolk tris extender and supplemented with BHT at two concentrations as 0.5 mM (T1) and 1.0 mM (T2). After dilution, equilibration and 24 h of cryopreservation, the samples were analyzed for progressive motility, sperm viability and membrane integrity. Results: Progressive motility, sperm viability and sperm membrane integrity were significantly (p<0.05) increased in the samples fortified with BHT as compared to the control during the process of cryopreservation and thawing. The BHT concentration of 1 mM revealed better results as compared to 0.5 mM. Conclusion: Addition of 1.0 mM BHT was found better in cryopreservation of Hariana bull semen compared to 0.5 mM BHT and control samples. The addition of BHT has improved the sperm quality by acting as an antioxidant thereby reducing the lipid peroxidation of the sperms. PMID:27065652

  1. To b or not to b ?? A nonextensive view of b-value in the Gutenberg-Richter law.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vallianatos, Filippos

    2014-05-01

    The Gutenberg-Richter (GR) (Gutenberg and Richter, 1944) law one of the cornerstones of modern seismology has been considered as a paradigm of manifestation of self-organized criticality since the dependence of the cumulative number of earthquakes with energy, i.e., the number of earthquakes with energy greater than E, behaves as a power law with the b value related to the critical exponent. A great number of seismic hazard studies have been originated as a result of this law. The Gutenberg-Richter (GR) law is an empirical relationship, which recent efforts relate it with general physical principles (Kagan and Knopoff, 1981; Wesnousky, 1999; Sarlis et al., 2010; Telesca, 2012; Vallianatos and Sammonds, 2013). Nonextensive statistical mechanics pioneered by Tsallis (Tsallis, 2009) provides a consistent theoretical framework for the studies of complex systems in their nonequilibrium stationary states, systems with multi fractal and self-similar structures, long-range interacting systems, etc. Earth is such system. In the present work we analyze the different pathways (originated in Sotolongo-Costa, A. Posadas , 2004; Silva et al., 2006) to extract the generalization of the G-R law as obtained in the frame of non extensive statistical physics. We estimate the b-value and we discuss its underline physics. This research has been funded by the European Union (European Social Fund) and Greek national resources under the framework of the "THALES Program: SEISMO FEAR HELLARC" project of the "Education & Lifelong Learning" Operational Programme. References Gutenberg, B. and C. F. Richter (1944). Bull. Seismol. Soc. Am. 34, 185-188. Kagan, Y. Y. and L. Knopoff (1981). J. Geophys. Res. 86, 2853-2862. Sarlis, N., E. Skordas and P. Varotsos (2010). Physical Review E - Statistical, Nonlinear, and Soft Matter Physics 82 (2) , 021110. Silva, R., G. Franca, C. Vilar and J. Alcaniz (2006). Phys. Rev. E, 73, 026102 Sotolongo-Costa, O. and A. Posadas (2004). Phys. Rev. Lett., 92

  2. Effect of red bull energy drink on auditory reaction time and maximal voluntary contraction.

    PubMed

    Goel, Vartika; Manjunatha, S; Pai, Kirtana M

    2014-01-01

    The use of "Energy Drinks" (ED) is increasing in India. Students specially use these drinks to rejuvenate after strenuous exercises or as a stimulant during exam times. The most common ingredient in EDs is caffeine and a popular ED available and commonly used is Red Bull, containing 80 mg of caffeine in 250 ml bottle. The primary aim of this study was to investigate the effects of Red Bull energy drink on Auditory reaction time and Maximal voluntary contraction. A homogeneous group containing twenty medical students (10 males, 10 females) participated in a crossover study in which they were randomized to supplement with Red Bull (2 mg/kg body weight of caffeine) or isoenergetic isovolumetric noncaffeinated control drink (a combination of Appy Fizz, Cranberry juice and soda) separated by 7 days. Maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) was recorded as the highest of the 3 values of maximal isometric force generated from the dominant hand using hand grip dynamometer (Biopac systems). Auditory reaction time (ART) was the average of 10 values of the time interval between the click sound and response by pressing the push button using hand held switch (Biopac systems). The energy and control drinks after one hour of consumption significantly reduced the Auditory reaction time in males (ED 232 ± 59 Vs 204 ± 34 s and Control 223 ± 57 Vs 210 ± 51 s; p < 0.05) as well as in females (ED 227 ± 56 Vs 214 ± 48 s and Control 224 ± 45 Vs 215 ± 36 s; p < 0.05) but had no effect on MVC in either sex (males ED 381 ± 37 Vs 371 ± 36 and Control 375 ± 61 Vs 363 ± 36 Newton, females ED 227 ± 23 Vs 227 ± 32 and Control 234 ± 46 Vs 228 ± 37 Newton). When compared across the gender groups, there was no significant difference between males and females in the effects of any of the drinks on the ART but there was an overall significantly lower MVC in females compared to males. Both energy drink and the control drink significantly improve the reaction time but may not have any effect

  3. Effect of red bull energy drink on auditory reaction time and maximal voluntary contraction.

    PubMed

    Goel, Vartika; Manjunatha, S; Pai, Kirtana M

    2014-01-01

    The use of "Energy Drinks" (ED) is increasing in India. Students specially use these drinks to rejuvenate after strenuous exercises or as a stimulant during exam times. The most common ingredient in EDs is caffeine and a popular ED available and commonly used is Red Bull, containing 80 mg of caffeine in 250 ml bottle. The primary aim of this study was to investigate the effects of Red Bull energy drink on Auditory reaction time and Maximal voluntary contraction. A homogeneous group containing twenty medical students (10 males, 10 females) participated in a crossover study in which they were randomized to supplement with Red Bull (2 mg/kg body weight of caffeine) or isoenergetic isovolumetric noncaffeinated control drink (a combination of Appy Fizz, Cranberry juice and soda) separated by 7 days. Maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) was recorded as the highest of the 3 values of maximal isometric force generated from the dominant hand using hand grip dynamometer (Biopac systems). Auditory reaction time (ART) was the average of 10 values of the time interval between the click sound and response by pressing the push button using hand held switch (Biopac systems). The energy and control drinks after one hour of consumption significantly reduced the Auditory reaction time in males (ED 232 ± 59 Vs 204 ± 34 s and Control 223 ± 57 Vs 210 ± 51 s; p < 0.05) as well as in females (ED 227 ± 56 Vs 214 ± 48 s and Control 224 ± 45 Vs 215 ± 36 s; p < 0.05) but had no effect on MVC in either sex (males ED 381 ± 37 Vs 371 ± 36 and Control 375 ± 61 Vs 363 ± 36 Newton, females ED 227 ± 23 Vs 227 ± 32 and Control 234 ± 46 Vs 228 ± 37 Newton). When compared across the gender groups, there was no significant difference between males and females in the effects of any of the drinks on the ART but there was an overall significantly lower MVC in females compared to males. Both energy drink and the control drink significantly improve the reaction time but may not have any effect

  4. Semen quality parameters as fertility predictors of water buffalo bull spermatozoa during low-breeding season.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Hussain; Andrabi, S Murtaza Hassan; Jahan, Sarwat

    2016-10-01

    The present study was carried out to assess various postthaw semen quality parameters for the prediction of fertility in buffalo bull during low-breeding season. Semen (30 ejaculates) was collected from five adult buffalo bulls with artificial vagina (42 °C). Sperm motility parameters, velocity distribution, motion kinematics, and subpopulations were analyzed by computer-aided sperm motion analyzer (CASA). Moreover, sperm visual motility, supravital plasma membrane integrity, viability/acrosome integrity, viability/mitochondrial transmembrane potential, DNA fragmentation/integrity, and morphology were analyzed by phase-contrast microscope, supravital hypoosmotic swelling test, Trypan blue/Giemsa staining, propidium iodide/"5,5',6,6'-tetrachloro-1,1',3,3'-tetraethylbenzimidazolyl carbocyanine iodide" (JC-1) fluorochromes, neutral comet assay/acridine orange assay and wet mount technique, respectively. Outcome of 528 inseminations was analyzed for in vivo fertility. Pearson's correlation coefficients revealed that sperm progressive motility (%), rapid velocity (%), average path velocity (μm/s), straight line velocity (μm/s), subpopulation one (most rapid, and progressive) of motile spermatozoa (%), supravital plasma membrane integrity (%), and viable spermatozoa with intact acrosome (%) were significantly correlated with in vivo fertility (r = 0.64, P < 0.01; r = 0.57, P < 0.01; r = 0.52, P < 0.01; r = 0.56, P < 0.01; r = 0.73, P < 0.001; r = 0.74, P < 0.001; r = 0.88, P < 0.001); whereas nonviable spermatozoa with damaged acrosome or low-mitochondrial transmembrane potential and comet length (μm) of neutral comet assay were negatively associated with in vivo fertility (r = -0.79, r = -0.75, P < 0.001, and r = -0.60, P < 0.05, respectively). Multiple regression analysis reported that combination of semen quality parameters as predictor of fertility were better (R(2) adjusted = 81.30%, P < 0.001) as compared with single parameter (R(2

  5. Validation of simultaneous deregression of cow and bull breeding values and derivation of appropriate weights.

    PubMed

    Calus, M P L; Vandenplas, J; Ten Napel, J; Veerkamp, R F

    2016-08-01

    Training of genomic prediction in dairy cattle may use deregressed proofs (DRP) as phenotypes. In this case, DRP should be estimated breeding values (EBV) corrected for information of relatives included in the data used for genomic prediction, and adjusted for regression to the mean (i.e., their reliability). Deregression is especially important when combining animals with EBV with low reliability, as commonly the case for cows, and high reliability. The objective of this paper, therefore, was to compare the performance of different deregression procedures for data that include both cow and bull EBV, and to develop and test procedures to obtain the appropriate deregressed weights for the DRP. Considered DRP were EBV: without any adjustment, adjusted for information of parents and regression to the mean, or adjusted for information of all relatives and regression to the mean. Considered deregressed weights were weights of initial EBV: without any adjustment, adjusted for information of parents, or adjusted for information of all relatives. The procedures were compared using simulated data based on an existing pedigree with 1,532 bulls and 13,720 cows that were considered to be included in the data used for genomic prediction. For each cow, 1 to 5 records were simulated. For each bull, an additional 50 to 200 daughters with 1 record each were simulated to generate a source of data that was not used for genomic prediction. The simulated trait had either a heritability of 0.05 or 0.3. The validation involved 3 steps: (1) computation of initial EBV and weights, (2) deregression of those EBV and weights, (3) using deregressed EBV and weights to compute final EBV, (4) comparison of the initial and final EBV and weights. The methods developed to compute appropriate weights for the DRP were either very precise and computationally somewhat demanding for larger data sets, or were less precise but computationally trivial due their approximate nature. Adjusting DRP for all

  6. Noncytopathic bovine viral diarrhea virus can persist in testicular tissue after vaccination of peri-pubertal bulls but prevents subsequent infection.

    PubMed

    Givens, M Daniel; Riddell, Kay P; Walz, Paul H; Rhoades, Jim; Harland, Richard; Zhang, YiJing; Galik, Patricia K; Brodersen, Bruce W; Cochran, Anna M; Brock, Kenny V; Carson, Robert L; Stringfellow, David A

    2007-01-15

    The objectives of this research were to evaluate the risk of prolonged testicular infection as a consequence of vaccination of peri-pubertal bulls with a modified-live, noncytopathic strain of BVDV and to assess vaccine efficacy in preventing prolonged testicular infections after a subsequent acute infection. Seronegative, peri-pubertal bulls were vaccinated subcutaneously with an approximate minimum immunizing dose or a 10x standard dose of modified-live, noncytopathic BVDV or were maintained as unvaccinated controls. Forty-nine days after vaccination, all bulls were intranasally inoculated with a noncytopathic field strain of BVDV. Semen and testicular biopsies collected after vaccination and challenge were assayed for BVDV using virus isolation, reverse transcription-nested PCR, or immunohistochemistry and the identity of viral strains was determined by nucleotide sequencing of PCR products. The vaccine strain of BVDV was detected in testicular tissue of vaccinated bulls as long as 134 days after immunization. Prolonged testicular infections with the challenge strain were detected only in unvaccinated bulls as long as 85 days after challenge. Whereas vaccination caused prolonged testicular infection in some bulls, it did prevent subsequent infection of testicular tissue with the challenge strain. This research demonstrates that subcutaneous vaccination of naïve, peri-pubertal bulls with a noncytopathic, modified-live strain of BVDV can result in prolonged viral replication within testicular tissue. The risk for these prolonged testicular infections to cause venereal transmission of BVDV or subfertility is likely to be low but requires further investigation. PMID:17005300

  7. Distribution and Dynamic Habitat Use of Young Bull Sharks Carcharhinus leucas in a Highly Stratified Northern Gulf of Mexico Estuary

    PubMed Central

    Drymon, J. Marcus; Ajemian, Matthew J.; Powers, Sean P.

    2014-01-01

    Understanding how animals alter habitat use in response to changing abiotic conditions is important for effective conservation management. For bull sharks (Carcharhinus leucas), habitat use has been widely examined in the eastern and western Gulf of Mexico; however, knowledge of their movements and the factors influencing them is lacking for populations in the more temperate north-central Gulf of Mexico. To examine how changes in hydrographic conditions affected the presence of young bull sharks in Mobile Bay, Alabama, thirty-five sharks were fitted with internal acoustic transmitters and monitored with an acoustic monitoring array consisting of thirty-three receivers between June 2009 and December 2010. Tagged sharks ranged in size from 60 to 114 cm fork length and were detected between the upper and lower portions of Mobile Bay. Despite a variety of freshwater sources associated with this highly productive estuary, sharks were most consistently detected at the largest input to the system – the Mobile and Tensaw Rivers. Our findings suggest a combination of hydrographic factors interact to influence the distribution of juvenile bull sharks in Mobile Bay. The factors affecting the probability of detecting at least one bull shark varied both temporally (2009 vs 2010) and spatially (upper vs lower bay). Electivity analysis demonstrated that bull sharks showed highest affinity for warm water (29–32°C), moderate salinities (10–11 psu) and normoxic waters (5–7 mg/l), although these patterns were not consistent between regions or across years. We suggest future studies coupling telemetry and hydrographic variables should, when possible, consider the interactions of multiple environmental parameters when defining the dynamic factors explaining the spatial distribution of coastal sharks. PMID:24841925

  8. Distribution and dynamic habitat use of young bull sharks Carcharhinus leucas in a highly stratified northern Gulf of Mexico estuary.

    PubMed

    Drymon, J Marcus; Ajemian, Matthew J; Powers, Sean P

    2014-01-01

    Understanding how animals alter habitat use in response to changing abiotic conditions is important for effective conservation management. For bull sharks (Carcharhinus leucas), habitat use has been widely examined in the eastern and western Gulf of Mexico; however, knowledge of their movements and the factors influencing them is lacking for populations in the more temperate north-central Gulf of Mexico. To examine how changes in hydrographic conditions affected the presence of young bull sharks in Mobile Bay, Alabama, thirty-five sharks were fitted with internal acoustic transmitters and monitored with an acoustic monitoring array consisting of thirty-three receivers between June 2009 and December 2010. Tagged sharks ranged in size from 60 to 114 cm fork length and were detected between the upper and lower portions of Mobile Bay. Despite a variety of freshwater sources associated with this highly productive estuary, sharks were most consistently detected at the largest input to the system--the Mobile and Tensaw Rivers. Our findings suggest a combination of hydrographic factors interact to influence the distribution of juvenile bull sharks in Mobile Bay. The factors affecting the probability of detecting at least one bull shark varied both temporally (2009 vs 2010) and spatially (upper vs lower bay). Electivity analysis demonstrated that bull sharks showed highest affinity for warm water (29-32 °C), moderate salinities (10-11 psu) and normoxic waters (5-7 mg/l), although these patterns were not consistent between regions or across years. We suggest future studies coupling telemetry and hydrographic variables should, when possible, consider the interactions of multiple environmental parameters when defining the dynamic factors explaining the spatial distribution of coastal sharks. PMID:24841925

  9. Further investigations into the relationship between ultimate pH and tenderness for beef samples from bulls and steers.

    PubMed

    Purchas, R W; Aungsupakorn, R

    1993-01-01

    Samples of longissimus dorsi muscle from 150 cattle comprising Friesian bulls and steers and Charolais × Angus cross steers, were used to investigate the nature of the relationship between ultimate pH and beef tenderness under conditions where cold-shortening was avoided. A modified Warner-Bratzler (WB) shear machine with a square- rather than a vee-blade enabled several aspects of tenderness to be evaluated, including peak force (PF), initial yield force (IY), PF-IY, and an index of total work done. The two steer groups differed little in meat quality characteristics, but, in terms of six major hindquarter cuts, the Charolais cross group yielded 14·3% more meat per unit live weight, due to a combination of a superior dressing-out percent and a higher cutability. Relative to Friesian steers, the bulls produced beef with a higher ultimate pH (P < 0·001), and after adjustment to a common pH, the bull beef was tougher for all WB parameters except PF-IY. Cooking loss was higher for beef from bulls after adjustment for pH. Although reduced by pH adjustment, beef from bulls remained significantly darker than that from steers (P < 0·05) based on reflectance measurements. Maximum toughness in terms of PF, IY, and work index was at an ultimate pH of 6·0-6·1, but the peak was much less clear for PF-IY. The decline in tenderness with an increase in ultimate pH to 6·2 was associated with a decrease in sarcomere length. This result supports a previous suggestion that shortening explains, at least in part, the lower average tenderness at intermediate pH values. PMID:22060661

  10. Time trends, environmental factors and genetic basis of semen traits collected in Holstein bulls under commercial conditions.

    PubMed

    Karoui, Sofiene; Díaz, Clara; Serrano, Magdalena; Cue, Roger; Celorrio, Idoia; Carabaño, María J

    2011-03-01

    The fact that results of artificial insemination (AI) are declining in highly selected dairy cattle populations has added a renewed interest to the evaluation of male fertility. Data from 42,348 ejaculates collected from 1990 to 2007 on 502 Holstein bulls were analysed in a Bayesian framework to provide estimates of the evolution of semen traits routinely collected in AI centres throughout the last decades of intense selection for production traits and estimate genetic parameters. The traits under consideration were volume (VOL), concentration (CONC), number of spermatozoa per ejaculate (NESPZ), mass motility score (MM), individual motility (IM), and post-thawing motility (PTM). The environmental factors studied were year-season and week of collection, which account for changes in environmental and technical conditions along time, age at collection, ejaculate order, time from previous collection (TPC) and time between collection and freezing (TCF) (only for PTM). Bull's inbreeding coefficient (Fi), bull's permanent environmental and additive genetic effects were also considered. The use of reduced models was evaluated using the Bayes factor. For all the systematic effects tested, strong or very strong evidence in favour of including the effect in the model was obtained, except for Fi for motility traits and TCF for PTM. No systematic time trends for environment or bull effects were observed, except for PTM, which showed an increasing environmental trend, associated with improvements in freezing-thawing protocols. Heritability estimates were moderate (0.16-0.22), except for IM, which presented a low value (0.07). Genetic correlations among motilities and between motilities and CONC were large and positive [0.38-0.87], VOL showed a negative correlation with CONC (-0.13) but with ample HPD 95%. The magnitude of heritabilities would allow an efficient selection if required and grants the use of these traits as indicators of the sperm viability component of bulls

  11. ALS - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - ALS ... The following organizations are good resources for information on amyotrophic lateral sclerosis : Muscular Dystrophy Association -- mda.org/disease/amyotrophic-lateral-sclerosis National Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) Registry -- ...

  12. ALS Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... ALS. Find Out How Our Mission Leading the fight to treat and cure ALS through global research ... you participate, advocate, and donate, you advance the fight to find the cure and lead us toward ...

  13. Head roll stabilisation in the nocturnal bull ant Myrmecia pyriformis: implications for visual navigation.

    PubMed

    Raderschall, Chloé A; Narendra, Ajay; Zeil, Jochen

    2016-05-15

    Ant foragers are known to memorise visual scenes that allow them to repeatedly travel along idiosyncratic routes and to return to specific places. Guidance is provided by a comparison between visual memories and current views, which critically depends on how well the attitude of the visual system is controlled. Here we show that nocturnal bull ants stabilise their head to varying degrees against locomotion-induced body roll movements, and this ability decreases as light levels fall. There are always un-compensated head roll oscillations that match the frequency of the stride cycle. Head roll stabilisation involves both visual and non-visual cues as ants compensate for body roll in complete darkness and also respond with head roll movements when confronted with visual pattern oscillations. We show that imperfect head roll control degrades navigation-relevant visual information and discuss ways in which navigating ants may deal with this problem. PMID:26994172

  14. Changes in muscle gene expression related to metabolism according to growth potential in young bulls.

    PubMed

    Bernard, Carine; Cassar-Malek, Isabelle; Renand, Gilles; Hocquette, Jean-François

    2009-06-01

    To analyse the effects of genetic selection in favour of high muscle development on muscle gene expression, oligonucleotide microarrays were used to compare the transcriptome of Longissimusthoracis muscle from 15- and 19-month-old Charolais bull calves divergently selected for high (H) or low (L) muscle growth. Transcriptome data revealed that about two thirds of the genes involved in glycolysis were up-regulated at 15 and at 19months of age in H animals. Lastly, some differentially expressed genes were associated with muscle mass in the carcass (FGF6, PLD2) independently of fat deposition and meat quality. Selection for muscle growth potential is associated with modified expression of some genes involved in growth, and also with increased expression of genes involved in glycolysis. Furthermore, this change in muscle metabolism is likely to be dissociated from fat deposition and beef quality, providing new criteria for genetic selection in favour of muscle growth. PMID:20416758

  15. Crustal Thickness on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge: Bull's-Eye Gravity Anomalies and Focused Accretion.

    PubMed

    Tolstoy, M; Harding, A J; Orcutt, J A

    1993-10-29

    Spreading segments of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge show negative bull's-eye anomalies in the mantle Bouguer gravity field. Seismic refraction results from 33 degrees S indicate that these anomalies can be accounted for by variations in crustal thickness along a segment. The crust is thicker in the center and thinner at the end of the spreading segment, and these changes are attributable to variations in the thickness of layer 3. The results show that accretion is focused at a slow-spreading ridge, that axial valley depth reflects the thickness of the underlying crust, and that along-axis density variations should be considered in the interpretation of gravity data. PMID:17812339

  16. ESR (electron spin resonance)-determined osmotic behavior of bull spermatozoa

    SciTech Connect

    Du, J.; Kleinhans, F.W.; Spitzer, V.J.; Critser, J.K. . Dept. of Medical Research); Horstman, L. . School of Veterinary Medicine); Mazur, P. )

    1990-01-01

    Our laboratories are pursuing a fundamental approach to the problems of semen cryopreservation. For many cell types (human red cells, yeast, HeLa) it has been demonstrated that there is an optimum cooling rate for cryopreservation. Faster rates allow insufficient time for cell dehydration and result in intracellular ice formation and cell death. It is possible to predict this optimal rate provided that the cell acts as an ideal osmometer and several other cell parameters are known such as the membrane hydraulic conductivity. It is the purpose of this work to examine the osmotic response of bull sperm to sucrose and NaCl utilizing electron spin resonance (ESR) to measure cell volume. For calibration purposes we also measured the ESR response of human red cells (RBC), the osmotic response of which is well documented with other methods. 15 refs., 1 fig.

  17. Seminal plasma protein profiles of ejaculates obtained by internal artificial vagina and electroejaculation in Brahman bulls.

    PubMed

    Rego, J P A; Moura, A A; Nouwens, A S; McGowan, M R; Boe-Hansen, G B

    2015-09-01

    The present study was conducted to investigate if differences exist in the seminal plasma protein profile from mature Brahman bulls using two methods of semen collection: internal artificial vagina (IAV) and electroejaculation (EEJ). Semen was collected four times from three bulls on the same day and parameters were assessed immediately post-collection. Seminal plasma proteins were evaluated by 2-D fluorescence difference gel electrophoresis and identified by mass spectrometry. Semen volume was greater (P < 0.05) for EEJ (4.6 ± 0.35 mL) than for IAV (1.86 ± 0.24 mL) but sperm concentration was greater in IAV (1505 ± 189 × 10(6) sperm/mL) than in EEJ samples (344 ± 87 × 10(6) sperm/mL). Sperm motility and the percentage of normal sperm were not different between treatments. Total concentration of seminal plasma proteins was greater for samples collected by IAV as compared to EEJ (19.3 ± 0.9 compared with 13.0 ± 1.8 mg/mL, P < 0.05; respectively). Based on 2-D gels, 22 spots had a greater volume (P < 0.05) in gels derived from IAV samples, corresponding to 21 proteins identified as transferrin, albumin, epididymal secretory glutathione peroxidase, among others. Thirty-three spots, corresponding to 26 proteins, had a greater volume (P < 0.05) in gels derived from EEJ samples. These proteins were identified as spermadhesin-1, Bovine Sperm Protin 1, 3 and 5 isoforms, angiogenin-1, alpha-1B-glycoprotein, clusterin, nucleobindin-1, cathepsins, spermadhesin Z13, annexins, among others. Thus, proteins in greater amounts in samples obtained by IAV and EEJ were mainly of epididymal origin and accessory sex glands, respectively. PMID:26282524

  18. Effect of feeding intensity and time on feed on intramuscular fatty acid composition of Simmental bulls.

    PubMed

    Sami, A S; Augustini, C; Schwarz, F J

    2004-06-01

    Seventy-two Simmental bulls, weighing 489 kg initially and approximately 15 months old, were divided into four groups to determine the effects of feeding intensity and time on feed on intramuscular fatty acid (FA) composition. Two groups of 18 bulls each were extensively (E) or intensively (I) fed on maize silage and concentrates with a daily gain of 943 g (E) or 1371 g (I). Half of each group were slaughtered after 100 days (S) or 138 days (L) on feed. In addition to carcass fatness parameters, intramuscular FA composition was also measured. Only small differences in the sum of saturated FA (SFA) percentages were found with 47.7 and 47.5% FA methyl esters (FAME) for SE and LE, respectively, and 48.7% FAME for each of SI and LI. Monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA) significantly increased with longer, and higher feeding intensity to 44.2% FAME (LI), whereas the other groups had similar contents of 41.9, 42.2 and 42.0% FAME (SE, LE and SI respectively). Polyunsaturated FA (PUFA) decreased with higher feeding intensity to 8.39% (SI) and 6.71% (LI) FAME (p < 0.05) in comparison with 9.48% (SE) and 9.54% (LE). Intensive feeding decreased the ratio of PUFA : SFA to 0.17 (SI) and 0.14 (LI, p < 0.05) in comparison with 0.20 (SE and LE). The mean conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) concentration was 0.41% FAME. Time on feed had only a small effect on the FA composition compared with feeding intensity. No significant relationships were detected between meat quality attributes and the pattern of FA. PMID:15189422

  19. A framework for assessing the feasibility of native fish conservation translocations: Applications to threatened bull trout

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Galloway, Benjamin T.; Muhlfeld, Clint C.; Guy, Christopher S.; Downs, Christopher C.; Fredenberg, Wade A.

    2016-01-01

    There is an urgent need to consider more aggressive and direct interventions for the conservation of freshwater fishes that are threatened by invasive species, habitat loss, and climate change. Conservation introduction (moving a species outside its indigenous range to other areas where conditions are predicted to be more suitable) is one type of translocation strategy that fisheries managers can use to establish new conservation populations in areas of refugia. To date, however, there are few examples of successful conservation-based introductions. Many attempts fail to establish new populations—in part because environmental factors that might influence success are inadequately evaluated before the translocation is implemented. We developed a framework to assess the feasibility of rescuing threatened fish populations through translocation into historically unoccupied stream and lake habitats. The suitability of potential introduction sites was evaluated based on four major components: the recipient habitat, recipient community, donor population, and future threats. Specific questions were then developed to evaluate each major component. The final assessment was based on a scoring system that addressed each question by using criteria developed from characteristics representative of highly suitable habitats and populations. This framework was used to evaluate the proposed within-drainage translocation of three Bull Trout Salvelinus confluentus populations in Glacier National Park, Montana. Our results indicated that within-drainage translocation is a feasible strategy for conserving locally adapted populations of Bull Trout through the creation of new areas of refugia in Glacier National Park. The framework provides a flexible platform that can help managers make informed decisions for moving threatened fishes into new areas of refugia for conservation and recovery programs.

  20. Comparative transcript profiling of gene expression of fresh and frozen-thawed bull sperm.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaoli; Wang, Yonggui; Zhu, Huabin; Hao, Haisheng; Zhao, Xueming; Qin, Tong; Wang, Dong

    2015-03-01

    Although frozen semen is widely used commercially in the cattle breeding industry, the resultant pregnancy rate is lower than that produced using fresh semen. Cryodamage is a major problem in semen cryopreservation; it causes changes to sperm transcripts that may influence sperm function and motility. We used suppression subtractive hybridization technology to establish a complementary DNA subtractive library, and combined microarray technology and sequence homology analysis to screen and analyze differentially expressed genes in the library, comparing fresh sperm with the frozen-thawed sperm of nine bulls. Overall, 19 positive differentially expressed unigenes were identified using microarray data and Significance Analysis of Microarrays software (|score (d)| ≥ 2, fold change > 1, and false discovery rate < 0.05). Of 15 differentially expressed unigenes exhibited high sequence homology (E-value ≤ 1 × 10(-3)), 12 were upregulated in frozen-thawed sperm, the remaining 3 were upregulated in fresh sperm, and 4 other clones were identified as unknown because of incomplete sequences or because there was no significant sequence homology (E-value > 1E(-03)) and were considered novel genes. The expression of five of these genes-RPL31, PRKCE, PAPSS2, PLP1, and R1G7-was verified by quantitative real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. There was a significant differential expression of the RPL31 gene (P < 0.05). Our preliminary results provide an overview of differentially expressed transcripts between fresh and frozen-thawed sperm of Holstein bulls. PMID:25459024

  1. Technical note: Relationship between infrared thermography and heat production in young bulls.

    PubMed

    Gomes, R A; Busato, K C; Ladeira, M M; Johnson, K A; Galvão, M C; Rodrigues, A C; Lourençoni, D; Chizzotti, M L

    2016-03-01

    The traditional techniques to measure heat production (HP) are calorimetry (direct and indirect) and comparative slaughter. Both methods are expensive and require extensive amounts of time and infrastructure. Infrared thermography (IRT) could be a faster and less expensive alternative to estimate cattle HP. The objective of this project was to evaluate the use of the IRT technique as an indicator of HP in cattle. A total of 24 bulls (12 Nellore and 12 Black Angus) with initial BW of 380 ± 7 kg were used. Initially, 4 animals of each breed were harvested (baseline animals) and simple regressions were developed for each breed from these baseline animals to estimate the initial chemical composition of the remaining bulls. Eight animals of each breed were fed a silage/concentrate diet for ad libitum intake in individual stalls. On the 25th, 50th, and 75th experimental day, infrared thermal images (Fluke Ti 55ft; Fluke Corporation) were taken of each animal's face to access skin and ocular surface temperatures. A metabolism trial was conducted to estimate the ME intake (MEI). After 84 experimental days, the cattle were harvested and retained energy (RE) and HP were calculated. The data were analyzed using the MIXED and REG procedures of SAS adopting a significance level of 0.05. Angus cattle had a greater daily MEI, HP, and skin and eye temperatures than Nellore. We found significant correlations ( ≤ 0.005) between daily HP and maximum ( = 0.65) and average skin temperatures ( = 0.65) and maximum ( = 0.65) and average ocular surface ( = 0.69) temperatures recorded on d 50. Infrared thermography has potential to be used to evaluate HP in cattle. PMID:27065272

  2. Soil Geochemical Control Over Nematode Populations in Bull Pass, McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poage, M. A.; Barrett, J. E.; Virginia, R. A.; Wall, D. H.

    2005-12-01

    The McMurdo Dry Valleys occupy the largest ice-free region of Antarctica and are characterized by climatic conditions among the most extreme on Earth. Despite the harsh environmental conditions, some soils of the dry valleys host simple low-diversity ecosystems dominated by microbes and several taxa of metazoans, predominantly nematodes. Distributions, abundance, and diversity of these biota appear to be related to the highly variable soil geochemistry (pH, conductivity, nitrate, sulfate, chloride) of the dry valleys. Bull Pass is a glacially carved valley within the dry valleys. An ancient lake margin near the valley floor creates a continuous gradient spanning the full range of geochemical parameters found across the entire McMurdo Dry Valleys system. This unique setting provides the opportunity to systematically investigate the soil geochemical control on local biodiversity and establish, on the spatial scale of hundreds of meters, correlations between nematode populations and individual geochemical parameters that have application at the regional scale. We measured soil geochemistry and nematode population data from a 1500-meter transect across this ancient lake margin. There were significant negative correlations between live nematode abundance and concentrations of soil nitrate, sulfate and chloride as well as total soil salinity, consistent with recent laboratory experiments showing strong salinity inhibition of nematode survival. A logistical regression analysis based on a compilation of published datasets from across the dry valleys was designed to calculate the probably of live nematode populations occurring given a particular soil chemistry, using the dataset from the Bull Pass transect as a case study to field-test the model. Small-scale chemical and biological gradients can provide insights on the distribution of soil biota at much larger regional scales.

