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Sample records for al eds hematology

  1. SEM, EDS and vibrational spectroscopic study of dawsonite NaAl(CO3)(OH)2.

    PubMed

    Frost, Ray L; López, Andrés; Scholz, Ricardo; Sampaio, Ney Pinheiro; de Oliveira, Fernando A N

    2015-02-01

    In this work we have studied the mineral dawsonite by using a combination of scanning electron microscopy with EDS and vibrational spectroscopy. Single crystals show an acicular habitus forming aggregates with a rosette shape. The chemical analysis shows a phase composed of C, Al, and Na. Two distinct Raman bands at 1091 and 1068 cm(-1) are assigned to the CO3(2-) ν1 symmetric stretching mode. Multiple bands are observed in both the Raman and infrared spectra in the antisymmetric stretching and bending regions showing that the symmetry of the carbonate anion is reduced and in all probability the carbonate anions are not equivalent in the dawsonite structure. Multiple OH deformation vibrations centred upon 950 cm(-1) in both the Raman and infrared spectra show that the OH units in the dawsonite structure are non-equivalent. Raman bands observed at 3250, 3283 and 3295 cm(-1) are assigned to OH stretching vibrations. The position of these bands indicates strong hydrogen bonding of the OH units in the dawsonite structure. The formation of the mineral dawsonite has the potential to offer a mechanism for the geosequestration of greenhouse gases. PMID:25459617

  2. SEM, EDS and vibrational spectroscopic study of dawsonite NaAl(CO3)(OH)2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frost, Ray L.; López, Andrés; Scholz, Ricardo; Sampaio, Ney Pinheiro; de Oliveira, Fernando A. N.

    2015-02-01

    In this work we have studied the mineral dawsonite by using a combination of scanning electron microscopy with EDS and vibrational spectroscopy. Single crystals show an acicular habitus forming aggregates with a rosette shape. The chemical analysis shows a phase composed of C, Al, and Na. Two distinct Raman bands at 1091 and 1068 cm-1 are assigned to the CO32- ν1 symmetric stretching mode. Multiple bands are observed in both the Raman and infrared spectra in the antisymmetric stretching and bending regions showing that the symmetry of the carbonate anion is reduced and in all probability the carbonate anions are not equivalent in the dawsonite structure. Multiple OH deformation vibrations centred upon 950 cm-1 in both the Raman and infrared spectra show that the OH units in the dawsonite structure are non-equivalent. Raman bands observed at 3250, 3283 and 3295 cm-1 are assigned to OH stretching vibrations. The position of these bands indicates strong hydrogen bonding of the OH units in the dawsonite structure. The formation of the mineral dawsonite has the potential to offer a mechanism for the geosequestration of greenhouse gases.

  3. Reptile Hematology.

    PubMed

    Sykes, John M; Klaphake, Eric

    2015-09-01

    The basic principles of hematology used in mammalian medicine can be applied to reptiles. The appearances of the blood cells are significantly different from those seen in most mammals, and vary with taxa and staining method used. Many causes for abnormalities of the reptilian hemogram are similar to those for mammals, although additional factors such as venipuncture site, season, hibernation status, captivity status, and environmental factors can also affect values, making interpretation of hematologic results challenging. Values in an individual should be compared with reference ranges specific to that species, gender, and environmental conditions when available. PMID:26297412

  4. Hematologic malignancies

    SciTech Connect

    Hoogstraten, B.

    1986-01-01

    The principle aim of this book is to give practical guidelines to the modern treatment of the six important hematologic malignancies. Topics considered include the treatment of the chronic leukemias; acute leukemia in adults; the myeloproliferative disorders: polycythemia vera, essential thrombocythemia, and idiopathic myelofibrosis/agnogenic myeloid metaplasia; Hodgkin's Disease; non-Hodgkin's lymphoma; and Multiple Myeloma.

  5. An SEM, EDS and vibrational spectroscopic study of the silicate mineral meliphanite (Ca,Na)2Be[(Si,Al)2O6(F,OH)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frost, Ray L.; López, Andrés; Theiss, Frederick L.; Romano, Antônio Wilson; Scholz, Ricardo

    2015-02-01

    The mineral meliphanite (Ca,Na)2Be[(Si,Al)2O6(F,OH)] is a crystalline sodium calcium beryllium silicate which has the potential to be used as piezoelectric material and for other ferroelectric applications. The mineral has been characterized by a combination of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and vibrational spectroscopy. EDS analysis shows a material with high concentrations of Si and Ca and low amounts of Na, Al and F. Beryllium was not detected. Raman bands at 1016 and 1050 cm-1 are assigned to the SiO and AlOH stretching vibrations of three dimensional siloxane units. The infrared spectrum of meliphanite is very broad in comparison with the Raman spectrum. Raman bands at 472 and 510 cm-1 are assigned to OSiO bending modes. Raman spectroscopy identifies bands in the OH stretching region. Raman spectroscopy with complimentary infrared spectroscopy enables the characterization of the silicate mineral meliphanite.

  6. Hematological Practice in India.

    PubMed

    Das, Reena; Ahluwalia, Jasmina; Sachdeva, Man Updesh Singh

    2016-04-01

    This article provides a short summary of hematological practice in India. It focuses particularly on how the patterns of hematologic practice differ from those of countries in the West with particular respect to genetic hematological diseases and a wide range of malignant disorders of hemopoiesis. It also focuses on the difficulties of control and management of hematological disorders set against a background of a relatively poor country. PMID:27040963

  7. Hematology in Africa.

    PubMed

    Makani, Julie; Roberts, David J

    2016-04-01

    This review of hematology in Africa highlights areas of current practice and the immediate needs for development and clinical research. Acute hematological practice is dominated by anemia, sickle cell disease, and the need to provide a safe and rapidly available supply of blood. There is a growing need for specialist services for bleeding and coagulation, hematological malignancy, and palliative care. There are many areas of practice where straightforward measures could yield large gains in patient care. There is an urgent need for good clinical research to describe the epidemiology, natural history, and management of hematological diseases in Africa. PMID:27040965

  8. Aluminum toxicity. Hematological effects.

    PubMed

    Mahieu, S; del Carmen Contini, M; Gonzalez, M; Millen, N; Elias, M M

    2000-01-01

    Sequential effects of intoxication with aluminum hydroxide (Al) (80 mg/Kg body weight, i.p., three times a week), were studied on rats from weaning and up to 28 weeks. The study was carried out on hematological and iron metabolism-related parameters on peripheral blood, at the end of the 1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 5th and 6th months of exposure. As it was described that hematotoxic effects of Al are mainly seen together with high levels of uremia, renal function was measured at the same periods. The animals treated developed a microcytosis and was accompanied by a decrease in mean corpuscular hemoglobin (MCH). Significantly lower red blood cell counts (RBC million/microl) were found in rats treated during the 1st month. These values matched those obtained for control rats during the 2nd month. From the 3rd month onwards, a significant increase was observed as compared to control groups, and the following values were obtained by the 6th month: (T) 10.0 +/- 0.3 versus (C) 8.7 +/- 0.2 (million/microl). Both MCH and mean corpuscular volume (MCV) were found to be significantly lower in groups treated from the 2nd month. At the end of the 6th month the following values were found: MCH (T) 13.3 +/- 0.1 versus (C) 16.9 +/- 0.3 (pg); MCV (T) 42.1 +/- 0.7 versus (C) 51.8 +/- 0.9 (fl). Al was found responsible for lower serum iron concentration levels and in the percentage of transferrin saturation. Thus, although microcytic anemia constitutes an evidence of chronic aluminum exposure, prolonged exposure could lead to a recovery of hematocrit and hemoglobin concentration values with an increase in red cell number. Nevertheless, both microcytosis and the decrease of MCH would persist. These modifications took place without changes being observed in the renal function during the observation period. PMID:10643868

  9. American Society of Hematology

    MedlinePlus

    Main Navigation Account Navigation Main Content American Society of Hematology ASH Store ASH Job Center ASH Apps Share Your Idea Donate My Account Search Show Main Menu + About Awards Membership ASH ...

  10. Microarrays in hematology.

    PubMed

    Walker, Josef; Flower, Darren; Rigley, Kevin

    2002-01-01

    Microarrays are fast becoming routine tools for the high-throughput analysis of gene expression in a wide range of biologic systems, including hematology. Although a number of approaches can be taken when implementing microarray-based studies, all are capable of providing important insights into biologic function. Although some technical issues have not been resolved, microarrays will continue to make a significant impact on hematologically important research. PMID:11753074

  11. Hematologic complications of pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Townsley, Danielle M

    2013-07-01

    Pregnancy induces a number of physiologic changes that affect the hematologic indices, either directly or indirectly. Recognizing and treating hematologic disorders that occur during pregnancy is difficult owing to the paucity of evidence available to guide consultants. This review discusses specifically the diagnosis and management of benign hematologic disorders occurring during pregnancy. Anemia secondary to iron deficiency is the most frequent hematologic complication and is easily treated with oral iron formulations; however, care must be taken not to miss other causes of anemia, such as sickle cell disease. Thrombocytopenia is also a common reason for consulting the hematologist, and distinguishing gestational thrombocytopenia from immune thrombocytopenia (ITP), preeclampsia, HELLP syndrome (hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, and low platelets), or thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) is essential since the treatment differs widely. Occasionally the management of mother and infant involves the expeditious recognition of neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia (NAIT), a condition that is responsible for severe life-threatening bleeding of the newborn. Additionally, inherited and acquired bleeding disorders affect pregnant women disproportionately and often require careful monitoring of coagulation parameters to prevent bleeding in the puerperium. Finally, venous thromboembolism (VTE) during pregnancy is still largely responsible for mortality during pregnancy, and the diagnosis, treatment options and guidelines for prevention of VTE during pregnancy are explored. PMID:23953339

  12. Hematologic Complications of Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Townsley, Danielle M.

    2013-01-01

    Pregnancy induces a number of physiologic changes that affect the hematologic indices, either directly or indirectly. Recognizing and treating hematologic disorders that occur during pregnancy is difficult owing to the paucity of evidence available to guide consultants. This paper specifically reviews the diagnosis and management of benign hematologic disorders occurring during pregnancy. Anemia secondary to iron deficiency is the most frequent hematologic complication and is easily treated with oral iron formulations,; however care must be taken not to miss other causes of anemia, such as sickle cell disease. Thrombocytopenia is also a common reason for consulting the hematologist and distinguishing gestational thrombocytopenia from immune thrombocytopenia (ITP), preeclampsia, HELLP syndrome, or thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) is essential since the treatment differs widely. Occasionally the management of mother and infant involves the expeditious recognition of neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia (NAIT), a condition that is responsible for severe life-threatening bleeding of the newborn. Additionally, inherited and acquired bleeding disorders affect pregnant women disproportionately and often require careful monitoring of coagulation parameters in order to prevent bleeding in the puerperium. Finally, venous thromboembolism (VTE) during pregnancy is still largely responsible for mortality during pregnancy and the diagnosis, treatment options and guidelines for prevention of VTE during pregnancy are explored. PMID:23953339

  13. Hematological Problems of Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Ballem, P.J.

    1988-01-01

    Hematologic complications are relatively common in pregnancy. Furthermore, many chronic hematologic disorders require special surveillance and intervention in pregnancy. In this brief review, the author discusses common nutritional anemias in pregnancy. She reviews the disorders of hemoglobin synthesis and the need for early genetic counselling and prenatal diagnosis, as well as the special requirements and problems affected patients encounter in pregnancy. An overview of the frequent causes of thrombocytopenia in pregnancy is given and an approach suggested to the management of both the mother and the fetus. An approach is also presented to the management of women at risk for thrombosis in pregnancy, a particularly vexing and controversial problem. The risks of the various forms of anticoagulation are reviewed. Finally, a brief review of obstetrical hemorrhage is presented along with some guidelines useful in its management. PMID:21253125

  14. Hematology and immunology studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kimzey, S. L.; Fischer, C. L.; Johnson, P. C.; Ritzmann, S. E.; Mengel, C. E.

    1975-01-01

    The hematology and immunology program conducted in support of the Apollo missions was designed to acquire specific laboratory data relative to the assessment of the health status of the astronauts prior to their commitment to space flight. A second objective was to detect and identify any alterations in the normal functions of the immunohematologic systems which could be attributed to space flight exposure, and to evaluate the significance of these changes relative to man's continuing participation in space flight missions. Specific changes observed during the Gemini Program formed the basis for the major portion of the hematology-immunology test schedule. Additional measurements were included when their contribution to the overall interpretation of the flight data base became apparent.

  15. Drug-Induced Hematologic Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Mintzer, David M.; Billet, Shira N.; Chmielewski, Lauren

    2009-01-01

    Objective. Drugs can induce almost the entire spectrum of hematologic disorders, affecting white cells, red cells, platelets, and the coagulation system. This paper aims to emphasize the broad range of drug-induced hematological syndromes and to highlight some of the newer drugs and syndromes. Methods. Medline literature on drug-induced hematologic syndromes was reviewed. Most reports and reviews focus on individual drugs or cytopenias. Results. Drug-induced syndromes include hemolytic anemias, methemoglobinemia, red cell aplasia, sideroblastic anemia, megaloblastic anemia, polycythemia, aplastic anemia, leukocytosis, neutropenia, eosinophilia, immune thrombocytopenia, microangiopathic syndromes, hypercoagulability, hypoprothrombinemia, circulating anticoagulants, myelodysplasia, and acute leukemia. Some of the classic drugs known to cause hematologic abnormalities have been replaced by newer drugs, including biologics, accompanied by their own syndromes and unintended side effects. Conclusions. Drugs can induce toxicities spanning many hematologic syndromes, mediated by a variety of mechanisms. Physicians need to be alert to the potential for iatrogenic drug-induced hematologic complications. PMID:19960059

  16. Artificial intelligence in hematology.

    PubMed

    Zini, Gina

    2005-10-01

    Artificial intelligence (AI) is a computer based science which aims to simulate human brain faculties using a computational system. A brief history of this new science goes from the creation of the first artificial neuron in 1943 to the first artificial neural network application to genetic algorithms. The potential for a similar technology in medicine has immediately been identified by scientists and researchers. The possibility to store and process all medical knowledge has made this technology very attractive to assist or even surpass clinicians in reaching a diagnosis. Applications of AI in medicine include devices applied to clinical diagnosis in neurology and cardiopulmonary diseases, as well as the use of expert or knowledge-based systems in routine clinical use for diagnosis, therapeutic management and for prognostic evaluation. Biological applications include genome sequencing or DNA gene expression microarrays, modeling gene networks, analysis and clustering of gene expression data, pattern recognition in DNA and proteins, protein structure prediction. In the field of hematology the first devices based on AI have been applied to the routine laboratory data management. New tools concern the differential diagnosis in specific diseases such as anemias, thalassemias and leukemias, based on neural networks trained with data from peripheral blood analysis. A revolution in cancer diagnosis, including the diagnosis of hematological malignancies, has been the introduction of the first microarray based and bioinformatic approach for molecular diagnosis: a systematic approach based on the monitoring of simultaneous expression of thousands of genes using DNA microarray, independently of previous biological knowledge, analysed using AI devices. Using gene profiling, the traditional diagnostic pathways move from clinical to molecular based diagnostic systems. PMID:16203606

  17. Secondary pulmonary alveolar proteinosis in hematologic malignancies.

    PubMed

    Chaulagain, Chakra P; Pilichowska, Monika; Brinckerhoff, Laurence; Tabba, Maher; Erban, John K

    2014-12-01

    Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP), characterized by deposition of intra-alveolar PAS positive protein and lipid rich material, is a rare cause of progressive respiratory failure first described by Rosen et al. in 1958. The intra-alveolar lipoproteinaceous material was subsequently proven to have been derived from pulmonary surfactant in 1980 by Singh et al. Levinson et al. also reported in 1958 the case of 19-year-old female with panmyelosis afflicted with a diffuse pulmonary disease characterized by filling of the alveoli with amorphous material described as "intra-alveolar coagulum". This is probably the first reported case of PAP in relation to hematologic malignancy. Much progress has been made on PAP first described by Rosen which is currently classified as idiopathic or primary or autoimmune PAP. Idiopathic PAP occurs as a result of auto-antibodies directed against granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) impeding the surfactant clearing function of alveolar macrophages leading to progressive respiratory failure. Whole lung lavage and GM-CSF therapy has improved outcomes in patients with idiopathic PAP. Despite major advancement in the management of hematologic malignancy and its complications, little is known about the type of PAP first described by Levinson and now known as secondary PAP; a term also used when PAP occurs due to other causes such as occupational dusts. In this article we review and analyze the limited literature available in secondary PAP due to hematologic malignancies and present a case of PAP associated with chronic lymphocytic leukemia successfully treated with bendamustine and rituximab. PMID:25300566

  18. SEM, EDS and vibrational spectroscopic study of the sulphate mineral rostite AlSO₄(OH,F)·5(H₂O).

    PubMed

    Frost, Ray L; Scholz, Ricardo; Lima, Rosa Malena Fernandes; López, Andrés

    2015-12-01

    We have studied the mineral rostite, a sulphate mineral of aluminium of formula AlSO4(OH,F)·5(H2O). The mineral is formed in mine dumps and wastes. Chemical analysis proves the presence of Al, F and S. A single intense band is observed at 991 cm(-1) and is assigned to the Raman active SO4(2-) ν1 symmetric stretching vibration. Low intensity Raman bands observed at 1070, 1083, 1131 and 1145 cm(-1) are assigned to the SO4(2-) ν3 antisymmetric stretching vibration. Multiple Raman and infrared bands in the OH stretching region are assigned to the stretching vibrations of water. The higher wavenumber band at ∼3400 cm(-1) may be due to the hydroxyl stretching vibrational mode. These multiple bands prove that water is involved in different molecular environments with different hydrogen bond strengths. Vibrational spectroscopy enhances our knowledge of the molecular structure of rostite. PMID:26163784

  19. Telomerase Activation in Hematological Malignancies.

    PubMed

    Ropio, Joana; Merlio, Jean-Philippe; Soares, Paula; Chevret, Edith

    2016-01-01

    Telomerase expression and telomere maintenance are critical for cell proliferation and survival, and they play important roles in development and cancer, including hematological malignancies. Transcriptional regulation of the rate-limiting subunit of human telomerase reverse transcriptase gen (hTERT) is a complex process, and unveiling the mechanisms behind its reactivation is an important step for the development of diagnostic and therapeutic applications. Here, we review the main mechanisms of telomerase activation and the associated hematologic malignancies. PMID:27618103

  20. Hematologic Disorders: Anemia.

    PubMed

    Baltierra, David; Harper, Tiffany; Jones, Matthew Page; Nau, Konrad C

    2015-06-01

    Anemia occurs in up to 25% of the US population. Normal hemoglobin levels vary by race, sex, and age. Classification of anemia by mean corpuscular volume guides the differential diagnosis and evaluation. Iron studies, reticulocyte count, the red blood cell distribution width index, and blood test results are used to make the diagnosis. Iron deficiency anemia is the most common microcytic anemia and is managed with iron therapy. Parenteral iron is available when the oral route cannot be used. Patients who do not benefit from therapy should be evaluated for adherence, malabsorption, occult bleeding, systemic disease, or less common inherited disorders. A source of gastrointestinal bleeding is found in 60% to 70% of patients with iron deficiency anemia who are referred for endoscopy. Normocytic anemia has a broad differential, including nutritional deficiencies, blood loss, renal disease, malignancy (solid tumors or hematologic cancer), rheumatologic disorders, endocrine disorders, and other systemic diseases. Macrocytic anemias are seen with vitamin B12 and folate deficiency, alcohol use, thyroid disease, hydroxyurea, antiretroviral drugs, myelodysplastic syndromes, and myeloma. Oral vitamin B12 is underused, and can be as effective as intramuscular vitamin B12 in managing anemia due to vitamin B12 deficiency. PMID:26080453

  1. Morphological and chemical analysis of bainite in Cu-17Al-11Mn (at.%) alloys by using orthogonal FIB-SEM and double-EDS STEM.

    PubMed

    Motomura, Shunichi; Hara, Toru; Omori, Toshihiro; Kainuma, Ryosuke; Nishida, Minoru

    2016-06-01

    In this study, new microscopy techniques were developed for understanding the mechanism for the bainitic transformation in a Cu-17Al-11Mn (at%) alloy. An orthogonally arranged focused ion beam and a scanning electron microscope were employed to observe three-dimensional (3D) morphology of the bainite phase, in addition to compositional analysis by using a scanning transmission electron microscope equipped with a double-detector energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometer system. The 3D morphology of these samples was observed at different aging times and aging temperatures; the results obtained indicated that with increasing aging time and/or aging temperature, the bainite phase at the initial stage of formation exhibits a plate-like shape, which changes to a lenticular form. A habit plane was uniquely determined as ∼{9 3 2} by the combination of 3D image reconstruction and an electron back-scattered diffraction technique. The compositional analysis revealed the spatial distribution of the compositional variation between the bainite and matrix phases in the initial stages of the transformation. In the bainite phase, the Cu concentration was higher, while the concentrations of Al and Mn were lower than those in the surrounding matrix, indicative of the diffusion of the constituent elements with the growth of the bainite phase. PMID:26884617

  2. Hematologic and plasma biochemical values of Spix's macaws (Cyanopsitta spixii).

    PubMed

    Foldenauer, Ulrike; Borjal, Raffy Jim; Deb, Amrita; Arif, Abdi; Taha, Abid Sharif; Watson, Ryan William; Steinmetz, Hanspeter; Bürkle, Marcellus; Hammer, Sven

    2007-12-01

    The Spix's macaw (Cyanopsitta spixii) is considered the world's most endangered parrot, with the last wild bird disappearing in 2001 and only 74 birds in captivity. To establish hematologic and plasma biochemical reference ranges and to look for differences relative to sex, age, and season, we obtained blood samples from 46 captive Spix's macaws (23 male, 23 female) housed in aviaries at the Al Wabra Wildlife Preservation in the State of Qatar. No significant differences in hematologic or plasma biochemical values were found between females and males. Adult and juvenile birds differed in mean concentrations of glucose, total protein, amylase, cholesterol, and phosphorus; in percentages of heterophils and lymphocytes; and in the absolute lymphocyte count. Total protein, cholesterol, and phosphorus concentrations; hematocrit; and heterophil and lymphocyte counts differed significantly by season. Baseline hematologic and plasma biochemical ranges were established, which may be useful as reference values for clinicians working with this highly endangered species. PMID:18351006

  3. Fish hematology and associated disorders.

    PubMed

    Grant, Krystan R

    2015-01-01

    Fish health is a growing concern as pets, education, and aquaculture evolves. For the veterinary staff, fish handling, diagnostics, medicine, and surgery may require specialized training and equipment in comparison with terrestrial and arboreal animals, simply because of their aquatic nature and diversity. Fish hematology is one diagnostic tool that may not require additional equipment, may be inexpensive, and provide useful information in guiding treatment options. Challenges involving hematology may include handling and restraint, venipuncture, evaluation, and interpretation. In this article, strategies for these challenges are discussed for teleost (bony fish) and elasmobranch (cartilaginous fish) fish types. PMID:25421028

  4. Fish Hematology and Associated Disorders.

    PubMed

    Grant, Krystan R

    2015-09-01

    Fish health is a growing concern as pets, education, and aquaculture evolves. For the veterinary staff, fish handling, diagnostics, medicine, and surgery may require specialized training and equipment in comparison with terrestrial and arboreal animals, simply because of their aquatic nature and diversity. Fish hematology is one diagnostic tool that may not require additional equipment, may be inexpensive, and provide useful information in guiding treatment options. Challenges involving hematology may include handling and restraint, venipuncture, evaluation, and interpretation. In this article, strategies for these challenges are discussed for teleost (bony fish) and elasmobranch (cartilaginous fish) fish types. PMID:26297413

  5. 42 CFR 493.941 - Hematology (including routine hematology and coagulation).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Hematology (including routine hematology and coagulation). 493.941 Section 493.941 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF....941 Hematology (including routine hematology and coagulation). (a) Program content and frequency...

  6. 42 CFR 493.941 - Hematology (including routine hematology and coagulation).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Hematology (including routine hematology and coagulation). 493.941 Section 493.941 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF....941 Hematology (including routine hematology and coagulation). (a) Program content and frequency...

  7. 42 CFR 493.941 - Hematology (including routine hematology and coagulation).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Hematology (including routine hematology and coagulation). 493.941 Section 493.941 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF....941 Hematology (including routine hematology and coagulation). (a) Program content and frequency...

  8. 42 CFR 493.941 - Hematology (including routine hematology and coagulation).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Hematology (including routine hematology and coagulation). 493.941 Section 493.941 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF....941 Hematology (including routine hematology and coagulation). (a) Program content and frequency...

  9. ED, heal thyself.

    PubMed

    Becker, Nora V; Friedman, Ari B

    2014-02-01

    Emergency department (ED) wait times have continued to worsen despite receiving considerable attention for more than 2 decades and despite the availability of a variety of methods to restructure care in a more streamlined fashion. This article offers an economic framework that abstracts away from the details of operations research to understand the fundamental disincentives to improving wait times. Hospitals that reduce wait times are financially penalized if they must provide more uncompensated care as a result. Pending changes under the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act are considered. We find that the likely effect of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act's insurance expansion is to reduce this penalty for improving ED wait times. Consequently, mandating adoption of solutions to ED crowding may be unnecessary and counterproductive. If the insurance expansion is insufficient to fully solve the problem, the hospital value-based purchasing initiative should adopt wait times as a goal in its next iteration. PMID:24332901

  10. PREFACE: EDS2010 Preface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heggie, Malcolm I.

    2011-03-01

    The biennial international conference on Extended Defects in Semiconductors started in 1978 with a meeting in Hünfeld, Germany. Subsequent meetings rotated between Poland, France, Great Britain, Germany, Russia and Italy, culminating in EDS2004 in Chernogolovka, EDS2006 in Halle and EDS2008 in Poitiers. EDS2010 was held at the University of Sussex at Brighton, UK from September 19th to 24th. An extension of the tabulation of this history, which first appeared on the EDS2006 website, is given in the attached PDF. It is with sadness that we note one of the founders of the series, Prof. Dr Helmut Alexander, passed away on 3 December 2009 and we were proud to dedicate EDS2010 to his memory. It has become a tradition to make an award in his name, and this year it was made to Ivan Isacov for his poster "Electrical levels of dislocation networks in p- and n-type silicon". A short and warm celebration of Prof. Dr Alexander's life by his friends and colleagues, Prof. Drs Helmut Gottschalk, Eicke Weber and Wolfgang Schröter, is included in this volume. The conference was a forum for the state-of-the-art of investigation and modelling of extended defects in semiconductors. Scientists from universities, research institutes and industry made contributions to a deeper understanding of extended defects, their interaction with point defects and their role in the development of semiconductor technology. The remit of the conference included extended defects, nanostructures, nanoparticles, quantum dots and interfaces within semiconducting materials ranging from narrow to wide band gaps, including graphene-derived materials and diamond. Scientific interests range from defect geometry, electronic structure, dynamics, spectroscopy, microscopy, reactions and chemistry to introduction mechanisms, such as implantation and strained layers and the operation of devices such as integrated circuits, heterostructures, and solar cells. The organisers were confronted with a long period between

  11. 42 CFR 493.849 - Condition: Hematology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Condition: Hematology. 493.849 Section 493.849 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... These Tests § 493.849 Condition: Hematology. The specialty of hematology, for the purpose of...

  12. 42 CFR 493.1215 - Condition: Hematology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Condition: Hematology. 493.1215 Section 493.1215 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES....1215 Condition: Hematology. If the laboratory provides services in the specialty of Hematology,...

  13. Immunofixation -- urine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Benz Jr. EJ, Shattil SJ, et al., eds. Hematology: Basic Principles and Practice. 4th ed. Philadelphia, PA: ... Jr, Silberstein LE, Heslop HE, Weitz JI, eds. Hematology: Basic Principles and Practice . 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: ...

  14. Hematologic manifestations of celiac disease

    PubMed Central

    Halfdanarson, Thorvardur R.; Litzow, Mark R.; Murray, Joseph A.

    2007-01-01

    Celiac disease is a common systemic disorder that can have multiple hematologic manifestations. Patients with celiac disease may present to hematologists for evaluation of various hematologic problems prior to receiving a diagnosis of celiac disease. Anemia secondary to malabsorption of iron, folic acid, and/or vitamin B12 is a common complication of celiac disease and many patients have anemia at the time of diagnosis. Celiac disease may also be associated with thrombocytosis, thrombocytopenia, leukopenia, venous thromboembolism, hyposplenism, and IgA deficiency. Patients with celiac disease are at increased risk of being diagnosed with lymphoma, especially of the T-cell type. The risk is highest for enteropathy-type T-cell lymphoma (ETL) and B-cell lymphoma of the gut, but extraintestinal lymphomas can also be seen. ETL is an aggressive disease with poor prognosis, but strict adherence to a gluten-free diet may prevent its occurrence. PMID:16973955

  15. B-Cell Hematologic Malignancy Vaccination Registry

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-09-15

    Monoclonal Gammopathy of Undetermined Significance; Multiple Myeloma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia; Lymphocytosis; Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin; B-Cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Hematological Malignancies

  16. Edward (Ed) T. Schneider

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    Research Pilot Edward T. Schneider is shown sitting in the cockpit of a McDonnell Douglas F/A-18 Hornet that was used in the High Angle-of-Attack Research Vehicle (HARV) program at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Ames - Dryden Flight Research Facility. When the aircraft arrived at the Dryden Facility in 1987, from the US Naval Air Test Center, Patuxent River, Maryland, it consisted of parts in crates. The aircraft crew made an airplane from those parts, and in doing so they took a 'sow's ear' and created a 'silk purse', thus the name on the side of the aircraft. Ed's helmet is from his time in the Navy. The design was taken from the Flag that is flown on the bow of a Navy ship, referred to as the Jack, and is navy blue with the 50 States being represented by the white stars. Ed arrived at the NASA Ames-Dryden Flight Research Facility (later renamed the Dryden Flight Research Center) on July 5, 1982, as a Navy Liaison Officer, becoming a NASA research pilot one year later. Ed was the project pilot for the F-18 High Angle-of-Attack program and later served as a project pilot for the F-15 aeronautical research aircraft, the NASA B-52 launch aircraft, and the SR-71 'Blackbird' aircraft. He served on active duty with the U.S. Navy from 1968 to 1983. Following squadron service he graduated from the U.S. Naval Test Pilot School, Patuxent River, Maryland, in 1973, and then served as an engineering test pilot, and test pilot school instructor at the Naval Air Test Center. Ed has been an active member of the Society of Experimental Test Pilots since 1974. He was made a Fellow of the Society in 1993 and served as its President in 1993/94. In 1996 he was awarded the NASA Exceptional Service Medal and the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics' Chanute Flight Award. He retired as a NASA research pilot in September 2000.

  17. Clinical hematology of rodent species.

    PubMed

    Pilny, Anthony A

    2008-09-01

    Pet rodents, such as rats, guinea pigs, and chinchillas, differ from more traditional companion animal species in many aspects of their hematologic parameters. Animals within this order have much diversity in size, anatomy, methods of restraint, and blood collection technique. Appropriate sample collection is often the most challenging aspect of the diagnostic protocol, and inappropriate restraint may cause a stress response that interferes with blood test results. For many of these patients, sedation is required and can also affect results as well. In most cases, however, obtaining a standard database is necessary and very possible when providing medical care for this popular group of pets. PMID:18675732

  18. Epigenetics in the hematologic malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Fong, Chun Yew; Morison, Jessica; Dawson, Mark A.

    2014-01-01

    A wealth of genomic and epigenomic data has identified abnormal regulation of epigenetic processes as a prominent theme in hematologic malignancies. Recurrent somatic alterations in myeloid malignancies of key proteins involved in DNA methylation, post-translational histone modification and chromatin remodeling have highlighted the importance of epigenetic regulation of gene expression in the initiation and maintenance of various malignancies. The rational use of targeted epigenetic therapies requires a thorough understanding of the underlying mechanisms of malignant transformation driven by aberrant epigenetic regulators. In this review we provide an overview of the major protagonists in epigenetic regulation, their aberrant role in myeloid malignancies, prognostic significance and potential for therapeutic targeting. PMID:25472952

  19. Multiscale Modeling of Hematologic Disorders

    SciTech Connect

    Fedosov, Dmitry A.; Pivkin, Igor; Pan, Wenxiao; Dao, Ming; Caswell, Bruce; Karniadakis, George E.

    2012-01-28

    Parasitic infectious diseases and other hereditary hematologic disorders are often associated with major changes in the shape and viscoelastic properties of red blood cells (RBCs). Such changes can disrupt blood flow and even brain perfusion, as in the case of cerebral malaria. Modeling of these hematologic disorders requires a seamless multiscale approach, where blood cells and blood flow in the entire arterial tree are represented accurately using physiologically consistent parameters. In this chapter, we present a computational methodology based on dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) which models RBCs as well as whole blood in health and disease. DPD is a Lagrangian method that can be derived from systematic coarse-graining of molecular dynamics but can scale efficiently up to small arteries and can also be used to model RBCs down to spectrin level. To this end, we present two complementary mathematical models for RBCs and describe a systematic procedure on extracting the relevant input parameters from optical tweezers and microfluidic experiments for single RBCs. We then use these validated RBC models to predict the behavior of whole healthy blood and compare with experimental results. The same procedure is applied to modeling malaria, and results for infected single RBCs and whole blood are presented.

  20. Common hematological disorders in children.

    PubMed

    Bansal, Deepak; Totadri, Sidharth

    2014-01-01

    It is common for primary care physicians to be faced with children with hematological disorders in everyday practice. The article seeks to provide realistic information for the first-contact physician in handling common hematological diseases in children. Practical step-wise approach to understanding and investigating anemia and bleeding disorders is illustrated. Requirement of iron in normal children and management of iron deficiency anemia (IDA) and thalassemia is explained. The gold standard for IDA continues to be ferrous sulphate which has good bioavailability and is inexpensive. There is emerging concept of delayed clamping of umbilical cord at birth, particularly in regions with widespread IDA, to augment iron stores in infancy. Typical case scenarios of children with immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) and hemophilia are provided to facilitate the understanding of management in day to day practice. The vital role of the medical practitioner in shared care of patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia and febrile neutropenia is emphasized. A risk based treatment algorithm for febrile neutropenia is provided. PMID:23934100

  1. Rheumatic manifestations of hematologic disorders.

    PubMed

    Aviña-Zubieta, J A; Galindo-Rodriguez, G; Lavalle, C

    1998-01-01

    A review of the literature during the past year on rheumatic manifestations in hematologic diseases supports the idea that 80% of the hemorrhage in hemophilia occurs within the joints, with knees, elbows, and ankles being the most affected joints in adults. In contrast, the ankle is the target joint in children. Septic arthritis in hemophilic patients is becoming more important due to the advent of HIV infection. Radioactive synoviorthesis in hemarthrosis has the same rate of success as surgical synovectomy, but with far lower costs. A new study documents the association of arthritis and vasculitis in patients with myelodysplasic syndromes and lymphoproliferative disorders. An increased incidence of scoliosis in patients with beta-thalassemia has been noted. Finally, the effects of bone marrow transplantation in patients with previous autoimmune diseases is reviewed. Progression of rheumatoid arthritis after bone marrow transplantation is documented in a patient with 13 years of follow-up. Hematologic disorders in rheumatic diseases are not the topic of this review. PMID:9448995

  2. 42 CFR 493.851 - Standard; Hematology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Standard; Hematology. 493.851 Section 493.851... (CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION LABORATORY REQUIREMENTS Participation in Proficiency Testing for... These Tests § 493.851 Standard; Hematology. (a) Failure to attain a score of at least 80 percent...

  3. Hematology of infancy and childhood: Third edition

    SciTech Connect

    Nathan, D.G.; Oski, F.A.

    1987-01-01

    These two volumes consist of 14 sections, each containing several chapters. The section titles are: History, Neonatal Hematology, Bone Marrow Failure, Disorders of Erythrocyte Production, Hemolytic Anemias, Disorders of Hemoglobin, The Phagocyte System, The Immune System, Oncology, Storage Disease, Coagulation, Genetics, Transfusion Therapy, and Hematologic Manifestations of Systemic Diseases.

  4. Hematologic toxicity of immunosuppressive treatment.

    PubMed

    Danesi, R; Del Tacca, M

    2004-04-01

    The administration of immunosuppressive agents may be associated with the occurrence of hematologic toxicity, such as anemia, due to bone marrow suppression or hemolysis, leukopenia, and thrombocytopenia. The administration of azathioprine and mycophenolate mofetil is more frequently associated with bone marrow suppression, while hemolytic-uremic syndrome may occur after administration of cyclosporine, tacrolimus, or muromonab (OKT3) and may be associated with the loss of the allograft. Moreover, microangiopathic hemolytic anemia and thrombocytopenia are rare, but potentially severe, complications of immunosuppressive treatment with tacrolimus and cyclosporine; they are characterized by intravascular hemolysis due to mechanical destruction of red cells as a result of pathological changes in small blood vessels. Viral infections (cytomegalovirus), administration of antiviral agents (gancyclovir), inhibitors of angiotensin-converting enzyme and angiotensin II receptor antagonists, antibacterial agents (sulfamethoxazole and trimethoprim), and allopurinol may aggravate bone marrow suppression, particularly when administered with agents that interfere with purine biosynthesis, including azathioprine and mycophenolate mofetil. PMID:15110637

  5. Skylab experiment results: Hematology studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kimzey, S. L.; Ritzmann, S. E.; Mengel, C. E.; Fischer, C. L.

    1975-01-01

    Studies were conducted to evaluate specific aspects of man's immunologic and hematologic systems that might be altered by or respond to the space flight environment. Biochemical functions investigated included cytogenetic damage to blood cells, immune resistance to disease, regulation of plasma and red cell volumes, metabolic processes of the red blood cell, and physicochemical aspects of red blood cell function. Measurements of hematocrit value showed significant fluctuations postflight, reflecting observed changes in red cell mass and plasma volume. The capacity of lymphocytes to respond to an in vitro mitogenic challenge was repressed postflight, and appeared to be related to mission duration. Most other deviations from earth function in these systems were minor or transient.

  6. GATA-related hematologic disorders.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Ritsuko; Yamamoto, Masayuki

    2016-08-01

    The transcription factors GATA1 and GATA2 are fundamental regulators of hematopoiesis and have overlapping expression profiles. GATA2 is expressed in hematopoietic stem cells and early erythroid-megakaryocytic progenitors and activates a certain set of early-phase genes, including the GATA2 gene itself. GATA2 also initiates GATA1 gene expression. In contrast, GATA1 is expressed in relatively mature erythroid progenitors and facilitates the expression of genes associated with differentiation, including the GATA1 gene itself; however, GATA1 represses the expression of GATA2. Switching the GATA factors from GATA2 to GATA1 appears to be one of the key regulatory mechanisms underlying erythroid differentiation. Loss-of-function analyses using mice in vivo have indicated that GATA2 and GATA1 are functionally nonredundant and that neither can compensate for the absence of the other. However, transgenic expression of GATA2 under the transcriptional regulation of the Gata1 gene rescues lethal dyserythropoiesis in GATA1-deficient mice, illustrating that the dynamic expression profiles of these GATA factors are critically important for the maintenance of hematopoietic homeostasis. Analysis of naturally occurring leukemias in GATA1-knockdown mice revealed that leukemic stem cells undergo functional alterations in response to exposure to chemotherapeutic agents. This mechanism may also underlie the aggravating features of relapsing leukemias. Recent hematologic analyses have suggested that disturbances in the balance of the GATA factors are associated with specific types of hematopoietic disorders. Here, we describe GATA1- and GATA2-related hematologic diseases, focusing on the regulation of GATA factor gene expression. PMID:27235756

  7. Zebrafish in hematology: sushi or science?

    PubMed Central

    Carradice, Duncan

    2008-01-01

    After a decade of the “modern era” of zebrafish hematology research, what have been their major contributions to hematology and what challenges does the model face? This review argues that, in hematology, zebrafish have demonstrated their suitability, are proving their utility, have supplied timely and novel discoveries, and are poised for further significant contributions. It presents an overview of the anatomy, physiology, and genetics of zebrafish hematopoiesis underpinning their use in hematology research. Whereas reverse genetic techniques enable functional studies of particular genes of interest, forward genetics remains zebrafish's particular strength. Mutants with diverse and interesting hematopoietic defects are emerging from multiple genetic screens. Some mutants model hereditary blood diseases, occasionally leading to disease genes first; others provide insights into developmental hematology. Models of malignant hematologic disorders provide tools for drug-target and pharmaceutics discovery. Numerous transgenic zebrafish with fluorescently marked blood cells enable live-cell imaging of inflammatory responses and host-pathogen interactions previously inaccessible to direct observation in vivo, revealing unexpected aspects of leukocyte behavior. Zebrafish disease models almost uniquely provide a basis for efficient whole animal chemical library screens for new therapeutics. Despite some limitations and challenges, their successes and discovery potential mean that zebrafish are here to stay in hematology research. PMID:18182572

  8. Rebooting the EdD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wergin, Jon F.

    2011-01-01

    In this essay, Jon Wergin reminds readers of the philosophical and historical foundations of the doctor of education (EdD) degree. He argues that the EdD should be based, in large part, on John Dewey's progressive ideals of democratization and Paulo Freire's concepts of emancipatory education. Drawing on theories of reflective practice,…

  9. What Is Ag-Ed?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindley, Judy

    Ag-Ed is an agricultural education project aimed at upper primary students, held in conjunction with the Toowoomba Show (similar to a county fair) in Queensland, Australia. The program achieves its purpose of helping children understand the impact and relevance that agriculture has on their everyday lives through two components, an Ag-Ed day and a…

  10. Current Role of Genetics in Hematologic Malignancies.

    PubMed

    Prakash, Gaurav; Kaur, Anupriya; Malhotra, Pankaj; Khadwal, Alka; Sharma, Prashant; Suri, Vikas; Varma, Neelam; Varma, Subhash

    2016-03-01

    Rapidly changing field of genetic technology and its application in the management of hematological malignancies has brought significant improvement in treatment and outcome of these disorders. Today, genetics plays pivotal role in diagnosis and prognostication of most hematologic neoplasms. The utilization of genetic tests in deciding specific treatment of various hematologic malignancies as well as for evaluation of depth of treatment response is rapidly advancing. Therefore, it is imperative for practitioners working in the field of hemato-oncology to have sufficient understanding of the basic concepts of genetics in order to comprehend upcoming molecular research in this area and to translate the same for patient care. PMID:26855503

  11. American Society of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2016 Engage with ASPHO and benefit from the Society’s professional development, education, and networking resources! Read More » ... Career Center Mentoring Funding Compensation Survey © The American Society of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology 8735 W. Higgins Road, ...

  12. DCB - Cancer Immunology, Hematology, and Etiology Research

    Cancer.gov

    Part of NCI’s Division of Cancer Biology’s research portfolio, studies supported include the characterization of basic mechanisms relevant to anti-tumor immune responses and hematologic malignancies.

  13. Common hematologic problems in the newborn nursery.

    PubMed

    Watchko, Jon F

    2015-04-01

    "Common red blood cell disorders encountered in the normal newborn nursery include hemolytic disease of the newborn and resultant hyperbilirubinemia, anemia, and polycythemia. A less frequent clinically relevant hematologic issue in newborns to be covered herein is thrombocytopenia." PMID:25836711

  14. Cancer associated fibroblasts in hematological malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Raffaghello, Lizzia; Vacca, Angelo; Pistoia, Vito; Ribatti, Domenico

    2015-01-01

    Tumor microenvironment plays an important role in cancer initiation and progression. In hematological malignancies, the bone marrow represents the paradigmatic anatomical site in which tumor microenvironment expresses its morphofunctional features. Among the cells participating in the composition of this microenvironment, cancer associated fibrobasts (CAFs) have received less attention in hematopoietic tumors compared to solid cancers. In this review article, we discuss the involvement of CAFs in progression of hematological malignancies and the potential targeting of CAFs in a therapeutic perspective. PMID:25474039

  15. Novel immunotherapies for hematological malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Michelle H.; Paulos, Chrystal M.

    2014-01-01

    Summary The immune system is designed to discriminate between self and tumor tissue. Through genetic recombination, there is fundamentally no limit to the number of tumor antigens that immune cells can recognize. Yet, tumors use a variety of immunosuppressive mechanisms to evade immunity. Insight into how the immune system interacts with tumors is expanding rapidly and has accelerated the translation of immunotherapies into medical breakthroughs. Herein, we appraise the state of the art in immunotherapy with a focus on strategies that exploit the patient’s immune system to kill cancer. We review various forms of immune-based therapies, which have shown significant promise in patients with hematological malignancies, including (i) conventional monoclonal therapies like rituximab, (ii) engineered monoclonal antibodies called bispecific T cell engagers (BiTEs), (iii) monoclonal antibodies and pharmaceutical drugs that block inhibitory T-cell pathways (i.e. PD-1, CTLA-4 and IDO), and (iv) adoptive cell transfer (ACT) therapy with T cells engineered to express chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) or T-cell receptors (TCRs). We also assess the idea of using these therapies in combination and conclude by suggesting multi-prong approaches to improve treatment outcomes and curative responses in patients. PMID:25510273

  16. Hematologic responses to hypobaric hyperoxia.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larkin, E. C.; Adams, J. D.; Williams, W. T.; Duncan, D. M.

    1972-01-01

    Study of the effects of hypoxia, activity, and G forces on human hematopoiesis in an attempt to elucidate these phenomena more precisely. Eight subjects were exposed to an atmosphere of 100% O2 at 258 mm Hg for 30 days, and thereafter immediately exposed to transverse G forces, simulating the Gemini flights' reentry profile. All subjects displayed a significant continuous decline in red cell mass during the exposure period, as measured by the carbon monoxide-dilution method. The Cr51 method also indicated a decline in red blood corpuscle mass. The decrease in red cell mass was due to suppression of erythropoiesis and to hemolysis. After exposure to hyperoxia, all subjects exhibited elevated plasma hemoglobin levels, decreased reticulocyte counts, and decreased red cell survivals. CO production rates and urine erythropoietin levels were unchanged. Two hours after termination of exposure to hyperoxia, all subjects exhibited increased reticulocyte counts which were sustained for longer than two weeks. The progressive decrease in red cell mass was promptly arrested on return to ground level atmospheres. Within 116 days after exposure to hyperoxia, the hematologic parameters of all eight subjects had returned to control levels.

  17. Novel immunotherapies for hematologic malignancies.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Michelle H; Paulos, Chrystal M

    2015-01-01

    The immune system is designed to discriminate between self and tumor tissue. Through genetic recombination, there is fundamentally no limit to the number of tumor antigens that immune cells can recognize. Yet, tumors use a variety of immunosuppressive mechanisms to evade immunity. Insight into how the immune system interacts with tumors is expanding rapidly and has accelerated the translation of immunotherapies into medical breakthroughs. Herein, we appraise novel strategies that exploit the patient's immune system to kill cancer. We review various forms of immune-based therapies, which have shown significant promise in patients with hematologic malignancies, including (i) conventional monoclonal therapies like rituximab; (ii) engineered monoclonal antibodies called bispecific T-cell engagers; (iii) monoclonal antibodies and pharmaceutical drugs that block inhibitory T-cell pathways (i.e. PD-1, CTLA-4, and IDO); and (iv) adoptive cell transfer therapy with T cells engineered to express chimeric antigen receptors or T-cell receptors. We also assess the idea of using these therapies in combination and conclude by suggesting multi-prong approaches to improve treatment outcomes and curative responses in patients. PMID:25510273

  18. Invasive Aspergillosis in Hematological Patients.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Shun-Ichi

    2016-01-01

    Invasive aspergillosis (IA) is still one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in hematological patients, although its outcome has been improving. Prolonged and profound neutropenia in patients receiving intensive chemotherapy for acute leukemia and stem cell transplantation is a major risk factor for IA. Allogeneic stem cell transplant recipients with graft-versus-host disease and corticosteroid use are also at high risk. Management in a protective environment with high efficiency particular air (HEPA) filter is generally recommended to prevent aspergillosis in patients with prolonged and profound neutropenia. Antifungal prophylaxis against Aspergillus species should be considered in patients with past history of aspergillosis or colonization of Aspergillus species, at facilities with high incidence of IA and those without a protective environment. Early diagnosis and prompt antifungal treatment is important to improve outcome. Imaging studies such as computed tomography and biomarkers such as galactomannan antigen and β-D-glucan are useful for early diagnosis. Empirical antifungal treatment based on persistent or recurrent fever during neutropenia despite broad-spectrum antibiotic therapy is generally recommended in high-risk patients. Alternatively, a preemptive treatment strategy has recently been proposed in the context of progress in the early diagnosis of IA based on the results of imaging studies and biomarkers. Voriconazole is recommended for initial therapy for IA. Liposomal amphotericin B is considered as alternative initial therapy. Combination antifungal therapy of echinocandin with voriconazole or liposomal amphotericin B could be a choice for refractory cases. PMID:27251320

  19. Structure of catalase determined by MicroED.

    PubMed

    Nannenga, Brent L; Shi, Dan; Hattne, Johan; Reyes, Francis E; Gonen, Tamir

    2014-01-01

    MicroED is a recently developed method that uses electron diffraction for structure determination from very small three-dimensional crystals of biological material. Previously we used a series of still diffraction patterns to determine the structure of lysozyme at 2.9 Å resolution with MicroED (Shi et al., 2013). Here we present the structure of bovine liver catalase determined from a single crystal at 3.2 Å resolution by MicroED. The data were collected by continuous rotation of the sample under constant exposure and were processed and refined using standard programs for X-ray crystallography. The ability of MicroED to determine the structure of bovine liver catalase, a protein that has long resisted atomic analysis by traditional electron crystallography, demonstrates the potential of this method for structure determination. PMID:25303172

  20. Effects of Using a Neuroeducational Intervention to Enhance Perseverance for Online EdD and EdS Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cadle, Charles R.

    2013-01-01

    Developing and maintaining a "completion mindset" is a necessary mental condition for online educational doctorate (EdD) and educational specialist (EdS) students to obtain their advanced degrees. The purpose of this research study was to examine the effect of a neuroeducational intervention on a volunteer convenience sample of EdD and…

  1. The European Hematology Association Roadmap for European Hematology Research: a consensus document

    PubMed Central

    Engert, Andreas; Balduini, Carlo; Brand, Anneke; Coiffier, Bertrand; Cordonnier, Catherine; Döhner, Hartmut; de Wit, Thom Duyvené; Eichinger, Sabine; Fibbe, Willem; Green, Tony; de Haas, Fleur; Iolascon, Achille; Jaffredo, Thierry; Rodeghiero, Francesco; Salles, Gilles; Schuringa, Jan Jacob

    2016-01-01

    The European Hematology Association (EHA) Roadmap for European Hematology Research highlights major achievements in diagnosis and treatment of blood disorders and identifies the greatest unmet clinical and scientific needs in those areas to enable better funded, more focused European hematology research. Initiated by the EHA, around 300 experts contributed to the consensus document, which will help European policy makers, research funders, research organizations, researchers, and patient groups make better informed decisions on hematology research. It also aims to raise public awareness of the burden of blood disorders on European society, which purely in economic terms is estimated at €23 billion per year, a level of cost that is not matched in current European hematology research funding. In recent decades, hematology research has improved our fundamental understanding of the biology of blood disorders, and has improved diagnostics and treatments, sometimes in revolutionary ways. This progress highlights the potential of focused basic research programs such as this EHA Roadmap. The EHA Roadmap identifies nine ‘sections’ in hematology: normal hematopoiesis, malignant lymphoid and myeloid diseases, anemias and related diseases, platelet disorders, blood coagulation and hemostatic disorders, transfusion medicine, infections in hematology, and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. These sections span 60 smaller groups of diseases or disorders. The EHA Roadmap identifies priorities and needs across the field of hematology, including those to develop targeted therapies based on genomic profiling and chemical biology, to eradicate minimal residual malignant disease, and to develop cellular immunotherapies, combination treatments, gene therapies, hematopoietic stem cell treatments, and treatments that are better tolerated by elderly patients. PMID:26819058

  2. The European Hematology Association Roadmap for European Hematology Research: a consensus document.

    PubMed

    Engert, Andreas; Balduini, Carlo; Brand, Anneke; Coiffier, Bertrand; Cordonnier, Catherine; Döhner, Hartmut; de Wit, Thom Duyvené; Eichinger, Sabine; Fibbe, Willem; Green, Tony; de Haas, Fleur; Iolascon, Achille; Jaffredo, Thierry; Rodeghiero, Francesco; Salles, Gilles; Schuringa, Jan Jacob

    2016-02-01

    The European Hematology Association (EHA) Roadmap for European Hematology Research highlights major achievements in diagnosis and treatment of blood disorders and identifies the greatest unmet clinical and scientific needs in those areas to enable better funded, more focused European hematology research. Initiated by the EHA, around 300 experts contributed to the consensus document, which will help European policy makers, research funders, research organizations, researchers, and patient groups make better informed decisions on hematology research. It also aims to raise public awareness of the burden of blood disorders on European society, which purely in economic terms is estimated at €23 billion per year, a level of cost that is not matched in current European hematology research funding. In recent decades, hematology research has improved our fundamental understanding of the biology of blood disorders, and has improved diagnostics and treatments, sometimes in revolutionary ways. This progress highlights the potential of focused basic research programs such as this EHA Roadmap.The EHA Roadmap identifies nine 'sections' in hematology: normal hematopoiesis, malignant lymphoid and myeloid diseases, anemias and related diseases, platelet disorders, blood coagulation and hemostatic disorders, transfusion medicine, infections in hematology, and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. These sections span 60 smaller groups of diseases or disorders.The EHA Roadmap identifies priorities and needs across the field of hematology, including those to develop targeted therapies based on genomic profiling and chemical biology, to eradicate minimal residual malignant disease, and to develop cellular immunotherapies, combination treatments, gene therapies, hematopoietic stem cell treatments, and treatments that are better tolerated by elderly patients. PMID:26819058

  3. What Is Ag-Ed?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Linley, Judy; Mylne, Lee

    1998-01-01

    Ag-Ed, an agricultural education project for upper elementary students, was held in conjunction with the Toowoomba Show in Queensland, Australia. Agriculture industry representatives provided 20 interactive agricultural presentations for class groups, which were supplemented with a teacher resource-package containing a directory and 13 sections of…

  4. 21 CFR 864.8625 - Hematology quality control mixture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Hematology quality control mixture. 864.8625 Section 864.8625 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Reagents § 864.8625...

  5. 21 CFR 864.8625 - Hematology quality control mixture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Hematology quality control mixture. 864.8625 Section 864.8625 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Reagents § 864.8625...

  6. 21 CFR 864.8625 - Hematology quality control mixture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Hematology quality control mixture. 864.8625 Section 864.8625 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Reagents § 864.8625...

  7. 21 CFR 864.8625 - Hematology quality control mixture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Hematology quality control mixture. 864.8625 Section 864.8625 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Reagents § 864.8625...

  8. 21 CFR 864.8625 - Hematology quality control mixture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Hematology quality control mixture. 864.8625 Section 864.8625 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Reagents § 864.8625...

  9. Gene and virotherapy for hematological malignancies.

    PubMed

    Domingo-Musibay, Evidio; Yamamoto, Masato

    2016-07-01

    Recent years have seen a transformation in the treatment of hematological malignancies. Advances in gene therapy and molecular techniques and significant gains in computational abilities have supported the rapid development of safer and better tolerated therapies for many patients with hematologic cancers. In this review, we discuss novel applications of gene therapy, including immunomodulation and gene silencing, and report on the rise of oncolytic viruses for use in the treatment of malignancies arising in cells of the blood, lymph, and marrow. We discuss the relationship of the tropism of wildtype viruses and their oncolytic behavior as well as the tumoricidal and immunostimulatory properties of a number of attenuated and recombinant viruses currently in clinical development in countries around the world. While we have focused on promising virotherapy applications for future development, we also present a historical perspective and identify areas of potential clinical and regulatory practice change. We outline several of the virus systems being developed for applications in hematology, and summarize efficacy data in the context of ongoing or future human clinical testing. We also present the advantages and limitations of gene and virus therapy, including challenges and opportunities for improved treatment tolerability and outcomes for patients with hematologic malignancies. PMID:27289361

  10. Allo HSCT Using RIC for Hematological Diseases

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-01-20

    Acute Myelogenous Leukemia; Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Plasma Cell Leukemia; Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; B-Cell Lymphoma; Follicular Lymphoma; Lymphoplasmacytic Lymphoma; Mantle-Cell Lymphoma; Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Burkitt's Lymphoma; Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma; Multiple Myeloma; Myeloproliferative Syndromes; Hematological Diseases

  11. A hematologic survey of captive waterfowl

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shave, H.J.; Howard, V.

    1976-01-01

    Hematologic parameters were studied in giant Canada geese (Branta canadensis maxima), mallard ducks (Anas platyrhynchos platyrhynchos) and various species of diving ducks at seasonal intervals throughout the year. Highest values for packed cell volume, hemoglobin content and erythrocyte counts were found in the winter and pre-nesting periods. Mean corpuscular volume and mean corpuscular hemoglobin varied inversely with these values.

  12. Overview of Deployed EDS Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Martz, H E; Crawford, C

    2009-09-24

    The term explosive detection system (EDS) is used by the TSA to describe equipment that is certified to detect explosives in checked bags. The EDS, as certified, by the TSL must consist of device for interrogating a bag and an automated detection algorithm (ATD) for evaluating the results of the interrogation. We only consider CT as the interrogation device in this report. A schematic drawing of a CT-based EDS is shown in Figure 2. The output of the ATD is the binary decision of alarm or non-alarm. Alarms may true- or false-positives. Non-alarms may be true- or false-negatives. False positives are also denoted false alarms. The true detection means that the ATD reports an alarm when a threat is present in the scanned bag. The probability of detecting a threat given that a threat is present is denoted the probability of detection (PD). The probability of false alarm (PFA) is the case when an alarm is reported when a threat is not present in a bag. Certification in this context means passing tests for PD and PFA at the TSL. The results of the EDS include CT cross-sectional images of the bag and specifics about the alarmed objects generated by ATD. These results are presented on a display so that a person may override the decision of ATD and declare the alarm to be a non-alarm. This process is denoted clearing. Bags that are not cleared by the person are sent to a secondary inspection process. Here the bags may be opened or assessed with explosive trace detection (ETD) in order to clear the bags. Bags that are not cleared at this point are evaluated by an ordinance disposal team. The CT scanner along with ATD is denoted Level 1 screening. The process of clearing on a display is denoted Level 2 screening. Secondary inspection is denoted Level 3 screening. Vendors of the deployed EDSs supply the TSA with equipment for all three levels. Therefore, the term EDS may include the equipment provided for Levels 1, 2 and 3. A schematic diagram of an EDS and the levels of

  13. High-Resolution Macromolecular Structure Determination by MicroED, a cryo-EM Method.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, J A; Gonen, T

    2016-01-01

    Microelectron diffraction (MicroED) is a new cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) method capable of determining macromolecular structures at atomic resolution from vanishingly small 3D crystals. MicroED promises to solve atomic resolution structures from even the tiniest of crystals, less than a few hundred nanometers thick. MicroED complements frontier advances in crystallography and represents part of the rebirth of cryo-EM that is making macromolecular structure determination more accessible for all. Here we review the concept and practice of MicroED, for both the electron microscopist and crystallographer. Where other reviews have addressed specific details of the technique (Hattne et al., 2015; Shi et al., 2016; Shi, Nannenga, Iadanza, & Gonen, 2013), we aim to provide context and highlight important features that should be considered when performing a MicroED experiment. PMID:27572734

  14. Redesigning physician compensation and improving ED performance.

    PubMed

    Finkelstein, Jeff; Lifton, James; Capone, Claudio

    2011-06-01

    Redesigning a physician compensation system in the emergency department (ED) should include goals of improving quality, productivity, and patient satisfaction. Tips for hospital administrators: A contemporary ED information system is needed to ensure that the ED is essentially a paperless operation. Transparency, internally and externally, is essential. ED physicians should perform as individuals, yet as members of a team. Incentives, especially incentive compensation, should strike a balance between individual and team performance. PMID:21692383

  15. Pretargeted Radioimmunotherapy for Hematologic and Other Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Press, Oliver W.; Pagel, John M.

    2010-01-01

    Summation Radioimmunotherapy (RIT) has emerged as one of the most promising treatment options, particularly for hematologic malignancies. However, this approach has generally been limited by a suboptimal therapeutic index (target-to-nontarget ratio) and an inability to deliver sufficient radiation doses to tumors selectively. Pretargeted RIT (PRIT) circumvents these limitations by separating the targeting vehicle from the subsequently administered therapeutic radioisotope, which binds to the tumor-localized antibody or is quickly excreted if unbound. A growing number of preclinical proof-of-principle studies demonstrate that PRIT is feasible and safe and provides improved directed radionuclide delivery to malignant cells compared with conventional RIT while sparing normal cells from nonspecific radiotoxicity. Early phase clinical studies corroborate these preclinical findings and suggest better efficacy and lesser toxicities in patients with hematologic and other malignancies. With continued research, PRIT-based treatment strategies promise to become cornerstones to improved outcomes for cancer patients despite their complexities. PMID:20423225

  16. Hematologic malignancies during pregnancy: A review.

    PubMed

    Mahmoud, Hossam K; Samra, Mohamed A; Fathy, Gamal M

    2016-07-01

    Malignancy is the second most common cause of mortality in the reproductive period and it complicates up to one out of every 1000 pregnancies. When cancer is diagnosed during pregnancy, the management approach must take into consideration both the mother and her fetus. Hematologic cancers diagnosed in pregnancy are not common, resulting in paucity of randomized controlled trials. Diagnosis of such malignancies may be missed or delayed, as their symptoms are similar to those encountered during normal pregnancy. Also, many imaging studies may be hazardous during pregnancy. Management of these malignancies during pregnancy induces many treatment-related risks for mother and baby and should consider patient's preferences for pregnancy continuation. In this article, hematologic malignancies diagnosed in pregnant patients including acute leukemias, chronic myeloid leukemia, lymphomas, multiple myeloma and myeloproliferative neoplasms, will be reviewed, including diagnostic and management strategies and their impact on the pregnant patient and the developing fetus. PMID:27408762

  17. Classification of hematologic malignancies using texton signatures.

    PubMed

    Tuzel, Oncel; Yang, Lin; Meer, Peter; Foran, David J

    2007-10-01

    We describe a decision support system to distinguish among hematology cases directly from microscopic specimens. The system uses an image database containing digitized specimens from normal and four different hematologic malignancies. Initially, the nuclei and cytoplasmic components of the specimens are segmented using a robust color gradient vector flow active contour model. Using a few cell images from each class, the basic texture elements (textons) for the nuclei and cytoplasm are learned, and the cells are represented through texton histograms. We propose to use support vector machines on the texton histogram based cell representation and achieve major improvement over the commonly used classification methods in texture research. Experiments with 3,691 cell images from 105 patients which originated from four different hospitals indicate more than 84% classification performance for individual cells and 89% for case based classification for the five class problem. PMID:19890460

  18. Vaccinations in patients with hematological malignancies.

    PubMed

    Tsigrelis, C; Ljungman, P

    2016-03-01

    Patients with hematological malignancies are at risk for a number of infections that are potentially preventable by vaccinations such as pneumococcal infections and influenza. Treatment, especially with anti-B-cell antibodies and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), negatively impacts the response to vaccination for several months. It is therefore recommended that patients be vaccinated before initiating immunosuppressive therapy if possible. The risk of side-effects with inactivated vaccines is low, but care has to be taken with live vaccines, such as varicella-zoster virus vaccine, since severe and fatal complications have been reported. HSCT patients require repeated doses of most vaccines to achieve long-lasting immune responses. New therapeutic options for patients with hematological malignancies that are rapidly being introduced into clinical practice will require additional research regarding the efficacy of vaccinations. New vaccines are also in development that will require well-designed studies to ascertain efficacy and safety. PMID:26602587

  19. Imaging of Spinal Manifestations of Hematological Disorders.

    PubMed

    Pawha, Puneet S; Chokshi, Falgun H

    2016-08-01

    Imaging manifestations of hematological diseases and their potential complications are broad, and there may be significant overlap in features of various disease processes. Knowledge of appropriate choice of imaging test, pertinent imaging patterns, and pathophysiology of disease can help the reader increase specificity in the diagnosis and treatment of the patient. Most importantly, we encourage readers of this review to engage their radiologists during the diagnostic, treatment, and management phases of care delivery. PMID:27444004

  20. Anemia of chronic disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Benz EJ Jr, Silberstein LE, et al, eds. Hematology: Basic Principles and Practice . 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: ... 2/1/2016 Updated by: Todd Gersten, MD, Hematology/Oncology, Florida Cancer Specialists & Research Institute, Wellington, FL. ...

