Science.gov

Sample records for al eur phys

  1. Comment on: Measurement of the force exerted on the surface of an object immersed in a plasma. Eur. Phys. J. D 69: 91 (2015), DOI: 10.1140/epjd/e2015-50743-2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czarnetzki, Uwe; Tsankov, Tsanko V.

    2015-10-01

    Surfaces exposed to a plasma experience a certain pressure that pushes them away from the volume. This effect has been investigated experimentally in a recent article by Thomas Trottenberg, Thomas Richter, and Holger Kersten from Kiel University/Germany [Eur. Phys. J. D 69, 91 (2015)]. The experimental results are impressive and have actually drawn the attention of the community to an interesting question which so far has been largely ignored. In addition to their experimental results the Kiel group proposes also a rough concept in order to explain their findings which provides certainly a basic qualitative understanding of the physical processes involved. However, on a closer inspection the picture developed so far is not entirely satisfying and the problem seems to require a more fundamental approach. This comment shows that the effect of the wall pressure can be described exactly using only analytical methods. The physical situation is analyzed by three different approaches. First, the simple case of only one spatial dimension is presented in detail. Second, the case of spherical symmetry is analyzed by some simplifying assumptions in order to investigate the effect of higher dimensionality. Third, a formal derivation for arbitrary geometry is given. This general result includes the one-dimensional case but does not allow a convenient connection between the pressures at the wall and in the center. Finally, the results are summarized and some conclusions are drawn.

  2. Authors response on Schick et al. 2017 "An experiment of the impact of a neonicotinoid pesticide on honey bees; the value of a formal analysis of the data". Environ Sci Eur (2017).

    PubMed

    Campbell, Peter; Coulson, Mike; Ward, Keith

    2017-01-01

    Whilst a formal statistical analysis of any experimental data is always preferable in principle, in the case of Pilling et al. (PLoS ONE 8:e77193, 2013), it is hard to see how the results of any formal analysis-including those provided by Schick et al.-could be considered reliable. Regardless of the issue of statistical analysis, there was a wealth of valuable and novel biological and chemical residue data generated under field conditions of use in Pilling et al., which when taken into consideration alongside other relevant available published data and information (i.e. expert judgement) demonstrated a low risk to honeybees from thiamethoxam when used as a seed treatment on oilseed rape. Indeed, similar conclusions have been reported in subsequent published honeybee field studies using thiamethoxam seed-treated oilseed rape, thus supporting the original conclusions of Pilling et al.

  3. Comments on "An update of the HLS estimate of the muon g-2" by M. Benayoun et al., EPJC (2013) 73:2453

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davier, M.; Malaescu, B.

    2013-11-01

    In a recent paper, Benayoun et al. (Eur. J. Phys. C 73:2453, 2013) use a specific model to compare results on the existing data for the cross section of the process e + e -→ π + π - and state conclusions about the inconsistency of the BABAR results with those from the other experiments. We show that a direct model-independent comparison of the data at hand contradicts this claim. Clear discrepancies with the results of Benayoun et al. (Eur. J. Phys. C 73:2453, 2013) are pointed out. As a consequence we do not believe that the lower value and the smaller uncertainty obtained for the prediction of the muon magnetic anomaly are reliable results.

  4. OBITUARY: Eur.Ing. Professor David Dew-Hughes in memoriam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Archie; Dew-Hughes, Denise; Donaldson, Gordon; Palmer, Richard

    2007-06-01

    We regret to announce the death of David Dew-Hughes, the second Honorary Editor of Superconductor Science and Technology, in Autumn 2006. He was born in Manchester, the eldest of three children, attended Manchester Grammar School and took his first degree in metallurgy at Birmingham, before undertaking a Doctorate of Engineering at Yale University. After initial work for IBM on semiconductors, he returned to England as a lecturer in metallurgy at Cambridge University. There he devoted his career to superconductivity long before it became fashionable, starting a group on the properties of what we now know as type II materials, with his students Jan Evetts, Archie Campbell and Anant Narlikar. Between them they paved the way to our understanding of the magnetic vortex properties of these materials, and thus to the development of modern practical materials for superconducting magnets. Eur.Ing. Professor David Dew-Hughes 1932-2006 In 1965 he became a founding Senior Lecturer in physics at Lancaster University, moving to Brookhaven National Laboratory in 1974. His final academic post was in engineering science at Oxford University where he also held a University College Tutorial Fellowship. As long ago as 1971 David wrote an authoritative review for Reports on Progress in Physics on 'The metallurgical enhancement of type II superconductors'. Following the discovery of high-Tc superconductivity, IOP Publishing launched Superconductor Science and Technology in 1988 and he was a founder member of its Editorial Board. When Jan Evetts retired as Honorary Editor in 1992, David was the natural choice as his successor. He served a five year term and remained on the Board as Deputy Editor until the end of 2000. To mark the 10th anniversary of high-temperature superconductivity in 1997, David edited a special issue of Superconductor Science and Technology in which past and present members of the Editorial Board contributed reviews of their specialities. He noted that at that time

  5. The Phys4Entry database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laricchiuta, Annarita

    2012-10-01

    The Phys4Entry DB is a database of state-selected dynamical information for elementary processes relevant to the state-to-state kinetic modeling of planetary-atmosphere entry conditions. The DB is intended to the challenging goal of complementing the information in the existing web-access databases, collecting and validating data of collisional dynamics of elementary processes involving ground and excited chemical species, with resolution on the electronic, vibrational and rotational degrees of freedom. Four relevant classes of elementary processes are considered, i.e. electron-molecule collisions, atom/molecule-molecule collisions, atom/molecule surface interaction and photon-induced processes, constructing a taxonomy for process classification. Data populating the DB are largely originated by the coordinated research activity done in the frame of the Phys4Entry FP7 project, considering different theoretical approaches from quantum to semi-classical or quasi-classical molecular dynamics. Nevertheless the results, obtained in the Bari plasma chemistry labs in years of research devoted to the construction of reliable state-to-state kinetic models for hydrogen and air plasmas, are also transferred to the DB. Two DB interfaces have been created for different roles allowed to different actions: the contributor, uploading new processes, and the inquirer, submitting queries, to access the complete information about the records, through a graphical tool, displaying energy or roto-vibrational dependence of dynamical data, or through the export action to download ascii datafiles. The DB is expected to have a significant impact on the modeling community working also in scientific fields different from the aerothermodynamics (i.e. fusion, environment, ), making practicable the state-to-state approach.

  6. EUReKA! A Conceptual Model of Emotion Understanding.

    PubMed

    Castro, Vanessa L; Cheng, Yanhua; Halberstadt, Amy G; Grühn, Daniel

    2016-07-01

    The field of emotion understanding is replete with measures, yet lacks an integrated conceptual organizing structure. To identify and organize skills associated with the recognition and knowledge of emotions, and to highlight the focus of emotion understanding as localized in the self, in specific others, and in generalized others, we introduce the conceptual framework of Emotion Understanding in Recognition and Knowledge Abilities (EUReKA). We then categorize fifty-six existing methods of emotion understanding within this framework to highlight current gaps and future opportunities in assessing emotion understanding across the lifespan. We hope the EUReKA model provides a systematic and integrated framework for conceptualizing and measuring emotion understanding for future research.

  7. Prevention of dementia: lessons from SYST-EUR and PROGRESS.

    PubMed

    Hanon, Olivier; Forette, Françoise

    2004-11-15

    Hypertension is one of the principal risk factors for cerebrovascular diseases, closely correlated also with cognitive decline and dementia. Data from recent therapeutic trials (SYST-EUR, PROGRESS) open the way toward the prevention of dementia (vascular or Alzheimer's type) by antihypertensive treatments. The results of these two studies suggest different mechanisms of action of antihypertensive drugs in the prevention of cognitive decline. The use of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, with or without diuretics, resulted in decrease incidence of stroke-related dementia, but dementia without stroke was not reduced. With the dihydropyridine calcium antagonists, a reduction in both Alzheimer's type and vascular dementia was demonstrated.

  8. Summary of PhysPAG Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritz, Steven M.

    2013-01-01

    The Physics of the Cosmos (PCOS) Program Analysis Group (PhysPAG) provides an important interface between the scientific community and NASA in matters related to PCOS objectives, and also provides opportunities for community discussions. An Executive Committee facilitates the work of several subgroups, including an Inflation Probe Science Analysis Group (IPSAG), an X-ray group (XRSAG) , a gamma-ray,group (GRSAG), a gravitational wave group (GWSAG), and a cosmic-ray group (CRSAG). In addition to identifying opportunities and issues, these groups also help articulate technology needs. Membership in all the SAGs is completely open, with information and newsletter signups available on the PhysPAG pages at the PCOS program website. The PhysPAG reports to the Astrophysics Subcommittee of the NASA Advisory Council. A summary of PhysPAG activities will be given, along with time for questions and discussion.

  9. Summary of PhysPAG Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nousek, John A.

    2014-01-01

    The Physics of the Cosmos Program Analysis Group (PhysPAG) is responsible for solicitiing and coordinating community input for the development and execution of NASA's Physics of the Cosmos (PCOS) program. In this session I will report on the activity of the PhysPAG, and solicit community involvement in the process of defining PCOS objectives, planning SMD architecture, and prioritizing PCOS activities. I will also report on the activities of the PhysPAG Executive Committee, which include the chairs of the Science Analysis Groups/ Science Interest Groups which fall under the PhysPAG sphere of interest. Time at the end of the presentation willl be reserved for questions and discussion from the community.

  10. Summary of PhysPAG Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritz, Steven M.

    2012-01-01

    The Physics of the Cosmos (PCOS) Program Analysis Group (PhysPAG) provides an important interface between the scientific community and NASA in matters related to PCOS objectives. An Executive Committee facilitates the work of several subgroups, including a Technology Science Analysis Group and an Inflation Probe Science Analysis Group. Work is also starting in areas of X-ray, gamma-ray, and gravitational wave astrophysics. The PAG reports to the Astrophysics Subcommittee of the NASA Advisory Council. A summary of PhysPAG activities will be given, along with time for questions and discussion.

  11. Analysis of bubbles and crashes in the TRY/USD, TRY/EUR, TRY/JPY and TRY/CHF exchange rate within the scope of econophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deviren, Bayram; Kocakaplan, Yusuf; Keskin, Mustafa; Balcılar, Mehmet; Özdemir, Zeynel Abidin; Ersoy, Ersan

    2014-09-01

    In this study, we analyze the Turkish Lira/US Dollar (TRY/USD), Turkish Lira/Euro (TRY/EUR), Turkish Lira/Japanese Yen (TRY/JPY) and Turkish Lira/Swiss Franc (TRY/CHF) exchange rates in the global financial crisis period to detect the bubbles and crashes in the TRY by using a mathematical methodology developed by Watanabe et al. (2007). The methodology defines the bubbles and crashes in financial market price fluctuations by considering an exponential fitting of the associated data. This methodology is applied to detect the bubbles and crashes in the TRY/USD, TRY/EUR, TRY/JPY and TRY/CHF exchange rates from January, 1, 2005 to December, 20, 2013. In this mathematical methodology, the whole period of bubbles and crashes can be determined purely from past data, and the start of bubbles and crashes can be identified even before its bursts. In this way, the periods of bubbles and crashes in the TRY/USD, TRY/EUR, TRY/JPY and TRY/CHF are determined, and the beginning and end points of these periods are detected. The results show that the crashes in the TRY/CHF exchange rate are commonly finished earlier than in the other exchange rates; hence it is probable that the crashes in the other exchange rates would be finished soon when the crashes in the TRY/CHF exchange rate ended. We also find that the periods of crashes in the TRY/EUR exchange rate take longer time than in the other exchange rates. This information can be used in risk management and/or speculative gain. The crashes' periods in the TRY/EUR and TRY/USD exchange rates are observed to be relatively longer than in the other exchange rates.

  12. Expanding the PhysTEC Coalition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stein, Fredrick

    2003-04-01

    The Physics Teacher Education Coalition (PhysTEC) is a community of physics departments representing scientists and educators at institutions dedicated to improving the science preparation of future K-12 teachers. Now in its second year, PhysTEC requires physics and education faculty to work together to provide an education for future teachers that emphasizes interactive engagement and a student-centered approach to learning science. The first six Coalition members are the physics departments at Ball State University, Oregon State University, University of Arizona, University of Arkansas, Western Michigan University, and Xavier University of Louisiana. PhysTEC is creating a broad, active Coalition of physics departments that have implemented or are interested in implementing one or more of the PhysTEC Program Components. · A long-term, active collaboration among the physics department, the department of education, and the local schools. · A Teacher-in-Residence (TIR) program that provides for a full-time participant in assisting faculty in course revisions. · The redesign of physics courses based on results from physics education research. · The redesign of elementary and secondary science methods courses with an emphasis on inquiry-based teaching and learning. · The establishment of a mentoring program to provide a valuable induction experience for novice science teachers. · The participation of physics faculty in the improvement and expansion of school experiences. www.phystec.org

  13. Comment on C. W. Wong, Maxwell equations and the redundant gauge degree of freedom 2009 Eur. J. Phys. 30, 1401-1416

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, John David

    2009-10-22

    In the paper cited in the title, the author makes the claim that in classical electromagnetic theory the longitudinal electric field is instantaneous, corresponding to action at a distance, contrary to popular and correct belief. We point out that the determination of the speed of propagation of electromagnetic fields requires specification of the initial condition of the sources or equivalent. The Coulomb field of a stationary point charge proves nothing. We describe in detail a simple example to illustrate the universal onset of the static 'instantaneous' regime throughout a region of space that expands with the speed of light.

  14. Response to 'Comment on 'Undamped electrostatic plasma waves''[Phys. Plasmas 20, 034701 (2013)

    SciTech Connect

    Valentini, F.; Perrone, D.; Veltri, P.; Califano, F.; Pegoraro, F.; Morrison, P. J.; O'Neil, T. M.

    2013-03-15

    Numerical and experimental evidence is given for the occurrence of the plateau states and concomitant corner modes proposed in Valentini et al.[Phys. Plasmas 19, 092103 (2012)]. It is argued that these states provide a better description of reality for small amplitude off-dispersion disturbances than the conventional Bernstein-Greene-Kruskal or cnoidal states such as those proposed in Schamel [Phys. Plasmas 20, 034701 (2013)].

  15. 78 FR 48765 - Bureau of European and Eurasian Affairs (EUR) Request for Proposals for the Fundraising...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-09

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF STATE Bureau of European and Eurasian Affairs (EUR) Request for Proposals for the Fundraising, Construction, Development, Organization, Management, Disassembly and Removal of a USA Pavilion/Exhibition at Universal...

  16. Back Cover: Eur. J. Immunol. 8'16.

    PubMed

    2016-08-01

    The cover shows a light sheet fluorescence microcopy image of a murine heart from diphtheria toxin treated CD11c-DTR mouse affected by fulminant myocarditis. The massive leukocyte infiltration was visualized by intravenous injection of fluorescent anti-CD45 antibodies. The autofluorescence channel reveals massive organ dilatation (grey). The leukocytic infiltrate is depicted in a heat map overlay from low (blue) to very high (bright yellow) and mainly affects the zone of the stimulus transduction system and the valves. The image is taken from Männ et al. (pp. 2028-2042) where the authors demonstrate, that a frequently used animal model for selective depletion of CD11c-expressing cells with diphtheria toxin suffers from a massive and 100% lethal phenotype of heart inflammation, which occurs within a few days after application of the toxin. This finding has important implications for previous and future studies using this animal model but may also provide a novel system to study fulminant myocarditis.

  17. Comment on “Theoretical analysis of high-field transport in graphene on a substrate” [J. Appl. Phys. 116, 034507 (2014)

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, Michael L. P.; Arora, Vijay K.

    2014-12-21

    In a recent article, Serov et al. [J. Appl. Phys. 116, 034507 (2014)] claim: “This study represents the first time that the high-field behavior in graphene on a substrate was investigated taking into account intrinsic graphene properties,” ignoring the most recent anisotropic distribution function [V. K. Arora et al., J. Appl. Phys. 112, 114330 (2012)] also published in J. Appl. Phys., targeting the same experimental data [V. E. Dorgan et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 97, 082112 (2010)]. The claim of Serov et al. of being first is refuted and many shortcomings of the hydrodynamic model for a highly quantum and degenerate graphene nanolayer are pointed out.

  18. Why the interpretation of "Measuring propagation speed of Coulomb fields" stands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Sangro, R.; Finocchiaro, G.; Patteri, P.; Piccolo, M.; Pizzella, G.

    2017-02-01

    The experimental findings reported in our original paper de Sangro et al. (Eur. Phys. J. C 75:137, 2015) have been criticized in Shabad (Eur. Phys. J. C 76:508, 2016). We believe that the arguments brought in Shabad (Eur. Phys. J. C 76:508, 2016) are not correct and we show evidence for this.

  19. Comment on “Effects of damping solitary wave in a viscosity bounded plasma” [Phys. Plasmas 21, 022118 (2014)

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, Uday Narayan Chatterjee, Prasanta; Roychoudhury, Rajkumar

    2015-07-15

    Recently Gun Li et al. discussed “Effects of damping solitary wave in a viscosity bounded plasma” [Phys. Plasmas 21, 022118 (2014)]. The paper contains some serious errors which have been pointed out in this Comment.

  20. Air - Net of Polish Permanent Station Rtk Dgps In Programme Eur Rvsm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fellner, A.

    All aircraft intending to operate in the EUR RVSM Airspace, except State aircraft, shall require an Reduced Vertical Separation Minimum approval issued by the responsible authority. To obtain such an approval, aircraft operators will have to satisfy the requirements set out in Joint Aviation Authorities (JAA) Temporary Guidance Leaflet No6 (TGL6), which require: · that aircraft for which RVSM Approval is sought have the vertical navigation performance capability required for RVSM operations through compliance with the criteria of the RVSM Minimum Aircraft System Performance Specification (MASPS); · that, they have instituted procedures for continued airworthiness (maintenance and repair) practices; · that they have instituted flight crew procedures for operations in the EUR RVSM Airspace. A comprehensive means of monitoring the height ­ keeping performance of aircraft has been developed utilising two types of equipment: · Height Monitoring Units ­ static height monitoring facilities; · GPS Monitoring Units ­ portable monitoring units on board aircraft. Poster present select problems connected of Polish Air - System RTK DGPS in EUR RVSM Programme. Reached results became during air - tests in years 1995 ­ 2001.

  1. ANN modeling for flood prediction in the upstream Eure's catchment (France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kharroubi, Ouissem; masson, Eric; Blanpain, Olivier; Lallahem, Sami

    2013-04-01

    Rainfall-Runoff relationship at basin scale is strongly depending on the catchment complexity including multi-scale interactions. In extreme events cases (i.e. floods and droughts) this relationship is even more complex and differs from average hydrological conditions making extreme runoff prediction very difficult to achieve. However, flood warning, flood prevention and flood mitigation rely on the possibility to predict both flood peak runoff and lag time. This point is crucial for decision making and flood warning to prevent populations and economical stakes to be damaged by extreme hydrological events. Since 2003 in France, a dedicated state service is in charge of producing flood warning from national level (i.e. SCHAPI) to regional level (i.e. SPC). This flood warning service is combining national weather forecast agency (i.e. Meteo France) together with a fully automated realtime hydrological network (i.e. Rainfall-Runoff) in order to produce a flood warning national map online and provide a set of hydro-meteorological data to the SPC in charge of flood prediction from regional to local scale. The SPC is in fact the flood service delivering hydrological prediction at operational level for decision making about flood alert for municipalities and first help services. Our research in collaboration with the SPC SACN (i.e. "Seine Aval et fleuves Côtiers Normands") is focused on the implementation of an Artificial Neural Network model (ANN) for flood prediction in deferent key points of the Eure's catchment and main subcatchment. Our contribution will focus on the ANN model developed for Saint-Luperce gauging station in the upstream part of the Eure's catchment. Prediction of extreme runoff at Saint-Luperce station is of high importance for flood warning in the Eure's catchment because it gives a good indicator on the extreme status and the downstream propagation of a potential flood event. Despite a good runoff monitoring since 27 years Saint Luperce flood

  2. Comment on "The universal instability in general geometry" [Phys. Plasmas 22, 090706 (2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smolyakov, A. I.; Yagi, M.; Kishimoto, Y.

    2016-11-01

    It is pointed out that the destabilization mechanism recently discussed by Helander and Plunk in relation to the universal instability was studied previously by Smolyakov et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 89, 125005 (2002)]. Moreover, the contribution of the trapped particles as discussed by Helander and Plunk is closely related to the mechanism of the ubiquitous instability previously studied by Coppi and Pegoraro [Nucl. Fusion 17, 969 (1977)].

  3. Comment on "Temperature dependence of atomic vibrations in mono-layer graphene" [J. Appl. Phys. 118, 074302 (2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Susi, T.; Kotakoski, J.

    2016-02-01

    In an interesting recent study [Allen et al., J. Appl. Phys. 118, 074302 (2015)] (see also their Erratum [Allen et al., J. Appl. Phys. 118, 159902 (2015)]), Allen and co-workers measured the mean square amplitudes of graphene lattice vibrations between 100 and 1300 K and used a simplified theoretical approximation for the acoustic phonon modes to evaluate the maximum phonon wavelengths supported by the lattice. By fitting their data using the smallest wave-vector as the fitting parameter, they found this to be significantly smaller than the physical size of the graphene crystallites.

  4. Comment on “Temperature dependence of atomic vibrations in mono-layer graphene” [J. Appl. Phys. 118, 074302 (2015)

    SciTech Connect

    Susi, T. Kotakoski, J.

    2016-02-14

    In an interesting recent study [Allen et al., J. Appl. Phys. 118, 074302 (2015)] (see also their Erratum [Allen et al., J. Appl. Phys. 118, 159902 (2015)]), Allen and co-workers measured the mean square amplitudes of graphene lattice vibrations between 100 and 1300 K and used a simplified theoretical approximation for the acoustic phonon modes to evaluate the maximum phonon wavelengths supported by the lattice. By fitting their data using the smallest wave-vector as the fitting parameter, they found this to be significantly smaller than the physical size of the graphene crystallites.

  5. Research-based resources on PhysPort

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayre, Eleanor

    2017-01-01

    PhysPort (http://physport.org) is a website that supports physics faculty in implementing research-based teaching practices in their classrooms. We provide expert recommendations and practical information about teaching methods and assessment. The PhysPort Data Explorer is an intuitive online tool for physics faculty to analyze their assessment data. Faculty upload their students' responses using our secure interface. The Data Explorer matches their pre/post data, scores it, compares it to national data, and graphs it in an interactive and intuitive manner. The Periscope collection on Physport brings together classroom video of students working groups with professional development materials for faculty, pre-service teachers, and learning assistants. To support PhysPort's development efforts, we conduct research on faculty needs around teaching and assessment, secondary analysis of published PER studies, and primary analysis of assessment data. In this talk, I'll introduce some of PhysPort's research-based resources and the research results which support them.

  6. Comment on 'Nonlinear properties of small amplitude dust ion acoustic solitary waves' [Phys. Plasmas 7, 3594 (2000)

    SciTech Connect

    Duha, S. S.; Mamun, A. A.

    2008-10-15

    The aim of this comment is to show how the model equations used by Ghosh et al. [Phys. Plasmas 7, 3594 (2000)] are completely inconsistent, and to provide a guideline for a consistent dusty plasma model which is appropriate for the study of the nonlinear properties of the dust ion acoustic solitary waves.

  7. Erratum: “Hamiltonian magnetohydrodynamics: Lagrangian, Eulerian, and dynamically accessible stability—Theory” [Phys. Plasmas 20, 092104 (2013)

    SciTech Connect

    Andreussi, T.; Morrison, P. J.; Pegoraro, F.

    2015-03-15

    An algebraic mistake in the rendering of the Energy Casimir stability condition for a symmetric magnetohydrodynamics plasma configuration with flows made in the article Andreussi et al. “Hamiltonian magnetohydrodynamics: Lagrangian, Eulerian, and dynamically accessible stability—Theory,” Phys. Plasmas 20, 092104 (2013) is corrected.

  8. Response to 'Comment on 'Nonlinear properties of small amplitude dust ion acoustic solitary waves'' [Phys. Plasmas 15, 104703 (2008)

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, M. R.; Sarkar, S.; Khan, Manoranjan; Ghosh, Samiran

    2008-10-15

    The objections are not justified. It should have been noted that ion charge number z{sub i}=1 throughout the referred paper [Ghosh et al., Phys. Plasmas 7, 3594 (2000)]. There is no inconsistency in the formulation of the referred paper as explained in the text.

  9. Comment on 'Energy transfer in nanowire solar cells with photon-harvesting shells' [J. Appl. Phys. 105, 124509 (2009)

    SciTech Connect

    Markvart, T.; Danos, L.; Greef, R.

    2010-07-15

    In a recent article, Peters et al. [J. Appl. Phys. 105, 124509 (2009)] claim to have observed photosensitization of crystalline silicon by energy transfer from an optically absorbing thin polymer film. We show that this claim is not justified. Their experimental design is not adequate to establish enhanced photoexcitation of silicon; moreover, the theoretical arguments in their interpretation do not stand up to scrutiny.

  10. Integrated model of multiple kernel learning and differential evolution for EUR/USD trading.

    PubMed

    Deng, Shangkun; Sakurai, Akito

    2014-01-01

    Currency trading is an important area for individual investors, government policy decisions, and organization investments. In this study, we propose a hybrid approach referred to as MKL-DE, which combines multiple kernel learning (MKL) with differential evolution (DE) for trading a currency pair. MKL is used to learn a model that predicts changes in the target currency pair, whereas DE is used to generate the buy and sell signals for the target currency pair based on the relative strength index (RSI), while it is also combined with MKL as a trading signal. The new hybrid implementation is applied to EUR/USD trading, which is the most traded foreign exchange (FX) currency pair. MKL is essential for utilizing information from multiple information sources and DE is essential for formulating a trading rule based on a mixture of discrete structures and continuous parameters. Initially, the prediction model optimized by MKL predicts the returns based on a technical indicator called the moving average convergence and divergence. Next, a combined trading signal is optimized by DE using the inputs from the prediction model and technical indicator RSI obtained from multiple timeframes. The experimental results showed that trading using the prediction learned by MKL yielded consistent profits.

  11. Components of a standardised olive leaf dry extract (Ph. Eur.) promote hypothiocyanite production by lactoperoxidase.

    PubMed

    Flemmig, Jörg; Rusch, Dorothea; Czerwińska, Monika Ewa; Rauwald, Hans-Wilhelm; Arnhold, Jürgen

    2014-05-01

    We investigated in vitro the ability of a standardised olive leaf dry extract (Ph. Eur.) (OLE) as well as of its single components to circumvent the hydrogen peroxide-induced inhibition of the hypothiocyanite-producing activity of lactoperoxidase (LPO). The rate of hypothiocyanite (⁻OSCN) formation by LPO was quantified by spectrophotometric detection of the oxidation of 5-thio-2-nitrobenzoic acid (TNB). By using excess hydrogen peroxide, we forced the accumulation of inactive enzymatic intermediates which are unable to promote the two-electronic oxidation of thiocyanate. Both OLE and certain extract components showed a strong LPO-reactivating effect. Thereby an o-hydroxyphenolic moiety emerged to be essential for a good reactivity with the inactive LPO redox states. This basic moiety is found in the main OLE components oleuropein, oleacein, hydroxytyrosol, caffeic acid as well as in different other constituents including the OLE flavone luteolin. As LPO is a key player in the humoral immune response, these results propose a new mode of action regarding the well-known bacteriostatic and anti-inflammatory properties of the leaf extract of Olea europaea L.

  12. Comment on "Fluid modeling of a high-voltage nanosecond pulsed xenon microdischarge" [Phys. Plasmas 23, 073513 (2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koulakis, J.; Bataller, A.; Pree, S.; Putterman, S.

    2016-11-01

    Simulations of sparks in 10 atmosphere Xenon gas by Levko and Raja [Phys. Plasmas 23, 073513 (2016)] are unable to reproduce the experimental fact of their opacity to visible light [Bataller et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 105, 223501 (2014)]. Levko and Raja have argued the discrepancy is due to enhanced ionization from the probing laser radiation and/or cathode field emission. Having observed comparable opacity in similar systems without probing lasers and without electrodes, we instead argue that the enhanced ionization is a thermodynamic result of dense plasma screening effects that lower the effective ionization potential. Levko and Raja do not adequately address these density effects in their spark discharge simulations.

  13. Comment on ``The application of the thermodynamic perturbation theory to study the hydrophobic hydration'' [J. Chem. Phys. 139, 024101 (2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graziano, Giuseppe

    2013-09-01

    It is shown that the behaviour of the hydration thermodynamic functions obtained in the 3D Mercedes-Benz model of water by Mohoric et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 139, 024101 (2013)] is not qualitatively correct with respect to experimental data for a solute whose diameter is 1.5-fold larger than that of a water molecule. It is also pointed out that the failure is due to the fact that the used 3D Mercedes-Benz model of water [A. Bizjak, T. Urbic, V. Vlachy, and K. A. Dill, J. Chem. Phys. 131, 194504 (2009)] does not reproduce in a quantitatively correct manner the peculiar temperature dependence of water density.

  14. Interpretation of EUV emissions observed by Mills et al.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phelps, A. V.; Clementson, J.

    2012-05-01

    An explanation of the so-called hydrino continuum emissions proposed by Mills and Lu, most recently in [Eur. Phys. J. D 64, 65 (2011)], is presented using conventional atomic, plasma, and discharge physics. It is argued that the observed EUV emissions during their pulsed discharges originate from transitions in ions sputtered or evaporated from the electrodes. Such an interpretation removes their justification for the introduction of hydrino particles.

  15. International collaborative study for the calibration of the Ph. Eur. somatropin chemical reference substance batches 3 and 4 (BSP108).

    PubMed

    Girard, M; Rautmann, G; Lorbetskie, B; Joly, M-A; Daas, A; Terao, E

    2013-01-01

    An international collaborative study was carried out for the establishment of replacement batches for the European Pharmacopoeia (Ph. Eur.) Somatropin Chemical Reference Substance (CRS) batch 2. The study was organised within the framework of the Biological Standardisation Programme (BSP) of the Council of Europe and the European Commission. Seventeen laboratories from Europe, North America, South America and Australia took part in the collaborative study. The study aimed at calibrating the somatropin content of 2 candidate preparations and demonstrating their suitability to serve as a reference substance in the tests for identification, for related proteins, for dimers and related substances of higher molecular mass (HMM), for charged variants distribution and for the assay of somatropin, as prescribed by the current Ph. Eur. monographs 0950 Somatropin bulk solution, 0951 Somatropin and 0952 Somatropin for injection. Based on the results summarised herein the Ph. Eur. Commission adopted in January 2012 candidate preparation b (cCRS-b, Sample D) as somatropin CRS batch 3 with an assigned content of 3.86 mg of somatropin monomer per vial, and candidate preparation a (cCRS-a, Sample C) as somatropin CRS batch 4 with an assigned content of 2.59 mg of somatropin monomer per vial.

  16. The PhysTEC Teacher Education Program at FIU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramer, Laird

    2010-10-01

    The FIU PhysTEC Project is an integral component of the Physics Department's educational transformation that has led to more than a ten-fold increase in majors. The transformation seeks to increase the quality and quantity of physics majors and future physics teachers, including those from historically underrepresented groups. Elements of the efforts include transformed introductory physics courses, establishment of a physics research and learning community, engagement of stakeholders spanning high school through the university administration, and advocacy by a physics education research group. The PhysTEC Project supports future physics teachers through a Learning Assistant program coupled to newly revised secondary education programs. The Learning Assistant program is an experiential program that recruits new students into teaching careers while providing a mechanism for transforming courses - undergraduates experience the rewards and intellectual challenges of teaching through providing interactive engagement learning experiences for their peers in introductory physics courses. Students that continue in the program enroll in a multidisciplinary teacher preparation program and may receive significant financial support. FIU is a minority-serving urban public research institution in Miami, Florida serving over 39,000 students, of which 64% are Hispanic, 13% are Black, and 56% are women. Programmatic strategies and impacts of the program will be provided.

  17. EPOCA/EUR-OCEANS data-mining compilation on the impacts of ocean acidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nisumaa, A.-M.; Pesant, S.; Bellerby, R. G. J.; Delille, B.; Middelburg, J.; Orr, J. C.; Riebesell, U.; Tyrrell, T.; Wolf-Gladrow, D.; Gattuso, J.-P.

    2010-03-01

    The uptake of anthropogenic CO2 by the oceans has led to a rise in the oceanic partial pressure of CO2, and to a decrease in pH and carbonate ion concentration. This modification of the marine carbonate system is referred to as ocean acidification. Numerous papers report the effects of ocean acidification on marine organisms and communities but few have provided details concerning full carbonate chemistry and complementary observations. Additionally, carbonate system variables are often reported in different units, calculated using different sets of dissociation constants and on different pH scales. Hence the direct comparison of experimental results has been problematic and often misleading. The need was identified to (1) gather data on carbonate chemistry, biological and biogeochemical properties, and other ancillary data from published experimental data, (2) transform the information into common framework, and (3) make data freely available. The present paper is the outcome of an effort to integrate ocean carbonate chemistry data from the literature which has been supported by the European Network of Excellence for Ocean Ecosystems Analysis (EUR-OCEANS) and the European Project on Ocean Acidification (EPOCA). A total of 166 papers were identified, 86 contained enough information to readily compute carbonate chemistry variables, and 67 datasets were archived at PANGAEA - The Publishing Network for Geoscientific & Environmental Data. This data compilation is regularly updated as an ongoing mission of EPOCA. Data access: http://doi.pangaea.de/10.1594/PANGAEA.735138

  18. EPOCA/EUR-OCEANS data compilation on the biological and biogeochemical responses to ocean acidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nisumaa, A.-M.; Pesant, S.; Bellerby, R. G. J.; Delille, B.; Middelburg, J. J.; Orr, J. C.; Riebesell, U.; Tyrrell, T.; Wolf-Gladrow, D.; Gattuso, J.-P.

    2010-07-01

    The uptake of anthropogenic CO2 by the oceans has led to a rise in the oceanic partial pressure of CO2, and to a decrease in pH and carbonate ion concentration. This modification of the marine carbonate system is referred to as ocean acidification. Numerous papers report the effects of ocean acidification on marine organisms and communities but few have provided details concerning full carbonate chemistry and complementary observations. Additionally, carbonate system variables are often reported in different units, calculated using different sets of dissociation constants and on different pH scales. Hence the direct comparison of experimental results has been problematic and often misleading. The need was identified to (1) gather data on carbonate chemistry, biological and biogeochemical properties, and other ancillary data from published experimental data, (2) transform the information into common framework, and (3) make data freely available. The present paper is the outcome of an effort to integrate ocean carbonate chemistry data from the literature which has been supported by the European Network of Excellence for Ocean Ecosystems Analysis (EUR-OCEANS) and the European Project on Ocean Acidification (EPOCA). A total of 185 papers were identified, 100 contained enough information to readily compute carbonate chemistry variables, and 81 data sets were archived at PANGAEA - The Publishing Network for Geoscientific & Environmental Data. This data compilation is regularly updated as an ongoing mission of EPOCA. Data access: http://doi.pangaea.de/10.1594/PANGAEA.735138

  19. The PhysTec Project of APS, AIP, and AAPT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jansen, Henri

    2002-04-01

    We will describe the development of the PhysTEC program at Oregon State University. The goal of this program is to enhance the number of secondary physics teachers and to improve the physics training of primary teachers and secondary teachers in related fields. Key elements of the plan include: (1) a seamless five-year program leading to a M.S. in science education and a B.S. in physics with a specialty in physics education, which takes advantage of our unique undergraduate physics curriculum (the Paradigms project); (2) a teacher-in-residence with joint duties in the Department of Physics and the Department of Science and Math Education; (3) inquiry-based and pedagogically-oriented lab and recitation sections in calculus-based introductory physics; (4) an inquiry-based physical science course for preservice elementary teachers; (5) outreach projects that enhance the preservice experience and support the methods and pedagogy training offered elsewhere in the curriculum.

  20. Comment on "Fe2: As simple as a Herculean labour. Neutral (Fe2), cationic (Fe2+), and anionic (Fe2-) species" [J. Chem. Phys. 142, 244304 (2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoyer, Chad E.; Li Manni, Giovanni; Truhlar, Donald G.; Gagliardi, Laura

    2016-01-01

    A recent paper on Fe2 [A. Kalemos, J. Chem. Phys. 142, 244304 (2015)] critiqued our previous work on the system [Hoyer et al., J. Chem. Phys. 141, 204309 (2014)]. In this comment, we explain the nature of our previously reported potential energy curve for Fe2 and we discuss our computed properties for Fe2. Additionally, we fix a labeling error that was present in our previous work, although this error is unrelated to the main point of discussion.

  1. Reply to: Comment on: polarity effects and apparent ion recombination in microionization chambers [Med. Phys. 43(5) 2141-2152 (2016)].

    PubMed

    Miller, Jessica R; Hooten, Brian D; Micka, John A; DeWerd, Larry A

    2017-03-01

    We would like to thank Dr. Brivio et al. [Med. Phys.] for their comment on our recent paper. Miller et al. [Med. Phys. 43 (2016) 2141-2152] determined the primary cause of voltage-dependent polarity effects in microchambers to be a potential difference between the guard and collecting electrodes. In their comment, Brivio et al., offer an explanation for the cause of such potential differences. Brivio et al. attribute the potential difference to the disparity in the work functions between guard and collecting electrodes composed of different materials. However, all of the microchambers investigated in Miller et al. contained a guard and collecting electrode which were composed of the same material. Therefore, the explanation offered by Brivio et al. that "the electric potential perturbation arises from the work function difference of the disparate materials electrodes" does not explain the polarity effects exhibited by the microchambers investigated in Miller et al., all of which contain electrodes composed of the same materials.

  2. Comment on "Analysis of single-layer metamaterial absorber with reflection theory" [J. Appl. Phys. 117, 154906 (2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tung, Nguyen Thanh

    2016-03-01

    In a recent paper, Xiong et al. [J. Appl. Phys. 117, 154906 (2015)] presented the simulated results of a Jerusalem-cross structure in an attempt to elaborate their proposed reflection theory for metamaterial absorbers. Noting that even at non-resonant frequencies the real part of the permeability shows an over-high average value and its imaginary part drops abruptly from positivity to negativity, we argue that their simulated results are unphysical, resulting from an incomplete understanding of the retrieval procedure.

  3. EurEAs_Gplex--A new SNaPshot assay for continental population discrimination and gender identification.

    PubMed

    Daca-Roszak, P; Pfeifer, A; Żebracka-Gala, J; Jarząb, B; Witt, M; Ziętkiewicz, E

    2016-01-01

    Assays that allow analysis of the biogeographic origin of biological samples in a standard forensic laboratory have to target a small number of highly differentiating markers. Such markers should be easy to multiplex and the assay must perform well in the degraded and scarce biological material. SNPs localized in the genome regions, which in the past were subjected to differential selective pressure in various populations, are the most widely used markers in the studies of biogeographic affiliation. SNPs reflecting biogeographic differences not related to any phenotypic traits are not sufficiently explored. The goal of our study was to identify a small set of SNPs not related to any known pigmentation/phenotype-specific genes, which would allow efficient discrimination between populations of Europe and East Asia. The selection of SNPs was based on the comparative analysis of representative European and Chinese/Japanese samples (B-lymphocyte cell lines), genotyped using the Infinium HumanOmniExpressExome microarray (Illumina). The classifier, consisting of 24 unlinked SNPs (24-SNP classifier), was selected. The performance of a 14-SNP subset of this classifier (14-SNP subclassifier) was tested using genotype data from several populations. The 14-SNP subclassifier differentiated East Asians, Europeans and Africans with ∼100% accuracy; Palestinians, representative of the Middle East, clustered with Europeans, while Amerindians and Pakistani were placed between East Asian and European populations. Based on these results, we have developed a SNaPshot assay (EurEAs_Gplex) for genotyping SNPs from the 14-SNP subclassifier, combined with an additional marker for gender identification. Forensic utility of the EurEAs_Gplex was verified using degraded and low quantity DNA samples. The performance of the EurEAs_Gplex was satisfactory when using degraded DNA; tests using low quantity DNA samples revealed a previously not described source of genotyping errors, potentially

  4. PREFACE: Prospects in Neutrino Physics 2013 - NuPhys2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2015-04-01

    The first "Prospects in Neutrino Physics 2013 - NuPhys2013" conference was held at the Institute of Physics, IoP, London, 19-20 December 2013 and was attended by about 130 delegates from institutions worldwide. Lunch and coffee breaks allowed discussions among delegates and speakers to take place in an informal setting. This conference is unique in discussing the worldwide strategy to address unresolved issues in neutrino physics, and shape the future directions of particle physics. We discussed the current status and focussed especially on the prospects of future experiments, their performance and physics reach. It is particularly timely due to the recent measurements in neutrino physics and planned worldwide experiments. The following topics were addressed: • Theory and Phenomenology Perspectives • Future Long and Short Baseline Neutrino Oscillation Experiments • Reactor neutrino and flux • Neutrinoless double beta decays • Solar, atmospheric, supernova neutrinos • Neutrino cosmology in which both the phenomenological and experimental aspects were equally addressed. World-leading experts in the different neutrino areas were invited to give review talks. To encourage and facilitate the participation of early-career researchers and PhD students, a poster session formed a key aspect of this meeting. The conference was organized by Francesca Di Lodovico and Silvia Pascoli. It was sponsored by the IoP through their Topic Research Meeting Grant, and also supported by Durham IPPP, ERC-207282, FP7 invisibles project, Queen Mary University of London.

  5. Alternative to Ph. Eur. pour-plate method for detection of microbial contamination in non-sterile pharmaceutical preparations.

    PubMed

    Palicz, A; Paul, A; Hofmann, A; Denzel, K

    2016-01-01

    The current European Pharmacopoeia (Ph. Eur.) texts for Interferon (IFN)-alfa-2 include a nonspecific photometric protein assay using albumin as calibrator and a highly variable cell-based assay for the potency determination of the protective effects. A request was expressed by the Official Medicines Control Laboratories (OMCLs) for improved methods for the batch control of recombinant interferon alfa-2 bulk and market surveillance testing of finished products, including those formulated with Human Serum Albumin (HSA). A HPLC method was developed at the Medical Products Agency (MPA, Sweden) for the testing of IFN-alfa-2 products. An initial collaborative study run under the Biological Standardisation Programme (BSP; study code BSP039) revealed the need for minor changes to improve linearity of the calibration curves, assay reproducibility and robustness. The goal of the collaborative study, coded BSP071, was to transfer and further validate this improved HPLC method. Ten laboratories participated in the study. Four marketed IFN-alfa-2 preparations (one containing HSA) together with the Ph. Eur. Chemical Reference Substance (CRS) for IFN-alfa-2a and IFN-alfa-2b, and in-house reference standards from two manufacturers were used for the quantitative assay. The modified method was successfully transferred to all laboratories despite local variation in equipment. The resolution between the main and the oxidised forms of IFN-alfa-2 was improved compared to the results from the BSP039 study. The improved method even allowed partial resolution of an extra peak after the principal peak. Symmetry of the main IFN peak was acceptable for all samples in all laboratories. Calibration curves established with the Ph. Eur. IFN-alfa-2a and IFN-alfa-2b CRSs showed excellent linearity with intercepts close to the origin and coefficients of determination greater than 0.9995. Assay repeatability, intermediate precision and reproducibility varied with the tested sample within acceptable

  6. Collaborative study for the establishment of the Ph. Eur. BRP batch 1 for anti-vaccinia immunoglobulin.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, F; Poirier, B; Leparc-Goffart, I; Buchheit, K H

    2005-09-01

    Upon suggestion of the French Official Medicines Control Laboratory, a collaborative study was initiated by the European Directorate for the Quality of Medicines with the goal of calibrating the candidate European Pharmacopoeia biological reference preparation (Ph. Eur. BRP) for anti-vaccinia immunoglobulin batch 1 in International Units (IU) against the 1(st) British standard (anti-smallpox serum). The candidate BRP batch 1 was obtained by lyophilising a pool of four plasma samples obtained from one donor who was multi-vaccinated with smallpox vaccine (Lister strain) and who had relatively high titres of neutralising anti-vaccinia antibodies. The plasma complied with the requirements of the Ph. Eur. monograph Human plasma for fractionation. For the candidate BRP the precision of fill and the residual moisture after lyophilisation comply with the requirements for biological reference preparations. The stability of the material was shown to be satisfactory for the intended purpose in an accelerated degradation test. Eight laboratories participated in the study. Two samples had to be assayed (candidate BRP batch 1 and 1(st) British standard). All participants were requested to test the samples using a common method (plaque reduction neutralisation) that had been validated beforehand, and their own in-house anti-vaccinia immunoglobulin titration method. From the raw data returned, the potency of the candidate BRP was calculated in IU/ml using the parallel lines method. The precision (intra-assay variation), repeatability (intra-laboratory variation) and reproducibility (inter-laboratory variation) were assessed. All laboratories used the Lister strain of vaccinia virus for the plaque reduction neutralisation assay. For laboratories using cell-adapted vaccinia virus, the results were satisfactory regarding intra-assay variability, intra-laboratory variability and inter-laboratory variability. For laboratories using vaccinia virus produced on animals, results were less

  7. Serological assays as alternatives to the Ph Eur challenge test for batch release of tetanus vaccines for human use.

    PubMed

    Winsnes, R; Hendriksen, C; Sesardic, D; Akkermans, A; Daas, A

    1999-01-01

    According to the European Pharmacopoeia (Ph Eur) monograph on Tetanus Vaccine (adsorbed) (1997: 0452), assessment of potency is based on a challenge test in guinea pigs or mice. The end-point is taken as paralysis or death. The test requires a large number of animals and causes severe distress. The aim of the present study was to refine the test, and reduce the number of animals needed, for batch release purposes. Serological assays having the potential of being internationally accepted, have been compared with Ph Eur assays. The study included five tetanus vaccines of various combinations and produced by different manufacturers. The results indicated an excellent correlation between enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and the challenge test (about 93% predictive value), as well as between the toxin binding inhibition (ToBI) test and the challenge test (about 95% predictive value) and between ELISA and the ToBI test (r = 0.92). Antitoxin concentrations determined by ELISA and ToBI were generally in the same range. An overall good correlation was also seen for serum pools of the guinea pigs injected with equal vaccine doses, between toxin neutralisation test in mice (TNT) and ELISA (r = 0.93) as well as between TNT and ToBI (r = 0.97). The ultimate goal of this project was to determine whether serological assays can be used for testing combined vaccines, particularly for tetanus and diphtheria components, using sera from the same animals.

  8. Preface: phys. stat. sol. (b) 241/9

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morawetz, Klaus

    2004-07-01

    Modelling and Simulation in Molecular Systems, Mesoscopic Structures, and Material Science was the title of a workshop held at the University of Technology in Chemnitz from 21 to 23 April 2004. This workshop coincided with the 50th birthday of Michael Schreiber. Therefore, the idea to publish a special issue is supported by two good reasons. First, a topical collection is appropriate for giving an overview about a field and to initiate further studies. This is one intention of the present issue. Second, the birthday is a suitable occasion for reflecting on the status of the different fields where Michael Schreiber has been active himself. Motivated by the characteristic name of the workshop (MS4), which expresses the broad range of his activities, the contributions are grouped into three main chapters: Disorder and Interaction, Phase Transitions and Criticality, and Transport Properties.The first part starts with the currently intensively discussed topic of composite Fermions in the paper by B. Kramer et al. This method of rewriting correlations as new quasiparticles has amongst other things the merit of explaining such exciting phenomena as the fractional quantum Hall effect. The methodological questions of Ward identities, causality, and conservation laws are the focus of the systematic investiga-tion in the second article by V. Janis et al. which concentrates on the problem of disorder and configura-tional averaging. The interplay between disorder and correlation is treated in the third contribution by C. Schuster et al., where different theoretical methods are tested on the problem of Friedel oscillations within the one-dimensional Heisenberg and Hubbard model. In the next contribution, M. Berciu et al. focus on localization as one consequence of disorder. The localized and extended electronic states are treated, together with the magnetic degrees of freedom, like spin waves. One of the astonishing consequence of localiza-tion is the observation of resonant

  9. Comment on ``Unified explanation of the anomalous dynamic properties of highly asymmetric polymer blends'' [J. Chem. Phys. 138, 054903 (2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colmenero, J.

    2013-05-01

    In a recent paper by Ngai and Capaccioli ["Unified explanation of the anomalous dynamic properties of highly asymmetric polymer blends," J. Chem. Phys. 138, 054903 (2013), 10.1063/1.4789585] the authors claimed that the so-called coupling model (CM) provides a unified explanation of all dynamical anomalies that have been reported for dynamically asymmetric blends over last ten years. Approximately half of the paper is devoted to chain-dynamic properties involving un-entangled polymers. According to the authors, the application of the CM to these results is based on the existence of a crossover at a time tc ≈ 1-2 ns of the magnitudes describing chain-dynamics. Ngai and Capaccioli claimed that the existence of such a crossover is supported by the neutron scattering and MD-simulation results, corresponding to the blend poly(methyl methacrylate)/poly(ethylene oxide), by Niedzwiedz et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 168301 (2007), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.98.168301] and Brodeck et al. [Macromolecules 43, 3036 (2010), 10.1021/ma902820a], respectively. Being one of the authors of these two papers, I will demonstrate here that there is no evidence supporting such a crossover in the data reported in these papers.

  10. Comment on “Maxwell's equations and electromagnetic Lagrangian density in fractional form” [J. Math. Phys. 53, 033505 (2012)

    SciTech Connect

    Rabei, Eqab M.; Al-Jamel, A.; Widyan, H.; Baleanu, D.

    2014-03-15

    In a recent paper, Jaradat et al. [J. Math. Phys. 53, 033505 (2012)] have presented the fractional form of the electromagnetic Lagrangian density within the Riemann-Liouville fractional derivative. They claimed that the Agrawal procedure [O. P. Agrawal, J. Math. Anal. Appl. 272, 368 (2002)] is used to obtain Maxwell's equations in the fractional form, and the Hamilton's equations of motion together with the conserved quantities obtained from fractional Noether's theorem are reported. In this comment, we draw the attention that there are some serious steps of the procedure used in their work are not applicable even though their final results are correct. Their work should have been done based on a formulation as reported by Baleanu and Muslih [Phys. Scr. 72, 119 (2005)].

  11. Comment on "Maxwell's equations and electromagnetic Lagrangian density in fractional form" [J. Math. Phys. 53, 033505 (2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabei, Eqab M.; Al-Jamel, A.; Widyan, H.; Baleanu, D.

    2014-03-01

    In a recent paper, Jaradat et al. [J. Math. Phys. 53, 033505 (2012)] have presented the fractional form of the electromagnetic Lagrangian density within the Riemann-Liouville fractional derivative. They claimed that the Agrawal procedure [O. P. Agrawal, J. Math. Anal. Appl. 272, 368 (2002)] is used to obtain Maxwell's equations in the fractional form, and the Hamilton's equations of motion together with the conserved quantities obtained from fractional Noether's theorem are reported. In this comment, we draw the attention that there are some serious steps of the procedure used in their work are not applicable even though their final results are correct. Their work should have been done based on a formulation as reported by Baleanu and Muslih [Phys. Scr. 72, 119 (2005)].

  12. Preface: phys. stat. sol. (a) 202/12

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neumann, Wolfgang; Stutzmann, Martin; Hildebrandt, Stefan

    2005-09-01

    The present special issue contains a collection of Original Papers dedicated to Professor Johannes Heydenreich on the occasion of his 75th birthday.Johannes Heydenreich, born on 20 June 1930 in Plauen/Vogtland near Dresden, studied physics at the Pädagogische Hochschule Potsdam, where he obtained his first academic degree Dipl. Phys. in 1958. He received his doctoral degree at the Martin Luther University in Halle in 1961 and the Habilitation degree in 1969. Already during his studies in Potsdam, he showed an interest in electron microscopy due to the influence of his teacher and supervisor Prof. Picht, one of the pioneers in electron optics. His interests were strengthened when Johannes Heydenreich did the experimental work for his Diploma degree at the Institute for Experimental Physics of the University of Halle, where he met Prof. Heinz Bethge for the first time. This was the beginning of a fruitful and longstanding collaboration. In 1962 Johannes Heydenreich joined the team of the later Institute for Solid State Physics and Electron Microscopy of the Academy of Sciences of the GDR, in Halle, for which the basis was laid by Prof. Bethge in 1960.Heydenreich has been working as Assistant Director for many years and played a decisive role in introducing and organising the various techniques of electron microscopy in the institute.The research activities of Prof. Heydenreich covered a broad spectrum over the years. At the beginning of his career he made significant contributions in the field of electron mirror microscopy. After that, his main interests were focused on transmission electron microscopy, ranging from diffraction contrast analysis of crystal defects to high-resolution electron microscopy and image processing. His favourite field was studies of defect-induced phenomena in advanced materials. The so-called Bethge-Heydenreich, the book Electron Microscopy in Solid State Physics, published at first in a German edition in 1982 and later in a revised

  13. Response to ``Comment on `Slow Debye-type peak observed in the dielectric response of polyalcohols' '' [J. Chem. Phys. 134, 037101 (2011)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergman, R.; Jansson, H.; Swenson, J.

    2011-01-01

    In our recent article [R. Bergman et al., J. Chem. Phys. 132, 044504 (2010)] we investigated some polyalcohols, i.e., glycerol, xylitol, and sorbitol by dielectric spectroscopy. In the study, a low-frequency peak of Debye character that normally is hidden by the large low-frequency dispersion due to conductivity was revealed by analyzing the real part of the permittivity and by using a thin Teflon film to suppress the low-frequency dispersion. We agree with the comment by Paluch et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 134, 037101 (2011)] that the Teflon film setup will indeed create a peak due to the dc conductivity. However, due to the fact that the location of the peak was almost identical in measurement with and without Teflon, we unfortunately mainly showed the data measured with Teflon, despite that it could also be observed in the real part of the permittivity without using the Teflon setup, as shown in our original article [R. Bergman et al., J. Chem. Phys. 132, 044504 (2010)]. Here, we show that the low-frequency peak of Debye character can also be observed by subtracting the dc conductivity. Furthermore, we show that the modulus representation used in Paluch et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 134, 037101 (2011).] is also not suitable for detecting processes hidden by the conductivity.

  14. Comment on "In situ imaging of ultra-fast loss of nanostructure in nanoparticle aggregates" [J. Appl. Phys. 115, 084903 (2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levitas, Valery I.; Hwang, Yong Seok

    2016-02-01

    One of the conclusions of a recent article by Egan et al. [J. Appl. Phys. 115, 084903 (2014)] was that since the melt-dispersion mechanism (MDM) of the reaction of aluminum nanoparticles was not observed in their experiments, this mechanism is very unlikely. Our main point here is to demonstrate that, in fact, these experiments do not disprove the MDM.

  15. Physics of the Cosmos Program Analysis Group (PhysPAG) Report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nousek, John A.

    2015-01-01

    The Physics of the Cosmos Program Analysis Group (PhysPAG) serves as a forum for soliciting and coordinating input and analysis from the scientific community in support of the PCOS program objectives. I will outline the activities of the PhysPAG over the past year, since the last meeting during the AAS meeting in National Harbor, and mention the activities of the PhysPAG related Scientific Interest Groups.

  16. Comment on ``Amorphization and defect recombination in ion implanted silicon carbide'' [J. Appl. Phys. 81, 7181 (1997)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heera, V.

    1998-04-01

    It is demonstrated that the simplified analysis of Rutherford backscattering\\channeling data on damage production in SiC performed by Grimaldi et al. [J. Appl. Phys. 81, 7181 (1997)] cannot be used to calculate the atomic displacement energy. The value of 12 eV at which the authors arrive is much too small. Moreover, their conclusion of similar displacement energies in Si and SiC is essentially wrong. The general reasons for that are discussed and illustrated by an example.

  17. Comment on "Size-efficient metamaterial absorber at low frequencies: Design, fabrication, and characterization" [J. Appl. Phys. 117, 243105 (2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lulu; Liu, Shaobin; Zhang, HaiFeng; Kong, Xiangkun; Yang, Hua; Ding, Guowen; Xu, Ce; Wang, Lingling; Shi, Wei

    2016-06-01

    In a recent article, Khuyen et al. [J. Appl. Phys. 117, 243105 (2015)] proposed a metamaterial perfect absorber (MPA) with a self-asymmetric structure and claimed that it could produce dual-band "perfect absorption." In this report, we demonstrate that the self-asymmetric structure is not a true MPA. The cross-polarization reflection, which is induced by coupling between the induced magnetic field and the incident electric field, is ignored in calculation of absorptivity of that structure. The real absorption rate of this structure is below 60%, which indicates that the structure cannot be called a perfect absorber.

  18. Preface: phys. stat. sol. (b) 242/9

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez, Maria

    2005-07-01

    The XVII Latin American Symposium on Solid State Physics took place in the conference rooms of the Convent San Francisco de Asis, in the heart of the Old Havana. The sixteen previous editions were organized in eight different countries; the last two were in Colombia (Cartagena, 1999) and Venezuela (Merida, 2002). After eighteen years the meeting came back to Havana in 2004.The program topics included: Surfaces and interfaces analysis; Spintronics; Magnetism; Materials and energy; Ab-initio methods, simulations and modeling in solids; Nanophysics, nanomaterials and nanotechnology; New materials, properties and applications; Preparation of materials, thin films and characterization; High temperature superconductivity; Techniques of structural analysis in solids. The program included 6 plenary talks, 13 invited talks, 58 oral presentations (in eight sessions) and 200 poster contributions (in four poster sessions).The meeting attracted more than 200 participants from 14 countries. The physica status solidi Young Researcher Award sponsored by Wiley-VCH was conferred at the meeting. This prize was divided between two participants: Clara Calderón (Study of electrical transport properties of ZnO thin films used as front contact of solar cells) from Colombia and Aim?? Pelaiz Barranco (AC behavior in lanthanum modified PZT ferroelectric ceramics) from Cuba. Special Mentions went to Val??rie Halté (Femtosec-ond dynamics of transmission of gold arrays of sub-wavelength holes) from France, Erick Larramendi Cancio (Cd desorption induced by Zn exposure during atomic layer epitaxy of CdxZn1-xTe) and Julio Cesar Rimada Herrera (Quantum and conversion efficiency calculation of AlGaAs/GaAs multiple quantum well solar cells) from Cuba.Nanostructures and in general low dimensional physics related to different systems was a very hot topic during the meeting. Some talks and presentations were devoted to optoelectronic materials and devices. Characterization of solids by different

  19. Preface: phys. stat. sol (a) 203/9

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duewski, P.; Bristowe, P.; Maurice, J.-L.; Komninou, P.

    2006-07-01

    This special issue contains a selection of papers that were presented at a symposium on Interfacial Processes and Properties of Advanced Materials (IPAM05) held at the E-MRS Fall Meeting, Warsaw, Poland on 5-7 September 2005. The symposium was conceived and inspired by the success of its predecessor (IPAM04) held at the University of Caen, France in June 2004.The symposium attracted over sixty contributions and was organized around five areas: Interfaces and dislocations in compound semiconductors, Gate oxide interfaces, Interfaces and defects in electroceramics, Metal-metal interfaces and interfacial modeling, and Interfaces in nano-structured and amorphous thin-film systems. The focus was on the influence of buried interfaces on the functionality of various electronic and opto-electronic devices such as lasers, ferroelectric memories, CMOS and magnetic disks. Therefore the materials addressed at the symposium included compound semiconductors (e.g. GaN, CdTe, ZnO), perovskites (e.g. SrTiO3), dielectrics (e.g. HfO2, SiO2, Al2O3), and metals (e.g. Fe/V superlattices). The aim of the symposium was to bring together leading interface experts, both experimental and theoretical, to explore the connection between interfacial properties (atomic and electronic structure, segregation, diffusion, kinetics) and materials performance in a device application. Papers were presented that described the use of a variety of sophisticated experimental techniques to explore the interfacial properties including HRTEM, X-ray high-resolution diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, STM, AFM, PL spectroscopy, SIMS and electrical and magnetic measurements. The theoretical work included applications of density functional theory, atomistic simulations, dislocation theory and finite element modeling. The program stimulated many exciting and productive discussions between experimentalists and theorists. The ultimate objective was to improve our knowledge of the role of interfaces on the properties of

  20. Comment on ``Modeling shock waves in orthotropic elastic materials'' [J. Appl. Phys. 104, 044904 (2008)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukyanov, Alexander A.

    2010-09-01

    This comment identifies two main problems with the paper Vignjevic et al. [J. Appl. Phys. 104, 044904 (2008)] related to shock waves modeling in composites. (1) The authors claim that they have proposed two different stress decompositions based on the assumption that the stress tensor is split into two components: one component is due to volumetric strain and the other is due to deviatoric strain. Following this, the authors defined a pressure as the state of stress resulting only from volumetric deformation. However, neither the first nor second decomposition of the stress tensor proposed by the authors provides a procedure for separating the material volumetric compression from the deviatoric strain tensor which results in a state of stress corresponding to volumetric deformation. Furthermore, the uniquely correct decomposition of the stress tensor based on the same second order material tensors has already been published (see, for example, [Int. J. Plast. 24, 140 (2008)]). Also, the second decomposition of the stress tensor includes serious mistakes and inconsistencies. (2) In addition, the numerical simulation results proposed by the authors cannot be justified. An analytical calculation of the Hugoniot stress levels and the acoustic speed of sound through the thickness orientation for a selected carbon-fiber epoxy composite show that the stress decompositions and material properties reported by the authors do not agree with the experimental data for this material and, more importantly, contradict the shock wave stability requirements.

  1. Comment on ``Study of dielectric relaxations of anhydrous trehalose and maltose glasses'' [J. Chem. Phys. 134, 014508 (2011)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaminski, K.; Wlodarczyk, P.; Paluch, M.

    2011-10-01

    Very recently Kwon et al. [H.-J. Kwon, J.-A. Seo, H. K. Kim, and Y. H. Hwang, J. Chem. Phys. 134, 014508 (2011)] published an article on the study of dielectric relaxation in trehalose and maltose glasses. They carried out broadband dielectric measurements at very wide range of temperatures covering supercooled liquid as well as glassy state of both saccharides. It is worth to mention that authors have also applied a new method for obtaining anhydrous glasses of trehalose and maltose that enables avoiding their caramelization. Four relaxation processes were identified in dielectric spectra of both saccharides. The slower one was identified as structural relaxation process the next one, not observed by the others, was assigned as Johari-Goldstein (JG) β-relaxation, while the last two secondary modes were of the same nature as found by Kaminski et al. [K. Kaminski, E. Kaminska, P. Wlodarczyk, S. Pawlus, D. Kimla, A. Kasprzycka, M. Paluch, J. Ziolo, W. Szeja, and K. L. Ngai, J. Phys. Chem. B 112, 12816 (2008)]. In this comment we show that the authors mistakenly assigned the slowest relaxation process as structural mode of disaccharides. We have proven that this relaxation process is an effect of formation of thin layer of air or water between plate of capacitor and sample. The same effect can be observed if plates of capacitor are oxidized. Thus, we concluded that their slowest mode is connected to the dc conduction process while their β JG process is primary relaxation of trehalose and maltose.

  2. Use of the EUR LiB 15/5 data set for radiation shielding calculations in iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdo, A. El-Sayed; Bashter, I. I.; Kansouh, W. A.

    The shielding effect of an iron sphere assembly has been tested for a Pu-α-Be neutron source placed in the center of the shield assembly. Emergent neutron and gamma spectra were measured with a stilbene scintillation counter. Discrimination between neutrons and gammas was achieved by the pulse shape discrimination technique based on the zero crossing method. Calculations have been made using the one-dimensional transport code ANISN-Westinghouse version (ANISN-W) and the EUR LiB 15/5 cross section data set. The agreement between measurements and calculations indicates that the cross section set and the calculation model are suitable for studying the iron shielding experiments over the neutron energy range 1.35-10 MeV and the gamma energy range 0.3-6 MeV. Total macroscopic cross sections for fast neutrons, linear attenuation coefficients for gamma rays and half-value thicknesses for neutrons and gammas for the whole energy range and at different energies have been obtained.