  3. Osmotic effects on volume and motility of bull sperm exposed to membrane permeable and nonpermeable agents.

    PubMed

    Liu, Z; Foote, R H

    1998-11-01

    Factorially arranged experiments were designed to study prefreeze packed cell volume (PCV) changes and associated percentages of motile and unstained bull sperm in simple macromolecule-free Tyrode's solution and egg yolk-Tris (EYT), varying in osmolarity, and with addition of rapidly permeating cryoprotectants, glycerol and 1,2-propanediol, and nonpermeating substances, sucrose and NaCl. The percentage of motile and unstained sperm was assessed after resuspending sperm in 300 mOsm/L Tyrode's solution. At 25 degreesC PCV increased in Tyrode's solution as osmolarity was decreased from 250 to 150 mOsm/L and decreased as Tyrode's solution was increased to 400 mosmol/L. The relationship of PCV to the reciprocal of the osmolarity was essentially linear over the range of 150 to 400 mOsm/L, but PCV did not decrease further in solutions ranging from 500 to 1000 mOsm/L. The percentage of motile sperm declined to zero in Tyrode's solution at 700 mOsm/L, but 40% of the sperm were still unstained in 1000 mOsm/L solutions. The addition of glycerol or 1,2-propanediol had little effect on PCV. With glycerol or 1,2-propanediol added to 308 mOsm/L Tyrode's solution to give a total of 1267 mOsm/L, there were 49 and 56% motile sperm, respectively, compared to 1% with NaCl added to give 787 mOsm/L. The PCV and percentage of motile sperm suspended in EYT responded to osmotic changes similar to those reported for Tyrode's solution at both 25 and 5 degreesC. Some sperm remained motile after initial exposure to 800 mOsm/L solutions. These findings may have application in improving bull sperm cryopreservation. PMID:9787066

  4. The in vitro effect of leptin on semen quality of water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) bulls

    PubMed Central

    Khaki, Amir; Batavani, Rooz Ali; Najafi, Gholamreza

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the probable effects of leptin addition in different levels to the semen extender on sperm quality (motility and motility parameters, viability, sperm membrane integrity, and DNA damage). Semen specimens were evaluated immediately after leptin addition, equilibration time and after thawing the frozen semen. Five healthy buffalo bulls (5 ejaculates from each bull) were used. Each ejaculate was diluted at 37 ˚C with tris-based extender containing 0 (control), 10, 20, 50, 100, and 200 ng mL-1 leptin. The diluted semen was kept 4 hr in refrigerator to reach to the equilibration time and then packed in 0.5 mL French straws and frozen in liquid nitrogen. Our results showed that, in the fresh semen, no significant difference was observed in all sperm quality parameters evaluated among all of the examined leptin concentrations. Addition of 10 ng mL-1 leptin into semen extender significantly preserved sperm motility, all of the motility parameters, and viability in equilibrated semen compared to that of control group. However, in vitro addition of 200 ng mL-1 leptin, significantly decreased theses parameters. In the frozen thawed semen, all leptin concentrations decreased sperm motility and viability, but significant decrease was observed in concentrations of 100 and 200 ng mL-1. Adding leptin to semen extender did not have any significant influence on sperm DNA damage and sperm membrane integrity in all examined groups. These findings suggest that in vitro addition of 10 ng mL-1 leptin could preserve sperm motility and viability in cooled semen of buffaloes. PMID:25593679

  5. The uses of infrared thermography to evaluate the effects of climatic variables in bull's reproduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menegassi, Silvio Renato Oliveira; Pereira, Gabriel Ribas; Dias, Eduardo Antunes; Koetz, Celso; Lopes, Flávio Guiselli; Bremm, Carolina; Pimentel, Concepta; Lopes, Rubia Branco; da Rocha, Marcela Kuczynski; Carvalho, Helena Robattini; Barcellos, Júlio Otavio Jardim

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the seasonal effects of the environment on sperm quality in subtropical region determined by temperature and humidity index (THI). We used 20 Brangus bulls (5/8 Angus × 3/8 Nellore) aged approximately 24 months at the beginning of the study. Semen evaluations were performed twice per season during 1 year. Climate THI data were collected from an automatic weather station from the National Institute of Meteorology. Infrared thermography images were used to determine the temperature of the proximal and distal poles of the testis to assess the testicular temperature gradient (TG). The seasonal effects on seminal and climatic variables were analyzed with ANOVA using MIXED procedure of SAS. Sperm motility in spring (60.1 %), summer (57.6 %), and autumn (64.5 %) showed difference compared to winter (73.0 %; P < 0.01). TG was negatively correlated with THI at 18 days (spermiogenesis) (-0.76; P < 0.05) and at 12 days (epididymal transit) (-0.85; P < 0.01). Ocular temperature (OcT) had a positive correlation with THI at 18 days (0.78; P < 0.05) and at 12 days (0.84; P < 0.01). Motility showed a negative correlation with THI only at 18 days (-0.79; P < 0.05). During spermiogenesis, the TG had higher negative correlation compared to OcT (-0.97; P < 0.01) and rectal temperature (-0.72; P < 0.05). Spermatozoa with distal midpiece reflex were correlated with THI during transit epididymis (0.72; P < 0.05). Seminal parameters are not affected when THI reaches 93.0 (spermiogenesis) and 88.0 (epididymal transit). We concluded that infrared thermography can be adopted as an indirect method in order to assess the effect of environmental changes in TG and OcT of Brangus bulls.

  6. Bull exposure and an increased within-day milking to suckling interval reduced postpartum anoestrus in dual purpose cows.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Hernández, P; García-Winder, M; Gallegos-Sánchez, J

    2002-12-16

    It is hypothesized that the combined effects of suckling and milking in the dual purpose cows is one of the main suppressors of reproductive efficiency in this production system. The experiment described here examined whether managing the interval between milking and suckling could reduce the postpartum anoestrous period and whether the presence of a teaser bull could enhance the effects of these managements. The experiment involved 39 Bos taurus x Bos indicus cows which had an average weight of 523.0 +/- 12.8 kg (mean +/- S.E.M.) and body condition score of 5-7 (scale 1-9) at calving. The cows and calves grazed separate pastures and the cows were supplemented with 2 kg 17% CP concentrates and 1 kg molasses per cow per day. The experiment was conducted over the first 100 days postpartum. Cows were hand-milked once per day in the presence of the calf to stimulate milk release. The factors in the 2 x 2 design were the milking to suckling interval (0 h, control suckling; CS versus 8 h prolonged-delay suckling; PDS) and no exposure versus exposure to a teaser bull (B). Cows were assigned at random within calving date to the four treatments: CS (n = 10), PDS (n = 10), CS-B (n = 9) and PDS-B (n = 10). Cows on treatments CS and CS-B had three-quarters of the udder milked and one-quarter was not milked. The entire udder was milked on those treatments where there was an interval between milking and suckling. The bull was introduced 7 days after calving in treatments where the cows were exposed to a teaser bull. Body weights of cows and calves and cow milk yield were recorded. Weekly blood samples were collected for plasma progesterone assay. Data were analyzed by ANOVA in a 2 x 2 factorial design and by chi(2)-test. There were no statistically significant differences between treatments in cow body weight at calving and at 100 days postpartum, nor in milk yield (overall mean 6.0 +/- 1.1 kg per day). Calf daily gain was 598 +/- 25 g for treatments CS and CS-B in which

  7. Enhanced early-life nutrition of Holstein bulls increases sperm production potential without decreasing postpubertal semen quality.

    PubMed

    Dance, Alysha; Thundathil, Jacob; Blondin, Patrick; Kastelic, John

    2016-08-01

    Enhanced early-life nutrition (∼130% of required energy and protein) increased testes size and weight (∼20-25%) and reduced age at puberty (∼1 month) in beef and dairy bulls, compared with those fed 70% of dietary requirements. The objective was to determine effects of early-life (2-31 weeks) nutritional modulation on feed costs, predicted number of harvestable sperm and doses of semen, and semen quality. Calves (∼1 week old) were randomly allocated into three groups that were fed 4, 6, or 8 L/day of milk (low [n = 8], medium [n = 9], and high groups [n = 9], respectively) from ages 2 to 8 weeks. Thereafter, they were weaned, transitioned onto barley silage-based diets, to receive ∼70, 100, or 130% of recommended amounts of energy and protein (feed costs were ∼CDN$280 more per bull to feed high versus low diets from 2 to 31 weeks). After 31 weeks, all bulls were fed a medium diet. Semen was collected, by electroejaculation, from 51 to 73 weeks, extended, chilled, and cryopreserved. Bulls fed high nutrition were numerically younger (P = 0.45) at sexual maturity (sperm with ≥30% progressive motility, ≥70% morphologically normal, and ≤20% abnormal heads), first acceptable post-chill sperm motility (>50%; P = 0.66) and first acceptable post-thaw motility (>25% progressive; P = 0.25) than bulls in the low-nutrition group. Semen from three bulls per group was used for in vitro fertilization (total of 1249 bovine oocytes); there were no significant differences among groups in fertilization percentage (mean ± SEM of 68.0 ± 8.7, 77.1 ± 3.5, and 68.7 ± 4.5% for low, medium, and high, respectively) or blastocyst yield (31.5 ± 5.6, 41.4 ± 4.9, and 33.7 ± 4.6%). On the basis of analysis of 2D gels of sperm proteins, 380 spots were identified on the fused master gel, but no spots were differentially expressed across groups. Overall, there were no significant differences in semen quality or sperm function among bulls fed

  8. Bull trout in the Boundary System: managing connectivity and the feasibility of a reintroduction in the lower Pend Oreille River, northeastern Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dunham, Jason B.; Taylor, Eric B.; Allendorf, Fred W.

    2014-01-01

    Assess the role of passage over Boundary Dam, in the context of other factors in the system that may influence the feasibility of establishing a self-sustaining bull trout population in the Boundary system.

  9. Relationships of metabolic hormones and serum glucose to growth and reproductive development in performance-tested Angus, Brangus, and Brahman bulls.

    PubMed

    Thomas, M G; Enns, R M; Hallford, D M; Keisler, D H; Obeidat, B S; Morrison, C D; Hernandez, J A; Bryant, W D; Flores, R; Lopez, R; Narro, L

    2002-03-01

    Understanding mechanisms that regulate growth and reproduction are important for improving selection strategies in cattle. In this study, Angus, Brangus, and Brahman bulls (n = 7 per breed) of similar age were selected from a group of 65 weanlings. Bulls were evaluated after weaning (i.e., approximately 6 mo of age) for 112 d for serum concentrations of metabolic hormones and glucose, growth, and reproductive traits. Performance data and blood sera were collected on d 0, 28, 56, 84, and 112. Sera were also collected in periods from d 50 to 59 (56D) and 103 to 112 (112D). Angus bulls were heavier (P < 0.05) throughout the study than Brahman bulls and were heavier than Brangus bulls on d 56, 84, and 112. Initial and final BW for Angus, Brangus, and Brahman bulls were 292.7, 260.6, and 230.4 and 468.3, 435.6, and 350.7 +/- 12 kg, respectively. Conversely, Brahman bulls had greater hip height (P < 0.05) than Brangus, and Brangus were taller (P < 0.05) than Angus. Angus bulls had the greatest (P < 0.05) scrotal circumference (SC) and Brahman bulls the least. Mean SC across days was 31.5, 29.7, and 25.0 +/- 0.6 cm for the three respective breeds. Serum testosterone was greater (P < 0.01) in Angus and Brangus bulls (10.0 and 8.9 +/- 1.4 ng/mL) than in Brahman bulls (4.0 +/- 1.4 ng/mL) throughout the study. After d 112, 100, 86, and 57% of the Angus, Brangus, and Brahman bulls passed a breeding soundness exam (P = 0.51). Serum concentrations of IGF-I and leptin were greater (P < or = 0.06) in Angus bulls on d 56, 84, and 112 than in Brangus and Brahman bulls. Serum concentrations of GH (P < 0.08) and glucose (P < 0.03) were greater in Brangus bulls than in Angus or Brahman bulls throughout the study. Prediction analyses suggested that serum concentrations of leptin could be used to predict (P < or = 0.08) BW and SC (R2 > 0.82) in the 56D and 112D periods among these breeds. Leptin was also useful in predicting (P < or = 0.09) serum concentrations of GH and testosterone in

  10. Feed restriction and realimentation in Holstein-Friesian bulls: II. Effect on blood pressure and systemic concentrations of metabolites and metabolic hormones.

    PubMed

    Keogh, K; Waters, S M; Kelly, A K; Wylie, A R G; Sauerwein, H; Sweeney, T; Kenny, D A

    2015-07-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the endocrine response and metabolic rate in Holstein–Friesian bulls during restricted feeding and realimentation. Sixty bulls were allocated to 1 of 2 feeding regimes: 1) restricted feed allowance (RES; n = 30) or 2) ad libitum feeding (ADLIB; n = 30) for 125 d (Period 1). The bulls in both treatment groups were then offered ad libitum access to feed for a further 55 d (Period 2). Five and 4 blood samples were collected during periods 1 (n = 60) and 2 (n = 30), respectively. Plasma samples were assayed for hormones and metabolites including insulin, IGF-1, leptin, thyroid hormones, albumin, β-hydroxy butyrate (BHB), creatinine, glucose, NEFA, total protein, triglycerides, and urea. Blood pressure measurements were determined on all animals at the beginning and end of each period as an indicator of metabolic rate. During Period 1, RES bulls gained 0.6 kg/d whereas ADLIB bulls grew at 1.9 kg/d. Following realimentation in Period 2, RES bulls displayed accelerated growth, gaining 2.5 kg/d compared with 1.4 kg/d for ADLIB bulls (P < 0.001). Treatment × period interactions (P < 0.05) were evident for all plasma analytes assayed. During Period 1, RES bulls had lower concentrations of glucose and insulin, reflecting their lower feed intake. Adipose and protein tissue mobilization was evident through greater concentrations of triglycerides, NEFA, BHB, creatinine, albumin, and total protein in RES animals in Period 1. Additionally, the effect of restricted feeding on growth was apparent through lower concentrations of IGF-1. A lower metabolic rate was also apparent through lower concentrations of thyroid hormones and fewer beats per minute in RES bulls during Period 1. During the initial stage of realimentation in Period 2, IGF-1, insulin, thyroid hormones, creatinine, glucose, total protein, and triglycerides followed the same pattern as per Period 1 with divergence maintained between RES and ADLIB bulls (P < 0.05), whereas

  11. The impact of dietary sugarcane addition to finishing diets on performance, apparent digestibility, and fatty acid composition of Holstein × Zebu bulls.

    PubMed

    Rotta, P P; Filho, S C Valadares; Engle, T E; Costa E Silva, L F; Sathler, D F T; Prado, I N; Bonafé, E G; Zawadzki, F; Visentainer, J V

    2014-06-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the influence of corn silage (CS) or sugarcane (SC) additions to finishing diets on voluntary intake, apparent digestibility, animal performance, and LM fatty acid (FA) composition in crossbred Holstein × Zebu bulls. Forty-two bulls (initial BW 328 ± 39.2 kg and an initial age of 23.5 mo) were used in this experiment. A completely randomized design was used to examine roughage source (CS vs. SC) and ratio of concentrate (CO) on nutrient utilization and production. The experimental diets consisted of 1) 60% CS and 40% CO on DM basis fed for 84 d (CS60:40), 2) 60% CS and 40% CO on DM basis fed for 42 d and 40% CS and 60% CO on DM basis fed for 42 d (CS reverse diet [CSR]), 3) 40% CS and 60% CO on DM basis fed for 84 d (CS40:60), 4) 60% SC and 40% CO on DM basis fed for 84 d (SC60:40), 5) 60% SC and 40% CO on DM basis fed for 42 d and 40% SC and 60% CO on DM basis fed for 42 d (SC reverse diet [SCR]), and 6) 40% SC and 60% CO on DM basis fed for 84 d (SC40:60). Dry matter and NDF intakes were greater (P < 0.01) in bulls fed CS-based diets than bulls fed SC-based diets. The greatest (P < 0.01) DM and CP digestibility were observed in bulls fed SC-based diets. Bulls fed CSR and CS40:60 had greater (P < 0.01) ADG than bulls fed SC-based diets. However, ADG was similar (P = 0.52) in bulls fed CS60:40, CSR, and SC40:60 diets. The percentage of C18:3 n-3 and C20:5 n-3 were greater (P < 0.01) in LM of bulls fed SC-based diets. The percentage of CLA was greater (P < 0.01) in LM of bulls fed SC60:40 than those fed CS-based diets. The findings of the present study indicate that SC40:60 can replace CS60:40 and CSR in finishing diets and, moreover, roughage source significantly altered the FA composition of crossbred Holstein × Zebu bulls LM. PMID:24713164

  12. Fertilizing potential in vitro of semen from young beef bulls containing a high or low percentage of sperm with a proximal droplet.

    PubMed

    Amann, R P; Seidel, G E; Mortimer, R G

    2000-12-01

    Fertilizing potential of semen containing a high percentage of sperm with a proximal droplet was evaluated using IVF. Design criteria: (a) specified semen with >100 x 10(6) sperm/mL with >40% progressively motile spermatozoa, after collection via electro-stimulation; (b) designated a droplet group, bulls whose semen contained >30% spermatozoa with a proximal droplet and <25% with other morphological abnormalities, and a control group, with <25% abnormalities of any type; and (c) stipulated evaluations at 11 to 13 mo of age and again -4 wk later. At the initial evaluation, when a bull was assigned to the droplet group, the next bull meeting control criteria was designated his pair; 15 pairs in four herds were studied. Semen was extended in egg-yolk citrate, cooled to 5 degrees C over approximately 2.5 h, and held at 5 degrees C. After 20 to 44 h, spermatozoa were processed by swimup, incubated with heparin, and co-cultured with oocytes (35 to 56 oocytes/sample; 18 h). Ova were observed for cleavage approximately 42 h after co-culture, and further development was evaluated on day 8. At first evaluation, cleavage rates were 18 and 46% for droplet and control groups (P < 0.01); semen had 34 to 70% and 0 to 12% droplet spermatozoa. For 10 of 15 droplet bulls, <10% of ova were cleaved whereas cleavage rate was >15% for all control bulls. At second evaluation, only three droplet bulls still had >30% of spermatozoa with a proximal droplet. Cleavage rates increased accordingly; only four droplet bulls had <10% cleaved ova and 10 had >34% cleaved ova. Three control bulls had <10% cleaved ova and nine had > or = 34% cleaved ova. Considering all 60 ejaculates, correlation between percentage of spermatozoa with a proximal droplet and percentage of cleaved ova was -0.49 (P < 0.0 1). Correlations between percentages of motile or normal spermatozoa in field evaluations and outcome in IVF were 0.28 and 0.52. Laboratory evaluations of spermatozoa concomitant with preparation for IVF

  13. Overdominance Effect of the Bovine Ghrelin Receptor (GHSR1a)-DelR242 Locus on Growth in Japanese Shorthorn Weaner Bulls: Heterozygote Advantage in Bull Selection and Molecular Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Komatsu, Masanori; Sato, Yoichi; Negami, Tatsuki; Terada, Tohru; Sasaki, Osamu; Yasuda, Jumpei; Arakawa, Aisaku; Yoshida, Chikara; Takahashi, Hideaki; Malau-Aduli, Aduli E. O.; Suzuki, Keiichi; Shimizu, Kentaro

    2014-01-01

    Ghrelin and the ghrelin receptor (GHSR1a) are involved in growth hormone secretion, food intake, and several other important functions. Ghrelin acts on GHSR1a and induces signal transduction via the Gαq subunit. In our previous study, we identified the DelR242 (3R) allele, a truncated 3-arginine residue (3R) [major type: 4 arginine residues (4R)] of the third intracellular loop of GHSR1a, with a high frequency in Japanese Shorthorn bulls (0.43) but with a low frequency in other cattle breeds (0.00–0.09). To further investigate the reasons for the higher frequency of the 3R allele, we performed several experiments. In this study, we found a significant sex difference in the frequency of the 3R allele. Statistical analysis revealed a significant overdominance effect of the DelR242 locus on growth in Japanese Shorthorn weaner bulls. However, additive/dominance/overdominance effects of the 3R allele on carcass traits in adult steers and dams were not significant. The mode of the overdominance effect was estimated to be solely controlled by the single DelR242 locus without any other linked loci using linkage disequilibrium analysis in GHSR1a. These results indicated that 4R/3R heterozygotes had a selective advantage in weaner bulls because of their higher average daily gain than homozygotes. We discussed possible molecular mechanisms involved in the overdominance effect of the DelR242 locus on these traits in weaner bulls using a structural model of the complex consisting of a GHSR1a dimer and Gαq. PMID:25538099

  14. Overdominance effect of the bovine ghrelin receptor (GHSR1a)-DelR242 locus on growth in Japanese Shorthorn weaner bulls: heterozygote advantage in bull selection and molecular mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Komatsu, Masanori; Sato, Yoichi; Negami, Tatsuki; Terada, Tohru; Sasaki, Osamu; Yasuda, Jumpei; Arakawa, Aisaku; Yoshida, Chikara; Takahashi, Hideaki; Malau-Aduli, Aduli E O; Suzuki, Keiichi; Shimizu, Kentaro

    2015-02-01

    Ghrelin and the ghrelin receptor (GHSR1a) are involved in growth hormone secretion, food intake, and several other important functions. Ghrelin acts on GHSR1a and induces signal transduction via the Gαq subunit. In our previous study, we identified the DelR242 (3R) allele, a truncated 3-arginine residue (3R) [major type: 4 arginine residues (4R)] of the third intracellular loop of GHSR1a, with a high frequency in Japanese Shorthorn bulls (0.43) but with a low frequency in other cattle breeds (0.00-0.09). To further investigate the reasons for the higher frequency of the 3R allele, we performed several experiments. In this study, we found a significant sex difference in the frequency of the 3R allele. Statistical analysis revealed a significant overdominance effect of the DelR242 locus on growth in Japanese Shorthorn weaner bulls. However, additive/dominance/overdominance effects of the 3R allele on carcass traits in adult steers and dams were not significant. The mode of the overdominance effect was estimated to be solely controlled by the single DelR242 locus without any other linked loci using linkage disequilibrium analysis in GHSR1a. These results indicated that 4R/3R heterozygotes had a selective advantage in weaner bulls because of their higher average daily gain than homozygotes. We discussed possible molecular mechanisms involved in the overdominance effect of the DelR242 locus on these traits in weaner bulls using a structural model of the complex consisting of a GHSR1a dimer and Gαq. PMID:25538099

  15. Post-death cloning of endangered Jeju black cattle (Korean native cattle): fertility and serum chemistry in a cloned bull and cow and their offspring.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun Young; Song, Dong Hwan; Park, Min Jee; Park, Hyo Young; Lee, Seung Eun; Choi, Hyun Yong; Moon, Jeremiah Jiman; Kim, Young Hoon; Mun, Seong Ho; Oh, Chang Eon; Ko, Moon Suck; Lee, Dong Sun; Riu, Key Zung; Park, Se Pill

    2013-12-17

    To preserve Jeju black cattle (JBC; endangered native Korean cattle), a pair of cattle, namely a post-death cloned JBC bull and cow, were produced by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) in a previous study. In the present study, we examined the in vitro fertilization and reproductive potentials of these post-death cloned animals. Sperm motility, in vitro fertilization and developmental capacity were examined in a post-death cloned bull (Heuk Oll Dolee) and an extinct nuclear donor bull (BK94-13). We assessed reproductive ability in another post-death cloned cow (Heuk Woo Sunee) using cloned sperm for artificial insemination (AI). There were no differences in sperm motility or developmental potential of in vitro fertilized embryos between the post-death cloned bull and its extinct nuclear donor bull; however, the embryo development ratio was slightly higher in the cloned sperm group than in the nuclear donor sperm group. After one attempt at AI, the post-death cloned JBC cow became pregnant, and gestation proceeded normally until day 287. From this post-death cloned sire and dam, a JBC male calf (Heuk Woo Dolee) was delivered naturally (weight, 25 kg). The genetic paternity/maternity of the cloned JBC bull and cow with regard to their offspring was confirmed using International Society for Animal Genetics standard microsatellite markers. Presently, Heuk Woo Dolee is 5 months of age and growing normally. In addition, there were no significant differences in blood chemistry among the post-death cloned JBC bull, the cow, their offspring and cattle bred by AI. This is the first report showing that a pair of cattle, namely, a post-death cloned JBC bull and cow, had normal fertility. Therefore, SCNT can be used effectively to increase the population of endangered JBC. PMID:23955237

  16. Post-Death Cloning of Endangered Jeju Black Cattle (Korean Native Cattle): Fertility and Serum Chemistry in a Cloned Bull and Cow and Their Offspring

    PubMed Central

    KIM, Eun Young; SONG, Dong Hwan; PARK, Min Jee; PARK, Hyo Young; LEE, Seung Eun; CHOI, Hyun Yong; MOON, Jeremiah Jiman; KIM, Young Hoon; MUN, Seong Ho; OH, Chang Eon; KO, Moon Suck; LEE, Dong Sun; RIU, Key Zung; PARK, Se Pill

    2013-01-01

    Abstract To preserve Jeju black cattle (JBC; endangered native Korean cattle), a pair of cattle, namely a post-death cloned JBC bull and cow, were produced by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) in a previous study. In the present study, we examined the in vitro fertilization and reproductive potentials of these post-death cloned animals. Sperm motility, in vitro fertilization and developmental capacity were examined in a post-death cloned bull (Heuk Oll Dolee) and an extinct nuclear donor bull (BK94-13). We assessed reproductive ability in another post-death cloned cow (Heuk Woo Sunee) using cloned sperm for artificial insemination (AI). There were no differences in sperm motility or developmental potential of in vitro fertilized embryos between the post-death cloned bull and its extinct nuclear donor bull; however, the embryo development ratio was slightly higher in the cloned sperm group than in the nuclear donor sperm group. After one attempt at AI, the post-death cloned JBC cow became pregnant, and gestation proceeded normally until day 287. From this post-death cloned sire and dam, a JBC male calf (Heuk Woo Dolee) was delivered naturally (weight, 25 kg). The genetic paternity/maternity of the cloned JBC bull and cow with regard to their offspring was confirmed using International Society for Animal Genetics standard microsatellite markers. Presently, Heuk Woo Dolee is 5 months of age and growing normally. In addition, there were no significant differences in blood chemistry among the post-death cloned JBC bull, the cow, their offspring and cattle bred by AI. This is the first report showing that a pair of cattle, namely, a post-death cloned JBC bull and cow, had normal fertility. Therefore, SCNT can be used effectively to increase the population of endangered JBC. PMID:23955237

  17. Copy number variations of the extensively amplified Y-linked genes, HSFY and ZNF280BY, in cattle and their association with male reproductive traits in Holstein bulls

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Recent transcriptomic analysis of the bovine Y chromosome revealed at least six multi-copy protein coding gene families, including TSPY, HSFY and ZNF280BY, on the male-specific region (MSY). Previous studies indicated that the copy number variations (CNVs) of the human and bovine TSPY were associated with male fertility in men and cattle. However, the relationship between CNVs of the bovine Y-linked HSFY and ZNF280BY gene families and bull fertility has not been investigated. Results We investigated the copy number (CN) of the bovine HSFY and ZNF280BY in a total of 460 bulls from 15 breeds using a quantitative PCR approach. We observed CNVs for both gene families within and between cattle breeds. The median copy number (MCN) of HSFY among all bulls was 197, ranging from 21 to 308. The MCN of ZNF280BY was 236, varying from 28 to 380. Furthermore, bulls in the Bos taurus (BTA) lineage had a significantly higher MCN (202) of HSFY than bulls in the Bos indicus (BIN) lineage (178), while taurine bulls had a significantly lower MCN (231) of ZNF280BY than indicine bulls (284). In addition, the CN of ZNF280BY was positively correlated to that of HSFY on the BTAY. Association analysis revealed that the CNVs of both HSFY and ZNF280BY were correlated negatively with testis size, while positively with sire conception rate. Conclusion The bovine HSFY and ZNF280BY gene families have extensively expanded on the Y chromosome during evolution. The CN of both gene families varies significantly among individuals and cattle breeds. These variations were associated with testis size and bull fertility in Holstein, suggesting that the CNVs of HSFY and ZNF280BY may serve as valuable makers for male fertility selection in cattle. PMID:24507556

  18. Comparison of active dry yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) and yeast culture for growth performance, carcass traits, meat quality and blood indexes in finishing bulls.

    PubMed

    Geng, Chun-Yin; Ren, Li-Ping; Zhou, Zhen-Ming; Chang, Ying; Meng, Qing-Xiang

    2016-08-01

    This study was conducted to compare the effect of active dry yeasts (ADY) and yeast cultures (YC), two typical products of yeast preparations, on growth performance, carcass characteristics, meat quality and blood indexes in finishing bulls fed a high-concentrate diet. Forty-five finishing bulls (mean body weight (BW) ± standard deviation: 505 ± 29 kg BW) were allocated to three groups of 15 bulls and assigned randomly to one of three diets which were CON diet (basal diet), ADY diet (basal diet + Levucell SC) and YC diet (basal diet + Diamond V XP), respectively. After 98 days of trial, all bulls were slaughtered. The result showed that ADY rather than YC improved growth performance and carcass traits of bulls compared to CON. Moreover, both ADY and YC improved beef tenderness and changed blood indexes related to fat metabolism. In conclusion, ADY had more pronounced effect on growth performance of bulls fed high-concentrate diet, and both ADY and YC improved the beef quality by intensive fat metabolism. PMID:26472702

  19. Insemination of susceptible heifers with semen from a non-viraemic bull with persistent bovine virus diarrhoea virus infection localized in the testes.

    PubMed

    Niskanen, R; Alenius, S; Belák, K; Baule, C; Belák, S; Voges, H; Gustafsson, H

    2002-06-01

    Bulls shedding bovine viral diarrhoea virus (BVDV) in semen and simultaneously having a high concentration of circulating antibodies may cause reproductive problems and spread the viral infection within cattle populations. To investigate this in detail, three heifers were inseminated with BVDV-infected semen from a non-viraemic, seropositive Holstein-Friesian bull, named 'Cumulus'. One control heifer was inseminated with semen from a healthy bull that was free of BVDV. All four heifers remained clinically healthy throughout the experiment. The conception succeeded in the control animal and in two of the three heifers inseminated with semen containing BVDV. The heifer with the failed conception was the only one that became systemically infected with BVDV. This animal was deemed non-pregnant by ultrasonic examination on day 34 after insemination and showed no signs of subsequent oestrus during the entire experimental period. At slaughter, 42 days after insemination, there were no histopathological changes in the ovaries and virus was not detected in ovarian tissue. The fact that seronegative dams served with semen from persistently infected bulls have occasionally produced persistently infected calves together with the present findings and the fact that non-viraemic, seropositive bulls can constantly shed BVDV, suggest that the use of semen from such bulls in BVDV-free herds could have far-reaching consequences, especially if it led to the birth of persistently infected (P1) calves. PMID:12071892

  20. Notes on the husbandry and long-term transportation of Bull ray (Pteromylaeus bovinus) and Dolphinfish (Coryphaena hippurus and Coryphaena equiselis).

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Nuno; Correia, João; Pinho, Rúben; Graça, José; Rodrigues, Filipe; Hirofumi, Morikawa

    2013-03-01

    Bull rays (Pteromylaeus bovinus) and Dolphinfish (Coryphaena hippurus and Coryphaena equiselis) were collected in Olhão (south of Portugal). These animals hosted multiple parasites, namely Caligus spp., and underwent a variety of treatments to remove them. Of all treatments tested, hydrogen peroxide showed the best results, although only concentrations above 100 ppm were effective in parasite removal. These high concentrations, however, proved to be highly toxic for the fish and led to the loss of some animals, especially those which had been handled before treatment. A total of 14 Bull rays were transported to Bolougne-Sur-Mer (France) by road and some animals were lost, which was attributed to excessive time in transit (>45 hr). In another transport, three Bull rays and 10 Dolphinfishes were moved to Stralsund (Germany) by road and air. The mechanical wounds suffered by one of the Bull rays during transport led to its death and, consequently, a deterioration of water quality in the tank containing two other conspecifics. This deterioration of water quality resulted in problems for the other two Bull rays, and one perished approximately 48 hr after arrival. The authors concluded that Dolphinfish can be transported with a low bioload for at least 27 hr, and Bull rays should not undergo transports longer than 35 hr. Special attention must be taken to injured animals, since this can lead to a decrease in water quality and consequently affect other animals in the same transport tank. PMID:23037944

  1. Improvement of liquid and frozen-thawed semen quality of Nili-Ravi buffalo bulls (Bubalus bubalis) through supplementation of fat.

    PubMed

    Adeel, M; Ijaz, A; Aleem, M; Rehman, H; Yousaf, M S; Jabbar, M A

    2009-05-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the effects of dietary fat on quality of liquid and frozen-thawed semen of Nili-Ravi buffalo bulls. Adult bulls (n=21) were fed a balanced ration (Con; n=7) or the same ration either containing sunflower oil (SF-O; n=7) or whole sunflower seeds (SF-S; n=7) for 63 days. Body weight and body condition score of each bull was recorded on days 0, 30 and 60 of the experiment. Semen was collected on days 39, 46, 53 and 60, frozen by a fast method and stored at -196 degrees C for 24h. Sperm motility was assessed using a bright field microscope. Plasma membrane integrity of fresh and frozen-thawed spermatozoa was assessed using a hypo-osmotic swelling (HOS) assay. The concentration of spermatozoa and volume of semen was not different among groups on various days of collection. Sunflower-enriched diets did not affect the motility and number of HOS-positive spermatozoa in the fresh semen. Motility and HOS of post-thawed spermatozoa were higher (p<0.05) in bulls fed the sunflower-enriched diets. Similarly, diets did not affect the body condition score and body weight of bulls. In conclusion, feeding of sunflower oil or sunflower seed as fat sources can improve the quality of buffalo bull spermatozoa. PMID:19246083

  2. The influence of diet on collagen content and quality attributes of infraspinatus muscle from Holstein-Friesian young bulls.

