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Sample records for al geophys res

  1. A new species of earth snake (Dipsadidae, Geophis) from Mexico.

    PubMed

    Canseco-Márquez, Luis; Pavón-Vázquez, Carlos J; López-Luna, Marco Antonio; Nieto-Montes de Oca, Adrián

    2016-01-01

    A new species of the Geophis dubius group is described from the mountains of the Sierra Zongolica in west-central Veracruz and the Sierra de Quimixtlán in central-east Puebla. The new species is most similar to Geophis duellmani and Geophis turbidus, which are endemic to the mountains of northern Oaxaca and the Sierra Madre Oriental of Puebla and Hidalgo, respectively. However, the new species differs from Geophis duellmani by the presence of postocular and supraocular scales and from Geophis turbidus by having a bicolor dorsum. With the description of the new species, the species number in the genus increases to 50 and to 12 in the Geophis dubius group. Additionally, a key to the species of the Geophis dubius group is provided.

  2. A new species of earth snake (Dipsadidae, Geophis) from Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Canseco-Márquez, Luis; Pavón-Vázquez, Carlos J.; López-Luna, Marco Antonio; Nieto-Montes de Oca, Adrián

    2016-01-01

    Abstract A new species of the Geophis dubius group is described from the mountains of the Sierra Zongolica in west-central Veracruz and the Sierra de Quimixtlán in central-east Puebla. The new species is most similar to Geophis duellmani and Geophis turbidus, which are endemic to the mountains of northern Oaxaca and the Sierra Madre Oriental of Puebla and Hidalgo, respectively. However, the new species differs from Geophis duellmani by the presence of postocular and supraocular scales and from Geophis turbidus by having a bicolor dorsum. With the description of the new species, the species number in the genus increases to 50 and to 12 in the Geophis dubius group. Additionally, a key to the species of the Geophis dubius group is provided. PMID:27587979

  3. A Pyrolitic Lower Mantle with (Mg,Fe3+)(Si,Al3+)O3 Bridgmanite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X.; Tsuchiya, T.

    2014-12-01

    To better understand the Earth's lower mantle (LM), thermodynamic properties (TDPs) of LM minerals should be illustrated clearly. We have so far reported the TDPs of Fe (and Al)-bearing MgO, MgSiO3 bridgmanite (Br) and post bridgmanite [1-5] by using the internally consistent LSDA+U method and the lattice dynamics method. In this work, two spin states, the high (HS) and low spin (LS) state, and several possible distribution configurations are considered in the LM pressure range. For Fe incorporated in Br, only Fe3+ at the Si site undergoes a HS to LS transition. However, this is suppressed by Al incorporation, because Al3+ prefers the Si site and attracts HS Fe3+ at the adjacent Mg site forming Fe3+-Al3+ pair. Br with geophysically relevant 6.25 mol% Fe2+ or Fe3+-Al3+ pair is found vibrationally stable. Incorporation of these elements increases the Br volume a little but gives marginal effects on the TDPs. Simulated densities, adiabatic bulk moduli, and bulk sound velocities of possible LM mineral aggregations show that a composition close to pyrolite with (Mg,Fe3+)(Si,Al3+)O3 Br is accountable for the reference Earth model, while Fe2+-bearing Br instead gives unignorable disagreements in deeper part. Neither Si-richer nor Si-poorer composition improves the disagreements. This indicates that Fe in LM bridgmanite should predominantly be ferric acquiring the HS state, and pyrolitic composition with (Mg,Fe3+)(Si,Al3+)O3 Br is a reasonable LM model. References:[1] A. Metsue, and T. Tsuchiya, J. Geophys. Res. 116, B08207 (2011). [2] A. Metsue, and T. Tsuchiya, Geophys. J. Int. 190, 310 (2012). [3] H. Fukui, T. Tsuchiya, and A. Q. R. Baron, J. Geophys. Res. 117, B12202 (2012). [4] T. Tsuchiya, and X. Wang, J. Geophys. 118, 83 (2013). [5] X. Wang, and T. Tsuchiya, under reviewing.

  4. Comment to: "Spontaneous transformation of adult mesenchymal stem cells from cynomolgus macaques in vitro" by Z. Ren et al. Exp. Cell Res. 317 (2011) 2950-2957: spontaneous transformation of mesenchymal stem cells in culture: facts or fiction?

    PubMed

    Torsvik, Anja; Røsland, Gro V; Bjerkvig, Rolf

    2012-03-10

    There is at present a controversy in the literature whether MSCs are susceptible to spontaneous in vitro transformation or not. Several groups have reported spontaneous transformation of MSCs from various species. However, some of these reports were not true transformations and later proven to be due to cross-contaminating cancer cells. To date there is no solid evidence that MSCs can undergo spontaneous transformation in culture. Only two groups used DNA fingerprinting to authenticate their transformed cells, and both groups later showed cross-contamination of cancer cells in their cultures. In this commentary, we address the paper "Spontaneous transformation of adult mesenchymal stem cells from cynomolgus macaques in vitro" by Z. Ren et al. Exp. Cell Res. 317 (2011) 2950-2957. In this article the authors characterize the transformed mesenchymal cells (TMCs) and claim to have verified their origin. We question the authentication of the TMCs made by the authors and we also believe it is in the interest of the scientific community, that a highly controversial finding, such as spontaneous transformation of MSCs, should be properly verified by stringent methods, preferably DNA fingerprinting, in order to validate if an actual transformation event has occurred.

  5. Iron Partitioning in the Lower Mantle: New Experimental Data from Al-Enriched Olivine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piet, H.; Nabiei, F.; Gillet, P.; Badro, J.

    2014-12-01

    The partitioning of iron between the major phases of the lower mantle has an important impact on their physical and chemical properties. A series of experimental studies of Fe-Mg exchange between bridgemanite (magnesium silicate perovskite) and ferropericlase have shown that stark differences in partitioning are observed if olivine [1, 2] or a pyrolitic [3, 4] starting composition are used. The discrepancy has been attributed to the presence of alumina, to that of ferric iron, to multiphase equilibria and even to the activity of FeO in the system. In order to mitigate the discrepancy, we synthesized a sample with San Carlos olivine composition that was doped in alumina. We then used this as starting material for experiments in the laser-heated diamond anvil cell at lower mantle (P,T) conditions along the geotherm. Samples were pressurized, heated, transformed to bridgemanite and ferropericlase, equilibrated, quenched, and decompressed. Thin sections were recovered from the hotspot using a focused ion beam microscope and the composition of the two phases was analyzed using analytical transmission electron microscopy. Iron partitioning in Al-rich olivine will be discussed through a detailed comparison with the Al-rich pyrolitic trend and the Al-free olivine trend. References [1] A-L. Auzende et al., Earth Planet. Sci. Lett., 2008. [2] R. Sinmyo et al., J. Geophys. Res., 2008.[3] R. Irifune et al., Science, 2010. [4] R. Sinmyo et al., Phys. Chem. Minerals, 2013.

  6. Comment on `Magnitude conversion problem using general orthogonal regression' by H. R. Wason, Ranjit Das and M. L. Sharma, (Geophys. J. Int., 190, 1091-1096)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasperini, Paolo; Lolli, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    The argument proposed by Wason et al. that the conversion of magnitudes from a scale (e.g. Ms or mb) to another (e.g. Mw), using the coefficients computed by the general orthogonal regression method (Fuller) is biased if the observed values of the predictor (independent) variable are used in the equation as well as the methodology they suggest to estimate the supposedly true values of the predictor variable are wrong for a number of theoretical and empirical reasons. Hence, we advise against the use of such methodology for magnitude conversions.

  7. RES-E-NEXT: Next Generation of RES-E Policy Instruments

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, M.; Bird, L.; Cochran, J.; Milligan, M.; Bazilian, M.; Denny, E.; Dillon, J.; Bialek, J.; O'Malley, M.; Neuhoff, K.

    2013-07-04

    The rapid deployment of renewable sources of electricity (RES-E) is transforming power systems globally. This trend is likely to continue with large increases in investment and deployment of RES-E capacity over the coming decades. Several countries now have penetration levels of variable RES-E generation (i.e., wind and solar) in excess of 15% of their annual electricity generation; and many jurisdictions (e.g., Spain, Portugal, Ireland, Germany, and Denmark; and, in the United States, Colorado) have experienced instantaneous penetration levels of more than 50% variable generation.1 These penetration levels of variable RES-E have prompted many jurisdictions to begin modifying practices that evolved in an era of readily dispatchable, centralised power systems. Providing insights for the transition to high levels of variable RES-E generation is the focus of this document, which is the final report of the RES-E-NEXT project commissioned by the International Energy Agency’s implementing agreement on Renewable Energy Technology Deployment (IEA-RETD). It presents a comprehensive assessment of issues that will shape power system evolution during the transition to high levels of variable RES-E generation. While policy will be a central tool to sustain the growth of RES-E capacity and to enable power system transitions, the scope of the report extends beyond policy considerations to include the related domains of regulation, power market design, and system operation protocols. This broad scope is in recognition that a changing resource mix with greater penetration levels of variable RES-E has broad implications for grid operations, wholesale and retail power markets, and infrastructure needs. The next decade will be a critical transition period for power system stakeholders, as global deployment of RES-E capacity (and especially variable RES-E capacity) continues to scale-up in many regions of the world. To address increased penetration levels of RES-E in power systems

  8. Silicate perovskite analogue ScAlO 3: temperature dependence of elastic moduli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kung, Jennifer; Rigden, Sally M.; Jackson, Ian

    2000-08-01

    The elastic moduli of ScAlO 3 perovskite, a very close structural analogue for MgSiO 3 perovskite, have been measured between 300 and 600 K using high precision ultrasonic interferometry in an internally heated gas-charged pressure vessel. This new capability for high temperature measurement of elastic wave speeds has been demonstrated on polycrystalline alumina. The temperature derivatives of elastic moduli of Al 2O 3 measured in this study agree within 15% with expectations based on published single-crystal data. For ScAlO 3 perovskite, the value of (∂ KS/∂ T) P is -0.033 GPa K -1 and (∂ G/∂ T) P is -0.015 GPa K -1. The relative magnitudes of these derivatives agree with the observation in Duffy and Anderson [Duffy, T.S., Anderson, D.L., 1989. Seismic velocities in mantle minerals and the mineralogy of the upper mantle. J. Geophys. Res. 94, 1895-1912.] that |(∂ KS/∂ T) P| is typically about twice |(∂ G/∂ T) P|. The value of (∂ KS/∂ T) P for ScAlO 3 is intermediate between those inferred less directly from V( P, T) studies of Fe-free and Fe- and Al-bearing MgSiO 3 perovskites [Wang, Y., Weidner, D.J., Liebermann, R.C., Zhao, Y., 1994. P- V- T equation of state of (Mg,Fe)SiO 3 perovskite: constraints on composition of the lower mantle. Phys. Earth Planet. Inter. 83, 13-40; Mao, H.K., Hemley, R.J., Shu, J., Chen, L., Jephcoat, A.P., Wu, Y., Bassett, W.A., 1991. Effect of pressure, temperature and composition on the lattice parameters and density of (Mg,Fe) SiO 3 perovskite to 30 GPa. J. Geophys. Res. 91, 8069-8079; Zhang, Weidner, D., 1999. Thermal equation of state of aluminum-enriched silicate perovskite. Science 284, 782-784]. The value of |(∂ G/∂ T)| P for ScAlO 3 is similar to those of most other mantle silicate phases but lower than the recent determination for MgSiO 3 perovskite [Sinelnikov, Y., Chen, G., Neuville, D.R., Vaughan, M.T., Liebermann, R.C., 1998. Ultrasonic shear wave velocities of MgSiO 3 perovskite at 8 GPa and 800K and

  9. Progress Towards a NASA Earth Science Reuse Enablement System (RES)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, James J.; Downs, Robert R.; Mattmann, Chris A.

    2010-01-01

    A Reuse Enablement System (RES) allows developers of Earth science software to contribute software for reuse by others and.for users to find, select, and obtain software for reuse in their own systems. This paper describes work that the X4S,4 Earth Science Data Systems (ESDS) Software Reuse Working Group has completed to date in the development of an RES for NASA.

  10. Proliferation of reticuloendothelial system (RES) in rats with altered vision or smell (to the hypothetic neural regulation of the RES).

    PubMed

    Jansa, P; Urbánek, K; Riegrová, D

    1993-12-01

    A long-term administration of an azo-dye, trypan blue, induced a reactive proliferation of RES in rats. Reaction of the RES was followed in rats whose optical analyzer was eliminated by enucleation of bulbs after the birth, in rats whose smell analyzer was altered by a repeated long-term exposition to ammoniac and in normal rats. Blind rats showed a striking proliferation of histiocytes of the RES in the liver, while the reaction was weak in the spleen and lymph nodes. In contrary to that, rats with altered smell and also the normal rats exhibited standard reactive changes in the spleen and lymph nodes and distinctly weaker reaction in the liver. The obtained results support an idea that vegetative neural mechanisms play a role in control and coordination of RES reactions.

  11. Manufactured residential utility wall system (ResCore), overview

    SciTech Connect

    Wendt, R.; Lundell, C.; Lau, T.M.

    1997-05-01

    This paper provides an overview of the design and development of a manufactured residential utility wall system referred to as ResCore. ResCore is a self-contained, manufactured, residential utility wall that provides complete rough-in of utilities (power, gas, water, and phone) and other functions (exhaust, combustion make-up air, refrigerant lines, etc.) to serve the residential kitchen, bath, utility, and laundry rooms. Auburn University, Department of Industrial Design faculty and students, supported by a team of graduate student researchers and the project`s advisory team, developed the ResCore. The project was accomplished through a research subcontract from the US Department of Energy administered by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The ResCore wall system features a ``layered`` manufacturing technique that allows each major component group--structural, cold water, hot water, drain, gas, electric, etc.--to be built as a separate subassembly and easily brought together for final assembly. The two structural layers are reinforced with bridging that adds strength and also permits firm attachment of plumbing pipes and other systems to the wall frame.

  12. 32 CFR 1802.22 - Challenges barred by res judicata.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Challenges barred by res judicata. 1802.22 Section 1802.22 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense NATIONAL COUNTERINTELLIGENCE CENTER CHALLENGES TO CLASSIFICATION OF DOCUMENTS BY AUTHORIZED HOLDERS PURSUANT TO SECTION 1.9...

  13. 32 CFR 1802.22 - Challenges barred by res judicata.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Challenges barred by res judicata. 1802.22 Section 1802.22 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense NATIONAL COUNTERINTELLIGENCE CENTER CHALLENGES TO CLASSIFICATION OF DOCUMENTS BY AUTHORIZED HOLDERS PURSUANT TO SECTION 1.9...

  14. 32 CFR 1803.22 - Requests barred by res judicata.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Requests barred by res judicata. 1803.22 Section 1803.22 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense NATIONAL COUNTERINTELLIGENCE CENTER PUBLIC REQUESTS FOR MANDATORY DECLASSIFICATION REVIEW OF CLASSIFIED INFORMATION PURSUANT...

  15. 32 CFR 1802.22 - Challenges barred by res judicata.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Challenges barred by res judicata. 1802.22 Section 1802.22 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense NATIONAL COUNTERINTELLIGENCE CENTER CHALLENGES TO CLASSIFICATION OF DOCUMENTS BY AUTHORIZED HOLDERS PURSUANT TO SECTION 1.9...

  16. 32 CFR 1802.22 - Challenges barred by res judicata.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Challenges barred by res judicata. 1802.22 Section 1802.22 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense NATIONAL COUNTERINTELLIGENCE CENTER CHALLENGES TO CLASSIFICATION OF DOCUMENTS BY AUTHORIZED HOLDERS PURSUANT TO SECTION 1.9...

  17. 32 CFR 1802.22 - Challenges barred by res judicata.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Challenges barred by res judicata. 1802.22 Section 1802.22 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense NATIONAL COUNTERINTELLIGENCE CENTER CHALLENGES TO CLASSIFICATION OF DOCUMENTS BY AUTHORIZED HOLDERS PURSUANT TO SECTION 1.9...

  18. 32 CFR 1803.22 - Requests barred by res judicata.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Requests barred by res judicata. 1803.22 Section 1803.22 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense NATIONAL COUNTERINTELLIGENCE CENTER PUBLIC REQUESTS FOR MANDATORY DECLASSIFICATION REVIEW OF CLASSIFIED INFORMATION PURSUANT...

  19. 7 CFR 4280.115 - RES and EEI grant funding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... benefits of the renewable energy system; (4) The quantity of energy savings expected to be derived from the... General Renewable Energy System and Energy Efficiency Improvement Grants § 4280.115 RES and EEI grant... contributions are acceptable for renewable energy system projects, including those that are eligible for...

  20. 7 CFR 4280.115 - RES and EEI grant funding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... benefits of the renewable energy system; (4) The quantity of energy savings expected to be derived from the... General Renewable Energy System and Energy Efficiency Improvement Grants § 4280.115 RES and EEI grant... contributions are acceptable for renewable energy system projects, including those that are eligible for...

  1. 7 CFR 4280.115 - RES and EEI grant funding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... benefits of the renewable energy system; (4) The quantity of energy savings expected to be derived from the... General Renewable Energy System and Energy Efficiency Improvement Grants § 4280.115 RES and EEI grant... contributions are acceptable for renewable energy system projects, including those that are eligible for...

  2. Residential Utility Core Wall System - ResCore

    SciTech Connect

    Boyd, G.; Lundell, C.; Wendt, R.

    1999-06-01

    This paper describes activities associated with the RESidential utility CORE wall system (ResCore) developed by students and faculty in the Department of Industrial Design at Auburn University between 1996 and 1998. These activities analyize three operational prototype units installed in Habitat for Humanity Houses. The paper contains two Parts: 1) analysis of the three operational prototype units, 2) exploration of alternative design solutions. ResCore is a manufactured construction component designed to expedite home building by decreasing the need for skilled labor at the work site. The unit concentrates untility elements into a wall unit(s), which is shipped to the construction site and installed in minimum time. The ResCore unit is intended to be built off-site in a manufacturing environment where the impact of vagaries of weather and work-crew coordination and scheduling are minimized. The controlled environment of the factory enhances efficient production of building components through material and labor throughput controls, enabling the production of components at a substantially reduced per-unit cost. The ResCore unit when compared to traditional "stick-built" utility wall components is in may ways analogous to the factory built roof truss compared to on-site "stick-Built" roof framing.

  3. Manufactured Residential Utility Wall System (ResCore),

    SciTech Connect

    Wendt, Robert; Lundell, Clark; Lau, Tin Man

    1997-12-31

    This paper describes the design and development of a manufactured residential utility wall system referred to as ResCore. ResCore is a self contained, manufactured, residential utility wall that provides complete rough-in of utilities (power, gas, water, and phone) and other functions (exhaust, combustion make-up air, refrigerant lines, etc.) to serve the kitchen, bath, utility, and laundry rooms. Auburn University, Department of Industrial Design faculty, students, supported by a team of graduate student researchers and the project`s advisory team, developed the ResCore. The project was accomplished through a research subcontract from the U.S. Department of Energy administered by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The ResCore wall system features a layered manufacturing technique that allows each major component group: structural, cold water, hot water, drain, gas, electric, etc. to be built as a separate subassembly and easily brought together for final assembly. The two structural layers are reinforced with bridging that adds strength and also permits firm attachment of plumbing pipes and other systems to the wall frame.

  4. Electroluminescence from indirect band gap semiconductor ReS2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutiérrez-Lezama, Ignacio; Aditya Reddy, Bojja; Ubrig, Nicolas; Morpurgo, Alberto F.