  3. Comment on ``Heat transfer in vacuum packaged microelectromechanical system devices'' [Phys. Fluids 20, 017103 (2008)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sone, Yoshio

    2009-11-01

    It is pointed out that the solution of a free molecular gas in a bounded domain proposed as speculation in Sec. II of Cai [Phys. Fluids 20, 017103 (2008)] and in Sec. II of Cai and Liu [Phys. Fluids 20, 067105 (2008)] and its result of the vanishing of flow velocity were rigorously derived under a more general situation and boundary condition more than 20 years ago.

  4. Response to 'Comment on 'Solitary waves and double layers in an ultra-relativistic degenerate dusty electron-positron-ion plasma' '[Phys. Plasmas 19, 064703 (2012)

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, N.

    2012-06-15

    The investigation of the occurrence of nonlinear electrostatic waves (viz., solitary waves and double layers) in degenerate plasmas was the main concern of the article presented by Roy et al.[Phys. Plasmas 19, 033705 (2012)]. The equations of state used in the article were the limits explained by Chandrasekhar [Mon. Not. R. Astron. Soc. 170, 405 (1935)]. It was designated as 'misleading' by some authors, which is opposed in this reply with explanation.

  5. Comment on 'Nonplanar dust-ion acoustic Gardner solitons in a dusty plasma with q-nonextensive electron velocity distribution' [Phys. Plasmas 19, 033703 (2012)

    SciTech Connect

    Mannan, A.; Tanjia, F.; Yasmin, S.

    2013-04-15

    The basic characteristics of cylindrical and spherical dust-ion acoustic Gardner solitary waves in a dusty plasma with q-nonextensive electron velocity distribution have been represented by Ghosh et al.[Phys. Plasmas 19, 033703 (2012)]. In this manuscript, they use the double layer stationary solution of the standard Gardner equation but they explain the whole article in terms of Gardner solitons which is completely incorrect.

  6. Comment on 'The diatomic dication CuZn{sup 2+} in the gas phase' [J. Chem. Phys. 135, 034306 (2011)

    SciTech Connect

    Fiser, Jiri; Diez, Reinaldo Pis; Franzreb, Klaus; Alonso, Julio A.

    2013-02-21

    In this Comment, the density functional theory (DFT) calculations carried out by Diez et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 135, 034306 (2011)] are revised within the framework of the coupled-cluster single double triple method. These more sophisticated calculations allow us to show that the {sup 2}{Sigma}{sup +} electronic ground state of CuZn{sup 2+}, characterized as the metastable ground state by DFT calculations, is a repulsive state instead. The {sup 2}{Delta} and {sup 2}{Pi} metastable states of CuZn{sup 2+}, on the other hand, should be responsible for the formation mechanism of the dication through the near-resonant electron transfer CuZn{sup +}+ Ar{sup +}{yields} CuZn{sup 2+}+ Ar reaction.

  7. Comment on "Unexpected size effect in the thermopower of thin-film stripes" [J. Appl. Phys. 110, 083709 (2011)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szakmany, Gergo P.; Orlov, Alexei O.; Bernstein, Gary H.; Porod, Wolfgang

    2014-06-01

    In a recent article, Sun et al. [J. Appl. Phys. 110, 083709 (2011)] claim to measure a size-dependent thermoelectric effect in a micron-scale single-metal thermocouple. In this Comment, we demonstrate that the observed phenomenon is not due to a size-dependent Seebeck effect as claimed, but is rather wire-size-dependent heat transport that causes unequal heating at the bonding pads. As a result, the bonding pads are at two different temperatures, and the observed voltage corresponds to a thermoelectric effect of a parasitic thermocouple formed between their metal structure and the bonding-pad wires. We provide simulations and suggest a control experiment based on their structure that supports our contention that the observation depends on width-dependent heat transport in the wires.

  8. Comment on “Two-dimensional positive column structure in a discharge tube with radius discontinuity” [Phys. Plasmas 21, 113503 (2014)

    SciTech Connect

    Demidova, M. V.; Kudryavtsev, A. A.; Kurlyandskaya, I. P.; Saifutdinov, A. I.; Stepanova, O. M.

    2015-09-15

    Zobnin et al. have published a paper [Phys. Plasmas, 21, 113503 (2014)] on a topic of discharge physics in the presence of a sharp change in cylindrical discharge geometry. In the comment it is pointed out that for untrapped electrons a full kinetic equation, which includes dependences on spatial coordinates and energies, has to be used for the electron velocity distribution function determination. It is also unclear what probe theories Zobnin et al. have used in their paper for the calculation of electron current to the discharge tube wall.

  9. Comment on: “Quantum exam” [Phys. Lett. A 350 (2006) 174

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Jie; Zhang, Shou

    2007-01-01

    In the Letter [B.A. Nguyen, Phys. Lett. A 350 (2006) 174], a quantum exam protocol was presented. Here we show a cheating protocol, by which any student can get the other students' solution without being detected. Then we propose a possible modified protocol against this attacking strategy.

  10. Comment on ``Derivation of paleoclassical key hypothesis'' [Phys. Plasmas 14, 040701 (2007)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thyagaraja, A.; Roach, C. M.; Hazeltine, R. D.

    2008-01-01

    The paleoclassical hypothesis, derived in Callen [Phys. Plasmas 14, 040701 (2007)], proposes that electron guiding centers experience additional diffusion which is absent from neoclassical theory. This is claimed to be associated with the diffusion of poloidal magnetic flux, and to be most significant in cold resistive plasmas. In this comment we explain why the paleoclassical hypothesis contradicts electrodynamics.

  11. Reply to the 'Comment on "trans-1,2-Disiloxybenzocyclobutene, an adequate partner for the auto-oxidation: EPR/spin trapping and theoretical studies"' by H.-G. Korth, P. Mulder and T. Paul, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2017, 19, C6CP04187F.

    PubMed

    Carissan, Yannick; Nava, Paola; Tuccio, Béatrice; Commeiras, Laurent; Parrain, Jean-Luc

    2017-01-25

    The proposal and the comments made by Korth et al. on a biradical intermediate along the isomerization path of the reaction of trans-1,2-tert-butyldimethyldisilyloxybenzocyclobutene 1 with dioxygen are unsuitable in our case. The mechanism scenario that we proposed is in agreement with our experimental observations. Moreover, new calculations were able to give an answer to the crucial question, "is the biradical an intermediate or a transition state?" together with the localization of the two radicals. This full article is a response to the "Comment on "trans-1,2-Disiloxybenzocyclobutene, an adequate partner for the auto-oxidation: EPR/spin trapping and theoretical studies" by J. Drujon et al., Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 2014, 16, 7513".

  12. Comment on ``Three-dimensional photonic-crystal emitter for thermal photovoltaic power generation'' [Appl. Phys. Lett. 83, 380 (2003)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trupke, Thorsten; Würfel, Peter; Green, Martin A.

    2004-03-01

    In a recent article, Lin et al. [Appl. Phys. Lett. 83, 380 (2003)] reported on the light-emitting properties of three-dimensional tungsten photonic crystals and their potential applications as improved thermal emitters in thermophotovoltaic (TPV) systems. Their findings have attracted considerable interest throughout the media and the application of this type of materials has been praised as a potential superior future energy source; e.g., in waste heat-driven electrical generators (http://www.photonics.com). The results of the theoretical modeling in the work of Lin et al. suggest that a TPV system can achieve higher heat to electric energy conversion efficiencies in combination with a three-dimensional tungsten photonic crystal than with any conventional selective thermal emitter. These theoretical results are based on the experimental observation that the photonic crystal, when heated to a given temperature, emits more radiation in certain spectral regimes than a black body of the same temperature. This experimental observation shall briefly be discussed here.

  13. Collaborative study for the establishment of the Ph. Eur. Hepatitis E virus RNA for NAT testing biological reference preparation batch 1.

    PubMed

    Baylis, S A; Terao, E; Blümel, J; Hanschmann, K-M O

    2017-01-01

    A new European Pharmacopoeia (Ph. Eur.) biological reference preparation (BRP) had to be established further to the decision to include nucleic acid testing (NAT) for the detection of hepatitis E virus (HEV) RNA in the monograph Human plasma (pooled and treated for virus inactivation) (1646). To this purpose, an international collaborative study was launched in the framework of the Biological Standardisation Programme (BSP) of the European Directorate for the Quality of Medicines & HealthCare (EDQM) and the Commission of the European Union (EU). The study was run in conjunction with the establishment of the 1(st) World Health Organization (WHO) international reference panel (IRP) for hepatitis E virus RNA genotypes (8578/13). Twenty-three laboratories used in-house developed and commercially available assays to calibrate a lyophilised candidate BRP prepared from a HEV 3f strain positive human plasma against the 1(st) WHO International Standard (IS) for HEV RNA (6329/10). Results from quantitative and qualitative assays were in good agreement and were combined to calculate an assigned potency. Real-time stability studies indicated that the candidate BRP is very stable at lower temperatures and is thus suitable for long-term use. Based on these results, in February 2016, the Ph. Eur. Commission adopted the candidate material as the hepatitis E virus RNA for NAT testing BRP batch 1, with an assigned unitage of 2.1 × 10(4) IU/vial (4.32 log10 IU/vial).

  14. Addendum and Erratum: Nature of vibrational excitations in vitreous silica [Phys. Rev. B 56, 8605 (1997)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shcheblanov, Nikita S.; Povarnitsyn, Mikhail E.; Taraskin, Sergei N.; Elliott, Stephen R.

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this paper is to clarify details of the projectional analysis for atomic vibrations in vitreous silica presented in a paper by Taraskin and Elliott [Phys. Rev. B 56, 8605 (1997), 10.1103/PhysRevB.56.8605]. The description of the stretching and bending modes has been discussed in detail while a description of the rotational modes and the procedure of their calculation have not been given in full detail. We specify the method for calculating the rotational modes omitted in the paper. We also correct a misprint in the expression for the B2(E ) mode which, unfortunately, has been reproduced in the vibrational analysis of the E mode in some publications.

  15. Chemistry Teacher Education Coalition: Extending the PhysTEC Model to Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirchhoff, Mary

    2012-02-01

    The American Association of Employment in Education reports that chemistry, like physics, faces ``some shortage'' of educators. Inspired by the success of the Physics Teacher Education Coalition (PhysTEC), the American Chemical Society (ACS) is developing the Chemistry Teacher Education Coalition (CTEC) to actively engage chemistry departments in the preparation of future chemistry teachers. Engaging chemistry departments in teacher preparation would increase the number and diversity of well-prepared high school chemistry teachers while catalyzing cultural change within chemistry departments. Many features of PhysTEC, such as a grant competition to create model teacher preparation programs and regular conferences, are directly applicable to chemistry. This presentation will provide an overview of ACS efforts to launch a successful CTEC initiative.

  16. Improving Science Teacher Preparation through the APS PhysTEC and NSF Noyce Programs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Tasha; Tyler, Micheal; van Duzor, Andrea; Sabella, Mel

    2013-03-01

    Central to the recruitment of students into science teaching at a school like CSU, is a focus on the professional nature of teaching. The purpose of this focus is twofold: it serves to change student perceptions about teaching and it prepares students to become teachers who value continued professional development and value the science education research literature. The Noyce and PhysTEC programs at CSU place the professional nature of teaching front and center by involving students in education research projects, paid internships, attendance at conferences, and participation in a new Teacher Immersion Institute and a Science Education Journal Reading Class. This poster will focus on specific components of our teacher preparation program that were developed through these two programs. In addition we will describe how these new components provide students with diverse experiences in the teaching of science to students in the urban school district. Supported by the NSF Noyce Program (0833251) and the APS PhysTEC Program.

  17. Comment on Weakly dissipative dust-ion acoustic wave modulation (J. Plasma Phys. 82, 905820104, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kourakis, I.; Elkamash, I. S.

    2016-10-01

    In a recent article (J. Plasma Phys., vol. 82, 2009, 905820104), weakly dissipative dust-ion acoustic wave modulation in dusty plasmas was considered. It is shown in this Comment that the analysis therein involved severe fallacies, and is in fact based on an erroneous plasma fluid model, which fails to satisfy an equilibrium condition, among other shortcomings. The subsequent analysis therefore is dubious and of limited scientific value.

  18. Comment on ``Multireference configuration-interaction calculations for positronium halides'' [J. Chem. Phys. 122, 054302 (2005)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitroy, J.; Bromley, M. W. J.

    2005-07-01

    Large-scale configuration-interaction calculations of the binding energies and annihilation rates of the positronium halides, PsF, PsCl, PsBr, and PsI [S. L. Saito, J. Chem. Phys. 122 054302 (2005)], have made erroneous predictions about the structures of these atoms. The predictions were based on small annihilation rates, which result from using a small basis and additionally invalid estimates of the contributions from single-particle orbitals with ℓ >8 .

  19. Comment on “Generalized dispersion relation for electron Bernstein waves in a non-Maxwellian magnetized anisotropic plasma” [Phys. Plasmas 17, 102114 (2010)

    SciTech Connect

    Sharifi, M. Parvazian, A.

    2015-02-15

    In a recent paper [Deeba et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 102114 (2010)], a generalized dielectric constant for the electron Bernstein waves using non-Maxwellian distribution functions was derived in a collisionless, uniform magnetized plasma. Using the Neumann series expansion for the products of Bessel functions, Deeba, Ahmad, and Murtaza derived the dispersion relations for both kappa and the generalized (r, q) distributions in a straightforward manner. However, their results are questionable, since the Neumann series expansion for the products of Bessel functions is valid for small argument, while for perpendicular propagation, it is necessary to evaluate special integrands for small as well as large arguments.

  20. Comment on “The two dimensional motion of a particle in an inverse square potential: Classical and quantum aspects” [J. Math. Phys. 54, 053509 (2013)

    SciTech Connect

    Bietenholz, Wolfgang Chryssomalakos, Chryssomalis Salgado, Marcelo

    2015-10-15

    We comment on a fatal flaw in the analysis contained in the work of Martínez-y-Romero et al., [J. Math. Phys. 54, 053509 (2013)], which concerns the motion of a point particle in an inverse square potential, and show that most conclusions reached there are wrong. In particular, the manifestly senseless claim that, in the attractive potential case, no bounded orbits exist for negative energies, is traced to a sign error. Several more mistakes, both in the classical and the quantum cases, are pointed out.

  1. Comment on “Shape transition of unstrained flattest single-walled carbon nanotubes under pressure” [J. Appl. Phys. 115, 044512 (2014)

    SciTech Connect

    Vassilev, Vassil M. Djondjorov, Peter A.; Mladenov, Ivaïlo M.

    2015-05-21

    Recently, Mu et al. [J. Appl. Phys. 115, 044512 (2014)] have developed an analytic approach to describe some special shapes of a single-wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) under hydrostatic pressure. These authors have found approximate analytic expressions for the parametric equations of the tube cross section profile and its curvature at the convex-to-concave transition pressure using a shell-like 2D continuum model describing the shapes of such nanotubes. In this comment, we provide additional insight into this problem taking into account the exact analytic representation of the shapes that a SWCNT attains when subjected to hydrostatic pressure according to the very same continuum model.

  2. Comment on ``The two dimensional motion of a particle in an inverse square potential: Classical and quantum aspects'' [J. Math. Phys. 54, 053509 (2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bietenholz, Wolfgang; Chryssomalakos, Chryssomalis; Salgado, Marcelo

    2015-10-01

    We comment on a fatal flaw in the analysis contained in the work of Martínez-y-Romero et al., [J. Math. Phys. 54, 053509 (2013)], which concerns the motion of a point particle in an inverse square potential, and show that most conclusions reached there are wrong. In particular, the manifestly senseless claim that, in the attractive potential case, no bounded orbits exist for negative energies, is traced to a sign error. Several more mistakes, both in the classical and the quantum cases, are pointed out.

  3. Comment on ``Molecular dynamics simulation study of nonconcatenated ring polymers in a melt. I. Statics'' [J. Chem. Phys. 134, 204904 (2011)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wittmer, J. P.; Meyer, H.; Johner, A.; Obukhov, S.; Baschnagel, J.

    2013-12-01

    Recent computational studies on melts of nonconcatenated rings suggest compact configurations of fractal dimension df = 3. This begs the question of whether the irregular surfaces of these compact rings may be characterized by a fractal surface dimension ds < 3. We revisit the scaling analysis of the form factor by Halverson et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 134, 204904 (2011)] implying ds ≈ 2.8. Our analysis suggests that this conclusion might be due to the application of the Generalized Porod Law at large wavevectors where length scales other than the total chain size do matter. We present an alternative "decorated Gaussian loop" model which does not require ds < 3.

  4. Comment on “Diffusion of n-type dopants in germanium” [Appl. Phys. Rev. 1, 011301 (2014)

    SciTech Connect

    Cowern, N. E. B. Simdyankin, S.; Goss, J. P.; Napolitani, E.; De Salvador, D.; Bruno, E.; Mirabella, S.; Ahn, C.; Bennett, N. S.

    2015-09-15

    The authors of the above paper call into question recent evidence on the properties of self-interstitials, I, in Ge [Cowern et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 155501 (2013)]. We show that this judgment stems from invalid model assumptions during analysis of data on B marker-layer diffusion during proton irradiation, and that a corrected analysis fully supports the reported evidence. As previously stated, I-mediated self-diffusion in Ge exhibits two distinct regimes of temperature, T: high-T, dominated by amorphous-like mono-interstitial clusters—i-morphs—with self-diffusion entropy ≈30 k, and low-T, where transport is dominated by simple self-interstitials. In a transitional range centered on 475 °C both mechanisms contribute. The experimental I migration energy of 1.84 ± 0.26 eV reported by the Münster group based on measurements of self-diffusion during irradiation at 550 °C < T < 680 °C further establishes our proposed i-morph mechanism.

  5. Using the PhysX engine for Physics-based Virtual Surgery with Force Feedback

    PubMed Central

    Maciel, Anderson; Halic, Tansel; Lu, Zhonghua; Nedel, Luciana P.; De, Suvranu

    2010-01-01

    Background The development of modern surgical simulators is highly challenging as they must support complex simulation environments. The demand for higher realism in such simulators has driven researchers to adopt physics-based models which are computationally very demanding. This poses a major problem since real time interactions must permit graphical updates of 30 Hz and a much higher rate of 1 kHz for force feedback (haptics). Recently several physics engines have been developed which offer multi-physics simulation capabilities including rigid and deformable bodies, cloth and fluids. While such physics engines provide unique opportunities for the development of surgical simulators, their higher latencies, compared to what is necessary for real time graphics and haptics, offer significant barriers to their use in interactive simulation environments. Methods In this work, we propose solutions to this problem and demonstrate how a multimodal surgical simulation environment may be developed based on NVIDIA’s PhysX physics library. Hence, models that are undergoing relatively low frequency updates in PhysX can exist in an environment that demands much higher frequency updates for haptics. We use a collision handling layer to interface between the physical response provided by PhysX and the haptic rendering device to provide both real time tissue response and force feedback. Results Our simulator integrates a bimanual haptic interface for force-feedback and per-pixel shaders for graphics realism in real time. To demonstrate the effectiveness of our approach, we present the simulation of the Laparoscopic Adjustable Gastric Banding (LAGB) procedure as a case study. Conclusions To develop complex and realistic surgical trainers with realistic organ geometries and tissue properties demands stable physics-based deformation methods which are not always compatible with the interaction level required for such trainers. We have shown that combining different modeling

  6. Comment on 'General nonlocality in quantum fields'[J. Math. Phys. 49, 033513 (2008)

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Haijun

    2010-05-15

    In a recent paper [H.-J. Wang, J. Math. Phys. 49, 033513 (2008)] a complex-geometry model was proposed to interpret the interaction of electromagnetism and the interaction between quarks while the nonlocal effects are involved. In that theoretical frame, from the metric matrix one can obtain a determinant-form condition to describe qualitatively the typical characteristics for the aforementioned interactions. In this comment we attempt to extend this kind of qualitative description to weak interaction by finding out an appropriate metric tensor for it.

  7. Comment on ``Quasirelativistic theory equivalent to fully relativistic theory'' [J. Chem. Phys. 123, 241102 (2005)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filatov, Michael

    2006-09-01

    The connection between the exact quasirelativistic approach developed in the title reference [W. Kutzelnigg and W. Liu, J. Chem. Phys. 123, 241102 (2005)] and the method of elimination of the small component in matrix form developed previously by Dyall is explicitly worked out. An equation that links Hermitian and non-Hermitian formulations of the exact quasirelativistic theory is derived. Besides establishing a kinship between the existing formulations, the proposed equation can be employed for the derivation of new formulations of the exact quasirelativistic theory.

  8. Comment on 'Thermodynamic cycles and the calculation of p Ka' [Chem. Phys. Lett. 367 (2003) 145

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Silva, Clarissa O.; da Silva, Edilson C.; Nascimento, Marco A. C.

    2003-11-01

    In a recent Letter, Pliego [Chem. Phys. Lett. 367 (2003) 145] has raised some questions about the methodology that we have employed for calculating p Ka values in aqueous solutions. In this comment we show that the problem with Pliego's analysis is the fact that he used Ben-Naim's definition of Δ Gsol for both the solute and the solvent, which implies that the concentration, for both components, should be equal to 1 M. For the solute, this is a reference state fully compatible with the quantum description, but for the solvent this choice is unphysical, as discussed in the Letter.

  9. Comment on ‘To stack or not to stack: Performance of a new density functional for the uracil and thymine dimers’ [Chem. Phys. Lett. 459 (2008) 164

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Mourik, Tanja

    2009-04-01

    A Letter by Gu et al. [J. Gu, J. Wang, J. Leszczynski, Y. Xie, H.F. Schaefer III, Chem. Phys. Lett. 459 (2008) 164] presented MP2/6-31+G(d) and MP2/TZVPP stacking energies for the uracil and thymine dimers, with the aim to assess the performance of the new M06-2X density functional. However, the stacking energies were not corrected for the basis set superposition error (BSSE). Here we show that correction for this error dramatically changes the results. BSSE correction severely reduces the stacking energy of the thymine dimer, whereas the stacked uracil dimer structure considered by Gu et al. is not even a minimum on the MP2/6-31+G(d) potential energy surface.

  10. Comment on "Diffusion by a random velocity field" [Phys. Fluids 13, 22 (1970)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saad, Tony; Sutherland, James C.

    2016-11-01

    This comment aims at addressing a mass conservation issue in a paper published in the physics of fluids. The paper [R. H. Kraichnan, "Diffusion by a random velocity field," Phys. Fluids 13(1), 22 (1970)] introduces a novel method to generate synthetic isotropic turbulence for computational purposes. The method has been used in the literature to generate inlet boundary conditions and to model aeroacoustic noise as well as for validation and verification purposes. However, the technique uses a continuous formulation to derive the mass conservation constraint. In this comment, we argue that the continuous constraint is invalid on a discrete grid and provide an alternative derivation using the discrete divergence. In addition, we present an analysis to quantify the impact of a pressure projection on the kinetic energy of a non-solenoidal velocity field.

  11. Comment on ``Global thermodynamics of hydrophobic cavitation, dewetting, and hydration'' [J. Chem. Phys. 123, 184504 (2005)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graziano, Giuseppe

    2006-07-01

    It is pointed out that in a Ben-Amotz in a recent article [J. Chem. Phys.123, 184504 (2005)] attributed a noncorrect meaning to the entropy convergence temperature, claiming that the latter corresponds to the temperature at which the hydration entropy of a series of solutes crosses zero. A short resumé of the entropy convergence phenomenon and of the provided statistical mechanical analyses is accomplished. In addition, it is brought out that the different temperature dependence of the cavity entropy change on increasing the cavity diameter, pointed out by Ben-Amotz, originates from the assumption that the work of cavity creation should be proportional to the experimental surface tension of liquid water for cavities large on a molecular scale.

  12. Comment on ``On the imaginary-real ratio rule of power spectra'' [J. Math. Phys. 50, 063301 (2009)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yong

    2010-04-01

    For the three-state ergodic Markov process, the condition of all the fluctuation spectra (i.e., power spectra) with respect to real observables being monotonic over [0,+∞) [Y. Chen, Fluct. Noise Lett. 7, L181 (2007) (Theorem 2.6)] is deduced from Theorem 1 of Qian and Xie [J. Math. Phys. 50, 063301 (2009)]. In addition, we present two examples using Theorem 3 of Qian and Xie [J. Math. Phys. 50, 063301 (2009)].

  13. Computational Fluid Dynamics Simulation of Hydrodynamics and Stresses in the PhEur/USP Disintegration Tester Under Fed and Fasted Fluid Characteristics.

    PubMed

    Kindgen, Sarah; Wachtel, Herbert; Abrahamsson, Bertil; Langguth, Peter

    2015-09-01

    Disintegration of oral solid dosage forms is a prerequisite for drug dissolution and absorption and is to a large extent dependent on the pressures and hydrodynamic conditions in the solution that the dosage form is exposed to. In this work, the hydrodynamics in the PhEur/USP disintegration tester were investigated using computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Particle image velocimetry was used to validate the CFD predictions. The CFD simulations were performed with different Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids, representing fasted and fed states. The results indicate that the current design and operating conditions of the disintegration test device, given by the pharmacopoeias, are not reproducing the in vivo situation. This holds true for the hydrodynamics in the disintegration tester that generates Reynolds numbers dissimilar to the reported in vivo situation. Also, when using homogenized US FDA meal, representing the fed state, too high viscosities and relative pressures are generated. The forces acting on the dosage form are too small for all fluids compared to the in vivo situation. The lack of peristaltic contractions, which generate hydrodynamics and shear stress in vivo, might be the major drawback of the compendial device resulting in the observed differences between predicted and in vivo measured hydrodynamics.

  14. PyDecay/GraphPhys: A Unified Language and Storage System for Particle Decay Process Descriptions

    SciTech Connect

    Dunietz, Jesse N.; /MIT /SLAC

    2011-06-22

    To ease the tasks of Monte Carlo (MC) simulation and event reconstruction (i.e. inferring particle-decay events from experimental data) for long-term BaBar data preservation and analysis, the following software components have been designed: a language ('GraphPhys') for specifying decay processes, common to both simulation and data analysis, allowing arbitrary parameters on particles, decays, and entire processes; an automated visualization tool to show graphically what decays have been specified; and a searchable database storage mechanism for decay specifications. Unlike HepML, a proposed XML standard for HEP metadata, the specification language is designed not for data interchange between computer systems, but rather for direct manipulation by human beings as well as computers. The components are interoperable: the information parsed from files in the specification language can easily be rendered as an image by the visualization package, and conversion between decay representations was implemented. Several proof-of-concept command-line tools were built based on this framework. Applications include building easier and more efficient interfaces to existing analysis tools for current projects (e.g. BaBar/BESII), providing a framework for analyses in future experimental settings (e.g. LHC/SuperB), and outreach programs that involve giving students access to BaBar data and analysis tools to give them a hands-on feel for scientific analysis.

  15. Response to “Comment on ‘Twin symmetry texture of energetically condensed niobium thin films on sapphire substrate’ ” [J. Appl. Phys. 112, 016101 (2012)

    DOE PAGES

    Zhao, X.; Philips, L.; Reece, C. E.; ...

    2012-07-01

    Welander is correct about the misidentified crystal-directions in the top-view sapphire lattice (Fig. 4 [Zhao et al., J. Appl. Phys. 110, 033523 (2011)]). He is also correct about the misorientation of the pole figures in Fig. 4. In Fig. 1 of this response, we have corrected these errors. Perhaps because of these errors, Welander misconstrued our discussion of the Nbcrystal growth as claiming a new 3D registry. That was not our intention. Rather, we wished to highlight the role of energetic condensation that drives low-defect crystal growth by a combination of non-equilibrium sub-plantation that disturbs the substrate lattice and thermalmore » annealing that annihilates defects and promotes large-grain crystal growth.« less

  16. Comment on ``Glass transition in pure and doped amorphous solid water: An ultrafast microcalorimetry study'' [J. Chem. Phys. 125, 094501 (2006)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johari, G. P.

    2007-10-01

    On investigating the data of Chonde et al. [J. Chem. Phys.125, 094501 (2006)], we find that (i) the relaxation time of the test liquid toluene used for determining the ultrafast scans' reliability was mistaken by several decades and incorrectly plotted, (ii) extrinsic effects had led to an exceptionally broad endotherm showing an enthalpy relaxation occurring implausibly at 500ps time scale, (iii) enthalpy relaxation times at structural unfreezing and at crystallization temperatures were assumed to be the same, equal to the reciprocal of the heating rate, and (iv) the data for water were incorrectly analyzed. An appropriate analysis would alter their conclusion and would be useful for discussing other ultrafast scans and nanocalorimetry data.

  17. Erratum: Studying the precision of ray tracing techniques with Szekeres models [Phys. Rev. D 92, 023532 (2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koksbang, S. M.; Hannestad, S.

    2015-09-01

    This erratum serves to give corrections of two errors made in Koksbang and Hannestad [Phys. Rev. D, 92, 023532 (2015)]. One error consists of having used the expression for the Doppler convergence for a flat background to study the convergence on curved backgrounds. The other error which was made, is a typo in the numerical code used to study the convergence in onion models with curved backgrounds. After correcting this typo, the results of Sec. VI A in Koksbang and Hannestad [Phys. Rev. D, 92, 023532 (2015)] were recomputed. Contrary to the original results, the new results show that the ray-tracing scheme studied in Koksbang and Hannestad [Phys. Rev. D, 92, 023532 (2015)] can reproduce the exact results in LTB onion models very well. The corrections and new results are described more elaborately below.

  18. Establishment of European Pharmacopoeia (Ph. Eur.) Biological Reference Preparations (BRP) batch 2 for rDNA hepatitis B vaccine (method A and B).

    PubMed

    Dobbelaer, R; Daas, A; Milne, C

    2004-01-01

    A collaborative study was initiated by the European Directorate for the Quality of Medicines (EDQM), to assign a potency value for candidate batch 2 of European Pharmacopoeia (Ph. Eur.) Biological Reference Preparation (BRP) for Hepatitis B (rDNA) antigen in vitro assays, for both method A and method B by calibrating them against the Ph. Eur. BRPs, batch 1 for methods A and B respectively. The study was prompted by the observation that the first batch of BRP for method B appeared to have lost potency over time. BRP 1 for method A showed no loss in potency, however stocks of the material were nearing depletion. Eleven laboratories participated in the study and all reported results. Participants performed 3 independent assays using both method A and method B. Method A was used to assess BRPs for method A and method B was used to assess BRPs for method B. Since BRP 1B was suspected to have lost potency, an additional sample was included in the method B test in an attempt to clarify the situation. BRP 1B was also assayed in method A against BRP 1A in the hope of also attaining further information by comparing the results from this study to those obtained in the original study to establish the first batch of BRP [1]. Although it was not the primary aim of this study to correlate in vitro potency with the immunogenicity assay in mice, a number of interested parties also performed the mouse in vivo assay to obtain data on the behaviour of the candidate BRPs in this assay. For method A, potency estimates were satisfactory in terms of repeatability and reproducibility. The candidate material was therefore assigned a value of 16.6 micrograms/ml. For method B, it appeared that the observation of reduced in vitro potency of BRP1 was confirmed. Despite the attempt to clarify the situation with additional studies, it was not possible to assign a potency value with the results obtained. A small-scale collaborative study will be organised to determine an appropriate value for the

  19. Comments on ''theory of dissipative density-gradient-driven turbulence in the tokamak edge'' (Phys. Fluids 28, 1419 (1985))

    SciTech Connect

    Krommes, J.A.

    1985-11-01

    The author critiques the model of tokamak edge turbulence by P.W. Terry and P.H. Diamond (Phys. Fluids 28, 1419, 1985). The critique includes a discussion of the physical basis, consistency and quantitative accuracy of the Terry-Diamond model. 19 refs. (WRF)

  20. Comment on "On the Crooks fluctuation theorem and the Jarzynski equality" [J. Chem. Phys. 129, 091101 (2008)].

    PubMed

    Adib, Artur B

    2009-06-28

    It has recently been argued that a self-consistency condition involving the Jarzynski equality (JE) and the Crooks fluctuation theorem (CFT) is violated for a simple Brownian process [L. Y. Chen, J. Chem. Phys.129, 091101 (2008)]. This note adopts the definitions in the original formulation of the JE and CFT and demonstrates the contrary.

  1. Comment on "Soret motion in non-ionic binary molecular mixtures" [J. Chem. Phys. 135, 054102 (2011)].

    PubMed

    Semenov, Semen N; Schimpf, Martin E

    2012-09-28

    The material transport equations derived in the article by Leroyer and Würger [J. Chem. Phys. 135, 054102 (2011)] do not adequately provide a description of material transport in liquid binary systems. An alternate approach based on non-equilibrium thermodynamics is presented.

  2. Olea europaea leaf (Ph.Eur.) extract as well as several of its isolated phenolics inhibit the gout-related enzyme xanthine oxidase.

    PubMed

    Flemmig, J; Kuchta, K; Arnhold, J; Rauwald, H W

    2011-05-15

    In Mediterranean folk medicine Olea europaea L. leaf (Ph.Eur.) preparations are used as a common remedy for gout. In this in vitro study kinetic measurements were performed on both an 80% ethanolic (v/v) Olea europaea leaf dry extract (OLE) as well as on nine of its typical phenolic constituents in order to investigate its possible inhibitory effects on xanthine oxidase (XO), an enzyme well known to contribute significantly to this pathological process. Dixon and Lineweaver-Burk plot analysis were used to determine K(i) values and the inhibition mode for the isolated phenolics, which were analysed by RP-HPLC for standardisation of OLE. The standardised OLE as well as some of the tested phenolics significantly inhibited the activity of XO. Among these, the flavone aglycone apigenin exhibited by far the strongest effect on XO with a K(i) value of 0.52 μM. In comparison, the known synthetic XO inhibitor allopurinol, used as a reference standard, showed a K(i) of 7.3 μM. Although the phenolic secoiridoid oleuropein, the main ingredient of the extract (24.8%), had a considerable higher K(i) value of 53.0 μM, it still displayed a significant inhibition of XO. Furthermore, caffeic acid (K(i) of 11.5 μM; 1.89% of the extract), luteolin-7-O-β-D-glucoside (K(i) of 15.0 μM; 0.86%) and luteolin (K(i) of 2.9 μM; 0.086%) also contributed significantly to the XO inhibiting effect of OLE. For oleuropein, a competitive mode of inhibition was found, while all other active substances displayed a mixed mode of inhibition. Tyrosol, hydroxytyrosol, verbascoside, and apigenin-7-O-β-D-glucoside, which makes up for 0.3% of the extract, were inactive in all tested concentrations. Regarding the pharmacological in vitro effect of apigenin-7-O-β-D-glucoside, it has to be considered that it is transformed into the active apigenin aglycone in the mammalian body, thus also contributing substantially to the anti-gout activity of olive leaves. For the first time, this study provides a

  3. Bierman {ital et al.}Reply:

    SciTech Connect

    Bierman, J.D.; Chan, P.; Liang, J.F.; Kelly, M.P.; Sonzogni, A.A.; Vandenbosch, R.

    1997-05-01

    reply to the Comment by C.H.Dasso et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 78,XXX(1997). A Reply to the Comment by C.H. Dasso and J. Fern{acute a}ndez-Niello. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  4. Comment on 'Power loss in open cavity diodes and a modified Child-Langmuir law' [Phys. Plasmas 12, 093102 (2005)

    SciTech Connect

    Swanekamp, S. B.; Ottinger, P. F.

    2007-09-15

    In this Comment, it is shown that no modification of the Child-Langmuir law [Phys. Rev.32, 492 (1911); Phys. Rev. 2, 450 (1913)] is necessary to treat the space-charge-limited flow from a diode with an open boundary as reported in Phys. Plasmas 12, 093102 (2005). The open boundary condition in their simulations can be represented by a voltage source and a resistor whose value is the vacuum-wave impedance of the opening. The diode can be represented as a variable resistor whose value depends on the voltage drop across the diode (as measured by the line integral of E across the diode gap). This is a simple voltage-divider circuit whose analysis shows that the real diode voltage drops as the vacuum-wave impedance increases. Furthermore, it is shown that in equilibrium, the voltage drop between the anode and cathode is independent of the path chosen for the line integral of the electric field so that E=-{nabla}{phi} is valid. In this case, the equations of electrostatics are applicable. This clearly demonstrates that the electric field is electrostatic and static fields DO NOT RADIATE. It is shown that the diode voltage drops as the vacuum wave impedance increases and the current drops according to the Child-Langmuir law. Therefore, the observed drop in circuit current can be explained by a real drop in voltage across the diode and not an effective drop as claimed by the authors.

  5. Diagnosing ALS

    MedlinePlus

    ... that a person diagnosed with ALS seek a second opinion from an ALS "expert" - someone who diagnoses and treats many ALS patients and has training in this medical specialty. The ALS Association maintains a list of recognized experts in the field of ALS. See ALS Association Certified Centers of ...

  6. Response to Comment on '#28;Twin Symmetry Texture of Energetically Condensed 2 Niobium Thin Films on Sapphire Substrate' #29; [J. Appl. Phys. 110, 033523(2011)

    SciTech Connect

    Xin Zhao, Charles Reece, Phillips Larry, Mahadevan Krishnan, Kang Seo

    2012-07-01

    Welander commented that in our article [J. Appl. Phys. 110, 033523(2011)] , Zhao et al claim to have found a new three-dimensional (3D) relationship for niobium-on-sapphire epitaxy”. Welander might have misunderstood the purpose of our article, which was to show that energetic condensation of Nb on sapphire drives crystal growth that is quite distinct from the type of epitaxy encountered in lower energy deposition. Welander is correct about the misidentified crystal-directions in the top-view sapphire lattice (Fig.4[ref.1]). He is also correct about the misorientation of the pole figures in Fig4[ref.1]. In Fig.1 of this response, we have corrected these errors. Perhaps because of these errors, Welander misconstrued our discussion of the Nb crystal growth as claiming a new 3D registry. That was not our intention. Rather, we wished to highlight the role of energetic condensation that drives low-defect crystal growth by a combination of non-equilibrium sub-plantation that disturbs the substrate lattice and thermal annealing that annihilates defects and promotes large-grain crystal growth.

  7. Erratum to "Multi-modal fission in collinear ternary cluster decay of 252Cf(sf,fff)" [Phys. Lett. B 746 (2015) 223

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Oertzen, W.; Nasirov, A. K.; Tashkodjaev, R. B.

    2016-11-01

    The scale of the ordinate axis of Fig. 4 on page 226 of PLB 746 (2015) 223 was incorrect. The new version of Fig. 4 (which is "Fig. 1" in the present note) with the correct ordinate axis is given here (upper part). The lower part shows the previous version. Five potential wells and barriers are shown. Considering a sequential process two barriers are relevant for the decay, with equal barriers for the symmetric cases with a smaller fragment at the center (in these cases only one barrier is shown). For the asymmetric case of 70Ni + 50Ca + 132Sn, two different barriers appear, denoted as (B1) and (B2), which correspond to the interactions of the middle cluster 50Ca with the outer nuclei 70Ni and 132Sn, respectively. In a sequential mechanism the separation of 132Sn from the other part via the barrier B2 having the smaller height, is favoured for the first step. For the second step the barrier (B1) between Ni and Ca, appears at smaller distances (dot-dashed curve) and is higher. The order of the barriers of the five channels is unchanged, compared to the figure in Ref. W. von Oertzen et al., Phys. Lett. B 746 (2015) 223.

  8. Corrigendum to "Multi-modal Fission in Collinear Ternary Cluster decay of 252Cf(sf,fff)" [Phys. Lett. B 746 (2015) 223

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Oertzen, W.; Nasirov, A. K.; Tashkodjaev, R. B.

    2017-02-01

    The scale of the ordinate axis of Fig. 4 on page 226 of PLB 746 (2015) 223 was incorrect. The new version of Fig. 4 (which is "Fig. 1" in the present note) with the correct ordinate axis is given here (upper part). The lower part shows the previous version. Five potential wells and barriers are shown. Considering a sequential process, two barriers are relevant for the sequential decay, with equal barriers for the symmetric cases with a smaller fragment at the center (in these cases only one barrier is shown). For the asymmetric case of 70Ni + 50Ca + 132Sn, two different barriers appear, denoted as (B1) and (B2), which correspond to the interactions of the middle cluster 50Ca with the outer nuclei 70Ni and 132Sn, respectively. In a sequential mechanism the separation of 132Sn from the other part via the barrier B2 has the smaller height, thus it is favored for the first step. For the second step the barrier (B1) between Ni and Ca, appears at smaller distances (dot-dashed curve) and is higher. The order of the barriers of the five channels is unchanged, compared to the figure in Ref. W. von Oertzen et al., Phys. Lett. B 746 (2015) 223.

  9. Comment on "The physics origin of the hierarchy of bodies in space" [J. Appl. Phys. 119, 094901 (2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swartz, C. H.

    2016-09-01

    A recent paper [A. Bejan and R. W. Wagstaff, J. Appl. Phys. 119, 094901 (2016)] concludes that bodies of the same size suspended uniformly in space are in a state of high internal tension. The tension is then relieved by rearrangement of the bodies into a non-uniform distribution of mass. In this Comment, it is shown that the conclusions are based upon calculations which are in error, and that the amount of tension is not in fact decreased by such a rearrangement.

  10. Comment on “On the quantum theory of molecules” [J. Chem. Phys. 137, 22A544 (2012)

    SciTech Connect

    Sutcliffe, Brian T.; Woolley, R. Guy

    2014-01-21

    In our previous paper [B. T. Sutcliffe and R. G. Woolley, J. Chem. Phys. 137, 22A544 (2012)] we argued that the Born-Oppenheimer approximation could not be based on an exact transformation of the molecular Schrödinger equation. In this Comment we suggest that the fundamental reason for the approximate nature of the Born-Oppenheimer model is the lack of a complete set of functions for the electronic space, and the need to describe the continuous spectrum using spectral projection.

  11. ALS Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... toward a world without ALS! Walk to Defeat ALS® Walk to Defeat ALS® draws people of all ... We need your help. I Will Advocate National ALS Registry The National ALS Registry is a congressionally ...

  12. Comment on “Stationary self-focusing of Gaussian laser beam in relativistic thermal quantum plasma” [Phys. Plasmas 20, 072703 (2013)

    SciTech Connect

    Habibi, M.; Ghamari, F.

    2014-06-15

    Patil and Takale in their recent article [Phys. Plasmas 20, 072703 (2013)], by evaluating the quantum dielectric response in thermal quantum plasma, have modeled the relativistic self-focusing of Gaussian laser beam in a plasma. We have found that there are some important shortcomings and fundamental mistakes in Patil and Takale [Phys. Plasmas 20, 072703 (2013)] that we give a brief description about them and refer readers to important misconception about the use of the Fermi temperature in quantum plasmas, appearing in Patil and Takale [Phys. Plasmas 20, 072703 (2013)].

  13. Comment on “Deterministic six states protocol for quantum communication” [Phys. Lett. A 358 (2006) 85

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Orany, Faisal A. A.

    2010-02-01

    In [J.S. Shaari, M. Lucamarini, M.R.B. Wahiddin, Phys. Lett. A 358 (2006) 85] the deterministic six states protocol (6DP) for quantum communication has been developed. This protocol is based on three mutually unbiased bases and four encoding operators. Information is transmitted between the users via two qubits from different bases. Three attacks have been studied; namely intercept-resend attack (IRA), double-CNOT attack (2CNOTA) and quantum man-in-the-middle attack. In this Letter, we show that the IRA and 2CNOTA are not properly addressed. For instance, we show that the probability of detecting Eve in the control mode of the IRA is 70% instead of 50% in the previous study. Moreover, in the 2CNOTA, Eve can only obtain 50% of the data not all of it as argued earlier.

  14. Notes on "Soliton solutions by Darboux transformation and some reductions for a new Hamiltonian lattice hierarchy" [Phys. Scr. 82 (2010) 015008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xi-Xiang

    We demonstrate that the Darboux transformation in the paper "Soliton solutions by Darboux transformation and some reductions for a new Hamiltonian lattice hierarchy" [Phys. Scr. 82 (2010) 015008] is incorrect, and establish a correct Darboux transformation.

  15. Comment on "Droplet shaped anode double layer and electron sheath formation in magnetically constricted anode" [Phys. Plasmas 23, 013502 (2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruenwald, J.

    2016-02-01

    This comment aims at clarifying some points in the very recent work of Chauhan et al. who presented an experimental study of a fireball (FB) configuration in a magnetized plasma, similar to R. L. Stenzel et al., Plasma Sources Sci. Technol. 21, 015012 (2012).

  16. ALS - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - ALS ... The following organizations are good resources for information on amyotrophic lateral sclerosis : Muscular Dystrophy Association -- www.mda.org/disease/amyotrophic-lateral-sclerosis National Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) ...

  17. Comment on ``Modified nonequilibrium molecular dynamics for fluid flows with energy conservation'' [J. Chem. Phys. 106, 5615 (1997)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Denis J.; Searles, Debra J.; Hoover, Wm. G.; Hoover, C. G.; Holian, Brad Lee; Posch, Harald A.; Morriss, Gary P.

    1998-03-01

    In their recent paper and the associated Response to this Comment, Tuckerman et al. dispute the form of the Liouville equation, as proposed by Liouville in 1838. They go on to introduce a definition of the entropy which is at variance with Boltzmann's H-function and with Gibbs' definition of entropy. They argue that their "entropy" is a constant of the motion, equal to its initial equilibrium value regardless of the imposition of external fields. We argue that the analysis of Tuckerman et al. is incorrect and that issues raised by Tuckerman et al. are not at all new but have already been correctly incorporated into nonequilibrium statistical mechanics.

  18. Revisiting Deng et al.'s Multiparty Quantum Secret Sharing Protocol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Tzonelih; Hwang, Cheng-Chieh; Yang, Chun-Wei; Li, Chuan-Ming

    2011-09-01

    The multiparty quantum secret sharing protocol [Deng et al. in Chin. Phys. Lett. 23: 1084-1087, 2006] is revisited in this study. It is found that the performance of Deng et al.'s protocol can be much improved by using the techniques of block-transmission and decoy single photons. As a result, the qubit efficiency is improved 2.4 times and only one classical communication, a public discussion, and two quantum communications between each agent and the secret holder are needed rather than n classical communications, n public discussions, and 3n/2 quantum communications required in the original scheme.

  19. Comment on ``Preserving the Boltzmann ensemble in replica-exchange molecular dynamics'' [J. Chem. Phys. 129, 164112 (2008)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuda, Ikuo

    2010-03-01

    A brief discussion of the ergodic description of constant temperature molecular dynamics (MD) is provided; the discussion is based on the analysis of criticisms raised in a recent paper [B. Cooke and S. C. Schmidler, J. Chem. Phys.129, 164112 (2008)]. In the paper, the following criticisms relating to the basic concepts of constant temperature MD are made in mathematical manners: (I) the Nosé-Hoover (NH) equation is not measure-preserving; (II) NH system and NH chain system are not ergodic under the Boltzmann measure; and (III) the Nosé Hamiltonian system as well as the Nosé-Poincaré Hamiltonian system is not ergodic. In this comment, I show the necessity for the reconsideration of these criticisms. The NH equation is measure-preserving, where the measure carries the Boltzmann-Gibbs density; this fact provides the compatibility between MD equation and the Boltzmann-Gibbs distribution. The arguments advanced in support of the above criticisms are unsound; ergodicities of those systems are still not theoretically judged. I discuss exact ergodic-theoretical expressions appropriate for constant temperature MD, and explain the reason behind the incorrect recognitions.

  20. Response to "Comment on `Construction of the landscape for multi-stable systems: Potential landscape, quasi-potential, A-type integral and beyond"' [J. Chem. Phys. 145, 147104 (2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Peijie; Li, Tiejun

    2016-10-01

    The uniqueness issue of SDE decomposition theory proposed by Ao and his co-workers has recently been discussed. A comprehensive study to investigate connections among different landscape theories [J. Chem. Phys. 144, 094109 (2016)] has pointed out that the decomposition is generally not unique, while Ao et al. recently argue that such conclusions are "incorrect" because the uniqueness of the decomposition for Ornstein-Uhlenbeck (O-U) process has been claimed before. In this response, we will demonstrate that the claimed "uniqueness" of the O-U process decomposition is invalid to serve as a counterexample according to the original definition of SDE decomposition. The absence of effective and concrete boundary conditions in previous SDE decomposition papers will be pointed out, and some other issues in the comment will also be responded.

  1. Reply to the EFSA (2016) on the relevance of recent publications (Hofmann et al. 2014, 2016) on environmental risk assessment and management of Bt-maize events (MON810, Bt11 and 1507).

    PubMed

    Kruse-Plass, Maren; Hofmann, Frieder; Kuhn, Ulrike; Otto, Mathias; Schlechtriemen, Ulrich; Schröder, Boris; Vögel, Rudolf; Wosniok, Werner

    2017-01-01

    In this commentary, we respond to a report of the EFSA GMO Panel (EFSA EFSA Supp Publ, 1) that criticises the outcomes of two studies published in this journal (Hofmann et al. Environ Sci Eur 26: 24, 2; Environ Sci Eur 28: 14, 3). Both publications relate to the environmental risk assessment and management of Bt-maize, including maize events MON810, Bt11 and maize 1507. The results of Hofmann et al. (Environ Sci Eur 26: 24, 2), using standardised pollen mass filter deposition measurements, indicated that the EFSA Panel model had underestimated pollen deposition and, hence, exposure of non-target organisms to Bt-maize pollen. The results implied a need for safety buffer distances in the kilometre range for protected nature reserve areas instead of the 20-30 m range recommended by the EFSA Panel. As a result, the EFSA Panel revised their model (EFSA EFSA J 13: 4127, 4), adopting the slope of the empirical data from Hofmann et al. The intercept, however, was substantially reduced to less than 1% at one point by introducing further assumptions based on the estimates of mainly panel members, citing possible 'uncertainty'. Hofmann et al. (Environ Sci Eur 28: 14, 3) published extensive empirical data regarding pollen deposition on leaves. These results were part of a larger 3-year study involving detailed measurements of pollen release, dispersal and deposition over the maize flowering period. The data collected in situ confirmed the previous predictions of Hofmann et al. (Environ Sci Eur 26: 24, 2). Mean levels and observed variability of pollen deposition on maize and four lepidopteran host plants exceeded the assumptions and disagreed with the conclusions of the EFSA Panel. The EFSA Panel reacted in a report (EFSA EFSA Supp Publ, 1) criticising the methods and outcomes of the two published studies of Hofmann et al. while reaffirming their original recommendations. We respond here point-by-point, showing that the critique is not justified. Based on our results on

  2. Collaborative study for the establishment of the WHO 3(rd) International Standard for Endotoxin, the Ph. Eur. endotoxin biological reference preparation batch 5 and the USP Reference Standard for Endotoxin Lot H0K354.

    PubMed

    Findlay, L; Desai, T; Heath, A; Poole, S; Crivellone, M; Hauck, W; Ambrose, M; Morris, T; Daas, A; Rautmann, G; Buchheit, K H; Spieser, J M; Terao, E

    2015-01-01

    An international collaborative study was organised jointly by the World Health Organization (WHO)/National Institute for Biological Standards and Control (NIBSC), the United States Pharmacopeia (USP) and the European Directorate for the Quality of Medicines & HealthCare (EDQM/Council of Europe) for the establishment of harmonised replacement endotoxin standards for these 3 organisations. Thirty-five laboratories worldwide, including Official Medicines Control Laboratories (OMCLs) and manufacturers enrolled in the study. Three candidate preparations (10/178, 10/190 and 10/196) were produced with the same material and same formulation as the current reference standards with the objective of generating a new (3(rd)) International Standard (IS) with the same potency (10 000 IU/vial) as the current (2(nd)) IS, as well as new European Pharmacopoeia (Ph. Eur.). and USP standards. The suitability of the candidate preparations to act as the reference standard in assays for endotoxin performed according to compendial methods was evaluated. Their potency was calibrated against the WHO 2(nd) IS for Endotoxin (94/580). Gelation and photometric methods produced similar results for each of the candidate preparations. The overall potency estimates for the 3 batches were comparable. Given the intrinsic assay precision, the observed differences between the batches may be considered unimportant for the intended use of these materials. Overall, these results were in line with those generated for the establishment of the current preparations of reference standards. Accelerated degradation testing of vials stored at elevated temperatures supported the long-term stability of the 3 candidate preparations. It was agreed between the 3 organisations that batch 10/178 be shared between WHO and EDQM and that batches 10/190 and 10/196 be allocated to USP, with a common assigned value of 10 000 IU/vial. This value maintains the continuity of the global harmonisation of reference materials and

  3. Comment on "Ion distribution function in a plasma with uniform electric field" [Phys. Plasmas 19, 113703 (2012)].

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mustafaev, Alex; Sukhomlinov, Vladimir; Timofeev, Nikolay

    2016-08-01

    The comparison between experimental data of ion distribution function at the parent gas plasma obtained by the authors and results of calculations presented by Lampe et al. are considered. It is shown that the experimental and calculated angular distributions of ions in the case at least of argon differ considerably. The analysis of Lampe et al. assumptions showed that the main reasons of these discrepancies were the assumptions of ion distribution function independence on field orientation and independence of charge exchange cross-section on the relative velocity of ion and atom.

  4. Combustion Synthesis Reaction Behavior of Cold-Rolled Ni/Al and Ti/Al Multilayers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-04-01

    6   Figure 4 . Combustion synthesis process of the cold-rolled Ni/Al multilayer foils: (a) reaction front of the displacement of the reaction...Reactive Nanostructured Foil Used as a Heat Source for Joining Titanium . J. Appl. Phys. 2004, 96 ( 4 ), 2336–2342. 16. Wang, J.; Besnoin, E...2011 2. REPORT TYPE Final 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) January 2006–January 2008 4 . TITLE AND SUBTITLE Combustion Synthesis Reaction Behavior of

  5. Comments on “Thermal relic abundances of particles with velocity-dependent interactions” [Phys. Lett. B 687 (2010) 275

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iminniyaz, Hoernisa

    2013-06-01

    We reexamine the effect of kinetic decoupling on the relic density of the non-relativistic particles whose annihilation rate is increased by Sommerfeld enhancement. I claim that the result in Dent et al. (2010) [1] is wrong in the case of kinetic decoupling for small coupling constant α.

  6. Comment on "Scaling properties of information-theoretic quantities in density functional reactivity theory" by C. Rong, T. Lu, P. W. Ayers, P. K. Chattaraj and S. Liu, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2015, 17, 4977-4988.

    PubMed

    Bohórquez, Hugo J

    2015-12-21

    The scaling properties of density functionals are key for fundamentally understanding density functional theory. Accordingly, the dependence of density functionals on the number of particles is of paramount relevance. The numerical exploration by Rong et al. addressed N-scaling for a set of quantum information quantities; they found linear relationships between each one of them and the electronic population for atoms, molecules, and atoms in molecules. The main motivation for their computational work was that the theoretical scaling of these quantities is unknown; however, these scaling properties can be analytically determined. Here I reveal the derivation of the N-scaling rules for the quantities studied by Rong et al. by following the procedure introduced in Comput. Theor. Chem., 2015, 1053, 38. In addition, a new atomic scaling rule explains the linear relationship between atomic populations and atomic values of the same quantum information quantities.

  7. On the Heat Transfer through a Solid Slab Heated Uniformly and Continuously on One of Its Surfaces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marin, E.; Lara-Bernal, A.; Calderon, A.; Delgado-Vasallo, O.

    2011-01-01

    Some peculiarities of the heat transfer through a sample that is heated by the superficial absorption of light energy under continuous uniform illumination are discussed. We explain, using a different approach to that presented in a recent article published in this journal (Salazar "et al" 2010 "Eur. J. Phys." 31 1053-9), that the front surface of…

  8. Renormalization scheme dependence of the two-loop QCD corrections to the neutral Higgs-boson masses in the MSSM.

    PubMed

    Borowka, S; Hahn, T; Heinemeyer, S; Heinrich, G; Hollik, W

    Reaching a theoretical accuracy in the prediction of the lightest MSSM Higgs-boson mass, [Formula: see text], at the level of the current experimental precision requires the inclusion of momentum-dependent contributions at the two-loop level. Recently two groups presented the two-loop QCD momentum-dependent corrections to [Formula: see text] (Borowka et al., Eur Phys J C 74(8):2994, 2014; Degrassi et al., Eur Phys J C 75(2):61, 2015), using a hybrid on-shell-[Formula: see text] scheme, with apparently different results. We show that the differences can be traced back to a different renormalization of the top-quark mass, and that the claim in Ref. Degrassi et al. (Eur Phys J C 75(2):61, 2015) of an inconsistency in Ref. Borowka et al. (Eur Phys J C 74(8):2994, 2014) is incorrect. We furthermore compare consistently the results for [Formula: see text] obtained with the top-quark mass renormalized on-shell and [Formula: see text]. The latter calculation has been added to the FeynHiggs package and can be used to estimate missing higher-order corrections beyond the two-loop level.

  9. Simulated photodetachment spectra of AlH2-

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mok, Daniel K. W.; Lee, Edmond P. F.; Chau, Foo-tim; Dyke, John M.

    2013-07-01

    We have carried out high-level ab initio calculations on AlH2 and its anion, as well as Franck-Condon factor calculations, which include anharmonicity and Duschinsky rotation, to simulate the photodetachment spectrum of AlH2-, with the aim of assigning the very recently reported photodetachment spectrum of AlH2- [X. Zhang, H. Wang, E. Collins, A. Lim, G. Ganteför, B. Kiran, H. Schnöckel, B. Eichhorn, and K. Bowen, J. Chem. Phys. 138, 124303 (2013)], 10.1063/1.4796200. However, our simulated spectra do not support the assignment of the reported experimental spectrum to AlH2-.

  10. Comment on 'Wave functions for a Duffin-Kemmer-Petiau particle in a time-dependent potential' [J. Math. Phys. 48, 073515 (2007)

    SciTech Connect

    Castro, L. B.; Castro, A. S. de

    2010-03-15

    It is shown that the paper 'Wave functions for a Duffin-Kemmer-Petiau particle in a time-dependent potential' by Merad and Bensaid [J. Math. Phys. 48, 073515 (2007)] is not correct in using inadvertently a non-Hermitian Hamiltonian in a formalism that does require Hermitian Hamiltonians.

  11. Note: Derivation of two-photon circular dichroism—Addendum to “Two-photon circular dichroism” [J. Chem. Phys. 62, 1006 (1975)

    SciTech Connect

    Friese, Daniel H.

    2015-09-07

    This addendum shows the detailed derivation of the fundamental equations for two-photon circular dichroism which are given in a very condensed form in the original publication [I. Tinoco, J. Chem. Phys. 62, 1006 (1975)]. In addition, some minor errors are corrected and some of the derivations in the original publication are commented.

  12. Comment on ``Barut-Girardello and Klauder-Perelomov coherent states for the Kravchuk functions'' [J. Math. Phys. 48, 112106 (2007)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fakhri, H.; Dehghani, A.

    2008-04-01

    We call attention to the misconstructions in a paper recently published in this journal [A. Chenaghlou and O. Faizy, J. Math. Phys. 48, 112106 (2007)]. It is shown that the constructed Barut-Girardello coherent states are problematic from the view points of the definition and the measure. The claimed coherencies for the Kravchuk functions cannot actually exist.

  13. Comment on: “From classical to modern ether-drift experiments: the narrow window for a preferred frame” [Phys. Lett. A 333 (2004) 355

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerra, Vasco; de Abreu, Rodrigo

    2007-02-01

    In a recent article [M. Consoli, E. Costanzo, Phys. Lett. A 333 (2004) 355], M. Consoli and E. Costanzo have investigated classical and modern aether drift experiments and explored the narrow window for detection of a preferred reference frame. This Letter proposes an easy to perform variant of Fizeau's experiment, which may confirm or deny Consoli Costanzo's claims.

  14. Comment on "Superposition of elliptic functions as solutions for a large number of nonlinear equations" [J. Math. Phys. 56, 032104 (2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yi; Li, Ji-Bin

    2015-08-01

    By using the method of planar dynamical systems, we solve exactly a nonlinear Schrödinger (NLS) equation discussed by Khare and Saxena [J. Math. Phys. 56, 032104 (2015)], and give the exact explicit parametric representations of all the traveling wave solutions.

  15. Comment on ``Monte Carlo investigation of current voltage and avalanche noise in GaN double-drift impact diodes'' [J. Appl. Phys. 97, 043709 (2005)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dash, G. N.

    2005-11-01

    The avalanche noise behavior of impact avalanche transit-time (IMPATT) diodes has been modeled by Reklaitis and Reggiani [J. Appl. Phys. 97, 043709 (2005)]. They have obtained general agreement of their results with those of McIntyre [IEEE Trans. Electron Devices ED-13, 164 (1966)]. However, McIntyre's theory predicts the opposite noise behavior from that observed in the IMPATT diode. Hence the applicability of the noise model of Reklaitis and Reggiani to IMPATT diode is questionable.

  16. Comment on “General rotating quantum vortex filaments in the low-temperature Svistunov model of the local induction approximation” [Phys. Fluids 26, 065105 (2014)

    SciTech Connect

    Hietala, Niklas Hänninen, Risto

    2014-11-15

    Van Gorder considers a formulation of the local induction approximation, which allows the vortex to move in the direction of the reference axis [“General rotating quantum vortex filaments in the low-temperature Svistunov model of the local induction approximation,” Phys. Fluids 26, 065105 (2014)]. However, in his analytical and numerical study he does not use it. A mistake in the torsion of a helical vortex is also corrected.

  17. Response to “Comment on ‘Stationary self-focusing of Gaussian laser beam in relativistic thermal quantum plasma’” [Phys. Plasmas 21, 064701 (2014)

    SciTech Connect

    Patil, S. D.; Takale, M. V.

    2014-06-15

    Habibi and Ghamari have presented a Comment on our paper [Phys. Plasmas 20, 072703 (2013)] by examining quantum dielectric response in thermal quantum plasma. They have modeled the relativistic self-focusing of Gaussian laser beam in cold and warm quantum plasmas and reported that self-focusing length does not change in both situations. In this response, we have reached the following important conclusions about the comment itself.

  18. Comment on ``Measurement of the ion drag force on falling dust particles and its relation to the void formation in complex (dusty) plasmas'' [Phys. Plasmas 10, 1278 (2003)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khrapak, S. A.; Ivlev, A. V.; Morfill, G. E.; Thomas, H. M.; Zhdanov, S. K.; Konopka, U.; Thoma, M. H.; Quinn, R. A.

    2003-11-01

    It is shown that the quantitative interpretation of recent experiments to determine the ion drag force in complex (dusty) plasmas [C. Zafiu, A. Melzer, and A. Piel, Phys. Plasmas 9, 4794 (2002); 10, 1278 (2003)] is not correct. A comparison of different models of the ion drag force is carried out to illustrate the complexity of this issue and to highlight the current level of the research.

  19. Polarity Control and Growth of Lateral Polarity Structures in AlN

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-05-10

    the broadening are negligible and can be simply explained with the difference in the strain level.18 Low temperature (5 K ) photoluminescence spectra...temperature Raman spectra of the Al-polar and N-polar domains recorded in z(xx)z geometry. FIG. 5. Low temperature (5 K ) photoluminescence spectra of the Al...Sitar, Appl. Phys. Lett. 92(4), 041911–041913 (2008). 3S. Rajan, A. Chini, M. H. Wong, J. S. Speck, and U. K . Mishra, J. Appl. Phys. 102(4), 044501

  20. AL Amyloidosis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Definition of the disease AL amyloidosis results from extra-cellular deposition of fibril-forming monoclonal immunoglobulin (Ig) light chains (LC) (most commonly of lambda isotype) usually secreted by a small plasma cell clone. Most patients have evidence of isolated monoclonal gammopathy or smoldering myeloma, and the occurrence of AL amyloidosis in patients with symptomatic multiple myeloma or other B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders is unusual. The key event in the development of AL amyloidosis is the change in the secondary or tertiary structure of an abnormal monoclonal LC, which results in instable conformation. This conformational change is responsible for abnormal folding of the LC, rich in β leaves, which assemble into monomers that stack together to form amyloid fibrils. Epidemiology AL amyloidosis is the most common type of systemic amyloidois in developed countries with an estimated incidence of 9 cases/million inhabitant/year. The average age of diagnosed patients is 65 years and less than 10% of patients are under 50. Clinical description The clinical presentation is protean, because of the wide number of tissues or organs that may be affected. The most common presenting symptoms are asthenia and dyspnoea, which are poorly specific and may account for delayed diagnosis. Renal manifestations are the most frequent, affecting two thirds of patients at presentation. They are characterized by heavy proteinuria, with nephrotic syndrome and impaired renal function in half of the patients. Heart involvement, which is present at diagnosis in more than 50% of patients, leading to restrictive cardiopathy, is the most serious complication and engages prognosis. Diagnostic methods The diagnosis relies on pathological examination of an involved site showing Congo red-positive amyloid deposits, with typical apple-green birefringence under polarized light, that stain positive with an anti-LC antibody by immunohistochemistry and/or immunofluorescence. Due to the

  1. Erratum: Resonant magnetic perturbations of edge-plasmas in toroidal confinement devices (2015 Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 57 123001)

    DOE PAGES

    Evans, T. E.