    PubMed

    Modzelewska-Kapituła, Monika; Nogalski, Zenon

    2016-07-01

    The aim of the study was to determine effects of feeding intensity on collagen content and eating quality of infraspinatus (INF) muscle. Twenty Polish Holstein-Friesian bulls (11-month-old) were fed either intensively (I, n=10, with triticale meal addition to total mixed ration) or semi-intensively (SI, n=10, without triticale meal) before slaughter at 19months. The animals from I group showed higher body weight at the end of fattening, average daily gain and dressing percentage than SI group. The INF muscle from I treatment had higher fat content and the proportion of water-soluble collagen, whereas lower insoluble collagen content compared with SI treatment. There were no differences in shear force values, cooking loss and eating quality between the treatments. In conclusion, feeding Holstein-Friesian bulls with increased energy value fodder beneficially affected its slaughter value and collagen profile in infraspinatus muscle. PMID:26974595

  3. Visceral organ weights, digestion and carcass characteristics of beef bulls differing in residual feed intake offered a high concentrate diet.

    PubMed

    Fitzsimons, C; Kenny, D A; McGee, M

    2014-06-01

    This study examined the relationship of residual feed intake (RFI) with digestion, body composition, carcass traits and visceral organ weights in beef bulls offered a high concentrate diet. Individual dry matter (DM) intake (DMI) and growth were measured in a total of 67 Simmental bulls (mean initial BW 431 kg (s.d.=63.7)) over 3 years. Bulls were offered concentrates (860 g/kg rolled barley, 60 g/kg soya bean meal, 60 g/kg molasses and 20 g/kg minerals per vitamins) ad libitum plus 0.8 kg grass silage DM daily for 105 days pre-slaughter. Ultrasonic muscle and fat depth, body condition score (BCS), muscularity score, skeletal measurements, blood metabolites, rumen fermentation and total tract digestibility (indigestible marker) were determined. After slaughter, carcasses and perinephric and retroperitoneal fat were weighed, carcasses were graded for conformation and fat score and weight of non-carcass organs, liver, heart, kidneys, lungs, gall bladder, spleen, reticulo-rumen full and empty and intestines full, were determined. The residuals of the regression of DMI on average daily gain (ADG), mid-test metabolic BW (BW0.75) and the fixed effect of year, using all animals, were used to compute individual RFI coefficients. Animals were ranked on RFI and assigned to high (inefficient), medium or low groupings. Overall mean ADG and daily DMI were 1.6 kg (s.d.=0.36) and 9.4 kg (s.d.=1.16), respectively. High RFI bulls consumed 7 and 14% more DM than medium and low RFI bulls, respectively (P<0.001). No differences between high and low RFI bulls were detected (P>0.05) for ADG, BW, BCS, skeletal measurements, muscularity scores, ultrasonic measurements, carcass weight, perinephric and retroperitoneal fat weight, kill-out proportion and carcass conformation and fat score. However, regression analysis indicated that a 1 kg DM/day increase in RFI was associated with a decrease in kill-out proportion of 20 g/kg (P<0.05) and a decrease in carcass conformation of 0.74 units (P<0

  4. Phenotypic and genetic relationships between residual energy intake and growth, feed intake, and carcass traits of young bulls.

    PubMed

    Jensen, J; Mao, I L; Andersen, B B; Madsen, P

    1992-02-01

    Residual energy intake, defined as actual minus predicted energy intake during a production period, was estimated for each of 650 bull calves of 31 Holstein Friesian or Brown Swiss sires. Residual energy intake, measured under ad libitum feeding, had heritabilities similar to those of growth rate and energy conversion ratio with an estimate of approximately .3. Residual energy intake was related to average daily energy intake both phenotypically and genetically such that selection for decreased residual energy intake would lead to a decrease in daily feed intake. Such selection would also tend to increase carcass fatness (i.e., genetically fat animals are the most efficient). Residual energy intake estimated with and without correction for carcass composition were closely correlated. Thus, residual energy intake may be estimated without the knowledge of carcass composition in growing bulls of dual-purpose breeds. PMID:1548200

  5. Sperm in poor quality semen from bulls during heat stress have a lower affinity for binding hydrogen-3 heparin

    SciTech Connect

    Ax, R.L.; Gilbert, G.R.; Shook, G.E.

    1987-01-01

    Binding assays with (/sup 3/H) heparin were performed using spermatozoa collected prior to, during, and following summer heat stress to dairy bulls. Ejaculates collected in August 1983 after a period of ambient temperatures exceeding 29.4/sup 0/C exhibited a high frequency of abnormal sperm, and motility was reduced in some samples. Sperm in samples collected during heat stress possessed dissociation constants for binding (/sup 3/H) heparin ranging from 134.5 to 163.2 nmol. In contrast, sperm in semen collected prior to and after heat stress had significantly lower dissociation constants (higher affinity) for (/sup 3/H)heparin, 12.9 to 56.4 nmol. The number of binding sites for (/sup 3/H) heparin on sperm did not change among collection periods. It was concluded that the binding affinity for (/sup 3/H) heparin may reflect membrane integrity of bull sperm.

  6. A register-based study of the antimicrobial usage in Danish veal calves and young bulls.

    PubMed

    Fertner, Mette; Toft, Nils; Martin, Henrik Læssøe; Boklund, Anette

    2016-09-01

    High antimicrobial usage and multidrug resistance have been reported in veal calves in Europe. This may be attributed to a high risk of disease as veal calves are often purchased from numerous dairy herds, exposed to stress related to the transport and commingling of new animals, and fed a new ration. In this study, we used national register data to characterize the use of antimicrobials registered for large Danish veal calf and young bull producing herds in 2014. A total of 325 herds with veal calf and potentially young bull production were identified from the Danish Cattle database. According to the national Danish database on drugs for veterinary use (VetStat), a total of 537,399 Animal Daily Doses (ADD200) were registered for these 325 herds during 2014. The amount of antimicrobials registered in 2014 varied throughout the year, with the highest amounts registered in autumn and winter. Antimicrobials were registered for respiratory disorders (79%), joints/limbs/CNS disorders (17%), gastrointestinal disorders (3.7%) and other disorders (0.3%). Of the registered antimicrobials, 15% were for oral and 85% for parenteral administration. Long-acting formulations with a therapeutic effect of more than 48h covered 58% of the drugs for parenteral use. Standardized at the herd-level, as ADD200/100 calves/day, antimicrobial use distributed as median [CI95%] for starter herds (n=22): 2.14 [0.19;7.58], finisher herds (n=24): 0.48 [0.00;1.48], full-line herds (n=183): 0.78 [0.05;2.20] and herds with an inconsistent pattern of movements (n=96): 0.62 [0.00;2.24]. Full-line herds are herds, which purchase calves directly from a dairy herd and raise them to slaughter. Furthermore, we performed a risk factor analysis on the 183 herds with a full-line production. Here, we investigated, whether the number of suppliers, the number of calves purchased, the frequency of purchase, the average age at introduction, the average time in the herd and vaccination influenced the amount of

  7. Effect of thawing methods on frozen semen quality of yak (Poephagus grunniens L.) bulls

    PubMed Central

    Borah, Binod Kumar Dutta; Deka, Bharat Chandra; Biswas, Ranjan Kumar; Chakravarty, Prithiviraj; Deori, Sourabh; Sinha, Sudip; Ahmed, Kutubuddin

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate different thawing temperatures and duration on the post-thaw semen quality of Indian yaks bulls. Materials and Methods: Semen ejaculates from four different yak bulls were collected using artificial vagina method and extended with tris extender containing 6.4% glycerol at 35°C, cooled gradually from 35°C to 5°C at 1°C/3 min and equilibrated at 4-5°C for 4 h and frozen in French mini straws using a programmable bio-freezer and finally stored in liquid nitrogen. Thawing of frozen semen straws was carried out using three methods i.e., 35°C for 60 s (thawing method I), 37°C for 30 s (thawing method II) and 75°C for 9 s (thawing method III). The post-thaw semen quality parameters assessed were sperm motility, percent live sperm, hypo-osmotic swelling test (HOST)-reacted sperm, acrosomal changes, and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) activities in the extracellular media. Results: The percent sperm motility, total incidence of acrosomal changes, and extracellular release of AST varied significantly (p<0.01) between thawing methods but live sperm and HOST-reacted sperm did not vary significantly between thawing methods. The percent sperm motility of frozen yak semen for thawing method III was significantly (p<0.05) higher than that for thawing methods I and II, the difference between thawing methods I and II being non-significant. The critical difference test revealed that the total incidence of acrosomal changes and extracellular release of AST were significantly (p<0.05) lower when thawing was done using methods I and II than in method III. Conclusion: On the basis of the present experiment, we can conclude that barring the post-thaw sperm motility, thawing of frozen yak semen in water either at 35°C for 60 s or 37°C for 30 s gives better post-thaw semen quality than at 75°C for 09 s. PMID:27047161

  8. Application of the Welfare Quality® assessment system on European beef bull farms.

    PubMed

    Kirchner, M K; Schulze Westerath, H; Knierim, U; Tessitore, E; Cozzi, G; Pfeiffer, C; Winckler, C

    2014-05-01

    Welfare concerns for intensive beef production have often been raised, but on-farm welfare assessment studies are rare. The aim of this study was to apply the Welfare Quality® (WQ) welfare assessment system for fattening cattle on beef bull farms to evaluate the state of welfare at the level of WQ measures and of aggregated scores, as well as overall classification. In addition, the purpose was to evaluate two ways of providing feedback information to the farmers with regard to possible welfare improvements on the farms. The study was conducted in Austria, Germany and Italy on a total of 63 beef bull farms with deep litter or cubicle-housing systems. Assessments were carried out 3 times (1 month and 7 months apart from the initial visit). In every country, farmers were assigned to two treatment groups (feedback from initial visit as written report, F, written feedback plus oral advice, FA) and a control group (C), which did not receive any feedback. At the criterion level, the highest average welfare scores were obtained from 'Absence of prolonged hunger' (94/100 points) followed by 'Absence of pain induced by management procedures' (88/100) and 'Comfort around resting' (77/100). Most welfare concerns related to the criteria 'Absence of disease' (40/100), 'Expression of social behaviour' (44/100) and 'Positive emotional state' (48/100), thus indicating room for improvements. Two-thirds of the farms achieved the 'Enhanced' level, about one-third was judged 'Acceptable' and only one farm 'Excellent'. After 6 months of monitoring period, there was no significant welfare improvement in both the treatment groups as compared with the control group. Reasons for the lack of effect may mainly be seen in the short monitoring period and a lack of external incentives. In conclusion, the WQ assessment system revealed areas for improvement, but longer term studies and investigations on alternative ways of transferring outcomes from on-farm welfare assessments to farmers should

  9. Evidence for prosauropod dinosaur gastroliths in the Bull Run Formation (Upper Triassic, Norian) of Virginia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Weems, R.E.; Culp, M.J.; Wings, O.

    2007-01-01

    Definitive criteria for distinguishing gastroliths from sedimentary clasts are lacking for many depositional settings, and many reported occurrences of gastroliths either cannot be verified or have been refuted. We discuss four occurrences of gastrolith-like stones (category 6 exoliths) not found within skeletal remains from the Upper Triassic Bull Run Formation of northern Virginia, USA. Despite their lack of obvious skeletal association, the most parsimonious explanation for several characteristics of these stones is their prolonged residence in the gastric mills of large animals. These characteristics include 1) typical gastrolith microscopic surface texture, 2) evidence of pervasive surface wear on many of these stones that has secondarily removed variable amounts of thick weathering rinds typically found on these stones, and 3) a width/length-ratio modal peak for these stones that is more strongly developed than in any population of fluvial or fanglomerate stones of any age found in this region. When taken together, these properties of the stones can be explained most parsimoniously by animal ingestion and gastric-mill abrasion. The size of these stones indicates the animals that swallowed them were large, and the best candidate is a prosauropod dinosaur, possibly an ancestor of the Early Jurassic gastrolith-producing prosauropod Massospondylus or Ammosaurus. Skeletal evidence for Upper Triassic prosauropods is lacking in the Newark Supergroup basins; footprints (Agrestipus hottoni and Eubrontes isp.) from the Bull Run Formation in the Culpeper basin previously ascribed to prosauropods are now known to be underprints (Brachychirotherium parvum) of an aetosaur and underprints (Kayentapus minor) of a ceratosaur. The absence of prosauropod skeletal remains or footprints in all but the uppermost (upper Rhaetian) Triassic rocks of the Newark Supergroup is puzzling because prosauropod remains are abundant elsewhere in the world in Upper Triassic (Carnian, Norian

  10. Water-quality variations in the Bull Run Watershed, Oregon, under 1978 to 1983 management conditions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rinella, F.A.

    1987-01-01

    During the period October 1978 to September 1983, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the City of Portland (Oregon) Water Bureau, conducted a study in the Bull Run River basin to define the hydrologic characteristics of the basin, and to examine relations between basin characteristics (both natural and man-made) and stream water quality and quantity within the basin. Hydrologically, the 1978-1983 period can be characterized as representative of the long-term average, with no records of extreme events. Likewise, water quality constituent concentrations affected by quantity of streamflow are representative of average values and ranges and exclude values that would be obtained during periods of extreme events. Ranges of concentration of major anions and cations for surface water collected October 1978 to September 1983 are similar to values collected historically. The ratio of constituent to chloride values determined for precipitation data collected during the period June 1980 to September 1981 indicated that other sources besides seawater contributed to its composition. In ratios of constituents in precipitation, Bull Run values are similar to those of other remote sites in Alaska, Washington, and California. Comparisons of storm-related suspended sediment load to annual suspended sediment loads indicated that 62% to 78% of the total annual loads occurred in 3 to 4 days during an average year. Multiple-linear regression analysis using discharge, suspended sediment and specific conductance indicated that most of the variation in the annual values could be explained by naturally occurring processes within the basin. A nonparametric time-trend analysis of 24 water quantity and quality constituents showed no statistically significant trends with estimated slopes large enough to be readily measurable for a particular year. Four constituents that were sampled weekly (turbidity, specific conductance, silica, and phytoplankton) had statistically significant

  11. The uses of infrared thermography to evaluate the effects of climatic variables in bull's reproduction.

    PubMed

    Menegassi, Silvio Renato Oliveira; Pereira, Gabriel Ribas; Dias, Eduardo Antunes; Koetz, Celso; Lopes, Flávio Guiselli; Bremm, Carolina; Pimentel, Concepta; Lopes, Rubia Branco; da Rocha, Marcela Kuczynski; Carvalho, Helena Robattini; Barcellos, Júlio Otavio Jardim

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the seasonal effects of the environment on sperm quality in subtropical region determined by temperature and humidity index (THI). We used 20 Brangus bulls (5/8 Angus × 3/8 Nellore) aged approximately 24 months at the beginning of the study. Semen evaluations were performed twice per season during 1 year. Climate THI data were collected from an automatic weather station from the National Institute of Meteorology. Infrared thermography images were used to determine the temperature of the proximal and distal poles of the testis to assess the testicular temperature gradient (TG). The seasonal effects on seminal and climatic variables were analyzed with ANOVA using MIXED procedure of SAS. Sperm motility in spring (60.1%), summer (57.6%), and autumn (64.5%) showed difference compared to winter (73.0%; P < 0.01). TG was negatively correlated with THI at 18 days (spermiogenesis) (-0.76; P < 0.05) and at 12 days (epididymal transit) (-0.85; P < 0.01). Ocular temperature (OcT) had a positive correlation with THI at 18 days (0.78; P < 0.05) and at 12 days (0.84; P < 0.01). Motility showed a negative correlation with THI only at 18 days (-0.79; P < 0.05). During spermiogenesis, the TG had higher negative correlation compared to OcT (-0.97; P < 0.01) and rectal temperature (-0.72; P < 0.05). Spermatozoa with distal midpiece reflex were correlated with THI during transit epididymis (0.72; P < 0.05). Seminal parameters are not affected when THI reaches 93.0 (spermiogenesis) and 88.0 (epididymal transit). We concluded that infrared thermography can be adopted as an indirect method in order to assess the effect of environmental changes in TG and OcT of Brangus bulls. PMID:26049285

  12. Beneficial Effects of Nitric Oxide Induced Mild Oxidative Stress on Post-Thawed Bull Semen Quality

    PubMed Central

    Sharafi, Mohsen; Zhandi, Mahdi; Shahverdi, Abdolhossein; Shakeri, Malak

    2015-01-01

    Background Cryopreservation of semen requires optimized conditions to minimize the harmful effects of various stresses. The main approach for protection of sperm against stress is based on the use of antioxidants and cryoprotectants, which are described as defensive methods. Recently, the application of controlled mild stressors has been de- scribed for activation of a temporary response in oocyte, embryo and somatic cells. In this study a sub-lethal oxidative stress induced by precise concentrations of nitric oxide (NO) has been evaluated for sperm during cryopreservation. Materials and Methods In this experimental study, we used different concentrations of NO [0 µM (NO-0), 0.01 µM (NO-0.01), 0.1 µM (NO-0.1), 1 µM (NO-1), 10 µM (NO-10) and 100 µM (NO-100)] during cryopreservation of bull semen. Their effects on post-thawed sperm quality that included motility and velocity parameters, plasma mem- brane functionality, acrosome integrity, apoptosis status, mitochondrial activity and lipid peroxidation after freezing-thawing were investigated. Results Exposure of sperm before freezing to NO-1 significantly increased total motility (88.4 ± 2.8%), progressive motility (50.4 ± 3.2%) and average path velocity (VAP, 53.8 ± 3.1 µm/s) compared to other extenders. In addition, NO-1 significantly increased plasma mem- brane functionality (89.3 ± 2.9%) compared to NO-0 (75.3 ± 2.9%), NO-0.01 (78.3 ± 2.9%), NO-0.1 (76.4 ± 2.9%), NO-10 (64 ± 2.9%) and NO-100 (42 ± 2.9%). Sperm exposed to NO-1 produced the highest percentage of viable (85.6 ± 2.3%) and the lowest percentage of apoptotic (10.8 ± 2.4%) spermatozoa compared to the other extenders. Also, NO-100 resulted in a higher percentage of dead spermatozoa (27.1 ± 2.7%) compared to the other extenders. In terms of mitochondrial activity, there was no significant difference among NO-0 (53.4 ± 3.2), NO-0.01 (52.1 ± 3.2), NO-0.1 (50.8 ± 3.2) and NO-1 (53.1 ± 3.2). For acrosome integrity, no significant

  13. Scrotal infrared digital thermography as a predictor of seasonal effects on sperm traits in Braford bulls.

    PubMed

    Menegassi, Silvio Renato Oliveira; Barcellos, Júlio Otavio Jardim; Dias, Eduardo Antunes; Koetz, Celso; Pereira, Gabriel Ribas; Peripolli, Vanessa; McManus, Concepta; Canozzi, Maria Eugênia Andrighetto; Lopes, Flávio Guiselli

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the seasonal effects of the environment on semen quality in bulls, using infrared thermography. Sperm motility (M), mass motion (MM), and vigor (VIG) were evaluated in sperm samples from 17 Bradford bulls aged approximately 24 months at the beginning of the study. Infrared thermography images and data were collected using an infrared FLIR T 300 camera and Quick Report 1.2 SP2 software to determine the temperature of the proximal and distal poles of the testis and to assess the testicular temperature gradient. The seasonal effects on physiological, seminal, and climatic variables were analyzed by the GLM ANOVA and CORR procedures using SAS®. The microclimatic factors were recorded in hourly intervals, and the daily mean temperature and mean relative humidity were calculated to determine the daily temperature-humidity index (THI) every day for 1 year. The temperature gradient (TG) variations of the testes were significantly higher in the autumn (4.5 °C), winter (4.0 °C), and spring (2.9 °C) compared to summer (0.9 °C) (P < 0.05). Ocular globe temperatures were lower in the winter (27.6 °C) and autumn (26.8 °C) compared to summer (33.9 °C) and spring (31.1 °C) (P < 0.05). The average MM (2.58), M (52.64), and VIG (2.70) of the semen decreased in the summer compared to other seasons (P < 0.01). The TG was negatively correlated with THI (-0.44; P < 0.05). For the seminal variables, MaD (-0.45; P < 0.05) and TD (-0.50; P < 0.01) presented a negative correlation with TG. The TG had a positive correlation between M and VIG, which had values of 0.36 and 0.35, respectively (P < 0.05). We have concluded that infrared thermography can be used to assess the testicular temperature gradient and its consequences on physical and quantitative aspects of sperm. PMID:24848445

  14. Scrotal infrared digital thermography as a predictor of seasonal effects on sperm traits in Braford bulls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menegassi, Silvio Renato Oliveira; Barcellos, Júlio Otavio Jardim; Dias, Eduardo Antunes; Koetz, Celso; Pereira, Gabriel Ribas; Peripolli, Vanessa; McManus, Concepta; Canozzi, Maria Eugênia Andrighetto; Lopes, Flávio Guiselli

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the seasonal effects of the environment on semen quality in bulls, using infrared thermography. Sperm motility (M), mass motion (MM), and vigor (VIG) were evaluated in sperm samples from 17 Bradford bulls aged approximately 24 months at the beginning of the study. Infrared thermography images and data were collected using an infrared FLIR T 300 camera and Quick Report 1.2 SP2 software to determine the temperature of the proximal and distal poles of the testis and to assess the testicular temperature gradient. The seasonal effects on physiological, seminal, and climatic variables were analyzed by the GLM ANOVA and CORR procedures using SAS®. The microclimatic factors were recorded in hourly intervals, and the daily mean temperature and mean relative humidity were calculated to determine the daily temperature-humidity index (THI) every day for 1 year. The temperature gradient (TG) variations of the testes were significantly higher in the autumn (4.5 °C), winter (4.0 °C), and spring (2.9 °C) compared to summer (0.9 °C) ( P < 0.05). Ocular globe temperatures were lower in the winter (27.6 °C) and autumn (26.8 °C) compared to summer (33.9 °C) and spring (31.1 °C) ( P < 0.05). The average MM (2.58), M (52.64), and VIG (2.70) of the semen decreased in the summer compared to other seasons ( P < 0.01). The TG was negatively correlated with THI (-0.44; P < 0.05). For the seminal variables, MaD (-0.45; P < 0.05) and TD (-0.50; P < 0.01) presented a negative correlation with TG. The TG had a positive correlation between M and VIG, which had values of 0.36 and 0.35, respectively ( P < 0.05). We have concluded that infrared thermography can be used to assess the testicular temperature gradient and its consequences on physical and quantitative aspects of sperm.

  15. Characterization of cattle of a five-breed diallel: VI. Fat deposition patterns of serially slaughtered bulls.

    PubMed

    Talamantes, M A; Long, C R; Smith, G C; Jenkins, T G; Ellis, W C; Cartwright, T C

    1986-05-01

    Dissection and chemical analysis data from 197 bulls of 15 breedtypes were used to examine the distribution of total fat (TOTFAT) among carcass fat (CFAT), viscera fat (VIF), kidney plus pelvic fat (KPF) and blood fat (BLF). The bulls were obtained from a five-breed diallel involving Angus, Brahman, Hereford, Holstein and Jersey; reciprocal crosses were pooled. One or two bulls of each breedtype were slaughtered at each of seven ages: 6, 9, 12, 15, 18, 24 and 30 mo. An allometric equation was utilized to describe growth rate of each fat depot relative to either TOTFAT or carcass side weight (CSW). The pooled within-breedtype differential growth rates obtained from the allometric equation indicated that as TOTFAT or CSW increased, the proportion composed of CFAT and KPF increased (growth coefficients significantly greater than 1), whereas the proportion composed of VIF and BLF decreased (growth coefficients significantly less than 1). Holstein and Jersey tended to have more CFAT than Hereford, Angus and Brahman. Jersey had more KPF than other breeds. Crossbreds exhibited positive heterosis for CFAT and VIF, and negative heterosis for KPF. On a constant CSW basis, there were no significant breedtype differences in TOTFAT: nevertheless, differences in fat distribution among breedtypes persisted. There were different amounts of fat at the depots studied, but fat growth coefficients relative to TOTFAT tended to be homogeneous among breedtypes. PMID:3722018

  16. Effects of feeding intensity and time on feed on performance, carcass characteristics and meat quality of Simmental bulls.

    PubMed

    Sami, A S; Augustini, C; Schwarz, F J

    2004-06-01

    Seventy two Simmental bulls, weighing 489 kg and approximately 15 months old fed extensively or intensively on maize silage and concentrate mixture for 100 or 138 days, were divided into four groups to assess the effect of time on feed and feeding intensity on the performance, carcass and meat quality traits. Bulls intensively fed for 138 days before slaughter had higher final body weight (673.7 kg) compared with the other three groups (610.6 kg, as overall mean). Intensive feeding significantly increased the average daily gain (1371 g/day) and improved the feed efficiency (6.95 kg DM/kg gain) compared with extensive feeding (943 g/day and 7.97 kg DM/kg gain). No significant differences were detected by time on feed. Hot carcass and kidney fat weights were significantly higher for intensively fed bulls compared with extensive ones. Dressing percentage significantly increased for 138 day groups compared with 100 day groups. Carcass conformation and fatness scores significantly improved by intensive feeding. L and b(*) values were not affected by time on feed or feeding intensity. Slaughtering after 138 days on feed significantly elevated the meat redness value (a(*)). Intensive feeding significantly decreased moisture and increased fat content of the longissimus dorsi muscle. Shear force, collagen content, juiciness, flavour and sarcomere length did not differ by time on feed or feeding intensity, while inconsistent effects were observed on tenderness and solubility of collagen. PMID:22061314

  17. Use of real-time ultrasound to evaluate live animal carcass traits in young performance-tested beef bulls.

    PubMed

    Bergen, R D; McKinnon, J J; Christensen, D A; Kohle, N; Belanger, A

    1997-09-01

    Young bulls were ultrasonically scanned to 1) study breed differences for 12th rib fat depth (USFAT) and longissimus muscle area (USREA), 2) evaluate the nature and predictability of USFAT and USREA development, and 3) determine the effect of age (YFAT and YREA, respectively) or weight (WREA) adjustments on USFAT and USREA. Angus (AA), Charolais (CH), Hereford (HH), Shorthorn (SS), and Simmental (SM) bulls (n = 886) were studied in 2 yr at two stations. Breed differences were observed for end of test USFAT (AA = SS > HH > CH = SM, P < .05) and USREA (CH = SM > SS = AA > HH, P < .05). Within-breed coefficients of variation were 29.8 to 48.4% for end of test USFAT and from 9.0 to 10.8% for end of test USREA. In most bulls, USFAT development was neither linear nor quadratic (P > .05), but USREA development was linear (P < .05). Prediction equations were characterized by low r2 and high residual standard deviation (RSD) values, although those for d-84 USREA had r2 values from .63 to .70 and RSD values from 4.09 to 5.80 cm2. High associations were obtained between end of test USFAT with YFAT (r = .83 to .91, P < .05) and USREA with YREA (r = .74 to .84, P < .05) but not for end of test USREA with WREA (r = .31 to .56, P < .05). These results indicate that end of test ultrasound measurements may be a useful addition to performance testing programs. PMID:9303445

  18. Multi-scale geomorphic and hydrogeologic influences on bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) spawning habitat in headwater streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bean, J. R.; Wilcox, A. C.; Woessner, W. W.; Muhlfeld, C.

    2013-12-01

    We investigated multi-scale hydrogeomorphic influences on the distribution and abundance of bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) spawning in snowmelt- dominated streams of the upper Flathead River basin, northwestern Montana. Bull trout redds were primarily found in unconfined alluvial valley reaches (74%), which were strongly influenced by hyporheic and groundwater-stream water exchange. A considerable proportion of redds (26%), however, were patchily distributed in confined valley reaches. Among all reaches and subreaches, the abundance of redds increased with increased bankfull dimensionless shear stress and decreased with reach-average streambed grain size (p < 0.05). Within these selected reaches and subreaches, redd occurrence tended to be associated with the finest available textural facies (i.e., gravel and small cobble substrates) in concave-up bedforms with downwelling intragravel flows. Streambed temperatures tracked stream water diurnal temperature cycles to a depth of at least 25 cm. Groundwater provided substantial thermal moderation of stream water for several high-density spawning reaches. Our spawning gravel competence results indicate that bull trout select spawning areas that are potentially susceptible to flooding-induced scour during the fall and winter incubation period.

  19. Color attributes and oxidative stability of longissimus lumborum and psoas major muscles from Nellore bulls.

    PubMed

    Canto, Anna C V C S; Costa-Lima, Bruno R C; Suman, Surendranath P; Monteiro, Maria Lucia G; Viana, Fernanda M; Salim, Ana Paula A A; Nair, Mahesh N; Silva, Teofilo J P; Conte-Junior, Carlos A

    2016-11-01

    The influence of muscle source on color stability of fresh beef from purebred Bos indicus cattle was investigated. Longissimus lumborum (LL) and psoas major (PM) muscles obtained from twelve (n=12) Nellore bull carcasses (24h post-mortem) were fabricated into 2.54-cm steaks, aerobically packaged, and stored at 4°C for nine days. Steaks were analyzed on day 0 for proximate composition and myoglobin concentration, whereas pH, instrumental color, metmyoglobin reducing activity (MRA), lipid oxidation, and protein oxidation were evaluated on days 0, 3, 6, and 9. LL steaks exhibited greater (P<0.05) redness, color stability, and MRA than PM counterparts. On the other hand, PM steaks demonstrated greater (P<0.05) myoglobin content, lipid oxidation, and protein oxidation than LL steaks. These results indicated the critical influence of muscle source on discoloration of fresh beef from Bos indicus animals and suggested the necessity to engineer muscle-specific strategies to improve color stability and marketability of beef from Bos indicus cattle. PMID:27236337

  20. Assessing the feasibility of native fish reintroductions: a framework applied to threatened bull trout

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dunham, Jason B.; Gallo, Kirsten; Shively, Dan; Allen, Chris; Goehring, Brad

    2011-01-01

    Translocations to recover native fishes have resulted in mixed success. One reason for the failure of these actions is inadequate assessments of their feasibility prior to implementation. Here, we provide a framework developed to assess the feasibility of one type of translocation-reintroduction. The framework was founded on two simple components of feasibility: the potential for recipient habitats to support a reintroduction and the potential of available donor populations to support a reintroduction. Within each component, we developed a series of key questions. The final assessment was based on a scoring system that incorporated consideration of uncertainty in available information. The result was a simple yet transparent system for assessing reintroduction feasibility that can be rapidly applied in practice. We applied this assessment framework to the potential reintroduction of threatened bull trout Salvelinus confluentus into the Clackamas River, Oregon. In this case, the assessment suggested that the degree of feasibility for reintroduction was high based on the potential of recipient habitats and available donor populations. The assessment did not provide a comprehensive treatment of all possible factors that would drive an actual decision to implement a reintroduction,

  1. The antennal sensory array of the nocturnal bull ant Myrmecia pyriformis.

    PubMed

    Ramirez-Esquivel, Fiorella; Zeil, Jochen; Narendra, Ajay

    2014-11-01

    Insects use antennal sensilla to not only detect chemical and mechanical cues but also to sense changes in temperature, humidity and CO(2) levels. Very little is known about the variation in numbers, size and structure of sensilla in ants. Here we describe in detail the array of sensilla on the apical segment of the antennae of the nocturnal Australian bull ant Myrmecia pyriformis. Using scanning electron microscopy techniques we identified eight types of sensilla: trichodea curvata, basiconica, trichodea, coelocapitular, chaetica, trichoid II, ampullacea and coeloconica. Mapping the spatial location of each sensillum revealed distinct distribution patterns for different types of sensilla which were consistent across different individuals. We found, in most cases, the number of sensilla increases with the size of the apical antennomere, which in turn increases with body size. Conversely, the size of sensilla did not appreciably increase with the size of the apical antennomere. We discuss the size, numbers and distribution of sensilla of M. pyriformis compared to other ant species. Lastly, given the inconsistent use of sensillum nomenclature and difficulties associated in reliable identification we have attempted to consolidate the ant sensilla literature to make possible interspecific comparisons. PMID:25102426

  2. [Survivability and penetration capacity of bull spermatozoa frozen by 3 technics].