  1. Hematologic manifestations of Helicobacter pylori infection

    PubMed Central

    Campuzano-Maya, Germán

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is the most common infection in humans, with a marked disparity between developed and developing countries. Although H. pylori infections are asymptomatic in most infected individuals, they are intimately related to malignant gastric conditions such as gastric cancer and gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma and to benign diseases such as gastritis and duodenal and gastric peptic ulcers. Since it was learned that bacteria could colonize the gastric mucosa, there have been reports in the medical literature of over 50 extragastric manifestations involving a variety medical areas of specialization. These areas include cardiology, dermatology, endocrinology, gynecology and obstetrics, hematology, pneumology, odontology, ophthalmology, otorhinolaryngology and pediatrics, and they encompass conditions with a range of clear evidence between the H. pylori infection and development of the disease. This literature review covers extragastric manifestations of H. pylori infection in the hematology field. It focuses on conditions that are included in international consensus and management guides for H. pylori infection, specifically iron deficiency, vitamin B12 (cobalamin) deficiency, immune thrombocytopenia, and MALT lymphoma. In addition, there is discussion of other conditions that are not included in international consensus and management guides on H. pylori, including auto-immune neutropenia, antiphospholipid syndrome, plasma cell dyscrasias, and other hematologic diseases. PMID:25278680

  2. Pulmonary disease in patients with hematologic malignancies.

    PubMed

    Poletti, Venerino; Trisolini, Rocco; Tura, Sante

    2002-03-01

    Patients with hematologic neoplasms frequently experience pulmonary disease. The possibility of a malignant involvement of the lung parenchyma is a well recognized and not unusual event, secondary spread due to lymphoproliferative disorders being the most common situation. Furthermore, the development and the advances in treatment options such as hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, radiation therapy and/or combined drug regimen use have significantly widened the spectrum of non-neoplastic pulmonary complications that can crop up in these patients. Infections, drug/radiation-induced toxicity, and graft-versus-host disease (GVHD)-related complications account by now for most pulmonary problems in hematologic patients and represent a difficult challenge both in diagnostic and in therapeutic terms for the clinician. The aim of this review is to highlight the clinicopathologic spectrum of lung diseases which can occur in the setting of hematologic malignancies. A particular emphasis is devoted to the diagnostic approach, high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) assuming a key role since different patterns of CT abnormalities are associated with a different yield of the available diagnostic tools and may help in narrowing the differential diagnosis. PMID:12002382

  3. Fertility issues in patients with hematologic malignancies.

    PubMed

    Loren, Alison W

    2015-01-01

    An essential component of a cancer patient's comprehensive care is addressing potential threats to his or her reproductive health. Providers should discuss the risk of infertility with newly diagnosed patients and offer the chance to consult with a reproductive specialist as early as possible. Standard fertility preservation options include embryo or oocyte cryopreservation for women and sperm banking for men; all options for pre-pubertal children are experimental. Patients with hematologic malignancies are a distinct population in whom standard options may present special challenges, and alternative management strategies are being explored. Unique approaches in hematologic malignancy patients include experimental techniques, such as hormonal therapy, referrals to reproductive specialists after cancer treatment, or discontinuation of tyrosine kinase inhibitor therapy in appropriate chronic myelogenous leukemia patients. Importantly, expedited communication between hematologists and reproductive specialists may greatly enhance the quality of care for these patients. Facilitation of referrals will both improve the quality-of-life and expand the prospect of parenthood in survivors. There are ample opportunities to advance the field of oncofertility through additional research, especially in hematologic malignancy patients. PMID:26637713

  4. Role of Extracellular Vesicles in Hematological Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Raimondo, Stefania; Corrado, Chiara; Raimondi, Lavinia; De Leo, Giacomo; Alessandro, Riccardo

    2015-01-01

    In recent years the role of tumor microenvironment in the progression of hematological malignancies has been widely recognized. Recent studies have focused on how cancer cells communicate within the microenvironment. Among several factors (cytokines, growth factors, and ECM molecules), a key role has been attributed to extracellular vesicles (EV), released from different cell types. EV (microvesicles and exosomes) may affect stroma remodeling, host cell functions, and tumor angiogenesis by inducing gene expression modulation in target cells, thus promoting cancer progression and metastasis. Microvesicles and exosomes can be recovered from the blood and other body fluids of cancer patients and contain and deliver genetic and proteomic contents that reflect the cell of origin, thus constituting a source of new predictive biomarkers involved in cancer development and serving as possible targets for therapies. Moreover, due to their specific cell-tropism and bioavailability, EV can be considered natural vehicles suitable for drug delivery. Here we will discuss the recent advances in the field of EV as actors in hematological cancer progression, pointing out the role of these vesicles in the tumor-host interplay and in their use as biomarkers for hematological malignancies. PMID:26583135

  5. Preclinical Medical Student Hematology/Oncology Education Environment.

    PubMed

    Zumberg, Marc S; Broudy, Virginia C; Bengtson, Elizabeth M; Gitlin, Scott D

    2015-12-01

    To better prepare medical students to care for patients in today's changing health-care environment as they transition to continuing their education as residents, many US medical schools have been reviewing and modifying their curricula and are considering integration of newer adult learning techniques, including team-based learning, flipped classrooms, and other active learning approaches (Assoc Am Med Coll. 2014). Directors of hematology/oncology (H/O) courses requested an assessment of today's H/O education environment to help them respond to the ongoing changes in the education content and environment that will be necessary to meet this goal. Several recommendations for the improvement of cancer education resulted from American Association for Cancer Education's (ACCE's) "Cancer Education Survey II" including a call for medical schools to evaluate the effectiveness of current teaching methods in achieving cancer education objectives (Chamberlain et al. J Cancer Educ 7(2):105-114.2014). To understand the current environment and resources used in medical student preclinical H/O courses, an Internet-based, Survey Monkey®-formatted, questionnaire focusing on nine topic areas was distributed to 130 United States Hematology/Oncology Course Directors (HOCDs). HOCDs represent a diverse group of individuals who work in variably supportive environments and who are variably satisfied with their position. Several aspects of these courses remain relatively unchanged from previous assessments, including a predominance of traditional lectures, small group sessions, and examinations that are either written or computer-based. Newer technology, including web-based reproduction of lectures, virtual microscopes, and availability of additional web-based content has been introduced into these courses. A variety of learner evaluation and course assessment approaches are used. The ultimate effectiveness and impact of these changes needs to be determined. PMID:25637457

  6. Verification and quality control of routine hematology analyzers.

    PubMed

    Vis, J Y; Huisman, A

    2016-05-01

    Verification of hematology analyzers (automated blood cell counters) is mandatory before new hematology analyzers may be used in routine clinical care. The verification process consists of several items which comprise among others: precision, accuracy, comparability, carryover, background and linearity throughout the expected range of results. Yet, which standard should be met or which verification limit be used is at the discretion of the laboratory specialist. This paper offers practical guidance on verification and quality control of automated hematology analyzers and provides an expert opinion on the performance standard that should be met by the contemporary generation of hematology analyzers. Therefore (i) the state-of-the-art performance of hematology analyzers for complete blood count parameters is summarized, (ii) considerations, challenges, and pitfalls concerning the development of a verification plan are discussed, (iii) guidance is given regarding the establishment of reference intervals, and (iv) different methods on quality control of hematology analyzers are reviewed. PMID:27161194

  7. Hematology of healthy Florida manatees (Trichechus manatus)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harvey, J.W.; Harr, K.E.; Murphy, D.; Walsh, M.T.; Nolan, E.C.; Bonde, R.K.; Pate, M.G.; Deutsch, C.J.; Edwards, H.H.; Clapp, W.L.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Hematologic analysis is an important tool in evaluating the general health status of free-ranging manatees and in the diagnosis and monitoring of rehabilitating animals. Objectives: The purpose of this study was to evaluate diagnostically important hematologic analytes in healthy manatees (Trichechus manatus) and to assess variations with respect to location (free ranging vs captive), age class (small calves, large calves, subadults, and adults), and gender. Methods: Blood was collected from 55 free-ranging and 63 captive healthy manatees. Most analytes were measured using a CELL-DYN 3500R; automated reticulocytes were measured with an ADVIA 120. Standard manual methods were used for differential leukocyte counts, reticulocyte and Heinz body counts, and plasma protein and fibrinogen concentrations. Results: Rouleaux, slight polychromasia, stomatocytosis, and low numbers of schistocytes and nucleated RBCs (NRBCs) were seen often in stained blood films. Manual reticulocyte counts were higher than automated reticulocyte counts. Heinz bodies were present in erythrocytes of most manatees. Compared with free-ranging manatees, captive animals had slightly lower MCV, MCH, and eosinophil counts and slightly higher heterophil and NRBC counts, and fibrinogen concentration. Total leukocyte, heterophil, and monocyte counts tended to be lower in adults than in younger animals. Small calves tended to have higher reticulocyte counts and NRBC counts than older animals. Conclusions: Hematologic findings were generally similar between captive and free-ranging manatees. Higher manual reticulocyte counts suggest the ADVIA detects only reticulocytes containing large amounts of RNA. Higher reticulocyte and NRBC counts in young calves probably reflect an increased rate of erythropoiesis compared with older animals. ?? 2009 American Society for Veterinary Clinical Pathology.

  8. Hematological Practice in Hong Kong and China.

    PubMed

    Kwong, Yok-Lam; Ha, Shau-Yin; Chan, Vivian

    2016-04-01

    Thalassemias and hemophilias are the most important inherited hematological diseases in Hong Kong and China. Prenatal diagnosis has significantly decreased the burden of these diseases. For thalassemia major, adequate transfusion and iron chelation therapy have dramatically improved patient outlook. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is curative for thalassemia major and is increasingly adopted. The efficacy of arsenic trioxide in acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) was discovered in China. An oral formulation of arsenic trioxide was developed in Hong Kong for newly diagnosed and relapsed APL patients. With combination chemotherapy containing non-P-glycoprotein-dependent drugs and L-asparaginase, durable remission can be achieved in the most patients. PMID:27040964

  9. Hematological Disorders Following Exposure to Insecticides

    PubMed Central

    Mastromatteo, Ernest

    1964-01-01

    The medical literature dealing with hematological disorders following exposure to insecticides (chiefly chlorinated hydrocarbons and organic phosphorus compounds) is briefly reviewed. The development of blood dyscrasias as a consequence of exposure to insecticides is considered unlikely. Reported cases are few in number and often involve persons with little contact with these materials. It is often impossible to prove (or to disprove) a cause-and-effect relation in the individual case. Pointers which may be of assistance in evaluating this relationship are described. Purpura as a result of allergic vascular changes after exposure to insecticides is also discussed. PMID:14145471

  10. Nanopharmacology in translational hematology and oncology

    PubMed Central

    Tomuleasa, Ciprian; Braicu, Cornelia; Irimie, Alexandra; Craciun, Lucian; Berindan-Neagoe, Ioana

    2014-01-01

    Nanoparticles have displayed considerable promise for safely delivering therapeutic agents with miscellaneous therapeutic properties. Current progress in nanotechnology has put forward, in the last few years, several therapeutic strategies that could be integrated into clinical use by using constructs for molecular diagnosis, disease detection, cytostatic drug delivery, and nanoscale immunotherapy. In the hope of bringing the concept of nanopharmacology toward a viable and feasible clinical reality in a cancer center, the present report attempts to present the grounds for the use of cell-free nanoscale structures for molecular therapy in experimental hematology and oncology. PMID:25092977

  11. Instability of EDS maglev systems

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Y.; Chen, S.S.

    1993-09-01

    Instabilities of an EDS maglev suspension system with 3 D.O.F. and 5 D.O.F. vehicles traveling on a double L-shaped set of guideway conductors have been investigated with various experimentally measured magnetical force data incorporated into the theoretical models. Divergence and flutter are obtained from both analytical and numerical solutions for coupled vibration of the 3 D.O.F. maglev vehicle model. Instabilities of five direction motions (heave, slip, rill, pitch and yaw) are observed for the 4 D.O.F. vehicle model. It demonstrates that system parameters, such as, system damping, vehicle geometry and coupling effects among five different motions play very important roles in the occurrence of dynamic instabilities of maglev vehicles.

  12. Media campaign educates public on ED overcrowding.

    PubMed

    2004-04-01

    A Tennessee health care system is reducing overcrowding in its EDs with a media campaign that urges patients with nonurgent needs to seek other care options. The campaign has contributed to a 5% decrease in ED volume at one hospital in the first few months. Advertising spots urge patients to go to primary care physicians and urgent care clinics. ED staff help educate patients while treating them for nonurgent needs. PMID:15077530

  13. Microscale functional cytomics for studying hematologic cancers

    PubMed Central

    Young, Edmond W. K.; Pak, Chorom; Kahl, Brad S.; Yang, David T.; Callander, Natalie S.; Miyamoto, Shigeki

    2012-01-01

    An important problem in translational cancer research is our limited ability to functionally characterize behaviors of primary patient cancer cells and associated stromal cell types, and relate mechanistic understanding to therapy selection. Functional analyses of primary samples face at least 3 major challenges: limited availability of primary samples for testing, paucity of functional information extracted from samples, and lack of functional methods accessible to many researchers. We developed a microscale cell culture platform that overcomes these limitations, especially for hematologic cancers. A key feature of the platform is the ability to compartmentalize small populations of adherent and nonadherent cells in controlled microenvironments that can better reflect physiological conditions and enable cell-cell interaction studies. Custom image analysis was developed to measure cell viability and protein subcellular localizations in single cells to provide insights into heterogeneity of cellular responses. We validated our platform by assessing viability and nuclear translocations of NF-κB and STAT3 in multiple myeloma cells exposed to different conditions, including cocultured bone marrow stromal cells. We further assessed its utility by analyzing NF-κB activation in a primary chronic lymphocytic leukemia patient sample. Our platform can be applied to myriad biological questions, enabling high-content functional cytomics of primary hematologic malignancies. PMID:22262772

  14. Targeting the Apoptosis Pathway in Hematologic Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Zaman, Shadia; Wang, Rui; Gandhi, Varsha

    2014-01-01

    Apoptosis is a cell death program that is well-orchestrated for normal tissue homeostasis and for removal of damaged, old, or infected cells. It is regulated by intrinsic and extrinsic pathways. The intrinsic pathway responds to signals such as ultraviolet radiation or DNA damage and activates “executioner” caspases through a mitochondria-dependent pathway. The extrinsic pathway is activated by death signals induced, for example, by an infection that activates the immune system or receptor-mediated pathways. The extrinsic pathway signals also cascade down to executioner caspases that cleave target proteins and lead to cell death. Strict control of cellular apoptosis is important for the hematopoietic system as it has a high turnover rate. However, the apoptosis program is often deregulated in hematologic malignancies leading to the accumulation of malignant cells. Therefore, apoptosis pathways have been identified for development of anticancer therapeutics. We review here the proteins that have been targeted for anticancer drug development in hematologic malignancies. These include BCL-2 family proteins, death ligands and receptors, inhibitor of apoptosis family proteins, and caspases. Except for caspase activators, drugs that target each of these classes of proteins have advanced into clinical trials. PMID:24295132

  15. Nucleoporins and nucleocytoplasmic transport in hematologic malignancies.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Akiko; Yaseen, Nabeel R

    2014-08-01

    Hematologic malignancies are often associated with chromosomal rearrangements that lead to the expression of chimeric fusion proteins. Rearrangements of the genes encoding two nucleoporins, NUP98 and NUP214, have been implicated in the pathogenesis of several types of hematologic malignancies, particularly acute myeloid leukemia. NUP98 rearrangements result in fusion of an N-terminal portion of NUP98 to one of numerous proteins. These rearrangements often follow treatment with topoisomerase II inhibitors and tend to occur in younger patients. They have been shown to induce leukemia in mice and to enhance proliferation and disrupt differentiation in primary human hematopoietic precursors. NUP214 has only a few fusion partners. DEK-NUP214 is the most common NUP214 fusion in AML; it tends to occur in younger patients and is usually associated with FLT3 internal tandem duplications. The leukemogenic activity of NUP214 fusions is less well characterized. Normal nucleoporins, including NUP98 and NUP214, have important functions in nucleocytoplasmic transport, transcription, and mitosis. These functions and their disruptions by oncogenic nucleoporin fusions are discussed. PMID:24657637

  16. Leptin and its receptor in hematologic malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Han, Tian-Jie; Wang, Xin

    2015-01-01

    Leptin is an adipocyte-derived cytokine coded by the obese gene, not only regulates metabolism, but also participates in hematopoiesis. Aberrant leptin levels in patients with hematologic malignancies were observed and associates with clinical characters, such as body mass index (BMI), gender, blast cell percentage. Leptin concentrations alter while diseases progress or remission. Leptin receptor is expressed in hematopoietic CD34+ stem cells, erythrocytes, lymphocytes, blast cells and samples in leukemia and lymphoma patients. The adipokine stimulates cell proliferation, cytokine secretion and protects malignant cells from apoptosis through Janus kinase-signal transducer and activator of transcription (JAK-STAT), mitogen-activated protein kinase and extracellular signal activated kinase 1/2 (MAPK/ERK1/2), or 3 kinase (PI3K) signaling pathways. These findings indicate leptin signaling possibility take part in occurrence, progression and prognosis of hematologic malignancies. This article reviews leptin/leptin receptor expression and the correlations with clinical characters, treatment and prognosis in myeloid and lymphoid neoplasms. PMID:26884894

  17. Hematologic effects and complications of snake envenoming.

    PubMed

    Berling, Ingrid; Isbister, Geoffrey K

    2015-04-01

    Hematologic abnormalities are the most common effects of snake envenoming globally. Venom-induced consumption coagulopathy (VICC) is the commonest and most important. Other hematologic abnormalities are an anticoagulant coagulopathy and thrombotic microangiopathy. Venom-induced consumption coagulopathy is a venom-induced activation of the clotting pathway by procoagulant toxins, resulting in clotting factor consumption and coagulopathy. The type of procoagulant toxin differs between snakes and can activate prothrombin, factor X, and factor V or consume fibrinogen. The most useful investigation in VICC is a prothrombin time/international normalized ratio. The d-dimer may assist in early diagnosis, but fibrinogen levels often add little in the clinical setting. Bedside investigations would be ideal, but point-of-care testing international normalized ratio and whole blood clotting tests have been shown to be unreliable in VICC. The major complication of VICC is hemorrhage, including intracranial hemorrhage which is often fatal. The role of antivenom in VICC is controversial and may only be beneficial for some types of snakes including Echis spp where the duration of abnormal clotting is reduced from more than a week to 24 to 48 hours. In contrast, antivenom does not appear to speed the recovery of VICC in Australian snake envenoming. Other treatments for VICC include factor replacement, observation and prevention of trauma, and heparin. An Australian study showed that fresh-frozen plasma speeds recovery of VICC, but early use may increase consumption. There is no evidence to support heparin. PMID:25556574

  18. Clinical, hematological and biochemical alterations in olive flounder, Paralichthys olivaceus following experimental infection by Vibrio scophthalmi

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hematological analysis can provide key values for monitoring fish health conditions. There is no information available on hematological changes of olive flounder following infection by Vibrio scophthalmi. In this study, hematological and biochemical alterations were determined for olive flounder inf...

  19. 78 FR 69324 - Revised Medical Criteria for Evaluating Hematological Disorders

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-19

    ... hematological disorders. For example: \\1\\ (50 FR 50068) \\2\\ We published some revisions to the hematological body system on April 24, 2002, and November 15, 2004. See 67 FR 20018 and 69 FR 67017 (corrected at 70 FR 15227). These revisions were not comprehensive; they addressed only specific listings. The...

  20. Hematological profile of sickle cell disease from South Gujarat, India.

    PubMed

    Rao, Sanjeev Shyam; Goyal, Jagdish Prasad; Raghunath, S V; Shah, Vijay B

    2012-05-10

    The aim of this study was to determine hematological profile of sickle cell disease (SCD) from Surat, South Gujarat, India. This prospective cross-sectional study was conducted in the Department of Pediatrics and Sickle Cell Anemia Laboratory, Faculty of Pathology, Government Medical College, Surat, India, between July 2009 and December 2010. Patients included in this study were in their steady state for a long period of time without any symptoms related to SCD or other diseases which could affect the hematological parameters. Venous blood of all patients was collected in ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid and hematological indices were measured. Thirty-three subjects homozygous in all were studied for their hematological parameters for sickle cell anemia. Moderate to severe anemia, low mean cell volume and high foetal hemoglobin dominate the hematological profile of SCD children. PMID:22826798

  1. Hematological profile of sickle cell disease from South Gujarat, India

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Sanjeev Shyam; Goyal, Jagdish Prasad; Raghunath, S.V.; Shah, Vijay B.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine hematological profile of sickle cell disease (SCD) from Surat, South Gujarat, India. This prospective cross-sectional study was conducted in the Department of Pediatrics and Sickle Cell Anemia Laboratory, Faculty of Pathology, Government Medical College, Surat, India, between July 2009 and December 2010. Patients included in this study were in their steady state for a long period of time without any symptoms related to SCD or other diseases which could affect the hematological parameters. Venous blood of all patients was collected in ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid and hematological indices were measured. Thirty-three subjects homozygous in all were studied for their hematological parameters for sickle cell anemia. Moderate to severe anemia, low mean cell volume and high foetal hemoglobin dominate the hematological profile of SCD children. PMID:22826798

  2. Effect of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug etoricoxib on the hematological parameters and enzymes of colon and kidney.

    PubMed

    Behal, N; Singh Kanwar, S; Sharma, P; Sanyal, S N

    2009-01-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the effects of a selective COX-2 inhibitor, etoricoxib in rats on the hematological and toxicity parameters in colon and kidney at two different doses of the drug, one within the therapeutic anti-inflammatory range as based on the reported ED50 value (Eto-1) while the other at ten times higher (Eto-2), relative to the toxicity studies which have not been reported so far. The results showed that the control and the drug treated animals achieved similar linear growth rate and also showed no major alterations in the histological parameters in the liver and kidney tissue. The animals treated with lower dose of etoricoxib showed an overall decrease in total leukocytes counts as well as in the number of neutrophils, lymphocytes, monocytes and eosinophills while the higher dose of the drug produced a highly significant increase in all the cell counts. However, the drug treatment at both the dose level produced significant fall in the activities of alkaline phosphatase, sucrase, lactase and maltase in the kidney but increased the activity of alkaline phosphatase in colon. The treatment of etoricoxib did not produce any change in the nitric oxide and citrulline levels in kidney while an increase was noted in the colonic tissue. It was concluded that etoricoxib is a relatively safe drug at its anti-inflammatory ED50 dose in rats when the hematological parameters and the structural and functional characteristics of kidney and colonic tissues were studied. PMID:19721906

  3. Cap-Independent Translation in Hematological Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Horvilleur, Emilie; Wilson, Lindsay A.; Bastide, Amandine; Piñeiro, David; Pöyry, Tuija A. A.; Willis, Anne E.

    2015-01-01

    Hematological malignancies are a heterogeneous group of diseases deriving from blood cells progenitors. Although many genes involved in blood cancers contain internal ribosome entry sites (IRESes), there has been only few studies focusing on the role of cap-independent translation in leukemia and lymphomas. Expression of IRES trans-acting factors can also be altered, and interestingly, BCL-ABL1 fusion protein expressed from “Philadelphia” chromosome, found in some types of leukemia, regulates several of them. A mechanism involving c-Myc IRES and cap-independent translation and leading to resistance to chemotherapy in multiple myeloma emphasize the contribution of cap-independent translation in blood cancers and the need for more work to be done to clarify the roles of known IRESes in pathology and response to chemotherapeutics. PMID:26734574

  4. [Angiogenesis in patients with hematologic malignancies].

    PubMed

    Mesters, R M; Padró, T; Steins, M; Bieker, R; Retzlaff, S; Kessler, T; Kienast, J; Berdel, W E

    2001-09-01

    Angiogenesis in Patients with Hematologic Malignancies The importance of angiogenesis for the progressive growth and viability of solid tumors is well established. Emerging data suggest an involvement of angiogenesis in the pathophysiology of hematologic malignancies as well. Recently, we and others have reported increased angiogenesis in the bone marrow of patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and normalization of bone marrow microvessel density when patients achieved a complete remission (CR) after induction chemotherapy. Tumor angiogenesis depends on the expression of specific mediators that initiate a cascade of events leading to the formation of new microvessels. Among these, VEGF (vascular endothelial growth factor), FGF (fibroblast growth factor) and angiopoietins play a pivotal role in the induction of neovascularization in solid tumors. These cytokines stimulate migration and proliferation of endothelial cells and induce angiogenesis in vivo. Recent data suggest an important role for these mediators in hematologic malignancies as well. Isolated AML blasts overexpress VEGF and VEGF receptor 2. Thus, the VEGF/VEGFR-2 pathway can promote the growth of leukemic blasts in an autocrine and paracrine manner. Therefore, neovascularization and angiogenic mediators/receptors may be promising targets for anti-angiogenic and anti-leukemic treatment strategies. The immunomodulatory drug thalidomide inhibits angiogenesis in animal models. Moreover, it has significant activity in refractory multiple myeloma. In a current phase II study for patients with primary refractory or relapsed multiple myeloma using a combination of thalidomide with hyperfractionated cyclophosphamide and dexamethasone (Hyper-CDT), we observed a partial remission in 12 of 14 evaluable patients (86%). Thus, this combination seems to be very potent. Furthermore, we evaluated the safety and efficacy of thalidomide in patients with AML not qualifying for intensive cytotoxic chemotherapy. 20

  5. Targeting oncogenic Ras signaling in hematologic malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Ashley F.; Braun, Benjamin S.

    2012-01-01

    Ras proteins are critical nodes in cellular signaling that integrate inputs from activated cell surface receptors and other stimuli to modulate cell fate through a complex network of effector pathways. Oncogenic RAS mutations are found in ∼ 25% of human cancers and are highly prevalent in hematopoietic malignancies. Because of their structural and biochemical properties, oncogenic Ras proteins are exceedingly difficult targets for rational drug discovery, and no mechanism-based therapies exist for cancers with RAS mutations. This article reviews the properties of normal and oncogenic Ras proteins, the prevalence and likely pathogenic role of NRAS, KRAS, and NF1 mutations in hematopoietic malignancies, relevant animal models of these cancers, and implications for drug discovery. Because hematologic malignancies are experimentally tractable, they are especially valuable platforms for addressing the fundamental question of how to reverse the adverse biochemical output of oncogenic Ras in cancer. PMID:22898602

  6. BMI1: A Biomarker of Hematologic Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Sahasrabuddhe, Anagh A.

    2016-01-01

    BMI1 oncogene is a catalytic member of epigenetic repressor polycomb group proteins. It plays a critical role in the regulation of gene expression pattern and consequently several cellular processes during development, including cell cycle progression, senescence, aging, apoptosis, angiogenesis, and importantly self-renewal of adult stem cells of several lineages. Preponderance of evidences indicates that deregulated expression of PcG protein BMI1 is associated with several human malignancies, cancer stem cell maintenance, and propagation. Importantly, overexpression of BMI1 correlates with therapy failure in cancer patients and tumor relapse. This review discusses the diverse mode of BMI1 regulation at transcriptional, posttranscriptional, and posttranslational levels as well as at various critical signaling pathways regulated by BMI1 activity. Furthermore, this review highlights the role of BMI1 as a biomarker and therapeutic target for several subtypes of hematologic malignancies and the importance to target this biomarker for therapeutic applications. PMID:27168727

  7. Expanding role of lenalidomide in hematologic malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Nilanjan; Grunwald, Michael R; Fasan, Omotayo; Bhutani, Manisha

    2015-01-01

    Lenalidomide is an immunomodulatory agent that has been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for treatment of multiple myeloma, deletion 5q myelodysplastic syndrome, and mantle cell lymphoma. In addition, it has clinical activity in lymphoproliferative disorders and acute myeloid leukemia. The mode of action includes immunomodulatory, anti-inflammatory, antiangiogenic, and antiproliferative mechanisms. The antitumor effect is a result of direct interference of key pathways in tumor cells and indirect modulation of the tumor microenvironment. There has been no recent collective review on lenalidomide in multiple myeloma, myelodysplastic syndrome/acute myeloid leukemia, and lymphoma. This review summarizes the results of current clinical studies of lenalidomide, alone and in combination with other agents, as a therapeutic option for various hematologic malignancies. PMID:25999761

  8. Targeting cell cycle regulators in hematologic malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Aleem, Eiman; Arceci, Robert J.

    2015-01-01

    Hematologic malignancies represent the fourth most frequently diagnosed cancer in economically developed countries. In hematologic malignancies normal hematopoiesis is interrupted by uncontrolled growth of a genetically altered stem or progenitor cell (HSPC) that maintains its ability of self-renewal. Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) not only regulate the mammalian cell cycle, but also influence other vital cellular processes, such as stem cell renewal, differentiation, transcription, epigenetic regulation, apoptosis, and DNA repair. Chromosomal translocations, amplification, overexpression and altered CDK activities have been described in different types of human cancer, which have made them attractive targets for pharmacological inhibition. Mouse models deficient for one or more CDKs have significantly contributed to our current understanding of the physiological functions of CDKs, as well as their roles in human cancer. The present review focuses on selected cell cycle kinases with recent emerging key functions in hematopoiesis and in hematopoietic malignancies, such as CDK6 and its role in MLL-rearranged leukemia and acute lymphocytic leukemia, CDK1 and its regulator WEE-1 in acute myeloid leukemia (AML), and cyclin C/CDK8/CDK19 complexes in T-cell acute lymphocytic leukemia. The knowledge gained from gene knockout experiments in mice of these kinases is also summarized. An overview of compounds targeting these kinases, which are currently in clinical development in various solid tumors and hematopoietic malignances, is presented. These include the CDK4/CDK6 inhibitors (palbociclib, LEE011, LY2835219), pan-CDK inhibitors that target CDK1 (dinaciclib, flavopiridol, AT7519, TG02, P276-00, terampeprocol and RGB 286638) as well as the WEE-1 kinase inhibitor, MK-1775. The advantage of combination therapy of cell cycle inhibitors with conventional chemotherapeutic agents used in the treatment of AML, such as cytarabine, is discussed. PMID:25914884

  9. Hematologic consequences of exposure to ionizing radiation.

    PubMed

    Dainiak, Nicholas

    2002-06-01

    From the early 1900s, it has been known that ionizing radiation (IR) impairs hematopoiesis through a variety of mechanisms. IR exposure directly damages hematopoietic stem cells and alters the capacity of bone marrow stromal elements to support and/or maintain hematopoiesis in vivo and in vitro. Exposure to IR induces dose-dependent declines in circulating hematopoietic cells not only through reduced bone marrow production, but also by redistribution and apoptosis of mature formed elements of the blood. Recently, the importance of using lymphocyte depletion kinetics to provide a "crude" dose estimate has been emphasized, particularly in rapid assessment of large numbers of individuals who may be exposed to IR through acts of terrorism or by accident. A practical strategy to estimate radiation dose and triage victims based upon clinical symptomatology is presented. An explosion of knowledge has occurred regarding molecular and cellular pathways that trigger and mediate hematologic responses to IR. In addition to damaging DNA, IR alters gene expression and transcription, and interferes with intracellular and intercellular signaling pathways. The clinical expression of these disturbances may be the development of leukemia, the most significant hematologic complication of IR exposure among survivors of the atomic bomb detonations over Japan. Those at greatest risk for leukemia are individuals exposed during childhood. The association of leukemia with chronic, low-dose-rate exposure from nuclear power plant accidents and/or nuclear device testing has been more difficult to establish, due in part to lack of precision and sensitivity of methods to assess doses that approach background radiation dose. Nevertheless, multiple myeloma may be associated with chronic exposure, particularly in those exposed at older ages. PMID:12063018

  10. Vorinostat in solid and hematologic malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Siegel, David; Hussein, Mohamad; Belani, Chandra; Robert, Francisco; Galanis, Evanthia; Richon, Victoria M; Garcia-Vargas, José; Sanz-Rodriguez, Cesar; Rizvi, Syed

    2009-01-01

    Vorinostat (Zolinza®), a histone deacetylase inhibitor, was approved by the US Food and Drug Administration in October 2006 for the treatment of cutaneous manifestations in patients with cutaneous T-cell lymphoma who have progressive, persistent or recurrent disease on or following two systemic therapies. This review summarizes evidence on the use of vorinostat in solid and hematologic malignancies and collated tolerability data from the vorinostat clinical trial program. Pooled vorinostat clinical trial data from 498 patients with solid or hematologic malignancies show that vorinostat was well tolerated as monotherapy or combination therapy. The most commonly reported drug-related adverse events (AEs) associated with monotherapy (n = 341) were fatigue (61.9%), nausea (55.7%), diarrhea (49.3%), anorexia (48.1%), and vomiting (32.8%), and Grade 3/4 drug-related AEs included fatigue (12.0%), thrombocytopenia (10.6%), dehydration (7.3%), and decreased platelet count (5.3%). The most common drug-related AEs observed with vorinostat in combination therapy (n = 157, most of whom received vorinostat 400 mg qd for 14 days) were nausea (48.4%), diarrhea (40.8%), fatigue (34.4%), vomiting (31.2%), and anorexia (20.4%), with the majority of AEs being Grade 2 or less. In Phase I trials, combinations with vorinostat were generally well tolerated and preliminary evidence of anticancer activity as monotherapy or in combination with other systemic therapies has been observed across a range of malignancies. Ongoing and planned studies will further evaluate the potential of vorinostat in combination therapy, including combinations with radiation, in patients with diverse malignancy types, including non-small-cell lung cancer, glioblastoma multiforme, multiple myeloma, and myelodysplastic syndrome. PMID:19635146

  11. Mechanical Ventilation and ARDS in the ED

    PubMed Central

    Mohr, Nicholas M.; Miller, Christopher N.; Deitchman, Andrew R.; Castagno, Nicole; Hassebroek, Elizabeth C.; Dhedhi, Adam; Scott-Wittenborn, Nicholas; Grace, Edward; Lehew, Courtney; Kollef, Marin H.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There are few data regarding mechanical ventilation and ARDS in the ED. This could be a vital arena for prevention and treatment. METHODS: This study was a multicenter, observational, prospective, cohort study aimed at analyzing ventilation practices in the ED. The primary outcome was the incidence of ARDS after admission. Multivariable logistic regression was used to determine the predictors of ARDS. RESULTS: We analyzed 219 patients receiving mechanical ventilation to assess ED ventilation practices. Median tidal volume was 7.6 mL/kg predicted body weight (PBW) (interquartile range, 6.9-8.9), with a range of 4.3 to 12.2 mL/kg PBW. Lung-protective ventilation was used in 122 patients (55.7%). The incidence of ARDS after admission from the ED was 14.7%, with a mean onset of 2.3 days. Progression to ARDS was associated with higher illness severity and intubation in the prehospital environment or transferring facility. Of the 15 patients with ARDS in the ED (6.8%), lung-protective ventilation was used in seven (46.7%). Patients who progressed to ARDS experienced greater duration in organ failure and ICU length of stay and higher mortality. CONCLUSIONS: Lung-protective ventilation is infrequent in patients receiving mechanical ventilation in the ED, regardless of ARDS status. Progression to ARDS is common after admission, occurs early, and worsens outcome. Patient- and treatment-related factors present in the ED are associated with ARDS. Given the limited treatment options for ARDS, and the early onset after admission from the ED, measures to prevent onset and to mitigate severity should be instituted in the ED. TRIAL REGISTRY: ClinicalTrials.gov; No.: NCT01628523; URL: www.clinicaltrials.gov PMID:25742126

  12. AL Amyloidosis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    systemic nature of the disease, non-invasive biopsies such as abdominal fat aspiration should be considered before taking biopsies from involved organs, in order to reduce the risk of bleeding complications. Differential diagnosis Systemic AL amyloidosis should be distinguished from other diseases related to deposition of monoclonal LC, and from other forms of systemic amyloidosis. When pathological studies have failed to identify the nature of amyloid deposits, genetic studies should be performed to diagnose hereditary amyloidosis. Management Treatment of AL amyloidosis is based on chemotherapy, aimed at controlling the underlying plasma clone that produces amyloidogenic LC. The hematological response should be carefully checked by serial measurements of serum free LC. The association of an alkylating agent with high-dose dexamethasone has proven to be effective in two thirds of patients and is considered as the current reference treatment. New agents used in the treatment of multiple myeloma are under investigation and appear to increase hematological response rates. Symptomatic measures and supportive care is necessary in patients with organ failure. Noticeably, usual treatments for cardiac failure (i.e. calcium inhibitors, β-blockers, angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors) are inefficient or even dangerous in patients with amyloid heart disease, that should be managed using diuretics. Amiodarone and pace maker implantation should be considered in patients with rhythm or conduction abnormalities. In selected cases, heart and kidney transplantation may be associated with prolonged patient and graft survival. Prognosis Survival in AL amyloidosis depends on the spectrum of organ involvement (amyloid heart disease being the main prognosis factor), the severity of individual organs involved and haematological response to treatment. PMID:22909024

  13. Blood donation before surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... Jr, Silberstein LE, et al, eds. Hematology: Basic Principles and Practice . 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2013:chap 112. Miller RD. Patient blood management: transfusion therapy. In: Miller RD, ed. Miller's Anesthesia . ...

  14. Expedition 7 Crew Interview: Ed Lu

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Ed Lu of Expedition Seven is seen during a pre-launch interview. He explains why he became interested in space flight. He states that this is a different type of mission and gives his reaction to the Columbia Space Shuttle tragedy. The handover of Expedition six is explained by Ed Lu. The challenges of this mission are also described by Lu. These challenges include working with a crew member reduction from three to two, and the conservation of clothing and consumables. Ed Lu talks about what it is like to work with commander Yuri Malenchenko in space. Finally, Ed Lu states that he will continue scientific experiments in space on calcium loss in bones.

  15. MicroED data collection and processing

    SciTech Connect

    Hattne, Johan; Reyes, Francis E.; Nannenga, Brent L.; Shi, Dan; Cruz, M. Jason de la; Leslie, Andrew G. W.; Gonen, Tamir

    2015-07-01

    The collection and processing of MicroED data are presented. MicroED, a method at the intersection of X-ray crystallography and electron cryo-microscopy, has rapidly progressed by exploiting advances in both fields and has already been successfully employed to determine the atomic structures of several proteins from sub-micron-sized, three-dimensional crystals. A major limiting factor in X-ray crystallography is the requirement for large and well ordered crystals. By permitting electron diffraction patterns to be collected from much smaller crystals, or even single well ordered domains of large crystals composed of several small mosaic blocks, MicroED has the potential to overcome the limiting size requirement and enable structural studies on difficult-to-crystallize samples. This communication details the steps for sample preparation, data collection and reduction necessary to obtain refined, high-resolution, three-dimensional models by MicroED, and presents some of its unique challenges.

  16. Serum thrombopoietin level in various hematological diseases.

    PubMed

    Usuki, K; Tahara, T; Iki, S; Endo, M; Osawa, M; Kitazume, K; Kato, T; Miyazaki, H; Urabe, A

    1996-09-01

    To investigate the pathophysiological role of thrombopoietin (TPO) in thrombopoiesis, we measured its serum levels in 15 healthy individuals, 84 patients with various hematological diseases and 2 patients with liver cirrhosis using an enzyme immunoassay procedure. The TPO level was 0.84 +/- 0.40 f mol/ml in normal individuals. TPO levels were considerably elevated in patients with myelosuppression after intensification chemotherapy of acute leukemia in complete remission (postchemotherapy group; n = 18; 18.46 +/- 9.70 f mol/ml). When the data of normal individuals and the postchemotherapy group were combined, TPO levels were inversely correlated with the platelet count in this combined group. We compared these data of normal individuals and the postchemotherapy group with various hematological disease states. In aplastic anemia (n = 13; 16.03 +/- 9.44 f mol/ml), acute lymphoblastic leukemia (n = 5; 10.36 +/- 5.57 f mol/ml), malignant lymphoma (n = 6; 2.79 +/- 2.27 f mol/ml), multiple myeloma (n = 3; 3.34 +/- 0.20 f mol/ml) and chronic lymphocytic leukemia (n = 2; 1.71 +/- 3.91 f mol/ml), the relationship of serum TPO levels and platelet counts was almost the same as in the combined group with normal individuals and the postchemotherapy group. However, the TPO levels were slightly higher in myeloproliferative disorders (n = 12; 1.99 +/- 1.47 f mol/ml) and lower in acute myelogenous leukemia (n = 8; 2.27 +/- 1.25 f mol/ml), hypoplastic leukemia (n = 3; 2.76 +/- 2.23 f mol/ml), myelodysplastic syndrome (n = 2; 0.42 +/- 0.60 f mol/ml), liver cirrhosis (n = 2; 1.50 +/- 0.92 f mol/ml) and idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (n = 12; 2.08 +/- 1.41 f mol/ml), when compared to the regression line for the combined group with normal individuals and postchemotherapy group. These findings suggest that TPO might play an important role in regulation of the platelet count in normal and pathological conditions. PMID:8888496

  17. 'Mystery shoppers' can uncover ED weaknesses.

    PubMed

    2006-12-01

    One veteran "mystery shopper" has uncovered several common ED practices that can hurt patient satisfaction. You can learn from her observations to improve your ED's customer service: Be sure to let all of your patients know how long they might expect to wait before seeing a doctor. Wash your hands where the patient can see you, so they can be confident you are practicing good hygiene. Clearly explain all forms and discharge instructions to help ensure patient compliance. PMID:17209484

  18. Common emergencies in cancer medicine: hematologic and gastrointestinal syndromes.

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, C. R.; Carter, I. K.; Leslie, W. T.; Sutton, F.

    1992-01-01

    A myriad of both primary and secondary hematologic and gastrointestinal system-related clinical problems may exist in the cancer patient. This review outlines a standard approach to the prompt diagnosis and therapeutic intervention for these clinical issues. PMID:1602515

  19. Exploring Big Data in Hematological Malignancies: Challenges and Opportunities.

    PubMed

    Westin, Gustavo F; Dias, Ajoy L; Go, Ronald S

    2016-08-01

    Secondary analysis of large datasets has become a useful alternative to address research questions outside the reach of clinical trials. It is increasingly utilized in hematology and oncology. In this review, we provided an overview of some examples of commonly used large datasets in the USA and described common research themes that can be pursued using such a methodology. We selected a sample of 14 articles on adult hematologic malignancies published in 2015 and highlighted their contributions as well as limitations. PMID:27177742

  20. Hematology of the Domestic Ferret (Mustela putorius furo).

    PubMed

    Smith, Stephen A; Zimmerman, Kurt; Moore, David M

    2015-09-01

    Pet ferrets are presented to veterinary clinics for routine care and treatment of clinical diseases and female reproductive problems. In addition to obtaining clinical history, additional diagnostic testing may be required, including hematological assessments. This article describes common blood collection methods, including venipuncture sites, volume of blood that can be safely collected, and handling of the blood. Hematological parameters for normal ferrets are provided along with a description of the morphology of ferret leukocytes to assist in performing a differential count. PMID:26297407

  1. Connective tissue: Vascular and hematological (blood) support

    PubMed Central

    Calvino, Nick

    2003-01-01

    Abstract Connective Tissue (CT) is a ubiquitous component of all major tissues and structures of the body (50% of all body protein is CT), including that of the blood, vascular, muscle, tendon, ligament, fascia, bone, joint, IVD's (intervertebral discs) and skin. Because of its ubiquitous nature, CT is an often overlooked component of any essential nutritional program that may address the structure, and/or function of these tissues. The central role of CT in the health of a virtually all cells, tissues, organs, and organ systems, is discussed. General nutritional CT support strategies, as well as specific CT support strategies that focus on blood, vascular, structural system (eg, muscles, tendons, ligaments, fascia, bone, and joints), integument (skin) and inflammatory and immune mediation will be discussed here and will deal with connective tissue dynamics and dysfunction. An overview of the current scientific understanding and possible options for naturally enhancing the structure and function of CT through the application of these concepts will be discussed in this article, with specific attention on the vascular and hematological systems. PMID:19674592

  2. Endothelial progenitor cells in hematologic malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Saulle, Ernestina; Castelli, Germana; Pelosi, Elvira

    2016-01-01

    Studies carried out in the last years have improved the understanding of the cellular and molecular mechanisms controlling angiogenesis during adult life in normal and pathological conditions. Some of these studies have led to the identification of some progenitor cells that sustain angiogenesis through indirect, paracrine mechanisms (hematopoietic angiogenic cells) and through direct mechanisms, i.e., through their capacity to generate a progeny of phenotypically and functionally competent endothelial cells [endothelial colony forming cells (ECFCs)]. The contribution of these progenitors to angiogenetic processes under physiological and pathological conditions is intensively investigated. Angiogenetic mechanisms are stimulated in various hematological malignancies, including chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), acute myeloid leukemia (AML), myelodysplastic syndromes and multiple myeloma, resulting in an increased angiogenesis that contributes to disease progression. In some of these conditions there is preliminary evidence that some endothelial cells could derive from the malignant clone, thus leading to the speculation that the leukemic cell derives from the malignant transformation of a hemangioblastic progenitor, i.e., of a cell capable of differentiation to the hematopoietic and to the endothelial cell lineages. Our understanding of the mechanisms underlying increased angiogenesis in these malignancies not only contributed to a better knowledge of the mechanisms responsible for tumor progression, but also offered the way for the discovery of new therapeutic targets. PMID:27583252

  3. Hyperhemolysis Syndrome without Underlying Hematologic Disease

    PubMed Central

    Eberly, Lauren Anne; Osman, Diaa; Collins, Nathaniel Perryman

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Hyperhemolysis is characterized by a life-threatening hemolytic transfusion reaction, with hemoglobin (Hb) and hematocrit (Hct) dropping markedly lower than before transfusion. This phenomenon, commonly described in sickle cell disease, is a rare occurrence in patients without hemoglobinopathies. Case Report. A 55-year-old male presented to the hospital after a motorcycle crash and received 10 units of cross-matched blood for active bleeding. The patient was blood group O, with a negative antibody screen. Ten days later, he represented complaining of dyspnea and was found to have a hematocrit of 12%. The direct antiglobulin test was positive for anti-immunoglobin G and complement. Indirect antiglobulin test was positive for anti-Jka alloantibodies. The presence of Jka antigen was revealed in one unit of previously transfused blood; patient's RBCs were negative for the Jka antigen. Laboratory data demonstrated findings consistent with DHTR, as well as reticulopenia and elevated ferritin levels. He continued to show signs of active hemolysis, requiring a total of 4 subsequent units of pRBCs. Each transfusion precipitated a drop in Hb and Hct to levels lower than before transfusion; once transfusions were held, the patient slowly recovered. Discussion. Hyperhemolysis in the setting of a DHTR can occur in patients without hematologic disease. PMID:25785210

  4. Erythrocyte and platelet proteomics in hematological disorders.

    PubMed

    Chakrabarti, Abhijit; Halder, Suchismita; Karmakar, Shilpita

    2016-04-01

    Erythrocytes undergo ineffective erythropoesis, hemolysis, and premature eryptosis in sickle cell disease and thalassemia. Abnormal hemoglobin variants associated with hemoglobinopathy lead to vesiculation, membrane instability, and loss of membrane asymmetry with exposal of phosphatidylserine. This potentiates thrombin generation resulting in activation of the coagulation cascade responsible for subclinical phenotypes. Platelet activation also results in the release of microparticles, which express and transfer functional receptors from platelet membrane, playing key roles in vascular reactivity and activation of intracellular signaling pathways. Over the last decade, proteomics had proven to be an important field of research in studies of blood and blood diseases. Blood cells and its fluidic components have been proven to be easy systems for studying differential expressions of proteins in hematological diseases encompassing hemoglobinopathies, different types of anemias, myeloproliferative disorders, and coagulopathies. Proteomic studies of erythrocytes and platelets reported from several groups have highlighted various factors that intersect the signaling networks in these anucleate systems. In this review, we have elaborated on the current scenario of anucleate blood cell proteomes in normal and diseased individuals and the cross-talk between the two major constituent cell types of circulating blood. PMID:26611378

  5. MicroRNAs in Myeloid Hematological Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Ciccone, Maria; Calin, George Adrian

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs are 19-24 nucleotides noncoding RNAs which silence modulate the expression of target genes by binding to the messenger RNAs. Myeloid malignancies include a broad spectrum of acute and chronic disorders originating from from the clonal transformation of a hematopoietic stem cell. Specific genetic abnormalities may define myeloid malignancies, such as translocation t(9;22) that represent the hallmark of chronic myeloid leukemia. Although next-generation sequencing pro-vided new insights in the genetic characterization and pathogenesis of myeloid neoplasms, the molecular mechanisms underlying myeloid neoplasms are lacking in most cases. Recently, several studies have demonstrated that the expression levels of specific miRNAs may vary among patients with myeloid malignancies compared with healthy individuals and partially unveiled how miRNAs participate in the leukemic transformation process. Finally, in vitro experiments and pre-clinical model provided preliminary data of the safety and efficacy of miRNA inhibitory molecules, opening new avenue in the treatment of myeloid hematological malignancies. PMID:27047254

  6. Five hematologic tests and treatments to question.

    PubMed

    Hicks, Lisa K; Bering, Harriet; Carson, Kenneth R; Haynes, Adam E; Kleinerman, Judith; Kukreti, Vishal; Ma, Alice; Mueller, Brigitta U; O'Brien, Sarah H; Panepinto, Julie A; Pasquini, Marcelo C; Rajasekhar, Anita; Sarode, Ravi; Wood, William A

    2014-12-01

    Choosing Wisely® is a medical stewardship initiative led by the American Board of Internal Medicine Foundation in collaboration with professional medical societies in the United States. The American Society of Hematology (ASH) released its first Choosing Wisely® list in 2013. Using the same evidence-based methodology as in 2013, ASH has identified 5 additional tests and treatments that should be questioned by clinicians and patients under specific, indicated circumstances. The ASH 2014 Choosing Wisely® recommendations include: (1) do not anticoagulate for more than 3 months in patients experiencing a first venous thromboembolic event in the setting of major, transient risk factors for venous thromboembolism; (2) do not routinely transfuse for chronic anemia or uncomplicated pain crises in patients with sickle cell disease; (3) do not perform baseline or surveillance computed tomography scans in patients with asymptomatic, early-stage chronic lymphocytic leukemia; (4) do not test or treat for heparin-induced thrombocytopenia if the clinical pretest probability of heparin-induced thrombocytopenia is low; and (5) do not treat patients with immune thrombocytopenia unless they are bleeding or have very low platelet counts. PMID:25696917

  7. Five hematologic tests and treatments to question.

    PubMed

    Hicks, Lisa K; Bering, Harriet; Carson, Kenneth R; Haynes, Adam E; Kleinerman, Judith; Kukreti, Vishal; Ma, Alice; Mueller, Brigitta U; O'Brien, Sarah H; Panepinto, Julie A; Pasquini, Marcelo C; Rajasekhar, Anita; Sarode, Ravi; Wood, William A

    2014-12-01

    Choosing Wisely(®) is a medical stewardship initiative led by the American Board of Internal Medicine Foundation in collaboration with professional medical societies in the United States. The American Society of Hematology (ASH) released its first Choosing Wisely(®) list in 2013. Using the same evidence-based methodology as in 2013, ASH has identified 5 additional tests and treatments that should be questioned by clinicians and patients under specific, indicated circumstances. The ASH 2014 Choosing Wisely(®) recommendations include: (1) do not anticoagulate for more than 3 months in patients experiencing a first venous thromboembolic event in the setting of major, transient risk factors for venous thromboembolism; (2) do not routinely transfuse for chronic anemia or uncomplicated pain crises in patients with sickle cell disease; (3) do not perform baseline or surveillance computed tomography scans in patients with asymptomatic, early-stage chronic lymphocytic leukemia; (4) do not test or treat for heparin-induced thrombocytopenia if the clinical pretest probability of heparin-induced thrombocytopenia is low; and (5) do not treat patients with immune thrombocytopenia unless they are bleeding or have very low platelet counts. PMID:25472968

  8. Natural Killer Cells Modulation in Hematological Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Baier, Céline; Fino, Aurore; Sanchez, Carole; Farnault, Laure; Rihet, Pascal; Kahn-Perlès, Brigitte; Costello, Régis T.

    2013-01-01

    Hematological malignancies (HM) treatment improved over the last years resulting in increased achievement of complete or partial remission, but unfortunately high relapse rates are still observed, due to remaining minimal residual disease. Therefore, sustainment of long-term remission is crucial, using either drug maintenance treatment or by boosting or prolonging an immune response. Immune system has a key role in tumor surveillance. Nonetheless, tumor-cells evade the specific T-lymphocyte mediated immune surveillance using many mechanisms but especially by the down-regulation of the expression of HLA class I antigens. In theory, these tumor-cells lacking normal expression of HLA class I molecules should be destroyed by natural killer (NK) cells, according to the missing-self hypothesis. NK cells, at the frontier of innate and adaptive immune system, have a central role in tumor-cells surveillance as demonstrated in the setting of allogenic stem cell transplantation. Nevertheless, tumors develop various mechanisms to escape from NK innate immune pressure. Abnormal NK cytolytic functions have been described in many HM. We present here various mechanisms involved in the escape of HM from NK-cell surveillance, i.e., NK-cells quantitative and qualitative abnormalities. PMID:24391641

  9. Parvovirus-B19 and hematologic disorders.

    PubMed

    Yetgin, Sevgi; Aytaç Elmas, Selin

    2010-12-01

    Parvovirus-B19 (PV-B19) is a member of Parvoviridae, which is one of the smallest DNA viruses. PV-B19-associated diseases usually serve as a good representation of the balance of virus, host response and the immune system. The diseases manifested with PV-B19 are erythema infectiosum, which is common in children, hydrops fetalis, transient pure red cell aplasia in patients with chronic hemolytic anemia, arthralgia - mostly observed in women, and chronic pure red cell aplasia in immunocompromised individuals. Cytopenia (bicytopenia, monocytopenia or pancytopenia) may also accompany the diseases mentioned above. On the other hand, there are many diseases, including neurologic, vasculitic, hepatic, rheumatoid, nephritic, autoimmune, myocardial, and others in which the mechanisms of the diseases are not clear, which may be associated with PV-B19. The virus may manifest with unexpected and unexplained clinical pictures and lead to misdiagnosis. Therefore, hematologic disorders in any unestablished clinical diagnosis should be investigated for PV-B19 infection. However, serologic examination for PV-B19 diagnosis is not sufficient in immunocompromised status. The virus can be determined with polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in the serum or tissue samples. Supportive therapy, blood transfusion and immunoglobulin are the conventional therapeutic interventions for PV-B19 today. Vaccination studies are under examination. PMID:27263735

  10. Endothelial progenitor cells in hematologic malignancies.

    PubMed

    Testa, Ugo; Saulle, Ernestina; Castelli, Germana; Pelosi, Elvira

    2016-01-01

    Studies carried out in the last years have improved the understanding of the cellular and molecular mechanisms controlling angiogenesis during adult life in normal and pathological conditions. Some of these studies have led to the identification of some progenitor cells that sustain angiogenesis through indirect, paracrine mechanisms (hematopoietic angiogenic cells) and through direct mechanisms, i.e., through their capacity to generate a progeny of phenotypically and functionally competent endothelial cells [endothelial colony forming cells (ECFCs)]. The contribution of these progenitors to angiogenetic processes under physiological and pathological conditions is intensively investigated. Angiogenetic mechanisms are stimulated in various hematological malignancies, including chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), acute myeloid leukemia (AML), myelodysplastic syndromes and multiple myeloma, resulting in an increased angiogenesis that contributes to disease progression. In some of these conditions there is preliminary evidence that some endothelial cells could derive from the malignant clone, thus leading to the speculation that the leukemic cell derives from the malignant transformation of a hemangioblastic progenitor, i.e., of a cell capable of differentiation to the hematopoietic and to the endothelial cell lineages. Our understanding of the mechanisms underlying increased angiogenesis in these malignancies not only contributed to a better knowledge of the mechanisms responsible for tumor progression, but also offered the way for the discovery of new therapeutic targets. PMID:27583252

  11. New sources of drugs for hematologic malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Sukhai, Mahadeo A.; Spagnuolo, Paul A.; Weir, Scott; Kasper, James; Patton, Lavonne

    2011-01-01

    Advancing novel therapeutic agents for the treatment of malignancy into the marketplace is an increasingly costly and lengthy process. As such, new strategies for drug discovery are needed. Drug repurposing represents an opportunity to rapidly advance new therapeutic strategies into clinical trials at a relatively low cost. Known on-patent or off-patent drugs with unrecognized anticancer activity can be rapidly advanced into clinical testing for this new indication by leveraging their known pharmacology, pharmacokinetics, and toxicology. Using this approach, academic groups can participate in the drug discovery field and smaller biotechnology companies can “de-risk” early-stage drug discovery projects. Here, several scientific approaches used to identify drug repurposing opportunities are highlighted, with a focus on hematologic malignancies. In addition, a discussion of the regulatory issues that are unique to drug repurposing and how they impact developing old drugs for new indications is included. Finally, the mechanisms to enhance drug repurposing through increased collaborations between academia, industry, and nonprofit charitable organizations are discussed. PMID:21511957

  12. Hematological and hemorheological effects of air pollution

    SciTech Connect

    Baskurt, O.K.; Levi, E.; Caglayan, S.; Dikmenoglu, N.; Kutman, M.N. )

    1990-07-01

    Selected hematological parameters and erythrocyte deformability indexes for 16 young male military students were compared before and after a period of exposure to heavy pollution. These students lived in Ankara, which has a serious air pollution problem. The mean sulfur dioxide levels measured at a station proximal to the campus where the students lived were 188 micrograms/m3 and 201 micrograms/m3 during first and second measurements, respectively. During the period between the two measurements, the mean sulfur dioxide level was 292 micrograms/m3. Significant erythropoiesis was indicated by increased erythrocyte counts and hemoglobin and hematocrit levels. Methemoglobin percentage was increased to 2.37 +/- 0.49% (mean +/- standard error) from 0.51 +/- 0.23%. Sulfhemoglobinemia was present in six subjects after the period of pollution, but it was not present in any student prior to this period. Significant increases in erythrocyte deformability indexes were observed after the period of pollution, i.e., from 1.13 +/- 0.01 to 1.21 +/0 0.02, implying that erythrocytes were less flexible, which might impair tissue perfusion.