    2016-12-01

    It has been recently claimed that bulk crystals of transition metal dichalcogenide (TMD) ReS2 are direct band gap semiconductors, which would make this material an ideal candidate, among all TMDs, for the realization of efficient opto-electronic devices. The situation is however unclear, because even more recently an indirect transition in the PL spectra of this material has been detected, whose energy is smaller than the supposed direct gap. To address this issue we exploit the properties of ionic liquid gated field-effect transistors (FETs) to investigate the gap structure of bulk ReS2. Using these devices, whose high quality is demonstrated by a record high electron FET mobility of 1100 cm2 V-1 s-1 at 4 K, we can induce hole transport at the surface of the material and determine quantitatively the smallest band gap present in the material, irrespective of its direct or indirect nature. The value of the band gap is found to be 1.41 eV, smaller than the 1.5 eV direct optical transition but in good agreement with the energy of the indirect optical transition, providing an independent confirmation that bulk ReS2 is an indirect band gap semiconductor. Nevertheless, contrary to the case of more commonly studied semiconducting TMDs (e.g., MoS2, WS2, etc) in their bulk form, we also find that ReS2 FETs fabricated on bulk crystals do exhibit electroluminescence when driven in the ambipolar injection regime, likely because the difference between direct and indirect gap is only 100 meV. We conclude that ReS2 does deserve more in-depth investigations in relation to possible opto-electronic applications.

  5. Interactions between small and medium scale gravity waves in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heale, Christopher; Snively, Jonathan

    2016-07-01

    Gravity waves play a prominent role in the momentum and energy budget of the Earth's upper atmosphere [e.g. Fritts and Alexander ,Rev. Geophys., 41, 1003, 2003]. Small scale waves with large vertical wavelengths are able to propagate into the thermosphere where they will dissipate and deposit their energy and momentum [e.g. Vadas and Fritts, J. Geoph. Res.,110, D15103, 2005; Yiǧit et al., J. Geophys. Res.-Atmospheres, 114, D07101, 14, 2009; Liu et al., Ann. Geophys., 31, 2013; Heale et al., J. Geophys. Res. Space Physics, 119, 2014]. However, small scale waves are also prone to refraction, reflection, filtering, and instabilities by the temperature and wind structure of the atmosphere. One of the primary sources of variability on scales relevant to these small-scale waves is other, larger scale waves. The use of multiple instruments and Airglow keograms has begun to uncover the richness of the spectrum in the atmosphere, but interaction and relatively poorly understood [e.g. Fritts et al., J. Geophys. Res. Atmos., 119, 2014; Bossert et al., J. Geophys. Res. Atmos., 120, 2015; Lu et al., J. Geophys. Res. Atmos., 120, 2015; Yuan et al., J. Geophys. Res. Atmos., 121, 2016]. We use a 2D nonlinear, compressible numerical model to investigate the character of interactions between small-scale and medium-scale gravity waves at varied amplitudes as they approach nonlinearity. We investigate the relative importance of linear and nonlinear interaction processes and their effects on the propagation of multiple wave packets, and the possibility of energy exchanges and the threshold of onset for instability or breaking within the waves. Furthermore, we assess the validity of linear interpretations of observational data where coherent large-amplitude waves are detected at multiple, separated scales.

  6. High-Resolution Seismic Velocity and Attenuation Structure of the Sichuan-Yunnan Region, Southwest China, Using Seismic Catalog and Waveform Data

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-07-13

    velocity beneath southeast Tibet from ambient noisy tomography (Yao et al., 2006). This low velocity anomaly may be related to lower or middle crustal flow ...2003). Upper mantle beneath southeast Asia from S velocity tomography , J. Geophys. Res. 108, no. B1, 2048, doi 10.1029/2000JB000073. Lees, J. M...upper mantle structure beneath western China from P wave travel time tomography , J. Geophys. Res., 107, 2220, doi 10.1029/2001JB000402. Yang, Z.X

  7. Improved Tumor Uptake by Optimizing Liposome Based RES Blockade Strategy

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xiaolian; Yan, Xuefeng; Jacobson, Orit; Sun, Wenjing; Wang, Zhantong; Tong, Xiao; Xia, Yuqiong; Ling, Daishun; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2017-01-01

    Minimizing the sequestration of nanomaterials (NMs) by the reticuloendothelial system (RES) can enhance the circulation time of NMs, and thus increase their tumor-specific accumulation. Liposomes are generally regarded as safe (GRAS) agents that can block the RES reversibly and temporarily. With the help of positron emission tomography (PET), we monitored the in vivo tissue distribution of 64Cu-labeled 40 × 10 nm gold nanorods (Au NRs) after pretreatment with liposomes. We systematically studied the effectiveness of liposome administration by comparing (1) differently charged liposomes; (2) different liposome doses; and (3) varying time intervals between liposome dose and NR dose. By pre-injecting 400 μmol/kg positively charged liposomes into mice 5 h before the Au NRs, the liver and spleen uptakes of Au NRs decreased by 30% and 53%, respectively. Significantly, U87MG tumor uptake of Au NRs increased from 11.5 ± 1.1 %ID/g to 16.1 ± 1.3 %ID/g at 27 h post-injection. Quantitative PET imaging is a valuable tool to understand the fate of NMs in vivo and cationic liposomal pretreatment is a viable approach to reduce RES clearance, prolong circulation, and improve tumor uptake. PMID:28042337

  8. Comparison of telogen hair analyses: genRES MPX-2SP kit versus genRES MPX-SP1 and genRES MPX-SP2 kits.

    PubMed

    Schmid, D; Bayer, B; Anslinger, K

    2008-12-01

    STR investigations of telogen hair are invariably difficult due to the small amounts of nuclear DNA and its degradation products. However, in recent years there has been a considerable improvement. This study examined the suitability of a new STR kit with shortened amplicons for the investigation of hair in routine casework. This kit allows the simultaneous amplification of the eight STR-loci D3S1358, VWA, FGA, TH01, SE33, D8S1179, D18S51, and D21S11, and the sex-determining amelogenin system. It was tested against the genRES MPX-SP1 and genRES MPX-SP2 kits. The sensitivity of the new genRES MPX-2SP kit was demonstrated to be inferior to that of the genRES MPX-SP1, but almost equal to that of the genRES MPX-SP2 kit.

  9. A Comprehensive Modeling Approach Towards Understanding and Prediction of the Alaskan Coastal System Response to Changes in an Ice-diminished Arctic

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    Walczowski , 2002; Maslowski et al., 2001; Maslowski et al., 2000; Clement et al., 2005; Clement et al., 2007; Cassano et al., 2001; Cassano et al., 2006a...Geophys. Res- Biogeosciences, 112, G04S49, doi:10.1029/2006JG000332. Clement, J.L., Maslowski, W., Cooper, L.W., Grebmeier, J.M., Walczowski , W. (2005...the flow of the Alaskan Stream, J. Geophys. Res., 113, C07036, doi:10.1029/2007JC004341. Maslowski, W., D. Marble, W. Walczowski , U. Schauer, J. L

  10. Determining Fault Geometries From Surface Displacements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkov, D.; Voisin, C.; Ionescu, I. R.

    2017-02-01

    We introduce a new algorithm for determining the geometry of active parts of faults. This algorithm uses surface measurements of displacement fields and local modeling of the Earth's crust as a half-space elastic medium. The numerical method relies on iterations alternating non-linear steps for recovering the geometry and linear steps for reconstructing slip fields. Our algorithm greatly improves upon past attempts at reconstructing fault profiles. We argue that these past attempts suffered from either the restrictive assumption that the geometry of faults can be derived using only uniformly constant slips or that they relied on arbitrary assumptions on the statistics of the reconstruction error. We test this algorithm on the 2006 Guerrero, Mexico, slow slip event (SSE) and on the 2009 SSE for the same region. These events occurred on a relatively well-known subduction zone, whose geometry was derived from seismicity and gravimetric techniques, see Kostoglodov et al. (Geophys Res Lett 23(23):3385-3388, 1996), Pardo and Suarez (J Geophys Res 100(B7):357-373, 1995), Singh and Pardo (Geophys Res Lett 20(14):1483-1486, 1993), so our results can be compared to known benchmarks. Our derived geometry is found to be consistent with these benchmarks regarding dip and strike angles and the positioning of the North American Trench. In addition, our derived slip distribution is also consistent with previous studies (all done with an assumed fixed geometry), see Larson et al. (Geophys Res Lett 34(13), 2007), Bekaert et al. (J Geophys Res: Solid Earth 120(2):1357-1375, 2015), Radiguet et al. (Geophys J Int 184(2):816-828, 2011, J Geophys Res 2012), Rivet et al. (Geophys Res Lett 38(8), 2011), Vergnolle et al. (J Geophys Res: Solid Earth 115(B8), 2010), Walpersdorf et al. Geophys Res Lett 38(15), 2011), to name a few. We believe that the new computational inverse method introduced in this paper holds great promise for applications to blind inversion cases, where both geometry and

  11. Diagnosing ALS

    MedlinePlus

    ... that a person diagnosed with ALS seek a second opinion from an ALS "expert" - someone who diagnoses and treats many ALS patients and has training in this medical specialty. The ALS Association maintains a list of recognized experts in the field of ALS. See ALS Association Certified Centers of ...

  12. TOPICAL REVIEW: Highest energy cosmic-rays and results from the HiRes experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolsky, P.; Thomson, G. B.

    2007-11-01

    The status of the field of ultrahigh energy cosmic-ray physics is summarized, from the point of view of the latest results of the High-Resolution Fly's Eye (HiRes) Experiment. HiRes results are presented, and compared with those of the Akeno Giant Air Shower Array (AGASA), plus the Telescope Array and Pierre Auger experiments. The HiRes measurement of the cosmic-ray spectrum and the observation of the GZK cutoff are presented. HiRes results on composition, searches for anisotropy, measurement of the proton-air total cross-section and shapes of shower profiles are presented.

  13. ALS Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... toward a world without ALS! Walk to Defeat ALS® Walk to Defeat ALS® draws people of all ... We need your help. I Will Advocate National ALS Registry The National ALS Registry is a congressionally ...

  14. Two-component regulatory proteins ResD-ResE are required for transcriptional activation of fnr upon oxygen limitation in Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed Central

    Nakano, M M; Zuber, P; Glaser, P; Danchin, A; Hulett, F M

    1996-01-01

    Bacillus subtilis can grow anaerobically in the presence of nitrate as a terminal electron acceptor. The two component regulatory proteins, ResD and ResE, and an anaerobic gene regulator, FNR, were previously shown to be indispensable for nitrate respiration in B. subtilis. Unlike Escherichia coli fnr, B. subtilis fnr transcription was shown to be highly induced by oxygen limitation. fnr is transcribed from its own promoter as well as from a promoter located upstream of narK, the first gene in the narK-fnr dicistronic operon. DNA fragments containing the narK promoter, the fnr promoter, and both of the promoters were used to construct three lacZ fusions to examine the transcriptional regulation of the narK-fnr operon. ResDE was found to be required for transcriptional activation of fnr from the fnr-specific promoter, and FNR was required for activation of narK-fnr transcription from the FNR-dependent narK operon promoter under anaerobiosis. In order to determine if the requirement for ResDE in nitrate respiration is solely to activate fnr transcription, fnr was placed under control of the IPTG (isopropyl-beta-D-thiogalactopyranoside)-inducible promoter, Pspac. The observed defect in anaerobic growth of a Pspac-fnr delta resDE mutant in the presence of IPTG indicated that resDE has an additional role in B. subtilis anaerobic gene regulation. PMID:8682783

  15. EPRI/NRC-RES fire human reliability analysis guidelines.

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, Stuart R.; Cooper, Susan E.; Najafi, Bijan; Collins, Erin; Hannaman, Bill; Kohlhepp, Kaydee; Grobbelaar, Jan; Hill, Kendra; Hendrickson, Stacey M. Langfitt; Forester, John Alan; Julius, Jeff

    2010-03-01

    During the 1990s, the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) developed methods for fire risk analysis to support its utility members in the preparation of responses to Generic Letter 88-20, Supplement 4, 'Individual Plant Examination - External Events' (IPEEE). This effort produced a Fire Risk Assessment methodology for operations at power that was used by the majority of U.S. nuclear power plants (NPPs) in support of the IPEEE program and several NPPs overseas. Although these methods were acceptable for accomplishing the objectives of the IPEEE, EPRI and the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) recognized that they required upgrades to support current requirements for risk-informed, performance-based (RI/PB) applications. In 2001, EPRI and the USNRC's Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research (RES) embarked on a cooperative project to improve the state-of-the-art in fire risk assessment to support a new risk-informed environment in fire protection. This project produced a consensus document, NUREG/CR-6850 (EPRI 1011989), entitled 'Fire PRA Methodology for Nuclear Power Facilities' which addressed fire risk for at power operations. NUREG/CR-6850 developed high level guidance on the process for identification and inclusion of human failure events (HFEs) into the fire PRA (FPRA), and a methodology for assigning quantitative screening values to these HFEs. It outlined the initial considerations of performance shaping factors (PSFs) and related fire effects that may need to be addressed in developing best-estimate human error probabilities (HEPs). However, NUREG/CR-6850 did not describe a methodology to develop best-estimate HEPs given the PSFs and the fire-related effects. In 2007, EPRI and RES embarked on another cooperative project to develop explicit guidance for estimating HEPs for human failure events under fire generated conditions, building upon existing human reliability analysis (HRA) methods. This document provides a methodology and guidance for conducting

  16. The Borrelia burgdorferi telomere resolvase, ResT, possesses ATP-dependent DNA unwinding activity.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shu Hui; Cozart, McKayla R; Hart, Madison A; Kobryn, Kerri

    2016-12-09

    Spirochetes of the genus Borrelia possess unusual genomes harboring multiple linear and circular replicons. The linear replicons are terminated by covalently closed hairpin (hp) telomeres. Hairpin telomeres are formed from replicated intermediates by the telomere resolvase, ResT, in a phosphoryl transfer reaction with mechanistic similarities to those promoted by type 1B topoisomerases and tyrosine recombinases. There is growing evidence that ResT is multifunctional. Upon ResT depletion DNA replication unexpectedly ceases. Additionally, ResT possesses RecO-like biochemical activities being able to promote single-strand annealing on both free ssDNA and ssDNA complexed with cognate single-stranded DNA binding protein. We report here that ResT possesses DNA-dependent ATPase activity that promotes DNA unwinding with a 3'-5' polarity. ResT can unwind a variety of substrates including synthetic replication forks and D-loops. We demonstrate that ResT's twin activities of DNA unwinding and annealing can drive regression of a model replication fork. These properties are similar to those of the RecQ helicase of the RecF pathway involved in DNA gap repair. We propose that ResT's combination of activities implicates it in replication and recombination processes operating on the linear chromosome and plasmids of Borrelia burgdorferi.

  17. Intelligent energy buildings based on RES and nanotechnology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaplanis, S.; Kaplani, E.

    2015-12-01

    The paper presents the design features, the energy modelling and optical performance details of two pilot Intelligent Energy Buildings, (IEB). Both are evolution of the Zero Energy Building (ZEB) concept. RES innovations backed up by signal processing, simulation models and ICT tools were embedded into the building structures in order to implement a new predictive energy management concept. In addition, nano-coatings, produced by TiO2 and ITO nano-particles, were deposited on the IEB structural elements and especially on the window panes and the PV glass covers. They exhibited promising SSP values which lowered the cooling loads and increased the PV modules yield. Both pilot IEB units were equipped with an on-line dynamic hourly solar radiation prediction model, implemented by sensors and the related software to manage effectively the energy source, the loads and the storage or the backup system. The IEB energy sources covered the thermal loads via a south façade embedded in the wall and a solar roof which consists of a specially designed solar collector type, while a PV generator is part of the solar roof, like a compact BIPV in hybrid configuration to a small wind turbine.

  18. Intelligent energy buildings based on RES and nanotechnology

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplanis, S. Kaplani, E.

    2015-12-31

    The paper presents the design features, the energy modelling and optical performance details of two pilot Intelligent Energy Buildings, (IEB). Both are evolution of the Zero Energy Building (ZEB) concept. RES innovations backed up by signal processing, simulation models and ICT tools were embedded into the building structures in order to implement a new predictive energy management concept. In addition, nano-coatings, produced by TiO2 and ITO nano-particles, were deposited on the IEB structural elements and especially on the window panes and the PV glass covers. They exhibited promising SSP values which lowered the cooling loads and increased the PV modules yield. Both pilot IEB units were equipped with an on-line dynamic hourly solar radiation prediction model, implemented by sensors and the related software to manage effectively the energy source, the loads and the storage or the backup system. The IEB energy sources covered the thermal loads via a south façade embedded in the wall and a solar roof which consists of a specially designed solar collector type, while a PV generator is part of the solar roof, like a compact BIPV in hybrid configuration to a small wind turbine.

  19. A Comprehensive Modeling Approach Towards Understanding and Prediction of the Alaskan Coastal System Response to Changes in an Ice-diminished Arctic

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-01

    coastal system (Maslowski et al., 2007a, 2007b; Maslowski et al., 2004; Maslowski and Lipscomb 2003; Maslowski and Walczowski , 2002; Maslowski et al...Geophys. Res-Biogeosciences, 112, G04S49, doi:10.1029/2006JG000332. Clement, J.L., Maslowski, W., Cooper, L.W., Grebmeier, J.M., Walczowski , W. (2005...of the Alaskan Stream, J. Geophys. Res., 113, C07036, doi:10.1029/2007JC004341. Maslowski, W., D. Marble, W. Walczowski , U. Schauer, J. L. Clement

  20. ALS - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - ALS ... The following organizations are good resources for information on amyotrophic lateral sclerosis : Muscular Dystrophy Association -- www.mda.org/disease/amyotrophic-lateral-sclerosis National Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) ...

  1. Shear-induced melt localization and the rheology of the partially molten mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katz, R. F.; Spiegelman, M.; Holtzman, B. K.

    2005-12-01

    The emergence of patterns of melt distribution in experiments on partially molten aggregates undergoing simple shear [1,2] provide a rare opportunity to test magma migration theory [3,4,5] by directly comparing experiments and calculations. The fundamental observation is the emergence and persistence to large strains of bands of high porosity and concentrated deformation oriented at about 15-25° to the plane of shear [6]. We have extended the analysis of Spiegelman [7] and report results from new linear analysis and numerical solutions that suggest that band angle in experiments is controlled by a balance between porosity and strain rate-weakening mechanisms. Lower angles are predicted for stronger strain rate-weakening. For the specific model considered here, a power-law stress-dependent rheology, calculations with n~6 are consistent with the observations. These results suggest that partially molten aggregates deforming under shear may have a greater sensitivity to strain rate than previously believed [8]. [1] Zimmerman, M. et al., Geophys. Res. Lett., 26, 1999. [2]Holtzman, B. et al., Geochem. Geophys. Geosyst., 4, 2003. [3]Mc{K}enzie, D., J. Petrol., 25, 1984. [4]Fowler, A., Geophys. Astrophys. Fluid Dyn., 33, 1985. [5]Bercovici, D. et al., J. Geophys. Res.- Solid Earth, 106, 2001. [6]Spiegelman, M., Geochem. Geophys. Geosyst., 4, 2003. [7]Holtzman, B. et al., J. Petrol., 2005. [8]Hirth, G. and D. Kohlstedt, J. Geophys. Res., 100, 1995.

