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  1. Rubus coreanus Miquel extract causes apoptosis of doxorubicin-resistant NCI/ADR-RES ovarian cancer cells via JNK phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min Kyoung; Choi, Hyeong Sim; Cho, Sung-Gook; Shin, Yong Cheol; Ko, Seong-Gyu

    2016-05-01

    Cancer cells can acquire an anticancer, drug-resistant phenotype following chemotherapy, which is tightly linked to cancer malignancy and patient survival rates. Therefore, the identification of options to treat chemotherapy‑resistant cancer cells is an urgent requirement. Rubus coreanus Miquel (RCM) has long been used as a source of food. In addition, it has been reported that RCM has effective functions against particular diseases, including cancer and inflammation. In the present study, it was demonstrated that RCM extract caused the apoptotic cell death of doxorubicin‑resistant NCI/ADR‑RES ovarian cancer cells by phosphorylating c‑Jun N‑terminal kinase (JNK). The RCM‑mediated reduction of cell viability showed no synergism with doxorubicin. In addition, ellagic acid and quercetin, which are phytochemicals found in RCM, also caused apoptosis of the NCI/ADR‑RES cells. In subsequent investigations of the RCM‑altered signaling pathway, RCM extract, ellagic acid and quercetin were found to commonly induce the phosphorylation of JNK and AKT. Additionally, the inhibition of JNK with SP600125 repressed the apoptotic cell death induced by RCM extract, ellagic acid and quercetin, and the inhibition of JNK appeared to switch apoptosis to necrosis. JNK inhibition also reduced the phosphorylation of AKT, which was induced by RCM extract, ellagic acid and quercetin, suggesting that the phosphorylation of JNK is required for AKT phosphorylation in RCM‑, ellagic acid‑ or quercetin‑induced apoptotic cell death. Therefore, the data obtained in the present study led to the conclusion that RCM caused apoptosis of doxorubicin‑resistant NCI/ADR-RES ovarian cancer cells via JNK phosphorylation, and suggested that RCM may be effective in the treatment of chemotherapy‑resistant cancer cells. PMID:26986492

  2. La faune de Mammifères du Pliocène terminal d'Ahl al Oughlam, Casablanca, Maroc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geraads, Denis; Amani, Fethi; Raynal, Jean-Paul; Sbihi-Alaoui, Fatima-Zohra

    1998-05-01

    The Late Pliocene site (ca 2.5 Ma) of Ahl al Oughlam has yielded a complete fauna of macroand micro-mammals, by far the richest of the late Cenozoic era of North Africa; it includes at least 55 species. Carnivora (23 species) are the dominant group. Many of them used the caves and fissures as dens or shelters, bringing in most of the ungulate remains. These remains include mostly medium-size species and juveniles of larger ones. Very few taxa are akin to Palearctic ones, and most of the faunal exchanges were intra-African. However, when compared to East Africa, the poor diversity of these ungulates must be noted, which the karstic nature of the site fails to fully explain, but which could result from a harsh, open and relatively cold environment.

  3. Response to "using of 'pseudo-second-order model' in adsorption", comment letter on "phenol removal from wastewater by adsorption on zeolitic composite" [Bizerea Spiridon et al., Environ Sci Pollut Res (2013) 20:6367-6381].

    PubMed

    Bizerea Spiridon, Otilia; Pitulice, Laura

    2014-01-01

    This letter is a response to the issues put forth by Dr. Y.S. Ho with regard to the article "Phenol removal from wastewater by adsorption on zeolitic composite" as reported by Bizerea Spiridon et al. (Environ Sci Pollut Res 20:6367-6381, 2013). The response proposes to clarify the error slipped in the typewritten linearized equation of the pseudo-second-kinetic model and the reason for using secondary reference regarding this model. PMID:24638835

  4. Mortality due to respiratory cancers in the coke oven plants of the Lorraine coalmining industry (Houillères du Bassin de Lorraine).

    PubMed Central

    Bertrand, J P; Chau, N; Patris, A; Mur, J M; Pham, Q T; Moulin, J J; Morviller, P; Auburtin, G; Figueredo, A; Martin, J

    1987-01-01

    The main activity of the Houillères du Bassin de Lorraine (Lorraine Collieries), employing 23,000 operatives and executives, is coalmining. The coke production is carried out by two coke oven plants with a workforce of respectively 747 and 552 workers. The coal coking process entails the emission of noxious products such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) from the ovens. The influence of occupational exposure on mortality due to respiratory cancers, and particularly to lung and upper respiratory and alimentary tracts cancer, was investigated among a cohort of 534 male workers from the two coke oven plants who had retired from work between 1963 and 1982. The job history of each subject has been precisely reconstructed by indicating the duration of exposure on the ovens, close to the ovens, and in maintenance occupations. The cohort mortality has been analysed according to the method of indirect standardisation with reference to the French male population and by a case-control study concerning the consumption of tobacco per cohort. The mortality due to lung cancer is 2.51 times higher than expected. This excess of mortality differs, but not significantly, between the two coke oven plants (standardised mortality ratio equals 3.05 and 1.75 respectively). It is not significantly higher among subjects exposed for more than five years, directly exposed on the ovens or working near the ovens or at maintenance occupations on the ovens (SMR = 2.78), than among those exposed for less than five years (SMR = 2.35) or those not exposed at all. Even taking into account the excess of mortality due to lung cancers in the Moselle district (1.6 time that of France), the excess of lung cancers does not seem to be explained by the regional factor, or by tobacco and alcohol consumption. Although no significant relation was offered between lung cancer and the duration of exposure to PAH, even when taking smoking habits into account, the carcinogenic role of occupational nuisances

  5. Neoantigen: A Long March toward Cancer Immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang

    2016-06-01

    Somatic mutations in cancer give rise to neoantigens. Technology revolutions in cancer genomics and immunology have made it possible to rapidly identify neoantigens for cancer vaccines. Leisegang and colleagues report that it is practical to rapidly identify neoantigens for adoptive T-cell therapy in a mouse tumor model. Clin Cancer Res; 22(11); 2602-4. ©2016 AACRSee related article by Leisegang et al., p. 2734. PMID:27006495

  6. Resistance electroslag (RES) surfacing

    SciTech Connect

    Forsberg, S.G.

    1985-08-01

    RES-surfacing is an abbreviation of resistance electroslag surfacing. The ElectroSlag Welding (ESW) process is wellknown for the welding of heavy-walled materials. During the past few years, a RES-surfacing system has been developed, in which a strip electrode is used in an ESW process. This is a development of the submerged arc welding (SAW) surfacing process using strip electrodes, which has been used in industry for many years. The basic difference between the SAW- and RES-surfacing processes is in the way of obtaining penetration in the base metal, and in fusion of the strip electrode and flux. In the SAW process, the required heat is derived from an electric arc; in the RES-process, it is obtained by resistance heating (i.e., the Joule effect) as a result of current flowing through a shallow molten pool of electrically conductive slag. To satisfy the basic differences in the processes, specific combinations of strip electrodes and fluxes have been developed. The welding equipment used for RES-surfacing is basically the same as for SAW-surfacing, except for minor modifications of the welding head due to heat radiation from the visible molten slag pool, and the use of additional equipment for magnetic control of the molten pool. result of the magnetic control of the molten pool.

  7. Reply to the comment by Quartau et al. on "Construction and destruction of a volcanic island developed inside an oceanic rift: Graciosa Island, Terceira Rift, Azores", J. Volcanol. Geotherm. Res. 284, 32-45, by Sibrant et al. (2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sibrant, A. L. R.; Marques, F. O.; Hildenbrand, A.

    2015-09-01

    In Sibrant et al. (2014), we reconstructed the evolution of Graciosa Island (Azores). We extensively discussed the nature and the meaning of the destruction episodes, either tectonics or gravitational, and concluded that the island has evolved through major landslides. In their comment, Quartau et al. (2015) conclude that (1) "Sibrant et al. (2014) is based almost solely on subaerial observations," which is false because we used the bathymetric data available to us (Figs. 3 and 4 in Sibrant et al., 2014). (2) "…the published multibeam sonar data around Graciosa reveals that their proposed successive phases of destruction of the volcanic edifices composing the island by massive landslides is incompatible with the high-resolution bathymetry." First, saying that the data were published is misleading because only two images are now provided in Quartau et al. (2015). Most of the high-resolution data used by Quartau et al. (2015) are not published, and they still do not release the data for us to analyse and use in this reply. Second, the high-resolution bathymetric maps are not incompatible with our model. For instance, mounds on the eastern submarine slope may actually be landslide blocks, and the platform developed to the S may correspond to flank collapses of the successive volcanoes, blanketed more recently by the young basaltic cover. (3) "The interpretation of collapse structures appears to have originated partly from a misreading of the volcano-stratigraphy and tectonic structures". We certainly did not "misread" the volcanic stratigraphy and tectonic structures in Graciosa; in great contrast to Quartau et al. (2015), we (a) used major unconformities to establish the volcano-stratigraphy, (b) calibrated this stratigraphy with high precision K-Ar dating, (c) made careful measurement of lava flow attitudes to infer the pre-collapse position of the main edifices, and (d) did not use hypothetical tectonic faults, as Quartau et al. (2015) did, to draw an

  8. ResPlan Database

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zellers, Michael L.

    2003-01-01

    The main project I was involved in was new application development for the existing CIS0 Database (ResPlan). This database application was developed in Microsoft Access. Initial meetings with Greg Follen, Linda McMillen, Griselle LaFontaine and others identified a few key weaknesses with the existing database. The weaknesses centered around that while the database correctly modeled the structure of Programs, Projects and Tasks, once the data was entered, the database did not capture any dynamic status information, and as such was of limited usefulness. After the initial meetings my goals were identified as follows: Enhance the ResPlan Database to include qualitative and quantitative status information about the Programs, Projects and Tasks Train staff members about the ResPlan database from both the user perspective and the developer perspective Give consideration to a Web Interface for reporting. Initially, the thought was that there would not be adequate time to actually develop the Web Interface, Greg wanted it understood that this was an eventual goal and as such should be a consideration throughout the development process.

  9. Discussion: 'Tumor diameter as a predictor in endometrial cancer surgery' by Yanazume et al.

    PubMed

    Van Le, Linda; Ko, Emily; Gehrig, Paola; DiFurio, Megan; Bae-Jump, Vicki; Rossi, Emma

    2011-06-01

    In the roundtable that follows, clinicians discuss a study published in this issue of the Journal in light of its methodology, relevance to practice, and implications for future research. Article discussed: Yanazume S, Saito T, Eto T, et al. Reassessment of the utility of frozen sections in endometrial cancer surgery using tumor diameter as an additional factor. Am J Obstet Gynecol 2011;204:531.e1-7. PMID:21752746

  10. The association between LEPR Q223R polymorphisms and breast cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yadong; Yang, Haiyan; Gao, Huiyan; Wang, Haiyu

    2015-05-01

    Recently, we have read with great interest the article entitled "The association between polymorphisms in the leptin receptor (LEPR) gene and risk of breast cancer: a systematic review and pooled analysis" published online by Wang et al. (Breast Cancer Res Treat 136:231-239, 2012). This article suggests that the A allele of LEPR gene rs1137101 variant was low-penetrant risk factor for developing breast cancer. The result is encouraging. Nevertheless, several key issues are worth noticing. PMID:25863476

  11. RES: Regularized Stochastic BFGS Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mokhtari, Aryan; Ribeiro, Alejandro

    2014-12-01

    RES, a regularized stochastic version of the Broyden-Fletcher-Goldfarb-Shanno (BFGS) quasi-Newton method is proposed to solve convex optimization problems with stochastic objectives. The use of stochastic gradient descent algorithms is widespread, but the number of iterations required to approximate optimal arguments can be prohibitive in high dimensional problems. Application of second order methods, on the other hand, is impracticable because computation of objective function Hessian inverses incurs excessive computational cost. BFGS modifies gradient descent by introducing a Hessian approximation matrix computed from finite gradient differences. RES utilizes stochastic gradients in lieu of deterministic gradients for both, the determination of descent directions and the approximation of the objective function's curvature. Since stochastic gradients can be computed at manageable computational cost RES is realizable and retains the convergence rate advantages of its deterministic counterparts. Convergence results show that lower and upper bounds on the Hessian egeinvalues of the sample functions are sufficient to guarantee convergence to optimal arguments. Numerical experiments showcase reductions in convergence time relative to stochastic gradient descent algorithms and non-regularized stochastic versions of BFGS. An application of RES to the implementation of support vector machines is developed.

  12. MET Exon 14 Alterations in Lung Cancer: Exon Skipping Extends Half-Life.

    PubMed

    Drilon, Alexander

    2016-06-15

    MET exon 14 alterations are a diverse group of mutations, many of which disrupt splice acceptor or donor sites leading to exon 14 skipping, impaired receptor degradation, and oncogenic transformation. These alterations are clinically targetable with MET-directed therapy. Clin Cancer Res; 22(12); 2832-4. ©2016 AACRSee related article by Tong et al., p. 3048. PMID:27009743

  13. Suicide: Incidence or Prevalence? Comments on Hernández-Alvarado et al. Increase in Suicide Rates by Hanging in the Population of Tabasco, Mexico between 2003 and 2012. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2016, 13, 552.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Niño, Julián Alfredo

    2016-01-01

    I recently reviewed the paper published in this journal by Hernández-Alvarado et al., titled "Increase in Suicide Rates by Hanging in the Population of Tabasco, Mexico between 2003 and 2012" [1], and I noticed that the epidemiological concept "prevalence" is not correctly used.[...]. PMID:27376318

  14. Twenty five years since the first prospective study by Forman et al. (1991) on Helicobacter pylori and stomach cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Sitas, Freddy

    2016-04-01

    Stomach cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer death worldwide, despite its incidence and mortality falling in many places. The discovery in 1984 that a bacterial infection with Helicobacter pylori could cause stomach and duodenal ulcers prompted work in its role in causing gastritis, and led to the first prospective study in 1991 by Forman et al., showing that infection with H.pylori increased the risk of stomach cancer in those infected by almost three-fold. Prior to then, it was hypothesized that stomach was caused by poor diets. While diets may still play a role, the falls in stomach cancer incidence have been associated with reductions in population prevalence of H. pylori. Discovery of the link was accelerated by the use of stored sera from other unrelated studies, and the use of serological assays. Since those discoveries the treatment landscape of gastric disorders has changed significantly, with a rapid uptake of antibiotic and proton pump inhibitors (triple) therapies in those who are H. pylori positive. Over time we have seen falls in gastric cancer, peptic and duodenal ulcers and in many of the procedures previously used to cure peptic ulcer disease, such as vagotomies and gastrectomies. Further still, an oral vaccine against H. pylori, first trialled in China, holds much promise of being the third vaccine against a cancer causing infection. If successful this would lead to a further reduction in H. pylori related conditions, and ultimately gastric cancer, an otherwise lethal disease. PMID:26922171

  15. Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Leukemia Liver cancer Non-Hodgkin lymphoma Ovarian cancer Pancreatic cancer Testicular cancer Thyroid cancer Uterine cancer ... have any symptoms. In certain cancers, such as pancreatic cancer, symptoms often do not start until the disease ...

  16. The use of 99mTc-Al2O3 for detection of sentinel lymph nodes in breast cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinilkin, I.; Chernov, V.; Medvedeva, A.; Zeltchan, R.; Slonimskaya, E.; Doroshenko, A.; Varlamova, N.; Skuridin, V.

    2016-08-01

    Purpose: to study the feasibility of using the new radiopharmaceutical based on the technetium-99m-labeled gamma-alumina for identification of sentinel lymph nodes (SLNs) in breast cancer patients. The study included two groups of breast cancer patients who underwent single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and intraoperaive gamma probe identification of sentinel lymph nodes (SLNs). To identify SLNs, the day before surgery Group I patients (n = 34) were injected with radioactive 99mTc-Al2O3, and Group II patients (n = 30) received 99mTc-labeled phytate colloid. A total of 37 SLNs were detected in Group I patients. The number of identified SLNs per patient ranged from 1 to 2 (the average number of identified SLNs was 1.08). Axillary lymph nodes were the most common site of SLN localization. 18 hours after 99mTc-Al2O3 injection, the percentage of its accumulation in the SLN was 7-11% (of the counts in the injection site) by SPECT and 17-31% by gamma probe detection. In Group II SLNs were detected in 27 patients. 18 hours after injection of the phytate colloid the percentage of its accumulation in the SLN was 1.5-2% out of the counts in the injection site by SPECT and 4-7% by gamma probe. The new radiopharmaceutical based on the 99mTc-Al2O3 demonstrates high accumulation in SLNs without redistribution through the entire lymphatic basin. The sensitivity and specificity of 99mTc-Al2O3 were 100% for both SPECT and intraoperative gamma probe identification.

  17. RES-E-NEXT: Next Generation of RES-E Policy Instruments

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, M.; Bird, L.; Cochran, J.; Milligan, M.; Bazilian, M.; Denny, E.; Dillon, J.; Bialek, J.; O'Malley, M.; Neuhoff, K.

    2013-07-04

    The rapid deployment of renewable sources of electricity (RES-E) is transforming power systems globally. This trend is likely to continue with large increases in investment and deployment of RES-E capacity over the coming decades. Several countries now have penetration levels of variable RES-E generation (i.e., wind and solar) in excess of 15% of their annual electricity generation; and many jurisdictions (e.g., Spain, Portugal, Ireland, Germany, and Denmark; and, in the United States, Colorado) have experienced instantaneous penetration levels of more than 50% variable generation.1 These penetration levels of variable RES-E have prompted many jurisdictions to begin modifying practices that evolved in an era of readily dispatchable, centralised power systems. Providing insights for the transition to high levels of variable RES-E generation is the focus of this document, which is the final report of the RES-E-NEXT project commissioned by the International Energy Agency’s implementing agreement on Renewable Energy Technology Deployment (IEA-RETD). It presents a comprehensive assessment of issues that will shape power system evolution during the transition to high levels of variable RES-E generation. While policy will be a central tool to sustain the growth of RES-E capacity and to enable power system transitions, the scope of the report extends beyond policy considerations to include the related domains of regulation, power market design, and system operation protocols. This broad scope is in recognition that a changing resource mix with greater penetration levels of variable RES-E has broad implications for grid operations, wholesale and retail power markets, and infrastructure needs. The next decade will be a critical transition period for power system stakeholders, as global deployment of RES-E capacity (and especially variable RES-E capacity) continues to scale-up in many regions of the world. To address increased penetration levels of RES-E in power systems

  18. CHIP: Caltech High-res IRS Pipeline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pontoppidan, Klaus M.

    2016-02-01

    CHIP (Caltech High-res IRS Pipeline) reduces high signal-to-noise short-high and long-high Spitzer-IRS spectra, especially that taken with dedicated background exposures. Written in IDL, it is independent of other Spitzer reduction tools except IRSFRINGE (ascl:1602.016).

  19. Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... body. Cancerous cells are also called malignant cells. Causes Cancer grows out of cells in the body. Normal ... of many cancers remains unknown. The most common cause of cancer-related death is lung cancer. In the U.S., ...

  20. Cross-Cancer Genome-Wide Analysis of Lung, Ovary, Breast, Prostate, and Colorectal Cancer Reveals Novel Pleiotropic Associations.

    PubMed

    Fehringer, Gordon; Kraft, Peter; Pharoah, Paul D; Eeles, Rosalind A; Chatterjee, Nilanjan; Schumacher, Fredrick R; Schildkraut, Joellen M; Lindström, Sara; Brennan, Paul; Bickeböller, Heike; Houlston, Richard S; Landi, Maria Teresa; Caporaso, Neil; Risch, Angela; Amin Al Olama, Ali; Berndt, Sonja I; Giovannucci, Edward L; Grönberg, Henrik; Kote-Jarai, Zsofia; Ma, Jing; Muir, Kenneth; Stampfer, Meir J; Stevens, Victoria L; Wiklund, Fredrik; Willett, Walter C; Goode, Ellen L; Permuth, Jennifer B; Risch, Harvey A; Reid, Brett M; Bezieau, Stephane; Brenner, Hermann; Chan, Andrew T; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Hudson, Thomas J; Kocarnik, Jonathan K; Newcomb, Polly A; Schoen, Robert E; Slattery, Martha L; White, Emily; Adank, Muriel A; Ahsan, Habibul; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Baglietto, Laura; Blomquist, Carl; Canzian, Federico; Czene, Kamila; Dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel; Eliassen, A Heather; Figueroa, Jonine D; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Fletcher, Olivia; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Gaudet, Mia M; Johnson, Nichola; Hall, Per; Hazra, Aditi; Hein, Rebecca; Hofman, Albert; Hopper, John L; Irwanto, Astrid; Johansson, Mattias; Kaaks, Rudolf; Kibriya, Muhammad G; Lichtner, Peter; Liu, Jianjun; Lund, Eiliv; Makalic, Enes; Meindl, Alfons; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram; Muranen, Taru A; Nevanlinna, Heli; Peeters, Petra H; Peto, Julian; Prentice, Ross L; Rahman, Nazneen; Sanchez, Maria Jose; Schmidt, Daniel F; Schmutzler, Rita K; Southey, Melissa C; Tamimi, Rulla; Travis, Ruth C; Turnbull, Clare; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Wang, Zhaoming; Whittemore, Alice S; Yang, Xiaohong R; Zheng, Wei; Buchanan, Daniel D; Casey, Graham; Conti, David V; Edlund, Christopher K; Gallinger, Steven; Haile, Robert W; Jenkins, Mark; Le Marchand, Loïc; Li, Li; Lindor, Noralene M; Schmit, Stephanie L; Thibodeau, Stephen N; Woods, Michael O; Rafnar, Thorunn; Gudmundsson, Julius; Stacey, Simon N; Stefansson, Kari; Sulem, Patrick; Chen, Y Ann; Tyrer, Jonathan P; Christiani, David C; Wei, Yongyue; Shen, Hongbing; Hu, Zhibin; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Shiraishi, Kouya; Takahashi, Atsushi; Bossé, Yohan; Obeidat, Ma'en; Nickle, David; Timens, Wim; Freedman, Matthew L; Li, Qiyuan; Seminara, Daniela; Chanock, Stephen J; Gong, Jian; Peters, Ulrike; Gruber, Stephen B; Amos, Christopher I; Sellers, Thomas A; Easton, Douglas F; Hunter, David J; Haiman, Christopher A; Henderson, Brian E; Hung, Rayjean J

    2016-09-01

    Identifying genetic variants with pleiotropic associations can uncover common pathways influencing multiple cancers. We took a two-stage approach to conduct genome-wide association studies for lung, ovary, breast, prostate, and colorectal cancer from the GAME-ON/GECCO Network (61,851 cases, 61,820 controls) to identify pleiotropic loci. Findings were replicated in independent association studies (55,789 cases, 330,490 controls). We identified a novel pleiotropic association at 1q22 involving breast and lung squamous cell carcinoma, with eQTL analysis showing an association with ADAM15/THBS3 gene expression in lung. We also identified a known breast cancer locus CASP8/ALS2CR12 associated with prostate cancer, a known cancer locus at CDKN2B-AS1 with different variants associated with lung adenocarcinoma and prostate cancer, and confirmed the associations of a breast BRCA2 locus with lung and serous ovarian cancer. This is the largest study to date examining pleiotropy across multiple cancer-associated loci, identifying common mechanisms of cancer development and progression. Cancer Res; 76(17); 5103-14. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27197191

  1. Note of clarification of data in the paper entitled association between BRIP1 (BACH1) polymorphisms and breast cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yadong; Yang, Haiyan; Wang, Haiyu

    2015-04-01

    With great interest, we read the recent article entitled "Association between BRIP1 (BACH1) polymorphisms and breast cancer risk: a meta-analysis" published online in Pabalan et al. (Breast Cancer Res Treat 137:553-558, 2013). This article suggests that overall summary estimates imply no associations but suggest susceptibility among carriers of the C47G polymorphism and Pro-Ser genotype in premenopausal women. The result is encouraging. Nevertheless, several key issues in this meta-analysis are worth noticing. PMID:25783186

  2. Microvesicles as mediators of intercellular communication in cancer.

    PubMed

    Antonyak, Marc A; Cerione, Richard A

    2014-01-01

    The discovery that cancer cells generate large membrane-enclosed packets of epigenetic information, known as microvesicles (MVs), that can be transferred to other cells and influence their behavior (Antonyak et al., Small GTPases 3:219-224, 2012; Cocucci et al., Trends Cell Biol 19:43-51, 2009; Rak, Semin Thromb Hemost 36:888-906, 2010; Skog et al., Nat Cell Biol 10:1470-1476, 2008) has added a unique perspective to the classical paracrine signaling paradigm. This is largely because, in addition to growth factors and cytokines, MVs contain a variety of components that are not usually thought to be released into the extracellular environment by viable cells including plasma membrane-associated proteins, cytosolic- and nuclear-localized proteins, as well as nucleic acids, particularly RNA transcripts and micro-RNAs (Skog et al., Nat Cell Biol 10:1470-1476, 2008; Al-Nedawi et al., Nat Cell Biol 10:619-624, 2008; Antonyak et al., Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 108:4852-4857, 2011; Balaj et al., Nat Commun 2:180, 2011; Choi et al., J Proteome Res 6:4646-4655, 2007; Del Conde et al., Blood 106:1604-1611, 2005; Gallo et al., PLoS One 7:e30679, 2012; Graner et al., FASEB J 23:1541-1557, 2009; Grange et al., Cancer Res 71:5346-5356, 2011; Hosseini-Beheshti et al., Mol Cell Proteomics 11:863-885, 2012; Martins et al., Curr Opin Oncol 25:66-75, 2013; Noerholm et al., BMC Cancer 12:22, 2012; Zhuang et al., EMBO J 31:3513-3523, 2012). When transferred between cancer cells, MVs have been shown to stimulate signaling events that promote cell growth and survival (Al-Nedawi et al., Nat Cell Biol 10:619-624, 2008). Cancer cell-derived MVs can also be taken up by normal cell types that surround the tumor, an outcome that helps shape the tumor microenvironment, trigger tumor vascularization, and even confer upon normal recipient cells the transformed characteristics of a cancer cell (Antonyak et al., Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 108:4852-4857, 2011; Martins et al., Curr Opin Oncol 25

  3. 32 CFR 1908.22 - Requests barred by res judicata.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Requests barred by res judicata. 1908.22 Section 1908.22 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense CENTRAL INTELLIGENCE AGENCY... EXECUTIVE ORDER 12958 Agency Action on Mdr Requests § 1908.22 Requests barred by res judicata....

  4. 32 CFR 1907.22 - Challenges barred by res judicata.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Challenges barred by res judicata. 1907.22 Section 1907.22 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense CENTRAL INTELLIGENCE... ORDER 12958 Action on Challenges § 1907.22 Challenges barred by res judicata. The Executive Secretary...

  5. 32 CFR 1802.22 - Challenges barred by res judicata.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Challenges barred by res judicata. 1802.22 Section 1802.22 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense NATIONAL... EXECUTIVE ORDER 12958 Action On Challenges § 1802.22 Challenges barred by res judicata. The...

  6. 32 CFR 1908.22 - Requests barred by res judicata.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Requests barred by res judicata. 1908.22 Section 1908.22 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense CENTRAL INTELLIGENCE AGENCY... EXECUTIVE ORDER 12958 Agency Action on Mdr Requests § 1908.22 Requests barred by res judicata....

  7. Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... your life Being exposed to chemicals that can cause cancer Being at risk for skin cancer Depending on ... than nonsmokers. Other forms of tobacco can also cause cancer, such as cigars, chewing tobacco and snuff. If ...

  8. The first experience of using 99mTc-Al2O3-based radiopharmaceutical for the detection of sentinel lymph nodes in cervical cancer patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinilkin, I. G.; Chernov, V. I.; Lyapunov, A. Yu.; Medvedeva, A. A.; Zelchan, R. V.; Chernyshova, A. L.; Kolomiets, L. A.

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate the feasibility of using 99mTc-Al2O3-based radiopharmaceutical, a novel molecular imaging agent for sentinel lymph node detection in patients with invasive cervical cancer. The study included 23 cervical cancer patients (T1aNxMx-T2bNxMx) treated at the Tomsk Cancer Research Institute. In the 18 hours before surgery, 80 MBq of the 99mTc-Al2O3 in peritumoral injected, followed by single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) of the pelvis and intraoperative SLN identification. Twenty-seven SLNs were detected by SPECT, and 34 SLNs were identified by intraoperative gamma probe. The total number of identified SLNs per patient ranged from 1 to 3 (the mean number of SLNs was 1.4 per patient). The most common site for SLN detection was the external iliac region (57.2%), followed by the internal iliac (14%), obturator (14%), presacral and retrosacral regions (14%), and the parametrial region (1%). Sensitivity in detecting SLNs was 100% for intraoperative SLN identification and 79% for SPECT image.

  9. The use of 99mTc-Al2O3 for detection of sentinel lymph nodes in cervical cancer patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinilkin, I. G.; Chernov, V. I.; Lyapunov, A. Yu; Medvedeva, A. A.; Zelchan, R. V.; Chernyshova, A. L.; Kolomiets, L. A.

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate the feasibility of using 99mTc-Al2O3- based radiopharmaceutical, a novel molecular imaging agent for sentinel lymph node detection in patients with invasive cervical cancer. The study included 23 cervical cancer patients (TlaNxMx- T2bNxMx) treated at the Tomsk Cancer Research Institute. At 18 hours before surgery, 80 MBq of the 99mTc-Al2O3 were injected peritumorally, followed by single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) of the pelvis and intraoperative SLN identification. Twenty-seven SLNs were detected by SPECT, and 34 SLNs were identified by intraoperative gamma probe. The total number of identified SLNs per patient ranged from 1 to 3(the mean number of SLNs was 1.4 per patient). The most common site for SLN detection was the external iliac region (57.2%), followed by the internal iliac, obturator, presacral and retrosacral regions (they amounted to 14%, respectively),and the parametrial region (1%). Sensitivity in detecting SLNs was 100% for intraoperative SLN identification and 79% for SPECT image.

  10. RES-529: a PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway inhibitor that dissociates the mTORC1 and mTORC2 complexes

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    RES-529 (previously named Palomid 529, P529) is a phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/AKT/mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway inhibitor that interferes with the pathway through both mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) and mTOR complex 2 (mTORC2) dissociation. This compound is currently being developed in oncology and ophthalmology. The oncology focus is for the treatment of glioblastoma, where it has received orphan designation by the US Food and Drug Administration, and prostate cancer. We present a review of the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway, its role in tumorigenesis, and the potential of RES-529 in cancer treatment. RES-529 inhibits mTORC1/mTORC2 activity in various cancer cell lines, as noted by decreased phosphorylation of substrates including ribosomal protein S6, 4E-BP1, and AKT, leading to cell growth inhibition and death, with activity generally in the range of 5–15 μmol/l. In animal tumor models where the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway is abnormally activated (i.e. glioblastoma, prostate cancer, and breast cancer), RES-529 reduces tumor growth by as much as 78%. RES-529 treatment is synergistic with radiation therapy, chemotherapy, and hormonal therapy in reducing tumor growth, potentially by preventing PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway activation associated with these treatments. Furthermore, this compound has shown antiangiogenic activity in several animal models. mTORC1 and mTORC2 have redundant and distinct activities that contribute toward oncogenesis. Current inhibitors of this pathway have primarily targeted mTORC1, but have shown limited clinical efficacy. Inhibitors of mTORC1 and mTORC2 such as RES-529 may therefore have the potential to overcome the deficiencies found in targeting only mTORC1. PMID:26918392

  11. RES-529: a PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway inhibitor that dissociates the mTORC1 and mTORC2 complexes.

    PubMed

    Weinberg, Mark A

    2016-07-01

    RES-529 (previously named Palomid 529, P529) is a phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/AKT/mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway inhibitor that interferes with the pathway through both mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) and mTOR complex 2 (mTORC2) dissociation. This compound is currently being developed in oncology and ophthalmology. The oncology focus is for the treatment of glioblastoma, where it has received orphan designation by the US Food and Drug Administration, and prostate cancer. We present a review of the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway, its role in tumorigenesis, and the potential of RES-529 in cancer treatment. RES-529 inhibits mTORC1/mTORC2 activity in various cancer cell lines, as noted by decreased phosphorylation of substrates including ribosomal protein S6, 4E-BP1, and AKT, leading to cell growth inhibition and death, with activity generally in the range of 5-15 μmol/l. In animal tumor models where the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway is abnormally activated (i.e. glioblastoma, prostate cancer, and breast cancer), RES-529 reduces tumor growth by as much as 78%. RES-529 treatment is synergistic with radiation therapy, chemotherapy, and hormonal therapy in reducing tumor growth, potentially by preventing PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway activation associated with these treatments. Furthermore, this compound has shown antiangiogenic activity in several animal models. mTORC1 and mTORC2 have redundant and distinct activities that contribute toward oncogenesis. Current inhibitors of this pathway have primarily targeted mTORC1, but have shown limited clinical efficacy. Inhibitors of mTORC1 and mTORC2 such as RES-529 may therefore have the potential to overcome the deficiencies found in targeting only mTORC1. PMID:26918392

  12. Occupational risk factors for prostate cancer: results from a case-control study in Montréal, Québec, Canada.

    PubMed

    Aronson, K J; Siemiatycki, J; Dewar, R; Gérin, M

    1996-02-15

    A population-based case-control study of cancer and occupation was carried out in Montréal, Canada. Between 1979 and 1986, 449 pathologically confirmed cases of prostate cancer were interviewed, as well as 1,550 cancer controls and 533 population controls. Job histories were evaluated by a team of chemist/hygienists using a checklist of 294 workplace chemicals. After preliminary evaluation, 17 occupations, 11 industries, and 27 substances were selected for multivariate logistic regression analyses to estimate the odds ratio between each occupational circumstance and prostate cancer with control for potential confounders. There was moderate support for risk due to the following occupations: electrical power workers, water transport workers, aircraft fabricators, metal product fabricators, structural metal erectors, and railway transport workers. The following substances exhibited moderately strong associations: metallic dust, liquid fuel combustion products, lubricating oils and greases, and polyaromatic hydrocarbons from coal. While the population attributable risk, estimated at between 12% and 21% for these occupational exposures, may be an overestimate due to our method of analysis, even if the true attributable fraction were in the range of 5-10%, this represents an important public health issue. PMID:8633620

  13. Identification and characterization of novel associations in the CASP8/ALS2CR12 region on chromosome 2 with breast cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Lin, Wei-Yu; Camp, Nicola J; Ghoussaini, Maya; Beesley, Jonathan; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Hopper, John L; Apicella, Carmel; Southey, Melissa C; Stone, Jennifer; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Broeks, Annegien; Van't Veer, Laura J; Th Rutgers, Emiel J; Muir, Kenneth; Lophatananon, Artitaya; Stewart-Brown, Sarah; Siriwanarangsan, Pornthep; Fasching, Peter A; Haeberle, Lothar; Ekici, Arif B; Beckmann, Matthias W; Peto, Julian; Dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel; Fletcher, Olivia; Johnson, Nichola; Bolla, Manjeet K; Wang, Qin; Dennis, Joe; Sawyer, Elinor J; Cheng, Timothy; Tomlinson, Ian; Kerin, Michael J; Miller, Nicola; Marmé, Frederik; Surowy, Harald M; Burwinkel, Barbara; Guénel, Pascal; Truong, Thérèse; Menegaux, Florence; Mulot, Claire; Bojesen, Stig E; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Nielsen, Sune F; Flyger, Henrik; Benitez, Javier; Zamora, M Pilar; Arias Perez, Jose Ignacio; Menéndez, Primitiva; González-Neira, Anna; Pita, Guillermo; Alonso, M Rosario; Alvarez, Nuria; Herrero, Daniel; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Brenner, Hermann; Dieffenbach, Aida Karina; Arndt, Volker; Stegmaier, Christa; Meindl, Alfons; Lichtner, Peter; Schmutzler, Rita K; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brüning, Thomas; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Tessier, Daniel C; Vincent, Daniel; Bacot, Francois; Nevanlinna, Heli; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Blomqvist, Carl; Khan, Sofia; Matsuo, Keitaro; Ito, Hidemi; Iwata, Hiroji; Horio, Akiyo; Bogdanova, Natalia V; Antonenkova, Natalia N; Dörk, Thilo; Lindblom, Annika; Margolin, Sara; Mannermaa, Arto; Kataja, Vesa; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Hartikainen, Jaana M; Wu, Anna H; Tseng, Chiu-Chen; Van Den Berg, David; Stram, Daniel O; Neven, Patrick; Wauters, Els; Wildiers, Hans; Lambrechts, Diether; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Rudolph, Anja; Seibold, Petra; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Radice, Paolo; Peterlongo, Paolo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Bonanni, Bernardo; Couch, Fergus J; Wang, Xianshu; Vachon, Celine; Purrington, Kristen; Giles, Graham G; Milne, Roger L; Mclean, Catriona; Haiman, Christopher A; Henderson, Brian E; Schumacher, Fredrick; Le Marchand, Loic; Simard, Jacques; Goldberg, Mark S; Labrèche, France; Dumont, Martine; Teo, Soo Hwang; Yip, Cheng Har; Hassan, Norhashimah; Vithana, Eranga Nishanthie; Kristensen, Vessela; Zheng, Wei; Deming-Halverson, Sandra; Shrubsole, Martha J; Long, Jirong; Winqvist, Robert; Pylkäs, Katri; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Kauppila, Saila; Andrulis, Irene L; Knight, Julia A; Glendon, Gord; Tchatchou, Sandrine; Devilee, Peter; Tollenaar, Robert A E M; Seynaeve, Caroline; Van Asperen, Christi J; García-Closas, Montserrat; Figueroa, Jonine; Lissowska, Jolanta; Brinton, Louise; Czene, Kamila; Darabi, Hatef; Eriksson, Mikael; Brand, Judith S; Hooning, Maartje J; Hollestelle, Antoinette; Van Den Ouweland, Ans M W; Jager, Agnes; Li, Jingmei; Liu, Jianjun; Humphreys, Keith; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Lu, Wei; Gao, Yu-Tang; Cai, Hui; Cross, Simon S; Reed, Malcolm W R; Blot, William; Signorello, Lisa B; Cai, Qiuyin; Pharoah, Paul D P; Perkins, Barbara; Shah, Mitul; Blows, Fiona M; Kang, Daehee; Yoo, Keun-Young; Noh, Dong-Young; Hartman, Mikael; Miao, Hui; Chia, Kee Seng; Putti, Thomas Choudary; Hamann, Ute; Luccarini, Craig; Baynes, Caroline; Ahmed, Shahana; Maranian, Mel; Healey, Catherine S; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna; Durda, Katarzyna; Sangrajrang, Suleeporn; Gaborieau, Valerie; Brennan, Paul; Mckay, James; Slager, Susan; Toland, Amanda E; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Shen, Chen-Yang; Hsiung, Chia-Ni; Wu, Pei-Ei; Ding, Shian-Ling; Ashworth, Alan; Jones, Michael; Orr, Nick; Swerdlow, Anthony J; Tsimiklis, Helen; Makalic, Enes; Schmidt, Daniel F; Bui, Quang M; Chanock, Stephen J; Hunter, David J; Hein, Rebecca; Dahmen, Norbert; Beckmann, Lars; Aaltonen, Kirsimari; Muranen, Taru A; Heikkinen, Tuomas; Irwanto, Astrid; Rahman, Nazneen; Turnbull, Clare A; Waisfisz, Quinten; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E J; Adank, Muriel A; Van Der Luijt, Rob B; Hall, Per; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Dunning, Alison; Easton, Douglas F; Cox, Angela

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that polymorphisms in CASP8 on chromosome 2 are associated with breast cancer risk. To clarify the role of CASP8 in breast cancer susceptibility, we carried out dense genotyping of this region in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC). Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) spanning a 1 Mb region around CASP8 were genotyped in 46 450 breast cancer cases and 42 600 controls of European origin from 41 studies participating in the BCAC as part of a custom genotyping array experiment (iCOGS). Missing genotypes and SNPs were imputed and, after quality exclusions, 501 typed and 1232 imputed SNPs were included in logistic regression models adjusting for study and ancestry principal components. The SNPs retained in the final model were investigated further in data from nine genome-wide association studies (GWAS) comprising in total 10 052 case and 12 575 control subjects. The most significant association signal observed in European subjects was for the imputed intronic SNP rs1830298 in ALS2CR12 (telomeric to CASP8), with per allele odds ratio and 95% confidence interval [OR (95% confidence interval, CI)] for the minor allele of 1.05 (1.03-1.07), P = 1 × 10(-5). Three additional independent signals from intronic SNPs were identified, in CASP8 (rs36043647), ALS2CR11 (rs59278883) and CFLAR (rs7558475). The association with rs1830298 was replicated in the imputed results from the combined GWAS (P = 3 × 10(-6)), yielding a combined OR (95% CI) of 1.06 (1.04-1.08), P = 1 × 10(-9). Analyses of gene expression associations in peripheral blood and normal breast tissue indicate that CASP8 might be the target gene, suggesting a mechanism involving apoptosis. PMID:25168388

  14. Identification and characterization of novel associations in the CASP8/ALS2CR12 region on chromosome 2 with breast cancer risk

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Wei-Yu; Camp, Nicola J.; Ghoussaini, Maya; Beesley, Jonathan; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Hopper, John L.; Apicella, Carmel; Southey, Melissa C.; Stone, Jennifer; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Broeks, Annegien; Van't Veer, Laura J.; Th Rutgers, Emiel J.; Muir, Kenneth; Lophatananon, Artitaya; Stewart-Brown, Sarah; Siriwanarangsan, Pornthep; Fasching, Peter A.; Haeberle, Lothar; Ekici, Arif B.; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Peto, Julian; Dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel; Fletcher, Olivia; Johnson, Nichola; Bolla, Manjeet K.; Wang, Qin; Dennis, Joe; Sawyer, Elinor J.; Cheng, Timothy; Tomlinson, Ian; Kerin, Michael J.; Miller, Nicola; Marmé, Frederik; Surowy, Harald M.; Burwinkel, Barbara; Guénel, Pascal; Truong, Thérèse; Menegaux, Florence; Mulot, Claire; Bojesen, Stig E.; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Nielsen, Sune F.; Flyger, Henrik; Benitez, Javier; Zamora, M. Pilar; Arias Perez, Jose Ignacio; Menéndez, Primitiva; González-Neira, Anna; Pita, Guillermo; Alonso, M. Rosario; Álvarez, Nuria; Herrero, Daniel; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Brenner, Hermann; Dieffenbach, Aida Karina; Arndt, Volker; Stegmaier, Christa; Meindl, Alfons; Lichtner, Peter; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brüning, Thomas; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Tessier, Daniel C.; Vincent, Daniel; Bacot, Francois; Nevanlinna, Heli; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Blomqvist, Carl; Khan, Sofia; Matsuo, Keitaro; Ito, Hidemi; Iwata, Hiroji; Horio, Akiyo; Bogdanova, Natalia V.; Antonenkova, Natalia N.; Dörk, Thilo; Lindblom, Annika; Margolin, Sara; Mannermaa, Arto; Kataja, Vesa; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Hartikainen, Jaana M.; Wu, Anna H.; Tseng, Chiu-Chen; Van Den Berg, David; Stram, Daniel O.; Neven, Patrick; Wauters, Els; Wildiers, Hans; Lambrechts, Diether; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Rudolph, Anja; Seibold, Petra; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Radice, Paolo; Peterlongo, Paolo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Bonanni, Bernardo; Couch, Fergus J.; Wang, Xianshu; Vachon, Celine; Purrington, Kristen; Giles, Graham G.; Milne, Roger L.; Mclean, Catriona; Haiman, Christopher A.; Henderson, Brian E.; Schumacher, Fredrick; Le Marchand, Loic; Simard, Jacques; Goldberg, Mark S.; Labrèche, France; Dumont, Martine; Teo, Soo Hwang; Yip, Cheng Har; Hassan, Norhashimah; Vithana, Eranga Nishanthie; Kristensen, Vessela; Zheng, Wei; Deming-Halverson, Sandra; Shrubsole, Martha J.; Long, Jirong; Winqvist, Robert; Pylkäs, Katri; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Kauppila, Saila; Andrulis, Irene L.; Knight, Julia A.; Glendon, Gord; Tchatchou, Sandrine; Devilee, Peter; Tollenaar, Robert A.E.M.; Seynaeve, Caroline; Van Asperen, Christi J.; García-Closas, Montserrat; Figueroa, Jonine; Lissowska, Jolanta; Brinton, Louise; Czene, Kamila; Darabi, Hatef; Eriksson, Mikael; Brand, Judith S.; Hooning, Maartje J.; Hollestelle, Antoinette; Van Den Ouweland, Ans M.W.; Jager, Agnes; Li, Jingmei; Liu, Jianjun; Humphreys, Keith; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Lu, Wei; Gao, Yu-Tang; Cai, Hui; Cross, Simon S.; Reed, Malcolm W. R.; Blot, William; Signorello, Lisa B.; Cai, Qiuyin; Pharoah, Paul D.P.; Perkins, Barbara; Shah, Mitul; Blows, Fiona M.; Kang, Daehee; Yoo, Keun-Young; Noh, Dong-Young; Hartman, Mikael; Miao, Hui; Chia, Kee Seng; Putti, Thomas Choudary; Hamann, Ute; Luccarini, Craig; Baynes, Caroline; Ahmed, Shahana; Maranian, Mel; Healey, Catherine S.; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna; Durda, Katarzyna; Sangrajrang, Suleeporn; Gaborieau, Valerie; Brennan, Paul; Mckay, James; Slager, Susan; Toland, Amanda E.; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Shen, Chen-Yang; Hsiung, Chia-Ni; Wu, Pei-Ei; Ding, Shian-ling; Ashworth, Alan; Jones, Michael; Orr, Nick; Swerdlow, Anthony J; Tsimiklis, Helen; Makalic, Enes; Schmidt, Daniel F.; Bui, Quang M.; Chanock, Stephen J.; Hunter, David J.; Hein, Rebecca; Dahmen, Norbert; Beckmann, Lars; Aaltonen, Kirsimari; Muranen, Taru A.; Heikkinen, Tuomas; Irwanto, Astrid; Rahman, Nazneen; Turnbull, Clare A.; Waisfisz, Quinten; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E. J.; Adank, Muriel A.; Van Der Luijt, Rob B.; Hall, Per; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Dunning, Alison; Easton, Douglas F.; Cox, Angela

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that polymorphisms in CASP8 on chromosome 2 are associated with breast cancer risk. To clarify the role of CASP8 in breast cancer susceptibility, we carried out dense genotyping of this region in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC). Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) spanning a 1 Mb region around CASP8 were genotyped in 46 450 breast cancer cases and 42 600 controls of European origin from 41 studies participating in the BCAC as part of a custom genotyping array experiment (iCOGS). Missing genotypes and SNPs were imputed and, after quality exclusions, 501 typed and 1232 imputed SNPs were included in logistic regression models adjusting for study and ancestry principal components. The SNPs retained in the final model were investigated further in data from nine genome-wide association studies (GWAS) comprising in total 10 052 case and 12 575 control subjects. The most significant association signal observed in European subjects was for the imputed intronic SNP rs1830298 in ALS2CR12 (telomeric to CASP8), with per allele odds ratio and 95% confidence interval [OR (95% confidence interval, CI)] for the minor allele of 1.05 (1.03–1.07), P = 1 × 10−5. Three additional independent signals from intronic SNPs were identified, in CASP8 (rs36043647), ALS2CR11 (rs59278883) and CFLAR (rs7558475). The association with rs1830298 was replicated in the imputed results from the combined GWAS (P = 3 × 10−6), yielding a combined OR (95% CI) of 1.06 (1.04–1.08), P = 1 × 10−9. Analyses of gene expression associations in peripheral blood and normal breast tissue indicate that CASP8 might be the target gene, suggesting a mechanism involving apoptosis. PMID:25168388

  15. The first experience of using of 99mTc-Al2O3 for detection of sentinel lymph nodes in breast cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doroshenko, A.; Chernov, V.; Medvedeva, A.; Zeltchan, R.; Slonimskaya, E.; Varlamova, N.; Skuridin, V.; Dergilev, A.; Sinilkin, I.

    2016-06-01

    Purpose: to study the feasibility of using the new radiopharmaceutical based on the technetium-99m-labeled gamma-alumina for identification of sentinel lymph nodes (SLNs) in breast cancer patients. Materials and methods. The study included two groups of breast cancer patients who underwent single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and intraoperaive gamma probe identification of sentinel lymph nodes (SLNs). To identify SLNs, the day before surgery Group I patients (n=34) were injected with radioactive 99mTc-Al203, and Group II patients (n=30) received 99mTc-labeled phytate colloid. Results. A total of 37 SLNs were detected in Group I patients. The number of identified SLNs per patient ranged from 1 to 2 (the average number of identified SLNs was 1.08). Axillary lymph nodes were the most common site of SLN localization. At 18 hours after 99mTc-Al203 injection, the percentage of its accumulation in the SLN was 7-11% (of the counts in the injection site) by SPECT and 17-31% by gamma probe detection. In Group II patients, SLNs were detected in 27 patients. At 18 hours after injection of the phytate colloid, the percentage of its accumulation in the SLN was 1.5-2% out of the counts in the injection site by SPECT and 4-7% by gamma probe. Conclusion. The new radiopharmaceutical based on the 99mTc - Al203 demonstrates high accumulation in SLNs without redistribution through the entire lymphatic basin. Sensitivity and specificity of 99mTc - Al203 were 100% for both SPECT and intraoperative gamma probe identification.

  16. ResDE-Dependent Regulation of Enterotoxin Gene Expression in Bacillus cereus: Evidence for Multiple Modes of Binding for ResD and Interaction with Fnr▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Esbelin, Julia; Armengaud, Jean; Zigha, Assia; Duport, Catherine

    2009-01-01

    In the food-borne pathogen Bacillus cereus F4430/73, the production of major virulence factors hemolysin BL (Hbl) and nonhemolytic enterotoxin (Nhe) is regulated through complex mechanisms. The two-component regulatory system ResDE is involved in the activation of hbl and nhe transcription. Here, the response regulator ResD and the sensor kinase ResE were overexpressed and purified, and autophosphorylation of ResE and transphosphorylation of ResD by ResE were demonstrated in vitro. ResD is mainly monomeric in solution, regardless of its phosphorylation state. ResD was shown to interact directly with promoter regions (p) of the enterotoxin regulator genes resDE, fnr, and plcR and the enterotoxin structural genes nhe and hbl, but with different affinities. Binding of ResD to pplcR, pnhe, and phbl was not dependent on the ResD phosphorylation status. In contrast, ResD phosphorylation significantly increased interactions between ResD and presDE and pfnr. Taken together, these results showed that phosphorylation of ResD results in a different target expression pattern. Furthermore, ResD and the redox activator Fnr were found to physically interact and simultaneously bind their target DNAs. We propose that unphosphorylated ResD acts as an antiactivator of Fnr, while phosphorylated ResD acts as a coactivator of Fnr. Finally, our findings represent the first molecular evidence of the role of ResDE as a sentinel system capable of sensing redox changes and coordinating a response that modulates B. cereus virulence. PMID:19395489

  17. Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Cancer begins in your cells, which are the building blocks of your body. Normally, your body forms ... be benign or malignant. Benign tumors aren't cancer while malignant ones are. Cells from malignant tumors ...