  13. Non–Emergency Department (ED) Interventions to Reduce ED Utilization: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Sofie Rahman; Chang, Anna Marie; Alqatari, Mahfood; Pines, Jesse M.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Recent health policy changes have focused efforts on reducing emergency department (ED) visits as a way to reduce costs and improve quality of care. This was a systematic review of interventions based outside the ED aimed at reducing ED use. Methods This study was designed as a systematic review. We reviewed the literature on interventions in five categories: patient education, creation of additional non-ED capacity, managed care, prehospital diversion, and patient financial incentives. Studies written in English, with interventions administered outside of the ED, and a comparison group where ED use was an outcome, were included. Two independent reviewers screened search results using MEDLINE, Cochrane, OAIster, or Scopus. The following data were abstracted from included studies: type of intervention, study design, population, details of intervention, effect on ED use, effect on non-ED health care use, and other health and financial outcomes. Quality of individual articles was assessed using Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) guidelines. Results Of 39 included studies, 34 were observational and five were randomized controlled trials. Two of five studies on patient education found reductions in ED use ranging from 21% to 80%. Out of 10 studies of additional non-ED capacity, four showed decreases of 9% to 54%, and one a 21% increase. Both studies on prehospital diversion found reductions of 3% to 7%. Of 12 studies on managed care, 10 had decreases ranging from 1% to 46%. Nine out of 10 studies on patient financial incentives found decreases of 3% to 50%, and one a 34% increase. Nineteen studies reported effect on non-ED use with mixed results. Seventeen studies included data on health outcomes, but 13 of these only included data on hospitalizations rather than morbidity and mortality. Seven studies included data on cost outcomes. According to the GRADE guidelines, all studies had at least some risk of bias, with four

  14. Risk of hematological malignancies among Chernobyl liquidators

    PubMed Central

    Kesminiene, Ausrele; Evrard, Anne-Sophie; Ivanov, Viktor K.; Malakhova, Irina V.; Kurtinaitis, Juozas; Stengrevics, Aivars; Tekkel, Mare; Anspaugh, Lynn R.; Bouville, André; Chekin, Sergei; Chumak, Vadim V.; Drozdovitch, Vladimir; Gapanovich, Vladimir; Golovanov, Ivan; Hubert, Phillip; Illichev, Sergei V.; Khait, Svetlana E.; Krjuchkov, Viktor P.; Maceika, Evaldas; Maksyoutov, Marat; Mirkhaidarov, Anatoly K.; Polyakov, Semion; Shchukina, Natalia; Tenet, Vanessa; Tserakhovich, Tatyana I.; Tsykalo, Aleksandr; Tukov, Aleksandr R.; Cardis, Elisabeth

    2010-01-01

    A case-control study of hematological malignancies was conducted among Chernobyl liquidators (accident recovery workers) from Belarus, Russia and Baltic countries in order to assess the effect of low-to-medium dose protracted radiation exposures on the relative risk of these diseases. The study was nested within cohorts of liquidators who had worked in 1986–87 around the Chernobyl plant. 117 cases (69 leukemia, 34 non-Hodgkin Lymphoma (NHL) and 14 other malignancies of lymphoid and hematopoietic tissue) and 481 matched controls were included in the study. Individual dose to the bone marrow and uncertainties were estimated for each subject. The main analyses were restricted to 70 cases (40 leukemia, 20 NHL and 10 other) and their 287 matched controls with reliable information on work in the Chernobyl area. Most subjects received very low doses (median 13 mGy). For all diagnoses combined, a significantly elevated OR was seen at doses of 200 mGy and above. The Excess Relative Risk (ERR) per 100 mGy was 0.60 (90% confidence interval (CI): −0.02, 2.35). The corresponding estimate for leukemia excluding chronic lymphoid leukemia (CLL) was 0.50 (90%CI −0.38, 5.7). It is slightly higher than, but statistically compatible with, those estimated from a-bomb survivors and recent low dose-rate studies. Although sensitivity analyses showed generally similar results, we cannot rule out the possibility that biases and uncertainties could have led to over or underestimation of the risk in this study. PMID:19138033

  15. Risk of hematological malignancies among Chernobyl liquidators.

    PubMed

    Kesminiene, Ausrele; Evrard, Anne-Sophie; Ivanov, Viktor K; Malakhova, Irina V; Kurtinaitis, Juozas; Stengrevics, Aivars; Tekkel, Mare; Anspaugh, Lynn R; Bouville, André; Chekin, Sergei; Chumak, Vadim V; Drozdovitch, Vladimir; Gapanovich, Vladimir; Golovanov, Ivan; Hubert, Phillipe; Illichev, Sergei V; Khait, Svetlana E; Kryuchkov, Viktor P; Maceika, Evaldas; Maksyoutov, Marat; Mirkhaidarov, Anatoly K; Polyakov, Semion; Shchukina, Natalia; Tenet, Vanessa; Tserakhovich, Tatyana I; Tsykalo, Aleksandr; Tukov, Aleksandr R; Cardis, Elisabeth

    2008-12-01

    A case-control study of hematological malignancies was conducted among Chernobyl liquidators (accident recovery workers) from Belarus, Russia and Baltic countries to assess the effect of low- to medium-dose protracted radiation exposures on the relative risk of these diseases. The study was nested within cohorts of liquidators who had worked around the Chernobyl plant in 1986-1987. A total of 117 cases [69 leukemia, 34 non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) and 14 other malignancies of lymphoid and hematopoietic tissue] and 481 matched controls were included in the study. Individual dose to the bone marrow and uncertainties were estimated for each subject. The main analyses were restricted to 70 cases (40 leukemia, 20 NHL and 10 other) and their 287 matched controls with reliable information on work in the Chernobyl area. Most subjects received very low doses (median 13 mGy). For all diagnoses combined, a significantly elevated OR was seen at doses of 200 mGy and above. The excess relative risk (ERR) per 100 mGy was 0.60 [90% confidence interval (CI) -0.02, 2.35]. The corresponding estimate for leukemia excluding chronic lymphoid leukemia (CLL) was 0.50 (90% CI -0.38, 5.7). It is slightly higher than but statistically compatible with those estimated from A-bomb survivors and recent low-dose-rate studies. Although sensitivity analyses showed generally similar results, we cannot rule out the possibility that biases and uncertainties could have led to over- or underestimation of the risk in this study. PMID:19138033

  16. Clinical predictors of Pseudomonas aeruginosa or Acinetobacter baumannii bacteremia in patients admitted to the ED.

    PubMed

    Kang, Cheol-In; Chung, Doo Ryeon; Peck, Kyong Ran; Song, Jae-Hoon

    2012-09-01

    The identification of clinical characteristics that could identify patients at high risk for Pseudomonas aeruginosa or Acinetobacter baumannii bacteremia would aid clinicians in the appropriate management of these life-threatening conditions, especially in patients admitted to the emergency department (ED) with community-onset infections. To determine clinical risk factors for P. aeruginosa or A. baumannii bacteremia in patients with community-onset gram-negative bacteremia (GNB), a post hoc analysis of a nationwide bacteremia surveillance database including patients with microbiologically documented GNB was performed. Ninety-six patients with P. aeruginosa or A. baumannii bacteremia were compared with 1230 patients with Escherichia coli or Klebsiella pneumoniae bacteremia. A solid tumor or hematologic malignancy was more likely to be associated with P. aeruginosa or A. baumannii bacteremia, whereas concurrent neurologic disease was less frequently seen. In regards to the site of infection, pneumonia was more common in P. aeruginosa or A. baumannii bacteremia, whereas a urinary tract infection was less frequently seen. Factors associated with P. aeruginosa or A. baumannii bacteremia in multivariate analysis included pneumonia (odds ratio [OR], 3.60; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.86-6.99), hematologic malignancy (OR, 2.71; 95% CI, 1.26-5.84), male sex (OR, 2.17; 95% CI, 1.31-3.58), solid tumor (OR, 1.89; 95% CI, 1.15-3.12), and health-care-associated infection (OR, 1.88; 95% CI, 1.48-2.41). Our data suggest that an initial empirical antimicrobial coverage of P. aeruginosa or A. baumannii bacteremia should be seriously considered in patients with pneumonia, a hematologic malignancy, solid tumor, or health-care-associated infection, when GNB is suspected, even in community-onset infections. PMID:22030178

  17. ED Patients with Prolonged Complaints and Repeat ED Visits Have an Increased Risk of Depression

    PubMed Central

    Brickman, Kristopher R.; Bahl, Rajiv; Marcinkowski, Nathan F.; Ammons, Katelyn R.; Akpunonu, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The objective of this study was to explore associations between presenting chief complaints of prolonged symptomatology, patient usage of the emergency department (ED), and underlying depression so that emergency physicians may better target patients for depression screening. Methods A convenience sample of ED patients were administered the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II) to assess for depression. We correlated completed BDI-II surveys to patient information including demographics, pertinent history of present illness information, and past medical history. Results Out of 425 participants screened, we identified complaints of two weeks or longer in 92 patients (22%). Of these patients, mild to severe depression was recognized in over half of the population (47), yet only nine patients reported a prior depression diagnosis. These 92 patients also visited the ED three times as frequently as those patients with more acute complaints (p<0.001). Finally, our study showed that patients with mild to severe depression had three times as many ED visits compared to patients with minimal or no depression (p<0.001). Conclusion Patients with complaints of symptomatology two weeks or longer are more likely to have underlying depression when presenting to the ED. Patients with three or more ED visits within the past year also have a greater incidence of underlying depression. We found a strong correlation between complaints with symptomatology of two weeks or longer and multiple ED visits, in which underlying depression may have contributed to these patients’ ED visits. PMID:27625727

  18. A Quantitative Content Analysis of Mercer University MEd, EdS, and Doctoral Theses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Randolph, Justus J.; Gaiek, Lura S.; White, Torian A.; Slappey, Lisa A.; Chastain, Andrea; Harris, Rose Prejean

    2010-01-01

    Quantitative content analysis of a body of research not only helps budding researchers understand the culture, language, and expectations of scholarship, it helps identify deficiencies and inform policy and practice. Because of these benefits, an analysis of a census of 980 Mercer University MEd, EdS, and doctoral theses was conducted. Each thesis…

  19. MicroED data collection and processing

    PubMed Central

    Hattne, Johan; Reyes, Francis E.; Nannenga, Brent L.; Shi, Dan; de la Cruz, M. Jason; Leslie, Andrew G. W.; Gonen, Tamir

    2015-01-01

    MicroED, a method at the intersection of X-ray crystallography and electron cryo-microscopy, has rapidly progressed by exploiting advances in both fields and has already been successfully employed to determine the atomic structures of several proteins from sub-micron-sized, three-dimensional crystals. A major limiting factor in X-ray crystallography is the requirement for large and well ordered crystals. By permitting electron diffraction patterns to be collected from much smaller crystals, or even single well ordered domains of large crystals composed of several small mosaic blocks, MicroED has the potential to overcome the limiting size requirement and enable structural studies on difficult-to-crystallize samples. This communication details the steps for sample preparation, data collection and reduction necessary to obtain refined, high-resolution, three-dimensional models by MicroED, and presents some of its unique challenges. PMID:26131894

  20. One Year Medical Outcomes and ED Recidivism Following ED Observation for Cocaine-Associated Chest Pain

    PubMed Central

    Cunningham, Rebecca; Walton, Maureen A.; Weber, Jim Edward; O'Broin, Samantha; Tripathi, Shanti P; Maio, Ronald F.; Booth, Brenda M.

    2010-01-01

    Chest pain is the most common complaint among cocaine users who present to the ED seeking care and many hospital resources are applied to stratify cocaine users in regard to future cardiac morbidity and mortality. Little is known about the longitudinal cardiac and non cardiac medical outcomes of cocaine users who have been stratified to an ED observation period following their ED visit. Objectives to examine one-year cardiac outcomes in a low-intermediate risk sample of patients with cocaine- associated chest pain in an urban ED, as well as to examine ED recidivism one year for cardiac and non-cardiac complaints. Methods Prospective consecutive cohort study of patients (18–60 years) who presented to an urban Level 1 ED with cocaine-associated chest pain and were risk stratified to low-intermediate cardiac risk. Exclusion criteria: EKG suggestive of AMI, elevated serum cardiac markers, history of AMI or CABG, hemodynamic instability, unstable angina. Baseline interviews using validated measures of health functioning, and substance use were conducted during CPOU stay, and 3, 6, and 12 months. ED utilization during the study year was abstracted from medical chart. Zero-Inflated Poisson regression analyses were conducted to predict recurrent ED visits. Results 219 participants (73% participation) were enrolled, 65% returned to the ED post index visit; 23% returned for chest pain, of these 66% had a positive cocaine urine screen. No patient had an AMI within the one year follow up period. Patients with continued cocaine use were more likely to have a recurrent ED visit (p<0.001) but these repeat visits were most often related to musculoskeletal pain (21%), and injury (30%) rather than potential cardiac complaints. Conclusions Patients with cocaine-associated chest pain who are low to intermediate cardiac risk and complete a CPOU protocol have less then 1% rate of MI in the subsequent 12-months. PMID:18824277

  1. Improving ED efficiency to capture additional revenue.

    PubMed

    Mandavia, Sujal; Samaniego, Loretta

    2016-06-01

    An increase in the number of patients visiting emergency departments (EDs) presents an opportunity for additional revenue if hospitals take four steps to optimize resources: Streamline the patient pathway and reduce the amount of time each patient occupies a bed in the ED. Schedule staff according to the busy and light times for patient arrivals. Perform registration and triage bedside, reducing initial wait times. Create an area for patients to wait for test results so beds can be freed up for new arrivals. PMID:27451568

  2. Canadian EdGEO National Workshop Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clinton, L. A.; Haidl, F. M.; Hymers, L. A.; van der Flier-Keller, E.

    2009-05-01

    Established in the early 1970s, EdGEO supports locally driven geosciences workshops for Canadian teachers. Workshops are organized by geoscientists and teachers, and typically have field, laboratory and classroom components. Grants of up to $3000 per workshop are available from the National EdGEO Program. By providing educational opportunities for today's teachers and, through them, their students, EdGEO seeks to cultivate a heightened awareness of our planet. EdGEO workshops provide teachers with potential fieldtrip sites for their students and the knowledge, enthusiasm and materials to inspire their students to engage in geoscience. Networking opportunities with local experts promote the importance of the geoscience profession. The expected result is an improved capacity on the part of Canadians to understand the Earth and to make informed decisions, especially with regard to the use of mineral and energy resources, the maintenance and remediation of the environment, and response to geological hazards. There exists a critical need to provide teachers with training and resources to tackle their Earth science curricula. In 2008, EdGEO supported fourteen workshops, with an unprecedented 521 teachers attending. These teachers then used our resources to reach an estimated 14,000 students during that single academic year. EdGEO workshops are locally driven and are therefore very diverse. Workshops are strongly tied to the provincial curriculum, focus on a specific geoscience topic, or may be largely field-based to demonstrate and practice how field activities could be incorporated into Earth science teaching. Many strive to include all of these important components. Geoscientists and teachers work collaboratively to develop and deliver EdGEO workshops to ensure that the activities can be effectively used in the classroom. The length of these professional development opportunities range from two-hour sessions to several days, and can generally accommodate up to twenty

  3. Liminal reproductive experiences after therapies for hematological malignancy.

    PubMed

    Halliday, Lesley E; Boughton, Maureen A; Kerridge, Ian

    2015-03-01

    In this article, we discuss the psychosocial health of young women related to fertility, pregnancy, and motherhood after therapies for hematological malignancies. We utilized a hermeneutical phenomenological approach to conduct in-depth interviews with 12 women who had previously received treatment for a hematological malignancy and had experienced uncertainty surrounding their ability to start or extend their biological family. Our presented findings are interpretations of the women's own words as they articulated how they inhabited a liminal space. We concluded that although fertility and motherhood possibly might not be immediate concerns when they received a diagnosis of hematological malignancy, young women could subsequently experience ongoing issues and concerns related to reproductive uncertainty and motherhood capabilities, which have the potential to affect emotionally and psychosocially on their lives. These issues might possibly require longer-term support, counseling, and informational resources. We also discuss the strengths, limitations, and implications of the study. PMID:25216861

  4. Hematologic and plasma biochemical values of hyacinth macaws (Anodorhynchus hyacinthinus).

    PubMed

    Kolesnikovas, Cristiane K M; Niemeyer, Claudia; Teixeira, Rodrigo H F; Nunes, Adauto L V; Rameh-de-Albuquerque, Luciana C; Sant'Anna, Sávio S; Catão-Dias, José L

    2012-09-01

    The hyacinth macaw (Anodorhyncus hyacinthinus), considered the largest psittacine bird species in the world, is an endangered species, with a remaining population of approximately 6500 birds in the wild. To establish hematologic and plasma biochemical reference ranges and to verify differences related to sex, samples from 29 hyacinth macaws (14 males, 15 females) were obtained from birds apprehended from illegal wildlife trade and subsequently housed at the Sorocaba Zoo, Brazil. No significant differences in hematologic or plasma biochemical values were found between females and males. Compared with published reference values, differences were found in mean concentrations of total red blood cell count, corpuscular volume, corpuscular hemoglobin level, total white blood cell count, aspartate aminotransferase level, creatine kinase concentration, alkaline phosphatase concentration, and phosphorus level. Baseline hematologic and plasma biochemical ranges were established, which may be useful as reference values for clinicians working with this endangered species in captivity or rehabilitation centers. PMID:23156973

  5. EZH2 in normal hematopoiesis and hematological malignancies.

    PubMed

    Herviou, Laurie; Cavalli, Giacomo; Cartron, Guillaume; Klein, Bernard; Moreaux, Jérôme

    2016-01-19

    Enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (EZH2), the catalytic subunit of the Polycomb repressive complex 2, inhibits gene expression through methylation on lysine 27 of histone H3. EZH2 regulates normal hematopoietic stem cell self-renewal and differentiation. EZH2 also controls normal B cell differentiation. EZH2 deregulation has been described in many cancer types including hematological malignancies. Specific small molecules have been recently developed to exploit the oncogenic addiction of tumor cells to EZH2. Their therapeutic potential is currently under evaluation. This review summarizes the roles of EZH2 in normal and pathologic hematological processes and recent advances in the development of EZH2 inhibitors for the personalized treatment of patients with hematological malignancies. PMID:26497210

  6. ROBUST ESTIMATES OF THE ED50

    EPA Science Inventory

    To explore the possibility that robust estimators of location can be adapted to the problem of estimating the ED50 in binary-response bioassay, 10 estimators are compared. A Monte Carlo study is conducted to determine the mean squared errors (MSE) of the estimators. Taking into a...

  7. The Trouble with the Ed.D

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flessa, Joseph

    2007-01-01

    This article review examines Arthur Levine's 2005 "Educating School Leaders," a report that recommended the elimination of the Ed.D. and the establishment of a new degree, the Master's in Educational Administration. The article review draws attention to the central irony of Levine's report: after chronicling the many ways that schools of education…

  8. The Consequences of edTPA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenblatt, Deborah

    2016-01-01

    States and teacher preparation programs across the country are increasingly using a teacher candidate assessment called edTPA. The purpose? To make sure that teacher candidates are ready and able to teach before they begin their careers. The teacher performance assessment requires candidates to compile a portfolio that consists of lesson plans,…

  9. Hematology and serum chemistry of cottontail rabbits of southern Illinois.

    PubMed

    Lepitzki, D A; Woolf, A

    1991-10-01

    In 1983 and 1984 blood was collected from 79 cottontail rabbits (Sylvilagus floridanus) confined to an outdoor enclosure in southern Illinois to establish reference values for hematology and serum chemistry. Packed cell volume, sodium, potassium, chloride, glucose, calcium, carbon dioxide, blood urea nitrogen, creatinine, uric acid, cholesterol, albumin, bilirubin, alkaline phosphatase, aspartate transaminase, alanine aminotransaminase, total protein, albumin/globulin ratio, and osmolality were measured. Sex and age (adult versus juvenile) of rabbit as well as season (June to September versus October to May) and method of capture (trap versus shot) variously affected most hematology and serum chemistry variables. PMID:1758030

  10. EXPOSURE TO CONCENTRATED AMBIENT AIR PARTICLES ALTERS HEMATOLOGIC INDICES IN HUMANS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Descriptions of changes in hematological indices have contested the premise that the biological effects of suspended particulate matter (PM) are restricted to the lung. Employing approximately 40 hematologic parameters reflecting blood cells, chemistries, mediators, and coagulati...

  11. 78 FR 54487 - Abbott Laboratories; Diagnostic-Hematology; Including On-Site Leased Workers From Manpower...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-04

    ... Employment and Training Administration Abbott Laboratories; Diagnostic--Hematology; Including On-Site Leased... on-site at the Santa Clara, California location of Abbott Laboratories, Diagnostic--Hematology... International, reporting to Abbott Laboratories, Diagnostic--Hematology division, including on-site...

  12. Hematological Adverse Events in Clozapine-Treated Children and Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerbino-Rosen, Ginny; Roofeh, David; Tompkins, D. Andrew; Feryo, Doug; Nusser, Laurie; Kranzler, Harvey; Napolitano, Barbara; Frederickson, Anne; Henderson, Inika; Rhinewine, Joe; Kumra, Sanjiv

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To retrospectively examine rates of hematological adverse events (HAEs) in psychiatrically ill, hospitalized children treated with clozapine. Method: Clozapine treatment was administered in an open-label fashion using a flexible titration schedule, and data from weekly complete blood counts was obtained. The rate of neutropenia and…

  13. Monoclonal antibodies targeting CD38 in hematological malignancies and beyond.

    PubMed

    van de Donk, Niels W C J; Janmaat, Maarten L; Mutis, Tuna; Lammerts van Bueren, Jeroen J; Ahmadi, Tahamtan; Sasser, A Kate; Lokhorst, Henk M; Parren, Paul W H I

    2016-03-01

    CD38 is a multifunctional cell surface protein that has receptor as well as enzyme functions. The protein is generally expressed at low levels on various hematological and solid tissues, while plasma cells express particularly high levels of CD38. The protein is also expressed in a subset of hematological tumors, and shows especially broad and high expression levels in plasma cell tumors such as multiple myeloma (MM). Together, this triggered the development of various therapeutic CD38 antibodies, including daratumumab, isatuximab, and MOR202. Daratumumab binds a unique CD38 epitope and showed strong anti-tumor activity in preclinical models. The antibody engages diverse mechanisms of action, including complement-dependent cytotoxicity, antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity, antibody-dependent cellular phagocytosis, programmed cell death, modulation of enzymatic activity, and immunomodulatory activity. CD38-targeting antibodies have a favorable toxicity profile in patients, and early clinical data show a marked activity in MM, while studies in other hematological malignancies are ongoing. Daratumumab has single agent activity and a limited toxicity profile, allowing favorable combination therapies with existing as well as emerging therapies, which are currently evaluated in the clinic. Finally, CD38 antibodies may have a role in the treatment of diseases beyond hematological malignancies, including solid tumors and antibody-mediated autoimmune diseases. PMID:26864107

  14. K(3)EDTA Vacuum Tubes Validation for Routine Hematological Testing.

    PubMed

    Lima-Oliveira, Gabriel; Lippi, Giuseppe; Salvagno, Gian Luca; Montagnana, Martina; Poli, Giovanni; Solero, Giovanni Pietro; Picheth, Geraldo; Guidi, Gian Cesare

    2012-01-01

    Background and Objective. Some in vitro diagnostic devices (e.g, blood collection vacuum tubes and syringes for blood analyses) are not validated before the quality laboratory managers decide to start using or to change the brand. Frequently, the laboratory or hospital managers select the vacuum tubes for blood collection based on cost considerations or on relevance of a brand. The aim of this study was to validate two dry K(3)EDTA vacuum tubes of different brands for routine hematological testing. Methods. Blood specimens from 100 volunteers in two different K(3)EDTA vacuum tubes were collected by a single, expert phlebotomist. The routine hematological testing was done on Advia 2120i hematology system. The significance of the differences between samples was assessed by paired Student's t-test after checking for normality. The level of statistical significance was set at P < 0.05. Results and Conclusions. Different brand's tubes evaluated can represent a clinically relevant source of variations only on mean platelet volume (MPV) and platelet distribution width (PDW). Basically, our validation will permit the laboratory or hospital managers to select the brand's vacuum tubes validated according to him/her technical or economical reasons for routine hematological tests. PMID:22888448

  15. K3EDTA Vacuum Tubes Validation for Routine Hematological Testing

    PubMed Central

    Lima-Oliveira, Gabriel; Lippi, Giuseppe; Salvagno, Gian Luca; Montagnana, Martina; Poli, Giovanni; Solero, Giovanni Pietro; Picheth, Geraldo; Guidi, Gian Cesare

    2012-01-01

    Background and Objective. Some in vitro diagnostic devices (e.g, blood collection vacuum tubes and syringes for blood analyses) are not validated before the quality laboratory managers decide to start using or to change the brand. Frequently, the laboratory or hospital managers select the vacuum tubes for blood collection based on cost considerations or on relevance of a brand. The aim of this study was to validate two dry K3EDTA vacuum tubes of different brands for routine hematological testing. Methods. Blood specimens from 100 volunteers in two different K3EDTA vacuum tubes were collected by a single, expert phlebotomist. The routine hematological testing was done on Advia 2120i hematology system. The significance of the differences between samples was assessed by paired Student's t-test after checking for normality. The level of statistical significance was set at P < 0.05. Results and Conclusions. Different brand's tubes evaluated can represent a clinically relevant source of variations only on mean platelet volume (MPV) and platelet distribution width (PDW). Basically, our validation will permit the laboratory or hospital managers to select the brand's vacuum tubes validated according to him/her technical or economical reasons for routine hematological tests. PMID:22888448

  16. Ribavirin for Chronic Hepatitis Prevention among Patients with Hematologic Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Tavitian, Suzanne; Peron, Jean-Marie; Huguet, Françoise; Kamar, Nassim; Abravanel, Florence; Beyne-Rauzy, Odile; Oberic, Lucie; Faguer, Stanislas; Alric, Laurent; Roussel, Murielle; Gaudin, Clément; Ysebaert, Loïc; Huynh, Anne

    2015-01-01

    Findings among a cohort of 26 patients who had hematologic malignancies and hepatitis E virus (HEV) infection support that HEV can induce chronic hepatitis. However, a 3-month course of ribavirin can induce a rapid viral clearance, reducing the risk for chronic hepatitis and enabling continuation of cytotoxic treatments for underlying malignancies. PMID:26197210

  17. Hematological Findings in Medical Professionals Involved at Intraoperative Fluoroscopy.

    PubMed

    Shafiee, Mohsen; Hoseinnezhad, Elham; Vafapour, Hassan; Borzoueisileh, Sajad; Ghorbani, Mohammad; Rashidfar, Razieh

    2016-01-01

    Medical professionals involved at intraoperative fluoroscopy are exposed to low doses of the occupational radiation exposures. The biological effects of chronic low-dose radiation on human health are complex and have not been well established. The aim of the present study is to follow up hematological parameter changes during 2 years in medical professionals exposed to ionization radiation in operating rooms.22 medical professionals (medical specialists and technicians), chronically exposed to ionizing radiation of mobile C-Arm X ray machine, were selected. The seven hematological parameters were examined each time. The statistical analyses were done by Student's t test and one way ONOVA test.The data analysis led to the following observations: (1) the present study incorporated that the basic hematological parameters including the mean value of red blood cells (P=0.90), white blood cells (P=0.68), and platelets count (P=0.45) did not show a significant difference between two years. (2) The mean values corpuscular hemoglobin concentration, corpuscular hemoglobin, and hematocrit parameters were found disturbed low or high in some of medical professionals but their means were not significantly different between two measurements. (3)A statistically significant relation in mean value of RBCs with the duration of exposure and sex were observed.It seems that, hematological parameters survey could not be a reliable test as the biological indicator of long term exposure to very low dose of radiation exposure in medical professionals which their physical dosimetry values are lower than dose limits. PMID:27357897

  18. Cytoplasmic Streaming - Skylab Student Experiment ED-63

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    This chart describes the Skylab student experiment (ED-63), Cytoplasmic Streaming, proposed by Cheryl A. Peitz of Arapahoe High School, Littleton, Colorado. Experiment ED-63 was to observe the effect of zero-gravity on cytoplasmic streaming in the aquatic plant named Elodea, commonly called water weed or water thyme. The phenomenon of cytoplasmic streaming is not well understood, but it is recognized as the circulation mechanism of the internal materials or cytoplasm of a cell. Cytoplasm is a gelatinous substance that has the ability to change its viscosity and flow, carrying various cell materials with it. The activity can be stimulated by sunlight or heat. In March 1972, NASA and the National Science Teachers Association selected 25 experiment proposals for flight on Skylab. Science advisors from the Marshall Space Flight Center aided and assisted the students in developing the proposals for flight on Skylab.

  19. Syncope risk stratification in the ED.

    PubMed

    Dipaola, Franca; Costantino, Giorgio; Solbiati, Monica; Barbic, Franca; Capitanio, Chiara; Tobaldini, Eleonora; Brunetta, Enrico; Zamunér, Antonio Roberto; Furlan, Raffaello

    2014-09-01

    Syncope may be the final common presentation of a number of clinical conditions spanning benign (i.e. neurally-mediated syncope) to life-threatening diseases (i.e. cardiac syncope). Hospitalization rate after a syncopal episode is high. An effective risk stratification is crucial to identify patients at risk of poor prognosis in the short term period to avoid unnecessary hospital admissions. The decision to admit or discharge a syncope patient from the ED is often based on the physician's clinical judgment. In recent years, several prognostic tools (i.e. clinical prediction rules and risk scores) have been developed to provide emergency physicians with accurate guidelines for hospital admission. At present, there are no compelling evidence that prognostic tools perform better than physician's clinical judgment in assessing the short-term outcome of syncope. However, the risk factors characterizing clinical prediction rules and risk scores may be profitably used by emergency doctors in their decision making, specifically whenever a syncope patient has to be discharged from ED or admitted to hospital. Patients with syncope of undetermined etiology, who are characterized by an intermediate-high risk profile after the initial evaluation, should be monitored in the ED. Indeed, data suggest that the 48h following syncope are at the highest risk for major adverse events. A new tool for syncope management is represented by the Syncope Unit in the ED or in an outpatient setting. Syncope Unit may reduce hospitalization and length of hospital stay. However, further studies are needed to clarify whether syncope patients' prognosis can be also improved. PMID:24811585

  20. Anorectal Complications During Neutropenic Period in Patients with Hematologic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Solmaz, Soner; Korur, Aslı; Gereklioğlu, Çiğdem; Asma, Süheyl; Büyükkurt, Nurhilal; Kasar, Mutlu; Yeral, Mahmut; Kozanoğlu, İlknur; Boğa, Can; Ozdoğu, Hakan

    2016-01-01

    Background Neutropenic patients are susceptible to any anorectal disease, and symptomatic anorectal disease afflicts 2–32% of oncology patients. Perianal infections are the most feared complication, considering the lack of natural defense against infectious microorganisms. When septic complications develop, the anorectal disease is potentially fatal, especially in neutropenic patients in whom mortality rates range between 11–57%. Although anorectal diseases are a frequent complication with potentially fatal outcomes among patients with hematologic diseases, sufficient data are not available in the literature. In this study, we aimed to investigate the anorectal complications developing during the neutropenic period in patients with hematologic diseases. Methods A total of 79 patients whose neutropenic period (absolute neutrophil count <500/mcL) continued for 7 days, or longer were included in the study. Results A total of 34 patients out of 79 (43%) were detected to develop anorectal complications, of them 6 (7.6%) developed an anorectal infection. The patients were characterized according to the hematological disease and its status (active or not), the type of treatment and the presence of a history of an anorectal pathology before the onset of the hematologic disease. Nineteen (24.1%) patients had the history of anorectal disturbances before diagnosis of the hematologic disease, and recurrence of an anorectal pathology was found in 14 out of 19 patients(73.7%). In addition, the overall mortality rate was higher among the patients who developed anorectal complications compared to another group (41.2% vs. 22.2%, p=0.059). Conclusion Anorectal pathology is a common complication with high recurrence rate in neutropenic patients. Perianal infections are important as they can cause life-threatening outcomes although they are relatively rare among all anorectal complications. Therefore perianal signs and symptoms should be meticulously evaluated concerning early

  1. Bacterial Infections Following Splenectomy for Malignant and Nonmalignant Hematologic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Leone, Giuseppe; Pizzigallo, Eligio

    2015-01-01

    Splenectomy, while often necessary in otherwise healthy patients after major trauma, finds its primary indication for patients with underlying malignant or nonmalignant hematologic diseases. Indications of splenectomy for hematologic diseases have been reducing in the last few years, due to improved diagnostic and therapeutic tools. In high-income countries, there is a clear decrease over calendar time in the incidence of all indication splenectomy except nonmalignant hematologic diseases. However, splenectomy, even if with different modalities including laparoscopic splenectomy and partial splenectomy, continue to be a current surgical practice both in nonmalignant hematologic diseases, such as Immune Thrombocytopenic Purpura (ITP), Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia (AIHA), Congenital Hemolytic Anemia such as Spherocytosis, Sickle Cell Anemia and Thalassemia and Malignant Hematological Disease, such as lymphoma. Today millions of people in the world are splenectomized. Splenectomy, independently of its cause, induces an early and late increase in the incidence of venous thromboembolism and infections. Infections remain the most dangerous complication of splenectomy. After splenectomy, the levels of antibody are preserved but there is a loss of memory B cells against pneumococcus and tetanus, and the loss of marginal zone monocytes deputed to immunological defense from capsulated bacteria. Commonly, the infections strictly correlated to the absence of the spleen or a decreased or absent splenic function are due to encapsulated bacteria that are the most virulent pathogens in this set of patients. Vaccination with polysaccharide and conjugate vaccines again Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, and Neisseria meningitidis should be performed before the splenectomy. This practice reduces but does not eliminate the occurrence of overwhelming infections due to capsulated bacteria. At present, most of infections found in splenectomized patients are due to Gram

  2. Regional Energy Deployment System (ReEDS)

    SciTech Connect

    Short, W.; Sullivan, P.; Mai, T.; Mowers, M.; Uriarte, C.; Blair, N.; Heimiller, D.; Martinez, A.

    2011-12-01

    The Regional Energy Deployment System (ReEDS) is a deterministic optimization model of the deployment of electric power generation technologies and transmission infrastructure throughout the contiguous United States into the future. The model, developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Strategic Energy Analysis Center, is designed to analyze the critical energy issues in the electric sector, especially with respect to potential energy policies, such as clean energy and renewable energy standards or carbon restrictions. ReEDS provides a detailed treatment of electricity-generating and electrical storage technologies and specifically addresses a variety of issues related to renewable energy technologies, including accessibility and cost of transmission, regional quality of renewable resources, seasonal and diurnal generation profiles, variability of wind and solar power, and the influence of variability on the reliability of the electrical grid. ReEDS addresses these issues through a highly discretized regional structure, explicit statistical treatment of the variability in wind and solar output over time, and consideration of ancillary services' requirements and costs.

  3. Contaminant concentrations, biochemical and hematological biomarkers in blood of West Indian manatees Trichechus manatus from Brazil.

    PubMed

    Anzolin, D G; Sarkis, J E S; Diaz, E; Soares, D G; Serrano, I L; Borges, J C G; Souto, A S; Taniguchi, S; Montone, R C; Bainy, A C D; Carvalho, P S M

    2012-07-01

    The West Indian manatee Trichechus manatus is threatened with extinction in Brazil, and this study focused on nondestructive blood samples analyzed for metals, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and organochlorine pesticides (OCPs), as well as biochemical and hematological biomarkers. Studied manatees were kept at Projeto Peixe-Boi headquarters in Pernambuco State, and at two natural areas in estuaries where they are released to the wild. Manatees kept at the natural estuary in Paraiba State have blood concentrations of Al, Pb, Cd, Sn that are 11, 7, 8 and 23 times greater, respectively, than the concentrations found in blood of animals from the same species in Florida, USA. An inhibition of butyrylcholinesterase in manatees kept at the two reintroduction sites in Alagoas and Paraiba States indicated possible exposure of the animals to cholinesterase inhibitor insecticides. PCBs and OCPs were not detected. Results from this study will help delineate conservation efforts in the region. PMID:22626623

  4. EDS coal liquefaction process development. Phase V. EDS Consolidation Program: flushing and blowdown system design

    SciTech Connect

    1984-01-01

    The flushing and blowdown system of an EDS plant provides the means of removing viscous coal products and slurry streams from plant vessels and lines. In addition, it provides the flushing oil needed during normal operations for purging instruments in slurry service, for flushing slurry pump and slurry agitator seals, and for flushing slurry safety valve inlet lines. It contains a blowdown system for collecting material from washing operations, including the transport of the collected material to slop tankage. The rerun options for depleting the inventory of collected slop are a related aspect of the flushing and blowdown system design although specific equipment for handling slop is not part of the flushing and blowdown system facilities. This report documents the results of a study which evaluates the flushing and blowdown requirements for a commercial-scale EDS plant. The work was conducted as part of the EDS Consolidation Program. The design recommendations represent a consolidation of learnings accrued during previous phases of the EDS Project including results obtained from ECLP operations, from the ECLP Test Program, and from past EDS Study Design preparations. 1 reference, 4 figures, 2 tables.

  5. EFFECTS OF ETHANE DIMETHANESULFONATE (EDS) ON ADULT AND IMMATURE RABBIT LEYDIG CELLS: COMPARISON WITH EDS-TREATED RAT LEYDIG CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ethane-dimethanesulfonate (EDS) has been shown to selectively kill Leydig cells and depress testosterone production in adult rats. ecent study has shown that immature rat leydig cells are less sensitive to EDS exposure. here is evidence that the rabbit metabolizes EDS to methane ...

  6. Cardiovascular and Hematological Medicine in 2013 - Advances and Insights.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Debabrata

    2012-12-11

    Welcome to the first issue of Cardiovascular & Hematological Agents in Medicinal Chemistry (CHAMC) for 2013. I hope everyone has had an enjoyable holiday season and I want to wish everyone a wonderful New Year. As you know, our journal (CHAMC) aims to cover the latest and outstanding developments in medicinal chemistry, rational drug design for the discovery of novel cardiovascular and hematological Agents and discusses such therapies in clinical practice. Each issue contains a series of timely in-depth reviews, original research articles and drug clinical trial studies written by leaders in the field covering a range of current topics in cardiovascular and hematological sciences. I feel that CHAMC is an essential journal for every medicinal chemist, clinician and healthcare provider who wishes to be kept informed and up-to-date with the latest and most important developments in cardiovascular and hematological drug discovery and their clinical uses. In the coming issues of the journal, we will discuss several important topics pertinent to chemists and clinicians in the cardiovascular and hematology fields such as curcumin and resveratrol as alternative medicinal agents against metabolic syndrome, interrelationship between chronic kidney disease and risk of cardiovascular diseases and effects of direct renin inhibitor, aliskiren, on arterial hypertension, chronic kidney disease and cardiovascular disease among others. The journal also delves into hot topics such as genetic testing and personalized medicine, use of literature-based discovery to identify novel therapeutic approaches, pharmacologic mechanism and clinical relevance of P2Y12 inhibitors and intracoronary injection of glycoprotein IIb/IIIa, abciximab, as adjuvant therapy in primary coronary intervention. Cardiovascular medicine and hematology are both very dynamic fields with rapid advances and we will continue to work to keep you up to date on new advances and therapies. I would also take this

  7. EDS Coal Liquefaction Process Development. Phase V. Laboratory evaluation of the characteristics of EDS Illinois bottoms

    SciTech Connect

    Lao, T C; Levasseur, A A

    1984-02-01

    This interim report documents work carried out by Combustion Engineering, Inc. under a contract to Exxon Research and Engineering Company to develop a conceptual Hybrid Boiler design fueled by the vacuum distillation residue (vacuum bottoms) derived from Illinois No. 6 coal in the EDS Coal Liquefaction Process. This report was prepared by Combustion Engineering, Inc., and is the first of two reports on the predevelopment phase of the Hybrid Boiler program. This report covers the results of a laboratory investigation to assess the fuel and ash properties of EDS vacuum bottoms. The results of the laboratory testing reported here were used in conjunction with Combustion Engineering's design experience to predict fuel performance and to develop appropriate boiler design parameters. These boiler design parameters were used to prepare the engineering design study reported in EDS Interim Report FE-2893-113, the second of the two reports on the predevelopment phase of the Hybrid Boiler Program. 46 figures, 29 tables.

  8. ED navigators steer patients to appropriate providers.

    PubMed

    2012-03-01

    At Presbyterian Healthcare Services in Albuquerque, NM, emergency department navigators refer patients with minor ailments to primary care providers or urgent care centers. All patients are triaged by nurse in ED. - Appropriate patients are sent to the hospital's Lean Track area where they are evaluated by a physician or mid-level provider. - Patients who can safely be treated in 12-24 hours are referred to the navigator, who obtains an appointment for them with a primary care provider or urgent care center. PMID:22423392

  9. Introducing Mediterranean Journal of Hematology and Infectious Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Leone, Giuseppe; Larocca, Luigi Maria; Pizzigallo, Eligio

    2009-01-01

    Summary: Mediterranean Journal of Hematology and Infectious Diseases (MJHID) is a new open access, peer-reviewed, online journal, which encompasses different aspects of clinical and translational research providing an insight into the relationship between acute and chronic infections and hematological diseases. MJHID will be a topical journal on subjects of current importance in clinical haematology and infectious diseases. Every issue should have, beside the editor in chief, a guest editor. Both editor in chief and guest editor provide to invite experts in the selected topic to performe a complete update of the arguments readily available for practising phisicians. The journal will have also a section devoted to original papers, case reports and letters to editor and Editorial comment mostly focusing on the arguments treated in the previous topical issues. PMID:21415983

  10. Planning for the future workforce in hematology research.

    PubMed

    Hoots, W Keith; Abkowitz, Janis L; Coller, Barry S; DiMichele, Donna M

    2015-04-30

    The medical research and training enterprise in the United States is complex in both its scope and implementation. Accordingly, adaptations to the associated workforce needs present particular challenges. This is particularly true for maintaining or expanding national needs for physician-scientists where training resource requirements and competitive transitional milestones are substantial. For the individual, these phenomena can produce financial burden, prolong the career trajectory, and significantly influence career pathways. Hence, when national data suggest that future medical research needs in a scientific area may be met in a less than optimal manner, strategies to expand research and training capacity must follow. This article defines such an exigency for research and training in nonneoplastic hematology and presents potential strategies for addressing these critical workforce needs. The considerations presented herein reflect a summary of the discussions presented at 2 workshops cosponsored by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute and the American Society of Hematology. PMID:25758827

  11. [Research in pediatric hematology [Germany, 1970-2000

    PubMed

    Welte, K

    2013-05-01

    Professor Riehm was not only an excellent pediatric oncologist, but also an excellent hematologist. He was a mentor also for young scientists who were interested in hematological research as his/her main focus. In the 1970s he has promoted research in coagulation disorders, during 1980s he supported the investigation on hematopoetic growth factors. During the 1990 s he was one of the first in Europe who have used hematopoietic growth factors as a supportive therapy in the protocol ALL-BFM and has also helped to set up the International Registry for Severe Chronic Neutropenias [SCNIR] in his Department. The sense of the top research directions of the time distinguishes him not only as a pioneer of the leukaemia therapy studies, but also as a pioneer in hematology. He created the environment in which research could blossom. PMID:23700055

  12. Hematologic and oncologic complications in the critically ill child.

    PubMed Central

    McIntosh, S.

    1984-01-01

    Admission of a patient to an intensive care unit for management of direct consequences of a hematologic or oncologic disease is occasionally necessary. Such problems included exchange transfusion, sepsis, compression of vital structures by malignant tumor, metabolic derangements, leukostasis, post-operative care, major sickling episodes in vital organs, and disseminated coagulopathy. More often, however, hematologic complications arise in the child critically ill from other causes, such as trauma or infections. The first two sections of this review address blood transfusion and hemostasis, topics likely to have wide application in the care of critically ill children. The last portion discusses problems unique to patients with sickling or malignant disease. Images FIG. 3 FIG. 4 FIG. 5 FIG. 6 PMID:6382836

  13. Target Therapy in Hematological Malignances: New Monoclonal Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Szymczyk, Agnieszka; Pawlowski, Johannes

    2014-01-01

    Apart from radio- and chemotherapy, monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) represent a new, more selective tool in the treatment of hematological malignancies. MoAbs bind with the specific antigens of the tumors. This interaction is a basis for targeted therapies which exhibit few side effects and significant antitumor activity. This review provides an overview of the functional characteristics of MoAbs, with some examples of their clinical application. The promising results in the treatment of hematological malignancies have led to the more frequent usage of MoAbs in the therapy. Development of MoAbs is a subject of extensive research. They are a promising method of cancer treatment in the future.

  14. Alternative donor transplant of benign primary hematologic disorders

    PubMed Central

    Tolar, J; Sodani, P; Symons, H

    2015-01-01

    Hematopoietic SCT is currently the only curative therapy for a range of benign inherited and acquired primary hematologic disorders in children, including BM failure syndromes and hemoglobinopathies. The preferred HLA-matched sibling donor is available for only about 25% of such children. However, there has been substantial progress over the last four decades in the use of alternative donors for those without a matched sibling—including HLA-matched unrelated donors, HLA-haploidentical related donors and unrelated-donor umbilical cord blood—so that it is now possible to find a donor for almost every child requiring an allograft. Below, we summarize the relative merits and limitations of the different alternative donors for benign hematologic conditions, first generally, and then in relation to specific disorders, and suggest recommendations for selecting such an alternative donor. PMID:25665040

  15. Polo-like kinase inhibitors in hematologic malignancies.

    PubMed

    Talati, Chetasi; Griffiths, Elizabeth A; Wetzler, Meir; Wang, Eunice S

    2016-02-01

    Polo-like kinases (Plk) are key regulators of the cell cycle and multiple aspects of mitosis. Two agents that inhibit the Plk signaling pathway have shown promising activity in patients with hematologic malignancies and are currently in phase III trials. Volasertib is a Plk inhibitor under evaluation combined with low-dose cytarabine in older patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) ineligible for intensive induction therapy. Rigosertib, a dual inhibitor of the Plk and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase pathways, is under investigation in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) who have failed azacitidine or decitabine treatment. The prognosis for patients with AML, who are ineligible for intensive induction therapy, and for those with MDS refractory/relapsed after a hypomethylating agent, remains poor. Novel approaches, such as Plk inhibitors, are urgently needed for these patients. Here, we provide a comprehensive overview of the current state of development of Plk inhibitors for the treatment of hematologic malignancies. PMID:26597019

  16. The TET2 interactors and their links to hematological malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Feng; Weeks, Ophelia; Yang, Feng-Chun; Xu, Mingjiang

    2016-01-01

    Ten-eleven translocation family proteins are dioxygenases that oxidize 5-methylcytosine to 5-hydroxymethylcytosine, 5-formylcytosine and 5-carboxylcytosine in DNA, early steps of active DNA demethylation. TET2, the second member of TET protein family, is frequently mutated in patients with hematological malignancies, leading to aberrant DNA methylation profiling and decreased 5hmC levels. Located in the nucleus and acting as a DNA-modifying enzyme, TET2 is thought to exert its function via TET2-containing protein complexes. Identifying the interactome network of TET2 likely holds the key to uncover the mechanisms by which TET2 exerts its function in cells. Here, we review recent literature on TET2 interactors and discuss their possible roles in TET2 loss-mediated dysregulation of hematopoiesis and pathogenesis of hematological malignancies. PMID:26099018

  17. Planning for the future workforce in hematology research

    PubMed Central

    Abkowitz, Janis L.; Coller, Barry S.; DiMichele, Donna M.

    2015-01-01

    The medical research and training enterprise in the United States is complex in both its scope and implementation. Accordingly, adaptations to the associated workforce needs present particular challenges. This is particularly true for maintaining or expanding national needs for physician-scientists where training resource requirements and competitive transitional milestones are substantial. For the individual, these phenomena can produce financial burden, prolong the career trajectory, and significantly influence career pathways. Hence, when national data suggest that future medical research needs in a scientific area may be met in a less than optimal manner, strategies to expand research and training capacity must follow. This article defines such an exigency for research and training in nonneoplastic hematology and presents potential strategies for addressing these critical workforce needs. The considerations presented herein reflect a summary of the discussions presented at 2 workshops cosponsored by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute and the American Society of Hematology. PMID:25758827

  18. Multidrug-resistant bacteria in hematology patients: emerging threats.

    PubMed

    Tatarelli, Paola; Mikulska, Malgorzata

    2016-06-01

    Multidrug-resistant (MDR) bacteria, particularly Gram negatives, such as Enterobacteriaceae resistant to third-generation cephalosporins or carbapenems and MDR Pseudomonas aeruginosa, are increasingly frequent in hematology patients. The prevalence of different resistant species varies significantly between centers. Thus, the knowledge of local epidemiology is mandatory for deciding the most appr-opriate management protocols. In the era of increasing antibiotic resistance, empirical therapy of febrile neutropenia should be individualized. A de-escalation approach is recommended in case of severe clinical presentation in patients who are at high risk for infection with a resistant strain. Targeted therapy of an MDR Gram negative usually calls for a combination treatment, although no large randomized trials exist in this setting. Infection control measures are the cornerstone of limiting the spread of MDR pathogens in hematology units. PMID:27196948

  19. [Extracellular vesicles and their role in hematological malignancies].

    PubMed

    Rzepiel, Andrea; Kutszegi, Nóra; Cs Sági, Judit; Kelemen, Andrea; Pálóczi, Krisztina; F Semsei, Ágnes; Buzás, Edit; Erdélyi, Dániel János

    2016-08-01

    Extracellular vesicles are produced in all organisms. The most intensively investigated categories of extracellular vesicles include apoptotic bodies, microvesicles and exosomes. Among a very wide range of areas, their role has been confirmed in intercellular communication, immune response and angiogenesis (in both physiological and pathological conditions). Their alterations suggest the potential use of them as biomarkers. In this paper the authors give an insight into the research of extracellular vesicles in general, and then focus on published findings in hematological malignancies. Quantitative and qualitative changes of microvesicles and exosomes may have value in diagnostics, prognostics and minimal residual disease monitoring of hematological malignancies. The function of extracellular vesicles in downregulation of natural killer cells' activity has been demonstrated in acute myeloid leukemia. In chronic lymphocytic leukemia, microvesicles seem to play a role in drug resistance. Orv. Hetil., 2016, 157(35), 1379-1384. PMID:27569460

  20. Bone marrow transfusions in previously irradiated, hematologically normal syngeneic mice

    SciTech Connect

    Brecher, G.; Lawce, H.; Tjio, J.H.

    1981-03-01

    Transfusion of syngeneic marrow into normal, nonirradiated recipients results only in minimal proliferation of donor cells. However, irradiated recipients, restored to hematologic normalcy by an initial marrow transfusion, subsequently sustain proliferation which replaces approximately 10% of endogenous marrow after a single transfusion of 4 x 10/sup 7/ marrow cells of the same strain as the host. Cells from histoincompatible donors proliferate only rarely or minimally in the marrows of these irradiated, but hematologically normal recipients without reirradiation. Syngeneic male donor cells proliferate in irradiated and restored female mice, while female donor cells fail to proliferate in the marrow of syngeneic male recipients. A possible explanation is that transfused female cells respond immunologically to the abundant H-Y antigen in the male environment and are eliminated as a result.

  1. Nanomedicine strategies for hematological malignancies: what is next?

    PubMed

    Visani, Giuseppe; Loscocco, Federica; Isidori, Alessandro

    2014-10-01

    The major obstacle in treating cancer depends on the low therapeutic index of most anticancer drugs. The lack of specificity, coupled with the large volumes of distribution, translates into a nonpreferential distribution of anticancer drugs to the tumor. Accordingly, the dose of the anticancer drug that is achievable within tumor is limited, resulting in suboptimal treatment and unwanted toxicity. Nanoparticles applied as drug-delivery systems are submicron-sized (3-200 nm) particles, that can enhance the selectivity of the active drug to cancer cells through a change of its pharmacokinetic profile, while avoiding toxicity in normal cells. This review will discuss the current uses of nanodrugs in hematology, with a focus on the most promising nanoparticles in development for the treatment of hematologic tumors. PMID:25413858

  2. Hematologic and plasma chemistry values in captive psittacine birds.

    PubMed

    Polo, F J; Peinado, V I; Viscor, G; Palomeque, J

    1998-01-01

    Reference values for some hematologic parameters in 19 species and plasma chemical values in 11 species of Psittacine birds, including cockatoos, parrots, amazons, macaws, conures, and lories, were established for use in veterinary medicine. The following parameters were studied: hematocrit, hemoglobin concentration, erythrocyte number, mean corpuscular volume, mean corpuscular hemoglobin, mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration, erythrocyte dimensions, leukocyte number and differential leukocyte count, glucose, urea, uric acid, cholesterol, triglycerides, creatinine, aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, alkaline phosphatase, creatinine phosphokinase, lactic dehydrogenase, gamma glutamyl transpeptidase, total plasma protein, albumin, globulins, albumin-globulin ratio, sodium, potassium, calcium, magnesium, total phosphorus, chloride, and osmolality. Hematologically, the Psittacine is a very homogeneous avian group, with small differences between species. They are, however, different from other groups of birds. PMID:9777153

  3. Understanding, treating and avoiding hematological disease: Better medicine through mathematics?

    PubMed Central

    Dale, David C.; Mackey, Michael C.

    2014-01-01

    This paper traces the experimental, clinical and mathematical modeling efforts to understand a periodic hematological disease–cyclical neutropenia. It is primarily a highly personal account by two scientists from quite different backgrounds of the interactions over almost 40 years and their attempts to understand this intriguing disease. It’s also a story of their efforts to offer effective treatments for the patients who suffer from cyclic neutropenia and other conditions causing neutropenia and infections. PMID:25213154

  4. Wavelength encoding technique for particle analyses in hematology analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rongeat, Nelly; Brunel, Patrick; Gineys, Jean-Philippe; Cremien, Didier; Couderc, Vincent; Nérin, Philippe

    2011-07-01

    The aim of this study is to combine multiple excitation wavelengths in order to improve accuracy of fluorescence characterization of labeled cells. The experimental demonstration is realized with a hematology analyzer based on flow cytometry and a CW laser source emitting two visible wavelengths. A given optical encoding associated to each wavelength allows fluorescence identification coming from specific fluorochromes and avoiding the use of noisy compensation method.

  5. Cytogenetic effect of 5-azacytidine in patients with hematological malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Tsuda, Jessica Romy; Segato, Rosimeire; Barbosa, Waldênia; Smith, Marília de Arruda Cardoso; Payão, Spencer Luiz Marques

    2011-01-01

    Background Recently, the importance of cytogenetics has grown in the diagnosis, prognosis and treatment of leukemias and myelodysplastic syndromes. 5-azacytidine is a drug that has well-known cytogenetical effects and is approved in the treatment of myelodysplastic syndromes. To date, no studies have been performed to evaluate the impact of 5-azacytidine on the chromosomes of patients with hematological neoplasias. This study aimed to investigate the effects of 5-azacytidine on chromosomes of patients with different hematological malignancies using G-band analyses to identify possible cytogenetical alterations. Methods The peripheral blood of 18 patients with hematological malignancies and 18 controls was collected in heparinized tubes. 5-azacytidine was added, at a final concentration of 10-5M, to cultures 7 hours prior to harvest. Results Uncoiled centromeric/pericentromeric heterochromatin of chromosomes-1, 9 and 16 occurred more frequently in the patients than in controls. This higher frequency of uncoiled heterochromatin was statistically significant (p-value = 0.004) for chromosome-9. Conversely, we observed that the fragile site at 19q13 was more frequent in controls (p-value = 0.0468). Conclusions The results of this study suggest that satellite sequences, located in the heterochromatin of chromosome-9, are hypomethylated in hematological malignancies. This hypomethylation may contribute to the disease, activating transposable elements and/or promoting genomic instability, enabling the loss of heterozygosity of important tumor suppressor genes. An investigation of the 19q13 region may help to understand whether or not the predominant occurrence of the fragile site at 19q13 in controls is due to hypermethylation of this region. PMID:23049342

  6. Diagnostic Application of Absolute Neutron Activation Analysis in Hematology

    SciTech Connect

    Zamboni, C.B.; Oliveira, L.C.; Dalaqua, L. Jr.

    2004-10-03

    The Absolute Neutron Activation Analysis (ANAA) technique was used to determine element concentrations of Cl and Na in blood of healthy group (male and female blood donators), select from Blood Banks at Sao Paulo city, to provide information which can help in diagnosis of patients. This study permitted to perform a discussion about the advantages and limitations of using this nuclear methodology in hematological examinations.

  7. Hematologic malignancies: at the forefront of immunotherapeutic innovation

    PubMed Central

    Bachireddy, Pavan; Burkhardt, Ute E.; Rajasagi, Mohini; Wu, Catherine J.

    2015-01-01

    The recent successes of cancer immunotherapy have stimulated interest for the potential widespread application of these approaches; hematologic malignancies have provided both initial proofs-of-concept and an informative testing ground for a variety of immune-based therapeutics. The immune-cell origin of many of the blood malignancies provides a unique opportunity to both understand the mechanisms of human immune-responsiveness and immune-evasion as well as to exploit the unique therapeutic opportunities they provide. PMID:25786696

  8. Hematologic comparisons of shot and live trapped cottontail rabbits.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, H A; Kirkpatrick, R L; Burkhart, H E; Davis, J W

    1978-01-01

    Comparisons were made between hematologic measurements of shot and box-trapped cottontail rabbits (Sylvilagus floridanus). Trapped rabbits had significantly (P less than 0.001) higher serum corticoid levels and segmented neutrophil percentages and significantly (P less than 0.001) lower lymphocyte percentages than did shot rabbits. Trapped rabbits also had significantly (P less than 0.05) higher packed cell volumes and blood urea nitrogen values than did shot rabbits. PMID:633520

  9. Galectins as therapeutic targets for hematological malignancies: a hopeful sweetness.

    PubMed

    Pena, Camilo; Mirandola, Leonardo; Figueroa, Jose A; Hosiriluck, Nattamol; Suvorava, Natallia; Trotter, Kayley; Reidy, Adair; Rakhshanda, Rahman; Payne, Drew; Jenkins, Marjorie; Grizzi, Fabio; Littlefield, Lauren; Chiriva-Internati, Maurizio; Cobos, Everardo

    2014-09-01

    Galectins are family of galactose-binding proteins known to play critical roles in inflammation and neoplastic progression. Galectins facilitate the growth and survival of neoplastic cells by regulating their cross-talk with the extracellular microenvironment and hampering anti-neoplastic immunity. Here, we review the role of galectins in the biology of hematological malignancies and their promise as potential therapeutic agents in these diseases. PMID:25405162

  10. Galectins as therapeutic targets for hematological malignancies: a hopeful sweetness

    PubMed Central

    Pena, Camilo; Mirandola, Leonardo; Figueroa, Jose A.; Hosiriluck, Nattamol; Suvorava, Natallia; Trotter, Kayley; Reidy, Adair; Rakhshanda, Rahman; Payne, Drew; Jenkins, Marjorie; Grizzi, Fabio; Littlefield, Lauren; Cobos, Everardo

    2014-01-01

    Galectins are family of galactose-binding proteins known to play critical roles in inflammation and neoplastic progression. Galectins facilitate the growth and survival of neoplastic cells by regulating their cross-talk with the extracellular microenvironment and hampering anti-neoplastic immunity. Here, we review the role of galectins in the biology of hematological malignancies and their promise as potential therapeutic agents in these diseases. PMID:25405162

  11. Targeting p53 by small molecules in hematological malignancies.

    PubMed

    Saha, Manujendra N; Qiu, Lugui; Chang, Hong

    2013-01-01

    p53 is a powerful tumor suppressor and is an attractive cancer therapeutic target. A breakthrough in cancer research came from the discovery of the drugs which are capable of reactivating p53 function. Most anti-cancer agents, from traditional chemo- and radiation therapies to more recently developed non-peptide small molecules exert their effects by enhancing the anti-proliferative activities of p53. Small molecules such as nutlin, RITA, and PRIMA-1 that can activate p53 have shown their anti-tumor effects in different types of hematological malignancies. Importantly, nutlin and PRIMA-1 have successfully reached the stage of phase I/II clinical trials in at least one type of hematological cancer. Thus, the pharmacological activation of p53 by these small molecules has a major clinical impact on prognostic use and targeted drug design. In the current review, we present the recent achievements in p53 research using small molecules in hematological malignancies. Anticancer activity of different classes of compounds targeting the p53 signaling pathway and their mechanism of action are discussed. In addition, we discuss how p53 tumor suppressor protein holds promise as a drug target for recent and future novel therapies in these diseases. PMID:23531342

  12. Study on hematological alterations induced by amphistomosis in buffaloes

    PubMed Central

    Chauhan, Vandip. D.; Patel, P. V.; Hasnani, Jigar J.; Pandya, Suchit S.; Pandey, Sunanda; Pansuriya, Dhaval V.; Choudhary, Vijayata

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The study was undertaken to compare the alterations in the hematological parameters in buffaloes suffering from Amphistomosis with normal buffaloes and to correlate it with the subclinical infection that is hard to diagnose. Materials and Methods: Blood samples from 50 amphistomes infected as well as 50 non-infected buffaloes from slaughter houses were taken into vacutainer tubes containing ethylene diamine tetraacetic acid for estimation of various hematological parameters by Automatic Analyzer Hema-2062 manufactured by Analytical Technologies Ltd. Result: There was a significant reduction in the mean hemoglobin, total leukocyte count, total erythrocyte count and packed cell volume and significant increase in the neutrophils count and eosinophil count of infected buffaloes as compared to the non-infected buffaloes respectively. Conclusion: Amphistomosis is characterized by severe neutrophilia, eosinophilia, and anemia. Anemia of high intensity along with hepatic damage can lead to the death of the animal in severe cases. Alterations in the Hematological parameters can be used as an indicator to diagnose and check the severity of amphistomosis especially in young ones and in subclinical infection. PMID:27047107

  13. Passive damping in EDS maglev systems.

    SciTech Connect

    Rote, D. M.

    2002-05-03

    There continues to be strong interest in the subjects of damping and drag forces associated with electrodynamic suspension (EDS) systems. While electromagnetic drag forces resist the forward motion of a vehicle and therefore consume energy, damping forces control, at least in part, the response of the vehicle to disturbances. Ideally, one would like to reduce the drag forces as much as possible while retaining adequate damping forces to insure dynamic stability and satisfactory ride quality. These two goals turn out to be difficult to achieve in practice. It is well known that maglev systems tend to be intrinsically under damped. Consequently it is often necessary in a practical system design to enhance the damping passively or actively. For reasons of cost and simplicity, it is desirable to rely as much as possible on passive damping mechanisms. In this paper, rough estimates are made of the passive damping and drag forces caused by various mechanisms in EDS systems. No attention will be given to active control systems or secondary suspension systems which are obvious ways to augment passive damping mechanisms if the latter prove to be inadequate.

  14. Text message program improves outcomes, decreases ED utilization among ED patients with poorly controlled diabetes.

    PubMed

    2014-02-01

    Diabetic patients who lack access to primary care tend to frequent the ED, often with complications from their disease that could have been prevented with proper management and education. To get around the problem of access, researchers tested an automated program that continuously delivered educational messaging via text to a group of patients who presented to the ED with poorly controlled diabetes. After six months, researchers noted improvements in Hb A1c levels, self-reported medication adherence, and ED utilization when compared with a control group. And the impact was particularly noteworthy among Latinos, according to the researchers. The text messaging program, dubbed TExT-Med, was developed by four physicians and two diabetes educators. The messages were delivered daily, and contained educational as well motivational content derived from the National Diabetes Education Program.There were also medication reminders, healthy living challenges, and trivia questions about diabetes. At six months, Hb A1c levels decreased by 1.05% in the intervention group, compared to 0.60% in the control group, and self-reported medication adherence improved from 4.5 to 5.4 (as measured on an 8 point scale) in the intervention group versus a decrease of 0.1 in the control group. During the six-month study period, 35.9% of patients in the intervention group presented to the ED for care, as compared to 51.6% of patients in the control group. PMID:24505864

  15. Disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Jr, Silberstein LE, et al, eds. Hematology: Basic Principles and Practice . 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2013:chap 141. Thachil J, Toh CH. Current concepts in the management of disseminated intravascular coagulation. Thromb Res . 2012;129 ...

  16. Capillary Study - Skylab Student Experiment ED-72

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    This chart describes the Skylab student experiment ED-72, Capillary Study, proposed by Roger G. Johnson of St. Paul, Mirnesota. Johnson theorized that capillary rise might continue to infinity in Skylab's zero-gravity environment. The behavior of fluids, particularly their flow properties in a low-gravity environment, had been important from the time that Robert H. Goddard launched his liquid-fueled rockets in the 1920's to the more sophisticated space systems of the day. It was necessary to design fluid-flow systems that would not only overcome the lack of gravity but also overcome, or take advantage of, the effect of surface tension. In March 1972, NASA and the National Science Teachers Association selected 25 experiment proposals for flight on Skylab. Science advisors from the Marshall Space Flight Center aided and assisted the students in developing the proposals for flight on Skylab.

  17. Contribution of ED admissions to inpatient hospital revenue.

    PubMed

    Sacchetti, Alfred; Harris, Russell H; Warden, Todd; Roth, Sandra

    2002-01-01

    Emergency department (ED) practices are traditionally profiled in terms of their patient encounters. Such evaluations reflect a preponderance of outpatient visits while crediting income from admitted patients to traditional hospital-based services. This study evaluates the contribution of ED admissions to inpatient hospital revenue. The study was set at an urban tertiary care community hospital with university affiliation. Information referable to ED patients was collected from the hospital's Universal Billing Code (UB-92)-based patient information warehouse. Data fields referable to hospital charges, insurance type, and disposition were used for analysis of a 1-year period from September 1, 1998 to August 31, 1999. Statistical analysis was through chi square and ANOVA. During the study period 33,174 patients were treated in the ED with 6,671 (20%) admitted to inpatient services. Total hospital charges for all ED patients during this time were $107 million dollars with $9.1 million (8.5%) generated from discharged patients and $98.0 million (91.5%) from admitted ED patients (P <.001). Mean charges for individual discharged patients were $344.10 whereas for individual admitted patients mean charges were $14,692.28. (P <.001) Medicaid and self pay represented 55.4% of the insurance coverage for discharged ED patients whereas these same insurance classes accounted for only 16.3% of admitted patients. (P <.001) Medicare visits accounted for 12.7% of discharged ED patients but 60.7% of admitted patients (P <.001). Total hospital gross revenue for inpatient services for the study period was $288 million of which 34% was contributed from admitted ED patients. ED services represent a major source of inpatient hospital revenue. The recognition of the ED's potential in this area may be lost if income from patients admitted through the ED is credited to traditional hospital-based services. PMID:11781909

  18. Could your ED meet a 15-minute service pledge?

    PubMed

    2003-01-01

    Patients dissatisfied with long waits is one of the most pressing problems that emergency department (ED) managers must address, and there is a trend of EDs offering service guarantees to patients to obtain higher satisfaction scores. At participating EDs, patients are offered letters of apology, movie passes, or a free visit if the guarantee isn't met. Census increased dramatically after the guarantee programs were implemented. To ensure the guarantees are met, additional nursing staff or ED beds may need to be added. PMID:12515111

  19. Mucorales-Specific T Cells in Patients with Hematologic Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Forghieri, Fabio; Candoni, Anna; Cesaro, Simone; Quadrelli, Chiara; Maertens, Johan; Rossi, Giulio; Morselli, Monica; Codeluppi, Mauro; Mussini, Cristina; Colaci, Elisabetta; Messerotti, Andrea; Paolini, Ambra; Maccaferri, Monica; Fantuzzi, Valeria; Del Giovane, Cinzia; Stefani, Alessandro; Morandi, Uliano; Maffei, Rossana; Marasca, Roberto; Narni, Franco; Fanin, Renato; Comoli, Patrizia; Romani, Luigina; Beauvais, Anne; Viale, Pier Luigi; Latgè, Jean Paul; Luppi, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Background Invasive mucormycosis (IM) is an emerging life-threatening fungal infection. It is difficult to obtain a definite diagnosis and to initiate timely intervention. Mucorales-specific T cells occur during the course of IM and are involved in the clearance of the infection. We have evaluated the feasibility of detecting Mucorales-specific T cells in hematological patients at risk for IM, and have correlated the detection of such cells with the clinical conditions of the patients. Methods and Findings By using an enzyme linked immunospot assay, the presence of Mucorales-specific T cells in peripheral blood (PB) samples has been investigated at three time points during high-dose chemotherapy for hematologic malignancies. Mucorales-specific T cells producing interferon-γ, interleukin-10 and interleukin-4 were analysed in order to detect a correlation between the immune response and the clinical picture. Twenty-one (10.3%) of 204 patients, accounting for 32 (5.3%) of 598 PB samples, tested positive for Mucorales-specific T cells. Two groups could be identified. Group 1, including 15 patients without signs or symptoms of invasive fungal diseases (IFD), showed a predominance of Mucorales-specific T cells producing interferon-gamma. Group 2 included 6 patients with a clinical picture consistent with invasive fungal disease (IFD): 2 cases of proven IM and 4 cases of possible IFD. The proven patients had significantly higher number of Mucorales-specific T cells producing interleukin-10 and interleukin-4 and higher rates of positive samples by using derived diagnostic cut-offs when compared with the 15 patients without IFD. Conclusions Mucorales-specific T cells can be detected and monitored in patients with hematologic malignancies at risk for IM. Mucorales-specific T cells polarized to the production of T helper type 2 cytokines are associated with proven IM and may be evaluated as a surrogate diagnostic marker for IM. PMID:26871570

  20. Hematologic toxicity in radioimmunotherapy: An evaluation of different predictive measures

    SciTech Connect

    Sgouros, G.; Divgi, C.; Scott, A.M.