  2. Melting enthalpies of mantle peridotite: calorimetric determinations in the system CaO-MgO-Al 2O 3-SiO 2 and application to magma generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kojitani, Hiroshi; Akaogi, Masaki

    1997-12-01

    High-temperature drop calorimetry in the temperature range of 1398-1785 K was performed for the samples of mixtures of synthetic anorthite (An), diopside (Di), enstatite (En) and forsterite (Fo) with the same compositions as those of primary melts generated at 1.1, 3 and 4 GPa at most 10° above the solidus of anhydrous mantle peridotite in the CaO-MgO-Al 2O 3-SiO 2 system. From the differences between the heat contents ( H T-H 298) of liquid and that of crystal mixture at the liquidus temperature, melting enthalpies of the samples of 1.1, 3 and 4 GPa-primary melt compositions were determined at 1 atm to be 531 ± 39 J · g -1 at 1583 K, 604 ± 21 J · g -1 at 1703 K, 646 ± 21 J · g -1 at 1753 K, respectively. These heat of fusion values suggest that mixing enthalpy of the melt in the An-Di-En-Fo system is approximately zero within the experimental errors when we use the heat of fusion of Fo by Richet et al. (P. Richet, F. Leclerc, L. Benoist, Melting of forsterite and spinel, with implications for the glass transition of Mg 2SiO 4 liquid, Geophys. Res. Lett. 20 (1993) 1675-1678). The measured enthalpies of melting at 1 atm were converted into those for melting reactions which occur under high pressures by correcting enthalpy changes associated with solid-state mineral reactions. Correcting the effects of pressure, temperature and FeO and Na 2O components on the melting enthalpies at 1 atm, heat of fusion values of a representative mantle peridotite just above the solidus under high pressure were estimated to be 590 J at 1.1 GPa and 1523 K, 692 J at 3 GPa and 1773 K, and 807 J at 4 GPa and 1923 K for melting reactions producing liquid of 1 g, with uncertainties of 50 J. By applying these melting enthalpies to a mantle diapir model which generates present MORBs, a potential mantle temperature of 1533 K has been estimated, assuming an eruption temperature of magma of 1473 K.

  3. RES-E Support Policies In The Baltic States: Development Aspect (Part I)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobinaite, V.; Priedite, I.

    2015-02-01

    Despite quite similar conditions (natural resources) for electricity production from renewable energy sources (RES-E) in three Baltic States (Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania), significant differences exist in these countries as to the RES-E production volume. In Latvia this volume is the highest, while in Estonia and Lithuania it is half as high. One of the factors that determine the RES-E production volumes is support policies, which in the Baltic States are different. The main objective of this work was to analyze and compare these support policies. The results have shown that for rapid RES-E development the most effective policy is to be market-oriented (as in Estonia), whereas for more stable development such policy should be producer-oriented (as in Lithuania).

  4. Disorder engineering and conductivity dome in ReS2 with electrolyte gating

    PubMed Central

    Ovchinnikov, Dmitry; Gargiulo, Fernando; Allain, Adrien; Pasquier, Diego José; Dumcenco, Dumitru; Ho, Ching-Hwa; Yazyev, Oleg V.; Kis, Andras

    2016-01-01

    Atomically thin rhenium disulphide (ReS2) is a member of the transition metal dichalcogenide family of materials. This two-dimensional semiconductor is characterized by weak interlayer coupling and a distorted 1T structure, which leads to anisotropy in electrical and optical properties. Here we report on the electrical transport study of mono- and multilayer ReS2 with polymer electrolyte gating. We find that the conductivity of monolayer ReS2 is completely suppressed at high carrier densities, an unusual feature unique to monolayers, making ReS2 the first example of such a material. Using dual-gated devices, we can distinguish the gate-induced doping from the electrostatic disorder induced by the polymer electrolyte itself. Theoretical calculations and a transport model indicate that the observed conductivity suppression can be explained by a combination of a narrow conduction band and Anderson localization due to electrolyte-induced disorder. PMID:27499375

  5. CeREs, A Compact Radiation Belt Explorer to study charged particle dynamics in geospace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanekal, S. G.; Summerlin, E. J.; Christian, E. R.; Crum, G.; Desai, M. I.; Evans, A.; Dumonthier, J.; Jamison, T.; Jones, A. D.; Livi, S. A.; Ogasawara, K.; Paschalidis, N.; Suarez, G.; Patel, D.

    2015-12-01

    The CeREs 3U CubeSat, set to be launched in mid-2016, will study the physics of the acceleration and loss of radiation belt electrons, particularly loss due to electron microbursts. CeRES will also observe solar electrons and protons entering the magnetosphere via the open field-line polar caps. CeREs is expected to be in a low earth high inclination orbit and carries onboard the Miniaturized Electron pRoton Telescope (MERiT). The MERiT instrument measures electrons and protons ranging in energy from 5 keV to >10 MeV with high time resolution of ~5ms in multiple differential energy channels. MERiT is particle telescope using a stack of solid-state detectors and space-facing avalanche photo diodes.We will describe the CeRES spacecraft, science goals and the MERiT instrument.

  6. ResA3: a web tool for resampling analysis of arbitrary annotations.

    PubMed

    Ruhs, Aaron; Cemic, Franz; Braun, Thomas; Krüger, Marcus

    2013-01-01

    Resampling algorithms provide an empirical, non-parametric approach to determine the statistical significance of annotations in different experimental settings. ResA(3) (Resampling Analysis of Arbitrary Annotations, short: ResA) is a novel tool to facilitate the analysis of enrichment and regulation of annotations deposited in various online resources such as KEGG, Gene Ontology and Pfam or any kind of classification. Results are presented in readily accessible navigable table views together with relevant information for statistical inference. The tool is able to analyze multiple types of annotations in a single run and includes a Gene Ontology annotation feature. We successfully tested ResA using a dataset obtained by measuring incorporation rates of stable isotopes into proteins in intact animals. ResA complements existing tools and will help to evaluate the increasing number of large-scale transcriptomics and proteomics datasets (resa.mpi-bn.mpg.de).

  7. Energetic Neutral Atom Imaging of the Lunar Poles and Night-Side

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vorburger, Audrey; Wurz, Peter; Barabash, Stas; Wieser, Martin; Futaana, Yoshifumi; Bhardwaj, Anil; Dhanya, Mb; Asamura, Kazushi

    2016-04-01

    So far all reported scientific results derived from measurements of the Chandrayaan-1 Energetic Neutral Analyzer (CENA) on board the Indian lunar mission Chandrayaan-1 focused on the sun-lit part of the Moon. Here, for the first time, we present the analysis of the Moon - solar wind interaction in Energetic Neutral Atoms (ENAs) from measurements over the poles and the night-side of the Moon. The Moon, not being protected by a global magnetic field or an atmosphere, is constantly bombarded by solar wind ions. Until recently, it was tacitly assumed that the solar wind ions that impinge onto the lunar surface are almost completely absorbed ( < 1% reflection) by the lunar surface (e.g. Crider and Vondrak [Adv. Space Res., 2002]; Feldman et al. [J. Geophys. Res., 2000]). However, recent observations conducted by the two ENA sensors of NASA's Interstellar Boundary Explorer and by Chandrayaan-1/CENA showed an average global energetic neutral atom (ENA) albedo of 10% - 20% (e.g. McComas et al. [Geophys. Res. Lett., 2009], Wieser et al. [Planet. Space Sci., 2009], Vorburger et al. [J. Geophys. Res., 2013]). In the past 6 years, several studies have closely investigated this solar wind - lunar surface interaction from various viewpoints. The main findings of these studies include (1) the dependency of the hydrogen reflection ratio on the local crustal magnetic fields (e.g., Wieser et al. [Geophys. Res. Lett. ,2010] and Vorburger et al. [J. Geophys. Res., 2012]), (2) the determination of the energy spectra of backscattered neutralized solar wind protons (Futaana et al. [J. Geophys. Res., 2012]) (3) the use of the spectra shape to remotely define an electric potential above a lunar magnetic anomaly (Futaana et al. [Geophys. Res. Lett., 2012]), (4) the favouring of backscattering over forward-scattering of impinging solar wind hydrogen particles (Vorburger et al. [Geophys. Res. Lett., 2011]), (5) the first-ever measurements of sputtered lunar oxygen (Vorburger et al. [J

  8. Aerosol reduction/expansion synthesis (A-RES) for zero valent metal particles

    DOEpatents

    Leseman, Zayd; Luhrs, Claudia; Phillips, Jonathan; Soliman, Haytham

    2016-04-12

    Various embodiments provide methods of forming zero valent metal particles using an aerosol-reductive/expansion synthesis (A-RES) process. In one embodiment, an aerosol stream including metal precursor compound(s) and chemical agent(s) that produces reducing gases upon thermal decomposition can be introduced into a heated inert atmosphere of a RES reactor to form zero valent metal particles corresponding to metals used for the metal precursor compound(s).

  9. Vertically oriented arrays of ReS2 nanosheets for electrochemical energy storage and electrocatalysis

    DOE PAGES

    Gao, Jian; Li, Lu; Tan, Jiawei; ...

    2016-05-17

    Here, transition-metal dichalcogenide (TMD) nanolayers show potential as high-performance catalysts in energy conversion and storage devices. Synthetic TMDs produced by chemical-vapor deposition (CVD) methods tend to grow parallel to the growth substrate. Here, we show that with the right precursors and appropriate tuning of the CVD growth conditions, ReS2 nanosheets can be made to orient perpendicular to the growth substrate. This accomplishes two important objectives; first, it drastically increases the wetted or exposed surface area of the ReS2 sheets, and second, it exposes the sharp edges and corners of the ReS2 sheets. We show that these structural features of themore » vertically grown ReS2 sheets can be exploited to significantly improve their performance as polysulfide immobilizers and electrochemical catalysts in lithium–sulfur (Li–S) batteries and in hydrogen evolution reactions (HER). After 300 cycles, the specific capacity of the Li–S battery with vertical ReS2 catalyst is retained above 750 mA h g–1, with only ~0.063% capacity decay per cycle, much better than the baseline battery (without ReS2), which shows ~0.184% capacity decay per cycle under the same test conditions. As a HER catalyst, the vertical ReS2 provides very small onset overpotential (<100 mV) and an exceptional exchange-current density (~67.6 μA/cm2), which is vastly superior to the baseline electrode without ReS2.« less

  10. Impaired consciousness in epilepsy investigated by a prospective responsiveness in epilepsy scale (RES)

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Li; Shklyar, Irina; Lee, Hyang Woon; Ezeani, Celestine C.; Anaya, Joseph; Balakirsky, Samantha; Han, Xiao; Enamandram, Sheila; Men, Clara; Cheng, Joyce Y.; Nunn, Abigail; Mayer, Tanya; Francois, Czestochowa; Albrecht, Molly; Hutchison, Alan L.; Yap, Ee-Lynn; Ing, Kevin; Didebulidze, Gvantsa; Xiao, Bo; Hamid, Hamada; Farooque, Pue; Detyniecki, Kamil; Giacino, Joseph T.; Blumenfeld, Hal

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Impaired consciousness in epileptic seizures has a major negative impact on patient quality of life. Prior work on epileptic unconsciousness has mainly used retrospective and nonstandardized methods. Our goal was to validate and to obtain initial data using a standardized prospective testing battery. Methods The responsiveness in epilepsy scale (RES) was used on 52 patients during continuous video/EEG monitoring. RES begins with higher-level questions and commands, and switches adaptively to more basic sensorimotor responses depending on patient performance. RES continues after seizures and includes postictal memory testing. Scoring was conducted based on video review. Key Findings Testing on standardized seizure simulations yielded good intra-rater and inter-rater reliability. We captured 59 seizures from 18 patients (35% of participants) during 1420 hours of RES monitoring. RES impairment was greatest during and after tonic-clonic seizures, less in partial seizures, and minimal in auras and subclinical seizures. In partial seizures, ictal RES impairment was significantly greater if EEG changes were present. Maximum RES impairment (lowest ictal score) was also significantly correlated with long postictal recovery time, and poor postictal memory. Significance We found that prospective testing of responsiveness during seizures is feasible and reliable. RES impairment was related to EEG changes during seizures, as well as to postictal memory deficits and recovery time. With a larger patient sample it is hoped that this approach can identify brain networks underlying specific components of impaired consciousness in seizures. This may allow the development of improved treatments targeted at preventing dysfunction in these networks. PMID:22150524

  11. The phenotype alterations showed by the res tomato mutant disappear when the plants are grown under semi-arid conditions: Is the res mutant tolerant to multiple stresses?

    PubMed

    Garcia-Abellan, José O; Albaladejo, Irene; Egea, Isabel; Flores, Francisco B; Capel, Carmen; Capel, Juan; Angosto, Trinidad; Lozano, Rafael; Bolarin, Maria C

    2016-02-23

    The res (restored cell structure by salinity) mutant, recently identified as the first tomato mutant accumulating jasmonate (JA) without stress, exhibited important morphological alterations when plants were grown under control conditions but these disappeared under salt stress. Since the defense responses against stresses are activated in the res mutant as a consequence of the increased expression of genes from the JA biosynthetic and signaling pathways, the mutant may display a tolerance response not only to salt stress but also to multiple stresses. Here, we show that when res mutant plants are grown under the summer natural conditions of the Mediterranean area, with high temperatures and low relative humidity, the characteristic leaf chlorosis exhibited by the mutant disappears and leaves become dark green over time, with a similar aspect to WT leaves. Moreover, the mutant plants are able to achieve chlorophyll and fluorescence levels similar to those of WT. These results hint that research on res tomato mutant may allow very significant advances in the knowledge of defense responses activated by JA against multiple stresses.

  12. Investigations of Magnetosphere-Ionosphere Coupling Relevant to Operational Systems.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-02-01

    at all inconsistent with the same phenomenon is being observed. Balsiger et al. [19801 the convection patterns reported by Carpenter et al. [1979...J. Geophys. Res., 83, 4755-4766, 1978. Balsiger . H., P. Eberhardt. J. Geiss. and D. T. Young, Magnetic stormtime of a 100-eV H * ion at L = 3 with a

  13. Evolutionäres Graphmatching zur Handknochen-Identifikation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, Benedikt; Fritsche, Armin; Thies, Christian; Deserno, Thomas M.

    Im medizinischen Umfeld ist häufig eine Identifikation lokaler Bildinhalte (z.B. Organe) erforderlich. Dazu lassen sich Bildinhalte als Graphstruktur abstrahieren und mit für die jeweilige Anwendung statistisch ermittelten Strukturprototypen vergleichen. Die Identifikation unbekannter Inhalte zu den Prototypen entspricht dann einem Graphmatching. In dieser Arbeit wird dazu ein auf evolutionärer Spieletheorie basierender Ansatz verwendet. Die Praxistauglichkeit wird am Beispiel der Identifikation von 19 Handknochen in 96 Handradiographien evaluiert und mit weiteren Matchingverfahren verglichen. Bei durchschnittlich 2.300 hierarchisch segmentierten Regionen je Radiographie werden mit 34 regionalen und 12 relationalen Merkmalen Werte von bis zu 71,63%, 65,76% bzw. 64,08% für Recall, Precision bzw. F-Measure für 27 unterschiedliche Parametrierungen erzielt.

  14. 3D Boltzmann Simulation of the Io's Plasma Environment with Adaptive Mesh and Particle Refinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipatov, A. S.; Combi, M. R.

    2002-12-01

    The global dynamics of the ionized and neutral components in the environment of Io plays an important role in the interaction of Jupiter's corotating magnetospheric plasma with Io [Combi et al., 2002; 1998; Kabin et al., 2001]. The stationary simulation of this problem was done in the MHD [Combi et al., 1998; Linker et al, 1998; Kabin et al., 2001] and the electrodynamic [Saur et al., 1999] approaches. In this report, we develop a method of kinetic ion-neutral simulation, which is based on a multiscale adaptive mesh, particle and algorithm refinement. This method employs the fluid description for electrons whereas for ions the drift-kinetic and particle approaches are used. This method takes into account charge-exchange and photoionization processes. The first results of such simulation of the dynamics of ions in the Io's environment are discussed in this report. ~ M R Combi et al., J. Geophys. Res., 103, 9071, 1998. M R Combi, T I Gombosi, K Kabin, Atmospheres in the Solar System: Comparative\\ Aeronomy. Geophys. Monograph Series, 130, 151, 2002. K Kabin et al., Planetary and Space Sci., 49, 337, 2001. J A Linker et al., J. Geophys. Res., 103(E9), 19867, 1998. J Saur et al., J. Geophys. Res., 104, 25105, 1999.

  15. Three-Dimensional Modelling of Venus Photochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolzenbach, A.; Lefèvre, F.; Lebonnois, S.; Maattanen, A. E.; Bekki, S.

    2015-12-01

    We have developed a new code of the Venus atmospheric chemistry based on our photochemical model already in use for Mars (e.g., Lefèvre et al., J. Geophys. Res., 2004). For Venus, the code also includes a parameterized treatment of cloud microphysics that computes the composition of sulphuric acid droplets and their number density based on a given droplet size distribution in altitude and latitude. We coupled this photochemical-microphysical package to the LMD general circulation model of Venus (Lebonnois et al., J. Geophys. Res., 2010) with a sedimentation module that takes into account the parametrized droplet size distribution. We will describe the results obtained with this first three-dimensional model of the Venus photochemistry. The space and time distribution of key chemical species as well as the modelled clouds characteristics will be detailed and compared to observations performed from Venus Express and from the Earth (e.g. Knollenberg and Hunten, J. Geophys. Res., 1980 ; Wilquet et al., J. Geophys. Res., 2009 ; Sandor et al., Icarus, 2012 ; Mahieux et al., PSS, 2014 ; Marcq et al., 2015, PSS).

  16. Anisotropy in the optical properties of bulk and layered transition metal dichalcogenide ReS2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Suvadip; Pradhan, Nihar; Garcia, Carlos; Rhodes, Daniel; McGill, Stephen; Balicas, Luis; Manousakis, Efstratios

    Unlike most transition metal dichalcogenides, ReS2 in the distorted 1T' phase, is a direct gap semiconductor. We measured the temperature dependent photoluminescence in both bulk and layered ReS2 and examined the evolution of the peaks with the number of layers. We obtained strong signatures of optical anisotropy in the absorption spectroscopy and photocurrent response which makes this material a potential candidate for optoelectronic applications. Many body calculations including electron-hole interactions as implemented in the GW+BSE approach, agrees with the strong anisotropy in the optical properties of bulk and monolayer ReS2. A shift in the excitonic peaks by about 0.8 eV introduced by solving the Bethe-Salpeter equation indicates strong contribution from excitonic bound states in this transition metal dichalcogenide.

  17. Industrial solutions trends for the control of HiRes spectrograph@E-ELT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Marcantonio, P.; Baldini, V.; Calderone, G.; Cirami, R.; Coretti, I.; Cristiani, S.

    Starting a few years ago, ESO initiated a number of projects aiming to explore the possible adoption of industrial standards and commercial off-the-shelf components (COTS) for the control of future VLT and E-ELT instrumentations. In this context, ESPRESSO, the next generation high-stability spectrograph for the VLT and to a certain extent, a precursor of HiRes, has adopted since the preliminary design phase those solutions. Based on the ESPRESSO experience and taking into account the requirements inferred from the preliminary Hi-Res studies in terms of both high-level operations as well as low-level control, I will present in this paper the current proposal for the HiRes hardware architecture.

  18. Anisotropic optical properties of few-layer transition metal dichalcogenide ReS2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhenglu; Cao, Ting; da Jornada, Felipe H.; Wu, Meng; Louie, Steven G.

    We present first-principles (DFT, GW and GW-BSE) calculations of the electronic and optical properties of few-layer rhenium disulfide (ReS2). Monolayer ReS2 shows strong many-electron effects with a fundamental quasiparticle band gap of 2.38 eV based on G0W0 calculation and a large exciton binding energy of 690 meV based on solving the Bethe-Salpeter equation. Highly anisotropic linear-polarized optical absorptions are revealed for few-layer and bulk ReS2. The band gap shows a decreasing trend with the optical polarization direction near the absorption edge gradually rotating from around 67 degree in the monolayer to 85 degree in the bulk, referencing to the Re-chain. Our calculations are consistent with recent experimental data and theoretical studies, and provide a systematic understanding of the electronic and optical properties in few-layer ReS2. This work was supported by National Science Foundation Grant No. DMR15-1508412 and the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231. Computational resources have been provided by DOE at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory's NERSC facility.

