Science.gov

Sample records for al environ sci

  1. Authors response on Schick et al. 2017 "An experiment of the impact of a neonicotinoid pesticide on honey bees; the value of a formal analysis of the data". Environ Sci Eur (2017).

    PubMed

    Campbell, Peter; Coulson, Mike; Ward, Keith

    2017-01-01

    Whilst a formal statistical analysis of any experimental data is always preferable in principle, in the case of Pilling et al. (PLoS ONE 8:e77193, 2013), it is hard to see how the results of any formal analysis-including those provided by Schick et al.-could be considered reliable. Regardless of the issue of statistical analysis, there was a wealth of valuable and novel biological and chemical residue data generated under field conditions of use in Pilling et al., which when taken into consideration alongside other relevant available published data and information (i.e. expert judgement) demonstrated a low risk to honeybees from thiamethoxam when used as a seed treatment on oilseed rape. Indeed, similar conclusions have been reported in subsequent published honeybee field studies using thiamethoxam seed-treated oilseed rape, thus supporting the original conclusions of Pilling et al.

  2. SciEthics Interactive: Science and Ethics Learning in a Virtual Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nadolny, Larysa; Woolfrey, Joan; Pierlott, Matthew; Kahn, Seth

    2013-01-01

    Learning in immersive 3D environments allows students to collaborate, build, and interact with difficult course concepts. This case study examines the design and development of the TransGen Island within the SciEthics Interactive project, a National Science Foundation-funded, 3D virtual world emphasizing learning science content in the context of…

  3. SciServer: An Online Collaborative Environment for Big Data in Research and Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raddick, Jordan; Souter, Barbara; Lemson, Gerard; Taghizadeh-Popp, Manuchehr

    2017-01-01

    For the past year, SciServer Compute (http://compute.sciserver.org) has offered access to big data resources running within server-side Docker containers. Compute has allowed thousands of researchers to bring advanced analysis to big datasets like the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and others, while keeping the analysis close to the data for better performance and easier read/write access. SciServer Compute is just one part of the SciServer system being developed at Johns Hopkins University, which provides an easy-to-use collaborative research environment for astronomy and many other sciences.SciServer enables these collaborative research strategies using Jupyter notebooks, in which users can write their own Python and R scripts and execute them on the same server as the data. We have written special-purpose libraries for querying, reading, and writing data. Intermediate results can be stored in large scratch space (hundreds of TBs) and analyzed directly from within Python or R with state-of-the-art visualization and machine learning libraries. Users can store science-ready results in their permanent allocation on SciDrive, a Dropbox-like system for sharing and publishing files.SciServer Compute’s virtual research environment has grown with the addition of task management and access control functions, allowing collaborators to share both data and analysis scripts securely across the world. These features also open up new possibilities for education, allowing instructors to share datasets with students and students to write analysis scripts to share with their instructors. We are leveraging these features into a new system called “SciServer Courseware,” which will allow instructors to share assignments with their students, allowing students to engage with big data in new ways.SciServer has also expanded to include more datasets beyond the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. A part of that growth has been the addition of the SkyQuery component, which allows for simple, fast

  4. ScyFlow: An Environment for the Visual Specification and Execution of Scientific Workflows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCann, Karen M.; Yarrow, Maurice; DeVivo, Adrian; Mehrotra, Piyush

    2004-01-01

    With the advent of grid technologies, scientists and engineers are building more and more complex applications to utilize distributed grid resources. The core grid services provide a path for accessing and utilizing these resources in a secure and seamless fashion. However what the scientists need is an environment that will allow them to specify their application runs at a high organizational level, and then support efficient execution across any given set or sets of resources. We have been designing and implementing ScyFlow, a dual-interface architecture (both GUT and APT) that addresses this problem. The scientist/user specifies the application tasks along with the necessary control and data flow, and monitors and manages the execution of the resulting workflow across the distributed resources. In this paper, we utilize two scenarios to provide the details of the two modules of the project, the visual editor and the runtime workflow engine.

  5. GENESIS SciFlo: Scientific Knowledge Creation on the Grid Using a Semantically-Enabled Dataflow Execution Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, B. D.; Manipon, G.; Tang, B.; Mazzoni, D.; Fetzer, E.; Dobinson, E.; Yunck, T.

    2005-12-01

    The General Earth Science Investigation Suite (GENESIS) project is a NASA-sponsored partnership between the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, academia, and NASA data centers to develop a new suite of Web Services tools to facilitate multi-sensor investigations in Earth System Science. The goal of GENESIS is to enable large-scale, multi-instrument atmospheric science using combined datasets from the AIRS, MODIS, MISR, and GPS sensors. Investigations include cross-comparison of spaceborne climate sensors, cloud spectral analysis, study of upper troposphere-stratosphere water transport, study of the aerosol indirect cloud effect, and global climate model validation. The challenges are to bring together very large datasets, reformat and understand the individual instrument retrievals, co-register or re-grid the retrieved physical parameters, perform computationally-intensive data fusion and data mining operations, and accumulate complex statistics over months to years of data. To meet these challenges, we have developed a Grid computing and dataflow framework, named SciFlo, in which we are deploying a set of versatile and reusable operators for data access, subsetting, registration, mining, fusion, compression, and advanced statistical analysis. SciFlo is a system for Scientific Knowledge Creation on the Grid using a Semantically-Enabled Dataflow Execution Environment. SciFlo leverages Simple Object Access Protocol (SOAP) Web Services and the Grid Computing standards (WS-* & Globus Alliance toolkits), and enables scientists to do multi-instrument Earth Science by assembling reusable Web Services and native executables into a distributed computing flow (tree of operators). The SciFlo client & server engines optimize the execution of such distributed data flows and allow the user to transparently find and use datasets and operators without worrying about the actual location of the Grid resources. The scientist injects a distributed computation into the Grid by simply filling

  6. U-ALS: A Ubiquitous Learning Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piovesan, Sandra Dutra; Passerino, Liliana Maria; Medina, Roseclea Duarte

    2012-01-01

    The diffusion of the use of the learning virtual environments presents a great potential for the development of an application which meet the necessities in the education area. In view of the importance of a more dynamic application and that can adapt itself continuously to the students' necessities, the "U-ALS" (Ubiquitous Adapted Learning…

  7. A Comprehensive Evaluation of H2SO4 formation from OH and sCI pathways in high BVOC environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, S.; Seco, R.; Park, J. H.; Guenther, A. B.; Smith, J. N.; Kuang, C.; Bustillos, J. O. V.; Tota, J.; Souza, R. A. F. D.

    2014-12-01

    The recently highlighted importance of stabilized Criegee intermediates (sCI) as an oxidant for atmospheric SO2 triggered a number of studies to assess the atmospheric implications of H2SO4 formation from the sCI reaction pathway. In addition, it has not been clear why new particle formation events are not observed in the Amazon rain forest. The mostly widely speculated reason has been a very low H2SO4 level. We will present quantitative assessments of SO2 oxidation by sCI leading to the H2SO4 production using a comprehensive observational dataset from a tropical rainforest study during the GOAmazon field campaign at the T3 site in Manacapuru, Amazonas, Brazil. To our best knowledge, this is the first observation of H2SO4 and OH in Amazon and is unique for all tropical sites due to the accompanying comprehensive gas and aerosol observations such as CO, NOX, SO2, VOCs, and physical and chemical characteristics of aerosols. We will discuss observed H2SO4 levels during the GOAmazon field campaigns to demonstrate 1) H2SO4 formation potential from OH and sCI oxidation pathways by contrasting extremely clean and relatively polluted air masses and 2) the Implications of the observed H2SO4 levels in new particle formation and particle growth events.

  8. Comment on Neiser et al. Assessment of Dextran Antigenicity of Intravenous Iron Preparations with Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA). Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2016, 17, 1185.

    PubMed

    Strom, Claes C; Andreasen, Hans B

    2017-01-10

    All IV iron complexes carry a risk of potentially fatal allergic type hypersensitivity reactions. The mechanism(s) behind these reactions is unknown but the limited data available suggests that classic IgE mediated allergy is exceedingly rare, if ever occurring. Iron-carbohydrate molecules are complex nano-particles and trying to reduce the risk of serious hypersensitivity to antibody binding of an artificial antibody seems meaningless. A recently published analysis of safety data from randomized clinical trials confirms the method reported by Neiser to be useless to predict reaction risk. In conclusion, the study by Neiser et al. is biased, contains no new information, and has no clinical relevance. We are concerned that the association of the authors with a commercial entity has caused a conflict of interest that biases not only the results, but the entire experimental setup against competitors. (Comment on Neiser et al. Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2016, 17, 1185, doi:10.3390/ijms17071185).

  9. GENESIS SciFlo: Choreographing Interoperable Web Services on the Grid using a Semantically-Enabled Dataflow Execution Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, B. D.; Manipon, G.; Xing, Z.

    2007-12-01

    The General Earth Science Investigation Suite (GENESIS) project is a NASA-sponsored partnership between the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, academia, and NASA data centers to develop a new suite of Web Services tools to facilitate multi-sensor investigations in Earth System Science. The goal of GENESIS is to enable large-scale, multi-instrument atmospheric science using combined datasets from the AIRS, MODIS, MISR, and GPS sensors. Investigations include cross-comparison of spaceborne climate sensors, cloud spectral analysis, study of upper troposphere-stratosphere water transport, study of the aerosol indirect cloud effect, and global climate model validation. The challenges are to bring together very large datasets, reformat and understand the individual instrument retrievals, co-register or re-grid the retrieved physical parameters, perform computationally-intensive data fusion and data mining operations, and accumulate complex statistics over months to years of data. To meet these challenges, we have developed a Grid computing and dataflow framework, named SciFlo, in which we are deploying a set of versatile and reusable operators for data access, subsetting, registration, mining, fusion, compression, and advanced statistical analysis. SciFlo leverages remote Web Services, called via Simple Object Access Protocol (SOAP) or REST (one-line) URLs, and the Grid Computing standards (WS-* & Globus Alliance toolkits), and enables scientists to do multi- instrument Earth Science by assembling reusable Web Services and native executables into a distributed computing flow (tree of operators). The SciFlo client & server engines optimize the execution of such distributed data flows and allow the user to transparently find and use datasets and operators without worrying about the actual location of the Grid resources. In particular, SciFlo exploits the wealth of datasets accessible by OpenGIS Consortium (OGC) Web Mapping Servers & Web Coverage Servers (WMS/WCS), and by Open Data

  10. Comment on Neiser et al. Assessment of Dextran Antigenicity of Intravenous Iron Preparations with Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA). Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2016, 17, 1185.

    PubMed Central

    Strom, Claes C.; Andreasen, Hans B.

    2017-01-01

    All IV iron complexes carry a risk of potentially fatal allergic type hypersensitivity reactions. The mechanism(s) behind these reactions is unknown but the limited data available suggests that classic IgE mediated allergy is exceedingly rare, if ever occurring. Iron–carbohydrate molecules are complex nano-particles and trying to reduce the risk of serious hypersensitivity to antibody binding of an artificial antibody seems meaningless. A recently published analysis of safety data from randomized clinical trials confirms the method reported by Neiser to be useless to predict reaction risk. In conclusion, the study by Neiser et al. is biased, contains no new information, and has no clinical relevance. We are concerned that the association of the authors with a commercial entity has caused a conflict of interest that biases not only the results, but the entire experimental setup against competitors. (Comment on Neiser et al. Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2016, 17, 1185, doi:10.3390/ijms17071185). PMID:28075402

  11. Learning by Creating and Exchanging Objects: The SCY Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Jong, Ton; Van Joolingen, Wouter R.; Giemza, Adam; Girault, Isabelle; Hoppe, Ulrich; Kindermann, Jorg; Kluge, Anders; Lazonder, Ard W.; Vold, Vibeke; Weinberger, Armin; Weinbrenner, Stefan; Wichmann, Astrid; Anjewierden, Anjo; Bodin, Marjolaine; Bollen, Lars; D'Ham, Cedric; Dolonen, Jan; Engler, Jan; Geraedts, Caspar; Grosskreutz, Henrik; Hovardas, Tasos; Julien, Rachel; Lechner, Judith; Ludvigsen, Sten; Matteman, Yuri; Meistadt, Oyvind; Naess, Bjorge; Ney, Muriel; Pedaste, Margus; Perritano, Anthony; Rinket, Marieke; Von Schlanbusch, Henrik; Sarapuu, Tago; Schulz, Florian; Sikken, Jakob; Slotta, Jim; Toussaint, Jeremy; Verkade, Alex; Wajeman, Claire; Wasson, Barbara; Zacharia, Zacharias C.; Van Der Zanden, Martine

    2010-01-01

    Science Created by You (SCY) is a project on learning in science and technology domains. SCY uses a pedagogical approach that centres around products, called "emerging learning objects" (ELOs) that are created by students. Students work individually and collaboratively in SCY-Lab (the general SCY learning environment) on "missions" that are guided…

  12. Preface: SciDAC 2007

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keyes, David E.

    2007-09-01

    It takes a village to perform a petascale computation—domain scientists, applied mathematicians, computer scientists, computer system vendors, program managers, and support staff—and the village was assembled during 24-28 June 2007 in Boston's Westin Copley Place for the third annual Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing (SciDAC) 2007 Conference. Over 300 registered participants networked around 76 posters, focused on achievements and challenges in 36 plenary talks, and brainstormed in two panels. In addition, with an eye to spreading the vision for simulation at the petascale and to growing the workforce, 115 participants—mostly doctoral students and post-docs complementary to the conferees—were gathered on 29 June 2007 in classrooms of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology for a full day of tutorials on the use of SciDAC software. Eleven SciDAC-sponsored research groups presented their software at an introductory level, in both lecture and hands-on formats that included live runs on a local BlueGene/L. Computation has always been about garnering insight into the behavior of systems too complex to explore satisfactorily by theoretical means alone. Today, however, computation is about much more: scientists and decision makers expect quantitatively reliable predictions from simulations ranging in scale from that of the Earth's climate, down to quarks, and out to colliding black holes. Predictive simulation lies at the heart of policy choices in energy and environment affecting billions of lives and expenditures of trillions of dollars. It is also at the heart of scientific debates on the nature of matter and the origin of the universe. The petascale is barely adequate for such demands and we are barely established at the levels of resolution and throughput that this new scale of computation affords. However, no scientific agenda worldwide is pushing the petascale frontier on all its fronts as vigorously as SciDAC. The breadth of this conference

  13. Comment on "Rainfall erosivity in Europe" by Panagos et al. (Sci. Total Environ., 511, 801-814, 2015).

    PubMed

    Auerswald, Karl; Fiener, Peter; Gomez, José A; Govers, Gerard; Quinton, John N; Strauss, Peter

    2015-11-01

    Recently a rainfall erosivity map has been published. We show that the values of this map contain considerable bias because (i) the temporal resolution of the rain data was insufficient, which likely underestimates rain erosivity by about 20%, (ii) no attempt had been included to account for the different time periods that were used for different countries, which can modify rain erosivity by more than 50%, (iii) and likely precipitation data had been used instead of rain data and thus rain erosivity is overestimated in areas with significant snowfall. Furthermore, the seasonal distribution of rain erosivity is not provided, which does not allow using the erosivity map for erosion prediction in many cases. Although a rain erosivity map for Europe would be highly desirable, we recommend using the national erosivity maps until these problems have been solved. Such maps are available for many European countries.

  14. Comment on: "The ascent of kimberlite: Insights from olivine" by Brett R.C. et al. [Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 424 (2015) 119-131

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamenetsky, Vadim S.

    2016-04-01

    Brett et al. (2015) proposed a kimberlite factory model that ;…involves carbonatitic proto-kimberlite melts preferentially assimilating Opx xenocrysts as they transit the cratonic mantle lithosphere to evolve into silicic-hydrous melts that reach olivine saturation during ascent; (p. 130). A cornerstone of this model is a specific, carbonatitic composition of proto-kimberlite melts ascending through the subcratonic lithospheric mantle ;…whereby parental carbonatitic magmas are progressively converted to kimberlite (e.g., Russell et al., 2012, 2013; Bussweiler et al., 2015); (p. 120). The model by Brett et al. (2015) is based on observations of ;the carbonate-sealed cracks; in olivine that ;…strongly support to the hypothesis that all kimberlite magmas originate as carbonatitic-melts (e.g., Russell et al., 2012, 2013; Kamenetsky et al., 2013; Pilbeam et al., 2013; Kamenetsky and Yaxley, 2015; Bussweiler et al., 2015).; (p. 129). While the major thrust of the study by Brett et al. (2015) hinges on the premise that the parental kimberlite melt is carbonatitic, the overwhelming majority in the kimberlite community still prefers a carbonated ultramafic/ultrabasic composition for parental kimberlite melts. Thus the suggestion that kimberlites have an initial carbonatite composition is not less than ;a paradigm shift; in the kimberlite petrology. It appears that a carbonatite origin for kimberlites has been proposed in many studies that significantly pre-date the publications starting from 2012 that they cite, but which unfortunately are overlooked by Brett et al. (2015). It is, therefore, worth acknowledging the research which has previously advanced this unorthodox idea.

  15. Reply on: "Comment on: The ascent of kimberlite: Insights from olivine" authored by Brett R.C. et al. [Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 424 (2015) 119-131

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brett, R. Curtis; Russell, J. K.; Andrews, G. D. M.; Jones, T. J.

    2016-04-01

    The Kamenetsky (2016) comment on the Kimberlite Factory model proposed by Brett et al. (2015) asserts, ;A cornerstone of this model is a specific, carbonatitic composition of proto-kimberlite melts ascending through the sub-cratonic lithospheric mantle; and ;… the major thrust of the study hinges on the premise that the parental kimberlite melt is carbonatitic;. This is a clear misstatement of our central thesis, which is to utilize the attributes of olivine xenocrysts to constrain the physical ascent of kimberlite. Brett et al.'s study does not hinge on the premise that parental kimberlite melt is carbonatitic. Rather, our interpretation that kimberlite melt originates as near carbonatitic hinges on our novel observation that early ;carbonate sealed cracks provide evidence of melt being drawn into decompression cracks and precipitating; (p. 129). Our connection between this observation and our interpretation is tied explicitly to earlier published works ;in this regard, the carbonate-filled sealed cracks strongly support to the hypothesis that all kimberlite magmas originate as carbonatitic-melts (e.g.,Russell et al., 2012, 2013;Kamenetsky et al., 2013; Pilbeam et al., 2013; Kamenetsky and Yaxley, 2015; Bussweiler et al., 2015); (p. 129). To state that our interpretation is based on a pre-existing bias towards a model of a carbonatitic origin of kimberlite magmas is incorrect. Rather, our new observational data independently demonstrates that the presence of carbonate-sealed cracks formed during kimberlite ascent.

  16. A bibliography for the conclusions to the special issue of Science of the Total Environment concerning 'The water quality of UK rivers entering the North Sea'. Sci. Tot. Environ., this volume.

    PubMed

    Neal, C; Turner, H

    2000-05-05

    In this document, a bibliography for the conclusions to the special issue of Science of the Total Environment concerning 'The water quality of UK rivers entering the North Sea'. Sci. Tot. Environ., this volume, is presented. It comprises a list of the papers presented in five special issues in learned journals, three in Science of the Total Environment (this volume and volumes 194/195, 1997 and 210/211, 1998) as well as Hydrological Processes (1999, vol 13: Special Issue, River Basin Sediment Dynamics, eds. Anderson, M.G., Peters, N.E. and Walling, D.E.) and Marine Pollution Bulletin [1999, vol 37(3-7) Special Issue: Flux of Materials between Rivers and Coastal Waters, eds. Stebbing, A.R.D., Huntley, D. and Leeks, G.J.L.]. The bibliography comprises six main sections with subsections for specific water quality issues. These are as follows: Section 1 deals with the introduction to LOIS and contained in this section is background material over the nature of the programme, the study area, remit, water quality issues and international context. Section 2 provides the main meat to the bibliography and it splits into Section 2.1 historical and Section 2.2 current water quality issues. Within Section 2.2 there are subsections dealing with specific current aspects of water quality (Section 2.2.1, major ions; Section 2.2.2, pH, dissolved carbon dioxide and dissolved oxygen; Section 2.2.3 nutrients; Section 2.2.4, trace elements; Section 2.2.5 micro-organics; Section 2.2.6 sediments; Section 2.2.7 biology). Section 3 deals with hydrology and climate variability, Section 4, modelling, Section 5 load estimation and Section 6 conclusions. A full listing of the LOIS programme is available from the LOIS programme office, CCMS, Plymouth Laboratory, Prospect Place, West Hoe, Plymouth, PL1 3DH, UK (e-mail lois@ccms.ac.uk).

  17. Comment on "Adsorption of hydrogen and hydrocarbon molecules on SiC(001)" by Pollmann et al. (Surf. Sci. Rep. 69 (2014) 55-104)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wimmer, E.; Celasco, E.; Vattuone, L.; Savio, L.; Tejeda, A.; Silly, M.; D'angelo, M.; Sirotti, F.; Rocca, M.; Catellani, A.; Galli, G.; Douillard, L.; Semond, F.; Aristov, V. Yu.; Soukiassian, P.

    2016-02-01

    This comment clarifies two issues related to the (001) surface reconstructions of cubic SiC, namely: (i) The failure of the bridge-bond model for H atoms interacting with the 3C-SiC(001) 3 × 2 reconstruction to explain all the experimental data based on different techniques, while a recent model has reconciled theory and experimental results. This model has not been discussed or even mentioned in the review by Pollmann et al.; and (ii) In their review, two models of the Si-terminated c(4 × 2) 3C-SiC(001) surface reconstruction are presented as equally probable. This is clearly not the case and the reasons are explained in this comment.

  18. Validation environment for AIPS/ALS: Implementation and results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Segall, Zary; Siewiorek, Daniel; Caplan, Eddie; Chung, Alan; Czeck, Edward; Vrsalovic, Dalibor

    1990-01-01

    The work is presented which was performed in porting the Fault Injection-based Automated Testing (FIAT) and Programming and Instrumentation Environments (PIE) validation tools, to the Advanced Information Processing System (AIPS) in the context of the Ada Language System (ALS) application, as well as an initial fault free validation of the available AIPS system. The PIE components implemented on AIPS provide the monitoring mechanisms required for validation. These mechanisms represent a substantial portion of the FIAT system. Moreover, these are required for the implementation of the FIAT environment on AIPS. Using these components, an initial fault free validation of the AIPS system was performed. The implementation is described of the FIAT/PIE system, configured for fault free validation of the AIPS fault tolerant computer system. The PIE components were modified to support the Ada language. A special purpose AIPS/Ada runtime monitoring and data collection was implemented. A number of initial Ada programs running on the PIE/AIPS system were implemented. The instrumentation of the Ada programs was accomplished automatically inside the PIE programming environment. PIE's on-line graphical views show vividly and accurately the performance characteristics of Ada programs, AIPS kernel and the application's interaction with the AIPS kernel. The data collection mechanisms were written in a high level language, Ada, and provide a high degree of flexibility for implementation under various system conditions.

  19. iSocial: delivering the Social Competence Intervention for Adolescents (SCI-A) in a 3D virtual learning environment for youth with high functioning autism.

    PubMed

    Stichter, Janine P; Laffey, James; Galyen, Krista; Herzog, Melissa

    2014-02-01

    One consistent area of need for students with autism spectrum disorders is in the area of social competence. However, the increasing need to provide qualified teachers to deliver evidence-based practices in areas like social competence leave schools, such as those found in rural areas, in need of support. Distance education and in particular, 3D Virtual Learning, holds great promise for supporting schools and youth to gain social competence through knowledge and social practice in context. iSocial, a distance education, 3D virtual learning environment implemented the 31-lesson social competence intervention for adolescents across three small cohorts totaling 11 students over a period of 4 months. Results demonstrated that the social competence curriculum was delivered with fidelity in the 3D virtual learning environment. Moreover, learning outcomes suggest that the iSocial approach shows promise for social competence benefits for youth.

  20. Preface: SciDAC 2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Horst

    2009-07-01

    By almost any measure, the SciDAC community has come a long way since DOE launched the SciDAC program back in 2001. At the time, we were grappling with how to efficiently run applications on terascale systems (the November 2001 TOP500 list was led by DOE's ASCI White IBM system at Lawrence Livermore achieving 7.2 teraflop/s). And the results stemming from the first round of SciDAC projects were summed up in two-page reports. The scientific results were presented at annual meetings, which were by invitation only and typically were attended by about 75 researchers. Fast forward to 2009 and we now have SciDAC Review, a quarterly magazine showcasing the scientific computing contributions of SciDAC projects and related programs, all focused on presenting a comprehensive look at Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing. That is also the motivation behind the annual SciDAC conference that in 2009 was held from June 14-18 in San Diego. The annual conference, which can also be described as a celebration of all things SciDAC, grew out those meetings organized in the early days of the program. In 2005, the meeting was held in San Francisco and attendance was opened up to all members of the SciDAC community. The schedule was also expanded to include a keynote address, plenary speakers and other features found in a conference format. This year marks the fifth such SciDAC conference, which now comprises four days of computational science presentations, multiple poster sessions and, since last year, an evening event showcasing simulations and modeling runs resulting from SciDAC projects. The fifth annual SciDAC conference was remarkable on several levels. The primary purpose, of course, is to showcase the research accomplishments resulting from SciDAC programs in particular and computational science in general. It is these accomplishments, represented in 38 papers and 52 posters, that comprise this set of conference proceedings. These proceedings can stand alone as

  1. Sci-Vis Framework

    SciTech Connect

    Arthur Bleeker, PNNL

    2015-03-11

    SVF is a full featured OpenGL 3d framework that allows for rapid creation of complex visualizations. The SVF framework handles much of the lifecycle and complex tasks required for a 3d visualization. Unlike a game framework SVF was designed to use fewer resources, work well in a windowed environment, and only render when necessary. The scene also takes advantage of multiple threads to free up the UI thread as much as possible. Shapes (actors) in the scene are created by adding or removing functionality (through support objects) during runtime. This allows a highly flexible and dynamic means of creating highly complex actors without the code complexity (it also helps overcome the lack of multiple inheritance in Java.) All classes are highly customizable and there are abstract classes which are intended to be subclassed to allow a developer to create more complex and highly performant actors. There are multiple demos included in the framework to help the developer get started and shows off nearly all of the functionality. Some simple shapes (actors) are already created for you such as text, bordered text, radial text, text area, complex paths, NURBS paths, cube, disk, grid, plane, geometric shapes, and volumetric area. It also comes with various camera types for viewing that can be dragged, zoomed, and rotated. Picking or selecting items in the scene can be accomplished in various ways depending on your needs (raycasting or color picking.) The framework currently has functionality for tooltips, animation, actor pools, color gradients, 2d physics, text, 1d/2d/3d textures, children, blending, clipping planes, view frustum culling, custom shaders, and custom actor states

  2. Preface: SciDAC 2006

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, William M., Dr.

    2006-01-01

    The second annual Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing (SciDAC) Conference was held from June 25-29, 2006 at the new Hyatt Regency Hotel in Denver, Colorado. This conference showcased outstanding SciDAC-sponsored computational science results achieved during the past year across many scientific domains, with an emphasis on science at scale. Exciting computational science that has been accomplished outside of the SciDAC program both nationally and internationally was also featured to help foster communication between SciDAC computational scientists and those funded by other agencies. This was illustrated by many compelling examples of how domain scientists collaborated productively with applied mathematicians and computer scientists to effectively take advantage of terascale computers (capable of performing trillions of calculations per second) not only to accelerate progress in scientific discovery in a variety of fields but also to show great promise for being able to utilize the exciting petascale capabilities in the near future. The SciDAC program was originally conceived as an interdisciplinary computational science program based on the guiding principle that strong collaborative alliances between domain scientists, applied mathematicians, and computer scientists are vital to accelerated progress and associated discovery on the world's most challenging scientific problems. Associated verification and validation are essential in this successful program, which was funded by the US Department of Energy Office of Science (DOE OS) five years ago. As is made clear in many of the papers in these proceedings, SciDAC has fundamentally changed the way that computational science is now carried out in response to the exciting challenge of making the best use of the rapid progress in the emergence of more and more powerful computational platforms. In this regard, Dr. Raymond Orbach, Energy Undersecretary for Science at the DOE and Director of the OS has stated

  3. FAQs about Spinal Cord Injury (SCI)

    MedlinePlus

    ... spinal cord injury? Where is the nearest SCI Model System of Care? Emergency Medical Services Hospital (Acute) Care Rehabilitation More ... spinal cord injury? Where is the nearest SCI Model System of Care? Follow Us! Get Email Updates Questions & Comments Suggest ...

  4. Preface: SciDAC 2005

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mezzacappa, Anthony

    2005-01-01

    On 26-30 June 2005 at the Grand Hyatt on Union Square in San Francisco several hundred computational scientists from around the world came together for what can certainly be described as a celebration of computational science. Scientists from the SciDAC Program and scientists from other agencies and nations were joined by applied mathematicians and computer scientists to highlight the many successes in the past year where computation has led to scientific discovery in a variety of fields: lattice quantum chromodynamics, accelerator modeling, chemistry, biology, materials science, Earth and climate science, astrophysics, and combustion and fusion energy science. Also highlighted were the advances in numerical methods and computer science, and the multidisciplinary collaboration cutting across science, mathematics, and computer science that enabled these discoveries. The SciDAC Program was conceived and funded by the US Department of Energy Office of Science. It is the Office of Science's premier computational science program founded on what is arguably the perfect formula: the priority and focus is science and scientific discovery, with the understanding that the full arsenal of `enabling technologies' in applied mathematics and computer science must be brought to bear if we are to have any hope of attacking and ultimately solving today's computational Grand Challenge problems. The SciDAC Program has been in existence for four years, and many of the computational scientists funded by this program will tell you that the program has given them the hope of addressing their scientific problems in full realism for the very first time. Many of these scientists will also tell you that SciDAC has also fundamentally changed the way they do computational science. We begin this volume with one of DOE's great traditions, and core missions: energy research. As we will see, computation has been seminal to the critical advances that have been made in this arena. Of course, to

  5. Corrigendum to 'The crystal structures of m,o-Ce3Pt4Sn6 and Ce1-xPt6Al13+2x' [Solid State Sci. 55 (2016) 48-57

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paschinger, Werner; Yubuta, Kunio; Saiga, Yuta; Takabatake, Toshiro; Giester, Gerald; Rogl, Peter

    2017-03-01

    The authors regret that a misleading version of Table 3 concerning the crystallographic data for the compound ;Ce1-xPt6Al13+2x; was reported. The correct formula of the compound is Ce1-xPt6Al16+2x. The occupancies shown in the corrected Table 3 (enclosed) for the defect sites Ce1, Al11, Al12 are the results of free parameter refinements and it is comforting to see that the sum (0.587(Ce1) + ½[0.414(Al11) + 0.414(Al12)] = 1) reaches full occupation.

  6. Novel Target for Ameliorating Pain and Other Problems after SCI: Spontaneous Activity in Nociceptors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    Pain gests that interventions preferentially targeting nociceptive pri- mary afferent neurons, such as antagonists of Nav1.8 (Jarvis et al., 2007) or... pain afflicts a majority of SCI patients (Dijkers et al., 2009). This pain is typically divided into two major classes, nociceptive and neuropathic...Bryce et al., 2012). The largest prospective pain study of patients with traumatic SCI found that moderate-to-severe nociceptive and neuro- pathic pain

  7. Opening Comments: SciDAC 2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strayer, Michael

    2008-07-01

    Welcome to Seattle and the 2008 SciDAC Conference. This conference, the fourth in the series, is a continuation of the PI meetings we first began under SciDAC-1. I would like to start by thanking the organizing committee, and Rick Stevens in particular, for organizing this year's meeting. This morning I would like to look briefly at SciDAC, to give you a brief history of SciDAC and also look ahead to see where we plan to go over the next few years. I think the best description of SciDAC, at least the simulation part, comes from a quote from Dr Ray Orbach, DOE's Under Secretary for Science and Director of the Office of Science. In an interview that appeared in the SciDAC Review magazine, Dr Orbach said, `SciDAC is unique in the world. There isn't any other program like it anywhere else, and it has the remarkable ability to do science by bringing together physical scientists, mathematicians, applied mathematicians, and computer scientists who recognize that computation is not something you do at the end, but rather it needs to be built into the solution of the very problem that one is addressing'. Of course, that is extended not just to physical scientists, but also to biological scientists. This is a theme of computational science, this partnership among disciplines, which goes all the way back to the early 1980s and Ken Wilson. It's a unique thread within the Department of Energy. SciDAC-1, launched around the turn of the millennium, created a new generation of scientific simulation codes. It advocated building out mathematical and computing system software in support of science and a new collaboratory software environment for data. The original concept for SciDAC-1 had topical centers for the execution of the various science codes, but several corrections and adjustments were needed. The ASCR scientific computing infrastructure was also upgraded, providing the hardware facilities for the program. The computing facility that we had at that time was the big 3

  8. Preface: SciDAC 2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, Rick

    2008-07-01

    The fourth annual Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing (SciDAC) Conference was held June 13-18, 2008, in Seattle, Washington. The SciDAC conference series is the premier communitywide venue for presentation of results from the DOE Office of Science's interdisciplinary computational science program. Started in 2001 and renewed in 2006, the DOE SciDAC program is the country's - and arguably the world's - most significant interdisciplinary research program supporting the development of advanced scientific computing methods and their application to fundamental and applied areas of science. SciDAC supports computational science across many disciplines, including astrophysics, biology, chemistry, fusion sciences, and nuclear physics. Moreover, the program actively encourages the creation of long-term partnerships among scientists focused on challenging problems and computer scientists and applied mathematicians developing the technology and tools needed to address those problems. The SciDAC program has played an increasingly important role in scientific research by allowing scientists to create more accurate models of complex processes, simulate problems once thought to be impossible, and analyze the growing amount of data generated by experiments. To help further the research community's ability to tap into the capabilities of current and future supercomputers, Under Secretary for Science, Raymond Orbach, launched the Innovative and Novel Computational Impact on Theory and Experiment (INCITE) program in 2003. The INCITE program was conceived specifically to seek out computationally intensive, large-scale research projects with the potential to significantly advance key areas in science and engineering. The program encourages proposals from universities, other research institutions, and industry. During the first two years of the INCITE program, 10 percent of the resources at NERSC were allocated to INCITE awardees. However, demand for supercomputing resources

  9. Opening Remarks: SciDAC 2007

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strayer, Michael

    2007-09-01

    superheated ionic gas in the ITER reactor as a result of an AORSA run on 22,500 processors that achieved over 87 trillion calculations per second (87 teraflops) which is 74% of the system's theoretical peak. Tomorrow, Argonne and IBM will announce that the first IBM Blue Gene/P, a 100 teraflop system, will be shipped to the Argonne Leadership Computing Facility later this fiscal year. By the end of FY2007 ASCR high performance and leadership computing resources will include the 114 teraflop IBM Blue Gene/P; a 102 teraflop Cray XT4 at NERSC and a 119 teraflop Cray XT system at Oak Ridge. Before ringing in the New Year, Oak Ridge will upgrade to 250 teraflops with the replacement of the dual core processors with quad core processors and Argonne will upgrade to between 250-500 teraflops, and next year, a petascale Cray Baker system is scheduled for delivery at Oak Ridge. The multidisciplinary teams in our SciDAC Centers for Enabling Technologies and our SciDAC Institutes must continue to work with our Scientific Application teams to overcome the barriers that prevent effective use of these new systems. These challenges include: the need for new algorithms as well as operating system and runtime software and tools which scale to parallel systems composed of hundreds of thousands processors; program development environments and tools which scale effectively and provide ease of use for developers and scientific end users; and visualization and data management systems that support moving, storing, analyzing, manipulating and visualizing multi-petabytes of scientific data and objects. The SciDAC Centers, located primarily at our DOE national laboratories will take the lead in ensuring that critical computer science and applied mathematics issues are addressed in a timely and comprehensive fashion and to address issues associated with research software lifecycle. In contrast, the SciDAC Institutes, which are university-led centers of excellence, will have more flexibility to pursue

  10. Reply to Comment on: “Direct evidence of ancient shock metamorphism at the site of the 1908 Tunguska event”, by P. Vannucchi et al. [Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 409 (2015) 168-174

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vannucchi, Paola; Morgan, Jason P.

    2015-06-01

    The comment by Schmieder et al. (in press) concentrates on the viability of the quartz planar microdeformation features (PMFs) (or deformation lamellae) presented by Vannucchi et al. (2015) to infer the presence of shock metamorphism in the area of the 1908 Tunguska event. Their comment focuses on two points: The quartz PMFs that are shown in Vannucchi et al. are not produced by shock metamorphism.

  11. Complementary and alternative therapies and SCI nursing.

    PubMed

    Oliver, N R

    2001-01-01

    Increasing numbers of individuals are experimenting with different complementary and alternative techniques and practices in their quest to improve their health status or change symptom experiences. Consumer utilization patterns are described, activities to ensure the safety and efficacy of alternative practices are reviewed, and relationships to nursing interventions and nursing responsibilities are presented. The relationship between complementary/alternative therapies and spinal cord injury (SCI) nursing practice, education, and research are described, as well as strategies for integrating these therapies into SCI nursing. The potential roles for SCI nurses and benefits to individuals with SCI are unlimited.

  12. Comment on: “Direct evidence of ancient shock metamorphism at the site of the 1908 Tunguska event”, by P. Vannucchi et al. [Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 409 (2015) 168-174

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmieder, Martin; Ferrière, Ludovic; Ormö, Jens; Buchner, Elmar; Koeberl, Christian; Reimold, Wolf Uwe

    2015-06-01

    Vannucchi et al. (2015) report alleged 'shock metamorphic' features in Permian sandstone clasts associated with the Siberian Trap basalts at Mount Stojkovic inside the Great Tunguska Depression, only a few kilometers away from the site of the 1908 Tunguska event. Given the low probability that these features have formed by either the Tunguska event or by an older impact in the same area, Vannucchi et al. argue that these features may in fact not be diagnostic for impact, but could also be related to explosive volcanism.

  13. Ultrasonic Al2O3 Ceramic Thermometry in High-Temperature Oxidation Environment

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Yanlong; Gao, Yubin; Xiao, Zhaoqian; Wang, Gao; Tian, Miao; Liang, Haijian

    2016-01-01

    In this study, an ultrasonic temperature measurement system was designed with Al2O3 high-temperature ceramic as an acoustic waveguide sensor and preliminarily tested in a high-temperature oxidation environment. The test results indicated that the system can indeed work stably in high-temperature environments. The relationship between the temperature and delay time of 26 °C–1600 °C ceramic materials was also determined in order to fully elucidate the high-temperature oxidation of the proposed waveguide sensor and to lay a foundation for the further application of this system in temperatures as high as 2000 °C. PMID:27845726

  14. SciDB and Geoinformatics Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Paul

    2015-04-01

    The SciDB project took as its design goals a list of features identified as being critical to scientific data management in a survey of working scientists (Stonebraker et al 2009). Earth scientists working with remote sensing data were well represented among those polled so it should come as no surprise that the platform has been embraced by that community. In this talk we focus on work done by researchers at NASA and INPE, and on applications created by commercial data providers in Korea and the United States. For each use-case, we will review the project team's objectives, the nature and quantity of the data involved, the their workload queries. As we discuss each use-case we will describe what is emerging as "best practice" for data management and analysis in this space. M. Stonebraker, J. Becla, D. J. DeWitt, K. T. Lim, D. Maier, O. Ratzesberger, and S. B. Zdonik. Requirements for science data bases and scidb. In CIDR 2009, Fourth Biennial Conference on Innovative Data Systems Research, Asilomar, CA, USA, January 4-7, 2009, Online Proceedings, 2009.

  15. Hydrogen effects on the mechanical properties of Al-Li 2090 alloy in an acid environment

    SciTech Connect

    Velez, E.; Sundaram, P.A.

    1998-01-06

    Although aluminum-lithium alloys are attractive materials for aeronautic and aerospace applications because of their lower density and higher elastic modulus compared to conventional aluminum alloys, their bane is their poor ductility and susceptibility to environment induced cracking (EIC). EIC of Al-Li alloys has been fairly well researched and the role of hydrogen in causing this phenomenon has been proposed. Of the various mechanisms proposed to explain the phenomenon of hydrogen embrittlement (HE) in Al-Li alloys, the formation of brittle hydrides, LiH and LiAlH{sub 4} has been indicated as the cause of embrittlement. This mechanism has been accepted widely, both for precharged specimens and in stress-corrosion cracking. Literature is not consistent with regard to the phenomenon of HE in Al-Li alloys, believed to be due to the widely varying experimental conditions used by each group of investigators. There is also no general agreement on the effect of aging temper on HE in these alloys. Some investigators note that the HE resistance is poor for the overaged (OA) condition while others claim the underaged (UA) temper as having poor resistance to HE. Some others have also reported that the peak aged (PA) temper is most resistant to HE. Most studies of HE for the Al-Li alloy system has been carried out in a NaOH environment. The main objective of this study is to obtain an understanding of the effect of hydrogen on the mechanical properties of a 2090 commercial alloy using electrolytic charging conditions in an acid environment for different tempers.

  16. Reply to comment on "Direct evidence of ancient shock metamorphism at the site of the 1908 Tunguska event" by Vannucchi et al. (Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 409 (2015) 168-174)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vannucchi, Paola; Morgan, Jason P.

    2015-04-01

    Our paper (Vannucchi et al., 2015) focuses on geologic evidence for shock metamorphism found at the epicentral region of the 1908 Tunguska event. None of the currently proposed bolide explanations for the 1908 event can produce the shock pressures indicated by the geological evidence described in Vannucchi et al. (2015). If the 1908 event would have generated these pressures over the epicentral region, an observable crater should have also formed. The comment by Melott and Overholt discusses the possibility that a 1908 cometary bolide strike in Tunguska cannot be excluded because of the absence of a detectable 14C increase at this site. They dispute the findings of a recent Liu et al.'s (2014) study that an East Asian comet impact recorded by eyewitness accounts in 773 AD was coincident with a detectable 14C increase in regional South China Sea corals that grew at that time. Their point, whether true or not, is fairly peripheral to our study because the bolide hypothesis for the 1908 Tunguska event, no matter the nature of the bolide itself, does not provide a viable explanation for the geological evidence of shock metamorphism found at the 1908 Tunguska site. Furthermore, as we discuss in our paper, the probability of a prior large impact-shock event having occurred at the site of the 1908 event is extremely low, suggesting that a terrestrial shock-generating mechanism may be linked to the resolution of the Tunguska enigma. Our preferred resolution is that a terrestrial hyper-explosive gas release event, a Verneshot (Morgan et al., 2004), created the large shock-event during the emplacement of the Siberian Traps. In this scenario, the 1908 Tunguska event was due to a much smaller gas-burst that re-used the lithospheric weakness created by the ancient Verneshot. Melott and Overholt's discussion regarding the existence and size of regional and global 14C anomalies related to cometary impacts seems, therefore, to be better addressed in response to the work of Liu et

  17. Comment on "Direct evidence of ancient shock metamorphism at the site of the 1908 Tunguska event" by Vannucchi et al. (Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 409 (2015) 168-174)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melott, Adrian L.; Overholt, Andrew C.

    2015-04-01

    An enormous explosion, reportedly aerial, over Tunguska, Siberia in 1908 is commonly thought to be a bolide of some type, possibly a rocky or metallic asteroid, or an icy comet. Vannucchi et al. (2015) present a variety of arguments against the bolide hypothesis. They argue that the lack of unambiguous meteoritic material in the area excludes rocky or metallic asteroids, and that the lack of a 14C anomaly in the geoisotope record excludes a comet. They then present evidence of shock metamorphism in the area which they attribute to a volcanic superexplosion. We show here that the exclusion of a comet based on the isotopic record and the work of Liu et al. (2014) is incorrect.

  18. Case study of a sabkha sedimentary environment: Mallahat al Bariquah, Libya

    SciTech Connect

    Krason, J.

    1987-05-01

    The importance of the sabkha sedimentary environment for formation and/or accumulation of hydrocarbons, salts, and various metalliferous mineral deposits has been recognized by many geologists. A sabkha in which sedimentation and the formation of salt deposits and hydrocarbons is in progress is located along the Mediterranean Sea coast, in northwestern Libya and northeastern Tunisia. The sabkha Mallahat al Bariquah was drilled in a regular grid at 1-km spacing; 63 holes have been completed. The sabkha and its vicinity were geologically mapped (1:20,000). Several hundred core and loose rock samples were thoroughly examined with regard to the lithology, mineralogy, paleontology, and chemical composition. The chemistry of brine from each drill hole and solar pan was determined. Three 24-hour pumping tests were performed, and the hydrogeological conditions of the sabkha were analyzed in detail. Economically valuable bedded salt reserves of 170,800,000 MT of NaCl were discovered and proven. Additionally, over 30 million MT of potassium, magnesium, and sodium salts including bromides are recoverable from the brine. Although marine-coastal sabkhas are common, the extensive scope of this study is unique. Mallahat al Bariquah sabkha is not unique with regard to its geographic, climatic, or sedimentary environments. Therefore, Mallahat al Bariquah can be considered as a model applicable in exploration for and study of similar sedimentary environments in other geographic regions and older geologic epochs.

  19. Corrosion performance of Fe-Cr-Al and Fe aluminide alloys in complex gas environments

    SciTech Connect

    Natesan, K.; Johnson, R.N.

    1995-05-01

    Alumina-forming structural alloys can offer superior resistance to corrosion in the presence of sulfur-containing environments, which are prevalent in coal-fired fossil energy systems. Further, Fe aluminides are being developed for use as structural materials and/or cladding alloys in these systems. Extensive development has been in progress on Fe{sub 3}Al-based alloys to improve their engineering ductility. In addition, surface coatings of Fe aluminide are being developed to impart corrosion resistance to structural alloys. This paper describes results from an ongoing program that is evaluating the corrosion performance of alumina-forming structural alloys, Fe-Al and Fe aluminide bulk alloys, and Fe aluminide coatings in environments typical of coal-gasification and combustion atmospheres. Experiments were conducted at 650-1000{degrees}C in simulated oxygen/sulfur gas mixtures. Other aspects of the program are corrosion evaluation of the aluminides in the presence of HCl-containing gases. Results are used to establish threshold Al levels in the alloys for development of protective alumina scales and to determine the modes of corrosion degradation that occur in the materials when they are exposed to S/Cl-containing gaseous environments.

  20. [SciELO: method for electronic publishing].

    PubMed

    Laerte Packer, A; Rocha Biojone, M; Antonio, I; Mayumi Takemaka, R; Pedroso García, A; Costa da Silva, A; Toshiyuki Murasaki, R; Mylek, C; Carvalho Reisl, O; Rocha F Delbucio, H C

    2001-01-01

    It describes the SciELO Methodology Scientific Electronic Library Online for electronic publishing of scientific periodicals, examining issues such as the transition from traditional printed publication to electronic publishing, the scientific communication process, the principles which founded the methodology development, its application in the building of the SciELO site, its modules and components, the tools use for its construction etc. The article also discusses the potentialities and trends for the area in Brazil and Latin America, pointing out questions and proposals which should be investigated and solved by the methodology. It concludes that the SciELO Methodology is an efficient, flexible and wide solution for the scientific electronic publishing.

  1. Comment on “40Ar / 39Ar dating of the Rajahmundry Traps, eastern India and their relationship to the Deccan Traps” by Knight et al. [Earth Planet Sci. Lett. 208 (2003) 85 99

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baksi, Ajoy K.

    2005-11-01

    Knight et al. presented age and chemical data on two (sets of) lava flows from the Rajahmundry area, on either bank of the Godavari River. The age and petrogenesis of these flows and their possible link to sections of the main Deccan Province are of importance to the understanding of many aspects of flood basalt volcanism. I comment on (a) the use of geochemical fingerprints for lava identification/correlation at Rajahmundry, superceding (apparent) field relations, (b) their 40Ar / 39Ar data and its refinement based on statistical tests and the alteration state of the samples (c) correlation of age data and the magnetic polarity of the lavas to the geomagnetic polarity time scale and (d) the possibility that both lavas at Rajahmundry were formed by intracanyon flows derived from ˜1000 km away.

  2. Comment on “Isotopic fractionation between Fe(III) and Fe(II) in aqueous solutions” by Clark Johnson et al., [Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 195 (2002) 141–153

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bullen, Thomas D.; White, Arthur F.; Childs, Cyril W.

    2003-01-01

    In a recent contribution [1], Johnson et al. reported the equilibrium isotope fractionation factor between dissolved Fe(II) and Fe(III) in aqueous solutions at pH=2.5 and 5.5. They suggest that because the iron isotope fractionation observed in their experiments spans virtually the entire range observed in sedimentary rocks, Fe(II)–Fe(III) aqueous speciation may play a major role in determining iron isotope variations in nature where Fe(II) and Fe(III) can become physically separated. They discounted earlier conclusions by us and others [2] ;  [3] that significant equilibrium fractionation between specific coexisting Fe(II)- or Fe(III)-aqueous complexes (e.g., between aqueous Fe(II)(OH)x(aq)and Fe(II)(aq) ion) is capable of producing iron isotope contrasts that can be preserved in nature. This is an important contribution not only because the authors recognize the importance of abiotic equilibrium iron isotope fractionation in nature in contrast to previous assertions [4], but also because it will help to focus discussion on the development and evaluation of experimental approaches that can reveal abiotic fractionation mechanisms. However, in this Comment we propose that the experiments presented in this paper cannot be interpreted as straightforwardly as Johnson et al. contend. In particular, we show that in one of their critical experiments attainment of either isotope mass balance or equilibrium was not demonstrated, and thus the results of that experiment cannot be used to calculate an Fe(II)–Fe(III) equilibrium fractionation factor.

  3. Factors Affecting the Hydrogen Environment Assisted Cracking Resistance of an AL-Zn-Mg-(Cu) Alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Young, G A; Scully, J R

    2002-04-09

    Precipitation hardenable Al-Zn-Mg alloys are susceptible to hydrogen environment assisted cracking (HEAC) when exposed to aqueous environments. In Al-Zn-Mg-Cu alloys, overaged tempers are used to increase HEAC resistance at the expense of strength but overaging has little benefit in low copper alloys. However, the mechanism or mechanisms by which overaging imparts HEAC resistance is poorly understood. The present research investigated hydrogen uptake, diffusion, and crack growth rate in 90% relative humidity (RH) air for both a commercial copper bearing Al-Zn-Mg-Cu alloy (AA 7050) and a low copper variant of this alloy in order to better understand the factors which affect HEAC resistance. Experimental methods used to evaluate hydrogen concentrations local to a surface and near a crack tip include nuclear reaction analysis (NRA), focused ion beam, secondary ion mass spectroscopy (FIB/SIMS) and thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS). Results show that overaging the copper bearing alloys both inhibits hydrogen ingress from oxide covered surfaces and decreases the apparent hydrogen diffusion rates in the metal.

  4. 2H and 27Al solid-state NMR study of the local environments in Al-doped 2-line ferrihydrite, goethite, and lepidocrocite

    DOE PAGES

    Kim, Jongsik; Ilott, Andrew J.; Middlemiss, Derek S.; ...

    2015-05-13

    Although substitution of aluminum into iron oxides and oxyhydroxides has been extensively studied, it is difficult to obtain accurate incorporation levels. Assessing the distribution of dopants within these materials has proven especially challenging because bulk analytical techniques cannot typically determine whether dopants are substituted directly into the bulk iron oxide or oxyhydroxide phase or if they form separate, minor phase impurities. These differences have important implications for the chemistry of these iron-containing materials, which are ubiquitous in the environment. In this work, 27Al and 2H NMR experiments are performed on series of Al-substituted goethite, lepidocrocite, and 2-line ferrihydrite in ordermore » to develop an NMR method to track Al substitution. The extent of Al substitution into the structural frameworks of each compound is quantified by comparing quantitative 27Al MAS NMR results with those from elemental analysis. Magnetic measurements are performed for the goethite series to compare with NMR measurements. Static 27Al spin–echo mapping experiments are used to probe the local environments around the Al substituents, providing clear evidence that they are incorporated into the bulk iron phases. As a result, predictions of the 2H and 27Al NMR hyperfine contact shifts in Al-doped goethite and lepidocrocite, obtained from a combined first-principles and empirical magnetic scaling approach, give further insight into the distribution of the dopants within these phases.« less

  5. Compatibility of the Zr-Al alloy with a tokamak plasma environment

    SciTech Connect

    Knize, R.J.; Cecchi, J.L.; Dylla, H.F.

    1981-12-01

    We have investigated the compatibility of the Zr-Al alloy bulk getter with a tokamak plasma environment, where the hydrogenic fluxes are sufficient to cause embrittlement in relatively short times. Under normal operating conditions with the getters activated, it is necessary to regenerate the absorbed hydrogenic species before the embrittlement limit is reached. We present a method for determining the loading under tokamak conditions where the Zr-Al surface characteristics can change. During glow discharge cleaning and pulse discharge cleaning, it is not convenient to regenerate. We find, however, that during the cleaning operations the getter self-inerts, thus limiting the loading. We present data and a model which accounts for this behavior in terms of impurity adsorption on the room temperature getter surface during the cleaning operations.

  6. Stress Corrosion Cracking in Al-Zn-Mg-Cu Aluminum Alloys in Saline Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holroyd, N. J. Henry; Scamans, G. M.

    2013-03-01

    Stress corrosion cracking of Al-Zn-Mg-Cu (AA7xxx) aluminum alloys exposed to saline environments at temperatures ranging from 293 K to 353 K (20 °C to 80 °C) has been reviewed with particular attention to the influences of alloy composition and temper, and bulk and local environmental conditions. Stress corrosion crack (SCC) growth rates at room temperature for peak- and over-aged tempers in saline environments are minimized for Al-Zn-Mg-Cu alloys containing less than ~8 wt pct Zn when Zn/Mg ratios are ranging from 2 to 3, excess magnesium levels are less than 1 wt pct, and copper content is either less than ~0.2 wt pct or ranging from 1.3 to 2 wt pct. A minimum chloride ion concentration of ~0.01 M is required for crack growth rates to exceed those in distilled water, which insures that the local solution pH in crack-tip regions can be maintained at less than 4. Crack growth rates in saline solution without other additions gradually increase with bulk chloride ion concentrations up to around 0.6 M NaCl, whereas in solutions with sufficiently low dichromate (or chromate), inhibitor additions are insensitive to the bulk chloride concentration and are typically at least double those observed without the additions. DCB specimens, fatigue pre-cracked in air before immersion in a saline environment, show an initial period with no detectible crack growth, followed by crack growth at the distilled water rate, and then transition to a higher crack growth rate typical of region 2 crack growth in the saline environment. Time spent in each stage depends on the type of pre-crack ("pop-in" vs fatigue), applied stress intensity factor, alloy chemistry, bulk environment, and, if applied, the external polarization. Apparent activation energies ( E a) for SCC growth in Al-Zn-Mg-Cu alloys exposed to 0.6 M NaCl over the temperatures ranging from 293 K to 353 K (20 °C to 80 °C) for under-, peak-, and over-aged low-copper-containing alloys (<0.2 wt pct) are typically ranging from

  7. Astronomy Popularization via Sci-fi Movies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qingkang

    2015-08-01

    It is astronomers’ duty to let more and more young people know a bit astronomy and be interested in astronomy and appreciate the beauty and great achievements in astronomy. One of the most effective methods to popularize astronomy to young people nowadays might be via enjoying some brilliant sci-fi movies related to astronomy with some guidance from astronomers. Firstly, we will introduce the basic information of our selective course “Appreciation of Sci-fi Movies in Astronomy” for the non-major astronomy students in our University, which is surely unique in China, then we will show its effect on astronomy popularization based on several rounds of teaching.

  8. Factors Affecting the Hydrogen Environment Assisted Cracking Resistance of an Al-Zn-Mg-(Cu) Alloy

    SciTech Connect

    G.A. Young; J.R. Scully

    2001-09-12

    It is well established that Al-Zn-Mg-(Cu) aluminum alloys are susceptible to hydrogen environment assisted cracking (HEAC) when exposed to aqueous environments. In Al-Zn-Mg-Cu alloys, overaged tempers are commonly used to increase HEAC resistance at the expense of strength. Overaging has little benefit in low copper alloys. However, the mechanism or mechanisms by which overaging imparts HEAC resistance is poorly understood. The present research investigated hydrogen uptake, diffusion, and crack growth rate in 90% relative humidity (RH) air for both a commercial copper bearing Al-Zn-Mg-Cu alloy (AA 7050) and a low copper variant of this alloy in order to better understand the factors which affect HEAC resistance. Experimental methods used to evaluate hydrogen concentrations local to a surface and near a crack tip include nuclear reaction analysis (NRA), focused ion beam, secondary ion mass spectroscopy (FIB/SIMS) and thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS). When freshly bared coupons of AA 7050 are exposed to 90 C, 90% RH air, hydrogen ingress follows inverse-logarithmic-type kinetics and is equivalent for underaged (HEAC susceptible) and overaged (HEAC resistant) tempers. However, when the native oxide is allowed to form (24 hrs in 25 C, 40% RH lab air) prior to exposure to 90 C, 90% RH air, underaged alloy shows significantly greater hydrogen ingress than the overaged alloy. Humid air is a very aggressive environment producing local ({approx}1{micro}m) hydrogen concentrations in excess of 10,000 wt. ppm at 90 C. In the copper bearing alloy, overaging also effects the apparent diffusivity of hydrogen. As AA 7050 is aged from underaged {yields} peak aged {yields} overaged, the activation energy for hydrogen diffusion increases and the apparent diffusivity for hydrogen decreases, In the low copper alloy, overaging has little effect on hydrogen diffusion. Comparison of the apparent activation energies for hydrogen diffusion and for K independent (stage II) crack growth

  9. Aggregation and Colloidal Stability of Commercially Available Al2O3 Nanoparticles in Aqueous Environments

    PubMed Central

    Mui, Julie; Ngo, Jennifer; Kim, Bojeong

    2016-01-01

    The aggregation and colloidal stability of three, commercially-available, gamma-aluminum oxide nanoparticles (γ-Al2O3 NPs) (nominally 5, 10, and 20–30 nm) were systematically examined as a function of pH, ionic strength, humic acid (HA) or clay minerals (e.g., montmorillonite) concentration using dynamic light scattering and transmission electron microscopy techniques. NPs possess pH-dependent surface charges, with a point of zero charge (PZC) of pH 7.5 to 8. When pH < PZC, γ-Al2O3 NPs are colloidally stable up to 100 mM NaCl and 30 mM CaCl2. However, significant aggregation of NPs is pronounced in both electrolytes at high ionic strength. In mixed systems, both HA and montmorillonite enhance NP colloidal stability through electrostatic interactions and steric hindrance when pH ≤ PZC, whereas their surface interactions are quite limited when pH > PZC. Even when pH approximates PZC, NPs became stable at a HA concentration of 1 mg·L−1. The magnitude of interactions and dominant sites of interaction (basal planes versus edge sites) are significantly dependent on pH because both NPs and montmorillonite have pH-dependent (conditional) surface charges. Thus, solution pH, ionic strength, and the presence of natural colloids greatly modify the surface conditions of commercial γ-Al2O3 NPs, affecting aggregation and colloidal stability significantly in the aqueous environment. PMID:28335218

  10. Preliminary base heating environments for a generalized ALS LO2/LH2 launch vehicle, appendix 1 and 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bender, Robert L.; Reardon, John E.

    1989-01-01

    A secondary objective of contract NAS8-39141 is to provide base heating assessments, as required, to support Advanced Launch System (ALS) preliminary launch vehicle and propulsion system design studies. The ALS propulsion systems integration working group meeting (No. 3) recently completed in San Diego, California, focused attention on the need for base heating environment determination to provide preliminary requirements for LO2/LH2 propulsion systems currently being considered for ALS. We were requested to provide these environments for a range of possible propellant mixture and nozzle area ratios. Base heating environments can only be determined as a function of altitude when the engine operating conditions and vehicle base region geometry (engine arrangement) are known. If time dependent environments are needed to assess thermal loads, a trajectory must also be provided. These parameters are not fixed at this time since the ALS configurations and propulsion operating conditions are varied and continue to be studied by Phase B contractors. Therefore, for this study, a generalized LO2/LH2 system was selected along with a vehicle configuration consisting of a seven-engine booster and a three-engine core. MSFC provided guidance for the selection. We also selected a limited number of body points on the booster and core vehicles and engines for the environment estimates. Environments at these locations are representative of maximum heating conditions in the base region and are provided as a function of altitude only. Guidelines and assumptions for this assessment, methodology for determining the environments, and preliminary results are provided in this technical note. Refinements in the environments will be provided as the ALS design matures.

  11. Preliminary base heating environments for a generalized ALS LO2/LH2 launch vehicle, appendix 1 and 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bender, Robert L.; Reardon, John E.

    1989-10-01

    A secondary objective of contract NAS8-39141 is to provide base heating assessments, as required, to support Advanced Launch System (ALS) preliminary launch vehicle and propulsion system design studies. The ALS propulsion systems integration working group meeting (No. 3) recently completed in San Diego, California, focused attention on the need for base heating environment determination to provide preliminary requirements for LO2/LH2 propulsion systems currently being considered for ALS. We were requested to provide these environments for a range of possible propellant mixture and nozzle area ratios. Base heating environments can only be determined as a function of altitude when the engine operating conditions and vehicle base region geometry (engine arrangement) are known. If time dependent environments are needed to assess thermal loads, a trajectory must also be provided. These parameters are not fixed at this time since the ALS configurations and propulsion operating conditions are varied and continue to be studied by Phase B contractors. Therefore, for this study, a generalized LO2/LH2 system was selected along with a vehicle configuration consisting of a seven-engine booster and a three-engine core. MSFC provided guidance for the selection. We also selected a limited number of body points on the booster and core vehicles and engines for the environment estimates. Environments at these locations are representative of maximum heating conditions in the base region and are provided as a function of altitude only. Guidelines and assumptions for this assessment, methodology for determining the environments, and preliminary results are provided in this technical note. Refinements in the environments will be provided as the ALS design matures.

  12. SciServer Compute brings Analysis to Big Data in the Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raddick, Jordan; Medvedev, Dmitry; Lemson, Gerard; Souter, Barbara

    2016-06-01

    SciServer Compute uses Jupyter Notebooks running within server-side Docker containers attached to big data collections to bring advanced analysis to big data "in the cloud." SciServer Compute is a component in the SciServer Big-Data ecosystem under development at JHU, which will provide a stable, reproducible, sharable virtual research environment.SciServer builds on the popular CasJobs and SkyServer systems that made the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) archive one of the most-used astronomical instruments. SciServer extends those systems with server-side computational capabilities and very large scratch storage space, and further extends their functions to a range of other scientific disciplines.Although big datasets like SDSS have revolutionized astronomy research, for further analysis, users are still restricted to downloading the selected data sets locally - but increasing data sizes make this local approach impractical. Instead, researchers need online tools that are co-located with data in a virtual research environment, enabling them to bring their analysis to the data.SciServer supports this using the popular Jupyter notebooks, which allow users to write their own Python and R scripts and execute them on the server with the data (extensions to Matlab and other languages are planned). We have written special-purpose libraries that enable querying the databases and other persistent datasets. Intermediate results can be stored in large scratch space (hundreds of TBs) and analyzed directly from within Python or R with state-of-the-art visualization and machine learning libraries. Users can store science-ready results in their permanent allocation on SciDrive, a Dropbox-like system for sharing and publishing files. Communication between the various components of the SciServer system is managed through SciServer‘s new Single Sign-on Portal.We have created a number of demos to illustrate the capabilities of SciServer Compute, including Python and R scripts

  13. Weldability of Fe-Al-Cr Overlay Coatings for CorrosionProtection in Oxidizing/Sulfidizing Environments

    SciTech Connect

    Regina, JR

    2003-03-04

    The effect of chromium additions to the weldability of Fe-Al based overlay claddings are currently being investigated for the corrosion protection of boiler tubes in Low NOx furnaces. The primary objective of this research is to identify weldable (crack-free) Fe-Al-Cr weld overlay coating compositions that provide corrosion resistance over long exposure times. During the current project phase, preliminary corrosion testing was conducted on several ternary Fe-Al-Cr alloys in two types of gaseous corrosion environments. These long-term corrosion tests were used to develop a target weld composition matrix and serve as a base line for future corrosion tests. Preliminary Fe-Al based welds with various aluminum concentrations and one ternary Fe-Al-Cr weld overlay were successfully deposited using a Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW) process and cracking susceptibility was evaluated on these coatings.

  14. MgAl2O4 spinel refractory as containment liner for high-temperature alkali salt containing environments

    DOEpatents

    Peascoe-Meisner, Roberta A [Knoxville, TN; Keiser, James R [Oak Ridge, TN; Hemric, James G [Knoxville, TN; Hubbard, Camden R [Oak Ridge, TN; Gorog, J Peter [Kent, WA; Gupta, Amul [Jamestown, NY

    2008-10-21

    A method includes containing a high-temperature alkali salt containing environment using a refractory containment liner containing MgAl.sub.2O.sub.4 spinel. A method, includes forming a refractory brick containing MgAl.sub.2O.sub.4 spinel having an exterior chill zone defined by substantially columnar crystallization and an interior zone defined by substantially equiaxed crystallization; and removing at least a portion of the exterior chill zone from the refractory brick containing MgAl.sub.2O.sub.4 spinel by scalping the refractory brick containing MgAl.sub.2O.sub.4 spinel to define at least one outer surface having an area of substantially equiaxed crystallization. A product of manufacture includes a refractory brick containing MgAl.sub.2O.sub.4 spinel including an interior zone defined by substantially equiaxed crystallization; and at least one outer surface having an area of substantially equiaxed crystallization.

  15. Uniform corrosion of FeCrAl alloys in LWR coolant environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terrani, K. A.; Pint, B. A.; Kim, Y.-J.; Unocic, K. A.; Yang, Y.; Silva, C. M.; Meyer, H. M.; Rebak, R. B.