    1996-05-01

    In essentially all cases of intravenously administered administered radiolabeled antibody, hematologic toxicity has limited the amount of radioactivity that may be administered. In this study 4 potential predictors of hematologic toxicity are evaluated: red marrow dose (RMD), whole-body dose (WBD), administered activity (AA), and administered activity per unit surface area (AASA). These were evaluated against 8 measures of hematologic toxicity: grade (G), time-to-nadir (TTN), and absolute and per cent drop in counts (ADC, %DC) for platelets (P) and white blood cells (W). Data from a phase I study of 29 patients with metastatic colon carcinoma and a total of 35 different antibody administrations of {sup 131}I-CC49 antibody were used in the analysis. Serum clearance kinetics were used to estimate RMD. A remainder-of-body term representing activity not in the red marrow was included in the RMD calculations. The whole-body dose was estimated as the product of whole-body cumulated activity, derived form survey meter measurements, and the whole-body to whole-body S-factor. All S-factors were obtained from MIRD Pamphlet 11. Patient surface area was estimated form each patient`s height and weight. Patients exhibiting accelerated clearance kinetics due to an immunologic response against the antibody (HAMA) were included in the analysis. The correlation coefficients, r, are listed in the table. All patients had been treated with 5-FU and leucovorin previously. When patients that has also been treated with mitomycin and/or alkylating agents were excluded from the analysis, the r values shown on the last line of the table were obtained for platelet toxicity grade. These results suggest that, although still poor, RMD may be a slightly better predictor of toxicity than other measures.

  1. Endothelialized Microfluidics for Studying Microvascular Interactions in Hematologic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Reginald; Ahn, Byungwook; Hardy, Elaissa Trybus; Mannino, Robert; Kita, Ashley; Tsai, Michelle; Lam, Wilbur A.

    2012-01-01

    Advances in microfabrication techniques have enabled the production of inexpensive and reproducible microfluidic systems for conducting biological and biochemical experiments at the micro- and nanoscales 1,2. In addition, microfluidics have also been specifically used to quantitatively analyze hematologic and microvascular processes, because of their ability to easily control the dynamic fluidic environment and biological conditions3-6. As such, researchers have more recently used microfluidic systems to study blood cell deformability, blood cell aggregation, microvascular blood flow, and blood cell-endothelial cell interactions6-13.However, these microfluidic systems either did not include cultured endothelial cells or were larger than the sizescale relevant to microvascular pathologic processes. A microfluidic platform with cultured endothelial cells that accurately recapitulates the cellular, physical, and hemodynamic environment of the microcirculation is needed to further our understanding of the underlying biophysical pathophysiology of hematologic diseases that involve the microvasculature. Here, we report a method to create an "endothelialized" in vitro model of the microvasculature, using a simple, single mask microfabrication process in conjunction with standard endothelial cell culture techniques, to study pathologic biophysical microvascular interactions that occur in hematologic disease. This "microvasculature-on-a-chip" provides the researcher with a robust assay that tightly controls biological as well as biophysical conditions and is operated using a standard syringe pump and brightfield/fluorescence microscopy. Parameters such as microcirculatory hemodynamic conditions, endothelial cell type, blood cell type(s) and concentration(s), drug/inhibitory concentration etc., can all be easily controlled. As such, our microsystem provides a method to quantitatively investigate disease processes in which microvascular flow is impaired due to alterations in

  2. Biochemical and hematological changes in low-level aluminum intoxication.

    PubMed

    González-Revaldería, J; Casares, M; de Paula, M; Pascual, T; Giner, V; Miravalles, E

    2000-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the biochemical and hematological changes in patients on routine hemodialysis treatment when they were accidentally exposed to moderately high serum aluminum concentrations during a period of time of less than four months. We studied the changes in biochemical and hematological measurements in 33 patients on dialysis in our hospital before and during the exposure to about 0.85 pmol/l of aluminum in dialysis water due to a malfunction of the reverse osmosis system of water purification. Patients showed a decrease in the hemoglobin concentration from 115+/-12.4 g/l to 108+/-12.2 g/l (p=0.026) and in the mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration from 5.15+/-0.22 to 5.02+/-0.30 mmol/l (p=0.014). Ferritin was decreased from 243+/-192 microg/l to 196+/-163 microg/l (p=0.047) and transferrin saturation from 0.20+/-0.06 to 0.15+/-0.07 (p=0.004). Biochemical measurements related to calcium-phosphate metabolism did not change. Otherwise, all patients showed an increase in serum aluminum from 0.56+/-0.44 to 1.63+/-0.52 micromol/l (p<0.001). No differences were detected in serum aluminum between patients receiving and not receiving oral aluminum salts. Even moderately high aluminum concentrations maintained during a short period of time could produce significant hematological alterations and a depletion of body iron stores before clinical manifestations were evident. PMID:10905758

  3. Transfusion Considerations in Pediatric Hematology and Oncology Patients.

    PubMed

    Bercovitz, Rachel S; Josephson, Cassandra D

    2016-06-01

    Pediatric patients with malignancies or benign hematologic diseases are a heterogeneous group with complicated underlying pathophysiologies leading to their requirements for transfusion therapy. Common practice among pediatric hematologists, oncologists, and transplant physicians is to transfuse stable patients red cells to maintain a hemoglobin greater than 7 or 8 g/dL and transfuse platelets to maintain a count greater than 10,000 or 20,000 platelets/μL. This review compiles data from myriad studies performed in pediatric patients to give readers the knowledge needed to make an informed choice when considering different management strategies for the transfusion of red blood cells, platelets, plasma, and granulocytes. PMID:27113005

  4. How I treat influenza in patients with hematologic malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Casper, Corey; Englund, Janet

    2010-01-01

    The 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic has heightened the interest of clinicians for options in the prevention and management of influenza virus infection in immunocompromised patients. Even before the emergence of the novel 2009 H1N1 strain, influenza disease was a serious complication in patients with hematologic malignancies receiving chemotherapy or undergoing hematopoietic cell transplantation. Here we review the clinical manifestations of seasonal and 2009 H1N1 influenza and discuss current diagnosis, antiviral treatment, and prophylaxis options. We also summarize infection control and vaccination strategies for patients, family members, and caregivers. PMID:20009037

  5. Hematologic Changes Associated with Specific Infections in the Tropics.

    PubMed

    Roberts, David J

    2016-04-01

    Anemia frequently accompanies and plays a minor role in the presentation and course of infection, whether parasitic, bacterial, or viral. However, a variety of infections, many of which are common in Africa and Asia, cause specific hematologic syndromes. The pathophysiology of these syndromes is complex, and to some extent, reduced red cell production may form part of an innate protective host response to infection. Across the world and in endemic areas, malaria is the most important among this group of infections and forms a major part of everyday practice. PMID:27040961

  6. Hematology and immunology studies - The second manned Skylab mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kimzey, S. L.; Johnson, P. C.; Ritzman, S. E.; Mengel, C. E.

    1976-01-01

    The hematologic and immunologic functions of the Skylab 3 astronauts were monitored during the preflight, inflight, and postflight phases of the mission. Plasma protein profiles showed high consistency in all phases. A transient suppression of lymphocyte responsiveness was observed postflight. A reduction in the circulating blood volume due to drops in both the plasma volume and red cell mass was found. The loss of red cell mass is most likely a suppressed erythrypoiesis. The functional integrity of the circulating red cells did not appear to be compromised in the course of flight.

  7. Success of Elective Cholecystectomy Treatment Plans After ED Visit

    PubMed Central

    Bingener, Juliane; Thomsen, Kristine M.; McConico, Andrea; Hess, Erik P.; Habermann, Elizabeth B.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Differentiation between patients with acute cholecystitis and patients with severe biliary colic can be challenging. Patients with undiagnosed acute cholecystitis can incur repeat emergency department (ED) visits, which is resource intensive. Methods Billing records from 2000 – 2013 of all adults who visited the ED in the 30 days preceding their cholecystectomy were analyzed. Patients who were discharged from the ED and underwent elective cholecystectomy were compared to those who were discharged and returned to the ED within 30 days. T-tests, chi-square tests and multivariable analysis were utilized as appropriate. Results From 2000 - 2013, 3138 patients (34%) presented to the ED within 30 days prior to surgery, 63% were women, mean age 51 years, and of those 1625 were directly admitted from the ED for cholecystectomy while 1513 patients left the ED to return for an elective cholecystectomy. Patients who were discharged were younger (mean age 49 vs 54 yrs, p<0.001) and had shorter ED stays (5.9 vs 7.2 hrs, p<0.001) than the patients admitted immediately. Of the discharged patients, 303 (20%) returned to the ED within 30 days to undergo urgent cholecystectomy. Compared to patients with successful elective cholecystectomy after the ED visit, those who failed the pathway were more likely to have an ASA score > 3 and were <40 or ≥60 compared to the successful group. Conclusions One in five patients failed the elective cholecystectomy pathway after ED discharge, leading to additional patient distress and use of resources. Further risk factor assessment may help design efficient care pathways. PMID:25043530

  8. MedEdPORTAL: Educational Scholarship for Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reynolds, Robby J.; Candler, Christopher S.

    2008-01-01

    MedEdPORTAL is an online publication service provided at no charge by the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC). The intent is to promote collaboration and educational scholarship by helping educators publish and share educational resources. With MedEdPORTAL, users can quickly locate high-quality, peer-reviewed teaching materials in both…

  9. Teaching Elementary School Social Studies Methods under edTPA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    An, Sohyun

    2016-01-01

    This article reports a self-study that analyzes my experience as a teacher educator navigating a turbulent educational landscape with the advent of edTPA. The data consist of my journal entries, the syllabi, handouts, work submitted by my students, and course evaluations. Data were analyzed by using an inductive process to describe how the edTPA…

  10. ExpandED Options: Learning beyond High School Walls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ExpandED Schools, 2014

    2014-01-01

    Through ExpandED Options by TASC, New York City high school students get academic credit for learning career-related skills that lead to paid summer jobs. Too many high school students--including those most likely to drop out--are bored or see classroom learning as irrelevant. ExpandED Options students live the connection between mastering new…

  11. Web Formation - Skylab Student Experiment ED-52

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Judith S. Miles of Lexington High School, Lexington, Massachusetts, proposed skylab student experiment ED-52, Web Formation. This experiment was a study of a spider's behavior in a weightless environment. The geometrical structure of the web of the orb-weaving spider provides a good measure of the condition of its central nervous system. Since the spider senses its own weight to determine the required thickness of web material and uses both the wind and gravity to initiate construction of its web, the lack of gravitational force in Skylab provided a new and different stimulus to the spider's behavioral response. Two common cross spiders, Arabella and Anita, were used for the experiment aboard the Skylab-3 mission. After initial disoriented attempts, both spiders produced almost Earth-like webs once they had adapted to weightlessness. This photograph is of Arabella, a cross spider, in her initial attempt at spirning a web. This picture was taken by the crew of the Skylab 3 mission before Arabella adapted to her new environment.

  12. Caregivers' insights on the dying trajectory in hematology oncology.

    PubMed

    McGrath, P

    2001-10-01

    It is increasingly acknowledged in the research literature that palliative care is not offered to patients with a hematologic malignancy. The evidence indicates that patients are not dying at home or in the comfort of the hospice setting but are more likely to end up in the high-tech care of an intensive care unit. The holistic, compassionate care of the hospice/palliative care philosophy is not routinely made available to either these patients or the families who care for them. However, little is known about what the end-of-life experience is for such patients and their families and how they are managing to negotiate their dying experience in a system that is designed to cure not to palliate. In particular, there is a dearth of information on what happens to the caregivers during what is characteristically a prolonged and difficult period of sustained caring within the high-tech system. This discussion presents findings from recent research that is beginning to document the experience of the dying trajectory for patients from these diagnostic groups and their families. The hope and expectation from such research is that the information will make a contribution to building multidisciplinary plans of care for hematologic malignancies during the dying trajectory, to ensure that patients and their families are appropriately referred to the palliative system or, at least, are given sensitive palliative care within the curative system. PMID:11605712

  13. Alterations in the ribosomal machinery in cancer and hematologic disorders

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Ribosomes are essential components of the protein translation machinery and are composed of more than 80 unique large and small ribosomal proteins. Recent studies show that in addition to their roles in protein translation, ribosomal proteins are also involved in extra-ribosomal functions of DNA repair, apoptosis and cellular homeostasis. Consequently, alterations in the synthesis or functioning of ribosomal proteins can lead to various hematologic disorders. These include congenital anemias such as Diamond Blackfan anemia and Shwachman Diamond syndrome; both of which are associated with mutations in various ribosomal genes. Acquired uniallelic deletion of RPS14 gene has also been shown to lead to the 5q syndrome, a distinct subset of MDS associated with macrocytic anemia. Recent evidence shows that specific ribosomal proteins are overexpressed in liver, colon, prostate and other tumors. Ribosomal protein overexpression can promote tumorigenesis by interactions with the p53 tumor suppressor pathway and also by direct effects on various oncogenes. These data point to a broad role of ribosome protein alterations in hematologic and oncologic diseases. PMID:22709827

  14. Hematological and Serum Biochemical Analyses in Experimental Caprine Besnoitiosis

    PubMed Central

    Oryan, Ahmad; Namazi, Fatemeh

    2011-01-01

    This study was undertaken to investigate the hematological and biochemical changes in experimentally infected goats with Besnoitia caprae from the time of infection till 360 days post-infection (PI). Six male goats were inoculated subcutaneously with 13×107 bradyzoites of B. caprae, and blood samples were collected from the jugular vein. The total erythrocyte and total leukocyte counts, hematocrit value, and differential leukocyte counts were determined. Serum biochemical analysis, including the total protein, albumin, total globulin, cholesterol, triglyceride, chloride, testosterone, calcium (Ca2+), inorganic phosphorus, sodium (Na+), potassium (K+), iron (Fe2+), glucose, serum amyloid A (SAA), haptoglobin (Hp), fibrinogen, ceruloplasmin, aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, creatine kinase, lactate dehydrogenase, and alkaline phosphatase, was undertaken. Skin biopsy from the limbs were collected at weekly intervals and histologically examined for Besnoitia cysts. Cysts were present in the skin biopsies of the leg of the infected goats from day 28 PI. There were variations in hematological analyses, but no significant difference was seen. From day 30 to 360 PI, results showed that SAA, Hp, fibrinogen, and ceruloplasmin concentrations increased, whereas testosterone concentrations decreased. Infected goats exhibited decrease of albumin and increase of serum total protein and globulin concentrations. By contrast, there were no significant differences in the remained analyses concentrations. PMID:21738268

  15. A stapled BIM peptide overcomes apoptotic resistance in hematologic cancers

    PubMed Central

    LaBelle, James L.; Katz, Samuel G.; Bird, Gregory H.; Gavathiotis, Evripidis; Stewart, Michelle L.; Lawrence, Chelsea; Fisher, Jill K.; Godes, Marina; Pitter, Kenneth; Kung, Andrew L.; Walensky, Loren D.

    2012-01-01

    Cancer cells subvert the natural balance between cellular life and death, achieving immortality through pathologic enforcement of survival pathways and blockade of cell death mechanisms. Pro-apoptotic BCL-2 family proteins are frequently disarmed in relapsed and refractory cancer through genetic deletion or interaction-based neutralization by overexpressed antiapoptotic proteins, resulting in resistance to chemotherapy and radiation treatments. New pharmacologic strategies are urgently needed to overcome these formidable apoptotic blockades. We harnessed the natural killing activity of BCL-2–interacting mediator of cell death (BIM), which contains one of the most potent BH3 death domains of the BCL-2 protein family, to restore BH3-dependent cell death in resistant hematologic cancers. A hydrocarbon-stapled peptide modeled after the BIM BH3 helix broadly targeted BCL-2 family proteins with high affinity, blocked inhibitory antiapoptotic interactions, directly triggered proapoptotic activity, and induced dose-responsive and BH3 sequence–specific cell death of hematologic cancer cells. The therapeutic potential of stapled BIM BH3 was highlighted by the selective activation of cell death in the aberrant lymphoid infiltrates of mice reconstituted with BIM-deficient bone marrow and in a human AML xenograft model. Thus, we found that broad and multimodal targeting of the BCL-2 family pathway can overcome pathologic barriers to cell death. PMID:22622039

  16. Non Activated Protein C Supplementation in Septic Pediatric Hematological Patients

    PubMed Central

    Perillo, Teresa; Muggeo, Paola; Arcamone, Giampaolo; Leonardis, Francesco De; Santoro, Nicola

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to examine safety and efficacy of non-activated Protein C (PC) supplementation in our cohort of septic pediatric hematological patients. We conducted a retrospective study of 22 septic patients receiving human plasma-derived PC concentrate from 2008 to 2015 at our Pediatric Oncology Center (Bari, Italy). The Surviving sepsis campaign definitions for sepsis, severe sepsis and septic shock were used to define the patients’ septic status. For each patient, we calculated Lansky performance status scale (LPSS) and a risk score defined the Hematologic risk score (HRS) that we created in 2007. Patients were defined as High risk for severe sepsis/septic shock in case of HRS>3. HRS<3 identified low risk patients. Baseline serum PC levels, PC administration dosage and duration and days until a 20% improvement in LPSS. Observed baseline serum PC levels (bPC) blood concentrations ranged from 31 to 80%. Patients received PC supplementation in case of low age-related bPC levels or >10% PC concentration decrease within 12 hours from the first evaluation. All patients received 80 U/kg/day PC, intravenously, every twenty-four hours. No drug-related adverse event was observed. The observed sepsis-related mortality rate in our cohort was 9%. PC supplementation in our cohort appeared to be safe, and, probably due to prompt PC administration, we observed an overall mortality that was much lower than expected mortality in cancer severe septic patients. PMID:27433305

  17. The immunoproteasome as a target in hematologic malignancies.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, Deborah J; Orlowski, Robert Z

    2012-07-01

    Suppression of proteasome function with the first-in-class small molecule inhibitor bortezomib is a rational therapeutic strategy against several hematologic malignancies, including multiple myeloma and mantle cell lymphoma. Second-generation inhibitors such as carfilzomib, ixazomib, and marizomib that, like bortezomib, target both the constitutive proteasome and the immunoproteasome, are also in clinical trials and showing encouraging activity. While the efficacy of these agents is well documented, toxicities associated with their use, such as peripheral neuropathy and gastrointestinal effects, can necessitate dose reductions or even discontinuations, possibly hampering their anti-neoplastic effects. These findings suggested that it could be possible to improve the therapeutic index of this class of drugs by specifically targeting only the immunoproteasome. Since the immunoproteasome is a unique target found in lymphoid-derived cells, immunoproteasome-specific inhibitors (IPSIs) could preserve efficacy while reducing treatment-emergent toxicities since they would spare other tissues with little to no immunoproteasome expression. This review discusses the current state of development of IPSIs, and the potential of using such agents for the treatment of hematologic malignancies. PMID:22726549

  18. Weights and hematology of wild black bears during hibernation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    DelGiudice, Glenn D.; Rogers, Lynn L.; Allen, Arthur W.; Seal, U.S.

    1991-01-01

    We compared weights and hematological profiles of adult (greater than 3-yr-old) female black bears (Ursus americanus) during hibernation (after 8 January). We handled 28 bears one to four times (total of 47) over 4 yr of varying mast and berry production. Mean weight of lactating bears was greater (P less than 0.0001) than that of non-lactating females. White blood cells (P less than 0.05) and mean corpuscular volume (P = 0.005) also differed between lactating and non-lactating bears. Hemoglobin (P = 0.006) and mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration (P = 0.02) varied among years; values were lowest during 1975, following decreased precipitation and the occurrence of a second year of mast and berry crop shortages in a three-year period. Significant (P less than 0.05) interaction between reproductive status (lactating versus non-lactating) and study year for hemoglobin, red blood cells, and packed cell volume, and increased mean corpuscular volume, suggested a greater nutritional challenge for lactating females compared to non-lactating females during the 1975 denning season. Our data suggest that hematological characteristics of denning bears may be more sensitive than weights as indicators of annual changes in nutritional status; however, other influential factors, in addition to mast and berry crop production, remain to be examined.

  19. Approaches to Managing Safety With Lenalidomide in Hematologic Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Blumel, Susan; Broadway-Duren, Jackie

    2014-01-01

    Lenalidomide is an oral immunomodulatory agent approved in relapsed multiple myeloma with dexamethasone, for transfusion-dependent anemia in myelodysplastic syndrome associated with deletion 5q, and in relapsed/progressive mantle cell lymphoma following bortezomib. In recent clinical trials, lenalidomide has shown promising activity in hematologic malignancies, including chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) and non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). Starting doses and dosing schedules vary by malignancy, with lenalidomide started at a lower dose for CLL than for NHL or multiple myeloma. Certain adverse events (AEs) are common across tumor types (e.g., neutropenia, thrombocytopenia, fatigue), whereas others are more often associated with CLL patients (e.g., tumor lysis syndrome and tumor flare reaction). Effective management requires awareness of these differences as well as appropriate prophylaxis, monitoring, and treatment of AEs. This article reviews the efficacy and safety of lenalidomide in CLL and NHL, focusing on approaches for the advanced practitioner to improve patient quality of life through optimal management of side effects. With these steps, lenalidomide can be administered safely, at the best starting doses and with minimal dose interruptions or reductions across hematologic malignancies. PMID:26110071

  20. Changes in hematological profiles during winter field operations

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez, A.; Reed, L.; D'Alesandro, M. )

    1991-03-11

    The authors have previously shown that there are changes in hematological profiles during experimental cold acclimation. They now report on hematological changes in 9 military volunteers during a 12 week winter field operation and show results similar to those observed during experimental cold acclimation. Blood was collected before and after completion of winter field operations and analyzed in a paired fashion. Hematocrit (HCT) and erythrocyte counts (RBC) were decreased; mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration (MCHC) and plasma volume (PV), which was calculated from hemoglobin (Hb) concentration and HCT, were increased. In addition, the reticulocyte count was increased from 1.37 {plus minus} 0.10% to 2.62 {plus minus} 0.24% after completion of field operations. There was a statistically significant inverse correlation between HCT and reticulocyte count, indicating the need for an enhanced rate of red cell production. Hemoglobin concentration, leukocyte count, and mean corpuscular volume were unchanged. The RBC population, to remain at steady state during periods of chronic cold exposure, shows alterations in the number of circulating cells, Hb concentration per cell and possibly cell turnover.

  1. TechEdSat Nano-Satellite Series Fact Sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murbach, Marcus; Martinez, Andres; Guarneros Luna, Ali

    2014-01-01

    TechEdSat-3p is the second generation in the TechEdSat-X series. The TechEdSat Series uses the CubeSat standards established by the California Polytechnic State University Cal Poly), San Luis Obispo. With typical blocks being constructed from 1-unit (1U 10x10x10 cm) increments, the TechEdSat-3p has a 3U volume with a 30 cm length. The project uniquely pairs advanced university students with NASA researchers in a rapid design-to-flight experience lasting 1-2 semesters.The TechEdSat Nano-Satellite Series provides a rapid platform for testing technologies for future NASA Earth and planetary missions, as well as providing students with an early exposure to flight hardware development and management.

  2. Extracorporeal Life Support in Patients with Hematologic Malignancies: A Single Center Experience

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Kuk Bin; Kim, Hwan Wook; Jo, Keon Hyon; Kim, Do Yeon; Choi, Hang Jun; Hong, Seok Beom

    2016-01-01

    Background Extracorporeal life support (ECLS) in patients with hematologic malignancies is considered to have a poor prognosis. However, to date, there is only one case series reported in the literature. In this study, we compared the in-hospital survival of ECLS in patients with and without hematologic malignancies. Methods We reviewed a total of 66 patients who underwent ECLS for treatment of acute respiratory failure from January 2012 to December 2014. Of these patients, 22 (32%) were diagnosed with hematologic malignancies, and 13 (59%) underwent stem cell transplantation before ECLS. Results The in-hospital survival rate of patients with hematologic malignancies was 5% (1/22), while that of patients without malignancies was 26% (12/46). The number of platelet transfusions was significantly higher in patients with hematologic malignancies (9.69±7.55 vs. 3.12±3.42 units/day). Multivariate analysis showed that the presence of hematologic malignancies was a significant negative predictor of survival to discharge (odds ratio, 0.07; 95% confidence interval, 0.01–0.79); p=0.031). Conclusion ECLS in patients with hematologic malignancies had a lower in-hospital survival rate, compared to patients without hematologic malignancies. PMID:27525237

  3. 21 CFR 864.9285 - Automated cell-washing centrifuge for immuno-hematology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Automated cell-washing centrifuge for immuno... Establishments That Manufacture Blood and Blood Products § 864.9285 Automated cell-washing centrifuge for immuno-hematology. (a) Identification. An automated cell-washing centrifuge for immuno-hematology is a device...

  4. 21 CFR 864.9285 - Automated cell-washing centrifuge for immuno-hematology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Automated cell-washing centrifuge for immuno... Establishments That Manufacture Blood and Blood Products § 864.9285 Automated cell-washing centrifuge for immuno-hematology. (a) Identification. An automated cell-washing centrifuge for immuno-hematology is a device...

  5. 21 CFR 864.9285 - Automated cell-washing centrifuge for immuno-hematology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Automated cell-washing centrifuge for immuno... Establishments That Manufacture Blood and Blood Products § 864.9285 Automated cell-washing centrifuge for immuno-hematology. (a) Identification. An automated cell-washing centrifuge for immuno-hematology is a device...

  6. 21 CFR 864.9285 - Automated cell-washing centrifuge for immuno-hematology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Automated cell-washing centrifuge for immuno... Establishments That Manufacture Blood and Blood Products § 864.9285 Automated cell-washing centrifuge for immuno-hematology. (a) Identification. An automated cell-washing centrifuge for immuno-hematology is a device...

  7. 21 CFR 864.9285 - Automated cell-washing centrifuge for immuno-hematology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Automated cell-washing centrifuge for immuno... Establishments That Manufacture Blood and Blood Products § 864.9285 Automated cell-washing centrifuge for immuno-hematology. (a) Identification. An automated cell-washing centrifuge for immuno-hematology is a device...

  8. Eosinophilic pustular folliculitis associated with hematological disorders: A report of two cases and review of Japanese literature.

    PubMed

    Takamura, Saori; Teraki, Yuichi

    2016-04-01

    Eosinophilic pustular folliculitis (EPF) occurs in patients with hematological disorders. However, clinical information about hematological disorder-associated EPF is scarce. We report two cases of EPF associated with mantle cell lymphoma and reviewed the available published work on Japanese cases. We identified a total of 23 Japanese cases, including the two cases reported here, who had hematological disorder-associated EPF. Fourteen cases were associated with treatment for hematological malignancies (transplantation-related EPF) and nine cases were associated with hematological malignancies themselves (hematological malignancy-related EPF). Although the skin eruption was clinically indistinguishable between the two subtypes, transplantation-related EPF occurred on the face and trunk of young and middle-aged men and women, whereas hematological malignancy-related EPF occurred mostly on the face of older men. Peripheral blood eosinophilia was more frequently observed in transplantation-related EPF. These observations suggest variations among patients with EPF associated with hematological disorders. PMID:26362415

  9. Having a patient advocate dedicated to the ED.

    PubMed

    2008-02-01

    The ED at St. Mary's Hospital in Tucson, AZ, has its own departmental patient advocate. This new staff position saves a lot of time for the rest of the team members. Here are some of the functions a patient advocate can perform in your ED: proactively prevent problems and satisfy delivery of care needs in a timelier manner to avoid complaints; train the ED staff in customer service and communication techniques; communicate with outside clinics to support uninsured or underinsured patients who don't have primary care physicians. PMID:18447293

  10. Natural products against hematological malignancies and identification of their targets.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ying; Liu, JinBao; Wu, YingLi; Guo, QingLong; Sun, HanDong; Chen, GuoQiang

    2015-12-01

    Naturally occurring molecules derived from higher plants, animals, microorganisms and minerals play an important role in the discovery and development of novel therapeutic agents. The identification of molecular targets is of interest to elucidate the mode of action of these compounds, and it may be employed to set up target-based assays and allow structure-activity relationship studies to guide medicinal chemistry efforts toward lead optimization. In recent years, plant-derived natural compounds possessing potential anti-tumor activities have been garnering much interest and efforts are underway to identify their molecular targets. Here, we attempt to summarize the discoveries of several natural compounds with activities against hematological malignancies, such as adenanthin, oridonin, gambogic acid and wogonoside, the identification of their targets, and their modes of actions. PMID:26566803

  11. Hematology and blood chemistry of macaws, Ara rubrogenys.

    PubMed

    García del Campo, A L; Huecas, V; Fernández, A; Puerta, M L

    1991-01-01

    1. The hematology and blood chemistry of 10 captive adult Ara rubrogenys is described. 2. They showed 3,650,000 erythrocytes/mm3, a hematocrit of 49.9% and a blood hemoglobin content of 15.2 g/100 ml. 3. Leukocyte number was 10,000 cells/mm3, the differential counts being 42.2% heterophils, 0.8% eosinophils, 2.4% basophils, 49.9% lymphocytes and 4.5% monocytes. 4. The number of thrombocytes was 21,800 cells/mm3. 5. Plasma composition was (mg/100 ml): glucose 295; triglycerides 102; cholesterol 166; urea 5.8; uric acid 5; creatinine 0.3; bilirubin was not detected and total protein concentration was 3.2 g/100 ml. Enzymatic activities were (units/1): GOT 188; GPT 10 and alkaline phosphatase 315. PMID:1685390

  12. Tetraspanins: Spanning from solid tumors to hematologic malignancies.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ying-Gui; Sari, Ita Novita; Zia, Mohammad Farid; Lee, Sung Ryul; Song, Su Jung; Kwon, Hyog Young

    2016-05-01

    Tetraspanins (tetraspans or TM4SF) are a family of integral membrane proteins with four transmembrane helices, a small extracellular loop, and a large extracellular loop. Although tetraspanins are expressed in many types of cells, including immune cells, their biological roles are not fully defined. Nonetheless, recent studies have revealed the important roles of tetraspanins in solid tumors and hematologic malignancies, and expression of tetraspanins is associated with the malignancy of human tumors. Furthermore, genetic mouse models of tetraspanins highlight their contribution to tumorigenesis. In this review, we summarize the implication of tetraspanins in cancer with a special focus on tetraspanin 3 in myeloid leukemia. Our increasing knowledge of tetraspanins and the pathologies that alter their function will undoubtedly inform the rational design of novel cancer therapies. PMID:26930362

  13. Tetraspanins as therapeutic targets in hematological malignancy: a concise review

    PubMed Central

    Beckwith, Kyle A.; Byrd, John C.; Muthusamy, Natarajan

    2015-01-01

    Tetraspanins belong to a family of transmembrane proteins which play a major role in the organization of the plasma membrane. While all immune cells express tetraspanins, most of these are present in a variety of other cell types. There are a select few, such as CD37 and CD53, which are restricted to hematopoietic lineages. Tetraspanins associate with numerous partners involved in a diverse set of biological processes, including cell activation, survival, proliferation, adhesion, and migration. The historical view has assigned them a scaffolding role, but recent discoveries suggest some tetraspanins can directly participate in signaling through interactions with cytoplasmic proteins. Given their potential roles in supporting tumor survival and immune evasion, an improved understanding of tetraspanin activity could prove clinically valuable. This review will focus on emerging data in the study of tetraspanins, advances in the clinical development of anti-CD37 therapeutics, and the future prospects of targeting tetraspanins in hematological malignancy. PMID:25852576

  14. Gene editing and its application for hematological diseases.

    PubMed

    Osborn, Mark J; Belanto, Joseph J; Tolar, Jakub; Voytas, Daniel F

    2016-07-01

    The use of precise, rationally designed gene-editing nucleases allows for targeted genome and transcriptome modification, and at present, four major classes of nucleases are being employed: zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs), transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs), meganucleases (MNs), and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/Cas9. Each reagent shares the ability to recognize and bind a target sequence of DNA. Depending on the properties of the reagent, the DNA can be cleaved on one or both strands, or epigenetic changes can be mediated. These novel properties can impact hematological disease by allowing for: (1) direct modification of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs), (2) gene alteration of hematopoietic lineage committed terminal effectors, (3) genome engineering in non-hematopoietic cells with reprogramming to a hematopoietic phenotype, and (4) transcriptome modulation for gene regulation, modeling, and discovery. PMID:27233509

  15. The human microbiome in hematopoiesis and hematologic disorders

    PubMed Central

    Manzo, Veronica E.

    2015-01-01

    Humans are now understood to be in complex symbiosis with a diverse ecosystem of microbial organisms, including bacteria, viruses, and fungi. Efforts to characterize the role of these microorganisms, commonly referred as the microbiota, in human health have sought to answer the fundamental questions of what organisms are present, how are they functioning to interact with human cells, and by what mechanism are these interactions occurring. In this review, we describe recent efforts to describe the microbiota in healthy and diseased individuals, summarize the role of various molecular technologies (ranging from 16S ribosomal RNA to shotgun metagenomic sequencing) in enumerating the community structure of the microbiota, and explore known interactions between the microbiota and humans, with a focus on the microbiota’s role in hematopoiesis and hematologic diseases. PMID:26012569

  16. Energy metabolism and hematology of white-tailed deer fawns

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rawson, R.E.; DelGiudice, G.D.; Dziuk, H.E.; Mech, L.D.

    1992-01-01

    Resting metabolic rates, weight gains and hematologic profiles of six newborn, captive white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) fawns (four females, two males) were determined during the first 3 mo of life. Estimated mean daily weight gain of fawns was 0.2 kg. The regression equation for metabolic rate was: Metabolic rate (kcal/kg0.75/day) = 56.1 +/- 1.3 (age in days), r = 0.65, P less than 0.001). Regression equations were also used to relate age to red blood cell count (RBC), hemoglobin concentration (Hb), packed cell volume, white blood cell count, mean corpuscular volume, mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration (MCHC), and mean corpuscular hemoglobin. The age relationships of Hb, MCHC, and smaller RBC's were indicative of an increasing and more efficient oxygen-carrying and exchange capacity to fulfill the increasing metabolic demands for oxygen associated with increasing body size.

  17. Relapsing Fever: Diagnosis Thanks to a Vigilant Hematology Laboratory.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, Inbal; Tarabin, Salman; Kafka, Michael

    2015-07-01

    Three cases of relapsing fever from southern Israel were diagnosed promptly thanks to vigilance of the hematology laboratory technicians. In this region of Israel, patients presenting with prolonged fever and leukopenia without localizing symptoms are generally suspected of having brucellosis or a rickettsial disease. Pediatric patients with prolonged fever, cytopenias, and negative aforementioned serologies are often hospitalized for further work-up. Because of the policy of performing a manual blood smear when results of the automated blood count demonstrate severe anemia and abnormal platelet and/or white blood cell counts, a diagnosis of tick-borne relapsing fever was confirmed and promptly relayed to the physician. This routine prevented unnecessary examinations and hospitalization days and provided important information to regional epidemiology and public health authorities. PMID:26186517

  18. Optical digital microscopy for cyto- and hematological studies in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganilova, Yu. A.; Dolmashkin, A. A.; Doubrovski, V. A.; Yanina, I. Yu.; Tuchin, V. V.

    2013-08-01

    The dependence of the spatial resolution and field of view of an optical microscope equipped with a CCD camera on the objective magnification has been experimentally investigated. Measurement of these characteristics has shown that a spatial resolution of 20-25 px/μm at a field of view of about 110 μm is quite realistic; this resolution is acceptable for a detailed study of the processes occurring in cell. It is proposed to expand the dynamic range of digital camera by measuring and approximating its light characteristics with subsequent plotting of the corresponding calibration curve. The biological objects of study were human adipose tissue cells, as well as erythrocytes and their immune complexes in human blood; both objects have been investigated in vitro. Application of optical digital microscopy for solving specific problems of cytology and hematology can be useful in both biomedical studies in experiments with objects of nonbiological origin.

  19. The role of JAK2 abnormalities in hematologic neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Alabdulaali, Mohammed K.

    2009-01-01

    In 2005, an activating mutation in the Janus kinase 2 (JAK2) was identified in a significant proportion of patients with myeloproliferative neoplasms, mainly polycythemia vera, essential thrombocythemia and primary myelofibrosis. Many types of mutations in the JAK-STAT pathway have been identified, the majority are related to JAK2. Currently JAK2 mutations are important in the area of diagnosis of myeloid neoplasms, but its role beyond the confirmation of clonality is growing and widening our knowledge about these disorders. In addition to that, clinical trials to target JAK2-STAT pathway will widen our knowledge and hopefully will offer more therapeutic options. In this review, we will discuss the role of JAK2 abnormalities in the pathogenesis, diagnosis, classification, severity and management of hematologic neoplasms.

  20. Hematological measurements in rats flown on Spacelab shuttle SL-3

    SciTech Connect

    Lange, R.D.; Andrews, R.B.; Gibson, L.A.; Congdon, C.C.; Wright, P.; Dunn, C.D.R.; Jones, J.B.

    1987-02-01

    Previous studies have shown that a decrease in red cell mass occurs in astronauts, and some studies indicate a leukocytosis occurs. A life science module housing young and mature rats was flown on shuttle mission Spacelab 3 (SL-3), and the results of hematology studies of flight and control rats are presented. Statistically significant increases in the hematocrit, red blood cell counts, and hemoglobin determinations, together with a mild neutrophilia and lymphopenia, were found in flight animals. No significant changes were found in bone marrow and spleen cell differentials or erythropoietin determinations. Clonal assays demonstrated an increased erythroid colony formation of flight animal bone marrow cells at erythropoietin doses of 0.02 and 1.0 U/ml but not 0.20 U/ml. These results agree with some but vary from other previously published studies. Erythropoietin assays performed by radioimmunoassay and clonal studies were performed for the first time.

  1. Hematologic parameters of astrorats flown on SL-3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lange, R. D.; Andrews, R. B.; Gibson, L. A.; Wright, P.; Dunn, C. D. R.

    1985-01-01

    Hematologic studies were performed on a group of large and small rats which were sacrificed after flying in life sciences shuttle engineering flight SL-3. The results are presented on flight (F) and control (C) 200 gm rats. The small flight animals demonstrated a significant increase in hematocrits, red blood cell counts, hemoglobins and peripheral blood percentages of neutrophils as well as a decrease in percentage of lymphocytes. Erythropoietin (Ep) determinations were similar for the two groups as were the bone marrow an spleen differential counts. In vitro cultures for erythroid colonies of bone marrow showed that in response to different doses of Ep, in all cases where differnces were statistically significant, the F rats had increased colony counts. The changes in red cell parameters could be caused by a decrease in plasma volume. However, no isotopic studies were possible on this flight and this lack points up the need for such studies to determine the red cell mass and plasma volume.

  2. Hematological measurements in rats flown on Spacelab shuttle, SL-3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lange, R. D.; Andrews, R. B.; Gibson, L. A.; Congdon, C. C.; Wright, P.; Dunn, C. D.; Jones, J. B.

    1987-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that a decrease in red cell mass occurs in astronauts, and some studies indicate a leukocytosis occurs. A life science module housing young and mature rats was flown on shuttle mission Spacelab 3 (SL-3), and the results of hematology studies of flight and control rats are presented. Statistically significant increases in the hematocrit, red blood cell counts, and hemoglobin determinations, together with a mild neutrophilia and lymphopenia, were found in flight animals. No significant changes were found in bone marrow and spleen cell differentials or erythropoietin determinations. Clonal assays demonstrated an increased erythroid colony formation of flight animal bone marrow cells at erythropoietin doses of 0.02 and 1.0 U/ml but not 0.20 U/ml. These results agree with some but vary from other previously published studies. Erythropoietin assays and clonal studies were performed for the first time.

  3. Reliability of a rapid hematology stain for sputum cytology*

    PubMed Central

    Gonçalves, Jéssica; Pizzichini, Emilio; Pizzichini, Marcia Margaret Menezes; Steidle, Leila John Marques; Rocha, Cristiane Cinara; Ferreira, Samira Cardoso; Zimmermann, Célia Tânia

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To determine the reliability of a rapid hematology stain for the cytological analysis of induced sputum samples. Methods: This was a cross-sectional study comparing the standard technique (May-Grünwald-Giemsa stain) with a rapid hematology stain (Diff-Quik). Of the 50 subjects included in the study, 21 had asthma, 19 had COPD, and 10 were healthy (controls). From the induced sputum samples collected, we prepared four slides: two were stained with May-Grünwald-Giemsa, and two were stained with Diff-Quik. The slides were read independently by two trained researchers blinded to the identification of the slides. The reliability for cell counting using the two techniques was evaluated by determining the intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) for intraobserver and interobserver agreement. Agreement in the identification of neutrophilic and eosinophilic sputum between the observers and between the stains was evaluated with kappa statistics. Results: In our comparison of the two staining techniques, the ICCs indicated almost perfect interobserver agreement for neutrophil, eosinophil, and macrophage counts (ICC: 0.98-1.00), as well as substantial agreement for lymphocyte counts (ICC: 0.76-0.83). Intraobserver agreement was almost perfect for neutrophil, eosinophil, and macrophage counts (ICC: 0.96-0.99), whereas it was moderate to substantial for lymphocyte counts (ICC = 0.65 and 0.75 for the two observers, respectively). Interobserver agreement for the identification of eosinophilic and neutrophilic sputum using the two techniques ranged from substantial to almost perfect (kappa range: 0.91-1.00). Conclusions: The use of Diff-Quik can be considered a reliable alternative for the processing of sputum samples. PMID:25029648

  4. Alternative testing systems for evaluating noncarcinogenic, hematologic toxicity.

    PubMed Central

    Parchment, R E

    1998-01-01

    Hematopoietic tissues are the targets of numerous xenobiotics. Clinical hematotoxicity is either a decrease or an increase in peripheral blood cell counts in one or more cell lineages--a cytopenia or a cytosis, respectively--that carries a risk of an adverse clinical event. The purpose of in vitro hematotoxicology is the prediction of these adverse hematologic effects from the effects of the toxicants on human hematopoietic targets under controlled experimental conditions in the laboratory. Building on its important foundations in experimental hematology and the wealth of hematotoxicology data found in experimental oncology, this field of alternative toxicology has developed rapidly during the past decade. Although the colony-forming unit-granulocyte/monocyte neutrophil progenitor is most frequently evaluated, other defined progenitors and stem cells as well as cell types found in the marrow stroma can be evaluated in vitro. End points have been proposed for predicting toxicant exposure levels at the maximum tolerated dose and the no observable adverse effect level for the neutrophil lineage, and several clinical prediction models for neutropenia have developed to the point that they are ready for prospective evaluation and validation in both preclinical species and humans. Known predictive end points are the key to successful comparisons across species or across chemical structures when in vitro dose-response curves are nonparallel. Analytical chemistry support is critical for accurate interpretation of in vitro data and for relating the in vitro pharmacodynamics to the in vivo pharmacokinetics. In contrast to acute neutropenia, anemia and acute thrombocytopenia, as well as adverse effects from chronic toxicant exposure, are much more difficult to predict from in vitro data. Pharmacologic principles critical for clinical predictions from in vitro data very likely will apply to toxicities to other proliferative tissues, such as mucositis. PMID:9599702

  5. SSF Terra-FM1 Ed3A

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2016-07-13

    SSF Terra-FM1 Ed3A Project Title:  CERES Discipline:  Clouds Radiation Budget ...   Reverb Tutorial Subset/Visualization Tool: CERES Order Tool Subset Data:  CERES Search and Subset Tool (HDF4 & ...

  6. SSF Aqua-FM3 Ed3A

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2016-07-13

    SSF Aqua-FM3 Ed3A Project Title:  CERES Discipline:  Clouds Radiation Budget ...   Reverb Tutorial Subset/Visualization Tool: CERES Order Tool Subset Data:  CERES Search and Subset Tool (HDF4 & ...

  7. Many Teens Give Sex Ed a Failing Grade

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/news/fullstory_160906.html Many Teens Give Sex Ed a Failing Grade International study finds courses ... HealthDay News) -- Teens around the world are getting sex education in schools that fail to address their ...

  8. Genome-wide association studies for hematological traits in Chinese Sutai pigs

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background It has been shown that hematological traits are strongly associated with the metabolism and the immune system in domestic pig. However, little is known about the genetic architecture of hematological traits. To identify quantitative trait loci (QTL) controlling hematological traits, we performed single marker Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and haplotype analysis for 15 hematological traits in 495 Chinese Sutai pigs. Results We identified 161 significant SNPs including 44 genome-wide significant SNPs associated with 11 hematological traits by single marker GWAS. Most of them were located on SSC2. Meanwhile, we detected 499 significant SNPs containing 154 genome-wide significant SNPs associated with 9 hematological traits by haplotype analysis. Most of the identified loci were located on SSC7 and SSC9. Conclusions We detected 4 SNPs with pleiotropic effects on SSC2 by single marker GWAS and (or) on SSC7 by haplotype analysis. Furthermore, through checking the gene functional annotations, positions and their expression variation, we finally selected 7 genes as potential candidates. Specially, we found that three genes (TRIM58, TRIM26 and TRIM21) of them originated from the same gene family and executed similar function of innate and adaptive immune. The findings will contribute to dissection the immune gene network, further identification of causative mutations underlying the identified QTLs and providing insights into the molecular basis of hematological trait in domestic pig. PMID:24674592

  9. Redefining the EdD: Seeking a Separate Identity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyce, Barbara Ann

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this manuscript was to discuss the recommendations and guidelines of the Carnegie Group's 2007 effort to "Reclaim the EdD" as well as to outline the work completed at the University of Virginia related to their re-design of the Doctor of Education (EdD) degree. In order to address the re-envision and re-formulation of the Doctor of…

  10. Rethinking the Ed.D., or What's in a Name?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Townsend, Barbara K.

    This paper traces the development of the Ed.D., explores the purposes the degree serves, and assesses its value. The creation of the degree stemmed largely from the reluctance of faculty in Arts and Sciences to offer the Ph.D. in professional schools. The one thing most Ed.D. programs have in common is that it is supposed to be an applied or…

  11. Perceptions of palliative care among hematologic malignancy specialists: a mixed-methods study

    PubMed Central

    LeBlanc, Thomas W.; O'Donnell, Jonathan D.; Crowley-Matoka, Megan; Rabow, Michael W.; Smith, Cardinale B.; White, Douglas B.; Tiver, Greer A.; Arnold, Robert M.; Schenker, Yael

    2016-01-01

    Background Patients with hematologic malignancies are less likely to receive specialist palliative care services than patients with solid tumors. Reasons for this difference are poorly understood. Methods This was a multisite, mixed-methods study to understand and contrast perceptions of palliative care among hematologic and solid tumor oncologists, using surveys assessing referral practices, and in-depth semi-structured interviews exploring views of palliative care. We compared referral patterns using standard statistical methods. We analyzed qualitative interview data using constant comparative methods, to explore reasons for observed differences. Results Among 66 interviewees, 23 oncologists cared exclusively for patients with hematologic malignancies; 43 treated only patients with solid tumors. Seven of 23 hematologic oncologists (30%) reported never referring to palliative care; all solid tumor oncologists had previously referred. In qualitative analyses, most hematologic oncologists viewed palliative care as end-of-life care, while most solid tumor oncologists viewed palliative care as a subspecialty that could assist with complex cases. Solid tumor oncologists emphasized practical barriers to palliative care referral, such as appointment availability and reimbursement issues. Hematologic oncologists emphasized philosophical concerns about palliative care referrals, including different treatment goals, responsiveness to chemotherapy, and a preference to control even palliative aspects of patient care. Conclusions Most hematologic oncologists view palliative care as end-of-life care, while solid tumor oncologists more often view palliative care as a subspecialty for co-managing complex patients. Efforts to integrate palliative care into hematologic malignancy practices will require solutions that address unique barriers to palliative care referral experienced by hematologic malignancy specialists. PMID:25784580

  12. Community paramedics fill gaps, take load off EDs.

    PubMed

    2014-03-01

    In a continuing effort to ease demand on busy EDs, some communities are coming up with new ways to leverage paramedics. Under a three-year pilot program in Raleigh, NC, a select group of paramedics with added training are being used to assess patients with mental health or addiction problems and transfer them to alternative facilities when appropriate. In Robbinsdale, MN, a community paramedicine program is filling in care gaps for patients with chronic diseases and other complaints who are at risk for repeat ED visits or inpatient hospitalizations. * Administrators of the Raleigh, NC, program say that in 2013, paramedics diverted more than 300 patients to alternative facilities. Of these, only 20% to 25% need further transport to the hospital. * Every time the NC paramedics divert a patient from the ED to an alternative facility, they return an estimated 14 bed-hours back to the ED. * In addition to responding to patients with non-urgent needs, the Robbinsdale, MN, community paramedicine program is a referral source for ED physicians who are concerned about follow-up care for patients who have presented to the ED with medical problems that require ongoing attention. PMID:24640290

  13. Hematology, Serum Chemistry, and Early Hematologic Changes in Free-Ranging South American Fur Seals ( Arctocephalus australis ) at Guafo Island, Chilean Patagonia.

    PubMed

    Seguel, Mauricio; Muñoz, Francisco; Keenan, Alessandra; Perez-Venegas, Diego J; DeRango, Eugene; Paves, Hector; Gottdenker, Nicole; Müller, Ananda

    2016-07-01

    The establishment of clinical pathology baseline data is critical to evaluate temporal and spatial changes in marine mammal groups. Despite increased availability of studies on hematology and biochemistry of marine mammals, reference ranges are lacking for many populations, especially among fur seal species. During the austral summers of 2014 and 2015, we evaluated basic hematologic and biochemical parameters in clinically healthy, physically restrained South American fur seal ( Arctocephalus australis ) lactating females and 2-mo-old pups. We also assessed the temporal variation of hematology parameters on the pups during their first 2 mo of life. Reference ranges of lactating females were similar to those previously reported in other fur seal species. In the case of pups, reference ranges are similar to values previously reported in sea lion species. As expected, most biochemical and hematologic values differ significantly between adult females and pups. As in other otariids, South American fur seals pups are born with higher values of total red blood cells, hemoglobin, and packed cell volume, and lower numbers of total leukocytes, neutrophils, lymphocytes, and eosinophils. To the best of our knowledge, data on hematology reference values for South American fur seals has not been previously reported and is useful for continued health monitoring of this species, as well as for comparisons with other otariid groups. PMID:27243331

  14. Hematological and biochemical findings in pregnant, postfoaling, and lactating jennies.

    PubMed

    Bonelli, F; Rota, A; Corazza, M; Serio, D; Sgorbini, M

    2016-04-15

    The aims of this study were to (1) verify if significant changes occur in hematological and biochemical parameters in jennies during the last 2 months of pregnancy and the first 2 months of lactation, and (2) determine any differences with mares. Hematological and biochemical parameters were evaluated in jennies every 15 days during late pregnancy, parturition, and early lactation. The Kolmogorov-Smirnov test, analysis of variance for repeated measurements and Tukey's multiple comparison test as post hoc were applied. The significance level was set at P < 0.05. Statistical analysis showed differences related to time for Red Blood Cells (RBC) count and Hematocrit (HCT), White Blood Cells (WBC) count, platelet count (PLT), total proteins, blood urea, triglycerides and total cholesterol concentrations, aspartate aminotransferase, gamma-glutamyltransferase, creatine-phosphokinase activities, sodium (Na) and potassium (K). RBC and HCT were higher in late pregnancy than at foaling and during lactation. The relative anemia might be due to increased water ingestion because of fluid losses. The WBC count was higher at foaling than during late pregnancy and lactation. This could be related to the release of cortisol and catecholamine during delivery. The PLT trend showed lower values from delivery to the first 2 months of lactation compared to late gestation. Blood urea increased near parturition, and then remained constant during delivery and lactation, which might be due to the high energy demand at the beginning of lactation. Triglycerides and total cholesterol showed a decrease from delivery through the lactation period. Thus, jennies seem to have a similar metabolism of fats to ponies and draft horse mares, characterized by a greater fat content and mobilization than light breed horses. Aspartate aminotransferase activity decreased at parturition and early lactation, probably because of a predominance of anabolic over catabolic processes during pregnancy. Gamma

  15. Hematologic and biochemical profiles in Standardbred mares during peripartum.

    PubMed

    Mariella, Jole; Pirrone, Alessandro; Gentilini, Fabio; Castagnetti, Carolina

    2014-03-01

    The purposes of this study were to determine physiological changes occurring in hematologic and biochemical parameters in mares between the last month of gestation and the first week after parturition. If a significant change was observed with respect to the reference interval of an adult horse, a further aim of the study was to establish different reference intervals. Blood samples were collected from 62 healthy pregnant Standardbred mares. Seventeen nonpregnant and nonlactating mares were used as a control group. In pregnant mares, blood sampling was conducted every three days from 1 month before the expected foaling date (335 days after the last mating), at parturition, and 7 days after foaling. The barren mares in the control group were sampled once. Results from samples collected 20 and 10 days before parturition, at parturition, and 7 days after were considered in the statistical analysis. A parametric method for all the parameters studied was used to establish reference intervals. Results were compared by repeated measures ANOVA. When significant differences were observed in relation to sampling time, a post hoc analysis was performed (Tukey test). The one-way ANOVA test followed by Dunnett's test was performed to evaluate the presence of a significant difference between each sampling time and the control group. Any significant difference in the blood count parameters at different sampling times was observed by repeated measure ANOVA. Hemoglobin (P < 0.01) and hematocrit (P < 0.01) 7 days after parturition and white blood cell count (P < 0.01) at parturition were significantly different from the control group. Erythrocyte indices and platelet count were within the normal reference intervals as established in the control group. In the biochemical panel, gamma-glutamyltransferase, creatinine, glucose, biliar acids, total protein, albumin-to-globulin ratio, and calcium were significantly different at different sampling times. Moreover, serum concentration of

  16. Detection of Imported Malaria with the Cell-Dyn 4000 Hematology Analyzer

    PubMed Central

    Wever, Peter C.; Henskens, Yvonne M. C.; Kager, Piet A.; Dankert, Jacob; van Gool, Tom

    2002-01-01

    The sensitivity and specificity of the Cell-Dyn 4000 hematology analyzer in the diagnosis of imported malaria were studied with samples from patients in an academic hospital setting. The performance of the Cell-Dyn 4000 hematology analyzer was compared with that of conventional diagnostic methods for malaria. The Cell-Dyn 4000 hematology analyzer detected hemozoin-containing depolarizing monocytes in 29 of 58 patients with malaria and 2 of 55 patients without malaria. The presence or absence of depolarizing monocytes in patients with malaria was related to duration of symptoms before presentation for malaria analysis. A second parameter, pseudoreticulocytosis due to nuclear material of intraerythrocytic malaria parasites, was detected by the Cell-Dyn 4000 hematology analyzer almost exclusively in Plasmodium falciparum malaria patients with parasitemia levels of ≥0.5%. Attention to these abnormalities in medical centers without tropical disease expertise may decrease a delay in the diagnosis of malaria. PMID:12454179

  17. The role of protein kinase C-alpha in hematologic malignancies.

    PubMed

    Lahn, Michael; Sundell, Karen; Köhler, Gabriele

    2006-01-01

    In recent years advances in histopathological and molecular understanding of hematologic malignancies have led to the development of drugs which selectively target proteins associated with hematologic tumorigenesis. One such targeted agent is the antisense oligonucleotide aprinocarsen, which specifically inhibits the signaling protein, protein kinase C-alpha (PKC-alpha). Although PKC-alpha has been associated with tumorigenesis, its role and expression levels in patients with hematologic malignancies are not well understood. We here review studies investigating the expression and role of PKC-alpha in hematologic malignancies. Such a review may offer new insights on how to develop strategies in identifying patients that might best benefit from PKC-alpha inhibition. PMID:16424642

  18. Measuring symptoms as a critical component of drug development and evaluation in hematological diseases

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Loretta A; Yucel, Emre; Cortes, Jorge E; Cleeland, Charles S

    2014-01-01

    With the rapid development of new therapies for patients with hematological malignancies, there is an increasing need for patient report of symptom status during all phases of drug testing. The patient’s perspective on new treatments reflects treatment tolerability as well as symptom benefit, and may assist patients and clinicians in choosing treatments. Inclusion of patient-reported outcomes, more common in solid-tumor than hematological trials, provides early information about symptoms to guide decisions about appropriate dosing and supportive care needs. We provide a historical overview of the use of patient-reported outcomes and symptom assessment in solid-tumor and hematological drug development, and offer recommendations about methodological issues in the monitoring of symptoms in the drug development process in hematological clinical trials. PMID:24910769

  19. [Hematologic and hematochemical characteristics of the herring gull (Larus argentatus) and the buzzard (Buteo buteo)].

    PubMed

    Bini, P P; Floris, B; Nuvole, P; Pau, S; Zedda, M T

    1989-09-01

    Some hematological and hematochemical parameters in eight herring gulls (Larus argentatus) and in six buzzards (Buteo buteo) were checked. The buzzards were fed with ovine meat exclusively, while the herring gulls were fed with fish and ovine meat. Considerable differences between the two species were noted, particularly as far as the hematological and lipidic parameters are concerned. These differences are probably related to the aquatic life of the herring gull. PMID:2627341

  20. Awakening the Hippo co-activator YAP1, a mercurial cancer gene, in hematologic cancers

    PubMed Central

    Cottini, Francesca; Anderson, Kenneth C; Tonon, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    Unrestrained oncogene activity triggers DNA damage. Cancer cells exploit various stratagems to deal with this potentially lethal event. We found that hematologic cancer cells inactivate the Hippo co-activator Yes-associated protein 1 (YAP1). A synthetic lethal approach is proposed whereby inhibition of the serine/threonine kinase 4 (STK4) could be exploited to restore YAP1 levels in hematologic cancers.

  1. Hematologic and serum chemical characteristics of mononuclear leukemia in Fischer 344 rats

    SciTech Connect

    Kusewitt, D.F.; Hahn, F.F.; Pickrell, J.A.

    1982-01-01

    Hematologic, serum chemical, and histopathologic studies were performed on 17 aged Fischer 344 rats with mononuclear leukemia. Twelve of the rats had leukemic hemograms, while five had nonleukemic or marginally abnormal differential leukocyte counts. Hematologic findings revealed that all rats were profoundly anemic. Serum chemistry studies confirmed the occurrence of icterus observed clinically, a finding consistent with hemolytic anemia. Alanine aminotransferase and serum alkaline phosphatase values were elevated.

  2. Role of Sphingolipids and Metabolizing Enzymes in Hematological Malignancies.

    PubMed

    Kitatani, Kazuyuki; Taniguchi, Makoto; Okazaki, Toshiro

    2015-06-01

    Sphingolipids such as ceramide, sphingosine-1-phosphate and sphingomyelin have been emerging as bioactive lipids since ceramide was reported to play a role in human leukemia HL-60 cell differentiation and death. Recently, it is well-known that ceramide acts as an inducer of cell death, that sphingomyelin works as a regulator for microdomain function of the cell membrane, and that sphingosine-1-phosphate plays a role in cell survival/proliferation. The lipids are metabolized by the specific enzymes, and each metabolite could be again returned to the original form by the reverse action of the different enzyme or after a long journey of many metabolizing/synthesizing pathways. In addition, the metabolites may serve as reciprocal bio-modulators like the rheostat between ceramide and sphingosine-1-phosphate. Therefore, the change of lipid amount in the cells, the subcellular localization and the downstream signal in a specific subcellular organelle should be clarified to understand the pathobiological significance of sphingolipids when extracellular stimulation induces a diverse of cell functions such as cell death, proliferation and migration. In this review, we focus on how sphingolipids and their metabolizing enzymes cooperatively exert their function in proliferation, migration, autophagy and death of hematopoetic cells, and discuss the way developing a novel therapeutic device through the regulation of sphingolipids for effectively inhibiting cell proliferation and inducing cell death in hematological malignancies such as leukemia, malignant lymphoma and multiple myeloma. PMID:25997737

  3. An evaluation of the ELT-8 hematology analyzer.

    PubMed

    Raik, E; McPherson, J; Barton, L; Hewitt, B S; Powell, E G; Gordon, S

    1982-04-01

    The TMELT-8 Hematology Analyzer is a fully automated cell counter which utilizes laser light scattering and hydrodynamic focusing to provide an 8 parameter whole blood count. The instrument consists of a sample handler with ticket printer, and a data handler with visual display unit, It accepts 100 microliter samples of venous or capillary blood and prints the values for WCC, RCC, Hb, Hct, MCV, MCH, MCHC and platelet count on to a standard result card. All operational and quality control functions, including graphic display of relative cell size distribution, can be obtained from the visual display unit and can also be printed as a permanent record if required. In a limited evaluation of the ELT-8, precision, linearity, accuracy, lack of sample carry-over and user acceptance were excellent. Reproducible values were obtained for all parameters after overnight storage of samples. Reagent usage and running costs were lower than for the Coulter S and the Coulter S Plus. The ease of processing capillary samples was considered to be a major advantage. The histograms served to alert the operator to a number of abnormalities, some of which were clinically significant. PMID:7099723

  4. Serologic and hematologic values of wild coyotes in Wisconsin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, G.J.; Rongstad, O.J.

    1980-01-01

    Blood samples were obtained from 30 coyotes (Canis latrans) captured in northern Wisconsin in conjunction with radio-telemetry studies. Samples were assayed for seven hematologic values, seven serum chemistries, serum albumin, globulin and total protein. Results are given with respect to sex and age and are compared with available data for captive wild and pen-raised coyotes. Leukocyte counts were greater for males than females and packed cell volumes were greater for adults than young, possibly due to differential response to capture and handling stress. Hemoglobin concentrations and calcium levels suggest differences in nutrition between pen-raised and wild coyotes. Sex and age differences in serum calcium for wild coyotes probably reflect nutritional differences between groups examined. Juvenile coyote serum alkaline phosphatase levels declined curvilinearly with age for coyotes less than one year old, suggesting a possible technique for separating juveniles and yearlings captured in autumn that are released for research purposes. Elevated glucose levels and leukocyte counts in wild coyotes may reflect greater handling stress than for pen-raised and captive coyotes. No significant sex or age effects were found for levels of serum urea nitrogen, total protein, cholesterol, and total bilirubin.