  19. Hi-Res Electronic Design. Courseware Evaluation for Vocational and Technical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, Gordon; And Others

    This courseware evaluation rates the Hi-Res Electronic Design program developed by Avant-Garde Creations. (The program--not contained in this document--is designed to determine closure and area of a survey.) Part A describes the program in terms of subject area (schematic diagrams and symbols) and hardware requirements (Apple II, color monitor,…

  20. Strain-engineering the anisotropic electrical conductance in ReS2 monolayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Sheng; Zhu, Hao; Eshun, Kwesi; Shi, Chen; Zeng, Min; Li, Qiliang

    2016-05-01

    Rhenium disulfide (ReS2) is a semiconducting layered transition metal dichalcogenide that exhibits a stable distorted 1 T (Re in octahedral coordination) phase. The reduced symmetry in ReS2 leads to in-plane anisotropy in various material properties. In this work, we performed a comprehensive first-principle computational study of strain effect on the anisotropic mechanical and electronic properties of ReS2 monolayers. We found that the anisotropic ratio in electron mobility along two principle axes is 2.36 while the ratio in hole mobility reaches 7.76. The study of strain applied along different directions shows that the elastic modulus is largest for out-of-plane direction, and the strain along a-direction induces indirect bandgap while strain along b- or c-direction does not. In addition, the carrier mobility can be significantly improved by the c-direction tensile strain. This study indicates that the ReS2 monolayer has promising applications in nanoscale strain sensor and conductance-switch FETs.

  1. Res-Parity: Parity Violation in Inelastic scattering at Low Q2

    SciTech Connect

    Reimer, Paul; Bosted, Peter; Arrington, John; Mkrtchyan, Hamlet; Zheng, Xiaochao

    2006-05-16

    Parity violating electron scattering has become a well established tool which has been used, for example, to probe the Standard Model and the strange-quark contribution to the nucleon. While much of this work has focused on elastic scattering, the RES-Parity experiment, which has been proposed to take place at Jefferson Laboratory, would focus on inelastic scattering in the low-Q2, low-W domain. RES-Parity would search for evidence of quark-hadron duality and resonance structure with parity violation in the resonance region. In terms of parity violation, this region is essentially unexplored, but the interpretation of other high-precision electron scattering experiments will rely on a reasonable understanding of scattering at lower energy and low-W through the effects of radiative corrections. RES-Parity would also study nuclear effects with the weak current. Because of the intrinsic broad band energy spectrum of neutrino beams, neutrino experiments are necessarily dependent on an untested, implicit assumption that these effects are identical to electromagnetic nuclear effects. RES-Parity is a relatively straight forward experiment. With a large expected asymmetry (~ 0.5 × 10-4) these studies may be completed with in a relatively brief period.

  2. Constructing CoRes--A Strategy for Building PCK in Pre-Service Science Teacher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hume, Anne; Berry, Amanda

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents findings from an exploratory study into a science teacher education initiative that seeks to build the foundations on which novice teachers can begin developing their pedagogical content knowledge (PCK). The initiative involved the use of Content Representations (CoRes), which were originally developed as part of a strategy for…

  3. Metal to insulator quantum-phase transition in few-layered ReS2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradhan, Nihar; McCreary, Amber; Rhodes, Daniel; Lu, Zhenguang; Smirnov, Dmitry; Manousakis, Efstratios; Feng, Simin; Namburu, Raju; Dubey, Madan; Hight Walker, Angela; Terrones, Humberto; Terrones, Mauricio; Dobrosavljevic, Vladimir; Balicas, Luis

    ReS2 a layer-independent direct band-gap semiconductor of 1.5 eV implies a potential for its use in optoelectronic applications. Here, we present an overall evaluation of transport and anisotropic Raman of few-layered ReS2 FET. ReS2 exfoliated on SiO2 behaves as an n-type semiconductor with an intrinsic carrier mobility surpassing μi ~30 cm2/Vs at T = 300 K which increases up to ~350 cm2/vs at 2 K. Semiconducting behavior is observed at low electron densities n, but at high values of nthe resistivity decreases by a factor >7 upon cooling to 2 K and displays a metallicT2 -dependence. The electric-field induced metallic state observed in MoS2 was recently claimed to result from a percolation type of transition. Instead, through a scaling analysis of the conductivity as a function of Tand n, we find that the metallic state of ReS2 results from a second-order metal to insulator transition driven by electronic correlations. Supported by U.S. Army Research Office MURI Grant No. W911NF-11-1-0362.

  4. Metal to insulator quantum-phase transition in few-layered ReS2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradhan, Nihar; Rhodes, Daniel; Lu, Zhenguang; Smirnov, Dmitry; Manousakis, Efstratios; Dobrosavljevic, Vladimir; Balicas, Luis; McCreary, Amber; Feng, Simin; Terrones, Maurico; Namburu, Raju; Dubey, Madan; Hight Walker, Angela; Terrones, Humberto

    ReS2 a layer-independent direct band-gap semiconductor of 1.5 eV implies a potential for its use in optoelectronic applications. Here, we present an overall evaluation of transport and anisotropic Raman of few-layered ReS2 FET. ReS2 exfoliated on SiO2 behaves as an n-type semiconductor with an intrinsic carrier mobility surpassing μi ~ 30cm2 /Vs at T = 300 K which increases up to ~ 350cm2 /vs at 2 K. Semiconducting behavior is observed at low electron densities n, but at high values of nthe resistivity decreases by a factor > 7 upon cooling to 2 K and displays a metallicT2-dependence. The electric-field induced metallic state observed in MoS2 was recently claimed to result from a percolation type of transition. Instead, through a scaling analysis of the conductivity as a function of Tand n, we find that the metallic state of ReS2 results from a second-order metal to insulator transition driven by electronic correlations. Supported by U.S. Army Research Office MURI Grant No. W911NF-11-1-0362.

  5. Humidity sensing using vertically oriented arrays of ReS2 nanosheets deposited on an interdigitated gold electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Aijun; Gao, Jian; Li, Baichang; Tan, Jiawei; Xiang, Yu; Gupta, Tushar; Li, Lu; Suresh, Shravan; Idrobo, Juan Carlos; Lu, Toh-Ming; Rong, Mingzhe; Koratkar, Nikhil

    2016-12-01

    We report a novel humidity sensor featuring vertically oriented arrays of ReS2 nanosheets grown on an interdigitated gold electrode by chemical vapor deposition. The vertical orientation of the nanosheets is important since it maximizes the exposed surface area for water adsorption/desorption. We find that the resistance of the ReS2 film decreases sensitively with increasing relative humidity, which we attribute to charge transfer from the absorbed H2O molecules to the n-doped ReS2 nanosheets. In addition to high sensitivity, the ReS2 sensors exhibit fast response/recovery time and excellent reversibility with minimal hysteresis. Moreover, our fabrication approach involving the direct (1-step) growth of the ReS2 films on an interdigitated electrode (without any transfer using wet chemistry or lithography) greatly simplifies the device architecture and has important practical benefits for the low-cost and scalable deployment of such sensor devices.

  6. Crustal Structure of North Iraq from Receiver Function Analyses

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-09-01

    1999), Park and Levin (2000), and Helffrich (2006). The current approach is based on the techniques by Zhu and Kanamori (2000), Julià et al. (2000...and H. Kanamori (2000). Moho depth variation in southern California from teleseismic receiver functions, J. Geophys. Res. 105: 2969–2980. Ammon

  7. Three-dimensional modelling of Venus photochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolzenbach, Aurélien; Lefèvre, Franck; Lebonnois, Sébastien; Määttänen, Anni; Bekki, Slimane

    2014-05-01

    We have developed a new code of the Venus atmospheric chemistry based on our photochemical model already in use for Mars (e.g., Lefèvre et al., J. Geophys. Res., 2004). For Venus, the code also includes a parameterized treatment of cloud microphysics that computes the composition of sulphuric acid droplets and their number density based on a given droplet size distribution in altitude. We coupled this photochemical-microphysical package to the LMD general circulation model of Venus (Lebonnois et al., J. Geophys. Res., 2010) with a sedimentation module recently added. We will describe preliminary results obtained with this first three-dimensional model of the Venus photochemistry. The space and time distribution of key chemical species as well as the modelled clouds characteristics will be detailed and compared to observations performed from Venus Express and from the Earth (e.g. Knollenberg and Hunten, J. Geophys. Res., 1980 ; Wilquet et al., J. Geophys. Res., 2009 ; Sandor et al., Icarus, 2012).

  8. Sulfuric Acid on Europa's Surface and the Radiolytic Sulfur Cycle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, R.; Johnson, R.; Anderson, M.

    1999-01-01

    Galileo infrared spectra of Europa's surface show distorted water bands that have been attributed to hydrated evaporite salts (McCord et al., J. Geophys. Res. 104, 11827, 1999) or to the scattering properties of ice (Dalton and Clark, Bull. Am. Astron. Soc. 30, 1081, 1998).

  9. AL Amyloidosis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Definition of the disease AL amyloidosis results from extra-cellular deposition of fibril-forming monoclonal immunoglobulin (Ig) light chains (LC) (most commonly of lambda isotype) usually secreted by a small plasma cell clone. Most patients have evidence of isolated monoclonal gammopathy or smoldering myeloma, and the occurrence of AL amyloidosis in patients with symptomatic multiple myeloma or other B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders is unusual. The key event in the development of AL amyloidosis is the change in the secondary or tertiary structure of an abnormal monoclonal LC, which results in instable conformation. This conformational change is responsible for abnormal folding of the LC, rich in β leaves, which assemble into monomers that stack together to form amyloid fibrils. Epidemiology AL amyloidosis is the most common type of systemic amyloidois in developed countries with an estimated incidence of 9 cases/million inhabitant/year. The average age of diagnosed patients is 65 years and less than 10% of patients are under 50. Clinical description The clinical presentation is protean, because of the wide number of tissues or organs that may be affected. The most common presenting symptoms are asthenia and dyspnoea, which are poorly specific and may account for delayed diagnosis. Renal manifestations are the most frequent, affecting two thirds of patients at presentation. They are characterized by heavy proteinuria, with nephrotic syndrome and impaired renal function in half of the patients. Heart involvement, which is present at diagnosis in more than 50% of patients, leading to restrictive cardiopathy, is the most serious complication and engages prognosis. Diagnostic methods The diagnosis relies on pathological examination of an involved site showing Congo red-positive amyloid deposits, with typical apple-green birefringence under polarized light, that stain positive with an anti-LC antibody by immunohistochemistry and/or immunofluorescence. Due to the

  10. Les applications des faisceaux d'ions dans la physique des polymères

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratier, B.; Moliton, A.; Lucas, B.; Guille, B.; Clamadieu, M.

    1998-06-01

    Experimental configurations of ions beams are illustrated by diagrams in the case of low energy implantation, Reactive Ion Beam Etching (RIBE), Ion Beam Assisted Deposition (IBAD) of molecular layers (or oligomers). Nous présentons les configurations expérimentales (illustrées par des schémas) de trois applications des faisceaux d'ions au traitement physique des polymères : dopage par implantation (cité pour mémoire), gravure par faisceaux d'ions réactifs (RIBE), dépôt des couches moléculaires (ou oligomères) assistés par faisceau (IBAD).

  11. Structural, electronic, and magnetic properties of transition metal doped ReS2 monolayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, M.; Shen, Y. H.; Yin, T. L.

    2017-02-01

    Magnetic properties of transition-metal (TM) atoms (TM=Co, Cu, Mn, Fe, and Ni) doped ReS2 monolayer are investigated by first-principles calculations. It is found that magnetism appears in the cases of Co, Fe, and Ni. Among all the samples, the Co-doped system has the largest magnetic moment. Therefore, we further study the interaction in the two-Co-doped system. Our results show that the interaction between two Co atoms is always ferromagnetic (FM), but such FM interaction is obviously depressed by the increasing Co-Co distance, which is well described by a simple Heisenberg model based on the Zener theory. Our results provide useful insight for promising applications of TM-doped ReS2 monolayer in the future.

  12. Optical anisotropy of tungsten-doped ReS2 layered crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, H. P.; Lin, K. H.; Huang, Y. S.

    2016-12-01

    The optical anisotropy of tungsten-doped rhenium disulfide (ReS2:W) layered crystals have been studied by polarization and temperature dependent piezoreflectance (PzR) spectroscopy from 25 to 300 K. The direct band edge excitonic transitions E1ex feature at E∥b polarization and E2ex feature at E⊥b polarization of tungsten-doped ReS2 layered crystals were determined from a detailed line-shape fit of the PzR spectra. The PzR spectra reveal a slightly blue shifted of excitonic transition with the tungsten incorporation. The angular dependence of the excitonic feature amplitudes agrees with Malus' rule. The parameters that describe the temperature variation of the energies and broadening function of the excitonic transitions are determined and discussed.

  13. EPRI/NRC-RES fire PRA guide for nuclear power facilities. Volume 1, summary and overview.

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2004-09-01

    This report documents state-of-the-art methods, tools, and data for the conduct of a fire Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) for a commercial nuclear power plant (NPP) application. The methods have been developed under the Fire Risk Re-quantification Study. This study was conducted as a joint activity between EPRI and the U. S. NRC Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research (RES) under the terms of an EPRI/RES Memorandum of Understanding [RS.1] and an accompanying Fire Research Addendum [RS.2]. Industry participants supported demonstration analyses and provided peer review of this methodology. The documented methods are intended to support future applications of Fire PRA, including risk-informed regulatory applications. The documented method reflects state-of-the-art fire risk analysis approaches. The primary objective of the Fire Risk Study was to consolidate recent research and development activities into a single state-of-the-art fire PRA analysis methodology. Methodological issues raised in past fire risk analyses, including the Individual Plant Examination of External Events (IPEEE) fire analyses, have been addressed to the extent allowed by the current state-of-the-art and the overall project scope. Methodological debates were resolved through a consensus process between experts representing both EPRI and RES. The consensus process included a provision whereby each major party (EPRI and RES) could maintain differing technical positions if consensus could not be reached. No cases were encountered where this provision was invoked. While the primary objective of the project was to consolidate existing state-of-the-art methods, in many areas, the newly documented methods represent a significant advancement over previously documented methods. In several areas, this project has, in fact, developed new methods and approaches. Such advances typically relate to areas of past methodological debate.

  14. Gestion de la douleur chronique par les infirmières des Groupes de médecine de famille

    PubMed Central

    Bergeron, Dave A; Bourgault, Patricia; Gallagher, Frances

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION : Des milliers de personnes souffrent actuellement de douleur chronique (DC) pour laquelle la prise en charge s’avère souvent inadéquate. Au Québec, les infirmières qui oeuvrent dans les Groupes de médecine de famille (GMF) jouent un rôle clé dans le suivi des personnes aux prises avec des problèmes de santé chroniques dont la DC. OBJECTIFS : Cette étude a pour objectifs de décrire les activités réalisées par les infirmières œuvrant en GMF en lien avec la gestion de la douleur chez la clientèle souffrant de DC, ainsi que les barrières à ces activités. MÉTHODE : Un dispositif descriptif corrélationnel transversal de type enquête postale a été utilisé. La population accessible à l’étude comprend les infirmières qui figurent sur la liste des membres de l’Ordre des infirmières et infirmiers du Québec travaillant en GMF. L’ensemble des infirmières figurant sur cette liste ayant consenti à être contactées à leur domicile pour des fins de recherche ont été contactées. Un questionnaire postal auto-administré (Pain Management Activities Questionnaire) a été complété par 53 infirmières travaillant en GMF. RÉSULTATS : Les trois activités le plus souvent réalisées par les infirmières sont d’établir une relation thérapeutique avec le client; de discuter avec le médecin de l’efficacité des mesures thérapeutiques et de faire un enseignement personnalisé au client. Les infirmières ont la perception qu’elles rencontrent en moyenne 2,68 personnes par semaine qui souffrent de DC. La méconnaissance des interventions possibles en douleur (71,7%) et la non-disponibilité de l’information sur la gestion de la douleur (52,8%) constituent les principales barrières selon les infirmières sondées. CONCLUSION : Les infirmières au sein des GMF font actuellement peu d’activités en gestion de la DC probablement en raison du manque de reconnaissance de la DC. PMID:25848847

  15. US defensive operations against Libya and the nuclear accident at Chernobyl. Markup before the Committee on Foreign Affairs, House of Representatives, Ninety-Ninth Congress, Second Session on H. Res. 424 and H. Res 440, May 1, 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    The House Foreign Affairs Committee met to mark up two resolutions: H. Res. 424 and H. Res. 440. H. Res. 424 thanks the United Kingdom for its assistance in the April 14, 1986 operation against Libya. Despite objections to the raid and to including the British, as well as questions about the quality of the US response and about the President's compliance with the Constitution and the War Powers Resolution, the resolution passed. H. Res. 440 expresses sympathy to the victims of the Chernobyl accident and asks the Soviet Union to relax restrictions on communications and the transfer of whatever technology and assistance will be helpful. It also criticizes the Soviet handling of information about the accident. An amendment strengthened the wording of the criticism, and the resolution passed. The report includes the committee discussion and the tests of the two resolutions.

  16. Inversion activity of the Tn5053 and Tn402 resolution system, which possess an uncommon res region

    SciTech Connect

    Kholodii, G.Ya.

    1995-12-01

    The classical bacterial site-specific systems of DNA resolution are characterized, despite their considerable divergence, by a regularly arranged res region represented as a triad of res sites. DNA resolution (deletion) is carried out more efficiently than DNA inversion, primarily due to this structure. In this report, the ratio of deletion to inversion activities is evaluated for the resolution systems of Tn5053 and Tn402, which belong to a novel family and possess an irregularly arranged res region. By this criterion, the system studied is shown to be similar to the classical ones. These data suggest that in the course of evolution of the resolvase systems, the same degree of recombination specialization could be attained by different arrangement of the res region. 12 refs., 3 figs.

  17. HF Accelerated Electron Fluxes, Spectra, and Ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlson, Herbert C.; Jensen, Joseph B.

    2015-10-01

    Wave particle interactions, an essential aspect of laboratory, terrestrial, and astrophysical plasmas, have been studied for decades by transmitting high power HF radio waves into Earth's weakly ionized space plasma, to use it as a laboratory without walls. Application to HF electron acceleration remains an active area of research (Gurevich in Usp Fizicheskikh Nauk 177(11):1145-1177, 2007) today. HF electron acceleration studies began when plasma line observations proved (Carlson et al. in J Atmos Terr Phys 44:1089-1100, 1982) that high power HF radio wave-excited processes accelerated electrons not to ~eV, but instead to -100 times thermal energy (10 s of eV), as a consequence of inelastic collision effects on electron transport. Gurevich et al (J Atmos Terr Phys 47:1057-1070, 1985) quantified the theory of this transport effect. Merging experiment with theory in plasma physics and aeronomy, enabled prediction (Carlson in Adv Space Res 13:1015-1024, 1993) of creating artificial ionospheres once ~GW HF effective radiated power could be achieved. Eventual confirmation of this prediction (Pedersen et al. in Geophys Res Lett 36:L18107, 2009; Pedersen et al. in Geophys Res Lett 37:L02106, 2010; Blagoveshchenskaya et al. in Ann Geophys 27:131-145, 2009) sparked renewed interest in optical inversion to estimate electron spectra in terrestrial (Hysell et al. in J Geophys Res Space Phys 119:2038-2045, 2014) and planetary (Simon et al. in Ann Geophys 29:187-195, 2011) atmospheres. Here we present our unpublished optical data, which combined with our modeling, lead to conclusions that should meaningfully improve future estimates of the spectrum of HF accelerated electron fluxes. Photometric imaging data can significantly improve detection of emissions near ionization threshold, and confirm depth of penetration of accelerated electrons many km below the excitation altitude. Comparing observed to modeled emission altitude shows future experiments need electron density profiles

  18. Serendipity, International Cooperation and Navigational Aids: A History of Radio Echo Sounding (RES) Technologies, 1958-1979

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turchetti, S.; Dean, K.; Naylor, S.; Siegert, M. J.