    PubMed

    Korvalan, P; Marinov, M F; Vodas, K

    1986-01-01

    Studied was the survival and penetration capacity of bull spermatozoa frozen after the following technologies--pellet, straw, and minitube--and the results obtained were compared via biologic experiments. The minitube technology of freezing the semen led to higher thermal resistance of the spermatozoa as against freezing in the form of straws and pallets (363.5 +/- 8.02 min, 356.25 +/- 7.79 min, and 339.00 +/- 8.44 min, respectively). The differences established were statistically highly significant (P less than 0.001). The penetration capacity of spermatozoa in an estral secretion of cows was highest at freezing in the form of minitubes (1.70 +/- 0.54 mm/min). The same was lower with straws (1.53 +/- 0.02 mm/min), and lowest--with pellets (1.52 +/- 0.04 mm/min). The differences were statistically significant (P less than 0.01). The fertilization capacity of spermatozoa frozen with the employment of the three technologies was best with the use of minitubes and straws--50.20, resp., 49.67 per cent, and lowest with the use of pellets--45.22 per cent. PMID:3811225

  3. Age-related polychlorinated biphenyl dynamics in immature bull sharks (Carcharhinus leucas).

    PubMed

    Olin, Jill A; Beaudry, Marina; Fisk, Aaron T; Paterson, Gordon

    2014-01-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) were quantified in liver tissues of bull sharks (Carcharhinus leucas) ranging in age from <4 wk to >3 yr. Summed values of PCBs (ΣPCBs) ranged from 310 ng/g to 22 070 ng/g (lipid wt) across age classes with ΣPCB concentrations for the youngest sharks in the present study (<4 wk; 5230 ± 2170 ng/g lipid wt) determined to not significantly differ from those quantified in >3-yr-old sharks, highlighting the extent of exposure of this young life stage to this class of persistent organic pollutants (POPs). Age normalization of PCB congener concentrations to those measured for the youngest sharks demonstrated a significant hydrophobicity (log octanol/water partition coefficient [KOW ]) effect that was indicative of maternal offloading of highly hydrophobic (log KOW ≥6.5) congeners to the youngest individuals. A distinct shift in the PCB congener profiles was also observed as these young sharks grew in size. This shift was consistent with a transition from the maternally offloaded signal to the initiation of exogenous feeding and the contributions of mechanisms including growth dilution and whole-body elimination. These results add to the growing pool of literature documenting substantially high concentrations of POPs in juvenile sharks that are most likely attributable to maternal offloading. Collectively, such results underscore the potential vulnerability of young sharks to POP exposure and pose additional concerns for shark-conservation efforts. PMID:24357032

  4. Understanding the mechanisms of ATPase beta family genes for cellular thermotolerance in crossbred bulls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deb, Rajib; Sajjanar, Basavaraj; Singh, Umesh; Alex, Rani; Raja, T. V.; Alyethodi, Rafeeque R.; Kumar, Sushil; Sengar, Gyanendra; Sharma, Sheetal; Singh, Rani; Prakash, B.

    2015-12-01

    Na+/K+-ATPase is an integral membrane protein composed of a large catalytic subunit (alpha), a smaller glycoprotein subunit (beta), and gamma subunit. The beta subunit is essential for ion recognition as well as maintenance of the membrane integrity. Present study was aimed to analyze the expression pattern of ATPase beta subunit genes (ATPase B1, ATPase B2, and ATPase B3) among the crossbred bulls under different ambient temperatures (20-44 °C). The present study was also aimed to look into the relationship of HSP70 with the ATPase beta family genes. Our results demonstrated that among beta family genes, transcript abundance of ATPase B1 and ATPase B2 is significantly ( P < 0.05) higher during the thermal stress. Pearson correlation coefficient analysis revealed that the expression of ATPase Β1, ATPase B2, and ATPase B3 is highly correlated ( P < 0.01) with HSP70, representing that the change in the expression pattern of these genes is positive and synergistic. These may provide a foundation for understanding the mechanisms of ATPase beta family genes for cellular thermotolerance in cattle.

  5. Relationships between muscle characteristics and meat quality traits of young Charolais bulls.

    PubMed

    Renand, G; Picard, B; Touraille, C; Berge, P; Lepetit, J

    2001-09-01

    Charolais bull calves (106) were used to study the variability in meat quality attributes in relation to the variability in muscle characteristics in the Longissimus thoracis (LT) muscle. The variability in traits was adjusted either to constant age or constant weight at slaughter and thus originated only from differences between animals born, reared and fattened in the same location. The following meat quality attributes were measured: the strength of the myofibrillar resistance to a 20% compression strain measured on the raw meat 2, 7 and 21 days post mortem; and taste panel scores of tenderness (initial and overall), flavour and juiciness of steaks grilled to a 55°C core temperature 6 or 15 days post-mortem. The following muscle characteristics were measured 24 h after slaughter: pH, dry matter, protein, lipid, heme iron and collagen contents, collagen solubility, LDH and ICDH activity, the proportion of slow twitch myosin heavy chain, the mean muscle fibre area and the mean sarcomere length. One fourth to one third of the variability of 2 day mechanical strength and 15 day tenderness or flavour scores were related to the variability in muscle characteristics. Tenderness and strength measurements were predominantly related to the muscle fibre area, collagen characteristics and energetic metabolic activity. Dry matter content was the principal muscle characteristic related to flavour. PMID:22062505

  6. Fatty acid profile of beef from immunocastrated (BOPRIVA(®)) Nellore bulls.

    PubMed

    Andreo, Nayara; Bridi, Ana Maria; Soares, Adriana Lourenço; Prohmann, Paulo Emílio Fernandes; Peres, Louise Manha; Tarsitano, Marina Avena; de Lima Giangareli, Barbara; Takabayashi, Alyson Akira

    2016-07-01

    Twenty Nellore bulls (ABW=357.7±9.65kg) were divided into 2 groups: intact and immunocastrated - Bopriva®. After the trial period, the cattle were slaughtered and carcass fat thickness was evaluated, ether extract and fatty acid composition of the longissimus thoracis analyses were performed, and the activity indices of relevant enzymes were calculated. The means were calculated and compared by Student's t-test and Pearson's correlation coefficients (p<0.05). The immunocastrated group showed higher back fat thickness, ether extract, monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFAs), and activity index of Δ(9) desaturase C18 and lower polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) and n-6 fatty acids when compared to the intact group. The correlations between ether extract and the saturated and monounsaturated fatty acids were positive, and negative with polyunsaturated, n-3, n-6 and PUFA/SFA. Therefore, immunocastration may improve the fatty acid profile in the longissimus thoracis by increasing MUFAs, mainly oleic acid that is the most representative fatty acid in the meat and is considered beneficial to health. PMID:26930361

  7. Determination by high-performance liquid chromatography of phenylbutazone in samples of plasma from fighting bulls.

    PubMed

    Marti, M I González; Sánchez, González C I; Jiménez, Hernández; Cachán, García; Castro, de Cabo M J; Cuadrado, A L Garzón

    2002-03-25

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the possible presence of phenylbutazone in plasma samples from fighting bulls killed in 2nd and 3rd category bullrings in the province of Salamanca (Spain) in 1998, 1999 and 2000. For quantitative and qualitative determination, a high-performance liquid chromatograph was used, equipped with a photodiode-array detector and setting wavelengths at 240, 254 and 284 nm. The mobile phase optimized for the simultaneous detection of dexamethasone, betamethasone, flunixin and phenylbutazone, was 0.01 M acetic acid pH 3 in methanol (35:65 v/v) at a flow rate of 1 ml/min. Plasma samples were deproteinized with 400 microl of acetonitrile and 20 microl of the supernatant were injected directly into the chromatographic system equipped with a Lichrospher 60 RP select B column and guard column. For the quantitative analysis, standard calibration curves were made in a concentration range between 0.25 and 30 microg/ml, using betamethasone as internal standard. The retention time of phenylbutazone was 8.7 +/- 0.2 min and recovery was 83%. The detection and quantification limits were 0.016 and 0.029, respectively for A=240 nm. The study results show that 17 of the 74 samples analyzed in 1998, 18 of those from 1999 and 10 of those from 2000 were positive for phenylbutazone. PMID:11936684

  8. Impacts and pathways of mine contaminants to bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) in an Idaho watershed.

    PubMed

    Kiser, Tim; Hansen, James; Kennedy, Brian

    2010-08-01

    Metals contamination from mining activities is a persistent problem affecting aquatic ecosystems throughout mining districts in the western USA. The Gold Creek drainage in northern Idaho has a history of mining within its headwaters and contains elevated sediment concentrations of As, Cd, Cu, Pb, and Zn. To determine system-wide impacts of increased metals, we measured concentrations of metals in water, sediment, and benthic macroinvertebrate tissues and related them to whole-body fish tissues and histopathological alterations in native salmonids. Water concentrations were higher than those in reference areas, but were below water quality criteria for protection of aquatic biota for most of the study area. Sediment and benthic macroinvertebrate tissue concentrations for all metals were significantly higher at all sites compared with the reference site. Fish tissues were significantly higher for all metals below mine sites compared with the reference site, but only Cd and Pb were higher in fish tissues in the furthest downstream reach in the Gold Creek Delta. Metals concentrations in benthic macroinvertebrate tissues and fish tissues were strongly correlated, suggesting a transfer of metals through a dietary pathway. The concentrations within sediments and biota were similar to those reported in other studies in which adverse effects to salmonids occurred. We observed histopathological changes in livers of bull trout, including inflammation, necrosis, and pleomorphism. Our study is consistent with other work in which sediment-driven exposure can transfer up the food chain and may cause adverse impacts to higher organisms. PMID:20101401

  9. Cryopreservation of bull semen: Evolution from egg yolk based to soybean based extenders.

    PubMed

    Layek, S S; Mohanty, T K; Kumaresan, A; Parks, J E

    2016-09-01

    Since the inception of bovine semen cryopreservation, egg yolk and milk based extenders have been used to protect sperm from the detrimental effects of cooling and freezing. In recent years, demand for alternatives to conventional commercial extenders has arisen as the risk of introducing exotic diseases through transporting egg yolk based products has been recognized. Egg yolk can also interfere with sperm evaluation and the presence of particulate material in the extender may reduce fertility. Soybeans contain lecithin, a phospholipid fraction that can substitute for high molecular weight lipoprotein and phospholipids from egg yolk and prevent or ameliorate damage to the sperm plasma membrane that occurs during extension, cooling, and cryopreservation. Soy lecithin based extenders have been evaluated for processing and freezing bovine semen, although extender from soybean milk has not been studied as extensively. Commercially available soy lecithin based extenders are used increasingly but remain under scrutiny and are not universally accepted. With these observations in mind, this review is intended to examine effects of conventional cryopreservation procedures, methods of assessment, and potential for developing soybean extract as an acceptable alternative to traditional egg yolk and milk based extenders for bull sperm cryopreservation. PMID:27509873

  10. Ecological evaluation of proposed dredged material from Bulls Head Channel (lower Suisun Bay)

    SciTech Connect

    Kohn, N.P.; White, P.J.; Gardiner, W.W.; Word, J.Q.

    1994-07-01

    This report describes the sampling and testing program conducted for USACE by Battelle/Marine Sciences Laboratory (MSL) to address (1) exclusion from further testing for ocean disposal, (2) suitability of open-water disposal within San Francisco Bay, and (3) beneficial uses, based on open-water and upland (leaching) disposal criteria, for the estimated 1.86 million cubic yards of sediment to be dredged from Bulls Head Channel and turning basin. To meet these objectives, core samples were collected from 28 locations to a depth of -47 ft mean lower low water (MLLW), which is -45 ft MLLW plus 2 ft overdepth. One to three samples per coring location were characterized physically and chemically; sediment from groups of locations and from various depth strata were combined into composite samples for biological toxicity characterization in addition to physical and chemical characterization. The chemical and biological tests were conducted following the guidance of USACE, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and state regulatory agencies.

  11. Differential abundances of four forms of Binder of SPerm 1 in the seminal plasma of Bos taurus indicus bulls with different patterns of semen freezability.

    PubMed

    Magalhães, Marcos Jorge; Martins, Leonardo Franco; Senra, Renato Lima; Santos, Thaís Ferreira Dos; Okano, Denise Silva; Pereira, Paulo Roberto Gomes; Faria-Campos, Alessandra; Campos, Sérgio Vale Aguiar; Guimarães, José Domingos; Baracat-Pereira, Maria Cristina

    2016-08-01

    The Binder of SPerm 1 (BSP1) protein is involved in the fertilization and semen cryopreservation processes and is described to be both beneficial and detrimental to sperm. Previously, the relationship of BSP1 with freezability events has not been completely understood. The objective of this work was to determine the differential abundance of the forms of the BSP1 protein in cryopreserved seminal plasma of Bos taurus indicus bulls with different patterns of semen freezability using proteomics. A wide cohort of adult bulls with high genetic value from an artificial insemination center was used as donors of high quality, fresh semen. Nine bulls presenting different patterns of semen freezability were selected. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis showed differential abundance in a group of seven protein spots in the frozen/thawed seminal plasma from the bulls, ranging from 15 to 17 kDa, with pI values from 4.6 to 5.8. Four of these spots were confirmed to be BSP1 using mass spectrometry, proteomics, biochemical, and computational analysis (Tukey's test at P < 0.05). The protein spot weighing 15.52 ± 0.53 kDa with a pI value of 5.78 ± 0.12 is highlighted by its high abundance in bulls with low semen freezability and its absence in bulls presenting high semen freezability. This is the first report showing that more than two forms of BSP1 are found in the seminal plasma of Nelore adult bulls and not all animals have a similar abundance of each BSP1 form. Different BSP1 forms may be involved in different events of fertilization and the cryopreservation process. PMID:27118515

  12. Comparative feeding ecology of bull sharks (Carcharhinus leucas) in the coastal waters of the southwest Indian Ocean inferred from stable isotope analysis.

    PubMed

    Daly, Ryan; Froneman, Pierre W; Smale, Malcolm J

    2013-01-01

    As apex predators, sharks play an important role shaping their respective marine communities through predation and associated risk effects. Understanding the predatory dynamics of sharks within communities is, therefore, necessary to establish effective ecologically based conservation strategies. We employed non-lethal sampling methods to investigate the feeding ecology of bull sharks (Carcharhinus leucas) using stable isotope analysis within a subtropical marine community in the southwest Indian Ocean. The main objectives of this study were to investigate and compare the predatory role that sub-adult and adult bull sharks play within a top predatory teleost fish community. Bull sharks had significantly broader niche widths compared to top predatory teleost assemblages with a wide and relatively enriched range of δ(13)C values relative to the local marine community. This suggests that bull sharks forage from a more diverse range of δ(13)C sources over a wider geographical range than the predatory teleost community. Adult bull sharks appeared to exhibit a shift towards consistently higher trophic level prey from an expanded foraging range compared to sub-adults, possibly due to increased mobility linked with size. Although predatory teleost fish are also capable of substantial migrations, bull sharks may have the ability to exploit a more diverse range of habitats and appeared to prey on a wider diversity of larger prey. This suggests that bull sharks play an important predatory role within their respective marine communities and adult sharks in particular may shape and link ecological processes of a variety of marine communities over a broad range. PMID:24205168

  13. Effects of ambient air temperature, humidity, and wind speed on seminal traits in Braford and Nellore bulls at the Brazilian Pantanal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menegassi, Silvio Renato Oliveira; Pereira, Gabriel Ribas; Bremm, Carolina; Koetz, Celso; Lopes, Flávio Guiselli; Fiorentini, Eduardo Custódio; McManus, Concepta; Dias, Eduardo Antunes; da Rocha, Marcela Kuczynski; Lopes, Rubia Branco; Barcellos, Júlio Otávio Jardim

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the bioclimatic thermal stress assessed by Equivalent Temperature Index (ETI) and Temperature Humidity Index (THI) on Braford and Nellore bulls sperm quality during the reproductive seasons at the tropical region in the Brazilian Pantanal. We used 20 bulls aged approximately 24 months at the beginning of the study. Five ejaculates per animal were collected using an electroejaculator. Temperature, air humidity, and wind speed data were collected every hour from the automatic weather station at the National Institute of Meteorology. Infrared thermography images data were collected to assess the testicular temperature gradient in each animal. Data were analyzed with ANOVA using MIXED procedure of SAS and means were compared using Tukey's HSD test. The THI and ETI at 12 days (epididymal transit) were higher in January (89.7 and 28.5, respectively) and February (90.0 and 29.0, respectively) compared to other months (P < 0.01). Total seminal defects differ only in Bradford bulls between the months of November and February. Nellore bulls had lower major defects (MaD) and total defects (TD) compared to Braford. Nellore bulls showed correlation between minor defects (MiD) and THI for 30 days (0.90) and 18 days (0.88; P < 0.05). Braford bulls showed correlation for MaD (0.89) in ETI for 12 days (P < 0.05). Infrared thermography showed no difference between animals. Reproductive response to environmental changes is a consequence of Nellore and Braford adaptation to climate stress conditions. Both THI and ETI environmental indexes can be used to evaluate the morphological changes in the seminal parameters in Nellore or Braford bulls; however, more experiments should be performed focusing on larger sample numbers and also in reproductive assessment during the consecutive years to assess fertility potential.

  14. Comparative Feeding Ecology of Bull Sharks (Carcharhinus leucas) in the Coastal Waters of the Southwest Indian Ocean Inferred from Stable Isotope Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Daly, Ryan; Froneman, Pierre W.; Smale, Malcolm J.

    2013-01-01

    As apex predators, sharks play an important role shaping their respective marine communities through predation and associated risk effects. Understanding the predatory dynamics of sharks within communities is, therefore, necessary to establish effective ecologically based conservation strategies. We employed non-lethal sampling methods to investigate the feeding ecology of bull sharks (Carcharhinus leucas) using stable isotope analysis within a subtropical marine community in the southwest Indian Ocean. The main objectives of this study were to investigate and compare the predatory role that sub-adult and adult bull sharks play within a top predatory teleost fish community. Bull sharks had significantly broader niche widths compared to top predatory teleost assemblages with a wide and relatively enriched range of δ13C values relative to the local marine community. This suggests that bull sharks forage from a more diverse range of δ13C sources over a wider geographical range than the predatory teleost community. Adult bull sharks appeared to exhibit a shift towards consistently higher trophic level prey from an expanded foraging range compared to sub-adults, possibly due to increased mobility linked with size. Although predatory teleost fish are also capable of substantial migrations, bull sharks may have the ability to exploit a more diverse range of habitats and appeared to prey on a wider diversity of larger prey. This suggests that bull sharks play an important predatory role within their respective marine communities and adult sharks in particular may shape and link ecological processes of a variety of marine communities over a broad range. PMID:24205168

  15. Effect of age at feedlot entry on performance and carcass characteristics of bulls and steers.

    PubMed

    Schoonmaker, J P; Loerch, S C; Fluharty, F L; Zerby, H N; Turner, T B

    2002-09-01

    , respectively; P < 0.01). Calves placed in the feedlot at 111 and 202 d of age had lower yield grades (3.2, 3.1, 3.5, respectively; P < 0.04), and produced fewer select carcasses than yearlings (25, 13, 48%, respectively; P < 0.01). Bulls and implanted steers both had an ADG of 1.7 kg/d when in the feedlot; however, bulls had a greater (P < 0.09) hot carcass weight (370 vs 354 kg) and a larger (P < 0.01) longissimus area (85.8 vs 81.3 cm2) than steers. Earlier feedlot placement resulted in greater quality grades but lower carcass weights. PMID:12350001

  16. Temperature-mediated differences in bacterial kidney disease expression and survival in Renibacterium salmoninarum-challenged bull trout and other salmonids

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jones, D.T.; Moffitt, C.M.; Peters, K.K.

    2007-01-01

    Resource managers considering restoration and reconnection of watersheds to protect and enhance threatened populations of bull trout Salvelinus confluentus have little information about the consequences of bacterial kidney disease (BKD) caused by Renibacterium salmoninarum. To better understand the response of bull trout to R. salmoninarum challenge, we conducted several laboratory experiments at two water temperatures. The extent, severity, and lethality of BKD in bull trout were compared with those of similarly challenged lake trout S. namaycush, Arctic char S. alpinus, Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha, and rainbow trout O. mykiss. The lethal dose of bacterial cells necessary to induce 50% mortality (LD50) was 10-fold lower at the 15??C challenge than at the 9??C challenge. Of the species tested, bull trout were relatively resistant to BKD, Arctic char were the most susceptible among Salvelinus species, and Chinook salmon were the most susceptible among Oncorhynchus species tested. Mean time to death was more rapid for all fish tested at 15??C than for fish challenged at 9??C. These results suggest that infection of bull trout with BKD likely poses a low risk to successful restoration of threatened populations. ?? Copyright by the American Fisheries Society 2007.

  17. Association between ETFA genotype and activity of superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione peroxidase in cryopreserved sperm of Holstein-Friesian bulls.

    PubMed

    Hering, D M; Lecewicz, M; Kordan, W; Kamiński, S

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether C/T missense mutation within the ETFA gene is associated with sperm antioxidant enzymatic activity. One hundred and twenty Holstein-Friesian bulls were genotyped by the PCR-RFLP technique (MwoI). Commercial straws of frozen-thawed semen were used to evaluate the activity of three antioxidant enzymes: superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione peroxidase. Among all bulls investigated, genotype CT was the most frequent (44.2%), in comparison with CC (42.5%) and TT (13.3%). Significant differences in glutathione peroxidase activity were observed between homozygous individuals (CC vs TT) with heterozygous CT having intermediate values. Dismutase activity was significantly associated with ETFA genotype, although only bulls with the CT genotype were significantly different from bulls carrying the CC genotype. The activity of catalase showed a similar trend (but was not statistically significant). In conclusion, we found that bulls with the ETFA TT genotype produce sperm with the highest glutathione peroxidase activity and can therefore be more efficiently protected from reactive oxygen. The mechanism of this interaction needs to be elucidated in future research. PMID:25472694

  18. [Assessment of a Bull Terrier bloodline regarding possible hypertrophic aggressive behaviour in situations of dog-dog-contact of the temperament test of Lower Saxony].

    PubMed

    Schalke, Esther; Ott, Stefanie; Hirschfeld, Jennifer; Hackbarth, Hansjoachim

    2010-01-01

    The expertise on the interpretation of and 11 b TierSchG assumes that a hypertrophy of aggressive behaviour exists in some blood lines of Bull Terriers, American Staffordshire Terriers and Pitbull type dogs. This study was carried out to detect whether a hypertrophy of aggressive behaviour occurred in a certain Bull Terrier breed line. A total of 38 dogs representing this line were tested according to the guidelines of the Dangerous Animals Act of Lower Saxony, Germany (GefTVO) enacted on July 5th, 2000. Furthermore, the results of their behaviour towards other dogs during the test were compared to those of 347 dogs tested by Böttjer (2003) in order to investigate possible significant differences in the occurrence of inadequate or disturbed aggressive behaviour. The comparison was aimed at exposing a possible significant accumulation of intraspecific aggressive behaviour. In the situations of dog-dog-contact of the test, 25 threatening behaviour"was displayed by 9 dogs (23.68%). Four dogs (10.53%) responded with "non-stationary threatening behaviour". All Bull Terriers reacted appropriately in every situation. A significant difference when comparing the results of the Bull Terriers to those of the dogs examined by Böttjer (2003) was not found. In conclusion, there were no indications for inadequate or disturbed aggressive behaviour in this Bull Terrier breed line. Furthermore, the broad majority of dogs proved to possess excellent social skills as well as the ability to communicate competently and to solve conflicts appropriately. PMID:20496824

  19. Body chemical composition of Nellore bulls with different residual feed intakes.

    PubMed

    Bonilha, E F M; Branco, R H; Bonilha, S F M; Araujo, F L; Magnani, E; Mercadante, M E Z

    2013-07-01

    Empty body and carcass chemical compositions, expressed as content of water, ether extract, protein, minerals, and energy, were evaluated in Nellore bulls with different residual feed intakes (RFI). Forty-nine not castrated males, with 343 kg of average initial BW and 398 kg of average slaughter BW, were studied. Animals were divided in two subgroups: reference group (RG) and ad libitum feeding group. At the end of the adaptation period, animals of subgroup RG were slaughtered and the other animals were finished in individual pens for approximately 100 d, until they reached a subcutaneous fat thickness over the LM of 4 mm, and were slaughtered at an average age of 540 d. Body composition was obtained after grinding, homogenizing, sampling, analyzing, and combining blood, hide, head + feet, viscera, and carcass. Tissue deposition rates and chemical composition of gain were also measured based on gains estimated by comparative slaughter technique. No significant differences in slaughter BW (P = 0.8639), empty BW (P = 0.7288), HCW (P = 0.6563), or empty body and carcass rates of gain were observed between RFI groups, demonstrating that the low (-0.331 kg DM/d) and high (+0.325 kg DM/d) RFI animals presented similar body sizes and growth rates. No significant differences in empty body or carcass content of water, ether extract, protein, minerals, and energy were observed between the low and high RFI animals. And also there were no significant differences in empty BW or carcass gain, demonstrating that low and high RFI animals had a similar growth potential. More efficient animals (low RFI) consumed less feed than less efficient animals (high RFI) but presented similar body sizes, growth rates, and empty body and carcass chemical composition. PMID:23658334

  20. Transmission dynamics of Mannheimia haemolytica in newly-received beef bulls at fattening operations.

    PubMed

    Timsit, E; Christensen, H; Bareille, N; Seegers, H; Bisgaard, M; Assié, S

    2013-01-25

    The primary objective of this study was to determine, at the lung level, whether single or multiple clones of Mannheimia haemolytica are present within a pen during a bovine respiratory disease (BRD) episode. A secondary objective was to assess whether M. haemolytica isolates obtained from nasal swabs (NS) are identical to those isolated deeper within the respiratory tract. Sixteen BRD episodes that naturally occurred in 12 pens of eight to 12 bulls (n=112) newly-received at three fattening operations were investigated. One hundred and seventy five M. haemolytica isolates were collected from 239 pairs of trans-tracheal aspirations (TTA) and NS performed during these 16 BRD episodes. M. haemolytica isolates were characterized by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). PFGE types obtained from NS and TTA were then compared. M. haemolytica was isolated during 14 BRD episodes. Two to three different clones of M. haemolytica were recovered during 10 episodes whereas only one clone was recovered in four episodes. A moderate agreement (kappa=0.50) between NS and TTA for M. haemolytica isolation was observed. Identical PFGE types were only observed in 77% of matched NS-TTA pairs. The significant within-pen diversity of M. haemolytica during BRD episodes indicates that the disease is not primarily due to the spread of a single virulent clone among cattle and highlights the importance of predisposing factors that enable the resident flora to overcome the cattle's immune system. The results also demonstrate that isolates recovered from NS are not always representative of the isolates present deeper within the respiratory tract. PMID:22901531

  1. Effect of Aging Time on Physicochemical Meat Quality and Sensory Property of Hanwoo Bull Beef.

    PubMed

    Cho, Soohyun; Kang, Sun Moon; Seong, Pilnam; Kang, Geunho; Kim, Yunseok; Kim, Jinhyung; Lee, Seounghwan; Kim, Sidong

    2016-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the meat quality and sensory properties of 12 major cuts from 10 Hanwoo bulls (25-32 mon of age) after they were aged at 2℃ for 0, 7, 14, and 21 d. Protein content (%) was between 19.17 and 22.50%. Intramuscular fat content ranged from 2.79 to 8.39%. The collagen content of the chuck roll, chuck tender, and short plate muscles was higher (1.97-2.04%) than that of the striploin muscles (1.48%) (p<0.05). CIE lightness (L*) values increased with an increase in aging days for tenderloin, loin, chuck roll, oyster blade, short plate, top sirloin, and eye of round muscles (p<0.05). Most muscles, except the short plate, showed no significant changes in redness CIE (a*) and yellowness (b*) color values during aging. The tenderloin, loin, and striploin showed significantly higher water holding capacity (58.60-62.06%) than that of chuck roll and short plate (53.86-57.07%) muscles (p<0.05). The Warner-Bratzler shear force values of most muscles decreased significantly as the aging period increased (p<0.05), exception the tenderloin. The chuck tender muscles showed the highest cooking loss, whereas tenderloin muscle showed the lowest (p<0.05). The tenderloin muscle had the longest sarcomere length (SL) (3.67-3.86 μm) and the bottom round muscle had the shortest SL (2.21-2.35 μm) (p<0.05). In the sensory evaluation, tenderness and overall-likeness scores of most muscles increased with increase in aging days. The tenderloin and oyster blade showed relatively higher tenderness and overall-likeness values than did the other muscles during the aging period. No significant differences were noted in juiciness and flavor-likeness scores among muscles and aging days. PMID:27499666

  2. Opportunistic visitors: long-term behavioural response of bull sharks to food provisioning in Fiji.

    PubMed

    Brunnschweiler, Juerg M; Barnett, Adam

    2013-01-01

    Shark-based tourism that uses bait to reliably attract certain species to specific sites so that divers can view them is a growing industry globally, but remains a controversial issue. We evaluate multi-year (2004-2011) underwater visual (n = 48 individuals) and acoustic tracking data (n = 82 transmitters; array of up to 16 receivers) of bull sharks Carcharhinus leucas from a long-term shark feeding site at the Shark Reef Marine Reserve and reefs along the Beqa Channel on the southern coast of Viti Levu, Fiji. Individual C. leucas showed varying degrees of site fidelity. Determined from acoustic tagging, the majority of C. leucas had site fidelity indexes >0.5 for the marine reserve (including the feeding site) and neighbouring reefs. However, during the time of the day (09:00-12:00) when feeding takes place, sharks mainly had site fidelity indexes <0.5 for the feeding site, regardless of feeding or non-feeding days. Site fidelity indexes determined by direct diver observation of sharks at the feeding site were lower compared to such values determined by acoustic tagging. The overall pattern for C. leucas is that, if present in the area, they are attracted to the feeding site regardless of whether feeding or non-feeding days, but they remain for longer periods of time (consecutive hours) on feeding days. The overall diel patterns in movement are for C. leucas to use the area around the feeding site in the morning before spreading out over Shark Reef throughout the day and dispersing over the entire array at night. Both focal observation and acoustic monitoring show that C. leucas intermittently leave the area for a few consecutive days throughout the year, and for longer time periods (weeks to months) at the end of the calendar year before returning to the feeding site. PMID:23516496

  3. Opportunistic Visitors: Long-Term Behavioural Response of Bull Sharks to Food Provisioning in Fiji

    PubMed Central

    Brunnschweiler, Juerg M.; Barnett, Adam

    2013-01-01

    Shark-based tourism that uses bait to reliably attract certain species to specific sites so that divers can view them is a growing industry globally, but remains a controversial issue. We evaluate multi-year (2004–2011) underwater visual (n = 48 individuals) and acoustic tracking data (n = 82 transmitters; array of up to 16 receivers) of bull sharks Carcharhinus leucas from a long-term shark feeding site at the Shark Reef Marine Reserve and reefs along the Beqa Channel on the southern coast of Viti Levu, Fiji. Individual C. leucas showed varying degrees of site fidelity. Determined from acoustic tagging, the majority of C. leucas had site fidelity indexes >0.5 for the marine reserve (including the feeding site) and neighbouring reefs. However, during the time of the day (09:00–12:00) when feeding takes place, sharks mainly had site fidelity indexes <0.5 for the feeding site, regardless of feeding or non-feeding days. Site fidelity indexes determined by direct diver observation of sharks at the feeding site were lower compared to such values determined by acoustic tagging. The overall pattern for C. leucas is that, if present in the area, they are attracted to the feeding site regardless of whether feeding or non-feeding days, but they remain for longer periods of time (consecutive hours) on feeding days. The overall diel patterns in movement are for C. leucas to use the area around the feeding site in the morning before spreading out over Shark Reef throughout the day and dispersing over the entire array at night. Both focal observation and acoustic monitoring show that C. leucas intermittently leave the area for a few consecutive days throughout the year, and for longer time periods (weeks to months) at the end of the calendar year before returning to the feeding site. PMID:23516496

  4. Tube bundle system studies at Signal Peak Energy Bull Mountains #1 Mine

    PubMed Central

    Zipf, R.K.; Ochsner, R.; Krog, R.; Marchewka, W.; Valente, M.; Jensen, R.

    2015-01-01

    A tube bundle system (TBS) is a mechanical system for continuously drawing gas samples through tubes from multiple monitoring points located in an underground coal mine for analysis and display on the surface. The U.S. National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), in collaboration with Signal Peak Energy (SPE), LLC, Bull Mountains No. 1 Mine, operated a TBS during mining of two bleederless, longwall panels. This paper describes the gas analysis data and its interpretation. As verified by the TBS, coal at the SPE mine tends to oxidize slowly. It was known that a reservoir of low-oxygen concentration atmosphere developed about 610 m (2,000 ft) behind the longwall face. A bleederless ventilation system facilitates formation of an inert atmosphere in this longwall gob and decreases the likelihood of spontaneous combustion. Connections of the mine atmosphere to the surface through subsidence cracks could allow airflow into the longwall gob, revive coal oxidation and increase spontaneous combustion risk. The atmospheric composition of the sealed areas was homogeneous, except in the immediate vicinity of suspected ingassing points. The TBS verified that gases within the partially sealed, bleederless longwall gob expanded into the longwall tailgate area when barometric pressure decreased. The concentration of carbon dioxide in the back return airflow at the longwall tailgate was observed to increase by a factor of three and possibly up to 10 times the typical background concentration of 0.5 to 1.0%, depending on the size of the longwall gob and the magnitude of barometric pressure decrease. TBS have the inherent disadvantage of slow response time due to travel time of the gas samples and sequential gas analyses. A TBS or similar continuous monitoring system could be beneficial in detecting and providing warning of potentially hazardous gas concentrations, if the slow response time of the system is always understood. PMID:26306075

  5. Scales of Stream Disturbance Patterns and Population Structure in Bull Trout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luce, C. H.; Rieman, B. E.; Dunham, J. B.