    2016-03-01

    Controlling the boundary layer in fusion-grade, high-performance, plasma discharges is essential for the successful development of toroidal magnetic confinement power generating systems. A promising approach for controlling the boundary plasma is based on the use of small, externally applied, edge resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP) fields (δmore » $$b_⊥^{ext}$$ ≈ $$10^{-4}$$ → $$10^{-3}$$ T). A long-term focus area in tokamak fusion research has been to find methods, involving the use of non-axisymmetric magnetic perturbations to reduce the intense particle and heat fluxes to the wall. Experimental RMP research has progressed from the early pioneering work on tokamaks with material limiters in the 1970s, to present day research in separatrix-limited tokamaks operated in high-confinement mode, which is primarily aimed at the mitigation of the intermittent fluxes due edge localized modes. At the same time the theoretical research has evolved from analytical models to numerical simulations, including the full 3D complexities of the problem. Following the first demonstration of ELM suppression in the DIII-D tokamak during 2003, there has been a rapid worldwide growth in theoretical, numerical and experimental edge RMP research resulting in the addition of ELM control coils to the ITER baseline design [A. Loarte, et al., Nucl. Fusion 54 (2014) 033007]. This review provides an overview of edge RMP research including a summary of the early theoretical and numerical background along with recent experimental results on improved particle and energy confinement in tokamaks triggered by edge RMP fields. The topics covered make up the basic elements needed for developing a better understanding of 3D magnetic perturbation physics, which is required in order to utilize the full potential of edge RMP fields in fusion relevant high performance, H-mode, plasmas.« less

  2. Establishment of recombinant major allergens Bet v 1 and Phl p 5a as Ph. Eur. reference standards and validation of ELISA methods for their measurement. Results from feasibility studies.

    PubMed

    Vieths, S; Barber, D; Chapman, M; Costanzo, A; Daas, A; Fiebig, H; Hanschmann, K M; Hrabina, M; Kaul, S; Ledesma, A; Moingeon, P; Reese, G; Schörner, C; van Ree, R; Weber, B; Buchheit, K H

    2012-04-01

    The potency of allergen extracts is determined as total allergenic activity without consideration of their composition and the units differ from one manufacturer to another, making it very difficult to compare the different products. Recently, purified major allergens have been obtained by recombinant DNA technology and produced under Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP) conditions. In principle, such recombinant allergens could be established as reference standards and could help for the standardisation of the major allergen content of allergen extracts. Two recombinant major allergens, one from birch pollen, rBet v 1, and one from Timothy grass pollen, Phl p 5a, have been selected at the end of the CREATE programme as a potential starting point for the establishment as European Pharmacopoeia (Ph. Eur.) Reference Standards through a project run by the Biological Standardisation Programme (BSP) of the European Directorate for the Quality of Medicines & HealthCare (EDQM). To this end, bulk candidate recombinant materials, produced under GMP conditions, were procured from two European manufacturers and subsequently formulated and lyophilised. Four ELISA systems from three different manufacturers were included in the project, two for Bet v 1 and two for Phl p 5a with the aim of establishing reference methods for determination of the respective major antigens both in natural allergen extracts as well as in recombinant allergen products. The project was run in 3 phases: a preparatory and preliminary testing phase (feasibility phase or Phase 1), an extended feasibility phase carried out in 3 laboratories (Phase 2) to confirm the transferability of the methods and an international collaborative study with a large number of participating laboratories (Phase 3). This article describes the work done in Phase 1 and Phase 2, i.e. the physico-chemical and biological characterisation of the recombinant candidate reference standards, the assessment of their suitability for the

  3. A GaAs-AlGaAs Based Thyristor

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-06-01

    Levinshtein and V . E . Chelnokov , "Subnanosecond tum-on of gallium arsenide thyristors," Sov. Tech. Phys. Lett., vol. 12, pp. 383-384, 1986; and...Angeles, California 90024 Abstract: A study of bipolar junction thyristors based on GaAs and AlGaAs materials for pulsed power switching applications is...related III- V heterostructures can be made to exhibit subnanosecond current rise-times under pulse power conditions, and thus should be considered

  4. Comment on “Magnetic field mediated low-temperature resistivity upturn in electron-doped La{sub 1−x}Hf{sub x}MnO{sub 3} manganite oxides” [J. Appl. Phys. 112, 123710 (2012)

    SciTech Connect

    Rozenberg, E.

    2014-01-21

    In a recent paper, Guo et al. [J. Appl. Phys. 112, 123710 (2012)] reported on characteristic features of the temperature (T) and magnetic field (H) dependences of electrical resistivity (ρ) in polycrystalline La{sub 1−x}Hf{sub x}MnO{sub 3} (x = 0.2 and 0.3) manganites. In particular, shallow minima were observed at some T{sub min} below 100 K on ρ(T) curves. Application of an external H ≤ 5 T leads first to a decrease in the T{sub min} value, while this value increases notably at H > 0.75 T. The authors attributed this complex behavior to competitive electron-electron interaction and Kondo-like spin dependent scattering of carriers. It is shown in the comment that such interpretation is very questionable due to the fundamental inapplicability of this approach for analysis of low-T conductivity in polycrystalline manganites. It seems that the most likely reason for the appearance of the low temperature minima on ρ(T) curves and their evolution upon field application is the well known grain boundary effects in magnetically and structurally inhomogeneous samples.

  5. Comment on "Solitons, Bäcklund transformation, and Lax pair for the (2 + 1)-dimensional Boiti-Leon- Pempinelli equation for the water waves" [J. Math. Phys. 51, 093519 (2010)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Xin-Yi

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies on the water waves have been impressive. Of current interest in fluid physics, Jiang et al. [J. Math. Phys. 51, 093519 (2010)] have reported certain soliton interactions along with binary-Bell-polynomial-type Bäcklund transformation and Lax pair for the (2 + 1)-dimensional Boiti-Leon-Pempinelli system for water waves. However, the story introduced by that paper can be made more complete, since in fluid physics and other fields, the variable-coefficient models can describe many physical processes more realistically than their constant-coefficient counterparts. Hereby, on a (2 + 1)-dimensional variable-coefficient Boiti-Leon-Pempinelli generalization, water-wave symbolic computation is performed. For the horizontal velocity of the water wave as well as the wave elevation, variable-coefficient-dependent auto-Bäcklund transformation is constructed out, along with some variable-coefficient-dependent shock-wave-type solutions. Relevant variable-coefficient constraints are also given, with respect to water waves.

  6. Reply to ``Comments on `Effects of using the more accurate intrinsic concentration on bipolar transistor modeling' '' [J. Appl. Phys. 68, 5911 (1990)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liou, J. J.

    1991-10-01

    This reply addresses the issues raised by Rode and Rosenbaum regarding the bipolar junction transistor model developed in the subject paper [J. Appl. Phys. 68, 5911(1990)]. The error associated with Eq. (4) in the subject paper is discussed and corrected, the value of the space-charge-region recombination time used is specified, and the results are recalculated. It is shown that the error in Eq. (4) does not alter notably the trends of the current gain calculated using the two different intrinsic concentrations.

  7. Response to ``Comment on `Application of Kolmogorov entropy to the self-amplified spontaneous emission free-electron lasers' '' [Phys. Plasmas 17, 084701 (2010)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shi-Chang; Elgin, John

    2010-08-01

    In this response, we conceptually and quantitatively demonstrate that the criticism in the Comment by Maraghechi and Salehi [Phys. Plasmas 17, 084701 (2010)] is unacceptable and the following conclusions obtained in our previous paper do hold on: (1) the self-fields of the electron beam have an effect of stabilizing the electron's dynamic behavior and (2) the adiabatic magnetic field of a linearly polarized one-dimensional planar wiggler has trivial influence to the stability of the electron's dynamic behavior, although it is helpful to the electrons to enter the cavity smoothly.

  8. Reply to ``Comment on `Quasisaddles as relevant points of the potential energy surface in the dynamics of supercooled liquids' '' [J. Chem. Phys. 118, 5263 (2002)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angelani, L.; Di Leonardo, R.; Ruocco, G.; Scala, A.; Sciortino, F.

    2003-03-01

    We reply to the Comment on the paper "Quasisaddles as relevant points of the potential energy surface in the dynamics of supercooled liquids" [J. Chem. Phys. 116, 10297 (2002)]. While we agree with J. P. K. Doye and D. J. Wales on their improved enumeration of zero curvature directions at quasisaddle points, we criticize their statement that this has important implications for the interpretation of our results. Indeed, we show here that the temperature dependence of the order of quasisaddles and true saddles are numerically coincident, providing a strong support to our previous interpretation.

  9. Comment on “Scaling behavior of one-dimensional Pt chains migration on Pt(110)-(1×2) surface”. [Phys. Lett. A 268 (2000) 413

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montalenti, F.; Ferrando, R.

    2000-11-01

    We show that the recently proposed scaling laws [see G. Zhuang, W. Wang, Phys. Lett. A 268 (2000) 413] for chain diffusion on missing-row Pt(110) have no real meaning, since they cannot be extended outside the narrow chain-length range which has been considered by Zhuang and Wang. The only asymptotic scaling law gives a chain mobility which is inversely proportional to the chain length; however this asymptotic scaling behaviour is not physically important due to the occurrence of multiple upward promotions for long chains.

  10. Comment on “Competition between coherent emission and broadband spontaneous emission in the quantum free electron laser” [Phys. Plasmas 20, 033106 (2013)

    SciTech Connect

    Petrillo, V.; Rossi, A. R.; Serafini, L.

    2013-12-15

    We point out that in the equation for the electron distribution evolution during Thomson/Compton or undulator radiation used in the paper: “Competition between coherent emission and broadband spontaneous emission in the quantum free electron laser” by G. R. M. Robb and R. Bonifacio [Phys. Plasmas 20, 033106 (2013)], the weight function should be the distribution of the number of emitted photons and not the photon energy distribution. Nevertheless, the considerations expressed in this comment do not alter the conclusions drawn in the paper in object.

  11. Comment on ``Competition between coherent emission and broadband spontaneous emission in the quantum free electron laser'' [Phys. Plasmas 20, 033106 (2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrillo, V.; Rossi, A. R.; Serafini, L.

    2013-12-01

    We point out that in the equation for the electron distribution evolution during Thomson/Compton or undulator radiation used in the paper: "Competition between coherent emission and broadband spontaneous emission in the quantum free electron laser" by G. R. M. Robb and R. Bonifacio [Phys. Plasmas 20, 033106 (2013)], the weight function should be the distribution of the number of emitted photons and not the photon energy distribution. Nevertheless, the considerations expressed in this comment do not alter the conclusions drawn in the paper in object.

  12. Response to ``Comment on `Isotope effects in liquid water by infrared spectroscopy. IV. No free OH groups in liquid water''' [J. Chem. Phys. 135, 117101 (2011)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Max, Jean-Joseph; Chapados, Camille

    2011-09-01

    The original infrared spectra in the OH stretch region that Riemenschneider and Ludwig (thereafter, RL) have obtained for pure water and aqueous salt solutions are very similar to what we have previously reported [J.-J. Max and C. Chapados, J. Chem. Phys. 115, 6803 (2001)]. In our 2010 paper, we claimed that "free" OH is not present in pure liquid water. The difference spectra from the salt solutions and pure water spectrum give small negative components situated near 3655 cm-1. Because this position is in the range where free OH groups should absorb RL assigned the negative peaks to free OH removed from pure water. That is, RL consider that pure liquid water contains free OH groups which are removed in the salt solutions. Obviously, the removal of all free OH present in pure water will produce maximum negative intensities in the difference spectra. In this response, we present unpublished difference spectra between several salt solutions and pure water where negative peaks are higher than that claimed by RL for pure water. Since this is impossible it demonstrates that the assignment proposed by RL to free OH is incorrect. The negative peaks come from the difference between large components that differ a little between salt solutions and pure water [J.-J. Max and C. Chapados, J. Chem. Phys. 115, 6803 (2001)]. Recall that the ionized salts do not absorb but perturb the surrounding water molecules.

  13. Response to "Comment on `A model for phosphate glass topology considering the modifying ion sub-network"' [J. Chem. Phys. 142, 107103 (2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermansen, Christian; Mauro, John C.; Yue, Yuanzheng

    2015-03-01

    In our recent paper [C. Hermansen, J. C. Mauro, and Y.-Z. Yue, J. Chem. Phys. 140, 154501 (2014)], we applied temperature-dependent constraint theory to model the glass transition temperature (Tg) and liquid fragility index (m) of alkali phosphate glasses. Sidebottom commented on this paper concerning the m values obtained by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) [D. L. Sidebottom, J. Chem. Phys. 142, ⬛ (2015)]. We have considered Sidebottom's comments carefully and conclude that the m values of phosphate liquids obtained by DSC are reliable, except for the NaPO3 and possibly P2O5 compositions. Based on his dynamic light scattering measurements, Sidebottom has found that P2O5 is a strong liquid with m ≈ 20. However, based on the heat capacity jump at Tg and the stretching exponent of the relaxation function, P2O5 should be classified as an intermediate fragile liquid with m ≈ 40. We also argue that m cannot be universally related to the average connectivity of the network and point out several inconsistencies with this view.

  14. Comment on 'Continuum modes in rotating plasmas: General equations and continuous spectra for large aspect ratio tokamaks'[Phys. Plasmas 18, 092103 (2011)

    SciTech Connect

    Goedbloed, J. P.

    2012-06-15

    It is shown that some of the main results of the recent paper by Lakhin and Ilgisonis [Phys. Plasmas 18, 092103 (2011)], viz. the derivation of the equations for the continuous spectra of poloidally and toroidally rotating plasmas and their special solution for large aspect ratio tokamaks with large parallel flows were obtained before by Goedbloed, Belieen, van der Holst, and Keppens [Phys. Plasmas 11, 28 (2004)]. A further rearrangement of the system of equations for the coupled Alfven and slow continuous spectra clearly exhibits: (a) coupling through a single tangential derivative, which is a generalization of the geodesic curvature; (b) the 'transonic' transitions of the equilibrium, which need to be carefully examined in order to avoid entering hyperbolic flow regimes where the stability formalism breaks down. A critical discussion is devoted to the implications of this failure, which is generally missed in the tokamak literature, possibly as a result of the wide-spread use of the sonic Mach number of gas dynamics, which is an irrelevant and misleading parameter in 'transonic' magnetohydrodynamics. Once this obstacle in understanding is removed, further application of the theory of trans-slow Alfven continuum instabilities to both tokamaks, with possible implications for the L-H transition, and astrophysical objects like 'fat' accretion disks, with a possible new route to magnetohydrodynamic turbulence, becomes feasible.

  15. Comment on ``Properties of 26Mg and 26Si in the sd shell model and the determination of the 25Al(p,γ)26Si reaction rate''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chipps, K. A.; Bardayan, D. W.; Chae, K. Y.; Cizewski, J. A.; Kozub, R. L.; Liang, J. F.; Matei, C.; O'Malley, P. D.; Pain, S. D.; Peters, W. A.; Pittman, S. T.; Smith, M. S.

    2011-11-01

    A recent discussion of theoretical work on the 25Al(p,γ)26Si astrophysical reaction rate [W.A. Richter, B. Alex Brown, A. Signoracci and M. Wiescher, Phys. Rev. CPRVCAN0556-281310.1103/PhysRevC.83.065803 83, 065803 (2011)] omits some current and relevant experimental information in forming its scientific conclusions. Accounting for this new information has the potential to significantly alter the reaction rate derived in the paper.

  16. Comment on “Rethinking first-principles electron transport theories with projection operators: The problems caused by partitioning the basis set” [J. Chem. Phys. 139, 114104 (2013)

    SciTech Connect

    Brandbyge, Mads

    2014-05-07

    In a recent paper Reuter and Harrison [J. Chem. Phys. 139, 114104 (2013)] question the widely used mean-field electron transport theories, which employ nonorthogonal localized basis sets. They claim these can violate an “implicit decoupling assumption,” leading to wrong results for the current, different from what would be obtained by using an orthogonal basis, and dividing surfaces defined in real-space. We argue that this assumption is not required to be fulfilled to get exact results. We show how the current/transmission calculated by the standard Greens function method is independent of whether or not the chosen basis set is nonorthogonal, and that the current for a given basis set is consistent with divisions in real space. The ambiguity known from charge population analysis for nonorthogonal bases does not carry over to calculations of charge flux.

  17. Comment on "Rethinking first-principles electron transport theories with projection operators: The problems caused by partitioning the basis set" [J. Chem. Phys. 139, 114104 (2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandbyge, Mads

    2014-05-01

    In a recent paper Reuter and Harrison [J. Chem. Phys. 139, 114104 (2013)] question the widely used mean-field electron transport theories, which employ nonorthogonal localized basis sets. They claim these can violate an "implicit decoupling assumption," leading to wrong results for the current, different from what would be obtained by using an orthogonal basis, and dividing surfaces defined in real-space. We argue that this assumption is not required to be fulfilled to get exact results. We show how the current/transmission calculated by the standard Greens function method is independent of whether or not the chosen basis set is nonorthogonal, and that the current for a given basis set is consistent with divisions in real space. The ambiguity known from charge population analysis for nonorthogonal bases does not carry over to calculations of charge flux.

  18. Al-doping influence on crystal growth of Ni-Al alloy: Experimental testing of a theoretical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rong, Xi-Ming; Chen, Jun; Li, Jing-Tian; Zhuang, Jun; Ning, Xi-Jing

    2015-12-01

    Recently, a condensing potential model was developed to evaluate the crystallization ability of bulk materials [Ye X X, Ming C, Hu Y C and Ning X J 2009 J. Chem. Phys. 130 164711 and Peng K, Ming C, Ye X X, Zhang W X, Zhuang J and Ning X J 2011 Chem. Phys. Lett. 501 330], showing that the best temperature for single crystal growth is about 0.6Tm, where Tm is the melting temperature, and for Ni-Al alloy, more than 6 wt% of Al-doping will badly reduce the crystallization ability. In order to verify these predictions, we fabricated Ni-Al films with different concentrations of Al on Si substrates at room temperature by pulsed laser deposition, and post-annealed the films at 833, 933, 1033 (˜ 0.6Tm), 1133, and 1233 K in vacuum furnace, respectively. The x-ray diffraction spectra show that annealing at 0.6Tm is indeed best for larger crystal grain formation, and the film crystallization ability remarkably declines with more than 6-wt% Al doping. Project supported by the Specialized Research Fund for the Doctoral Program of Higher Education, China (Grant No. 20130071110018) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11274073).

  19. Thermoelectric properties of Fe and Al co-added Ge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, Takayuki; Kurosaki, Ken; Yusufu, Aikebaier; Ohishi, Yuji; Muta, Hiroaki; Yamanaka, Shinsuke

    2017-04-01

    The polycrystalline bulk samples of Fe and Al co-added Ge were synthesized by melt-spinning followed by spark plasma sintering and the thermoelectric properties were examined. Here, Al acts as a p-type dopant, while Fe is expected to form FeGe2 as precipitates. Since the lattice mismatch between Ge and FeGe2 is small (<4%), they would coherently connect with each other, reducing the thermal conductivity without affecting the electrical transport. In this study, a reduction in thermal conductivity was achieved by dispersing the FeGe2 precipitates in the Al-doped Ge matrix, while they had little influences on both the carrier mobility and the Seebeck coefficient. As the results, the maximum ZT value of 0.13 was obtained at 773 K, which is three times higher than that of single-crystal Ge reported by the authors’ group [Y. Ohishi et al., Jpn. J. Appl. Phys. 55, 051301 (2016)].

  20. Stripe-teeth metamaterial Al- and Nb-based rectennas (Presentation Recording)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osgood, Richard M.; Giardini, Stephen A.; Carlson, Joel B.; Joghee, Prabhuram; O'Hayre, Ryan P.; Diest, Kenneth; Rothschild, Mordechai

    2015-09-01

    Unlike a semiconductor, where the absorption is limited by the band gap, a "microrectenna array" could theoretically very efficiently rectify any desired portion of the infrared frequency spectrum (25 - 400 THz). We investigated vertical metal-insulator-metal (MIM) diodes that rectify vertical high-frequency fields produced by a metamaterial planar stripe-teeth Al or Au array (above the diodes), similar to stripe arrays that have demonstrated near-perfect absorption in the infrared due to critical coupling [1]. Using our design rules that maximize asymmetry (and therefore the component of the electric field pointed into the substrate, analogous to Second Harmonic Generation), we designed, fabricated, and analyzed these metamaterial-based microrectenna arrays. NbOx and Al2O3 were produced by anodization and ALD, respectively. Smaller visible-light Pt-NbOx-Nb rectennas have produced output power when illuminated by visible (514 nm) light [2]. The resonances of these new Au/NbOx/Nb and Al/Al2O3/Al microrectenna arrays, with larger dimensions and more complex nanostructures than in Ref. 1, were characterized by microscopic FTIR microscopy and agreed well with FDTD models, once the experimental refractive index values were entered into the model. Current-voltage measurements were carried out, showed that the Al/Al2O3/Al diodes have very large barrier heights and breakdown voltages, and were compared to our model of the MIM diode. We calculate expected THz-rectification using classical [3] and quantum [4] rectification models, and compare to measurements of direct current output, under infrared illumination. [1] C. Wu, et. al., Phys. Rev. B 84 (2011) 075102. [2] R. M. Osgood III, et. al., Proc. SPIE 8096, 809610 (2011). [3] A. Sanchez, et. al., J. Appl. Phys. 49 (1978) 5270. [4] J. R. Tucker and M. J. Feldman, Rev. of Mod. Phys. 57, (1985)1055.

  1. Comments to the Article by Thuillier et al. "The Infrared Solar Spectrum Measured by the SOLSPEC Spectrometer Onboard the International Space Station" on the Interpretation of Ground-based Measurements at the Izaña Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolsée, D.; Pereira, N.; Cuevas, E.; García, R.; Redondas, A.

    2016-10-01

    Thuillier et al. ( Solar Phys. 290, 1581, 2015) article compares ATLAS-3 reference composite solar spectral irradiance (SSI) with more recent spatial measurements, as well as ground-based ones, including IRSPERAD. With respect to the IRSPERAD spectrum of Bolsée et al. ( Solar Phys. 289, 2433, 2014), Thuillier et al. (2015) presents an analysis based on a set of meteorological parameters retrieved at the moment of the respective ground-based campaign. This comment is intended to give a new insight to the said analysis which is based upon revised values of the meteorological parameters incorrectly used in Thuillier et al. (2015).

  2. Self-Aligned ALD AlOx T-gate Insulator for Gate Leakage Current Suppression in SiNx-Passivated AlGaN/GaN HEMTs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    blanket-deposited between the source and drain, as has been demonstrated by Ye et al. [21]. Similiarly, Saadat and co-workers have used ALD-deposited HfOx...been reported previously by Saadat et al. [22] and noted to be indicative of slow trapping centers in the oxide and at the oxide/semiconductor...gate dielectric. Appl Phys Lett 2005;86:063501–3. [22] Saadat OI, Chung JW, Piner EL, Palacios T. Gate-first AlGaN/GaN HEMT technology for high-frequency

  3. Relaxation of compressively strained AlGaN by inclined threading dislocations.

    SciTech Connect

    Follstaedt, David Martin; Lee, Stephen Roger; Crawford, Mary Hagerott; Provencio, Paula Polyak; Allerman, Andrew Alan; Floro, Jerrold Anthony

    2005-06-01

    Transmission electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction were used to assess the microstructure and strain of Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1?x}N(x = 0.61-0.64) layers grown on AlN. The compressively-strained AlGaN is partially relaxed by inclined threading dislocations, similar to observations on Si-doped AlGaN by P. Cantu, F. Wu, P. Waltereit, S. Keller, A. E. Romanov, U. K. Mishra, S. P. DenBaars, and J. S. Speck [Appl. Phys. Lett. 83, 674 (2003) ]; however, in our material, the dislocations bend before the introduction of any Si. The bending may be initiated by the greater lattice mismatch or the lower dislocation density of our material, but the presence of Si is not necessarily required. The relaxation by inclined dislocations is quantitatively accounted for with the model of A. E. Romanov and J. S. Speck [Appl. Phys. Lett. 83, 2569 (2003)], and we demonstrate the predicted linear dependence of relaxation on layer thickness. Notably, such relaxation was not found in tensile strained AlGaN grown on GaN [J. A. Floro, D. M. Follstaedt, P. Provencio, S. J. Hearne, and S. R. Lee, J. Appl. Phys. 96, 7087 (2004)], even though the same mechanism appears applicable.

  4. Comment on "A model for phosphate glass topology considering the modifying ion sub-network" [J. Chem. Phys. 140, 154501 (2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidebottom, David L.

    2015-03-01

    In a recent paper, Hermansen, Mauro, and Yue [J. Chem. Phys. 140, 154501 (2014)] applied the temperature-dependent constraint theory to model both the glass transition temperature, Tg, and fragility, m, of a series of binary alkali phosphate glasses of the form (R2O)x (P2 O 5) 1 - x , where R represents an alkali species. Key to their success seems to be the retention of linear constraints between the alkali ion (R+) and the non-bridging oxygens near Tg, which allows the model to mimic a supposed minimum for both Tg(x) and m(x) located near x = 0.2. However, the authors have overlooked several recent studies that clearly show there is no minimum in m(x). We argue that the retention of the alkali ion constraints at these temperatures is unjustified and question whether the model calculations can be revised to meet the actual experimental data. We also discuss alternative interpretations for the fragility based on two-state thermodynamics that can accurately account for its compositional dependence.

  5. Comment on “A model for phosphate glass topology considering the modifying ion sub-network” [J. Chem. Phys. 140, 154501 (2014)

    SciTech Connect

    Sidebottom, David L.

    2015-03-14

    In a recent paper, Hermansen, Mauro, and Yue [J. Chem. Phys. 140, 154501 (2014)] applied the temperature-dependent constraint theory to model both the glass transition temperature, T{sub g}, and fragility, m, of a series of binary alkali phosphate glasses of the form (R{sub 2}O){sub x}(P{sub 2}O{sub 5}){sub 1−x}, where R represents an alkali species. Key to their success seems to be the retention of linear constraints between the alkali ion (R{sup +}) and the non-bridging oxygens near T{sub g}, which allows the model to mimic a supposed minimum for both T{sub g}(x) and m(x) located near x = 0.2. However, the authors have overlooked several recent studies that clearly show there is no minimum in m(x). We argue that the retention of the alkali ion constraints at these temperatures is unjustified and question whether the model calculations can be revised to meet the actual experimental data. We also discuss alternative interpretations for the fragility based on two-state thermodynamics that can accurately account for its compositional dependence.

  6. What Is ALS?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Javits, actor David Niven, “Sesame Street” creator Jon Stone, boxing champion Ezzard Charles, NBA Hall of Fame ... Help for People with ALS and Caregivers Read stories from families living with ALS Forms of ALS ...

  7. Current Collapse Induced in AlGaN/GaN High-Electron-Mobility Transistors by Bias Stress

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-08-25

    structure where the traps causing current collapse can be passivated by forming H-defect complexes. Hierro et al.7 have shown, for example, that deep...Lett. 75, 4016 ~1999!. 7 A. Hierro , S. A. Ringel, M. Hansen, J. S. Speck, U. K. Mishra, and S. P. DenBaars, Appl. Phys. Lett. 77, 1499 ~2000!. 8 S. J

  8. Addition of NH3 to Al3O3-

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyrwas, Richard B.; Jarrold, Caroline Chick; Das, Ujjal; Raghavachari, Krishnan

    2006-05-01

    Recent computational studies on the addition of ammonia (NH3) to the Al3O3- cluster anion [A. Guevara-Garcia, A. Martinez, and J. V. Ortiz, J. Chem. Phys. 122, 214309 (2005)] have motivated experimental and additional computational studies, reported here. Al3O3- is observed to react with a single NH3 molecule to form the Al3O3NH3- ion in mass spectrometric studies. This is in contrast to similarly performed studies with water, in which the Al3O5H4- product was highly favored. However, the anion PE spectrum of the ammoniated species is very similar to that of Al3O4H2-. The adiabatic electron affinity of Al3O3NH3 is determined to be 2.35(5)eV. Based on comparison between the spectra and calculated electron affinities, it appears that NH3 adds dissociatively to Al3O3-, suggesting that the time for the Al3O3-•NH3 complex to either overcome or tunnel through the barrier to proton transfer (which is higher for NH3 than for water) is short relative to the time for collisional cooling in the experiment.

  9. Abu al-Layth al-Libi

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-02-01

    Introduction In the tradition of post-9/11 senior Arab militant figures operating in Khurasan (the Afghanistan-Pakistan region), there is little doubt as to...the standing of Libyan jihadi commander Abu al-Layth al-Libi. If Usama bin Ladin and Ayman al-Zawahiri came to be the most prominent Arab -Afghan...Libi, a longtime leader of the Libyan Islamic Fighting Group (LIFG), who rapidly established himself as the champion of the Arab -Afghan milieu after

  10. Comment on ``Curvy-steps approach to constraint-free extended-Lagrangian ab initio molecular dynamics, using atom-centered basis functions: Convergence toward Born-Oppenheimer trajectories'' [J. Chem. Phys. 121, 11542 (2004)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iyengar, Srinivasan S.; Schlegel, H. Bernhard; Scuseria, Gustavo E.; Millam, John M.; Frisch, Michael J.

    2005-07-01

    The curvy-extended-Lagrangian molecular-dynamics (ELMD) approach [J. M. Herbert and M. Head-Gordon, J. Chem. Phys. 121, 11542 (2004)] is similar to atom-centered density-matrix propagation (ADMP) [H. B. Schlegel, J. M. Millam, S. S. Iyengar, G. A. Voth, A. D. Daniels, G. E. Scuseria, and M. J. Frisch, J. Chem. Phys. 114, 9758 (2001); S. S. Iyengar, H.B. Schlegel, J.M. Millam, G.A. Voth, G.E. Scuseria, and M.J. Frisch, ibid.115, 10291 (2001); H.B. Schlegel, S.S. Iyengar, X. Li, J.M. Millam, G.A. Voth, G.E. Scuseria, and M.J. Frisch, ibid. 117, 8694 (2002); S.S. Iyengar, H.B. Schlegel, G.A. Voth, J.M. Millam, G.E. Scuseria, and M.J. Frisch, Israel J. Chem. 42, 191 (2002)] and based on Car-Parrinello [Phys. Rev. Lett. 55, 2471 (1985)] extended-Lagrangian [H.C. Andersen, J. Chem. Phys. 72, 2384 (1980)] molecular dynamics. Similarities between curvy-ELMD and ADMP arise from using unconverged electronic single-particle density matrices within Gaussian basis functions as dynamical variables. Curvy-ELMD differs from ADMP in not requiring idempotency to be explicitly enforced. In this Comment, we address several misleading remarks in Refs. 1 [J.M. Herbert and M. Head-Gordon, J. Chem. Phys. 121, 11542 (2004)] and 8 [J.M. Herbert and M. Head-Gordon, J. Chem. Phys. (submitted)].

  11. Relaxation of compressively-strained AlGaN by inclined threading dislocations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Follstaedt, D. M.; Lee, S. R.; Provencio, P. P.; Allerman, A. A.; Floro, J. A.; Crawford, M. H.

    2005-09-01

    Transmission electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction were used to assess the microstructure and strain of AlxGa1-xN(x=0.61-0.64) layers grown on AlN. The compressively-strained AlGaN is partially relaxed by inclined threading dislocations, similar to observations on Si-doped AlGaN by P. Cantu, F. Wu, P. Waltereit, S. Keller, A. E. Romanov, U. K. Mishra, S. P. DenBaars, and J. S. Speck [Appl. Phys. Lett. 83, 674 (2003)]; however, in our material, the dislocations bend before the introduction of any Si. The bending may be initiated by the greater lattice mismatch or the lower dislocation density of our material, but the presence of Si is not necessarily required. The relaxation by inclined dislocations is quantitatively accounted for with the model of A. E. Romanov and J. S. Speck [Appl. Phys. Lett. 83, 2569 (2003)], and we demonstrate the predicted linear dependence of relaxation on layer thickness. Notably, such relaxation was not found in tensile strained AlGaN grown on GaN [J. A. Floro, D. M. Follstaedt, P. Provencio, S. J. Hearne, and S. R. Lee, J. Appl. Phys. 96, 7087 (2004)], even though the same mechanism appears applicable.

  12. Entropic uncertainty and measurement reversibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berta, Mario; Wehner, Stephanie; Wilde, Mark M.

    2015-11-01

    The entropic uncertainty relation with quantum side information (EUR-QSI) from [Berta et al., Nat. Phys. 6, 659 (2010)] is a unifying principle relating two distinctive features of quantum mechanics: quantum uncertainty due to measurement incompatibility, and entanglement. In these relations, quantum uncertainty takes the form of preparation uncertainty where one of two incompatible measurements is applied. In particular, the "uncertainty witness" lower bound in the EUR-QSI is not a function of a post-measurement state. An insightful proof of the EUR-QSI from [Coles et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 210405 (2012)] makes use of a fundamental mathematical consequence of the postulates of quantum mechanics known as the non-increase of quantum relative entropy under quantum channels. Here, we exploit this perspective to establish a tightening of the EUR-QSI which adds a new state-dependent term in the lower bound, related to how well one can reverse the action of a quantum measurement. As such, this new term is a direct function of the post-measurement state and can be thought of as quantifying how much disturbance a given measurement causes. Our result thus quantitatively unifies this feature of quantum mechanics with the others mentioned above. We have experimentally tested our theoretical predictions on the IBM Quantum Experience and find reasonable agreement between our predictions and experimental outcomes.

  13. Entropic uncertainty and measurement reversibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berta, Mario; Wehner, Stephanie; Wilde, Mark M.

    2016-07-01

    The entropic uncertainty relation with quantum side information (EUR-QSI) from (Berta et al 2010 Nat. Phys. 6 659) is a unifying principle relating two distinctive features of quantum mechanics: quantum uncertainty due to measurement incompatibility, and entanglement. In these relations, quantum uncertainty takes the form of preparation uncertainty where one of two incompatible measurements is applied. In particular, the ‘uncertainty witness’ lower bound in the EUR-QSI is not a function of a post-measurement state. An insightful proof of the EUR-QSI from (Coles et al 2012 Phys. Rev. Lett. 108 210405) makes use of a fundamental mathematical consequence of the postulates of quantum mechanics known as the non-increase of quantum relative entropy under quantum channels. Here, we exploit this perspective to establish a tightening of the EUR-QSI which adds a new state-dependent term in the lower bound, related to how well one can reverse the action of a quantum measurement. As such, this new term is a direct function of the post-measurement state and can be thought of as quantifying how much disturbance a given measurement causes. Our result thus quantitatively unifies this feature of quantum mechanics with the others mentioned above. We have experimentally tested our theoretical predictions on the IBM quantum experience and find reasonable agreement between our predictions and experimental outcomes.

  14. Response to {open_quotes}Comment on {open_quote}Reversible work of formation of an embryo of a new phase within a uniform macroscopic mother phase{close_quote}thinsp{close_quotes} [J. Chem. Phys. {bold 111}, 3769 (1999)

    SciTech Connect

    Debenedetti, P.G.; Reiss, H.

    1999-08-01

    External constraints are necessary in order to calculate the energetics of embryo formation when the embryo is not a critical nucleus. The expression for the reversible work of formation obtained in by Debenedetti and Reiss [J. Chem. Phys. {bold 108}, 5498 (1998)] is rigorous and valid regardless of the relative densities of the embryo and mother phase. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  15. Comment on: “Effects of including the counterrotating term and virtual photons on the eigenfunctions and eigenvalues of a scalar photon collective emission theory” [Phys. Lett. A 372 (2008) 2514

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svidzinsky, Anatoly; Chang, Jun-Tao

    2008-08-01

    In a recent Letter [R. Friedberg, J.T. Manassah, Phys. Lett. A 372 (2008) 2514] Friedberg and Manassah argue that effect of virtual photons has serious consequences for large atomic samples. Here we show that such effect is negligible for evolution of a uniformly excited atomic state prepared by absorption of a single photon.

  16. /Cu-Al System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kish, Orel; Froumin, Natalya; Aizenshtein, Michael; Frage, Nachum

    2014-05-01

    Wettability and interfacial interaction of the Ta2O5/Cu-Al system were studied. Pure Cu does not wet the Ta2O5 substrate, and improved spreading is achieved when relatively a high fraction of the active element (~40 at.% Al) was added. The Al2O3 and AlTaO4 phases were observed at the Ta2O5/Cu-Al interface. A thermodynamic evaluation allowed us to suggest that the lack of wetting bellow 40 at.% Al is due to the presence of a native oxide, which covers the drop. The conditions of the native oxide decomposition and the formation of the volatile Al2O suboxide strongly depend on the vacuum level during sessile drop experiments and the composition of the Cu-Al alloy. In our case, Al contents greater than 40% provides thermodynamic conditions for the formation of Al2O (as a result of Al reaction with Al2O3) and the drop spreading. It was suggested that the final contact angle in the Ta2O5/Cu-Al system (50°) is determined by Ta adsorption on the newly formed alumina interlayer.

  17. Initial Symptoms of ALS

    MedlinePlus

    ... Chapters Certified Centers and Clinics Support Groups About ALS About Us Our Research In Your Community Advocate ... Diagnosis En español Symptoms The initial symptoms of ALS can be quite varied in different people. One ...

  18. Lou Gehrig's Disease (ALS)

    MedlinePlus

    ... 1930s. People in England and Australia call ALS motor neurone disease (MND). The French refer to it ... about ALS in 1869. Lou Gehrig's disease damages motor neurons in the brain and spinal cord. Motor ...

  19. Experimental Progress on the NIST ^27Al^+ Optical Clock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, Chin-Wen; Hume, David B.; Koelemeij, Jeroen C. J.; Rosenband, Till; Bergquist, James C.; Wineland, Dave J.

    2009-05-01

    A recent measurement of the frequency ratio between single-ion optical clocks based on ^27Al^+ and ^199Hg^+ at NIST showed a combined statistical and systematic uncertainty of 5.2 x 10-17[1]. Here we report progress on improving both the accuracy and stability of the ^27Al^+ optical clock. We have developed a new trap and laser systems that enable the use of ^25Mg^+ for sympathetic cooling and clock-state detection of ^27Al^+. These developments should reduce time-dilation shifts caused by harmonic motion of the ions and thus lower the dominant systematic uncertainty below 10-17. In the new clock apparatus we have demonstrated spectroscopy of the ^27Al^+ ^1S0 to ^3P0 transition with a quality factor of Q = 3.5 x 10^14 and simultaneously a contrast approaching unity. In addition, we have developed techniques for the sympathetic laser cooling and quantum logic spectroscopy of multiple aluminum ions with the goal of further improving measurement stability [2]. *supported by ONR and NIST [1] T. Rosenband et al., Science 319, 1808 (2008) [2] D. B. Hume et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 99, 120502 (2007)

  20. Reflectance Effects Caused by Refractive Index Gradients in Diamond Cell Samples of H2 and Al2O3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Ho-Kwang; Eggert, Jon H.; Hemley, Russell J.

    At high pressures, optical spectroscopic techniques are the principal means for probing dense solid hydrogen, including both its vibrational and electronic excitations. Ruoff et al. [Phys. Rev. B47, 11039 (1993)] proposed that refractive index gradients of H2 samples loaded with 5% Al2O3 powder in diamond anvil cells could cause a 4% rise in infrared reflectivity which interfered with the measurements on hydrogen reported by Mao et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 65, 484 (1990)]. We have analyzed this alternative proposal, including computer simulations of the appropriate sample configuration. Our calculations show that effects of a graded index on the rise of reflectivity from 1.0 to 0.5 eV are less than 0.1% and are therefore insignificant.

  1. Comment on ‘Towards addressing transient learning challenges in undergraduate physics: an example from electrostatics’

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwang-Hua, Chu Rainer

    2016-11-01

    We make some crucial remarks about the recent presentation by Fredlund et al (2015 Eur. J. Phys. 36 055002) considering the tutorial problem raised therein. After working out the velocity of the electron (we also included the role of image charges or induced charges) as it strikes the (conducting) metal sphere, we found the velocity value is already near the relativistic regime. The latter then encounters the open issue; to obtain a classical equation of motion of a point charge for which Yaghjian (2008 Phys. Rev. E 78 046606) has mentioned the following difficulty: the electrostatic energy of formation and thus the electrostatic mass of a point charge is infinite.

  2. Comment on “Isolating the non-polar contributions to the intermolecular potential for water-alkane interactions” [J. Chem. Phys. 141, 064905 (2014)

    SciTech Connect

    McDaniel, Jesse G.; Yethiraj, Arun

    2016-04-06

    The manuscript by Ballal et al.(Ref 1) presents an interesting study demonstrating the inability of popular force fields with standard combination rules to accurately describe water/alkane interactions. The authors find that the Lorentz-Berthelot combination rules on the SPC/E water and TraPPE alkane potentials give a cross interaction that fails to predict the (low-water content) water solubility in various alkanes. Realizing that both explicit polarization as well as the static octupole moment of methane are missing in these potentials, the authors examine the effect of these terms, but are still unable to resolve the discrepancy. They conclude with the statement that “the research community lacks a complete picture of water-alkane interactions at the molecular level.

  3. Comment on “Isolating the non-polar contributions to the intermolecular potential for water-alkane interactions” [J. Chem. Phys. 141, 064905 (2014)

    DOE PAGES

    McDaniel, Jesse G.; Yethiraj, Arun

    2016-04-06

    The manuscript by Ballal et al.(Ref 1) presents an interesting study demonstrating the inability of popular force fields with standard combination rules to accurately describe water/alkane interactions. The authors find that the Lorentz-Berthelot combination rules on the SPC/E water and TraPPE alkane potentials give a cross interaction that fails to predict the (low-water content) water solubility in various alkanes. Realizing that both explicit polarization as well as the static octupole moment of methane are missing in these potentials, the authors examine the effect of these terms, but are still unable to resolve the discrepancy. They conclude with the statement thatmore » “the research community lacks a complete picture of water-alkane interactions at the molecular level.« less

  4. Comment on "A study of vertical and in-plane electron mobility due to interface roughness scattering at low temperature in InAs-GaSb superlattices" [J. Appl. Phys. 114, 053712 (2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szmulowicz, F.

    2014-04-01

    The purpose of this comment is to point out that the paper by Safa, Asgari, and Faraone [J. Appl. Phys. 114, 053712 (2013)] (SAF) on electronic transport in superlattices contains a number of errors in physics and execution. By dealing with a finite number of periods and forcing the wave function to be zero at the upper and lower boundaries of the superlattice stack, SAF have turned the system into a quantum well for which the momentum along the growth axis is not a good quantum number, so that the bands in the growth direction are flat and the corresponding carrier velocities and vertical mobilities are zero. A number of other errors allow the authors to get nonzero results and to reach conclusions that qualitatively mirror those of Szmulowicz, Haugan, Elhamri, and Brown [Phys. Rev. B 84, 155307 (2011)].

  5. Erratum to “Axial and transverse acoustic radiation forces on a fluid sphere placed arbitrarily in Bessel beam standing wave tweezers” [Ann. Phys. 342 (3) (2014) 158-170

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitri, F. G.

    2014-09-01

    A typographical error is corrected in three equations in the article [Ann. Phys. 342 (3) (2014) 158-170, http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.aop.2013.12.009]. They are Eqs. (12)-(14), where the factor (1+Sp,q) should have been printed as (1+sp(ka)). The numerical computations and plots used the correct factor (1+sp(ka)) in the related equations.

  6. Response to “Comment on ‘General rotating quantum vortex filaments in the low-temperature Svistunov model of the local induction approximation’” [Phys. Fluids 26, 119101 (2014)

    SciTech Connect

    Van Gorder, Robert A.

    2014-11-15

    In R. A. Van Gorder, “General rotating quantum vortex filaments in the low-temperature Svistunov model of the local induction approximation,” Phys. Fluids 26, 065105 (2014) I discussed properties of generalized vortex filaments exhibiting purely rotational motion under the low-temperature Svistunov model of the local induction approximation. Such solutions are stationary in terms of translational motion. In the Comment [N. Hietala, “Comment on ‘General rotating quantum vortex filaments in the low-temperature Svistunov model of the local induction approximation’ [Phys. Fluids 26, 065105 (2014)],” Phys. Fluids 26, 119101 (2014)], the author criticizes my paper for not including translational motion (although it was clearly stated that the filament motion was assumed rotational). As it turns out, if one is interested in studying the geometric structure of solutions (which was the point of my paper), one obtains the needed qualitative results on the structure of such solutions by studying the purely rotational case. Nevertheless, in this Response I shall discuss the vortex filaments that have both rotational and translational motions. I then briefly discuss why one might want to study such generalized rotating filament solutions, in contrast to simple the standard helical or planar examples (which are really special cases). I also discuss how one can study the time evolution of filaments which exhibit more complicated dynamics than pure translation and rotation. Doing this, one can study non-stationary solutions which initially appear purely rotational and gradually display other dynamics as the filaments evolve.

  7. Impact of Duality Violations on Spectral Sum Rule analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catà, Oscar

    2007-02-01

    Recent sum rule analyses on the two-point correlator have led to significant discrepancies in the values found for the OPE condensates, most dramatically in the dimension eight condensate and to a lesser extent in the dimension six one [R. Barate et al., ALEPH Collaboration, Eur. Phys. J. C 4 (1998) 409; K. Ackerstaff et al., OPAL Collaboration, Eur. Phys. J. C 7 (1999) 571, arXiv:hep-ex/9808019; S. Peris, B. Phily and E. de Rafael, Phys. Rev. Lett. 86 (2001) 14, arXiv:hep-ph/0007338; S. Friot, D. Greynat and E. de Rafael, JHEP 0410 (2004) 043, arXiv:hep-ph/0408281; M. Davier, L. Girlanda, A. Hocker and J. Stern, Phys. Rev. D 58 (1998) 096014, arXiv:hep-ph/9802447; B.L. Ioffe and K.N. Zyablyuk, Nucl. Phys. A 687 (2001) 437, arXiv:hep-ph/0010089. K.N. Zyablyuk, Eur. Phys. J. C 38 (2004) 215, arXiv:hep-ph/0404230; J. Bijnens, E. Gamiz and J. Prades, JHEP 0110 (2001) 009, arXiv:hep-ph/0108240; C.A. Dominguez and K. Schilcher, Phys. Lett. B 581 (2004) 193, arXiv:hep-ph/0309285; J. Rojo and J. I. Latorre, JHEP 0401 (2004) 055, arXiv:hep-ph/0401047; V. Cirigliano, E. Golowich and K. Maltman, Phys. Rev. D 68 (2003) 054013, arXiv:hep-ph/0305118; S. Ciulli, C. Sebu, K. Schilcher and H. Spiesberger, Phys. Lett. B 595 (2004) 359, arXiv:hep-ph/0312212. S. Narison, arXiv:hep-ph/0412152]. Precise knowledge of these condensates is of relevance in kaon decays [M. Knecht, S. Peris and E. de Rafael, Phys. Lett. B 457 (1999) 227, arXiv:hep-ph/9812471; J.F. Donoghue and E. Golowich, Phys. Lett. B 478 (2000) 172, arXiv:hep-ph/9911309; M. Knecht, S. Peris and E. de Rafael, Phys. Lett. B 508 (2001) 117, arXiv:hep-ph/0102017] and therefore it seems mandatory to assess the actual impact of what is commonly neglected in spectral sum rules, most prominently the issue of duality violations. We will explicitly compute them in a toy model and show that they are a priori non-negligible.

  8. Genetic testing in ALS

    PubMed Central

    McLaughlin, Russell L.; Heverin, Mark; Thorpe, Owen; Abrahams, Sharon; Al-Chalabi, Ammar; Hardiman, Orla

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To determine the degree of consensus among clinicians on the clinical use of genetic testing in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and the factors that determine decision-making. Methods: ALS researchers worldwide were invited to participate in a detailed online survey to determine their attitudes and practices relating to genetic testing. Results: Responses from 167 clinicians from 21 different countries were analyzed. The majority of respondents (73.3%) do not consider that there is a consensus definition of familial ALS (FALS). Fifty-seven percent consider a family history of frontotemporal dementia and 48.5% the presence of a known ALS genetic mutation as sufficient for a diagnosis of FALS. Most respondents (90.2%) offer genetic testing to patients they define as having FALS and 49.4% to patients with sporadic ALS. Four main genes (SOD1, C9orf72, TARDBP, and FUS) are commonly tested. A total of 55.2% of respondents would seek genetic testing if they had personally received a diagnosis of ALS. Forty-two percent never offer presymptomatic testing to family members of patients with FALS. Responses varied between ALS specialists and nonspecialists and based on the number of new patients seen per year. Conclusions: There is a lack of consensus among clinicians as to the definition of FALS. Substantial variation exists in attitude and practices related to genetic testing of patients and presymptomatic testing of their relatives across geographic regions and between experienced specialists in ALS and nonspecialists. PMID:28159885

  9. Ventilatory Control in ALS

    PubMed Central

    Nichols, Nicole L.; Van Dyke, J.; Nashold, L.; Satriotomo, I.; Suzuki, M.; Mitchell, G.S.

    2015-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal, progressive neurodegenerative disease. ALS selectively causes degeneration in upper and lower (spinal) motor neurons, leading to muscle weakness, paralysis and death by ventilatory failure. Although ventilatory failure is generally the cause of death in ALS, little is known concerning the impact of this disorder on respiratory motor neurons, the consequences of respiratory motor neuron cell death, or the ability of the respiratory control system to “fight back” via mechanisms of compensatory respiratory plasticity. Here we review known effects of ALS on breathing, including possible effects on rhythm generation, respiratory motor neurons, and their target organs: the respiratory muscles. We consider evidence for spontaneous compensatory plasticity, preserving breathing well into disease progression despite dramatic loss of spinal respiratory motor neurons. Finally, we review current and potential therapeutic approaches directed toward preserving the capacity to breathe in ALS patients. PMID:23692930

  10. Response to "Comment on `Motion of a helical vortex filament in superfluid 4He under the extrinsic form of the local induction approximation"' [Phys. Fluids 26, 019101 (2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Gorder, Robert A.

    2014-01-01

    I agree with the authors regarding their comments on the Donnelly-Glaberson instability for such helical filaments as those obtained in my paper. I also find merit in their derivation of the quantum LIA (local induction approximation) in the manner of the LIA of Boffetta et al. However, I disagree with the primary criticisms of Hietala and Hänninen. In particular, though they suggest LIA and local nonlinear equation modes are not comparable since the former class of models contains superfluid friction parameters, note that since these parameters are small one may take them to zero and consider a qualitative comparison of the models (which is what was done in my paper). Second, while Hietala and Hänninen criticize certain assumptions made in my paper (and the paper of Shivamoggi where the model comes from) since the results break-down when Ak → ∞, note that in my paper I state that any deviations from the central axis along which the filament is aligned must be sufficiently bounded in variation. Therefore, it was already acknowledged that Ak(=|Φx|) should be sufficiently bounded, precluding the Ak → ∞ case. I also show that, despite what Hietala and Hänninen claim, the dispersion relation obtained in my paper is consistent with LIA, where applicable. Finally, while Hietala and Hänninen claim that the dispersion parameter should be complex valued, I show that their dispersion relation is wrong, since it was derived incorrectly (they assume the complex modulus of the potential function is constant, yet then use this to obtain a potential function with non-constant modulus).

  11. Erratum: Resonant magnetic perturbations of edge-plasmas in toroidal confinement devices (2015 Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 57 123001)

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, T. E.

    2016-03-01

    Controlling the boundary layer in fusion-grade, high-performance, plasma discharges is essential for the successful development of toroidal magnetic confinement power generating systems. A promising approach for controlling the boundary plasma is based on the use of small, externally applied, edge resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP) fields (δ$b_⊥^{ext}$ ≈ $10^{-4}$ → $10^{-3}$ T). A long-term focus area in tokamak fusion research has been to find methods, involving the use of non-axisymmetric magnetic perturbations to reduce the intense particle and heat fluxes to the wall. Experimental RMP research has progressed from the early pioneering work on tokamaks with material limiters in the 1970s, to present day research in separatrix-limited tokamaks operated in high-confinement mode, which is primarily aimed at the mitigation of the intermittent fluxes due edge localized modes. At the same time the theoretical research has evolved from analytical models to numerical simulations, including the full 3D complexities of the problem. Following the first demonstration of ELM suppression in the DIII-D tokamak during 2003, there has been a rapid worldwide growth in theoretical, numerical and experimental edge RMP research resulting in the addition of ELM control coils to the ITER baseline design [A. Loarte, et al., Nucl. Fusion 54 (2014) 033007]. This review provides an overview of edge RMP research including a summary of the early theoretical and numerical background along with recent experimental results on improved particle and energy confinement in tokamaks triggered by edge RMP fields. The topics covered make up the basic elements needed for developing a better understanding of 3D magnetic perturbation physics, which is required in order to utilize the full potential of edge RMP fields in fusion relevant high performance, H-mode, plasmas.

  12. Alternative Tsunami Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tan, A.; Lyatskaya, I.

    2009-01-01

    The interesting papers by Margaritondo (2005 "Eur. J. Phys." 26 401) and by Helene and Yamashita (2006 "Eur. J. Phys." 27 855) analysed the great Indian Ocean tsunami of 2004 using a simple one-dimensional canal wave model, which was appropriate for undergraduate students in physics and related fields of discipline. In this paper, two additional,…

  13. Inelastic stopping for deuterons in warm Al plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Bin; Liu, Chun-Lei; Liu, Ling; Wang, Jian-Guo

    2015-06-01

    The inelastic stopping is studied for deuterons in the Al plasmas with a fixed density 0.02 g cm-3 at 7 different temperatures from 2.7 to 64 eV within the projectile energy range from 100 keV u-1 to 10 MeV u-1 from our model (He and Wang 2014 Phys. Plasmas 21 063111). All the results are compared in detail with those from the isolated ion model where all the bound electrons are assumed in the ground state and the target ions are in almost the same charge states as those in the plasmas. The relativistic plane wave Born approximation is tested by much improved methods and found to be able to describe well the inelastic processes in the plasmas. The relevant result of the inelastic stopping is found to reflect the joint effect of the transition probability, electron occupation number and transition energy. It is found that the transitions of the deeply bound states play a dominant role to the inelastic stopping in the two models. The results due to all the excitation and de-excitation and those due to all the ionization and three body recombination in the plasmas are usually lower and higher than those for the corresponding isolated ions, respectively. It is demonstrated that models with target ions in the ground state could agree well with experiments in plasmas at a high enough projectile energy provided by a proper choice of the charge state of the target ion. The obvious difference between our model and Casas et al's model (Casas et al 2013 Phys. Rev. E 88 033102) is seen for the stopping with the projectile energy around 100 keV u-1 due to the different physical picture underlying them, which is helpful to probe which model proves more reliable in future experiments.

  14. ALS2 mutations

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Susanne A.; Carr, Lucinda; Deuschl, Guenther; Hopfner, Franziska; Stamelou, Maria; Wood, Nicholas W.; Bhatia, Kailash P.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To determine the genetic etiology in 2 consanguineous families who presented a novel phenotype of autosomal recessive juvenile amyotrophic lateral sclerosis associated with generalized dystonia. Methods: A combination of homozygosity mapping and whole-exome sequencing in the first family and Sanger sequencing of candidate genes in the second family were used. Results: Both families were found to have homozygous loss-of-function mutations in the amyotrophic lateral sclerosis 2 (juvenile) (ALS2) gene. Conclusions: We report generalized dystonia and cerebellar signs in association with ALS2-related disease. We suggest that the ALS2 gene should be screened for mutations in patients who present with a similar phenotype. PMID:24562058

  15. Drop and recovery of thermal conductivity of AlN upon UV irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaikhi, A. Al; Srivastava, G. P.

    2007-12-01

    We have performed calculations of the room-temperature thermal conductivity of oxygen contaminated aluminium nitride (AlN) by employing the Callaway model with a detailed account of three-phonon scattering processes. The role of Al vacancy and O substitution of N has been examined in the form of extended defects (clusters) and point defects. Our work provides support for the theoretical model proposed by Harris et al. [Phys. Rev. B. 47, 5428 (1993)] to explain the experimentally observed drop in the conductivity upon UV irradiation and its recovery upon UV removal and subsequent illumination of the sample with visible light at room temperature. With the reported oxygen concentration in the sample, the scattering of phonons from oxygen-related extended defects is found to be ineffective. Within the picture presented by Harris et al., the point impurity scattering parameter increases by around 17% upon UV irradiation of the sample at room temperature.

  16. Lou Gehrig's Disease (ALS)

    MedlinePlus

    ... when it becomes necessary. For instance, a power wheelchair can enable a paralyzed person with ALS to ... done these things despite being confined to a wheelchair for many years, being able to move only ...

  17. Genetic Testing for ALS

    MedlinePlus

    ... Involved Donate Familial Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (FALS) and Genetic Testing By Deborah Hartzfeld, MS, CGC, Certified Genetic ... guarantee a person will develop symptoms of ALS. Genetic Counseling If there is more than one person ...

  18. Ag-Al-Ca

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carow-Watamura, U.; Louzguine, D. V.; Takeuchi, A.

    This document is part of Part 1 http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/97.etType="URL"/> 'Systems from Ag-Al-Ca to Au-Pd-Si' of Subvolume B 'Physical Properties of Ternary Amorphous Alloys' of Volume 37 'Phase Diagrams and Physical Properties of Nonequilibrium Alloys' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group III 'Condensed Matter'. It contains the Chapter 'Ag-Al-Ca' with the content:

  19. The Aharonov-Bohm effect and Tonomura et al. experiments: Rigorous results

    SciTech Connect

    Ballesteros, Miguel; Weder, Ricardo

    2009-12-15

    The Aharonov-Bohm effect is a fundamental issue in physics. It describes the physically important electromagnetic quantities in quantum mechanics. Its experimental verification constitutes a test of the theory of quantum mechanics itself. The remarkable experiments of Tonomura et al. ['Observation of Aharonov-Bohm effect by electron holography', Phys. Rev. Lett 48, 1443 (1982) and 'Evidence for Aharonov-Bohm effect with magnetic field completely shielded from electron wave', Phys. Rev. Lett 56, 792 (1986)] are widely considered as the only experimental evidence of the physical existence of the Aharonov-Bohm effect. Here we give the first rigorous proof that the classical ansatz of Aharonov and Bohm of 1959 ['Significance of electromagnetic potentials in the quantum theory', Phys. Rev. 115, 485 (1959)], that was tested by Tonomura et al., is a good approximation to the exact solution to the Schroedinger equation. This also proves that the electron, that is, represented by the exact solution, is not accelerated, in agreement with the recent experiment of Caprez et al. in 2007 ['Macroscopic test of the Aharonov-Bohm effect', Phys. Rev. Lett. 99, 210401 (2007)], that shows that the results of the Tonomura et al. experiments can not be explained by the action of a force. Under the assumption that the incoming free electron is a Gaussian wave packet, we estimate the exact solution to the Schroedinger equation for all times. We provide a rigorous, quantitative error bound for the difference in norm between the exact solution and the Aharonov-Bohm Ansatz. Our bound is uniform in time. We also prove that on the Gaussian asymptotic state the scattering operator is given by a constant phase shift, up to a quantitative error bound that we provide. Our results show that for intermediate size electron wave packets, smaller than the ones used in the Tonomura et al. experiments, quantum mechanics predicts the results observed by Tonomura et al. with an error bound smaller than 10

  20. Comment on "Photoelectron angular distributions as a probe of alignment in a polyatomic molecule: Picosecond time- and angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy of S1 p-difluorobenzene" [J. Chem. Phys. 111, 1438 (1999)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Midgley, Jonathan; Davies, Julia A.; Reid, Katharine L.

    2013-09-01

    In this Comment we submit the results of an experiment in which we use the technique of time-resolved photoelectron velocity map imaging to probe the intramolecular dynamics occurring following the preparation of the 3151 vibrational level in S1 p-difluorobenzene with a 1 ps laser pulse. The extracted photoelectron angular distributions are discussed in the context of earlier comparable measurements from our group [J. Chem. Phys. 111, 1438 (1999)], and we conclude that the specific interpretation of the earlier results was incorrect as a consequence of systematic errors that are removed in the present study.

  1. Rippled Surface Structure and Electronic and Magnetic Properties of Ni_3Al(001)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jae Il; Hong, S. C.; Mannstadt, W.; Freeman, A. J.

    1998-03-01

    LEED experiments on the composite Ni-Al surface of Ni_3Al(001) revealed a very small amount of ripplingfootnote D. Sondericker, F. Jona and P. M. Marcus, Phys. Rev. B33, 900 (1986). Challenged by this observation, structural, electronic and magnetic properties of Ni_3Al(001) were investigated by the local density full-potential linearized augmented plane wave (FLAPW) methodfootnote E. Wimmer, H. Krakauer, M. Weinert and A. J. Freeman, Phys. Rev. B24, 864 (1981).. A stable rippled surface atomic geometry was determined by atomic force calculations, with both surface Ni and Al atoms contracting down to the bulk region-consistent with experiment. The amount of rippling found by calculation (0.054 Åis almost within the experimental error bar (0.02 ± 0.03 ÅCharge densities, calculated work functions, and density of states for the rippled surfaces are reported. The spin polarized calculation shows that the magnetic moments for the Ni atoms decrease from 0.2 μB for the center layer to ~ 0.03 μB for the surface layer, which is essentially "magnetically dead". * Work in Korea supported by KOSEF through SNU-CTP and work at Northwestern U. supported by ONR

  2. Investigation of stopping power for deuterons in partially ionized warm Al plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    He, Bin Wang, Jian-Guo

    2014-06-15

    The stopping powers for deuterons in Al plasmas with a fixed density of 0.02 g/cm{sup 3} and the temperatures at 4.5, 13, and 17 eV are studied in detail for a wide projectile energy range with different models. Comparison of these models indicates that our model is totally in best agreement with the experimental data and the main reason for this is that our calculation for the inelastic processes should be the most reliable. It is found that the difference between our model and the local density approximation model (Wang et al., Phys. Plasmas 5, 2977 (1998)) is mainly due to the quite different physical picture behind them. In Mehlhorn's model (J. Appl. Phys. 52, 6522 (1981)), the Bethe equation is found to overestimate the inelastic stopping in Al plasmas, meanwhile, it is gradually close to our results with temperature decreasing. The model by classical dielectric function with the choice of the maximum of the momentum transfer associated with the temperature is found not suitable to describe the stopping in warm plasmas. With temperature increasing the stopping due to plasma wave rises up which rapidly exceeds the inelastic stopping in warm Al plasmas.

  3. Study of the Linewidths of Excitonic Luminescence Transitions in AlGaN Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bajaj, K. K.; Coli, Giuliano; Li, J.; Lin, Jingyu; Jiang, H. X.

    2001-03-01

    We have investigated the linewidth of excitonic photoluminescence transitions at 10 K and as a function of Al concentration in AlGaN alloys grown by low-pressure metal organic chemical vapor deposition on (0001) oriented sapphire substrates, with low-temperature GaN buffer layers. Al composition ranged from 0 to 35 percent. By means of a lineshape analysis of the excitonic transition we identify the contribution of the compositional disorder in the alloy to the excitonic linewidth and find that the values of the excitonic linewidths in our samples are considerably smaller than those reported recently[1]. These values of the excitonic linewidths, as expected, increase as a function of Al concentration and agree very well with those calculated by a model presented by Lee and Bajaj[2]. [1] G. Steude, B.K. Meyer, A. Göldner, A. Hoffmann, F. Bertram, J.Christen, H. Amano and I. Akasaki, Appl. Phys. Lett 74, 2456 (1999) [2] S. M. Lee and K. K. Bajaj, J. Appl. Phys. 73, 1788 (1993)

  4. Statins: Do They Cause ALS?

    MedlinePlus

    Statins: Do they cause ALS? Do statins cause amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS)? Answers from Francisco Lopez-Jimenez, M.D. ... D. References Sorensen HT, et al. Statins and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: The level of evidence for an association. Journal ...

  5. Rapidly solidified NiAl and FeAl

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaydosh, D. J.; Crimp, M. A.

    1984-01-01

    Melt spinning was used to produce rapidly solidified ribbons of the B2 intermetallics NiAl and FeAl. Both Fe-40Al and Fe-45Al possessed some bend ductility in the as spun condition. The bend ductility of Fe-40Al, Fe-45Al, and equiatomic NiAl increased with subsequent heat treatment. Heat treatment at approximately 0.85 T (sub m) resulted in significant grain growth in equiatomic FeAl and in all the NiAl compositions. Low bend ductility in both FeAl and NiAl generally coincided with intergranular failure, while increased bend ductility was characterized by increasing amounts of transgranular cleavage fracture.

  6. Beta-decay of proton-rich nucleus ^23Al and astrophysical consequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, Y. J.; Iacob, V. E.; Al-Abdullah, T.; Fu, C.; Hardy, J. C.; Nica, N.; Park, H. I.; Tabacaru, G.; Trache, L.; Tribble, R. E.

    2006-04-01

    We will present the results of a β-decay study that was motivated by a nuclear astrophysics problem. For the first time γ-rays have been observed following the β decay of pure samples of ^23Al. We used the ^1H(^24Mg,2n)^23Al reaction and the MARS recoil separator of Texas A&M University. β and β-γ coincidence measurements were made with a fast tape-transport system and β and γ-ray detectors. The experiment allowed us to measure β branching ratios and deduce logft values for transitions to 14 final states in ^23Mg, including the isobaric analog state, and from them to determine unambigously the spin and parity of ^23Al ground state to be J^π=5/2^+. We will discuss how this excludes the large increase in the radiative proton-capture cross section for the reaction ^22Mg(p,γ)^23Al at astrophysical energies which was implied by claims that the spin and parity is J^π=1/2^+ [1,2], claims that motivated this study in the first place. The reaction is possible candidate to explain why space-based gamma-ray telescopes do not observe γ-rays from the decay of long-lived ^22Na formed in ONe novae explosions [3]: a larger cross section would be required to divert significant flux from the A=22 into the A=23 mass chain. [1] X. Z. Cai et al, Phys. Rev. C 65, 024610 (2002). [2] H.-Y. Zhang et al., Chin. Phys. Lett. 19, 1599 (2002). [3] M. Wiescher et al., Astrophys. J. 343, 352 (1989).

  7. ALS superbend magnet system

    SciTech Connect

    Zbasnik, J.; Wang, S.T.; Chen, J.Y.; DeVries, G.J.; DeMarco, R.; Fahmie, M.; Geyer, A.; Green, M.A.; Harkins, J.; Henderson, T.; Hinkson, J.; Hoyer, E.H.; Krupnick, J.; Marks, S.; Ottens, F.; Paterson, J.A.; Pipersky, P.; Portmann, G.; Robin, D.A.; Schlueter, R.D.; Steier, C.; Taylor, C.E.; Wahrer, R.

    2000-09-15

    The Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is preparing to upgrade the Advanced Light Source (ALS) with three superconducting dipoles (Superbends). In this paper we present the final magnet system design which incorporates R&D test results and addresses the ALS operational concerns of alignment, availability, and economy. The design incorporates conduction-cooled Nb-Ti windings and HTS current leads, epoxy-glass suspension straps, and a Gifford-McMahon cryocooler to supply steady state refrigeration. We also present the current status of fabrication and testing.

  8. Fosetyl-al

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Fosetyl - al ; CASRN 39148 - 24 - 8 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Ef

  9. Al Shanker Remembers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Educator, 2000

    2000-01-01

    In a 1996 interview shortly before his death, Al Shanker, longtime president of the American Federation of Teachers, discussed such topics as: his own educational experiences; how he learned about political fighting in the Boy Scouts; the appeal of socialism; multinational corporations and the nation state; teaching tough students; and John Dewey…

  10. Iron Partitioning in the Lower Mantle: New Experimental Data from Al-Enriched Olivine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piet, H.; Nabiei, F.; Gillet, P.; Badro, J.

    2014-12-01

    The partitioning of iron between the major phases of the lower mantle has an important impact on their physical and chemical properties. A series of experimental studies of Fe-Mg exchange between bridgemanite (magnesium silicate perovskite) and ferropericlase have shown that stark differences in partitioning are observed if olivine [1, 2] or a pyrolitic [3, 4] starting composition are used. The discrepancy has been attributed to the presence of alumina, to that of ferric iron, to multiphase equilibria and even to the activity of FeO in the system. In order to mitigate the discrepancy, we synthesized a sample with San Carlos olivine composition that was doped in alumina. We then used this as starting material for experiments in the laser-heated diamond anvil cell at lower mantle (P,T) conditions along the geotherm. Samples were pressurized, heated, transformed to bridgemanite and ferropericlase, equilibrated, quenched, and decompressed. Thin sections were recovered from the hotspot using a focused ion beam microscope and the composition of the two phases was analyzed using analytical transmission electron microscopy. Iron partitioning in Al-rich olivine will be discussed through a detailed comparison with the Al-rich pyrolitic trend and the Al-free olivine trend. References [1] A-L. Auzende et al., Earth Planet. Sci. Lett., 2008. [2] R. Sinmyo et al., J. Geophys. Res., 2008.[3] R. Irifune et al., Science, 2010. [4] R. Sinmyo et al., Phys. Chem. Minerals, 2013.

  11. AlInN HEMT Grown on SiC by Metalorganic Vapor Phase Epitaxy for Millimeter-Wave Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-10-01

    Grand- jean, V. Darakchieva, B . Monemar, M. Lorenz, and G. Ramm, J. Appl. Phys. 103(9), 093714 (2008). [10] J. W. Chung, O. I. Saadat , J. M. Tirado, X...5 19a. NAME OF RESPONSIBLE PERSON a. REPORT unclassified b . ABSTRACT unclassified c. THIS PAGE unclassified Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8-98...1350 S. Guo et al.: AlInN HEMT grown on SiC by MOVPE for millimeter-wave applications p h ys ic a ssp status solid i a Figure 4 (a) Mobility and ( b

  12. Al Partitioning Patterns and Root Growth as Related to Al Sensitivity and Al Tolerance in Wheat.

    PubMed Central

    Samuels, T. D.; Kucukakyuz, K.; Rincon-Zachary, M.

    1997-01-01

    Studies of Al partitioning and accumulation and of the effect of Al on the growth of intact wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) roots of cultivars that show differential Al sensitivity were conducted. The effects of various Al concentrations on root growth and Al accumulation in the tissue were followed for 24 h. At low external Al concentrations, Al accumulation in the root tips was low and root growth was either unaffected or stimulated. Calculations based on regression analysis of growth and Al accumulation in the root tips predicted that 50% root growth inhibition in the Al-tolerant cv Atlas 66 would be attained when the Al concentrations were 105 [mu]M in the nutrient solution and 376.7 [mu]g Al g-1 dry weight in the tissue. In contrast, in the Al-sensitive cv Tam 105, 50% root growth inhibition would be attained when the Al concentrations were 11 [mu]M in the nutrient solution and 546.2 [mu]g Al g-1 dry weight in the tissue. The data support the hypotheses that differential Al sensitivity correlates with differential Al accumulation in the growing root tissue, and that mechanisms of Al tolerance may be based on strategies to exclude Al from the root meristems. PMID:12223623

  13. Al Sumelat Water Network. Village of Al Sumelat, Iraq

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-03-15

    OFFICE OF THE SPECIAL INSPECTOR GENERAL FOR IRAQ RECONSTRUCTION AL SUMELAT WATER NETWORK VILLAGE OF AL SUMELAT, IRAQ...Sumelat Water Network Village of Al Sumelat, Iraq 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e...Al Sumelat Water Network Village of Al Sumelat, Iraq Synopsis Introduction. This report was previously provided on a limited distribution basis

  14. Photoelectron Angular Distribution Asymmetry Parameters for Photodetachment of Li^- and Al^-.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chien-Nan; Starace, Anthony F.

    1997-04-01

    Calculation of photoelectron angular distribution asymmetry parameters for photodetachment precesses is a more stringent test for theory than calculation of partial or total cross sections. Since asymmetry parameters involve ratios of transition matrix elements of different channels, they are particularly sensitive to the resonance behavior of transition matrix elements. We present the asymmetry parameters for photodetachment of Li^- (2s^2 ^1S) and Al^- (3s^23p^2 ^3P) using the eigenchannel R-matrix method(U.Fano and C.M. Lee, Phys. Rev. Lett. 31), 1573 (1973)^,(C.H. Greene, in Fundamental Processes of Atomic Dynamics,) edited by J.S. Briggs, H. Kleinpoppen, and H.O. Lutz (Plenum, New York, 1988), pp.105-127.. Our results are in good agreement with the available Al^- photodetachment measurements(A.M. Covington et al.), U of Nevada-Reno, private communication..

  15. 27Al, 47,49Ti, 31P, and 13C MAS NMR Study of VX, GD, and HD Reactions with Nanosize Al2O3, Conventional Al2O3 and TiO2, and Aluminum and Titanium Metal

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    reactions involved and peak assignments for titanophosphonate 3, Ti(m) and anatase (see text). 17568 J. Phys. Chem. C , Vol. 111, No. 47, 2007 Wagner et al...postulated to be Ti(O)[O2P(CH3)OPin]2, in agreement with elemental analysis. High-field 47,49Ti MAS NMR of anatase shows marked narrowing of its signals...Metal 14. ABSTRACT 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: Reactions of VX, GD, and HD with Al2O3, TiO2 ( anatase and rutile), aluminum, and titanium metal

  16. PHYS-MA-TECH. An Integrated Partnership.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scarborough, Jule Dee

    This document contains 45 integrated physics, mathematics, and technology curriculum modules developed by teachers at 5 Illinois schools. An introduction discusses the collaborative project, in which teams of one mathematics, physics, and technology teacher from each school developed innovative instructional delivery models that enabled the three…

  17. Hydrogen and Carbon Effects on Al2O3 Surface Phases and Metal Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiao-Gang; Smith, John

    2005-03-01

    Effects of H and C impurities on α-Al2O3 (0001) surface stability and metal wetting behavior are determined from first principles[1]. The ab initio surface phase diagram for H and C on the alumina surface reveals six distinct surface phases. These different surface phases exhibit a variety of adhesion strengths with Cu and Co, and correspondingly different wetting behaviors. These results are consistent with the varied wetting characteristics observed experimentally. [1] Xiao-Gang Wang and John R. Smith, Phys. Rev. B70, Rapid communications, 081401 (2004).

  18. First-principles study of the Hume-Rothery electron concentration rule in Al-Cu-(Fe,Ru)-Si 1/1-cubic approximants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asahi, Ryoji; Kontsevoi, O. Y.; Mizutani, U.; Takeuchi, T.; Freeman, A. J.

    2006-03-01

    To elucidate the Hume-Rothery electron concentration rule, we determined the self-consistent electronic structures of the Al108Ru24Cu6Si6 and Al108Fe24Cu6Si6 1/1-1/1-1/1 approximants containing 144 atoms in each Pm-3 cubic unit cell using the full-potential linearized augmented plane wave (FLAPW) method [1], now running on massively parallel computer platforms. A significant pseudogap was found around the Fermi level for both alloys in the calculated densities of states, which should contribute to stabilization of the system. The FLAPW wave functions provide a direct observation of the Brillouin zone resonance in the Fermi surface [2]: a Fourier analysis of the wave functions confirms the Hume-Rothery matching rule 2kF=K where the reciprocal lattice vectors K consist of 543, 550, and 710 planes highly degenerate at the N point. Consequently, an effective electron concentration per atom (e/a) was evaluated to be 0.8 for both Ru and Fe in these structures making a sharp contrast with the previously assumed empirical value of -2.7 proposed by Raynor [3]. [1] Wimmer et al., Phys. Rev. B 24, 864 (1981). [2] Asahi et al., Phys. Rev. B 72, 125102 (2005). [3] Raynor, Prog. Metal Phys. 1, 1 (1949).

  19. Experimental investigation of ≈130 keV kinetic energy antiprotons annihilation on nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aghai-Khozani, H.; Barna, D.; Corradini, M.; Hayano, R.; Hori, M.; Kobayashi, T.; Leali, M.; Lodi-Rizzini, E.; Mascagna, V.; Prest, M.; Soter, A.; Todoroki, K.; Vallazza, E.; Venturelli, L.; Zurlo, N.

    2014-04-01

    MeV. In 2012, the 100 keV region has been investigated for the first time (Aghai-Khozani et al. Eur. Phys. J. Plus 127, 125-128, 2012). We present here the first preliminary results of this experiment.

  20. Quantum defect theory for Coulomb and other potentials in the framework of configuration interaction and implementation to the calculation of 2 D and 2 F o perturbed spectra of Al

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komninos, Yannis; Nicolaides, Cleanthes A.

    2004-05-01

    In continuation of our earlier work on the ab initio calculation of perturbed spectra and on a corresponding quantum defect theory (QDT), we discuss certain essential characteristics having to do with the unification of the continuous and the discrete spectra via the formal and practical construction of smooth quantities without invoking the pair of analytic forms of regular and irregular functions. The theory and its computational methodology are in the framework of configuration interaction (CI), and its structure shows how wavefunctions and properties of excited states of atoms and molecules can be computed provided one uses reliable zero-order basis functions, regardless of whether the relevant potential is, asymptotically, Coulombic or some other type. The mathematical connection with smooth reaction matrices in the discrete spectrum is demonstrated via the Mittag-Leffler theorem for the construction of analytic functions. We compare results for the quantum defects and fine structure from the present theory, as implemented by Komninos et al ( 1995 J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 28 2049 , 1996 J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 29 L193 ), of the Al spectra of 2 D symmetry (strongly perturbed) and of 2 F o symmetry (weakly perturbed), with the recently reported measurements on high-lying states ( Dyubko et al 2003 J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 36 3797 and 4827 ), as well as with those of Eriksson and Isberg (1963 Ark. Fys. 23 527) for the low-lying states. The comparison reveals for the first time very good agreement between theory and experiment for both series. In addition, predictions for the other states of the series are made. Previous computations of the quantum defects of the 2 D spectrum, in general, do not agree among themselves while they deviate from the experimental values.

  1. Comment on “Motion of a helical vortex filament in superfluid {sup 4}He under the extrinsic form of the local induction approximation” [Phys. Fluids 25, 085101 (2013)

    SciTech Connect

    Hietala, Niklas Hänninen, Risto

    2014-01-15

    We comment on the paper by Van Gorder [“Motion of a helical vortex filament in superfluid {sup 4}He under the extrinsic form of the local induction approximation,” Phys. Fluids 25, 085101 (2013)]. We point out that the flow of the normal fluid component parallel to the vortex will often lead into the Donnelly–Glaberson instability, which will cause the amplification of the Kelvin wave. We explain why the comparison to local nonlinear equation is unreasonable, and remark that neglecting the motion in the x-direction is not reasonable for a Kelvin wave with an arbitrary wavelength and amplitude. The correct equations in the general case are also derived.

  2. Comments on "Including the effects of temperature-dependent opacities in the implicit Monte Carlo algorithm" by N.A. Gentile [J. Comput. Phys. 230 (2011) 5100-5114

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Karabi

    2017-02-01

    We briefly comment on a paper by N.A. Gentile [J. Comput. Phys. 230 (2011) 5100-5114] in which the Fleck factor has been modified to include the effects of temperature-dependent opacities in the implicit Monte Carlo algorithm developed by Fleck and Cummings [1,2]. Instead of the Fleck factor, f = 1 / (1 + βcΔtσP), the author derived the modified Fleck factor g = 1 / (1 + βcΔtσP - min [σP‧ (a Tr4 - aT4) cΔt/ρCV, 0 ]) to be used in the Implicit Monte Carlo (IMC) algorithm in order to obtain more accurate solutions with much larger time steps. Here β = 4 aT3 / ρCV, σP is the Planck opacity and the derivative of Planck opacity w.r.t. the material temperature is σP‧ = dσP / dT.

  3. Response to 'Comment on 'Resonant dissociative electron transfer of the presolvated electron to CCl{sub 4} in liquid: Direct observation and lifetime of the CCl{sub 4}*{sup -} transition state' [J. Chem. Phys. 129, 027101 (2008)]'

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, C.-R.; Drew, K.; Luo, T.; Lu, M.-J.; Lu, Q.-B.

    2008-07-14

    In our recent paper [J. Chem. Phys.128, 041102 (2008)], we reported a femtosecond time-resolved laser spectroscopic study of the electron transfer reaction of CCl{sub 4} in liquid ethanol. Our results provide direct evidence of the resonant dissociative electron transfer (RDET) of the presolvated electron to CCl{sub 4}, and indicate that RDET can be an efficient process in an aqueous environment. In a recent Comment, the author argues that the relevance of diethanolamine (DEA) induced destruction of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) in the polar stratosphere as a possible pathway for chemical ozone destruction should not be a motivation for further studies of DEA on CFC molecules, as no correlation is observed between polar chemical ozone loss and cosmic ray activity. Here, we show that this claim is misleading: it is made by using inconclusive and ambiguous data while ignoring pronounced and well-documented data.

  4. ALS insertion devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoyer, E.; Chin, J.; Halbach, K.; Hassenzahl, W. V.; Humphries, D.; Kincaid, B.; Lancaster, H.; Plate, D.

    1991-08-01

    The Advanced Light Source (ALS), the first US third generation synchrotron radiation source, is currently under construction at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. The low-emittance, 1.5 GeV electron storage ring and the insertion devices are specifically designed to produce high brightness beams in the UV to soft X-Ray range. The planned initial complement of insertion devices includes four 4.6 m long undulators, with period lengths of 3.9 cm, 5.0 cm (2) and 8.0 cm, and a 2.9 m long wiggler of 16 cm period length. Undulator design is well advanced and fabrication has begun on the 5.0 cm and 8.0 cm period length undulators. This paper discusses ALS insertion device requirements; general design philosophy; and design of the magnetic structure, support structure/drive systems, control system and vacuum system.

  5. Hexagonal AlN: Dimensional-crossover-driven band-gap transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bacaksiz, C.; Sahin, H.; Ozaydin, H. D.; Horzum, S.; Senger, R. T.; Peeters, F. M.

    2015-02-01

    Motivated by a recent experiment that reported the successful synthesis of hexagonal (h ) AlN [Tsipas et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 103, 251605 (2013), 10.1063/1.4851239], we investigate structural, electronic, and vibrational properties of bulk, bilayer, and monolayer structures of h -AlN by using first-principles calculations. We show that the hexagonal phase of the bulk h -AlN is a stable direct-band-gap semiconductor. The calculated phonon spectrum displays a rigid-layer shear mode at 274 cm-1 and an Eg mode at 703 cm-1, which are observable by Raman measurements. In addition, single-layer h -AlN is an indirect-band-gap semiconductor with a nonmagnetic ground state. For the bilayer structure, A A' -type stacking is found to be the most favorable one, and interlayer interaction is strong. While N -layered h -AlN is an indirect-band-gap semiconductor for N =1 -9 , we predict that thicker structures (N ≥10 ) have a direct band gap at the Γ point. The number-of-layer-dependent band-gap transitions in h -AlN is interesting in that it is significantly different from the indirect-to-direct crossover obtained in the transition-metal dichalcogenides.

  6. Ordering and growth of rare gas films (Xe, Kr, Ar, and Ne) on the pseudo-ten-fold quasicrystalline approximant Al₁₃Co₄(100) surface.

    PubMed

    Petucci, J; Karimi, M; Huang, Y-T; Curtarolo, S; Diehl, R D

    2014-03-05

    Adsorption of the rare gases Kr, Ar, and Ne on the complex alloy surface Al₁₃Co₄(100) was studied using grand canonical Monte Carlo (GCMC) computer simulations. This surface is an approximant to the ten-fold decagonal Al-Ni-Co quasicrystalline surface, on which rare gas adsorption was studied previously. Comparison of adsorption results on the periodic Al₁₃Co₄(100) surface with those of the quasiperiodic Al-Ni-Co surface indicates some similarities, such as layer-by-layer growth, and some dissimilarities, such as the formation of Archimedes tiling phases (Mikhael et al 2008 Nature 454 501, Shechtman et al 1984 Phys. Rev. Lett. 53 1951, Macia 2006 Rep. Prog. Phys. 69 397, Schmiedeberg et al 2010 Eur. Phys. J. E 32 25-34, Kromer et al 2012 Phys. Rev. Lett. 108 218301, Schmiedeberg and Stark 2008 Phys. Rev. Lett. 101 218302). The conditions under which Archimedes tiling phases (ATP) emerge on Al₁₃Co₄(100) are examined and their presence is related to the gas-gas and gas-surface interaction parameters.

  7. Relativistic general-order coupled-cluster method for high-precision calculations: Application to the Al+ atomic clock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kállay, Mihály; Nataraj, H. S.; Sahoo, B. K.; Das, B. P.; Visscher, Lucas

    2011-03-01

    We report the implementation of a general-order relativistic coupled-cluster method for performing high-precision calculations of atomic and molecular properties. As a first application, the black-body radiation shift of the Al+ clock has been estimated precisely. The computed shift relative to the frequency of the 3s21S0e→3s3p3P0o clock transition given by (-3.66±0.60)×10-18 calls for an improvement over the recent measurement with a reported result of (-9±3)×10-18 [Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.104.070802 104, 070802 (2010)].

  8. Frequently Asked Questions about ALS and the ALS Registry

    MedlinePlus

    ... Why is it necessary to provide my Social Security Number (SSN) when registering in the National ALS ... Why is it necessary to provide my Social Security Number (SSN) when registering in the National ALS ...

  9. Rectangular model of a ballistic spin interferometer in (001) InGaAs/InAlAs quantum wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koga, Takaaki; Faniel, S.; Mineshige, S.; Mastuura, T.; Sekine, Y.

    2010-01-01

    We report an unambiguous detection of the crytalline anisotropy of the spin-orbit interaction in (001) InAlAs/InGaAs/InAlAs quantum wells using nanofabricated rectangular loop arrays, where the sides of the constituent loops are aligned along either the [110] or [ 1 1 ¯ 0] crystallographic axis. The fabrication and measurements were performed on the epi-wafer samples whose spin properties were characterized previously [Koga et al. Phys. Rev. Lett 89 (2002) 046801]. We find that the experimentally observed spin interference patterns - the amplitude modulation of the Al'tshuler-Aronov-Spivak oscillations as a function of the gate voltage - are in good agreement with the results of the spin interferometer model extended for rectangular loops and including both the Rashba and Dresselhaus spin-orbit interactions.

  10. Existence of traversable wormholes in the spherical stellar systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Övgün, A.; Halilsoy, M.

    2016-07-01

    Potentiality of the presence of traversable wormholes in the outer/inner regions of the halos of galaxies, situated on the Navarro-Frenk-White (NFW) density profile and Universal Rotation Curve (URC) dark matter models have been investigated recently (Rahaman et al. in Eur. Phys. J. C 74:2750, 2014a; Rahaman et al. in Ann. Phys. 350:561-567, 2014b; Kuhfittig in Eur. Phys. J. C 74:2818, 2014a; Kuhfittig in Found. Phys. 7:111-119, 2014b; Kuhfittig in Int. J. Mod. Phys. D 24(03):1550023, 2015; Rahaman et al. in Astrophys. Space Sci. 361(1):37, 2016a; Rahaman et al. in Astrophys. Space Sci. 361(3):90, 2016b). Since this covers our own galaxy also as a possible home for traversable wormholes it prompts us to further the subject by considering alternative density distributions. From this token herein we make use of the Einasto model (Einasto in Tr. Inst. Astrofiz. Alma-Ata 5:87, 1965; Einasto and Haud in Galaxy Astron. Astrophys. 223:89, 1989; Merritt et al. in Astron. J. 132:6, 2006) to describe the density profiles for the same purpose. Our choice for the latter is based on the fact that theoretical dark matter halos produced in computer simulations are best described by such a profile. For technical reasons we trim the number of parameters in the Einasto profile to a possible minimum. Based on such a model it is shown that traversable wormholes in the outer regions of spiral galaxies are possible while the inner part regions prohibit such formations.

  11. Electron detachment and fragmentation of laser-excited rotationally hot Al4-

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kafle, B.; Aviv, O.; Chandrasekaran, V.; Heber, O.; Rappaport, M. L.; Rubinstein, H.; Schwalm, D.; Strasser, D.; Zajfman, D.

    2015-11-01

    Absolute photoabsorption cross sections of negatively charged tetra-atomic aluminum clusters have been measured for photon energies between 1.8 and 2.7 eV. The experiment used the depletion technique in combination with an electrostatic ion-beam trap, in which Al4- ions produced in a sputter ion source were stored for 90 ms before being subjected to a short laser pulse. Moreover, the competition between one-atom fragmentation and electron emission of the laser-excited Al4- has been measured. These measurements show that fragmentation dominates electron emission at all photon energies below the electron attachment energy of ˜2.2 eV, even though the fragmentation energy is expected to be 10%-20% higher than the electron attachment energy. These findings, when taken together with the delayed-electron and fragmentation yields observed in a previous measurement [O. Aviv et al., Phys. Rev. A 83, 023201 (2011), 10.1103/PhysRevA.83.023201], can be well explained within the statistical phase-space theory for unimolecular decays assuming the Al4- ions to be rotationally hot. The analysis permits the determination of the adiabatic electron detachment energy of Al4- to be Ead=(2.18 ±0.02 ) eV and the one-atom fragmentation energy to be D0=(2.34 ±0.05 ) eV. Moreover, two direct s -wave ionization channels are observed with threshold energies of (2.18 ±0.02 ) eV and (2.45 ±0.02 ) eV.

  12. Al Jazirah, Sudan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    Al Jazirah (also Gezira) is one of the 26 states of Sudan. The state lies between the Blue Nile and the White Nile in the east-central region of the country. It is a well populated area suitable for agriculture. The area was at the southern end of Nubia and little is known about its ancient history and only limited archaeological work has been conducted in this area. The region has benefited from the Gezira Scheme, a program to foster cotton farming begun in 1925. At that time the Sennar Dam and numerous irrigation canals were built. Al Jazirah became the Sudan's major agricultural region with more than 2.5 million acres (10,000 km) under cultivation. The initial development project was semi-private, but the government nationalized it in 1950. Cotton production increased in the 1970s but by the 1990s increased wheat production has supplanted a third of the land formerly seeded with cotton.

    The image was acquired December 25, 2006, covers an area of 56 x 36.4 km, and is located near 14.5 degrees north latitude, 33.1 degrees east longitude.

    The U.S. science team is located at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Science Mission Directorate.

  13. AL Amyloidosis and Agent Orange

    MedlinePlus

    ... for survivors' benefits . Research on AL amyloidosis and herbicides The Health and Medicine Division (formally known as ... to the compounds of interest found in the herbicide Agent Orange and AL amyloidosis." VA made a ...

  14. Al Qaeda as a System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-03-15

    either as welcome guests or parasites . As welcome guests, Al Qaeda members take sanctuary in sponsor states. Sponsor states provide Al Qaeda with...sponsorship, Al Qaeda takes sanctuary as parasites either overtly or covertly. They take overt sanctuary in countries that publicly claim a policy...39 Yehudit Barsky, “Al Qa’ida, Iran, and Hezbollah: A Continuing Symbiosis ,” The American Jewish Committee Series on Terrorism , February 2004, 2-3

  15. Top Quarks Spin Correlations with Graviton in ADD and RS Models at the Large Hadron Collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arai, Masato; Okada, Nobuchika; Smolek, Karel; Šimák, Vladislav

    2008-03-01

    In LHC physics we study the spin correlation of top-antitop pairs production to investigate the production mechanism of heavy quarks[F. Hubard et al. Eur. Phys. J. C 44 (2006) 13]. The s-channel process mediated by graviton Kaluza-Klein modes in ADD model with several extra dimensions[N. Arkani-Hamed, S. Dimopoulos and G. Dvali, Phys. Lett. 429B (1998) 263, hep-ph/9803315] or in the Randall-Sundrum model with only one extra dimension[L. Randall and R. Sundrum, Phys. Rev. Lett. 83 (1999) 3370 hep-ph/9905221] contribute to the top-antitop pair production and affects the resulting top spin correlations. We calculated the full density matrix for the top-antitop pair production. We find a sizable deviation of the top spin correlations from the Standard.

  16. Influence of addition of Si in FeAl alloys: Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apiñaniz, E.; Legarra, E.; Plazaola, F.; Garitaonandia, J. S.

    The magnetic behaviour of Fe-based magnetic systems has been studied theoretically and experimentally for many years [E.P. Wohlfath, K.H.J. Buschow, Handbook of Ferromagnetic Materials, vol. 4, North-Holland Elsevier Science Publishers, Amsterdam, New York, Oxford, Tokyo, 1988 (Chapter 1)]. Starting with Al dissolved in Fe, the first stable structure is the D03 cubic structure and it exists over the range 23-37 at% Al. In this range these alloys present interesting magnetic properties. The other stable compound existing over a wide range of composition is FeAl which is also cubic, with the B2 structure (CsCl), and it exists over the range 37-50 at% Al. On the other hand, the FeAlSi alloys show the D03 structure, but do not show the B2 structure. The effect of Si in these alloys is double; on the one hand, it contributes to the decrease of the lattice parameter which, as reported by Nogues et al. [Phys. Rev. B 74 (2006) 024407], has a major influence on the magnetism and, on the other hand, having one more p electron than the Al atom, it promotes the charge transfer from Si to Fe atoms, as reported by Legarra et al. [Hyperfine Interact. 169 (2006) 1217-1222]. In this work, we perform ab-initio electronic calculations by means of tight binding linear muffin-tin orbital (TBLMTO) and Vienna Ab-initio Simulation Package (VASP) in order to study the magnetic contribution of Si/Al substitution in the FeAl alloys.

  17. Dry etching of Al-rich AlGaAs with silicon nitride masks for photonic crystal fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiuyu; Togano, Yuji; Hashimura, Kentaro; Morifuji, Masato; Kondow, Masahiko

    2015-04-01

    We investigate inductively coupled plasma (ICP) deep dry etching of Al0.8Ga0.2As for photonic crystal (PC) fabrication using a Cl2/BCl3/CH4 gas mixture. On the basis of our previous report [Y. Kitabayashi et al., Jpn. J. Appl. Phys. 52, 04CG07 (2013)], we obtained a PC structure having air holes deeper than 1.5 µm and a diameter of 120 nm by adjusting the gas flow rate and increasing the process pressure. In this study, silicon nitride (SiNx) and SiO2 were both used as the mask layer. Furthermore, samples with SiNx and SiO2 masks for ICP deep dry etching were also fabricated and compared. The vertical profile of the PC structure with the SiNx mask layer displayed a rounded shape that was caused by the charge up in the mask layer. Then, a thinner mask layer was used to ease the effects of mask retardation and charge up. As a result, a PC structure with a SiNx mask layer having air holes deeper than 1.7 µm and a diameter of 190 nm was successfully fabricated.

  18. Growth and Optical Properties of Al rich AlN/AlGaN Quantum Wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahtamouni, T. M. Al; Nepal, N.; Nakarmi, M. L.; Lin, J. Y.; Jiang, H. X.

    2006-03-01

    Al rich AlGaN alloys are promising materials for the applications in the optoelectronic devices such as deep ultraviolet (UV) emitters and detectors in the spectral range down to 200 nm. AlGaN based UV emitters (λ<340nm) has applications in bio-chemical agent detection and medical research/ health care. To realize deep UV emission (λ< 280 nm) Al rich AlGaN based quantum wells (QWs) are required. We report here the growth of AlN/AlxGa1-xNQWs (x>0.65) on AlN/sapphire templates by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). Deep UV photoluminescence (PL) was employed to study the optical properties of the QWs. Well width (Al composition) dependence was studied by varying the QW thickness (Al composition) with fixed x ˜ 0.65 (well width at 3 nm). Optical properties of these QWs such as the effects of alloy fluctuation, temperature, strain and piezoelectric field, carrier and exciton localizations on the quantum efficiency have been studied. Carrier and exciton dynamics were probed. Implications of our findings on the applications of Al rich AlN/AlGaN QWs for UV emitters and detectors will also be discussed.

  19. Studies of 27Al NMR in SrAl4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niki, Haruo; Higa, Nonoka; Kuroshima, Hiroko; Toji, Tatsuki; Morishima, Mach; Minei, Motofumi; Yogi, Mamoru; Nakamura, Ai; Hedo, Masato; Nakama, Takao; Ōnuki, Yoshichika; Harima, Hisatomo

    A charge density wave (CDW) transition at TCDW = 243 K and a structural phase (SP) transition at approximately 100 K occur in SrAl4 with the BaAl4-type body center tetragonal structure, which is the divalent and non-4f electron reference compound of EuAl4. To understand the behaviors of the CDW and SP transitions, the 27Al NMR measurements using a single crystal and a powder sample of SrAl4 have been carried out. The line width below TCDW is modulated by an electrical quadruple interaction between 27Al nucleus and CDW charge modulation. The incommensurate CDW state below TCDW changes into a different structure below TSP. The temperature dependences of Knight shifts of 27Al(I) and 27Al(II) show the different behaviors. The temperature variation of 27Al(I) Knight shift shows anomalies at the CDW and SP transition temperatures, revealing the shift to negative side below TCDW, which is attributable to the core polarization of the d-electrons. However, 27Al(II) Knight shift keeps almost constant except for the small shift due to the SP transition. The 1/T1T of 27Al(I) indicates the obvious changes due to the CDW and SP transitions, while that of 27Al(II) takes a constant value. The density of state at the Fermi level at Al(I) site below 60 K would be about 0.9 times less than that above TCDW.

  20. Observation of clusters in Re60Fe30Al10 alloys and the associated magnetic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Z, Kong H.; J, Ding; L, Dong Z.; L, Wang; T, White; Y, Li

    2002-03-01

    Magnetic properties and microstructure of melt-spun ribbons of RE60Fe30Al10 alloys with RE{} = {}Nd, Sm, Dy, Gd and Y were studied in detail. High coercivity values in the range of MA m-1 were observed at low temperatures for amorphous ribbons. Presence of Fe-rich clusters and nanoscale rare-earth crystallites in the amorphous matrix in the ribbons were revealed by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy studies. The magnetic transition temperatures were estimated experimentally and compared with fitting results based on the cluster ferromagnetism model (Wang L et al 2001 Phys. Rev. B 64 214410). Possible mechanisms for the magnetic behaviour observed due to the presence of Fe-rich magnetic clusters are discussed.

  1. Dirac cones in artificial structures of 3d transitional-metals doped Mg-Al spinels

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Yuan; Zuo, Xu; Feng, Min; Shao, Bin

    2014-05-07

    Motivated by recent theoretical predications for Dirac cone in two-dimensional (2D) triangular lattice [H. Ishizuka, Phys. Rev. Lett. 109, 237207 (2012)], first-principles studies are performed to predict Dirac cones in artificial structures of 3d transitional-metals (TM = Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, and Cu) doped Mg-Al spinels. In investigated artificial structures, TM dopants substitute specific positions of the B sub-lattice in Mg-Al spinel, and form a quasi-2D triangular lattice in the a-b plane. Calculated results illustrate the existence of the spin-polarized Dirac cones formed in d-wave bands at (around) the K-point in the momentum space. The study provides a promising route for engineering Dirac physics in condensed matters.

  2. Dirac cones in artificial structures of 3d transitional-metals doped Mg-Al spinels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yuan; Feng, Min; Shao, Bin; Zuo, Xu

    2014-05-01

    Motivated by recent theoretical predications for Dirac cone in two-dimensional (2D) triangular lattice [H. Ishizuka, Phys. Rev. Lett. 109, 237207 (2012)], first-principles studies are performed to predict Dirac cones in artificial structures of 3d transitional-metals (TM = Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, and Cu) doped Mg-Al spinels. In investigated artificial structures, TM dopants substitute specific positions of the B sub-lattice in Mg-Al spinel, and form a quasi-2D triangular lattice in the a-b plane. Calculated results illustrate the existence of the spin-polarized Dirac cones formed in d-wave bands at (around) the K-point in the momentum space. The study provides a promising route for engineering Dirac physics in condensed matters.

  3. Atomic structure of the super-heavy element No I (Z=102)

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yong; Hutton, Roger; Zou Yaming

    2007-12-15

    The multiconfiguration Dirac-Fock (MCDF) method was used to calculate the excitation energies of the levels of {sup 3}P and {sup 1}P in the lowest excited configurations for the two homolog elements of No I and Yb I. Also the transition probability of the 7s7p {sup 1}P{sub 1}{yields}7s{sup 2} {sup 1}S{sub 0} transition and the ground-state ionization energy of No I were calculated. The results for Yb I agree very well with the available experiments, with deviations of below 0.6% for the triplets and below 4% for the singlet. The result for the No I excitation energies clears the situation of conflicting results between Borschevsky et al., 30 056 cm{sup -1} (3.726 eV) [Phys. Rev. A 75, 042514 (2007)], and Fritzsche, 3.36 eV [Eur. Phys. J. D 33, 15 (2005)] for the 7s7p {sup 1}P{sub 1} level, which is planned to be measured in the near future with a newly developed experimental technique by Backe et al. [Eur. Phys. J. D 45, 99 (2007)]. The ionization energy result obtained in this work, 53 701 cm{sup -1}, is in excellent agreement with the scaled result of 53 600(600) cm{sup -1}.

  4. Rub' al Khali, Arabia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    The Rub' al Khali is one of the largest sand deserts in the world, encompassing most of the southern third of the Arabian Peninsula. It includes parts of Oman, United Arab Emirates, and Yemen. The desert covers 650,000 square kilometers, more than the area of France. Largely unexplored until recently, the desert is 1000 km long and 500 km wide. The first documented journeys made by Westerners were those of Bertram Thomas in 1931 and St. John Philby in 1932. With daytime temperatures reaching 55 degrees Celsius, and dunes taller than 330 meters, the desert may be one of the most forbidding places on Earth.

    The image was acquired December 2, 2005, covers an area of 54.8 x 61.9 km, and is located near 20.7 degrees north latitude, 53.6 degrees east longitude.

    The U.S. science team is located at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Science Mission Directorate.

  5. Morton et al. Reply

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morton, Douglas C.; Nagol, Jyoteshwar; Carabajal, Claudia C.; Rosette, Jacqueline; Palace, Michael; Cook, Bruce D.; Vermote, Eric F.; Harding, David J.; North, Peter R. J.

    2016-01-01

    Multiple mechanisms could lead to up-regulation of dry-season photosynthesis in Amazon forests, including canopy phenology and illumination geometry. We specifically tested two mechanisms for phenology-driven changes in Amazon forests during dry-season months, and the combined evidence from passive optical and lidar satellite data was incompatible with large net changes in canopy leaf area or leaf reflectance suggested by previous studies. We therefore hypothesized that seasonal changes in the fraction of sunlit and shaded canopies, one aspect of bidirectional reflectance effects in Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) data, could alter light availability for dry-season photosynthesis and the photosynthetic capacity of Amazon forests without large net changes in canopy composition. Subsequent work supports the hypothesis that seasonal changes in illumination geometry and diffuse light regulate light saturation in Amazon forests. These studies clarify the physical mechanisms that govern light availability in Amazon forests from seasonal variability in direct and diffuse illumination. Previously, in the debate over light limitation of Amazon forest productivity, seasonal changes in the distribution of light within complex Amazon forest canopies were confounded with dry-season increases in total incoming photosynthetically active radiation. In the accompanying Comment, Saleska et al. do not fully account for this confounding effect of forest structure on photosynthetic capacity.

  6. Comment on ‘Wind-influenced projectile motion’

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winther Andersen, Poul

    2015-11-01

    We comment on the article ‘Wind-influenced projectile motion’ by Bernardo et al (2015 Eur. J. Phys. 36 025016) where they examine the trajectory of a particle that is subjected to gravity and a linear air resistance plus the influence from the wind. They find by using the Lambert W function that the particle's trajectory for a special angle, the critical angle {θ }{{C}}, between the initial velocity and the horizontal is part of a straight line. In this comment we will show that this result can be proved without using the Lambert W function which is not that well known to beginning students of physics.

  7. Comments on "Advantages and challenges in coupling an ideal gas to atomistic models in adaptive resolution simulations" by K. Kreis, A.C. Fogarty, K. Kremer and R. Potestio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, R.

    2015-09-01

    Kreis et al. (Eur. Phys. J. Special Topics, this issue, 2015, doi: 10.1140/epjst/e2015-02412-1) discuss the option of minimizing the complexity of the coarse-grained model in adaptive resolution molecular dynamics simulations (AdResS) by adopting a collisionless ideal gas model for this purpose. Here we discuss the technical detail of how an ideal gas model is implemented, the effective role in the simulation that is left to the coarse-grained model when it is drastically simplified as suggested, and relations between the force and potential interpolations adopted in different variants of AdResS.

  8. Sivers effect in Drell-Yan processes

    SciTech Connect

    Anselmino, M.; Boglione, M.; Melis, S.; Prokudin, A.; D'Alesio, U.; Murgia, F.

    2009-03-01

    The Sivers distributions recently extracted from semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering data [M. Anselmino et al., Eur. Phys. J. A 39, 89 (2009)] are used to compute estimates for Sivers asymmetries in Drell-Yan processes which are being planned at several facilities (RHIC, COMPASS, J-PARC, PAX, PANDA, NICA (JINR) and SPASCHARM (IHEP)). Most of these asymmetries turn out to be large and could allow a clear test of the predicted sign change of the Sivers distributions when active in SIDIS and Drell-Yan processes. This is regarded as a fundamental test of our understanding, within QCD and the factorization scheme, of single spin asymmetries.

  9. Isomeric state in {sup 53}Co: A mean field analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Patra, S. K.; Bhat, F. H.; Panda, R. N.; Arumugam, P.; Gupta, Raj K.

    2009-04-15

    We study the ground and the first excited intrinsic states of {sup 53}Co and its mirror nucleus {sup 53}Fe, within the frameworks of the relativistic and nonrelativistic mean field formalisms. The analysis of the single-particle energy spectra of these nuclei show a competition of spins 1/2{sup -} and 3/2{sup -} in a low-lying excited state, which agrees well with the recent experimental observation [D. Rudolph et al., Eur. Phys. J. A 36, 131 (2008)] of spin and parity J{sup {pi}}=3/2{sup -} for the isomeric configuration in {sup 53}Co.

  10. Traces of Lorentz symmetry breaking in a hydrogen atom at ground state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borges, L. H. C.; Barone, F. A.

    2016-02-01

    Some traces of a specific Lorentz symmetry breaking scenario in the ground state of the hydrogen atom are investigated. We use standard Rayleigh-Schrödinger perturbation theory in order to obtain the corrections to the ground state energy and the wave function. It is shown that an induced four-pole moment arises, due to the Lorentz symmetry breaking. The model considered is the one studied in Borges et al. (Eur Phys J C 74:2937, 2014), where the Lorentz symmetry is broken in the electromagnetic sector.

  11. Motif-based success scores in coauthorship networks are highly sensitive to author name disambiguation.

    PubMed

    Klosik, David F; Bornholdt, Stefan; Hütt, Marc-Thorsten

    2014-09-01

    Following the work of Krumov et al. [Eur. Phys. J. B 84, 535 (2011)] we revisit the question whether the usage of large citation datasets allows for the quantitative assessment of social (by means of coauthorship of publications) influence on the progression of science. Applying a more comprehensive and well-curated dataset containing the publications in the journals of the American Physical Society during the whole 20th century we find that the measure chosen in the original study, a score based on small induced subgraphs, has to be used with caution, since the obtained results are highly sensitive to the exact implementation of the author disambiguation task.

  12. Alexandria (Al Iskandariya), Egypt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This image of Alexandria was taken by astronauts on board the International Space Station in December 2000 using an Electronic Still Camera. A wider-angle view (STS088-739-90) taken from the Space Shuttle in December 1998 is available for context. Alexandria (Al Iskandariya) occupies a T-shaped peninsula and strip of land separating the Mediterranean from Lake Mariout. Originally the town was built upon a mole (stone breakwater) called Heptastadium, which joined the island of Pharos (see referenced website, below) to the mainland. Since then sedimentary deposits have widened the mole. Since 1905, when the 370,000 Alexandrians lived in an area of about 4 sq km between the two harbors, the city (population 4 million; see referenced website, below) has grown beyond its medieval walls and now occupies an area of about 300 sq km. The Mahmudiya Canal, connecting Alexandria with the Nile, runs to the south of the city and, by a series of locks, enters the harbor of the principal port of Egypt (note ships). The reddish and ochre polygons west of Lake Mariout are salt-evaporation, chemical-storage, and water-treatment ponds within the coastal lagoon. Reference Youssef Halim and Fatma Abou Shouk, 2000, Human impacts on Alexandria's marine environment: UNESCO, Coastal Regions and Small Islands Unit (CSI), Coastal Management Sourcebooks 2 (accessed December 20, 2000) Additional photographs taken by astronauts can be viewed at NASA-JSC's Gateway to Astronaut Photography of Earth. Image ISS001-ESC-5025 provided by the Earth Sciences and Image Analysis Laboratory, Johnson Space Center.

  13. Is there a paraneoplastic ALS?

    PubMed

    Corcia, Philippe; Gordon, Paul H; Camdessanche, Jean-Philippe

    2015-06-01

    Our objective was to examine the strength of evidence in support of the paraneoplastic syndrome (PNS) as one cause of ALS and, if the association appears more likely than chance, determine which features of ALS imply concurrent malignancy. We reviewed the literature on concurrent ALS and neoplasia assessing the strength of evidence for the association. Most accounts of ALS and neoplasm are case reports or small uncontrolled series. In order of strength of evidence, three clinical situations that support a paraneoplastic aetiology for ALS are: 1) laboratory evidence of well-characterized onconeuronal antibodies, most often anti-Hu, anti-Yo or anti-Ri; 2) co-occurrence of ALS and a neoplasm known to cause PNS, usually lymphoma or cancer of the breast; and 3) combined ALS and a neoplasm not classically associated with PNS, without detectable onconeuronal antibodies. Clinical features that warrant evaluation of neoplasm include upper motor neuron disease in elderly females, rapid progression, non-motor signs, and young onset. In conclusion, most examples of ALS and neoplasm do not constitute a classically established PNS. Rare instances of elevated onconeuronal antibody titres or typical neoplasm, implies that, albeit rare, the PNS is one of a multitude of causes of ALS.

  14. Internal quantum efficiency in yellow-amber light emitting AlGaN-InGaN-GaN heterostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Ngo, Thi Huong; Gil, Bernard; Valvin, Pierre; Damilano, Benjamin; Lekhal, Kaddour; De Mierry, Philippe

    2015-09-21

    We determine the internal quantum efficiency of strain-balanced AlGaN-InGaN-GaN hetero-structures designed for yellow-amber light emission, by using a recent model based on the kinetics of the photoluminescence decay initiated by Iwata et al. [J. Appl. Phys. 117, 075701 (2015)]. Our results indicate that low temperature internal quantum efficiencies sit in the 50% range and we measure that adding an AlGaN layer increases the internal quantum efficiency from 50% up to 57% with respect to the GaN-InGaN case. More dramatic, it almost doubles from 2.5% up to 4.3% at room temperature.

  15. Temporally resolved characterization of shock-heated foam target with Al absorption spectroscopy for fast electron transport study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yabuuchi, T.; Sawada, H.; Regan, S. P.; Anderson, K.; Wei, M. S.; Betti, R.; Hund, J.; Key, M. H.; Mackinnon, A. J.; McLean, H. S.; Paguio, R. R.; Patel, P. K.; Saito, K. M.; Stephens, R. B.; Wilks, S. C.; Beg, F. N.

    2012-09-01

    The CH foam plasma produced by a laser-driven shock wave has been characterized by a temporally resolved Al 1s-2p absorption spectroscopy technique. A 200 mg/cm3 foam target with Al dopant was developed for this experiment, which used an OMEGA EP [D. D. Meyerhofer et al., J. Phys.: Conf. Ser. 244, 032010 (2010)] long pulse beam with an energy of 1.2 kJ and 3.5 ns pulselength. The plasma temperatures were inferred with the accuracy of 5 eV from the fits to the measurements using an atomic physics code. The results show that the inferred temperature is sustained at 40-45 eV between 6 and 7 ns and decreases to 25 eV at 8 ns. 2-D radiation hydrodynamic simulations show a good agreement with the measurements. Application of the shock-heated foam plasma platform toward fast electron transport experiments is discussed.

  16. Direct observation of interface asymmetry in GaAs-AlAs superlattices grown by MBE.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCartney, M.; Menéndez, J.; Pfeiffer, L. N.; West, K. W.

    1996-03-01

    Transmission electron microscopy techniques have been applied to the study of compositional profiles in (GaAs)_6(AlAs)6 superlattices grown by Molecular Beam Epitaxy. Cross-sectional samples in [100] and [110] orientations were used in both high-resolution and diffraction contrast imaging. Comparisons were made with simulated images computed from theoretically predicted compositional profiles. In samples grown at temperatures below 450 ^circC, the shape of the compositional profiles is found to be consistent with Ga surface segregation models. If Ga segregates to the AlAs surface, the direct (AlAs on GaAs) interface is predicted to be broad due to the penetration of Ga atoms into the AlAs layers. The indirect interface is expected to be sharper because Al does not segregate to the GaAs surface. The microscopy results are consistent with Raman experiments on the same samples.(G.S. Spencer, J. Menéndez, L.N. Pfeiffer, and K.W. West, Phys. Rev. B 52), 8205 (1995).

  17. Structure of V{sub 2}AlC studied by theory and experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, Jochen M.; Mertens, Raphael; Music, Denis

    2006-01-01

    We have studied V{sub 2}AlC (space group P6{sub 3}/mmc, prototype Cr{sub 2}AlC) by ab initio calculations. The density of states (DOS) of V{sub 2}AlC for antiferromagnetic, ferromagnetic, and paramagnetic configurations have been discussed. According to the analysis of DOS and cohesive energy, no significant stability differences between spin-polarized and non-spin-polarized configurations were found. Based on the partial DOS analysis, V{sub 2}AlC can be classified as a strongly coupled nanolaminate according to our previous work [Z. Sun, D. Music, R. Ahuja, S. Li, and J. M. Schneider, Phys. Rev. B 70, 092102 (2004)]. Furthermore, this phase has been synthesized in the form of thin films by magnetron sputtering. The equilibrium volume, determined by x-ray diffraction, is in good agreement with the theoretical data, implying that ab initio calculations provide an accurate description of V{sub 2}AlC.

  18. h -AlN-Mg(OH)2 van der Waals bilayer heterostructure: Tuning the excitonic characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bacaksiz, C.; Dominguez, A.; Rubio, A.; Senger, R. T.; Sahin, H.

    2017-02-01

    Motivated by recent studies that reported the successful synthesis of monolayer Mg (OH) 2 [Suslu et al., Sci. Rep. 6, 20525 (2016), 10.1038/srep20525] and hexagonal (h -)AlN [Tsipas et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 103, 251605 (2013), 10.1063/1.4851239], we investigate structural, electronic, and optical properties of vertically stacked h -AlN and Mg (OH) 2 , through ab initio density-functional theory (DFT), many-body quasiparticle calculations within the GW approximation and the Bethe-Salpeter equation (BSE). It is obtained that the bilayer heterostructure prefers the A B' stacking having direct band gap at the Γ with Type-II band alignment in which the valance band maximum and conduction band minimum originate from different layer. Regarding the optical properties, the imaginary part of the dielectric function of the individual layers and heterobilayer are investigated. The heterobilayer possesses excitonic peaks, which appear only after the construction of the heterobilayer. The lowest three exciton peaks are analyzed in detail by means of band decomposed charge density and the oscillator strength. Furthermore, the wave function calculation shows that the first peak of the heterobilayer originates from spatially indirect exciton where the electron and hole localized at h -AlN and Mg (OH) 2 , respectively, which is important for the light harvesting applications.

  19. Impurity Enhancement of Al_2O_3/Al Adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiao-Gang; Smith, John R.; Zhang, Wenqing; Evans, Anthony

    2003-03-01

    Our first-principles computations indicate that the clean Al_2O_3/Al interface is relatively weak - weaker than bulk Al. Fracture experiments reveal that the interface is relatively strong with observed failure in bulk Al, however. This paradox is resolved via doping effects of the common impurity C. We have found that only 1/3 of a monolayer of carbon segregated to the interface can increase the work of separation by a factor of 3. The resulting strong interface is consistent with fracture experiments. It arises due to void formation in the interface, which provides low-strain sites for the carbon to segregate to. The degree of void formation is consistent with the relatively high heat of oxide formation of Al.

  20. Thermal Modeling of Al-Al and Al-Steel Friction Stir Spot Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jedrasiak, P.; Shercliff, H. R.; Reilly, A.; McShane, G. J.; Chen, Y. C.; Wang, L.; Robson, J.; Prangnell, P.

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents a finite element thermal model for similar and dissimilar alloy friction stir spot welding (FSSW). The model is calibrated and validated using instrumented lap joints in Al-Al and Al-Fe automotive sheet alloys. The model successfully predicts the thermal histories for a range of process conditions. The resulting temperature histories are used to predict the growth of intermetallic phases at the interface in Al-Fe welds. Temperature predictions were used to study the evolution of hardness of a precipitation-hardened aluminum alloy during post-weld aging after FSSW.

  1. Corrigendum to Aerosol impacts on California winter clouds and precipitation during CalWater 2011: local pollution versus long-range transported dust published in Atmos. Chem. Phys., 14, 81–101, 2014

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, Jiwen; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; DeMott, Paul J.; Comstock, Jennifer M.; Singh, Balwinder; Rosenfeld, Daniel; Tomlinson, Jason M.; White, A.; Prather, Kimberly; Minnis, Patrick; Ayers, J. K.; Min, Qilong

    2014-05-01

    In the paper “Aerosol impacts on California winter clouds and precipitation during CalWater 2011: local pollution versus long-range transported dust” by J. Fan et al., wrong versions of Fig. 8 and Fig. 12 were published. Please find the correct figures below.

  2. Philosophieren als Unterrichtsprinzip im Mathematikunterricht

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meerwaldt, Diana

    Philosophieren und Mathematik scheinen zunächst gegensätzliche Bereiche zu sein, die sich kaum vereinbaren lassen. Dies trifft für eine Auffassung zu, die Philosophieren als "Gerede" disqualifiziert und Mathematik als eine reine "Formelwissenschaft" begreift. Beide Auffassungen werden den Gegenständen nicht gerecht.

  3. The Evolution of Al Qaeda

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-06-15

    Al Qaeda is a product of the forces of globalization. Increasing access to global finances , international travel, and sophisticated technology is...evolution. Al Qaeda is a product of the forces of globalization. Increasing access to global finances , international travel, and sophisticated technology...75 Finance

  4. Characteristics of CeCoIn5/Al/AlOx/Nb and CeCoIn5/Al/AlOx/Al Tunnel Junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Petrovic, C.; Nevirkovets, I.P.; Chernyashevskyy, O.; Hu, R.; Ketterson, J.B.; Sarma, B.K.

    2009-03-03

    We report characteristics of CeCoIn{sub 5}/Al/AlO{sub x}/Nb and CeCoIn{sub 5}/Al/AlO{sub x}/Al tunnel junctions fabricated on the (0 0 1) surface of CeCoIn{sub 5} crystal platelets. The main result of this work is the observation of a low Josephson current (as compared with that expected from the Ambegaokar-Baratoff formula), which is consistent with idea that the order parameter in the heavy-fermion superconductor CeCoIn{sub 5} has unconventional pairing symmetry.

  5. Probing of the pseudogap via thermoelectric properties in the Au-Al-Gd quasicrystal approximant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishikawa, Asuka; Takagiwa, Yoshiki; Kimura, Kaoru; Tamura, Ryuji

    2017-03-01

    The pseudogap of the recently discovered Au-Al-Gd quasicrystal approximant crystal (AC) is investigated over a wide electron-per-atom (e /a ) ratio of ˜0.5 using thermoelectric properties as an experimental probe. This Au-Al-Gd AC provides an ideal platform for fine probing of the pseudogap among a number of known ACs because the Au-Al-Gd AC possesses an extraordinarily wide single-phase region with respect to the variation in the electron concentration [A. Ishikawa, T. Hiroto, K. Tokiwa, T. Fujii, and R. Tamura, Phys. Rev. B 93, 024416 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevB.93.024416], in striking contrast to, for instance, binary stoichiometric C d6R ACs. As a result, a salient peak structure is observed in the Seebeck coefficient, S , with the composition as well as that of the power factor S2σ , in addition to a gradual variation in the conductivity, σ , and S . These two features are directly associated with rapid and slow variations, respectively, of spectral conductivity σ (E ) , and hence the fine structure inside the pseudogap, in the vicinity of the Fermi level EF. Based on the observed continuous variation of the Fermi wave vector reported in the previous experimental work, fine tuning of EF toward an optimal position was attempted, which led to the successful observation of a sharp peak in S2σ with a value of ˜270 μ W /m .K2 at 873 K. This is the highest value ever reported among both Tsai-type and Bergman-type compounds. The dimensionless figure of merit was determined as 0.026 at 873 K, which is also the highest reported among both Tsai-type and Bergman-type compounds.

  6. Medical application of 26Al

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinhausen, C.; Gerisch, P.; Heisinger, B.; Hohl, Ch.; Kislinger, G.; Korschinek, G.; Niedermayer, M.; Nolte, E.; Dumitru, M.; Alvarez-Brückmann, M.; Schneider, M.; Ittel, T. H.

    1996-06-01

    Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) measurements with 26Al as tracer were performed in order to study the aluminium metabolism and anomalies in the human body and in rats. In particular, the differences between healthy volunteers and patients with renal failure were investigated. The obtained data points of 26Al in blood and urine were described by an open compartment model with three peripheral compartments. It was found that the minimum of peripheral compartments needed to describe 26Al concentrations in blood and urine over a time period of three years is at least three.

  7. PhysDoc: A Distributed Network of Physics Institutions: Collecting, Indexing, and Searching High Quality Documents by Using Harvest; The Dublin Core Metadata Initiative: Mission, Current Activities, and Future Directions; Information Services for Higher Education: A New Competitive Space; Intellectual Property Conservancies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Severiens, Thomas; Hohlfeld, Michael; Zimmermann, Kerstin; Hilf, Eberhard R.; von Ossietzky, Carl; Weibel, Stuart L.; Koch, Traugott; Hughes, Carol Ann; Bearman, David

    2000-01-01

    Includes four articles that discuss a variety to topics, including a distributed network of physics institutions documents called PhysDocs which harvests information from the local Web-servers of professional physics institutions; the Dublin Core metadata initiative; information services for higher education in a competitive environment; and…

  8. Erratum to "Solar Sources and Geospace Consequences of Interplanetary Magnetic Clouds Observed During Solar Cycle 23-Paper 1" [J. Atmos. Sol.-Terr. Phys. 70(2-4) (2008) 245-253

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gopalswamy, N.; Akiyama, S.; Yashiro, S.; Michalek, G.; Lepping, R. P.

    2009-01-01

    One of the figures (Fig. 4) in "Solar sources and geospace consequences of interplanetary magnetic Clouds observed during solar cycle 23 -- Paper 1" by Gopalswamy et al. (2008, JASTP, Vol. 70, Issues 2-4, February 2008, pp. 245-253) is incorrect because of a software error in t he routine that was used to make the plot. The source positions of various magnetic cloud (MC) types are therefore not plotted correctly.

  9. Comment on "Are polynuclear superhalogens without halogen atoms probable? A high-level ab initio case study on triple-bridged binuclear anions with cyanide ligands" [J. Chem. Phys. 140, 094301 (2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díaz-Tinoco, Manuel; Ortiz, J. V.

    2016-10-01

    For the vertical electron detachment energies of triply-bridged Mg2(CN)5 - superhalides, the Outer Valence Green Function (OVGF) yields results similar to those of the coupled-cluster singles and doubles plus approximate triples, or CCSD(T), method. Invalid comparisons between states with different symmetry or localization properties underlie the assertion of Yin et al that OVGF produces large discrepancies with respect to CCSD(T) for several isomers of Mg2(CN)5 -.

  10. Special issue: diagnostics of atmospheric pressure microplasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruggeman, Peter; Czarnetzki, Uwe; Tachibana, Kunihide

    2013-11-01

    464004 [14] Sousa J S and Puech V 2013 J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 46 464005 [15] Takeda K et al 2013 J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 46 464006 [16] Vallade J and Massines F 2013 J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 46 464007 [17] Wang C and Wu W 2013 J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 46 464008 [18] Schröter S et al 2013 J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 46 464009 [19] Rusterholtz D L et al 2013 J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 46 464010 [20] Huang B-D et al 2013 J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 46 464011 [21] Pothiraja R et al 2013 J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 46 464012 [22] Marinov I et al 2013 J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 46 464013 [23] Akishev Y et al 2013 J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 46 464014 [24] Brandenburg R et al 2013 J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 46 464015 [25] Houlahan T J Jret al 2013 J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 46 464016 [26] Benedikt J et al 2013 J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 46 464017 [27] McKay K et al 2013 J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 46 464018 [28] Selected papers from the 2nd International Workshop on Microplasmas 2005 J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 38 1633-759 [29] Special issue: 3rd International Workshop on Microplasmas 2007 Control. Plasma Phys. 47 3-128 [30] Cluster issue on Microplasmas: 4th International Workshop on Microplasmas 2008 J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 41 1904001 [31] Microplasmas: scientific challenges and technological opportunities 2010 Eur. Phys. J. D 60 437-608 [32] Becker K H, Schoenbach K H and Eden J G 2006 J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 39 R55 [33] Iza F, Kim G J, Lee S M, Lee J K, Walsh J L, Zhang Y T and Kong M G 2008 Plasma Process. Polym. 5 322-44 [34] Tachibana K 2006 Trans. Electr. Electron. Eng. 1 145-55 [35] Samukawa S et al 2012 J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 45 253001

  11. Comment on ‘Lorentz transformations and the wave equation’

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Rocco, Héctor O.

    2017-01-01

    In this comment we make some clarifications with respect to certain asumptions and demands required by Ricardo Heras in his paper entitled ‘Lorentz transformations and the wave equation’ (2016 Eur. J. Phys. 37 025603).

  12. LETTERS AND COMMENTS: Note on the 'log formulae' for pendulum motion valid for any amplitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qing-Xin, Yuan; Pei, Ding

    2010-01-01

    In this note, we present an improved approximation to the solution of Lima (2008 Eur. J. Phys. 29 1091), which decreases the maximum relative error from 0.6% to 0.084% in evaluating the exact pendulum period.

  13. Jack Steinberger: Memories of the PS and of LEP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsesmelis, Emmanuel

    2012-03-01

    This contribution, a personal recollection by the author, is part of a special issue - CERN's accelerators, experiments and international integration 1959-2009. Guest Editor: Herwig Schopper [Schopper, Herwig. 2011. Editorial. Eur. Phys. J. H 36: 437

  14. Fractal dynamics of human gait: a reassessment of the 1996 data of Hausdorff et al.

    PubMed

    Delignières, Didier; Torre, Kjerstin

    2009-04-01

    We propose in this paper a reassessment of the original data of Hausdorff et al. (Hausdorff JM, Purdon PL, Peng C-K, Ladin Z, Wei JY, Goldberger AR. J Appl Physiol 80: 1448-1457, 1996). We confirm, using autoregressive fractionally integrated moving average modeling, the presence of genuine fractal correlations in stride interval series in self-paced conditions. In contrast with the conclusions of the authors, we show that correlations did not disappear in metronomic conditions. The series of stride intervals presented antipersistent correlations, and 1/f fluctuations were evidenced in the asynchronies to the metronome. We show that the super central pattern generator model (West B, Scafetta N. Phys Rev E Stat Nonlin Soft Matter Phys 67: 051917, 2003) allows accounting for the experimentally observed correlations in both self-paced and metronomic conditions, by the simple setting of the coupling strength parameter. We conclude that 1/f fluctuations in gait are not overridden by supraspinal influences when walking is paced by a metronome. The source of 1/f noise is still at work in this condition, but expressed differently under the influence of a continuous coupling process.

  15. K -shell ionization cross sections of Al, Si, S, Ca, and Zn for oxygen ions in the energy range 1. 1--8 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Geretschlaeger, M. ); Smit, Z. ); Steinbauer, E. )

    1992-03-01

    {ital K}-shell ionization cross sections induced by 1.1--8-MeV oxygen ions in Al, Si, S, Ca, and Zn were measured using different target thicknesses. The cross sections for vanishingly thin and for charge-equilibrium targets were obtained by extrapolation. The experimental results are compared to the perturbed stationary-state approximation with energy-loss, Coulomb, and relativistic corrections (ECPSSR) cross sections (Brandt and Lapicki, Phys. Rev. A 23, 1717 (1981)), to the modification of the ECPSSR theory (MECPSSR) (Benka, Geretschlaeger, and Paul, J. Phys. (Paris) Colloq. Suppl. 12, C9-251 (1987)), to the theory for direct Coulomb ionization of the 1{ital s}{sigma} molecular orbital (Montenegro and Sigaud, J. Phys. B 18, 299 (1985)), and to several semiclassical approximation codes using either the united atom binding procedure or the variational approach of Andersen {ital et} {ital al}. (Nucl. Instrum. Methods 192, 79 (1982)). The cross sections were also compared to the statistical molecular-orbital theory of inner-shell ionization for (nearly) symmetric atomic collisions (Mittelman and Wilets, Phys. Rev. 154, 12 (1967)). For fast collisions ({xi}{similar to}1), the ionization cross sections are well reproduced by theories for direct Coulomb ionization. For slower collisions ({xi}{lt}1), the experimental cross sections are systematically higher than the direct-ionization values, but they agree satisfactorily with the summed cross sections for direct Coulomb ionization and for molecular-orbital ionization. Best agreement (within a factor of 2) was found for the sums of MECPSSR and statistical cross sections.

  16. Reply to Gopalswamy et al.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cane, H. V.; Richardson, I. G.

    2003-01-01

    The comment of Gopalswamy et al. (thereafter GMY) relates to a letter discussing coronal mass ejections (CMEs), interplanetary ejecta and geomagnetic storms. GMY contend that Cane et al. incorrectly identified ejecta (interplanetary CMEs) and hypothesize that this is because Cane et al. fail to understand how to separate ejecta from "shock sheaths" when interpreting solar wind and energetic particle data sets. They (GMY) are wrong be cause the relevant section of the paper was concerned with the propagation time to 1 AU of any potentially geoeffective structures caused by CMEs, i.e. upstream compression regions with or without shocks, or ejecta. In other words, the travel times used by Cane et al. were purposefully and deliberately distinct from ejecta travel times (except for those slow ejecta, approx. 30% of their events, which generated no upstream features), and no error in identification was involved. The confusion of GMY stems from the description did not characterize the observations sufficiently clearly.

  17. In memory of Al Cameron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowan, John; Truran, James W.

    Al Cameron, who died recently (October 3, 2005) at 80, was one of the giants in astrophysics. His insights were profound and his interests were wide-ranging. Originally trained as a nuclear physicist, he made major contributions in a number of fields, including nuclear reactions in stars, nucleosynthesis, the abundances of the elements in the Solar System, and the origin of the Solar System and the Moon. In 1957, Cameron and, independently, Burbidge, Burbidge, Fowler and Hoyle, wrote seminal papers on nuclear astrophysics. Most of our current ideas concerning ele- ment formation in stars have followed from those two pioneering and historical works. Al also made many contributions in the field of Solar System physics. Particularly noteworthy in this regard was Cameron's work on the formation of the Moon. Al was also a good friend and mentor of young people. Al Cameron will be missed by many in the community both for his scientific contributions and for his friendship.

  18. Do Radioactive Half-Lives Depend on the Earth-Sun Distance?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodwin, John; Hardy, John; Iacob, Victor; Golovko, Victor

    2010-11-01

    In recent articles [1-4], Jenkins et al. claim to have evidence that radioactive half-lives vary as a function of the earth-to-sun distance. They base their claims on data obtained by others over the space of several years -- the decay of ^32Si as measured at Brookhaven National Laboratory [5] from 1982-85 and that of ^226Ra as measured at the Physikalisch Technische Bundesanstalt in Germany [6] from 1984-88 -- in which the decay rates show a small but statistically significant oscillation with a period of one year and approximately correlated with the earth-sun distance (and with the seasons). Here we report a series of seven measurements of the ^198Au half-life (see [7] for a description of two of these) made by us at various intervals over a period of one aphelion-aphelion cycle. Each measured half-life has a precision of about 0.02%. There is no evidence of any deviation from a constant half-life. [1] J. H. Jenkins et al., Astropart. Phys. 31 407 (2009) [2] J. H. Jenkins et al., Astropart. Phys. 32, 42 (2010) [3] E. Fischbach et al., Space Sci. Rev. 145, 285 (2009) [4] J. Jenkins et al., arxiv:0912:5385v1 [5] D. Alburger et al., Earth and Planet. Sci. Lett. 78, 168 (1986) [6] H. Siegert et al., Appl. Radiat. Isot. 49, 1397 (1998) [7] J. R. Goodwin et al., Eur. Phys. J. A 34, 271 (2007).

  19. Al-Co-Fe (030)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carow-Watamura, U.; Louzguine, D. V.; Takeuchi, A.

    This document is part of Part 1 http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/9getType="URL"/> 'Systems from Ag-Al-Ca to Au-Pd-Si' of Subvolume B 'Physical Properties of Ternary Amorphous Alloys' of Volume 37 'Phase Diagrams and Physical Properties of Nonequilibrium Alloys' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group III 'Condensed Matter'. It contains the Chapter 'Al-Co-Fe (030)' with the content:

  20. Al-La-Nb (068)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carow-Watamura, U.; Louzguine, D. V.; Takeuchi, A.

    This document is part of Part 1 http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/97.etType="URL"/> 'Systems from Ag-Al-Ca to Au-Pd-Si' of Subvolume B 'Physical Properties of Ternary Amorphous Alloys' of Volume 37 'Phase Diagrams and Physical Properties of Nonequilibrium Alloys' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group III 'Condensed Matter'. It contains the Chapter 'Al-La-Nb (068)' with the content:

  1. Al-Cu-Zr (050)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carow-Watamura, U.; Louzguine, D. V.; Takeuchi, A.

    This document is part of Part 1 http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/9getType="URL"/> 'Systems from Ag-Al-Ca to Au-Pd-Si' of Subvolume B 'Physical Properties of Ternary Amorphous Alloys' of Volume 37 'Phase Diagrams and Physical Properties of Nonequilibrium Alloys' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group III 'Condensed Matter'. It contains the Chapter 'Al-Cu-Zr (050)' with the content:

  2. Al-La-Ni (069)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carow-Watamura, U.; Louzguine, D. V.; Takeuchi, A.

    This document is part of Part 1 http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/9getType="URL"/> 'Systems from Ag-Al-Ca to Au-Pd-Si' of Subvolume B 'Physical Properties of Ternary Amorphous Alloys' of Volume 37 'Phase Diagrams and Physical Properties of Nonequilibrium Alloys' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group III 'Condensed Matter'. It contains the Chapter 'Al-La-Ni (069)' with the content:

  3. Al-Au-La (010)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carow-Watamura, U.; Louzguine, D. V.; Takeuchi, A.

    This document is part of Part 1 http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/9getType="URL"/> 'Systems from Ag-Al-Ca to Au-Pd-Si' of Subvolume B 'Physical Properties of Ternary Amorphous Alloys' of Volume 37 'Phase Diagrams and Physical Properties of Nonequilibrium Alloys' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group III 'Condensed Matter'. It contains the Chapter 'Al-Au-La (010)' with the content:

  4. Al-Ce-V (029)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carow-Watamura, U.; Louzguine, D. V.; Takeuchi, A.

    This document is part of Part 1 http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/97.etType="URL"/> 'Systems from Ag-Al-Ca to Au-Pd-Si' of Subvolume B 'Physical Properties of Ternary Amorphous Alloys' of Volume 37 'Phase Diagrams and Physical Properties of Nonequilibrium Alloys' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group III 'Condensed Matter'. It contains the Chapter 'Al-Ce-V (029)' with the content:

  5. Comparing the Thermodynamic Behaviour of Al(1)+ZrO2(s) to Al(1)+Al2O3(s)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Copland, Evan

    2004-01-01

    In an effort to better determine the thermodynamic properties of Al(g) and Al2O(g). the vapor in equilibrium with Al(l)+ZrO2(s) was compared to the vapor in equilibrium with Al(l)+Al2O3(s) over temperature range 1197-to-1509K. The comparison was made directly by Knudsen effusion-cell mass spectrometry with an instrument configured for a multiple effusion-cell vapor source (multi-cell KEMS). Second law enthalpies of vaporization of Al(g) and Al2O(g) together with activity measurements show that Al(l)+ZrO2(s) is thermodynamically equivalent to Al(l)+Al2O3(s), indicating Al(l) remained pure and Al2O3(s) was present in the ZrO2-cell. Subsequent observation of the Al(l)/ZrO2 and vapor/ZrO2 interfaces revealed a thin Al2O3-layer had formed, separating the ZrO2-cell from Al(l) and Al(g)+Al2O(g), effectively transforming it into an Al2O3 effusion-cell. This behavior agrees with recent observations made for Beta-NiAl(Pt) alloys measured in ZrO2 effusion-cell.

  6. Corrigendum and addendum to "Moduli spaces of framed symplectic and orthogonal bundles on P2 and the K-theoretic Nekrasov partition functions" [J. Geom. Phys. 106 (2016) 284-304

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choy, Jaeyoo

    2016-12-01

    We give a scheme-theoretic description of μ-1(0) and μ-1(0) / / Sp(2) , where μ is the moment map defining the space of ADHM data associated to framed SO(3 , R) -instantons with instanton number 1. The irreducible component in μ-1(0) / / Sp(2) , other than the Zariski closure of the instanton moduli space, is non-reduced, which is a corrigendum to [Choy (2016), Theorem 4.3]. We further describe this component using the factorization property Braverman et al. (2006).

  7. Atomic and Molecular Hydrogen Interaction with Ti-Doped Al (100): Hydrogen Dissociation and Surface Alane Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muller, Erik; Sutter, Peter; Zahl, Percy; Chaudhuri, Santanu; Muckerman, James

    2006-03-01

    A comprehensive research effort on the atomistic mechanisms underlying hydrogen storage in Ti-doped NaAlH4 is aimed at deriving a knowledge base for the rational optimization of this and other related complex hydride materials. Our investigation focuses on the role of the Ti dopants in promoting reversible hydrogenation, a key requirement for any practical hydrogen storage material. The re-hydrogenation reaction proceeds from the crucial initial step of dissociative adsorption of molecular hydrogen on Al or NaH. A specific Al:Ti complex was recently predicted as an active site for H2 dissociation on extended Al(100) surfaces [1]. Combining high-resolution surface imaging experiments (scanning tunneling microscopy, low-energy electron microscopy) with density functional theory, we are investigating the dissociative adsorption of H2 on Ti-doped Al(100) prepared in ultrahigh vacuum. We will discuss our progress toward identifying catalytically active sites for H2 dissociation on this surface, as well as pathways toward the formation of mobile Al-species. [1] S. Chaudhuri and J.T. Muckerman, J. Phys. Chem. B 109, 6952 (2005).

  8. Localized electron states and phase separation at the LaAlO3/SrTiO3 interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satpathy, S.; Shanavas, K. V.

    2012-02-01

    Even though the 2D electron gas at the polar interfaces of LAO/STO has been studied extensively, an explanation for the observed magnetic centers or the coexistence of magnetism and superconductivity is still lacking. Earlier density-functional calculations have indicated the presence of multi-bands and two types of electrons at the interface [1]. Here we propose that a combination of lattice disorder, octahedral rotations, and Jahn-Teller distortion can lead to some of these electrons to be localized near the interface and form lattice polarons. Evidence for this is presented from detailed density-functional calculations, which indicate that the energy gain associated with JT distortion and impurity or disorder induced local potentials can offset the kinetic energy cost of localization. Our model studies [2] also show the possible existence of a phase separation, thereby providing a natural explanation for the coexistence of magnetism and superconductivity [3].[4pt] [1] Z. S. Popovi'c, S. Satpathy and R. M. Martin Phys. Rev. Lett., 101, 256801 (2008)[0pt] [2] B. R. K. Nanda and S. Satpathy Phys. Rev B, 83, 195114 (2011)[0pt] [3] L. Li et. al. Nature Physics, 7, 762 (2011); J. A. Bert et. al. ibid, 767 (2011);

  9. Electronic energy dissipation during scattering of vibrationally excited molecules at metal surfaces: ab initio simulations for HCl/Al(111).

    PubMed

    Grotemeyer, Michael; Pehlke, Eckhard

    2014-01-31

    In this Letter, ab initio molecular dynamics simulations based on time-dependent density functional theory for the electrons and Ehrenfest dynamics for the nuclei are reported that detail the interaction of a vibrating HCl molecule with an Al(111) substrate. The mechanism responsible for the strong electron-hole-pair (EHP)-vibrational coupling in case of highly vibrationally excited molecules is traced back to a large eigenenergy shift of the spz*-like antibonding HCl lowest unoccupied molecular orbital with the bond length. As a consequence of this mechanism, the electronic excitation spectra turn out to be highly asymmetric. The simulations suggest an explanation of how to reconcile a strong EHP-vibrational coupling in case of highly vibrationally excited molecules with the small, but clearly evident, electronic contribution to the v=0 → v=1 vibrational excitation observed experimentally during the scattering of HCl molecules at a hot Au surface by Ran et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 98 237601 (2007)].

  10. Reply to ``Comment on `Effect of α-nucleus potential on the 27Al(α,t)28Si reaction' ''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, S. K.; Tariq, A. S. B.; Rahman, A. F. M. M.; Roy, P. K.; Huda, M. N.; Mondal, A. S.; Basak, A. K.; Gupta, H. M. Sen; Malik, F. B.

    2000-10-01

    The point stressed by Michel and Reidemeister is that the Michel potential in our work is not final and an adjustment of the parameter α gives an elastic distribution and a potential similar to that obtained for the molecular one. This is usual in the absence of the elastic data at large angles as commented on by Tariq et al. [Phys. Rev. C 59, 2558 (1999)]. However, the inadequacy of the Michel potential with the parameter α=7.4 in the description of the (α,t) reaction data leads to a finding of a better value for the parameter by Michel and Reidemeister. This justifies the use of the molecular and Michel potentials in the analysis of the reaction and conforms to the suggestion by Satchler (Ref. [40] in Tariq et al.) that the performance of a potential in nonelastic processes is a stronger criterion in its selection.

  11. Protein Aggregation Inhibitors for ALS Therapy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-07-01

    well as the development of novel organic bases. Since then, he has been an instructor of chemistry at Northeastern Illinois University, teaching ...courses in general, organic, and more recently toxicological chemistry and pharmacology, in addition to teaching in the Urban Health Program at the...Tetrahedron Lett. 2013, 54, 573−575. (35) Becke, A. D. Density-functional thermochemistry . III. The role of exact exchange. J. Chem. Phys. 1993, 98, 5648−5652

  12. Modeling of the ALS linac

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, C.H.

    1996-08-01

    The ALS injector linac is used for the Beam Test Facility (BTF) and the Damping Experiments when it is available in between the ALS filings. These experiments usually require higher quality beams and a better characterization than is normally required for ALS operations. This paper focuses on the beam emittance, energy tilt, and especially the longitudinal variation of the beam parameters. For instance, the authors want to avoid longitudinal variations at the low beta section of the BTF. On the other hand, a large energy tilt is required for post-acceleration compression of the bunch using an alpha magnet. The PARMELA code was modified to calculate and display longitudinal variations of the emittance ellipse. Using the Microsoft Development Studio under Windows NT environment the code can handle a much larger number of particles than was previously possible.

  13. Superconductivity in Al/Al2O3 interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palnichenko, A. V.; Vyaselev, O. M.; Mazilkin, A. A.; Khasanov, S. S.

    2016-06-01

    Metastable superconductivity at Tc ≈ 65 K has been observed in Al foil subjected to special oxidation process, according to the ac magnetic susceptibility and electrical resistance measurements. Comparison of the ac susceptibility and the dc magnetization measurements infers that the superconductivity arises within the interfacial granular layer formed during the oxidation process between metallic aluminum and its oxide.

  14. Baumard et al.'s moral markets lack market dynamics.

    PubMed

    Fessler, Daniel M T; Holbrook, Colin

    2013-02-01

    Market models are indeed indispensable to understanding the evolution of cooperation and its emotional substrates. Unfortunately, Baumard et al. eschew market thinking in stressing the supposed invariance of moral/cooperative behavior across circumstances. To the contrary, humans display contingent morality/cooperation, and these shifts are best accounted for by market models of partner choice for mutually beneficial collaboration.

  15. Hybrid density functional theory studies of AlN and GaN under uniaxial strain.

    PubMed

    Qin, Lixia; Duan, Yifeng; Shi, Hongliang; Shi, Liwei; Tang, Gang

    2013-01-30

    The structural stability, spontaneous polarization, piezoelectric response, and electronic structure of AlN and GaN under uniaxial strain along the [0001] direction are systematically investigated using HSE06 range-separated hybrid functionals. Our results exhibit interesting behavior. (i) AlN and GaN share the same structural transition from wurtzite to a graphite-like phase at very large compressive strains, similarly to other wurtzite semiconductors. Our calculations further reveal that this well-known phase transition is driven by the transverse-acoustic soft phonon mode associated with elastic instabilities. (ii) The applied tensile strain can either drastically suppress or strongly enhance the polarization and piezoelectricity, based on the value of the strain. Furthermore, large enhancements of polarization and piezoelectricity close to the phase-transition regions at large compressive strains are predicted, similar to those previously predicted in ferroelectric fields. Our calculations indicate that such colossal enhancements are strongly correlated to phase transitions when large atomic displacements are generated by external strains. (iii) Under the same strain, AlN and GaN have significantly different electronic properties: both wurtzite and graphite-like AlN always display direct band structures, while the the bandgap of wurtzite GaN is always direct and that of graphite-like GaN always indirect. Furthermore, the bandgap of graphite-like AlN is greatly enhanced by large compressive strain, but that of wurtzite GaN is not sensitive to compressive strain. Our results are drastically different from those for equibiaxial strain (Duan et al 2012 Appl. Phys. Lett. 100 022104).

  16. Hybrid density functional theory studies of AlN and GaN under uniaxial strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Lixia; Duan, Yifeng; Shi, Hongliang; Shi, Liwei; Tang, Gang

    2013-01-01

    The structural stability, spontaneous polarization, piezoelectric response, and electronic structure of AlN and GaN under uniaxial strain along the [0001] direction are systematically investigated using HSE06 range-separated hybrid functionals. Our results exhibit interesting behavior. (i) AlN and GaN share the same structural transition from wurtzite to a graphite-like phase at very large compressive strains, similarly to other wurtzite semiconductors. Our calculations further reveal that this well-known phase transition is driven by the transverse-acoustic soft phonon mode associated with elastic instabilities. (ii) The applied tensile strain can either drastically suppress or strongly enhance the polarization and piezoelectricity, based on the value of the strain. Furthermore, large enhancements of polarization and piezoelectricity close to the phase-transition regions at large compressive strains are predicted, similar to those previously predicted in ferroelectric fields. Our calculations indicate that such colossal enhancements are strongly correlated to phase transitions when large atomic displacements are generated by external strains. (iii) Under the same strain, AlN and GaN have significantly different electronic properties: both wurtzite and graphite-like AlN always display direct band structures, while the the bandgap of wurtzite GaN is always direct and that of graphite-like GaN always indirect. Furthermore, the bandgap of graphite-like AlN is greatly enhanced by large compressive strain, but that of wurtzite GaN is not sensitive to compressive strain. Our results are drastically different from those for equibiaxial strain (Duan et al 2012 Appl. Phys. Lett. 100 022104).

  17. FTD and ALS: genetic ties that bind.

    PubMed

    Orr, Harry T

    2011-10-20

    Curiously, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD), seemingly disparate neurodegenerative disorders, can be inherited together. Two groups (DeJesus-Hernandez et al. and Renton et al.) show that the long sought after ALS/FTD mutation on chromosomal region 9p is a hexanucleotide expansion in C90RF72. These studies, plus a study on X-linked ALS/FTD, provide molecular starting points for identifying pathways that link ALS and FTD pathogenesis.

  18. Phase Breaking in InAs/AlGaSb Open Quantum Dot Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maemoto, T.; Kitamura, Y.; Ueda, K.; Sasa, S.; Inoue, M.; Ishibashi, K.; Aoyagi, Y.

    2002-03-01

    We report on phase breaking times in InAs/AlGaAs open quantum dot structures in ballistic transport regimes. These results are compared with the results of InAs quantum wires and lateral surface superlattices [1]. The open dot structures with sub-micron scale have been fabricated by electron beam lithography and split-gate technique. Fluctuations of magnetoresistance have been observed at 4.2 K from low magnetic fields below 1 T, which were not seen in the conventional devices. The large-period fluctuations can be analyzed from the semi-classical scattering trajectory depending on the geometrical feature of the devices. In addition to these large-period conductance fluctuations, the short-period fluctuations have been also observed even at 4.2K. These fluctuations may result from the complex modes of the interference electron waves possibly characterized by highly characteristic wave function scarring [2]. From the analyses of correlation functions of these magneto-oscillations [3], the phase breaking times of the present InAs/AlGaSb open quantum dot structures were estimated to be 20-50 ps. [1] T. Maemoto, M. Ichiu, A. Ohya, S. Sasa, M. Inoue, K. Ishibashi, Y. Aoyagi, Physica B 272, 110 (1999). [2] R. Akis, D. K. Ferry, and J. P. Bird, Phys. Rev. Lett. 79, 123 (1997). [3] K. Ishibashi, J. P. Bird, D. K. Ferry, M. Lakrimi, A. D. Grassie, K. M. Hutchings, Y. Ochiai, T. Sugano and Y. Aoyagi, Jpn. J. Appl. Phys. 34, 6966 (1995).

  19. ALS - A unique design approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamberlain, Roger A.

    1990-09-01

    An advanced launch system (ALS), which is intended to be flexible and to deliver a wide range of payloads at a reduced cost, is discussed. The ALS concept also features total quality management, modular subsystems, standardized interfaces, standardized missions, and off-line payload encapsulation. The technological improvements include manufacturing of dry structures, use of composite materials, adaptive guidance and control systems, and laser-initiated radar systems. The operational improvements range from paperless management, to rocket engine leak detection devices and automated ground operations.

  20. Determination of environmental dependence of the &-circ; decay half-life of ^198Au

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dibidad, A.; Goodwin, J.; Hardy, J.

    2009-10-01

    A series of articles by the C. Rolfs group [1] claimed changes in the half-lives of isotopes undergoing α, β^-, β^+, and electron-capture decays as the temperature reduced to 12 K from room temperature. These isotopes were contained in metallic, conductive environments, such as Au, Cu, and Pd, but it was also suggested that the half-life is different in an insulator. One publication [1] reported the half-life of ^198Au in a gold metal environment to change by 3.6 ±1.0% between room temperature and 12 K. Until then, radioactive half-lives were considered independent of environmental factors. We repeated the measurements of the ^198Au half-life in a gold metal environment under similar conditions as ref. [1] and demonstrated [2] that the half-life is the same at both temperatures within 0.04%, two orders of magnitude below the original claims. In the experiment reported here, we measured the half-life of ^198Au in an insulated environment -- gold (III) oxide -- at room temperature. Preliminary results indicate there is no difference in the measured half-life in an insulator as compared in a conductor. [4pt] [1] T. Spillane et al, Eur. Phys. J. A 31, 203 (2007) [0pt] [2] J.R. Goodwin et al, Eur. Phys. J. A 34, 271 (2007)

  1. A more precise atomic mass of ^4He : Ongoing reduction of uncertainties for the UW-PTMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinegar, David; Zafonte, Steven; van Liew van Dyck, Seth, Jr.

    2004-05-01

    Using a Penning trap mass spectrometer (PTMS), the atomic mass of ^4He has been found to be 4 002 603 254.153(64) nu (an uncertainty of 16 ppt). This number agrees well with the previous two best measurements of the ^4He mass(S. Brunner, et al., Eur. Phys. J. D 15), 181-188 (2001). (T. Fritioff, et al., Eur. Phys. J. D 15), 141--143, (2001).. In addition to giving a precise atomic mass of the α-particle, ^4He can now be used as a convenient reference ion by less precise mass spectrometers. For our measurement, the cyclotron frequencies of ^12C^6+ and ^4H^2+ ions were compared, using a Penning ion trap with an extremely stable (less than 2 ppt/h of drift) magnetic field. While many aspects of our experiment have been previously described (as for the recent ^16O result, at 10 ppt unceratinty(R. S. Van Dyck, Jr., S. L. Zafonte, and P. B. Schwinberg, Hyp. Interact. 132), 163--175, (2001), and references.), we will present several techniques and changes to the apparatus that have improved the accuracy of our machine by about an order of magnitude in recent years.

  2. Dynamic Modeling of ALS Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Harry

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of dynamic modeling and simulation of Advanced Life Support (ALS) systems is to help design them. Static steady state systems analysis provides basic information and is necessary to guide dynamic modeling, but static analysis is not sufficient to design and compare systems. ALS systems must respond to external input variations and internal off-nominal behavior. Buffer sizing, resupply scheduling, failure response, and control system design are aspects of dynamic system design. We develop two dynamic mass flow models and use them in simulations to evaluate systems issues, optimize designs, and make system design trades. One model is of nitrogen leakage in the space station, the other is of a waste processor failure in a regenerative life support system. Most systems analyses are concerned with optimizing the cost/benefit of a system at its nominal steady-state operating point. ALS analysis must go beyond the static steady state to include dynamic system design. All life support systems exhibit behavior that varies over time. ALS systems must respond to equipment operating cycles, repair schedules, and occasional off-nominal behavior or malfunctions. Biological components, such as bioreactors, composters, and food plant growth chambers, usually have operating cycles or other complex time behavior. Buffer sizes, material stocks, and resupply rates determine dynamic system behavior and directly affect system mass and cost. Dynamic simulation is needed to avoid the extremes of costly over-design of buffers and material reserves or system failure due to insufficient buffers and lack of stored material.

  3. Interface states at the SiN/AlGaN interface on GaN heterojunctions for Ga and N-polar material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeluri, Ramya; Swenson, Brian L.; Mishra, Umesh K.

    2012-02-01

    Dielectric passivation is important to improve the stability and reliability of gallium nitride based semiconductor devices. We need to characterize various dielectrics and their interfaces to nitrides accurately to be able to exploit the benefits efficiently. Earlier, B. L. Swenson and U. K. Mishra [J. Appl. Phys. 106, 064902 (2009)] have detailed a photo-assisted high frequency CV characterization technique for the Ga-polar SiN/GaN interface that gives an accurate value of interface state density (Dit) across the bandgap of the dielectric. In this work, we extend the technique to study the interface states at the SiN/AlGaN interface on GaN for Ga and N polar material. This simulates the AlGaN/GaN HEMT structure. A MIS-type structure comprised of a metal on SiN on an AlGaN/GaN heterojunction was used for the study. For a structure with 1 nm AlGaN interlayer, a peak interface state density of 2.8 × 1012 cm-2 eV-1 was measured. For Ga polar devices, the measured Dit decreases with increasing AlGaN thickness. In the N-polar case, the measured Dit increases with increasing AlGaN thickness. The variations of measured Dit with AlGaN thickness, in both cases, can be explained by screening from the accumulation charge at the AlGaN/GaN interface.

  4. Supplement to the paper "Quadratic Sagnac effect — the influence of the gravitational potential of the Coriolis force on the phase difference between the arms of a rotating Michelson interferometer (an explanation of D C Miller's experimental results, 1921 - 1926)" (Usp. Fiz. Nauk 185 431 (2015) [Phys. Usp. 58 398 (2015)])

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malykin, G. B.; Pozdnyakova, V. I.

    2015-08-01

    The paper "Quadratic Sagnac effect — the influence of the gravitational potential of the Coriolis force on the phase difference between the arms of a rotating Michelson interferometer (an explanation of D C Miller's experimental results, 1921 - 1926)" (Usp. Fiz. Nauk 185 431 (2015) [Phys. Usp. 58 398 (2015)]) is amended and supplemented with information concerning earlier work on the influence of rotation on Michelson - Morley's nonzero results.

  5. Many-Body Effect in Spin Dephasing in n-Type GaAs Quantum Wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weng, Ming-Qi; Wu, Ming-Wei

    2005-03-01

    By constructing and numerically solving the kinetic Bloch equations we perform a many-body study of the spin dephasing due to the D'yakonov-Perel' effect in n-type GaAs (100) quantum wells for high temperatures. In our study, we include the spin-conserving scattering such as the electron-phonon, the electron-nonmagnetic impurity as well as the electron-electron Coulomb scattering into consideration. The dephasing obtained from our theory contains both the single-particle and the many-body contributions with the latter originating from the inhomogeneous broadening introduced by the DP term [J. Supercond.: Incorp. Novel Magn. 14 (2001) 245 Eur. Phys. J. B 18 (2000) 373]. Our result agrees very well with the experimental data [Phys. Rev. B 62 (2000) 13034] of Malinowski et al. We further show that in the case we study, the spin dephasing is dominated by the many-body effect.

  6. Large rectification magnetoresistance in nonmagnetic Al/Ge/Al heterojunctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Kun; Li, Huan-Huan; Grünberg, Peter; Li, Qiang; Ye, Sheng-Tao; Tian, Yu-Feng; Yan, Shi-Shen; Lin, Zhao-Jun; Kang, Shi-Shou; Chen, Yan-Xue; Liu, Guo-Lei; Mei, Liang-Mo

    2015-09-01

    Magnetoresistance and rectification are two fundamental physical properties of heterojunctions and respectively have wide applications in spintronics devices. Being different from the well known various magnetoresistance effects, here we report a brand new large magnetoresistance that can be regarded as rectification magnetoresistance: the application of a pure small sinusoidal alternating-current to the nonmagnetic Al/Ge Schottky heterojunctions can generate a significant direct-current voltage, and this rectification voltage strongly varies with the external magnetic field. We find that the rectification magnetoresistance in Al/Ge Schottky heterojunctions is as large as 250% at room temperature, which is greatly enhanced as compared with the conventional magnetoresistance of 70%. The findings of rectification magnetoresistance open the way to the new nonmagnetic Ge-based spintronics devices of large rectification magnetoresistance at ambient temperature under the alternating-current due to the simultaneous implementation of the rectification and magnetoresistance in the same devices.

  7. Large rectification magnetoresistance in nonmagnetic Al/Ge/Al heterojunctions

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Kun; Li, Huan-huan; Grünberg, Peter; Li, Qiang; Ye, Sheng-tao; Tian, Yu-feng; Yan, Shi-shen; Lin, Zhao-jun; Kang, Shi-shou; Chen, Yan-xue; Liu, Guo-lei; Mei, Liang-mo

    2015-01-01

    Magnetoresistance and rectification are two fundamental physical properties of heterojunctions and respectively have wide applications in spintronics devices. Being different from the well known various magnetoresistance effects, here we report a brand new large magnetoresistance that can be regarded as rectification magnetoresistance: the application of a pure small sinusoidal alternating-current to the nonmagnetic Al/Ge Schottky heterojunctions can generate a significant direct-current voltage, and this rectification voltage strongly varies with the external magnetic field. We find that the rectification magnetoresistance in Al/Ge Schottky heterojunctions is as large as 250% at room temperature, which is greatly enhanced as compared with the conventional magnetoresistance of 70%. The findings of rectification magnetoresistance open the way to the new nonmagnetic Ge-based spintronics devices of large rectification magnetoresistance at ambient temperature under the alternating-current due to the simultaneous implementation of the rectification and magnetoresistance in the same devices. PMID:26387967

  8. Structure and oscillational motion of /sup 57/Fe atoms in interstitial sites in Al as determined from interference of Moessbauer. gamma. radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Pauling, L.

    1981-12-01

    The first excited site of the /sup 57/Fe atom entrapped in an interstitial site in aluminum, as reported by W. Petry, G. Vogl, and W. Mansel (Phys. Rev. Lett. 45, 1862 (1980)) from a Moessbauer spectroscopic study of a single crystal, is analyzed by consideration of the value of the Hooke's law constant of the Fe-Al bonds obtained from the values for elemental Fe and Al. The eight wavefunctions for the eightfold nearly degenerate excited state are described as 2s1p1d1f hybrids of three-dimensional harmonic oscillator wavefunctions relative to the center of the undistorted Al/sub 6/ octahedron or as localized 1s functions relative to the center of the distorted octahedron. These considerations provide a qualitative understanding of the observations on this system.

  9. Oxygen-induced changes in electron-energy-loss spectra for Al, Be and Ni. [Al; Be; Ni

    SciTech Connect

    Madden, H.H.; Landers, R.; Kleiman, G.G. , 13081-970 Campinas, Sao Paulo, Brasil); Zehner, D.M. )

    1999-09-01

    Electron-energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) data are presented to illustrate line shape changes that occur as a result of oxygen interaction with metal surfaces. The metals were aluminum, beryllium and nickel. Core-level EELS data were taken for excitations from Al(2p), Be(1s), Ni(3p/3s) and O(1s) levels to the conduction band (CB) density of states (DOS) of the materials. The primary beam energies for the spectra were 300, 450, 300, and 1135 eV, respectively. The data are presented in both the (as measured) first-derivative and the integral forms. The integral spectra were corrected for coherent background losses and analyzed for CB DOS information. These spectra were found to be in qualitative agreement with published experimental and theoretical studies of these materials. One peak in the spectra for Al oxide is analyzed for its correlation with excitonic screening of the Al(2p) core hole. Similar evidence for exciton formation is found in the Ni(3p) spectra for Ni oxide. Data are also presented showing oxygen-induced changes in the lower-loss-energy EELS curves that, in the pure metal, are dominated by plasmon-loss and interband-transition signals. Single-scattering loss profiles in the integral form of the data were calculated using a procedure of Tougaard and Chorkendorff [S. Tougaard and I. Chorkendorff, Phys. Rev. B. [bold 35], 6570 (1987)]. For all three oxides these profiles are dominated by a feature with a loss energy of around 20[endash]25 eV. Although this feature has been ascribed by other researchers as due to bulk plasmon losses in the oxide, an alternative explanation is that the feature is simply due to O(2s)-to-CB-level excitations. An even stronger feature is found at 7 eV loss energy for Ni oxide. Speculation is given as to its source. The line shapes in both the core-level and noncore-level spectra can also be used simply as [open quotes]fingerprints[close quotes] of the surface chemistry of the materials. Our data were taken using commercially

  10. AlSb/InAs/AlSb quantum wells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kroemer, Herbert

    1990-01-01

    Researchers studied the InAs/AlSb system recently, obtaining 12nm wide quantum wells with room temperature mobilities up to 28,000 cm(exp 2)/V center dot S and low-temperature mobilities up to 325,000 cm(exp 2)/V center dot S, both at high electron sheet concentrations in the 10(exp 12)/cm(exp 2) range (corresponding to volume concentrations in the 10(exp 18)/cm(exp 2) range). These wells were not intentionally doped; the combination of high carrier concentrations and high mobilities suggest that the electrons are due to not-intentional modulation doping by an unknown donor in the AlSb barriers, presumably a stoichiometric defect, like an antisite donor. Inasmuch as not intentionally doped bulk AlSb is semi-insulating, the donor must be a deep one, being ionized only by draining into the even deeper InAs quantum well. The excellent transport properties are confirmed by other observations, like excellent quantum Hall effect data, and the successful use of the quantum wells as superconductive weak links between Nb electrodes, with unprecendentedly high critical current densities. The system is promising for future field effect transistors (FETs), but many processing problems must first be solved. Although the researchers have achieved FETs, the results so far have not been competitive with GaAs FETs.

  11. Effect of interface geometry on electron tunnelling in Al/Al2O3/Al junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koberidze, M.; Feshchenko, A. V.; Puska, M. J.; Nieminen, R. M.; Pekola, J. P.

    2016-04-01

    We investigate how different interface geometries of an Al/Al2O3 junction, a common component of modern tunnel devices, affect electron transport through the tunnel barrier. We study six distinct Al/Al2O3 interfaces which differ in stacking sequences of the metal and the oxide surface atoms and the oxide termination. To construct model potential barrier profiles for each examined geometry, we rely on first-principles density-functional theory (DFT) calculations for the barrier heights and the shapes of the interface regions as well as on experimental data for the barrier widths. We show that even tiny variations in the atomic arrangement at the interface cause significant changes in the tunnel barrier parameters and, consequently, in electron transport properties. Especially, we find that variations in the crucial barrier heights and widths can be as large as 2 eV and 5 Å, respectively. Finally, to gain information about the average properties of the measured junction, we fit the conductance calculated within the Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin approximation to the experimental data and interpret the fit parameters with the help of the DFT results.

  12. Probing and modelling the localized self-mixing in a GaN/AlGaN field-effect terahertz detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, J. D.; Qin, H.; Lewis, R. A.; Sun, Y. F.; Zhang, X. Y.; Cai, Y.; Wu, D. M.; Zhang, B. S.

    2012-04-01

    In our previous work [Sun et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 100, 013506 (2012)], we inferred the existence of localized self-mixing in an antenna-coupled field-effect terahertz detector. In this Letter, we report a quasistatic self-mixing model taking into account the localized terahertz fields and its verification by comparing the simulated results with the experimental data in a two-dimensional space of the gate voltage and the drain/source bias. The model well describes the detector characteristics: not only the magnitude, but also the polarity, of the photocurrent can be tuned. The existence of strongly localized self-mixing in such detectors is confirmed.

  13. Taylor-Couette flow control by amplitude variation of the inner cylinder cross-section oscillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oualli, Hamid; Mekadem, Mahmoud; Lebbi, Mohamed; Bouabdallah, Ahcene

    2015-07-01

    The hydrodynamic stability of a viscous fluid flow evolving in an annular space between a rotating inner cylinder with a periodically variable radius and an outer fixed cylinder is considered. The basic flow is axis-symmetric with two counter-rotating vortices each wavelength along the whole filled system length. The numerical simulations are implemented on the commercial Fluent software package, a finite-volume CFD code. It is aimed to make investigation of the early flow transition with assessment of the flow response to radial pulsatile motion superimposed to the inner cylinder cross-section as an extension of a previous developed work in Oualli et al. [H. Oualli, A. Lalaoua, S. Hanchi, A. Bouabdallah, Eur. Phys. J. Appl. Phys. 61, 11102 (2013)] where a comparative controlling strategy is applied to the outer cylinder. The same basic system is considered with similar calculating parameters and procedure. In Oualli et al. [H. Oualli, A. Lalaoua, S. Hanchi, A. Bouabdallah, Eur. Phys. J. Appl. Phys. 61, 11102 (2013)], it is concluded that for the actuated outer cylinder and relatively to the non-controlled case, the critical Taylor number, Tac1, characterizing the first instability onset illustrated by the piled Taylor vortices along the gap, increases substantially to reach a growing rate of 70% when the deforming amplitude is ɛ = 15%. Interestingly, when this controlling strategy is applied to the inner cylinder cross-section with a slight modification of the actuating law, this tendency completely inverts and the critical Taylor number decreases sharply from Tac1 = 41.33 to Tac1 = 17.66 for ɛ = 5%, corresponding to a reduction rate of 57%. Fundamentally, this result is interesting and can be interpreted by prematurely triggering instabilities resulting in rapid development of flow turbulence. Practically, important applicative aspects can be met in several industry areas where substantial intensification of transport phenomena (mass, momentum and heat) is

  14. Origins of low resistivity in Al ion-implanted ZnO bulk single crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Oga, T.; Izawa, Y.; Kuriyama, K.; Kushida, K.; Kinomura, A.

    2011-06-15

    The origins of low resistivity in Al ion-implanted ZnO bulk single crystals are studied by combining Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS), nuclear reaction analysis (NRA), photoluminescence (PL), and Van der Pauw methods. The Al-ion implantation (peak concentration: 2.6 x 10{sup 20}cm{sup -3}) into ZnO is performed using a multiple-step energy. The resistivity decreases from {approx}10{sup 4{Omega}} cm for un-implanted ZnO to 1.4 x 10{sup -1{Omega}} cm for as-implanted, and reaches 6.0 x 10{sup -4{Omega}} cm for samples annealed at 1000 deg. C. RBS and NRA measurements for as-implanted ZnO suggest the existence of the lattice displacement of Zn (Zn{sub i}) and O (O{sub i}), respectively. After annealing at 1000 deg. C, the Zn{sub i} related defects remain and the O{sub i} related defects disappear. The origin of the low resistivity in the as-implanted sample is attributed to the Zn{sub i} ({approx}30 meV [Look et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 82, 2552 (1999)]). In contrast, the origin of the low resistivity in the sample annealed at 1000 deg. C is assigned to both of the Zn{sub i} related defects and the electrically activated Al donor. A new PL emission appears at around 3.32 eV after annealing at 1000 deg. C, suggesting electrically activated Al donors.

  15. Reflectance effects caused by refractive-index gradients of H2 samples loaded with 0.5-μm Al2O3 powder in diamond-anvil cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruoff, Arthur L.; Greene, Raymond G.; Ghandehari, Kouros; Xia, Qing

    1993-05-01

    This paper shows that there is doubtful basis for the claim of metallization of hydrogen as a result of optical studies in the diamond-anvil cell to date. The presence of fine Al2O3 particles in the hydrogen precludes a simple hydrogen-diamond interface; the graded index must be included and is shown to account for the observed behavior in H. K. Mao et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 65, 484 (1990)] and M. Hanfland et al. [Phys. Rev. B 43, 8767 (1991)]. The small reflectivity found on the published experiment (having only a tiny fraction of the diamond covered with Al2O3) at 161 GPa and a mentioned result at 160 GPa (with no Al2O3), both at room temperature, is very likely due to an absorption peak of hydrogen in diamond at 0.38 eV broadened by the stresses in the diamond anvil. Therefore, it must be shown that refractive-index gradients and/or hydrogen in diamond are not responsible for the observed reflectance before other claims are made.

  16. Relativity and Al^+ Optical Clocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, Chin-Wen; Hume, David B.; Wineland, David J.; Rosenband, Till

    2010-03-01

    We have constructed an optical clock based on quantum logic spectroscopy of an Al+ ion that has a fractional frequency inaccuracy of 8.6x10-18. The frequency of the ^1S0<->^3P0 clock transition is compared to that of a previously constructed Al^+ optical clock with a statistical measurement uncertainty of 7.0x10-18. The two clocks exhibit a relative stability of 2.8x10-15&-1/2circ;, and a fractional frequency difference of -1.8x10-17, consistent with the accuracy limit of the older clock. By comparing the frequencies of the clocks, we have observed relativistic effects, such as time dilation due to velocities less than 10 m/s and the gravitational red shift from a 0.33 m height change of one of the clocks.

  17. On the effect of the barrier widths in the InAs/AlSb/GaSb single-barrier interband tunneling structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, J. F.; Yang, L.; Wu, M. C.; Chu, S. N. G.; Cho, A. Y.

    1990-10-01

    The dependence of the interband tunneling current on AlSb barrier widths is studied in the InAs/AlSb/GaSb single-barrier diode structures. The experimental results show that the peak current density displays an exponential dependence on the barrier width. The Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin approximation combined with the kṡp two-band model were used in analyzing the energy level in the AlSb barrier through which the peak tunneling currents occur. The energy level thus obtained (0.48±0.10 eV above the valence band edge of the AlSb) agrees with the valence-band offset (0.40±0.15 eV) between the AlSb and the GaSb obtained by x-ray photoemission measurement reported by Gualtieri et al. [Appl. Phys. Lett. 49, 1037 (1986)]. By adjusting the barrier width properly, we obtained a high peak current density of 24 kA/cm2 (with a peak-to-valley ratio of 1.4) and a high peak-to-valley ratio of 4.5 (with a peak current density of 3.5 kA/cm2) at room temperature. In addition, the peak-current voltages for different AlSb barrier widths were calculated and compared with the measured results.

  18. [Coagulation behavior of Al13 species].

    PubMed

    Hu, Cheng-zhi; Liu, Hui-juan; Qu, Jiu-hui

    2006-12-01

    Coagulation behavior of Al13 species was examined in synthetic water with high alkalinity and high humic acid concentration from viewpoint of the transformation of Al hydrolysis products during the coagulation process. The results indicated that coagulation efficiency of Al coagulants positively correlated with the content of Al13 in the coagulation process. Aluminum chloride (AlCl3) was more effective than polyaluminum chloride (PACI) in removing turbidity and dissolved organic matter in the synthetic water because AlCl3 could not only generate Al13 species but also function as pH control agent in the coagulation process. During coagulation process pH control can improve coagulation process through regulating Al speciation, and AlCl3 benefited most from pH control.

  19. Synthesis of AlN/Al Polycrystals along with Al Nanoparticles Using Thermal Plasma Route

    SciTech Connect

    Kanhe, Nilesh S.; Nawale, A. B.; Kulkarni, N. V.; Bhoraskar, S. V.; Mathe, V. L.; Das, A. K.

    2011-07-15

    This paper for the first time reports the (200) oriented growth of hexagonal Aluminum nitride crystals during synthesis of aluminum nanoparticles in dc transferred arc thermal plasma reactor by gas phase condensation in nitrogen plasma. The structural and morphological study of as synthesized AlN crystal and aluminium nanoparticles was done by using the x-ray diffraction method, scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy.

  20. Investigations of Al-Dalang and Al-Hawashat meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gismelseed, A. M.; Abdallah, S. B.; Al-Rawas, A. D.; Al-Mabsali, F. N.; Widatallah, H. M.; Elzain, M. E.; Yousif, A. A.; Ericsson, T.; Annersten, H.

    2016-12-01

    Mössbauer spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements, and electron microprobe analysis (EMPA) have been performed on two meteorites named Al-Dalang and Al-Hawashat after identifying their falling sites in the Western region of Sudan. These two meteorites are ordinary chondrites with similar mineralogy. XRD and EMPA show that the two specimens consist of primary olivine, ortho-pyroxene and later crystallising clino-pyroxene as reaction rims against plagioclase. Fe-metal phases are dominated by kamacite (≈6 wt.% Ni) and minor amounts of tetrataenite (≈52 wt.% Ni). Troilite (FeS) and alabandite (MnS) are optically observed as sulphide phases. The Mössbauer measurements at 295 and 78 K are in agreement with the above characterizations, showing at least two paramagnetic doublets which are assigned to olivine and pyroxene and magnetic sextets assigned to kamacite (hyperfine field ≈33.5 T) and troilite FeS (hyperfine field ≈31 T).

  1. Al-Al2O3-Pd junction hydrogen sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okuyama, K.; Takinami, N.; Chiba, Y.; Ohshima, S.; Kambe, S.

    1994-07-01

    Al-Al2O3-Pd MIM (metal insulator metal) junctions fabricated on a glass substrate were tested as hydrogen sensors. The I-V (current versus voltage) characteristics of the junctions were measured at room temperature in a vacuum of 10-5 Torr and in H2 gas of 10-2-100 Torr. A significant increase in the current was observed upon introduction of H2 gas. This phenomenon is believed to occur due to the work function lowering of the hydrogen-absorbed Pd top electrode. The rise time was on the order of minutes, while the recovery time when hydrogen was purged was more than 20 h. However, when the junction was placed in an oxidizing ambient such as air, the recovery time was drastically reduced to the order of minutes, indicating that the device is operative as a hydrogen sensor in the atmospheric ambient. Hydrogen adsorption and desorption behavior of the Pd film was also investigated using a Pd coated quartz microbalance, and the results explained the current response of the Pd MIM junction to hydrogen in the presence of oxygen.

  2. Ab initio modeling of zincblende AlN layer in Al-AlN-TiN multilayers

    DOE PAGES

    Yadav, S. K.; Wang, J.; Liu, X. -Y.

    2016-06-13

    An unusual growth mechanism of metastable zincblende AlN thin film by diffusion of nitrogen atoms into Al lattice is established. Using first-principles density functional theory, we studied the possibility of thermodynamic stability of AlN as a zincblende phase due to epitaxial strains and interface effect, which fails to explain the formation of zincblende AlN. We then compared the formation energetics of rocksalt and zincblende AlN in fcc Al through direct diffusion of nitrogen atoms to Al octahedral and tetrahedral interstitials. Furthermore, the formation of a zincblende AlN thin film is determined to be a kinetically driven process, not a thermodynamicallymore » driven process.« less

  3. New Particle Formation Events During 2013 in Hada Al Sham, Saudi-Arabia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neitola, K.; Hyvärinen, A.; Lihavainen, H.; Alghamdi, M.; Hussein, T.; Khodeir, M.; Shehata, A.; Laaksonen, A. J.; Kulmala, M. T.

    2014-12-01

    clear growth, S is clear shrinkage, G + S is both growth and shrinkage and unclear is not clear in either way.ReferencesM. Dal Maso, et al. (2005). Bor. Env. Res., 10, 323-336.M. Kulmala, et al. (2006). Atmos. Chem. Phys., 6, 787-793. M. Kulmala, et al. (2013). Science, 336, 943-946.

  4. Microstructure and magnetic microstructure of the Pr 60Al 10Ni 10Cu 20-xFe x ( x=0, 4, 10, 15, 18) alloys observed by magnetic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Z. Y.; Han, S. H.; Wang, Y. T.; Wang, W. H.; Han, B. S.

    2005-03-01

    The microstructure and magnetic microstructure of the Pr 60Al 10Ni 10Cu 20-xFe x ( x=0, 4, 10, 15, 18) alloys have been achieved simultaneously by employing a magnetic force microscope directly on the as-cast cylinder rod surface for the first time. By varying the content of Fe, the microstructure of the Pr-based alloy changes progressively from a full glassy state to a composite state with nanocrystalline particles embedded in the glassy matrix, and finally into a nanostructured state. The accompanying magnetic property gradually changes from paramagnetic to hard. The experiment directly evidences the existence of exchange coupling between the crystallites and the variety of the grain-size-dependent magnetic properties can be well explained by Löffler et al.'s new random-anisotropy model (Löffler, et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 85 (9) (2000) 1990).

  5. Bond ionicities in CuBC2 chalcogenides (B=Al, Ga, In; C=S, Se, Te)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merino, J. M.; Díaz, R.; León, M.

    2000-04-01

    The bond ionicities, fi,Cu-C and fi,BC of several CuBC2 (B=Al, Ga, In, and C=S, Se, Te) chalcopyrite compounds are estimated by means of the Phillips-Van Vechten dielectric theory for binary tetrahedral compounds and Levine's extension to multibond crystals in the same way as Neumann [Crystal Res. Technol. 18, 1299 (1983)]. The influence of Cu 3d electrons has been taken into account considering Jaffe-Zunger [Phys. Rev. B 29, 1882 (1984)] band-structure calculations in chalcopyrite compounds, and performing a simple extrapolation for Te compounds. The Cu-C bond susceptibilities have been estimated from the static dielectric constant values obtained by Márquez and Rincón [Phys. Status Solidi B 191, 115 (1995)], and a set of Cu-C bond susceptibilities is proposed. The evaluated fi,Cu-C bond ionicities were found to increase with the atomic fractional coordinate of the C atom, x[anion], indicating that the anion position is a good estimation of the Cu-C bond ionicity.

  6. Conductivity of the two-dimensional electron gas at LaAlO3/SrTiO3 interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirichenko, E. V.; Stephanovich, V. A.; Dugaev, V. K.

    2017-02-01

    We propose an analytical theory of metallic conductivity in the two-dimensional (2D) LaAlO3/SrTiO3 (LAO/STO) interface. For that we consider the electron-phonon interaction at the interface. The electronic part is taken from our previous work [Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 18, 2104 (2016), 10.1039/C5CP06627A], considering the conditions for the interfacial charge carrier (electron or hole) to become itinerant. The second ingredient deals with the atomic oscillations localized near the interface and decaying rapidly at its both sides, which can be regarded as 2D acoustic phonons. The dispersion of such phonons depends on the characteristics of phonon spectra of LAO and STO. Calculating the corresponding scattering rate by Fermi's golden rule, we show that the resulting resistivity (i.e., inverse conductivity) has typical metallic character, growing linearly with temperature and tending to zero (without defects forming so-called residual resistivity) at T →0 . The results of our calculations are in agreement with available experimental data.

  7. NiAl-base composite containing high volume fraction of AlN for advanced engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hebsur, Mohan (Inventor); Whittenbeger, John D. (Inventor); Lowell, Carl F. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A particulate reinforced NiAl-AlN composite alloy has a NiAl matrix and greater than about 13 volume percent fine particles of AlN within the matrix. The particles preferably have a diameter from about 15 nanometers to about 50 nanometers. The particulate reinforced NiAl-AlN composite alloy may be prepared by cryomilling prealloyed NiAl in liquid nitrogen using grinding media having a diameter of from about 2 to 6 mm at an impeller speed of from about 450 RPM to about 800 RPM. The cryomilling may be done for a duration of from about 4 hours to about 20 hours to obtain a cryomilled powder. The cryomilled powder may be consolidated to form the particulate reinforced NiAl-AlN composite alloy. The particulate reinforced alloy can further include a toughening alloy. The toughening alloy may include NiCrAlY, FeCrAlY, and FeAl.

  8. Reflection of waves from slowly decaying complex permittivity profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horsley, S. A. R.; Artoni, M.; La Rocca, G. C.

    2016-12-01

    Wave propagation through rapidly but continuously varying media is surprisingly subtle, and in a pair of recent papers [Horsley et al., J. Opt. 18, 044016 (2016), 10.1088/2040-8978/18/4/044016; Longhi, Eur. Phys. Lett. 112, 64001 (2015), 10.1209/0295-5075/112/64001] it was found that planar media with a spatially varying permittivity ɛ (x ) obeying the spatial Kramers-Kronig relations do not reflect waves incident from one side, however rapid the changes in ɛ (x ) . Within this large class of media there are some examples where the dissipation or gain is not asymptotically negligible and it has been pointed out [Longhi, Eur. Phys. Lett. 112, 64001 (2015), 10.1209/0295-5075/112/64001] that it is impossible to define meaningful reflection and transmission coefficients in such cases. Here we show—using an exactly soluble example—that despite the lack of any meaningful reflection and transmission coefficients, these profiles are still reflectionless from one side in the sense that the profile generates no counterpropagating wave for incidence from one side. This finding is demonstrated through examining the propagation of pulses through the profile, where from one side we find that no second reflected pulse is generated, while from the other there is. We conclude with a discussion of the effect of truncating these infinitely extended profiles, illustrating how the reflectionless behavior may be retained over a wide range of incident angles.

  9. Investigations of the structural stability of highly strained [(Al)GaIn]As/Ga (PAs) multiple quantum wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marschner, T.; Lutgen, S.; Volk, M.; Stolz, W.; Göbel, E. O.

    1996-10-01

    The structural stability of highly strained [(Al)GaIn]As/Ga (PAs) strained layer superlattice (SLS) structures as a function of the average lattice mismatch is investigated. The SLS structures, grown by metalorganic vapor-phase epitaxy, are studied by using high-resolution x-ray diffraction. The range of stable SLS structures obtained experimentally is compared to a recent theoretical model assuming strain relaxation by formation of misfit dislocations [D. C. Houghton, M. Davies, and M. Dion, Appl. Phys. Lett. 64, 505 (1994)]. In particular, the influence of the surface migration length of the group-III species on the growth surface is investigated by varying the Al concentration in the compressively strained [(Al)GaIn]As layers. Structurally stable [(Al)GaIn]As/Ga(PAs) SLS structures having a total layer thickness of 1 μm and an average lattice mismatch of up to (Δd/d)⊥=1.2×10-2 have been realized. These values exceed by far the values of the misfit dislocation model. This behavior indicates that surface morphology changes rather than misfit dislocation formation are the primary cause for the instability of highly strained SLSs.

  10. Electronic structure of interfaces between insulating LaAlO3 and SrTiO3 perovskite oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Min Sik; Rhim, S. H.; Freeman, A. J.

    2006-03-01

    Since heteroepitaxial structures of perovskite oxides are potent candidates for multifunctional devices, understanding their interface properties is very important for applications, because they often show completely different properties from bulk. Recently, interfaces between the wide-band gap insulators of LaAlO3 and SrTiO3, were found to be insulating when hole-doped, and conducting when electron-doped. First-principles calculations with the highly precise full-potential linearized augmented plane wave (FLAPW) method for the stoichiometric compounds on [001] superlattices composed of perovskite unit cells of LaAlO3 and SrTiO3, show metallicity in both the hole-doped AlO2/SrO and electron-doped LaO/TiO2 interfaces, even with inclusion of geometry relaxation. Only by considering oxygen vacancies is the experimental result of insulating behavior in the hole-doped AlO2/SrO interface obtained. A. Ohtommo and H. Y. Hwang, Nature 427, 423 (2004). Wimmer, Krakauer, Weinert, Freeman, Phys.Rev.B, 24, 864 (1981)

  11. An AES and SIMS study of the effect of temperature on the interaction of oxygen with Al(100)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauderback, L. L.; Larson, S. A.

    1990-07-01

    Oxygen in chemisorbed, oxide and mixed chemisorbed/oxide layers deposited on Al(100) at 300 K is shown to be essentially immobile with respect to migration across the surface and with respect to diffusion into the subsurface for temperatures up to ˜ 700 K. The immobility of chemisorbed oxygen prevents it from being thermally converted to the oxide for temperatures up to 700 K. It is argued, in accord with the predictions of ab-initio calculations [K.L. Bedford and A.B. Kunz, Phys. Rev. B 25 (1982) 2119], that the immobility of chemisorbed oxygen on Al(100) is consistent with the adsorption of oxygen within or slightly below the surface Al plane at fourfold hollow sites. Increasing the temperature of the Al(100) surface during oxygen adsorption is shown to enhance subsurface oxidation even though increasing the surface temperature in UHV following oxygen adsorption at 300 K does not cause diffusion of oxygen into the subsurface or enhance oxide formation.

  12. Electron and Composite Fermion Transport in MOCVD Grown GaAs/AlGaAs Heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zudov, M. A.; Du, R. R.; Simmons, J. A.; Chui, H. C.

    1996-03-01

    Previously, high quality fractional quantum Hall effect(FQHE) data was accessible only from MBE-grown heterostructures. Sandia National Labs has recently grown high purity MOCVD GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructure with 2DEG mobility of 2.0x10^6 cm^2/Vs[1]. Material parameters such as impurity potential profile, defects and interface quality are expected to be modified for MOCVD. While these are believed to affect predominantly the carrier scattering in 2DEG, their effects on quantum transport properties (in particular the experimental effective mass and spin g-factor of composite fermions) are also worth examination. We report on temperature-dependent Shubnikov -de Haas(SdH) oscillations near zero magnetic field, SdH near Landau level filling factor ν = 1/2, 3/2, and angular dependent magnetoresistance mesurements on the FQHE states around ν = 3/2 in high-density (up to 3.2x10^11 cm-2) MOCVD samples. Measurements were performed in a 20mK/20T ^3He-^4He mixture dilution refrigerator. Our results around ν = 3/2 conform to the same composite fermion level scheme obtained earlier for low-density MBE samples[2]. [1] H. C. Chui, B. E. Hammons, N. E. Harff, J. A. Simmons and M. E. Sherwin, to appear in Appl. Phys. Lett. [2] R. R. Du, A. S. Yeh, H. L. Stormer, D. C. Tsui, L. N. Pfeifer, K. W. West, Phys. Rev. Lett. 75, 3926(1995)

  13. Benefits for Military Veterans with ALS

    MedlinePlus

    ... Advocate Get Involved Donate Military Veterans Resources for Military Veterans, Families & Survivors The ALS Association is working everyday to ... and Caregivers Newly Diagnosed Clinical Trials Familial ALS Military Veterans For Caregivers Resources Read stories ... Site ...

  14. Cenomanian-Turonian biostratigraphy of the Jardas Al Abid area, Al Jabal Al Akhdar, northeast Libya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Qot, Gamal M.; Abdulsamad, Esam O.

    2016-09-01

    The Upper Cenomanian-Turonian succession exposed at Jardas al'Abid area consists mainly of carbonates with siliciclastic intercalations. This succession is subdivided lithostratigraphically into: Qasr al'Abid (Late Cenomanian) and Al Baniyah (Late Cenomanian-Coniacian) formations. This sequence is relatively rich in macrofossil assemblages especially bivalves, gastropods, and echinoids with rare ammonites. Based on the first occurrence (FO) and last occurrence (LO) of some index species of these macrofossil groups, an integrated biostratigraphic framework has been constructed. The studied Cenomanian-Turonian sequence is subdivided biostratigraphically into three ammonite biozones; Pseudaspidoceras pseudonodosoides Total Range Zone, Choffaticeras segne Total Range Zone, and Coilopoceras requienianum Total Range Zone. Based on the rest of macrofossil assemblages other than the ammonites, eight biozones were recognized; Mecaster batnensis Total Range Zone, Ceratostreon flabellatum-Neithea dutrugei Acme Zone, Costagyra olisiponensis Acme Zone, Pycnodonte (Phygraea) vesicularis vesiculosa Acme Zone, Mytiloides labiatus Total Range Zone = Mecaster turonensis Acme Zone, Rachiosoma rectilineatum-Curvostrea rouvillei-Tylostoma (T.) globosum Assemblage Zone, Radiolites sp.-Apricardia? matheroni Total Range Zone, and Nerinea requieniana Total Range Zone. Most of the proposed biozones are recorded for the first time from Libya. The integration among these biozones as well as local and inter-regional correlation of the biozones have been discussed. The stage boundaries of the studied stratigraphic intervals are discussed, where the Cenomanian/Turonian boundary is delineated at the last occurrence (LO) of Pseudaspidoceras pseudonodosoides (Choffat), while the Turonian/Coniacian boundary is delineated arbitrary being agree with the LO of the Turonian fauna.

  15. Effects of the Al content on pore structures of porous TieAl alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Jaing, Y; He, Y H; Xu, N P; Zou, J; Huang, B; Lui, C T

    2008-01-01

    Porous TieAl alloys with different nominal compositions were fabricated through a reactive synthesis of Ti and Al elemental powders. It has been found that the pore parameters vary with the Al contents, indicating that the nature of the pores can be manipulated through changing the Al contents. In addition, detailed structural characterizations showed that the fabricated porous TieAl alloys can have three crystalline phases (i.e., a2-Ti3Al, g-TiAl, and TiAl3) when using different compositions. The fundamental reasons behind these phenomena have been explored.

  16. Determination of the structure factor of simple liquid metals from the pseudopotential theory and optimized random-phase approximation: Application to Al and Ga

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bretonnet, J. L.; Regnaut, C.

    1985-04-01

    We present the results of calculations of the static structure factor S(q) of liquid Al and Ga at the melting point. These calculations were motivated because many simple liquid metals exhibit structure anomalies taking the form of a shoulder on the main peak or even an asymmetry in the peak itself, while other liquid metals are correctly predicted by the standard models of liquid structure. Al and Ga have similar valence, electronic density, and size of their ionic radius; therefore, their pair potentials are somewhat similar. Despite this, their structure factors display most of the differences that can be observed among the variety of liquid metals. Starting from the Shaw optimized model potential [Phys. Rev. 174, 769 (1968)], a pair potential is constructed. A comparative examination of the electron-gas response function of Vashishta and Singwi [Phys. Rev. B 6, 875 (1972)] and of Ichimaru and Utsumi [Phys. Rev. B 24, 7385 (1981)] is carried out. Different depletion hole distributions are also used and full nonlocality is taken into account through effective masses. So S(q) is calculated by means of the optimized random-phase approximation. Particular attention is also devoted to the low-q region. By comparison with Monte Carlo computation, we show the limitation of various thermodynamic perturbation methods, such as the random-phase approximation or the soft-sphere model. The study of S(q) provides a stringent test of the model potential, where the electron-ion pseudopotential and the local-field correction are of prime importance, but where effective masses and depletion hole distribution may also have a role to play.

  17. Photoelectrical, photophysical and photocatalytic properties of Al based MOFs: MIL-53(Al) and MIL-53-NH2(Al)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Yang; Li, Huiliang; Liu, Yuanyuan; Huang, Baibiao; Sun, Qilong; Dai, Ying; Qin, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Xiaoyang

    2016-01-01

    Two Al based MOFs (MIL-53(Al) and MIL-53-NH2 (Al)) were synthesized, and their photoelectrical, photophysical and photocatalytic properties towards oxygen evolution from water were investigated. Different from the ligand to metal charge transfer process previously reported, we proposes a new photocatalytic mechanism based on electron tunneling according to the results of theoretical calculation, steady state and time resolved fluorescence spectra. The organic linkers absorb photons, giving rise to electrons and holes. Then, the photogenerated electrons tunnel through the AlO6-octahedra, which not only inhibit the recombination of photogenerated charge carriers, but also is a key factor to the photocatalytic activity of Al based MOFs.

  18. Framework Al zoning in zeolite ECR-1.

    PubMed

    Shin, Jiho; Ahn, Nak Ho; Cho, Sung June; Ren, Limin; Xiao, Feng-Shou; Hong, Suk Bong

    2014-02-25

    Rietveld analyses of the synchrotron X-ray diffraction data for various cation forms of zeolite ECR-1 have demonstrated framework Al zoning, which parallels the alternation of Al-rich maz and Al-poor mor layers. This can be further supported by notable differences in the average bond valence of its 10 crystallographically distinct tetrahedral sites.

  19. Magneto-transport in InAs/AlGaSb open quantum dot structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maemoto, Toshihiko; Kobayashi, Tetsuji; Kitamura, Yoji; Karasaki, Moritomo; Kita, Toshihiro; Sasa, Shigehiko; Inoue, Masataka; Ishibashi, Koji; Aoyagi, Yoshinobu

    2001-03-01

    We report on the magneto-transport properties in InAs/AlGaSb open quantum dot structures, in which electron interference should be an important process. The open dot structures such as the square or circle cavities with sub-micron scale have been fabricated by electron beam lithography. Since the device size is small enough to be less than the elastic mean free path, the electron transport is expected to be predominantly ballistic in nature. Oscillations or fluctuations of magnetoresistance have been observed from low magnetic fields below 1 T, which were not seen in the conventional devices. The periodic fluctuations indicate the important effect of electric wave interference in the quantum dot structures. The large and simple structures of magnetoresistance fluctuations can be analyzed from the semi-classical scattering trajectory depending on the geometrical feature of the devices. In addition to these large-period magneto-oscillations, the short-period magnetoresistance fluctuations have been also observed even at 4.2K [1]. These fluctuations may result from the complex modes of the interference electron waves possibly characterized by highly characteristic wave function scattering [2]. From the analyses of correlation functions of these oscillations, interference of electron waves in the InAs/AlGaSb open quantum dot structures will be discussed. [1] T. Maemoto, M. Ichiu, A. Ohya, S. Sasa, M. Inoue, K. Ishibashi, Y. Aoyagi, Physica B 272, 110 (1999). [2] R. Akis, D. K. Ferry, and J. P. Bird, Phys. Rev. Lett. 79, 123 (1997).

  20. Opportunity's 'Rub al Khali' Panorama

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on the image for Opportunity's 'Rub al Khali' Panorama (QTVR)

    This panoramic image, dubbed 'Rub al Khali,' was acquired by NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity on the plains of Meridiani during the period from the rover's 456th to 464th sols on Mars (May 6 to May 14, 2005). Opportunity was about 2 kilometers (1.2 miles) south of 'Endurance Crater' at a place known informally as 'Purgatory Dune.'

    The rover was stuck in the dune's deep fine sand for more than a month. 'Rub al Khali' (Arabic translation: 'the empty quarter') was chosen as the name for this panorama because it is the name of a similarly barren, desolate part of the Saudi Arabian desert on Earth.

    The view spans 360 degrees. It consists of images obtained in 97 individual pointings of the panoramic camera. The camera took images with five camera filters at each pointing. This 22,780-by-6,000-pixel mosaic is an approximately true-color rendering generated using the images acquired through filters admitting light wavelengths of 750, 530, and 480 nanometers.

    Lighting varied during the nine sols it took to acquire this panorama, resulting in some small image seams within the mosaic. These seams have been smoothed in sky parts of the mosaic to better simulate the vista that a person would see if able to view it all at the same time on Mars.

    Opportunity's tracks leading back to the north (center of the panorama) are a reminder of the rover's long trek from Endurance Crater. The deep ruts dug by Opportunity's wheels as it became stuck in the sand appear in the foreground. The crest and trough of the last ripple the rover crossed before getting stuck is visible in the center. These wind-formed sand features are only about 10 to 15 centimeters (4 to 6 inches) tall. The crest of the actual ripple where the rover got stuck can be seen just to the right of center. The tracks and a few other places on and near ripple crests can

  1. Instandhaltungsmanagement als Gestaltungsfeld Ganzheitlicher Produktionssysteme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dombrowski, Uwe; Schulze, Sven; Otano, Isabel Crespo

    Sich kontinuierlich verändernde Rahmenbedingungen, wie beispielsweise eine steigende Variantenvielfalt, verkürzte Produktlebenszyklen sowie Kundenforderungen nach höherer Qualität, kürzeren Lieferzeiten und geringeren Kosten, fordern von produzierenden Unternehmen eine stetige Anpassung der Prozesse, der Organisation und der Strukturen. Seit den 90er Jahren versuchen immer mehr deutsche Unternehmen diesen veränderten Anforderungen mit der Einführung eines Ganzheitlichen Produktionssystems (GPS) zu begegnen. Ganzheitliche Produktionssysteme sind dabei in ihren Grundlagen an das Toyota Produktionssystem angelehnt, vereinigen aber auch weitere Methoden zu einem unternehmensspezifischen Regelwerk. Im Rahmen des langfristigen Trends zu unternehmensindividuellen Produktionssystemen wird sowohl in der Industrie als auch in der Forschung intensiv über das Toyota Produktionssystem, Lean Production, Lean Management und Ganzheitliche Produktionssysteme diskutiert, werden Konzepte zu Implementierung und Betrieb erstellt und die Wirtschaftlichkeit untersucht.

  2. Systems Engineering Techniques for ALS Decision Making

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriquez, Luis F.; Drysdale, Alan E.; Jones, Harry; Levri, Julie A.

    2004-01-01

    The Advanced Life Support (ALS) Metric is the predominant tool for predicting the cost of ALS systems. Metric goals for the ALS Program are daunting, requiring a threefold increase in the ALS Metric by 2010. Confounding the problem, the rate new ALS technologies reach the maturity required for consideration in the ALS Metric and the rate at which new configurations are developed is slow, limiting the search space and potentially giving the perspective of a ALS technology, the ALS Metric may remain elusive. This paper is a sequel to a paper published in the proceedings of the 2003 ICES conference entitled, "Managing to the metric: an approach to optimizing life support costs." The conclusions of that paper state that the largest contributors to the ALS Metric should be targeted by ALS researchers and management for maximum metric reductions. Certainly, these areas potentially offer large potential benefits to future ALS missions; however, the ALS Metric is not the only decision-making tool available to the community. To facilitate decision-making within the ALS community a combination of metrics should be utilized, such as the Equivalent System Mass (ESM)-based ALS metric, but also those available through techniques such as life cycle costing and faithful consideration of the sensitivity of the assumed models and data. Often a lack of data is cited as the reason why these techniques are not considered for utilization. An existing database development effort within the ALS community, known as OPIS, may provide the opportunity to collect the necessary information to enable the proposed systems analyses. A review of these additional analysis techniques is provided, focusing on the data necessary to enable these. The discussion is concluded by proposing how the data may be utilized by analysts in the future.

  3. Wear behavior of Al-Al{sub 3}Ti composite manufactured by a centrifugal method

    SciTech Connect

    Watanabe, Yoshimi; Yamanaka, Noboru; Fukui, Yasuyoshi

    1999-12-01

    The purpose of the present study was to develop a wear-resistant, light Al-Al{sub 3}Ti composite material. An Al-Al{sub 3}Ti composite specimen was machined from a thick-walled tube of Al-Al{sub 3}Ti functionally graded material (FGM) manufactured by the centrifugal method from a commercial ingot of Al-5 mass% Ti master alloy. The alloy was heated to a temperature where solid Al{sub 3}Ti particles resided in a liquid Al matrix, and then the centrifugal method was carried out. Al{sub 3}Ti particles in a commercial alloy ingot exist as platelets, and this shape was maintained through the casting. Three kinds of wear specimens were prepared, taking into account the morphology of the Al{sub 3}Ti particles in the thick-walled FGM tube; the Al{sub 3}Ti particles were arranged with their platelet planes nearly normal to the radial direction as a result of the applied centrifugal force. The wear resistance of the Al-Al{sub 3}Ti composite was significantly higher than that of pure Al. Wear-resistance anisotropy and dissolution of the Al{sub 3}Ti into the Al matrix at the near-surface region, around 100 {micro}m in depth, were also observed. The mechanism of the supersaturated-layer formation and the origin of the anisotropic wear resistance are discussed.

  4. Fabrication and characterization of InAlN/GaN-based double-channel high electron mobility transistors for electronic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, JunShuai; Zhang, JinCheng; Zhang, Kai; Zhao, Yi; Zhang, LinXia; Ma, XiaoHua; Li, XiaoGang; Meng, FanNa; Hao, Yue

    2012-06-01

    In our previous work [J. S. Xue et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 100, 013507 (2012)], superior electron-transport properties are obtained in InAlN/GaN/InAlN/GaN double-channel (DC) heterostructures grown by pulsed metal organic chemical vapor deposition (PMOCVD). In this paper, we present a detailed fabrication and systematic characterization of high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs) fabricated on these heterostructures. The device exhibits distinct DC behavior concerning with both static-output and small-signal performance, demonstrating an improved maximum drain current density of 1059 mA/mm and an enhanced transconductance of 223 mS/mm. Such enhancement of device performance is attributed to the achieved low Ohmic contact resistance as low as 0.33 ± 0.05 Ω.mm. Moreover, very low gate diode reverse leakage current is observed due to the high quality of InAlN barrier layer deposited by PMOCVD. A current gain frequency of 10 GHz and a maximum oscillation frequency 21 GHz are also observed, which are comparable to the state-of-the-art AlGaN/GaN-based DC HEMT found in the literature. The results demonstrate the great potential of PMOCVD for application in InAlN-related device's epitaxy.

  5. Magnetism of Al-substituted magnetite reduced from Al-hematite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Zhaoxia; Liu, Qingsong; Zhao, Xiang; Roberts, Andrew P.; Heslop, David; Barrón, Vidal; Torrent, José

    2016-06-01

    Aluminum-substituted magnetite (Al-magnetite) reduced from Al-substituted hematite or goethite (Al-hematite or Al-goethite) is an environmentally important constituent of magnetically enhanced soils. In order to characterize the magnetic properties of Al-magnetite, two series of Al-magnetite samples were synthesized through reduction of Al-hematite by a mixed gas (80% CO2 and 20% CO) at 395°C for 72 h in a quartz tube furnace. Al-magnetite samples inherited the morphology of their parent Al-hematite samples, but only those transformed from Al-hematite synthesized at low temperature possessed surficial micropores, which originated from the release of structural water during heating. Surface micropores could thus serve as a practical fingerprint of fire or other high-temperature mineralogical alteration processes in natural environments, e.g., shear friction in seismic zones. In addition, Al substitution greatly affects the magnetic properties of Al-magnetite. For example, coercivity (Bc) increases with increasing Al content and then decreases slightly, while the saturation magnetization (Ms), Curie temperature (Tc), and Verwey transition temperature (Tv) all decrease with increasing Al content due to crystal defect formation and dilution of magnetic ions caused by Al incorporation. Moreover, different trends in the correlation between Tc and Bc can be used to discriminate titanomagnetite from Al-magnetite, which is likely to be important in environmental and paleomagnetic studies, particularly in soil.

  6. Mid-infrared pump-related electric-field domains in GaAs/(Al,Ga)As quantum-cascade structures for terahertz lasing without population inversion

    SciTech Connect

    Giehler, M.; Wienold, M.; Schrottke, L.; Hey, R.; Grahn, H. T.; Pavlov, S. G.; Huebers, H.-W.; Winnerl, S.; Schneider, H.

    2011-11-15

    We investigate the effect of mid-infrared (MIR) pumping on the transport properties of GaAs/(Al,Ga)As terahertz (THz) quantum lasers (TQLs), which rely on quantum coherence effects of intersubband transitions. Aiming at THz lasing at elevated temperatures, we extend the concept of THz gain with and without population inversion of a single, MIR-pumped, electrically driven THz stage proposed by Waldmueller et al.[Phys. Rev. Lett. 99, 117401 (2007)] to an entire TQL. However, experiments using a CO{sub 2} as well as a free-electron laser and numerical simulations show that this resonant MIR pumping causes a negative differential conductivity (NDC) in addition to the NDC caused by sequential tunneling. Lasing of these TQLs is prevented by the formation of electric-field domains below the resonance field strength for gain of each single THz stage.

  7. Size-Selective Raman Scattering in Self-Assembled Ge/Si Quantum Dot Superlattices

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-06-01

    Peng and J. M. Zhou, Phys. Rev. B 59, 4980 (1999). [2] A. Milekhin, N. Stepina, A. Yakimov, A. Nikiforov, S . Schulze and D. R. T. Zahn, Eur Phys. J. B...16, 355 (2000). [3] A. Milekhin, N. Stepina, A. Yakimov, A. Nikiforov, S . Schulze , T.Kampen and D. R. T. Zahn, to published in Poceedings ofICPS-I 0

  8. Reply to Vance et al.

    SciTech Connect

    Woon-Chee Yee; Elliott, J.L; Kwon, J.M.; Goodfellow, P.

    1996-07-01

    In our report of a family with a motor and sensory polyneuropathy that was linked to chromosome 3q, we classified this neuropathy as a form of hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy II (HMSN II, also known as {open_quotes}CMT2{close_quotes}). Doubts have been raised by Vance et al. as to whether this neuropathy should be classified as hereditary sensory autonomic neuropathy I (HSAN I) instead of HMSN II. While it is reasonable to raise such doubts, we believe that the neuropathy is best designated as HMSN II for the reasons described below. The group of disorders described as HSAN are characterized by primary or predominant involvement of sensory and autonomic neurons that fail to develop or that undergo atrophy and degeneration. These disorders were extensively reviewed by Dyck and Ohta, who initially described them as the hereditary sensory neuropathies (HSN). It was Dyck who subsequently suggested that these disorders be designated HSAN rather than HSN, because of the presence of autonomic involvement. 8 refs.

  9. Growth and characterization of (In,Ga,Mn)As and (In,Al,Mn)As epilayers and heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maksimov, O.; Sheu, B. L.; Schiffer, P.; Samarth, N.

    2004-03-01

    Lattice-matched III-Mn-V semiconductors on InP (001) substrates provide an attractive route toward the design of more magnetically concentrated ferromagnetic semiconductor alloys [1]. Here, we report the low temperature molecular beam epitaxy of (In_0.5Ga_0.5)_1-xMn_xAs and (In_0.5Al_0.5)_1-xMn_xAs epilayers, heterostructures and superlattices. Electron and x-ray diffraction studies show that the samples have structural quality similar to that of the more extensively studied (In,Mn)As and (Ga,Mn)As ferromagnetic semiconductors. Electron probe microanalysis measurements indicate that up to ˜ 11 % of Mn can be incorporated in the alloys. Magnetization measurements with a superconducting quantum interference device show that (In_0.5Ga_0.5)_0.89Mn_0.11As and (In_0.5Al_0.5)_0.89Mn_0.11As epilayers have a Curie temperature (T_C) ranging up to 95 K and 25 K, respectively. The consistently lower values of TC in (In_0.5Al_0.5)_1-xMn_xAs compared to (In_0.5Ga_0.5)_1-xMn_xAs are attributed to a reduced hole density caused by an enhanced acceptor activation energy. Work supported by grants from DARPA, ONR and NSF. 1. S. Ohya, H. Kobayashi, M. Tanaka, Appl. Phys. Lett. 83, 2175 (2003).

  10. Dynamical spin injection into a two-dimensional electron gas in an AlGaAs/GaAs structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohtomo, Kenro; Ando, Yuichiro; Shinjo, Teruya; Uemura, Tetsuya; Shiraishi, Masashi

    A two-dimensional electron system in a GaAs-based heterostructure is the attractive platform for spintronics since it has high mobility and spin-orbit interaction can be modulated by the gate voltage1. Thus, it is a possible platform to realize electric gate-controlled spin transistor2. However, room-temperature spin transport through GaAs-based heterostructure has yet to be shown. We report first spin transport through the quantum well at GaAs/AlGaAs interface at room temperature. We used spin pumping under ferromagnetic resonance to inject spins from the Ni80Fe20 to the GaAs/AlGaAs quantum well. Generated spin current propagated through the 1 μm channel and was detected using spin-charge conversion inverse spin Hall effect in the Pt electrode. In agreement with spin pumping theory, polarity of the spin transport signal was reversed together with magnetization of the Ni80Fe20. This first demonstration of spin transport through a quantum well at a semiconductor heterostructure interface at room temperature opens a way to realize Datta-Das spin-based transistor.1 J. Nitta, et al., PRL 78, 1335 (1997). 2 S. Datta and B. Das, Appl. Phys. Lett. 56, 665 (1990).

  11. Growth and Stress-induced Transformation of Zinc blende AlN Layers in Al-AlN-TiN Multilayers

    PubMed Central

    Li, Nan; Yadav, Satyesh K.; Wang, Jian; Liu, Xiang-Yang; Misra, Amit

    2015-01-01

    AlN nanolayers in sputter deposited {111}Al/AlN/TiN multilayers exhibit the metastable zinc-blende-structure (z-AlN). Based on density function theory calculations, the growth of the z-AlN is ascribed to the kinetically and energetically favored nitridation of the deposited aluminium layer. In situ nanoindentation of the as-deposited {111}Al/AlN/TiN multilayers in a high-resolution transmission electron microscope revealed the z-AlN to wurzite AlN phase transformation through collective glide of Shockley partial dislocations on every two {111} planes of the z-AlN. PMID:26681109

  12. Growth and stress-induced transformation of zinc blende AlN layers in Al-AlN-TiN multilayers

    DOE PAGES

    Li, Nan; Yadav, Satyesh K.; Wang, Jian; ...

    2015-12-18

    We report that AlN nanolayers in sputter deposited {111}Al/AlN/TiN multilayers exhibit the metastable zinc-blende-structure (z-AlN). Based on density function theory calculations, the growth of the z-AlN is ascribed to the kinetically and energetically favored nitridation of the deposited aluminium layer. In situ nanoindentation of the as-deposited {111}Al/AlN/TiN multilayers in a high-resolution transmission electron microscope revealed the z-AlN to wurzite AlN phase transformation through collective glide of Shockley partial dislocations on every two {111} planes of the z-AlN.

  13. Orientation relationship of eutectoid FeAl and FeAl2

    PubMed Central

    Scherf, A.; Kauffmann, A.; Kauffmann-Weiss, S.; Scherer, T.; Li, X.; Stein, F.; Heilmaier, M.

    2016-01-01

    Fe–Al alloys in the aluminium range of 55–65 at.% exhibit a lamellar microstructure of B2-ordered FeAl and triclinic FeAl2, which is caused by a eutectoid decomposition of the high-temperature Fe5Al8 phase, the so-called ∊ phase. The orientation relationship of FeAl and FeAl2 has previously been studied by Bastin et al. [J. Cryst. Growth (1978 ▸), 43, 745] and Hirata et al. [Philos. Mag. Lett. (2008 ▸), 88, 491]. Since both results are based on different crystallographic data regarding FeAl2, the data are re-evaluated with respect to a recent re-determination of the FeAl2 phase provided by Chumak et al. [Acta Cryst. (2010 ▸), C66, i87]. It is found that both orientation relationships match subsequent to a rotation operation of 180° about a 〈112〉 crystallographic axis of FeAl or by applying the inversion symmetry of the FeAl2 crystal structure as suggested by the Chumak data set. Experimental evidence for the validity of the previously determined orientation relationships was found in as-cast fully lamellar material (random texture) as well as directionally solidified material (∼〈110〉FeAl || solidification direction) by means of orientation imaging microscopy and global texture measurements. In addition, a preferential interface between FeAl and FeAl2 was identified by means of trace analyses using cross sectioning with a focused ion beam. On the basis of these habit planes the orientation relationship between the two phases can be described by (01)FeAl || (114) and [111]FeAl || [10]. There is no evidence for twinning within FeAl lamellae or alternating orientations of FeAl lamellae. Based on the determined orientation and interface data, an atomistic model of the structure relationship of Fe5Al8, FeAl and FeAl2 in the vicinity of the eutectoid decomposition is derived. This model is analysed with respect to the strain which has to be accommodated at the interface of FeAl and FeAl2. PMID:27047304

  14. Reactivity of aluminum cluster anions with ammonia: selective etching of Al11(-) and Al12(-).

    PubMed

    Grubisic, Andrej; Li, Xiang; Gantefoer, Gerd; Bowen, Kit H; Schnöckel, Hansgeorg; Tenorio, Francisco J; Martinez, Ana

    2009-11-14

    Reactivity of aluminum cluster anions toward ammonia was studied via mass spectrometry. Highly selective etching of Al(11)(-) and Al(12)(-) was observed at low concentrations of ammonia. However, at sufficiently high concentrations of ammonia, all other sizes of aluminum cluster anions, except for Al(13)(-), were also observed to deplete. The disappearance of Al(11)(-) and Al(12)(-) was accompanied by concurrent production of Al(11)NH(3)(-) and Al(12)NH(3)(-) species, respectively. Theoretical simulations of the photoelectron spectrum of Al(11)NH(3)(-) showed conclusively that its ammonia moiety is chemisorbed without dissociation, although in the case of Al(12)NH(3)(-), dissociation of the ammonia moiety could not be excluded. Moreover, since differences in calculated Al(n)(-) + NH(3) (n=9-12) reaction energies were not able to explain the observed selective etching of Al(11)(-) and Al(12)(-), we concluded that thermodynamics plays only a minor role in determining the observed reactivity pattern, and that kinetics is the more influential factor. In particular, the conversion from the physisorbed Al(n)(-)(NH(3)) to chemisorbed Al(n)NH(3)(-) species is proposed as the likely rate-limiting step.

  15. First-principles study of the Al(001)-Al3Nb(001) interfacial properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Yanhong; Xu, Rui

    2017-03-01

    The adhesion, interfacial energy and bonding on fcc-Al(001)/D022-Al3Nb(001) interface were investigated using density functional calculations. Considering different terminations of Al3Nb(001) (Al+Nb-terminated and Al-terminated) and stacking sites (top-, bridge- and center-sites), six Al(001)/Al3Nb(001) models were calculated. For the models with same stacking site, Al+Nb-terminated model has larger work of adhesion (Wad) than the Al-terminated one. For the models with same termination, the work of adhesion increases, and the interface energy decreases as the order of center-sited, bridge-sited and top-sited. Al+Nb-terminated-center-sited and Al-terminated-center-sited models are more stable among six models. The interfacial bonding was discussed with analysis of valence electron density distribution and partial density of states (PDOS). The bonding is mainly contributed from Al-Nb covalent bonds and Al-Al metallic interactions.

  16. Interfacial Phenomena in Al/Al, Al/Cu, and Cu/Cu Joints Soldered Using an Al-Zn Alloy with Ag or Cu Additions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pstruś, Janusz; Gancarz, Tomasz

    2014-05-01

    The studies of soldered joints were carried out in systems: Al/solder/Al, Al/solder/Cu, Cu/solder/Cu, where the solder was (Al-Zn)EUT, (Al-Zn)EUT with 0.5, 1.0, and 1.5 at.% of Ag and (Al-Zn)EUT with 0.5, 1.0, and 1.5 at.% of Cu addition. Brazing was performed at 500 °C for 3 min. The EDS analysis indicated that the composition of the layers starting from the Cu pad was CuZn, Cu5Zn8, and CuZn4, respectively. Wetting tests were performed at 500 °C for 3, 8, 15, and 30 min, respectively. Thickness of the layers and their kinetics of growth were measured based on the SEM micrographs. The formation of interlayers was not observed from the side of Al pads. On the contrary, dissolution of the Al substrate and migration of Al-rich particles into the bulk of the solder were observed.

  17. Genetics of Familial and Sporadic ALS

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-04

    Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS); Familial Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis; Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis With Frontotemporal Dementia; Lou Gehrig's Disease; Motor Neuron Disease; Primary Lateral Sclerosis

  18. Preface: phys. stat. sol. (c) 1/9

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leitch, Andrew; Botha, Reinhardt

    2004-08-01

    The Conference on Photo-responsive Materials took place at the Kariega Game Reserve in the Eastern Cape, South Africa from 25-29 February 2004. More than 60 delegates from 12 different countries participated in the four-day event.The purpose of the conference was to bring together scientists working on various aspects of photo-responsive materials, so as to stimulate this important field of solid state physics in Southern Africa. As may be seen from the list of papers appearing in these proceedings, there was much interest in copper indium diselenide as a thin film material for photovoltaic applications. Also worth mentioning were the valuable contributions on ZnO, GaN and other materials that are currently attracting attention worldwide.The conference program allowed sufficient time for interaction and exchanging of views. Being in a game reserve in the heart of the beautiful Eastern Cape, delegates were also taken on game drives and had the opportunity of taking a river cruise up the Kariega River to view the majestic fish eagle.The members of the academic program committee were: Vivian Alberts (Rand Afrikaans University), Danie Auret (University of Pretoria), Darrell Comins (University of the Witwatersrand), and Reinhardt Botha and Andrew Leitch (University of Port E All papers appearing in these proceedings underwent a strict reviewing process separate from the conference. We express our appreciation to the referees for their diligence in this important task. The conference was organized by the Department of Physics at the University of Port Elizabeth, under the auspices of the Condensed Matter Physics and Materials Science (CMPMS) subgroup of the South African Institute of Physics. It was sponsored by EMF Limited (UK), Sensors Unlimited Inc. (USA), and Carl Zeiss (Pty) Ltd. Special thanks must go to Dr Eunete van Wyk for her professional assistance in the preparation of these proceedings.

  19. Preface: phys. stat. sol. (b) 242/2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szopa, Marek; Mierzejewski, Marcin; Lisowski, Mariusz

    2005-02-01

    This issue contains the Proceedings of the 28th International Conference of Theoretical Physics, ICTP2004 - Electron Correlations in Nano- and Macrosystems, which was held in Ustro, Poland, from 2-7 September 2004. ICTP2004 followed the series of conferences organized by the Institute of Physics of the University of Silesia in Katowice, devoted biannually to the physics of condensed matter.The main objective of the Conference was to bring together specialists working on the physics of electron correlations in nano- and macro-regimes, with the intention of enhancing their mutual understanding and cooperation. The Conference was an international forum for the presentation and discussion of novel scientific ideas and experimental results. The programme of the conference consisted of 25 invited lectures, 11 contributed lectures and 27 papers presented during poster session. The contributions were devoted to problems related to the following subjects: Transport in low dimensional systems Carbon nanotubes and fullerenes Non Fermi liquid systems Superconductivity and Magnetism Quantum phase transitions New materials in magnetoelectronics Among the participants were 88 scientists from 10 countries and 3 continents. The invited talks were presented by distinguished physicists: Hélène Bouchiat, Liviu Chibotaru, Ulrich Eckern, Klaus Ensslin, Jim Freericks, Raymond Frésard, Peter Hänggi, Heike Herper, Carsten Honerkamp, Helmut Keiter, Stefan Krompiewski, Tadeusz Lulek, Kazumi Maki, Nina Markovi, Roman Micnas, Volker Meden, Andrzej M. Ole, Thomas Pruschke, Marek Przybylski, Ken-ichi Sasaki, Uri Sivan, Józef Spaek, Frank Steglich, Michael Thorwart and Roland Zeyher. The Organizing Committee would like to express our gratitude to the International Scientific Committee and to all the speakers and contributors for their talks and posters. Special thanks are addressed to all the participants for their valuable discussions and stimulating atmosphere of the meeting. We express our thanks to the referees. Their work improved significantly the quality of papers presented in this issue. We are also indebted to the editorial staff of physica status solidi for their help. Our cooperation was smooth and efficient. Last but not least, we thank all the sponsors of the conference (see list).

  20. Preface: phys. stat. sol. (b) 241/10

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demkov, Alex; Gilmer, David; Liang, Yong; Fonseca, Leonardo; Liu, Chun-Li

    2004-08-01

    The following 15 papers were presented at the 5th Motorola Workshop on Computational Materials and Electronics held 13-14 November 2003 in Austin, Texas, USA . Not every talk given at the workshop is represented with a paper in this selection; however, the reader should be able to come up with a general picture and the scope of the workshop.Traditionally, the Motorola Workshop on Computational Materials and Electronics has covered materials theory, nano-device physics and semiconductor processing. The main focus of the 2003 Workshop was Alternative Gate Dielectrics for CMOS Technology. This year we again expanded the scope of the Workshop to include experiment, in addition to the computational materials, quantum transport, and molecular electronics. The participants came from fifteen US and one European university, four National Laboratories, International SEMATECH, and Motorola's Semiconductor and Corporate research organizations. The Workshop illustrates our continuing commitment to longer-term research, and to the research community. We hope you will enjoy the reading.

  1. Preface: phys. stat. sol. (b) 242/13

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esser, Norbert; Zahn, Dietrich R. T.

    2005-11-01

    Wolfgang Richter celebrated his 65th birthday on 2 January 2005. On such an occasion, usually marking retirement, achievements and breakthroughs in research are reviewed. But Wolfgang Richter is not retiring: he has accepted an offer of a professorship at the University Rome II Tor Vergata. As he explained to us with his famous smile, he plans to concentrate his future efforts even more on his true love in science - the optical diagnostics of interfaces.Wolfgang Richter has been working in the field of optical spectroscopy of solids since his PhD studies at the University of Cologne. Having finished his PhD in 1969 in the field of infrared spectroscopy he decided to reduce the probed volume by increasing the energy of probing photons: Raman spectroscopy! During his postdoctoral and Habilitation periods (1970-1979) at Pennsylvania State University, Max-Planck-Institut für Festkörperforschung, and RWTH Aachen, he pursued his interest in resonance Raman spectroscopy on semiconductors.In 1979 he received his first appointment as full professor at the University of Ulm. He returned to RWTH Aachen in 1981 and discovered his true destiny: semiconductor interfaces. At that time in the Department of Semiconductor Technology, metal-organic vapour phase epitaxy (MOVPE) was under development as a new technique for growing semiconductor layers. The underlying processes in MOVPE were known to be complex and very difficult to analyse with available experimental techniques, due to the unfriendly, reactive gas phase environment. Optical diagnostics turned out to be the key to a better understanding of MOVPE processes. Wolfgang Richter moved from RWTH Aachen to TU Berlin at the end of 1988 and began building a strong research group concentrating on interface analysis from two complementary sides: on the one hand, tracking MOVPE growth processes online by in situ optics and, on the other hand, advancing the fundamental understanding of optical spectra of interfaces by relating the optical response to atomic structures. Combining both aspects has finally led to considerable progress in surface and interface optics, as well as in vapour phase epitaxy and, moreover, the in situ optical tools developed are nowadays available as standard options in commercial MOVPE machines.The advances largely concerned the development of reflectance anisotropy spectroscopy and spectroscopic ellipsometry as in situ optical tools. However, considerable progress in Raman spectroscopy was also made: analysis of surfaces, ultrathin layers down to a single monolayer or even sub-monolayer coverages, and sub-wavelength spatial resolution were demonstrated in recent years. Current challenges concern, in particular, organic materials, molecule-solid interfaces and bio-interfaces, which will help in the development of many new applications and devices. Interfaces will play a crucial role in many of these developments and optical spectroscopy offers promising capabilities for analysing such interfaces. Wolfgang Richter and his group at University of Rome II Tor Vergata are sure to be active in this emerging field for a long time to come.Based on a symposium on Optical Spectroscopy of Interfaces at the Spring Meeting of the German Physical Society in Berlin 2005, we have asked former and present colleagues of Wolfgang Richter to contribute to this special issue of physica status solidi (b) on Advanced Optical Diagnostics of Surfaces, Nanostructures and Ultrathin Films. We think that the collection of 26 papers gives an excellent overview on recent achievements and future developments in the field of linear optics. In addition to a number of Original Papers on experimental work and some Review Articles, the issue includes examples of the current approaches of computational theory to solid state optics and interface optics. We hope that this issue will stimulate the expansion of the growing field of optical analysis of interfaces, nanostructures and ultrathin layers into new areas of basic and applied science. After the success in characterising inorganic materials, it is surely time that the potential of optical spectroscopy techniques for probing thin films and interfaces of composite (organic-inorganic) materials was considered.5 October 2005

  2. Editorial: phys. stat. sol. (a) 201/5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stutzmann, Martin

    2004-04-01

    Physica status solidi was founded in 1961 by a number of eminent solid state physicists as an attempt to overcome the iron curtain, which then separated East and West, at least in the field of science. Since that time our world has changed quite a bit, and so have the boundary conditions of science publishing. However, one thing has not changed: then as now, the general policy and development of a respectable scientific journal should be determined by a board of independent scientists, who volunteer to assume responsibility for the scientific content of the journal, to assure a fair and critical peer review process for all submitted manuscripts, and, in cases of conflict, to finally decide which papers will be published and which will not.As a matter of fact, an international Board of Editors which consists of scientists coming from different countries and continents, with a good reputation in their respective community, and without any conflict of interest with the Publisher of the journal is, in my opinion, these days more important than ever. As our daily scientific work becomes increasingly specialized, but at the same time also increasingly interdisciplinary, we are more and more forced to trust the quality and reliability of published scientific results in the literature, without really having a chance to come to an independent opinion on our own. This is one of the reasons why the many recent cases of plagiarism, scientific misconduct, or outright fraud have caused such a high level of public awareness. It is quite clear that without a serious peer review there would be an even larger number of such cases in the literature, and that without the responsible action taken by concerned Journal Editors, many of the revealed cases probably would have remained under the carpet.It is, therefore, a particular pleasure for me to introduce to you on the following pages the current Editorial Board of physica status solidi (a) in the form of a brief curriculum vitae, a photograph, and an e-mail address (in case you want to contact our Editors directly!). Of course, since 1961 the Editorial Board of our journal has undergone many changes and will continue to do so, but we always have attempted to maintain a good balance between the different areas of solid state physics, between theory and experiment, and between different countries. And although nothing is perfect, I hope that you will find at least one or two board members, who are known to you through their contributions to the literature in solid state physics.For me, this is the perfect occasion to thank all Members of the Editorial Board, past and present, for their advice, continuing support, and dedication! Vielen herzlichen Dank!

  3. Editorial: phys. stat. sol. (b) 241/5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stutzmann, Martin

    2004-04-01

    Physica status solidi was founded in 1961 by a number of eminent solid state physicists as an attempt to overcome the iron curtain, which then separated East and West, at least in the field of science. Since that time our world has changed quite a bit, and so have the boundary conditions of science publishing. However, one thing has not changed: then as now, the general policy and development of a respectable scientific journal should be determined by a board of independent scientists, who volunteer to assume responsibility for the scientific content of the journal, to assure a fair and critical peer review process for all submitted manuscripts, and, in cases of conflict, to finally decide which papers will be published and which will not.As a matter of fact, an international Board of Editors which consists of scientists coming from different countries and continents, with a good reputation in their respective community, and without any conflict of interest with the Publisher of the journal is, in my opinion, these days more important than ever. As our daily scientific work becomes increasingly specialized, but at the same time also increasingly interdisciplinary, we are more and more forced to trust the quality and reliability of published scientific results in the literature, without really having a chance to come to an independent opinion on our own. This is one of the reasons why the many recent cases of plagiarism, scientific misconduct, or outright fraud have caused such a high level of public awareness. It is quite clear that without a serious peer review there would be an even larger number of such cases in the literature, and that without the responsible action taken by concerned Journal Editors, many of the revealed cases probably would have remained under the carpet.It is, therefore, a particular pleasure for me to introduce to you on the following pages the current Editorial Board of physica status solidi (b) in the form of a brief curriculum vitae, a photograph, and an e-mail address (in case you want to contact our Editors directly!). Of course, since 1961 the Editorial Board of our journal has undergone many changes and will continue to do so, but we always have attempted to maintain a good balance between the different areas of solid state physics, between theory and experiment, and between different countries. And although nothing is perfect, I hope that you will find at least one or two board members, who are known to you through their contributions to the literature in solid state physics.For me, this is the perfect occasion to thank all Members of the Editorial Board, past and present, for their advice, continuing support, and dedication! Vielen herzlichen Dank!

  4. Preface: phys. stat. sol. (a) 203/4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kittler, Martin; Yang, Deren

    2006-03-01

    This issue of physica status solidi (a) contains the majority of papers presented at the 2nd Sino-German Symposium The Silicon Age which was held at the Lindner Hotel Cottbus, Germany, 19-24 September 2005. This meeting followed the 1st Symposium Progress in Silicon Materials held in June 2002 in Hangzhou, P.R. China. 8 Chinese and 14 German scientists from universities, research institutes and industry were invited to present their views about different aspects of silicon.There was a continuous progress in silicon materials development during the last 40-50 years, driven by the need of the IC industry for better and larger monocrystalline silicon wafers. Moreover, low-cost crystalline silicon now dominates the world's production of solar cells in the photovoltaics industry. Furthermore, there are intensive research activities worldwide for on-chip integration of Si-based photonics in CMOS technology. In addition, new areas being connected with silicon are starting to appear, namely Si-based biochips and nanoelectronics. Silicon, one can reasonably argue, is already the most investigated of all materials. However, there is still a need for continuation of research and development regarding numerous aspects of Si and also SiGe, including related technologies, advanced diagnostics or the role of crystal defects, which are the working fields of many laboratories all over the world. This was also shown by the presentations at the symposium and can be found in the contributions contained in this issue.The organizers would like to thank the participants for their high level contributions and discussions during the symposium. This intensive and open communication allowed the participants to create synergies between the different fields of silicon research and also to build up relationships for cooperation between Chinese and German research groups.Finally, we would like to thank the Sino-German Science Center for the financial support of the symposium.

  5. Preface: phys. stat. sol. (c) 1/7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheikhrouhou, Abdelwaheb

    2004-05-01

    The Third International Conference on Magnetic and Superconducting Materials (MSM03) belongs to a series of conferences, held biannually, aiming at providing a forum to the scientists in the magnetic and superconducting materials areas over the world.The first conference of the series (MSM99) was held in Iran with the proceedings published by World Scientific in 2000, and the second conference (MSM01) was held in Jordan with the proceedings published in Physica B 321 (2002).MSM03 was organized by the Materials Physics Laboratory, Sfax University (Laboratoire de Physique des Matériaux de la Faculté des Sciences de Sfax), with many domestic and international supporting institutions. It was held in Monastir (Tunisia), 1-4 September 2003, with over 150 participants and keynote lecturers attending from the following countries: Algeria, Austria, China, Czech Republic, Egypt, France, Germany, Hungary, Iran, Italy, Japan, Jordan, Morocco, Netherlands, Pakistan, Poland, Russia, Spain, Sudan, Sultanate of Oman, Taiwan, Tunisia, United Kingdom and United States of America.Altogether, about 170 papers on a variety of subjects relevant to the topic of the conference were presented, out of which 42 were keynote lectures. The submissions were peer-reviewed, and ultimately 115 articles were selected for publication in this journal. However, it must be noted that 13 of 39 keynote speakers did not submit their manuscripts for publication. Invited and other speakers were distinguished members of the international scientific community who are interested in pure sciences and materials research, and involved in the fabrication, characterization and investigation of the physical properties of magnetic and superconducting materials. High-caliber scientists attended the conference contributing to its success and the event resulted in new international relationships in research and cooperation. The Chairman of the Organizing Committee was Professor Abdelwaheb Cheikhrouhou, Materials Physics Laboratory, Sciences Faculty of Sfax (Tunisia) and the Co-Chairmen were Professor Sami Mahmood, Dean of Sciences at Yarmouk University (Jordan) and Professor Mohamed Akhavan from the Sharif University of Technology (Iran). The four-day conference consisted of several oral and poster sessions, followed by social programs in the evenings. The success of the event could be measured during the closing session on the last day, when several delegates emphasized the high-quality science that had been evident at the conference. A post conference three-day tour to the south of Tunisia (Matmata, Douz City: the gate of desert and the mountains oasis: Tamerza, Mides and Chebika) was also arranged. The conference was generously sponsored by: - The Tunisian Ministry of High Education, Scientific Research and Technology - The Tunisian Secretary of State for Scientific Research and Technology - The Tunisian National Office of Tourism - The Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics (ICTP) - French Institute for Cooperation in Tunisia - Tunisian-Italian Scientific Partnership - British Gas - Tunisian Society for Electricity and Gas - Imex Olive Oil -Confiserie TRIKI Le Moulin The next MSM conference in 2005 will be held in Morocco.

  6. 75 FR 23729 - Orders Finding that the (1) Phys,1

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-04

    ... subject contracts are SPDCs. NGX stated that the subject contracts lack sufficient liquidity to perform a... to meet the material price reference, price linkage and material liquidity criteria for SPDC determination. Similarly, the 7a Index contracts lack sufficient liquidity to perform a significant...

  7. Preface: phys. stat. sol. (c) 1/6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kavokin, Alexey

    2004-04-01

    This volume contains some of the papers presented at the Third International Conference on Physics of Light-Matter Coupling in Nanostructures (PLMCN3) which took place in Acireale, Sicily, from 1 to 4 October 2003. This meeting was fourth in the series started by PLMCN (St. Nectaire, 2000) and continued by PLMCN1 (Rome, 2001) and PLMCN2 (Rithymnon, 2002). All four conferences had the same format (about 70 participants), similar subject scope (interface between fundamental physics of light-matter coupling phenomena and applied research on new semiconductor materials and low-dimensional structures), and the proceedings of all of them have been published in physica status solidi.During these four years, a huge progress has been achieved in the understanding of exciton-polariton effects in microcavities. From the discovery of stimulated scattering of polaritons in 1999 to the first experimental reports of polariton Bose condensation and lasing, attention to this rapidly developing research area has been increased drastically. It is clear now that realization of a new generation of opto-electronic devices, referred to as polariton devices, is a realistic task for the coming decade. To achieve this target, much work has to be done both in fundamental research on dynamics of exciton-polaritons in microcavities and experimental realization of high-quality microcavities presumably based on wide-band gap semiconductors like GaN, ZnO, ZnSe, suitable for the observation of strong exciton-light coupling at room temperature. Forty nine research teams from twelve European countries have created a Polariton Consortium aimed at integration of the European research effort towards fabrication of polariton devices. PLMCN3 was not only an international conference devoted, in particular, to the research on polariton devices, but also the first scientific meeting of this community.The PLMCN meetings since the very first one have been sponsored by the US Army European Research Office (ERO). This time, with the initiative of Jim Harvey from ERO, a special session has been organized on the devices of 21st century, where a number of intriguing ideas have been proposed on new light sources, polariton lasers, and quantum memory elements based on microcavities. A special prize for the most crazy but realizable idea has been won by Misha Portnoi (Exeter) for the concept of a white diode based on a microcavity.Each PLMCN meeting brings participants from new countries. This time, the traditionally strong participation from Japan, Russia, the European Union and the USA has been enforced by a representative delegation from Israel and two speakers from Mexico. We are looking forward for new-comers from other countries not yet involved in the PLMCN community, to join us for the next meeting to be held in St. Petersburg on 29 June-3 July 2004. Sergey Ivanov from the A. F. Ioffe Institute chairs the local Organizing Committee of this future conference. We are going to keep a unique informal and creative atmosphere being characteristic of the PLMCN meetings. We invite all those who wish to know more about light-matter coupling in solids or to present any new interesting results in this area and at the same time to enjoy the beautiful city of St. Petersburg, to contact Sergey Ivanov (ivan@beam.ioffe.rssi.ru) or myself (kavokin@lasmea.univ-bpclermont.fr). We are looking forward to welcoming you in St. Petersburg!

  8. Preface: phys. stat. sol. (a) 201/11

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goovaerts, Etienne; Nistor, Sergiu V.

    2004-09-01

    We are glad to introduce in this issue of physica status solidi (a) a series of papers which were presented at the international workshop on Defects and Impurities in Crystalline Boron Nitride Compounds, held in Diepenbeek-Hasselt, Belgium, on 20-21 February 2004. Because of the strong scientific connections, this workshop was jointly organised with the 9th International Workshop on Surface and Bulk Defects in CVD Diamond Films (18-20 February 2004) and this led to the joint publication of the contributions in the present issue. For several years boron nitride, and in particular cubic boron nitride, is back in the centre of materials research activities because of new potential applications as a wide band gap semiconductor for electronics and opto-electronics in extreme conditions. However, important efforts are needed to understand the role of defects and impurities in controlling its semiconducting properties and growth processes in order to realise these promises. An international group of researchers (30 participants from 12 countries: Belarus, Belgium, Czech Republic, Germany, Italy, Japan, Latvia, Romania, Russia, Sweden, Ukraine, USA; among which 8 invited) has gathered to discuss the present status of research on the following topics: Impurities and morphology, Synthesis and microstructure, Optical and electrical properties, and Point defects characterisation. Contributions were presented on boron nitride single crystals, on p-n junctions formed with this material, but also on crystalline powders, thin films and B-C-N nanotubes. Among the characterisation methods which have been discussed, we mention optical spectroscopy (absorption, luminescence, Raman), multifrequency electron spin resonance, high resolution and analytical electron microscopy and analytical micro ion beam techniques.This workshop was organised as a final activity of the Flemish-Romanian scientific and technological cooperation project Defects in diamond-like materials of the B/C/N system, involving from the Flemish side both the Experimental Condensed Matter Physics Laboratory at the Physics Department of the University of Antwerp and the Materials Physics Division at the Institute for Materials Research of the Limburgs Universitair Centrum, and from the Romanian side the Microstructure of Defects in Solids Laboratory of the National Institute for Materials Physics in Magurele-Bucuresti.We gratefully acknowledge the financial support of the Flemish and Romanian governments through the above mentioned international bilateral project, as well as the organisational support of all three home institutions along the duration of the whole project.We also wish to personally thank Miloš Nesládek and Ken Haenen for the invaluable and continuous assistance in the practical organisation of this workshop.

  9. Preface: phys. stat. sol. (a) 201/5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avelino Pasa, André

    2004-04-01

    This issue contains scientific contributions to the 4th German/Brazilian Workshop on Applied Surface Science. The workshop was held in Germany at the beautiful Castle Ringberg conference site of the Max Planck Society, located 60 km from Munich, from 21-26 September 2003. The meeting was attended by about 50 participants, with 21 invited talks and 18 contributed presentations (8 oral and 10 posters) on relevant topics of surface science.As in previous meetings (1995 in Portobello, RJ, Brazil, 1998 in Döllnsee, Berlin, Germany, and 2001 in Itapema, SC, Brazil), a significant number of important questions in surface science were covered from both the theoretical and the experimental point of view. In the field of materials science, emphasis was given to the description of the structural, physical and chemical properties of nanostructures and films of inorganic (metals, alloys and oxides) and organic (polymers and biological molecules) materials.A substantial part of the success of the meeting can be attributed to the relaxed atmosphere at the castle, near the lake Tegernsee, where excellent scientific presentations were mixed with intense discussions among both senior and younger researchers. The event also led to the development of new and ongoing collaborations between partners from Brazil and Germany.The organizers of the Workshop, Israel J. R. Baumvol (Porto Alegre, Brazil), Hajo Freund (Berlin, Germany), Wolfgang H. P. Losch (Natal, Brazil), Horst Niehus (Berlin, Germany), André A. Pasa (Florianópolis, Brazil) and Eberhard Umbach (Würzburg, Germany), are greatly indebted to the following organizations for financial support: Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG), Fritz-Haber-Institut Berlin (FHI), Fundação Coordenação de Aperfeiçoamento de Pessoal de Nível Superior (CAPES), Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina (UFSC) and the specially created intergovernmental agreement between CAPES and DFG to promote such meetings.

  10. Editorial: phys. stat. sol. (b) 243/1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stutzmann, Martin

    2006-01-01

    Dear Colleagues and Friends,on behalf of the Publishers, the Editorial Office, and the Editors of physica status solidi we wish you all the best for the coming year 2006! It is our sincere hope that your personal and professional experience with our journal has been a positive one and that you will continue to choose physica status solidi for the publication of your scientific findings in solid state physics also in the future.In doing so, you will be in increasingly good company! As a matter of fact, 2005 has been a year of exceptional growth in the number of manuscripts submitted to physica status solidi . Thus, the number of Original Papers which have reached our Editorial Office in Berlin has increased by as much as 30% compared to the long term average over the last ten years. For the Rapid Research Letter section, the corresponding increase has been even more impressive: more than +100% just in the last two years. We view this development as a confirmation of our longstanding efforts to ensure a timely publication service of high scientific quality. One relevant indicator for the high scientific standards expected from articles which are submitted for publication in physica status solidi is the average acceptance rate, which currently is less than 40%. This rate has continuously decreased from a value of about 60% ten years ago and bears witness to our efforts to strive for quality rather than quantity.Also, physica status solidi has been able to continue its long tradition as a truly international journal, despite of the strong competition in an established field such as solid state physics. In 2005, submitted papers have originated almost equally from the Americas, Europe, and Asia, with a clearly growing contribution from China, India, and Japan. We are actively working together with our international Editorial Boards and the Regional Editors to maintain a reasonable balance among papers from different parts of the world. The increasing international visibility of physica status solidi is impressively documented by the ever rising numbers of article downloads via the internet: on the average, each of the 2000 articles published annually in physica status solidi is presently accessed about 100 times via the www.Finally, let me mention some other recent developments, which are not so directly visible from the outside. Thus, a new all electronic publishing system has become operative in our Berlin Editorial Office in 2005, which allows a more efficient and timely handling of manuscripts from submission to publication (www.manuscriptXpress.com) and is particularly valuable for the editing of conference proceedings (conferences.wiley-vch.de). In addition, the functionality of the journal within the Wiley InterScience website has been enhanced by new features such as Citation Tracking. Together with the ongoing digitization of all physica status solidi issues since the 1960s, which is expected to be complete in 2006, this makes the physica status solidi homepage at Wiley InterScience a very valuable tool for literature search in solid state physics, past and present. Try it out at www.interscience.wiley.com!All of us from physica status solidi would like to convey to you our very best wishes for good health and success in the coming year 2006!

  11. Editorial: phys. stat. sol. (c) 3/1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stutzmann, Martin

    2006-01-01

    Dear Colleagues and Friends,on behalf of the Publishers, the Editorial Office, and the Editors of physica status solidi we wish you all the best for the coming year 2006! It is our sincere hope that your personal and professional experience with our journal has been a positive one and that you will continue to choose physica status solidi for the publication of your scientific findings in solid state physics also in the future.In doing so, you will be in increasingly good company! As a matter of fact, 2005 has been a year of exceptional growth in the number of manuscripts submitted to physica status solidi . Thus, the number of Original Papers which have reached our Editorial Office in Berlin has increased by as much as 30% compared to the long term average over the last ten years. For the Rapid Research Letter section, the corresponding increase has been even more impressive: more than +100% just in the last two years. We view this development as a confirmation of our longstanding efforts to ensure a timely publication service of high scientific quality. One relevant indicator for the high scientific standards expected from articles which are submitted for publication in physica status solidi is the average acceptance rate, which currently is less than 40%. This rate has continuously decreased from a value of about 60% ten years ago and bears witness to our efforts to strive for quality rather than quantity.Also, physica status solidi has been able to continue its long tradition as a truly international journal, despite of the strong competition in an established field such as solid state physics. In 2005, submitted papers have originated almost equally from the Americas, Europe, and Asia, with a clearly growing contribution from China, India, and Japan. We are actively working together with our international Editorial Boards and the Regional Editors to maintain a reasonable balance among papers from different parts of the world. The increasing international visibility of physica status solidi is impressively documented by the ever rising numbers of article downloads via the internet: on the average, each of the 2000 articles published annually in physica status solidi is presently accessed about 100 times via the www. Finally, let me mention some other recent developments, which are not so directly visible from the outside. Thus, a new all electronic publishing system has become operative in our Berlin Editorial Office in 2005, which allows a more efficient and timely handling of manuscripts from submission to publication (www.manuscriptXpress.com) and is particularly valuable for the editing of conference proceedings (conferences.wiley-vch.de). In addition, the functionality of the journal within the Wiley InterScience website has been enhanced by new features such as Citation Tracking. Together with the ongoing digitization of all physica status solidi issues since the 1960s, which is expected to be complete in 2006, this makes the physica status solidi homepage at Wiley InterScience a very valuable tool for literature search in solid state physics, past and present. Try it out at www.interscience.wiley.com! All of us from physica status solidi would like to convey to you our very best wishes for good health and success in the coming year 2006!

  12. Editorial: phys. stat. sol. (a) 203/1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stutzmann, Martin

    2006-01-01

    Dear Colleagues and Friends,on behalf of the Publishers, the Editorial Office, and the Editors of physica status solidi we wish you all the best for the coming year 2006! It is our sincere hope that your personal and professional experience with our journal has been a positive one and that you will continue to choose physica status solidi for the publication of your scientific findings in solid state physics also in the future.In doing so, you will be in increasingly good company! As a matter of fact, 2005 has been a year of exceptional growth in the number of manuscripts submitted to physica status solidi. Thus, the number of Original Papers which have reached our Editorial Office in Berlin has increased by as much as 30% compared to the long term average over the last ten years. For the Rapid Research Letter section, the corresponding increase has been even more impressive: more than +100% just in the last two years. We view this development as a confirmation of our longstanding efforts to ensure a timely publication service of high scientific quality. One relevant indicator for the high scientific standards expected from articles which are submitted for publication in physica status solidi is the average acceptance rate, which currently is less than 40%. This rate has continuously decreased from a value of about 60% ten years ago and bears witness to our efforts to strive for quality rather than quantity.Also, physica status solidi has been able to continue its long tradition as a truly international journal, despite of the strong competition in an established field such as solid state physics. In 2005, submitted papers have originated almost equally from the Americas, Europe, and Asia, with a clearly growing contribution from China, India, and Japan. We are actively working together with our international Editorial Boards and the Regional Editors to maintain a reasonable balance among papers from different parts of the world. The increasing international visibility of physica status solidi is impressively documented by the ever rising numbers of article downloads via the internet: on the average, each of the 2000 articles published annually in physica status solidi is presently accessed about 100 times via the www.Finally, let me mention some other recent developments, which are not so directly visible from the outside. Thus, a new all electronic publishing system has become operative in our Berlin Editorial Office in 2005, which allows a more efficient and timely handling of manuscripts from submission to publication (www.manuscriptXpress.com) and is particularly valuable for the editing of conference proceedings (conferences.wiley-vch.de). In addition, the functionality of the journal within the Wiley InterScience website has been enhanced by new features such as Citation Tracking. Together with the ongoing digitization of all physica status solidi issues since the 1960s, which is expected to be complete in 2006, this makes the physica status solidi homepage at Wiley InterScience a very valuable tool for literature search in solid state physics, past and present. Try it out at www.interscience.wiley.com!All of us from physica status solidi would like to convey to you our very best wishes for good health and success in the coming year 2006!

  13. Dedication: phys. stat. sol. (a) 202/15

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albrecht, Martin

    2005-12-01

    The papers in this issue are dedicated to Professor Horst Paul Strunk on the occasion of his 65th birthday and his retirement from active teaching. This volume honours a scientist who has made a lasting impact on the field in electron microscopic characterisation of growth and relaxation phenomena in epitaxial growth of semiconductors. Born in The Hague, The Netherlands, on 13 June 1940, he studied physics in Stuttgart where he received his degree in Physics in 1968. He joined the group of Prof. Seeger at the Max-Planck-Institut für Metallforschung and defended his Ph.D. on defects in NaCl at Stuttgart University in 1973. He spent one year at Cornell University as a visiting Professor before joining Technische Universität Hamburg-Harburg in 1983. There he created the Zentralbereich Elektronenmikroskopie and was a professor for materials analytics from 1983 till 1989. In 1989 he changed to the University of Erlangen-Nürnberg, where he established the Verbundlabor für hochauflösende Elektronenmikroskopie and directed the Lehrstuhl Mikrocharakterisierung at the Institut für Werkstoffwissenschaften of the same university. He spent two research periods at the Universities of Rennes in France and Campinas in Brazil. Together with his colleague Prof. Jürgen Werner he created the series of conferences on polycrystalline semiconductors POLYSE which he has been supervising together with Jürgen Werner since 1990.The research activities of Horst P. Strunk are focused on microstructure of materials and their relation to macroscopic physical properties. Main topics are dislocations, their formation and interaction mechanisms, strain relaxation as well as fundamental mechanisms of epitaxial growth. The spectrum of materials covers a wide range starting from metals over ionic crystals, e.g. NaCl to elemental and compound semiconductors. From the beginning, the main tool of study has been the transmission electron microscope. However, Horst P. Strunk recognised that a thorough understanding of materials problems would require the combined use of structural characterisation, advanced spectroscopy and modelling. Therefore he complemented electron microscopic approaches by optical methods e.g. Raman spectroscopy and cathodoluminescence. Modelling of strain states by finite elements and of defect structures by ab-initio calculations became an important topic especially in the last years. It is characteristic for the scientific approach of Horst Strunk that methodological developments were not an end in itself but linked to problems in solid state physics and materials sciences. Among the scientific works of Strunk, a few examples should be highlighted which mark important stages in his scientific career. Pioneering work has been done on the influence of dislocations in homoepitaxial growth of Si and GaAs in collaboration with Elisabeth Bauser in Stuttgart. Strunk correlated growth spirals on the surface to dislocations that caused these step sources. Studying the dislocation structure of heteroepitaxial Ge/GaAs layers, Strunk discovered that a new dislocation multiplication source works which, later known as Hagen-Strunk source, had a strong impact on understanding of relaxation processes by dislocations in heteroepitaxial semiconductor systems. Work on electrical and structural properties of grain boundaries in silicon was performed together with Jürgen Werner. This was the starting point of a long lasting research on photovoltaic materials that accompanies Strunk till today. Fundamental studies on heteroepitaxial growth were performed in the system SiGe grown from solution. In this context, finite elements were established for the first time in the study of nanostructured materials. In the last years correlated studies on structural and optical properties on III-nitride heterostructures were done by cathodoluminescence in the transmission electron microscope. The impact of Horst P. Strunk's work is evident from the fact that his lab became part of collaborative international projects based on the unique facilities at the Verbundlabor für Hochauflösende Elektronenmikroskopie and the profound knowledge in the field of crystal growth and solid state physics present in his group. The articles in this issue contain original research results contributed by his friends, collaborators and former students. They are a testimony of the lasting impact of Horst P. Strunk's work and they express the authors' gratefulness for benefiting from his work. This volume gives us a unique opportunity to say thank you to Horst P. Strunk and to wish him a new period in his life that should continue to be scientifically as fruitful as up to now but less affected by the burden of administrative work than during the last years.

  14. Preface: phys. stat. sol. (a) 203/12

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackman, Richard B.; Nesládek, Milo; Haenen, Ken

    2006-09-01

    The 30 papers gathered in this issue of physica status solidi (a) give a thorough overview over different topics that were presented during the 11th edition of the International Workshop on Surface and Bulk Defects in CVD Diamond Films (SBDD), which took place from 22 to 24 February 2006, at the Hasselt University in Diepenbeek-Hasselt, Belgium. Since its start more than 10 years ago, the SBDD Workshop has grown into a well-established, yearly early bird meeting place, addressing new emerging science related to the progress in the CVD diamond field. The 10 invited lectures, 29 contributed oral presentations and 26 posters were presented in several sessions during an intense two and a half day long meeting.The number of participants reached 115 this year with participants coming from fifteen countries: Austria, Belgium, Czech Republic, France, Germany, Israel, Italy, Japan, Mexico, Poland, Russia, Singapore, Slovak Republic, Sweden, UK, and USA. The mixture of young and established scientists, including a great proportion of students, made this meeting a hot spot of lively discussions on a wide range of scientific subjects, not only during the meeting itself, but also at several occasions throughout many social events offered by the hospitality of the city of Hasselt.It stands for itself that the workshop would not have been possible without the support of many people and institutions. For financial aid we are especially indebted to the Scientific Research Community Surface Modification of Materials of the F.W.O.-Vlaanderen (Belgium), whose incessant support plays an important role in keeping this meeting going. We also thank the Hasselt University for offering the lecture hall and infrastructure facilities and Seki Technotron Corp. for sponsoring the poster reception and their presence with a table top exhibit. Finally we highly appreciate the active approach of the editorial staff of physica status solidi in this conference and would like to thank most notably Stefan Hildebrandt, Ron Schulz-Rheinländer, Christoph Lellig, and Julia Hübner, for their excellent and patient work, bringing the number of successfully published proceedings of SBDD in pss (a) up to 8 already!To finish, we would all like to invite you to the 12th edition of the SBDD series, newly renamed as Hasselt Diamond Workshop, to be held at its established location of Diepenbeek-Hasselt. We look forward meeting you again at SBDD XII in 2007:Hasselt Diamond Workshop - SBDD XII28 February-2 March 2007Hasselt University, Diepenbeek-Hasselt, Belgiumhttp://www.imo.uhasselt.be/SBDD2007London, Paris, Hasselt, August 2006

  15. Preface: phys. stat. sol. (a) 201/11

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergonzo, Philippe; Haenen, Ken; Nebel, Christoph; Nesládek, Milo; Vanek, Milan

    2004-09-01

    The present issue of physica status solidi (a) contains a collection of 24 papers presented at the 9th International Workshop on Surface and Bulk Defects in CVD Diamond Films held in Diepen- beek-Hasselt, Belgium, 18-20 February 2004. The concept of this workshop originated in 1996 with the idea of bringing together scientists who are active and innovative in the field of electronic and optical properties of thin film diamond. Since then, this meeting have grown up to a regular conference devoted to new issues in CVD diamond research and related to diamond as a material for electronics and nanobioelectronics. This year the programme was spread over two and a half days, including 8 invited lectures from a total of 39 talks, and a poster session featuring 15 posters. In addition we were able to connect this meeting with a workshop on Defects and Impurities in Crystalline Boron Nitride Compounds, scientifically organized from the University of Antwerp and leading finally to a joint meeting lasting four days. The papers from the BN workshop are joining this proceeding issue on pages 2559-2598.At SBDD IX, topics ranged from homo- and heteroepitaxial growth, doping, hydrogen induced surface conductivity, defects and their characterization, to devices including bio-sensing applications. As usual, very intense and lively discussions took place among participants, from young students to established scientists, after talks, during breaks and in the evenings while enjoying the hospitality of the Limburgs Universitair Centrum and especially the city of Hasselt. The number of participants reached a record breaking 96 this year, with participants coming from fifteen different countries (Australia, Austria, Belgium, Czech Republic, France, Germany, Israel, Italy, Japan, Mexico, Romania, Russia, Sweden, UK, USA). This yearly increasing number indicates that this workshop is continuing to be very attractive to a large scientific community, as it summarizes the up-to-date research on diamond as a wide band gap semiconductor.The workshop would have not been possible without the support of many people and institutions. For financial aid we are especially indebted to the Scientific Research Community Surface Modification of Materials of the F. W. O.-Vlaanderen (Belgium) and its continuous support since starting this workshop 9 years ago. We also thank the Limburgs Universitair Centrum for offering the lecture hall and infrastructure facilities. Finally we highly appreciate the active approach of the editorial staff of physica status solidi in this conference and would like to thank most notably Stefan Hildebrandt and Katharina Fröhlich, for their excellent and patient work, making this already the sixth successfully published proceedings of SBDD in pss (a).To finish, we would all like to invite you for the 10th anniversary of the SBDD series in February 2005 in Diepenbeek-Hasselt and we look forward to seeing you at:Surface and Bulk Defects in CVD Diamond Films, X23-25 February 2005Limburgs Universitair Centrum, Diepenbeek - Hasselt, Belgiumhttp://www.imo.luc.ac.be/SBDD2005

  16. Preface: phys. stat. sol. (a) 202/11

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergonzo, Philippe; Nesládek, Milo

    2005-09-01

    The present issue of physica status solidi (a) contains a collection of 31 papers presented at the 10th International Workshop on Surface and Bulk Defects in CVD Diamond Films held in Diepenbeek-Hasselt, Belgium, 23-25 February 2005. The 10th anniversary of the meeting proved the success of the concept, which originated in 1996 with the idea of bringing together scientists who are active and innovative in the field of electronic and optical properties of thin film diamond. This year the programme contained 9 invited oral talks, 14 contributed oral talks and 34 posters. 103 Participants from 14 countries (Austria, Belgium, Czech Republic, Finland, France, Germany, Japan, Mexico, Poland, Slovak Republic, Sweden, Switzerland, UK, USA) took part in the meeting. The meeting was traditionally directed towards topics ranging from defects and their characterization as well as electrical transport in CVD diamond towards modern diamond thin film devices including bio-sensing applications. Also, diamond homoepitaxial and heteroepitaxial growth, doping, hydrogen induced surface conductivity and several other topics including defects in boron nitride materials were addressed. Intense and lively discussions were as usual part of this meeting to which the hospitality of the city of Hasselt contributed greatly.The workshop would have not been possible without the support of many people and institutions. We also acknowledge the financial support of the Scientific Research Community of the F.W.O.-Vlaanderen (Belgium) and the University of Hasselt. We also thank the editorial staff of physica status solidi, most notably Stefan Hildebrandt, for their excellent and patient work. Finally, we would like to thank Ken Haenen, whose skills for the successful organization are gratefully acknowledged.August 2005

  17. Preface: phys. stat. sol. (b) 243/5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artacho, Emilio; Beck, Thomas L.; Hernández, Eduardo

    Between 20 and 24 June 2005 the Centre Européen de Calcul Atomique et Moléculaire - or CECAM, as it is more widely known - hosted a workshop entitled State-of-the-art, developments and perspectives of real-space electronic structure methods in condensed-matter and chemical physics, organized with the support of CECAM itself and the ?k network. The workshop was attended by some forty participants coming from fifteen countries, and about thirty presentations were given. The workshop provided a lively forum for the discussion of recent methodological developments in electronic structure calculations, ranging from linear-scaling methods, mesh techniques, time-dependent density functional methods, and a long etcetera, which had been our ultimate objective when undertaking its organization.The first-principles simulation of solids, liquids and complex matter in general has jumped in the last few years from the relatively confined niches in condensed matter and materials physics and in quantum chemistry, to cover most of the sciences, including nano, bio, geo, environmental sciences and engineering. This effect has been propitiated by the ability of simulation techniques to deal with an ever larger degree of complexity. Although this is partially to be attributed to the steady increase in computer power, the main factor behind this change has been the coming of age of the main theoretical framework for most of the simulations performed today, together with an extremely active development of the basic algorithms for its computer implementation. It is this latter aspect that is the topic of this special issue of physica status solidi.There is a relentless effort in the scientific community seeking to achieve not only higher accuracy, but also more efficient, cost-effective and if possible simpler computational methods in electronic structure calculations [1]. From the early 1990s onwards there has been a keen interest in the computational condensed matter and chemical physics communities in methods that had the potential to overcome the unfavourable scaling of the computational cost with the system size, implicit in the momentum-space formalism familiar to solid-state physicists and the quantum chemistry approaches more common in chemical physics and physical chemistry. This interest was sparkled by the famous paper in which Weitao Yang [2] introduced the Divide and Conquer method. Soon afterwards several practical schemes aiming to achieve linear-scaling calculations, by exploiting what Walter Kohn called most aptly the near-sightedness of quantum mechanics [3], were proposed and explored (for a review on linear-scaling methods, see [4]). This search for novel, more efficient and better scaling algorithms proved to be fruitful in more than one way. Not only was it the start of several packages which are well-known today (such as Siesta, Conquest, etc.), but it also leads to new ways of representing electronic states and orbitals, such as grids [5, 6], wavelets [7], finite elements, etc. Also, the drive to exploit near-sightedness attracted computational solid state physicists to the type of atomic-like basis functions traditionally used in the quantum chemistry community. At the same time computational chemists learnt about plane waves and density functional theory, and thus a fruitful dialogue was started between two communities that hitherto had not had much contact.Another interesting development that has begun to take place over the last decade or so is the convergence of several branches of science, notably physics, chemistry and biology, at the nanoscale. Experimentalists in all these different fields are now performing highly sophisticated measurements on systems of nanometer size, the kind of systems that us theoreticians can address with our computational methods, and this convergence of experiment and theory at this scale has also been very fruitful, particularly in the fields of electronic transport and STM image simulation. It is now quite common to find papers at the cutting edge of nanoscience and nanotechnology co-authored by experimentalists and theorists, and it can only be expected that this fruitful interplay between theory and experiment will increase in the future.It was considerations such as these that moved us to propose to CECAM and ?k the celebration of a workshop devoted to the discussion of recent developments in electronic structure techniques, a proposal that was enthusiastically received, not just by CECAM and ?k, but also by our invited speakers and participants. Interest in novel electronic structure methods is now as high as ever, and we are therefore very happy that physica status solidi has given us the opportunity to devote a special issue to the topics covered in the workshop. This special issue of physica status solidi gathers invited contributions from several attendants to the workshop, contributions that are representative of the range of topics and issues discussed then, including progress in linear scaling methods, electronic transport, simulation of STM images, time-dependent DFT methods, etc. It rests for us to thank all the contributors to this special issue for their efforts, CECAM and ?k for funding the workshop, physica status solidi for agreeing to devote this special issue to the workshop, and last but not least Emmanuelle and Emilie, the CECAM secretaries, for their invaluable practical help in putting this workshop together

  18. The impact of vaccine success and awareness on epidemic dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juang, Jonq; Liang, Yu-Hao

    2016-11-01

    The role of vaccine success is introduced into an epidemic spreading model consisting of three states: susceptible, infectious, and vaccinated. Moreover, the effect of three types, namely, contact, local, and global, of infection awareness and immunization awareness is also taken into consideration. The model generalizes those considered in Pastor-Satorras and Vespignani [Phys. Rev. E 63, 066117 (2001)], Pastor-Satorras and Vespignani [Phys. Rev. E 65, 036104 (2002)], Moreno et al. [Eur. Phys. J. B 26, 521-529 (2002)], Wu et al. [Chaos 22, 013101 (2012)], and Wu et al. [Chaos 24, 023108 (2014)]. Our main results contain the following. First, the epidemic threshold is explicitly obtained. In particular, we show that, for any initial conditions, the epidemic eventually dies out regardless of what other factors are whenever some type of immunization awareness is considered, and vaccination has a perfect success. Moreover, the threshold is independent of the global type of awareness. Second, we compare the effect of contact and local types of awareness on the epidemic thresholds between heterogeneous networks and homogeneous networks. Specifically, we find that the epidemic threshold for the homogeneous network can be lower than that of the heterogeneous network in an intermediate regime for intensity of contact infection awareness while it is higher otherwise. In summary, our results highlight the important and crucial roles of both vaccine success and contact infection awareness on epidemic dynamics.

  19. Triaxial Superdeformed Bands in ^163Tm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pattabiraman, N. S.; Ghugre, S. S.; Garg, Umesh; Li, T.; Nayak, B. K.; Zhu, S.; Chakrawarthy, R. S.; Macchiavelli, A. O.; Janssens, R. V. F.

    2002-10-01

    Following the recent discovery of triaxial superdeformation bands in the Z = 71, 72 nuclei [1,2], we have investigated the Z = 69 nucleus ^163 Tm using the reaction ^130 Te( ^37 Cl, 4n) ^163 Tm with a beam energy of 170 MeV. Gamma-ray spectroscopy was performed using the Gammasphere array at LBNL. The data were sorted into a hypercube. The preliminary results have indicated two bands with δ E _γ 60 keV above the previously known 5286 keV, 49/2^- state. These bands appear to talk to one another. It may be recalled that evidence for wobbling motion has recently been reported in the isobaric nucleus ^163 Lu The detailed experimental results and comparisons with the neighboring nuclei will be presented. [1] H. Amro et al, Phys. Lett. B 506, 39(2001). [2] G. Schonwasser eet al., Eur. Phys. J. A13, 291(2002). [3] D. R. Jensen et al, Nucl. Phys. A 703, 3 (2002).

  20. Perturbative stability of catenoidal soap films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jana, Soumya; Kar, Sayan

    2013-09-01

    The perturbative stability of catenoidal soap films formed between parallel, equal radii, coaxial rings is studied using analytical and semi-analytical methods. Using a theorem on the nature of eigenvalues for a class of Sturm-Liouville operators, we show that, for the given boundary conditions, azimuthally asymmetric perturbations are stable, while symmetric perturbations lead to an instability --a result demonstrated in Ben Amar et al. (Eur. Phys. J. B 3, 197 (1998)) using numerics and experiment. Further, we show how to obtain the lowest real eigenvalue of perturbations, using the semi-analytical Asymptotic Iteration Method (AIM). Conclusions using AIM support the analytically obtained result as well as the results by Ben Amar et al.. Finally, we compute the eigenfunctions and show, pictorially, how the perturbed soap film evolves in time.

  1. A relativistic description of MOND using the Palatini formalism in an extended metric theory of gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrientos, E.; Mendoza, S.

    2016-10-01

    We construct a relativistic metric description of MOND using the Palatini formalism following the f(χ) = χb description of T. Bernal et al. (Eur. Phys. J. C 71, 1794 (2011)). We show that in order to recover the non-relativistic MOND regime where, for circular orbits the Tully-Fisher law replaces Kepler's third law, the value of the parameter b = 3/2, which is coincident with the value found using the pure metric formalism of T. Bernal et al. Unlike this pure metric formalism, which yields fourth-order field equations, the Palatini approach yields second-order field equations, which is a desirable requirement from a theoretical perspective. Thus, the phenomenology associated to astrophysical phenomena with Tully-Fisher scalings can be accounted for using this proposal, without the need to introduce any non-baryonic dark matter particles.

  2. Comment on: Gain-assisted superluminal light propagation through a Bose-Einstein condensate cavity system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macke, Bruno; Ségard, Bernard

    2016-09-01

    In a recent theoretical article [S.H. Kazemi, S. Ghanbari, M. Mahmoudi, Eur. Phys. J. D 70, 1 (2016)], Kazemi et al. claim to have demonstrated superluminal light transmission in an optomechanical system where a Bose-Einstein condensate serves as the mechanical oscillator. In fact the superluminal propagation is only inferred from the existence of a minimum of transmission of the system at the probe frequency. This condition is not sufficient and we show that, in all the cases where superluminal propagation is claimed by Kazemi et al., the propagation is in reality subluminal. Moreover, we point out that the system under consideration is not minimum-phase-shift. The Kramers-Kronig relations then only fix a lower limit to the group delay and we show that these two quantities have sometimes opposite signs.

  3. Spatial fluctuation enhancement and nonradiative-recombination-center generation due to high Si-doping into GaAs/AlAs short-period-superlattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobori, H.; Shigetani, A.; Umezu, I.; Sugimura, A.

    2006-04-01

    Through the time-resolved photoluminescence (TR-PL) measurement for excitons, we have studied the enhancement of spatial fluctuation (SF) and the generation of nonradiative-recombination-centers (NRC) due to high Si-doping into GaAs/AlAs short-period-superlattices (SPS's). We have carried out the exciton transport analysis according to Krivorotov et al. [I.N. Krivorotov, T. Chang, G.D. Gilliland, L.P. Fu, K.K. Bajaj, Phys. Rev. B 58 (1998) 10687]. From this analysis, we have obtained the temperature dependence of the exciton diffusivity, the concentration of the NRC and the average distant between adjacent localized states of excitons. The temperature dependence of the exciton diffusivity is found to be given by the sum of the temperature-independent contribution and the activation-type contribution. For the exciton diffusivity in undoped GaAs/AlAs SPS's, only the activation-type contribution has been observed. Therefore, we point out the possibility that the temperature-independent contribution comes from the tunneling through the impurities. In this experiment, the activation energy and the concentration of the NRC are found to be larger than those of undoped GaAs/AlAs SPS's. We infer that high Si-doping into GaAs/AlAs SPS causes the enhancement of the SF and the generation of NRC.

  4. Spin-dependent tunneling junctions with AlN and AlON barriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Manish; Nickel, Janice H.; Anthony, Thomas C.; Wang, Shan X.

    2000-10-01

    We report on ferromagnetic spin-dependent tunneling (SDT) junctions with NiFe/AlN/NiFe and NiFe/AlON/NiFe structures. Good barriers were formed by plasma nitridation and oxy-nitridation of Al films. Tunneling magnetoresistance ratios (TMR) up to 18% were observed at room temperature. The devices exhibit lower resistance-area products than those seen in reference junctions with Al2O3 barriers. The degradation in TMR at higher bias voltages is found to be less than that found in standard alumina junctions. AlN and AlON could thus be alternate materials for the tunnel barrier in SDT junctions.

  5. Processing and Mechanical Properties of Directionally Solidified NiAl/NiAlTa Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, D. R.; Oliver, B. F.; Noebe, R. D.; Whittenberger, J. D.

    1994-01-01

    Promising creep strengths were found for a directionally solidified NiAl-NiAlTa alloy when compared to other NiAl based intermetallics. The directionally solidified alloy had an off-eutectic composition that resulted in microstructures consisting of NiAl dendrites surrounded by aligned eutectic regions. The room temperature toughness of the two phase alloy was similar to that of polycrystalline NiAl even with the presence of the brittle Laves phase NiAlTa. Alloying additions that may improve the room temperature toughness by producing multiphase alloys are discussed.

  6. Atomic structure and oxygen deficiency of the ultrathin aluminium oxide barrier in Al/AlOx/Al Josephson junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Lunjie; Tran, Dung Trung; Tai, Cheuk-Wai; Svensson, Gunnar; Olsson, Eva

    2016-07-01

    Al/AlOx/Al Josephson junctions are the building blocks of a wide range of superconducting quantum devices that are key elements for quantum computers, extremely sensitive magnetometers and radiation detectors. The properties of the junctions and the superconducting quantum devices are determined by the atomic structure of the tunnel barrier. The nanoscale dimension and disordered nature of the barrier oxide have been challenges for the direct experimental investigation of the atomic structure of the tunnel barrier. Here we show that the miniaturized dimension of the barrier and the interfacial interaction between crystalline Al and amorphous AlOx give rise to oxygen deficiency at the metal/oxide interfaces. In the interior of the barrier, the oxide resembles the atomic structure of bulk aluminium oxide. Atomic defects such as oxygen vacancies at the interfaces can be the origin of the two-level systems and contribute to decoherence and noise in superconducting quantum circuits.

  7. Atomic structure and oxygen deficiency of the ultrathin aluminium oxide barrier in Al/AlOx/Al Josephson junctions.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Lunjie; Tran, Dung Trung; Tai, Cheuk-Wai; Svensson, Gunnar; Olsson, Eva

    2016-07-12

    Al/AlOx/Al Josephson junctions are the building blocks of a wide range of superconducting quantum devices that are key elements for quantum computers, extremely sensitive magnetometers and radiation detectors. The properties of the junctions and the superconducting quantum devices are determined by the atomic structure of the tunnel barrier. The nanoscale dimension and disordered nature of the barrier oxide have been challenges for the direct experimental investigation of the atomic structure of the tunnel barrier. Here we show that the miniaturized dimension of the barrier and the interfacial interaction between crystalline Al and amorphous AlOx give rise to oxygen deficiency at the metal/oxide interfaces. In the interior of the barrier, the oxide resembles the atomic structure of bulk aluminium oxide. Atomic defects such as oxygen vacancies at the interfaces can be the origin of the two-level systems and contribute to decoherence and noise in superconducting quantum circuits.

  8. Atomic structure and oxygen deficiency of the ultrathin aluminium oxide barrier in Al/AlOx/Al Josephson junctions

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Lunjie; Tran, Dung Trung; Tai, Cheuk-Wai; Svensson, Gunnar; Olsson, Eva

    2016-01-01

    Al/AlOx/Al Josephson junctions are the building blocks of a wide range of superconducting quantum devices that are key elements for quantum computers, extremely sensitive magnetometers and radiation detectors. The properties of the junctions and the superconducting quantum devices are determined by the atomic structure of the tunnel barrier. The nanoscale dimension and disordered nature of the barrier oxide have been challenges for the direct experimental investigation of the atomic structure of the tunnel barrier. Here we show that the miniaturized dimension of the barrier and the interfacial interaction between crystalline Al and amorphous AlOx give rise to oxygen deficiency at the metal/oxide interfaces. In the interior of the barrier, the oxide resembles the atomic structure of bulk aluminium oxide. Atomic defects such as oxygen vacancies at the interfaces can be the origin of the two-level systems and contribute to decoherence and noise in superconducting quantum circuits. PMID:27403611

  9. Silicate perovskite analogue ScAlO 3: temperature dependence of elastic moduli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kung, Jennifer; Rigden, Sally M.; Jackson, Ian

    2000-08-01

    The elastic moduli of ScAlO 3 perovskite, a very close structural analogue for MgSiO 3 perovskite, have been measured between 300 and 600 K using high precision ultrasonic interferometry in an internally heated gas-charged pressure vessel. This new capability for high temperature measurement of elastic wave speeds has been demonstrated on polycrystalline alumina. The temperature derivatives of elastic moduli of Al 2O 3 measured in this study agree within 15% with expectations based on published single-crystal data. For ScAlO 3 perovskite, the value of (∂ KS/∂ T) P is -0.033 GPa K -1 and (∂ G/∂ T) P is -0.015 GPa K -1. The relative magnitudes of these derivatives agree with the observation in Duffy and Anderson [Duffy, T.S., Anderson, D.L., 1989. Seismic velocities in mantle minerals and the mineralogy of the upper mantle. J. Geophys. Res. 94, 1895-1912.] that |(∂ KS/∂ T) P| is typically about twice |(∂ G/∂ T) P|. The value of (∂ KS/∂ T) P for ScAlO 3 is intermediate between those inferred less directly from V( P, T) studies of Fe-free and Fe- and Al-bearing MgSiO 3 perovskites [Wang, Y., Weidner, D.J., Liebermann, R.C., Zhao, Y., 1994. P- V- T equation of state of (Mg,Fe)SiO 3 perovskite: constraints on composition of the lower mantle. Phys. Earth Planet. Inter. 83, 13-40; Mao, H.K., Hemley, R.J., Shu, J., Chen, L., Jephcoat, A.P., Wu, Y., Bassett, W.A., 1991. Effect of pressure, temperature and composition on the lattice parameters and density of (Mg,Fe) SiO 3 perovskite to 30 GPa. J. Geophys. Res. 91, 8069-8079; Zhang, Weidner, D., 1999. Thermal equation of state of aluminum-enriched silicate perovskite. Science 284, 782-784]. The value of |(∂ G/∂ T)| P for ScAlO 3 is similar to those of most other mantle silicate phases but lower than the recent determination for MgSiO 3 perovskite [Sinelnikov, Y., Chen, G., Neuville, D.R., Vaughan, M.T., Liebermann, R.C., 1998. Ultrasonic shear wave velocities of MgSiO 3 perovskite at 8 GPa and 800K and

  10. Reply to the comment on `Pople versus Dunning basis-sets for group IA metal hydrides and some other second row hydrides: The case against a De Facto standard' by R.A. Klein and M.A. Zottola [Chem. Phys. Lett. 419 (2006) 254--258

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, Roger A.; Zottola, Mark A.

    2006-10-01

    In their Comment on our recent Letter [R.A. Klein, M.A. Zottola, Chem. Phys. Lett. 419 (2006) 254-258], Feller and Peterson point out that density functional theory combined with the Pople triple split-valence basis-set 6-311++G(2d,p), does indeed perform well in comparison to second-order perturbation and coupled cluster theory in combination with correlation-consistent basis-sets for the prediction of bond lengths and harmonic frequencies but does not provide acceptable accuracy for dissociation energies. MPW1PW91/6-311++G(2d,p) is, therefore, highly suitable and computationally efficient for generating starting structures for subsequent single-point (SP) calculations at higher and more computationally expensive levels of theory.

  11. The Parr formula for the superheating field in a semi-infinite film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Castillo, Pierre

    2005-05-01

    Di Bartolo, Dolgert, and Dorsey [Phys. Rev. B 53, 5650-5660 (1996)] have constructed asymptotic matched solutions at order 2 for the half-space Ginzburg-Landau model in the weak-κ limit. These authors deduced a formal expansion for the superheating field hsh(κ) up to order 4, extending the de Gennes formula [Proceedings of the Eighth Latin American School of Physics, Caracas, 1966] and the two terms in Parr's formula [Z. Phys. B 25, 359-361 (1976)]. On the other hand, the present author [Eur. J. Appl. Math 13, 519-547 (2002)] obtained two terms in the lower bound for hsh(κ). In this paper, we prove rigorously that the second term of the expansion of hsh(κ) is of the order of O(κ1/2) and we get the Parr formula. We improve the upper bound obtained by Bolley and Helffer [Ann. Inst. Henri Poincaré, Anal. Non Linéaire 14, 597-613 (1997)] and we get κ(hsh(κ))2⩽2-3/2=15/32κ+O(κ1+ρ), ρ >0. The proof is based on new estimates for f', A, and A'. To achieve this, we are guided by the analysis of the properties of the approximate solution constructed previously in [Del Castillo, Math Modell. Numer. Anal. 36, 971-973 (2002); J. Math. Phys. 44, 2416-2450 (2003); Dolgert et al., Phys. Rev. B 53, 5650-5660 (1996)].

  12. onHigh-peak-power strain-compensated GaInAs/AlInAs quantum cascade lasers (λ ˜4.6 μm) based on a slightly diagonal active region design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Q.; Lösch, R.; Bronner, W.; Hugger, S.; Fuchs, F.; Aidam, R.; Wagner, J.

    2008-12-01

    Employing a "slightly diagonal" active region design for the quantum cascade lasers compared to a reference sample based on the conventional vertical transition design [R. Köhler et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 76, 1092 (2000)], we have improved the maximum operation temperature, room-temperature maximum peak power per facet, and room-temperature slope efficiency from 320 K, 200 mW, and 570 mW/A to higher than 360 K, 3.2 W, and 2200 mW/A, respectively, for the device size of 16 μm×3 mm with as-cleaved facets operated in pulsed mode.

  13. X-ray computed microtomography of sea ice - comment on "A review of air-ice chemical and physical interactions (AICI): liquids, quasi-liquids, and solids in snow" by Bartels-Rausch et al. (2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obbard, R. W.

    2015-07-01

    This comment addresses a statement made in "A review of air-ice chemical and physical interactions (AICI): liquids, quasi-liquids, and solids in snow" by Bartels-Rausch et al. (Atmos. Chem. Phys., 14, 1587-1633, doi:10.5194/acp-14-1587-2014, 2014). Here we rebut the assertion that X-ray computed microtomography of sea ice fails to reveal liquid brine inclusions by discussing the phases present at the analysis temperature.

  14. Effects of renal impairment on aluminum (Al) kinetics and Al-induced toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Yokel, R.A.; McNamara, P.J.

    1986-03-01

    Al-induced toxicity most commonly occurs in the renally impaired. To study the influence of renal impairment on Al kinetics and toxicity, renally impaired rabbits were prepared by the remnant kidney procedure. Six weeks after partial nephrectomy creatinine clearance was 21% of controls and serum creatinine, BUN, Ca, and PO/sub 4/ were 222, 248, 122, and 50% of presurgery levels respectively. Serum Al kinetics after i.v. Al were: Al clearance 27%, initial and steady state volumes of distribution 50 and 80%, half life 362% and mean residence time 300% of controls (renally intact rabbits). Beginning 9 weeks after partial nephrectomy, rabbits received 145 to 160 ..mu..mole Al/kg s.c. daily, 5 x weekly x 4 weeks. Acquisition of a classically conditioned reflex (nictitating membrane extension) was impaired comparable to that produced by 100-200 ..mu..mole Al in controls but retention and extinction deficits were greater than those seen after 400 ..mu..mole Al in controls. Tissue Al concentrations were less than those seen after 200 ..mu..mole Al in controls. Body weight was comparable to that produced by 400 ..mu..mole Al in controls. These results suggest that renal impairment alters Al serum distribution, impairs its clearance, and increases the Al-induced impairment of memory and body weight gain.

  15. Influence of AlN thickness on AlGaN epilayer grown by MOCVD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayasakthi, M.; Juillaguet, S.; Peyre, H.; Konczewicz, L.; Baskar, K.; Contreras, S.

    2016-10-01

    AlGaN/AlN layers were grown by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) on sapphire substrates. The AlN buffer thickness was varied from 400 nm to 800 nm. The AlGaN layer thickness was 1000 nm. The crystalline quality, thickness and composition of AlGaN were determined using high resolution X-ray diffraction (HRXRD). The threading dislocation density (TDD) was found to decrease with increase of AlN layer thickness. Reciprocal space mapping (RSM) was used to estimate the strain and relaxation between AlGaN and AlN. The optical properties of AlGaN layers were investigated by temperature dependent photoluminescence (PL). PL intensities of AlGaN layers increases with increasing the AlN thickness. The surface morphology of AlGaN was studied by atomic force microscopy (AFM). Root mean square (RMS) roughness values were found to be decreased while increase of AlN thickness.

  16. Durability Assessment of TiAl Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Draper, Susan L.; Lerch, Bradley A.

    2008-01-01

    The durability of TiAl is a prime concern for the implementation of TiAl into aerospace engines. Two durability issues, the effect of high temperature exposure on mechanical properties and impact resistance, have been investigated and the results are summarized in this paper. Exposure to elevated temperatures has been shown to be detrimental to the room temperature ductility of gamma alloys with the most likely mechanisms being the ingress of interstitials from the surface. Fluorine ion implantation has been shown to improve the oxidation resistance of gamma alloys, and ideally it could also improve the environmental embrittlement of high Nb content TiAl alloys. The effect of F ion implantation on the surface oxidation and embrittlement of a third generation, high Nb content TiAl alloy (Ti-45Al-5Nb-B-C) were investigated. Additionally, the ballistic impact resistance of a variety of gamma alloys, including Ti-48Al-2Cr- 2Nb, Ti-47Al-2Cr-2Nb, ABB-2, ABB-23, NCG359E, 95A and Ti-45Al-5Nb-B-C was accessed. Differences in the ballistic impact properties of the various alloys will be discussed, particularly with respect to their manufacturing process, microstructure, and tensile properties.

  17. Diana Al-Hadid: Identity and Heritage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jungerberg, Tom; Smith, Anna; Borsh, Colleen

    2012-01-01

    Diana Al-Hadid's sculptures reflect the many locations, cultures, histories, and mythologies that have shaped her as an artist. In large-scale works which have the appearance of architectural ruins, Al-Hadid employs imagery drawn from many diverse interests including science and technology, history, and literature. She also incorporates images and…

  18. Sporadic and hereditary amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS).

    PubMed

    Ajroud-Driss, Senda; Siddique, Teepu

    2015-04-01

    Genetic discoveries in ALS have a significant impact on deciphering molecular mechanisms of motor neuron degeneration. The identification of SOD1 as the first genetic cause of ALS led to the engineering of the SOD1 mouse, the backbone of ALS research, and set the stage for future genetic breakthroughs. In addition, careful analysis of ALS pathology added valuable pieces to the ALS puzzle. From this joint effort, major pathogenic pathways emerged. Whereas the study of TDP43, FUS and C9ORF72 pointed to the possible involvement of RNA biology in motor neuron survival, recent work on P62 and UBQLN2 refocused research on protein degradation pathways. Despite all these efforts, the etiology of most cases of sporadic ALS remains elusive. Newly acquired genomic tools now allow the identification of genetic and epigenetic factors that can either increase ALS risk or modulate disease phenotype. These developments will certainly allow for better disease modeling to identify novel therapeutic targets for ALS. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Neuromuscular Diseases: Pathology and Molecular Pathogenesis.

  19. Energetics of Al13 Keggin cluster compounds

    PubMed Central

    Armstrong, Christopher R.; Casey, William H.; Navrotsky, Alexandra

    2011-01-01

    The ϵ-Al13 Keggin aluminum hydroxide clusters are essential models in establishing molecular pathways for geochemical reactions. Enthalpies of formation are reported for two salts of aluminum centered ϵ-Keggin clusters, Al13 selenate, (Na(AlO4)Al12(OH)24(SeO4)4•12H2O) and Al13 sulfate, (NaAlO4Al12(OH)24(SO4)4•12H2O). The measured enthalpies of solution, ΔHsol, at 28 °C in 5 N HCl for the ε-Al13 selenate and sulfate are −924.57 (± 3.83) and −944.30 ( ± 5.66) kJ·mol-1, respectively. The enthalpies of formation from the elements, ΔHf,el, for Al13 selenate and sulfate are −19,656.35 ( ± 67.30) kJ·mol-1, and −20,892.39 ( ± 70.01) kJ·mol-1, respectively. In addition, ΔHf,el for sodium selenate decahydrate was calculated using data from high temperature oxide melt solution calorimetry measurements: −4,006.39 ( ± 11.91) kJ·mol-1. The formation of both ε-Al13 Keggin cluster compounds is exothermic from oxide-based components but energetically unfavorable with respect to a gibbsite-based assemblage. To understand the relative affinity of the ϵ-Keggin clusters for selenate and sulfate, the enthalpy associated with two S-Se exchange reactions was calculated. In the solid state, selenium is favored in the Al13 compound relative to the binary chalcogenate, while in 5 N HCl, sulfur is energetically favored in the cluster compound compared to the aqueous solution. This contribution represents the first thermodynamic study of ε-Al13 cluster compounds and establishes a method for other such molecules, including the substituted versions that have been created for kinetic studies. Underscoring the importance of ε-Al13 clusters in natural and anthropogenic systems, these data provide conclusive thermodynamic evidence that the Al13 Keggin cluster is a crucial intermediate species in the formation pathway from aqueous aluminum monomers to aluminum hydroxide precipitates. PMID:21852572

  20. Laser fields at flat interfaces: II. Plasmon resonances in aluminium photoelectron spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raşeev, G.

    2012-07-01

    Using the model derived in paper I [G. Raşeev, Eur. Phys. J. D 66, 167 (2012)], this work presents calculations of the photoelectron spectrum (PES) of low index aluminium surfaces in the 10-30 eV region. The laser is p or transverse magnetic linearly polarized incident on a flat structureless surface and its fields are modeled in I using the vector potential in the temporal gauge. This model uses a tensor and non-local isotropic (TNLI) susceptibility and solves the classical Ampère-Maxwell equation through the use of the vector potential from the electron density-coupled integro-differential equations (VPED-CIDE). The PE cross sections are the squares of the PE transition moments calculated using the VPED-CIDE vector potential function of the penetration coordinate. The PES is obtained in a one step model using either the Fermi golden rule or the Weisskopf-Wigner (WW) expressions. The WW cross section PES compares favorably with the experimental angle and energy resolved photoelectron yield (AERPY) spectrum of Levinson et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 43, 952 (1979)], Levinson and Plummer [Phys. Rev. B 24, 628 (1981)] for Al(001) and of Barman et al. [Phys. Rev. B 58, R4285 (1998)], Barman [Curr. Sci. 88, 54 (2005)] for Al(111) surfaces. As in the experiment, our theoretical AERPY displays the multipole surface plasmon resonance at 11.32/12.75 eV for Al(001)/Al(111), mainly due to the surface contribution |⟨ψf|p·A|ψi⟩|2, the bulk plasmon minimum at 15 eV and the two single particle excitation resonances at about 16 and 22 eV. The nature of the plasmon resonances of the PES is analyzed using the reflectance, the electron density induced by the laser and Feibelman's parameter d⊥ all introduced in paper I.

  1. Beyond detection: biological physics informing progression and treatment of cancer Beyond detection: biological physics informing progression and treatment of cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, T. J.; Thompson, A. M.

    2012-12-01

    The full text of the Preface is given in the PDF file. References [1] Kaur P et al 2012 Phys. Biol. 9 065001 [2] Lobikin M et al 2012 Phys. Biol. 9 065002 [3] Tanner K 2012 Phys. Biol. 9 065003 [4] Liu S V et al 2012 Phys. Biol. 9 065004 [5] Liao D et al 2012 Phys. Biol. 9 065005 [6] Liao D et al 2012 Phys. Biol. 9 065006 [7] Orlando P A et al 2012 Phys. Biol. 9 065007

  2. Dose-enhancement effects in TaSi/Al- and Al-gate MOS devices

    SciTech Connect

    Fleetwood, D.M.; Beutler, D.E.; Draper, B.L.; Knott, D.; Brown, D.B.; Rosenstock, H.

    1988-01-01

    The response of MOS capacitors with TaSi/Al and Al electrodes to medium- and low-energy x-irradiation is investigated. Experimentally measured dose-enhancement effects are compared with computer simulations for these structures.

  3. Phase stability in binary Ti-Al

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, C. D.; Hofmeister, W. H.; Bayuzick, R. J.

    1991-01-01

    Binary Ti-Al samples containing from 46 to 54 at. pct Al were solidified while undercooled by various amounts using electromagnetic levitation techniques. A detailed thermal history of these samples was obtained with sampling rates as high as 500 KHz during recalescence. This very high sampling rate was essential to resolve the thermal events. Primary alpha solidification was observed in samples containing from 51 to 54 at. pct Al that were undercooled less than about 100 K at solidification. Primary beta solidification was found for all undercoolings tested in samples containing less than 51 at. pct Al and for undercoolings greater than about 100 K in samples containing 51 to 54 at. pct Al.

  4. The neuropathology of FTD associated With ALS.

    PubMed

    Mackenzie, Ian R A

    2007-01-01

    There is increasing recognition of a clinical overlap between frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Recent advances in our understanding of the neuropathologic, biochemical, and genetic basis of these conditions provides evidence for a common underlying pathogenesis. The neuropathology in most cases of FTD with ALS is a subtype of frontotemporal lobar degeneration, characterized by neuronal inclusions that are immunoreactive for ubiquitin but not tau (frontotemporal lobar degeneration with ubiquitinated inclusions). These cases show significant pathologic overlap with clinically pure FTD and those with classic ALS. Moreover, the ubiquitinated pathologic protein in all these conditions has recently been identified as TDP-43. A number of families have been reported with autosomal dominant FTD-ALS linked to chromosome 9p and these also have TDP-43-positive frontotemporal lobar degeneration with ubiquitinated inclusions pathology. Together, these findings suggest that FTD-ALS is part of a clinicopathologic spectrum of disease, now identified as TDP-43 proteinopathies.

  5. NiAl alloys for structural uses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koss, D. A.

    1991-01-01

    Alloys based on the intermetallic compound NiAl are of technological interest as high temperature structural alloys. These alloys possess a relatively low density, high melting temperature, good thermal conductivity, and (usually) good oxidation resistance. However, NiAl and NiAl-base alloys suffer from poor fracture resistance at low temperatures as well as inadequate creep strength at elevated temperatures. This research program explored macroalloying additions to NiAl-base alloys in order to identify possible alloying and processing routes which promote both low temperature fracture toughness and high temperature strength. Initial results from the study examined the additions of Fe, Co, and Hf on the microstructure, deformation, and fracture resistance of NiAl-based alloys. Of significance were the observations that the presence of the gamma-prime phase, based on Ni3Al, could enhance the fracture resistance if the gamma-prime were present as a continuous grain boundary film or 'necklace'; and the Ni-35Al-20Fe alloy was ductile in ribbon form despite a microstructure consisting solely of the B2 beta phase based on NiAl. The ductility inherent in the Ni-35Al-20Fe alloy was explored further in subsequent studies. Those results confirm the presence of ductility in the Ni-35Al-20Fe alloy after rapid cooling from 750 - 1000 C. However exposure at 550 C caused embrittlement; this was associated with an age-hardening reaction caused by the formation of Fe-rich precipitates. In contrast, to the Ni-35Al-20Fe alloy, exploratory research indicated that compositions in the range of Ni-35Al-12Fe retain the ordered B2 structure of NiAl, are ductile, and do not age-harden or embrittle after thermal exposure. Thus, our recent efforts have focused on the behavior of the Ni-35Al-12Fe alloy. A second parallel effort initiated in this program was to use an alternate processing technique, mechanical alloying, to improve the properties of NiAl-alloys. Mechanical alloying in the

  6. Photoelectrical, photophysical and photocatalytic properties of Al based MOFs: MIL-53(Al) and MIL-53-NH{sub 2}(Al)

    SciTech Connect

    An, Yang; Li, Huiliang; Liu, Yuanyuan; Huang, Baibiao; Sun, Qilong; Dai, Ying; Qin, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Xiaoyang

    2016-01-15

    Two Al based MOFs (MIL-53(Al) and MIL-53-NH{sub 2} (Al)) were synthesized, and their photoelectrical, photophysical and photocatalytic properties towards oxygen evolution from water were investigated. Different from the ligand to metal charge transfer process previously reported, we proposes a new photocatalytic mechanism based on electron tunneling according to the results of theoretical calculation, steady state and time resolved fluorescence spectra. The organic linkers absorb photons, giving rise to electrons and holes. Then, the photogenerated electrons tunnel through the AlO{sub 6}-octahedra, which not only inhibit the recombination of photogenerated charge carriers, but also is a key factor to the photocatalytic activity of Al based MOFs. - Graphical abstract: The photoelectrical, photophysical and photocatalytic properties towards oxygen evolution from water of two Al based MOFs were investigated. A new photocatalytic mechanism was proposed based on electron tunneling according to the results of both theoretical calculation and steady state, time resolved fluorescence spectra. The electron tunneling process not only inhibit the recombination of photogenerated charge carriers, but also is a key factor to the photocatalytic activity of Al based MOFs.

  7. Al/Al2O3 Metal Matrix Composites (MMCs) and Macrocomposites for Armor Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-01

    ceramics (high hardness, high stiffness, low thermal expansion). In this study , Al/Al2O3 MMCs with alumina particle contents ranging from 12% to 46% were...expansion). In this study , Al/Al2O3 MMCs with alumina particle contents ranging from 12% to 46% were fabricated by different processing approaches...the different MMCs. The matrix alloy, alumina volume fraction, densities, mechanical properties , and thermal properties are summarized in Table 2

  8. High temperature creep behaviour of Al-rich Ti-Al alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sturm, D.; Heilmaier, M.; Saage, H.; Aguilar, J.; Schmitz, G. J.; Drevermann, A.; Palm, M.; Stein, F.; Engberding, N.; Kelm, K.; Irsen, S.

    2010-07-01

    Compared to Ti-rich γ-TiAl-based alloys Al-rich Ti-Al alloys offer an additional reduction of in density and a better oxidation resistance which are both due to the increased Al content. Polycrystalline material was manufactured by centrifugal casting. Microstructural characterization was carried out employing light-optical, scanning and transmission electron microscopy and XRD analyses. The high temperature creep of two binary alloys, namely Al60Ti40 and Al62Ti38 was comparatively assessed with compression tests at constant true stress in a temperature range between 1173 and 1323 K in air. The alloys were tested in the cast condition (containing various amounts of the metastable phases Al5Ti3 and h-Al2Ti) and after annealing at 1223 K for 200 h which produced (thermodynamically stable) lamellar γ-TiAl + r-Al2Ti microstructures. In general, already the as-cast alloys exhibit a reasonable creep resistance at 1173 K. Compared with Al60Ti40, both, the as-cast and the annealed Al62Ti38 alloy exhibit better creep resistance up to 1323 K which can be rationalized by the reduced lamella spacing. The assessment of creep tests conducted at identical stress levels and varying temperatures yielded apparent activation energies for creep of Q = 430 kJ/mol for the annealed Al60Ti40 alloy and of Q = 383 kJ/mol for the annealed Al62Ti38 material. The latter coincides well with that of Al diffusion in γ-TiAl, whereas the former can be rationalized by the instability of the microstructure containing metastable phases.

  9. Corrosion Studies of 2195 Al-Li Alloy and 2219 Al Alloy with Differing Surface Treatments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danford, M. D.; Mendrek, M. J.

    1998-01-01

    Corrosion studies of 2195 Al-Li and 2219 Al alloys have been conducted using the scanning reference electrode technique (SRET) and the polarization resistance (PR) technique. The SRET was used to study corrosion mechanisms, while corrosion rate measurements were studied with the PR technique. Plates of Al203 blasted, soda blasted and conversion coated 2219 Al were coated with Deft primer and the corrosion rates studied with the EIS technique. Results from all of these studies are presented.

  10. Fall 2014 SEI Research Review Eliciting Unstated Requirements at Scale (EURS)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-28

    introducing ideation • Affinitize visually as well as virtually • Automate identification of relevant ideas to keep others informed of what might...Review Konrad Stoddard Oct. 28, 2014 © 2014 Carnegie Mellon University Contact Information Presenter / Point of Contact Mike Konrad Software

  11. 78 FR 45593 - Bureau of European and Eurasian Affairs (EUR) Request for Proposals for the Fundraising...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-29

    ... a 2790 square meter plot with a building footprint no more than 70% of the plot size. The Department... meter plot with a building footprint no more than 70% of the plot size. Excluding the area required...

  12. Mediterranean basins relative to lithosphere structure: Oblique element in the Eur-Africa convergence

    SciTech Connect

    Bostrom, R.C.

    1988-08-01

    The author has correlated structural data in the Mediterranean portion of the Alpide tectonic belt with the high-degree geoid and SeaSat-derived gravity. The geoid provides a uniform synoptic view of the region; by suppressing the effect of surficial tectonic features, they can identify the major lithosphere structural units.

  13. Japanese version of the ALS-FTD-Questionnaire (ALS-FTD-Q-J).

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Yasuhiro; Beeldman, Emma; Raaphorst, Joost; Izumi, Yuishin; Yoshino, Hiide; Masuda, Michihito; Atsuta, Naoki; Ito, Satoru; Adachi, Tadashi; Adachi, Yoshiki; Yokota, Osamu; Oda, Masaya; Hanashima, Ritsuko; Ogino, Mieko; Ichikawa, Hiroo; Hasegawa, Kazuko; Kimura, Hideki; Shimizu, Toshio; Aiba, Ikuko; Yabe, Hayato; Kanba, Makoto; Kusumi, Kimiyoshi; Aoki, Tetsuya; Hiroe, Yu; Watanabe, Hirohisa; Nishiyama, Kazutoshi; Nomoto, Masahiro; Sobue, Gen; Nakashima, Kenji

    2016-08-15

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD) share common clinical, genetic and neuropathological features. Some ALS patients have behavioral/personality changes, which could result in significant obstacles in the care provided by family members and caregivers. An easy screening tool would contribute greatly to the evaluation of these symptoms. We translated the ALS-FTD-Questionnaire, developed in the Netherlands, into Japanese (ALS-FTD-Q-J) and examined the clinimetric properties (internal consistency, construct and clinical validity). Patients with ALS and/or behavioral variant FTD (bvFTD) were evaluated alongside healthy controls in this multicenter study. All ALS patients, regardless of bvFTD status, were further evaluated by the frontal behavioral inventory (FBI) and for frontal/executive function, cognition, anxiety/depression, and motor functions. Data from 146 subjects were analyzed: ALS (92), ALS-bvFTD (6), bvFTD (16), and healthy controls (32). The internal consistency of the ALS-FTD-Q-J was good (Cronbach α=0.92). The ALS-FTD-Q-J showed construct validity as it exhibited a high correlation with the FBI (r=0.79). However, correlations were moderate with anxiety/depression and low with cognitive scales, in contrast to the original report, i.e. a moderate correlation with cognition and a low correlation with anxiety/depression. The ALS-FTD-Q-J discriminated ALS patients from (ALS-)bvFTD patients and controls. Thus, the ALS-FTD-Q-J is useful for evaluating Japanese ALS/FTD patients.

  14. Alanes formation on the Al(111) surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rangan, Sylvie; Veyan, Jean-Francois; Chabal, Yves J.; Chaudhuri, Santanu; Muckerman, James T.

    2008-03-01

    Alane clusters (AlxHy) are believed to be the ubiquitous intermediates in hydrogen storage reactions for a wide variety of alanates (LiAlH4, NaAlH4) currently considered for hydrogen storage. The formation and behavior of alanes at surfaces appear to control and limit the efficiency of hydrogen storage. In particular, hydrogen adsorption on the Al(111) surface leads to the coexistence of several adsorbed species, the concentration of which is affected by the step density, the surface coverage and the temperature. We combine density functional theory (DFT) and surface infra-red (IR) absorption spectroscopy to uncover the mechanisms for alane formation on Al(111) surfaces. At low coverage, DFT predicts a two-fold bridge site adsorption for atomic hydrogen, consistent with previous Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy measurements. At higher coverage, the formation of small chemisorbed AlH3 occurs at the step edges. With increasing coverage AlH3 is extracted from the step edge and becomes highly mobile on the terraces in a weakly bound state. This mobility is the key factor leading to the growth of larger alanes through AlH3 oligomerization. For these large alanes, previous Thermal Programmed Desorption studies are discussed and compared to the thermal stability observed in IR.

  15. Microwave Transmission Measurements in Gated GaAs/AlGaAs Quantum Wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stone, Kristjan; Knez, Ivan; Du, Rui-Rui; Manfra, Michael; Pfeiffer, Loren; West, Ken

    2010-03-01

    Microwave transmission measurements across a 2D electron system have been previously demonstrated in quantum Hall effect and electronic solids regime [1]. We have developed a co-planar waveguide (CPW) system for experiments in microwave-induced resistance oscillations and zero resistance states. Microwaves from a tunable source (2 - 40 GHz) were fed into our system and coupled to a CPW meander line at 300mK to measure cyclotron resonance peaks from a carbon-doped (100) GaAs/AlxGa1-xAs quantum well 2D hole system. Our samples are Hall bars with mobility μ= 0.7-1 x10^6 cm^2/Vs and carrier density ranging from 2.02 - 2.26x10^11cm-2. Each sample has been gated with AuPd using a Si3N4 dielectric. A differential power measurement δP = Pout -Pout^gate is taken with the signal from the power sensor triggered from a modulated gate to remove the background microwave signal, yielding a cyclotron resonance peak from the transmission signal. We are able to fit our cyclotron transmission signal using the Drude model and determine the hole mass and the cyclotron scattering time. Experimental data as well as a brief discussion will be presented. The work at Rice was funded by NSF DMR-0706634. [1] L. W. Engel et al, Phys. Rev. Lett. 71, 2638 (1993).

  16. Effects of hydrogen absorption in TbNiAl and UNiAl

    SciTech Connect

    Bordallo, H.N.; Nakotte, H.; Schultz, A.; Kolomiets, A.V.; Havela, L.; Andreev, A.V.

    1998-12-31

    Although hydrides of intermetallic compounds are used extensively as hydrogen-storage media, little is known about the exact nature of metal-hydrogen interactions. However, this knowledge is of essential importance for the understanding of thermodynamics and other properties. Hydrides (deuterides) of TbNiAl and UNiAl have been widely studied because of drastic increase of magnetic ordering temperature under hydrogenation. Here the authors report neutron-diffraction results of the three deuterides, TbNiAlD{sub 1.28}, TbNiAlD{sub 0.8}a nd UNiAlD{sub 2.23}.

  17. Phase diagrams of Al-Si and Al-Ge systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kagaya, Hiroko-Matsuo; Imazawa, Kazumoto; Sato, Mayumi; Soma, Toshinobu

    1998-03-01

    Considering the contributions from the band and local mode frequencies, the temperature- and pressure-dependent mean-square displacement for Al-Si and Al-Ge solid solutions is quantitatively calculated to be similar to that for matrix Al. Then, the concentration-dependence of the Debye temperature at higher and lower temperatures is estimated, the pressure effect on the solidus curve is presented by applying Lindeman's melting law to the Al-Si and Al-Ge alloy systems. The solidus curve obtained increases as a function of the pressure, and is in good agreement with the observed tendency for these solid solutions.

  18. A new discontinuously reinforced aluminum MMC: Al+AlB{sub 2} flakes

    SciTech Connect

    HALL,AARON C.; ECONOMY,J.

    2000-06-08

    Development of a novel metal matrix composite based on the Al-B alloy system has been undertaken. Preparation of this discontinuously reinforced material is based on the precipitation of high aspect ratio AlB{sub 2} from an Al-B alloy. This paper describes a number of efforts forced on preparing high volume fractions (> 30 v%) of AlB{sub 2} in aluminum. New insights into the behavior of the Al-B alloys system allowed this effort to be successful.

  19. Atomistic Modeling of RuAl and (RuNi) Al Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gargano, Pablo; Mosca, Hugo; Bozzolo, Guillermo; Noebe, Ronald D.; Gray, Hugh R. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Atomistic modeling of RuAl and RuAlNi alloys, using the BFS (Bozzolo-Ferrante-Smith) method for alloys is performed. The lattice parameter and energy of formation of B2 RuAl as a function of stoichiometry and the lattice parameter of (Ru(sub 50-x)Ni(sub x)Al(sub 50)) alloys as a function of Ni concentration are computed. BFS based Monte Carlo simulations indicate that compositions close to Ru25Ni25Al50 are single phase with no obvious evidence of a miscibility gap and separation of the individual B2 phases.

  20. Decoding ALS: from genes to mechanism.

    PubMed

    Taylor, J Paul; Brown, Robert H; Cleveland, Don W

    2016-11-10

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a progressive and uniformly fatal neurodegenerative disease. A plethora of genetic factors have been identified that drive the degeneration of motor neurons in ALS, increase susceptibility to the disease or influence the rate of its progression. Emerging themes include dysfunction in RNA metabolism and protein homeostasis, with specific defects in nucleocytoplasmic trafficking, the induction of stress at the endoplasmic reticulum and impaired dynamics of ribonucleoprotein bodies such as RNA granules that assemble through liquid-liquid phase separation. Extraordinary progress in understanding the biology of ALS provides new reasons for optimism that meaningful therapies will be identified.

  1. Ni{sub 3}Al aluminide alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, C.T.

    1993-10-01

    This paper provides a brief review of the recent progress in research and development of Ni{sub 3}Al and its alloys. Emphasis has been placed on understanding low ductility and brittle fracture of Ni{sub 3}Al alloys at ambient and elevated temperatures. Recent studies have resulted in identifying both intrinsic and extrinsic factors governing the fracture behavior of Ni{sub 3}Al alloys. Parallel efforts on alloy design using physical metallurgy principles have led to properties for structural use. Industrial interest in these alloys is high, and examples of industrial involvement in processing and utilization of these alloys are briefly mentioned.

  2. Arsenate uptake by Al nanoclusters and other Al-based sorbents during water treatment.

    PubMed

    Mertens, Jasmin; Rose, Jérôme; Wehrli, Bernhard; Furrer, Gerhard

    2016-01-01

    In many parts of the world, arsenic from geogenic and anthropogenic sources deteriorates the quality of drinking water resources. Effective methods of arsenic removal include adsorption and coagulation with iron- and aluminum-based materials, of which polyaluminum chloride is widely employed as coagulant in water treatment due to its low cost and high efficiency. We compared the arsenic uptake capacity and the arsenic bonding sites of different Al-based sorbents, including Al nanoclusters, polyaluminum chloride, polyaluminum granulate, and gibbsite. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy revealed that As(V) forms bidentate-binuclear complexes in interaction with all Al-based removal agents. The octahedral configuration of nanoclusters and the distribution of sorption sites remain the same in all types of removal agents consisting of nano-scale Al oxyhydroxide particles. The obtained distances for As(V)-O and As(V)-Al agreed with previously published data and were found to be 1.69 ± 0.02 Å and 3.17-3.21 Å, respectively. Our study suggests that As(V) binds to Al nanoclusters as strongly as to Al oxide surfaces. The As sorption capacity of Al nanoclusters was found to be very similar to that of Al clusters in a polyaluminum chloride. The most efficient Al-based sorbents for arsenic removal were Al nanoclusters, followed by polyaluminum granulate.

  3. InAlN/AlN/GaN heterostructures for high electron mobility transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usov, S. O.; Sakharov, A. V.; Tsatsulnikov, A. F.; Lundin, V. W.; Zavarin, E. E.; Nikolaev, A. E.; Yagovkina, M. A.; Zemlyakov, V. E.; Egorkin, V. I.; Ustinov, V. M.

    2016-08-01

    The results of development of InAlN/AlN/GaN heterostructures, grown on sapphire substrates by metal-organic chemical vapour deposition, and high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs) based on them are presented. The dependencies of the InAlN/AlN/GaN heterostructure properties on epitaxial growth conditions were investigated. The optimal indium content and InAlN barrier layer thicknesses of the heterostructures for HEMT s were determined. The possibility to improve the characteristics of HEMTs by in-situ passivation by Si3N4 thin protective layer deposited in the same epitaxial process was demonstrated. The InAlN/AlN/GaN heterostructure grown on sapphire substrate with diameter of 100 mm were obtained with sufficiently uniform distribution of sheet resistance. The HEMTs with saturation current of 1600 mA/mm and transconductance of 230 mS/mm are demonstrated.

  4. Oxidation of Al2O3 continuous fiber-reinforced/NiAl composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doychak, J.; Nesbitt, J. A.; Noebe, R. D.; Bowman, R. R.

    1992-01-01

    The 1200 C and 1300 C isothermal and cyclic oxidation behavior of Al2O3 continuous fiber-reinforced/NiAl composites were studied. Oxidation resulted in formation of Al2O3 external scales in a similar manner as scales formed on monolithic NiAl. The isothermal oxidation of an Al2O3/NiAl composite resulted in oxidation of the matrix along the fiber/matrix interface near the fiber ends. This oxide acted as a wedge between the fiber and the matrix, and, under cyclic oxidation conditions, led to further oxidation along the fiber lengths and eventual cracking of the composite. The oxidation behavior of composites in which the Al2O3 fibers were sputter coated with nickel prior to processing was much more severe. This was attributed to open channels around the fibers which formed during processing, most likely as a result of the diffusion of the nickel coating into the matrix.

  5. Elimination of AlGaN epilayer cracking by spatially patterned AlN mask

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarzyński, Marcin; Kryśko, Marcin; Targowski, Grzegorz; Czernecki, Robert; Sarzyńska, Agnieszka; Libura, Adam; Krupczyński, Wiktor; Perlin, Piotr; Leszczyński, Michał

    2006-03-01

    The inherent problem in III-nitride technology is the cracking of AlGaN layers that results from lattice mismatch between AlGaN and GaN. In case of thin substrates (30-90μm), such as, bulk GaN grown by the high-pressure/high-temperature method, the bowing of AlGaN /GaN strained structures becomes an additional problem. To eliminate cracking and bowing, AlGaN layers were grown on GaN substrates with an AlN mask patterned to form 3-15μm wide windows. In the 3μm window, the AlGaN layer was not cracked, although its thickness and Al composition exceeded critical values for growth on nonpatterned substrates. Dislocation density in the windows was of 5×106/cm2.

  6. Search for WH associated production in 5.3 fb-1 of pp¯ collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D0 Collaboration; Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Alves, G. A.; Ancu, L. S.; Aoki, M.; Arov, M.; Askew, A.; Åsman, B.; Atramentov, O.; Avila, C.; Backusmayes, J.; Badaud, F.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Barreto, J.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bazterra, V.; Beale, S.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Begel, M.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bellantoni, L.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besançon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bezzubov, V. A.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatnagar, V.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Bolton, T. A.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Bose, T.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brock, R.; Brooijmans, G.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Brown, J.; Bu, X. B.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Burnett, T. H.; Buszello, C. P.; Calpas, B.; Camacho-Pérez, E.; Carrasco-Lizarraga, M. A.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chen, G.; Chevalier-Théry, S.; Cho, D. K.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Christoudias, T.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clutter, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M.-C.; Croc, A.; Cutts, D.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; de, K.; de Jong, S. J.; de La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Déliot, F.; Demarteau, M.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Devaughan, K.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Dominguez, A.; Dorland, T.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duggan, D.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Dyshkant, A.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, A.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Facini, G.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Fuess, S.; Gadfort, T.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Gavrilov, V.; Gay, P.; Geist, W.; Geng, W.; Gerbaudo, D.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Golovanov, G.; Goussiou, A.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Greenwood, Z. D.; Gregores, E. M.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Grohsjean, A.; Grünendahl, S.; Grünewald, M. W.; Guo, F.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Haas, A.; Hagopian, S.; Haley, J.; Han, L.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-de La Cruz, I.; Herner, K.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hohlfeld, M.; Hossain, S.; Hubacek, Z.; Huske, N.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffré, M.; Jain, S.; Jamin, D.; Jesik, R.; Johns, K.; Johnson, M.; Johnston, D.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Joshi, J.; Juste, A.; Kaadze, K.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Kasper, P. A.; Katsanos, I.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Khatidze, D.; Kirby, M. H.; Kohli, J. M.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kurča, T.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Kvita, J.; Lammers, S.; Landsberg, G.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Lellouch, J.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lietti, S. M.; Lim, J. K.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, Y.; Liu, Z.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; Love, P.; Lubatti, H. J.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Mackin, D.; Madar, R.; Magaña-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Maravin, Y.; Martínez-Ortega, J.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C. L.; Meijer, M. M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P. G.; Merkin, M.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; Miconi, F.; Mondal, N. K.; Muanza, G. S.; Mulhearn, M.; Nagy, E.; Naimuddin, M.; Narain, M.; Nayyar, R.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Neustroev, P.; Novaes, S. F.; Nunnemann, T.; Obrant, G.; Orduna, J.; Osman, N.; Osta, J.; Otero Y Garzón, G. J.; Owen, M.; Padilla, M.; Pangilinan, M.; Parashar, N.; Parihar, V.; Park, S. K.; Parsons, J.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Patwa, A.; Penning, B.; Perfilov, M.; Peters, K.; Peters, Y.; Petrillo, G.; Pétroff, P.; Piegaia, R.; Piper, J.; Pleier, M.-A.; Podesta-Lerma, P. L. M.; Podstavkov, V. M.; Pol, M.-E.; Polozov, P.; Popov, A. V.; Prewitt, M.; Price, D.; Protopopescu, S.; Qian, J.; Quadt, A.; Quinn, B.; Rangel, M. S.; Ranjan, K.; Ratoff, P. N.; Razumov, I.; Renkel, P.; Rijssenbeek, M.; Ripp-Baudot, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rominsky, M.; Royon, C.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Safronov, G.; Sajot, G.; Sánchez-Hernández, A.; Sanders, M. P.; Sanghi, B.; Santos, A. S.; Savage, G.; Sawyer, L.; Scanlon, T.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scheglov, Y.; Schellman, H.; Schliephake, T.; Schlobohm, S.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwienhorst, R.; Sekaric, J.; Severini, H.; Shabalina, E.; Shary, V.; Shchukin, A. A.; Shivpuri, R. K.; Simak, V.; Sirotenko, V.; Skubic, P.; Slattery, P.; Smirnov, D.; Smith, K. J.; Snow, G. R.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Söldner-Rembold, S.; Sonnenschein, L.; Sopczak, A.; Sosebee, M.; Soustruznik, K.; Spurlock, B.; Stark, J.; Stolin, V.; Stoyanova, D. A.; Strauss, M.; Strom, D.; Stutte, L.; Suter, L.; Svoisky, P.; Takahashi, M.; Tanasijczuk, A.; Taylor, W.; Titov, M.; Tokmenin, V. V.; Tsai, Y.-T.; Tsybychev, D.; Tuchming, B.; Tully, C.; Tuts, P. M.; Uvarov, L.; Uvarov, S.; Uzunyan, S.; van Kooten, R.; van Leeuwen, W. M.; Varelas, N.; Varnes, E. W.; Vasilyev, I. A.; Verdier, P.; Vertogradov, L. S.; Verzocchi, M.; Vesterinen, M.; Vilanova, D.; Vint, P.; Vokac, P.; Wahl, H. D.; Wang, M. H. L. S.; Warchol, J.; Watts, G.; Wayne, M.; Weber, M.; Welty-Rieger, L.; White, A.; Wicke, D.; Williams, M. R. J.; Wilson, G. W.; Wimpenny, S. J.; Wobisch, M.; Wood, D. R.; Wyatt, T. R.; Xie, Y.; Xu, C.; Yacoob, S.; Yamada, R.; Yang, W.-C.; Yasuda, T.; Yatsunenko, Y. A.; Ye, Z.; Yin, H.; Yip, K.; Youn, S. W.; Yu, J.; Zelitch, S.; Zhao, T.; Zhou, B.; Zhu, J.; Zielinski, M.; Zieminska, D.; Zivkovic, L.

    2011-03-01

    584200875T.SjöstrandS.MrennaP.SkandsJ. High Energy Phys.06052006026versions 6.319, 6.323 and 6.409. Tune A was usedM.ManganoJ. High Energy Phys.03072003001version 2.05A.Pukhovhep-ph/99082881999E.BoosNucl. Instrum. Methods Phys. Res. A5342004250J.PumplinJ. High Energy Phys.02072002012R. Brun, F. Carminati, CERN Program Library Long Writeup, report W5013, 1993.J.M.CampbellR.K.EllisPhys. Rev. D601999113006K.A.AssamaganarXiv:hep-ph/0406152O.BreinA.DjouadiR.HarlanderPhys. Lett. B5792004149M.L.CiccoliniS.DittmaierM.KrämerPhys. Rev. D682003073003J.BaglioA.DjouadiJ. High Energy Phys.10102010064A.DjouadiJ.KalinowskiM.SpiraComput. Phys. Commun.108199856N.KidonakisPhys. Rev. D782008074005N.KidonakisPhys. Rev. D742006114012R.HambergW.L.van NeervenW.B.KilgoreNucl. Phys. B3591991343R.HambergW.L.van NeervenW.B.KilgoreNucl. Phys. B6442002403A.D.MartinR.G.RobertsW.J.StirlingR.S.ThornePhys. Lett. B604200461V.M. Abazov, et al., D0 Collaboration, FERMILAB-PUB-10/544-E, 2010, arXiv:1101.0124 [hep-ex], Phys. Rev. D, submitted for publication.J.HegemanJ. Phys. Conf. Ser.1602009012024V.M.AbazovD0 CollaborationPhys. Lett. B6702009292Only tau leptons decaying to hadrons are considered as tau candidates; those decaying to electrons or muons are included in the respective lepton contribution.V.M.AbazovD0 CollaborationPhys. Rev. D762007092007G.BlazeyU.BaurR.K.EllisD.ZeppenfeldProceedings of the Workshop “QCD and Weak Boson Physics in Run II”200047arXiv:hep-ex/0005012Fermilab-Pub-00/297J.AlwallEur. Phys. C532008473V.M.AbazovD0 CollaborationNucl. Instrum. Methods Phys. Res. A6202010490L.BreimanMachine Learning4520015I.NarskyarXiv:physics/05071432005S.ParkeS.VeseliPhys. Rev. D601999093003Aplanarity is defined as 32λ, where λ is the smallest eigenvalue of the normalized momentum tensor M=(∑piopjo)/(∑|p|2), where o runs over the jets and charged lepton in the event, and pio is the i-th 3-momentum component of the o-th physics object.χ is the angle between the charged lepton and dijet system

  7. Diffusion at the Al/Al oxide interface during electromigration in wide lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Augur, R. A.; Wolters, R. A. M.; Schmidt, W.; Dirks, A. G.; Kordić, S.

    1996-03-01

    Significant large-scale modification of the surface of Al-Si conductors was observed, due to electromigration in wide lines and under low stress conditions. After electromigration stressing the Al layers showed local thickness variations, i.e., damage by thinning. The mechanism underlying this damage causes substantial metal transport. Nevertheless, damage by thinning has received little attention in the past. Thinning was observed: (1) in a number of different alloys (Al-Si, Al-Cu, Al-Si-V, and Al-Si-V-Pd), (2) with a number of different underlayers [SiO2, W-Ti (no vacuum break after Al deposition) and W-Ti (oxidized surface before Al deposition)], (3) over an extended temperature range, (4) over a range of current density, and (5) in structures with and without passivation. The results show that thinning is a general phenomenon. An activation energy of approximately 0.5 eV was determined for the temperature dependence of a combined mechanism of concurrent thinning plus voiding in Al99Si1. Several alternatives are examined to explain the observations, namely mass movement along dislocations, Al bulk diffusion, and diffusion at the interface between the Al and its oxide. It is shown that diffusion at the Al/Al oxide interface most probably plays an important role in the damage mechanism, even under stress conditions where grain boundary diffusion is traditionally thought to dominate. Results also showed that alloying of Al with Pd can reduce the effects of damage by thinning.

  8. Interdiffusion in Diffusion Couples: U-Mo v. Al and Al-Si

    SciTech Connect

    D. D. Keiser, Jr.; E. Perez; B. Yao; Y. H. Sohn

    2009-11-01

    Interdiffusion and microstructural development in the U-Mo-Al system was examined using solid-tosolid diffusion couples consisting of U-7wt.%Mo, U-10wt.%Mo and U-12wt.%Mo vs. pure Al, annealed at 600°C for 24 hours. The influence of Si alloying addition (up to 5 wt.%) in Al on the interdiffusion microstructural development was also examined using solid-to-solid diffusion couples consisting of U-7wt.%Mo, U-10wt.%Mo and U-12wt.%Mo vs. pure Al, Al-2wt.%Si, and Al-5wt.%Si annealed at 550°C up to 20 hours. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) were employed to examine the development of a very fine multiphase intermetallic layer. In ternary U-Mo-Al diffusion couples annealed at 600°C for 24 hours, interdiffusion microstructure varied of finely dispersed UAl3, UAl4, U6Mo4Al43, and UMo2Al20 phases while the average composition throughout the interdiffusion zone remained constant at approximately 80 at.% Al. Interdiffusion microstructure observed by SEM/TEM analyses and diffusion paths drawn from concentration profiles determined by EPMA appear to deviate from the assumption of “local thermodynamic equilibrium,” and suggest that interdiffusion occurs via supersaturated UAl4 followed by equilibrium transformation into UAl3, U6Mo4Al43, UAl4 and UMo2Al20 phases. Similar observation was made for U-Mo vs. Al diffusion couples annealed at 550°C. The addition of Si (up to 5 wt.%) in Al significantly reduced the thickness of the intermetallic layer by changing the constituent phases of the interdiffusion zone developed in U-Mo vs. Al-Si diffusion couples. Specifically, the formation of (U,Mo)(Al,Si)3 with relatively large solubility for Mo and Si, along with UMo2Al20 phases was observed along with disappearance of U6Mo4Al43 and UAl4 phases. Simplified understanding based on U-Al, U-Si, and Mo-Si binary phase diagrams is discussed in the light of the beneficial effect of Si alloying addition.

  9. Osmotic self-propulsion of slender particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnitzer, Ory; Yariv, Ehud

    2015-03-01

    We consider self-diffusiophoresis of axisymmetric particles using the continuum description of Golestanian et al. ["Designing phoretic micro-and nano-swimmers," New J. Phys. 9, 126 (2007)], where the chemical reaction at the particle boundary is modelled by a prescribed distribution of solute absorption and the interaction of solute molecules with that boundary is represented by diffusio-osmotic slip. With a view towards modelling of needle-like particle shapes, commonly employed in experiments, the self-propulsion problem is analyzed using slender-body theory. For a particle of length 2L, whose boundary is specified by the axial distribution κ(z) of cross-sectional radius, we obtain the approximation - /μ 2 D L ∫- L L j ( z ) /d κ ( z ) d z d z for the particle velocity, wherein j(z) is the solute-flux distribution, μ the diffusio-osmotic slip coefficient, and D the solute diffusivity. This approximation can accommodate discontinuous flux distributions, which are commonly used for describing bimetallic particles; it agrees strikingly well with the numerical calculations of Popescu et al. ["Phoretic motion of spheroidal particles due to self-generated solute gradients," Eur. Phys. J. E: Soft Matter Biol. Phys. 31, 351-367 (2010)], performed for spheroidal particles.

  10. On Dobbert et al, 'Cultural Transmission...'

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gearing, Frederick

    1984-01-01

    Criticizes Dobbert et al's model of cultural transmission (presented in earlier article) as being a species of social physics. Suggests improvements to the model, notably that observation and analysis at the emic level be taken into account. (RDN)

  11. Pike International, LLC et al. Information Sheet

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Pike International LLC, et al. (the Company) is located in New Haven, Connecticut. The Complaint involves the lease of, and renovation activities conducted at, property constructed prior to 1978, located in New Haven, Connecticut.

  12. ALS and Oxidative Stress: The Neurovascular Scenario

    PubMed Central

    Thakur, Keshav; Gupta, Pawan Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Oxidative stress and angiogenic factors have been placed as the prime focus of scientific investigations after an establishment of link between vascular endothelial growth factor promoter (VEGF), hypoxia, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) pathogenesis. Deletion of the hypoxia-response element in the vascular endothelial growth factor promoter and mutant superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) which are characterised by atrophy and muscle weakness resulted in phenotype resembling human ALS in mice. This results in lower motor neurodegeneration thus establishing an important link between motor neuron degeneration, vasculature, and angiogenic molecules. In this review, we have presented human, animal, and in vitro studies which suggest that molecules like VEGF have a therapeutic, diagnostic, and prognostic potential in ALS. Involvement of vascular growth factors and hypoxia response elements also highlights the converging role of oxidative stress and neurovascular network for understanding and treatment of various neurodegenerative disorders like ALS. PMID:24367722

  13. 12th Annual ALS Users' Association Meeting

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, Arthur L.

    1999-12-17

    Science took the front seat as 219 Advanced Light Source (ALS) users and staff gathered on Monday and Tuesday, October 18 and 19 for the twelfth annual users' meeting. The bulk of the meeting was dedicated to reports on science at the ALS. Packed into two busy days were 31 invited oral presentations and 80 submitted poster presentations, as well as time to visit 24 vendor booths. The oral sessions were dedicated to environmental science, chemical dynamics, biosciences, magnetic materials, and atomic and molecular science. In addition, there was an ALS highlights session that emphasized new results and a session comprising highlights from the young scientists who will carry the ALS into the future.

  14. Half life of /sup 26/Al

    SciTech Connect

    Norris, T.L.; Gancarz, A.J.; Rokop, D.J.; Thomas, K.W.

    1983-01-01

    The half-life of /sup 26/Al has been redetermined because of suggestions of an error in the accepted value based on its use in calculating /sup 21/Ne production rates from cosmic rays in meteorites. Two solutions of /sup 26/Al were analyzed for the specific radioactivity and mass spectrometric determination of the /sup 26/Al concentration. The half-life obtained for /sup 26/Al was 7.05 x 10/sup 5/ years +- 3.7% at the two sigma level. This is identical to the accepted value of 7.16 x 10/sup 5/ years and indicates that problems with the /sup 21/Ne production rate is not due to an erroneous half-life.

  15. Al Qaeda: A Modern Day Lernaean Hydra

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-03-01

    insurgency. Still others have referred to it as a netwar organization waging conflict primarily through the use of networks. A few authors have...organization waging conflict primarily through the use of networks. A few authors have characterized it as a religious movement. Like the Hydra, Al...Al Qaeda as an insurgency. Still others have referred to it as a Netwar organization waging conflict primarily through the use of networks.1 A

  16. Patterns of inheritance in familial ALS.

    PubMed

    Bradley, Marcus; Bradley, Lloyd; de Belleroche, Jackie; Orrell, Richard W

    2005-05-10

    We investigated 185 families with ALS for evidence of anticipation and mitochondrial inheritance. Although initial analysis demonstrated significant anticipation of age at death between generations in patients with familial ALS, further analysis demonstrated features of regression to the mean, suggesting that the perceived differences are the result of bias. In addition, there was no evidence of an effect of preferential maternal inheritance, which would have supported transmission of mitochondrial DNA mutations.

  17. 17th Annual ALS Users' Association Meeting

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, Art; Tamura, Lori

    2004-11-29

    It's not exactly Russian roulette, but scheduling October events outdoors is not risk-free, even in usually sunny California. An overflow crowd of more than 400 registered users, ALS staff, and vendors enjoyed a full indoor program featuring science highlights and workshops spread over two and a half days from October 18 to October 20. However, a major storm, heralding the onset of the San Francisco Bay Area rainy season, posed a few weather challenges for the events on the ALS patio.

  18. Modeling of precipitation in Al alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Asta, M.; Foiles, S.M.; Wolfer, W.G.

    1996-10-01

    Objective was the development of a computational model of precipitation from a supersaturated alloy solid solution. The model is based on the formalism of chemical-reaction-rate theory combined with classical descriptions of precipitate thermodynamic properties and a mean-field treatment of diffusion-limited growht and coarsening. For the case of precipitation of Al{sub 3}Sc in supersaturated Al-Sc alloys, it is demonstrated how the model can be used to calculate number densities and size distributions of precipitates as a function of aging time and temperature, including effects of continuous cooling and thermally generated point defects. Application of the model to a specific alloy system requires knowledge of diffusion data, point defect energetics, and thermodynamic properties for bulk phases and interphase interfaces. For interfaces and point defects, thermodynamic data can be difficult to measure and reliable values of defect free energies are often unavailable. For this reason, part of the efforts were devoted to applying semiempirical and first-principles atomistic techniques to the calculation of interfacial and point-defect thermodynamic properties. This report discusses applications for interphase interfaces in the Al-Ag, Al-Sc, and Al-Li alloy systems. We also describe atomistic work aimed at understanding the energetics of vacancy clusters in Al. These clusters serve as sinks for isolated vacancies during aging and their growth can lead to more complex defects, such as dislocation loops, that act as heterogeneous nucleation sites.

  19. Theoretics-directed effect of copper or aluminum content on the ductility characteristics of Al-based (Al3Ti, AlTi, AlCu, AlTiCu2) intermetallic compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yong; Ma, Xiao-Juan; Liu, Qi-Jun; Kong, Ge-Xing; Ma, Hai-Xia; Wang, Wen-Peng; Wang, Yi-Gao; Jiao, Zhen; Liu, Fu-Sheng; Liu, Zheng-Tang

    2016-11-01

    First-principle simulations have been applied to investigate the effect of copper (Cu) or aluminum (Al) content on the ductility of Al3Ti, AlTi, AlCu, and AlTiCu2 alloys. The mechanical stable and elastic properties of Al-based intermetallic compounds are researched by density functional theory with the generalized gradient approximation (DFT-GGA). The calculated lattice constants are in conformity with the previous experimental and theoretical data. The deduced elastic constants show that the investigated Al3Ti, AlTi, AlCu, and AlTiCu2 structures are mechanically stable. Shear modulus, Young’s modulus, Poisson’s ratio, and the ratio B/G have also been figured out by using reckoned elastic constants. A further analysis of Young’s modulus and Poisson’s ratio reveals that the third added element copper content has significant effects on the Al-Ti-based ICs ductile character. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 41674088, 11574254, 11272296, and 11547311), the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2011CB808201), the Fundamental Research Fund for the Central Universities, China (Grant Nos. 2682014ZT30 and 2682014ZT31), and the Fund of the State Key Laboratory of Solidification Processing in Northwestern Polytechnical University, China (Grant No. SKLSP201511).

  20. Metastability in the MgAl2O4-Al2O3 System

    DOE PAGES

    Wilkerson, Kelley R.; Smith, Jeffrey D.; Hemrick, James G.

    2014-07-22

    Aluminum oxide must take a spinel form ( γ-Al2O3) at elevated temperatures in order for extensive solid solution to form between MgAl2O4 and α-Al2O3. The solvus line between MgAl2O4 and Al2O3 has been defined at 79.6 wt% Al2O3 at 1500°C, 83.0 wt% Al2O3 at 1600°C, and 86.5 wt% Al2O3 at 1700°C. A metastable region has been defined at temperatures up to 1700°C which could have significant implications for material processing and properties. Additionally, initial processing could have major implications on final chemistry. The spinel solid solution region has been extended to form an infinite solid solution with Al2O3 at elevatedmore » temperatures. A minimum in melting at 1975°C and a chemistry of 96 wt% Al2O3 rather than a eutectic is present, resulting in no eutectic crystal formation during solidification.« less

  1. Temperature dependence of the dielectric response of anodized Al-Al2O3-metal capacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hickmott, T. W.

    2003-03-01

    The temperature dependence of capacitance, CM, and conductance, GM, of Al-Al2O3-metal capacitors with Cu, Ag, and Au electrodes has been measured between 100 and 340 K at seven frequencies between 10 kHz and 1 MHz. Al2O3 films between 15 and 64 nm thick were formed by anodizing evaporated Al films in borate-glycol or borate-H2O electrolyte. The interface capacitance at the Al2O3-metal interface, CI, which is in series with the capacitance CD due to the Al2O3 dielectric, is determined from plots of 1/CM versus insulator thickness. CI is not fixed for a given metal-insulator interface but depends on the vacuum system used to deposit the metal electrode. CI is nearly temperature independent. When CI is taken into account the dielectric constant of Al2O3 determined from capacitance measurements is ˜8.3 at 295 K. The dielectric constant does not depend on anodizing electrolyte, insulator thickness, metal electrode, deposition conditions for the metal electrode or measurement frequency. By contrast, GM of Al-Al2O3-metal capacitors depends on both the deposition conditions of the metal and on the metal. For Al-Al2O3-Cu capacitors, GM is larger for capacitors with large values of 1/CI that result when Cu is evaporated in an oil-pumped vacuum system. For Al-Al2O3-Ag capacitors, GM does not depend on the Ag deposition conditions.

  2. Exchange bias induced at a Co2FeAl0.5Si0.5/Cr interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, C. N. T.; Vick, A. J.; Inami, N.; Ono, K.; Frost, W.; Hirohata, A.

    2017-03-01

    In order to engineer the strength of an exchange bias in a cubic Heusler alloy layer, crystalline strain has been induced at a ferromagnet/antiferromagnet interface by their lattice mismatch in addition to the conventional interfacial exchange coupling between them. Such interfaces have been formed in (Co2FeAl0.5Si0.5(CFAS)/Cr)3 structures grown by ultrahigh vacuum molecular beam epitaxy. The magnetic and structural properties have been characterised to investigate the exchange interactions at the CFAS/Cr interfaces. Due to the interfacial lattice mismatch of 1.4%, the maximum offset of 18 Oe in a magnetisation curve has been measured for the case of a CFAS (2 nm)/Cr (0.9 nm) interface at 193 K. The half-metallic property of CFAS has been observed to remain unchanged, which agrees with the theoretical prediction by Culbert et al (2008 J. Appl. Phys. 103 07D707). Such a strain-induced exchange bias may provide insight of the interfacial interactions and may offer a wide flexibility in spintronic device design.

  3. Nanolabyrinthine ZrAlN thin films by self-organization of interwoven single-crystal cubic and hexagonal phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghafoor, Naureen; Johnson, Lars J. S.; Klenov, Dmitri O.; Demeulemeester, Jelly; Desjardins, Patrick; Petrov, Ivan; Hultman, Lars; Odén, Magnus

    2013-08-01

    Self-organization on the nanometer scale is a trend in materials research. Thermodynamic driving forces may, for example, yield chessboard patterns in metal alloys [Y. Ni and A. G. Khachaturyan, Nature Mater. 8, 410-414 (2009)], 10.1038/nmat2431 or nitrides [P. H. Mayrhofer, A. Hörling, L. Karlsson, J. Sjölén, T. Larsson, and C. Mitterer, Appl. Phys. Lett. 83, 2049 (2003)], 10.1063/1.1608464 during spinodal decomposition. Here, we explore the ZrN-AlN system, which has one of the largest positive enthalpies of mixing among the transition metal aluminum nitrides [D. Holec, R. Rachbauer, L. Chen, L. Wang, D. Luefa, and P. H. Mayrhofer, Surf. Coat. Technol. 206, 1698-1704 (2011), 10.1016/j.surfcoat.2011.09.019; B. Alling, A. Karimi, and I. Abrikosov, Surf. Coat. Technol. 203, 883-886 (2008)], 10.1016/j.surfcoat.2008.08.027. Surprisingly, a highly regular superhard (36 GPa) two-dimensional nanolabyrinthine structure of two intergrown single crystal phases evolves during magnetron sputter thin film synthesis of Zr0.64Al0.36N/MgO(001). The self-organization is surface driven and the synergistic result of kinetic limitations, where the enthalpy reduction balances both investments in interfacial and elastic energies.

  4. A concise introduction to Colombeau generalized functions and their applications in classical electrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gsponer, Andre

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this introduction to Colombeau algebras of generalized functions (in which distributions can be freely multiplied) is to explain in elementary terms the essential concepts necessary for their application to basic nonlinear problems in classical physics. Examples are given in hydrodynamics and electrodynamics. The problem of the self-energy of a point electric charge is worked out in detail: the Coulomb potential and field are defined as Colombeau generalized functions, and integrals of nonlinear expressions corresponding to products of distributions (such as the square of the Coulomb field and the square of the delta function) are calculated. Finally, the methods introduced in Gsponer (2007 Eur. J. Phys. 28 267, 2007 Eur. J. Phys. 28 1021 and 2007 Eur. J. Phys. 28 1241), to deal with point-like singularities in classical electrodynamics are confirmed.

  5. Effects of Al(III) and nano-Al13 species on malate dehydrogenase activity.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaodi; Cai, Ling; Peng, Yu; Li, Huihui; Chen, Rong Fu; Shen, Ren Fang

    2011-01-01

    The effects of different aluminum species on malate dehydrogenase (MDH) activity were investigated by monitoring amperometric i-t curves for the oxidation of NADH at low overpotential using a functionalized multi-wall nanotube (MWNT) modified glass carbon electrode (GCE). The results showed that Al(III) and Al(13) can activate the enzymatic activity of MDH, and the activation reaches maximum levels as the Al(III) and Al(13) concentration increase. Our study also found that the effects of Al(III) and Al(13) on the activity of MDH depended on the pH value and aluminum speciation. Electrochemical and circular dichroism spectra methods were applied to study the effects of nano-sized aluminum compounds on biomolecules.

  6. Microscopic Properties of Long-Period Ordering in Al-Rich TiAl Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hata, S.; Nakano, T.; Kuwano, N.; Itakura, M.; Matsumura, S.; Umakoshi, Y.

    2008-07-01

    The ordering mechanism of long-period superstructures (LPSs) in Al-rich TiAl alloys has been investigated by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). The LPSs are classified in terms of arrangements of base clusters with different shapes and compositions formed in Ti-rich (002) layers of L10-TiAl matrix: square Ti4Al, fat rhombus Ti3Al, and lean rhombus Ti2Al type clusters. The HRTEM observations revealed that antiphase boundaries of long-range-ordered LPS domains and short-range-ordered microdomains are constructed by various space-filling arrangements of the base clusters. Such a microscopic property characterized by the base clusters and their arrangements is markedly analogous to that of the {left< {{text{1,1/2,0}}} rightrangle } * special-point ordering alloys such as Ni-Mo.

  7. Effects of Al(III) and Nano-Al13 Species on Malate Dehydrogenase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xiaodi; Cai, Ling; Peng, Yu; Li, Huihui; Chen, Rong Fu; Shen, Ren Fang

    2011-01-01

    The effects of different aluminum species on malate dehydrogenase (MDH) activity were investigated by monitoring amperometric i-t curves for the oxidation of NADH at low overpotential using a functionalized multi-wall nanotube (MWNT) modified glass carbon electrode (GCE). The results showed that Al(III) and Al13 can activate the enzymatic activity of MDH, and the activation reaches maximum levels as the Al(III) and Al13 concentration increase. Our study also found that the effects of Al(III) and Al13 on the activity of MDH depended on the pH value and aluminum speciation. Electrochemical and circular dichroism spectra methods were applied to study the effects of nano-sized aluminum compounds on biomolecules. PMID:22163924

  8. Protective Al2O3 scale formation on NbAl3-base alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doychak, J.; Hebsur, M. G.

    1991-01-01

    The oxidation of NbAl3 with additions of Cr and Y was studied to determine the mechanisms of the beneficial effects of these elements upon oxidation. Cr additions to the binary NbAl3 alloy of up to 6.8 at. percent reduced the scale growth rates and promoted alpha-Al2O3 formation over much longer times relative to binary NbAl3. A major effect of Cr is to form a layer of AlNbCr at the metal/scale interface, which is inherently more oxidation-resistant than the matrix alloy in the long term. Yttrium additions to a Cr-containing alloy improved the scale growth rate and adherence and changed the scale microstructure to mimic that of a typical protective Al2O3 scale.

  9. Magnetic behavior of CoPt-AlN granular structure laminated with AlN layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Youxing; Shi, Ji; Nakamura, Yoshio

    2011-04-01

    The magnetic behavior of CoPt-AlN granular structure laminated with AlN layers has been studied. Ultrathin multilayer structure, [CoPt0.5 nm/AlN0.5nm]4, is used as the precursor of the magnetic layers, which are separated by 5-nm-thick AlN layers. Upon thermal annealing, the ultrathin multilayer transforms into CoPt-AlN granular structure, and the thick AlN layers remain to be spacers. When the film was annealed at 400 °C, the out-of-plane direction becomes the easy axis of magnetization, although the coercivity remains small. TEM observation has proved that CoPt shows disklike shape at such an annealing temperature. When increasing the annealing temperature to 600 °C and above, the films show "isotropic" magnetic behavior due to the formation of equiaxial CoPt particles in the magnetic layers.

  10. Potential skin involvement in ALS: revisiting Charcot's observation - a review of skin abnormalities in ALS.

    PubMed

    Paré, Bastien; Gros-Louis, François

    2017-03-25

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a neurodegenerative disease affecting motor neurons of the brain and spinal cord, leading to progressive paralysis and death. Interestingly, many skin changes have been reported in ALS patients, but never as yet fully explained. These observations could be due to the common embryonic origin of the skin and neural tissue known as the ectodermal germ layer. Following the first observation in ALS patients' skin by Dr Charcot in the 19th century, in the absence of bedsores unlike other bedridden patients, other morphological and molecular changes have been observed. Thus, the skin could be of interest in the study of ALS and other neurodegenerative diseases. This review summarizes skin changes reported in the literature over the years and discusses about a novel in vitro ALS tissue-engineered skin model, derived from patients, for the study of ALS.

  11. Process Capability Analysis of Vacuum Moulding for Development of Al-Al2O3 MMC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, R.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the present study is to investigate process capability of vacuum moulding (VM) for development of Al-Al2O3 metal matrix composite (MMC). Starting from the identification of component, prototypes were prepared (with three different input parameters namely: vacuum pressure; component volume and sand grit size to give output in form of dimensional accuracy). Measurements on the coordinate measuring machine helped in calculating the dimensional tolerances of the Al-Al2O3 MMC prepared. Some important mechanical properties were also compared to verify the suitability of the components. Final components produced are acceptable as per ISO standard UNI EN 20286-I (1995). The results of study suggest that VM process lies in ±4.5 sigma (σ) limit as regard to dimensional accuracy of Al-Al2O3 MMC is concerned. This process ensures rapid production of pre-series technological prototypes and proof of concept at less production cost and time.

  12. Relative importance of hydrolyzed Al(III) species (Al(a), Al(b), and Al(c)) during coagulation with polyaluminum chloride: a case study with the typical micro-polluted source waters.

    PubMed

    Yan, Mingquan; Wang, Dongsheng; Qu, Jiuhui; He, Wenjie; Chow, Christopher W K

    2007-12-15

    The relative importance of three different Al species, Al(a) (monomeric species, instantaneous reacted species), Al(b) (medium polymer species, reacted less than 120 min), and Al(c) (colloidal or solid species, no reaction), defined by timed complexation reaction rate measured by using ferron reagent in polyaluminum chloride (PACl) was investigated in terms of DOC (dissolved organic carbon), UV(254), and turbidity removal efficiencies. Micro-polluted, typical North China, source waters were used to conduct the experiments. The results show that DOC removal is correlated well to the content of Al(b). Removal of UV(254) is determined by the content of Al(b) and Al(c), particularly Al(c). Turbidity removal is primarily related to the content of Al(c); however, Al(b) could destabilize particles efficiently, and the flocs formed by Al(b) are not as large as those formed by Al(c), which affected the settling efficiency. Unlike the preformed Al(b), the in situ formed Al(b) could remove turbidity more efficiently since Al(c) is the dominant final species formed during coagulation. Al(a) shows a strong ability to react with some unsatisfied coordinate bonds of organic matter to facilitate particle and DOC removal. The distinct coagulation feature of Al(a), Al(b), and Al(c) can be applied to develop tailor-made PACl (with the correct distribution of Al species) to match the characteristics of raw water for optimized coagulation.

  13. The lowest ionization potentials of Al2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Barnes, Leslie A.; Taylor, Peter R.

    1988-01-01

    Potential curves for the lowest two electronic states (X 2 sigma g + and A 2 pi u) of Al2(+) were computed using complete active space SCF/multireference CI wave functions and large Gaussian basis sets. The lowest observable vertical ionization potential (to Al2(+) X 2 sigma g +) of the Al2 X 3 pi u ground state is calculated to occur around 6.1 eV, in excellent agreement with the experimental range of 6.0 to 6.42 eV obtained in recent cluster ionization studies by Cox and co-workers. The second vertical ionization potential (to Al2(+) A 2 pi u) occurs near 6.4 eV, also within the experimental range. The adiabatic IP of 5.90 eV is in good agreement with the value of 5.8 to 6.1 eV deduced by Hanley and co-workers from the difference in thresholds between collision induced dissociation processes of Al3(+). The computed IP values are somewhat larger than those deduced from branching ratios in cluster fragmentation experiments by Jarrold and co-workers. The observation of an ionization threshold below 6.42 eV is shown to be incompatible with an Al2 ground electronic state assignment of 3 sigma g -, but the separation between the two lowest states of Al2 is so small that it is likely that both are populated in the experiments, so that this does not provide unambiguous support for the recent theoretical assignment of the ground state as 3 pi u.

  14. Influence of RCS on Al-3Mg and Al-3Mg-0.25Sc alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhovi, Prabhakar M.; Venkateswarlu, K.

    2016-02-01

    An influence of repetitive corrugation and straightening (RCS) was studied on Al-3Mg and Al-3Mg-0.25Sc alloys up to eight passes. Each pass consist of a corrugation and followed by straightening. This has resulted in introducing large plastic strain in sample, and thus led to formation of sub-micron grain sizes with high angle grain boundaries. These sub grain formation was eventually resulted in improved mechanical properties. The average grain size of Al-3Mg-0.25Sc alloy after 8 passes yielded to ∼0.6pm. Microhardness, strength properties were evaluated and it suggests that RCS was responsible for high hardness values as compared to the as cast samples. The microhardness values after RCS were 105 HV and 130 HV for Al-3Mg and Al-3Mg-0.25Sc alloys, respectively. Similarly, ∼ 40% improvement in tensile strength from 240 MPa to 370 MPa was observed for Al- 3Mg-0.25Sc alloy after RCS process.Al-3Mg and Al-3Mg-0.25Scalloys exhibited maximum strength of 220 MPa and 370 MPa, respectively. It is concluded that RCS process has a strong influence on Al- 3Mg and Al-3Mg-0.25Sc alloys for obtaining improved mechanical properties and grain refinement. In addition to RCS process and presence of AESc precipitates in Al-3Mg-0.25Sc alloy had a significant role in grain refinement and improved mechanical properties as compared to Al-3Mg alloy.

  15. Stabilization of itinerant (band) magnetism in FeAl by Ga substitution for Al

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papaconstantopoulos, D. A.; Mazin, I. I.; Hathaway, K. B.

    2001-06-01

    Band structure calculations of FeGa1-xAlx have been performed, to further investigate the stability of ferromagnetism in FeAl. The Stoner parameter increases by about 20% at the FeGa end. This is also confirmed by our spin-polarized calculations. We conclude that Ga substitution for Al is likely to stabilize the elusive (or illusive) ferromagnetic state in FeAl.

  16. Another Security Improvement over the Lin et al.'s E-voting Scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asaar, Maryam Rajabzadeh; Mohajeri, Javad; Salmasizadeh, Mahmoud

    In 2003, Lin et al. have proposed an electronic voting scheme which can be utilized in large-scale elections, and claimed it detects double voting. But in this paper, by presenting an attack, we show that voters can successfully vote more than once without being detected. Hence, we propose a new modified scheme based on the Lin et al.'s scheme with the same efficiency to solve this weakness and analyze its security.

  17. Two-Phase (TiAl+TiCrAl) Coating Alloys for Titanium Aluminides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brady, Michael P. (Inventor); Smialek, James L. (Inventor); Brindley, William J. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    A coating for protecting titanium aluminide alloys, including the TiAl gamma + Ti3Al (alpha(sub 2)) class, from oxidative attack and interstitial embrittlement at temperatures up to at least 1000 C. is disclosed. This protective coating consists essentially of titanium, aluminum. and chromium in the following approximate atomic ratio: Ti(41.5-34.5)Al(49-53)Cr(9.5-12.5)

  18. Small Al clusters. II - Structure and binding in Al(n) (n = 2-6, 13)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pettersson, Lars G. M.; Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Halicioglu, Timur

    1987-01-01

    The structure and stability of aluminum clusters containing up to six atoms have been studied using correlated wave functions and extended basis sets. The lowest energy structure is planar for Al4 and Al5, but three dimensional for Al6. The icosahedral, hcp, fcc, and two planar structures of Al13 were considered at the SCF level. The lowest energy structure is the icosahedron, but the planar structures are fairly low lying even in this case. A simplified description using two- and three-body interaction potentials is found to agree well with the ab initio structures and binding energies.

  19. The Dissociation Energies of AlH2 and AlAr

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ricca, Alessandra; Partridge, Harry; Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Visscher, Luuk; Langhoff, Stephen R. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    The D(sub 0) values for AlH2 and AlAr are computed using the coupled cluster approach in conjunction with large basis sets. Basis set superposition and spin-orbit effects are accounted for as they are sizeable due to the small binding energy. The computed dissociation energy for AlAr is 101 /cm , which is 83% of the experimental value (122.4/ cm). Our best estimate for the H2 binding energy in AlH2 is 40 +/- 28 /cm.

  20. Synthesis of core-shell AlOOH hollow nanospheres by reacting Al nanoparticles with water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lozhkomoev, A. S.; Glazkova, E. A.; Bakina, O. V.; Lerner, M. I.; Gotman, I.; Gutmanas, E. Y.; Kazantsev, S. O.; Psakhie, S. G.

    2016-05-01

    A novel route for the synthesis of boehmite nanospheres with a hollow core and the shell composed of highly crumpled AlOOH nanosheets by oxidizing Al nanopowder in pure water under mild processing conditions is described. The stepwise events of Al transformation into boehmite are followed by monitoring the pH in the reaction medium. A mechanism of formation of hollow AlOOH nanospheres with a well-defined shape and crystallinity is proposed which includes the hydration of the Al oxide passivation layer, local corrosion of metallic Al accompanied by hydrogen evolution, the rupture of the protective layer, the dissolution of Al from the particle interior and the deposition of AlOOH nanosheets on the outer surface. In contrast to previously reported methods of boehmite nanoparticle synthesis, the proposed method is simple, and environmentally friendly and allows the generation of hydrogen gas as a by-product. Due to their high surface area and high, slit-shaped nanoporosity, the synthesized AlOOH nanostructures hold promise for the development of more effective catalysts, adsorbents, vaccines and drug carriers.

  1. Possible Involvement of Al-Induced Electrical Signals in Al Tolerance in Wheat.

    PubMed Central

    Papernik, L. A.; Kochian, L. V.

    1997-01-01

    The relationship between Al-induced depolarization of root-cell transmembrane electrical potentials (Em) and Al tolerance in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) was investigated. Al exposure induced depolarizations of Em in the Al-tolerant wheat cultivars Atlas and ET3, but not in the Al-sensitive wheat cultivars Scout and ES3. The depolarizations of Em occured in root cap cells and as far back as 10 mm from the root tip. The depolarization was specific to Al3+; no depolarization was observed when roots were exposed to the rhizotoxic trivalent cation La3+. The Al-induced depolarization occurred in the presence of anion-channel antagonists that blocked the release of malate, indicating that the depolarization is not due to the electrogenic efflux of malate2-. K+-induced depolarizations in the root cap were of the same magnitude as Al-induced depolarizations, but did not trigger malate release, indicating that Al-induced depolarization of root cap cell membrane potentials is probably linked to, but is not sufficient to trigger, malate release. PMID:12223834

  2. High temperature deformation of NiAl and CoAl

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nix, W. D.

    1982-01-01

    The high temperature mechanical properties of the aluminides are reviewed with respect to their potential as high temperature structural materials. It is shown that NiAl and CoAl are substantially stronger than the pure metals Ni and Co at high temperatures and approach the strength of some superalloys, particularly when those superalloys are tested in "weak" directions. The factors that limit and control the high temperature strengths of NiAl and CoAl are examined to provide a basis for the development of intermetallic alloys of this type.

  3. Survey and alignment at the ALS

    SciTech Connect

    Krebs, G.F.; Lauritzen, T.; Thur, W.

    1995-11-01

    This paper describes survey and alignment at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory`s Advanced Light Source (ALS) accelerators from 1993 to 1995. The ALS is a 1.0 - 1.9 GeV electron accelerator producing extremely bright synchrotron light in the UV and soft-X-ray wavelengths. At the ALS, electrons are accelerated in a LINAC to 50 MeV, injected into a booster ring for further acceleration and finally injected into the storage ring. This is shown schematically in Figure 1. The storage ring, some 200 m in circumference, has been run with electron currents above 400 mA with lifetimes as high as 24 hours. The ALS is a third generation light source and requires for efficient storage ring operation, magnets aligned to within 150 mm of their ideal position. To accomplish this a network of monuments was established and their positions measured with respect to one another. The data was reduced using GEONET`` and STAR*NET`` software. Using the monuments as reference points, magnet positions were measured and alignment confirmed using the Kem Electronic Coordinate Determination System (ECDS``). A number of other papers dealing with survey and alignment (S&A) at the ALS have been written that may further elucidate some details of the methods and systems described in this paper.

  4. Relativistic general-order coupled-cluster method for high-precision calculations: Application to the Al{sup +} atomic clock

    SciTech Connect

    Kallay, Mihaly; Nataraj, H. S.; Sahoo, B. K.; Das, B. P.; Visscher, Lucas

    2011-03-15

    We report the implementation of a general-order relativistic coupled-cluster method for performing high-precision calculations of atomic and molecular properties. As a first application, the black-body radiation shift of the Al{sup +} clock has been estimated precisely. The computed shift relative to the frequency of the 3s{sup 2} {sup 1}S{sub 0}{sup e}{yields}3s3p {sup 3}P{sub 0}{sup o} clock transition given by (-3.66{+-}0.60)x10{sup -18} calls for an improvement over the recent measurement with a reported result of (-9{+-}3)x10{sup -18}[Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 070802 (2010)].

  5. A New Method to Retrieve the Orbital Parameters of the Galilean Satellites Using Small Telescopes: A Teaching Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez-Lavega, Agustin; Ordoñez-Etxebarria, Iñaki; del Rio-Gaztelurrutia, Teresa

    2014-11-01

    We show in this communication how it is possible to deduce the radius of the orbits of Galilean satellites around Jupiter using a small number of well-planned observations. This allows the instructor to propose a complete student activity that involves planning an observation, the observation itself, processing and analyzing the images and deduction of relevant magnitudes [1]. This work was performed in the Aula EspaZio Gela under the Master in Space Science and Technology [2].References[1] I. Ordoñez-Etxebarria, T. del Río Gaztelurrutia and A. Sánchez Lavega, European Journal of Physics, Eur. J. Phys., 35, 045020 (14pp), (2014)[2] A. Sánchez-Lavega et al., European Journal of Engineering Education, doi:10.1080/03043797.2013.788611 (2013)AcknowledgementsThis work was supported by a grant from Diputaciõn Foral de Bizkaia — Bizkaiko Foru Aldundia to the Aula Espazio Gela.

  6. Use of polyethylene terephthalate for temporal recompression of intense femtosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mironov, S. Yu; Ginzburg, V. N.; Gacheva, E. I.; Silin, D. E.; Kochetkov, A. A.; Mamaev, Yu A.; Shaykin, A. A.; Khazanov, E. A.; Mourou, G. A.

    2015-02-01

    The linear characteristics of polyethylene terephthalate, such as index of refraction, spectral transmittance and transverse distribution of phase and polarization distortions, have been measured. Spectrum broadening of laser pulses (intensity over 1.3 ТW cm-2) after propagation through a 0.7 mm thick sample has been demonstrated in experiment. Taking into consideration almost unlimited aperture, submillimeter thickness and the low cost of polyethylene terephthalate, the obtained results demonstrate that it is a prospective material to be used for spectrum broadening and subsequent time compression of petawatt laser pulses to single cycle regime (Mourou et al 2014 Single cycle thin film compressor opening the door to zeptosecond-exawatt physics Eur. Phys. J. Spec. Top. 223 1181-8).

  7. d{sub 5/2} proton hole strength in neutron-rich {sup 43}P: Shell structure and nuclear shapes near N=28

    SciTech Connect

    Riley, L. A.; Baugher, T. R.; Hosier, K. E.; Adrich, P.; Bazin, D.; Diget, C. A.; Weisshaar, D.; Brown, B. A.; Cook, J. M.; Gade, A.; Garland, D. A.; Glasmacher, T.; Ratkiewicz, A.; Siwek, K. P.; Cottle, P. D.; Kemper, K. W.; Otsuka, T.; Rae, W. D. M.; Tostevin, J. A.; Utsuno, Y.

    2008-07-15

    We report on the use of the one-proton knockout reaction from {sup 44}S to determine the location of d{sub 5/2} proton strength in neutron-rich {sup 43}P. The results are used to test two shell-model frameworks with different pictures of the evolution of single-proton energies along the N=28 isotones near the neutron dripline. We observe a concentration of d{sub 5/2} proton hole strength near 1 MeV in excitation energy. This result favors the recent shell-model interaction of Utsuno et al. [Eur. Phys. J. Spec. Top. 150, 187 (2007)] and provides additional evidence for an oblate shape for {sup 42}Si.

  8. Belief Propagation Algorithm for Portfolio Optimization Problems.

    PubMed

    Shinzato, Takashi; Yasuda, Muneki

    2015-01-01

    The typical behavior of optimal solutions to portfolio optimization problems with absolute deviation and expected shortfall models using replica analysis was pioneeringly estimated by S. Ciliberti et al. [Eur. Phys. B. 57, 175 (2007)]; however, they have not yet developed an approximate derivation method for finding the optimal portfolio with respect to a given return set. In this study, an approximation algorithm based on belief propagation for the portfolio optimization problem is presented using the Bethe free energy formalism, and the consistency of the numerical experimental results of the proposed algorithm with those of replica analysis is confirmed. Furthermore, the conjecture of H. Konno and H. Yamazaki, that the optimal solutions with the absolute deviation model and with the mean-variance model have the same typical behavior, is verified using replica analysis and the belief propagation algorithm.

  9. Effects of the generalised uncertainty principle on quantum tunnelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blado, Gardo; Prescott, Trevor; Jennings, James; Ceyanes, Joshuah; Sepulveda, Rafael

    2016-03-01

    In a previous paper (Blado et al 2014 Eur. J. Phys. 35 065011), we showed that quantum gravity effects can be discussed with only a background in non-relativistic quantum mechanics at the undergraduate level by looking at the effect of the generalised uncertainty principle (GUP) on the finite and infinite square wells. In this paper, we derive the GUP corrections to the tunnelling probability of simple quantum mechanical systems which are accessible to undergraduates (alpha decay, simple models of quantum cosmogenesis and gravitational tunnelling radiation) and which employ the WKB approximation, a topic discussed in undergraduate quantum mechanics classes. It is shown that the GUP correction increases the tunnelling probability in each of the examples discussed.

  10. Stabilization of traffic flow in optimal velocity model via delayed-feedback control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Yanfei; Hu, Haiyan

    2013-04-01

    Traffic jams may occur due to various reasons, such as traffic accidents, lane reductions and on-ramps. In order to suppress the traffic congestion in an optimal velocity traffic model without any driver's delay taken into account, a delayed-feedback control of both displacement and velocity differences is proposed in this study. By using the delay-independent stability criteria and the H∞-norm, the delayed-feedback control can be determined to stabilize the unstable traffic flow and suppress the traffic jam. The numerical case studies are given to demonstrate and verify the new control method. Furthermore, a comparison is made between the new control method and the method proposed by Konishi et al. [K. Konishi, M. Hirai, H. Kokame, Decentralized delayed-feedback control of an optimal velocity traffic model, Eur. Phys. J. B 15 (2000) 715-722]. The results show that the new control method makes the traffic flow more stable and improves the control performance.

  11. Reply to comments on 'Energy in one-dimensional linear waves in a string'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burko, Lior M.

    2011-11-01

    In this reply we respond to comments made by Repetto et al and by Butokov on our letter (Burko 2010 Eur. J. Phys. 31 L71-7), in which we discussed two different results for the elastic potential energy of a string element. One derived from the restoring force on a stretched string element and the other from the work done to bring the string to a certain distorted configuration. We argue that one cannot prefer from fundamental principles the former over the latter (or vice versa), and therefore one may apply either expression to situations in which their use contributes to insight. The two expressions are different by a boundary term which has a clear physical interpretation. For the case of standing waves, we argue that the latter approach has conceptual clarity that may contribute to physical understanding.

  12. Relativistic electromagnetic mass models in spherically symmetric spacetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maurya, S. K.; Gupta, Y. K.; Ray, Saibal; Chatterjee, Vikram

    2016-10-01

    Under the static spherically symmetric Einstein-Maxwell spacetime of embedding class one we explore possibility of constructing electromagnetic mass model where mass and other physical parameters have purely electromagnetic origin (Lorentz in Proc. Acad. Sci. Amst. 6, 1904). This work is in continuation of our earlier investigation of Maurya et al. (Eur. Phys. J. C 75:389, 2015a) where we developed an algorithm and found out three new solutions of electromagnetic mass model. In the present work we consider different metric potentials ν and λ and have analyzed them in a systematic way. It is observed that some of the previous solutions related to electromagnetic mass model are nothing but special cases of the presently obtained generalized solution set. We further verify the solution set and especially show that these are extremely applicable in the case of compact stars.

  13. Quantum memory for images: A quantum hologram

    SciTech Connect

    Vasilyev, Denis V.; Sokolov, Ivan V.; Polzik, Eugene S.

    2008-02-15

    Matter-light quantum interface and quantum memory for light are important ingredients of quantum information protocols, such as quantum networks, distributed quantum computation, etc. [P. Zoller et al., Eur. Phys. J. D 36, 203 (2005)]. In this paper we present a spatially multimode scheme for quantum memory for light, which we call a quantum hologram. Our approach uses a multiatom ensemble which has been shown to be efficient for a single spatial mode quantum memory. Due to the multiatom nature of the ensemble and to the optical parallelism it is capable of storing many spatial modes, a feature critical for the present proposal. A quantum hologram with the fidelity exceeding that of classical hologram will be able to store quantum features of an image, such as multimode superposition and entangled quantum states, something that a standard hologram is unable to achieve.

  14. Momentum transfer dependence of generalized parton distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Neetika

    2016-11-01

    We revisit the model for parametrization of the momentum dependence of nucleon generalized parton distributions in the light of recent MRST measurements of parton distribution functions (A.D. Martin et al., Eur. Phys. J. C 63, 189 (2009)). Our parametrization method with a minimum set of free parameters give a sufficiently good description of data for Dirac and Pauli electromagnetic form factors of proton and neutron at small and intermediate values of momentum transfer. We also calculate the GPDs for up- and down-quarks by decomposing the electromagnetic form factors for the nucleon using the charge and isospin symmetry and also study the evolution of GPDs to a higher scale. We further investigate the transverse charge densities for both the unpolarized and transversely polarized nucleon and compare our results with Kelly's distribution.

  15. JEWEL 2.0.0: directions for use

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zapp, Korinna

    2014-02-01

    In this publication the first official release of the Jewel 2.0.0 code [The first version Jewel 1 (Zapp et al. in Eur Phys J C 60:617, 2009) could only treat elastic scattering explicitly and the code was never published, The code can be downloaded from the official Jewel homepage http://jewel.hepforge.org] is presented. Jewel is a Monte Carlo event generator simulating QCD jet evolution in heavy-ion collisions. It treats the interplay of QCD radiation and re-scattering in a medium with fully microscopic dynamics in a consistent perturbative framework with minimal assumptions. After a qualitative introduction into the physics of Jewel detailed information about the practical aspects of using the code is given. The code is available from the official Jewel homepage http://jewel.hepforge.org.

  16. 78 FR 76054 - Establishment of Class E Airspace; Chatom, AL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-16

    ..., Georgia 30320; telephone (404) 305-6364. ] SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: History On September 4, 2013, the... Above the Surface of the Earth. * * * * * ASO AL E5 Chatom, AL Roy Wilcox Airport, AL (Lat. 31 27'06''...

  17. [Al-Biruni--a universal scientist].

    PubMed

    Kujundzić, E; Masić, I

    1999-01-01

    Al-Biruni's was of Persian descent. He was born in Horesmiya and had studied mathematics, history and medicine. Acquiring knowledge from these sciences, he wrote an outstanding work on chronology of several nations and devoted it to Ziyarit ruler Kabus. He made a chronological overview of calendars from many nations, including Persians, Greeks, Egyptians, Jews, Melkitian and Nestorian Christians, Sabeyaans as well as the old Arabs. Data presented in the work, according to the later authors, were taken from very reliable sources. He was contemporary of Ibn-Sina, and thanks to their friendship, they have discussed very much miscellaneous topics. He belonged to the group of scholars, taken by Gaznevian Soultan Mahmud to a long journey to India. Afterwards Al-Biruni wrote and published detailed work "Description of India"--a work on cultural history of India. Due to excellent abilities of Al-Biruni as a philosopher and scholar, there are still significant and reliable notes about buddhistic philosophy, structure of castes and Brahmans' life style. In this Al-Biruni's masterpiece, there are many comparative analysis of Suffism and certain Indian philosophical methods. Al-Biruni's most important work is "Pharmacopoeia"--"Kitab al-saydala", which brilliantly describes all medicaments. This work has been published in many languages. He also wrote few works on astronomy and astrology. In those works he has explained some astrological events through scientific approach in a such peculiar way that nobody has ever explained before. He was also interested in sciences like geology, mineralology, geography, mathematics, psychology and many others.

  18. Al Sahawa - The Awakening: An Education and Training Resource Guide

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-07-01

    Mamoun Sami Rashid , Al Anbar Governor during 2005–06 described it best as a sequence of actions and events throughout Al Anbar: When we started... Rashid , Al Anbar Governor 2005 to 2006, interview with Dr. William Knarr, Colonel Dale Alford, USMC, and Lieutenant Colonel David Graves, USMC...1 . Who’s Who Appendix A Interviewees Abd al-Hakim Muhammad Rashid Muhammad al-Jughayfi, Mayor of Hadithah Abdul Qadir Mohammed Jassim Obeidi al

  19. A Comment on Eerland et al. (2016).

    PubMed

    Hart, William

    2016-03-01

    People imagine criminal behavior in greater detail and ascribe more blame to criminals when a description of a crime is written using the imperfective verb aspect (Hart & Albarracín, 2011, Experiment 3). An initiative to reproduce these findings conducted by Eerland et al. (2016) yielded a lack of replication. Eerland et al. have suggested that the original effect was likely driven by a Type I error produced by methodological aspects of the experiment, including low sample size. Recent conceptual replications of Hart and Albarracín's effect (Sherrill, Eerland, Zwaan, & Magliano, 2015), however, might imply the effect could be contingent on sample characteristics.

  20. Vibrations on Al surfaces covered by sodium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rusina, G. G.; Eremeev, S. V.; Borisova, S. D.; Sklyadneva, I. Yu.; Chulkov, E. V.

    2006-09-01

    In this paper we present the results of a comparative study of vibrational and structural properties of the ordered (√{3}×√{3})R30∘ and c(2 × 2) phases formed by Na adatoms at room temperature on the Al(1 1 1) and Al(1 0 0) surfaces, respectively. The surface relaxation, surface phonon dispersion, and polarization of vibrational modes are calculated using the embedded-atom method. Our calculated structural parameters are in agreement with experimental and ab initio results. The obtained vibrational frequencies compare fairly well with available experimental data.

  1. Complementary and Alternative Therapies in ALS

    PubMed Central

    Bedlack, Richard S.; Joyce, Nanette; Carter, Gregory T.; Pagononi, Sabrina; Karam, Chafic

    2015-01-01

    Synopsis Given the severity of their illness and lack of effective disease modifying agents, it is not surprising that most patients with ALS consider trying complementary and alternative therapies. Some of the most commonly considered alternative therapies include special diets, nutritional supplements, cannabis, acupuncture, chelation and energy healing. This chapter reviews these in detail. We also describe 3 models by which physicians may frame discussions about alternative therapies: paternalism, autonomy and shared decision making. Finally, we review a program called ALSUntangled which using shared shared decision making to review alternative therapies for ALS. PMID:26515629

  2. The Future of Al Qa’ida

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-05-24

    commissions and panels; and private review and oversight bodies. C O R P O R A T I O N For More Information Visit RAND at www.rand.org Explore RAND...affiliated groups and its leadership. A range of senior officials, including Saif al-Adel and Abu Miqad al-Masri, continue to play key roles. Finally, there...20 30 40 50 60 70 2003 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 Turkey Egypt Jordan Lebanon Indonesia Pakistan Pe rc te nt ag e  of   R es po nd en ts  w it h  Co

  3. Heterogeneity of Mg Isotopes and Variable ^26Al/^27Al Ratio in FUN CAIs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, C.; Nagashima, K.; Hutcheon, I. D.; Wasserburg, G. J.; Papanastassiou, D. A.; Davis, A. M.; Huss, G. R.; Krot, A. N.

    2013-09-01

    We report high-precision Mg-isotope data of individual minerals from the Axtell 2271, BG82DH8, EK1-4-1, C1, TE, and CG14 FUN CAIs, which shows variations in both Mg-isotope ratio and ^26Al/^27Al ratio.

  4. Directional Solidification and Mechanical Properties of NiAl-NiAlTa Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, D. R.; Chen, X. F.; Oliver, B. F.; Noebe, R. D.; Whittenberger, J. D.

    1995-01-01

    Directional solidification of eutectic alloys is a promising technique for producing in-situ composite materials exhibiting a balance of properties. Consequently, the microstructure, creep strength and fracture toughness of directionally solidified NiAl-NiAlTa alloys were investigated. Directional solidification was performed by containerless processing techniques to minimize alloy contamination. The eutectic composition was found to be NiAl-15.5 at% Ta and well-aligned microstructures were produced at this composition. A near-eutectic alloy of NiAl-14.5Ta was also investigated. Directional solidification of the near-eutectic composition resulted in microstructures consisting of NiAl dendrites surrounded by aligned eutectic regions. The off-eutectic alloy exhibited promising compressive creep strengths compared to other NiAl-based intermetallics, while preliminary testing indicated that the eutectic alloy was competitive with Ni-base single crystal superalloys. The room temperature toughness of these two-phase alloys was similar to that of polycrystalline NiAl even with the presence of the brittle Laves phase NiAlTa.

  5. Electronic circuits having NiAl and Ni.sub.3 Al substrates

    DOEpatents

    Deevi, Seetharama C.; Sikka, Vinod K.

    1999-01-01

    An electronic circuit component having improved mechanical properties and thermal conductivity comprises NiAl and/or Ni.sub.3 Al, upon which an alumina layer is formed prior to applying the conductive elements. Additional layers of copper-aluminum alloy or copper further improve mechanical strength and thermal conductivity.

  6. An Alternative Perspective on von Winterfeldt et al.'s (1997) Test of Consequence Monotonicity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ho, Moon-Ho R.; Regenwetter, Michel; Niederee, Reinhard; Heyer, Dieter

    2005-01-01

    D. von Winterfeldt, N.-K. Chung, R. D. Luce, and Y. Cho (see record 1997-03378-008) provided several tests for consequence monotonicity of choice or judgment, using certainty equivalents of gambles. The authors reaxiomatized consequence monotonicity in a probabilistic framework and reanalyzed von Winterfeldt et al.'s main experiment via a…

  7. Transport mechanisms of leakage current in Al2O3/InAlAs MOS capacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Chengji; Lu, Hongliang; Zhang, Yimen; Zhang, Yuming; Guan, He; Wu, Lifan; Lu, Bin; Liu, Chen

    2016-09-01

    An Al2O3 layer is inserted between the InAlAs layer and the metal gate in InAs/AlSb HEMTs to suppress the leakage current. The transport mechanisms of leakage current in Al2O3/InAlAs metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) capacitors at both positive and negative biases at different temperatures ranging from 10 °C to 70 °C are investigated. For positive bias, the leakage current is dominated by Schottky emission. Based on the fitted straight lines, the relative dielectric constant of Al2O3 and the barrier height between Al2O3 and InAlAs are extracted. However, for negative bias, the leakage current is dominated by Frenkel-Poole (F-P) emission and the depth of the trap energy level from the conduction band (ϕt) is extracted. Furthermore, authors explain the reason why the dominating mechanisms at positive and negative biases are different.

  8. The Genyornis Egg: Response to Miller et al.'s commentary on Grellet-Tinner et al., 2016

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grellet-Tinner, Gerald; Spooner, Nigel A.; Handley, Warren D.; Worthy, Trevor H.

    2017-04-01

    Williams (1981) and Williams and Rich (1991) attributed Australian Quaternary fossil eggshell that differed from that of emu Dromaius novaehollandiae to the extinct bird Genyornis newtoni without any osteological or embryonic support. Such association by proximity or abundance mirrors the case of the mistaken association of oviraptor eggs to Protoceratops in the 1920's by Andrews (Grellet-Tinner and Makovicky, 2006). No other candidate species was considered, and this attribution has been unchallenged and followed by everyone thereafter. Much research has been done on this Australian eggshell, with one result being that the extinction of the parent of this eggshell is the most well documented for a taxon in Australia (e.g., Miller et al., 1999, 2005). Grellet-Tinner et al. (2016) raised several problems with the identity of the eggshell Williams (1981) attributed to Genyornis newtoni and suggested that extinct megapodes of the genus Progura were the more likely layer of this eggshell type, therein referred to as ;putative Genyornis oological material; (PGOM). Miller et al. (2017) challenged our hypothesis stating that ;Based on the dimensions of the reconstructed Spooner Egg,Grellet-Tinner et al. (2016)argue that PGOM is too small for a bird with the body mass estimated for Genyornis (168-275 kg) … …[and] …. None of the additional PGOM observations reported byGrellet-Tinner et al. (2016)are inconsistent with a Genyornis parent;. Here we take the opportunity to respond to their critique, the basis of which resolves into a few points, which we address in turn.

  9. An impedance study of complex Al/Cu-Al2O3 electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denisova, J.; Katkevics, J.; Erts, D.; Viksna, A.

    2011-06-01

    Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) was used to investigate different Cu deposition regimes on Al surface obtained by internal electrolysis and to characterize properties of fabricated electrodes. EIS experimental data confirmed that Cu deposition by internal electrolysis is realized and the complex electrode system is obtained. The main difficulty in preparation of Al/Cu electrodes is to prevent aluminium oxidation before and during electrochemical deposition of Cu particles. In this work NaCl, CH3COONa, K2SO4, mono- and diammonium citrate electrolytes were examined to determine their suitability for impedance measurements. Al/Cu-Al2O3 electrode composition was approved by equivalent circuit analysis, optical and scanning electron microscope methods. The most optimal Cu deposition mode using internal electrolysis was determined. The obtained results are promising for future electrochemical fabrication of nanostructures directly on Al surfaces by internal electrolysis.

  10. Fundamental Influence of C on Adhesion of the Al2O3/Al Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiao-Gang; Smith, John R.; Evans, Anthony

    2002-12-01

    Our first-principles computations indicate that the clean Al2O3/Al interface is relatively weak—weaker than bulk Al. Fracture experiments reveal that the interface is relatively strong with observed failure in bulk Al, however. This paradox is resolved via doping effects of the common impurity C. We have found that only 1/3 of a monolayer of carbon segregated to the interface can increase the work of separation by a factor of 3. The resulting strong interface is consistent with fracture experiments. It arises due to void formation in the interface, which provides low-strain sites for the carbon to segregate to. The degree of void formation is consistent with the relatively high heat of oxide formation of Al.

  11. CVD Fiber Coatings for Al2O3/NiAl Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boss, Daniel E.

    1995-01-01

    While sapphire-fiber-reinforced nickel aluminide (Al2O3/NiAl) composites are an attractive candidate for high-temperature structures, the significant difference in the coefficient of thermal expansion between the NiAl matrix and the sapphire fiber creates substantial residual stresses in the composite. This study seeks to produce two fiber-coating systems with the potential to reduce the residual stresses in the sapphire/NiAl composite system. Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) was used to produce both the compensating and compliant-fiber coatings for use in sapphire/NiAl composites. A special reactor was designed and built to produce the FGM and to handle the toxic nickel precursors. This process was successfully used to produce 500-foot lengths of fiber with coating thicknesses of approximately 3 microns, 5 microns, and 10 microns.

  12. Temperature dependence of the activity of Al in dilute Ni(Al) solid solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang Yong; Smith, J. R.; Evans, A. G.

    2006-12-01

    Activities of dilute Al solid solutions in Ni are determined from a first-principles approach. Both thermal lattice vibration and electronic contributions to free energies are considered and compared. Vibrational contributions tend to dominate the temperature dependencies of the free energies, though electron thermal effects are significant. Calculations show opposing temperature trends for the formation enthalpies and entropies, leading to a partial cancellation of their role in the overall energetics. Nevertheless, their remaining temperature effects are strong. Over the temperature range, 400 KAl activity coefficient varies by 15 orders of magnitude, due to the relative strength of Al-Ni and Al-Al bonds. The Ni activity coefficient only varies less than 4% over the same range. Calculational results compare well with available experimental data. The thermodynamic principles elucidated from the calculations are used to provide a fundamental interpretation.

  13. Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ adherence on CoCrAl alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Kingsley, L.M.

    1980-04-01

    Adherence of protective oxides on NiCrAl and CoCrAl superalloys has been promoted by a dispersion of a highly oxygen reactive element or its oxide being produced within the protection system. Two aspects of this subject are investigated here: the use of Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ as both the dispersion and protective oxide; and the production of an HfO/sub 2/ dispersion while simultaneously aluminizing the alloy. It was found that an Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ dispersion will act to promote the adherence of an external scale of Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ to a degree comparable to previously tested dispersions and an HfO/sub 2/ dispersion comparable to that produced by a Rhines pack treatment is produced during aluminization.

  14. 1300 K compressive properties of a reaction milled NiAl-AlN composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whittenberger, J. Daniel; Arzt, Eduard; Luton, Michael J.

    1990-01-01

    When B2 crystal-structure nickel aluminide is subjected to high-intensity mechanical ball milling in a liquid nitrogen bath, or 'cryomilling', an NiAl composite is obtained which contains about 10 vol pct AlN particles. This composition arises from the incorporation of N during cryomilling; during subsequent thermomechanical processing, the N reacts with Al. While compressive testing of extruded or isostatically pressed specimens at 1300 K indicated that strength at relatively fast strain rates is slightly dependent on consolidation method, slower strain rates indicate no clear dependency on densification technique: four different consolidation methods were found to yield similar creep strengths. The creep properties of NiAl-AlN are similar to those of the single-crystal Ni-base superalloy NASAIR 100.

  15. Bonding characters of Al-containing bulk metallic glasses studied by 27Al NMR.

    PubMed

    Xi, X K; Sandor, M T; Wang, H J; Wang, J Q; Wang, W H; Wu, Y

    2011-03-23

    We report very small (27)Al metallic shifts in a series of Cu-Zr-Al bulk metallic glasses. This observation and the Korringa type of spin-lattice relaxation behavior suggest that s-character wavefunctions weakly participate in bonding and opens the possibility of enhanced covalency (pd hybridization) with increasing Al concentration, in good agreement with elastic constants and hardness measurements. Moreover, ab initio calculations show that this bonding character originates from the strong Al 3p band and Zr 4d band hybridization since their atomic energy levels are closer to each other while the Al 3s band is localized far below the Fermi level. This study might provide a chemical view for understanding flow and fracture mechanisms of these bulk glass-forming alloys.

  16. Backward-forward reaction asymmetry of neutron elastic scattering on deuterium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pirovano, E.; Beyer, R.; Junghans, A. R.; Nankov, N.; Nolte, R.; Nyman, M.; Plompen, A. J. M.

    2017-02-01

    A new measurement of the angular distribution of neutron elastic scattering on deuterium was carried out at the neutron time-of-flight facility nELBE. The backward-forward asymmetry of the reaction was investigated via the direct detection of neutrons scattered at the laboratory angle of 15∘ and 165∘ from a polyethylene sample enriched with deuterium. In order to extend the measurement to neutron energies below 1 MeV, 6Li glass scintillators were employed. The data were corrected for the background and the multiple scattering in the target, the events due to scattering on deuterium were separated from those due to carbon, and the ratio of the differential cross section at 15∘ and 165∘ was determined. The results, covering the energy range from 200 keV to 2 MeV, were found to be in agreement with the theoretical predictions calculated by Canton et al. [Eur. Phys. J. A 14, 225 (2002)], 10.1140/epja/i2001-10122-3 and by Golak et al. [Eur. Phys. J. A 50, 177 (2014)], 10.1140/epja/i2014-14177-7. The comparison with the evaluated nuclear data libraries indicated CENDL-3.1, JEFF-3.2, and JENDL-4.0 as the evaluations that best describe the asymmetry of n -d scattering. ENDF/B-VII.1 is compatible with the data for energies below 700 keV, but above the backward to forward ratio is higher than measured. ROSFOND-2010 and BROND-2.2 resulted to have little compatibility with the data.

  17. Formation of gamma(sup prime)-Ni3Al via the Peritectoid Reaction: gamma + beta (+ Al2O3)=gamma(sup prime)(+ Al2O3)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Copeland, Evan

    2008-01-01

    The activities of Al and Ni were measured using multi-cell Knudsen effusion-cell mass spectrometry (multi-cell KEMS), over the composition range 8-32 at.%Al and temperature range T=1400-1750 K in the Ni-Al-O system. These measurements establish that equilibrium solidification of gamma(sup prime)-Ni3Al-containing alloys occurs by the eutectic reaction, L (+ Al2O3)=gamma + Beta(+ Al2O3), at 1640 +/- 1 K and a liquid composition of 24.8 +/- 0.2 at.%al (at an unknown oxygen content). The {gamma + Beta (+Al2O3} phase field is stable over the temperature range 1633-1640 K, and gamma(sup prime)-Ni3Al forms via the peritectoid, gamma + Beta (+ Al2O3)=gamma(sup prime) (+ Al2O3), at 1633 +/- 1 K. This behavior is consistent with the current Ni-Al phase diagram and a new diagram is proposed. This new Ni-Al phase diagram explains a number of unusual steady-state solidification structures reported previously and provides a much simpler reaction scheme in the vicinity of the gamma(sup prime)-Ni2Al phase field.

  18. Formation of gamma'-Ni3Al via the Peritectoid Reaction: gamma plus beta (+Al2O3) equals gamma'(+Al2O3)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Copland, Evan

    2008-01-01

    The activities of Al and Ni were measured using multi-cell Knudsen effusion-cell mass spectrometry (multi-cell KEMS), over the composition range 8 - 32 at.%Al and temperature range T = 1400 - 1750 K in the Ni-Al-O system. These measurements establish that equilibrium solidification of gamma'-Ni3Al-containing alloys occurs by the eutectic reaction, L (+ Al2O3) = gamma + beta (+ Al2O3), at 1640 plus or minus 1 K and a liquid composition of 24.8 plus or minus 0.2 at.%Al (at an unknown oxygen content). The {gamma + beta + Al2O3} phase field is stable over the temperature range 1633 - 1640 K, and gamma'-Ni3Al forms via the peritectiod, gamma + beta (+ Al2O3) = gamma'(+ Al2O3), at 1633 plus or minus 1 K. This behavior is inconsistent with the current Ni-Al phase diagram and a new diagram is proposed. This new Ni-Al phase diagram explains a number of unusual steady state solidification structures reported previously and provides a much simpler reaction scheme in the vicinity of the gamma'-Ni3Al phase field.

  19. 76 FR 62481 - Incapital LLC, et al.

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-07

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION Incapital LLC, et al.; Notice of Application September 30, 2011. AGENCY: Securities and Exchange Commission (``Commission''). ACTION: Notice of application for an order under section 12(d)(1)(J) of...

  20. Electron impact exctation of Al X

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aggarwal, Kanti; Keenan, Francis

    2013-05-01

    Emission lines of Al ions, including Al X, are important for the modeling and diagnostics of lasing, fusion and astrophysical plasmas, for which atomic data are required for a variety of parameters, such as energy levels, radiative rates (A- values), and excitation rates or equivalently the effective collision strengths (Υ), which are obtained from the electron impact collision strengths (Ω). Experimentally, energy levels are available for Al X on the NIST website, but there is paucity for accurate collisional atomic data. Therefore, here we report a complete set of results (namely energy levels, radiative rates, and effective collision strengths) for all transitions among the lowest 98 levels of Al X. These levels belong to the (1s2) 2s2, 2s2p, 2p2, 2s3 l, 2p3 l, 2s4 l, and 2p4 l configurations. Finally, we also report the A- values for four types of transitions, namely electric dipole (E1), electric quadrupole (E2), magnetic dipole (M1), and magnetic quadrupole (M2), because these are also required for plasma modeling. For our calculations of wavefunctions, we have adopted the fully relativistic GRASP code, and for the calculations of Ω, the Dirac atomic R-matrix code (DARC) of PH Norrington and IP Grant. Additionally, parallel ca