    2016-10-01

    The corrosion behavior of commercial and model FeCrAl alloys and type 310 stainless steel was examined by autoclave tests and compared to Zircaloy-4, the reference cladding materials in light water reactors. The corrosion studies were carried out in three distinct water chemistry environments found in pressurized and boiling water reactor primary coolant loop conditions for up to one year. The structure and morphology of the oxides formed on the surface of these alloys was consistent with thermodynamic predictions. Spinel-type oxides were found to be present after hydrogen water chemistry exposures, while the oxygenated water tests resulted in the formation of very thin and protective hematite-type oxides. Unlike the alloys exposed to oxygenated water tests, the alloys tested in hydrogen water chemistry conditions experienced mass loss as a function of time. This mass loss was the result of net sum of mass gain due to parabolic oxidation and mass loss due to dissolution that also exhibits parabolic kinetics. The maximum thickness loss after one year of LWR water corrosion in the absence of irradiation was ∼2 μm, which is inconsequential for a ∼300-500 μm thick cladding.

  16. Uniform corrosion of FeCrAl alloys in LWR coolant environments

    DOE PAGES

    Terrani, K. A.; Pint, B. A.; Kim, Y. -J.; ...

    2016-06-29

    The corrosion behavior of commercial and model FeCrAl alloys and type 310 stainless steel was examined by autoclave tests and compared to Zircaloy-4, the reference cladding materials in light water reactors. The corrosion studies were carried out in three distinct water chemistry environments found in pressurized and boiling water reactor primary coolant loop conditions for up to one year. The structure and morphology of the oxides formed on the surface of these alloys was consistent with thermodynamic predictions. Spinel-type oxides were found to be present after hydrogen water chemistry exposures, while the oxygenated water tests resulted in the formation ofmore » very thin and protective hematite-type oxides. Unlike the alloys exposed to oxygenated water tests, the alloys tested in hydrogen water chemistry conditions experienced mass loss as a function of time. This mass loss was the result of net sum of mass gain due to parabolic oxidation and mass loss due to dissolution that also exhibits parabolic kinetics. Finally, the maximum thickness loss after one year of LWR water corrosion in the absence of irradiation was ~2 μm, which is inconsequential for a ~300–500 μm thick cladding.« less

  17. Uniform corrosion of FeCrAl alloys in LWR coolant environments

    SciTech Connect

    Terrani, K. A.; Pint, B. A.; Kim, Y. -J.; Unocic, K. A.; Yang, Y.; Silva, C. M.; Meyer, III, H. M.; Rebak, R. B.

    2016-06-29

    The corrosion behavior of commercial and model FeCrAl alloys and type 310 stainless steel was examined by autoclave tests and compared to Zircaloy-4, the reference cladding materials in light water reactors. The corrosion studies were carried out in three distinct water chemistry environments found in pressurized and boiling water reactor primary coolant loop conditions for up to one year. The structure and morphology of the oxides formed on the surface of these alloys was consistent with thermodynamic predictions. Spinel-type oxides were found to be present after hydrogen water chemistry exposures, while the oxygenated water tests resulted in the formation of very thin and protective hematite-type oxides. Unlike the alloys exposed to oxygenated water tests, the alloys tested in hydrogen water chemistry conditions experienced mass loss as a function of time. This mass loss was the result of net sum of mass gain due to parabolic oxidation and mass loss due to dissolution that also exhibits parabolic kinetics. Finally, the maximum thickness loss after one year of LWR water corrosion in the absence of irradiation was ~2 μm, which is inconsequential for a ~300–500 μm thick cladding.

  18. OPENING REMARKS: SciDAC: Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strayer, Michael

    2005-01-01

    Good morning. Welcome to SciDAC 2005 and San Francisco. SciDAC is all about computational science and scientific discovery. In a large sense, computational science characterizes SciDAC and its intent is change. It transforms both our approach and our understanding of science. It opens new doors and crosses traditional boundaries while seeking discovery. In terms of twentieth century methodologies, computational science may be said to be transformational. There are a number of examples to this point. First are the sciences that encompass climate modeling. The application of computational science has in essence created the field of climate modeling. This community is now international in scope and has provided precision results that are challenging our understanding of our environment. A second example is that of lattice quantum chromodynamics. Lattice QCD, while adding precision and insight to our fundamental understanding of strong interaction dynamics, has transformed our approach to particle and nuclear science. The individual investigator approach has evolved to teams of scientists from different disciplines working side-by-side towards a common goal. SciDAC is also undergoing a transformation. This meeting is a prime example. Last year it was a small programmatic meeting tracking progress in SciDAC. This year, we have a major computational science meeting with a variety of disciplines and enabling technologies represented. SciDAC 2005 should position itself as a new corner stone for Computational Science and its impact on science. As we look to the immediate future, FY2006 will bring a new cycle to SciDAC. Most of the program elements of SciDAC will be re-competed in FY2006. The re-competition will involve new instruments for computational science, new approaches for collaboration, as well as new disciplines. There will be new opportunities for virtual experiments in carbon sequestration, fusion, and nuclear power and nuclear waste, as well as collaborations

  19. Life expectancy of modular Ti6Al4V hip implants: influence of stress and environment.

    PubMed

    Chandra, A; Ryu, J J; Karra, P; Shrotriya, P; Tvergaard, V; Gaisser, M; Weik, T

    2011-11-01

    Stress dependent electrochemical dissolution is identified as one of the key mechanisms governing surface degradation in fretting and crevice corrosion of biomedical implants. The present study focuses on delineating the roles of mechanical stress and chemical conditions on the life expectancy of modular hip implants. First, material removal on a stressed surface of Ti6Al4V subjected to single asperity contact is investigated experimentally to identify the influence of contact load, in-plane stress and chemical environment on mean wear rates. A range of known stress levels are applied to the specimen while its surface is mechanically stimulated in different non-reactive to oxidizing aqueous environments. Evolution of surface degradation is monitored, and its mechanism is elucidated. This phase allows estimation of Preston Constant which is later used in the analysis. Second phase of the work is semi-analytical and computational, where, based on the estimated Preston constant and other material and process parameters, the scratch propensity (consisting of magnitude of scratch depth and their frequency per unit area) due to micro-motion in modular hip implants is estimated. The third phase views these scratches as initial notches and utilizes a mixed-mode fatigue crack propagation model to estimate the critical crack length for onset of instability. The number of loading cycles needed to reach this critical crack length is then labeled as the expected life of the implant under given mechanical and chemical conditions. Implications of different material and process conditions to life expectancy of orthopedic implants are discussed. It is observed that transverse micro-motion, compared to longitudinal micro-motion, plays a far more critical role in determining the implant life. Patient body weight, as well as proximity of the joint fluid to its iso-electric point play key roles in determining wear rates and associated life expectancies of modular hip implants

  20. SciFi - A large scintillating fibre tracker for LHCb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirn, Thomas

    2017-02-01

    The LHCb detector will be upgraded during the Long Shutdown 2 (LS2) of the LHC in order to cope with higher instantaneous luminosities and to read out the data at 40 MHz using a trigger-less read-out system. All front-end electronics will be replaced and several sub-detectors must be redesigned to cope with higher occupancy. The current tracking detectors downstream of the LHCb dipole magnet will be replaced by the Scintillating Fibre (SciFi) Tracker. Concept, design and operational parameters are driven by the challenging LHC environment including significant ionising and neutron radiation levels. Over a total active surface of 360 m2 the SciFi Tracker will use scintillating fibres (∅ = 0.25 mm) read out by state-of-the-art multi-channel Silicon Photomultipliers (SiPMs) arrays. A custom ASIC will be used to digitise the signals from the SiPMs. The project is now at the transition from R&D to series production. We will present the evolution of the design and the latest lab and test beam results.

  1. Web life: Planet SciCast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2009-08-01

    So what is the site about? Planet SciCast is an online repository for short films about science - a bit like a science-specific, moderated version of YouTube. As of July 2009, the site hosts over 150 films on topics ranging from CERN's Large Hadron Collider to fun things to do with treacle. New content appears on the site every few weeks, and some films include links to information about related experiments, demos and activities. The site also runs an annual competition aimed at getting more people involved in making science films, with prizes in categories like "best original score" and "best presenter".

  2. Using SciDB to Support Photon Science Data Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Becla, Jack; Wang, Daniel; lim, Kian-Tat; /SLAC

    2012-02-15

    Array data analytic systems like SciDB hold great potential to accelerate processing data from SLAC's Linac Coherent Light Source and other experiments. SciDB is unique in its ability to integrate storage and processing of array data efficiently, providing both space-efficient storage and out-of-memory efficient parallel array processing. We describe a recent effort to leverage SciDB to store and process LCLS data. The work includes development of software to import data into SciDB, subsequent benchmarks, and interactive manipulation of data in SciDB.

  3. Public Data Set: Erratum: "Multi-point, high-speed passive ion velocity distribution diagnostic on the Pegasus Toroidal Experiment" [Rev. Sci. Instrum. 83, 10D516 (2012)

    SciTech Connect

    Burke, Marcus G.; Fonck, Raymond J.; Bongard, Michael W.; Schlossberg, David J.; Winz, Gregory R.

    2016-07-18

    This data set contains openly-documented, machine readable digital research data corresponding to figures published in M.G. Burke et al., 'Erratum: "Multi-point, high-speed passive ion velocity distribution diagnostic on the Pegasus Toroidal Experiment" [Rev. Sci. Instrum. 83, 10D516 (2012)],' Rev. Sci. Instrum. 87, 079902 (2016).

  4. Biomaterial scaffolds used for the regeneration of spinal cord injury (SCI).

    PubMed

    Kim, Moonhang; Park, So Ra; Choi, Byung Hyune

    2014-11-01

    This review presents a summary of various types of scaffold biomaterials used alone or together with therapeutic drugs and cells to regenerate spinal cord injury (SCI). The inhibitory environment and loss of axonal connections after SCI give rise to critical obstacles to regeneration of lost tissues and neuronal functions. Biomaterial scaffolds can provide a bridge to connect lost tissues, an adhesion site for implanted or host cells, and sustained release of therapeutic drugs in the injured spinal cord. In addition, they not only provide a structural platform, but can play active roles by inhibiting apoptosis of cells, inflammation and scar formation, and inducing neurogenesis, axonal growth and angiogenesis. Many synthetic and natural biomaterial scaffolds have been extensively investigated and tested in vitro and in animal SCI models for these purposes. We summarized the literature on the biomaterials commonly used for spinal cord regeneration in terms of historical backgrounds and current approaches.

  5. Wear Behavior of Al-SiC Metal Matrix Composite under various Corrosive Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradhan, Smrutiranjan; Barman, Tapan Kumar; Sahoo, Prasanta; Sutradhar, Goutam

    2016-09-01

    This paper investigates the wear behavior under corrosive environments of LM6 based metal matrix composite reinforced with 5 wt% SiC prepared through the stir casting method. The experiments are carried out in a pin-on-disk tribotester varying five levels of normal load and sliding speed. The duration of each experiment is fixed for 30 minutes. Three environments viz. dry, deionised and dilute acid environments are considered to carry out the tribological tests. The composite exhibits slightly good wear resistance under low load and speed condition but weight loss increases as these parameters increases in all three environments. Maximum weight loss occurs in case of acid environment as it is more corrosive than dry and deionised environment. The wear surface of the composite is examined through the scanning electron microscopic (SEM) and energy dispersive x-ray analysis (EDX).

  6. SciDAC Institute for Ultrascale Visualization

    SciTech Connect

    Humphreys, Grigori R.

    2008-09-30

    The Institute for Ultrascale Visualization aims to address visualization needs of SciDAC science domains, including research topics in advanced scientific visualization architectures, algorithms, and interfaces for understanding large, complex datasets. During the current project period, the focus of the team at the University of Virginia has been interactive remote rendering for scientific visualization. With high-performance computing resources enabling increasingly complex simulations, scientists may desire to interactively visualize huge 3D datasets. Traditional large-scale 3D visualization systems are often located very close to the processing clusters, and are linked to them with specialized connections for high-speed rendering. However, this tight coupling of processing and display limits possibilities for remote collaboration, and prohibits scientists from using their desktop workstations for data exploration. In this project, we are developing a client/server system for interactive remote 3D visualization on desktop computers.

  7. Opening Comments: SciDAC 2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strayer, Michael

    2009-07-01

    Welcome to San Diego and the 2009 SciDAC conference. Over the next four days, I would like to present an assessment of the SciDAC program. We will look at where we've been, how we got to where we are and where we are going in the future. Our vision is to be first in computational science, to be best in class in modeling and simulation. When Ray Orbach asked me what I would do, in my job interview for the SciDAC Director position, I said we would achieve that vision. And with our collective dedicated efforts, we have managed to achieve this vision. In the last year, we have now the most powerful supercomputer for open science, Jaguar, the Cray XT system at the Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility (OLCF). We also have NERSC, probably the best-in-the-world program for productivity in science that the Office of Science so depends on. And the Argonne Leadership Computing Facility offers architectural diversity with its IBM Blue Gene/P system as a counterbalance to Oak Ridge. There is also ESnet, which is often understated—the 40 gigabit per second dual backbone ring that connects all the labs and many DOE sites. In the President's Recovery Act funding, there is exciting news that ESnet is going to build out to a 100 gigabit per second network using new optical technologies. This is very exciting news for simulations and large-scale scientific facilities. But as one noted SciDAC luminary said, it's not all about the computers—it's also about the science—and we are also achieving our vision in this area. Together with having the fastest supercomputer for science, at the SC08 conference, SciDAC researchers won two ACM Gordon Bell Prizes for the outstanding performance of their applications. The DCA++ code, which solves some very interesting problems in materials, achieved a sustained performance of 1.3 petaflops, an astounding result and a mark I suspect will last for some time. The LS3DF application for studying nanomaterials also required the development of a

  8. A millenium approach to Data Acquisition: SCI and PCI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Hans; Bogaerts, A.; Lindenstruth, V.

    The international SCI standard IEEE/ANSI 1596a [Ref. 1.] is on its way to become the computer interconnect of the year 2000 since for a first time, low latency desktop multiprocessing and cluster computing can be implemented at low cost. The PCI bus is todays's dominating local bus extension for all major computer platforms as well as for buses like VMEbus. PCI is a self configuring memory and I/O system for peripheral components with a hierarchical architecture. SCI is a scalable, bus-like interconnect for distributed processors and memories. It allows for optionally coherent data caching and assures errorfree data delivery. First measurement with commercial SCI products (SBUS-SCI) confirm simulations that SCI can handle even the highest data rates of LHC experiments. The eventbuilder layer for a millenium very high rate DAQ system can therefore be viewed as a SCI network ( bridges, cables & switches) interfaced between PCI buses on the frontend (VMEb ) side and on the processor farm ( Multi-CPU) side. Such a combination of SCI and PCI enables PCI-PCI memory access, transparently across SCI. It also allows for a novel, low level trigger technique: the trigger algorithm can access VME data buffers with bus-like latencies like local memory, i.e. full data transfers become redundent. The first prototype of a PCI-SCI bridge for DAQ is presented as starting point for a test system with built-in scalability.

  9. In situ evolution of trivalent chromium process passive film on Al in a corrosive aqueous environment.

    PubMed

    Dong, Xuecheng; Argekar, Sandip; Wang, Peng; Schaefer, Dale W

    2011-11-01

    In situ neutron reflectivity (NR) is used to observe the structure and evolution of a Trivalent Chromium Process (TCP) passive film on Al in a NaCl-D(2)O solution. Using a split liquid reflectivity cell we mimicked the corrosion process on the anodic sites in alloy AA 2024-T3 in a pitting scenario. The split cell separates the anodic and cathodic reactions, allowing NR observation of the corroding anodic surface under potential control. We observed the evolution of the TCP film on the Al anode and compared the degradation of the Al with and without TCP protection. When held at 100 mV above the open-circuit potential (OCP), unprotected aluminum dissolves at a rate of 120 Å/h. By contrast, TCP-coated Al is stable up to the pitting potential (200 mV above OCP). In the passive state D(2)O molecules penetrate the bulk TCP film by partially replacing the hydrate water. In spite of exchange of hydration water, the TCP film is stable and the underlying aluminum is fully protected. The passive character of the TCP film is due to a dense layer at the metal-TCP interface and/or to suppression of ion transport in the bulk film. As the pitting potential is approached the film swells and NaCl-D(2)O solution penetrates the TCP film. At this point, 50 vol % of the TCP film is occupied by bulk NaCl-D(2)O solution. Failure occurs by aluminum dissolution under the swollen TCP film as the imbibed solution contacts the Al metal. Further increase in potential leads to complete stripping of the TCP film.

  10. Probing the local environment of substitutional Al^{3+} in goethite using X-ray absorption spectroscopy and first-principles calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ducher, Manoj; Blanchard, Marc; Vantelon, Delphine; Nemausat, Ruidy; Cabaret, Delphine

    2016-03-01

    We present experimental and calculated Al K-edge X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectra of aluminous goethite with 10-33 mol% of AlOOH and diaspore. Significant changes are observed experimentally in the near- and pre-edge regions with increasing Al concentration in goethite. First-principles calculations based on density functional theory (DFT) reproduce successfully the experimental trends. This permits to identify the electronic and structural parameters controlling the spectral features and to improve our knowledge of the local environment of {Al}^{3+} in the goethite-diaspore partial solid solution. In the near-edge region, the larger peak spacing in diaspore compared to Al-bearing goethite is related to the nature (Fe or Al) of the first cation neighbours around the absorbing Al atom (Al*). The intensity ratio of the two near-edge peaks, which decreases with Al concentration, is correlated with the average distance of the first cations around Al* and the distortion of the {AlO}_6 octahedron. Finally, the decrease in intensity of the pre-edge features with increasing Al concentration is due to the smaller number of Fe atoms in the local environment of Al since Al atoms tend to cluster. In addition, it is found that the pre-edge features of the Al K-edge XANES spectra enable to probe indirectly empty 3 d states of Fe. Energetic, structural and spectroscopic results suggest that for Al concentrations around 10 mol%, Al atoms can be considered as isolated, whereas above 25 mol%, Al clusters are more likely to occur.

  11. GeoSciML version 3: A GML application for geologic information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    International Union of Geological Sciences., I. C.; Richard, S. M.

    2011-12-01

    orientation (e.g. 'miarolitic cavities'). The Earth material package allows for the description of both individual components, such as minerals, and compound materials, such as rocks or unconsolidated materials. Provision is made for alteration, weathering, metamorphism, particle geometry, fabric, and petrophysical descriptions. Mapped features describe the shape of the geological features using standard GML geometries, such as polygons, lines, points or 3D volumes. Geological events provide the age, process and environment of formation of geological features. The Earth Resource section includes features to represent mineral occurrences and mines and associated human activities independently. This addition allows description of resources and reserves that can comply with national and internationally accepted reporting codes. GeoSciML v3 is under consideration as the data model for INSPIRE annex 2 geologic reporting in Europe.

  12. Performance of Plasma Sprayed Al2O3 Coating in Bio-Simulated Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yıldız, F.; Yetim, A. F.; Alsaran, A.; Çelik, A.

    2014-01-01

    Alumina coatings deposited on the surface of stainless steel 316L by the method of plasma spraying are studied. Tests for wear and corrosion are preformed in Ringer's solution simulating a human body environment. The structure, microhardness, wear resistance and corrosion resistance of the steel are determined with and without a coating. Deposition of a coating onto the stainless steel is shown to be an effective means for protecting implants from corrosion and wear.

  13. Experiences using SciPy for computer vision research

    SciTech Connect

    Eads, Damian R; Rosten, Edward J

    2008-01-01

    SciPy is an effective tool suite for prototyping new algorithms. We share some of our experiences using it for the first time to support our research in object detection. SciPy makes it easy to integrate C code, which is essential when algorithms operating on large data sets cannot be vectorized. The universality of Python, the language in which SciPy was written, gives the researcher access to a broader set of non-numerical libraries to support GUI development, interface with databases, manipulate graph structures. render 3D graphics, unpack binary files, etc. Python's extensive support for operator overloading makes SciPy's syntax as succinct as its competitors, MATLAB, Octave, and R. More profoundly, we found it easy to rework research code written with SciPy into a production application, deployable on numerous platforms.

  14. Cold Spraying of Cu-Al-Bronze for Cavitation Protection in Marine Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krebs, S.; Gärtner, F.; Klassen, T.

    2015-01-01

    Traveling at high speeds, ships have to face the problem of rudder cavitation-erosion. At present, the problem is countered by fluid dynamically optimized rudders, synthetic, and weld-cladded coatings on steel basis. Nevertheless, docking and repair is required after certain intervals. Bulk Cu-Al-bronzes are in use at ships propellers to withstand corrosion and cavitation. Deposited as coatings with bulk-like properties, such bronzes could also enhance rudder life times. The present study investigates the coating formation by cold spraying CuAl10Fe5Ni5 bronze powders. By calculations of the impact conditions, the range of optimum spray parameters was preselected in terms of the coating quality parameter η on steel substrates with different temperatures. As-atomized and annealed powders were compared to optimize cavitation resistance of the coatings. Results provide insights about the interplay between the mechanical properties of powder and substrate for coating formation. Single particle impact morphologies visualize the deformation behavior. Coating performance was assessed by analyzing microstructures, bond strength, and cavitation resistance. These first results demonstrate that cold-sprayed bronze coatings have a high potential for ensuring a good performances in rudder protection. With further optimization, such coatings could evolve towards a competitive alternative to existing anti-cavitation procedures.

  15. 75 FR 24747 - SCI, LLC/Zener-Rectifier Operations Division A Wholly Owned Subsidiary of SCI, LLC/ON...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-05

    ... Phoenix, AZ; Amended Certification Regarding Eligibility To Apply for Worker Adjustment Assistance In... of SCI, LLC/ON Semiconductor, Phoenix, Arizona. The notice was published in the Federal Register on... at the Phoenix Arizona location of SCI LLC/Zener-Rectifier, Operations Division, a wholly...

  16. SciJourn is magic: construction of a science journalism community of practice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicholas, Celeste R.

    2016-01-01

    This article is the first to describe the discoursal construction of an adolescent community of practice (CoP) in a non-school setting. CoPs can provide optimal learning environments. The adolescent community centered around science journalism and positioned itself dichotomously in relationship to school literacy practices. The analysis focuses on recordings from a panel-style research interview from an early implementation of the Science Literacy Through Science Journalism (SciJourn) project. Researchers trained high school students participating in a youth development program to write science news articles. Students engaged in the authentic practices of professional science journalists, received feedback from a professional editor, and submitted articles for publication. I used a fine-grained critical discourse analysis of genre, discourse, and style to analyze student responses about differences between writing in SciJourn and in school. Students described themselves as agentic in SciJourn and passive in school, using an academic writing discourse of deficit to describe schooling experiences. They affiliated with and defined a SciJourn CoP, constructing positive journalistic identities therein. Educators are encouraged to develop similar CoPs. The discursive features presented may be used to monitor the development of communities of practice in a variety of settings.

  17. Microlithography and resist technology information at your fingertips via SciFinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konuk, Rengin; Macko, John R.; Staggenborg, Lisa

    1997-07-01

    Finding and retrieving the information you need about microlithography and resist technology in a timely fashion can make or break your competitive edge in today's business environment. Chemical Abstracts Service (CAS) provides the most complete and comprehensive database of the chemical literature in the CAplus, REGISTRY, and CASREACT files including 13 million document references, 15 million substance records and over 1.2 million reactions. This includes comprehensive coverage of positive and negative resist formulations and processing, photoacid generation, silylation, single and multilayer resist systems, photomasks, dry and wet etching, photolithography, electron-beam, ion-beam and x-ray lithography technologies and process control, optical tools, exposure systems, radiation sources and steppers. Journal articles, conference proceedings and patents related to microlithography and resist technology are analyzed and indexed by scientific information analysts with strong technical background in these areas. The full CAS database, which is updated weekly with new information, is now available at your desktop, via a convenient, user-friendly tool called 'SciFinder.' Author, subject and chemical substance searching is simplified by SciFinder's smart search features. Chemical substances can be searched by chemical structure, chemical name, CAS registry number or molecular formula. Drawing chemical structures in SciFinder is easy and does not require compliance with CA conventions. Built-in intelligence of SciFinder enables users to retrieve substances with multiple components, tautomeric forms and salts.

  18. Evaluation of the corrosion resistance of Fe-Al-Cr alloys in simulated low NOx environments

    SciTech Connect

    Deacon, R.M.; DuPont, J.N.; Kiely, C.J.; Marder, A.R.; Tortorelli, P.F.

    2009-08-15

    Due to their excellent corrosion resistance, iron aluminum alloys are currently being considered for use as weld claddings in fossil fuel fired power plants. The susceptibility to hydrogen cracking of these alloys at higher aluminum concentrations has led researchers to examine the effect of chromium additions on the corrosion resistance of lower aluminum alloys. In this work, three iron aluminum alloys were exposed to simulated coal combustion environments at 500 and 700{sup o}C for short (100 h) and long (5000 h) isothermal durations. Scanning electron microscopy was used to analyze the corrosion products. All alloys exhibited excellent corrosion resistance during short term exposures. For longer test times, increasing the aluminum concentration improved alloy corrosion resistance. The addition of chromium to the binary iron aluminum alloy prevented the formation iron sulfide and resulted in slower corrosion kinetics. A general classification of the scales developed on these alloys is presented.

  19. Response to Julian et al. (2015) "comment on and reinterpretation of Gabriel et al. (2014) 'fish mercury and surface water sulfate relationships in the everglades protection area'".

    PubMed

    Gabriel, Mark C; Axelrad, Don; Orem, William; Osborne, Todd Z

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this forum is to respond to a rebuttal submitted by Julian et al., Environ Manag 55:1-5, 2015 where they outlined their overall disagreement with the data preparation, methods, and interpretation of results presented in Gabriel et al. (Environ Manag 53:583-593, 2014). Here, we provide background information on the research premise presented in Gabriel et al. (Environ Manag 53:583-593, 2014) and provide a defense for this work using five themes. In spite of what Julian et al. perceive as limitations in the sampling methods and analytical tools used for this work, the relationships found between fish total mercury and surface water sulfate concentrations in Gabriel et al. (Environ Manag 53:583-593, 2014) are comparable to relationships between pore water methylmercury (MeHg) and pore water sulfate found in past studies indicating that sulfate is important to MeHg production and bioaccumulation in the Everglades. Julian et al. state "…there is no way to justify any ecosystem-wide sulfur strategy as a management approach to reduce mercury risk in the (Everglades) as suggested by Gabriel et al. (Environ Manag 53:583-593, 2014), Corrales et al. (Sci Tot Environ 409:2156-2162, 2011) and Orem et al. (Rev Environ Sci Technol 41 (S1):249-288, 2011)." We disagree, and having stated why sulfate input reduction to the Everglades may be the most effective means of reducing mercury in Everglades fish, it is important that research on sulfur and mercury biogeochemistry continues. If further studies support the relationship between sulfate loading reduction and MeHg reduction, sulfur mass balance studies should commence to (1) better quantify agricultural and connate seawater sulfate inputs and (2) define opportunities to reduce sulfate inputs to the Everglades ecosystem.

  20. Response to Julian et al. (2015) "Comment on and Reinterpretation of Gabriel et al. (2014) `Fish Mercury and Surface Water Sulfate Relationships in the Everglades Protection Area'"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabriel, Mark C.; Axelrad, Don; Orem, William; Osborne, Todd Z.

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this forum is to respond to a rebuttal submitted by Julian et al., Environ Manag 55:1-5, 2015 where they outlined their overall disagreement with the data preparation, methods, and interpretation of results presented in Gabriel et al. (Environ Manag 53:583-593, 2014). Here, we provide background information on the research premise presented in Gabriel et al. (Environ Manag 53:583-593, 2014) and provide a defense for this work using five themes. In spite of what Julian et al. perceive as limitations in the sampling methods and analytical tools used for this work, the relationships found between fish total mercury and surface water sulfate concentrations in Gabriel et al. (Environ Manag 53:583-593, 2014) are comparable to relationships between pore water methylmercury (MeHg) and pore water sulfate found in past studies indicating that sulfate is important to MeHg production and bioaccumulation in the Everglades. Julian et al. state "…there is no way to justify any ecosystem-wide sulfur strategy as a management approach to reduce mercury risk in the (Everglades) as suggested by Gabriel et al. (Environ Manag 53:583-593, 2014), Corrales et al. (Sci Tot Environ 409:2156-2162, 2011) and Orem et al. (Rev Environ Sci Technol 41 (S1):249-288, 2011)." We disagree, and having stated why sulfate input reduction to the Everglades may be the most effective means of reducing mercury in Everglades fish, it is important that research on sulfur and mercury biogeochemistry continues. If further studies support the relationship between sulfate loading reduction and MeHg reduction, sulfur mass balance studies should commence to (1) better quantify agricultural and connate seawater sulfate inputs and (2) define opportunities to reduce sulfate inputs to the Everglades ecosystem.

  1. 2H and 27Al solid-state NMR study of the local environments in Al-doped 2-line ferrihydrite, goethite, and lepidocrocite

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jongsik; Ilott, Andrew J.; Middlemiss, Derek S.; Chernova, Natasha A.; Pinney, Nathan; Morgan, Dane; Grey, Clare P.

    2015-05-13

    Although substitution of aluminum into iron oxides and oxyhydroxides has been extensively studied, it is difficult to obtain accurate incorporation levels. Assessing the distribution of dopants within these materials has proven especially challenging because bulk analytical techniques cannot typically determine whether dopants are substituted directly into the bulk iron oxide or oxyhydroxide phase or if they form separate, minor phase impurities. These differences have important implications for the chemistry of these iron-containing materials, which are ubiquitous in the environment. In this work, 27Al and 2H NMR experiments are performed on series of Al-substituted goethite, lepidocrocite, and 2-line ferrihydrite in order to develop an NMR method to track Al substitution. The extent of Al substitution into the structural frameworks of each compound is quantified by comparing quantitative 27Al MAS NMR results with those from elemental analysis. Magnetic measurements are performed for the goethite series to compare with NMR measurements. Static 27Al spin–echo mapping experiments are used to probe the local environments around the Al substituents, providing clear evidence that they are incorporated into the bulk iron phases. As a result, predictions of the 2H and 27Al NMR hyperfine contact shifts in Al-doped goethite and lepidocrocite, obtained from a combined first-principles and empirical magnetic scaling approach, give further insight into the distribution of the dopants within these phases.

  2. Comment on "Timing and nature of the Xinlin-Xiguitu Ocean: constraints from ophiolitic gabbros in the northern Great Xing'an Range, eastern Central Asian Orogenic Belt" by Feng et al. (2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Dong-Hong

    2016-10-01

    We disagree the transitional supra-subduction zone model of Feng et al. (Int J Earth Sci (Geol Rundsch) 105:491-505, 2016) for the tectonic setting of Jifeng ophiolite suite in NE China. Existence of the komatiite in the Jifeng ophiolite indicates an oceanic plateau environment for this ophiolite suite within the so-called Xinlin-Xiguitu ocean.

  3. Best Sci-Tech Books of 2008

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sapp, Gregg

    2009-01-01

    In tight economic times, the concerns and issues of science, viewed as not having enough practical value, can get pushed aside. But the top science books of 2008 demonstrate how science more often than not pays for itself. What's more practical than food (Tomorrow's Table), health (Our Daily Meds), the environment (The Hot Topics), or even--sex…

  4. Status of FNAL SciBooNE experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Nakajima, Yasuhiro; /Kyoto U.

    2007-12-01

    SciBooNE is a new experiment at FNAL which will make precision neutrino-nucleus cross section measurements in the one GeV region. These measurements are essential for the future neutrino oscillation experiments. We started data taking in the antineutrino mode on June 8, 2007, and collected 5.19 x 10{sup 19} protons on target (POT) before the accelerator shutdown in August. The first data from SciBooNE are reported in this article.

  5. Introduction to Searching with SciFinder Scholar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ridley, Damon D.

    2001-04-01

    With SciFinder Scholar now one of the preferred access routes to information in the sciences, many college information retrieval courses that dealt with online networks need to be redesigned. Although one of the basic assumptions within the design of SciFinder Scholar is that staff and students may retrieve valuable answers with little training, nevertheless, with a little instruction improved search results may be obtained. We present here our basic teaching program for senior undergraduate and postgraduate classes.

  6. GENESIS SciFlo: Enabling Multi-Instrument Atmospheric Science Using Grid Workflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, B. D.; Tang, B.; Manipon, G.; Yunck, T.; Fetzer, E.; Braverman, A.; Dobinson, E.

    2004-12-01

    The General Earth Science Investigation Suite (GENESIS) project is a NASA-sponsored partnership between the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, academia, and NASA data centers to develop a new suite of web services tools to facilitate multi-sensor investigations in Earth System Science. The goal of GENESIS is to enable large-scale, multi-instrument atmospheric science using combined datasets from the AIRS, MODIS, MISR, and GPS sensors. Investigations will include cross-comparison of spaceborne climate sensors, cloud spectral analysis, study of upper troposphere-strato-sphere water transport, study of the aerosol indirect cloud effect, and global climate model validation. The challenges are to bring together very large datasets, reformat and understand the individual instrument retrievals, co-register or re-grid the retrieved physical parameters, perform computationally-intensive data fusion and data mining operations, and accumulate complex statistics over months to years of data. To meet these challenges, we are developing a Grid computing and dataflow framework, named SciFlo, in which we are deploying a set of versatile and reusable operators for data access, subsetting, registration, mining, fusion, compression, and advanced statistical analysis. SciFlo is a system for Scientific Knowledge Creation on the Grid using a Semantically-Enabled Dataflow Execution Environment. SciFlo leverages Simple Object Access Protocol (SOAP) Web Services and the Grid Computing standards (Globus Alliance toolkits), and enables scientists to do multi-instrument Earth Science by assembling reusable web services and executable operators into a distributed computing flow (operator tree). The SciFlo client & server engines optimize the execution of such distributed data flows and allow the user to transparently find and use datasets and operators without worrying about the actual location of the Grid resources. The scientist injects a distributed computation into the Grid by simply filling out

  7. Reply to Comment on "The Jurassic-Cretaceous basaltic magmatism of the Oued El-Abid syncline (High Atlas, Morocco): Physical volcanology, geochemistry and geodynamic implications" by André Michard et al. (2013) [J. Afr. Earth Sci. 88 (December) (2013) 101-105

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bensalah, Mohamed Khalil; Youbi, Nasrrddine; Mata, João; Madeira, José; Martins, Línia; Font, Eric; Medina, Fida; Marzoli, Andrea; Hachimi, Hind El; Bertrand, Hervé; Bellieni, Giuliano; Doblas, Miguel; Mahmoudi, Abdelkader; Beraâouz, El Hassane; Miranda, Rui; Verati, Chrystèle; Min, Angelo De; Abbou, Mohamed Ben; Zayane, Rachid

    2016-06-01

    We welcome the comment by Michard et al. (2013) as it gives us the opportunity to better discuss the Jurassic-Cretaceous magmatism of the High Atlas (Morocco). In their comment, Michard et al. (2013) focus on three main points which are: (i) the age of the basalts from Naour, (ii) the structural history of the Central High Atlas and (iii) the geodynamic significance of the related Jurassic-Cretaceous magmatism. We will address these questions in the following sections.

  8. Solving Large-scale Eigenvalue Problems in SciDACApplications

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Chao

    2005-06-29

    Large-scale eigenvalue problems arise in a number of DOE applications. This paper provides an overview of the recent development of eigenvalue computation in the context of two SciDAC applications. We emphasize the importance of Krylov subspace methods, and point out its limitations. We discuss the value of alternative approaches that are more amenable to the use of preconditioners, and report the progression using the multi-level algebraic sub-structuring techniques to speed up eigenvalue calculation. In addition to methods for linear eigenvalue problems, we also examine new approaches to solving two types of non-linear eigenvalue problems arising from SciDAC applications.

  9. Corrosion and carburization behavior of Al-rich surface layer on Ni-base alloy in supercritical-carbon dioxide environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Ho Jung; Kim, Sung Hwan; Kim, Hyunmyung; Jang, Changheui

    2016-12-01

    In order to improve the corrosion and carburization resistance in a high-temperature supercritical-carbon dioxide (S-CO2) environment, an Al-rich surface layer was developed on Alloy 600 by Al deposition and a subsequent high energy electron beam (EB) remelting. As a result of the EB surface treatment, an Al enriched (5-7 wt.%) micro-alloying zone (40 μm) was produced. When the EB surface-treated Alloy 600 was corroded in S-CO2 at 600 °C (20 MPa) for 500 h, the surface oxide layer mostly consisted of chromia (Cr2O3) with small amount of transition alumina (Al2O3). In addition, a carburized region of an amorphous C layer inter-mixed with the alumina was observed at the oxide/matrix interface. Meanwhile, when the EB surface-treated specimen was pre-oxidized in helium at 900 °C, α-alumina layer was formed on the surface, which showed superior corrosion and carburization resistance in S-CO2 environment. Therefore, it could be said that the presence of Al-rich surface layer alone is not enough to provide sufficient corrosion and carburization resistance in S-CO2 environment at 600 °C, unless pre-oxidation at higher temperature is applied to form a more protective α-alumina on the surface.

  10. Professors' Perceptions of Distance Education in Virtual Environments: The Case of the Education Faculty of University of Al-Yarmouk (Jordan)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oassim-Al-shboul, Oassim Mahmoud; Sabiote, Clemente Rodriguez; Álvarez-Rodríguez, José

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this study is to determine the perceptions that the teaching staff of the Faculty of Education at University of Al-Yarmouk (Jordan) have of the implementation of distance learning in virtual environments, more specifically, the professors' opinion of the potential and limitations of this educational strategy. To fulfil this goal, we…

  11. SciTech Clubs for Girls. [Annual] technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Nogal, A.M.

    1993-02-01

    Since January 1992, 9 exhibits have been constructed by the SciTech Clubs for Girls, which involved 63 girls, ages 10 to 14. These exhibits are: Bubble Shapes by the St. Charles Cadette Girl Scout Troop No. 109. Density Games by the South Elgin Cadette Girl Scout Troop No. 132. Electric Fleas by the Warrenville Junior Girl Scout Troop No. 305. Energy vs. Power by the Aurora Junior Girl Scout Troop No. 242. The Organ Pipe by the Bartlett Junior Girl Scout Troop No. 107. Ohm`s Law by the Geneva Junior Girl Scout Troop No. 401. What is Gravity by the Pilsen YMCA girls. Insulation at Work by the Algonquin Junior Girl Scout Troop No. 303. Series vs. Parallel by the Leland Junior Girl Scout Troop No. 50. The report is a description of each exhibit and the group that built the exhibit. Each group had a minimum of 10 hours of contact time at SciTech with the SciTech Clubs for Girls Program Coordinator. All mentors are female. Each exhibit building experience includes a trip to the hardware store to purchase supplies. After the exhibit is complete, the girls receive certificates of achievement and a SciTech Club Patch.

  12. Combined SCI and TBI: recovery of forelimb function after unilateral cervical spinal cord injury (SCI) is retarded by contralateral traumatic brain injury (TBI), and ipsilateral TBI balances the effects of SCI on paw placement.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Tomoo; Lin, Amity; Ma, Xiaokui; McKenna, Stephen L; Creasey, Graham H; Manley, Geoffrey T; Ferguson, Adam R; Bresnahan, Jacqueline C; Beattie, Michael S

    2013-10-01

    A significant proportion (estimates range from 16 to 74%) of patients with spinal cord injury (SCI) have concomitant traumatic brain injury (TBI), and the combination often produces difficulties in planning and implementing rehabilitation strategies and drug therapies. For example, many of the drugs used to treat SCI may interfere with cognitive rehabilitation, and conversely drugs that are used to control seizures in TBI patients may undermine locomotor recovery after SCI. The current paper presents an experimental animal model for combined SCI and TBI to help drive mechanistic studies of dual diagnosis. Rats received a unilateral SCI (75 kdyn) at C5 vertebral level, a unilateral TBI (2.0 mm depth, 4.0 m/s velocity impact on the forelimb sensori-motor cortex), or both SCI+TBI. TBI was placed either contralateral or ipsilateral to the SCI. Behavioral recovery was examined using paw placement in a cylinder, grooming, open field locomotion, and the IBB cereal eating test. Over 6weeks, in the paw placement test, SCI+contralateral TBI produced a profound deficit that failed to recover, but SCI+ipsilateral TBI increased the relative use of the paw on the SCI side. In the grooming test, SCI+contralateral TBI produced worse recovery than either lesion alone even though contralateral TBI alone produced no observable deficit. In the IBB forelimb test, SCI+contralateral TBI revealed a severe deficit that recovered in 3 weeks. For open field locomotion, SCI alone or in combination with TBI resulted in an initial deficit that recovered in 2 weeks. Thus, TBI and SCI affected forelimb function differently depending upon the test, reflecting different neural substrates underlying, for example, exploratory paw placement and stereotyped grooming. Concurrent SCI and TBI had significantly different effects on outcomes and recovery, depending upon laterality of the two lesions. Recovery of function after cervical SCI was retarded by the addition of a moderate TBI in the contralateral

  13. Combined SCI and TBI: Recovery of forelimb function after unilateral cervical spinal cord injury (SCI) is retarded by contralateral traumatic brain injury (TBI), and ipsilateral TBI balances the effects of SCI on paw placement

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, Tomoo; Lin, Amity; Ma, Xiaokui; McKenna, Stephen L.; Creasey, Graham H.; Manley, Geoffrey T.; Ferguson, Adam R.; Bresnahan, Jacqueline C.; Beattie, Michael S.

    2015-01-01

    A significant proportion (estimates range from 16–74%) of patients with spinal cord injury (SCI) have concomitant traumatic brain injury (TBI), and the combination often produces difficulties in planning and implementing rehabilitation strategies and drug therapies. For example, many of the drugs used to treat SCI may interfere with cognitive rehabilitation, and conversely drugs that are used to control seizures in TBI patients may undermine locomotor recovery after SCI. The current paper presents an experimental animal model for combined SCI and TBI to help drive mechanistic studies of dual diagnosis. Rats received a unilateral SCI (75 kdyn) at C5 vertebral level, a unilateral TBI (2.0 mm depth, 4.0 m/s velocity impact on the forelimb sensori-motor cortex), or both SCI + TBI. TBI was placed either contralateral or ipsilateral to the SCI. Behavioral recovery was examined using paw placement in a cylinder, grooming, open field locomotion, and the IBB cereal eating test. Over 6 weeks, in the paw placement test, SCI + contralateral TBI produced a profound deficit that failed to recover, but SCI + ipsilateral TBI increased the relative use of the paw on the SCI side. In the grooming test, SCI + contralateral TBI produced worse recovery than either lesion alone even though contralateral TBI alone produced no observable deficit. In the IBB forelimb test, SCI + contralateral TBI revealed a severe deficit that recovered in 3 weeks. For open field locomotion, SCI alone or in combination with TBI resulted in an initial deficit that recovered in 2 weeks. Thus, TBI and SCI affected forelimb function differently depending upon the test, reflecting different neural substrates underlying, for example, exploratory paw placement and stereotyped grooming. Concurrent SCI and TBI had significantly different effects on outcomes and recovery, depending upon laterality of the two lesions. Recovery of function after cervical SCI was retarded by the addition of a moderate TBI in the

  14. What's Manifest in the History of SciTech: Reflections on The History Manifesto.

    PubMed

    Kevles, Daniel J

    2016-06-01

    Making nuts-and-bolts public policy is not--and never has been--the long suit of professional historians, but general historical work, whatever its durée, has done a good deal to shape discourse on public issues. Jo Guldi and David Armitage neglect that fact, as well as the opinion-shaping influence of history conveyed via nonprint media. They also ignore the large body of scholarship produced in all media during recent decades in the history of science, technology, and science-related medicine (SciTech), even though SciTech itself looms enormously large in the modern era as an instrument of national and international security, a driver of the economy, and a transformer of medicine, public health, and the environment. Much of this scholarship, even though of short durée, can illuminate salient contemporary issues, including innovation; patronage and practice; government and policy; imperialism and globalization; intellectual property; science and religion; and human rights, environment, energy, and disasters.

  15. Overview of the Scalable Coherent Interface, IEEE STD 1596 (SCI)

    SciTech Connect

    Gustavson, D.B.; James, D.V.; Wiggers, H.A.

    1992-10-01

    The Scalable Coherent Interface standard defines a new generation of interconnection that spans the full range from supercomputer memory `bus` to campus-wide network. SCI provides bus-like services and a shared-memory software model while using an underlying, packet protocol on many independent communication links. Initially these links are 1 GByte/s (wires) and 1 GBit/s (fiber), but the protocol scales well to future faster or lower-cost technologies. The interconnect may use switches, meshes, and rings. The SCI distributed-shared-memory model is simple and versatile, enabling for the first time a smooth integration of highly parallel multiprocessors, workstations, personal computers, I/O, networking and data acquisition.

  16. Distributed job scheduling in SCI Local Area MultiProcessors

    SciTech Connect

    Agasaveeran, S.; Li, Qiang

    1996-12-31

    Local Area MultiProcessors (LAMP) is a network of personal workstations with distributed shared physical memory provided by high performance technologies such as SCI. LAMP is more tightly coupled than the traditional local area networks (LAN) but is more loosely coupled than the bus based multiprocessors. This paper presents a distributed scheduling algorithm which exploits the distributed shared memory in SCI-LAMP to schedule the idle remote processors among the requesting workstations. It considers fairness by allocating remote processing capacity to the requesting workstations based on their priorities according to the decay-usage scheduling approach. The performance of the algorithm in scheduling both sequential and parallel jobs is evaluated by simulation. It is found that the higher priority nodes achieve faster job response times and higher speedups than that of the lower priority nodes. Lower scheduling overhead allows finer granularity of remote processors sharing than in LAN.

  17. Molecular Determinants Fundamental to Axon Regeneration after SCI

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    adult zebrafish (Specific Aim 1). We also will examine in vivo the role of PTP σ in inhibition of axon regeneration (Specific Aim 2). In addition, we...AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-11-1-0645 TITLE: Molecular Determinants Fundamental to Axon Regeneration ... Regeneration after SCI 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-11-1-0645 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER Jeffrey Alan Plunkett, Ph.D

  18. Utilization of SciFinder Scholar at an Undergraduate Institution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Reilly, Stacy A.; Wilson, Anne M.; Howes, Barbara

    2002-04-01

    The use of tools to search chemical information databases continues to be important to science educators. The ability to perform online searches of Chemical Abstracts Service can have a significant impact on teaching and research. The implementation of SciFinder Scholar at Butler University has resulted in significant changes in teaching, student-based research, and faculty development in the Chemistry Department. Details of these changes in courses, student research projects and proposals, and the professional growth of the faculty are discussed.

  19. Online Registries for Researchers: Using ORCID and SciENcv.

    PubMed

    Vrabel, Mark

    2016-12-01

    The Open Researcher and Contributor ID (ORCID) registry helps resolve name ambiguity by assigning persistent unique identifiers that automatically link to a researcher's publications, grants, and other activities. This article provides an overview of ORCID and its benefits, citing several examples of its use in cancer and nursing journals. The article also briefly describes My NCBI and the Science Experts Network Curriculum Vitae (SciENcv) and its connection to ORCID.

  20. An Implantable Neuroprosthetic Device to Normalize Bladder Function after SCI

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-01

    experiments using cats . These results have laid the foundation for us to further design and develop an implantable stimulator for human application in...experiments using cats . These results have laid the foundation for us to further design and develop this implantable stimulator into human application in...stimulator system Our previous studies [1-4] in anesthetized chronic SCI cats showed that blocking pudendal nerves using high-frequency (6-10 kHz

  1. Thermomechanical fatigue behavior of SiC/Ti-24Al-11Nb in air and argon environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartolotta, Paul A.; Verrilli, Michael J.

    1992-01-01

    A series of tension-tension, load-controlled thermomechanical fatigue (TMF) tests were conducted on a titanium aluminide composite in both laboratory air and a flowing argon environment. Results from these tests show that the environment plays an increasingly important role as applied stress levels are decreased. Differences in damage mechanisms between the two environments were observed which corresponds to observed variations in TMF lives.

  2. Erratum: “Multi-point, high-speed passive ion velocity distribution diagnostic on the Pegasus Toroidal Experiment” [Rev. Sci. Instrum. 83, 10D516 (2012)

    SciTech Connect

    Burke, Marcus G.; Fonck, Raymond J.; Bongard, Michael W.; Schlossberg, David J.; Winz, Gregory R.

    2016-07-18

    This article corrects an error in M.G. Burke et al., 'Multi-point, high-speed passive ion velocity distribution diagnostic on the Pegasus Toroidal Experiment,' Rev. Sci. Instrum. 83, 10D516 (2012) pertaining to ion temperature. The conclusions of this paper are not altered by the revised ion temperature measurements.

  3. Using Scenarios to Design Complex Technology-Enhanced Learning Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Jong, Ton; Weinberger, Armin; Girault, Isabelle; Kluge, Anders; Lazonder, Ard W.; Pedaste, Margus; Ludvigsen, Sten; Ney, Muriel; Wasson, Barbara; Wichmann, Astrid; Geraedts, Caspar; Giemza, Adam; Hovardas, Tasos; Julien, Rachel; van Joolingen, Wouter R.; Lejeune, Anne; Manoli, Constantinos C.; Matteman, Yuri; Sarapuu, Tago; Verkade, Alex; Vold, Vibeke; Zacharia, Zacharias C.

    2012-01-01

    Science Created by You (SCY) learning environments are computer-based environments in which students learn about science topics in the context of addressing a socio-scientific problem. Along their way to a solution for this problem students produce many types of intermediate products or learning objects. SCY learning environments center the entire…

  4. 75 FR 19626 - Notice of Intent To Grant Exclusive Patent License: SciTech Medical Inc.

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-15

    ... Exclusive Patent License: SciTech Medical Inc. AGENCY: Department of the Navy, DoD. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY... SciTech Medical Inc. The proposed license is a revocable, nonassignable, partially exclusive...

  5. Orthostatic Responses to Anticholinesterase Inhibition in Persons with SCI

    PubMed Central

    Wecht, Jill M.; Cirnigliaro, Christopher M.; Azarelo, Frank; Bauman, William A.; Kirshblum, Steven C.

    2015-01-01

    Acetylcholine (Ach) is the pre-synaptic neurotransmitter of the sympathetic nervous system. Increased pre-synaptic Ach may augment post-synaptic release of norepinephrine thereby increasing systemic blood pressure (BP). The primary objective of this investigation was to determine the hemodynamic effect of pyridostigmine bromide (PYRIDO: 60 mg), an Ach inhibitor (AchI), compared to no-drug (NO-D) during head-up tilt (HUT) in individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI). Secondarily we aimed to determine the effects of PYRIDO compared to NO-D on symptoms of orthostatic intolerance (OI) and adverse event reporting (AE). Ten individuals with SCI (C4–C7) were studied on 2 occasions: visit 1) NO-D and visit 2) PYRIDO. On each visit subjects underwent a progressive HUT maneuver to 15°, 25°, 35° for 5 minutes at each angle and 45 minutes at 45°. Supine and orthostatic heart rate (HR), systolic and diastolic BP (SBP & DBP) were monitored and symptoms of OI and AE recorded. Supine hemodynamics did not differ between the trials. The significant fall in SBP during the NO-D trial was diminished with PYRIDO and five subjects had an increased DBP during HUT with PYRIDO compared to the NO-D trial. Individuals that responded to PYRIDO with an increase in orthostatic BP had significantly lower resting HR than non-responders (p<0.01), which suggests increased levels of pre-synaptic Ach. Subjective symptoms of OI and AE reporting did not differ between the two trials. These preliminary data suggest that PYRIDO is safe and may be effective at ameliorating the orthostatic fall in BP in select individuals with SCI. PMID:25916633

  6. Nuclear Physics in the SciDAC Era

    SciTech Connect

    Robert Edwards

    2009-08-01

    Lattice QCD currently provides our only means of solving QCD (Quantum Chromo Dynamics) -- the theory of the strong nuclear force -- in the low-energy regime, and thus of crucial importance for theoretical and experimental research programs in High Energy and Nuclear Physics. Under the SciDAC program, a software infrastructure has been developed for lattice QCD that effectively utilize the capabilities of the INCITE facilities. These developments have enabled a new generation of Nuclear Physics calculations investigating the spectrum and structure of matter, such as the origin of mass and spin. This software infrastructure is described and recent results are reviewed.

  7. Strategies for chemical reaction searching in SciFinder

    PubMed

    Ridley

    2000-09-01

    The bibliographic, chemical structure, and chemical reaction databases produced by Chemical Abstracts Service allow a number of possibilities for chemical reaction searching. While these same databases may be searched through the STN network, many end-users find the intuitive software interface SciFinder simpler, but there still are issues to address. Searching may be performed through keywords, chemical structures, or chemical reactions, and the answers may vary with respect to precision and comprehension. Often combinations of search options may be needed to best solve the problem. Retrosynthetic analyses are easily performed in the chemical reaction database and can give unique insights into synthetic alternatives.

  8. Introduction to Structure Searching with SciFinder Scholar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ridley, Damon D.

    2001-04-01

    CAS Registry Numbers provide a key to searching for chemical substances in CAS databases, and the challenge is to obtain the Registry Numbers for all the substances required. When the substances can be represented by structures, then one option is to find the Registry Numbers through structure searches. With SciFinder Scholar, the process of drawing and searching structures is intuitive; however, there are underlying issues and opportunities that need some explanation in courses on chemical information retrieval.We describe here our introductory course, which addresses the major ones.

  9. Exploring Earth and the Solar System: Educational Outreach Through NASA's Space Place, SciJinks, and Climate Kids Websites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meneses, Joseph Chistopher

    2012-01-01

    NASA's Space Place team publishes engaging content and creates an effective environment to inspire a young audience to dare mighty things. NASA uses the Space Place, Climate Kids, and SciJinks websites to cultivate interest among elementary-school-aged children in both science and technology. During my summer internship at Jet Propulsion Laboratory I used Adobe Flash and ActionScript 3 to develop content for the Space Place, Climate Kids, and SciJinks sites. In addition, I was involved in the development process for ongoing and new projects during my internship. My involvement allowed me to follow a project from concept to design, implementation, and release. I personally worked on three projects this summer, two of which are currently in deployment. The first is a scrambled letter-tile guessing game titled Solar System Scramble. The second, Butterfrog Mix-Up, is a rotating-tile puzzle game. The third project is a unfinished prototype for a maze game.

  10. Psychometric evaluation of the Spanish version of the MPI-SCI

    PubMed Central

    Soler, MD; Cruz-Almeida, Y; Saurí, J; Widerström-Noga, EG

    2013-01-01

    Study design Postal surveys. Objectives To confirm the factor structure of the Spanish version of the MPI-SCI (MPI-SCI-S, Multidimensional Pain Inventory in the SCI population) and to test its internal consistency and construct validity in a Spanish population. Setting Guttmann Institute, Barcelona, Spain. Methods The MPI-SCI-S along with Spanish measures of pain intensity (Numerical Rating Scale), pain interference (Brief Pain Inventory), functional independence (Functional Independence Measure), depression (Beck Depression Inventory), locus of control (Multidimensional health Locus of Control), support (Functional Social Support Questionnaire (Duke-UNC)), psychological well-being (Psychological Global Well-Being Index) and demographic/injury characteristics were assessed in persons with spinal cord injury (SCI) and chronic pain (n = 126). Results Confirmatory factor analysis suggested an adequate factor structure for the MPI-SCI-S. The internal consistency of the MPI-SCI-S subscales ranged from acceptable (r = 0.66, Life Control) to excellent (r = 0.94, Life Interference). All MPI-SCI-S subscales showed adequate construct validity, with the exception of the Negative and Solicitous Responses subscales. Conclusions The Spanish version of the MPI-SCI is adequate for evaluating chronic pain impact following SCI in a Spanish-speaking population. Future studies should include additional measures of pain-related support in the Spanish-speaking SCI population. PMID:23608807

  11. Hot Corrosion Studies of Detonation-Gun-Sprayed NiCrAlY + 0.4 wt.% CeO2 Coated Superalloys in Molten Salt Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamal, Subhash; Jayaganthan, R.; Prakash, Satya

    2011-08-01

    Rare earth oxide (CeO2) has been incorporated in NiCrAlY alloy and hot corrosion resistance of detonation-gun-sprayed NiCrAlY + 0.4 wt.% CeO2 coatings on superalloys, namely, superni 75, superni 718, and superfer 800H in molten 40% Na2SO4-60% V2O5 salt environment were investigated at 900 °C for 100 cycles. The coatings exhibited characteristic splat globular dendritic structure with diameter similar to the original powder particles. The weight change technique was used to establish corrosion kinetics. X-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscopy/energy-dispersive analysis (FE-SEM/EDAX), and x-ray mapping techniques were used to analyze the corrosion products. Coated superfer 800H alloy showed the highest corrosion resistance among the examined superalloys. CeO2 was found to be distributed in the coating along the splat boundaries, whereas Al streaks distributed non-uniformly. The main phases observed for the coated superalloys are oxides of Ni, Cr, Al, and spinels, which are suggested to be responsible for developing corrosion resistance.

  12. Influence of dispersion state of initial AlN powder on the hydrolysis process in air environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ditts, A. A.; Revva, I. B.; Grishko, N. Y.; Tarnovskiy, R. V.

    2016-11-01

    The research results of the hydrolysis processes of aluminum nitride powders received by the SVS method in dependence on humidity of the storage environment, and grain size distribution are presented in this work. Oxidation kinetics was estimated by means of X- ray Diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The induction period of the hydrolysis process for various powders, its dependence on powder dispersion and thickness of the oxide layer on surface of particles have been defined.

  13. A Design Method for FES Bone Health Therapy in SCI

    PubMed Central

    Andrews, Brian; Shippen, James; Armengol, Monica; Gibbons, Robin; Holderbaum, William; Harwin, William

    2016-01-01

    FES assisted activities such as standing, walking, cycling and rowing induce forces within the leg bones and have been proposed to reduce osteoporosis in spinal cord injury (SCI). However, details of the applied mechanical stimulus for osteogenesis is often not reported. Typically, comparisons of bone density results are made after costly and time consuming clinical trials. These studies have produced inconsistent results and are subject to sample size variations. Here we propose a design process that may be used to predict the clinical outcome based on biomechanical simulation and mechano-biology. This method may allow candidate therapies to be optimized and quantitatively compared. To illustrate the approach we have used data obtained from a rower with complete paraplegia using the RowStim (III) system. PMID:28078075

  14. eSciMart: Web Platform for Scientific Software Marketplace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kryukov, A. P.; Demichev, A. P.

    2016-10-01

    In this paper we suggest a design of a web marketplace where users of scientific application software and databases, presented in the form of web services, as well as their providers will have presence simultaneously. The model, which will be the basis for the web marketplace is close to the customer-to-customer (C2C) model, which has been successfully used, for example, on the auction sites such as eBay (ebay.com). Unlike the classical model of C2C the suggested marketplace focuses on application software in the form of web services, and standardization of API through which application software will be integrated into the web marketplace. A prototype of such a platform, entitled eSciMart, is currently being developed at SINP MSU.

  15. Effect of chloride environment on fatigue behavior of AA6061-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} particle composite

    SciTech Connect

    Bertolini, L.; Brunella, M.F.; Candiani, S.

    1998-12-31

    The paper deals with the corrosion fatigue behavior of a particulate reinforced metal matrix composite with aluminium alloy AA 6061-T6 matrix and 10% by volume of alumina particles. The material was in two different working conditions. Fatigue K-increasing and K-decreasing crack growth rate tests were carried out in air and a 3.5% NaCl aqueous solution. The condition of pitting corrosion initiation in chloride environments was studied by means of potentiodynamic polarization tests carried out in aerated and deaerated 3.5% NaCl solutions. Furthermore immersion tests were performed in aerated solutions. The aggressive environment significantly increased the fatigue crack growth rate for a given {Delta}K, with respect to tests in air. The sensitivity of the fatigue behavior to the chloride solution was different in the two materials, whereas the corrosion behavior was similar. Thereafter an interaction between pitting corrosion, occurring preferentially at the particle-matrix interface, and the mechanisms of crack propagation in the composite material was argued.

  16. Constitutive Model for the Time-Dependent Mechanical Behavior of 430 Stainless Steel and FeCrAlY Foams in Sulfur-Bearing Environments

    SciTech Connect

    Hemrick, James Gordon; Lara-Curzio, Edgar

    2013-01-01

    The mechanical behavior of 430 stainless steel and pre-oxidized FeCrAlY open-cell foam materials of various densities was evaluated in compression at temperatures between 450 C and 600 C in an environment containing hydrogen sulfide and water vapor. Both materials showed negligible corrosion due to the gaseous atmosphere for up to 168 hours. The monotonic stress-strain response of these materials was found to be dependent on both the strain rate and their density, and the 430 stainless steel foam materials exhibited less stress relaxation than FeCrAlY for similar experimental conditions. Using the results from multiple hardening-relaxation and monotonic tests, an empirical constitutive equation was derived to predict the stress-strain behavior of FeCrAlY foams as a function of temperature and strain rate. These results are discussed in the context of using these materials in a black liquor gasifier to accommodate the chemical expansion of the refractory liner resulting from its reaction with the soda in the black liquor.

  17. Constitutive Model for the Time-Dependent Mechanical Behavior of 430 Stainless Steel and FeCrAlY Foams in Sulfur-Bearing Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemrick, James G.; Lara-Curzio, Edgar

    2013-03-01

    The mechanical behavior of 430 stainless steel and pre-oxidized FeCrAlY open-cell foam materials of various densities was evaluated in compression at temperatures between 450°C and 600°C in an environment containing hydrogen sulfide and water vapor. Both materials showed negligible corrosion due to the gaseous atmosphere for up to 168 h. The monotonic stress-strain response of these materials was found to be dependent on both the strain rate and their density, and the 430 stainless steel foam materials exhibited less stress relaxation than the FeCrAlY for similar experimental conditions. Using the results from multiple hardening-relaxation and monotonic tests, an empirical constitutive equation was derived to predict the stress-strain behavior of FeCrAlY foams as a function of temperature, and strain rate. These results are discussed in the context of using these materials in a black liquor gasifier to accommodate the chemical expansion of the refractory liner resulting from its reaction with the soda in the black liquor.

  18. Degradation of Ti-6Al-4V alloy under cyclic loading in a simulated body environment with cell culturing.

    PubMed

    Doi, Kotaro; Miyabe, Sayaka; Tsuchiya, Hiroaki; Fujimoto, Shinji

    2016-03-01

    The present study reports the corrosion fatigue of the Ti-6Al-4V alloy using cyclic deformation test in a simulated body fluid under cell culturing for the first time. Cyclic deformation tests were carried out using three types of specimens to reveal the effects of proteins and cells on the corrosion fatigue of the alloy. For the 1-day-immersed and 1-week-immersed specimens, tensile specimens were soaked in a simulated body fluid for 1 day and 1 week, respectively, before cyclic deformation test, whereas for the cell-cultured specimen, MC3T3-E1 osteoblast-like cells were seeded and then cultured on tensile specimens for 1 week. The incubation period for crack initiation was longer for the cell-cultured and 1-week-immersed specimens compared to that for the 1-day-immersed specimen. On the other hand, crack propagation period for the cell-cultured and 1-week-immersed specimens was shorter than that for the 1-day-immersed specimen. These results indicate that proteins and cells adhered on the alloy surface inhibit metal dissolution at newly created surface emerged by cyclic deformation to suppress crack initiation, whereas they accelerate crack propagation because dissolution at crack tip is accelerated in the occluded space formed under proteins and cells.

  19. Environmental fatigue of an Al-Li-Cu alloy. I - Intrinsic crack propagation kinetics in hydrogenous environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piascik, Robert S.; Gangloff, Richard P.

    1991-01-01

    Deleterious environmental effects on steady-state, intrinsic fatigue crack propagation (FCP) rates (da/dN) in peak aged Al-Li-Cu alloy 2090 are established by electrical potential monitoring of short cracks with programmed constant delta K and K(sub max) loading. The da/dN are equally unaffected by vacuum, purified helium, and oxygen but are accelerated in order of decreasing effectiveness of aqueous 1 percent NaCl with anodic polarization, pure water vapor, moist air, and NaCl with cathodic polarization. While da/dN depends on delta K(sup 4.0) for the inert gases, water vapor and chloride induced multiple power-laws, and a transition growth rate 'plateau'. Environmental effects are strongest at low delta K. Crack tip damage is ascribed to hydrogen embrittlement because of the following: (1) accelerated da/dN due to part-per-million levels of H2O without condensation; (2) impeded molecular flow model predictions of the measured water vapor pressure dependence of da/dN as affected by mean crack opening; (3) the lack of an effect of film-forming O2; (4) the likelihood for crack tip hydrogen production in NaCl; and (5) the environmental and delta K-process zone volume dependencies of the microscopic cracking modes. For NaCl, growth rates decrease with decreasing loading frequency, with the addition of passivating Li2CO3, and upon cathodic polarization. These variables increase crack surface film stability to reduce hydrogen entry efficiency. The hydrogen environmental FCP resistance of 2090 is similar to other 2000 series alloys and is better than 7075.

  20. Environmental fatigue of an Al-Li-Cu alloy. Part 1: Intrinsic crack propagation kinetics in hydrogenous environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piascik, Robert S.; Gangloff, Richard P.

    1991-01-01

    Deleterious environmental effects on steady-state, intrinsic fatigue crack propagation (FCP) rates (da/dN) in peak aged Al-Li-Cu alloy 2090 are established by electrical potential monitoring of short cracks with programmed constant delta K and K(sub max) loading. The da/dN are equally unaffected by vacuum, purified helium, and oxygen but are accelerated in order of decreasing effectiveness by aqueous 1 percent NaCl with anodic polarization, pure water vapor, moist air, and NaCl with cathodic polarization. While da/dN depends on delta K(sup 4.0) for the inert gases, water vapor and chloride induced multiple power-laws, and a transition growth rate 'plateau'. Environmental effects are strongest at low delta K. Crack tip damage is ascribed to hydrogen embrittlement because of the following: (1) accelerated da/dN due to part-per-million levels of H2O without condensation; (2) impeded molecular flow model predictions of the measured water vapor pressure dependence of da/dN as affected by mean crack opening; (3) the lack of an effect of film-forming O2; (4) the likelihood for crack tip hydrogen production in NaCl, and (5) the environmental and delta K-process zone volume dependencies of the microscopic cracking modes. For NaCl, growth rates decrease with decreasing loading frequency, with the addition of passivating Li2CO3, and upon cathodic polarization. These variables increase crack surface film stability to reduce hydrogen entry efficiency. The hydrogen environmental FCP resistance of 2090 is similar to other 2000 series alloys and is better than 7075.