  18. Progress Towards a NASA Earth Science Reuse Enablement System (RES)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, James J.; Downs, Robert R.; Mattmann, Chris A.

    2010-01-01

    A Reuse Enablement System (RES) allows developers of Earth science software to contribute software for reuse by others and.for users to find, select, and obtain software for reuse in their own systems. This paper describes work that the X4S,4 Earth Science Data Systems (ESDS) Software Reuse Working Group has completed to date in the development of an RES for NASA.

  19. 19 CFR 171.54 - Substitute res in an administrative forfeiture action.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Substitute res in an administrative forfeiture... Procedures § 171.54 Substitute res in an administrative forfeiture action. (a) Substitute res. Where property... of the property (the res) to obtain release of the property. The offer, which may be tendered at...

  20. Retraction: "Over-expression of FoxM1 leads to epithelial-mesenchymal transition and cancer stem cell phenotype in pancreatic cancer cells" by Bao et al.

    PubMed

    2016-08-01

    The above article, published online on April 18, 2011 in Wiley Online Library (wileyonlinelibrary.com), has been retracted by agreement between the journal Editor in Chief, Gary S. Stein, and Wiley Periodicals, Inc. The retraction has been agreed following an investigation from Wayne State University involving the second author that found Figures 1C and 4C to be inappropriately re-used and re-labeled. REFERENCE Bao B, Wang Z, Ali S, Kong D, Banerjee S, Ahmad A, Li Y, Azmi AS, Miele L, Sarkar FH. 2011. Over-expression of FoxM1 leads to epithelial-mesenchymal transition and cancer stem cell phenotype in pancreatic cancer cells. J Cell Biochem 112:2296-2306; doi: 10.1002/jcb.23150. PMID:27301890

  1. [Cancer].

    PubMed

    de la Peña-López, Roberto; Remolina-Bonilla, Yuly Andrea

    2016-09-01

    Cancer is a group of diseases which represents a significant public health problem in Mexico and worldwide. In Mexico neoplasms are the second leading cause of death. An increased morbidity and mortality are expected in the next decades. Several preventable risk factors for cancer development have been identified, the most relevant including tobacco use, which accounts for 30% of the cancer cases; and obesity, associated to another 30%. These factors, in turn, are related to sedentarism, alcohol abuse and imbalanced diets. Some agents are well knokn to cause cancer such as ionizing radiation, viruses such as the papilloma virus (HPV) and hepatitis virus (B and C), and more recently environmental pollution exposure and red meat consumption have been pointed out as carcinogens by the International Agency for Research in Cancer (IARC). The scientific evidence currently available is insufficient to consider milk either as a risk factor or protective factor against different types of cancer. PMID:27603890

  2. HiRes Deconvolution of Outflow Cavities Imaged by Spitzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velusamy, Thangasamy; Langer, W. D.; Marsh, K. A.

    2007-05-01

    Circumstellar outflows are believed to play a central role in the dispersal of the envelope and the ejection of angular momentum from protostars and their associated disks. The opening angle of the outflow is an important indicator of the time evolution of the outflow and its effects on infall and accretion. The scattered light emission escaping out the outflow cavities can be observed in the deep Spitzer images in the IRAC bands. We present examples of HiRes deconvolved Spitzer IRAC images of outflow cavities. HiRes achieves sub-arcsec resolution (< 0.8") for IRAC channels at 3.6 and 4.5 microns and 1" at 5.8 and 8 microns. Furthermore, HiRes deconvolution removes all the diffraction lobes producing cleaner looking narrow image of the protostar and nearby bright stars. Thus HiRes analysis improves our ability to trace the outflow cavities. We also present geometric models of the outflow (inclination and deprojected opening angles) derived by fitting SEDs and images of the outflow cavities. This work was performed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration

  3. 7 CFR 4280.115 - RES and EEI grant funding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... General Renewable Energy System and Energy Efficiency Improvement Grants § 4280.115 RES and EEI grant... contributions are acceptable for renewable energy system projects, including those that are eligible for Federal... this section, as long as the items are an integral and necessary part of the renewable energy system...

  4. 7 CFR 4280.115 - RES and EEI grant funding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... General Renewable Energy System and Energy Efficiency Improvement Grants § 4280.115 RES and EEI grant... contributions are acceptable for renewable energy system projects, including those that are eligible for Federal... this section, as long as the items are an integral and necessary part of the renewable energy system...

  5. 32 CFR 1802.22 - Challenges barred by res judicata.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Challenges barred by res judicata. 1802.22 Section 1802.22 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense NATIONAL COUNTERINTELLIGENCE CENTER CHALLENGES TO CLASSIFICATION OF DOCUMENTS BY AUTHORIZED HOLDERS PURSUANT TO SECTION 1.9...

  6. 32 CFR 1802.22 - Challenges barred by res judicata.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Challenges barred by res judicata. 1802.22 Section 1802.22 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense NATIONAL COUNTERINTELLIGENCE CENTER CHALLENGES TO CLASSIFICATION OF DOCUMENTS BY AUTHORIZED HOLDERS PURSUANT TO SECTION 1.9...

  7. 32 CFR 1802.22 - Challenges barred by res judicata.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Challenges barred by res judicata. 1802.22 Section 1802.22 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense NATIONAL COUNTERINTELLIGENCE CENTER CHALLENGES TO CLASSIFICATION OF DOCUMENTS BY AUTHORIZED HOLDERS PURSUANT TO SECTION 1.9...

  8. 32 CFR 1802.22 - Challenges barred by res judicata.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Challenges barred by res judicata. 1802.22 Section 1802.22 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense NATIONAL COUNTERINTELLIGENCE CENTER CHALLENGES TO CLASSIFICATION OF DOCUMENTS BY AUTHORIZED HOLDERS PURSUANT TO SECTION 1.9...

  9. Adolescents' View of Family Functioning: A Validation of the RES.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chambliss, Catherine; And Others

    The contextual model argues that people in a relationship must experience a sense of loyalty, fairness, and reciprocity in order to build commitment and trust and provide ongoing mutual care. The Relational Ethics Scale (RES), which assess key relational variables, was developed for use in empirical research to test the theoretical framework of…

  10. 32 CFR 1803.22 - Requests barred by res judicata.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Requests barred by res judicata. 1803.22 Section 1803.22 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense NATIONAL COUNTERINTELLIGENCE... SECTION 3.6 OF EXECUTIVE ORDER 12958 NACIC Action on MDR Requests § 1803.22 Requests barred by...

  11. Residential Utility Core Wall System - ResCore

    SciTech Connect

    Boyd, G.; Lundell, C.; Wendt, R.

    1999-06-01

    This paper describes activities associated with the RESidential utility CORE wall system (ResCore) developed by students and faculty in the Department of Industrial Design at Auburn University between 1996 and 1998. These activities analyize three operational prototype units installed in Habitat for Humanity Houses. The paper contains two Parts: 1) analysis of the three operational prototype units, 2) exploration of alternative design solutions. ResCore is a manufactured construction component designed to expedite home building by decreasing the need for skilled labor at the work site. The unit concentrates untility elements into a wall unit(s), which is shipped to the construction site and installed in minimum time. The ResCore unit is intended to be built off-site in a manufacturing environment where the impact of vagaries of weather and work-crew coordination and scheduling are minimized. The controlled environment of the factory enhances efficient production of building components through material and labor throughput controls, enabling the production of components at a substantially reduced per-unit cost. The ResCore unit when compared to traditional "stick-built" utility wall components is in may ways analogous to the factory built roof truss compared to on-site "stick-Built" roof framing.

  12. Manufactured residential utility wall system (ResCore), overview

    SciTech Connect

    Wendt, R.; Lundell, C.; Lau, T.M.

    1997-05-01

    This paper provides an overview of the design and development of a manufactured residential utility wall system referred to as ResCore. ResCore is a self-contained, manufactured, residential utility wall that provides complete rough-in of utilities (power, gas, water, and phone) and other functions (exhaust, combustion make-up air, refrigerant lines, etc.) to serve the residential kitchen, bath, utility, and laundry rooms. Auburn University, Department of Industrial Design faculty and students, supported by a team of graduate student researchers and the project`s advisory team, developed the ResCore. The project was accomplished through a research subcontract from the US Department of Energy administered by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The ResCore wall system features a ``layered`` manufacturing technique that allows each major component group--structural, cold water, hot water, drain, gas, electric, etc.--to be built as a separate subassembly and easily brought together for final assembly. The two structural layers are reinforced with bridging that adds strength and also permits firm attachment of plumbing pipes and other systems to the wall frame.

  13. Manufactured Residential Utility Wall System (ResCore),

    SciTech Connect

    Wendt, Robert; Lundell, Clark; Lau, Tin Man

    1997-12-31

    This paper describes the design and development of a manufactured residential utility wall system referred to as ResCore. ResCore is a self contained, manufactured, residential utility wall that provides complete rough-in of utilities (power, gas, water, and phone) and other functions (exhaust, combustion make-up air, refrigerant lines, etc.) to serve the kitchen, bath, utility, and laundry rooms. Auburn University, Department of Industrial Design faculty, students, supported by a team of graduate student researchers and the project`s advisory team, developed the ResCore. The project was accomplished through a research subcontract from the U.S. Department of Energy administered by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The ResCore wall system features a layered manufacturing technique that allows each major component group: structural, cold water, hot water, drain, gas, electric, etc. to be built as a separate subassembly and easily brought together for final assembly. The two structural layers are reinforced with bridging that adds strength and also permits firm attachment of plumbing pipes and other systems to the wall frame.

  14. CRISPR-Cas9 systems: versatile cancer modelling platforms and promising therapeutic strategies.

    PubMed

    Wen, Wan-Shun; Yuan, Zhi-Min; Ma, Shi-Jie; Xu, Jiang; Yuan, Dong-Tang

    2016-03-15

    The RNA-guided nuclease CRISPR-Cas9 (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats-CRISPR associated nuclease 9) and its variants such as nickase Cas9, dead Cas9, guide RNA scaffolds and RNA-targeting Cas9 are convenient and versatile platforms for site-specific genome editing and epigenome modulation. They are easy-to-use, simple-to-design and capable of targeting multiple loci simultaneously. Given that cancer develops from cumulative genetic and epigenetic alterations, CRISPR-Cas9 and its variants (hereafter referred to as CRISPR-Cas9 systems) hold extensive application potentials in cancer modeling and therapy. To date, they have already been applied to model oncogenic mutations in cell lines (e.g., Choi and Meyerson, Nat Commun 2014;5:3728) and in adult animals (e.g., Xue et al., Nature 2014;514:380-4), as well as to combat cancer by disabling oncogenic viruses (e.g., Hu et al., Biomed Res Int 2014;2014:612823) or by manipulating cancer genome (e.g., Liu et al., Nat Commun 2014;5:5393). Given the importance of epigenome and transcriptome in tumourigenesis, manipulation of cancer epigenome and transcriptome for cancer modeling and therapy is a promising area in the future. Whereas (epi)genetic modifications of cancer microenvironment with CRISPR-Cas9 systems for therapeutic purposes represent another promising area in cancer research. Herein, we introduce the functions and mechanisms of CRISPR-Cas9 systems in genome editing and epigenome modulation, retrospect their applications in cancer modelling and therapy, discuss limitations and possible solutions and propose future directions, in hope of providing concise and enlightening information for readers interested in this area. PMID:26044706

  15. Trimethoxy-resveratrol and piceatannol administered orally suppress and inhibit tumor formation and growth in prostate cancer xenografts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Resveratrol (Res) is recognized as a promising cancer chemoprevention dietary polyphenol with antioxidative, anti-inflammatory and anticancer properties. However, the role of its analogues in prostate cancer (PCa) chemoprevention is still unknown. METHODS. We synthesized natural and synthetic anal...

  16. 21 CFR 1316.94 - Posting of substitute res in an administrative forfeiture action.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Posting of substitute res in an administrative... Property § 1316.94 Posting of substitute res in an administrative forfeiture action. (a) Where property is... owner may obtain release of the property by posting a substitute res with the seizing agency....

  17. 21 CFR 1316.98 - Substitute res bond in a judicial forfeiture action against a conveyance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Substitute res bond in a judicial forfeiture... for Certain Property § 1316.98 Substitute res bond in a judicial forfeiture action against a..., the owner may obtain release of the property by filing a substitute res bond with the seizing...

  18. 21 CFR 1316.98 - Substitute res bond in a judicial forfeiture action against a conveyance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Substitute res bond in a judicial forfeiture... for Certain Property § 1316.98 Substitute res bond in a judicial forfeiture action against a..., the owner may obtain release of the property by filing a substitute res bond with the seizing...

  19. 21 CFR 1316.98 - Substitute res bond in a judicial forfeiture action against a conveyance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Substitute res bond in a judicial forfeiture... for Certain Property § 1316.98 Substitute res bond in a judicial forfeiture action against a..., the owner may obtain release of the property by filing a substitute res bond with the seizing...

  20. Green tea extract selectively targets nanomechanics of live metastatic cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, Sarah E.; Jin, Yu-Sheng; Lu, Qing-Yi; Rao, JianYu; Gimzewski, James K.

    2011-05-01

    Green tea extract (GTE) is known to be a potential anticancer agent (Yang et al 2009 Nat. Rev. Cancer 9 429-39) with various biological activities (Lu et al 2005 Clin. Cancer Res. 11 1675-83 Yang et al 1998 Carcinogenesis 19 611-6) yet the precise mechanism of action is still unclear. The biomechanical response of GTE treated cells taken directly from patient's body samples was measured using atomic force microscopy (AFM) (Binnig et al 1986 Phys. Rev. Lett. 56 930). We found significant increase in stiffness of GTE treated metastatic tumor cells, with a resulting value similar to untreated normal mesothelial cells, whereas mesothelial cell stiffness after GTE treatment is unchanged. Immunofluorescence analysis showed an increase in cytoskeletal-F-actin in GTE treated tumor cells, suggesting GTE treated tumor cells display mechanical, structural and morphological features similar to normal cells, which appears to be mediated by annexin-I expression, as determined by siRNA analysis of an in vitro cell line model. Our data indicates that GTE selectively targets human metastatic cancer cells but not normal mesothelial cells, a finding that is significantly advantageous compared to conventional chemotherapy agents.

  1. BMP9/p38 MAPK is essential for the antiproliferative effect of resveratrol on human colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Shuang-Xue; Wang, Dong-Xu; Wu, Qiu-Xiang; Ren, Chun-Mei; Li, Yang; Chen, Qian-Zhao; Zeng, Yu-Hua; Shao, Ying; Yang, Jun-Qin; Bai, Yan; Zhang, Pu; Yu, Yu; Wu, Ke; Sun, Wen-Juan; He, Bai-Cheng

    2016-02-01

    Colon cancer is one of the most common malignancies of the digestive system. Although more effective therapeutic strategies have been developed in the last decades, there is still a great clinical need to explore new treatment regimens for colon cancer due to the undesirable prognosis. In the present study, we investigated the anticancer activity of resveratrol (Res) in human colon cancer cells, and the possible mechanism underlying this effect. We employed crystal violet staining, flow cytometry and western blotting to test the antiproliferation- and apoptosis-inducing effects of Res in LoVo cells. A xenograft tumor model was also introduced to confirm the in vivo anticancer effect of Res. Using PCR, western blotting, a recombinant adenovirus and a specific inhibitor of p38 MAPK or bone morphogenetic protein receptor (BMPR) to explore the possible molecular mechanisms. We found that Res markedly inhibited the proliferation and promoted the apoptosis of LoVo cells, and suppressed the in vivo tumor growth of colon cancer. Res substantially upregulated the expression of bone morphogenetic protein 9 (BMP9). Exogenous expression of BMP9 enhanced the anticancer effect of Res in LoVo cells, while BMP9 knockdown partly reduced this activity. Res increased the activation of p38 MAPK, which was enhanced by the exogenous expression of BMP9. The anticancer activity of Res, or Res combined with BMP9, was reduced partly by the p38 MAPK inhibitor. The BMPR inhibitor almost abolished the Res-induced activation of p38 MAPK, and attenuated the antiproliferative effect of Res in the LoVo cells. Our findings strongly suggest that the anticancer effect of Res in human colon cancer cells may be partly mediated by upregulation of BMP9 to activate p38 MAPK in a BMPR-dependent manner. PMID:26555012

  2. 77 FR 61579 - Grant of Interim Extension of the Term of U.S. Patent No. 5,454,779; ResQPump®/ResQPOD® ITD

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-10

    ... United States Patent and Trademark Office Grant of Interim Extension of the Term of U.S. Patent No. 5,454,779; ResQPump /ResQPOD ITD AGENCY: United States Patent and Trademark Office, Commerce. ACTION: Notice of Interim Patent Term Extension. SUMMARY: The United States Patent and Trademark Office has...

  3. The Absolute Calibration of the HiRes Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, J. N.; Thomas, S. B.; HiRes Collaboration

    2003-07-01

    The HiRes experiment studies ultra high energy cosmic rays using the air fluorescence technique. The experiment uses large mirrors that collect the fluorescence light and fo cus it onto arrays of photomultiplier tubes (PMTs). The PMTs measure the intensity and time of arrival of the collected light. Our primary system for in situ calibration of the PMTs uses a high stability (<1%) portable light source. This source is transferred from the lab to the field where it is employed as a standard candle to calibrate the 64 detectors (>16,000 PMTs). To determine the absolute response it is necessary to understand the absolute light output of this source. We have measured the source irradiance using a hybrid photo dio de system, two NIST calibrated photo-dio des, and by observing the photo electron statistics of the PMTs. 2. Introduction The goal of the High Resolution Fly's Eye (HiRes) project is to study cosmic rays at the highest energies. An ultra high energy cosmic ray entering the earth's atmosphere collides with atmospheric nuclei triggering the development of an Extensive Air Shower (EAS). The EAS emits fluorescence light as it develops. HiRes uses the air fluorescence signal to measure properties of the primary cosmic ray particle. The fundamental detector elements in HiRes are photomultiplier tubes (PMTs). The light from an EAS is collected by large mirrors and fo cused into cameras each consisting of 256 PMTs [1]. Routine monitoring and calibration of the PMTs and associated electronics are crucial to the proper interpretation of the data. The primary system for in situ calibration of the PMTs involves the use of a high stability portable xenon flash lamp. The Roving Xenon Flasher (RXF) offers several advantages. The pulse-to-pulse variation in intensity is very small ˜0.3% and the stability over a night is better than 2%. The emission spectrum of the RXF is sufficiently broad to allow calibration over a wide range of wavelengths. It is also readily transported

  4. Transport, metabolism, cytotoxicity and effects of novel taxanes on the cell cycle in MDA-MB-435 and NCI/ADR-RES cells.

    PubMed

    Ehrlichová, Marie; Ojima, Iwao; Chen, Jin; Václavíková, Radka; Němcová-Fürstová, Vlasta; Vobořilová, Jana; Simek, Petr; Horský, Stanislav; Souček, Pavel; Kovář, Jan; Brabec, Marek; Gut, Ivan

    2012-10-01

    Resistance of tumours to taxanes causes chemotherapy failure in numerous patients. Resistance is partly due to the low tumour uptake of taxanes and their rapid metabolism. Structural modifications of taxanes can reduce their P-glycoprotein-related efflux or decrease metabolism and consequently increase taxane efficiency. This study compared cytotoxicity and effects of the cell cycle, transport and metabolism of novel taxanes SB-T-1102, SB-T-1103, SB-T-1214 and SB-T-1216, fluorinated SB-T-12851, SB-T-12852, SB-T-12853, SB-T-12854 and IDN5109 with paclitaxel in paclitaxel-sensitive (MDA-MB-435) and paclitaxel-resistant (NCI/ADR-RES) human cancer cells. We have shown before that NCI/ADR-RES cells were 1,000-fold less sensitive to paclitaxel than MDA-MB-435 cells in correspondence to P-glycoprotein overexpression and up to 20-fold lower uptake of the drug in the resistant cells. The uptake of novel taxanes was 1.2 to 3.8 times lower than that of paclitaxel in the MDA-MB-435 cells, but 1.5 to 6.5 times higher in NCI/ADR-RES cells. NCI/ADR-RES cells were correspondingly only 2- to 6.6-fold less sensitive than the MDA-MB-435 cells to novel taxanes. Both cell lines showed minimal metabolism of the novel taxanes which was therefore not responsible for their different sensitivity, the observed differences in their individual efficiency and higher effects than paclitaxel. All novel taxanes caused G(2)/M block of the cell cycle similar to paclitaxel, but lower at concentrations by order of magnitude. Thus, structural modifications of taxanes resulting in their decreased P-glycoprotein-related transport probably caused their higher efficiency than paclitaxel in multidrug-resistant NCI/ADR-RES tumour cells. PMID:22855252

  5. Breast cancer in men

    MedlinePlus

    ... Johnson KC, Olsson H, Casagrande JT, et al. Anthropometric and hormonal risk factors for male breast cancer: ... D, Ferlay J, Brinton LA, Cook MB. An international comparison of male and female breast cancer incidence ...

  6. ALS - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - ALS ... The following organizations are good resources for information on amyotrophic lateral sclerosis : Muscular Dystrophy Association -- mda.org/disease/amyotrophic-lateral-sclerosis National Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) Registry -- ...

  7. ALS Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... ALS. Find Out How Our Mission Leading the fight to treat and cure ALS through global research ... you participate, advocate, and donate, you advance the fight to find the cure and lead us toward ...

  8. Sulfur vacancy activated field effect transistors based on ReS2 nanosheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Kai; Deng, Hui-Xiong; Wang, Zhenxing; Huang, Yun; Wang, Feng; Li, Shu-Shen; Luo, Jun-Wei; He, Jun

    2015-09-01

    Rhenium disulphide (ReS2) is a recently discovered new member of the transition metal dichalcogenides. Most impressively, it exhibits a direct bandgap from bulk to monolayer. However, the growth of ReS2 nanosheets (NSs) still remains a challenge and in turn their applications are unexplored. In this study, we successfully synthesized high-quality ReS2 NSs via chemical vapor deposition. A high-performance field effect transistor of ReS2 NSs with an on/off ratio of ~105 was demonstrated. Through both electrical transport measurements at varying temperatures (80 K-360 K) and first-principles calculations, we find sulfur vacancies, which exist intrinsically in ReS2 NSs and significantly affect the performance of the ReS2 FET device. Furthermore, we demonstrated that sulfur vacancies can efficiently adsorb and recognize oxidizing (O2) and reducing (NH3) gases, which electronically interact with ReS2 only at defect sites. Our findings provide experimental groundwork for the synthesis of new transition metal dichalocogenides, supply guidelines for understanding the physical nature of ReS2 FETs, and offer a new route toward tailoring their electrical properties by defect engineering in the future.Rhenium disulphide (ReS2) is a recently discovered new member of the transition metal dichalcogenides. Most impressively, it exhibits a direct bandgap from bulk to monolayer. However, the growth of ReS2 nanosheets (NSs) still remains a challenge and in turn their applications are unexplored. In this study, we successfully synthesized high-quality ReS2 NSs via chemical vapor deposition. A high-performance field effect transistor of ReS2 NSs with an on/off ratio of ~105 was demonstrated. Through both electrical transport measurements at varying temperatures (80 K-360 K) and first-principles calculations, we find sulfur vacancies, which exist intrinsically in ReS2 NSs and significantly affect the performance of the ReS2 FET device. Furthermore, we demonstrated that sulfur vacancies

  9. Cancer Basics

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer? Breast Cancer Colon/Rectum Cancer Lung Cancer Prostate Cancer Skin Cancer Show All Cancer Types News and Features Cancer Glossary ACS Bookstore Cancer Information Cancer Basics Cancer Prevention & Detection Signs & Symptoms of Cancer Treatments & Side Effects ...

  10. Sulfur vacancy activated field effect transistors based on ReS2 nanosheets.

    PubMed

    Xu, Kai; Deng, Hui-Xiong; Wang, Zhenxing; Huang, Yun; Wang, Feng; Li, Shu-Shen; Luo, Jun-Wei; He, Jun

    2015-10-14

    Rhenium disulphide (ReS2) is a recently discovered new member of the transition metal dichalcogenides. Most impressively, it exhibits a direct bandgap from bulk to monolayer. However, the growth of ReS2 nanosheets (NSs) still remains a challenge and in turn their applications are unexplored. In this study, we successfully synthesized high-quality ReS2 NSs via chemical vapor deposition. A high-performance field effect transistor of ReS2 NSs with an on/off ratio of ∼10(5) was demonstrated. Through both electrical transport measurements at varying temperatures (80 K-360 K) and first-principles calculations, we find sulfur vacancies, which exist intrinsically in ReS2 NSs and significantly affect the performance of the ReS2 FET device. Furthermore, we demonstrated that sulfur vacancies can efficiently adsorb and recognize oxidizing (O2) and reducing (NH3) gases, which electronically interact with ReS2 only at defect sites. Our findings provide experimental groundwork for the synthesis of new transition metal dichalocogenides, supply guidelines for understanding the physical nature of ReS2 FETs, and offer a new route toward tailoring their electrical properties by defect engineering in the future. PMID:26352273

  11. H.J.Res.79 — 112th Congress (2011-2012) Continuing Appropriations Resolution, 2012

    THOMAS, 112th Congress

    Rep. Rogers, Harold [R-KY-5

    2011-09-14

    09/15/2011 Rules Committee Resolution H. Res. 399 Reported to House. Rule provides for consideration of H.J. Res. 79 with 1 hour of general debate. Previous question shall be considered as ordered without intervening motions except motion to recommit with or without instructions... (All Actions)

  12. EPRI/NRC-RES fire human reliability analysis guidelines.

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, Stuart R.; Cooper, Susan E.; Najafi, Bijan; Collins, Erin; Hannaman, Bill; Kohlhepp, Kaydee; Grobbelaar, Jan; Hill, Kendra; Hendrickson, Stacey M. Langfitt; Forester, John Alan; Julius, Jeff

    2010-03-01

    During the 1990s, the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) developed methods for fire risk analysis to support its utility members in the preparation of responses to Generic Letter 88-20, Supplement 4, 'Individual Plant Examination - External Events' (IPEEE). This effort produced a Fire Risk Assessment methodology for operations at power that was used by the majority of U.S. nuclear power plants (NPPs) in support of the IPEEE program and several NPPs overseas. Although these methods were acceptable for accomplishing the objectives of the IPEEE, EPRI and the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) recognized that they required upgrades to support current requirements for risk-informed, performance-based (RI/PB) applications. In 2001, EPRI and the USNRC's Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research (RES) embarked on a cooperative project to improve the state-of-the-art in fire risk assessment to support a new risk-informed environment in fire protection. This project produced a consensus document, NUREG/CR-6850 (EPRI 1011989), entitled 'Fire PRA Methodology for Nuclear Power Facilities' which addressed fire risk for at power operations. NUREG/CR-6850 developed high level guidance on the process for identification and inclusion of human failure events (HFEs) into the fire PRA (FPRA), and a methodology for assigning quantitative screening values to these HFEs. It outlined the initial considerations of performance shaping factors (PSFs) and related fire effects that may need to be addressed in developing best-estimate human error probabilities (HEPs). However, NUREG/CR-6850 did not describe a methodology to develop best-estimate HEPs given the PSFs and the fire-related effects. In 2007, EPRI and RES embarked on another cooperative project to develop explicit guidance for estimating HEPs for human failure events under fire generated conditions, building upon existing human reliability analysis (HRA) methods. This document provides a methodology and guidance for conducting

  13. Intelligent energy buildings based on RES and nanotechnology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaplanis, S.; Kaplani, E.

    2015-12-01

    The paper presents the design features, the energy modelling and optical performance details of two pilot Intelligent Energy Buildings, (IEB). Both are evolution of the Zero Energy Building (ZEB) concept. RES innovations backed up by signal processing, simulation models and ICT tools were embedded into the building structures in order to implement a new predictive energy management concept. In addition, nano-coatings, produced by TiO2 and ITO nano-particles, were deposited on the IEB structural elements and especially on the window panes and the PV glass covers. They exhibited promising SSP values which lowered the cooling loads and increased the PV modules yield. Both pilot IEB units were equipped with an on-line dynamic hourly solar radiation prediction model, implemented by sensors and the related software to manage effectively the energy source, the loads and the storage or the backup system. The IEB energy sources covered the thermal loads via a south façade embedded in the wall and a solar roof which consists of a specially designed solar collector type, while a PV generator is part of the solar roof, like a compact BIPV in hybrid configuration to a small wind turbine.

  14. Intelligent energy buildings based on RES and nanotechnology

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplanis, S. Kaplani, E.

    2015-12-31

    The paper presents the design features, the energy modelling and optical performance details of two pilot Intelligent Energy Buildings, (IEB). Both are evolution of the Zero Energy Building (ZEB) concept. RES innovations backed up by signal processing, simulation models and ICT tools were embedded into the building structures in order to implement a new predictive energy management concept. In addition, nano-coatings, produced by TiO2 and ITO nano-particles, were deposited on the IEB structural elements and especially on the window panes and the PV glass covers. They exhibited promising SSP values which lowered the cooling loads and increased the PV modules yield. Both pilot IEB units were equipped with an on-line dynamic hourly solar radiation prediction model, implemented by sensors and the related software to manage effectively the energy source, the loads and the storage or the backup system. The IEB energy sources covered the thermal loads via a south façade embedded in the wall and a solar roof which consists of a specially designed solar collector type, while a PV generator is part of the solar roof, like a compact BIPV in hybrid configuration to a small wind turbine.

  15. Vaginal cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Vaginal cancer; Cancer - vagina; Tumor - vaginal ... Most vaginal cancers occur when another cancer, such as cervical or endometrial cancer , spreads. This is called secondary vaginal cancer. Cancer ...

  16. Disorder engineering and conductivity dome in ReS2 with electrolyte gating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ovchinnikov, Dmitry; Gargiulo, Fernando; Allain, Adrien; Pasquier, Diego José; Dumcenco, Dumitru; Ho, Ching-Hwa; Yazyev, Oleg V.; Kis, Andras

    2016-08-01

    Atomically thin rhenium disulphide (ReS2) is a member of the transition metal dichalcogenide family of materials. This two-dimensional semiconductor is characterized by weak interlayer coupling and a distorted 1T structure, which leads to anisotropy in electrical and optical properties. Here we report on the electrical transport study of mono- and multilayer ReS2 with polymer electrolyte gating. We find that the conductivity of monolayer ReS2 is completely suppressed at high carrier densities, an unusual feature unique to monolayers, making ReS2 the first example of such a material. Using dual-gated devices, we can distinguish the gate-induced doping from the electrostatic disorder induced by the polymer electrolyte itself. Theoretical calculations and a transport model indicate that the observed conductivity suppression can be explained by a combination of a narrow conduction band and Anderson localization due to electrolyte-induced disorder.

  17. CeREs, A Compact Radiation Belt Explorer to study charged particle dynamics in geospace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanekal, S. G.; Summerlin, E. J.; Christian, E. R.; Crum, G.; Desai, M. I.; Evans, A.; Dumonthier, J.; Jamison, T.; Jones, A. D.; Livi, S. A.; Ogasawara, K.; Paschalidis, N.; Suarez, G.; Patel, D.

    2015-12-01

    The CeREs 3U CubeSat, set to be launched in mid-2016, will study the physics of the acceleration and loss of radiation belt electrons, particularly loss due to electron microbursts. CeRES will also observe solar electrons and protons entering the magnetosphere via the open field-line polar caps. CeREs is expected to be in a low earth high inclination orbit and carries onboard the Miniaturized Electron pRoton Telescope (MERiT). The MERiT instrument measures electrons and protons ranging in energy from 5 keV to >10 MeV with high time resolution of ~5ms in multiple differential energy channels. MERiT is particle telescope using a stack of solid-state detectors and space-facing avalanche photo diodes.We will describe the CeRES spacecraft, science goals and the MERiT instrument.

  18. Disorder engineering and conductivity dome in ReS2 with electrolyte gating.

    PubMed

    Ovchinnikov, Dmitry; Gargiulo, Fernando; Allain, Adrien; Pasquier, Diego José; Dumcenco, Dumitru; Ho, Ching-Hwa; Yazyev, Oleg V; Kis, Andras

    2016-01-01

    Atomically thin rhenium disulphide (ReS2) is a member of the transition metal dichalcogenide family of materials. This two-dimensional semiconductor is characterized by weak interlayer coupling and a distorted 1T structure, which leads to anisotropy in electrical and optical properties. Here we report on the electrical transport study of mono- and multilayer ReS2 with polymer electrolyte gating. We find that the conductivity of monolayer ReS2 is completely suppressed at high carrier densities, an unusual feature unique to monolayers, making ReS2 the first example of such a material. Using dual-gated devices, we can distinguish the gate-induced doping from the electrostatic disorder induced by the polymer electrolyte itself. Theoretical calculations and a transport model indicate that the observed conductivity suppression can be explained by a combination of a narrow conduction band and Anderson localization due to electrolyte-induced disorder. PMID:27499375

  19. RES-E Support Policies In The Baltic States: Development Aspect (Part I)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobinaite, V.; Priedite, I.

    2015-02-01

    Despite quite similar conditions (natural resources) for electricity production from renewable energy sources (RES-E) in three Baltic States (Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania), significant differences exist in these countries as to the RES-E production volume. In Latvia this volume is the highest, while in Estonia and Lithuania it is half as high. One of the factors that determine the RES-E production volumes is support policies, which in the Baltic States are different. The main objective of this work was to analyze and compare these support policies. The results have shown that for rapid RES-E development the most effective policy is to be market-oriented (as in Estonia), whereas for more stable development such policy should be producer-oriented (as in Lithuania).

  20. Disorder engineering and conductivity dome in ReS2 with electrolyte gating

    PubMed Central

    Ovchinnikov, Dmitry; Gargiulo, Fernando; Allain, Adrien; Pasquier, Diego José; Dumcenco, Dumitru; Ho, Ching-Hwa; Yazyev, Oleg V.; Kis, Andras

    2016-01-01

    Atomically thin rhenium disulphide (ReS2) is a member of the transition metal dichalcogenide family of materials. This two-dimensional semiconductor is characterized by weak interlayer coupling and a distorted 1T structure, which leads to anisotropy in electrical and optical properties. Here we report on the electrical transport study of mono- and multilayer ReS2 with polymer electrolyte gating. We find that the conductivity of monolayer ReS2 is completely suppressed at high carrier densities, an unusual feature unique to monolayers, making ReS2 the first example of such a material. Using dual-gated devices, we can distinguish the gate-induced doping from the electrostatic disorder induced by the polymer electrolyte itself. Theoretical calculations and a transport model indicate that the observed conductivity suppression can be explained by a combination of a narrow conduction band and Anderson localization due to electrolyte-induced disorder. PMID:27499375

  1. HIV Infection and Cancer Risk

    MedlinePlus

    ... Other Funding Find NCI funding for small business innovation, technology transfer, and contracts Training Cancer Training at ... Engels EA, Pfeiffer RM, Goedert JJ, et al. Trends in cancer risk among people with AIDS in ...

  2. Impaired consciousness in epilepsy investigated by a prospective responsiveness in epilepsy scale (RES)

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Li; Shklyar, Irina; Lee, Hyang Woon; Ezeani, Celestine C.; Anaya, Joseph; Balakirsky, Samantha; Han, Xiao; Enamandram, Sheila; Men, Clara; Cheng, Joyce Y.; Nunn, Abigail; Mayer, Tanya; Francois, Czestochowa; Albrecht, Molly; Hutchison, Alan L.; Yap, Ee-Lynn; Ing, Kevin; Didebulidze, Gvantsa; Xiao, Bo; Hamid, Hamada; Farooque, Pue; Detyniecki, Kamil; Giacino, Joseph T.; Blumenfeld, Hal

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Impaired consciousness in epileptic seizures has a major negative impact on patient quality of life. Prior work on epileptic unconsciousness has mainly used retrospective and nonstandardized methods. Our goal was to validate and to obtain initial data using a standardized prospective testing battery. Methods The responsiveness in epilepsy scale (RES) was used on 52 patients during continuous video/EEG monitoring. RES begins with higher-level questions and commands, and switches adaptively to more basic sensorimotor responses depending on patient performance. RES continues after seizures and includes postictal memory testing. Scoring was conducted based on video review. Key Findings Testing on standardized seizure simulations yielded good intra-rater and inter-rater reliability. We captured 59 seizures from 18 patients (35% of participants) during 1420 hours of RES monitoring. RES impairment was greatest during and after tonic-clonic seizures, less in partial seizures, and minimal in auras and subclinical seizures. In partial seizures, ictal RES impairment was significantly greater if EEG changes were present. Maximum RES impairment (lowest ictal score) was also significantly correlated with long postictal recovery time, and poor postictal memory. Significance We found that prospective testing of responsiveness during seizures is feasible and reliable. RES impairment was related to EEG changes during seizures, as well as to postictal memory deficits and recovery time. With a larger patient sample it is hoped that this approach can identify brain networks underlying specific components of impaired consciousness in seizures. This may allow the development of improved treatments targeted at preventing dysfunction in these networks. PMID:22150524

  3. Vertically Oriented Arrays of ReS2 Nanosheets for Electrochemical Energy Storage and Electrocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jian; Li, Lu; Tan, Jiawei; Sun, Hao; Li, Baichang; Idrobo, Juan Carlos; Singh, Chandra Veer; Lu, Toh-Ming; Koratkar, Nikhil

    2016-06-01

    Transition-metal dichalcogenide (TMD) nanolayers show potential as high-performance catalysts in energy conversion and storage devices. Synthetic TMDs produced by chemical-vapor deposition (CVD) methods tend to grow parallel to the growth substrate. Here, we show that with the right precursors and appropriate tuning of the CVD growth conditions, ReS2 nanosheets can be made to orient perpendicular to the growth substrate. This accomplishes two important objectives; first, it drastically increases the wetted or exposed surface area of the ReS2 sheets, and second, it exposes the sharp edges and corners of the ReS2 sheets. We show that these structural features of the vertically grown ReS2 sheets can be exploited to significantly improve their performance as polysulfide immobilizers and electrochemical catalysts in lithium-sulfur (Li-S) batteries and in hydrogen evolution reactions (HER). After 300 cycles, the specific capacity of the Li-S battery with vertical ReS2 catalyst is retained above 750 mA h g(-1), with only ∼0.063% capacity decay per cycle, much better than the baseline battery (without ReS2), which shows ∼0.184% capacity decay per cycle under the same test conditions. As a HER catalyst, the vertical ReS2 provides very small onset overpotential (<100 mV) and an exceptional exchange-current density (∼67.6 μA/cm(2)), which is vastly superior to the baseline electrode without ReS2. PMID:27187173

  4. In vitro comparative studies of resveratrol and triacetylresveratrol on cell proliferation, apoptosis, and STAT3 and NFκB signaling in pancreatic cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Duan, JingJing; Yue, Wen; E, JianYu; Malhotra, Jyoti; Lu, Shou-En; Gu, Jun; Xu, Feng; Tan, Xiang-Lin

    2016-01-01

    Resveratrol (RES) has been studied extensively as an anticancer agent. However, the anticancer effects of triacetylresveratrol (TRES, an acetylated analog of RES) which has higher bioavailability have not been well established. We comparatively evaluated their effects on cell proliferation, apoptosis and the molecular changes in STAT3, NFκB and apoptotic signaling pathways in pancreatic cancer cells. Apoptosis was determined by flow cytometry. The nuclear translocation and interaction of STAT3 and NFκB were detected by Western blotting and immunoprecipitation, respectively. Both TRES and RES inhibited cell viability, and induced apoptosis of pancreatic cancer cells in a concentration and incubation time-dependent manner. TRES, similarly to RES, inhibited the phosphorylation of STAT3 and NFκB, down-regulated Mcl-1, and up-regulated Bim and Puma in pancreatic cancer cells. Remarkably, we, for the first time, observed that both TRES and RES suppressed the nuclear translocation, and interrupted the interaction of STAT3 and NFκB in PANC-1 cells. Comparative anticancer effects of TRES and RES on pancreatic cancer suggested that TRES with higher bioavailability may be a potential agent for pancreatic cancer prevention and treatment. Further in vivo experiments and functional studies are warranted to investigate whether TRES exhibits better beneficial effects than RES in mice and humans. PMID:27539371

  5. In vitro comparative studies of resveratrol and triacetylresveratrol on cell proliferation, apoptosis, and STAT3 and NFκB signaling in pancreatic cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Duan, JingJing; Yue, Wen; E, JianYu; Malhotra, Jyoti; Lu, Shou-en; Gu, Jun; Xu, Feng; Tan, Xiang-Lin

    2016-01-01

    Resveratrol (RES) has been studied extensively as an anticancer agent. However, the anticancer effects of triacetylresveratrol (TRES, an acetylated analog of RES) which has higher bioavailability have not been well established. We comparatively evaluated their effects on cell proliferation, apoptosis and the molecular changes in STAT3, NFκB and apoptotic signaling pathways in pancreatic cancer cells. Apoptosis was determined by flow cytometry. The nuclear translocation and interaction of STAT3 and NFκB were detected by Western blotting and immunoprecipitation, respectively. Both TRES and RES inhibited cell viability, and induced apoptosis of pancreatic cancer cells in a concentration and incubation time-dependent manner. TRES, similarly to RES, inhibited the phosphorylation of STAT3 and NFκB, down-regulated Mcl-1, and up-regulated Bim and Puma in pancreatic cancer cells. Remarkably, we, for the first time, observed that both TRES and RES suppressed the nuclear translocation, and interrupted the interaction of STAT3 and NFκB in PANC-1 cells. Comparative anticancer effects of TRES and RES on pancreatic cancer suggested that TRES with higher bioavailability may be a potential agent for pancreatic cancer prevention and treatment. Further in vivo experiments and functional studies are warranted to investigate whether TRES exhibits better beneficial effects than RES in mice and humans. PMID:27539371

  6. KLK6-regulated miRNA networks activate oncogenic pathways in breast cancer subtypes.

    PubMed

    Sidiropoulos, Konstantinos G; Ding, Qiang; Pampalakis, Georgios; White, Nicole M A; Boulos, Peter; Sotiropoulou, Georgia; Yousef, George M

    2016-08-01

    KLK6 is expressed in normal mammary tissues and is aberrantly regulated in breast cancer. At physiological levels of expression, i.e. those found in normal mammary tissues, KLK6 acts as a tumor suppressor in human breast cancer. However, aberrant overexpression of KLK6 (i.e. 50-100-fold higher than normal), a characteristic of a subset of human breast cancers is associated with increased tumorigenicity (Pampalakis et al. Cancer Res 69:3779-3787, 2009). Here, we stably transfected KLK6-non-expressing MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells with the full-length KLK6 cDNA to overexpress KLK6 at levels comparable to those observed in patients, and investigated potential oncogenic miRNA networks regulated by these abnormally high KLK6 expression levels and increased activity of this serine protease. A number of miRNAs that are upregulated (e.g. miR-146a) or downregulated (e.g. miR-34a) via KLK6-induced alterations in the miRNA biogenesis machinery were identified. Integrated experimental and bioinformatics analyses identified convergent miRNA networks targeting the cell cycle, MYC, MAPK, and other signaling pathways. In large clinical datasets, significant correlations between KLK6 and downstream MAPK and MYC targets at both the RNA and protein levels was confirmed, as well as negative correlation with GATA3. It was also demonstrated that KLK6 overexpression and likely its proteolytic activity is associated with alterations in downstream miRNAs and their targets, and these differ with the molecular subtypes of breast cancer. The data partly explains the different characteristics of breast cancer subtypes. Importantly, we introduce a combined KLK6-CDKN1B+MYC+CDKN1C score for prediction of long-term patient survival outcomes, with higher scores indicating poor survival. PMID:27093921

  7. The cytotoxicity of 3-bromopyruvate in breast cancer cells depends on extracellular pH.

    PubMed

    Azevedo-Silva, João; Queirós, Odília; Ribeiro, Ana; Baltazar, Fátima; Young, Ko H; Pedersen, Peter L; Preto, Ana; Casal, Margarida

    2015-04-15

    Although the anti-cancer properties of 3BP (3-bromopyruvate) have been described previously, its selectivity for cancer cells still needs to be explained [Ko et al. (2001) Cancer Lett. 173, 83-91]. In the present study, we characterized the kinetic parameters of radiolabelled [14C] 3BP uptake in three breast cancer cell lines that display different levels of resistance to 3BP: ZR-75-1 < MCF-7 < SK-BR-3. At pH 6.0, the affinity of cancer cells for 3BP transport correlates with their sensitivity, a pattern that does not occur at pH 7.4. In the three cell lines, the uptake of 3BP is dependent on the protonmotive force and is decreased by MCTs (monocarboxylate transporters) inhibitors. In the SK-BR-3 cell line, a sodium-dependent transport also occurs. Butyrate promotes the localization of MCT-1 at the plasma membrane and increases the level of MCT-4 expression, leading to a higher sensitivity for 3BP. In the present study, we demonstrate that this phenotype is accompanied by an increase in affinity for 3BP uptake. Our results confirm the role of MCTs, especially MCT-1, in 3BP uptake and the importance of cluster of differentiation (CD) 147 glycosylation in this process. We find that the affinity for 3BP transport is higher when the extracellular milieu is acidic. This is a typical phenotype of tumour microenvironment and explains the lack of secondary effects of 3BP already described in in vivo studies [Ko et al. (2004) Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. 324, 269-275]. PMID:25641640

  8. A prospective randomised controlled trial of laparoscopic vs open radical cystectomy for bladder cancer: perioperative and oncologic outcomes with 5-year follow-upT Lin et al

    PubMed Central

    Lin, T; Fan, X; Zhang, C; Xu, K; Liu, H; Zhang, J; Jiang, C; Huang, H; Han, J; Yao, Y; Xie, W; Dong, W; Bi, L; Huang, J

    2014-01-01

    Background: Laparoscopic radical cystectomy (LRC) is increasingly being used for muscle-invasive bladder cancer. However, high levels of clinical evidence comparing laparoscopic vs open radical cystectomy (ORC) are lacking. Methods: A prospective randomised controlled clinical trial comparing LRC vs ORC in patients undergoing radical cystectomy for bladder cancer. Thirty-five patients were eligible for final analysis in each group. Results: The median follow-up was 26 months (range, 4–59 months) for laparoscopic vs 32 months (range, 6–60 months) for ORC. Significant differences were noted in operative time, estimated blood loss (EBL), blood transfusion rate, analgesic requirement, and time to resumption of oral intake. No significant differences were noted in the length of hospital stay, complication rate, lymph node yield (14.1±6.3 for LRC and 15.2±5.9 for ORC), positive surgical margin rate, postoperative pathology, or recurrence rate (7 for LRC and 8 for ORC). The 5-year recurrence-free survival with laparoscopic vs ORC was 78.5% vs 70.9%, respectively (P=0.773). The overall survival with laparoscopic vs ORC was 73.8% vs 67.4%, respectively (P=0.511). Conclusion: Our study demonstrated that LRC is superior to ORC in perioperative outcomes, including EBL, blood transfusion rate, and analgesic requirement. We found no major difference in oncologic outcomes. The number of patients is too small to allow for a final conclusion. PMID:24407192

  9. Retraction: "Activated K-Ras and INK4a/Arf Deficiency Promote Aggressiveness of Pancreatic Cancer by Induction of EMT Consistent With Cancer Stem Cell Phenotype" by Wang et al.

    PubMed

    2016-10-01

    The above article, published online on November 23, 2012 in Wiley Online Library (wileyonlinelibrary.com), has been retracted by agreement between the journal Editor in Chief, Gary S. Stein, and Wiley Periodicals, Inc. The retraction has been agreed following an investigation from Wayne State University involving the first author and the corresponding author that found Figure 4B and C to be inappropriately manipulated and re-labeled. Literature Cited Wang Z, Ali S, Banerjee S, Bao B, Li Y, Azmi AS, Korc M, Sarkar FH. 2013. Activated K-Ras and INK4a/Arf deficiency promote aggressiveness of pancreatic cancer by induction of EMT consistent with cancer stem cell phenotype. J Cell Physiol 228:556-562; doi: 10.1002/jcp.24162. PMID:27315162

  10. Challenging Roadblocks to Cancer Cure.

    PubMed

    Loda, Massimo

    2016-09-01

    The Pezcoller Symposium in Trento, Italy, June 2015, focused entirely on the question of why advanced cancer cure is so uncommon despite the extraordinarily rapid growth of invaluable therapeutic information. Participants were asked to define and to critically evaluate real and potential obstacles to permanent disease eradication. High-level concepts on potential road blocks to cures as well as opportunities for intervention in diverse areas of investigation ranging from genomic alterations to metabolism, microenvironment, immunity, and mechanotransduction were discussed. Provocative concepts and novel therapeutic avenues were proposed. What follows is a critical analysis of the highlights of this meeting. Cancer Res; 76(17); 4924-30. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27520451

  11. Al Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandanayaka, Tharaka; Azarmi, Fardad

    2014-05-01

    In the present study, cold spraying technique was used to fabricate a metal matrix composite (MMC) that consists of Ni matrix and 20 vol.% Ni3Al particles at two different particle sizes as reinforcement. This study intends to investigate the effect of reinforcement particle size on microstructural and mechanical properties of cold sprayed MMCs. Two different Ni3Al powders with nominal particle size of -45 to +5 and +45 to 100 μm were used as reinforcement in this study. Cold sprayed Ni-Ni3Al samples were subjected to the microstructural observation and characterization prior to any mechanical testing. Then, samples were tested using nano-indentation, Knoop hardness, Vickers hardness, and Resonance frequency to evaluate their mechanical properties. No significant changes were observed in microstructural characteristics due to different particle sizes. The results obtained from a variety of mechanical testings indicated that the increasing reinforcement particle size resulted in the slight reduction of mechanical properties such as elastic modulus and hardness in cold sprayed MMCs. The mechanical interlock between deposited particles defines the bonding strength in cold sprayed samples. Small size particles have a higher velocity and impact resulting in stronger interlock between deformed particles.

  12. Sphingosine enhances apoptosis of radiation-resistant prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Nava, V E; Cuvillier, O; Edsall, L C; Kimura, K; Milstien, S; Gelmann, E P; Spiegel, S

    2000-08-15

    Ceramide has been implicated as an important component of radiation-induced apoptosis of human prostate cancer cells. We examined the role of the sphingolipid metabolites--ceramide, sphingosine, and sphingosine-1-phosphate--in susceptibility to radiation-induced apoptosis in prostate cancer cell lines with different sensitivities to gamma-irradiation. Exposure of radiation-sensitive TSU-Pr1 cells to 8-Gy irradiation led to a sustained increase in ceramide, beginning after 12 h of treatment and increasing to 2.5- to 3-fold within 48 h. Moreover, irradiation of TSU-Pr1 cells also produced a marked and rapid 50% decrease in the activity of sphingosine kinase, the enzyme that phosphorylates sphingosine to form sphingosine-1-phosphate. In contrast, the radiation-insensitive cell line, LNCaP, had sustained sphingosine kinase activity and did not produce elevated ceramide levels on 8-Gy irradiation. Although LNCaP cells are highly resistant to gamma-irradiation-induced apoptosis, they are sensitive to the death-inducing effects of tumor necrosis factor alpha, which also increases ceramide levels in these cells (K. Kimura et al., Cancer Res., 59: 1606-1614, 1999). Moreover, we found that although irradiation alone did not increase sphingosine levels in LNCaP cells, tumor necrosis factor alpha plus irradiation induced significantly higher sphingosine levels and markedly reduced intracellular levels of sphingosine-1-phosphate. The elevation of sphingosine levels either by exogenous sphingosine or by treatment with the sphingosine kinase inhibitor N,N-dimethylsphingosine induced apoptosis and also sensitized LNCaP cells to gamma-irradiation-induced apoptosis. Our data suggest that the relative levels of sphingolipid metabolites may play a role in determining the radiosensitivity of prostate cancer cells, and that the enhancement of ceramide and sphingosine generation could be of therapeutic value. PMID:10969794

  13. AL Amyloidosis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Definition of the disease AL amyloidosis results from extra-cellular deposition of fibril-forming monoclonal immunoglobulin (Ig) light chains (LC) (most commonly of lambda isotype) usually secreted by a small plasma cell clone. Most patients have evidence of isolated monoclonal gammopathy or smoldering myeloma, and the occurrence of AL amyloidosis in patients with symptomatic multiple myeloma or other B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders is unusual. The key event in the development of AL amyloidosis is the change in the secondary or tertiary structure of an abnormal monoclonal LC, which results in instable conformation. This conformational change is responsible for abnormal folding of the LC, rich in β leaves, which assemble into monomers that stack together to form amyloid fibrils. Epidemiology AL amyloidosis is the most common type of systemic amyloidois in developed countries with an estimated incidence of 9 cases/million inhabitant/year. The average age of diagnosed patients is 65 years and less than 10% of patients are under 50. Clinical description The clinical presentation is protean, because of the wide number of tissues or organs that may be affected. The most common presenting symptoms are asthenia and dyspnoea, which are poorly specific and may account for delayed diagnosis. Renal manifestations are the most frequent, affecting two thirds of patients at presentation. They are characterized by heavy proteinuria, with nephrotic syndrome and impaired renal function in half of the patients. Heart involvement, which is present at diagnosis in more than 50% of patients, leading to restrictive cardiopathy, is the most serious complication and engages prognosis. Diagnostic methods The diagnosis relies on pathological examination of an involved site showing Congo red-positive amyloid deposits, with typical apple-green birefringence under polarized light, that stain positive with an anti-LC antibody by immunohistochemistry and/or immunofluorescence. Due to the

  14. The response regulator ResD modulates virulence gene expression in response to carbohydrates in Listeria monocytogenes.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Marianne H; Kallipolitis, Birgitte H; Christiansen, Janne K; Olsen, John E; Ingmer, Hanne

    2006-09-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a versatile bacterial pathogen that is able to accommodate to diverse environmental and host conditions. Presently, we have identified a L. monocytogenes two-component response regulator, ResD that is required for the repression of virulence gene expression known to occur in the presence of easily fermentable carbohydrates not found inside host organisms. Structurally and functionally, ResD resembles the respiration regulator ResD in Bacillus subtilis as deletion of the L. monocytogenes resD reduces respiration and expression of cydA, encoding a subunit of cytochrome bd. The resD mutation also reduces expression of mptA encoding the EIIABman component of a mannose/glucose-specific PTS system, indicating that ResD controls sugar uptake. This notion was supported by the poor growth of resD mutant cells that was alleviated by excess of selected carbohydrates. Despite the growth deficient phenotype of the mutant in vitro the mutation did not affect intracellular multiplication in epithelial or macrophage cell lines. When examining virulence gene expression we observed traditional induction by charcoal in both mutant and wild-type cells whereas the repression observed in wild-type cells by fermentable carbohydrates did not occur in resD mutant cells. Thus, ResD is a central regulator of L. monocytogenes when present in the external environment. PMID:16968229

  15. Industrial solutions trends for the control of HiRes spectrograph@E-ELT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Marcantonio, P.; Baldini, V.; Calderone, G.; Cirami, R.; Coretti, I.; Cristiani, S.

    Starting a few years ago, ESO initiated a number of projects aiming to explore the possible adoption of industrial standards and commercial off-the-shelf components (COTS) for the control of future VLT and E-ELT instrumentations. In this context, ESPRESSO, the next generation high-stability spectrograph for the VLT and to a certain extent, a precursor of HiRes, has adopted since the preliminary design phase those solutions. Based on the ESPRESSO experience and taking into account the requirements inferred from the preliminary Hi-Res studies in terms of both high-level operations as well as low-level control, I will present in this paper the current proposal for the HiRes hardware architecture.

  16. VisRes: A G RACE tool for displaying and analysing resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Busby, D. W.; Burke, P. G.; Burke, V. M.; Noble, C. J.; Scott, N. S.

    1998-11-01

    VisRes is a graphical tool for displaying and analysing resonance data. Files of eigenphase sums, generated during the computation of electron and photon interactions with atoms and molecules, can be read and the data displayed both as continuous and discontinuous graphs. Resonance resolution can be improved by interactively computing additional data points and merging them with the displayed data. Resonance positions and widths are determined by fitting user selected data points by the Breit—Wigner formula. VisRes is written in C and Motif for the UNIX operating system. It can be operated exclusively on the host workstation or in distributed mode where data is read from and computed on a remote computer but displayed and analysed on the host workstation. While it is published as a stand-alone tool, VisRes also forms part of the Graphical R-matrix Atomic Collision Environment (G RACE).

  17. Validating the use of Hospital Episode Statistics data and comparison of costing methodologies for economic evaluation: an end-of-life case study from the Cluster randomised triAl of PSA testing for Prostate cancer (CAP)

    PubMed Central

    Thorn, Joanna C; Turner, Emma L; Hounsome, Luke; Walsh, Eleanor; Down, Liz; Verne, Julia; Donovan, Jenny L; Neal, David E; Hamdy, Freddie C; Martin, Richard M; Noble, Sian M

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the accuracy of routine data for costing inpatient resource use in a large clinical trial and to investigate costing methodologies. Design Final-year inpatient cost profiles were derived using (1) data extracted from medical records mapped to the National Health Service (NHS) reference costs via service codes and (2) Hospital Episode Statistics (HES) data using NHS reference costs. Trust finance departments were consulted to obtain costs for comparison purposes. Setting 7 UK secondary care centres. Population A subsample of 292 men identified as having died at least a year after being diagnosed with prostate cancer in Cluster randomised triAl of PSA testing for Prostate cancer (CAP), a long-running trial to evaluate the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) testing. Results Both inpatient cost profiles showed a rise in costs in the months leading up to death, and were broadly similar. The difference in mean inpatient costs was £899, with HES data yielding ∼8% lower costs than medical record data (differences compatible with chance, p=0.3). Events were missing from both data sets. 11 men (3.8%) had events identified in HES that were all missing from medical record review, while 7 men (2.4%) had events identified in medical record review that were all missing from HES. The response from finance departments to requests for cost data was poor: only 3 of 7 departments returned adequate data sets within 6 months. Conclusions Using HES routine data coupled with NHS reference costs resulted in mean annual inpatient costs that were very similar to those derived via medical record review; therefore, routinely available data can be used as the primary method of costing resource use in large clinical trials. Neither HES nor medical record review represent gold standards of data collection. Requesting cost data from finance departments is impractical for large clinical trials. Trial registration number ISRCTN92187251

  18. Comment on ``Geoeffectiveness of Halo Coronal Mass Ejections'' by N. Gopalswamy, S. Yashiro, and S. Akiyama (J. Geophys. Res. 2007, 112, doi:10.1029/2006JA012149)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yermolaev, Yu. I.

    2008-12-01

    Comment on paper: Gopalswamy, N., S. Yashiro, and S. Akiyama (2007), Geoeffectiveness of halo coronal mass ejections, J. Geophys. Res., 112, A06112, doi:10.1029/2006JA012149 Gopalswamy et al. [2007] studied the geoeffectiveness of halo coronal mass ejections (CMEs) on the basis of solar observations during 1996-2005 and found that the geoeffectiveness of 229 frontside halo CMEs was 71%. Recently for observations of 305 frontside halo CMEs during 1997-2003 the geoeffectiveness was found to be 40% [Kim et al., 2005]. Complex analysis of both solar and interplanetary measurements showed that the geoeffectiveness of frontside halo CMEs is likely to be about 50% [Yermolaev et al., 2005; Yermolaev and Yermolaev, 2006]. Gopalswamy et al. [2007] did not discuss possible causes of this difference and were limited only to the general words: "The reason for the conflicting results (geoeffectiveness of CMEs ranging from 35% to more than 80%) may be attributed to the different definition of halo CMEs and geoeffectiveness." So, here we shall present our point of view on high geoeffectivenees of CME obtained in paper by Gopalswamy et al. [2007].

  19. Time-resolved spectroscopy of Bi3+ centers in Y4Al2O9

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babin, V.; Lipińska, L.; Mihokova, E.; Nikl, M.; Shalapska, T.; Suchocki, A.; Zazubovich, S.; Zhydachevskii, Ya

    2015-08-01

    Steady-state and time-resolved emission and excitation spectra as well as luminescence decay kinetics are studied at 4.2-400 K under excitation in the 3-6 eV energy range for Bi3+ ions substituting for Y3+ ions in four inequivalent crystal lattice sites of Y4Al2O9:Bi ceramics. Luminescence characteristics of Bi3+ centers of all the four types are identified and are shown to arise from the radiative decay of the triplet relaxed excited state (RES) of Bi3+ ions. The parameters of the triplet RES, namely, probabilities of the radiative and nonradiative transitions from the metastable and emitting levels as well as the energy distance between these levels, are determined. The influence of the nearest surroundings of Bi3+ ions on the luminescence characteristics and the parameters of the triplet RES of Bi3+ centers is discussed.

  20. Developing HEAT Scores with H-Res Thermal Imagery to Support Urban Energy Efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemachandran, Bharanidharan

    As part of The Calgary Community GHG Reduction Plan (2009) The City is seeking an implementation strategy to reduce GHGs and promote low-carbon living, with a focus on improving urban energy efficiency. The most cited obstacle to energy efficiency improvements is the lack of interest from consumers (CUI, 2008). However, Darby (2006) has shown that effective feedback significantly reduces energy consumption. To exploit these findings, the HEAT (Heat Energy Assessment Technologies) Geoweb project integrates high-resolution (H-Res) airborne thermal imagery (TABI 1800) to provide unique energy efficiency feedback to Calgary homeowners in the form of interactive HEAT Maps and Hot Spots (Hay et al., 2011). As a part of the HEAT Phase II program, the goal of this research is to provide enhanced feedback support for urban energy efficiency by meeting two key objectives: (i) develop an appropriate method to define HEAT Scores using TABI 1800 imagery that allows for the comparison of waste heat of one or more houses with all other mapped houses in the community and city, and (ii) develop a multi-scale interactive Geoweb interface that displays the HEAT Scores at City, Community and Residential scales. To achieve these goals, we describe the evolution of three novel HEAT Score techniques based on: (i) a Standardized Score, (ii) the WUFIRTM model and Logistic Regression and (iii ) a novel criteria weighted method that considers: (a) heat transfer through different roofing materials, (b) local climatic conditions and (c) house age and living area attributes. Furthermore, (d) removing or adding houses to analysis based on this 3rd technique, does not affect the HEAT Score of other houses and (e) HEAT Scores can be compared within and across different cities. We also describe how HEAT Scores are incorporated within the HEAT Geoweb architecture. It is envisioned that HEAT Scores will promote energy efficiency among homeowners and urban city planners, as they will quantify and

  1. A non-linear mathematical model for the in vivo evaluation of the RES phagocytic function.

    PubMed

    Bondareva, I B; Parfenov, A S

    1995-01-01

    A new non-linear mathematical model was constructed in order to perform in vivo quantification of the RES phagocytic function. This method is based on the same technical facilities as used for the routine liver-spleen scintigraphy with radiocolloids [1, 2]. But kinetic modeling of dynamic Tc-99m-sulfur colloid data produced estimations of the functional RE-parameters: the clearance rate of the colloidal particles, the rate of phagocytosis, and the RES functional volume, which can not be obtained by classical approaches. This non-linear model was designed on the basis of the principal characteristics of particulate material interaction with macrophages (attachment, phagocytosis, digestion) [3, 4, 5]. The theoretically examined behavior of this in vivo mathematical model corresponds with the experimental behavior of the RES. The mathematical expression of the dynamics is the system of non-linear differential equations with constant coefficients that have no analytical solution. Fitting of the normalized heart blood time-activity curve was obtained to identify the unknown model parameters via non-linear regression. For this purpose general interactive PASCAL procedure IDPAR for a PDP-11/34 computer was used (an IBM PC version is also available). Two to three iterations were needed to estimate the set of unknown parameters for any patient study (1-1.5 min). A very good fitting was obtained between experimental and model curves in every case of different pathologies (error of the approximation is about 2-3%). Studies were performed using an in vivo bolus injection of 3.6 mg/80 kg commercially available colloid KOREN labeled with 3m-Ci 99m-Tc (analog of TCK-1). Our method was used to determine the RES functional parameters for patient groups with different levels of the RES dysfunction. Obtained results illustrate the possibilities of our technique to quantitatively estimate not only great pathology (portal cirrhosis), but also small changes of the RE-function (case of

  2. 75 FR 5633 - Notice of Extension of Comment Period for NUREG-1921, EPRI/NRC-RES Fire Human Reliability...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-03

    ... document entitled ``NUREG-1921 (EPRI 1019196), EPRI/NRC-RES Fire Human Reliability Analysis Guidelines, Draft Report for Comment'' (December 11, 2009; 74 FR 65810). This document extends the public comment... COMMISSION Notice of Extension of Comment Period for NUREG-1921, EPRI/NRC- RES Fire Human...

  3. Eye Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Eye Cancer - Overview Request Permissions Print to PDF Eye Cancer - Overview Approved by the Cancer.Net Editorial Board , ... Cancer Research and Advocacy Survivorship Blog About Us Eye Cancer Guide Cancer.Net Guide Eye Cancer Overview Statistics ...

  4. Cancer - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - cancer ... The following organizations are good resources for information on cancer : American Cancer Society -- www.cancer.org Cancer Care -- www.cancercare.org National Cancer Institute -- www.cancer.gov

  5. Career Outcomes of Graduates of R25E Short-Term Cancer Research Training Programs.

    PubMed

    Desmond, Renee A; Padilla, Luz A; Daniel, Casey L; Prickett, Charles T; Venkatesh, Raam; Brooks, C Michael; Waterbor, John W

    2016-03-01

    The efficacy of short-term cancer research educational programs in meeting its immediate goals and long-term cancer research career objectives has not been well studied. The purpose of this report is to describe the immediate impact on, and the long-term career outcomes of, 499 medical students and graduate students who completed the Cancer Research Experiences for Students (CaRES) program at the University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) from 1999 to 2013. In summer 2014, all 499 program alumni were located and 96.4 % (481 of 499) agreed to complete a longitudinal tracking survey. About 23 % of CaRES alumni (110 of 499) have published at least one cancer-related paper. Overall 238 cancer-related papers have been published by CaRES alumni, one third of this number being first-authored publications. Nearly 15 % (71 of 481 respondents) reported that their current professional activities include cancer research, primarily clinical research and outcomes research. Of these 71 individuals, 27 (38 %) have completed their training and 44 (62 %) remain in training. Of all respondents, 58 % reported that they administered care to cancer patients and 30 % reported other cancer-related professional responsibilities such as working with a health department or community group on cancer control activities. Of the 410 respondents not currently engaged in cancer research, 118 (29 %) stated intentions to conduct cancer research in the next few years. Nearly all respondents (99.6 %) recommended CaRES to today's students. Challenging short-term educational cancer research programs for medical students and graduate health professional students can help them refine and solidify their career plans, with many program alumni choosing cancer research careers. PMID:25604064

  6. Strain-engineering the anisotropic electrical conductance in ReS2 monolayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Sheng; Zhu, Hao; Eshun, Kwesi; Shi, Chen; Zeng, Min; Li, Qiliang

    2016-05-01

    Rhenium disulfide (ReS2) is a semiconducting layered transition metal dichalcogenide that exhibits a stable distorted 1 T (Re in octahedral coordination) phase. The reduced symmetry in ReS2 leads to in-plane anisotropy in various material properties. In this work, we performed a comprehensive first-principle computational study of strain effect on the anisotropic mechanical and electronic properties of ReS2 monolayers. We found that the anisotropic ratio in electron mobility along two principle axes is 2.36 while the ratio in hole mobility reaches 7.76. The study of strain applied along different directions shows that the elastic modulus is largest for out-of-plane direction, and the strain along a-direction induces indirect bandgap while strain along b- or c-direction does not. In addition, the carrier mobility can be significantly improved by the c-direction tensile strain. This study indicates that the ReS2 monolayer has promising applications in nanoscale strain sensor and conductance-switch FETs.

  7. Constructing CoRes--A Strategy for Building PCK in Pre-Service Science Teacher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hume, Anne; Berry, Amanda

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents findings from an exploratory study into a science teacher education initiative that seeks to build the foundations on which novice teachers can begin developing their pedagogical content knowledge (PCK). The initiative involved the use of Content Representations (CoRes), which were originally developed as part of a strategy for…

  8. Metal to insulator quantum-phase transition in few-layered ReS2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradhan, Nihar; Rhodes, Daniel; Lu, Zhenguang; Smirnov, Dmitry; Manousakis, Efstratios; Dobrosavljevic, Vladimir; Balicas, Luis; McCreary, Amber; Feng, Simin; Terrones, Maurico; Namburu, Raju; Dubey, Madan; Hight Walker, Angela; Terrones, Humberto

    ReS2 a layer-independent direct band-gap semiconductor of 1.5 eV implies a potential for its use in optoelectronic applications. Here, we present an overall evaluation of transport and anisotropic Raman of few-layered ReS2 FET. ReS2 exfoliated on SiO2 behaves as an n-type semiconductor with an intrinsic carrier mobility surpassing μi ~ 30cm2 /Vs at T = 300 K which increases up to ~ 350cm2 /vs at 2 K. Semiconducting behavior is observed at low electron densities n, but at high values of nthe resistivity decreases by a factor > 7 upon cooling to 2 K and displays a metallicT2-dependence. The electric-field induced metallic state observed in MoS2 was recently claimed to result from a percolation type of transition. Instead, through a scaling analysis of the conductivity as a function of Tand n, we find that the metallic state of ReS2 results from a second-order metal to insulator transition driven by electronic correlations. Supported by U.S. Army Research Office MURI Grant No. W911NF-11-1-0362.

  9. Metal to insulator quantum-phase transition in few-layered ReS2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradhan, Nihar; McCreary, Amber; Rhodes, Daniel; Lu, Zhenguang; Smirnov, Dmitry; Manousakis, Efstratios; Feng, Simin; Namburu, Raju; Dubey, Madan; Hight Walker, Angela; Terrones, Humberto; Terrones, Mauricio; Dobrosavljevic, Vladimir; Balicas, Luis

    ReS2 a layer-independent direct band-gap semiconductor of 1.5 eV implies a potential for its use in optoelectronic applications. Here, we present an overall evaluation of transport and anisotropic Raman of few-layered ReS2 FET. ReS2 exfoliated on SiO2 behaves as an n-type semiconductor with an intrinsic carrier mobility surpassing μi ~30 cm2/Vs at T = 300 K which increases up to ~350 cm2/vs at 2 K. Semiconducting behavior is observed at low electron densities n, but at high values of nthe resistivity decreases by a factor >7 upon cooling to 2 K and displays a metallicT2 -dependence. The electric-field induced metallic state observed in MoS2 was recently claimed to result from a percolation type of transition. Instead, through a scaling analysis of the conductivity as a function of Tand n, we find that the metallic state of ReS2 results from a second-order metal to insulator transition driven by electronic correlations. Supported by U.S. Army Research Office MURI Grant No. W911NF-11-1-0362.

  10. Anisotropic Electron transport and device applications of atomically thin ReS2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Erfu; Fu, Yajun; Wang, Yaojia; Feng, Yanqing; Liu, Huimei; Wan, Xiangang; Zhou, Wei; Wang, Baigeng; Zeng, Junwen; Ho, Ching-Hwa; Huang, Ying-Sheng; Yuan, Hongtao; Hwang, Harold Y.; Cui, Yi; Xing, Dingyu; Miao, Feng

    Semiconducting two-dimensional transition metal dichalcogenides are emerging as top candidates for post-silicon electronics. While most of them exhibit isotropic behavior, lowering the lattice symmetry could induce anisotropic properties, which are both scientifically interesting and potentially useful. In this talk, we will present atomically thin rhenium disulfide (ReS2) flakes with unique distorted 1T structure, which exhibit in-plane anisotropic properties. We first fabricated mono- and few-layer ReS2 field effect transistors, which exhibit competitive performance with large current on/off ratios (~107) and low subthreshold swings (100 mV dec-1) . The observed anisotropic ratio along two principle axes reaches up to 3.1. Furthermore, we successfully demonstrated an integrated digital inverter with good performance by utilizing two ReS2 anisotropic field effect transistors, suggesting the promising implementation of large-scale two-dimensional logic circuits. Recent results on ultra-high responsivity (as high as 88,600 A W-1) phototransistors based on few-layer ReS2 will also be discussed. Our results underscore the unique properties of two-dimensional semiconducting materials with low crystal symmetry for future electronic and optoelectronic applications.

  11. Anisotropic optical properties of few-layer transition metal dichalcogenide ReS2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhenglu; Cao, Ting; da Jornada, Felipe H.; Wu, Meng; Louie, Steven G.

    We present first-principles (DFT, GW and GW-BSE) calculations of the electronic and optical properties of few-layer rhenium disulfide (ReS2). Monolayer ReS2 shows strong many-electron effects with a fundamental quasiparticle band gap of 2.38 eV based on G0W0 calculation and a large exciton binding energy of 690 meV based on solving the Bethe-Salpeter equation. Highly anisotropic linear-polarized optical absorptions are revealed for few-layer and bulk ReS2. The band gap shows a decreasing trend with the optical polarization direction near the absorption edge gradually rotating from around 67 degree in the monolayer to 85 degree in the bulk, referencing to the Re-chain. Our calculations are consistent with recent experimental data and theoretical studies, and provide a systematic understanding of the electronic and optical properties in few-layer ReS2. This work was supported by National Science Foundation Grant No. DMR15-1508412 and the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231. Computational resources have been provided by DOE at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory's NERSC facility.

  12. Res-Parity: Parity Violation in Inelastic scattering at Low Q2

    SciTech Connect

    Reimer, Paul; Bosted, Peter; Arrington, John; Mkrtchyan, Hamlet; Zheng, Xiaochao

    2006-05-16

    Parity violating electron scattering has become a well established tool which has been used, for example, to probe the Standard Model and the strange-quark contribution to the nucleon. While much of this work has focused on elastic scattering, the RES-Parity experiment, which has been proposed to take place at Jefferson Laboratory, would focus on inelastic scattering in the low-Q2, low-W domain. RES-Parity would search for evidence of quark-hadron duality and resonance structure with parity violation in the resonance region. In terms of parity violation, this region is essentially unexplored, but the interpretation of other high-precision electron scattering experiments will rely on a reasonable understanding of scattering at lower energy and low-W through the effects of radiative corrections. RES-Parity would also study nuclear effects with the weak current. Because of the intrinsic broad band energy spectrum of neutrino beams, neutrino experiments are necessarily dependent on an untested, implicit assumption that these effects are identical to electromagnetic nuclear effects. RES-Parity is a relatively straight forward experiment. With a large expected asymmetry (~ 0.5 × 10-4) these studies may be completed with in a relatively brief period.

  13. Primary minerals of Zn-Pb mining and metallurgical dumps and their environmental behavior at Plombières, Belgium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kucha, H.; Martens, A.; Ottenburgs, R.; de Vos, W.; Viaene, W.

    1996-02-01

    The primary phases and minerals of the Plombières dumps include typical smelting furnace products such as metallic Fe, Pb, Cu, Zn, Fe-Zn alloys, carbides, phosphides, sulfides of Fe, Zn, Pb, Cu, Mn (alabandite), and FeAs. Spinels, mainly of Fe and Al, are common constituents of the primary assemblage; substitution by Zn, V, Cr, Ti, Mg, and Ca occurs. Primary phases also include the most common Zn-rich fayalite, Zn-rich Ca-Fe silicates, melilite, corundum, and apatite. Most of the Zn is incorporated in iron silicates, ZnO and ZnS. Lead occurs mainly as PbS, metallic lead, and is also present in coal residues. Cadmium is found mainly in metallic zinc and its alloys and in ZnO. The dumps also contain mining wastes composed of pyrite, melnikovite, and iron oxides produced by natural weathering of Zn-Pb ores. Melnikovite and iron oxides are rich in As, Pb, and Zn and possess an increased content of Tl. Leaching tests carried out on the surfaces of polished sections indicate that acid rain (solutions I and II) will mobilize mainly Zn and Cd and, to a much smaller extent, Pb and Sb. Leaching of metals by sulfate-chloride fluids present in the pore network of dumps (solutions III, IV, and V) depends on the pH, which in the dumps is controlled by the proportion of carbonates to sulfides. The more acid fluids leach both sulfides and silicates.

  14. Pinning effect of reactive elements on adhesion energy and adhesive strength of incoherent Al2O3/NiAl interface.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Z; Zhang, R F; Legut, D; Li, D Q; Zhang, S H; Fu, Z H; Guo, H B

    2016-08-17

    The profound effects of reactive elements (REs) on the adhesion energy and adhesive strength of the α-Al2O3/β-NiAl interface in thermal barrier coating (TBC) systems have attracted increasing attention because RE-doping has played a significant role in improving the thermal cycling lifetime of TBCs. However, the fundamental mechanism is, so far, not well understood due to the experimental difficulty and theoretical complexity in interface modelling. For this purpose, in the present study we have performed comprehensive density functional theory calculations and information targeted experiments to underline the origin of the surprising enhancement of interface adhesion, stability and mechanical strength of the α-Al2O3/β-NiAl interface by different RE doping levels. Our results suggest that the interface failure firstly appears within the NiAl layer adjacent to the Al-terminated oxide under mechanical loading, while the formation of O-RE-Ni bond pairs at the interface can effectively hinder the interface de-cohesion, providing a higher mechanical strength. By comparing several typical REs, it is observed that Hf can emerge not only with the highest interface adhesion energy, but also the highest mechanical strength; in agreement with our experimental results. By continuously increasing the dopant concentration, the strengthening effect may increase correspondingly, but is limited by the solute solubility. These results shed light into the effect of REs on the stability and strength of the α-Al2O3/β-NiAl interface, providing theoretical guidance for interface design via a combinational analysis of bond topology and electronic structure. PMID:27480916

  15. Nuclear and cytoplasmic expressions of ERβ1 and ERβ2 are predictive of response to therapy and alters prognosis in familial breast cancers.

    PubMed

    Yan, Max; Rayoo, Mukta; Takano, Elena A; Fox, Stephen B

    2011-04-01

    Estrogen receptor (ER) α has been studied extensively in familial breast cancers but there are limited data on ERβ and its isoforms. This is an important issue since many BRCA1-associated tumours are "triple negative" and are resistant to conventional and targeted therapies. We performed an immunohistochemical study of pan-ERβ, ERβ1 and ERβ2 in a cohort of 123 familial breast carcinomas (35 BRCA1, 33 BRCA2 and 55 BRCAX) using a cut-off for positivity at 20% (Shaaban et al. in Clin Cancer Res 14:5228-5235, 2008). BRCA1 cancers were more likely to be nuclear ERα negative and nuclear pan-ERβ positive (21/32, 66%) when compared with BRCA2 (2/29, 7%) and BRCAX cancers (11/49, 22%) (both P < 0.001). For survival analysis, expression was also stratified using cut-offs defined by Bates et al. (Breast Cancer Res Treat 111:453-459, 2008) (score out of 7). Cytoplasmic ERβ2 expression correlated with shorter overall survival at 15 years regardless of cut-off used (both P < 0.046) At a cut-off score of 6 out of 7, cytoplasmic ERβ2 expression correlated with a poorer response to chemotherapy in both univariate (P = 0.011) and multivariate analyses including grade, lymph node status and chemotherapy as an interaction variable (P = 0.045, Hazard ratio 1.22, 95% CI 1.004-9.87). A similar trend was seen in a univariate analysis with a cut-off of 20% although this did not reach statistical significance (P = 0.057). Expression of nuclear ERβ1 was associated with a favourable response to endocrine therapy at 15 years regardless of cut-offs employed (both P < 0.025). However, this did not reach statistical significance in a multivariate analysis (P > 0.05). Since a significant proportion of ERα negative familial breast carcinomas are positive for nuclear ERβ1 and cytoplasmic ERβ2, the different ERβ isoforms and their intracellular location may need to be assessed, to identify patients that may benefit from hormonal and chemotherapy. PMID:20490651

  16. Cancer Statistics

    MedlinePlus

    ... Role in Cancer Research Intramural Research Extramural Research Bioinformatics and Cancer NCI-Designated Cancer Centers Frederick National ... Role in Cancer Research Intramural Research Extramural Research Bioinformatics and Cancer NCI-Designated Cancer Centers Frederick National ...

  17. Colon cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Colorectal cancer; Cancer - colon; Rectal cancer; Cancer - rectum; Adenocarcinoma - colon; Colon - adenocarcinoma ... In the United States, colorectal cancer is one of the leading causes of deaths due to cancer. Early diagnosis can often lead to a complete cure. Almost ...

  18. Cancer Vaccines

    MedlinePlus

    ... Partners & Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & ... Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists NCI Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & ...

  19. Cervical Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Role in Cancer Research Intramural Research Extramural Research Bioinformatics and Cancer NCI-Designated Cancer Centers Frederick National ... Role in Cancer Research Intramural Research Extramural Research Bioinformatics and Cancer NCI-Designated Cancer Centers Frederick National ...

  20. Cancer Staging

    MedlinePlus

    ... Role in Cancer Research Intramural Research Extramural Research Bioinformatics and Cancer NCI-Designated Cancer Centers Frederick National ... Role in Cancer Research Intramural Research Extramural Research Bioinformatics and Cancer NCI-Designated Cancer Centers Frederick National ...

  1. Metastatic Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Partners & Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & ... Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists NCI Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & ...

  2. Molecular profiling of prostate cancer derived exosomes may reveal a predictive signature for response to docetaxel

    PubMed Central

    Kharaziha, Pedram; Chioureas, Dimitris; Rutishauser, Dorothea; Baltatzis, George; Lennartsson, Lena; Fonseca, Pedro; Azimi, Alireza; Hultenby, Kjell; Zubarev, Roman; Ullén, Anders; Yachnin, Jeffrey; Nilsson, Sten; Panaretakis, Theocharis

    2015-01-01

    Docetaxel is a cornerstone treatment for metastatic, castration resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) which remains a leading cause of cancer-related deaths, worldwide. The clinical usage of docetaxel has resulted in modest gains in survival, primarily due to the development of resistance. There are currently no clinical biomarkers available that predict whether a CRPC patient will respond or acquire resistance to this therapy. Comparative proteomics analysis of exosomes secreted from DU145 prostate cancer cells that are sensitive (DU145 Tax-Sen) or have acquired resistance (DU145 Tax-Res) to docetaxel, demonstrated significant differences in the amount of exosomes secreted and in their molecular composition. A panel of proteins was identified by proteomics to be differentially enriched in DU145 Tax-Res compared to DU145 Tax-Sen exosomes and was validated by western blotting. Importantly, we identified MDR-1, MDR-3, Endophilin-A2 and PABP4 that were enriched only in DU145 Tax-Res exosomes. We validated the presence of these proteins in the serum of a small cohort of patients. DU145 cells that have uptaken DU145 Tax-Res exosomes show properties of increased matrix degradation. In summary, exosomes derived from DU145 Tax-Res cells may be a valuable source of biomarkers for response to therapy. PMID:25844599

  3. Edge-to-Edge Oriented Self-Assembly of ReS2 Nanoflakes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qin; Wang, Wenjie; Kong, Xin; Mendes, Rafael G; Fang, Liwen; Xue, Yinghui; Xiao, Yao; Rümmeli, Mark H; Chen, Shengli; Fu, Lei

    2016-09-01

    The self-assembly of two-dimensional (2D) nanomaterials, an emerging research area, still remains largely unexplored. The strong interlayer attraction between 2D nanosheets leads to face-to-face stacking rather than edge-to-edge coupling. We demonstrate, for the first time, how one can induce and control an edge-to-edge self-assembly process for 2D nanomaterials. The extremely weak van der Waals coupling and strong anisotropy of ReS2 allow us to realize an oriented self-assembly (OSA) process. The aspect ratio of the resulting ReS2 nanoscrolls can be well controlled. In addition, we perform simulations to further explain and confirm the OSA process, demonstrating its great potential to be expanded as a general edge-to-edge self-assembly process suitable for other 2D nanomaterials. PMID:27547983

  4. Highly efficient and ultrastable visible-light photocatalytic water splitting over ReS2.

    PubMed

    Liu, Huimei; Xu, Bo; Liu, J-M; Yin, Jiang; Miao, Feng; Duan, Chun-Gang; Wan, X G

    2016-06-01

    Two dimensional materials have many outstanding intrinsic advantages that can be utilized to enhance the photocatalytic efficiency of water splitting. Herein, based on ab initio calculations, we reveal that for monolayer and multilayer rhenium disulphide (ReS2), the band gap and band edge positions are an excellent match with the water splitting energy levels. Moreover, the effective masses of the carriers are relatively light, and the optical absorption coefficients are high under visible illumination. Due to the feature of weak interlayer coupling, these properties are independent of the layer thickness. Our results suggest that ReS2 is a stable and efficient photocatalyst with potential applications in the use of solar energy for water splitting. PMID:27167677

  5. Vulva cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer - perineum; Cancer - vulvar; Genital warts - vulvar cancer; HPV - vulvar cancer ... is rare. Risk factors include: Human papilloma virus (HPV, or genital warts ) infection in women under age ...

  6. US defensive operations against Libya and the nuclear accident at Chernobyl. Markup before the Committee on Foreign Affairs, House of Representatives, Ninety-Ninth Congress, Second Session on H. Res. 424 and H. Res 440, May 1, 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    The House Foreign Affairs Committee met to mark up two resolutions: H. Res. 424 and H. Res. 440. H. Res. 424 thanks the United Kingdom for its assistance in the April 14, 1986 operation against Libya. Despite objections to the raid and to including the British, as well as questions about the quality of the US response and about the President's compliance with the Constitution and the War Powers Resolution, the resolution passed. H. Res. 440 expresses sympathy to the victims of the Chernobyl accident and asks the Soviet Union to relax restrictions on communications and the transfer of whatever technology and assistance will be helpful. It also criticizes the Soviet handling of information about the accident. An amendment strengthened the wording of the criticism, and the resolution passed. The report includes the committee discussion and the tests of the two resolutions.

  7. EPRI/NRC-RES fire PRA guide for nuclear power facilities. Volume 1, summary and overview.

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2004-09-01

    This report documents state-of-the-art methods, tools, and data for the conduct of a fire Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) for a commercial nuclear power plant (NPP) application. The methods have been developed under the Fire Risk Re-quantification Study. This study was conducted as a joint activity between EPRI and the U. S. NRC Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research (RES) under the terms of an EPRI/RES Memorandum of Understanding [RS.1] and an accompanying Fire Research Addendum [RS.2]. Industry participants supported demonstration analyses and provided peer review of this methodology. The documented methods are intended to support future applications of Fire PRA, including risk-informed regulatory applications. The documented method reflects state-of-the-art fire risk analysis approaches. The primary objective of the Fire Risk Study was to consolidate recent research and development activities into a single state-of-the-art fire PRA analysis methodology. Methodological issues raised in past fire risk analyses, including the Individual Plant Examination of External Events (IPEEE) fire analyses, have been addressed to the extent allowed by the current state-of-the-art and the overall project scope. Methodological debates were resolved through a consensus process between experts representing both EPRI and RES. The consensus process included a provision whereby each major party (EPRI and RES) could maintain differing technical positions if consensus could not be reached. No cases were encountered where this provision was invoked. While the primary objective of the project was to consolidate existing state-of-the-art methods, in many areas, the newly documented methods represent a significant advancement over previously documented methods. In several areas, this project has, in fact, developed new methods and approaches. Such advances typically relate to areas of past methodological debate.

  8. Polytypism and unexpected strong interlayer coupling in two-dimensional layered ReS2.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Xiao-Fen; Wu, Jiang-Bin; Zhou, Linwei; Qiao, Jingsi; Shi, Wei; Chen, Tao; Zhang, Xin; Zhang, Jun; Ji, Wei; Tan, Ping-Heng

    2016-04-21

    Anisotropic two-dimensional (2D) van der Waals (vdW) layered materials, with both scientific interest and application potential, offer one more dimension than isotropic 2D materials to tune their physical properties. Various physical properties of 2D multi-layer materials are modulated by varying their stacking orders owing to significant interlayer vdW coupling. Multilayer rhenium disulfide (ReS2), a representative anisotropic 2D material, was expected to be randomly stacked and lack interlayer coupling. Here, we demonstrate two stable stacking orders, namely isotropic-like (IS) and anisotropic-like (AI) N layer (NL, N > 1) ReS2 are revealed by ultralow- and high-frequency Raman spectroscopy, photoluminescence and first-principles density functional theory calculation. Two interlayer shear modes are observed in AI-NL-ReS2 while only one shear mode appears in IS-NL-ReS2, suggesting anisotropic- and isotropic-like stacking orders in IS- and AI-NL-ReS2, respectively. This explicit difference in the observed frequencies identifies an unexpected strong interlayer coupling in IS- and AI-NL-ReS2. Quantitatively, the force constants of them are found to be around 55-90% of those of multilayer MoS2. The revealed strong interlayer coupling and polytypism in multi-layer ReS2 may stimulate future studies on engineering physical properties of other anisotropic 2D materials by stacking orders. PMID:27035503

  9. Resolvase-catalysed reactions between res sites differing in the central dinucleotide of subsite I.

    PubMed Central

    Stark, W M; Grindley, N D; Hatfull, G F; Boocock, M R

    1991-01-01

    The resolvase-catalysed reaction between two res sites in a circular DNA substrate normally gives two circular recombination products linked in a two-noded catenane. Homology between the two res sites at the central overlap dinucleotide of subsite I is important for recombination. Reactions between res sites differing at one position in the central dinucleotide (AC X AT) gave a low yield of recombinants containing mismatched base-pairs, but gave large amounts of a non-recombinant four-noded knot. This result was predicted by a 'simple rotation' model for strand exchange. The mismatch is evidently recognized only after commitment to an initial 180 degrees rotation of the resolvase-linked DNA ends, and it induces a second 180 degrees rotation which restores correct base-pairing at the overlap, giving the four-noded product. Correct base-pairing is not essential for religation, but may be important for release of the products. Characteristic patterns of 4, 6, 8 and 10 node knots, or 4, 8, 12 and 16 node knots were obtained, depending on the reaction conditions and the resolvase. Two pathways for multiple rounds of rotation in 360 degrees steps are inferred. The results support a model for strand exchange by supercoil-directed subunit rotation within a resolvase tetramer. Images PMID:1655422

  10. H.Res.1 — 113th Congress (2013-2014) Electing officers of the House of Representatives.

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Rep. McMorris Rodgers, Cathy [R-WA-5

    2013-01-03

    01/03/2013 Subsequent to the adoption of the resolution, the Chair announced that, without objection, H. Res. 1 is amended by striking "Florida" in the second place it appears and inserting "Oregon". (All Actions)

  11. Serendipity, International Cooperation and Navigational Aids: A History of Radio Echo Sounding (RES) Technologies, 1958-1979

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turchetti, S.; Dean, K.; Naylor, S.; Siegert, M. J.

    2006-12-01

    This paper explores the history of RES and examines major technological advances that fostered the use of this technique in the sub-glacial exploration of Antarctica. The paper will especially focus on three themes: the role played by accidental discoveries in the origins of RES; the importance of international collaboration in its technological development; and the need of establishing new technological networks in the deployment of RES apparatus during Antarctic missions. The origins of RES can be traced back to two important -albeit accidental- findings. First, during post-war US military operations in the Antarctic radio altimeters produced gross errors in height indication. Furthermore, during the IGY ionospheric research and sounding was hampered by interference due to bottom echoes. These serendipitous events helped to figure out that the Antarctic ice was transparent to certain frequencies, and therefore new radio technologies could be used to sound what lay beneath it. The establishment of the Scientific Committee on Antarctic Research (SCAR) and the Antarctic Treaty (AT) provided a new international framework vital to the development of RES technologies. This allowed researchers from different countries to come together and discuss important technological features for the first time. At a technical level, the setting up of international experiments (such as those of 1963 and 1964 in Greenland) gave an opportunity for experts from different countries to compare the performance of new RES apparatus. At a political level, the parallel debate within the AT community on the allocation of Antarctic radio frequencies helped radio engineers to work out ways to circumvent interference with radio communications. Finally, the deployment of RES equipment in Antarctic exploration relied upon a number of technological aids to improve the potential and accuracy of geophysical sounding. The use of new aircrafts, guidance systems, and computers proved vital in many

  12. Tellurium-Assisted Epitaxial Growth of Large-Area, Highly Crystalline ReS2 Atomic Layers on Mica Substrate.

    PubMed

    Cui, Fangfang; Wang, Cong; Li, Xiaobo; Wang, Gang; Liu, Kaiqiang; Yang, Zhou; Feng, Qingliang; Liang, Xing; Zhang, Zhongyue; Liu, Shengzhong; Lei, Zhibin; Liu, Zonghuai; Xu, Hua; Zhang, Jin

    2016-07-01

    Anisotropic 2D layered material rhenium disulfide (ReS2 ) with high crystal quality and uniform monolayer thickness is synthesized by using tellurium-assisted epitaxial growth on mica substrate. Benefit from the lower eutectic temperature of rhenium-tellurium binary eutectic, ReS2 can grow from rhenium (melting point at 3180 °C) and sulfur precursors in the temperature range of 460-900 °C with high efficiency. PMID:27121002

  13. Cancer Statistics: Endometrial Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... at a Glance Show More At a Glance Estimated New Cases in 2016 60,050 % of All New Cancer Cases 3.6% Estimated Deaths in 2016 10,470 % of All Cancer ... of This Cancer : In 2013, there were an estimated 635,437 women living with endometrial cancer in ...

  14. The Role of Cholesterol in Cancer.

    PubMed

    Kuzu, Omer F; Noory, Mohammad A; Robertson, Gavin P

    2016-04-15

    The roles played by cholesterol in cancer development and the potential of therapeutically targeting cholesterol homeostasis is a controversial area in the cancer community. Several epidemiologic studies report an association between cancer and serum cholesterol levels or statin use, while others suggest that there is not one. Furthermore, the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) project using next-generation sequencing has profiled the mutational status and expression levels of all the genes in diverse cancers, including those involved in cholesterol metabolism, providing correlative support for a role of the cholesterol pathway in cancer development. Finally, preclinical studies tend to more consistently support the role of cholesterol in cancer, with several demonstrating that cholesterol homeostasis genes can modulate development. Because of space limitations, this review provides selected examples of the epidemiologic, TCGA, and preclinical data, focusing on alterations in cholesterol homeostasis and its consequent effect on patient survival. In melanoma, this focused analysis demonstrated that enhanced expression of cholesterol synthesis genes was associated with decreased patient survival. Collectively, the studies in melanoma and other cancer types suggested a potential role of disrupted cholesterol homeostasis in cancer development but additional studies are needed to link population-based epidemiological data, the TCGA database results, and preclinical mechanistic evidence to concretely resolve this controversy. Cancer Res; 76(8); 2063-70. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27197250

  15. Cancer Patients and Fungal Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... mould-related diseases in immunocompromised patients. Journal of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy 2011;66:i5-i14. Ribaud P. Fungal ... al. Clinical Practice Guideline for the Use of Antimicrobial Agents in Neutropenic Patients with Cancer: 2010 Update ...

  16. Oral cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Cancer - mouth; Mouth cancer; Head and neck cancer; Squamous cell cancer - mouth; Malignant neoplasm - oral ... Oral cancer most commonly involves the lips or the tongue. It may also occur on the: Cheek lining Floor ...

  17. Ovarian cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Cancer - ovaries ... Ovarian cancer is the fifth most common cancer among women. It causes more deaths than any other type of female reproductive organ cancer. The cause of ovarian cancer is unknown. Risk ...

  18. Oral Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health About Oral Cancer Oral cancer includes cancers of the mouth and pharynx (the back of the throat). Oral cancer accounts for roughly two percent of all cancers ...

  19. Polytypism and unexpected strong interlayer coupling in two-dimensional layered ReS2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Xiao-Fen; Wu, Jiang-Bin; Zhou, Linwei; Qiao, Jingsi; Shi, Wei; Chen, Tao; Zhang, Xin; Zhang, Jun; Ji, Wei; Tan, Ping-Heng

    2016-04-01

    Anisotropic two-dimensional (2D) van der Waals (vdW) layered materials, with both scientific interest and application potential, offer one more dimension than isotropic 2D materials to tune their physical properties. Various physical properties of 2D multi-layer materials are modulated by varying their stacking orders owing to significant interlayer vdW coupling. Multilayer rhenium disulfide (ReS2), a representative anisotropic 2D material, was expected to be randomly stacked and lack interlayer coupling. Here, we demonstrate two stable stacking orders, namely isotropic-like (IS) and anisotropic-like (AI) N layer (NL, N > 1) ReS2 are revealed by ultralow- and high-frequency Raman spectroscopy, photoluminescence and first-principles density functional theory calculation. Two interlayer shear modes are observed in AI-NL-ReS2 while only one shear mode appears in IS-NL-ReS2, suggesting anisotropic- and isotropic-like stacking orders in IS- and AI-NL-ReS2, respectively. This explicit difference in the observed frequencies identifies an unexpected strong interlayer coupling in IS- and AI-NL-ReS2. Quantitatively, the force constants of them are found to be around 55-90% of those of multilayer MoS2. The revealed strong interlayer coupling and polytypism in multi-layer ReS2 may stimulate future studies on engineering physical properties of other anisotropic 2D materials by stacking orders.Anisotropic two-dimensional (2D) van der Waals (vdW) layered materials, with both scientific interest and application potential, offer one more dimension than isotropic 2D materials to tune their physical properties. Various physical properties of 2D multi-layer materials are modulated by varying their stacking orders owing to significant interlayer vdW coupling. Multilayer rhenium disulfide (ReS2), a representative anisotropic 2D material, was expected to be randomly stacked and lack interlayer coupling. Here, we demonstrate two stable stacking orders, namely isotropic-like (IS) and

  20. 6 Common Cancers - Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues 6 Common Cancers - Breast Cancer Past Issues / Spring 2007 Table of Contents For ... her down. Photo: AP Photo/Brett Flashnick Breast Cancer Breast cancer is a malignant (cancerous) growth that ...

  1. 6 Common Cancers - Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Current Issue Past Issues 6 Common Cancers - Breast Cancer Past Issues / Spring 2007 Table of Contents ... slow her down. Photo: AP Photo/Brett Flashnick Breast Cancer Breast cancer is a malignant (cancerous) growth ...

  2. 6 Common Cancers - Colorectal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Current Issue Past Issues 6 Common Cancers - Colorectal Cancer Past Issues / Spring 2007 Table of Contents For ... of colon cancer. Photo: AP Photo/Ron Edmonds Colorectal Cancer Cancer of the colon (large intestine) or rectum ( ...

  3. 6 Common Cancers - Colorectal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues 6 Common Cancers - Colorectal Cancer Past Issues / Spring 2007 Table of Contents For ... colon cancer. Photo: AP Photo/Ron Edmonds Colorectal Cancer Cancer of the colon (large intestine) or rectum ( ...

  4. Postlingual Adult Performance in Noise with HiRes 120 and ClearVoice Low, Medium and High

    PubMed Central

    Holden, Laura K.; Brenner, Christine; Reeder, Ruth M.; Firszt, Jill B.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives The study’s objectives were to evaluate speech recognition in multiple listening conditions using several noise types with HiRes 120 and ClearVoice (Low, Medium, High) and to determine which ClearVoice program was most beneficial for everyday use. Methods Fifteen postlingual adults attended four sessions; speech recognition was assessed at sessions one and three with HiRes 120 and at sessions two and four with all ClearVoice programs. Test measures included sentences presented in restaurant noise (R-SPACE™), in speech-spectrum noise, in four- and eight-talker babble, and connected discourse presented in 12-talker babble. Participants completed a questionnaire comparing ClearVoice programs. Results Significant group differences in performance between HiRes 120 and ClearVoice were present only in the R-SPACE™; performance was better with ClearVoice High than HiRes 120. Among ClearVoice programs, no significant group differences were present for any measure. Individual results revealed most participants performed better in the R-SPACE™ with ClearVoice than HiRes 120. For other measures, significant individual differences between HiRes 120 and ClearVoice were not prevalent. Individual results among ClearVoice programs differed and overall preferences varied. Questionnaire data indicated increased understanding with High and Medium in certain environments. Discussion R-SPACE™ and questionnaire results indicated an advantage for ClearVoice High and Medium. Individual test and preference data showed mixed results between ClearVoice programs making global recommendations difficult; however, results suggest providing ClearVoice High and Medium and HiRes 120 as processor options for adults willing to change settings. For adults unwilling or unable to change settings, ClearVoice Medium is a practical choice for daily listening. PMID:23683298

  5. Bio-SCoRes: A Smorgasbord Architecture for Coreference Resolution in Biomedical Text

    PubMed Central

    Kilicoglu, Halil; Demner-Fushman, Dina

    2016-01-01

    Coreference resolution is one of the fundamental and challenging tasks in natural language processing. Resolving coreference successfully can have a significant positive effect on downstream natural language processing tasks, such as information extraction and question answering. The importance of coreference resolution for biomedical text analysis applications has increasingly been acknowledged. One of the difficulties in coreference resolution stems from the fact that distinct types of coreference (e.g., anaphora, appositive) are expressed with a variety of lexical and syntactic means (e.g., personal pronouns, definite noun phrases), and that resolution of each combination often requires a different approach. In the biomedical domain, it is common for coreference annotation and resolution efforts to focus on specific subcategories of coreference deemed important for the downstream task. In the current work, we aim to address some of these concerns regarding coreference resolution in biomedical text. We propose a general, modular framework underpinned by a smorgasbord architecture (Bio-SCoRes), which incorporates a variety of coreference types, their mentions and allows fine-grained specification of resolution strategies to resolve coreference of distinct coreference type-mention pairs. For development and evaluation, we used a corpus of structured drug labels annotated with fine-grained coreference information. In addition, we evaluated our approach on two other corpora (i2b2/VA discharge summaries and protein coreference dataset) to investigate its generality and ease of adaptation to other biomedical text types. Our results demonstrate the usefulness of our novel smorgasbord architecture. The specific pipelines based on the architecture perform successfully in linking coreferential mention pairs, while we find that recognition of full mention clusters is more challenging. The corpus of structured drug labels (SPL) as well as the components of Bio-SCoRes and

  6. HiRes camera and LIDAR ranging system for the Clementine mission

    SciTech Connect

    Ledebuhr, A.G.; Kordas, J.F.; Lewis, I.T.

    1995-04-01

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory developed a space-qualified High Resolution (HiRes) imaging LIDAR (Light Detection And Ranging) system for use on the DoD Clementine mission. The Clementine mission provided more than 1.7 million images of the moon, earth, and stars, including the first ever complete systematic surface mapping of the moon from the ultra-violet to near-infrared spectral regions. This article describes the Clementine HiRes/LIDAR system, discusses design goals and preliminary estimates of on-orbit performance, and summarizes lessons learned in building and using the sensor. The LIDAR receiver system consists of a High Resolution (HiRes) imaging channel which incorporates an intensified multi-spectral visible camera combined with a Laser ranging channel which uses an avalanche photo-diode for laser pulse detection and timing. The receiver was bore sighted to a light-weight McDonnell-Douglas diode-pumped ND:YAG laser transmitter that emmitted 1.06 {micro}m wavelength pulses of 200 mJ/pulse and 10 ns pulse-width, The LIDAR receiver uses a common F/9.5 Cassegrain telescope assembly. The optical path of the telescope is split using a color-separating beamsplitter. The imaging channel incorporates a filter wheel assembly which spectrally selects the light which is imaged onto a custom 12 mm gated image intensifier fiber-optically-coupled into a 384 x 276 pixel frame transfer CCD FPA. The image intensifier was spectrally sensitive over the 0.4 to 0.8 {micro}m wavelength region. The six-position filter wheel contained 4 narrow spectral filters, one broadband and one blocking filter. At periselene (400 km) the HiRes/LIDAR imaged a 2.8 km swath width at 20-meter resolution. The LIDAR function detected differential signal return with a 40-meter range accuracy, with a maximum range capability of 640 km, limited by the bit counter in the range return counting clock.

  7. Bio-SCoRes: A Smorgasbord Architecture for Coreference Resolution in Biomedical Text.

    PubMed

    Kilicoglu, Halil; Demner-Fushman, Dina

    2016-01-01

    Coreference resolution is one of the fundamental and challenging tasks in natural language processing. Resolving coreference successfully can have a significant positive effect on downstream natural language processing tasks, such as information extraction and question answering. The importance of coreference resolution for biomedical text analysis applications has increasingly been acknowledged. One of the difficulties in coreference resolution stems from the fact that distinct types of coreference (e.g., anaphora, appositive) are expressed with a variety of lexical and syntactic means (e.g., personal pronouns, definite noun phrases), and that resolution of each combination often requires a different approach. In the biomedical domain, it is common for coreference annotation and resolution efforts to focus on specific subcategories of coreference deemed important for the downstream task. In the current work, we aim to address some of these concerns regarding coreference resolution in biomedical text. We propose a general, modular framework underpinned by a smorgasbord architecture (Bio-SCoRes), which incorporates a variety of coreference types, their mentions and allows fine-grained specification of resolution strategies to resolve coreference of distinct coreference type-mention pairs. For development and evaluation, we used a corpus of structured drug labels annotated with fine-grained coreference information. In addition, we evaluated our approach on two other corpora (i2b2/VA discharge summaries and protein coreference dataset) to investigate its generality and ease of adaptation to other biomedical text types. Our results demonstrate the usefulness of our novel smorgasbord architecture. The specific pipelines based on the architecture perform successfully in linking coreferential mention pairs, while we find that recognition of full mention clusters is more challenging. The corpus of structured drug labels (SPL) as well as the components of Bio-SCoRes and

  8. Multilayer ReS2 lateral p-n homojunction for photoemission and photodetection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Najmzadeh, Mohammad; Ko, Changhyun; Wu, Kedi; Tongay, Sefaattin; Wu, Junqiao

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, a multilayer ReS2 p-n homojunction is fabricated on an oxidized Si substrate, and its photoemission under a forward bias and its photodetection under a reverse bias are reported for the first time. Au nanoparticles were used to make lateral p-n homojunctions. The device shows room temperature photoemission in the IR range, and in the photodetector mode, it shows a 0.41 A/W responsivity under illumination by a 660 nm red laser.

  9. CH-RES-TOCSY: Enantiomers spectral resolution and measurement of heteronuclear residual dipolar couplings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lokesh, N.; Suryaprakash, N.

    2015-04-01

    A new 2D NMR technique cited as CH-RES-TOCSY, for complete unraveling the spectra of enantiomers and for the measurement of structurally important Csbnd H RDCs is reported. The spectral overlap and complexity of peaks were reduced by the blend of selective excitation and homo-decoupling. Differential values of Csbnd H RDCs of enantiomers (R and S) are exploited to separate the enantiomeric peaks. The complete unraveling of the spectra of both the enantiomers is achieved by incorporating a TOCSY mixing block prior to signal acquisition. The additional application of the method is demonstrated for the assignment of symmetric isomers.

  10. Res-E Support Policies in the Baltic States: Electricity Price Aspect (Part II)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobinaite, V.; Priedite, I.

    2015-04-01

    Increasing volumes of electricity derived from renewable energy sources (RES-E) affect the electricity market prices and the prices for final electricity consumers in the Baltic States. The results of a multivariate regression analysis show that in 2013 the RES-E contributed to decreasing the electricity market prices in the Baltic States. However, the final electricity consumers pay for the promotion of RES-E through the approved RES-E component which has a tendency to increase. It is estimated that in 2013 the net benefits from the wind electricity promotion were achieved in Lithuania and Latvia while the net cost - in Estonia. This suggests that the economic efficiency of the wind electricity support scheme based on the application of feed-in tariffs was higher than that based on the feed-in premium. Rakstā analizēta elektroenerģijas ražošanas no atjaunojamiem energoresursiem (AER-E) palielināšanas ietekme uz elektroenerģijas tirgus cenu un gala cenu elektroenerģijas lietotājiem Baltijas valstīs. Daudzfaktoru regresijas analīzes rezultāti atklāja, ka AER-E 2013. gadā varētu samazināt elektroenerģijas tirgus cenas Baltijas valstīs. Tomēr jāņem vērā, ka elektroenerģijas lietotāja gala cenā ir iekļauta AER-E atbalsta komponente, kurai ir raksturīgi palielināties. Aprēķināts, ka no vēja elektroenerģijas ražošanas Latvijā un Lietuvā tika iegūta tīrā peļņa, bet Igaunijā tikai nosedza pašizmaksu. Tas liecina, ka vēja elektroenerģijas atbalsta shēmai, kas balstīta uz obligātā iepirkuma atbalsta principu, ir augstāka ekonomiskā efektivitāte, nekā atbalsta shēmai, kas balstīta uz piemaksu par no AER saražoto elektroenerģiju obligātā iepirkuma ietvaros.

  11. Case report: diffuse splenic metastasis of occult breast cancer with incompatible blood group antigenic determinants.

    PubMed

    Baranyay, Ferenc

    2009-01-01

    Cancer cells with immunogenic properties having altered protein glycosilation, modified blood group substances have been widely studied [Kannagi R, Miyake M, Zenita KM, Itai S, Hiraiwa N, Shigeta K, et al. Cancer-associated carbohydrate antigens: modified blood group substances and oncodevelopmental antigens on tumor cells. Gann Monogr Cancer Res 1988; 34: p. 15-28; Hakomori S. Antigen structure and genetic basis of histo-blood groups A, B and O their changes associated with human cancer. Biochem Biophys Acta 1999; 1473: p. 247-266; Brooks SA, Carter TM, Royle L, Harvey DJ, Fry SA, Kinch C, et al. Altered glycosilation of proteins in cancer: what is the potential for new anti-tumour strategies. Anticancer Agents Med Chem 2008; 8: p. 2-21]. In the study reported here, a 78-year-old female patient was admitted to the hospital with circulatory failure. At autopsy, the spleen (weight: 420 g) was extremely firm with a diffusely blackberry-colored cut surface. There were no signs of carcinomatous process at autopsy. By histology, the spleen showed diffuse metastatic carcinomatous infiltration. Using immunohistochemistry, an antibody to breast carcinoma antigen (BioGenex) labelled metastatic cells of the spleen and bone marrow. The patient was blood group O. Labelling for binding of lectins with and without blood group antigen specificity and monoclonal antibodies was carried out. The B blood group specific Banderiaea simplicifolia agglutinin I and an anti-B blood group monoclonal antibody labelled all the metastatic cells of spleen and bone marrow intensely. There was no detection of blood group A antigen by either binding of Dolichos biflorus agglutinin or anti-blood group A monoclonal antibodies. These observations raise the possibility that the detected incompatible B blood group antigen determinants on the metastatic cells were immunogenic. The surviving carcinoma cells may have found a place of refuge from immune surveillance in the spleen and in the bone marrow

  12. Thyroid Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... are here Home > Types of Cancer > Thyroid Cancer Thyroid Cancer This is Cancer.Net’s Guide to Thyroid Cancer. Use the menu below to choose the ... social workers, and patient advocates. Cancer.Net Guide Thyroid Cancer Overview Statistics Medical Illustrations Risk Factors Symptoms ...

  13. Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... are here Home > Types of Cancer > Breast Cancer Breast Cancer This is Cancer.Net’s Guide to Breast Cancer. Use the menu below to choose the Overview/ ... social workers, and patient advocates. Cancer.Net Guide Breast Cancer Overview Statistics Medical Illustrations Risk Factors Screening Symptoms ...

  14. Anal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... are here Home > Types of Cancer > Anal Cancer Anal Cancer This is Cancer.Net’s Guide to Anal Cancer. Use the menu below to choose the ... social workers, and patient advocates. Cancer.Net Guide Anal Cancer Introduction Statistics Risk Factors and Prevention Screening ...

  15. Cancer Statistics: Pancreas Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Series Pancreatic Cancer - Did you know that an estimated 46,000 Americans were diagnosed with pancreatic cancer ... at a Glance Show More At a Glance Estimated New Cases in 2016 53,070 % of All ...

  16. EGFR over-expression and activation in high HER2, ER negative breast cancer cell line induces trastuzumab resistance.

    PubMed

    Dua, Rajiv; Zhang, Jianhuan; Nhonthachit, Phets; Penuel, Elicia; Petropoulos, Chris; Parry, Gordon

    2010-08-01

    HER2 is gene amplified or over-expressed in 20-25% of breast cancers resulting in elevated HER2 activation. Trastuzumab (Herceptin), a humanized monoclonal antibody, targets activated HER2 and is clinically effective in HER2-over-expressing breast cancers. However, despite prolonged survival, treated breast cancer patients develop resistance. Resistance to trastuzumab occurs upon inactivation of HER2 regulatory proteins or upon up-regulation of alternative receptors. In particular, elevated levels of EGFR, present in estrogen receptor (ER) positive, trastuzumab-resistant BT-474 xenografts caused, a trastuzumab-resistant phenotype (Ritter et al. Clin Cancer Res 13:4909-4919, 2007). However, the role of EGFR in acquired trastuzumab resistance in ER negative cell models is not well defined. In this study, SKBR3 cell line clones expressing EGFR were generated to examine the role of EGFR over-expression on trastuzumab sensitivity in an, ER-negative breast carcinoma cell line. A stable clone, SKBR3/EGFR (clone 4) expressing moderate levels of EGFR remained sensitive to trastuzumab, whereas a stable clone, SKBR3/EGFR (clone 5) expressing high levels of EGFR, became resistant to trastuzumab. Depletion of EGFR by EGFR small-interfering RNAs in the SKBR3/EGFR (clone 5) reversed trastuzumab resistance. However, the SKBR3/EGFR (clone 5) cell line remained sensitive to lapatinib, an EGFR/HER2 inhibitor. Biochemical analysis using co-immunoprecipitation and proximity-based quantitative VeraTag assays demonstrated that high levels of EGFR phosphorylation, EGFR/EGFR homo-dimerization, and EGFR/HER2 hetero-dimerization were present in the trastuzumab-resistant cells. We conclude that EGFR over-expression can mediate trastuzumab resistance in both ER positive and ER negative cells and hypothesize that a threshold level of EGFR, in the absence of autocrine ligand production, is required to induce the resistant phenotype. PMID:19859802

  17. The tomato res mutant which accumulates JA in roots in non-stressed conditions restores cell structure alterations under salinity.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Abellan, José O; Fernandez-Garcia, Nieves; Lopez-Berenguer, Carmen; Egea, Isabel; Flores, Francisco B; Angosto, Trinidad; Capel, Juan; Lozano, Rafael; Pineda, Benito; Moreno, Vicente; Olmos, Enrique; Bolarin, Maria C

    2015-11-01

    Jasmonic acid (JA) regulates a wide spectrum of plant biological processes, from plant development to stress defense responses. The role of JA in plant response to salt stress is scarcely known, and even less known is the specific response in root, the main plant organ responsible for ionic uptake and transport to the shoot. Here we report the characterization of the first tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) mutant, named res (restored cell structure by salinity), that accumulates JA in roots prior to exposure to stress. The res tomato mutant presented remarkable growth inhibition and displayed important morphological alterations and cellular disorganization in roots and leaves under control conditions, while these alterations disappeared when the res mutant plants were grown under salt stress. Reciprocal grafting between res and wild type (WT) (tomato cv. Moneymaker) indicated that the main organ responsible for the development of alterations was the root. The JA-signaling pathway is activated in res roots prior to stress, with transcripts levels being even higher in control condition than in salinity. Future studies on this mutant will provide significant advances in the knowledge of JA role in root in salt-stress tolerance response, as well as in the energy trade-off between plant growth and response to stress. PMID:25582191

  18. The effects of RE and Si on the microstructure and corrosion resistance of Zn-6Al-3Mg hot dip coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shiwei; Gao, Bo; Yin, Shaohua; Tu, Ganfeng; Zhu, Guanglin; Sun, Shuchen; Zhu, Xiaoping

    2015-12-01

    The effects of Si and RE on the microstructure and corrosion resistance of Zn-6Al-3Mg coating (ZAM) have been investigated. Surface morphology observations of the coating and corrosion products reveal that the additions of Si and rare earth metals (RES) improve the microstructural homogeneity of ZAMSR coating and stability of corrosion products formed on ZAMSR coating. Moreover, only uniform corrosion occurs in ZAMSR coating during the corrosion test, while intergranular corrosion and pitting occur in ZAM. As a result, the corrosion resistance of ZAM coating is improved by the additions of Si and RES.

  19. Plumbagin inhibits prostate cancer development in TRAMP mice via targeting PKCε, Stat3 and neuroendocrine markers

    PubMed Central

    Hafeez, Bilal Bin

    2012-01-01

    Plumbagin (PL), 5-hydroxy-2-methyl-1,4-naphthoquinone, is a quinoid constituent isolated from the roots of the medicinal plant Plumbago zeylanica L. (also known as chitrak). PL has also been found in Juglans regia (English Walnut), Juglans cinerea (whitenut) and Juglans nigra (blacknut). The roots of P. zeylanica have been used in Indian and Chinese systems of medicine for more than 2500 years for the treatment of various types of ailments. We were the first to report that PL inhibits the growth and invasion of hormone refractory prostate cancer (PCa) cells [Aziz,M.H. et al. (2008) Plumbagin, a medicinal plant-derived naphthoquinone, is a novel inhibitor of the growth and invasion of hormone-refractory prostate cancer. Cancer Res., 68, 9024–9032.]. Now, we present that PL inhibits in vivo PCa development in the transgenic adenocarcinoma of mouse prostate (TRAMP). PL treatment (2mg/kg body weight i.p. in 0.2ml phosphate-buffered saline, 5 days a week) to FVB–TRAMP resulted in a significant (P < 0.01) decrease in prostate tumor size and urogenital apparatus weights at 13 and 20 weeks. Histopathological analysis revealed that PL treatment inhibited progression of prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN) to poorly differentiated carcinoma (PDC). No animal exhibited diffuse tumor formation in PL-treated group at 13 weeks, whereas 75% of the vehicle-treated mice elicited diffuse PIN and large PDC at this stage. At 20 weeks, 25% of the PL-treated animals demonstrated diffuse PIN and 75% developed small PDC, whereas 100% of the vehicle-treated mice showed large PDC. PL treatment inhibited expression of protein kinase C epsilon (PKCε), signal transducers and activators of transcription 3 phosphorylation, proliferating cell nuclear antigen and neuroendocrine markers (synaptophysin and chromogranin-A) in excised prostate tumor tissues. Taken together, these results further suggest PL could be a novel chemopreventive agent against PCa. PMID:22976928

  20. Predicting Power Output of Upper Body using the OMNI-RES Scale

    PubMed Central

    Bautista, Iker J.; Chirosa, Ignacio J.; Tamayo, Ignacio Martín; González, Andrés; Robinson, Joseph E.; Chirosa, Luis J.; Robertson, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    The main aim of this study was to determine the optimal training zone for maximum power output. This was to be achieved through estimating mean bar velocity of the concentric phase of a bench press using a prediction equation. The values for the prediction equation would be obtained using OMNI–RES scale values of different loads of the bench press exercise. Sixty males (age 23.61 2.81 year; body height 176.29 6.73 cm; body mass 73.28 4.75 kg) voluntarily participated in the study and were tested using an incremental protocol on a Smith machine to determine one repetition maximum (1RM) in the bench press exercise. A linear regression analysis produced a strong correlation (r = −0.94) between rating of perceived exertion (RPE) and mean bar velocity (Velmean). The Pearson correlation analysis between real power output (PotReal) and estimated power (PotEst) showed a strong correlation coefficient of r = 0.77, significant at a level of p = 0.01. Therefore, the OMNI–RES scale can be used to predict Velmean in the bench press exercise to control the intensity of the exercise. The positive relationship between PotReal and PotEst allowed for the identification of a maximum power-training zone. PMID:25713677

  1. An Upper Limit on the Electron-Neutrino Flux from the HiRes Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbasi, R. U.; Abu-Zayyad, T.; Allen, M.; Amann, J. F.; Archbold, G.; Belov, K.; Belz, J. W.; Ben Zvi, S. Y.; Bergman, D. R.; Biesiadecka, A.; Blake, S. A.; Boyer, J. H.; Brusova, O. A.; Burt, G. W.; Cannon, C.; Cao, Z.; Deng, W.; Fedorova, Y.; Findlay, J.; Finley, C. B.; Gray, R. C.; Hanlon, W. F.; Hoffman, C. M.; Holzscheiter, M. H.; Hughes, G.; Hüntemeyer, P.; Ivanov, D.; Jones, B. F.; Jui, C. C. H.; Kim, K.; Kirn, M. A.; Knapp, B. C.; Loh, E. C.; Maestas, M. M.; Manago, N.; Mannel, E. J.; Marek, L. J.; Martens, K.; Matthews, J. A. J.; Matthews, J. N.; Moore, S. A.; O'Neill, A.; Painter, C. A.; Perera, L.; Reil, K.; Riehle, R.; Roberts, M. D.; Rodriguez, D.; Sasaki, M.; Schnetzer, S. R.; Scott, L. M.; Seman, M.; Sinnis, G.; Smith, J. D.; Snow, R.; Sokolsky, P.; Song, C.; Springer, R. W.; Stokes, B. T.; Stratton, S. R.; Thomas, J. R.; Thomas, S. B.; Thomson, G. B.; Tupa, D.; Wiencke, L. R.; Zech, A.; Zhang, X.

    2008-09-01

    Air-fluorescence detectors such as the High Resolution Fly's Eye (HiRes) detector are very sensitive to upward-going, Earth-skimming ultra-high-energy electron-neutrino-induced showers. This is due to the relatively large interaction cross sections of these high-energy neutrinos and to the Landau-Pomeranchuk-Migdal (LPM) effect. The LPM effect causes a significant decrease in the cross sections for bremsstrahlung and pair production, allowing charged-current electron-neutrino-induced showers occurring deep in the Earth's crust to be detectable as they exit the Earth into the atmosphere. A search for upward-going neutrino-induced showers in the HiRes-II monocular data set has yielded a null result. From an LPM calculation of the energy spectrum of charged particles as a function of primary energy and depth for electron-induced showers in rock, we calculate the shape of the resulting profile of these showers in air. We describe a full detector Monte Carlo simulation to determine the detector response to upward-going electron-neutrino-induced cascades and present an upper limit on the flux of electron neutrinos.

  2. Radition belt dynamics : Recent results from van Allen Probes and future observations from CeREs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanekal, Shrikanth; O'Brien, Paul; Baker, Daniel N.; Ogasawara, Keiichi; Fennell, Joseph; Christian, Eric; Claudepierre, Seth; Livi, Stefano; Desai, Mihir; Li, Xinlin; Jaynes, Allison; Turner, Drew; Jones, Ashley; Schiller, Quintin

    2016-07-01

    We describe recent observations of the Earth's radiation belts made by instruments on board the Van Allen Probes mission, particularly the Relativistic Electron Proton Telescope (REPT) and the Magnetic Electron Ion spectrometer (MagEIS). These observations have significantly advanced our understanding of terrestrial radiation belt dynamics. The Van Allen Probes mission comprises two identically instrumented spacecraft which were launched 31 August, 2012 into low-inclination lapping equatorial orbits. The orbit periods are about 9 hours, with perigees and apogees of of ~600 km and 5.8 RE respectively. We discuss the new scientific findings of the Van Allen Probes mission regarding the physics of energization and loss of relativistic electrons and their implications for future low-cost missions, especially CubeSats. We describe the CeREs (a Compact Radiation belt Explorer) CubeSat mission currently being built at the Goddard Space Flight Center, and carrying on board, an innovative instrument, the Miniaturized Electron Proton Telescope (MERiT). The MERiT is a compact low-mass low-power instrument measuring electrons from a few keV to tens of MeV in multiple differential channels. MERiT is optimized to measure electron microbursts with a high time resolution of a few milliseconds. We present and discuss possible future scientific contributions from CeREs.

  3. Cancer in beluga from the St. Lawrence estuary.

    PubMed Central

    Hammill, Mike O; Lesage, Véronique; Kingsley, Michael C S

    2003-01-01

    Martineau et al. (2002) reported that St. Lawrence beluga (SLB) have high cancer rates. Unfortunately, errors in their interpretation of the data have led them to overstate the importance of cancer and its links to environmental sources. PMID:12573920

  4. Prostate Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Prostate Cancer What is Prostate Cancer? How Tumors Form The body is made up ... the Escape (Esc) button on your keyboard.) How Prostate Cancer Occurs Prostate cancer occurs when a tumor forms ...

  5. Esophageal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... esophagus, and chest wall Lung Cancer Esophageal Cancer Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease Barrett’s Esophagus Chest Wall Tumors Mediastinal Tumors ... Section Navigation Select Topic Lung Cancer Esophageal Cancer Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease Barrett’s Esophagus Chest Wall Tumors Mediastinal Tumors ...

  6. Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Breast Cancer What is Breast Cancer? How Tumors Form The body is made up ... tumors form in the breast tissue. Who Gets Breast Cancer? Breast cancer is one of the most common ...

  7. Testicular cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Cancer - testes; Germ cell tumor; Seminoma testicular cancer; Nonseminoma testicular cancer ... The exact cause of testicular cancer is unknown. Factors that may ... increases if he has: Abnormal testicle development Exposure ...

  8. Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Breast cancer affects one in eight women during their lives. Breast cancer kills more women in the United States ... cancer. No one knows why some women get breast cancer, but there are a number of risk ...

  9. Ovarian Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Ovarian Cancer There are five main types of cancer that affect a woman’s reproductive organs: cervical, ovarian, uterine, ... rare fallopian tube cancer.) This fact sheet about ovarian cancer is part of the Centers for Disease Control ...

  10. Cancer Statistics

    MedlinePlus

    ... cancer statistics across the world. U.S. Cancer Mortality Trends The best indicator of progress against cancer is ... the number of cancer survivors has increased. These trends show that progress is being made against the ...

  11. Breast cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... of targeted therapy. It blocks certain hormones that fuel cancer growth. Cancer treatment can be local or ... breast cancer should not drink alcohol at all) Alternative Names Cancer - breast; Carcinoma - ductal; Carcinoma - lobular; DCIS; ...

  12. Incidence, detection, and tumour stage of breast cancer in a cohort of Italian women with negative screening mammography report recommending early (short-interval) rescreen

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Although poorly described in the literature, the practice of early (short-interval) rescreen after a negative screening mammogram is controversial due to its financial and psychological burden and because it is of no proven benefit. Methods The present study targeted an Italian 2-yearly screening programme (Emilia-Romagna Region, 1997-2002). An electronic dataset of 647,876 eligible negative mammography records from 376,257 women aged 50-69 years was record-linked with the regional breast cancer registry. The statistical analysis addressed the following research questions: (1) the prevalence of recommendation for early (<24 months) rescreen (RES) among negative mammography reports; (2) factors associated with the likelihood of a women receiving RES; and (3) whether women receiving RES and women receiving standard negative reports differed in terms of proportional incidence of interval breast cancer, recall rate at the next rescreen, detection rate of breast cancer at the next rescreen and the odds of having late-stage breast cancer during the interscreening interval and at the next rescreen. Results RES was used in eight out of 13 screening centres, where it was found in 4171 out of 313,320 negative reports (average rate 1.33%; range 0.05%-4.33%). Reports with RES were more likely for women aged 50-59 years versus older women (odds ratio (OR) 1.33; 95% CI 1.25-1.42), for the first versus subsequent screening rounds (OR 1.91; 95% CI 1.79-2.04) and with a centre-specific recall rate below the average of 6.2% (OR 1.41; 95% CI 1.32-1.50). RES predicted a 3.51-fold (95% CI 0.94-9.29) greater proportional incidence of first-year interval cancers, a 1.90-fold (95% CI 1.62-2.22) greater recall rate at the next screen, a 1.72-fold (95% CI 1.01-2.74) greater detection rate of cancer at the next screen and a non-significantly decreased risk of late disease stage (OR 0.59; 95% CI 0.23-1.53). Conclusion The prevalence of RES was in line with the maximum standard

  13. Sleep on the right side-Get cancer on the left?

    PubMed

    Hallberg, Orjan; Johansson, Olle

    2010-06-01

    Breast cancer frequently occurs in the left breast among both women and men [R. Roychoudhuri, V. Putcha, H. Møller, Cancer and laterality: a study of the five major paired organs (UK), Cancer Causes Control 17 (2006) 655-662; M.T. Goodman, K.H. Tung, L.R. Wilkens, Comparative epidemiology of breast cancer among men and women in the US, 1996 to 2000, Cancer Causes Control 17 (2006) 127-136; C.I. Perkins, J. Hotes, B.A. Kohler, H.L. Howe, Association between breast cancer laterality and tumor location, United States, 1994-1998, Cancer Causes Control 15 (2004) 637-645; H.A. Weiss, S.S. Devesa, L.A. Brinton, Laterality of breast cancer in the United States, Cancer Causes Control 7 (1996) 539-543; A. Ekbom, H.O. Adami, D. Trichopoulos, M. Lambe, C.C. Hsieh, J. Pontén, Epidemiologic correlates of breast cancer laterality (Sweden), Cancer Causes Control 5 (1994) 510-516]. Moreover, recent results showed that the left side of the body is more prone to melanoma than the right side [D.H. Brewster, M.J. Horner, S. Rowan, P. Jelfs, E. de Vries, E. Pukkala, Left-sided excess of invasive cutaneous melanoma in six countries, Eur. J. Cancer 43 (2007) 2634-2637]. Current explanations for left-sided breast cancer include handedness [L. Titus-Ernstoff, P.A. Newcomb, K.M. Egan, et al., Left-handedness in relation to breast cancer risk in postmenopausal women, Epidemiology 11 (2000) 181-184; M.A. Kramer, S. Albrecht, R.A. Miller, Handedness and the laterality of breast cancer in women, Nurs. Res. 34 (1985) 333-337; M.K. Ramadhani, S.G. Elias, P.A. van Noord, D.E. Grobbee, P.H. Peeters, C.S. Uiterwaal, Innate left handedness and risk of breast cancer: case-cohort study, BMJ 331 (2005) 882-883], size difference, nursing preference, and brain structure. However, men are affected even more by left laterality than women, thus many of these explanations are unconvincing. Increasing rates of skin melanoma have been associated with immune-disruptive radiation from FM/TV transmitters [O

  14. [Studies on Cancer Diagnosis by Using Spectroscopy Combined with Chemometrics].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhuo-yong

    2015-09-01

    Studies on cancer diagnosis using various spectroscopic methods combined with chemometrics are briefly reviewed. Elemental contents in serum samples were determined by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES), bidirectional associative memory (BAM) networks were used to establish diagnosis models for the relationships between elemental contents and lung cancer, liver cancer, and stomach cancer, respectively. Near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) is a non-destructive detection technology. Near infrared spectra of endometrial carcinoma samples were determined and spectral features were extracted by chemoometric methods, a fuzzy rule-based expert system (FuRES) was used for establishing diagnosis model, satisfactory results were obtained. We also proposed a novel variable selection method based on particle swarm optimization (PSO) for near infrared spectra of endometrial carcinoma samples. Spectra with optimized variable were then modeled by support victor machine (SVM). Terahertz technology is an emerging technology for non-destructive detection, which has some unique characteristics. Terahertz time domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) was used for cervical carcinoma measurement. Absorption coefficients were calculated from the measured time domain spectra and then processed with derivative, orthogonal signal correction (PC-OSC) to reduce interference components, and then fuzzy rule-based expert system (FuRES), fuzzy optimal associative memory (FOAM), support victor machine (SVM), and partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) were used for diagnosis model establishment. The above results provide useful information for cancer occurring and development, and provide novel approaches for early stage diagnosis of various cancers. PMID:26669135

  15. DNA Methylation in Cancer and Aging.

    PubMed

    Klutstein, Michael; Nejman, Deborah; Greenfield, Razi; Cedar, Howard

    2016-06-15

    DNA methylation is known to be abnormal in all forms of cancer, but it is not really understood how this occurs and what is its role in tumorigenesis. In this review, we take a wide view of this problem by analyzing the strategies involved in setting up normal DNA methylation patterns and understanding how this stable epigenetic mark works to prevent gene activation during development. Aberrant DNA methylation in cancer can be generated either prior to or following cell transformation through mutations. Increasing evidence suggests, however, that most methylation changes are generated in a programmed manner and occur in a subpopulation of tissue cells during normal aging, probably predisposing them for tumorigenesis. It is likely that this methylation contributes to the tumor state by inhibiting the plasticity of cell differentiation processes. Cancer Res; 76(12); 3446-50. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27256564

  16. Cancer Prevention and Interception: A New Era for Chemopreventive Approaches.

    PubMed

    Albini, Adriana; DeCensi, Andrea; Cavalli, Franco; Costa, Alberto

    2016-09-01

    At several recent, internationally attended scientific meetings, including the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR)'s "Shaping the Future of Cancer Prevention: A Roadmap for Integrative Cancer Science and Public Health" summit in Leesburg (VA) and the AACR Annual Meeting in New Orleans, the focus on cancer prevention to reduce cancer-related deaths was extensively discussed with renewed attention and emphasis. Cancer prevention should be actively proposed even to healthy individuals, and not just to individuals with high cancer risk. We discuss evaluation of a high cancer risk versus the relatively low risk for side effects of chemopreventive agents. The concept of cancer interception, which is halting transformed cells from becoming malignant cancers, should be adopted for cancer prevention. Potential prevention/interception actions include adopting healthy life style and avoiding carcinogens, repressing inflammation and pathologic angiogenesis, controlling metabolism, correcting insulin resistance and other metabolic alterations. Current drugs with limited toxicity can be repurposed to reduce cancer incidence. Aspirin is now being recommended for the prevention of colorectal cancer and it prevents other neoplasms as well. Metformin and β-blockers could be valuable for reducing pancreatic and breast cancer onset. On the basis of the evaluation of cancer risk, we here call for personalized approaches for cancer prevention and preventive interception and we envisage a list of measures and potential guidelines for preventive and interceptive strategies to reduce cancer burden. Investment into translational research to bring these approaches into public health policies and in the clinic is urgently needed. Clin Cancer Res; 22(17); 4322-7. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27220959

  17. Lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Aisner, J.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains 13 chapters. Some of the chapter titles are: The Pathology of Lung Cancer; Radiotherapy for Non-Small-Cell Cancer of the Lung; Chemotherapy for Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer; Immunotherapy in the Management of Lung Cancer; Preoperative Staging and Surgery for Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer; and Prognostic Factors in Lung Cancer.

  18. 6 Common Cancers - Lung Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Current Issue Past Issues 6 Common Cancers - Lung Cancer Past Issues / Spring 2007 Table of Contents For ... for Desperate Housewives. (Photo ©2005 Kathy Hutchins / Hutchins) Lung Cancer Lung cancer causes more deaths than the next ...

  19. 6 Common Cancers - Skin Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues 6 Common Cancers - Skin Cancer Past Issues / Spring 2007 Table of Contents For ... AP Photo/Herald-Mail, Kevin G. Gilbert Skin Cancer Skin cancer is the most common form of ...

  20. 6 Common Cancers - Lung Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues 6 Common Cancers - Lung Cancer Past Issues / Spring 2007 Table of Contents For ... Desperate Housewives. (Photo ©2005 Kathy Hutchins / Hutchins) Lung Cancer Lung cancer causes more deaths than the next ...

  1. What Causes Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... articles window. My Saved Articles » My ACS » What Causes Cancer? Cancer is a complex group of diseases with ... cancer. Learn About Cancer Topics Cancer Basics What Causes Cancer? Breast Cancer Colon/Rectum Cancer Lung Cancer Prostate ...

  2. Immunoscore in Rectal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-28

    Cancer of the Rectum; Neoplasms, Rectal; Rectal Cancer; Rectal Tumors; Rectal Adenocarcinoma; Melanoma; Breast Cancer; Renal Cell Cancer; Lung Cancer; Bladder Cancer; Head and Neck Cancer; Ovarian Cancer; Thyroid Cancer

  3. Aicardi-Goutières syndrome is caused by IFIH1 mutations.

    PubMed

    Oda, Hirotsugu; Nakagawa, Kenji; Abe, Junya; Awaya, Tomonari; Funabiki, Masahide; Hijikata, Atsushi; Nishikomori, Ryuta; Funatsuka, Makoto; Ohshima, Yusei; Sugawara, Yuji; Yasumi, Takahiro; Kato, Hiroki; Shirai, Tsuyoshi; Ohara, Osamu; Fujita, Takashi; Heike, Toshio

    2014-07-01

    Aicardi-Goutières syndrome (AGS) is a rare, genetically determined early-onset progressive encephalopathy. To date, mutations in six genes have been identified as etiologic for AGS. Our Japanese nationwide AGS survey identified six AGS-affected individuals without a molecular diagnosis; we performed whole-exome sequencing on three of these individuals. After removal of the common polymorphisms found in SNP databases, we were able to identify IFIH1 heterozygous missense mutations in all three. In vitro functional analysis revealed that IFIH1 mutations increased type I interferon production, and the transcription of interferon-stimulated genes were elevated. IFIH1 encodes MDA5, and mutant MDA5 lacked ligand-specific responsiveness, similarly to the dominant Ifih1 mutation responsible for the SLE mouse model that results in type I interferon overproduction. This study suggests that the IFIH1 mutations are responsible for the AGS phenotype due to an excessive production of type I interferon. PMID:24995871

  4. An alternative method to finding patterns in HiRes stereo data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbasi, R. U.; Abu-Zayyad, T.; Amman, J. F.; Archbold, G. C.; Belov, K.; Blake, S. A.; Belz, J. W.; BenZvi, S.; Bergman, D. R.; Boyer, J. H.; Burt, G. W.; Cao, Z.; Connolly, B. M.; Deng, W.; Fedorova, Y.; Findlay, J.; Finley, C. B.; Gray, R. C.; Hanlon, W. F.; Hoffman, C. M.; Holzscheiter, M. H.; Hughes, G. A.; Hüntemeyer, P.; Jones, B. F.; Jui, C. C. H.; Kim, K.; Kirn, M. A.; Knapp, B. C.; Loh, E. C.; Maestas, M. M.; Manago, N.; Mannel, E. J.; Marek, L. J.; Martins, K.; Matthews, J. A. J.; Matthews, J. N.; Moore, S. A.; O'Neill, A.; Painter, C. A.; Perera, L.; Reil, K.; Riehle, R.; Roberts, M.; Rodriguez, D.; Sasaki, M.; Schnetzer, S.; Scott, L. M.; Seman, M.; Sinnis, G.; Smith, J. D.; Sokolsky, P.; Song, C.; Springer, R. W.; Stokes, B. T.; Thomas, J. R.; Thomas, S. B.; Thomson, G. B.; Tupa, D.; Westerhoff, S.; Weincke, L. R.; Zech, A.; Zhang, X.

    2007-12-01

    In this paper ultra-high energy cosmic rays UHECRs data observed by the HiRes fluorescence detector in stereo mode is analyzed to search for events in the sky with an arrival direction lying on a great circle. Such structure is known as the arc structure. The arc structure is expected when the charged cosmic rays pass through the galactic magnetic field. The arcs searched for could represent a broad or a small scale anisotropy depending on the proposed source model for the UHECRs. The arcs in this paper are looked for using Hough transform were Hough transform is a technique used to looking for patterns in images. No statistically significant arcs were found in this study.

  5. Malaria, malnutrition and MSF. Médecins Sans Frontières.

    PubMed

    Evans, D W

    This is a personal account of my brief time in Burundi as a volunteer doctor with Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) at the beginning of 2001. Burundi is a small nation in central Africa (bounded by the Democratic Republic of Congo, Rwanda and Tanzania) which has suffered from problems between the Hutu and Tutsi "ethnic groups", similar to those for which Rwanda is better known. Unlike Rwanda, the war between government troops and rebel forces continues in Burundi. MSF has been in Burundi since 1992, providing basic healthcare, nutrition programs, surgical services and epidemiological intervention. In late 2000, a malaria epidemic began in Burundi's highland regions where transmission is normally low, and thus the population largely not immune. Malnutrition rates also increased and MSF rapidly expanded its usual program in an attempt to control these new health problems. PMID:11837845

  6. An RES-Based Model for Risk Assessment and Prediction of Backbreak in Bench Blasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faramarzi, F.; Ebrahimi Farsangi, M. A.; Mansouri, H.

    2013-07-01

    Most blasting operations are associated with various forms of energy loss, emerging as environmental side effects of rock blasting, such as flyrock, vibration, airblast, and backbreak. Backbreak is an adverse phenomenon in rock blasting operations, which imposes risk and increases operation expenses because of safety reduction due to the instability of walls, poor fragmentation, and uneven burden in subsequent blasts. In this paper, based on the basic concepts of a rock engineering systems (RES) approach, a new model for the prediction of backbreak and the risk associated with a blast is presented. The newly suggested model involves 16 effective parameters on backbreak due to blasting, while retaining simplicity as well. The data for 30 blasts, carried out at Sungun copper mine, western Iran, were used to predict backbreak and the level of risk corresponding to each blast by the RES-based model. The results obtained were compared with the backbreak measured for each blast, which showed that the level of risk achieved is in consistence with the backbreak measured. The maximum level of risk [vulnerability index (VI) = 60] was associated with blast No. 2, for which the corresponding average backbreak was the highest achieved (9.25 m). Also, for blasts with levels of risk under 40, the minimum average backbreaks (<4 m) were observed. Furthermore, to evaluate the model performance for backbreak prediction, the coefficient of correlation ( R 2) and root mean square error (RMSE) of the model were calculated ( R 2 = 0.8; RMSE = 1.07), indicating the good performance of the model.

  7. Quality of Life in Patients Undergoing Radiation Therapy for Primary Lung Cancer, Head and Neck Cancer, or Gastrointestinal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-19

    Anal Cancer; Colorectal Cancer; Esophageal Cancer; Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Gallbladder Cancer; Gastric Cancer; Head and Neck Cancer; Liver Cancer; Lung Cancer; Pancreatic Cancer; Small Intestine Cancer

  8. Toxoplasmosis in a bar-shouldered dove (Geopelia humeralis) from the zoo of Clères, France

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Toxoplasmosis causes mortality in several avian species, especially passerine birds. Toxoplasmosis was diagnosed in a bar-shouldered dove (Geopelia humeralis) found dead at the zoo of Clères (France). The bird had necrotizing pneumonia and nephritis with intralesional tachyzoites of Toxoplasma gondi...

  9. ALS - The cost cutter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colucci, Frank

    1987-10-01

    The Advanced Launch System (ALS) development program will avail itself of existing technologies in the short term in order to produce an interim 'core' vehicle that may be operational by 1993; the full, booster-incorporating system objective will then be achieved in 1998. This programmatic 'decoupling' of booster and core vehicle development efforts will separate their funding peaks. The ALS program will cut costs by colocating manufacturing and launch facilities, using Al-Li alloys in booster primary structures, and aggressively applying 'paperless' CIM. The ALS launch vehicle configuration will be primarily determined by both payload requirements and flight frequency.

  10. Les nouveaux critères de la Maladie d’Alzheimer – Perspective gériatrique*

    PubMed Central

    Molin, Pierre; Rockwood, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    RÉSUMÉ Deux nouvelles séries de critères pour le diagnostic de la maladie d’Alzheimer sont maintenant en vigueur, incluant une série publiée en 2014. Un « nouveau lexique » conceptualisant la maladie a également été proposé. En 2012, la Conférence consensuelle canadienne affirmait que, pour l’instant, ni les nouveaux critères ni la nouvelle terminologie ne modifiaient la pratique en première ligne. Néanmoins, pour les consultants spécialisés en démence, l’avènement de ces critères ouvre la porte à de nombreux défis et occasions. En général, les nouveaux critères accordent une place grandissante aux biomarqueurs. Toutefois, les évidences qui sous-tendent leur utilisation demeurent incomplètes. L’étude de sujets provenant de la communauté ayant raffiné notre compréhension des critères neuropathologiques des démences, il est probable que notre expérience avec les biomarqueurs en bénéficierait également. Pour l’instant, ces critères sont réservés à la recherche. Cependant, leur adoption à plus large échelle est pressentie, particulièrement aux États-Unis. Les gériatres canadiens doivent être conscients de la terminologie maintenant utilisée et du changement fondamental qui en découle : un diagnostic de maladie d’Alzheimer ne requiert plus un diagnostic de démence. Dans l’attente de nouvelles données – auxquelles les gériatres peuvent contribuer – il y a lieu de faire preuve de prudence dans l’adoption des nouveaux critères, car ils sont susceptibles de moins bien s’appliquer aux personnes âgées. PMID:27403215

  11. The role of Al in C-S-H: NMR, XRD, and compositional results for precipitated samples

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, G.K.; Young, J. Francis; Kirkpatrick, R. James . E-mail: kirkpat@uiuc.edu

    2006-01-15

    X-ray diffraction, compositional analysis, and {sup 29}Si and {sup 27}Al MAS NMR spectroscopy of Al-substituted tobermorite-type C-S-H made by precipitation from solution provide significant new insight into the structural mechanisms of Al-substitution in this important and complicated phase. Al occurs in 4-, 5-, and 6-coordination (Al[4], Al[5], and Al[6]) and plays multiple structural roles. Al[4] occurs on the bridging tetrahedra of the drierkette Al-silicate chains, and Al[5] and Al[6] occur in the interlayer and perhaps on particle surfaces. Al does not enter either the central Ca-O sheet or the pairing tetrahedra of the tobermorite-type layers. Al[4] occurs on three types of bridging sites, Q{sup 3} sites that bridge across the interlayer; Q{sup 2} sites that are charge balanced by interlayer Ca{sup +2}, Na{sup +}, or H{sup +}; and Q{sup 2} sites that are most likely charge balanced by interlayer or surface Al[5] and Al[6] through Al[4]-O-Al[5,6] linkages. Although the data presented here are for relatively well-crystallized tobermorite-type C-S-H with C/S ratios {<=} 1.2, comparable spectral features for hydrated white cement pastes in previously published papers [M.D. Andersen, H.J. Jakobsen, J. Skibsted, Incorporation of aluminum in the calcium silicate hydrate (C-S-H) of hydrated Portland cements: a high-field {sup 27}Al and {sup 29}Si MAS NMR investigation Inorg. Chem. 42 (2003) 2280-2287; M.D. Andersen, H.J. Jakobsen, J. Skibsted, Characterization of white Portland cement hydration and the C-S-H structure in the presence of sodium aliminate by {sup 27}Al and {sup 29}Si MAS NMR spectroscopy, Cem. Concr. Res. 43 (2004) 857-868; M.D. Andersen, H. J. Jakobsen, J. Skibsted, A new aluminum-hydrate phase in hydrated Portland cements characterized by {sup 27}Al and {sup 29}Si MAS NMR spectroscopy, Cem. Concr. Res., submitted for publication.] indicate the presence of similar structural environments in the C-S-H of such pastes, and by implication OPC pastes.

  12. Al-Anon/Alateen

    MedlinePlus

    Find an Al-Anon meeting Español | Français 2018 Int'l Convention Home About Group Meetings What If I'm not ready ... a meeting? What can I expect at an Al-Anon meeting? What was my first meeting like? ...

  13. Zebrafish as a cancer model.

    PubMed

    Feitsma, Harma; Cuppen, Edwin

    2008-05-01

    The zebrafish has developed into an important model organism for biomedical research over the last decades. Although the main focus of zebrafish research has traditionally been on developmental biology, keeping and observing zebrafish in the lab led to the identification of diseases similar to humans, such as cancer, which subsequently became a subject for study. As a result, about 50 articles have been published since 2000 in which zebrafish were used as a cancer model. Strategies used include carcinogenic treatments, transplantation of mammalian cancer cells, forward genetic screens for proliferation or genomic instability, reverse genetic target-selected mutagenesis to inactivate known tumor suppressor genes, and the generation of transgenics to express human oncogenes. Zebrafish have been found to develop almost any tumor type known from human, with similar morphology and, according to gene expression array studies, comparable signaling pathways. However, tumor incidences are relatively low, albeit highly comparable between different mutants, and tumors develop late in life. In addition, tumor spectra are sometimes different when compared with mice and humans. Nevertheless, the zebrafish model has created its own niche in cancer research, complementing existing models with its specific experimental advantages and characteristics. Examples of these are imaging of tumor progression in living fish by fluorescence, treatment with chemical compounds, and screening possibilities not only for chemical modifiers but also for genetic enhancers and suppressors. This review aims to provide a comprehensive overview of the state of the art of zebrafish as a model in cancer research. (Mol Cancer Res 2008;6(5):685-94). PMID:18505914

  14. Is There a Future for Chemoprevention of Prostate Cancer?

    PubMed

    Bosland, Maarten C

    2016-08-01

    The outcome of the Selenium and Vitamin E Cancer Prevention Trial, demonstrating harm and no preventive activity of selenomethionine and α-tocopherol for prostate cancer, and the lack of approval by the FDA for the use of 5α-reductase inhibitors to prevent prostate cancer have cast doubt about the future of chemoprevention of prostate cancer. This article attempts to critically assess whether the notion that chemoprevention of prostate cancer has no future is warranted. Risk of prostate cancer is modifiable and chemoprevention of prostate cancer, particularly fatal/lethal cancer, is both needed and possible. However, the approach to prostate cancer-chemopreventive agent development has not followed a rational and systematic process. To make progress, the following steps are necessary: (i) identification of intermediate biomarkers predictive of fatal/lethal disease; (ii) development of a rational approach to identification of candidate agents, including high-throughput screening and generation of information on mechanism and biology of candidate agents and potential molecular targets; and (iii) systematic evaluation of the predictive value of preclinical models, phase II trials, and intermediate biomarkers for the outcome of phase III trials. New phase III trials should be based on adequate preclinical and phase II studies. Cancer Prev Res; 9(8); 642-7. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27099271

  15. Aerodigestive cancers: oral cancer.

    PubMed

    Haws, Luke; Haws, Bryn Taylor

    2014-09-01

    Worldwide, approximately 260,000 new cases of oral cancer occur, and more than 125,000 mortalities are attributed to oral cancers each year. Oral cancers most commonly arise in the tongue, followed by the floor of the mouth and the lower gum. Tobacco and alcohol use are the major risk factors, although human papillomavirus has been identified as an etiology in a small percentage of oral squamous cell cancers. Although the evidence to support routine annual screening for oral cancers is inconclusive, family physicians and dental practitioners should be attentive to precursor lesions, such as leukoplakia and erythroplakia, and strongly consider obtaining or referring for biopsy patients with suspicious lesions. Depending on stage, management of oral cancers often involves surgery, with or without postoperative radiotherapy or chemotherapy. Patients who have been treated for these cancers should undergo close surveillance by otolaryngology subspecialists, but their family physicians primarily will be responsible for their long-term care. Complications relating to management, including difficulties with speech, swallowing, and chewing, will need to be addressed. For patients with advanced-stage disease, family physicians also may be responsible for palliative and end-of-life care. PMID:25198382

  16. S.Res.282 — 112th Congress (2011-2012) A resolution to authorize testimony in Kanelos v. County of Mohave, et al. and Zanna, et al. v. Mohave County, et al.

    THOMAS, 112th Congress

    Sen. Reid, Harry [D-NV

    2011-09-23

    09/23/2011 Submitted in the Senate, considered, and agreed to without amendment and with a preamble by Unanimous Consent. (consideration: CR S5958-5959; text as passed Senate: CR S5959; text of measure as introduced: CR S5952) (All Actions)

  17. Thrombosis in Cancer: Research Priorities Identified by a National Cancer Institute/National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Strategic Working Group.

    PubMed

    Key, Nigel S; Khorana, Alok A; Mackman, Nigel; McCarty, Owen J T; White, Gilbert C; Francis, Charles W; McCrae, Keith R; Palumbo, Joseph S; Raskob, Gary E; Chan, Andrew T; Sood, Anil K

    2016-07-01

    The risk for venous thromboembolism (VTE) is increased in cancer and particularly with chemotherapy, and it portends poorer survival among patients with cancer. However, many fundamental questions about cancer-associated VTE, or Trousseau syndrome, remain unanswered. This report summarizes the proceedings of a working group assembled by the NCI and NHLBI in August 2014 to explore the state of the science in cancer-associated VTE, identify clinically important research gaps, and develop consensus on priorities for future research. Representing a convergence of research priorities between the two NIH Institutes, the workshop addressed epidemiologic, basic science, clinical, and translational issues in cancer-associated VTE. Cancer Res; 76(13); 3671-5. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27527638

  18. Predicting cancer outcome

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, S N; Fernandes, M

    2005-03-24

    We read with interest the paper by Michiels et al on the prediction of cancer with microarrays and the commentary by Ioannidis listing the potential as well as the limitations of this approach (February 5, p 488 and 454). Cancer is a disease characterized by complex, heterogeneous mechanisms and studies to define factors that can direct new drug discovery and use should be encouraged. However, this is easier said than done. Casti teaches that a better understanding does not necessarily extrapolate to better prediction, and that useful prediction is possible without complete understanding (1). To attempt both, explanation and prediction, in a single nonmathematical construct, is a tall order (Figure 1).

  19. Les cellulites cervico-faciales graves, facteurs et critères de gravité

    PubMed Central

    Lakouichmi, Mohammed; Tourabi, Khalid; Abir, Bader-eddine; Zouhair, Said; Lahmiti, Saad; Hattab, Nadia Mansouri

    2014-01-01

    La cellulite cervico-faciale grave est une infection polymicrobienne extensive et redoutable du tissu cellulo-adipeux de la face et du cou. L'objectif de cette étude est d'analyser certains facteurs favorisants et d’évaluer les critères de gravité en fonction des formes anatomo-cliniques. Il s'agit d'une étude rétrospective réalisée, entre janvier 2007 et décembre 2012, au service de chirurgie maxillo faciale de l'hôpital militaire Avicenne de Marrakech. Sur 147 cas de cellulites cervico-faciales pris en charge au niveau du service, 13 dossiers de cellulites graves ont été retenus. Neuf hommes (69%) et quatre femmes (31%) ont fait l'objet de cette étude, avec un âge moyen de 35 ans. Tous les patients ont été adressés pour prise en charge secondaire après avoir pris des anti-inflammatoires (AI). Sept cas (54%) étaient immunocompétents. La cause dentaire était soulevée chez neufs cas (69%). Cinq cas (38%) ont présenté une forme pseudo phlegmoneuse avec des signes compressifs des voies aéro-digestives. L'extension médiastinale a été observée chez quatre patients (31%). La forme nécrosante extensive a été retrouvée dans trois cas (23%). L’étude bactériologique, réalisée chez tous les patients, avait mis en évidence une flore microbienne mixte et polymorphe. Les cellulites cervico-faciales graves posent un réel problème de prise en charge thérapeutique. L'analyse des facteurs favorisants et l’évaluation des critères de gravité dans cette série ont permis de limiter une évolution défavorable. PMID:26113891

  20. Cholesterol Metabolism and Prostate Cancer Lethality.

    PubMed

    Stopsack, Konrad H; Gerke, Travis A; Sinnott, Jennifer A; Penney, Kathryn L; Tyekucheva, Svitlana; Sesso, Howard D; Andersson, Swen-Olof; Andrén, Ove; Cerhan, James R; Giovannucci, Edward L; Mucci, Lorelei A; Rider, Jennifer R

    2016-08-15

    Cholesterol metabolism has been implicated in prostate cancer pathogenesis. Here, we assessed the association of intratumoral mRNA expression of cholesterol synthesis enzymes, transporters, and regulators in tumor specimen at diagnosis and lethal prostate cancer, defined as mortality or metastases from prostate cancer in contrast to nonlethal disease without evidence of metastases after at least 8 years of follow-up. We analyzed the prospective prostate cancer cohorts within the Health Professionals Follow-up Study (n = 249) and the Physicians' Health Study (n = 153) as well as expectantly managed patients in the Swedish Watchful Waiting Study (n = 338). The expression of squalene monooxygenase (SQLE) was associated with lethal cancer in all three cohorts. Men with high SQLE expression (>1 standard deviation above the mean) were 8.3 times (95% confidence interval, 3.5 to 19.7) more likely to have lethal cancer despite therapy compared with men with the mean level of SQLE expression. Absolute SQLE expression was associated with lethal cancer independently from Gleason grade and stage, as was a SQLE expression ratio in tumor versus surrounding benign prostate tissue. Higher SQLE expression was tightly associated with increased histologic markers of angiogenesis. Collectively, this study establishes the prognostic value of intratumoral cholesterol synthesis as measured via SQLE, its second rate-limiting enzyme. SQLE expression at cancer diagnosis is prognostic for lethal prostate cancer both after curative-intent prostatectomy and in a watchful waiting setting, possibly by facilitating micrometastatic disease. Cancer Res; 76(16); 4785-90. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27325648

  1. [Environmental factors in ALS].

    PubMed

    Juntas-Morales, Raul; Pageot, Nicolas; Corcia, Philippe; Camu, William

    2014-05-01

    ALS is likely to be a disorder of multifactorial origin. Among all the factors that may increase the risk of ALS, environmental ones are being studied for many years, but in the recent years, several advances have pointed to a new interest in their potential involvement in the disease process, especially for the cyanotoxin BMAA. Food containing BMAA has been found on Guam, a well-known focus of ALS/parkinsonism/dementia and high levels of BMAA have been identified into the brain of these patients. The BMAA cyanotoxin is potentially ubiquitous and have also been found into the food of patients who died from ALS both in Europe and USA. BMAA can be wrongly integrated into the protein structure during mRNA traduction, competing with serine. This may induce abnormal protein folding and a subsequent cell death. Heavy metals, such as lead or mercury may be directly toxic for neuronal cells. Several works have suggested an increased risk of ALS in individuals chronically exposed to these metals. Exposure to pesticides has been suggested to be linked to an increased risk of developing ALS. The mechanism of their toxicity is likely to be mediated by paraoxonases. These proteins are in charge of detoxifying the organism from toxins, and particularly organophosphates. To date, there are insufficient scientific data to suggest that exposure to electromagnetic fields may increase the risk of having ALS. We are particularly missing longitudinal cohorts to demonstrate that risk. PMID:24703731

  2. Parathyroid cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... the thyroid gland, which is located at the base of the neck. Parathyroid cancer is a very rare type of cancer. Men and women are equally affected. It usually occurs in people older than 30. The cause of parathyroid cancer ...

  3. Lung Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Lung cancer is one of the most common cancers in the world. It is a leading cause of ... in the United States. Cigarette smoking causes most lung cancers. The more cigarettes you smoke per day and ...

  4. Prostate cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000380.htm Prostate cancer To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Prostate cancer is cancer that starts in the prostate gland. ...

  5. Cancer - penis

    MedlinePlus

    ... an organ that makes up part of the male reproductive system. Causes The exact cause is unknown. Smegma, a ... Squamous cell cancer - penis Images Male reproductive anatomy Male reproductive system References National Comprehensive Cancer Network. National Comprehensive Cancer ...

  6. Cancer Chemotherapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... controlled way. Cancer cells keep growing without control. Chemotherapy is drug therapy for cancer. It works by killing the cancer ... It depends on the type and amount of chemotherapy you get and how your body reacts. Some ...

  7. Stomach cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Cancer - stomach; Gastric cancer; Gastric carcinoma; Adenocarcinoma of the stomach ... Several types of cancer can occur in the stomach. The most common type is called adenocarcinoma. It starts from one of the cell ...

  8. Uterine Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... is pregnant. There are different types of uterine cancer. The most common type starts in the endometrium, the lining of the uterus. This type of cancer is sometimes called endometrial cancer. The symptoms of ...

  9. Cancer Moonshot

    Cancer.gov

    The Cancer Moonshot, led by Vice President Joe Biden, will marshal resources across the federal government to speed progress in cancer research and lead to improved cancer prevention, detection, and treatment.

  10. Bone Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Cancer that starts in a bone is uncommon. Cancer that has spread to the bone from another ... more common. There are three types of bone cancer: Osteosarcoma - occurs most often between ages 10 and ...

  11. Thyroid Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... body work normally. There are several types of cancer of the thyroid gland. You are at greater ... imaging tests, and a biopsy to diagnose thyroid cancer. Treatment depends on the type of cancer you ...

  12. Stomach Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... with stomach acid and helps digest protein. Stomach cancer mostly affects older people - two-thirds of people ... Smoke cigarettes Have a family history of stomach cancer It is hard to diagnose stomach cancer in ...

  13. Cancer Today

    MedlinePlus

    ... Society: Cancer Facts and Figures 2007 : NCI Cancer Screening Tests Screening tests can find diseases and conditions early when ... active or are older than 21. Prostate Cancer Screening (Men): Get advice from your doctor if you ...

  14. Ovarian Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... deaths than other female reproductive cancers. The sooner ovarian cancer is found and treated, the better your chance for recovery. But ovarian cancer is hard to detect early. Women with ovarian ...

  15. Lung Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Lung Cancer What is Lung Cancer? How Tumors Form The body is made ... button on your keyboard.) Two Major Types of Lung Cancer There are two major types of lung ...

  16. Metastatic Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... cancers, including cancers of the blood and the lymphatic system ( leukemia , multiple myeloma , and lymphoma ), can form metastatic tumors. Although rare, the metastasis of blood and lymphatic system cancers to the lung, heart, central nervous system , ...

  17. Anal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... saved articles window. My Saved Articles » My ACS » Anal Cancer Download Printable Version [PDF] » Whether you (or ... the topics below to get started. What Is Anal Cancer? What is anal cancer? What are the ...

  18. Thyroid cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... cancer is a cancer that starts in the thyroid gland. The thyroid gland is located inside the front of your lower ... thyroid cells that are normally present in the thyroid gland. This form of thyroid cancer tends to occur ...

  19. Esophageal cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Cancer - esophagus ... Esophageal cancer is not common in the United States. It occurs most often in men over 50 years old. There are two main types of esophageal cancer: squamous cell carcinoma and adenocarcinoma. These two types ...

  20. Cancer Today

    MedlinePlus

    ... your doctor if you are considering having a prostate-specific antigen (PSA) test or digital rectal examination (DRE). Skin ... regular colonoscopy for cancer of the colon, serum prostatic-specific antigen (PSA) for prostate cancer, mammography for breast cancer, ...

  1. Skin Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... States. The two most common types are basal cell cancer and squamous cell cancer. They usually form on the head, face, ... If not treated, some types of skin cancer cells can spread to other tissues and organs. Treatments ...

  2. Pancreatic Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... sugar levels. Pancreatic cancer usually begins in the cells that produce the juices. Some risk factors for ... therapy. Targeted therapy uses substances that attack cancer cells without harming normal cells. NIH: National Cancer Institute

  3. Bone Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Cancer that starts in a bone is uncommon. Cancer that has spread to the bone from another part of the body is more common. There are three types of bone cancer: Osteosarcoma - occurs most often between ages 10 ...

  4. Obesity, cholesterol metabolism, and breast cancer pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    McDonnell, Donald P; Park, Sunghee; Goulet, Matthew T; Jasper, Jeff; Wardell, Suzanne E; Chang, Ching-Yi; Norris, John D; Guyton, John R; Nelson, Erik R

    2014-09-15

    Obesity and altered lipid metabolism are risk factors for breast cancer in pre- and post-menopausal women. These pathologic relationships have been attributed in part to the impact of cholesterol on the biophysical properties of cell membranes and to the influence of these changes on signaling events initiated at the membrane. However, more recent studies have indicated that the oxysterol 27-hydroxycholesterol (27HC), and not cholesterol per se, may be the primary biochemical link between lipid metabolism and cancer. The enzyme responsible for production of 27HC from cholesterol, CYP27A1, is expressed primarily in the liver and in macrophages. In addition, significantly elevated expression of this enzyme within breast tumors has also been observed. It is believed that 27HC, acting through the liver X receptor in macrophages and possibly other cells, is involved in maintaining organismal cholesterol homeostasis. It has also been shown recently that 27HC is an estrogen receptor agonist in breast cancer cells and that it stimulates the growth and metastasis of tumors in several models of breast cancer. These findings provide the rationale for the clinical evaluation of pharmaceutical approaches that interfere with cholesterol/27HC synthesis as a means to mitigate the impact of cholesterol on breast cancer pathogenesis. Cancer Res; 74(18); 4976-82. ©2014 AACR. PMID:25060521

  5. Limitations of the Driver/Passenger Model in Cancer Prevention.

    PubMed

    Kuhner, Mary K; Kostadinov, Rumen; Reid, Brian J

    2016-05-01

    Mutations detected in cancers are often divided into "drivers" and "passengers." We suggest that this classification is potentially misleading for purposes of early detection and prevention. Specifically, some mutations are frequent in tumors and thus appear to be drivers, but are poor predictors of cancer; other mutations are individually rare and thus appear to be passengers, but may collectively explain a large proportion of risk. The assumptions bundled into the terms "driver" and "passenger" can lead to misunderstandings of neoplastic progression, with unintended consequences including overdiagnosis, overtreatment, and failure to identify the true sources of risk. We argue that samples from healthy, benign, or neoplastic tissues are critical for evaluating the risk of future cancer posed by mutations in a given gene. Cancer Prev Res; 9(5); 335-8. ©2016 AACR. PMID:26932841

  6. Meeting Report: The Role of the Mobilome in Cancer.

    PubMed

    Ardeljan, Daniel; Taylor, Martin S; Burns, Kathleen H; Boeke, Jef D; Espey, Michael Graham; Woodhouse, Elisa C; Howcroft, Thomas Kevin

    2016-08-01

    Approximately half of the human genome consists of repetitive sequence attributed to the activities of mobile DNAs, including DNA transposons, RNA transposons, and endogenous retroviruses. Of these, only long interspersed elements (LINE-1 or L1) and sequences copied by LINE-1 remain mobile in our species today. Although cells restrict L1 activity by both transcriptional and posttranscriptional mechanisms, L1 derepression occurs in developmental and pathologic contexts, including many types of cancers. However, we have limited knowledge of the extent and consequences of L1 expression in premalignancies and cancer. Participants in this NIH strategic workshop considered key questions to enhance our understanding of mechanisms and roles the mobilome may play in cancer biology. Cancer Res; 76(15); 4316-9. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27527733

  7. When Does ALS Start? ADAR2–GluA2 Hypothesis for the Etiology of Sporadic ALS

    PubMed Central

    Hideyama, Takuto; Kwak, Shin

    2011-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is the most common adult-onset motor neuron disease. More than 90% of ALS cases are sporadic, and the majority of sporadic ALS patients do not carry mutations in genes causative of familial ALS; therefore, investigation specifically targeting sporadic ALS is needed to discover the pathogenesis. The motor neurons of sporadic ALS patients express unedited GluA2 mRNA at the Q/R site in a disease-specific and motor neuron-selective manner. GluA2 is a subunit of the AMPA receptor, and it has a regulatory role in the Ca2+-permeability of the AMPA receptor after the genomic Q codon is replaced with the R codon in mRNA by adenosine–inosine conversion, which is mediated by adenosine deaminase acting on RNA 2 (ADAR2). Therefore, ADAR2 activity may not be sufficient to edit all GluA2 mRNA expressed in the motor neurons of ALS patients. To investigate whether deficient ADAR2 activity plays pathogenic roles in sporadic ALS, we generated genetically modified mice (AR2) in which the ADAR2 gene was conditionally knocked out in the motor neurons. AR2 mice showed an ALS-like phenotype with the death of ADAR2-lacking motor neurons. Notably, the motor neurons deficient in ADAR2 survived when they expressed only edited GluA2 in AR2/GluR-BR/R (AR2res) mice, in which the endogenous GluA2 alleles were replaced by the GluR-BR allele that encoded edited GluA2. In heterozygous AR2 mice with only one ADAR2 allele, approximately 20% of the spinal motor neurons expressed unedited GluA2 and underwent degeneration, indicating that half-normal ADAR2 activity is not sufficient to edit all GluA2 expressed in motor neurons. It is likely therefore that the expression of unedited GluA2 causes the death of motor neurons in sporadic ALS. We hypothesize that a progressive downregulation of ADAR2 activity plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of sporadic ALS and that the pathological process commences when motor neurons express unedited GluA2. PMID:22102833

  8. Drug testing in the patient: toward personalized cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Coombes, R Charles

    2015-04-22

    Two different devices show that delivery of cancer drugs directly into tumors in vivo can indicate cancer sensitivity; if implemented in clinical practice, these devices have the potential to reduce indiscriminate drug use, to improve survival, and to reduce unnecessary adverse effects (Jonas et al. and Klinghoffer et al., this issue). PMID:25904739

  9. X-ray detector calibration at CEA/Bruyères-le-Châtel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, L.; Stemmler, P.; Ban, G.; Villette, B.; Frotté, V.; Bizeuil, C.; Boutin, J.-Y.; Nazet, C.

    1996-02-01

    At CEA/Bruyères-le-Châtel (Service CEM), there are facilities to calibrate X-ray detectors from 200 eV to 100 keV, with an accuracy of 4% at high energies ( E > 3 keV). The source is the direct radiation from the X-ray tubes [C Kα (277 eV) to Ti KαKβ (4.51/4.93 keV)] or fluorescence emission from secondary targets [Mg Kα (1.25 keV) to U Kα (98 keV)]. In addition, calibrations are carried out with the synchrotron radiation of the Super-ACO storage ring (LURE-Orsay), by selecting the monoenergetic beams with a double crystal monochromator which is tunable between 0.8 and 8 keV. The resolution is better than 1 eV. This last tool is very useful in the study of the absorption edges of the detector compounds (for example, Si K-edge and Ar K-edge). Some examples are presented of results obtained between 1 and 50 keV, with special reference to high flux detectors such as gold photocathodes and silicon avalanche photodiodes. Thick silicon photodiodes (for the high energy range) were also calibrated.

  10. Effects of soil tillage on Tuber magnatum development in natural truffières.

    PubMed

    Salerni, E; Iotti, M; Leonardi, P; Gardin, L; D'Aguanno, M; Perini, C; Pacioni, P; Zambonelli, A

    2014-04-01

    Tuber magnatum Pico, the Italian white truffle, commands the highest prices of any truffle. Despite its commercial value, it is the only edible European truffle which has not yet been successfully cultivated. Because of this, it is essential to safeguard natural truffières and to identify cultural practices to maximize their productivity. Soil tillage is successfully and extensively used in black truffle cultivation to enhance productivity, but its effects are not known on the development of T. magnatum. A recently developed real-time PCR assay was applied to evaluate the effects of tillage (10-15 cm depth) on T. magnatum mycelium in two different natural truffle grounds located in Tuscany and Emilia-Romagna. Tillage effects on bulk density, ectomycorrhizal fungal communities, and ascoma production were also assessed. Tilling significantly increased the quantity of T. magnatum mycelium which seemed to be related to an increase in soil porosity by up to 34%, and the diversity of ectomycorrhizal fungal communities. On the contrary, no significant effects were found on ascoma production. The results highlight that real-time PCR is the most reliable method for evaluating the effects of cultural practices on the development of T. magnatum in soil avoiding long-term studies on fruiting body production. PMID:24281760

  11. In Search of the 'New Informal Legitimacy' of Médecins Sans Frontières.

    PubMed

    Calain, Philippe

    2012-04-01

    FOR MEDICAL HUMANITARIAN ORGANIZATIONS, MAKING THEIR SOURCES OF LEGITIMACY EXPLICIT IS A USEFUL EXERCISE, IN RESPONSE TO: misperceptions, concerns over the 'humanitarian space', controversies about specific humanitarian actions, challenges about resources allocation and moral suffering among humanitarian workers. This is also a difficult exercise, where normative criteria such as international law or humanitarian principles are often misrepresented as primary sources of legitimacy. This essay first argues for a morally principled definition of humanitarian medicine, based on the selfless intention of individual humanitarian actors. Taking Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) as a case in point, a common source of moral legitimacy for medical humanitarian organizations is their cosmopolitan appeal to distributive justice and collective responsibility. More informally, their legitimacy is grounded in the rightfulness of specific actions and choices. This implies a constant commitment to publicity and accountability. Legitimacy is also generated by tangible support from the public to individual organizations, by commitments to professional integrity, and by academic alliances to support evidence-based practice and operational research. PMID:22442647

  12. All About ALS

    MedlinePlus

    ... External link, please review our exit disclaimer . Subscribe All About ALS Understanding a Devastating Disorder In the ... a coffee pot, or button a shirt. Eventually, all muscles under voluntary control are affected, and people ...

  13. Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pictures of ALS Mutant Proteins Support Two Major Theories About How the Disease is Caused May 2003 ... All NINDS-prepared information is in the public domain and may be freely copied. Credit to the ...

  14. Genetic Testing for ALS

    MedlinePlus

    ... Involved Donate Familial Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (FALS) and Genetic Testing By Deborah Hartzfeld, MS, CGC, Certified Genetic ... guarantee a person will develop symptoms of ALS. Genetic Counseling If there is more than one person ...

  15. ALS synchrotron radiation shielding

    SciTech Connect

    Donahue, R.J.

    1995-10-01

    This note discusses the assumptions and results of synchrotron radiation shielding estimates for ALS bend magnet and wiggler beamlines. Estimates of gas bremsstrahlung production are not included and are dealt with elsewhere.

  16. What Is ALS?

    MedlinePlus

    ... scarring or hardening ("sclerosis") in the region. Motor neurons reach from the brain to the spinal cord ... the body. The progressive degeneration of the motor neurons in ALS eventually leads to their demise. When ...

  17. 6 Common Cancers - Prostate Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Current Issue Past Issues 6 Common Cancers - Prostate Cancer Past Issues / Spring 2007 Table of Contents For ... for early screening. Photo: AP Photo/Danny Moloshok Prostate Cancer The prostate gland is a walnut-sized structure ...

  18. 6 Common Cancers - Prostate Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues 6 Common Cancers - Prostate Cancer Past Issues / Spring 2007 Table of Contents For ... early screening. Photo: AP Photo/Danny Moloshok Prostate Cancer The prostate gland is a walnut-sized structure ...

  19. The influence of RBE variations in a clinical proton treatment plan for a hypopharynx cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tilly, N.; Johansson, J.; Isacsson, U.; Medin, J.; Blomquist, E.; Grusell, E.; Glimelius, B.

    2005-06-01

    Currently, most clinical range-modulated proton beams are assumed to have a fixed overall relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of 1.1. However, it is well known that the RBE increases with depth in the spread-out Bragg peak (SOBP) and becomes about 10% higher than mid-SOBP RBE at 2 mm from the distal edge (Paganetti 2003 Technol. Cancer Res. Treat. 2 413-26) and can reach values of 1.3-1.4 in vitro at the distal edge (Robertson et al 1975 Cancer 35 1664-77, Courdi et al 1994 Br. J. Radiol. 67 800-4). We present a fast method for applying a variable RBE correction with linear energy transfer (LET) dependent tissue-specific parameters based on the αref/βref ratios suitable for implementation in a treatment planning system. The influence of applying this variable RBE correction on a clinical multiple beam proton dose plan is presented here. The treatment plan is evaluated by RBE weighted dose volume histograms (DVHs) and the calculation of tumour control probability (TCP) and normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) values. The variable RBE correction yields DVHs for the clinical target volumes (CTVs), a primary advanced hypopharynx cancer and subclinical disease in the lymph nodes, that are slightly higher than those achieved by multiplying the absorbed dose with RBE = 1.1. Although, more importantly, the RBE weighted DVH for an organ at risk, the spinal cord is considerably increased for the variable RBE. As the spinal cord in this particular case is located 8 mm behind the planning target volume (PTV) and hence receives only low total doses, the NTCP values are zero in spite of the significant increase in the RBE weighted DVHs for the variable RBE. However, high NTCP values for the non-target normal tissue were obtained when applying the variable RBE correction. As RBE variations tend to be smaller for in vivo systems, this study—based on in vitro data since human tissue RBE values are scarce and have large uncertainties—can be interpreted as showing

  20. Integrated Molecular Profiling in Advanced Cancers Trial

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-19

    Breast Cancer; Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Colorectal Cancer; Genitourinary Cancer; Pancreatobiliary Gastrointestinal Cancer; Upper Aerodigestive Tract Cancer; Gynecological Cancers; Melanoma Cancers; Rare Cancers; Unknown Primary Cancers

  1. Erratum to: Low expression of ULK1 is associated with operable breast cancer progression and is an adverse prognostic marker of survival for patients.

    PubMed

    Tang, Jun; Deng, Rong; Luo, Rong-Zhen; Shen, Guo-Ping; Cai, Mu-Yan; Du, Zi-Ming; Jiang, Shan; Yang, Ming-Tian; Fu, Jian-Hua; Zhu, Xiao-Feng

    2016-04-01

    Erratum to: Breast Cancer Res Treat (2012),134:549–560,DOI 10.1007/s10549-012-2080-y. In the original publication of the article, Fig. 5c was published incorrectly. The authors apologize for this error and the correct Fig. 5c is given below. PMID:26960710

  2. Electrical transport properties of ReS2 with polymer electrolyte gating in the high-doping limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ovchinnikov, Dmitry; Allain, Adrien; Pasquier, Diego; Dumcenco, Dumitru; Ho, Ching-Hwa; Huang, Ying-Sheng; Yazyev, Oleg; Kis, Andras

    Two-dimensional (2D) materials have emerged as promising candidates for future electronic applications. Among them, transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) demonstrate not only potential as ultrathin transistor channel material, but also intriguing spin and valley physics, which in principle could allow new types of devices and circuits. Here we report on the first study of two-dimensional anisotropic ReS2 at high doping levels, enabled by polymer electrolyte gating. Significantly increasing the doping level using electrolyte instead of standard solid gate, we measured an unusual modulation of the conductivity at high carrier densities in monolayer ReS2. In the case of thicker flakes, the effect is milder and an insulator-metal-insulator sequence with increasing doping is observed. Transport measurements provide the evidence of major influence of ionic disorder. Furthermore, we discuss possible band structure effects.

  3. ANALYSIS OF LARGE-SCALE ANISOTROPY OF ULTRA-HIGH ENERGY COSMIC RAYS IN HiRes DATA

    SciTech Connect

    Abbasi, R. U.; Abu-Zayyad, T.; Allen, M.; Archbold, G.; Belov, K.; Belz, J. W.; Bergman, D. R.; Blake, S. A.; Brusova, O. A.; Burt, G. W.; Cannon, C.; Cao, Z.; Deng, W.; Fedorova, Y.; Findlay, J.; Gray, R. C.; Hanlon, W. F.; Amann, J. F.; Hoffman, C. M.; Finley, C. B.

    2010-04-10

    Stereo data collected by the HiRes experiment over a six-year period are examined for large-scale anisotropy related to the inhomogeneous distribution of matter in the nearby universe. We consider the generic case of small cosmic-ray deflections and a large number of sources tracing the matter distribution. In this matter tracer model the expected cosmic-ray flux depends essentially on a single free parameter, the typical deflection angle {theta} {sub s}. We find that the HiRes data with threshold energies of 40 EeV and 57 EeV are incompatible with the matter tracer model at a 95% confidence level unless {theta} {sub s} > 10 deg. and are compatible with an isotropic flux. The data set above 10 EeV is compatible with both the matter tracer model and an isotropic flux.

  4. Cancer Research Repository for Individuals With Cancer Diagnosis and High Risk Individuals.

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-12

    Pancreatic Cancer; Thyroid Cancer; Lung Cancer; Esophageal Cancer; Thymus Cancer; Colon Cancer; Rectal Cancer; GIST; Anal Cancer; Bile Duct Cancer; Duodenal Cancer; Gallbladder Cancer; Gastric Cancer; Liver Cancer; Small Intestine Cancer; Peritoneal Surface Malignancies; Familial Adenomatous Polyposis; Lynch Syndrome; Bladder Cancer; Kidney Cancer; Penile Cancer; Prostate Cancer; Testicular Cancer; Ureter Cancer; Urethral Cancer; Hypopharyngeal Cancer; Laryngeal Cancer; Lip Cancer; Oral Cavity Cancer; Nasopharyngeal Cancer; Oropharyngeal Cancer; Paranasal Sinus Cancer; Nasal Cavity Cancer; Salivary Gland Cancer; Skin Cancer; CNS Tumor; CNS Cancer; Mesothelioma

  5. Cancer of the Uterus (Endometrial Cancer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Management Education & Events Advocacy For Patients About ACOG Cancer of the Uterus [Endometrial Cancer] Home For Patients Search FAQs Cancer of the ... Uterus [Endometrial Cancer] FAQ097, May 2011 PDF Format Cancer of the Uterus [Endometrial Cancer] Gynecologic Problems What ...

  6. Retraction: "Down-regulation of uPA and uPAR by 3,3'-diindolylmethane contributes to the inhibition of cell growth and migration of breast cancer cells" by Ahmad et al.

    PubMed

    2016-08-01

    The above article, published online on August 19, 2009 in Wiley Online Library (wileyonlinelibrary.com), has been retracted by agreement between the journal Editor in Chief, Gary S. Stein, and Wiley Periodicals, Inc. The retraction has been agreed following an investigation from Wayne State University involving the third author and the corresponding author that found Figure 5C to be inappropriately re-used and re-labeled. REFERENCE Ahmad A, Kong D, Wang Z, Sarkar SH, Banerjee S, Sarkar FH. 2009. Down-regulation of uPA and uPAR by 3,3'-diindolylmethane contributes to the inhibition of cell growth and migration of breast cancer cells. J Cell Biochem 108:916-925; doi: 10.1002/jcb.22323. PMID:27301886

  7. Retraction: "Down-regulation of Notch-1 is associated with Akt and FoxM1 in inducing cell growth inhibition and apoptosis in prostate cancer cells" by Wang et al.

    PubMed

    2016-08-01

    The above article, published online on July 23, 2010 in Wiley Online Library (wileyonlinelibrary.com), has been retracted by agreement between the journal Editor in Chief, Gary S. Stein, and Wiley Periodicals, Inc. The retraction has been agreed following an investigation from Wayne State University involving the first author and the corresponding author that found Figures 1B and 3A to be inappropriately manipulated. REFERENCE Wang Z, Li Y, Ahmad A, Banerjee S, Azmi AS, Kong D, Wojewoda C, Miele L, Sarkar FH. 2011. Down-regulation of Notch-1 is associated with Akt and FoxM1 in inducing cell growth inhibition and apoptosis in prostate cancer cells. J Cell Biochem 112:78-88; doi: 10.1002/jcb.22770. PMID:27301889

  8. Retraction: "Concurrent inhibition of NF-κB, cyclooxygenase-2, and epidermal growth factor receptor leads to greater anti-tumor activity in pancreatic cancer" by Ali et al.

    PubMed

    2016-08-01

    The above article, published online on March 8, 2010 in Wiley Online Library (wileyonlinelibrary.com), has been retracted by agreement between the journal Editor in Chief, Gary S. Stein, and Wiley Periodicals, Inc. The retraction has been agreed following an investigation from Wayne State University involving the first author and the corresponding author that found Figures 2A, 4, 6A, and 6C to be inappropriately manipulated. REFERENCE Ali S, Banerjee S, Schaffert JM, El-Rayes BF, Philip PA, Sarkar FH. 2010. Concurrent inhibition of NF-κB, cyclooxygenase-2, and epidermal growth factor receptor leads to greater anti-tumor activity in pancreatic cancer. J Cell Biochem 110:171-181; doi: 10.1002/jcb.22523. PMID:27301888

  9. Retraction: "Down-regulation of Notch-1 and Jagged-1 inhibits prostate cancer cell growth, migration and invasion, and induces apoptosis via inactivation of Akt, mTOR, and NF-κB signaling pathways" by Wang et al.

    PubMed

    2016-08-01

    The above article, published online on January 5, 2010 in Wiley Online Library (wileyonlinelibrary.com), has been retracted by agreement between the journal Editor in Chief, Gary S. Stein, and Wiley Periodicals, Inc. The retraction has been agreed following an investigation from Wayne State University involving the first author and the corresponding author that found Figure 5A to be inappropriately manipulated. REFERENCE Wang Z, Li Y, Banerjee S, Kong D, Ahmad A, Nogueira V, Hay N, Sarkar FH. 2010. Down-regulation of Notch-1 and Jagged-1 inhibits prostate cancer cell growth, migration and invasion, and induces apoptosis via inactivation of Akt, mTOR, and NF-κB signaling pathways. J Cell Biochem 109:726-736; doi: 10.1002/jcb.22451. PMID:27301887

  10. Retraction: "Inactivation of Ink4a/Arf Leads to Deregulated Expression of miRNAs in K-Ras Transgenic Mouse Model of Pancreatic Cancer" by Ali et al.

    PubMed

    2016-10-01

    The above article, published online on June 21, 2012 in Wiley Online Library (wileyonlinelibrary.com), has been retracted by agreement between the journal Editor in Chief, Gary S. Stein, and Wiley Periodicals, Inc. The retraction has been agreed following an investigation from Wayne State University involving the first author and the corresponding author that found Figure 5A to be inappropriately manipulated. Literature Cited Ali S, Banerjee S, Logna F, Bao B, Philip PA, Korc M, Sarkar FH. 2012. Inactivation of Ink4a/Arf leads to deregulated expression of miRNAs in K-Ras transgenic mouse model of pancreatic cancer. J Cell Physiol 227:3373-3380; doi: 10.1002/jcp.24036. PMID:27315161

  11. Toxoplasmosis in a bar-shouldered dove (Geopelia humeralis) from the Zoo of Clères, France

    PubMed Central

    Rigoulet, Jacques; Hennache, Alain; Lagourette, Pierre; George, Catherine; Longeart, Loïc; Le Net, Jean-Loïc; Dubey, Jitender P.

    2014-01-01

    Toxoplasmosis causes mortality in several avian species, especially passerine birds. Toxoplasmosis was diagnosed in a bar-shouldered dove (Geopelia humeralis) found dead at the zoo of Clères (France). The bird had necrotizing pneumonia and nephritis with intralesional tachyzoites of Toxoplasma gondii. The diagnosis was confirmed by immunostaining with polyclonal rabbit T. gondii antibodies and by transmission electron microscopy. To our knowledge, the bar-shouldered dove is a new host record for T. gondii. PMID:25407506

  12. High-Performance 2D Rhenium Disulfide (ReS2 ) Transistors and Photodetectors by Oxygen Plasma Treatment.

    PubMed

    Shim, Jaewoo; Oh, Aely; Kang, Dong-Ho; Oh, Seyong; Jang, Sung Kyu; Jeon, Jaeho; Jeon, Min Hwan; Kim, Minwoo; Choi, Changhwan; Lee, Jaehyeong; Lee, Sungjoo; Yeom, Geun Young; Song, Young Jae; Park, Jin-Hong

    2016-08-01

    A high-performance ReS2 -based thin-film transistor and photodetector with high on/off-current ratio (10(4) ), high mobility (7.6 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) ), high photoresponsivity (2.5 × 10(7) A W(-1) ), and fast temporal response (rising and decaying time of 670 ms and 5.6 s, respectively) through O2 plasma treatment is reported. PMID:27206245

  13. Alternative Polyadenylation: Another Foe in Cancer.

    PubMed

    Erson-Bensan, Ayse Elif; Can, Tolga

    2016-06-01

    Advancements in sequencing and transcriptome analysis methods have led to seminal discoveries that have begun to unravel the complexity of cancer. These studies are paving the way toward the development of improved diagnostics, prognostic predictions, and targeted treatment options. However, it is clear that pieces of the cancer puzzle are still missing. In an effort to have a more comprehensive understanding of the development and progression of cancer, we have come to appreciate the value of the noncoding regions of our genomes, partly due to the discovery of miRNAs and their significance in gene regulation. Interestingly, the miRNA-mRNA interactions are not solely dependent on variations in miRNA levels. Instead, the majority of genes harbor multiple polyadenylation signals on their 3' UTRs (untranslated regions) that can be differentially selected on the basis of the physiologic state of cells, resulting in alternative 3' UTR isoforms. Deregulation of alternative polyadenylation (APA) has increasing interest in cancer research, because APA generates mRNA 3' UTR isoforms with potentially different stabilities, subcellular localizations, translation efficiencies, and functions. This review focuses on the link between APA and cancer and discusses the mechanisms as well as the tools available for investigating APA events in cancer. Overall, detection of deregulated APA-generated isoforms in cancer may implicate some proto-oncogene activation cases of unknown causes and may help the discovery of novel cases; thus, contributing to a better understanding of molecular mechanisms of cancer. Mol Cancer Res; 14(6); 507-17. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27075335

  14. Integrated digital inverters based on two-dimensional anisotropic ReS2 field-effect transistors.

    PubMed

    Liu, Erfu; Fu, Yajun; Wang, Yaojia; Feng, Yanqing; Liu, Huimei; Wan, Xiangang; Zhou, Wei; Wang, Baigeng; Shao, Lubin; Ho, Ching-Hwa; Huang, Ying-Sheng; Cao, Zhengyi; Wang, Laiguo; Li, Aidong; Zeng, Junwen; Song, Fengqi; Wang, Xinran; Shi, Yi; Yuan, Hongtao; Hwang, Harold Y; Cui, Yi; Miao, Feng; Xing, Dingyu

    2015-01-01

    Semiconducting two-dimensional transition metal dichalcogenides are emerging as top candidates for post-silicon electronics. While most of them exhibit isotropic behaviour, lowering the lattice symmetry could induce anisotropic properties, which are both scientifically interesting and potentially useful. Here we present atomically thin rhenium disulfide (ReS2) flakes with unique distorted 1T structure, which exhibit in-plane anisotropic properties. We fabricated monolayer and few-layer ReS2 field-effect transistors, which exhibit competitive performance with large current on/off ratios (∼10(7)) and low subthreshold swings (100 mV per decade). The observed anisotropic ratio along two principle axes reaches 3.1, which is the highest among all known two-dimensional semiconducting materials. Furthermore, we successfully demonstrated an integrated digital inverter with good performance by utilizing two ReS2 anisotropic field-effect transistors, suggesting the promising implementation of large-scale two-dimensional logic circuits. Our results underscore the unique properties of two-dimensional semiconducting materials with low crystal symmetry for future electronic applications. PMID:25947630

  15. Studies of systematic uncertainties in the estimation of the monocular aperture of the HiRes experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    High Resolution Fly'S Eye Collaboration; Abu-Zayyad, T.; Amman, J. F.; Archbold, G.; Belov, K.; Belz, J. W.; Ben Zvi, S. Y.; Bergman, D. R.; Blake, S. A.; Brusova, O.; Burt, G. W.; Cao, Z.; Connolly, B. C.; Deng, W.; Fedorova, Y.; Finley, C. B.; Gray, R. C.; Hanlon, W. F.; Hoffman, C. M.; Hughes, G. A.; Holzscheiter, M. H.; Hüntemeyer, P.; Jones, B. F.; Jui, C. C. H.; Kim, K.; Kirn, M. A.; Loh, E. C.; Maestas, M. M.; Manago, N.; Marek, L. J.; Martens, K.; Matthews, J. A. J.; Matthews, J. N.; Moore, S. A.; O'Neill, A.; Painter, C. A.; Perera, L.; Reil, K.; Riehle, R.; Roberts, M.; Rodriguez, D.; Sasaki, M.; Schnetzer, S. R.; Scott, L. M.; Sinnis, G.; Smith, J. D.; Sokolsky, P.; Song, C.; Springer, R. W.; Stokes, B. T.; Thomas, J. R.; Thomas, S. B.; Thomson, G. B.; Tupa, D.; Westerhoff, S.; Wiencke, L. R.; Zech, A.; Zhang, X.

    2007-06-01

    We have studied several sources of systematic uncertainty in calculating the aperture of the High Resolution Fly’s Eye experiment (HiRes) in monocular mode, primarily as they affect the HiRes-II site. The energy dependent aperture is determined with detailed Monte Carlo simulations of the air showers and the detector response. We have studied the effects of changes to the input energy spectrum and composition used in the simulation. A realistic shape of the input spectrum is used in our analysis in order to avoid biases in the aperture estimate due to the limited detector resolution. We have examined the effect of exchanging our input spectrum with a simple E-3 power law in the “ankle” region. Uncertainties in the input composition are shown to be significant for energies below ˜1018 eV for data from the HiRes-II detector. Another source of uncertainties is the choice of the hadronic interaction model in the air shower generator. We compare the aperture estimate for two different models: QGSJet01 and SIBYLL 2.1. We also describe the implications of employing an atmospheric database with hourly measurements of the aerosol component, instead of using an average as has been used in our previously published measurements of the monocular spectra.

  16. Integrated digital inverters based on two-dimensional anisotropic ReS2 field-effect transistors

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Erfu; Fu, Yajun; Wang, Yaojia; Feng, Yanqing; Liu, Huimei; Wan, Xiangang; Zhou, Wei; Wang, Baigeng; Shao, Lubin; Ho, Ching-Hwa; Huang, Ying-Sheng; Cao, Zhengyi; Wang, Laiguo; Li, Aidong; Zeng, Junwen; Song, Fengqi; Wang, Xinran; Shi, Yi; Yuan, Hongtao; Hwang, Harold Y.; Cui, Yi; Miao, Feng; Xing, Dingyu

    2015-01-01

    Semiconducting two-dimensional transition metal dichalcogenides are emerging as top candidates for post-silicon electronics. While most of them exhibit isotropic behaviour, lowering the lattice symmetry could induce anisotropic properties, which are both scientifically interesting and potentially useful. Here we present atomically thin rhenium disulfide (ReS2) flakes with unique distorted 1T structure, which exhibit in-plane anisotropic properties. We fabricated monolayer and few-layer ReS2 field-effect transistors, which exhibit competitive performance with large current on/off ratios (∼107) and low subthreshold swings (100 mV per decade). The observed anisotropic ratio along two principle axes reaches 3.1, which is the highest among all known two-dimensional semiconducting materials. Furthermore, we successfully demonstrated an integrated digital inverter with good performance by utilizing two ReS2 anisotropic field-effect transistors, suggesting the promising implementation of large-scale two-dimensional logic circuits. Our results underscore the unique properties of two-dimensional semiconducting materials with low crystal symmetry for future electronic applications. PMID:25947630

  17. Lung Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Lung cancer is one of the most common cancers in the world. It is a leading cause of cancer death in men and women in the United States. Cigarette smoking causes most lung cancers. The more cigarettes you smoke per day and ...

  18. Vaginal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Vaginal cancer is a rare type of cancer. It is more common in women 60 and older. You are also more likely to get it if you have had a human ... test can find abnormal cells that may be cancer. Vaginal cancer can often be cured in its ...

  19. Molecular Subtypes of Non-muscle Invasive Bladder Cancer.

    PubMed

    Lerner, Seth P; Robertson, A Gordon

    2016-07-11

    In this issue of Cancer Cell, Hedegaard et al. report a comprehensive multi-center transcriptional analysis of non-muscle invasive urothelial bladder cancer. They describe three molecular subtypes similar to those seen in other cohorts, as well as a unique CIS signature associated with risk of progression to muscle invasive cancer. PMID:27411578

  20. Rapidly solidified NiAl and FeAl

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaydosh, D. J.; Crimp, M. A.

    1984-01-01

    Melt spinning was used to produce rapidly solidified ribbons of the B2 intermetallics NiAl and FeAl. Both Fe-40Al and Fe-45Al possessed some bend ductility in the as spun condition. The bend ductility of Fe-40Al, Fe-45Al, and equiatomic NiAl increased with subsequent heat treatment. Heat treatment at approximately 0.85 T (sub m) resulted in significant grain growth in equiatomic FeAl and in all the NiAl compositions. Low bend ductility in both FeAl and NiAl generally coincided with intergranular failure, while increased bend ductility was characterized by increasing amounts of transgranular cleavage fracture.

  1. What Is Breast Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Next Topic Types of breast cancers What is breast cancer? Breast cancer starts when cells in the breast ... breast cancer? ” and Non-cancerous Breast Conditions . How Breast Cancer Spreads Breast cancer can spread through the lymph ...

  2. Diet and cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Fiber and cancer; Cancer and fiber; Nitrates and cancer; Cancer and nitrates ... DIET AND BREAST CANCER The link between nutrition and breast cancer has been well studied. To reduce risk of breast cancer the American ...

  3. Prostate cancer - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - prostate cancer ... The following organizations are good resources for information on prostate cancer : American Cancer Society -- www.cancer.org/cancer/prostatecancer/index National Cancer Institute -- www.cancer.gov/cancertopics/ ...

  4. Radon and Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Laboratory for Cancer Research Partners & Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer ... Centers Frederick National Lab Partners & Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists NCI Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer ...

  5. Cervical Cancer Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... Laboratory for Cancer Research Partners & Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer ... Centers Frederick National Lab Partners & Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists NCI Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer ...

  6. NCI Designated Cancer Centers

    MedlinePlus

    ... Laboratory for Cancer Research Partners & Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer ... Cancer Center History Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research Partners ... Profiles in Cancer Research Outstanding Investigator Award Recipients ...

  7. Endometrial Cancer Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... Laboratory for Cancer Research Partners & Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer ... Centers Frederick National Lab Partners & Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists NCI Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer ...

  8. Prostate Cancer Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... Laboratory for Cancer Research Partners & Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer ... Centers Frederick National Lab Partners & Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists NCI Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer ...

  9. Clinical and Molecular Phenotype of Aicardi-Goutières Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Rice, Gillian ; Patrick, Teresa ; Parmar, Rekha ; Taylor, Claire F. ; Aeby, Alec ; Aicardi, Jean ; Artuch, Rafael ; Montalto, Simon Attard ; Bacino, Carlos A. ; Barroso, Bruno ; Baxter, Peter ; Benko, Willam S. ; Bergmann, Carsten ; Bertini, Enrico ; Biancheri, Roberta ; Blair, Edward M. ; Blau, Nenad ; Bonthron, David T. ; Briggs, Tracy ; Brueton, Louise A. ; Brunner, Han G. ; Burke, Christopher J. ; Carr, Ian M. ; Carvalho, Daniel R. ; Chandler, Kate E. ; Christen, Hans-Jürgen ; Corry, Peter C. ; Cowan, Frances M. ; Cox, Helen ; D’Arrigo, Stefano ; Dean, John ; De Laet, Corinne ; De Praeter, Claudine ; Déry, Catherine ; Ferrie, Colin D. ; Flintoff, Kim ; Frints, Suzanna G. M. ; Garcia-Cazorla, Angels ; Gener, Blanca ; Goizet, Cyril ; Goutières, Françoise ; Green, Andrew J. ; Guët, Agnès ; Hamel, Ben C. J. ; Hayward, Bruce E. ; Heiberg, Arvid ; Hennekam, Raoul C. ; Husson, Marie ; Jackson, Andrew P. ; Jayatunga, Rasieka ; Jiang, Yong-Hui ; Kant, Sarina G. ; Kao, Amy ; King, Mary D. ; Kingston, Helen M. ; Klepper, Joerg ; van der Knaap, Marjo S. ; Kornberg, Andrew J. ; Kotzot, Dieter ; Kratzer, Wilfried ; Lacombe, Didier ; Lagae, Lieven ; Landrieu, Pierre Georges ; Lanzi, Giovanni ; Leitch, Andrea ; Lim, Ming J. ; Livingston, John H. ; Lourenco, Charles M. ; Lyall, E. G. Hermione ; Lynch, Sally A. ; Lyons, Michael J. ; Marom, Daphna ; McClure, John P. ; McWilliam, Robert ; Melancon, Serge B. ; Mewasingh, Leena D. ; Moutard, Marie-Laure ; Nischal, Ken K. ; Østergaard, John R. ; Prendiville, Julie ; Rasmussen, Magnhild ; Rogers, R. Curtis ; Roland, Dominique ; Rosser, Elisabeth M. ; Rostasy, Kevin ; Roubertie, Agathe ; Sanchis, Amparo ; Schiffmann, Raphael ; Scholl-Bürgi, Sabine ; Seal, Sunita ; Shalev, Stavit A. ; Corcoles, C. Sierra ; Sinha, Gyan P. ; Soler, Doriette ; Spiegel, Ronen ; Stephenson, John B. P. ; Tacke, Uta ; Tan, Tiong Yang ; Till, Marianne ; Tolmie, John L. ; Tomlin, Pam ; Vagnarelli, Federica ; Valente, Enza Maria ; Van Coster, Rudy N. A. ; Van der Aa, Nathalie ; Vanderver, Adeline ; Vles, Johannes S. H. ; Voit, Thomas ; Wassmer, Evangeline ; Weschke, Bernhard ; Whiteford, Margo L. ; Willemsen, Michel A. A. ; Zankl, Andreas ; Zuberi, Sameer M. ; Orcesi, Simona ; Fazzi, Elisa ; Lebon, Pierre ; Crow, Yanick J. 

    2007-01-01

    Aicardi-Goutières syndrome (AGS) is a genetic encephalopathy whose clinical features mimic those of acquired in utero viral infection. AGS exhibits locus heterogeneity, with mutations identified in genes encoding the 3′→5′ exonuclease TREX1 and the three subunits of the RNASEH2 endonuclease complex. To define the molecular spectrum of AGS, we performed mutation screening in patients, from 127 pedigrees, with a clinical diagnosis of the disease. Biallelic mutations in TREX1, RNASEH2A, RNASEH2B, and RNASEH2C were observed in 31, 3, 47, and 18 families, respectively. In five families, we identified an RNASEH2A or RNASEH2B mutation on one allele only. In one child, the disease occurred because of a de novo heterozygous TREX1 mutation. In 22 families, no mutations were found. Null mutations were common in TREX1, although a specific missense mutation was observed frequently in patients from northern Europe. Almost all mutations in RNASEH2A, RNASEH2B, and RNASEH2C were missense. We identified an RNASEH2C founder mutation in 13 Pakistani families. We also collected clinical data from 123 mutation-positive patients. Two clinical presentations could be delineated: an early-onset neonatal form, highly reminiscent of congenital infection seen particularly with TREX1 mutations, and a later-onset presentation, sometimes occurring after several months of normal development and occasionally associated with remarkably preserved neurological function, most frequently due to RNASEH2B mutations. Mortality was correlated with genotype; 34.3% of patients with TREX1, RNASEH2A, and RNASEH2C mutations versus 8.0% RNASEH2B mutation–positive patients were known to have died (P=.001). Our analysis defines the phenotypic spectrum of AGS and suggests a coherent mutation-screening strategy in this heterogeneous disorder. Additionally, our data indicate that at least one further AGS-causing gene remains to be identified. PMID:17846997

  10. The Union and Médecins Sans Frontières approach to operational research.

    PubMed

    Harries, A D; Rusen, I D; Reid, T; Detjen, A K; Berger, S D; Bissell, K; Hinderaker, S G; Edginton, M; Fussell, M; Fujiwara, P I; Zachariah, R

    2011-02-01

    Operational research (OR) has become a hot topic at national meetings, international conferences and donor fora. The International Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease (The Union) and Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) Operational Centre Brussels strongly promote and implement OR with colleagues in low- and middle-income countries. Here we describe how the two organisations define OR, and explain the guiding principles and methodology that underpin the strategy for developing and expanding OR in those countries. We articulate The Union's and MSF's approach to supporting OR, highlighting the main synergies and differences. Then, using the Malawi National Tuberculosis Control Programme as an example, we show how OR can be embedded within tuberculosis control activities, leading to changes in policy and practice at the national level. We discuss the difficult, yet vitally important, issue of capacity building, and share our vision of a new paradigm of product-related training and performance-based OR fellowships as two ways of developing the necessary skills at country level to ensure research is actually performed. Finally, we highlight the need to consider and incorporate into practice the ethical components of OR. This is a key moment to be involved in OR. We are confident that in partnership with interested stakeholders, including the World Health Organization, we can stimulate the implementation of quality, relevant OR as an integral part of health service delivery that in turn will lead to better health for people, particularly for those living in the poorer parts of the world. PMID:21219672

  11. Simulation of Regional Explosion S-Phases (SiRES) Project

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, S C; Wagner, J; Larsen, S; Rodgers, A; Mayeda, K; Smith, K; Walter, W

    2003-07-01

    Seismic monitoring aims to locate and identify all events that generate elastic waves in the solid earth. Amplitudes and arrival-times of seismic phases are commonly exploited to accomplish these goals. For large events that produce strong body and surface waves out to 90{sup o}, events can be accurately located and the Ms/m{sub b} discriminant can be used to distinguish earthquakes from explosions. As event yield/magnitude decreases, the probability of detecting signals at distant stations diminishes, and monitoring relies heavily on regional-distance stations (between about 2{sup o} and 13{sup o}). Many regional discriminant and magnitude methods make use of S-phase amplitude measurements, which are expected to diminish for explosion sources. Despite the general success of regional monitoring methods there remain instances when explosions produce anomalously large S-phases that confound regional discriminants. The 2-year Simulation of Regional Explosion S-phases (SiRES) project explores the phenomenology of regional S-phase generation through numerical simulation. In the first year of this study we construct a 3-dimensional model of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and the surrounding region. Extensive databases of geologic information, including existing 3-dimensional models developed under past and ongoing NTS programs, are used to construct the regional model. In addition to deterministic geologic structure and topography we introduce stochastic variability within geologic units and along boundaries. The stochastic variability provides a more realistic simulation of the regional wave field, which is known to largely consist of scattered energy. Here we introduce the project and report on the first few months of progress.

  12. Ready for a world without antibiotics? The Pensières Antibiotic Resistance Call to Action

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Resistance to antibiotics has increased dramatically over the past few years and has now reached a level that places future patients in real danger. Microorganisms such as Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae, which are commensals and pathogens for humans and animals, have become increasingly resistant to third-generation cephalosporins. Moreover, in certain countries, they are also resistant to carbapenems and therefore susceptible only to tigecycline and colistin. Resistance is primarily attributed to the production of beta-lactamase genes located on mobile genetic elements, which facilitate their transfer between different species. In some rare cases, Gram-negative rods are resistant to virtually all known antibiotics. The causes are numerous, but the role of the overuse of antibiotics in both humans and animals is essential, as well as the transmission of these bacteria in both the hospital and the community, notably via the food chain, contaminated hands, and between animals and humans. In addition, there are very few new antibiotics in the pipeline, particularly for Gram-negative bacilli. The situation is slightly better for Gram-positive cocci as some potent and novel antibiotics have been made available in recent years. A strong and coordinated international programme is urgently needed. To meet this challenge, 70 internationally recognized experts met for a two-day meeting in June 2011 in Annecy (France) and endorsed a global call to action ("The Pensières Antibiotic Resistance Call to Action"). Bundles of measures that must be implemented simultaneously and worldwide are presented in this document. In particular, antibiotics, which represent a treasure for humanity, must be protected and considered as a special class of drugs. PMID:22958833

  13. Metastatic cancer to the lung

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bladder cancer Breast cancer Colon cancer Kidney cancer Neuroblastoma Prostate cancer Sarcoma Wilms tumor Symptoms Symptoms may ... Breast cancer Cancer Chemotherapy Colon cancer Lung cancer Neuroblastoma Prostate cancer Radiation therapy Wilms tumor Update Date ...

  14. Modulus measurements in ordered Co-Al, Fe-Al, and Ni-Al alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harmouche, M. R.; Wolfenden, A.

    1985-01-01

    The composition and/or temperature dependence of the dynamic Young's modulus for the ordered B2 Co-Al, Fe-Al, and Ni-Al aluminides has been investigated using the piezoelectric ultrasonic composite oscillator technique (PUCOT). The modulus has been measured in the composition interval 48.49 to 52.58 at. pct Co, 50.87 to 60.2 at. pct Fe, and 49.22 to 55.95 at. pct Ni for Co-Al, Fe-Al, and Ni-Al, respectively. The measured values for Co-Al are in the temperature interval 300 to 1300 K, while those for the other systems are for ambient temperature only. The data points show that Co-Al is stiffer than Fe-Al, which is stiffer than Ni-Al. The data points for Fe-Al and Ni-Al are slightly higher than those reported in the literature.

  15. The Borrelia burgdorferi telomere resolvase, ResT, anneals ssDNA complexed with its cognate ssDNA-binding protein

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Shu Hui; Kobryn, Kerri

    2016-01-01

    Spirochetes of the genus Borrelia possess unusual genomes that consist in a linear chromosome and multiple linear and circular plasmids. The linear replicons are terminated by covalently closed hairpin ends, referred to as hairpin telomeres. The hairpin telomeres represent a simple solution to the end-replication problem. Deoxyribonucleic acid replication initiates internally and proceeds bidirectionally toward the hairpin telomeres. The telomere resolvase, ResT, forms the hairpin telomeres from replicated telomere intermediates in a reaction with similarities to those promoted by type IB topoisomerases and tyrosine recombinases. ResT has also been shown to possess DNA single-strand annealing activity. We report here that ResT promotes single-strand annealing of both free DNA strands and ssDNA complexed with single-stranded DNA binding protein (SSB). The annealing of complementary strands bound by SSB requires a ResT–SSB interaction that is mediated by the conserved amphipathic C-terminal tail of SSB. These properties of ResT are similar to those demonstrated for the recombination mediator protein, RecO, of the RecF pathway. Borrelia burgdorferi is unusual in lacking identifiable homologs of the RecFOR proteins. We propose that ResT may provide missing RecFOR functions. PMID:27131360

  16. The Borrelia burgdorferi telomere resolvase, ResT, anneals ssDNA complexed with its cognate ssDNA-binding protein.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shu Hui; Kobryn, Kerri

    2016-06-20

    Spirochetes of the genus Borrelia possess unusual genomes that consist in a linear chromosome and multiple linear and circular plasmids. The linear replicons are terminated by covalently closed hairpin ends, referred to as hairpin telomeres. The hairpin telomeres represent a simple solution to the end-replication problem. Deoxyribonucleic acid replication initiates internally and proceeds bidirectionally toward the hairpin telomeres. The telomere resolvase, ResT, forms the hairpin telomeres from replicated telomere intermediates in a reaction with similarities to those promoted by type IB topoisomerases and tyrosine recombinases. ResT has also been shown to possess DNA single-strand annealing activity. We report here that ResT promotes single-strand annealing of both free DNA strands and ssDNA complexed with single-stranded DNA binding protein (SSB). The annealing of complementary strands bound by SSB requires a ResT-SSB interaction that is mediated by the conserved amphipathic C-terminal tail of SSB. These properties of ResT are similar to those demonstrated for the recombination mediator protein, RecO, of the RecF pathway. Borrelia burgdorferi is unusual in lacking identifiable homologs of the RecFOR proteins. We propose that ResT may provide missing RecFOR functions. PMID:27131360

  17. Risk Stratification System for Oral Cancer Screening.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Lutécia H Mateus; Reis, Isildinha M; Reategui, Erika P; Gordon, Claudia; Saint-Victor, Sandra; Duncan, Robert; Gomez, Carmen; Bayers, Stephanie; Fisher, Penelope; Perez, Aymee; Goodwin, W Jarrard; Hu, Jennifer J; Franzmann, Elizabeth J

    2016-06-01

    Oral cavity and oropharyngeal cancer (oral cancer) is a deadly disease that is increasing in incidence. Worldwide 5-year survival is only 50% due to delayed intervention with more than half of the diagnoses at stage III and IV, whereas earlier detection (stage I and II) yields survival rates up to 80% to 90%. Salivary soluble CD44 (CD44), a tumor-initiating marker, and total protein levels may facilitate oral cancer risk assessment and early intervention. This study used a hospital-based design with 150 cases and 150 frequency-matched controls to determine whether CD44 and total protein levels in oral rinses were associated with oral cancer independent of age, gender, race, ethnicity, tobacco and alcohol use, and socioeconomic status (SES). High-risk subjects receiving oral cancer prevention interventions as part of a community-based program (n = 150) were followed over 1 year to determine marker specificity and variation. CD44 ≥5.33 ng/mL was highly associated with case status [adjusted OR 14.489; 95% confidence interval (CI), 5.973-35.145; P < .0001, vs. reference group CD44 <2.22 ng/mL and protein <1.23 mg/mL]. Total protein aided prediction above CD44 alone. Sensitivity and specificity in the frequency-matched study was 80% and 48.7%, respectively. However, controls were not representative of the target screening population due, in part, to a high rate of prior cancer. In contrast, specificity in the high-risk community was 74% and reached 95% after annual retesting. Simple and inexpensive salivary CD44 and total protein measurements may help identify individuals at heightened risk for oral cancer from the millions who partake in risky behaviors. Cancer Prev Res; 9(6); 445-55. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27020654

  18. Comments on Li et al. Effects of in Utero Exposure to Dicyclohexyl Phthalate on Rat Fetal Leydig Cells. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2016, 13, 246

    PubMed Central

    Svingen, Terje

    2016-01-01

    Profiling the expression levels of genes or proteins in tissues comprising two or more cell types is commonplace in biological sciences. Such analyses present particular challenges, however, for example a potential shift in cellular composition, or ‘cellularity’, between specimens. That is, does an observed change in expression level represent what occurs within individual cells, or does it represent a shift in the ratio of different cell types within the tissue? This commentary attempts to highlight the importance of considering cellularity when interpreting quantitative expression data, using the mammalian testis and a recent study on the effects of phthalate exposure on testis function as an example. PMID:27231928

  19. Comments on Li et al. Effects of in Utero Exposure to Dicyclohexyl Phthalate on Rat Fetal Leydig Cells. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2016, 13, 246.

    PubMed

    Svingen, Terje

    2016-01-01

    Profiling the expression levels of genes or proteins in tissues comprising two or more cell types is commonplace in biological sciences. Such analyses present particular challenges, however, for example a potential shift in cellular composition, or 'cellularity', between specimens. That is, does an observed change in expression level represent what occurs within individual cells, or does it represent a shift in the ratio of different cell types within the tissue? This commentary attempts to highlight the importance of considering cellularity when interpreting quantitative expression data, using the mammalian testis and a recent study on the effects of phthalate exposure on testis function as an example. PMID:27231928

  20. MUTAGENICITY AND CLASTOGENICITY OF TENIPOSIDE (VM-26) IN L5178Y/TK(+/-)-3.7.2C MOUSE LYMPHOMA CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The antitumor drug teniposide (VM-26) is a potent inducer of DNA breaks (Long et al., Cancer Res., 45:3106, 1985), but it is only weakly mutagenic at the hprt locus in CHO cells (Singh and Gupta, Cancer Res., 43:577, 1983). In the present study, the mutagenic and clastogenic acti...

  1. Al Shanker Remembers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Educator, 2000

    2000-01-01

    In a 1996 interview shortly before his death, Al Shanker, longtime president of the American Federation of Teachers, discussed such topics as: his own educational experiences; how he learned about political fighting in the Boy Scouts; the appeal of socialism; multinational corporations and the nation state; teaching tough students; and John Dewey…

  2. ALS renewal moves forward

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falcone, R. W.; Feinberg, B.; Hussain, Z.; Kirz, J.; Krebs, G. F.; Padmore, H. A.; Robin, D. S.; Robinson, A. L.

    2007-11-01

    As the result of an extensive long-term planning process involving all its stakeholders—management, staff, and users—the ALS has seen its future and is aggressively moving ahead to implement its vision for keeping the facility at the cutting edge for the next 2-3 decades. The evolving strategic plan now in place aims to renew the ALS so it can address a new generation of fundamental questions about size dependent and dimensional-confinement phenomena at the nanoscale; correlation and complexity in physical, biological, and environmental systems; and temporal evolution, assembly, dynamics and ultrafast phenomena. The renewal spans three areas: (1) increased staffing at beamlines to support the growing user community and safety professionals to keep an increasingly complex facility hazard free; (2) implementing advances in accelerator, insertion device, beamline, and detector technology that will make it possible for ALS users to address emerging grand scientific and technological challenges with incisive world-class tools; and (3) construction of a user support building and guest housing that will increase the safety and user friendliness of the ALS by providing users office, meeting, experiment staging, and laboratory space for their work and on-site accommodations at reasonable rates.

  3. Fosetyl-al

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Fosetyl - al ; CASRN 39148 - 24 - 8 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Ef

  4. S6K1ing to ResTOR Adipogenesis with Polycomb.

    PubMed

    Juan, Aster H; Sartorelli, Vittorio

    2016-05-01

    Signal-directed chromatin recruitment of mammalian Polycomb complexes is a fundamental component of epigenetic regulation. In this issue, Yi et al. (2016) reveal how mTORC1 activation deploys the ribosomal serine/threonine kinase S6K1 and Polycomb proteins at genomic regulatory regions to repress expression of anti-adipogenic developmental regulators. PMID:27153531

  5. The impact of rhetoric and education on the "Res Gestae" of Ammianus Marcellinus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez, Pablo

    The aim of this thesis is to explore and underline the impact of education and rhetoric on the Res Gestae of Ammianus Marcellinus. I will examine the concept of education in two different aspects. First, I will determine the role of education in regards to Ammianus' early life by describing the cultural climate in the East in the fourth century (Introduction and chapter 1). In this analysis, I will argue that the historian's familiarity with Latin suggests an early acquaintance with the language, indicating that he should not be invariably associated with earlier Greek historians. Second, I will look at how the content of the curriculum is reflected in the RG, explaining how literary sources shaped the composition of the historian's digressions on geography (Chapter 3) and astronomy (Chapter 4). In the past, scholars have examined Ammianus' cultural digressions as an example of the tension between things seen and things read. In my argumentation, I will concentrate on explaining the reasons why Ammianus often tended to rely on literary works rather than observation. I will show that the explanation greatly lies in the content of the curriculum. Concerning the role of rhetoric, I will examine how rhetorical training is articulated in the RG. In Chapter 2, I will show that Ammianus' selection of historical material can be explained in light of the ancient theory of styles. In this context, I will study the role of a rhetorical device designed to raise the emotions of readers by bringing the scene before their eyes: enargeia. In Chapters 3 and 4, I will demonstrate that the cultural digressions in the RG are mostly the product of cultural stereotypes and literary influences. In Chapter 5, I will show the impact of rhetorical treatises on some passages of the RG, arguing that the traditional classification of oratory into deliberative, epideictic and judicial is echoed in both the speeches and the historical narrative. To conclude: the main purpose of my dissertation

  6. Use of CD40L immunoconjugates to overcome the defective immune response to vaccines for infections and cancer in the aged.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yu Cheng; Thoman, Marilyn; Linton, Phyllis-Jean; Deisseroth, Albert

    2009-12-01

    :147-164, 1998; Ben-Yehuda and Weksler In: Cancer Investigation 10:525-531, 1992]. One of the more interesting examples of the functional defects in the cells of the adaptive immune response is a reduced level of expression in the surface cytoadhesion and activation receptor molecules on CD4 helper T cells undergoing activation during vaccination. Upon infection or vaccination, CD40L is typically increased on the surface of CD4 helper T cells during activation, and this increased expression is absolutely essential to the CD40L promotion of expansion of antigen-specific B cells and CD 8 effector T cells in response to infection or vaccination [Singh et al. In: Protein Sci 7:1124-1135, 1998; Grewal and Flavell In: Immunol Res 16: 59-70, 1997; Kornbluth In: J Hematother Stem Cell Res 11:787-801, 2002; Garcia de Vinuesa et al. In: Eur J Immunol 29:3216-3224, 1999]. In aged human beings and mice, the reduced levels of expression of CD40 ligand (CD40L) in activated CD4 helper T cells is dramatically reduced [Eaton et al. In: J Exp Med 200:1613-1622, 2004; Dong et al. In: J Gen Virol 84:1623-1628, 2003]. To circumvent the reduction in CD40L expression and the subsequent reduction in immune response in the elderly, we have developed a chimeric vaccine comprised of the CD40L linked to the target antigen, in a replication incompetent adenoviral vector and in booster protein. This review will discuss the implementation the potential use of this approach for the vaccination of the older populations for cancer and infection. PMID:19444444

  7. Eye Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Cancer of the eye is uncommon. It can affect the outer parts of the eye, such as the eyelid, which are made up ... adults are melanoma and lymphoma. The most common eye cancer in children is retinoblastoma, which starts in ...

  8. Liver Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... body digest food, store energy, and remove poisons. Primary liver cancer starts in the liver. Metastatic liver ... and spreads to your liver. Risk factors for primary liver cancer include Having hepatitis B or C ...

  9. Nasal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... the way to your throat as you breathe. Cancer of the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses is ... be like those of infections. Doctors diagnose nasal cancer with imaging tests, lighted tube-like instruments that ...

  10. Pancreatic Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... hormones that help control blood sugar levels. Pancreatic cancer usually begins in the cells that produce the juices. Some risk factors for developing pancreatic cancer include Smoking Long-term diabetes Chronic pancreatitis Certain ...

  11. Esophageal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... from your throat to your stomach. Early esophageal cancer usually does not cause symptoms. Later, you may ... You're at greater risk for getting esophageal cancer if you smoke, drink heavily, or have acid ...

  12. Gallbladder Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... your gallbladder and liver to your small intestine. Cancer of the gallbladder is rare. It is more ... the abdomen It is hard to diagnose gallbladder cancer in its early stages. Sometimes doctors find it ...

  13. Prostate Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... man's bladder that produces fluid for semen. Prostate cancer is common among older men. It is rare ... younger than 40. Risk factors for developing prostate cancer include being over 65 years of age, family ...

  14. Intestinal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... connects your stomach to your large intestine. Intestinal cancer is rare, but eating a high-fat diet ... increase your risk. Possible signs of small intestine cancer include Abdominal pain Weight loss for no reason ...

  15. Colorectal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... rectum are part of the large intestine. Colorectal cancer occurs when tumors form in the lining of ... men and women. The risk of developing colorectal cancer rises after age 50. You're also more ...

  16. Thymus Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... cell. These cells help protect you from infections. Cancer of the thymus is rare. You are more ... Sometimes there are no symptoms. Other times, thymus cancer can cause A cough that doesn't go ...

  17. Cancer Chemotherapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... cells grow and die in a controlled way. Cancer cells keep forming without control. Chemotherapy is drug ... Your course of therapy will depend on the cancer type, the chemotherapy drugs used, the treatment goal ...

  18. Bladder cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder; Urothelial cancer ... In the United States, bladder cancer usually starts from the cells lining the bladder. These cells are called transitional cells. These tumors are classified by the way ...

  19. Colorectal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... and rectum are part of the large intestine. Colorectal cancer occurs when tumors form in the lining of ... both men and women. The risk of developing colorectal cancer rises after age 50. You're also more ...

  20. Cervical Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... the place where a baby grows during pregnancy. Cervical cancer is caused by a virus called HPV. The ... for a long time, or have HIV infection. Cervical cancer may not cause any symptoms at first. Later, ...

  1. Cervical cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... and cervical cancer cannot be seen with the naked eye. Special tests and tools are needed to ... Pap smears and cervical cancer References Committee on Adolescent Health Care of the American College of Obstetricians ...

  2. Eye Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... adults are melanoma and lymphoma. The most common eye cancer in children is retinoblastoma, which starts in the cells of the retina. ... from other parts of the body. Treatment for eye cancer varies by the type and by how advanced ...

  3. Prostate Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... a man's bladder that produces fluid for semen. Prostate cancer is common among older men. It is rare ... men younger than 40. Risk factors for developing prostate cancer include being over 65 years of age, family ...

  4. Skin Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... early. If not treated, some types of skin cancer cells can spread to other tissues and organs. Treatments ... and a type of laser light to kill cancer cells. Biologic therapy boosts your body's own ability to ...

  5. Oral Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... use. Some oral cancers are linked to human papilloma virus (HPV) infections of the mouth and throat. ... The number of oropharyngeal cancers linked to human papilloma virus (HPV) has risen dramatically over the past ...

  6. Cancer treatments

    MedlinePlus

    ... cells. Targeted treatment zeroes in on specific targets (molecules) in cancer cells. These targets play a role ... Cryotherapy Also called cryosurgery , this therapy uses very cold gas to freeze and kill cancer cells. It ...

  7. Ovarian cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... of ovarian cancer Already been diagnosed with ovarian cancer to determine how well treatment is working Other tests that may be done include: Complete blood count and blood chemistry Pregnancy test (serum HCG) CT or MRI of ...

  8. Occupational Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Carcinogen List Cancer Clusters Cancer Policy at NIOSH Diesel Exhaust in Miners Study (DEMS) Related Topics Asbestos ... Toxicology Program Report on Carcinogens NIOSH Pocket Guide Diesel Exhaust in Miners Study (DEMS) Recent NIOSH Research ...

  9. Cervical Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) Inside Knowledge: Get the Facts About Gynecologic Cancer campaign. The ... the facts about gynecologic cancer, providing important “inside knowledge” about their bodies and health. Get the Facts ...

  10. Uterine Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) Inside Knowledge: Get the Facts About Gynecologic Cancer campaign. The ... the facts about gynecologic cancer, providing important “inside knowledge” about their bodies and health. Get the Facts ...

  11. Colon cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... red or processed meats Have colorectal polyps Have inflammatory bowel disease ( Crohn disease or ulcerative colitis ) Have a family history of colon cancer Have a personal history of breast cancer Some inherited diseases also increase the risk ...

  12. Thyroid Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... of treatments. They may include surgery, radioactive iodine, hormone treatment, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, or targeted therapy. Targeted therapy uses substances that attack cancer cells without harming normal cells. NIH: National Cancer Institute

  13. The BonaRes Centre - A virtual institute for soil research in the context of a sustainable bio-economy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wollschläger, Ute; Helming, Katharina; Heinrich, Uwe; Bartke, Stephan; Kögel-Knabner, Ingrid; Russell, David; Eberhardt, Einar; Vogel, Hans-Jörg

    2016-04-01

    Fertile soils are central resources for the production of biomass and provision of food and energy. A growing world population and latest climate targets lead to an increasing demand for both, food and bio-energy, which require preserving and improving the long-term productivity of soils as a bio-economic resource. At the same time, other soil functions and ecosystem services need to be maintained. To render soil management sustainable, we need to establish a scientific knowledge base about complex soil system processes that allows for the development of model tools to quantitatively predict the impact of a multitude of management measures on soil functions. This, finally, will allow for the provision of site-specific options for sustainable soil management. To face this challenge, the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research recently launched the funding program "Soil as a Natural Resource for the Bio-Economy - BonaRes". In a joint effort, ten collaborative projects and the coordinating BonaRes Centre are engaged to close existing knowledge gaps for a profound and systemic understanding of soil functions and their sensitivity to soil management. This presentation provides an overview of the concept of the BonaRes Centre which is responsible for i) setting up a comprehensive data base for soil-related information, ii) the development of model tools aiming to estimate the impact of different management measures on soil functions, and iii) establishing a web-based portal providing decision support tools for a sustainable soil management. A specific focus of the presentation will be laid on the so-called "knowledge-portal" providing the infrastructure for a community effort towards a comprehensive meta-analysis on soil functions as a basis for future model developments.

  14. Can Energy Cost During Low-Intensity Resistance Exercise be Predicted by the OMNI-RES Scale?

    PubMed

    Vianna, Jefferson M; Reis, Victor M; Saavedra, Francisco; Damasceno, Vinicius; Silva, Sérgio G; Goss, Fredric

    2011-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the precision of the OMNI-RES scale to predict energy cost (EC) at low intensity in four resistance exercises (RE). 17 male recreational body builders (age = 26.6 ± 4.9 years; height = 177.7 ± 0.1 cm; body weight = 79.0 ± 11.1 kg and percent body fat = 10.5 ± 4.6%) served as subjects. Initially tests to determine 1RM for four resistance exercises (bench press, half squat, lat pull down and triceps extension) were administered. Subjects also performed resistance exercise at 12, 16, 20, and 24% of 1RM at a rate of 40 bpm until volitional exhaustion. Oxygen uptake (VO2) and rate of perceived exertion (RPE) using the OMNI-RES were obtained during and after all RE. EC was calculated using VO2 and the caloric values of VO2 for non-protein RER. Regression analyses were performed for every RE, using EC as the dependent and RPE as the predictor variable. The triceps extension, lat pull down and bench press, RPE correlated strongly with EC (R > 0.97) and predicted EC with a error of less than 0.2 kcal.min(-1). In conclusion, RPE using the OMNI-RES scale can be considered as an accurate indicator of EC in the bench press, lat pull down and triceps extension performed by recreational bodybuilders, provided lower intensities are used (up to 24% of 1-RM) and provided each set of exercise is performed for the maximal sustainable duration. It would be interesting in future studies to consider having the subjects exercise at low intensities for longer durations than those in the present study. PMID:23486188

  15. Can Energy Cost During Low-Intensity Resistance Exercise be Predicted by the OMNI-RES Scale?

    PubMed Central

    Vianna, Jefferson M.; Reis, Victor M.; Saavedra, Francisco; Damasceno, Vinicius; Silva, Sérgio G.; Goss, Fredric

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the precision of the OMNI-RES scale to predict energy cost (EC) at low intensity in four resistance exercises (RE). 17 male recreational body builders (age = 26.6 ± 4.9 years; height = 177.7 ± 0.1 cm; body weight = 79.0 ± 11.1 kg and percent body fat = 10.5 ± 4.6%) served as subjects. Initially tests to determine 1RM for four resistance exercises (bench press, half squat, lat pull down and triceps extension) were administered. Subjects also performed resistance exercise at 12, 16, 20, and 24% of 1RM at a rate of 40 bpm until volitional exhaustion. Oxygen uptake (VO2) and rate of perceived exertion (RPE) using the OMNI-RES were obtained during and after all RE. EC was calculated using VO2 and the caloric values of VO2 for non-protein RER. Regression analyses were performed for every RE, using EC as the dependent and RPE as the predictor variable. The triceps extension, lat pull down and bench press, RPE correlated strongly with EC (R > 0.97) and predicted EC with a error of less than 0.2 kcal.min−1. In conclusion, RPE using the OMNI-RES scale can be considered as an accurate indicator of EC in the bench press, lat pull down and triceps extension performed by recreational bodybuilders, provided lower intensities are used (up to 24% of 1-RM) and provided each set of exercise is performed for the maximal sustainable duration. It would be interesting in future studies to consider having the subjects exercise at low intensities for longer durations than those in the present study. PMID:23486188

  16. ALS Project Management Manual

    SciTech Connect

    Krupnick, Jim; Harkins, Joe

    2000-05-01

    This manual has been prepared to help establish a consistent baseline of management practices across all ALS projects. It describes the initial process of planning a project, with a specific focus on the production of a formal project plan. We feel that the primary weakness in ALS project management efforts to date stems from a failure to appreciate the importance of ''up-front'' project planning. In this document, we present a guide (with examples) to preparing the documents necessary to properly plan, monitor, and control a project's activities. While following the manual will certainly not guarantee good project management, failure to address the issues we raise will dramatically reduce the chance of success. Here we define success as meeting the technical goals on schedule and within the prescribed budget.

  17. ALS insertion devices

    SciTech Connect

    Hoyer, E.; Chin, J.; Halbach, K.; Hassenzahl, W.V.; Humphries, D.; Kincaid, B.; Lancaster, H.; Plate, D.

    1990-11-01

    The Advanced Light Source (ALS), the first US third generation synchrotron radiation source, is currently under construction at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. The low-emittance, 1.5 GeV electron storage ring and the insertion devices are specifically designed to produce high brightness beams in the UV to soft X-Ray range. The planned initial complement of insertion devices includes four 4.6 m long undulators, with period lengths of 3.9 cm, 5.0 cm (2) and 8.0 cm, and a 2.9 m long wiggler of 16 cm period length. Undulator design is well advanced and fabrication has begun on the 5.0 cm and 8.0 cm period length undulators. This paper discusses ALS insertion device requirements; general design philosophy; and design of the magnetic structure, support structure/drive systems, control system and vacuum system. 18 refs., 9 figs., 5 tabs.

  18. APOBEC3 cytidine deaminases in double-strand DNA break repair and cancer promotion.

    PubMed

    Nowarski, Roni; Kotler, Moshe

    2013-06-15

    High frequency of cytidine to thymidine conversions was identified in the genome of several types of cancer cells. In breast cancer cells, these mutations are clustered in long DNA regions associated with single-strand DNA (ssDNA), double-strand DNA breaks (DSB), and genomic rearrangements. The observed mutational pattern resembles the deamination signature of cytidine to uridine carried out by members of the APOBEC3 family of cellular deaminases. Consistently, APOBEC3B (A3B) was recently identified as the mutational source in breast cancer cells. A3G is another member of the cytidine deaminases family predominantly expressed in lymphoma cells, where it is involved in mutational DSB repair following ionizing radiation treatments. This activity provides us with a new paradigm for cancer cell survival and tumor promotion and a mechanistic link between ssDNA, DSBs, and clustered mutations. Cancer Res; 73(12); 3494-8. ©2013 AACR. PMID:23598277

  19. Ausbildung als zentrale Aufgabe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krämer, Walter; Schmerbach, Sibylle

    Anders als Lesen und Schreiben zählen Grundkenntnisse in Statistik heute noch nicht zu den Voraussetzungen einer sinnvollen Teilhabe am Sozialgeschehen. Und auch in der akademischen Statistik-Ausbildung gibt es noch einiges zu tun. Das vorliegende Kapitel zeichnet die Geschichte dieser akademischen Ausbildung an deutschen Universitäten nach dem zweiten Weltkrieg nach, stellt aktuelle Defizite vor und weist auf mögliche Verbesserungen hin.

  20. Prostate cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, G.P.; Kuss, R., Khoury, S.; Chatelain, C.; Denis, L.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains over 70 selections. Some of the titles are: Place of the Computed Tomography in the Staging of Prostatic Cancer; Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) in Staging of the Prostatic Cancer; Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Prostate; Long-Term Results in Radiotherapy of Prostatic Cancer; Interstitial Irradiation Using I-125 Seeds; and Treatment of Cancer of the Prostate by Use of Physiotherapy: Long-Term Results.

  1. Retention of Rotavirus Infectivity in Mussels Heated by Using the French Recipe Moules Marinières.

    PubMed

    Souza, Doris Sobral Marques; Miura, Takayuki; Le Mennec, Cécile; Barardi, Célia Regina Monte; Le Guyader, Françoise S

    2015-11-01

    To evaluate the persistence of infectious virus after heating, mussels contaminated with a rotavirus strain were prepared following the French recipe moules marinières (mariner's mussels). Rotavirus was then quantified by real-time quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) and a cell culture infectivity assay. Results showed the persistence of infectious virus after 3 min of cooking. After 5 min, when no infectious virus could be detected, the RT-qPCR approach showed a 1-log decrease compared with concentrations detected after 1 min of cooking. PMID:26555530

  2. RES-TOCSY: A facile approach for accurate determination of magnitudes, and relative signs of nJHF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lokesh; Chaudhari, Sachin R.; Suryaprakash, N.

    2014-05-01

    The RES-TOCSY experiment for accurate determination of heteronuclear nJHF is reported. The main feature of the proposed technique is the accurate measurement of magnitudes of heteronuclear couplings from the displacement of cross sections of the 2D spectrum and their relative signs from the slopes of their displacement vectors. The experiment is highly advantageous as the couplings of smaller magnitudes hidden within line widths could also be accurately determined, and also in situations when the spectrum does not display any coupling fine structures. The efficient utility of the developed pulse sequence is unambiguously established on fluorine containing aromatic and aliphatic molecules.

  3. Erratum to: RAGE-binding S100A8/A9 promotes the migration and invasion of human breast cancer cells through actin polymerization and epithelial-mesenchymal transition.

    PubMed

    Yin, Chonggao; Li, Hongli; Zhang, Baogang; Liu, Yuqing; Lu, Guohua; Lu, Shijun; Sun, Lei; Qi, Yueliang; Li, Xiaolong; Chen, Weiyi

    2016-04-01

    Erratum to: Breast Cancer Res Treat (2013),142:297–309,DOI 10.1007/s10549-013-2737-1.In the original publication, the images in Fig. 3 were mistakenly selected from other experiments in which similar procedures were performed. The corrected Fig. 3 is given in this erratum. PMID:27000201

  4. Cancer Triptych.

    PubMed

    Faulkner, Sandra L

    2016-08-01

    The author uses personal narrative to show how the cold cloak of cancer covered her family during the polar vortex of 2013-2014. The use of a triptych form hinges together related themes of containment, coping, communicative responses, and social support after a cancer diagnosis. This narrative demonstrates the multiple responses and communicative coping strategies to a cancer diagnosis. PMID:26752448

  5. Testicular Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... of skin behind the penis. You can get cancer in one or both testicles. Testicular cancer mainly affects young men between the ages of ... undescended testicle Have a family history of the cancer Symptoms include pain, swelling, or lumps in your ...

  6. Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Breast cancer affects one in eight women during their lives. No one knows why some women get breast cancer, but there are many risk factors. Risks that ... who have family members with breast or ovarian cancer may wish to be tested for the genes. ...

  7. Cancer pain

    SciTech Connect

    Swerdlow, M.; Ventafridda, V.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains 13 chapters. Some of the chapter titles are: Importance of the Problem; Neurophysiology and Biochemistry of Pain; Assessment of Pain in Patients with Cancer; Drug Therapy; Chemotherapy and Radiotherapy for Cancer Pain; Sympton Control as it Relates to Pain Control; and Palliative Surgery in Cancer Pain Treatment.

  8. Breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Pearce, Lynne

    2016-08-17

    Essential facts Breast cancer is the most common cancer in the UK, with around 60,000 new cases diagnosed each year, according to the charity Breast Cancer Care. Over a lifetime, women have a one in eight risk of developing it. PMID:27533387

  9. Cancer Basics

    MedlinePlus

    ... of cells , tiny units that make up all living things. Cancer (also known as malignancy , pronounced: muh-LIG- ... cancer and cancer treatments can disrupt a person's life for a while. People ... to take care of the things they have to get done. For example, teens ...

  10. Cervical Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... dysplasia of the cervix, vagina, or vulva • A family history of cervical cancer •Smoking •Certain sexually transmitted infections , such as chlamydia • ... to treat your cancer, you still need cervical cancer screening. Cells are taken from the upper vagina ... smallest units of a structure in the body; the building blocks for all ...

  11. What is Prostate Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Topic Key statistics for prostate cancer What is prostate cancer? Cancer starts when cells in the body begin ... through the center of the prostate. Types of prostate cancer Almost all prostate cancers are adenocarcinomas . These cancers ...

  12. Breast Cancer Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Breast Cancer Prevention (PDQ®)–Patient Version What is prevention? Go ... to keep cancer from starting. General Information About Breast Cancer Key Points Breast cancer is a disease in ...

  13. Throat or larynx cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Vocal cord cancer; Throat cancer; Laryngeal cancer; Cancer of the glottis; Cancer of oropharynx or hypopharynx ... use tobacco are at risk of developing throat cancer. Drinking too much alcohol over a long time ...

  14. National Cancer Institute

    MedlinePlus

    ... Partners & Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & ... Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists NCI Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & ...

  15. Inflammatory Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Partners & Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & ... Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists NCI Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & ...

  16. Secondhand Smoke and Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Partners & Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & ... Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists NCI Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & ...

  17. Psychological Stress and Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Partners & Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & ... Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists NCI Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & ...

  18. Photodynamic Therapy for Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Partners & Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & ... Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists NCI Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & ...

  19. Snapshot of Stomach Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Partners & Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & ... Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists NCI Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & ...

  20. Electromagnetic Fields and Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Partners & Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & ... Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists NCI Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & ...

  1. Antioxidants and Cancer Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... Partners & Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & ... Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists NCI Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & ...

  2. Biological Therapies for Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Partners & Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & ... Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists NCI Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & ...

  3. Snapshot of Pediatric Cancers

    MedlinePlus

    ... Partners & Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & ... Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists NCI Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & ...

  4. Head and Neck Cancers

    MedlinePlus

    ... Partners & Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & ... Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists NCI Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & ...

  5. Helicobacter pylori and Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Partners & Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & ... Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists NCI Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & ...

  6. Colon cancer - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - colon cancer ... The following organizations are good resources for information on colon cancer : American Cancer Society -- www.cancer.org/cancer/colonandrectumcancer/index Colon Cancer Alliance -- www.ccalliance.org National ...

  7. Snapshot of Esophageal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Partners & Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & ... Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists NCI Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & ...

  8. Throat or larynx cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Vocal cord cancer; Throat cancer; Laryngeal cancer; Cancer of the glottis; Cancer of oropharynx or hypopharynx ... or use tobacco are at risk of developing throat cancer. Drinking too much alcohol over a long ...

  9. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... Screening & Early Detection Treatment Cancer & Public Health Cancer Health Disparities Childhood Cancers Research Clinical Trials Global Health Key ... Screening & Early Detection Treatment Cancer & Public Health Cancer Health Disparities Childhood Cancer Clinical Trials Global Health Key Initiatives ...

  10. Dicer Elicits Paclitaxel Chemosensitization and Suppresses Cancer Stemness in Breast Cancer by Repressing AXL.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ting-Yu; Chen, Hsin-An; Chiu, Ching-Feng; Chang, Yi-Wen; Kuo, Tsang-Chih; Tseng, Po-Chun; Wang, Weu; Hung, Mien-Chie; Su, Jen-Liang

    2016-07-01

    Paclitaxel is a standard-of-care chemotherapy for breast cancer, despite the increasing recognition of its poor effectiveness in the treatment of patients with advanced disease. Here, we report that adenovirus-type 5 E1A-mediated elevation of the miRNA-processing enzyme Dicer is sufficient to enhance paclitaxel sensitization and reduce cancer stem-like cell properties in this setting. Elevating Dicer expression increased levels of the AXL kinase targeting miRNA miR-494, thereby repressing AXL expression to increase paclitaxel sensitivity. We found that Dicer expression was regulated at the transcription level by E1A, through activation of an MAPK14/CEBPα pathway. Our findings define a mechanism of E1A-mediated chemosensitization for paclitaxel, which is based upon the suppression of breast cancer stem-like cells, with potential implications for the diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer patients. Cancer Res; 76(13); 3916-28. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27216190

  11. Resistance to Trastuzumab in Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Pohlmann, Paula R; Mayer, Ingrid A; Mernaugh, Ray

    2009-12-15

    HER2 is a transmembrane oncoprotein encoded by the HER2/neu gene and is overexpressed in approximately 20 to 25% of invasive breast cancers. It can be therapeutically targeted by trastuzumab, a humanized IgG1 kappa light chain monoclonal antibody. Although trastuzumab is currently considered one of the most effective treatments in oncology, a significant number of patients with HER2-overexpressing breast cancer do not benefit from it. Understanding the mechanisms of action and resistance to trastuzumab is therefore crucial for the development of new therapeutic strategies. This review discusses proposed trastuzumab mode of action as well as proposed mechanisms for resistance. Mechanisms for resistance are grouped into four main categories: (1) obstacles preventing trastuzumab binding to HER2; (2) upregulation of HER2 downstream signaling pathways; (3) signaling through alternate pathways; and (4) failure to trigger an immune-mediated mechanism to destroy tumor cells. These potential mechanisms through which trastuzumab resistance may arise have been used as a guide to develop drugs, presently in clinical trials, to overcome resistance. The mechanisms conferring trastuzumab resistance, when completely understood, will provide insight on how best to treat HER2-overexpressing breast cancer. The understanding of each mechanism of resistance is therefore critical for the educated development of strategies to overcome it, as well as for the development of tools that would allow definitive and efficient patient selection for each therapy. (Clin Cancer Res 2009;15(24):7479-91). PMID:20008848

  12. Stromal-Based Signatures for the Classification of Gastric Cancer.

    PubMed

    Uhlik, Mark T; Liu, Jiangang; Falcon, Beverly L; Iyer, Seema; Stewart, Julie; Celikkaya, Hilal; O'Mahony, Marguerita; Sevinsky, Christopher; Lowes, Christina; Douglass, Larry; Jeffries, Cynthia; Bodenmiller, Diane; Chintharlapalli, Sudhakar; Fischl, Anthony; Gerald, Damien; Xue, Qi; Lee, Jee-Yun; Santamaria-Pang, Alberto; Al-Kofahi, Yousef; Sui, Yunxia; Desai, Keyur; Doman, Thompson; Aggarwal, Amit; Carter, Julia H; Pytowski, Bronislaw; Jaminet, Shou-Ching; Ginty, Fiona; Nasir, Aejaz; Nagy, Janice A; Dvorak, Harold F; Benjamin, Laura E

    2016-05-01

    Treatment of metastatic gastric cancer typically involves chemotherapy and monoclonal antibodies targeting HER2 (ERBB2) and VEGFR2 (KDR). However, reliable methods to identify patients who would benefit most from a combination of treatment modalities targeting the tumor stroma, including new immunotherapy approaches, are still lacking. Therefore, we integrated a mouse model of stromal activation and gastric cancer genomic information to identify gene expression signatures that may inform treatment strategies. We generated a mouse model in which VEGF-A is expressed via adenovirus, enabling a stromal response marked by immune infiltration and angiogenesis at the injection site, and identified distinct stromal gene expression signatures. With these data, we designed multiplexed IHC assays that were applied to human primary gastric tumors and classified each tumor to a dominant stromal phenotype representative of the vascular and immune diversity found in gastric cancer. We also refined the stromal gene signatures and explored their relation to the dominant patient phenotypes identified by recent large-scale studies of gastric cancer genomics (The Cancer Genome Atlas and Asian Cancer Research Group), revealing four distinct stromal phenotypes. Collectively, these findings suggest that a genomics-based systems approach focused on the tumor stroma can be used to discover putative predictive biomarkers of treatment response, especially to antiangiogenesis agents and immunotherapy, thus offering an opportunity to improve patient stratification. Cancer Res; 76(9); 2573-86. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27197264

  13. Early Events in the Molecular Pathogenesis of Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Kadara, Humam; Scheet, Paul; Wistuba, Ignacio I; Spira, Avrum E

    2016-07-01

    The majority of cancer-related deaths in the United States and worldwide are attributed to lung cancer. There are more than 90 million smokers in the United States who represent a significant population at elevated risk for lung malignancy. In other epithelial tumors, it has been shown that if neoplastic lesions can be detected and treated at their intraepithelial stage, patient prognosis is significantly improved. Thus, new strategies to detect and treat lung preinvasive lesions are urgently needed in order to decrease the overwhelming public health burden of lung cancer. Limiting these advances is a poor knowledge of the earliest events that underlie lung cancer development and that would constitute markers and targets for early detection and prevention. This review summarizes the state of knowledge of human lung cancer pathogenesis and the molecular pathology of premalignant lung lesions, with a focus on the molecular premalignant field that associates with lung cancer development. Lastly, we highlight new approaches and models to study genome-wide alterations in human lung premalignancy in order to facilitate the discovery of new markers for early detection and prevention of this fatal disease. Cancer Prev Res; 9(7); 518-27. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27006378

  14. Synthesis and antiproliferative activity of coumarin-estrogen conjugates against breast cancer cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Khan, M. Omar F.; Cooperwood, John S.

    2010-01-01

    The syntheses and cytotoxic activity of coumarin-estrogen conjugates are described. In vitro results indicated that conjugates 10, 11 and 13 show growth inhibitory activities at 5-dose concentration (100, 10, 1, 0.1, 0.01 μM) against the following NCI-7- human breast cancer cell lines: BT-549, HS 578T, MCF 7, MDA-MB-231/ATCC, MDA-MB-435, NCI/ADR-RES, and thus serve as new leads for further development of antibreast cancer agent. PMID:20556210

  15. Optical gain characteristics in Al-rich AlGaN/AlN quantum wells

    SciTech Connect

    Oto, Takao; Banal, Ryan G.; Funato, Mitsuru; Kawakami, Yoichi

    2014-05-05

    The optical gain characteristics of Al-rich AlGaN/AlN quantum wells (QWs) were assessed by the variable stripe length method at room temperature. An Al{sub 0.79}Ga{sub 0.21}N/AlN QW with a well width of 5 nm had a large optical gain of 140 cm{sup −1}. Increasing the excitation length induced a redshift due to the gain consumption and the consequent saturation of the amplified spontaneous emission. Moreover, a change in the dominant gain polarization with Al composition, which was attributed to switching of the valence band ordering of strained AlGaN/AlN QWs at Al compositions of ∼0.8, was experimentally demonstrated.

  16. Intensive chemotherapy of metastatic colorectal cancer: weighing between safety and clinical efficacy: Evaluation of Masi G, Loupakis F, Salvatore L, et al. Bevacizumab with FOLFOXIRI (irinotecan, oxaliplatin, fluorouracil, and folinate) as first-line treatment for metastatic colorectal cancer: a phase 2 trial. Lancet Oncol 2010;11:845-52.

    PubMed

    Bruera, Gemma; Ricevuto, Enrico

    2011-06-01

    This paper evaluates a recent study whereby a four-drug combination regimen adding bevacizumab to triplet fluorouracil, oxaliplatin and irinotecan chemotherapy is described for the first-line treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer. It extends the use of intensive medical treatments combining chemotherapy and the VEGF inhibitor bevacizumab, opening new perspectives for the design of four-drug intensive regimen-associating chemotherapy and targeted agents. In the future, these four-drug intensive regimens should be further improved for efficacy:toxicity ratio and verification in randomized trials. PMID:21545334

  17. Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Maitra, Anirban; Hruban, Ralph H.

    2009-01-01

    The past two decades have witnessed an explosion in our understanding of pancreatic cancer, and it is now clear that pancreatic cancer is a disease of inherited (germ-line) and somatic gene mutations. The genes mutated in pancreatic cancer include KRAS2, p16/CDKN2A, TP53, and SMAD4/DPC4, and these are accompanied by a substantial compendium of genomic and transcriptomic alterations that facilitate cell cycle deregulation, cell survival, invasion, and metastases. Pancreatic cancers do not arise de novo, and three distinct precursor lesions have been identified. Experimental models of pancreatic cancer have been developed in genetically engineered mice, which recapitulate the multistep progression of the cognate human disease. Although the putative cell of origin for pancreatic cancer remains elusive, minor populations of cells with stem-like properties have been identified that appear responsible for tumor initiation, metastases, and resistance of pancreatic cancer to conventional therapies. PMID:18039136

  18. Hunting the Extinct Steppe Bison (Bison priscus) Mitochondrial Genome in the Trois-Frères Paleolithic Painted Cave.

    PubMed

    Marsolier-Kergoat, Marie-Claude; Palacio, Pauline; Berthonaud, Véronique; Maksud, Frédéric; Stafford, Thomas; Bégouën, Robert; Elalouf, Jean-Marc

    2015-01-01

    Despite the abundance of fossil remains for the extinct steppe bison (Bison priscus), an animal that was painted and engraved in numerous European Paleolithic caves, a complete mitochondrial genome sequence has never been obtained for this species. In the present study we collected bone samples from a sector of the Trois-Frères Paleolithic cave (Ariège, France) that formerly functioned as a pitfall and was sealed before the end of the Pleistocene. Screening the DNA content of the samples collected from the ground surface revealed their contamination by Bos DNA. However, a 19,000-year-old rib collected on a rock apart the pathway delineated for modern visitors was devoid of such contaminants and reproducibly yielded Bison priscus DNA. High-throughput shotgun sequencing combined with conventional PCR analysis of the rib DNA extract enabled to reconstruct a complete mitochondrial genome sequence of 16,318 bp for the extinct steppe bison with a 10.4-fold coverage. Phylogenetic analyses robustly established the position of the Bison priscus mitochondrial genome as basal to the clade delineated by the genomes of the modern American Bison bison. The extinct steppe bison sequence, which exhibits 93 specific polymorphisms as compared to the published Bison bison mitochondrial genomes, provides an additional resource for the study of Bovinae specimens. Moreover this study of ancient DNA delineates a new research pathway for the analysis of the Magdalenian Trois-Frères cave. PMID:26083419

  19. Hunting the Extinct Steppe Bison (Bison priscus) Mitochondrial Genome in the Trois-Frères Paleolithic Painted Cave

    PubMed Central

    Marsolier-Kergoat, Marie-Claude; Palacio, Pauline; Berthonaud, Véronique; Maksud, Frédéric; Stafford, Thomas; Bégouën, Robert; Elalouf, Jean-Marc

    2015-01-01

    Despite the abundance of fossil remains for the extinct steppe bison (Bison priscus), an animal that was painted and engraved in numerous European Paleolithic caves, a complete mitochondrial genome sequence has never been obtained for this species. In the present study we collected bone samples from a sector of the Trois-Frères Paleolithic cave (Ariège, France) that formerly functioned as a pitfall and was sealed before the end of the Pleistocene. Screening the DNA content of the samples collected from the ground surface revealed their contamination by Bos DNA. However, a 19,000-year-old rib collected on a rock apart the pathway delineated for modern visitors was devoid of such contaminants and reproducibly yielded Bison priscus DNA. High-throughput shotgun sequencing combined with conventional PCR analysis of the rib DNA extract enabled to reconstruct a complete mitochondrial genome sequence of 16,318 bp for the extinct steppe bison with a 10.4-fold coverage. Phylogenetic analyses robustly established the position of the Bison priscus mitochondrial genome as basal to the clade delineated by the genomes of the modern American Bison bison. The extinct steppe bison sequence, which exhibits 93 specific polymorphisms as compared to the published Bison bison mitochondrial genomes, provides an additional resource for the study of Bovinae specimens. Moreover this study of ancient DNA delineates a new research pathway for the analysis of the Magdalenian Trois-Frères cave. PMID:26083419

  20. Gene Signature in Sessile Serrated Polyps Identifies Colon Cancer Subtype.

    PubMed

    Kanth, Priyanka; Bronner, Mary P; Boucher, Kenneth M; Burt, Randall W; Neklason, Deborah W; Hagedorn, Curt H; Delker, Don A

    2016-06-01

    Sessile serrated colon adenoma/polyps (SSA/P) are found during routine screening colonoscopy and may account for 20% to 30% of colon cancers. However, differentiating SSA/Ps from hyperplastic polyps (HP) with little risk of cancer is challenging and complementary molecular markers are needed. In addition, the molecular mechanisms of colon cancer development from SSA/Ps are poorly understood. RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) was performed on 21 SSA/Ps, 10 HPs, 10 adenomas, 21 uninvolved colon, and 20 control colon specimens. Differential expression and leave-one-out cross-validation methods were used to define a unique gene signature of SSA/Ps. Our SSA/P gene signature was evaluated in colon cancer RNA-Seq data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) to identify a subtype of colon cancers that may develop from SSA/Ps. A total of 1,422 differentially expressed genes were found in SSA/Ps relative to controls. Serrated polyposis syndrome (n = 12) and sporadic SSA/Ps (n = 9) exhibited almost complete (96%) gene overlap. A 51-gene panel in SSA/P showed similar expression in a subset of TCGA colon cancers with high microsatellite instability. A smaller 7-gene panel showed high sensitivity and specificity in identifying BRAF-mutant, CpG island methylator phenotype high, and MLH1-silenced colon cancers. We describe a unique gene signature in SSA/Ps that identifies a subset of colon cancers likely to develop through the serrated pathway. These gene panels may be utilized for improved differentiation of SSA/Ps from HPs and provide insights into novel molecular pathways altered in colon cancer arising from the serrated pathway. Cancer Prev Res; 9(6); 456-65. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27026680

  1. AL Amyloidosis and Agent Orange

    MedlinePlus

    ... for survivors' benefits . Research on AL amyloidosis and herbicides The Health and Medicine Division (formally known as ... to the compounds of interest found in the herbicide Agent Orange and AL amyloidosis." VA made a ...

  2. Isorhapontigenin (ISO) Inhibits Invasive Bladder Cancer Formation In Vivo and Human Bladder Cancer Invasion In Vitro by Targeting STAT1/FOXO1 Axis.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Guosong; Wu, Amy D; Huang, Chao; Gu, Jiayan; Zhang, Liping; Huang, Haishan; Liao, Xin; Li, Jingxia; Zhang, Dongyun; Zeng, Xingruo; Jin, Honglei; Huang, Haojie; Huang, Chuanshu

    2016-07-01

    Although our most recent studies have identified Isorhapontigenin (ISO), a novel derivative of stilbene that isolated from a Chinese herb Gnetum cleistostachyum, for its inhibition of human bladder cancer growth, nothing is known whether ISO possesses an inhibitory effect on bladder cancer invasion. Thus, we addressed this important question in current study and discovered that ISO treatment could inhibit mouse-invasive bladder cancer development following bladder carcinogen N-butyl-N-(4-hydroxybutyl) nitrosamine (BBN) exposure in vivo We also found that ISO suppressed human bladder cancer cell invasion accompanied by upregulation of the forkhead box class O 1 (FOXO1) mRNA transcription in vitro Accordingly, FOXO1 was profoundly downregulated in human bladder cancer tissues and was negatively correlated with bladder cancer invasion. Forced expression of FOXO1 specifically suppressed high-grade human bladder cancer cell invasion, whereas knockdown of FOXO1 promoted noninvasive bladder cancer cells becoming invasive bladder cancer cells. Moreover, knockout of FOXO1 significantly increased bladder cancer cell invasion and abolished the ISO inhibition of invasion in human bladder cancer cells. Further studies showed that the inhibition of Signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1) phosphorylation at Tyr701 was crucial for ISO upregulation of FOXO1 transcription. Furthermore, this study revealed that metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) was a FOXO1 downstream effector, which was also supported by data obtained from mouse model of ISO inhibition BBN-induced mouse-invasive bladder cancer formation. These findings not only provide a novel insight into the understanding of mechanism of bladder cancer's propensity to invasion, but also identify a new role and mechanisms underlying the natural compound ISO that specifically suppresses such bladder cancer invasion through targeting the STAT1-FOXO1-MMP-2 axis. Cancer Prev Res; 9(7); 567-80. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27080594

  3. Al(+)-ligand binding energies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sodupe, M.; Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Ab initio calculations are used to optimize the structure and determine the binding energies of Al(+) to a series of ligands. For Al(+)-CN, the bonding was found to have a large covalent component. For the remaining ligands, the bonding is shown to be electrostatic in origin. The results obtained for Al(+) are compared with those previously reported for Mg(+).

  4. Al Jazirah, Sudan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    Al Jazirah (also Gezira) is one of the 26 states of Sudan. The state lies between the Blue Nile and the White Nile in the east-central region of the country. It is a well populated area suitable for agriculture. The area was at the southern end of Nubia and little is known about its ancient history and only limited archaeological work has been conducted in this area. The region has benefited from the Gezira Scheme, a program to foster cotton farming begun in 1925. At that time the Sennar Dam and numerous irrigation canals were built. Al Jazirah became the Sudan's major agricultural region with more than 2.5 million acres (10,000 km) under cultivation. The initial development project was semi-private, but the government nationalized it in 1950. Cotton production increased in the 1970s but by the 1990s increased wheat production has supplanted a third of the land formerly seeded with cotton.

    The image was acquired December 25, 2006, covers an area of 56 x 36.4 km, and is located near 14.5 degrees north latitude, 33.1 degrees east longitude.

    The U.S. science team is located at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Science Mission Directorate.

  5. Studies of 27Al NMR in EuAl4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niki, H.; Nakamura, S.; Higa, N.; Kuroshima, H.; Toji, T.; Yogi, M.; Nakamura, A.; Hedo, M.; Nakama, T.; Ōnuki, Y.; Harima, H.

    2015-03-01

    EuAl4 orders antiferromagnetically at TN ≈ 16 K with an effective magnetic moment of 8.02 μB. In the paramagnetic phase, the magnetic susceptibility of EuAl4 follows the Curie-Weiss law with a positive Curie-Weiss temperature θP = +14 K. The antiferromagnetic state is changed into the field induced ferromagnetic state at a critical field Hc of approximately 2 T. In order to microscopically investigate the magnetic and electronic properties in EuAl4, the NMR measurements of EuAl4 have been carried out at temperatures between 2 and 300 K, applying an external magnetic field of approximately 6.5 T. The 27Al NMR spectra corresponding to Al(I) and Al(II) sites are obtained. From the 27Al NMR spectra, the isotropic part Kiso and anisotropic part Kaniso of Knight shift, and nuclear quadrupole frequncy νQ are obtained. The Kiso and Kaniso shift to negative side with decreasing temperature due to the RKKY interaction. These temperature dependences follow the Curie-Weiss law with θP = +14 K, which is consistent with that of the magnetic susceptibility. From the K - χ plot, the values of the hyperfine fields Hhf_iso and Hhf_aniso are -3.231 and -0.162 kOe/μB for Al(I) site, and -1.823 and -0.264 kOe/μB for Al(II) site, respectively. The values of νQ of 27Al nucleus for Al(I) and Al(II) sites are approximately 0.865 and 0.409 MHz, respectively. The nuclear relaxation time T1 of 27Al NMR for both sites is almost constant in the paramagnetic phase, while the value of 1/T1 is abruptly decreased in the ordered ferromagnetic state.

  6. Lymphedema After Surgery in Patients With Endometrial Cancer, Cervical Cancer, or Vulvar Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-23

    Lymphedema; Stage IA Cervical Cancer; Stage IA Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IA Vulvar Cancer; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage IB Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IB Vulvar Cancer; Stage II Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage II Vulvar Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIA Vulvar Cancer; Stage IIIB Vulvar Cancer; Stage IIIC Vulvar Cancer; Stage IVB Vulvar Cancer

  7. Variability in the practice of fertility preservation for patients with cancer.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Kasey A; Grindler, Natalia M; Rhee, Julie S; Cooper, Amber R; Ratts, Valerie S; Carson, Kenneth R; Jungheim, Emily S

    2015-01-01

    Fertility is important to women and men with cancer. While options for fertility preservation (FP) are available, knowledge regarding the medical application of FP is lacking. Therefore we examined FP practices for cancer patients among reproductive endocrinologists (REs). A 36 item survey was sent to board-certified REs. 98% of respondents reported counseling women with cancer about FP options. Oocyte and embryo cryopreservation were universally offered by these providers, but variability was noted in reported management of these cases-particularly for women with breast cancer. 86% of the respondents reported using letrozole during controlled ovarian stimulation (COS) in patients with estrogen receptor positive (ER+) breast cancer to minimize patient exposure to estrogen. 49% of respondents who reported using letrozole in COS for patients with ER+ breast cancer reported that they would also use letrozole in COS for women with ER negative breast cancer. Variability was also noted in the management of FP for men with cancer. 83% of participants reported counseling men about sperm banking with 22% recommending against banking for men previously exposed to chemotherapy. Overall, 79% of respondents reported knowledge of American Society for Clinical Oncology FP guidelines-knowledge that was associated with providers offering gonadal tissue cryopreservation (RR 1.82, 95% CI 1.14-2.90). These findings demonstrate that RE management of FP in cancer patients varies. Although some variability may be dictated by local resources, standardization of FP practices and communication with treating oncologists may help ensure consistent recommendations and outcomes for patients seeking FP. PMID:26010087

  8. Variability in the Practice of Fertility Preservation for Patients with Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, Kasey A.; Grindler, Natalia M.; Rhee, Julie S.; Cooper, Amber R.; Ratts, Valerie S.; Carson, Kenneth R.; Jungheim, Emily S.

    2015-01-01

    Fertility is important to women and men with cancer. While options for fertility preservation (FP) are available, knowledge regarding the medical application of FP is lacking. Therefore we examined FP practices for cancer patients among reproductive endocrinologists (REs). A 36 item survey was sent to board-certified REs. 98% of respondents reported counseling women with cancer about FP options. Oocyte and embryo cryopreservation were universally offered by these providers, but variability was noted in reported management of these cases—particularly for women with breast cancer. 86% of the respondents reported using letrozole during controlled ovarian stimulation (COS) in patients with estrogen receptor positive (ER+) breast cancer to minimize patient exposure to estrogen. 49% of respondents who reported using letrozole in COS for patients with ER+ breast cancer reported that they would also use letrozole in COS for women with ER negative breast cancer. Variability was also noted in the management of FP for men with cancer. 83% of participants reported counseling men about sperm banking with 22% recommending against banking for men previously exposed to chemotherapy. Overall, 79% of respondents reported knowledge of American Society for Clinical Oncology FP guidelines—knowledge that was associated with providers offering gonadal tissue cryopreservation (RR 1.82, 95% CI 1.14–2.90). These findings demonstrate that RE management of FP in cancer patients varies. Although some variability may be dictated by local resources, standardization of FP practices and communication with treating oncologists may help ensure consistent recommendations and outcomes for patients seeking FP. PMID:26010087

  9. Interfacial characterization of Al-Al thermocompression bonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malik, N.; Carvalho, P. A.; Poppe, E.; Finstad, T. G.

    2016-05-01

    Interfaces formed by Al-Al thermocompression bonding were studied by the transmission electron microscopy. Si wafer pairs having patterned bonding frames were bonded using Al films deposited on Si or SiO2 as intermediate bonding media. A bond force of 36 or 60 kN at bonding temperatures ranging from 400-550 °C was applied for a duration of 60 min. Differences in the bonded interfaces of 200 μm wide sealing frames were investigated. It was observed that the interface had voids for bonding with 36 kN at 400 °C for Al deposited both on Si and on SiO2. However, the dicing yield was 33% for Al on Si and 98% for Al on SiO2, attesting for the higher quality of the latter bonds. Both a bond force of 60 kN applied at 400 °C and a bond force of 36 kN applied at 550 °C resulted in completely bonded frames with dicing yields of, respectively, 100% and 96%. A high density of long dislocations in the Al grains was observed for the 60 kN case, while the higher temperature resulted in grain boundary rotation away from the original Al-Al interface towards more stable configurations. Possible bonding mechanisms and reasons for the large difference in bonding quality of the Al films deposited on Si or SiO2 are discussed.

  10. Studies of 27Al NMR in SrAl4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niki, Haruo; Higa, Nonoka; Kuroshima, Hiroko; Toji, Tatsuki; Morishima, Mach; Minei, Motofumi; Yogi, Mamoru; Nakamura, Ai; Hedo, Masato; Nakama, Takao; Ōnuki, Yoshichika; Harima, Hisatomo

    A charge density wave (CDW) transition at TCDW = 243 K and a structural phase (SP) transition at approximately 100 K occur in SrAl4 with the BaAl4-type body center tetragonal structure, which is the divalent and non-4f electron reference compound of EuAl4. To understand the behaviors of the CDW and SP transitions, the 27Al NMR measurements using a single crystal and a powder sample of SrAl4 have been carried out. The line width below TCDW is modulated by an electrical quadruple interaction between 27Al nucleus and CDW charge modulation. The incommensurate CDW state below TCDW changes into a different structure below TSP. The temperature dependences of Knight shifts of 27Al(I) and 27Al(II) show the different behaviors. The temperature variation of 27Al(I) Knight shift shows anomalies at the CDW and SP transition temperatures, revealing the shift to negative side below TCDW, which is attributable to the core polarization of the d-electrons. However, 27Al(II) Knight shift keeps almost constant except for the small shift due to the SP transition. The 1/T1T of 27Al(I) indicates the obvious changes due to the CDW and SP transitions, while that of 27Al(II) takes a constant value. The density of state at the Fermi level at Al(I) site below 60 K would be about 0.9 times less than that above TCDW.

  11. ALS Performance Summary - Update

    SciTech Connect

    Waters, A M; Brown, W D; Martz, Jr., H E

    2004-09-30

    High Energy Density Physics (HEDP) experiments play an important role in corroborating the improved physics codes that underlie LLNL's Stockpile Stewardship mission. Conducting these experiments, whether on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) or another national facility such as Omega, will require not only improvement in the diagnostics for measuring the experiment, but also detailed knowledge of the as-built target components and assemblies themselves. To assist in this effort, a defined set of well-known reference standards designed to represent a range of HEDP targets have been built and are being used to quantify the performance of different characterization techniques [Hibbard, et al. 2004]. Without the critical step of using reference standards for qualifying characterization tools there can be no verification of either commercial or internally-developed characterization techniques and thus an uncertainty in the input to the physics code models would exist.

  12. Pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Güngör, C; Hofmann, B T; Wolters-Eisfeld, G; Bockhorn, M

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, it has become clear that the current standard therapeutic options for pancreatic cancer are not adequate and still do not meet the criteria to cure patients suffering from this lethal disease. Although research over the past decade has shown very interesting and promising new therapeutic options for these patients, only minor clinical success was achieved. Therefore, there is still an urgent need for new approaches that deal with early detection and new therapeutic options in pancreatic cancer. To provide optimal care for patients with pancreatic cancer, we need to understand better its complex molecular biology and thus to identify new target molecules that promote the proliferation and resistance to chemotherapy of pancreatic cancer cells. In spite of significant progress in curing cancers with chemotherapy, pancreatic cancer remains one of the most resistant solid tumour cancers and many studies suggest that drug-resistant cancer cells are the most aggressive with the highest relapse and metastatic rates. In this context, activated Notch signalling is strongly linked with chemoresistance and therefore reflects a rational new target to circumvent resistance to chemotherapy in pancreatic cancer. Here, we have focused our discussion on the latest research, current therapy options and recently identified target molecules such as Notch-2 and the heparin-binding growth factor midkine, which exhibit a wide range of cancer-relevant functions and therefore provide attractive new therapeutic target molecules, in terms of pancreatic cancer and other cancers also. Linked Articles This article is part of a themed section on Midkine. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2014.171.issue-4 PMID:24024905

  13. Doppelthydrophile Blockcopolymere als Mineralisationstemplate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasparova, Pavla

    2002-07-01

    Die vorliegende Arbeit beschäftigt sich mit der Synthese und den Eigenschaften von doppelthydrophilen Blockcopolymeren und ihrer Anwendung in einem biomimetischen Mineralisationsprozeß von Calciumcarbonat und Bariumsulfat. Doppelthydrophile Blockcopolymere bestehen aus einem hydrophilen Block, der nicht mit Mineralien wechselwirkt und einem zweiten Polyelektrolyt-Block, der stark mit Mineraloberflächen wechselwirkt. Diese Blockcopolymere wurden durch ringöffnende Polymerisation von N-carboxyanhydriden (NCA's) und a-methoxy-ω-amino[poly(ethylene glycol)] PEG-NH2 als Initiator hergestellt. Die hergestellten Blockcopolymere wurden als effektive Wachstumsmodifikatoren für die Kristallisation von Calciumcarbonat und Bariumsulfat Mineralien eingesetzt. Die so erhaltenen Mineralpartikel (Kugeln, Hantel, eiförmige Partikel) wurden durch Lichtmikroskopie in Lösung, SEM und TEM charakterisiert. Röntgenweitwinkelstreuung (WAXS) wurde verwendet, um die Modifikation von Calciumcarbonat zu ermitteln und die Größe der Calciumcarbonat- und Bariumsulfat-Nanopartikel zu ermitteln. This work describes the synthesis and characterization of double hydrophilic block copolymers and their use in a biomimetic mineralization process of Calcium Carbonate and Barium Sulfate. Double hydrophilic block copolymers consist of a hydrophilic block that does not interact with minerals and another hydrophilic polyelectrolyte block that strongly interacts with mineral surfaces. These polymers were synthesised via ring opening polymerisation of N-carboxyanhydride (NCA), and the first hydrophilic block a-methoxy-ω-amino[poly(ethylene glycol)] PEG-NH2 was used as an initiator. The prepared block copolymers were used as effective crystal growth modifiers to control the crystallization of Calcium Carbonate and Barium Sulfate minerals. The resulting mineral particles (spheres, dumbbells, egg-like particles) were characterised by light microscopy in solution, by SEM, and by TEM. X-Ray scattering

  14. Neutron diffraction study of hydrogen-bond symmetrization in δ-AlOOD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sano-Furukawa, A.; Hattori, T.; Kuribayashi, T.

    2013-12-01

    δ-AlOOH, a high-pressure polymorph of diaspore, is an important hydrous mineral in the deep earth that has the ability to transport hydrogen into the lower mantle. Theoretical studies have pointed out that hydrogen would locate at the center between two oxygen atoms at high pressure, which is so called hydrogen-bond symmetrization [1]. It was also suggested that the symmetrization would trigger the increase of bulk modulus, which is one of the important parameters of minerals at high pressure. The transition of δ-AlOOH(D) at high pressure has been suggested by X-ray and neutron diffraction [2, 3]. X-ray diffraction study found that the axes a and b where the hydrogen bond is oriented become less compressible above 12 GPa in δ-AlOOD. Neutron diffraction study on δ-AlOOD up to 9.2 GPa showed the increase of O-D bond distance, that is considered as a precousor phenomena of the symmetrization. However, the pressure was insufficient to observe the symmetrization. To investigate the symmetrization of hydrogen bond directly, we conducted neutron diffraction experiments to 16.7 GPa at PLANET, MLF in J-PARC. Powder sample of δ-AlOOD was loaded in Paris-Edinburgh press with double-toroid sintered diamond anvils with methanol-ethanol mixture of pressure medium. In the experiments, the disappearance of 120 refrection was observed at 12.1 GPa, indicating the transition from P21nm to Pnnm, which can be attributed to the disorder of hydrogen bond or the symmtrization. Results of Rietveld refienment will be shown in the presentation. [1] Tsuchiya et al., Geophys. Res. Lett., 29, 1909, 2002. [2] Sano-Furukawa et al., Am. Mineral., 93, 1558-1567, 2008. [3] Sano-Furukawa et al., Am. Mineral., 94, 1255-1261, 2009.

  15. Échange terres rares légères Ca dans l'apatite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iqdari, Abderrahmane; Velde, Bruce; Benalioulhaj, Noureddine; Dujon, Saint-Clair; El Yamine, Nacer

    2003-04-01

    Diffusion experiments were carried out on natural apatite crystals that were immersed in molten light rare earth element (REE) chloride salt at temperatures between 900 and 1150 °C for periods up to 35 days. Electron microprobe analysis of the crystals showed that light REEs replaced Ca according to electronic balance, i.e. 2 REE3+ for 3 Ca2+. These diffusion profiles indicate that a maximum amount of substitution in the structure occurs when two of the ten Ca ions in apatite are replaced by the REE diffusing elements. Anisotropic diffusion is observed between a and c crystallographic directions. Comparison of maximum distance indicates that the larger ions move more easily in the apatite structure. We conclude that the light REEs diffuse within the channel structures of the mineral, and that this diffusion is controlled by the substitution type of elements in the calcium sites. To cite this article: A. Iqdari et al., C. R. Geoscience 335 (2003).

  16. Contagious cancer.

    PubMed

    Welsh, James S

    2011-01-01

    Although cancer can on occasion be caused by infectious agents such as specific bacteria, parasites, and viruses, it is not generally considered a transmissible disease. In rare circumstances, however, direct communication from one host to another has been documented. The Tasmanian devil is now threatened with extinction in the wild because of a fatal transmissible cancer, devil facial tumor disease (DFTD). Another example is canine transmissible venereal tumor (CTVT or Sticker's sarcoma) in dogs. There is a vast difference in prognosis between these two conditions. DFTD is often fatal within 6 months, whereas most cases of CTVT are eventually rejected by the host dog, who then is conferred lifelong immunity. In man, only scattered case reports exist about such communicable cancers, most often in the setting of organ or hematopoietic stem cell transplants and cancers arising during pregnancy that are transmitted to the fetus. In about one third of cases, transplant recipients develop cancers from donor organs from individuals who were found to harbor malignancies after the transplantation. The fact that two thirds of the time cancer does not develop, along with the fact that cancer very rarely is transmitted from person to person, supports the notion that natural immunity prevents such cancers from taking hold in man. These observations might hold invaluable clues to the immunobiology and possible immunotherapy of cancer. PMID:21212437

  17. Lung Cancer Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer Treatment Small Cell Lung Cancer Treatment Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in the United States. Lung cancer is ... non- skin cancer in the United States. Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in men and in women. ...

  18. Uterine Cancer: Cancer of the Uterus

    MedlinePlus

    ... sheet ePublications Uterine cancer: Cancer of the uterus fact sheet Print this fact sheet Uterine cancer: Cancer ... U.S. federal government and is in the public domain. This public information is not copyrighted and may ...

  19. Targeting the Heterogeneity of Cancer with Individualized Neoepitope Vaccines.

    PubMed

    Türeci, Özlem; Vormehr, Mathias; Diken, Mustafa; Kreiter, Sebastian; Huber, Christoph; Sahin, Ugur

    2016-04-15

    Somatic mutations binding to the patient's MHC and recognized by autologous T cells (neoepitopes) are ideal cancer vaccine targets. They combine a favorable safety profile due to a lack of expression in healthy tissues with a high likelihood of immunogenicity, as T cells recognizing neoepitopes are not shaped by central immune tolerance. Proteins mutated in cancer (neoantigens) shared by patients have been explored as vaccine targets for many years. Shared ("public") mutations, however, are rare, as the vast majority of cancer mutations in a given tumor are unique for the individual patient. Recently, the novel concept of truly individualized cancer vaccination emerged, which exploits the vast source of patient-specific "private" mutations. Concurrence of scientific advances and technological breakthroughs enables the rapid, cost-efficient, and comprehensive mapping of the "mutanome," which is the entirety of somatic mutations in an individual tumor, and the rational selection of neoepitopes. How to transform tumor mutanome data to actionable knowledge for tailoring individualized vaccines "on demand" has become a novel research field with paradigm-shifting potential. This review gives an overview with particular focus on the clinical development of such vaccines.Clin Cancer Res; 22(8); 1885-96. ©2016 AACR SEE ALL ARTICLES IN THIS CCR FOCUS SECTION, "OPPORTUNITIES AND CHALLENGES IN CANCER IMMUNOTHERAPY". PMID:27084742

  20. Cancer in Patients With Gabapentin (GPRD)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2012-02-02

    Pain, Neuropathic; Epilepsy; Renal Pelvis Cancer; Pancreatic Cancer; Breast Cancer; Nervous System Cancer; Chronic Pancreatitis; Stomach Cancer; Renal Cell Carcinoma; Diabetes; Bladder Cancer; Bone and Joint Cancer; Penis Cancer; Anal Cancer; Cancer; Renal Cancer

  1. Stomach (Gastric) Cancer Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... Treatment Stomach Cancer Prevention Stomach Cancer Screening Research Stomach (Gastric) Cancer Screening (PDQ®)–Patient Version What is ... These are called diagnostic tests . General Information About Stomach (Gastric) Cancer Key Points Stomach cancer is a ...

  2. Breast Cancer Overview

    MedlinePlus

    ... Breast Cancer - Overview Request Permissions Print to PDF Breast Cancer - Overview Approved by the Cancer.Net Editorial Board , ... bean-shaped organs that help fight infection. About breast cancer Cancer begins when healthy cells in the breast ...

  3. Types of Breast Cancers

    MedlinePlus

    ... the key statistics about breast cancer? Types of breast cancers Breast cancer can be separated into different types ... than invasive ductal carcinoma. Less common types of breast cancer Inflammatory breast cancer This uncommon type of invasive ...

  4. Children's cancer centers

    MedlinePlus

    Pediatric cancer center; Pediatric oncology center; Comprehensive cancer center ... Treating childhood cancer is not the same as treating adult cancer. The cancers are different. So are the treatments and the ...

  5. Photodynamic therapy for cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer of the esophagus-photodynamic; Esophageal cancer-photodynamic; Lung cancer-photodynamic ... the light at the cancer cells. PDT treats cancer in the: Lungs, using a bronchoscope Esophagus, using upper endoscopy Doctors ...

  6. What Is Ovarian Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... the key statistics about ovarian cancer? What is ovarian cancer? Cancer starts when cells in the body begin ... section . Other cancers that are similar to epithelial ovarian cancer Primary peritoneal carcinoma Primary peritoneal carcinoma (PPC) is ...

  7. Living with Prostate Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... pork, lamb, and processed meat (such as hot dogs, sausage, and bacon); and low in high-fat ... ACS Bookstore Cancer Information Cancer Basics Cancer Prevention & Detection Signs & Symptoms of Cancer Treatments & Side Effects Cancer ...

  8. What Is Bone Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... our document called Osteosarcoma . Chondrosarcoma: Chondrosarcoma (KON-droh-sar-KOH-muh) is a cancer of cartilage cells. ... AdditionalResources Other Resources and References Cancer Information Cancer Basics Cancer Prevention & Detection Signs & Symptoms of Cancer Treatments & ...

  9. Tests for Liver Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... cancer Next Topic Liver cancer stages Tests for liver cancer If you have some of the signs ... cancer has come back (recurred). Other blood tests Liver function tests (LFTs): Because liver cancer often develops ...

  10. Basic Cancer Terms

    MedlinePlus

    ... Statistics Cancer Terms: Treatment Cancer Terms: After Treatment Online Medical Dictionaries Diagnosing Cancer Managing Your Care Financial Considerations How Cancer is Treated Side Effects Dating, Sex, and Reproduction Advanced Cancer For Children For ...

  11. Cancer Terms: After Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Statistics Cancer Terms: Treatment Cancer Terms: After Treatment Online Medical Dictionaries Diagnosing Cancer Managing Your Care Financial Considerations How Cancer is Treated Side Effects Dating, Sex, and Reproduction Advanced Cancer For Children For ...

  12. What Is Lung Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... starts in the lungs, it is called lung cancer. Lung cancer begins in the lungs and may spread ... lung cancer. For more information, visit the National Cancer Institute’s Lung Cancer. Previous Basic Information Basic Information Basic Information ...

  13. Photodynamic therapy for cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Photoradiation therapy; Cancer of the esophagus-photodynamic; Esophageal cancer-photodynamic; Lung cancer-photodynamic ... the light at the cancer cells. PDT treats cancer in the: Lungs, using a bronchoscope Esophagus, using upper endoscopy Doctors ...

  14. Control of Proliferation and Cancer Growth by the Hippo Signaling Pathway.

    PubMed

    Ehmer, Ursula; Sage, Julien

    2016-02-01

    The control of cell division is essential for normal development and the maintenance of cellular homeostasis. Abnormal cell proliferation is associated with multiple pathological states, including cancer. Although the Hippo/YAP signaling pathway was initially thought to control organ size and growth, increasing evidence indicates that this pathway also plays a major role in the control of proliferation independent of organ size control. In particular, accumulating evidence indicates that the Hippo/YAP signaling pathway functionally interacts with multiple other cellular pathways and serves as a central node in the regulation of cell division, especially in cancer cells. Here, recent observations are highlighted that connect Hippo/YAP signaling to transcription, the basic cell-cycle machinery, and the control of cell division. Furthermore, the oncogenic and tumor-suppressive attributes of YAP/TAZ are reviewed, which emphasizes the relevance of the Hippo pathway in cancer. Mol Cancer Res; 14(2); 127-40. ©2015 AACR. PMID:26432795

  15. Mutations in ADAR1 cause Aicardi-Goutières syndrome associated with a type I interferon signature

    PubMed Central

    Rice, Gillian I; Kasher, Paul R; Forte, Gabriella M A; Mannion, Niamh M; Greenwood, Sam M; Szynkiewicz, Marcin; Dickerson, Jonathan E; Bhaskar, Sanjeev S; Zampini, Massimiliano; Briggs, Tracy A; Jenkinson, Emma M; Bacino, Carlos A; Battini, Roberta; Bertini, Enrico; Brogan, Paul A; Brueton, Louise A; Carpanelli, Marialuisa; Laet, Corinne De; de Lonlay, Pascale; del Toro, Mireia; Desguerre, Isabelle; Fazzi, Elisa; Garcia-Cazorla, Àngels; Heiberg, Arvid; Kawaguchi, Masakazu; Kumar, Ram; Lin, Jean-Pierre S-M; Lourenco, Charles M; Male, Alison M; Marques, Wilson; Mignot, Cyril; Olivieri, Ivana; Orcesi, Simona; Prabhakar, Prab; Rasmussen, Magnhild; Robinson, Robert A; Rozenberg, Flore; Schmidt, Johanna L; Steindl, Katharina; Tan, Tiong Y; van der Merwe, William G; Vanderver, Adeline; Vassallo, Grace; Wakeling, Emma L; Wassmer, Evangeline; Whittaker, Elizabeth; Livingston, John H; Lebon, Pierre; Suzuki, Tamio; McLaughlin, Paul J; Keegan, Liam P; O’Connell, Mary A; Lovell, Simon C; Crow, Yanick J

    2014-01-01

    Adenosine deaminases acting on RNA (ADARs) catalyze the hydrolytic deamination of adenosine to inosine in double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) and thereby potentially alter the information content and structure of cellular RNAs. Notably, although the overwhelming majority of such editing events occur in transcripts derived from Alu repeat elements, the biological function of non-coding RNA editing remains uncertain. Here, we show that mutations in ADAR1 (also known as ADAR) cause the autoimmune disorder Aicardi-Goutières syndrome (AGS). As in Adar1-null mice, the human disease state is associated with upregulation of interferon-stimulated genes, indicating a possible role for ADAR1 as a suppressor of type I interferon signaling. Considering recent insights derived from the study of other AGS-related proteins, we speculate that ADAR1 may limit the cytoplasmic accumulation of the dsRNA generated from genomic repetitive elements. PMID:23001123

  16. Médecins Sans Frontières' Clinical Guidance mobile application: analysis of a new electronic health tool

    PubMed Central

    Wright, V.; Dalwai, M.; Smith, R. Vincent

    2015-01-01

    Many health care workers lack access to clinical support tools in rural and resource-limited settings. To address this gap, the Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) Clinical Guidelines manual was converted into a static mobile health reference application (app) entitled MSF Guidance. The app's utility and growth was examined, and within 6 months of its launch 150 countries had downloaded the app, with demonstrated retention among new and existing users. With over 3500 downloads and 36 000 sessions amounting to 250 000 screen views, MSF Guidance is a new mobile health platform with widely demonstrated utility, including potential use as an epidemiological tool, where clinical conditions investigated by app users were found to correlate with geographical outbreaks. These findings show that mobile apps can be used to disseminate health information effectively. PMID:26767171

  17. Validation of SSiB model over grassland with CHeRES field experiment data in 2001

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Lan; Xue, Yongkang

    2004-08-01

    The Simplified Simple Biosphere model (SSiB) is validated in off-line simulations against field measurements in the summer of 2001 from the China Heavy Rainfall Experiment and Study (CHeRES) over a grassland site located in the lower reaches of the Yangtze River. When initialized and driven by the observed atmospheric forcing, the model reproduced the observed surface heat fluxes and surface skin temperature realistically. The model was also able to well simulate the variation of soil water content. The sensitivity experiments found that the leaf reflectance was the most significant parameter in improving the estimation of surface albedo during both wet and dry periods. This study suggests that the model is capable of simulating the physical processes and of assessing the impact of biophysical parameters that relate to land-atmosphere interactions over the eastern Asian monsoon regions, which is crucial for mesoscale atmospheric models.

  18. Storms from the past in a warmer climate. Results from high-res non-hydrostatic modeling over Crete.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koutroulis, Aristeidis; Grillakis, Manolis; Tsanis, Ioannis

    2016-04-01

    Weather extremes such as precipitation can be a hazard for life and property. The region of Crete has suffered from numerous severe flood events in the past decades and local authorities have a great interest in future scenarios in order to develop measures against natural calamities. In this study we use high-res non-hydrostatic modeling outputs provided by three modeling groups (GERICS, UNI and SMHI) at horizontal resolution of about 2km. Three recent, high impact, extreme storms were selected for simulation. High spatiotemporal resolution precipitation fields were compared to observations. Simulations proved to be sufficiently efficient in realistic capturing storm events and thus valuable in impact modelling. Similar simulations, but with a perturbation of +2 degrees were conducted for the representation of warmer climate conditions. Similar storm events of today's climate over Crete could result in significantly higher precipitation accumulations and intensities in a warmer climate.

  19. The Theos/ComRes survey into public perception of Darwinism in the UK: a recipe for confusion.

    PubMed

    Baker, Sylvia

    2012-04-01

    A survey of the general public in the UK, conducted in 2008, suggested that more than half of the British population are unconvinced by Darwinism. That survey, conducted by the polling company ComRes on behalf of the theological think-tank Theos, reported its full findings in March 2009 and found them to be "complex and confused." This paper argues that the confusion identified may have been partly engendered by the way in which the survey questionnaire was constructed and that the survey itself, not simply its respondents, was confused. A source of the confusion, it is argued, could be found, first, in the definitions used for the four positions of young earth creationism, theistic evolution, atheistic evolution and intelligent design. Second, a failure to define the key terms "evolution" and "science," used in some of the survey questions, resulted in responses that were difficult to interpret. PMID:23045881

  20. Quality orthopaedic care in sudden-onset disasters: suggestions from Médecins Sans Frontières-France.

    PubMed

    Herard, Patrick; Boillot, François

    2016-03-01

    A huge change is needed in the conception and implementation of surgical care during sudden-onset disasters (SOD). The inadequate surgical response mounted by the majority of foreign medical teams (FMT) after Haiti's earthquake is a striking example of the need for a structured professional approach. Logistical capacity already exists to provide safe, timely, effective, efficient, equitable and ethical patient-centred care with minimum standards. However, knowledge, skills and training in the fields of general, orthopaedic and plastic surgery need further clarification. Surgical activity data and clinical examples from several Médecins Sans Frontières-France (MSF) projects are used here to describe the skill set and experience essential for surgeons working in SOD contexts. PMID:26614107

  1. Hyperemesis gravidarum avec troubles ioniques sévères: à propos d'un cas

    PubMed Central

    Jarraya, Anouar; Elleuch, Sahar; Zouari, Jawhar; Trigui, Khaled; Sofiene, Abidi; Smaoui, Mohamed; Kolsi, Kamel

    2015-01-01

    L'hyperemesis gravidarum s'accompagne habituellement d'une perte de poids, d'une acétonurie et de troubles hydro-électrolytiques comme il peut également s'accompagner d'anomalies du bilan hépatique. Nous rapportons un cas de vomissements gravidiques à 10 semaines d'aménorrhée non traité et vu tardivement avec des troubles ioniques sévères associés à des répercussions cliniques dans un contexte de cytolyse, de cholestase et d'insuffisance rénale aigue. Ce cas a bien répondu au traitement médical. PMID:26161187

  2. Interfacial reactions and oxidation behavior of Al 2O 3 and Al 2O 3/Al coatings on an orthorhombic Ti 2AlNb alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, H. Q.; Wang, Q. M.; Gong, J.; Sun, C.

    2011-02-01

    The uniform and dense Al2O3 and Al2O3/Al coatings were deposited on an orthorhombic Ti2AlNb alloy by filtered arc ion plating. The interfacial reactions of the Al2O3/Ti2AlNb and Al2O3/Al/Ti2AlNb specimens after vacuum annealing at 750 °C were studied. In the Al2O3/Ti2AlNb specimens, the Al2O3 coating decomposed significantly due to reaction between the Al2O3 coating and the O-Ti2AlNb substrate. In the Al2O3/Al/Ti2AlNb specimens, a γ-TiAl layer and an Nb-rich zone came into being by interdiffusion between the Al layer and the O-Ti2AlNb substrate. The γ-TiAl layer is chemically compatible with Al2O3, with no decomposition of Al2O3 being detected. No internal oxidation or oxygen and nitrogen dissolution zone was observed in the O-Ti2AlNb alloy. The Al2O3/Al/Ti2AlNb specimens exhibited excellent oxidation resistance at 750 °C.

  3. S.Res.485 — 112th Congress (2011-2012) A resolution to authorize representation by the Senate Legal Counsel in the case of Common Cause, et al. v. Joseph R. Biden, et al.

    THOMAS, 112th Congress

    Sen. Reid, Harry [D-NV

    2012-06-06

    06/06/2012 Submitted in the Senate, considered, and agreed to without amendment and with a preamble by Unanimous Consent. (consideration: CR S3799; text as passed Senate: CR S3799; text of measure as introduced: CR S3783) (All Actions)

  4. Response to Madans et al. Comments on Sabariego et al. Measuring Disability: Comparing the Impact of Two Data Collection Approaches on Disability Rates. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health, 2015, 12, 10329-10351.

    PubMed

    Sabariego, Carla; Oberhauser, Cornelia; Posarac, Aleksandra; Bickenbach, Jerome; Kostanjsek, Nenad; Chatterji, Somnath; Officer, Alana; Coenen, Michaela; Chhan, Lay; Cieza, Alarcos

    2016-01-01

    We greatly appreciate and wish to thank Madans, Mont and Loeb for the issues they raise in their Comment [1] on our paper "Measuring Disability: Using the WHO Model Disability Survey to Address the Impact of Screeners on Disability Rates" [2]. [...]. PMID:26703704

  5. Molecular pathways: myeloid complicity in cancer.

    PubMed

    Stromnes, Ingunn M; Greenberg, Philip D; Hingorani, Sunil R

    2014-10-15

    Cancer-induced inflammation results in accumulation of myeloid cells. These myeloid cells include progenitors and progeny of monocytes, granulocytes, macrophages, and dendritic cells. It has become increasingly evident that tumor-dependent factors can condition myeloid cells toward an immunosuppressive and protumorigenic phenotype. Thus, myeloid cells are not simply bystanders in malignancy or barometers of disease burden. Reflecting their dynamic and plastic nature, myeloid cells manifest a continuum of cellular differentiation and are intimately involved at all stages of neoplastic progression. They can promote tumorigenesis through both immune-dependent and -independent mechanisms and can dictate response to therapies. A greater understanding of the inherent plasticity and relationships among myeloid subsets is needed to inform therapeutic targeting. New clinical trials are being designed to modulate the activities of myeloid cells in cancer, which may be essential to maximize the efficacy of both conventional cytotoxic and immune-based therapies for solid tumors. Clin Cancer Res; 20(20); 5157-70. ©2014 AACR. PMID:25047706

  6. Molecular Pathways: Isocitrate Dehydrogenase Mutations in Cancer.

    PubMed

    Clark, Owen; Yen, Katharine; Mellinghoff, Ingo K

    2016-04-15

    IDH1 and IDH2 are homodimeric enzymes that catalyze the conversion of isocitrate to α-ketoglutarate (α-KG) and concomitantly produce reduced NADPH from NADP(+) Mutations in the genes encoding IDH1 and IDH2 have recently been found in a variety of human cancers, most commonly glioma, acute myeloid leukemia (AML), chondrosarcoma, and intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma. The mutant protein loses its normal enzymatic activity and gains a new ability to produce the "oncometabolite" R(-)-2-hydroxyglutarate (R-2-HG). R-2-HG competitively inhibits α-KG-dependent enzymes which play crucial roles in gene regulation and tissue homeostasis. Expression of mutant IDH impairs cellular differentiation in various cell lineages and promotes tumor development in cooperation with other cancer genes. First-generation inhibitors of mutant IDH have entered clinical trials, and have shown encouraging results in patients with IDH-mutant AML. This article summarizes recent progress in our understanding of the role of mutant IDH in tumorigenesis.Clin Cancer Res; 22(8); 1837-42. ©2016 AACR. PMID:26819452

  7. Oral Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... What are the effects of oral cancer on speech and swallowing? The effects of cancer on speech and swallowing depend on the location and size ... movement. This could result in unclear production of speech sounds made with the lips such as /p/, / ...

  8. Vulvar Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... sex painful and difficult. If found early, vulvar cancer has a high cure rate and the treatment options involve less surgery. ... people may also need radiation therapy. When vulvar cancer is found and treated early, the cure rate is over 90%. The key to a ...

  9. Oral Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... won't heal Bleeding in your mouth Loose teeth Problems or pain with swallowing A lump in your neck An earache Oral cancer treatments may include surgery, radiation therapy or chemotherapy. Some patients have a combination of treatments. NIH: National Cancer Institute

  10. Stomach cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... much higher than in the United States. The value of screening in the United States and other countries with much lower rates of stomach cancer is not clear. The following may help reduce your risk of stomach cancer: DO NOT smoke. Keep a ...

  11. Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... I found something when I did my breast self-exam. What should I do now? How often should I have mammograms? I have breast cancer. What are my treatment options? How often should I do breast self-exams? I have breast cancer. Is my daughter ...

  12. Intestinal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... increase your risk. Possible signs of small intestine cancer include Abdominal pain Weight loss for no reason Blood in the stool A lump in the abdomen Imaging tests that create pictures of the small ... help diagnose intestinal cancer and show whether it has spread. Surgery is ...

  13. Anal cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... the last part of your large intestine where solid waste from food (stool) is stored. Stool leaves your body through the anus when you have a bowel movement. Anal cancer is fairly rare. It spreads ... Squamous cell carcinoma. This is the most common type of anal cancer. It starts in cells that ...

  14. Gallbladder cancer

    PubMed Central

    Patrlj, Leonardo; Kopljar, Mario; Kliček, Robert; Kolovrat, Marijan; Loncar, Bozo; Busic, Zeljko

    2014-01-01

    Gallbladder cancer is the fifth most common cancer involving gastrointestinal tract, but it is the most common malignancy of the biliary tract, accounting for 80-95% of biliary tract cancers. This tumor is a highly lethal disease with an overall 5-year survival of less than 5% and mean survival mere than 6 months. An early diagnosis is essential as this malignancy progresses silently with a late diagnosis. The percentage of patients diagnosed to have gallbladder cancer after simple cholecystectomy for presumed gallbladder stone disease is 0.5-1.5%. Patients with preoperative suspicion of gallbladder cancer should not be treated by laparoscopy. Epidemiological studies have identified striking geographic and ethnic disparities—inordinately high occurrence in American Indians, elevated in Southeast Asia, yet quite low elsewhere in the Americas and the world. Environmental triggers play a critical role in eliciting cancer developing in the gallbladder, best exemplified by cholelithiasis and chronic inflammation from biliary tract and parasitic infections. Improved imaging modalities and improved radical aggressive surgical approach in the last decade has improved outcomes and helped prolong survival in patients with gallbladder cancer. The overall 5-year survival for patients with gallbladder cancer who underwent R0 curative resection was from 21% to 69%. In the future, the development of potential diagnostic markers for disease will yield screening opportunities for those at risk either with ethnic susceptibility or known anatomic anomalies of the biliary tract. PMID:25392833

  15. Rub' al Khali, Arabia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    The Rub' al Khali is one of the largest sand deserts in the world, encompassing most of the southern third of the Arabian Peninsula. It includes parts of Oman, United Arab Emirates, and Yemen. The desert covers 650,000 square kilometers, more than the area of France. Largely unexplored until recently, the desert is 1000 km long and 500 km wide. The first documented journeys made by Westerners were those of Bertram Thomas in 1931 and St. John Philby in 1932. With daytime temperatures reaching 55 degrees Celsius, and dunes taller than 330 meters, the desert may be one of the most forbidding places on Earth.

    The image was acquired December 2, 2005, covers an area of 54.8 x 61.9 km, and is located near 20.7 degrees north latitude, 53.6 degrees east longitude.

    The U.S. science team is located at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Science Mission Directorate.

  16. Fine-Tuning Cancer Immunotherapy: Optimizing the Gut Microbiome.

    PubMed

    Pitt, Jonathan M; Vétizou, Marie; Waldschmitt, Nadine; Kroemer, Guido; Chamaillard, Mathias; Boneca, Ivo Gomperts; Zitvogel, Laurence

    2016-08-15

    The equilibrium linking the intestinal microbiota, the intestinal epithelium, and the host immune system establishes host health and homeostasis, with perturbations of this balance resulting in chronic inflammatory and autoimmune immunopathologies. The mutualistic symbiosis between gut microbiota and host immunity raises the possibility that dysbiosis of the intestinal content also influences the outcome of cancer immunotherapy. Here, we present our recent findings that specific gut-resident bacteria determine the immunotherapeutic responses associated with CTLA-4 checkpoint blockade. This new evidence hints that interindividual differences in the microbiome may account for the significant heterogeneity in therapeutic and immunopathologic responses to immune checkpoint therapies. We discuss how this new understanding could improve the therapeutic coverage of immune checkpoint inhibitors, and potentially limit their immune-mediated toxicity, through the use of adjunctive "oncomicrobiotics" that indirectly promote beneficial immune responses through optimizing the gut microbiome. Cancer Res; 76(16); 4602-7. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27474734

  17. H.J.Res.43 — 113th Congress (2013-2014) Removing the deadline for the ratification of the equal rights amendment.

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Rep. Andrews, Robert E. [D-NJ-1

    2013-05-09

    03/12/2014 Ms. Speier asked unanimous consent that she be considered the first sponsor of H.J. Res. 43, removing the deadline for the ratification of the equal rights amendment, a bill originally introduced by Representative Robert Andrews of New Jersey, for the purposes of adding... (All Actions)

  18. Science Teachers' Views on CoRes and PaP-eRs as a Framework for Articulating and Developing Pedagogical Content Knowledge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertram, Adam; Loughran, John

    2012-12-01

    This paper reports on a study which was designed to examine how CoRes (Content Representations) and PaP-eRs (Pedagogical and Professional-experience Repertoires) might impact the practice of science teachers by considering how they might value (or not) pedagogical content knowledge (PCK) as part of their professional knowledge. The paper is based on a 2 year longitudinal study that used CoRes and PaP-eRs as a form of intervention with a group of teachers ( n = 6) to determine how they interpreted, used and developed their understanding of PCK over time. The study concluded that the participating teachers developed rich understandings of their professional knowledge of science teaching and were of the view that CoRes and PaP-eRs were significant in shaping that development. As a consequence, the study also validates the use of CoRes and PaP-eRs as a meaningful methodology for examining science teachers' PCK.

  19. Sequential bottom-up and top-down processing for the synthesis of transition metal dichalcogenide nanosheets: the case of rhenium disulfide (ReS2).

    PubMed

    Al-Dulaimi, Naktal; Lewis, Edward A; Lewis, David J; Howell, Simon K; Haigh, Sarah J; O'Brien, Paul

    2016-06-14

    Bottom-up (aerosol-assisted chemical vapor deposition, AACVD) and top-down (liquid phase exfoliation, LPE) processing methodologies are used in tandem to produce colloids of few-layer thick rhenium disulfide (ReS2) in N-methyl pyrrolidone. The processing route we use is a potentially robust and scalable pathway to manufacture useful 2D materials. PMID:27250595

  20. ResQ: An Approach to Unified Estimation of B-Factor and Residue-Specific Error in Protein Structure Prediction.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jianyi; Wang, Yan; Zhang, Yang

    2016-02-22

    Computer-based structure prediction becomes a major tool to provide large-scale structure models for annotating biological function of proteins. Information of residue-level accuracy and thermal mobility (or B-factor), which is critical to decide how biologists utilize the predicted models, is however missed in most structure prediction pipelines. We developed ResQ for unified residue-level model quality and B-factor estimations by combining local structure assembly variations with sequence-based and structure-based profiling. ResQ was tested on 635 non-redundant proteins with structure models generated by I-TASSER, where the average difference between estimated and observed distance errors is 1.4Å for the confidently modeled proteins. ResQ was further tested on structure decoys from CASP9-11 experiments, where the error of local structure quality prediction is consistently lower than or comparable to other state-of-the-art predictors. Finally, ResQ B-factor profile was used to assist molecular replacement, which resulted in successful solutions on several proteins that could not be solved from constant B-factor settings. PMID:26437129

  1. Unusual cutaneous features associated with a heterozygous gain-of-function mutation in IFIH1: overlap between Aicardi–Goutières and Singleton–Merten syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Bursztejn, A.-C.; Briggs, T.A.; del Toro Duany, Y.; Anderson, B.H.; O’Sullivan, J.; Williams, S.G.; Bodemer, C.; Fraitag, S.; Gebhard, F.; Leheup, B.; Lemelle, I.; Oojageer, A.; Raffo, E.; Schmitt, E.; Rice, G.I.; Hur, S.; Crow, Y.J.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Cutaneous lesions described as chilblain lupus occur in the context of familial chilblain lupus or Aicardi–Goutières syndrome. To date, seven genes related to Aicardi–Goutières syndrome have been described. The most recently described encodes the cytosolic double-stranded RNA receptor IFIH1 (also known as MDA5), a key component of the antiviral type I interferon-mediated innate immune response. Enhanced type I interferon signalling secondary to gain-of-function mutations in IFIH1 can result in a range of neuroinflammatory phenotypes including classical Aicardi–Goutières syndrome. It is of note that none of the patients with a neurological phenotype so far described with mutations in this gene was reported to demonstrate cutaneous involvement. We present a family segregating a heterozygous pathogenic mutation in IFIH1 showing dermatological involvement as a prominent feature, variably associated with neurological disturbance and premature tooth loss. All three affected individuals exhibited increased expression of interferon-stimulated genes in whole blood, and the mutant protein resulted in enhanced interferon signalling in vitro, both in the basal state and following ligand stimulation. Our results further extend the phenotypic spectrum associated with mutations in IFIH1, indicating that the disease can be confined predominantly to the skin, while also highlighting phenotypic overlap with both Aicardi–Goutières syndrome and Singleton–Merten syndrome. PMID:26284909

  2. Metabolic Dependencies in RAS-Driven Cancers.

    PubMed

    Kimmelman, Alec C

    2015-04-15

    The ability to inhibit the RAS oncogene has been the holy grail of oncology because of the critical role of this gene in a multitude of tumor types. In addition, RAS-mutant tumors are among the most aggressive and refractory to treatment. Although directly targeting the RAS oncogene has proven challenging, an alternative approach for treating RAS-driven cancers is to inhibit critical downstream events that are required for tumor maintenance. Indeed, much focus has been put on inhibiting signaling cascades downstream of RAS. Recent studies have shown that oncogenic RAS promotes a metabolic reprogramming of tumor cells, shifting them toward an anabolic metabolism necessary to produce biomass to support unconstrained proliferation. These cancers also use a diverse set of fuel sources to meet their metabolic needs and have even developed a variety of mechanisms to act as metabolic scavengers to obtain necessary metabolic substrates from both extracellular and intracellular sources. Collectively, these adaptations can create "metabolic bottlenecks" whereby tumor cells rely on particular pathways or rate-limiting metabolites. In this regard, inhibiting individual or combinations of these metabolic pathways can attenuate growth in preclinical models. Because these dependencies are tumor selective and downstream of oncogenic RAS, there is the opportunity for therapeutic intervention. Although targeting tumor metabolism is still in the early days of translation to patients, our continued advances in understanding critical metabolic adaptations in RAS-driven cancers, as well as the ability to study this altered metabolism in relevant tumor models, will accelerate the development of new therapeutic approaches. Clin Cancer Res; 21(8); 1828-34. ©2015 AACR. See all articles in this CCR Focus section, "Targeting RAS-Driven Cancers." PMID:25878364

  3. Aspirin Suppresses the Acquisition of Chemoresistance in Breast Cancer by Disrupting an NFκB-IL6 Signaling Axis Responsible for the Generation of Cancer Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Saha, Shilpi; Mukherjee, Shravanti; Khan, Poulami; Kajal, Kirti; Mazumdar, Minakshi; Manna, Argha; Mukherjee, Sanhita; De, Sunanda; Jana, Debarshi; Sarkar, Diptendra K; Das, Tanya

    2016-04-01

    Acquired chemoresistance has curtailed cancer survival since the dawn of chemotherapy. Accumulating evidence suggests a major role for cancer stem cells (CSC) in chemoresistance, although their involvement in acquired resistance is still unknown. The use of aspirin has been associated with reduced cancer risk and recurrence, suggesting that the anti-inflammatory drug may exert effects on CSCs. In this study, we investigated the contribution of CSCs to acquired chemoresistance of breast cancer and the avenues for reversing such effects with aspirin. We observed that the residual risk of recurrence was higher in breast cancer patients who had acquired chemoresistance. Treatment of preexisting CSCs with a genotoxic drug combination (5-fluorouracil, doxorubicin, and cyclophosphamide) generated an NFκB-IL6-dependent inflammatory environment that imparted stemness to nonstem cancer cells, induced multidrug resistance, and enhanced the migration potential of CSCs. Treatment with aspirin prior to chemotherapy suppressed the acquisition of chemoresistance by perturbing the nuclear translocation of NFκB in preexisting CSCs. Therefore, disruptions to the NFκB-IL6 feedback loop prevented CSC induction and sensitized preexisting CSCs to chemotherapy. Collectively, our findings suggest that combining aspirin and conventional chemotherapy may offer a new treatment strategy to improve recurrence-free survival of breast cancer patients. Cancer Res; 76(7); 2000-12. ©2016 AACR. PMID:26842876

  4. Prostate Cancer Research Trial Helps John Spencer Treat His Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... please turn Javascript on. Feature: Prostate Cancer Prostate Cancer Research Trial Helps John Spencer Treat His Cancer Past ... Prostate Cancer" Articles Progress Against Prostate Cancer / Prostate Cancer Research Trial Helps John Spencer Treat His Cancer / Prostate ...

  5. Vitamin E transport gene variants and prostate cancer

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In the February 15, 2009 issue of Cancer Research, Wright et al. investigated whether polymorphisms in two vitamin E transport genes are associated with elevated prostate cancer risk resulting from altered plasma vitamin E concentrations. However, the circulating vitamin E level is influenced by man...

  6. Sensitizing cancer cells: Is it really all about U?

    PubMed Central

    Stover, Patrick J.; Weiss, Robert S.

    2016-01-01

    In this issue of Cancer Cell, Hu et al. report that TMPK and RNR, two key enzymes in deoxyribonucleotide biosynthesis, co-localize to damaged DNA and produce nucleotides necessary for DNA repair while suppressing uracil incorporation. TMPK inhibition disrupts this balance and selectively sensitizes cancer cells to low-dose chemotherapy. PMID:22789532

  7. MYC - a thorn in the side of cancer immunity.

    PubMed

    Spranger, Stefani; Gajewski, Thomas F; Kline, Justin

    2016-06-01

    For decades, MYC has been known for its role in regulating cancer cell proliferation and survival. In a recent paper published in Science, Casey et al. have uncovered a new function for MYC in promoting immune evasion by directly regulating expression of programmed death-ligand 1 (PD-L1) and CD47 on cancer cells. PMID:27113275

  8. Alexandria (Al Iskandariya), Egypt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This image of Alexandria was taken by astronauts on board the International Space Station in December 2000 using an Electronic Still Camera. A wider-angle view (STS088-739-90) taken from the Space Shuttle in December 1998 is available for context. Alexandria (Al Iskandariya) occupies a T-shaped peninsula and strip of land separating the Mediterranean from Lake Mariout. Originally the town was built upon a mole (stone breakwater) called Heptastadium, which joined the island of Pharos (see referenced website, below) to the mainland. Since then sedimentary deposits have widened the mole. Since 1905, when the 370,000 Alexandrians lived in an area of about 4 sq km between the two harbors, the city (population 4 million; see referenced website, below) has grown beyond its medieval walls and now occupies an area of about 300 sq km. The Mahmudiya Canal, connecting Alexandria with the Nile, runs to the south of the city and, by a series of locks, enters the harbor of the principal port of Egypt (note ships). The reddish and ochre polygons west of Lake Mariout are salt-evaporation, chemical-storage, and water-treatment ponds within the coastal lagoon. Reference Youssef Halim and Fatma Abou Shouk, 2000, Human impacts on Alexandria's marine environment: UNESCO, Coastal Regions and Small Islands Unit (CSI), Coastal Management Sourcebooks 2 (accessed December 20, 2000) Additional photographs taken by astronauts can be viewed at NASA-JSC's Gateway to Astronaut Photography of Earth. Image ISS001-ESC-5025 provided by the Earth Sciences and Image Analysis Laboratory, Johnson Space Center.

  9. Undulators at the ALS

    SciTech Connect

    Hoyer, E.; Akre, J.; Chin, J.

    1994-07-01

    At Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory`s (LBL) Advanced Light Source (ALS), three 4.6 m long undulators have been completed, tested and installed. A fourth is under construction. The completed undulators include two 5.0 cm period length, 89 period devices (U5.0s) which achieve a 0.85 T effective field at a 14 mm minimum gap and a 8.0 cm period length, 55 period device (U8.0) that reaches a 1.2 T effective field at a 14 mm minimum gap. The undulator under construction is a 10.0 cm period length, 43 period device (U10.0) that is designed to achieve 0.98 T at a 23 mm gap. Undulator magnetic gap variation (rms) is within 25 microns over the periodic structure length. Reproducibility of the adjustable magnetic gap has been measured to be within +/{minus} 5 microns. Gap adjusting range is from 14 mm to 210 mm, which can be scanned in one minute. The 5.1 m long vacuum chambers are flat in the vertical direction to within 0.74 mm and straight in the horizontal direction to within 0.08 mm over the 4.6 m magnetic structure sections. Vacuum chamber base pressures after UHV beam conditioning are. in the mid 10{sup {minus}11} Torr range and storage ring operating pressures with full current are in the low 10{sup {minus}10} Torr range. Measurements show that the uncorrelated magnetic field errors are 0.23%, and 0.20% for the two U5.Os and the U8.0 respectively and that the field integrals are small over the 1 cm by 6 cm beam aperture. Device description, fabrication, and measurements are presented.

  10. MT-4 Suppresses Resistant Ovarian Cancer Growth through Targeting Tubulin and HSP27

    PubMed Central

    Pai, Hui Chen; Kumar, Sunil; Shen, Chien-Chang; Liou, Jing Ping; Pan, Shiow Lin; Teng, Che Ming

    2015-01-01

    Objective In this study, the anticancer mechanisms of MT-4 were examined in A2780 and multidrug-resistant NCI-ADR/res human ovarian cancer cell lines. Methods To evaluate the activity of MT-4, we performed in vitro cell viability and cell cycle assays and in vivo xenograft assays. Immunoblotting analysis was carried out to evaluate the effect of MT-4 on ovarian cancer. Tubulin polymerization was determined using a tubulin binding assay. Results MT-4 (2-Methoxy-5-[2-(3,4,5-trimethoxy-phenyl)-ethyl]-phenol), a derivative of moscatilin, can inhibit both sensitive A2780 and multidrug-resistant NCI-ADR/res cell growth and viability. MT-4 inhibited tubulin polymerization to induce G2/M arrest followed by caspase-mediated apoptosis. Further studies indicated that MT-4 is not a substrate of P-glycoprotein (p-gp). MT-4 also caused G2/M cell cycle arrest, accompanied by the upregulation of cyclin B, p-Thr161 Cdc2/p34, polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1), Aurora kinase B, and phospho-Ser10-histone H3 protein levels. In addition, we found that p38 MAPK pathway activation was involved in MT-4-induced apoptosis. Most importantly, MT-4 also decreased heat shock protein 27 expression and reduced its interaction with caspase-3, which inured cancer cells to chemotherapy resistance. Treatment of cells with SB203580 or overexpression of dominant negative (DN)-p38 or wild-type HSP27 reduced PARP cleavage caused by MT-4. MT-4 induced apoptosis through regulation of p38 and HSP27. Our xenograft models also show the in vivo efficacy of MT-4. MT-4 inhibited both A2780 and NCI-ADR/res cell growth in vitro and in vivo. Conclusion These findings indicate that MT-4 could be a potential lead compound for the treatment of multidrug-resistant ovarian cancer. PMID:25874627

  11. Tumor-Associated Neutrophils Show Phenotypic and Functional Divergence in Human Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Saha, Shilpi; Biswas, Subhra K

    2016-07-11

    Studies in murine cancer models have demonstrated the phenotypic and functional divergence of neutrophils; however, their role in pro- or anti-tumor responses in human remains elusive. In this issue of Cancer Cell, Singhal et al. report the existence of specialized subsets of neutrophils in human lung cancer with diverging functions. PMID:27411583

  12. Ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Matulonis, Ursula A; Sood, Anil K; Fallowfield, Lesley; Howitt, Brooke E; Sehouli, Jalid; Karlan, Beth Y

    2016-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is not a single disease and can be subdivided into at least five different histological subtypes that have different identifiable risk factors, cells of origin, molecular compositions, clinical features and treatments. Ovarian cancer is a global problem, is typically diagnosed at a late stage and has no effective screening strategy. Standard treatments for newly diagnosed cancer consist of cytoreductive surgery and platinum-based chemotherapy. In recurrent cancer, chemotherapy, anti-angiogenic agents and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibitors are used, and immunological therapies are currently being tested. High-grade serous carcinoma (HGSC) is the most commonly diagnosed form of ovarian cancer and at diagnosis is typically very responsive to platinum-based chemotherapy. However, in addition to the other histologies, HGSCs frequently relapse and become increasingly resistant to chemotherapy. Consequently, understanding the mechanisms underlying platinum resistance and finding ways to overcome them are active areas of study in ovarian cancer. Substantial progress has been made in identifying genes that are associated with a high risk of ovarian cancer (such as BRCA1 and BRCA2), as well as a precursor lesion of HGSC called serous tubal intraepithelial carcinoma, which holds promise for identifying individuals at high risk of developing the disease and for developing prevention strategies. PMID:27558151

  13. Pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Kamisawa, Terumi; Wood, Laura D; Itoi, Takao; Takaori, Kyoichi

    2016-07-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a highly lethal disease, for which mortality closely parallels incidence. Most patients with pancreatic cancer remain asymptomatic until the disease reaches an advanced stage. There is no standard programme for screening patients at high risk of pancreatic cancer (eg, those with a family history of pancreatic cancer and chronic pancreatitis). Most pancreatic cancers arise from microscopic non-invasive epithelial proliferations within the pancreatic ducts, referred to as pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasias. There are four major driver genes for pancreatic cancer: KRAS, CDKN2A, TP53, and SMAD4. KRAS mutation and alterations in CDKN2A are early events in pancreatic tumorigenesis. Endoscopic ultrasonography and endoscopic ultrasonography-guided fine-needle aspiration offer high diagnostic ability for pancreatic cancer. Surgical resection is regarded as the only potentially curative treatment, and adjuvant chemotherapy with gemcitabine or S-1, an oral fluoropyrimidine derivative, is given after surgery. FOLFIRINOX (fluorouracil, folinic acid [leucovorin], irinotecan, and oxaliplatin) and gemcitabine plus nanoparticle albumin-bound paclitaxel (nab-paclitaxel) are the treatments of choice for patients who are not surgical candidates but have good performance status. PMID:26830752

  14. Data on cell cycle in breast cancer cell line, MDA-MB-231 with ferulic acid treatment.

    PubMed

    Park, Eunmi

    2016-06-01

    Inhibition to repair DNA metabolism to respond to damaged DNA can lead to genetic instability, resulting in cancer cell death (Audeh et al., 2010; Bryant et al., 2005; Farmer et al., 2005; Lukas et al., 2003; Tutt et al., 2010) [1], [2], [6], [8], [11]. Despite of various studies demonstrating efficiency of combination therapy through down-regulation of DNA repair pathway, the suppression effects of DNA repair pathway by chemotherapeutic agents from natural bioactive compounds are less understood (Eitsuka et al., 2014; Kastan et al., 2004; Kawabata et al., 2000; Mancuso et al., 2014) [5], [7], [9]. Here, the data shows that ferulic acid reduced the S-phases post to UV treatment in breast cancer cells and was hypersensitive in breast cancer cells, MDA-MB-231. PMID:26958638

  15. Data on cell cycle in breast cancer cell line, MDA-MB-231 with ferulic acid treatment

    PubMed Central

    Park, Eunmi

    2016-01-01

    Inhibition to repair DNA metabolism to respond to damaged DNA can lead to genetic instability, resulting in cancer cell death (Audeh et al., 2010; Bryant et al., 2005; Farmer et al., 2005; Lukas et al., 2003; Tutt et al., 2010) [1], [2], [6], [8], [11]. Despite of various studies demonstrating efficiency of combination therapy through down-regulation of DNA repair pathway, the suppression effects of DNA repair pathway by chemotherapeutic agents from natural bioactive compounds are less understood (Eitsuka et al., 2014; Kastan et al., 2004; Kawabata et al., 2000; Mancuso et al., 2014) [5], [7], [9]. Here, the data shows that ferulic acid reduced the S-phases post to UV treatment in breast cancer cells and was hypersensitive in breast cancer cells, MDA-MB-231. PMID:26958638

  16. Breast Cancer -- Male

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home > Types of Cancer > Breast Cancer in Men Breast Cancer in Men This is Cancer.Net’s Guide to Breast Cancer in Men. Use the menu below to choose ... social workers, and patient advocates. Cancer.Net Guide Breast Cancer in Men Overview Statistics Risk Factors and Prevention ...

  17. Thermal Modeling of Al-Al and Al-Steel Friction Stir Spot Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jedrasiak, P.; Shercliff, H. R.; Reilly, A.; McShane, G. J.; Chen, Y. C.; Wang, L.; Robson, J.; Prangnell, P.

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents a finite element thermal model for similar and dissimilar alloy friction stir spot welding (FSSW). The model is calibrated and validated using instrumented lap joints in Al-Al and Al-Fe automotive sheet alloys. The model successfully predicts the thermal histories for a range of process conditions. The resulting temperature histories are used to predict the growth of intermetallic phases at the interface in Al-Fe welds. Temperature predictions were used to study the evolution of hardness of a precipitation-hardened aluminum alloy during post-weld aging after FSSW.

  18. Prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Attard, Gerhardt; Parker, Chris; Eeles, Ros A; Schröder, Fritz; Tomlins, Scott A; Tannock, Ian; Drake, Charles G; de Bono, Johann S

    2016-01-01

    Much progress has been made in research for prostate cancer in the past decade. There is now greater understanding for the genetic basis of familial prostate cancer with identification of rare but high-risk mutations (eg, BRCA2, HOXB13) and low-risk but common alleles (77 identified so far by genome-wide association studies) that could lead to targeted screening of patients at risk. This is especially important because screening for prostate cancer based on prostate-specific antigen remains controversial due to the high rate of overdiagnosis and unnecessary prostate biopsies, despite evidence that it reduces mortality. Classification of prostate cancer into distinct molecular subtypes, including mutually exclusive ETS-gene-fusion-positive and SPINK1-overexpressing, CHD1-loss cancers, could allow stratification of patients for different management strategies. Presently, men with localised disease can have very different prognoses and treatment options, ranging from observation alone through to radical surgery, with few good-quality randomised trials to inform on the best approach for an individual patient. The survival of patients with metastatic prostate cancer progressing on androgen-deprivation therapy (castration-resistant prostate cancer) has improved substantially. In addition to docetaxel, which has been used for more than a decade, in the past 4 years five new drugs have shown efficacy with improvements in overall survival leading to licensing for the treatment of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer. Because of this rapid change in the therapeutic landscape, no robust data exist to inform on the selection of patients for a specific treatment for castration-resistant prostate cancer or the best sequence of administration. Moreover, the high cost of the newer drugs limits their widespread use in several countries. Data from continuing clinical and translational research are urgently needed to improve, and, crucially, to personalise management. PMID

  19. Risks of Breast Cancer Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Breast Cancer Screening (PDQ®)–Patient Version What is screening? Go ... cancer screening: Cancer Screening Overview General Information About Breast Cancer Key Points Breast cancer is a disease in ...

  20. Risks of Endometrial Cancer Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... Laboratory for Cancer Research Partners & Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer ... Centers Frederick National Lab Partners & Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists NCI Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer ...

  1. Risks of Prostate Cancer Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... Laboratory for Cancer Research Partners & Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer ... Centers Frederick National Lab Partners & Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists NCI Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer ...

  2. Risks of Cervical Cancer Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... Laboratory for Cancer Research Partners & Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer ... Centers Frederick National Lab Partners & Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists NCI Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer ...

  3. Modeling neuronal vulnerability in ALS.

    PubMed

    Roselli, Francesco; Caroni, Pico

    2014-08-20

    Using computational models of motor neuron ion fluxes, firing properties, and energy requirements, Le Masson et al. (2014) reveal how local imbalances in energy homeostasis may self-amplify and contribute to neurodegeneration in ALS. PMID:25144872

  4. Philosophieren als Unterrichtsprinzip im Mathematikunterricht

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meerwaldt, Diana

    Philosophieren und Mathematik scheinen zunächst gegensätzliche Bereiche zu sein, die sich kaum vereinbaren lassen. Dies trifft für eine Auffassung zu, die Philosophieren als "Gerede" disqualifiziert und Mathematik als eine reine "Formelwissenschaft" begreift. Beide Auffassungen werden den Gegenständen nicht gerecht.

  5. Lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Jie; Kislinger, Thomas; Jurisica, Igor; Wigle, Dennis A.

    2010-01-01

    High-throughput genomic data for both lung development and lung cancer continue to accumulate. Significant molecular intersection between these two processes has been hypothesized due to overlap in phenotypes and genomic variation. Examining the network biology of both cancer and development of the lung may shed functional light on the individual signaling modules involved. Stem cell biology may explain a portion of this network intersection and consequently studying lung organogenesis may have relevance for understanding lung cancer. This review summarizes our understanding of the potential overlapping mechanisms involved in lung development and lung tumorigenesis. PMID:19202349

  6. Skin Cancer in the Crosshairs

    PubMed Central

    Sinnya, Sudipta; Zwald, Fiona O.; Colegio, Oscar R.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The International Transplant Skin Cancer Collaborative (ITSCC) is an organization comprising of physicians; transplant surgeons and basic science research scientists dedicated in providing optimal care and ongoing research advancements in solid organ transplant recipients to improve patient outcome and quality of life. As medical advances occur, it is anticipated that the sheer number of solid organ transplantations occurring worldwide will continue to increase. The long-term medication associated immunosuppression improves graft survival, but as a consequence, these individuals become increasingly susceptible to various cutaneous malignancies, lymphoproliferative disorders and infections. Squamous cell carcinoma is the most frequently encountered skin cancer and increases 65- to 250-fold [Jensen et al., Skin cancer in kidney and heart transplant recipients and different long-term immunosuppressive therapy regimens. J Am Acad Dermatol. 1999;40:177-186; Lindelöf et al., Incidence of skin cancer in 5356 patients following organ transplantation. Br J Dermatol. 2000; 143:513-519]. However, the rates of basal cell carcinoma, Merkel cell carcinoma and melanoma also increase in organ transplant recipients leading to significant morbidity as well as mortality [Berg and Otley. Skin cancer in organ transplant recipients: epidemiology, pathogenesis, and management. J Am Acad Dermatol. 2002; 47:1-20]. In October 2014, the International Transplant Skin Cancer Collaborative and its equivalent European counterpart, Skin Care in Organ Transplant Recipients Europe held its 10th biennial meeting in Essex, MA to discuss the clinical conundrums and the evolving research pertinent to the field. This meeting report provides a synthesis of all the clinical and research data presented at the 4-day meeting.

  7. Quantitative Analysis of Human Cancer Cell Extravasation Using Intravital Imaging.

    PubMed

    Willetts, Lian; Bond, David; Stoletov, Konstantin; Lewis, John D

    2016-01-01

    Metastasis, or the spread of cancer cells from a primary tumor to distant sites, is the leading cause of cancer-associated death. Metastasis is a complex multi-step process comprised of invasion, intravasation, survival in circulation, extravasation, and formation of metastatic colonies. Currently, in vitro assays are limited in their ability to investigate these intricate processes and do not faithfully reflect metastasis as it occurs in vivo. Traditional in vivo models of metastasis are limited by their ability to visualize the seemingly sporadic behavior of where and when cancer cells spread (Reymond et al., Nat Rev Cancer 13:858-870, 2013). The avian embryo model of metastasis is a powerful platform to study many of the critical steps in the metastatic cascade including the migration, extravasation, and invasion of human cancer cells in vivo (Sung et al., Nat Commun 6:7164, 2015; Leong et al., Cell Rep 8, 1558-1570, 2014; Kain et al., Dev Dyn 243:216-28, 2014; Leong et al., Nat Protoc 5:1406-17, 2010; Zijlstra et al., Cancer Cell 13:221-234, 2008; Palmer et al., J Vis Exp 51:2815, 2011). The chicken chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) is a readily accessible and well-vascularized tissue that surrounds the developing embryo. When the chicken embryo is grown in a shell-less, ex ovo environment, the nearly transparent CAM provides an ideal environment for high-resolution fluorescent microcopy approaches. In this model, the embryonic chicken vasculature and labeled cancer cells can be visualized simultaneously to investigate specific steps in the metastatic cascade including extravasation. When combined with the proper image analysis tools, the ex ovo chicken embryo model offers a cost-effective and high-throughput platform for the quantitative analysis of tumor cell metastasis in a physiologically relevant in vivo setting. Here we discuss detailed procedures to quantify cancer cell extravasation in the shell-less chicken embryo model with advanced fluorescence

  8. Gastric cancer stem cells: evidence, potential markers, and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Brungs, Daniel; Aghmesheh, Morteza; Vine, Kara L; Becker, Therese M; Carolan, Martin G; Ranson, Marie

    2016-04-01

    Gastric cancer is a significant global health problem. It is the fifth most common cancer and third leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide (Torre et al. in CA Cancer J Clin 65(2):87-108, 2015). Despite advances in treatment, overall prognosis remains poor, due to tumour relapse and metastasis. There is an urgent need for novel therapeutic approaches to improve clinical outcomes in gastric cancer. The cancer stem cell (CSC) model has been proposed to explain the high rate of relapse and subsequent resistance of cancer to current systemic treatments (Vermeulen et al. in Lancet Oncol 13(2):e83-e89, 2012). CSCs have been identified in many solid malignancies, including gastric cancer, and have significant clinical implications, as targeting the CSC population may be essential in preventing the recurrence and spread of a tumour (Dewi et al. in J Gastroenterol 46(10):1145-1157, 2011). This review seeks to summarise the current evidence for CSC in gastric cancer, with an emphasis on candidate CSC markers, clinical implications, and potential therapeutic approaches. PMID:26428661

  9. Characteristics of CeCoIn5/Al/AlOx/Nb and CeCoIn5/Al/AlOx/Al Tunnel Junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Petrovic, C.; Nevirkovets, I.P.; Chernyashevskyy, O.; Hu, R.; Ketterson, J.B.; Sarma, B.K.

    2009-03-03

    We report characteristics of CeCoIn{sub 5}/Al/AlO{sub x}/Nb and CeCoIn{sub 5}/Al/AlO{sub x}/Al tunnel junctions fabricated on the (0 0 1) surface of CeCoIn{sub 5} crystal platelets. The main result of this work is the observation of a low Josephson current (as compared with that expected from the Ambegaokar-Baratoff formula), which is consistent with idea that the order parameter in the heavy-fermion superconductor CeCoIn{sub 5} has unconventional pairing symmetry.

  10. Cancer Genetics Services Directory

    MedlinePlus

    ... Overview–for health professionals Research NCI Cancer Genetics Services Directory This directory lists professionals who provide services related to cancer genetics (cancer risk assessment, genetic ...

  11. The Rock Engineering System (RES) applied to landslide susceptibility zonation of the northeastern flank of Etna: methodological approach and results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apuani, Tiziana; Corazzato, Claudia

    2015-04-01

    Ground deformations in the northeastern flank of Etna are well known. Despite only a few landslide events have been documented, these have significantly involved and damaged lifelines and buildings. These events are mainly related to the activity of the volcano-tectonic structures and associated seismicity, as in the case of the 2002 reactivation of the Presa landslide during an increased activity of the Pernicana fault system. In order to highlight the areal distribution of potentially unstable slopes based on a detailed, site-specific study of the factors responsible for landslide, and to ultimately contribute to risk management, a landslide susceptibility analysis of the northeastern flank of Etna in the Pernicana area was carried out, and a susceptibility map at 1:10.000 scale was produced, extending over an area of 168 km2. Different methods are proposed in the literature to obtain the regional distribution of potentially unstable slopes, depending on the problem scale, the slope dynamic evolution in the geological context, and the availability of data. Among semi-quantitative approaches, the present research combines the Rock Engineering System (RES) methodology with parameter zonation mapping in a GIS environment. The RES method represents a structured approach to manage a high number of interacting factors involved in the instability problem. A numerically coded, site-specific interaction matrix (IM) analyzes the cause-effect relationship in these factors, and calculates the degree of interactivity of each parameter, normalized by the overall interactivity of the system (weight factor). In the specific Etna case, the considered parameters are: slope attitude, lithotechnical properties (lithology, structural complexity, soil and rock mass quality), land use, tectonic structures, seismic activity (horizontal acceleration) and hydrogeological conditions (groundwater and drainage). Thematic maps are prepared at 1:10.000 scale for each of these parameters, and

  12. Metastatic Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer.gov en español Multimedia Publications Site Map Digital Standards for NCI Websites POLICIES Accessibility Comment Policy Disclaimer FOIA Privacy & Security Reuse & Copyright Syndication Services Website Linking U.S. Department of Health ...

  13. Endometrial Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Member Login Join Pay Dues Follow us: Women's Health Care Physicians Contact Us My ACOG ACOG Departments Donate ... and is best made in consultation with your health care team. What happens after treatment for endometrial cancer? ...

  14. Cancer Clusters

    MedlinePlus

    ... Resources NCI Grants Management Legal Requirements NCI Grant Policies Grants Management Contacts Training Cancer Training at NCI Funding for ... Closeout NCI Grants Management Legal Requirements NCI Grant Policies Grant Management Contacts Other Funding Find NCI funding for small ...

  15. Childhood Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... the circulatory system and the lymphatic system , two systems that are located throughout the body. This makes it hard to treat these cancers by operating on just one area. However, in children with ...

  16. Oral cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... is advanced Other symptoms may include: Chewing problems Mouth sores that may bleed Pain with swallowing Speech difficulties ... Your doctor or dentist will examine your mouth area. The exam may ... bleeding Tests used to confirm oral cancer include: Gum biopsy ...

  17. Thyroid cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... known prevention. Awareness of risk (such as previous radiation therapy to the neck) can allow earlier diagnosis and treatment. Sometimes, people with family histories and genetic mutations related to thyroid cancer will have their thyroid ...

  18. Endometrial Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... having diabetes. Using estrogen replacement therapy without taking progestin may also increase the risk for endometrial cancer. ... take a combination of estrogen and the hormone progestin. While estrogen stimulates growth of the endometrium, progestin ...

  19. Breast cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... chance that you could develop breast cancer: Some risk factors you can control, such as drinking alcohol. Others, such as family history, you cannot control. The more risk factors you have, the more your risk increases. ...

  20. Endometrial cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Endometrial biopsy Dilation and curettage ( D and C ) Pap smear (may raise a suspicion for endometrial cancer, but ... for more than 2 years. Frequent pelvic exams, Pap smears and endometrial biopsy may be considered in some ...

  1. Cancer Imaging

    MedlinePlus

    ... I/II Trials CIP ARRA-Funded Clinical Trials Informatics The Cancer Imaging Archive TCGA Imaging Genomics Quantitative Imaging Network LIDC-IDRI Imaging Informatics Resources News & Events News and Announcements Events – Meetings ...

  2. Cervical cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... eye. Special tests and tools are needed to spot such conditions: A Pap smear screens for precancers and cancer, but does not make a final diagnosis. The human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA test may be ...

  3. Lung cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... any symptoms. Symptoms depend on the type of cancer you have, but may include: Chest pain Cough that does not go away Coughing up blood Fatigue Losing weight without trying Loss of appetite Shortness of breath ...

  4. Vulvar Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... a human papillomavirus (HPV) infection or have a history of genital warts. Your health care provider diagnoses vulvar cancer with a physical exam and a biopsy. Treatment varies, depending on your overall health and ...

  5. Evidence of Nb-Ta mobility in high temperature F-rich fluids evidenced by the La Bosse quartz-Nb-ferberite stockwork (Echassières, French Massif Central).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marignac, C.; Cuney, M.

    2012-04-01

    ). Thus the unusual Nb content of the La Bosse ferberites is correlated to the apparently very distal setting of this quartz system relatively to the parent granite, in contrast with most quartz-W systems in the French Massif Central (Aïssa et al. 1987). When invaded by aplites or aplopegmatites, the ferberite-bearing quartz veins are dissolved, but the ferberites remain apparently unaffected - they are not dissolved by the granite melt. Yet, the acicular and lanceolate crystals have lost their Nb-zoning and display uniform homogenised Nb content. The emplacement of the Beauvoir granite was associated with late magmatic exsolution of an Al- and F-rich, silica undersaturated, hydrothermal fluid that percolated upwards in the surrounding schists (Cuney et al. 1992). When interacting with the quartz veins of the La Bosse stockwork, this fluid precipitated topazites. Again, included ferberites remain apparently unaffected. However, they display microscopic vuggy cavities, successively filled by a Nb-rich ferberite (up to 8.91% Nb2O5) with significant Ta content (up to 0.35 % Ta2O5), a wolframo-ixiolite and a Ta-rich columbite. Later Li-phengite was precipitated from the same magmatic fluid, and was associated with hubnerite enrichment of pre-existing ferberites along Li-phengite-bearing microcracks (down to 0.20 mole % Fb). Ta and Nb are known for their poor solubility in hydrothermal fluids, but the Nb and Ta enrichments observed in the wolframite of La Bosse stockwork show that they can be transported to some extent by F-rich fluids. Aïssa, M., Marignac, C., Weisbrod, A. (1987). Le stockwerk à ferbérite d'Echassières : évolution spatiale et temporelle; cristallochimie des ferbérites. In : Cuney, M., Autran, A. (eds), Echassières : le forage scientifique d'Echassières (Allier). Une clé pour la compréhension des mécanismes magmatiques et hydrothermaux associés aux granites à métaux rares. Mém. GPF, tome 1, 311-334. M Cuney, C Marignac, A Weisbrod (1992). The

  6. Evidence of Nb-Ta mobility in high temperature F-rich fluids evidenced by the La Bosse quartz-Nb-ferberite stockwork (Echassières, French Massif Central).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marignac, C.; Cuney, M.

    2012-04-01

    ). Thus the unusual Nb content of the La Bosse ferberites is correlated to the apparently very distal setting of this quartz system relatively to the parent granite, in contrast with most quartz-W systems in the French Massif Central (Aïssa et al. 1987). When invaded by aplites or aplopegmatites, the ferberite-bearing quartz veins are dissolved, but the ferberites remain apparently unaffected - they are not dissolved by the granite melt. Yet, the acicular and lanceolate crystals have lost their Nb-zoning and display uniform homogenised Nb content. The emplacement of the Beauvoir granite was associated with late magmatic exsolution of an Al- and F-rich, silica undersaturated, hydrothermal fluid that percolated upwards in the surrounding schists (Cuney et al. 1992). When interacting with the quartz veins of the La Bosse stockwork, this fluid precipitated topazites. Again, included ferberites remain apparently unaffected. However, they display microscopic vuggy cavities, successively filled by a Nb-rich ferberite (up to 8.91% Nb2O5) with significant Ta content (up to 0.35 % Ta2O5), a wolframo-ixiolite and a Ta-rich columbite. Later Li-phengite was precipitated from the same magmatic fluid, and was associated with hubnerite enrichment of pre-existing ferberites along Li-phengite-bearing microcracks (down to 0.20 mole % Fb). Ta and Nb are known for their poor solubility in hydrothermal fluids, but the Nb and Ta enrichments observed in the wolframite of La Bosse stockwork show that they can be transported to some extent by F-rich fluids. Aïssa, M., Marignac, C., Weisbrod, A. (1987). Le stockwerk à ferbérite d'Echassières : évolution spatiale et temporelle; cristallochimie des ferbérites. In : Cuney, M., Autran, A. (eds), Echassières : le forage scientifique d'Echassières (Allier). Une clé pour la compréhension des mécanismes magmatiques et hydrothermaux associés aux granites à métaux rares. Mém. GPF, tome 1, 311-334. M Cuney, C Marignac, A Weisbrod (1992). The

  7. Aging, cancer, and cancer vaccines

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    World population has experienced continuous growth since 1400 A.D. Current projections show a continued increase - but a steady decline in the population growth rate - with the number expected to reach between 8 and 10.5 billion people within 40 years. The elderly population is rapidly rising: in 1950 there were 205 million people aged 60 or older, while in 2000 there were 606 million. By 2050, the global population aged 60 or over is projected to expand by more than three times, reaching nearly 2 billion people [1]. Most cancers are age-related diseases: in the US, 50% of all malignancies occur in people aged 65-95. 60% of all cancers are expected to be diagnosed in elderly patients by 2020 [2]. Further, cancer-related mortality increases with age: 70% of all malignancy-related deaths are registered in people aged 65 years or older [3]. Here we introduce the microscopic aspects of aging, the pro-inflammatory phenotype of the elderly, and the changes related to immunosenescence. Then we deal with cancer disease and its development, the difficulty of treatment administration in the geriatric population, and the importance of a comprehensive geriatric assessment. Finally, we aim to analyze the complex interactions of aging with cancer and cancer vaccinology, and the importance of this last approach as a complementary therapy to different levels of prevention and treatment. Cancer vaccines, in fact, should at present be recommended in association to a stronger cancer prevention and conventional therapies (surgery, chemotherapy, radiation therapy), both for curative and palliative intent, in order to reduce morbidity and mortality associated to cancer progression. PMID:22510392

  8. Prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Castillejos-Molina, Ricardo Alonso; Gabilondo-Navarro, Fernando Bernardo

    2016-04-01

    Prostate cancer is the most frequent tumor found in men worldwide and in Mexico in particular. Age and family history are the main risk factors. The diagnosis is made by prostate biopsy in patients with abnormalities detected in their prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels or digital rectal exam (DRE). This article reviews screening and diagnostic methods as well as treatment options for patients diagnosed with prostate cancer. PMID:27557386

  9. Simulation of the 2008 Iowa Flood using HiResFlood-UCI Model with Remote Sensing Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, P.; Thorstensen, A. R.; Hsu, K. L.; AghaKouchak, A.; Sanders, B. F.; Sorooshian, S.

    2014-12-01

    Precipitation is a key forcing variable in hydrological modeling of floods and being able to accurately observe precipitation is extremely important in mitigating flood impacts. The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission, launched in Feb 2014 also presents an opportunity for high-quality real-time precipitation data and improved flood warnings. The PERSIANN-CCS developed by the scientists at the Center for Hydrometeorology and Remote Sensing (CHRS) at the University of California, Irvine is one algorithm integrated in the IMERG of PMM/GPM. In this research, the high resolution coupled hydrologic/hydraulic model named HiResFlood-UCI was applied to simulate the historical 2008 Iowa flood in the Cedar River basin. HiResFlood-UCI is a coupling of the NWS's distributed hydrologic model HL-RDHM and the hydraulic model BreZo developed by the Computational Hydraulics Group at the University of California, Irvine. The model was forced with the real-time PERSIANN-CCS and NEXRAD Stage 2 precipitation data. Simulations were evaluated based on 2 criteria: hydrographs within the basin and the areal extent of the flooding. Streamflow hydrographs were compared at 7 USGS gages, and simulated inundation maps were evaluated using USDA AWiFS 56m resolution areal flood imagery. The results show reasonable simulated hydrographs compared to USGS streamflow observations when simulating with PERSIANN-CCS and NEXRAD Stage 2 as forcing inputs. The simulation driven by NEXRAD Stage 2 slightly outperforms the PERSIANN-CCS simulation as the latter marginally underestimated the observed hydrographs. The simulation in both cases shows a good agreement (0.672 and 0.727 CSI for Stage 2 and PERSIANN-CCS simulations respectively) with the AWiFS image over the most impacted area in the Cedar Rapids region. Since the PERSIANN-CCS simulation slightly underestimated the discharge, the probability of detection (0.925) is lower than that of the Stage 2 simulation (0.965). As a trade-off, the false

  10. Pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Vincent, Audrey; Herman, Joseph; Schulick, Rich; Hruban, Ralph H; Goggins, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Substantial progress has been made in our understanding of the biology of pancreatic cancer, and advances in patients’ management have also taken place. Evidence is beginning to show that screening first-degree relatives of individuals with several family members affected by pancreatic cancer can identify non-invasive precursors of this malignant disease. The incidence of and number of deaths caused by pancreatic tumours have been gradually rising, even as incidence and mortality of other common cancers have been declining. Despite developments in detection and management of pancreatic cancer, only about 4% of patients will live 5 years after diagnosis. Survival is better for those with malignant disease localised to the pancreas, because surgical resection at present offers the only chance of cure. Unfortunately, 80–85% of patients present with advanced unresectable disease. Furthermore, pancreatic cancer responds poorly to most chemotherapeutic agents. Hence, we need to understand the biological mechanisms that contribute to development and progression of pancreatic tumours. In this Seminar we will discuss the most common and deadly form of pancreatic cancer, pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. PMID:21620466

  11. Stimulated emission in AlGaN/AlGaN quantum wells with different Al content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mickevičius, J.; Jurkevičius, J.; Kazlauskas, K.; Žukauskas, A.; Tamulaitis, G.; Shur, M. S.; Shatalov, M.; Yang, J.; Gaska, R.

    2012-02-01

    Stimulated emission (SE) is studied in AlGaN/AlGaN multiple quantum wells (MQWs) with different Al content grown on sapphire substrate. The spectra of spontaneous and stimulated emission and their transformations with increasing temperature as well as stimulated emission thresholds were measured in the temperature range from 8 to 300 K. Phonon-assisted band broadening in low-Al-content MQWs and double-scaled potential profile in high-Al-content MQWs were observed in the samples and linked with carrier localization conditions. The temperature dependence of the stimulated emission threshold was similar in the samples where the stimulated transitions occur between extended states and in the samples where the transitions occur in localized states. The stimulated emission threshold depends predominantly on the density of nonradiative recombination centers.

  12. American Cancer Society Recommendations for Prostate Cancer Early Detection

    MedlinePlus

    ... Research Get Involved Find Local ACS Learn About Cancer » Prostate Cancer » More Information » Prostate Cancer Early Detection » American ... Causes Cancer? Breast Cancer Colon/Rectum Cancer Lung Cancer Prostate Cancer Skin Cancer Show All Cancer Types News ...

  13. Medical application of 26Al

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinhausen, C.; Gerisch, P.; Heisinger, B.; Hohl, Ch.; Kislinger, G.; Korschinek, G.; Niedermayer, M.; Nolte, E.; Dumitru, M.; Alvarez-Brückmann, M.; Schneider, M.; Ittel, T. H.

    1996-06-01

    Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) measurements with 26Al as tracer were performed in order to study the aluminium metabolism and anomalies in the human body and in rats. In particular, the differences between healthy volunteers and patients with renal failure were investigated. The obtained data points of 26Al in blood and urine were described by an open compartment model with three peripheral compartments. It was found that the minimum of peripheral compartments needed to describe 26Al concentrations in blood and urine over a time period of three years is at least three.

  14. Bugs and Food: A Recipe for Cancer?

    PubMed Central

    Ohland, Christina L.; Jobin, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Obesity and the associated state of subchronic inflammation are risk factors for numerous pathologies, including carcinogenesis. Recently, Schulz et al. (2014) demonstrated that high-fat diet-induced intestinal dysbiosis promotes cancer development in K-rasG12Dint mice without inducing obesity or mucosal inflammation, positioning microbial activities as a central component of diet-induced carcinogenesis. PMID:25470545

  15. Bacteria Moving into Focus of Human Cancer.

    PubMed

    Boccellato, Francesco; Meyer, Thomas F

    2015-06-10

    Although bacteria have long been associated with human cancer, drawing causal relationships has been difficult. In this issue of Cell Host & Microbe, Scanu et al. (2015) provide evidence for a transforming activity of Salmonella Typhimurium on predisposed host cells, which can subsequently form tumors in a xenograft model. PMID:26067598

  16. Lung cancer - small cell

    MedlinePlus

    Cancer - lung - small cell; Small cell lung cancer; SCLC ... About 15% of all lung cancer cases are SCLC. Small cell lung cancer is slightly more common in men than women. Almost all cases of SCLC ...

  17. Uterine Cancer Statistics

    MedlinePlus

    ... Research AMIGAS Fighting Cervical Cancer Worldwide Stay Informed Statistics for Other Kinds of Cancer Breast Cervical Colorectal ( ... Skin Vaginal and Vulvar Cancer Home Uterine Cancer Statistics Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet ...

  18. Chemotherapy for Thyroid Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... cancer Next Topic Targeted therapy for thyroid cancer Chemotherapy for thyroid cancer Chemotherapy (chemo) uses anti-cancer drugs that are injected ... vein or muscle, or are taken by mouth. Chemotherapy is systemic therapy, which means that the drug ...

  19. American Cancer Society

    MedlinePlus

    ... Involved Find Local ACS How the American Cancer Society Fights Childhood Cancer Advances in treatment have improved ... long lasting consequences. Learn how the American Cancer Society is working to save more lives from cancer ...

  20. Breast Cancer: Treatment Options

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer - Treatment Options Request Permissions Print to PDF Breast Cancer - Treatment Options Approved by the Cancer.Net Editorial ... recommendations for ovarian ablation . Hormonal therapy for metastatic breast cancer Hormonal therapies are also commonly used to treat ...

  1. Surgery for Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Next Topic Breast-conserving surgery (lumpectomy) Surgery for breast cancer Most women with breast cancer have some type ... Relieve symptoms of advanced cancer Surgery to remove breast cancer There are two main types of surgery to ...

  2. Learning about Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... genetic terms used on this page Learning About Breast Cancer What do we know about heredity and breast ... Cancer What do we know about heredity and breast cancer? Breast cancer is a common disease. Each year, ...

  3. Lung cancer - small cell

    MedlinePlus

    Cancer - lung - small cell; Small cell lung cancer; SCLC ... About 15% of all lung cancer cases are SCLC. Small cell lung cancer is slightly more common in men than women. Almost all cases of SCLC are ...

  4. Diet and cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Fiber and cancer; Cancer and fiber; Nitrates and cancer; Cancer and nitrates ... daily. Lower your intake of processed meats, smoked, nitrite-cured, and salt-preserved foods; emphasize plant-based ...

  5. Alcohol and Cancer Risk

    MedlinePlus

    ... Overview Cancer Prevention Overview–for health professionals Research Alcohol and Cancer Risk On This Page What is ... in the risk of colorectal cancer. Research on alcohol consumption and other cancers: Numerous studies have examined ...

  6. Liver (Hepatocellular) Cancer Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... Liver cancer is not common in the United States. Liver cancer is the fourth most common cancer and the third leading cause of cancer death in the world. In the United States, men, especially Chinese American men, have an increased ...

  7. Pancreatic Cancer Stage 3

    MedlinePlus

    ... historical Searches are case-insensitive Pancreatic Cancer Stage 3 Add to My Pictures View /Download : Small: 720x576 ... Large: 3000x2400 View Download Title: Pancreatic Cancer Stage 3 Description: Stage III pancreatic cancer; drawing shows cancer ...

  8. Cervical Cancer Stage IVB

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the body, such as the lymph nodes, lung, liver, intestine, or bone. Stage IVB cervical cancer. Topics/Categories: Anatomy -- Gynecologic Cancer Types -- Cervical Cancer Staging Type: Color, Medical Illustration Source: National Cancer Institute ...

  9. What Is Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Germ Cell Tumors Kidney/Wilms Tumor Liver Cancer Neuroblastoma Osteosarcoma Rhabdomyosarcoma Skin Cancer Soft Tissue Sarcoma Thyroid ... Tumor Liver Cancer Lymphoma (Non-Hodgkin) Lymphoma (Hodgkin) Neuroblastoma Osteosarcoma Retinoblastoma Rhabdomyosarcoma Skin Cancer Soft Tissue Sarcoma ...

  10. Childhood Cancer Statistics

    MedlinePlus

    ... Germ Cell Tumors Kidney/Wilms Tumor Liver Cancer Neuroblastoma Osteosarcoma Rhabdomyosarcoma Skin Cancer Soft Tissue Sarcoma Thyroid ... Tumor Liver Cancer Lymphoma (Non-Hodgkin) Lymphoma (Hodgkin) Neuroblastoma Osteosarcoma Retinoblastoma Rhabdomyosarcoma Skin Cancer Soft Tissue Sarcoma ...

  11. Symptoms of Ovarian Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Informed Cancer Home What Are the Symptoms of Ovarian Cancer? Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Gynecologic cancer symptoms diaries Ovarian cancer may cause one or more of these signs ...

  12. Cancer during Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer is Treated Side Effects Dating, Sex, and Reproduction Dating and Intimacy Sexuality and Cancer Treatment: Men ... here Home > Navigating Cancer Care > Dating, Sex, and Reproduction > Cancer During Pregnancy Request Permissions Print to PDF ...

  13. Uterine Cancer Risk Questionnaire

    MedlinePlus

    ... University School of Medicine Uterine cancer (also called endometrial cancer) is one of the most common cancers in ... help protect themselves. To estimate your risk of uterine cancer and learn about ways to lower that risk, ...

  14. Understanding cancer staging

    MedlinePlus

    ... the body. The spread of cancer is called metastasis . Cancer staging is used to help describe the ... cancer has spread to nearby lymph nodes (N) Metastasis (M) , or if and how much the cancer ...

  15. Cancer Biomarkers | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    This group promotes research to identify, develop, and validate biological markers for early cancer detection and cancer risk assessment. | Research to identify, develop and validate biomarkers for early cancer detection and risk assessment.

  16. Epigenetic field cancerization in gastrointestinal cancers.

    PubMed

    Baba, Yoshifumi; Ishimoto, Takatsugu; Kurashige, Junji; Iwatsuki, Masaaki; Sakamoto, Yasuo; Yoshida, Naoya; Watanabe, Masayuki; Baba, Hideo

    2016-06-01

    Epigenetic alterations, including aberrant DNA methylation, play an important role in human cancer development. Importantly, epigenetic alterations are reversible and can be targets for therapy or chemoprevention for various types of human cancers. A field for cancerization, or a field defect, is formed by the accumulation of genetic and/or epigenetic alterations in normal-appearing tissues and can correlate with risk of cancer development. Thus, a better understanding of epigenetic field cancerization may represent a useful translational opportunity for cancer risk assessment, including previous history and exposure to carcinogenic factors, and for cancer prevention. In this article, we summarize current knowledge regarding epigenetic field cancerization and its clinical implications in gastrointestinal cancers, including colorectal cancer, gastric cancer and esophageal cancer. PMID:26971491

  17. Genome-wide DNA hypomethylation and RNA:DNA hybrid accumulation in Aicardi–Goutières syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Yoong Wearn; Sanz, Lionel A; Xu, Xiaoqin; Hartono, Stella R; Chédin, Frédéric

    2015-01-01

    Aicardi–Goutières syndrome (AGS) is a severe childhood inflammatory disorder that shows clinical and genetic overlap with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). AGS is thought to arise from the accumulation of incompletely metabolized endogenous nucleic acid species owing to mutations in nucleic acid-degrading enzymes TREX1 (AGS1), RNase H2 (AGS2, 3 and 4), and SAMHD1 (AGS5). However, the identity and source of such immunogenic nucleic acid species remain undefined. Using genome-wide approaches, we show that fibroblasts from AGS patients with AGS1-5 mutations are burdened by excessive loads of RNA:DNA hybrids. Using MethylC-seq, we show that AGS fibroblasts display pronounced and global loss of DNA methylation and demonstrate that AGS-specific RNA:DNA hybrids often occur within DNA hypomethylated regions. Altogether, our data suggest that RNA:DNA hybrids may represent a common immunogenic form of nucleic acids in AGS and provide the first evidence of epigenetic perturbations in AGS, furthering the links between AGS and SLE. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.08007.001 PMID:26182405

  18. Ethical dilemmas in medical humanitarian practice: cases for reflection from Médecins Sans Frontières.

    PubMed

    Sheather, Julian; Shah, Tejshri

    2011-03-01

    Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) is an independent medical humanitarian organisation working in over 70 countries. It has provided medical assistance for over 35 years to populations vulnerable through conflict, disease and inadequate health systems. Medical ethics define the starting point of the relationship between medical staff and patients. The ethics of humanitarian interventions and of research in conflict settings are much debated. However, less is known about the ethical dilemmas faced by medical humanitarian staff in their daily work. Ethical dilemmas can be intensified in humanitarian contexts by insecure environments, lack of optimum care, language barriers, potentially heightened power discrepancies between care providers and patients, differing cultural values and perceptions of patients, communities and medical staff. Time constraints, stressful conditions and lack of familiarity with ethical frameworks can prevent reflection on these dilemmas, as can frustration that such reflection does not necessarily provide instant solutions. Lack of reflection, however, can be distressing for medical practitioners and can reduce the quality of care. Ethical reflection has a central role in MSF, and the organisation uses ethical frameworks to help with clinical and programmatic decisions as well as in deliberations over operational research. We illustrate and discuss some real ethical dilemmas facing MSF teams. Only by sharing and seeking guidance can MSF and similar actors make more thoughtful and appropriate decisions. Our aim in sharing these cases is to invite discussion and dialogue in the wider medical community working in crisis, conflict or with severe resource limitations. PMID:21084354

  19. Un exemple de transfert de technologie dans le domaine des polymères conducteurs : le projet ``HYRA"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parneix, J. P.; Miane, J. L.; Colin, T.; Ruffie, G.; Mege, J.

    1998-06-01

    The HYRA project is a response to the restructuration of local companies : these are purveyors of high technology military and spatial especially in the radars business. Furthermore, the development of mobile communications needs devices and materials in the millimeter range (from 20 to 100Ghz). The aim of the HYRA project is the development of materials with specific properties - particularly conducting materials - in the millimeter wave range. The results obtained on thermoplastic/conducting polymer composites are presented. Le projet HYRA répond à des préoccupations régionales liées à des restructurations industrielles : les industries régionales fournissant les marchés militaires et spatiaux disposent de techniques très performantes mais coûteuses, en particulier dans le domaine des radars. Par ailleurs le développement des communications mobiles a besoin de dispositifs et de matériaux dans tout le domaine millimétrique (de 20 à 100 Ghz). Le projet HYRA a pour but le développement de matériaux à propriétés spécifiques - en particulier conducteurs - dans ce domaine de fréquence. Les résultats obtenus sur des composites thermoplastiques/polymères conducteurs sont présentés.

  20. Public health surveillance after the 2010 haiti earthquake: the experience of médecins sans frontières.

    PubMed

    Polonsky, Jonathan; Luquero, Francisco; Francois, Gwenola; Rousseau, Caroline; Caleo, Grazia; Ciglenecki, Iza; Delacre, Clara; Siddiqui, M Ruby; Terzian, Mego; Verhenne, Leen; Porten, Klaudia; Checchi, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    Background In January 2010, Haiti was struck by a powerful earthquake, killing and wounding hundreds of thousands and leaving millions homeless. In order to better understand the severity of the crisis, and to provide early warning of epidemics or deteriorations in the health status of the population, Médecins Sans Frontières established surveillance for infections of epidemic potential and for death rates and malnutrition prevalence. Methods Trends in infections of epidemic potential were detected through passive surveillance at health facilities serving as sentinel sites. Active community surveillance of death rates and malnutrition prevalence was established through weekly home visits. Results There were 102,054 consultations at the 15 reporting sites during the 26 week period of operation. Acute respiratory infections, acute watery diarrhoea and malaria/fever of unknown origin accounted for the majority of proportional morbidity among the diseases under surveillance. Several alerts were triggered through the detection of immediately notifiable diseases and increasing trends in some conditions. Crude and under-5 death rates, and acute malnutrition prevalence, were below emergency thresholds. Conclusion Disease surveillance after disasters should include an alert and response component, requiring investment of resources in informal networks that improve sensitivity to alerts as well as on the more common systems of data collection, compilation and analysis. Information sharing between partners is necessary to strengthen early warning systems. Community-based surveillance of mortality and malnutrition is feasible but requires careful implementation and validation. PMID:23330069