  5. MLL-SEPTIN gene fusions in hematological malignancies.

    PubMed

    Cerveira, Nuno; Bizarro, Susana; Teixeira, Manuel R

    2011-08-01

    The mixed lineage leukemia (MLL) locus is involved in more than 60 different rearrangements with a remarkably diverse group of fusion partners in approximately 10% of human leukemias. MLL rearrangements include chromosomal translocations, gene internal duplications, chromosome 11q deletions or inversions and MLL gene insertions into other chromosomes, or vice versa. MLL fusion partners can be classified into four distinct categories: nuclear proteins, cytoplasmatic proteins, histone acetyltransferases and septins. Five different septin genes (SEPT2, SEPT5, SEPT6, SEPT9, and SEPT11) have been identified as MLL fusion partners, giving rise to chimeric fusion proteins in which the N terminus of MLL is fused, in frame, to almost the entire open reading frame of the septin partner gene. The rearranged alleles result from heterogeneous breaks in distinct introns of both MLL and its septin fusion partner, originating distinct gene fusion variants. MLL-SEPTIN rearrangements have been repeatedly identified in de novo and therapy related myeloid neoplasia in both children and adults, and some clinicopathogenetic associations are being uncovered. The fundamental roles of septins in cytokinesis, membrane remodeling and compartmentalization can provide some clues on how abnormalities in the septin cytoskeleton and MLL deregulation could be involved in the pathogenesis of hematological malignancies. PMID:21714766

  6. Blood gas and hematological changes in experimental peracute porcine pleuropneumonia.

    PubMed Central

    Kiorpes, A L; MacWilliams, P S; Schenkman, D I; Bäckström, L R

    1990-01-01

    The effect of experimental, peracute, porcine pleuropneumonia on arterial blood gases, acid base status, the leukogram, and gross and microscopic lung structure was studied in nine growing pigs (mean weight +/- SD 10.6 +/- 2.0 kg). Pigs were inoculated intranasally with a virulent serotype 5 isolate of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae, and all showed signs typical of the disease within four hours. Death occurred in all pigs from 4.5 to 32 hours postinoculation (mean 14 hours). Gross and microscopic changes were typical of porcine pleuropneumonia in all pigs. Changes in the leukogram included a rapid decline in total white cells, segmented neutrophils, lymphocytes, monocytes, and eosinophils. Pigs maintained alveolar ventilation throughout the study as arterial CO2 tension was unchanged; however, arterial O2 tension and pH decreased from (mean +/- SD) 95.2 +/- 5.7 torr and 7.463 +/- 0.018 at baseline to 62.1 +/- 12.3 torr and 7.388 +/- 0.045, respectively, within 90 minutes prior to death. The data showed that in this model of peracute porcine pleuropneumonia, progressive ventilatory failure was not a feature of the disease, and the blood gas values and acid base status were maintained within physiological ranges. The histopathological hematological and physiological findings were consistent with the hypothesis that peracute porcine pleuropneumonia resembles septic shock. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 3. PMID:2106382

  7. Clinical management of HIV-associated hematologic malignancies.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chia-Ching J; Kaplan, Lawrence D

    2016-01-01

    HIV is associated with an excess risk for lymphoid malignancies. Although the risk of lymphoma has decreased in HIV-infected individuals in the era of effective combination antiretroviral therapy, it remains high. Treatment outcomes have improved due to improvements in HIV and cancer therapeutics for the common HIV-associated lymphomas. R-CHOP/R-EPOCH are the standard of care for HIV-associated diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. HIV-infected patients with Burkitt lymphoma and good performance status should receive dose-intensive regimens. HIV-infected patients with primary central nervous system lymphoma can respond favorably to high-dose methotrexate-based therapy. In many cases, treatment and expected outcomes for HIV-infected patients with either Hodgkin or non-Hodgkin's lymphomas are very similar to HIV-negative patients. There is currently no standard treatment for HIV-associated multicentric Castleman disease or primary effusion lymphoma. For those hematologic cancers in which transplantation is part of standard care, this modality should be considered an option in those with well-controlled HIV infection. PMID:26652941

  8. Expert Assistant For A Clinical Hematology Blood Cell Analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Carole; Navlakha, Jainendra K.

    1989-03-01

    The COULTER COUNTER Model S Plus Series instruments are automated clinical hematology blood cell analyzers which measure the count, volume and population distribution of red blood cells, white blood cells and platelets, and hemoglobin from patient blood samples. In the clinical laboratory environment, instrument startup consists of a number of component and system checks to assure proper operation and calibration to insure reliable results are produced on patient samples. If a startup check fails, troubleshooting procedures are provided to assist the operator in determining the cause of the error. Troubleshooting requires expertise in instrument operation, troubleshooting procedures and evaluation of the data produced. This expert system is designed and developed to assist the startup diagnostics of COULTER COUNTER Model S Plus Series instruments. The system reads data produced by the instrument and validates it against expected values. If the values are not all correct, then the troubleshooting starts. Troubleshooting is handled for the most common subsystem problems and those which the operator has the equipment and knowledge to handle, problems that are cheapest to fix and problems that are quickest to fix. The expert system restarts the startup sequence whenever troubleshooting has been successful or recommends calling Customer Service when unsuccessful.

  9. Role of Sphingolipids and Metabolizing Enzymes in Hematological Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Kitatani, Kazuyuki; Taniguchi, Makoto; Okazaki, Toshiro

    2015-01-01

    Sphingolipids such as ceramide, sphingosine-1-phosphate and sphingomyelin have been emerging as bioactive lipids since ceramide was reported to play a role in human leukemia HL-60 cell differentiation and death. Recently, it is well-known that ceramide acts as an inducer of cell death, that sphingomyelin works as a regulator for microdomain function of the cell membrane, and that sphingosine-1-phosphate plays a role in cell survival/proliferation. The lipids are metabolized by the specific enzymes, and each metabolite could be again returned to the original form by the reverse action of the different enzyme or after a long journey of many metabolizing/synthesizing pathways. In addition, the metabolites may serve as reciprocal bio-modulators like the rheostat between ceramide and sphingosine-1-phosphate. Therefore, the change of lipid amount in the cells, the subcellular localization and the downstream signal in a specific subcellular organelle should be clarified to understand the pathobiological significance of sphingolipids when extracellular stimulation induces a diverse of cell functions such as cell death, proliferation and migration. In this review, we focus on how sphingolipids and their metabolizing enzymes cooperatively exert their function in proliferation, migration, autophagy and death of hematopoetic cells, and discuss the way developing a novel therapeutic device through the regulation of sphingolipids for effectively inhibiting cell proliferation and inducing cell death in hematological malignancies such as leukemia, malignant lymphoma and multiple myeloma. PMID:25997737

  10. Welcoming a new age for gene therapy in hematology.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Mitchell J; Mullighan, Charles G

    2016-05-26

    Our capacities to understand and manipulate mammalian genomes are accelerating at an astounding pace. In 2007, Capecchi, Evans, and Smithies were awarded the Nobel Prize in medicine for their work on gene targeting, which showed that embryonic stem cells could be modified by homologous recombination (HR) with engineered template DNA to alter virtually any gene and create mutant mice. This work revolutionized biology by allowing investigators to study the in vivo consequences of selected gene alteration. However, the efficiency of HR in embryonic stem cells is unpredictable, depending on the target gene and HR template. More importantly, spontaneous HR occurs at very low rates in most somatic cells, restricting the use of standard gene targeting for most laboratory and clinical applications. This limitation is being overcome by genome-editing technologies, which markedly enhance the capacity to alter cellular genes with laser-like precision. Four review articles in this edition of Blood summarize the field of genome editing, focusing on its potential for treating hematological disorders. PMID:27053534

  11. Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathies in hematological malignancies.

    PubMed

    Jongen, Joost Louis Marie; Broijl, Annemiek; Sonneveld, Pieter

    2015-01-01

    Recent developments in the treatment of hematological malignancies, especially with the advent of proteasome inhibitors and immunomodulatory drugs in plasma cell dyscrasias, call for an increased collaboration between hematologists and neurologists. This collaboration involves differentiating chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathies (CiPN) from disease-related neurologic complications, early recognition of CiPN and treatment of neuropathic pain. Multiple myeloma, Waldenstrom's macroglobulinemia and light-chain amyloidosis frequently present with peripheral neuropathy. In addition, multiple myeloma, non-Hodgkin lymphomas and leukemia's may mimic peripheral neuropathy by compression or invasion of the extra/intradural space. Platinum compounds, vinca alkaloids, proteasome inhibitors and immunomodulatory drugs may all cause CiPN, each with different and often specific clinical characteristics. Early recognition, by identifying the distinct clinical phenotype of CiPN, is of crucial importance to prevent irreversible neurological damage. No recommendations can be given on the use of neuroprotective strategies because of a lack of convincing clinical evidence. Finally, CiPN caused by vinca-alkaloids, proteasome inhibitors and immunomodulatory drugs is often painful and neurologists are best equipped to treat this kind of painful neuropathy. PMID:25326770

  12. Anemia in the elderly: a public health crisis in hematology.

    PubMed

    Guralnik, Jack M; Ershler, William B; Schrier, Stanley L; Picozzi, Vincent J

    2005-01-01

    Over 3 million people in the United States aged 65 years and older are anemic. This condition is associated with significant functional impairment and, perhaps, increased mortality. In March 2004, the American Society of Hematology (in conjunction with the National Institute of Aging) convened a "blue ribbon" panel of twenty physicians who are experts on various aspects of this topic. This paper highlights important consensus concepts resulting from that meeting. In particular, four areas of thought are shared. First, the epidemiology of anemia in the elderly is reviewed, including its definition, its expression in different racial groups, and its wide-ranging manifestations. Second, the pathophysiology of anemia in the elderly is reviewed as pertains to three general etiological categories (nutritional, chronic diseases, and so-called "unexplained" anemias). Particular emphasis is given to pathophysiologic mechanisms of anemia that are potentially unique to this age group. Third, a practical approach to the diagnosis and management of anemia for this patient population for the practicing hematologist is provided. Finally, the public health implications of anemia in the elderly for key stakeholder constituencies will be discussed in the oral presentation. PMID:16304431

  13. TET proteins and 5-methylcytosine oxidation in hematological cancers

    PubMed Central

    An, Jungeun; Pastor, William A.; Ko, Myunggon; Rao, Anjana

    2015-01-01

    Summary DNA methylation has pivotal regulatory roles in mammalian development, retrotransposon silencing, genomic imprinting and X-chromosome inactivation. Cancer cells display highly dysregulated DNA methylation profiles characterized by global hypomethylation in conjunction with hypermethylation of promoter CpG islands (CGIs) that presumably lead to genome instability and aberrant expression of tumor suppressor genes or oncogenes. The recent discovery of Ten-Eleven-Translocation (TET) family dioxygenases that oxidize 5mC to 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC), 5-formylcytosine (5fC) and 5-carboxylcytosine (5caC) in DNA has led to profound progress in understanding the mechanism underlying DNA demethylation. Among the three TET genes, TET2 recurrently undergoes inactivating mutations in a wide range of myeloid and lymphoid malignancies. TET2 functions as a bona fide tumor suppressor particularly in the pathogenesis of myeloid malignancies resembling chronic myelomoncytic leukemia (CMML) and myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) in human. Here we review diverse functions of TET proteins and the novel epigenetic marks that they generate in DNA methylation/demethylation dynamics and normal and malignant hematopoietic differentiation. The impact of TET2 inactivation in hematopoiesis and various mechanisms modulating the expression or activity of TET proteins are also discussed. Furthermore, we also present evidence that TET2 and TET3 collaborate to suppress aberrant hematopoiesis and hematopoietic transformation. A detailed understanding of the normal and pathological functions of TET proteins may provide new avenues to develop novel epigenetic therapies for treating hematological malignancies. PMID:25510268

  14. [Microbiological isolates in patients with febrile neutropenia and hematological neoplasias].

    PubMed

    Figuera Esparza, M; Carballo, M; Silva, M; Figueredo, A; Avilán, J

    2006-09-01

    We studied the frequency of culture isolation, type of microorganism isolated and local pattern of resistance in 309 adult febrile neutropenic inpatients with hematological neoplasm, who were hospitalized between January 1998 and December 2003, in Caracas University Hospital (Hospital Universitario de Caracas), in Venezuela. There were 576 febrile neutropenic episodes. Organisms were isolated in 41% of 940 cultures. The most common organisms involved were gram-negative bacilli (48%), followed by gram-positive cocci (35.1%), fungal (11.5%) and other agents (5.4%). Coagulase-negative staphylococci (22.4%) and Escherichia coli (13.4%) were the most isolated; 58.5% of 479 agents isolated had an antibiogram; 62.2% of coagulase-negative staphylococci and 23.1% coagulase-positive staphylococci were oxacillin-resistant. We did not find any vancomycin-resistant organisms. The gram-negative antimicrobial sensitivity for imipenem was 96.2%, cefepime 81%, and ceftazidime 57.5%. Tazobactam-piperacillin and sulbactam-cefoperazone were tested in 26% of antibiograms and had activity of 57.1% and 77.5%, respectively. Fungi were not characterized. Betalactamases producing gram-negative bacilli were found. In general, micro-biological identification and local vigilance of antibacterial resistance pattern must be done routinely in these patients, in order to improve empiric therapy guidelines. PMID:17099792

  15. Imaging Manifestations of Hematologic Diseases with Renal and Perinephric Involvement.

    PubMed

    Purysko, Andrei S; Westphalen, Antonio C; Remer, Erick M; Coppa, Christopher P; Leão Filho, Hilton M; Herts, Brian R

    2016-01-01

    The kidneys and perinephric tissues can be affected by a variety of hematologic disorders, which usually occur in the setting of multisystem involvement. In many of these disorders, imaging is used to evaluate the extent of disease, guide biopsy, and/or monitor disease activity and patient response to therapy. Lymphoma, leukemia, and multiple myeloma commonly manifest as multiple parenchymal or perinephric lesions. Erdheim-Chester disease and Rosai-Dorfman disease, rare forms of multisystemic histiocytosis, are often identified as perinephric and periureteral masses. Renal abnormalities depicted at imaging in patients with sickle cell disease include renal enlargement, papillary necrosis, and renal medullary carcinoma. Sickle cell disease, along with other causes of intravascular hemolysis, can also lead to hemosiderosis of the renal cortex. Thrombosis of renal veins is sometimes seen in patients with coagulation disorders but more often occurs in association with certain malignancies and nephrotic syndrome. Immunoglobulin G4-related sclerosing disease is another multisystem process that often produces focal renal lesions, seen along with involvement of more characteristic organs such as the pancreas. Perinephric lesions with calcifications should raise the possibility of secondary amyloidosis, especially in patients with a history of lymphoma and multiple myeloma. Although the imaging patterns of renal and perinephric involvement are usually not specific for a single entity, and the same entity can manifest with different or overlapping patterns, familiarity with these patterns and key clinical and histopathologic features may help to narrow the differential diagnosis and determine the next step of care. (©)RSNA, 2016. PMID:27257766

  16. Acute hematologic and hemorheologic effects of sulfur dioxide inhalation

    SciTech Connect

    Baskurt, O.K.

    1988-09-01

    Fifty male rats were exposed to 0.87 ppm sulfur dioxide (SO/sub 2/) for 24 hr. Hematologic and hemorheologic parameters measured in this group were compared with the results of a control group of 51 male rats. Hematocrit values were found to be higher (p less than .005) in the SO/sub 2/-treated group (43.55 +/- 0.41%, mean +/- standard error), when compared to the control group value (41.97 +/- 0.35%). Sulfhemoglobin values were also higher (p less than .0001) in the SO/sub 2/-treated group (0.60 +/- 0.08%) than the control group (0.08 +/- 0.02%). Osmotic hemolysis ratio was slightly increased (p less than .05) in the 0.55% sodium chloride solution. However, whole blood and packed cell viscosities were lower in the SO/sub 2/-treated animals, while there was no significant difference in the plasma viscosities. The mechanism of these effects could not be clarified completely, but structural and functional effects of SO2 inhalation on peripheral erythrocytes were discussed.

  17. Human rhinovirus C infections in pediatric hematology and oncology patients.

    PubMed

    Loria, Carolina; Domm, Jennifer A; Halasa, Natasha B; Heitman, Elizabeth; Miller, E Kathryn; Xu, Meng; Saville, Benjamin R; Frangoul, Haydar; Williams, John V

    2015-02-01

    Children with cancer and HSCT recipients are at high risk for common viral infections. We sought to define the viral etiology of ARI and identify risk factors. Nasal wash samples were collected from pediatric hematology-oncology patients and HSCT recipients with ARI during the 2003-2005 winter seasons. Real-time RT-PCR was performed to detect Flu A, influenza B, RSV, PIV 1-3, human MPV, and HRV. HRV specimens were sequenced and genotyped. Seventy-eight samples from 62 children were included. Viruses were detected in 31 of 78 samples (40%). HRV were detected most frequently, in 16 (52%) including five HRVC; followed by seven (22%) RSV, five (16%) Flu A, four (13%) MPV, and two (6%) PIV2. There was a trend toward higher risk of viral infection for children in day care. Only 8% of the study children had received influenza vaccine. HRV, including the recently discovered HRVC, are an important cause of infection in pediatric oncology and HSCT patients. Molecular testing is superior to conventional methods and should be standard of care, as HRV are not detected by conventional methods. PMID:25377237

  18. Authentic Field-Based Learning Experiences for EdD Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hershberger, Jane Boag

    2009-01-01

    This EPP examines the problem of EdD coursework not having sufficient connection to the work that EdD students will eventually assume as leaders of school districts or other educational systems. It reviews literature critical of EdD programs and websites of educational administration professional organizations with recommended curriculum for EdD…

  19. ALS - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - ALS ... The following organizations are good resources for information on amyotrophic lateral sclerosis : Muscular Dystrophy Association -- mda.org/disease/amyotrophic-lateral-sclerosis National Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) Registry -- ...

  20. ALS Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... ALS. Find Out How Our Mission Leading the fight to treat and cure ALS through global research ... you participate, advocate, and donate, you advance the fight to find the cure and lead us toward ...

  1. ED quality performance moves into the public reporting arena.

    PubMed

    2010-09-01

    As an ED manager, you face the growing challenge of your performance data being shared with the public and with hospital administration. Be sure to share the good news with your administration, so they can use it to help market the hospital. When adverse rankings appear, you have two options: Seek additional resources to improve performance, or challenge the data. Use an automated system to access"real-time"data on your department's performance, so you will always be ready to defend your ED. PMID:20853578

  2. Automated SEM-EDS GSR Analysis for Turkish Ammunitions

    SciTech Connect

    Cakir, Ismail; Uner, H. Bulent

    2007-04-23

    In this work, Automated Scanning Electron Microscopy with Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectrometry (SEM-EDS) was used to characterize 7.65 and 9mm cartridges Turkish ammunition. All samples were analyzed in a SEM Jeol JSM-5600LV equipped BSE detector and a Link ISIS 300 (EDS). A working distance of 20mm, an accelerating voltage of 20 keV and gunshot residue software was used in all analysis. Automated search resulted in a high number of particles analyzed containing gunshot residues (GSR) unique elements (PbBaSb). The obtained data about the definition of characteristic GSR particles was concordant with other studies on this topic.

  3. Microbiologic Methods Utilized in the MAL-ED Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Houpt, Eric; Gratz, Jean; Kosek, Margaret; Zaidi, Anita K. M.; Qureshi, Shahida; Kang, Gagandeep; Babji, Sudhir; Mason, Carl; Bodhidatta, Ladaporn; Samie, Amidou; Bessong, Pascal; Barrett, Leah; Lima, Aldo; Havt, Alexandre; Haque, Rashidul; Mondal, Dinesh; Taniuchi, Mami; Stroup, Suzanne; McGrath, Monica; Lang, Dennis

    2014-01-01

    A central hypothesis of The Etiology, Risk Factors and Interactions of Enteric Infections and Malnutrition and the Consequences for Child Health and Development (MAL-ED) study is that enteropathogens contribute to growth faltering. To examine this question, the MAL-ED network of investigators set out to achieve 3 goals: (1) develop harmonized protocols to test for a diverse range of enteropathogens, (2) provide quality-assured and comparable results from 8 global sites, and (3) achieve maximum laboratory throughput and minimum cost. This paper describes the rationale for the microbiologic assays chosen and methodologies used to accomplish the 3 goals. PMID:25305291

  4. Characterization of pyrotechnic reaction residue particles by SEM/EDS.

    PubMed

    Kosanke, Ken L; Dujay, Richard C; Kosanke, Bonnie

    2003-05-01

    Today the method commonly used for detecting gunshot residue is through the combined use of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). In recent years, this same methodology began to find use in detecting and characterizing pyrotechnic reaction residue (PRR) particles whether produced by explosion or burning. This is accomplished by collecting particulate samples from a surface in the immediate area of the pyrotechnic reaction. Suspect PRR particles are identified by their morphology (typically 1 to 20 microm spheroidal particles) using an SEM; then they are analyzed for the elements they contain using X-ray EDS. This can help to identify the general type of pyrotechnic composition involved. PMID:12762523

  5. Automated SEM-EDS GSR Analysis for Turkish Ammunitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cakir, Ismail; Uner, H. Bulent

    2007-04-01

    In this work, Automated Scanning Electron Microscopy with Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectrometry (SEM-EDS) was used to characterize 7.65 and 9mm cartridges Turkish ammunition. All samples were analyzed in a SEM Jeol JSM-5600LV equipped BSE detector and a Link ISIS 300 (EDS). A working distance of 20mm, an accelerating voltage of 20 keV and gunshot residue software was used in all analysis. Automated search resulted in a high number of particles analyzed containing gunshot residues (GSR) unique elements (PbBaSb). The obtained data about the definition of characteristic GSR particles was concordant with other studies on this topic.

  6. Prognostic significance of hematological profiles in melanoma patients.

    PubMed

    Gandini, Sara; Ferrucci, Pier Francesco; Botteri, Edoardo; Tosti, Giulio; Barberis, Massimo; Pala, Laura; Battaglia, Angelo; Clerici, Alessandra; Spadola, Giuseppe; Cocorocchio, Emilia; Martinoli, Chiara

    2016-10-01

    Cancer-related inflammation may play an important role in disease progression and patient outcome, and could be easily monitored through indirect parameters routinely evaluated at diagnosis. Here, we investigated if peripheral blood cells and the ratios of neutrophils to lymphocytes (NLR) and of lymphocytes to monocytes (LMR) as surrogate markers of cancer related inflammation are associated with disease progression and survival of melanoma patients at any stage of the disease. Records of 1,182 melanoma patients included in an Institutional tumor registry in the period 2000-2010, were reviewed. Among them, 584 patients with a cutaneous or unknown primary melanoma and available pre-operative blood tests were analyzed. Survival was estimated with the Kaplan-Meier method, and analyzed using Log-rank test, Cox regression and multivariate Cox proportional hazard models. We found that patients presenting with distant metastases had higher leukocytes, neutrophils and monocytes, and lower lymphocytes compared to Stage I-III patients. Furthermore, at a single-patient level, hematological profiles changed on disease progression from regional to distant metastatic, with significantly increased circulating leukocytes, neutrophils and monocytes, and decreased lymphocytes. Peripheral blood cell counts were not associated with survival of patients with a localized or regionally metastasized melanoma. Instead, in Stage IV patients, leukocytes (p = 0.001), neutrophils (p = 0.0002), monocytes (p = 0.002), NLR (p < 0.0001) and LMR (p = 0.005) were all significantly associated with survival, independently of other known prognostic factors. These results suggest that cellular components of peripheral blood do count for survival of patients with advanced melanoma. PMID:27252119

  7. Splenectomy in hematologic disorders. The ever-changing indications.

    PubMed Central

    Wilhelm, M C; Jones, R E; McGehee, R; Mitchener, J S; Sandusky, W R; Hess, C E

    1988-01-01

    A comparison between a series of splenectomies performed at the University of Virginia Medical Center for hematologic disorders between 1946 and 1962 (Series I) and 1963 and 1982 (Series II) is presented. Four hundred splenectomies (20 per year) were performed between 1963 and 1982 compared with 94 (5.5 per year) between 1946 and 1962. Also noted in Series II was a sharp decline in the number performed each year between 1974 and 1983. The major factor responsible for these observations was the evolution of the staging laparotomy for malignant lymphomas, particularly Hodgkin's disease, and the decline in the average annual incidence of staging laparotomies since 1974. Staging laparotomy currently is rarely done for non-Hodgkin's lymphomas. Also contributing to the changes noted was an increase in the total number but subsequent fall in the annual incidence of splenectomy for hereditary spherocytosis, idiopathic hypersplenism, and myeloproliferative disorders in Series II. The average number of splenectomies for idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura increased from 1.1 per year in Series I to 3.6 per year in Series II; the annual incidence during the study period of Series II, however, remained constant. The total number of splenectomies for hairy cell leukemia and Felty's syndrome increased from zero in Series I to 12 and 17, respectively, in Series II, whereas the number of miscellaneous reasons dropped from 29 (1.7 per year) in Series I to 15 (0.75 per year) in Series II. The mortality rate in Series I was 6.3% compared with 4.0% in Series II. No deaths occurred in Series II after 1979. Indications for splenectomy in Series II were for diagnostic purposes in 3.2%, therapeutic in 56.5%, staging in 39.5%, and restaging in 0.8%. Accessory spleens were found in 49 (12.5%) in Series II. PMID:3377568

  8. Technicon H*1 Hematology System: Optical Design Considerations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colella, G. M.; Tycko, D. H.; Groner, W.

    1988-06-01

    The Technicon H*1 systemTM is a clinical laboratory flow cytometer which performs a complete hematology profile, providing quantitative information on the various types of cells in a blood sample. A light-scattering method, using a HeNe laser, determines in a single flow channel the red cell count, platelet count, and the distributions of red cell volume, red cell hemoglobin concentration, and platelet volume. To accomplish this the scattered light from each red cell in the sample is measured in real time at two angular intervals. The cell volume and the hemoglobin concentration within the cell are derived from these two measurements. Severe accuracy and precision specifications are placed on the medically important red cell count (RBC) and the mean red cell volume (MCV). From the point of view of optical system design, the dominant factor is the requirement that RBC and MCV have precision and accuracy of the order of 2%. Signal-to-noise and scattering-angle definition requirements dictated the choice of a HeNe laser light source. The optics includes an illumination system for producing a sharply defined, uniformly illuminated scattering region and a detection system which must accurately define the accepted scattering angles. In previous cytometric methods for determining MCV only a single quantity was measured for each cell. Such methods cannot disentangle the independent effects of cell size and hemoglobin concentration on the measurement, thus compromising MCV accuracy. The present double-angle scattering method overcomes this accuracy problem. The H*1 red cell method, the supporting optical design and data demonstrating that the use of this technique eliminates interference between the observed red cell indices are presented.

  9. Acquired uniparental disomy of chromosome 9p in hematologic malignancies.

    PubMed

    Wang, Linghua; Wheeler, David A; Prchal, Josef T

    2016-08-01

    Acquired uniparental disomy (aUPD) is a common and recurrent molecular event in human cancers that leads to homozygosity for tumor suppressor genes as well as oncogenes, while retaining the diploid chromosomal complement. Because of the lack of copy number change, aUPD is undetectable by comparative genome hybridization, so the magnitude of this genetic change was underappreciated in the past. 9p aUPD was first described in 2002 in patients with polycythemia vera (PV). Since then, systematic application of genomewide single-nucleotide polymorphism arrays has indicated that 9p aUPD is the most common chromosomal aberration in myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs), contributing to discovery of the PV-defining mutation JAK2V617F21. It was also found in other myeloid and lymphoid malignancies, though at a relatively lower frequency. By leading to JAK2V617F 23 homozygosity, 9p aUPD plays a causal role in the development of PV and is also associated with less favorable clinical outcomes. It is also possible that new targets other than JAK2V617F 25 are present within 9p aUPD that may contribute to diversity of PV outcome and phenotype. This review summarizes recent discoveries on 9p aUPD in hematologic malignancies and discusses possible underlying mechanisms and potential roles of 9p aUPD in the pathogenesis of PV, the relationship between 9p aUPD and JAK2V617F29, and possible new cancer-related targets within the 9p aUPD region. PMID:26646991

  10. Hematological shift in goat kids naturally devoid of prion protein

    PubMed Central

    Reiten, Malin R.; Bakkebø, Maren K.; Brun-Hansen, Hege; Lewandowska-Sabat, Anna M.; Olsaker, Ingrid; Tranulis, Michael A.; Espenes, Arild; Boysen, Preben

    2015-01-01

    The physiological role of the cellular prion protein (PrPC) is incompletely understood. The expression of PrPC in hematopoietic stem cells and immune cells suggests a role in the development of these cells, and in PrPC knockout animals altered immune cell proliferation and phagocytic function have been observed. Recently, a spontaneous nonsense mutation at codon 32 in the PRNP gene in goats of the Norwegian Dairy breed was discovered, rendering homozygous animals devoid of PrPC. Here we report hematological and immunological analyses of homozygous goat kids lacking PrPC (PRNPTer/Ter) compared to heterozygous (PRNP+/Ter) and normal (PRNP+/+) kids. Levels of cell surface PrPC and PRNP mRNA in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) correlated well and were very low in PRNPTer/Ter, intermediate in PRNP+/Ter and high in PRNP+/+ kids. The PRNPTer/Ter animals had a shift in blood cell composition with an elevated number of red blood cells (RBCs) and a tendency toward a smaller mean RBC volume (P = 0.08) and an increased number of neutrophils (P = 0.068), all values within the reference ranges. Morphological investigations of blood smears and bone marrow imprints did not reveal irregularities. Studies of relative composition of PBMCs, phagocytic ability of monocytes and T-cell proliferation revealed no significant differences between the genotypes. Our data suggest that PrPC has a role in bone marrow physiology and warrant further studies of PrPC in erythroid and immune cell progenitors as well as differentiated effector cells also under stressful conditions. Altogether, this genetically unmanipulated PrPC-free animal model represents a unique opportunity to unveil the enigmatic physiology and function of PrPC. PMID:26217662

  11. Microstructure of Ni-Al powder and Ni-Al composite coatings prepared by twin-wire arc spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ji-xiao; Wang, Gui-xian; Liu, Jing-shun; Zhang, Lun-yong; Wang, Wei; Li, Ze; Wang, Qi-xiang; Sun, Jian-fei

    2016-07-01

    Ni-Al powder and Ni-Al composite coatings were fabricated by twin-wire arc spraying (TWAS). The microstructures of Ni-5wt%Al powder and Ni-20wt%Al powder were characterized by scanning electronic microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). The results showed that the obtained particle size ranged from 5 to 50 μm. The morphology of the Ni-Al powder showed that molten particles were composed of Ni solid solution, NiAl, Ni3Al, Al2O3, and NiO. The Ni-Al phase and a small amount of Al2O3 particles changed the composition of the coating. The microstructures of the twin-wire-arc-sprayed Ni-Al composite coatings were characterized by SEM, EDS, X-ray diffraction (XRD), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The results showed that the main phase of the Ni-5wt%Al coating consisted of Ni solid solution and NiAl in addition to a small amount of Al2O3. The main phase of the Ni-20wt%Al coating mainly consisted of Ni solid solution, NiAl, and Ni3Al in addition to a small amount of Al and Al2O3, and NiAl and Ni3Al intermetallic compounds effectively further improved the final wear property of the coatings. TEM analysis indicated that fine spherical NiAl3 precipitates and a Ni-Al-O amorphous phase formed in the matrix of the Ni solid solution in the original state.

  12. Clonal Non-Malignant Hematological Disorders: Unraveling Molecular Pathogenic Mechanisms to Develop Novel Targeted Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Risitano, Antonio M.; Selleri, Carmine

    2014-01-01

    Clonal non-malignant hematological disorders are a heterogeneous group of diseases that are particularly challenging for hematologists. Indeed, most obvious and frequent hematological diseases include a broad spectrum of malignancies, such as leukemias, lymphomas, myeloma, and other myeloproliferative or lymphoproliferative disorders. In recent years, all these diseases have been categorized by the WHO according to a novel classification of myeloid and lymphoid malignancies, which takes in account the outstanding progress in our understanding of molecular defects underlying hematological malignancies. Regardless of a number of novel technologies, hematologists continue to deal daily with conditions where a clear diagnosis of a malignancy is missing: this is the case of several clonal hematological disorders, which are considered bona fide non-malignant. Some myelodysplastic syndromes, chronic T and NK disorders of granular lymphocytes, myelofibrosis, monoclonal gammopathies, monoclonal B-cel lymphocytosis, mastocytosis and paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria are paradigmatic examples of how clonal disorders are clearly different from cancers, even if they may share with hematological malignancies similar molecular, genetic, epigenetic and immunological processes. Indeed, it is not entirely clear whether in individual conditions such pathogenic mechanisms may represent initial step(s) of malignant transformation, making a bridge between these clonal non-malignant disorders and typical hematological cancers. Some of these non-malignant disorders imply specific pathogenic mechanisms and/or clinical course, and so they have been definitely established with their own biological and clinical identity. However, the obvious question whether some of these clonal non-malignant hematological diseases form some a kind of disease-continuum with their corresponding malignant counterpart is still to be answered. PMID:24778992

  13. Inside the Sex Ed Studio: An Interview with Peggy Brick

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taverner, William J.

    2008-01-01

    "Inside the Sex Ed Studio" profiles leaders in the field of sexuality education. Peggy Brick, former director of Planned Parenthood of Greater Northern New Jersey's Center for Family Life Education (CFLE) and author of numerous sexuality education resources used worldwide, is the subject of this interview. Ms. Brick was interviewed by William J.…

  14. Candidate Success and edTPA: Looking at the Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Lesley A.; Kelly, Mary K.; Baldwin, Joni L.; Arnold, Jackie M.

    2016-01-01

    This descriptive study looks at the correlations between Teacher Performance Assessment (edTPA) data and numerous program data points, including GPA, major GPA, and benchmark assignment scores, gathered in an Early Childhood Education (ECE) program. Previous studies have looked to correlate grade point average (GPA) with pre-service teacher…

  15. Weck Ed. Weck Educational Development Program. Final Performance Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coplin, Jennifer; And Others

    This document includes a final performance report and evaluation report from the Weck Ed program, through which job-linked adult basic education and General Educational Development (GED) test preparation courses that were jointly developed by the company Pilling Weck and Durham Technical Community College were offered to Pilling Weck employees on…

  16. Creating a Minnesota Statewide SNAP-Ed Program Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gold, Abby; Barno, Trina Adler; Sherman, Shelley; Lovett, Kathleen; Hurtado, G. Ali

    2013-01-01

    Systematic evaluation is an essential tool for understanding program effectiveness. This article describes the pilot test of a statewide evaluation tool for the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program-Education (SNAP-Ed). A computer algorithm helped Community Nutrition Educators (CNEs) build surveys specific to their varied educational settings…

  17. Lifeworld and Textualism: Reassembling the Researcher/ed and "Others"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Payne, Phillip G.

    2005-01-01

    This response to McKenzie's "post-post" concerns about environmental education research draws upon empirical, conceptual, anecdotal, metaphorical, imaged and poetic means to help the researcher "reassemble" the researcher/ed by attending to her/his relational body and embodiment of various, often hegemonic, socially constructed environmental…

  18. Prediction of College Student Dropouts Using EDS Scores.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Witherspoon, A. D.; Long, Carolyn K.; Chubick, Jennifer D.

    1999-01-01

    To identify college students at risk for dropping out, scores on the Environmental Deprivation Scale (EDS) given six quarters earlier were studied. Students who had graduated at follow-up had lower scores than those who had dropped out. Examination of items showed types of support lacking for at-risk students. (EMK)

  19. Engaging the public through writing an op-ed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labosier, Chris; Zhu, Laiyin; Quiring, Steven

    2012-10-01

    In May, prior to the start of the 2012 hurricane season, AGU asked us to write an op-ed for the Houston Chronicle on the importance of funding hurricane research. We were excited to be asked and pleased that AGU facilitated the process by providing us with some guidance on writing the op-ed. Given the impact that Hurricane Ike had in Texas just a few years ago, we felt it was important to remind the citizens of the greater Houston metropolitan area of the societal benefits of funding hurricane research. Thanks to the assistance of AGU staff, writing the article required only a few hours of time. Our op-ed was published in the print edition of the Houston Chronicle on 1 June 2012, the official start of the hurricane season (http://www.chron.com/default/article/Tight-budgets-posing-threat-to-Texas-hurricane-3600363.php). It was picked up by the media relations office in the College of Geosciences at Texas A&M University and featured on the college's Web site in the dean's biweekly briefing and on its Facebook page. As a result, the op-ed reached a large and diverse audience.

  20. Air pollution and ED visits for chest pain.

    PubMed

    Szyszkowicz, Mieczyslaw

    2009-02-01

    This was a study of 157,028 emergency department (ED)-diagnosed visits for chest pain (International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision [ICD-9]: 786) in 6 cities in Canada. The generalized linear mixed methods technique was applied to analyze the relations between daily counts of ED visits for chest pain on the levels of ambient air pollutants after adjusting for meteorological variables. The daily counts of visits were analyzed separately for the whole period (January-December), warm (April-September), and cold (October-March). The results are presented in the form of the excess risks associated with an increase in the mean values of the pollutant concentrations. The highest increase was obtained for nitrogen dioxide (NO2) exposure in the warm period as follows: 5.9% (95% confidence interval, 3.3-5.8) for mean value equals to 20.1 ppb. The associations of ED visits for chest pain with air pollution are very similar to the associations of ED visits related to cardiac problems. PMID:19371523

  1. FETC, TCEA Commemorate 25 Years of Serving Ed Tech Industry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    T.H.E. Journal, 2005

    2005-01-01

    There's only one way to prepare for all of the exciting things that the ed tech market has in store for 2005-- by attending a conference. That's why T.H.E. Journal hopes readers will join them at this year's FETC (Booth 1505) and TCEA (Booth 1934) conferences to help celebrate their 25th anniversaries. Overviews are provided for both conferences…

  2. Three Ways edTPA Prepared Me for the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butler, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    edTPA, a capstone assessment designed to assess whether new teachers are ready for the job by evaluating their teaching and their analysis of their teaching, helped prepare the author for the classroom in three ways. First, he became accountable to his students. Second, he learned to analyze his teaching. Third, he discovered how to relate…

  3. EdMOO: One Approach to a Multimedia Collaborative Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holkner, Bernard

    The nature of the multiuser object oriented (MOO) environment lends itself to flexible and rich interactive collaboration space providing interactive discussion, mail, mailing list, and news features to its virtual denizens. EdMOO (HREF1) was created in mid-1995 as an environment for teachers to experience the text based virtual reality…

  4. 5 Ways That edX Could Change Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parry, Marc

    2012-01-01

    Since MIT and Harvard started edX, their joint experiment with free online courses, the venture has attracted enormous attention for opening the ivory tower to the world. But in the process, the world will become part of an expensive and ambitious experiment testing some of the most interesting--and difficult--questions in digital education. Can…

  5. Institutionalizing Environmental Scanning in the ED QUEST Process.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrison, James L.

    An environmental scanning system is structured to identify and evaluate trends, events, and emerging issues. QUEST represents the quick environmental scanning technique, and an ED QUEST process enables an educational organization to clarify its future and define its options. This paper describes how an educational organization can establish an…

  6. HAZ-ED Classroom Activities for Understanding Hazardous Waste.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC.

    The Federal Superfund Program investigates and cleans up hazardous waste sites throughout the United States. Part of this program is devoted to informing the public and involving people in the process of cleaning up hazardous waste sites from beginning to end. The Haz-Ed program was developed to assist the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA)…

  7. Merging Career and Ex Ed Centers: A Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shea, Denise Dwight

    1995-01-01

    Career centers in universities are increasingly being merged with other student employment programs, such as internship and cooperative education programs. Experiential education (ex ed) is poised to become the largest service component of the new merged services. Discusses values to students, employers, and career services professionals. (JPS)

  8. Indiana AdvancED/NCA District Accreditation Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boles, Sterling M.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the perceived strengths and limitations of the AdvancED/NCA district model of accreditation. Indiana public school superintendent, principal, and teacher results were examined in order to determine effective systems model improvement efforts. The survey results of district-accredited staff members from…

  9. SSF1deg-Day Terra Ed4

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2016-06-08

    ... and Order:  Reverb   Reverb Tutorial Subset/Visualization Tool:  CERES Order Tool Search and Order:  ASDC Order ... Documents:  Detailed CERES SSF1deg-lite Product Information Data Products Catalog: DPC_SSF1deg-Day_Ed4_R5V1 ...

  10. SSF1deg-Day Aqua Ed4

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2016-06-08

    ... and Order:  Reverb   Reverb Tutorial Subset/Visualization Tool:  CERES Order Tool Search and Order:  ASDC Order ... Documents:  Detailed CERES SSF1deg-lite Product Information Data Products Catalog: DPC_SSF1deg-Day_Ed4_R6V1 ...

  11. Targeted Marrow Irradiation, Fludarabine Phosphate, and Busulfan Before Donor Progenitor Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Hematologic Malignancies

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-03

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Hematologic Malignancies; Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia; Non Hodgkin Lymphoma; Hodgkin Lymphoma,; Multiple Myeloma; Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Chronic Myeloid Leukemia; Myelofibrosis; Myeloproliferative Syndrome

  12. AB273. Challenge of AMS700CXR inflatable penile prosthesis for treating patients with severe ED in China

    PubMed Central

    Xin, Zhongcheng

    2016-01-01

    More than 50% of patients with erectile dysfunction (ED) showed erectile tissues pathological changes include corpus cavernous fibrosis, endothelial dysfunction, arterial and/or vein disorder, neuropathy and hormon disorder et al. Currently used on demanded treating ED therapies, include oral medication using PDE5i, intra-cavernosal injection (ICI) therapy, vacuum device et al., the clinical efficacies of reached to 70% with some kinks of adverse events, however, these therapies showed no effects on sever ED with sever pathological changes in erectile tissue. Penile prosthesis implantation (PPI) is the solution of choice in patients who have failed or present contraindication to the use of all conservative treatment for ED. We retrospectively evaluated the clinical outcome of PPI in Chinese patients with severe erectile dysfunction (SED) from July 2000 to December 2011, 224 patients, overall satisfaction with the PPI surgery was reported by 89.0% of men and 82.5% of partners, mechanical malfunction occurred in 4 cases (2.0%) and 3 cases were re-implanted new device, and 2 cases (1.0%) developed a mild curvature of the penis. Scrotal erosion with infection occurred in 1 case with diabetes mellitus (0.5%) and required complete removal of the implanted AMS 700 CXM. After 3 years no PPI device available in China, AMS 700CXR finally approved by China SDA recently, and the quality this device is improved very much compared to AMS700CXM, and the long-term mechanical reliability studies on AMS 700CXR noted that the clinical efficacy and device service of AMS 700CXR showed significantly better than that of AMS 700 CXM, which yields excellent results in terms of cosmetic and functional outcome and therefore has a significant impact on patients' satisfaction, sex life and overall quality of life. Overall, long term reliability has been significantly improved and complication rates are low in the hands of experienced surgeons.

  13. Hematological Parameters Improve Prediction of Mortality and Secondary Adverse Events in Coronary Angiography Patients

    PubMed Central

    Gijsberts, Crystel M.; den Ruijter, Hester M.; de Kleijn, Dominique P.V.; Huisman, Albert; ten Berg, Maarten J.; van Wijk, Richard H.A.; Asselbergs, Folkert W.; Voskuil, Michiel; Pasterkamp, Gerard; van Solinge, Wouter W.; Hoefer, Imo E.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Prediction of primary cardiovascular events has been thoroughly investigated since the landmark Framingham risk score was introduced. However, prediction of secondary events after initial events of coronary artery disease (CAD) poses a new challenge. In a cohort of coronary angiography patients (n = 1760), we examined readily available hematological parameters from the UPOD (Utrecht Patient Oriented Database) and their addition to prediction of secondary cardiovascular events. Backward stepwise multivariable Cox regression analysis was used to test their ability to predict death and major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE). Continuous net reclassification improvement (cNRI) and integrated discrimination improvement (IDI) measures were calculated for the hematological parameters on top of traditional risk factors to assess prediction improvement. Panels of 3 to 8 hematological parameters significantly improved prediction of death and adverse events. The IDIs ranged from 0.02 to 0.07 (all P < 0.001) among outcome measures and the cNRIs from 0.11 to 0.40 (P < 0.001 in 5 of 6 outcome measures). In the hematological panels red cell distribution width (RDW) appeared most often. The multivariable adjusted hazard ratio of RDW per 1 standard deviation (SD) increase for MACE was 1.19 [1.08–1.32], P < 0.001. Routinely measured hematological parameters significantly improved prediction of mortality and adverse events in coronary angiography patients. Accurately indicating high-risk patients is of paramount importance in clinical decision-making. PMID:26559287

  14. POINT-OF-CARE HEMATOLOGY AND COAGULATION TESTING IN PRIMARY, RURAL EMERGENCY, AND DISASTER CARE SCENARIOS

    PubMed Central

    Curtis, Corbin M.; Kost, Gerald J.; Louie, Richard F.; Sonu, Rebecca J.; Ammirati, Erika B.; Sumner, Stephanie

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to review current principles and criteria for obtaining Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments of 1988 (CLIA ’88) waiver, identify existing point-of-care (POC) coagulation and hematology technologies, and analyze regulatory challenges regarding CLIA-waiver for those and future devices. CLIA ’88 documentation requires tests performed by laboratories with a Certificate of Waiver to be so simple that the likelihood of erroneous results by the user is negligible, or poses no unreasonable risk of harm to the patient if performed incorrectly as determined by the Secretary of Health and Human Services. “Simple” means that the test uses unprocessed samples, has a direct read-out of test results, does not have specifications for user training, and includes instructions for confirmatory testing when advisable. Currently the CLIA-waived hematology and coagulation POC devices only test for hemoglobin (Hb), hematocrit (Hct), and prothrombin time/international normalized ratio (PT/INR). The problem with these devices is the lack of multiplexing. POC coagulation and hematology devices face challenges for obtaining a waiver. These challenges include the lack of clinical needs assessment, miniturized assays that correct for interfering substances, and assays simple enough to be combined in a multiplex platform. Several scenarios demonstrate how POC coagulation or hematology devices can improve crisis care. Industry should perform needs assessment on clinicians and emergency responders to determine which analytes to incorporate on multiplex POC coagulation and hematology devices, and produce devices that address confounding factors. PMID:23843728

  15. Antibody-modified T cells: CARs take the front seat for hematologic malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Maus, Marcela V.; Grupp, Stephan A.; Porter, David L.

    2014-01-01

    T cells redirected to specific antigen targets with engineered chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) are emerging as powerful therapies in hematologic malignancies. Various CAR designs, manufacturing processes, and study populations, among other variables, have been tested and reported in over 10 clinical trials. Here, we review and compare the results of the reported clinical trials and discuss the progress and key emerging factors that may play a role in effecting tumor responses. We also discuss the outlook for CAR T-cell therapies, including managing toxicities and expanding the availability of personalized cell therapy as a promising approach to all hematologic malignancies. Many questions remain in the field of CAR T cells directed to hematologic malignancies, but the encouraging response rates pave a wide road for future investigation. PMID:24578504

  16. The bone marrow stroma in hematological neoplasms—a guilty bystander

    PubMed Central

    Tripodo, Claudio; Sangaletti, Sabina; Piccaluga, Pier P.; Prakash, Sonam; Franco, Giovanni; Borrello, Ivan; Orazi, Attilio; Colombo, Mario P.; Pileri, Stefano A.

    2013-01-01

    In the setting of hematological neoplasms, changes in the bone marrow (BM) stroma might arise from pressure exerted by the neoplastic clone in shaping a supportive microenvironment, or from chronic perturbation of the BM homeostasis. Under such conditions, alterations in the composition of the BM stroma can be profound, and could emerge as relevant prognostic factors. In this Review, we delineate the multifaceted contribution of the BM stroma to the pathobiology of several hematological neoplasms, and discuss the impact of stromal modifications on the natural course of these diseases. Specifically, we highlight the involvement of BM stromal components in lymphoid and myeloid malignancies, and present the most relevant processes responsible for remodeling the BM stroma. The role of bystander BM stromal elements in the setting of hematological neoplasms is discussed, strengthening the rationale for treatment strategies that target the BM stroma. PMID:21448151

  17. Unmet Needs for Psychosocial Care in Hematologic Malignancies and Hematopoietic Cell Transplant.

    PubMed

    Barata, Anna; Wood, William A; Choi, Sung Won; Jim, Heather S L

    2016-08-01

    Individuals diagnosed with hematologic malignancies experience significant unmet psychological, physical, informational, financial, and spiritual needs. The goal of the current review is to summarize and highlight recent research focused on these issues in the diagnosis and treatment periods and beyond. The review also describes the needs of adolescent and young adult (AYA) and pediatric patients. While a large body of research has reported on unmet needs among adult hematologic cancer patients, there is far less data regarding the challenges confronted by AYA and pediatric populations. Available data suggests that among all age groups, hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) is a risk factor for greater unmet needs. Recommendations for screening and evidence-based interventions to prevent or ameliorate unmet needs are provided. Future research is needed to develop additional evidence-based psychosocial interventions with a focus on hematologic cancer. PMID:27113094

  18. Influence of cadmium exposure on selected hematological parameters in freshwater teleost, Notemigonus crysoleucas

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, W.H.; Baer, K.N.; Stackhouse, R.A.; Watson, C.F.

    1987-02-01

    The use of hematological parameters for assessing the acute toxicity of heavy metals to mammals has shown considerable promise. These parameters include the measurement of blood glucose, hematocrit, and a variety of enzymes. The present investigation was undertaken to evaluate the use of selected hematological parameters in aquatic organisms. Exposure of Notemigonus crysoleucas to cadmium resulted in a 96-hr /sup LC/50 value of 3.15 mg Cd/liter. The influence of cadmium on selected hematological parameters was examined following 96 hr of exposure to 0, 1.35, and 2.40 mg Cd/liter. Cadmium exposure produced significant alterations in the levels of glucose, aspartate aminotransaminase, and alanine aminotransaminase. Hematocrit was not altered by exposure to cadmium. These results indicate that glucose and transaminases may be useful as diagnostic tests for cadmium exposure in aquatic organisms.

  19. Allopurinol hypersensitivity syndrome in patients with hematological malignancies: characteristics and clinical outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Min, Hong Ki; Lee, Boin; Kwok, Seung-Ki; Ju, Ji Hyeon; Kim, Wan-Uk; Park, Young Min

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims Allopurinol is a urate-lowering agent that is commonly used to prevent chemotherapy-related hyperuricemia. Allopurinol hypersensitivity syndrome (AHS) is a disorder involving multiple organs, which may be accompanied by cutaneous adverse reactions. We identified the characteristics and clinical outcomes of chemotherapy-associated AHS in patients with hematological malignancies. Methods This retrospective single-center study included 26 AHS patients (11 with and 15 without hematological malignancies) admitted to Seoul St. Mary's Hospital. AHS was defined using the criteria of Singer and Wallace. Comparisons were made using the Mann-Whitney U test and Fisher exact test as appropriate. Results In patients with a hematological malignancy and AHS, statistically significant differences were observed in terms of younger age at onset; shorter duration of exposure; higher starting and maintenance doses of allopurinol; lower incidence of eosinophilia, leukocytosis, and underlying renal insufficiency; and more frequent occurrence of fever compared to AHS patients without a hematological malignancy. Two AHS patients with a hematological malignancy were examined for human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-B typing, but neither patient harbored the HLA-B*5801 allele. All of the patients ceased allopurinol treatment, with most patients making a full recovery. Two patients in the study died; however, these deaths were unrelated to AHS. One patient developed serious sequelae of AHS that required hemodialysis. Conclusions Physicians who prescribe allopurinol for the prevention of chemotherapy-related hyperuricemia should be aware of the unique risk of AHS, even in patients with hematological malignancies who do not have known risk factors for AHS. Novel urate-lowering agents should be considered alternative treatments. PMID:26161019

  20. Informal Financial Assistance for Patients With a Hematological Malignancy: Implications for Oncology Social Work Practice.

    PubMed

    McGrath, Pam

    2015-01-01

    The article presents original research findings on informal financial assistance for hematological patients; that is, the gifts from family, friends, and communities that help patients cope with the financial hardship associated with cancer. The qualitative study involved interviews with 45 hematology patients that were audio-recorded, transcribed, coded, and then thematically analyzed. The findings examine the differing perspectives that individuals and families bring to the notion of informal financial aid, provide examples of individuals who require and receive informal financial assistance, and conclude with descriptions of those who require informal financial assistance but it is not available. The implications of the findings for oncology social work practice are explored. PMID:26671243

  1. The Role of Vitamin D in Hematologic Disease and Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Aric C.; Juckett, Mark B.

    2013-01-01

    Vitamin D is a steroid hormone with a broad range of biological effects ranging from the classical role as a mediator of calcium and phosphate balance to cellular differentiation and immune modulation. These effects impact normal and dysfunctional hematopoietic and immune function, which may allow an avenue for improved treatment and support of patients suffering from hematologic disorders. In this review, we will summarize the role of vitamin D in normal hematopoiesis, discuss ways in which vitamin D may improve outcomes, and discuss a potential role of vitamin D for treating hematologic disorders and modulating the immune system to improve the outcome of allogeneic stem cell transplant. PMID:23778150

  2. Hematological aspect of Rh deficiency syndrome: a case report and a review of the literature

    SciTech Connect

    Nash, R.; Shojania, A.M.

    1987-03-01

    The hematological aspects of the original case of Rhmod are reported. The subject, as in other reported cases, had a chronic hemolytic anemia characterized by stomatocytosis, reduced osmotic fragility, and abnormal autohemolysis correctable with the addition of glucose. The /sup 51/Cr red cell survival studies showed the spleen to be the preferential site of red cell destruction and splenectomy produced a dramatic improvement in red cell survival. The topic of Rh deficiency syndrome (Rhnull and Rhmod) is briefly reviewed with regard to the number of cases reported, to genetic aspects, to the hematological findings, and to the results of splenectomy.

  3. Hematological assessment in pet guinea pigs (Cavia porcellus): blood sample collection and blood cell identification.

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, Kurt; Moore, David M; Smith, Stephen A

    2015-01-01

    Pet guinea pigs are presented to veterinary clinics for routine care and treatment of clinical diseases. In addition to obtaining clinical history and exam findings, diagnostic testing may be required, including hematological assessments. This article describes common blood collection methods, including venipuncture sites, the volume of blood that can be safely collected, and handling of the blood. Hematological parameters for normal guinea pigs are provided for comparison with in-house or commercial test results. A description of the morphology of guinea pig leukocytes is provided to assist in performing a differential count. PMID:25421024

  4. Hematological assessment in pet rabbits: blood sample collection and blood cell identification.

    PubMed

    Moore, David M; Zimmerman, Kurt; Smith, Stephen A

    2015-01-01

    Pet rabbits are presented to veterinary clinics for routine care and treatment of clinical diseases. In addition to obtaining clinical history, additional diagnostic testing may be required, including hematological assessments. This article describes common blood collection methods, including venipuncture sites, volume of blood that can be safely collected, and handling of the blood. Hematological parameters for normal rabbits are provided for comparison with in-house or commercial test results. A description of the morphology of rabbit leukocytes is provided to assist in performing a differential count. Differential diagnoses are provided for abnormal values identified in the hemogram. PMID:25421022

  5. ED becomes 'lean' and cuts LBTC, LOS times.

    PubMed

    2008-04-01

    Lean manufacturing techniques, first developed by Toyota, can be successfully adapted to help improve processes in your ED. St. Luke's Episcopal Hospital in Houston, has used Lean to reduce median length of stay, frequency of diversions, and the percentage of patients who left before treatment was complete (LBTC). Here's why "Lean" can help improve the performance of your ED: It enables you and your staff to see things from the patient's point of view. Lean tools enable you to view the status of your department in real-time and to compare that status with your performance goals. Exercises help identify areas where your processes break down and determine the most likely solutions. PMID:18689224

  6. Patient's jewelry stolen as she rests in the ED.

    PubMed

    2007-12-01

    In a hospital ED in Rhode Island, a 96-year-old patient was robbed of her jewelry while she rested in her room. The thief was dressed in scrubs. Identification badges are only one way of keeping unwanted intruders out and your patients' belongings safe. Other suggestions: Have different groups of staff members, i.e., ED doctors and nurses, wear color-coded scrubs that distinguish them from other hospital personnel. If your staff see a strangely dressed person or someone who looks lost or like they don't fit in, they should question them about their identity. Create protocols for the removal and safekeeping of patients' jewelry that cover several different scenarios. PMID:18198764

  7. Remotely operated welding systems for EdF plant maintenance

    SciTech Connect

    Thapon, G. ); Blight, J.; Durand, B. )

    1992-01-01

    With the objective of improving weld quality, reducing outage times, and minimizing integrated dose, Electricite de France (EdF) and Comex Nucleaire (CxN) have developed a number of advanced remotely controlled welding systems. Three such developments are described, two having been used operationally and the third being qualified for use in the coming months. The three developments involve replacing pressurizes heaters, replacing fuel charge head sleeves, and real-time interactive welding.

  8. The implementation of Mask-Ed: reflections of academic participants.

    PubMed

    Reid-Searl, Kerry; Levett-Jones, Tracy; Cooper, Simon; Happell, Brenda

    2014-09-01

    This paper profiles the findings from a study that explored the perspectives and experiences of nurse educators who implemented a novel simulation approach termed Mask-Ed. The technique involves the educator wearing a silicone mask and or body parts and transforming into a character. The premise of this approach is that the masked educator has domain specific knowledge related to the simulation scenario and can transmit this to learners in a way that is engaging, realistic, spontaneous and humanistic. Nurse educators charged with the responsibility of implementing Mask-Ed in three universities were invited to participate in the study by attending an introductory workshop, implementing the technique and then journaling their experiences, insights and perspectives over a 12 month period. The journal entries were then thematically analysed. Key themes were categorised under the headings of Preparation, Implementation and Impact; Reflexivity and Responsiveness; Student Engagement and Ownership; and Teaching and Learning. Mask-Ed is a simulation approach which allows students to interact with the 'characters' in humanistic ways that promote person-centred care and therapeutic communication. This simulation approach holds previously untapped potential for a range of learning experiences, however, to be effective, adequate resourcing, training, preparation and practice is required. PMID:24906681

  9. Edward (Ed) T. Schneider preparing for an F-104 flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    NASA research pilot Edward T. Scheider is shown standing in the cockpit of a two-seat F-104. He is wearing a full pressure suit, which is required on all flights above 50,000 feet. Ed served in the U.S. Navy from 1968 to 1983. He attended the U.S. Naval Test Pilot School and graduated in 1973. He was then assigned as an engineering test pilot, and as an instructor at the Naval Test Pilot School. He first arrived at what was then called the Ames-Dryden Flight Research Facility (now the Dryden Flight Research Center) as a Navy Liaison Officer on July 5, 1982. He joined NASA as a research pilot a year later. Ed was a project pilot on the F-18 High Angle-of-Attack program, the F-15 aeronautical research aircraft, the B-52 launch aircraft, and the NASA-operated SR-71 Blackbirds. Ed retired as a NASA research pilot in September 2000.

  10. Lean-driven solutions slash ED wait times, LOS.

    PubMed

    2012-12-01

    The ED at The Aroostook Medical Center (TAMC) in Presque Isle, ME, is a level II trauma center. It is the largest in the region, with only 89 beds. It has undergone a transformation in recent months, with average wait times to see a provider going from four to five hours down to less than five minutes, and the left-without-being-seen (LWBS) rate has been slashed from a high of 7% down to less than 1%. The hospital says the improvements are the result of lean-driven, staff-designed solutions, coupled with administrative engagement and oversight. And administrators say more improvements are on the way in 2013 when a hospital-wide workgroup will try to clear away obstacles and inefficiencies from the hospital admissions process. To tackle long wait times among patients with lower triage levels, the ED instituted a fast-track system, manned by mid-level providers and a tech or LPN. Responsibilities for charge nurses have been redesigned so that they have the power to monitor and facilitate patient flow. The ED has initiated more point-of-care testing so that nurses and techs can conduct many routine tests on their own. While the lean model relies on staff-driven solutions, administrators make the difference when it comes to sustaining changes and minimizing employee resistance. PMID:23214229

  11. States leverage telepsychiatry solutions to ease ED crowding, accelerate care.

    PubMed

    2015-02-01

    Many states are having success turning to telepsychiatry-based solutions to connect mental health patients with needed care while also decompressing crowded EDs. Just one year into a statewide telepsychiatry initiative in North Carolina (NC-STeP), administrators say the approach has saved as much as $7 million, and hospital demand for the service is higher than anticipated. In Texas, mental health emergency centers (MHEC) that use telepsychiatry to connect patients in rural areas with needed psychiatric care are freeing up EDs to focus on medical care. In just 11 months, 91 North Carolina hospitals have at least started the process to engage in NC-STeP. Much of the savings from NC-STeP come from involuntary commitment orders being overturned as a result of the telepsychiatry consults, reducing the need for expensive inpatient care. Implementing NC-STeP has involved multiple hurdles including credentialing difficulties and technical/firewall challenges. The Texas model provides 24/7 availability of psychiatrists via telemedicine through a network of MHECs. In-person staff at the MHECs perform basic screening tests and blood draws so that medical clearance can be achieved without the need for an ED visit in most cases. Funding for the MHECs comes from the state, hospitals in the region, and local governmental authorities that reap savings or benefits from the initiative. PMID:25688413

  12. Teachers are students in ZPG program called 'Pop Ed.'.

    PubMed

    Schline, S

    1977-01-01

    Zero Population Growth's Population Education (Pop Ed) program began in 1975 as an ongoing effort to bring the "real world" into the classroom by demonstrating the relationships among population trends, food and energy resources, and environmental and economic problems. The training workshops which last for a day or 2 have the following goals: 1) to offer a brief demographic overview for teachers, 2) to provide lesson plans and techniques readily usable in the classroom, 3) to alert teachers to the best written and audiovisual materials available, 4) to identify local resources for teaching Pop Ed, and 5) to provide sample materials. In the 1st year of program operation 10 workshops were held. These workshops are credited, at least partly, with the subsequent population instruction that reached over 10,400 students and 1600 teachers. Another 15 workshops were held in the 2nd year of operation. Obstacles to the program are the assumption on the part of some teachers that Pop Ed belongs in disciplines other than their own and the belief on the part of many teachers that they will require extensive training. PMID:12308748

  13. Fresh policies and procedures, transparency fuel ED turnaround.

    PubMed

    2016-05-01

    The ED at Banner Payson Medical Center in Payson, AZ, has charted dramatic improvements on key metrics through a range of staff and policy changes. In just a few months, the ED has halved wait times, patient satisfaction has improved, and daily volume is up. Administrators say the secret to the success of the effort is a move to be transparent by posting key metrics regarding patient flow, a tactic that has helped the team pull together and feel a sense of accomplishment when performance goals are achieved. Administrators adjusted staff schedules to better match patient volume patterns in the ED, and they added staff to help nurses during peak hours. A new provider group enlisted the assistance of scribes during peak hours to manage the documentation workload while also enabling physicians to focus more patient interaction. Physicians hold end-of-shift huddles to review successes and challenges, and to improve physician/nurse communication. The tactic also helps develop the staff from an educational standpoint. PMID:27266001

  14. Levels of mineral nutrients in fresh- and frozen bulk hydrated biological specimens: a comparison of EDS data collected in the environmental SEM and a conventional cryo-SEM.

    PubMed

    Egerton-Warburton, L M; Griffin, B J

    1994-01-01

    Energy-dispersive X-ray microanalysis (EDS) was compared in fresh- and frozen bulk hydrated tissues using the Environmental SEM (ESEM) and conventional cryo-SEM, respectively. Analysis of globoid inclusions of Eucalyptus calophylla seed from two soil types demonstrated that higher levels of cations (K, Ca, Mg, Al, Fe, Mn, Cu, Zn) occurred in seeds from soils containing higher levels of Al, while EDS-detectable levels of S and P were dependent upon the techniques utilised. Cumulative changes in ESEM-EDS-detectable levels of S and P were characterized by collecting cumulative spectra from nutrient standards and compared with those for K. Progressive increases in K occurred and were consistent with an enriching effect. Levels of S and P increased during early analysis (40-60 sec live time) and decreased thereafter. The semi-conductive nature of biological samples, the loss of anions and gain of cations from the net negatively-charged electron interaction volume contributed to an electrochemical bias. These local modifications in fluid chemistry were reversible. Dehydration effects also occurred in stable, 'wet' samples. These differences indicated that EDS in ESEM may be limited to cations rather than anions, and that changes in fluid electrochemistry and dehydration may affect the level and distribution of elements. PMID:7881898

  15. Treatment of Nausea and Vomiting in Pregnancy: Factors Associated with ED Revisits

    PubMed Central

    Sharp, Brian R.; Sharp, Kristen M.; Patterson, Brian; Dooley-Hash, Suzanne

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Nausea and vomiting in pregnancy (NVP) is a condition that commonly affects women in the first trimester of pregnancy. Despite frequently leading to emergency department (ED) visits, little evidence exists to characterize the nature of ED visits or to guide its treatment in the ED. Our objectives were to evaluate the treatment of NVP in the ED and to identify factors that predict return visits to the ED for NVP. Methods We conducted a retrospective database analysis using the electronic medical record from a single, large academic hospital. Demographic and treatment variables were collected using a chart review of 113 ED patient visits with a billing diagnosis of “nausea and vomiting in pregnancy” or “hyperemesis gravidarum.” Logistic regression analysis was used with a primary outcome of return visit to the ED for the same diagnoses. Results There was wide treatment variability of nausea and vomiting in pregnancy patients in the ED. Of the 113 patient visits, 38 (33.6%) had a return ED visit for NVP. High gravidity (OR 1.31, 95% CI [1.06–1.61]), high parity (OR 1.50 95% CI [1.12–2.00]), and early gestational age (OR 0.74 95% CI [0.60–0.90]) were associated with an increase in return ED visits in univariate logistic regression models, while only early gestational age (OR 0.74 95% CI [0.59–0.91]) was associated with increased return ED visits in a multiple regression model. Admission to the hospital was found to decrease the likelihood of return ED visits (p=0.002). Conclusion NVP can be difficult to manage and has a high ED return visit rate. Optimizing care with aggressive, standardized treatment in the ED and upon discharge, particularly if factors predictive of return ED visits are present, may improve quality of care and reduce ED utilization for this condition. PMID:27625723

  16. Analysis of microtraces in invasive traumas using SEM/EDS.

    PubMed

    Vermeij, E J; Zoon, P D; Chang, S B C G; Keereweer, I; Pieterman, R; Gerretsen, R R R

    2012-01-10

    Scanning electron microscopy in combination with energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry (SEM/EDS) is a proven forensic tool and has been used to analyze several kinds of trace evidence. A forensic application of SEM/EDS is the examination of morphological characteristics of tool marks that tools and instruments leave on bone. The microtraces that are left behind by these tools and instruments on the bone are, however, often ignored or not noticed at all. In this paper we will describe the use of SEM/EDS for the analysis of microtraces in invasive sharp-force, blunt-force and bone-hacking traumas in bone. This research is part of a larger multi-disciplinary approach in which pathologists, forensic anthropologists, toolmark and microtrace experts work together to link observed injuries to a suspected weapon or, in case of an unknown weapon, to indicate a group of objects that could have been used as a weapon. Although there are a few difficulties one have to consider, the method itself is rather simple and straightforward to apply. A sample of dry and clean bone is placed into the SEM sample chamber and brightness and contrast are set such that bone appears grey, metal appears white and organic material appears black. The sample is then searched manually to find relevant features. Once features are found their elemental composition is measured by an energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer (EDS). This method is illustrated using several cases. It is shown that SEM/EDS analysis of microtraces in bone is a valuable tool to get clues about an unknown weapon and can associate a specific weapon with injuries on the basis of appearance and elemental composition. In particular the separate results from the various disciplines are complementary and may be combined to reach a conclusion with a stronger probative value. This is not only useful in the courtroom but above all in criminal investigations when one have to know for what weapon or object to look for. PMID:21871744

  17. Self-Esteem and Emotional Intelligence among B.Ed Trainees of Tsunami Affected Coastal Belt

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Babu M, Sameer

    2008-01-01

    Through this study the author investigates the relationship between self-esteem and emotional intelligence among B.Ed trainees of Tsunami affected coastal belt of Alappey district of Kerala, India. Stream of study, marital status and age based comparisons were made among the B.Ed trainees. 92 B.Ed trainees were the participants in the study. It…

  18. EDS1 mediates pathogen resistance and virulence function of a bacterial effector in soybean

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Enhanced disease susceptibility 1 (EDS1) and phytoalexin deficient 4 (PAD4) are well known regulators of both basal and resistance (R) protein-mediated plant defense. We identified two EDS1- (GmEDS1a/b) and one PAD4-like (GmPAD4) protein that are required for resistance signaling in soybean. Consist...

  19. Rapid Assessment of the ED Institutional Eligibility and Compliance Monitoring Systems. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jung, Steven M.

    Two U.S. Department of Education (ED) systems for establishing the initial eligibility and monitoring the performance of postsecondary institutions that participate in ED financial assistance programs were assessed. The evaluation was designed to describe and evaluate the eligibility and certification functions of ED's Eligibility and Agency…

  20. EDS coal liquefaction process development. Phase V. EDS commercial plant study design update. Illinois coal. Volume 1. Main report

    SciTech Connect

    Epperly, W. R.

    1981-03-01

    The objectives of the Study Design Update (SDU) were to identify the technical issues facing a potential commercial-size EDS plant design; to provide a reliable basis for estimating the cost of EDS products; and to furnish research guidance to the EDS Project. The SDU consists of two distinct studies in which different processing schemes are used to produce the hydrogen and fuel gas required by the plant. These studies are referred to as the Base Case and the Market Flexibility Sensitivity Case. In the Base Case, hydrogen is generated by steam reforming of the light hydrocarbon gases produced in the plant. Fuel gas is generated by feeding the bottoms stream from the liquefaction section vacuum pipestill to a FLEXICOKING unit. In the FLEXICOKING unit reactor, the bottoms stream is converted to coke; additional liquid product is also recovered. The coke is converted to low-Btu fuel gas in the FLEXICOKING unit gasifier. In the Market Flexibility Sensitivity (MFS) Case, the bottoms stream from the vacuum pipestill is split, and about half is sent to the FLEXICOKING unit for recovery of additional liquid product and production of fuel gas. The remainder of the bottoms stream is converted to hydrogen in a Partial Oxidation Unit. Hence the MFS Case does not consume light hydrocarbon gases produced and they are available for sale. The study of these two cases has demonstrated the importance of bottoms process selection to the economics and thermal efficiency of an EDS plant. Volume 1 - Main Report has been developed to be a stand-alone document. Both the Base Case and Market Flexibility Sensitivity (MFS) Case are covered. This volume includes an overview and detailed case summaries. It also covers economics, product recovery factors, material and energy balances, cost estimates and enviromental considerations.

  1. EDS coal liquefaction process development, Phase V. Engineering design study of an EDS Illinois bottoms fired hybrid boiler

    SciTech Connect

    1984-04-01

    This interim report documents work carried out by Combustion Engineering, Inc. under a contract to Exxon Research and Engineering Company and was prepared by Combustion Engineering, Inc. This report is the second of two reports by Combustion Engineering, Inc. on the predevelopment phase of the Hybrid Boiler program and covers the results of an engineering design study of a Hybrid Boiler firing the vacuum distillation residue (vacuum bottoms) derived from processing Illinois No. 6 coal in the EDS Coal Liquefaction Process. The function of the Hybrid Boiler is to heat the coal slurry feed for an EDS coal liquefaction plant by a process coil in the convection section and to generate high pressure steam in the radiant section. The Hybrid Boiler design developed in this phase of the program is based on the results of a laboratory characterization program (reported in EDS Interim Report FE-2893-112), on Combustion Engineering, Inc.'s extensive experience as a designer and supplier of steam generating equipment, and on Exxon Research and Engineering Co.'s experience with the design and operation of process heaters.

  2. Report of patients with chronic myeloid leukemia, from hematology clinic, Ahmedabad, Gujarat 2000-2010 at 1st myelostone meeting: Indian evidence of chronic myelogenous leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Deotare, Uday R.; Chudgar, Urmish; Bhagat, Eva

    2013-01-01

    The data of 156 patients was presented from Hematology clinic, Ahmedabad. This hematology clinic caters large number of the population from Gujarat as well as from neighboring states such as Rajasthan and Madhya Pradesh. Out of 156 patients, 146 (94%) patients were in chronic phase. Complete hematological response was seen in 90% of patients and overall survival was 82% at 5 years. PMID:24516308

  3. Abnormal hematologic findings in an African hedgehog (Atelerix albiventris) with gastrointestinal lymphosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Helmer, P J

    2000-06-01

    A 4-year-old African hedgehog (Atelerix albiventris) was examined for weight loss and hematochezia, and was subsequently diagnosed with gastrointestinal lymphosarcoma. Abnormal hematological findings included marked leukocytosis with lymphocytosis and atypical circulating lymphocytes. This report represents the first documentation of hemogram abnormalities associated with gastrointestinal lymphosarcoma in this species. PMID:10857034

  4. The role of telomeres and telomerase in hematologic malignancies and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Telomeres are specific nucleoprotein structures at the ends of eukaryotic chromosomes. Telomeres and telomere-associated proteins maintain genome stability by protecting the ends of chromosomes from fusion and degradation. In normal somatic cells, the length of the telomeres gradually becomes shortened with cell division. In tumor cells, the shortening of telomeres length is accelerated under the increased proliferation pressure. However, it will be maintained at an extremely short length as the result of activation of telomerase. Significantly shortened telomeres, activation of telomerase, and altered expression of telomere-associated proteins are common features of various hematologic malignancies and are related with progression or chemotherapy resistance in these diseases. In patients who have received hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), the telomere length and the telomerase activity of the engrafted donor cells have a significant influence on HSCT outcomes. Transplantation-related factors should be taken into consideration because of their impacts on telomere homeostasis. As activation of telomerase is widespread in tumor cells, it has been employed as a target point in the treatment of neoplastic hematologic disorders. In this review, the characteristics and roles of telomeres and telomerase both in hematologic malignancies and in HSCT will be summarized. The current status of telomerase-targeted therapies utilized in the treatment of hematologic malignancies will also be reviewed. PMID:25139287

  5. Phosphatase of regenerating liver in hematopoietic stem cells and hematological malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Michihiro; Chen, Sisi; Gao, Rui; Bai, Yunpeng; Zhang, Zhong-Yin; Liu, Yan

    2014-01-01

    The phosphatases of regenerating liver (PRLs), consisting PRL1, PRL2 and PRL3, are dual-specificity protein phosphatases that have been implicated as biomarkers and therapeutic targets in several solid tumors. However, their roles in hematological malignancies are largely unknown. Recent findings demonstrate that PRL2 is important for hematopoietic stem cell self-renewal and proliferation. In addition, both PRL2 and PRL3 are highly expressed in some hematological malignancies, including acute myeloid leukemia (AML), chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), multiple myeloma (MM) and acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Moreover, PRL deficiency impairs the proliferation and survival of leukemia cells through regulating oncogenic signaling pathways. While PRLs are potential novel therapeutic targets in hematological malignancies, their exact biological function and cellular substrates remain unclear. This review will discuss how PRLs regulate hematopoietic stem cell behavior, what signaling pathways are regulated by PRLs, and how to target PRLs in hematological malignancies. An improved understanding of how PRLs function and how they are regulated may facilitate the development of PRL inhibitors that are effective in cancer treatment. PMID:25486470

  6. Exploring Therapeutic Potentials of Baicalin and Its Aglycone Baicalein for Hematological Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Haijun; Gao, Yu; Wu, Jianlei; Chen, Yingyu; Chen, Buyuan; Hu, Jianda; Zhou, Jia

    2014-01-01

    Despite tremendous advances in the targeted therapy for various types of hematological malignancies with successful improvements in the survival rates, emerging resistance issues are startlingly high and novel therapeutic strategies are urgently needed. In addition, chemoprevention is currently becoming an elusive goal. Plant-derived natural products have garnered considerable attention in recent years due to the potential dual functions as chemotherapeutics and dietary chemoprevention. One of the particularly ubiquitous families is the polyphenolic flavonoids. Among them, baicalin and its aglycone baicalein have been widely investigated in hematological malignancies because both of them exhibit remarkable pharmacological properties. This review focuses on the recent achievements in drug discovery research associated with baicalin and baicalein for hematological malignancy therapies. The promising anticancer activities of these two flavonoids targeting diverse signaling pathways and their potential biological mechanisms in different types of hematological malignancies, as well as the combination strategy with baicalin or baicalein as chemotherapeutic adjuvants for recent therapies in these intractable diseases are discussed. Meanwhile, the biotransformation of baicalin and baicalein and the relevant approaches to improve their bioavailability are also summarized. PMID:25128647

  7. Invasive infection due to Saprochaete capitata in a young patient with hematological malignancies.

    PubMed

    Parahym, Ana Maria Rabelo de Carvalho; Rolim Neto, Pedro José; da Silva, Carolina Maria; Domingos, Igor de Farias; Gonçalves, Sarah Santos; Leite, Edinalva Pereira; de Morais, Vera Lúcia Lins; Macêdo, Danielle Patrícia Cerqueira; de Lima Neto, Reginaldo Gonçalves; Neves, Rejane Pereira

    2015-06-01

    We report a case of invasive infection due to Saprochaete capitata in a patient with hematological malignancies after chemotherapy treatment and empiric antifungal therapy with caspofungin. Although severely immunocompromised the patient survived been treated with amphotericin B lipid complex associated with voriconazole. PMID:26273269

  8. CC-486 (Oral Azacitidine) Bioequivalence Study in Patients With Solid Tumor or Hematologic Malignancies

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-10

    Hematological Neoplasms; Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma; Hodgkin's Lymphoma; Lymphoma; Multiple Myeloma; Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Leukemia; Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Neoplasms; Melanoma; Breast Cancer; Metastatic Breast Cancer; Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Small Cell Lung Cancer; Renal Cell Carcinoma; Glioblastoma Multiforme; Osteosarcoma; Sarcoma; Thyroid Cancer; Genitourinary

  9. The effect of anticoagulant, storage temperature and dilution on cord blood hematology parameters over time

    PubMed Central

    FREISE, K. J.; SCHMIDT, R. L.; GINGERICH, E. L.; VENG-PEDERSEN, P.; WIDNESS, J. A.

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY The objective of the study was to determine whether selected hematologic parameters measured on umbilical cord blood samples using an automated hematology analyzer (Sysmex XE-2100) were affected by (i) anticoagulant (the specimens were collected in EDTA vs. sodium heparin), (ii) temperature (the specimens were maintained at 4° C vs. room temperature for up to 72 h) and (iii) 1 : 5 dilution vs. undiluted using the manufacturer's diluting solution. Use of heparin, instead of EDTA, had little effect on the hematologic results (n = 8) except for lower platelet and progenitor cell counts. Results were remarkably stable for 72 h at either room temperature or 4° C except for modest red blood cell swelling at 24 h. Specimens of blood diluted at 1 : 5 had an immediate small, but significant change on white cell count (+13.3%), reticulocyte count (−11.2%) and reticulocyte hemoglobin content (−19.6%). Diluted samples did not change further over 4 h at room temperature. With a 1 : 5 dilution, analysis of 40 μl of cord blood stored for 3 days at room temperature may provide useful hematologic information with little phlebotomy loss. PMID:18422712

  10. The role of telomeres and telomerase in hematologic malignancies and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Limengmeng; Xiao, Haowen; Zhang, Xing; Wang, Chong; Huang, He

    2014-01-01

    Telomeres are specific nucleoprotein structures at the ends of eukaryotic chromosomes. Telomeres and telomere-associated proteins maintain genome stability by protecting the ends of chromosomes from fusion and degradation. In normal somatic cells, the length of the telomeres gradually becomes shortened with cell division. In tumor cells, the shortening of telomeres length is accelerated under the increased proliferation pressure. However, it will be maintained at an extremely short length as the result of activation of telomerase. Significantly shortened telomeres, activation of telomerase, and altered expression of telomere-associated proteins are common features of various hematologic malignancies and are related with progression or chemotherapy resistance in these diseases. In patients who have received hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), the telomere length and the telomerase activity of the engrafted donor cells have a significant influence on HSCT outcomes. Transplantation-related factors should be taken into consideration because of their impacts on telomere homeostasis. As activation of telomerase is widespread in tumor cells, it has been employed as a target point in the treatment of neoplastic hematologic disorders. In this review, the characteristics and roles of telomeres and telomerase both in hematologic malignancies and in HSCT will be summarized. The current status of telomerase-targeted therapies utilized in the treatment of hematologic malignancies will also be reviewed. PMID:25139287

  11. Course and outcome of Early Lyme borreliosis in patients with hematological malignancies.

    PubMed

    Maraspin, Vera; Ružić-Sabljić, Eva; Lusa, Lara; Strle, Franc

    2015-08-01

    Patients with erythema migrans and underlying hematological malignancy more often had signs of disseminated Lyme borreliosis and more frequently needed antibiotic retreatment than sex-, age-, and antibiotic treatment-matched immunocompetent persons with erythema migrans. However, the outcome was excellent in both groups. PMID:25956890

  12. SUBACTUTE HEMATOLOGICAL RESPONSES OF THE YUCATAN SAILFIN MOLLY (POECILIA VELIFERA) EXPOSED TO CADMIUM CHLORIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study focuses on the subacute hematological responses of the Yucatan sailfin molly, Poecilia velifera, exposed to cadmium chloride. Previous studies in other teleosts and mammals have suggested that exposure to cadmium chloride results in a leucocytic response. Fish were exp...

  13. Gray wolf density and its association with weights and hematology of pups from 1970 to 1988

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    DelGiudice, G.D.; Mech, L.D.; Seal, U.S.

    1991-01-01

    We examined weights and hematologic profiles of gray wolf (Canis lupus) pups and the associated wolf density in the east-central Superior National Forest of northeastern Minnesota (USA) during 1970 to 1988. We collected weight and hematologic data from 117 pups (57 females, 60 males) during 1 September to 22 November each year. The wolf density (wolves/800 km2) trend was divided into three phases: high (72 +/- 7), 1970 to 1975; medium (44 +/- 2), 1976 to 1983; and low (27 +/- 2), 1984 to 1988. Wolf numbers declined (P = 0.0001) 39 and 63% from 1970 to 1975 to 1976 to 1983 and from 1970 to 1975 to 1984 to 1988, respectively. Weight was similar between male and female pups and did not vary as wolf density changed. Mean hemoglobin (P = 0.04), red (P = 0.0001) and white blood cells (P = 0.002), mean corpuscular volume, mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration and mean corpuscular hemoglobin (P = 0.0001) did differ among the multi-annual phases of changing wolf density. Weight and hematologic data also were compared to values from captive wolf pups. The high, but declining wolf density was associated with macrocytic, normochromic anemia in wolf pups, whereas the lowest density coincided with a hypochromic anemia. Although hematologic values show promise for assessing wolf pup condition and wolf population status, they must be used cautiously until data are available from other populations.

  14. HEMATOLOGICAL AND MOLECULAR CARDIAC EFFECTS FOLLOWING PULMONARY EXPOSURE TO OIL COMBUSTION PARTICLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hematological and Molecular Cardiac Effects Following Pulmonary Exposure to Oil Combustion Particles
    K. Dreher, R. Jaskot, and J. Richards. USEPA, Research Triangle Park, NC

    Systemic health effects induced following pulmonary exposure to various combustion particles are...

  15. The safety profile of vorinostat (suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid) in hematologic malignancies: A review of clinical studies.

    PubMed

    Duvic, Madeleine; Dimopoulos, Meletios

    2016-02-01

    Histone acetyltransferases and histone deacetylases (HDACs) are multifunctional enzymes that posttranslationally modify both histone and nonhistone acetylation sites, affecting a broad range of cellular processes (e.g., cell cycle, apoptosis, and protein folding) often dysregulated in cancer. HDAC inhibitors are small molecules that directly interact with HDAC catalytic sites preventing the removal of acetyl groups, thereby counteracting the effects of HDACs. Since the first HDAC inhibitor, valproic acid, was investigated as a potential antitumor agent, there have been a number of other HDAC inhibitors developed to improve efficacy and safety. Despite significant progress in the management of patients with hematologic malignancies, overall survival is still poor. The discovery that HDACs may play a role in hematologic malignancies and preclinical studies showing promising activity with HDAC inhibitors in various tumor types, led to clinical evaluation of HDAC inhibitors as potential treatment options for patients with advanced hematologic malignancies. The Food and Drug Administration has approved two HDAC inhibitors, vorinostat (2006) and romidepsin (2009), for the treatment of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma. This review highlights the safety of HDAC inhibitors currently approved or being investigated for the treatment of hematologic malignancies, with a specific focus on the safety experience with vorinostat in cutaneous T-cell lymphoma. PMID:26827693

  16. Blood at 70: its roots in the history of hematology and its birth.

    PubMed

    Coller, Barry S

    2015-12-10

    This year we celebrate Blood's 70th year of publication. Created from the partnership of the book publisher Henry M. Stratton and the prominent hematologist Dr William Dameshek of Tufts School of Medicine, Blood has published many papers describing major advances in the science and clinical practice of hematology. Blood's founding antedated that of the American Society of Hematology (ASH) by more than 11 years and Stratton and Dameshek helped galvanize support for the creation of ASH. In this review, I place the birth of Blood in the context of the history of hematology before 1946, emphasizing the American experience from which it emerged, and focusing on research conducted during World War II. I also provide a few milestones along Blood's 70 years of publication, including: the growth in Blood's publications, the evolution of its appearance, the countries of submission of Blood papers, current subscriptions to Blood, and the evolution of topics reported in Blood's papers. The latter provides a snapshot of the evolution of hematology as a scientific and clinical discipline and the introduction of new technology to study blood and bone marrow. Detailed descriptions of the landmark discoveries reported in Blood will appear in later papers celebrating Blood's birthday authored by past Editors-in-Chief. PMID:26631112

  17. A Comparison of Computer-Assisted Instruction and Tutorials in Hematology and Oncology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garrett, T. J.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    A study comparing the effectiveness of computer-assisted instruction (CAI) and small group instruction found no significant difference in medical student achievement in oncology but higher achievement through small-group instruction in hematology. Students did not view CAI as more effective, but saw it as a supplement to traditional methods. (MSE)

  18. Hematological Malignancies Escape from NK Cell Innate Immune Surveillance: Mechanisms and Therapeutic Implications

    PubMed Central

    Farnault, Laure; Sanchez, Carole; Baier, Céline; Le Treut, Thérèse; Costello, Régis T.

    2012-01-01

    Hematological malignancies treatment improved over the last years resulting in increased achievement of complete or partial remission, but unfortunately high relapse rates are still observed. Therefore, sustainment of long-term remission is crucial. Immune system has a key role in tumor surveillance. Natural killer (NK) cells, at the frontier of innate and adaptive immune system, have a central role in tumor cells surveillance as demonstrated in the setting of allogenic stem cell transplantation. Nevertheless, tumor cells develop various mechanisms to escape from NK cells innate immune pressure. Abnormal NK cytolytic functions have been described in nearly all hematological malignancies. We present here various mechanisms involved in the escape of hematological malignancies from NK cells surveillance: NK cells quantitative deficiency and NK cell qualitative deficiency by increased inhibition signaling or decreased activating stimuli. A challenge of immunotherapy is to restore an efficient antitumor response. A combination of classical therapy plus immune modulation strategies will soon become a standard of care for hematological malignancies. PMID:22899948

  19. Meeting the challenge of hematologic malignancies in sub-Saharan Africa

    PubMed Central

    Wood, William A.; Lee, Stephanie J.; Shea, Thomas C.; Naresh, Kikkeri N.; Kazembe, Peter N.; Casper, Corey; Hesseling, Peter B.; Mitsuyasu, Ronald T.

    2012-01-01

    Cancer is a leading cause of death and disability in sub-Saharan Africa and will eclipse infectious diseases within the next several decades if current trends continue. Hematologic malignancies, including non-Hodgkin lymphoma, leukemia, Hodgkin lymphoma, and multiple myeloma, account for nearly 10% of the overall cancer burden in the region, and the incidence of non-Hodgkin lymphoma and Hodgkin lymphoma is rapidly increasing as a result of HIV. Despite an increasing burden, mechanisms for diagnosing, treating, and palliating malignant hematologic disorders are inadequate. In this review, we describe the scope of the problem, including the impact of endemic infections, such as HIV, Epstein-Barr virus, malaria, and Kaposi sarcoma–associated herpesvirus. We additionally describe current limitations in hematopathology, chemotherapy, radiotherapy, hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, and supportive care and palliation. We review contemporary treatment and outcomes of hematologic malignancies in the region and outline a clinical service and research agenda, which builds on recent global health successes combating HIV and other infectious diseases. Achieving similar progress against hematologic cancers in sub-Saharan Africa will require the sustained collaboration and advocacy of the entire global cancer community. PMID:22461494

  20. SUBACUTE HEMATOLOGICAL RESPONSES OF THE YUCATAN SAILFIN MOLLY (POECILIA VELIFERA) EXPOSED TO CADMIUM CHLORIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study focuses on the subacute hematological responses of the Yucatan sailfin molly, Poecilia velifera, exposed to cadmium chloride. Previous studies in other teleosts and mammals have suggested that exposure to cadmium chloride results in a leucocytic response. Fish were exp...

  1. [Demonstration of the calcified osseous component in decalcified bone marrow biopsies. Study of hematological cases].

    PubMed

    Vigliani, R

    2000-08-01

    In order to investigate the possibility of the evidentiation of the mineralized component of decalcified bone a series of Jamshidi-type consecutive bone marrow biopsies for various hematological disorders were pre-stained with von Kossa modified procedure for calcium. Methodologically the controls showed reliable silver staining as far as localization (osteo-medullary interface and mineralization front) and preservation (after decalcification) were concerned. The results were: 1) a good morphology of bone marrow tissue also concerning immunohistochemical stainings; 2) a better overview of the osseous components and related artifacts as induced by biopsy, processing and sampling; 3) precise identification of the osteoid seams and remarkably of the relative angle of sectioning for an appropriate measurement; 4) better evidentiation of the remodelling osteoblastic-osteoclastic units; 5) visualization of the osteocytic lacunae and canaliculi and the mineralized matrix to some extent depending on their effective permeability. Summarizing the osteologic features were: normality or minimal abnormality of difficult interpretation; classical osteometabolic alterations; lesions specifically due to hematological disorders; various combination of these findings. Theoretical and practical aspects are discussed. In conclusion this methodological variant in comparison with the usual paraffin procedure clearly gives more information concerning osteometabolic evaluation in routine hematological biopsies; offers a vicarious or complementary approach to osteometabolic diseases; represents a conceptual stimulus to interpret diagnostically and prognostically the osseous pathology as determined by routinely encountered hematological disorders. PMID:11029887

  2. Coagulability and Rheology: Hematologic Benefits from Exercise, Fish, and Aspirin. Implications for Athletes and Nonathletes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eichner, Edward R.

    1986-01-01

    Healthy hematologic adaptations to exercise are described. The benefits of increased performance for elite athletes and reduced risk of heart attack for the general population are stressed. The advisability of increased amounts of fish in the diet and low doses of aspirin to reduce coronary risk factors are discussed. (Author/MT)

  3. Invasive infection due to Saprochaete capitata in a young patient with hematological malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Parahym, Ana Maria Rabelo de Carvalho; Rolim, Pedro José; da Silva, Carolina Maria; Domingos, Igor de Farias; Gonçalves, Sarah Santos; Leite, Edinalva Pereira; de Morais, Vera Lúcia Lins; Macêdo, Danielle Patrícia Cerqueira; de Lima, Reginaldo Gonçalves; Neves, Rejane Pereira

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of invasive infection due to Saprochaete capitata in a patient with hematological malignancies after chemotherapy treatment and empiric antifungal therapy with caspofungin. Although severely immunocompromised the patient survived been treated with amphotericin B lipid complex associated with voriconazole. PMID:26273269

  4. Affirming the Connection: Comparative Findings on Communication Issues from Hospice Patients and Hematology Survivors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGrath, Pam

    2004-01-01

    The following discussion presents comparative findings from hospice patients and hematology survivors on the topic of talking about dying to significant others within their network of family and friends. The insights have been gathered from an Australian research program that is exploring the notion of spirituality in relation to serious illness.…

  5. Association of ABO and Colton Blood Group Gene Polymorphisms With Hematological Traits Variation

    PubMed Central

    Shahbazi, Shirin; Mashayekhi, Amir; Fatahi, Neda; Mahdavi, Mohammad-Reza

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Hematological parameters are appraised routinely to determine overall human health and to diagnose and monitor certain diseases. In GWASs, more than 30 loci carrying common deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) polymorphisms have been identified related to hematological traits. In this study, we investigated the contribution of ABO rs2073823 along with AQP1 rs1049305 and rs10244884 polymorphisms in hematological traits variation in a cohort of Iranian healthy individuals. Genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral blood of 168 healthy volunteer. Genotyping was performed by ARMS-PCR or PCR-RFLP and confirmed by DNA sequencing. Complete blood analyses were conducted for the participants. Significant association was observed between AQP1 rs1049305 and the hematological traits including hemoglobin, hematocrit, and platelet count (P = 0.012, 0.008, and 0.011, respectively). The AQP1 rs10244884 status was also significantly linked to hemoglobin and hematocrit levels in the study cohort (P = 0.015 and 0.041, respectively). Furthermore, ABO rs2073823 polymorphism was identified as a hemoglobin and hematocrit levels modifier (both with P = 0.004). AQP1 and ABO variants appear to predict hemoglobin and hematocrit levels but not other erythrocyte phenotype parameters including red blood cell counts and red blood cell indices. PMID:26632894

  6. Abnormal hematologic findings in an African hedgehog (Atelerix albiventris) with gastrointestinal lymphosarcoma.

    PubMed Central

    Helmer, P J

    2000-01-01

    A 4-year-old African hedgehog (Atelerix albiventris) was examined for weight loss and hematochezia, and was subsequently diagnosed with gastrointestinal lymphosarcoma. Abnormal hematological findings included marked leukocytosis with lymphocytosis and atypical circulating lymphocytes. This report represents the first documentation of hemogram abnormalities associated with gastrointestinal lymphosarcoma in this species. PMID:10857034

  7. Hematology/immunology (M110 series). [human hemodynamic response to weightlessness simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The hematology/immunology experiments in the Skylab mission study various aspects of the red blood cell, including its metabolism and life span, and blood volume changes under zero gravity conditions to determine the precise mechanism of the transient changes which have been seen on the relatively brief missions of the past.

  8. Medical Laboratory Technician--Hematology, Serology, Blood Banking, and Immunohematology (AFSC 90470).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Joselyn H.

    This three-volume student text is designed for use by Air Force personnel enrolled in a self-study extension course for medical laboratory technicians. Covered in the individual volumes are hematology (the physiology of blood, complete blood counts and related studies, erythrocyte studies, leukocyte and thrombocyte maturation, and blood…

  9. Relationship between blood lead levels and hematological indices in pregnant women.

    PubMed

    La-Llave-León, Osmel; Lugo-Soto, Rodrigo; Aguilar-Durán, Marisela; Estrada-Martínez, Sergio; Salas-Pacheco, José-Manuel; Sandoval-Carrillo, Ada; Castellanos-Juárez, Francisco Xavier; Barraza-Salas, Marcel; Vázquez-Alanís, Fernando; García-Vargas, Gonzalo

    2015-01-01

    Several studies have revealed a negative association between blood lead levels and hematological impairment. In this cross-sectional study, we examined the relationship between blood lead levels and hematological indices in 292 pregnant women from Durango, Mexico. Apparently healthy pregnant women, aged 14-41 years and at 3-41 weeks of gestation, were recruited between June 2007 and May 2008. Blood lead and hematological indices were measured. The mean blood lead was 2.79 ± 2.16 μg/dL, and lead levels ≥ 5 μg/dL were detected in 25 women (8.6%). Hemoglobin, hematocrit, and red blood cells count were significantly higher in pregnant women with a blood lead concentration of ≥ 5 μg/dL than the group with lower blood lead levels (p < .05). Mean corpuscular volume and mean corpuscular hemoglobin were not significantly related to lead levels. Hemoglobin and hematocrit showed a non-significant positive correlation with blood lead, but the correlation between red blood cell count and blood lead levels was statistically significant (r = 0.185, p = .002). The findings suggest that a positive association between blood lead and some hematological indices may occur at relatively low blood lead concentration (mean < 5 μg/dL). PMID:25531188

  10. T-Regulatory Cell and CD3 Depleted Double Umbilical Cord Blood Transplantation in Hematologic Malignancies

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-03-04

    Hematologic Malignancy; Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia in Blast Crisis; Anemia, Refractory, With Excess of Blasts; Chronic Myeloproliferative Disease; Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Follicular Lymphoma; Lymphoplasmacytic Lymphoma; Mantle-Cell Lymphoma; Prolymphocytic Lymphoma; Large Cell Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma; Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Burkitt's Lymphoma; High Grade Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma

  11. Genomic Hallmarks of Genes Involved in Chromosomal Translocations in Hematological Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shugay, Mikhail; Ortiz de Mendíbil, Iñigo; Vizmanos, José L.; Novo, Francisco J.

    2012-01-01

    Reciprocal chromosomal translocations (RCTs) leading to the formation of fusion genes are important drivers of hematological cancers. Although the general requirements for breakage and fusion are fairly well understood, quantitative support for a general mechanism of RCT formation is still lacking. The aim of this paper is to analyze available high-throughput datasets with computational and robust statistical methods, in order to identify genomic hallmarks of translocation partner genes (TPGs). Our results show that fusion genes are generally overexpressed due to increased promoter activity of 5′ TPGs and to more stable 3′-UTR regions of 3′ TPGs. Furthermore, expression profiling of 5′ TPGs and of interaction partners of 3′ TPGs indicates that these features can help to explain tissue specificity of hematological translocations. Analysis of protein domains retained in fusion proteins shows that the co-occurrence of specific domain combinations is non-random and that distinct functional classes of fusion proteins tend to be associated with different components of the gene fusion network. This indicates that the configuration of fusion proteins plays an important role in determining which 5′ and 3′ TPGs will combine in specific fusion genes. It is generally accepted that chromosomal proximity in the nucleus can explain the specific pairing of 5′ and 3′ TPGS and the recurrence of hematological translocations. Using recently available data for chromosomal contact probabilities (Hi-C) we show that TPGs are preferentially located in early replicated regions and occupy distinct clusters in the nucleus. However, our data suggest that, in general, nuclear position of TPGs in hematological cancers explains neither TPG pairing nor clinical frequency. Taken together, our results support a model in which genomic features related to regulation of expression and replication timing determine the set of candidate genes more likely to be translocated in

  12. Hematology of sloth bears (Melursus ursinus ursinus) from two locations in India.

    PubMed

    Shanmugam, Arun Attur; Kumar, Jadav Kajal; Selvaraj, Illayaraja; Selvaraj, Vimal

    2008-04-01

    Standard hematology parameters were determined for 122 sloth bears (Melursus ursinus ursinus) at the Sur Sarovar Bird Sanctuary, Uttar Pradesh, India (27 degrees 0'N; 77 degrees 45'E), and the Bannerghatta Biological Park, Karnataka, India (12 degrees 48'N; 77 degrees 34'E) from March 2003 to July 2006. These two native sloth bear habitats have different climatic conditions and provided an opportunity to examine the effect of climate on the physiologic hematology values of these bears. We primarily analyzed the influence of age, sex, season, and body weight on the different hematology parameters. Several values were significantly different in sloth bear cubs (1 yr). The cubs had a lower erythrocyte count, hemoglobin concentration, packed cell volume (PCV), and mean cell hemoglobin (MCV) values when compared to adult and subadult bears. The cubs also had higher leukocyte counts, due to higher circulating neutrophils, as compared to adult and subadult bears. Within subadult and adult bears, we also identified a sexual dimorphic difference in leukocyte count in adult and subadult bears, wherein female bears had higher counts than males. This difference was the result of a significantly higher number of circulating neutrophils in female bears. Platelet counts were also higher in females as compared to males. On comparing different seasons, leukocyte counts were higher in winter as compared to the summer and monsoon seasons. When compared based on location, erythrocyte counts were higher in subadult and adult bears at Bannerghatta, which was at a higher altitude than Sur Sarovar. Within subadult and adult bears, we did not find any significant influence of age or body weight on the different hematologic parameters. In this study we have obtained mean hematologic values for sloth bears in their native habitat to serve as a reference for this species. This report will be useful to develop and evaluate health profiles

  13. Evaluation of hematologic values in free-ranging African buffalo (Syncerus caffer).

    PubMed

    Beechler, B R; Jolles, A E; Ezenwa, V O

    2009-01-01

    As part of a large-scale disease screening program, blood samples were collected from 534 African buffalo (Syncerus caffer) in South Africa's Hluhluwe-iMfolozi Park in October 2005 and May 2006 to establish age- and sex-specific reference intervals for erythrogram and leukogram values. Sixty-seven of the animals were positive for bovine tuberculosis (TB), allowing for comparisons between TB-positive and TB-negative groups. Positive animals had basopenia and slight lymphopenia compared to TB-negative animals. Blood values were compared to those reported for captive African buffalo, American bison (Bos bison), and cattle (Bos taurus). The free-ranging buffalo sampled in this study had higher white blood cell counts than captive buffalo, and this difference was driven by lymphocytes. Free-ranging buffalo also had higher red blood cell counts, mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration (MCHC), white blood cell counts, neutrophils and lymphocytes, and lower mean corpuscular volume (MCV) than cattle. Demographic and environmental factors strongly affected hematologic values in the study population. Older animals had significantly higher hemoglobin, hematocrit, MCV, and mean corpuscular hemoglobin (MCH), while younger animals had a higher red blood cell count, red cell distribution width (RDW), and white blood cell count, which was due to lymphocytes and basophils. Females had a higher hemoglobin concentration, hematocrit, MCV, MCH, and basophils than males. At the end of the wet season, hemoglobin, red blood cell count, hematocrit, MCHC, RDW, white blood cell count, and neutrophils were all significantly higher, while basophils and MCV were lower, than at the end of the dry season. Our results emphasize the need to use species-specific data when interpreting hematologic values and point to important differences in hematology between captive and free-ranging animals of the same species. Strong variability in hematologic values with animal age and sex, season, and herd

  14. Bloodstream infections in patients with hematological malignancies: which is more fatal – cancer or resistant pathogens?

    PubMed Central

    Gedik, Habip; Şimşek, Funda; Kantürk, Arzu; Yildirmak, Taner; Arica, Deniz; Aydin, Demet; Demirel, Naciye; Yokuş, Osman

    2014-01-01

    Background The primary objective of this study was to report the incidence of bloodstream infections (BSIs) and clinically or microbiologically proven bacterial or fungal BSIs during neutropenic episodes in patients with hematological malignancies. Methods In this retrospective observational study, all patients in the hematology department older than 14 years who developed febrile neutropenia during chemotherapy for hematological cancers were evaluated. Patients were included if they had experienced at least one neutropenic episode between November 2010 and November 2012 due to chemotherapy in the hematology ward. Results During 282 febrile episodes in 126 patients, 66 (23%) episodes of bacteremia and 24 (8%) episodes of fungemia were recorded in 48 (38%) and 18 (14%) patients, respectively. Gram-negative bacteria caused 74% (n=49) of all bacteremic episodes. Carbapenem-resistant Gram-negative bacteria (n=6) caused 12% and 9% of Gram-negative bacteremia episodes and all bacteremia episodes, respectively. Carbapenem-resistant Gram-negative bacteria included Acinetobacter baumannii (n=4), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (n=1), and Serratia marcescens (n=1). Culture-proven invasive fungal infection occurred in 24 episodes in 18 cases during the study period, with 15 episodes in ten cases occurring in the first study year and nine episodes in eight cases in the second study year. In 13 of 18 cases (72%) with bloodstream yeast infections, previous azole exposure was recorded. Candida parapsilosis, C. glabrata, and C. albicans isolates were resistant to voriconazole and fluconazole. Conclusion BSIs that occur during febrile neutropenic episodes in hematology patients due to Gram-negative bacteria should be treated initially with non-carbapenem-based antipseudomonal therapy taking into consideration antimicrobial stewardship. Non-azole antifungal drugs, including caspofungin and liposomal amphotericin B, should be preferred as empirical antifungal therapy in the events of possible

  15. Candida Associated Bloodstream Infections in Pediatric Hematology Patients: A Single Center Experience

    PubMed Central

    Gokcebay, Dilek Gurlek; Yarali, Nese; Isik, Pamir; Bayram, Cengiz; Ozkaya-Parlakay, Aslinur; Kara, Abdurrahman; Tunc, Bahattin

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives Candida-associated bloodstream infections are frequent and potentially life-threatening conditions in hematology patients. The aim of this study is to evaluate the characteristics, risk factors, and outcome of Candida-associated bloodstream infections in children with hematological diseases. Methods The medical records of the patients with hematological diseases and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) recipients who were diagnosed as Candida-associated bloodstream infection between February 2010 and February 2014 were reviewed retrospectively. Results Thirty episodes of candidemia involving 26 patients (38% female, and 62% male) with a median age of 7-year (range; 1 to 17) were noted. The incidence of candidemia in our study was 5.2 per 1000 hospital admissions. Infections with non-albicans Candida spp. occurred more frequently (63%) and C. krusei was the predominant microorganism among non-albicans Candida spp. (37%). Candida albicans was isolated from 11 of the 30 episodes (37%). Twenty-six of the episodes (88%) patients had a central venous catheter (CVC) prior to candidemia, and they were removed in 16 (62%). Thirty-day mortality rate was 20%. Isolated Candida spp, underlying disease and its status, presence of mucositis, neutropenia, using of broad spectrum antibiotics, corticosteroids or total parenteral nutrition were not identified as predictors of outcome. Multivariate analysis revealed that CVCs kept in place was the only significant factor associated with mortality (OR, 0.07; 95% CI, 0.006–0.716). Conclusions Candida-associated bloodstream infections were common in children with hematological diseases and HSCT recipients, particularly in patients with CVCs. In addition to appropriate antifungal therapy, CVC removal improves the outcome of candidemia in children with hematological disease. PMID:26977277

  16. EDs credit drills, community engagement with helping them manage casualties from tornado crises.

    PubMed

    2011-07-01

    Emergency department leaders at DCH Regional Medical Center in Tuscaloosa, AL, and Cullman Regional Medical Center in Cullman, AL, credit their regular practice drills with helping them deal with unprecedented demand when deadly tornadoes swept through the South this past April. Both facilities used the hospital instant command structure (HICS) to mobilize the resources needed to care for the surge in patients, and say the approach worked well in helping them meet the needs of their communities. However, the crises also showcased opportunities for improvement. The ED at DCH Regional Medical Center saw more than 600 patients on the day of the storm, a three-fold increase in the hospital's typical volume. CRMC treated 99 patients in the seven hours immediately following the storm when it usually treats 114 patients per day. In addition to a big surge in patients, both hospitals dealt with power outages that limited access to some services such as radiology. Triage proved particularly challenging at DCH Regional Medical Center, as patients flowed into the hospital from numerous access points. The hospital plans to assign coordinators to each area of the hospital to better manage the influx in the future. When reviewing emergency operations plans, Joint Commission reviewers often find deficiencies in hazard vulnerability analyses as well as the processes used to determine the emergency credentials of licensed independent practitioners. PMID:21749003

  17. Secondary contamination of ED personnel from hazardous materials events, 1995-2001.

    PubMed

    Horton, D Kevin; Berkowitz, Zahava; Kaye, Wendy E

    2003-05-01

    Hazardous materials (hazmat) events pose a health threat not only for those individuals in the immediate vicinity of the release (ie, members of the general public, on-site first responders, employees), but also for ED personnel (ie, physicians and nurses) treating the chemically contaminated victims arriving at the hospital. Secondary contamination injuries to ED personnel result when exposed victims enter the ED without being properly decontaminated. Data from the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry's Hazardous Substances Emergency Events Surveillance System were used to conduct a retrospective analysis on hazmat events occurring in 16 states from 1995 through 2001 that involved secondary injury to ED personnel. Six events were identified in which 15 ED personnel were secondarily injured while treating contaminated victims. The predominant injuries sustained were respiratory and eye irritation. Proper victim decontamination procedures, good field-to-hospital communication, and appropriate personal protective equipment (PPE) use can help prevent ED personnel injuries and contamination of the ED. PMID:12811712

  18. SEM/EDS Characterization of Ambient PM during Agricultural Burns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, J.; Wall, S.

    2010-12-01

    Ambient particulate matter (PM) samples were collected with UNC passive samplers during agricultural burns in Imperial Valley, California. Four Bermuda grass field burn events were sampled at 3-8 locations surrounding each burn. Sampling began at the start of each burn (30-60 min) and continued for 24-120 hours. During 3 of the 4 burn events, winds were calm and plumes were observed to travel straight up to the inversion layer. In one event, winds created a ground-level plume that enveloped two UNC samplers mounted on telephone poles very close to the field (0.2-0.3 miles away). Computer-controlled scanning electron microscopy / energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (CCSEM/EDS) was used to measure particle sizes and elemental composition, from which mass concentrations and size distributions were calculated. The median PM2.5 and PM10 levels measured in this study were 3.4 and 20 ug/m3, respectively. To determine quantitative accuracy, UNC sampler PM2.5 results (PM< 2.5 um) were compared to PM2.5 results from four co-located, continuous-reading beta-attenuation monitors (EBAMs). The median agreement (EBAM - UNC) was 3.8 ug/m3. Manual SEM/EDS detected various distinctive species in these samples, including sea salt, spores, plant fragments, and large soot agglomerates. During the ‘plume event’, 24-hour PM2.5 exposures downwind were up to 17 times higher than that measured upwind. Numerous submicron combustion particles with carbon and oxygen only were directly observed by manual SEM/EDS in the two plume-impacted samples, along with larger ash particles enriched in potassium, sulfur, chlorine, calcium, sodium, and phosphorus. CCSEM/EDS data from this event was grouped into 5 particle classes to generate size-fraction-specific pie charts. Burn-related particle types contributed 95% of the PM2.5 in the location directly impacted by the ground-level plume, compared to only 12% in the upwind location. A sample of Imperial County Bermuda grass analyzed in bulk and

  19. An Extremely Rare Situation - Subcutaneously Filariasis Presented at ED Craiova

    PubMed Central

    ROTARU, LUCIANA; ȘERBAN, C,

    2014-01-01

    A 32 year old male patient presented to the ED Craiova with migratory, burning pain, to the right cervical and left upper eyelid. Sudden, transient, bilateral knee swelling six months ago. An inflammatory trace and a renitent cord can feel at this level, with spontaneous mobility. A microfilaraemic parasite was surgically extracted from upper eyelid. Mobility of the parasite was the key element of an extremely quick and easy diagnosis for a very rare disease but the specific circumstances of the contamination remains unclear. Even uncommon, multiple determinations are possible requiring systematic and long term investigation and medical surveillance. PMID:25729596

  20. Status of the development of EDS coal liquefaction

    SciTech Connect

    Vick, G.K.; Epperly, W.R.

    1982-07-23

    This article traces the evolution and development of a modern coal liquefaction technology, the EDS (Exxon Donor Solvent) process, over a period of 15 years. During this time the technology has been advanced from laboratory experiments to a pilot plant with a coal feed rate of 250 tons per day, and findings from several areas of science and technology have been important. The process is now in the final stage of development to generate the data needed to design a plant of commercial size.

  1. Designing concrete EDS maglev guideways: Power losses in metallic reinforcement

    SciTech Connect

    Beto, D.; Plotkin, D.

    1997-05-01

    Conventional reinforced concrete designs will have to be altered when designing a guideway for a maglev using an electrodynamically suspended (EDS) propulsion system. This type of propulsion system generates large magnetic fields that will develop magnetically induced, circulating eddy currents in any conventional steel reinforcement in close proximity to the magnets. These eddy currents, if large enough, may produce significant power losses that could adversely effect operation of the system. This paper presents a method and explanation for civil engineers to use for estimating the power losses due to the presence of metallic reinforcement. This procedure may be used to help guide future designs in the selection and placement of reinforcing material.

  2. EDs in the Midwest and South activate disaster plans as deadly tornadoes sweep through the region.

    PubMed

    2012-05-01

    Hospitals in the Midwest and South activated their disaster plans in early March to deal with a phalanx of powerful tornadoes that leveled several small towns and killed at least two dozen people. Some hospitals had to activate plans for both internal and external disasters as their own facilities were threatened. One small critical-access hospital in West Liberty, KY, sustained significant damage and had to evacuate its patients to another facility. All the hospitals credit their disaster plans and practice drills with helping them to manage the crisis as efficiently as possible. Morgan County ARH Hospital in West Liberty, KY, went for several days without an operational lab or radiology department, but staff kept the ED open for absolute emergencies. Margaret Mary Community Hospital (MMCH) in Batesville, IN, received six tornado victims, but it was prepared for many more. Administrators credit advanced warning of the storms with helping them to prepare effectively, as well as to coordinate their response with other hospitals in the area. As a level 1 trauma center, the University of Louisville Hospital in Louisville, KY, received all the most seriously injured patients in the region, even while the facility itself was under a tornado warning. Staff had to route families away from the glassed-in waiting room to the basement until the tornado warning had passed. At one point during the crisis, there were 90 patients in the hospital's ED even though the department is only equipped with 29 beds. Administrators at Huntsville Hospital in Huntsville, AL, encouraged colleagues to take advantage of smaller-scale emergencies to activate parts of their disaster plans, and to focus disaster preparation drills on their hospital's top hazard vulnerabilities. PMID:22545338

  3. Interfacial Phenomena in Al/Al, Al/Cu, and Cu/Cu Joints Soldered Using an Al-Zn Alloy with Ag or Cu Additions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pstruś, Janusz; Gancarz, Tomasz

    2014-05-01

    The studies of soldered joints were carried out in systems: Al/solder/Al, Al/solder/Cu, Cu/solder/Cu, where the solder was (Al-Zn)EUT, (Al-Zn)EUT with 0.5, 1.0, and 1.5 at.% of Ag and (Al-Zn)EUT with 0.5, 1.0, and 1.5 at.% of Cu addition. Brazing was performed at 500 °C for 3 min. The EDS analysis indicated that the composition of the layers starting from the Cu pad was CuZn, Cu5Zn8, and CuZn4, respectively. Wetting tests were performed at 500 °C for 3, 8, 15, and 30 min, respectively. Thickness of the layers and their kinetics of growth were measured based on the SEM micrographs. The formation of interlayers was not observed from the side of Al pads. On the contrary, dissolution of the Al substrate and migration of Al-rich particles into the bulk of the solder were observed.

  4. Hypothermic cardiac arrest: an 11 year review of ED management and outcome.

    PubMed

    Brunette, D D; McVaney, K

    2000-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the emergency department (ED) management of hypothermic cardiac arrest and its outcome. The medical records of all patients with hypothermic cardiac arrest treated in the ED from January 1, 1988 to January 31, 1999 were retrospectively reviewed. Data collected included initial body temperature, serum potassium, methods of rewarming, return of perfusing rhythm, and morbidity and mortality. Data were analyzed by descriptive methods. Eleven patients were treated in the ED resuscitation room for hypothermic cardiac arrest. Six patients were found in cardiac arrest in the field, one patient arrested during transport, and four patients arrested after ED arrival. The average initial temperature was 79.1 degrees F (range 69.0 degrees F to 86.7 degrees F). Seven patients received an ED thoracotomy with internal cardiac massage and warm mediastinal irrigation. Four patients had airway management in the ED and then direct transport to the operating room for cardiac bypass rewarming. Three of the seven patients who received an ED thoracotomy subsequently went to intraoperative cardiac bypass rewarming. Five of the seven (71.4%) patients who received an ED thoracotomy survived, versus none of the four patients (0%) who went directly to intraoperative cardiac bypass. A direct comparison of immediate ED thoracotomy versus intraoperative cardiac bypass without ED thoracotomy is cautiously made as this was an unmatched and nonrandomized study. Three of the surviving patients underwent intraoperative cardiac bypass rewarming after receiving an ED thoracotomy. In two of these patients a perfusing rhythm had been established after thoracotomy in the ED and before transport to the operating room for cardiac bypass. Only one of seven (14.3%) patients who arrested prehospital survived versus four of four (100%) who arrested in the ED. ED thoracotomy with internal cardiac massage and mediastinal irrigation rewarming is effective in the management

  5. Hybrid Al + Al3Ni metallic foams synthesized in situ via laser engineered net shaping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Baolong; Li, Ying; Smugeresky, John E.; Zhou, Yizhang; Baker, Dean; Lavernia, Enrique J.

    2011-09-01

    A hybrid, Al + Al3Ni metallic foam was synthesized in situ via laser engineered net shaping (LENS®) of Ni-coated 6061 Al powder in the absence of a foaming agent. During LENS® processing, the Ni coating reacted with the Al matrix, resulting in the simultaneous formation of a fine dispersion of Al3Ni, and a high volume fraction of porosity. As a reinforcement phase, the intermetallic compound formed particles with a size range of 1-5 µm and a volume fraction of 63%, with accompanying 35-300 µm pores with a 60% volume fraction. The microstructure of the as-deposited Al + Al3Ni composite foams was characterized using SEM, EDS, XRD and TEM/HRTEM techniques. The evolution of the microstructure was analyzed on the basis of the thermal field present during deposition, paying particular attention to the thermodynamics of the Al3Ni intermetallic compound formation as well as discussing the mechanisms that may be responsible for the observed porosity. The mechanical behavior of the as-deposited material was characterized using compression and microhardness testing, indicating that the yield strength and hardness are 190 MPa and 320 HV, respectively, which represents an increase of over three times higher than that of annealed Al6061, or similar to heat-treated Al6061 fully dense matrix, and much higher than those of traditional Al alloy foams, and with a low density of 1.64 g/m3.

  6. [Epidemiological, clinical, cytologic and immunophenotypic aspects of acute leukemia in children: the experience at the hematology laboratory of IBN SINA University Hospital Center].

    PubMed

    Doumbia, Mariam; Uwingabiye, Jean; Bissan, Aboubacar; Rachid, Razine; Benkirane, Souad; Masrar, Azlarab

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to describe epidemiological, cytologic and immunophenotypic aspects of acute leukemias (AL) in children diagnosed at IBN SINA University Hospital Center and to determine the concordance between cytology and immunophenotyping results. This is a cross-sectional study conducted in the hematology laboratory of IBN SINA University Hospital Center between June 2012 and May 2014. Among the 104 cases with diagnosed AL, 52% were boys with a sex-ratio H/F= 1.32, the average age was 5.7 years. The distribution of different types of AL was: lymphoid AL (LAL) (74%), myeloid (AML) (20.2%), biphenotypic AL (BAL) (65.8%). Among the LALs, 78% were classified as B LAL and 22% as T LAL. Clinical signs were mainly presented with tumor syndrome (73.1%), fever (61%) and hemorrhagic syndrome (50%). The most common blood count abnormalities were: thrombopenia (89.4%), anemia (86.5%), hyperleukocytosis (79.8%). The rate of peripheral and bone marrow blasts was statistically higher for LAL than for AML and BAL (p <0.001). The rate of relapse and mortality was 21.2% and 16. 3% respectively. Concordance rate between the results of cytology and of immunophenotyping was 92.7% for LAL and 82.6% for AML. Diagnosis of AL is always based primarily on cytology. Immunophenotyping allowed us to make a better distinction between acute leukemias. The management of paediatric AL is a major health problem which requires specialized care centers. PMID:27516823

  7. Economic evaluation of a preemptive treatment strategy for invasive fungal infection in neutropenic patients with hematological diseases.

    PubMed

    Kimura, S-I; Murata, T; Akahoshi, Y; Nakano, H; Ugai, T; Wada, H; Yamasaki, R; Ishihara, Y; Kawamura, K; Sakamoto, K; Ashizawa, M; Sato, M; Terasako-Saito, K; Nakasone, H; Kikuchi, M; Yamazaki, R; Kako, S; Kanda, J; Tanihara, A; Nishida, J; Kanda, Y

    2015-05-01

    We compared the expected medical costs of empirical and preemptive treatment strategies for invasive fungal infection in neutropenic patients with hematological diseases. Based on the results of two clinical trials with different backgrounds reported by Oshima et al. [J Antimicrob Chemother 60(2):350-355; Oshima study] and Cordonnier et al. [Clin Infect Dis 48(8):1042-1051; PREVERT study], we developed a decision tree model that represented the outcomes of empirical and preemptive treatment strategies, and estimated the expected medical costs of medications and examinations in the two strategies. We assumed that micafungin was started in the empirical group at 5 days after fever had developed, while voriconazole was started in the preemptive group only when certain criteria, such as positive test results of imaging studies and/or serum markers, were fulfilled. When we used an incidence of positive test results of 6.7 % based on the Oshima study, the expected medical costs of the empirical and preemptive groups were 288,198 and 150,280 yen, respectively. Even in the case of the PREVERT study, in which the incidence of positive test results was 32.9 %, the expected medical costs in the empirical and preemptive groups were 291,871 and 284,944 yen, respectively. A sensitivity analysis indicated that the expected medical costs in the preemptive group would exceed those in the empirical group when the incidence of positive test results in the former was over 34.4 %. These results suggest that a preemptive treatment strategy can be expected to reduce medical costs compared with empirical therapy in most clinical settings. PMID:25577175

  8. Influences of Sex and Age on the Hematological Profile of the Jundiá (Silver Catfish) Rhamdia quelen.

    PubMed

    Nascimento, Nivaldo Ferreira do; Nakaghi, Laura Satiko Okada; Hilbig, Cleonice Cristina; Ventura, Arlene Sobrinho; Azevedo, Ana Carolina Barni de; Dean, Andressa Fierli; Bombardelli, Robie Allan

    2016-09-01

    In this study, sex and age influenced the hematological profiles of Jundiá (Silver Catfish) Rhamdia quelen. Females showed lower levels of hemoglobin, young fish increased lymphocyte counts, and older fish increased hematocrit values. These results indicate that, depending on age and sex, the fish have disparate hematological profiles. For this reason, it is important to consider the sex and age of an R. quelen when examining the impact of environmental and management factors on this species in terms of their hematological profiles. Received May 24, 2015; accepted March 24, 2016. PMID:27485153

  9. Arsenic entrapment by nanocrystals of Al-magnetite: The role of Al in crystal growth and As retention.

    PubMed

    Freitas, Erico T F; Stroppa, Daniel G; Montoro, Luciano A; de Mello, Jaime W V; Gasparon, Massimo; Ciminelli, Virginia S T

    2016-09-01

    The nature of As-Al-Fe co-precipitates aged for 120 days are investigated in detail by High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HRTEM), Scanning TEM (STEM), electron diffraction, Energy Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy (EDS), Electron Energy-Loss Spectroscopy (EELS), and Energy Filtered Transmission Electron Microscopy (EFTEM). The Al present in magnetite is shown to favour As incorporation (up to 1.10 wt%) relative to Al-free magnetite and Al-goethite, but As uptake by Al-magnetite decreases with increasing Al substitution (3.53-11.37 mol% Al). Arsenic-bearing magnetite and goethite mesocrystals (MCs) are formed by oriented aggregation (OA) of primary nanoparticles (NPs). Well-crystalline magnetite likely formed by Otswald ripening was predominant in the Al-free system. The As content in Al-goethite MCs (having approximately 13% substituted Al) was close to the EDS detection limit (0.1 wt% As), but was below detection in Al-goethites with 23.00-32.19 mol% Al. Our results show for the first time the capacity of Al-magnetite to incorporate more As than Al-free magnetite, and the role of Al in favouring OA-based crystal growth under the experimental conditions, and therefore As retention in the formed MCs. The proposed mechanism of As incorporation involves adsorption of As onto the newly formed NPs. Arsenic is then trapped in the MCs as they grow by self-assembly OA upon attachment of the NPs. We conclude that Al may diffuse to the crystal faces with high surface energy to reduce the total energy of the system during the attachment events, thus favouring the oriented aggregation. PMID:27258899

  10. The collection of MicroED data for macromolecular crystallography.

    PubMed

    Shi, Dan; Nannenga, Brent L; de la Cruz, M Jason; Liu, Jinyang; Sawtelle, Steven; Calero, Guillermo; Reyes, Francis E; Hattne, Johan; Gonen, Tamir

    2016-05-01

    The formation of large, well-ordered crystals for crystallographic experiments remains a crucial bottleneck to the structural understanding of many important biological systems. To help alleviate this problem in crystallography, we have developed the MicroED method for the collection of electron diffraction data from 3D microcrystals and nanocrystals of radiation-sensitive biological material. In this approach, liquid solutions containing protein microcrystals are deposited on carbon-coated electron microscopy grids and are vitrified by plunging them into liquid ethane. MicroED data are collected for each selected crystal using cryo-electron microscopy, in which the crystal is diffracted using very few electrons as the stage is continuously rotated. This protocol gives advice on how to identify microcrystals by light microscopy or by negative-stain electron microscopy in samples obtained from standard protein crystallization experiments. The protocol also includes information about custom-designed equipment for controlling crystal rotation and software for recording experimental parameters in diffraction image metadata. Identifying microcrystals, preparing samples and setting up the microscope for diffraction data collection take approximately half an hour for each step. Screening microcrystals for quality diffraction takes roughly an hour, and the collection of a single data set is ∼10 min in duration. Complete data sets and resulting high-resolution structures can be obtained from a single crystal or by merging data from multiple crystals. PMID:27077331

  11. Reference ranges of hematology and lymphocyte subsets in healthy Korean native cattle (Hanwoo) and Holstein dairy cattle.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yun-Mi; Lee, Jin-A; Jung, Bock-Gie; Kim, Tae-Hoon; Lee, Bong-Joo; Suh, Guk-Hyun

    2016-06-01

    There are no accurate reference ranges for hematology parameters and lymphocyte subsets in Korean native beef cattle (Hanwoo). This study was performed to establish reliable reference ranges of hematology and lymphocyte subsets using a large number of Hanwoo cattle (n = 350) and to compare differences between Hanwoo and Holstein dairy cattle (n = 334). Additionally, age-related changes in lymphocyte subsets were studied. Bovine leukocyte subpopulation analysis was performed using mono or dual color flow cytometry. The leukocyte subpopulations investigated in healthy cattle included: CD2(+) cells, sIgM(+) cells, MHC class II(+) cells, CD3(+) CD4(+) cells, CD3(+) CD8(+) cells, and WC1(+) cells. Although Hanwoo and Holstein cattle are the same species, results showed several differences in hematology and lymphocyte subsets between Hanwoo and Holstein cattle. This study is the first report to establish reference ranges of hematology and lymphocyte subsets in adult Hanwoo cattle. PMID:26419947

  12. Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells as Therapeutic Target in Hematological Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    De Veirman, Kim; Van Valckenborgh, Els; Lahmar, Qods; Geeraerts, Xenia; De Bruyne, Elke; Menu, Eline; Van Riet, Ivan; Vanderkerken, Karin; Van Ginderachter, Jo A.

    2014-01-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) are a heterogeneous population of immature myeloid cells that accumulate during pathological conditions such as cancer and are associated with a poor clinical outcome. MDSC expansion hampers the host anti-tumor immune response by inhibition of T cell proliferation, cytokine secretion, and recruitment of regulatory T cells. In addition, MDSC exert non-immunological functions including the promotion of angiogenesis, tumor invasion, and metastasis. Recent years, MDSC are considered as a potential target in solid tumors and hematological malignancies to enhance the effects of currently used immune modulating agents. This review focuses on the characteristics, distribution, functions, cell–cell interactions, and targeting of MDSC in hematological malignancies including multiple myeloma, lymphoma, and leukemia. PMID:25538893

  13. Influence of collection time on hematologic and immune markers in the American alligator (Alligator mississippiensis).

    PubMed

    Finger, John W; Williams, Robert J; Hamilton, Matthew T; Elsey, Ruth M; Oppenheimer, Victor A; Holladay, Steven D; Gogal, Robert M

    2015-01-01

    Crocodilians are important keystone species and indicators of environmental health. Much remains unknown, however regarding utility of field-collected crocodilian blood samples for ecologic assessments. Field sampling sites are also often distant to analysis centers, necessitating development of new techniques and panels of assays that will yield environmentally relevant data. Stability and viability of hematological and immunological indices have been of particular interest for linking ecosystem health to biomarkers in resident species. In this study, we investigated the effect of time at analysis post-blood sampling at 4 and 24 hr on a panel of potential biomarkers in alligator blood. Our results suggest alligator blood samples can be reliably evaluated for both hematologic and immunologic profile 24 hr after sampling. PMID:25560415

  14. Comparison of survival of adolescents and young adults with hematologic malignancies in Osaka, Japan.

    PubMed

    Nakata-Yamada, Kayo; Inoue, Masami; Ioka, Akiko; Ito, Yuri; Tabuchi, Takahiro; Miyashiro, Isao; Masaie, Hiroaki; Ishikawa, Jun; Hino, Masayuki; Tsukuma, Hideaki

    2016-06-01

    The survival gap between adolescents and young adults (AYAs) with hematological malignancies persists in many countries. To determine to what extent it does in Japan, we investigated survival and treatment regimens in 211 Japanese AYAs (15-29 years) in the Osaka Cancer Registry diagnosed during 2001-2005 with hematological malignancies, and compared adolescents (15-19 years) with young adults (20-29 years). AYAs with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) had a poor 5-year survival (44%), particularly young adults (29% vs. 64% in adolescents, p = 0.01). Additional investigation for patients with ALL revealed that only 19% of young adults were treated with pediatric treatment regimens compared with 45% of adolescents (p = 0.05). Our data indicate that we need to focus on young adults with ALL and to consider establishing appropriate cancer care system and guidelines for them in Japan. PMID:26695739

  15. Intrauterine Growth Restriction Associated with Hematologic Abnormalities: Probable Manifestations of Placental Mesenchymal Dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Payo, Cristina; Bernabeu, Rocio Alvarez; Villar, Isabel Salas; Goy, Enrique Iglesias

    2015-10-01

    Introduction Placental mesenchymal dysplasia is a rare vascular disease associated with intrauterine growth restriction, fetal demise as well as Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome. Some neonates present hematologic abnormalities possibly related to consumptive coagulopathy and hemolytic anemia in the placental circulation. Case report We present a case of placental mesenchymal dysplasia in a fetus with intrauterine growth restriction and cerebellar hemorrhagic injury diagnosed in the 20th week of pregnancy. During 26th week, our patient had an intrauterine fetal demise in the context of gestational hypertension. We have detailed the ultrasound findings that made us suspect the presence of hematologic disorders during 20th week. Discussion We believe that the cerebellar hematoma could be the consequence of thrombocytopenia accompanied by anemia. If hemorrhagic damage during fetal life is found, above all associates with an anomalous placental appearance and with intrauterine growth restriction, PMD should be suspected along other etiologies. PMID:26495159

  16. Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome in Pediatric Hematologic-Oncologic Disease: Literature Review and Case Presentation

    PubMed Central

    ARZANIAN, Mohammad Thaghi; SHAMSIAN, Bibi Shahin; KARIMZADEH, Parvaneh; KAJIYAZDI, Mohammad; MALEK, Fatima; HAMMOUD, Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    Objective Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is a cliniconeuroradiological disease entity, which is represented by characteristic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of subcortical/cortical hyperintensity in T2-weighted sequences. It is more often seen in parietaloccipital lobes, and is accompanied by clinical neurological changes. PRES is a rare central nervous system (CNS) complication in patients with childhood hematologic-oncologic disese and shows very different neurological symptoms between patients, ranging from numbness of extremities to generalized seizure. In this article, we will review PRES presentation in hematologic-oncologic patients. Then, we will present our patient, a 7-year-old boy with Evans syndrome on treatment with cyclosporine, mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) and prednisone, with seizure episodes and MRI finding in favour of PRES. PMID:24949044

  17. The emerging importance of ribosomal dysfunction in the pathogenesis of hematologic disorders.

    PubMed

    Raiser, David M; Narla, Anupama; Ebert, Benjamin L

    2014-03-01

    More than a decade has passed since the initial identification of ribosomal protein gene mutations in patients with Diamond-Blackfan anemia (DBA), a hematologic disorder that became the founding member of a class of diseases known as ribosomopathies. In these diseases, genetic abnormalities that result in defective ribosome biogenesis cause strikingly tissue-specific phenotypes in patients, specifically bone marrow failure, craniofacial abnormalities and skeletal defects. Several animal models and numerous in vitro studies have demonstrated that the p53 pathway is central to the ribosomopathy phenotype. Additionally, there is mounting evidence of a link between the dysregulation of components of the translational machinery and the pathology of various malignancies. The importance of the role of ribosomal dysfunction in the pathogenesis of hematologic disorders is becoming clearer, and elucidation of the underlying mechanisms could have broad implications for both basic cellular biology and clinical intervention strategies. PMID:23863123

  18. Immunotherapy of hematological cancers: PD-1 blockade for the treatment of Hodgkin's lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Kroemer, Guido; Galluzzi, Lorenzo

    2015-01-01

    The blockade of immunological checkpoints has been successfully employed for the treatment of various solid neoplasms including melanoma, mesothelioma, non-small cell lung carcinoma, and renal cell carcinoma. A recent study indicates that the vast majority of patients with advanced, heavily pretreated Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL) also respond to a monoclonal antibody targeting programmed cell death 1 (PDCD1, best known as PD-1). Thus, checkpoint blockers may soon become part of our therapeutic armamentarium against hematological tumors. This would be particularly important as it would spare (at least some) patients the deleterious toxic effects of combinatorial chemotherapies and bone marrow transplantation. We anticipate that the realm of immunotherapy will eventually conquer vast portions of the territory that now belongs to hematological malignancies. PMID:26155425

  19. The Global Challenge of Carbapenem-Resistant Enterobacteriaceae in Transplant Recipients and Patients With Hematologic Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Satlin, Michael J.; Jenkins, Stephen G.; Walsh, Thomas J.

    2014-01-01

    Carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE) are emerging global pathogens. The spread of CRE to transplant recipients and patients with hematologic malignancies has ominous implications. These patients rely on timely, active antibacterial therapy to combat gram-negative infections; however, recommended empirical regimens are not active against CRE. Approximately 3%–10% of solid organ transplant (SOT) recipients in CRE-endemic areas develop CRE infection, and the infection site correlates with the transplanted organ. Mortality rates associated with CRE infections approach 40% in SOT recipients and 65% in patients with hematologic malignancies. Given that the current antimicrobial armamentarium to combat CRE is extremely limited, a multifaceted approach that includes antimicrobial stewardship and active surveillance is needed to prevent CRE infections in immunocompromised hosts. Improving outcomes of established infections will require the use of risk factor–based prediction tools and molecular assays to more rapidly administer CRE-active therapy and the development of new antimicrobial agents with activity against CRE. PMID:24463280

  20. Targeting the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway: a preferred approach in hematologic malignancies?

    PubMed Central

    Brinkmann, K; Kashkar, H

    2014-01-01

    Acquired resistance toward apoptosis represents one of the hallmarks of human cancer and a major cause of the inefficacy of most anticancer treatment regimens. Based on its ability to inhibit apoptosis, the B-cell lymphoma/leukemia 2 (Bcl-2) protein family has garnered the most attention as a promising therapeutic target in cancer. Accordingly, efforts have lately been focused on the development of drugs targeting Bcl-2 proteins with considerable therapeutic success, particularly in hematologic malignancies. Here, we review the previous studies and highlight the pivotal role of the Bcl-2 protein family in the homeostasis of hematologic tissue compartment. This knowledge provides more insight into why some cancers are more sensitive to Bcl-2 targeting than others and will foster the clinical evaluation of Bcl-2-targeting strategies in cancer by avoiding severe on-target side effects in the development of healthy tissues. PMID:24603326

  1. Hypergravity-Induced Changes in Hematological and Lymphocyte Function Parameters in a Mouse Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gridley, Daila S.; Miller, Glen M.; Nelson, Gregory A.; Pecaut, Michael J.

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to quantify hypergravity-induced changes in hematological and lymphocyte characteristics. Mice were subjected to 1, 2, and 3G and euthanized on days 1 , 4, 7, 10, and 21. The data show that increased gravitational force resulted in persistent hypothermia. Red blood cell (RBC) counts, hematocrit, and hemoglobin were reduced by day 21, whereas hemoglobin and RBC volume were low at most times of measurement. A transient increase was noted in platelet numbers in the 3G group. Fluctuations in spontaneous blastogenesis of lymphocytes were dependent upon centrifugation time and not gravity. Changes in splenocyte responses to T and B cell mitogens due to gravity were also noted. Cytokine production was primarily affected during the first week; IL-2, IL-4 and TNF-alpha were increased, whereas IFN-gamma was decreased. These findings indicate that altered gravity can influence both hematological and functional variables that may translate into serious health consequences.

  2. Evaluation of Biochemical, Genetic and Hematological Biomarkers in a Commercial Catfish Rhamdia quelen Exposed to Diclofenac.

    PubMed

    Ghelfi, Ariane; Ribas, João Luiz Coelho; Guiloski, Izonete Cristina; Bettim, Franciele Lima; Piancini, Laércio Dante Stein; Cestari, Marta Margarete; Pereira, Aramis José; Sassaki, Guilherme Lanzi; Silva de Assis, Helena Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Juveniles Rhamdia quelen fish species were exposed to diclofenac for 96 h at concentrations of 0.2, 2, and 20 μg/L. Biochemical, genetic, and hematological biomarkers were assessed in the liver, kidney, and blood in order to evaluate the toxic effects. No oxidative stress was observed in liver. In kidney the superoxide dismutase activity increased in all concentrations, suggesting an alteration in the hydrogen peroxide production, but DNA damage and lipid peroxidation were not detected. Diclofenac exposure increased the red blood cells number at concentrations of 0.2 and 2 μg/L, and monocytes and neutrophils at 2 and 20 μg/L, respectively. These results suggest that acute exposure to diclofenac, even at low concentrations, caused hematologic and renal enzymatic alterations in R. quelen. PMID:26589900

  3. Clinical trials of dendritic cell-based cancer vaccines in hematologic malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Pyzer, Athalia R; Avigan, David E; Rosenblatt, Jacalyn

    2015-01-01

    The potential for the immune system to target hematological malignancies is demonstrated in the allogeneic transplant setting, where durable responses can be achieved. However, allogeneic transplantation is associated with significant morbidity and mortality related to graft versus host disease. Cancer immunotherapy has the capacity to direct a specific cytotoxic immune response against cancer cells, particularly residual cancer cells, in order to reduce the likelihood of disease relapse in a more targeted and tolerated manner. Ex vivo dendritic cells can be primed in various ways to present tumor associated antigen to the immune system, in the context of co-stimulatory molecules, eliciting a tumor specific cytotoxic response in patients. Several approaches to prime dendritic cells and overcome the immunosuppressive microenvironment have been evaluated in pre-clinical and early clinical trials with promising results. In this review, we summarize the clinical data evaluating dendritic cell based vaccines for the treatment of hematological malignancies. PMID:25625926

  4. Weights, hematology and serum chemistry of seven species of free-ranging tropical pelagic seabirds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Work, T.M.

    1996-01-01

    I established reference values for weight, hematology, and serum chemistry for seven species of free-ranging Hawaiian tropical pelagic seabirds comprising three orders (Procellariiformes, Pelecaniformes, Charadriiformes) and six families (Procellariidae, Phaethontidae, Diomedeidae, Sulidae, Fregatidae, and Laridae). Species examined included 84 Hawaiian darkrumped petrels (Pterodoma phaeopygia), 90 wedge-tailed shearwaters (Puffinus pacificus), 151 Laysan albatrosses (Diomedea immutabilis), 69 red-footed boobies (Sula sula), 154 red-tailed tropicbirds (Phaeton rubricauda), 90 great frigatebirds (Fregata minor), and 72 sooty terns (Sterna fuscata). Hematocrit, total plasma solids, total and differential white cell counts, serum glucose, calcium, phosphorus, uric acid, total protein, albumin, globulin, aspartate aminotransferase and creatinine phosphokinase were analyzed. Among and within species, hematology and chemistry values varied with age, sex, season, and island of collection. Despite this variation, order-wide trends were observed.

  5. Erythrocytes oxidative damage and hematological effects of 2,4,4',5-tetrachlorodiphenyl sulfone in rats.

    PubMed

    Badraoui, Riadh; Abdelmoula, Nouha B; Rebai, Tarek

    2011-07-01

    The effects of subchronic exposure to tetrachlorodiphenyl sulfone (TCDS) on hematological parameters [white blood cells (WBC), red blood cells (RBC), mean cell volume (MCV), mean corpuscular hemoglobin (MCH), mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration (MCHC), hemoglobin (Hb) and hematocrite (Ht) levels] were examined. Oxidative stress in erythrocytes was also assessed by measuring thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) and enzyme antioxidant activities [superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and glutathione peroxidase (GPx)]. TCDS was administered orally, dissolved in water, ad libitum to 12 female rats at 28.9 mg/kg/day for 6 or 12 weeks. Results showed that TCDS induced significant decreases in RBC, Hb, and Ht. Whereas MCV, MCH, and MCHC remain unchanged and WBC increased only in the second period of the study. Moreover erythrocyte TBARS level increased, and antioxidant enzyme (SOD, GPx, and CAT) activities decreased. We concluded that TCDS intoxication promotes erythrocyte oxidative damage and disrupt hematological constituents in rats. PMID:20382005

  6. Exaggerated NT-proBNP production in patients with hematologic malignancies: a case series.

    PubMed

    Andreu, Aileen; Guglin, Maya

    2012-01-01

    ©2011 Wiley Periodicals Inc. Extremely elevated serum brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) in cancer patients is a poorly understood phenomenon. The authors report three cases of patients with hematologic malignancies and serial N-terminal pro-BNP (NT-proBNP) measurements with values in the range of tens to hundred thousands pg/mL. Through matching NT-proBNP results with clinical, laboratory, echocardiographic and radiologic data, the authors found that these patients demonstrated exaggerated responses to fluid overload. Patients with hematologic malignancies may have higher than expected values of NT-proBNP in response to hypervolemic states. The authors hypothesize that this may be related to possible infiltration of the myocardium by substances produced in the setting of these diseases or due to proteins interfering with the assay.Congest Heart Fail. PMID:23167814

  7. Relating tumor score to hematology in green turtles with fibropapillomatosis in Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Work, T.M.; Balazs, G.H.

    1999-01-01

    The relationship between hematologic status and severity of tumor affliction in green turtles (Chelonia mydas) with fibropapillomatosis (FP) was examined. During 1 wk periods in July 1997 and July 1998, we bled 108 free-ranging green turtles from Pala'au (Molokai, Hawaii, USA) where FP is endemic. Blood was analyzed for hematocrit, estimated total solids, total white blood cell (WBC) count and differential WBC count. Each turtle was assigned a subjective tumor score ranging from 0 (no visible external tumors) to 3 (heavily tumored) that indicated the severity of FP. There was a progressive increase in monocytes and a decrease in all other hematologic parameters except heterophils and total numbers of white blood cells as tumor score increased. These data indicate that tumor score can relate to physiologic status of green turtles afflicted with FP, and that tumor score is a useful field monitor of severity of FP in this species.

  8. Hematological and biochemical features of postpartum fever in the heavy draft mare.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Takahiro; Kimura, Yuki; Oya, Anna; Chiba, Akiko; Ishii, Mitsuo; Nambo, Yasuo

    2016-01-01

    Heavy draft mares potentially have a higher risk of suffering from postpartum fever (PF) than light breed mares. The purpose of this study was to compare hematological and biochemical features between clinically healthy mares (n=40) and PF-affected mares (n=16). Mares were classified as having PF when their rectal temperature rose to >38.5°C within 96 hr of foaling. The numbers of leukocytes, lymphocytes, and neutrophils and the serum magnesium level were significantly lower in PF-affected mares. The serum SAA and NEFA levels were significantly higher in PF-affected mares. Strong inflammation responses, fat mobilization associated with negative energy balance and possibly endotoxin participate in hematological and biochemical features of PF in heavy draft mares. PMID:27073331

  9. Recent advances in the development of Aurora kinases inhibitors in hematological malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Choudary, Iqra; Barr, Paul M.; Friedberg, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Over the last two decades, since the discovery of Drosophila mutants in 1995, much effort has been made to understand Aurora kinase biology. Three mammalian subtypes have been identified thus far which include the Aurora A, B and C kinases. These regulatory proteins specifically work at the cytoskeleton and chromosomal structures between the kinetochores and have vital functions in the early phases of the mitotic cell cycle. Today, there are multiple phase I and phase II clinical trials as well as numerous preclinical studies taking place looking at Aurora kinase inhibitors in both hematologic and solid malignancies. This review focuses on the preclinical and clinical development of Aurora kinase inhibitors in hematological malignancy and discusses their therapeutic potential. PMID:26622997

  10. Hematological and biochemical features of postpartum fever in the heavy draft mare

    PubMed Central

    AOKI, Takahiro; KIMURA, Yuki; OYA, Anna; CHIBA, Akiko; ISHII, Mitsuo; NAMBO, Yasuo

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Heavy draft mares potentially have a higher risk of suffering from postpartum fever (PF) than light breed mares. The purpose of this study was to compare hematological and biochemical features between clinically healthy mares (n=40) and PF-affected mares (n=16). Mares were classified as having PF when their rectal temperature rose to >38.5°C within 96 hr of foaling. The numbers of leukocytes, lymphocytes, and neutrophils and the serum magnesium level were significantly lower in PF-affected mares. The serum SAA and NEFA levels were significantly higher in PF-affected mares. Strong inflammation responses, fat mobilization associated with negative energy balance and possibly endotoxin participate in hematological and biochemical features of PF in heavy draft mares. PMID:27073331

  11. TNF-α, a good or bad factor in hematological diseases?

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Tian; Wang, Min

    2014-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) is a highly pleiotropic cytokine involved in a spectrum of physiological processes that control inflammation, anti-tumor responses and homeostasis through two receptors, TNF-R1 and TNF-R2. In general, TNF-R1 mediates cytotoxicity, resistance to infection and stimulation of NF-κB. By contrast, TNF-R2 has been implicated in proliferation of T-cell line, thymocytes and human mononuclear cells. Hematological malignancies are the types of cancer that affect normal hematopoiesis, have a speedy development, high lethal rate and until now still have no effective treatment. Several studies have shown that inflammatory cytokines play an important role in the onset and progress of these diseases. In this review, we summarize the recent studies and evaluate the positive or negative role of TNF-α in some hematological malignancies or diseases with a malignant tendency.

  12. Hematologic and plasma biochemical reference values in Indian peafowl (Pavo cristatus).

    PubMed

    Samour, Jaime; Naldo, Jesus; Rahman, Habeeb; Sakkir, Mohammed

    2010-06-01

    Blood samples were collected from captive, adult, clinically normal Indian peafowl (Pavo cristatus) for hematologic and plasma biochemical analyses. Hematologic parameters investigated were total red blood cell count, hemoglobin, packed cell volume, fibrinogen, mean cell volume, mean cell hemoglobin, mean cell hemoglobin concentration, total white blood cell count, differential white blood cell count, and thrombocyte count. Plasma biochemical parameters investigated were alanine aminotransferase, alkaline phosphatase, amylase, aspartate aminotransferase, bile acids, total bilirubin, blood urea nitrogen, calcium, cholesterol, creatinine, creatine kinase, gamma glutamyltransferase, lactate dehydrogenase, glucose, iron, phosphorus, and uric acid, as well as plasma protein electrophoresis. Results were compared with values from studies done in houbara bustards (Chlamydotis undulata), kori bustards (Ardeotis kori), stone curlews (Burhinus oedicnemus), and taxonomically related species, including ring-necked pheasants (Phasianus colchicus), red-legged partridges (Alectoris rufa), Kashmir native fowl (Kashmirfavorella), and Bangladesh native, Fayoumi, and Assil fowl (Gallus domesticus). PMID:20806654

  13. Al Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandanayaka, Tharaka; Azarmi, Fardad

    2014-05-01

    In the present study, cold spraying technique was used to fabricate a metal matrix composite (MMC) that consists of Ni matrix and 20 vol.% Ni3Al particles at two different particle sizes as reinforcement. This study intends to investigate the effect of reinforcement particle size on microstructural and mechanical properties of cold sprayed MMCs. Two different Ni3Al powders with nominal particle size of -45 to +5 and +45 to 100 μm were used as reinforcement in this study. Cold sprayed Ni-Ni3Al samples were subjected to the microstructural observation and characterization prior to any mechanical testing. Then, samples were tested using nano-indentation, Knoop hardness, Vickers hardness, and Resonance frequency to evaluate their mechanical properties. No significant changes were observed in microstructural characteristics due to different particle sizes. The results obtained from a variety of mechanical testings indicated that the increasing reinforcement particle size resulted in the slight reduction of mechanical properties such as elastic modulus and hardness in cold sprayed MMCs. The mechanical interlock between deposited particles defines the bonding strength in cold sprayed samples. Small size particles have a higher velocity and impact resulting in stronger interlock between deformed particles.

  14. Adherence-related issues in adolescents and young adults with hematological disorders.

    PubMed

    Leader, Avi; Raanani, Pia

    2014-01-01

    Nonadherence to medical recommendations is a widespread problem well documented in a multitude of clinical settings. Nonadherence may adversely affect clinical outcomes such as survival and quality of life and increase health-care-related costs. An understanding of the factors driving nonadherence is key to developing effective adherence-enhancing interventions (AEIs). There are ongoing attempts in contemporary adherence research to better define the various components of adherence, to find optimal measures of adherence and correlations with clinical outcomes, and to create a classification system for AEIs. Nonadherence is also widely prevalent among adolescents and young adults (AYAs) with chronic hematological diseases, affecting up to 50% of patients and increasing with age. Combined use of objective (i.e. electronic monitoring, EM) and subjective (i.e. self-report) measures of adherence may be the preferred approach to assess adherence. The unique physical, social and emotional aspects of the AYA life stage are closely related to intricate causes of nonadherence in AYAs such as problems in transition to adult care. Until proven otherwise, the empirical target in AYAs with hematological disorders should be perfect adherence. Multilevel AEIs, EM feedback and behavioral interventions are among the most effective types of AEIs. Despite the magnitude of the problem, only a handful of AEIs have been evaluated among AYAs with hematological disorders. Thus, this is a field with unmet needs warranting high-quality trials using standardized and well-specified assessment methods and interventions. This review discusses the prevalence, definition, causes and clinical implications of nonadherence among AYAs with hematological disorders, along with strategies to measure and improve adherence. PMID:25228561

  15. Combination epigenetic and immunotherapy overcomes resistance to monoclonal antibodies in hematologic malignancies: A new therapeutic approach.

    PubMed

    Epner, Elliot M; Saroya, Bikramajit Singh; Hasanali, Zainul S; Loughran, Thomas P

    2016-03-01

    We recently reported that addition of epigenetic agents could overcome resistance of leukemic cells to monoclonal antibody-mediated anti-tumor effects in T-cell prolymphocytic leukemia. We also reported that epigenetic agents could induce expression of the CD30 gene, thus providing a therapeutic target for the antibody drug conjugate brentuximab vedotin. Here we discuss these findings and their generality to treatment of other hematologic and solid malignancies. PMID:26802532

  16. The Effect of Clozapine on Hematological Indices: A 1-Year Follow-Up Study.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jimmy; Takeuchi, Hiroyoshi; Fervaha, Gagan; Powell, Valerie; Bhaloo, Amaal; Bies, Robert; Remington, Gary

    2015-10-01

    Clozapine is the antipsychotic of choice for treatment-resistant schizophrenia and is linked to a need for mandatory hematological monitoring. Besides agranulocytosis, other hematological aberrations have resulted in premature termination in some cases. Considering clozapine's role in immunomodulation, we proceeded to investigate the impact of clozapine on the following 3 main hematological cell lines: red blood cells, platelets, white blood cells (WBCs), and its differential counts. Data were extracted from patients initiated on clozapine between January 2009 and December 2010 at a single hospital. Patients with a preclozapine complete blood count, who were receiving clozapine during the 1-year follow-up period, were included in the present investigation. Counts of red blood cells, platelets, WBC, and its differential including neutrophils, lymphocytes, monocytes, eosinophils, and basophils were extracted and trajectories plotted. One hundred one patients were included in this study and 66 remained on clozapine at the end of 1 year. There was a synchronized but transient increase in WBC, neutrophils, monocytes, eosinophils, basophils, and platelets beginning as early as the first week of clozapine treatment. There were no cases of agranulocytosis reported in this sample, and five developed neutropenia. A spike in neutrophils immediately preceded the onset of neutropenia in three of the five. The cumulative incidence rates were 48.9% for neutrophilia, 5.9% for eosinophilia, and 3% each for thrombocytosis and thrombocytopenia. Early hematological aberrations are visible across a range of cell lines, primarily of the myeloid lineage. These disturbances are transient and are probably related to clozapine's immunomodulatory properties. We do not suggest discontinuing clozapine as a consequence of the observed aberrations. PMID:26267420

  17. Hematological, oxidative stress, and immune status profiling in elite combat sport athletes.

    PubMed

    Dopsaj, Violeta; Martinovic, Jelena; Dopsaj, Milivoj; Kasum, Goran; Kotur-Stevuljevic, Jelena; Koropanovski, Nenad

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this study was to profile hematological, oxidative stress, and immunological parameters in male athletes who practiced combat sports and to determine whether the type of combat sport influenced the measured parameters. Eighteen karate professionals, 15 wrestlers, and 14 kickboxers participated in the study. Hematological, iron-related, oxidative stress, and immunological parameters were measured at the beginning of a precompetitive period. The general linear model showed significant differences between the karate professionals, wrestlers, and kickboxers with respect to their hematological and iron status parameters (Wilks' Lambda = 0.270, F = 2.186, p < 0.05) and oxidative stress status (Wilks' Lambda = 0.529, F = 1.940, p < 0.05). The immature reticulocyte fraction was significantly higher in wrestlers (0.30 ± 0.03) compared with kickboxers (0.24 ± 0.04; p < 0.05) and karate professionals (0.26 ± 0.04; p < 0.05). Low hemoglobin density was significantly lower in wrestlers and kickboxers (p < 0.05) compared with karate professionals (karate: 3.51 ± 1.19, wrestlers: 1.95 ± 1.10, and kickboxers: 1.77 ± 0.76). Significant differences were observed between the karate professionals and wrestlers with respect to their pro-oxidant-antioxidant balance (437 ± 103 vs. 323 ± 148, p < 0.05) and superoxide-dismutase activity (SOD) (73 ± 37 vs. 103 ± 30, p < 0.05). All the measured parameters (with the exception of SOD activity) fell within their physiological ranges, indicating that the study participants represented a young and healthy male population. Hematological parameters differed between kickboxers and karate professionals. The low pro-oxidant-antioxidant balance and high SOD activity in wrestlers could be associated with the long-term impact of wrestling as a type of strenuous exercise. PMID:24270459

  18. Inhaled concentrated ambient particles are associated with hematologic and bronchoalveolar lavage changes in canines.

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, R W; Coull, B; Reinisch, U; Catalano, P; Killingsworth, C R; Koutrakis, P; Kavouras, I; Murthy, G G; Lawrence, J; Lovett, E; Wolfson, J M; Verrier, R L; Godleski, J J

    2000-01-01

    Pulmonary inflammatory and hematologic responses of canines were studied after exposure to concentrated ambient particles (CAPs) using the Harvard ambient particle concentrator (HAPC). For pulmonary inflammatory studies, normal dogs were exposed in pairs to either CAPs or filtered air (paired studies) for 6 hr/day on 3 consecutive days. For hematologic studies, dogs were exposed for 6 hr/day for 3 consecutive days with one receiving CAPs while the other was simultaneously exposed to filtered air; crossover of exposure took place the following week (crossover studies). Physicochemical characterization of CAPs exposure samples included measurements of particle mass, size distribution, and composition. No statistical differences in biologic responses were found when all CAPs and all sham exposures were compared. However, the variability in biologic response was considerably higher with CAPs exposure. Subsequent exploratory graphical analyses and mixed linear regression analyses suggested associations between CAPs constituents and biologic responses. Factor analysis was applied to the compositional data from paired and crossover experiments to determine elements consistently associated with each other in CAPs samples. In paired experiments, four factors were identified; in crossover studies, a total of six factors were observed. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and hematologic data were regressed on the factor scores. Increased BAL neutrophil percentage, total peripheral white blood cell (WBC) counts, circulating neutrophils, and circulating lymphocytes were associated with increases in the aluminum/silicon factor. Increased circulating neutrophils and increased BAL macrophages were associated with the vanadium/nickel factor. Increased BAL neutrophils were associated with the bromine/lead factor when only the compositional data from the third day of CAPs exposure were used. Significant decreases in red blood cell counts and hemoglobin levels were correlated with the sulfur

  19. Hematologic Assessment in Pet Rats, Mice, Hamsters, and Gerbils: Blood Sample Collection and Blood Cell Identification.

    PubMed

    Lindstrom, Nicole M; Moore, David M; Zimmerman, Kurt; Smith, Stephen A

    2015-09-01

    Hamsters, gerbils, rats, and mice are presented to veterinary clinics and hospitals for prophylactic care and treatment of clinical signs of disease. Physical examination, history, and husbandry practice information can be supplemented greatly by assessment of hematologic parameters. As a resource for veterinarians and their technicians, this article describes the methods for collection of blood, identification of blood cells, and interpretation of the hemogram in mice, rats, gerbils, and hamsters. PMID:26297409

  20. Effect of feeding cottonseed meal on some hematological and serum biochemical parameters in broiler birds

    PubMed Central

    Thirumalaisamy, G.; Purushothaman, M. R.; Kumar, P. Vasantha; Selvaraj, P.

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The study was undertaken to find out the effect of feeding cottonseed meal (CSM) on performance of hematological and serum biochemical parameters in broiler birds. Materials and Methods: A 6-week biological trial was carried out with 432-day-old Cobb 400 broiler chicks distributed to nine experimental diets with six replicates, each containing eight chicks. The experimental diets were formulated based on total amino acids (BTAA) or based on digestible amino acids (BDAA) with or without iron supplementation with two levels of CSM (2% and 4%) and control diet based on maize – soybean. The whole blood was subjected to hematological studies. The serum samples were analyzed for protein fractions and lipid profiles. Results: The packed cell volume (PCV) value, red blood cell (RBC) numbers, and hemoglobin (Hb) were lower in iron unsupplemented CSM BTAA or BDAA diets than the control (33.86-35.54 vs. 36.41%, 2.78-2.87 vs. 2.98 × 106/μl, and 10.30-10.70 vs. 10.88%). Supplementation of iron in CSM diets improved the PCV, RBC numbers, and Hb, and the values were comparable to the control. White blood cell numbers, mean corpuscular volume, mean corpuscular Hb (MCH), and MCH concentration values were comparable to the control. The erythrocyte osmotic fragility (EOF) was poor in birds fed diets containing up to 4% CSM BTAA or CSM BDAA without iron supplementation (32.02-32.57 vs. 28.77%). Supplementation of iron improved the EOF. The serum cholesterol level did not change with or without iron supplementation. Conclusion: This study suggested that feeding of CSM BTAA or BDAA up to 4% level voiding iron supplementation lowers the hematological parameters, whereas supplementation of iron did not alter serum protein fractions and cholesterol profile; however, it had lowered some hematological parameters, which was rectified by iron supplementation. PMID:27536033

  1. Hematologic assessment in pet rats, mice, hamsters, and gerbils: blood sample collection and blood cell identification.

    PubMed

    Lindstrom, Nicole M; Moore, David M; Zimmerman, Kurt; Smith, Stephen A

    2015-01-01

    Hamsters, gerbils, rats, and mice are presented to veterinary clinics and hospitals for prophylactic care and treatment of clinical signs of disease. Physical examination, history, and husbandry practice information can be supplemented greatly by assessment of hematologic parameters. As a resource for veterinarians and their technicians, this article describes the methods for collection of blood, identification of blood cells, and interpretation of the hemogram in mice, rats, gerbils, and hamsters. PMID:25421023

  2. Physical fitness and hematological changes during acclimatization to moderate altitude: a retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Brothers, Michael D; Wilber, Randall L; Byrnes, William C

    2007-01-01

    While high altitude adaptations have been studied extensively, limited research has examined moderate altitude (MA: 1500 to 3000 m) adaptations and their time course, despite the fact that millions of people sojourn to or reside at MA. We retrospectively examined long-term MA acclimatization by analyzing recurring physical fitness test results and hematological data among 2147 college-age male cadets previously residing at either sea level (SL) or MA and currently attending the U.S. Air Force Academy (USAFA), a unique, regimented, and well-controlled military university located at 2210 m. Significant (p < 0.01) differences were found in aerobic and anaerobic fitness test scores between former SL and MA subjects, with MA subjects scoring 27 points (8%) higher during a 1.5-mile aerobic fitness run and 18 points (6%) higher than SL subjects in the anaerobic fitness test for 2 yr. These differences may be partly explained by the hematological differences observed. Hemoglobin concentration ([Hb]) was significantly (p < 0.001) higher (6.3%; approximately 1 g/dL) in MA subjects prior to arrival at USAFA and acutely, but the difference between altitude conditions was gone at the next retrospective blood draw (+17 months). After 2.5 yr at USAFA, former SL residents had significantly (p < 0.001) higher [Hb] by +10%, or 1.5 g/dL versus prearrival values. This study suggests that significant hematological acclimatization occurs with MA exposure and requires greater than 7 months to reach stability. The altitude-induced erythropoiesis may explain in part the improvements in aerobic performance, but altitude-related anaerobic differences still remain after hematological acclimatization. PMID:17824822

  3. Biochemical, endocrine, and hematological factors in human oxygen tolerance extension: Predictive studies 6

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambertsen, C. J.; Clark, J. M.

    1992-01-01

    The Predictive Studies VI (Biochemical, endocrine, and hematological factors in human oxygen tolerance extension) Program consisted of two related areas of research activity, integrated in design and performance, that were each based on an ongoing analysis of human organ oxygen tolerance data obtained for the continuous oxygen exposures of the prior Predictive Studies V Program. The two research areas effectively blended broad investigation of systematically varied intermittent exposure patterns in animals with very selective evaluation of specific exposure patterns in man.

  4. A “Bone Marrow Score” for Predicting Hematological Disease in Immunocompetent Patients With Fevers of Unknown Origin

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hao-Yuan; Yang, Ching-Fen; Chiou, Tzeon-Jye; Yang, Sheng-Hsiang; Gau, Jyh-Pyng; Yu, Yuan-Bin; Liu, Chun-Yu; Liu, Jin-Hwang; Chen, Po-Min; Hsu, Hui-Chi; Fung, Chang-Phone; Tzeng, Cheng-Hwai; Hsiao, Liang-Tsai

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Delayed diagnosis of hematological malignancies in immunocompetent patients with fever of unknown origin (FUO) remains an exhausting challenge for non-hematologist physicians. This retrospective cohort study aimed to establish a scoring system, “bone marrow (BM) score”, to identify FUO patients who require early bone marrow biopsy (BMB) to diagnose hematological disease. Two cohorts, comprising 85 (training) and 20 (validation) eligible immunocompetent patients, with FUOs diagnosed between January 1, 2006 and July 31, 2013, underwent BMBs and were enrolled in the study. Demographic, laboratory, imaging, diagnostic, and outcome data were collected and retrospectively analyzed. Factors associated with hematological etiologies diagnosed using BMBs in the training cohort were identified and scored according to the relative hazards. These were further validated using the validation cohort. For the training cohort, 29 of 85 (34.1%) patients had hematological etiologies diagnosed using BMB. Seven factors significantly predicted the diagnostic yield of hematological diseases in the BM and were scored, with the 6 points for leucoerythroblastic changes in peripheral blood smears, 5.5 for elevated ferritin level (>1000 ng/mL), 4 for splenomegaly, 2 for thrombocytopenia, 1.5 for each of elevated lactate dehydrogenase levels and anemia, and 1 for neutropenia. When the cut-off value of the scoring system was set to 6, its sensitivity and specificity to diagnose hematological diseases in the BM of immunocompetent FUO patients were 93% and 58%, respectively. For the validation cohort, 7 of 20 (35%) patients had hematological disease, and all had BM scores higher than the cut-off, with the sensitivity and specificity at 100% and 77%, respectively. As immunocompetent FUO patients with hematological disease have poor prognoses, the “BM score” is valuable for non-hematologist physicians to identify immunocompetent FUO patients requiring early BMB. PMID:25501092

  5. Residential radon exposure and risk of incident hematologic malignancies in the Cancer Prevention Study-II Nutrition Cohort.

    PubMed

    Teras, Lauren R; Diver, W Ryan; Turner, Michelle C; Krewski, Daniel; Sahar, Liora; Ward, Elizabeth; Gapstur, Susan M

    2016-07-01

    Dosimetric models show that radon, an established cause of lung cancer, delivers a non-negligible dose of alpha radiation to the bone marrow, as well as to lymphocytes in the tracheobronchial epithelium, and therefore could be related to risk of hematologic cancers. Studies of radon and hematologic cancer risk, however, have produced inconsistent results. To date there is no published prospective, population-based study of residential radon exposure and hematologic malignancy incidence. We used data from the American Cancer Society Cancer Prevention Study-II Nutrition Cohort established in 1992, to examine the association between county-level residential radon exposure and risk of hematologic cancer. The analytic cohort included 140,652 participants (66,572 men, 74,080 women) among which 3019 incident hematologic cancer cases (1711 men, 1308 women) were identified during 19 years of follow-up. Cox proportional hazard regression was used to calculate multivariable-adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for radon exposure and hematologic cancer risk. Women living in counties with the highest mean radon concentrations (>148Bq/m(3)) had a statistically significant higher risk of hematologic cancer compared to those living in counties with the lowest (<74Bq/m(3)) radon levels (HR=1.63, 95% CI:1.23-2.18), and there was evidence of a dose-response relationship (HRcontinuous=1.38, 95% CI:1.15-1.65 per 100Bq/m(3); p-trend=0.001). There was no association between county-level radon and hematologic cancer risk among men. The findings of this large, prospective study suggest residential radon may be a risk factor for lymphoid malignancies among women. Further study is needed to confirm these findings. PMID:27015563

  6. Weights, hematology and serum chemistry of free-ranging brown boobies (Sula leucogaster) in Johnston Atoll, Central Pacific

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Work, T.M.

    1999-01-01

    Hematologic and serum chemistry values are reported for 105 brown boobies (Sula leucogaster) from Johnston Atoll, Central Pacific. Hematocrit, estimated total plasma solids, total and differential white cell counts, serum glucose, calcium, phosphorus, uric acid, total protein, albumin, globulin, aspartate aminotransferase, and creatinine phosphokinase were analyzed. Hematologic and serum chemistry values varied with age and sex. Values were compared with those of red-footed boobies and other tropical and temperate marine pelecaniforms.

  7. ACOs: time for ED managers to get involved, shape how their departments will add value.

    PubMed

    2011-06-01

    Even with a proposed rule outlining how accountable care organizations (ACO) will be structured under fee-for-service Medicare, emergency medicine experts are concerned about how ACOs will impact patient access to the ED. Further, some see a clear need to beef-up case management staff, while others say ED managers need to get involved with ACO-development now so their interests and concerns are represented. Under a proposed rule unveiled by the Department of Health and Human Services, a handful of quality indicators will require the tracking of ED visits related to certain ambulatory care-sensitive conditions; experts say it could be a challenge for ED staff to differentiate between appropriate and inappropriate use of the ED. EDs that figure out how to contribute value under the ACO mission will be better positioned to prosper under the new model. The ACO model is likely to add considerable complexity to billing and reimbursement. PMID:21675150

  8. A comparison between pre- and posthibernation morphometry, hematology, and blood chemistry in viperid snakes.

    PubMed

    Dutton, Christopher J; Taylor, Peter

    2003-03-01

    Snakes from temperate climates are often made to hibernate in zoos to stimulate reproduction. Unfortunately, deaths have occurred during and after hibernation. This study evaluated the health status, pre- and posthibernation, of 31 adult viperid snakes. It included morphometric measurements, hematology, and blood chemistry. No differences were seen in body weights and weight to length ratios between pre- and posthibernation examinations, suggesting that the overall condition of the snakes did not change. No differences were seen in hematologic and blood chemistry parameters, except that bile acids (3alpha-hydroxybile acids) decreased, the implications of which are unknown. Three individuals had markedly high plasma uric acid levels posthibernation; of these, two individuals died from extensive visceral gout and one recovered with fluid therapy. Viperid snakes should be clinically healthy, well hydrated, and in good body condition when they are put into hibernation. They should be maintained in an environment with sufficient humidity and should have access to water. Blood samples should be collected on arousal for measuring plasma uric acid levels. Changes in morphometry, hematology, and blood chemistry appear to be abnormal and should be investigated thoroughly. PMID:12723800

  9. Effects of Salvadora persica Extract on the Hematological and Biochemical Alterations against Immobilization-Induced Rats

    PubMed Central

    Ramadan, Kholoud S.; Alshamrani, Salha A.

    2015-01-01

    A total of 24 rats were divided into 4 groups: control, stress, extract alone, and stress + extract (n = 6 each), for total 21 days of treatment. The immobilization stress was induced in rats by putting them in 20 cm × 7 cm plastic tubes for 2 h/day for 21 days. Rats were postorally treated with Salvadora persica at a dose of 900 mg/kg body weight via intragastric intubations. At the end of the test period, hematological and biochemical parameters were determined in blood and serum samples with determination of vital organs weights. The vital organ weights were not significantly affected in stressed rats as compared to control rats. Compared to the control group, the stress treated group showed significances in several hematological parameters, including decreases in WBC, RBC, and PLT counts. Furthermore, in comparison to the control group, the stress group showed significantly increased blood glucose, serum total cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol, and triacylglycerols levels and decreased HDL-cholesterol level. The hematological and biochemical parameters in the stress + extract treated group were approximately similar to control group. The SP extract restored the changes observed following stress treatment. PMID:26221565

  10. Hematological Parameters in Severe Complicated Plasmodium falciparum Malaria among Adults in Aden

    PubMed Central

    Bakhubaira, Sawsan

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To study some hematological parameters in adult patients with complicated severe malaria and their relations to clinical outcome. Materials and Methods: This was a prospective study, including 77 patients from Aden Governorate with complicated severe malaria over the course of 2 years (2010-2011). Results: The common form of severe malaria in Aden was cerebral malaria (25.9%), followed by renal failure (18.2%), severe anemia (16.9%), and hepatitis (14.3%), with a case fatality rate of 7.8%. Hemoglobin concentration was significantly different among the various complications of severe malaria, while platelet and white blood cell counts did not show such differences. The mean age was older among patients that died. Hematological parameters did not significantly differ among dead or surviving patients. Thrombocytopenia was seen in 42.9% of patients and 18.2% of these had platelet counts of <50.0x109/L. However, none of them developed bleeding. Conclusion: This study concluded that hematological changes are common complications encountered in severe malaria, but they are not related to the clinical outcome. Conflict of interest:None declared. PMID:24385830

  11. Genetic modification of human T lymphocytes for the treatment of hematologic malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Hoyos, Valentina; Savoldo, Barbara; Dotti, Gianpietro

    2012-01-01

    Modern chemotherapy regimens and supportive care have produced remarkable improvements in the overall survival of patients with hematologic malignancies. However, the development of targeted small molecules, monoclonal antibodies, and biological therapies that demonstrate greater efficacy and lower toxicity remains highly desirable in hematology, and oncology in general. In the context of biological therapies, T-lymphocyte based treatments have enormous potential. Donor lymphocyte infusion in patients relapsed after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant pioneered the concept that T lymphocytes can effectively control tumor growth, and this was then followed by the development of cell culture strategies to generate T lymphocytes with selective activity against tumor cells. Over the past decade, it has become clear that the adoptive transfer of ex vivo expanded antigen-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes promotes sustained antitumor effects in patients with virus-associated lymphomas, such as Epstein-Barr virus related post-transplant lymphomas and Hodgkin's lymphomas. Because of this compelling clinical evidence and the concomitant development of methodologies for robust gene transfer to human T lymphocytes, the field has rapidly evolved, offering new opportunities to extend T-cell based therapies. This review summarizes the most recent biological and clinical developments using genetically manipulated T cells for the treatment of hematologic malignancies. PMID:22929977

  12. Hematology of Wild Caught Dubois's Tree Frog Polypedates teraiensis, Dubois, 1986 (Anura: Rhacophoridae)

    PubMed Central

    Mahapatra, Pravati Kumari

    2014-01-01

    Blood was analyzed from eighty (forty males and forty females) adult individuals of Polypedates teraiensis to establish reference ranges for its hematological and serum biochemical parameters. The peripheral blood cells were differentiated as erythrocytes, lymphocytes, eosinophils, neutrophils, monocytes, basophils, and thrombocytes, with similar morphology to other anurans. Morphology of blood cells did not vary according to sex. The hematological investigations included morphology and morphometry of erythrocytes, morphometry of leucocytes, packed cell volume (PCV), hemoglobin content (Hb), mean corpuscular volume (MCV), mean corpuscular hemoglobin (MCH), mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration (MCHC), erythrocyte or red blood cell (RBC) count, leukocyte or white blood cell (WBC) count, differential leukocyte count, and neutrophil to lymphocyte (N/L) ratio. Besides, protein, cholesterol, glucose, urea, uric acid, and creatinine content of blood serum were assayed. Hematological parameters that differed significantly between sexes were RBC count, length and breadth of RBC, neutrophil %, N/L ratio, area occupied by basophils, and diameter of large lymphocyte and eosinophils. The level of glucose, urea, and creatinine in blood serum also significantly differed between sexes. PMID:24616633

  13. The growing threat of multidrug-resistant Gram-negative infections in patients with hematologic malignancies.

    PubMed

    Baker, Thomas M; Satlin, Michael J

    2016-10-01

    Prolonged neutropenia and chemotherapy-induced mucositis render patients with hematologic malignancies highly vulnerable to Gram-negative bacteremia. Unfortunately, multidrug-resistant (MDR) Gram-negative bacteria are increasingly encountered globally, and current guidelines for empirical antibiotic coverage in these patients may not adequately treat these bacteria. This expansion of resistance, coupled with traditional culturing techniques requiring 2-4 days for bacterial identification and antimicrobial susceptibility results, have grave implications for these immunocompromised hosts. This review characterizes the epidemiology, risk factors, resistance mechanisms, recommended treatments, and outcomes of the MDR Gram-negative bacteria that commonly cause infections in patients with hematologic malignancies. We also examine the infection prevention strategies in hematology patients, such as infection control practices, antimicrobial stewardship, and targeted decolonization. Finally, we assess the strategies to improve outcomes of the infected patients, including gastrointestinal screening to guide empirical antibiotic therapy, new rapid diagnostic tools for expeditious identification of MDR pathogens, and use of two new antimicrobial agents, ceftolozane/tazobactam and ceftazidime/avibactam. PMID:27339405

  14. Evaluation of Toxicity Effects of Asafetida on Biochemical, Hematological, and Histological Parameters in Male Wistar Rats

    PubMed Central

    Bagheri, Seyyed Majid; Yadegari, Maryam; Mirjalily, Aghdas; Rezvani, Mohammd Ebrahim

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Asafetida is traditionally used in folklore medicine for the treatment of various ailments. To validate its use in traditional medicine, it is important to evaluate its toxicity in the animal system. Therefore, this study aimed to evaluate the toxicological effects of asafetida in Wistar albino rats. Materials and Methods: Acute toxicity tests were conducted by the oral administration of 250, 500, and 1,000 mg/kg body weight of the animal. In chronic study, animals were administered with various doses of asafetida (25, 50, 100, and 200 mg/kg body weight) for a period of 6 weeks. At end of experiment, the effects of asafetida on hematological, renal, and hepatic markers and histological parameters were analyzed. Results: In acute toxicity study, no mortality was seen up to 72 h of the administration of asafetida. No signs of neurological and behavioral changes were noticed within 24 h. In the chronic study, the asafetida intake has changed the hematological parameters such as red blood cell (RBC), white blood cell (WBC), hematocrit (HCT), and platelets. Aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) were significantly increased in treated animals. The plasma level of urea and creatinine were not altered by the administration of asafetida throughout the study. Histopathology study indicates hepatotoxicity, but no signs of prominent pathological changes in kidney. Conclusions: Asafetida did not show any acute toxicity, but chronic administration could have undesirable effects on hepatocytes and hematological factors. PMID:26862262

  15. Hematologic parameters in raptor species in a rehabilitation setting before release.

    PubMed

    Black, Peter A; McRuer, David L; Horne, Leigh-Ann

    2011-09-01

    To be considered for release, raptors undergoing rehabilitation must have recovered from their initial injury in addition to being clinically healthy. For that purpose, a good understanding of reference hematologic values is important in determining release criteria for raptors in a rehabilitation setting. In this study, retrospective data were tabulated from clinically normal birds within 10 days of release from a rehabilitation facility. Hematologic values were compiled from 71 red-tailed hawks (Buteo jamaicensis), 54 Eastern screech owls (Megascops asio), 31 Cooper's hawks (Accipiter cooperii), 30 great-horned owls (Bubo virginianus), 28 barred owls (Strix varia), 16 bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus), and 12 broad-winged hawks (Buteo platypterus). Parameters collected included a white blood cell count and differential, hematocrit, and total protein concentration. Comparisons were made among species and among previously published reports of reference hematologic values in free-ranging birds or permanently captive birds. This is the first published report of reference values for Eastern screech owls, barred owls, and broad-winged hawks; and the first prerelease reference values for all species undergoing rehabilitation. These data can be used as a reference when developing release criteria for rehabilitated raptors. PMID:22216719

  16. Assessment of sub-chronic, hematological and histopathological toxicities of a herbal combination.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Shadab; Khan, Rafeeq Alam; Feroz, Zeeshan

    2015-11-01

    The herbal combination under study consists of Withania somnifera, Tribulus terrestris, Mucuna pruriens and Argyria speciosa. Present study is mainly designed to investigate the gross physical, sub-chronic, hematological and histopathological effects of the combination widely used for its stimulating, revitalizing and fertility boosting effects in Pakistan. Sub-chronic, hematological and histopathological outcomes of herbal combination were assessed on 27 albino rabbits weighing from 1000 gm-1500 gm after giving herbal combination for 60 days in two doses 27 and 81 mg/kg against control. No significant toxicity was revealed during the entire period of study, however some biochemical changes were observed in kidney and liver but these changes did not coincide with histopathological findings. There was no mortality and evidence of systemic toxicity including hematological toxicity following 60 days administration of herbal combination. Results of present study suggest that further studies are required on large number of animals before reaching to a definite conclusion, more over clinical studies should also be conducted to confirm the possible toxic effects of the herbal combination. PMID:26639483

  17. Reference Intervals of Hematology and Clinical Chemistry Analytes for 1-Year-Old Korean Children

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hye Ryun; Roh, Eun Youn; Chang, Ju Young

    2016-01-01

    Background Reference intervals need to be established according to age. We established reference intervals of hematology and chemistry from community-based healthy 1-yr-old children and analyzed their iron status according to the feeding methods during the first six months after birth. Methods A total of 887 children who received a medical check-up between 2010 and 2014 at Boramae Hospital (Seoul, Korea) were enrolled. A total of 534 children (247 boys and 287 girls) were enrolled as reference individuals after the exclusion of data obtained from children with suspected iron deficiency. Hematology and clinical chemistry analytes were measured, and the reference value of each analyte was estimated by using parametric (mean±2 SD) or nonparametric methods (2.5-97.5th percentile). Iron, total iron-binding capacity, and ferritin were measured, and transferrin saturation was calculated. Results As there were no differences in the mean values between boys and girls, we established the reference intervals for 1-yr-old children regardless of sex. The analysis of serum iron status according to feeding methods during the first six months revealed higher iron, ferritin, and transferrin saturation levels in children exclusively or mainly fed formula than in children exclusively or mainly fed breast milk. Conclusions We established reference intervals of hematology and clinical chemistry analytes from community-based healthy children at one year of age. These reference intervals will be useful for interpreting results of medical check-ups at one year of age. PMID:27374715

  18. Newcastle disease virus, rituximab, and doxorubicin combination as anti-hematological malignancy therapy

    PubMed Central

    Al-Shammari, Ahmed Majeed; Rameez, Huda; Al-Taee, Maha F

    2016-01-01

    Hematological malignancies are important diseases that need more powerful therapeutics. Even with current targeting therapies, such as rituximab and other chemotherapeutic agents, there is a need to develop new treatment strategies. Combination therapy seems the best option to target the tumor cells by different mechanisms. Virotherapy is a very promising treatment modality, as it is selective, safe, and causes cancer destruction. The Iraqi strain of Newcastle disease virus (NDV) has proved to be effective both in vitro and in vivo. In the current work, we tested its ability on anti-hematological tumors and enhanced current treatments with combination therapy, and studied this combination using Chou–Talalay analysis. p53 concentration was measured to evaluate the mechanism of this proposed synergism. The results showed that NDV was synergistic with doxorubicin in low doses on plasmacytoma cells, with no involvement of p53 pathways, but involved p53 when the combination was used on non-Hodgkin lymphoma cells. NDV in combination with rituximab showed enhanced cytotoxicity that was p53-independent. In conclusion, this work proposes a novel combination modality for treatment of some hematological malignancies. PMID:27579294

  19. Magnitude of Anemia and Hematological Predictors among Children under 12 Years in Odisha, India

    PubMed Central

    Behera, Shuchismita; Bulliyya, Gandham

    2016-01-01

    Background. Anemia is a wide spread public health problem in India which affects children. The present study evaluates the prevalence of anemia and status of various hematological parameters among children of Khurda district, Odisha. Method. A total of 313 children aged 0–12 years were enrolled for the study which included preschool (0–5 years) and school aged (6–12 years) groups. Hematological indicators were measured by standard procedures, which include red blood cell (RBC) indicators, white blood cell (WBC) indicators, and plasma ferritin. Results. Mean hemoglobin (Hb) of the study population was 10.43 ± 3.33 g/dL and prevalence of anemia was 62%. In this population, boys had a lower mean Hb value than that of the girls. All grades of anemia were higher among school age children than preschool children. Mean plasma ferritin was found to be higher in school age boys than their counterpart girls. The mean level of WBC count was found to be higher among preschool age boys than among the school age boys (p = 0.025). Conclusion. The prevalence of anemia was higher with concomitant acute infection among study population, which is a matter of concern. Since the hematological parameters are interrelated with each other as well as with the age and gender, relevant intervention strategy and constant monitoring are needed while providing public health nutrition programs to eradicate anemia. PMID:27127647

  20. Rescue of Hippo coactivator YAP1 triggers DNA damage-induced apoptosis in hematological cancers.

    PubMed

    Cottini, Francesca; Hideshima, Teru; Xu, Chunxiao; Sattler, Martin; Dori, Martina; Agnelli, Luca; ten Hacken, Elisa; Bertilaccio, Maria Teresa; Antonini, Elena; Neri, Antonino; Ponzoni, Maurilio; Marcatti, Magda; Richardson, Paul G; Carrasco, Ruben; Kimmelman, Alec C; Wong, Kwok-Kin; Caligaris-Cappio, Federico; Blandino, Giovanni; Kuehl, W Michael; Anderson, Kenneth C; Tonon, Giovanni

    2014-06-01

    Oncogene-induced DNA damage elicits genomic instability in epithelial cancer cells, but apoptosis is blocked through inactivation of the tumor suppressor p53. In hematological cancers, the relevance of ongoing DNA damage and the mechanisms by which apoptosis is suppressed are largely unknown. We found pervasive DNA damage in hematologic malignancies, including multiple myeloma, lymphoma and leukemia, which leads to activation of a p53-independent, proapoptotic network centered on nuclear relocalization of ABL1 kinase. Although nuclear ABL1 triggers cell death through its interaction with the Hippo pathway coactivator YAP1 in normal cells, we show that low YAP1 levels prevent nuclear ABL1-induced apoptosis in these hematologic malignancies. YAP1 is under the control of a serine-threonine kinase, STK4. Notably, genetic inactivation of STK4 restores YAP1 levels, triggering cell death in vitro and in vivo. Our data therefore identify a new synthetic-lethal strategy to selectively target cancer cells presenting with endogenous DNA damage and low YAP1 levels. PMID:24813251

  1. HEMATOLOGICAL AND SERUM BIOCHEMICAL VALUES IN ANESTHETIZED CAPTIVE TASMANIAN DEVILS (SARCOPHILUS HARRISII).

    PubMed

    Hope, Katharine L; Peck, Sarah

    2016-06-01

    The Tasmanian devil (Sarcophilus harrisii) population has decreased by estimates of 80% in the past 20 yr due to the effects of devil facial tumor disease (DFTD). In the process of creating a DFTD-free insurance population, the captive population and the number of institutions housing devils worldwide has increased tremendously. In order to provide the best husbandry and veterinary care for these captive animals, it is essential to know normal hematology and biochemistry values for the species. Baseline reference intervals (RIs) were determined for hematology and biochemistry variables for 170 healthy anesthetized captive Tasmanian devils and significant sex and age differences were determined. Higher relative neutrophil counts, hemoglobin, mean corpuscular hemoglobin (MCH), creatinine, creatine phosphokinase, and cholesterol were seen in males compared to females, whereas higher white cell counts (WBC) and lymphocyte counts (absolute and relative) were seen in females. Subadults have higher red blood cell counts, WBC, lymphocytes (absolute and relative), calcium and phosphorus, alkaline phosphatase, glutamate dehydrogenase, glucose, and albumin than adults; whereas, adults have higher relative neutrophils, relative eosinophils, mean corpuscular volume, MCH, platelets, total solids, total plasma proteins, globulins, and chloride than subadults. This study provides a comprehensive report of hematology and serum biochemistry RIs for healthy captive anesthetized Tasmanian devils and offers invaluable diagnostic information to care for the growing captive population of this endangered marsupial. PMID:27468030

  2. Evaluation of hematological and biochemical profiles in dairy cows with left displacement of the abomasum.

    PubMed

    Mokhber Dezfouli, M; Eftekhari, Z; Sadeghian, S; Bahounar, A; Jeloudari, M

    2013-03-01

    For the present study, 25 Holstein and crossbreed, 3 to 7-year-old cows diagnosed with left displacement of the abomasum and 15 healthy cattle as control groups over a period of 2 years were used. LDA diagnosis was based on clinical examinations (high-pitched bell-like sounds) and confirmed by laparoscopy. Two blood samples were collected from each case through the jugular vein including one tube containing EDTA for hematological parameters analysis and one tube without anticoagulant for biochemical analysis. Hematological parameters including Ca, P, Mg, Cl, AST, urea, and glucose concentrations were measured by routine procedures. Serum was determined by use of an atomic absorption spectrophotometer, and Na and K values were obtained using a flame photometer. The results of this study showed that Hb, percentage of PCV, total leukocytic, neutrophils, total protein count plus AST, urea, and glucose concentrations were significantly increased in the LDA cases compared to the control group, whereas a marked decrease in plasma electrolyte concentrations (hyponatremia, hypochloremia, hypokalemia, and hypocalcemia) was found in 88-92% of LDA cases. In conclusion, in the present study, it was shown that DA causes alterations in the clinical, hematological, and biochemical profiles and these alterations can be more severe when DA is concurrent with other diseases. PMID:23483814

  3. Hematological Profile and Martial Status in Rugby Players during Whole Body Cryostimulation

    PubMed Central

    Lombardi, Giovanni; Lanteri, Patrizia; Porcelli, Simone; Mauri, Clara; Colombini, Alessandra; Grasso, Dalila; Zani, Viviana; Bonomi, Felice Giulio; Melegati, Gianluca; Banfi, Giuseppe

    2013-01-01

    Cold-based therapies are commonly applied to alleviate pain symptoms secondary to inflammatory diseases, but also to treat injuries or overuse, as done in sports rehabilitation. Whole body cryotherapy, a relatively new form of cold therapy, consists of short whole-body exposure to extremely cold air (−110°C to −140°C). Cryostimulation is gaining wider acceptance as an effective part of physical therapy to accelerate muscle recovery in rugby players. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of repeated cryostimulation sessions on the hematological profile and martial status markers in professional rugby players. Twenty-seven professional rugby players received 2 daily cryostimulation treatments for 7 consecutive days. Blood samples were collected before and after administration of the cryotherapic protocol and hematological profiles were obtained. No changes in the leukocyte count or composition were seen. There was a decrease in the values for erythrocytes, hematocrit, hemoglobin and mean corpuscular hemoglobin content, and an increase in mean corpuscular volume and red cell distribution width. Platelet count and mean volume remained unchanged. Serum transferrin and ferritin decreased, while soluble transferrin receptor increased. Serum iron and transferrin saturation were unchanged, as was reticulocyte count, whereas the immature reticulocyte fraction decreased substantially. In conclusion, in this sample of professional rugby players, cryostimulation modified the hematological profile, with a reduction in erythrocyte count and hemoglobinization paralleled by a change in martial status markers. PMID:23383348

  4. Growth performance and hematological traits of broiler chickens reared under assorted monochromatic light sources.

    PubMed

    Kim, M J; Parvin, R; Mushtaq, M M H; Hwangbo, J; Kim, J H; Na, J C; Kim, D W; Kang, H K; Kim, C D; Cho, K O; Yang, C B; Choi, H C

    2013-06-01

    A study was conducted to investigate the effect of different monochromatic lights on growth performance and hematological response of growing broiler chickens. A total of 360 one-day-old broiler chicks were randomly divided into 6 lighting treatments, which were replicated 6 times with 10 chicks in each replicate. Six light treatments include incandescent bulbs (as a control) and light-emitting diode white light, blue light, red light, green light, and yellow light (YL). The birds were provided with similar nutritional specifications and environmental management facilities, except for the lights throughout the experimental period. Growth performance was evaluated in terms of BW, BW gain, feed intake, and feed conversion ratio at weekly intervals. At the end of 5 wk, 2 birds from each replicate were randomly selected for blood collection to determine hematological response. The BW and feed intake was numerically higher in YL at 5 wk of age. But interestingly, this did not result in improved feed conversion ratio in YL; nevertheless, numerical values were lower in YL at 5 wk (P > 0.05). Red blood cells, blood platelet count, and percent hematocrit were numerically higher under YL, whereas white blood cell counts and percent hemoglobin remained unaffected due to light treatments. It was concluded that monochromatic light is a potential light source that might provide a beneficial effect on growth performance but is inconclusive for hematological measures of broilers. PMID:23687140

  5. Bioimpedance spectroscopy as technique of hematological and biochemical analysis of blood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malahov, M. V.; Smirnov, A. V.; Nikolaev, D. V.; Melnikov, A. A.; Vikulov, A. D.

    2010-04-01

    Bioimpedance spectroscopy may become a useful method for the express analysis and monitoring of blood parameters. The aim of this study was to identify biochemical and hematological parameters of blood that can be accurately predicted by means of bioimpedance technique. Hematological (red blood cell and white blood cell parameters) and biochemical (total proteins, albumins, fibrinogen, sodium, potassium, chloride ion concentrations in plasma) parameters were measured with a hematological analyzer and routine methods. Bioimpedance spectroscopy of the whole blood (1.5 ml) in frequency range 5-500 kHz (31 frequencies) was performed using BIA analyzer ABC-01 "Medass". Frequency relationships of resistance and reactance of the whole blood and the parameters of the Cole model were investigated. Close simple and multiple correlations of bioimpedance indices were observed only with erythrocyte parameters (Ht, Hb, RBC). Thus bioimpedance analysis of the whole blood can accurately predict red cell parameters but it is less effective for estimation of plasma biochemical and white cell parameters.

  6. HEMATOLOGY IN AN EASTERN MASSASAUGA (SISTRURUS CATENATUS) POPULATION AND THE EMERGENCE OF OPHIDIOMYCES IN ILLINOIS, USA.

    PubMed

    Allender, Matthew C; Phillips, Christopher A; Baker, Sarah J; Wylie, Daniel B; Narotsky, Amy; Dreslik, Michael J

    2016-04-28

    Disease events are threatening wildlife populations across North America. Specifically, mortality events due to Ophidiomyces (snake fungal disease; SFD) have been observed recently in snakes in Illinois, US. We investigated the health of a population of eastern massasaugas ( Sistrurus catenatus ) in south-central Illinois using 1) a meta-analysis of hematologic findings from 2004, 2011, 2013, and 2014; 2) a determination of the prevalence of SFD in snakes examined in 2013 and 2014; and 3) the examination of 184 museum specimens collected from 1999-2013 for signs and presence of SFD. For the meta-analysis and prevalence of SFD, hematologic analytes were reduced to three principle components that explained 67.5% of the cumulative variance. There were significant differences among one principle component (total white blood cell counts, monocytes, lymphocytes, and basophils) across years when it was highest in 2004 and 2014. The top general linear model explaining the difference in principle components included the main effects of year and stage, body condition index (BCI), and the interaction between stage and BCI. The prevalence of SFD was 18% (n=7) in 2013 and 24% (n=11) in 2014, and no hematologic analytes were associated with SFD. In museum specimens, Ophidiomyces DNA was first detected from an individual collected in 2000. Studies such as these, integrating multiple modalities of health, can elucidate the epidemiology of diseases that may pose conservation threats. PMID:26967140

  7. Newcastle disease virus, rituximab, and doxorubicin combination as anti-hematological malignancy therapy.

    PubMed

    Al-Shammari, Ahmed Majeed; Rameez, Huda; Al-Taee, Maha F

    2016-01-01

    Hematological malignancies are important diseases that need more powerful therapeutics. Even with current targeting therapies, such as rituximab and other chemotherapeutic agents, there is a need to develop new treatment strategies. Combination therapy seems the best option to target the tumor cells by different mechanisms. Virotherapy is a very promising treatment modality, as it is selective, safe, and causes cancer destruction. The Iraqi strain of Newcastle disease virus (NDV) has proved to be effective both in vitro and in vivo. In the current work, we tested its ability on anti-hematological tumors and enhanced current treatments with combination therapy, and studied this combination using Chou-Talalay analysis. p53 concentration was measured to evaluate the mechanism of this proposed synergism. The results showed that NDV was synergistic with doxorubicin in low doses on plasmacytoma cells, with no involvement of p53 pathways, but involved p53 when the combination was used on non-Hodgkin lymphoma cells. NDV in combination with rituximab showed enhanced cytotoxicity that was p53-independent. In conclusion, this work proposes a novel combination modality for treatment of some hematological malignancies. PMID:27579294

  8. Magnetic Vibration Simulator with Magnetic Levitation for EDS Maglev

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murai, Toshiaki; Hasegawa, Hitoshi; Kashiwagi, Takayuki

    A magnetic vibration simulator is one of the most important test tools to evaluate the basic performance of superconducting magnet (SCM) for EDS maglev. In this paper, we propose a new magnetic vibration simulator which can also suspend car and bogie mounted with the SCMs to evaluate the performance of not only SCMs but also vehicle dynamics with levitation. This system is composed of magnetic exciting coils which can simultaneously suspend and vibrate the SCMs and inverters which can simultaneously control 3-phase and zero-phase currents. This paper describes the principle, analytical method and control method of this system, and using numerical example, the vehicle dynamics and the vibration response of SCM are revealed.

  9. Mechanical engineers' handbook, energy and power. 3rd ed.

    SciTech Connect

    Myer Kutz

    2005-12-15

    In addition to chapters on thermophysical properties of fluids, fundamentals of fluid mechanics, thermodynamics, heat transfer, combustion, and furnaces, Book 4 of the Handbook features coverage of both conventional (gaseous and liquid fuels, coal, and nuclear) and alternative (solar, geothermal, and fuel cells) energy sources, plus chapters on power machinery, refrigeration and cryogenics, environmental issues, and thermal systems optimization. Much of the material in this book is new or extensively revised, including coverage of such topics as: Heat pipes; Wind turbines; Fuel cells; Thermal systems optimization; Combustion; Fans, blowers, compressors, and pumps; Indoor environmental control; and Fluid power. Chapters of particular interest are: Combustion by Eric Eddings; Furnaces by Carroll Cone; Gaseous fuels by Richard J. Reed; Coals, lignite, peat by James Keppeler; and Air pollution-control technologies by C.A. Miller.

  10. EDS V25 containment vessel explosive qualification test report.

    SciTech Connect

    Rudolphi, John Joseph

    2012-04-01

    The V25 containment vessel was procured by the Project Manager, Non-Stockpile Chemical Materiel (PMNSCM) as a replacement vessel for use on the P2 Explosive Destruction Systems. It is the first EDS vessel to be fabricated under Code Case 2564 of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, which provides rules for the design of impulsively loaded vessels. The explosive rating for the vessel based on the Code Case is nine (9) pounds TNT-equivalent for up to 637 detonations. This limit is an increase from the 4.8 pounds TNT-equivalency rating for previous vessels. This report describes the explosive qualification tests that were performed in the vessel as part of the process for qualifying the vessel for explosive use. The tests consisted of a 11.25 pound TNT equivalent bare charge detonation followed by a 9 pound TNT equivalent detonation.

  11. Risk of Non-hematologic Cancer in Individuals with High Count Monoclonal B-Cell Lymphocytosis (MBL)

    PubMed Central

    Solomon, Benjamin M.; Chaffee, Kari G.; Moreira, Jonathan; Schwager, Susan M.; Cerhan, James R.; Call, Timothy G.; Kay, Neil E.; Slager, Susan L.; Shanafelt, Tait D.

    2015-01-01

    It is unknown whether individuals with monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis (MBL) are at risk for adverse outcomes associated with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), such as the risk of non-hematologic cancer. We identified all locally-residing individuals diagnosed with high count MBL at Mayo Clinic between 1999 and 2009 and compared their rates of non-hematologic cancer to that of patients with CLL and two control cohorts: general medicine patients and patients who underwent clinical evaluation with flow cytometry but who had no hematologic malignancy. After excluding individuals with prior cancers, there were 107 high count MBL cases, 132 CLL cases, 589 clinic controls, and 482 flow cytometry controls. With 4.6 years median follow-up, 14 (13%) individuals with high count MBL, 21 (4%) clinic controls (comparison MBL p<0.0001), 18 (4%) flow controls (comparison MBL p=0.0001), and 16 (12%) CLL patients (comparison MBL p=0.82) developed non-hematologic cancer. On multivariable Cox regression analysis, individuals with high count MBL had higher risk of non-hematologic cancer than flow controls (HR=2.36; p=0.04) and borderline higher risk than clinic controls (HR=2.00; p=0.07). Patients with high count MBL appear to be at increased risk for non-hematologic cancer, further reinforcing that high count MBL has a distinct clinical phenotype despite low risk of progression to CLL. PMID:26310541

  12. Risk of non-hematologic cancer in individuals with high-count monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis.

    PubMed

    Solomon, B M; Chaffee, K G; Moreira, J; Schwager, S M; Cerhan, J R; Call, T G; Kay, N E; Slager, S L; Shanafelt, T D

    2016-02-01

    It is unknown whether individuals with monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis (MBL) are at risk for adverse outcomes associated with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), such as the risk of non-hematologic cancer. We identified all locally residing individuals diagnosed with high-count MBL at Mayo Clinic between 1999 and 2009 and compared their rates of non-hematologic cancer with that of patients with CLL and two control cohorts: general medicine patients and patients who underwent clinical evaluation with flow cytometry but who had no hematologic malignancy. After excluding individuals with prior cancers, there were 107 high-count MBL cases, 132 CLL cases, 589 clinic controls and 482 flow cytometry controls. With 4.6 years median follow-up, 14 (13%) individuals with high-count MBL, 21 (4%) clinic controls (comparison MBL P<0.0001), 18 (4%) flow controls (comparison MBL P=0.0001) and 16 (12%) CLL patients (comparison MBL P=0.82) developed non-hematologic cancer. On multivariable Cox regression analysis, individuals with high-count MBL had higher risk of non-hematologic cancer compared with flow controls (hazard ratio (HR)=2.36; P=0.04) and borderline higher risk compared with clinic controls (HR=2.00; P=0.07). Patients with high-count MBL appear to be at increased risk for non-hematologic cancer, further reinforcing that high-count MBL has a distinct clinical phenotype despite low risk of progression to CLL. PMID:26310541

  13. High-resolution structure determination by continuous rotation data collection in MicroED

    PubMed Central

    Leslie, Andrew G. W.; Gonen, Tamir

    2014-01-01

    MicroED uses very small three-dimensional protein crystals and electron diffraction for structure determination. An improved data collection protocol for MicroED called “continuous rotation” is presented. Here microcrystals are continuously rotated during data collection yielding improved data, and allowing data processing with MOSFLM resulting in improved resolution for the model protein lysozyme. These improvements pave the way for the implementation and application of MicroED with wide applicability in structural biology. PMID:25086503

  14. EdF`s Mercier on the biggest maintenance program in the world

    SciTech Connect

    Mercier, E.F.

    1993-08-01

    This article presents an interview with Jean-Pierre Mercier, present vice president of operations and maintenance engineering at Electricite de France (EdF). The maintenance budget for EdF is in the range of 1.5 to 1.7 billion US dollars per year. Mercier discusses the changing direction of the EdF maintenance program, with increasing emphasis on human performance, safety culture, and professionalism at the power station sites and among the many outside contractors.

  15. Frequency of ED revisits and death among older adults after a fall

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shan W.; Obermeyer, Ziad; Chang, Yuchiao; Shankar, Kalpana N.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Falls among older adults (aged ≥65 years) are the leading cause of both injury deaths and emergency department (ED) visits for trauma. We examine the characteristics and prevalence of older adult ED fallers as well as the recurrent ED visit and mortality rate. Methods This was a retrospective analysis of a cohort of elderly fall patients who presented to the ED between 2005 and 2011 at two urban, level-1 trauma, teaching hospitals with approximately 80,000-95,000 annual visits. We examined the frequency of ED revisits and death at 3 days, 7 days, 30 days, and 1 year controlling for certain covariates. Results Our cohort included 21,340 patients. The average age was 78.6. An increasing proportion of patients revisited the ED over the course of a year, ranging from 2% of patients at 3 days to 25% at 1 year. Death rates increased from 1.2% at 3 days to 15% at 1 year. 10,728 (50.2%) patients returned to the ED at some point during our 7-year study period and 36% of patients had an ED revisit or death within 1 year. In multivariate logistic regression, male sex and comorbidities were associated with ED revisits and death. Conclusion Over a third of older adult ED fall patients had an ED revisit or died within one year. Falls are one of the geriatric syndromes that contribute to frequent ED revisits and death rates. Future research should determine whether falls increase the risk of such outcomes and how to prevent future fall and death. PMID:25983268

  16. Curvature sensing MARCKS-ED peptides bind to membranes in a stereo-independent manner.

    PubMed

    Yan, Lei; de Jesus, Armando Jerome; Tamura, Ryo; Li, Victoria; Cheng, Kui; Yin, Hang

    2015-07-01

    Membrane curvature and lipid composition plays a critical role in interchanging of matter and energy in cells. Peptide curvature sensors are known to activate signaling pathways and promote molecular transport across cell membranes. Recently, the 25-mer MARCKS-ED peptide, which is derived from the effector domain of the myristoylated alanine-rich C kinase substrate protein, has been reported to selectively recognize highly curved membrane surfaces. Our previous studies indicated that the naturally occurring L-MARCKS-ED peptide could simultaneously detect both phosphatidylserine and curvature. Here, we demonstrate that D-MARCKS-ED, composed by unnatural D-amino acids, has the same activities as its enantiomer, L-MARCKS-ED, as a curvature and lipid sensor. An atomistic molecular dynamics simulation suggests that D-MARCKS-ED may change from linear to a boat conformation upon binding to the membrane. Comparable enhancement of fluorescence intensity was observed between D- and L-MARCKS-ED peptides, indicating similar binding affinities. Meanwhile, circular dichroism spectra of D- and L-MARCKS-ED are almost symmetrical both in the presence and absence of liposomes. These results suggest similar behavior of artificial D- and natural L-MARCKS-ED peptides when binding to curved membranes. Our studies may contribute to further understanding of how MARCKS-ED senses membrane curvature as well as provide a new direction to develop novel membrane curvature probes. PMID:25851418

  17. Intermetallic compound formation at Cu-Al wire bond interface

    SciTech Connect

    Bae, In-Tae; Young Jung, Dae; Chen, William T.; Du Yong

    2012-12-15

    Intermetallic compound (IMC) formation and evolution at Cu-Al wire bond interface were studied using focused ion beam /scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM)/energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS), nano beam electron diffraction (NBED) and structure factor (SF) calculation. It was found that discrete IMC patches were formed at the Cu/Al interface in as-packaged state and they grew toward Al pad after high temperature storage (HTS) environment at 150 Degree-Sign C. TEM/EDS and NBED results combined with SF calculation revealed the evidence of metastable {theta} Prime -CuAl{sub 2} IMC phase (tetragonal, space group: I4m2, a = 0.404 nm, c= 0.580 nm) formed at Cu/Al interfaces in both of the as-packaged and the post-HTS samples. Two feasible mechanisms for the formation of the metastable {theta} Prime -CuAl{sub 2} phase are discussed based on (1) non-equilibrium cooling of wire bond that is attributed to highly short bonding process time and (2) the epitaxial relationships between Cu and {theta} Prime -CuAl{sub 2}, which can minimize lattice mismatch for {theta} Prime -CuAl{sub 2} to grow on Cu.

  18. Hematological and physiological adaptations following 46 weeks of moderate altitude residence.

    PubMed

    Brothers, Michael D; Doan, Brandon K; Zupan, Michael F; Wile, Al L; Wilber, Randall L; Byrnes, William C

    2010-01-01

    Although acclimatization to moderate altitude (MA) is thought to be unnecessary or to require minimal adaptation, retrospective data from the U.S. Air Force Academy (USAFA), a military college located at 2210 m, suggested otherwise. To further examine the utility of USAFA as a model for MA acclimatization, a longitudinal experimental design was prospectively utilized to determine the magnitude and time course of selected hematological and performance parameters following 46 weeks at this unique MA setting. Incoming USAFA male freshmen (n=55) were divided into experimental groups based on prior residence at sea level (SL) or MA. Hematological and performance parameters were repeatedly assessed during their entire first year at MA. Hematological data consisted of a complete blood count (CBC) with reticulocyte parameters, as well as determination of serum levels of ferritin, erythropoietin, and soluble transferrin receptor (sTfR). Performance testing included aerobic (1.5-mile run) and physical (push-ups, sit-ups, pull-ups, and standing long jump) fitness tests, maximal aerobic capacity, and running economy. Significant (p<0.05; main effect) hematological differences between SL and MA subjects were observed for the majority of the study. MA subjects had a significantly higher hemoglobin concentration ([Hb], +5.5%), hematocrit (+2.8%), and serum ferritin (+59.0%) and significantly lower sTfR (-11.4%) values than their SL peers. Although both serum ferritin and sTfR demonstrated a significant altitude group x time interaction, [Hb] and hematocrit did not. A significant main effect of altitude without interaction was also observed for performance parameters, with SL subjects having a significantly lower Vo2peak (-5.9%), slower 1.5- mile run time (+5.4%), poorer running economy (+6.6%), and lower composite physical fitness test score (-13.9%) than MA subjects. These results suggest that complete acclimatization to 2210 m by former SL residents may require lengthy

  19. Transformation and Immobilization of Chromium by Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi as Revealed by SEM-EDS, TEM-EDS, and XAFS.

    PubMed

    Wu, Songlin; Zhang, Xin; Sun, Yuqing; Wu, Zhaoxiang; Li, Tao; Hu, Yajun; Su, Dan; Lv, Jitao; Li, Gang; Zhang, Zhensong; Zheng, Lirong; Zhang, Jing; Chen, Baodong

    2015-12-15

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF), ubiquitous soil fungi that form symbiotic relationships with the majority of terrestrial plants, are known to play an important role in plant tolerance to chromium (Cr) contamination. However, the underlying mechanisms, especially the direct influences of AMF on the translocation and transformation of Cr in the soil-plant continuum, are still unresolved. In a two-compartment root-organ cultivation system, the extraradical mycelium (ERM) of mycorrhizal roots was treated with 0.05 mmol L(-1) Cr(VI) for 12 days to investigate the uptake, translocation, and transformation of Cr(VI) by AMF using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), scanning electron microscopy equipped with energy-dispersive spectroscopy (SEM-EDS), transmission electron microscopy equipped with energy-dispersive spectroscopy (TEM-EDS), and X-ray-absorption fine structure (XAFS) technologies. The results indicated that AMF can immobilize quantities of Cr via reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III), forming Cr(III)-phosphate analogues, likely on the fungal surface. Besides this, we also confirmed that the extraradical mycelium (ERM) can actively take up Cr [either in the form of Cr(VI) or Cr(III)] and transport Cr [potentially in the form of Cr(III)-histidine analogues] to mycorrhizal roots but immobilize most of the Cr(III) in the fungal structures. Based on an X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy analysis of Cr(VI)-treated roots, we proposed that the intraradical fungal structures can also immobilize Cr within mycorrhizal roots. Our findings confirmed the immobilization of Cr by AMF, which plays an essential role in the Cr(VI) tolerance of AM symbioses. PMID:26551890

  20. Microstructure and properties of (Ti, Al) N coatings on WC-Co cemented carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yudong; Liu, Zhen; Yang, Jing; Chen, Yigang

    2013-03-01

    (Ti, Al)N films were grown on WC-Co cemented carbides by R.F. reactive sputtering using Ti/Al composite target. The crystalline structure, morphology and composition of (Ti, Al)N coatings were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), optical microscope and X-ray energy dispersive spectroscope (EDS), respectively. The mechanical properties of (Ti, Al)N coatings with the variable Al content were investigated by applying nanoindentation. With the increase of the Al content, the crystal structure of (Ti, Al)N films changed from fcc to hexagonal structure. When the ratio of Ti to Al in (Ti, Al)N coatings was approximately 4:1, and the N content was 40.67 %, the nano-hardness of (Ti, Al)N coating was highly up to 28 GPa. By adjusting the Al content, the lowest value of friction coefficients was 0.1397.

  1. A preliminary examination of Loss of Control Eating Disorder (LOC-ED) in middle childhood.

    PubMed

    Matherne, Camden E; Tanofsky-Kraff, Marian; Altschul, Anne M; Shank, Lisa M; Schvey, Natasha A; Brady, Sheila M; Galescu, Ovidiu; Demidowich, Andrew P; Yanovski, Susan Z; Yanovski, Jack A

    2015-08-01

    Loss of Control Eating Disorder (LOC-ED) has been proposed as a diagnostic category for children 6-12years with binge-type eating. However, characteristics of youth with LOC-ED have not been examined. We tested the hypothesis that the proposed criteria for LOC-ED would identify children with greater adiposity, more disordered eating attitudes, and greater mood disturbance than those without LOC-ED. Participants were 251 youth (10.29years±1.54, 53.8% female, 57.8% White, 35.5% Black, 2.0% Asian, 4.8% Hispanic, 53.0% overweight). Youth were interviewed regarding eating attitudes and behaviors, completed questionnaires to assess general psychopathology, and underwent measurements of body fat mass. Using previously proposed criteria for LOC-ED, children were classified as LOC-ED (n=19), LOC in the absence of the full disorder (subLOC, n=33), and youth not reporting LOC (noLOC, n=199). LOC-ED youth had higher BMIz (p=0.001) and adiposity (p=0.003) and reported greater disordered eating concerns (p<0.001) compared to noLOC youth. Compared to subLOC youth, LOC-ED youth had non-significantly higher BMIz (p=0.11), and significantly higher adiposity (p=0.04) and disordered eating attitudes (p=0.02). SubLOC youth had greater disordered eating concerns (p<0.001) and BMIz (p=0.03) but did not differ in adiposity (p=0.33) compared to noLOC youth. These preliminary data suggest that LOC-ED youth are elevated on disordered eating cognitions and anthropometric measures compared to youth without LOC-ED. Longitudinal studies are needed to determine if those with LOC-ED are at particularly increased risk for progression of disordered eating and excess weight gain. PMID:25913008

  2. A Preliminary Examination of Loss of Control Eating Disorder (LOC-ED) in Middle Childhood

    PubMed Central

    Matherne, Camden E.; Tanofsky-Kraff, Marian; Altschul, Anne M.; Shank, Lisa M.; Schvey, Natasha A.; Brady, Sheila M.; Galescu, Ovidiu; Demidowich, Andrew P.; Yanovski, Susan Z.; Yanovski, Jack A.

    2015-01-01

    Loss of Control Eating Disorder (LOC-ED) has been proposed as a diagnostic category for children 6–12y with binge-type eating. However, characteristics of youth with LOC-ED have not been examined. We tested the hypothesis that the proposed criteria for LOC-ED would identify children with greater adiposity, more disordered eating attitudes, and greater mood disturbance than those without LOC-ED. Participants were 251 youth (10.29y ± 1.54, 53.8% female, 57.8 % White, 35.5% Black, 2.0% Asian, 4.8% Hispanic, 53.0% overweight). Youth were interviewed regarding eating attitudes and behaviors, completed questionnaires to assess general psychopathology, and underwent measurements of body fat mass. Using previously proposed criteria for LOC-ED, children were classified as LOC-ED (n = 19), LOC in the absence of the full disorder (subLOC, n = 33), and youth not reporting LOC (noLOC, n = 199). LOC-ED youth had higher BMIz (p = 0.001) and adiposity (p = 0.003) and reported greater disordered eating concerns (p < 0.001) compared to noLOC youth. Compared to subLOC youth, LOC-ED youth had non-significantly higher BMIz (p = 0.11), and significantly higher adiposity (p = 0.04) and disordered eating attitudes (p = 0.02). SubLOC youth had greater disordered eating concerns (p < 0.001) and BMIz (p = 0.03) but did not differ in adiposity (p = 0.33) compared to noLOC youth. These preliminary data suggest that LOC-ED youth are elevated on disordered eating cognitions and anthropometric measures compared to youth without LOC-ED. Longitudinal studies are needed to determine if those with LOC-ED are at particularly increased risk for progression of disordered eating and excess weight gain. PMID:25913008

  3. Asia-Pacific Hematology Consortium Report on approach to multiple myeloma. Survey results from the 6th International Hematologic Malignancies Conference: Bridging the Gap 2015, Beijing, China.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jin; Hou, Jian; Liu, Kai-Yan; Parmar, Simrit; De La Fuente, Adolfo; Andersson, Börje; Yan, ChenHua; Zhou, Daobin; Tan, Daryl; Ritchie, David; Wu, Deipei; Shpall, Elizabeth; Laport, Ginna G; Li, JianYong; Hu, Jiong; Zhang, Lian Sheng; Wang, Michael; Malhotra, Pankaj; Jiang, Qian; Qin, Yazhen; Wong, Raymond; Champlin, Richard; Issaragrisil, Surapol; Iyer, Swaminathan; Mathews, Vikram; Wang, Yu; Hu, Yu; Xiao, Zhijian; Shao, Zonghong; Rosengarten, Rafael; Steuernagle, Jon; Xiao, Jun Huang; Orlowski, Robert; Chim, Chor Sang

    2016-07-01

    The Asia-Pacific Hematology Consortium (APHCON), in partnership with MDRingTM, a mobile global physician education network, has initiated a detailed longitudinal study of physician knowledge and practice preferences in the Asia-Pacific sphere. The first dataset comes from a series of surveys answered by delegates at the APHCON Bridging The Gap (BTG) conference in Beijing in January, 2015. In this report we present our findings regarding diagnosis and treatment of multiple myeloma (MM). We aim to create a conduit for physicians in this region to share their experiences with the rest of the world, to identify areas of consensus and best practices, and to highlight opportunities for improvement in communication, education and patient care. PMID:26887657

  4. Differences in attitudes and beliefs toward end-of-life care between hematologic and solid tumor oncology specialists

    PubMed Central

    Hui, D.; Bansal, S.; Park, M.; Reddy, A.; Cortes, J.; Fossella, F.; Bruera, E.

    2015-01-01

    Background Patients with hematologic malignancies often receive aggressive care at the end-of-life. To better understand the end-of-life decision-making process among oncology specialists, we compared the cancer treatment recommendations, and attitudes and beliefs toward palliative care between hematologic and solid tumor specialists. Patients and methods We randomly surveyed 120 hematologic and 120 solid tumor oncology specialists at our institution. Respondents completed a survey examining various aspects of end-of-life care, including palliative systemic therapy using standardized case vignettes and palliative care proficiency. Results Of 240 clinicians, 182 (76%) clinicians responded. Compared with solid tumor specialists, hematologic specialists were more likely to favor prescribing systemic therapy with moderate toxicity and no survival benefit for patients with Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) performance status 4 and an expected survival of 1 month (median preference 4 versus 1, in which 1 = strong against treatment and 7 = strongly recommend treatment, P < 0.0001). This decision was highly polarized. Hematologic specialists felt less comfortable discussing death and dying (72% versus 88%, P = 0.007) and hospice referrals (81% versus 93%, P = 0.02), and were more likely to feel a sense of failure with disease progression (46% versus 31%, P = 0.04). On multivariate analysis, hematologic specialty [odds ratio (OR) 2.77, P = 0.002] and comfort level with prescribing treatment to ECOG 4 patients (OR 3.79, P = 0.02) were associated with the decision to treat in the last month of life. Conclusions We found significant differences in attitudes and beliefs toward end-of-life care between hematologic and solid tumor specialists, and identified opportunities to standardize end-of-life care. PMID:26041765

  5. Standalone engine simulator (SAES), Engine Dynamics simulator (EDS) Xerox Sigma 5 interface hardware manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirshten, P. M.; Black, S.; Pearson, R.

    1979-01-01

    The ESS-EDS and EDS-Sigma interfaces within the standalone engine simulator are described. The operation of these interfaces, including the definition and use of special function signals and data flow paths within them during data transfers, is presented along with detailed schematics and circuit layouts of the described equipment.

  6. Assessment of the Framingham risk factors among ED patients with newly diagnosed atrial fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Barrett, Tyler W.; Storrow, Alan B.; Jenkins, Cathy A.; Harrell, Frank E.; Amdahl, John; Russ, Stephan; Slovis, Corey M.; Darbar, Dawood

    2010-01-01

    Study Objective Atrial fibrillation (AF) is often first diagnosed in the emergency department (ED) and accounts for nearly 1% of all ED visits. Our objective was to assess the Framingham Heart Study risk score for AF development in ED patients with newly diagnosed AF. Methods We systematically reviewed the electronic medical records of ED patients with newly diagnosed AF between August 2005 and July 2008. We measured the frequency of the Framingham Heart Study predictors and calculated each patient's risk score. Results During the 3-year study period, 914 patients had 1228 ED visits. New AF was diagnosed in 296 (32%) patients. Among these patients, 107 (36%) were female, 127 (43%) had prior ED visits since 2003, 189 (64%) were taking hypertension medications and 170 (57.4%) had previous electrocardiograms with measurable PR intervals. The median PR interval was 166 ms (151 to 180) and 60% of available PR intervals were ≥160 ms. The median (Interquartile range) age, body mass index, and systolic blood pressure were 66 years (53 to 77), 27 (23 to 31), and 134 mm Hg (118 to 151), respectively. Median risk score was 7 (3 to 9) indicating high predicted risk. Heart failure and cardiac murmurs were previously diagnosed in 45 (15%) and 32 (11%) of these patients, respectively. Conclusions The Framingham risk factors for AF are commonly encountered among ED patients with newly diagnosed AF. The ED might provide an opportunity to identify patients at high risk for AF and refer them for primary prevention interventions. PMID:21208770

  7. Internet-Based Economic Education: The Case of EconEdLink

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    VanFossen, Phillip J.; Herman-Ellison, Lisa C.

    2006-01-01

    The National Council on Economic Education's (NCEE) EconEdLink site provides lessons and classroom learning activities based on economics topics in the news, as well as access to real-time economic data. EconEdLink's content is designed to help integrate economic concepts across the curriculum as outlined in the Voluntary National Content…

  8. The Distinctiveness of the EdD in Producing and Transforming Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taysum, Alison

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to focus on the distinctiveness of the Professional doctorate in education (EdD) located in the development of higher education (HE) in England using Bourdieu's theory of practice. It does this by building on a previous paper published in this journal, "The Distinctiveness of the EdD in the University Tradition" (vol. 38,…

  9. Evaluation of the Demonstration Sites in the ConnectEd Network

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farr, Beverly; Bradby, Denise; Hartry, Ardice; Sipes, Laurel; Hall, Leslie; Tasoff, Shayna

    2009-01-01

    In California, the James Irvine Foundation created ConnectEd: The California Center for College and Career to promote multiple pathways that link to the state's 15 major industry sectors. The ConnectEd Network of Schools, a demonstration project supported by Irvine, plays a critical role in expanding student options through multiple pathways and…

  10. Unstandardized Responses to a "Standardized" Test: The edTPA as Gatekeeper and Curriculum Change Agent

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ledwell, Katherine; Oyler, Celia

    2016-01-01

    We examine edTPA (a teacher performance assessment) implementation at one private university during the first year that our state required this exam for initial teaching certification. Using data from semi-structured interviews with 19 teacher educators from 12 programs as well as public information on edTPA pass rates, we explore whether the…

  11. Multiple Intelligence and Digital Learning Awareness of Prospective B.Ed Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gracious, F. L. Antony; Shyla, F. L. Jasmine Anne

    2012-01-01

    The present study Multiple Intelligence and Digital Learning Awareness of prospective B.Ed teachers was probed to find the relationship between Multiple Intelligence and Digital Learning Awareness of Prospective B.Ed Teachers. Data for the study were collected using self made Multiple Intelligence Inventory and Digital Learning Awareness Scale.…

  12. "What about Bilingualism?" A Critical Reflection on the edTPA with Teachers of Emergent Bilinguals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kleyn, Tatyana; López, Dina; Makar, Carmina

    2015-01-01

    Amidst the debates surrounding teacher quality and preparation programs, the edTPA (education Teaching Performance Assessment) has emerged to assess future teachers through a portfolio-based certification process. This study offers the perspective of three faculty members who participated in an experimental configuration of edTPA implementation…

  13. G. ED. Paper-Book 1974-1984. The Process of Growth of an Innovation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Verduin-Muller, Henriette, Ed.

    Fifteen papers presented at conferences throughout Europe and in the USSR, Nigeria, Japan, Jamaica, and Tunesia provide an introduction to the research work being done by the graduate level Department of Geography for Education (G.ED.) at the University of Utrecht in the Netherlands. An introductory chapter describes the three G.ED. modules, which…

  14. An Evaluation of California's Community College Based Economic Development Programs (ED>Net).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowman (James) Associates, San Francisco, CA.

    This study describes economic outcomes of California's ED>Net (California Community College Economic Network) program, an alliance between community colleges and California businesses. ED>Net's purpose is to advance the state's economic growth by providing job-related education and services to businesses and organizations. This report develops…

  15. Economic Development Network (ED>Net): 1995-96 Report to the Governor and the Legislature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California Community Colleges, Sacramento. Office of the Chancellor.

    The Economic Development Network (ED>Net) of the California Community Colleges was designed to advance the state's economic growth and competitiveness by coordinating and facilitating workforce improvement, technology deployment, and business development initiatives. This report reviews outcomes for ED>Net for 1995-96 based on reports prepared by…

  16. Characteristics of Reading Disability Types in Middle School Students Classified ED

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mattison, Richard E.

    2008-01-01

    Types of reading disabilities (RD) have not yet been investigated in students classified with emotional disturbance (ED). The prevalence of RD and differentiating characteristics were examined in 118 middle school students attending a self-contained school for ED students by defining RDs with reading standard scores less than 85 on the two…

  17. Minimizing ED Waiting Times and Improving Patient Flow and Experience of Care.

    PubMed

    Sayah, Assaad; Rogers, Loni; Devarajan, Karthik; Kingsley-Rocker, Lisa; Lobon, Luis F

    2014-01-01

    We conducted a pre- and postintervention analysis to assess the impact of a process improvement project at the Cambridge Hospital ED. Through a comprehensive and collaborative process, we reengineered the emergency patient experience from arrival to departure. The ED operational changes have had a significant positive impact on all measured metrics. Ambulance diversion decreased from a mean of 148 hours per quarter before changes in July 2006 to 0 hours since April 2007. ED total length of stay decreased from a mean of 204 minutes before the changes to 132 minutes. Press Ganey patient satisfaction scores rose from the 12th percentile to the 59th percentile. ED patient volume grew by 11%, from a mean of 7,221 patients per quarter to 8,044 patients per quarter. Compliance with ED specific quality core measures improved from a mean of 71% to 97%. The mean rate of ED patients that left without being seen (LWBS) dropped from 4.1% to 0.9%. Improving ED operational efficiency allowed us to accommodate increasing volume while improving the quality of care and satisfaction of the ED patients with minimal additional resources, space, or staffing. PMID:24829802

  18. A Review of "Older, Wiser, Sexually Smarter: 30 Sex Ed Lessons for Adults Only"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garrity, Joan Mogul

    2010-01-01

    While virtually all sex ed curricula are designed to be used with children, teens and young adults, "Older, Wiser, Sexually Smarter: 30 Sex Ed Lessons for Adults Only" ([C] 2009, Planned Parenthood of Greater Northern New Jersey) offers lessons to help participants fully embrace the possibility of sexual pleasure and intimacy from mid-life through…

  19. Race to the Top District Competition: The Data Quality Campaign's Comments on ED's Proposed Criteria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Data Quality Campaign, 2012

    2012-01-01

    The Data Quality Campaign (DQC) submits these comments in response to the US Department of Education's (ED) draft requirements, priorities, selection criteria, and definitions for the Race to the Top District (RTT-D) competition. DQC applauds ED for including the following components of the proposal: (1) Data is acknowledged throughout the…

  20. EdTrAc Teacher Education Program: First-Year Implementation Evaluation (2005-2006)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pittman, Brian; Shelton, Ellen

    2006-01-01

    The Educational Training Academy (EdTrAc) is an NSF-funded project of Normandale Community College to increase the number, diversity, and skills of students preparing to be elementary and middle school teachers with a specialty in math and science. Overall, this evaluation indicates that the EdTrAc implementation is on track after its first year…

  1. MARCKS-ED Peptide as a Curvature and Lipid Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Morton, Leslie A.; Yang, Hengwen; Saludes, Jonel P.; Fiorini, Zeno; Beninson, Lida; Chapman, Edwin R.; Fleshner, Monika; Xue, Ding; Yin, Hang

    2012-01-01

    Membrane curvature and lipid composition regulate important biological processes within a cell. Currently, several proteins have been reported to sense and/or induce membrane curvatures, e.g. Synaptotagmin-1 and Amphiphysin. However, the large protein scaffold of these curvature sensors limits their applications in complex biological systems. Our interest focuses on identifying and designing peptides that can sense membrane curvature based on established elements observed in natural curvature-sensing proteins. Membrane curvature remodeling also depends on their lipid composition, suggesting strategies to specifically target membrane shape and lipid components simultaneously. We have successfully identified a 25-mer peptide, MARCKS-ED, based on the effector domain sequence of the intracellular membrane protein myristoylated alanine-rich C-kinase substrate that can recognize PS with preferences for highly curved vesicles in a sequence specific manner. These studies further contribute to the understanding of how proteins and peptides sense membrane curvature, as well as provide potential probes for membrane shape and lipid composition. PMID:23075500

  2. Accuracy of ED Bedside Ultrasound for Identification of gallstones: retrospective analysis of 575 studies

    PubMed Central

    Scruggs, William; Fox, J. Christian; Potts, Brian; Zlidenny, Alexander; McDonough, JoAnne; Anderson, Craig L.; Larson, Jarrod; Barajas, Graciela; Langdorf, Mark I.

    2008-01-01

    Study Objective To determine the ability of emergency department (ED) physicians to diagnose cholelithiasis with bedside ultrasound. Methods ED gallbladder ultrasounds recorded over 37 months were compared to radiology ultrasound interpretation. Results Of 1,690 ED gallbladder ultrasound scans performed during this period, radiology ultrasound was performed in 575/1690 (34%) cases. ED physician bedside interpretation was 88% sensitive [95% CI, 84–91] and 87% specific [95% CI, 82–91], while positive predictive value (PPV) was 91% [88–94%] and negative predictive value (NPV) was 83% [78–87%], using radiology interpretation as the criterion reference. Conclusion ED physician ultrasound of the gallbladder for cholelithiasis is both sensitive and specific. PMID:19561694

  3. Targeting the PI3K/AKT/mTOR Signaling Axis in Children with Hematologic Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Barrett, David; Brown, Valerie I.; Grupp, Stephan A.; Teachey, David T.

    2014-01-01

    The phosphatidylinositiol 3-kinase (PI3K), AKT, mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway (PI3K/AKT/mTOR) is frequently dysregulated in disorders of cell growth and survival, including a number of pediatric hematologic malignancies. The pathway can be abnormally activated in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), acute myelogenous leukemia (AML), and chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML), as well as in some pediatric lymphomas and lymphoproliferative disorders. Most commonly, this abnormal activation occurs as a consequence of constitutive activation of AKT, providing a compelling rationale to target this pathway in many of these conditions. A variety of agents, beginning with the rapamycin analogue (rapalog) sirolimus, have been used successfully to target this pathway in a number of pediatric hematologic malignancies. Rapalogs demonstrate significant preclinical activity against ALL, which has led to a number of clinical trials. Moreover, rapalogs can synergize with a number of conventional cytotoxic agents and overcome pathways of chemotherapeutic resistance for drugs commonly used in ALL treatment, including methotrexate and corticosteroids. Based on preclinical data, rapalogs are also being studied in AML, CML, and non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma. Recently, significant progress has been made using rapalogs to treat pre-malignant lymphoproliferative disorders, including the autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS); complete remissions in children with otherwise therapy-resistant disease have been seen. Rapalogs only block one component of the pathway (mTORC1), and newer agents are under preclinical and clinical development that can target different and often multiple protein kinases in the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway. Most of these agents have been tolerated in early-phase clinical trials. A number of PI3K inhibitors are under investigation. Of note, most of these also target other protein kinases. Newer agents are under development that target both m

  4. Teaching and Assessing ED Handoffs: A Qualitative Study Exploring Resident, Attending, and Nurse Perceptions

    PubMed Central

    Flanigan, Moira; Heilman, James A.; Johnson, Tom; Yarris, Lalena M.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education requires that residency programs ensure resident competency in performing safe, effective handoffs. Understanding resident, attending, and nurse perceptions of the key elements of a safe and effective emergency department (ED) handoff is a crucial step to developing feasible, acceptable educational interventions to teach and assess this fundamental competency. The aim of our study was to identify the essential themes of ED-based handoffs and to explore the key cultural and interprofessional themes that may be barriers to developing and implementing successful ED-based educational handoff interventions. Methods Using a grounded theory approach and constructivist/interpretivist research paradigm, we analyzed data from three primary and one confirmatory focus groups (FGs) at an urban, academic ED. FG protocols were developed using open-ended questions that sought to understand what participants felt were the crucial elements of ED handoffs. ED residents, attendings, a physician assistant, and nurses participated in the FGs. FGs were observed, hand-transcribed, audio-recorded and subsequently transcribed. We analyzed data using an iterative process of theme and subtheme identification. Saturation was reached during the third FG, and the fourth confirmatory group reinforced the identified themes. Two team members analyzed the transcripts separately and identified the same major themes. Results ED providers identified that crucial elements of ED handoff include the following: 1) Culture (provider buy-in, openness to change, shared expectations of sign-out goals); 2) Time (brevity, interruptions, waiting); 3) Environment (physical location, ED factors); 4) Process (standardization, information order, tools). Conclusion Key participants in the ED handoff process perceive that the crucial elements of intershift handoffs involve the themes of culture, time, environment, and process. Attention to these

  5. Evaluation of Exxon Donor Solvent (EDS) coal-derived liquid as utility diesel fuel. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Heater, W.R.; Froh, T.W.; Ariga, S.; Baker, Q.A.; Piispanen, W.; Webb, P.; Trayser, D.; Keane, W.J.

    1983-10-01

    The program consisted of three phases: (I) characterization of the physical and chemical properties of EDS, (II) evaluation of EDS in a laboratory medium-speed diesel engine, and (III) evaluation of EDS in a low-speed diesel engine operating at a utility. The characteristics of high aromatic content and low cetane number that were found during Phase I made it unlikely that EDS could be used as a direct substitute for diesel fuel without engine modification to provide ignition assistance. Phase II was conducted on a 12-cylinder General Electric Company 7FDL diesel engine. Blends of up to 30% EDS and 70% 0.2 diesel fuel (DF-2) were successfully consumed. Dual fuel tests were also conducted on a single cylinder by injecting EDS through the existing engine fuel oil system and injecting DF-2 through an auxiliary nozzle as an ignition source. Acceptable operation was achieved using 5 to 10% pilot oil heat input. Phase III was conducted on a 16-cylinder Cooper-Bessemer LSV-16-GDT diesel engine at an EUC plant in Easton, Maryland. Blends of up to 66.7% EDS and 33.3% DF-2 were successfully consumed. Dual fuel tests were also conducted on a single cylinder by injecting EDS through the existing fuel oil system and using a natural-gas-fueled precombustion chamber as an ignition source. Acceptable operation was achieved using 3 to 6% pilot gas heat input. The program confirmed that it is feasible to consume significant proportions of EDS in a diesel engine, but more development is needed before EDS can be considered a viable alternative liquid fuel for diesel engines, and an industrial hygiene program is needed to assure safe handling of the fuel.

  6. Trace elemental analysis of school chalk using energy dispersive X-ray florescence spectroscopy (ED-XRF)

    SciTech Connect

    Maruthi, Y. A.; Das, N. Lakshmana; Ramprasad, S.; Ram, S. S.; Sudarshan, M.

    2015-08-28

    The present studies focus the quantitative analysis of elements in school chalk to ensure the safety of its use. The elements like Calcium (Ca), Aluminum (Al), Iron (Fe), Silicon (Si) and Chromium (Cr) were analyzed from settled chalk dust samples collected from five classrooms (CD-1) and also from another set of unused chalk samples collected from local market (CD-2) using Energy Dispersive X-Ray florescence(ED-XRF) spectroscopy. Presence of these elements in significant concentrations in school chalk confirmed that, it is an irritant and occupational hazard. It is suggested to use protective equipments like filtered mask for mouth, nose and chalk holders. This study also suggested using the advanced mode of techniques like Digital boards, marker boards and power point presentations to mitigate the occupational hazard for classroom chalk.

  7. Trace elemental analysis of school chalk using energy dispersive X-ray florescence spectroscopy (ED-XRF)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maruthi, Y. A.; Das, N. Lakshmana; Ramprasad, S.; Ram, S. S.; Sudarshan, M.

    2015-08-01

    The present studies focus the quantitative analysis of elements in school chalk to ensure the safety of its use. The elements like Calcium (Ca), Aluminum (Al), Iron (Fe), Silicon (Si) and Chromium (Cr) were analyzed from settled chalk dust samples collected from five classrooms (CD-1) and also from another set of unused chalk samples collected from local market (CD-2) using Energy Dispersive X-Ray florescence(ED-XRF) spectroscopy. Presence of these elements in significant concentrations in school chalk confirmed that, it is an irritant and occupational hazard. It is suggested to use protective equipments like filtered mask for mouth, nose and chalk holders. This study also suggested using the advanced mode of techniques like Digital boards, marker boards and power point presentations to mitigate the occupational hazard for classroom chalk

  8. Effect of taking dietary supplement on hematological and biochemical parameters in male bodybuilders an equation model

    PubMed Central

    Meamar, Rokhsareh; Maracy, Mohammad; Nematollahi, Shahrzad; Yeroshalmi, Shemouil; Zamani-Moghaddam, Ali; Ghazvini, Mohammad Reza Aghaye

    2015-01-01

    Background: The improved physical action following administration of supplements to bodybuilders was supported by changes in laboratory parameters. Despite the fact that these supplements are sometimes associated both advantage and side effects, this study were conducted for the purpose of evaluating the possible effects of some commonly used supplements in bodybuilders on the hematological and biochemical parameters. Materials and Methods: In this study, we included 40 male bodybuilders as cases and 40 controls in the age group of 20-40 years. They used different kinds of supplements for 1 year. In general, all the supplements used were classified into two groups: hormonal and non-hormonal. Laboratory tests were requested for evaluation of hematological and biochemical parameters. Results: In an equation model, we found that weight (P = 0.024), duration of bodybuilding (P < 0.001), and duration of hormone supplement consumption (P < 0.001) were loaded significantly on the latent variables, demographic and dietary supplement, respectively. The relationship between dietary supplement and biochemical and hematological parameters was significant (P = 0.01) and some of these parameters including creatinine (P = 0.023), blood aspartate aminotransferase (AST) (P < 0.001), alanine aminotransferase (ALT) (P < 0.001), and red blood cell distribution (RDW) (P = 0.046) had a significant role than others. In a multivariate regression model, we found that WBC (P < 0.001), platelets (P < 0.001), blood urea nitrogen (BUN; P < 0.001), creatinine (P < 0.001), AST (P = 0.005), and ALT (P = 0.001) were higher in athletes than in controls. Conclusions: It is strongly advised that there should be some concerns about possible supplement-induced changes in the laboratory exams for bodybuilders. The available supplements are unchecked and not approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA). More studies should be designed for a better and precise administration of each supplement in

  9. Hematological and Biochemistry Profile and Risk Factors Associated with Pulmonary Tuberculosis Patients in Guyana

    PubMed Central

    Kurup, Rajini; Flemming, Keon; Daniram, Sudish; Marks-James, Shenika; Roberts Martin, Roberta

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the hematological and biochemistry profile of patients with or without HIV-TB at the Georgetown Chest Clinic, Guyana. Methods. An observational, laboratory based study was designed to assess the relationship of PTB and HIV with patients routine biochemical and hematological values. The study was conducted during the period January 2013 to December 2014; a total sample size of 316 patients was enrolled following exclusion and inclusion criteria. Results. Mean age of study population was 40.1 ± 13.8 (95% CI 38.6–41.7) and most were between 40 and 49 age group (27.8%, 95% CI 23.2–33.0). More males were in the study 74.4% (95% CI 69.3–78.8) than females 81% (95% CI 21.1–30.7). 30% (95% CI 25.3–35.3) had a sputum smear grade of 3+ and 62.5% (95% CI 47.0–75.7) showed a CD4 count <200. The study demonstrated significantly low hemoglobin (Hb) 91.7% (95% CI 78.2–97.1), low WBC 27.8% (95% CI 15.8–44.0), high indirect bilirubin 7.4% (95% CI 2.1–23.3), ALT 41.8% (95% CI 28.4–56.7), and AST 72.2% (95% CI 57.3–83.3) among TB-HIV patients. Homelessness RR (relative risk) 2.2 (95% CI 0.48–12.3), smoking RR 1.09 (95% CI 1.01–1.19), and gender (male) RR 1.2 (95% CI 0.61–2.26) were main associated risk factors. Conclusions. There is slight variation among PTB and PTB-HIV coinfected patients in some hematological and biochemistry parameters. PMID:27190646

  10. Hematological Changes in Patients Undergoing Coronary Artery Bypass Surgery: a Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Lako, Sotir; Dedej, Teuta; Nurka, Tatjana; Ostreni, Vera; Demiraj, Aurel; Xhaxho, Roland; Prifti, Edvin

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Removal of pro inflammatory stimuli after CABG, wound closure and the regenerative ability of the bone marrow will ensure a gradual recovery of hematological parameters. The aim of this study was to assess the hematological changes after CABG. Materials and Methods: A prospective cohort study included 164 consecutive patients undergoing on pump CABG surgery between January 2012 and January 2013. Patients with primary hematologic disease, emergent or urgent CABG and off-pump CABG were not included. A time line protocol was employed. Results: All patients survived surgery. Average values of erythrocytes, hemoglobin and hematocrit declined, to reach lower values on day 3 after surgery (-33.6 %, -33.1 %, -32.6 % versus preoperative value, p<0.001) and then gradually increased to reach normal values after one month and the preoperative values after three months. The average values of leukocytes and neutrophils increased rapidly to achieve the highest value on day 2, while the average value of lymphocytes decreased quickly to achieve lower value on day 1 after surgery (+74.7 %, +127.1 %, -52.4 % respectively from the preoperative value, p<0.001). The average platelet count decreased to the lowest value on day 2 after surgery (-26.4 % from the preoperative value, p<0.001), after which gradually increased up to +100.8 % of preoperative value on day 14 (p<0.001) and then gradually decreased to reach normal values on day 21 and preoperative values after three months. Conclusions: Average values of the three peripheral blood cells parameters undergo important changes after CABG, but not life threatening, and regain normal and preoperative values after 1-3 months after surgery. PMID:26261388

  11. Hematology and plasma biochemistry of wild-caught Indian cobra Naja naja (Linnaeus, 1758)

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Hematology and plasma biochemistry parameters are useful in the assessment and management of snake physiological status. Although reference ranges are readily available for many snake species, they are lacking for most venomous ophidians. We determined hematology and plasma biochemistry reference ranges for the wild-caught Indian cobra, Naja naja. Results Blood samples, taken from the ventral tail vein, were assessed for erythrocyte count, total leukocyte count, hemoglobin concentration, hematocrit, mean corpuscular volume, mean corpuscular hemoglobin, and mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration, considering the sex of snakes. Results revealed the erythrocyte numbers (male, 390000 ± 12503.33/mm3 and female, 347500 ± 7505.55/mm3), shapes and the centrally located oval nuclei. Leukocytes were round, circular or disk-shaped, and the mean size was larger in male than female snakes. The maximum number of leukocytes was found to be 11700 ± 100/mm3 in male and 12100 ± 200/mm3 in female snakes, and mean values of differential leukocyte count differed statistically between male and female snakes. The total leukocyte levels were found to be higher in female snakes, but the levels of hemoglobin, hematocrit, and MCV values were higher in male snakes. However, the MCH and MCHC values remained higher in female snakes throughout the study period. Mean protein and cholesterol contents differed significantly between male (45.32 ± 1.76 and 3.76 ± 0.06 mg/mL) and female (12.47 ± 0.82 and 4.72 ± 0.2 mg/mL) snakes. Conclusions In conclusion, monitoring snake hematological and biochemical parameters can serve as a means to evaluate the physiological and health status of N. naja populations, which may be a useful indicator of their environmental status. PMID:24735569

  12. [Changes of pathogens for nosocomial infection of patients with hematological diseases].

    PubMed

    Wang, Ji-Jun; Hu, Kai; Wang, Zheng-Hui; Wang, Jing; Jing, Hong-Mei; Zhao, Wei; Liu, Yan; Chen, Yu-Ping; Ke, Xiao-Yan

    2010-08-01

    In order to investigate the distribution of nosocomial infection in patients with hematological diseases in our hospital, and to explore the changes of the pathogens isolated. The method of retrospective investigation and analysis was employed. 1164 strain pathogens were isolated from the patients with hematological diseases during the period of 1997-2009. The results showed that the Gram-positive cocci infection increased gradually during the 13 years, but has been stable in the last 4 years. The Gram-negative bacteria showed a trend decrease. The fungi increased during these years. The rates of infection with gram-positive cocci, gram-negative bacteria and fungus were 28.2%, 59.8% and 12.0% respectively. For the details, Escherichia coli infection rate was the highest: 12.1%, followed by Pseudomonas aeruginosa (9.1%), Enterobacter (8.4%), Klebsiella pneumoniae (7.4%), Staphylococcus epidermidis (6.3%) and Enterococci (6.6%). The distribution of G(+)- and G⁻ pathogens showed obvious change on end of 1990's and beginning of this century, but it was tending towards stability on recent years; the incidence of fungus was tending towards increase, which was related to wide application of strong broad-spectrum antibiotics. In conclusion, the patients with hematological diseases, as the high-risk group of nosocomial infection, should be monitored strictly. Infection is related to many factors, and the main factor is dysfunction of autoimmunity. The strategies should be explored to strengthen the immune protection and set up a reasonable scheme of antibiotics. PMID:20723323

  13. Hematological Toxicity After Robotic Stereotactic Body Radiosurgery for Treatment of Metastatic Gynecologic Malignancies

    SciTech Connect

    Kunos, Charles A.; Debernardo, Robert; Radivoyevitch, Tomas; Fabien, Jeffrey; Dobbins, Donald C.; Zhang Yuxia; Brindle, James

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: To evaluate hematological toxicity after robotic stereotactic body radiosurgery (SBRT) for treatment of women with metastatic abdominopelvic gynecologic malignancies. Methods and Materials: A total of 61 women with stage IV gynecologic malignancies treated with abdominopelvic SBRT were analyzed after ablative radiation (2400 cGy/3 divided consecutive daily doses) delivered by a robotic-armed Cyberknife SBRT system. Abdominopelvic bone marrow was identified using computed tomography-guided contouring. Fatigue and hematologic toxicities were graded by retrospective assignment of common toxicity criteria for adverse events (version 4.0). Bone marrow volume receiving 1000 cGy (V10) was tested for association with post-therapy (median 32 days [25%-75% quartile, 28-45 days]) white- or red-cell counts, hemoglobin levels, and platelet counts as marrow toxicity surrogates. Results: In all, 61 women undergoing abdominopelvic SBRT had a median bone marrow V10 of 2% (25%-75% quartile: 0%-8%). Fifty-seven (93%) of 61 women had received at least 1 pre-SBRT marrow-taxing chemotherapy regimen for metastatic disease. Bone marrow V10 did not associate with hematological adverse events. In all, 15 grade 2 (25%) and 2 grade 3 (3%) fatigue symptoms were self-reported among the 61 women within the first 10 days post-therapy, with fatigue resolved spontaneously in all 17 women by 30 days post-therapy. Neutropenia was not observed. Three (5%) women had a grade 1 drop in hemoglobin level to <10.0 g/dL. Single grade 1, 2, and 3 thrombocytopenias were documented in 3 women. Conclusions: Abdominopelvic SBRT provided ablative radiation dose to cancer targets without increased bone marrow toxicity. Abdominopelvic SBRT for metastatic gynecologic malignancies warrants further study.

  14. Distinct Inflammatory Mediator Patterns Characterize Infectious and Sterile Systemic Inflammation in Febrile Neutropenic Hematology Patients

    PubMed Central

    Wennerås, Christine; Hagberg, Lars; Andersson, Rune; Hynsjö, Lars; Lindahl, Anders; Okroj, Marcin; Blom, Anna M.; Johansson, Peter; Andreasson, Björn; Gottfries, Johan; Wold, Agnes E.

    2014-01-01

    Background Invasive infections and sterile tissue damage can both give rise to systemic inflammation with fever and production of inflammatory mediators. This makes it difficult to diagnose infections in patients who are already inflamed, e.g. due to cell and tissue damage. For example, fever in patients with hematological malignancies may depend on infection, lysis of malignant cells, and/or chemotherapy-induced mucosal damage. We hypothesized that it would be possible to distinguish patterns of inflammatory mediators characterizing infectious and non-infectious causes of inflammation, respectively. Analysis of a broad range of parameters using a multivariate method of pattern recognition was done for this purpose. Methods In this prospective study, febrile (>38°C) neutropenic patients (n = 42) with hematologic malignancies were classified as having or not having a microbiologically defined infection by an infectious disease specialist. In parallel, blood was analyzed for 116 biomarkers, and 23 clinical variables were recorded for each patient. Using O-PLS (orthogonal projection to latent structures), a model was constructed based on these 139 variables that could separate the infected from the non-infected patients. Non-discriminatory variables were discarded until a final model was reached. Finally, the capacity of this model to accurately classify a validation set of febrile neutropenic patients (n = 10) as infected or non-infected was tested. Results A model that could segregate infected from non-infected patients was achieved based on discrete differences in the levels of 40 variables. These variables included acute phase proteins, cytokines, measures of coagulation, metabolism, organ stress and iron turn-over. The model correctly identified the infectious status of nine out of ten subsequently recruited febrile neutropenic hematology patients. Conclusions It is possible to separate patients with infectious inflammation from those with sterile

  15. Detection and Identification of Hematologic Malignancies and Solid Tumors by an Electrochemical Technique

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Bowen; Zhang, Xiaoping; Wang, Xuemei; Cheng, Jian; Chen, Baoan

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Develop and evaluate an electrochemical method to identify healthy individuals, malignant hematopathic patients and solid tumor patients by detecting the leukocytes in whole-blood. Methods A total of 114 individual blood samples obtained from our affiliated hospital in China (June 2015- August 2015) were divided into three groups: healthy individuals (n = 35), hematologic malignancies (n = 41) and solid tumors (n = 38). An electrochemical workstation system was used to measure differential pulse voltammetry due to the different electrochemical behaviors of leukocytes in blood samples. Then, one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) was applied to analyze the scanning curves and to compare the peak potential and peak current. Results The scanning curve demonstrated the specific electrochemical behaviors of the blank potassium ferricyanide solution and that mixed with blood samples in different groups. Significant differences in mean peak potentials of mixture and shifts (ΔEp (mV)) were observed of the three groups (P< = 0.001). 106.00±9.00 and 3.14±7.48 for Group healthy individuals, 120.90±11.18 and 18.10±8.81 for Group hematologic malignancies, 136.84±11.53 and 32.89±10.50 for Group solid tumors, respectively. In contrast, there were no significant differences in the peak currents and shifts. Conclusions The newly developed method to apply the electrochemical workstation system to identify hematologic malignancies and solid tumors with good sensitivity and specificity might be effective, suggesting a potential utility in clinical application. PMID:27115355

  16. Hematologic and plasma biochemistry reference intervals of healthy adult barn owls (Tyto alba).

    PubMed

    Szabo, Zoltan; Klein, Akos; Jakab, Csaba

    2014-06-01

    Hematologic and plasma biochemistry parameters of barn owls (Tyto alba) were studied in collaboration by the Exotic Division of the Faculty of Veterinary Science of the Szent Istvan University and the Eötvös Loránd University, both in Budapest, Hungary. Blood samples were taken from a total of 42 adult barn owls kept in zoos and bird repatriation stations. The following quantitative and qualitative hematologic values were determined: packed cell volume, 46.2 +/- 4%; hemoglobin concentration, 107 +/- 15 g/L; red blood cell count, 3.2 +/- 0.4 x 10(12)/L; white blood cell count, 13.7 +/- 2.7 x 10(9)/L; heterophils, 56.5 +/- 11.5% (7.8 +/- 2 x 10(9)/L); lymphocytes, 40.3 +/- 10.9% (5.5 +/- 1.9 x 10(9)/L); monocytes, 1.8 +/- 2.1% (0.3 +/- 0.3 x 10(9)/ L); eosinophils, 1 +/- 1% (0.1 +/- 0.1 x 10(9)/L); and basophils, 0.6 +/- 0.5% (0.1 +/- 0.1 x 10(9)/L). The following plasma biochemistry values also were determined: aspartate aminotransferase, 272 +/- 43 U/L; L-gamma-glutamyltransferase, 9.5 +/- 4.7 U/L; lipase, 31.7 +/- 11.1 U/L; creatine kinase, 2228 +/- 578 U/L; lactate dehydrogenase, 1702 +/- 475 U/L; alkaline phosphatase, 358 +/- 197 U/L; amylase, 563 +/- 114 U/L; glutamate dehydrogenase, 7.5 +/- 2.5 U/L; total protein, 30.6 +/- 5.3 g/L; uric acid, 428 +/- 102 micromol/L; and bile acids, 43 +/- 18 micromol/L. These results provide reliable reference values for the clinical interpretation of hematologic and plasma biochemistry results for the species. PMID:25055626

  17. Hematological and biochemical status of Beta-thalassemia major patients in Bangladesh: A comparative analysis

    PubMed Central

    Karim, Md. Fazlul; Ismail, Md.; Hasan, AKM Mahbub; Shekhar, Hossain Uddin

    2016-01-01

    Background: Thalassemia is one of the most common hereditary disorders and Beta-thalassemia major is its severe form. The present study is concerned with the analysis of liver function, thyroid function and estimation of critical serum ions as well as hematological characteristics in beta-thalassemia patients and controls. Subjects and Methods: The study included 54 patients with beta-thalassemia major and 54 healthy individuals matched by sex and age. The activity of Alanine transaminase (ALT), Alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and Aspartate transaminase (AST) were assessed in order to evaluate the liver function. Serum content of iron (Fe), calcium (Ca), magnesium (Mg), sodium (Na) and potassium (K) were also estimated. Tri iodothyronine (T3), Thyroxin (T4) and Thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) levels were assessed in order to evaluate the thyroid function. Hemoglobin (Hb), ferritin, hematocrit (HCT), mean corpuscular volume (MCV), mean corpuscular hemoglobin (MCH), mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration(MCHC), total iron binding capacity (TIBC) and creatinine level were also measured. Results: Significantly, higher ALT (P< 0.001), AST (P< 0.05), ALP (P< 0.001) activities and lower creatinine (P< 0.001) level in beta-thalassemia patients were found in comparison to healthy individuals. Lower serum level of calcium (P< 0.05), magnesium (P< 0.05) and higher level of iron (P> 0.05), sodium (P> 0.05) and potassium (P > 0.05) have been found in patients in comparison to healthy individuals. Hematological parameters like Hb (P< 0.001), ferritin (P< 0.05), HCT (P< 0.001), MCV (P< 0.05) and MCH (P< 0.05) have been significantly reduced in patients except MCHC (P> 0.05). No significant difference was observed in thyroid function between patients and control group. Conclusions: Our study demonstrates that beta-thalassemia patients and controls have difference in liver function, thyroid function, serum contents of ions and hematological characteristics. PMID:27047645

  18. Hypertension and hematologic parameters in a community near a uranium processing facility

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, Sara E.; Burch, James B.; Bottai, Matteo; Pinney, Susan M.; Puett, Robin; Porter, Dwayne; Vena, John E.; Hebert, James R.

    2010-11-15

    Background: Environmental uranium exposure originating as a byproduct of uranium processing can impact human health. The Fernald Feed Materials Production Center functioned as a uranium processing facility from 1951 to 1989, and potential health effects among residents living near this plant were investigated via the Fernald Medical Monitoring Program (FMMP). Methods: Data from 8216 adult FMMP participants were used to test the hypothesis that elevated uranium exposure was associated with indicators of hypertension or changes in hematologic parameters at entry into the program. A cumulative uranium exposure estimate, developed by FMMP investigators, was used to classify exposure. Systolic and diastolic blood pressure and physician diagnoses were used to assess hypertension; and red blood cells, platelets, and white blood cell differential counts were used to characterize hematology. The relationship between uranium exposure and hypertension or hematologic parameters was evaluated using generalized linear models and quantile regression for continuous outcomes, and logistic regression or ordinal logistic regression for categorical outcomes, after adjustment for potential confounding factors. Results: Of 8216 adult FMMP participants 4187 (51%) had low cumulative uranium exposure, 1273 (15%) had moderate exposure, and 2756 (34%) were in the high (>0.50 Sievert) cumulative lifetime uranium exposure category. Participants with elevated uranium exposure had decreased white blood cell and lymphocyte counts and increased eosinophil counts. Female participants with higher uranium exposures had elevated systolic blood pressure compared to women with lower exposures. However, no exposure-related changes were observed in diastolic blood pressure or hypertension diagnoses among female or male participants. Conclusions: Results from this investigation suggest that residents in the vicinity of the Fernald plant with elevated exposure to uranium primarily via inhalation exhibited

  19. Prediction of Clinical Deterioration in Hospitalized Adult Patients with Hematologic Malignancies Using a Neural Network Model

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Scott B.; Wong, Deborah J. L.; Correa, Aditi; Li, Ning; Deng, Jane C.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Clinical deterioration (ICU transfer and cardiac arrest) occurs during approximately 5–10% of hospital admissions. Existing prediction models have a high false positive rate, leading to multiple false alarms and alarm fatigue. We used routine vital signs and laboratory values obtained from the electronic medical record (EMR) along with a machine learning algorithm called a neural network to develop a prediction model that would increase the predictive accuracy and decrease false alarm rates. Design Retrospective cohort study. Setting The hematologic malignancy unit in an academic medical center in the United States. Patient Population Adult patients admitted to the hematologic malignancy unit from 2009 to 2010. Intervention None. Measurements and Main Results Vital signs and laboratory values were obtained from the electronic medical record system and then used as predictors (features). A neural network was used to build a model to predict clinical deterioration events (ICU transfer and cardiac arrest). The performance of the neural network model was compared to the VitalPac Early Warning Score (ViEWS). Five hundred sixty five consecutive total admissions were available with 43 admissions resulting in clinical deterioration. Using simulation, the neural network outperformed the ViEWS model with a positive predictive value of 82% compared to 24%, respectively. Conclusion We developed and tested a neural network-based prediction model for clinical deterioration in patients hospitalized in the hematologic malignancy unit. Our neural network model outperformed an existing model, substantially increasing the positive predictive value, allowing the clinician to be confident in the alarm raised. This system can be readily implemented in a real-time fashion in existing EMR systems. PMID:27532679

  20. Management of iron deficiency anemia: A survey of pediatric hematology/oncology specialists

    PubMed Central

    Powers, Jacquelyn M.; McCavit, Timothy L.; Buchanan, George R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Iron deficiency anemia (IDA) is the most common hematologic condition in children and adolescents in the United States (US). No prior reports have described the management of IDA by a large cohort of pediatric hematology-oncology specialists. Procedure A 20-question electronic survey that solicited responses to two hypothetical cases of IDA was sent to active members of the American Society of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology (ASPHO) in the United States. Results Of 1,217 recipients, 398 (32.7%) reported regularly treating IDA and completed the survey. In a toddler with nutritional IDA, 15% (N=61) of respondents reported ordering no diagnostic test beyond a complete blood count. Otherwise, wide variability in laboratory testing was reported. For treatment, most respondents would prescribe ferrous sulfate (N=335, 84%) dosed at 6 mg/kg/day (N=248, 62%) divided twice daily (N=272, 68%). The recommended duration of iron treatment after resolution of anemia and normalized serum ferritin varied widely from 0 months to 3 months. For an adolescent with heavy menstrual bleeding and IDA, most respondents recommended ferrous sulfate (N=327, 83%), with dosing based on the number of tablets daily. For IDA refractory to oral treatment, intravenous iron therapy was recommended most frequently, 48% (N=188) using iron sucrose, 17% (n=68) ferric gluconate, and 15% (N=60) low molecular weight iron dextran. Conclusion The approach to diagnosis and treatment of IDA in childhood was widely variable among responding ASPHO members. Given the lack of an evidence base to guide clinical decision making, further research investigating IDA management is needed. PMID:25663613