  1. Environmental fatigue of an Al-Li-Cu alloy: part I. Intrinsic crack propagation kinetics in hydrogenous environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piascik, Robert S.; Gangloff, Richard P.

    1991-10-01

    Deleterious environmental effects on steady-state, intrinsic fatigue crack propagation (FCP) rates (da/dN) in peak-aged Al-Li-Cu alloy 2090 are established by electrical potential monitoring of short cracks with programmed constant ΔK and K maxI loading. Such rates are equally unaffected by vacuum, purified helium, and oxygen but are accelerated in order of decreasing effectiveness by aqueous 1 pct NaCl with anodic polarization, pure water’ vapor, moist air, and NaCl with cathodic polarization. While da/dN depend on ΔK4.0 for the inert gases, water vapor and chloride induce multiple power laws and a transition growth rate “plateau.” Environmental effects are strongest at low ΔK. Crack tip damage is ascribed to hydrogen embrittlement because of accelerated da/dN due to parts-per-million (ppm) levels of H2O without condensation, impeded molecular flow model predictions of the measured water vapor pressure dependence of da/dN as affected by mean crack opening, the lack of an effect of film-forming O2, the likelihood for crack tip hydrogen production in NaCl, and the environmental and ΔK-process zone volume dependencies of the microscopic cracking modes. For NaCl, growth rates decrease with decreasing loading frequency, with the addition of passivating Li2CO3 and upon cathodic polarization. These variables increase crack surface film stability to reduce hydrogen entry efficiency. Small crack effects are not observed for 2090; such cracks do not grow at abnormally high rates in single grains or in NaCl and are not arrested at grain boundaries. The hydrogen environmental FCP resistance of 2090 is similar to other 2000 series alloys and is better than 7075.

  2. ScienceDirect through SciVerse: a new way to approach Elsevier.

    PubMed

    Bengtson, Jason

    2011-01-01

    SciVerse is the new combined portal from Elsevier that services their ScienceDirect collection, SciTopics, and their Scopus database. Using SciVerse to access ScienceDirect is the specific focus of this review. Along with advanced keyword searching and citation searching options, SciVerse also incorporates a very useful image search feature. The aim seems to be not only to create an interface that provides broad functionality on par with other database search tools that many searchers use regularly but also to create an open platform that could be changed to respond effectively to the needs of customers.

  3. Reply to the EFSA (2016) on the relevance of recent publications (Hofmann et al. 2014, 2016) on environmental risk assessment and management of Bt-maize events (MON810, Bt11 and 1507).

    PubMed

    Kruse-Plass, Maren; Hofmann, Frieder; Kuhn, Ulrike; Otto, Mathias; Schlechtriemen, Ulrich; Schröder, Boris; Vögel, Rudolf; Wosniok, Werner

    2017-01-01

    In this commentary, we respond to a report of the EFSA GMO Panel (EFSA EFSA Supp Publ, 1) that criticises the outcomes of two studies published in this journal (Hofmann et al. Environ Sci Eur 26: 24, 2; Environ Sci Eur 28: 14, 3). Both publications relate to the environmental risk assessment and management of Bt-maize, including maize events MON810, Bt11 and maize 1507. The results of Hofmann et al. (Environ Sci Eur 26: 24, 2), using standardised pollen mass filter deposition measurements, indicated that the EFSA Panel model had underestimated pollen deposition and, hence, exposure of non-target organisms to Bt-maize pollen. The results implied a need for safety buffer distances in the kilometre range for protected nature reserve areas instead of the 20-30 m range recommended by the EFSA Panel. As a result, the EFSA Panel revised their model (EFSA EFSA J 13: 4127, 4), adopting the slope of the empirical data from Hofmann et al. The intercept, however, was substantially reduced to less than 1% at one point by introducing further assumptions based on the estimates of mainly panel members, citing possible 'uncertainty'. Hofmann et al. (Environ Sci Eur 28: 14, 3) published extensive empirical data regarding pollen deposition on leaves. These results were part of a larger 3-year study involving detailed measurements of pollen release, dispersal and deposition over the maize flowering period. The data collected in situ confirmed the previous predictions of Hofmann et al. (Environ Sci Eur 26: 24, 2). Mean levels and observed variability of pollen deposition on maize and four lepidopteran host plants exceeded the assumptions and disagreed with the conclusions of the EFSA Panel. The EFSA Panel reacted in a report (EFSA EFSA Supp Publ, 1) criticising the methods and outcomes of the two published studies of Hofmann et al. while reaffirming their original recommendations. We respond here point-by-point, showing that the critique is not justified. Based on our results on

  4. Hydrogen and the First Stars: First Results from the SCI-HI 21-cm all-sky spectrum experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voytek, Tabitha; Peterson, Jeffrey; Lopez-Cruz, Omar; Jauregui-Garcia, Jose-Miguel; SCI-HI Experiment Team

    2015-01-01

    The 'Sonda Cosmologica de las Islas para la Deteccion de Hidrogeno Neutro' (SCI-HI) experiment is an all-sky 21-cm brightness temperature spectrum experiment studying the cosmic dawn (z~15-35). The experiment is a collaboration between Carnegie Mellon University (CMU) and Instituto Nacional de Astrofísica, Óptica y Electrónica (INAOE) in Mexico. Initial deployment of the SCI-HI experiment occurred in June 2013 on Guadalupe; a small island about 250 km off of the Pacific coast of Baja California in Mexico. Preliminary measurements from this deployment have placed the first observational constraints on the 21-cm all-sky spectrum around 70 MHz (z~20), see Voytek et al (2014).Neutral Hydrogen (HI) is found throughout the universe in the cold gas that makes up the intergalactic medium (IGM). HI can be observed through the spectral line at 21 cm (1.4 GHz) due to hyperfine structure. Expansion of the universe causes the wavelength of this spectral line to stretch at a rate defined by the redshift z, leading to a signal which can be followed through time.Now the strength of the 21-cm signal in the IGM is dependent only on a small number of variables; the temperature and density of the IGM, the amount of HI in the IGM, the UV energy density in the IGM, and the redshift. This means that 21-cm measurements teach us about the history and structure of the IGM. The SCI-HI experiment focuses on the spatially averaged 21-cm spectrum, looking at the temporal evolution of the IGM during the cosmic dawn before reionization.Although the SCI-HI experiment placed first constraints with preliminary data, this data was limited to a narrow frequency regime around 60-85 MHz. This limitation was caused by instrumental difficulties and the presence of residual radio frequency interference (RFI) in the FM radio band (~88-108 MHz). The SCI-HI experiment is currently undergoing improvements and we plan to have another deployment soon. This deployment would be to Socorro and Clarion, two

  5. Methodology for the development and calibration of the SCI-QOL item banks

    PubMed Central

    Tulsky, David S.; Kisala, Pamela A.; Victorson, David; Choi, Seung W.; Gershon, Richard; Heinemann, Allen W.; Cella, David

    2015-01-01

    Objective To develop a comprehensive, psychometrically sound, and conceptually grounded patient reported outcomes (PRO) measurement system for individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI). Methods Individual interviews (n = 44) and focus groups (n = 65 individuals with SCI and n = 42 SCI clinicians) were used to select key domains for inclusion and to develop PRO items. Verbatim items from other cutting-edge measurement systems (i.e. PROMIS, Neuro-QOL) were included to facilitate linkage and cross-population comparison. Items were field tested in a large sample of individuals with traumatic SCI (n = 877). Dimensionality was assessed with confirmatory factor analysis. Local item dependence and differential item functioning were assessed, and items were calibrated using the item response theory (IRT) graded response model. Finally, computer adaptive tests (CATs) and short forms were administered in a new sample (n = 245) to assess test-retest reliability and stability. Participants and Procedures A calibration sample of 877 individuals with traumatic SCI across five SCI Model Systems sites and one Department of Veterans Affairs medical center completed SCI-QOL items in interview format. Results We developed 14 unidimensional calibrated item banks and 3 calibrated scales across physical, emotional, and social health domains. When combined with the five Spinal Cord Injury – Functional Index physical function banks, the final SCI-QOL system consists of 22 IRT-calibrated item banks/scales. Item banks may be administered as CATs or short forms. Scales may be administered in a fixed-length format only. Conclusions The SCI-QOL measurement system provides SCI researchers and clinicians with a comprehensive, relevant and psychometrically robust system for measurement of physical-medical, physical-functional, emotional, and social outcomes. All SCI-QOL instruments are freely available on Assessment CenterSM. PMID:26010963

  6. 3D Boltzmann Simulation of the Io's Plasma Environment with Adaptive Mesh and Particle Refinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipatov, A. S.; Combi, M. R.

    2002-12-01

    The global dynamics of the ionized and neutral components in the environment of Io plays an important role in the interaction of Jupiter's corotating magnetospheric plasma with Io [Combi et al., 2002; 1998; Kabin et al., 2001]. The stationary simulation of this problem was done in the MHD [Combi et al., 1998; Linker et al, 1998; Kabin et al., 2001] and the electrodynamic [Saur et al., 1999] approaches. In this report, we develop a method of kinetic ion-neutral simulation, which is based on a multiscale adaptive mesh, particle and algorithm refinement. This method employs the fluid description for electrons whereas for ions the drift-kinetic and particle approaches are used. This method takes into account charge-exchange and photoionization processes. The first results of such simulation of the dynamics of ions in the Io's environment are discussed in this report. ~ M R Combi et al., J. Geophys. Res., 103, 9071, 1998. M R Combi, T I Gombosi, K Kabin, Atmospheres in the Solar System: Comparative\\ Aeronomy. Geophys. Monograph Series, 130, 151, 2002. K Kabin et al., Planetary and Space Sci., 49, 337, 2001. J A Linker et al., J. Geophys. Res., 103(E9), 19867, 1998. J Saur et al., J. Geophys. Res., 104, 25105, 1999.

  7. "Sci-Tech - Couldn't be without it !"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2002-03-01

    Launch of a Major European Outreach Programme Seven of Europe's leading Research Organizations [1] launch joint outreach programme for the European Science and Technology Week at the Technopolis Museum in Brussels on 22 March. Their aim is to show Europeans how today's society couldn't be without fundamental research . Could you imagine life without mobile phones, cars, CD players, TV, refrigerators, computers, the internet and the World Wide Web, antibiotics, vitamins, anaesthetics, vaccination, heating, pampers, nylon stockings, glue, bar codes, metal detectors, contact lenses, modems, laser printers, digital cameras, gameboys, play stations...? Technology is everywhere and used by everyone in today's society, but how many Europeans suspect that without studies on the structure of the atom, lasers would not exist, and neither would CD players? Most do not realise that most things they couldn't be without have required years of fundamental research . To fill this knowledge gap, the leading Research Organizations in Europe [1], with the support of the research directorate of the European Commission, have joined forces to inform Europeans how technology couldn't be without science, and how science can no longer progress without technology. The project is called...... Sci-Tech - Couldn't be without it! Sci-Tech - Couldn't be without it! invites Europeans to vote online in a survey to identify the top ten technologies they can't live without. It will show them through a dynamic and entertaining Web space where these top technologies really come from, and it will reveal their intimate links with research. Teaching kits will be developed to explain to students how their favourite gadgets actually work, and how a career in science can contribute to inventions that future generations couldn't be without. The results of the survey will be presented as a series of quiz shows live on the Internet during the Science Week, from 4 to 10 November. Sci-tech - Couldn't be without

  8. rOpenSci - open tools for open science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ram, K.

    2013-12-01

    Solving many of the basic and applied challenges in ecology and evolution requires access to large amounts of data, often spanning long spatial and temporal scales. The long-established model where researchers collect and analyze their own data will soon be replaced by one where disparate datasets are brought to bear on both basic and applied problems. As science becomes more data-driven, it faces a whole new set of challenges. Researchers will not only have to maintain expertise in their domains but also learn new skills to curate, retrieve, and analyze these newly available data. In order to fully realize the potential of data-driven science and allow researchers to draw insights from these vast data stores, we need to address challenges associated with all aspects of the research life cycle. To foster and support a new generation of data-driven science, my colleagues and I founded a project called rOpenSci (http://ropensci.org). The project is an integrated effort to build tools and training using Ecology and Evolution as a model community. In this talk I will outline several of the barriers that need to be overcome including better incentive mechanisms for data, training gaps, and lowering technical barriers.

  9. SciDAC-Center for Plasma Edge Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Choong Seock

    2012-06-04

    The SciDAC ProtoFSP Center for Plasma Edge Simulation (CPES) [http://www.cims.nyu.edu/cpes/] was awarded to New York University, Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences in FY 2006. C.S. Chang was the institutional and national project PI. It's mission was 1) to build kinetic simulation code applicable to tokamak edge region including magnetic divertor geometry, 2) to build a computer science framework which can integrate the kinetic code with MHD/fluid codes in multiscale, 3) to conduct scientific research using the developed tools. CPES has built two such edge kinetic codes XGC0 and XGC1, which are still the only working kinetic edge plasma codes capable of including the diverted magnetic field geometry. CPES has also built the code coupling framework EFFIS (End-to-end Framework for Fusion Integrated Simulation), which incubated and used the Adios (www.olcf.ornl.gov/center-projects/adios/) and eSiMon (http://www.olcf.ornl.gov/center-projects/esimmon/) technologies, together with the Kepler technology.

  10. STARtorialist: Astronomy Outreach via Fashion, Sci-Fi, & Pop Culture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rice, Emily L.; Ash, Summer

    2015-01-01

    Astronomical images in the public domain have increasingly been used as inspiration and patterns for clothing, accessories, and home decor. These 'AstroFashion' items are as diverse as DIY projects, handmade and boutique products, mass-produced commercial items, and haute couture. STARtorialist is a Tumblr-based blog that curates the proliferation of these products with the goal of celebrating the beauty of the universe and highlighting the science behind the images. The blog also includes sci-fi, space, and science-related aspects of popular culture. Each post features images and descriptions of the products, and often where/how we found them and/or the people wearing them, with links to the original astronomical images or other relevant science content. The popularity of each post is evident in the number of 'notes', including 'faves' (personal bookmarks) and 'reblogs' (shares with other users). Since launching the blog in December 2013, with an average of one post per day, we've attracted hundreds of followers on Tumblr and Twitter and thousands of notes on Tumblr. We will present our most popular posts and recommend how education, outreach, and press offices can add Tumblr to their social media repertoire.

  11. Tribocorrosive behaviour of commonly used temporomandibular implants in a synovial fluid-like environment: Ti-6Al-4V and CoCrMo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Royhman, D.; Yuan, J. C.; Shokuhfar, T.; Takoudis, C.; Sukotjo, C.; Mathew, M. T.

    2013-10-01

    The temporomandibular joint implant metal alloys, Ti6Al4V and CoCrMo, (n = 3/group) were tested under free-potential and potentiostatic conditions using a custom-made tribocorrosion apparatus. Sliding duration (1800 cycles), frequency (1.0 Hz) and load (16 N) mimicked the daily mastication process. Synovial-like fluid (bovine calf serum, pH = 7.6 at 37 °C) was used to simulate the in vivo environment. Changes in friction coefficient were monitored throughout the sliding process. Changes in surface topography, total weight loss and roughness values were calculated using scanning electron microscopy and white-light interferometry. Finally, statistical analyses were performed using paired t-tests to determine significance between regions within each metal type and also independent sample t-tests to determine statistical significance between metal alloy types. Ti6Al4V demonstrated a greater decrease of potential than CoCrMo, a higher weight loss from wear (Kw = 257.8 versus 2.62 µg p < 0.0001), a higher weight loss from corrosion (Kc = 17.44 versus 0.14 µg p < 0.0001) and a higher weight loss from the combined effects of wear and corrosion (Kwc = 275.28 versus 2.76 µg p < 0.0001). White-light interferometry measurements demonstrated a greater difference in surface roughness inside the wear region in Ti6Al4V than CoCrMo after the sliding (Ra = 323.80 versus 70.74 nm p < 0.0001). In conclusion, CoCrMo alloy shows superior anti-corrosive and biomechanical properties.

  12. Particles in Action. Study Guide. Unit C2. ZIM-SCI, Zimbabwe Secondary School Science Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stocklmayer, Sue

    The Zimbabwe Secondary School Science Project (ZIM-SCI) developed student study guides, corresponding teaching guides, and science kits for a low-cost science course which could be taught during the first 2 years of secondary school without the aid of qualified teachers and conventional laboratories. This ZIM-SCI study guide is a four-part unit…

  13. Close Encounters of the Best Kind: The Latest Sci-Fi

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kunzel, Bonnie

    2008-01-01

    Not only is science fiction alive and well--it's flourishing. From the big screen (howdy, Wall-E) to the big books (like Suzanne Collins's The Hunger Games, which has attracted loads of prepublication praise), 2008 has been a great year for sci-fi. Publishers have released truckloads of new sci-fi titles this year, but what's particularly…

  14. The Adequacy of the Science Citation Index (SCI) as an Indicator of International Scientific Activity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carpenter, Mark P.; Narin, Francis

    1981-01-01

    Presents the results of a study of Science Citation Index (SCI) as a source for developing indicators of international scientific activity. Journal counts based on SCI and British Library Lending Division (BLLD) cataloging records are compared and reference patterns in key journals are described. Eleven references are listed. (JL)

  15. What is Matter? Study Guide. Unit C1. ZIM-SCI, Zimbabwe Secondary School Science Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stocklmayer, Sue

    The Zimbabwe Secondary School Science Project (ZIM-SCI) developed student study guides, corresponding teaching guides, and science kits for a low-cost science course which could be taught during the first 2 years of secondary school without the aid of qualified teachers and conventional laboratories. This ZIM-SCI study guide is a two-part unit…

  16. Detection of Abnormal Muscle Activations during Walking Following Spinal Cord Injury (SCI)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Ping; Low, K. H.; McGregor, Alison H.; Tow, Adela

    2013-01-01

    In order to identify optimal rehabilitation strategies for spinal cord injury (SCI) participants, assessment of impaired walking is required to detect, monitor and quantify movement disorders. In the proposed assessment, ten healthy and seven SCI participants were recruited to perform an over-ground walking test at slow walking speeds. SCI…

  17. What Makes Things Happen? Study Guide. Unit B. ZIM-SCI, Zimbabwe Secondary School Science Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dube, Peter

    The Zimbabwe Secondary School Science Project (ZIM-SCI) developed student study guides, corresponding teaching guides, and science kits for a low-cost science course which could be taught during the first 2 years of secondary school without the aid of qualified teachers and conventional laboratories. This ZIM-SCI study guide presents activities…

  18. Membrane Targeting and Insertion of the C-Tail Protein SciP.

    PubMed

    Pross, Eva; Soussoula, Lavinia; Seitl, Ines; Lupo, Domenico; Kuhn, Andreas

    2016-10-09

    C-tailed membrane proteins insert into the bilayer post-translationally because the hydrophobic anchor segment leaves the ribosome at the end of translation. Nevertheless, we find here evidence that the targeting of SciP to the membrane of Escherichia coli occurs co-translationally since signal elements in the N-terminal part of the SciP protein sequence are present. Two short hydrophobic sequences were identified that targeted a green fluorescent protein-SciP fusion protein to the membrane involving the signal recognition particle. After targeting, the membrane insertion of SciP is catalyzed by YidC independent of the SecYEG translocase. However, when the C-terminal tail of SciP was extended to 21 aa residues, we found that SecYEG becomes involved and makes its membrane insertion more efficient.

  19. First time experiences using SciPy for computer vision research

    SciTech Connect

    Eads, Damian R; Rosten, Edward J

    2008-01-01

    SciPy is an effective tool suite for prototyping new algorithms. We share some of our experiences using it for the first time to support our research in object detection. SciPy makes it easy to integrate C code, which is essential when algorithms operating on large data sets cannot be vectorized. Python's extensive support for operator overloading makes SciPy's syntax as succinct as its competitors, MATLAB. Octave. and R. The universality of Python. the language in which SciPy was written, gives the researcher access to a broader set of non-numerical libraries to support GUI development. interface with databases, manipulate graph structures, render 3D graphics, unpack binary files, etc. More profoundly, we found it easy to rework research code written with SciPy into a production application, deployable on numerous platforms.

  20. Data Sharing and Publication Using the SciDrive Service

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishin, D.; Medvedev, D.; Szalay, A. S.; Plante, R.; Graham, M.

    2014-05-01

    Despite all the progress made during the last years in the field of cloud data storage, the problem of fast and reliable data storage for the scientific community still remains open. The SciDrive project meets the need for a free open-source scientific data publishing platform. Having the primary target audience of astronomers as the largest data producers, the platform however is not bound to any scientific domain and can be used by different communities. Our current installation provides a free and safe storage platform for scientists to publish their data and share it with the community with the simplicity of Dropbox. The system allows service providers to harvest from the files and derive their broader context in a fairly automated fashion. Collecting various scientific data files in a single location or multiple connected sites allows building an intelligent system of metadata extractors. Our system is aimed at simplifying the cataloging and processing of large file collections for the long tail of scientific data. We propose an extensible plugin architecture for automatic metadata extraction and storage. The current implementation targets some of the data formats commonly used by the astronomy communities, including FITS, ASCII and Excel tables, TIFF images, and YT simulations data archives. Along with generic metadata, format-specific metadata is also processed. For example, basic information about celestial objects is extracted from FITS files and TIFF images, if present. This approach makes the simple BLOB storage a smart system providing access to various data in its own representation, such as a database for files containing tables, or providing additional search and access features such as full-text search, image pyramids or thumbnails creation, simulation dataset id extractor for fast search. A 100TB implementation has just been put into production at Johns Hopkins University.

  1. Data publication and sharing using the SciDrive service

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishin, Dmitry; Medvedev, D.; Szalay, A. S.; Plante, R. L.

    2014-01-01

    Despite the last years progress in scientific data storage, still remains the problem of public data storage and sharing system for relatively small scientific datasets. These are collections forming the “long tail” of power log datasets distribution. The aggregated size of the long tail data is comparable to the size of all data collections from large archives, and the value of data is significant. The SciDrive project's main goal is providing the scientific community with a place to reliably and freely store such data and provide access to it to broad scientific community. The primary target audience of the project is astoromy community, and it will be extended to other fields. We're aiming to create a simple way of publishing a dataset, which can be then shared with other people. Data owner controls the permissions to modify and access the data and can assign a group of users or open the access to everyone. The data contained in the dataset will be automaticaly recognized by a background process. Known data formats will be extracted according to the user's settings. Currently tabular data can be automatically extracted to the user's MyDB table where user can make SQL queries to the dataset and merge it with other public CasJobs resources. Other data formats can be processed using a set of plugins that upload the data or metadata to user-defined side services. The current implementation targets some of the data formats commonly used by the astronomy communities, including FITS, ASCII and Excel tables, TIFF images, and YT simulations data archives. Along with generic metadata, format-specific metadata is also processed. For example, basic information about celestial objects is extracted from FITS files and TIFF images, if present. A 100TB implementation has just been put into production at Johns Hopkins University. The system features public data storage REST service supporting VOSpace 2.0 and Dropbox protocols, HTML5 web portal, command-line client and Java

  2. Effects of Early Acute Care on Autonomic Outcomes in SCI: Bedside to Bench and Back

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-30

    spinal cord injury (SCI), but evidence-based protocols are needed. Optimal early treatment and management of SCI has not been established in clinical...and electronic medical records of SCI patients We have held meetings with the SFGH spinal cord injury clinicians and have established methods for...of  blood  pressure  in  the  rats  after   spinal  cord   injury  at  the  high  thoracic  level  using  the

  3. Corrosion-fatigue of laser-repaired commercially pure titanium and Ti-6Al-4V alloy under different test environments.

    PubMed

    Zavanelli, R A; Guilherme, A S; Pessanha-Henriques, G E; de Arruda Nóbilo, M Antônio; Mesquita, M F

    2004-10-01

    This study evaluated the corrosion-fatigue life of laser-repaired specimens fabricated from commercially pure titanium (CP Ti) and Ti-6Al-4V alloy, tested under different storage conditions. For each metal, 30 dumbbell rods with a central 2.3 mm diameter were prepared by lost-wax casting with the Rematitan System. Simulating the failure after service, corrosion-fatigue life in different media at room temperature (air, synthetic saliva and fluoride synthetic saliva) was determined at a testing frequency of 10 Hz for intact specimens and after laser repairing, using a square waveform with equal maximum tensile and compressive stress that was 30% lower than the 0.2% offset yield strength. For laser welding, the fractured specimens were rejoined using a jig to align the sections invested in type-IV dental stone. The adjacent areas of the gap was air-abraded with 100 microm aluminum oxide, laser welded and retested under the same conditions as the initial intact specimens. The number of cycles at failure was recorded, and the fracture surface was examined with a scanning electron microscope (SEM). The number of cycles for failure of the welded and intact specimens was compared by anova and the Tukey test at a 5% probability level. Within the limitations of this study, the number of cycles required for fracture decreased in wet environments and the laser repairing process adversely affected the life of both metals under the corrosion-fatigue conditions.

  4. Sci-Hub: What Librarians Should Know and Do about Article Piracy.

    PubMed

    Hoy, Matthew B

    2017-01-01

    The high cost of journal articles has driven many researchers to turn to a new way of getting access: "pirate" article sites. Sci-Hub, the largest and best known of these sites, currently offers instant access to more than 58 million journal articles. Users attracted by the ease of use and breadth of the collection may not realize that these articles are often obtained using stolen credentials and downloading them may be illegal. This article will briefly describe Sci-Hub and how it works, the legal and ethical issues it raises, and the problems it may cause for librarians. Librarians should be aware of Sci-Hub and the ways it may change their patrons' expectations. They should also understand the risks Sci-Hub can pose to their patrons and their institutions.

  5. 76 FR 10395 - BreconRidge Manufacturing Solutions, Now Known as Sanmina-SCI Corporation, Division...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-24

    ... Corporation, Division Optoelectronic and Microelectronic Design and Manufacturing, a Subsidiary of Sanmina-SCI Corporation, Including On- Site Leased Workers From Kelly Services, Penski, Inc., and Whitney Enterprises... Corporation, Division Optoelectronic and Microelectronic Design and Manufacturing, a subsidiary of...

  6. Complementary use of the SciSearch database for improved biomedical information searching.

    PubMed Central

    Brown, C M

    1998-01-01

    The use of at least two complementary online biomedical databases is generally considered critical for biomedical scientists seeking to keep fully abreast of recent research developments as well as to retrieve the highest number of relevant citations possible. Although the National Library of Medicine's MEDLINE is usually the database of choice, this paper illustrates the benefits of using another database, the Institute for Scientific Information's SciSearch, when conducting a biomedical information search. When a simple query about red wine consumption and coronary artery disease was posed simultaneously in both MEDLINE and SciSearch, a greater number of relevant citations were retrieved through SciSearch. This paper also provides suggestions for carrying out a comprehensive biomedical literature search in a rapid and efficient manner by using SciSearch in conjunction with MEDLINE. PMID:9549014

  7. SCI Survey to Determine Pressure Ulcer Vulnerability in the Outpatient Population

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-10-01

    include an analysis of osteomyelitis diagnosis and treatment with plans to submit a proposed algorithm to the SCI-QUERI‘ (SCI-Quality Enhancement...34, is there independent ability to % SERVICE CONNECTED BOWEL PRGM LOC # HRS PER TREATMENT BLADDER CONTINENT BLADDER MANAGEMENT INDEWELLING CATHETER...ANEMIA AUTONOMIC DYSREFLEXIA DIABETES1 DIABETES2 HETEROTOPIC OSSIFICATION HYPERTHYROID HYPOTHYROID OSTEOMYELITIS PAIN LEVEL 1-10 TOBACCO USE PAST

  8. FES-Rowing versus Zoledronic Acid to Improve Bone Health in SCI

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    SCI, although the risk is high in this population of osteoporosis -related bone fracture. This study aims to learn if the severe osteoporosis in lower... Osteoporosis , FES-rowing, zoledronic acid, exercise, bone health 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 19a...Introduction Serious spinal cord injury (SCI) causes osteoporosis in the lower extremities, significantly increasing the risk of bone fracture in

  9. Theoretical investigation on local structure and transport properties of NaFsbnd AlF3 molten salts under electric field environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Xiaojun; Xu, Zhenming; Li, Jie; Chen, Jiangan; Liu, Qingsheng

    2016-08-01

    The effect of electric field and molecular ratio CR (NaF/AlF3) on basic structure and transport properties of NaFsbnd AlF3 molten salts were investigated by molecular dynamics simulations with the Buckingham potential model. The [AlF6]3- groups are the dominant specie in NaFsbnd AlF3 molten salts at CR ≥ 2.6, and followed by the [AlF5]2- groups, while CR ≤ 2.4, [AlF5]2- groups are the protagonists up to 40%. In NaFsbnd AlF3 system, with the increase of CR, the proportion of Fb decreases slightly and the percentage of Ff increases dramatically. The Alsbnd F bonds have ionic characters as well as partial covalently characters due to the hybridization of F-2p and Al-3s, 3p orbitals. The order of ion diffusion ability follows as Na+ > F- > Al3+. Adding more NaF can break some F bridges of structure networks and decrease the polymerization degree of NaFsbnd AlF3 molten salts, the viscosity reduces and ionic conductivity increases as a consequence. The calculated results of ionic conductivity are in agreement with the experimental results. Electric field has no significant impact on the local structure characters, while transport properties are not. The change of CR (NaF/AlF3) can significantly affect these characters of both the structure and transport.

  10. Mid-year Status of MESSENGER SciBox Science Planning and Commanding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, L.; Choo, T. H.; Steele, R. J.; Lucks, M.; Nair, H.; Perry, M. E.; Anderson, B. J.; Berman, A. F.; Solomon, S. C.

    2011-12-01

    More than halfway into its primary orbital mission, MESSENGER has successfully exploited the SciBox planning and commanding system to automate science observation scheduling and command generation for its full instrument suite, as well as its radio-frequency communication and guidance and control systems. MESSENGER's SciBox software coordinates instrument observations to determine the optimal conflict-free science schedule for the entire orbital mission and generates weekly command sequences for submission to mission operations. SciBox maximizes science return by filling all available observing opportunities and fully utilizing onboard storage and downlink bandwidth. As of four months into its one-year orbital mission, MESSENGER SciBox had scheduled the acquisition and downlink of nearly 40,000 images and comparable data sets from the spacecraft's six other instruments. The flexibility of MESSENGER SciBox allows for rapid re-optimization of schedules in the event of unforeseen circumstances. It has also allowed the science and planning teams to analyze rapidly the effects of modifying operational parameters and adding new observations. Within two hours, the entire mission can be re-optimized, schedules and command sequences generated, and a full set of plots and reports produced. The effects on resource usage, observational coverage, and compliance with operational constraints may be quickly assessed. This rapid turnaround ensures that optimal schedules are produced regardless of circumstances. We present an overview of the MESSENGER SciBox design and its operation.

  11. Treatment of Neuropathic Pain after SCI with a Catalytic Oxidoreductant

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    chronic morphine tolerance in a mouse model under conditions previously reported for earlier analogs MnTE(or nHex)-2-PyP5+ ([21] [Warner et al...Batinic‐Haberle, I. Pharmacokinetics, Brain  Hippocampus  and Cortex, and  Mitochondrial Accumulation of a New Generation of Lipophilic Redox‐Active...parameter that dominates the efficacy of metalloporphyrins in blocking the  development of  morphine  antinociceptive tolerance through peroxynitrite‐mediated

  12. Targeting Translational Successes through CANSORT-SCI: Using Pet Dogs To Identify Effective Treatments for Spinal Cord Injury.

    PubMed

    Moore, Sarah A; Granger, Nicolas; Olby, Natasha J; Spitzbarth, Ingo; Jeffery, Nick D; Tipold, Andrea; Nout-Lomas, Yvette S; da Costa, Ronaldo C; Stein, Veronika M; Noble-Haeusslein, Linda J; Blight, Andrew R; Grossman, Robert G; Basso, D Michele; Levine, Jonathan M

    2017-03-22

    Translation of therapeutic interventions for spinal cord injury (SCI) from laboratory to clinic has been historically challenging, highlighting the need for robust models of injury that more closely mirror the human condition. The high prevalence of acute, naturally occurring SCI in pet dogs provides a unique opportunity to evaluate expeditiously promising interventions in a population of animals that receive diagnoses and treatment clinically in a manner similar to persons with SCI, while adhering to National Institutes of Health guidelines for scientific rigor and transparent reporting. In addition, pet dogs with chronic paralysis are often maintained long-term by their owners, offering a similarly unique population for study of chronic SCI. Despite this, only a small number of studies have used the clinical dog model of SCI. The Canine Spinal Cord Injury Consortium (CANSORT-SCI) was recently established by a group of veterinarians and basic science researchers to promote the value of the canine clinical model of SCI. The CANSORT-SCI group held an inaugural meeting November 20 and 21, 2015 to evaluate opportunities and challenges to the use of pet dogs in SCI research. Key challenges identified included lack of familiarity with the model among nonveterinary scientists and questions about how and where in the translational process the canine clinical model would be most valuable. In light of these, we review the natural history, outcome, and available assessment tools associated with canine clinical SCI with emphasis on their relevance to human SCI and the translational process.

  13. Toward Sci-φ: A Lightweight Cloud PaaS for Developing Embarrassingly Parallel Applications Based on Jini

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Embarrassingly parallel problems are characterised by a very small amount of information to be exchanged among the parts they are split in, during their parallel execution. As a consequence they do not require sophisticated, low-latency, high-bandwidth interconnection networks but can be efficiently computed in parallel by exploiting commodity hardware. Basically, this means cheap clusters, networks of workstations and desktops, and Computational Clouds. This computational model can be exploited to compute a quite large range of problems. This paper describes Sci-φ, an almost complete redesign of a previous tool of ours aimed at developing task parallel applications based on Java and Jini that were shown to be an effective and efficient solution in environments like clusters and networks of workstations and desktops. PMID:24701174

  14. Impact of Health Behaviors and Health Management on Employment After SCI: Psychological Health and Health Management

    PubMed Central

    Meade, Michelle A.; Krause, James S.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between employment and psychological health and health management as described by individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI) who were employed at least once following injury. Methods: A qualitative approach used 6 focus groups at 2 sites with 44 participants who were at least 10 years post SCI. All had been employed at some point since injury. Heterogeneous and homogeneous groups were delineated based on specific characteristics, such as education, gender, or race. Group sessions followed a semi-structured interview format with questions about personal, environmental, and policy related factors influencing employment following SCI. All group sessions were recorded, transcribed, and coded into conceptual categories to identify topics, themes, and patterns. Inferences were drawn about their meaning. NVivo 10 software using the constant comparative method was used for data analysis. Results: Narratives discussed the relationship between employment and psychological and emotional health and health management. Four themes were identified: (1) adjustment and dealing with emotional reactions, (2) gaining self-confidence, (3) preventing burnout, and (4) attitudes and perspectives. Most themes reflected issues that varied based on severity of injury as well as stage of employment. Conclusions: Individuals with SCI who are successful in working following injury must determine how to perform the behaviors necessary to manage their health and prevent emotional or physical complications. The emotional consequences of SCI must be recognized and addressed and specific behaviors enacted in order to optimize employment outcomes.

  15. Direct Observation of Lattice Aluminum Environments in Li Ion Cathodes LiNi 1–yz Co y Al z O 2 and Al-Doped LiNi x Mn y Co z O 2 via 27 Al MAS NMR Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Dogan, Fulya; Vaughey, John T.; Iddir, Hakim; Key, Baris

    2016-07-06

    Direct observations of local lattice aluminum environments have been a major challenge for aluminum -bearing Li ion battery materials, such as LiNi1-y-zCoyAlzO2 Al(NCA) and aluminum-doped LiNixMnyCozO2 (NMC). Al-27 magic angle spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is the only structural probe currently available that can qualitatively and quantitatively characterize lattice and nonlattice (i.e., surface, coatings, segregation, secondary phase etc.) aluminum coordination and provide information that helps discern its effect in the lattice. In the present study, we use NMR to gain new insights into transition metal (TM)-O-Al coordination and evolution of lattice aluminum sites upon cycling. With the aid of first-principles DFT calculations, we show direct evidence of lattice Al sites, nonpreferential Ni/Co-O-Al ordering in NCA, and the lack of bulk lattice aluminum in aluminum -"doped" NMC. Aluminum coordination of the paramagnetic (lattice) and diamagnetic (nonlattice) nature is investigated for Al-doped NMC and NCA. For the latter, the evolution of the lattice site(s) upon cycling is also studied. A clear reordering of lattice aluminum environments due to nickel migration is observed in NCA upon extended cycling.

  16. Charged-Current Neutral Pion production at SciBooNE

    SciTech Connect

    Catala-Perez, J.; /Valencia U., IFIC

    2009-10-01

    SciBooNE, located in the Booster Neutrino Beam at Fermilab, collected data from June 2007 to August 2008 to accurately measure muon neutrino and anti-neutrino cross sections on carbon below 1 GeV neutrino energy. SciBooNE is studying charged current interactions. Among them, neutral pion production interactions will be the focus of this poster. The experimental signature of neutrino-induced neutral pion production is constituted by two electromagnetic cascades initiated by the conversion of the {pi}{sup 0} decay photons, with an additional muon in the final state for CC processes. In this poster, I will present how we reconstruct and select charged-current muon neutrino interactions producing {pi}{sup 0}'s in SciBooNE.

  17. Implementing Connected Component Labeling as a User Defined Operator for SciDB

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oloso, Amidu; Kuo, Kwo-Sen; Clune, Thomas; Brown, Paul; Poliakov, Alex; Yu, Hongfeng

    2016-01-01

    We have implemented a flexible User Defined Operator (UDO) for labeling connected components of a binary mask expressed as an array in SciDB, a parallel distributed database management system based on the array data model. This UDO is able to process very large multidimensional arrays by exploiting SciDB's memory management mechanism that efficiently manipulates arrays whose memory requirements far exceed available physical memory. The UDO takes as primary inputs a binary mask array and a binary stencil array that specifies the connectivity of a given cell to its neighbors. The UDO returns an array of the same shape as the input mask array with each foreground cell containing the label of the component it belongs to. By default, dimensions are treated as non-periodic, but the UDO also accepts optional input parameters to specify periodicity in any of the array dimensions. The UDO requires four stages to completely label connected components. In the first stage, labels are computed for each subarray or chunk of the mask array in parallel across SciDB instances using the weighted quick union (WQU) with half-path compression algorithm. In the second stage, labels around chunk boundaries from the first stage are stored in a temporary SciDB array that is then replicated across all SciDB instances. Equivalences are resolved by again applying the WQU algorithm to these boundary labels. In the third stage, relabeling is done for each chunk using the resolved equivalences. In the fourth stage, the resolved labels, which so far are "flattened" coordinates of the original binary mask array, are renamed with sequential integers for legibility. The UDO is demonstrated on a 3-D mask of O(1011) elements, with O(108) foreground cells and O(106) connected components. The operator completes in 19 minutes using 84 SciDB instances.

  18. Bringing the SciBar detector to the booster neutrino beam

    SciTech Connect

    Aguilar-Arevalo, A.A.; Alcaraz, J.; Andringa, S.; Brice, S.J.; Brown, B.C.; Bugel, L.; Catala, J.; Cervera, A.; Conrad, J.M.; Couce, E.; Dore, U.; Espinal, X.; Finley, D.A.; Gomez-Cadenas, J.J.; Hayato, Y.; Hiraide, K.; Ishii, T.; Jover, G.; Kobilarcik, T.; Kurimoto, Y.; Kurosawa, Y.; /Columbia U. /Fermilab /KEK, Tsukuba /Barcelona, IFAE /Tokyo U., ICRR /Valencia U., IFIC /Kyoto U. /Los Alamos /Louisiana State U. /Stratton Mountain Sch. /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Colorado U.

    2006-01-01

    This document presents the physics case for bringing SciBar, the fully active, finely segmented tracking detector at KEK, to the FNAL Booster Neutrino Beam (BNB) line. This unique opportunity arose with the termination of K2K beam operations in 2005. At that time, the SciBar detector became available for use in other neutrino beam lines, including the BNB, which has been providing neutrinos to the MiniBooNE experiment since late 2002. The physics that can be done with SciBar/BNB can be put into three categories, each involving several measurements. First are neutrino cross section measurements which are interesting in their own right, including analyses of multi-particle final states, with unprecedented statistics. Second are measurements of processes that represent the signal and primary background channels for the upcoming T2K experiment. Third are measurements which improve existing or planned MiniBooNE analyses and the understanding of the BNB, both in neutrino and antineutrino mode. For each of these proposed measurements, the SciBar/BNB combination presents a unique opportunity or will significantly improve upon current or near-future experiments for several reasons. First, the fine granularity of SciBar allows detailed reconstruction of final states not possible with the MiniBooNE detector. Additionally, the BNB neutrino energy spectrum is a close match to the expected T2K energy spectrum in a region where cross sections are expected to vary dramatically with energy. As a result, the SciBar/BNB combination will provide cross-section measurements in an energy range complementary to MINERvA and complete the knowledge of neutrino cross sections over the entire energy range of interest to the upcoming off-axis experiments.

  19. Diagnosing ALS

    MedlinePlus

    ... that a person diagnosed with ALS seek a second opinion from an ALS "expert" - someone who diagnoses and treats many ALS patients and has training in this medical specialty. The ALS Association maintains a list of recognized experts in the field of ALS. See ALS Association Certified Centers of ...

  20. CitSci.org: A New Model for Managing, Documenting, and Sharing Citizen Science Data.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yiwei; Kaplan, Nicole; Newman, Greg; Scarpino, Russell

    2015-10-01

    Citizen science projects have the potential to advance science by increasing the volume and variety of data, as well as innovation. Yet this potential has not been fully realized, in part because citizen science data are typically not widely shared and reused. To address this and related challenges, we built CitSci.org (see www.citsci.org), a customizable platform that allows users to collect and generate diverse datasets. We hope that CitSci.org will ultimately increase discoverability and confidence in citizen science observations, encouraging scientists to use such data in their own scientific research.

  1. Final Report for DOE Project: Portal Web Services: Support of DOE SciDAC Collaboratories

    SciTech Connect

    Mary Thomas, PI; Geoffrey Fox, Co-PI; Gannon, D; Pierce, M; Moore, R; Schissel, D; Boisseau, J

    2007-10-01

    Grid portals provide the scientific community with familiar and simplified interfaces to the Grid and Grid services, and it is important to deploy grid portals onto the SciDAC grids and collaboratories. The goal of this project is the research, development and deployment of interoperable portal and web services that can be used on SciDAC National Collaboratory grids. This project has four primary task areas: development of portal systems; management of data collections; DOE science application integration; and development of web and grid services in support of the above activities.

  2. Sleep-Disordered Breathing in Chronic SCI: A Randomized Controlled Trial of Treatment Impact on Cognition, Quality of Life, and Cardiovascular Disease

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-13-1-0479 TITLE: Sleep-Disordered Breathing in Chronic SCI: A...5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Sleep-Disordered Breathing in Chronic SCI: A Randomized Controlled Trial of Treatment Impact on Cognition...SCI. In this prospective randomized controlled trial, we will objectively measure sleep disordered breathing (SDB) in chronic SCI patients using

  3. Influence of the P2O5/Al2O3 co-doping on the local environment of erbium ions and on the 1.5 μm quantum efficiency of Er3+-borosilicate glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourhis, Kevin; Boetti, Nadia G.; Koponen, Joona; Milanese, Daniel; Petit, Laetica

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, the absorption properties of Er3+-doped borosilicate glasses with various P2O5 and Al2O3 content are measured for different silica concentrations. The Judd-Ofelt parameters (Ω2, Ω4 and Ω6) have been calculated in order to investigate the local environment of the rare-earth cations. The compositional changes of Ω2 and Ω6 are attributed to changes in the bonding between Er3+ and surrounding ligand groups due to structural modifications occurring with the introduction of P2O5 and Al2O3. The luminescence quantum efficiency of the 4I13/2 → 4I15/2 transition slightly increases with the addition of P2O5 whereas it decreases with the progressive replacement of P2O5 by Al2O3. We noticed that it also increases when the silica content is higher.

  4. Al-tobermorite in Pyroclastic Rock-Seawater Environments: 1963-1967 Surtsey Tephra and 2000-year-old Roman Baianus Sinus Harbor Concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, M. D.; Moore, J. G.; Wenk, H.; Monteiro, P. J.

    2012-12-01

    Interaction of basaltic tephra from the 1963-1967 Surtsey eruptions in Iceland with 70-150 °C seawater produced authigenic zeolites and Al-tobermorite, a layered calcium-aluminum-silicate-hydrate mineral that holds promise as a cementitious binder for environmentally-friendly concretes and concrete encapsulations of hazardous wastes, but has never been recognized in conventional portland cement concretes. A Roman concrete breakwater, or pilae, constructed of lime and Campi Flegrei pyroclastic rock in the 14-26°C seawater of Pozzuoli Bay (Baianus Sinus) in first century BCE, however, developed Al-tobermorite in relict lime clasts, Neapolitan Yellow Tuff pumice fragments, and voids, forming about 5-10 volume% of the pozzolanic mortar. A thermal model of the 10m2 by 6m tall pilae indicates that exothermic hydration of portlandite and poorly-crystalline calcium-aluminum-silicate-hydrate (C-A-S-H) cementitious binder produced maximum adiabatic temperatures <85 °C, 28-90 days after installation. Relative to Surtsey Al-tobermorite, Baianus Sinus Al-tobermorite in relict lime clasts is enriched in aluminum and calcium, with Al/(Si+Al)=0.16-0.17 and Ca/(Si+Al)=0.83. This is likely the result of saturation with respect to portlandite at pH>12.7, and high Al3+mobility in a system infused with silicon, aluminum, sodium and potassium from the alkali-rich Flegrean ash, with sulfate and chloride from seawater acting as possible mineralizers. Synchrotron-radiation soft X-ray microscopy and NMR studies indicate that Baianus Sinus Al-tobermorite has a double-silicate-chain structure with aluminum substitution for silicon in tetrahedral chain and branching sites, and a large 11.44(3) Å interlayer spacing. The bulk modulus measured from high pressure synchroton X-ray diffraction experiments, 54.7±5.5 GPa, is ~20 GPa greater than modern C-A-S-H. Na2O and K2O at 0.3-1.2 weight% partially balance Al3+ substitution for Si4+ in both the Surtsey and Baianus Sinus crystals. Sulphate and

  5. Scalable Earth-observation Analytics for Geoscientists: Spacetime Extensions to the Array Database SciDB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appel, Marius; Lahn, Florian; Pebesma, Edzer; Buytaert, Wouter; Moulds, Simon

    2016-04-01

    Today's amount of freely available data requires scientists to spend large parts of their work on data management. This is especially true in environmental sciences when working with large remote sensing datasets, such as obtained from earth-observation satellites like the Sentinel fleet. Many frameworks like SpatialHadoop or Apache Spark address the scalability but target programmers rather than data analysts, and are not dedicated to imagery or array data. In this work, we use the open-source data management and analytics system SciDB to bring large earth-observation datasets closer to analysts. Its underlying data representation as multidimensional arrays fits naturally to earth-observation datasets, distributes storage and computational load over multiple instances by multidimensional chunking, and also enables efficient time-series based analyses, which is usually difficult using file- or tile-based approaches. Existing interfaces to R and Python furthermore allow for scalable analytics with relatively little learning effort. However, interfacing SciDB and file-based earth-observation datasets that come as tiled temporal snapshots requires a lot of manual bookkeeping during ingestion, and SciDB natively only supports loading data from CSV-like and custom binary formatted files, which currently limits its practical use in earth-observation analytics. To make it easier to work with large multi-temporal datasets in SciDB, we developed software tools that enrich SciDB with earth observation metadata and allow working with commonly used file formats: (i) the SciDB extension library scidb4geo simplifies working with spatiotemporal arrays by adding relevant metadata to the database and (ii) the Geospatial Data Abstraction Library (GDAL) driver implementation scidb4gdal allows to ingest and export remote sensing imagery from and to a large number of file formats. Using added metadata on temporal resolution and coverage, the GDAL driver supports time-based ingestion of

  6. [Analysis of the citation of the articles published in National Journal of Andrology by SCI periodicals from 2002 to 2008].

    PubMed

    Huang, Hai

    2009-03-01

    Science Citation Index (SCI) is one of the world's most important and influential information retrieval systems. Today Web of Science covers over 9000 international and regional journals and book series in every field of natural sciences, social sciences, and arts and humanities. More and more Chinese periodicals have been cited by SCI. This paper briefly introduces the SCI database and its selection process and analyzes the citation of the articles published in National Journal of Andrology (NJA) by SCI journals from 2002 to 2008, aiming to provide some information for the internationalization of NJA.

  7. System Configuration and Operation Plan of Hayabusa2 DCAM3-D Camera System for Scientific Observation During SCI Impact Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogawa, Kazunori; Shirai, Kei; Sawada, Hirotaka; Arakawa, Masahiko; Honda, Rie; Wada, Koji; Ishibashi, Ko; Iijima, Yu-ichi; Sakatani, Naoya; Nakazawa, Satoru; Hayakawa, Hajime

    2017-03-01

    An artificial impact experiment is scheduled for 2018-2019 in which an impactor will collide with asteroid 162137 Ryugu (1999 JU3) during the asteroid rendezvous phase of the Hayabusa2 spacecraft. The small carry-on impactor (SCI) will shoot a 2-kg projectile at 2 km/s to create a crater 1-10 m in diameter with an expected subsequent ejecta curtain of a 100-m scale on an ideal sandy surface. A miniaturized deployable camera (DCAM3) unit will separate from the spacecraft at about 1 km from impact, and simultaneously conduct optical observations of the experiment. We designed and developed a camera system (DCAM3-D) in the DCAM3, specialized for scientific observations of impact phenomenon, in order to clarify the subsurface structure, construct theories of impact applicable in a microgravity environment, and identify the impact point on the asteroid. The DCAM3-D system consists of a miniaturized camera with a wide-angle and high-focusing performance, high-speed radio communication devices, and control units with large data storage on both the DCAM3 unit and the spacecraft. These components were successfully developed under severe constraints of size, mass and power, and the whole DCAM3-D system has passed all tests verifying functions, performance, and environmental tolerance. Results indicated sufficient potential to conduct the scientific observations during the SCI impact experiment. An operation plan was carefully considered along with the configuration and a time schedule of the impact experiment, and pre-programed into the control unit before the launch. In this paper, we describe details of the system design concept, specifications, and the operating plan of the DCAM3-D system, focusing on the feasibility of scientific observations.

  8. What Makes Things Happen? Teacher's Guide. Unit B. ZIM-SCI, Zimbabwe Secondary School Science Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dube, Peter

    The Zimbabwe Secondary School Science Project (ZIM-SCI) developed student study guides, corresponding teaching guides, and science kits for a low-cost science course which could be taught during the first 2 years of secondary school without the aid of qualified teachers and conventional laboratories. This teaching guide, designed to be read in…

  9. Particles in Action. Teacher's Guide. Unit C2. ZIM-SCI, Zimbabwe Secondary School Science Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stocklmayer, Sue

    The Zimbabwe Secondary School Science Project (ZIM-SCI) developed student study guides, corresponding teaching guides, and science kits for a low-cost science course which could be taught during the first 2 years of secondary school without the aid of qualified teachers and conventional laboratories. This teaching guide, designed to be read in…

  10. Purification and biochemical characterisation of human and murine stem cell inhibitors (SCI).

    PubMed

    Graham, G J; Freshney, M G; Donaldson, D; Pragnell, I B

    1992-01-01

    We have recently characterised an inhibitor of haemopoietic stem cell proliferation (SCI/MIP-1 alpha) and report here on its purification and initial biological and biochemical characterisation. The activity can be detected by direct addition to the CFU-A stem cell assay and this simple test for inhibitory activity has greatly facilitated the purification of the molecule. The purification involves a combination of Mono Q ion exchange chromatography, heparin-sepharose affinity chromatography and Blue Sepharose affinity chromatography. The purified stem cell inhibitor is an 8 kD peptide which is identical to the previously described peptide macrophage inflammatory protein 1 alpha. The peptide has a natural tendency to form large self-aggregates and appears, in physiological buffers, to have a native molecular weight of around 90 kD. SCI is a heat stable, protease sensitive protein which is half maximally active at between 10 and 25 pM in the CFU-A assay. The self-aggregates can be disrupted by dilute solutions of acetic acid and it appears that disruption increases the specific activity of SCI preparations. We also report the characterisation of the human homologue of the stem cell inhibitor (human SCI/MIP-1 alpha) which is 74% identical to murine MIP-1 alpha and which shares all the above features of the murine inhibitor.

  11. National Computational Infrastructure for Lattice Gauge Theory SciDAC-2 Closeout Report Indiana University Component

    SciTech Connect

    Gottlieb, Steven Arthur; DeTar, Carleton; Tousaint, Doug

    2014-07-24

    This is the closeout report for the Indiana University portion of the National Computational Infrastructure for Lattice Gauge Theory project supported by the United States Department of Energy under the SciDAC program. It includes information about activities at Indian University, the University of Arizona, and the University of Utah, as those three universities coordinated their activities.

  12. Novel Target for Ameliorating Pain and Other Problems after SCI: Spontaneous Activityin Nociceptors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    the function of a sodium ion channel, Nav1.8, that is selectively expressed in primary afferent neurons (especially nociceptors) ameliorate reflex...potent and selective Nav1.8 sodium channel blocker, attenuates neuropathic and inflammatory pain in the rat. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A, 104:8520–8525

  13. Cross section analyses in MiniBooNE and SciBooNE experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Katori, Teppei

    2015-05-15

    The MiniBooNE experiment (2002-2012) and the SciBooNE experiment (2007-2008) are modern high statistics neutrino experiments, and they developed many new ideas in neutrino cross section analyses. In this note, I discuss selected topics of these analyses.

  14. SCI Survey to Determine Pressure Ulcer Vulnerability in the Outpatient Population

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-01

    2009. Patients with or without pressure ulcers were included. Patients with SCI due to terminal disease, multiple sclerosis of amyotrophic lateral ... sclerosis were excluded. A data extraction tool was used to compile information known to impact the development of pressure ulcers in persons with

  15. Performance Engineering Research Institute SciDAC-2 Enabling Technologies Institute Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Lucas, Robert

    2013-04-20

    Enhancing the performance of SciDAC applications on petascale systems had high priority within DOE SC at the start of the second phase of the SciDAC program, SciDAC-2, as it continues to do so today. Achieving expected levels of performance on high-end computing (HEC) systems is growing ever more challenging due to enormous scale, increasing architectural complexity, and increasing application complexity. To address these challenges, the University of Southern California?s Information Sciences Institute organized the Performance Engineering Research Institute (PERI). PERI implemented a unified, tripartite research plan encompassing: (1) performance modeling and prediction; (2) automatic performance tuning; and (3) performance engineering of high profile applications. Within PERI, USC?s primary research activity was automatic tuning (autotuning) of scientific software. This activity was spurred by the strong user preference for automatic tools and was based on previous successful activities such as ATLAS, which automatically tuned components of the LAPACK linear algebra library, and other recent work on autotuning domain-specific libraries. Our other major component was application engagement, to which we devoted approximately 30% of our effort to work directly with SciDAC-2 applications. This report is a summary of the overall results of the USC PERI effort.

  16. Evaluating soil organic C sequestration in the Cotton Belt with the soil conditioning index (SCI)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Simulation models that are sensitive to management, edaphic factors, and climate could provide insightful probes of how land owners and producers might be able to sequester soil organic C and engage in emerging carbon markets. We used the soil conditioning index (SCI) embedded in the RUSLE2 model t...

  17. SciTech Clubs for Girls. [Final report], September 1, 1991--April 30, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Malamud, E.; Diaz, O.; Cox, J.

    1994-12-31

    The program of SciTech Clubs for Girls and its progress are described. This is a program that promotes the learning of science and mathematics by girls in the age range of 9 to 13 years through the process of building exhibits and learning from local professionals. A list of exhibits and a critique of the program are given.

  18. The SciELO Open Access: A Gold Way from the South

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Packer, Abel L.

    2009-01-01

    Open access has long emphasized access to scholarly materials. However, open access can also mean access to the means of producing visible and recognized journals. This issue is particularly important in developing and emergent countries. The SciELO (Scientific Electronic Library On-line) project, first started in Brazil and, shortly afterward, in…

  19. SciSpark's SRDD : A Scientific Resilient Distributed Dataset for Multidimensional Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palamuttam, R. S.; Wilson, B. D.; Mogrovejo, R. M.; Whitehall, K. D.; Mattmann, C. A.; McGibbney, L. J.; Ramirez, P.

    2015-12-01

    Remote sensing data and climate model output are multi-dimensional arrays of massive sizes locked away in heterogeneous file formats (HDF5/4, NetCDF 3/4) and metadata models (HDF-EOS, CF) making it difficult to perform multi-stage, iterative science processing since each stage requires writing and reading data to and from disk. We have developed SciSpark, a robust Big Data framework, that extends ApacheTM Spark for scaling scientific computations. Apache Spark improves the map-reduce implementation in ApacheTM Hadoop for parallel computing on a cluster, by emphasizing in-memory computation, "spilling" to disk only as needed, and relying on lazy evaluation. Central to Spark is the Resilient Distributed Dataset (RDD), an in-memory distributed data structure that extends the functional paradigm provided by the Scala programming language. However, RDDs are ideal for tabular or unstructured data, and not for highly dimensional data. The SciSpark project introduces the Scientific Resilient Distributed Dataset (sRDD), a distributed-computing array structure which supports iterative scientific algorithms for multidimensional data. SciSpark processes data stored in NetCDF and HDF files by partitioning them across time or space and distributing the partitions among a cluster of compute nodes. We show usability and extensibility of SciSpark by implementing distributed algorithms for geospatial operations on large collections of multi-dimensional grids. In particular we address the problem of scaling an automated method for finding Mesoscale Convective Complexes. SciSpark provides a tensor interface to support the pluggability of different matrix libraries. We evaluate performance of the various matrix libraries in distributed pipelines, such as Nd4jTM and BreezeTM. We detail the architecture and design of SciSpark, our efforts to integrate climate science algorithms, parallel ingest and partitioning (sharding) of A-Train satellite observations from model grids. These

  20. SCY-078 Is Fungicidal against Candida Species in Time-Kill Studies

    PubMed Central

    Scorneaux, Bernard; Angulo, David; Borroto-Esoda, Katyna; Ghannoum, Mahmoud; Peel, Michael

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT SCY-078 is an orally bioavailable ß-1,3-glucan synthesis inhibitor (GSI) and the first-in-class of structurally novel triterpene antifungals in clinical development for treating candidemia and invasive candidiasis. In vitro susceptibilities by broth microdilution, antifungal carryover, and time-kill dynamics were determined for three reference (ATCC) strains (Candida albicans 90028, Candida parapsilosis 90018, and Candida tropicalis 750), a quality-control (QC) strain (Candida krusei 6258), and four other strains (C. albicans MYA-2732, 64124, and 76485 and Candida glabrata 90030). Caspofungin (CASP), fluconazole (FLC), and voriconazole (VRC) were comparators. For time-kill experiments, SCY-078 and CASP were evaluated at 0.25, 1, 2, 4, 8, and 16 times the MIC80, and FLU and VRC were evaluated at 4× MIC80. The time to reach 50%, 90%, and 99.9% reduction in the number of CFUs from the starting inoculum was determined. Net change in the number of CFU per milliliter was used to determine 50% and 90% effective concentrations and maximum effect (EC50, EC90, and Emax, respectively). The SCY-078 MIC range was between 0.0625 and 1 μg/ml and generally similar to that of CASP. Antifungal carryover was not observed for SCY-078. SCY-078 was fungicidal against seven isolates at ≥4× MIC (kill of ≥3 log10) and achieved a 1.7-log10 reduction in CFU count/milliliter against C. albicans 90028. CASP behaved similarly against each isolate and achieved a 1.5-log10 reduction in the number of CFU/milliliter against C. albicans 90028. Reductions of 50% in CFU count/milliliter were achieved rapidly (1 to 2.8 h); fungicidal endpoints were reached at 12.1 to 21.8 h at ≥4× MIC. EC90 was reached at ∼5× MIC at each time point to 24 h. The EC50 and EC90 values were generally similar (8 to 24 h). Time-kill behavior of CASP was similar to that of SCY-078. FLC and VRC were fungistatic. Overall, SCY-078 has primarily fungicidal activity against Candida spp. and behaved

  1. SCY-078 Is Fungicidal against Candida Species in Time-Kill Studies.

    PubMed

    Scorneaux, Bernard; Angulo, David; Borroto-Esoda, Katyna; Ghannoum, Mahmoud; Peel, Michael; Wring, Stephen

    2017-03-01

    SCY-078 is an orally bioavailable ß-1,3-glucan synthesis inhibitor (GSI) and the first-in-class of structurally novel triterpene antifungals in clinical development for treating candidemia and invasive candidiasis. In vitro susceptibilities by broth microdilution, antifungal carryover, and time-kill dynamics were determined for three reference (ATCC) strains (Candida albicans 90028, Candida parapsilosis 90018, and Candida tropicalis 750), a quality-control (QC) strain (Candida krusei 6258), and four other strains (C. albicans MYA-2732, 64124, and 76485 and Candida glabrata 90030). Caspofungin (CASP), fluconazole (FLC), and voriconazole (VRC) were comparators. For time-kill experiments, SCY-078 and CASP were evaluated at 0.25, 1, 2, 4, 8, and 16 times the MIC80, and FLU and VRC were evaluated at 4× MIC80 The time to reach 50%, 90%, and 99.9% reduction in the number of CFUs from the starting inoculum was determined. Net change in the number of CFU per milliliter was used to determine 50% and 90% effective concentrations and maximum effect (EC50, EC90, and Emax, respectively). The SCY-078 MIC range was between 0.0625 and 1 μg/ml and generally similar to that of CASP. Antifungal carryover was not observed for SCY-078. SCY-078 was fungicidal against seven isolates at ≥4× MIC (kill of ≥3 log10) and achieved a 1.7-log10 reduction in CFU count/milliliter against C. albicans 90028. CASP behaved similarly against each isolate and achieved a 1.5-log10 reduction in the number of CFU/milliliter against C. albicans 90028. Reductions of 50% in CFU count/milliliter were achieved rapidly (1 to 2.8 h); fungicidal endpoints were reached at 12.1 to 21.8 h at ≥4× MIC. EC90 was reached at ∼5× MIC at each time point to 24 h. The EC50 and EC90 values were generally similar (8 to 24 h). Time-kill behavior of CASP was similar to that of SCY-078. FLC and VRC were fungistatic. Overall, SCY-078 has primarily fungicidal activity against Candida spp. and behaved comparably to CASP.

  2. Understanding Quality of Life in Adults with Spinal Cord Injury Via SCI-Related Needs and Secondary Complications

    PubMed Central

    Noreau, Luc; Leblond, Jean; Dumont, Frédéric S.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Understanding the factors that can predict greater quality of life (QoL) is important for adults with spinal cord injury (SCI), given that they report lower levels of QoL than the general population. Objectives: To build a conceptual model linking SCI-related needs, secondary complications, and QoL in adults with SCI. Prior to testing the conceptual model, we aimed to develop and evaluate the factor structure for both SCI-related needs and secondary complications. Methods: Individuals with a traumatic SCI (N = 1,137) responded to an online survey measuring 13 SCI-related needs, 13 secondary complications, and the Life Satisfaction Questionnaire to assess QoL. The SCI-related needs and secondary complications were conceptualized into factors, tested with a confirmatory factor analysis, and subsequently evaluated in a structural equation model to predict QoL. Results: The confirmatory factor analysis supported a 2-factor model for SCI related needs, χ2(61, N = 1,137) = 250.40, P <.001, comparative fit index (CFI) = .93, root mean square error of approximation (RMSEA) = .05, standardized root mean square residual (SRMR) = .04, and for 11 of the 13 secondary complications, χ2(44, N = 1,137) = 305.67, P < .001, CFI = .91, RMSEA = .060, SRMR = .033. The final 2 secondary complications were kept as observed constructs. In the structural model, both vital and personal development unmet SCI-related needs (β = -.22 and -.20, P < .05, respectively) and the neuro-physiological systems factor (β = -.45, P < .05) were negatively related with QoL. Conclusions: Identifying unmet SCI-related needs of individuals with SCI and preventing or managing secondary complications are essential to their QoL. PMID:25477745

  3. Science Classroom Inquiry (SCI) Simulations: A Novel Method to Scaffold Science Learning

    PubMed Central

    Peffer, Melanie E.; Beckler, Matthew L.; Schunn, Christian; Renken, Maggie; Revak, Amanda

    2015-01-01

    Science education is progressively more focused on employing inquiry-based learning methods in the classroom and increasing scientific literacy among students. However, due to time and resource constraints, many classroom science activities and laboratory experiments focus on simple inquiry, with a step-by-step approach to reach predetermined outcomes. The science classroom inquiry (SCI) simulations were designed to give students real life, authentic science experiences within the confines of a typical classroom. The SCI simulations allow students to engage with a science problem in a meaningful, inquiry-based manner. Three discrete SCI simulations were created as website applications for use with middle school and high school students. For each simulation, students were tasked with solving a scientific problem through investigation and hypothesis testing. After completion of the simulation, 67% of students reported a change in how they perceived authentic science practices, specifically related to the complex and dynamic nature of scientific research and how scientists approach problems. Moreover, 80% of the students who did not report a change in how they viewed the practice of science indicated that the simulation confirmed or strengthened their prior understanding. Additionally, we found a statistically significant positive correlation between students’ self-reported changes in understanding of authentic science practices and the degree to which each simulation benefitted learning. Since SCI simulations were effective in promoting both student learning and student understanding of authentic science practices with both middle and high school students, we propose that SCI simulations are a valuable and versatile technology that can be used to educate and inspire a wide range of science students on the real-world complexities inherent in scientific study. PMID:25786245

  4. Science classroom inquiry (SCI) simulations: a novel method to scaffold science learning.

    PubMed

    Peffer, Melanie E; Beckler, Matthew L; Schunn, Christian; Renken, Maggie; Revak, Amanda

    2015-01-01

    Science education is progressively more focused on employing inquiry-based learning methods in the classroom and increasing scientific literacy among students. However, due to time and resource constraints, many classroom science activities and laboratory experiments focus on simple inquiry, with a step-by-step approach to reach predetermined outcomes. The science classroom inquiry (SCI) simulations were designed to give students real life, authentic science experiences within the confines of a typical classroom. The SCI simulations allow students to engage with a science problem in a meaningful, inquiry-based manner. Three discrete SCI simulations were created as website applications for use with middle school and high school students. For each simulation, students were tasked with solving a scientific problem through investigation and hypothesis testing. After completion of the simulation, 67% of students reported a change in how they perceived authentic science practices, specifically related to the complex and dynamic nature of scientific research and how scientists approach problems. Moreover, 80% of the students who did not report a change in how they viewed the practice of science indicated that the simulation confirmed or strengthened their prior understanding. Additionally, we found a statistically significant positive correlation between students' self-reported changes in understanding of authentic science practices and the degree to which each simulation benefitted learning. Since SCI simulations were effective in promoting both student learning and student understanding of authentic science practices with both middle and high school students, we propose that SCI simulations are a valuable and versatile technology that can be used to educate and inspire a wide range of science students on the real-world complexities inherent in scientific study.

  5. ALS Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... toward a world without ALS! Walk to Defeat ALS® Walk to Defeat ALS® draws people of all ... We need your help. I Will Advocate National ALS Registry The National ALS Registry is a congressionally ...

  6. Atoms and Molecules. Study Guide. Unit 2. ZIM-SCI, Zimbabwe Secondary School Science Project. Year 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mandizha, George

    The Zimbabwe Secondary School Science Project (ZIM-SCI) developed student study guides, corresponding teaching guides, and science kits for a low-cost science course which could be taught during the third year of secondary school without the aid of qualified teachers and conventional laboratories. This ZIM-SCI study guide is a four-part unit…

  7. Using Electricity. Study Guide. Unit I2. ZIM-SCI, Zimbabwe Secondary School Science Project. Year 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chidume, Kwashira

    The Zimbabwe Secondary School Science Project (ZIM-SCI) developed student study guides, corresponding teaching guides, and science kits for a low-cost science course which could be taught during the first 2 years of secondary school without the aid of qualified teachers and conventional laboratories. This ZIM-SCI study guide presents activities…

  8. Understanding Electricity. Study Guide. Unit I1. ZIM-SCI, Zimbabwe Secondary School Science Project. Year 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chidume, Kwashira

    The Zimbabwe Secondary School Science Project (ZIM-SCI) developed student study guides, corresponding teaching guides, and science kits for a low-cost science course which could be taught during the first 2 years of secondary school without the aid of qualified teachers and conventional laboratories. This ZIM-SCI study guide presents activities…

  9. Ranking Business and Economics Journals in South America Using the Scientific Electronic Library Online (SciELO)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alexander, Jennifer K.; Pradenas, Lorena; Parada, Victor; Scherer, Robert F.

    2012-01-01

    Access to published research for knowledge creation and education in the administrative science disciplines in South America has been enhanced since the introduction of the Scientific Electronic Library Online (SciELO). Although SciELO has been available as an online journal indexing and publication service since 1998, there have been no…

  10. 32 CFR 147.32 - Temporary eligibility for access at the top secret and SCI levels and temporary eligibility for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Temporary eligibility for access at the top secret and SCI levels and temporary eligibility for âQâ access authorization: For someone who is not the... Guidelines for Temporary Access § 147.32 Temporary eligibility for access at the top secret and SCI...

  11. 32 CFR 147.32 - Temporary eligibility for access at the top secret and SCI levels and temporary eligibility for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Temporary eligibility for access at the top secret and SCI levels and temporary eligibility for âQâ access authorization: For someone who is not the... Guidelines for Temporary Access § 147.32 Temporary eligibility for access at the top secret and SCI...

  12. What Do You Know about Water? Study Guide. Unit D. ZIM-SCI, Zimbabwe Secondary School Science Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dube, Peter

    The Zimbabwe Secondary School Science Project (ZIM-SCI) developed student study guides, corresponding teaching guides, and science kits for a low-cost science course which could be taught during the first 2 years of secondary school without the aid of qualified teachers and conventional laboratories. This ZIM-SCI study guide is a three-part unit…

  13. Life, Beginning and Growing. Study Guide. Unit E1. ZIM-SCI, Zimbabwe Secondary School Science Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hosking, Bunty

    The Zimbabwe Secondary School Science Project (ZIM-SCI) developed student study guides, corresponding teaching guides, and science kits for a low-cost science course which could be taught during the first 2 years of secondary school without the aid of qualified teachers and conventional laboratories. This ZIM-SCI study guide is a three-part unit…

  14. 32 CFR 147.32 - Temporary eligibility for access at the top secret and SCI levels and temporary eligibility for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Temporary eligibility for access at the top secret and SCI levels and temporary eligibility for âQâ access authorization: For someone who is not the... Guidelines for Temporary Access § 147.32 Temporary eligibility for access at the top secret and SCI...

  15. Our Planet Earth. Teacher's Guide. Unit F1. ZIM-SCI, Zimbabwe Secondary School Science Project. Year 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stocklmayer, Sue

    The Zimbabwe Secondary School Science Project (ZIM-SCI) developed student study guides, corresponding teaching guides, and science kits for a low-cost science course which could be taught during the first 2 years of secondary school without the aid of qualified teachers and conventional laboratories. This ZIM-SCI study guide presents activities,…

  16. Reproducing by Flowers and Seeds. Study Guide. Unit E2. ZIM-SCI, Zimbabwe Secondary School Science Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zesaguli, Josie

    The Zimbabwe Secondary School Science Project (ZIM-SCI) developed student study guides, corresponding teaching guides, and science kits for a low-cost science course which could be taught during the first 2 years of secondary school without the aid of qualified teachers and environmental laboratories. This ZIM-SCI study guide consists of…

  17. Sense from Senses. Study Guide. Unit J. ZIM-SCI, Zimbabwe Secondary School Science Project. Year 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simango, Sam

    The Zimbabwe Secondary School Science Project (ZIM-SCI) developed student study guides, corresponding teaching guides, and science kits for a low-cost science course which could be taught during the first 2 years of secondary school without the aid of qualified teachers and conventional laboratories. This ZIM-SCI study guide presents activities…

  18. Forces in Living Things. Study Guide. Unit H2. ZIM-SCI, Zimbabwe Secondary School Science Project. Year 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hosking, Bunty; Zesaguli, Josie

    The Zimbabwe Secondary School Science Project (ZIM-SCI) developed student study guides, corresponding teaching guides, and science kits for a low-cost science course which could be taught during the first 2 years of secondary school without the aid of qualified teachers and conventional laboratories. This ZIM-SCI study guide presents activities…

  19. Learning to be a Scientist. Study Guide. Unit A1. ZIM-SCI, Zimbabwe Secondary School Science Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stocklmayer, Sue

    The Zimbabwe Secondary School Science Project (ZIM-SCI) developed student study guides, corresponding teaching guides, and science kits for a low-cost science course which could be taught during the first 2 years of secondary school without the aid of qualified teachers and conventional laboratories. This ZIM-SCI study guide introduces students to…

  20. Living Things and Their Food. Study Guide. Unit G2. ZIM-SCI, Zimbabwe Secondary School Science Project. Year 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hosking, Bunty

    The Zimbabwe Secondary School Science Project (ZIM-SCI) developed student study guides, corresponding teaching guides, and science kits for a low-cost science course which could be taught during the first 2 years of secondary school without the aid of qualified teachers and conventional laboratories. This ZIM-SCI study guide presents activities…

  1. Energy for Living. Study Guide. Unit G1. ZIM-SCI, Zimbabwe Secondary School Science Project. Year 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hosking, Bunty

    The Zimbabe Secondary School Science Project (ZIM-SCI) developed student study guides, corresponding teaching guides, and science kits for a low-cost science course which could be taught during the first 2 years of secondary school without the aid of qualified teachers and conventional laboratories. This ZIM-SCI study guide includes activities and…

  2. Forces in Action. Study Guide. Unit H1. ZIM-SCI, Zimbabwe Secondary School Science Project. Year 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dube, Peter

    The Zimbabwe Secondary School Science Project (ZIM-SCI) developed student study guides, corresponding teaching guides, and science kits for a low-cost science course which could be taught during the first 2 years of secondary school without the aid of qualified teachers and conventional laboratories. This ZIM-SCI study guide presents activities…

  3. Interaction of polyethylene glycol (PEG) with the membrane-binding domains following spinal cord injury (SCI): introduction of a mechanism for SCI repair.

    PubMed

    Rad, Iman; Khodayari, Kaveh; Hadi Alijanvand, Saeid; Mobasheri, Hamid

    2015-01-01

    Lipid-binding domains regulate positioning of the membrane proteins via specific interactions with phospholipid's head groups. Spinal cord injury (SCI) diminishes the integrity of neural fiber membranes at nanoscopic level. In cases that the ruptured zone size is beyond the natural resealing ability, there is a need for reinforcing factors such as polymers (e.g. Polyethylene glycol) to patch the dismantled axoplasm. Certain conserved sequential and structural patterns of interacting residues specifically bind to PEGs. It is also found that PEG600, PEG400 and PEG200 share the strongest interaction with the lipid-binding domains even more successful than phospholipid head groups. The alpha helix structure composed of hydrophobic, neutral and acidic residues prepares an opportunity for PEG400 to play an amphipathic role in the interaction with injured membrane. This in-silico study introduces a mechanism for PEG restorative ability at the molecular level. It is believed that PEG400 interrelates the injured membrane to their underneath axoplasm while retaining the integrity of ruptured membrane via interaction with ENTH domains of membrane proteins. This privilege of PEG400 in treating injured membrane must be considered in designing of polymeric biomaterials that are introduced for SCI repair.

  4. Sacrificial anode stability and polarization potential variation in a ternary Al-xZn-xMg alloy in a seawater-marine environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muazu, Abubakar; Aliyu, Yaro Shehu; Abdulwahab, Malik; Idowu Popoola, Abimbola Patricia

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, the effects of zinc (Zn) and magnesium (Mg) addition on the performance of an aluminum-based sacrificial anode in seawater were investigated using a potential measurement method. Anodic efficiency, protection efficiency, and polarized potential were the parameters used. The percentages of Zn and Mg in the anodes were varied from 2% to 8% Zn and 1% to 4% Mg. The alloys produced were tested as sacrificial anodes for the protection of mild steel in seawater at room temperature. Current efficiency as high as 88.36% was obtained in alloys containing 6% Zn and 1% Mg. The polarized potentials obtained for the coupled (steel/Al-based alloys) are as given in the Pourbaix diagrams, with steel lying within the immunity region/cathodic region and the sacrificial anodes within the anodic region. The protection offered by the sacrificial anodes to the steel after the 7th and 8th week was measured and protection efficiency values as high as 99.66% and 99.47% were achieved for the Al-6%Zn-1%Mg cast anode. The microstructures of the cast anodes comprise of intermetallic structures of hexagonal Mg3Zn2 and body-centered cubic Al2Mg3Zn3. These are probably responsible for the breakdown of the passive alumina film, thus enhancing the anode efficiency.

  5. GeoSciGraph: An Ontological Framework for EarthCube Semantic Infrastructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, A.; Schachne, A.; Condit, C.; Valentine, D.; Richard, S.; Zaslavsky, I.

    2015-12-01

    The CINERGI (Community Inventory of EarthCube Resources for Geosciences Interoperability) project compiles an inventory of a wide variety of earth science resources including documents, catalogs, vocabularies, data models, data services, process models, information repositories, domain-specific ontologies etc. developed by research groups and data practitioners. We have developed a multidisciplinary semantic framework called GeoSciGraph semantic ingration of earth science resources. An integrated ontology is constructed with Basic Formal Ontology (BFO) as its upper ontology and currently ingests multiple component ontologies including the SWEET ontology, GeoSciML's lithology ontology, Tematres controlled vocabulary server, GeoNames, GCMD vocabularies on equipment, platforms and institutions, software ontology, CUAHSI hydrology vocabulary, the environmental ontology (ENVO) and several more. These ontologies are connected through bridging axioms; GeoSciGraph identifies lexically close terms and creates equivalence class or subclass relationships between them after human verification. GeoSciGraph allows a community to create community-specific customizations of the integrated ontology. GeoSciGraph uses the Neo4J,a graph database that can hold several billion concepts and relationships. GeoSciGraph provides a number of REST services that can be called by other software modules like the CINERGI information augmentation pipeline. 1) Vocabulary services are used to find exact and approximate terms, term categories (community-provided clusters of terms e.g., measurement-related terms or environmental material related terms), synonyms, term definitions and annotations. 2) Lexical services are used for text parsing to find entities, which can then be included into the ontology by a domain expert. 3) Graph services provide the ability to perform traversal centric operations e.g., finding paths and neighborhoods which can be used to perform ontological operations like

  6. Assessing the in vitro toxicity of the lunar dust environment using respiratory cells exposed to Al(2)O(3) or SiO(2) fine dust particles.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Jacqueline A; Verhoff, Ashley M; Morgan, Julie E; Fischer, David G

    2009-12-01

    Prior chemical and physical analysis of lunar soil suggests a composition of dust particles that may contribute to the development of acute and chronic respiratory disorders. In this study, fine Al(2)O(3) (0.7 μm) and fine SiO(2) (mean 1.6 μm) were used to assess the cellular uptake and cellular toxicity of lunar dust particle analogs. Respiratory cells, murine alveolar macrophages (RAW 264.7) and human type II epithelial (A549), were cultured as the in vitro model system. The phagocytic activity of both cell types using ultrafine (0.1 μm) and fine (0.5 μm) fluorescent polystyrene beads was determined. Following a 6-h exposure, RAW 264.7 cells had extended pseudopods with beads localized in the cytoplasmic region of cells. After 24 h, the macrophage cells were rounded and clumped and lacked pseudopods, which suggest impairment of phagocytosis. A549 cells did not contain beads, and after 24 h, the majority of the beads appeared to primarily coat the surface of the cells. Next, we investigated the cellular response to fine SiO(2) and Al(2)O(3) (up to 5 mg/ml). RAW 264.7 cells exposed to 1.0 mg/ml of fine SiO(2) for 6 h demonstrated pseudopods, cellular damage, apoptosis, and necrosis. A549 cells showed slight toxicity when exposed to fine SiO(2) for the same time and dose. A549 cells had particles clustered on the surface of the cells. Only a higher dose (5.0 mg/ml) of fine SiO(2) resulted in a significant cytotoxicity to A549 cells. Most importantly, both cell types showed minimal cytotoxicity following exposure to fine Al(2)O(3). Overall, this study suggests differential cellular toxicity associated with exposure to fine mineral dust particles.

  7. SCiP at 35: an idiosyncratic history of the society for computers in psychology.

    PubMed

    Wolfe, Christopher R

    2006-05-01

    SCiP history may be divided into three eras: the Paleozoic (1971-1982), the Mesozoic (1982-1994), and the Cenozoic (1994-present). Following a list of Secretary-Treasurers, a list of all SCiP Presidents is provided in Table 1. Next I present personal highlights, including the first symposium on psychology and the World-Wide Web; David Rumelhart's mathematical explanation of connectionism; and Stevan Hamad's discussion of "freeing" the journal literature. I observe that a small conference is becoming more intimate and that much of our mission involves figuring out how to conduct high-quality scientific research with consumer-grade electronics. I argue that we are an increasingly international organization, that graduate students are welcome, and that we should become more inclusive in the areas of gender and ethnicity and should make membership more meaningful I conclude by looking ahead and attempting to predict the future.

  8. Simulations with SCI as a data carrier in data acquisition systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kristiansen, E.H. Univ. of Oslo . Dept. of Physics); Bothner, J.W.; Hulaas, T.I.; Skaali, T.B. ); Rongved, E. )

    1994-02-01

    Detailed simulations of processor networks based on the Scalable Coherent Interface (SCI) show that SCI is suitable as data carrier in data acquisition systems where the total bandwidth need is in the multi GBytes/s range and a low latency is required. The objective of these simulations was to find topologies with low latency and high bandwidth, but also with the cost of implementation in mind. A ring-to-ring bridge has been used as the building element for the networks. The simulations have been performed on regular k-ary n-cubes type topologies from a few tens of nodes and up to about 500 nodes under different load conditions. Among the parameters which has been manipulated in the simulations are the number of nodes, topology structure, number of outstanding requests and load in the system.

  9. Assembling Large, Multi-Sensor Climate Datasets Using the SciFlo Grid Workflow System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, B. D.; Manipon, G.; Xing, Z.; Fetzer, E.

    2008-12-01

    NASA's Earth Observing System (EOS) is the world's most ambitious facility for studying global climate change. The mandate now is to combine measurements from the instruments on the A-Train platforms (AIRS, AMSR-E, MODIS, MISR, MLS, and CloudSat) and other Earth probes to enable large-scale studies of climate change over periods of years to decades. However, moving from predominantly single-instrument studies to a multi-sensor, measurement-based model for long-duration analysis of important climate variables presents serious challenges for large-scale data mining and data fusion. For example, one might want to compare temperature and water vapor retrievals from one instrument (AIRS) to another instrument (MODIS), and to a model (ECMWF), stratify the comparisons using a classification of the cloud scenes from CloudSat, and repeat the entire analysis over years of AIRS data. To perform such an analysis, one must discover & access multiple datasets from remote sites, find the space/time matchups between instruments swaths and model grids, understand the quality flags and uncertainties for retrieved physical variables, and assemble merged datasets for further scientific and statistical analysis. To meet these large-scale challenges, we are utilizing a Grid computing and dataflow framework, named SciFlo, in which we are deploying a set of versatile and reusable operators for data query, access, subsetting, co-registration, mining, fusion, and advanced statistical analysis. SciFlo is a semantically-enabled ("smart") Grid Workflow system that ties together a peer-to-peer network of computers into an efficient engine for distributed computation. The SciFlo workflow engine enables scientists to do multi-instrument Earth Science by assembling remotely-invokable Web Services (SOAP or http GET URLs), native executables, command-line scripts, and Python codes into a distributed computing flow. A scientist visually authors the graph of operation in the VizFlow GUI, or uses a

  10. Assembling Large, Multi-Sensor Climate Datasets Using the SciFlo Grid Workflow System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, B.; Manipon, G.; Xing, Z.; Fetzer, E.

    2009-04-01

    NASA's Earth Observing System (EOS) is an ambitious facility for studying global climate change. The mandate now is to combine measurements from the instruments on the "A-Train" platforms (AIRS, AMSR-E, MODIS, MISR, MLS, and CloudSat) and other Earth probes to enable large-scale studies of climate change over periods of years to decades. However, moving from predominantly single-instrument studies to a multi-sensor, measurement-based model for long-duration analysis of important climate variables presents serious challenges for large-scale data mining and data fusion. For example, one might want to compare temperature and water vapor retrievals from one instrument (AIRS) to another instrument (MODIS), and to a model (ECMWF), stratify the comparisons using a classification of the "cloud scenes" from CloudSat, and repeat the entire analysis over years of AIRS data. To perform such an analysis, one must discover & access multiple datasets from remote sites, find the space/time "matchups" between instruments swaths and model grids, understand the quality flags and uncertainties for retrieved physical variables, assemble merged datasets, and compute fused products for further scientific and statistical analysis. To meet these large-scale challenges, we are utilizing a Grid computing and dataflow framework, named SciFlo, in which we are deploying a set of versatile and reusable operators for data query, access, subsetting, co-registration, mining, fusion, and advanced statistical analysis. SciFlo is a semantically-enabled ("smart") Grid Workflow system that ties together a peer-to-peer network of computers into an efficient engine for distributed computation. The SciFlo workflow engine enables scientists to do multi-instrument Earth Science by assembling remotely-invokable Web Services (SOAP or http GET URLs), native executables, command-line scripts, and Python codes into a distributed computing flow. A scientist visually authors the graph of operation in the Viz

  11. The spectacular evolution of Supernova 1996al over 15 years: a low energy explosion of a stripped massive star in a highly structured environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benetti, Stefano

    2016-06-01

    The final fate of massive stars is not well explored and depending on the stellar mass may have very much different outputs, ranging from very energetic explosions (e.g. GRB-SNe) to direct collapse on black-holes with very weak or not explosion at all (Heger, Woosley, & Baraffe, 2005). Here I present the case of SN 1996al. I describe the physical properties of this luminous supernova in the framework of a very weak explosion (kinetic energy of 1.6 x 10^(50 erg)), where the bolometric luminosity is sustained by the conversion of the kinetic energy into radiation thanks to the interaction between a low mass ( 1.15 M_{⊙}) , 87% of which is Helium, the remaining is Hydrogen) symmetric ejecta with an highly asymmetric circumstellar material. The detection of Hα emission in pre-explosion archive images suggests that the progenitor of SN 1996al was most likely a massive star ( 25 M_{⊙}) ZAMS) that had lost a large fraction of its hydrogen envelope before explosion, and was hence embedded in a H-rich cocoon. The low-mass ejecta and modest kinetic energy of the explosion are then explained with massive fallback of material into the compact remnant, a 7 - 8 M_{⊙}) black hole. Finally, I will try to place this particularly interesting SN in the framework of the SNIIn zoo.

  12. Psychosocial and Behavioral Factors Associated with Bowel and Bladder Management after SCI

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    family in the Jersey Shore and we stopped in Hershey, Pennsylvania. We stopped there for the night and we were thinking we’d go tour the chocolate ... mood , going out into the community and taking care of bowel and bladder dysfunction. The study is asking persons with SCI (civilians and veterans) and...You will also complete a series of questionnaires about your mood , the quality of care you get, and you bowel and bladder program and any specific

  13. FES-Rowing versus Zoledronic Acid to Improve Bone Health in SCI

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-01

    loss or to induce new bone formation following SCI, although the risk is high in this population of osteoporosis -related bone fracture. This study...aims to learn if the severe osteoporosis in lower extremities caused by spinal cord injuries can be slowed or reversed with a combination of an... exercise that simulates weight-bearing and a bisphosphonate medication. 70 Individuals with T3-12 spinal cord injuries will be enrolled in a 12-month

  14. T-1025 IU SciBath-768 detector tests in MI-12

    SciTech Connect

    Tayloe, Rex; Cooper, R.; Garrison, L.; Thornton, T.; Rebenitsch, L.; DeJongh, Fritz; Loer, Benjamin; Ramberg, Erik; Yoo, Jonghee; /Fermilab

    2012-02-11

    This is a memorandum of understanding between the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab) and the experimenters of Department of Physics and Center for Exploration of Energy and Matter, Indiana University, who have committed to participate in detector tests to be carried out during the 2012 Fermilab Neutrino program. The memorandum is intended solely for the purpose of recording expectations for budget estimates and work allocations for Fermilab, the funding agencies and the participating institutions. it reflects an arrangement that currently is satisfactory to the parties; however, it is recognized and anticipated that changing circumstances of the evolving research program will necessitate revisions. The parties agree to modify this memorandum to reflect such required adjustments. Actual contractual obligations will be set forth in separate documents. The experimenters propsoe to test their prototype 'SciBat-768' detector in the MI-12 building for 3 months (February-April) in Spring 2012. The major goal of this effort is to measure or limit the flux of beam-induced neutrons in a far-off-axis (> 45{sup o}) location of the Booster Neutrino Beamline (BNB). This flux is of interest for a proposed coherent neutral-current neutrino-argon elastic scattering experiment. A second goal is to collect more test data for the SciBath-768 to enable better understanding and calibration of the device. The SciBath-768 detector successfully ran for 3 months in the MINOS Underground Area in Fall 2011 as testbeam experiment T-1014 and is currently running above ground in the MINOS service building. For the run proposed here, the experiments are requesting: space in MI-12 in which to run the SciBath detector during February-April 2012 while the BNB is operating; technical support to help with moving the equipment on site; access to power, internet, and accelerator signals; and a small office space from which to run and monitor the experiment.

  15. SciDAC Visualization and Analytics Center for EnablingTechnology

    SciTech Connect

    Bethel, E. Wes; Johnson, Chris; Joy, Ken; Ahern, Sean; Pascucci,Valerio; Childs, Hank; Cohen, Jonathan; Duchaineau, Mark; Hamann, Bernd; Hansen, Charles; Laney, Dan; Lindstrom, Peter; Meredith, Jeremy; Ostrouchov, George; Parker, Steven; Silva, Claudio; Sanderson, Allen; Tricoche, Xavier

    2006-11-28

    The SciDAC2 Visualization and Analytics Center for EnablingTechnologies (VACET) began operation on 10/1/2006. This document, dated11/27/2006, is the first version of the VACET project management plan. Itwas requested by and delivered to ASCR/DOE. It outlines the Center'saccomplishments in the first six weeks of operation along with broadobjectives for the upcoming future (12-24 months).

  16. Developing a Meaningful Life: Social Reintegration of Service-Members and Veterans with SCI

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    military veteran who suffered a service-related traumatic SCI. Methods: An in-depth anthropological interview was used with Jake, a 28-year old marine...spinal cord injury. 9 Participants Seth Messinger, Principal Investigator Associate Professor of Anthropology Seth Messinger is responsible...Networks for Veterans with Spinal Cord Injury in Obtaining Employment. Annals of Anthropological Practice. 37,2:40-56 Fritz, H., Lysack, C

  17. Improvement in student science proficiency through InSciEd out.

    PubMed

    Pierret, Chris; Sonju, James D; Leicester, Jean E; Hoody, Maggie; LaBounty, Thomas J; Frimannsdottir, Katrin R; Ekker, Stephen C

    2012-12-01

    Integrated Science Education Outreach (InSciEd Out) is a collaboration formed between Mayo Clinic, Winona State University, and Rochester Public Schools (MN) with the shared vision of achieving excellence in science education. InSciEd Out employs an equitable partnership model between scientists, teachers, education researchers, and the community. Teams of teachers from all disciplines within a single school experience cutting-edge science using the zebrafish model system, as well as current pedagogical methods, during a summer internship at the Mayo Clinic. Within the internship, the teachers produce new curriculum that directly addresses opportunities for science education improvement at their own school. Zebrafish are introduced within the new curriculum to support a living model of the practice of science. Following partnership with the InSciEd Out program and 2 years of implementation in the classroom, teacher-interns from a K-8 public school reported access to local scientific technology and expertise they had not previously recognized. Teachers also reported improved integration of other disciplines into the scientific curriculum and a flow of concepts vertically from K through 8. Students more than doubled selection of an Honors science track in high school to nearly 90%. 98% of students who took the Minnesota Comprehensive Assessments in their 5(th) and 8(th) grade year (a span that includes 2 years of InSciEd Out) showed medium or high growth in science proficiency. These metrics indicate that cooperation between educators and scientists can result in positive change in student science proficiency and demonstrate that a higher expectation in science education can be achieved in US public schools.

  18. Improvement in Student Science Proficiency Through InSciEd Out

    PubMed Central

    Sonju, James D.; Leicester, Jean E.; Hoody, Maggie; LaBounty, Thomas J.; Frimannsdottir, Katrin R.; Ekker, Stephen C.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Integrated Science Education Outreach (InSciEd Out) is a collaboration formed between Mayo Clinic, Winona State University, and Rochester Public Schools (MN) with the shared vision of achieving excellence in science education. InSciEd Out employs an equitable partnership model between scientists, teachers, education researchers, and the community. Teams of teachers from all disciplines within a single school experience cutting-edge science using the zebrafish model system, as well as current pedagogical methods, during a summer internship at the Mayo Clinic. Within the internship, the teachers produce new curriculum that directly addresses opportunities for science education improvement at their own school. Zebrafish are introduced within the new curriculum to support a living model of the practice of science. Following partnership with the InSciEd Out program and 2 years of implementation in the classroom, teacher-interns from a K–8 public school reported access to local scientific technology and expertise they had not previously recognized. Teachers also reported improved integration of other disciplines into the scientific curriculum and a flow of concepts vertically from K through 8. Students more than doubled selection of an Honors science track in high school to nearly 90%. 98% of students who took the Minnesota Comprehensive Assessments in their 5th and 8th grade year (a span that includes 2 years of InSciEd Out) showed medium or high growth in science proficiency. These metrics indicate that cooperation between educators and scientists can result in positive change in student science proficiency and demonstrate that a higher expectation in science education can be achieved in US public schools. PMID:23244687

  19. The Small Carry-on Impactor (SCI) and the Hayabusa2 Impact Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saiki, T.; Imamura, H.; Arakawa, M.; Wada, K.; Takagi, Y.; Hayakawa, M.; Shirai, K.; Yano, H.; Okamoto, C.

    2016-10-01

    Hayabusa2 is a sample return mission of JAXA launched on 3 December 2014. Hayabusa2 is the successor of Hayabusa, which returned samples from the asteroid Itokawa to the Earth. Although the design of Hayabusa2 follows that of Hayabusa, the former is equipped with some new components. The small carry-on impactor (SCI) is one of those components. The SCI is a compact kinetic impactor designed to remove the asteroid surface regolith locally and create an artificial crater. One of the most important scientific objectives of Hayabusa2 is to investigate the chemical and physical properties of the internal materials and structures of the target body, asteroid Ryugu. Hayabusa2 will attempt to observe the resultant crater with some scientific instruments and to get samples from around the crater. High kinetic energy is required to create a meaningful crater, however, the impact system design needs to fit within strict constraints. Complicated functions, such as a guidance and control system, are not permitted. A special type of shaped charge is used for the acceleration of the impactor of the SCI in order to make system simpler. Using this explosion technique makes it possible to accelerate the impactor very quickly and to hit the asteroid without a guidance system. However, the impact operation will be complicated because the explosive is very powerful and it scatters high-speed debris at the detonation. This paper describes an overview of the SCI system, the results of the development testing and an outline of the impact experiment of the Hayabusa2 mission.

  20. Obesity/Overweight in Persons With Early and Chronic SCI: A Randomized, Multicenter, Controlled Lifestyle Intervention

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    modeled after the landmark Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) on obesity and component disease risks. The TLI consists of a 6-month clinical program...clinical trial (RCT) conducted at 2 SCI rehabilitation research centers and a Veterans Affairs Medical Centers. The study is modeled after the Diabetes ...Prevention Program (DPP), an NIH-sponsored 27-center RCT that reported a sustained 7% body weight reduction in pre- diabetic individuals accompanied by

  1. Pressure Relief Behaviors and Weight Shifting Activities to Prevent Pressure Ulcers in Persons with SCI

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Stephen Sprigle, PhD, PT CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Georgia Tech Research Corporation Atlanta GA 30332-0001 REPORT DATE...AND ADDRESS(ES) AND ADDRESS(ES) 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER Georgia Tech Research Corporation 505 10th St NW Atlanta GA 30332-0001 9...activities in persons with SCI Submitted to and Approved by: - Georgia Tech , Shepherd Center, Kessler have each approved the protocol - HRPO

  2. SciDAC Center for Gyrokinetic Particle Simulation of Turbulent Transport in Burning Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Zhihong

    2013-12-18

    During the first year of the SciDAC gyrokinetic particle simulation (GPS) project, the GPS team (Zhihong Lin, Liu Chen, Yasutaro Nishimura, and Igor Holod) at the University of California, Irvine (UCI) studied the tokamak electron transport driven by electron temperature gradient (ETG) turbulence, and by trapped electron mode (TEM) turbulence and ion temperature gradient (ITG) turbulence with kinetic electron effects, extended our studies of ITG turbulence spreading to core-edge coupling. We have developed and optimized an elliptic solver using finite element method (FEM), which enables the implementation of advanced kinetic electron models (split-weight scheme and hybrid model) in the SciDAC GPS production code GTC. The GTC code has been ported and optimized on both scalar and vector parallel computer architectures, and is being transformed into objected-oriented style to facilitate collaborative code development. During this period, the UCI team members presented 11 invited talks at major national and international conferences, published 22 papers in peer-reviewed journals and 10 papers in conference proceedings. The UCI hosted the annual SciDAC Workshop on Plasma Turbulence sponsored by the GPS Center, 2005-2007. The workshop was attended by about fifties US and foreign researchers and financially sponsored several gradual students from MIT, Princeton University, Germany, Switzerland, and Finland. A new SciDAC postdoc, Igor Holod, has arrived at UCI to initiate global particle simulation of magnetohydrodynamics turbulence driven by energetic particle modes. The PI, Z. Lin, has been promoted to the Associate Professor with tenure at UCI.

  3. Supporting Research using Satellite Data: A Framework for Spatiotemporal Queries in SciDB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, S. S.; Krcal, L.

    2015-12-01

    Natural phenomena such as haze, hurricane, and blizzard that evolve over time usually do not have well-defined boundaries. Their features may be captured by multiple satellites. To process and extract information from the large-scale satellite data, one needs a data-intensive architecture for distributed storage and computation resources. Such architecture allows end users such as scientists to effectively run their computation tasks with sharing computational resources and intermediate results, but without data replication. The satellite data is most conveniently represented using arrays, exploiting its multidimensional nature. For our investigation, we use the open-source distributed, array-based SciDB as a platform for our spatiotemporal framework. SciDB conforms with the data-intensive architecture, providing a highly effectively computational and data storage platform. Moreover, it provides standard extension points, i.e., user defined data types, operators and functions. Our current work focuses on more sophisticated indices including cartesian-coordinate indices, hierarchical triangular mesh and hybrid indices with data statistics and indexing. Furthermore, we introduce a spatiotemporal framework that allows us to generate and maintain indices according to given criteria and perform spatial and temporal operators and predicates. This framework overcomes weaknesses in SciDB where standard underlying array operations are less effective. We will demonstrate some examples (e.g., hurricane research using satellite data) of the functionalities in the proposed spatiotemporal framework.

  4. Comparing NetCDF and SciDB on managing and querying 5D hydrologic dataset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Haicheng; Xiao, Xiao

    2016-11-01

    Efficiently extracting information from high dimensional hydro-meteorological modelling datasets requires smart solutions. Traditional methods are mostly based on files, which can be edited and accessed handily. But they have problems of efficiency due to contiguous storage structure. Others propose databases as an alternative for advantages such as native functionalities for manipulating multidimensional (MD) arrays, smart caching strategy and scalability. In this research, NetCDF file based solutions and the multidimensional array database management system (DBMS) SciDB applying chunked storage structure are benchmarked to determine the best solution for storing and querying 5D large hydrologic modelling dataset. The effect of data storage configurations including chunk size, dimension order and compression on query performance is explored. Results indicate that dimension order to organize storage of 5D data has significant influence on query performance if chunk size is very large. But the effect becomes insignificant when chunk size is properly set. Compression of SciDB mostly has negative influence on query performance. Caching is an advantage but may be influenced by execution of different query processes. On the whole, NetCDF solution without compression is in general more efficient than the SciDB DBMS.

  5. [SciELO: A cooperative project for the dissemination of science].

    PubMed

    Bojo Canales, C; Fraga Medín, C; Hernández Villegas, S; Primo Peña, E

    2009-10-01

    The article describes the SciELO (Scientific Electronic Library Online) model for the electronic publication and dissemination of scientific journals, its origin and evolution, methodology, components, services and potential, and its implantation in Spain. It consists of thirteen participant countries with eight certified web portals, with another 5 under development and another two thematic ones. In February 2009 Scielo.org had 611 magazines and 195,789 articles of which 46% were about health sciences. Spain became a project member in 1999 and launched the SciELO web portal in 2001, as well as 4 magazines. It currently has 39 titles in the field of Health Sciences; one of which is the Revista Española de Sanidad Penitenciaria, which joined the project in 2007 and which currently has 6 issues from 2007 and 2008 available. This makes it one of the most important open access initiatives existing. The report concludes by stating that the SciELO model contributes to the development of research and science by offering an effective and efficient method of promoting and increasing the dissemination of scientific publications in Latin America.

  6. An Exploratory Analysis of the Potential Association Between SCI Secondary Health Conditions and Daily Activities

    PubMed Central

    Cobb, John; Dumont, Frédéric S.; Leblond, Jean; Park, So Eyun; Noonan, Vanessa K.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Secondary health conditions (SHCs) are common following traumatic spinal cord injury (tSCI) and are believed to influence a person’s ability to participate in daily activities (DAs). This association should be understood so that health care providers may target interventions with clarity and purpose to manage SHCs and facilitate DAs to maximal effect. Objective: To explore the association between SHCs and DAs expressed as the increased chance of not participating as much as wanted in a DA when an SHC is present. Methods: Community-dwelling persons with tSCI (n = 1,137) responded to the SCI Community Survey. The occurrence and frequency of 21 SHCs were determined. The extent of participation in 26 DAs was measured. The relative risk (RR) of not participating as much as wanted in a DA when a SHC is present was calculated. Results: When some SHC were present, the RR of not participating as much as wanted increased significantly (range, 15%-153%; P < .001). Certain SHCs (light-headedness/dizziness, fatigue, weight problems, constipation, shoulder problems) were associated with a greater chance of not participating in many DAs. No single SHC was associated with every DA and conversely not every DA was associated with an SHC. Conclusions: Maximizing participation in DAs requires minimizing SHCs in every instance. Understanding the association between SHCs and DAs may facilitate targeted care resulting in less severe SHCs, greater participation in DAs, and benefits to both the individual and society. PMID:25477741

  7. [Analysis on acupuncture literature in Science Citation Index (SCI) periodicals in 2007].

    PubMed

    Gao, Liang; Tian, Li-xin; Guo, Yi

    2009-06-01

    To grasp the international developing tendency of acupuncture research and provide some references for promoting acupuncture and moxibustion internationalization process, the articles about acupuncture in Science Citation Index (SCI) periodicals in 2007 were retrieved by adopting the retrieval tactics on line in combination with database searching. Results indicate that 257 articles about acupuncture had been retrived from the SCI Web databases. These articles were published in 125 journals respectively, most of which were Euramerican journals. Among these journals, the impact factor of the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA), 25. 547, is the highest one. It is shown that the impact factors of the SCI periodicals, in which acupuncture articles embodied are increased, the quality of these articles are improved obviously and the types of the articles are various in 2007, but there is obvious difference in the results of these studies due to the difference of experimental methods, the subjects of these experiments and acupuncture manipulations. Therefore, standardization of many problems arising from the researches on acupuncture is extremely imminent.

  8. Family dynamics and psychosocial functioning in children with SCI/D from Colombia, South America

    PubMed Central

    Nicolais, Christina J.; Perrin, Paul B.; Panyavin, Ivan; Nicholls, Elizabeth G.; Olivera Plaza, Silvia Leonor; Quintero, Lorena Medina; Arango-Lasprilla, Juan Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to examine the connections between family dynamics and the psychosocial functioning of children with spinal cord injuries and disorders (SCI/D). Design Cross-sectional. Setting Participants were recruited from communities in Neiva, Colombia. Participants Thirty children with SCI/D and their primary caregiver participated. Children were between 8 and 17 years of age, and had sustained their injury at least six months prior to data collection. Interventions NA. Outcome measures Participating children completed measures assessing their own psychosocial functioning (Children's Depression Inventory, Revised Children's Manifest Anxiety Scale-2, Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory), and their primary caregiver completed measures of family dynamics (Family Adaptability and Cohesion Evaluation Scale- Fourth Edition, Family Communication Scale, Family Assessment Device- General Functioning, Family Satisfaction Scale, Relationship-Focused Coping Scale). Results A correlation matrix showed a number of significant bivariate correlations between child and family variables, and three multiple regressions showed that family satisfaction, empathy, and flexibility significantly explained 27% of the variance in child worry; family satisfaction and communication explained 18% of the variance in child social anxiety; and family cohesion and communication explained 23% of the variance in child emotional functioning. Conclusions These findings highlight the importance of rehabilitation professionals considering the association between family dynamics and the psychosocial functioning of children with SCI/D when working with this population. PMID:25582185

  9. GeoSciML v3.0 - a significant upgrade of the CGI-IUGS geoscience data model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raymond, O.; Duclaux, G.; Boisvert, E.; Cipolloni, C.; Cox, S.; Laxton, J.; Letourneau, F.; Richard, S.; Ritchie, A.; Sen, M.; Serrano, J.-J.; Simons, B.; Vuollo, J.

    2012-04-01

    GeoSciML version 3.0 (http://www.geosciml.org), released in late 2011, is the latest version of the CGI-IUGS* Interoperability Working Group geoscience data interchange standard. The new version is a significant upgrade and refactoring of GeoSciML v2 which was released in 2008. GeoSciML v3 has already been adopted by several major international interoperability initiatives, including OneGeology, the EU INSPIRE program, and the US Geoscience Information Network, as their standard data exchange format for geoscience data. GeoSciML v3 makes use of recently upgraded versions of several Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) and ISO data transfer standards, including GML v3.2, SWE Common v2.0, and Observations and Measurements v2 (ISO 19156). The GeoSciML v3 data model has been refactored from a single large application schema with many packages, into a number of smaller, but related, application schema modules with individual namespaces. This refactoring allows the use and future development of modules of GeoSciML (eg; GeologicUnit, GeologicStructure, GeologicAge, Borehole) in smaller, more manageable units. As a result of this refactoring and the integration with new OGC and ISO standards, GeoSciML v3 is not backwardly compatible with previous GeoSciML versions. The scope of GeoSciML has been extended in version 3.0 to include new models for geomorphological data (a Geomorphology application schema), and for geological specimens, geochronological interpretations, and metadata for geochemical and geochronological analyses (a LaboratoryAnalysis-Specimen application schema). In addition, there is better support for borehole data, and the PhysicalProperties model now supports a wider range of petrophysical measurements. The previously used CGI_Value data type has been superseded in favour of externally governed data types provided by OGC's SWE Common v2 and GML v3.2 data standards. The GeoSciML v3 release includes worked examples of best practice in delivering geochemical

  10. SciNews: Incorporating Science Current Events in 21st Century Classrooms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DiMaggio, E.

    2011-12-01

    Middle school students are instructed with the aid of textbooks, lectures, and activities to teach topics that satisfy state standards. However, teaching materials created to convey standard-aligned science concepts often leave students asking how the content relates to their lives and why they should be learning it. Conveying relevance is important for student learning and retention, especially in science where abstract concepts can often be incorrectly perceived as irrelevant. One way to create an educational link between classroom content and everyday life is through the use of scientific current events. Students read, hear, and watch media coverage of natural events (such as the 2011 earthquake and tsunami in Japan), but do not necessarily relate the scientific information from media sources to classroom studies. Taking advantage of these brief 'teachable moments'--when student interest is high--provides a valuable opportunity to make classroom-to-everyday life associations and to incorporate inquiry based learning. To address this need, I create pre-packaged current event materials for middle to high school teachers that align to state standards, and which are short, effective, and easy to implement in the classroom. Each lesson takes approximately 15-30 minutes to implement, allowing teachers time to facilitate brief but meaningful discussions. I assemble materials within approximately one week of the regional or global science event, consisting of short slide shows, maps, videos, pictures, and real-time data. I use a listserv to send biweekly emails to subscribed instructors containing the current event topic and a link to download the materials. All materials are hosted on the Arizona State University Education Outreach SciNews website (http://sese.asu.edu/teacher-resources) and are archived. Currently, 285 educators subscribe to the SciNews listserv, representing 36 states and 19 countries. In order to assess the effectiveness and usefulness of Sci

  11. Ground-Based Testing of TiB2 and Al2O3/TiB2 Response to Space Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jefferies, Sharon A.; Logan, Kathryn V.

    2007-01-01

    Two materials, titanium diboride and an alumina/titanium diboride composite, exhibit characteristics favorable for use in multiple space applications. These characteristics include low mass (4.52 gm/cc), high strain rate impact resistance, high temperature use (3000oC M.P.), thermal and electrical conductivity, thermal shock resistance, and high visible-range reflectivity. Additionally, the presence of boron in these materials gives them the potential to shield against neutron radiation as well as charged radiation. These materials are flying on MISSE 6 to assess material changes resulting from exposure to the space environment. This study provides a preliminary, ground-based examination of these materials' interactions with individual components of the space environment, in particular atomic oxygen (AO) and neutron radiation, in order to better predict and understand post-flight results. Individual specimens are exposed to ground state AO and surface oxidation is measured. Equivalent exposures of up to 13 months show no rapid oxidation, however evidence indicates some surface oxidation occurring. Other samples are placed near a polyethylene moderated, one Ci Am/Be neutron source to determine their shielding capability. Comparisons between exposed and shielded indium foil, which is activated by transmitted neutrons, measure each material's ability to shield neutrons. Preliminary results indicate a significant shielding benefit provided by both materials.

  12. The High-resolution Stereo Color Imager (HiSCI) on ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter (TGO)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McEwen, A. S.; Thomas, N.; Bridges, J.; Byrne, S.; Cremonese, G.; Delamere, W.; Hansen, C.; Hauber, E.; Ivanov, A.; Kestay, L.; Kirk, R.; Mangold, N.; Markiewicz, W.; Massironi, M.; Mattson, S.; Okubo, C.; Wray, J.

    2011-10-01

    HiSCI has been chosen for the payload of the ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter (TGO), a joint ESA/NASA mission scheduled to arrive at Mars in 2016 [1]. There are 3 major HiSCI partners: (1) the telescope assembly will be built in Switzerland overseen by the University of Bern; (2) the overall design, electronics, and integration will be by Ball Aerospace in Colorado; and (3) operations will be joint with MRO's High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) [2] at the University of Arizona. HiSCI will acquire the best-ever colour and stereo images over significant areas of Mars.

  13. Antifungal activities of SCY-078 (MK-3118) and standard antifungal agents against clinical non-Aspergillus mold isolates.

    PubMed

    Lamoth, Frédéric; Alexander, Barbara D

    2015-07-01

    The limited armamentarium of active and oral antifungal drugs against emerging non-Aspergillus molds is of particular concern. Current antifungal agents and the new orally available beta-1,3-d-glucan synthase inhibitor SCY-078 were tested in vitro against 135 clinical non-Aspergillus mold isolates. Akin to echinocandins, SCY-078 showed no or poor activity against Mucoromycotina and Fusarium spp. However, SCY-078 was highly active against Paecilomyces variotii and was the only compound displaying some activity against notoriously panresistant Scedosporium prolificans.

  14. Publishing datasets with eSciDoc and panMetaDocs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulbricht, D.; Klump, J.; Bertelmann, R.

    2012-04-01

    Currently serveral research institutions worldwide undertake considerable efforts to have their scientific datasets published and to syndicate them to data portals as extensively described objects identified by a persistent identifier. This is done to foster the reuse of data, to make scientific work more transparent, and to create a citable entity that can be referenced unambigously in written publications. GFZ Potsdam established a publishing workflow for file based research datasets. Key software components are an eSciDoc infrastructure [1] and multiple instances of the data curation tool panMetaDocs [2]. The eSciDoc repository holds data objects and their associated metadata in container objects, called eSciDoc items. A key metadata element in this context is the publication status of the referenced data set. PanMetaDocs, which is based on PanMetaWorks [3], is a PHP based web application that allows to describe data with any XML-based metadata schema. The metadata fields can be filled with static or dynamic content to reduce the number of fields that require manual entries to a minimum and make use of contextual information in a project setting. Access rights can be applied to set visibility of datasets to other project members and allow collaboration on and notifying about datasets (RSS) and interaction with the internal messaging system, that was inherited from panMetaWorks. When a dataset is to be published, panMetaDocs allows to change the publication status of the eSciDoc item from status "private" to "submitted" and prepare the dataset for verification by an external reviewer. After quality checks, the item publication status can be changed to "published". This makes the data and metadata available through the internet worldwide. PanMetaDocs is developed as an eSciDoc application. It is an easy to use graphical user interface to eSciDoc items, their data and metadata. It is also an application supporting a DOI publication agent during the process of

  15. ALS - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - ALS ... The following organizations are good resources for information on amyotrophic lateral sclerosis : Muscular Dystrophy Association -- www.mda.org/disease/amyotrophic-lateral-sclerosis National Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) ...

  16. A Novel Approach for Effectively Treating SCI Pain, Improving Opioid Efficacy, and Preventing Opioid-Induced Constipation: Key Role of Toll-Like Receptor 4 (TLR4)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    pain ; however, morphine for 7 d post-SCI has little effect on chronic thermal nociceptive thresholds in this model. Establishing effects of post-SCI...AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-13-1-0277 TITLE: A Novel Approach for Effectively Treating SCI Pain , Improving Opioid Efficacy, and Preventing Opioid...SCI Pain , Improving Opioid Efficacy, and Preventing Opioid-Induced Constipation: Key Role of Toll-Like Receptor 4 (TLR4) 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b

  17. Comment on ``Implementing of a precision fast thermoelectric cooler using a personal computer parallel port connection and ADN8830 controller'' [Rev. Sci. Instrum. 74, 3862 (2003)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sloman, A. W.

    2004-03-01

    Eli Flaxer has described a feedback controlled circuit to drive a Peltier junction to control the temperature of a specimen in the range 0 to 50 °C in a room temperature environment [Rev. Sci. Instrum. 74, 3862 (2003)]. The amount of heat transferred per unit current by a Peltier junction varies substantially with the temperature difference across the Peltier junction. Flaxer's circuit does not provide any mechanism to compensate for this variation. This means that if the proportional-integral-differential control loop he uses is optimized at any particular temperature differential, the control loop with be over-damped at lower specimen temperatures, and under-damped at higher specimen temperatures. A circuit using a second thermistor to monitor the temperature of the exhaust side of the Peltier junction, and a digital control loop, can minimize this problem [A. W. Sloman, Paul Buggs, James Molloy, and Douglas Stewart, Meas. Sci. Technol. 7, 1653 (1996)]. This circuit has the incidental advantage of offering ten times better temperature stability.

  18. Collaborative Science Using Web Services and the SciFlo Grid Dataflow Engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, B. D.; Manipon, G.; Xing, Z.; Yunck, T.

    2006-12-01

    The General Earth Science Investigation Suite (GENESIS) project is a NASA-sponsored partnership between the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, academia, and NASA data centers to develop a new suite of Web Services tools to facilitate multi-sensor investigations in Earth System Science. The goal of GENESIS is to enable large-scale, multi-instrument atmospheric science using combined datasets from the AIRS, MODIS, MISR, and GPS sensors. Investigations include cross-comparison of spaceborne climate sensors, cloud spectral analysis, study of upper troposphere-stratosphere water transport, study of the aerosol indirect cloud effect, and global climate model validation. The challenges are to bring together very large datasets, reformat and understand the individual instrument retrievals, co-register or re-grid the retrieved physical parameters, perform computationally-intensive data fusion and data mining operations, and accumulate complex statistics over months to years of data. To meet these challenges, we have developed a Grid computing and dataflow framework, named SciFlo, in which we are deploying a set of versatile and reusable operators for data access, subsetting, registration, mining, fusion, compression, and advanced statistical analysis. SciFlo leverages remote Web Services, called via Simple Object Access Protocol (SOAP) or REST (one-line) URLs, and the Grid Computing standards (WS-* &Globus Alliance toolkits), and enables scientists to do multi-instrument Earth Science by assembling reusable Web Services and native executables into a distributed computing flow (tree of operators). The SciFlo client &server engines optimize the execution of such distributed data flows and allow the user to transparently find and use datasets and operators without worrying about the actual location of the Grid resources. In particular, SciFlo exploits the wealth of datasets accessible by OpenGIS Consortium (OGC) Web Mapping Servers & Web Coverage Servers (WMS/WCS), and by Open Data

  19. DOE SciDAC's Earth System Grid Center for Enabling Technologies Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Dean N.

    2011-09-27

    The mission of the Earth System Grid Federation (ESGF) is to provide the worldwide climate-research community with access to the data, information, model codes, analysis tools, and intercomparison capabilities required to make sense of enormous climate data sets. Its specific goals are to (1) provide an easy-to-use and secure web-based data access environment for data sets; (2) add value to individual data sets by presenting them in the context of other data sets and tools for comparative analysis; (3) address the specific requirements of participating organizations with respect to bandwidth, access restrictions, and replication; (4) ensure that the data are readily accessible through the analysis and visualization tools used by the climate research community; and (5) transfer infrastructure advances to other domain areas. For the ESGF, the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Earth System Grid Center for Enabling Technologies (ESG-CET) team has led international development and delivered a production environment for managing and accessing ultra-scale climate data. This production environment includes multiple national and international climate projects (such as the Community Earth System Model and the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project), ocean model data (such as the Parallel Ocean Program), observation data (Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Best Estimate, Carbon Dioxide Information and Analysis Center, Atmospheric Infrared Sounder, etc.), and analysis and visualization tools, all serving a diverse user community. These data holdings and services are distributed across multiple ESG-CET sites (such as ANL, LANL, LBNL/NERSC, LLNL/PCMDI, NCAR, and ORNL) and at unfunded partner sites, such as the Australian National University National Computational Infrastructure, the British Atmospheric Data Centre, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory, the Max Planck Institute for Meteorology, the German Climate Computing

  20. The Fulldome Curriculum for the Spitz SciDome Digital Planetarium: Volume 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradstreet, David H.; Sanders, S. J.; Huggins, S.

    2014-01-01

    The Spitz Fulldome Curriculum (FDC) for the SciDome digital planetarium ushered in a new and innovative way to present astronomical pedagogy via its use of the unique teaching attributes of the digital planetarium. In the case of the FDC, which uses the ubiquitous Starry Night planetarium software as its driving engine, these engaging and novel teaching techniques have also been made usable to desktop computers and flat-screen video projectors for classroom use. Volume 2 of the FDC introduces exciting new classes and mini-lessons to further enlighten and invigorate students as they struggle with often difficult three dimensional astronomical concepts. Additionally, other topics with related astronomical ties have been created to integrate history into planetarium presentations. One of the strongest advantages of the SciDome is its use of Starry Night as its astronomical engine. With it students can create their own astronomical configurations in the computer lab or at home, using the PC or Mac version. They can then simply load their creations onto the SciDome planetarium system and display them for their classmates on the dome. This poster will discuss and illustrate some of the new content that has been developed for Volume 2. Topics covered in Volume 2 include eclipses, plotting planet locations on a curtate orbit chart by observing their positions in the sky, time and timekeeping (including sidereal day, hour angles, sidereal time, LAST, LMST, time zones and the International Date Line), teaching to the Boy Scout Merit Badge requirements, plotting scale analemmas on the surface of planets and interpreting them, precession, astronomical events in revolutionary Boston, the Lincoln Almanac Trial, eclipsing binaries, lunar librations, a trip through the universe, watching the speed of light move in real time, stellar sizes and the Milky Way.

  1. Weight-supported treadmill vs over-ground training for walking after acute incomplete SCI

    PubMed Central

    Dobkin, B; Apple, D.; Barbeau, H.; Basso, M.; Behrman, A.; Deforge, D.; Ditunno, J.; Dudley, G.; Elashoff, R.; Fugate, L.; Harkema, S.; Saulino, M.; Scott, M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To compare the efficacy of step training with body weight support on a treadmill (BWSTT) with over-ground practice to the efficacy of a defined over-ground mobility therapy (CONT) in patients with incomplete spinal cord injury (SCI) admitted for inpatient rehabilitation. Methods A total of 146 subjects from six regional centers within 8 weeks of SCI were entered in a single-blinded, multicenter, randomized clinical trial (MRCT). Subjects were graded on the American Spinal Injury Association Impairment Scale (ASIA) as B, C, or D with levels from C5 to L3 and had a Functional Independence Measure for locomotion (FIM-L) score <4. They received 12 weeks of equal time of BWSTT or CONT. Primary outcomes were FIM-L for ASIA B and C subjects and walking speed for ASIA C and D subjects 6 months after SCI. Results No significant differences were found at entry between treatment groups or at 6 months for FIM-L (n = 108) or walking speed and distance (n = 72). In the upper motor neuron (UMN) subjects, 35% of ASIA B, 92% of ASIA C, and all ASIA D subjects walked independently. Velocities for UMN ASIA C and D subjects were not significantly different for BWSTT (1.1 ± 0.6 m/s, n = 30) and CONT (1.1 ± 0.7, n = 25) groups. Conclusions The physical therapy strategies of body weight support on a treadmill and defined overground mobility therapy did not produce different outcomes. This finding was partly due to the unexpectedly high percentage of American Spinal Injury Association C subjects who achieved functional walking speeds, irrespective of treatment. The results provide new insight into disability after incomplete spinal cord injury and affirm the importance of the multicenter, randomized clinical trial to test rehabilitation strategies. PMID:16505299

  2. Studying the History of the Intergalactic Medium with the SCI-HI Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voytek, Tabitha Christine

    The Cosmic Dawn (z ˜ 15 -- 35) is the period in the history of our universe when stars first began to form in small Dark Matter minihalos. Light from these first stars is too dim for telescopes to see, which means that the Cosmic Dawn has never been directly measured. However, the first stars impacted the gas, or intergalactic medium (IGM), around them. The impact of the first stars was heating and eventual ionization of the IGM. The process of heating and ionization creates a spectrum that varies over redshift, namely the spatially averaged brightness temperature spectrum of 21-cm light from the IGM. Measurement of this spectrum will give us a first glimpse of the Cosmic Dawn. The "Sonda Cosmologica de las Islas para la Deteccion de Hidrogeno Neutro" (SCIHI) experiment is a collaboration between Carnegie Mellon University (CMU) and Instituto Nacional de Astrofisica, Optica y Electronica (INAOE) in Mexico and was designed to make this measurement. The SCI-HI experiment is a small-scale system which travels with the team to remote locations for deployments. These remote locations are necessary to avoid radio frequency interference and other environmental impacts on the system. This thesis describes the development and deployment of the SCI-HI experiment. It starts with the original design and covers development of the system over time. Deployment location selection is then discussed, including the results of site evaluations. In addition, the thesis outlines the data analysis process used for the system and shows results from data collected during the June 2013 deployment of the experiment. Finally, the thesis describes plans for the future of the SCI-HI experiment, including deployment to South Africa in 2015.

  3. A Characterization Of The GNAT SciTech STAR Class 0.5m Prototype Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barentine, J. C.; Culver, R. B.

    2002-05-01

    In 1995 the Global Network of Automated Telescopes (GNAT) acquired an option to purchase a 0.5m "STAR" class telescope, manufactured by SciTech Corporation of Forresthill, CA, contingent upon its attainment of performance specifications published by SciTech. In spite of a concerted, and protracted effort, the telescope has not yet approached the manufacturer's specifications, and has proven largely unusable for its intended purpose. In light of the difficult history of commercial development of true automated telescopes (see Sinnott 1996 and Henry 1994) it is important to understand the current state of such commercial systems. We present results of a characterization of this telescope and recommendations for how to proceed in light of its failure to attain specifications. Principle failings of the telescope can be summarized as follows: 1) the mechanical structure was inadequately designed and built, yielding large and unacceptable pointing and tracking errors, 2) the autoguider system was never successfully implemented, limiting the system to very short integrations, 3) the autofocus mechanism was never successfully implemented, resulting in periodic, unacceptable focus drifts during automatic operation, 4) the telescope control system as provided with the telescope did not work and ultimately had to be developed by an independent contractor recommended by GNAT and contracted through SciTech, and 5) the telescope optical system design did not adequately accommodate scattered light issues, yielding significant scattered light contributions to the images under certain conditions. Based on analyses of these issues, we present recommendations for improvements in this system. Support of this work has been provided by Colorado State University and GNAT. REFERENCES Sinnott, R.W. Sky And Telescope vol.91, no.6, p.38 (1996) Henry, G.W. IAPPP Communication No.57, Autumn 1994, p.57

  4. MicroRNA-146a Contributes to SCI Recovery via Regulating TRAF6 and IRAK1 Expression

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Jinsong; Zhou, Yulan; Yan, Shouquan

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNA-146a participates in spinal cord injury (SCI) recovery. Until recently, how miRNA-146a participates in SCI remained unclear. In this study, we tried to explore the roles of miRNA-146a in the recovery of SCI using a rat model. The expression of the probable target genes of miRNA-146a (including IRAK1 and TARF6) as well as proinflammation cytokines were measured until 7 days after surgery in the three groups (sham group, SCI group, and miRNA-146a antagomir injection group). Also, the animals' motivations were estimated using Basso Beattie Bresnahan (BBB) during the whole experiment. A luciferase assay was performed to demonstrate that miRNA-146a could directly target the mRNAs of IRAK1 and TRAF6. Our experiments indicate that miRNA-146a inhibits proinflammatory cytokine secretion by suppressing IRAK1 and TRAF6 expression in the SCI model. In contrast, miRNA-146a may be upregulated by inflammatory mediators via the IRAK1/TRAF6 pathway in the spinal cord. As a negative feedback element, miRNA-146a could make sure that the expression of IRAK1- and TRAF6-mediated genes was under tight control. Thus, miRNA-146a may serve as a novel therapeutic target for SCI interventions. PMID:27830143

  5. SciSpark: Highly Interactive and Scalable Model Evaluation and Climate Metrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, B. D.; Palamuttam, R. S.; Mogrovejo, R. M.; Whitehall, K. D.; Mattmann, C. A.; Verma, R.; Waliser, D. E.; Lee, H.

    2015-12-01

    Remote sensing data and climate model output are multi-dimensional arrays of massive sizes locked away in heterogeneous file formats (HDF5/4, NetCDF 3/4) and metadata models (HDF-EOS, CF) making it difficult to perform multi-stage, iterative science processing since each stage requires writing and reading data to and from disk. We are developing a lightning fast Big Data technology called SciSpark based on ApacheTM Spark under a NASA AIST grant (PI Mattmann). Spark implements the map-reduce paradigm for parallel computing on a cluster, but emphasizes in-memory computation, "spilling" to disk only as needed, and so outperforms the disk-based ApacheTM Hadoop by 100x in memory and by 10x on disk. SciSpark will enable scalable model evaluation by executing large-scale comparisons of A-Train satellite observations to model grids on a cluster of 10 to 1000 compute nodes. This 2nd generation capability for NASA's Regional Climate Model Evaluation System (RCMES) will compute simple climate metrics at interactive speeds, and extend to quite sophisticated iterative algorithms such as machine-learning based clustering of temperature PDFs, and even graph-based algorithms for searching for Mesocale Convective Complexes. We have implemented a parallel data ingest capability in which the user specifies desired variables (arrays) as several time-sorted lists of URL's (i.e. using OPeNDAP model.nc?varname, or local files). The specified variables are partitioned by time/space and then each Spark node pulls its bundle of arrays into memory to begin a computation pipeline. We also investigated the performance of several N-dim. array libraries (scala breeze, java jblas & netlib-java, and ND4J). We are currently developing science codes using ND4J and studying memory behavior on the JVM. On the pyspark side, many of our science codes already use the numpy and SciPy ecosystems. The talk will cover: the architecture of SciSpark, the design of the scientific RDD (sRDD) data structure, our

  6. SciSpark: Highly Interactive and Scalable Model Evaluation and Climate Metrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, B. D.; Mattmann, C. A.; Waliser, D. E.; Kim, J.; Loikith, P.; Lee, H.; McGibbney, L. J.; Whitehall, K. D.

    2014-12-01

    Remote sensing data and climate model output are multi-dimensional arrays of massive sizes locked away in heterogeneous file formats (HDF5/4, NetCDF 3/4) and metadata models (HDF-EOS, CF) making it difficult to perform multi-stage, iterative science processing since each stage requires writing and reading data to and from disk. We are developing a lightning fast Big Data technology called SciSpark based on ApacheTM Spark. Spark implements the map-reduce paradigm for parallel computing on a cluster, but emphasizes in-memory computation, "spilling" to disk only as needed, and so outperforms the disk-based ApacheTM Hadoop by 100x in memory and by 10x on disk, and makes iterative algorithms feasible. SciSpark will enable scalable model evaluation by executing large-scale comparisons of A-Train satellite observations to model grids on a cluster of 100 to 1000 compute nodes. This 2nd generation capability for NASA's Regional Climate Model Evaluation System (RCMES) will compute simple climate metrics at interactive speeds, and extend to quite sophisticated iterative algorithms such as machine-learning (ML) based clustering of temperature PDFs, and even graph-based algorithms for searching for Mesocale Convective Complexes. The goals of SciSpark are to: (1) Decrease the time to compute comparison statistics and plots from minutes to seconds; (2) Allow for interactive exploration of time-series properties over seasons and years; (3) Decrease the time for satellite data ingestion into RCMES to hours; (4) Allow for Level-2 comparisons with higher-order statistics or PDF's in minutes to hours; and (5) Move RCMES into a near real time decision-making platform. We will report on: the architecture and design of SciSpark, our efforts to integrate climate science algorithms in Python and Scala, parallel ingest and partitioning (sharding) of A-Train satellite observations from HDF files and model grids from netCDF files, first parallel runs to compute comparison statistics and PDF

  7. Novel Target for Ameliorating Pain and Other Problems after SCI: Spontaneous Activity in Nociceptors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-01

    prediction that interventions that reduce the function of sodium ion channel Nav1.8 (primarily expressed in nociceptive primary afferent neurons) ameliorate...Nav1.8 sodium channel blocker, attenuates neuropathic and inflammatory pain in the rat. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A, 104:8520–8525. Shields, SD, Ahn...gated sodium channel expressed by sensory neurons. Nature 379:257– 262. CrossRef Medline Akopian AN, Souslova V, England S, Okuse K, Ogata N, Ure J

  8. [Analysis of acupuncture literatures published in Science Citation Index (SCI) periodicals in 2010].

    PubMed

    Xiang, Yan; Li, Rui

    2012-08-01

    Acupuncture-related literatures published in foreign medical journal in Science Citation Index (SCI) periodicals in 2010 were retrieved, summarized and analyzed. The result shows that the recognition of acupuncture clinic abroad was still in the initial period. Most of the researches were still remained in the section of clinical efficacy verification. There was comparatively less studies on its working mechanism. Traditional treatments according to differentiation of syndromes were still deficient in clinical researches. There were big differences on research results, however, most of the result equated therapeutic effect of acupuncture with placeboes. And it was lack of unified and standard estimation system on the effect of acupuncture.

  9. Measurement of Neutron and Muon Fluxes 100~m Underground with the SciBath Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Garrison, Lance

    2014-01-01

    The SciBath detector is an 80 liter liquid scintillator detector read out by a three dimensional grid of 768 wavelength-shifting fibers. Initially conceived as a fine-grained charged particle detector for neutrino studies that could image charged particle tracks in all directions, it is also sensitive to fast neutrons (15-200 MeV). In fall of 2011 the apparatus performed a three month run to measure cosmic-induced muons and neutrons 100~meters underground in the FNAL MINOS near-detector area. Data from this run has been analyzed and resulted in measurements of the cosmic muon flux as \

  10. Highlights from day three of the EuroSciCon 2015 Sports Science Summit

    PubMed Central

    Chawla, Amit; McGregor, Alison

    2015-01-01

    This EuroSciCon Sports Science Summit represented a significant gathering of leading professionals in the field of sports science. The conference was held on 13–15 January 2015 at the O2 arena, London, UK. The chairman on the third day was Mr Greg Robertson, a specialist trainee Orthopedic surgeon from Edinburgh. The conference attracted over 80 attendants from all over the world, with 32 presentations from invited speakers and peer-reviewed submissions. This meeting report provides a summary of the best abstracts from the conference. PMID:28031889

  11. Transposon-Assisted Genetic Engineering with Mos1-Mediated Single-Copy Insertion (MosSCI).

    PubMed

    Frøkjær-Jensen, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Transgenesis in model organisms is necessary to determine the function, expression, and subcellular localization of gene products. In Caenorhabditis elegans, injected DNA can be propagated as multicopy extrachromosomal arrays but transgenes in arrays are mosaic, over-expressed in some tissues and silenced in the germline. Here, a method to insert a transgene into a specific genomic location called Mos1-mediated single-copy insertion (MosSCI) is described. Single-copy insertion allows transgene expression at levels that approximate endogenous gene expression as well as expression in the germline.

  12. [Analysis on acupuncture related articles published in periodicals in science citation index (SCI) in 2008].

    PubMed

    Wang, Chao; He, Wen-Ju; Guo, Yi

    2010-09-01

    Acupuncture related articles published in periodicals in Science Citation Index (SCI) in 2008 were summarized and analyzed. About 583 articles were collected using "acupuncture" and "in 2008" as keywords in the Web of Science data base by information retrieval. These papers were summarized and analyzed from various aspects of country, language, subject category, literature type, publication sources, impact factor, research method, acupoints, disease category and needling methods by using Excel software combined with manual sorting of the literature, the aim is to provide a reference for domestic acupuncture research.

  13. SciFinder Scholar 2006: an empirical analysis of research topic query processing.

    PubMed

    Wagner, A Ben

    2006-01-01

    Topical search queries in SciFinder Scholar are processed through an extensive set of natural language processing algorithms that greatly enhance the relevance and comprehensiveness of the search results. Little detailed documentation on these algorithms has been published. However, a careful examination of the highlighted hit terms coupled with a comparison of results from small variations in query language reveal much additional, useful information about these algorithms. An understanding of how these algorithms work can lead to better search results and explain many unexpected results, including differing hit counts for singular versus plural query words and phrases.

  14. Ontological Encoding of GeoSciML and INSPIRE geological standard vocabularies and schemas: application to geological mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lombardo, Vincenzo; Piana, Fabrizio; Mimmo, Dario; Fubelli, Giandomenico; Giardino, Marco

    2016-04-01

    Encoding of geologic knowledge in formal languages is an ambitious task, aiming at the interoperability and organic representation of geological data, and semantic characterization of geologic maps. Initiatives such as GeoScience Markup Language (last version is GeoSciML 4, 2015[1]) and INSPIRE "Data Specification on Geology" (an operative simplification of GeoSciML, last version is 3.0 rc3, 2013[2]), as well as the recent terminological shepherding of the Geoscience Terminology Working Group (GTWG[3]) have been promoting information exchange of the geologic knowledge. There have also been limited attempts to encode the knowledge in a machine-readable format, especially in the lithology domain (see e.g. the CGI_Lithology ontology[4]), but a comprehensive ontological model that connect the several knowledge sources is still lacking. This presentation concerns the "OntoGeonous" initiative, which aims at encoding the geologic knowledge, as expressed through the standard vocabularies, schemas and data models mentioned above, through a number of interlinked computational ontologies, based on the languages of the Semantic Web and the paradigm of Linked Open Data. The initiative proceeds in parallel with a concrete case study, concerning the setting up of a synthetic digital geological map of the Piemonte region (NW Italy), named "GEOPiemonteMap" (developed by the CNR Institute of Geosciences and Earth Resources, CNR IGG, Torino), where the description and classification of GeologicUnits has been supported by the modeling and implementation of the ontologies. We have devised a tripartite ontological model called OntoGeonous that consists of: 1) an ontology of the geologic features (in particular, GeologicUnit, GeomorphologicFeature, and GeologicStructure[5], modeled from the definitions and UML schemata of CGI vocabularies[6], GeoScienceML and INSPIRE, and aligned with the Planetary realm of NASA SWEET ontology[7]), 2) an ontology of the Earth materials (as defined by the

  15. Performance Engineering Research Institute SciDAC-2 Enabling Technologies Institute Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, Mary

    2014-09-19

    Enhancing the performance of SciDAC applications on petascale systems has high priority within DOE SC. As we look to the future, achieving expected levels of performance on high-end com-puting (HEC) systems is growing ever more challenging due to enormous scale, increasing archi-tectural complexity, and increasing application complexity. To address these challenges, PERI has implemented a unified, tripartite research plan encompassing: (1) performance modeling and prediction; (2) automatic performance tuning; and (3) performance engineering of high profile applications. The PERI performance modeling and prediction activity is developing and refining performance models, significantly reducing the cost of collecting the data upon which the models are based, and increasing model fidelity, speed and generality. Our primary research activity is automatic tuning (autotuning) of scientific software. This activity is spurred by the strong user preference for automatic tools and is based on previous successful activities such as ATLAS, which has automatically tuned components of the LAPACK linear algebra library, and other re-cent work on autotuning domain-specific libraries. Our third major component is application en-gagement, to which we are devoting approximately 30% of our effort to work directly with Sci-DAC-2 applications. This last activity not only helps DOE scientists meet their near-term per-formance goals, but also helps keep PERI research focused on the real challenges facing DOE computational scientists as they enter the Petascale Era.

  16. Building a Universal Nuclear Energy Density Functional (UNEDF). SciDAC-2 Project

    SciTech Connect

    Vary, James P.; Carlson, Joe; Furnstahl, Dick; Horoi, Mihai; Lusk, Rusty; Nazarewicz, Witek; Ng, Esmond; Thompson, Ian

    2012-09-29

    An understanding of the properties of atomic nuclei is crucial for a complete nuclear theory, for element formation, for properties of stars, and for present and future energy and defense applications. During the period of Dec. 1 2006 – Jun. 30, 2012, the UNEDF collaboration carried out a comprehensive study of all nuclei, based on the most accurate knowledge of the strong nuclear interaction, the most reliable theoretical approaches, the most advanced algorithms, and extensive computational resources, with a view towards scaling to the petaflop platforms and beyond. Until recently such an undertaking was hard to imagine, and even at the present time such an ambitious endeavor would be far beyond what a single researcher or a traditional research group could carry out. The UNEDF SciDAC project has developed several key computational codes and algorithms for reaching the goal of solving the nuclear quantum many-body problem throughout the chart of nuclei. Without such developments, scientific progress would not be possible. In addition the UNEDF SciDAC successfully applied these developments to solve many forefront research problems.

  17. Scientific support of SciTech museum exhibits and outreach programs

    SciTech Connect

    Peshkin, M.

    1995-08-01

    SciTech (Science and Technology Interactive Center) is a small hands-on science museum located in Aurora, Illinois, not far from Argonne National Laboratory. Its constituency includes prosperous suburbs and economically disadvantaged minority communities in Aurora and Chicago. Its mission is to contribute to the country`s scientific literacy initiative by offering hands-on experiences on the museum floor and through outreach programs extended to school children, their teachers, and other groups. Argonne`s participation is focused mainly on the development of exhibits to carry the ideas of modern science and technology to the public. This is an area in which traditional museums are weak, but in which SciTech has become a nationally recognized leader with the assistance of Argonne, Fermilab, nearby technological companies, and many volunteer scientists and engineers. We also participate in development and improvement of the museum`s general exhibits and outreach programs. Argonne`s Director, Alan Schriesheim, serves as a member of the museum`s Board of Directors. Murray Peshkin serves part-time as the museum`s Senior Scientist. Dale Henderson serves part-time as an exhibit developer. That work is supported by the Laboratory Director`s discretionary funds. In addition, several members of the Physics Division voluntarily assist with exhibit development and the Division makes facilities available for that effort.

  18. SciDAC - The Scientific Data Management Center (http://sdmcenter.lbl.gov)

    SciTech Connect

    Ling Liu Calton Pu

    2005-06-20

    In SciDAC SDM project, the main assignment to the Georgia Institute of Technology team (according to the proposed work) is to develop advanced information extraction and information integration technologies on top of the XWRAP technology originated from Georgia Tech [LPH01]. We have developed XWRAPComposer technology to enable the XWRAP code generator to generate Java information wrappers that are capable of extraction of data from multiple linked pages. These information wrappers are used as gateways or adaptors for scientific information mediators to access and fuse interesting data and answering complex queries over a large collection of heterogeneous scientific information sources. Our accomplishments over the SciDAC sponsored years (July 2001 to July 2004) can be summarized along two dimensions. Technically, we have produced a number of major software releases and published over 30 research papers in both international conferences and international journals. The planned software releases include 1. Five Java wrappers and five WDSL-enabled wrappers for SDM Pilot scenarios, which were released in early 2003, 2. The XWRAPComposer toolkit (command line version) which was first released in late 2003 and then released in Summer 2004, 3. Five Ptolemy wrapper actors which were released first in Summer 2003, and then released again in Fall 2005. 4. The decomposable XWRAPComposer actor in Ptolemy, which we have made it available as open source in end of 2004 and tested it in early 2005.

  19. Neuroinflammatory contributions to pain after SCI: roles for central glial mechanisms and nociceptor-mediated host defense.

    PubMed

    Walters, Edgar T

    2014-08-01

    Neuropathic pain after spinal cord injury (SCI) is common, often intractable, and can be severely debilitating. A number of mechanisms have been proposed for this pain, which are discussed briefly, along with methods for revealing SCI pain in animal models, such as the recently applied conditioned place preference test. During the last decade, studies of animal models have shown that both central neuroinflammation and behavioral hypersensitivity (indirect reflex measures of pain) persist chronically after SCI. Interventions that reduce neuroinflammation have been found to ameliorate pain-related behavior, such as treatment with agents that inhibit the activation states of microglia and/or astroglia (including IL-10, minocycline, etanercept, propentofylline, ibudilast, licofelone, SP600125, carbenoxolone). Reversal of pain-related behavior has also been shown with disruption by an inhibitor (CR8) and/or genetic deletion of cell cycle-related proteins, deletion of a truncated receptor (trkB.T1) for brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), or reduction by antisense knockdown or an inhibitor (AMG9810) of the activity of channels (TRPV1 or Nav1.8) important for electrical activity in primary nociceptors. Nociceptor activity is known to drive central neuroinflammation in peripheral injury models, and nociceptors appear to be an integral component of host defense. Thus, emerging results suggest that spinal and systemic effects of SCI can activate nociceptor-mediated host defense responses that interact via neuroinflammatory signaling with complex central consequences of SCI to drive chronic pain. This broader view of SCI-induced neuroinflammation suggests new targets, and additional complications, for efforts to develop effective treatments for neuropathic SCI pain.

  20. Sterilization-CO2-Injection (SCI) BaPS: Establishment of a new method to measure rates of soil respiration and gross nitrification in calcareous agricultural soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conrads, Hannah; Ingwersen, Joachim; Streck, Thilo

    2013-04-01

    out that with the acidic soils no significant differences in the nitrification rates between the standard BaPS method and the SCI-BaPS method were found whereas with calcareous soils nitrification rates calculated with the standard BaPS method were 60 to 180% higher than the nitrification rates measured with the SCI-BaPS. Comparing SCI-BaPS nitrification rates with 15N pool dilution results, with all soils BaPS rates were always higher than 15N rates, which suggests a systematic overestimation due to the utilization of an inadequate respiration quotient (RQ = dCO2,R/dO2,R = 1). For all soils the RQ values were adjusted such that BaPS nitrification rates matched the 15N rates (Müller et al., 2004). This procedure yielded a mean optimum RQ value of 0.9. After this adjustment both methods yielded comparable results. Further, temperature and moisture dependency of the CO2,aq flux and dissolution dynamics were studied and will be presented.

  1. Transporter Protein-Coupled DPCPX Nanoconjugates Induce Diaphragmatic Recovery after SCI by Blocking Adenosine A1 Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Minic, Zeljka; Zhang, Yanhua; Mao, Guangzhao

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory complications in patients with spinal cord injury (SCI) are common and have a negative impact on the quality of patients' lives. Systemic administration of drugs that improve respiratory function often cause deleterious side effects. The present study examines the applicability of a novel nanotechnology-based drug delivery system, which induces recovery of diaphragm function after SCI in the adult rat model. We developed a protein-coupled nanoconjugate to selectively deliver by transsynaptic transport small therapeutic amounts of an A1 adenosine receptor antagonist to the respiratory centers. A single administration of the nanoconjugate restored 75% of the respiratory drive at 0.1% of the systemic therapeutic drug dose. The reduction of the systemic dose may obviate the side effects. The recovery lasted for 4 weeks (the longest period studied). These findings have translational implications for patients with respiratory dysfunction after SCI. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The leading causes of death in humans following SCI are respiratory complications secondary to paralysis of respiratory muscles. Systemic administration of methylxantines improves respiratory function but also leads to the development of deleterious side effects due to actions of the drug on nonrespiratory sites. The importance of the present study lies in the novel drug delivery approach that uses nanotechnology to selectively deliver recovery-inducing drugs to the respiratory centers exclusively. This strategy allows for a reduction in the therapeutic drug dose, which may reduce harmful side effects and markedly improve the quality of life for SCI patients. PMID:27013674

  2. Development and psychometric characteristics of the SCI-QOL Bladder Management Difficulties and Bowel Management Difficulties item banks and short forms and the SCI-QOL Bladder Complications scale

    PubMed Central

    Tulsky, David S.; Kisala, Pamela A.; Tate, Denise G.; Spungen, Ann M.; Kirshblum, Steven C.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To describe the development and psychometric properties of the Spinal Cord Injury – Quality of Life (SCI-QOL) Bladder Management Difficulties and Bowel Management Difficulties item banks and Bladder Complications scale. Design Using a mixed-methods design, a pool of items assessing bladder and bowel-related concerns were developed using focus groups with individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI) and SCI clinicians, cognitive interviews, and item response theory (IRT) analytic approaches, including tests of model fit and differential item functioning. Setting Thirty-eight bladder items and 52 bowel items were tested at the University of Michigan, Kessler Foundation Research Center, the Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago, the University of Washington, Craig Hospital, and the James J. Peters VA Medical Center, Bronx, NY. Participants Seven hundred fifty-seven adults with traumatic SCI. Results The final item banks demonstrated unidimensionality (Bladder Management Difficulties CFI = 0.965; RMSEA = 0.093; Bowel Management Difficulties CFI = 0.955; RMSEA = 0.078) and acceptable fit to a graded response IRT model. The final calibrated Bladder Management Difficulties bank includes 15 items, and the final Bowel Management Difficulties item bank consists of 26 items. Additionally, 5 items related to urinary tract infections (UTI) did not fit with the larger Bladder Management Difficulties item bank but performed relatively well independently (CFI = 0.992, RMSEA = 0.050) and were thus retained as a separate scale. Conclusion The SCI-QOL Bladder Management Difficulties and Bowel Management Difficulties item banks are psychometrically robust and are available as computer adaptive tests or short forms. The SCI-QOL Bladder Complications scale is a brief, fixed-length outcomes instrument for individuals with a UTI. PMID:26010964

  3. Towards molecular computers that operate in a biological environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahan, Maya; Gil, Binyamin; Adar, Rivka; Shapiro, Ehud

    2008-07-01

    Even though electronic computers are the only computer species we are accustomed to, the mathematical notion of a programmable computer has nothing to do with electronics. In fact, Alan Turing’s notional computer [L.M. Turing, On computable numbers, with an application to the entcheidungsproblem, Proc. Lond. Math. Soc. 42 (1936) 230-265], which marked in 1936 the birth of modern computer science and still stands at its heart, has greater similarity to natural biomolecular machines such as the ribosome and polymerases than to electronic computers. This similarity led to the investigation of DNA-based computers [C.H. Bennett, The thermodynamics of computation - Review, Int. J. Theoret. Phys. 21 (1982) 905-940; A.M. Adleman, Molecular computation of solutions to combinatorial problems, Science 266 (1994) 1021-1024]. Although parallelism, sequence specific hybridization and storage capacity, inherent to DNA and RNA molecules, can be exploited in molecular computers to solve complex mathematical problems [Q. Ouyang, et al., DNA solution of the maximal clique problem, Science 278 (1997) 446-449; R.J. Lipton, DNA solution of hard computational problems, Science 268 (1995) 542-545; R.S. Braich, et al., Solution of a 20-variable 3-SAT problem on a DNA computer, Science 296 (2002) 499-502; Liu Q., et al., DNA computing on surfaces, Nature 403 (2000) 175-179; D. Faulhammer, et al., Molecular computation: RNA solutions to chess problems, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 97 (2000) 1385-1389; C. Mao, et al., Logical computation using algorithmic self-assembly of DNA triple-crossover molecules, Nature 407 (2000) 493-496; A.J. Ruben, et al., The past, present and future of molecular computing, Nat. Rev. Mol. Cell. Biol. 1 (2000) 69-72], we believe that the more significant potential of molecular computers lies in their ability to interact directly with a biochemical environment such as the bloodstream and living cells. From this perspective, even simple molecular computations may have

  4. Further Precipitation Reactions Associated with Beta’ (Al3Zr) Particles in Al-Li-Cu-Mg-Zr Alloys

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-12-01

    Gregson 8’ precipitation in Al-Li-Mg-Cu-Zr alloys. H.M. Flower J. Mater. Sci. Lett., 3, 829 (1984) 5 P.L. Makin On the ageing of an aluminium-lithium...Technol., 2, 349 (1986) 8 H.M. Flower The effect of composition and heat treatment upon the et al microstructure/property relationships in Al-Li-Cu-Mg...1119 REFERENCES concluded) No. Author Title, etc 10 P.J. Gregon Microstructural control of toughness in aluminium- H.M. Flower lithium alloys. Acta

  5. SciData: a data model and ontology for semantic representation of scientific data.

    PubMed

    Chalk, Stuart J

    2016-01-01

    With the move toward global, Internet enabled science there is an inherent need to capture, store, aggregate and search scientific data across a large corpus of heterogeneous data silos. As a result, standards development is needed to create an infrastructure capable of representing the diverse nature of scientific data. This paper describes a fundamental data model for scientific data that can be applied to data currently stored in any format, and an associated ontology that affords semantic representation of the structure of scientific data (and its metadata), upon which discipline specific semantics can be applied. Application of this data model to experimental and computational chemistry data are presented, implemented using JavaScript Object Notation for Linked Data. Full examples are available at the project website (Chalk in SciData: a scientific data model. http://stuchalk.github.io/scidata/, 2016).

  6. VACET: Proposed SciDAC2 Visualization and Analytics Center forEnabling Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Bethel, W.; Johnson, Chris; Hansen, Charles; Parker, Steve; Sanderson, Allen; Silva, Claudio; Tricoche, Xavier; Pascucci, Valerio; Childs, Hank; Cohen, Jonathon; Duchaineau, Mark; Laney, Dan; Lindstrom,Peter; Ahern, Sean; Meredith, Jeremy; Ostrouchov, George; Joy, Ken; Hamann, Bernd

    2006-06-19

    This paper accompanies a poster that is being presented atthe SciDAC 2006 meeting in Denver, CO. This project focuses on leveragingscientific visualization and analytics software technology as an enablingtechnology for increasing scientific productivity and insight. Advancesincomputational technology have resultedin an "information big bang,"which in turn has createda significant data understanding challenge. Thischallenge is widely acknowledged to be one of the primary bottlenecks incontemporary science. The vision for our Center is to respond directly tothat challenge by adapting, extending, creating when necessary anddeploying visualization and data understanding technologies for ourscience stakeholders. Using an organizational model as a Visualizationand Analytics Center for Enabling Technologies (VACET), we are wellpositioned to be responsive to the needs of a diverse set of scientificstakeholders in a coordinated fashion using a range of visualization,mathematics, statistics, computer and computational science and datamanagement technologies.

  7. Open for collaboration: an academic platform for drug discovery and development at SciLifeLab.

    PubMed

    Arvidsson, Per I; Sandberg, Kristian; Forsberg-Nilsson, Karin

    2016-10-01

    The Science for Life Laboratory Drug Discovery and Development (SciLifeLab DDD) platform reaches out to Swedish academia with an industry-standard infrastructure for academic drug discovery, supported by earmarked funds from the Swedish government. In this review, we describe the build-up and operation of the platform, and reflect on our first two years of operation, with the ambition to share learnings and best practice with academic drug discovery centers globally. We also discuss how the Swedish Teacher Exemption Law, an internationally unique aspect of the innovation system, has shaped the operation. Furthermore, we address how this investment in infrastructure and expertise can be utilized to facilitate international collaboration between academia and industry in the best interest of those ultimately benefiting the most from translational pharmaceutical research - the patients.

  8. Recent progress in CdTe solar cell research at SCI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasala, R. A.; Powell, R. C.; Dorer, G. L.; Reiter, N.

    1997-02-01

    Research at Solar Cells Inc. is focused on developing processes which will lead to high volume and low cost manufacturing of solar cells and to increase the performance of our present technology. The process research has focused on developing vapor transport deposition of the semiconductors, eliminating wet chemistry steps while minimizing the chloride treatment time, forming a low-loss back contact using only dry processing, and an improved interconnection technique. The performance improvement work has focused on the increase of the photocurrent by a combination of more transparent glass substrates and a thinner CdS window layer deposited on an i-SnO2 buffer layer. SCI record 13.0% 1 cm2 devices have been fabricated using these techniques. Stability monitoring continues and shows minimal degradation for over 20,000 hours of continuous light soak at 0.8 sun illumination.

  9. The Virtual Earth-Solar Observatory of the SCiESMEX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De la Luz, V.; Gonzalez-Esparza, A.; Cifuentes-Nava, G.

    2015-12-01

    The Mexican Space Weather Service (SCiESMEX, http://www.sciesmex.unam.mx) started operations in October 2014. The project includes the Virtual Earth-Solar Observatory (VESO, http://www.veso.unam.mx). The VESO is a improved project wich objetive is integrate the space weather instrumentation network from the National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM). The network includes the Mexican Array Radiotelescope (MEXART), the Callisto receptor (MEXART), a Neutron Telescope, a Cosmic Ray Telescope. the Schumann Antenna, the National Magnetic Service, and the mexican GPS network (TlalocNet). The VESO facility is located at the Geophysics Institute campus Michoacan (UNAM). We offer the service of data store, real-time data, and quasi real-time data. The hardware of VESO includes a High Performance Computer (HPC) dedicated specially to big data storage.

  10. Extraordinary tools for extraordinary science: the impact of SciDAC on accelerator science and technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryne, Robert D.

    2006-09-01

    Particle accelerators are among the most complex and versatile instruments of scientific exploration. They have enabled remarkable scientific discoveries and important technological advances that span all programs within the DOE Office of Science (DOE/SC). The importance of accelerators to the DOE/SC mission is evident from an examination of the DOE document, ''Facilities for the Future of Science: A Twenty-Year Outlook.'' Of the 28 facilities listed, 13 involve accelerators. Thanks to SciDAC, a powerful suite of parallel simulation tools has been developed that represent a paradigm shift in computational accelerator science. Simulations that used to take weeks or more now take hours, and simulations that were once thought impossible are now performed routinely. These codes have been applied to many important projects of DOE/SC including existing facilities (the Tevatron complex, the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider), facilities under construction (the Large Hadron Collider, the Spallation Neutron Source, the Linac Coherent Light Source), and to future facilities (the International Linear Collider, the Rare Isotope Accelerator). The new codes have also been used to explore innovative approaches to charged particle acceleration. These approaches, based on the extremely intense fields that can be present in lasers and plasmas, may one day provide a path to the outermost reaches of the energy frontier. Furthermore, they could lead to compact, high-gradient accelerators that would have huge consequences for US science and technology, industry, and medicine. In this talk I will describe the new accelerator modeling capabilities developed under SciDAC, the essential role of multi-disciplinary collaboration with applied mathematicians, computer scientists, and other IT experts in developing these capabilities, and provide examples of how the codes have been used to support DOE/SC accelerator projects.

  11. PACIFIC: the readout ASIC for the SciFi Tracker of the upgraded LHCb detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazorra, J.; Chanal, H.; Comerma, A.; Gascón, D.; Gómez, S.; Han, X.; Pillet, N.; Vandaele, R.

    2016-02-01

    The LHCb detector will be upgraded during the Long Shutdown 2 (LS2) of the LHC in order to cope with higher instantaneous luminosities and will switch to a 40 MHz readout rate using a trigger-less software based system. All front-end electronics will be replaced and several sub-detectors must be redesigned to cope with the higher detector occupancy and radiation damage. The current tracking detectors downstream of the LHCb dipole magnet will be replaced by the Scintillating Fibre (SciFi) Tracker. The SciFi Tracker will use scintillating fibres read out by Silicon Photomultipliers (SiPMs). State-of-the-art multi-channel SiPM arrays are being developed and a custom ASIC, called the low-Power ASIC for the sCIntillating FIbres traCker (PACIFIC), will be used to digitise the signals from the SiPMs. This article presents an overview of the R&D for the PACIFIC. It is a 64-channel ASIC implemented in 130 nm CMOS technology, aiming at a radiation tolerant design with a power consumption below 10 mW per channel. It interfaces directly with the SiPM anode through a current mode input, and provides a configurable non-linear 2-bit per channel digital output. The SiPM signal is acquired by a current conveyor and processed with a fast shaper and a gated integrator. The digitization is performed using a three threshold non-linear flash ADC operating at 40 MHz. Simulation and test results show the PACIFIC chip prototypes functioning well.

  12. Extraordinary Tools for Extraordinary Science: The Impact ofSciDAC on Accelerator Science&Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Ryne, Robert D.

    2006-08-10

    Particle accelerators are among the most complex and versatile instruments of scientific exploration. They have enabled remarkable scientific discoveries and important technological advances that span all programs within the DOE Office of Science (DOE/SC). The importance of accelerators to the DOE/SC mission is evident from an examination of the DOE document, ''Facilities for the Future of Science: A Twenty-Year Outlook''. Of the 28 facilities listed, 13 involve accelerators. Thanks to SciDAC, a powerful suite of parallel simulation tools has been developed that represent a paradigm shift in computational accelerator science. Simulations that used to take weeks or more now take hours, and simulations that were once thought impossible are now performed routinely. These codes have been applied to many important projects of DOE/SC including existing facilities (the Tevatron complex, the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider), facilities under construction (the Large Hadron Collider, the Spallation Neutron Source, the Linac Coherent Light Source), and to future facilities (the International Linear Collider, the Rare Isotope Accelerator). The new codes have also been used to explore innovative approaches to charged particle acceleration. These approaches, based on the extremely intense fields that can be present in lasers and plasmas, may one day provide a path to the outermost reaches of the energy frontier. Furthermore, they could lead to compact, high-gradient accelerators that would have huge consequences for US science and technology, industry, and medicine. In this talk I will describe the new accelerator modeling capabilities developed under SciDAC, the essential role of multi-disciplinary collaboration with applied mathematicians, computer scientists, and other IT experts in developing these capabilities, and provide examples of how the codes have been used to support DOE/SC accelerator projects.

  13. SciDAC's Earth System Grid Center for Enabling Technologies Semiannual Progress Report October 1, 2010 through March 31, 2011

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Dean N.

    2011-04-02

    This report summarizes work carried out by the Earth System Grid Center for Enabling Technologies (ESG-CET) from October 1, 2010 through March 31, 2011. It discusses ESG-CET highlights for the reporting period, overall progress, period goals, and collaborations, and lists papers and presentations. To learn more about our project and to find previous reports, please visit the ESG-CET Web sites: http://esg-pcmdi.llnl.gov/ and/or https://wiki.ucar.edu/display/esgcet/Home. This report will be forwarded to managers in the Department of Energy (DOE) Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing (SciDAC) program and the Office of Biological and Environmental Research (OBER), as well as national and international collaborators and stakeholders (e.g., those involved in the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project, phase 5 (CMIP5) for the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) 5th Assessment Report (AR5); the Community Earth System Model (CESM); the Climate Science Computational End Station (CCES); SciDAC II: A Scalable and Extensible Earth System Model for Climate Change Science; the North American Regional Climate Change Assessment Program (NARCCAP); the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program; the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)), and also to researchers working on a variety of other climate model and observation evaluation activities. The ESG-CET executive committee consists of Dean N. Williams, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Ian Foster, Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); and Don Middleton, National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR). The ESG-CET team is a group of researchers and scientists with diverse domain knowledge, whose home institutions include eight laboratories and two universities: ANL, Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), LLNL, NASA/Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), NCAR, Oak Ridge National

  14. Measurement of the nu(mu)-CCQE cross-section in the SciBooNE experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Alcaraz-Aunion, Jose Luis; Walding, Joseph; /Imperial Coll., London

    2009-09-01

    SciBooNE is a neutrino and anti-neutrino cross-section experiment at Fermilab, USA. The SciBooNE experiment is summarized and two independent CCQE analyses are described. For one of the analyses, an absolute {nu}{sub {mu}}-CCQE cross section in the neutrino energy region (0.6-1.6) GeV is shown and the technique developed for such a purpose is also explained. The total cross section measured over this energy range agrees well with expectations, based on the NEUT event generator and using a value of 1.21 GeV for the CCQE axial mass.

  15. SciNOvA: A Measurement of Neutrino-Nucleus Scattering in a Narrow-Band Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Paley, J.; Djurcic, Z.; Harris, D.; Tesarek, R.; Feldman, G.; Corwin, L.; Messier, M.D.; Mayer, N.; Musser, J.; Paley, J.; Tayloe, R.; /Indiana U. /Iowa State U. /Minnesota U. /South Carolina U. /Wichita State U. /William-Mary Coll.

    2010-10-15

    We propose to construct and deploy a fine-grained detector in the Fermilab NOvA 2 GeV narrow-band neutrino beam. In this beam, the detector can make unique contributions to the measurement of quasi-elastic scattering, neutral-current elastic scattering, neutral-current {pi}{sup 0} production, and enhance the NOvA measurements of electron neutrino appearance. To minimize cost and risks, the proposed detector is a copy of the SciBar detector originally built for the K2K long baseline experiment and used recently in the SciBooNE experiment.

  16. A Novel Approach for Effectively Treating SCI Pain, Improving Opioid Efficacy, and Preventing Opioid-Induced Constipation: Key Role of Toll-Like Receptor 4 (TLR4)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    Approved for Public Release; Distribution Unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a disabling and costly condition... Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a disabling and costly condition affecting wounded military personnel (1). SCI is also one of the leading causes of...of life for service-members, veterans, caretakers, and the general population. Keywords Spinal cord injury, central neuropathic pain, rat

  17. Measuring stigma after spinal cord injury: Development and psychometric characteristics of the SCI-QOL Stigma item bank and short form

    PubMed Central

    Kisala, Pamela A.; Tulsky, David S.; Pace, Natalie; Victorson, David; Choi, Seung W.; Heinemann, Allen W.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To develop a calibrated item bank and computer adaptive test (CAT) to assess the effects of stigma on health-related quality of life in individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI). Design Grounded-theory based qualitative item development methods, large-scale item calibration field testing, confirmatory factor analysis, and item response theory (IRT)-based psychometric analyses. Setting Five SCI Model System centers and one Department of Veterans Affairs medical center in the United States. Participants Adults with traumatic SCI. Main Outcome Measures SCI-QOL Stigma Item Bank Results A sample of 611 individuals with traumatic SCI completed 30 items assessing SCI-related stigma. After 7 items were iteratively removed, factor analyses confirmed a unidimensional pool of items. Graded Response Model IRT analyses were used to estimate slopes and thresholds for the final 23 items. Conclusions The SCI-QOL Stigma item bank is unique not only in the assessment of SCI-related stigma but also in the inclusion of individuals with SCI in all phases of its development. Use of confirmatory factor analytic and IRT methods provide flexibility and precision of measurement. The item bank may be administered as a CAT or as a 10-item fixed-length short form and can be used for research and clinical applications. PMID:26010973

  18. Predicting plants -modeling traits as a function of environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franklin, Oskar

    2016-04-01

    A central problem in understanding and modeling vegetation dynamics is how to represent the variation in plant properties and function across different environments. Addressing this problem there is a strong trend towards trait-based approaches, where vegetation properties are functions of the distributions of functional traits rather than of species. Recently there has been enormous progress in in quantifying trait variability and its drivers and effects (Van Bodegom et al. 2012; Adier et al. 2014; Kunstler et al. 2015) based on wide ranging datasets on a small number of easily measured traits, such as specific leaf area (SLA), wood density and maximum plant height. However, plant function depends on many other traits and while the commonly measured trait data are valuable, they are not sufficient for driving predictive and mechanistic models of vegetation dynamics -especially under novel climate or management conditions. For this purpose we need a model to predict functional traits, also those not easily measured, and how they depend on the plants' environment. Here I present such a mechanistic model based on fitness concepts and focused on traits related to water and light limitation of trees, including: wood density, drought response, allocation to defense, and leaf traits. The model is able to predict observed patterns of variability in these traits in relation to growth and mortality, and their responses to a gradient of water limitation. The results demonstrate that it is possible to mechanistically predict plant traits as a function of the environment based on an eco-physiological model of plant fitness. References Adier, P.B., Salguero-Gómez, R., Compagnoni, A., Hsu, J.S., Ray-Mukherjee, J., Mbeau-Ache, C. et al. (2014). Functional traits explain variation in plant lifehistory strategies. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A., 111, 740-745. Kunstler, G., Falster, D., Coomes, D.A., Hui, F., Kooyman, R.M., Laughlin, D.C. et al. (2015). Plant functional traits

  19. Therapeutic effects of anti-spastic medication on neuromuscular abnormalities in SCI: a system identification approach.

    PubMed

    Mirbagheri, M M; Kindig, M; Niu, X; Varoqui, D

    2013-01-01

    Previous attempts to investigate the effects of antispastic medications are limited to clinical studies using that use clinical evaluations to assess. Since these measures are neither objective nor quantitative, the therapeutic effects of such medications on neuromuscular properties have not been fully evaluated. In this study, as a first attempt, we examined the effect of tizanidine, an anti-spastic medication, on modification of the neuromuscular properties of patients with chronic incomplete spinal cord injury (SCI). Each patient was administered 2 mg of tizanidine four times per day for four weeks. The spastic ankle of each patient was evaluated at baseline (prior to any medication, and then 1, 2, and 4 weeks after the start of medication. The ankle was perturbed with a small-amplitude Pseudo-Random Binary Sequence (PRBS) perturbation at various positions over the ankle range-of-motion. A parallel-cascade system identification technique, which provides an objective and quantitative measure of neuromuscular properties, was used to calculate the intrinsic and reflex stiffness. The stiffness vs. joint angle trends were then calculated for each evaluation; these curves were compared across the intervention time to determine the recovery pattern (i.e. change over time) due to the tizanidine intervention. All patients exhibited decreases in reflex stiffness (which abnormally increase after SCI) due to the medication; however, patients were observed to exhibit multiple recovery patterns. For some patients, the reflex stiffness continuously reduced over the four-week intervention period, while for other patients, the decrease during the first week (i.e. between the baseline and 1-Week evaluations) was most pronounced. Also, some patients presented a significant decrease with time, while others presented no improvement in the intrinsic stiffness. These findings suggest that tizanidine may be effective in reducing not only reflex stiffness, but also the subject

  20. A preliminary study of intravenous surfactants in paraplegic dogs: polymer therapy in canine clinical SCI.

    PubMed

    Laverty, Peter H; Leskovar, Alenka; Breur, Gert J; Coates, Joan R; Bergman, Robert L; Widmer, William R; Toombs, James P; Shapiro, Scott; Borgens, Richard B

    2004-12-01

    Hydrophilic polymers, both surfactants and triblock polymers, are known to seal defects in cell membranes. In previous experiments using laboratory animals, we have exploited this capability using polyethylene glycol (PEG) to repair spinal axons after severe, standardized spinal cord injury (SCI) in guinea pigs. Similar studies were conducted using a related co-polymer Poloxamer 188 (P 188). Here we carried out initial investigations of an intravenous application of PEG or P 188 (3500 Daltons, 30% w/w in saline; 2 mL/kg I.V. and 2 mL/kg body weight or 300 mL P 188 per kg, respectively) to neurologically complete cases of paraplegia in dogs. Our aim was to first determine if this is a clinically safe procedure in cases of severe naturally occurring SCI in dogs. Secondarily, we wanted to obtain preliminary evidence if this therapy could be of clinical benefit when compared to a larger number of similar, but historical, control cases. Strict entry criteria permitted recruitment of only neurologically complete paraplegic dogs into this study. Animals were treated by a combination of conventional and experimental techniques within approximately 72 h of admission for spinal trauma secondary to acute, explosive disk herniation. Outcome measures consisted of measurements of voluntary ambulation, deep and superficial pain perception, conscious proprioception in hindlimbs, and evoked potentials (somatosensory evoked potentials [SSEP]). We determined that polymer injection is a safe adjunct to the conventional management of severe neurological injury in dogs. We did not observe any unacceptable clinical response to polymer injection; there were no deaths, nor any other problem arising from, or associated with, the procedures. Outcome measures over the 6-8-week trial were improved by polymer injection when compared to historical cases. This recovery was unexpectedly rapid compared to these comparator groups. The results of this pilot trial provides evidence consistent with the

  1. Observing Some Life Cycles. Teacher's Guide. Unit E3. ZIM-SCI, Zimbabwe Secondary School Science Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chitepo, Thoko; And Others

    The Zimbabwe Secondary School Science Project (ZIM-SCI) developed student study guides, corresponding teaching guides, and science kits for a low-cost science course which could be taught during the first 2 years of secondary school without the aid of qualified teachers and conventional laboratories. This teaching guide contains instructional…

  2. Atoms and Molecules. 'O' Level. Teacher's Guide. Unit 2. ZIM-SCI, Zimbabwe Secondary School Science Project. Year 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mandizha, George

    The Zimbabwe Secondary School Science Project (ZIM-SCI) developed student study guides, corresponding teaching guides, and science kits for a low-cost science course which could be taught during the third year of secondary school without the aid of qualified teachers and conventional laboratories. This teaching guide, designed to be used in…

  3. Using Electricity. Teacher's Guide. Unit I2. ZIM-SCI, Zimbabwe Secondary School Science Project. Year 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chidume, Kwashira

    The Zimbabwe Secondary School Science Project (ZIM-SCI) developed student study guides, corresponding teaching guides, and science kits for a low-cost science course which could be taught during the first 2 years of secondary school without the aid of qualified teachers and conventional laboratories. This teaching guide, designed to be used in…

  4. Understanding Electricity. Teacher's Guide. Unit I1. ZIM-SCI, Zimbabwe Secondary School Science Project. Year 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chidume, Kwashira

    The Zimbabwe Secondary School Science Project (ZIM-SCI) developed student study guides, corresponding teaching guides, and science kits for a low-cost science course which could be taught during the first 2 years of secondary school without the aid of qualified teachers and conventional laboratories. This teaching guide, designed to be read in…

  5. Reactions of the rat musculoskeletal system to compressive spinal cord injury (SCI) and whole body vibration (WBV) therapy.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, A; Pick, C; Harrach, R; Stein, G; Bendella, H; Ozsoy, O; Ozsoy, U; Schoenau, E; Jaminet, P; Sarikcioglu, L; Dunlop, S; Angelov, D N

    2015-06-01

    Traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) causes a loss of locomotor function with associated compromise of the musculo-skeletal system. Whole body vibration (WBV) is a potential therapy following SCI, but little is known about its effects on the musculo-skeletal system. Here, we examined locomotor recovery and the musculo-skeletal system after thoracic (T7-9) compression SCI in adult rats. Daily WBV was started at 1, 7, 14 and 28 days after injury (WBV1-WBV28 respectively) and continued over a 12-week post-injury period. Intact rats, rats with SCI but no WBV (sham-treated) and a group that received passive flexion and extension (PFE) of their hind limbs served as controls. Compared to sham-treated rats, neither WBV nor PFE improved motor function. Only WBV14 and PFE improved body support. In line with earlier studies we failed to detect signs of soleus muscle atrophy (weight, cross sectional diameter, total amount of fibers, mean fiber diameter) or bone loss in the femur (length, weight, bone mineral density). One possible explanation is that, despite of injury extent, the preservation of some axons in the white matter, in combination with quadripedal locomotion, may provide sufficient trophic and neuronal support for the musculoskeletal system.

  6. What Do You Know about Water? Teacher's Guide. Unit D. ZIM-SCI, Zimbabwe Secondary School Science Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dube, Peter

    The Zimbabwe Secondary School Science Project (ZIM-SCI) developed student study guides, corresponding teaching guides, and science kits for a low-cost science course which could be taught during the first 2 years of secondary school without the aid of qualified teachers and conventional laboratories. This teaching guide, designed to be read in…

  7. Reactions of the rat musculoskeletal system to compressive spinal cord injury (SCI) and whole body vibration (WBV) therapy

    PubMed Central

    Schwarz, A.; Pick, C.; Harrach, R.; Stein, G.; Bendella, H.; Ozsoy, O.; Ozsoy, U.; Schoenau, E.; Jaminet, P.; Sarikcioglu, L.; Dunlop, S.; Angelov, D.N.

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) causes a loss of locomotor function with associated compromise of the musculo-skeletal system. Whole body vibration (WBV) is a potential therapy following SCI, but little is known about its effects on the musculo-skeletal system. Here, we examined locomotor recovery and the musculo-skeletal system after thoracic (T7-9) compression SCI in adult rats. Daily WBV was started at 1, 7, 14 and 28 days after injury (WBV1-WBV28 respectively) and continued over a 12-week post-injury period. Intact rats, rats with SCI but no WBV (sham-treated) and a group that received passive flexion and extension (PFE) of their hind limbs served as controls. Compared to sham-treated rats, neither WBV nor PFE improved motor function. Only WBV14 and PFE improved body support. In line with earlier studies we failed to detect signs of soleus muscle atrophy (weight, cross sectional diameter, total amount of fibers, mean fiber diameter) or bone loss in the femur (length, weight, bone mineral density). One possible explanation is that, despite of injury extent, the preservation of some axons in the white matter, in combination with quadripedal locomotion, may provide sufficient trophic and neuronal support for the musculoskeletal system. PMID:26032204

  8. Our Planet Earth. Study Guide. Unit F1. ZIM-SCI, Zimbabwe Secondary School Science Project. Year 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stocklmayer, Sue

    The Zimbabwe Secondary School Science Project (ZIM-SCI) developed student study guides, corresponding teaching guides, and science kits for a low-cost science course which could be taught during the first 2 years of secondary school without the aid of qualified teachers and conventional laboratories. This teaching guide, designed to be read in…

  9. "Publish SCI Papers or No Degree": Practices of Chinese Doctoral Supervisors in Response to the Publication Pressure on Science Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Yongyan

    2016-01-01

    Publishing English papers in journals listed in Science Citation Index (SCI) has become a requirement for degree conferment for doctoral science students at many universities in China. The publication requirement engenders high pressure for doctoral students and their supervisors and shapes the politics of the relationship between the two parties.…

  10. Life, Beginning and Growing. Teacher's Guide. Unit E1. ZIM-SCI, Zimbabwe Secondary School Science Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hosking, Bunty

    The Zimbabwe Secondary School Science Project (ZIM-SCI) developed student study guides, corresponding teaching guides, and science kits for a low-cost science course which could be taught during the first 2 years of secondary school without the aid of qualified teachers and conventional laboratories. This teaching guide, designed to be read in…

  11. Reproducing by Flowers and Seeds. Teacher's Guide. Unit E2. ZIM-SCI, Zimbabwe Secondary School Science Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zesaguli, Josie

    The Zimbabwe Secondary School Science Project (ZIM-SCI) developed student study guides, corresponding teaching guides, and science kits for a low-cost science course which could be taught during the first 2 years of secondary school without the aid of qualified teachers and conventional laboratories. This teaching guide, designed to be read in…

  12. Sense from Senses. Teacher's Guide. Unit J. ZIM-SCI, Zimbabwe Secondary School Science Project. Year 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simango, Sam

    The Zimbabwe Secondary School Science Project (ZIM-SCI) developed student study guides, corresponding teaching guides, and science kits for a low-cost science course which could be taught during the first 2 years of secondary school without the aid of qualified teachers and conventional laboratories. This teaching guide, designed to be read in…

  13. Living Things and Their Food. Teacher's Guide. Unit G2. ZIM-SCI, Zimbabwe Secondary School Science Project. Year 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hosking, Bunty

    The Zimbabwe Secondary School Science Project (ZIM-SCI) developed student study guides, corresponding teaching guides, and science kits for a low-cost science course which could be taught during the first 2 years of secondary school without the aid of qualified teachers and conventional laboratories. This teaching guide, designed to be read in…

  14. Energy for Living. Teacher's Guide. Unit G1. ZIM-SCI, Zimbabwe Secondary School Science Project. Year 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hosking, Bunty

    The Zimbabwe Secondary School Science Project (ZIM-SCI) developed student study guides, corresponding teaching guides, and science kits for a low-cost science course which could be taught during the first 2 years of secondary school without the aid of qualified teachers and conventional laboratories. This teaching guide, designed to be read in…

  15. Forces. Teacher's Guide. Units H1 and H2. ZIM-SCI, Zimbabwe Secondary School Science Project. Year 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dock, Alan; Hosking, Bunty

    The Zimbabwe Secondary School Science Project (ZIM-SCI) developed student study guides, corresponding teaching guides, and science kits for a low-cost science course which could be taught during the first 2 years of secondary school without the aid of qualified teachers and conventional laboratories. This teaching guide, designed to be read in…

  16. Interactions in Ternary Mixtures of MnO2, Al2O3, and Natural Organic Matter (NOM) and the Impact on MnO2 Oxidative Reactivity.

    PubMed

    Taujale, Saru; Baratta, Laura R; Huang, Jianzhi; Zhang, Huichun

    2016-03-01

    Our previous work reported that Al2O3 inhibited the oxidative reactivity of MnO2 through heteroaggregation between oxide particles and surface complexation of the dissolved Al ions with MnO2 (S. Taujale and H. Zhang, "Impact of interactions between metal oxides to oxidative reactivity of manganese dioxide" Environ. Sci. Technol. 2012, 46, 2764-2771). The aim of the current work was to investigate interactions in ternary mixtures of MnO2, Al2O3, and NOM and how the interactions affect MnO2 oxidative reactivity. For the effect of Al ions, we examined ternary mixtures of MnO2, Al ions, and NOM. Our results indicated that an increase in the amount of humic acids (HAs) increasingly inhibited Al adsorption by forming soluble Al-HA complexes. As a consequence, there was less inhibition on MnO2 reactivity than by the sum of two binary mixtures (MnO2+Al ions and MnO2+HA). Alginate or pyromellitic acid (PA)-two model NOM compounds-did not affect Al adsorption, but Al ions increased alginate/PA adsorption by MnO2. The latter effect led to more inhibition on MnO2 reactivity than the sum of the two binary mixtures. In ternary mixtures of MnO2, Al2O3, and NOM, NOM inhibited dissolution of Al2O3. Zeta potential measurements, sedimentation experiments, TEM images, and modified DLVO calculations all indicated that HAs of up to 4 mg-C/L increased heteroaggregation between Al2O3 and MnO2, whereas higher amounts of HAs completely inhibited heteroaggregation. The effect of alginate is similar to that of HAs, although not as significant, while PA had negligible effects on heteroaggregation. Different from the effects of Al ions and NOMs on MnO2 reactivity, the MnO2 reactivity in ternary mixtures of Al2O3, MnO2, and NOM was mostly enhanced. This suggests MnO2 reactivity was mainly affected through heteroaggregation in the ternary mixtures because of the limited availability of Al ions.

  17. Measurement of the absolute vμ-CCQE cross section at the SciBooNE experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Aunion, Jose Luis Alcaraz

    2010-07-01

    This thesis presents the measurement of the charged current quasi-elastic (CCQE) neutrino-nucleon cross section at neutrino energies around 1 GeV. This measurement has two main physical motivations. On one hand, the neutrino-nucleon interactions at few GeV is a region where existing old data are sparse and with low statistics. The current measurement populates low energy regions with higher statistics and precision than previous experiments. On the other hand, the CCQE interaction is the most useful interaction in neutrino oscillation experiments. The CCQE channel is used to measure the initial and final neutrino fluxes in order to determine the neutrino fraction that disappeared. The neutrino oscillation experiments work at low neutrino energies, so precise measurement of CCQE interactions are essential for flux measurements. The main goal of this thesis is to measure the CCQE absolute neutrino cross section from the SciBooNE data. The SciBar Booster Neutrino Experiment (SciBooNE) is a neutrino and anti-neutrino scattering off experiment. The neutrino energy spectrum works at energies around 1 GeV. SciBooNE was running from June 8th 2007 to August 18th 2008. In that period, the experiment collected a total of 2.65 x 1020 protons on target (POT). This thesis has used full data collection in neutrino mode 0.99 x 1020 POT. A CCQE selection cut has been performed, achieving around 70% pure CCQE sample. A fit method has been exclusively developed to determine the absolute CCQE cross section, presenting results in a neutrino energy range from 0.2 to 2 GeV. The results are compatible with the NEUT predictions. The SciBooNE measurement has been compared with both Carbon (MiniBoonE) and deuterium (ANL and BNL) target experiments, showing a good agreement in both cases.

  18. Bibliometric analysis of the Korean Journal of Parasitology: measured from SCI, PubMed, Scopus, and Synapse databases.

    PubMed

    Lee, Choon Shil

    2009-10-01

    The Korean Journal of Parasitology (KJP) is the official journal of the Korean Society for Parasitology which is celebrating its 50th anniversary in 2009. To assess the contributions and achievements of the KJP, bibliometric analysis was conducted based on the citation data retrieved from 4 major databases; SCI, PubMed, Synapse, and Scopus. It was found that the KJP articles were constantly cited by the articles published in major international journals represented in these databases. More than 60% of 1,370 articles published in the KJP from 1963 to June 2009 were cited at least once by SCI articles. The overall average times cited by SCI articles are 2.6. The rate is almost 3 times higher for the articles published in the last 10 years compared to 1.0 for the articles of the 1960s. The SCI journal impact factor for 2008 is calculated as 0.871. It is increasing and it is expected to increase further with the introduction of the KJP in the database in 2008. The more realistic h-indices were measured from the study data set covering all the citations to the KJP; 17 for SCI, 6 for PubMed, 19 for Synapse, and 17 for Scopus. Synapse extensively picked up the citations to the earlier papers not retrievable from the other 3 databases. It identified many papers published in the 1960s and in the 1980s which have been cited heavily, proving the central role of the KJP in the dissemination of the important research findings over the last 5 decades.

  19. Sci-Fin: Visual Mining Spatial and Temporal Behavior Features from Social Media

    PubMed Central

    Pu, Jiansu; Teng, Zhiyao; Gong, Rui; Wen, Changjiang; Xu, Yang

    2016-01-01

    Check-in records are usually available in social services, which offer us the opportunity to capture and analyze users’ spatial and temporal behaviors. Mining such behavior features is essential to social analysis and business intelligence. However, the complexity and incompleteness of check-in records bring challenges to achieve such a task. Different from the previous work on social behavior analysis, in this paper, we present a visual analytics system, Social Check-in Fingerprinting (Sci-Fin), to facilitate the analysis and visualization of social check-in data. We focus on three major components of user check-in data: location, activity, and profile. Visual fingerprints for location, activity, and profile are designed to intuitively represent the high-dimensional attributes. To visually mine and demonstrate the behavior features, we integrate WorldMapper and Voronoi Treemap into our glyph-like designs. Such visual fingerprint designs offer us the opportunity to summarize the interesting features and patterns from different check-in locations, activities and users (groups). We demonstrate the effectiveness and usability of our system by conducting extensive case studies on real check-in data collected from a popular microblogging service. Interesting findings are reported and discussed at last. PMID:27999398

  20. Impact of SciDAC on accelerator projects across the office of science through electromagnetic modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, K.; Folwell, N.; Ge, L.; Guetz, A.; Ivanov, V.; Kabel, A.; Kowalski, M.; Lee, L.; Li, Z.; Ng, C.; Prudencio, E.; Schussman, G.; Uplenchwar, R.; Xiao, L.; Collaborators, ISICs/SAPP

    2005-01-01

    Electromagnetic Modelling led by SLAC is a principal component of the "Advanced Computing for 21st Century Accelerator Science and Technology" SciDAC project funded through the Office of High Energy Physics. This large team effort comprises three other national laboratories (LBNL, LLNL, SNL) and six universities (CMU, Columbia, RPI, Stanford, UC Davis and U of Wisconsin) with the goal to develop a set of parallel electromagnetic codes based on unstructured grids to target challenging problems in accelerators, and solve them to unprecedented realism and accuracy. Essential to the code development are the collaborations with the ISICs/SAPP in eigensolvers, meshing, adaptive refinement, shape optimization and visualization (see "Achievements in ISICs/SAPP Collaborations for Electromagnetic Modelling of Accelerators"). Supported by these advances in computational science, we have successfully performed the large-scale simulations that have impacted important accelerator projects across the Office of Science (SC) including the Positron Electron Project (PEP) -II, Next Linear Collider (NLC) and the International Linear Collider (ILC) in High Energy Physics (HEP), the Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA) in Nuclear Physics (NP) and the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) in Basic Energy Science (BES).

  1. Measurement of neutrino induced charged current neutral pion production cross section at SciBooNE

    SciTech Connect

    Catala-Perez, Juan

    2014-01-01

    SciBooNE is a neutrino scattering experiment located in the Booster Neutrino Beam at Fermilab. It collected data from June 2007 to August 2008 to accurately measure muon neutrino and anti-neutrino cross sections on carbon around 1 GeV neutrino energy. In this thesis we present the results on the measurement of the muon neutrino cross section resulting in a μ- plus a single π0 final state (CC- π0 channel). The present work will show the steps taken to achieve this result: from the reconstruction improvements to the background extraction. The flux-averaged CC - π0 production cross section measurement obtained in this thesis < σCC- π0 > Φ = (5.6 ± 1.9fit ± 0.7beam ± 0.5int - 0.7det) × 10-40 cm2/N at an average energy of 0.89 GeV is found to agree well both with the expectation from the Monte Ca

  2. Sci-Fin: Visual Mining Spatial and Temporal Behavior Features from Social Media.

    PubMed

    Pu, Jiansu; Teng, Zhiyao; Gong, Rui; Wen, Changjiang; Xu, Yang

    2016-12-20

    Check-in records are usually available in social services, which offer us the opportunity to capture and analyze users' spatial and temporal behaviors. Mining such behavior features is essential to social analysis and business intelligence. However, the complexity and incompleteness of check-in records bring challenges to achieve such a task. Different from the previous work on social behavior analysis, in this paper, we present a visual analytics system, Social Check-in Fingerprinting (Sci-Fin), to facilitate the analysis and visualization of social check-in data. We focus on three major components of user check-in data: location, activity, and profile. Visual fingerprints for location, activity, and profile are designed to intuitively represent the high-dimensional attributes. To visually mine and demonstrate the behavior features, we integrate WorldMapper and Voronoi Treemap into our glyph-like designs. Such visual fingerprint designs offer us the opportunity to summarize the interesting features and patterns from different check-in locations, activities and users (groups). We demonstrate the effectiveness and usability of our system by conducting extensive case studies on real check-in data collected from a popular microblogging service. Interesting findings are reported and discussed at last.

  3. Assessing ComSciCon 2013: A science communication workshop for STEM graduate students (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, S.; Ranjan, S.; Sanders, N.; Morey, S.

    2013-12-01

    We report on the efficacy of Communicating Science 2013, a science communication workshop for graduate students. Effective science communication is imperative for the sharing of scientific ideas, continued funding and support from policy makers, and education of the public. Science graduate students are a prime group to target for communication training, as they will be our future scientists, educators, and EPO professionals. To this end, Communicating Science 2013 (ComSciCon), a workshop organized by and for STEM graduate students, was held in June of this year. This workshop taught graduate students from around the nation to effectively communicate science to both their peers and the public. To learn about grad students' attitudes toward science communication and establish the workshop's efficacy, we surveyed the participants both before and after the workshop. This assessment probed topics such as communication preparation the participants have already received, how science communication is perceived in their home department, and what participants gained from the workshop. We report the results here.

  4. What Is Required In Uganda? The 2007 Report Of The Japan Sci-edu. Support Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchida, Tatsuhiro

    2010-07-01

    The development of ability for technology and invention is required as self-sustaining growth of science and technology in Asian and African developing countries. Science education that connects to the real world is the required education for the self-sustaining growth. But in fact, it is very common to study for the entrance examination. According to C. Camilla, S. and Sjo/berg, [The Re-emergence of Values in the Science Curriculum. Rotterdam, 2007, Sense Publishers], Ugandan students are the most interested ones in science and technology (I would like to be a scientist, I would like to get a job in technology) in the world. Science education should mortgages future of youth. Especially science education of developing countries should be directly connected to the real world. Because they need a lot of engineers as skilled worker, we implemented physics education that was directly connected with manufacturing by the sci-edu. support project in Uganda. The best results were achieved by contrivance in spite of poverty area. Our education method gave one form of New Science Education in Asia and Africa.

  5. Final Technical Report - SciDAC Cooperative Agreement: Center for Wave Interactions with Magnetohydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Schnack, Dalton D.

    2012-07-01

    Final technical report for research performed by Dr. Thomas G. Jenkins in collaboration with Professor Dalton D. Schnack on SciDAC Cooperative Agreement: Center for Wave Interactions with Magnetohydrodyanics, DE-FC02-06ER54899, for the period of 8/15/06 - 8/14/11. This report centers on the Slow MHD physics campaign work performed by Dr. Jenkins while at UW-Madison and then at Tech-X Corporation. To make progress on the problem of RF induced currents affect magnetic island evolution in toroidal plasmas, a set of research approaches are outlined. Three approaches can be addressed in parallel. These are: (1) Analytically prescribed additional term in Ohm's law to model the effect of localized ECCD current drive; (2) Introduce an additional evolution equation for the Ohm's law source term. Establish a RF source 'box' where information from the RF code couples to the fluid evolution; and (3) Carry out a more rigorous analytic calculation treating the additional RF terms in a closure problem. These approaches rely on the necessity of reinvigorating the computation modeling efforts of resistive and neoclassical tearing modes with present day versions of the numerical tools. For the RF community, the relevant action item is - RF ray tracing codes need to be modified so that general three-dimensional spatial information can be obtained. Further, interface efforts between the two codes require work as well as an assessment as to the numerical stability properties of the procedures to be used.

  6. [Systematic review of studies on quality of life indexed on the SciELO database].

    PubMed

    Landeiro, Graziela Macedo Bastos; Pedrozo, Celine Cristina Raimundo; Gomes, Maria José; Oliveira, Elizabete Regina de Araújo

    2011-10-01

    Interest in the quality of life construct has increased in the same proportion as the output of instruments to measure it. In order to analyze the scientific literature on the subject to provide a reflection on this construct in Brazil, a systematic review of the SciELO database covering the period from January 2001 to December 2006 was conducted. It was divided into 3 phases: the first involving 180 publications, the second 124, and the third 10. Of the 180 publications, 77.4% consisted of production in the last three years, with growth of 32.4% from 2001 to 2006. Of these, 124 were selected for methodological analysis in accordance with the category of the study: 79 (63.9%) instrument application articles; 25 (20.1%) translation, validation, adaptation and construction of a QOL instrument; 10 (8%) qualitative studies on QOL; 5 (4%) bibliographical review, 5 (4%) on the quality of life concept. The next stage involved the use of questionnaires and/or interview scripts in order to obtain a broader consensus on perceived quality of life from the interviewees. It was seen that there was significant scientific output in the period under scrutiny, with diversification of approaches and methodologies, highlighting the complexity of the quality of life construct.

  7. Lambda Station: Alternate network path forwarding for production SciDAC applications

    SciTech Connect

    Grigoriev, Maxim; Bobyshev, Andrey; Crawford, Matt; DeMar, Phil; Grigaliunas, Vyto; Moibenko, Alexander; Petravick, Don; Newman, Harvey; Steenberg, Conrad; Thomas, Michael; /Caltech

    2007-09-01

    The LHC era will start very soon, creating immense data volumes capable of demanding allocation of an entire network circuit for task-driven applications. Circuit-based alternate network paths are one solution to meeting the LHC high bandwidth network requirements. The Lambda Station project is aimed at addressing growing requirements for dynamic allocation of alternate network paths. Lambda Station facilitates the rerouting of designated traffic through site LAN infrastructure onto so-called 'high-impact' wide-area networks. The prototype Lambda Station developed with Service Oriented Architecture (SOA) approach in mind will be presented. Lambda Station has been successfully integrated into the production version of the Storage Resource Manager (SRM), and deployed at US CMS Tier1 center at Fermilab, as well as at US-CMS Tier-2 site at Caltech. This paper will discuss experiences using the prototype system with production SciDAC applications for data movement between Fermilab and Caltech. The architecture and design principles of the production version Lambda Station software, currently being implemented as Java based web services, will also be presented in this paper.

  8. Exploration tools for drug discovery and beyond: applying SciFinder to interdisciplinary research.

    PubMed

    Haldeman, Margaret; Vieira, Barbara; Winer, Fred; Knutsen, Lars J S

    2005-06-01

    Chemists have long recognized the value of online databases for surveying the literature of their field. Chemical Abstracts Service (CAS) databases covering almost a century's worth of journal articles and patent documents are among the best known and widely used for searching information on compounds. Today's research presents a new challenge, however, as the boundaries of chemistry and biological sciences overlap increasingly. This trend is especially true in the drug discovery field where published findings relating to both chemical and biological entities and their interactions are examined. CAS has expanded its resources to meet the requirements of the new, interdisciplinary challenges faced by today's researchers. This is evident both in the content of CAS databases, which have been expanded to include more biology-related information, and in the technology of the search tools now available to researchers on their desktop. It is the integration of content and search-and-retrieval technology that enables new insights to be made in the vast body of accumulated information. CAS's SciFinder is a widely used research tool for this purpose.

  9. OptoSci educator kits: an immediate solution to photonics teaching laboratories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, Douglas; Moodie, David; Mauchline, Iain; Johnstone, Walter; Culshaw, Brian

    2003-10-01

    The burgeoning growth of the worldwide photonics and optical communications industry has imposed ever increasing demands on the supply of suitably skilled engineers and scientists who can design, install and operate modern photonics systems. In recognition of this need OptoSci, in collaboration with university academics, has commercially developed a series of hardware based teaching packages in optics, optoelectronics and optical communications. Each educator kit is fully self-contained, including all of the optoelectronic hardware and comprehensive literature support. This saves the academic tutor considerable development time and enables the kits to be immediately installed in the photonics teaching laboratory to support accompanying lecture courses. A fundamental design objective of our educator kits is to provide students with hands-on practical experience of photonics components, instruments and systems and allow them to investigate essential physical principles and key technical issues relevant to their lecture courses. This paper will outline the design philosophy behind the products to meet the desired educational aims, and then examine the specific educational objectives and topics investigated in each educator kit.

  10. AL Amyloidosis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Definition of the disease AL amyloidosis results from extra-cellular deposition of fibril-forming monoclonal immunoglobulin (Ig) light chains (LC) (most commonly of lambda isotype) usually secreted by a small plasma cell clone. Most patients have evidence of isolated monoclonal gammopathy or smoldering myeloma, and the occurrence of AL amyloidosis in patients with symptomatic multiple myeloma or other B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders is unusual. The key event in the development of AL amyloidosis is the change in the secondary or tertiary structure of an abnormal monoclonal LC, which results in instable conformation. This conformational change is responsible for abnormal folding of the LC, rich in β leaves, which assemble into monomers that stack together to form amyloid fibrils. Epidemiology AL amyloidosis is the most common type of systemic amyloidois in developed countries with an estimated incidence of 9 cases/million inhabitant/year. The average age of diagnosed patients is 65 years and less than 10% of patients are under 50. Clinical description The clinical presentation is protean, because of the wide number of tissues or organs that may be affected. The most common presenting symptoms are asthenia and dyspnoea, which are poorly specific and may account for delayed diagnosis. Renal manifestations are the most frequent, affecting two thirds of patients at presentation. They are characterized by heavy proteinuria, with nephrotic syndrome and impaired renal function in half of the patients. Heart involvement, which is present at diagnosis in more than 50% of patients, leading to restrictive cardiopathy, is the most serious complication and engages prognosis. Diagnostic methods The diagnosis relies on pathological examination of an involved site showing Congo red-positive amyloid deposits, with typical apple-green birefringence under polarized light, that stain positive with an anti-LC antibody by immunohistochemistry and/or immunofluorescence. Due to the

  11. Towards flash flood disaster prevention: the SciNetNat Haz proposal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konstantinos, Papatheodorou; Elena, Tzanou; Carmen, Maftei; Ozgur, Kirca; Hafzullah, Aksoy

    2015-04-01

    Floods occur with a continuously increasing frequency due to climatic changes and cause serious damage in the wider Black Sea area, endangering human life and property. As societies continuously expand, these phenomena are expected to play an increasingly important role, blocking sustainable development unless properly tackled. Flash flood prevention seems at this point, to be the target of effectively mitigating the potential threat. Since in many cases, there is a cross-border character of the problem, collaborative efforts have to be made involving cooperation between countries. To this end, a variety of problems exist, including the "information gap" related to the unavailability of data and the multitude of methodologies used to assess flood hazard; a fact that renders comparison of hazard assessment results and cross border cooperation ineffective. An effort made within the context of the SciNetNatHaz project, suggests a two step approach to produce reliable the results which can lead to decision making regarding designing preventive measures. The first step aims at defining the flood prone areas on a regional scale, using geomorphometric models and readily available topographic data; thus overcoming the problem of data availability for any region of interest. The second step follows a vulnerability and risk assessment of the flood prone areas of interest and focuses on the calculation of flood parameters on a local scale using hydraulic models. Implementation of the full process is based on Open Source software tools so that it can be implemented with minimal costs by anyone interested. Implementation of the proposed procedure in three different cases in Greece and in Romania shows that it can provide accurate and reliable results to support decision making regarding the design of preventive measures. Keywords: Flash floods, hazard assessment, flood disaster prevention, HEC-RAS, SAGA GIS . Acknowledgements: This work is partially funded by the EU through the

  12. Reactivity of stabilized Criegee intermediates (sCI) from isoprene and monoterpene ozonolysis toward SO2 and organic acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sipilä, M.; Jokinen, T.; Berndt, T.; Richters, S.; Makkonen, R.; Donahue, N. M.; Mauldin, R. L., III; Kurten, T.; Paasonen, P.; Sarnela, N.; Ehn, M.; Junninen, H.; Rissanen, M. P.; Thornton, J.; Stratmann, F.; Herrmann, H.; Worsnop, D. R.; Kulmala, M.; Kerminen, V.-M.; Petäjä, T.

    2014-01-01

    Oxidation processes in Earth's atmosphere are tightly connected to many environmental and human health issues and are essential drivers for biogeochemistry. Until the recent discovery of the atmospheric relevance of stabilized Criegee intermediates (sCI), atmospheric oxidation processes were thought to be dominated by few main oxidants: ozone, hydroxyl radicals (OH), nitrate radicals and, e.g. over oceans, halogen atoms such as chlorine. Here, we report results from laboratory experiments at 293 K and atmospheric pressure focusing on sCI formation from the ozonolysis of isoprene and the most abundant monoterpenes (α-pinene and limonene), and subsequent reactions of the resulting sCIs with SO2 producing sulphuric acid (H2SO4). The measured sCI yields were (0.15 ± 0.07), (0.27 ± 0.12) and (0.58 ± 0.26) for the ozonolysis of α-pinene, limonene and isoprene, respectively. The ratio between the rate coefficient for the sCI loss (including thermal decomposition and the reaction with water vapour) and the rate coefficient for the reaction of sCI with SO2, k(loss) / k(sCI + SO2), was determined at relative humidities of 10% and 50%. Observed values represent the average reactivity of all sCIs produced from the individual alkene used in the ozonolysis. For the monoterpene derived sCIs, the relative rate coefficients k(loss) / k(sCI + SO2) were in the range (2.0-2.4) × 1012 molecule cm-3 and nearly independent on the relative humidity. This fact points to a minor importance of the sCI + H2O reaction in the case of the sCI arising from α-pinene and limonene. For the isoprene sCIs, however, the ratio k(loss) / k(sCI + SO2) was strongly dependent on the relative humidity. To explore whether sCIs could have a more general role in atmospheric oxidation, we investigated as an example the reactivity of acetone oxide (sCI from the ozonolysis of 2,3-dimethyl-2-butene) toward small organic acids, i.e. formic and acetic acid. Acetone oxide was found to react faster with the

  13. [Letters to the editor published in Peruvian biomedical journals indexed in SciELO-Peru 2006-2013].

    PubMed

    Montenegro-Idrogo, Juan José; Mejía-Dolores, Jhon William; Chalco-Huamán, Joel L

    2015-01-01

    This bibliometric study describes the characteristics of letters to the editor published between 2006-2013 in biomedical journals indexed in SciELO-Peru.253 letters (10.3% of total publications) were collected. Most letters (139) were in the Peruvian Journal of Experimental Medicine and Public Health, with marked increase throughout those years. 25% of letters submitted included medical student participation. 14% of authors presented with international affiliations and 27% with endogenous affiliation - common in university journals (Anales de la Facultad de Medicina, Revista Médica Herediana).The usual criteria justifying the publication of letters were: opinion of medical fact or public domain (35.6%) and discussion of results, methodological flaws or interpretation (22.9%). In biomedical journals indexed in SciELO Peru the letters to the editor comprise a percentage of publications that has increased in recent years, with low publication of letters of findings or primary data, compared with opinion or criticism.

  14. Efficient Assessment of the Environment for Integral Urban Water Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rost, Grit; Londong, Jörg

    2015-04-01

    required subjects/disciplines implies first sight expert knowledge or provided open access data. In the case of the need for a more detailed screening the next steps consist of scientifically based analysis and legal statutory analysis. Indexes (indicators) or benchmarks for each assessment scale will be summarized and linked to suitable measures. The trans- and interdisciplinary approach makes sure that technical, informative and administrative measures will be involved. A rating between the current situation and the determined target situation will help for effective derivation of measures. Conclusion: The claim of the stepwise assessment is to make the data possible to handle, and to summarize the knowledge of expert's effective environmental assessment methods. The universe, comprehensive assessment will be feasible by using the toolbox. The toolbox will be a planning tool for sustainable urban water management and closed loop recycling water management. GWP, INBO (2009) A Handbook for Integrated Water Resources Management in Basins. 104. Karthe D, Heldt S, Rost G, et al (2014) Modular Concept for Municipal Water Management in the Kharaa River Basin, Mongolia. Environ. Sci. Price RK, Vojinović Z (2011) Urban Hydroinformatics Data, Models and Decision Support for Integrated Urban Water Management. 520. Rost G, Londong J, Dietze S, Osor G (2013) Integrated urban water management - an adapted management approach for planning and implementing measures: Case study area Darkhan , Kharaa catchment, Mongolia. Submitt to Environ Earth Sci 19. Stäudel J, Schalkwyk B Van, Gibbens M (2014) Methods and strategies for community-based enhancement & up-scaling of sanitation & waste management in peri-urban areas in South Africa. SANO. Rhombos-Verlag, Weimar, pp 1-13

  15. Clinical Trial of AC105 (Mg/PEG) for Treatment of Acute Spinal Cord Injury (SCI). Phase 2

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    505-9. Kwon BK, Roy J, Lee JH, Okon E, Zhang H, Marx JC, Kindy MS. (2009) Magnesium chloride in a polyethylene glycol formulation as a...13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Acorda Therapeutics, Inc. is developing the polymer formulation of magnesium , known as AC-105...15. SUBJECT TERMS AC-105, Magnesium , Mg, Spinal Cord Injury, SCI 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT 18. NUMBER OF

  16. Development of a Small Molecule P2X7R Antagonist as a Treatment for Acute SCI

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    microglia in response to SCI, and of the role of P2X7 receptor activation in that process . Indeed, in parallel work using uninjured human brain tissue...distinct glial fates are instructed, and how that process may be manipulated for therapeutic purposes. Thus, on the basis of the injury-associated...autocrine loop for the self -maintenance of glial progenitors, the perturbation of which might dictate progenitor recruitment as either reactive glia or

  17. Development of a Small Molecule P2X7R Antagonist as a Treatment for Acute SCI

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-10-01

    evaluated the impact of deletion of connexins (Cx30/Cx43) in astrocytes on post-traumatic ATP release. In vivo bioluminescence imaging showed a...Introduction The proposed studies were based on the observati on that ATP release and activation of P2X7 receptors drives the innate inf lammatory...tissue swelling. Prior studies have shown that excess ive ATP release from peri-traumatic regions contributes to the inflammatory response to SCI by

  18. Development of a Small Molecule P2X7R Antagonist as a Treatment for Acute SCI

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-10-01

    impact of deletion of connexins (Cx30/Cx43) in astrocytes on post-traumatic ATP release. In vivo bioluminescence imaging showed a significant reduction...the observation that ATP release and activation of P2X7 receptors drives the innate inflammatory response initiated by spinal cord injury. P2X7R...swelling. Prior studies have shown that excessive ATP release from peri-traumatic regions contributes to the inflammatory response to SCI by

  19. SCI1, the first member of the tissue-specific inhibitors of CDK (TIC) class, is probably connected to the auxin signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    DePaoli, Henrique; Goldman, Gustavo; Goldman, Maria-Helena

    2012-01-01

    The recent finding of a tissue-specific cell cycle regulator (SCI1) that inhibits cell proliferation/differentiation in the upper pistil points to an unanticipated way of controlling plant morphogenesis. The similarity between the SCI1 RNAi-silenced plants and some auxin-related phenotypes suggested that SCI1 could be involved in the auxin signaling pathway. To address this hypothesis, we analyzed the expression of three auxin-related genes in transgenic plants in which SCI1 was silenced and overexpressed. The results showed that the expression levels of the auxin-related genes largely correlated with the SCI1 expression level. Additionally, we analyzed the Arabidopsis SCI1 upstream regulatory region and found putative cis-acting elements also present in the AtCYCB1;1 AtYUC1, AtYUC2 and AtYUC4 URRs, suggesting a cell cycle- and auxin-related transcriptional regulation. Based on our previous and the current studies, we propose SCI1 as a signal transducer engaging auxin signaling and cell division/differentiation. PMID:22301969

  20. From Sci-Fi to Reality--Mobile Robots Get the Job Done

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roman, Harry T.

    2006-01-01

    Robots are simply computers that can interact with their environment. Some are fixed in place in industrial assembly plants for cars, appliances, micro electronic circuitry, and pharmaceuticals. Another important category of robots is the mobiles, machines that can be driven to the workplace, often designed for hazardous duty operation or…

  1. The Fulldome Curriculum for the Spitz SciDome Digital Planetarium: A New Age for Planetarium Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradstreet, David H.; Huggins, S. L.

    2010-01-01

    Astronomy education received a huge boost from the Space Program in the 1960's and early 1970's as evidenced by a large increase in school planetariums built nationwide at that time. But with the waning of manned explorations so also went the push for astronomy in the schools, and many school planetariums are underutilized or not used at all. This poster will discuss and illustrate some of the new Fulldome Curriculum that has been developed specifically for the Spitz SciDome digital planetarium powered by Starry Night. It is now possible to teach astronomical concepts in new and exciting ways and present topics that were extremely difficult to convey to lay audiences in the past. One of the strongest advantages of the SciDome is that, since it uses Starry Night as its astronomical engine, students can create their own astronomical configurations in the computer lab or at home using the PC or Mac version and then simply load them onto the SciDome planetarium system and display them for the class on the dome. Additionally, the instructor can create artificial bodies to pose "What if” scenarios, for example, "What would the Moon look like if it didn't rotate synchronously?", or "What would the analemma look like if the Earth's orbit were circular and not an ellipse?" Topics covered in the series include The Moon, Seasons, Coordinate Systems, Roemer's Method of Measuring the Speed of Light, Analemmas in the Solar System, Precession, Mimas and the Cassini Division, Halley's Comet in 1910, Dog Days, Galactic Distributions of Celestial Bodies, Retrograde Paths of Mars, Mercury's Orbit and the Length of the Mercurian Day, Altitude of the North Celestial Pole, Why Polaris Appears Mostly Stationary, Circumpolar Contellations, Planet Definition, Scale of the Solar System, Stonehenge, The Changing Aspect of Saturn's Appearance and Scorpio's Claws.

  2. Observation of cosmic ray hadrons at the top of the Sierra Negra volcano in Mexico with the SciCRT prototype

    SciTech Connect

    Ortiz, E.; Valdés-Galicia, J. F.; Matsubara, Y.; Nagai, Y.; Hurtado, A.; Musalem, O.; García, R.; Anzorena, M. A.; González, L. X.; Itow, Y.; Sako, T.; Lopez, D.; Sasai, Y.; Munakata, K.; Kato, C.; Kozai, M.; Shibata, S.; Takamaru, H.; Kojima, H.; Watanabe, K.; Tsuchiya, H.; Koi, T.

    2016-02-16

    In this study we report the flux of protons and neutral emission measured at the top of the Sierra Negra volcano at 4600 m.a.s.l. (575 g/cm2), in Eastern Mexico. As an example of the capability of the mini-SciCR as a cosmic ray detector we present the Forbush decrease recorded on March 7, 2012. These data were obtained with a cosmic ray detector prototype called mini-SciCR that was operating from October 2010 to July 2012. Our main aims were to measure the hadronic component flux of the secondary cosmic ray and to show the appropriate performance of all system of the detector. To separate the signals of protons from other charged particles we obtained the energy deposition pattern when they cross the detector using a Monte Carlo simulation, and to separate the signals of neutral emission we used an anticoincidence system between the edge bars and the internal bars of the detector. The mini-SciCR is a prototype of a new cosmic ray detector called SciBar Cosmic Ray Telescope (SciCRT) installed in the same place, which is in the process of calibration. The SciCRT will work mainly as a Solar Neutron and Muon Telescope, it is designed to achieve: (1) larger effective area than the current Solar Neutron Telescope, (2) higher energy resolution to determine the energy spectrum of solar neutrons, (3) lower energy threshold, and (4) higher particle identification ability.

  3. Observation of cosmic ray hadrons at the top of the Sierra Negra volcano in Mexico with the SciCRT prototype

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz, E.; Valdés-Galicia, J. F.; Matsubara, Y.; Nagai, Y.; Hurtado, A.; Musalem, O.; García, R.; Anzorena, M. A.; González, L. X.; Itow, Y.; Sako, T.; Lopez, D.; Sasai, Y.; Munakata, K.; Kato, C.; Kozai, M.; Shibata, S.; Takamaru, H.; Kojima, H.; Watanabe, K.; Tsuchiya, H.; Koi, T.

    2016-11-01

    In this work we report the flux of protons and neutral emission measured at the top of the Sierra Negra volcano at 4600 m.a.s.l. (575 g/cm2), in Eastern Mexico. As an example of the capability of the mini-SciCR as a cosmic ray detector we present the Forbush decrease recorded on March 7, 2012. These data were obtained with a cosmic ray detector prototype called mini-SciCR that was operating from October 2010 to July 2012. Our main aims were to measure the hadronic component flux of the secondary cosmic ray and to show the appropriate performance of all system of the detector. To separate the signals of protons from other charged particles we obtained the energy deposition pattern when they cross the detector using a Monte Carlo simulation, and to separate the signals of neutral emission we used an anticoincidence system between the edge bars and the internal bars of the detector. The mini-SciCR is a prototype of a new cosmic ray detector called SciBar Cosmic Ray Telescope (SciCRT) installed in the same place, which is in the process of calibration. The SciCRT will work mainly as a Solar Neutron and Muon Telescope, it is designed to achieve: (1) larger effective area than the current Solar Neutron Telescope, (2) higher energy resolution to determine the energy spectrum of solar neutrons, (3) lower energy threshold, and (4) higher particle identification ability.

  4. DOE's SciDAC Visualization and Analytics Center for EnablingTechnologies -- Strategy for Petascale Visual Data Analysis Success

    SciTech Connect

    Bethel, E Wes; Johnson, Chris; Aragon, Cecilia; Rubel, Oliver; Weber, Gunther; Pascucci, Valerio; Childs, Hank; Bremer, Peer-Timo; Whitlock, Brad; Ahern, Sean; Meredith, Jeremey; Ostrouchov, George; Joy, Ken; Hamann, Bernd; Garth, Christoph; Cole, Martin; Hansen, Charles; Parker, Steven; Sanderson, Allen; Silva, Claudio; Tricoche, Xavier

    2007-10-01

    The focus of this article is on how one group of researchersthe DOE SciDAC Visualization and Analytics Center for EnablingTechnologies (VACET) is tackling the daunting task of enabling knowledgediscovery through visualization and analytics on some of the world slargest and most complex datasets and on some of the world's largestcomputational platforms. As a Center for Enabling Technology, VACET smission is the creation of usable, production-quality visualization andknowledge discovery software infrastructure that runs on large, parallelcomputer systems at DOE's Open Computing facilities and that providessolutions to challenging visual data exploration and knowledge discoveryneeds of modern science, particularly the DOE sciencecommunity.

  5. The effect of complex rehabilitation training for 12 weeks on trunk muscle function and spine deformation of patients with SCI.

    PubMed

    Sung, Dong-Hun; Yoon, Seong-Deok; Park, Gi Duck

    2015-03-01

    [Purpose] It is important for patients with incomplete spinal cord injury (SCI) to strengthen their muscle strength and return to the work force one of the ultimate objectives of rehabilitation. This study reports how a single patient with SCI became stabilized in terms of abdominal muscles and back extension muscles, as well as returning the back to the neutral position from spinal deformation, as result of complex exercises performed for 12 weeks. [Subjects] The degree of damage of the subject was rated as C grade. The subject of this study had unstable posture due to paralysis in the lower extremities of the left side after removal of a malignant tumor by surgical operation, and tilting and torsion in the pelvis increased followed by increase of kyphosis in the thoracolumbar spine. The subject was more than two years since diagnosis of incomplete SCI after surgery. [Methods] Using isokinetic lumbar muscle strength measurement equipment, peak torque/weight, total work and average power in flexion and extension of the lumbar region were measured. A trunk measurement system (Formetric 4D, DIERS, Germany), which is a 3D image processing apparatus with high resolution for vertebrae, was used in order to measure 3D vertebrae and pelvis deformation as well as static balance abilities. As an exercise method, a foam roller was used to conduct fascia relaxation massage for warming-up, and postural kyphosis was changed into postural lordosis by lat pull-down using equipment, performed in 5 sets of 15 times preset at 60% intensity of 1RM 4 set of 10 crunch exercises per set using Togu's were done while sitting at the end of Balance pad, and 4 sets of 15 bridge exercises. [Results] All angular speed tests showed a gradual increase in muscle strength. Flexion and extension showed 10% and 3% improvements, respectively. The spine deformation test showed that isokinetic exercise and lat pull-down exercise for 12 weeks resulted in improved spinal shape. [Conclusion] In this study

  6. Development of a Small Molecule P2X7R Antagonist as a Treatment for Acute SCI

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-01

    brain edema. Methods Mice. Aqp4−/− mice were generated by GenOway by cloning and sequencing of a targeted region of the murine Aqp4 gene in a 129/Sv... genetic back- ground. The strategy was to design a targeted locus allowing us to delete exons 1–3 to avoid any expression of putative splice variants...was made on the back region and a laminectomy was performed aseptically at the T11-T12 level. Before SCI, a catheter was placed in the left femoral

  7. 26Al-26Mg systematics in chondrules from Kaba and Yamato 980145 CV3 carbonaceous chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagashima, Kazuhide; Krot, Alexander N.; Komatsu, Mutsumi

    2017-03-01

    We report the mineralogy, petrography, and in situ measured 26Al-26Mg systematics in chondrules from the least metamorphosed CV3 (Vigarano-type) chondrites, Kaba and Yamato (Y) 980145. Two Y 980145 chondrules measured show no resolvable excesses in 26Mg (26Mg∗), a decay product of a short-lived (t1/2 ∼0.7 Ma) radionuclide 26Al. Plagioclase in one of the chondrules is replaced by nepheline, indicative of thermal metamorphism. The lack of 26Mg∗ in the Y 980145 chondrules is most likely due to disturbance of their 26Al-26Mg systematics during the metamorphism. Although Kaba experienced extensive metasomatic alteration (<300 °C), it largely avoided subsequent thermal metamorphism, and the 26Al-26Mg systematics of its chondrules appear to be undisturbed. All eight Kaba chondrules measured show 26Mg∗, corresponding to the initial 26Al/27Al ratios [(26Al/27Al)0] ranging from (2.9 ± 1.7) × 10-6 to (6.3 ± 2.7) × 10-6. If CV parent asteroid accreted rapidly after chondrule formation, the inferred (26Al/27Al)0 ratios in Kaba chondrules provide an upper limit on 26Al available in this asteroid at the time of its accretion. The estimated initial abundance of 26Al in the CV asteroid is too low to melt it and contradicts the existence of a molten core in this body suggested from the paleomagnetic records of Allende [Carporzen et al. (2011) Magnetic evidence for a partially differentiated carbonaceous chondrite parent body. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA108, 6386-6389] and Kaba [Gattacceca et al. (2013) More evidence for a partially differentiated CV parent body from the meteorite Kaba. Lunar Planet. Sci.44, abstract#1721].

  8. Segregation-Induced Subsurface Restructuring of FeAl(100)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kottche, M.; Graupner, H.; Hammer, L.; Heinz, K.; Zehner, D. M.

    1996-03-01

    For FeAl, the stacking sequence in the [100] direction of the bulk crystal (CsCl structure) consists of alternating, single element planes. After sputtering, the selvedge region is depleted in Al. Following annealing to 350 ^circC, Al segregates to the surface region and a c(2 x 2) structure develops.(H. Graupner, L. Hammer, K. Müller, and D. M. Zehner, Surf. Sci. 322 (1995) 103. Research is sponsored by the *University of Erlangen-Nürnberg, Germany and DAAD, and the **Division of Materials Sciences, U.S. Department of Energy, under contract DE-AC05-84OR21400 with Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc.) We have used low-energy electron diffraction (LEED) and Auger electron spectroscopy to investigate the structure and composition of this surface. From a detailed LEED I-V analysis, it has been determined that the subsurface region of the (100) surface orders with annealing, to form a stable Fe_3Al slab which is capped by an Al top layer and acts as an interface to the bulk FeAl. Within the limits of error, the interfacial Fe_3Al is similar to the bulk phase with some slight geometric rippling of the layers containing both elements. Annealing to higher temperatures leads to additional Al diffusion and eliminates the restructuring, resulting in a (1 x 1) phase.

  9. SCI Survey to Determine Pressure Ulcer Vulnerability in the Outpatient Population

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-03-01

    expressed are either mean ± SD or N (%). 554 L.J. Gould et al. / Medical Hypotheses 83 (2014) 552–558 day, osteomyelitis, diabetes , and ulcer location...and diabetes . Although advanced age has been identified as a PrU risk factor, this was not the case in our study. This is congruent with a meta...13.9) 0.200 Diabetes mellitus 9 (19.1) 11 (15.3) 0.581 LOS, rehab 79.0 ± 55.6 201.3 ± 145.4 0.001 LOS, hosp in prior year 5.3 ± 17.0 25.9 ± 57.1 0.018

  10. Magnetism of Al-substituted magnetite reduced from Al-hematite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Zhaoxia; Liu, Qingsong; Zhao, Xiang; Roberts, Andrew P.; Heslop, David; Barrón, Vidal; Torrent, José

    2016-06-01

    Aluminum-substituted magnetite (Al-magnetite) reduced from Al-substituted hematite or goethite (Al-hematite or Al-goethite) is an environmentally important constituent of magnetically enhanced soils. In order to characterize the magnetic properties of Al-magnetite, two series of Al-magnetite samples were synthesized through reduction of Al-hematite by a mixed gas (80% CO2 and 20% CO) at 395°C for 72 h in a quartz tube furnace. Al-magnetite samples inherited the morphology of their parent Al-hematite samples, but only those transformed from Al-hematite synthesized at low temperature possessed surficial micropores, which originated from the release of structural water during heating. Surface micropores could thus serve as a practical fingerprint of fire or other high-temperature mineralogical alteration processes in natural environments, e.g., shear friction in seismic zones. In addition, Al substitution greatly affects the magnetic properties of Al-magnetite. For example, coercivity (Bc) increases with increasing Al content and then decreases slightly, while the saturation magnetization (Ms), Curie temperature (Tc), and Verwey transition temperature (Tv) all decrease with increasing Al content due to crystal defect formation and dilution of magnetic ions caused by Al incorporation. Moreover, different trends in the correlation between Tc and Bc can be used to discriminate titanomagnetite from Al-magnetite, which is likely to be important in environmental and paleomagnetic studies, particularly in soil.

  11. Challenges of animal models in SCI research: Effects of pre-injury task-specific training in adult rats before lesion.

    PubMed

    May, Zacnicte; Fouad, Karim; Shum-Siu, Alice; Magnuson, David S K

    2015-09-15

    A rarely explored subject in animal research is the effect of pre-injury variables on behavioral outcome post-SCI. Low reporting of such variables may underlie some discrepancies in findings between laboratories. Particularly, intensive task-specific training before a SCI might be important, considering that sports injuries are one of the leading causes of SCI. Thus, individuals with SCI often underwent rigorous training before their injuries. In the present study, we asked whether training before SCI on a grasping task or a swimming task would influence motor recovery in rats. Swim pre-training impaired recovery of swimming 2 and 4 weeks post-injury. This result fits with the idea of motor learning interference, which posits that learning something new may disrupt learning of a new task; in this case, learning strategies to compensate for functional loss after SCI. In contrast to swimming, grasp pre-training did not influence grasping ability after SCI at any time point. However, grasp pre-trained rats attempted to grasp more times than untrained rats in the first 4 weeks post-injury. Also, lesion volume of grasp pre-trained rats was greater than that of untrained rats, a finding which may be related to stress or activity. The increased participation in rehabilitative training of the pre-trained rats in the early weeks post-injury may have potentiated spontaneous plasticity in the spinal cord and counteracted the deleterious effect of interference and bigger lesions. Thus, our findings suggest that pre-training plays a significant role in recovery after CNS damage and needs to be carefully controlled for.

  12. Martian Weathering Environments of the Amazonian Indicated by Correlated Morphologic and Spectral Observation in Acidalia Planitia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraft, M. D.; Rogers, D.; Fergason, R. L.; Michalski, J. R.; Sharp, T. G.

    2009-12-01

    While much attention has been given to chemical alteration and the state of water on early Mars, it remains important to understand aqueous processes throughout Martian history, including the recent geologic past. It has been suggested that the Amazonian was marked primarily by anhydrous, oxidative weathering because Amazonian surfaces, such as the northern plains, lack hydration features in near-infrared spectra [1]. But high-silica materials (Surface Type 2, ST2) discovered by the Thermal Emission Spectrometer [2] that occur in the northern plains attest to aqueous alteration of silicate minerals. The questions are when did this occur and by what process? ST2 correlates spatially with outflow sediments and high-silica materials may have formed in large amounts of water related to outflow flooding events of the late Hesperian [3,4]. ST2 also may correspond to global ice-rich mantles, indicating formation in icy environments related to geologically recent climate fluctuations [3]. Can these very different mechanisms and environments be discerned? In a global study of TES spectra, Rogers et al. (2007) [5] found significant spectral differences between ST2 surfaces in northern and southern Acidalia Planitia that occur near 40-50° N. Several geomorphic transitions occur across latitudes, and many of these are directly or potentially related to Amazonian periglacial activity and occur in the 40-50° N range. This potential link between composition and periglacial morphology needs further exploration. We examined this relationship from 40-50° N in Acidalia Planitia, using Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) multispectral data to measure the local spectral properties of the surface. We identified a boundary between two surface spectral types that match closely the spectra of north and south Acidalia derived by Rogers et al. [2007]. This boundary is diffuse, occurring between 47-48° N in our study region in western Acidalia, and correlates with observed

  13. Biomaterial bridges enable regeneration and re-entry of corticospinal tract axons into the caudal spinal cord after SCI: Association with recovery of forelimb function.

    PubMed

    Pawar, Kiran; Cummings, Brian J; Thomas, Aline; Shea, Lonnie D; Levine, Ariel; Pfaff, Sam; Anderson, Aileen J

    2015-10-01

    Severed axon tracts fail to exhibit robust or spontaneous regeneration after spinal cord injury (SCI). Regeneration failure reflects a combination of factors, including the growth state of neuronal cell bodies and the regeneration-inhibitory environment of the central nervous system. However, while spared circuitry can be retrained, target reinnervation depends on longitudinally directed regeneration of transected axons. This study describes a biodegradable implant using poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLG) bridges as a carrier scaffold to support regeneration after injury. In order to detect regeneration of descending neuronal tracts into the bridge, and beyond into intact caudal parenchyma, we developed a mouse cervical implantation model and employed Crym:GFP transgenic mice. Characterization of Crym:GFP mice revealed that descending tracts, including the corticospinal tract, were labeled by green fluorescent protein (GFP), while ascending sensory neurons and fibers were not. Robust co-localization between GFP and neurofilament-200 (NF-200) as well as GFP and GAP-43 was observed at both the rostral and caudal bridge/tissue interface. No evidence of similar regeneration was observed in mice that received gelfoam at the lesion site as controls. Minimal co-localization between GFP reporter labeling and macrophage markers was observed. Taken together, these data suggest that axons originating from descending fiber tracts regenerated, entered into the PLG bridge at the rostral margin, continued through the bridge site, and exited to re-enter host tissue at the caudal edge of the intact bridge. Finally, regeneration through implanted bridges was associated with a reduction in ipsilateral forelimb errors on a horizontal ladder task.

  14. Enhanced TC in granular and thin film Al-Al2O3 nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higgins, J. S.; Greene, R. L.

    It is known since the 1970s that the superconducting transition temperature of granular aluminum films can be as high as two to three times the transition temperature of bulk aluminum, depending on the grain size and how strongly the nanometer size grains are connected1,2. As the strength of the grain connectivity becomes increasingly weak, the enhanced TC is suppressed. The mechanism behind this enhancement is still under debate. Recently, work on larger aluminum nanoparticles (18nm) embedded in an insulating Al2O3 matrix showed an onset of the superconducting transition as high as three times that of bulk aluminum3. In this situation, the Al grains are electrically disconnected and in a regime far removed from that of the granular films. Here we compare the two situations through electronic and thermal measurements in order to help elucidate the mechanism behind the enhancements. 1S. Pracht, et al., arXiv:1508.04270v1 [cond-mat.supr-con] (2015). 2G. Deutscher, New Superconductors From Granular to High TC, New Jersey: World Scientific, 2006, p. 72-74. 3V. N. Smolyaninova, et al., Sci. Rep. 5, 15777 (2015). Funding by NSF DMR # 1410665.

  15. Measuring self-esteem after spinal cord injury: Development, validation and psychometric characteristics of the SCI-QOL Self-esteem item bank and short form

    PubMed Central

    Kalpakjian, Claire Z.; Tate, Denise G.; Kisala, Pamela A.; Tulsky, David S.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To describe the development and psychometric properties of the Spinal Cord Injury-Quality of Life (SCI-QOL) Self-esteem item bank. Design Using a mixed-methods design, we developed and tested a self-esteem item bank through the use of focus groups with individuals with SCI and clinicians with expertise in SCI, cognitive interviews, and item-response theory- (IRT) based analytic approaches, including tests of model fit, differential item functioning (DIF) and precision. Setting We tested a pool of 30 items at several medical institutions across the United States, including the University of Michigan, Kessler Foundation, the Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago, the University of Washington, Craig Hospital, and the James J. Peters/Bronx Department of Veterans Affairs hospital. Participants A total of 717 individuals with SCI completed the self-esteem items. Results A unidimensional model was observed (CFI = 0.946; RMSEA = 0.087) and measurement precision was good (theta range between −2.7 and 0.7). Eleven items were flagged for DIF; however, effect sizes were negligible with little practical impact on score estimates. The final calibrated item bank resulted in 23 retained items. Conclusion This study indicates that the SCI-QOL Self-esteem item bank represents a psychometrically robust measurement tool. Short form items are also suggested and computer adaptive tests are available. PMID:26010972

  16. Measuring resilience after spinal cord injury: Development, validation and psychometric characteristics of the SCI-QOL Resilience item bank and short form

    PubMed Central

    Victorson, David; Tulsky, David S.; Kisala, Pamela A.; Kalpakjian, Claire Z.; Weiland, Brian; Choi, Seung W.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To describe the development and psychometric properties of the Spinal Cord Injury - Quality of Life (SCI-QOL) Resilience item bank and short form. Design Using a mixed-methods design, we developed and tested a resilience item bank through the use of focus groups with individuals with SCI and clinicians with expertise in SCI, cognitive interviews, and item-response theory based analytic approaches, including tests of model fit and differential item functioning (DIF). Setting We tested a 32-item pool at several medical institutions across the United States, including the University of Michigan, Kessler Foundation, the Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago, the University of Washington, Craig Hospital and the James J. Peters/Bronx Department of Veterans Affairs medical center. Participants A total of 717 individuals with SCI completed the Resilience items. Results A unidimensional model was observed (CFI = 0.968; RMSEA = 0.074) and measurement precision was good (theta range between −3.1 and 0.9). Ten items were flagged for DIF, however, after examination of effect sizes we found this to be negligible with little practical impact on score estimates. The final calibrated item bank resulted in 21 retained items. Conclusion This study indicates that the SCI-QOL Resilience item bank represents a psychometrically robust measurement tool. Short form items are also suggested and computer adaptive tests are available. PMID:26010971

  17. Galvanic Corrosion of Al-7075-T6 and Steel-4340 Coupled to Brass QQ-B- 626,360 and Al-7075-T6 Coupled to Steel-4130 and Steel-4340: Exposure to Aqueous NaCl and Salt-Fog Environments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-06-30

    between the copper plates fail. Reboul (3) and Mansfeld et al. (4) provide excellent reviews on the galvanic corrosion behavior of aluminum coupled to...A.S.T.M., STP 576, 1976), p. 20. 2. Baboian, R,, ibid., p. 5. 3. Reboul , M. C., Corrosion, Vol. 35, No. 9, 1979, p. 423, 4. Nansfeld, F., lIcngstenbcrg

  18. What Is ALS?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Javits, actor David Niven, “Sesame Street” creator Jon Stone, boxing champion Ezzard Charles, NBA Hall of Fame ... Help for People with ALS and Caregivers Read stories from families living with ALS Forms of ALS ...

  19. Measurement of Neutrino-Nucleon Neutral-Current Elastic Scattering Cross-section at SciBooNE

    SciTech Connect

    Takei, Hideyuki

    2009-02-01

    In this thesis, results of neutrino-nucleon neutral current (NC) elastic scattering analysis are presented. Neutrinos interact with other particles only with weak force. Measurement of cross-section for neutrino-nucleon reactions at various neutrino energy are important for the study of nucleon structure. It also provides data to be used for beam flux monitor in neutrino oscillation experiments. The cross-section for neutrino-nucleon NC elastic scattering contains the axial vector form factor GA(Q2) as well as electromagnetic form factors unlike electromagnetic interaction. GA is propotional to strange part of nucleon spin (Δs) in Q2 → 0 limit. Measurement of NC elastic cross-section with smaller Q2 enables us to access Δs. NC elastic cross-sections of neutrino-nucleon and antineutrino-nucleon were measured earlier by E734 experiment at Brookheaven National Laboratory (BNL) in 1987. In this experiment, cross-sections were measured in Q2 > 0.4 GeV2 region. Result from this experiment was the only published data for NC elastic scattering cross-section published before our experiment. SciBooNE is an experiment for the measurement of neutrino-nucleon scattering cross-secitons using Booster Neutrino Beam (BNB) at FNAL. BNB has energy peak at 0.7 GeV. In this energy region, NC elastic scattering, charged current elastic scattering, charged current pion production, and neutral current pion production are the major reaction branches. SciBar, electromagnetic calorimeter, and Muon Range Detector are the detectors for SciBooNE. The SciBar consists of finely segmented scintillators and 14336 channels of PMTs. It has a capability to reconstruct particle track longer than 8 cm and separate proton from muons and pions using energy deposit information. Signal of NC elastic scattering is a single proton track. In vp → vp process, the recoil proton is detected. On the other hand, most of vn → vn is

  20. Modeling of the ALS linac

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, C.H.

    1996-08-01

    The ALS injector linac is used for the Beam Test Facility (BTF) and the Damping Experiments when it is available in between the ALS filings. These experiments usually require higher quality beams and a better characterization than is normally required for ALS operations. This paper focuses on the beam emittance, energy tilt, and especially the longitudinal variation of the beam parameters. For instance, the authors want to avoid longitudinal variations at the low beta section of the BTF. On the other hand, a large energy tilt is required for post-acceleration compression of the bunch using an alpha magnet. The PARMELA code was modified to calculate and display longitudinal variations of the emittance ellipse. Using the Microsoft Development Studio under Windows NT environment the code can handle a much larger number of particles than was previously possible.

  1. NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Paper 27: Knowledge diffusion and US government technology policy: Issues and opportunities for sci/tech librarians

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinelli, Thomas E.; Barclay, Rebecca O.; Hannah, Stan; Lawrence, Barbara; Kennedy, John M.

    1992-01-01

    Federal involvement in simulating economic growth through the development and application of technology policy is currently the subject of serious debate. A recession and the recognition that an internationally competitive economy is a prerequisite for the attainment of national goals have fostered a number of technology policy initiatives aimed at improving the economic competitiveness of American industry. This paper suggests that the successful implementation of U.S. technology policy will require the adoption of a knowledge diffusion model, the development of user oriented information products and services, and a more 'activist' approach on the part of sci/tech librarians in the provision of scientific and technical information (STI). These changes will have a dramatic impact on the sci/tech library of the future and the preparation of sci/tech librarians.

  2. NASA/DoD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. XXVII - Knowledge diffusion and U.S. government technology policy: Issues and opportunities for sci/tech librarians

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinelli, Thomas E.; Barclay, Rebecca O.; Hannah, Stan; Lawrence, Barbara; Kennedy, John M.

    1992-01-01

    Federal involvement in stimulating economic growth through the development and application of technology policy is currently the subject of serious debate. A recession and the recognition that an internationally competitive economy is a prerequisite for the attainment of national goals have fostered a number of technology policy initiatives aimed at improving the economic competitiveness of American industry. This paper suggests that the successful implementation of U.S. technology policy will require the adoption of a knowledge diffusion model, the development of user oriented information products and services, and a more 'activist' approach on the part of sci/tech librarians in the provision of scientific and technical information (STI). These changes will have a dramatic impact on the sci/tech library of the future and the preparation of sci/tech librarians.

  3. Aerosol volatility in a boreal forest environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Häkkinen, S. A. K.; ńijälä, M.; Lehtipalo, K.; Junninen, H.; Virkkula, A.; Worsnop, D. R.; Kulmala, M.; Petäjä, T.; Riipinen, I.

    2012-04-01

    during spring and autumn 2008. Results from the aerosol mass spectrometry indicate that the non-volatile residual consists of nitrate and organic compounds, especially during autumn. These compounds may be low-volatile organic nitrates or salts. During winter and spring the non-volatile core (black carbon removed) correlated markedly with carbon monoxide, which is a tracer of anthropogenic emissions. Due to this, the non-volatile residual may also contain other pollutants in addition to black carbon. Thus, it seems that the amount of different compounds in submicron aerosol particles varies with season and as a result the chemical composition of the non-volatile residual changes within a year. This work was supported by University of Helsinki three-year research grant No 490082 and Maj and Tor Nessling Foundation grant No 2010143. Aalto et al., (2001). Physical characterization of aerosol particles during nucleation events. Tellus B, 53, 344-358. Jayne, et al., (2000). Development of an aerosol mass spectrometer for size and composition analysis of submicron particles. Aerosol Sci. Technol., 33(1-2), 49-70. Kalberer et al., (2004). Identification of Polymers as Major Components of Atmospheric Organic Aerosols. Science, 303, 1659-1662. Smith et al., (2010). Observations of aminium salts in atmospheric nanoparticles and possible climatic implications. P. Natl. Acad. Sci., 107(15). Vesala et al., (1998). Long-term field measurements of atmosphere-surface interactions in boreal forest combining forest ecology, micrometeorology, aerosol physics and atmospheric chemistry. Trends Heat, Mass Mom. Trans., 4, 17-35. Wehner et al., (2002). Design and calibration of a thermodenuder with an improved heating unit to measure the size-dependent volatile fraction of aerosol particles. J. Aerosol Sci., 33, 1087-1093.

  4. Observation of cosmic ray hadrons at the top of the Sierra Negra volcano in Mexico with the SciCRT prototype

    DOE PAGES

    Ortiz, E.; Valdés-Galicia, J. F.; Matsubara, Y.; ...

    2016-02-16

    In this study we report the flux of protons and neutral emission measured at the top of the Sierra Negra volcano at 4600 m.a.s.l. (575 g/cm2), in Eastern Mexico. As an example of the capability of the mini-SciCR as a cosmic ray detector we present the Forbush decrease recorded on March 7, 2012. These data were obtained with a cosmic ray detector prototype called mini-SciCR that was operating from October 2010 to July 2012. Our main aims were to measure the hadronic component flux of the secondary cosmic ray and to show the appropriate performance of all system of themore » detector. To separate the signals of protons from other charged particles we obtained the energy deposition pattern when they cross the detector using a Monte Carlo simulation, and to separate the signals of neutral emission we used an anticoincidence system between the edge bars and the internal bars of the detector. The mini-SciCR is a prototype of a new cosmic ray detector called SciBar Cosmic Ray Telescope (SciCRT) installed in the same place, which is in the process of calibration. The SciCRT will work mainly as a Solar Neutron and Muon Telescope, it is designed to achieve: (1) larger effective area than the current Solar Neutron Telescope, (2) higher energy resolution to determine the energy spectrum of solar neutrons, (3) lower energy threshold, and (4) higher particle identification ability.« less

  5. Environment Matters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harvey, Carl A., II

    2010-01-01

    Environment isn't just the space itself; it also includes the feelings and vibes--the atmosphere. As with all environments there are elements that can't be controlled. So, the focus needs to be on what can be changed and modified to make the environment better. The environment in the school library can be compared to others in the real world. Not…

  6. 40 CFR Appendix G to Part 50 - Reference Method for the Determination of Lead in Suspended Particulate Matter Collected From...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    .... Sci. and Tech., 10, 877-880 (1976). 2. Skogerboe, R. K. et al. “Monitoring for Lead in the Environment... County, IL, by Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy.” Envir. Sci. and Tech., 3, 472-475 (1969). 7....

  7. 40 CFR Appendix G to Part 50 - Reference Method for the Determination of Lead in Suspended Particulate Matter Collected From...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    .... Sci. and Tech., 10, 877-880 (1976). 2. Skogerboe, R. K. et al. “Monitoring for Lead in the Environment... County, IL, by Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy.” Envir. Sci. and Tech., 3, 472-475 (1969). 7....

  8. 40 CFR Appendix G to Part 50 - Reference Method for the Determination of Lead in Suspended Particulate Matter Collected From...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    .... Sci. and Tech., 10, 877-880 (1976). 2. Skogerboe, R. K. et al. “Monitoring for Lead in the Environment... County, IL, by Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy.” Envir. Sci. and Tech., 3, 472-475 (1969). 7....

  9. Abu al-Layth al-Libi

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-02-01

    Introduction In the tradition of post-9/11 senior Arab militant figures operating in Khurasan (the Afghanistan-Pakistan region), there is little doubt as to...the standing of Libyan jihadi commander Abu al-Layth al-Libi. If Usama bin Ladin and Ayman al-Zawahiri came to be the most prominent Arab -Afghan...Libi, a longtime leader of the Libyan Islamic Fighting Group (LIFG), who rapidly established himself as the champion of the Arab -Afghan milieu after

  10. Learning Environments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    David, Thomas G., Ed.; Wright, Benjamin E., Ed.

    The focus of the 16 essays in this book is the physical environment of learning, specifically the man-made or built environment. The authors contend that educators have tended to overlook the influence of built environments on the learning process--a process not confined to schools, but involving play areas, tree houses, and the city itself. The…

  11. Effects of Na+ and He+ pickup ions on the lunar plasma environment: 3D hybrid modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipatov, A. S.; Cooper, J. F.; Sittler, E. C.; Hartle, R. E.; Sarantos, M.

    2011-12-01

    The hybrid kinetic model used here supports comprehensive simulation of the interaction between different spatial and energetic elements of the moon-solar wind-magnetosphere of the Earth system. There is a set of MHD,kinetic, hybrid, drift kinetic, electrostatic and full kinetic modeling of the lunar plasma environment [1]. However, observations show the existence of several species of the neutrals and pickup ions like Na, He, K, O etc., (see e.g., [2,3,4]). The solar wind parameters are chosen from the ARTEMIS observations [5]. The Na+, He+ lunar exosphere's parameters are chosen from [6,7]. The hybrid kinetic model allows us to take into account the finite gyroradius effects of pickup ions and to correctly estimate the ions velocity distribution and the fluxes along the magnetic field, and on the lunar surface. Modeling shows the formation of the asymmetric Mach cone, the structuring of the pickup ion tails, and presents another type of lunar-solar wind interaction. We will compare the results of our modeling with observed distributions. References [1] Lipatov, A.S., and Cooper, J.F., Hybrid kinetic modeling of the Lunar plasma environment: Past, present and future. In: Lunar Dust, Plasma and Atmosphere: The Next Steps, January 27-29, 2010, Boulder, Colorado, Abstracts/lpa2010.colorado.edu/. [2] Potter, A.E., and Morgan, T.H., Discovery of sodium and potassium vapor in the atmosphere of the Moon, Science, 241, 675-680, doi:10.1126/science.241.4866.675, 1988. [3] Tyler, A.L., et al., Observations of sodium in the tenuous lunar atmosphere, Geophys. Res. Lett., 15(10), 1141-1144, doi:10.1029/GL015i010p01141, 1988. [4] Tanaka, T., et al., First in situ observation of the Moon-originating ions in the Earth's Magnetosphere by MAP-PACE on SELENE (KAGUYA), Geophys. Res. Lett., 36, L22106, doi:10.1029/2009GL040682, 2009. [5] Wiehle, S., et al., First Lunar Wake Passage of ARTEMIS: Discrimination of Wake Effects and Solar Wind Fluctuations by 3D Hybrid Simulations, Planet

  12. Constraints on silicates formation in the Si-Al-Fe system: Application to hard deposits in steam generators of PWR nuclear reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, Gilles; Million-Picallion, Lisa; Lefevre, Grégory; Delaunay, Sophie

    2015-04-01

    -clay interactions in the nuclear waste storage, and by contrast with basic thermodynamic predictions. Conclusion: The Fe-clays and steam generators contexts imply relatively close aqueous environments: hydrothermal, reduced, diluted, neutral to slightly alkaline. The main difference is the status of iron: ferric/ferrous (magnetite) in the steam generators, metallic in the Fe-clay experiments. The concentration of aqueous iron when supplied by magnetite is low and does not allow its incorporation in secondary phases. By contrast, aqueous ferrous iron released by the corrosion of steel is not limited by the source, rather by the sink, and produces Fe-rich silicates. This example illustrates the discrepancy between complex mineral reactions and oversimplified predictions when sorption/passivation and nucleation/growth constraints are ignored. Reference: [1] Lanson et al. (2012) Amer. Min. 97, 864-871. [2] Lantenois et al. (2005) Clays & Clay Min. 53, 597-612. [3] Mosser-Ruck et al. (2010) Clays & Clay Min. 58, 280-291. [4] Perronnet et al. (2008) App. Clay Sci. 38, 187-202. [5] Osacky et al. (2010) App. Clay Sci. 50, 237-244. [6] Guillaume et al. (2003) Clay Min. 38, 281-302. [7] Rivard et al. (2013) Amer. Mineral. 98, 163-180. [8] Svensson and Hansen (2013) Clays & Clay Min. 61, 566-579.

  13. iSocial: Delivering the Social Competence Intervention for Adolescents (SCI-A) in a 3D Virtual Learning Environment for Youth with High Functioning Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stichter, Janine P.; Laffey, James; Galyen, Krista; Herzog, Melissa

    2014-01-01

    One consistent area of need for students with autism spectrum disorders is in the area of social competence. However, the increasing need to provide qualified teachers to deliver evidence-based practices in areas like social competence leave schools, such as those found in rural areas, in need of support. Distance education and in particular, 3D…

  14. Leg joint power output during progressive resistance FES-LCE cycling in SCI subjects: developing an index of fatigue

    PubMed Central

    Haapala, Stephenie A; Faghri, Pouran D; Adams, Douglas J

    2008-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to investigate the biomechanics of the hip, knee and ankle during a progressive resistance cycling protocol in an effort to detect and measure the presence of muscle fatigue. It was hypothesized that knee power output can be used as an indicator of fatigue in order to assess the cycling performance of SCI subjects. Methods Six spinal cord injured subjects (2 incomplete, 4 complete) between the ages of twenty and fifty years old and possessing either a complete or incomplete spinal cord injury at or below the fourth cervical vertebra participated in this study. Kinematic data and pedal forces were recorded during cycling at increasing levels of resistance. Ankle, knee and hip power outputs and resultant pedal force were calculated. Ergometer cadence and muscle stimulation intensity were also recorded. Results The main findings of this study were: (a) ankle and knee power outputs decreased, whereas hip power output increased with increasing resistance, (b) cadence, stimulation intensity and resultant pedal force in that combined order were significant predictors of knee power output and (c) knowing the value of these combined predictors at 10 rpm, an index of fatigue can be developed, quantitatively expressing the power capacity of the knee joint with respect to a baseline power level defined as fatigue. Conclusion An index of fatigue was successfully developed, proportionalizing knee power capacity during cycling to a predetermined value of fatigue. The fatigue index value at 0/8th kp, measured 90 seconds into active, unassisted pedaling was 1.6. This indicates initial power capacity at the knee to be 1.6 times greater than fatigue. The fatigue index decreased to 1.1 at 2/8th kp, representing approximately a 30% decrease in the knee's power capacity within a 4 minute timespan. These findings suggest that the present cycling protocol is not sufficient for a rider to gain the benefits of FES and thus raises speculation as to

  15. Measurement of K+ production cross section by 8 GeV protons using high-energy neutrino interactions in the SciBooNE detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, G.; Mariani, C.; Alcaraz-Aunion, J. L.; Brice, S. J.; Bugel, L.; Catala-Perez, J.; Conrad, J. M.; Djurcic, Z.; Dore, U.; Finley, D. A.; Franke, A. J.; Giganti, C.; Gomez-Cadenas, J. J.; Guzowski, P.; Hanson, A.; Hayato, Y.; Hiraide, K.; Jover-Manas, G.; Karagiorgi, G.; Katori, T.; Kobayashi, Y. K.; Kobilarcik, T.; Kubo, H.; Kurimoto, Y.; Louis, W. C.; Loverre, P. F.; Ludovici, L.; Mahn, K. B. M.; Masuike, S.; Matsuoka, K.; McGary, V. T.; Metcalf, W.; Mills, G. B.; Mitsuka, G.; Miyachi, Y.; Mizugashira, S.; Moore, C. D.; Nakajima, Y.; Nakaya, T.; Napora, R.; Nienaber, P.; Orme, D.; Otani, M.; Russell, A. D.; Sanchez, F.; Shaevitz, M. H.; Shibata, T.-A.; Sorel, M.; Stefanski, R. J.; Takei, H.; Tanaka, H.-K.; Tanaka, M.; Tayloe, R.; Taylor, I. J.; Tesarek, R. J.; Uchida, Y.; van de Water, R.; Walding, J. J.; Wascko, M. O.; White, H. B.; Yokoyama, M.; Zeller, G. P.; Zimmerman, E. D.

    2011-07-01

    The SciBooNE Collaboration reports K+ production cross section and rate measurements using high-energy daughter muon neutrino scattering data off the SciBar polystyrene (C8H8) target in the SciBooNE detector. The K+ mesons are produced by 8 GeV protons striking a beryllium target in Fermilab Booster Neutrino Beam line (BNB). Using observed neutrino and antineutrino events in SciBooNE, we measure (d2σ)/(dpdΩ)=(5.34±0.76)mb/(GeV/c×sr) for p+Be→K++X at mean K+ energy of 3.9 GeV and angle (with respect to the proton beam direction) of 3.7 degrees, corresponding to the selected K+ sample. Compared to Monte Carlo predictions using previous higher energy K+ production measurements, this measurement, which uses the NUANCE neutrino interaction generator, is consistent with a normalization factor of 0.85±0.12. This agreement is evidence that the extrapolation of the higher energy K+ measurements to an 8 GeV beam energy using Feynman scaling is valid. This measurement reduces the error on the K+ production cross section from 40% to 14%.

  16. The NASA SCI Files[TM]: The Case of the Shaky Quake. A Lesson Guide with Activities in Mathematics, Science, and Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ricles, Shannon

    The NASA SCI Files is a series of instructional programs consisting of broadcast, print, and online elements emphasizing standards-based instruction, problem-based learning, and science as inquiry. The series seeks to motivate students in grades 3-5 to become critical thinkers and active problem solvers. In this program, the tree house detectives…

  17. The Case of the Physical Fitness Challenge: An Educator Guide with Activities in Mathematics, Science, and Technology. The NASA SCI Files. EG-2005-10-09-LARC

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ricles, Shannon; Jaramillo, Becky; Fargo, Michelle

    2005-01-01

    In this companion to the "NASA SCI Files[TM]" episode "The Case of the Physical Fitness Challenge," the tree house detectives learn about anatomy, fitness and nutrition in preparation for the President's Challenge. The guide is divided into four segments aimed at grades 3-5, each of which includes an overview, a set of objectives, vocabulary to be…

  18. The NASA SCI Files[TM]: The Case of the Powerful Pulleys. A Lesson Guide with Activities in Mathematics, Science, and Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ricles, Shannon

    This teacher's guide, with accompanying videotape, presents an episode of the NASA SCI Files. In this episode, one of the tree house detectives has had an accident and cannot get into the tree house. Using problem-based learning, the rest of the gang investigates the world of simple machines and physical science and "pull" together to…

  19. The Case of the Great Space Exploration: An Educator Guide with Activities in Mathematics, Science, and Technology. The NASA SCI Files. EG-2004-09-12-LARC

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ricles, Shannon; Jaramillo, Becky; Fargo, Michelle

    2004-01-01

    In this companion to the "NASA SCI Files" episode "The Case of the Great Space Exploration," the tree house detectives learn about NASA's new vision for exploring space. In four segments aimed at grades 3-5, students learn about a variety of aspects of space exploration. Each segment of the guide includes an overview, a set of objectives,…

  20. Measurement of K+ production cross section by 8 GeV protons using high energy neutrino interactions in the SciBooNE detector

    DOE PAGES

    Cheng, G.

    2011-07-28

    The SciBooNE Collaboration reports K+ production cross section and rate measurements using high energy daughter muon neutrino scattering data off the SciBar polystyrene (C8H8) target in the SciBooNE detector. The K+ mesons are produced by 8 GeV protons striking a beryllium target in Fermilab Booster Neutrino Beam line (BNB). Using observed neutrino and antineutrino events in SciBooNE, we measure d2σ/dpdΩ = (5.34 ±0.76) mb/(GeV/c x sr) for p + Be =K+ + X at mean K+ energy of 3.9 GeV and angle (with respect to the proton beam direction) of 3.7 degrees, corresponding to the selected K+ sample. Compared tomore » Monte Carlo predictions using previous higher energy K+ production measurements, this measurement, which uses the NUANCE neutrino interaction generator, is consistent with a normalization factor of 0.85 ± 0.12. This agreement is evidence that the extrapolation of the higher energy K+ measurements to an 8 GeV beam energy using Feynman scaling is valid. This measurement reduces the error on the K+ production cross section from 40% to 14%.« less

  1. Measurement of K+ production cross section by 8 GeV protons using high energy neutrino interactions in the SciBooNE detector

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, G.

    2011-07-28

    The SciBooNE Collaboration reports K+ production cross section and rate measurements using high energy daughter muon neutrino scattering data off the SciBar polystyrene (C8H8) target in the SciBooNE detector. The K+ mesons are produced by 8 GeV protons striking a beryllium target in Fermilab Booster Neutrino Beam line (BNB). Using observed neutrino and antineutrino events in SciBooNE, we measure d2σ/dpdΩ = (5.34 ±0.76) mb/(GeV/c x sr) for p + Be =K+ + X at mean K+ energy of 3.9 GeV and angle (with respect to the proton beam direction) of 3.7 degrees, corresponding to the selected K+ sample. Compared to Monte Carlo predictions using previous higher energy K+ production measurements, this measurement, which uses the NUANCE neutrino interaction generator, is consistent with a normalization factor of 0.85 ± 0.12. This agreement is evidence that the extrapolation of the higher energy K+ measurements to an 8 GeV beam energy using Feynman scaling is valid. This measurement reduces the error on the K+ production cross section from 40% to 14%.

  2. "A Ton of Faith in Science!" Nature and Role of Assumptions in, and Ideas about, Science and Epistemology Generated upon Watching a Sci-Fi Film

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myers, John Y.; Abd-El-Khalick, Fouad

    2016-01-01

    This study (i) explicates the sorts of ideas about science and the nature of knowing that were generated among participant graduate students who viewed the sci-fi film, "Contact," and (ii) examines the interactions between these ideas and ontic stances with which participants approached viewing the film. Eleven doctoral students of…

  3. /Cu-Al System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kish, Orel; Froumin, Natalya; Aizenshtein, Michael; Frage, Nachum

    2014-05-01

    Wettability and interfacial interaction of the Ta2O5/Cu-Al system were studied. Pure Cu does not wet the Ta2O5 substrate, and improved spreading is achieved when relatively a high fraction of the active element (~40 at.% Al) was added. The Al2O3 and AlTaO4 phases were observed at the Ta2O5/Cu-Al interface. A thermodynamic evaluation allowed us to suggest that the lack of wetting bellow 40 at.% Al is due to the presence of a native oxide, which covers the drop. The conditions of the native oxide decomposition and the formation of the volatile Al2O suboxide strongly depend on the vacuum level during sessile drop experiments and the composition of the Cu-Al alloy. In our case, Al contents greater than 40% provides thermodynamic conditions for the formation of Al2O (as a result of Al reaction with Al2O3) and the drop spreading. It was suggested that the final contact angle in the Ta2O5/Cu-Al system (50°) is determined by Ta adsorption on the newly formed alumina interlayer.

  4. Effects of Testosterone and Evoked Resistance Exercise after Spinal Cord Injury (TEREX-SCI): study protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Gorgey, Ashraf S; Khalil, Refka E; Gill, Ranjodh; O'Brien, Laura C; Lavis, Timothy; Castillo, Teodoro; Cifu, David X; Savas, Jeannie; Khan, Rehan; Cardozo, Christopher; Lesnefsky, Edward J; Gater, David R; Adler, Robert A

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI) are at a lifelong risk of obesity and chronic metabolic disorders including insulin resistance and dyslipidemia. Within a few weeks of injury, there is a significant decline in whole body fat-free mass, particularly lower extremity skeletal muscle mass, and subsequent increase in fat mass (FM). This is accompanied by a decrease in anabolic hormones including testosterone. Testosterone replacement therapy (TRT) has been shown to increase skeletal muscle mass and improve metabolic profile. Additionally, resistance training (RT) has been shown to increase lean mass and reduce metabolic disturbances in SCI and other clinical populations. Methods and analysis 26 individuals with chronic, motor complete SCI between 18 and 50 years old were randomly assigned to a RT+TRT group (n=13) or a TRT group (n=13). 22 participants completed the initial 16-week training phase of the study and 4 participants withdrew. 12 participants of the 22 completed 16 weeks of detraining. The TRT was provided via transdermal testosterone patches (4–6 mg/day). The RT+TRT group had 16 weeks of supervised unilateral progressive RT using surface neuromuscular electrical stimulation with ankle weights. This study will investigate the effects of evoked RT+TRT or TRT alone on body composition (muscle cross-sectional area, visceral adipose tissue, %FM) and metabolic profile (glucose and lipid metabolism) in individuals with motor complete SCI. Findings from this study may help in designing exercise therapies to alleviate the deterioration in body composition after SCI and decrease the incidence of metabolic disorders in this clinical population. Ethics and dissemination The study is currently approved by the McGuire VA Medical Center and Virginia Commonwealth University. All participants read and signed approved consent forms. Results will be submitted to peer-reviewed journals and presented at national and international conferences. Trial

  5. A multimethod research investigation of consumer involvement in Australian health service accreditation programmes: the ACCREDIT-SCI study protocol

    PubMed Central

    Greenfield, David; Hinchcliff, Reece; Moldovan, Max; Mumford, Virginia; Pawsey, Marjorie; Irene Westbrook, Johanna; Braithwaite, Jeffrey

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Health service accreditation programmes are a regulatory mechanism adopted to drive improvements inpatient safety and quality. Research investigating the benefits or limitations, of consumer involvement in accreditation programmes is negligible. To develop our knowledge in this area the ACCREDIT collaboration (Accreditation Collaborative for the Conduct of Research, Evaluation and Designated Investigations through Teamwork) has developed a research plan, known as the ACCREDIT-SCI (Standards of Consumer Involvement) study protocol. Two complementary studies have been designed: one, to examine the effectiveness of a standard for consumer participation and two, to explore how patient experiences vary across a range of settings with differing accreditation results. Methods and design The research setting is the Australian healthcare system, and the two studies focus on three accreditation programmes in the primary, acute and aged care domains. The studies will use multimethods: document analysis; interviews and surveys. Participants will be stakeholders across the three domains including: policy officers; frontline healthcare professionals; accreditation agency personnel, including surveyors and healthcare consumers. Drawing on previous experience, the research team has developed purpose-designed tools. Data will be analysed using thematic, narrative and statistical (descriptive and inferential) procedures. Ethics and dissemination The University of New South Wales Human Research Ethics Committee has approved the two studies (HREC 10274). Findings will be disseminated through seminars, conference presentations, academic publications and research partner websites. The findings will be formulated to facilitate uptake by policy and accreditation agency professionals, researchers and academics, and consumers, nationally and internationally. PMID:23059848

  6. Astrobites and GeoSciBites: Using Online Research Digests for Outreach to Undergraduates and the Broader Community

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranjan, S.; Kohler, S.; Sanders, N.; Morey, S.

    2011-12-01

    Effective science communication is imperative for the sharing of scientific ideas, continued funding and support from policy makers, and education of the public. As future researchers and educators, it is particularly important to engage graduate students in science communication. Astrobites (http://astrobites.org) is an innovative education initiative developed by graduate students in planetary science, astronomy, and astrophysics. Our goal is to help undergraduates make the transition from the classroom to careers in research by introducing them to the astronomical literature in a pedagogical, approachable, and comprehensible way. Every day we select one new journal article posted to the astrophysics preprint server (arXiv.org/astro-ph) and prepare a brief summary describing methods and results, explain jargon, and provide context. We also write regular blog posts containing career advice, such as tips for applying for fellowships or demystifying the publishing process. The articles are written by 30 graduate students in astrophysics from throughout the US and Europe and are read by 1000 daily readers worldwide, including undergraduates, researchers, and interested non-scientists. We describe lessons learned in starting, sustaining, and expanding science outreach blogs like Astrobites. We survey our readership and present analysis summarizing our reader base and impact. We report on the foundation of other ';bites blogs, focusing on the foundation of GeoSciBites, a geophysical sciences outreach blog. We discuss future opportunities for additional outreach initiatives in new disciplines.

  7. Evaluation of university scientific research ability based on the output of sci-tech papers: A D-AHP approach

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lifang

    2017-01-01

    University scientific research ability is an important indicator to express the strength of universities. In this paper, the evaluation of university scientific research ability is investigated based on the output of sci-tech papers. Four university alliances from North America, UK, Australia, and China, are selected as the case study of the university scientific research evaluation. Data coming from Thomson Reuters InCites are collected to support the evaluation. The work has contributed new framework to the issue of university scientific research ability evaluation. At first, we have established a hierarchical structure to show the factors that impact the evaluation of university scientific research ability. Then, a new MCDM method called D-AHP model is used to implement the evaluation and ranking of different university alliances, in which a data-driven approach is proposed to automatically generate the D numbers preference relations. Next, a sensitivity analysis has been given to show the impact of weights of factors and sub-factors on the evaluation result. At last, the results obtained by using different methods are compared and discussed to verify the effectiveness and reasonability of this study, and some suggestions are given to promote China’s scientific research ability. PMID:28212446

  8. Astrobites and GeoSciBites: Using Online Research Digests for Outreach to Undergraduates and the Broader Community

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranjan, S.; Kohler, S.; Sanders, N.; Morey, S.

    2013-12-01

    Effective science communication is imperative for the sharing of scientific ideas, continued funding and support from policy makers, and education of the public. As future researchers and educators, it is particularly important to engage graduate students in science communication. Astrobites (http://astrobites.org) is an innovative education initiative developed by graduate students in planetary science, astronomy, and astrophysics. Our goal is to help undergraduates make the transition from the classroom to careers in research by introducing them to the astronomical literature in a pedagogical, approachable, and comprehensible way. Every day we select one new journal article posted to the astrophysics preprint server (arXiv.org/astro-ph) and prepare a brief summary describing methods and results, explain jargon, and provide context. We also write regular blog posts containing career advice, such as tips for applying for fellowships or demystifying the publishing process. The articles are written by 30 graduate students in astrophysics from throughout the US and Europe and are read by 1000 daily readers worldwide, including undergraduates, researchers, and interested non-scientists. We describe lessons learned in starting, sustaining, and expanding science outreach blogs like Astrobites. We survey our readership and present analysis summarizing our reader base and impact. We report on the foundation of other ';bites blogs, focusing on the foundation of GeoSciBites, a geophysical sciences outreach blog. We discuss future opportunities for additional outreach initiatives in new disciplines.

  9. Twenty years of Internet-based research at SCiP: A discussion of surviving concepts and new methodologies.

    PubMed

    Wolfe, Christopher R

    2017-02-07

    This discussion of the symposium 20 Years of Internet-Based Research at SCiP: Surviving Concepts, New Methodologies compares the issues faced by the pioneering Internet-based psychology researchers who presented at the first symposia on the topic, at the 1996 annual meeting of the Society for Computers in Psychology, to the issues facing researchers today. New methodologies unavailable in the early days of Web-based psychological research are discussed, with an emphasis on mobile computing with smartphones that is capitalizing on capabilities such as touch screens and gyro sensors. A persistent issue spanning the decades has been the challenge of conducting scientific research with consumer-grade electronics. In the 1996 symposia on Internet-based research, four advantages were identified: easy access to a geographically unlimited subject population, including subjects from very specific and previously inaccessible target populations; bringing the experiment to the subject; high statistical power through large sample size; and reduced cost. In retrospect, it appears that Internet-based research has largely lived up to this early promise-with the possible exception of sample size, since the public demand for controlled psychology experiments has not always been greater than the supply offered by researchers. There are many reasons for optimism about the future of Internet-based research. However, unless courses and textbooks on psychological research methods begin to give Web-based research the attention it deserves, the future of Internet-based psychological research will remain in doubt.

  10. ReSciPE for Scientific Inquiry: Professional Development for Scientists to Support Their Work With Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, L. K.; Laursen, S.; Schott, C.

    2006-12-01

    Funders and institutions are asking scientists to become more involved in communicating the "broader impacts" of their work with the public. Many scientists also wish to contribute to public science literacy and high-quality science education in schools. The ReSciPE Project--Resources for Scientists in Partnership with Education--is providing professional development workshops and other resources to scientists who are involved in education as volunteers or through professional commitments. As of fall 2006, we have presented 16 workshops on "Scientific Inquiry in the K-12 Classroom" to over 350 scientists and science educators at professional meetings, laboratories, and universities from Massachusetts to Hawaii. We will describe the project goals and our model for helping scientists to become more effective in working with students and teachers. Evaluation results from pre- and post-workshop surveys of over 200 workshop participants demonstrate that we are reaching an audience of working scientists as well as science educators and E/PO specialists, that our audience is diverse in gender, ethnicity, and career stage, and that the workshops are effective in broadening participants' ideas of their potential role in education. However, they also have ongoing needs for both knowledge and support. We argue that working with education or other public audiences is an increasingly important professional skill for scientists and offer this project as one experiment in providing appropriate professional development for this work.

  11. Evaluation of university scientific research ability based on the output of sci-tech papers: A D-AHP approach.

    PubMed

    Zong, Fan; Wang, Lifang

    2017-01-01

    University scientific research ability is an important indicator to express the strength of universities. In this paper, the evaluation of university scientific research ability is investigated based on the output of sci-tech papers. Four university alliances from North America, UK, Australia, and China, are selected as the case study of the university scientific research evaluation. Data coming from Thomson Reuters InCites are collected to support the evaluation. The work has contributed new framework to the issue of university scientific research ability evaluation. At first, we have established a hierarchical structure to show the factors that impact the evaluation of university scientific research ability. Then, a new MCDM method called D-AHP model is used to implement the evaluation and ranking of different university alliances, in which a data-driven approach is proposed to automatically generate the D numbers preference relations. Next, a sensitivity analysis has been given to show the impact of weights of factors and sub-factors on the evaluation result. At last, the results obtained by using different methods are compared and discussed to verify the effectiveness and reasonability of this study, and some suggestions are given to promote China's scientific research ability.

  12. Iowa's Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruth, Amy, Ed.

    1994-01-01

    This theme issue explores the changes in Iowa's environment. When Native Americans lived in Iowa hundreds of years ago, the land was rich in tall grasslands, fertile soil, wildlife, wetlands, and unpolluted waters. When European-American pioneers settled Iowa in 1833, they changed the environment in order to survive. The first article in this…

  13. Aquatic Environments

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aquatic microbiology can be defined as the study of microorganisms and microbial communities in water environments. Aquatic environments occupy more than 70% of the earth’s surface including oceans, estuaries, rivers, lakes, wetlands, streams, springs, and aquifers. Water is essential for life and m...

  14. Initial Symptoms of ALS

    MedlinePlus

    ... Chapters Certified Centers and Clinics Support Groups About ALS About Us Our Research In Your Community Advocate ... Diagnosis En español Symptoms The initial symptoms of ALS can be quite varied in different people. One ...

  15. Lou Gehrig's Disease (ALS)

    MedlinePlus

    ... 1930s. People in England and Australia call ALS motor neurone disease (MND). The French refer to it ... about ALS in 1869. Lou Gehrig's disease damages motor neurons in the brain and spinal cord. Motor ...

  16. Sci-Fi Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freudenrich, Craig C.

    2000-01-01

    Recommends using science fiction television episodes, novels, and films for teaching science and motivating students. Studies Newton's Law of Motion, principles of relativity, journey to Mars, interplanetary trajectories, artificial gravity, and Martian geology. Discusses science fiction's ability to capture student interest and the advantages of…

  17. Basics of SCI Rehabilitation

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... Question Videos by Family Relationship Videos by Experts Resources The Short List Government Programs Family and Caregiver ... by Family Relationship Videos by Spinal Cord Experts Resources Forums Peer Counseling Blog About Us Contact Donate ...

  18. Glass corrosion in natural environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thorpe, Arthur N.

    1989-01-01

    A series of studies of the effects of solutes which appear in natural aqueous environments, specifically Mg and Al, under controlled conditions, permit characterization of the retardation of silicate glass leaching in water containing such solutes. In the case of Mg the interaction with the glass appears to consist of exchange with alkali ions present in the glass to a depth of several microns. The effect of Al can be observed at much lower levels, indicating that the mechanism in the case of Al involves irreversible formation of aluminosilicate species at the glass surface.

  19. Socioeconomic environment

    SciTech Connect

    1995-10-01

    This portion of the Energy vision 2020 draft report discusses the socioeconomic environment of the Tennessee Valley region. It describes the region and mentions geographical factors, current economy, the agricultural sector, and future trends in the economy of the region.

  20. X-ray spectroscopy for chemistry in the 2-4 keV energy regime at the XMaS beamline: ionic liquids, Rh and Pd catalysts in gas and liquid environments, and Cl contamination in γ-Al2O3.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Paul B J; Nguyen, Bao N; Nicholls, Rachel; Bourne, Richard A; Brazier, John B; Lovelock, Kevin R J; Brown, Simon D; Wermeille, Didier; Bikondoa, Oier; Lucas, Christopher A; Hase, Thomas P A; Newton, Mark A

    2015-11-01

    The 2-4 keV energy range provides a rich window into many facets of materials science and chemistry. Within this window, P, S, Cl, K and Ca K-edges may be found along with the L-edges of industrially important elements from Y through to Sn. Yet, compared with those that cater for energies above ca. 4-5 keV, there are relatively few resources available for X-ray spectroscopy below these energies. In addition, in situ or operando studies become to varying degrees more challenging than at higher X-ray energies due to restrictions imposed by the lower energies of the X-rays upon the design and construction of appropriate sample environments. The XMaS beamline at the ESRF has recently made efforts to extend its operational energy range to include this softer end of the X-ray spectrum. In this report the resulting performance of this resource for X-ray spectroscopy is detailed with specific attention drawn to: understanding electrostatic and charge transfer effects at the S K-edge in ionic liquids; quantification of dilution limits at the Cl K- and Rh L3-edges and structural equilibria in solution; in vacuum deposition and reduction of [Rh(I)(CO)2Cl]2 to γ-Al2O3; contamination of γ-Al2O3 by Cl and its potential role in determining the chemical character of supported Rh catalysts; and the development of chlorinated Pd catalysts in `green' solvent systems. Sample environments thus far developed are also presented, characterized and their overall performance evaluated.

  1. Preclinical Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamic Target of SCY-078, a First-in-Class Orally Active Antifungal Glucan Synthesis Inhibitor, in Murine Models of Disseminated Candidiasis.

    PubMed

    Wring, Stephen A; Randolph, Ryan; Park, SeongHee; Abruzzo, George; Chen, Qing; Flattery, Amy; Garrett, Graig; Peel, Michael; Outcalt, Russell; Powell, Kendall; Trucksis, Michelle; Angulo, David; Borroto-Esoda, Katyna

    2017-04-01

    SCY-078 (MK-3118) is a novel, semisynthetic derivative of enfumafungin and represents the first compound of the triterpene class of antifungals. SCY-078 exhibits potent inhibition of β-(1,3)-d-glucan synthesis, an essential cell wall component of many pathogenic fungi, including Candida spp. and Aspergillus spp. SCY-078 is currently in phase 2 clinical development for the treatment of invasive fungal diseases. In vitro disposition studies to assess solubility, intestinal permeability, and metabolic stability were predictive of good oral bioavailability. Preclinical pharmacokinetic studies were consistent with once-daily administration to humans. After intravenous delivery, plasma clearance in rodents and dogs was low, representing <15% and <25% of hepatic blood flow, respectively. The terminal elimination-phase half-life was 5.5 to 8.7 h in rodents, and it was ∼9.3 h in dogs. The volume of distribution at steady-state was high (4.7 to 5.3 liters/kg), a finding suggestive of extensive tissue distribution. Exposure of SCY-078 in kidney tissue, a target organ for invasive fungal disease such as candidiasis, exceeded plasma by 20- to 25-fold for the area under the concentration-time curve from 0 h to infinity (AUC0-∞) and Cmax SCY-078 achieved efficacy endpoints following oral delivery across multiple murine models of disseminated candidiasis. The pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic indices Cmax/MIC and AUC/MIC correlated with outcome. Target therapeutic exposure, expressed as the plasma AUC0-24, was comparable across models, with an upper value of 11.2 μg·h/ml (15.4 μM·h); the corresponding mean value for free drug AUC/MIC was ∼0.75. Overall, these results demonstrate that SCY-078 has the oral and intravenous (i.v.) pharmacokinetic properties and potency in murine infection models of disseminated candidiasis to support further investigation as a novel i.v. and oral treatment for invasive fungal diseases.

  2. Preclinical Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamic Target of SCY-078, a First-in-Class Orally Active Antifungal Glucan Synthesis Inhibitor, in Murine Models of Disseminated Candidiasis

    PubMed Central

    Randolph, Ryan; Park, SeongHee; Abruzzo, George; Chen, Qing; Flattery, Amy; Garrett, Graig; Peel, Michael; Outcalt, Russell; Powell, Kendall; Trucksis, Michelle; Angulo, David; Borroto-Esoda, Katyna

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT SCY-078 (MK-3118) is a novel, semisynthetic derivative of enfumafungin and represents the first compound of the triterpene class of antifungals. SCY-078 exhibits potent inhibition of β-(1,3)-d-glucan synthesis, an essential cell wall component of many pathogenic fungi, including Candida spp. and Aspergillus spp. SCY-078 is currently in phase 2 clinical development for the treatment of invasive fungal diseases. In vitro disposition studies to assess solubility, intestinal permeability, and metabolic stability were predictive of good oral bioavailability. Preclinical pharmacokinetic studies were consistent with once-daily administration to humans. After intravenous delivery, plasma clearance in rodents and dogs was low, representing <15% and <25% of hepatic blood flow, respectively. The terminal elimination-phase half-life was 5.5 to 8.7 h in rodents, and it was ∼9.3 h in dogs. The volume of distribution at steady-state was high (4.7 to 5.3 liters/kg), a finding suggestive of extensive tissue distribution. Exposure of SCY-078 in kidney tissue, a target organ for invasive fungal disease such as candidiasis, exceeded plasma by 20- to 25-fold for the area under the concentration-time curve from 0 h to infinity (AUC0–∞) and Cmax. SCY-078 achieved efficacy endpoints following oral delivery across multiple murine models of disseminated candidiasis. The pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic indices Cmax/MIC and AUC/MIC correlated with outcome. Target therapeutic exposure, expressed as the plasma AUC0–24, was comparable across models, with an upper value of 11.2 μg·h/ml (15.4 μM·h); the corresponding mean value for free drug AUC/MIC was ∼0.75. Overall, these results demonstrate that SCY-078 has the oral and intravenous (i.v.) pharmacokinetic properties and potency in murine infection models of disseminated candidiasis to support further investigation as a novel i.v. and oral treatment for invasive fungal diseases. PMID:28137806

  3. Alexandria (Al Iskandariya), Egypt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This image of Alexandria was taken by astronauts on board the International Space Station in December 2000 using an Electronic Still Camera. A wider-angle view (STS088-739-90) taken from the Space Shuttle in December 1998 is available for context. Alexandria (Al Iskandariya) occupies a T-shaped peninsula and strip of land separating the Mediterranean from Lake Mariout. Originally the town was built upon a mole (stone breakwater) called Heptastadium, which joined the island of Pharos (see referenced website, below) to the mainland. Since then sedimentary deposits have widened the mole. Since 1905, when the 370,000 Alexandrians lived in an area of about 4 sq km between the two harbors, the city (population 4 million; see referenced website, below) has grown beyond its medieval walls and now occupies an area of about 300 sq km. The Mahmudiya Canal, connecting Alexandria with the Nile, runs to the south of the city and, by a series of locks, enters the harbor of the principal port of Egypt (note ships). The reddish and ochre polygons west of Lake Mariout are salt-evaporation, chemical-storage, and water-treatment ponds within the coastal lagoon. Reference Youssef Halim and Fatma Abou Shouk, 2000, Human impacts on Alexandria's marine environment: UNESCO, Coastal Regions and Small Islands Unit (CSI), Coastal Management Sourcebooks 2 (accessed December 20, 2000) Additional photographs taken by astronauts can be viewed at NASA-JSC's Gateway to Astronaut Photography of Earth. Image ISS001-ESC-5025 provided by the Earth Sciences and Image Analysis Laboratory, Johnson Space Center.

  4. Discussion on the article "Paleoseismological analysis of an intraplate extensional structure: the Concud fault (Iberian Chain, Eastern Spain)" by P. Lafuente, L. E. Arlegui, C. L. Liesa, and J. L. Simón (Int J Earth Sci)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutiérrez, Francisco; Lucha, Pedro; Guerrero, Jesús; Gutiérrez, Mateo; Carbonel, Domingo

    2012-03-01

    This discussion is focused on three aspects of the paper published by Lafuente et al. (Int J Earth Sci, doi: 10.1007/s00531-010-0542-1 , 2010) on Concud Fault, constitute the fundamental basis to assess the seismic potential of this capable structure: (1) A slip rate estimated for the Concud Fault based on an erroneous displacement value and a questionable correlation, obviating previously published datings, markedly different to those used by the authors. The wrong displacement value introduces an error of more than 25% in the calculated Quaternary slip rate. (2) A new paleoseismological interpretation of the outcrop of Condud Fault at Los Baños, adding two improperly justified paleoearthquakes to the four events previously inferred. (3) The attribution of faults affecting a young terrace to the most recent recorded earthquake on Concud Fault, ruling out implicitly the likely option of a gravitational origin for them, either landsliding or subsidence due to evaporite dissolution.

  5. SciDAC Fusiongrid Project--A National Collaboratory to Advance the Science of High Temperature Plasma Physics for Magnetic Fusion

    SciTech Connect

    SCHISSEL, D.P.; ABLA, G.; BURRUSS, J.R.; FEIBUSH, E.; FREDIAN, T.W.; GOODE, M.M.; GREENWALD, M.J.; KEAHEY, K.; LEGGETT, T.; LI, K.; McCUNE, D.C.; PAPKA, M.E.; RANDERSON, L.; SANDERSON, A.; STILLERMAN, J.; THOMPSON, M.R.; URAM, T.; WALLACE, G.

    2006-08-31

    This report summarizes the work of the National Fusion Collaboratory (NFC) Project funded by the United States Department of Energy (DOE) under the Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing Program (SciDAC) to develop a persistent infrastructure to enable scientific collaboration for magnetic fusion research. A five year project that was initiated in 2001, it built on the past collaborative work performed within the U.S. fusion community and added the component of computer science research done with the USDOE Office of Science, Office of Advanced Scientific Computer Research. The project was a collaboration itself uniting fusion scientists from General Atomics, MIT, and PPPL and computer scientists from ANL, LBNL, Princeton University, and the University of Utah to form a coordinated team. The group leveraged existing computer science technology where possible and extended or created new capabilities where required. Developing a reliable energy system that is economically and environmentally sustainable is the long-term goal of Fusion Energy Science (FES) research. In the U.S., FES experimental research is centered at three large facilities with a replacement value of over $1B. As these experiments have increased in size and complexity, there has been a concurrent growth in the number and importance of collaborations among large groups at the experimental sites and smaller groups located nationwide. Teaming with the experimental community is a theoretical and simulation community whose efforts range from applied analysis of experimental data to fundamental theory (e.g., realistic nonlinear 3D plasma models) that run on massively parallel computers. Looking toward the future, the large-scale experiments needed for FES research are staffed by correspondingly large, globally dispersed teams. The fusion program will be increasingly oriented toward the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) where even now, a decade before operation begins, a large

  6. Results of a Telephone Survey of Television Station Managers Concerning the NASA SCI Files(TM) and NASA CONNECT(TM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinelli, Thomas E.; Perry, Jeannine

    2004-01-01

    A telephone survey of television station managers concerning 2 instructional television programs, the NASA SCI Files(TM) and NASA CONNECT(TM), offered by the NASA Langley Center for Distance Learning (CDL) was conducted. Using a 4-point scale, with 4 being very satisfied, survey participants reported that they were either very satisfied (77.1 percent) or satisfied (19.9 percent) with the overall (educational and technical) quality of the NASA SCI Files(TM). Using a 4-point scale, with 4 being very satisfied, survey participants reported that they were either very satisfied (77.9 percent) or satisfied (19.1 percent) with the overall (educational and technical) quality of NASA CONNECT(TM) .

  7. SciDAC's Earth System Grid Center for Enabling Technologies Semi-Annual Progress Report for the Period October 1, 2009 through March 31, 2010

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Dean N.; Foster, I. T.; Middleton, D. E.; Ananthakrishnan, R.; Siebenlist, F.; Shoshani, A.; Sim, A.; Bell, G.; Drach, R.; Ahrens, J.; Jones, P.; Brown, D.; Chastang, J.; Cinquini, L.; Fox, P.; Harper, D.; Hook, N.; Nienhouse, E.; Strand, G.; West, P.; Wilcox, H.; Wilhelmi, N.; Zednik, S.; Hankin, S.; Schweitzer, R.; Bernholdt, D.; Chen, M.; Miller, R.; Shipman, G.; Wang, F.; Bharathi, S.; Chervenak, A.; Schuler, R.; Su, M.

    2010-04-21

    This report summarizes work carried out by the ESG-CET during the period October 1, 2009 through March 31, 2009. It includes discussion of highlights, overall progress, period goals, collaborations, papers, and presentations. To learn more about our project, and to find previous reports, please visit the Earth System Grid Center for Enabling Technologies (ESG-CET) website. This report will be forwarded to the DOE SciDAC program management, the Office of Biological and Environmental Research (OBER) program management, national and international collaborators and stakeholders (e.g., the Community Climate System Model (CCSM), the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) 5th Assessment Report (AR5), the Climate Science Computational End Station (CCES), the SciDAC II: A Scalable and Extensible Earth System Model for Climate Change Science, the North American Regional Climate Change Assessment Program (NARCCAP), and other wide-ranging climate model evaluation activities).

  8. Preservation Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Reagan W.

    2004-01-01

    The long-term preservation of digital entities requires mechanisms to manage the authenticity of massive data collections that are written to archival storage systems. Preservation environments impose authenticity constraints and manage the evolution of the storage system technology by building infrastructure independent solutions. This seeming paradox, the need for large archives, while avoiding dependence upon vendor specific solutions, is resolved through use of data grid technology. Data grids provide the storage repository abstractions that make it possible to migrate collections between vendor specific products, while ensuring the authenticity of the archived data. Data grids provide the software infrastructure that interfaces vendor-specific storage archives to preservation environments.

  9. Safe environments.

    PubMed

    2014-08-28

    A new film on the Social Care Institute for Excellence website aims to encourage health and social care organisations to create safe environments in which staff can raise concerns as part of normal practice. Key points raised in the film include that managers should listen to what whistleblowers say and ensure the concerns raised are managed well, and that open cultures in which concerns can be raised help build safer working environments and effective learning organisations. You can view the film at tinyurl.com/oh3dk3q.

  10. Measuring grief and loss after spinal cord injury: Development, validation and psychometric characteristics of the SCI-QOL Grief and Loss item bank and short form

    PubMed Central

    Kalpakjian, Claire Z.; Tulsky, David S.; Kisala, Pamela A.; Bombardier, Charles H.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To develop an item response theory (IRT) calibrated Grief and Loss item bank as part of the Spinal Cord Injury – Quality of Life (SCI-QOL) measurement system. Design A literature review guided framework development of grief/loss. New items were created from focus groups. Items were revised based on expert review and patient feedback and were then field tested. Analyses included confirmatory factor analysis (CFA), graded response IRT modeling and evaluation of differential item functioning (DIF). Setting We tested a 20-item pool at several rehabilitation centers across the United States, including the University of Michigan, Kessler Foundation, Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago, the University of Washington, Craig Hospital and the James J. Peters/Bronx Department of Veterans Affairs hospital. Participants A total of 717 individuals with SCI answered the grief and loss questions. Results The final calibrated item bank resulted in 17 retained items. A unidimensional model was observed (CFI = 0.976; RMSEA = 0.078) and measurement precision was good (theta range between −1.48 to 2.48). Ten items were flagged for DIF, however, after examination of effect sizes found this to be negligible with little practical impact on score estimates. Conclusions This study indicates that the SCI-QOL Grief and Loss item bank represents a psychometrically robust measurement tool. Short form items are also suggested and computer adaptive tests are available. PMID:26010969

  11. Measuring psychological trauma after spinal cord injury: Development and psychometric characteristics of the SCI-QOL Psychological Trauma item bank and short form

    PubMed Central

    Kisala, Pamela A.; Victorson, David; Pace, Natalie; Heinemann, Allen W.; Choi, Seung W.; Tulsky, David S.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To describe the development and psychometric properties of the SCI-QOL Psychological Trauma item bank and short form. Design Using a mixed-methods design, we developed and tested a Psychological Trauma item bank with patient and provider focus groups, cognitive interviews, and item response theory based analytic approaches, including tests of model fit, differential item functioning (DIF) and precision. Setting We tested a 31-item pool at several medical institutions across the United States, including the University of Michigan, Kessler Foundation, Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago, the University of Washington, Craig Hospital and the James J. Peters/Bronx Veterans Administration hospital. Participants A total of 716 individuals with SCI completed the trauma items Results The 31 items fit a unidimensional model (CFI=0.952; RMSEA=0.061) and demonstrated good precision (theta range between 0.6 and 2.5). Nine items demonstrated negligible DIF with little impact on score estimates. The final calibrated item bank contains 19 items Conclusion The SCI-QOL Psychological Trauma item bank is a psychometrically robust measurement tool from which a short form and a computer adaptive test (CAT) version are available. PMID:26010967

  12. Product and market study for Los Alamos National Laboratory. Building resources for technology commercialization: The SciBus Analytical, Inc. paradigm

    SciTech Connect

    1996-02-01

    The study project was undertaken to investigate how entrepreneurial small businesses with technology licenses can develop product and market strategies sufficiently persuasive to attract resources and exploit commercialization opportunities. The study attempts to answer two primary questions: (1) What key business development strategies are likely to make technology transfers successful, and (2) How should the plan best be presented in order to attract resources (e.g., personnel, funding, channels of distribution)? In the opinion of the investigator, Calidex Corporation, if the business strategies later prove to be successful, then the plan model has relevance for any technology licensee attempting to accumulate resources and bridge from technology resident in government laboratories to the commercial marketplace. The study utilized SciBus Analytical, Inc. (SciBus), a Los Alamos National Laboratory CRADA participant, as the paradigm small business technology licensee. The investigator concluded that the optimum value of the study lay in the preparation of an actual business development plan for SciBus that might then have, hopefully, broader relevance and merit for other private sector technology transfer licensees working with various Government agencies.

  13. Investigation of biosolids degradation under flooded environments for use in underwater cover designs for mine tailing remediation.

    PubMed

    Jia, Yu; Nason, Peter; Maurice, Christian; Alakangas, Lena; Öhlander, Björn

    2015-07-01

    To evaluate the potential suitability of digested sewage sludge (frequently termed biosolids) for use as underwater cover material for mine waste tailings, the degradability of biosolids at 20 - 22 °C under flooded anaerobic conditions was evaluated during incubation for 230 days. Leaching of elements from the flooded anaerobic system was also evaluated. Biosolid degradation was confirmed by the generation and accumulation of CH4 and CO2. Specifically, approximately 1.65 mmoL gas/g biosolids was generated as a result of incubation, corresponding to degradation of 7.68% of the organic matter, and the residue was stable at the end of the laboratory experiment. Under field conditions in northern Sweden, it is expected that the degradation rate will be much slower than that observed in the present study (Nason et al. Environ Earth Sci 70:30933105, 2013). Although the majority of biosolid fractions (>92%) were shown to be recalcitrant during the incubation period, long-term monitoring of further degradability of residue is necessary. The leaching results showed that most of the metals and metalloids leached from the biosolids at day 230 were below the limit value for non-hazardous waste, although Ni was the only element approximately three times higher than the limit value for inert material at the landfill site. In conclusion, biosolids have potential for use as covering material for underwater storage of tailings based on their biodegradability and leaching of elements.

  14. Safer Environment

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has proposed Mercury and Air Toxics Standards (MATS) for power plants to limit mercury, acid gases and other toxic pollution from power plants. This page describes how new rules mean a safer environment.

  15. Architecture & Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erickson, Mary; Delahunt, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Most art teachers would agree that architecture is an important form of visual art, but they do not always include it in their curriculums. In this article, the authors share core ideas from "Architecture and Environment," a teaching resource that they developed out of a long-term interest in teaching architecture and their fascination with the…

  16. The psychometric properties of Chinese version of SCI Exercise Self-Efficacy Scale in patients with stroke

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Xiaofang; Liu, Yanjin; Wang, Aixia; Wang, Min

    2016-01-01

    Objective To test the Chinese version of the SCI Exercise Self-Efficacy Scale (C-ESES) in stroke patients and evaluate its validity and reliability. Background Physical inactivity is a well established and changeable risk factor for stroke, and regular exercise of 3–7 days per week is essential for stroke survivors and the general population. Though regular exercise is beneficial, it has been proved that duration, frequency, and intensity of exercise are generally low in stroke survivors. Methods The performance of the instrument was assessed in 350 Chinese stroke survivors and repeated in 50 patients to examine test–retest reliability. Questionnaires included a form on demographic and socioeconomic characteristics, C-ESES, and the Chinese version of the General Self-Efficacy Scale. The AMOS 20.0 and SPSS 17.0 were chosen to evaluate their validity and reliability. Results Even though 350 participants answered the questionnaires in the present study, useful data were obtained from 321 participants (response rate: 91.71%). Correlation between item and the total scale score (Item–Total Correlation) ranged from 0.551 to 0.718, indicating that no item needed to be omitted; two factors, with factor loading 0.620 and 0.806, were obtained from an exploratory principal components analysis, assuming 59.745% of the total variance. The two factors were named internal motivation and external motivation. A confirmatory factor analysis supported the results with a suitable model (χ5=291.157; df=185; P<0.001; root mean square error of approximation =0.044; goodness-of-fit index =0.938; adjusted goodness-of-fit index =0.914; comparative fit index =0.858). The C-ESES correlated well with the validated General Self-Efficacy Scale (r=0.827, P<0.01). Good internal consistency (Cronbach’s α=0.757 to 0.879) and test–retest reliability (r=0.750, P<0.01) were obtained. Conclusion The C-ESES is a short, easy to understand, and psychometrically sound measurement to evaluate

  17. Genetic testing in ALS

    PubMed Central

    McLaughlin, Russell L.; Heverin, Mark; Thorpe, Owen; Abrahams, Sharon; Al-Chalabi, Ammar; Hardiman, Orla

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To determine the degree of consensus among clinicians on the clinical use of genetic testing in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and the factors that determine decision-making. Methods: ALS researchers worldwide were invited to participate in a detailed online survey to determine their attitudes and practices relating to genetic testing. Results: Responses from 167 clinicians from 21 different countries were analyzed. The majority of respondents (73.3%) do not consider that there is a consensus definition of familial ALS (FALS). Fifty-seven percent consider a family history of frontotemporal dementia and 48.5% the presence of a known ALS genetic mutation as sufficient for a diagnosis of FALS. Most respondents (90.2%) offer genetic testing to patients they define as having FALS and 49.4% to patients with sporadic ALS. Four main genes (SOD1, C9orf72, TARDBP, and FUS) are commonly tested. A total of 55.2% of respondents would seek genetic testing if they had personally received a diagnosis of ALS. Forty-two percent never offer presymptomatic testing to family members of patients with FALS. Responses varied between ALS specialists and nonspecialists and based on the number of new patients seen per year. Conclusions: There is a lack of consensus among clinicians as to the definition of FALS. Substantial variation exists in attitude and practices related to genetic testing of patients and presymptomatic testing of their relatives across geographic regions and between experienced specialists in ALS and nonspecialists. PMID:28159885

  18. Electromagnetic plasma particle simulations on Solar Probe Plus spacecraft interaction with near-Sun plasma environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyake, Yohei; Usui, Hideyuki

    It is necessary to predict the nature of spacecraft-plasma interactions in extreme plasma conditions such as in the near-Sun environment. The spacecraft environment immersed in the solar corona is characterized by the small Debye length due to dense (7000 mathrm{/cc}) plasmas and a large photo-/secondary electron emission current emitted from the spacecraft surfaces, which lead to distinctive nature of spacecraft-plasma interactions [1,2,3]. In the present study, electromagnetic field perturbation around the Solar Probe Plus (SPP) spacecraft is examined by using our original EM-PIC (electromagnetic particle-in-cell) plasma simulation code called EMSES. In the simulations, we consider the SPP spacecraft at perihelion (0.04 mathrm{AU} from the Sun) and important physical effects such as spacecraft charging, photoelectron and secondary electron emission, solar wind plasma flow including the effect of spacecraft orbital velocity, and the presence of a background magnetic field. Our preliminary results show that both photoelectrons and secondary electrons from the spacecraft are magnetized in a spatial scale of several meters, and make drift motion due the presence of the background convection electric field. This effect leads to non-axisymmetric distributions of the electron density and the resultant electric potential near the spacecraft. Our simulations predict that a strong (˜ 100 mathrm{mV/m}) spurious electric field can be observed by the probe measurement on the spacecraft due to such a non-axisymmetric effect. We also confirm that the large photo-/secondary electron current alters magnetic field intensity around the spacecraft, but the field variation is much smaller than the background magnetic field magnitude (a few mathrm{nT} compared to a few mathrm{mu T}). [1] Ergun et al., textit{Phys. Plasmas}, textbf{17}, 072903, 2010. [2] Guillemant et al., textit{Ann. Geophys.}, textbf{30}, 1075-1092, 2012. [3] Guillemant et al., textit{IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci

  19. Ventilatory Control in ALS

    PubMed Central

    Nichols, Nicole L.; Van Dyke, J.; Nashold, L.; Satriotomo, I.; Suzuki, M.; Mitchell, G.S.

    2015-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal, progressive neurodegenerative disease. ALS selectively causes degeneration in upper and lower (spinal) motor neurons, leading to muscle weakness, paralysis and death by ventilatory failure. Although ventilatory failure is generally the cause of death in ALS, little is known concerning the impact of this disorder on respiratory motor neurons, the consequences of respiratory motor neuron cell death, or the ability of the respiratory control system to “fight back” via mechanisms of compensatory respiratory plasticity. Here we review known effects of ALS on breathing, including possible effects on rhythm generation, respiratory motor neurons, and their target organs: the respiratory muscles. We consider evidence for spontaneous compensatory plasticity, preserving breathing well into disease progression despite dramatic loss of spinal respiratory motor neurons. Finally, we review current and potential therapeutic approaches directed toward preserving the capacity to breathe in ALS patients. PMID:23692930

  20. Control of Environment Assisted Cracking of Al 7075 Using Inhibitors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-05-01

    Phytic Acid , Molybdic Acid . Tolyltrazole. W912 (1/2 %), No M04 and P0 4 67 114 Phytic ... Acid , Molybdic Acid . Tolylmrazole. W912 (’/2 %), No MO4 and P0 4 +Triton x 114 72 57 Hor Phytic Acid 49 52 H-PA/ W912 (1/2 %) + Tritonx 114 35 30 1HPA...list or test chemicals. Cr z Chromate conversion coating B z Commercial Inhibitor B HPA = Hot Phytic Acid 18 Table 8. Wetting Agents BASE

  1. Sustaining and Extending the Open Science Grid: Science Innovation on a PetaScale Nationwide Facility (DE-FC02-06ER41436) SciDAC-2 Closeout Report

    SciTech Connect

    Livny, Miron; Shank, James; Ernst, Michael; Blackburn, Kent; Goasguen, Sebastien; Tuts, Michael; Gibbons, Lawrence; Pordes, Ruth; Sliz, Piotr; Deelman, Ewa; Barnett, William; Olson, Doug; McGee, John; Cowles, Robert; Wuerthwein, Frank; Gardner, Robert; Avery, Paul; Wang, Shaowen; Lincoln, David Swanson

    2015-02-11

    Under this SciDAC-2 grant the project’s goal w a s t o stimulate new discoveries by providing scientists with effective and dependable access to an unprecedented national distributed computational facility: the Open Science Grid (OSG). We proposed to achieve this through the work of the Open Science Grid Consortium: a unique hands-on multi-disciplinary collaboration of scientists, software developers and providers of computing resources. Together the stakeholders in this consortium sustain and use a shared distributed computing environment that transforms simulation and experimental science in the US. The OSG consortium is an open collaboration that actively engages new research communities. We operate an open facility that brings together a broad spectrum of compute, storage, and networking resources and interfaces to other cyberinfrastructures, including the US XSEDE (previously TeraGrid), the European Grids for ESciencE (EGEE), as well as campus and regional grids. We leverage middleware provided by computer science groups, facility IT support organizations, and computing programs of application communities for the benefit of consortium members and the US national CI.

  2. Glutamate Receptor Aptamers and ALS

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-01

    that the evolutionary conversion of a ribozyme (RNA) to a deoxribozyme (DNA) of the same function can be accomplished but only with some critical...the role of neutrality in adaptation. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 93, 397-401. 40. Schultes, E. A., and Bartel, D. P. (2000) One sequence, two ribozymes ...implications for the emergence of new ribozyme folds. Science 289, 448-452. 41. Mandal, M., and Breaker, R. R. (2004) Gene regulation by

  3. ALS2 mutations

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Susanne A.; Carr, Lucinda; Deuschl, Guenther; Hopfner, Franziska; Stamelou, Maria; Wood, Nicholas W.; Bhatia, Kailash P.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To determine the genetic etiology in 2 consanguineous families who presented a novel phenotype of autosomal recessive juvenile amyotrophic lateral sclerosis associated with generalized dystonia. Methods: A combination of homozygosity mapping and whole-exome sequencing in the first family and Sanger sequencing of candidate genes in the second family were used. Results: Both families were found to have homozygous loss-of-function mutations in the amyotrophic lateral sclerosis 2 (juvenile) (ALS2) gene. Conclusions: We report generalized dystonia and cerebellar signs in association with ALS2-related disease. We suggest that the ALS2 gene should be screened for mutations in patients who present with a similar phenotype. PMID:24562058

  4. Phase 2 Clinical Trial of AC105 (Mg/PEG) for Treatment of Acute Spinal Cord Injury (SCI)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-01

    rapidly depleted in injured central nervous system (CNS), and this depletion correlates with the severity of injury in animal models (Heath and Vink...1999). Exogenously delivered Mg reduces injury in animals (Kwon et al., 2009) but conventional systemic Mg therapy is limited by the inability to...shown that tissue magnesium (Mg) is rapidly depleted in injured central nervous system (CNS), and this depletion correlates with the severity of

  5. Iron Partitioning in the Lower Mantle: New Experimental Data from Al-Enriched Olivine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piet, H.; Nabiei, F.; Gillet, P.; Badro, J.

    2014-12-01

    The partitioning of iron between the major phases of the lower mantle has an important impact on their physical and chemical properties. A series of experimental studies of Fe-Mg exchange between bridgemanite (magnesium silicate perovskite) and ferropericlase have shown that stark differences in partitioning are observed if olivine [1, 2] or a pyrolitic [3, 4] starting composition are used. The discrepancy has been attributed to the presence of alumina, to that of ferric iron, to multiphase equilibria and even to the activity of FeO in the system. In order to mitigate the discrepancy, we synthesized a sample with San Carlos olivine composition that was doped in alumina. We then used this as starting material for experiments in the laser-heated diamond anvil cell at lower mantle (P,T) conditions along the geotherm. Samples were pressurized, heated, transformed to bridgemanite and ferropericlase, equilibrated, quenched, and decompressed. Thin sections were recovered from the hotspot using a focused ion beam microscope and the composition of the two phases was analyzed using analytical transmission electron microscopy. Iron partitioning in Al-rich olivine will be discussed through a detailed comparison with the Al-rich pyrolitic trend and the Al-free olivine trend. References [1] A-L. Auzende et al., Earth Planet. Sci. Lett., 2008. [2] R. Sinmyo et al., J. Geophys. Res., 2008.[3] R. Irifune et al., Science, 2010. [4] R. Sinmyo et al., Phys. Chem. Minerals, 2013.

  6. Lou Gehrig's Disease (ALS)

    MedlinePlus

    ... when it becomes necessary. For instance, a power wheelchair can enable a paralyzed person with ALS to ... done these things despite being confined to a wheelchair for many years, being able to move only ...

  7. Genetic Testing for ALS

    MedlinePlus

    ... Involved Donate Familial Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (FALS) and Genetic Testing By Deborah Hartzfeld, MS, CGC, Certified Genetic ... guarantee a person will develop symptoms of ALS. Genetic Counseling If there is more than one person ...

  8. Ag-Al-Ca

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carow-Watamura, U.; Louzguine, D. V.; Takeuchi, A.

    This document is part of Part 1 http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/97.etType="URL"/> 'Systems from Ag-Al-Ca to Au-Pd-Si' of Subvolume B 'Physical Properties of Ternary Amorphous Alloys' of Volume 37 'Phase Diagrams and Physical Properties of Nonequilibrium Alloys' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group III 'Condensed Matter'. It contains the Chapter 'Ag-Al-Ca' with the content:

  9. Mexican environments

    SciTech Connect

    Babcock, L.; Nieder, P.

    1995-06-01

    This paper addresses the broad Mexican demographic/economic environment as it influences/interacts with the Mexican physical environment. Mexico is relatively resource-rich, but a high population yields a low per capita income, one sixth that of the United States an Canada, still above levels of most other American countries. The Mexican population has become highly urbanized, and population will continue to increase well into the next century. Mexico City will continue to dominate the Mexican urban hierarchy into the future, and the heavy concentration of people has resulted in a heavy concentration of environmental problems in the Mexico City region. A multi-billion-dollar program has been implemented with a goal of limiting air emissions in 2010 to the levels experienced in 1990. Numerous Mexican environmental problems exist beyond Mexico City, in border areas, and throughout Mexico, but qualified professionals and other resources needed for assessments and management are lacking. The authors conclude that continued economic/environmental cooperation among Canada, the United States, and Mexico will help Mexico to acquire resources needed to improve its infrastructure, environmental education, and environmental education, and environmental management, but the authors question whether Mexico, even with reduced population growth, will be able to attain levels of affluence currently enjoyed in the United State and Canada. They raise, but leave unanswered, the larger question of the level of environmentally sound development which is achievable, appropriate, and sustainable for Mexico and for the North American continent as a whole.

  10. Neuropsychological Assessment in Extreme Environments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    Archives of Clinical Neuropsychology 22S (2007) S89–S99 Neuropsychological assessment in extreme environments Michael Lowe a,∗, Wayne Harris b...c. THIS PAGE unclassified Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std Z39-18 S90 M. Lowe et al. / Archives of Clinical Neuropsychology 22S...et al. / Archives of Clinical Neuropsychology 22S (2007) S89–S99 S91 There was a 10% reduction in this score during the final hour of toluene

  11. Final Report on DOE SciDAC project on Next Generation of Multi-Scale Quantum Simulation Software for Strongly Correlated Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Bai, Zhaojun; Scalettar, Richard; Savrasov, Sergey

    2012-07-01

    This report summarizes the accomplishments of the University of California Davis team which is part of a larger SciDAC collaboration including Mark Jarrell of Louisiana State University, Karen Tomko of the Ohio Supercomputer Center, and Eduardo F. D'Azevedo and Thomas A. Maier of Oak Ridge National Laboratory. In this report, we focus on the major UCD accomplishments. As the paper authorship list emphasizes, much of our work is the result of a tightly integrated effort; hence this compendium of UCD efforts of necessity contains some overlap with the work at our partner institutions.

  12. Building Infrastructure to Accelerate Transfer of Basic Research in Spinal Cord Injury (SCI) to Clinical Practice: North American Clinical Trials Network

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-08-01

    Association for Collaborative Spine Research annual meeting in Chicago at the end of July and they will meet separately to decide how best to move forward with...Mild and moderate elevation of ALT and AST in SCI patients, as reported by Shepard and Bracken,23 was confirmed to occur within the first day of...Spine (Suppl.) 17, 119–128. 23. Shepard , M.J., and Bracken, M.B. (1994). The effect of methyl- prednisilone, naloxone, and spinal cord trauma on

  13. Monitoring Illness in a Closed Work Environment.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-10-20

    AD-AlS 1#17 NAVAL HEALTH RESEARCH CENTER SAN DIEGO CA F/S 5/2 MONITORING ILLNESS MN A CLOSED WORK ENVIRONMENT .(Ul OCT Al L HERNANSEN, V M PUGH...CLOSED WORK ENVIRONMENT Larry Hermansen* and William M. Pugh* Naval Health Research Center P.O. Box 85122 San Diego, California 92138 Accesion Yor NUIS 0R...monitoring outpatient illness rates in a closed work environment . This paper presents additional procedures which were used to further organize and

  14. Comment on "Quaternary glaciations: from observations to theories" by D. Paillard [Quat. Sci. Rev. 107 (2015), 11-24

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bol'shakov, Vyacheslav A.; Kuzmin, Yaroslav V.

    2015-07-01

    In the invited review by Paillard (2015), comprehensive information about both theoretical and empirical studies of Pleistocene glaciations and their causes are presented. D. Paillard's review concludes that Milankovitch's (1930, 1941) theory cannot explain the 100,000 yr periodicity of glaciations within the last one million years, and that an additional factor must be responsible for global climate fluctuations. According to Paillard (2015), changes in the carbon dioxide (CO2) content of the atmosphere are responsible. This statement radically alters the conventional viewpoint about the leading role of orbital variations on global Pleistocene climate (e.g., Hays et al., 1976).

  15. Training Spatial Knowledge Acquisition Using Virtual Environments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-02-22

    involves cognitive science, perceptual psychology, virtual- environment design, real-world training methods , etc.), it obviously requires close...97’... 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5. FUNDING NUMBERS Training Spatial Knowledge Acquisition Using Virtual Environments N00014-96-1-0379 6. AUTHOR(S...KNOWLEDGE ACQUISITION USING VIRTUAL ENVIRONMENTS (1 FEBRUARY 1996 TO 31 JANUARY 1997) OF ¶ NATHANIEL I. DURLACH, ET AL., MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF

  16. Environment matters

    SciTech Connect

    2005-07-01

    This year's annual review is devoted to the theme of environmental health. It contains: an overview by the Director of the World Bank's Environment Department, J. Warren Evans; viewpoints on health risks of environmental pollution, integrating health concerns into carbon planning, sanitation in the world's poorest countries and impacts of indoor air pollution on health; and reviews on the World Bank's efforts to adapt safeguards to demanding priorities and on the Banks' 2005 environmental portfolio. Feature articles include a review of the Bank's Clean Air Initiative (now active in Africa, South and East Asia and Latin America). Reviews of work in the Bank's six regions focus on efforts to address the linkages among poverty, environmental pollution and human health.

  17. Badlands and the Carbon cycle: a significant source of petrogenic organic carbon in rivers and marine environments?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Copard, Yoann; Eyrolle-Boyer, Frederique; Radakovitch, Olivier; Poirel, Alain; Raimbault, Patrick; Lebouteiller, Caroline; Gairoard, Stéphanie; Di-Giovanni, Christian

    2016-04-01

    , which represent less than 0.25 % of the Rhône surface, may yield 15 % of the POC annually delivered to the sea. In other words, 50% of the petrogenic OC would have a badlands origin. At a global scale, we assume that badlands could significantly contribute to the delivery of petrogenic OC to the marine environments. references: Copard Y, Amiotte-Suchet P, Di-Giovanni C, 2007. Earth Planet. Sci. Let., 258, 345-357. Galy V, Peuker-Ehrenbrinck B, Eglinton T, 2015. Nature, 501, 204-208. Graz Y, Di Giovanni C, Copard Y, Mathys N, et al. 2012. Earth Surf. Proc. Land., 37, 1263-1271. Ronov AB, Yaroshevsky AA, 1976. Geochem. Intern. 13, 1761-1795.

  18. Combined geophysical and petrophysical characterization to support a hydrogeological model of a coastal environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burschil, Thomas; Wiederhold, Helga; Scheer, Wolfgang; Kirsch, Reinhard; Krawczyk, Charlotte M.

    2014-05-01

    Global warming affects the water cycle by changing precipitation/evaporation and raising sea level. Especially groundwater systems in sensitive environments, such as coastal areas or barrier islands, have to be evaluated with respect to the potential reduction of water quality, e.g. salinization by saltwater intrusion (Hinsby et al., 2012). To assess these hazards using groundwater modeling we need a strong base of hydraulic and hydrogeological information. The use of integrated geophysical methods, in combination with a petrophysical characterization, provides a reliable architecture for groundwater modeling. Within the EU-project CLIWAT, we investigated the hydrogeological situation of the North Sea island of Föhr in Schleswig-Holstein (Germany). The island was mainly formed during glaciations in Pleistocene Series, especially Saalian and Weichselian Stages. These deposits remain as a Geest core in the southern central part, and house a freshwater lens that is used for the local water supply. To investigate the architecture of the fresh water lens, we carried out several surveys with airborne electromagnetic (AEM), seismic reflection, and borehole methods. To enhance the AEM resistivity model we inverted the data with a-priori constraints from seismic reflections (Burschil et al., 2012a). This constrained inversion leads to, among other things, a separation of two aquifers by resistivity data. Additionally, from borehole logs, vertical seismic profiles (VSP), and nearby AEM inversion point models we are able to petrophysically characterize different lithological categories regarding resistivity and seismic velocity. Subsurface glacial structures, e.g. buried valleys and a push moraine complex, are mapped down to 150 m below sea level. Below this rather horizontal features indicate Tertiary layers. Geophysically determined petrophysical values were correlated with lithological categories to enhance the interpretation of geophysical data. In this way, we expose

  19. Statins: Do They Cause ALS?

    MedlinePlus

    Statins: Do they cause ALS? Do statins cause amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS)? Answers from Francisco Lopez-Jimenez, M.D. ... D. References Sorensen HT, et al. Statins and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: The level of evidence for an association. Journal ...

  20. Rapidly solidified NiAl and FeAl

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaydosh, D. J.; Crimp, M. A.

    1984-01-01

    Melt spinning was used to produce rapidly solidified ribbons of the B2 intermetallics NiAl and FeAl. Both Fe-40Al and Fe-45Al possessed some bend ductility in the as spun condition. The bend ductility of Fe-40Al, Fe-45Al, and equiatomic NiAl increased with subsequent heat treatment. Heat treatment at approximately 0.85 T (sub m) resulted in significant grain growth in equiatomic FeAl and in all the NiAl compositions. Low bend ductility in both FeAl and NiAl generally coincided with intergranular failure, while increased bend ductility was characterized by increasing amounts of transgranular cleavage fracture.

  1. ALS superbend magnet system

    SciTech Connect

    Zbasnik, J.; Wang, S.T.; Chen, J.Y.; DeVries, G.J.; DeMarco, R.; Fahmie, M.; Geyer, A.; Green, M.A.; Harkins, J.; Henderson, T.; Hinkson, J.; Hoyer, E.H.; Krupnick, J.; Marks, S.; Ottens, F.; Paterson, J.A.; Pipersky, P.; Portmann, G.; Robin, D.A.; Schlueter, R.D.; Steier, C.; Taylor, C.E.; Wahrer, R.

    2000-09-15

    The Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is preparing to upgrade the Advanced Light Source (ALS) with three superconducting dipoles (Superbends). In this paper we present the final magnet system design which incorporates R&D test results and addresses the ALS operational concerns of alignment, availability, and economy. The design incorporates conduction-cooled Nb-Ti windings and HTS current leads, epoxy-glass suspension straps, and a Gifford-McMahon cryocooler to supply steady state refrigeration. We also present the current status of fabrication and testing.

  2. Final Report for "Tech-X Corporation work for the SciDAC Center for Simulation of RF Wave Interactions with Magnetohydrodynamics (SWIM)"

    SciTech Connect

    Jenkins, Thomas G.; Kruger, Scott E.

    2013-03-25

    Work carried out by Tech-X Corporation for the DoE SciDAC Center for Simulation of RF Wave Interactions with Magnetohydrodynamics (SWIM; U.S. DoE Office of Science Award Number DE-FC02-06ER54899) is summarized and is shown to fulfil the project objectives. The Tech-X portion of the SWIM work focused on the development of analytic and computational approaches to study neoclassical tearing modes and their interaction with injected electron cyclotron current drive. Using formalism developed by Hegna, Callen, and Ramos [Phys. Plasmas 16, 112501 (2009); Phys. Plasmas 17, 082502 (2010); Phys. Plasmas 18, 102506 (2011)], analytic approximations for the RF interaction were derived and the numerical methods needed to implement these interactions in the NIMROD extended MHD code were developed. Using the SWIM IPS framework, NIMROD has successfully coupled to GENRAY, an RF ray tracing code; additionally, a numerical control system to trigger the RF injection, adjustment, and shutdown in response to tearing mode activity has been developed. We discuss these accomplishments, as well as prospects for ongoing future research that this work has enabled (which continue in a limited fashion under the SciDAC Center for Extended Magnetohydrodynamic Modeling (CEMM) project and under a baseline theory grant). Associated conference presentations, published articles, and publications in progress are also listed.

  3. Anti-preS responses influence the anti-HBs response in newborns after vaccination with the third generation Sci-B-Vac vaccine.

    PubMed

    Sylvan, Staffan P E; Madalinski, Kazimierz; Hellström, Ulla B

    2009-12-11

    We analysed the specificity and significance of the antibody response towards the linear preS1 sequence that has been shown to represent the "hepatocyte binding site" comprising amino acids preS1 (21-47) or the specific preS2 (131-140) antibody response to the "polymerised albumin receptor" in relation to the antibody response to hepatitis B surface antigen during immunisation of healthy children with the preS-containing Sci-B-Vac vaccine. Twenty-eight healthy newborns received three doses of the Sci-B-Vac vaccine according to a 0-, 1-, and 6-month scheme. Seventeen (61%) of the 28 newborns had detectable levels of anti-preS1 (21-47) antibodies and 14 (50%) were anti-preS2 (131-140) reactive at 6 and/or 9 months after initiation of the vaccination. The mean levels of anti-HBs were significantly higher in the anti-preS2 (131-140) non-reactive (24580+/-7815IU/l, mean+SEM) compared with the reactive sera (7287+/-2317IU/l, p<0.025). The highest anti-HBs levels were found in newborns who exhibited reactivity towards the aa 21-47 of the preS1 but lacked anti-preS2 (131-140) reactivity.

  4. MCrAlY bond coat with enhanced Yttrium layer

    DOEpatents

    Jablonski, Paul D; Hawk, Jeffrey A

    2015-04-21

    One or more embodiments relates to an MCrAlY bond coat comprising an MCrAlY layer in contact with a Y--Al.sub.2O.sub.3 layer. The MCrAlY layer is comprised of a .gamma.-M solid solution, a .beta.-MAl intermetallic phase, and Y-type intermetallics. The Y--Al.sub.2O.sub.3 layer is comprised of Yttrium atoms coordinated with oxygen atoms comprising the Al.sub.2O.sub.3 lattice. Both the MCrAlY layer and the Y--Al.sub.2O.sub.3 layer have a substantial absence of Y--Al oxides, providing advantage in the maintainability of the Yttrium reservoir within the MCrAlY bulk. The MCrAlY bond coat may be fabricated through application of a Y.sub.2O.sub.3 paste to an MCrAlY material, followed by heating in a non-oxidizing environment.

  5. Dust Plasma Environment between Saturn's Rings and Mimas' L Shell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sittler, E. C., Jr.; Johnson, R. E.

    2015-12-01

    We will present a new analysis of the available data on the extension of Saturn's ring atmosphere into the magnetosphere beyond the A-ring outer edge (Johnson et al. 2006) out to the orbit of Mimas. This is an interesting region in Saturn's magnetosphere containing the F and G rings and penetrated by the E-ring and the Enceladus neutral torus. This analysis will include a comparison of the Cassini Plasma Spectrometer (CAPS) plasma data, Radio and Plasma Wave Spectrometer (RPWS) plasma wave observations, RPWS Langmuir Probe (LP) observations and Cassini Dust Analyzer (CDA). The central focus will be on the dust plasma interactions. Specific attention will be paid to the SOI data for which there are considerable differences between the ion and electron densities (Elrod et al., 2012) while for other close flybys inside Mimas' L shell such differences are less obvious but the electron data appear to be highly variable. Using previous identifications of nm particles (Jones et al., 2010) inferred from CAPS data and micron sized particles that can be detected by CDA (Kempf et al., 2006) and the RPWS plasma wave dust impact signatures (Kurth et al., 2006) we will attempt to infer the full particle size distribution between the A-ring and Mimas. These nm to micron sized particles can accumulate considerable charge and under certain circumstances could account for the radial trend in the ion density described in Elrod et al. (2014) a critical issue in preparation for the Cassini proximal orbits. References: Elrod, M.K., W.-L. Tseng, R.J. Wilson, R.E. Johnson, J. Geophys. Res., 117, A03207, 2012. Elrod, M.K., W-L Tseng, A.K. Woodson, R.E. Johnson, Icarus, 242, 130-137,2014. Johnson, R. E., et al., Icarus, 180, 393-402, 2006. Jones, G. H., et al., Geophys. Res. Lett., 36, L16204, 2009. Kempf, S., U. Beckmann, R. Srama, M. Horanyi, S. Auerd, E. Grun, Planet. Space Sci., 54, 999-1006, 2006. Kurth, W. S., T.F. Averkamp, D.A. Gurnett, Z. Wang, Planet. Space Sci., 54, 988-998, 2006.

  6. Assessment of DNA damages caused by exposure of bacterial cells and spores to the Mars surface environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fajardo-Cavazos, Patricia; Schuerger, Andrew; Robles-Martinez, Jose; Douki, Thierry; Nicholson, Wayne

    prolonged exposure to simulated full-spectrum solar radiation in Mars atmospheric conditions. The results indicate that forward-contaminant DNA can persist for considerable periods of time at the martian surface, particularly if shielded from solar radiation. References: [1] The ESA-NASA ExoMars programme 2016-2018 -an overview http://sci.esa.int/science-e/www/object/index.cfm?fobjectid=46048 [2] Nicholson, W.L., et al. (2009) Trends Microbiol. 17, 389-392. [3] Pratt, L.M. et al. (2009) http://mepag.jpl.nasa.gov/reports/ [4] Fajardo-Cavazos et al. (2008) Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 74, 5159-5167. [5] Schuerger, A.C. et al. (2008) Icarus 194, 86-100. [6] Slieman, T.A. and Nicholson, W.L. (2000) Appl. Environ. Mi-crobiol. 66, 199-205. [7] Douki, T. et al. (2005) Photochem. Photobiol. 81, 163-169. [8] Fajardo-Cavazos, P. et al. (2010) Astrobiology, in press. Acknowledgments: Thanks go to Galen Bruno and Jeff Fedenko for excellent technical assis-tance. This work was supported by NASA grants NNA05CS68G, NNA06CB58G, and NNX08AO15G.

  7. Fosetyl-al

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Fosetyl - al ; CASRN 39148 - 24 - 8 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Ef

  8. Al Shanker Remembers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Educator, 2000

    2000-01-01

    In a 1996 interview shortly before his death, Al Shanker, longtime president of the American Federation of Teachers, discussed such topics as: his own educational experiences; how he learned about political fighting in the Boy Scouts; the appeal of socialism; multinational corporations and the nation state; teaching tough students; and John Dewey…

  9. Al Partitioning Patterns and Root Growth as Related to Al Sensitivity and Al Tolerance in Wheat.

    PubMed Central

    Samuels, T. D.; Kucukakyuz, K.; Rincon-Zachary, M.

    1997-01-01

    Studies of Al partitioning and accumulation and of the effect of Al on the growth of intact wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) roots of cultivars that show differential Al sensitivity were conducted. The effects of various Al concentrations on root growth and Al accumulation in the tissue were followed for 24 h. At low external Al concentrations, Al accumulation in the root tips was low and root growth was either unaffected or stimulated. Calculations based on regression analysis of growth and Al accumulation in the root tips predicted that 50% root growth inhibition in the Al-tolerant cv Atlas 66 would be attained when the Al concentrations were 105 [mu]M in the nutrient solution and 376.7 [mu]g Al g-1 dry weight in the tissue. In contrast, in the Al-sensitive cv Tam 105, 50% root growth inhibition would be attained when the Al concentrations were 11 [mu]M in the nutrient solution and 546.2 [mu]g Al g-1 dry weight in the tissue. The data support the hypotheses that differential Al sensitivity correlates with differential Al accumulation in the growing root tissue, and that mechanisms of Al tolerance may be based on strategies to exclude Al from the root meristems. PMID:12223623

  10. Al Sumelat Water Network. Village of Al Sumelat, Iraq

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-03-15

    OFFICE OF THE SPECIAL INSPECTOR GENERAL FOR IRAQ RECONSTRUCTION AL SUMELAT WATER NETWORK VILLAGE OF AL SUMELAT, IRAQ...Sumelat Water Network Village of Al Sumelat, Iraq 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e...Al Sumelat Water Network Village of Al Sumelat, Iraq Synopsis Introduction. This report was previously provided on a limited distribution basis

  11. ALS insertion devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoyer, E.; Chin, J.; Halbach, K.; Hassenzahl, W. V.; Humphries, D.; Kincaid, B.; Lancaster, H.; Plate, D.

    1991-08-01

    The Advanced Light Source (ALS), the first US third generation synchrotron radiation source, is currently under construction at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. The low-emittance, 1.5 GeV electron storage ring and the insertion devices are specifically designed to produce high brightness beams in the UV to soft X-Ray range. The planned initial complement of insertion devices includes four 4.6 m long undulators, with period lengths of 3.9 cm, 5.0 cm (2) and 8.0 cm, and a 2.9 m long wiggler of 16 cm period length. Undulator design is well advanced and fabrication has begun on the 5.0 cm and 8.0 cm period length undulators. This paper discusses ALS insertion device requirements; general design philosophy; and design of the magnetic structure, support structure/drive systems, control system and vacuum system.

  12. Finite Gyroradius Effects in the Plasma Environment Near Titan: 3D Hybrid Modeling of the T5 Encounter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpson, D. G.; Lipatov, A. S.; Sittler, E. C.; Cooper, J. F.; Hartle, R. E.; Sarantos, M.

    2012-12-01

    -2369, 2007. [3] Dougherty, M.K., and 12 colleagues, The Cassini magnetic field investigation, Space Sci. Rev., 114 (1-4), 331-383, 2004. [4] Lipatov, et al., Background and pickup ion velocity distribution dynamics in Titan's plasma environment: 3D hybrid simulation and comparison with CAPS T9 observations, Adv. Space Res., 48, 1114-1125, 2011. [5] Ulusen, D., et al., Investigation of the force balance in Titan ionosphere: Cassini T5 flyby, Icarus, 210, 867-880, 2010.

  13. Opportunity's 'Rub al Khali' Panorama

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on the image for Opportunity's 'Rub al Khali' Panorama (QTVR)

    This panoramic image, dubbed 'Rub al Khali,' was acquired by NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity on the plains of Meridiani during the period from the rover's 456th to 464th sols on Mars (May 6 to May 14, 2005). Opportunity was about 2 kilometers (1.2 miles) south of 'Endurance Crater' at a place known informally as 'Purgatory Dune.'

    The rover was stuck in the dune's deep fine sand for more than a month. 'Rub al Khali' (Arabic translation: 'the empty quarter') was chosen as the name for this panorama because it is the name of a similarly barren, desolate part of the Saudi Arabian desert on Earth.

    The view spans 360 degrees. It consists of images obtained in 97 individual pointings of the panoramic camera. The camera took images with five camera filters at each pointing. This 22,780-by-6,000-pixel mosaic is an approximately true-color rendering generated using the images acquired through filters admitting light wavelengths of 750, 530, and 480 nanometers.

    Lighting varied during the nine sols it took to acquire this panorama, resulting in some small image seams within the mosaic. These seams have been smoothed in sky parts of the mosaic to better simulate the vista that a person would see if able to view it all at the same time on Mars.

    Opportunity's tracks leading back to the north (center of the panorama) are a reminder of the rover's long trek from Endurance Crater. The deep ruts dug by Opportunity's wheels as it became stuck in the sand appear in the foreground. The crest and trough of the last ripple the rover crossed before getting stuck is visible in the center. These wind-formed sand features are only about 10 to 15 centimeters (4 to 6 inches) tall. The crest of the actual ripple where the rover got stuck can be seen just to the right of center. The tracks and a few other places on and near ripple crests can

  14. [Comparison and thinking on literatures of low back pain treated with acupuncture-moxibustion published in foreign SCI journals and domestic core journals].

    PubMed

    Lin, Xiang-Jun; Li, Rui

    2012-07-01

    The literatures of clinical research on acupuncture treatment of low back pain included in foreign SCI journals as well as the domestic core journals in the recent 10 years were collected in this article to discuss the divergence of views domestically and abroad. The result showed that acute and chronic back pain and low back pain were generally set as the targets of research abroad. While, diseases with western diagnosis such as lumbar disc herniation was often set as the study target by domestic researchers. It indicats that divergence existed in understanding and study methods between Chinese and foreign research fellows. Thus, comparison should be carried out so as to learn from the strong points of each other and close the gap.

  15. panMetaDocs, eSciDoc, and DOIDB - an infrastructure for the curation and publication of file-based datasets for 'GFZ Data Services'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulbricht, Damian; Elger, Kirsten; Bertelmann, Roland; Klump, Jens

    2016-04-01

    With the foundation of DataCite in 2009 and the technical infrastructure installed in the last six years it has become very easy to create citable dataset DOIs. Nowadays, dataset DOIs are increasingly accepted and required by journals in reference lists of manuscripts. In addition, DataCite provides usage statistics [1] of assigned DOIs and offers a public search API to make research data count. By linking related information to the data, they become more useful for future generations of scientists. For this purpose, several identifier systems, as ISBN for books, ISSN for journals, DOI for articles or related data, Orcid for authors, and IGSN for physical samples can be attached to DOIs using the DataCite metadata schema [2]. While these are good preconditions to publish data, free and open solutions that help with the curation of data, the publication of research data, and the assignment of DOIs in one software seem to be rare. At GFZ Potsdam we built a modular software stack that is made of several free and open software solutions and we established 'GFZ Data Services'. 'GFZ Data Services' provides storage, a metadata editor for publication and a facility to moderate minted DOIs. All software solutions are connected through web APIs, which makes it possible to reuse and integrate established software. Core component of 'GFZ Data Services' is an eSciDoc [3] middleware that is used as central storage, and has been designed along the OAIS reference model for digital preservation. Thus, data are stored in self-contained packages that are made of binary file-based data and XML-based metadata. The eSciDoc infrastructure provides access control to data and it is able to handle half-open datasets, which is useful in embargo situations when a subset of the research data are released after an adequate period. The data exchange platform panMetaDocs [4] makes use of eSciDoc's REST API to upload file-based data into eSciDoc and uses a metadata editor [5] to annotate the files

  16. PROBING THE DARK AGES AT z ∼ 20: THE SCI-HI 21 cm ALL-SKY SPECTRUM EXPERIMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Voytek, Tabitha C.; Natarajan, Aravind; Peterson, Jeffrey B.; Jáuregui García, José Miguel; López-Cruz, Omar

    2014-02-10

    We present first results from the SCI-HI experiment, which we used to measure the all-sky-averaged 21 cm brightness temperature in the redshift range 14.8 < z < 22.7. The instrument consists of a single broadband sub-wavelength size antenna and a sampling system for real-time data processing and recording. Preliminary observations were completed in 2013 June at Isla Guadalupe, a Mexican biosphere reserve located in the Pacific Ocean. The data was cleaned to excise channels contaminated by radio frequency interference, and the system response was calibrated by comparing the measured brightness temperature to the Global Sky Model of the Galaxy and by independent measurement of Johnson noise from a calibration terminator. We present our results, discuss the cosmological implications, and describe plans for future work.

  17. Differential effects on KCC2 expression and spasticity of ALS and traumatic injuries to motoneurons

    PubMed Central

    Mòdol, Laura; Mancuso, Renzo; Alé, Albert; Francos-Quijorna, Isaac; Navarro, Xavier

    2014-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a neurodegenerative disease manifested by progressive muscle atrophy and paralysis due to the loss of upper and lower motoneurons (MN). Spasticity appears in ALS patients leading to further disabling consequences. Loss of the inhibitory tone induced by downregulation of the potassium chloride cotransporter 2 (KCC2) in MN has been proposed to importantly contribute to the spastic behavior after spinal cord injury (SCI). The aim of the present study was to test whether the alterations in the expression of KCC2 are linked to the appearance of spasticity in the SODG93A ALS murine model. We compared SODG93A mice to wild type mice subjected to SCI to mimic the spinal MN disconnection from motor descending pathways, and to sciatic nerve lesion to mimic the loss of MN connectivity to muscle. Electrophysiological results show that loss of motor function is observed at presymptomatic stage (8 weeks) in SODG93A mice but hyperreflexia and spasticity do not appear until a late stage (16 weeks). However, KCC2 was not downregulated despite MN suffered disconnection both from muscles and upper MNs. Further experiments revealed decreased gephyrin expression, as a general marker of inhibitory systems, accompanied by a reduction in the number of Renshaw interneurons. Moreover, 5-HT fibers were increased in the ventral horn of the lumbar spinal cord at late stage of disease progression in SOD1G93A mice. Taken together, the present results indicate that spasticity appears late in the ALS model, and may be mediated by a decrease in inhibitory interneurons and an increase of 5-HT transmission, while the absence of down-regulation of KCC2 could rather indicate an inability of MNs to respond to insults. PMID:24478630

  18. RU SciTech: Weaving Astronomy and Physics into a University-sponsored Summer Camp for Middle School Students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hart, Quyen N.