    2006-12-01

    This paper explores the history of RES and examines major technological advances that fostered the use of this technique in the sub-glacial exploration of Antarctica. The paper will especially focus on three themes: the role played by accidental discoveries in the origins of RES; the importance of international collaboration in its technological development; and the need of establishing new technological networks in the deployment of RES apparatus during Antarctic missions. The origins of RES can be traced back to two important -albeit accidental- findings. First, during post-war US military operations in the Antarctic radio altimeters produced gross errors in height indication. Furthermore, during the IGY ionospheric research and sounding was hampered by interference due to bottom echoes. These serendipitous events helped to figure out that the Antarctic ice was transparent to certain frequencies, and therefore new radio technologies could be used to sound what lay beneath it. The establishment of the Scientific Committee on Antarctic Research (SCAR) and the Antarctic Treaty (AT) provided a new international framework vital to the development of RES technologies. This allowed researchers from different countries to come together and discuss important technological features for the first time. At a technical level, the setting up of international experiments (such as those of 1963 and 1964 in Greenland) gave an opportunity for experts from different countries to compare the performance of new RES apparatus. At a political level, the parallel debate within the AT community on the allocation of Antarctic radio frequencies helped radio engineers to work out ways to circumvent interference with radio communications. Finally, the deployment of RES equipment in Antarctic exploration relied upon a number of technological aids to improve the potential and accuracy of geophysical sounding. The use of new aircrafts, guidance systems, and computers proved vital in many

  19. Polytypism and unexpected strong interlayer coupling in two-dimensional layered ReS2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Xiao-Fen; Wu, Jiang-Bin; Zhou, Linwei; Qiao, Jingsi; Shi, Wei; Chen, Tao; Zhang, Xin; Zhang, Jun; Ji, Wei; Tan, Ping-Heng

    2016-04-01

    Anisotropic two-dimensional (2D) van der Waals (vdW) layered materials, with both scientific interest and application potential, offer one more dimension than isotropic 2D materials to tune their physical properties. Various physical properties of 2D multi-layer materials are modulated by varying their stacking orders owing to significant interlayer vdW coupling. Multilayer rhenium disulfide (ReS2), a representative anisotropic 2D material, was expected to be randomly stacked and lack interlayer coupling. Here, we demonstrate two stable stacking orders, namely isotropic-like (IS) and anisotropic-like (AI) N layer (NL, N > 1) ReS2 are revealed by ultralow- and high-frequency Raman spectroscopy, photoluminescence and first-principles density functional theory calculation. Two interlayer shear modes are observed in AI-NL-ReS2 while only one shear mode appears in IS-NL-ReS2, suggesting anisotropic- and isotropic-like stacking orders in IS- and AI-NL-ReS2, respectively. This explicit difference in the observed frequencies identifies an unexpected strong interlayer coupling in IS- and AI-NL-ReS2. Quantitatively, the force constants of them are found to be around 55-90% of those of multilayer MoS2. The revealed strong interlayer coupling and polytypism in multi-layer ReS2 may stimulate future studies on engineering physical properties of other anisotropic 2D materials by stacking orders.Anisotropic two-dimensional (2D) van der Waals (vdW) layered materials, with both scientific interest and application potential, offer one more dimension than isotropic 2D materials to tune their physical properties. Various physical properties of 2D multi-layer materials are modulated by varying their stacking orders owing to significant interlayer vdW coupling. Multilayer rhenium disulfide (ReS2), a representative anisotropic 2D material, was expected to be randomly stacked and lack interlayer coupling. Here, we demonstrate two stable stacking orders, namely isotropic-like (IS) and

  20. Thermal Ion Upwelling in the High-Altitude Ionosphere

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-01-01

    Balsiger et al., 1980; Lennartsen and Shelley, 1986). Further studies by Sharp et al. (1977), Ghielmetti et al. (1978) and Gorney (1981) showed that...development of plasma sheet instabilities, Geophys. Res. Lett., 9, 1337, 1982. Balsiger , H., P. Ederhardt, J. Geiss, and D. T. Young, Magnetic storm...Chang, p. 17, AGU, VN ashington, D.C., 1986. 221 Young, D. T., H. Balsiger and J. Geiss, Correlations of Magnetospheric ion composition with geomagnetic

  1. Earth’s Radiation Belts.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-09-28

    provided by ion-composition studies. GEOS observations reported by Geiss et al. [1978] and Balsiger et al. [1980] typically show the presence of 0+ (along...This means that He+ or 0+ might dominate 1+ in the ring-current compo- sition studies of Balsiger et al. [1960] by virtue of their greater surviva...radiation zone?, Geophys. Res. Lett., 6, 531-534, 1979. Balsiger , H., P. Eberhardt, J. Geiss, and D. T. Young, Magnetic storm injection of 0. 9- to

  2. Bio-SCoRes: A Smorgasbord Architecture for Coreference Resolution in Biomedical Text.

    PubMed

    Kilicoglu, Halil; Demner-Fushman, Dina

    2016-01-01

    Coreference resolution is one of the fundamental and challenging tasks in natural language processing. Resolving coreference successfully can have a significant positive effect on downstream natural language processing tasks, such as information extraction and question answering. The importance of coreference resolution for biomedical text analysis applications has increasingly been acknowledged. One of the difficulties in coreference resolution stems from the fact that distinct types of coreference (e.g., anaphora, appositive) are expressed with a variety of lexical and syntactic means (e.g., personal pronouns, definite noun phrases), and that resolution of each combination often requires a different approach. In the biomedical domain, it is common for coreference annotation and resolution efforts to focus on specific subcategories of coreference deemed important for the downstream task. In the current work, we aim to address some of these concerns regarding coreference resolution in biomedical text. We propose a general, modular framework underpinned by a smorgasbord architecture (Bio-SCoRes), which incorporates a variety of coreference types, their mentions and allows fine-grained specification of resolution strategies to resolve coreference of distinct coreference type-mention pairs. For development and evaluation, we used a corpus of structured drug labels annotated with fine-grained coreference information. In addition, we evaluated our approach on two other corpora (i2b2/VA discharge summaries and protein coreference dataset) to investigate its generality and ease of adaptation to other biomedical text types. Our results demonstrate the usefulness of our novel smorgasbord architecture. The specific pipelines based on the architecture perform successfully in linking coreferential mention pairs, while we find that recognition of full mention clusters is more challenging. The corpus of structured drug labels (SPL) as well as the components of Bio-SCoRes and

  3. High Resolution Model Intercomparison Project (HighResMIP v1.0) for CMIP6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haarsma, Reindert J.; Roberts, Malcolm J.; Vidale, Pier Luigi; Senior, Catherine A.; Bellucci, Alessio; Bao, Qing; Chang, Ping; Corti, Susanna; Fučkar, Neven S.; Guemas, Virginie; von Hardenberg, Jost; Hazeleger, Wilco; Kodama, Chihiro; Koenigk, Torben; Leung, L. Ruby; Lu, Jian; Luo, Jing-Jia; Mao, Jiafu; Mizielinski, Matthew S.; Mizuta, Ryo; Nobre, Paulo; Satoh, Masaki; Scoccimarro, Enrico; Semmler, Tido; Small, Justin; von Storch, Jin-Song

    2016-11-01

    Robust projections and predictions of climate variability and change, particularly at regional scales, rely on the driving processes being represented with fidelity in model simulations. The role of enhanced horizontal resolution in improved process representation in all components of the climate system is of growing interest, particularly as some recent simulations suggest both the possibility of significant changes in large-scale aspects of circulation as well as improvements in small-scale processes and extremes. However, such high-resolution global simulations at climate timescales, with resolutions of at least 50 km in the atmosphere and 0.25° in the ocean, have been performed at relatively few research centres and generally without overall coordination, primarily due to their computational cost. Assessing the robustness of the response of simulated climate to model resolution requires a large multi-model ensemble using a coordinated set of experiments. The Coupled Model Intercomparison Project 6 (CMIP6) is the ideal framework within which to conduct such a study, due to the strong link to models being developed for the CMIP DECK experiments and other model intercomparison projects (MIPs). Increases in high-performance computing (HPC) resources, as well as the revised experimental design for CMIP6, now enable a detailed investigation of the impact of increased resolution up to synoptic weather scales on the simulated mean climate and its variability. The High Resolution Model Intercomparison Project (HighResMIP) presented in this paper applies, for the first time, a multi-model approach to the systematic investigation of the impact of horizontal resolution. A coordinated set of experiments has been designed to assess both a standard and an enhanced horizontal-resolution simulation in the atmosphere and ocean. The set of HighResMIP experiments is divided into three tiers consisting of atmosphere-only and coupled runs and spanning the period 1950-2050, with the

  4. High Resolution Model Intercomparison Project (HighResMIP v1.0) for CMIP6

    SciTech Connect

    Haarsma, Reindert J.; Roberts, Malcolm J.; Vidale, Pier Luigi; Senior, Catherine A.; Bellucci, Alessio; Bao, Qing; Chang, Ping; Corti, Susanna; Fučkar, Neven S.; Guemas, Virginie; von Hardenberg, Jost; Hazeleger, Wilco; Kodama, Chihiro; Koenigk, Torben; Leung, L. Ruby; Lu, Jian; Luo, Jing-Jia; Mao, Jiafu; Mizielinski, Matthew S.; Mizuta, Ryo; Nobre, Paulo; Satoh, Masaki; Scoccimarro, Enrico; Semmler, Tido; Small, Justin; von Storch, Jin-Song

    2016-01-01

    Robust projections and predictions of climate variability and change, particularly at regional scales, rely on the driving processes being represented with fidelity in model simulations. The role of enhanced horizontal resolution in improved process representation in all components of the climate system is of growing interest, particularly as some recent simulations suggest both the possibility of significant changes in large-scale aspects of circulation as well as improvements in small-scale processes and extremes.

    However, such high-resolution global simulations at climate timescales, with resolutions of at least 50 km in the atmosphere and 0.25° in the ocean, have been performed at relatively few research centres and generally without overall coordination, primarily due to their computational cost. Assessing the robustness of the response of simulated climate to model resolution requires a large multi-model ensemble using a coordinated set of experiments. The Coupled Model Intercomparison Project 6 (CMIP6) is the ideal framework within which to conduct such a study, due to the strong link to models being developed for the CMIP DECK experiments and other model intercomparison projects (MIPs).

    Increases in high-performance computing (HPC) resources, as well as the revised experimental design for CMIP6, now enable a detailed investigation of the impact of increased resolution up to synoptic weather scales on the simulated mean climate and its variability.

    The High Resolution Model Intercomparison Project (HighResMIP) presented in this paper applies, for the first time, a multi-model approach to the systematic investigation of the impact of horizontal resolution. A coordinated set of experiments has been designed to assess both a standard and an enhanced horizontal-resolution simulation in the atmosphere and ocean. The set of HighResMIP experiments is divided into three tiers consisting of atmosphere-only and coupled runs and

  5. Res-E Support Policies in the Baltic States: Electricity Price Aspect (Part II)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobinaite, V.; Priedite, I.

    2015-04-01

    Increasing volumes of electricity derived from renewable energy sources (RES-E) affect the electricity market prices and the prices for final electricity consumers in the Baltic States. The results of a multivariate regression analysis show that in 2013 the RES-E contributed to decreasing the electricity market prices in the Baltic States. However, the final electricity consumers pay for the promotion of RES-E through the approved RES-E component which has a tendency to increase. It is estimated that in 2013 the net benefits from the wind electricity promotion were achieved in Lithuania and Latvia while the net cost - in Estonia. This suggests that the economic efficiency of the wind electricity support scheme based on the application of feed-in tariffs was higher than that based on the feed-in premium. Rakstā analizēta elektroenerģijas ražošanas no atjaunojamiem energoresursiem (AER-E) palielināšanas ietekme uz elektroenerģijas tirgus cenu un gala cenu elektroenerģijas lietotājiem Baltijas valstīs. Daudzfaktoru regresijas analīzes rezultāti atklāja, ka AER-E 2013. gadā varētu samazināt elektroenerģijas tirgus cenas Baltijas valstīs. Tomēr jāņem vērā, ka elektroenerģijas lietotāja gala cenā ir iekļauta AER-E atbalsta komponente, kurai ir raksturīgi palielināties. Aprēķināts, ka no vēja elektroenerģijas ražošanas Latvijā un Lietuvā tika iegūta tīrā peļņa, bet Igaunijā tikai nosedza pašizmaksu. Tas liecina, ka vēja elektroenerģijas atbalsta shēmai, kas balstīta uz obligātā iepirkuma atbalsta principu, ir augstāka ekonomiskā efektivitāte, nekā atbalsta shēmai, kas balstīta uz piemaksu par no AER saražoto elektroenerģiju obligātā iepirkuma ietvaros.

  6. High Resolution Model Intercomparison Project (HighResMIP v1.0) for CMIP6

    DOE PAGES

    Haarsma, Reindert J.; Roberts, Malcolm J.; Vidale, Pier Luigi; ...

    2016-11-22

    Robust projections and predictions of climate variability and change, particularly at regional scales, rely on the driving processes being represented with fidelity in model simulations. The role of enhanced horizontal resolution in improved process representation in all components of the climate system is of growing interest, particularly as some recent simulations suggest both the possibility of significant changes in large-scale aspects of circulation as well as improvements in small-scale processes and extremes. However, such high-resolution global simulations at climate timescales, with resolutions of at least 50 km in the atmosphere and 0.25° in the ocean, have been performed at relativelymore » few research centres and generally without overall coordination, primarily due to their computational cost. Assessing the robustness of the response of simulated climate to model resolution requires a large multi-model ensemble using a coordinated set of experiments. The Coupled Model Intercomparison Project 6 (CMIP6) is the ideal framework within which to conduct such a study, due to the strong link to models being developed for the CMIP DECK experiments and other model intercomparison projects (MIPs). Increases in high-performance computing (HPC) resources, as well as the revised experimental design for CMIP6, now enable a detailed investigation of the impact of increased resolution up to synoptic weather scales on the simulated mean climate and its variability. The High Resolution Model Intercomparison Project (HighResMIP) presented in this paper applies, for the first time, a multi-model approach to the systematic investigation of the impact of horizontal resolution. A coordinated set of experiments has been designed to assess both a standard and an enhanced horizontal-resolution simulation in the atmosphere and ocean. The set of HighResMIP experiments is divided into three tiers consisting of atmosphere-only and coupled runs and spanning the period 1950

  7. High Resolution Model Intercomparison Project (HighResMIP v1.0) for CMIP6

    SciTech Connect

    Haarsma, Reindert J.; Roberts, Malcolm J.; Vidale, Pier Luigi; Senior, Catherine A.; Bellucci, Alessio; Bao, Qing; Chang, Ping; Corti, Susanna; Fuckar, Neven S.; Guemas, Virginie; von Hardenberg, Jost; Hazeleger, Wilco; Kodama, Chihiro; Koenigk, Torben; Leung, L. Ruby; Lu, Jian; Luo, Jing -Jia; Mao, Jiafu; Mizielinski, Matthew S.; Mizuta, Ryo; Nobre, Paulo; Satoh, Masaki; Scoccimarro, Enrico; Semmler, Tido; Small, Justin; von Storch, Jin -Song

    2016-11-22

    Robust projections and predictions of climate variability and change, particularly at regional scales, rely on the driving processes being represented with fidelity in model simulations. The role of enhanced horizontal resolution in improved process representation in all components of the climate system is of growing interest, particularly as some recent simulations suggest both the possibility of significant changes in large-scale aspects of circulation as well as improvements in small-scale processes and extremes.

    However, such high-resolution global simulations at climate timescales, with resolutions of at least 50 km in the atmosphere and 0.25° in the ocean, have been performed at relatively few research centres and generally without overall coordination, primarily due to their computational cost. Assessing the robustness of the response of simulated climate to model resolution requires a large multi-model ensemble using a coordinated set of experiments. The Coupled Model Intercomparison Project 6 (CMIP6) is the ideal framework within which to conduct such a study, due to the strong link to models being developed for the CMIP DECK experiments and other model intercomparison projects (MIPs).

    Increases in high-performance computing (HPC) resources, as well as the revised experimental design for CMIP6, now enable a detailed investigation of the impact of increased resolution up to synoptic weather scales on the simulated mean climate and its variability.

    The High Resolution Model Intercomparison Project (HighResMIP) presented in this paper applies, for the first time, a multi-model approach to the systematic investigation of the impact of horizontal resolution. A coordinated set of experiments has been designed to assess both a standard and an enhanced horizontal-resolution simulation in the atmosphere and ocean. The set of HighResMIP experiments is divided into three tiers consisting of atmosphere-only and coupled runs and spanning

  8. HiRes camera and LIDAR ranging system for the Clementine mission

    SciTech Connect

    Ledebuhr, A.G.; Kordas, J.F.; Lewis, I.T.

    1995-04-01

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory developed a space-qualified High Resolution (HiRes) imaging LIDAR (Light Detection And Ranging) system for use on the DoD Clementine mission. The Clementine mission provided more than 1.7 million images of the moon, earth, and stars, including the first ever complete systematic surface mapping of the moon from the ultra-violet to near-infrared spectral regions. This article describes the Clementine HiRes/LIDAR system, discusses design goals and preliminary estimates of on-orbit performance, and summarizes lessons learned in building and using the sensor. The LIDAR receiver system consists of a High Resolution (HiRes) imaging channel which incorporates an intensified multi-spectral visible camera combined with a Laser ranging channel which uses an avalanche photo-diode for laser pulse detection and timing. The receiver was bore sighted to a light-weight McDonnell-Douglas diode-pumped ND:YAG laser transmitter that emmitted 1.06 {micro}m wavelength pulses of 200 mJ/pulse and 10 ns pulse-width, The LIDAR receiver uses a common F/9.5 Cassegrain telescope assembly. The optical path of the telescope is split using a color-separating beamsplitter. The imaging channel incorporates a filter wheel assembly which spectrally selects the light which is imaged onto a custom 12 mm gated image intensifier fiber-optically-coupled into a 384 x 276 pixel frame transfer CCD FPA. The image intensifier was spectrally sensitive over the 0.4 to 0.8 {micro}m wavelength region. The six-position filter wheel contained 4 narrow spectral filters, one broadband and one blocking filter. At periselene (400 km) the HiRes/LIDAR imaged a 2.8 km swath width at 20-meter resolution. The LIDAR function detected differential signal return with a 40-meter range accuracy, with a maximum range capability of 640 km, limited by the bit counter in the range return counting clock.

  9. Ammonification in Bacillus subtilis Utilizing Dissimilatory Nitrite Reductase Is Dependent on resDE

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Tamara; Frankenberg, Nicole; Marino, Marco; Jahn, Dieter

    1998-01-01

    During anaerobic nitrate respiration Bacillus subtilis reduces nitrate via nitrite to ammonia. No denitrification products were observed. B. subtilis wild-type cells and a nitrate reductase mutant grew anaerobically with nitrite as an electron acceptor. Oxygen-sensitive dissimilatory nitrite reductase activity was demonstrated in cell extracts prepared from both strains with benzyl viologen as an electron donor and nitrite as an electron acceptor. The anaerobic expression of the discovered nitrite reductase activity was dependent on the regulatory system encoded by resDE. Mutation of the gene encoding the regulatory Fnr had no negative effect on dissimilatory nitrite reductase formation. PMID:9422613

  10. Bio-SCoRes: A Smorgasbord Architecture for Coreference Resolution in Biomedical Text

    PubMed Central

    Kilicoglu, Halil; Demner-Fushman, Dina

    2016-01-01

    Coreference resolution is one of the fundamental and challenging tasks in natural language processing. Resolving coreference successfully can have a significant positive effect on downstream natural language processing tasks, such as information extraction and question answering. The importance of coreference resolution for biomedical text analysis applications has increasingly been acknowledged. One of the difficulties in coreference resolution stems from the fact that distinct types of coreference (e.g., anaphora, appositive) are expressed with a variety of lexical and syntactic means (e.g., personal pronouns, definite noun phrases), and that resolution of each combination often requires a different approach. In the biomedical domain, it is common for coreference annotation and resolution efforts to focus on specific subcategories of coreference deemed important for the downstream task. In the current work, we aim to address some of these concerns regarding coreference resolution in biomedical text. We propose a general, modular framework underpinned by a smorgasbord architecture (Bio-SCoRes), which incorporates a variety of coreference types, their mentions and allows fine-grained specification of resolution strategies to resolve coreference of distinct coreference type-mention pairs. For development and evaluation, we used a corpus of structured drug labels annotated with fine-grained coreference information. In addition, we evaluated our approach on two other corpora (i2b2/VA discharge summaries and protein coreference dataset) to investigate its generality and ease of adaptation to other biomedical text types. Our results demonstrate the usefulness of our novel smorgasbord architecture. The specific pipelines based on the architecture perform successfully in linking coreferential mention pairs, while we find that recognition of full mention clusters is more challenging. The corpus of structured drug labels (SPL) as well as the components of Bio-SCoRes and

  11. Raman vibrational spectra of bulk to monolayer ReS2 with lower symmetry

    DOE PAGES

    Feng, Yanqing; Zhou, Wei; Wang, Yaojia; ...

    2015-08-26

    Lattice structure and symmetry of two-dimensional (2D) layered materials are of key importance to their fundamental mechanical, thermal, electronic and optical properties. Raman spectroscopy, as a convenient and nondestructive tool, however has its limitations on identifying all symmetry allowing Raman modes and determining the corresponding crystal structure of 2D layered materials with high symmetry like graphene and MoS2. Due to lower structural symmetry and extraordinary weak interlayer coupling of ReS2, we successfully identified all 18 first-order Raman active modes for bulk and monolayer ReS2. Without van der Waals (vdW) correction, our local density approximation (LDA) calculations successfully reproduce all themore » Raman modes. Our calculations also suggest no surface reconstruction effect and the absence of low frequency rigid-layer Raman modes below 100 cm-1. As a result, combining with Raman and LDA thus provides a general approach for studying the vibrational and structural properties of 2D layered materials with lower symmetry.« less

  12. Radition belt dynamics : Recent results from van Allen Probes and future observations from CeREs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanekal, Shrikanth; O'Brien, Paul; Baker, Daniel N.; Ogasawara, Keiichi; Fennell, Joseph; Christian, Eric; Claudepierre, Seth; Livi, Stefano; Desai, Mihir; Li, Xinlin; Jaynes, Allison; Turner, Drew; Jones, Ashley; Schiller, Quintin

    2016-07-01

    We describe recent observations of the Earth's radiation belts made by instruments on board the Van Allen Probes mission, particularly the Relativistic Electron Proton Telescope (REPT) and the Magnetic Electron Ion spectrometer (MagEIS). These observations have significantly advanced our understanding of terrestrial radiation belt dynamics. The Van Allen Probes mission comprises two identically instrumented spacecraft which were launched 31 August, 2012 into low-inclination lapping equatorial orbits. The orbit periods are about 9 hours, with perigees and apogees of of ~600 km and 5.8 RE respectively. We discuss the new scientific findings of the Van Allen Probes mission regarding the physics of energization and loss of relativistic electrons and their implications for future low-cost missions, especially CubeSats. We describe the CeREs (a Compact Radiation belt Explorer) CubeSat mission currently being built at the Goddard Space Flight Center, and carrying on board, an innovative instrument, the Miniaturized Electron Proton Telescope (MERiT). The MERiT is a compact low-mass low-power instrument measuring electrons from a few keV to tens of MeV in multiple differential channels. MERiT is optimized to measure electron microbursts with a high time resolution of a few milliseconds. We present and discuss possible future scientific contributions from CeREs.

  13. Description and evaluation of the Res-Q Arrhythmia Control Device.

    PubMed

    Miller, R E; Wilkoff, B L

    1995-02-01

    The Res-Q Arrhythmia Control Device (Intermedics Inc.) is one of the latest entries into the growing implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) market. Dysrhythmias are classified according to their zone of detection, with a bradycardia zone, up to 3 tachycardia zones, and a fibrillation zone. Detection criterion, therapies, and redetection criterion within each zone are independently programmable, tailoring the setup to each individual's needs. In a hierarchical manner, this allows efficacy, urgency, and patient comfort to be appropriately balanced. Tachycardia therapy options include antitachycardia pacing (ATP), low-energy cardioversion, and high-energy shock, while VVI pacing provides bradycardia therapy. ATP programming is extremely flexible. Biphasic waveform and a maximum output of 700 V have yielded a high rate of successful implantation. Unique features include the multiprogrammable sensing autogain, which tracks evoked T waves during pacing, as well as the use of the pulse generator to perform implant testing. Major strengths include programming flexibility and individualized therapy for multiple dysrhythmias. The major shortcoming relates to a lack of stored electrograms. Although long-term follow-up is not yet available, the Res-Q appears to be a capable challenger to a peer group of advanced generation ICDs.

  14. Pinning effect of reactive elements on adhesion energy and adhesive strength of incoherent Al2O3/NiAl interface.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Z; Zhang, R F; Legut, D; Li, D Q; Zhang, S H; Fu, Z H; Guo, H B

    2016-08-17

    The profound effects of reactive elements (REs) on the adhesion energy and adhesive strength of the α-Al2O3/β-NiAl interface in thermal barrier coating (TBC) systems have attracted increasing attention because RE-doping has played a significant role in improving the thermal cycling lifetime of TBCs. However, the fundamental mechanism is, so far, not well understood due to the experimental difficulty and theoretical complexity in interface modelling. For this purpose, in the present study we have performed comprehensive density functional theory calculations and information targeted experiments to underline the origin of the surprising enhancement of interface adhesion, stability and mechanical strength of the α-Al2O3/β-NiAl interface by different RE doping levels. Our results suggest that the interface failure firstly appears within the NiAl layer adjacent to the Al-terminated oxide under mechanical loading, while the formation of O-RE-Ni bond pairs at the interface can effectively hinder the interface de-cohesion, providing a higher mechanical strength. By comparing several typical REs, it is observed that Hf can emerge not only with the highest interface adhesion energy, but also the highest mechanical strength; in agreement with our experimental results. By continuously increasing the dopant concentration, the strengthening effect may increase correspondingly, but is limited by the solute solubility. These results shed light into the effect of REs on the stability and strength of the α-Al2O3/β-NiAl interface, providing theoretical guidance for interface design via a combinational analysis of bond topology and electronic structure.

  15. The tomato res mutant which accumulates JA in roots in non-stressed conditions restores cell structure alterations under salinity.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Abellan, José O; Fernandez-Garcia, Nieves; Lopez-Berenguer, Carmen; Egea, Isabel; Flores, Francisco B; Angosto, Trinidad; Capel, Juan; Lozano, Rafael; Pineda, Benito; Moreno, Vicente; Olmos, Enrique; Bolarin, Maria C

    2015-11-01

    Jasmonic acid (JA) regulates a wide spectrum of plant biological processes, from plant development to stress defense responses. The role of JA in plant response to salt stress is scarcely known, and even less known is the specific response in root, the main plant organ responsible for ionic uptake and transport to the shoot. Here we report the characterization of the first tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) mutant, named res (restored cell structure by salinity), that accumulates JA in roots prior to exposure to stress. The res tomato mutant presented remarkable growth inhibition and displayed important morphological alterations and cellular disorganization in roots and leaves under control conditions, while these alterations disappeared when the res mutant plants were grown under salt stress. Reciprocal grafting between res and wild type (WT) (tomato cv. Moneymaker) indicated that the main organ responsible for the development of alterations was the root. The JA-signaling pathway is activated in res roots prior to stress, with transcripts levels being even higher in control condition than in salinity. Future studies on this mutant will provide significant advances in the knowledge of JA role in root in salt-stress tolerance response, as well as in the energy trade-off between plant growth and response to stress.

  16. Optical study of the structural change in ReS2 single crystals using polarized thermoreflectance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Ching-Hwa

    2005-01-01

    In this report the optical properties of ReS2 are characterized using polarized thermoreflectance (PTR) measurements in the temperature range between 25 and 300 K. Single crystals of ReS2 were grown by chemical vapor transport method using Br2 as a transport agent. Crystal morphologies of the as-grown rhenium disulfides were shown to possess two different kinds of the structural phases after crystallization. Observing in detail on the crystallized solids, the crystal phases can be essentially divided into two distinct types of normal triclinic layer and tetragonal structure. The PTR experiments were done with optical polarizations along and perpendicular to the crystals' b-axis for both layer and tetragonal crystals. From the experimental analyses of PTR measurements the occurrence of structural change in ReS2 is mostly probable caused by the atomic bonding deformation along -axis, which is parallel to the Re4 parallelogram consisted diamond chains. Temperature dependences of the band-edge transitions for the different structural phases of ReS2 are analyzed. The parameters that describe temperature variations of the transition energies and broadening parameters for both layered and tetragonal ReS2 are evaluated and discussed.

  17. What Is ALS?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Javits, actor David Niven, “Sesame Street” creator Jon Stone, boxing champion Ezzard Charles, NBA Hall of Fame ... Help for People with ALS and Caregivers Read stories from families living with ALS Forms of ALS ...

  18. FunResDB-A web resource for genotypic susceptibility testing of Aspergillus fumigatus.

    PubMed

    Weber, Michael; Schaer, Jonas; Walther, Grit; Kaerger, Kerstin; Steinmann, Jörg; Rath, Peter-Michael; Spiess, Birgit; Buchheidt, Dieter; Hamprecht, Axel; Kurzai, Oliver

    2017-03-11

    Therapy of invasive aspergillosis is becoming more difficult due to the emergence of azole resistance in Aspergillus fumigatus. A majority of resistant strains carries mutations in the CYP51A gene. Due to a lack of sensitivity of culture-based methods, molecular detection of A. fumigatus has become an important diagnostic tool. We set up the database FunResDB (www.nrz-myk.de/funresdb) to gather all available information about CYP51A-dependent azole resistance from published literature. In summary, the screening resulted in 79 CYP51A variants, which are linked to 59 nonsynonymous mutations. A tailor-made online sequence analysis tool allows for genotypic susceptibility testing of A. fumigatus.

  19. Réalisation de réseaux sur polymères par laser UV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castex, M. C.; Fischer, A.; Simeonov, D.; Adès, D.; Siove, A.

    2003-06-01

    Nous présentons ici une méthode très simple de réalisation de réseaux d'amplitude de pas sub-micronique sur des films polymères à base de carbazote déposés sur des substrat de silice. Les réseaux sont fabriqués en irradiant avec un faisceau laser à 193nm un masque de phase placé au contact du film. La qualité des réseaux obtenus permet désormais d'envisager la réalisation de micro-cavités lasers de type planaire permettant de sélectionner une émission laser monomode autour de 400nm.

  20. [The differential diagnosis in Menières disease: the basilar impression (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Elies, W

    1978-11-22

    We examined the cranio-cervical region in 180 patients with nonspecific dizziness and in most cases unilateral sensory-neural hearing loss. In 32 cases we found malformations of the cranio-cervical region. The sympatomatology of the basilar impression is probably caused by the compression of the vessels of the lower cerebellar regions and the brain stem as well as disturbances of the cerebro-spinal fluid circulation. The basilar impression is diagnosed by means of lateral X-rays of the skull base, tomography of this region and in some cases computertomography of the posterior cranial fossa. The importance of basilar impression in the differential diagnosis of Menières disease and acoustic neuroma is discussed.

  1. Inflammatory myopathy in a patient with Aicardi-Goutières syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tumienė, Birutė; Voisin, Norine; Preikšaitienė, Eglė; Petroška, Donatas; Grikinienė, Jurgita; Samaitienė, Rūta; Utkus, Algirdas; Reymond, Alexandre; Kučinskas, Vaidutis

    2017-03-01

    Aicardi-Goutières syndrome (AGS) is an inflammatory disorder belonging to the recently characterized group of type I interferonopathies. The most consistently affected tissues in AGS are the central nervous system and skin, but various organ systems and tissues have been reported to be affected, pointing to the systemic nature of the disease. Here we describe a patient with AGS due to a homozygous p.Arg114His mutation in the TREX1 gene. The histologically proven inflammatory myopathy in our patient expands the range of clinical features of AGS. Histological signs of muscle biopsies in the proband, and in two other AGS patients described earlier, are similar to those seen in various autoimmune myositises and could be ascribed to inapproapriate IFN I activation. In view of signs of possible mitochondrial damage in AGS, we propose that mitochondrial DNA could be a trigger of autoimmune responses in AGS.

  2. An RES-Based Model for Risk Assessment and Prediction of Backbreak in Bench Blasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faramarzi, F.; Ebrahimi Farsangi, M. A.; Mansouri, H.

    2013-07-01

    Most blasting operations are associated with various forms of energy loss, emerging as environmental side effects of rock blasting, such as flyrock, vibration, airblast, and backbreak. Backbreak is an adverse phenomenon in rock blasting operations, which imposes risk and increases operation expenses because of safety reduction due to the instability of walls, poor fragmentation, and uneven burden in subsequent blasts. In this paper, based on the basic concepts of a rock engineering systems (RES) approach, a new model for the prediction of backbreak and the risk associated with a blast is presented. The newly suggested model involves 16 effective parameters on backbreak due to blasting, while retaining simplicity as well. The data for 30 blasts, carried out at Sungun copper mine, western Iran, were used to predict backbreak and the level of risk corresponding to each blast by the RES-based model. The results obtained were compared with the backbreak measured for each blast, which showed that the level of risk achieved is in consistence with the backbreak measured. The maximum level of risk [vulnerability index (VI) = 60] was associated with blast No. 2, for which the corresponding average backbreak was the highest achieved (9.25 m). Also, for blasts with levels of risk under 40, the minimum average backbreaks (<4 m) were observed. Furthermore, to evaluate the model performance for backbreak prediction, the coefficient of correlation ( R 2) and root mean square error (RMSE) of the model were calculated ( R 2 = 0.8; RMSE = 1.07), indicating the good performance of the model.

  3. Monocular measurement of the spectrum of UHE cosmic rays by the FADC detector of the HiRes experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbasi, R. U.; Abu-Zayyad, T.; Amman, J. F.; Archbold, G. C.; Bellido, J. A.; Belov, K.; Belz, J. W.; Bergman, D. R.; Cao, Z.; Clay, R. W.; Cooper, M. D.; Dai, H.; Dawson, B. R.; Everett, A. A.; Girard, J. H. V.; Gray, R. C.; Hanlon, W. F.; Hoffman, C. M.; Holzscheiter, M. H.; Hüntemeyer, P.; Jones, B. F.; Jui, C. C. H.; Kieda, D. B.; Kim, K.; Kirn, M. A.; Loh, E. C.; Manago, N.; Marek, L. J.; Martens, K.; Martin, G.; Manago, N.; Matthews, J. A. J.; Matthews, J. N.; Meyer, J. R.; Moore, S. A.; Morrison, P.; Moosman, A. N.; Mumford, J. R.; Munro, M. W.; Painter, C. A.; Perera, L.; Reil, K.; Riehle, R.; Roberts, M.; Sarracino, J. S.; Schnetzer, S.; Shen, P.; Simpson, K. M.; Sinnis, G.; Smith, J. D.; Sokolsky, P.; Song, C.; Springer, R. W.; Stokes, B. T.; Thomas, S. B.; Thompson, T. N.; Thomson, G. B.; Tupa, D.; Westerhoff, S.; Wiencke, L. R.; VanderVeen, T. D.; Zech, A.; Zhang, X.

    2005-03-01

    We have measured the spectrum of UHE cosmic rays using the Flash ADC (FADC) detector (called HiRes-II) of the High Resolution Fly's Eye experiment running in monocular mode. We describe in detail the data analysis, development of the Monte Carlo simulation program, and results. We also describe the results of the HiRes-I detector. We present our measured spectra and compare them with a model incorporating galactic and extragalactic cosmic rays. Our combined spectra provide strong evidence for the existence of the spectral feature known as the "ankle."

  4. Abu al-Layth al-Libi

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-02-01

    Introduction In the tradition of post-9/11 senior Arab militant figures operating in Khurasan (the Afghanistan-Pakistan region), there is little doubt as to...the standing of Libyan jihadi commander Abu al-Layth al-Libi. If Usama bin Ladin and Ayman al-Zawahiri came to be the most prominent Arab -Afghan...Libi, a longtime leader of the Libyan Islamic Fighting Group (LIFG), who rapidly established himself as the champion of the Arab -Afghan milieu after

  5. Toxoplasmosis in a bar-shouldered dove (Geopelia humeralis) from the zoo of Clères, France

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Toxoplasmosis causes mortality in several avian species, especially passerine birds. Toxoplasmosis was diagnosed in a bar-shouldered dove (Geopelia humeralis) found dead at the zoo of Clères (France). The bird had necrotizing pneumonia and nephritis with intralesional tachyzoites of Toxoplasma gondi...

  6. Les nouveaux critères de la Maladie d’Alzheimer – Perspective gériatrique*

    PubMed Central

    Molin, Pierre; Rockwood, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    RÉSUMÉ Deux nouvelles séries de critères pour le diagnostic de la maladie d’Alzheimer sont maintenant en vigueur, incluant une série publiée en 2014. Un « nouveau lexique » conceptualisant la maladie a également été proposé. En 2012, la Conférence consensuelle canadienne affirmait que, pour l’instant, ni les nouveaux critères ni la nouvelle terminologie ne modifiaient la pratique en première ligne. Néanmoins, pour les consultants spécialisés en démence, l’avènement de ces critères ouvre la porte à de nombreux défis et occasions. En général, les nouveaux critères accordent une place grandissante aux biomarqueurs. Toutefois, les évidences qui sous-tendent leur utilisation demeurent incomplètes. L’étude de sujets provenant de la communauté ayant raffiné notre compréhension des critères neuropathologiques des démences, il est probable que notre expérience avec les biomarqueurs en bénéficierait également. Pour l’instant, ces critères sont réservés à la recherche. Cependant, leur adoption à plus large échelle est pressentie, particulièrement aux États-Unis. Les gériatres canadiens doivent être conscients de la terminologie maintenant utilisée et du changement fondamental qui en découle : un diagnostic de maladie d’Alzheimer ne requiert plus un diagnostic de démence. Dans l’attente de nouvelles données – auxquelles les gériatres peuvent contribuer – il y a lieu de faire preuve de prudence dans l’adoption des nouveaux critères, car ils sont susceptibles de moins bien s’appliquer aux personnes âgées. PMID:27403215

  7. Sphères diélectriques non concentriques par MMP-3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiener, S.; Ney, M.

    1992-11-01

    The aim of this communication is to present shortly the well known MMP coeds (Multiple Multipoles Programs) based on the GMT (Generalized Multipole Technique). A specific application is also computed. The scattering of a plane wave on spherical dielectric resonators is a classical problem with an analytic solution. For non concentric spheres, the analytic computation requires a “heavy” formalism and some approximation. However, this problem can be computed with the MMP 3D codes. Great care will be given to the self validation process of the computation with special features belonging to the code as well as external validation which is given, in the case of the single sphere, by the Mie's series and for the non concentric spheres by results computed with another numerical method. Cette communication se propose de présenter rapidement les codes MMP (Multiples MultiPôles) basés sur la TMG (Technique des Multipôles Généralisés) et ensuite de montrer une application spécifique. La diffraction d'une onde plane sur des sphères diélectriques en résonance avec ou sans pertes est un problème classique et qui possède une solution analytique. En revanche, si l'on cherche à calculer à généraliser le problème avec des sphères non concentriques, un formalisme complexe et quelques approximations sont nécessaires. Ce problème peut être calculés par les codes MMP 3D. On s'attachera aussi à valider les résultats d'une manière interne en utilisant les possibilités du code ainsi que d'une manière externe en comparant avec les séries de Mie, mais aussi avec les résultats obtenus par une autre méthode numérique.

  8. Les cellulites cervico-faciales graves, facteurs et critères de gravité

    PubMed Central

    Lakouichmi, Mohammed; Tourabi, Khalid; Abir, Bader-eddine; Zouhair, Said; Lahmiti, Saad; Hattab, Nadia Mansouri

    2014-01-01

    La cellulite cervico-faciale grave est une infection polymicrobienne extensive et redoutable du tissu cellulo-adipeux de la face et du cou. L'objectif de cette étude est d'analyser certains facteurs favorisants et d’évaluer les critères de gravité en fonction des formes anatomo-cliniques. Il s'agit d'une étude rétrospective réalisée, entre janvier 2007 et décembre 2012, au service de chirurgie maxillo faciale de l'hôpital militaire Avicenne de Marrakech. Sur 147 cas de cellulites cervico-faciales pris en charge au niveau du service, 13 dossiers de cellulites graves ont été retenus. Neuf hommes (69%) et quatre femmes (31%) ont fait l'objet de cette étude, avec un âge moyen de 35 ans. Tous les patients ont été adressés pour prise en charge secondaire après avoir pris des anti-inflammatoires (AI). Sept cas (54%) étaient immunocompétents. La cause dentaire était soulevée chez neufs cas (69%). Cinq cas (38%) ont présenté une forme pseudo phlegmoneuse avec des signes compressifs des voies aéro-digestives. L'extension médiastinale a été observée chez quatre patients (31%). La forme nécrosante extensive a été retrouvée dans trois cas (23%). L’étude bactériologique, réalisée chez tous les patients, avait mis en évidence une flore microbienne mixte et polymorphe. Les cellulites cervico-faciales graves posent un réel problème de prise en charge thérapeutique. L'analyse des facteurs favorisants et l’évaluation des critères de gravité dans cette série ont permis de limiter une évolution défavorable. PMID:26113891

  9. Cancer de la cavité orale chez trois frères germains en Mauritanie

    PubMed Central

    Baba, Nacer Dine

    2016-01-01

    Les facteurs de risque majeurs pour les cancers de la cavité orale sont la consommation d'alcool et le tabac mais une composante héréditaire a également été évoquée. L’observation que nous vous présentons ci-dessous a pour objectif d’illustrer cette composante parmi les autres facteurs de risque plus connus. C’est l’histoire de trois frères germains ayant présenté chacun un cancer de la cavité orale avec une évolution très rapide en moins d’une année pour chacun d’entre eux. En plus du facteur familial, les facteurs de risque retrouvés chez ces patients étaient: le tabagisme, une mauvaise hygiène bucco-dentaire, une alimentation pauvre en légumes et en fruits. Le risque familial des cancers de la cavité orale était pendant très longtemps un sujet controversé mais plusieurs études récentes ont suggérées l’existence de ce risque ce qui concorde avec notre observation chez ces trois frères. Ces études ont montré aussi que bien que la composante héréditaire pour les carcinomes des voies aéro-digestives supérieures semble probable, il est important que les membres de la famille à risque comprennent que leur vulnérabilité à ces tumeurs peut être considérablement réduite par l'arrêt du tabac, la modération de la consommation d'alcool et la consommation fréquente de fruits et légumes crus. Des études plus poussées devront être réalisées dans notre pays pour préciser la place respective de ces différents facteurs de risque pour ce cancer. En attendant, la prévention et le diagnostic précoce restent les moyens les plus appropriées pour la lutte contre ce type de cancers. PMID:28292118

  10. Selectively tunable optical Stark effect of anisotropic excitons in atomically thin ReS2

    PubMed Central

    Sim, Sangwan; Lee, Doeon; Noh, Minji; Cha, Soonyoung; Soh, Chan Ho; Sung, Ji Ho; Jo, Moon-Ho; Choi, Hyunyong

    2016-01-01

    The optical Stark effect is a coherent light–matter interaction describing the modification of quantum states by non-resonant light illumination in atoms, solids and nanostructures. Researchers have strived to utilize this effect to control exciton states, aiming to realize ultra-high-speed optical switches and modulators. However, most studies have focused on the optical Stark effect of only the lowest exciton state due to lack of energy selectivity, resulting in low degree-of-freedom devices. Here, by applying a linearly polarized laser pulse to few-layer ReS2, where reduced symmetry leads to strong in-plane anisotropy of excitons, we control the optical Stark shift of two energetically separated exciton states. Especially, we selectively tune the Stark effect of an individual state with varying light polarization. This is possible because each state has a completely distinct dependence on light polarization due to different excitonic transition dipole moments. Our finding provides a methodology for energy-selective control of exciton states. PMID:27857053

  11. The Union and Médecins Sans Frontières approach to operational research.

    PubMed

    Harries, A D; Rusen, I D; Reid, T; Detjen, A K; Berger, S D; Bissell, K; Hinderaker, S G; Edginton, M; Fussell, M; Fujiwara, P I; Zachariah, R

    2011-02-01

    Operational research (OR) has become a hot topic at national meetings, international conferences and donor fora. The International Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease (The Union) and Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) Operational Centre Brussels strongly promote and implement OR with colleagues in low- and middle-income countries. Here we describe how the two organisations define OR, and explain the guiding principles and methodology that underpin the strategy for developing and expanding OR in those countries. We articulate The Union's and MSF's approach to supporting OR, highlighting the main synergies and differences. Then, using the Malawi National Tuberculosis Control Programme as an example, we show how OR can be embedded within tuberculosis control activities, leading to changes in policy and practice at the national level. We discuss the difficult, yet vitally important, issue of capacity building, and share our vision of a new paradigm of product-related training and performance-based OR fellowships as two ways of developing the necessary skills at country level to ensure research is actually performed. Finally, we highlight the need to consider and incorporate into practice the ethical components of OR. This is a key moment to be involved in OR. We are confident that in partnership with interested stakeholders, including the World Health Organization, we can stimulate the implementation of quality, relevant OR as an integral part of health service delivery that in turn will lead to better health for people, particularly for those living in the poorer parts of the world.

  12. Multiscale anisotropy controlled by folding: the example of the Chaudrons fold (Corbières, France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Louis, Laurent; Robion, Philippe; David, Christian; Frizon de Lamotte, Dominique

    2006-04-01

    In this paper, anisotropies developed in silicoclastic continental deposits during the building of the Chaudrons anticline (Corbières, France) are studied. A microstructural analysis of the deformational features in three different panels within the fold (crest, hinge, and forelimb, respectively) is reported and compared with early field observations (distribution and orientation of cleavage) and laboratory measurements (estimation of magnetic and acoustic anisotropies). The main finding of this investigation is the preservation of unwelded joints between grains of calcite promoted by the presence of quartz grains. These joints, which appear as discontinuities in a matrix of calcite, are analyzed in orientation and composition. In the three panels of the fold that are investigated, a range of dip angles is observed with at least two major generations of joints, the average orientation of which is found to be consistent with both macroscopic cleavage and magnetic and acoustic fabrics. To account for the multimodal distribution of the joints orientation, we suggest an original scenario in which they are successively generated by sets. Two processes have operated simultaneously during the development of the fold: (1) horizontal rock mass compaction inducing pressure solution and twinning in calcite; (2) preservation of unwelded calcite/calcite grain joints due to stress heterogeneities associated with quartz inclusions. From these results, we suggest that microstructural processes are the same before and during folding, ruling out a passive shearing of cleavage plane formed during a first step of layer parallel shortening.

  13. Effects of Aicardi-Goutières syndrome mutations predicted from ADAR-RNA structures.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Andrew J; Beal, Peter A

    2017-02-01

    Adenosine (A) to inosine (I) RNA editing is important for life in metazoan organisms. Dysregulation or mutations that compromise the efficacy of A to I editing results in neurological disorders and a shorten life span. These reactions are catalyzed by adenosine deaminases acting on RNA (ADARs), which hydrolytically deaminate adenosines in regions of duplex RNA. Because inosine mimics guanosine in hydrogen bonding, this prolific RNA editing alters the sequence and structural information in the RNA landscape. Aicardi-Goutières syndrome (AGS) is a severe childhood autoimmune disease that is one of a broader set of inherited disorders characterized by constitutive upregulation of type I interferon (IFN) referred to as type I interferonopathies. AGS is caused by mutations in multiple genes whose protein products, including ADAR1, are all involved in nucleic acid metabolism or sensing. The recent crystal structures of human ADAR2 deaminase domain complexed with duplex RNA substrates enabled modeling of how AGS causing mutations may influence RNA binding and catalysis. The mutations can be broadly characterized into three groups; mutations on RNA-binding loops that directly affect RNA binding, "second-layer" mutations that can alter the disposition of RNA-binding loops, and mutations that can alter the position of an α-helix bearing an essential catalytic residue.

  14. Selectively tunable optical Stark effect of anisotropic excitons in atomically thin ReS2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sim, Sangwan; Lee, Doeon; Noh, Minji; Cha, Soonyoung; Soh, Chan Ho; Sung, Ji Ho; Jo, Moon-Ho; Choi, Hyunyong

    2016-11-01

    The optical Stark effect is a coherent light-matter interaction describing the modification of quantum states by non-resonant light illumination in atoms, solids and nanostructures. Researchers have strived to utilize this effect to control exciton states, aiming to realize ultra-high-speed optical switches and modulators. However, most studies have focused on the optical Stark effect of only the lowest exciton state due to lack of energy selectivity, resulting in low degree-of-freedom devices. Here, by applying a linearly polarized laser pulse to few-layer ReS2, where reduced symmetry leads to strong in-plane anisotropy of excitons, we control the optical Stark shift of two energetically separated exciton states. Especially, we selectively tune the Stark effect of an individual state with varying light polarization. This is possible because each state has a completely distinct dependence on light polarization due to different excitonic transition dipole moments. Our finding provides a methodology for energy-selective control of exciton states.

  15. /Cu-Al System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kish, Orel; Froumin, Natalya; Aizenshtein, Michael; Frage, Nachum

    2014-05-01

    Wettability and interfacial interaction of the Ta2O5/Cu-Al system were studied. Pure Cu does not wet the Ta2O5 substrate, and improved spreading is achieved when relatively a high fraction of the active element (~40 at.% Al) was added. The Al2O3 and AlTaO4 phases were observed at the Ta2O5/Cu-Al interface. A thermodynamic evaluation allowed us to suggest that the lack of wetting bellow 40 at.% Al is due to the presence of a native oxide, which covers the drop. The conditions of the native oxide decomposition and the formation of the volatile Al2O suboxide strongly depend on the vacuum level during sessile drop experiments and the composition of the Cu-Al alloy. In our case, Al contents greater than 40% provides thermodynamic conditions for the formation of Al2O (as a result of Al reaction with Al2O3) and the drop spreading. It was suggested that the final contact angle in the Ta2O5/Cu-Al system (50°) is determined by Ta adsorption on the newly formed alumina interlayer.

  16. Initial Symptoms of ALS

    MedlinePlus

    ... Chapters Certified Centers and Clinics Support Groups About ALS About Us Our Research In Your Community Advocate ... Diagnosis En español Symptoms The initial symptoms of ALS can be quite varied in different people. One ...

  17. Lou Gehrig's Disease (ALS)

    MedlinePlus

    ... 1930s. People in England and Australia call ALS motor neurone disease (MND). The French refer to it ... about ALS in 1869. Lou Gehrig's disease damages motor neurons in the brain and spinal cord. Motor ...

  18. A numerical study of negative sprites observed over two Florida storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, N.; Cummer, S. A.

    2015-12-01

    Although negative cloud-to-ground (CG) lightning strokes occur much more frequently than positive CGs, sprites caused by negative CGs are very rare. Past observations indicate that the ratio of negative and positive sprites is 1:200-300 [Barrington-Leigh et al., J. Geophys. Res, 106, 1741, 2001; Taylor et al., Geophys. Res. Lett., 35, L14812, 2008; Li et al., J. Geophys. Res., 117, A09310, 2012; Cummer et al., J. Geophys. Res., 118, 5176, 2013]. This has been recognized as one of the polarity asymmetry problems in lightning research [Williams, Plasma Sources Sci. Technol., 15 (2), S91, 2006]. On 12 September 2014, a few negative sprites were observed over two thunderstorms near the east coast of Florida. The sferic data indicate that the parent lightning strokes are all extremely impulsive, with the inferred impulse charge moment changes ranging from 650 to 1300 C km. In this talk, we present the simulation results of the response of the lower ionosphere to the quasi-electrostatic field of the parent lightning discharges of the negative sprites. The results indicate that the modifications of the ionosphere density by the parent CGs of the negative sprites vary significantly. The most impulsive lightning stoke may have increased the ionospheric density by nearly four orders of magnitude. Finally, we show that the sprite streamer initiation theory that mesospheric perturbations created by atmospheric gravity waves are the source of the inhomogeneities initiating sprite streamers [Liu et al., Nat. Commun. 6:7540, 2015] also works for the observed negative sprites.

  19. Ready for a world without antibiotics? The Pensières Antibiotic Resistance Call to Action

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Resistance to antibiotics has increased dramatically over the past few years and has now reached a level that places future patients in real danger. Microorganisms such as Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae, which are commensals and pathogens for humans and animals, have become increasingly resistant to third-generation cephalosporins. Moreover, in certain countries, they are also resistant to carbapenems and therefore susceptible only to tigecycline and colistin. Resistance is primarily attributed to the production of beta-lactamase genes located on mobile genetic elements, which facilitate their transfer between different species. In some rare cases, Gram-negative rods are resistant to virtually all known antibiotics. The causes are numerous, but the role of the overuse of antibiotics in both humans and animals is essential, as well as the transmission of these bacteria in both the hospital and the community, notably via the food chain, contaminated hands, and between animals and humans. In addition, there are very few new antibiotics in the pipeline, particularly for Gram-negative bacilli. The situation is slightly better for Gram-positive cocci as some potent and novel antibiotics have been made available in recent years. A strong and coordinated international programme is urgently needed. To meet this challenge, 70 internationally recognized experts met for a two-day meeting in June 2011 in Annecy (France) and endorsed a global call to action ("The Pensières Antibiotic Resistance Call to Action"). Bundles of measures that must be implemented simultaneously and worldwide are presented in this document. In particular, antibiotics, which represent a treasure for humanity, must be protected and considered as a special class of drugs. PMID:22958833

  20. Clinical and Molecular Phenotype of Aicardi-Goutières Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Rice, Gillian ; Patrick, Teresa ; Parmar, Rekha ; Taylor, Claire F. ; Aeby, Alec ; Aicardi, Jean ; Artuch, Rafael ; Montalto, Simon Attard ; Bacino, Carlos A. ; Barroso, Bruno ; Baxter, Peter ; Benko, Willam S. ; Bergmann, Carsten ; Bertini, Enrico ; Biancheri, Roberta ; Blair, Edward M. ; Blau, Nenad ; Bonthron, David T. ; Briggs, Tracy ; Brueton, Louise A. ; Brunner, Han G. ; Burke, Christopher J. ; Carr, Ian M. ; Carvalho, Daniel R. ; Chandler, Kate E. ; Christen, Hans-Jürgen ; Corry, Peter C. ; Cowan, Frances M. ; Cox, Helen ; D’Arrigo, Stefano ; Dean, John ; De Laet, Corinne ; De Praeter, Claudine ; Déry, Catherine ; Ferrie, Colin D. ; Flintoff, Kim ; Frints, Suzanna G. M. ; Garcia-Cazorla, Angels ; Gener, Blanca ; Goizet, Cyril ; Goutières, Françoise ; Green, Andrew J. ; Guët, Agnès ; Hamel, Ben C. J. ; Hayward, Bruce E. ; Heiberg, Arvid ; Hennekam, Raoul C. ; Husson, Marie ; Jackson, Andrew P. ; Jayatunga, Rasieka ; Jiang, Yong-Hui ; Kant, Sarina G. ; Kao, Amy ; King, Mary D. ; Kingston, Helen M. ; Klepper, Joerg ; van der Knaap, Marjo S. ; Kornberg, Andrew J. ; Kotzot, Dieter ; Kratzer, Wilfried ; Lacombe, Didier ; Lagae, Lieven ; Landrieu, Pierre Georges ; Lanzi, Giovanni ; Leitch, Andrea ; Lim, Ming J. ; Livingston, John H. ; Lourenco, Charles M. ; Lyall, E. G. Hermione ; Lynch, Sally A. ; Lyons, Michael J. ; Marom, Daphna ; McClure, John P. ; McWilliam, Robert ; Melancon, Serge B. ; Mewasingh, Leena D. ; Moutard, Marie-Laure ; Nischal, Ken K. ; Østergaard, John R. ; Prendiville, Julie ; Rasmussen, Magnhild ; Rogers, R. Curtis ; Roland, Dominique ; Rosser, Elisabeth M. ; Rostasy, Kevin ; Roubertie, Agathe ; Sanchis, Amparo ; Schiffmann, Raphael ; Scholl-Bürgi, Sabine ; Seal, Sunita ; Shalev, Stavit A. ; Corcoles, C. Sierra ; Sinha, Gyan P. ; Soler, Doriette ; Spiegel, Ronen ; Stephenson, John B. P. ; Tacke, Uta ; Tan, Tiong Yang ; Till, Marianne ; Tolmie, John L. ; Tomlin, Pam ; Vagnarelli, Federica ; Valente, Enza Maria ; Van Coster, Rudy N. A. ; Van der Aa, Nathalie ; Vanderver, Adeline ; Vles, Johannes S. H. ; Voit, Thomas ; Wassmer, Evangeline ; Weschke, Bernhard ; Whiteford, Margo L. ; Willemsen, Michel A. A. ; Zankl, Andreas ; Zuberi, Sameer M. ; Orcesi, Simona ; Fazzi, Elisa ; Lebon, Pierre ; Crow, Yanick J. 

    2007-01-01

    Aicardi-Goutières syndrome (AGS) is a genetic encephalopathy whose clinical features mimic those of acquired in utero viral infection. AGS exhibits locus heterogeneity, with mutations identified in genes encoding the 3′→5′ exonuclease TREX1 and the three subunits of the RNASEH2 endonuclease complex. To define the molecular spectrum of AGS, we performed mutation screening in patients, from 127 pedigrees, with a clinical diagnosis of the disease. Biallelic mutations in TREX1, RNASEH2A, RNASEH2B, and RNASEH2C were observed in 31, 3, 47, and 18 families, respectively. In five families, we identified an RNASEH2A or RNASEH2B mutation on one allele only. In one child, the disease occurred because of a de novo heterozygous TREX1 mutation. In 22 families, no mutations were found. Null mutations were common in TREX1, although a specific missense mutation was observed frequently in patients from northern Europe. Almost all mutations in RNASEH2A, RNASEH2B, and RNASEH2C were missense. We identified an RNASEH2C founder mutation in 13 Pakistani families. We also collected clinical data from 123 mutation-positive patients. Two clinical presentations could be delineated: an early-onset neonatal form, highly reminiscent of congenital infection seen particularly with TREX1 mutations, and a later-onset presentation, sometimes occurring after several months of normal development and occasionally associated with remarkably preserved neurological function, most frequently due to RNASEH2B mutations. Mortality was correlated with genotype; 34.3% of patients with TREX1, RNASEH2A, and RNASEH2C mutations versus 8.0% RNASEH2B mutation–positive patients were known to have died (P=.001). Our analysis defines the phenotypic spectrum of AGS and suggests a coherent mutation-screening strategy in this heterogeneous disorder. Additionally, our data indicate that at least one further AGS-causing gene remains to be identified. PMID:17846997

  1. Des lasers à excimères pour cristalliser le silicium des écrans plats : pourquoi ? comment ?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prat, C.

    2003-06-01

    Les contraintes techniques et économiques de la fabrication d'écrans plats à cristaux liquides à matrice active ont suscité de nombreuses études de procédés de cristallisation de couches minces de silicium par laser à excimères, exploitant principalement trois types de phénomènes physiques, dans le but d'obtenir des cristaux micrométriques les plus uniformes possible.

  2. Nearly monochromatic waves in the distant geotail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kellogg, P.; Bale, S.

    2003-04-01

    Nearly monochromatic waves in the geotail were first reported by Kojima et al (1997), who showed that some were consistent with Langmuir waves but others were electron cyclotron harmonics. Farrell et al (2002) found an association with reconnection in one case, but it seems that this cannot be universal as nearly monochromatic waves are more common than observations of reconnection. Several hundred examples of monochromatic waves were observed during a passage of the Wind satellite through the geotail at -90 RE. We present an investigation of the environment in which these waves are found. Kojima,H, H.Furuya, H.Usui, H.Matsumoto, "Modulated electron plasma waves observed in the tail lobe: Geotail waveform observations" Geophys. Res. Lett. 24, 3049, (1997) Farrell, W.M., M.D.Desch,M.L.Kaiser and K. Goetz, "The dominance of electron plasma waves near a reconnection X-line region", Geophys.Res.Lett. 29, 1029, (2002)

  3. Mycorrhiza analyses in New Zealand truffières reveal frequent but variable persistence of Tuber melanosporum in co-existence with other truffle species.

    PubMed

    Guerin-Laguette, Alexis; Cummings, Nicholas; Hesom-Williams, Nina; Butler, Ruth; Wang, Yun

    2013-02-01

    This study compiles the results from an examination of mycorrhizae on root samples from Tuber melanosporum truffières in New Zealand. Samples were taken over 5 years from 328 trees in 43 truffières established with nursery-inoculated trees. Mycorrhizae were analysed using a combination of morphological and molecular techniques, focusing on the identification of Tuber species. Results show that 49% of the trees, and nearly 90% of the truffières, retained T. melanosporum mycorrhizae up to 21 years after planting. Tuber mycorrhizae with spiky cystidia were found on 26.9% of the tested trees: Tuber brumale (5.5%), Tuber maculatum (10.7%), and unidentified Tuber species (10.7%), and were detected in 67% of the truffières tested. T. brumale was found in 28% and T. maculatum in 35% of the truffières. In 56% of the truffières, T. melanosporum was found to occur with spiky Tuber species. The existence of T. brumale and T. maculatum in the same truffière was recorded only once. Forty-four percent of trees examined had Scleroderma-like (SCL) mycorrhizae and 50% of trees hosted other ectomycorrhizal species (OE). For all categories of mycorrhizal species examined, the variation between truffières was greater than variation within each truffière. Overall results indicate that Corylus avellana tends to be more receptive to mycorrhizae of Tuber species than Quercus robur but is not necessarily more productive. In productive truffières, Q. robur appears to host SCL mycorrhizae more often than C. avellana. This is the first study of its scale to analyse the mycorrhizal species associated with T. melanosporum truffières in the Southern Hemisphere.

  4. Gravity Waves in the Atmospheres of Mars and Venus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tellmann, Silvia; Paetzold, Martin; Häusler, Bernd; Bird, Michael K.; Tyler, G. Leonard; Hinson, David P.; Imamura, Takeshi

    2016-10-01

    Gravity waves are ubiquitous in all stably stratified planetary atmospheres and play a major role in the redistribution of energy and momentum. Gravity waves can be excited by many different mechanisms, e.g. by airflow over orographic obstacles or by convection in an adjacent layer.Gravity waves on Mars were observed in the lower atmosphere [1,2] but are also expected to play a major role in the cooling of the thermosphere [3] and the polar warming [4]. They might be excited by convection in the daytime boundary layer or by strong winter jets in combination with the pronounced topographic diversity on Mars.On Venus, gravity waves play an important role in the mesosphere above the cloud layer [5] and probably below. Convection in the cloud layer is one of the most important source mechanisms but certain correlations with topography were observed by different experiments [6,7,8].Temperature height profiles from the radio science experiments on Mars Express (MaRS) [9] and Venus Express (VeRa) [10] have the exceptionally high vertical resolution necessary to study small-scale vertical gravity waves, their global distribution, and possible source mechanisms.Atmospheric instabilities, which are clearly identified in the data, can be investigated to gain further insight into possible atmospheric processes contributing to the excitation of gravity waves.[1] Creasey, J. E., et al.,(2006), Geophys. Res. Lett., 33, L01803, doi:10.1029/2005GL024037.[2]Tellmann, S., et al.(2013), J. Geophys. Res. Planets, 118, 306-320, doi:10.1002/jgre.20058.[3]Medvedev, A. S., et al.(2015), J. Geophys. Res. Planets, 120, 913-927. doi:10.1002/2015JE004802.[4] Barnes, J. R. (1990), J. Geophys. Res., 95, B2, 1401-1421.[5] Tellmann, S., et al. (2012), Icarus, 221, 471 - 480.[6] Blamont, J.E. et al., (1986) 231, 1422-1425.[7] Bertaux J.-L., et al. (2016), J. Geophys. Res., Planets, in press.[8] Piccialli, A., et al. (2014), Icarus, 227, 94 - 111.[9] Pätzold, M., et al. (2016), Planet. Space Sci

  5. The formation of free radical intermediates in the reactions of gaseous NO 2 with solid NaCl and NaBr—Atmospheric and toxicological implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, J. K. S.; Pitts, J. N.; Beichert, P.; Finlayson-Pitts, B. J.

    The reaction of gaseous NO 2 with alkali halides is of significant interest for its potential to occur in polluted marine atmospheres ((Finlayson-Pitts, 1993), Res. Chem. Int.19, 235-249). We report here a new paramagnetic signal in NaBr and NaCl formed upon reaction with gaseous NO 2 and assigned to a radical anion intermediate of the type [X… NO 2] - where X = Br, Cl. This is a new type of V k center (Castner and Känzig, 1957, J. Phys. Chem. Solids3, 178-195; Fowler, 1968; Seidel, 1969, in Magnetic Resonance and Radiofrequency Spectroscopy (edited by Averbuch P.), North Holland, Amsterdam, pp. 141-156), which is remarkably stable. Indeed, with NaCl it can be observed for several days following the reaction after handling the sample in room light and ambient air. This intermediate may be responsible at least in part for synergistic effects observed in the deep lung in rats exposed simultaneously to gaseous NO 2 and NaCl aerosol (Last and Warren, 1987, Toxicol. Appl. Pharmacol.90, 34-42). While the gaseous product ClNO was suggested earlier as the causative agent (Last and Warren, 1987, Toxicol. Appl. Pharmacol.90, 34-42), it is highly reactive with liquid water and will be removed largely in the upper respiratory tract, while small particles are able to penetrate into the deep lung. Given the ubiquitous occurrence (Finlayson-Pitts and Pitts, 1986, Atmospheric Chemistry: Fundamentals and Experimental Techniques, Wiley, New York), of NO 2 and airborne salt particles, which occur not only in marine areas but also significant distances inland (Shaw, 1991, J. geophys. Res.96, 22,369-22,372) as well as in the plumes from oil well burning (Lowenthal et al., 1993, Geophys. Res. Lett.20, 691-693; Stevens et al., 1993, Wat. Sci. Technol.27, 223-233; Sheridan et al., 1992, Geophys. Res. Lett.19, 389-392; Parungo et al., 1992, J. geophys. Res. 97, 15,867-15,882; Cahill et al., 1992, J. geophys. Res.97, 14,513-14,520) this radical anion could provide a vehicle for delivery

  6. Finescale Water-Mass Variability from ARGO Profiling Floats

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-30

    characterize lateral stirring on O(100 km) lengthscales. This variability represents the low-wavenumber source for the submesoscale being studied under...produce a spectrum for water-mass variability on isopycnals over horizontal wavelengths of 0.03-30 km (Kunze et al. 2014). The submesoscale band...other. 4 REFERENCES D’Asaro, E.A., 1988: Geneation of submesoscale vortices – A new mechanism. J. Geophys. Res., 93, 6685-6693. Ferrari, R

  7. Magnetospheric Plasma Studies Using Data from the Dynamics High and Low Altitude Plasma Instruments.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-05-15

    High Altitude Plasma Instrument (HAPI) [Burch et al, 1981] on DE-1 are shown...Accreeration Regions, J. Geophys. Res. , 84, 5863, 1979. Burch, J. L., J. D. Winningham, V. A. Blevins, N. Eaker, W. C. Gibson, and R. A. Hoffman, High - altitude plasma instrument for... Altitude Plasma Instrument (HAPI) consists of five elec- trostatic analyzers mounted in a fan-shaped angular array at angles of 450, 780, 900, 1020,

  8. Evaluation of Sea Ice Kinematics and their Impact on Ice Thickness Distribution in the Arctic

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-01

    interpolated to the 9km grid (Jakobsson et al. 2000; Maslowski and Walczowski 2002). Bathymetry south of 64oN is derived from ETOPO5 at five-minute...2009GL038777. Clement, J. L., W. Maslowski, L. Cooper, J. Grebmeier, W. Walczowski , 2005: Ocean circulation and exchanges through the northern Bering...Arctic sea ice age through spring 2011, Geophys. Res. Lett., 38, LXXXXX, doi:10.1029/2011GL047735. Maslowski, W., and W. Walczowski , 2002: Circulation

  9. Aerosol Microphysics and Radiation Integration

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-09-30

    Al Mandoos (2007), Haboob dust storms of the southern Arabian Peninsula, J. Geophys. Res., in press. Zhang, J., J. S. Reid, S. D. Miller, J. F. Turk...Analysis and Predictions System (NAAPS) and the Coupled Ocean/Atmosphere Mesoscale Prediction System ( COAMPS ®). This work included generation of Navy...Ocean/Atmosphere Mesoscale Prediction System ( COAMPS ?). 15. SUBJECT TERMS 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT Same as Report

  10. Application of Earth Sciences Products for use in Next Generation Numerical Aerosol Prediction Models

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-09-30

    J. S. Reid, D. W. Breed, A. L. Walker, A. Al Mandoos (2008), Haboob dust storms of the southern Arabian Peninsula, J. Geophys. Res., 113, D01202...fields from the NRL Aerosol Analysis and Prediction System (NAAPS) and Coupled Ocean Atmosphere Mesoscale Prediction System ( COAMPS ®) with near real time...Mesoscale Prediction System ( COAMPS ?) with near real time satellite surface and aerosol products via a high resolution radiative transfer model, angular

  11. Correlated Measurements of the Disturbances of Geomagnetic Field and Changes of Secondary Particle Fluxes at Aragats-Space Environmental Center (ASEC)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-02-01

    responding to GCR energies ≥ 10 GeV) and Muon Telescopes (MT, responding to GCR energies ≥ 15 GeV) well before the onset of a major geomagnetic storm...S., et al.: Precursors of geomagnetic storms observed by the muon detector network, J. Geophys. Res. 105, 27457-27468, 2000. N. Gopalswamy, S...AMMM Aragats Multidirectional Muon Monitor ANM Aragats Neutron Monitor ASCII American Standard Code for Information Interchange ASEC

  12. Studies of Ionospheric Irregularities: Origins and Effects

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-09-30

    occurred during a modest magnetic storm on September 25-26, 2001 [ Ledvina et al., 2002]. In this example a large ionospheric density surge, sometimes...receiver. REFERENCES Ledvina , B.M., J.J. Makela, and P.M. Kintner. 2002: First observations of GPS L1 amplitude scintillations at midlatitude...refereed] Ledvina , B.M., J.J. Makela, and P.M. Kintner. 2002: First observations of GPS L1 amplitude scintillations at midlatitude, Geophys. Res. Lett

  13. Global and Temporal Distribution of Meteoric Smoke: A Two-Dimensional Simulation Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-02-02

    flexible, microphysical model which has been applied to a wide variety of atmo- spheric problems both on Earth and on other planets. The applications range...is an annual variation of global input. For instance, if the whole earth would receive more mete- oric material during January, this would result in...regions during the DROPPS program, Geophys. Res. Lett., 28, 1427–1430. Curtius, J., et al. (2005), Observations of meteoritic material and impli

  14. CRRES Electric Field Power Spectra and Radial Diffusion Coefficients

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-03-30

    a., 1997]. These studies presume a waves, or VLF waves (for a review, see Friedel et al. single DLL fixed for all times independent of magnetic [2002...in craft potential. Also affecting the spherical probes wereb er single event upsets, primarily during 1990. Because ofprinciple determined for each...radiation zone, J. Geophys. Res., 6. Summary 70, 3533-3539. Friedel , R. H. W., G. D. Reeves, and T. Obara (2002), Relativistic electron [45] Using the CRRES

  15. SWIFT Observations in the Arctic Sea State DRI

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-30

    Swell and sea in the emerging Arctic Ocean, Geophys. Res. Lett., 41 (2014). Thomson et al, “Science Plan for the Sea State and Boundary Layer Physics...1 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. SWIFT Observations in the Arctic Sea State DRI Jim...to understand the role of waves and sea state in the Arctic Ocean, such that forecast models are improved and a robust climatology is defined

  16. The impact of rhetoric and education on the "Res Gestae" of Ammianus Marcellinus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez, Pablo

    The aim of this thesis is to explore and underline the impact of education and rhetoric on the Res Gestae of Ammianus Marcellinus. I will examine the concept of education in two different aspects. First, I will determine the role of education in regards to Ammianus' early life by describing the cultural climate in the East in the fourth century (Introduction and chapter 1). In this analysis, I will argue that the historian's familiarity with Latin suggests an early acquaintance with the language, indicating that he should not be invariably associated with earlier Greek historians. Second, I will look at how the content of the curriculum is reflected in the RG, explaining how literary sources shaped the composition of the historian's digressions on geography (Chapter 3) and astronomy (Chapter 4). In the past, scholars have examined Ammianus' cultural digressions as an example of the tension between things seen and things read. In my argumentation, I will concentrate on explaining the reasons why Ammianus often tended to rely on literary works rather than observation. I will show that the explanation greatly lies in the content of the curriculum. Concerning the role of rhetoric, I will examine how rhetorical training is articulated in the RG. In Chapter 2, I will show that Ammianus' selection of historical material can be explained in light of the ancient theory of styles. In this context, I will study the role of a rhetorical device designed to raise the emotions of readers by bringing the scene before their eyes: enargeia. In Chapters 3 and 4, I will demonstrate that the cultural digressions in the RG are mostly the product of cultural stereotypes and literary influences. In Chapter 5, I will show the impact of rhetorical treatises on some passages of the RG, arguing that the traditional classification of oratory into deliberative, epideictic and judicial is echoed in both the speeches and the historical narrative. To conclude: the main purpose of my dissertation

  17. Ionospheric Storm Effects at Subauroral Latitudes: A Case Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-02-01

    al., 1988; Kilifarska, 1988; Oliver et al., 1988: Ezquer and de 6 7 Adler, 1989; Fesen et al., 1989; Rodger et al., 1989; Richards 100 et al., 1989...It is Buonsanto. M. J.. J. E. Salah. K. L. Miller, W. L. Oliver . R. G. t tBurnside. and P. G. Richards. Observations of neutral circulationunderstood...active times as observed by Hafstad, L. R., and M. A. Tuve. Note on Kennelly- Heaviside layer Dynamics Explorer 2, J. Geophys. Res., 92, 10.133-10,138

  18. Commentary on strengthening the assessment of factorial invariance across population subgroups: a commentary on Varni et al. (2013).

    PubMed

    Beaujean, A Alexander; Limbers, Christine A; Varni, James W

    2013-08-20

    In his commentary on Varni et al.'s (Qual Life Res. doi: 10.1007/s11136-013-0370-4 , 2013) article, McIntosh (Qual Life Res. doi: 10.1007/s11136-013-0465-y , 2013) has two main arguments. First, we should have paid more attention to statistical tests (i.e., χ (2) values) instead of approximate fit indexes for our analysis, especially with the baseline model. Second, Bayesian methods are better than the frequentist methods we used in determining the model's invariance across age and gender groups. We believe that statistical tests do have a place in assessing model fit, but overemphasis on them, especially with larger sample sizes, can lead to errant decisions. Second, while we agree that Bayesian methods have the potential to contribute much to the field of assessing invariance, more development needs to be conducted before they can be widely utilized in assessing factorial invariance across groups.

  19. Comment on Mroczek et al. Evaluation of Quality of Life of Those Living near a Wind Farm. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health, 2015, 12, 6066–6083

    PubMed Central

    Shepherd, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    An article published in the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health indicated that, far from degrading health, noise from wind turbines may actually be associated with positive health outcomes. Such a finding is counter to that reported elsewhere for general and wind turbine noise. This Commentary sets out to explore alternative explanations of these differences. PMID:28157146

  20. Comment on Mroczek et al. Evaluation of Quality of Life of Those Living near a Wind Farm. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health, 2015, 12, 6066-6083.

    PubMed

    Shepherd, Daniel

    2017-02-01

    An article published in the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health indicated that, far from degrading health, noise from wind turbines may actually be associated with positive health outcomes. Such a finding is counter to that reported elsewhere for general and wind turbine noise. This Commentary sets out to explore alternative explanations of these differences.

  1. 3-D, Impulsive Magnetic Reconnection in a Laboratory Plasma (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorfman, S. E.; Ji, H.; Yamada, M.; Yoo, J.; Myers, C. E.; Roytershteyn, V.; Daughton, W. S.; Jara-Almonte, J.

    2013-12-01

    of space and astrophysical plasmas where impulsive reconnection occurs. In particular, this work has relevance to the upcoming Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) Mission which aims to understand how electron scale structure may affect the global reconnection process. [1] S. Dorfman, et. al., Geophys. Res. Lett. 40, 233-238 (2013). [2] S. Dorfman, et. al., Phys. Plasmas 15, 102107 (2008). [3] H. Ji, et. al., Geophys. Res. Lett., 35, L13106 (2008). [4] V. Roytershteyn, et. al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 055706 (2010). [5] V. Roytershteyn, et. al., Phys. Plasmas 20, 061212 (2013). [6] S. Ohtani, et. al., J. Geophys. Res., 97(A12), 19311-19324 (1992). [7] J. P. Eastwood, et. al., J. Geophys. Res., 112, A06235 (2007). [8] J. S. Pickett, et. al., J. Geophys. Res., 106(A9), 19081-19099 (2001).

  2. Genetic testing in ALS

    PubMed Central

    McLaughlin, Russell L.; Heverin, Mark; Thorpe, Owen; