Science.gov

Sample records for al contrib mineral

  1. Lherzolitic versus harzburgitic garnet trends: sampling of extended depth versus extended composition. Reply to the comment by Ivanic et al. 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopylova, M.; Hill, P. J. A.; Russell, J. K.; Cookenboo, H.

    2016-02-01

    Using the Hill et al. (Contrib Mineral Petrol 169:13, 2015. doi: 10.1007/s00410-014-1102-7) modeling technique, we have tested the idea of Ivanic et al. (Contrib Mineral Petrol 164:505-520, 2012) that decompression and metamorphic re-equilibration of garnet with spinel causes garnet zoning perpendicular to the Cr-Ca harzburgitic trend in garnet composition. The modeling confirms that garnet zoning across the harzburgitic trend cannot form without spinel buffering. The harzburgitic trend is very rare because it results from extreme compositional heterogeneity of the mantle at the same depth. In contrast, the common lherzolitic trend requires less diversity in the bulk composition of the mantle, as it can be established with only a few samples of metamorphically re-equilibrated mantle peridotite deriving from a variety of depths.

  2. Thermal magnetic behaviour of Al-substituted haematite mixed with clay minerals and its geological significance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Zhaoxia; Liu, Qingsong; Zhao, Xiangyu; Jin, Chunsheng; Liu, Caicai; Li, Shihu

    2015-01-01

    Clay minerals and Al-substituted haematite (Al-hm) usually coexist in soils and sediments. However, effects of clay minerals on Al-hm during thermal magnetic measurements in argon environment have not been well studied. In order to quantify such effects, a series of Al-hm samples were synthesized, and were then mixed with clay minerals (illite, chlorite, kaolinite and Ca-montmorillonite). The temperature dependence of magnetic susceptibility curves in an argon environment showed that Al-substituted magnetite was produced during the thermal treatment via the reduction of Al-hm by the clay mineral, which leads to a significant magnetic enhancement of the thermal products. In addition, the reductive capacity varies among different types of clay minerals, that is, illite > chlorite > kaolinite > Ca-montmorillonite. Furthermore, the iron content in the clay minerals and Al content of Al-hm are two predominant factors controlling the reduced haematite content. The iron is released from the clay minerals and provides the reducing agent, while Al decreases the crystallinity of haematite and thus facilitates the chemical reaction. Therefore, the thermal magnetic measurements can be used to quantify the Al content of Al-hm in natural samples. Our study provides significant information for palaeomagnetism and environmental magnetism studies, such as thermal magnetic analysis and palaeomagnetic intensity reconstruction using ancient pottery and kilns.

  3. Discovery of New Al-Cu-Fe Minerals in the Khatyrka CV3 Meteorite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, C.; Lin, C.; Bindi, L.; Steinhardt, P. J.

    2016-08-01

    Our nanomineralogy investigation of Khatyrka has revealed two new alloy minerals (AlCu with a Pm-3m CsCl structure and Al3Fe with a C2/m structure) and associated icosahedrite (quasicrystal Al63Cu26Fe11 with a five-fold symmetry) in section 126A of USNM 7908.

  4. Cavitation pitting and erosion of Al 6061-T6 in mineral oil and water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, B. C. S.; Buckley, D. H.

    1983-01-01

    The authors are currently carrying out a study of the cavitation erosion of different bearing metals and alloys in mineral oils were studied. The variations of weight loss, the pit diameter and depth due to cavitation erosion on Al 6061-T6 in mineral oil and water are presented.

  5. Minerals

    MedlinePlus

    Minerals are important for your body to stay healthy. Your body uses minerals for many different jobs, including building bones, making ... regulating your heartbeat. There are two kinds of minerals: macrominerals and trace minerals. Macrominerals are minerals your ...

  6. The mineral resource potential of the Wadi al Jarir and Al Jurdhawiyah quadrangles, sheets 25/42C and 25/42D, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fenton, Michael D.

    1983-01-01

    Areas with potential for metallic mineral deposits in the Wadi al Jarir and Al Jurdhawiyah quadrangles, northeastern Arabian Shield, have been identified by reconnaissance rock geochemistry, inspection of ancient prospects, and interpretation of previous work. The ancient prospects of Abraq Shawfan, Abraq Shawfan South, Ad Du'ibi, Ad Du'ibi West, and Ad Dirabi are not recommended for further study. The Bald al Jimalah East ancient lead-silver mine should be drilled to investigate its mineral potential at depth and to.determine its apparent relationship to the nearby Baid al Jimalah West tungsten-tin prospect. High precious metal and copper contents confirmed at the Jarrar ancient prospect suggest additional study. Preliminary results of core and percussion drilling at the Bald al Jimalah West tungsten-tin prospect indicate that the mineralized rocks decrease in grade with depth and are not suitable for current economic exploitation. Geochemically anomalous areas in both plutonic and layered volcanic and clastic terrane are possible sites of significant base metal, molybdenum, tin, tungsten, and rare-earth element mineralization.

  7. Metallic-mineral assessment of the Aban Al Ahmar quadrangle, sheet 25F, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kamilli, Robert J.; Arnold, Mark A.; Cole, James C.; Kleinkopf, M. Dean; Lee, Keenan; Miller, William R.; Raines, Gary L.; ,; ,

    1990-01-01

    Comprehensive detailed interdisciplinary study assesses the metallic-mineral-resource potential in the Aban Al Ahmar Quadrangle of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, located in the eastern margin of the northeastern Arabian Shield, utilizing techniques of geophysics, geologic mapping, remote sensing and geochemistry. The landscape of the study area is characterized by isolated mountain groups, inselbergs, and local tracts of dissected hills separated by broad, low-relief peneplain. Topics covered include mining and exploration history; geological setting; interpretation of geophysical anomalies; limonitic hydrothermally altered and mineralized rocks; geochemical interpretation; mineral resource potential; skarn deposiits associated with intermediate igneous rocks; gold deposits; tin/tungsten skarn deposits; etc. 

  8. Formation of crystalline Zn-Al layered double hydroxide precipitates on γ-alumina: the role of mineral dissolution.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Livi, Kenneth J T; Xu, Wenqian; Siebecker, Matthew G; Wang, Yujun; Phillips, Brian L; Sparks, Donald L

    2012-11-01

    To better understand the sequestration of toxic metals such as nickel (Ni), zinc (Zn), and cobalt (Co) as layered double hydroxide (LDH) phases in soils, we systematically examined the presence of Al and the role of mineral dissolution during Zn sorption/precipitation on γ-Al(2)O(3) (γ-alumina) at pH 7.5 using extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (EXAFS), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM), synchrotron-radiation powder X-ray diffraction (SR-XRD), and (27)Al solid-state NMR. The EXAFS analysis indicates the formation of Zn-Al LDH precipitates at Zn concentration ≥0.4 mM, and both HR-TEM and SR-XRD reveal that these precipitates are crystalline. These precipitates yield a small shoulder at δ(Al-27) = +12.5 ppm in the (27)Al solid-state NMR spectra, consistent with the mixed octahedral Al/Zn chemical environment in typical Zn-Al LDHs. The NMR analysis provides direct evidence for the existence of Al in the precipitates and the migration from the dissolution of γ-alumina substrate. To further address this issue, we compared the Zn sorption mechanism on a series of Al (hydr)oxides with similar chemical composition but differing dissolubility using EXAFS and TEM. These results suggest that, under the same experimental conditions, Zn-Al LDH precipitates formed on γ-alumina and corundum but not on less soluble minerals such as bayerite, boehmite, and gibbsite, which point outs that substrate mineral surface dissolution plays an important role in the formation of Zn-Al LDH precipitates. PMID:23043294

  9. Sulfates, Ferric Oxides and Al-OH Bearing Minerals in Aram Chaos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masse, M.; Bourgeois, O.; Le Mouelic, S.; Le Deit, L.; Verpoorter, C.; Combe, J.; Sotin, C.; Bibring, J.; Gondet, B.; Langevin, Y.

    2008-12-01

    Aram Chaos is a 280 km wide Martian crater centered at 2.5N, 338.5E. This crater is filled by chaotic terrains, overlain by a presently dome-shaped layered, 900 m thick formation, displaying spectral signatures of ferric oxides and sulfates on TES and OMEGA data (Glotch et al. 2005, JGR 110, E09006). In a previous study (Masse et al. 2008, JGR in press), using OMEGA, MOLA, MOC, TES, THEMIS and CTX data, we proposed that the presently dome-shaped formation is composed of a bright material that contains both monohydrated sulfates and ferric oxides. After its emplacement, this formation has been grooved down to various depths by large aeolian erosion corridors. The borders of the corridors are steep linear cliffs where the bright, layered, sulfate-rich material crops out. These cliffs are also partially covered by dark debris fans, which originate from the bright formation itself and which feed dark sand sheets covering the lowest stratigraphic levels of the bright formation. We therefore infer that the dark ferric oxide sand sheets and debris fans are erosional products of the bright formation. We therefore infer that the dark ferric oxide sand sheets and debris fans are erosional products of the bright formation. Due to the relatively low spatial resolution of OMEGA, it is not possible to analyse the exact composition of the cliffs. The aim of the present work is to refine these results and to compare them with newly acquired, high resolution, hyperspectral data from the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM). CRISM data confirm the mineralogical conclusions made with OMEGA data. Moreover, CRISM data allow the detection of a new layer, containing an Al-OH bearing mineral, at the bottom of this dome-shaped formation.

  10. Modification of Ti6Al4V substrates with well-defined zwitterionic polysulfobetaine brushes for improved surface mineralization.

    PubMed

    Liu, Pingsheng; Domingue, Emily; Ayers, David C; Song, Jie

    2014-05-28

    Osteoconductive mineral coatings are beneficial for improving the osteointegration of metallic orthopedic/dental implants, but achieving adequate structural integration between the surface minerals and underlying metallic substrates has been a significant challenge. Here, we report covalent grafting of zwitterionic poly(sulfobetaine methacrylate) (pSBMA) brushes on the Ti6Al4V substrates to promote the surface-mineralization of hydroxyapatite with enhanced surface mineral coverage and mineral-substrate interfacial adhesion. We first optimized the atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) conditions for synthesizing pSBMA polymers in solution. Well-controlled pSBMA polymers (relative molecular weight up to 26 kD, PDI = 1.17) with high conversions were obtained when the ATRP was carried out in trifluoroethanol/ionic liquid system at 60 °C. Applying identical polymerization conditions, surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (SI-ATRP) was carried out to graft zwitterionic pSBMA brushes (PDI < 1.20) from the Ti6Al4V substrates, generating a stable superhydrophilic and low-fouling surface coating without compromising the bulk mechanic property of the Ti6Al4V substrates. The zwitterionic pSBMA surface brushes, capable of attracting both cationic and anionic precursor ions during calcium phosphate apatite mineralization, increased the surface mineral coverage from 32% to 71%, and significantly reinforced the attachment of the apatite crystals on the Ti6Al4V substrate. This facile approach to surface modification of metallic substrates can be exploited to generate multifunctional polymer coatings and improve the performance of metallic implants in skeletal tissue engineering and orthopedic and dental care. PMID:24828749

  11. Modification of Ti6Al4V Substrates with Well-defined Zwitterionic Polysulfobetaine Brushes for Improved Surface Mineralization

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Osteoconductive mineral coatings are beneficial for improving the osteointegration of metallic orthopedic/dental implants, but achieving adequate structural integration between the surface minerals and underlying metallic substrates has been a significant challenge. Here, we report covalent grafting of zwitterionic poly(sulfobetaine methacrylate) (pSBMA) brushes on the Ti6Al4V substrates to promote the surface-mineralization of hydroxyapatite with enhanced surface mineral coverage and mineral-substrate interfacial adhesion. We first optimized the atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) conditions for synthesizing pSBMA polymers in solution. Well-controlled pSBMA polymers (relative molecular weight up to 26kD, PDI = 1.17) with high conversions were obtained when the ATRP was carried out in trifluoroethanol/ionic liquid system at 60 °C. Applying identical polymerization conditions, surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (SI-ATRP) was carried out to graft zwitterionic pSBMA brushes (PDI < 1.20) from the Ti6Al4V substrates, generating a stable superhydrophilic and low-fouling surface coating without compromising the bulk mechanic property of the Ti6Al4V substrates. The zwitterionic pSBMA surface brushes, capable of attracting both cationic and anionic precursor ions during calcium phosphate apatite mineralization, increased the surface mineral coverage from 32% to 71%, and significantly reinforced the attachment of the apatite crystals on the Ti6Al4V substrate. This facile approach to surface modification of metallic substrates can be exploited to generate multifunctional polymer coatings and improve the performance of metallic implants in skeletal tissue engineering and orthopedic and dental care. PMID:24828749

  12. Mineral replacement reactions and element mobilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Putnis, Christine V.; Ruiz-Agudo, Encarnacion; King, Helen E.; Hövelmann, Jörn; Renard, François

    2016-04-01

    When a mineral is out of equilibrium with an aqueous fluid, reactions will take place in an attempt to reach a new equilibrium. Commonly in the Earth dissolution at a mineral-fluid interface initiates a coupled reaction involving dissolution and precipitation (Ruiz-Agudo et al., 2014). This is a ubiquitous reaction during such processes as metamorphism, metasomatism and weathering. When rock-forming minerals such as feldspars, olivine, pyroxenes are in contact with aqueous fluids (typically NaCl-rich) resultant new phases are formed and elements present in the parent mineral are released to the fluid and therefore mobilized for transport elsewhere. This has been shown in a number of systems such as the albitisation of feldspars (Hövelmann et al., 2010) when a Ca-bearing plagioclase is replaced by albite (NaAlSi3O8). However during this reaction not only is Ca released to the fluid but most other minor elements, such as Mg, Pb, rare earth elements amongst others, are almost totally mobilized and removed in solution. This interface-coupled dissolution-precipitation reaction has many implications for the redistributon of elements in the crust of the Earth. It is also of note that albitisation occurs often in areas of high mineralization, such as in the Curnamona Province in S. Australia (Au-Cu and Ag-Pb-Zn deposits) and the Bamble District of S. Norway. Secondly atomic force microscopy (AFM) has been used to image these reactions at a nanoscale, especially at the calcite-fluid interface, such as the formation of apatite from phosphate-bearing solutions, and the sequestration of toxic elements, eg., Se and As. References Ruiz-Agudo E., Putnis C.V., Putnis A. (2014) Coupled dissolution and precipitation at mineral-fluid interfaces. Chemical Geology, 383, 132-146. Putnis C.V. and Ruiz-Agudo E. (2013) The mineral-water interface: where minerals react with the environment. Elements, 9, 177-182. Hövelmann J., Putnis A., Geisler T., Schmidt B.C., Golla-Schindler U. (2009

  13. Distribution of Water in Nominally Anhydrous Minerals during Metamorphic Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Lankvelt, A.; Seaman, S. J.; Williams, M. L.

    2014-12-01

    Nominally anhydrous minerals are a reservoir for water in otherwise dry rocks. This water may play a role in facilitating metamorphic reactions and enhancing deformation. In this study, we examined orthopyroxene-bearing granites from the Athabasca Granulite terrane in northern Saskatchewan. These rocks intruded the lower crust (pressures of 1 GPa) at circa 2.6 Ga at temperatures of > 900 ºC and were subsequently metamorphosed at granulite facies conditions (700 ºC and 1 GPa) in the Paleoproterozoic (Williams et al., 2000). One of the primary reactions recorded by these rocks is locally known as the "Mary" reaction and involves the anhydrous reaction: orthopyroxene + Ca-plagioclase = clinopyroxene + garnet + Na-plagioclase. Measurements of water concentrations in both product and reactant assemblages were performed using a Bruker Vertex 70 Fourier transform infrared spectrometer and revealed that there is a slight excess of water in product minerals over reactant minerals. There are two possible explanations for this. The first is that water was derived from an external source, possibly hydrous, likely contemporaneous, mafic dikes. This interpretation is supported by higher concentrations of K, which is essentially absent from the reactant minerals, in the Na-rich rims of plagioclase. However, only modest amounts of external fluids could have been introduced, or amphiboles would have been stabilized at the expense of clinopyroxene (Moore & Carmichael, 1998). An alternative interpretation is that slightly more water-rich minerals reacted more readily, releasing water that was then incorporated into their products, whereas the water-poorer minerals failed to react. Support for this interpretation comes from very low water concentrations in orthopyroxene and plagioclase from an unreacted and undeformed sample. This interpretation suggests that water in anhydrous minerals may catalyze metamorphic reactions, and a lack of water may be critical for preserving metastable

  14. Mineral resource assessment of selected areas in Clark and Nye Counties, Nevada [Chapters A-L

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ludington, Steve

    2006-01-01

    During 2004-2006, the U.S. Geological Survey conducted a mineral resource assessment of selected areas administered by the Bureau of Land Management in Clark and Nye Counties, Nevada. The purpose of this study is to provide the BLM with information for land planning and management and, specifically, to determine mineral resource potential in accordance with regulations in 43 CFR 2310, which governs the withdrawal of public lands. The Clark County Conservation of Public Land and Natural Resources Act of 2002 (Public Law 107-282) temporarily withdraws a group of areas designated as Areas of Critical Environmental Concern (ACECs) from mineral entry, pending final approval of an application for permanent withdrawal by the BLM. This study provides information about mineral resource potential of the ACECs. Existing information was compiled about the ACECs, including geology, geophysics, geochemistry, and mineral-deposit information. Field examinations of selected areas and mineral occurrences were conducted to determine their geologic setting and mineral potential.

  15. Improved source assessment of Si, Al and related mineral components to PM10 based on a daily sampling procedure.

    PubMed

    Peng, Ge; Puxbaum, Hans; Bauer, Heidi; Jankowski, Nicole; Shi, Yao

    2010-01-01

    Samples obtained from an industrialized valley in the East Alpine region were collected daily for a half year and analyzed using X-ray fluorescence to examine the elements Si, Al, Fe, Ca, Mg, Na, K, Zn, P, S and Cl. Some factors affecting the changes of these elements were considered, including time, elemental correlations, weekday, weekend and seasonal changes. Diagnostic analysis provided an insight into a decoupling behavior that occursin siliceous and carbonates minerals. A decrease in Si and Al and an increase in carbonates, Na, K, Zn and P were observed during the cold season. However, a consistently high correlation of Si and Al was observed in all seasons. It was established that such high levels originated from street surface abrasion. The increase in variability and absolute levels of carbonates during the cold season was demonstrated by adding carbonates to the street surface as gritting material to increase the grip on snowy surfaces. A marked increase in Na and Cl was observed in winter which may have been caused by thaw salt that is widely used in winter in Austria. This was associated with a significant increase in K, Zn, and P in the cold season that was the result of domestic space heating with wood. PM10 levels in December were 12 microg/m3 and were higher than levels detected in July. It was established that such high levels originated from mineral oxides, wood smoke, and inorganic ionic material(s).

  16. Elasticity of Hydrous Aluminosilicate Mineral, Topaz-OH (Al2SiO4(OH)2) at High Pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hariharan, A.; Mookherjee, M.; Tsuchiya, J.

    2015-12-01

    We examined the equation of state and high-pressure elasticity of the hydrous aluminosilicate mineral topaz-OH (Al2SiO4(OH)2) using first principles simulation. Topaz-OH is a hydrous phase in the Al2O3-SiO2-H2O (ASH) ternary system, which is relevant for the mineral phase relations in the hydrated sedimentary layer of subducting slabs. Based on recent experiments, it is known that the protons in the topaz-OH exhibit positional disorder with half occupancy over two distinct crystallographic sites. In order to adequately depict the proton environment in the topaz-OH, we examined five crystal structure models with distinct configuration for the protons. Upon full geometry optimization, we find that there are two distinct crystal structures for the topaz-OH. The first crystal structure has an orthorhombic Pbnm space group symmetry, and the second crystal structure has a monoclinic P21/c space group symmetry. At static conditions, the monoclinic (P21/c) topaz-OH has lower energy compared to the orthorhombic (Pbnm) topaz-OH. The energy of the monoclinic (P21/c) topaz-OH remains stable at least up to 40 GPa, i.e., pressures beyond the thermodynamic stability of the topaz-OH. Based on the results from first principles simulation, the equation of state for the monoclinic topaz-OH is well represented by a third-order Birch-Murnaghan formulation, with V0 = 348.63 (±0.04) Å3, K0 = 164.7 (±0.04) GPa, and K'0 = 4.24 (±0.05). The equation of state for the orthorhombic topaz-OH is well represented by a third-order Birch-Murnaghan formulation, with V0 = 352.47 (±0.04) Å3, K0 = 166.4 (±0.06) GPa, and K'0 = 4.03 (±0.04). While the bulk modulus is very similar for both the monoclinic and orthorhombic topaz-OH, the shear elastic moduli are very sensitive to the position of the proton and the orientation of the hydroxyl (O-H) groups. In the hydrated sedimentary layer of a subducting slab, transformation of a mineral assemblage consisting of coesite (SiO2) and diaspore (AlOOH) to

  17. Pseudosinhalite: discovery of the hydrous MgAl-borate as a new mineral in the Tayozhnoye, Siberia, skarn deposit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreyer, W.; Pertsev, N. N.; Medenbach, O.; Burchard, M.; Dettmar, D.

    After its initial synthesis as the new compound Mg2Al3B2O9(OH) (Daniels et al. 1997) pseudosinhalite has now been discovered as a new mineral. It occurs, together with hydrotalcite, as a replacement product of sinhalite, MgAlBO4, in an impure marble of the contact metasomatic iron boron deposit of Tayozhnoye in the Aldan Shield of Siberia. Its chemical composition determined by electron microprobe is (wt%): Al2O3 46.88; MgO 25.12; FeO 1.99; B2O3 (calculated) 21.75; H2O (calculated) 2.81 giving a total of 98.55 and leading to the empirical formula (Mg2.00 Fe2+0.09)Σ=2.09 Al2.94 B2O9(OH). The small deviation from the ideal stoichiometry with (Mg+Fe2+):Al≠2:3 may be caused by either solid solution towards, or submicroscopic interlayering with lamellae of, the structurally similar mineral sinhalite. The underlying substitution involving also B and H would be (Mg+Fe)+B=Al+2H. Pseudosinhalite is monoclinic, space group P21/c, with a=7.49(1), b=4.33(1), c=9.85(2) Å β=110.7(1)° V=299(1) Å3 Z=2. Calculated density is 3.508g/cm3. Pseudosinhalite is colourless with white streak and has a vitreous lustre. It is transparent; no fluorescence was detected. There is no cleavage and parting; fractures are concoidal. Optical constants could not be measured properly due to polysynthetic microtwinning, but α<1.72<γ. For synthetic pseudosinhalite α=1.691(1) β=1.713(1) γ=1.730(1) Δ=0.039 2V=80°. The temperature of pseudosinhalite formation was below about 400°C at low pressures and with a hydrous, CO2-bearing fluid participating in the reaction.

  18. Simmonsite, Na2LiAlF6, a new mineral from the Zapot amazonite-topazzinnwaldite pegmatite, Hawthorne, Nevada, U.S.A

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Foord, E.E.; O'Connor, J. T.; Hughes, J.M.; Sutley, S.J.; Falster, A.U.; Soregaroli, A.E.; Lichte, F.E.; Kile, D.E.

    1999-01-01

    Simmonsite, Na2LiAlF6, a new mineral of pegmatitic-hydrothermal origin, occurs in a late-stage breccia pipe structure that cuts the Zapot amazonite-topaz-zinnvvaldite pegmatite located in the Gillis Range, Mineral Co., Nevada, U.S.A. The mineral is intimately intergrown with cryolite, cryolithionite and trace elpasolite. A secondary assemblage of other alumino-fluoride minerals and a second generation of cryolithionite has formed from the primary assemblage. The mineral is monoclinic, P21 or P21/m, a = 7.5006(6) A??, b = 7.474(1) A??, c = 7.503(1) A??, ??= 90.847(9) ??, V=420.6(1) A??3, Z = 4. The four strongest diffraction maxima [d(A??), likl, I/I100] are (4.33, 111 and 111, 100); (1.877, 400 and 004, 90); (2.25, 13T, 113, 131 and 311, 70); and (2.65, 220, 202, 022, 60). Simmonsite is pale buff cream with white streak, somewhat greasy, translucent to transparent, Mohs hardness of 2.5-3, no distinct cleavage, subconchoidal fracture, no parting, not extremely brittle, Dm is 3.05(2) g/cm3, and Dc is 3.06(1) g/cm3. The mineral is biaxial, very nearly Isotropie, N is 1.359(1) for ?? = 589 nm, and birefringence is 0.0009. Electron microprobe analyses gave (wt%) Na = 23.4, Al = 13.9, F = 58.6, Li = 3.56 (calculated), with a total of 99.46. The empirical formula (based on 6 F atoms) is Na1.98Li1.00 ooAl|ooF6. The crystal structure was not solved, presumably because of unit-cell scale twinning, but similarities to the perovskite-type structure exist. The mineral is named for William B. Simmons, Professor of Mineralogy and Petrology, University of New Orleans, New Orleans.

  19. Vibrational spectroscopic characterization of the sulphate mineral khademite Al(SO4)F·5(H2O).

    PubMed

    Frost, Ray L; Scholz, Ricardo; López, Andrés; Xi, Yunfei

    2013-12-01

    Vibrational spectroscopy has been used to characterize the sulphate mineral khademite Al(SO4)F·5(H2O). Raman band at 991 cm-1 with a shoulder at 975 cm-1 is assigned to the ν1 (SO4)2- symmetric stretching mode. The observation of two symmetric stretching modes suggests that the sulphate units are not equivalent. Two low intensity Raman bands at 1104 and 1132 cm-1 are assigned to the ν3 (SO4)2- antisymmetric stretching mode. The broad Raman band at 618 cm-1 is assigned to the ν4 (SO4)2- bending modes. Raman bands at 455, 505 and 534 cm-1 are attributable to the doubly degenerate ν2 (SO4)2- bending modes. Raman bands at 2991, 3146 and 3380 cm-1 are assigned to the OH stretching bands of water. Five infrared bands are noted at 2458, 2896, 3203, 3348 and 3489 cm-1 are also due to water stretching bands. The observation of multiple water stretching vibrations gives credence to the non-equivalence of water units in the khademite structure. Vibrational spectroscopy enables an assessment of the structure of khademite.

  20. A vibrational spectroscopic study of the silicate mineral analcime - Na2(Al4SiO4O12)·2H2O - A natural zeolite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frost, Ray L.; López, Andrés; Theiss, Frederick L.; Romano, Antônio Wilson; Scholz, Ricardo

    2014-12-01

    We have studied the mineral analcime using a combination of scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive spectroscopy and vibrational spectroscopy. The mineral analcime Na2(Al4SiO4O12)·2H2O is a crystalline sodium silicate. Chemical analysis shows the mineral contains a range of elements including Na, Al, Fe2+ and Si. The mineral is characterized by intense Raman bands observed at 1052, 1096 and 1125 cm-1. The infrared bands are broad; nevertheless bands may be resolved at 1006 and 1119 cm-1. These bands are assigned to SiO stretching vibrational modes. Intense Raman band at 484 cm-1 is attributed to OSiO bending modes. Raman bands observed at 2501, 3542, 3558 and 3600 cm-1 are assigned to the stretching vibrations of water. Low intensity infrared bands are noted at 3373, 3529 and 3608 cm-1. The observation of multiple water bands indicate that water is involved in the structure of analcime with differing hydrogen bond strengths. This concept is supported by the number of bands in the water bending region. Vibrational spectroscopy assists with the characterization of the mineral analcime.

  1. Arangasite, Al2(PO4)(SO4)F · 7.5H2O, a new mineral from the Alyaskitovy deposit, Eastern Yakutia, Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gamyanin, G. N.; Zayakina, N. V.; Galenchikova, L. T.

    2014-12-01

    A new hydrous aluminum sulfate-phosphate-fluoride arangasite, Al2(PO4)(SO4)F · 7.5H2O, has been found in cassiterite-silicate-sulfide ore at the Alyaskitovy deposit, Indigirka River basin, eastern Sakha (Yakutia) (64°39' N, 142°70' E). The new mineral was named after its type locality, Arangas Creek. It belongs to the secondary minerals of the oxidation zone and occurs in cavities within quartz-muscovite-tourmaline-sulfide veins and adjacent greisen. Arangasite is associated with other secondary minerals: phosphorscorodite, fluellite, gypsum, colquiriite, strengite, mansfieldite, and sinkankasite. Arangasite forms white compact segregations composed of fine-lamellar aggregates. This paper reports data on its chemical composition, optical, radiographic, thermal, and IR-spectroscopic characteristics.

  2. The molecular structure of the multianion mineral hidalgoite PbAl 3(AsO 4)(SO 4)(OH) 6 - Implications for arsenic removal from soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frost, Ray L.; Palmer, Sara J.; Xi, Yunfei

    2011-11-01

    The objective of this research is to determine the molecular structure of the mineral hidalgoite PbAl 3(AsO 4)(SO 4)(OH) 6 using vibrational spectroscopy. The mineral is found in old mine sites. Observed bands are assigned to the stretching and bending vibrations of (SO 4) 2- and (AsO 4) 3- units, stretching and bending vibrations of hydrogen bonded (OH) - ions and Al 3+-(O,OH) units. The approximate range of O-H⋯O hydrogen bond lengths is inferred from the Raman and infrared spectra. Values of 2.6989 Å, 2.7682 Å, 2.8659 Å were obtained. The formation of hidalgoite may offer a mechanism for the removal of arsenic from the environment.

  3. Raman spectroscopy of the multi-anion mineral schlossmacherite (H 3O,Ca)Al 3(AsO 4,PO 4,SO 4) 2(OH) 6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frost, Ray L.; Palmer, Sara J.; Xi, Yunfei

    2012-02-01

    The mineral schlossmacherite (H 3O,Ca)Al 3(AsO 4,PO 4,SO 4) 2(OH) 6, a multi-cation-multi-anion mineral of the beudantite mineral subgroup has been characterised by Raman spectroscopy. The mineral and related minerals functions as a heavy metal collector and is often amorphous or poorly crystalline, such that XRD identification is difficult. The Raman spectra are dominated by an intense band at 864 cm -1, assigned to the symmetric stretching mode of the AsO 43- anion. Raman bands at 809 and 819 cm -1 are assigned to the antisymmetric stretching mode of AsO 43-. The sulphate anion is characterised by bands at 1000 cm -1 ( ν1), and at 1031, 1082 and 1139 cm -1 ( ν3). Two sets of bands in the OH stretching region are observed: firstly between 2800 and 3000 cm -1 with bands observed at 2850, 2868, 2918 cm -1 and secondly between 3300 and 3600 with bands observed at 3363, 3382, 3410, 3449 and 3537 cm -1. These bands enabled the calculation of hydrogen bond distances and show a wide range of H-bond distances.

  4. Ab initio calculations of Li and B equilibrium isotope fractionation between high -P and -T minerals and aqueous fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowalski, P.; Jahn, S.; Wunder, B.

    2011-12-01

    : staurolite-fluid-mica-spodumene for Li [1] and fluid-tourmaline-B[4] micas for B [2], and reproduce the measured values within accuracy of the measurements and chosen ab initio method. In order to investigate the compression and expansion effects, which influence the fractionation process in high -T and -P materials in the proposed computational approach we treat solids and fluids as continuous media. This allows for modelling the variation of isotope fractionation with the coordination environment of the fractionating element and with pressure and temperature. Our approach is tested by obtaining a good agreement with recent high pressure (P=8GPa) measurements of Li isotopes for spodumene [3] and measurements of B isotopes in differently coordinated states in solids and fluids [2]. [1] Wunder B. et al. (2006) Contrib. Mineral. Petrol. 151, 112-120; Wunder B. et al. (2007) Chem. Geol. 238, 277-290. [2] Meyer et al. (2008) Contrib. Mineral. Petrol. 156, 259-267; Wunder et al. (2005) Lithos 84, 206-216 [3] Wunder, B., Meixner, A., Romer, R. L. and Jahn, S. (2011) Eur. Mineral., in press. DOI: 10.1127/0935-1221/2011/022-2095

  5. Comparison of bio-mineralization behavior of Ti-6Al-4V-1Nb and Zr-1Nb nano-tubes formed by anodization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Yong; Hong, Sun I.

    2014-12-01

    Nano-tubes of titanium and zirconium alloys like Ti-6Al-4V-1Nb and Zr-1Nb were prepared by anodization followed by coating with hydroxylapatite (HA) and their bio-mineralization behaviors were compared to develop a bio-compatible material for implants in orthopedics, dentistry and cardiology. Ti-6Al-4V-1Nb weight gain in a simulated body solution increased gradually. The bigger tube diameter was, the heavier HA was deposited. Surface roughness of both alloys increased highly with the increasing diameter of nano-tube. Their surface roughness decreased by HA deposition due to the removal of the empty space of the nano-tubes. Zr-1Nb alloy had faster growth of nano-tubes layers more than Ti-6Al-4V-1Nb alloy.

  6. A vibrational spectroscopic study of the phosphate mineral vantasselite Al4(PO4)3(OH)3·9H2O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frost, Ray L.; Scholz, Ricardo; Belotti, Fernanda Maria; López, Andrés; Theiss, Frederick L.

    2015-08-01

    We have studied the phosphate mineral vantasselite Al4(PO4)3(OH)3·9H2O using a combination of SEM with EDX and Raman and infrared spectroscopy. Qualitative chemical analysis shows Al, Fe and P. Raman bands at 1013 and 1027 cm-1 are assigned to the PO43- ν1 symmetric stretching mode. The observation of two bands suggests the non-equivalence of the phosphate units in the vantasselite structure. Raman bands at 1051, 1076 and 1090 cm-1 are attributed to the PO43- ν3 antisymmetric stretching vibration. A comparison is made with the spectroscopy of wardite. Strong infrared bands at 1044, 1078, 1092, 1112, 1133, 1180 and 1210 cm-1 are attributed to the PO43- ν3 antisymmetric stretching mode. Some of these bands may be due to δAl2OH deformation modes. Vibrational spectroscopy offers a mechanism for the study of the molecular structure of vantasselite.

  7. Interpreting Al-in Hornblende and Hbl-Plag thermobarometry results from the Tuolumne batholith and magmatic lobes in conjunction with single mineral element distribution electron microprobe maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Memeti, V.; Krause, J.; Anderson, J. L.; Paterson, S. R.

    2009-12-01

    Several recent thermobarometry studies have been conducted on the 95-85 Ma Tuolumne batholith, Sierra Nevada, CA, since Ague & Brimhall (1988) first reported ~2.5-3 kbar pressures and an emplacement depth of ~ 10 km from these sphene bearing granodioritic rocks. Average pressure estimates from more recent reports using the simultaneous solution of the plagioclase-amphibole thermometer by Holland & Blundy (1994), and the temperature corrected Al-in-hornblende barometer by Anderson & Smith (1995) are around 2 kbar, but vary in detail from 2 to 3 kbar. Further complications are revealed on temperature-pressure plots since some results fall below the granite and tonalite solidi and are thus subsolidus in nature. Many recent studies also indicate that single minerals in volcanic and plutonic rocks preserve complex magmatic growth histories, and in one sample or thin section can show heterogeneous mineral chemistries and multiple mineral populations, likely due to recycling and mixing processes occurring in large magma chambers. This implies that the pairing of minerals for thermobarometry calculations and thus the usage of these methods is complicated and requires the prior evaluation of the geochemistry of the individual minerals used for the analyses. We have done pressure and temperature estimates using the thermometer by Holland & Blundy (1994) and the Al-in-hornblende barometer by Anderson & Smith (1995) in conjunction with X-ray electron microprobe element distribution maps of the amphiboles and plagioclase grains used for the thermobarometry. With this approach, we attempt to better control the process of analyses pairing for the calculations since we establish a better awareness of the nature of individual mineral chemistry heterogeneities and the presence of multiple mineral populations. We selected a number of granodiorite samples from the peripheral magmatic lobes of the batholith, which have been determined to represent less complex and shorter lived, local

  8. Stimulatory effects of hydroxyl radical generation by Ga-Al-As laser irradiation on mineralization ability of human dental pulp cells.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Satoshi; Tsujimoto, Yasuhisa; Matsushima, Kiyoshi

    2007-01-01

    The present study was conducted to investigate the effects of Ga-Al-As laser irradiation on the mineralization ability of human dental pulp (HDP) cells. HDP cells in vitro were irradiated once with a Ga-AL-As laser at 0.5 W for 500 s and at 1.0 W for 500 s in order to investigate free radicals as one mechanism for transmission of laser photochemical energy to cells. Production of the hydroxyl radical (*OH) was measured using the ESR spin-trapping method and was found to be increased by laser irradiation. The DMPO-OH was not detected in the presence of dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), a *OH scavenger. The formation of calcification nodule was also investigated by von Kossa staining. The number of calcified nodules was increased by 1.0 W-laser irradiation. Alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity was higher in the 1.0 W-laser irradiation group. Expression of mRNAs for heat shock protein 27, bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) and ALP were greater in the 1.0 W-laser irradiation group. Expression of BMPs in the conditioned medium was also higher in the 1.0 W-laser irradiation group. In particular, DMSO decreased the number of calcified nodule produced by 1.0 W-laser irradiation. These results supposed that the mineralization of HDP cells is stimulated by laser irradiation, and that *OH generated by laser irradiation is a trigger for promotion of HDP cell mineralization.

  9. REE Mineralization in Kiruna-type Magnetite-Apatite Ore Deposits: Magmatism and Metasomatism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harlov, D. E.

    2015-12-01

    Magnetite-apatite ore bodies of the Kiruna type occur worldwide and are generally associated with volcanic rocks or volcanism. They also show strong evidence of extensive metasomatism over a wide P-T range. Notable examples include the Kiirunavaara ore body, northern Sweden (Harlov et al., 2002, Chem. Geol., 191, 47-72); the Grängesberg ore body, central Sweden (Jonsson et al., 2010, NGF abstracts, vol 1, 88-89); the Mineville ore body, Adirondacks, New York, USA (McKeown and Klemc, 1956, U.S. Geol Sur Bull (1956), pp. 9-23); the Pea Ridge ore body, SE Missouri, USA (Kerr, 1998, MS Thesis, Univ. Windsor, Windsor, Ontario, Canada 113 pp); the Jurassic Marcona ore body in south-central Peru (Chen et al., 2010, Econ Geol, 105, 1441-1456); and a collection of ore bodies from the Bafq Region, central Iran (Daliran et al., 2010, Geol. Assoc. Canada, Short Course Notes, v. 20, p.147-159). In these ore bodies, low Th and U monazite, xenotime, allanite, REE carbonates, and/or REE fluorides are commonly associated with the apatite as inclusions, rim grains, or as independent grains in the surrounding mineral matrix. High contrast BSE imaging, coupled with EMPA and LA-ICPMS, indicates that the apatite has experienced fluid-induced alteration in the form of (Y+REE) + Na + Si + Cl depletion implying that it served as the source for the (Y+REE) (e.g. Kiirunavaara, northern Sweden; Harlov et al., 2002). Formation of monazite and xenotime associated with fluorapatite, as inclusions or rim grains, has experimentally been demonstrated to originate from the fluorapatite as the result of fluid-aided, coupled dissolution-reprecipitation processes (Harlov et al., 2005, Contrib. Mineral. Petrol. 150, 268-286). This is explains the low Th and U content of the monazite and xenotime. Fluid sources could range from 700-900 °C, residual, acidic (HCl, H2HSO4) grain boundary fluids, remaining after the last stages of ore body crystallization, to later stage, cooler (< 600 °C) (H2O-CO2-(Na

  10. Using remote sensing techniques and field-based structural analysis to explore new gold and associated mineral sites around Al-Hajar mine, Asir terrane, Arabian Shield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonbul, Abdullah R.; El-Shafei, Mohamed K.; Bishta, Adel Z.

    2016-05-01

    Modern earth resource satellites provide huge amounts of digital imagery at different resolutions. These satellite imageries are considered one of the most significant sources of data for mineral exploration. Image processing techniques were applied to the exposed rocks around the Al-Aqiq area of the Asir terrane in the southern part of the Arabian Shield. The area under study has two sub-parallel N-S trending metamorphic belts of green-schist facies. The first belt is located southeast of Al-Aqiq, where the Al-Hajar Gold Mine is situated. It is essentially composed of metavolcanics and metasedimentary rocks, and it is intruded by different plutonic rocks of primarily diorite, syenite and porphyritic granite. The second belt is located northwest of Al-Aqiq, and it is composed of metavolcanics and metasedimentary rocks and is intruded by granite bodies. The current study aimed to distinguish the lithological units, detect and map the alteration zones, and extract the major fault lineaments around the Al-Hajar gold prospect. Digital satellite imageries, including Landsat 7 ETM + multispectral and panchromatic and SPOT-5 were used in addition to field verification. Areas with similar spectral signatures to the prospect were identified in the nearby metamorphic belt; it was considered as a target area and was inspected in the field. The relationships between the alteration zones, the mineral deposits and the structural elements were used to locate the ore-bearing zones in the subsurface. The metasedimentary units of the target area showed a dextral-ductile shearing top-to-the-north and the presence of dominant mineralized quartz vein-system. The area to the north of the Al-Hajar prospect showed also sub-parallel shear zones along which different types of alterations were detected. Field-based criteria such as hydrothermal breccia, jasper, iron gossans and porphyritic granite strongly indicate the presence of porphyry-type ore deposits in Al-Hajar metamorphic belt that

  11. Synthesis and crystal structure of the synthetic analogue of mineral minyulite K[Al 2F(H 2O) 4(PO 4) 2]. Structural correlations with AlPO 4-CJ2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumas, Eddy; Taulelle, Francis; Férey, Gérard

    2001-07-01

    The validation of our program of simulation for the prediction of unknown dehydrated structures needs accurate information of the mother hydrated structure at the starting point. This paper describes the synthesis (95°C, 10 days, autogenous pressure) and the structure (space group Pba2; a=9.3477(2), b=9.7571(1), c=5.5280(1) Å, V=503.91 Å 3, Z=2) of the synthetic homologue of two-dimensional mineral minyulite K[Al 2F(H 2O) 4(PO 4) 2]. The 27Al, 19F and 31P solid state NMR characteristics are reported, as well as the thermal decomposition which confirms the prediction of a collapse of the structure. Finally, structural correlations between minyulite and AlPO 4-CJ2 are given.

  12. Vibrational spectroscopic characterization of the phosphate mineral kulanite Ba(Fe2+,Mn2+,Mg)2(Al,Fe3+)2(PO4)3(OH)3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frost, Ray L.; López, Andrés; Xi, Yunfei; Granja, Amanda; Scholz, Ricardo

    2013-11-01

    The mineral kulanite BaFe2Al2(PO4)3(OH)3, a barium iron aluminum phosphate, has been studied by using a combination of electron microscopy and vibrational spectroscopy. Scanning electron microscopy with EDX shows the mineral is homogenous with no other phases present. The Raman spectrum is dominated by an intense band at 1022 cm-1 assigned to the PO43-ν1 symmetric stretching mode. Low intensity Raman bands at 1076, 1110, 1146, 1182 cm-1 are attributed to the PO43-ν3 antisymmetric stretching vibrations. The infrared spectrum shows a complex spectral profile with overlapping bands. Multiple phosphate bending vibrations supports the concept of a reduction in symmetry of the phosphate anion. Raman spectrum at 3211, 3513 and 3533 cm-1 are assigned to the stretching vibrations of the OH units. Vibrational spectroscopy enables aspects on the molecular structure of kulanite to be assessed.

  13. The molecular structure of the phosphate mineral senegalite Al2(PO4)(OH)3ṡ3H2O - A vibrational spectroscopic study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frost, Ray L.; López, Andrés; Xi, Yunfei; Murta, Natália; Scholz, Ricardo

    2013-09-01

    We have studied the mineral senagalite, a hydrated hydroxy phosphate of aluminium with formula Al2(PO4)(OH)3ṡ3H2O using a combination of electron microscopy and vibrational spectroscopy. Senegalite crystal aggregates shows tabular to prismatic habitus and orthorhombic form. The Raman spectrum is dominated by an intense band at 1029 cm-1 assigned to the PO43- ν1 symmetric stretching mode. Intense Raman bands are found at 1071 and 1154 cm-1 with bands of lesser intensity at 1110, 1179 and 1206 cm-1 and are attributed to the PO43- ν3 antisymmetric stretching vibrations. The infrared spectrum shows complexity with a series overlapping bands. A comparison is made with spectra of other aluminium containing phosphate minerals such as augelite and turquoise. Multiple bands are observed for the phosphate bending modes giving support for the reduction of symmetry of the phosphate anion. Vibrational spectroscopy offers a means for the assessment of the structure of senagalite.

  14. Raman spectroscopic study of the mineral qingheiite Na2(Mn2+,Mg,Fe2+)2(Al,Fe3+)(PO4)3, a pegmatite phosphate mineral from Santa Ana pegmatite, Argentina.

    PubMed

    Frost, Ray L; Xi, Yunfei; Scholz, Ricardo; López, Andrés; Moreira, Caio; de Lena, Jorge Carvalho

    2013-10-01

    The pegmatite mineral qingheiite Na2(Mn(2+),Mg,Fe(2+))2(Al,Fe(3+))(PO4)3 has been studied by a combination of SEM and EMP, Raman and infrared spectroscopy. The studied sample was collected from the Santa Ana pegmatite, Argentina. The mineral occurs as a primary mineral in lithium bearing pegmatite, in association with beausite and lithiophilite. The Raman spectrum is characterized by a very sharp intense Raman band at 980 cm(-1) assigned to the PO4(3-) symmetric stretching mode. Multiple Raman bands are observed in the PO4(3-) antisymmetric stretching region, providing evidence for the existence of more than one phosphate unit in the structure of qingheiite and evidence for the reduction in symmetry of the phosphate units. This concept is affirmed by the number of bands in the ν4 and ν2 bending regions. No intensity was observed in the OH stretching region in the Raman spectrum but significant intensity is found in the infrared spectrum. Infrared bands are observed at 2917, 3195, 3414 and 3498 cm(-1) are assigned to water stretching vibrations. It is suggested that some water is coordinating the metal cations in the structure of qingheiite.

  15. Raman spectroscopic study of the mineral qingheiite Na2(Mn2+,Mg,Fe2+)2(Al,Fe3+)(PO4)3, a pegmatite phosphate mineral from Santa Ana pegmatite, Argentina.

    PubMed

    Frost, Ray L; Xi, Yunfei; Scholz, Ricardo; López, Andrés; Moreira, Caio; de Lena, Jorge Carvalho

    2013-10-01

    The pegmatite mineral qingheiite Na2(Mn(2+),Mg,Fe(2+))2(Al,Fe(3+))(PO4)3 has been studied by a combination of SEM and EMP, Raman and infrared spectroscopy. The studied sample was collected from the Santa Ana pegmatite, Argentina. The mineral occurs as a primary mineral in lithium bearing pegmatite, in association with beausite and lithiophilite. The Raman spectrum is characterized by a very sharp intense Raman band at 980 cm(-1) assigned to the PO4(3-) symmetric stretching mode. Multiple Raman bands are observed in the PO4(3-) antisymmetric stretching region, providing evidence for the existence of more than one phosphate unit in the structure of qingheiite and evidence for the reduction in symmetry of the phosphate units. This concept is affirmed by the number of bands in the ν4 and ν2 bending regions. No intensity was observed in the OH stretching region in the Raman spectrum but significant intensity is found in the infrared spectrum. Infrared bands are observed at 2917, 3195, 3414 and 3498 cm(-1) are assigned to water stretching vibrations. It is suggested that some water is coordinating the metal cations in the structure of qingheiite. PMID:23792288

  16. A vibrational spectroscopic study of the mixed anion mineral sanjuanite Al 2(PO 4)(SO 4)(OH)·9H 2O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frost, Ray L.; Palmer, Sara J.

    2011-09-01

    The mineral sanjuanite Al 2(PO 4)(SO 4)(OH)·9H 2O has been characterised by Raman spectroscopy complimented by infrared spectroscopy. The mineral is characterised by an intense Raman band at 984 cm -1, assigned to the (PO 4) 3- ν 1 symmetric stretching mode. A shoulder band at 1037 cm -1 is attributed to the (SO 4) 2- ν 1 symmetric stretching mode. Two Raman bands observed at 1102 and 1148 cm -1 are assigned to (PO 4) 3- and (SO 4) 2- ν 3 antisymmetric stretching modes. Multiple bands provide evidence for the reduction in symmetry of both anions. This concept is supported by the multiple sulphate and phosphate bending modes. Raman spectroscopy shows that there are more than one non-equivalent water molecules in the sanjuanite structure. There is evidence that structural disorder exists, shown by the complex set of overlapping bands in the Raman and infrared spectra. At least two types of water are identified with different hydrogen bond strengths. The involvement of water in the sanjuanite structure is essential for the mineral stability.

  17. Ferroindialite (Fe2+,Mg)2Al4Si5O18, a new beryl-group mineral from the Eifel volcanic region, Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chukanov, N. V.; Aksenov, S. M.; Pekov, I. V.; Ternes, B.; Schüller, W.; Belakovskiy, D. I.; Van, K. V.; Blass, G.

    2014-12-01

    A new mineral, ferroindialite, a Fe2+-dominant analog of indialite, has been found in a pyrometamorphosed xenolith of pelitic rock hosted in alkaline basalts. Associated minerals are phlogopite, sanidine, sillimanite, pyroxenes of the enstatite-ferrosilite series, wagnerite, fluorapatite, tridymite, zircon and almandine. Ferroindialite forms brown-purple to gray with a violet-blue tint short prismatic or thick tabular hexagonal crystals up to 1.5 mm in size. The new mineral is brittle, with a Mohs' hardness of 7. Cleavage is not observed. D meas = 2.66(1), D calc = 2.667 g/cm3. IR spectrum shows neither H2O nor OH groups. Ferroindialite is anomalously biaxial (-), α = 1.539(2), β = 1.552(2), γ = 1.554(2), 2 V meas = 30(10)°. The mineral is weakly pleochroic, ranging from colorless on X to pale violet on Z. Dispersion is weak, r < v. The chemical composition (electron microprobe, mean of five point analyses, wt %) is as follows: 0.14 Na2O, 0.46 K2O, 4.95 MgO, 1.13 MnO, 12.66 FeO, 2.64 Fe2O3, 30.45 Al2O3, 47.22 SiO2, total is 99.65. The distribution of total iron content between Fe2+ and Fe3+ was carried out according to structural data. The empirical formula of ferroindialite is: (K0.06Na0.03)(Fe{1.12/2+}Mg0.78Mn0.10)Σ2.00(Al3.79Fe{0.21/3+})Σ4.00Si4.98O18. The simplified formula is: (Fe2+,Mg)2Al4Si5O18. The crystal structure has been refined on a single crystal, R = 0.049. Ferroindialite is hexagonal, space group P6/ mcc; a = 9.8759(3), c = 9.3102(3) Å, V = 786.40(3) Å3, Z = 2. The strongest lines in the X-ray powder diffraction pattern [ d, Å ( I, %) ( hkl)] are: 8.59 (100) (100), 4.094 (27) (102), 3.390 (35) (112), 3.147 (19) (202), 3.055 (31) (211), 2.657 (12) (212), 1.695 (9) (224). The type specimen of ferroindialite is deposited in the Fersman Mineralogical Museum, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow, registration number 4400/1.

  18. Vibrational spectroscopic study of the copper silicate mineral ajoite (K,Na)Cu7AlSi9O24(OH)6·3H2O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frost, Ray L.; Xi, Yunfei

    2012-06-01

    Ajoite (K,Na)Cu7AlSi9O24(OH)6·3H2O is a mineral named after the Ajo district of Arizona. Raman and infrared spectroscopy were used to characterise the molecular structure of ajoite. The structure of the mineral shows disorder which is reflected in the difficulty of obtaining quality Raman spectra. The Raman spectrum is characterised by a broad spectral profile with a band at 1048 cm-1 assigned to the ν1 (A1g) symmetric stretching vibration. Strong bands at 962, 1015 and 1139 cm-1 are assigned to the ν3 SiO4 antisymmetric stretching vibrations. Multiple ν4 SiO4 vibrational modes indicate strong distortion of the SiO4 tetrahedra. Multiple AlO and CuO stretching bands are observed. Raman spectroscopy and confirmed by infrared spectroscopy clearly shows that hydroxyl units are involved in the ajoite structure. Based upon the infrared spectra, water is involved in the ajoite structure, probably as zeolitic water.

  19. Molecular structure of the phosphate mineral brazilianite NaAl3(PO4)2(OH)4 - A semi precious jewel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frost, Ray L.; Xi, Yunfei

    2012-02-01

    The phosphate mineral brazilianite NaAl3(PO4)2(OH)4 is a semi precious jewel. There are almost no minerals apart from brazilianite which are used in jewellery. Vibrational spectroscopy was used to characterise the molecular structure of brazilianite. Brazilianite is composed of chains of edge-sharing Al-O octahedra linked by P-O tetrahedra, with Na located in cavities of the framework. An intense sharp Raman band at 1019 cm-1 is attributed to the PO43- symmetric stretching mode. Raman bands at 973 and 988 cm-1 are assigned to the stretching vibrations of the HOPO33- units. The infrared spectra compliment the Raman spectra but show greater complexity. Multiple Raman bands are observed in the PO43- and HOPO33- bending region. This observation implies that both phosphate and hydrogen phosphate units are involved in the structure. Raman OH stretching vibrations are found at 3249, 3417 and 3472 cm-1. These peaks show that the OH units are not equivalent in the brazilianite structure. Vibrational spectroscopy is useful for increasing the knowledge of the molecular structure of brazilianite.

  20. The Structures of Two Hole Centers in the Mineral Brasilianite NaAl3(PO4)2(OH)4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landrath, K. D.; Lehmann, G.

    1987-06-01

    Two hole centers were detected in natural brazilianite by EPR at X-band and temperatures between 20 and 300 K. For the more intense center a hyperfine splitting (hfs) due to two nonequivalent Al nuclei could be completely analyzed by comparison of the hfs patterns with simulations for 1 ≦ A1/A2 ≦1.4. The orientation of the principle axes of these hfs tensors allowed to assign this hole to a specific oxygen in the lattice. The phosphorus bound to it is evidently exchanged against a lower valency cation, most likely Si4+ . In the second center a hfs splitting due to one Al and one P nucleus was identified. Although a complete analysis of their hfs tensors was not possible, this center could also be assigned to a particular oxygen for which evidently one adjacent Al is exchanged against a divalent ion.

  1. A Firmly Localized Hole Center in the Mineral Brazilianite NaAl3(PO4)2(OH)4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Requardt, A.; Hill, F.; Lehmann, G.

    1982-03-01

    A hole center on an oxygen adjacent to one aluminum and one phosphorous was detected and analyzed in natural and X-ray irradiated brazilianite. The slightly anisotropic 27 Al shfs splitting is larger than in many other hole centers in which the Al is a lower valency impurity ion with only a coordinative bond to an oxygen lone pair. The hole is trapped at an oxygen with particularly long bond distances to one P and two Al. Thus one structural Al must be substituted by a presumably divalent cation of yet unknown nature. No optical absorption is associated with this center, therefore the large distortion of the coordination polyhedra must be responsible for absence of a light-induced hole transfer between different oxygen ions. Comparison with other systems suggests that the energy differences for other configurations of the hole center are also too high to allow thermal hopping of the hole at or below room temperature. Possible mechanisms for formation and destruction of this center are deduced from experimental results.

  2. Clay Minerals

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, Karl T.; Sanders, Rebecca L.; Washton, Nancy M.

    2014-03-14

    Clay minerals are important components of the environment and are involved or implicated in processes such as the uptake of pollutants and the release of nutrients and as potential platforms for a number of chemical reactions. Owing to their small particle sizes (typically, on the order of microns or smaller) and mixing with a variety of other minerals and soil components, advanced characterization methods are needed to study their structures, dynamics, and reactivities. In this article, we describe the use of solid-state NMR methods to characterize the structures and chemistries of clay minerals. Early one-pulse magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR studies of 27Al and 29Si have now been enhanced and extended with new studies utilizing advanced methodologies (such as Multiple Quantum MAS) as well as studies of less-sensitive nuclei. In additional work, the issue of reactivity of clay minerals has been addressed, including studies of reactive surface area in the environment. Utilizations of NMR-sensitive nuclides within the clay minerals themselves, and in molecules that react with specific sites on the clay mineral surfaces, have aided in understanding the reactivity of these complex aluminosilicate systems.

  3. A vibrational spectroscopic study of the phosphate mineral whiteite CaMn(++)Mg2Al2(PO4)4(OH)2·8(H2O).

    PubMed

    Frost, Ray L; Scholz, Ricardo; López, Andrés; Xi, Yunfei

    2014-04-24

    Vibrational spectroscopy enables subtle details of the molecular structure of whiteite to be determined. Single crystals of a pure phase from a Brazilian pegmatite were used. The infrared and Raman spectroscopy were applied to compare the molecular structure of whiteite with that of other phosphate minerals. The Raman spectrum of whiteite shows an intense band at 972 cm(-1) assigned to the ν1PO4(3-) symmetric stretching vibrations. The low intensity Raman bands at 1076 and 1173 cm(-1) are assigned to the ν3PO4(3-) antisymmetric stretching modes. The Raman bands at 1266, 1334 and 1368 cm(-1) are assigned to AlOH deformation modes. The infrared band at 967 cm(-1) is ascribed to the PO4(3-)ν1 symmetric stretching vibrational mode. The infrared bands at 1024, 1072, 1089 and 1126 cm(-1) are attributed to the PO4(3-)ν3 antisymmetric stretching vibrations. Raman bands at 553, 571 and 586 cm(-1) are assigned to the ν4 out of plane bending modes of the PO4(3-) unit. Raman bands at 432, 457, 479 and 500 cm(-1) are attributed to the ν2 PO4 and H2PO4 bending modes. In the 2600 to 3800 cm(-1) spectral range, Raman bands for whiteite are found 3426, 3496 and 3552 cm(-1) are assigned to AlOH stretching vibrations. Broad infrared bands are also found at 3186 cm(-1). Raman bands at 2939 and 3220 cm(-1) are assigned to water stretching vibrations. Raman spectroscopy complimented with infrared spectroscopy has enabled aspects of the structure of whiteite to be ascertained and compared with that of other phosphate minerals.

  4. A vibrational spectroscopic study of the phosphate mineral lulzacite Sr2Fe2+(Fe2+,Mg)2Al4(PO4)4(OH)10

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frost, Ray L.; López, Andrés; Belotti, Fernanda M.; Xi, Yunfei; Scholz, Ricardo

    2014-06-01

    The mineral lulzacite from Saint-Aubin des Chateaux mine, France, with theoretical formula Sr2Fe2+(Fe2+,Mg)2Al4(PO4)4(OH)10 has been studied using a combination of electron microscopy with EDX and vibrational spectroscopic techniques. Chemical analysis shows a Sr, Fe, Al phosphate with minor amounts of Ga, Ba and Mg. Raman spectroscopy identifies an intense band at 990 cm-1 with an additional band at 1011 cm-1. These bands are attributed to the PO43-ν1 symmetric stretching mode. The ν3 antisymmetric stretching modes are observed by a large number of Raman bands. The Raman bands at 1034, 1051, 1058, 1069 and 1084 together with the Raman bands at 1098, 1116, 1133, 1155 and 1174 cm-1 are assigned to the ν3 antisymmetric stretching vibrations of PO43- and the HOPO32- units. The observation of these multiple Raman bands in the symmetric and antisymmetric stretching region gives credence to the concept that both phosphate and hydrogen phosphate units exist in the structure of lulzacite. The series of Raman bands at 567, 582, 601, 644, 661, 673 and 687 cm-1 are assigned to the PO43-ν2 bending modes. The series of Raman bands at 437, 468, 478, 491, 503 cm-1 are attributed to the PO43- and HOPO32-ν4 bending modes. No Raman bands of lulzacite which could be attributed to the hydroxyl stretching unit were observed. Infrared bands at 3511 and 3359 cm-1 are ascribed to the OH stretching vibration of the OH units. Very broad bands at 3022 and 3299 cm-1 are attributed to the OH stretching vibrations of water. Vibrational spectroscopy offers insights into the molecular structure of the phosphate mineral lulzacite.

  5. A vibrational spectroscopic study of the phosphate mineral whiteite CaMn(++)Mg2Al2(PO4)4(OH)2·8(H2O).

    PubMed

    Frost, Ray L; Scholz, Ricardo; López, Andrés; Xi, Yunfei

    2014-04-24

    Vibrational spectroscopy enables subtle details of the molecular structure of whiteite to be determined. Single crystals of a pure phase from a Brazilian pegmatite were used. The infrared and Raman spectroscopy were applied to compare the molecular structure of whiteite with that of other phosphate minerals. The Raman spectrum of whiteite shows an intense band at 972 cm(-1) assigned to the ν1PO4(3-) symmetric stretching vibrations. The low intensity Raman bands at 1076 and 1173 cm(-1) are assigned to the ν3PO4(3-) antisymmetric stretching modes. The Raman bands at 1266, 1334 and 1368 cm(-1) are assigned to AlOH deformation modes. The infrared band at 967 cm(-1) is ascribed to the PO4(3-)ν1 symmetric stretching vibrational mode. The infrared bands at 1024, 1072, 1089 and 1126 cm(-1) are attributed to the PO4(3-)ν3 antisymmetric stretching vibrations. Raman bands at 553, 571 and 586 cm(-1) are assigned to the ν4 out of plane bending modes of the PO4(3-) unit. Raman bands at 432, 457, 479 and 500 cm(-1) are attributed to the ν2 PO4 and H2PO4 bending modes. In the 2600 to 3800 cm(-1) spectral range, Raman bands for whiteite are found 3426, 3496 and 3552 cm(-1) are assigned to AlOH stretching vibrations. Broad infrared bands are also found at 3186 cm(-1). Raman bands at 2939 and 3220 cm(-1) are assigned to water stretching vibrations. Raman spectroscopy complimented with infrared spectroscopy has enabled aspects of the structure of whiteite to be ascertained and compared with that of other phosphate minerals. PMID:24491665

  6. Raman and infrared spectroscopic characterization of the phosphate mineral paravauxite Fe2+Al2(PO4)2(OH)2ṡ8H2O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frost, Ray L.; Scholz, Ricardo; Lópes, Andrés; Xi, Yunfei; Gobac, Željka Žigovečki; Horta, Laura Frota Campos

    2013-12-01

    We have undertaken a vibrational spectroscopic study of paravauxite the Siglo XX mine, Bustillo Province, northern of Potosí department, Bolivia. This mine is important source for rare and unusual secondary phosphate minerals and is the type locality for a number of rare phosphates such as vauxite, sigloite, metavauxite and for jeanbandyite. The chemical formula of the studied sample was determined as Fe0.952+,(Al0.07)Σ1.02(Al)2.09(PO4)1.97(OH)1.98·7.90(H2O). The Raman spectrum is dominated by an intense Raman band at 1020 cm-1 assigned to the PO43-ν1 symmetric stretching mode. Low intensity Raman bands found at 1058, 1115 and 1148 cm-1 are assigned to the PO43-ν3 antisymmetric stretching vibrations. Raman bands of paravauxite at 537, 570, 609 and 643 cm-1 are assigned to the ν4PO43- bending modes whilst the Raman bands at 393 and 420 cm-1 are due to the ν2PO43- bending modes. The Raman spectral profile of paravauxite in the hydroxyl stretching region is broad with component bands resolved at 3086, 3215, 3315, 3421, 3505 and 3648 cm-1. Vibrational spectroscopy enables the assessment of the molecular structure of paravauxite to be undertaken.

  7. The use of CCD area detectors in charge-density research. Application to a mineral compound: the alpha-spodumene LiAl(SiO3)2.

    PubMed

    Kuntzinger; Dahaoui; Ghermani; Lecomte; Howard

    1999-12-01

    X-ray diffraction data sets collected on both Nonius and Siemens (Bruker) goniometers equipped with charge-coupled device (CCD) area detectors have been tested for the electron-density determination of the aluminosilicate mineral compound alpha-spodumene LiAl(SiO(3))(2), aluminium lithium silicon oxide. Data collection strategies, reflection intensity peak integration methods and experimental error estimates are different for the two instruments. Therefore, the consistency and quality of the two types of CCD measurements have been carefully compared to each other and to high-resolution data collected on a conventional CAD-4 point-detector diffractometer. Multipole density model refinements were carried out against the CCD data and the statistical factors analysed in terms of experimental weighting schemes based on the standard uncertainties of the diffraction intensities derived by the Nonius and Siemens software programs. Consistent experimental electron-density features in the Si-O-Si and Si-O-Al bridges were found from both CCD data sets. The net atomic charges obtained from the kappa refinements against each CCD data set are also in good agreement and quite comparable with the results of the conventional CAD-4 experiment.

  8. Nevadaite, (Cu2+, Al, V3+)6 [Al8 (PO4)8 F8] (OH 2 (H2O)22, a new phosphate mineral species from the Gold Quarry mine, Carlin, Eureka County, Nevada: description and crystal structure

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cooper, M.A.; Hawthorne, F.C.; Roberts, Andrew C.; Foord, E.E.; Erd, Richard C.; Evans, H.T.; Jensen, M.C.

    2004-01-01

    Nevadaite, (Cu2+, ???, Al, V3+)6 (PO4)8 F8 (OH)2 (H2O)22, is a new supergene mineral species from the Gold Quarry mine, near Carlin, Eureka County, Nevada, U.S.A. Nevadaite forms radiating clusters to 1 mm of prismatic crystals, locally covering surfaces more that 2 cm across; individual crystals are elongate on [001] with a length:width ratio of > 10:1 and a maximum diameter of ???30 ??m. It also occurs as spherules and druses associated with colorless to purple-black fluellite, colorless wavellite, strengitevariscite, acicular maroon-to-red hewettite, and rare anatase, kazakhstanite, tinticite, leucophosphite, torbernite and tyuyamunite. Nevadaite is pale green to turquoise blue with a pale powder-blue streak and a vitreous luster; it does not fluoresce under ultra-violet light. It has no cleavage, a Mohs hardness of ???3, is brittle with a conchoidal fracture, and has measured and calculated densities of 2.54 and 2.55 g/cm3, respectively. Nevadaite is biaxial negative, with ?? 1.540, ?? 1.548, ?? 1.553, 2V(obs.) = 76??, 2V(calc.) = 76??, pleochroic with X pale greenish blue, Y very pale greenish blue, Z blue, and with absorption Z ??? X > Y and orientation X = c, Y = a, Z = b. Nevadaite is orthorhombic, space group P21mn, a 12.123(2), b 18.999(2), c 4.961(1) A?? , V 1142.8(2) A??3, Z = 1, a:b:c = 0.6391:1:0.2611. The strongest seven lines in the X-ray powder-diffraction pattern [d in A??(I)(hkl)] are: 6.077(10)(200), 5.618(9)(130), 9.535(8)(020), 2.983(6)(241), 3.430(4)(041), 2.661(4)(061 , and 1.844(4)(352). A chemical analysis with an electron microprobe gave P2O5 32.54, Al2O3 27.07, V2O3 4.24, Fe2O3 0.07, CuO 9.24, ZnO 0.11, F 9.22, H2O (calc.) 23.48, OH ??? F -3.88, sum 102.09 wt.%; the valence states of V and Fe, and the amount of H2O, were determined by crystal-structure analysis. The resulting empirical formula on the basis of 63.65 anions (including 21.65 H2O pfu) is (CU2+2.00 Zn0.02 V3+0.98 Fe3+0.01 Al1.15)??4.16 Al8 P7.90 O32 [F8.37 (OH 1.63]??10 (H2O

  9. Raman spectroscopic study of the hydroxy-phosphate mineral plumbogummite PbAl3(PO4)2(OH,H2O)6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frost, Ray L.; Palmer, Sara J.; Xi, Yunfei; Čejka, Jiří; Sejkora, Jiří; Plášil, Jakub

    2013-02-01

    Plumbogummite PbAl3(PO4)2(OH,H2O)6 is a mineral of environmental significance and is a member of the alunite-jarosite supergroup. The molecular structure of the mineral has been investigated by Raman spectroscopy. The spectra of different plumbogummite specimens differ although there are many common features. The Raman spectra prove the spectral profile consisting of overlapping bands and shoulders. Raman bands and shoulders observed at 971, 980, 1002 and 1023 cm-1 (China sample) and 913, 981, 996 and 1026 cm-1 (Czech sample) are assigned to the ν1 symmetric stretching modes of the (PO4)3-, at 1002 and 1023 cm-1 (China) and 996 and 1026 cm-1 to the ν1 symmetric stretching vibrations of the (O3POH)2- units, and those at 1057, 1106 and 1182 (China) and at 1102, 1104 and 1179 cm-1 (Czech) to the ν3 (PO4)3- and ν3 (PO3) antisymmetric stretching vibrations. Raman bands and shoulders at 634, 613 and 579 cm-1 (China) and 611 and 596 cm-1 (Czech) are attributed to the ν4 (δ) (PO4)3- bending vibrations and those at 507, 494 and 464 cm-1 (China) and 505 and 464 cm-1 (Czech) to the ν2 (δ) (PO4)3- bending vibrations. The Raman spectrum of the OH stretching region is complex. Raman bands and shoulders are identified at 2824, 3121, 3249, 3372, 3479 and 3602 cm-1 for plumbogummite from China, and at 3077, 3227, 3362, 3480, 3518 and 3601 cm-1 for the Czech Republic sample. These bands are assigned to the ν OH stretching modes of water molecules and hydrogen ions. Approximate O-H⋯O hydrogen bond lengths inferred from the Raman spectra vary in the range >3.2-2.62 Å (China) and >3.2-2.67 Å (Czech). The minority presence of some carbonate ions in the plumbogummite (China sample) is connected with distinctive intensity increasing of the Raman band at 1106 cm-1, in which may participate the ν1 (CO3)2- symmetric stretching vibration overlapped with phosphate stretching vibrations.

  10. Vibrational spectroscopy of the phosphate mineral lazulite--(Mg, Fe)Al2(PO4)2·(OH)2 found in the Minas Gerais, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Frost, Ray L; Xi, Yunfei; Beganovic, Martina; Belotti, Fernanda Maria; Scholz, Ricardo

    2013-04-15

    This research was done on lazulite samples from the Gentil mine, a lithium bearing pegmatite located in the municipality of Mendes Pimentel, Minas Gerais, Brazil. Chemical analysis was carried out by electron microprobe analysis and indicated a magnesium rich phase with partial substitution of iron. Traces of Ca and Mn, (which partially replaced Mg) were found. The calculated chemical formula of the studied sample is: (Mg0.88, Fe0.11)Al1.87(PO4)2.08(OH)2.02. The Raman spectrum of lazulite is dominated by an intense sharp band at 1060 cm(-1) assigned to PO stretching vibrations of of tetrahedral [PO4] clusters presents into the HPO4(2-) units. Two Raman bands at 1102 and 1137 cm(-1) are attributed to both the HOP and PO antisymmetric stretching vibrations. The two infrared bands at 997 and 1007 cm(-1) are attributed to the ν1PO4(3-) symmetric stretching modes. The intense bands at 1035, 1054, 1081, 1118 and 1154 cm(-1) are assigned to the ν3PO4(3-) antisymmetric stretching modes from both the HOP and tetrahedral [PO4] clusters. A set of Raman bands at 605, 613, 633 and 648 cm(-1) are assigned to the ν4 out of plane bending modes of the PO4, HPO4 and H2PO4 units. Raman bands observed at 414, 425, 460, and 479 cm(-1) are attributed to the ν2 tetrahedral PO4 clusters, HPO4 and H2PO4 bending modes. The intense Raman band at 3402 and the infrared band at 3403 cm(-1) are assigned to the stretching vibration of the OH units. A combination of Raman and infrared spectroscopy enabled aspects of the molecular structure of the mineral lazulite to be understood.

  11. Vibrational spectroscopy of the phosphate mineral lazulite - (Mg, Fe)Al2(PO4)2·(OH)2 found in the Minas Gerais, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frost, Ray L.; Xi, Yunfei; Beganovic, Martina; Belotti, Fernanda Maria; Scholz, Ricardo

    2013-04-01

    This research was done on lazulite samples from the Gentil mine, a lithium bearing pegmatite located in the municipality of Mendes Pimentel, Minas Gerais, Brazil. Chemical analysis was carried out by electron microprobe analysis and indicated a magnesium rich phase with partial substitution of iron. Traces of Ca and Mn, (which partially replaced Mg) were found. The calculated chemical formula of the studied sample is: (Mg0.88, Fe0.11)Al1.87(PO4)2.08(OH)2.02. The Raman spectrum of lazulite is dominated by an intense sharp band at 1060 cm-1 assigned to PO stretching vibrations of of tetrahedral [PO4] clusters presents into the HPO42- units. Two Raman bands at 1102 and 1137 cm-1 are attributed to both the HOP and PO antisymmetric stretching vibrations. The two infrared bands at 997 and 1007 cm-1 are attributed to the ν1PO43- symmetric stretching modes. The intense bands at 1035, 1054, 1081, 1118 and 1154 cm-1 are assigned to the ν3PO43- antisymmetric stretching modes from both the HOP and tetrahedral [PO4] clusters. A set of Raman bands at 605, 613, 633 and 648 cm-1 are assigned to the ν4 out of plane bending modes of the PO4, HPO4 and H2PO4 units. Raman bands observed at 414, 425, 460, and 479 cm-1 are attributed to the ν2 tetrahedral PO4 clusters, HPO4 and H2PO4 bending modes. The intense Raman band at 3402 and the infrared band at 3403 cm-1 are assigned to the stretching vibration of the OH units. A combination of Raman and infrared spectroscopy enabled aspects of the molecular structure of the mineral lazulite to be understood.

  12. Vibrational spectroscopy of the phosphate mineral lazulite--(Mg, Fe)Al2(PO4)2·(OH)2 found in the Minas Gerais, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Frost, Ray L; Xi, Yunfei; Beganovic, Martina; Belotti, Fernanda Maria; Scholz, Ricardo

    2013-04-15

    This research was done on lazulite samples from the Gentil mine, a lithium bearing pegmatite located in the municipality of Mendes Pimentel, Minas Gerais, Brazil. Chemical analysis was carried out by electron microprobe analysis and indicated a magnesium rich phase with partial substitution of iron. Traces of Ca and Mn, (which partially replaced Mg) were found. The calculated chemical formula of the studied sample is: (Mg0.88, Fe0.11)Al1.87(PO4)2.08(OH)2.02. The Raman spectrum of lazulite is dominated by an intense sharp band at 1060 cm(-1) assigned to PO stretching vibrations of of tetrahedral [PO4] clusters presents into the HPO4(2-) units. Two Raman bands at 1102 and 1137 cm(-1) are attributed to both the HOP and PO antisymmetric stretching vibrations. The two infrared bands at 997 and 1007 cm(-1) are attributed to the ν1PO4(3-) symmetric stretching modes. The intense bands at 1035, 1054, 1081, 1118 and 1154 cm(-1) are assigned to the ν3PO4(3-) antisymmetric stretching modes from both the HOP and tetrahedral [PO4] clusters. A set of Raman bands at 605, 613, 633 and 648 cm(-1) are assigned to the ν4 out of plane bending modes of the PO4, HPO4 and H2PO4 units. Raman bands observed at 414, 425, 460, and 479 cm(-1) are attributed to the ν2 tetrahedral PO4 clusters, HPO4 and H2PO4 bending modes. The intense Raman band at 3402 and the infrared band at 3403 cm(-1) are assigned to the stretching vibration of the OH units. A combination of Raman and infrared spectroscopy enabled aspects of the molecular structure of the mineral lazulite to be understood. PMID:23434550

  13. The phosphate mineral sigloite Fe3+Al2(PO4)2(OH)3·7(H2O), an exception to the paragenesis rule - A vibrational spectroscopic study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frost, Ray L.; Xi, Yunfei; Scholz, Ricardo; Belotti, Fernanda Maria; Filho, Mauro Cândido

    2013-02-01

    The secondary phosphate mineral sigloite Fe3+Al2(PO4)2(OH)3·7H2O is the exception to the rule that phosphate mineral paragenesis is related to the final phase of hydrothermal mineralization at low temperatures. Sigloite was formed as an oxidation pseudomorph after paravauxite, during the last supergene paragenetic stage. We have studied the secondary phosphate mineral sigloite Fe3+Al2(PO4)2(OH)3·7H2O using vibrational spectroscopic techniques. Because the mineral is a phosphate mineral, it is readily studied by spectroscopic techniques as the phosphate and hydrogen phosphate units are readily measured. Indeed, sigloite shows the presence of both phosphate and hydrogen phosphate units in its structure. Raman bands at 1009 cm-1 with shoulders at 993 and 1039 cm-1 are assigned to stretching vibrations of PO43- and HPO42- units. The Raman band at 993 cm-1 is assigned to the ν1 symmetric stretching mode of the POH units, whereas the Raman band at 1009 cm-1 is assigned to the ν1PO43- symmetric stretching mode. Raman bands observed at 506, 528, 571, 596, 619 and 659 cm-1 are attributed to the ν4 out of plane bending modes of the PO4 and H2PO4 units. The Raman bands at 2988, 3118 and 3357 cm-1 are assigned to water stretching vibration. The series of bands at 3422, 3449, 3493, 3552 and 3615 cm-1 are assigned to the OH stretching vibrations of the hydroxyl units. The observation of multiple bands gives credence to the non-equivalence of the OH units in the sigloite structure.

  14. Enthalpies of formation of low albite (NaAlSi3O8), gibbsite (Al(OH)3), and NaAlO2; revised values for ΔH°f,298 and ΔG°f,298 of some aluminosilicate minerals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hemingway, Bruce S.; Robie, Richard A.

    1977-01-01

    The enthalpies of formation from the elements ΔH°t, of low albite, analbite, NaAlSi3O8 glass, gibbsite (Al(OH)3), and NaAlO2, have been determined by hydrofluoric acid solution calorimetry from measurements of the heats of solution, ΔH°soln, of low albite, NaAlO2, SiO2, Al(OH)3, Al, H2O, NaCl, and HC1-12.731H2O in 20.1 weight percent HF(aq) at temperatures between 303.15 and 348.15 K. At 298.15 K the enthalpies of formation, ΔH°f,298, for low albite, analbite, NaAlSi3O8 glass, gibbsite (Al(OH)3), and NaAlO2 are -3 935 115±3415, -3 924 235±3640, -3 875 455±3700, ±1293130±1190, and 1135 990±1255 J mol-1, respectively. Our values for the enthalpies of formation of low albite, analbite, and for NaAlSi3O8 glass are approximately 13 810 J mol-1 more negative than the values calculated by D. R. Waldbaum in 1968. Our value for the enthalpy of formation of gibbsite at 298.15 K is 11234 J more negative than the value of R. Barany and K. K. Kelley obtained in 1961. The standard Gibbs free energies of formation, ΔG°f,298 for low albite, analbite, and gibbsite calculated from the above enthalpies and the appropriate entropy data are -3 711 715±3435, -3 706 500±3660, and -1154 890±1200 J mol-1, respectively. The enthalpy of solution of Standard Reference Material 1654, α-quartz (37 to 74 μm), in 20.1 wt percent HF(aq) is -137 737±209 J mol-1 at 333.15 K. This value is approximately 1255 J less negative than the value obtained by King in 1951 and 1952 for material that has a mean particle diameter of less than 5 μm and that has been used by the U.S. Bureau of Mines in their determinations of the enthalpies of formation of many silicates. Revised values of the enthalpies and Gibbs free energies of formation are presented for some aluminosilicate minerals, based upon this new data for ΔH°f,298 of gibbsite and the heat of solution of α-quartz.

  15. Infrared and Raman spectroscopic characterisation of the sulphate mineral creedite - Ca3Al2SO4(F,OH)·2H2O - and in comparison with the alums

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frost, Ray L.; Xi, Yunfei; Scholz, Ricardo; López, Andrés; Granja, Amanda

    2013-05-01

    The mineral creedite is a fluorinated hydroxy hydrated sulphate of aluminium and calcium of formula Ca3Al2SO4(F,OH)·2H2O. The mineral has been studied by a combination of electron probe analysis to determine the molecular formula of the mineral and the structure assessed by vibrational spectroscopy. The spectroscopy of creedite may be compared with that of the alums. The Raman spectrum of creedite is characterised by an intense sharp band at 986 cm-1 assigned to the SO42- ν1 (Ag) symmetric stretching mode. Multiple bands of creedite in the antisymmetric stretching region support the concept of a reduction in symmetry of the sulphate anion. Multiple bands are also observed in the bending region with the three bands at 601, 629 and 663 cm-1 assigned to the SO42- ν4 (Ag) bending modes. The observation of multiple bands at 440, 457 and 483 cm-1 attributed to the SO42- ν2 (Bg) bending modes supports the concept that the symmetry of the sulphate is reduced by coordination to the water bonded to the Al3+ in the creedite structure. The splitting of the ν2, ν3 and ν4 modes is attributed to the reduction of symmetry of the SO4 and it is proposed that the sulphate coordinates to water in the hydrated aluminium in bidentate chelation.

  16. Infrared and Raman spectroscopic characterisation of the sulphate mineral creedite--Ca3Al2SO4(F,OH)·2H2O--and in comparison with the alums.

    PubMed

    Frost, Ray L; Xi, Yunfei; Scholz, Ricardo; López, Andrés; Granja, Amanda

    2013-05-15

    The mineral creedite is a fluorinated hydroxy hydrated sulphate of aluminium and calcium of formula Ca3Al2SO4(F,OH)·2H2O. The mineral has been studied by a combination of electron probe analysis to determine the molecular formula of the mineral and the structure assessed by vibrational spectroscopy. The spectroscopy of creedite may be compared with that of the alums. The Raman spectrum of creedite is characterised by an intense sharp band at 986 cm(-1) assigned to the SO4(2)- ν1 (Ag) symmetric stretching mode. Multiple bands of creedite in the antisymmetric stretching region support the concept of a reduction in symmetry of the sulphate anion. Multiple bands are also observed in the bending region with the three bands at 601, 629 and 663 cm(-1) assigned to the SO4(2)- ν4 (Ag) bending modes. The observation of multiple bands at 440, 457 and 483 cm(-1) attributed to the SO4(2)- ν2 (Bg) bending modes supports the concept that the symmetry of the sulphate is reduced by coordination to the water bonded to the Al(3+) in the creedite structure. The splitting of the ν2, ν3 and ν4 modes is attributed to the reduction of symmetry of the SO4 and it is proposed that the sulphate coordinates to water in the hydrated aluminium in bidentate chelation.

  17. Karchevskyite, [Mg18Al9(OH)54][Sr2(CO3,PO4)9(H2O,H3O)11], a new mineral species of the layered double hydroxide family

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Britvin, S. N.; Chukanov, N. V.; Bekenova, G. K.; Yagovkina, M. A.; Antonov, A. V.; Bogdanova, A. N.; Krasnova, N. I.

    2008-12-01

    Karchevskyite, a new mineral related to the family of layered double hydroxides (LDHs), has been found in the Iron open pit at the Kovdor carbonatite massif, Kola Peninsula, Russia. The mineral occurs as spherulites of up to 1.5 mm in diameter composed of thin, curved lamellae. Dolomite, magnetite, quintinite-3 T, strontium carbonate, and fluorapatite are associated minerals. Karchevskyite is white in aggregates and colorless in separate platelets. Its luster is vitreous with a pearly shine on the cleavage surface. The new mineral is nonfluorescent. The Mohs hardness is 2. The cleavage is eminent (micalike), parallel to {001}. The measured density is 2.21(2) g/cm3, and the calculated value is 2.18(1) g/cm3. Karchevskyite is colorless and nonpleochroic in immersion liquids. It is uniaxial, negative, ω = 1.542(2), and ɛ = 1.534(2). The chemical composition (electron microprobe, average of ten point analyses, standard deviation in parentheses, wt %) is as follows: 29.7(1.1) MgO, 18.3(0.7) Al2O3, 7.4(0.4) SrO, 0.2(0.1) CaO, 1.3(0.2) P2O5, 14.5(0.4) CO2, and 28.6 H2O (estimated by difference); the total is 100. The empirical formula calculated on the basis of nine Al atoms is Mg18.00Al9.00(OH)54.00(Sr1.79Mg0.48Ca0.09)2.36 (Ca3)8.26(PO4)0.46(H2O)6.54(H3O)4.18. The idealized formula is [Mg18Al9(OH)54][Sr2(CO3, PO4)9(H2O, H3O)11]. The new mineral slowly dissolves in 10% HCl with weak effervescence. Karchevskyite is trigonal; possible space groups are P3, P3, P overline 3 1 m, P31 m, P312, P312, P3 m1, or P3 m1; unit-cell dimensions are a = 16.055(6), c = 25.66(1) Å, V = 5728(7) Å3, Z = 3. The strongest reflections in the X-ray powder diffraction pattern [ d, ( I, %)( hkl)] are: 8.52(10)(003), 6.41(4)(004), 5.13(3)(005), 4.27(6)(006), 3.665(9)(007), 3.547(9)(107), 3.081(6)(315). Wavenumbers of absorption bands in the infrared spectrum of the new mineral are (cm-1; s is shoulder): 3470, 3420s, 3035, 2960s, 1650, 1426, 1366, 1024, 937, 860, 779, 678, 615s, 553, 449, 386

  18. Solvent exchange in AlF{sub x} (H{sub 2}O){sup 3-x}{sub 6-x} (aq) complexes: Ligand-directed labilization of water as an analogue for ligand-induced dissolution of oxide minerals

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, B.L.; Casey, W.H.; Crawford, S.N.

    1997-08-01

    We demonstrate, using dynamic {sup 17}O-NMR spectroscopy, that fluoride ions in the inner-coordination sphere of AlF{sub x} (H{sub 2}O){sub 6-x}{sup 3-x} (aq) complexes (0 {le} x {le} 2) progressively enhance, by orders of magnitude, the rate of exchange of waters from the innersphere to the bulk solvent. At 298K, the rate of the elementary ligand-exchange reaction increased approximately linearly with each fluoride substitution from about 2 s{sup -1} for the fully hydrated [Al(H{sub 2}O){sub 4}{sup +} (aq).] complex. A similar effect can be expected for isoelectronic complexes, such as the hydrolysis product: AlOH (H{sub 2}O){sub 5}{sup 2+} (aq). By hypothesis, a similar phenomenon accounts for fluoride-enhanced release of metals from a dissolving mineral surface. If so, it should be possible to predict the effectiveness of different adsorbed ligands to enhance dissolution of minerals from spectroscopic rate measurements on dissolved complexes, as was recently shown for aminocarboxylate ligands and NiO(s). 42 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  19. Mineral Chart

    MedlinePlus

    ... How Can I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Mineral Chart KidsHealth > For Teens > Mineral Chart Print A A A Text Size en ... sources of calcium. You'll also find this mineral in broccoli and dark green, leafy vegetables. Soy ...

  20. Vladimirivanovite, Na6Ca2[Al6Si6O24](SO4,S3,S2,Cl)2 · H2O, a new mineral of sodalite group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sapozhnikov, A. N.; Kaneva, E. V.; Cherepanov, D. I.; Suvorova, L. F.; Levitsky, V. I.; Ivanova, L. A.; Reznitsky, L. Z.

    2012-12-01

    The results of an examination of vladimirivanovite, a new mineral of the sodalite group, found at the Tultui deposit in the Baikal region are discussed. The mineral occurs in the form of outer rims (0.01-3 mm thick) of lazurite, elongated segregations without faced crystals (0.2 to 3-4 mm in size; less frequently, 4 × 12-15 × 20 mm), and rare veinlets (up to 5 mm) hosted in calciphyre and marble. Vladimirivanovite is irregular and patchy dark blue. The mineral is brittle; on average, the microhardness VHN is 522-604, 575 kg/mm2; and the Mohs hardness is 5.0-5.5. The measured and calculated densities are 2.48(3) and 2.436 g/cm3, respectively. Vladimirivanovite is optically biaxial; 2 V meas = 63(±1)°, 2 V calc = 66.2°; the refractive indices are α = 1.502-1.507 (±0.002), N m = 1.509-1.514 (±0.002), and N g = 1.512-1.517 (±0.002). The chemical composition is as follows, wt %: 32.59 SiO2, 27.39 Al2O3, 7.66 CaO, 17.74 Na2O, 11.37 SO3, 1.94 S, 0.12 Cl, and 1.0 H2O; total is 99.62. The empirical formula calculated based on (Si + Al) = 12 with sulfide sulfur determined from the charge balance is Na6.36Ca1.52(Si6.03Al5.97)Σ12O23.99(SO4)1.58(S3)0.17(S2)0.08 · Cl0.04 · 0.62H2O; the idealized formula is Na6Ca2[Al6Si6O24](SO4,S3,S2,Cl)2 · H2O. The new mineral is orthorhombic, space group Pnaa; the unit-cell dimensions are a = 9.066, b = 12.851, c = 38.558 Å, V = 4492 Å3, and Z = 6. The strongest reflections in the X-ray powder diffraction pattern ( dÅ— I[ hkl]) are: 6.61-5[015], 6.43-11[020, 006], 3.71-100[119, 133], 2.623-30[20.12, 240], 2.273-6[04.12], 2.141-14[159, 13.15], 1.783-9[06.12, 04.18], and 1.606-6[080, 00.24]. The crystal structure has been solved with a single crystal. The mineral was named in memoriam of Vladimir Georgievich Ivanov (1947-2002), Russian mineralogist and geochemist. The type material of the mineral is deposited at the Mineralogical Museum of St. Petersburg State University, St. Petersburg, Russia.

  1. Vibrational spectroscopic study of the sulphate mineral glaucocerinite (Zn,Cu)10Al6(SO4)3(OH)32ṡ18H2O - A natural layered double hydroxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frost, Ray L.; Theiss, Frederick L.; López, Andrés; Scholz, Ricardo

    2014-06-01

    We have studied the molecular structure of the mineral glaucocerinite (Zn,Cu)5Al3(SO4)1.5(OH)16ṡ9(H2O) using a combination of Raman and infrared spectroscopy. The mineral is one of the hydrotalcite supergroup of natural layered double hydroxides. The Raman spectrum is characterised by an intense Raman band at 982 cm-1 with a low intensity band at 1083 cm-1. These bands are attributed to the sulphate symmetric and antisymmetric stretching mode. The infrared spectrum is quite broad with a peak at 1020 cm-1. A series of Raman bands at 546, 584, 602, 625 and 651 cm-1 are assigned to the ν4 (SO4)2- bending modes. The observation of multiple bands provides evidence for the reduction in symmetry of the sulphate anion from Td to C2v or even lower symmetry. The Raman band at 762 cm-1 is attributed to a hydroxyl deformation mode associated with AlOH units. Vibrational spectroscopy enables aspects of the molecular structure of glaucocerinite to be determined.

  2. Inhibition of mineralization of glutaraldehyde-pretreated bovine pericardium by AlCl3. Mechanisms and comparisons with FeCl3, LaCl3, and Ga(NO3)3 in rat subdermal model studies.

    PubMed

    Webb, C L; Schoen, F J; Flowers, W E; Alfrey, A C; Horton, C; Levy, R J

    1991-04-01

    + solutions yielded significant inhibition of GPBP calcification, which did not differ significantly from that provided by Al3- and had a comparable concentration dependency. Light microscopic examination (Prussian blue staining) and EELS of FeCl3-preincubated explants demonstrated Fe3+ localization within devitalized GPBP connective tissue cells. The authors conclude that Al3+ and Fe3+ significantly inhibit the pathologic mineralization of glutaraldehyde-pretreated bovine pericardium by mechanisms that are likely related to the high affinity of these cations for membrane associated and other intracellular phosphorus loci.

  3. A Raman and infrared spectroscopic study of the sulphate mineral aluminite Al2(SO4)(OH)4·7H2O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frost, Ray L.; López, Andrés; Scholz, Ricardo; Wang, Lina

    2015-09-01

    The mineral aluminite has been studied using a number of techniques, including scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDX) and Raman and infrared spectroscopy. Raman spectroscopy identifies multiple sulphate symmetric stretching modes in line with the three sulphate crystallographically different sites. Raman spectroscopy also identifies a low intensity band at 1069 cm-1 which may be attributed to a carbonate symmetric stretching mode, indicating the presence of thaumasite. The observation of multiple bands in this ν4 spectral region offers evidence for the reduction in symmetry of the sulphate anion from Td to C2v or even lower symmetry. The Raman band at 3588 cm-1 is assigned to the OH unit stretching vibration and the broad feature at around 3439 cm-1 to water stretching bands. Water stretching vibrations are observed at 3157, 3294, 3378 and 3439 cm-1. Vibrational spectroscopy enables an assessment of the molecular structure of aluminite to be made.

  4. A Raman and infrared spectroscopic study of the sulphate mineral aluminite Al2(SO4)(OH)4·7H2O.

    PubMed

    Frost, Ray L; López, Andrés; Scholz, Ricardo; Wang, Lina

    2015-09-01

    The mineral aluminite has been studied using a number of techniques, including scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDX) and Raman and infrared spectroscopy. Raman spectroscopy identifies multiple sulphate symmetric stretching modes in line with the three sulphate crystallographically different sites. Raman spectroscopy also identifies a low intensity band at 1069 cm(-1) which may be attributed to a carbonate symmetric stretching mode, indicating the presence of thaumasite. The observation of multiple bands in this ν4 spectral region offers evidence for the reduction in symmetry of the sulphate anion from Td to C2v or even lower symmetry. The Raman band at 3588 cm(-1) is assigned to the OH unit stretching vibration and the broad feature at around 3439 cm(-1) to water stretching bands. Water stretching vibrations are observed at 3157, 3294, 3378 and 3439 cm(-1). Vibrational spectroscopy enables an assessment of the molecular structure of aluminite to be made. PMID:25897716

  5. Microbially mediated mineral carbonation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Power, I. M.; Wilson, S. A.; Dipple, G. M.; Southam, G.

    2010-12-01

    Mineral carbonation involves silicate dissolution and carbonate precipitation, which are both natural processes that microorganisms are able to mediate in near surface environments (Ferris et al., 1994; Eq. 1). (Ca,Mg)SiO3 + 2H2CO3 + H2O → (Ca,Mg)CO3 + H2O + H4SiO4 + O2 (1) Cyanobacteria are photoautotrophs with cell surface characteristics and metabolic processes involving inorganic carbon that can induce carbonate precipitation. This occurs partly by concentrating cations within their net-negative cell envelope and through the alkalinization of their microenvironment (Thompson & Ferris, 1990). Regions with mafic and ultramafic bedrock, such as near Atlin, British Columbia, Canada, represent the best potential sources of feedstocks for mineral carbonation. The hydromagnesite playas near Atlin are a natural biogeochemical model for the carbonation of magnesium silicate minerals (Power et al., 2009). Field-based studies at Atlin and corroborating laboratory experiments demonstrate the ability of a microbial consortium dominated by filamentous cyanobacteria to induce the precipitation of carbonate minerals. Phototrophic microbes, such as cyanobacteria, have been proposed as a means for producing biodiesel and other value added products because of their efficiency as solar collectors and low requirement for valuable, cultivable land in comparison to crops (Dismukes et al., 2008). Carbonate precipitation and biomass production could be facilitated using specifically designed ponds to collect waters rich in dissolved cations (e.g., Mg2+ and Ca2+), which would allow for evapoconcentration and provide an appropriate environment for growth of cyanobacteria. Microbially mediated carbonate precipitation does not require large quantities of energy or chemicals needed for industrial systems that have been proposed for rapid carbon capture and storage via mineral carbonation (e.g., Lackner et al., 1995). Therefore, this biogeochemical approach may represent a readily

  6. A vibrational spectroscopic study of the phosphate mineral zanazziite - Ca2(MgFe2+)(MgFe2+Al)4Be4(PO4)6ṡ6(H2O)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frost, Ray L.; Xi, Yunfei; Scholz, Ricardo; Belotti, Fernanda M.; Dias Menezes Filho, Luiz Alberto

    2013-03-01

    Zanazziite is the magnesium member of a complex beryllium calcium phosphate mineral group named roscherite. The studied samples were collected from the Ponte do Piauí mine, located in Itinga, Minas Gerais. The mineral was studied by electron microprobe, Raman and infrared spectroscopy. The chemical formula can be expressed as Ca2.00(Mg3.15,Fe0.78,Mn0.16,Zn0.01,Al0.26,Ca0.14)Be4.00(PO4)6.09(OH)4.00ṡ5.69(H2O) and shows an intermediate member of the zanazziite-greinfeinstenite series, with predominance of zanazziite member. The molecular structure of the mineral zanazziite has been determined using a combination of Raman and infrared spectroscopy. A very intense Raman band at 970 cm-1 is assigned to the phosphate symmetric stretching mode whilst the Raman bands at 1007, 1047, 1064 and 1096 cm-1 are attributed to the phosphate antisymmetric stretching mode. The infrared spectrum is broad and the antisymmetric stretching bands are prominent. Raman bands at 559, 568, 589 cm-1 are assigned to the ν4 out of plane bending modes of the PO4 and HPO4 units. The observation of multiple bands supports the concept that the symmetry of the phosphate unit in the zanazziite structure is reduced in symmetry. Raman bands at 3437 and 3447 cm-1 are attributed to the OH stretching vibrations; Raman bands at 3098 and 3256 are attributed to water stretching vibrations. The width and complexity of the infrared spectral profile in contrast to the well resolved Raman spectra, proves that the pegmatitic phosphates are better studied with Raman spectroscopy.

  7. Sb(III) and Sb(V) Sorption onto Al-Rich Phases: Hydrous Al Oxide and the Clay Minerals Kaolinite KGa-1b and Oxidized and Reduced Nontronite NAu-1

    SciTech Connect

    Ilgen, Anastasia G.; Trainor, Thomas P.

    2012-11-13

    We have studied the immobilization of Sb(III) and Sb(V) by Al-rich phases - hydrous Al oxide (HAO), kaolinite (KGa-1b), and oxidized and reduced nontronite (NAu-1) - using batch experiments to determine the uptake capacity and the kinetics of adsorption and Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) Spectroscopy to characterize the molecular environment of adsorbed Sb. Both Sb(III) and Sb(V) are adsorbed in an inner-sphere mode on the surfaces of the studied substrates. The observed adsorption geometry is mostly bidentate corner-sharing, with some monodentate complexes. The kinetics of adsorption is relatively slow (on the order of days), and equilibrium adsorption isotherms are best fit using the Freundlich model. The oxidation state of the structural Fe within nontronite affects the adsorption capacity: if the clay is reduced, the adsorption capacity of Sb(III) is slightly decreased, while Sb(V) uptake is increased significantly. This may be a result of the presence of dissolved Fe(II) in the reduced nontronite suspensions or associated with the structural rearrangements in nontronite due to reduction. These research findings indicate that Sb can be effectively immobilized by Al-rich phases. The increase in Sb(V) uptake in response to reducing structural Fe in clay can be important in natural settings since Fe-rich clays commonly go through oxidation-reduction cycles in response to changing redox conditions.

  8. Industrial Minerals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brady, Lawrence L.

    1983-01-01

    Discusses trends in and factors related to the production of industrial minerals during 1982, indicating that, as 1981 marked a downturn in production of industrial minerals, 1982 continued the trend with temporary and permanent cutbacks in mine and plant production. Includes highlights of several conferences/conference papers in this field.…

  9. A vibrational spectroscopic study of the silicate mineral harmotome - (Ba,Na,K)1-2(Si,Al)8O16ṡ6H2O - A natural zeolite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frost, Ray L.; López, Andrés; Wang, Lina; Romano, Antônio Wilson; Scholz, Ricardo

    2015-02-01

    The mineral harmotome (Ba,Na,K)1-2(Si,Al)8O16ṡ6H2O is a crystalline sodium calcium silicate which has the potential to be used in plaster boards and other industrial applications. It is a natural zeolite with catalytic potential. Raman bands at 1020 and 1102 cm-1 are assigned to the SiO stretching vibrations of three dimensional siloxane units. Raman bands at 428, 470 and 491 cm-1 are assigned to OSiO bending modes. The broad Raman bands at around 699, 728, 768 cm-1 are attributed to water librational modes. Intense Raman bands in the 3100 to 3800 cm-1 spectral range are assigned to OH stretching vibrations of water in harmotome. Infrared spectra are in harmony with the Raman spectra. A sharp infrared band at 3731 cm-1 is assigned to the OH stretching vibration of SiOH units. Raman spectroscopy with complimentary infrared spectroscopy enables the characterization of the silicate mineral harmotome.

  10. Esperanzaite, NaCa2Al2(As5+O4)2F4(OH)*2H2O, a new mineral species from the La Esperanza mine, Mexico: descriptive mineralogy and atomic arrangement

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Foord, E.E.; Hughes, J.M.; Cureton, F.; Maxwell, C.H.; Falster, A.U.; Sommer, A.J.; Hlava, P.F.

    1999-01-01

    Esperanzaite, ideally NaCa2Al2(As5+O4)2F4(OH)??2H2O, Z = 2, is a new mineral species from the La Esperanza mine, Durango State, Mexico. The mineral occurs as blue-green botryoidal crystalline masses on rhyolite, with separate spheres up to 1.5 mm in diameter. The Mohs hardness is 4 1/2 , and the specific gravity, 3.24 (obs.) and 3.36(3) (calc.). Optical properties were measured in 589 nm light. Esperanzaite is biaxial (-), X = Y = Z = colorless, ?? 1.580(1), ?? 1.588(1), and ?? 1.593(1); 2V(obs) is 74(1)??and 2V(calc) is 76.3??. The dispersion is medium, r < v, and the optic axes are oriented according to a ?? Z = +50.5??, b = Y, c ?? X = +35??. The strongest five X-ray-diffraction maxima in the powder pattern [d in A??(I)(hkl)] are: 2.966(100)(131, 311, 031), 3.527(90)(220), 2.700(90)(221,002,040), 5.364(80)(001,020) and 4.796(80)(011). Esperanzaite is monoclinic, a 9.687(5), b 10.7379(6), c 5.5523(7) A??, ?? 105.32(1)??, space group P21/m. The atomic arrangement of esperanzaite was solved by direct methods and Fourier analysis (R = 0.032). The Fundamental Building Block (FBB) is formed of [001] stacks of heteropolyhedral tetramers; the tetramers are formed of two arsenate tetrahedra and two Al octahedra, corner-linked in four-member rings. The FBBs are linked by irregular Na??5 and Ca??8 polyhedra.

  11. Lunar highland rocks - Element partitioning among minerals. II - Electron microprobe analyses of Al, P, Ca, Ti, Cr, Mn and Fe in olivine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, J. V.; Hansen, E. C.; Steele, I. M.

    1980-01-01

    Lunar olivines from anorthosites, granulitic impactites, and rocks in the Mg-rich plutonic trend were subjected to electron probe measurements for Al, P, Ca, Ti, Cr and Mn, which show that the FeO/MnO ratio for lunar olivines lies between 80 and 110 with little difference among the rock types. The low values of Ca in lunar olivines indicate slow cooling to subsolidus temperatures, with blocking temperatures of about 750 C for 67667 and 1000 C for 60255,73-alpha determined by the Finnerty and Boyd (1978) experiments. An important paradox is noted in the low Ti content of Fe-rich olivines from anorthosites, although both Ti and Fe tend to become enriched in liquid during fractional distillation. Except for Ca and Mn, olivine from anorthosites has lower minor element values than other rock types. Formation from a chemically distinct system is therefore implied.

  12. Günterblassite, (K,Ca)3 - x Fe[(Si,Al)13O25(OH,O)4] · 7H2O, a new mineral: the first phyllosilicate with triple tetrahedral layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chukanov, N. V.; Rastsvetaeva, R. K.; Aksenov, S. M.; Pekov, I. V.; Zubkova, N. V.; Britvin, S. N.; Belakovskiy, D. I.; Schüller, W.; Ternes, B.

    2012-12-01

    A new mineral, günterblassite, has been found in the basaltic quarry at Mount Rother Kopf near Gerolstein, Rheinland-Pfalz, Germany as a constituent of the late assemblage of nepheline, leucite, augite, phlogopite, åkermanite, magnetite, perovskite, a lamprophyllite-group mineral, götzenite, chabazite-K, chabazite-Ca, phillipsite-K, and calcite. Günterblassite occurs as colorless lamellar crystals up to 0.2 × 1 × 1.5 mm in size and their clusters. The mineral is brittle, with perfect cleavage parallel to (001) and less perfect cleavage parallel to (100) and (010). The Mohs hardness is 4. The calculated and measured density is 2.17 and 2.18(1) g/cm3, respectively. The IR spectrum is given. The new mineral is optically biaxial and positive as follows: α = 1.488(2), β = 1.490(2), γ = 1.493(2), 2 V meas = 80(5)°. The chemical composition (electron microprobe, average of seven point analyses, H2O is determined by gas chromatography, wt %) is as follows: 0.40 Na2O, 5.18 K2O, 0.58 MgO, 3.58 CaO, 4.08 BaO, 3.06 FeO, 13.98 Al2O3, 52.94 SiO2, 15.2 H2O, and the total is 98.99. The empirical formula is Na0.15K1.24Ba0.30Ca0.72Mg0.16F{0.48/2+}[Si9.91Al3.09O25.25(OH)3.75] · 7.29H2O. The crystal structure has been determined from a single crystal, R = 0.049. Günterblassite is orthorhombic, space group Pnm21; the unit-cell dimensions are a = 6.528(1), b = 6.970(1), c = 37.216(5) Å, V = 1693.3(4) Å3, Z = 2. Günterblassite is a member of a new structural type; its structure is based on three-layer block [Si13O25(OH,O)4]. The strong reflections in the X-ray powder diffraction pattern [ d Å ( I, %) are as follows: 6.532 (100), 6.263 (67), 3.244 (49), 3.062 (91), 2.996 (66), 2.955 (63), and 2.763 (60). The mineral was named in honor of Günter Blass (born in 1943), a well-known amateur mineralogist and specialist in electron microprobe and X-ray diffraction. The type specimen of günterblassite is deposited in the collections of the Fersman Mineralogical Museum of the

  13. Hillesheimite, (K,Ca,□)2(Mg,Fe,Ca,□)2[(Si,Al)13O23(OH)6](OH) · 8H2O, a new phyllosilicate mineral of the Günterblassite group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chukanov, N. V.; Zubkova, N. V.; Pekov, I. V.; Belakovskiy, D. I.; Schüller, W.; Ternes, B.; Blass, G.; Pushcharovsky, D. Yu.

    2013-12-01

    A new mineral, hillesheimite, has been found in the Graulai basaltic quarry, near the town of Hillesheim, the Eifel Mountains, Rhineland-Palatinate (Rheinland-Pfalz), Germany. It occurs in the late assemblage comprising nepheline, augite, fluorapatite, magnetite, perovskite, priderite, götzenite, lamprophyllite-group minerals, and åkermanite. Colorless flattened crystals of hillesheimite reaching 0.2 × 1 × 1.5 mm in size and aggregates of the crystals occur in miarolitic cavities in alkali basalt. The mineral is brittle, with Mohs' hard-ness 4. Cleavage is perfect parallel to (010) and distinct on (100) and (001). D calc = 2.174 g/cm3, D meas = 2.16(1) g/cm3. IR spectrum is given. Hillesheimite is biaxial (-), α = 1.496(2), β = 1.498(2), γ = 1.499(2), 2 V meas = 80°. The chemical composition (electron microprobe, mean of 4 point analyses, H2O determined from structural data, wt %) is as follows: 0.24 Na2O, 4.15 K2O, 2.14 MgO, 2.90 CaO, 2.20 BaO, 2.41 FeO, 15.54 Al2O3, 52.94 SiO2, 19.14 H2O, total is 101.65. The empirical formula is: K0.96Na0.08Ba0.16Ca0.56Mg0.58Fe{0.37/2+}[Si9.62Al3.32O23(OH)6][(OH)0.82(H2O)0.18] · 8H2O. The crystal structure has been determined from X-ray single-crystal diffraction data, R = 0.1735. Hillesheimite is orthorhombic, space group Pmmn, the unit-cell dimensions are: a = 6.979(11), b = 37.1815(18), c = 6.5296(15) Å; V=1694(3) Å3, Z = 2. The crystal structure is based on the block [(Si,Al)13O25(OH)4] consisting of three single tetrahedral layers linked via common vertices and is topologically identical to the triple layers in günterblassite and umbrianite. The strong reflections [ d Å ( I %)] in the X-ray powder diffraction pattern are: 6.857(58), 6.545(100), 6.284(53), 4.787(96), 4.499(59), 3.065(86), 2.958(62), 2.767(62). The mineral was named after its type locality. Type specimens are deposited in the Fersman Mineralogical Museum, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow, registration number 4174/1.

  14. Mineral Quantification.

    PubMed

    2016-01-01

    Optimal intakes of elements, such as sodium, potassium, magnesium, calcium, manganese, copper, zinc and iodine, can reduce individual risk factors including those related to cardiovascular diseases among humans and animals. In order to meet the need for vitamins, major minerals, trace minerals, fatty acids and amino acids, it is necessary to include a full spectrum programme that can deliver all of the nutrients in the right ratio. Minerals are required for normal growth, activities of muscles, skeletal development (such as calcium), cellular activity, oxygen transport (copper and iron), chemical reactions in the body, intestinal absorption (magnesium), fluid balance and nerve transmission (sodium and potassium), as well as the regulation of the acid base balance (phosphorus). The chapter discusses the chemical and instrumentation techniques used for estimation of minerals such as N, P, Ca, Mg, K, Na, Fe, Cu, Zn, B and Mb. PMID:26939263

  15. Mineral Quantification.

    PubMed

    2016-01-01

    Optimal intakes of elements, such as sodium, potassium, magnesium, calcium, manganese, copper, zinc and iodine, can reduce individual risk factors including those related to cardiovascular diseases among humans and animals. In order to meet the need for vitamins, major minerals, trace minerals, fatty acids and amino acids, it is necessary to include a full spectrum programme that can deliver all of the nutrients in the right ratio. Minerals are required for normal growth, activities of muscles, skeletal development (such as calcium), cellular activity, oxygen transport (copper and iron), chemical reactions in the body, intestinal absorption (magnesium), fluid balance and nerve transmission (sodium and potassium), as well as the regulation of the acid base balance (phosphorus). The chapter discusses the chemical and instrumentation techniques used for estimation of minerals such as N, P, Ca, Mg, K, Na, Fe, Cu, Zn, B and Mb.

  16. Extraterrestrial magnetic minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pechersky, D. M.; Markov, G. P.; Tsel'movich, V. A.; Sharonova, Z. V.

    2012-07-01

    Thermomagnetic and microprobe analyses are carried out and a set of magnetic characteristics are measured for 25 meteorites and 3 tektites from the collections of the Vernadsky Geological Museum of the Russian Academy of Sciences and Museum of Natural History of the North-East Interdisciplinary Science Research Institute, Far Eastern Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences. It is found that, notwithstanding their type, all the meteorites contain the same magnetic minerals and only differ by concentrations of these minerals. Kamacite with less than 10% nickel is the main magnetic mineral in the studied samples. Pure iron, taenite, and schreibersite are less frequent; nickel, various iron spinels, Fe-Al alloys, etc., are very rare. These minerals are normally absent in the crusts of the Earth and other planets. The studied meteorites are more likely parts of the cores and lower mantles of the meteoritic parent bodies (the planets). Uniformity in the magnetic properties of the meteorites and the types of their thermomagnetic (MT) curves is violated by secondary alterations of the meteorites in the terrestrial environment. The sediments demonstrate the same monotony as the meteorites: kamacite is likely the only extraterrestrial magnetic mineral, which is abundant in sediments and associated with cosmic dust. The compositional similarity of kamacite in iron meteorites and in cosmic dust is due to their common source; the degree of fragmentation of the material of the parent body is the only difference.

  17. Esperanzaite, NaCa(2)Al(2)(As(5+)O(4))[As(5+)O(3)(OH)](OH)(2)F(4)(H(2)O), A New Mineral From Mina La Esperanza, Mexico: Descriptive Mineralogy and Atomic Arrangement

    SciTech Connect

    Cureton, F.; Falster, A.U.; Foord, E.E.; Hlava, P.F.; Hughes, J.M.; Maxwell, C.H.

    1998-11-09

    Esperanzaite, ideally NaCazA12(As5+0.i)[As5+03 (OH)] (OH)2FJH20), Z =2, is a new mineral from the Mina h Esperarq Durango State, Mexico. The mineral occurs as blue-green botryoidal crystalline masses on rhyolite, with separate spheres up to 1.5 mm Y Deceased in diameter. Mobs hardness is 4.5, specific gravity 3.240h, and 3.36( 3)C.IC. Optical properties were measured in 589 nm light. Esperanzaite is biaxial (-), .Y= Y = Z= colorless, a 1.580(1), ~ 1.588( 1), and y 1.593(1 ); 2V0hs is 74(1 ~ and 2 }'CUIC is 76.3". Dispersion is medium, r < v, and optic axes are oriented as a A Z = +50.5o, b = Y, c P. X = +35". The five strongest X-ray diffraction maxima in the powder pattern are (~ /, hk~: 2.966,100, 13 i, 31 i, 031 ; 3.527,90, 220; 2.700,90,221,002, 040; 5.364>80, 001, 020; 4.796,80,011. Esperanzaite is monoclinic, u 9.687(5), b 10.7379(6), c 5.5523(7)& ~ 105.32( 1 )", space group P21/nz. The atomic arrangement of esperanzaite was solved by Direct Methods and Fourier analysis (R= 0.03 1). The Fundamental Building Block is formed of stacks of heteropolyhedral tetramers; the tetramers are formed of two arsenate tetrahedral and two Al octahedra, comer-linked in 4-member rings. The Fundamental Building Blocks are linked by irregular lda~j and Ca@ polyhedra.

  18. Industrial Minerals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradbury, James C.

    1978-01-01

    The past year is seen as not particularly good for industrial minerals and for industry in general. Environmental concerns continued to trouble the industry with unacceptable asbestos concentrations and chlorofluorocarbon effects on ozone. A halting U.S. economy also affected industrial progress. (MA)

  19. Thermodynamic modeling of non-ideal mineral-fluid equilibria in the system Si-Al-Fe-Mg-Ca-Na-K-H-O-Cl at elevated temperatures and pressures: Implications for hydrothermal mass transfer in granitic rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolejš, David; Wagner, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    We present the results of thermodynamic modeling of fluid-rock interaction in the system Si-Al-Fe-Mg-Ca-Na-H-O-Cl using the GEM-Selektor Gibbs free energy minimization code. Combination of non-ideal mixing properties in solids with multicomponent aqueous fluids represents a substantial improvement and it provides increased accuracy over existing modeling strategies. Application to the 10-component system allows us to link fluid composition and speciation with whole-rock mineralogy, mass and volume changes. We have simulated granite-fluid interaction over a wide range of conditions (200-600 °C, 100 MPa, 0-5 m Cl and fluid/rock ratios of 10-2-104) in order to explore composition of magmatic fluids of variable salinity, temperature effects on fluid composition and speciation and to simulate several paths of alteration zoning. At low fluid/rock ratios (f/r) the fluid composition is buffered by the silicate-oxide assemblage and remains close to invariant. This behavior extends to a f/r of 0.1 which exceeds the amount of exsolved magmatic fluids controlled by water solubility in silicate melts. With increasing peraluminosity of the parental granite, the Na-, K- and Fe-bearing fluids become more acidic and the oxidation state increases as a consequence of hydrogen and ferrous iron transfer to the fluid. With decreasing temperature, saline fluids become more Ca- and Na-rich, change from weakly acidic to alkaline, and become significantly more oxidizing. Large variations in Ca/Fe and Ca/Mg ratios in the fluid are a potential geothermometer. The mineral assemblage changes from cordierite-biotite granites through two-mica granites to chlorite-, epidote- and zeolite-bearing rocks. We have carried out three rock-titration simulations: (1) reaction with the 2 m NaCl fluid leads to albitization, chloritization and desilication, reproducing essential features observed in episyenites, (2) infiltration of a high-temperature fluid into the granite at 400 °C leads to hydrolytic

  20. Mineral bioprocessing

    SciTech Connect

    Torma, A.E.

    1993-05-01

    In the last 25 years, the introduction of biotechnological methods in hydrometallurgy has created new opportunities and challenges for the mineral processing industry. This was especially true for the production of metal values from mining wastes and low-and-complex-grade mineral resources, which were considered economically not amenable for processing by conventional extraction methods. Using bio-assisted heap, dump and in-situ leaching technologies, copper and uranium extractions gained their first industrial applications. The precious metal industries were the next to adopt the bio-preoxidation technique in the extraction of gold from refractory sulfide-bearing ores and concentrates. A variety of other bioleaching opportunities exist for nickel, cobalt, cadmium and zinc sulfide leaching. Recently developed bioremediation methods and biosorption technologies have shown a good potential for industrial applications to remove trace heavy metal and radionuclide concentrations from contaminated soils, and mining and processing effluents.

  1. Mineral Abundance Near Aristarchus Crater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradford, Alison; Storrs, A.

    2007-12-01

    Mineral Abundance Near Aristarchus Crater Alison Bradford and Alex Storrs Towson University We analyze Hubble Space Telescope (HST) images to determine the abundance of minerals near Aristarchus crater. Following the calibration of Robinson et al. (2007) we present ratio maps of images obtained in August of 2005 showing the abundance of TiO2 and other minerals in this interesting area in the middle of Oceanus Procellarum. A prominent cleft (Schroter's Valley, presumably a collapsed lava tube) makes this region of special interest for analyzing the formation of mare basalts. Reference: Robinson, M.S., et al. (2007): "High resolution mapping of TiO2 abundances on the Moon using the Hubble Space Telescope", GRL 34, L13203

  2. Geochemistry and Minerality of Wine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oze, C.; Horton, T. W.; Beaman, M.

    2010-12-01

    Kaolinite (Al2Si2O5(OH)4) and gibbsite (Al(OH)3) are capable of forming in a variety of environments including anthropogenic solutions such as wine. Here, we evaluate the geochemistry of twelve white wines in order to assess the potential relationship between kaolinite/gibbsite saturation and minerality, a common wine descriptor used to express the rock and/or soil character in the aromas and flavors of wines. Aluminum and Si concentrations ranged from 228-1,281 µg L-1 and 6,583-19,746 µg L-1, respectively, where Si and Al are the only elements to demonstrate positive covariance with minerality scores. Sulfur levels varied from 25,013-167,383 µg L-1 and show the strongest negative covariance with minerality scores. However, like all of the elements studied (Al, Si, Na, Mg, S, K, Ca, and Fe), these trends were not significantly different than random at the 95% confidence level. In contrast, the relative degrees of gibbsite/kaolinite saturation display strong positive covariance with minerality scores and these trends are not random at the greater than 95% confidence level. Overall, our tasters were able to accurately assess the degree of gibbsite/kaolinite saturation amongst the twelve wines based on the objective of assessing minerality. Although the wines were undersaturated with respect to gibbsite/kaolinite, geochemical modeling reveals that increasing the wines’ pHs from ~3.3 to 4.1-4.6 (which is achievable on the palate where saliva has a pH of 7.4) results in gibbsite/kaolinite oversaturation. By considering that minerality is a function of gibbsite/kaolinite saturation and decreasing S, the origin of minerality’s taste and chemical origin in wine with known physical standards becomes increasingly crystalline.

  3. Vitamins and Minerals

    MedlinePlus

    ... I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Vitamins and Minerals KidsHealth > For Teens > Vitamins and Minerals Print A ... of a good thing? What Are Vitamins and Minerals? Vitamins and minerals make people's bodies work properly. ...

  4. Lavoisierite, Mn2+ 8[Al10(Mn3+Mg)][Si11P]O44(OH)12, a new mineral from Piedmont, Italy: the link between "ardennite" and sursassite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlandi, Paolo; Biagioni, Cristian; Pasero, Marco; Mellini, Marcello

    2013-03-01

    The new mineral species lavoisierite, ideally Mn2+ 8[Al10(Mn3+Mg)][Si11P]O44(OH)12, has been discovered in piemontite-bearing micaschists belonging to the Piedmontese Nappe from Punta Gensane, Viù Valley, Western Alps, Italy. It occurs as yellow-orange acicular to prismatic-tabular crystals up to a few millimeters in length, with white streak and vitreous luster, elongated along [010] and flattened on {001}. Lavoisierite is associated with quartz, "mica," sursassite, piemontite, spessartine, braunite, and "tourmaline." Calculated density is 3.576 g cm-3. In plane-polarized light, it is transparent, pleochroic, with pale yellow parallel to [010] and yellow-orange normal to this direction; extinction is parallel and elongation is positive. Birefringence is moderate; the calculated average refraction index n is 1.750. Lavoisierite is orthorhombic, space group Pnmm, with a 8.6891(10), b 5.7755(3), c 36.9504(20) Å, V 1854.3(2) Å3, Z = 2. Calculated main diffraction lines of the X-ray powder diffraction pattern are [ d in Å, ( I), ( hkl); relative intensities are visually estimated]: 4.62 (m) (112), 2.931 (vs) (11 10), 2.765 (s) (11 11), 2.598 (s) (310), 2.448 (ms) (028). Chemical analyses by electron microprobe give (in wt%) P2O5 2.08, V2O5 0.37, SiO2 34.81, TiO2 0.13, Al2O3 22.92, Cr2O3 0.32, Fe2O3 0.86, Mn2O3 6.92, MnO 19.09, MgO 5.73, CaO 1.94, Na2O 0.01, H2O 5.44, sum 100.62 wt%. H2O content was calculated from structure refinement. The empirical formula, based on 56 anions, is (Mn{5.340/2+}Mg1.810Ca0.686Na0.006)Σ=7.852(Al8.921Mn{1.739/3+}Mg1.010Fe{0.214/3+}Cr0.084Ti0.032)Σ=12.000(Si11.496P0.582V0.081)Σ=12.159O43.995(OH)12.005. The crystal structure of lavoisierite was solved by direct methods and refined on the basis of 1743 observed reflections to R 1 = 4.6 %. The structure is characterized by columns of edge-sharing octahedra running along [010] and linked to each other by means of [SiO4], [Si2O7], and [Si3O10] groups. Lavoisierite, named after the French

  5. New Minerals and Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Birch, William D.

    1997-01-01

    Defines geodiversity, compares it to biodiversity, and discusses the mineral classification system. Charts the discovery of new minerals in Australia over time and focuses on uses of these minerals in technological advances. (DDR)

  6. Rocks and Minerals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naturescope, 1987

    1987-01-01

    Provides background information on rocks and minerals, including the unique characteristics of each. Teaching activities on rock-hunting and identification, mineral configurations, mystery minerals, and growing crystals are provided. Reproducible worksheets are included for two of the activities. (TW)

  7. Mineral spirits poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Mineral spirits are liquid chemicals used to thin paint and as a degreaser. Mineral spirits poisoning occurs ... be found in: Mineral spirits ( Stoddard solvent ) Some paints Some floor and furniture waxes and polishes Some ...

  8. Marine Mineral Exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spiess, Fren N.

    This book is the forty-first in the Elsevier Oceanography Series, and with it the series has come full circle. Its first title, published in 1964, was John Mero's landmark study The Mineral Resources of the Sea [Mero, 1964]. Looking back at that first major treatise and comparing it with this and other recent books on the topic [e.g., Teleki et al., 1987] one cannot help but be impressed with how well Mero used the sparse data and studies that had been put together by his time. Twenty-two years and many millions of dollars later a substantial mining-oriented base of knowledge has been built — we know much more about the economics and the engineering — yet the basic premises and conclusions that Mero assembled are still intact, and answers to the fundamental questions (e.g., formation processes for manganese nodules) are not in much better condition than they were then.

  9. Determinants of pathologic mineralization.

    PubMed

    Kirsch, Thorsten

    2008-01-01

    Physiologic mineralization is necessary for the formation of skeletal tissues and for their appropriate functions during adulthood. Mineralization has to be controlled and restricted to specific regions. If the mineralization process occurs in regions that normally do not mineralize, there can be severe consequences (pathologic or ectopic mineralization). Recent findings have indicated that physiologic and pathologic mineralization events are initiated by matrix vesicles, membrane-enclosed particles released from the plasma membranes of mineralization-competent cells. The understanding of how these vesicles are released from the plasma membrane and initiate the mineralization process may provide novel therapeutic strategies to prevent pathologic mineralization. In addition, other regulators (activators and inhibitors) of physiologic mineralization have been identified and characterized, and there is evidence that the same factors also contribute to the regulation of pathologic mineralization. Finally, programmed cell death (apoptosis) may be a contributor to physiologic mineralization and if occurring after tissue injury may induce pathologic mineralization and mineralization-related differentiation events in the injured and surrounding areas. This review describes how the understanding of mechanisms and factors regulating physiologic mineralization can be used to develop new therapeutic strategies to prevent pathologic or ectopic mineralization events.

  10. A Developed Spectral Identification Tree for Mineral Mapping using Hyperspectral Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gan, Fuping; Wang, Runsheng; Yan, Bokun; Shang, Kun

    2016-04-01

    The relationship between the spectral features and the composition of minerals are the basis of mineral identification using hyperspectral data. The reflectance spectrum of minerals results from the systematic combination of several modes of interaction between electromagnetic energy and mineral particles in the form of reflection and absorption. Minerals tend to have absorbing features at specific wavelengths with a characteristic shape, which can be used as diagnostic indicators for identification. The spectral identification tree (SIT) method for mineral identification is developed in our research to map minerals accurately and applied in some typical mineral deposits in China. The SIT method is based on the diagnostic absorption features of minerals through comparing and statistically analyzing characteristic spectral data of minerals. We establish several levels of identification rules for the type, group and species of minerals using IF-THEN rule according to the spectral identification criteria so that the developed SIT can be further used to map minerals at different levels of detail from mineral type to mineral species. Identifiable minerals can be grouped into six types: Fe2+-bearing, Fe3+-bearing, Mn2+-bearing, Al-OH-bearing, Mg-OH-bearing and carbonate minerals. Each type can be further divided into several mineral groups. Each group contains several mineral species or specific minerals. A mineral spectral series, therefore, can be constructed as "type-group-species-specific mineral (mineral variety)" for mineral spectral identification. It is noted that the mineral classification is based mainly on spectral reflectance characteristics of minerals which may not be consistent with the classification in mineralogy. We applied the developed SIT method to the datasets acquired at the Eastern Tianshan Mountains of Xinjiang (HyMap data) and the Qulong district of Xizang (Hyperion data). In Xinjiang, the two major classes of Al-OH and Mg-OH minerals were

  11. Nucleoside phosphorylation by phosphate minerals.

    PubMed

    Costanzo, Giovanna; Saladino, Raffaele; Crestini, Claudia; Ciciriello, Fabiana; Di Mauro, Ernesto

    2007-06-01

    In the presence of formamide, crystal phosphate minerals may act as phosphate donors to nucleosides, yielding both 5'- and, to a lesser extent, 3'-phosphorylated forms. With the mineral Libethenite the formation of 5'-AMP can be as high as 6% of the adenosine input and last for at least 10(3) h. At high concentrations, soluble non-mineral phosphate donors (KH(2)PO(4) or 5'-CMP) afford 2'- and 2':3'-cyclic AMP in addition to 5'-and 3'-AMP. The phosphate minerals analyzed were Herderite Ca[BePO(4)F], Hureaulite Mn(2+)(5)(PO(3)(OH)(2)(PO(4))(2)(H(2)O)(4), Libethenite Cu(2+)(2)(PO(4))(OH), Pyromorphite Pb(5)(PO(4))(3)Cl, Turquoise Cu(2+)Al(6)(PO(4))(4)(OH)(8)(H(2)O)(4), Fluorapatite Ca(5)(PO(4))(3)F, Hydroxylapatite Ca(5)(PO(4))(3)OH, Vivianite Fe(2+)(3)(PO(4))(2)(H(2)O)(8), Cornetite Cu(2+)(3)(PO(4))(OH)(3), Pseudomalachite Cu(2+)(5)(PO(4))(2)(OH)(4), Reichenbachite Cu(2+)(5)(PO(4))(2)(OH)(4), and Ludjibaite Cu(2+)(5)(PO(4))(2)(OH)(4)). Based on their behavior in the formamide-driven nucleoside phosphorylation reaction, these minerals can be characterized as: 1) inactive, 2) low level phosphorylating agents, or 3) active phosphorylating agents. Instances were detected (Libethenite and Hydroxylapatite) in which phosphorylation occurs on the mineral surface, followed by release of the phosphorylated compounds. Libethenite and Cornetite markedly protect the beta-glycosidic bond. Thus, activated nucleic monomers can form in a liquid non-aqueous environment in conditions compatible with the thermodynamics of polymerization, providing a solution to the standard-state Gibbs free energy change (DeltaG degrees ') problem, the major obstacle for polymerizations in the liquid phase in plausible prebiotic scenarios.

  12. Crystal structure of the mineral (Na,Ca,K){sub 2}(Ca,Na){sub 4}(Mg,Fe){sub 5}(Mg,Fe,Ti){sub 5}[Si{sub 12}Al{sub 4}O{sub 44}](F,O){sub 4}: a triclinic representative of the amphibole family

    SciTech Connect

    Rastsvetaeva, R. K. Aksenov, S. M.

    2012-05-15

    A mineral belonging to the amphibole family found at the Rothenberg paleovolcano (Eifel, Germany) was studied by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. The triclinic pseudomonoclinic unit-cell parameters are a = 5.3113(1) Angstrom-Sign , b = 18.0457(3) Angstrom-Sign ; c = 9.8684(2) Angstrom-Sign , {alpha} = 90.016(2) Degree-Sign , {beta} = 105.543(4) Degree-Sign , {gamma} = 89.985(2) Degree-Sign . The structure was solved by direct methods in sp. gr. P1 and refined to the R factor of 2.7% based on 6432 reflections with |F| > 3{sigma}(F) taking into account twinning. The mineral with the idealized formula (Na,Ca,K){sub 2}(Ca,Na){sub 4}(Mg,Fe){sub 5}(Mg,Fe,Ti){sub 5}[Si{sub 12}Al{sub 4}O{sub 44}](F,O){sub 4} has some symmetry and structural features that distinguish it from other minerals of this family.

  13. ALS Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... toward a world without ALS! Walk to Defeat ALS® Walk to Defeat ALS® draws people of all ... We need your help. I Will Advocate National ALS Registry The National ALS Registry is a congressionally ...

  14. Bartering for Minerals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    May, Kathie

    2002-01-01

    Presents an activity in which students are assigned occupations that rely on specific minerals. To obtain the needed minerals, students learn how to trade services and commodities. Includes details on preparation, modeling behaviors, and printed materials. (DDR)

  15. [Study on the influence of mineralizer on the structures and spectral properties of calcium aluminates].

    PubMed

    Zheng, Huai-Li; Liu, Jun-Yu; Li, Lin-Tao; Li, Fang

    2009-11-01

    The present paper investigated the effect of mineralizer on the structure and properties of calcium aluminates formation. Calcium aluminates powder was synthesized under high temperature calcination by mixing bauxite, limestone and a certain amount of mineralizer. The product structure, compositional information and spectral properties were carefully characterized by XRD, IR and DTA-TG, and the mineralization mechanism of mineralizer was studied during the process of calcium aluminates preparation. The results showed that calcium aluminates powder could be obtained under lower temperature calcination after adding mineralizer to the raw materials. The main products of the reaction were CaAl10 O18 and CaAl2 Si2 O8 without mineralizer, however, the main products of the reaction were CaAl3 BO7 and Ca3 Al10 O18 with mineralizer, in which Al2 O3s could be extracted easily, while CaAl2 Si2 O8 was reduced greatly in which Al2 O3 could not be extracted easily. At the same time, it is easy for calcspar to decompose after adding mineralizer. It is favorable to Al-Si bond break and Al stripping from bauxite. These facts could improve the extraction rate of Al2 O3 from raw materials. Also, in the case of adding mineralizer to the raw mixes, the crystal structure and composition are changed, which is beneficial to reducing calcination temperature.

  16. Moon's Pink Mineral

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martel, L. M. V.; Taylor, G. J.

    2014-12-01

    Since the 2010 remote-sensing discovery of lunar regolith rich in Mg-Al spinel on the rims and central peaks of impact craters and inner rings of basins on the Moon, researchers have been designing experiments to better understand the origin and formation history of spinel-rich rocks and what they mean for the construction of the lunar crust. The newly detected rock type is referred to as pink spinel anorthosite, or PSA, due to high plagioclase and low abundance (<5%) of mafic minerals such as olivine and pyroxene. Two recent studies tested specific hypotheses of PSA production on the Moon. Juliane Gross (American Museum of Natural History and the Lunar and Planetary Institute, LPI) and colleagues at the LPI, University of Hawaii, and NASA Johnson Space Center conducted experiments to model the crystallization of spinel in impact melts from impact events. Tabb Prissel (Brown University) and colleagues from Brown conducted experiments to model a plutonic formation of spinel from magma-wallrock interactions. In each study, comparisons of the remote sensing data with Apollo lunar samples or lunar meteorites were crucial for testing the PSA formation hypotheses with the experimental results. Definitive answers aren't in yet. PSA could form from impact melting of the right target rocks. Equally likely is PSA formation by reaction of basaltic magma and crust. One big unknown is the effect space weathering has in determining the amount of spinel in the PSA..

  17. Chemical Bonding in Sulfide Minerals

    SciTech Connect

    Vaughan, David J.; Rosso, Kevin M.

    2006-08-01

    An understanding of chemical bonding and electronic structure in sulfide minerals is central to any attempt at understanding their crystal structures, stabilities and physical properties. It is also an essential precursor to understanding reactivity through modeling surface structure at the molecular scale. In recent decades, there have been remarkable advances in first principles (ab initio) methods for the quantitative calculation of electronic structure. These advances have been made possible by the very rapid development of high performance computers. Several review volumes that chart the applications of these developments in mineralogy and geochemistry are available (Tossell and Vaughan, 1992; Cygan and Kubicki, 2001). An important feature of the sulfide minerals is the diversity of their electronic structures, as evidenced by their electrical and magnetic properties (see Pearce et al. 2006, this volume). Thus, sulfide minerals range from insulators through semiconductors to metals, and exhibit every type of magnetic behavior. This has presented problems for those attempting to develop bonding models for sulfides, and also led to certain misconceptions regarding the kinds of models that may be appropriate. In this chapter, chemical bonding and electronic structure models for sulfides are reviewed with emphasis on more recent developments. Although the fully ab initio quantitative methods are now capable of a remarkable degree of sophistication in terms of agreement with experiment and potential to interpret and predict behavior with varying conditions, both qualitative and more simplistic quantitative approaches will also be briefly discussed. This is because we believe that the insights which they provide are still helpful to those studying sulfide minerals. In addition to the application of electronic structure models and calculations to solid sulfides, work on sulfide mineral surfaces (Rosso and Vaughan 2006a,b) and solution complexes and clusters (Rickard

  18. Effects of aluminum exposure on bone mineral density, mineral, and trace elements in rats.

    PubMed

    Li, Xinwei; Hu, Chongwei; Zhu, Yanzhu; Sun, Hao; Li, Yanfei; Zhang, Zhigang

    2011-10-01

    The purpose of the study was to investigate the effects of aluminum (Al) exposure on bone mineral elements, trace elements, and bone mineral density (BMD) in rats. One hundred Wistar rats were divided randomly into two groups. Experimental rats were given drinking water containing aluminum chloride (AlCl(3), 430 mg Al(3+)/L), whereas control rats were given distilled water for up to 150 days. Ten rats were sacrificed in each group every 30 days. The levels of Al, calcium (Ca), phosphorus (P), magnesium (Mg), zinc (Zn), iron (Fe), copper (Cu), manganese (Mn), selenium (Se), boron (B), and strontium (Sr) in bone and the BMD of femur were measured. Al-treated rats showed lower deposition of Ca, P, and Mg compared with control rats. Levels of trace elements (Zn, Fe, Cu, Mn, Se, B, and Sr) were significantly lower in the Al-treated group than in the control group from day 60, and the BMD of the femur metaphysis in the Al-treated group was significantly lower than in the control group on days 120 and 150. These findings indicate that long-term Al exposure reduces the levels of mineral and trace elements in bone. As a result, bone loss was induced (particularly in cancellous bone). PMID:20886309

  19. ALS - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - ALS ... The following organizations are good resources for information on amyotrophic lateral sclerosis : Muscular Dystrophy Association -- mda.org/disease/amyotrophic-lateral-sclerosis National Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) Registry -- ...

  20. Reagan issues mineral policy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The National Materials and Minerals Program plan and report that President Reagan sent to Congress on April 5 aims to ‘decrease America's minerals vulnerability’ while reducing future dependence on potentially unstable foreign sources of minerals. These goals would be accomplished by taking inventory of federal lands to determine mineral potential; by meeting the stockpile goals set by the Strategic and Critical Material Stockpiling Act; and by establishing a business and political climate that would encourage private-sector research and development on minerals.Now that the Administration has issued its plan, the Subcommittee on Mines and Mining of the House Committee on Interior and Insular Affairs will consider the National Minerals Security Act (NMSA), which was introduced 1 year ago by subcommittee chairman Jim Santini (D-Nev.) [Eos, May 19, 1981, p. 497]. The bill calls for establishing a three-member White-House-level council to coordinate the development of a national minerals policy; amending tax laws to assist the mining industry to make capital investments to locate and produce strategic materials; and creating a revolving fund for the sale and purchase of strategic minerals. In addition, the NMSA bill would allow the secretary of the interior to make previously withdrawn public lands available for mineral development. The subcommittee will hold a hearing on the Administration's plan on May 11. Interior Secretary James Watt has been invited to testify.

  1. 36 CFR 293.14 - Mineral leases and mineral permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Mineral leases and mineral... AGRICULTURE WILDERNESS-PRIMITIVE AREAS § 293.14 Mineral leases and mineral permits. (a) All laws pertaining to mineral leasing shall extend to each National Forest Wilderness for the period specified in the...

  2. 36 CFR 293.14 - Mineral leases and mineral permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Mineral leases and mineral... AGRICULTURE WILDERNESS-PRIMITIVE AREAS § 293.14 Mineral leases and mineral permits. (a) All laws pertaining to mineral leasing shall extend to each National Forest Wilderness for the period specified in the...

  3. 36 CFR 293.14 - Mineral leases and mineral permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Mineral leases and mineral... AGRICULTURE WILDERNESS-PRIMITIVE AREAS § 293.14 Mineral leases and mineral permits. (a) All laws pertaining to mineral leasing shall extend to each National Forest Wilderness for the period specified in the...

  4. 36 CFR 293.14 - Mineral leases and mineral permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Mineral leases and mineral... AGRICULTURE WILDERNESS-PRIMITIVE AREAS § 293.14 Mineral leases and mineral permits. (a) All laws pertaining to mineral leasing shall extend to each National Forest Wilderness for the period specified in the...

  5. 36 CFR 293.14 - Mineral leases and mineral permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Mineral leases and mineral... AGRICULTURE WILDERNESS-PRIMITIVE AREAS § 293.14 Mineral leases and mineral permits. (a) All laws pertaining to mineral leasing shall extend to each National Forest Wilderness for the period specified in the...

  6. {sup 13}C chemical shift anisotropies for carbonate ions in cement minerals and the use of {sup 13}C, {sup 27}Al and {sup 29}Si MAS NMR in studies of Portland cement including limestone additions

    SciTech Connect

    Sevelsted, Tine F.; Herfort, Duncan

    2013-10-15

    {sup 13}C isotropic chemical shifts and chemical shift anisotropy parameters have been determined for a number of inorganic carbonates relevant in cement chemistry from slow-speed {sup 13}C MAS or {sup 13}C({sup 1}H) CP/MAS NMR spectra (9.4 T or 14.1 T) for {sup 13}C in natural abundance. The variation in the {sup 13}C chemical shift parameters is relatively small, raising some doubts that different carbonate species in Portland cement-based materials may not be sufficiently resolved in {sup 13}C MAS NMR spectra. However, it is shown that by combining {sup 13}C MAS and {sup 13}C({sup 1}H) CP/MAS NMR carbonate anions in anhydrous and hydrated phases can be distinguished, thereby providing valuable information about the reactivity of limestone in cement blends. This is illustrated for three cement pastes prepared from an ordinary Portland cement, including 0, 16, and 25 wt.% limestone, and following the hydration for up to one year. For these blends {sup 29}Si MAS NMR reveals that the limestone filler accelerates the hydration for alite and also results in a smaller fraction of tetrahedrally coordinated Al incorporated in the C-S-H phase. The latter result is more clearly observed in {sup 27}Al MAS NMR spectra of the cement–limestone blends and suggests that dissolved aluminate species in the cement–limestone blends readily react with carbonate ions from the limestone filler, forming calcium monocarboaluminate hydrate. -- Highlights: •{sup 13}C chemical shift anisotropies for inorganic carbonates from {sup 13}C MAS NMR. •Narrow {sup 13}C NMR chemical shift range (163–171 ppm) for inorganic carbonates. •Anhydrous and hydrated carbonate species by {sup 13}C MAS and {sup 13}C({sup 1}H) CP/MAS NMR. •Limestone accelerates the hydration for alite in Portland – limestone cements. •Limestone reduces the amount of aluminium incorporated in the C-S-H phase.

  7. Digging into Minnesota Minerals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minnesota State Dept. of Natural Resources, St. Paul.

    This publication presents students with facts about geology and several learning activities. Topics covered include rocks and minerals, volcanoes and earthquakes, fossils, exploration geology, mining in Minnesota, environmental issues related to mining, mineral uses, mining history, and the geology of Minnesota's state parks. A geologic timetable…

  8. Mineral Fiber Toxicology

    EPA Science Inventory

    The chemical and physical properties of different forms of mineral fibers impact biopersistence and pathology in the lung. Fiber chemistry, length, aspect ratio, surface area and dose are critical factors determining mineral fiber-associated health effects including cancer and as...

  9. Mineral Commodity Summaries 2001

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    2001-01-01

    Published on an annual basis, this report is the earliest Government publication to furnish estimates covering nonfuel mineral industry data. Data sheets contain information on the domestic industry structure, Government programs, tariffs, and 5-year salient statistics for over 90 individual minerals and materials.

  10. Mineral Commodity Summaries 2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    2005-01-01

    Published on an annual basis, this report is the earliest Government publication to furnish estimates covering nonfuel mineral industry data. Data sheets contain information on the domestic industry structure, Government programs, tariffs, and 5-year salient statistics for over 90 individual minerals and materials.

  11. Mineral Commodity Summaries 2004

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    2004-01-01

    Published on an annual basis, this report is the earliest Government publication to furnish estimates covering nonfuel mineral industry data. Data sheets contain information on the domestic industry structure, Government programs, tariffs, and 5-year salient statistics for over 90 individual minerals and materials.

  12. Mineral Commodity Summaries 2000

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    2000-01-01

    Published on an annual basis, this report is the earliest Government publication to furnish estimates covering nonfuel mineral industry data. Data sheets contain information on the domestic industry structure, Government programs, tariffs, and 5-year salient statistics for over 90 individual minerals and materials.

  13. Mineral Commodity Summaries 2006

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    2006-01-01

    Published on an annual basis, this report is the earliest Government publication to furnish estimates covering nonfuel mineral industry data. Data sheets contain information on the domestic industry structure, Government programs, tariffs, and 5-year salient statistics for over 90 individual minerals and materials.

  14. Mineral Commodity Summaries 2003

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    2003-01-01

    Published on an annual basis, this report is the earliest Government publication to furnish estimates covering nonfuel mineral industry data. Data sheets contain information on the domestic industry structure, Government programs, tariffs, and 5-year salient statistics for over 90 individual minerals and materials.

  15. Mineral Commodity Summaries 1999

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    1999-01-01

    Published on an annual basis, this report is the earliest Government publication to furnish estimates covering nonfuel mineral industry data. Data sheets contain information on the domestic industry structure, Government programs, tariffs, and 5-year salient statistics for over 90 individual minerals and materials.

  16. Mineral Commodity Summaries 2007

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    2007-01-01

    Published on an annual basis, this report is the earliest Government publication to furnish estimates covering nonfuel mineral industry data. Data sheets contain information on the domestic industry structure, Government programs, tariffs, and 5-year salient statistics for over 90 individual minerals and materials.

  17. Mineral Commodity Summaries 1998

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    1998-01-01

    Published on an annual basis, this report is the earliest Government publication to furnish estimates covering nonfuel mineral industry data. Data sheets contain information on the domestic industry structure, Government programs, tariffs, and 5-year salient statistics for over 90 individual minerals and materials.

  18. Mineral Commodity Summaries 1997

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    1997-01-01

    Published on an annual basis, this report is the earliest Government publication to furnish estimates covering nonfuel mineral industry data. Data sheets contain information on the domestic industry structure, Government programs, tariffs, and 5-year salient statistics for over 90 individual minerals and materials

  19. Mineral Commodity Summaries 2002

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    2002-01-01

    Published on an annual basis, this report is the earliest Government publication to furnish estimates covering nonfuel mineral industry data. Data sheets contain information on the domestic industry structure, Government programs, tariffs, and 5-year salient statistics for over 90 individual minerals and materials.

  20. The Miner's Canary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guinier, Lani

    2005-01-01

    Miners used canaries as early warning signals: when a canary gasped for breath, the miners knew there was a problem with the atmosphere in the mine. The experience of people of color in higher education can be used similarly as a diagnostic tool.

  1. Vitamins, Minerals, and Mood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaplan, Bonnie J.; Crawford, Susan G.; Field, Catherine J.; Simpson, J. Steven A.

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the authors explore the breadth and depth of published research linking dietary vitamins and minerals (micronutrients) to mood. Since the 1920s, there have been many studies on individual vitamins (especially B vitamins and Vitamins C, D, and E), minerals (calcium, chromium, iron, magnesium, zinc, and selenium), and vitamin-like…

  2. Mineral commodity summaries 2016

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ober, Joyce A.

    2016-01-01

    This report is the earliest Government publication to furnish estimates covering 2015 nonfuel mineral industry data. Data sheets contain information on the domestic industry structure, Government programs, tariffs, and 5-year salient statistics for more than 90 individual minerals and materials

  3. Scientists observe fungi-dissolving minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Atreyee

    2012-10-01

    Ectomycorrhizal fungi (EMF) live in moist dark recesses and never see daylight. They cling to the roots of trees in boreal forests, break down soil minerals and supply essential elements and nutrients to the trees. Along the way, they play a distinct but not yet well-understood role in bioweathering, a process in which water, air, and organisms interact to break down soil minerals within the first few meters of Earth's surface. In a synthetically designed and controlled laboratory environment, Gazzè et al. cultured EMF; the researchers monitored the process as the fungi colonized a soil mineral on a petri dish over a period of 7 months. The authors then extracted individual grains of chlorite, a common soil-forming clay mineral, and cleaned the mineral surfaces to look at how the fungi had affected the mineral surfaces they came in contact with. Using atomic force microscopy, a specialized process that allows observations of three-dimensional features at nanometer (10-9 meter) scales, the authors found numerous primary channels, of the order of a micron (10-6 meters) in width and up to 50 nanometers in depth, from which smaller secondary channels extended outward. The network of channels resembled a herringbone-like pattern—evidence of dissolution by EMF.

  4. Underground mineral extraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, C. G.; Stephens, J. B.

    1980-01-01

    A method was developed for extracting underground minerals such as coal, which avoids the need for sending personnel underground and which enables the mining of steeply pitched seams of the mineral. The method includes the use of a narrow vehicle which moves underground along the mineral seam and which is connected by pipes or hoses to water pumps at the surface of the Earth. The vehicle hydraulically drills pilot holes during its entrances into the seam, and then directs sideward jets at the seam during its withdrawal from each pilot hole to comminute the mineral surrounding the pilot hole and combine it with water into a slurry, so that the slurried mineral can flow to a location where a pump raises the slurry to the surface.

  5. Mineral Commodity Summaries 2010

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    2010-01-01

    Each chapter of the 2010 edition of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Mineral Commodity Summaries (MCS) includes information on events, trends, and issues for each mineral commodity as well as discussions and tabular presentations on domestic industry structure, Government programs, tariffs, 5-year salient statistics, and world production and resources. The MCS is the earliest comprehensive source of 2009 mineral production data for the world. More than 90 individual minerals and materials are covered by two-page synopses. For mineral commodities for which there is a Government stockpile, detailed information concerning the stockpile status is included in the two-page synopsis. National reserves information for most mineral commodities found in this report, including those for the United States, are derived from a variety of sources. The ideal source of such information would be comprehensive evaluations that apply the same criteria to deposits in different geographic areas and report the results by country. In the absence of such evaluations, national reserves estimates compiled by countries for selected mineral commodities are a primary source of national reserves information. Lacking national assessment information by governments, sources such as academic articles, company reports, presentations by company representatives, and trade journal articles, or a combination of these, serve as the basis for national reserves information reported in the mineral commodity sections of this publication. A national estimate may be assembled from the following: historically reported reserves information carried for years without alteration because no new information is available; historically reported reserves reduced by the amount of historical production; and company reported reserves. International minerals availability studies conducted by the U.S. Bureau of Mines (USBM), before 1996, and estimates of identified resources by an international collaborative effort (the

  6. Why Mineral Interfaces Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Putnis, Andrew; Putnis, Christine V.

    2015-04-01

    While it is obvious that reactions between a mineral and an aqueous solution take place at the mineral-fluid interface it is only relatively recently that high spatial resolution studies have demonstrated how the local structure of the mineral surface and the chemical composition of the fluid at the interface control both the short-range and the long-range consequences of mineral-fluid interaction. Long-range consequences of fluid-mineral interaction control element cycles in the earth, the formation of ore-deposits, the chemical composition of the oceans through weathering of rocks and hence climate changes. Although weathering is clearly related to mineral dissolution, to what extent do experimentally measured dissolution rates of minerals help to understand weathering, especially weathering mechanisms? This question is related to the short-range, local reactions that take place when a mineral, that is not stable in the fluid, begins to dissolve. In this case the fluid composition at the interface will become supersaturated with respect to a different phase or phases. This may be a different composition of the same mineral e.g. a Ca-rich feldspar dissolving in a Na-rich solution results in a fluid at the interface which may be supersaturated with respect to an Na-rich feldspar. Alternatively, the interfacial fluid could be supersaturated with respect to a different mineral e.g. an Na-rich zeolite, depending on the temperature. Numerous experiments have shown that the precipitation of a more stable phase at the mineral-fluid interface results in a coupling between the dissolution and the precipitation, and the replacement of one mineral by another. This process separates the short-range mechanisms which depend only on the composition of the interfacial solution, and the long-range consequences that depend on the composition of the residual fluid released from the reacting parent mineral. Typically such residual fluids may carry metal ions tens to hundreds of

  7. A SEM, EDS and vibrational spectroscopic study of the clay mineral fraipontite.

    PubMed

    Theiss, Frederick L; López, Andrés; Scholz, Ricardo; Frost, Ray L

    2015-08-01

    The mineral fraipontite has been studied by using a combination of scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive analysis and vibrational spectroscopy (infrared and Raman). Fraipontite is a member of the 1:1 clay minerals of the kaolinite-serpentine group. The mineral contains Zn and Cu and is of formula (Cu,Zn,Al)₃(Si,Al)₂O₅(OH)₄. Qualitative chemical analysis of fraipontite shows an aluminium silicate mineral with amounts of Cu and Zn. This kaolinite type mineral has been characterised by Raman and infrared spectroscopy; in this way aspects about the molecular structure of fraipontite clay are elucidated.

  8. Minerals Yearbook, centennial edition 1981. Volume I. Metals and minerals

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-01-01

    This edition of the Minerals Yearbook Marks the centennial of the first annual publication of comprehensive mineral industry statistics by the Federal Government. This volume of the Minerals Yearbook, covering metals and minerals, contains 71 commodity or commodity group chapters with data on approximately 90 minerals that were obtained as a result of the mineral information gathering activities of the Bureau of Mines. In addition, the volume contains a chapter on mining and quarrying trends and a statistical summary.

  9. Minerals yearbook, 1993. Volume 1. Metals and minerals. Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    This edition of the Mineral Yearbook discusses the performance of the worlwide minerals and materials industry during 1993 and provides background information to assist in interpreting that performance. Volume 1, Metals and Minerals, contains chapters on virtually all metallic and industrial mineral commodities important to the U.S. economy. A chapter on survey methods with a statistical summary of nonfuel minerals, and a chapters on trends in mining and quarrying in the metals and industrial mineral industries are also included.

  10. Mineral facilities of Europe

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Almanzar, Francisco; Baker, Michael S.; Elias, Nurudeen; Guzman, Eric

    2010-01-01

    This map displays over 1,700 records of mineral facilities within the countries of Europe and western Eurasia. Each record represents one commodity and one facility type at a single geographic location. Facility types include mines, oil and gas fields, and plants, such as refineries, smelters, and mills. Common commodities of interest include aluminum, cement, coal, copper, gold, iron and steel, lead, nickel, petroleum, salt, silver, and zinc. Records include attributes, such as commodity, country, location, company name, facility type and capacity (if applicable), and latitude and longitude geographical coordinates (in both degrees-minutes-seconds and decimal degrees). The data shown on this map and in table 1 were compiled from multiple sources, including (1) the most recently available data from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Minerals Yearbook (Europe and Central Eurasia volume), (2) mineral statistics and information from the USGS Minerals Information Web site (http://minerals.usgs.gov/minerals/pubs/country/europe.html), and (3) data collected by the USGS minerals information country specialists from sources, such as statistical publications of individual countries, annual reports and press releases of operating companies, and trade journals. Data reflect the most recently published table of industry structure for each country at the time of this publication. Additional information is available from the country specialists listed in table 2.

  11. Elastic properties of minerals

    SciTech Connect

    Aleksandrov, K.S.; Prodaivoda, G.T.

    1993-09-01

    Investigations of the elastic properties of the main rock-forming minerals were begun by T.V. Ryzhova and K.S. Aleksandrov over 30 years ago on the initiative of B.P. Belikov. At the time, information on the elasticity of single crystals in general, and especially of minerals, was very scanty. In the surveys of that time there was information on the elasticity of 20 or 30 minerals. These, as a rule, did not include the main rock-forming minerals; silicates were represented only by garnets, quartz, topaz, tourmaline, zircon, beryl, and staurolite, which are often found in nature in the form of large and fairly high-quality crystals. Then and even much later it was still necessary to prove a supposition which now seems obvious: The elastic properties of rocks, and hence the velocities of elastic (seismic) waves in the earth`s crust, are primarily determined by the elastic characteristics of the minerals composing these rocks. Proof of this assertion, with rare exceptions of mono-mineralic rocks (marble, quartzite, etc.) cannot be obtained without information on the elasticities of a sufficiently large number of minerals, primarily framework, layer, and chain silicates which constitute the basis of most rocks. This also served as the starting point and main problem of the undertakings of Aleksandrov, Ryzhova, and Belikov - systematic investigations of the elastic properties of minerals and then of various rocks. 108 refs., 7 tabs.

  12. Melilite-group minerals at Oldoinyo Lengai, Tanzania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiedenmann, Daniel; Keller, Jörg; Zaitsev, Anatoly N.

    2010-07-01

    Oldoinyo Lengai and the volcanic centres of the Lake Natron-Engaruka province contain melilite as a widespread mineral. Extraordinarily Na-Al-rich melilites (up to 6 wt.% Na 2O and 9 wt.% Al 2O 3) from recent explosive eruptions are among the most Na-rich ever reported. Their unusual mineral composition leads to optical properties with vivid birefringence colours of 2nd order. The continuous variation in mineral composition from common åkermanite to Na-Al-melilite ( alumoåkermanite) is documented and reflects the whole peralkaline trend of Oldoinyo Lengai. The data presented allow the volcano's evolution from primitive olivine melilitites to highly evolved and peralkaline combeite-wollastonite nephelinites to be traced. Melilite compositions of Oldoinyo Lengai extend the magmatic field in the Ca 2Fe(Si 2O 7)-Ca 2Mg(Si 2O 7)-(CaNa)Al(Si 2O 7) end-member ternary compositional diagram.

  13. Mineral resources of Antarctica

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Compiled and edited by Wright, Nancy A.; Williams, Paul L.

    1974-01-01

    Although the existence of mineral deposits in Antarctica is highly probable, the chances of finding them are quite small. Minerals have been found there in great variety but only as occurrences. Manganese nodules, water (as ice), geothermal energy, coal, petroleum, and natural gas are potential resources that could perhaps be exploited in the future. On the basis of known mineral occurrences in Antarctica and relationships between geologic provinces of Antarctica and those of neighboring Gondwana continents, the best discovery probability for a base-metal deposit in any part of Antarctica is in the Andean orogen; it is estimated to be 0.075 (75 chances in 1,000).

  14. Definitions of Health Terms: Minerals

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/definitions/mineralsdefinitions.html Definitions of Health Terms : Minerals To use the sharing features on this page, ... National Institutes of Health, Office of Dietary Supplements Minerals Minerals are those elements on the earth and ...

  15. Crystal structure of the NaCa(Fe{sup 2+}, Al, Mn){sub 5}[Si{sub 8}O{sub 19}(OH)](OH){sub 7} {center_dot} 5H{sub 2}O mineral: A new representative of the palygorskite group

    SciTech Connect

    Rastsvetaeva, R. K. Aksenov, S. M.; Verin, I. A.

    2012-01-15

    A specimen of a new representative of the palygorskite-sepiolite family from Aris phonolite (Namibia) is studied by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. The parameters of the triclinic (pseudomonoclinic) unit cell are as follows: a = 5.2527(2) Angstrom-Sign , b = 17.901(1) Angstrom-Sign , c = 13.727(1) Angstrom-Sign , {alpha} = 90.018(3) Degree-Sign , {beta} = 97.278(4) Degree-Sign , and {gamma} = 89.952(3) Degree-Sign . The structure is solved by the direct methods in space group P1-bar and refined to R = 5.5% for 4168 |F| > 7{sigma}(F) with consideration for twinning by the plane perpendicular to y (the ratio of the twin components is 0.52: 0.48). The crystal chemical formula (Z = 1) is (Na{sub 1.6}K{sub 0.2}Ca{sub 0.2})[Ca{sub 2}(Fe{sub 3.6}{sup 2+}Al{sub 1.6}Mn{sub 0.8})(OH){sub 9}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}][(Fe{sub 3.9}{sup 2+}Ti{sub 0.1})(OH){sub 5} (H{sub 2}O){sub 2}][Si{sub 16}O{sub 38}(OH){sub 2}] {center_dot} 6H{sub 2}O, where the compositions of two ribbons of octahedra and a layer of Si tetrahedra are enclosed in brackets. A number of specific chemical, symmetrical, and structural features distinguish this mineral from other minerals of this family, in particular, from tuperssuatsiaite and kalifersite, which are iron-containing representatives with close unit cell parameters.

  16. Minerals Management Service: Strategic plan

    SciTech Connect

    1997-09-30

    This plan addresses the management of the mineral resources on the Outer Continental Shelf in an environmentally sound and safe manner and the timely collection, verification, and distribution of mineral revenues from Federal and Indian lands. The Minerals Management Service (MMS) manages the Nation`s natural gas, oil and other mineral resources on the Outer Continental Shelf (OCS), and collects, accounts for, and disburses revenues from offshore federal mineral leases and from onshore mineral leases on Federal and Indian lands.

  17. Vitamins and Minerals

    MedlinePlus

    ... Also, many nutrients interact with each other. Most nutritionists believe in designing an overall program of supplements. ... SUPPLEMENTS? In addition to vitamins and minerals, some nutritionists suggest that people with HIV take supplements of ...

  18. Fluorescent minerals, a review

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Modreski, P.J.; Aumente-Modreski, R.

    1996-01-01

    Fluorescent minerals are more than just an attractive novelty, and collecting them is a speciality for thousands of individuals who appreciate their beauty, rarity, and scientific value. Fluorescent properties can be used as an aid to mineral identification, locality determination, and distinction between natural and synthetic gemstones. This article gives an overview of those aspects of fluorescence that are of most interest to collectors, hobbyists, and mineralogists. -from Authors

  19. [Sorption and desorption of phenanthrene by organo-mineral complexes with different bridge cations].

    PubMed

    Ni, Jin-zhi; Luo, Yong-ming; Wei, Ran; Li, Xiu-hua; Qian, Wei

    2008-12-01

    Sorption and desorption of phenanthrene by organo-mineral complexes with Ca2+, Fe3+ and Al3+ as bridge cations were studied according to the association type between organic matter and minerals in natural soils. The results showed that the data of phenanthrene sorption and desorption by different cation saturated montmorillonite and their corresponding humic acid and mineral complexes could be fitted with Freundlich model, and the order of the sorption capacities (Kf) were Ca-Mont (0.184) > Fe-Mont (0.028) > Al-Mont (0.015) and Fe-Mont-HA (2.341) > Ca-Mont-HA (1.557) > Al-Mont-HA (1.136), respectively. The Kf values of humic acid and mineral complexes were far greater than those of minerals, which demonstrated that humic acid made great contributions to the sorption of phenanthrene in the organo-mineral complexes. However, the Kf values of the organo-mineral complexes with different bridge cations were not consistent with their organic carbon content, which indicated that both the organic carbon content and the combined types between organic matter and mineral could affect the sorption capacity of phenanthrene by the organo-mineral complexes. The desorption hysteresis of phenanthrene was significant for Ca2+ and Al3+ bridged organo-mineral complexes. Desorption hysteresis of phenanthrene was mainly from the sorption of phenanthrene by organic matter, and the contributions of mineral to the desorption hysteresis were not significant. PMID:19256397

  20. [Sorption and desorption of phenanthrene by organo-mineral complexes with different bridge cations].

    PubMed

    Ni, Jin-zhi; Luo, Yong-ming; Wei, Ran; Li, Xiu-hua; Qian, Wei

    2008-12-01

    Sorption and desorption of phenanthrene by organo-mineral complexes with Ca2+, Fe3+ and Al3+ as bridge cations were studied according to the association type between organic matter and minerals in natural soils. The results showed that the data of phenanthrene sorption and desorption by different cation saturated montmorillonite and their corresponding humic acid and mineral complexes could be fitted with Freundlich model, and the order of the sorption capacities (Kf) were Ca-Mont (0.184) > Fe-Mont (0.028) > Al-Mont (0.015) and Fe-Mont-HA (2.341) > Ca-Mont-HA (1.557) > Al-Mont-HA (1.136), respectively. The Kf values of humic acid and mineral complexes were far greater than those of minerals, which demonstrated that humic acid made great contributions to the sorption of phenanthrene in the organo-mineral complexes. However, the Kf values of the organo-mineral complexes with different bridge cations were not consistent with their organic carbon content, which indicated that both the organic carbon content and the combined types between organic matter and mineral could affect the sorption capacity of phenanthrene by the organo-mineral complexes. The desorption hysteresis of phenanthrene was significant for Ca2+ and Al3+ bridged organo-mineral complexes. Desorption hysteresis of phenanthrene was mainly from the sorption of phenanthrene by organic matter, and the contributions of mineral to the desorption hysteresis were not significant.

  1. Clay Minerals: Adsorbophysical Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotova, O.

    2013-12-01

    The structure and features of surfaces of clay minerals (kaolin, montmorillonite, etc) have an important scientific and practical value. On the surface the interrelation of processes at electronic, atomic and molecular levels is realized. Availability of mineral surface to external influences opens wide scientific and technical opportunities of use of the surface phenomena, so the research of crystal-chemical and crystal-physical processes in near-surface area of clay minerals is important. After long term researches of gas-clay mineral system in physical fields the author has obtained experimental and theoretical material contributing to the creation of the surface theory of clays. A part of the researches is dedicated to studying the mechanism of crystal-chemical and crystal-physical processes in near surface area of clay mineral systems, selectivity of the surface centers to interact with gas phase molecules and adsorbophysical properties. The study of physical and chemical properties of fine clay minerals and their modification has a decisive importance for development of theory and practice of nanotechnologies: they are sorbents, membranes, ceramics and other materials with required electronic features.

  2. Mineral commodity summaries 2014

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    2014-01-01

    Each chapter of the 2014 edition of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Mineral Commodity Summaries (MCS) includes information on events, trends, and issues for each mineral commodity as well as discussions and tabular presentations on domestic industry structure, Government programs, tariffs, 5-year salient statistics, and world production and resources. The MCS is the earliest comprehensive source of 2013 mineral production data for the world. More than 90 individual minerals and materials are covered by two-page synopses. For mineral commodities for which there is a Government stockpile, detailed information concerning the stockpile status is included in the two-page synopsis. Abbreviations and units of measure, and definitions of selected terms used in the report, are in Appendix A and Appendix B, respectively. “Appendix C—Reserves and Resources” includes “Part A—Resource/Reserve Classification for Minerals” and “Part B—Sources of Reserves Data.” A directory of USGS minerals information country specialists and their responsibilities is Appendix D. The USGS continually strives to improve the value of its publications to users. Constructive comments and suggestions by readers of the MCS 2014 are welcomed.

  3. Mineral commodity summaries 2013

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    2013-01-01

    Each chapter of the 2013 edition of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Mineral Commodity Summaries (MCS) includes information on events, trends, and issues for each mineral commodity as well as discussions and tabular presentations on domestic industry structure, Government programs, tariffs, 5-year salient statistics, and world production and resources. The MCS is the earliest comprehensive source of 2012 mineral production data for the world. More than 90 individual minerals and materials are covered by two-page synopses. For mineral commodities for which there is a Government stockpile, detailed information concerning the stockpile status is included in the two-page synopsis. Abbreviations and units of measure, and definitions of selected terms used in the report, are in Appendix A and Appendix B, respectively. “Appendix C—Reserves and Resources” includes “Part A—Resource/Reserve Classification for Minerals” and “Part B—Sources of Reserves Data.” A directory of USGS minerals information country specialists and their responsibilities is Appendix D. The USGS continually strives to improve the value of its publications to users. Constructive comments and suggestions by readers of the MCS 2013 are welcomed.

  4. Minerals yearbook, 1983. Volume 1. Metals and minerals

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-01-01

    This volume of the Minerals Yearbook, covering metals and minerals, contains 73 commodity or commodity group chapters with data on approximately 90 minerals that were obtained as a result of the mineral information gathering activities of the Bureau of Mines. In addition, the volume contains a chapter on mining and quarrying trends and a statistical summary.

  5. Minerals yearbook, 1982. volume 1. metals and minerals

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-01-01

    This volume of the Minerals Yearbook, covering metals and minerals, contains 73 commodity or commodity group chapters with data on approximately 90 minerals that were obtained as a result of the mineral information gathering activities of the Bureau of Mines. In addition, the volume contains a chapter on mining and quarrying trends and a statistical summary.

  6. Mathematical model for bone mineralization

    PubMed Central

    Komarova, Svetlana V.; Safranek, Lee; Gopalakrishnan, Jay; Ou, Miao-jung Yvonne; McKee, Marc D.; Murshed, Monzur; Rauch, Frank; Zuhr, Erica

    2015-01-01

    Defective bone mineralization has serious clinical manifestations, including deformities and fractures, but the regulation of this extracellular process is not fully understood. We have developed a mathematical model consisting of ordinary differential equations that describe collagen maturation, production and degradation of inhibitors, and mineral nucleation and growth. We examined the roles of individual processes in generating normal and abnormal mineralization patterns characterized using two outcome measures: mineralization lag time and degree of mineralization. Model parameters describing the formation of hydroxyapatite mineral on the nucleating centers most potently affected the degree of mineralization, while the parameters describing inhibitor homeostasis most effectively changed the mineralization lag time. Of interest, a parameter describing the rate of matrix maturation emerged as being capable of counter-intuitively increasing both the mineralization lag time and the degree of mineralization. We validated the accuracy of model predictions using known diseases of bone mineralization such as osteogenesis imperfecta and X-linked hypophosphatemia. The model successfully describes the highly nonlinear mineralization dynamics, which includes an initial lag phase when osteoid is present but no mineralization is evident, then fast primary mineralization, followed by secondary mineralization characterized by a continuous slow increase in bone mineral content. The developed model can potentially predict the function for a mutated protein based on the histology of pathologic bone samples from mineralization disorders of unknown etiology. PMID:26347868

  7. Minerals Yearbook, 1989. Volume i. Metals and Minerals

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    The edition of the Minerals Yearbook discusses the performance of the worldwide mineral industry during 1989 and provides background information to assist in interpreting that performance. Volume I, Metals and Minerals, contains chapters on virtually all metallic and industrial mineral commodities important to the U.S. economy. A chapter on advanced materials also has been added to the Minerals Yearbook series beginning with the 1989 volume. In addition, a chapter on survey methods used in data collection with a statistical summary of nonfuel minerals and a chapter on trends in mining and quarrying in the metals and industrial mineral industries are included.

  8. Nanoscale Structure at Mineral-Fluid Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sturchio, N. C.; Sturchio, N. C.; Fenter, P.; Cheng, L.; Park, C.; Zhang, Z.; Zhang, Z.; Nagy, K. L.; Schlegel, M. L.

    2001-12-01

    The nature of nanoparticles and their role in the natural environment is currently a subject of renewed interest. The high surface area (and surface area-to-volume ratio) of nanoparticles exerts a widespread influence on geochemical reactions and transport processes. A thorough understanding of the nanoscale world remains largely hypothetical, however, because of the challenges associated with characterizing nanoscale structures and processes. Recent insights gained from high-resolution synchrotron x-ray reflectivity measurements at the solid-fluid interfaces of macroscopic (i.e., mm-scale) mineral particles may provide relevant guidelines for expected nanoparticle surface structures. For example, at calcite-water and barite-water interfaces, undercoordinated surface cations bond with water species of variable protonation, and modest relaxations (to several hundredths of a nanometer) affect the outermost unit cells [1,2]. Undercoordinated tetrahedral ions at aluminosilicate surfaces also bond with water species, whereas interstitial or interlayer alkali or alkaline earth ions at the surface may readily exchange with hydronium or other ions; modest relaxations also affect the outermost unit cells [3,4]. Modulation of liquid water structure out to about one nanometer has been observed at the (001) cleavage surface of muscovite in deionized water, and may be present at other mineral-fluid interfaces [4]. Dissolution mechanisms at the orthoclase-water interface have been clarified by combining x-ray reflectivity and scanning force microscopy measurements [5]. Further progress in understanding nanoscale structures and processes at macroscopic mineral-water interfaces is likely to benefit nanoparticle studies. [1] Fenter et al. (2000) Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 64, 1221-1228. [2] Fenter et al. (2001) J. Phys. Chem. B 105(34), 8112-8119. [3] Fenter et al. (2000) Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 64, 3663-3673. [4] Cheng et al. (2001) Phys. Rev. Lett., (in press). [5] Teng et al

  9. Hydrated Minerals in the Martian Southern Highlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wray, James J.; Seelos, F. P.; Murchie, S. L.; Squyres, S. W.

    2008-09-01

    Hydrated minerals including sulfates, phyllosilicates, and hydrated silica have been observed on the surface of Mars by the orbital near-infrared spectrometers OMEGA and CRISM [1,2]. Global maps from OMEGA [3,4] show that km-scale and larger exposures of these minerals are scattered widely throughout the planet's low and mid latitudes, but are relatively rare. Yet CRISM has found hundreds to thousands of Fe/Mg-phyllosilicate exposures in the highlands of Terra Tyrrhena alone [2], suggesting that smaller exposures may be much more common. To search for such exposures, we have surveyed the browse products from all PDS-released CRISM targeted observations (as of July 2008) across a large fraction of the Southern highlands, including the Noachis, Cimmeria, and Sirenum regions. Sulfates are observed in Noachian-aged terrains in each of these regions, including as far South as -63º latitude, suggesting that sulfate formation may have occurred locally or regionally throughout a large fraction of Martian history. Some of our strongest phyllosilicate detections occur adjacent to inferred chloride-bearing deposits [5] in Terra Sirenum. Also in Sirenum, the D 100 km Columbus crater contains light-toned, hydrated sulfate-bearing layers overlying materials that contain both a kaolin group clay and Fe/Mg-smectite clay, in different locations. However, phyllosilicates do not appear predominantly associated with impact craters in the regions surveyed, in contrast with Terra Tyrrhena [2]. We are currently searching for additional hydrated mineral exposures using CRISM multispectral data, providing further detail on their global distribution and identifying local areas of interest for future focused studies. [1] Bibring, J.-P. et al. (2005) Science 307, 1576-1581. [2] Mustard, J. F. et al. (2008) Nature 454, 305-309. [3] Bibring, J.-P. et al. (2006) Science 312, 400-404. [4] Poulet, F. et al. (2007) Mars 7, Abs. #3170. [5] Osterloo M. M. et al. (2008) Science 319, 1651-1654.

  10. The mineral economy of Brazil--Economia mineral do Brasil

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gurmendi, Alfredo C.; Barboza, Frederico Lopes; Thorman, Charles H.

    1999-01-01

    This study depicts the Brazilian government structure, mineral legislation and investment policy, taxation, foreign investment policies, environmental laws and regulations, and conditions in which the mineral industry operates. The report underlines Brazil's large and diversified mineral endowment. A total of 37 mineral commodities, or groups of closely related commodities, is discussed. An overview of the geologic setting of the major mineral deposits is presented. This report is presented in English and Portuguese in pdf format.

  11. Minerals yearbook, 1993. Volume 1. Metals and minerals. Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    This edition of the Minerals Yearbook discusses the performance of the worldwide minerals and materials industry during 1993 and provides background information to assist in interpreting that performance. It contains chapters on virtually all metallic and industrial mineral commodities important to the U.S. economy. A chapter on survey methods with a statistical summary of nonfuel minerals, and a chapter on trends in mining and quarrying in the metals and industrial mineral industries are also included.

  12. Minerals yearbook, 1994. Volume 1. Metals and minerals. Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    1994-12-31

    The edition of the Minerals Yearbook discusses the performance of the worldwide minerals and materials industry during 1994 and provides background information to assist in interpreting that performance. The volume I, Metals and Minerals, contains chapters on virtually all metallic and industrial mineral commodities important to the U.S. economy. The volume also contains chapters on Survey Methods, a Statistical Summary of Nonfuel Minerals, and Trends in Mining and Quarrying.

  13. Measuring the Hardness of Minerals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bushby, Jessica

    2005-01-01

    The author discusses Moh's hardness scale, a comparative scale for minerals, whereby the softest mineral (talc) is placed at 1 and the hardest mineral (diamond) is placed at 10, with all other minerals ordered in between, according to their hardness. Development history of the scale is outlined, as well as a description of how the scale is used…

  14. American Strategic Minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeYoung, John H., Jr.; Chidester, Alfred H.

    American Strategic Minerals is a collection of six papers that were presented in December 1982 at a conference organized by the Center for the Study of Marine Policy at the University of Delaware. According to editor Gerard J. Mangone, director of the center, the papers were commissioned “to investigate not only the objective resource situation, but also past United States policy on strategic minerals and future options open to Washington.” The authors and their chapter titles are John C. Kraft, University of Delaware: “Strategic minerals and world stability” V. Anthony Cammarota, Jr., U.S. Bureau of Mines: “America's dependence on strategic minerals” John D. Morgan, U.S. Bureau of Mines: “Future demands of the United States for strategic minerals” J. Robert Moore, University of Texas: “Alternative sources of strategic minerals from the seabed” Allan I. Mendelowitz and John E. Watson, U.S. General Accounting Office: “U.S. mining investments in developing countries” and James W. Curlin, Nautilus Press: “The political dimensions of strategic minerals.”

  15. Mineral Mapping with AVIRIS and EO-1 Hyperion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kruse, Fred A.

    2004-01-01

    Imaging Spectrometry data or Hyperspectral Imagery (HSI) acquired using airborne systems have been used in the geologic community since the early 1980 s and represent a mature technology (Goetz et al., 1985; Kruse et al., 1999). The solar spectral range, 0.4 to 2.5 m, provides abundant information about many important Earth-surface minerals (Clark et al., 1990). In particular, the 2.0 to 2.5 m (SWIR) spectral range covers spectral features of hydroxyl-bearing minerals, sulfates, and carbonates common to many geologic units and hydrothermal alteration assemblages. Previous research has proven the ability of airborne and spaceborne hyperspectral systems to uniquely identify and map these and other minerals, even in sub-pixel abundances (Kruse and Lefkoff, 1993; Boardman and Kruse, 1994; Boardman et al., 1995; Kruse, et al., 1999). This paper describes a case history for a site in northern Death Valley, California and Nevada along with selected SNR calculations/results for other sites around the world. Various hyperspectral mineral mapping results for this site have previously been presented and published (Kruse, 1988; Kruse et al., 1993, 1999, 2001, 2002, 2003), however, this paper presents a condensed summary of key details for hyperspectral data from 2000 and 2001 and the results of accuracy assessment for satellite hyperspectral data compared to airborne hyperspectral data used as ground truth.

  16. Green Clay Minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velde, B.

    2003-12-01

    Color is a problem for scientific study. One aspect is the vocabulary one used to describe color. Mint green, bottle green, and Kelly green are nice names but not of great utility in that people's physical perception of color is not always the same. In some industries, such as colored fabric manufacture, current use is to send a set of standard colors which are matched by the producer. This is similar to the use of the Munsell color charts in geology. None of these processes makes use of physical optical spectral studies. The reason is that they are difficult to obtain and interpret. For a geologist, color is very important but we rarely have the possibility to standardize the method of our color perception. One reason is that color is both a reflective and transmission phenomenon. The thickness of the sample is critical to any transmission characteristics. Hence, a field color determination is different from one made by using a petrographic microscope. Green glauconite in a hand specimen is not the same color in 30 μm thick thin section seen with a microscope using transmitted light.A second problem is that color in a spectral identification is the result of several absorption emissions,with overlapping signal, forming a complicated spectrum. Interpretation depends very greatly on the spectrum of the light source and the conditions of transmission-reflection of the sample. As a result, for this text, we will not attempt to analyze the physical aspect of green in green clays. In the discussion which follows, reference is made concerning color, to thin section microscopic perception.Very briefly, green clay minerals are green, because they contain iron. This is perhaps not a great revelation to mineralogists, but it is the key to understanding the origin and stability of green clay minerals. In fact, iron can color minerals either red or green or in various shades of orange and brown. The color most likely depends upon the relative abundance of the iron ion valence

  17. The Perils of Partition: Erroneous Results from Applying D Mineral/Magma to Rocks that Equilibrated Without Magma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treiman, A. H.

    1995-09-01

    10 x CI, no LREE enrichment, and no Eu depletion (Figure 1). The petrogenesis and planetologic implications of this "parent magma" must be fundamentally different from those of the original simple basalt. If the rock equilibrated at a temperature far below its solidus, each mineral species would appear to have had a different parent magma (because of the various temperature dependencies of the Dmineral/mineral(s)). In the above example, using deep-subsolidus Dmineral/mineral [6,7,8] and Dmineral/basalt, one would infer that each mineral had a distinct parent magma, with REE abundances in the order [whitlockite magma] ~? [augite magma] > [opx magma] > [plag magma]. This order looks like, but is not, the order of igneous crystallization. Figure 1: Calculated REE abundances in minerals of a eucrite basalt (CREE = 10 X CI), chemically equilibrated without magma present just below its solidus temperature. Also shown are calculated REE abundances in the "parent magma" that would be inferred by assuming that the mineral compositions reflected equilibration with a magma. References: [1] Jones J. H. (1995) ch. 7, Handbook of Physical Constants, Vol. 3, Chapter 7, AGU. [2] Barnes S. J. (1986) Contrib. Mineral. Petrol., 93, 524-531. [3] Consolmagno G. J. and Drake M. J. (1977) GCA, 41, 1271-1282. [4] Treiman A. H., GCA, submitted. [6] Floss C. (1991) Ph.D. thesis, Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri. [7] Pun A. and Papike J. J. (1994) LPS XXV, 1111-1112. [8] Stosch H.-G. (1982) GCA, 46, 793-811.

  18. Novel biological approaches to carbon mineralization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Power, Ian; Kenward, Paul; Harrison, Anna; Dipple, Gregory; Raudsepp, Mati; Wilson, Siobhan; Southam, Gordon

    2015-04-01

    supersaturated solutions in tens of days. Precipitates were positively identified as magnesite using transmission electron microscopy and selected area electron diffraction of a thin section produced by focus ion beam milling. These experiments represent an acceleration in magnesite formation of several orders of magnitude in comparison to naturally occurring magnesite at near-surface conditions and without requiring energy input (e.g., high temperature reactions). Our current focus is to further elucidate this reaction pathway and upscale precipitation for sequestering anthropogenic CO2. [1] Power et al. (2013) Rev. Mineral. Geochem. 77: 305-360. [2] Power et al. (2013) Int. J. Greenh. Gas Control. 16: 145-155. [3] Harrison et al. (2013) Environ. Sci. Technol. 47: 126-134. [4] Power et al. (2007) Geochem. Trans. 8, 13. [5] Hänchen et al. (2008) Chem. Eng. Sci. 63: 1012-1028. [6] Roberts et al. (2013) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A.. 110: 14540-14545. [7] Kenward et al. (2009) Geobiology 7: 556-565.

  19. Hydrothermal and Diagenetic Mineralization on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehlmann, B. L.; Quinn, D. P.

    2015-12-01

    Predicted by geophysical modeling, the mineraolgic record of early Mars groundwater has only recently been discovered. First, rover exploration in sedimentary basins reveals diagenesis. At Meridiani, sandstone porosity is occluded by precipitation of secondary sulfates, hematite, and silica. Multiple alteration episodes are indicated by crystal vugs, disruption of preexisting textures by hematite concretions, and grain coatings (e.g. McLennan et al., 2005). At Gale crater, raised ridges in mudstones, interpreted to be early diagenetic features, are crossed by later-emplaced hydrated calcium sulfate veins (e.g. Grotzinger et al., 2014). Waters in Gale were likely circumneutral while jarosite mineralogy at Meridiani implies acidic waters. Second, systems of raised ridges at 100-m scale are observed from orbit in multiple Martian sedimentary rock units. An outstanding example is sulfate-bearing sediments exhumed at the northern margin of the Syrtis Major lavas (e.g. Quinn & Ehlmann, 2015). Polygonal and with no clearly preferred orientation, the ridges rise 5-30 m above the surrounding terrain. Parallel light-toned grooves with dark interiors (indicative of isopachous fills) and jarosite in ridge mineralogy point to mineralization by acidic waters. Third, some mineral assemblages observed from orbit represent the products of subsurface aqueous alteration at elevated temperatures (Ehlmann et al., 2011). These are globally distributed, exposed in scarps and by impact cratering. Mineral assemblages variously include (a) serpentine and carbonate; (b) prehnite and chlorite, and (c) zeolites. Collectively, these datasets indicate that groundwaters were spatially widespread on ancient Mars, contributing to the sustenance of lakes and to the alteration of bedrock to >1 km depths. While the Martian surface may have always been relatively inhospitable, a warmer, wetter subsurface provided a long-term potentially habitable environment. Key outstanding questions remaining include

  20. Minerals Yearbook 1989: Boron

    SciTech Connect

    Lyday, P.A.

    1990-08-01

    U.S. production and sales of boron minerals and chemicals decreased during the year. Domestically, glass fiber insulation was the largest use for borates, followed by sales to distributors, textile-grade glass fibers, and borosilicate glasses. California was the only domestic source of boron minerals. The United States continued to provide essentially all of its own supply while maintaining a strong position as a source of sodium borate products and boric acid exported to foreign markets. Supplementary U.S. imports of Turkish calcium borate and calcium-sodium borate ores, borax, and boric acid, primarily for various glass uses, continued.

  1. Oxalate minerals on Mars?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Applin, D. M.; Izawa, M. R. M.; Cloutis, E. A.; Goltz, D.; Johnson, J. R.

    2015-06-01

    Small amounts of unidentified organic compounds have only recently been inferred on Mars despite strong reasons to expect significant concentrations and decades of searching. Based on X-ray diffraction and reflectance spectroscopic analyses we show that solid oxalic acid and its most common mineral salts are stable under the pressure and ultraviolet irradiation environment of the surface of Mars, and could represent a heretofore largely overlooked reservoir of organic carbon in the martian near-surface. In addition to the delivery to Mars by carbonaceous chondrites, oxalate minerals are among the predicted breakdown products of meteoritic organic matter delivered to the martian surface, as well as any endogenic organic carbon reaching the martian surface from the interior. A reinterpretation of pyrolysis experiments from the Viking, Phoenix, and Mars Science Laboratory missions shows that all are consistent with the presence of significant concentrations of oxalate minerals. Oxalate minerals could be important in numerous martian geochemical processes, including acting as a possible nitrogen sink (as ammonium oxalate), and contributing to the formation of “organic” carbonates, methane, and hydroxyl radicals.

  2. Marine mineral resources

    SciTech Connect

    Fillmore, E.

    1990-01-01

    This book includes the following topics: law of the sea; minerals of the deep seabed; placers and subseabed metallics; industrial chemical materials and coal; the United State exclusive economic zone: the management challenge; and the United Kingdom and Norway: offshore petroleum development policies.

  3. Bioleaching of Minerals

    SciTech Connect

    F. Roberto

    2002-02-01

    Bioleaching is the term used to describe the microbial dissolution of metals from minerals. The commercial bioleaching of metals, particularly those hosted in sulfide minerals, is supported by the technical disciplines of biohydrometallurgy, hydrometallurgy, pyrometallurgy, chemistry, electrochemistry, and chemical engineering. The study of the natural weathering of these same minerals, above and below ground, is also linked to the fields of geomicrobiology and biogeochemistry. Studies of abandoned and disused mines indicate that the alterations of the natural environment due to man's activities leave as remnants microbiological activity that continues the biologically mediated release of metals from the host rock (acid rock drainage; ARD). A significant fraction of the world's copper, gold and uranium is now recovered by exploiting native or introduced microbial communities. While some members of these unique communities have been extensively studied for the past 50 years, our knowledge of the composition of these communities, and the function of the individual species present remains relatively limited. Nevertheless, bioleaching represents a major strategy in mineral resource recovery whose importance will increase as ore reserves decline in quality, become more difficult to process (due to increased depth, increased need for comminution, for example), and as environmental considerations eliminate traditional physical processes such as smelting, which have served the mining industry for hundreds of years.

  4. Oxidants from Pulverized Minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martel, L. M. V.

    2007-06-01

    Joel Hurowitz (previously at State University of New York at Stony Brook and now at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory), Nick Tosca, Scott McLennan, and Martin Schoonen (SUNY at Stony Brook) studied the production of hydrogen peroxide from freshly pulverized minerals in solution. Their experiments focused on olivine, augite, and labradorite; silicate minerals of basaltic planetary surfaces, such as the Moon and Mars, that are exposed to the intense crushing and grinding of impact cratering processes. The hydrogen peroxide produced in the experiments was enough to adequately explain the oxidizing nature of Martian regolith first determined by the Viking Landers and the results suggest, for the first time, that mechanically activated mineral surfaces may be an important part of the overall explanation for the Viking Lander biology experiment results. Hurowitz and coauthors further showed that when the pulverized minerals are heat-treated to high temperature under vacuum (to cause dehydroxylation) there is almost a 20 times increase in hydrogen peroxide production, a result which may be highly relevant to lunar dust. These careful studies demonstrate the importance of and concern about reactive dusts on planetary surfaces from two standpoints: the health of astronauts on surface maneuvers who may inadvertently breath it and the viability of possible Martian organic species to survive in such a corrosive, antiseptic surface environment.

  5. Identification of Minerals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allison, Diane

    2005-01-01

    The lab described in this article was developed to satisfy two major goals. First, the activity is designed to show students the proper techniques used to identify the seven characteristics of all minerals. Second, the lab gives students a glimpse into the life of a professional field geologist. The author has students complete this lab at the end…

  6. Clay Mineral: Radiological Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cotomácio, J. G.; Silva, P. S. C.; Mazzilli, B. P.

    2008-08-01

    Since the early days, clays have been used for therapeutic purposes. Nowadays, most minerals applied as anti-inflammatory, pharmaceutics and cosmetic are the clay minerals that are used as the active ingredient or, as the excipient, in formulations. Although their large use, few information is available in literature on the content of the radionuclide concentrations of uranium and thorium natural series and 40K in these clay minerals. The objective of this work is to determine the concentrations of 238U, 232Th, 226Ra, 228Ra, 210Pb and 40K in commercial samples of clay minerals used for pharmaceutical or cosmetic purposes. Two kinds of clays samples were obtained in pharmacies, named green clay and white clay. Measurement for the determination of 238U and 232Th activity concentration was made by alpha spectrometry and gamma spectrometry was used for 226Ra, 228Ra, 210Pb and 40K determination. Some physical-chemical parameters were also determined as organic carbon and pH. The average activity concentration obtained was 906±340 Bq kg-1 for 40K, 40±9 Bq kg-1 for 226Ra, 75±9 Bq kg-1 for 228Ra, 197±38 Bq kg-1 for 210Pb, 51±26 Bq kg-1 for 238U and 55±24 Bq kg-1 for 232Th, considering both kinds of clay.

  7. Minerals yearbook 1977. Volume I. Metals and minerals

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-01-01

    This report contains chapters on virtually all metallic and nonmetallic mineral commodities important to the domestic economy. In addition, it includes a general review chapter on the mineral industries, a chapter on mining and quarrying trends, and a statistical summary.

  8. Predicting the Mineral Composition of Dust Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perlwitz, J. P.; Perez, C.; Miller, R. L.; Rodriguez, S.

    2012-12-01

    at Izaña is based on a 9 year period (2002-2010) and three size fractions (total, PM10 and PM2.5). One approach is solely based on the data base of soil mineralogy provided by Claquin et al. (1999). We show that this data base alone is not sufficient to realistically represent the soil dust composition in the atmosphere. In our second approach, we complement the Claquin-data base with information on the size distribution of minerals, derived from published measurements (Kandler et al., 2009), with which we are able to achieve a significant improvement of the model skill compared to measurements. Claquin, T., M. Schulz, and Y. J. Balkanski (1999), Modeling the mineralogy of atmospheric dust sources, J. Geophys. Res., 104(D18), 22,243--22,256, doi: 10.1029/1999JD900416. Kandler, K., L. Schütz, C. Deutscher, M. Ebert, H. Hofmann, S. Jäckel, R. Jaenicke, P. Knippertz, K. Lieke, A. Massling, A. Petzold, A. Schladitz, B. Weinzierl, A. Wiedensohler, S. Zorn, and S. Weinbruch (2009), Size distribution, mass concentration, chemical and mineralogical composition and derived optical parameters of the boundary layer aerosol at Tinfou, Morocco, during SAMUM2006, Tellus, 61B(1), 32--50, doi: 10.1111/j.1600-0889.2008.00385.x.

  9. Al Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandanayaka, Tharaka; Azarmi, Fardad

    2014-05-01

    In the present study, cold spraying technique was used to fabricate a metal matrix composite (MMC) that consists of Ni matrix and 20 vol.% Ni3Al particles at two different particle sizes as reinforcement. This study intends to investigate the effect of reinforcement particle size on microstructural and mechanical properties of cold sprayed MMCs. Two different Ni3Al powders with nominal particle size of -45 to +5 and +45 to 100 μm were used as reinforcement in this study. Cold sprayed Ni-Ni3Al samples were subjected to the microstructural observation and characterization prior to any mechanical testing. Then, samples were tested using nano-indentation, Knoop hardness, Vickers hardness, and Resonance frequency to evaluate their mechanical properties. No significant changes were observed in microstructural characteristics due to different particle sizes. The results obtained from a variety of mechanical testings indicated that the increasing reinforcement particle size resulted in the slight reduction of mechanical properties such as elastic modulus and hardness in cold sprayed MMCs. The mechanical interlock between deposited particles defines the bonding strength in cold sprayed samples. Small size particles have a higher velocity and impact resulting in stronger interlock between deformed particles.

  10. 77 FR 61022 - Notice of Realty Action: Notice of Receipt of Conveyance of Mineral Interest Application, Santa...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-05

    ... Bureau of Land Management Notice of Realty Action: Notice of Receipt of Conveyance of Mineral Interest..., et al., for the conveyance of the federally owned mineral interests underlying a 1,148.68 acre tract... mineral interests in the land covered by the application from all forms of appropriation under the...

  11. Carbon Mineral Ecology: Predicting the Undiscovered Minerals of Carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazen, R. M.; Hummer, D. R.; Downs, R. T.; Hystad, G.; Golden, J.

    2015-12-01

    The diversity and distribution of Earth's minerals through deep time reflects key events in our planet's crustal evolution. Studies in mineral ecology exploit mineralogical databases to document diversity-distribution relationships of minerals, which reveal that all carbon-bearing minerals, as well as subsets containing C with O, H, Ca, or Na, conform to Large Number of Rare Events (LNRE) distributions. LNRE models facilitate prediction of total mineral diversity, and thus point to minerals that exist on Earth but have not yet been discovered and described. Our model predicts that at least 548 C minerals exist on Earth today, indicating that at least 145 carbon-bearing mineral species have yet to be discovered. Furthermore, by analyzing subsets of the most common additional elements in carbon-bearing minerals (i.e., 378 C + O species; 282 C + H species; 133 C + Ca species; and 100 C + Na species), we predict that 129 of these missing carbon minerals contain oxygen, 118 contain hydrogen, 52 contain calcium, and more than 60 contain sodium. The majority of these as yet undescribed minerals are predicted to be hydrous carbonates, many of which may have been overlooked because they are colorless, poorly crystalized, and/or water-soluble. We propose the identities of plausible as yet undescribed carbon minerals, as well as search strategies for their discovery. Some of these minerals will be natural examples of known synthetic compounds, including carbides such as calcium carbide (CaC2), crystalline hydrocarbons such as pyrene (C16H10), and numerous oxalates, anhydrous carbonates, and hydrous carbonates. Many other missing carbon minerals will be isomorphs of known carbon minerals, notably of the more than 100 different hydrous carbonate structures. An understanding of Earth's "missing" minerals provides a more complete picture of geochemical processes that influence crustal evolution.

  12. Minerals Yearbook, 1988. Volume 1. Metals and minerals

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    Volume I of the 1988 Minerals Yearbook, covering metals and minerals, contains 79 commodity or commodity group chapters with data on approximately 90 minerals that were obtained as a result of the mineral information gathering activities of the U.S. Bureau of Mines. In addition, the volume contains chapters on mining and quarrying trends and on the statistical surveying methods used by the Bureau of Mines and a statistical summary.

  13. Minerals yearbook, 1984. Volume 1. Metals and minerals

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-01-01

    The volume of the Minerals Yearbook, covering metals and minerals, contains 72 commodity or commodity group chapters with data on approximately 90 minerals that were obtained as a result of the mineral information gathering activities of the Bureau of Mines. In addition, the volume contains a chapter on mining and quarrying trends, a chapter discussing the statistical surveying methods used by the Bureau of Mines, and a statistical summary.

  14. Minerals yearbook, 1985. Volume 1. Metals and minerals

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-01-01

    This volume of the 1985 Minerals Yearbook, covering metals and minerals, contains 72 commodity or commodity group chapters with data on approximately 90 minerals that were obtained as a result of the mineral information gathering activities of the Bureau of Mines. In addition, the volume contains a chapter on mining and quarrying trends, a chapter discussing the statistical surveying methods used by the Bureau of Mines, and a statistical summary.

  15. Radioactive minerals - Multimedias strategies for their divulgation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabral, João; Gomes, Ana; Aldano, Ana; Fonseca, Pedro; Cabral, Tiago; Nobre, José

    2014-05-01

    The region corresponding to Sortelha-Penalobo - Bendada, located deep in the transition zone between the Hesperian massif and the Cova da Beira in the central part of Portugal, more specifically in the Mountainous region of the province of Beira Alta, county Sabugal. This region is characterized by great mineral wealth combined with geomorphology of recognized landscape value. Under the scientific point of view, this region is the origin of the mineral sabugalite (HAl(UO2)4(PO4)4.16H2O) that was described by the famous American mineralogist Clifford Frondel (1907-2002) in the fifties of the 20th century. Uranium minerals of Sabugal region were also associated with the radioactivity studies made by the well-known French physicist Marie Curie (1867-1934). In 2007, U. Kolitsch et al described the Bendadaite (Fe (AsO4) 2 (OH) 2 • 4H2O), which corresponds to a new mineral from the group arthurite. The mineral wealth of this region is responsible for a rich history of mining and to highlight the importance until the 1990s the extraction of uranium minerals. The main uranium minerals extracted were the tobernite (Cu (UO2) 2 (PO4) 2 • 12 H2O), the metatobernite (Cu (UO2) 2 (PO4) 2 • 8 H 2 O), the autonite (Ca (UO2) 2 (PO4 ) 2 • 12H2O-10) and sabugalite (HAL (UO2) 4 (PO4) 4 16H2O). Due to the high radioactivity of these minerals, their handling becomes infeasible for disclosure purposes. An integrated and multidisciplinary museological strategy aims to access 3D images by QR codes, using multitouch as the primary means of interaction with the user, and can handle even the virtual samples, access various magnifications and enjoy explanations supplied by a mascot, in a fun way. All this framework and geological environment becomes an asset for the scientific, educational and economic development of the region. On the other hand, it has a vital importance in the context of a strategy of forming a geological park, in the point of view of tourism, research and

  16. Mineral oil soluble borate compositions

    SciTech Connect

    Dulat, J.

    1981-09-15

    Alkali metal borates are reacted with fatty acids or oils in the presence of a low hlb value surfactant to give a stable mineral oil-soluble product. Mineral oil containing the borate can be used as a cutting fluid.

  17. Raman spectroscopy of garnet-group minerals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mingsheng, P.; Mao, Ho-kwang; Dien, L.; Chao, E.C.T.

    1994-01-01

    The Raman spectra of the natural end members of the garnet-group minerals, which include pyrope, almandine and spessarite of Fe-Al garnet series and grossularite, andradite and uvarovite of Ca-Fe garnet series, have been studied. Measured Raman spectra of these minerals are reasonably and qualitatively assigned to the internal modes, translational and rotatory modes of SiO4 tetrahedra, as well as the translational motion of bivalent cations in the X site. The stretch and rotatory Alg modes for the Fe-Al garnet series show obvious Raman shifts as compared with those for the Ca-Fe garnet series, owing to the cations residing in the X site connected with SiO4 tetrahedra by sharing the two edges. The Raman shifts of all members within either of the series are attributed mainly to the properties of cations in the X site for the Fe-Al garnet series and in the Y site for the Ca-Fe garnet series. ?? 1994 Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  18. Mineral bridges in nacre.

    PubMed

    Checa, Antonio G; Cartwright, Julyan H E; Willinger, Marc-Georg

    2011-12-01

    We confirm with high-resolution techniques the existence of mineral bridges between superposed nacre tablets. In the towered nacre of both gastropods and the cephalopod Nautilus there are large bridges aligned along the tower axes, corresponding to gaps (150-200nm) in the interlamellar membranes. Gaps are produced by the interaction of the nascent tablets with a surface membrane that covers the nacre compartment. In the terraced nacre of bivalves bridges associated with elongated gaps in the interlamellar membrane (>100nm) have mainly been found at or close to the edges of superposed parental tablets. To explain this placement, we hypothesize that the interlamellar membrane breaks due to differences in osmotic pressure across it when the interlamellar space below becomes reduced at an advanced stage of calcification. In no cases are the minor connections between superimposed tablets (<60nm), earlier reported to be mineral bridges, found to be such.

  19. Minerals and mine drainage

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, H.C.; Thomson, B.M.

    2009-09-15

    A review of literature published in 2008 and early 2009 on research related to the production of acid mine drainage and/or in the dissolution of minerals as a result of mining, with special emphasis on the effects of these phenomena on the water quality in the surrounding environment, is presented. This review is divided into six sections: 1) Site Characterization and Assessment, 2) Protection, Prevention, and Restoration, 3) Toxicity Assessment, 4) Environmental Fate and Transport, 5) Biological Characterization, and 6) Treatment Technologies. Because there is much overlap in research areas associated with minerals and mine drainage, many papers presented in this review can be classified into more than one category, and the six sections should not be regarded as being mutually-exclusive, nor should they be thought of as being all-inclusive.

  20. Clay Mineral: Radiological Characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Cotomacio, J. G.; Silva, P. S. C.; Mazzilli, B. P

    2008-08-07

    Since the early days, clays have been used for therapeutic purposes. Nowadays, most minerals applied as anti-inflammatory, pharmaceutics and cosmetic are the clay minerals that are used as the active ingredient or, as the excipient, in formulations. Although their large use, few information is available in literature on the content of the radionuclide concentrations of uranium and thorium natural series and {sup 40}K in these clay minerals.The objective of this work is to determine the concentrations of {sup 238}U, {sup 232}Th, {sup 226}Ra, {sup 228}Ra, {sup 210}Pb and {sup 40}K in commercial samples of clay minerals used for pharmaceutical or cosmetic purposes. Two kinds of clays samples were obtained in pharmacies, named green clay and white clay.Measurement for the determination of {sup 238}U and {sup 232}Th activity concentration was made by alpha spectrometry and gamma spectrometry was used for {sup 226}Ra, {sup 228}Ra, {sup 210}Pb and {sup 40}K determination. Some physical-chemical parameters were also determined as organic carbon and pH. The average activity concentration obtained was 906{+-}340 Bq kg{sup -1} for {sup 40}K, 40{+-}9 Bq kg{sup -1} for {sup 226}Ra, 75{+-}9 Bq kg{sup -1} for {sup 228}Ra, 197{+-}38 Bq kg{sup -1} for {sup 210}Pb, 51{+-}26 Bq kg{sup -1} for {sup 238}U and 55{+-}24 Bq kg{sup -1} for {sup 232}Th, considering both kinds of clay.

  1. Salton sea minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Peter M.

    The long-held notion that precious metals, minerals, and other useful substances can be extracted from natural waters is starting to become realized at several locations of geothermal brines. In a recent study by A. Maimoni of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory it was determined that there is a high potential for minerals recovery from the hot brines of a 1000-MWe geothermal power station at the Salton Sea geothermal field in southern California. The study estimated that the revenue from the minerals could substantially exceed that from the power station (Geothermics, 11, 239-258, 1982).According to the study, ‘A 1000-MWe power plant could recover 14-31% of the U.S. demand for manganese.’ In the example of lithium production, such a geothermal plant could produce 5-10 times the annual world output of lithium. Large quantities of lead and zinc could be extracted, as well as significant amounts of gold, platinum, and silver. The chemical composition of the brines is incredibly complex, however, for reasons not currently understood.

  2. Clay Mineral Preferred Orientation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Day-Stirrat, R. J.

    2014-12-01

    Anisotropy of the orientation of clay minerals, often referred to as texture, may be unique to sediments' deposition, composition, deformation or diagenetic history. The literature is rich with studies that include preferred orientation generation in fault gouge, low-grade metamorphic rocks, sediments with variable clay content and during the smectite-to-illite transformation. Untangling the interplay between many competing factors in any one geologic situation has proven a significant challenge over many years. Understanding how, where and when clay minerals develop a preferred orientation has significant implications for permeability anisotropy in shallow burial, the way mechanical properties are projected from shallower to deeper settings in basin modeling packages and the way velocity anisotropy is accounted for in seismic data processing. The assessment of the anisotropic properties of fine-grained siliciclastic rocks is gaining significant momentum in rock physics research. Therefore, a fundamental understanding of how clay minerals develop a preferred orientation in space and time is crucial to the understanding of anisotropy of physical properties. The current study brings together a wealth of data that may be used in a predictive sense to account for fabric anisotropy that may impact any number of rock properties.

  3. Biological impact on mineral dissolution: Application of the lichen model to understanding mineral weathering in the rhizosphere

    PubMed Central

    Banfield, Jillian F.; Barker, William W.; Welch, Susan A.; Taunton, Anne

    1999-01-01

    Microorganisms modify rates and mechanisms of chemical and physical weathering and clay growth, thus playing fundamental roles in soil and sediment formation. Because processes in soils are inherently complex and difficult to study, we employ a model based on the lichen–mineral system to identify the fundamental interactions. Fixed carbon released by the photosynthetic symbiont stimulates growth of fungi and other microorganisms. These microorganisms directly or indirectly induce mineral disaggregation, hydration, dissolution, and secondary mineral formation. Model polysaccharides were used to investigate direct mediation of mineral surface reactions by extracellular polymers. Polysaccharides can suppress or enhance rates of chemical weathering by up to three orders of magnitude, depending on the pH, mineral surface structure and composition, and organic functional groups. Mg, Mn, Fe, Al, and Si are redistributed into clays that strongly adsorb ions. Microbes contribute to dissolution of insoluble secondary phosphates, possibly via release of organic acids. These reactions significantly impact soil fertility. Below fungi–mineral interfaces, mineral surfaces are exposed to dissolved metabolic byproducts. Through this indirect process, microorganisms can accelerate mineral dissolution, leading to enhanced porosity and permeability and colonization by microbial communities. PMID:10097050

  4. Major issues in miner health.

    PubMed Central

    Joyce, S

    1998-01-01

    As recently as the last few decades, thousands of miners died in explosions, roof collapses, fires, and floods each year, and lung disease caused by inhaling mineral dusts was ubiquitous. Miners worked virtually unprotected, and were often treated as expendable bodies fulfilling critical roles in this important industry, which in the United States comprises about 5% of the gross domestic product. PMID:9799195

  5. Minerals yearbook, 1992. Volume 1. Metals and minerals. Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    This edition of the Minerals Yearbook discusses the performance of the worldwide mineral and materials industry during 1992 and provides background information to assist in interpreting that performance. Content of the individual Yearbook volumes follows: Volume I, Metals and Minerals, contains chapters on virtually all metallic and industrial mineral commodities important to the U.S. economy. Chapters on advanced materials, nonrenewable organic materials, and nonferrous metals recycling also were added to the Minerals Yearbook series beginning with the 1989, 1990, and 1991 volumes, respectively. A new chapter on materials recycling has been initiated in this 1992 volume. In addition, a chapter on survey methods used in data collection with a statistical summary of nonfuel minerals and a chapter on trends in mining and quarrying in the metals and industrial mineral industries are included.

  6. Minerals yearbook, 1991. Volume 1. Metals and minerals. Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    1991-12-31

    This edition of the Mineral Yearbook discusses the performance of the worlwide minerals and materials industry during 1991 and provides background information to assist in interpreting that performance. Volume 1, Metals and Mineral, contains chapters on virtually all metallic and industrial mineral commodities important to the U.S. economy. Chapters on advanced materials and nonrenewable organic materials also were added to the Minerals Yearbook series beginning with the 1989 and 1990 volumes, respectively. A new chapter on nonferrous metals recycling has been initiated in this 1991 volume. In addition, a chapter on survey methods used in data collection with a statistical summary of nonfuel minerals and a chapter on trends in mining and quarrying in the metals and industrial mineral industries are included.

  7. Enzymatic mineralization of silk scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Samal, Sangram K; Dash, Mamoni; Declercq, Heidi A; Gheysens, Tom; Dendooven, Jolien; Van Der Voort, Pascal; Cornelissen, Ria; Dubruel, Peter; Kaplan, David L

    2014-07-01

    The present study focuses on the alkaline phosphatase (ALP) mediated formation of apatitic minerals on porous silk fibroin protein (SFP) scaffolds. Porous SFP scaffolds impregnated with different concentrations of ALP are homogeneously mineralized under physiological conditions. The mineral structure is apatite while the structures differ as a function of the ALP concentration. Cellular adhesion, proliferation, and colonization of osteogenic MC3T3 cells improve on the mineralized SFP scaffolds. These findings suggest a simple process to generate mineralized scaffolds that can be used to enhanced bone tissue engineering-related utility. PMID:24610728

  8. 43 CFR 19.8 - Prospecting, mineral locations, mineral patents, and mineral leasing within National Forest...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    .... 2 of 43 CFR, which appears in Volume II of the List of CFR Sections Affected, 1964-1972, for the... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Prospecting, mineral locations, mineral patents, and mineral leasing within National Forest Wilderness. 19.8 Section 19.8 Public Lands:...

  9. 43 CFR 19.8 - Prospecting, mineral locations, mineral patents, and mineral leasing within National Forest...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    .... 2 of 43 CFR, which appears in Volume II of the List of CFR Sections Affected, 1964-1972, for the... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Prospecting, mineral locations, mineral patents, and mineral leasing within National Forest Wilderness. 19.8 Section 19.8 Public Lands:...

  10. 43 CFR 19.8 - Prospecting, mineral locations, mineral patents, and mineral leasing within National Forest...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    .... 2 of 43 CFR, which appears in Volume II of the List of CFR Sections Affected, 1964-1972, for the... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2012-10-01 2011-10-01 true Prospecting, mineral locations, mineral patents, and mineral leasing within National Forest Wilderness. 19.8 Section 19.8 Public Lands:...

  11. 43 CFR 19.8 - Prospecting, mineral locations, mineral patents, and mineral leasing within National Forest...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    .... 2 of 43 CFR, which appears in Volume II of the List of CFR Sections Affected, 1964-1972, for the... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Prospecting, mineral locations, mineral patents, and mineral leasing within National Forest Wilderness. 19.8 Section 19.8 Public Lands:...

  12. 43 CFR 19.8 - Prospecting, mineral locations, mineral patents, and mineral leasing within National Forest...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    .... 2 of 43 CFR, which appears in Volume II of the List of CFR Sections Affected, 1964-1972, for the... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Prospecting, mineral locations, mineral patents, and mineral leasing within National Forest Wilderness. 19.8 Section 19.8 Public Lands:...

  13. Water, mineral waters and health.

    PubMed

    Petraccia, Luisa; Liberati, Giovanna; Masciullo, Stefano Giuseppe; Grassi, Marcello; Fraioli, Antonio

    2006-06-01

    The authors focus on water resources and the use of mineral waters in human nutrition, especially in the different stages of life, in physical activity and in the presence of some morbid conditions. Mineral water is characterized by its purity at source, its content in minerals, trace elements and other constituents, its conservation and its healing properties recognized by the Ministry of Health after clinical and pharmacological trials. Based on total salt content in grams after evaporation of 1l mineral water dried at 180 degrees C (dry residues), mineral waters can be classified as: waters with a very low mineral content, waters low in mineral content, waters with a medium mineral content, and strongly mineralized waters. Based on ion composition mineral waters can be classified as: bicarbonate waters, sulfate waters, sodium chloride or saltwater, sulfuric waters. Based on biological activity mineral waters can be classified as: diuretic waters, cathartic waters, waters with antiphlogistic properties. Instructions for use, doses, and current regulations are included.

  14. Electron microprobe mineral analysis guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, R. W.

    1980-01-01

    Electron microprobe mineral analysis guide is a compilation of X-ray tables and spectra recorded from various mineral matrices. Spectra were obtained using electron microprobe, equipped with LiF geared, curved crystal X-ray spectrometers, utilizing typical analytical operating conditions: 15 Kv acceleration potential, 0.02 microampere sample current as measured on a clinopyroxene standard (CP19). Tables and spectra are presented for the majority of elements, fluorine through uranium, occurring in mineral samples from lunar, meteoritic and terrestrial sources. Tables for each element contain relevant analytical information, i.e., analyzing crystal, X-ray peak, background and relative intensity information, X-ray interferences and a section containing notes on the measurement. Originally intended to cover silicates and oxide minerals the tables and spectra have been expanded to cover other mineral phases. Electron microprobe mineral analysis guide is intended as a spectral base to which additional spectra can be added as the analyst encounters new mineral matrices.

  15. Hearing protection for miners

    SciTech Connect

    Schulz, T.

    2008-10-15

    A NIOSH analysis showed that at age 50 approximately 90% of coal miners have a hearing impairment, yet noise included hearing loss is 100% preventable. The article discusses requirements of the MSHA regulations, 30 CFR Part 62 - occupational noise exposure (2000) and a 2008-MSHA document describing technologically achievable and promising controls for several types of mining machinery. Hearing protection is still required for exposure to greater than 90 dBA. These are now commercially available ways to determine how much attenuation an individual gets from a given hearing protector, known as 'fit testing'. 3 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab., 1 photo.

  16. Mineral industries of the USSR - 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    The report discusses mainly the mineral industries in the USSR, with a small section included concerning the mineral industries of Poland. Topics discussed include labor, foreign trade, metals, non-metallic minerals, and mineral fuels.

  17. Recommended nomenclature for zeolite minerals: report of the subcommittee on zeolites of the International Mineralogical Association, Commission of New Minerals and Mineral Names

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coombs, D.S.; Alberti, A.; Armbruster, T.; Artioli, G.; Colella, C.; Galli, E.; Grice, Joel D.; Liebau, F.; Mandarino, J.A.; Minato, H.; Nickel, E.H.; Passaglia, E.; Peacor, D.R.; Quartieri, S.; Rinaldi, R.; Ross, M.; Sheppard, R.A.; Tillmanns, E.; Vezzalini, G.

    1998-01-01

    This report embodies recommendations on zeolite nomenclature approved by the International Mineralogical Association Commission of New Minerals and Mineral Names. In a working definition of a zeolite mineral used for review, interrupted tetrahedral framework structures are accepted where other zeolitic properties prevail, and complete substitution by elements other than Si and Al is allowed. Separate species are recognized in topologically distinctive compositional series in which different extra-framework cations are the most abundance in atomic proportions. To name these, the appropriate chemical symbol is attached by a hyphen to the series name as a suffix except for the names harmotome, pollucite and wairakite in the phillipsite and analcime series. Differences in space-group symmetry and in order-disorder relationships in zeolites having the same topologically distinctive framework do not in general provide adequate grounds for recognition of separate species. Zeolite species are not to be distinguished solely on Si:Al ratio except for heulandite (Si:Al < 4.0) and clinoptilolite (Si:Al ??? 4.0). Dehydration, partial hydration, and over-hydration are not sufficient grounds for the recognition of separate species of zeolites. Use of the term 'ideal formula' should be avoided in referring to a simplified or averaged formula of a zeolite. Newly recognized species in compositional series are as follows: brewsterite-Sr.-Ba: chabazite-Ca.-Na.-K; clinoptilolite-K, -Na, -Ca: dachiardite-Ca, -Na; erionite-K, -Ca: faujasite-Na, -Ca, -Na: paulingite-K. -Ca; phillipsite-Na, -Ca, -Ka; stilbite-Ca, -Na. Key references, type locality, origin of name, chemical data. IZA structure-type symbols, space-group symmetry; unit-cell dimensions, and comments on structure are listed for 13 compositional series, 82 accepted zeolite mineral species, and three of doubtful status. Herschelite, leonhardite, svetlozarite, and wellsite are discredited as mineral species names. Obsolete and

  18. Fe-Impregnated Mineral Colloids for Peroxide Activation: Effects of Mineral Substrate and Fe Precursor.

    PubMed

    Li, Yue; Machala, Libor; Yan, Weile

    2016-02-01

    Heterogeneous iron species at the mineral/water interface are important catalysts for the generation of reactive oxygen species at circumneutral pH. One significant pathway leading to the formation of such species arises from deposition of dissolved iron onto mineral colloids due to changes in redox conditions. This study investigates the catalytic properties of Fe impregnated on silica, alumina, and titania nanoparticles (as prototypical mineral colloids). Fe impregnation was carried out by immersing the mineral nanoparticles in dilute Fe(II) or Fe(III) solutions at pH 6 and 3, respectively, in an aerobic environment. The uptake of iron per unit surface area follows the order of nTiO2 > nAl2O3 > nSiO2 for both types of Fe precursors. Impregnation of mineral particles in Fe(II) solutions results in predominantly Fe(III) species due to efficient surface-mediated oxidation. The catalytic activity of the impregnated solids to produce hydroxyl radical (·OH) from H2O2 decomposition was evaluated using benzoic acid as a probe compound under dark conditions. Invariably, the rates of benzoic acid oxidation with different Fe-laden particles increase with the surface density of Fe until a critical density above which the catalytic activity approaches a plateau, suggesting active Fe species are formed predominantly at low surface loadings. The critical surface density of Fe varies with the mineral substrate as well as the aqueous Fe precursor. Fe impregnated on TiO2 exhibits markedly higher activity than its Al2O3 and SiO2 counterparts. The speciation of interfacial Fe is analyzed with diffuse reflectance UV-vis analysis and interpretation of the data in the context of benzoic oxidation rates suggests that the surface activity of the solids for ·OH generation correlates strongly with the isolated (i.e., mononuclear) Fe species. Therefore, iron dispersed on mineral colloids is a significant form of reactive iron surfaces in the aquatic environment.

  19. Fe-Impregnated Mineral Colloids for Peroxide Activation: Effects of Mineral Substrate and Fe Precursor.

    PubMed

    Li, Yue; Machala, Libor; Yan, Weile

    2016-02-01

    Heterogeneous iron species at the mineral/water interface are important catalysts for the generation of reactive oxygen species at circumneutral pH. One significant pathway leading to the formation of such species arises from deposition of dissolved iron onto mineral colloids due to changes in redox conditions. This study investigates the catalytic properties of Fe impregnated on silica, alumina, and titania nanoparticles (as prototypical mineral colloids). Fe impregnation was carried out by immersing the mineral nanoparticles in dilute Fe(II) or Fe(III) solutions at pH 6 and 3, respectively, in an aerobic environment. The uptake of iron per unit surface area follows the order of nTiO2 > nAl2O3 > nSiO2 for both types of Fe precursors. Impregnation of mineral particles in Fe(II) solutions results in predominantly Fe(III) species due to efficient surface-mediated oxidation. The catalytic activity of the impregnated solids to produce hydroxyl radical (·OH) from H2O2 decomposition was evaluated using benzoic acid as a probe compound under dark conditions. Invariably, the rates of benzoic acid oxidation with different Fe-laden particles increase with the surface density of Fe until a critical density above which the catalytic activity approaches a plateau, suggesting active Fe species are formed predominantly at low surface loadings. The critical surface density of Fe varies with the mineral substrate as well as the aqueous Fe precursor. Fe impregnated on TiO2 exhibits markedly higher activity than its Al2O3 and SiO2 counterparts. The speciation of interfacial Fe is analyzed with diffuse reflectance UV-vis analysis and interpretation of the data in the context of benzoic oxidation rates suggests that the surface activity of the solids for ·OH generation correlates strongly with the isolated (i.e., mononuclear) Fe species. Therefore, iron dispersed on mineral colloids is a significant form of reactive iron surfaces in the aquatic environment. PMID:26713453

  20. Desorption of ciprofloxacin from clay mineral surfaces.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qingfeng; Li, Zhaohui; Hong, Hanlie; Li, Rongbiao; Jiang, Wei-Teh

    2013-01-01

    Desorption from soil clay components may affect the transport and fate of antibiotics in the environment. In this study, ciprofloxacin (CIP) desorption from a kaolinite and a montmorillonite was investigated under different pHs, different concentrations of metal cations of various valencies (Na(+), Ca(2+) and Al(3+)) and a cationic surfactant hexadecyltrimethylammonium (HDTMA), and different desorption cycles. Desorption of CIP from kaolinite and montmorillonite was strongly pH-dependent and desorption isotherms were well fitted with the Langmuir equation. The percentage of CIP desorbed increased with increasing initial CIP loadings, desorbing cation concentrations, and desorption cycles. Comparatively, CIP was more readily desorbed from kaolinite than from montmorillonite. Moreover, the hysteresis index values were all negative, suggesting that the presence of metal cations and HDTMA in solution promoted CIP desorption from clay minerals, owing to cation exchange. The XRD analyses indicated that desorption of CIP occurred from both external and interlayer surfaces of montmorillonite. Formation of Al-CIP complex on solid surface and then detachment of Al-CIP from the solid surface may contribute to the higher CIP desorption by Al(3+) in comparison to Na(+) and Ca(2+). PMID:23123088

  1. Spectroscopic characterization of manganese minerals.

    PubMed

    Lakshmi Reddy, S; Padma Suvarna, K; Udayabhaska Reddy, G; Endo, Tamio; Frost, R L

    2014-01-01

    Manganese minerals ardenite, alleghanyite and leucopoenicite originated from Madhya Pradesh, India, Nagano prefecture Japan, Sussex Country and Parker Shaft Franklin, Sussex Country, New Jersey respectively are used in the present work. In these minerals manganese is the major constituent and iron if present is in traces only. An EPR study of on all of the above samples confirms the presence of Mn(II) with g around 2.0. Optical absorption spectrum of the mineral alleghanyite indicates that Mn(II) is present in two different octahedral sites and in leucophoenicite Mn(II) is also in octahedral geometry. Ardenite mineral gives only a few Mn(II) bands. NIR results of the minerals ardenite, leucophoenicite and alleghanyite are due to hydroxyl and silicate anions which confirming the formulae of the minerals.

  2. Spectroscopic characterization of manganese minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakshmi Reddy, S.; Padma Suvarna, K.; Udayabhaska Reddy, G.; Endo, Tamio; Frost, R. L.

    2014-01-01

    Manganese minerals ardenite, alleghanyite and leucopoenicite originated from Madhya Pradesh, India, Nagano prefecture Japan, Sussex Country and Parker Shaft Franklin, Sussex Country, New Jersey respectively are used in the present work. In these minerals manganese is the major constituent and iron if present is in traces only. An EPR study of on all of the above samples confirms the presence of Mn(II) with g around 2.0. Optical absorption spectrum of the mineral alleghanyite indicates that Mn(II) is present in two different octahedral sites and in leucophoenicite Mn(II) is also in octahedral geometry. Ardenite mineral gives only a few Mn(II) bands. NIR results of the minerals ardenite, leucophoenicite and alleghanyite are due to hydroxyl and silicate anions which confirming the formulae of the minerals.

  3. Sorptive stabilization of organic matter by amorphous Al hydroxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, M. P. W.; Scheel, T.; Mikutta, R.; van Hees, P.; Kaiser, K.; Kalbitz, K.

    2010-03-01

    Amorphous Al hydroxides (am-Al(OH) 3) strongly sorb and by this means likely protect dissolved organic matter (OM) against microbial decay in soils. We carried out batch sorption experiments (pH 4.5; 40 mg organic C L -1) with OM extracted from organic horizons under a Norway spruce and a European beech forest. The stabilization of OM by sorption was analyzed by comparing the CO 2 mineralized during the incubation of sorbed and non-sorbed OM. The mineralization of OM was evaluated based in terms of (i) the availability of the am-Al(OH) 3, thus surface OM loadings, (ii) spectral properties of OM, and (iii) the presence of phosphate as a competitor for OM. This was done by varying the solid-to-solution ratio (SSR = 0.02-1.2 g L -1) during sorption. At low SSRs, hence limited am-Al(OH) 3 availability, only small portions of dissolved OM were sorbed; for OM from Oa horizons, the mineralization of the sorbed fraction exceeded that of the original dissolved OM. The likely reason is competition with phosphate for sorption sites favouring the formation of weak mineral-organic bindings and the surface accumulation of N-rich, less aromatic and less complex OM. This small fraction controlled the mineralization of sorbed OM even at higher SSRs. At higher SSRs, i.e., with am-Al(OH) 3 more available, competition of phosphate decreased and aromatic compounds were sorbed selectively, which resulted in pronounced resistance of sorbed OM against decay. The combined OC mineralization of sorbed and non-sorbed OM was 12-65% less than that of the original DOM. Sorbed OM contributed only little to the overall OC mineralization. Stabilization of OC increased in direct proportion to am-Al(OH) 3 availability, despite constant aromatic C (˜30%). The strong stabilization at higher mineral availability is primarily governed by strong Al-OM bonds formed under less competitive conditions. Due to these strong bonds and the resulting strong stabilization, the surface loading, a proxy for the

  4. Microelectrophoresis of selected mineral particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herren, B. J.; Tipps, R. W.; Alexander, K. D.

    1982-01-01

    Particle mobilities of ilmenite, labradorite plagioclase, enstatite pyroxene, and olivine were measured with a Rank microelectrophoresis system to evaluate indicated mineral separability. Sodium bicarbonate buffer suspension media with and without additives (0.0001 M DTAB and 5 percent v/v ethylene glycol) were used to determine differential adsorption by mineral particles and modification of relative mobilities. Good separability between some minerals was indicated; additives did not enhance separability.

  5. Mineral Time Capsules on Mars?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schirber, Michael

    2006-01-01

    Like dinosaur-age insects trapped in amber, biomolecules sequestered in million-year-old sulfate minerals could provide a glimpse into the past, say researchers who've recently analyzed such minerals from N orth America. The same minerals have recently been discovered on Mars , so they may be a good place to look for traces of past life on the red planet, the researchers say.

  6. [Preventing cardiovascular risk in miners].

    PubMed

    Lipatova, L V; Izmailova, O A

    2016-01-01

    The article presents results concerning usage of intravenous laser radiation of blood in miners with cardiovascular diseases. After cardiovascular state assessment, the miners at high cardiovascular risk were subjected to prophylactic procedures with traditional medical treatment added by intravenous laser therapy. Findings are anti-arrhythmic, antihypertensive, antiatherogenic and anti-aggregation effects of complex treatment with intravenous laser radiation of blood in miners at high cardiovascular risk and its subsequent decrease due to treatment. PMID:27265943

  7. Modeling light scattering by mineral dust particles using spheroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merikallio, Sini; Nousiainen, Timo

    Suspended dust particles have a considerable influence on light scattering in both terrestrial and planetary atmospheres and can therefore have a large effect on the interpretation of remote sensing measurements. Assuming dust particles to be spherical is known to produce inaccurate results when modeling optical properties of real mineral dust particles. Yet this approximation is widely used for its simplicity. Here, we simulate light scattering by mineral dust particles using a distribution of model spheroids. This is done by comparing scattering matrices calculated from a dust optical database of Dubovik et al. [2006] with those measured in the laboratory by Volten et al. [2001]. Wavelengths of 441,6 nm and 632,8 nm and refractive indexes of Re = 1.55 -1.7 and Im = 0.001i -0.01i were adopted in this study. Overall, spheroids are found to fit the measurements significantly better than Mie spheres. Further, we confirm that the shape distribution parametrization developed in Nousiainen et al. (2006) significantly improves the accuracy of simulated single-scattering for small mineral dust particles. The spheroid scheme should therefore yield more reliable interpretations of remote sensing data from dusty planetary atmospheres. While the spheroidal scheme is superior to spheres in remote sensing applications, its performance is far from perfect especially for samples with large particles. Thus, additional advances are clearly possible. Further studies of the Martian atmosphere are currently under way. Dubovik et al. (2006) Application of spheroid models to account for aerosol particle nonspheric-ity in remote sensing of desert dust, JGR, Vol. 111, D11208 Volten et al. (2001) Scattering matrices of mineral aerosol particles at 441.6 nm and 632.8 nm, JGR, Vol. 106, No. D15, pp. 17375-17401 Nousiainen et al. (2006) Light scattering modeling of small feldspar aerosol particles using polyhedral prisms and spheroids, JQSRT 101, pp. 471-487

  8. Mineralization by nanobacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kajander, E. Olavi; Bjorklund, Michael; Ciftcioglu, Neva

    1998-07-01

    Nanobacteria are the smallest cell-walled bacteria, only recently discovered in human and cow blood and in commercial cell culture serum. In this study, we identified with energy-dispersive x-ray microanalysis and chemical analysis that all growth phases of nanobacteria produce biogenic apatite on their cell envelope. Fourier transform IR spectroscopy revealed the mineral as carbonate apatite. Previous models for stone formation have lead to a hypothesis that an elevated pH due to urease and/or alkaline phosphatase activity are important lithogenic factors. Our results indicate that carbonate apatite can be formed without these factors at pH 7.4 at physiological phosphate and calcium concentrations. Due to their specific macromolecules, nanobacteria can produce apatite very efficiency in media mimicking tissue fluids and glomerular filtrate and rapidly mineralizing most of available calcium and phosphate. This can be also monitored by (superscript 85)Sr incorporation and provides a unique model for in vitro studies on calcification. Recently, bacteria have been implicated in the formation of carbonate (hydroxy)fluorapatite in marine sediments. Apatite grains are found so commonly in sedimentary rocks that apatite is omitted in naming the stone. To prove that apatite and other minerals are formed by bacteria would implicate that the bacteria could be observed and their actions followed in stones. We have started to approach this in two ways. Firstly, by the use of sensitive methods for detecting specific bacterial components, like antigens, muramic acid and nucleic acids, that allow for detecting the presence of bacteria and, secondly, by follow-up of volatile bacterial metabolites observed by continuous monitoring with ion mobility spectrometry, IMCELL, working like an artificial, educatable smelling nose. The latter method might allow for remote real time detection of bacterial metabolism, a signature of life, in rocks via fractures of drillholes with or without

  9. Protein- mediated enamel mineralization

    PubMed Central

    Moradian-Oldak, Janet

    2012-01-01

    Enamel is a hard nanocomposite bioceramic with significant resilience that protects the mammalian tooth from external physical and chemical damages. The remarkable mechanical properties of enamel are associated with its hierarchical structural organization and its thorough connection with underlying dentin. This dynamic mineralizing system offers scientists a wealth of information that allows the study of basic principals of organic matrix-mediated biomineralization and can potentially be utilized in the fields of material science and engineering for development and design of biomimetic materials. This chapter will provide a brief overview of enamel hierarchical structure and properties as well as the process and stages of amelogenesis. Particular emphasis is given to current knowledge of extracellular matrix protein and proteinases, and the structural chemistry of the matrix components and their putative functions. The chapter will conclude by discussing the potential of enamel for regrowth. PMID:22652761

  10. Thermodynamic properties of minerals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robie, Richard A.

    1962-01-01

    In the ten years since the publication of the national Bureau of Standards comprehensive tables of thermochemical properties, by Rossini and other (1952), a very large body of modern calorimetric and equilibrium data has become available. Because of the complex interrelations among many thermochemical data and the necessity for internal consistency among these values, a complete revision of this standard reference is required. This is also true of the summaries of thermochemical data for the sulfides (Richardson and Jeffes 1952) and for the oxides (Coughlin 1954). The following tables present critically selected values for the heat and free energy of formation, the logarithm of the equilibrium constant of formation Log Kf, the entropy and the molar volume, at 298.15°K (25.0°C) and one atmosphere for minerals.

  11. Mineral mining installation

    SciTech Connect

    Eggenstein, F.; Plester, K.

    1980-10-14

    A mineral mining installation comprises a longwall structure, such as a conveyor or a winning installation, and a roof support assembly constituted by a plurality of roof support units positioned side-by-side. At least some of the roof support units are provided with hydraulic bracing rams for bracing the longwall structure longitudinally. Each bracing ram is pivotally connected between the longwall structure and the floor sill of a respective roof support unit. Each ram is connected to its floor sill by connection means constituted by a bracket slidably mounted on that floor sill for movement towards, and away from, the longwall structure. Means are provided for securing each of the brackets to its floor sill in any one of a plurality of positions.

  12. Pneumoconiosis of shale miners.

    PubMed Central

    Seaton, A; Lamb, D; Brown, W R; Sclare, G; Middleton, W G

    1981-01-01

    Four patients are described in whom pneumoconiosis was diagnosed towards the end of a lifetime's work in shale mines. All developed complicated pneumoconiosis, diagnosed in two cases at necropsy, in one by lobectomy, and in one radiologically. Two of the patients were found at necropsy also to have peripheral squamous lung cancer.The clinical and histological features of the disease resembled the pneumoconioses of coalminers and kaolin workers and the lungs of three of the patients were shown to contain dust composed predominantly of kaolinite, mica, and silica. Shale miners' complicated pneumoconiosis has not previously been described. Although the British shale industry is now defunct, oil production from shale is expanding in other countries, notably the USA. It is suggested that control should be exercised over dust exposure levels in this industry and that epidemiological studies should be carried out to quantify the risks of both pneumoconiosis and bronchial carcinoma. Images PMID:7314011

  13. Minerals Bill introduced in House

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richman, Barbara T.

    A bill that aims to strengthen a national minerals policy and to establish a three-member White-House-level council to coordinate the development of this policy was introduced in the House of Representatives on April 30 by James D. Santini (D-Nev.). Entitled the National Minerals Security Act (NMSA), the legislation, if passed, also would amend tax laws to assist the mining industry to make capital investments to locate and produce strategic minerals; it would provide the means for the Secretary of the Interior to make withdrawn public lands available for mineral development; and it would create a revolving fund for the sale and purchase of strategic minerals.Santini estimates that 4 billion tons of minerals are needed annually to sustain the nation's economy. Much of the minerals are supplied by other nations, however; Santini wants to see an end to the United States' dependence on foreign countries, especially those that seem relatively unstable politically. ‘The U.S. has placed its national security in the hands of a few foreign nations,’ Santini said in a recent press conference. ‘We are heavily dependent on the region of southern Africa for 76% of our cobalt, 93% of our platinum, 48% of our chromium, and a host of other strategic and critical minerals. Without these minerals, we cannot build jet aircraft, weapons, or other military hardware vitally important to our national security.’

  14. Nontronite Mineralization in Columbia River Basalts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, L.

    2015-12-01

    The ferric smectite nontronite is one of the first minerals formed by secondary weathering of Columbia River Basalts (CRB). Although nontronite is a common weathering product of CRB, it is not ubiquitous; field relations in near-surface flows suggest it only forms where sufficient water is available. In near-surface flows that are above the water table, nontronite is found filling cracks or vesicles, or in association with paleosols now preserved between flows in many localities. Field relations strongly suggest that porosity and permeability at the millimeter to meter scale control the supply of water for weathering and are key to the chemical composition of secondary clays and to the overall abundance of individual secondary weathering minerals. Weathering in the basalts initiates in void spaces that hold water, where high-Fe nontronite forms radiating acicular sprays. Small void spaces fill completely with nontronite of uniform composition, which penetrates the walls and replaces surrounding glass and ferromagnesian minerals. This process produces a relatively limited quantity of high-purity ferric nontronite. In large void spaces where water is limiting, nontronite lines the interior of vesicles but does not fill them; vermicular clay strands grow into the space from nucleation sites at the vesicle wall. Nontronitic cores are coated by layers of Mg- and Al-rich clays, and Mn oxides coat the exteriors. Thus, weathering under water-limited conditions appears to produce more compositionally complex mineral assemblages. In more extensively weathered basalts, nontronite is not present except in isolated, enclosed spaces. Results of this study may be useful in interpreting remotely sensed mineralogical data on Mars. The compositions of ferromagnesian smectites and spatial relationships between different clays on Mars may hold clues to the original conditions of water-rock interaction.

  15. [Species Determination and Spectral Characteristics of Swelling Clay Minerals in the Pliocene Sandstones in Xinghai, Qinghai].

    PubMed

    Wang, Chao-wen; Chen, Jiang-jun; Fang, Qian; Yin, Ke; Hong, Han-lie

    2015-10-01

    X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier infrared absorption spectroscopy (FTIR) were conducted to deepen our research on specific species and spectral characteristics of swelling clay minerals in the Pliocene sandstones in Xinghai, Qinghai province. XRD results show that swelling clay minerals are dominant clay minerals in the sandstones, which can be up to 97% in percentage. XRD patterns show 060 reflections of the samples occur both remarkably at 1.534 Å and 1.498 Å, indicating the samples contain physical mixtures of trioctahedral and dioctahedral swelling clay minerals, respectively. Further treatment of Li-300 degrees C heat and glycerol saturation shows the swelling clay minerals collapse to 9.3-9.9 Å with a partial expansion to -18 Å. This indicates the swelling clay minerals dominate montmorillonite and contain minor saponite. The montmorillonite shows no swelling after Li-300 degrees C heat and glycerol saturation because of Li+ inserting into the octahedral layers, which balances the layer charge caused by the substitution of Mg to Al. FTIR results show the samples are composed of a kind of phyllosilicate with absorbed and structural water, which is in agreement with the results of XRD. Absorbed peaks at 913, 842, 880 cm(-1), corresponding to OH associated with Al-Al, Al-Mg, and Al-Fe pairs, further indicates the minerals are dominant dioctahedron in structure. Meanwhile, absorbed peaks at 625 and 519 cm(-1), corresponding to coupled Si-O and Al-O-Si deformation, indicates parts of Si is replaced by Al in tetrahedron. The spectral characteristics of the samples are against the presence of beidellite and nontronite based on the results of XRD and FTIR, while demonstrating an,existence of montmorillonite. This study, to distinguish the specific species of swelling clay species in clay minerals, would be of great importance when using clay mineralogy to interpret provenance and climatic information.

  16. Mineral species control of aluminum solubility in sulfate-rich acidic waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Adele M.; Collins, Richard N.; Waite, T. David

    2011-02-01

    The identification of the mineral species controlling the solubility of Al in acidic waters rich in sulfate has presented researchers with several challenges. One of the particular challenges is that the mineral species may be amorphous by X-ray diffraction. The difficulty in discerning between adsorbed or structural sulfate is a further complication. Numerous studies have employed theoretical calculations to determine the Al mineral species forming in acid sulfate soil environments. The vast majority of these studies indicate the formation of a mineral species matching the stoichiometry of jurbanite, Al(OH)SO 4·5H 2O. Much debate, however, exists as to the reality of jurbanite forming in natural environments, particularly in view of its apparent rare occurrence. In this work the use of Al, S and O K-edge XANES spectroscopy, in combination with elemental composition analyses of groundwater precipitates and a theoretical analysis of soluble Al concentrations ranging from pH 3.5 to 7, were employed to determine the mineral species controlling the solubility of Al draining from acid sulfate soils into Blacks Drain in north-eastern New South Wales, Australia. The results indicate that a mixture of amorphous Al hydroxide (Al(OH) 3) and basaluminite (Al 4(SO 4)(OH) 10·5H 2O) was forming. The use of XANES spectroscopy is particularly useful as it provides insight into the nature of the bond between sulfate and Al, and confirms the presence of basaluminite. This counters the possibility that an Al hydroxide species, with appreciable amounts of adsorbed sulfate, is forming within these groundwaters. Below approximately pH 4.5, prior to precipitation of this amorphous Al(OH) 3/basaluminite mixture, our studies indicate that the Al 3+ activity of these acidic sulfate-rich waters is limited by the availability of dissolved Al from exchangeable and amorphous/poorly crystalline mineral species within adjacent soils. Further evidence suggests the Al 3+ activity below pH 4.5 is

  17. Mineral Detector for Igneous Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishikawa, S. T.; Hart, S. D.; Gulick, V. C.

    2010-12-01

    We present a Raman spectral analysis tool that uses machine learning algorithms to classify pure minerals in igneous rocks. Experiments show greater than 90% accuracy classifying a test set of pure minerals against a database of similar reference minerals using an artificial neural network. Efforts are currently underway to improve this tool for use as a mineral detector in rock samples, an important milestone toward autonomously classifying rocks based on spectral, and previous imaging work. Although pure mineral classification has been widely successful, applying the same methods to rocks is difficult because the spectra may represent a combination of multiple, and often competing, mineral signatures. In such cases some minerals may appear with more intensity than others resulting in masking of weaker minerals. Furthermore, with our particular spectrometer (852 nm excitation, ~50 micron spot size), minerals such as potassium feldspar fluoresce, both obscuring its characteristic Raman features and suppressing those of weaker minerals. For example, plagioclase and quartz, two key minerals for determining the composition of igneous rocks, are often hidden by minerals such as potassium feldspar and pyroxene, and are consequently underrepresented in the spectral analysis. These technicalities tend to skew the perceived composition of a rock from its actual composition. Despite these obstacles, an experiment involving a training set of 26 minerals (plagioclase, potassium feldspar, pyroxene, olivine, quartz) and a test set of 57 igneous rocks (basalt, gabbro, andesite, diorite, dacite, granodiorite, rhyolite, granite) shows that generalizations derived from their spectral data are consistent with expected trends: as rock composition goes from felsic to mafic there is a marked increase in the detection of minerals such as plagioclase and pyroxene along with a decrease in the detection of minerals such as quartz and potassium feldspar. The results suggest that phaneritic

  18. Spatial Arrangment of Organic Compounds on a Model Mineral Surface: Implications for Soil Organic Matter Stabilization

    SciTech Connect

    Petridis, Loukas; Ambaye, Haile Arena; Jagadamma, Sindhu; Kilbey, S. Michael; Lokitz, Bradley S; Lauter, Valeria; Mayes, Melanie

    2014-01-01

    The complexity of the mineral organic carbon interface may influence the extent of stabilization of organic carbon compounds in soils, which is important for global climate futures. The nanoscale structure of a model interface was examined here by depositing films of organic carbon compounds of contrasting chemical character, hydrophilic glucose and amphiphilic stearic acid, onto a soil mineral analogue (Al2O3). Neutron reflectometry, a technique which provides depth-sensitive insight into the organization of the thin films, indicates that glucose molecules reside in a layer between Al2O3 and stearic acid, a result that was verified by water contact angle measurements. Molecular dynamics simulations reveal the thermodynamic driving force behind glucose partitioning on the mineral interface: The entropic penalty of confining the less mobile glucose on the mineral surface is lower than for stearic acid. The fundamental information obtained here helps rationalize how complex arrangements of organic carbon on soil mineral surfaces may arise

  19. Nitrogen mineralization in production agriculture

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Understanding the effects of N management and how it relates to the N cycle in soil ecosystems is essential to determining N availability. This manuscript describes the importance of N mineralization to production agriculture and introduces a special issue on “N Mineralization in Production Agricult...

  20. Ways to defuse miners' anger

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-06-01

    The violence and riots which often occur with mining personnel are considered. The emotions and feelings which miners often experience because of their work environment are dealth with. From recognizing the pressures, the article then works to present methods to help defuse the miners' hostility and anger.

  1. Plant macro- and micronutrient minerals

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    All plants must obtain a number of inorganic mineral elements from their environment to ensure successful growth and development of both vegetative and reproductive tissues. A total of fourteen mineral nutrients are considered to be essential. Several other elements have been shown to have beneficia...

  2. A Mineral Processing Field Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carmody, Maurice

    2014-01-01

    This article describes a field course in Cornwall looking at mineral processing with the focus on the chemistry involved. The course was split into two parts. The first looked at tin mining based around Penzance. This involved visiting mines, hunting for mineral samples, carrying out a stream survey and visiting the Camborne School of Mines…

  3. From Mountain Men to Miners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevens, Robert L.; Fogel, Jared A.

    1999-01-01

    Examines three of the changes wrought by coal mining: (1) the miner's working conditions; (2) the establishment of company towns; and (3) the violence that ensued when miners from Harlan County, Kentucky, referred to as "Bloody Harlan," tried to better their lives by joining labor unions. (CMK)

  4. Mineral Resources and the Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Academy of Sciences, Washington, DC.

    This report presents the findings and recommendations of panels created by the Committee on Mineral Resources and the Environment (COMRATE) to study four topic areas of mineral resources and the environment. The topic areas studied by the panels were: technology, supply, the environment, and demand. Section I, the report of the technology panel,…

  5. 76 FR 6110 - Conflict Minerals

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-03

    ... FR 80948 (December 23, 2010)]. The original comment period for Release No. 34-63547 is scheduled to... COMMISSION 17 CFR Parts 229 and 249 RIN 3235-AK84 Conflict Minerals AGENCY: Securities and Exchange... 1934 (the ``Exchange Act'') and would require any such issuer for which conflict minerals are...

  6. Investigating Minerals: Promoting Integrated Inquiry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Rudi; Carmack, Elizabeth

    2007-01-01

    "Mineral Detectives!" is one of eighteen lessons in the "Private Whys?" integrated science unit, which uses a guided inquiry investigation to teach students in grades three through five about the role of minerals in our lives. The University of North Texas developed "Private Whys?" with funding from the Copper Development Association. This lesson…

  7. Ex situ aqueous mineral carbonation.

    PubMed

    Gerdemann, Stephen J; O'Connor, William K; Dahlin, David C; Penner, Larry R; Rush, Hank

    2007-04-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) located in Albany, OR (formerly the Albany Research Center) has studied ex situ mineral carbonation as a potential option for carbon dioxide sequestration. Studies focused on the reaction of Ca-, Fe-, and Mg-silicate minerals with gaseous CO2 to form geologically stable, naturally occurring solid carbonate minerals. The research included resource evaluation, kinetic studies, process development, and economic evaluation. An initial cost estimate of approximately $69/ton of CO2 sequestered was improved with process improvements to $54/ton. The scale of ex situ mineral carbonation operations, requiring 55 000 tons of mineral to carbonate, the daily CO2 emissions from a 1-GW, coal-fired power plant, may make such operations impractical.

  8. Ex Situ Aqueous Mineral Carbonation

    SciTech Connect

    Gerdemann, S.J.; O'Connor, W.K.; Dahlin, D.C.; Penner, L.R.; Rush, G.E.

    2007-04-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) located in Albany, OR (formerly the Albany Research Center) has studied ex situ mineral carbonation as a potential option for carbon dioxide sequestration. Studies focused on the reaction of Ca-, Fe-, and Mg-silicate minerals with gaseous CO2 to form geologically stable, naturally occurring solid carbonate minerals. The research included resource evaluation, kinetic studies, process development, and economic evaluation. An initial cost estimate of ~$69/ton of CO2 sequestered was improved with process improvements to ~$54/ton. The scale of ex situ mineral carbonation operations, requiring ~55 000 tons of mineral to carbonate, the daily CO2 emissions from a 1-GW, coal-fired power plant, may make such operations impractical.

  9. Ex situ aqueous mineral carbonation

    SciTech Connect

    Stephen J. Gerdemann; William K. O'Connor; David C. Dahlin; Larry R. Penner; Hank Rush

    2007-04-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) located in Albany, OR (formerly the Albany Research Center) has studied ex situ mineral carbonation as a potential option for carbon dioxide sequestration. Studies focused on the reaction of Ca-, Fe-, and Mg-silicate minerals with gaseous CO{sub 2} to form geologically stable, naturally occurring solid carbonate minerals. The research included resource evaluation, kinetic studies, process development, and economic evaluation. An initial cost estimate of about $69/ton of CO{sub 2} sequestered was improved with process improvements to about 54/ton. The scale of ex situ mineral carbonation operations, requiring about 55,000 tons of mineral to carbonate, the daily CO{sub 2} emissions from a 1-GW, coal-fired power plant, may make such operations impractical. 23 refs., 4 figs., 5 tabs.

  10. TEM observation of bacteria-induced plagioclase dissolution and secondary mineral formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamura, T.; Kyono, A.; Nishimiya, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Silicate minerals are the most common minerals in the earth's crust. Bacteria are also distributed throughout the earth's surface environment. The silicate minerals are known to be dissolved by organic acids and polysaccharides known as bacteria metabolites. The metabolic activity of bacteria therefore plays an important role in the interaction between dissolution of the silicate minerals and formation of secondary minerals. However, little is known about the secondary mineral formation process associated with the bacterial metabolism. To clarify the bacterial effect on the mineral dissolution and the secondary mineral formation, we closely investigated the effect of bacterial activity on surface texture modification and chemical composition changes of plagioclase which is the most abundant silicate mineral in the earth's crust. The bacteria were isolated from soil and then added in a suitable medium with several plagioclase fragments (Ab100% and An100%). It was incubated for 10 days. Al and Si concentrations in the medium were measured by ICP-AES to monitor the dissolution of the plagioclase. Secondary mineral formation during the incubation was observed by TEM, EDS and SAED methods. The authors will give the experiment results and discuss the effect of bacterial activity on the plagioclase dissolution and the secondary mineral formation in detail.

  11. [Study on the Influence of Mineralizer on the Preparation of Calcium Aluminates Based on Infrared Spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Fan, Wei; Wang, Liang; Zheng, Huai-li; Chen, Wei; Tang, Xiao-min; Shang, Juan-fang; Qian, Li

    2015-05-01

    In this study, effect of mineralizer on the structure and spectraproperties of calcium aluminates formation was extensively studied. Medium or low-grade bauxite and calcium carbonate were used as raw material and mineralizer CaF2 as additive. Calcium aluminates can be obtained after mixing fully, calcination and grinding. The prepared calcium aluminates can be directly used for the production of polyaluminiumchloride (PAC), polymeric aluminum sulfate, sodium aluminate and some other water treatment agents. The calcium aluminates preparation technology was optimized by investigating the mass ratio of raw materials (bauxiteand calcium carbonate) and mineralizer CaF2 dosage. The structure and spectra properties of bauxite and calcium aluminates were characterized by Fourier transform infrared(FTIR) spectroscopy analysis and the mineralization mechanism of the mineralizer was studied. FTIR spectra indicated that the addition of mineralizer promoted the decomposition and transformation of the diaspore, gibbsite and kaolinite, the decomposition of calcium carbonate, and more adequately reaction between bauxite and calcium carbonate. In addition, not only Ca in calcium carbonate and Si in bauxite were more readily reacted, but also Si-O, Si-O-Al and Al-Si bonds in the bauxite were more fractured which contributed to the release of Al in bauxite, and therefore, the dissolution rate of Al2O3 could be improved. The dissolution rate of Al2O3 can be promoted effectively when the mineralizer CaF2 was added in a mass ratio amount of 3%. And the mineralizer CaF2 cannot be fully functioned, when its dosage was in a mass percent of 1. 5%. Low-grade bauxite was easier to sinter for the preparation of calcium aluminates comparing with the highgrade one. The optimum material ratio for the preparation of calcium aluminates calcium at 1 250 °C was the mass ratio between bauxite and calcium carbonate of 1 : 0. 6 and mineralizer CaF2 mass ratio percent of 3%. PMID:26415430

  12. 26Al- 26Mg and 207Pb- 206Pb systematics of Allende CAIs: Canonical solar initial 26Al/ 27Al ratio reinstated

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobsen, Benjamin; Yin, Qing-zhu; Moynier, Frederic; Amelin, Yuri; Krot, Alexander N.; Nagashima, Kazuhide; Hutcheon, Ian D.; Palme, Herbert

    2008-07-01

    The precise knowledge of the initial 26Al/ 27Al ratio [( 26Al/ 27Al) 0] is crucial if we are to use the very first solid objects formed in our Solar System, calcium-aluminum-rich inclusions (CAIs) as the "time zero" age-anchor and guide future work with other short-lived radio-chronometers in the early Solar System, as well as determining the inventory of heat budgets from radioactivities for early planetary differentiation. New high-precision multi-collector inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry (MC-ICP-MS) measurements of 27Al/ 24Mg ratios and Mg-isotopic compositions of nine whole-rock CAIs (six mineralogically characterized fragments and three micro-drilled inclusions) from the CV carbonaceous chondrite, Allende yield a well-defined 26Al- 26Mg fossil isochron with an ( 26Al/ 27Al) 0 of (5.23 ± 0.13) × 10 - 5 . Internal mineral isochrons obtained for three of these CAIs ( A44A, AJEF, and A43) are consistent with the whole-rock CAI isochron. The mineral isochron of AJEF with ( 26Al/ 27Al) 0 = (4.96 ± 0.25) × 10 - 5 , anchored to our precisely determined absolute 207Pb- 206Pb age of 4567.60 ± 0.36 Ma for the same mineral separates, reinstate the "canonical" ( 26Al/ 27Al) 0 of 5 × 10 - 5 for the early Solar System. The uncertainty in ( 26Al/ 27Al) 0 corresponds to a maximum time span of ± 20 Ka (thousand years), suggesting that the Allende CAI formation events were culminated within this time span. Although all Allende CAIs studied experienced multistage formation history, including melting and evaporation in the solar nebula and post-crystallization alteration likely on the asteroidal parent body, the 26Al- 26Mg and U-Pb-isotopic systematics of the mineral separates and bulk CAIs behaved largely as closed-system since their formation. Our data do not support the "supra-canonical" 26Al/ 27Al ratio of individual minerals or their mixtures in CV CAIs, suggesting that the supra-canonical 26Al/ 27Al ratio in the CV CAIs may have resulted from post

  13. Universal ripper miner

    DOEpatents

    Morrell, Roger J.; Larson, David A.

    1991-01-01

    A universal ripper miner used to cut, collect and transfer material from an underground mine working face includes a cutter head that is vertically movable in an arcuate cutting cycle by means of drive members, such as hydraulically actuated pistons. The cutter head may support a circular cutter bit having a circular cutting edge that may be indexed to incrementally expose a fresh cutting edge. An automatic indexing system is disclosed wherein indexing occurs by means of a worm gear and indexing lever mechanism. The invention also contemplates a bi-directional bit holder enabling cutting to occur in both the upstroke and the downstroke cutting cycle. Another feature of the invention discloses multiple bits arranged in an in-line, radially staggered pattern, or a side-by-side pattern to increase the mining capacity in each cutting cycle. An on-board resharpening system is also disclosed for resharpening the cutting edge at the end of cutting stroke position. The aforementioned improvement features may be used either singly, or in any proposed combination with each other.

  14. Mineral evolution of bone.

    PubMed

    Ravaglioli, A; Krajewski, A; Celotti, G C; Piancastelli, A; Bacchini, B; Montanari, L; Zama, G; Piombi, L

    1996-03-01

    A study on the evolution with age of the mineral composition of bones was performed on samples belonging to human and other common mammalian species (cattle, sheep, dog). The study was carried out on the ashes obtained by calcination of the bone samples (1 h at 900 degrees C). The calcined powders were carefully examined by X-ray diffraction, from which precise quantitative evaluation (also confirmed by chemical analysis) of the crystalline phases present was derived. These data were analysed as a function of the introduced fractional age phi, a new relative scale that allows even largely different lifespan species to be compared. An overall linear increase in (Ca + Mg)/P ratio with log phi was found and the other considerations on molecular constitution (especially as regards Mg2+ substituting for Ca2+ in very young subjects) of the various phases detected were formulated and relative implications evaluated. The results appear promising for an improvement of knowledge in the field of biomedical experimentation and clinical implantology.

  15. Mineral Commodity Profiles: Selenium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Butterman, W.C.; Brown, R.D.

    2004-01-01

    Overview -- Selenium, which is one of the chalcogen elements in group 16 (or 6A) of the periodic table, is a semiconductor that is chemically similar to sulfur for which it substitutes in many minerals and synthetic compounds. It is a byproduct of copper refining and, to a much lesser extent, lead refining. It is used in many applications, the major ones being a decolorizer for glass, a metallurgical additive to free-machining varieties of ferrous and nonferrous alloys, a constituent in cadmium sulfoselenide pigments, a photoreceptor in xerographic copiers, and a semiconductor in electrical rectifiers and photocells. Refined selenium amounting to more than 1,800 metric tons (t) was produced by 14 countries in 2000. Japan, Canada, the United States, and Belgium, which were the four largest producers, accounted for nearly 85 percent of world production. An estimated 250 t of the world total is secondary selenium, which is recovered from scrapped xerographic copier drums and selenium rectifiers; the selenium in nearly all other uses is dissipated (not recoverable as waste or scrap). The present selenium reserve bases for the United States and the world (including the United States), which are associated with copper deposits, are expected to be able to satisfy demand for selenium for several decades without difficulty.

  16. Experimental dynamic metamorphism of mineral single crystals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kirby, S.H.; Stern, L.A.

    1993-01-01

    This paper is a review of some of the rich and varied interactions between non-hydrostatic stress and phase transformations or mineral reactions, drawn mainly from results of experiments done on mineral single crystals in our laboratory or our co-authors. The state of stress and inelastic deformation can enter explicitly into the equilibrium phase relations and kinetics of mineral reactions. Alternatively, phase transformations can have prominent effects on theology and on the nature of inelastic deformation. Our examples represent five types of structural phase changes, each of which is distinguished by particular mechanical effects. In increasing structural complexity, these include: (1) displacive phase transformations involving no bond-breaking, which may produce anomalous brittle behavior. A primary example is the a-?? quartz transition which shows anomalously low fracture strength and tertiary creep behavior near the transition temperature; (2) martensitic-like transformations involving transformation strains dominated by shear deformation. Examples include the orthoenstatite ??? clinoenstatite and w u ??rtzite ??? sphalerite transformations; (3) coherent exsolution or precipitation of a mineral solute from a supersaturated solid-solution, with anisotropy of precipitation and creep rates produced under nonhydrostatic stress. Examples include exsolution of corundum from MgO ?? nAl2O3 spinels and Ca-clinopyroxene from orthopyroxene; (4) order-disorder transformations that are believed to cause anomalous plastic yield strengthening, such as MgO - nAl2O3 spinels; and (5) near-surface devolatilization of hydrous silicate single-crystals that produces a fundamental brittleness thought to be connected with dehydration at microcracks at temperatures well below nominal macroscopic dehydration temperatures. As none of these interactions between single-crystal phase transformations and non-hydrostatic stress is understood in detail, this paper serves as a challenge to

  17. 30 CFR 57.5070 - Miner training.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Miner training. 57.5070 Section 57.5070 Mineral... Agents, and Diesel Particulate Matter Diesel Particulate Matter-Underground Only § 57.5070 Miner training. (a) Mine operators must provide annual training to all miners at a mine covered by this part who...

  18. 43 CFR 3816.1 - Mineral locations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Mineral locations. 3816.1 Section 3816.1..., DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) LANDS AND MINERALS SUBJECT TO LOCATION Mineral Locations in Reclamation Withdrawals § 3816.1 Mineral locations. The Act of April 23, 1932 (47 Stat. 136;...

  19. 43 CFR 3815.1 - Mineral locations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Mineral locations. 3815.1 Section 3815.1..., DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) LANDS AND MINERALS SUBJECT TO LOCATION Mineral Locations in Stock Driveway Withdrawals § 3815.1 Mineral locations. Under authority of the provisions of...

  20. 43 CFR 3816.1 - Mineral locations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Mineral locations. 3816.1 Section 3816.1..., DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) LANDS AND MINERALS SUBJECT TO LOCATION Mineral Locations in Reclamation Withdrawals § 3816.1 Mineral locations. The Act of April 23, 1932 (47 Stat. 136;...

  1. 43 CFR 3815.1 - Mineral locations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Mineral locations. 3815.1 Section 3815.1..., DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) LANDS AND MINERALS SUBJECT TO LOCATION Mineral Locations in Stock Driveway Withdrawals § 3815.1 Mineral locations. Under authority of the provisions of...

  2. 43 CFR 3815.1 - Mineral locations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Mineral locations. 3815.1 Section 3815.1..., DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) LANDS AND MINERALS SUBJECT TO LOCATION Mineral Locations in Stock Driveway Withdrawals § 3815.1 Mineral locations. Under authority of the provisions of...

  3. 43 CFR 3816.1 - Mineral locations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Mineral locations. 3816.1 Section 3816.1..., DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) LANDS AND MINERALS SUBJECT TO LOCATION Mineral Locations in Reclamation Withdrawals § 3816.1 Mineral locations. The Act of April 23, 1932 (47 Stat. 136;...

  4. 43 CFR 3815.1 - Mineral locations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Mineral locations. 3815.1 Section 3815.1..., DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) LANDS AND MINERALS SUBJECT TO LOCATION Mineral Locations in Stock Driveway Withdrawals § 3815.1 Mineral locations. Under authority of the provisions of...

  5. 43 CFR 3816.1 - Mineral locations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Mineral locations. 3816.1 Section 3816.1..., DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) LANDS AND MINERALS SUBJECT TO LOCATION Mineral Locations in Reclamation Withdrawals § 3816.1 Mineral locations. The Act of April 23, 1932 (47 Stat. 136;...

  6. Tribology of earthmoving, mining, and minerals processing

    SciTech Connect

    Hawk, Jeffrey A.; Wilson, Rick D.

    2001-01-01

    Earthmoving, mining, and minerals processing each involve frequent, and often severe, mechanical interactions between metals, and between metals and abrasive nonmetallic and metallic materials (i.e., mineral bearing ores). The abrasive nature of ores causes significant wear to extracting, handling, and processing equipment. Consequently, wear in earthmoving, mining, and minerals processing operations results in the removal of large amounts of material from the wear surfaces of scraping, digging, and ore processing equipment. From an energy point of view, material wear of this nature is classified as an indirect tribological loss (Imhoff et al., 1985). Additionally, a significant amount of energy is expended to overcome frictional forces in the operation of all earthmoving, mining, and minerals processing machinery (i.e., a direct tribological loss). However, in these particular processes, wear losses are more than five times those of frictional losses. In general, the amount of material lost from a particular component in these operations, before it becomes unserviceable, is far greater than that which can be tolerated in typical metal-to-metal wear situations (e.g., lubricated bearing-shaft wear couples in machinery). Consequently, much of the equipment used in earthmoving, mining, and ore processing makes use of easily replaceable or repairable, and preferably low-cost, wear components. The mechanisms by which metal-to-metal and abrasive wear occurs, and the relationships between material properties and wear behavior, are reasonably well-understood in general terms. However, the specific wear mechanisms/wear material interactions that occur during earthmoving, digging, and the processing of ore are more complex, and depend on the wear material, and on the nature of abrasive, the type of loading, and the environment. As a result of this general knowledge, reliable predictions can be made regarding the performance of particular materials under a range of in

  7. [Mineral water as a cure].

    PubMed

    Nocco, Priska Binz

    2008-01-01

    The treatment of diseases with mineral spring water belongs to the oldest medical therapies. The "remedy" mineral water is therefore of importance also within the pharmacy. The present pharmacy historical work examines the impact of the use of mineral waters, as well as of their dried components, as therapeutic agents in the 19th and early 20th centuries, i.e. from approx. 1810 to 1930, as well as the contributions given by pharmacists in the development and analysis of mineral water springs. Beside these aspects, the aim here is also to describe the role played by pharmacists in the production of artificial mineral water as well as in the sale and wholesale of natural and artificial mineral water. In the first part of this work the situation in Switzerland and its surrounding countries, such as Germany, France, Italy and Austria, is discussed. The second part contains a case-study of the particular situation in the Canton Tessin. It is known from the scientific literature published at that time that information on mineral water was frequently reported. Starting from the beginning of the 19th century the number of such publications increased tremendously. The major part of them were publications in scientific journals or contributions to medical and pharmaceutical manuals and reference books. In particular the spa-related literature, such as spa-guides, was of growing interest to a broad public. The inclusion of monographs into the Swiss, the Cantonal as well the foreign pharmacopoeias granted a legal frame for the mineral waters and their dried components. These works are of major importance from a pharmacy historical standpoint and represent a unique proof of historical evidence of the old medicinal drug heritage. The most frequently used therapies based on mineral waters were drinking and bath cures. Several diseases, particularly those of a chronic character, were treated with mineral waters. The positive influence of these cures on the recovery of the patients

  8. The mineral disorders in pediatrics.

    PubMed

    Linshaw, M; Aigbe, M; Kaskel, F

    1998-05-01

    There is increasing awareness of the role that metals/minerals play in health and disease. Minerals contribute in essential ways to the fundamental biochemical and physiological functions of cells. Deficit of an essential mineral leads to aberrations in cell function. Alternatively, minerals in excess have significant toxicity, and in an era of increasing threat to a safe environment, the potential for toxic tissue injury to contribute to progressive renal insufficiency and ultimately to unexplained renal failure remains a major concern. This review provides information on selected minerals that are attracting growing attention with respect to their influence on renal function in health and disease. Although all minerals have the potential to cause toxicity if consumed in sufficient quantity, most are essential nutrients whose deficiency is associated with significant health problems. Certain minerals, including aluminum, arsenic, cadmium, lead, and mercury are considered toxic. Their suggested positive effects on the health of animals has been recently summarized, but in humans they are not currently known to exert any clearly beneficial biological or biochemical effect.

  9. Economic drivers of mineral supply

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wagner, Lorie A.; Sullivan, Daniel E.; Sznopek, John L.

    2003-01-01

    The debate over the adequacy of future supplies of mineral resources continues in light of the growing use of mineral-based materials in the United States. According to the U.S. Geological Survey, the quantity of new materials utilized each year has dramatically increased from 161 million tons2 in 1900 to 3.2 billion tons in 2000. Of all the materials used during the 20th century in the United States, more than half were used in the last 25 years. With the Earth?s endowment of natural resources remaining constant, and increased demand for resources, economic theory states that as depletion approaches, prices rise. This study shows that many economic drivers (conditions that create an economic incentive for producers to act in a particular way) such as the impact of globalization, technological improvements, productivity increases, and efficient materials usage are at work simultaneously to impact minerals markets and supply. As a result of these economic drivers, the historical price trend of mineral prices3 in constant dollars has declined as demand has risen. When price is measured by the cost in human effort, the price trend also has been almost steadily downward. Although the United States economy continues its increasing mineral consumption trend, the supply of minerals has been able to keep pace. This study shows that in general supply has grown faster than demand, causing a declining trend in mineral prices.

  10. BET Measurements: Outgassing of Minerals.

    PubMed

    Clausen; Fabricius

    2000-07-01

    Outgassing minerals at elevated temperatures prior to BET measurements can lead to phase changes, especially in the case of amorphous and poorly crystalline materials. In order to evaluate the applicability of the BET method when low outgassing temperatures are required, selected aquifer minerals were outgassed at different temperatures and for different times. The studied minerals are 2-line ferrihydrite, goethite, lepidocrocite, quartz, calcite, alpha-alumina, and kaolinite. The results demonstrate that measured specific surface areas of iron oxides are strongly dependent on outgassing conditions because the surface area increased by 170% with increasing temperature. In the poorly crystalline minerals, phase changes caused by heating were observed at temperatures lower than 100 degrees C. Therefore low outgassing temperatures are preferable for minimizing phase changes. As demonstrated in this study, stable BET values can be obtained by increasing the outgassing time without heating iron oxides. For quartz, calcite, alpha-alumina, and kaolinite, stable BET values were obtained after outgassing the minerals at 100 to 250 degrees C for 2 h. However, outgassing these minerals at room temperature (20 degrees C) only resulted in minor errors, implying that aquifer sediments containing poorly crystalline materials can be outgassed at low temperatures if the outgassing time is increased. Scanning electron microscopy of the studied minerals demonstrated that the particle size as calculated from BET data compares well with particle size observed by scanning electron microscopy images. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  11. Shock-induced modifications of magnetic minerals from impact structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kontny, A. M.

    2013-05-01

    Meteorite impact structures are an important feature of most planetary surfaces. The effects of shock waves on the intrinsic magnetic properties of minerals and rocks are therefore essential for the understanding of magnetization processes related to impact events on Earth and other planetary bodies. Despite numerous observations on natural settings (Carporzen et al. 2005; Mang et al. 2012), and experimental studies (Louzada et al. 2010, 2011; Gattacecca et al 2007; Gilder et al. 2004; Mang et al. 2013) there remain uncertainties concerning the rock magnetic properties and the magnetization process related to natural impact structures on Earth. In general, the magnetic signature of terrestrial impact structures is a combined effect between disrupted main regional magnetic trends due to shock and / or thermal demagnetization and high-amplitude, short-wavelength magnetic anomalies in the centre of intermediate to large impact structures. Some large structures (>40 km) are reported to exhibit central high-amplitude anomalies but the dominant magnetic feature is a magnetic low (Pilkington and Grieve 1992). The latter observation is especially important for the giant non-magnetized impact basins on Mars. Therefore numerous studies focused on the understanding of the demagnetization processes during shock pressure (Gilder et al. 2004; Louzada et al. 2010, 2011; Rochette et al. 2003). Many investigations of terrestrial impact structures, however, demonstrated that a natural remanent magnetization (NRM), which is imprinted into terrestrial rocks by the Earth magnetic field, is the main cause of the observed magnetic anomalies. Magnetic signatures of impact structures on Earth are therefore thought to be a combination of three parameters: (1) composition and magnetic properties of the target rocks, (2) modification of rocks and magnetic minerals (fracturing and melting) due to impact-related p-T conditions, (3) acquisition of new natural remanent magnetization (TRM, SRM or

  12. Geology and regional setting of the Al Masane ancient mine area, southeastern Arabian Shield, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Conway, Clay M.

    1985-01-01

    Chemical characteristics of volcanic rocks at Al Masane and elsewhere, along with features such as zinc-copper-iron sulfide mineralization, rhyolite-basalt bimodality, and the quartz phenocryst-rich nature of the felsic rocks, are compatible with an unusually primitive tholeiitic island-arc origin for the strata and mineral deposits of the Habawnah mineral belt.

  13. Mineral Commodity Profiles -- Rubidium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Butterman, W.C.; Reese, R.G.

    2003-01-01

    Overview -- Rubidium is a soft, ductile, silvery-white metal that melts at 39.3 ?C. One of the alkali metals, it is positioned in group 1 (or IA) of the periodic table between potassium and cesium. Naturally occurring rubidium is slightly radioactive. Rubidium is an extremely reactive metal--it ignites spontaneously in the presence of air and decomposes water explosively, igniting the liberated hydrogen. Because of its reactivity, the metal and several of its compounds are hazardous materials, and must be stored and transported in isolation from possible reactants. Although rubidium is more abundant in the earth?s crust than copper, lead, or zinc, it forms no minerals of its own, and is, or has been, produced in small quantities as a byproduct of the processing of cesium and lithium ores taken from a few small deposits in Canada, Namibia, and Zambia. In the United States, the metal and its compounds are produced from imported raw materials by at least one company, the Cabot Corporation (Cabot, 2003). Rubidium is used interchangeably or together with cesium in many uses. Its principal application is in specialty glasses used in fiber optic telecommunication systems. Rubidium?s photoemissive properties have led to its use in night-vision devices, photoelectric cells, and photomultiplier tubes. It has several uses in medical science, such as in positron emission tomographic (PET) imaging, the treatment of epilepsy, and the ultracentrifugal separation of nucleic acids and viruses. A dozen or more other uses are known, which include use as a cocatalyst for several organic reactions and in frequency reference oscillators for telecommunications network synchronization. The market for rubidium is extremely small, amounting to 1 to 2 metric tons per year (t/yr) in the United States. World resources are vast compared with demand.

  14. Glycine Polymerization on Oxide Minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitadai, Norio; Oonishi, Hiroyuki; Umemoto, Koichiro; Usui, Tomohiro; Fukushi, Keisuke; Nakashima, Satoru

    2016-07-01

    It has long been suggested that mineral surfaces played an important role in peptide bond formation on the primitive Earth. However, it remains unclear which mineral species was key to the prebiotic processes. This is because great discrepancies exist among the reported catalytic efficiencies of minerals for amino acid polymerizations, owing to mutually different experimental conditions. This study examined polymerization of glycine (Gly) on nine oxide minerals (amorphous silica, quartz, α-alumina and γ-alumina, anatase, rutile, hematite, magnetite, and forsterite) using identical preparation, heating, and analytical procedures. Results showed that a rutile surface is the most effective site for Gly polymerization in terms of both amounts and lengths of Gly polymers synthesized. The catalytic efficiency decreased as rutile > anatase > γ-alumina > forsterite > α- alumina > magnetite > hematite > quartz > amorphous silica. Based on reported molecular-level information for adsorption of Gly on these minerals, polymerization activation was inferred to have arisen from deprotonation of the NH3 + group of adsorbed Gly to the nucleophilic NH2 group, and from withdrawal of electron density from the carboxyl carbon to the surface metal ions. The orientation of adsorbed Gly on minerals is also a factor influencing the Gly reactivity. The examination of Gly-mineral interactions under identical experimental conditions has enabled the direct comparison of various minerals' catalytic efficiencies and has made discussion of polymerization mechanisms and their relative influences possible Further systematic investigations using the approach reported herein (which are expected to be fruitful) combined with future microscopic surface analyses will elucidate the role of minerals in the process of abiotic peptide bond formation.

  15. Mineral induction by immobilized phosphoproteins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saito, T.; Arsenault, A. L.; Yamauchi, M.; Kuboki, Y.; Crenshaw, M. A.

    1997-01-01

    Dentin phosphoproteins are thought to have a primary role in the deposition of mineral on the collagen of dentin. In this study we determined the type of binding between collagen and phosphoproteins necessary for mineral formation onto collagen fibrils and whether the phosphate esters are required. Bovine dentin phosphophoryn or phosvitin from egg yolk were immobilized on reconstituted skin type I collagen fibrils by adsorption or by covalent cross-linking. In some samples the ester phosphate was removed from the covalently cross-linked phosphoproteins by treatment with acid phosphatase. All samples were incubated at 37 degrees C in metastable solutions that do not spontaneously precipitate. Reconstituted collagen fibrils alone did not induce mineral formation. The phosphoproteins adsorbed to the collagen fibrils desorbed when the mineralization medium was added, and mineral was not induced. The mineral induced by the cross-linked phosphoproteins was apatite, and the crystals were confined to the surface of the collagen fibrils. With decreasing medium saturation the time required for mineral induction increased. The interfacial tensions calculated for apatite formation by either phosphoprotein cross-linked to collagen were about the same as that for phosphatidic acid liposomes and hydroxyapatite. This similarity in values indicates that the nucleation potential of these highly phosphorylated surfaces is about the same. It is concluded that phosphoproteins must be irreversibly bound to collagen fibrils for the mineralization of the collagen network in solutions that do not spontaneously precipitate. The phosphate esters of phosphoproteins are required for mineral induction, and the carboxylate groups are not sufficient.

  16. Fragrance sensitivity in coal miners.

    PubMed

    Goodfield, M J; Saihan, E M

    1988-02-01

    In a prospective study, we have examined the incidence of fragrance sensitivity in Nottinghamshire coal miners. Our results confirm previous reports of an increased incidence of such sensitivity in miners (45%) when compared with both male (20%) and female (13%) non-miners. This increased incidence is not related to an increased use of perfumed cosmetics, but may be related to the use of a highly perfumed body lotion in subjects who already have a high incidence of irritant hand eczema. There was no significant increase in the rate of positive reactions to other applied allergens.

  17. Mineral catalysis of a potentially prebiotic aldol condensation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De Graaf, R. M.; Visscher, J.; Xu, Y.; Arrhenius, G.; Schwartz, A. W.

    1998-01-01

    Minerals may have played a significant role in chemical evolution. In the course of investigating the chemistry of phosphonoacetaldehyde (PAL), an analogue of glycolaldehyde phosphate, we have observed a striking case of catalysis by the layered hydroxide mineral hydrotalcite ([Mg2Al(OH)6][Cl.nH2O]). In neutral or moderately basic aqueous solutions, PAL is unreactive even at a concentration of 0.1 M. In the presence of a large excess of NaOH (2 M), the compound undergoes aldol condensation to produce a dimer containing a C3-C4 double-bond. In dilute neutral solutions and in the presence of the mineral, however, condensation takes place rapidly, to produce a dimer which is almost exclusively the C2-C3 unsaturated product.

  18. 76 FR 44892 - Information Collection; Locatable Minerals

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-27

    ... Forest Service Information Collection; Locatable Minerals AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice... approved information collection, Locatable Minerals-36 CFR part 228, subpart A. DATES: Comments must be... entry to the building. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Tony Ferguson, Director, Minerals and...

  19. Mineral Losses During Extreme Environmental Conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Advisory groups that make recommendations for mineral intakes continue to identify accurate determinations of sweat mineral losses during physical activity as a critical void in their deliberations. Although estimates of sweat mineral concentrations are available, they are highly variable. Practica...

  20. Search for Aqueous Minerals in Parana Valles, Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talib, Saveelah; Dalton, J. B.; Moore, J. M.

    2007-10-01

    Search for Aqueous Minerals in Parana Valles, Mars S. Talib, J.B. Dalton and J.M. Moore We have performed a compositional analysis of surface deposits in Parana Valles using a combination of Mars Observer Laser Altimeter (MOLA), Mars Observer Camera (MOC), Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) and Thermal Emission Imaging Subsystem (THEMIS) observations. Parana Valles lies within a well-defined basin in the southern highlands and contains a well-developed watershed drainage network (Barnhart et al., 2007). The strong evidence of hydrologic activity suggests that aqueously-derived minerals may be sufficiently abundant to be detected through orbital remote sensing. We examined MOLA observations to determine locations of smaller basins within Parana, where ponding and sedimentation may have occurred. Mosaics of MOC images were then examined to identify albedo differences which could indicate mineral deposits. THEMIS night-time thermal infrared mosaics were examined to identify regions of high thermal inertia, which may be swept clear of surface dust. Finally, image cubes from TES were compiled. The TES data were culled following the method of Stockstill et al. (2005) to eliminate orbital tracks of high atmospheric dust or water ice cloud composition. A Dust Cover Index (Ruff and Christensen 2002) was computed for TES data and used to reject observations obscured by high surface dust. Once the TES image cube had been reduced, regions of interest were defined based on the areas determined likely to contain minerals of aqueous origin based on the MOLA, MOC, and THEMIS observations. A linear spectral mixture model was then applied to these spectra using the Arizona State University Thermal Emission Spectral Library (Christensen et al., 2000) to estimate mineral abundances. We found that the surface mineralogy of Parana Valles is dominated by mixtures of phyllosilicates, feldspars, olivines and pyroxenes. This is consistent with chemically-weathered basaltic material.

  1. Andic soils : mineralogical effect onto organic matter dynamics, organic matter effect onto mineral dynamics, or both?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basile-Doelsch, Isabelle; Amundson, Ronald; Balesdent, Jérome; Borschneck, Daniel; Bottero, Jean-Yves; Colin, Fabrice; de Junet, Alexis; Doelsch, Emmanuel; Legros, Samuel; Levard, Clément; Masion, Armand; Meunier, Jean-Dominique; Rose, Jérôme

    2014-05-01

    From a strictly mineralogical point of view, weathering of volcanic glass produces secondary phases that are short range ordered alumino-silicates (SRO-AlSi). These are imogolite tubes (2 to 3 nm of diameter) and allophane supposedly spheres (3.5 to 5 nm). Their local structure is composed of a curved gibbsite Al layer and Si tetrahedra in the vacancies (Q0). Proto-imogolites have the same local structure but are roof-shape nanoparticles likely representing the precursors of imogolite and allophanes (Levard et al. 2010). These structures and sizes give to the SRO-AlSi large specific surfaces and high reactivities. In some natural sites, imogolites and allophanes are formed in large quantities. Aging of these phases may lead to the formation of more stable minerals (halloysite, kaolinite and gibbsite) (Torn et al 1997). In natural environments, when the weathering of volcanic glass is associated with the establishment of vegetation, the soils formed are generally andosols. These soils are particularly rich in organic matter (OM), which is explained by the high ability of SRO-AlSi mineral phases to form bonds with organic compounds. In a first order "bulk" approach, it is considered that these bonds strongly stabilize the organic compounds as their mean age can reach more than 10 kyrs in some studied sites (Basile-Doelsch et al. 2005; Torn et al. 1997). However, the structure of the mineral phases present in andosols deserves more attention. Traditionally, the presence in the SRO-AlSi andosols was shown by selective dissolution approaches by oxalate and pyrophosphate. Using spectroscopic methods, mineralogical analysis of SRO-AlSi in andosols samples showed that these mineral phases were neither imogolites nor allophanes as originally supposed, but only less organized structures remained in a state of proto-imogolites (Basile-Doelsch al. 2005 ; Levard et al., 2012). The presence of OM would have an inhibitory effect on the formation of secondary mineral phases, by

  2. Hunting for eruption ages in accessory minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vazquez, J. A.

    2012-12-01

    A primary goal in geochronology is to provide precise and accurate ages for tephras that serve as chronostratigraphic markers for constraining the timing and rates of volcanism, sedimentation, climate change, and catastrophic events in Earth history. Zircon remains the most versatile accessory mineral for dating silicic tephras due to its common preservation in distal pyroclastic deposits, as well as the robustness of its U-Pb and U-series systems even after host materials have been hydrothermally altered or weathered. Countless studies document that zircon may be complexly zoned in age due to inheritance, contamination, recycling of antecrysts, protracted crystallization in long-lived magma reservoirs, or any combination of these. Other accessory minerals such as allanite or chevkinite can retain similar records of protracted crystallization. If the goal is to date the durations of magmatic crystallization, differentiation, and/or magma residence, then these protracted chronologies within and between accessory minerals are a blessing. However, if the goal is to date the timing of eruption with high precision, i.e., absolute ages with millennial-scale uncertainties, then this age zoning is a curse. Observations from ion microprobe 238U-230Th dating of Pleistocene zircon and allanite provide insight into the record of near-eruption crystallization in accessory minerals and serve as a guide for high-precision whole-crystal dating. Although imprecise relative to conventional techniques, ion probe analysis allows high-spatial resolution 238U-230Th dating that can document multi-millennial age distributions at the crystal scale. Analysis of unpolished rims and continuous depth profiling of zircon from small and large volume eruptions (e.g., Coso, Mono Craters, Yellowstone) reveals that the final several micrometers of crystallization often yield ages that are indistinguishable from associated eruption ages from the 40Ar/39Ar or (U-Th)/He methods. Using this approach, we

  3. Mineral and water nutrition.

    PubMed

    Beede, D K

    1991-07-01

    In providing minerals to dairy cattle it is important to distinguish between dietary requirements and feeding recommendations. The requirement is the absolute amount of an element needed to meet the animal's metabolic needs for maintenance, growth, pregnancy, and lactation divided by the coefficient of absorption; this is estimated by the factorial method. Actual estimates of requirements for lactating dairy cattle have been determined for Ca and P. The major difficulties in relying on the requirement estimate are that dry matter intake varies and the true absorption coefficient of the mixture of feeds in the ration generally is unknown. Therefore, feeding recommendations, based on feeding graded concentrations of an element, often offer more applicable information. With the exception of Ca and P, the current feeding recommendations for the other macrominerals, Mg, Na, K, Cl and S, have resulted from feeding trials. With certain environmental and physiologic situations the feeding recommendations may vary. For example, during heat stress the dietary K recommendation for the lactating cow should be higher than in cool weather because of increased sweating and decreased feed intake. Another example may be that the source of supplemental Mg may affect what dietary inclusion rate will yield optimal performance and should be recommended. An important consideration in dairy ration formulation in the future will address the interrelationships of the various macrominerals. There is accumulating evidence that shows that different concentrations of Na, Cl, and K may interrelate and affect lactational performance. Many times the naturally occurring concentrations of one or more of these elements may have to be associated with varying concentrations of the others in order to optimize animal performance and health. Much experimentation likely will examine these interrelationships in the future. Supplementation of trace elements in diets of dairy cattle is common practice. This

  4. Highwall miners pursue thinner seams

    SciTech Connect

    Fiscor, S.

    2006-04-15

    OEMs have implemented design changes to reduce the machine's footprint and to mine more accurately. Three manufacturers offer highwall mining systems, American Highwall Systems (AMS), ICG Addcar and Superior Highwall Miners. Latest developments in their machines are reported. 3 photos.

  5. 77 FR 56273 - Conflict Minerals

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-12

    ..., Release No. 34-63547 (Dec. 15, 2010) [75 FR 80948] (the ``Proposing Release''). \\5\\ Public Law 111-203... (Jan. 7, 2011) (``WGC I''). \\33\\ Conflict Minerals, Release No. 34-63793 (Jan. 28, 2011) [76 FR...

  6. Novel routes to metalloorganics containing aluminum from minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayanan, Ramasubramanian

    Novel pathways for synthesizing Al metalloorganics directly from widely available oxides and oxo-hydroxides of aluminum are developed. The Al metalloorganics are then used to produce low-cost precursors for ceramics and polymers containing Al. Alumatrane, an unique, air-stable, aluminum alkoxide is prepared in one step from aluminum hydroxide in quantitative yields. Subsequently, alumatrane was used to prepare and characterize all group II dialuminate ceramics (MAlsb2Osb4, M = Mg, Ca, Sr, Ba). Similarly, an air-stable alkoxide of silicon was synthesized directly from SiOsb2, and is used in conjunction with alumatrane to produce precursors for aluminosilicate ceramics (MAlSiOsb4, M = K, Li, Na). Aluminum formate is synthesized, in differing efficiencies, from different crystalline minerals of Al, by direct dissolution in formic acid. A few other aluminum carboxylates are also synthesized, either directly from minerals or from aluminum formates, thus expanding the scope of the acid dissolution of aluminum hydroxides. Aluminum allyloxypropanoate (AAP) (Al(Osb2CCHsb2CHsb2OCH{=}CHsb2)sb2(OH)), an aluminum carboxylate with a polymerizable group has been synthesized from aluminum formate. This, has been incorporated into methyl methacrylate (MMA) polymers to impart fire retardancy. The increase in char yields as a result of AAP incorporation, indicate improved fire retardancy. Fire retardant characteristics of alumatrane has also been investigated, in MMA polymers and in a polyurethane polymer, taking char yields as a measure of fire retardance efficiency.

  7. The Zapot pegmatite mineral county

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Foord, E.E.; Soregaroli, A.E.; Gordon, H.M.

    1999-01-01

    The Zapot pegmatite is currently being mined for mineral specimens (chiefly amazonite, topaz and smoky quartz in miarolitic cavities), for gemstones (topaz and smoky quartz) and for decorative rock (amazonite). The deposit is owned and operated by Harvey Gordon Minerals of Reno, Nevada, and is the only amazonite-topaz mining operation in the state. Thousands of specimens from this operation have reached the collector market.

  8. Mineral of the month: magnesium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kramer, Deborah A.

    2005-01-01

    Magnesium, often confused with last month’s mineral of the month manganese, is valued primarily because of its light weight and high strength-to-weight ratio. Magnesium is the eighth most abundant element and constitutes about 2 percent of the Earth’s crust. It is the third most plentiful element dissolved in seawater, with a concentration averaging 0.13 percent. Magnesium is found in over 60 minerals, and also is recovered from seawater, wells, and lake brines and bitterns.

  9. The maximum water storage capacities in nominally anhydrous minerals in the mantle transition zone and lower mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, T.; Yurimoto, H.

    2012-12-01

    Water is the most important volatile component in the Earth, and affects the physicochemical properties of mantle minerals, e.g. density, elastic property, electrical conductivity, thermal conductivity, rheological property, melting temperature, melt composition, element partitioning, etc. So many high pressure experiments have been conducted so far to determine the effect of water on mantle minerals. To clarify the maximum water storage capacity in nominally anhydrous mantle minerals in the mantle transition zone and lower mantle is an important issue to discuss the possibility of the existence of water reservoir in the Earth mantle. So we have been clarifying the maximum water storage capacity in mantle minerals using MA-8 type (KAWAI-type) high pressure apparatus and SIMS (secondary ion mass spectroscopy). Upper mantle mineral, olivine can contain ~0.9 wt% H2O in the condition just above 410 km discontinuity in maximum (e.g. Chen et al., 2002; Smyth et al., 2006). On the other hand, mantle transition zone mineral, wadsleyite and ringwoodite can contain significant amount (about 2-3 wt.%) of H2O (e.g. Inoue et al., 1995, 1998, 2010; Kawamoto et al., 1996; Ohtani et al., 2000). But the lower mantle mineral, perovskite can not contain significant amount of H2O, less than ~0.1 wt% (e.g. Murakami et al., 2002; Inoue et al., 2010). In addition, garnet and stishovite also can not contain significant amount of H2O (e.g. Katayama et al., 2003; Mookherjee and Karato, 2010; Litasov et al., 2007). On the other hand, the water storage capacities of mantle minerals are supposed to be significantly coupled with Al by a substitution with Mg2+, Si4+ or Mg2+ + Si4+, because Al3+ is the trivalent cation, and H+ is the monovalent cation. To clarify the degree of the substitution, the water contents and the chemical compositions of Al-bearing minerals in the mantle transition zone and the lower mantle were also determined in the Al-bearing systems with H2O. We will introduce the

  10. The phosphate mineral arrojadite-(KFe) and its spectroscopic characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frost, Ray L.; Xi, Yunfei; Scholz, Ricardo; Horta, Laura Frota Campos

    2013-05-01

    The arrojadite-(KFe) mineral has been analyzed using a combination of scanning electron microscopy and a combination of Raman and infrared spectroscopy. The origin of the mineral is Rapid Creek sedimentary phosphatic iron formation, northern Yukon. The formula of the mineral was determined as KNaCaNa(FeMgMn)Al(PO)10.85(POOH)(OH)2. The complexity of the mineral formula is reflected in the spectroscopy. Raman bands at 975, 991 and 1005 cm-1 with shoulder bands at 951 and 1024 cm-1 are assigned to the PO43- ν1 symmetric stretching modes. The Raman bands at 1024, 1066, 1092, 1123, 1148 and 1187 cm-1 are assigned to the PO43- ν3 antisymmetric stretching modes. A series of Raman bands observed at 540, 548, 557, 583, 604, 615 and 638 cm-1 are attributed to the ν4 out of plane bending modes of the PO4 and H2PO4 units. The ν2 PO4 and H2PO4 bending modes are observed at 403, 424, 449, 463, 479 and 513 cm-1. Hydroxyl and water stretching bands are readily observed. Vibrational spectroscopy enables new information about the complex phosphate mineral arrojadite-(KFe) to be obtained.

  11. VNIR spectroscopy of rock forming minerals mixtures: a tool to interpret planetary igneous compositions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carli, C.; Serventi, G.; Ciarniello, M.; Capaccioni, F.; Sgavetti, M.

    Visible and Near Infrared (VNIR) spectroscopy is a powerful technique to investigate and map the mineralogical composition of a Solar System body. Laboratory activities, measuring and analyzing minerals and their mixtures, rock powders and slabs, varying the particle and grain sizes, permit to improve the confidence on the spectra.s interpretation. Here we summarized a set of activity on spectral mixtures between plagioclases and mafic materials at 63 125 and 125 250 mu m: illustrating the spectral variations due to the different intensity of the plagioclase absorption varying it Fe2+ content once mixed with orthopyroxene - clinopyroxene, orthopyroxene - olivine poor and - olivine rich materials (Serventi et al., 2013); an IMSA (Hapke, 1993) application to retrieve the endmember.s optical constants and to model the relative mineral abundances in intimate mixtures (Ciarniello et al., 2011) highlighting the influence of the mineral distribu- tions (Carli et al., 2014); a spectra deconvolution with Modified Gaussians (MGM, Sunshine et al., 1990) to define spectral parameters (Band Center, Depth and Width) trends respect to the mineralogical composition of endmembers (mineral chemis- try) and mixtures (mineral abundances). Also discussing the influence of the sizes (Serventi et al., 2015).

  12. Mineral commodity profiles: nitrogen

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kramer, Deborah A.

    2004-01-01

    Overview -- Nitrogen (N) is an essential element of life and a part of all animal and plant proteins. As a part of the DNA and RNA molecules, nitrogen is an essential constituent of each individual's genetic blueprint. As an essential element in the chlorophyll molecule, nitrogen is vital to a plant's ability to photosynthesize. Some crop plants, such as alfalfa, peas, peanuts, and soybeans, can convert atmospheric nitrogen into a usable form by a process referred to as 'fixation.' Most of the nitrogen that is available for crop production, however, comes from decomposing animal and plant waste or from commercially produced fertilizers. Commercial fertilizers contain nitrogen in the form of ammonium and/or nitrate or in a form that is quickly converted to the ammonium or nitrate form once the fertilizer is applied to the soil. Ammonia is generally the source of nitrogen in fertilizers. Anhydrous ammonia is commercially produced by reacting nitrogen with hydrogen under high temperatures and pressures. The source of nitrogen is the atmosphere, which is almost 80 percent nitrogen. Hydrogen is derived from a variety of raw materials, which include water, and crude oil, coal, and natural gas hydrocarbons. Nitrogen-based fertilizers are produced from ammonia feedstocks through a variety of chemical processes. Small quantities of nitrates are produced from mineral resources principally in Chile. In 2002, anhydrous ammonia and other nitrogen materials were produced in more than 70 countries. Global ammonia production was 108 million metric tons (Mt) of contained nitrogen. With 28 percent of this total, China was the largest producer of ammonia. Asia contributed 46 percent of total world ammonia production, and countries of the former U.S.S.R. represented 13 percent. North America also produced 13 percent of the total; Western Europe, 9 percent; the Middle East, 7 percent; Central America and South America, 5 percent; Eastern Europe, 3 percent; and Africa and Oceania

  13. Microbial mineral colonization across a subsurface redox transition zone

    DOE PAGES

    Converse, Brandon J.; McKinley, James P.; Resch, Charles T.; Roden, Eric E.

    2015-08-28

    Here our study employed 16S rRNA gene amplicon pyrosequencing to examine the hypothesis that chemolithotrophic Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria (FeOB) would preferentially colonize the Fe(II)-bearing mineral biotite compared to quartz sand when the minerals were incubated in situ within a subsurface redox transition zone (RTZ) at the Hanford 300 Area site in Richland, WA, USA. The work was motivated by the recently documented presence of neutral-pH chemolithotrophic FeOB capable of oxidizing structural Fe(II) in primary silicate and secondary phyllosilicate minerals in 300 Area sediments and groundwater (Benzine et al., 2013). Sterilized portions of sand+biotite or sand alone were incubated in situ formore » 5 months within a multilevel sampling (MLS) apparatus that spanned a ca. 2-m interval across the RTZ in two separate groundwater wells. Parallel MLS measurements of aqueous geochemical species were performed prior to deployment of the minerals. Contrary to expectations, the 16S rRNA gene libraries showed no significant difference in microbial communities that colonized the sand+biotite vs. sand-only deployments. Both mineral-associated and groundwater communities were dominated by heterotrophic taxa, with organisms from the Pseudomonadaceae accounting for up to 70% of all reads from the colonized minerals. These results are consistent with previous results indicating the capacity for heterotrophic metabolism (including anaerobic metabolism below the RTZ) as well as the predominance of heterotrophic taxa within 300 Area sediments and groundwater. Although heterotrophic organisms clearly dominated the colonized minerals, several putative lithotrophic (NH4+, H2, Fe(II), and HS- oxidizing) taxa were detected in significant abundance above and within the RTZ. Such organisms may play a role in the coupling of anaerobic microbial metabolism to oxidative pathways with attendant impacts on elemental cycling and redox-sensitive contaminant behavior in the vicinity of the RTZ.« less

  14. Microbial mineral colonization across a subsurface redox transition zone

    PubMed Central

    Converse, Brandon J.; McKinley, James P.; Resch, Charles T.; Roden, Eric E.

    2015-01-01

    This study employed 16S rRNA gene amplicon pyrosequencing to examine the hypothesis that chemolithotrophic Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria (FeOB) would preferentially colonize the Fe(II)-bearing mineral biotite compared to quartz sand when the minerals were incubated in situ within a subsurface redox transition zone (RTZ) at the Hanford 300 Area site in Richland, WA, USA. The work was motivated by the recently documented presence of neutral-pH chemolithotrophic FeOB capable of oxidizing structural Fe(II) in primary silicate and secondary phyllosilicate minerals in 300 Area sediments and groundwater (Benzine et al., 2013). Sterilized portions of sand+biotite or sand alone were incubated in situ for 5 months within a multilevel sampling (MLS) apparatus that spanned a ca. 2-m interval across the RTZ in two separate groundwater wells. Parallel MLS measurements of aqueous geochemical species were performed prior to deployment of the minerals. Contrary to expectations, the 16S rRNA gene libraries showed no significant difference in microbial communities that colonized the sand+biotite vs. sand-only deployments. Both mineral-associated and groundwater communities were dominated by heterotrophic taxa, with organisms from the Pseudomonadaceae accounting for up to 70% of all reads from the colonized minerals. These results are consistent with previous results indicating the capacity for heterotrophic metabolism (including anaerobic metabolism below the RTZ) as well as the predominance of heterotrophic taxa within 300 Area sediments and groundwater. Although heterotrophic organisms clearly dominated the colonized minerals, several putative lithotrophic (NH4+, H2, Fe(II), and HS- oxidizing) taxa were detected in significant abundance above and within the RTZ. Such organisms may play a role in the coupling of anaerobic microbial metabolism to oxidative pathways with attendant impacts on elemental cycling and redox-sensitive contaminant behavior in the vicinity of the RTZ. PMID

  15. Microbial mineral colonization across a subsurface redox transition zone

    SciTech Connect

    Converse, Brandon J.; McKinley, James P.; Resch, Charles T.; Roden, Eric E.

    2015-08-28

    Here our study employed 16S rRNA gene amplicon pyrosequencing to examine the hypothesis that chemolithotrophic Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria (FeOB) would preferentially colonize the Fe(II)-bearing mineral biotite compared to quartz sand when the minerals were incubated in situ within a subsurface redox transition zone (RTZ) at the Hanford 300 Area site in Richland, WA, USA. The work was motivated by the recently documented presence of neutral-pH chemolithotrophic FeOB capable of oxidizing structural Fe(II) in primary silicate and secondary phyllosilicate minerals in 300 Area sediments and groundwater (Benzine et al., 2013). Sterilized portions of sand+biotite or sand alone were incubated in situ for 5 months within a multilevel sampling (MLS) apparatus that spanned a ca. 2-m interval across the RTZ in two separate groundwater wells. Parallel MLS measurements of aqueous geochemical species were performed prior to deployment of the minerals. Contrary to expectations, the 16S rRNA gene libraries showed no significant difference in microbial communities that colonized the sand+biotite vs. sand-only deployments. Both mineral-associated and groundwater communities were dominated by heterotrophic taxa, with organisms from the Pseudomonadaceae accounting for up to 70% of all reads from the colonized minerals. These results are consistent with previous results indicating the capacity for heterotrophic metabolism (including anaerobic metabolism below the RTZ) as well as the predominance of heterotrophic taxa within 300 Area sediments and groundwater. Although heterotrophic organisms clearly dominated the colonized minerals, several putative lithotrophic (NH4+, H2, Fe(II), and HS- oxidizing) taxa were detected in significant abundance above and within the RTZ. Such organisms may play a role in the coupling of anaerobic microbial metabolism to oxidative pathways with attendant impacts on elemental cycling and redox-sensitive contaminant

  16. Recommended nomenclature for zeolite minerals: report of the subcommittee on zeolites of the International Mineralogical Association, Commission on new Minerals and Mineral names

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coombs, D.S.; Alberti, A.; Armbruster, T.; Artioli, G.; Colella, C.; Galli, E.; Grice, Joel D.; Liebau, F.; Mandarino, J.A.; Minato, H.; Nickel, E.H.; Passaglia, E.; Peacor, D.R.; Quartieri, S.; Rinaldi, R.; Ross, M.; Sheppard, R.A.; Tillmanns, E.; Vezzalini, G.

    1997-01-01

    This report embodies recommendations on zeolite nomenclature approved by the International Mineralogical Association, Commission on New Minerals and Mineral Names. In a working definition of a zeolite mineral used for this review, structures containing an interrupted framework of tetrahedra are accepted where other zeolitic properties prevail, and complete substitution by elements other than Si and Al is allowed. Separate species are recognized in topologically distinctive compositional series in which different extra-framework cations are the most abundant in atomic proportions. To name these, the appropriate chemicalsymbol is attached by a hyphen to the series name as a suffix, except for the names harmotome, pollucite and wairakite in the phillipsite and analcime series. Differences in space-group symmetry and in order-disorder relationships in zeolites having the same topologically distinctive framework do not in general provide adequate grounds for recognition of separate species. Zeolite species are not to be distinguished solely on the ratio Si:Al except for heulandite (Si:Al < 4.0) and clinoptilolite (Si:Al ??? 4.0). Dehydration, partial hydration, and overhydration are not sufficient grounds for the recognition of separate species of zeolites. Use of the term 'ideal formula' should be avoided in referring to a simplified or averaged formula of a zeolite. newly recognized species in compositional series are as follows: brewsterite-Sr, -Ba, chabazite-Ca, -Na, -K, clinoptilolite-K, -Na, -Ca, dachiardite-Ca, -Na, erionite-Na, erionite-Na, -K, -Ca, faujasite-Na, -Ca, -Mg, ferrierite-Mg, -K, -Na, gmelinite-Na, -Ca, -K, heulandite-Ca, -Na, -K, -Sr, levyne-Ca, -Na, paulingite-K, -Ca, phillipsite-Na, -Ca, -K, and stilbite-Ca, -Na. Key references, type locality, origin of name, chemical data, IZA structure-type symbols, space-group symmetry, unit-cell dimensions, and comments on structure are listed for 13 compositional series, 82 accepted zeolite mineral species

  17. Recommended nomenclature for zeolite minerals: Report of the Subcommittee on Zeolites of the International Mineralogical Association, Commission on New Minerals and Mineral Names

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coombs, D.S.; Alberti, A.; Armbruster, T.; Artioli, G.; Colella, C.; Galli, E.; Grice, Joel D.; Liebau, F.; Mandarino, J.A.; Minato, H.; Nickel, E.H.; Passaglia, E.; Peacor, D.R.; Quartieri, S.; Rinaldi, R.; Ross, M.; Sheppard, R.A.; Tillmanns, E.; Vezzalini, G.

    1998-01-01

    This report embodies recommendations on zeolite nomenclature approved by the International Mineralogical Association Commission on New Minerals and Mineral Names. In a working definition of a zeolite mineral used for this review, structures containing an interrupted containing an interrupted framework of tetrahedra are accepted where other zeolitic properties prevail, and complete substitution by elements other than Si and Al is alloowed. Separate species are recognized in topologically distinctive compositional series in which different extra-framework cations are the most abundant in atomic proportions. To name these, the appropriate chemical symbol is attached by a hyphen to the series name as a suffix, except for the names harmotome, pollucite and wairakite in the phillipsite and analcime series. Differences in space-group symmetry and in order-disorder relationships in zeolites having the same topologically distinctive framework do not in general provide adequate grounds for recognition of separate species. Zeolite species are not to be distinguished solely in Si:Al ratio except for heulandite (Si:Al < 4.0) and clinoptilolite (Si:Al ??? 4.0). Dehydration, partial hydration and over-hydration are not sufficient grounds for the recognition of separate species of zeolites. Use of the term 'ideal formula' should be avoided in referring to a simplified or averaged formula of zeolite. Newly recognized species in compositional series are as follows: brewsterite-Sr, -Ba; chabazite-Ca, -Na, -K; clinoptilolite-K, -Na, -Ca; dechiardite-Ca, -Na; erionite-Na, -K, -Ca,; faujasite-Na, -Ca, -Mg; ferrierite-Mg, -K, -Na; gmelinite-Na, -Ca, -K; heulandite-Ca, -Na, -K, -Sr; levyne-Ca, -Na; paulingite-K, -Ca; phillipsite-Na, -Ca, -K stilbite-Ca, -Na. Key references, type locality, origin of name, chemical data, IZA structure-type symbols, space-group symmetry, unit-cell dimensions, and comments on structure are listed for 13 compositional series, 82 accepted zeolite mineral

  18. Mineral-resource data bases

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    1997-01-01

    Data bases are essential for modern scientific research. The new and exciting work being done in the Mineral Resource Program in the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) usually begins with the question, "Where are the known deposits?" A mineral-resource data base containing this type of information and more can be useful not just to USGS scientists, but to anyone who needs such data. Users of the data bases from outside the USGS include mining and exploration companies, environmental groups, academia, other Federal Agencies, and the general public. At present, the USGS has two large mineral-resource data bases, MRDS (Mineral Resource Data System) and MAS (Minerals Availability System). MRDS was built and is mamtained by the USGS, and MAS was built and maintained by the Bureau of Mines. In 1996, after the Bureau was abolished, MAS was transferred to the USGS. The two data bases were compiled for different purposes and contain very different mformation. For instance, MAS contains information on costs, details of mining methods, and feasibility studies. MRDS has mineralogical and geologic data that are not contained in MAS. Because they are both mineral-resource data bases, however, they contain some information in common, such as location, name(s) of sites, and commodities present. Both data bases are international in scope, and both are quite large. MRDS contains over 110,000 records, while MAS has over 220,000. One reason that MAS has more records is that it contains information on smelters, mill sites, and fossil fuel sites, as well as mineral- resource sites. The USGS is working to combine the information in both data bases. This is a large undertaking that will require some years to complete. In the interim, information from both data bases will still be available

  19. Biomineralization: mineral formation by organisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Addadi, Lia; Weiner, Steve

    2014-09-01

    Organisms form many different types of minerals, with diverse shapes and sizes. These minerals fulfill a variety of functions. Inspired by the late H A Lowenstam, Steve Weiner and Lia Addadi have addressed many questions that relate to the mechanisms by which biological organisms produce these mineral phases and how their structures relate to their functions. Addadi and Weiner have explored the manner in which macromolecules extracted from mineralized tissues can interact with some crystal planes and not others, how these macromolecules can be occluded inside the forming crystals residing preferentially on specific crystal planes, and how they can induce one polymorph of calcium carbonate and not another to nucleate. Addadi and Weiner have also identified a novel strategy used by the sea urchin to form its smooth and convoluted mineralized skeletal elements. The strategy involves the initial production by cells of a highly disordered mineral precursor phase in vesicles, and then the export of this so-called amorphous phase to the site of skeletal formation, where it crystallizes. This strategy is now known to be used by many different invertebrate phyla, as well as by vertebrates to build bones and teeth. One of the major current research aims of the Weiner--Addadi group is to understand the biomineralization pathways whereby ions are extracted from the environment, are transported and deposited inside cells within vesicles, how these disordered phases are then transferred to the site of skeletal formation, and finally how the so-called amorphous phase crystallizes. Biology has clearly evolved unique strategies for forming crystalline minerals. Despite more than 300 years of research in this field, many challenging questions still remain unanswered.

  20. The effect of 7 to 8 months of vitamin/mineral supplementation on the vitamin and mineral status of athletes.

    PubMed

    Telford, R D; Catchpole, E A; Deakin, V; McLeay, A C; Plank, A W

    1992-06-01

    Blood indicators of eight vitamins (B1, B2, B6, C, E, A, B12, folate) and six minerals (Cu, Mg, Zn, Ca, P, Al) were measured in 86 athletes before and after a 7- to 8-month period of training. During this period half consumed a multivitamin/mineral supplement and a matched group took a placebo. Following the supplementation period, blood biochemical indicators of B1, B6, B12, and folate status all increased but there were no significant effects of supplementation on B2, C, E, and A, or on the blood levels of any of the minerals. The supplementation had no effect on red or white cell counts or on hemoglobin levels. Irrespective of the supplementation, some blood measures varied according to sex, females evidencing significantly higher values than males for vitamins C, E, copper, magnesium, and aluminium, with B2 being higher in males. It is concluded that 7 to 8 months of multivitamin/mineral supplementation increased the blood nutritional status of some vitamins but did not affect any blood mineral levels, and that some blood nutritional indicators may vary according to sex.

  1. Understanding mineral dusts from the Middle East

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engelbrecht, J. P.; McDonald, E.; Gillies, J. A.; Jayanty, J.; Casuccio, G.; Gertler, A.

    2012-12-01

    The purpose of the program was to provide scientifically founded information on the chemical and physical properties of airborne mineral dust collected during a period of approximately one year, largely in 2006, at Djibouti, Afghanistan (Bagram, Khowst), Qatar, United Arab Emirates, Iraq (Balad, Baghdad, Tallil, Tikrit, Taji, Al Asad), and Kuwait (Northern, Central, Coastal, and Southern regions). To fully understand mineral dusts, their chemical and physical properties as well as mineralogical interrelationships were accurately established. Three collocated low volume particulate samplers, one each for the total suspended (TSP), less than 10 μm in aerodynamic diameter (PM10), and less than 2.5 μm in aerodynamic diameter (PM2.5) particulate matter were deployed at each of the 15 sites, operating on a "1 in 6 day" sampling schedule. A total of 3,136 filter samples were collected on a 1-in-6 day schedule, along with one-time bulk soil samples, at each of the 15 sites. Sample media included Teflon® membrane and quartz fiber filters for chemical analysis (71 species), and Nuclepore® filters for individual particle analysis by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). The provisional study of the data revealed three broad air pollution sources: geological dust, smoke from burn pits, and until now unidentified lead-zinc smelters and battery-processing facilities. SEM results and secondary electron imagery show that quartz and other silicate minerals and, to a lesser extent, dolomite and calcite particles are coated by a thin Si-Al-Mg layer, probably the clay minerals palygorskite and/or montmorillonite/illite. Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) was performed on aerosol samples collected at six military sites in Iraq (Balad, Baghdad, Tallil, Tikrit, Taji, and Al Asad). PMF results reflect chemical differences amongst sources impacting at individual sites, further complicated by the regional geomorphology and meteorology. Sampling sites are seldom impacted by one source at

  2. 1996 annual report on Alaska's mineral resources

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schneider, Jill L.

    1997-01-01

    This is the fifteenth annual report that has been prepared in response to the Alaska National Interest Lands Conservation Act. Current Alaskan mineral projects and events that occurred during 1995 are summarized. For the purpose of this document, the term 'minerals' encompasses both energy resources (oil and gas, coal and peat, uranium, and geothermal) and nonfuel-mineral resources (metallic and industrial minerals).

  3. 43 CFR 8.5 - Mineral rights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2012-10-01 2011-10-01 true Mineral rights. 8.5 Section 8.5 Public... INTERIOR AND OF THE ARMY RELATIVE TO RESERVOIR PROJECT LANDS § 8.5 Mineral rights. Mineral, oil and gas..., but mineral rights not acquired will be subordinated to the Government's right to regulate...

  4. 43 CFR 3861.3 - Mineral surveyors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Mineral surveyors. 3861.3 Section 3861.3..., DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) MINERAL PATENT APPLICATIONS Surveys and Plats § 3861.3 Mineral surveyors....

  5. 21 CFR 573.680 - Mineral oil.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Mineral oil. 573.680 Section 573.680 Food and... Listing § 573.680 Mineral oil. Mineral oil may be safely used in animal feed, subject to the provisions of this section. (a) Mineral oil, for the purpose of this section, is that complying with the...

  6. 43 CFR 3830.10 - Locatable minerals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Locatable minerals. 3830.10 Section 3830..., DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) LOCATING, RECORDING, AND MAINTAINING MINING CLAIMS OR SITES; GENERAL PROVISIONS Mining Law Minerals § 3830.10 Locatable minerals....

  7. 43 CFR 3830.10 - Locatable minerals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Locatable minerals. 3830.10 Section 3830..., DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) LOCATING, RECORDING, AND MAINTAINING MINING CLAIMS OR SITES; GENERAL PROVISIONS Mining Law Minerals § 3830.10 Locatable minerals....

  8. 43 CFR 3861.3 - Mineral surveyors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Mineral surveyors. 3861.3 Section 3861.3..., DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) MINERAL PATENT APPLICATIONS Surveys and Plats § 3861.3 Mineral surveyors....

  9. 21 CFR 573.680 - Mineral oil.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Mineral oil. 573.680 Section 573.680 Food and... Listing § 573.680 Mineral oil. Mineral oil may be safely used in animal feed, subject to the provisions of this section. (a) Mineral oil, for the purpose of this section, is that complying with the...

  10. 43 CFR 8.5 - Mineral rights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Mineral rights. 8.5 Section 8.5 Public... INTERIOR AND OF THE ARMY RELATIVE TO RESERVOIR PROJECT LANDS § 8.5 Mineral rights. Mineral, oil and gas..., but mineral rights not acquired will be subordinated to the Government's right to regulate...

  11. 43 CFR 8.5 - Mineral rights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Mineral rights. 8.5 Section 8.5 Public... INTERIOR AND OF THE ARMY RELATIVE TO RESERVOIR PROJECT LANDS § 8.5 Mineral rights. Mineral, oil and gas..., but mineral rights not acquired will be subordinated to the Government's right to regulate...

  12. 43 CFR 3861.3 - Mineral surveyors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Mineral surveyors. 3861.3 Section 3861.3..., DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) MINERAL PATENT APPLICATIONS Surveys and Plats § 3861.3 Mineral surveyors....

  13. 43 CFR 3830.10 - Locatable minerals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Locatable minerals. 3830.10 Section 3830..., DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) LOCATING, RECORDING, AND MAINTAINING MINING CLAIMS OR SITES; GENERAL PROVISIONS Mining Law Minerals § 3830.10 Locatable minerals....

  14. 43 CFR 8.5 - Mineral rights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Mineral rights. 8.5 Section 8.5 Public... INTERIOR AND OF THE ARMY RELATIVE TO RESERVOIR PROJECT LANDS § 8.5 Mineral rights. Mineral, oil and gas..., but mineral rights not acquired will be subordinated to the Government's right to regulate...

  15. 21 CFR 573.680 - Mineral oil.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Mineral oil. 573.680 Section 573.680 Food and... Listing § 573.680 Mineral oil. Mineral oil may be safely used in animal feed, subject to the provisions of this section. (a) Mineral oil, for the purpose of this section, is that complying with the...

  16. 21 CFR 573.680 - Mineral oil.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Mineral oil. 573.680 Section 573.680 Food and... Listing § 573.680 Mineral oil. Mineral oil may be safely used in animal feed, subject to the provisions of this section. (a) Mineral oil, for the purpose of this section, is that complying with the...

  17. 43 CFR 3861.3 - Mineral surveyors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Mineral surveyors. 3861.3 Section 3861.3..., DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) MINERAL PATENT APPLICATIONS Surveys and Plats § 3861.3 Mineral surveyors....

  18. 43 CFR 8.5 - Mineral rights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Mineral rights. 8.5 Section 8.5 Public... INTERIOR AND OF THE ARMY RELATIVE TO RESERVOIR PROJECT LANDS § 8.5 Mineral rights. Mineral, oil and gas..., but mineral rights not acquired will be subordinated to the Government's right to regulate...

  19. 43 CFR 3830.10 - Locatable minerals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Locatable minerals. 3830.10 Section 3830..., DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) LOCATING, RECORDING, AND MAINTAINING MINING CLAIMS OR SITES; GENERAL PROVISIONS Mining Law Minerals § 3830.10 Locatable minerals....

  20. 21 CFR 573.680 - Mineral oil.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Mineral oil. 573.680 Section 573.680 Food and... Listing § 573.680 Mineral oil. Mineral oil may be safely used in animal feed, subject to the provisions of this section. (a) Mineral oil, for the purpose of this section, is that complying with the...

  1. Portable Radiometer Identifies Minerals in the Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goetz, A. F. H.; Machida, R. A.

    1982-01-01

    Hand-held optical instrument aids in identifying minerals in field. Can be used in exploration for minerals on foot or by aircraft. The radiometer is especially suitable for identifying clay and carbonate minerals. Radiometer measures reflectances of mineral at two wavelengths, computes ratio of reflectances, and displays ratio to user.

  2. Traditional Methods for Mineral Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, Robert E.; Carpenter, Charles E.

    This chapter describes traditional methods for analysis of minerals involving titrimetric and colorimetric procedures, and the use of ion selective electrodes. Other traditional methods of mineral analysis include gravimetric titration (i.e., insoluble forms of minerals are precipitated, rinse, dried, and weighed) and redox reactions (i.e., mineral is part of an oxidation-reduction reaction, and product is quantitated). However, these latter two methods will not be covered because they currently are used little in the food industry. The traditional methods that will be described have maintained widespread usage in the food industry despite the development of more modern instrumentation such as atomic absorption spectroscopy and inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (Chap. 24). Traditional methods generally require chemicals and equipment that are routinely available in an analytical laboratory and are within the experience of most laboratory technicians. Additionally, traditional methods often form the basis for rapid analysis kits (e.g., Quantab®; for salt determination) that are increasingly in demand. Procedures for analysis of minerals of major nutritional or food processing concern are used for illustrative purposes. For additional examples of traditional methods refer to references (1-6). Slight modifications of these traditional methods are often needed for specific foodstuffs to minimize interferences or to be in the range of analytical performance. For analytical requirements for specific foods see the Official Methods of Analysis of AOAC International (5) and related official methods (6).

  3. CRYSTAL CHEMISTRY OF HYDROUS MINERALS

    SciTech Connect

    Y. ZHAO; ET AL

    2001-02-01

    Hydrogen has long been appreciated for its role in geological processes of the Earth's crust. However, its role in Earth's deep interior has been neglected in most geophysical thinking. Yet it is now believed that most of our planet's hydrogen may be locked up in high pressure phases of hydrous silicate minerals within the Earth's mantle. This rocky interior (approximately 7/8 of Earth's volume) is conjectured to contain 1-2 orders of magnitude more water than the more obvious oceans (the ''hydrosphere'') and atmosphere. This project is aimed at using the capability of neutron scattering from hydrogen to study the crystal chemistry and stability of hydrogen-bearing minerals at high pressures and temperatures. At the most basic level this is a study of the atomic position and hydrogen bond itself. We have conducted experimental runs on hydrous minerals under high pressure and high temperature conditions. The crystallographic structure of hydrous minerals at extreme conditions and its structural stability, and hydrogen bond at high P-T conditions are the fundamental questions to be addressed. The behavior of the hydrous minerals in the deep interior of the Earth has been discussed.

  4. Metamorphism and gold mineralization in the Blue Ridge, Southernmost Appalachians

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stowell, H.H.; Lesher, C.M.; Green, N.L.; Sha, P.; Guthrie, G.M.; Sinha, A.K.

    1996-01-01

    Lode gold mineralization in the Blue Ridge of the southernmost Appalachians is hosted by metavolcanic rocks (e.g., Anna Howe mine, AL; Royal Vindicator mine, GA), metaplutonic rocks (e.g., Hog Mountain mine, AL), and metasedimentary rocks (e.g., Lowe, Tallapoosa, and Jones Vein mines, AL). Most gold occurs in synkinematic quartz ?? plagioclase ?? pyrite ?? pyrrhotite ?? chlorite veins localized along polydeformational faults that juxtapose rocks with significantly different peak metamorphic mineral assemblages. Mineralogy, chemistry, and O and H isotope studies suggest that the three types of host rocks have undergone differing amounts and types of alteration during mineralization. Limited wall-rock alteration in metavolcanic- and metasediment-hosted deposits, and relatively extensive wall-rock alteration in granitoid-hosted deposits, suggests that most deposits formed from fluids that were close to equilibrium with metavolcanic and metasedimentary rocks. Stable isotope compositions of the fluids calculated from vein minerals and vein selvages are consistent with a predominantly metasedimentary fluid source, but vary from deposit to deposit (-22 to -47??? ??D, 4-5??? ??18O, and 5-7??? ??34S at Anna Howe and Royal Vindicator; -48 to -50??? ??D, 9-13??? ??18O, and ca. 19??? ??34S at Lowe and Jones Vein; and -22 to -23??? ??D, 8-11??? ??18O, 9-10??? ??34S, and -6 ??13C at Hog Mountain). Silicate mineral thermobarometry of vein, vein selvage, and wall-rock mineral assemblages indicate that mineralization and regional metamorphism occured at greenschist to amphibolite facies (480?? ?? 75??C at Anna Howe, 535?? ?? 50??C at 6.4 ?? 1 kbars at Lowe, 530?? ?? 50??C at 6.9 ?? 1 kbars at Tallapoosa, and 460?? ?? 50??C at 5.5 ?? 1 kbars at Hog Mountain). Oxygen isotope fractionation between vein minerals and selvage minerals consistently records equilibration temperatures that are similar to or slightly lower than those estimated from silicate thermometry. Auriferous veins

  5. Radioactivity in bottled mineral waters.

    PubMed

    Martín Sánchez, A; Rubio Montero, M P; Gómez Escobar, V; Jurado Vargas, M

    1999-06-01

    Consumption of bottled mineral water is a growing practice and is sometimes a necessity rather than a choice. In this work, a study of the radioactive content of a wide selection of commercial bottled mineral waters for human intake was carried out. The origins of the analyzed waters were very different, coming from various locations in France, Portugal and Spain. Their total alpha and beta activity concentrations were determined and also gamma spectrometry was used to detect some radionuclides. In some cases, the waters presented high values of the total alpha and beta activity concentrations surpassing the reference levels established by the CSN, the Spanish. Regulatory Organization. In these cases, a determination of uranium and 226Ra was also performed by using low-level liquid scintillation counting. The results revealed a strong correlation between radioactive content and dry residue, and lead one to conclude that high radioactive content is mainly related to the mineralization in waters of underground origin.

  6. Respiratory disability in coal miners

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, W.K.C.; Lapp, N.L.; Seaton, D.

    1980-06-20

    It has been suggested that the assessment of ventilatory capacity alone is inadequate for the determination of disabling occupational respiratory impairment in coal miners. The Department of Labor has accepted this view and now routinely requests blood gas analyses in those claimants not meeting the ventilatory criteria. We tested the validity of this contention by selecting two groups of coal miners claiming total disability. The first consisted of 150 claimants who were referred for spirometry, while the second consisted of 50 claimants who had been referred for blood gas studies. Of those in group 1, eight met the extant criteria for disability, while only two of those in group 2 satisfied the criteria, and, in both, cardiac disease was responsible. We conclude that blood gas analyses are unnecessary in the determination of pulmonary disability in coal miners.

  7. [Method of Remote Sensing Identification for Mineral Types Based on Multiple Spectral Characteristic Parameters Matching].

    PubMed

    Wei, Jing; Ming, Yan-fang; Han, Liu-sheng; Ren, Zhong-liang; Guo, Ya-min

    2015-10-01

    The traditional mineral mapping methods with remote sensing data, based on spectral reflectance matching techniques, shows low accuracy, for obviously being affected by the image quality, atmospheric and other factors. A new mineral mapping method based on multiple types of spectral characteristic parameters is presented in this paper. Various spectral characteristic parameters are used together to enhanced the stability in the situation of atmosphere and environment background affecting. AVIRIS (Airborne Visible Infrared Imaging Spectrometer) data of Nevada Cuprite are selected to determine the mineral types with this method. Typical mineral spectral data are also obtained from USGS (United States Geological Survey) spectral library to calculate the spectral characteristic parameters. A mineral identification model based on multiple spectral characteristic parameters is built by analyzing the various characteristic parameters, and is applied in the mineral mapping experiment in Cuprite area. The mineral mapping result produced by Clark et al. in 1995 is used to evaluate the effect of this method, results show, that mineral mapping results with this method can obtain a high precision, the overall mineral identification accuracy is 78.96%.

  8. Reactivity of clay minerals with acids and alkalies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carroll, D.; Starkey, H.C.

    1971-01-01

    One-g samples of a montmorillonite, a metabentonite, an illite, two kaolinites, and three halloysites were treated with 50 ml of hydrochloric acid (6??45 N, 1:1), acetic acid (4??5 N, 1:3), sodium hydroxide (2??8 N), sodium chloride solution (pH 6??10; Na = 35???; Cl = 21??5???), and natural sea water (pH 7??85; Na = 35??5???; Cl = 21??5???) for a 10-day period in stoppered plastic vials. The supernatant solutions were removed from the clay minerals and analyzed for SiO2, Al2O3, CaO, MgO, Na2O, and K2O. All the solutions removed some SiO2, Al2O3, and Fe2O3 from the samples, but the quantities were small. Sodium hydroxide attacked the kaolin group minerals more strongly than it did montmorillonite, metabentonite, or illite. Halloysite was more strongly attacked by hydrochloric acid than was any of the other experimental minerals. Hydrochloric acid removed iron oxide coatings from soil clay minerals, but acetic acid did not remove them completely. The samples most strongly attacked by HCl and NaOH were examined by X-ray diffraction. Acid treatment did not destroy the structure of the clays, but the halloysite structure was partially destroyed. Sodium hydroxide attacked the halloysite structure, as shown by chemical analysis and X-ray diffraction. These experiments show that treatment in dilute acids has no harmful effect in the preparation of clays for X-ray diffraction. Acetic acid is preferred to hydrochloric acid for this purpose. Hydrochloric acid cleans clay minerals by removing free iron oxide from the surface; acetic acid is less effective. ?? 1971.

  9. Modeling Hydrothermal Mineralization: Fractal or Multifrcatal Models?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Q.

    2004-05-01

    Hydrothermal mineralization occurs when the natural geo-processes involve the interaction of ore material-carrying hydrothermal fluids with rocks in the earth's crust in a specific geological environment. Mineralization can cause element concentration enrichment or depletion in the country rocks. Local enrichment may form ore body that can be mined for profit at the current economic and technological conditions. To understand the spatial distribution of element concentration enrichment or depletion caused by mineralization in a mineral district is essential for mineral exploration and mineral prediction. Grade-tonnage model and mineral deposits size distribution model are common models used for characterizing mineral deposits. This paper proposes a non-linear mineralization model on the basis of a modified classical igneous differentiation mineralization model to describe the generation of multifractal distribution of element concentration in the country rocks as well as grade-tonnage fractal/multifractal distribution of ore deposits that have been often observed in hydrothermal mineralization. This work may also lead to a singularity model to explain the common properties of mineralization and mineralization-associated geochemical anomaly diversity and the generalized self-similarity of the anomalies. The model has been applied to a case study of mineral deposits prediction and mineral resource assessment in the Abitibi district, northern Ontario, Canada.

  10. Viewing minerals, atom by atom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maggs, William Ward

    With state-of-the-art technology supported by scissors and bungy cords, Earth scientists are beginning to look at mineral surfaces and mineral-fluid interactions on an atomic scale.The instrument that can provide such a detailed view is the scanning tunneling microscope (STM), which made a great theoretical and practical splash when it was introduced in 1981 by Gerd Binnig and Heinrich Rohrer, physicists at IBM's laboratory in Zurich. They won a Nobel Prize in Physics for their work 5 years later.

  11. 43 CFR 3873.1 - Segregation of mineral from non-mineral land.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Segregation of mineral from non-mineral...) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) ADVERSE CLAIMS, PROTESTS AND CONFLICTS Segregation § 3873.1 Segregation of mineral from non-mineral land. Where a survey...

  12. 43 CFR 3873.1 - Segregation of mineral from non-mineral land.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Segregation of mineral from non-mineral...) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) ADVERSE CLAIMS, PROTESTS AND CONFLICTS Segregation § 3873.1 Segregation of mineral from non-mineral land. Where a survey...

  13. 43 CFR 3873.1 - Segregation of mineral from non-mineral land.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Segregation of mineral from non-mineral...) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) ADVERSE CLAIMS, PROTESTS AND CONFLICTS Segregation § 3873.1 Segregation of mineral from non-mineral land. Where a survey...

  14. 43 CFR 3873.1 - Segregation of mineral from non-mineral land.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Segregation of mineral from non-mineral...) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) ADVERSE CLAIMS, PROTESTS AND CONFLICTS Segregation § 3873.1 Segregation of mineral from non-mineral land. Where a survey...

  15. Nuclear Melt Glass Dissolution and Secondary Mineral Precipitation at 40 to 200C

    SciTech Connect

    Zavarin, M; Roberts, S; Viani, B; Pawloski, G; Rose, T

    2004-06-14

    Most long-lived radionuclides associated with an underground nuclear test are initially incorporated into melt glass and become part of the hydrologic source term (HST) only upon their release via glass dissolution (Pawloski et al., 2001). As the melt glass dissolves, secondary minerals precipitate. The types of secondary minerals that precipitate influence the water chemistry in and around the melt glass. The secondary minerals also provide a sorption sink to the released radionuclides. The changing water chemistry affects the rate of glass dissolution; it also affects the sorption behavior of the released radionuclides. This complex nature of glass dissolution and its important role in defining the HST requires a thorough understanding of glass dissolution and secondary mineral precipitation. The identity of secondary minerals formed at temperatures from 40 to 200 C are evaluated in this report to assist in that understanding.

  16. Genesis and evolution of the Baid al Jimalah tungsten deposit, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kamilli, Robert J.

    1986-01-01

    Baid al Jimalah is similar in character and origin to other tungsten-tin greisen deposits in the world, especially the Hemerdon deposit in Devon, England. It is also analogous to Climax-type molybdenum deposits, which contain virtually identical mineral assemblages, but with the relative intensities of the molybdenum and tungsten mineralization reversed.

  17. Detrital shocked minerals: microstructural provenance indicators of impact craters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavosie, A. J.

    2014-12-01

    The study of detrital shocked minerals (DSMs) merges planetary science, sedimentology, mineralogy/crystallography, accessory mineral geochemistry, and geochronology, with the goal of identifying and determining provenance of shock metamorphosed sand grains. Diagnostic high-pressure impact-generated microstructures (planar fractures, planar deformation features) are readily identified on external grain surfaces using standard SEM imaging methods (BSE), and when found, unambiguously confirm an impact origin for a given sand grain. DSMs, including quartz, zircon, monazite, and apatite, have thus far been documented at the Vredefort Dome [1,2,3], Sudbury [4], Rock Elm [5], and Santa Fe [6,7] impact structures. DSMs have been identified in alluvium, colluvium, beach sand, and glacial deposits. Two main processes are recognized that imply the global siliciclastic record contains DSMs: they survive extreme distal transport, and they survive 'deep time' lithification. Distal transport: In South Africa, shocked minerals are preserved in alluvium from the Vaal River >750 km downstream from the Vredefort impact; SHRIMP U-Pb geochronology has confirmed the origin of detrital shocked zircon and monazite from shocked Vredefort bedrock [2]. Vredefort-derived shocked zircons have also been found at the mouth of the Orange River on the Atlantic coast, having travelled ~2000 km downriver from Vredefort [8]. Deep time preservation: Vredefort-derived shocked zircon and quartz has been documented in glacial diamictite from the 300 Myr-old Dwyka Group in South Africa. Shocked minerals were thus entrained and transported in Paleozoic ice sheets that passed over Vredefort [9]. An impact crater can thus be viewed as a unique 'point source', in some cases for billions of years [2,4]; DSMs thus have applications in studying eroded impact craters, sedimentary provenance, landscape evolution, and long-term sediment transport processes throughout the geologic record. This work was supported by

  18. Exchangeable and secondary mineral reactive pools of aluminium in coastal lowland acid sulfate soils.

    PubMed

    Yvanes-Giuliani, Yliane A M; Waite, T David; Collins, Richard N

    2014-07-01

    The use of coastal floodplain sulfidic sediments for agricultural activities has resulted in the environmental degradation of many areas worldwide. The generation of acidity and transport of aluminium (Al) and other metals to adjacent aquatic systems are the main causes of adverse effects. Here, a five-step sequential extraction procedure (SEP) was applied to 30 coastal lowland acid sulfate soils (CLASS) from north-eastern New South Wales, Australia. This enabled quantification of the proportion of aluminium present in 'water-soluble', 'exchangeable', 'organically-complexed', 'reducible iron(III) (oxyhydr)oxide/hydroxysulfate-incorporated' and 'amorphous Al mineral' fractions. The first three extractions represented an average of 5% of 'aqua regia' extractable Al and their cumulative concentrations were extremely high, reaching up to 4000 mg·kg(-1). Comparison of Al concentrations in the final two extractions indicated that 'amorphous Al minerals' are quantitatively a much more important sink for the removal of aqueous Al derived from the acidic weathering of these soils than reducible Fe(III) minerals. Correlations were observed between soil pH, dissolved and total organic carbon (DOC and TOC) and Al concentrations in organic carbon-rich CLASS soil horizons. These results suggest that complexation of Al by dissolved organic matter significantly increases soluble Al concentrations at pH values >5.0. As such, present land management practices would benefit with redefinition of an 'optimal' soil from pH ≥5.5 to ~4.8 for the preservation of aquatic environments adjacent to organic-rich CLASS where Al is the sole or principle inorganic contaminant of concern. Furthermore, it was observed that currently-accepted standard procedures (i.e. 1 M KCl extraction) to measure exchangeable Al concentrations in these types of soils severely underestimate exchangeable Al and a more accurate representation may be obtained through the use of 0.2 M CuCl2.

  19. Authigenic Mineral Cycling in Roman Seawater Concrete with Campi Flegrei Pumiceous Ash Pozzolan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, M. D.; Mulcahy, S. R.; Chen, H.; Li, Q.; Cappelletti, P.; Carraro, C.; Wenk, H. R.

    2015-12-01

    Alteration of Campi Flegrei pumiceous ash in Roman concrete harbor structures along the central Italian coast produced zeolite and Ca-silicate minerals that have reinforced cementitious fabrics for >2000 years. X-ray microdiffraction experiments and electron microprobe analyses show that diverse alteration paths produced authigenic phillipsite and Al-tobermorite in the pyroclasts, pores, and cementing matrix of mortars in Romacons drill cores from Portus Cosanus, Portus Neronis, and Baianus Sinus. These minerals have cation exchange capabilities for some radionuclides and heavy metal cations and are candidate sorbents for concrete waste encapsulations. Compositions of phillipsite in certain Portus Cosanus and Portus Neronis pumice clasts are similar to those in the Neapolitan Yellow Tuff. Dissolution of this phillipsite and alkali feldspar produced new, authigenic phillipsite with less Si, greater Al and Ca, Al-tobermorite, and poorly-crystalline binder in pumice vesicles. Conversely, alteration of trachytic glass to clay mineral (nontronite) in a Baianus Sinus tuff clast is associated with new, authigenic phillipsite and Al-tobermorite in the tuff and cementing matrix. The Al-tobermorite has lower Al/(Si+Al) and Ca/(Si+Al) compared to Al-tobermorite in relict lime clasts. These more siliceous crystals, similar to those in hydrothermally-altered basalt, have 11.3 Å d-spacing in [001]. Raman spectra show symmetrical bending of Si-O-Si and Si-O-Al linkages, Si-O and Si-Al symmetrical stretching, and possible Q3 Si and Al tetrahedral peaks that suggest cross-linking of silicate chains-an important factor in cation exchange. The authigenic crystals refine pore space, contribute to binding in interfacial zones, and obstruct microcrack propagation. The well-constrained history of temperature variations and seawater immersion could provide further information for understanding alteration in volcanoclastic deposits and predicting regenerative processes in high performance

  20. Can the dissolution rates of individual minerals be used to describe whole rock dissolution?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Critelli, Teresa; Marini, Luigi; Schott, Jacques; Mavromatis, Vasileios; Apollaro, Carmine; Rinder, Thomas; De Rosa, Rosanna; Oelkers, Eric H.

    2014-05-01

    There have been an exhaustive number of laboratory studies determining the dissolution rates of individual minerals, but few have focused on the dissolution rates of minerals in multi-mineralic rocks. As a result, geochemical modeling of the temporal evolution of water-rock interaction is generally based on the assumption that the dissolution rate of minerals within a rock is equal to that measured in the laboratory on individual minerals. To verify this hypothesis, we have determined experimentally the dissolution rates of a well characterized metabasalt rock (Apollaro et al., 2011; Bloise et al., 2012) from the Mt. Reventino area (Southern Italy) at 25°C in mixed flow reactors. From these experiments and rock modal analysis we have deduced the dissolution rates of the minerals present in the rock (actinolite, albite, chlorite, epidote, and phengite). The major observation of this effort include: (i) only small differences in the dissolution rates of the individual minerals were observed; these rates are close to the whole-rock dissolution rate and (ii) the dissolution rates of albite and chlorite are in close agreement with laboratory rates obtained from individual mineral dissolution experiments, whereas those of actinolite, phengite, and epidote are not consistent with those reported in literature by 1-2 orders of magnitude. These results demonstrate that the dissolution rate of a given mineral in a multi-phase rock can be affected by the presence of the other minerals. Rock dissolution kinetics are likely constrained by the dissolution rates of the more abundant, lesser reactive mineral or minerals in the rock. These unreactive minerals can prevent the dissolution of the more rapidly dissolving mineral grains by keeping them out of contact with the aqueous phase. This implies that the overall weathering rate of rocks cannot be modelled from the measured dissolution rates of its individual minerals. If confirmed through further studies, this conclusion may

  1. Mineral Dissolution and Secondary Precipitation on Quartz Sand in Simulated Hanford Tank Solutions Affecting Subsurface Porosity

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Guohui; Um, Wooyong

    2012-11-23

    Highly alkaline nuclear waste solutions have been released from underground nuclear waste storage tanks and pipelines into the vadose zone at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Hanford Site in Washington, causing mineral dissolution and re-precipitation upon contact with subsurface sediments. High pH caustic NaNO3 solutions with and without dissolved Al were reacted with quartz sand through flow-through columns stepwise at 45, 51, and 89°C to simulate possible reactions between leaked nuclear waste solution and primary subsurface mineral. Upon reaction, Si was released from the dissolution of quartz sand, and nitrate-cancrinite [Na8Si6Al6O24(NO3)2] precipitated on the quartz surface as a secondary mineral phase. Both steady-state dissolution and precipitation kinetics were quantified, and quartz dissolution apparent activation energy was determined. Mineral alteration through dissolution and precipitation processes results in pore volume and structure changes in the subsurface porous media. In this study, the column porosity increased up to 40.3% in the pure dissolution column when no dissolved Al was present in the leachate, whereas up to a 26.5% porosity decrease was found in columns where both dissolution and precipitation were observed because of the presence of Al in the input solution. The porosity change was also confirmed by calculation using the dissolution and precipitation rates and mineral volume changes.

  2. Organo-mineral Interactions in Ultisols and Andosols with Contrasting Mineralogy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sparks, D. L.

    2015-12-01

    Organo-mineral associations play an important role in long-term stabilization of soil organic matter. To understand the role of soil minerals and major cations in organo-mineral interactions, we applied STXM-NEXAFS spectroscopy at C, N, Al and Si K-edges, as well as Ca and Fe L-edges, to conduct submicron-level investigations of the associations of C and C forms with Ca, Fe, Al and Si in soil clay fraction of Ultisols and Andosols with contrasting mineralogy. Ultisols were under agricultural use receiving input of limestone and mushroom compost, whereas Andosols were under natural vegetation. The poorly crystalline minerals such as allophane and ferrihydrite were rich in Andosols, while Ultisols were dominated by vermiculite, illite and kaolinite. STXM analysis showed a high spatial correlation between C and Ca in the Utisols. The major Ca forms in agricultural Ultisols were organic Ca. A variety of C forms such as phenols, heterocyclic compounds, carboxylamides were found in Ca-rich "hot spots" in Ultisols. In contrast a relatively uniform distribution of C and C forms on mineral surfaces was observed in Andosols, revolutionizing our view of heterogeneous distribution of OM in natural soil. The C forms associated with minerals were aromatic and carboxyl C. These results demonstrates the importance of Ca containing organic compounds in soil C sequestration in agricultural Ultisols, and highlights the important role of the poorly-crystalline soil minerals in soil organic matter sequestration in Andosols.

  3. Microbial mat mineralization in Great Salt Lake (Utah, USA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    PACE, Aurélie; Bouton, Anthony; Bourillot, Raphaël; Vennin, Emmanuelle; Visscher, Pieter; Dupraz, Christophe; Thomazo, Christophe; Serge, Galaup; Sophie, Leleu; Anna, Kwasniewski; Léa, Pigot; Michel, Franceschi

    2015-04-01

    Great Salt Lake is located in the Basin and Range province of Utah (USA). Its average surface is 4480 Km2 and its maximum depth is of about 15m. It is a partly rainfed endorheic hypersaline lake (average salinity: 140g/L). Due to the high salinity, little or no grazing organisms are present, favoring the development of microbialites that cover the margin of the lake. This work aims to understand the products and processes of mineralization in recent and modern microbialites on the western margin of Antelope Island. The distribution of microbialites and their morphology has been studied along lakeshore to center transects, showing a contrasting spatial distribution in bay versus headland. Fossil microbialites show a great diversity of macro- and microfabrics, some microbialites being essentially built by microbial-mediated carbonate precipitation, while other show the predominance of trapping and binding processes. The nature and composition of the microbial carbonates have been determined through polarizing, cathodoluminescence, reflected fluorescence microscopy, X-Ray diffractometry and isotope geochemistry (δ 18O and δ13C) in order to investigate the preservation of environmental signals in microbialites. Petrophysics analysis such as permeability and porosimetry, have been done to observe the structure of the microbialite. Microprobe and silver foils method have been used respectively to characterize oxygen production and sulfate reduction in living microbial mats. Mineralization zones seem to coincide with sulfate reduction hotspots. This mineralization results in mixed clotted-laminated fabric at the macro- and microscale. Several analysis such as Cryo-SEM, environmental SEM and raman spectroscopy three phases of mineralization allowed us to distinguish three type of minerals inside the mat: (1) a Mg and Si-rich clay developing on the organic matrix; (2) an intracellular Al-rich clay. (3) aragonite clots replacing the organic matrixes and embedding bacteria

  4. Ultraviolet spectra of minerals and rocks relevant to airless bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenspon, A.; Hibbitts, C.; Klima, R. L.; Izenberg, N. R.

    2011-12-01

    Reflectance spectroscopy from the ultraviolet (UV) through infrared is used to determine the composition of solar system objects from asteroids to gas giants. Ultraviolet spectroscopy is often used to characterize small amounts of dispersed media, for example during probing tenuous atmospheres and characterizing aurora as well as exploring atmospheric chemistry. It has also been used to characterize the compositions of solid surfaces of airless bodies such as the icy Galilean and Saturnian satellites [1,2], Mercury [3], and the Moon [3,4]. Spacecraft have obtained reflectance spectra of solid-surfaced airless bodies throughout the ultraviolet through visible (~ 100 to 750nm) that show absorption features indicative of mineral composition and processes such as space weathering. We are obtaining vacuum UV - infrared (~ 130 - 5000 nm) bidirectional reflectance spectra of minerals and rocks under vacuum and at different temperatures to increase the library of available UV reflectance spectra and to assist in the interpretation of these types of observations. Reflectance spectra of olivine and montmorillonite are consistent with those measured previously [5]. We are expanding our results to minerals relevant to Mercury, where understanding UV reflectance may prove critical for mineralogical interpretation of surface spectroscopy [6], as well as exploring the effect of hydration and temperature on UV spectra. [1] Hendrix, A.R. et al., Icarus, 135, 79-84, 1998. [2] Hendrix, A.R., and C.J. Hansen, Icarus 193, 323-333, 2008. [3] Holsclaw, G.M. et al., Icarus, 209, 179-194, 2010. [4] Gladstone, G.R. et al., Science, 330, 472-476, 2010. [5] Cloutis, E. A., Icarus, 197, 321-347, 2008. [6] Izenberg et al., AGU Fall 2011 Abstract ID: 119846

  5. Detrital Mineral Grains in Tektites.

    PubMed

    Bairnes, V E

    1963-12-27

    Abundant detrital crystalline mineral grains have been found in layered Muong Nong-type indochinite tektites from Nong Sapong, northeastern Thailand. These grains are an integral part of some tektite layers, and their presence furnishes strong presumptive evidence that indochinites, as well as other tektite groups in which layered specimens occur, formed from surficial earth materials.

  6. Mineral evolution and Earth history

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bradley, Dwight C.

    2015-01-01

    The field of mineral evolution—a merger of mineralogy and Earth history—coalesced in 2008 with the first of several global syntheses by Robert Hazen and coworkers in the American Mineralogist. They showed that the cumulative abundance of mineral species has a stepwise trend with first appearances tied to various transitions in Earth history such as the end of planetary accretion at ca. 4.55 Ga and the onset of bio-mediated mineralogy at ca. >2.5 Ga. A global age distribution is best established for zircon. Observed abundance of zircon fluctuates through more than an order of magnitude during successive supercontinent cycles. The pulse of the Earth is also recorded, albeit imperfectly, by the 87Sr/86Sr composition of marine biogenic calcite; the Sr-isotopic ratio of this mineral reflects the balance of inputs of primitive strontium at mid-ocean ridges and evolved strontium that drains off the continents. A global mineral evolution database, currently in the works, will greatly facilitate the compilation and analysis of extant data and the expansion of research in mineralogy outside its traditional bounds and into more interdisciplinary realms.

  7. Mineral of the month: boron

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lyday, Phyllis A.

    2005-01-01

    What does boron have to do with baseball, apple pie, motherhood and Chevrolet? Boron minerals and chemicals are used in the tanning of leather baseballs and gloves; in micro-fertilizer to grow apples and in the glass and enamels of bakewares to cook apple pie; in boron detergents for soaking baby clothes and diapers; and in fiberglass parts for the Chevrolet Corvette.

  8. Mineral of the month: indium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    George, Micheal W.

    2004-01-01

    Indium was discovered in Germany in 1863. Although it is a lustrous silver-white color, the finders named the new material for the “indigo” spectral lines the mineral created on the spectrograph. Indium ranks 61st in abundance in Earth’s crust and is about three times more abundant than silver or mercury.

  9. Mineral impurities in coal combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Raask, E.

    1985-01-01

    This article discusses the many and varied problems associated with coal combustion and suggests remedial measures to assist in producing electrical energy from coal more efficiently. Contents include: influence of coal mineral matter on boiler design; mineral impurities in coal; quality of coal utilized in power stations; coal grinding, abrasive fuel minerals and plant wear; particulates silicate minerals in boiler flame; reactions of nonsilicate impurities in coal flame; creation, capture and coalescence of particulate ash in boiler flame; slag viscosity; sintering, fusion and slagging propensities of coal ashes, adhesion of ash deposit on boiler tubes and refractory materials; deposition mechanisms, rate measurements and the mode of formation of boiler deposits; thermal radiation and heat transfer properties of boiler deposits; measures to combat boiler fouling and slagging; some specific ash-related problems with US Coals; use of additives in coal fired boilers; high temperature corrosion in coal-fired plants; ash impaction erosion wear; low temeprature fouling and corrosion; comparison of ash-related problems in pulverized fuel and other coal-fired systems.

  10. Mineral of the month: titanium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gambogi, Joseph

    2004-01-01

    From paint to airplanes, titanium is important in a number of applications. Commercial production comes from titanium-bearing ilmenite, rutile and leucoxene (altered ilmenite). These minerals are used to produce titanium dioxide pigment, as well as an assortment of metal and chemical products.

  11. Mineral of the month: aggregates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tepordei, Valentin V.

    2005-01-01

    Natural aggregates, consisting of crushed stone, and sand and gravel, are a major contributor to economic health, and have an amazing variety of uses. Aggregates are among the most abundant mineral resources and are major basic raw materials used by construction, agriculture and other industries that employ complex chemical and metallurgical processes.

  12. Detrital Mineral Grains in Tektites.

    PubMed

    Bairnes, V E

    1963-12-27

    Abundant detrital crystalline mineral grains have been found in layered Muong Nong-type indochinite tektites from Nong Sapong, northeastern Thailand. These grains are an integral part of some tektite layers, and their presence furnishes strong presumptive evidence that indochinites, as well as other tektite groups in which layered specimens occur, formed from surficial earth materials. PMID:17834370

  13. Mineral of the month: rhenium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Magyar, Michael J.

    2005-01-01

    Rhenium, an exotic, heat-resistant metal, has grown in importance since its discovery nearly 80 years ago. First isolated by a team of German chemists studying a platinum ore, the mineral was named for the Rhine River. From then until the 1960s, only 2 metric tons of rhenium were produced worldwide. In 2004, worldwide production was 40 metric tons.

  14. Elastic Properties of Mantle Minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duffy, T. S.; Stan, C. V.

    2012-12-01

    The most direct information about the interior structure of the Earth comes from seismic wave velocities. Interpretation of seismic data requires an understanding of how sound velocities and elastic properties of minerals vary with pressure, temperature, crystal structure, and composition as well as the role of anelasticity, melts, etc. More generally, elastic moduli are important for understanding many solid-state phenomena including mechanical stability, interatomic interactions, material strength, compressibility, and phase transition mechanisms. The database of mineral elasticity measurements has been growing rapidly in recent years. In this work, we report initial results of an ongoing survey of our current knowledge of mineral elasticity at both ambient conditions and high pressures and temperatures. The analysis is selective, emphasizing single crystal measurements but also incorporating polycrystalline measurements and volume compression data as appropriate. The goal is to synthesize our current understanding of mineral elasticity in terms of structure and composition, and to identify the major remaining needs for experimental and theoretical work. Clinopyroxenes (Cpx) provide an example of our approach. A wide range of clinopyroxene compositions are found geologically and Mg-, Ca-, and Na-rich clinopyroxenes are expected to be important components in the upper mantle. The single-crystal elastic properties of a number of endmember Cpx compositions have been measured and these exhibit a range of ~25% in shear velocity. Those with monovalent cations (spodumene, jadeite) in the M2 site exhibit the highest velocities while Fe-rich (hendenbergit, acmite) compositions have the lowest velocities. The effects on velocity due to a wide range of chemical substitutions can be defined, but there are important discrepancies and omissions in the database. New measurements of omphacites, intermediate diopside-hedenbergite compositions, aegerine/acmite, augite, etc. are

  15. Structure and physical properties of Hydrogrossular mineral series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adhikari, Puja

    The mineral hydrogrossular series (Ca3Al2(SiO 4)3-x(OH)4x; 0 ≤ x ≤ 3) are important water bearing minerals found in the upper and lower part of the Earth's mantle. They are vital to the planet's hydrosphere under different hydrothermal conditions. The composition and structure of this mineral series are important in geoscience and share many commonalities with cement and clay materials. Other than the end members of the series x = 0 (grossular) and x = 3 (katoite) which have a cubic garnet structure, the structure of the series is totally unknown. We used large-scale ab initio modeling to investigate the structures and properties for hydrogrossular series for x = 0, 0.5, 1, 1.5, 2, 2.5, 3. Results indicate that for x > 0 and x < 3, the structures are tetragonal. This shows that there is structural change related to the lowering of overall symmetry associated with the composition of SiO4 tetrahedra and AlO6 octahedra. Total Bond order also explains the reason behind the change in the compressibility of the series. The electronic structure, mechanical and optical properties of the hydrogrossular series are calculated and the results for grossular and katoite are in good agreement with the available experimental data. The x--dependence of these physical properties for the series supports the notion of the aforementioned structural transition from cubic to tetragonal.

  16. Characterization and Thermodynamics Studies of Feldspar and Feldspathoid Minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudow, M.; Lilova, K.

    2015-12-01

    The application of thermal analysis and calorimetry for the studies of minerals has a history as long as the existence of the thermal methods themselves. New advanced calorimetric techniques have been developed for more accurate characterization of both bulk and nano materials thus impacting their design, processing, and applications. TG-DTA and TG-DSC are used to characterize the composition of complex minerals (e.g. [KxNa1-x(AlSi3)O8]) based on the weight changes and phase transformations observed with temperature increase. Additionally, those techniques allow to determine the quantity of the different types of water contained in natural feldspars and feldspathoids (absorbed, interlayer, structural). The results for several clays will be discussed. The geochemical properties and thermal stability of another class of minerals - aluminosilicate frameworks (alkali sodalities, natrolites, etc.) as related to high-level nuclear waste treatment facilities, radioactive waste storage and management were studied. The natural sodalite Na8[Al6Si6O24]Cl2 and similar frameworks with different anions are part of sodium-aluminosilicate (NAS) low activity radioactive waste produced during steam reforming process treatment. The enthalpies and entropies of formation and the hydration enthalpies of the above-mentioned feltspathoids are obtained and the effect of the different cations and anions on the thermodynamic stability was studied. The results will allow to predict the long term behavior of the compounds in the environment under different conditions.

  17. Np and Pu Sorption to Manganese Oxide Minerals

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, P; Johnson, M R; Roberts, S K; Zavarin, M

    2005-08-30

    Manganese oxide minerals are a significant component of the fracture lining mineralogy at Yucca Mountain (Carlos et al., 1993) and within the tuff-confining unit at Yucca Flat (Prothro, 1998), Pahute Mesa (Drellack et al., 1997), and other locations at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Radionuclide sorption to manganese oxide minerals was not included in recent Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) hydrologic source term (HST) models which attempt to predict the migration behavior of radionuclides away from underground nuclear tests. However, experiments performed for the Yucca Mountain Program suggest that these minerals may control much of the retardation of certain radionuclides, particularly Np and Pu (Triay et al., 1991; Duff et al., 1999). As a result, recent HST model results may significantly overpredict radionuclide transport away from underground nuclear tests. The sorption model used in HST calculations performed at LLNL includes sorption to iron oxide, calcite, zeolite, smectite, and mica minerals (Zavarin and Bruton 2004a; 2004b). For the majority of radiologic source term (RST) radionuclides, we believe that this accounts for the dominant sorption processes controlling transport. However, for the case of Np, sorption is rather weak to all but the iron and manganese oxides (Figure 1). Thus, we can expect to significantly reduce predicted Np transport by accounting for Np sorption to manganese oxides. Similarly, Pu has been shown to be predominantly associated with manganese oxides in Yucca Mountain fractured tuffs (Duff et al., 1999). Recent results on colloid-facilitated Pu transport (Kersting and Reimus, 2003) also suggest that manganese oxide coatings on fracture surfaces may compete with colloids for Pu, thus reducing the effects of colloid-facilitated Pu transport (Figure 1b). The available data suggest that it is important to incorporate Np and Pu sorption to manganese oxides in reactive transport models. However, few data are available for

  18. Water concentrations in mantle peridotite minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, J. M.; Hauri, E. H.

    2010-12-01

    of core concentrations. The exceptions are Ol and Cpx in Pali Aike, which have decreasing concentrations towards the rims, as previously observed by Demouchy et al. (2006). The lack of zonation can either indicate that diffusive loss or hydrothermal addition have not affected water concentrations, or that concentrations have been completely altered. We suggest that the former interpretation is correct, based on the observation that most grains are optically transparent and give consistent values for multiple analyses. In contrast, visibly altered grains yield poor quality analytical points and anomalously high concentrations, suggesting that these grains have undergone hydroxyl addition related to alteration. Assuming that pyroxenes provide accurate estimates of mantle water content, we assess the implications for mantle composition and for melting systematics. We examine the difference in water contents among different samples and the degree to which water concentrations correlate with indicators of mantle depletion, such as trace element concentrations and mineral modes. The low water content of the SWIR pyroxenite veins may indicate that they originated as garnet pyroxenites, as garnets store minimal amounts of water.

  19. The chronology of third molar mineralization by digital orthopantomography.

    PubMed

    Maled, Venkatesh; Vishwanath, S B

    2016-10-01

    The present study was designed to determine the chronology of third molar mineralization to establish Indian reference data and to observe the advantages of digital orthopantomography. Therefore, a cross-sectional study was undertaken by evaluating 167 digital orthopantomographs in order to assess the mineralization status of the mandibular third molar of Caucasian individuals (85 males and 82 females) between the age of 14 and 24. The evaluation was carried out using the 8-stage developmental scheme of Demirjian et al (1973). The range, mean age, standard deviation and Student t-test are presented for each stage of mineralization in all four quadrants. Statistically significant differences between males and females were not found for all four third molars. All the individuals in this study with mature third molar were at least 18 years of age. For medicolegal purposes, the likelihood of whether an Indian is older than 18 years or not was determined. The advantage of digital orthopantomography in the interpretation of the tooth mineralization over the traditional method was acknowledged.

  20. Thermodynamics of Minerals Stable Near the Earth's Surface

    SciTech Connect

    Navrotsky, Alexandra

    2003-02-01

    OAK B262 Research & Education Activities We are working on developing calorimetric techniques for sulfide minerals. We have completed calorimetric studies of (Na, K, H3O) jarosites, of Na and K jarosite -alunite solid solutions, and of Cr6+ - containing jarosites. We are now working on phases containing As and Pb. These studies are important to issues of heavy metal pollution in the environment. A number of postdocs, graduate students, and undergrads have participated in the research. We have active collaboration with Dirk Baron, faculty at California State University, Bakersfield. In a collaboration with Peter Burns, Notre Dame University, we are working on thermochemistry of U6+ minerals. Navrotsky has participated in a number of national workshops that are helping to define the interfaces between nanotechnology and earth/environmental science. Major Findings Our first finding on uranyl minerals shows that studtite, a phase containing structural peroxide ion, is thermodynamically unstable in the absence of a source of aqueous peroxide ion but is thermodynamically stable in contact with a solution containing peroxide concentrations expected for the radiolysis of water in contact with spent nuclear fuel. This work is in press in Science. We have a consistent thermodynamic data set for the (Na, K, H3O) (Al, Fe) jarosite, alunite minerals and for Cr6+ substituting for S6+ in jarosite. The latter phases represent one of the few solid sinks for trapping toxic Cr6+ in groundwater. Contributions within Discipline Better understanding of thermodynamic driving for and constraints on geochemical and environmental processes.

  1. The chronology of third molar mineralization by digital orthopantomography.

    PubMed

    Maled, Venkatesh; Vishwanath, S B

    2016-10-01

    The present study was designed to determine the chronology of third molar mineralization to establish Indian reference data and to observe the advantages of digital orthopantomography. Therefore, a cross-sectional study was undertaken by evaluating 167 digital orthopantomographs in order to assess the mineralization status of the mandibular third molar of Caucasian individuals (85 males and 82 females) between the age of 14 and 24. The evaluation was carried out using the 8-stage developmental scheme of Demirjian et al (1973). The range, mean age, standard deviation and Student t-test are presented for each stage of mineralization in all four quadrants. Statistically significant differences between males and females were not found for all four third molars. All the individuals in this study with mature third molar were at least 18 years of age. For medicolegal purposes, the likelihood of whether an Indian is older than 18 years or not was determined. The advantage of digital orthopantomography in the interpretation of the tooth mineralization over the traditional method was acknowledged. PMID:27485643

  2. U.S. Geological Survey Mineral Resources Program—Mineral resource science supporting informed decisionmaking

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilkins, Aleeza M.; Doebrich, Jeff L.

    2016-09-19

    The USGS Mineral Resources Program (MRP) delivers unbiased science and information to increase understanding of mineral resource potential, production, and consumption, and how mineral resources interact with the environment. The MRP is the Federal Government’s sole source for this mineral resource science and information. Program goals are to (1) increase understanding of mineral resource formation, (2) provide mineral resource inventories and assessments, (3) broaden knowledge of the effects of mineral resources on the environment and society, and (4) provide analysis on the availability and reliability of mineral supplies.

  3. The geology of aluminium phosphates and sulphates of the alunite group minerals: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dill, Harald G.

    2001-03-01

    Aluminium phosphates and sulphates of the alunite supergroup (APS minerals) occur in a wide range of environments of formation covering the metamorphic, igneous and sedimentary realms. Supergene processes, including mineral dressing and dumping when sulphide ores are mined, as well as hypogene alteration are also responsible for the precipitation of APS minerals. In these environments, complex solid solution series (s.s.s.) can form. The general formula of these alunite minerals is AB 3 (XO 4) 2(OH) 6, where A is a large cation (Na, U, K, Ag, NH 4, Pb, Ca, Ba, Sr, REE). B sites are occupied by cations of the elements Al, Fe, Cu and Zn. In nature, the anion (XO 4) x- is dominated by P and S. Mineral dressing and identification of APS minerals often needs a combination of highly sophisticated measures including Atterberg settling methods, XRD, DTA, TGA, TEM-EDX, SEM, EMPA and XRF. In sedimentary rocks APS minerals occur in various rocks and environments of deposition: calcareous, phosphorite-bearing, argillaceous-carbonaceous, arenaceous, coal-bearing environments, in soils and paleosols, in saprolite (bauxites, laterites) and in calcareous-argillaceous sequences hosting Carlin-type SHDG deposits. In igneous rocks, APS minerals may be encountered mainly in acidic through intermediate pyroclastic, volcanic and subvolcanic rocks. They occur in barren volcanic rocks and porphyry-type intrusions that have sparked epithermal Au-Ag-base metal deposits, Au-Sb mineralization, APS-bearing argillite and alunite deposits in their immediate surroundings. Granitic and pegmatitic rocks are rarely host of supergene APS mineralization. During low-grade stage regional metamorphism, peraluminous parent rocks originating from a sedimentary or igneous protolith may also give rise to APS mineralization. Peraluminous parent rocks enriched in S and/or P are a prerequisite for the formation of APS minerals that are stable up to a temperature of 400°C at moderately high fluid pressure of up

  4. In situ visualisation and characterisation of the capacity of highly reactive minerals to preserve soil organic matter (SOM) in colloids at submicron scale.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Jian; Wen, Yongli; Li, Huan; Hao, Jialong; Shen, Qirong; Ran, Wei; Mei, Xinlan; He, Xinhua; Yu, Guanghui

    2015-11-01

    Mineral-organo associations (MOAs) are a mixture of identifiable biopolymers associated with highly reactive minerals and microorganisms. However, the in situ characterization and correlation between soil organic matter (SOM) and highly reactive Al and Fe minerals are still unclear for the lack of technologies, particularly in the long-term agricultural soil colloids at submicron scale. We combined several novel techniques, including nano-scale secondary ion mass spectrometry (NanoSIMS), X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) to characterise the capacity of highly reactive Al and Fe minerals to preserve SOM in Ferralic Cambisol in south China. Our results demonstrated that: (1) highly reactive minerals were strongly related to SOM preservation, while SOM had a more significant line correlation with the highly reactive Al minerals than the highly reactive Fe minerals, according to the regions of interest correlation analyses using NanoSIMS; (2) allophane and ferrihydrite were the potential mineral species to determine the SOM preservation capability, which was evaluated by the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Fe K-edge XANES spectroscopy techniques; and (3) soil organic biopolymers with dominant compounds, such as proteins, polysaccharides and lipids, were distributed at the rough and clustered surface of MOAs with high chemical and spatial heterogeneity according to the CLSM observation. Our results also promoted the understanding of the roles played by the highly reactive Al and Fe minerals in the spatial distribution of soil organic biopolymers and SOM sequestration.

  5. Sequence of mineral assemblages in differentiated granitic pegmatites.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Norton, J.J.

    1983-01-01

    The sequence of mineral assemblages in internally zoned granitic pegmatites recognized by Cameron et al. (1949) is modified here to account for an observed vertical component, especially in feldspar compositions, in addition to the recognized outer contact-to-inner core differentiation process, and the importance of primary lithium minerals other than spodumene, such as petalite. The zonal patterns of 11 well-known granitic pegmatites are consistent with this revised sequence, with additional explanations for the repeated monomineralic zones of quartz or pollucite, etc. The crystallization history of zoned pegmatites is described in general terms, beginning with the magmatic crystallization which produces the outer zones. Aqueous fluid is exsolved continuously from the magma as relatively anhydrous phases precipitate, and plays an important role in the formation of the inner zones; its evolution is thought to be a major cause of pegmatite differentiation.-J.E.S.

  6. Re-evaluation of Non-regulatory Asbestos Group Minerals for Regulatory Agencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dogan, M.; Dogan, A.

    2013-05-01

    There are established rules and regulations for some asbestos group minerals - amphibole group minerals of actinolite, amosite, anthophyllite, crocidolite, tremolite; and serpentine group minerals of chrysotile- called "regulatory". There are also "non-regulatory" naturally occurring asbestos (NOA) group minerals as constituent of rocks and soil, including richterite, winchite, fluoro-edenite, balangeroite, carlosturanite, gageite, arfvedsonite, and magnesio-arfvedsonite. Strong evidences for carcinogenicity of these NOA minerals in later cohorts of cancer patients demonstrated the risks associated with these minerals. In addition, although the chrysotile asbestos regulated by some organizations such as WHO, World Trade Organization, United Nations, US EPA, International Labour Organization, and EU Countries; however, controversies still continue surrounding the use of chrysotile. Determinations of polymineralic fibrous veins, mixed particles, amphibole cleavage fragments, and genetic predisposition are also important issues (i.e. Dogan et al., 2006).Therefore, accurate characterizations of chemical composition, morphology, structure, and defects are necessary in order to find out mechanism(s) of carcinogenicity of all asbestos group minerals. Calculation methods of chemical composition are still under debate because of assumption of no vacancies at any sites and intergrowth of minerals. Substitution(s) may cause deviations from the ideal chemical formula and wide variations in chemical compositions. Detail morphological and chemical quantification of individual asbestos group minerals in micro- and nano-scale may help to evaluate its true carcinogenetic mechanism(s), and consequently prevention and possibly treatment of related diseases. we propose that nonregulatory asbestos minerals and the chrysotile should be re-evaluated. The amount of fibers inhaled, in terms of weight percent and number, need also be re-evaluated by mineralogists. Finally, Regulatory

  7. Vitamin and Mineral Supplement Fact Sheets

    MedlinePlus

    ... Tables Online DRI Tool Daily Value (DV) Tables Vitamin and Mineral Supplement Fact Sheets Search the list ... Supplements: Background Information Botanical Dietary Supplements: Background Information Vitamin and Mineral Fact Sheets Botanical Supplement Fact Sheets ...

  8. Mineral Resources, Economic Growth, and World Population

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brooks, David B.; Andrews, P. W.

    1974-01-01

    World mineral supply and demand is discussed. The economics of future mineral availability in terms of effects on pollution, land use, energy consumption, human settlements, and the international distribution of income are emphasized. (DT)

  9. USSR and Afghanistan mineral resources

    SciTech Connect

    Shroder, J.F. Jr.

    1983-01-01

    Afghanistan is a geological complex in which plentiful minerals and fuels were formed. Western geologists explored that country during the last 100 years and produced many reports and maps. Real progress in a systematic analysis, however, was not made until the intensive efforts of the Soviet Union during the past two decades. By diplomatic and economic maneuvers, the Soviets took control of Afghanistan's nascent hydrocarbon indusry during the 1960s. Following the 1973 coup, the Soviets and Afghan supporters replaced pro-Western technical advisors and hampered Western-linked development. Intensive field investgations led to the discovery of hundreds of mineral deposits and several good petroleum prospects. The current Russian military occupation is partially subsidized with Afghanistan resources. 83 references, 3 figures, 3 tables.

  10. Quarterly minerals outlook, June 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Glass, G.B.

    1983-01-01

    An overview is presented of the mineral industry of Wyoming. Petroleum production shows a slight annual decline. Many producers have been shutting in their natural gas wells due to the sharp decline in demand. Activities in the base, precious, and ferrous metals industry are summarized. Uranium and trona production is down from the previous year. Other minerals mentioned are gypsum, limestone, bentonite, and phosphorus. Production of coal is given by county. Electric utilities have not used all the coal they bought last year, and construction of several power plants have been delayed indefinitely. Underground coal gasification projects are mentioned. Tables present production forecasts for coal to 1990, for oil and gas to 1988, and for uranium and trona to 1987. 5 tables.

  11. Minerals

    MedlinePlus

    ... yogurt legumes, such as beans, split peas, and lentils Zinc Zinc helps your immune system, which is ... peanuts legumes, such as beans, split peas, and lentils When people don't get enough of these ...

  12. Minerals

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Over the past two decades, the aquaculture industry has expanded rapidly throughout the world and is expected to continue to grow in the years to come due to the high cost of harvesting fish from the oceans, the un-sustainability of ocean fishing methods, and the increased demand for fish as a resul...

  13. Miners custom-make trailer

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-06-01

    The Maintenance Department at Glenharold Mine in Stanton, North Dakota, has developed a custom solution to a nagging problem. Employees have fabricated a flatbed trailer to haul large equipment and have saved the mine the expense of investing in a new tractor-trailer. Using Lincoln Electric's Jetweld LH-100M to fillet weld Tl steel, the miners constructed a 200-t-capacity flatbed from scraps. The trailer can haul a D-10 bulldozer or a 60 cu-yd dragline bucket.

  14. Evaporites, petroleum and mineral resources

    SciTech Connect

    Melvin, J.L.

    1991-01-01

    This book illustrates the expanding knowledge of evaporites as important reservoir seals, fluid aquitards, ore-hosting sediments, and economically viable sediments in their own right. Researchers, oil and gas professionals, minerals resource professionals, environmental specialists and others within geology and the other earth sciences shall utilize the information within this book in their understanding of the many recent discoveries and concepts involved in the field of evaporite sedimentology.

  15. Mineral of the month: garnet

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olson, Donald

    2005-01-01

    Garnet is the general name given to a group of complex silicate minerals, all with isometric crystal structure, similar properties and chemical compositions. Garnet occurs in every color of the spectrum except blue, but it is most commonly red, purple, brown and green. Garnet necklaces dating from the Bronze Age have been found in graves and also among the ornaments adorning the oldest Egyptian mummies.

  16. Mine and mineral occurrences of Afghanistan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Orris, G.J.; Bliss, J.D.

    2002-01-01

    This inventory of more than 1000 mines and mineral occurrences in Afghanistan was compiled from published literature and the files of project members of the National Industrial Minerals project of the U.S. Geological Survey. The compiled data have been edited for consistency and most duplicates have been deleted. The data cover metals, industrial minerals, coal, and peat. Listings in the table represent several levels of information, including mines, mineral showings, deposits, and pegmatite fields.

  17. The Diversity of Aqueous Mineral-Bearing Deposits on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murchie, S. L.; Mustard, J. F.; Arvidson, R. E.; Ehlmann, B. L.; Bibring, J.; Bishop, J. L.; Wray, J. J.; CRISM Team

    2011-12-01

    Coordinated orbital observations from Mars Global Surveyor, Mars Odyssey, Mars Express, and Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter have documented a dozen types of deposits characterized by distinctive morphology, stratigraphy, geologic settings, and assemblages of minerals that form in liquid water. Phyllosilicate minerals are widespread in four types of deposits of mostly Noachian age: deep crustal rocks altered to predominantly Fe/Mg-phyllosilicate; shallow, stratified deposits with Al-phyllosilicate overlying Fe/Mg-phyllosilicate; phyllosilicates concentrated in lower beds of deltaic deposits; and phyllosilicate overlain by chlorides in topographically low intercrater plains. Two types of carbonate deposits date to possibly pre-Noachian and later Noachian times respectively: Fe/Ca carbonates exhumed from kilometers depth by impact basins, and shallow Mg-rich carbonates associated with olivine-rich rocks. Hydrated and hydroxylated Mg and/or Fe sulfates occur in three late Noachian to early Hesperian deposit types: shallow layered deposits in Meridiani and thicker ones in Valles Marineris, and intracrater deposits in which the sulfates are commonly associated with Al-phyllosilicate. In addition, gypsum occurs in reworked dune deposits surrounding the north polar layered deposits. Silica-rich deposits occur in shallow sedimentary layers on the Tharsis plateau, and in rare light-colored mounds of probable hydrothermal origin. Although genetic mechanisms of these diverse deposits are still uncertain, they likely represent multiple environments recording different phases of the history of surface and subsurface liquid water on Mars. The mineral assemblages in the sulfate-bearing deposits generally suggest saline, acidic conditions, whereas some of the phyllosilicate- and carbonate-bearing deposits likely record more neutral conditions. Continued and coordinated analysis of these global data sets is revealing new types of deposits and greater detail on their mineral assemblages.

  18. Characteristics of Hydrothermal Mineralization in Ultraslow Spreading Ridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, H.; Yang, Q.; Ji, F.; Dick, H. J.

    2014-12-01

    Hydrothermal activity is a major component of the processes that shape the composition and structure of the ocean crust, providing a major pathway for the exchange of heat and elements between the Earth's crust and oceans, and a locus for intense biological activity on the seafloor and underlying crust. In other hand, the structure and composition of hydrothermal systems are the result of complex interactions between heat sources, fluids, wall rocks, tectonic controls and even biological processes. Ultraslow spreading ridges, including the Southwest Indian Ridge, the Gakkel Ridge, are most remarkable end member in plate-boundary structures (Dick et al., 2003), featured with extensive tectonic amagmatic spreading and frequent exposure of peridotite and gabbro. With intensive surveys in last decades, it is suggested that ultraslow ridges are several times more effective than faster-spreading ridges in sustaining hydrothermal activities. This increased efficiency could attributed to deep mining of heat and even exothermic serpentinisation (Baker et al., 2004). Distinct from in faster spreading ridges, one characteristics of hydrothermal mineralization on seafloor in ultraslow spreading ridges, including the active Dragon Flag hydrothermal field at 49.6 degree of the Southwest Indian Ridge, is abundant and pervasive distribution of lower temperature precipitated minerals ( such as Fe-silica or silica, Mn (Fe) oxides, sepiolite, pyrite, marcasite etc. ) in hydrothermal fields. Structures formed by lower temperature activities in active and dead hydrothermal fields are also obviously. High temperature precipitated minerals such as chalcopyrite etc. are rare or very limited in hydrothermal chimneys. Distribution of diverse low temperature hydrothermal activities is consistence with the deep heating mechanisms and hydrothermal circulations in the complex background of ultraslow spreading tectonics. Meanwhile, deeper and larger mineralization at certain locations along the

  19. Is Struvite a Prebiotic Mineral?

    PubMed Central

    Gull, Maheen; Pasek, Matthew A.

    2013-01-01

    The prebiotic relevance of mineral struvite, MgNH4PO4·6H2O, was studied experimentally as a phosphorylating reagent and, theoretically, to understand the geochemical requirements for its formation. The effectiveness of phosphorylation by the phosphate mineral, monetite, CaHPO4, was also studied to compare to the efficiency of struvite. The experiments focused on the phosphorylation reactions of the minerals with organic compounds, such as nucleosides, glycerol and choline chloride, and heat at 75 °C for about 7–8 days and showed up to 28% phosphorylation of glycerol. In contrast, the compositional requirements for the precipitation of struvite are high ammonium and phosphate concentrations, as well as a little Ca2+ dissolved in the water. Combined, these requirements suggest that it is not likely that struvite was present in excess on the early Earth to carry out phosphorylation reactions. The present study focuses on the thermodynamic aspects of struvite formation, complementing the results given by Orgel and Handschuh (1973), which were based on the kinetic effects. PMID:25369744

  20. Chemical dissolution of sulfide minerals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chao, T.T.; Sanzolone, R.F.

    1977-01-01

    Chemical dissolution treatments involving the use of aqua regia, 4 N HNO3, H2O2-ascorbic acid, oxalic acid, KClO3+HCl, and KClO3+HCl followed by 4 N HNO3 were applied to specimens of nine common sulfide minerals (galena, chalcopyrite, cinnabar, molybdenite, orpiment, pyrite, stibnite, sphalerite, and tetrahedrite) mixed individually with a clay loam soil. The resultant decrease in the total sulfur content of the mixture, as determined by using the Leco induction furnace, was used to evaluate the effectiveness of each chemical treatment. A combination of KClO3+HCl followed by 4 N HNO3 boiling gently for 20 min has been shown to be very effective in dissolving all the sulfide minerals. This treatment is recommended to dissolve metals residing in sulfide minerals admixed with secondary weathering products, as one step in a fractionation scheme whereby metals in soluble and adsorbed forms, and those associated with organic materials and secondary oxides, are first removed by other chemical extractants.

  1. Raising Environmental Awareness among Miners in Iran

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mozaffari, Ezatollah

    2013-01-01

    Generation of waste is inevitable but controllable in minerals industry. The aim of this research is to find ways for raising environmental awareness among miners. Miners' attitude towards environmental mining has been investigated. A survey has been done collecting mine managers' point of view coupled with current trend on mine waste management…

  2. MARINE MINERAL RESOURCES - AN UPDATE AND INTRODUCTION.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cruickshank, Michael J.; Siapno, William

    1985-01-01

    This article briefly traces the status of marine minerals development, and it describes papers presented in this special issue on the subject. Subjects covered include types of deposits, marine mining in Canada, Manganese nodules, metalliferous sulfides as seabed minerals, metallurgical processes for reducing sulfide minerals, U. S. phosphate industry, construction materials and placers, and industry problems.

  3. 30 CFR 57.5070 - Miner training.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Miner training. 57.5070 Section 57.5070 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Air Quality, Radiation,...

  4. 30 CFR 57.5070 - Miner training.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Miner training. 57.5070 Section 57.5070 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Air Quality, Radiation, Physical Agents, and Diesel Particulate...

  5. 30 CFR 57.5070 - Miner training.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Miner training. 57.5070 Section 57.5070 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Air Quality, Radiation,...

  6. 36 CFR 331.17 - Minerals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Minerals. 331.17 Section 331..., KENTUCKY AND INDIANA § 331.17 Minerals. All activities in connection with prospecting, exploration, development, mining or other removal or the processing of mineral resources and all uses reasonably...

  7. 36 CFR 331.17 - Minerals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Minerals. 331.17 Section 331..., KENTUCKY AND INDIANA § 331.17 Minerals. All activities in connection with prospecting, exploration, development, mining or other removal or the processing of mineral resources and all uses reasonably...

  8. 36 CFR 331.17 - Minerals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true Minerals. 331.17 Section 331..., KENTUCKY AND INDIANA § 331.17 Minerals. All activities in connection with prospecting, exploration, development, mining or other removal or the processing of mineral resources and all uses reasonably...

  9. 36 CFR 331.17 - Minerals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Minerals. 331.17 Section 331..., KENTUCKY AND INDIANA § 331.17 Minerals. All activities in connection with prospecting, exploration, development, mining or other removal or the processing of mineral resources and all uses reasonably...

  10. 36 CFR 331.17 - Minerals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Minerals. 331.17 Section 331..., KENTUCKY AND INDIANA § 331.17 Minerals. All activities in connection with prospecting, exploration, development, mining or other removal or the processing of mineral resources and all uses reasonably...

  11. Minerals yearbook vol. III: Area reports international

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    2011-01-01

    This volume of the Minerals Yearbook provides an annual review of mineral production and trade and of mineral-related government and industry developments in more than 175 foreign countries. Each report includes sections on government policies and programs, environmental issues, trade and production data, industry structure and ownership, commodity sector developments, infrastructure, and a summary outlook.

  12. Stategy for Locating Potential Sites for Hydrogen in Minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, N. L.; Gibbs, G. V.; Rosso, K. M.

    2002-12-01

    Neutron diffraction is ideally suited for determining structural positions of hydrogen in minerals and usually the sample is deuterated in order to reduce the incoherent scattering from the hydrogen. In many cases, however, difficulties in location of hydrogen in minerals by neutron diffraction may arise because the there may be too little hydrogen in the sample to detect, the sample cannot be deuterated, there may be deterioration in the quality of diffraction data collected in pressure cells, etc. We propose a strategy that will aid in both the determination of potential docking sites of hydrogen and in the determination of the crystallographic orientation of O-H bonds. The strategy is based on determining the Laplacian of the electron density, -∇ 2ρ (r), of the mineral. As demonstrated by Bader et al. (1984), a mapping of the Laplacian of the electron density distribution yields a series of concentric shells centered at the nucleus of each atom defining where the electron density distribution, ρ, is alternately locally concentrated and locally depleted, a distribution that reflects the shell structure of the atom. The region where the distribution is positive is called the valence-shell charge concentration (VSCC) of the atom (Bader, 1990). When two atoms combine and a bond is formed, the VSCC of each atom is distorted to one degree or another with the concomitant formation of maxima and minima in the VSCC of each atom. The maxima define domains where Ÿƒ is locally concentrated and the minima define domains where ρ is locally depleted. It has been found that the number, the location and the relative sizes of the maxima provide a faithful representation of the bonded and non-bonded electron pairs of the Lewis model. The non-bonded electron pairs correspond with sites of potential electrophilic attack. Gibbs et al. (2002) has extended this approach to minerals and predicted potential sites for hydrogen in coesite. The theoretical results agree very well

  13. Mortality among sulfide ore miners

    SciTech Connect

    Ahlman, K.; Koskela, R.S.; Kuikka, P.; Koponen, M.; Annanmaeki, M. )

    1991-01-01

    Lung cancer mortality was studied during 1965-1985 in Outokumpu township in North Karelia, where an old copper mine was located. Age-specific lung cancer death rates (1968-1985) were higher among the male population of Outokumpu than among the North Karelian male population of the same age excluding the Outokumpu district (p less than .01). Of all 106 persons who died from lung cancer during 1965-1985 in Outokumpu township, 47 were miners of the old mine, 39 of whom had worked there for at least three years and been heavily exposed to radon daughters and silica dust. The study cohort consisted of 597 miners first employed between 1954 and 1973 by a new copper mine and a zinc mine, and employed there for at least 3 years. The period of follow-up was 1954-1986. The number of person-years was 14,782. The total number of deaths was 102; the expected number was 72.8 based on the general male population and 97.8 based on the mortality of the male population of North Karelia. The excess mortality among miners was due mainly to ischemic heart disease (IHD); 44 were observed, the expected number was 22.1, based on the general male population, and the North Karelian expected number was 31.2 (p less than .05). Of the 44 miners who died from IHD, 20 were drillers or chargers exposed to nitroglycerin in dynamite charges, but also to several simultaneous stress factors including PAHs, noise, vibration, heavy work, accident risk, and working alone. Altogether 16 tumors were observed in the cohort. Ten of these were lung cancers, the expected number being 4.3. Miners who had died from lung cancer were 35-64 years old, and had entered mining work between 1954 and 1960. Five of the ten lung cancer cases came from the zinc mine (1.7 expected). Three of them were conductors of diesel-powered ore trains.

  14. A detailed study of ice nucleation by feldspar minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whale, T. F.; Murray, B. J.; Wilson, T. W.; Carpenter, M. A.; Harrison, A.; Holden, M. A.; Vergara Temprado, J.; Morris, J.; O'Sullivan, D.

    2015-12-01

    Immersion mode heterogeneous ice nucleation plays a crucial role in controlling the composition of mixed phase clouds, which contain both supercooled liquid water and ice particles. The amount of ice in mixed phase clouds can affect cloud particle size, lifetime and extent and so affects radiative properties and precipitation. Feldspar minerals are probably the most important minerals for ice nucleation in mixed phase clouds because they nucleate ice more efficiently than other components of atmospheric mineral dust (Atkinson et al. 2013). The feldspar class of minerals is complex, containing numerous chemical compositions, several crystal polymorphs and wide variations in microscopic structure. Here we present the results of a study into ice nucleation by a wide range of different feldspars. We found that, in general, alkali feldspars nucleate ice more efficiently than plagioclase feldspars. However, we also found that particular alkali feldspars nucleate ice relatively inefficiently, suggesting that chemical composition is not the only important factor that dictates the ice nucleation efficiency of feldspar minerals. Ice nucleation by feldspar is described well by the singular model and is probably site specific in nature. The alkali feldspars that do not nucleate ice efficiently possess relatively homogenous structure on the micrometre scale suggesting that the important sites for nucleation are related to surface topography. Ice nucleation active site densities for the majority of tested alkali feldspars are similar to those found by Atkinson et al (2013), meaning that the validity of global aerosol modelling conducted in that study is not affected. Additionally, we have found that ice nucleation by feldspars is strongly influenced, both positively and negatively, by the solute content of droplets. Most other nucleants we have tested are unaffected by solutes. This provides insight into the mechanism of ice nucleation by feldspars and could be of importance

  15. Microbial mineralization of organic nitrogen forms in poultry litters.

    PubMed

    Rothrock, Michael J; Cook, Kimberly L; Warren, Jason G; Eiteman, Mark A; Sistani, Karamat

    2010-01-01

    Ammonia volatilization from the mineralization of uric acid and urea has a major impact on the poultry industry and the environment. Dry acids are commonly used to reduce ammonia emissions from poultry houses; however, little is known about how acidification affects the litter biologically. The goal of this laboratory incubation was to compare the microbiological and physiochemical effects of dry acid amendments (Al+Clear, Poultry Litter Treatment, Poultry Guard) on poultry litter to an untreated control litter and to specifically correlate uric acid and urea contents of these litters to the microbes responsible for their mineralization. Although all three acidifiers eventually produced similar effects within the litter, there was at least a 2-wk delay in the microbiological responses using Poultry Litter Treatment. Acidification of the poultry litter resulted in >3 log increases in total fungal concentrations, with both uricolytic (uric acid degrading) and ureolytic (urea degrading) fungi increasing by >2 logs within the first 2 to 4 wk of the incubation. Conversely, total, uricolytic, and ureolytic bacterial populations all significantly declined during this same time period. While uric acid and urea mineralization occurred within the first 2 wk in the untreated control litter, acidification resulted in delayed mineralization events for both uric acid and urea (2 and 4 wk delay, respectively) once fungal cell concentrations exceeded a threshold level. Therefore, fungi, and especially uricolytic fungi, appear to have a vital role in the mineralization of organic N in low-pH, high-N environments, and the activity of these fungi should be considered in best management practices to reduce ammonia volatilization from acidified poultry litter.

  16. Review of Distribution Coefficients for Radionuclides in Carbonate Minerals

    SciTech Connect

    Sutton, M

    2009-08-14

    An understanding of the transport of radionuclides in carbonate minerals is necessary to be able to predict the fate of (and potentially remediate) radionuclides in the environment. In some environments, carbonate minerals such as calciate, aragonite, dolomite and limestone are present and an understanding of the sorption of radionuclides in these carbonate minerals is therefore advantageous. A list of the radionuclides of interest is given in Table 1. The distribution coefficient, K{sub d} is defined as the ratio of the contaminant concentration bound on the solid phase to the contaminant concentration remaining in the liquid phase at equilibrium. Some authors report distribution coefficients and other report partition coefficients, the data presented in this work assumes equality between these two terms, and data are presented and summarized in this work as logarithmic distribution coefficient (log K{sub D}). Published literature was searched using two methods. Firstly, the JNC Sorption Database, namely Shubutani et al (1999), and Suyama and Sasamoto (2004) was used to select elements of interest and a number of carbonate minerals. Secondly, on-line literature search tools were used to locate relevant published articles from 1900 to 2009. Over 300 data points covering 16 elements (hydrogen, carbon, calcium, nickel, strontium, technetium, palladium, iodine, cesium, samarium, europium, holmium, uranium, neptunium, plutonium and americium) were used to calculate an average and range of log K{sub d} values for each element. Unfortunately, no data could be found for chlorine, argon, krypton, zirconium, niobium, tin, thorium and curium. A description of the data is given below, together with the average, standard deviation, minimum, maximum and number of inputs for radionuclide K{sub d} values for calcite, aragonate, limestone, dolomite and unidentified carbonate rocks in Table 2. Finally, the data are condensed into one group (carbonate minerals) of data for each

  17. Microbial mineralization of organic nitrogen forms in poultry litters.

    PubMed

    Rothrock, Michael J; Cook, Kimberly L; Warren, Jason G; Eiteman, Mark A; Sistani, Karamat

    2010-01-01

    Ammonia volatilization from the mineralization of uric acid and urea has a major impact on the poultry industry and the environment. Dry acids are commonly used to reduce ammonia emissions from poultry houses; however, little is known about how acidification affects the litter biologically. The goal of this laboratory incubation was to compare the microbiological and physiochemical effects of dry acid amendments (Al+Clear, Poultry Litter Treatment, Poultry Guard) on poultry litter to an untreated control litter and to specifically correlate uric acid and urea contents of these litters to the microbes responsible for their mineralization. Although all three acidifiers eventually produced similar effects within the litter, there was at least a 2-wk delay in the microbiological responses using Poultry Litter Treatment. Acidification of the poultry litter resulted in >3 log increases in total fungal concentrations, with both uricolytic (uric acid degrading) and ureolytic (urea degrading) fungi increasing by >2 logs within the first 2 to 4 wk of the incubation. Conversely, total, uricolytic, and ureolytic bacterial populations all significantly declined during this same time period. While uric acid and urea mineralization occurred within the first 2 wk in the untreated control litter, acidification resulted in delayed mineralization events for both uric acid and urea (2 and 4 wk delay, respectively) once fungal cell concentrations exceeded a threshold level. Therefore, fungi, and especially uricolytic fungi, appear to have a vital role in the mineralization of organic N in low-pH, high-N environments, and the activity of these fungi should be considered in best management practices to reduce ammonia volatilization from acidified poultry litter. PMID:21043291

  18. 25 CFR 215.25 - Other minerals and deep-lying lead and zinc minerals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Other minerals and deep-lying lead and zinc minerals. 215... LEAD AND ZINC MINING OPERATIONS AND LEASES, QUAPAW AGENCY § 215.25 Other minerals and deep-lying lead and zinc minerals. Except as provided in § 215.6(b), leases on Quapaw Indian lands, for...

  19. 25 CFR 215.25 - Other minerals and deep-lying lead and zinc minerals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Other minerals and deep-lying lead and zinc minerals. 215... LEAD AND ZINC MINING OPERATIONS AND LEASES, QUAPAW AGENCY § 215.25 Other minerals and deep-lying lead and zinc minerals. Except as provided in § 215.6(b), leases on Quapaw Indian lands, for...

  20. 25 CFR 215.25 - Other minerals and deep-lying lead and zinc minerals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Other minerals and deep-lying lead and zinc minerals. 215... LEAD AND ZINC MINING OPERATIONS AND LEASES, QUAPAW AGENCY § 215.25 Other minerals and deep-lying lead and zinc minerals. Except as provided in § 215.6(b), leases on Quapaw Indian lands, for...

  1. 25 CFR 215.25 - Other minerals and deep-lying lead and zinc minerals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true Other minerals and deep-lying lead and zinc minerals. 215... LEAD AND ZINC MINING OPERATIONS AND LEASES, QUAPAW AGENCY § 215.25 Other minerals and deep-lying lead and zinc minerals. Except as provided in § 215.6(b), leases on Quapaw Indian lands, for...

  2. 25 CFR 215.25 - Other minerals and deep-lying lead and zinc minerals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Other minerals and deep-lying lead and zinc minerals. 215... LEAD AND ZINC MINING OPERATIONS AND LEASES, QUAPAW AGENCY § 215.25 Other minerals and deep-lying lead and zinc minerals. Except as provided in § 215.6(b), leases on Quapaw Indian lands, for...

  3. The nanophase iron mineral(s) in Mars soil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banin, A.; Ben-Shlomo, T.; Margulies, L.; Blake, D. F.; Gehring, A. U.

    1992-01-01

    Iron-enriched smectites have been suggested as important mineral compounds of the Martian soil. They were shown to comply with the chemical analysis of the Martian soil, to simulate many of the findings of the Viking Labeled Release Experiments on Mars, to have spectral reflectance in the VIS-NIR strongly resembling the bright regions on Mars. The analogy with Mars soil is based, in a number of aspects, on the nature and behavior of the iron oxides and oxyhydroxides deposited on the surface of the clay particles. A summary of the properties of these iron phases and some recent findings are presented. Their potential relevance to Mars surface processes is discussed.

  4. The Loop chondrite - Petrology, mineral chemistry, and opaque mineralogy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boctor, N. Z.; Kullerud, G.

    1981-03-01

    The petrography, mineral chemistry, and opaque mineralogy of the Loop chondrite, a meteorite found in Gaines County (Texas) in 1962, are discussed. The investigation confirms Mason's (1975) classification of the meteorite as olivine hypersthene chondrite (L6) and proves that the Loop and the Ashmore are distinct chondrites. Tables setting forth representative analyses of silicates and chromite and of metal and troilite are included. It is found that in comparison with the chromite composition of L6 chondrites given by Bunch et al. (1967), the Loop is slightly more enriched in A12O3 and MgO and slightly depleted in Cr2O3.

  5. Relationship between nanoscale mineral properties and calcein labeling in mineralizing bone surfaces.

    PubMed

    Aido, Marta; Kerschnitzki, Michael; Hoerth, Rebecca; Burghammer, Manfred; Montero, Cédric; Checa, Sara; Fratzl, Peter; Duda, Georg N; Willie, Bettina M; Wagermaier, Wolfgang

    2014-08-01

    Bone's mineral properties, such as particle thickness and degree of alignment have been associated with bone quality. Bone formation, remodeling, aging of the tissue and mineral homeostasis influence mineral particle properties leading to specific patterns across bone. Scanning small angle X-ray scattering (sSAXS) with synchrotron radiation is a powerful tool, which allows us to study bone's nanoscale mineral properties in a position-resolved way. We used sSAXS, fluorescence light microscopy and backscattered electron (BSE) imaging to study bone's mineral properties at the tibial midshaft of in vivo-loaded mice. By combining these techniques, we could detect local changes in mineral properties. Regions labeled with calcein fluorochrome have lower mean mineral thickness and degree of mineral alignment. We also observed thinner and less aligned mineral particles near blood vessels. We conclude that mineral properties (i) are altered by fluorochrome labeling and (ii) depend on the proximity to blood vessels.

  6. Draft Genome Sequence of Ensifer adhaerens M78, a Mineral-Weathering Bacterium Isolated from Soil

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuanli; Chen, Wei; He, Linyan; Wang, Qi

    2016-01-01

    Ensifer adhaerens M78, a bacterium isolated from soil, can weather potash feldspar and release Fe, Si, and Al from rock under nutrient-poor conditions. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of strain M78, which may facilitate a better understanding of the molecular mechanism involved in mineral weathering by the bacterium. PMID:27609930

  7. Draft Genome Sequence of Ensifer adhaerens M78, a Mineral-Weathering Bacterium Isolated from Soil.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuanli; Chen, Wei; He, Linyan; Wang, Qi; Sheng, Xia-Fang

    2016-01-01

    Ensifer adhaerens M78, a bacterium isolated from soil, can weather potash feldspar and release Fe, Si, and Al from rock under nutrient-poor conditions. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of strain M78, which may facilitate a better understanding of the molecular mechanism involved in mineral weathering by the bacterium. PMID:27609930

  8. Draft Genome Sequence of Ensifer adhaerens M78, a Mineral-Weathering Bacterium Isolated from Soil.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuanli; Chen, Wei; He, Linyan; Wang, Qi; Sheng, Xia-Fang

    2016-01-01

    Ensifer adhaerens M78, a bacterium isolated from soil, can weather potash feldspar and release Fe, Si, and Al from rock under nutrient-poor conditions. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of strain M78, which may facilitate a better understanding of the molecular mechanism involved in mineral weathering by the bacterium.

  9. Luna 20 - Mineral chemistry of spinel, pleonaste, chromite, ulvospinel, ilmenite and rutile.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haggerty, S. E.

    1973-01-01

    Review of some of the results of a reflection microscopy and electron microprobe study performed on a part of the Luna 20 soil sample designated as the East Coast Consortium aliquot. The study is restricted to analyses of the oxides of Fe, Ti, Mg, Mn, Cr, and Al in this sample. The spinel mineral group, ilmenite and rutile only are discussed.

  10. Origin of secondary sulfate minerals on active andesitic stratovolcanoes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zimbelman, D.R.; Rye, R.O.; Breit, G.N.

    2005-01-01

    Sulfate minerals in altered rocks on the upper flanks and summits of active andesitic stratovolcanoes result from multiple processes. The origin of these sulfates at five active volcanoes, Citlalte??petl (Mexico), and Mount Adams, Hood, Rainier, and Shasta (Cascade Range, USA), was investigated using field observations, petrography, mineralogy, chemical modeling, and stable-isotope data. The four general groups of sulfate minerals identified are: (1) alunite group, (2) jarosite group, (3) readily soluble Fe- and Al-hydroxysulfates, and (4) simple alkaline-earth sulfates such as anhydrite, gypsum, and barite. Generalized assemblages of spatially associated secondary minerals were recognized: (1) alunite+silica??pyrite??kaolinite?? gypsum??sulfur, (2) jarosite+alunite+silica; (3) jarosite+smectite+silica??pyrite, (4) Fe- and Al-hydroxysulfates+silica, and (5) simple sulfates+silica??Al-hydroxysulfates??alunite. Isotopic data verify that all sulfate and sulfide minerals and their associated alteration assemblages result largely from the introduction of sulfur-bearing magmatic gases into meteoric water in the upper levels of the volcanoes. The sulfur and oxygen isotopic data for all minerals indicate the general mixing of aqueous sulfate derived from deep (largely disproportionation of SO2 in magmatic vapor) and shallow (oxidation of pyrite or H2S) sources. The hydrogen and oxygen isotopic data of alunite indicate the mixing of magmatic and meteoric fluids. Some alunite-group minerals, along with kaolinite, formed from sulfuric acid created by the disproportionation of SO2 in a condensing magmatic vapor. Such alunite, observed only in those volcanoes whose interiors are exposed by erosion or edifice collapse, may have ??34S values that reflect equilibrium (350??50 ??C) between aqueous sulfate and H2S. Alunite with ??34S values indicating disequilibrium between parent aqueous sulfate and H2S may form from aqueous sulfate created in higher level low

  11. Structure-mechanics relationships in mineralized tendons.

    PubMed

    Spiesz, Ewa M; Zysset, Philippe K

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, we review the hierarchical structure and the resulting elastic properties of mineralized tendons as obtained by various multiscale experimental and computational methods spanning from nano- to macroscale. The mechanical properties of mineralized collagen fibres are important to understand the mechanics of hard tissues constituted by complex arrangements of these fibres, like in human lamellar bone. The uniaxial mineralized collagen fibre array naturally occurring in avian tendons is a well studied model tissue for investigating various stages of tissue mineralization and the corresponding elastic properties. Some avian tendons mineralize with maturation, which results in a graded structure containing two zones of distinct morphology, circumferential and interstitial. These zones exhibit different amounts of mineral, collagen, pores and a different mineral distribution between collagen fibrillar and extrafibrillar space that lead to distinct elastic properties. Mineralized tendon cells have two phenotypes: elongated tenocytes placed between fibres in the circumferential zone and cuboidal cells with lower aspect ratios in the interstitial zone. Interestingly some regions of avian tendons seem to be predestined to mineralization, which is exhibited as specific collagen cross-linking patterns as well as distribution of minor tendon constituents (like proteoglycans) and loss of collagen crimp. Results of investigations in naturally mineralizing avian tendons may be useful in understanding the pathological mineralization occurring in some human tendons.

  12. Mineral-resource analysis in Canada

    SciTech Connect

    DeYoung, J.H. Jr.

    1983-01-01

    In Canada, mineral statistics are collected and mineral resources are analyzed by both government and private organizations. Published mineral-resource reports of Canada's Department of Energy, Mines and Resources and of the Centre for Resource Studies in Kingston, Ontario illustrate the types of analyses that provide essential information about mineral-industry activities from exploration through refined materials. International comparisons of the types of information available to policymakers may provide some insight into the nature of national mineral policies. Reasons for the high quality of and emphasis given to mineral resource analysis in Canada include the importance of the mineral industry to the national economy, the constitutional framework that encourages provincial interest in policy-oriented research, and the rapport between government officials and researchers with their counterparts in industry. 38 references, 8 figures.

  13. Decorin modulates matrix mineralization in vitro

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mochida, Yoshiyuki; Duarte, Wagner R.; Tanzawa, Hideki; Paschalis, Eleftherios P.; Yamauchi, Mitsuo

    2003-01-01

    Decorin (DCN), a member of small leucine-rich proteoglycans, is known to modulate collagen fibrillogenesis. In order to investigate the potential roles of DCN in collagen matrix mineralization, several stable osteoblastic cell clones expressing higher (sense-DCN, S-DCN) and lower (antisense-DCN, As-DCN) levels of DCN were generated and the mineralized nodules formed by these clones were characterized. In comparison with control cells, the onset of mineralization by S-DCN clones was significantly delayed; whereas it was markedly accelerated and the number of mineralized nodules was significantly increased in As-DCN clones. The timing of mineralization was inversely correlated with the level of DCN synthesis. In these clones, the patterns of cell proliferation and differentiation appeared unaffected. These results suggest that DCN may act as an inhibitor of collagen matrix mineralization, thus modulating the timing of matrix mineralization.

  14. Mineralization of Carbon Dioxide: Literature Review

    SciTech Connect

    Romanov, V; Soong, Y; Carney, C; Rush, G; Nielsen, B; O'Connor, W

    2015-01-01

    CCS research has been focused on CO2 storage in geologic formations, with many potential risks. An alternative to conventional geologic storage is carbon mineralization, where CO2 is reacted with metal cations to form carbonate minerals. Mineralization methods can be broadly divided into two categories: in situ and ex situ. In situ mineralization, or mineral trapping, is a component of underground geologic sequestration, in which a portion of the injected CO2 reacts with alkaline rock present in the target formation to form solid carbonate species. In ex situ mineralization, the carbonation reaction occurs above ground, within a separate reactor or industrial process. This literature review is meant to provide an update on the current status of research on CO2 mineralization. 2

  15. Reactivity of Sulfide Mineral Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Rosso, Kevin M.; Vaughan, David J.

    2006-08-01

    In the preceding chapter, the fundamental nature of sulfide mineral surfaces has been discussed, and the understanding we have of the ways in which the surface differs from a simple truncation of the bulk crystal structure reviewed. This naturally leads on to considering our understanding of sulfide surface chemistry, in the sense of how sulfide surfaces interact and react, particularly with gases and liquids. As noted elsewhere in this volume, research on sulfide mineral surfaces and surface reactivity is a relatively recent concern of mineralogists and geochemists, partly prompted by the availability of new imaging and spectroscopic methods, powerful computers and new computer algorithms. There has been a significantly longer history of sulfide mineral surface research associated with technologists working with, or within, the mining industry. Here, electrochemical methods, sometimes combined with analytical and spectroscopic techniques, have been used to probe surface chemistry. The motivation for this work has been to gain a better understanding of the controls of leaching reactions used to dissolve out metals from ores, or to understand the chemistry of the froth flotation systems used in concentrating the valuable (usually sulfide) minerals prior to metal extraction. The need for improved metal extraction technologies is still a major motivation for research on sulfide surfaces, but in the last couple of decades, new concerns have become important drivers for such work. In particular, much greater awareness of the negative environmental impact of acid and toxic metal-bearing waters derived from breakdown of sulfide minerals at former mining operations has prompted research on oxidation reactions, and on sorption of metals at sulfide surfaces. At the interface between fundamental geochemistry and industrial chemistry, the role of sulfide substrates in catalysis, and in the self-assembly and functionalization of organic molecules, has become an area of

  16. The Minerals of Aureum Chaos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on image for animation of 3-dimensional model with 5x vertical exaggeration

    This image of chaotic terrain in the Aureum Chaos region of Mars was taken by the Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) at 0858UTC (3:58 a.m. EST) on January 24, 2008, near 3.66 degrees south latitude, 26.5 degrees west longitude. The image was taken in 544 colors covering 0.36-3.92 micrometers, and shows features as small as 18 meters (60 feet) across. The image is about 10 kilometers (6.2 miles) wide at its narrowest point.

    Aureum Chaos is a 368 kilometer (229 mile) wide area of chaotic terrain in the eastern part of Valles Marineris. The chaotic terrain is thought to have formed by collapse of the surrounding Margaritifer Terra highland region. Aureum Chaos contains heavily eroded, randomly oriented mesas, plateaus, and knobs many revealing distinct layered deposits along their slopes. These deposits may be formed from remnants of the collapsed highlands, sand carried by Martian winds, dust or volcanic ash that settled out of the atmosphere, or sediments laid down on the floor of an ancient lake.

    The top panel in the montage above shows the location of the CRISM image on a mosaic taken by the Mars Odyssey spacecraft's Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS). The CRISM data cover a narrow plateau near the edge of the chaotic terrain, that stretches across from the southwest to the northeast.

    The lower left image, an infrared false color image, reveals the plateau and several eroded knobs of varying sizes. The plateau's layer-cake structure is similar to that of other layered outcrops in Valles Marineris.

    The lower right image reveals the strengths of mineral spectral features overlain on a black-and-white version of the infrared image. Areas shaded in red hold more of the mineral pyroxene, a primary component of basaltic rocks that are prevalent in the highlands. Spots of green

  17. Mineral Influence on Microbial Survival During Carbon Sequestration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santillan, E. U.; Shanahan, T. M.; Wolfe, W. W.; Bennett, P.

    2012-12-01

    CO2 sequestered in a deep saline aquifer will perturb subsurface biogeochemistry by acidifying the groundwater and accelerating mineral diagenesis. Subsurface microbial communities heavily influence geochemistry through their metabolic processes, such as with dissimilatory iron reducing bacteria (DIRB). However, CO2 also acts as a sterilant and will perturb these communities. We investigated the role of mineralogy and its effect on the survival of microbes at high PCO2 conditions using the model DIRB Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. Batch cultures of Shewanella were grown to stationary phase and exposed to high PCO2 using modified Parr reactors. Cell viability was then determined by plating cultures after exposure. Results indicate that at low PCO2 (2 bar), growth and iron reduction are decreased and cell death occurs within 1 hour when exposed to CO2 pressures of 10 bar or greater. Further, fatty acid analysis indicates microbial lipid degradation with C18 fatty acids being the slowest lipids to degrade. When cultures were grown in the presence of rocks or minerals representative of the deep subsurface such as carbonates and silicates and exposed to 25 bar CO2, survival lasted beyond 2 hours. The most effective protecting substratum was quartz sandstone, with cultures surviving beyond 8 hours of CO2 exposure. Scanning electron microscope images reveal biofilm formation on the mineral surfaces with copious amounts of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) present. EPS from these biofilms acts as a reactive barrier to the CO2, slowing the penetration of CO2 into cells and resulting in increased survival. When biofilm cultures were grown with Al and As to simulate the release of toxic metals from minerals such as feldspars and clays, survival time decreased, indicating mineralogy may also enhance microbial death. Biofilms were then grown on iron-coated quartz sand to determine conversely what influence biofilms may have on mineral dissolution during CO2 perturbation

  18. Fungal biomineralization of montmorillonite and goethite to short-range-ordered minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Huan; Hu, Shuijin; Polizzotto, Matthew L.; Chang, Xiaoli; Shen, Qirong; Ran, Wei; Yu, Guanghui

    2016-10-01

    Highly reactive nano-scale minerals, e.g., short-range-ordered minerals (SROs) and other nanoparticles, play an important role in soil carbon (C) retention. Yet, the mechanisms that govern biomineralization from bulk minerals to highly reactive nano-scale minerals remain largely unexplored, which critically hinders our efforts toward managing nano-scale minerals for soil C retention. Here we report the results from a study that explores structural changes during Aspergillus fumigatus Z5 transformation of montmorillonite and goethite to SROs. We examined the morphology and structure of nano-scale minerals, using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, time-resolved solid-state 27Al and 29Si NMR, and Fe K-edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy combined with two dimensional correlation spectroscopy (2D COS) analysis. Our results showed that after a 48-h cultivation of montmorillonite and goethite with Z5, new biogenic intracellular and extracellular reactive nano-scale minerals with a size of 3-5 nm became abundant. Analysis of 2D COS further suggested that montmorillonite and goethite were the precursors of the dominant biogenic nano-scale minerals. Carbon 1s near edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectra and their deconvolution results demonstrated that during fungus Z5 growth, carboxylic C (288.4-289.1 eV) was the dominant organic group, accounting for approximately 34% and 59% in the medium and aggregates, respectively. This result suggested that high percentage of the production of organic acids during the growth of Z5 was the driving factor for structural changes during biomineralization. This is, to the best of our knowledge, the first report of the structural characterization of nano-scale minerals by 2D COS, highlighting its potential to elucidate biomineralization pathways and thus identify the precursors of nano-scale minerals.

  19. Inclusions of crichtonite group minerals in pyropes from the Internatsionalnaya kimberlite pipe, Yakutia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezvukhin, D. I.; Malkovets, V. G.; Sharygin, I. S.; Kuzmin, D. V.; Gibsher, A. A.; Litasov, K. D.; Pokhilenko, N. P.; Sobolev, N. V.

    2016-02-01

    The results of study of crichtonite group minerals in pyropes from the Internatsionalnaya kimberlite pipe are reported. Most of the studied samples are characterized by high concentrations of Sr, Ca, Na, and LREEs in comparison with minerals of the LIMA series from kimberlites of South Africa, whereas the average concentrations of Ba and K are significantly lower. Crichtonite group minerals in pyropes are characterized by predomination of Na over K in most samples and by a high concentration of Al2O3 (up to 4.5 wt %). Findings of inclusions of crichtonite group minerals with high concentrations of incompatible elements provide evidence for the metasomatic origin of host chromium-rich pyropes.

  20. Structure and chemical characteristics of natural mineral deposit Terbunskaya (Lipetsk region, Russia)

    SciTech Connect

    Motyleva, S. Mertvishcheva, M.; Shchuchka, R.; Gulidova, V.

    2015-07-22

    New knowledge about the mineralogical features Terbunsky mineral. Investigated 5 fractions isolated from the incision (2-2,5 m). Terbunskaya deposit belongs to minerals Santonian age. Scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive analysis of fractions isolated studied in detail. In the coarse fractions found ancient organic remains of algae and micro-organisms that have been sedimented together with the mineral component during geological periods. The share of organic inclusions does not exceed 1.5%. Chemical composition confirms the presence of silicon and carbonate organisms. Advantageously proportion of minerals having a layered structure with a plurality of micro and nano pore size 600 - 80-nm and an average chemical composition (wt%): Na (0,64), Mg (0,54), Al (13.48), Si (27 57), K (2.39) Ca (0.75)

  1. Determination of minerals extracted from several commercial teas (Camellia sinensis) to hot water (infusion).

    PubMed

    Gezgin, Sait; Ozcan, Mehmet Musa; Atalay, Emine

    2006-01-01

    Mineral contents of some tea and their infusions drunk in Turkey were established by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry. The Al, Ca, K, Mg, Mn, P, and S contents were very high in both infusions and tea (i.e., pieces of the tea plant). The As, Cd, Cr, Li, Pb, and Se contents of infusion and tea were found to be very low. The level of K of all samples is higher than those of other minerals. Generally, mineral contents of tea were found to be higher than those of tea infusions. In addition, the health benefits of teas and knowledge of their mineral contents are of great interest and may be useful for further study of enzyme systems and vital biochemical functions. PMID:16579740

  2. Mineral chemistry of lunar samples.

    PubMed

    Keil, K; Prinz, M; Bunch, T E

    1970-01-30

    Glass spherules, glass fragments, augite, ferroaugite, titanaugite, pyroxmangite, pigeonite, hypersthene, plagioclase, potassium feldspar, maskelynite, olivine, silica, ilmenite, TiO(2), "ferropseudobrookite," spinel, ulvöspinel, native iron, nickel-iron, troilite, and chlorapatite were analyzed with the electron microprobe. There are no indications of large-scale chemical differentiation, chemical weathering, or hydrous minerals. Contributions of meteoritic material to lunar surface rocks are small. Rocks with igneous textures originated from a melt that crystallized at or near the surface, and oxygen fugacities have been low. Shock features indicate that at least some surface material is impact-produced.

  3. Strata control in mineral engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Bieniawski, Z.T.

    1986-01-01

    This book covers the state-of-the-art of strata control practice both in the United States and abroad with respect to strata reinforcement by rock bolting, long wall mining technology and innovations in energy development, such as mining for oil and tunneling for storage of high-level nuclear waste in deep underground repositories. It features coverage of design concepts in rock engineering and rockbolt systems, stability of rock pillars, rockbursts, shaft design and construction and a detailed consideration of mineral and energy needs in the United States.

  4. Evaluating biodiversity of mineral lands

    SciTech Connect

    Wade, G.L.; Tritton, L.M.

    1997-12-31

    Increasingly, lands intended for mining, or lands that have been mined and reclaimed, are being evaluated in terms of biological diversity (biodiversity). The concept of biodiversity includes die variety and number of living organisms, their organizations, and the environments that support them. This paper presents a framework for discussing and evaluating biodiversity and for constructing checklists for evaluating biodiversity before and after mining. This framework identifies some of the different types of biodiversity applicable to mineral lands, die ranges of scale at which they are applicable, and the social stakes and stakeholders relevant across scale and diversity types.

  5. Geostatistical Analysis of Spatial Variability of Mineral Abundance and Kd in Frenchman Flat, NTS, Alluvium

    SciTech Connect

    Carle, S F; Zavarin, M; Pawloski, G A

    2002-11-01

    LLNL hydrologic source term modeling at the Cambric site (Pawloski et al., 2000) showed that retardation of radionuclide transport is sensitive to the distribution and amount of radionuclide sorbing minerals. While all mineralogic information available near the Cambric site was used in these early simulations (11 mineral abundance analyses from UE-5n and 9 from RNM-l), these older data sets were qualitative in nature, with detection limits too high to accurately measure many of the important radionuclide sorbing minerals (e.g. iron oxide). Also, the sparse nature of the mineral abundance data permitted only a hypothetical description of the spatial distribution of radionuclide sorbing minerals. Yet, the modeling results predicted that the spatial distribution of sorbing minerals would strongly affect radionuclide transport. Clearly, additional data are needed to improve understanding of mineral abundances and their spatial distributions if model predictions in Frenchman Flat are to be defensible. This report evaluates new high-resolution quantitative X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) data on mineral distributions and their abundances from core samples recently collected from drill hole ER-5-4. The total of 94 samples from ER-5-4 were collected at various spacings to enable evaluation of spatial variability at a variety of spatial scales as small as 0.3 meters and up to hundreds of meters. Additional XRD analyses obtained from drillholes UE-Sn, ER-5-3, and U-11g-1 are used to augment evaluation of vertical spatial variability and permit some evaluation of lateral spatial variability. A total of 163 samples are evaluated. The overall goal of this study is to understand and characterize the spatial variation of sorbing minerals in Frenchman Flat alluvium using geostatistical techniques, with consideration for the potential impact on reactive transport of radionuclides. To achieve this goal requires an effort to ensure that plausible geostatistical models are used to

  6. Constraints on the Mineral Evolution of Terrestrial Planets Using Statistical Correlations Among the Mineral-Forming Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hummer, D. R.; Hazen, R. M.; Golden, J.; Downs, R. T.

    2015-12-01

    The mineralogy of terrestrial planets is governed not only by size, bulk chemical composition, planetary differentiation processes, and secondary geochemical processes, but also by the fundamental way in which a planet's constituent elements parse themselves into mineral species. To gain insight into which elements tend to associate with each other to form minerals, we have used the IMA mineralogical database (rruff.info/ima) to conduct a statistical analysis of the number of known mineral species containing each of the 72 mineral-forming elements, as well as how many species contain both X and Y for every possible X-Y pair of elements. The frequency with which elements X and Y occur together in the nominal chemical formulae of minerals was compared with the expected rate of co-occurrence (assuming that elements are distributed among mineral species randomly). The results reveal that among the most strongly correlated element pairs are H-O, Na-Si, Al-Si, S-Ag, O-Si, Si-Ca, and O-Ca. Examples of strongly anti-correlated pairs are O-S, O-Ag, Si-S, O-Sb, O-Se, H-Ag, and Si-As. The strength of these correlations and anti-correlations varied by many orders of magnitude (as measured by their p-value in a chi-squared test for variable dependence), ranging from near 1 to an astounding 10-304. Out of 2520 unique element pairs, 1688 were statistically significant (p-value <0.05). These pair correlations can be attributed to an array of geochemical factors, including but not limited to 1) the mutual exclusivity of sulfide vs. silicate anionic groups, 2) crystal chemical considerations of size and charge similarities among cations, especially within silicate structures, 3) group relationships on the periodic table, and 4) soft vs. hard ion relationships. These principles, along with the specific correlations they produce, can serve as a valuable guide in explaining the mineral evolution of Earth's crust, and predicting the mineralogy of terrestrial planets even when the bulk

  7. Minerals, fibrosis, and the lung.

    PubMed Central

    Heppleston, A G

    1991-01-01

    Determinants of pulmonary fibrosis induced by inhaled mineral dusts include quantity retained, particle size, and surface area, together with their physical form and the reactive surface groups presented to alveolar cells. The outstanding problem is to ascertain how these factors exert their deleterious effects. Both compact and fibrous minerals inflict membrane damage, for which chemical mechanisms still leave uncertainty. A major weakness of cytotoxicity studies, even when lipid peroxidation and reactive oxygen species are considered, lies in tacitly assuming that membrane damage suffices to account for fibrogenesis, whereas the parallel occurrence of such manifestations does not necessarily imply causation. The two-phase procedure established that particles, both compact and fibrous, induce release of a macrophage factor that provokes fibroblasts into collagen synthesis. The amino acid composition of the macrophage fibrogenic factor was characterized and its intracellular action explained. Fibrous particles introduce complexities respecting type, durability, and dimensions. Asbestotic fibrosis is believed to depend on long fibers, but scrutiny of the evidence from experimental and human sources reveals that a role for short fibers needs to be entertained. Using the two-phase system, short fibers proved fibrogenic. Other mechanisms, agonistic and antagonistic, may participate. Growth factors may affect the fibroblast population and collagen production, with cytokines such as interleukin-1 and tumor necrosis factor exerting control. Immune involvement is best regarded as an epiphenomenon. Downregulation of fibrogenesis may follow collagenase release from macrophages and fibroblasts, while augmented type II cell secretion of lipid can interfere with the macrophage-particle reaction. PMID:1954926

  8. Mineral Resources Data System (MRDS)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mason, G.T.; Arndt, R.E.

    1996-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) operates the Mineral Resources Data System (MRDS), a digital system that contained 111,955 records on Sept. 1, 1995. Records describe metallic and industrial commodity deposits, mines, prospects, and occurrences in the United States and selected other countries. These records have been created over the years by USGS commodity specialists and through cooperative agreements with geological surveys of U.S. States and other countries. This CD-ROM contains the complete MRDS data base, several subsets of it, and software to allow data retrieval and display. Data retrievals are made by using GSSEARCH, a program that is included on this CD-ROM. Retrievals are made by specifying fields or any combination of the fields that provide information on deposit name, location, commodity, deposit model type, geology, mineral production, reserves, and references. A tutorial is included. Retrieved records may be printed or written to a hard disk file in four different formats: ascii, fixed, comma delimited, and DBASE compatible.

  9. Viscoelastic properties of mineralized alginate hydrogel beads.

    PubMed

    Olderøy, Magnus O; Xie, Minli; Andreassen, Jens-Petter; Strand, Berit L; Zhang, Zhibing; Sikorski, Pawel

    2012-07-01

    Alginate hydrogels have applications in biomedicine, ranging from delivery of cells and growth factors to wound management aids. However, they are mechanically soft and have shown little potential for the use in bone tissue engineering. Here, the viscoelastic properties of alginate hydrogel beads mineralized with calcium phosphate, both by a counter-diffusion (CD) and an enzymatic approach, are characterized by a micro-manipulation technique and mathematical modeling. Fabricated hydrogel materials have low mineral content (below 3 % of the total hydrogel mass, which corresponds to mineral content of up to 60 % of the dry mass) and low dry mass content (<5 %). For all samples compression and hold (relaxation after compression) data was collected and analyzed. The apparent Young's modulus of the mineralized beads was estimated by the Hertz model (compression data) and was shown to increase up to threefold upon mineralization. The enzymatically mineralized beads showed higher apparent Young's modulus compared to the ones mineralized by CD, even though the mineral content of the former was lower. Full compression-relaxation force-time profiles were analyzed using viscoelastic model. From this analysis, infinite and instantaneous Young's moduli were determined. Similarly, enzymatic mineralized beads, showed higher instantaneous and infinite Young's modulus, even if the degree of mineralization is lower then that achieved for CD method. This leads to the conclusion that both the degree of mineralization and the spatial distribution of mineral are important for the mechanical performance of the composite beads, which is in analogy to highly structured mineralized tissues found in many organisms.

  10. Terminal particle from Stardust track 130: Probable Al-rich chondrule fragment from comet Wild 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joswiak, D. J.; Nakashima, D.; Brownlee, D. E.; Matrajt, G.; Ushikubo, T.; Kita, N. T.; Messenger, S.; Ito, M.

    2014-11-01

    A 4 × 6 μm terminal particle from Stardust track 130, named Bidi, is composed of a refractory assemblage of Fo97 olivine, Al- and Ti-bearing clinopyroxene and anorthite feldspar (An97). Mineralogically, Bidi resembles a number of components found in primitive chondritic meteorites including Al-rich chondrules, plagioclase-bearing type I ferromagnesian chondrules and amoeboid olivine aggregates (AOAs). Measured widths of augite/pigeonite lamellae in the clinopyroxene indicate fast cooling rates suggesting that Bidi is more likely to be a chondrule fragment than an AOA. Bulk element concentrations, including an Al2O3 content of 10.2 wt%, further suggests that Bidi is more akin to Al-rich rather than ferromagnesian chondrules. This is supported by high anorthite content of the plagioclase feldspar, overall bulk composition and petrogenetic analysis using a cosmochemical Al2O3-Ca2SiO4-Mg2SiO4 phase diagram. Measured minor element abundances of individual minerals in Bidi generally support an Al-rich chondrule origin but are not definitive between any of the object types. Oxygen isotope ratios obtained from olivine (+minor high-Ca pyroxene)fall between the TF and CCAM lines and overlap similar minerals from chondrules in primitive chondrites but are generally distinct from pristine AOA minerals. Oxygen isotope ratios are similar to some minerals from both Al-rich and type I ferromagnesian chondrules in unequilibrated carbonaceous, enstatite and ordinary chondrites. Although no single piece of evidence uniquely identifies Bidi as a particular object type, the preponderance of data, including mineral assemblage, bulk composition, mineral chemistry, inferred cooling rates and oxygen isotope ratios, suggest that Bidi is more closely matched to Al-rich chondrules than AOAs or plagioclase-bearing type I ferromagnesian chondrules and likely originated in a chondrule-forming region in the inner solar system.

  11. Mineral Resource Information System for Field Lab in the Osage Mineral Reservation Estate

    SciTech Connect

    Carroll, H.B.; Johnson, William I.

    1999-04-27

    The Osage Mineral Reservation Estate is located in Osage County, Oklahoma. Minerals on the Estate are owned by members of the Osage Tribe who are shareholders in the Estate. The Estate is administered by the Osage Agency, Branch of Minerals, operated by the U.S. Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA). Oil, natural gas, casinghead gas, and other minerals (sand, gravel, limestone, and dolomite) are exploited by lessors. Operators may obtain from the Branch of Minerals and the Osage Mineral Estate Tribal Council leases to explore and exploit oil, gas, oil and gas, and other minerals on the Estate. Operators pay a royalty on all minerals exploited and sold from the Estate. A mineral Resource Information system was developed for this project to evaluate the remaining hydrocarbon resources located on the Estate. Databases on Microsoft Excel spreadsheets of operators, leases, and production were designed for use in conjunction with an evaluation spreadsheet for estimating the remaining hydrocarbons on the Estate.

  12. 30 CFR 48.6 - Experienced miner training.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Experienced miner training. 48.6 Section 48.6 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR EDUCATION AND TRAINING TRAINING AND RETRAINING OF MINERS Training and Retraining of Underground Miners § 48.6 Experienced miner training. (a) Except as provided in...

  13. 30 CFR 281.8 - Rights to minerals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Rights to minerals. 281.8 Section 281.8 Mineral Resources MINERALS MANAGEMENT SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE LEASING OF MINERALS OTHER THAN OIL, GAS, AND SULPHUR IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF General § 281.8 Rights to minerals. (a)...

  14. Soapstone (steatite) cookware as a source of minerals.

    PubMed

    Quintaes, K D; Amaya-Farfan, J; Morgano, M A; Mantovani, D M B

    2002-02-01

    Steatite or soapstone, is a soft metamorphic rock composed mainly of talc, dolomite and actinolite, which is abundantly found and used for the manufacture of cookware in south-east Brazil. The study estimates its usage for cookware among dwellers of Ouro Preto, and assesses the possible toxicological or nutritional impact on food preparation. Pans made of steatite were purchased both in the crude (n = 6) and 'cured'forms (n = 6). Migration of Ca, Fe, Mg, Mn, Co, Al, Cr, Ni, Pb and Cd was determined for 20 sequential cooking trials, using 3 and 5% acetic acid as a food simulant. Analytical determinations were carried out by inductively coupled plasma atomic-emission spectrometry and the data treated by an individual model of random effects, simple linear regression and Pearson's correlation. About 81% of Ouro Preto's native population own soapstone cookware and, of these, 79% use the pans regularly. Mineral migration followed the general solubility of the crystalline components of the rock. Therefore, Ca, Mg, Fe and Mn were, in that order, the elements that exhibited highest migration, whereas the remaining were seen in negligible levels, except for Ni in the crude pans. The 5% solution favoured migration, whereas curing tended to restrict migration and extend durability of the pan. It is concluded that while cured soapstone pans do not offer mineral toxicity, they may contribute to the mineral nutrition of human beings. PMID:11824418

  15. Soapstone (steatite) cookware as a source of minerals.

    PubMed

    Quintaes, K D; Amaya-Farfan, J; Morgano, M A; Mantovani, D M B

    2002-02-01

    Steatite or soapstone, is a soft metamorphic rock composed mainly of talc, dolomite and actinolite, which is abundantly found and used for the manufacture of cookware in south-east Brazil. The study estimates its usage for cookware among dwellers of Ouro Preto, and assesses the possible toxicological or nutritional impact on food preparation. Pans made of steatite were purchased both in the crude (n = 6) and 'cured'forms (n = 6). Migration of Ca, Fe, Mg, Mn, Co, Al, Cr, Ni, Pb and Cd was determined for 20 sequential cooking trials, using 3 and 5% acetic acid as a food simulant. Analytical determinations were carried out by inductively coupled plasma atomic-emission spectrometry and the data treated by an individual model of random effects, simple linear regression and Pearson's correlation. About 81% of Ouro Preto's native population own soapstone cookware and, of these, 79% use the pans regularly. Mineral migration followed the general solubility of the crystalline components of the rock. Therefore, Ca, Mg, Fe and Mn were, in that order, the elements that exhibited highest migration, whereas the remaining were seen in negligible levels, except for Ni in the crude pans. The 5% solution favoured migration, whereas curing tended to restrict migration and extend durability of the pan. It is concluded that while cured soapstone pans do not offer mineral toxicity, they may contribute to the mineral nutrition of human beings.

  16. Behavioural correlates of monogamy in the noisy miner, Manorina melanocephala

    PubMed

    POLDMAA; Holder

    1997-09-01

    Mating behaviour of female cooperatively breeding noisy miners was examined. Dow & Whitmore (1990, Cooperative Breeding in Birds (Ed. by P. B. Stacey & W. D. Koenig), pp. 559-592, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press) suggested that female noisy miners mate promiscuously to recruit males as helpers to their nests, and that the benefit of doing so might be (1) increased genetic variability of their broods or (2) increased survival of their offspring as a direct result of multi-male care. Multilocus DNA profiling has since shown that 96.5% of nestlings resulted from monogamous matings and that extra-group and multiple paternity within broods were rare (Poldmaa et al. 1995, Behav. Ecol. Sociobiol.37, 137-143). In this study, strong behavioural correlates of monogamy were found. A breeding female associated more often with only one male in her social group, and most of the female's sexual behaviours were directed towards this male. Females were observed copulating repeatedly with the same male, but never with more than one male. Home ranges of breeding females rarely overlapped with each other, but home ranges of breeding males overlapped greatly. Furthermore, a greater percentage of a female's home range was shared with that of her genetic mate than with those of other males. Thus, behavioural evidence is consistent with the genetic evidence that noisy miners mate monogamously in some populations.1997The Association for the Study of Animal Behaviour

  17. Quantitative infrared spectra of hydrosilicates and related minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmeister, A. M.; Bowey, J. E.

    2006-04-01

    Absorption coefficients associated with atomic motions of species expected in astronomical environments are determined from infrared measurements of various hydrosilicates, hydrated magnesium oxide, and the Al-bearing chain silicate, sapphirine. Band types measured include O-H stretching modes near 3 μm, Si-O stretching motions near 10 μm, Si-O-Si bends near 14 μm, O-Si-O bends near 20 μm, and translations of cations such as Mg and Ca near 50-200 μm. We obtain data from films of varying thickness and use a ratioing method. First, bandstrengths of O-H fundamentals were determined from spectra obtained from films of controlled thicknesses, generally 6 μm. The O-H absorbance strength was then used to accurately determine thickness for a thinner film of each mineral (found to be <1 μm), thus providing bandstrengths of all other absorptions. Thin films were prepared such that the fundamental lattice modes showed intrinsic behaviour (i.e. band shapes were unchanged upon further thinning) and O-H modes are well resolved above the spectral noise. Bandstrengths were found to depend weakly on structure and should be applicable to other silicate minerals, allowing estimation of elemental concentrations independent of knowing the speciation of dust in astronomical environments. Comparison with observational data of NGC 6302 suggests that lizardite and saponite could be present in addition to refractory minerals.

  18. Chemistry and mineralogy of clay minerals in Asian and Saharan dusts and the implications for iron availability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, G. Y.; Achterberg, E. P.

    2014-06-01

    Mineral dust supplied to remote ocean regions stimulates phytoplankton growth through delivery of micronutrients, notably iron (Fe). Although attention is usually paid to Fe (hydr)oxides as major sources of available Fe, Fe-bearing clay minerals are typically the dominant phase in mineral dust. The mineralogy and chemistry of clay minerals in dust particles, however, are largely unknown. We conducted microscopic identification and chemical analysis of the clay minerals in Asian and Saharan dust particles. Cross-sectional slices of dust particles were prepared by focused ion beam (FIB) techniques and analyzed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) combined with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDXS). TEM images of FIB slices revealed that clay minerals occurred as either nano-thin platelets or relatively thick plates. The nano-thin platelets included illite, smectite, illite-smectite mixed layers and their nanoscale mixtures (illite-smectite series clay minerals, ISCMs) which could not be resolved with an electron microbeam. EDXS chemical analysis of the clay mineral grains revealed that the average Fe content was 5.8% in nano-thin ISCM platelets assuming 14% H2O, while the Fe content of illite and chlorite was 2.8 and 14.8%, respectively. In addition, TEM and EDXS analyses were performed on clay mineral grains dispersed and loaded on microgrids. The average Fe content of clay mineral grains was 6.7 and 5.4% in Asian and Saharan dusts, respectively. A comparative X-ray diffraction analysis of bulk dusts showed that Saharan dust was more enriched in clay minerals than in Asian dust, while Asian dust was more enriched in chlorite. The average Fe / Si, Al / Si and Fe / Al molar ratios of the clay minerals, compared to previously reported chemistries of mineral dusts and leached solutions, indicated that dissolved Fe originated from clay minerals. Clay minerals, in particular nanocrystalline ISCMs and Fe-rich chlorite are important sources of available Fe in

  19. The nanosphere iron mineral(s) in Mars soil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banin, A.; Ben-Shlomo, T.; Margulies, L.; Blake, D. F.; Mancinelli, R. L.; Gehring, A. U.

    1993-01-01

    A series of surface-modified clays containing nanophase (np) iron/oxyhydroxides of extremely small particle sizes, with total iron contents as high as found in Mars soil, were prepared by iron deposition on the clay surface from ferrous chloride solution. Comprehensive studies of the iron mineralogy in these 'Mars-soil analogs' were conducted using chemical extractions, solubility analyses, pH and redox, x ray and electron diffractometry, electron microscopic imaging specific surface area and particle size determinations, differential thermal analyses, magnetic properties characterization, spectral reflectance, and Viking biology simulation experiments. The clay matrix and the procedure used for synthesis produced nanophase iron oxides containing a certain proportion of divalent iron, which slowly converts to more stable, fully oxidized iron minerals. The noncrystalline nature of the iron compounds precipitated on the surface of the clay was verified by their complete extractability in oxalate. Lepidocrocite (gamma-FeOOH) was detected by selected area electron diffraction. It is formed from a double iron Fe(II)/Fe(III) hydroxyl mineral such as 'green rust', or ferrosic hydroxide. Magnetic measurements suggested that lepidocrocite converted to the more stable meaghemite (gamma-Fe203) by mild heat treatment and then to nanophase hematite (aplha-Fe203) by extensive heat treatment. Their chemical reactivity offers a plausible mechanism for the somewhat puzzling observations of the Viking biology experiments. Their unique chemical reactivities are attributed to the combined catalytic effects of the iron oxide/oxyhydroxide and silicate phase surfaces. The mode of formation of these (nanophase) iron oxides on Mars is still unknown.

  20. [Environmental factors in ALS].

    PubMed

    Juntas-Morales, Raul; Pageot, Nicolas; Corcia, Philippe; Camu, William

    2014-05-01

    ALS is likely to be a disorder of multifactorial origin. Among all the factors that may increase the risk of ALS, environmental ones are being studied for many years, but in the recent years, several advances have pointed to a new interest in their potential involvement in the disease process, especially for the cyanotoxin BMAA. Food containing BMAA has been found on Guam, a well-known focus of ALS/parkinsonism/dementia and high levels of BMAA have been identified into the brain of these patients. The BMAA cyanotoxin is potentially ubiquitous and have also been found into the food of patients who died from ALS both in Europe and USA. BMAA can be wrongly integrated into the protein structure during mRNA traduction, competing with serine. This may induce abnormal protein folding and a subsequent cell death. Heavy metals, such as lead or mercury may be directly toxic for neuronal cells. Several works have suggested an increased risk of ALS in individuals chronically exposed to these metals. Exposure to pesticides has been suggested to be linked to an increased risk of developing ALS. The mechanism of their toxicity is likely to be mediated by paraoxonases. These proteins are in charge of detoxifying the organism from toxins, and particularly organophosphates. To date, there are insufficient scientific data to suggest that exposure to electromagnetic fields may increase the risk of having ALS. We are particularly missing longitudinal cohorts to demonstrate that risk.

  1. The role of reaction affinity and secondary minerals in regulating chemical weathering rates at the Santa Cruz Soil Chronosequence, California

    SciTech Connect

    Maher, K.; Steefel, C. I.; White, A.F.; Stonestrom, D.A.

    2009-02-25

    In order to explore the reasons for the apparent discrepancy between laboratory and field weathering rates and to determine the extent to which weathering rates are controlled by the approach to thermodynamic equilibrium, secondary mineral precipitation and flow rates, a multicomponent reactive transport model (CrunchFlow) was used to interpret soil profile development and mineral precipitation and dissolution rates at the 226 ka marine terrace chronosequence near Santa Cruz, CA. Aqueous compositions, fluid chemistry, transport, and mineral abundances are well characterized (White et al., 2008, GCA) and were used to constrain the reaction rates for the weathering and precipitating minerals in the reactive transport modeling. When primary mineral weathering rates are calculated with either of two experimentally determined rate constants, the nonlinear, parallel rate law formulation of Hellmann and Tisser and [2006] or the aluminum inhibition model proposed by Oelkers et al. [1994], modeling results are consistent with field-scale observations when independently constrained clay precipitation rates are accounted for. Experimental and field rates, therefore, can be reconciled at the Santa Cruz site. Observed maximum clay abundances in the argillic horizons occur at the depth and time where the reaction fronts of the primary minerals overlap. The modeling indicates that the argillic horizon at Santa Cruz can be explained almost entirely by weathering of primary minerals and in situ clay precipitation accompanied by undersaturation of kaolinite at the top of the profile. The rate constant for kaolinite precipitation was also determined based on model simulations of mineral abundances and dissolved Al, SiO{sub 2}(aq) and pH in pore waters. Changes in the rate of kaolinite precipitation or the flow rate do not affect the gradient of the primary mineral weathering profiles, but instead control the rate of propagation of the primary mineral weathering fronts and thus total

  2. Fluorine in the Mantle: the Role of Nominally Anhydrous Minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosenfelder, J. L.; Rossman, G. R.

    2012-12-01

    indicated by experimental studies [3,4,7], which consistently find mineral-melt partition coefficients following the order cpx>opx>gt>ol. 3) Contrary to the study of Beyer et al. [3] but in accord with the results of Dalou et al. [4], we find no overall correlation between Al and F in pyroxenes. 4) Results so far suggest that H and F co-substitute in garnets, but are decoupled in other NAMs. Beyer et al. [3] have suggested that the F budget of the mantle can be entirely accommodated by F incorporation in NAMs, and our results are in accord with their calculations. We speculate that F within mantle NAMs may exert an important influence on melting, but probably has much less of an effect compared to hydrogen - or even no effect at all - on other processes or properties such as deformation, chemical diffusion, viscosity, and electrical conductivity. [1] Smith et al. (1981), Lithos, 14, 133-147. [2] Hervig and Bell (2005), Fall AGU 2005 abstract [3] Beyer et al. (2012), EPSL, 337-338, 1-9 [4] Dalou et al. (2012), CMP [5] Bell and Rossman , 1992, Science, 255, 1391-1397 [6] Mosenfelder et al. (2011), 96, 1725-1741. [7] Hauri et al. (2006), EPSL, 248, 715-734.

  3. Mortality from stomach cancer in Ontario miners.

    PubMed Central

    Kusiak, R A; Ritchie, A C; Springer, J; Muller, J

    1993-01-01

    An excess of mortality from stomach cancer has been found in Ontario gold miners (observed (obs) 104, standardised mortality ratio (SMR) 152, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 125-185) and no excess of stomach cancer could be detected in other miners in Ontario (obs 74, SMR 102, 95% CI 80-128). The excess of stomach cancer appeared five to 19 years after the miners began gold mining in Ontario. In that interval, similar patterns of excess mortality from stomach cancer were found in miners born in north America (obs 14, SMR 268, CI 147-450) and in miners born outside north America (obs 12, SMR 280, 95% CI 145-489). Twenty or more years after the miners began mining gold, an excess of mortality from stomach cancer was found in gold miners born outside of north American (obs 41, SMR 160, 95% CI 115-218) but not in gold miners born in north America (obs 37, SMR 113, 95% CI 80-156). The excess of stomach cancer in gold miners under the age of 60 (obs 45, SMR 167, 95% CI 122-223) seems larger than the excess in gold miners between the ages of 60 and 74 (obs 59, SMR 143, 95% CI 109-184). Exposures to arsenic, chromium, mineral fibre, diesel emissions, and aluminium powder were considered as possible explanations of the excess of stomach cancer in Ontario gold miners. Exposure to diesel emissions and aluminium powder was rejected as gold miners and uranium miners were exposed to both agents but an excess of stomach cancer was noted only in gold miners. The association between the excess of stomach cancer and the time since the miner began mining gold suggested that duration of exposure to dust in gold mines ought to be weighted according to the time since the exposure to dust occurred and that an appropriate time weighting function would be one in the interval five to 19 years after each year of exposure to dust and zero otherwise. A statistically significant association between the relative risk of mortality from stomach cancer and the time weighted duration of exposure to

  4. Defective skeletal mineralization in pediatric CKD.

    PubMed

    Wesseling-Perry, Katherine

    2015-04-01

    Although traditional diagnosis and treatment of renal osteodystrophy focused on changes in bone turnover, current data demonstrate that abnormalities in skeletal mineralization are also prevalent in pediatric chronic kidney disease (CKD) and likely contribute to skeletal morbidities that continue to plague this population. It is now clear that alterations in osteocyte biology, manifested by changes in osteocytic protein expression, occur in early CKD before abnormalities in traditional measures of mineral metabolism are apparent and may contribute to defective skeletal mineralization. Current treatment paradigms advocate the use of 1,25(OH)2vitamin D for the control of secondary hyperparathyroidism; however, these agents fail to correct defective skeletal mineralization and may exacerbate already altered osteocyte biology. Further studies are critically needed to identify the initial trigger for abnormalities of skeletal mineralization as well as the potential effects that current therapeutic options may have on osteocyte biology and bone mineralization. PMID:25638580

  5. Regulation of bone mineral loss during lactation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brommage, R.; Deluca, H. F.

    1985-01-01

    The effects of varyng dietary calcium and phosphorous levels, vitamin D deficiency, oophorectomy, adrenalectomy, and simultaneous pregnancy on bone mineral loss during lactation in rats are studied. The experimental procedures and evaluations are described. The femur ash weight of lactating and nonlactating rats are calculated. The data reveals that a decrease in dietary calcium of 0.02 percent results in an increased loss of bone mineral, an increase in calcium to 1.4 percent does not lessen bone mineral loss, and bone mineral loss in vitamin D deficient rats is independent of calcium levels. It is observed that changes in dietary phosphorous level, oophorectomy, adrenalectomy, and simultaneous pragnancy do not reduce bone mineral loss during lactation. The analysis of various hormones to determine the mechanism that triggers bone mineral loss during lactation is presented.

  6. Defective skeletal mineralization in pediatric CKD.

    PubMed

    Wesseling-Perry, Katherine

    2015-04-01

    Although traditional diagnosis and treatment of renal osteodystrophy focused on changes in bone turnover, current data demonstrate that abnormalities in skeletal mineralization are also prevalent in pediatric chronic kidney disease (CKD) and likely contribute to skeletal morbidities that continue to plague this population. It is now clear that alterations in osteocyte biology, manifested by changes in osteocytic protein expression, occur in early CKD before abnormalities in traditional measures of mineral metabolism are apparent and may contribute to defective skeletal mineralization. Current treatment paradigms advocate the use of 1,25(OH)2vitamin D for the control of secondary hyperparathyroidism; however, these agents fail to correct defective skeletal mineralization and may exacerbate already altered osteocyte biology. Further studies are critically needed to identify the initial trigger for abnormalities of skeletal mineralization as well as the potential effects that current therapeutic options may have on osteocyte biology and bone mineralization.

  7. Interaction of root exudates with the mineral soil constituents and their effect on mineral weathering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mimmo, T.; Terzano, R.; Medici, L.; Lettino, A.; Fiore, S.; Tomasi, N.; Pinton, R.; Cesco, S.

    2012-04-01

    Plants release significant amounts of high and low molecular weight organic compounds into the rhizosphere. Among these exudates organic acids (e.g. citric acid, malic acid, oxalic acid), phenolic compounds (e.g. flavonoids), amino acids and siderophores of microbial and/or plant origin strongly influence and modify the biogeochemical cycles of several elements, thus causing changes in their availability for plant nutrition. One class of these elements is composed by the trace elements; some of them are essential for plants even if in small concentrations and are considered micronutrients, such as Fe, Zn, Mn. Their solubility and bioavailability can be influenced, among other factors, by the presence in soil solution of low molecular weight root exudates acting as organic complexing agents that can contribute to the mineral weathering and therefore, to their mobilization in the soil solution. The mobilized elements, in function of the element and of its concentration, can be either important nutrients or toxic elements for plants. The objective of this study was to assess the influence of several root exudates (citric acid, malic acid, oxalic acid, genistein, quercetin and siderophores) on the mineralogy of two different soils (an agricultural calcareous soil and an acidic polluted soil) and to evaluate possible synergic or competitive behaviors. X-ray diffraction (XRD) coupled with Electron Probe Micro Analysis (EPMA) was used to identify the crystalline and amorphous phases which were subjected to mineral alteration when exposed to the action of root exudates. Solubilization of trace metals such as Cu, Zn, Ni, Cr, Pb, Cd as well as of major elements such as Si, Al, Fe and Mn was assessed by means of Inductively Coupled Plasma Optical Emission Spectroscopy (ICP-OES). Soil microorganisms have proven to decrease mineral weathering by reducing the concentration of active root exudates in solution. Results obtained are an important cornerstone to better understand the

  8. Manganese oxides and associated minerals as constituents of dispersed mineralization of metasomatic rocks in the Dukat ore field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filimonova, L. G.; Sivtsov, A. V.; Trubkin, N. V.

    2010-08-01

    Lithiophorite and coronadite—varieties of vernadite and todorokite—make up finely dispersed colloform mixtures along with minor grains and nanoparticles of aluminosilicates and ore minerals in metasomatic rocks of the Dukat ore field, which were formed in local areas of fluid and hydrothermal-solution discharge at the upper level of the ore-forming system. Fe-vernadite associates with feroxyhyte, magnetite, apatite, K-feldspar, native silver, and acanthite in greisenized granitoids and with epidote, cerianite, plattnerite, and Fe-chlorite in quartz-garnet-chlorite propylites. Todorokite with high Pb, Tl, and Sn contents associates with epidote, albite, bitumen, and native silver in quartz-epidote-chlorite propylites. Al-vernadite, coronadite, and lithiophorite associate with opal, kaolinite, Fe-chlorite, zincite, uraninite, native silver, and acanthite in argillisites. These data allowed us to estimate the conditions of manganese accumulation in the epithermal ore-forming system and deposition conditions of Mn-rich, finely dispersed mineral mixtures in mineralized zones hosted in metasomatic rocks of the ore field.

  9. Chladniite: A New Mineral Honoring the Father of Meteoritics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCoy, T. J.; Steele, I. M.; Keil, K.; Leonard, B. F.; Endress, M.

    1993-07-01

    cell. A total of 17 lines were observed in the powder pattern. Chladniite is hexagonal, R 3(bar), a = 14.967 angstroms, c = 42.595 angstroms, beta = 120 degrees. Attempts to determine the structure of chladniite are in progress. Chladniite is named for Ernst Florens Friedrich Chladni (1756-1827), who is widely regarded as the "Father of Meteoritics." After his initial training as a lawyer, Chladni turned his attention to science, particularly problems in acoustics. He was not, however, able to obtain a permanent position and embarked upon the life of a nomad, traveling among the great cities of Europe lecturing about acoustics. During these travels, he eventually gained an interest in meteoritics. It was Chladni's pioneering book of 1794 that, for the first time, presented strong evidence for an extraterrestrial origin of meteoritic stones and irons [5]. In addition, Chladni argued that meteorites must have been the building blocks of all planets and argued that a large iron core must exist inside the Earth. During his extensive travels, Chladni also established a meteorite collection that can still be seen at Humboldt University in Berlin. It is appropriate that a mineral be named in his honor as we approach the 200th anniversary of the publication of his monumental work. References: [1] McCoy et al. (1993) Meteoritics, in press. [2] Fuchs et al. (1967) GCA, 21, 1711-1719. [3] Araki and Moore (1981) Am. Mineral., 66, 827-842. [4] Livingstone (1980) Min. Mag., 43, 833-836. [5] Chladni (1794) Riga, J. F. Hartknoch (in German); reprinted (with introduction by G. Hoppe) by Akad. Verlagsgesellschaft Geest & Portig K.-G. (1982) (in German).

  10. Superconductivity and magnetism in naturally occurring minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Renxiong; Saha, S. R.; Wang, Xiangfeng; Greene, R. L.; Paglione, J.; Santelli, C.; Post, J.

    2014-03-01

    In a new and unique venture in collaboration with the Smithsonian Museum of Natural History's Department of Mineral Sciences, we present preliminary results from a project focusing on the search for superconductivity in mineral specimens provided by Geologists/Curators of the Smithsonian Institution. Including magnetization and transport studies of Wittichenite, Pyrrhotite, Nagyagite, Pyrargyrite and other related compounds, we report preliminary findings of the physical properties of mineral specimens at low temperatures, including several unreported magnetic phases and unconvetional behaviors.

  11. Controls on radium transport by adsorption to iron minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, M.; Wang, T.; Kocar, B. D.

    2015-12-01

    Radium is a naturally occurring radioactive metal found in many subsurface environments. Radium isotopes are generated by uranium and thorium decay, and are particularly abundant within groundwaters where minimal porewater flux leads to accumulation. These isotopes are used as natural tracers for estimating submarine groundwater discharge (SGD) [1], allowing for large scale estimation of GW fluxes into and out of the ocean [2]. They also represent a substantial hazard in wastewater produced after hydraulic fracturing for natural gas extraction [3], resulting in a significant risk of environmental release to surface and near-surface waters, and increased cost for water treatment or disposal. Adsorption to mineral surfaces represents a dominant pathway of radium retention in subsurface environments. For SGD studies, adsorption processes impact estimates of GW fluxes, while in hydraulic fracturing, radium adsorption to aquifer solids mediates wastewater radium activities. Analysis of past sorption studies revealed large variability in partition coefficients [4], while examination of radium adsorption kinetics and surface complexation have only recently started [5]. Accordingly, we present the results of sorption and column experiments of radium with a suite of iron minerals representative of those found within deep saline and near-surface (freshwater) aquifers, and evaluate impacts of varying salinity solutions through artificial waters. Further, we explore the impacts of pyrite oxidation and ferrihydrite transformation to other iron-bearing secondary minerals on the transport and retention of radium. These results will provide critical information on the mineralogical controls on radium retention in subsurface environments, and will therefore improve predictions of radium groundwater transport in natural and contaminated systems. [1] Charette, M.A., Buesseler, K.O. & Andrews, J.E., Limnol. Oceanogr. (2001). [2] Moore, W.S., Ann. Rev. Mar. Sci. (2010). [3] Vengosh, A

  12. The Moon: Determining Minerals and their Abundances with Mid-IR Spectral Deconvolution II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlowski, Richard W.; Donaldson Hanna, K.; Sprague, A. L.; Grosse, F. A.; Boop, T. S.; Warell, J.; Boccafola, K.

    2007-10-01

    We determine the mineral compositions and abundances at three locations on the lunar surface using an established spectral deconvolution algorithm (Ramsey 1996, Ph.D. Dissertation, ASU; Ramsey and Christiansen 1998, JGR 103, 577-596) for mid-infrared spectral libraries of mineral separates of varying grain sizes. Spectral measurements of the lunar surface were obtained at the Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF) on Mauna Kea, HI with Boston University's Mid-Infrared Spectrometer and Imager (MIRSI). Our chosen locations, Aristarchus, Grimaldi and Mersenius C, have been previously observed in the VIS near-IR from ground-based telescopes and spacecraft (Zisk et al. 1977, The Moon 17, 59-99; Hawke et al. 1993, GRL 20, 419-422; McEwen et al. 1994, Science 266, 1858-1862; Peterson et al. 1995, 22, 3055-3058; Warell et al. 2006, Icarus 180, 281-291), however there are no sample returns for analysis. Surface mineral deconvolutions of the Grimaldi Basin infill are suggestive of anorthosite, labradorite, orthopyroxene, olivine, garnet and phosphate. Peterson et al. (1995) indicated the infill of Grimaldi Basin has a noritic anorthosite or anorthositic norite composition. Our spectral deconvolution supports these results. Modeling of other lunar locations is underway. We have also successfully modeled laboratory spectra of HED meteorites, Vesta, and Mercury (see meteorites and mercurian abstracts this meeting). These results demonstrate the spectral deconvolution method to be robust for making mineral identifications on remotely observed objects, in particular main-belt asteroids, the Moon, and Mercury. This work was funded by NSF AST406796.

  13. The formation of polynuclear Al[sub 13] under simulated natural conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Furrer, G.; Trusch, B.; Mueller, C. )

    1992-10-01

    Polynuclear aluminum species can be formed in nature by the dissolution of Al-containing minerals, as a consequence of soil and surface water acidification, followed by neutralization processes. Under simulated natural conditions in the laboratory, i.e., by allowing acidic Al(III) solutions to flow over granulated marble at flow velocities of 3-4 mm/min, large fractions of monomeric Al(III) were transformed to the Al[sub 13]O[sub 4](OH)[sub 24](H[sub 2]O)[sub 12][sup 7+] polymer (thereafter referred to as Al[sub 13] or Al[sub 13][sup 7]) which was measured by [sup 27]Al-NMR spectroscopy. Over two-thirds of the monomeric Al(III) was converted to polynuclear Al[sub 13] even when gibbsite particles were mixed with the marble granules. The Al[sub 13] polymer was also formed in stirred batch experiments containing marble granules and dissolved phthalate or salicylate. The results suggest that Al[sub 13] formation is easily possible in nature if the total Al(III) concentration is high enough. In these experiments, Al[sub 13] was detected when the total dissolved Al(III) was 1.9 [times] 10[sup [minus]4] mol/L. The minimum total Al(III) concentration required to produce Al[sub 13], which can be predicted from available thermodynamic data, is on the order of 10[sup [minus]5] mol/L.

  14. Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pictures of ALS Mutant Proteins Support Two Major Theories About How the Disease is Caused May 2003 ... All NINDS-prepared information is in the public domain and may be freely copied. Credit to the ...

  15. Genetic Testing for ALS

    MedlinePlus

    ... Involved Donate Familial Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (FALS) and Genetic Testing By Deborah Hartzfeld, MS, CGC, Certified Genetic ... guarantee a person will develop symptoms of ALS. Genetic Counseling If there is more than one person ...

  16. All About ALS

    MedlinePlus

    ... External link, please review our exit disclaimer . Subscribe All About ALS Understanding a Devastating Disorder In the ... a coffee pot, or button a shirt. Eventually, all muscles under voluntary control are affected, and people ...

  17. What Is ALS?

    MedlinePlus

    ... scarring or hardening ("sclerosis") in the region. Motor neurons reach from the brain to the spinal cord ... the body. The progressive degeneration of the motor neurons in ALS eventually leads to their demise. When ...

  18. Protein-mediated enamel mineralization.

    PubMed

    Moradian-Oldak, Janet

    2012-06-01

    Enamel is a hard nanocomposite bioceramic with significant resilience that protects the mammalian tooth from external physical and chemical damages. The remarkable mechanical properties of enamel are associated with its hierarchical structural organization and its thorough connection with underlying dentin. This dynamic mineralizing system offers scientists a wealth of information that allows the study of basic principels of organic matrix-mediated biomineralization and can potentially be utilized in the fields of material science and engineering for development and design of biomimetic materials. This chapter will provide a brief overview of enamel hierarchical structure and properties and the process and stages of amelogenesis. Particular emphasis is given to current knowledge of extracellular matrix protein and proteinases, and the structural chemistry of the matrix components and their putative functions. The chapter will conclude by discussing the potential of enamel for regrowth.

  19. Shock waves data for minerals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahrens, Thomas J.; Johnson, Mary L.

    1994-01-01

    Shock compression of the materials of planetary interiors yields data which upon comparison with density-pressure and density-sound velocity profiles constrain internal composition and temperature. Other important applications of shock wave data and related properties are found in the impact mechanics of terrestrial planets and solid satellites. Shock wave equation of state, shock-induced dynamic yielding and phase transitions, and shock temperature are discussed. In regions where a substantial phase change in the material does not occur, the relationship between the particle velocity, U(sub p), and the shock velocity, U(sub s), is given by U(sub s) = C(sub 0) + S U(sub p), where C(sub 0) is the shock velocity at infinitesimally small particle velocity, or the ambient pressure bulk sound velocity. Numerical values for the shock wave equation of state for minerals and related materials of the solar system are provided.

  20. Multiphase Sequestration Geochemistry: Model for Mineral Carbonation

    SciTech Connect

    White, Mark D.; McGrail, B. Peter; Schaef, Herbert T.; Hu, Jian Z.; Hoyt, David W.; Felmy, Andrew R.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Wurstner, Signe K.

    2011-04-01

    Carbonation of formation minerals converts low viscosity supercritical CO2 injected into deep saline reservoirs for geologic sequestration into an immobile form. Until recently the scientific focus of mineralization reactions with reservoir rocks has been those that follow an aqueous-mediated dissolution/precipitation mechanism, driven by the sharp reduction in pH that occurs with CO2 partitioning into the aqueous phase. For sedimentary basin formations the kinetics of aqueous-mediated dissolution/precipitation reactions are sufficiently slow to make the role of mineralization trapping insignificant over a century period. For basaltic saline formations aqueous-phase mineralization progresses at a substantially higher rate, making the role of mineralization trapping significant, if not dominant, over a century period. The overlooked mineralization reactions for both sedimentary and basaltic saline formations, however, are those that occur in liquid or supercritical CO2 phase; where, dissolved water appears to play a catalyst role in the formation of carbonate minerals. A model is proposed in this paper that describes mineral carbonation over sequestration reservoir conditions ranging from dissolved CO2 in aqueous brine to dissolved water in supercritical CO2. The model theory is based on a review of recent experiments directed at understanding the role of water in mineral carbonation reactions of interest in geologic sequestration systems occurring under low water contents.

  1. Plasmid-mediated mineralization of 4-chlorobiphenyl.

    PubMed Central

    Shields, M S; Hooper, S W; Sayler, G S

    1985-01-01

    Strains of Alcaligenes and Acinetobacter spp. were isolated from a mixed culture already proven to be proficient at complete mineralization of monohalogenated biphenyls. These strains were shown to harbor a 35 X 10(6)-dalton plasmid mediating a complete pathway for 4-chlorobiphenyl (4CB) oxidation. Subsequent plasmid curing of these bacteria resulted in the abolishment of the 4CB mineralization phenotype and loss of even early 4CB metabolism by Acinetobacter spp. Reestablishment of the Alcaligenes plasmid, denoted pSS50, in the cured Acinetobacter spp. via filter surface mating resulted in the restoration of 4CB mineralization abilities. 4CB mineralization, however, proved to be an unstable characteristic in some subcultured strains. Such loss was not found to coincide with any detectable alteration in plasmid size. Cultures capable of complete mineralization, as well as those limited to partial metabolism of 4CB, produced 4-chlorobenzoate as a metabolite. Demonstration of mineralization of a purified 14C-labeled chlorobenzoate showed it to be a true intermediate in 4CB mineralization. Unlike the mineralization capability, the ability to produce a metabolite has proven to be stable on subculture. These results indicate the occurrence of a novel plasmid, or evolved catabolic plasmid, that mediates the complete mineralization of 4CB. Images PMID:2993249

  2. Minerals yearbook, 1992: Louisiana. Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    White, D.H.; Marsalis, W.E.

    1994-03-01

    Louisiana's nonfuel mineral production in 1992 totaled $309.3 million. This was a $42.5 million decline in value from that reported by the mineral industry in 1991. Although there was an increase in the value of gemstones, lime, and industrial sand and gravel, it failed to offset a decline in the demand and sales of gypsum, construction sand and gravel, salt, crushed stone, and sulfur. The values of these five mineral commodities fell $53.9 million between 1991 and 1992. The State ranked 32d nationally in mineral value and accounted for 35% of the Nation's salt tonnage and 42% of the Frasch sulfur production.

  3. Mineral-Based Amendments for Remediation

    PubMed Central

    O’Day, Peggy A.; Vlassopoulos, Dimitri

    2011-01-01

    Amending soils with mineral-based materials to immobilize contaminants is both old and new. Although mineral amendments have been used for decades in agriculture, new applications with a variety of natural and reprocessed materials are emerging. By sequestering contaminants in or on solid phases and reducing their ability to partition into water or air, amendments can reduce the risk of exposure to humans or biota. A variety of mineral types are commonly used to amend contaminated soils, with different modes of molecular-scale sequestration. Regulatory, social, and economic factors also influence decisions to employ mineral amendments as a treatment technology. PMID:22203887

  4. Mineralization of breccia pipes in northern Arizona.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wenrich, K.J.

    1985-01-01

    Hundreds of breccia pipes, some mineralized with ore-grade Cu and/or U, occur in the Colorado Plateau of N Arizona. The pipes originated in the Mississippian Redwall limestone, on its solution-collapse, and stoped through the overlying strata to the Triassic Chinle formation. Mineralization occurred during the Mesozoic, first with Mississippi Valley-type Cu-Pb-Zn deposits, and later with uraninite. The origin of the mineralizing fluids is unknown. Prospecting criteria and the complete systematics of these pipes and their mineralizations require further research.-G.J.N.

  5. Mineral Facilities of Latin America and Canada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bernstein, Rachel; Eros, Mike; Quintana-Velazquez, Meliany

    2006-01-01

    This data set consists of records for over 900 mineral facilities in Latin America and Canada. The mineral facilities include mines, plants, smelters, or refineries of aluminum, cement, coal, copper, diamond, gold, iron and steel, nickel, platinum-group metals, salt, and silver, among others. Records include attributes such as commodity, country, location, company name, facility type and capacity if applicable, and generalized coordinates. The data were compiled from multiple sources, including the 2003 and 2004 USGS Minerals Yearbooks (Latin America and Candada volume), data to be published in the 2005 Minerals Yearbook Latin America and Canada Volume, minerals statistics and information from the USGS minerals information Web site (minerals.usgs.gov/minerals), and data collected by USGS minerals information country specialists. Data reflect the most recent published table of industry structure for each country. Other sources include statistical publications of individual countries, annual reports and press releases of operating companies,and trade journals. Due to the sensitivity of some energy commodity data, the quality of these data should be evaluated on a country-by-country basis. Additional information and explanation is available from the country specialists.

  6. Coal liquefaction process employing extraneous minerals

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, N.L.; Schmid, B.K.

    1980-09-16

    In a coal liquefaction process which includes a recycle of a product slurry which contain recycle mineral residue and recycle of extraneous catalytic material to said liquefication zone, hydrocracking of the hydrocarbonaceous material from the mineral residue occurs and a mixture of hydrocarbon gases, dissolved liquid, normally solid dissolved coal, suspended mineral residue and suspended extraneous catalytic mineral results. A first portion of said residue slurry is recycled to the liquefication zone, a second portion is passed to separation means and the third portion goes to a hydroclone. Overflow from the hydroclone goes to the liquefaction zone to reduce the median diameter of the particles recycled.

  7. Citrate bridges between mineral platelets in bone.

    PubMed

    Davies, Erika; Müller, Karin H; Wong, Wai Ching; Pickard, Chris J; Reid, David G; Skepper, Jeremy N; Duer, Melinda J

    2014-04-01

    We provide evidence that citrate anions bridge between mineral platelets in bone and hypothesize that their presence acts to maintain separate platelets with disordered regions between them rather than gradual transformations into larger, more ordered blocks of mineral. To assess this hypothesis, we take as a model for a citrate bridging between layers of calcium phosphate mineral a double salt octacalcium phosphate citrate (OCP-citrate). We use a combination of multinuclear solid-state NMR spectroscopy, powder X-ray diffraction, and first principles electronic structure calculations to propose a quantitative structure for this material, in which citrate anions reside in a hydrated layer, bridging between apatitic layers. To assess the relevance of such a structure in native bone mineral, we present for the first time, to our knowledge, (17)O NMR data on bone and compare them with (17)O NMR data for OCP-citrate and other calcium phosphate minerals relevant to bone. The proposed structural model that we deduce from this work for bone mineral is a layered structure with thin apatitic platelets sandwiched between OCP-citrate-like hydrated layers. Such a structure can explain a number of known structural features of bone mineral: the thin, plate-like morphology of mature bone mineral crystals, the presence of significant quantities of strongly bound water molecules, and the relatively high concentration of hydrogen phosphate as well as the maintenance of a disordered region between mineral platelets.

  8. MINER: software for phylogenetic motif identification.

    PubMed

    La, David; Livesay, Dennis R

    2005-07-01

    MINER is web-based software for phylogenetic motif (PM) identification. PMs are sequence regions (fragments) that conserve the overall familial phylogeny. PMs have been shown to correspond to a wide variety of catalytic regions, substrate-binding sites and protein interfaces, making them ideal functional site predictions. The MINER output provides an intuitive interface for interactive PM sequence analysis and structural visualization. The web implementation of MINER is freely available at http://www.pmap.csupomona.edu/MINER/. Source code is available to the academic community on request.

  9. TUCS/phosphate mineralization of actinides

    SciTech Connect

    Nash, K.L.

    1997-10-01

    This program has as its objective the development of a new technology that combines cation exchange and mineralization to reduce the concentration of heavy metals (in particular actinides) in groundwaters. The treatment regimen must be compatible with the groundwater and soil, potentially using groundwater/soil components to aid in the immobilization process. The delivery system (probably a water-soluble chelating agent) should first concentrate the radionuclides then release the precipitating anion, which forms thermodynamically stable mineral phases, either with the target metal ions alone or in combination with matrix cations. This approach should generate thermodynamically stable mineral phases resistant to weathering. The chelating agent should decompose spontaneously with time, release the mineralizing agent, and leave a residue that does not interfere with mineral formation. For the actinides, the ideal compound probably will release phosphate, as actinide phosphate mineral phases are among the least soluble species for these metals. The most promising means of delivering the precipitant would be to use a water-soluble, hydrolytically unstable complexant that functions in the initial stages as a cation exchanger to concentrate the metal ions. As it decomposes, the chelating agent releases phosphate to foster formation of crystalline mineral phases. Because it involves only the application of inexpensive reagents, the method of phosphate mineralization promises to be an economical alternative for in situ immobilization of radionuclides (actinides in particular). The method relies on the inherent (thermodynamic) stability of actinide mineral phases.

  10. Cancrinite-group minerals behavior at non-ambient conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lotti, Paolo; Gatta, G. Diego; Kahlenberg, Volker; Merlini, Marco; Alvaro, Matteo; Cámara, Fernando

    2014-05-01

    Cancrinite-group minerals occur in the late stages of alkaline (SiO2)-undersaturated magmatism and in related effusive or contact rocks. So far only few studies have been devoted to the description of the thermo-elastic behavior, phase-stability and P /T -structure evolution (at the atomic scale) of this mineral group. Cancrinite-group minerals have an open-framework structure characterized by the [CAN]-topology. The [CAN]-framework shows large 12-ring channels, parallel to the c crystallographic axis, bound by columns of cages, the so-called can units. While very limited chemical variation is observed in the framework composition (the composition is almost always [Si6Al6O24]) a remarkable chemical variability is reported for the extraframework components in the cancrinite-group minerals. Two subgroups can be identified according to the extraframework content of the can units: the cancrinite- and the davyne-subgroups, showing Na-H2O and Ca-Cl chains, respectively. The channels are stuffed by cations, anions and molecules. We aimed to model the thermo-elastic behavior and the mechanisms of the (P ,T)-induced structure evolution of cancrinite-group minerals, with special interest on the role played by the extraframework population. The study was restricted to the following (CO3)-rich and (SO4)-rich end-members: cancrinite sensu stricto {[(Na,Ca)6(CO3)1.2-1.7][Na2(H2O)2][Al6Si6O24]}, vishnevite {[(Na,Ca,K)6(SO4)][Na2(H2O)2][Al6Si6O24]}, balliranoite {[(Na,Ca)6(CO3)1.2-1.7][Ca2Cl2][Al6Si6O24]} and davyne {[(Na,Ca,K)6((SO4),Cl)][Ca2Cl2][Al6Si6O24]}. Their high-P and low-T (T < 293 K) behavior was investigated by means of in-situ single-crystal X-ray diffraction, using diamond-anvil cells and (N2)-cryosystems, respectively. The high-T behavior of cancrinite has also been studied by means of in-situ single-crystal X-ray diffraction with a resistive heater. Cancrinite minerals share a similar volume compressibility and thermal expansivity at ambient conditions (cancrinite

  11. Diamond and Unusual Minerals Discovered from the Chromitite in Polar Ural: A First Report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, J.; Bai, W.; Fang, Q.; Meng, F.; Chen, S.; Zhang, Z.

    2007-12-01

    Ultrahigh pressure (UHP) minerals, such as diamond, coesite, and pseudomorphs of octahedral olivine, and as well as about 80 other mineral species have been recovered from podiform chromitites of the Luobusa ophiolite, southern Tibet, and a new mineral, Luobusaite (Fe0.82Si2), has been approved recently by CNMMN. The UHP minerals from Luobusa are controversial because they have not found in situ and because ophiolites are currently believed to form at shallow levels above oceanic spreading centers. More detailed study and experimental work are needed to understand the origin and significance of these unusual minerals and investigations of other ophiolites are needed to determine if such minerals occur elsewhere. For this purpose, we collected about 1500 kg of chromitite from two orebodies in an ultramafic body in the Polar Urals. Thus far, more than 60 different mineral species have been separated from these ores. The most exciting discovery is the common occurrence of diamond, a typical UHP mineral in the Luobusa chromitites. Diamonds from Ural chromitite are clear, colorless, well-developed crystals with octahedral morphology, generally 0.2-0.3 mm in size. Attached with the diamonds and perhaps also occurring as inclusions within them are many minerals as chromite, MnNiCrFe alloy, native Si and Ta, corundum, zircon, feldspar, garnet, moissanite, confirming their natural origin and suggesting a long residence time in the mantle. Other mineral group include: (1) native elements: Cr, W, Ni, Co, Si, Al and Ta; (2) carbides: SiC and WC; (3) alloys: Cr-Fe, Si-Al-Fe, Ni-Cu, Ag-Au, Ag-Sn, Fe-Si, Fe-P, and Ag-Zn-Sn; (4) oxides: NiCrFe, PbSn, REE, rutile and Si- bearing rutile, ilmenite, corundum, chromite, MgO, and SnO2; (5) silicates: kyanite, pseudomorphs of octahedral olivine, zircon, garnet, feldspar, and quartz,; (6) sulfides of Fe, Ni, Cu, Mo, Pb, Ab, AsFe, FeNi, CuZn, and CoFeNi; and (7) iron groups: native Fe, FeO, and Fe2O3. These minerals are very similar in

  12. Mineral precipitation by epilithic biofilms in the speed river, ontario, Canada.

    PubMed

    Konhauser, K O; Schultze-Lam, S; Ferris, F G; Fyfe, W S; Longstaffe, F J; Beveridge, T J

    1994-02-01

    Epilithic microbial communities, ubiquitously found in biofilms on submerged granite, limestone, and sandstone, as well as on the concrete support pillars of bridges, were examined in the Speed River, Ontario, Canada. Transmission electron microscopy showed that attached bacteria (on all substrata) were highly mineralized, ranging from Fe-rich capsular material to fine-grained (<1 mum) authigenic (primary) mineral precipitates. The authigenic grains exhibited a wide range of morphologies, from amorphous gel-like phases to crystalline structures. Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy indicated that the most abundant mineral associated with epilithic bacteria was a complex (Fe, Al) silicate of variable composition. The gel-like phases were similar in composition to a chamositic clay, whereas the crystalline structures were more siliceous and had compositions between those of glauconite and kaolinite. The consistent formation of (Fe, Al) silicates by all bacterial populations, regardless of substratum lithology, implies that biomineralization was a surface process associated with the anionic nature of the cell wall. The adsorption of dissolved constituents from the aqueous environment contributed significantly to the mineral formation process. In this regard, it appears that epilithic microbial biofilms dominate the reactivity of the rock-water interface and may determine the type of minerals formed, which will ultimately become part of the riverbed sediment. Because rivers typically contain high concentrations of dissolved iron, silicon, and aluminum, these findings provide a unique insight into biogeochemical activities that are potentially widespread in natural waters.

  13. Spatial Arrangement of Organic Compounds on a Model Mineral Surface: Implications for Soil Organic Matter Stabilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambaye, Haile; Petridis, Loukas; Jagadamma, Sindhu; Kilbey, Michael; Lauter, Valeria; Lokitz, Bradley; Mayes, Melanie

    2015-03-01

    Stability of organic carbon compounds in soil is important for global climate futures which could be affected by the complexity of the mineral-organic carbon interfaces. We examined the nanoscale structure of model interfaces by depositing films of organic carbon compounds of contrasting chemical character, hydrophilic glucose, deuterated-amphiphilic stearic acid (SA) and Natural Organic Matters (NOM) onto a soil mineral analogue (Al2O3) . The NOM was separated into its constituent components such as NOM-Philic and NOM-Phobic when it is deposited onto the soil mineral. We used Neutron Reflectivity technique to understand the depth organization of the thin films. The result indicates that glucose molecules reside in a layer between Al2O3 and stearic acid and SA self-assembles. No self-assembly of SA was observed when SA and NOM-Phobic was deposited on the mineral soil. Molecular dynamics simulations reveal the thermodynamic driving force behind glucose partitioning on the mineral interface. Funded by ORNL Director's Research and Development Program. Research at ORNL was sponsored by the BES, DOE.

  14. Double layer hydroxide minerals as host structures for bioorganic molecules. [Abstract only

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Ton; Arrhenius, Meichia L.; Hui, Stella S.-Y.; Ring, Ken M.; Gedulin, Benjamin I.; Orgel, Leslie E.; Arrhenius, Gustaf

    1994-01-01

    A central problem in molecular evolution concerns the selective concentration from dilute, multicomponent solution of source molecules into a reactive environment, where formation of larger molecular assemblages can take place. Minerals consisting of positively charged, separable metal hydroxide sheets have proven capable of these functions. This common structural type is represented by minerals such as pyroaurite (Mg-Fe(3+) hydroxide), hydrotalcite (Mg-Al), green rust Fe(2+)-Fe(3+) and others. Effective interlayer sorption is demonstrated for orthophosphate and condensed phosphates, anionic alkyl compounds, polypeptides, nucleic acids, cyanide complexes and glycolaldehyde phosphate, the latter shown to readily oligomerize to form and selectively retain racemic hexose -2, 4, 6-phosphates, preferentially of altrose (Pitsch, et al, 1993). The selective aldomerization and retention effects correlate with the charge distribution in the host mineral structure and the stereochemistry of the substrate molecules. Interaction between nucleic acid bases, and between the cyanide groups of glycolaldehyde phosphate nitrile at the low water activity in the mineral interlayer is indicated by doubling of the monomeric separation of the hydroxide mineral sheets.

  15. Discriminant diagrams for iron oxide trace element fingerprinting of mineral deposit types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupuis, Céline; Beaudoin, Georges

    2011-04-01

    Magnetite and hematite are common minerals in a range of mineral deposit types. These minerals form partial to complete solid solutions with magnetite, chromite, and spinel series, and ulvospinel as a result of divalent, trivalent, and tetravalent cation substitutions. Electron microprobe analyses of minor and trace elements in magnetite and hematite from a range of mineral deposit types (iron oxide-copper-gold (IOCG), Kiruna apatite-magnetite, banded iron formation (BIF), porphyry Cu, Fe-Cu skarn, Fe-Ti, V, Cr, Ni-Cu-PGE, Cu-Zn-Pb volcanogenic massive sulfide (VMS) and Archean Au-Cu porphyry and Opemiska Cu veins) show compositional differences that can be related to deposit types, and are used to construct discriminant diagrams that separate different styles of mineralization. The Ni + Cr vs. Si + Mg diagram can be used to isolate Ni-Cu-PGE, and Cr deposits from other deposit types. Similarly, the Al/(Zn + Ca) vs. Cu/(Si + Ca) diagram can be used to separate Cu-Zn-Pb VMS deposits from other deposit types. Samples plotting outside the Ni-Cu-PGE and Cu-Zn-Pb VMS fields are discriminated using the Ni/(Cr + Mn) vs. Ti + V or Ca + Al + Mn vs. Ti + V diagrams that discriminate for IOCG, Kiruna, porphyry Cu, BIF, skarn, Fe-Ti, and V deposits.

  16. Ab Initio Treatment of Lower Mantle Mineral Solvi.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, D. Y.; Oganov, A. R.; Schmidt, M. W.

    2006-12-01

    The lower mantle of the Earth extends from about 670 to 2980 km depth and consists mainly of MgSiO3- perovskite (~ 70 vol%), (Mg,Fe)O magnesiowüstite (~ 20 vol%) and CaSiO3-perovskite (~ 10 vol%). To obtain a realistic picture of the lower mantle, it is necessary to consider the perovskite minerals as coexisting solid solutions with a large miscibility gap, as this is the case in nature. In this work we investigate the solvi of the three binaries in the Ca-perovskite - Mg-perovskite - corundum ternary, i.e. the solid solutions relevant for the Earth's lower mantle minerals in a simplified CMAS system. It is possible to calculate thermodynamic properties, structures and energetics of the individual minerals at extreme conditions of the mantle using ab initio methods, such as the density functional theory (DFT). We use the DFT together with the generalized gradient approximation (GGA) and the projector augmented wave (PAW) method, as implemented in the VASP code. The binary solvi are modelled through a subregular solid solution model together with point defect calculations at different pressures in the lower mantle regime. Point defects in the (Ca,Mg)-perovskite system are simple substitutions, but in MgSiO3-Al2O3 there is a coupled charge substitution of 2Al3+ with Mg2+Si^{4+}. Additionally, different symmetries of the perovskite (and akimotoite/ilmenite for MgSiO3) structures have been taken into account, thus allowing for phase transitions in solid solutions. At pressures and temperatures of the lower mantle, the solvus in the (Ca,Mg)SiO3 system remains wide open and solubilities of Ca in Mg-perovskite and Mg in Ca-perovskite decrease with pressure (at constant temperature and along any adiabatic geotherm). Calculations on the MgSiO3-Al2O3 (akimotoite-corundum) solvus show higher solubilities. Still, we find it unlikely that Ca-perovskite would disappear (i.e. fully dissolve in Mg-perovskite) at conditions of the lower mantle, at last not in the simplified CMAS

  17. Was Mineral Surface Complexity and Toxicity an Impetus for Evolution of Microbial Extracellular Polymeric Substances?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahai, N.; Xu, J.; Zhu, C.; Campbell, J.; Hickey, W.; Zhang, N.

    2011-12-01

    Modern ecological niches are teeming with an astonishing diversity of microbial life closely associated with mineral surfaces, highlighting the remarkable success of microorganisms in conquering the challenges and capitalizing on the benefits presented by the mineral-water interface. Such community-living is enabled by an extracellular, polymeric, biofilm matrix developed at cell surfaces. Despite the energetic penalties, biofilm formation capability likely evolved on early Earth because of crucial cell survival functions, of which recognized roles include facilitating cell-attachment at mineral surfaces, intercellular signaling and lateral gene transfer, protection from dessication in tidal pools, and screening toxic UV light and toxic soluble metals. Cell-attachment to mineral surfaces was likely critical for cell survival and function, but the potential toxicity of mineral surfaces towards cells and the complexities of the mineral-water-cell interface in promoting biofilm formation, have not been fully appreciated. We examined the effects of nanoparticulate oxides (amorphous SiO2, anatase β-TiO2, and γ-Al2O3) on EPS- and biofilm-producing wild-type strains and their isogenic knock-out mutants which are defective in EPS-producing ability. In detail, we used Gram-negative wild-type Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 and its EPS knock-out mutant Δ-psl, and the Gram-positive wild-type Bacillus subtilis NCIB3610 and its EPS-knock-out mutant yhxBΔ. We conducted bacterial growth experiments in the presence of each oxide in order to determine the viability of each cell type relative to oxide-free controls. The amount of EPS generated in the presence of oxides was also quantified and qualitatively analyzed by fluorescent stains. The results indicated a previously unrecognized role for microbial extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) in shielding both Gram-negative and Gram-positive cells against the toxic effects of mineral surfaces. This role is distinct from the

  18. Extensive genetics of ALS

    PubMed Central

    Calvo, Andrea; Mazzini, Letizia; Cantello, Roberto; Mora, Gabriele; Moglia, Cristina; Corrado, Lucia; D'Alfonso, Sandra; Majounie, Elisa; Renton, Alan; Pisano, Fabrizio; Ossola, Irene; Brunetti, Maura; Traynor, Bryan J.; Restagno, Gabriella

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To assess the frequency and clinical characteristics of patients with mutations of major amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) genes in a prospectively ascertained, population-based epidemiologic series of cases. Methods: The study population includes all ALS cases diagnosed in Piemonte, Italy, from January 2007 to June 2011. Mutations of SOD1, TARDBP, ANG, FUS, OPTN, and C9ORF72 have been assessed. Results: Out of the 475 patients included in the study, 51 (10.7%) carried a mutation of an ALS-related gene (C9ORF72, 32; SOD1, 10; TARDBP, 7; FUS, 1; OPTN, 1; ANG, none). A positive family history for ALS or frontotemporal dementia (FTD) was found in 46 (9.7%) patients. Thirty-one (67.4%) of the 46 familial cases and 20 (4.7%) of the 429 sporadic cases had a genetic mutation. According to logistic regression modeling, besides a positive family history for ALS or FTD, the chance to carry a genetic mutation was related to the presence of comorbid FTD (odds ratio 3.5; p = 0.001), and age at onset ≤54 years (odds ratio 1.79; p = 0.012). Conclusions: We have found that ∼11% of patients with ALS carry a genetic mutation, with C9ORF72 being the commonest genetic alteration. Comorbid FTD or a young age at onset are strong indicators of a possible genetic origin of the disease. PMID:23100398

  19. The nanophase iron mineral(s) in Mars soil.

    PubMed

    Banin, A; Ben-Shlomo, T; Margulies, L; Blake, D F; Mancinelli, R L; Gehring, A U

    1993-11-25

    A series of surface-modified clays containing nanophase (np) iron oxide/oxyhydroxides of extremely small particle sizes, with total iron contents as high as found in Mars soil, were prepared by iron deposition on the clay surface from ferrous chloride solution. Comprehensive studies of the iron mineralogy in these "Mars-soil analogs" were conducted using chemical extractions, solubility analyses, pH and redox, x ray and electron diffractometry, electron microscopic imaging, specific surface area and particle size determinations, differential thermal analyses, magnetic properties characterization, spectral reflectance, and Viking biology simulation experiments. The clay matrix and the procedure used for synthesis produced nanophase iron oxides containing a certain proportion of divalent iron, which slowly converts to more stable, fully oxidized iron minerals. The clay acted as an effective matrix, both chemically and sterically, preventing the major part of the synthesized iron oxides from ripening, i.e., growing and developing larger crystals. The precipitated iron oxides appear as isodiametric or slightly elongated particles in the size range 1-10 nm, having large specific surface area. The noncrystalline nature of the iron compounds precipitated on the surface of the clay was verified by their complete extractability in oxalate. Lepidocrocite (gamma-FeOOH) was detected by selected area electron diffraction. It is formed from a double iron Fe(II)/Fe(III) hydroxy mineral such as "green rust," or ferrosic hydroxide. Magnetic measurements suggested that lepidocrocite converted to the more stable maghemite (gamma-Fe2O3) by mild heat treatment and then to nanophase hematite (alpha-Fe2O3) by extensive heat treatment. After mild heating, the iron-enriched clay became slightly magnetic, to the extent that it adheres to a hand-held magnet, as was observed with Mars soil. The chemical reactivity of the iron-enriched clays strongly resembles, and offers a plausible mechanism

  20. The nanophase iron mineral(s) in Mars soil.

    PubMed

    Banin, A; Ben-Shlomo, T; Margulies, L; Blake, D F; Mancinelli, R L; Gehring, A U

    1993-11-25

    A series of surface-modified clays containing nanophase (np) iron oxide/oxyhydroxides of extremely small particle sizes, with total iron contents as high as found in Mars soil, were prepared by iron deposition on the clay surface from ferrous chloride solution. Comprehensive studies of the iron mineralogy in these "Mars-soil analogs" were conducted using chemical extractions, solubility analyses, pH and redox, x ray and electron diffractometry, electron microscopic imaging, specific surface area and particle size determinations, differential thermal analyses, magnetic properties characterization, spectral reflectance, and Viking biology simulation experiments. The clay matrix and the procedure used for synthesis produced nanophase iron oxides containing a certain proportion of divalent iron, which slowly converts to more stable, fully oxidized iron minerals. The clay acted as an effective matrix, both chemically and sterically, preventing the major part of the synthesized iron oxides from ripening, i.e., growing and developing larger crystals. The precipitated iron oxides appear as isodiametric or slightly elongated particles in the size range 1-10 nm, having large specific surface area. The noncrystalline nature of the iron compounds precipitated on the surface of the clay was verified by their complete extractability in oxalate. Lepidocrocite (gamma-FeOOH) was detected by selected area electron diffraction. It is formed from a double iron Fe(II)/Fe(III) hydroxy mineral such as "green rust," or ferrosic hydroxide. Magnetic measurements suggested that lepidocrocite converted to the more stable maghemite (gamma-Fe2O3) by mild heat treatment and then to nanophase hematite (alpha-Fe2O3) by extensive heat treatment. After mild heating, the iron-enriched clay became slightly magnetic, to the extent that it adheres to a hand-held magnet, as was observed with Mars soil. The chemical reactivity of the iron-enriched clays strongly resembles, and offers a plausible mechanism

  1. The nanophase iron mineral(s) in Mars soil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banin, A.; Ben-Shlomo, T.; Margulies, L.; Blake, D. F.; Mancinelli, R. L.; Gehring, A. U.

    1993-01-01

    A series of surface-modified clays containing nanophase (np) iron oxide/oxyhydroxides of extremely small particle sizes, with total iron contents as high as found in Mars soil, were prepared by iron deposition on the clay surface from ferrous chloride solution. Comprehensive studies of the iron mineralogy in these "Mars-soil analogs" were conducted using chemical extractions, solubility analyses, pH and redox, x ray and electron diffractometry, electron microscopic imaging, specific surface area and particle size determinations, differential thermal analyses, magnetic properties characterization, spectral reflectance, and Viking biology simulation experiments. The clay matrix and the procedure used for synthesis produced nanophase iron oxides containing a certain proportion of divalent iron, which slowly converts to more stable, fully oxidized iron minerals. The clay acted as an effective matrix, both chemically and sterically, preventing the major part of the synthesized iron oxides from ripening, i.e., growing and developing larger crystals. The precipitated iron oxides appear as isodiametric or slightly elongated particles in the size range 1-10 nm, having large specific surface area. The noncrystalline nature of the iron compounds precipitated on the surface of the clay was verified by their complete extractability in oxalate. Lepidocrocite (gamma-FeOOH) was detected by selected area electron diffraction. It is formed from a double iron Fe(II)/Fe(III) hydroxy mineral such as "green rust," or ferrosic hydroxide. Magnetic measurements suggested that lepidocrocite converted to the more stable maghemite (gamma-Fe2O3) by mild heat treatment and then to nanophase hematite (alpha-Fe2O3) by extensive heat treatment. After mild heating, the iron-enriched clay became slightly magnetic, to the extent that it adheres to a hand-held magnet, as was observed with Mars soil. The chemical reactivity of the iron-enriched clays strongly resembles, and offers a plausible mechanism

  2. U.S. Geological Survey Minerals Yearbook—Metals and Minerals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    2016-01-01

    This edition of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Minerals Yearbook discusses the performance of the worldwide minerals and materials industries during 2012 and provides background information to assist in interpreting that performance. Content of the individual Minerals Yearbook volumes follows:• Volume I, Metals and Minerals, contains chapters about virtually all metallic and industrial mineral commodities important to the U.S. economy. Chapters on survey methods, summary statistics for domestic nonfuel minerals, and trends in mining and quarrying in the metals and industrial mineral industries in the United States are also included.• Volume II, Area Reports: Domestic, contains a chapter on the mineral industry of each of the 50 States and Puerto Rico and the Administered Islands. This volume also has chapters on survey methods and summary statistics of domestic nonfuel minerals.• Volume III, Area Reports: International, is published as four separate reports. These regional reports contain the latest available minerals data on more than 180 foreign countries and discuss the importance of minerals to the economies of these nations and the United States. Each report begins with an overview of the region’s mineral industries during the year. It continues with individual country chapters that examine the mining, refining, processing, and use of minerals in each country of the region and how each country’s mineral industry relates to U.S. industry. Most chapters include production tables and industry structure tables, information about Government policies and programs that affect the country’s mineral industry, and an outlook section.The USGS continually strives to improve the value of its publications to users. Constructive comments and suggestions by readers of the Minerals Yearbook are welcomed.

  3. Simulating the Changes of Minerals and Elements under Chemical Weathering by Acid Hydrothermal Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo, F.; Chen, H.

    2013-12-01

    In paleoenvironmental research, previous investigations reveal that the intensity of chemical weathering can be inferred from the elemental variations of marine or lacustrine sediments. Different kinds of rocks from Taiwan were applied in hydrothermal experiments to simulate element proportions and leaching sequence under chemical weathering. In our experiments, powder samples (2g) are treated in sulfuric acid solutions (20 ml) of 0.05M and 0.5M at 150°C for 1, 4, 7, 14, 30 and 60 days, respectively. We can further discuss mineral alteration and relative elemental migration according to the experimental results. There is no obvious variation in mineral phase and element at 0.05M, but the results of 0.5M have significant variations. The elemental contents are affected by the mineral leaching and secondary mineral deposited, so we use XRD and SEM to identify the existence of secondary minerals and their compositions. Our research exhibits that K/Rb, Ti/Al and Rb/Sr ratios show similar trend in most parent rocks (i.e. granite, andesite, quartz sandstone, calcite sandstone and mudstone) at 0.5M long-term experiments; however, the CIA value, was generally used as the proxy of chemical weathering, keep in a stable condition. The K/Rb and Ti/Al ratio increase, but Rb/Sr ratio decreases. In contrast, the actinolite schist and serpentinite show the different result. It is probably caused by the major mineral, chlorite and serpentinite in the rocks. We conclude that the major element Ti is relatively stable. Therefore, we use each element divided by Ti for judging relatively enriched or depleted under chemical weathering processes. Finally, we find that K/Rb ratio, which has obvious variations, is seldom influenced by mineral assemblage, so it can be regarded as a suitable weathering proxy.

  4. The Interfacial Behavior between Biochar and Soil Minerals and Its Effect on Biochar Stability.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fan; Zhao, Ling; Gao, Bin; Xu, Xiaoyun; Cao, Xinde

    2016-03-01

    In this study, FeCl3, AlCl3, CaCl2, and kaolinite were selected as model soil minerals and incubated with walnut shell derived biochar for 3 months and the incubated biochar was then separated for the investigation of biochar-mineral interfacial behavior using XRD and SEM-EDS. The XPS, TGA, and H2O2 oxidation were applied to evaluate effects of the interaction on the stability of biochar. Fe8O8(OH)8Cl1.35 and AlCl3·6H2O were newly formed on the biochar surface or inside of the biochar pores. At the biochar-mineral interface, organometallic complexes such as Fe-O-C were generated. All the 4 minerals enhanced the oxidation resistance of biochar surface by decreasing the relative contents of C-O, C═O, and COOH from 36.3% to 16.6-26.5%. Oxidation resistance of entire biochar particles was greatly increased with C losses in H2O2 oxidation decreasing by 13.4-79.6%, and the C recalcitrance index (R50,bicohar) in TGA analysis increasing from 44.6% to 45.9-49.6%. Enhanced oxidation resistance of biochar surface was likely due to the physical isolation from newly formed minerals, while organometallic complex formation was probably responsible for the increase in oxidation resistance of entire biochar particles. Results indicated that mineral-rich soils seemed to be a beneficial environment for biochar since soil minerals could increase biochar stability, which displays an important environmental significance of biochar for long-term carbon sequestration.

  5. Bone mineral measurement from Apollo experiment M-078. [derangement of bone mineral metabolism in spacecrews

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vogel, J. M.; Rambaut, P. C.; Smith, M. C., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    Loss of mineral from bone during periods of immobilization, recumbency, or weightlessness is examined. This report describes the instrumentation, technique, and bone mineral changes observed preflight and postflight for the Apollo 14, 15, and 16 missions. The bone mineral changes documented during the Apollo Program are reviewed, and their relevance to future missions is discussed.

  6. 43 CFR 3000.8 - Management of Federal minerals from reserved mineral estates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Management of Federal minerals from reserved mineral estates. 3000.8 Section 3000.8 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000)...

  7. 43 CFR 3594.5 - Minerals soluble in water; brines; minerals taken in solution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Minerals soluble in water; brines; minerals taken in solution. 3594.5 Section 3594.5 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000)...

  8. 43 CFR 3000.8 - Management of Federal minerals from reserved mineral estates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Management of Federal minerals from reserved mineral estates. 3000.8 Section 3000.8 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000)...

  9. 43 CFR 3594.5 - Minerals soluble in water; brines; minerals taken in solution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Minerals soluble in water; brines; minerals taken in solution. 3594.5 Section 3594.5 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000)...

  10. 43 CFR 3000.8 - Management of Federal minerals from reserved mineral estates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Management of Federal minerals from reserved mineral estates. 3000.8 Section 3000.8 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000)...

  11. 43 CFR 3594.5 - Minerals soluble in water; brines; minerals taken in solution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Minerals soluble in water; brines; minerals taken in solution. 3594.5 Section 3594.5 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000)...

  12. 43 CFR 3000.8 - Management of Federal minerals from reserved mineral estates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Management of Federal minerals from reserved mineral estates. 3000.8 Section 3000.8 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000)...

  13. 43 CFR 3594.5 - Minerals soluble in water; brines; minerals taken in solution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Minerals soluble in water; brines; minerals taken in solution. 3594.5 Section 3594.5 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000)...

  14. [Treatment of infectious diseases in al-Andalus].

    PubMed

    Casal, M T; Casal, M

    2004-12-01

    The treatment used in Islamic Spain, al-Andalus, for a number of infectious diseases such as leprosy, tuberculosis, gonococcal disease, diarrhea, smallpox, measles, parasitic diseases, etc., is reviewed briefly. The different remedies of plant, animal and mineral extracts employed by renowned physicians of the time, such as Isaac, Arib ibn Said, Abulcasis, al-Gafiqi and Averroes among others, are analyzed briefly to provide an understanding of the approach to the treatment of infectious diseases nowadays known to be caused by microorganisms. PMID:15696226

  15. Mineral Engineering Education in the West.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borgmann, Carl W.; Bartram, John W.

    A large percentage of all US degrees in mineral engineering fields are awarded by 14 institutions of higher education in 13 western states: Alaska, Arizona, California, Colorado, Hawaii, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, Oregon, Utah, Washington, and Wyoming. But low undergraduate enrollments in the mineral engineering curricula have increased…

  16. Mineral resource of the month: potash

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jasinski, Stephen M.

    2011-01-01

    The article offers basic information about the mineral resource potash. According to the author, potash is the generic term for a variety of mined and manufactured salts that contain the mineral potassium in a water-soluble form. The author adds that potash is used in fertilizers, soaps and detergents, glass and ceramics, and alkaline batteries.

  17. ELECTROCHEMICAL PROPERTIES OF ROCKS AND MINERALS.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olhoeft, Gary R.

    1985-01-01

    Many phenomena and processes in the earth sciences are a result of the electrochemical properties of rocks and minerals. Examples include formation of mineral deposits and petroleum reservoirs control of drilling muds, and success or failure of toxic waste isolation barriers. Such phenomena can be observed at a distance using geophysical techniques to measure various electrical properties of the earth.

  18. Dehydration-induced luminescence in clay minerals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coyne, L. M.; Lahav, N.; Lawless, J. G.

    1981-01-01

    Reports of triboluminescent phenomena in organic crystalline materials prompted a search for related processes in clay minerals. The reported extensive mechanical distortion produced on freezing and drying of montmorillonite was particularly interesting because of studies of condensation reactions in a wet/dry cycled reaction sequence. The discovery of an unusual luminescent process in several clay minerals is reported and its characteristics are described.

  19. Mineral resource of the month: tantalum

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    2011-01-01

    The article offers information on a rare transition metal called tantalum. It says that the blue-gray mineral resource was discovered in 1801 or 1802 and was used for capacitors in 1940. It adds that the tantalite ore and other minerals in the ore should be separated in order to generate concentrates of tantalum. The use of tantalum are also cited.

  20. 36 CFR 292.18 - Mineral resources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Mineral resources. 292.18 Section 292.18 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE NATIONAL RECREATION AREAS Sawtooth National Recreation Area-Federal Lands § 292.18 Mineral resources. (a)...

  1. 36 CFR 292.18 - Mineral resources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Mineral resources. 292.18 Section 292.18 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE NATIONAL RECREATION AREAS Sawtooth National Recreation Area-Federal Lands § 292.18 Mineral resources. (a)...

  2. 36 CFR 292.18 - Mineral resources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Mineral resources. 292.18 Section 292.18 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE NATIONAL RECREATION AREAS Sawtooth National Recreation Area-Federal Lands § 292.18 Mineral resources. (a)...

  3. 36 CFR 292.18 - Mineral resources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Mineral resources. 292.18 Section 292.18 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE NATIONAL RECREATION AREAS Sawtooth National Recreation Area-Federal Lands § 292.18 Mineral resources. (a)...

  4. 36 CFR 292.18 - Mineral resources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Mineral resources. 292.18 Section 292.18 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE NATIONAL RECREATION AREAS Sawtooth National Recreation Area-Federal Lands § 292.18 Mineral resources. (a)...

  5. Mineral Resource of the Month: Graphite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olson, Donald W.

    2008-01-01

    Graphite, a grayish black opaque mineral with a metallic luster, is one of four forms of pure crystalline carbon (the others are carbon nanotubes, diamonds and fullerenes). It is one of the softest minerals and it exhibits perfect basal (one-plane) cleavage. Graphite is the most electrically and thermally conductive of the nonmetals, and it is chemically inert.

  6. ASEAN Mineral Database and Information System (AMDIS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okubo, Y.; Ohno, T.; Bandibas, J. C.; Wakita, K.; Oki, Y.; Takahashi, Y.

    2014-12-01

    AMDIS has lunched officially since the Fourth ASEAN Ministerial Meeting on Minerals on 28 November 2013. In cooperation with Geological Survey of Japan, the web-based GIS was developed using Free and Open Source Software (FOSS) and the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) standards. The system is composed of the local databases and the centralized GIS. The local databases created and updated using the centralized GIS are accessible from the portal site. The system introduces distinct advantages over traditional GIS. Those are a global reach, a large number of users, better cross-platform capability, charge free for users, charge free for provider, easy to use, and unified updates. Raising transparency of mineral information to mining companies and to the public, AMDIS shows that mineral resources are abundant throughout the ASEAN region; however, there are many datum vacancies. We understand that such problems occur because of insufficient governance of mineral resources. Mineral governance we refer to is a concept that enforces and maximizes the capacity and systems of government institutions that manages minerals sector. The elements of mineral governance include a) strengthening of information infrastructure facility, b) technological and legal capacities of state-owned mining companies to fully-engage with mining sponsors, c) government-led management of mining projects by supporting the project implementation units, d) government capacity in mineral management such as the control and monitoring of mining operations, and e) facilitation of regional and local development plans and its implementation with the private sector.

  7. Minerals yearbook, 1990: Idaho. Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Minarik, R.J.; Gillerman, V.S.

    1992-09-01

    The 1990 Annual Report is on the Mineral Industry of Idaho. Idaho ranked 26th nationally for total mineral production value compared with 28th in 1989. The State was first in the Nation in antimony and garnet production; second in silver and vandaium production; and third in output of lead, molybdenum, and marketable phosphate rock.

  8. Earth mineral resource of the month: asbestos

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Virta, Robert L.

    2010-01-01

    The article discusses the characteristics and feature of asbestos. According to the author, asbestos is a generic name for six needle-shaped minerals that possess high tensile strengths, flexibility, and resistance to chemical and thermal degradation. These minerals are actinolite, amosite, anthophyllite, chrysolite, crocilodite and tremolite. Asbestos is used for strengthening concrete pipe, plastic components, and gypsum plasters.

  9. Mineral Oil Aspiration Related Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Andrew D.; Fischer, Philip R.; Reed, Ann M.; Wylam, Mark E.

    2015-01-01

    We describe the development of rheumatoid factor-positive migratory polyarthritis in a 5-year-old male who had been administered bidaily oral mineral oil as a laxative since birth. Minor respiratory symptoms, radiographic and bronchoscopic findings were consistent with chronic lipoid pneumonia. We speculate that immune sensitization to mineral oil promoted the clinical syndrome of juvenile idiopathic arthritis. PMID:26171269

  10. Mineral losses during extreme environmental conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Minerals are nutrients that are conserved by the body. During exposure to environmental stimuli, such as heat and/or exercise, the excretion of minerals, macro (Na, K, Ca, Mg) and micro (Cu, Fe, Zn), occurs through the body surface in the form of cellular desquamation and sweat, as well as in the u...

  11. Killer clays! Natural antibacterial clay minerals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, L.B.; Holland, M.; Eberl, D.D.; Brunet, T.; De Courrsou, L. B.

    2004-01-01

    The clay chemical properties that may be important in medicine were investigated. It was found that natural clay minerals can have striking and very specific effects on microbial populations. The effects can range from potentially enhanced microbial growth to complete sterilization. This paper presents evidence that natural clay minerals can be effective antimicrobial agents.

  12. 43 CFR 9239.5 - Minerals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Minerals. 9239.5 Section 9239.5 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR TECHNICAL SERVICES (9000) TRESPASS Kinds of Trespass § 9239.5 Minerals....

  13. 43 CFR 9239.5 - Minerals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Minerals. 9239.5 Section 9239.5 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR TECHNICAL SERVICES (9000) TRESPASS Kinds of Trespass § 9239.5 Minerals....

  14. 43 CFR 9239.5 - Minerals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Minerals. 9239.5 Section 9239.5 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR TECHNICAL SERVICES (9000) TRESPASS Kinds of Trespass § 9239.5 Minerals....

  15. 43 CFR 9239.5 - Minerals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Minerals. 9239.5 Section 9239.5 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR TECHNICAL SERVICES (9000) TRESPASS Kinds of Trespass § 9239.5 Minerals....

  16. Acidosis inhibits mineralization in human osteoblasts.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Shoko; Hirukawa, Koji; Togari, Akifumi

    2013-09-01

    Osteoblasts and osteoclasts maintain bone volume. Acidosis affects the function of these cells including mineral metabolism. We examined the effect of acidosis on the expression of transcription factors and mineralization in human osteoblasts in vitro. Human osteoblasts (SaM-1 cells) derived from the ulnar periosteum were cultured with α-MEM containing 50 μg/ml ascorbic acid and 5 mM β-glycerophosphate (calcifying medium). Acidosis was induced by incubating the SaM-1 cells in 10 % CO₂ (pH approximately 7.0). Mineralization, which was augmented by the calcifying medium, was completely inhibited by acidosis. Acidosis depressed c-Jun mRNA and increased osteoprotegerin (OPG) production in a time-dependent manner. Depressing c-Jun mRNA expression using siRNA increased OPG production and inhibited mineralization. In addition, depressing OPG mRNA expression with siRNA enhanced mineralization in a dose-dependent manner. Acidosis or the OPG protein strongly inhibited mineralization in osteoblasts from neonatal mice. The present study was the first to demonstrate that acidosis inhibited mineralization, depressed c-Jun mRNA expression, and induced OPG production in human osteoblasts. These results suggest that OPG is involved in mineralization via c-Jun in human osteoblasts.

  17. Mineral Process Chemistry: A Special Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dudeney, A. W. L.

    1982-01-01

    Mineral Process Chemistry is one of the special study options of the Nuffield Advanced Science course in chemistry. Following general comments on mineral process chemistry, the subject matter of the option is described, focusing on copper and china clay. (Author/JN)

  18. Physical properties of evaporite minerals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robertson, Eugene C.

    1962-01-01

    The data in the following tables were abstracted from measurements of physical properties of evaporite minerals or of equivalent synthetic compounds. The compounds considered are the halide and sulfate salts which supposedly precipitated from evaporating ocean water and which form very extensive and thick "rock salt" beds. These beds are composed almost entirely of NaCl. In places where the beds are deeply buried and where fractures occur in the overlying rocks, the salt is plastically extruded upward as in a pipe to form the "salt domes". Most of the tables are for NaCl, both the natural (halite) and the synthetic salt, polycrystalline and single crystals. These measurements have been collected for use 1) in studies on storage of radioactive wastes in salt domes or beds, 2) in calculations concerned with nuclear tests in salt domes and beds, and 3) in studies of phenomena in salt of geologic interest. Rather than an exhaustive compilation of physical property measurements, there tables represent a summary of data from accessible sources. As limitations of time have presented making a more systematic and comprehensive selection, the data given may seem arbitrarily chosen. Some of the data listed are old, and newer, more accurate data are undoubtedly available. Halite (an synthetic NaCl) has been very thoroughly studied because of its relatively simple and highly symmetrical crystal structure, its easy availability naturally or synthetically, both in single crystals and polycrystalline, its useful and scientifically interesting properties, and its role as a compound of almost purely ionic bonding. The measurements of NaCl in the tables, however, represent only a small part of the total number of observations; discrimination was necessary to keep the size of the tabulations manageable. The physical properties of the evaporite minerals other than halite and sylvite have received only desultory attention of experiementalists, and appear in only a few tables. The

  19. An Impact Origin for Surface Minerals on Ceres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zolotov, M. Y.

    2013-12-01

    environments in impact plumes and surges could have led to deposition of minerals which typically do not form together (e.g., brucite and cronstedtite). Aqueous minerals could have formed in impact clouds, crater outflows, transient ice-covered crater lakes, and related hydrothermal systems. The observed clay-sized and spatially homogeneous surface materials [2] could be gravitationally sorted deposits of impact clouds and surges. The surface materials could have formed through impacts on an icy shell of a differentiated Ceres during the Late Heavy Bombardment (LHB) in the inner solar system, which affected may other asteroids [6]. However, mineral-forming processes during collisions of an undifferentiated and hydrated Ceres with water-rich bodies during LHB remain a possibility. A detection of fluidized crater outflows together with topography and composition of surface materials with Dawn will test this hypothesis. Refs: [1] McCord, T.B. et al. (2011) Space Sci. Rev. 163, 63-76. [2] Rivkin, A.S. et al. (2011) Space Sci. Rev. 101, 1-22. [3] Milliken, R.E., and Rivkin, A.S. (2009) Nature Geoscience 2, 258-261. [4] Castillo-Rogez, J.C., and McCord, T.B. (2010) Icarus 205, 443-459. [5] Gerasimov, M.V. et al. (2002) Deep-Sea Res. II 49, 995-1009. [6] Marchi, S. et al. (2013) Nature Geoscience, 6, 303-307.

  20. Ground Truthing Orbital Clay Mineral Observations with the APXS Onboard Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schroeder, C.; Gellert, R.; VanBommel, S.; Clark, B. C.; Ming, D. W.; Mittlefehldt, D. S.; Yen, A. S.

    2016-01-01

    NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity has been exploring approximately 22 km diameter Endeavour crater since 2011. Its rim segments predate the Hesperian-age Burns formation and expose Noachian-age material, which is associated with orbital Fe3+-Mg-rich clay mineral observations [1,2]. Moving to an orders of magnitude smaller instrumental field of view on the ground, the clay minerals were challenging to pinpoint on the basis of geochemical data because they appear to be the result of near-isochemical weathering of the local bedrock [3,4]. However, the APXS revealed a more complex mineral story as fracture fills and so-called red zones appear to contain more Al-rich clay minerals [5,6], which had not been observed from orbit. These observations are important to constrain clay mineral formation processes. More detail will be added as Opportunity is heading into her 10th extended mission, during which she will investigate Noachian bedrock that predates Endeavour crater, study sedimentary rocks inside Endeavour crater, and explore a fluid-carved gully. ESA's ExoMars rover will land on Noachian-age Oxia Planum where abundant Fe3+-Mg-rich clay minerals have been observed from orbit, but the story will undoubtedly become more complex once seen from the ground.