    2005-05-01

    Ecological theory proposes that the geometry and dynamics of suitable habitats are important predictors for the persistence of a population or metapopulation. A key finding supporting a metapopulation-like conceptualization of extinction and colonization in fragmented salmonid populations is that individuals of particular species are more likely to be absent from small patches of suitable habitat than from large patches. Extinctions from small patches occur for a few reasons that can be roughly classed as physical catastrophic causes (e.g. a major channel reorganizing event) or as biological small-population effects related to genetics and demographics. One important question with implications for land management is how strong of a role physical disturbances play in determining presence and absence of a species within a patch. If disturbance plays a key role in structuring populations, then we would expect to observe two patterns. First the spatial scale of disturbance should be on the order of the size of patches that are commonly unoccupied. The second prediction would be that the spatial scale of genetic variability should show strong gene flow at scales smaller than the scale of disturbance. We examined aerial photography over the last 40 years in central Idaho to measure the scale of stream disturbance patches. The scale of stream disturbances was on the same order of magnitude as the divide between commonly occupied and unoccupied patches, and was smaller than scales of high gene flow among bull trout populations, failing to reject the possibility that disturbance plays an important role in structuring populations in this basin. Management for persistence of the species must consider both the likelihood of decreased habitat patch sizes and increased disturbance scales with global warming. Knowing disturbance patch scales and how disturbance operates to structure populations can be used to consider a disturbance based paradigm for management of sensitive

  6. A Novel Approach to Identifying Physical Markers of Cryo-Damage in Bull Spermatozoa

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Sung-Jae; Kwon, Woo-Sung; Rahman, Md Saidur; Lee, June-Sub; Pang, Myung-Geol

    2015-01-01

    Cryopreservation is an efficient way to store spermatozoa and plays a critical role in the livestock industry as well as in clinical practice. During cryopreservation, cryo-stress causes substantial damage to spermatozoa. In present study, the effects of cryo-stress at various cryopreservation steps, such as dilution / cooling, adding cryoprtectant, and freezing were studied in spermatozoa collected from 9 individual bull testes. The motility (%), motion kinematics, capacitation status, mitochondrial activity, and viability of bovine spermatozoa at each step of the cryopreservation process were assessed using computer-assisted sperm analysis, Hoechst 33258/chlortetracycline fluorescence, rhodamine 123 staining, and hypo-osmotic swelling test, respectively. The results demonstrate that the cryopreservation steps reduced motility (%), rapid speed (%), and mitochondrial activity, whereas medium/slow speed (%), and the acrosome reaction were increased (P < 0.05). Differences (Δ) of the acrosome reaction were higher in dilution/cooling step (P < 0.05), whereas differences (Δ) of motility, rapid speed, and non-progressive motility were higher in cryoprotectant and freezing as compared to dilution/cooling (P < 0.05). On the other hand, differences (Δ) of mitochondrial activity, viability, and progressive motility were higher in freezing step (P < 0.05) while the difference (Δ) of the acrosome reaction was higher in dilution/cooling (P < 0.05). Based on these results, we propose that freezing / thawing steps are the most critical in cryopreservation and may provide a logical ground of understanding on the cryo-damage. Moreover, these sperm parameters might be used as physical markers of sperm cryo-damage. PMID:25938413

  7. Effect of Aging Time on Physicochemical Meat Quality and Sensory Property of Hanwoo Bull Beef

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seounghwan

    2016-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the meat quality and sensory properties of 12 major cuts from 10 Hanwoo bulls (25-32 mon of age) after they were aged at 2℃ for 0, 7, 14, and 21 d. Protein content (%) was between 19.17 and 22.50%. Intramuscular fat content ranged from 2.79 to 8.39%. The collagen content of the chuck roll, chuck tender, and short plate muscles was higher (1.97-2.04%) than that of the striploin muscles (1.48%) (p<0.05). CIE lightness (L*) values increased with an increase in aging days for tenderloin, loin, chuck roll, oyster blade, short plate, top sirloin, and eye of round muscles (p<0.05). Most muscles, except the short plate, showed no significant changes in redness CIE (a*) and yellowness (b*) color values during aging. The tenderloin, loin, and striploin showed significantly higher water holding capacity (58.60-62.06%) than that of chuck roll and short plate (53.86-57.07%) muscles (p<0.05). The Warner-Bratzler shear force values of most muscles decreased significantly as the aging period increased (p<0.05), exception the tenderloin. The chuck tender muscles showed the highest cooking loss, whereas tenderloin muscle showed the lowest (p<0.05). The tenderloin muscle had the longest sarcomere length (SL) (3.67-3.86 μm) and the bottom round muscle had the shortest SL (2.21-2.35 μm) (p<0.05). In the sensory evaluation, tenderness and overall-likeness scores of most muscles increased with increase in aging days. The tenderloin and oyster blade showed relatively higher tenderness and overall-likeness values than did the other muscles during the aging period. No significant differences were noted in juiciness and flavor-likeness scores among muscles and aging days. PMID:27499666

  8. Differences in CASA output according to the chamber type when analyzing frozen-thawed bull sperm.

    PubMed

    Ibănescu, Iulian; Leiding, Claus; Ciornei, Ştefan Gregore; Roșca, Petru; Sfartz, Ioana; Drugociu, Dan

    2016-03-01

    As demonstrated by some authors, the type of analyzing chamber can greatly influence the results of computer-assisted sperm analysis (CASA). This study aimed to compare three of the disposable chamber types currently available on the market and to determine whether the CASA output may be significantly different among them. The semen from five Fleckvieh bulls was analyzed by CASA using three different disposable chambers: Leja (20μm), MofA (20μm) and Minitube (20μm), at three different time points: immediately after filling the chamber, at 6min, and also at 12min after filling. Sperm concentration was also determined using the Nucleocounter® NC-100™ device and the hemocytometer as standard methods. The results showed higher values in terms of total and progressive sperm motility for MofA compared to the other two chambers immediately after filling (p<0.05), but higher values for Leja and Minitube after 6 and 12min (p<0.05). All three disposable chambers offered lower values for sperm concentration compared to standard methods (Leja: 68.4±4.9×106/mL; MofA: 80.8±9.6×106/mL; Minitube: 67.3±5.4×106/mL; Nucleocounter: 86.5×106/mL; Hemocytometer: 84.0×106/mL). We conclude that for rapid analyses the MofA chambers provide superior results when compared to the other types that we tested. However, when the analysis requires a longer duration, the Minitube type, and especially the Leja type provide a greater degree of confidence. Further, for determining sperm concentration we think that examiners would be more accurate using the Nucleocounter or the hemocytometer and should make use of CASA only when the other methods are not available. PMID:26791331

  9. Effects of feeding a spray-dried multivalent polyclonal antibody preparation on feedlot performance, feeding behavior, carcass characteristics, rumenitis, and blood gas profile of Brangus and Nellore yearling bulls.

    PubMed

    Millen, D D; Pacheco, R D L; DiLorenzo, N; Martins, C L; Marino, C T; Bastos, J P S T; Mariani, T M; Barducci, R S; Sarti, L M N; DiCostanzo, A; Rodrigues, P H M; Arrigoni, M D B

    2015-09-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of replacing monensin (MON) with a spray-dried multivalent polyclonal antibody preparation (PAP) against several ruminal microorganisms on feedlot performance, carcass characteristics, feeding behavior, blood gas profile, and the rumenitis incidence of Brangus and Nellore yearling bulls. The study was designed as a completely randomized design with a 2 × 2 factorial arrangement, replicated 6 times (4 bulls per pen and a total of 24 pens), in which bulls ( = 48) of each biotype were fed diets containing either MON fed at 300 mg/d or PAP fed at 3 g/d. No significant feed additive main effects were observed for ADG ( = 0.27), G:F ( = 0.28), HCW ( = 0.99), or dressing percentage ( = 0.80). However, bulls receiving PAP had greater DMI ( = 0.02) and larger ( = 0.02) final LM area as well as greater ( < 0.01) blood concentrations of bicarbonate and base excess in the extracellular fluid than bulls receiving MON. Brangus bulls had greater ( < 0.01) ADG and DMI expressed in kilograms, final BW, heavier HCW, and larger initial and final LM area than Nellore bulls. However, Nellore bulls had greater daily DMI fluctuation ( < 0.01), expressed as a percentage, and greater incidence of rumenitis ( = 0.05) than Brangus bulls. In addition, Brangus bulls had greater ( < 0.01) DMI per meal and also presented lower ( < 0.01) DM and NDF rumination rates when compared with Nellore bulls. Significant interactions ( < 0.05) between biotype and feed additive were observed for SFA, unsaturated fatty acids (UFA), MUFA, and PUFA concentrations in adipose tissues. When Nellore bulls were fed PAP, fat had greater ( < 0.05) SFA and PUFA contents but less ( < 0.01) UFA and MUFA than Nellore bulls receiving MON. For Brangus bulls, MON led to greater ( < 0.05) SFA and PUFA and less ( < 0.05) UFA and MUFA than Brangus bulls fed PAP. Feeding a spray-dried PAP led to similar feedlot performance compared with that when feeding MON. Spray

  10. The effect of cysteine and glutathione on sperm and oxidative stress parameters of post-thawed bull semen.

    PubMed

    Tuncer, Pürhan Barbaros; Bucak, Mustafa Numan; Büyükleblebici, Serhat; Sarıözkan, Serpil; Yeni, Deniz; Eken, Ayşe; Akalın, Pınar Peker; Kinet, Hüseyin; Avdatek, Fatih; Fidan, A Fatih; Gündoğan, Mustafa

    2010-12-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effects of antioxidants such as reduced glutathione (GSH) and cysteine in Laiciphose® extender on semen parameters, fertilizing ability, lipid peroxidation (LPO) level and glutathione peroxidise (GPx) activity of post-thawed bull semen. Totally 54 ejaculates of three bulls were used in the study. Five groups, namely; GSH (0.5 and 2 mM), cysteine (5 and 10 mM) and control group, were conducted to test the antioxidants in Laiciphose®. Insemination doses were processed that each 0.25-mL straw contained 15 x 10⁶ sperm. The addition of antioxidants did not present any significant effect on the percentages of post-thaw sperm morphology (acrosome and total abnormalities), subjective, CASA and progressive motilities, as well as sperm motility characteristics (VAP, VSL, VCL, LIN and ALH), compared to the control groups (P > 0.05). GSH 0.5mM (55.5±7.38%) and cysteine 10 mM (48±5.65%) led to lower rates of DNA damage, compared to control (P < 0.05). As regards to MDA level, cysteine at 10 mM dose gave the highest level (4.99±0.44 nmol/L) (P < 0.001). GPx activity was demonstrated to be higher level upon the addition of 5 mM cysteine when compared to the other groups (P < 0.05). With respect to fertility results based on 60-day non-returns, the supplementation of antioxidants did not present significant differences (P > 0.05). The results of this study may provide an useful information for the future studies in this area. So, further studies could be suggested to achieve better information in terms of the DNA damage and fertilizing capacity of bull sperm frozen with effective antioxidants. PMID:20951122

  11. Fusarium toxin-contaminated maize in diets of growing bulls: effects on performance, slaughtering characteristics, and transfer into physiological liquids.

    PubMed

    Winkler, Janine; Gödde, Jens; Meyer, Ulrich; Frahm, Jana; Westendarp, Heiner; Dänicke, Sven

    2016-08-01

    The present feeding study was carried out to examine the effects of Fusarium toxin-contaminated diets on performance and slaughtering characteristics and on the transfer of the Fusarium toxins zearalenone (ZEN), deoxynivalenol (DON) and their metabolites into physiological matrices. A total of 61 bulls (483 ± 46 kg) were fed with graded proportions of Fusarium toxin-contaminated feed over a period of 10 weeks. The total mixed rations (TMR) consisted of 47 % grass silage, 20 % press pulp silage, and 33 % concentrate on dry matter (DM) basis. Increasing toxin concentrations were achieved by the exchange of control maize with Fusarium toxin-contaminated maize in the concentrates. Thus, dietary toxin concentrations between 0.08 and 0.69 mg ZEN and 0.36 and 8.31 mg DON per kg DM were covered by the four feeding groups. Based on increasing DM intake with increasing mycotoxin contaminations of the diet, the live weight gain and energy intake differed significantly between the groups. No effects were observed on slaughtering characteristics and organ weights. ZEN, α-zeralenol, β-zeralenol (β-ZEL), zeralanone, α-zearalanol, β-zearalanol, DON, and de-deepoxy-DON (de-DON) were simultaneously determined in urine, plasma, and liquor whereby quantifiable concentrations of ZEN, β-ZEL, DON, and de-DON were found in urine, of DON and de-DON in plasma, and solely of de-DON in liquor. Based on overall results it can be concluded that current EU-guidance values for critical concentrations of DON and ZEN can be regarded as safe levels also for growing bulls. Urine and blood toxin residue levels can be used to assess exposure of bulls. PMID:27083899

  12. Analysis of the lipid composition of bull spermatozoa by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry--a cautionary note.

    PubMed

    Schiller, Jürgen; Müller, Karin; Süss, Rosemarie; Arnhold, Jürgen; Gey, Claudia; Herrmann, Andreas; Lessig, Jacqueline; Arnold, Klaus; Müller, Peter

    2003-11-01

    In this study we demonstrated the combination of MALDI-TOF MS and TLC as a fast and powerful tool to investigate the phospholipid (PL) composition of organic extracts of bull spermatozoa. Since phosphatidylcholine (PC) is the dominant PL species, an adequate resolution of MALDI-TOF spectra for sphingomyelin (SM) or phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) was achieved only after previous PL separation by TLC. We found a poor diversity especially for PE and PC, mainly containing ether-linked fatty acids which were 1-palmityl-2-docosahexaenoyl-PL and the corresponding alkenyl-acyl compound (plasmalogen) 1-palmitenyl-2-docosahexaenoyl-PL. For PC, both lipids were quantified after phospholipase A2 digestion to represent 44.2 and 37.2%, respectively, of the total PC. In contrast, the diacyl-PC content of bull spermatozoa was comparatively low (18.6% of total PC). In the presence of trifluoroacetic acid (TFA), which is routinely added to the MALDI-TOF matrix to improve the signal to noise ratio, a high lysophospholipid (LPL) content was detected in the PL extracts of bull spermatozoa, whereas TLC did not reveal significant amounts of LPL. The TFA mediated hydrolysis of the acid-labile alkenyl-acyl PL to the corresponding LPL was shown to cause this discrepancy. This assumption was verified by analysing the PL composition by MALDI-TOF MS before and after (i) digestion of sperm cell lipids with phospholipase A2 and (ii) exposition of spermatozoa to HCl fumes. We conclude that the analysis of samples containing alkenyl-acyl-PL by MALDI-TOF has to be performed with great caution. PMID:14580713

  13. Residency patterns and migration dynamics of adult bull sharks (Carcharhinus leucas) on the east coast of southern Africa.

    PubMed

    Daly, Ryan; Smale, Malcolm J; Cowley, Paul D; Froneman, Pierre W

    2014-01-01

    Bull sharks (Carcharhinus leucas) are globally distributed top predators that play an important ecological role within coastal marine communities. However, little is known about the spatial and temporal scales of their habitat use and associated ecological role. In this study, we employed passive acoustic telemetry to investigate the residency patterns and migration dynamics of 18 adult bull sharks (195-283 cm total length) tagged in southern Mozambique for a period of between 10 and 22 months. The majority of sharks (n = 16) exhibited temporally and spatially variable residency patterns interspersed with migration events. Ten individuals undertook coastal migrations that ranged between 433 and 709 km (mean  = 533 km) with eight of these sharks returning to the study site. During migration, individuals exhibited rates of movement between 2 and 59 km x d(-1) (mean = 17.58 km x d(-1)) and were recorded travelling annual distances of between 450 and 3760 km (mean = 1163 km). Migration towards lower latitudes primarily took place in austral spring and winter and there was a significant negative correlation between residency and mean monthly sea temperature at the study site. This suggested that seasonal change is the primary driver behind migration events but further investigation is required to assess how foraging and reproductive activity may influence residency patterns and migration. Results from this study highlight the need for further understanding of bull shark migration dynamics and suggest that effective conservation strategies for this vulnerable species necessitate the incorporation of congruent trans-boundary policies over large spatial scales. PMID:25295972

  14. Residency Patterns and Migration Dynamics of Adult Bull Sharks (Carcharhinus leucas) on the East Coast of Southern Africa

    PubMed Central

    Daly, Ryan; Smale, Malcolm J.; Cowley, Paul D.; Froneman, Pierre W.

    2014-01-01

    Bull sharks (Carcharhinus leucas) are globally distributed top predators that play an important ecological role within coastal marine communities. However, little is known about the spatial and temporal scales of their habitat use and associated ecological role. In this study, we employed passive acoustic telemetry to investigate the residency patterns and migration dynamics of 18 adult bull sharks (195–283 cm total length) tagged in southern Mozambique for a period of between 10 and 22 months. The majority of sharks (n = 16) exhibited temporally and spatially variable residency patterns interspersed with migration events. Ten individuals undertook coastal migrations that ranged between 433 and 709 km (mean  = 533 km) with eight of these sharks returning to the study site. During migration, individuals exhibited rates of movement between 2 and 59 km.d−1 (mean  = 17.58 km.d−1) and were recorded travelling annual distances of between 450 and 3760 km (mean  = 1163 km). Migration towards lower latitudes primarily took place in austral spring and winter and there was a significant negative correlation between residency and mean monthly sea temperature at the study site. This suggested that seasonal change is the primary driver behind migration events but further investigation is required to assess how foraging and reproductive activity may influence residency patterns and migration. Results from this study highlight the need for further understanding of bull shark migration dynamics and suggest that effective conservation strategies for this vulnerable species necessitate the incorporation of congruent trans-boundary policies over large spatial scales. PMID:25295972

  15. Efficacy of caudal epidural injection of lidocaine, xylazine and xylazine plus hyaluronidase in reducing discomfort produced by electroejaculation in bulls.

    PubMed

    Pagliosa, Ronaldo C; Derossi, Rafael; Costa, Deiler S; Faria, Fabio J C

    2015-11-01

    To test the hypothesis that epidural administration of lidocaine, xylazine or xylazine plus hyaluronidase provides reduced pain and stress during electroejaculation in bulls, eight 30-month-old Nellore bulls received saline solution (control), 2% lidocaine, 2% xylazine or 2% xylazine plus hyaluronidase injected into the first intercoccygeal (Co1-Co2) epidural space in randomized order. Heart rate, respiratory rate, mean arterial pressure, analgesia, animal behavior and motor blockade were evaluated before treatment and at predetermined intervals during and after treatment. Pain and stress were scored subjectively, and semen quality was evaluated. The onset of anesthetic action was significantly faster with lidocaine (3.0 ± 1.2 min) than with xylazine or xylazine plus hyaluronidase (8.9 ± 1.5 and 5.5 ± 2.6 min, P=0.021 and P=0.012, respectively), and the onset of anesthesia with xylazine plus hyaluronidase was significantly faster than that with xylazine alone (P=0.032). Treatment with xylazine or xylazine plus hyaluronidase resulted in less discomfort than treatment with lidocaine, as indicated by animal behavior. Changes in heart rate, respiratory rate and arterial pressure were within acceptable limits. Penile protrusion and semen emission occurred in all animals during all four treatments. Our results suggest that xylazine plus hyaluronidase reduced discomfort during electroejaculation more effectively than xylazine or lidocaine alone. Further experiments are necessary to determine whether electroejaculation with xylazine plus hyaluronidase is feasible for obtaining semen from Nellore bulls unaccustomed to being handled or restrained. PMID:26097016

  16. Efficacy of caudal epidural injection of lidocaine, xylazine and xylazine plus hyaluronidase in reducing discomfort produced by electroejaculation in bulls

    PubMed Central

    PAGLIOSA, Ronaldo C.; DEROSSI, Rafael; COSTA, Deiler S.; FARIA, Fabio J.C.

    2015-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that epidural administration of lidocaine, xylazine or xylazine plus hyaluronidase provides reduced pain and stress during electroejaculation in bulls, eight 30-month-old Nellore bulls received saline solution (control), 2% lidocaine, 2% xylazine or 2% xylazine plus hyaluronidase injected into the first intercoccygeal (Co1–Co2) epidural space in randomized order. Heart rate, respiratory rate, mean arterial pressure, analgesia, animal behavior and motor blockade were evaluated before treatment and at predetermined intervals during and after treatment. Pain and stress were scored subjectively, and semen quality was evaluated. The onset of anesthetic action was significantly faster with lidocaine (3.0 ± 1.2 min) than with xylazine or xylazine plus hyaluronidase (8.9 ± 1.5 and 5.5 ± 2.6 min, P=0.021 and P=0.012, respectively), and the onset of anesthesia with xylazine plus hyaluronidase was significantly faster than that with xylazine alone (P=0.032). Treatment with xylazine or xylazine plus hyaluronidase resulted in less discomfort than treatment with lidocaine, as indicated by animal behavior. Changes in heart rate, respiratory rate and arterial pressure were within acceptable limits. Penile protrusion and semen emission occurred in all animals during all four treatments. Our results suggest that xylazine plus hyaluronidase reduced discomfort during electroejaculation more effectively than xylazine or lidocaine alone. Further experiments are necessary to determine whether electroejaculation with xylazine plus hyaluronidase is feasible for obtaining semen from Nellore bulls unaccustomed to being handled or restrained. PMID:26097016

  17. [The effect of lasalocid on apparent digestibility, characteristics of rumen fermentation and fattening and slaughter output of bulls].

    PubMed

    Richter, G H; Flachowsky, G

    1990-10-01

    Four digestion experiments with 5 wethers each (Feeding: artificially dried grass; 0, 15, 30 or 60 mg lasalocid per animal and day), two short time experiments (Exp. 1: 3 rumen fistulated sheep; feeding; artificially dried grass; 0, 15, 30 or 60 mg lasalocid per animal and day; exp. 2: 20 bulls; feeding; 2 kg concentrates per animal and day; wheat straw ad libitum; 0, 150 or 300 mg lasalocid per animal and day) and one individual feeding experiment (24 bulls per group; duration: 279 days, feeding: 2 kg concentrates per animal and day, corn silage and whole barley-grass silage ad libitum; 0 or 100/200 mg lasalocid per animal and day) were carried out in order to investigate the influence of the ionophore lasalocid on digestibility, figures of rumen fermentation as well as fattening and slaughtering results of bulls. Higher doses of lasalocid (30 and 60 mg per animal and day) decreased significantly digestibility of organic matter (1.8 and 2.8 units) and crude fibre (5.8 and 7.2 units). Relative acetate (22 to 120 mmoles per mol) and butyrate concentration (23 to 58 mmoles per mol) were decreased and molar propionate concentration of rumen liquid (25 to 154 mmoles per mol) was increased depending on level of lasalocid supplementation. Lasalocid did not significantly influence the dry matter intake; daily weight gain and slaughtering results were increased (4.4 and 6.1%), energy efficiency was improved (3.8%). Effects of lasalocid are similar to that of monensin. A dose of 20 to 30 mg lasalocid per kg dry matter is recommended. PMID:1963770

  18. Sexual polymorphisms of vomeronasal 1 receptor family gene expression in bulls, steers, and estrous and early luteal-phase heifers

    PubMed Central

    KUBO, Haruna; OTSUKA, Midori; KADOKAWA, Hiroya

    2015-01-01

    Vomeronasal 1 receptors (V1R) are a family of receptors for intraspecies chemosignals, including pheromones, and are expressed in the olfactory epithelium (OE) and vomeronasal organ (VO). Even in the well-studied rodents, it is unclear which members of the V1R family cause sexual polymorphisms, as there are numerous genes and it is difficult to quantify their expressions individually. Bovine species carry only 34 V1R homologs, and the OE and VOs are large enough to sample. Here, V1R expression was quantified in the OE and VOs of individual bovines. Based on the 34 gene sequences, we obtained a molecular dendrogram consisting of four clusters and six independent branches. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR was used to obtain gene expression profiles in the VOs and OE of 5 Japanese Black bulls, 5 steers, 7 estrous heifers and 6 early luteal-phase heifers. Ten genes showed significant between-group differences, and 22 showed high expression in VOs than in OE. The bulls showed higher expression of one gene more in OE and another in VOs (both P<0.05) than did steers; both genes belonged to the first cluster. No genes were expressed more abundantly in steers than in bulls. The estrous heifers showed higher expression of a gene of the second cluster in OE, and a gene of the third cluster in VOs (both P<0.05) than did early luteal-phase heifers. These results suggest V1R expression exhibits sexual polymorphisms in cattle. PMID:26477467

  19. Sexual polymorphisms of vomeronasal 1 receptor family gene expression in bulls, steers, and estrous and early luteal-phase heifers.

    PubMed

    Kubo, Haruna; Otsuka, Midori; Kadokawa, Hiroya

    2016-02-01

    Vomeronasal 1 receptors (V1R) are a family of receptors for intraspecies chemosignals, including pheromones, and are expressed in the olfactory epithelium (OE) and vomeronasal organ (VO). Even in the well-studied rodents, it is unclear which members of the V1R family cause sexual polymorphisms, as there are numerous genes and it is difficult to quantify their expressions individually. Bovine species carry only 34 V1R homologs, and the OE and VOs are large enough to sample. Here, V1R expression was quantified in the OE and VOs of individual bovines. Based on the 34 gene sequences, we obtained a molecular dendrogram consisting of four clusters and six independent branches. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR was used to obtain gene expression profiles in the VOs and OE of 5 Japanese Black bulls, 5 steers, 7 estrous heifers and 6 early luteal-phase heifers. Ten genes showed significant between-group differences, and 22 showed high expression in VOs than in OE. The bulls showed higher expression of one gene more in OE and another in VOs (both P<0.05) than did steers; both genes belonged to the first cluster. No genes were expressed more abundantly in steers than in bulls. The estrous heifers showed higher expression of a gene of the second cluster in OE, and a gene of the third cluster in VOs (both P<0.05) than did early luteal-phase heifers. These results suggest V1R expression exhibits sexual polymorphisms in cattle. PMID:26477467

  20. Methodological factors affecting the results of staining frozen-thawed fertile and subfertile Japanese Black bull spermatozoa for acrosomal status.

    PubMed

    Almadaly, Essam; El-Kon, Ismail; Heleil, Bassiouni; Fattouh, El-Sayed; Mukoujima, Koushi; Ueda, Takuya; Hoshino, Youichirou; Takasu, Masaki; Murase, Tetsuma

    2012-12-01

    In the present study, some methodological factors affecting the acrosomal staining of frozen-thawed Japanese Black bull spermatozoa were investigated by examining; the effect of fixation/permeabilization procedure on intact acrosome percentage after fluorescein isothiocyanate peanut agglutinin (FITC-PNA) staining, the acrosomal staining patterns by using two types of fluorescent probes FITC-PSA (Pisum Sativum Agglutinin) and FITC-PNA and the effect of staining methods, either smear or vial, on intact acrosome percentage. Then intact acrosome percentage was compared between the samples stained by thus established method and those simply fixed with glutaraldehyde (glutaraldehyde fixation method). A possibility that FITC-PNA staining or the glutaraldehyde fixation methods could detect any difference in intact acrosome percentage or acrosomal staining patterns between fertile and subfertile bulls was also examined. The results showed that (1) 4% paraformaldehyde fixation plus 1% Triton X-100 permeabilization was better than absolute ethanol alone, (2) FITC-PNA acrosomal labeling was more specific than FITC-PSA, (3) sperm suspensions should be smeared and gently processed before acrosomal staining rather than spotted onto glass slides after staining in vial in order to avoid excessive mechanical damage of the sperm acrosome, and (4) staining spermatozoa with FITC-PNA had no major advantages over examination of simply glutaraldehyde fixed sperm samples and both failed to detect any significant difference in intact acrosome percentage between the fertile and the subfertile bulls used here. The present study demonstrates important methodological considerations which need to be taken into account in order to design a reliable and reproducible protocol for the study of the acrosome. PMID:23182469

  1. To Madagascar and back: long-distance, return migration across open ocean by a pregnant female bull shark Carcharhinus leucas.

    PubMed

    Lea, J S E; Humphries, N E; Clarke, C R; Sims, D W

    2015-12-01

    A large, pregnant, female bull shark Carcharhinus leucas was tracked migrating from Seychelles across open ocean to south-east Madagascar, c. 2000 km away, and back again. In Madagascar, the shark spent a prolonged period shallower than 5 m, consistent with entering estuarine habitat to pup, and upon return to Seychelles the shark was slender and no longer gravid. This represents an unprecedented return migration across the open ocean for a C. leucas and highlights the need for international collaboration to manage the regional C. leucas population sustainably. PMID:26511427

  2. Hepatic transcriptome profiling identifies differences in expression of genes associated with changes in metabolism and postnatal growth between Hereford and Holstein-Friesian bulls.

    PubMed

    Lisowski, Pawel; Kościuczuk, Ewa M; Gościk, Joanna; Pierzchała, Mariusz; Rowińska, Barbara; Zwierzchowski, Lech

    2014-04-01

    This study examined liver transcriptomic profiles of cattle distinctly different in meat and milk production capacity. It was performed on bulls of two different genetic backgrounds: Herefords (H), a meat breed, and Holstein-Friesians (HF), a dairy breed. Using bovine long oligo-microarrays and qPCR, we identified 128 genes that are differentially expressed between the two breeds. In H bulls, we observed up-regulation of genes involved in fatty acid biosynthesis and lipid metabolism (CD36, CAT, HSD3B1, FABP1, ACAA1) and involved in insulin signaling (INSR, INSIG2, NR4A1) and down-regulation of genes involved in somatotropic axis signaling (IGF1, GHR, IGFBP3) as compared to HF. Transcriptome profiling of these two breeds allowed us to pinpoint the transcriptional differences between Holstein and Hereford bulls at hepatic level associated with changes in metabolism and postnatal growth. PMID:24304134

  3. Postpartum interval to estrus and patterns of LH and progesterone in first-calf suckled beef cows exposed to mature bulls.

    PubMed

    Custer, E E; Berardinelli, J G; Short, R E; Wehrman, M; Adair, R

    1990-05-01

    Two trials were conducted in which Angus x Hereford first-calf cows were assigned randomly at calving to one of two treatments: exposure to mature penile-blocked bulls (BE) or isolation from bulls (NE). In Trial 1 (BE, n = 38; NE, n = 37), cow to bull ratio increased from 12:1 to 19:1 over a 14-d period; in Trial 2 (BE, n = 25; NE, n = 24), this ratio was maintained at 13:1. In both trials, blood samples were collected weekly for progesterone and ovaries and uteri of cows were examined rectally. Cows were observed for estrus twice daily (am:pm) beginning 10 d after calving. In Trial 2, intensive blood sampling for LH began 10 d after calving (eight cows per treatment) and continued at weekly intervals until estrus or the end of the trial. Postpartum weight change, condition score change and time to uterine involution did not differ (P greater than .10) between treatments in either trial. Interval to estrus was shorter (P less than .05) for BE cows than for NE cows in both trials. A greater proportion (P less than .05) of BE cows exhibited estrus by 60 and 90 d after calving and showed an increase in progesterone before first estrus. Mean and baseline LH concentrations and amplitude, frequency and duration of LH pulses were not altered (P greater than .10) by bull exposure. In conclusion, exposing first-calf suckled beef cows to bulls after calving hastened resumption of estrous cycles. Bull exposure did not alter patterns of LH concentrations but did increase proportions of cows that showed increased progesterone before first estrus. PMID:2365649

  4. Associations of DNA polymorphisms in growth hormone and its transcriptional regulators with growth and carcass traits in two populations of Brangus bulls.

    PubMed

    Thomas, M G; Enns, R M; Shirley, K L; Garcia, M D; Garrett, A J; Silver, G A

    2007-01-01

    Sequence polymorphisms in the growth hormone (GH) gene and its transcriptional regulators, Pit-1 and Prop-1, were evaluated for associations with growth and carcass traits in two populations of Brangus bulls Chihuahuan Desert Rangeland Research Center (CDRRC, N = 248 from 14 sires) and a cooperating breeding program (COOP, N = 186 from 34 sires). Polymorphisms were SNP mutations in intron 4 (C/T) and exon V (C/G) in GH, A/G in exon VI in Pit-1, and A/G in exon III in Prop-1. In the COOP population, bulls of Pit-1 GG genotype had a significantly greater percentage of intramuscular fat than bulls of the AA or AG genotype, and bulls of the Prop-1 AA genotype had significantly greater scrotal circumference than bulls of AG or GG genotypes at ~365 days of age. Also, heterozygous genotypes for the two GH polymorphisms appeared advantageous for traits of muscularity and adiposity in the COOP population. The heterozygous genotype of GH intron 4 SNP was associated with advantages in weight gain, scrotal circumference, and fat thickness in the CDRRC population. The two GH polymorphisms accounted for >/=27.7% of the variation in these traits in the CDRRC population; however, R(2) was <5% in the COOP population. Based on haplotype analyses the two GH SNPs appeared to be in phase; the haplotype analyses also paralleled with the genotype analyses. Polymorphisms in GH and its transcriptional regulators appear to be predictors of growth and carcass traits in Brangus bulls, particularly those with heterozygous GH genotypes. PMID:17469072

  5. Al Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandanayaka, Tharaka; Azarmi, Fardad

    2014-05-01

    In the present study, cold spraying technique was used to fabricate a metal matrix composite (MMC) that consists of Ni matrix and 20 vol.% Ni3Al particles at two different particle sizes as reinforcement. This study intends to investigate the effect of reinforcement particle size on microstructural and mechanical properties of cold sprayed MMCs. Two different Ni3Al powders with nominal particle size of -45 to +5 and +45 to 100 μm were used as reinforcement in this study. Cold sprayed Ni-Ni3Al samples were subjected to the microstructural observation and characterization prior to any mechanical testing. Then, samples were tested using nano-indentation, Knoop hardness, Vickers hardness, and Resonance frequency to evaluate their mechanical properties. No significant changes were observed in microstructural characteristics due to different particle sizes. The results obtained from a variety of mechanical testings indicated that the increasing reinforcement particle size resulted in the slight reduction of mechanical properties such as elastic modulus and hardness in cold sprayed MMCs. The mechanical interlock between deposited particles defines the bonding strength in cold sprayed samples. Small size particles have a higher velocity and impact resulting in stronger interlock between deformed particles.