    2015-01-01

    We present a successful model for organizing a small University-sponsored summer camp that integrates astronomy and physics content with other science disciplines and computer programming content. The aim of our science and technology camp is to engage middle school students in a wide array of critical thinking tasks and hands-on activities centered on science and technology. Additionally, our program seeks to increase and maintain STEM interest among children, particularly in under-represented populations (e.g., Hispanic, African-American, women, and lower socioeconomic individuals) with hopes of decreasing disparities in diversity across many STEM fields.During this four-day camp, organized and facilitated by faculty volunteers, activities rotated through many STEM modules, including optics, telescopes, circuit building, computer hardware, and programming. Specifically, we scaffold camp activities to build upon similar ideas and content if possible. Using knowledge and skills gained through the AAS Astronomy Ambassadors program, we were able to integrate several astronomy activities into the camp, leading students through engaging activities, and conduct educational research. We present best practices on piloting a similar program in a university environment, our efforts to connect the learning outcomes common across all the modules, specifically in astronomy and physics, outline future camp activities, and the survey results on the impact of camp activities on attitudes toward science, technology, and science careers.

  19. An Epidemiological Study of Cutaneous Leishmaniasis in Al-Jabal Al-Gharbi, Libya

    PubMed Central

    Abdellatif, Manal Z. M.; El-Mabrouk, Khamis

    2013-01-01

    Cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) is an endemic parasitic infection in the Mediterranean region, including Libya and its Al-jabal Al-gharbi province. We aimed at studying the occupational relevance as well as other epidemiological aspects of CL. We investigated 140 CL cases who attended at Gharyan outpatient polyclinic during a period of 6 months in 2009. CL infection was clinically diagnosed and confirmed by demonstration of Leishmania parasites on smears from lesions. Our findings showed that males were more affected than females (P=0.04), and people above 10-years were more affected than younger ones (P=0.0001). A significant percent of CL cases belonged to Al-Kawasem subprovince (P=0.0001). Farm-related activities were the most frequent occupations among CL cases (P=0.04). In addition to farm workers, housewives and students are at risk groups since they are engaged at farm activities. Moreover, those who have occupations that require staying outdoors for a part of night, e.g., policemen, are also at risk. Compared to children, adult CL patients had multiple lesions (P=0.001) that were more prevalent in their upper and lower extremities than the face (P=0.0001). We conclude that CL is a major health problem in Al-jabal Al-gharbi province of Libya. The presence of rodents and sandflies makes it a suitable environment for Leishmania to spread in an endemic epidemiological pattern. Being engaged in farming activities or outdoor occupations increases the risk of infection. Various clinical patterns of CL suggest the presence of more than 1 species of Leishmania at Al-jabal Al-gharbi province. We propose that the 2 species responsible for CL in this area are L. major and L. tropica. Further investigations to identify the leishmanial species responsible for CL at Al-jabal Al-gharbi together with adoption of preventive and control programs are needed. PMID:23467624

  20. An epidemiological study of cutaneous leishmaniasis in Al-jabal Al-gharbi, Libya.

    PubMed

    Abdellatif, Manal Z M; El-Mabrouk, Khamis; Ewis, Ashraf A

    2013-02-01

    Cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) is an endemic parasitic infection in the Mediterranean region, including Libya and its Al-jabal Al-gharbi province. We aimed at studying the occupational relevance as well as other epidemiological aspects of CL. We investigated 140 CL cases who attended at Gharyan outpatient polyclinic during a period of 6 months in 2009. CL infection was clinically diagnosed and confirmed by demonstration of Leishmania parasites on smears from lesions. Our findings showed that males were more affected than females (P=0.04), and people above 10-years were more affected than younger ones (P=0.0001). A significant percent of CL cases belonged to Al-Kawasem subprovince (P=0.0001). Farm-related activities were the most frequent occupations among CL cases (P=0.04). In addition to farm workers, housewives and students are at risk groups since they are engaged at farm activities. Moreover, those who have occupations that require staying outdoors for a part of night, e.g., policemen, are also at risk. Compared to children, adult CL patients had multiple lesions (P=0.001) that were more prevalent in their upper and lower extremities than the face (P=0.0001). We conclude that CL is a major health problem in Al-jabal Al-gharbi province of Libya. The presence of rodents and sandflies makes it a suitable environment for Leishmania to spread in an endemic epidemiological pattern. Being engaged in farming activities or outdoor occupations increases the risk of infection. Various clinical patterns of CL suggest the presence of more than 1 species of Leishmania at Al-jabal Al-gharbi province. We propose that the 2 species responsible for CL in this area are L. major and L. tropica. Further investigations to identify the leishmanial species responsible for CL at Al-jabal Al-gharbi together with adoption of preventive and control programs are needed.

  1. Evaluation of unique identifiers used as keys to match identical publications in Pure and SciVal – a case study from health science

    PubMed Central

    Madsen, Heidi Holst; Madsen, Dicte; Gauffriau, Marianne

    2016-01-01

    Unique identifiers (UID) are seen as an effective key to match identical publications across databases or identify duplicates in a database. The objective of the present study is to investigate how well UIDs work as match keys in the integration between Pure and SciVal, based on a case with publications from the health sciences. We evaluate the matching process based on information about coverage, precision, and characteristics of publications matched versus not matched with UIDs as the match keys. We analyze this information to detect errors, if any, in the matching process. As an example we also briefly discuss how publication sets formed by using UIDs as the match keys may affect the bibliometric indicators number of publications, number of citations, and the average number of citations per publication.  The objective is addressed in a literature review and a case study. The literature review shows that only a few studies evaluate how well UIDs work as a match key. From the literature we identify four error types: Duplicate digital object identifiers (DOI), incorrect DOIs in reference lists and databases, DOIs not registered by the database where a bibliometric analysis is performed, and erroneous optical or special character recognition. The case study explores the use of UIDs in the integration between the databases Pure and SciVal. Specifically journal publications in English are matched between the two databases. We find all error types except erroneous optical or special character recognition in our publication sets. In particular the duplicate DOIs constitute a problem for the calculation of bibliometric indicators as both keeping the duplicates to improve the reliability of citation counts and deleting them to improve the reliability of publication counts will distort the calculation of average number of citations per publication. The use of UIDs as a match key in citation linking is implemented in many settings, and the availability of UIDs may become

  2. Evaluation of unique identifiers used as keys to match identical publications in Pure and SciVal - a case study from health science.

    PubMed

    Madsen, Heidi Holst; Madsen, Dicte; Gauffriau, Marianne

    2016-01-01

    Unique identifiers (UID) are seen as an effective key to match identical publications across databases or identify duplicates in a database. The objective of the present study is to investigate how well UIDs work as match keys in the integration between Pure and SciVal, based on a case with publications from the health sciences. We evaluate the matching process based on information about coverage, precision, and characteristics of publications matched versus not matched with UIDs as the match keys. We analyze this information to detect errors, if any, in the matching process. As an example we also briefly discuss how publication sets formed by using UIDs as the match keys may affect the bibliometric indicators number of publications, number of citations, and the average number of citations per publication.  The objective is addressed in a literature review and a case study. The literature review shows that only a few studies evaluate how well UIDs work as a match key. From the literature we identify four error types: Duplicate digital object identifiers (DOI), incorrect DOIs in reference lists and databases, DOIs not registered by the database where a bibliometric analysis is performed, and erroneous optical or special character recognition. The case study explores the use of UIDs in the integration between the databases Pure and SciVal. Specifically journal publications in English are matched between the two databases. We find all error types except erroneous optical or special character recognition in our publication sets. In particular the duplicate DOIs constitute a problem for the calculation of bibliometric indicators as both keeping the duplicates to improve the reliability of citation counts and deleting them to improve the reliability of publication counts will distort the calculation of average number of citations per publication. The use of UIDs as a match key in citation linking is implemented in many settings, and the availability of UIDs may become

  3. Modified spectral count index (mSCI) for estimation of protein abundance by protein relative identification possibility (RIPpro): a new proteomic technological parameter.

    PubMed

    Sun, Aihua; Zhang, Jiyang; Wang, Chunping; Yang, Dong; Wei, Handong; Zhu, Yunping; Jiang, Ying; He, Fuchu

    2009-11-01

    Peptides Count (SC) was widely used for protein abundance estimation in proteomics. On the basis of that, Mann and co-workers corrected the SC by dividing spectrum counts by the number of observable peptides per protein and named it PAI. Here we present modified spectral count index (mSCI) for protein abundance estimation, which was defined as the number of observed peptides divided by protein relative identification possibility (RIPpro). RIPpro was derived from 6788 mRNA and protein expression data (collected from human liver samples) and related to proteins' three physical and chemical properties (MW/pI/Hp). For 46 proteins in mouse neuro2a cells, mSCI shows a linear relationship with the actual protein concentration, similar or better than PAI abundance. Also, multiple linear regressions were performed to quantitative assess several factors' impact on the mRNA/protein abundance correlation. Our results shown that the primary factor affecting protein levels was mRNA abundance (32-37%), followed by variability in protein measurement, MW and protein turnover (7-12%,7-9% and 2-3%, respectively). Interestingly, we found that the concordance between mRNA transcripts and protein expression was not consistent among all protein functional categories. This correlation was lower for signaling proteins as compared to metabolism genes. It was determined that RIPpro was the primary factor affecting signaling protein abundance (23% on average), followed by mRNA abundance (17%). In contrast, only 5% (on average) of the variability of metabolic protein abundance was explained by RIPpro, much lower than mRNA abundance (40%). These results provide the impetus for further investigation of the biological significance of mechanisms regulating the mRNA/protein abundance correlation and provide additional insight into the relative importance of the technological parameter (RIPpro) in mRNA/protein correlation research.

  4. Changing polar environments: Interdisciplinary challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shepson, Paul B.; Ariya, Parisa A.; Deal, Clara J.; Donaldson, D. James; Douglas, Thomas A.; Loose, Brice; Maksym, Ted; Matrai, Patricia A.; Russell, Lynn M.; Saenz, Benjamin; Stefels, Jacqueline; Steiner, Nadja

    2012-03-01

    In the past few decades, there has been enormous growth in scientific studies of physical, chemical, and biological interactions among reservoirs in polar regions. This has come, in part, as a result of a few significant discoveries: There is dramatic halogen chemistry that occurs on and above the sea ice in the springtime that destroys lower tropospheric ozone and mercury [Simpson et al., 2007; Steffen et al., 2008], the sunlit snowpack is very photochemically active [Grannas et al., 2007], biology as a source of organic compounds plays a pivotal role in these processes, and these processes are occurring in the context of rapidly changing polar regions under climate feedbacks that are as of yet not fully understood [Serreze and Barry, 2011]. Stimulated by the opportunities of the International Polar Year (IPY, 2007-2009), a number of large-scale field studies in both polar environments have been undertaken, aimed at the study of the complex biotic and abiotic processes occurring in all phases (see Figure 1). Sea ice plays a critical role in polar environments: It is a highly reflective surface that interacts with radiation; it provides a habitat for mammals and micro-organisms alike, thus playing a key role in polar trophic processes and elemental cycles; and it creates a saline environment for chemical processes that facilitate release of halogenated gases that contribute to the atmosphere's ability to photochemically cleanse itself in an otherwise low-radiation environment. Ocean-air and sea ice-air interfaces also produce aerosol particles that provide cloud condensation nuclei.

  5. 40 CFR 721.430 - Oxo-substituted amino-al-kanoic acid derivative.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Oxo-substituted amino-al-kanoic acid... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.430 Oxo-substituted amino-al-kanoic acid derivative. (a) Chemical... as oxo-substituted amino al-kan-oic acid derivative (PMN No. P-92-692) is subject to reporting...

  6. 40 CFR 721.430 - Oxo-substituted amino-al-kanoic acid derivative.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Oxo-substituted amino-al-kanoic acid... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.430 Oxo-substituted amino-al-kanoic acid derivative. (a) Chemical... as oxo-substituted amino al-kan-oic acid derivative (PMN No. P-92-692) is subject to reporting...

  7. 40 CFR 721.430 - Oxo-substituted amino-al-kanoic acid derivative.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Oxo-substituted amino-al-kanoic acid... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.430 Oxo-substituted amino-al-kanoic acid derivative. (a) Chemical... as oxo-substituted amino al-kan-oic acid derivative (PMN No. P-92-692) is subject to reporting...

  8. 40 CFR 721.430 - Oxo-substituted amino-al-kanoic acid derivative.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Oxo-substituted amino-al-kanoic acid... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.430 Oxo-substituted amino-al-kanoic acid derivative. (a) Chemical... as oxo-substituted amino al-kan-oic acid derivative (PMN No. P-92-692) is subject to reporting...

  9. 40 CFR 721.430 - Oxo-substituted amino-al-kanoic acid derivative.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Oxo-substituted amino-al-kanoic acid... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.430 Oxo-substituted amino-al-kanoic acid derivative. (a) Chemical... as oxo-substituted amino al-kan-oic acid derivative (PMN No. P-92-692) is subject to reporting...

  10. Contribution to: SciDAC Progess Report - Collaborative Design and Development of the Community Climate System Model for Terascale Computing

    SciTech Connect

    Cameron-Smith, P; Caldeira, K; Taylor, J; Lamarque, J F

    2003-10-17

    Since pre-industrial times, the concentrations of various aerosol types (e.g., sulfate, black carbon, and mineral dust) and several key greenhouse gases such as methane (CH{sub 4}), nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O), and ozone (O{sub 3}), have been changing because of anthropogenic activities. Collectively, the magnitude of the climate forcing from these species is larger than that of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) although some are positive and some are negative (see Fig. 27). The behavior and effect of these non-CO{sub 2} species is more complicated than for CO{sub 2} because they are affected by atmospheric chemistry and aerosol microphysics, so their distributions are more heterogeneous. There are also feedbacks between climate, chemistry, and aerosols that further increase the importance of chemistry and aerosols, e.g. a change in any one of stratospheric ozone, stratospheric temperature, or stratospheric dynamics will feedback on the other two. For aerosols, in addition to the direct effect of scattering and absorbing light, they act indirectly by serving as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), leading to clouds with more (but smaller) droplets that reflect more sunlight and last longer, thus cooling the atmosphere. Aerosols and atmospheric chemistry can also have an impact through interaction with the biosphere, e.g., fertilization of the land with nitrogen species and fertilization of the oceans with Iron from mineral dust. There is also chemical production of CO{sub 2} in the atmosphere through oxidation of species such as CH{sub 4}, CO and terpenes. Thus, to predict and understand future climates, the radiative forcing from these non-CO{sub 2} gases and aerosols, as well as their feedbacks into the radiative, dynamical, and biogeochemical balances, must be taken into account. The non-CO{sub 2} species are also important because they should be more amenable to anthropogenic control measures trying to mitigate climate change (Hansen et al., 2000) than CO{sub 2} because

  11. Frequently Asked Questions about ALS and the ALS Registry

    MedlinePlus

    ... Why is it necessary to provide my Social Security Number (SSN) when registering in the National ALS ... Why is it necessary to provide my Social Security Number (SSN) when registering in the National ALS ...

  12. Impact of locomotion training with a neurologic controlled hybrid assistive limb (HAL) exoskeleton on neuropathic pain and health related quality of life (HRQoL) in chronic SCI: a case study (.).

    PubMed

    Cruciger, Oliver; Schildhauer, Thomas A; Meindl, Renate C; Tegenthoff, Martin; Schwenkreis, Peter; Citak, Mustafa; Aach, Mirko

    2016-08-01

    Chronic neuropathic pain (CNP) is a common condition associated with spinal cord injury (SCI) and has been reported to be severe, disabling and often treatment-resistant and therefore remains a clinical challenge for the attending physicians. The treatment usually includes pharmacological and/or nonpharmacological approaches. Body weight supported treadmill training (BWSTT) and locomotion training with driven gait orthosis (DGO) have evolved over the last decades and are now considered to be an established part in the rehabilitation of SCI patients. Conventional locomotion training goes along with improvements of the patients' walking abilities in particular speed and gait pattern. The neurologic controlled hybrid assistive limb (HAL®, Cyberdyne Inc., Ibraki, Japan) exoskeleton, however, is a new tailored approach to support motor functions synchronously to the patient's voluntary drive. This report presents two cases of severe chronic and therapy resistant neuropathic pain due to chronic SCI and demonstrates the beneficial effects of neurologic controlled exoskeletal intervention on pain severity and health-related quality of life (HRQoL). Both of these patients were engaged in a 12 weeks period of daily HAL®-supported locomotion training. In addition to improvements in motor functions and walking abilities, both show significant reduction in pain severity and improvements in all HRQoL domains. Although various causal factors likely contribute to abatement of CNP, the reported results occurred due to a new approach in the rehabilitation of chronic spinal cord injury patients. These findings suggest not only the feasibility of this new approach but in conclusion, demonstrate the effectiveness of neurologic controlled locomotion training in the long-term management of refractory neuropathic pain. Implications for Rehabilitation CNP remains a challenge in the rehabilitation of chronic SCI patients. Locomotion training with the HAL exoskeleton seems to improve CNP

  13. Lunar radiation environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwadron, Nathan; Spence, Harlan; Wilson, Jody

    One of the goals of the CRaTER investigation is to characterize the radiation environment near the Moon in order to enable exploration. The state-of-the-art understanding developed thus far during the LRO mission is documented in a special issue of the Spaceweather Journal entitled “Space Weather: Building the observational foundation to deduce biological effects of space radiation” (Schwadron et al., 2013a). This recently published CRaTER work probes deeper into the physics of the radiation environment at the Moon. It motivates and provides the scientific basis for new investigations in the next phase of the LRO mission. The effects of Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCRs) and Solar Energetic Particles (SEPs) range from chemical modification of the regolith, the generation of a radiation albedo that is increasingly illuminating chemical properties of the regolith, causing charging of the regolith and hazards to human explorers and robotic missions. Low-lunar orbit provides a platform for measuring SEP anisotropy over timescales of 2 hours both parallel and perpendicular to the ecliptic plane, and so far we have observed more than 18 SEP events with time-variable anisotropies during the LRO mission. Albedo proton maps of the Moon from CRaTER indicate that the flux of lunar albedo protons is correlated with elemental abundances at the lunar surface. The yield of albedo protons from the maria is 1% higher than the yield from the highlands, and there are localized peaks with even higher contrast (that may be co-located with peaks in trace elemental abundances as measured by the Lunar Prospector Gamma Ray Spectrometer). The Moon’s radiation environment both charges and affects the chemistry in the Moon’s polar regions, particularly in PSRs. This makes these regions a prime target for new CRaTER observations, since CRaTER measures GCRs and SEPs that penetrate the regolith down to 10s of cm. Thus, we review emerging discoveries from LRO/CRaTER’s remarkable exploration of

  14. Anatomy education environment measurement inventory: A valid tool to measure the anatomy learning environment.

    PubMed

    Hadie, Siti Nurma Hanim; Hassan, Asma'; Ismail, Zul Izhar Mohd; Asari, Mohd Asnizam; Khan, Aaijaz Ahmed; Kasim, Fazlina; Yusof, Nurul Aiman Mohd; Manan Sulong, Husnaida Abdul; Tg Muda, Tg Fatimah Murniwati; Arifin, Wan Nor; Yusoff, Muhamad Saiful Bahri

    2017-01-30

    Students' perceptions of the education environment influence their learning. Ever since the major medical curriculum reform, anatomy education has undergone several changes in terms of its curriculum, teaching modalities, learning resources, and assessment methods. By measuring students' perceptions concerning anatomy education environment, valuable information can be obtained to facilitate improvements in teaching and learning. Hence, it is important to use a valid inventory that specifically measures attributes of the anatomy education environment. In this study, a new 11-factor, 132-items Anatomy Education Environment Measurement Inventory (AEEMI) was developed using Delphi technique and was validated in a Malaysian public medical school. The inventory was found to have satisfactory content evidence (scale-level content validity index [total] = 0.646); good response process evidence (scale-level face validity index [total] = 0.867); and acceptable to high internal consistency, with the Raykov composite reliability estimates of the six factors are in the range of 0.604-0.876. The best fit model of the AEEMI is achieved with six domains and 25 items (X(2)  = 415.67, P < 0.001, ChiSq/df = 1.63, RMSEA = 0.045, GFI = 0.905, CFI = 0.937, NFI = 0.854, TLI = 0.926). Hence, AEEMI was proven to have good psychometric properties, and thus could be used to measure the anatomy education environment in Malaysia. A concerted collaboration should be initiated toward developing a valid universal tool that, using the methods outlined in this study, measures the anatomy education environment across different institutions and countries. Anat Sci Educ. © 2017 American Association of Anatomists.

  15. Discussion of “Geomechanical modeling of the nucleation process of Australia's 1989 M5.6 Newcastle earthquake” by C.D. Klose [Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 256 (2007) 547 553

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinn, C. D.; Glen, R. A.; Diessel, C. F. K.

    2008-05-01

    On the basis of a numerical simulation, Klose [Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 256: 547-553 (2007)] proposed that the MW = 5.2-5.6 earthquake that nucleated beneath Newcastle (New South Wales, Australia) at 10.30 AM December 28, 1989 (AEST), was the result of 200yr of coal mining in the region. We argue here that Klose's [Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 256: 547-553 (2007)] ultimate conclusion is not supported by his own model or by available geological and seismic data. In particular, the 1989 Newcastle earthquake was not anomalous with respect to regional seismic activity.

  16. Emission Measurements of Lunar Analogues Measured in a Simulated Lunar Environment for Interpretation of Data Returned from the Diviner Lunar Radiometer on NASA’s Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, I. R.; Bowles, N. E.; Greenhagen, B. T.; Paige, D. A.

    2009-12-01

    analogue minerals in the laboratory, by heating the minerals to ~400K while they are surrounded by a shroud cooled to ~120K by liquid nitrogen, all in a vacuum of <10^(-4)mbar. The simulator is attached to a Brüker IFS66v Fourier Transform Spectrometer at the University of Oxford. This setup is capable of measuring emission spectra in a simulated lunar environment from the mid to far-infrared of a wide range of minerals of various grain size distributions. This presentation includes the minerals albite, andesine, anorthite, augite, bytownite, diopside, enstatite, fayalite, forsterite, ilmenite, quartz etc, and several mineral mixtures. References: [1] Greenhagen B.T. & Paige D.A.(2009) LPS XL; [2] Paige, D.A. et al.(2009) Space Sci.Rev.; [3] Greenhagen B.T. & Paige D.A.(2006) LPS XXXVII; [4] Murcray F.H. et al.(1970) JGR, 75; [5] Lucey P.G.(1991) LPS XXI; [6] Salisbury J.W. & Walter L.S.(1989) JGR, 94; [7] Cooper B.L. et al.(2002) JGR, 107; [8] Logan L.M. & Hunt G.R.(1970) Science, 169; [9] Logan L.M. et al.(1973) JGR, 79; [10] Henderson B.G. et al.(1996) JGR, 101; [11]Henderson B.G. & Jakosky B.M.(1997) JGR, 102; [12]Nash D.B. et al.(1993) JGR, 98

  17. Al Jazirah, Sudan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    Al Jazirah (also Gezira) is one of the 26 states of Sudan. The state lies between the Blue Nile and the White Nile in the east-central region of the country. It is a well populated area suitable for agriculture. The area was at the southern end of Nubia and little is known about its ancient history and only limited archaeological work has been conducted in this area. The region has benefited from the Gezira Scheme, a program to foster cotton farming begun in 1925. At that time the Sennar Dam and numerous irrigation canals were built. Al Jazirah became the Sudan's major agricultural region with more than 2.5 million acres (10,000 km) under cultivation. The initial development project was semi-private, but the government nationalized it in 1950. Cotton production increased in the 1970s but by the 1990s increased wheat production has supplanted a third of the land formerly seeded with cotton.

    The image was acquired December 25, 2006, covers an area of 56 x 36.4 km, and is located near 14.5 degrees north latitude, 33.1 degrees east longitude.

    The U.S. science team is located at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Science Mission Directorate.

  18. AL Amyloidosis and Agent Orange

    MedlinePlus

    ... for survivors' benefits . Research on AL amyloidosis and herbicides The Health and Medicine Division (formally known as ... to the compounds of interest found in the herbicide Agent Orange and AL amyloidosis." VA made a ...

  19. Al Qaeda as a System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-03-15

    either as welcome guests or parasites . As welcome guests, Al Qaeda members take sanctuary in sponsor states. Sponsor states provide Al Qaeda with...sponsorship, Al Qaeda takes sanctuary as parasites either overtly or covertly. They take overt sanctuary in countries that publicly claim a policy...39 Yehudit Barsky, “Al Qa’ida, Iran, and Hezbollah: A Continuing Symbiosis ,” The American Jewish Committee Series on Terrorism , February 2004, 2-3

  20. Observations of Al, Fe and Ca(+) in Mercury's Exosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bida, Thomas A.; Killen, Rosemary M.

    2011-01-01

    We report 5-(sigma) tangent column detections of Al and Fe, and strict 3-(sigma) tangent column upper limits for Ca(+) in Mercury's exosphere obtained using the HIRES spectrometer on the Keck I telescope. These are the first direct detections of Al and Fe in Mercury's exosphere. Our Ca(-) observation is consistent with that reported by The Mercury Atmospheric and Surface Composition Spectrometer (MASCS) on the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft.

  1. h -AlN-Mg(OH)2 van der Waals bilayer heterostructure: Tuning the excitonic characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bacaksiz, C.; Dominguez, A.; Rubio, A.; Senger, R. T.; Sahin, H.

    2017-02-01

    Motivated by recent studies that reported the successful synthesis of monolayer Mg (OH) 2 [Suslu et al., Sci. Rep. 6, 20525 (2016), 10.1038/srep20525] and hexagonal (h -)AlN [Tsipas et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 103, 251605 (2013), 10.1063/1.4851239], we investigate structural, electronic, and optical properties of vertically stacked h -AlN and Mg (OH) 2 , through ab initio density-functional theory (DFT), many-body quasiparticle calculations within the GW approximation and the Bethe-Salpeter equation (BSE). It is obtained that the bilayer heterostructure prefers the A B' stacking having direct band gap at the Γ with Type-II band alignment in which the valance band maximum and conduction band minimum originate from different layer. Regarding the optical properties, the imaginary part of the dielectric function of the individual layers and heterobilayer are investigated. The heterobilayer possesses excitonic peaks, which appear only after the construction of the heterobilayer. The lowest three exciton peaks are analyzed in detail by means of band decomposed charge density and the oscillator strength. Furthermore, the wave function calculation shows that the first peak of the heterobilayer originates from spatially indirect exciton where the electron and hole localized at h -AlN and Mg (OH) 2 , respectively, which is important for the light harvesting applications.

  2. Forging of FeAl intermetallic compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Flores, O.; Juarez, J.; Campillo, B.; Martinez, L.; Schneibel, J.H.

    1994-09-01

    Much activity has been concentrated on the development of intermetallic compounds with the aim of improving tensile ductility, fracture toughness and high notch sensitivity in order to develop an attractive combination of properties for high and low temperature applications. This paper reports experience in processing and forging of FeAl intermetallic of B2 type. During the experiments two different temperatures were employed, and the specimens were forged after annealing in air, 10{sup {minus}2} torr vacuum and argon. From the results it was learned that annealing FeAl in argon atmosphere prior to forging resulted in better deformation behavior than for the other two environments. For the higher forging temperature used in the experiments (700C), the as-cast microstructure becomes partially recrystallized.

  3. Overview of Mercury's ionized exosphere and plasma environment: Results from the first MESSENGER flyby

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zurbuchen, Thomas H.; Raines, Jim M.; Gloeckler, George; Krimigis, Stamatios M.; Slavin, James A.; Koehn, Patrick L.; Killen, Rosemary M.; Sprague, Ann L.; McNutt, Ralph L., Jr.; Solomon, Sean C.

    2008-09-01

    spacecraft, the observed velocity distributions are often incomplete, and an inversion requires model assumptions. The FIPS data indicate strong plasma heating at the magnetospheric boundary and document the evolution of the plasma throughout the magnetosphere. Conclusions The FIPS sensor has provided the first ion plasma measurements of Mercury's magnetosphere and ionized exosphere. The exosphere is found to be compositionally rich, with a significant number of atomic and molecular species. The measurements provide a first glimpse of Mercury's exosphere as a system that is highly connected through the incomplete shielding of Mercury's magnetic field from the solar wind, the interactions of the solar wind components with Mercury's surface, and the subsequent evolution of these particles in Mercury's small yet violent magnetosphere. References [1] Andrews, G. B. et al. (2007) Space Sci Rev., 131, 523. [2] Kabin, K. et al. (2000) Icarus, 143, 397. [3] Zurbuchen, T. H. et al. (2008) Science, in press. [4] Sprague, A. L. et al. (1995) Icarus, 118, 211. [5] Koehn, P. L. and Sprague A. L. (2007) Planet. Space Sci., 55, 1530. [6] Crider, D. H. and Vondrak R. R. (2000) JGR, 105, 26773. [7] Slavin, J. A. et al. (2008), Science, in press. [8] Mukai, T. et al. (2004) Adv. Space Phys, 33, 2166.

  4. Growth and Optical Properties of Al rich AlN/AlGaN Quantum Wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahtamouni, T. M. Al; Nepal, N.; Nakarmi, M. L.; Lin, J. Y.; Jiang, H. X.

    2006-03-01

    Al rich AlGaN alloys are promising materials for the applications in the optoelectronic devices such as deep ultraviolet (UV) emitters and detectors in the spectral range down to 200 nm. AlGaN based UV emitters (λ<340nm) has applications in bio-chemical agent detection and medical research/ health care. To realize deep UV emission (λ< 280 nm) Al rich AlGaN based quantum wells (QWs) are required. We report here the growth of AlN/AlxGa1-xNQWs (x>0.65) on AlN/sapphire templates by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). Deep UV photoluminescence (PL) was employed to study the optical properties of the QWs. Well width (Al composition) dependence was studied by varying the QW thickness (Al composition) with fixed x ˜ 0.65 (well width at 3 nm). Optical properties of these QWs such as the effects of alloy fluctuation, temperature, strain and piezoelectric field, carrier and exciton localizations on the quantum efficiency have been studied. Carrier and exciton dynamics were probed. Implications of our findings on the applications of Al rich AlN/AlGaN QWs for UV emitters and detectors will also be discussed.

  5. Potential role of stabilized Criegee radicals in sulfuric acid production in a high biogenic VOC environment.

    PubMed

    Kim, Saewung; Guenther, Alex; Lefer, Barry; Flynn, James; Griffin, Robert; Rutter, Andrew P; Gong, Longwen; Cevik, Basak Karakurt

    2015-03-17

    We present field observations made in June 2011 downwind of Dallas-Fort Worth, TX, and evaluate the role of stabilized Criegee radicals (sCIs) in gaseous sulfuric acid (H2SO4) production. Zero-dimensional model calculations show that sCI from biogenic volatile organic compounds composed the majority of the sCIs. The main uncertainty associated with an evaluation of H2SO4 production from the sCI reaction channel is the lack of experimentally determined reaction rates for sCIs formed from isoprene ozonolysis with SO2 along with systematic discrepancies in experimentally derived reaction rates between other sCIs and SO2 and water vapor. In general, the maximum of H2SO4 production from the sCI channel is found in the late afternoon as ozone increases toward the late afternoon. The sCI channel, however, contributes minor H2SO4 production compared with the conventional OH channel in the mid-day. Finally, the production and the loss rates of H2SO4 are compared. The application of the recommended mass accommodation coefficient causes significant overestimation of H2SO4 loss rates compared with H2SO4 production rates. However, the application of a lower experimental value for the mass accommodation coefficient provides good agreement between the loss and production rates of H2SO4. The results suggest that the recommended coefficient for the H2O surface may not be suitable for this relatively dry environment.

  6. Studies of 27Al NMR in SrAl4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niki, Haruo; Higa, Nonoka; Kuroshima, Hiroko; Toji, Tatsuki; Morishima, Mach; Minei, Motofumi; Yogi, Mamoru; Nakamura, Ai; Hedo, Masato; Nakama, Takao; Ōnuki, Yoshichika; Harima, Hisatomo

    A charge density wave (CDW) transition at TCDW = 243 K and a structural phase (SP) transition at approximately 100 K occur in SrAl4 with the BaAl4-type body center tetragonal structure, which is the divalent and non-4f electron reference compound of EuAl4. To understand the behaviors of the CDW and SP transitions, the 27Al NMR measurements using a single crystal and a powder sample of SrAl4 have been carried out. The line width below TCDW is modulated by an electrical quadruple interaction between 27Al nucleus and CDW charge modulation. The incommensurate CDW state below TCDW changes into a different structure below TSP. The temperature dependences of Knight shifts of 27Al(I) and 27Al(II) show the different behaviors. The temperature variation of 27Al(I) Knight shift shows anomalies at the CDW and SP transition temperatures, revealing the shift to negative side below TCDW, which is attributable to the core polarization of the d-electrons. However, 27Al(II) Knight shift keeps almost constant except for the small shift due to the SP transition. The 1/T1T of 27Al(I) indicates the obvious changes due to the CDW and SP transitions, while that of 27Al(II) takes a constant value. The density of state at the Fermi level at Al(I) site below 60 K would be about 0.9 times less than that above TCDW.

  7. SciDAC's Earth System Grid Center for Enabling Technologies Semi-Annual Progress Report for the Period April 1, 2009 through September 30, 2009

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Dean N.; Foster, I. T.; Middleton, D. E.

    2009-10-15

    This report summarizes work carried out by the ESG-CET during the period April 1, 2009 through September 30, 2009. It includes discussion of highlights, overall progress, period goals, collaborations, papers, and presentations. To learn more about our project, and to find previous reports, please visit the Earth System Grid Center for Enabling Technologies (ESG-CET) website. This report will be forwarded to the DOE SciDAC program management, the Office of Biological and Environmental Research (OBER) program management, national and international collaborators and stakeholders (e.g., the Community Climate System Model (CCSM), the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) 5th Assessment Report (AR5), the Climate Science Computational End Station (CCES), the SciDAC II: A Scalable and Extensible Earth System Model for Climate Change Science, the North American Regional Climate Change Assessment Program (NARCCAP), and other wide-ranging climate model evaluation activities). During this semi-annual reporting period, the ESG-CET team continued its efforts to complete software components needed for the ESG Gateway and Data Node. These components include: Data Versioning, Data Replication, DataMover-Lite (DML) and Bulk Data Mover (BDM), Metrics, Product Services, and Security, all joining together to form ESG-CET's first beta release. The launch of the beta release is scheduled for late October with the installation of ESG Gateways at NCAR and LLNL/PCMDI. Using the developed ESG Data Publisher, the ESG II CMIP3 (IPCC AR4) data holdings - approximately 35 TB - will be among the first datasets to be published into the new ESG enterprise system. In addition, the NCAR's ESG II data holdings will also be published into the new system - approximately 200 TB. This period also saw the testing of the ESG Data Node at various collaboration sites, including: the British Atmospheric Data Center (BADC), the Max-Planck-Institute for Meteorology, the University of Tokyo Center for

  8. Superconductivity and the environment: a Roadmap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishijima, Shigehiro; Eckroad, Steven; Marian, Adela; Choi, Kyeongdal; Kim, Woo Seok; Terai, Motoaki; Deng, Zigang; Zheng, Jun; Wang, Jiasu; Umemoto, Katsuya; Du, Jia; Febvre, Pascal; Keenan, Shane; Mukhanov, Oleg; Cooley, Lance D.; Foley, Cathy P.; Hassenzahl, William V.; Izumi, Mitsuru

    2013-11-01

    gas emissions according to the Kyoto Protocol (Hartikainen et al 2003 Supercond. Sci. Technol. 16 963). New technologies would include superconducting energy storage systems to effectively store power generation from renewable sources as well as high-temperature superconducting systems used in generators, transformers and synchronous motors in power stations and heavy-industry facilities. However, to be effective, these systems must be superior to conventional systems and, in reality, market penetration will occur as existing electrical machinery is written off. At current write-off rates, to achieve a 50% transfer to superconducting systems will take 20 years (Hartikainen et al 2003 Supercond. Sci. Technol. 16 963). The Roadmap next considers dc transmission of green power with a section by Eckroad and Marian who provide an update on the development of superconducting power transmission lines in view of recent sustainability studies. The potential of magnetic energy storage is then presented by Coi and Kim, who argue that a successful transition to wind and solar power generation must be harmonized with the conventional electrical network, which requires a storage technology with a fast response and long backup times. Transport. Superconducting Maglev trains and motors for international shipping have the potential to considerably reduce the emissions that contribute to greenhouse gases while improving their economic viability by reducing losses and improving efficiencies. International shipping, alone, contributes 3% of the greenhouse gas emissions. Three sections of the Roadmap identify how high-speed rail can be a major solution to providing fast, low energy, environmentally-friendly transport enabling reduction in automobile and aircraft travel by offering an alternative that is very competitive. With maritime international environmental regulations tightening, HTS motors with the characteristics of high torque and compactness will become important devices for

  9. Al Qaeda and the Global War on Terror

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    needed to understand the enemy and the operational environment of the Arab Muslim world, with the aim of increasing the effectiveness of America’s...the enemy and the operational environment of the Arab Muslim world, with the aim of increasing the effectiveness of America’s future wartime efforts...www.independent.co.uk/news/world/asia/ special -report-is-al-qaida-in-p.htmls- 850606.html (accessed April 20, 2010). The authors reported that in the summer of 2000

  10. Correction: Xie, H.; et al. 3D QSAR studies, pharmacophore modeling and virtual screening on a series of steroidal aromatase inhibitors. Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2014, 15, 20927-20947.

    PubMed

    Xie, Huiding; Qiu, Kaixiong; Xie, Xiaoguang

    2015-03-05

    A number of sentences in the first paragraph of the introduction of [28] were copied verbatim from [21,22,25,29]. Although [21,22,25] were cited in the text, [29] was omitted and it was not made sufficiently clear that direct quotations were used. The authors wish to apologize to the authors of [21,22,25,29] and to the readers of the journal for any inconvenience.

  11. Rub' al Khali, Arabia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    The Rub' al Khali is one of the largest sand deserts in the world, encompassing most of the southern third of the Arabian Peninsula. It includes parts of Oman, United Arab Emirates, and Yemen. The desert covers 650,000 square kilometers, more than the area of France. Largely unexplored until recently, the desert is 1000 km long and 500 km wide. The first documented journeys made by Westerners were those of Bertram Thomas in 1931 and St. John Philby in 1932. With daytime temperatures reaching 55 degrees Celsius, and dunes taller than 330 meters, the desert may be one of the most forbidding places on Earth.

    The image was acquired December 2, 2005, covers an area of 54.8 x 61.9 km, and is located near 20.7 degrees north latitude, 53.6 degrees east longitude.

    The U.S. science team is located at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Science Mission Directorate.

  12. Morton et al. Reply

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morton, Douglas C.; Nagol, Jyoteshwar; Carabajal, Claudia C.; Rosette, Jacqueline; Palace, Michael; Cook, Bruce D.; Vermote, Eric F.; Harding, David J.; North, Peter R. J.

    2016-01-01

    Multiple mechanisms could lead to up-regulation of dry-season photosynthesis in Amazon forests, including canopy phenology and illumination geometry. We specifically tested two mechanisms for phenology-driven changes in Amazon forests during dry-season months, and the combined evidence from passive optical and lidar satellite data was incompatible with large net changes in canopy leaf area or leaf reflectance suggested by previous studies. We therefore hypothesized that seasonal changes in the fraction of sunlit and shaded canopies, one aspect of bidirectional reflectance effects in Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) data, could alter light availability for dry-season photosynthesis and the photosynthetic capacity of Amazon forests without large net changes in canopy composition. Subsequent work supports the hypothesis that seasonal changes in illumination geometry and diffuse light regulate light saturation in Amazon forests. These studies clarify the physical mechanisms that govern light availability in Amazon forests from seasonal variability in direct and diffuse illumination. Previously, in the debate over light limitation of Amazon forest productivity, seasonal changes in the distribution of light within complex Amazon forest canopies were confounded with dry-season increases in total incoming photosynthetically active radiation. In the accompanying Comment, Saleska et al. do not fully account for this confounding effect of forest structure on photosynthetic capacity.

  13. PMEL contributions to the collaboration: SCALING THE EARTH SYSTEM GRID TO PETASCALE DATA for the DOE SciDACs Earth System Grid Center for Enabling Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Hankin, Steve

    2012-06-01

    Drawing to a close after five years of funding from DOE's ASCR and BER program offices, the SciDAC-2 project called the Earth System Grid (ESG) Center for Enabling Technologies has successfully established a new capability for serving data from distributed centers. The system enables users to access, analyze, and visualize data using a globally federated collection of networks, computers and software. The ESG software now known as the Earth System Grid Federation (ESGF) has attracted a broad developer base and has been widely adopted so that it is now being utilized in serving the most comprehensive multi-model climate data sets in the world. The system is used to support international climate model intercomparison activities as well as high profile U.S. DOE, NOAA, NASA, and NSF projects. It currently provides more than 25,000 users access to more than half a petabyte of climate data (from models and from observations) and has enabled over a 1,000 scientific publications.

  14. [SciELO Public Health: the performance of Cadernos de Saúde Pública and Revista de Saúde Pública].

    PubMed

    Barata, Rita Barradas

    2007-12-01

    The aim of this paper was to analyze two Brazilian scientific journals included in the SciELO Library of Public Health, using a group of bibliometric indicators and scrutinizing the articles most viewed. Cadernos de Saúde Pública was accessed 3,743.59 times per month, with an average of 30.31 citations per article. The 50 articles most viewed (6.72 to 524.5 views) were mostly published in Portuguese (92%). 42% were theoretical essays, 20% surveys, and 16% descriptive studies. 42% used argumentative techniques, 34% quantitative techniques, 18% qualitative techniques, and 6% mathematical modeling. The most common themes were: health and work (50%), epidemiology (22%), and environmental health (8%). Revista de Saúde Pública was accessed 1,590.97 times per month, with an average of 26.27 citations per article. The 50 articles most viewed (7.33 and 56.50 views) were all published in Portuguese: 46% were surveys, 14% databases analysis, and 12% systematic reviews. Quantitative techniques were adopted in 66% of such articles, while mathematical modeling was the same as observed in Cadernos de Saúde Pública, as were qualitative techniques. The most common themes were health services organization (22%), nutrition (22%), health and work (18%), epidemiology (12%), and environmental health (12%).

  15. Dynamics of pickup ion velocity distribution function in Titan's plasma environment (TA encounter): 3D hybrid kinetic modeling and comparison with CAPS observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpson, D. G.; Lipatov, A. S.; Sittler, E. C.; Hartle, R. E.; Cooper, J. F.

    2013-12-01

    ., Springer, (Dordrecht, Heidelberg, London, New York, pp. 393-455, 2009). [2] Sittler, E.C., et al., Saturn's Magnetospheric Interaction with Titan as Defined by Cassini Encounters T9 and T18: New Results, Planet. Space Sci., doi.10.1016/j.pss.2009.09.017. [3] Coates, A.J., Interaction of Titan's ionosphere with Saturn's magnetosphere. Phil. Trans. R. Soc. A (2009) 367, 773-788, doi: 10.1098/rsta.2008.0248. [4] Lipatov, A.S., et al., Background and pickup ion velocity distribution dynamics in Titan's plasma environment: 3D hybrid simulation and comparison with CAPS T9 observations. Adv. Space Res. 48, 1114-1125, 2011.

  16. A Learning Framework for the Small Business Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelliher, Felicity; Henderson, Joan Bernadette

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this article is to offer insight into the factors affecting individual and organisational learning in a small business; specifically the identification of the learning relationships that are unique to the small business environment. Design/methodology/approach: The authors apply Crossan et al.'s (1997, 1999) Organisational…

  17. Presence within a mixed reality environment.

    PubMed

    van Schaik, Paul; Turnbull, Triece; van Wersch, Anna; Drummond, Sarah

    2004-10-01

    Mixed reality environments represent a new approach to creating technology-mediated experiences. However, there is a lack of empirical research investigating users' actual experience. The aim of the current exploratory, non-experimental study was to establish levels of and identify factors associated with presence, within the framework of Schubert et al.'s model of presence. Using questionnaire and interview methods, the experience of the final performance of the Desert Rain mixed reality environment was investigated. Levels of general and spatial presence were relatively high, but levels of involvement and realness were not. Overall, intrinsic motivation, confidence and intention to re-visit Desert Rain were high. However, age was negatively associated with both spatial presence and confidence to play. Furthermore, various problems in navigating the environment were identified. Results are discussed in terms of Schubert's model and other theoretical perspectives. Implications for system design are presented.

  18. Reply to comments by Ahmad et al. on: Shah, A. A., 2013. Earthquake geology of Kashmir Basin and its implications for future large earthquakes International Journal of Earth Sciences DOI:10.1007/s00531-013-0874-8 and on Shah, A. A., 2015. Kashmir Basin Fault and its tectonic significance in NW Himalaya, Jammu and Kashmir, India, International Journal of Earth Sciences DOI:10.1007/s00531-015-1183-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, A. A.

    2016-03-01

    Shah (Int J Earth Sci 102:1957-1966, 2013) mapped major unknown faults and fault segments in Kashmir basin using geomorphological techniques. The major trace of out-of-sequence thrust fault was named as Kashmir basin fault (KBF) because it runs through the middle of Kashmir basin, and the active movement on it has backtilted and uplifted most of the basin. Ahmad et al. (Int J Earth Sci, 2015) have disputed the existence of KBF and maintained that faults identified by Shah (Int J Earth Sci 102:1957-1966, 2013) were already mapped as inferred faults by earlier workers. The early works, however, show a major normal fault, or a minor out-of-sequence reverse fault, and none have shown a major thrust fault.

  19. Giant thermal vibrations in the framework compounds Ba1 -xSrxAl2O4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawaguchi, S.; Ishii, Y.; Tanaka, E.; Tsukasaki, H.; Kubota, Y.; Mori, S.

    2016-08-01

    Synchrotron x-ray diffraction experiments were performed on the network compounds Ba1 -xSrxAl2O4 at temperatures between 15 and 800 K. The ferroelectric phase of the parent BaAl2O4 is largely suppressed by substituting a small amount of Sr for Ba and disappears for x ≥0.1 . Structural refinements reveal that the isotropic atomic displacement parameter Biso in the bridging oxygen atom is largely independent of temperature and retains an anomalously large value in the adjacent paraelectric phase even at the lowest temperature. The Biso systematically increases as x increases, exhibiting an especially large value for x =0.5 . According to previous electron diffraction experiments for Ba1 -xSrxAl2O4 with x ≥0.1 , strong thermal diffuse scattering occurs at two reciprocal points relating to two distinct soft modes at the M and K points over a wide range of temperatures below 800 K [Y. Ishii et al., Sci. Rep. 6, 19154 (2016), 10.1038/srep19154]. Although the latter mode disappears at approximately 200 K, the former does not condense, at least down to 100 K. The anomalously large Biso observed in this study is ascribed to these soft modes existing in a wide temperature range.

  20. Is there a paraneoplastic ALS?

    PubMed

    Corcia, Philippe; Gordon, Paul H; Camdessanche, Jean-Philippe

    2015-06-01

    Our objective was to examine the strength of evidence in support of the paraneoplastic syndrome (PNS) as one cause of ALS and, if the association appears more likely than chance, determine which features of ALS imply concurrent malignancy. We reviewed the literature on concurrent ALS and neoplasia assessing the strength of evidence for the association. Most accounts of ALS and neoplasm are case reports or small uncontrolled series. In order of strength of evidence, three clinical situations that support a paraneoplastic aetiology for ALS are: 1) laboratory evidence of well-characterized onconeuronal antibodies, most often anti-Hu, anti-Yo or anti-Ri; 2) co-occurrence of ALS and a neoplasm known to cause PNS, usually lymphoma or cancer of the breast; and 3) combined ALS and a neoplasm not classically associated with PNS, without detectable onconeuronal antibodies. Clinical features that warrant evaluation of neoplasm include upper motor neuron disease in elderly females, rapid progression, non-motor signs, and young onset. In conclusion, most examples of ALS and neoplasm do not constitute a classically established PNS. Rare instances of elevated onconeuronal antibody titres or typical neoplasm, implies that, albeit rare, the PNS is one of a multitude of causes of ALS.

  1. Intermetallic compound formation at Cu-Al wire bond interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bae, In-Tae; Young Jung, Dae; Chen, William T.; Du, Yong

    2012-12-01

    Intermetallic compound (IMC) formation and evolution at Cu-Al wire bond interface were studied using focused ion beam /scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM)/energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS), nano beam electron diffraction (NBED) and structure factor (SF) calculation. It was found that discrete IMC patches were formed at the Cu/Al interface in as-packaged state and they grew toward Al pad after high temperature storage (HTS) environment at 150 °C. TEM/EDS and NBED results combined with SF calculation revealed the evidence of metastable θ'-CuAl2 IMC phase (tetragonal, space group: I4¯m2, a = 0.404 nm, c = 0.580 nm) formed at Cu/Al interfaces in both of the as-packaged and the post-HTS samples. Two feasible mechanisms for the formation of the metastable θ'-CuAl2 phase are discussed based on (1) non-equilibrium cooling of wire bond that is attributed to highly short bonding process time and (2) the epitaxial relationships between Cu and θ'-CuAl2, which can minimize lattice mismatch for θ'-CuAl2 to grow on Cu.

  2. Sex and Fertility After SCI

    MedlinePlus

    ... About Blog Facing Disability Jeff Shannon Donate Experts \\ Sex and Fertility After Spinal Cord Injury Topics Adult ... Spasticity, Physical Therapy-Lokomat Spasticity, Physical Therapy-Lokomat Sex and Fertility After Spinal Cord Injury Sex and ...

  3. Complete genome sequence of Aeromonas hydrophila AL06-06

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aeromonas hydrophila occurs in freshwater environments and infects fish and mammals. In this work, we report the complete genome sequence of Aeromonas hydrophila AL06-06, which was isolated from diseased goldfish and is being used for comparative genomic studies with A. hydrophila strains causing ba...

  4. Impurity Enhancement of Al_2O_3/Al Adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiao-Gang; Smith, John R.; Zhang, Wenqing; Evans, Anthony

    2003-03-01

    Our first-principles computations indicate that the clean Al_2O_3/Al interface is relatively weak - weaker than bulk Al. Fracture experiments reveal that the interface is relatively strong with observed failure in bulk Al, however. This paradox is resolved via doping effects of the common impurity C. We have found that only 1/3 of a monolayer of carbon segregated to the interface can increase the work of separation by a factor of 3. The resulting strong interface is consistent with fracture experiments. It arises due to void formation in the interface, which provides low-strain sites for the carbon to segregate to. The degree of void formation is consistent with the relatively high heat of oxide formation of Al.

  5. Siderophore production in high iron environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, S. A.; Hoffman, C. L.; Moffett, J. W.; Edwards, K. J.

    2010-12-01

    Up until recently, the geochemical cycling of Fe in deep sea hydrothermal plumes has assumed to be inorganically dominated, resulting in quantitative precipitation of all hydrothermally sourced Fe to the seafloor. Recent detection of organic Fe binding ligands within both the dissolved and particulate phase (Bennett et al., 2008; Toner et al., 2009), suggests that hydrothermally sourced Fe may be important on a global scale (Tagliabue et al., 2010). The source of these organic ligands is currently unknown; hypotheses include the possible entrainment of organic carbon from the biologically rich diffuse flow areas, or in-situ production from microbial processes. However, the microbial production of organic ligands is only expected when Fe is a limited micronutrient, which is not the case in the hydrothermal environment. The importance of Fe cycling microorganisms within hydrothermal systems was previously overlooked due to the poor energetics with regards to Fe oxidation and reduction. But their recent detection within the hydrothermal system, both around low temperature Fe rich mineral deposits and within hydrothermal plumes (Edwards et al., 2004; Sylvan et al., In prep) suggests that they may have an important role in the hydrothermal Fe cycle, potentially resulting in an interplay between Fe and organic carbon. Within the laboratory, we have carried out experiments to investigate an Fe oxidizing bacteria in a variety of high Fe environments. We have detected both the production of siderophores and an increase in reduced Fe when the Fe oxidizing bacteria is exposed to both Fe(III) and Fe(II) rich minerals. The role of these microbes in the mineral dissolution of Fe sulfides along the seafloor and within the hydrothermal plume, may have important implications on the speciation of Fe and the role of siderophores in the marine environment. Bennett, S.A. et al. 2008. EPSL, 270: 157-167. Edwards, K.J. et al. 2004. Geomicrobiology Journal, 21: 393-404. Sylvan, J.B. et al

  6. Corrigendum to "Widespread occurrence of (per)chlorate in the Solar System" [Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 430 (2015) 470-476

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, W. Andrew; Davila, Alfonso F.; Sears, Derek; Coates, John D.; McKay, Christopher P.; Brundrett, Maeghan; Estrada, Nubia; Böhlke, J. K.

    2016-02-01

    The authors regret that two sets of data (Atacama (Rao et al., 2010) and Mars Meteorite Range (Kounaves et al., 2014)) in Fig. 2 of our article were plotted in the wrong units. The correction does not change the relationship between ClO3- and ClO4- ; it only shifts the magnitude of the concentrations. The conclusions of the article are not affected. The corrected Fig. 2 appears below.

  7. The in vitro biocompatibility and macrophage phagocytosis of Mg17Al12 phase in Mg-Al-Zn alloys.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chen; He, Peng; Wan, Peng; Li, Mei; Wang, Kehong; Tan, Lili; Zhang, Yu; Yang, Ke

    2015-07-01

    Mg alloys are gaining interest for applications as biodegradable medical implant, including Mg-Al-Zn series alloys with good combination of mechanical properties and reasonable corrosion resistance. However, whether the existence of second phase particles in the alloys exerts influence on the biocompatibility is still not clear. A deeper understanding of how the particles regulate specific biological responses is becoming a crucial requirement for their subsequent biomedical application. In this work, the in vitro biocompatibility of Mg17Al12 as a common second phase in biodegradable Mg-Al-Zn alloys was investigated via hemolysis, cytotoxicity, cell proliferation, and cell adhesion tests. Moreover, osteogenic differentiation was evaluated by the extracellular matrix mineralization assay. The Mg17Al12 particles were also prepared to simulate the real situation of second phase in the in vivo environment in order to estimate the cellular response in macrophages to the Mg17Al12 particles. The experimental results indicated that no hemolysis was found and an excellent cytocompatibility was also proved for the Mg17Al12 second phase when co-cultured with L929 cells, MC3T3-E1 cells and BMSCs. Macrophage phagocytosis co-culture test revealed that Mg17Al12 particles exerted no harmful effect on RAW264.7 macrophages and could be phagocytized by the RAW264.7 cells. Furthermore, the possible inflammatory reaction and metabolic way for Mg17Al12 phase were also discussed in detail.

  8. Portfolio evaluation of health programs: a reply to Sendi et al.

    PubMed

    Bridges, John F P; Terris, Darcey D

    2004-05-01

    Sendi et al. (Soc. Sci. Med. 57 (2003) 2207) extend previous research on cost-effectiveness analysis to the evaluation of a portfolio of interventions with risky outcomes using a "second best" approach that can identify improvements in efficiency in the allocation of resources. This method, however, cannot be used to directly identify the optimal solution to the resource allocation problem. Theoretically, a stricter adherence to the foundations of portfolio theory would permit direct optimization in portfolio selection, however, when we include uncertainty in our analysis in addition to the traditional concept of risk (which is often mislabelled uncertainty) complexities are introduced that create significant hurdles in the development of practical applications of portfolio theory for health care policy decision making.

  9. Effect of chemical environment and rock composition on fracture mechanics properties of reservoir lithologies in context of CO2 sequestration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Major, J. R.; Eichhubl, P.; Callahan, O. A.

    2015-12-01

    The coupled chemical and mechanical response of reservoir and seal rocks to injection of CO2 have major implications on the short and long term security of sequestered carbon. Many current numerical models evaluating behavior of reservoirs and seals during and after CO2 injection in the subsurface consider chemistry and mechanics separately and use only simple mechanical stability criteria while ignoring time-dependent failure parameters. CO2 injection irreversibly alters the subsurface chemical environment which can then affect geomechanical properties on a range of time scales by altering rock mineralogy and cements through dissolution, remobilization, and precipitation. It has also been documented that geomechanical parameters such as fracture toughness (KIC) and subcritical index (SCI) are sensitive to chemical environment. Double torsion fracture mechanics testing of reservoir lithologies under controlled environmental conditions relevant to CO2 sequestration show that chemical environment can measurably affect KIC and SCI. This coupled chemical-mechanical behavior is also influenced by rock composition, grains, amount and types of cement, and fabric. Fracture mechanics testing of the Aztec Sandstone, a largely silica-cemented, subarkose sandstone demonstrate it is less sensitive to chemical environment than Entrada Sandstone, a silty, clay-rich sandstone. The presence of de-ionized water lowers KIC by approximately 20% and SCI 30% in the Aztec Sandstone relative to tests performed in air, whereas the Entrada Sandstone shows reductions on the order of 70% and 90%, respectively. These results indicate that rock composition influences the chemical-mechanical response to deformation, and that the relative chemical reactivity of target reservoirs should be recognized in context of CO2 sequestration. In general, inert grains and cements such as quartz will be less sensitive to the changing subsurface environment than carbonates and clays.

  10. Thermal Modeling of Al-Al and Al-Steel Friction Stir Spot Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jedrasiak, P.; Shercliff, H. R.; Reilly, A.; McShane, G. J.; Chen, Y. C.; Wang, L.; Robson, J.; Prangnell, P.

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents a finite element thermal model for similar and dissimilar alloy friction stir spot welding (FSSW). The model is calibrated and validated using instrumented lap joints in Al-Al and Al-Fe automotive sheet alloys. The model successfully predicts the thermal histories for a range of process conditions. The resulting temperature histories are used to predict the growth of intermetallic phases at the interface in Al-Fe welds. Temperature predictions were used to study the evolution of hardness of a precipitation-hardened aluminum alloy during post-weld aging after FSSW.

  11. Multiscale modelling of Interaction of Alane Clusters on Al(111) surface: A Reactive Force Field and Infrared Absorption Spectroscopy Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ojwang, Julius; van Duin, Adri; Goddard, William, III; van Santen, Rutger

    2010-10-01

    Alanes are believed to be the ubiquitous facilitators of mass transport of aluminum atoms during the thermal decomposition of NaAlH4. Alanes also take part on decomposition of AlH3, another important material for hydrogen storage. We have used interplay of theoretical simulations (reactive force field and density functional theory) and experiments (IR reflection absorption spectroscopy) to address the issue of the role of alanes as facilitators of mass transport of aluminum atoms. We have obtained valuable details on the mechanism of formation and agglomeration of alanes on Al(111) surface. Our simulations show that, on the Al(111) surface, alanes oligomerize into larger alanes. The identification of these string like intermediates as a precursor to the bulk hydride phase allows us to explain the loss of resolution in surface IR experiments with increasing hydrogen coverage on single crystal Al(111) surface. This is in excellent agreement with the experimental works of Go et al. (E. Go, K. Thuermer, J.E. Reutt-Robey, Surf. Sci.,437:377(1999)).

  12. Philosophieren als Unterrichtsprinzip im Mathematikunterricht

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meerwaldt, Diana

    Philosophieren und Mathematik scheinen zunächst gegensätzliche Bereiche zu sein, die sich kaum vereinbaren lassen. Dies trifft für eine Auffassung zu, die Philosophieren als "Gerede" disqualifiziert und Mathematik als eine reine "Formelwissenschaft" begreift. Beide Auffassungen werden den Gegenständen nicht gerecht.

  13. The Evolution of Al Qaeda

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-06-15

    Al Qaeda is a product of the forces of globalization. Increasing access to global finances , international travel, and sophisticated technology is...evolution. Al Qaeda is a product of the forces of globalization. Increasing access to global finances , international travel, and sophisticated technology...75 Finance

  14. Developing quality of care indicators for patients with traumatic and non-traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI): A feasibility study using administrative health data

    PubMed Central

    Parsons, Daria; Craven, B. Catharine; Jaglal, Susan B.; Verrier, Molly

    2015-01-01

    Objectives (1) to inform the development of health system quality indicators for traumatic and non-traumatic spinal cord injury from acute care admission to community care discharge using administrative data, and (2) to examine characteristics and differences in care among type of care facility, and type of pathology using administrative data. Design Retrospective cohort study using administrative health data. Setting Ontario, Canada. Participants Using administrative health data, we used International Classification codes 10th version Canadian Edition to identify incident cases of SCI from April 1, 2006 to March 31, 2012. Results We identified 7,693 cases in our cohort, of whom 1,537 (20.0%) were categorized as traumatic spinal cord (TSCI) and 6,156 (80.0%) as non-traumatic (NTSCI). Of those identified with NTSCI, more than half (54.0%) were diagnosed with either Guillain Barré syndrome and Multiple Sclerosis (n = 3,326). More individuals admitted to a trauma/spine center were seen by an orthopedic surgeon or a neurosurgeon (20.3% compared to 5.6% for NTSCI; 77.7% compared to 24.9% for TSCI). Only 25.7% (n = 724) of the NTSCI cohort were admitted to a rehabilitation facility from a trauma/spine center, compared to 58.9% (n = 754) of those with TSCI. Conclusions Important challenges in data completeness and utility were identified. Province wide processes to flag incomplete data and provision of incentives for comprehensive data are urgently needed to develop quality indicators across the care continuum. Consensus on the coding for NTSCI for the purposes of developing health system indicators is required. PMID:26111282

  15. Physical Environments of Assisted Living: Research Needs and Challenges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cutler, Lois J.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: This article aims to review research measures and findings related to physical environments of assisted living (AL) according to multiple conceptual perspectives--ecological, cultural, and Maslovian hierarchy. Design and Methods: A literature and research review was undertaken with two foci: performance measures for physical environments,…

  16. Design Characteristics of Virtual Learning Environments: State of Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mueller, Daniel; Strohmeier, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    Virtual learning environments constitute current information systems' category for electronically supported training and development in (higher) education(al) and vocational training settings. Frequently expected advantages of using virtual learning environments refer, for instance, to the efficiency, individuality, ubiquity, timeliness and…

  17. Data Environment Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-12-01

    input or output. Out of (iii), the dual mathematical programming problem arising in the first way ( Chames , et al. 1978) reproduces (and generalizes) M...DMU’s were the Charnes-Cooper test (see Chames and Cooper 1961 and Ben-Israel et al. 1977) for multi-criteria ("goal programming") optimality here...Hunsaker (Management Science February 1986) present them erroneously with erroneous conclusions and all examples erroneously solved. (See Chames et al 1987

  18. Characteristics of CeCoIn5/Al/AlOx/Nb and CeCoIn5/Al/AlOx/Al Tunnel Junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Petrovic, C.; Nevirkovets, I.P.; Chernyashevskyy, O.; Hu, R.; Ketterson, J.B.; Sarma, B.K.

    2009-03-03

    We report characteristics of CeCoIn{sub 5}/Al/AlO{sub x}/Nb and CeCoIn{sub 5}/Al/AlO{sub x}/Al tunnel junctions fabricated on the (0 0 1) surface of CeCoIn{sub 5} crystal platelets. The main result of this work is the observation of a low Josephson current (as compared with that expected from the Ambegaokar-Baratoff formula), which is consistent with idea that the order parameter in the heavy-fermion superconductor CeCoIn{sub 5} has unconventional pairing symmetry.

  19. Environment surveys. [monitoring and protection of environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenwood, L. R.

    1974-01-01

    Environment applications are concerned with the quality, protection, and improvement of water, land, and air resources and, in particular, with the pollution of these resources caused by man and his works, as well as changes to the resources due to natural phenomena (for example, drought and floods). The broad NASA objectives related to the environment are directed toward the development and demonstration of the capability to monitor remotely and assess environmental conditions related to water quality, land and vegetation quality, wildlife resources, and general environment. The contributions of ERTS-1 to these subdiscipline areas are broadly summarized.

  20. Oxygen isotope heterogeneity of the mantle beneath the Canary Islands: a discussion of the paper of Gurenko et al.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Day, James M. D.; Macpherson, Colin G.; Lowry, David; Pearson, D. Graham

    2012-07-01

    Gurenko et al. (Contrib Mineral Petrol 162:349-363, 2011) report laser-assisted fluorination (LF) and secondary ionization mass spectrometry (SIMS) 18O/16O datasets for olivine grains from the Canary Islands of Gran Canaria, Tenerife, La Gomera, La Palma and El Hierro. As with prior studies of oxygen isotopes in Canary Island lavas (e.g. Thirlwall et al. Chem Geol 135:233-262, 1997; Day et al. Geology 37:555-558, 2009, Geochim Cosmochim Acta 74:6565-6589, 2010), these authors find variations in δ18Ool (~4.6-6.0 ‰) beyond that measured for mantle peridotite olivine (Mattey et al. Earth Planet Sci Lett 128:231-241, 1994) and interpret this variation to reflect contributions from pyroxenite-peridotite mantle sources. Furthermore, Gurenko et al. (Contrib Mineral Petrol 162:349-363, 2011) speculate that δ18Ool values for La Palma olivine grains measured by LF (Day et al. Geology 37:555-558, 2009, Geochim Cosmochim Acta 74:6565-6589, 2010) may be biased to low values due to the presence of altered silicate, possibly serpentine. The range in δ18Ool values for Canary Island lavas are of importance for constraining their origin. Gurenko et al. (Contrib Mineral Petrol 162:349-363, 2011) took a subset (39 SIMS analyses from 13 grains from a single El Hierro lava; EH4) of a more extensive dataset (321 SIMS analyses from 110 grains from 16 Canary Island lavas) to suggest that δ18Ool is weakly correlated ( R 2 = 0.291) with the parameter used by Gurenko et al. (Earth Planet Sci Lett 277:514-524, 2009) to describe the estimated weight fraction of pyroxenite-derived melt ( Xpx). With this relationship, end-member δ18O values for HIMU-peridotite (δ18O = 5.3 ± 0.3 ‰) and depleted pyroxenite (δ18O = 5.9 ± 0.3 ‰) were defined. Although the model proposed by Gurenko et al. (Contrib Mineral Petrol 162:349-363, 2011) implicates similar pyroxenite-peridotite mantle sources to those proposed by Day et al. (Geology 37:555-558, 2009, Geochim Cosmochim Acta 74:6565-6589, 2010