  6. Movement of bull trout in the upper Jarbidge River watershed, Idaho and Nevada, 2008-09--A supplement to Open-File Report 2010-1033

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Munz, Carrie S.; Allen, M. Brady; Connolly, Patrick J.

    2011-01-01

    We monitored bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) in 2008 and 2009 as a continuation of our work in 2006 and 2007, which involved the tagging of 1,536 bull trout with passive integrated transponder (PIT) tags in the East Fork Jarbidge River and West Fork Jarbidge River and their tributaries in northeastern Nevada and southern Idaho. We installed PIT tag interrogation systems (PTISs) at established locations soon after ice-out, and maintained the PTISs in order to collect information on bull trout movements through December of each year. We observed a marked increase of movement in 2008 and 2009. Bull trout tagged in the uppermost portions of the East Fork Jarbidge River at altitudes greater than 2,100 meters moved to the confluence of the East Fork Jarbidge River and West Fork Jarbidge River in summer and autumn. Ten bull trout tagged upstream of the confluence of Pine Creek and the West Fork Jarbidge River moved downstream and then upstream in the East Fork Jarbidge River, and then past the PTIS at Murphy Hot Springs (river kilometer [rkm] 4.1). Two of these fish ascended Dave Creek, a tributary of the East Fork Jarbidge River, past the PTIS at rkm 0.4. One bull trout that was tagged at rkm 11 in Dave Creek on June 28, 2007 moved downstream to the confluence of the East Fork Jarbidge River and West Fork Jarbidge River (rkm 0) on July 28, 2007, and it was then detected in the West Fork Jarbidge River moving past our PTIS at rkm 15 on May 4, 2008. Combined, the extent and types of bull trout movements observed indicated that the primarily age-1 and age-2 bull trout that we tagged in 2006 and 2007 showed increased movement with age and evidence of a substantial amount of fluvial life history. The movements suggest strong connectivity between spawning areas and downstream mainstem areas, as well as between the East Fork Jarbidge River and West Fork Jarbidge River.

  7. Fattening performance, metabolic indicators, and muscle composition of bulls fed fiber-rich versus starch-plus-lipid-rich concentrate diets.

    PubMed

    Mialon, M M; Renand, G; Ortigues-Marty, I; Bauchart, D; Hocquette, J F; Mounier, L; Noël, T; Micol, D; Doreau, M

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the responses in fattening performance and meat composition for high-concentrate diets rich in either starch and lipids (especially omega-3 fatty acids) or fibrous by-products. A total of 140 Charolais bulls (initially 319 ± 27 kg BW) were allocated to 3 high-concentrate diets and were fattened for up to 18 mo. The diet treatments included concentrate mixtures rich in either fiber (FR; n = 56) or starch plus linseed (diets SL and SLR; n = 56 and n = 28, respectively) and barley straw. The concentrate mix was offered ad libitum in SL and FR diets but was kept isoenergetic to the FR diet in the SLR diet. Bulls were weighed every 15 d. Feed intake was measured daily. Carcass composition was assessed for all animals slaughtered at 699 ± 65 kg BW. Meat nutritional quality traits (e.g., fat content and fatty acid composition focusing on n-6 and n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids) were measured on the longissimus thoracis, rectus abdominis, and semitendinosus muscles. Metabolic enzyme activity (phosphofructokinase, lactate dehydrogenase, and cytochrome-c oxidase) was measured on these muscles and on liver. The SL diet bulls had greater fattening performance, BW gain (P = 0.006), and efficiency for growth (P = 0.025) at an energy intake similar to that of FR diet bulls. They also had heavier carcasses with a greater proportion of fat. However, liver samples showed no difference in specific metabolic activity. Compared to bulls fed the SL diet, bulls fed SLR consumed 15% less energy and had lower BW gain (P < 0.001) but were slightly more efficient for growth (P = 0.010). They had lower carcass weight but a greater muscle-to-fat ratio. Compared to bulls fed the FR diet, SLR bulls had lower than planned NEg intake and lower BW gain but did not have differences in body composition. Compared to the FR diet, the SL diet led to a greater omega-3 fatty acid content because of a greater supply of dietary linoleic acid, especially in lean muscle

  8. Use of antimicrobial-impregnated polymethyl methacrylate beads for treatment of chronic, refractory septic arthritis and osteomyelitis of the digit in a bull.

    PubMed

    Trostle, S S; Hendrickson, D A; Stone, W C; Klohnen, A A

    1996-02-01

    A 6-year-old 895-kg Angus bull was evaluated for a 6-month history of left hind limb lameness that was refractory to antimicrobial treatment. On physical examination, there was soft-tissue swelling associated with the lateral digit. Radiography revealed septic arthritis of the distal interphalangeal joint and osteomyelitis of the distal and middle phalanges. Treatment included debridement and lavage. Bacteriologic culture of debrided tissues yielded aerobic and anaerobic organisms. Antimicrobials were administered parenterally and locally in the form of antimicrobial-impregnated polymethyl methacrylate beads. The limb also was placed in a cast to promote ankylosis. The bull recovered, and the digit was salvaged. PMID:8575974

  9. Curcumin has protective and antioxidant properties on bull spermatozoa subjected to induced oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Tvrdá, Eva; Tušimová, Eva; Kováčik, Anton; Paál, Dušan; Greifová, Hana; Abdramanov, Abzal; Lukáč, Norbert

    2016-09-01

    Over the past decades, there has been an emphasis on assessment of the use of natural compounds in the prevention or repair of oxidative injury to spermatozoa. Curcumin (CUR) is a natural phenol with powerful antioxidant properties. The aim of the present study was to examine if CUR could reverse reactive oxygen species (ROS)-mediated alterations to the motility, viability and intracellular antioxidant profile of bull spermatozoa subjected to a prooxidant (i.e., ferrous ascorbate - FeAA). Spermatozoa were washed from recently collected semen samples, suspended in 2.9% sodium citrate and subjected to CUR treatment (5, 10, 25 and 50μmol/L) in the presence or absence of FeAA (150μmol/L FeSO4 and 750μmol/L ascorbic acid) during a 6h in vitro culture. Spermatozoa motility characteristics were assessed using the SpermVision computer-aided spermatozoa analysis (CASA) system. Cell viability was examined with the metabolic activity (MTT) assay, ROS generation was quantified using luminometry and the nitroblue-tetrazolium (NBT) test was used to quantify the intracellular superoxide formation. Cell lysates were prepared at the end of the culture to assess the intracellular activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPx) as well as the concentrations of glutathione (GSH) and malondialdehyde (MDA). Treatment with FeAA led to a reduced spermatozoa motility (P<0.001), viability (P<0.001) and decreased the antioxidant characteristics of the samples (P<0.001) but increased the ROS generation (P<0.001), superoxide production (P<0.001) and lipid peroxidation (P<0.001). The CUR treatment led to a preservation of spermatozoa motion (P<0.001), mitochondrial activity (P<0.001) and antioxidant characteristics (P<0.05 with SOD and GSH; P<0.01 with CAT and GPx), revealing the concentration range of 25-50μmol/L CUR to be the most effective for sustaining spermatozoa viability. Data from the present study suggest that CUR exhibits significant

  10. Expression of genes related to the regulation of muscle protein turnover in Angus and Nellore bulls.

    PubMed

    Busato, K C; Gomes, R A; Ladeira, M M; Duarte, M S; Freitas, N C; Rodrigues, A C; Chalfun-Junior, A; Paiva, L V; Chizzotti, M L

    2016-04-01

    We aimed to evaluate the expression of genes related to the regulation of muscle protein turnover in the longissimus dorsi (LD) muscle of Angus and Nellore bulls and to estimate the within-breed correlations of gene expression and performance traits. Thirteen genes related to the IGF-1 and myostatin pathways were studied. Thirteen animals, with an initial average BW of 381.2 ± 11.8 kg, from each breed were used in a completely randomized 2 × 2 factorial design (2 breeds and 2 feeding levels). The diet consisted of corn silage and a corn-soybean meal concentrate in a roughage-to-concentrate ratio of 30:70. Cattle were fed ad libitum (with 9 animals from each breed) or feed restricted (a 55% restriction of total DMI of ad libitum-fed animals, calculated as percentage of metabolic BW, with 4 animals of each breed). The experimental period lasted for 82 d and it was preceded by a 28-d adaptation period. The performance traits evaluated were slaughter body weight, total ADG (from d 1 to 82 of the trial), initial ADG (from d 1 to 41 of the trial), final ADG (from d 42 to 82 of the trial), total DMI (from d 1 to 82 of the trial), initial DMI (from d 1 to 41 of the trial), final DMI (from d 42 to 82 of the trial), HCW, LD weight (LDW), and rib eye area (REA). After slaughter, samples were taken from the LD muscle between the 12th and 13th ribs for gene expression analysis by quantitative reverse transcription PCR. There was no difference ( > 0.05) in the expression of any of the genes studied between ad libitum-fed Angus and ad libitum-fed Nellore, whereas feed restriction increased the expression of (; < 0.001), (; = 0.05), and (; = 0.04) and decreased the expression of ( < 0.01). The REA was negatively correlated to (; = 0.01), (; = 0.02), and ( = 0.05). The HCW was negatively correlated to ( = 0.01) and ( = 0.01) and tended to be negatively correlated to ( = 0.07), whereas the LDW tended to be negatively correlated to ( = 0.08). The genes , , and seem to be important

  11. AL Amyloidosis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Definition of the disease AL amyloidosis results from extra-cellular deposition of fibril-forming monoclonal immunoglobulin (Ig) light chains (LC) (most commonly of lambda isotype) usually secreted by a small plasma cell clone. Most patients have evidence of isolated monoclonal gammopathy or smoldering myeloma, and the occurrence of AL amyloidosis in patients with symptomatic multiple myeloma or other B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders is unusual. The key event in the development of AL amyloidosis is the change in the secondary or tertiary structure of an abnormal monoclonal LC, which results in instable conformation. This conformational change is responsible for abnormal folding of the LC, rich in β leaves, which assemble into monomers that stack together to form amyloid fibrils. Epidemiology AL amyloidosis is the most common type of systemic amyloidois in developed countries with an estimated incidence of 9 cases/million inhabitant/year. The average age of diagnosed patients is 65 years and less than 10% of patients are under 50. Clinical description The clinical presentation is protean, because of the wide number of tissues or organs that may be affected. The most common presenting symptoms are asthenia and dyspnoea, which are poorly specific and may account for delayed diagnosis. Renal manifestations are the most frequent, affecting two thirds of patients at presentation. They are characterized by heavy proteinuria, with nephrotic syndrome and impaired renal function in half of the patients. Heart involvement, which is present at diagnosis in more than 50% of patients, leading to restrictive cardiopathy, is the most serious complication and engages prognosis. Diagnostic methods The diagnosis relies on pathological examination of an involved site showing Congo red-positive amyloid deposits, with typical apple-green birefringence under polarized light, that stain positive with an anti-LC antibody by immunohistochemistry and/or immunofluorescence. Due to the

  12. Effect of an allostatic modulator on stress blood indicators and meat quality of commercial young bulls in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Rubio Lozano, M S; Méndez Medina, R D; Reyes Mayorga, K; Rubio García, M E; Ovando, M A; Ngapo, T M; Galindo Maldonado, F A

    2015-07-01

    To assess the effect of an allostatic modulator (AM) on stress blood indicators and meat quality traits, the feed of 80 non-castrated 18-20 month-old bulls was supplemented with 10 g/day of an AM for 30 days before slaughter. Another 80 bulls served as control animals. The AM was comprised of ascorbic acid, acetoxybenzoic acid and sodium and potassium chloride. Blood samples were taken at slaughter for analyses of hematocrit value, erythrocyte and leukocyte counts, and glucose, lactate and cortisol concentrations. Post-mortem measures of meat color and pH were made at 24h and color, shear force and cooking loss on meat from 20 animals at 28 days. The AM supplementation resulted in lower hematocrit value, erythrocyte count and glucose level (P<0.05), higher a* (P<0.0001) and b* (P<0.0001) at 24h and lower b* (P<0.05) at 28 days. Thus AM treatment improved some stress blood indicators and meat color and therefore merits further investigation. PMID:25817802

  13. Numerical modeling of the Snowmass Creek paleoglacier, Colorado, and climate in the Rocky Mountains during the Bull Lake glaciation (MIS 6)

    SciTech Connect

    Eric M. Leonard; Mitchell A. Plummer; Paul E. Carrara

    2014-04-01

    Well-preserved moraines from the penultimate, or Bull Lake, glaciation of Snowmass Creek Valley in the Elk Range of Colorado present an opportunity to examine the character of the high-altitude climate in the Rocky Mountains during Marine Oxygen Isotope Stage 6. This study employs a 2-D coupled mass/energy balance and flow model to assess the magnitudes of temperature and precipitation change that could have sustained the glacier in mass-balance equilibrium at its maximum extent during the Bull Lake glaciation. Variable substrate effects on glacier flow and ice thickness make the modeling somewhat more complex than in geologically simpler settings. Model results indicate that a temperature depression of about 6.7°C compared with the present (1971–2000 AD) would have been necessary to sustain the Snowmass Creek glacier in mass-balance equilibrium during the Bull Lake glaciation, assuming no change in precipitation amount or seasonality. A 50% increase or decrease from modern precipitation would have been coupled with 5.2°C and 9.1°C Bull Lake temperature depressions respectively. Uncertainty in these modeled temperature depressions is about 1°C.

  14. Effect of humid tropical climate on the thermoregulatory response of Limousin × Creole and Creole growing bulls in Guadeloupe (French West Indies)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berbigier, P.; Sergent, D.; Sophie, S. A.; Barlet, J. P.; Decoux, G.

    1987-03-01

    In Guadeloupe (French West Indies), eight Limousin × Creole (local) growing bulls and eight Creole bulls were either exposed to full sunshine or shaded; each climatic treatment involved half of the animals of each breed. All the bulls were fed ad libitum on a concentrate diet. Twice a week, around 12 a.m., respiratory rhythm, rectal temperature, heart rate as well as microclimatic parameters (mainly black globe temperature) were measured and a blood sample taken for packed cell volume, prolactin, and triiodothyronin (T3) plasma concentration determination. Respiratory rhythm and, to a lesser extent, rectal temperature were found to increase more for the Limousin × Creole crossbred than for the Creole bull on exposure to the sun and rise in globe temperature. However, the heart rate and blood parameters in the crossbred did not seem seriously affected by heat. This seems to indicate that the crossbred animals, though they required more positive thermal regulation than the local cattle, are not heat-stressed in the West Indian conditions. These findings are also supported by the lack of effect of exposure to the sun on the growth and carcass characteristics of such animals (reported elsewhere).

  15. Effect of surgical castration of bull calves at different stages of maturity with or without analgesia on the acute phase response (APR) and complete blood count (CBC)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The study objective was to determine if surgical castration at birth or weaning impacts the acute phase response (APR) or complete blood counts (CBC) and whether concurrent administration of an oral analgesic (meloxicam) ameliorates inflammation. Bull calves (n=29) from the University of Arkansas re...

  16. Growth and Pubertal Development of F1 Bulls from Hereford, Angus, Norwegian Red, Swedish Red and White, Friesian, and Wagyu Sires

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of the study was to characterize growth, testicular development and puberty between 9 and 14 mo of age in bulls (n = 120) produced by mating sires from Hereford (H), Angus (A), Norwegian Red (N), Swedish Red and White (S), Friesian (F), and Wagyu (W), to MARC III (¼ Hereford, ¼ Angus, ...

  17. Growth and pubertal development of F1 bulls from Hereford, Angus, Norwegian Red, Swedish Red and White, Friesian, and Wagyu sires

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of the study was to characterize body growth, testicular development and puberty between 8 and 14 mo of age in bulls (n = 120) produced by mating sires from Hereford, Angus, Norwegian Red, Swedish Red and White, Friesian, and Wagyu, to MARC III (1/4 Hereford, 1/4 Angus, 1/4 Red Poll, 1...

  18. Effect of nutrition during calfhood and peripubertal period on serum metabolic hormones, gonadotropins and testosterone concentrations, and on sexual development in bulls.

    PubMed

    Brito, Leonardo F C; Barth, Albert D; Rawlings, Norm C; Wilde, Randal E; Crews, Denny H; Mir, Priya S; Kastelic, John P

    2007-07-01

    The objective of the present study was to characterize the effects of nutrition on circulating concentrations of metabolic hormones, gonadotropins, and testosterone during sexual development in bulls. Nutrition regulated the hypothalamus-pituitary-testes axis through effects on the GnRH pulse generator in the hypothalamus and through direct effects on the testes. Pituitary function (gonadotropin secretion after GnRH challenge) was not affected by nutrition. However, nutrition affected LH pulse frequency and basal LH concentration during the early gonadotropin rise (10-26 weeks of age). There were close temporal associations between changes in insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) concentrations and changes in LH pulse frequency, suggesting a role for IGF-I in regulating the early gonadotropin rise in bulls. The peripubertal increase in testosterone concentration was delayed in bulls with lesser serum IGF-I concentrations (low nutrition), suggesting a role for IGF-I in regulating Leydig cell function. Serum IGF-I concentrations accounted for 72 and 67% of the variation in scrotal circumference and paired-testes volume, respectively (at any given age), indicating that IGF-I may regulate testicular growth. Bulls with a more sustained elevated LH pulse frequency during the early gonadotropin rise (high nutrition) had greater testicular mass at 70 weeks of age relative to the control group (medium nutrition), despite no differences in metabolic hormone concentrations after 26 weeks of age. Therefore, gonadotropin-independent mechanism regulating testicular growth might be dependent on previous gonadotropin milieu. PMID:16677793

  19. EFFECT OF CHRONIC TREATMENT WITH THE GONADOTROPHIN-RELEASING HORMONE AGONIST AZAGLY-NAFARELIN ON BASAL CONCENTRATIONS OF LH IN PREPUBERTAL BULLS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Infusion of GnRH agonists for extended periods inhibits pulsatile LH release, but enhances testicular function of bulls. The reason long-term infusion of GnRH agonist enhances testosterone (T) concentration in blood of cattle treated for extended periods with GnRH agonists has not been delineated. T...

  20. Numerical modeling of the Snowmass Creek paleoglacier, Colorado, and climate in the Rocky Mountains during the Bull Lake glaciation (MIS 6)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonard, Eric M.; Plummer, Mitchell A.; Carrara, Paul E.

    2014-11-01

    Well-preserved moraines from the penultimate, or Bull Lake, glaciation of Snowmass Creek Valley in the Elk Range of Colorado (USA) present an opportunity to examine the character of the high-altitude climate in the Rocky Mountains during Marine Oxygen Isotope Stage 6. This study employs a 2-D coupled mass/energy balance and flow model to assess the magnitudes of temperature and precipitation change that could have sustained the glacier in mass-balance equilibrium at its maximum extent during the Bull Lake glaciation. Variable substrate effects on glacier flow and ice thickness make the modeling somewhat more complex than in geologically simpler settings. Model results indicate that a temperature depression of about 6.7°C compared with the present (1971-2000 AD) would have been necessary to sustain the Snowmass Creek glacier in mass-balance equilibrium during the Bull Lake glaciation, assuming no change in precipitation amount or seasonality. A 50% increase or decrease from modern precipitation would have been coupled with 5.2°C and 9.1°C Bull Lake temperature depressions respectively. Uncertainty in these modeled temperature depressions is about 1°C.

  1. The influence of temperament on endotoxin-induced changes in body temperature, sickness behavior, and secretion of cortisol and epinephrine in bulls

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study was designed to determine the influence of temperament on body temperature, sickness behavior, and the secretion of cortisol and epinephrine in response to an endotoxin challenge. Purebred Brahman bulls were selected based on temperament score measured at weaning [n=8 each Calm (C), Inter...

  2. Predicting Breed Composition Using Breed Frequencies of 50,000 Markers from the U.S. Meat Animal Research Center 2,000 Bull Project

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Our objective was to evaluate whether breed composition of crossbred cattle could be predicted using reference breed frequencies of SNP markers on the BovineSNP50 array. Semen DNA samples of over 2,000 bulls from 16 common commercial beef breeds were genotyped using the array and used to estimate cu...

  3. Effects of complete vitamin and mineral supplementation in full potential all-milk diets on growth and health of Holstein bull calves

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pre-ruminant Holstein bull calves were fed two diets of pasteurized whole milk (PWM) in amounts that either limited intake or that maximized intake according to common commercial practice. Diets then were either supplemented or not supplemented with a full complement of vitamins and trace minerals ...

  4. Differential testosterone response to GnRH-induced LH release before and after musth in adult Asian elephant (Elephas maximus) bulls.

    PubMed

    Somgird, Chaleamchat; Sripiboon, Supaphen; Mahasawangkul, Sittidet; Boonprasert, Khajohnpat; Brown, Janine L; Stout, Tom A E; Colenbrander, Ben; Thitaram, Chatchote

    2016-04-15

    Bull elephants exhibit marked increases in testosterone secretion during musth, and studies have shown a heightened sensitivity of the testis to GnRH-stimulated testosterone production in musth compared to nonmusth males. However, activity of the hypothalamo-pituitary-gonadal axis before or soon after musth has not been studied in detail. The aim of this study was to evaluate LH and testosterone responses to GnRH challenge in nine adult Asian elephant (Elephas maximus) bulls during three periods relative to musth: premusth, postmusth, and nonmusth. Bulls were administered 80 μg of a GnRH agonist, and blood was collected before and after injection to monitor serum hormone concentrations. The same bulls were injected with saline 2 weeks before each GnRH challenge and monitored using the same blood collection protocol. All bulls responded to GnRH, but not saline, with an increase in LH and testosterone during all three periods. The mean peak LH (1.76 ± 0.19 ng/mL; P < 0.001) and testosterone (6.71 ± 1.62 ng/mL; P = 0.019) concentrations after GnRH were higher than the respective baselines (0.57 ± 0.07 ng/mL, 3.05 ± 0.60 ng/mL). Although basal- and GnRH-induced LH secretion were similar across the stages, evaluation of the area under the curve in GnRH-treated bulls indicated that the testosterone response was greatest during premusth (2.84 ± 0.76 area units; P = 0.019) compared to postmusth (2.02 ± 0.63 area units), and nonmusth (2.01 ± 0.46 area units). This confirms earlier reports that GnRH stimulates LH release and subsequent testosterone production in bull elephants. Furthermore, although the hypothalamo-pituitary-gonadal axis is active throughout the year, the testis appears to be more responsive to LH in terms of testosterone production in the period leading up to musth, compared to the nonmusth and postmusth periods. This heightened sensitivity, perhaps as a result of LH receptor up-regulation, may prime the testis for maximal

  5. The influence of age and weaning on permeability of the gastrointestinal tract in Holstein bull calves.

    PubMed

    Wood, K M; Palmer, S I; Steele, M A; Metcalf, J A; Penner, G B

    2015-10-01

    Fourteen Holstein bull calves were used in a randomized complete block design to investigate the effect of calf age and weaning on permeability of the gastrointestinal tract (GIT). Calves were randomly assigned to 1 of 2 treatments: (1) a weaning protocol that was initiated on d 35; WN; n=7), or (2) a control treatment where calves were not weaned (CON; n=7). Calves were bottle-fed milk replacer (150 g/L), in 3 equal portions/d targeting 15% of their body weight (BW) in liquid milk intake [approximately 21.1g/kg of BW/d, dry matter (DM) basis]. On d 35, the amount of milk replacer offered to WN calves was reduced to 7.5% of BW for 7 d before calves were weaned on d 42. On d 14, 28, and 42, calves were orally dosed with 500 mL of Cr-EDTA (179 mM Cr-EDTA solution) and housed in a metabolism crate to enable total urine collection and determination of total urinary Cr recovery as an indicator of total-tract permeability. On d 44, calves were killed and tissues from the rumen, omasum, duodenum, jejunum, ileum, cecum, and proximal and distal colon were collected, rinsed, and transported in buffer solution (pH 7.4 at 38.5°C). Tissues were incubated in Ussing chambers under short-circuit conditions with buffer solutions designed to mimic the mucosal and serosal energy source that would be available in vivo (glucose for tissues from the small intestine and short-chain fatty acids for tissues that would be exposed to fermentation; rumen, omasum, and large intestinal tissues). The serosal to mucosal flux of (14)C-mannitol and (3)H-inulin was measured for each region. Although we detected treatment × period interactions for BW and starter intake, dietary treatments did not differ within a week. Overall, the time that ruminal pH was <5.5 was less before weaning than after weaning. We observed a differential response for the appearance of Cr in urine for WN and CON calves, where the appearance of Cr (mg/48 h) in urine decreased for both treatments from d 14 to 28, but

  6. The transduction channel of hair cells from the bull-frog characterized by noise analysis.

    PubMed

    Holton, T; Hudspeth, A J

    1986-06-01

    Receptor currents in response to mechanical stimuli were recorded from hair cells in the excised epithelium of the bull-frog sacculus by the whole-cell, gigohm-seal voltage-clamp technique. The stimulus-dependent transduction current was separated from the cell's stimulus-independent K+ and Ca2+ currents; the K+ currents were blocked with an internal solution containing Cs+ while the Ca2+ current was reduced by holding the membrane potential below -70 mV. The temperature of the preparation was maintained at about 10 degrees C to slow the kinetics of the cells' transduction channels. Calibrated displacements of hair bundles of individual hair cells were made with a probe coupled by suction to the kinociliary bulb and moved with a piezoelectricbimorph stimulator. The root mean square noise of probe motion was less than 2 nm. The mean, I, and the variance, sigma 2, of the receptor current were measured from the response to saturating (+/- 0.5 micron) displacements of the hair bundle. I was corrected for current offsets and sigma 2 for the transduction-independent background variance. The relation between sigma 2 and I is consistent with the predictions of a two-conductance-state model of the transduction channel, a model having only one non-zero conductance state. The relation between sigma 2 and I was fitted by the equation sigma 2 = Ii-I2/N, where N is the number of transduction channels in the cell and i is the current through a single open channel. The conductance of the transduction channel is approximately ohmic with a reversal potential near 0 mV. The estimated conductance of a single transduction channel, gamma, is 12.7 +/- 2.7 pS (mean +/- S.D.; n = 18) at 10 degrees C. gamma is independent of the maximum transduction conductance of the cell, Gmax. The number of transduction channels, N, is proportional to Gmax. N ranges from 7 to 280 in cells with Gmax ranging from 0.08 to 2.48 nS. The largest values of N correspond to a few, perhaps four, active

  7. Ion transfer characteristics of the calcium current in bull-frog atrial myocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, D L; Giles, W R; Shibata, E F

    1988-01-01

    1. Voltage clamp studies on single cells from bull-frog atrium have been carried out to study the ion transfer characteristics of the calcium current, ICa. In agreement with the preliminary results of Hume & Giles (1983), a TTX-resistant, 'second transient inward current' was recorded consistently. Its average peak size at 0 mV in 2.5 mM [Ca2+]o Ringer solution was approximately -200 pA, and it was blocked by Cd2+ and La3+ but not by tetrodotoxin (TTX, 3 x 10(-6) M). 2. The peak size of this current increases by approximately 4 times when [Ca2+]o is raised from 1.25 to 7.5 mM, indicating that Ca2+ is a major charge carrier. 3. A well-defined reversal potential, Erev, for ICa can be recorded in normal Ringer solution and also when Ba2+ or Sr2+ serve as the charge carriers. When [Ca2+]o is changed the shifts in Erev follow the predictions of a Nernstian Ca2+ electrode. However, all Erev values are well below those predicted from the thermodynamic Nernstian ECa values (see Campbell, Giles, Hume, Noble & Shibata, 1988a). 4. The Ca2+ current exhibits voltage-dependent inactivation, whether the direction of net current flow is inward or outward; however, the rate of inactivation is affected by the species of cation carrying the current. Inactivation is reduced substantially in Ba2+ Ringer solution. 5. Magnesium (5 mM) is not a significant carrier or blocker of ICa in normal [Ca2+]o Ringer solution; however, 5 mM [Mg2+]o can block the current carried by either Sr2+ or Ba2+. In the absence of Mg2+, equimolar substitutions of Sr2+ or Ba2+ for Ca2+ result in larger currents than those carried by Ca2+ in the normal Ringer solution. 6. Sodium appears not to be a significant charge carrier in the presence of normal [Ca2+]o. However, after free [Ca2+]o has been reduced to extremely low levels (less than 10(-6) M) Na+ can carry a significant fraction of 'ICa'. Thus, it appears that the high selectivity of ICa for Ca2+ ions depends upon the presence of Ca2+. 7. 'Slow tails' are

  8. Separation of motile sperm for in vitro fertilization from frozen-thawed bull semen using progesterone induction on a microchip.

    PubMed

    Li, Jingchun; Ning, Bolin; Cao, Xinyan; Luo, Yinghua; Guo, Li; Wei, Guosheng; Liu, Shengjun; Zhang, Ying; Zhang, Aizhong; Wu, Rui; Li, Yanbing

    2016-09-01

    This study presents a novel method for the separation of motile sperm from non-progressive motile and immotile sperm and in vitro Fertilization (IVF). This separation of bull sperm was accomplished by inducing chemotaxis along a progesterone release agent in a 7.5-mm microchannel microchip composed of a biocompatible polydimethysiloxane layer and a glass gradient. The selected sperm was applied directly for IVF. In the first experiment, we tested the effect of different lengths of microchannnel (5mm, 7.5mm and 10mm) on quality parameter of separated sperm. The results showed that separated sperm using 7.5-mm microchannel chip were improved in sperm motility, swimming velocity, and beat frequency compared with other groups. In the second experiment, a medium containing sperm from swim-up method and outlet reservoir of our 7.5-mm microchannel chip was collected and mitochondrial activity of the sperm was determined by fluorescence microscopy. The sperm from the microchip had higher mitochondria activity (47.6%±6.0%) than the sperm from the swim-up method (23.6%±4.7%) (P<0.05). There were significant differences in rate of acrosome intactness between the swim-up method and the microchip (36.0%±4.1% vs. 66.8±2.1%, respectively, P<0.05). In the third experiment, we compared sperm penetration in the microchip-IVF system with a standard IVF method (droplet-IVF). The microchip-IVF group had the highest percentages of oocytes penetrated (82.2%±1.6% vs. 63.5%±2.4%) and monospermic oocytes (67.8%±3.4% vs. 42.4%±1.5%). In addition, early developmental competence of oocytes to the blastocyst stage was higher when the oocytes were inseminated in the microchip-IVF system compared with those inseminated in a standard droplet-IVF system. These results demonstrate that our microchip based on a sperm chemotaxis system is useful for motile sperm separation from frozen-thawed bull semen for IVF. Therefore, the optimized microchip system provides a good opportunity to sort

  9. [Contents and deposition of major minerals in tissues and in the whole bodies of growing young bulls German Simmental breed].

    PubMed

    Schwarz, F J; Heindl, U; Kirchgessner, M

    1995-01-01

    54 bulls of the German Simmental breed were fed either on a high energy level (maize silage ad libitum and 1.8 kg concentrate) or on a low energy level (maize silage restrictively and 1.0 kg concentrate). In dependence on feeding intensity a mean daily weight gain of 870 or 1210 g was obtained. Animals were slaughtered with a live mass of 200 kg, 350 kg, 500 kg, 575 kg and 650 kg. Empty body was divided into 13 cuts and afterwards separated into lean, bone and adipose tissues and tendons. Major mineral element content was determined in these tissues as well as in the noncarcass parts. In the lean tissue the mean content (200 kg) of 0.3 g calcium, 10 g phosphorus, 1 g magnesium, 2.3 g sodium and 14.8 g potassium/kg dry matter decreased slightly with rising live mass (200-650 kg). The contents of major mineral elements were much higher in bone tissue. For the fattening period from 200 to 650 kg of live mass mean contents of 151.5 g calcium, 71.3 g phosphorus, 3.2 g magnesium, 5.1 g sodium and 1.1 g potassium per kg DM were analysed. Mineral element content of bone tissue increased with rising live mass as well as animals on low feeding intensity showed a higher mineral content than on high energy level. In all, major mineral element content in fat tissue was very low. In noncarcass parts head and legs calcium and phosphorus had analogous to bone tissue the highest concentration. Hide showed a high content of sodium, whereas organs and digestive tract had a high content of potassium and phosphorus. Total mass of major mineral elements in the different tissues increased above all in the fattening period of 200 to 350 kg. In carcass as well as in empty body, mass of calcium and phosphorus was much higher than magnesium, sodium and potassium. Also animals on low feeding intensity showed a higher mass of major mineral elements in carcass and empty body than animals on high energy feeding intensity. The intensively fed bulls had a mean deposition of 12.7 g calcium, 6.9 g

  10. Neonatal lipopolysaccharide exposure does not diminish the innate immune response to a subsequent lipopolysaccharide challenge in Holstein bull calves.

    PubMed

    Benjamin, A L; Korkmaz, F T; Elsasser, T H; Kerr, D E

    2016-07-01

    The innate immune response following experimental mastitis is quite variable between individual dairy cattle. An inflammatory response that minimizes collateral damage to the mammary gland while still effectively resolving the infection following pathogen exposure is beneficial to dairy producers. The ability of a lipopolysaccharide (LPS) exposure in early life to generate a low-responding phenotype and thus reduce the inflammatory response to a later-life LPS challenge was investigated in neonatal bull calves. Ten Holstein bull calves were randomly assigned to either an early life LPS (ELL) group (n=5) or an early life saline (ELS) group (n=5). At 7d of age, calves received either LPS or saline, and at 32d of age, all calves were challenged with an intravenous dose of LPS to determine the effect of the early life treatment (LPS or saline) on the immune response generated toward a subsequent LPS challenge. Dermal fibroblast and monocyte-derived macrophage cultures from each calf were established at age 20 and 27d, respectively, to model sustained effects from the early life LPS exposure on gene expression and protein production of components within the LPS response pathway. The ELL calves had greater levels of plasma IL-6 and tumor necrosis factor-α than the ELS calves following the early life LPS or saline treatments. However, levels of these 2 immune markers were similar between ELL and ELS calves when both groups were subsequently challenged with LPS. A comparison of the in vitro LPS responses of the ELL and ELS calves revealed similar patterns of protein production and gene expression following an LPS challenge of both dermal fibroblast and monocyte-derived macrophage cultures established from the treatment groups. Whereas an early life exposure to LPS did not result in a dampened inflammatory response toward a later LPS challenge in these neonatal bull calves, the potential that exposure to inflammation or stress in early life or in utero can create an

  11. Effect of refined soy oil or whole soybeans on intake, methane output, and performance of young bulls.

    PubMed

    Jordan, E; Kenny, D; Hawkins, M; Malone, R; Lovett, D K; O'Mara, F P

    2006-09-01

    An experiment was conducted to establish the effects of feeding refined soy oil (RSO) or whole soybeans (WSB) containing soy oil on DMI, animal performance, and enteric methane (CH4) emissions in young bulls. Thirty-six Charolais and Limousin cross-bred, young beef bulls (338 +/- 27 kg of BW, 218 +/- 17 d of age at the beginning of the experiment) were blocked by BW, age, and breed before being assigned in a randomized complete block design to 1 of 3 experimental treatments (n = 12). The experimental period lasted for 103 d, with enteric CH4 output recorded for 2 periods of 5 consecutive days on d 37 to 41 and d 79 to 83. The 3 dietary treatments consisted of a barley/soybean meal-based concentrate with 0 g/d of RSO; oil from WSB as 6% of DMI (WSB treatment); and oil from RSO as 6% of DMI (RSO treatment). Each diet had a 10:90 forage:concentrate ratio, using barley straw as the forage source. Diet affected DMI (P < or = 0.001) and GE intake (P < 0.05 during the CH4 measurement periods), with the WSB treatment producing the lowest values. The addition of WSB decreased ADG (P < 0.05) compared with the RSO treatment. The WSB treatment also decreased (P < 0.05) average daily carcass gain (ADCG). Both the RSO and WSB concentrates decreased (P < 0.05 to P < 0.001) daily enteric CH4 output when expressed in terms of liters per day, liters per kilogram of DMI, percentage of GE intake, liters per kilogram of ADG, and liters per kilogram of ADCG. Diet had no effect (P = 0.557) on ruminal protozoal numbers. The reductions in enteric CH4 were achieved at relatively high oil inclusion levels. Such oil levels have previously been reported to decrease DMI of high-forage diets, although no effect on DMI was noted with the low-forage diets fed in this experiment. This impact on DMI of high-forage diets may limit the range of diets for which this CH4 reduction strategy may be applicable. The inclusion level of WSB in the current experiment (27%) was beyond the palatability threshold

  12. Growth and pubertal development of F1 bulls from Hereford, Angus, Norwegian Red, Swedish Red and White, Friesian, and Wagyu sires.

    PubMed

    Casas, E; Lunstra, D D; Cundiff, L V; Ford, J J

    2007-11-01

    The objective of the study was to characterize body growth, testicular development, and puberty from 8 to 14 mo of age in bulls (n = 120) produced by mating sires from Hereford, Angus, Norwegian Red, Swedish Red and White, Friesian, and Wagyu breeds to MARC III ((1/4) Hereford, (1/4) Angus, (1/4) Red Poll, and (1/4) Pinzgauer) cows. Traits evaluated were birth weight, weaning weight (at 215 d), yearling weight, ADG from 8 to 14 mo of age, paired testicular volume growth from 8 to 14 mo of age, age at puberty (determined by production of 50 x 10(6) sperm with 10% motility), age at freezable semen (determined by production of 500 x 10(6) sperm with 50% motility), and, at 15 mo of age, paired testicular weight and daily sperm production per testis pair. There was an effect of sire breed (P = 0.03) for age at puberty; animals with Wagyu and Swedish Red and White inheritance reached puberty at a later date (302 and 302 d of age, respectively) compared with Angus-sired bulls (268 d). Age at puberty for Hereford-, Norwegian Red-, and Friesian-sired bulls was 270, 271, and 278 d, respectively. Differences in BW were observed (P = 0.03) at birth; bulls with Hereford and Friesian were heavier at birth (43 and 41 kg, respectively) compared with those with Norwegian Red, Swedish Red and White, and Wagyu inheritance (39, 38, and 38 kg, respectively). Differences in BW were also observed at 1 yr of age (P = 0.001), where the heaviest animals were those sired by Angus (450 kg), whereas the lightest animals were those sired by Wagyu (403 kg). Bulls with Wagyu inheritance had the lowest (P = 0.04) ADG (1.12 kg/d) compared with bulls with inheritance from Hereford (1.22 kg/d), Angus (1.28 kg/d), Norwegian Red (1.24 kg/d), Swedish Red and White (1.25 kg/d), and Friesian (1.27 kg/d). Differences in scrotal growth rate were not significant (P = 0.99). They ranged from 1.95 in Angus-sired to 1.66 cm3/d in Wagyu-sired bulls. There were no differences (P = 0.80) for age at freezable semen

  13. Animal Performance and Carcass Characteristics of Bulls (1/2 Purunã vs 1/2 Canchim) Slaughtered at 16 and 22 Months Old, and Three Different Weights

    PubMed Central

    do Prado, Ivanor Nunes; Eiras, Carlos Emanuel; Fugita, Carlos Alberto; Passetti, Rodrigo Augusto Cortêz; Ornaghi, Mariana Garcia; Rivaroli, Dayane Cristina; Pinto, Adriana Aparecida; Moletta, José Luiz

    2015-01-01

    Current study aimed to evaluate the performance of bulls (1/2 Purunã vs 1/2 Canchim) slaughtered at two ages and three different weights. One hundred and thirteen bulls were divided into two slaughter ages (16 and 22 months) and three different slaughter weights (light, 422 kg; medium, 470 kg; and heavy, 550 kg). The body weight was higher for bulls slaughtered at 16 months. Daily gain, carcass weight and dressing were higher for bulls slaughtered at 16 months. Feed intake was higher for bulls slaughtered at 22 months although feed efficiency was better for bulls slaughtered at 16 months. Carcass characteristics were better for bulls slaughtered at 16 months. The percentages of muscle, fat and bone and meat characteristics were similar between two slaughter ages. Feed intake and animal performance was lower for lighter animals. Feed conversion and carcass dressing were similar in the three slaughter weights. Muscle percentage was higher for heavier animals but fat and bone percentages were lower. Slaughter weight had no effect on meat characteristics. PMID:25715688

  14. Effect of Carbohydrate Sources and Levels of Cotton Seed Meal in Concentrate on Feed Intake, Nutrient Digestibility, Rumen Fermentation and Microbial Protein Synthesis in Young Dairy Bulls

    PubMed Central

    Wanapat, M.; Anantasook, N.; Rowlinson, P.; Pilajun, R.; Gunun, P.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of levels of cottonseed meal with various carbohydrate sources in concentrate on feed intake, nutrient digestibility, rumen fermentation and microbial protein synthesis in dairy bulls. Four, 6 months old dairy bulls were randomly assigned to receive four dietary treatments according to a 2×2 factorial arrangement in a 4×4 Latin square design. Factor A was carbohydrate source; cassava chip (CC) and cassava chip+rice bran in the ratio of 3:1 (CR3:1), and factor B was cotton seed meal levels in the concentrate; 109 g CP/kg (LCM) and 328 g CP/kg (HCM) at similar overall CP levels (490 g CP/kg). Bulls received urea-lime treated rice straw ad libitum and were supplemented with 10 g of concentrate/kg BW. It was found that carbohydrate source and level of cotton seed meal did not have significant effects on ruminal pH, ammonia nitrogen concentration, microbial protein synthesis or feed intake. Animals which received CC showed significantly higher BUN concentration, ruminal propionic acid and butyric acid proportions, while dry matter, organic matter digestibility, populations of total viable bacteria and proteolytic bacteria were lower than those in the CR3:1 treatment. The concentration of total volatile fatty acids was higher in HCM than LCM treatments, while the concentration of butyric acid was higher in LCM than HCM treatments. The population of proteolytic bacteria with the LCM treatments was higher than the HCM treatments; however other bacteria groups were similar among the different levels of cotton seed meal. Bulls which received LCM had higher protein digestibility than those receiving HCM. Therefore, using high levels of cassava chip and cotton seed meal might positively impact on energy and nitrogen balance for the microbial population in the rumen of the young dairy bull. PMID:25049819

  15. The g.-165 T>C Rather than Methylation Is Associated with Semen Motility in Chinese Holstein Bulls by Regulating the Transcriptional Activity of the HIBADH Gene

    PubMed Central

    Ju, Zhihua; Wang, Xiuge; Jiang, Qiang; Sun, Yan; Huang, Jinming; Zhong, Jifeng; Wang, Changfa

    2015-01-01

    The 3-hydroxyisobutyrate dehydrogenase (HIBADH) is regarded as a human sperm-motility marker. However, the molecular mechanisms involved in the regulation of expression of the HIBADH gene in bulls remain largely unknown. HIBADH was detected in the testis, epididymis, and sperm via reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and Western blot analysis. It is also expressed in the seminiferous epithelium, spermatids, and the entire epididymis, as detected by immunohistochemistry. Furthermore, HIBADH was expressed in the neck-piece and mid-piece of bull spermatids, as shown in the immunofluorescence assay. Using serially truncated bovine HIBADH promoters and luciferase constructs, we discovered an 878 bp (-703 bp to +175 bp) fragment that constitutes the core promoter region. One SNP g.-165 T>C of HIBADH was identified and genotyped in 307 Chinese Holstein bulls. Correlation analysis revealed that bulls with the TT genotype had higher initial sperm motility than those with the CC genotype (P < 0.05). Furthermore, the T- or C-containing loci (designated as pGL3-T and pGL3-C) were transiently transfected into MLTC-1 to test the effect of SNP on HIBADH expression. The luciferase reporter assay showed that the pGL3-T genotype exhibited 58% higher transcriptional activity than the pGL3-C genotype (P < 0.05). The bisulfite sequencing analysis revealed that the methylation pattern of the core promoter presented hypomethylation in the ejaculated semen in high-motility and low-motility bulls. The results demonstrated for the first time that the g.-165 T>C rather than methylation in the 5'-flanking region could affect the bovine sperm motility through the regulation of HIBADH gene transcriptional activity. PMID:26133183

  16. The g.-165 T>C Rather than Methylation Is Associated with Semen Motility in Chinese Holstein Bulls by Regulating the Transcriptional Activity of the HIBADH Gene.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shuai; Zhang, Yan; Yang, Chunhong; Ju, Zhihua; Wang, Xiuge; Jiang, Qiang; Sun, Yan; Huang, Jinming; Zhong, Jifeng; Wang, Changfa

    2015-01-01

    The 3-hydroxyisobutyrate dehydrogenase (HIBADH) is regarded as a human sperm-motility marker. However, the molecular mechanisms involved in the regulation of expression of the HIBADH gene in bulls remain largely unknown. HIBADH was detected in the testis, epididymis, and sperm via reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and Western blot analysis. It is also expressed in the seminiferous epithelium, spermatids, and the entire epididymis, as detected by immunohistochemistry. Furthermore, HIBADH was expressed in the neck-piece and mid-piece of bull spermatids, as shown in the immunofluorescence assay. Using serially truncated bovine HIBADH promoters and luciferase constructs, we discovered an 878 bp (-703 bp to +175 bp) fragment that constitutes the core promoter region. One SNP g.-165 T>C of HIBADH was identified and genotyped in 307 Chinese Holstein bulls. Correlation analysis revealed that bulls with the TT genotype had higher initial sperm motility than those with the CC genotype (P < 0.05). Furthermore, the T- or C-containing loci (designated as pGL3-T and pGL3-C) were transiently transfected into MLTC-1 to test the effect of SNP on HIBADH expression. The luciferase reporter assay showed that the pGL3-T genotype exhibited 58% higher transcriptional activity than the pGL3-C genotype (P < 0.05). The bisulfite sequencing analysis revealed that the methylation pattern of the core promoter presented hypomethylation in the ejaculated semen in high-motility and low-motility bulls. The results demonstrated for the first time that the g.-165 T>C rather than methylation in the 5'-flanking region could affect the bovine sperm motility through the regulation of HIBADH gene transcriptional activity. PMID:26133183

  17. Molecular characterisation of Babesia gibsoni infection from a pit-bull terrier pup recently imported into South Africa.

    PubMed

    Matjila, P T; Penzhorn, B L; Leisewitz, A L; Bhoora, R; Barker, R

    2007-03-01

    Canine babesiosis caused by Babesia gibsoni was diagnosed in a 3-month-old Pit-bull pup during a routine clinical examination. Diagnosis was confirmed by way of smear examination, PCR, Reverse Line Blot (RLB) and sequence analysis which showed 100% homology with B. gibsoni (Japan AB118032) and Babesia sp. (Oklahoma) (AF205636). Haematology showed moderate anaemia and severe thrombocytopenia. Treatment was initiated with diminazene aceturate (Berenil RTU) followed by 2 doses of imidocarb diproprionate (Forray-65) 3 days and 14 days later, respectively. Babesia gibsoni DNA was still detectable 2 weeks post-treatment on the PCR/RLB test. A 10-day course of combination drug therapy using atovaquone and azithromycin was initiated. Blood samples taken on Day 1 and Day 40 after completion of treatment were negative for B. gibsoni DNA on PCR/RLB test. The implications of a possible introduction of B. gibsoni into South Africa are discussed. PMID:17665757

  18. Seasonal and long-term changes in relative abundance of bull sharks from a tourist shark feeding site in Fiji.

    PubMed

    Brunnschweiler, Juerg M; Baensch, Harald

    2011-01-01

    Shark tourism has become increasingly popular, but remains controversial because of major concerns originating from the need of tour operators to use bait or chum to reliably attract sharks. We used direct underwater sampling to document changes in bull shark Carcharhinus leucas relative abundance at the Shark Reef Marine Reserve, a shark feeding site in Fiji, and the reproductive cycle of the species in Fijian waters. Between 2003 and 2009, the total number of C. leucas counted on each day ranged from 0 to 40. Whereas the number of C. leucas counted at the feeding site increased over the years, shark numbers decreased over the course of a calendar year with fewest animals counted in November. Externally visible reproductive status information indicates that the species' seasonal departure from the feeding site may be related to reproductive activity. PMID:21346792

  19. Genetic parameters of growth, feed intake, feed conversion and carcass composition of dual-purpose bulls in performance testing.

    PubMed

    Jensen, J; Mao, I L; Andersen, B B; Madsen, P

    1991-03-01

    Genetic parameters for growth, total energy intake, feed conversion ratio, average daily energy intake and carcass composition were estimated in an experiment with 650 bull calves from 31 half-sib groups of Holstein Friesian or Brown Swiss sires. All traits analyzed had an amount of additive genetic variance that allows for considerable response to selection. No interaction between genotype (sire group) and proportion of roughage in the diet was found. Daily gain was strongly correlated negatively with feed conversion ratio but positively correlated with daily energy intake. Results indicate that genetic selection for either daily gain or average daily energy intake would decrease carcass fatness at a constant slaughter weight. However, the environmental correlation between daily energy intake and carcass fatness was positive. PMID:2061263

  20. Seasonal and Long-Term Changes in Relative Abundance of Bull Sharks from a Tourist Shark Feeding Site in Fiji

    PubMed Central

    Brunnschweiler, Juerg M.; Baensch, Harald

    2011-01-01

    Shark tourism has become increasingly popular, but remains controversial because of major concerns originating from the need of tour operators to use bait or chum to reliably attract sharks. We used direct underwater sampling to document changes in bull shark Carcharhinus leucas relative abundance at the Shark Reef Marine Reserve, a shark feeding site in Fiji, and the reproductive cycle of the species in Fijian waters. Between 2003 and 2009, the total number of C. leucas counted on each day ranged from 0 to 40. Whereas the number of C. leucas counted at the feeding site increased over the years, shark numbers decreased over the course of a calendar year with fewest animals counted in November. Externally visible reproductive status information indicates that the species' seasonal departure from the feeding site may be related to reproductive activity. PMID:21346792

  1. Polarised skylight and the landmark panorama provide night-active bull ants with compass information during route following.

    PubMed

    Reid, Samuel F; Narendra, Ajay; Hemmi, Jan M; Zeil, Jochen

    2011-02-01

    Navigating animals are known to use a number of celestial and terrestrial compass cues that allow them to determine and control their direction of travel. Which of the cues dominate appears to depend on their salience. Here we show that night-active bull ants attend to both the pattern of polarised skylight and the landmark panorama in their familiar habitat. When the two directional cues are in conflict, ants choose a compromise direction. However, landmark guidance appears to be the primary mechanism of navigation used by forager ants, with those cues in the direction of heading having the greatest influence on navigation. Different colonies respond to the removal of these cues to different degrees, depending on the directional information provided by the local landmark panorama. Interestingly, other parts of the surrounding panorama also influence foraging speed and accuracy, suggesting that they too play a role in navigation. PMID:21228195

  2. Effectiveness of a program aimed at the elimination of BLAD-carrier bulls from Polish Holstein-Friesian cattle.

    PubMed

    Czarnik, Urszula; Grzybowski, Grzegorz; Kamiński, Stanisław; Prusak, Beata; Zabolewicz, Tadeusz

    2007-01-01

    The molecular basis of BLAD is the D128G mutation of the gene coding for the CD18 subunit of beta-2 integrin. This mutation is lethal, since homozygous (BL/BL) animals die before they reach sexual maturity. In the 1990s, BLAD was the most widespread genetic disease in HF cattle worldwide. The aim of the present study was to determine the frequency of BLAD carriers among 4645 young breeding bulls in Poland in 1995-2006. The frequency of carriers of the mutated allele showed a clear decreasing trend. The highest frequency (7.9%) was recorded while implementing the BLAD control program (1995-1997). Regular monitoring has enabled a great reduction of this threat to the tested population. Today only sporadic cases of BL/TL heterozygotes are reported (ca. 0.8% in 2004-2006). PMID:17998595

  3. Retained functional integrity of bull spermatozoa after double freezing and thawing using PureSperm density gradient centrifugation.

    PubMed

    Maxwell, W M C; Parrilla, I; Caballero, I; Garcia, E; Roca, J; Martinez, E A; Vazquez, J M; Rath, D

    2007-10-01

    The main aim of this study was to compare the motility and functional integrity of bull spermatozoa after single and double freezing and thawing. The viability and morphological integrity of spermatozoa selected by PureSperm density gradient centrifugation after cryopreservation of bovine semen in two commercial extenders (Experiment 1) and the function of bull spermatozoa before and after a second freezing and thawing assisted by PureSperm selection (Experiment 2) were examined. On average, 35.8 +/- 12.1% of sperm loaded onto the PureSperm density gradient were recovered after centrifugation. In Experiment 1, post-thaw motility and acrosome integrity were higher for spermatozoa frozen in Tris-egg yolk extender than in AndroMed, whether the assessments were made immediately after thawing [80.4 +/- 12.7 vs 47.6 +/- 19.0% motile and 78.8 +/- 8.3 vs 50.1 +/- 19.5% normal apical ridge (NAR), p < 0.05] or after preparation on the gradient (83.3 +/- 8.6 vs 69.4 +/- 15.9% motile and 89.5 +/- 7.2 vs 69.1 +/- 11.4% NAR, p < 0.05). For semen frozen in Tris-egg yolk extender, selection on the PureSperm gradient did not influence total motility but significantly improved the proportion of acrosome-intact spermatozoa. After the gradient, both the total motility and percentage of normal acrosomes increased for spermatozoa frozen in AndroMed (Minitüb Tiefenbach, Germany). In Experiment 2, there was no difference in sperm motility after the first and second freeze-thawing (82.9 +/- 12.7 vs 68.8 +/- 18.7%). However, the proportion of acrosome-intact spermatozoa was significantly improved by selection through the PureSperm gradient, whether measured by phase contrast microscopy (78.9 +/- 9.7 vs 90.4 +/- 4.0% NAR, p < 0.05) or flow cytometry (53.4 +/- 11.7 vs 76.3 +/- 6.0% viable acrosome-intact spermatozoa, p < 0.001). The improvement in the percentage of spermatozoa with normal acrosomes was maintained after resuspension in the cooling extender and cooling to 4 degrees C (88

  4. Characterization of relative growth of empty body and carcass components for bulls from a five-breed diallel.

    PubMed

    Baker, J F; Bryson, W L; Sanders, J O; Dahm, P F; Cartwright, T C; Ellis, W C; Long, C R

    1991-08-01

    Slaughter and carcass data were obtained on 197 bulls produced in a diallel involving Angus, Brahman, Hereford, Holstein and Jersey that were slaughtered at either 6, 9, 12, 15, 18, 24, or 30 mo of age. Bulls were given ad libitum access to a 72% TDN diet on an individual basis from 6 mo of age until slaughter. Empty body weight (EBWT) was determined as the sum of the weights of blood, hide, hard drop, soft drop (minus contents of the digestive tract), and carcass weight (CWT), which were recorded at slaughter. Carcass protein (CPROT) and fat (CFAT) were based on weights and chemical analyses of lean and fat tissue and bone of the carcass. Empty body protein (EBPROT) and fat (EBFAT) were based on weights and chemical estimates of the components of the empty body. Growth of EBWT, EBPROT, EBFAT, CWT, CPROT, and CFAT relative to either live weight (LWT), EBWT, or CWT were investigated using the allometric equation. Breed-type differences existed (P less than .01) for the growth of EBWT relative to LWT. Comparisons of general combining abilities revealed that Angus, Hereford, and Jersey generally had lower maturing rates of EBWT relative to LWT and that Brahman and Holstein had higher maturing rates. Across breed-type, relative growth rates indicated that fat and protein were later-maturing components relative to LWT, EBWT, or CWT, which implies that other components mature relatively earlier. Relative maturing rates of components studied were not important in explaining differences in body composition that have been previously reported for these breed-types. PMID:1894551

  5. Effects of vegetable fats versus lard in milk replacers on feed intake, digestibility, and growth in Finnish Ayrshire bull calves.

    PubMed

    Huuskonen, A; Khalili, H; Kiljala, J; Joki-Tokola, E; Nousiainen, J

    2005-10-01

    The aim was to study whether vegetable fat mixtures could be used instead of lard [15.2% in dry matter (DM)] in milk replacers without impairing the performance of Finnish Ayrshire bull calves (n = 58). The growth performance of the calves was measured before and after weaning from 14 d to 6 mo of age. The following 3 fat sources in a milk replacer were studied: 1) a mixture of palm, coconut, and rapeseed oil, 2) palm and coconut oil, and 3) lard. The calves were bucket-fed 2 L of milk replacer 3 times per day. The milk replacer contained 116 g of DM/L, resulting in an average DM intake of 4.8 g of DM/kg of body weight0.75 (BW0.75) during the 8-wk trial, after which the calves were weaned. All the calves had free access to water, commercial starter, and grass silage before weaning. The weaned calves had free access to water and grass silage and were given 3 kg/d (air-dry basis) of a commercial concentrate mixture. The concentrate was replaced by barley when the bulls were 4.5 mo old. There were no significant differences between the diets in feed intake and apparent diet digestibility. The health and BW of the calves were similar during the study. The feed conversion rate (kg of DM intake/kg of gain) before weaning was significantly greater for the lard diet compared with the 2 vegetable fat mixtures. After weaning, the feed conversion rate was slightly lower for the diet that included the palm, coconut, and rapeseed oil mixture than for the diet that included palm and coconut oil mixture. The study showed that the 2 mixtures consisting solely of vegetable oils were effective dietary components, thus providing 2 alternative fat mixtures of milk replacers, for use instead of lard in formulating commercial calf milk replacers. PMID:16162531

  6. Comparison of production characteristics from birth through slaughter of calves sired by Angus, Charolais or Piedmontese bulls.

    PubMed

    Baker, J F; Lunt, D K

    1990-06-01

    Birth, weaning, growth and carcass records for calves sired by Angus, Charolais or Piedmontese bulls were used to evaluate the potential contribution of Piedmontese to beef production in the U.S. Bulls were mated by AI to Hereford and crossbred cows and heifers. Calves were born during fall 1985 or spring 1986. Statistical models used to analyze the importance of sire breed used sire nested within sire breed as a random effect. Effects of sex, birth season, contemporary group, dam breed and parity were considered fixed and tested with the residual error. Piedmontese-sired calves had the longest gestation length, followed by Charolais and Angus-sired calves (287.5, 285.0 and 282.8 d, respectively). Breed of sire was not significant for birth weight, but Piedmontese- and Charolais-sired calves had longer cannon bones than Angus-sired calves. Differences were found for weaning hip height, but weaning weights, weaning muscle scores and ADG during the preweaning period were similar for calves by the three sire breeds. When fed to a similar fat thickness, Angus-sired calves required fewer days on feed, produced lighter carcasses and gained less per day than Charolais- or Piedmontese-sired calves. Piedmontese-sired calves required more days on feed than Charolais-sired calves when slaughtered at a similar subcutaneous fat thickness. Piedmontese-sired calves produced carcasses with a larger average rib eye area, higher dressing percentage and lower (more desirable) yield grade than Charolais- or Angus-sired calves. No significant sire breed differences were detected for tissue cholesterol content. PMID:2384357

  7. Chemical sterilisation of Bos indicus bull calves following intratesticular injection of zinc acetate: effects on semen quality and testicular changes.

    PubMed

    Cavalieri, J; Wang, M; Johnson, L

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effects in Bos indicus bull calves of intratesticular administration of 1mL of either saline (n=9) or one of the two doses of zinc acetate (ZA1, 57.75mg, n=10 or ZA2, 71.75mg, n=10) on semen quality and testicular changes. Semen was collected by electroejaculation on Days 343, 524 and 783 and animals were slaughtered on Day 860. Treatment reduced median maximum number of progressively motile and morphologically normal sperm collected (P=0.001) and the percentage of animals in which sperm were recovered (saline: 100%, 9/9; ZA1: 44.9%, 4/9 and ZA2: 40.0%, 4/10; P=0.013). Compared to saline treated controls, treatment with ZA reduced the mean diameter of the testes after Day 34 of treatment (treatment×time, P=0.013) and total testicular weight at slaughter (treatment: mean±SEM; saline: 569.4±59.0g, ZA1: 249.3±72.9g, ZA2: 247.5±68.1g; P=0.004). Histological changes in testes of bulls treated with ZA were characterized by germ cell depletion, vacuolation of Sertoli cells, interstitial fibrosis, epididymal duct atrophy with variable remnants of testicular tissue and degeneration. We conclude that intratesticular administration of two doses of ZA in B. indicus calves is able to severely impair spermatogenesis and cause varying degrees of testicular degeneration and a reduction in testicular diameter and mass. Further investigation is required to determine ways of obtaining more consistent results from treatment. PMID:25752498

  8. Effect of an accelerated finishing program on performance, carcass characteristics, and circulating insulin-like growth factor I concentration of early-weaned bulls and steers.

    PubMed

    Schoonmaker, J P; Loerch, S C; Fluharty, F L; Turner, T B; Moeller, S J; Rossi, J E; Dayton, W R; Hathaway, M R; Wulf, D M

    2002-04-01

    Sixty-three Angus x Simmental calves were allotted to a bull or a steer group based on sire, birth date, and birth weight to determine effects of castration status on performance, carcass characteristics, and circulating insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) concentrations in early-weaned cattle. At 75 d of age, calves in the steer group were castrated. Calves were not creep-fed prior to weaning. All calves were weaned and weighed at an average age of 115 d and transported by truck to the OARDC feedlot in Wooster, OH. Performance and carcass characteristics were measured in three phases. Phase 1 was from 115 to 200 d of age, phase 2 was from 201 to 277 d of age, and phase 3 was from 278 d of age to slaughter. Before implantation, four bulls and four steers were selected for serial slaughter and carcass evaluation. Steers were implanted with Synovex-C at 130 d of age and with Revalor-S at 200 and 277 d of age. Serum samples were collected from all calves on the day of implantation, 28 and 42 d after implantation, and at slaughter and analyzed for circulating IGF-I concentration. Bulls gained 9.7% faster (1.75 vs 1.60 kg/d; P < 0.01), consumed 25 kg more DM (521 vs 496 kg; P = 0.11), and were 3.3% more efficient (282 vs 273 g/kg, P < 0.10) than steers in phase 1. However, steers gained 10.5% faster (1.62 vs 1.46 kg/d; P < 0.02), consumed similar amounts of DM, and were 6.5% more efficient than bulls (214 vs 201 g/kg; P < 0.06) in phase 2. Overall gains and efficiency were similar between bulls and steers; however, bulls consumed 140 kg more DM (P < 0.05), were 27 kg heavier (P < 0.05), and had to stay in the feedlot 18 more days (P < 0.05) than steers to achieve a similar amount of fat thickness. Implanted steers had greater concentrations of circulating IGF-I than bulls (P < 0.01), and the pattern of IGF-I concentration over time was affected by castration status (castration status x time interaction; P < 0.01). Synovex-C had a lower impact on circulating IGF

  9. Association of TNP2 Gene Polymorphisms of the bta-miR-154 Target Site with the Semen Quality Traits of Chinese Holstein Bulls

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jinming; Zhang, Xiaojian; Qi, Chao; Li, Jianbin; Zhong, Jifeng; Li, Guorong; Wang, Changfa

    2014-01-01

    Transition protein 2 (TNP2) participates in removing nucleohistones and the initial condensation of spermatid nucleus during spermiogenesis. This study investigated the relationship between the variants of the bovine TNP2 gene and the semen quality traits of Chinese Holstein bulls. We detected three single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of the TNP2 gene in 392 Chinese Holstein bulls, namely, g.269 G>A (exon 1), g.480 C>T (intron 1), and g.1536 C>T (3′-UTR). Association analysis showed that the semen quality traits of the Chinese Holstein bulls was significantly affected by the three SNPs. The bulls with the haplotypic combinations H6H4, H6H6, and H6H8 had higher initial semen motility than those with the H7H8 and H8H4 haplotypic combinations (P<0.05). SNPs in the microRNA (miRNA) binding region of the TNP2 gene 3′-UTR may have contributed to the phenotypic differences. The phenotypic differences are caused by the altered expression of the miRNAs and their targets. Bioinformatics analysis predicted that the g.1536 C>T site in the TNP2 3′-UTR is located in the bta-miR-154 binding region. The quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction results showed that the TNP2 mRNA relative expression in bulls with the CT and CC genotypes was significantly higher than those with the TT genotype (P<0.05) in the g.1536 C>T site. The luciferase assay also indicated that bta-miR-154 directly targets TNP2 in a murine Leydig cell tumor cell line. The SNP g.1536 C>T in the TNP2 3′-UTR, which altered the binding of TNP2 with bta-miR-154, was found to be associated with the semen quality traits of Chinese Holstein bulls. PMID:24416221

  10. Effects of pipothiazine palmitate on handling stress and on the characteristics of semen collected by electroejaculation in bison (Bison bison) bulls.

    PubMed

    Toosi, B M; Gratton, G; McCorkell, R B; Wynne-Edwards, K E; Woodbury, M R; Lessard, C

    2013-04-01

    Handling North American bison can pose risk to the handler and evoke stress in the animal. Moreover, this induced stress might affect qualities of semen collected by electroejaculation. The objective of this study was to investigate if a long acting neuroleptic tranquilizer (LAN) would reduce the stress of bison and thereby improve the quality of electroejaculated semen. Eight experimental replicates were conducted between May and November. In each replicate, the same six bison bulls were randomly assigned into LAN-treated (n=3) and non-treated control (n=3) groups. Pipothiazine palmitate (Piportil L4) was administered intramuscularly as a single dose of 100 mg in replicates 1-4 or 200 mg in replicates 5-8. Within each replicate, semen was collected by electroejaculation at 4, 6, 11 and 13 days post treatment. Behavioral parameters, sperm morphology and motility parameters were analyzed. A blood sample was collected before each electroejaculation and serum concentrations of testosterone, cortisol and corticosterone were determined. Treatment bulls with 100 mg of Piportil L4 reduced the restraint time and the struggling of bison bulls during handling compared to the control group (P<0.05). Semen motility parameters and serum concentrations of testosterone, cortisol and corticosterone were not significantly affected when 100mg of the LAN was administered (P>0.05). However, giving 200 mg of Piportil L4 reduced the restraint time of bison bulls and the duration of semen collection (P<0.05). Also, this treatment improved total and progressive sperm motilities when compared to the respective controls (P<0.05). Interestingly, serum concentration of corticosterone, as an endocrine stress indicator, was decreased after administration of 200mg of Pipothiazine palmitate, while testosterone concentrations were increased compared to those values in untreated control bulls (corticosterone: 0.10±0.01 compared with 0.15±0.02 ng/mL; testosterone: 9.11±1.68 compared with 5.33±0

  11. Gene expression profile of Musculus longissimus dorsi in bulls of a Charolais × Holstein F2-cross with divergent intramuscular fat content

    PubMed Central

    Komolka, Katrin; Ponsuksili, Siriluck; Albrecht, Elke; Kühn, Christa; Wimmers, Klaus; Maak, Steffen

    2015-01-01

    Transcriptomes of Musculus longissimus dorsi (MLD) were compared between bulls from a F2-cross derived from Charolais and Holstein Friesian. Two groups of 10 bulls were selected which differed significantly in intramuscular fat (IMF) deposition despite standardized husbandry and feeding conditions and identical sires in both groups. Consequently, genetic factors underlying the different capability of IMF deposition should be identified. A total of 32 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were found of which 11 were up-regulated and 21 were down-regulated in the high IMF group. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) identified a gene network comprising DEGs with functions in carbohydrate metabolism, lipid metabolism and molecular transport. The data from this study were deposited in NCBI's Gene Expression Omnibus and are accessible through GEO Series accession number GSE75347. We provide here a dataset which is of potential value to dissect molecular pathways influencing differences in IMF deposition in crossbred cattle with standardized genetic background. PMID:26981388

  12. Assessment of beef production from Brahman x Thai native and Charolais x Thai native crossbred bulls slaughtered at different weights. I: growth performance and carcass quality.

    PubMed

    Waritthitham, A; Lambertz, C; Langholz, H-J; Wicke, M; Gauly, M

    2010-05-01

    Effects of genotype and slaughter weight on growth performance and carcass quality of Brahman x Thai native (BRA) and Charolais x Thai native (CHA) crossbred bulls were studied. Thirty-four BRA and 34 CHA bulls raised under practical fattening beef farm conditions were randomly selected and slaughtered at 500, 550 and 600 kg live weight, respectively. Parameters of growth performance, carcass quality and commercial prime cuts were determined. Results showed that growth performance and carcass quality of CHA was better, since they showed higher weight gain, better body muscle score, higher carcass weight high dressing percentage, higher carcass muscle, less carcass fat and bone plus connective tissue proportions, better carcass classifications, greater loin eye area and higher commercial prime cut percentage. Slaughter weights up to 600 kg resulted in increased carcass weight, loin eye area and percentage of commercial prime cuts and can therefore be recommended. PMID:20374884

  13. Assessing the impacts of river regulation on native bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) and westslope cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarkii lewisi) habitats in the upper Flathead River, Montana, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Muhlfeld, Clint C.; Jones, Leslie A.; Kotter, D.; Miller, William J.; Geise, Doran; Tohtz, Joel; Marotz, Brian

    2012-01-01

    Hungry Horse Dam on the South Fork Flathead River, Montana, USA, has modified the natural flow regimen for power generation, flood risk management and flow augmentation for anadromous fish recovery in the Columbia River. Concern over the detrimental effects of dam operations on native resident fishes prompted research to quantify the impacts of alternative flow management strategies on threatened bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) and westslope cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarkii lewisi) habitats. Seasonal and life‐stage specific habitat suitability criteria were combined with a two‐dimensional hydrodynamic habitat model to assess discharge effects on usable habitats. Telemetry data used to construct seasonal habitat suitability curves revealed that subadult (fish that emigrated from natal streams to the river system) bull trout move to shallow, low‐velocity shoreline areas at night, which are most sensitive to flow fluctuations. Habitat time series analyses comparing the natural flow regimen (predam, 1929–1952) with five postdam flow management strategies (1953–2008) show that the natural flow conditions optimize the critical bull trout habitats and that the current strategy best resembles the natural flow conditions of all postdam periods. Late summer flow augmentation for anadromous fish recovery, however, produces higher discharges than predam conditions, which reduces the availability of usable habitat during this critical growing season. Our results suggest that past flow management policies that created sporadic streamflow fluctuations were likely detrimental to resident salmonids and that natural flow management strategies will likely improve the chances of protecting key ecosystem processes and help to maintain and restore threatened bull trout and westslope cutthroat trout populations in the upper Columbia River Basin.

  14. Multi-tissue stable isotope analysis and acoustic telemetry reveal seasonal variability in the trophic interactions of juvenile bull sharks in a coastal estuary.

    PubMed

    Matich, Philip; Heithaus, Michael R

    2014-01-01

    Understanding how natural and anthropogenic drivers affect extant food webs is critical to predicting the impacts of climate change and habitat alterations on ecosystem dynamics. In the Florida Everglades, seasonal reductions in freshwater flow and precipitation lead to annual migrations of aquatic taxa from marsh habitats to deep-water refugia in estuaries. The timing and intensity of freshwater reductions, however, will be modified by ongoing ecosystem restoration and predicted climate change. Understanding the importance of seasonally pulsed resources to predators is critical to predicting the impacts of management and climate change on their populations. As with many large predators, however, it is difficult to determine to what extent predators like bull sharks (Carcharhinus leucas) in the coastal Everglades make use of prey pulses currently. We used passive acoustic telemetry to determine whether shark movements responded to the pulse of marsh prey. To investigate the possibility that sharks fed on marsh prey, we modelled the predicted dynamics of stable isotope values in bull shark blood and plasma under different assumptions of temporal variability in shark diets and physiological dynamics of tissue turnover and isotopic discrimination. Bull sharks increased their use of upstream channels during the late dry season, and although our previous work shows long-term specialization in the diets of sharks, stable isotope values suggested that some individuals adjusted their diets to take advantage of prey entering the system from the marsh, and as such this may be an important resource for the nursery. Restoration efforts are predicted to increase hydroperiods and marsh water levels, likely shifting the timing, duration and intensity of prey pulses, which could have negative consequences for the bull shark population and/or induce shifts in behaviour. Understanding the factors influencing the propensity to specialize or adopt more flexible trophic interactions

  15. First record of dicephalia in a bull shark Carcharhinus leucas (Chondrichthyes: Carcharhinidae) foetus from the Gulf of Mexico, U.S.A.

    PubMed

    Wagner, C M; Rice, P H; Pease, A P

    2013-04-01

    The first recorded incidence of dicephalia in a bull shark Carcharhinus leucas is reported from a foetus collected by a fisherman in the Gulf of Mexico near Florida, U.S.A. External examination, Radiography and magnetic resonance imaging revealed a case of monosomic dicephalia where the axial skeleton and internal organs were found to divide into parallel systems anterior to the pectoral girdle resulting in two well-developed heads. PMID:23557317

  16. What's in a Name? Effect of Breed Perceptions & Labeling on Attractiveness, Adoptions & Length of Stay for Pit-Bull-Type Dogs.

    PubMed

    Gunter, Lisa M; Barber, Rebecca T; Wynne, Clive D L

    2016-01-01

    Previous research has indicated that certain breeds of dogs stay longer in shelters than others. However, exactly how breed perception and identification influences potential adopters' decisions remains unclear. Current dog breed identification practices in animal shelters are often based upon information supplied by the relinquishing owner, or staff determination based on the dog's phenotype. However, discrepancies have been found between breed identification as typically assessed by welfare agencies and the outcome of DNA analysis. In Study 1, the perceived behavioral and adoptability characteristics of a pit-bull-type dog were compared with those of a Labrador Retriever and Border Collie. How the addition of a human handler influenced those perceptions was also assessed. In Study 2, lengths of stay and perceived attractiveness of dogs that were labeled as pit bull breeds were compared to dogs that were phenotypically similar but were labeled as another breed at an animal shelter. The latter dogs were called "lookalikes." In Study 3, we compared perceived attractiveness in video recordings of pit-bull-type dogs and lookalikes with and without breed labels. Lastly, data from an animal shelter that ceased applying breed labeling on kennels were analyzed, and lengths of stay and outcomes for all dog breeds, including pit bulls, before and after the change in labeling practice were compared. In total, these findings suggest that breed labeling influences potential adopters' perceptions and decision-making. Given the inherent complexity of breed assignment based on morphology coupled with negative breed perceptions, removing breed labels is a relatively low-cost strategy that will likely improve outcomes for dogs in animal shelters. PMID:27008213

  17. What’s in a Name? Effect of Breed Perceptions & Labeling on Attractiveness, Adoptions & Length of Stay for Pit-Bull-Type Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Gunter, Lisa M.; Barber, Rebecca T.; Wynne, Clive D. L.

    2016-01-01

    Previous research has indicated that certain breeds of dogs stay longer in shelters than others. However, exactly how breed perception and identification influences potential adopters' decisions remains unclear. Current dog breed identification practices in animal shelters are often based upon information supplied by the relinquishing owner, or staff determination based on the dog's phenotype. However, discrepancies have been found between breed identification as typically assessed by welfare agencies and the outcome of DNA analysis. In Study 1, the perceived behavioral and adoptability characteristics of a pit-bull-type dog were compared with those of a Labrador Retriever and Border Collie. How the addition of a human handler influenced those perceptions was also assessed. In Study 2, lengths of stay and perceived attractiveness of dogs that were labeled as pit bull breeds were compared to dogs that were phenotypically similar but were labeled as another breed at an animal shelter. The latter dogs were called "lookalikes." In Study 3, we compared perceived attractiveness in video recordings of pit-bull-type dogs and lookalikes with and without breed labels. Lastly, data from an animal shelter that ceased applying breed labeling on kennels were analyzed, and lengths of stay and outcomes for all dog breeds, including pit bulls, before and after the change in labeling practice were compared. In total, these findings suggest that breed labeling influences potential adopters' perceptions and decision-making. Given the inherent complexity of breed assignment based on morphology coupled with negative breed perceptions, removing breed labels is a relatively low-cost strategy that will likely improve outcomes for dogs in animal shelters. PMID:27008213

  18. An ecological risk assessment of the acute and chronic toxicity of the herbicide picloram to the threatened bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) and the rainbow trout (Onchorhyncus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Fairchild, J F; Feltz, K P; Sappington, L C; Allert, A L; Nelson, K J; Valle, J

    2009-05-01

    We conducted acute and chronic toxicity studies of the effects of picloram acid on the threatened bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) and the standard coldwater surrogate rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). Juvenile fish were chronically exposed for 30 days in a proportional flow-through diluter to measured concentrations of 0, 0.30, 0.60, 1.18, 2.37, and 4.75 mg/L picloram. No mortality of either species was observed at the highest concentration. Bull trout were twofold more sensitive to picloram (30-day maximum acceptable toxic concentration of 0.80 mg/L) compared to rainbow trout (30-day maximum acceptable toxic concentration of 1.67 mg/L) based on the endpoint of growth. Picloram was acutely toxic to rainbow trout at 36 mg/L (96-h ALC50). The acute:chronic ratio for rainbow trout exposed to picloram was 22. The chronic toxicity of picloram was compared to modeled and measured environmental exposure concentrations (EECs) using a four-tiered system. The Tier 1, worst-case exposure estimate, based on a direct application of the current maximum use rate (1.1 kg/ha picloram) to a standardized aquatic ecosystem (water body of 1-ha area and 1-m depth), resulted in an EEC of 0.73 mg/L picloram and chronic risk quotients of 0.91 and 0.44 for bull trout and rainbow trout, respectively. Higher-tiered exposure estimates reduced chronic risk quotients 10-fold. Results of this study indicate that picloram, if properly applied according to the manufacturer's label, poses little risk to the threatened bull trout or rainbow trout in northwestern rangeland environments on either an acute or a chronic basis. PMID:18784952

  19. Effect on post-cryopreserved semen characteristics of Holstein bulls of adding combinations of vitamin C and either catalase or reduced glutathione to Tris extender.

    PubMed

    Eidan, Sajeda M

    2016-04-01

    This study was undertaken to investigate the influence of adding combinations of vitamin C to Tris extender with either catalase or reduced glutathione on post-cryopreserved semen characteristics of Holstein bulls for different preservation periods (cooling at 5°C, 48 h, 1, 2 and 3 months post cryopreservation, PC). Seven Holstein bulls of 2.5-3 years of age were used in this experiment. Semen was collected via artificial vagina in one ejaculate per bull per week for the 7 week experimental period. Pooled semen was equally divided into three treatments using Tris extender. Combinations of vitamin C (2.5mM) were added with either catalase (100 IU/ml, T2) or reduced glutathione (2mM, T3) to Tris extender and comparisons in response were made with the control group (Tris extender, T1). Individual sperm motility (IM), viability (V), plasma membrane integrity (PMI), and acrosome integrity (AI) were assessed during all periods of the study along with Malondialdehyde (MDA) concentrations and freezing ability. The IM was greater (P ≤ 0.01) in the T2 as compared with the T1 group at all periods of the study. Furthermore, the IM were greater (P ≤ 0.01) in the T3 as compared with the T1 group at the 48 h time period and at 3 months PC. The V, PMI and AI were greater (P ≤ 0.01) in T2 and T3 as compared with the T1 group at all the experimental periods. The MDA was greater (P ≤ 0.01) in the T2 as compared with the T1 group at 3 months PC. In conclusion, there was improved semen quality if semen of Holstein bulls was collected and stored in combinations of vitamin C with either catalase (T2) or reduced glutathione (T3) being added to Tris extender. PMID:26861956

  20. An ecological risk assessment of the acute and chronic toxicity of the herbicide picloram to the threatened bull trout (salvelinus confluentus) and the rainbow trout (onchorhyncus mykiss)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fairchild, J.F.; Feltz, K.P.; Sappington, L.C.; Allert, A.L.; Nelson, K.J.; Valle, J.

    2009-01-01

    We conducted acute and chronic toxicity studies of the effects of picloram acid on the threatened bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) and the standard coldwater surrogate rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). Juvenile fish were chronically exposed for 30 days in a proportional flow-through diluter to measured concentrations of 0, 0.30, 0.60, 1.18, 2.37, and 4.75 mg/L picloram. No mortality of either species was observed at the highest concentration. Bull trout were twofold more sensitive to picloram (30-day maximum acceptable toxic concentration of 0.80 mg/L) compared to rainbow trout (30-day maximum acceptable toxic concentration of 1.67 mg/L) based on the endpoint of growth. Picloram was acutely toxic to rainbow trout at 36 mg/L (96-h ALC50). The acute:chronic ratio for rainbow trout exposed to picloram was 22. The chronic toxicity of picloram was compared to modeled and measured environmental exposure concentrations (EECs) using a four-tiered system. The Tier 1, worst-case exposure estimate, based on a direct application of the current maximum use rate (1.1 kg/ha picloram) to a standardized aquatic ecosystem (water body of 1-ha area and 1-m depth), resulted in an EEC of 0.73 mg/L picloram and chronic risk quotients of 0.91 and 0.44 for bull trout and rainbow trout, respectively. Higher-tiered exposure estimates reduced chronic risk quotients 10-fold. Results of this study indicate that picloram, if properly applied according to the manufacturer's label, poses little risk to the threatened bull trout or rainbow trout in northwestern rangeland environments on either an acute or a chronic basis. ?? 2008 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.

  1. Effect of equilibration times, freezing, and thawing rates on post-thaw quality of buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) bull spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Shah, S A H; Andrabi, S M H; Qureshi, I Z

    2016-09-01

    The effects of equilibration times (E1, 2 h; E2, 4 h; E3, 6 h), freezing rates (FR1, manual, 5 cm above liquid nitrogen (LN2 ) for 10 min, plunging in LN2 ; FR2, programmable ultra-fast, holding at +4 °C for 2 min, from 4 to -10 °C at -10 °C/min, from -10 to -20 °C at -15 °C/min, from -20 to -120 °C at -60 °C/min, holding at -120 °C for 30 sec, plunging in LN2 ), and thawing rates (T1, 37 °C for 30 sec; T2, 50 °C for 15 sec; T3, 70 °C for 7 sec) were evaluated on quality of buffalo bull spermatozoa. Progressive motility (%), rapid velocity (%), average path velocity (VAP, μm/s), straight line velocity (VSL, μm/s), and mitochondrial transmembrane potential (%) were higher (p < 0.05) with E2, FR2, and T3 compared to other groups. Sperm curved line velocity (VCL, μm/s) was higher (p < 0.05) with E2 and FR2 compared to other groups. Sperm straightness (%) and linearity (LIN, %) were higher (p < 0.05) with E2 compared to other groups. Sperm LIN was affected (p < 0.05) with T3 compared to other groups. Supravital-plasma membrane integrity (%), viability and acrosome integrity (%) of spermatozoa were higher (p < 0.05) with E2 and FR2 compared to other groups. Sperm DNA integrity (%) was higher (p < 0.05) with FR2 and T1 compared to other groups. We concluded that inclusion of 4 h-equilibration time, programmable ultra-fast freezing rate, and rapid thawing at 70 °C for 7 sec in cryopreservation protocol improves the post-thaw quality of buffalo bull spermatozoa. PMID:27153390

  2. Cosmogenic exposure-age chronologies of Pinedale and Bull Lake glaciations in greater Yellowstone and the Teton Range, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Licciardi, J.M.; Pierce, K.L.

    2008-01-01

    We have obtained 69 new cosmogenic 10Be surface exposure ages from boulders on moraines deposited by glaciers of the greater Yellowstone glacial system and Teton Range during the middle and late Pleistocene. These new data, combined with 43 previously obtained 3He and 10Be ages from deposits of the northern Yellowstone outlet glacier, establish a high-resolution chronology for the Yellowstone-Teton mountain glacier complexes. Boulders deposited at the southern limit of the penultimate ice advance of the Yellowstone glacial system yield a mean age of 136??13 10Be ka and oldest ages of ???151-157 10Be ka. These ages support a correlation with the Bull Lake of West Yellowstone, with the type Bull Lake of the Wind River Range, and with Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) 6. End moraines marking the maximum Pinedale positions of outlet glaciers around the periphery of the Yellowstone glacial system range in age from 18.8??0.9 to 16.5??1.4 10Be ka, and possibly as young as 14.6??0.7 10Be ka, suggesting differences in response times of the various ice-cap source regions. Moreover, all dated Pinedale terminal moraines in the greater Yellowstone glacial system post-date the Pinedale maximum in the Wind River Range by ???4-6 kyr, indicating a significant phase relationship between glacial maxima in these adjacent ranges. Boulders on the outermost set and an inner set of Pinedale end moraines enclosing Jenny Lake on the eastern Teton front yield mean ages of 14.6??0.7 and 13.5??1.1 10Be ka, respectively. The outer Jenny Lake moraines are partially buried by outwash from ice on the Yellowstone Plateau, hence their age indicates a major standstill of an expanded valley glacier in the Teton Range prior to the Younger Dryas, followed closely by deglaciation of the Yellowstone Plateau. These new glacial chronologies are indicative of spatially variable regional climate forcing and temporally complex patterns of glacier responses in this region of the Rocky Mountains during the Pleistocene

  3. Effects of ractopamine hydrochloride and dietary protein content on performance, carcass traits and meat quality of Nellore bulls.

    PubMed

    Cônsolo, N R B; Mesquita, B S; Rodriguez, F D; Rizzi, V G; Silva, L F P

    2016-03-01

    Ractopamine hydrochloride (RH) alters protein metabolism and improves growth performance in Bos taurus cattle with high carcass fat. Our objective was to evaluate the effects of RH, dietary CP and RH×CP interaction on performance, blood metabolites, carcass characteristics and meat quality of young Nellore bulls. A total of 48 bulls were randomly assigned to four treatments in a 2×2 factorial arrangement. The factors were two levels of dietary CP (100% and 120% of metabolizable protein requirement, defined as CP100 and CP120, respectively), and two levels of RH (0 and 300 mg/animal·per day). Treated animal received RH for the final 35 days before slaughter. Animals were weighed at the beginning of the feedlot period (day 63), at the beginning of ractopamine supplementation (day 0), after 18 days of supplementation (day 18) and before slaughter (day 34). Animals were slaughtered and hot carcass weights recorded. After chilling, carcass data was collected and longissimus samples were obtained for determination of meat quality. The 9-11th rib section was removed for carcass composition analysis. Supplementation with RH increased ADG independently of dietary CP. There was a RH×CP interaction on dry matter intake (DMI), where RH reduced DMI at CP120, with no effect at CP100. Ractopamine improved feed efficiency, without RH×CP interaction. Ractopamine had no effect on plasma creatinine and urea concentration. Greater dietary CP tended to increase blood urea, and there was a RH×CP interaction for plasma total protein. Ractopamine supplementation increased plasma total protein at CP120, and had no effect at CP100. Ractopamine also decreased plasma glucose concentration at CP100, but had no effect at CP120. Ractopamine increased alkaline phosphatase activity at CP120 and had no effect at CP100. There was a tendency for RH to increase longissimus muscle area, independently of dietary CP. Ractopamine did not alter fat thickness; however, fat thickness was reduced by

  4. Seminal Plasma Heparin Binding Proteins Improve Semen Quality by Reducing Oxidative Stress during Cryopreservation of Cattle Bull Semen

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Maulikkumar; Gandotra, Vinod K.; Cheema, Ranjna S.; Bansal, Amrit K.; Kumar, Ajeet

    2016-01-01

    Heparin binding proteins (HBPs) are produced by accessory glands. These are secreted into the seminal fluid, bind to the spermatozoa at the time of ejaculation, favour capacitation, acrosome reaction, and alter the immune system response toward the sperm. The present study was conducted with an objective to assess the effect of purified seminal plasma-HBPs (SP-HBPs) on cross bred cattle bull sperm attributes during two phases of cryopreservation: Pre freezing and freezing-thawing. SP-HBPs were purified from pooled seminal plasma by heparin affinity chromatography. Three doses of SP-HBPs i.e. 10, 20, 40 μg/mL semen were standardized to find out the optimum dose and 20 μg/mL was found to be an optimum dose. Semen as such and treated with SP-HBPs was diluted with sodium citrate-egg yolk diluter and cryopreserved as per the standard protocol. Sperm parameters i.e. motility, viability, Hypo-osmotic swelling test (HOST), acrosome damage, in vitro capacitation and lipid peroxidation were evaluated in SP-HBP treated and untreated (control) semen at both phases of cryopreservation. A considerable variation in percent sperm motility, viability, membrane integrity (HOST), acrosome damage, acrosome reaction and lipid peroxidation was observed at both phases among the bulls irrespective of the treatment. Incubation of neat semen with 20 μg/mL SP-HBP before processing for cryopreservation enhanced the average motility, viability, membrane integrity by 7.2%, 1.5%, 7.9%, and 5.6%, 6.6%, 7.4% in pre-frozen and frozen-thawed semen in comparison to control. There was also an average increase of 4.1%/3.9% in in vitro capacitation and acrosome reaction in SP-HBPs-treated frozen-thawed semen as compared to control. However, binding of SP-HBPs to the sperm declined acrosome damage and lipid peroxidation by 1.3%/4.1% and 22.1/32.7 μM/109 spermatozoa in SP-HBP treated pre-frozen/frozen-thawed semen as compared to control, respectively. Significant (p<0.05) effects were observed only in

  5. Minimization of apoptosis-like changes in cryopreserved buffalo bull sperm by supplementing extender with Bcl-2 protein

    PubMed Central

    Dalal, Jasmer; Kumar, Ajeet; Honparkhe, Mrigank; Deka, Dipak; Singh, Narinder

    2016-01-01

    Aim: This study was aimed at evaluating the anti-apoptotic effects of Bcl-2 protein in cryopreserved buffalo bull sperm. Materials and Methods: A total 10 ejaculates from two buffalo bulls (5 each) were collected using artificial vagina method, and semen was evaluated using a standard protocol. Semen was extended by Tris egg yolk extender supplemented with Bcl-2 protein at 5, 10, and 15 µM. Semen was cryopreserved at ultra-low temperature using traditional vapor freezing method. Pre-freeze and post-thaw semen samples were evaluated for percent motility, viability, hypo-osmotic swelling test (HOST) reactive sperms; status of mitochondrial membrane activity and status of sperm phospholipase A1 and phospholipase A2 activity. Results: There were no significant effects of Bcl-2 protein supplementation on pre-freeze sperm quality. Percent motility and active mitochondria in post-thaw Bcl-2 supplemented and control groups were also similar. However, viable sperms were significantly (p<0.05) higher (74.29±4.23%) in Bcl-2 supplemented group (5 µM) as compared to control (51.6±5.77%). The proportion of HOST reactive sperms was also higher (63.1±6.73%) in Bcl-2 supplemented (5 µM) group as compared to control (50.7±6.98%). The sperm with low PLA activity (non-apoptotic) was significantly (p<0.05) higher in all the supplemented doses of Bcl-2 protein, i.e., at 5 µM (73.42±5.79%), 10 µM (75.51±6.22%), and 15 µM (74.78±5.89%) as compared to control (60.23±4.45%). We found that Bcl-2 protein supplementation at 5 µM dose improved the post-thaw semen quality indicated by higher viability, HOST reactive sperms, and sperm with low PLA activity (non-apoptotic sperms). Conclusion: Bcl-2 protein supplementation exerts its protective effect on spermatozoa against apoptosis-like changes developed during cryopreservation. PMID:27284216

  6. Suitable strategy to improve nitrogen utilization and reduce the environmental impact of Nellore bulls supplemented on tropical pasture.

    PubMed

    Jose Neto, A; Zervoudakis, J T; da Silva-Marques, R P; Silva, L C R P; Hatamoto-Zervoudakis, L K; Klopfenstein, T J

    2016-03-01

    Expansion of the biodiesel industry has increased the crude glycerin (CG) supply. Crude glycerin has the potential of replacing corn in ruminant diets because the glycerol can be converted to glucose in the liver of ruminants, providing energy for cellular metabolism. The objective was to evaluate the effects of CG with urea, soybean meal, cottonseed meal, and corn gluten feed, respectively, on intake, digestibility, microbial protein yield, and efficiency of N utilization. Five Nellore bulls (initial BW of 448 kg [SD 14]) grazing tropical pasture were used in a 5 × 5 Latin square design. The supplements were control (no supplementation; only free-choice mineral mixture ad libitum), CG with urea (CG-Urea), CG with soybean meal, CG with cottonseed meal, and CG with corn gluten. Crude glycerin was used in all supplements to replace corn (15% of DM supplement). There were differences between CG-Urea and other supplements with regard to intake of DM (% of BW and total; < 0.01), OM ( < 0.01), CP ( < 0.01), and TDN ( < 0.01). The digestibility of CP was greater ( = 0.04) for animals supplemented with CG-Urea than for those fed other supplements. Animals supplemented with CG-Urea showed greater N intake ( < 0.01) and N ammonia ( = 0.04) than those supplemented with other treatments. Nitrogen retained (g/d) was not affected by protein source but was greater for cattle fed a protein supplement compared with cattle fed the control supplement ( < 0.01). Supplementing the animals with protein sources increased ( = 0.02) the daily production of rumen microbial nitrogen (g/d) compared with the control group. Microbial protein (g/d) was lesser for the control than for protein sources ( = 0.02). However, when expressed relative to TDN ( = 0.35) and CP ( = 0.82), there were no differences across treatments. Crude protein intake per digestible OM intake (g CP/kg digestible OM intake) was greater for animals fed protein sources compared with animals fed control supplements ( < 0

  7. Effects of pain mitigation and method of castration on behavior and feedlot performance in cull beef bulls.

    PubMed

    Repenning, P E; Ahola, J K; Callan, R J; Fox, J T; French, J T; Giles, R L; Peel, R K; Whittier, J C; Engle, T E

    2013-10-01

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate the effects of castration method (banding vs. surgical) and use of analgesia on behavior and feedlot performance in cull bulls. Angus, Hereford, and Angus-crossbred bulls (n = 20; initial BW = 384 ± 59.3 kg; 336 ± 20.1 d old) were housed in feedlot pens equipped with the ability to measure individual daily feed intake. A balanced randomized block design using a 2 × 2 factorial arrangement of treatments was used. A multimodal analgesia (MMA) protocol was used and consisted of sutcutaneous ketamine stun containing butorphanol (0.01 mg/kg BW), xylazine (0.02 mg/kg BW), ketamine (0.04 mg/kg BW), and a local 2% lidocaine hydrochloride anesthetic block of the spermatic cords (10 mL/cord) and scrotum (10 mL) on d 0. Flunixin meglumine (1.2 mg/kg) was administered intravenously on d 0, 1, 2, and 3 to MMA cattle. Cattle were stratified to treatments based on breed, BW, age, and a temperament score. Treatments included 1) band castration without analgesia (BND), 2) band castration with analgesia (BND-MMA), 3) surgical castration without analgesia (SURG), and 4) surgical castration with analgesia (SURG-MMA). All castrations were performed on d 0. Chute exit velocity (EV) and time in chute (TIC) were collected on d -9, 0, 1, 2, and 13. Willingness-to-enter-chute (WTE) score, rectal temperature (TEMP), heart rate (HR), and respiration (RESP) were collected on d 0, 1, 2, 3, and 13. Cattle were weighed on d -9 and 13 while feeding behaviors were collected continuously for 57 d precastration and 28 d postcastration. There was a tendency (P < 0.09) for ADG to be greater in cattle receiving analgesia. Both SURG treatments exhibited elevated TEMP on d 1 (P < 0.001) and 2 (P < 0.05) compared to BND treatments. Postcastration DMI was greater (P = 0.02) in MMA treatments compared with nonmedicated treatments throughout the trial. Meal duration was greater (P < 0.05) in BND than SURG castrates during the first week postcastration. Results

  8. Effects of the platelet-activating factor (PAF) on selected quality parameters of cryopreserved bull semen (AI) with reduced sperm motility.

    PubMed

    Lecewicz, M; Kordan, W; Majewska, A; Kamiński, S; Dziekońska, A; Mietelska, K

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the effects of platelet-activating factor (PAF) on selected quality parameters of cryopreserved bull semen with reduced sperm motility used for artificial insemination. The aim of experiment 1 was to identify the optimal concentration of the phospholipid able to preserve sperm viability. Cryopreserved semen was treated with different PAF concentrations: 1×10(-5) M, 1×10(-6) M, 1×10(-7) M, 1×10(-8) M and 1×10(-9) M. The experiment demonstrated that PAF at concentration 1×10(-9) M increased most the sperm viability parameters (motility parameters, plasma membrane integrity and mitochondrial function) after 120 min of incubation of thawed semen at 37°C. Cryopreserved bull semen with reduced sperm motility (below 70%) was supplemented with PAF in a concentration of 1×10(-9) M. A statistically significant increase in sperm motility, percentage of linear motile spermatozoa and VSL value was observed after 120 min incubation of sperm with 1×10(-9) M PAF. Sperm supplementation with PAF also had positive effects on plasma membrane integrity and percentage of spermatozoa with preserved mitochondrial transmembrane potential, but the differences were not statistically significant. The results indicated positive effects of PAF supplementation at a concentration of 1×10(-9) M on the selected sperm quality parameters in cryopreserved bull semen with reduced motility. PMID:27096799

  9. The influence of nutritional levels and shade structure on testicular growth and hourly variations of plasma LH and testosterone levels in young Creole bulls in a tropical environment.

    PubMed

    Gauthier, D; Berbigier, P

    1982-01-01

    Twelve Creole bulls 13.3 months of age were divided into three groups according to live weight. The first group received a low nutritional level and was housed in a shaded stable; the second group received a high nutritional level and was housed in the same stable as the first group; the third group received the same ration as the second group but was exposed to solar radiation. Live weight and testicular diameter were recorded fortnightly. After 65 days, the blood of the bulls was sampled every 20 min for 12 h. Plasma LH and testosterone were quantified by radioimmunoassay. There was no significant influence of solar radiation on the testicular growth or the hormonal levels. Underfeeding decreased testicular growth and the average plasma LH and testosterone levels. However, this action was effective only in decreasing the number of hormonal pulses per day (0.63 vs 2.55 LH pulses per day and 0.75 vs 2.50 testosterone pulses per day); it did not change the basal hormone levels. It is suggested that this decrease in LH pulsatility might be responsible for the slow testicular growth in the underfed bulls. PMID:7156502

  10. Case studies of the legal and institutional obstacles and incentives to the development of small-scale hydroelectric power: Bull Run, Portland, Oregon

    SciTech Connect

    1980-05-01

    The National Conference of State Legislatures' Small-Scale Hydroelectric Policy Project is designed to assist selected state legislatures in looking at the benefits that a state can derive from the development of small-scale hydro, and in carrying out a review of state laws and regulations that affect the development of the state's small-scale hydro resources. The successful completion of the project should help establish state statutes and regulations that are consistent with the efficient development of small-scale hydro. As part of the project's work with state legislatures, seven case studies of small-scale hydro sites were conducted to provide a general analysis and overview of the significant problems and opportunities for the development of this energy resource. The case study approach was selected to expose the actual difficulties and advantages involved in developing a specific site. Such an examination of real development efforts will clearly reveal the important aspects about small-scale hydro development which could be improved by statutory or regulatory revision. Moreover, the case study format enables the formulation of generalized opportunities for promoting small-scale hydro based on specific development experiences. The case study for small-scale hydro power development at the City of Portland's water reserve in the Bull Run Forest is presented with information included on the Bull Run hydro power potential, current water usage, hydro power regulations and plant licensing, technical and economic aspects of Bull Run project, and the environmental impact. (LCL)

  11. Evaluation of the Life History of Native Salmonids in the Malheur River Basin; Cooperative Bull Trout/Redband Trout Research Project, 2002-2003 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Alan; Soupir, Jim; Schwabe, Lawrence

    2003-08-01

    The Malheur River is a 306-kilometer tributary to the Snake River, which drains 12,950 square kilometers. The Malheur River originates in the Blue Mountains and flows into the Snake River near Ontario, Oregon. The climate of the basin is characterized by hot dr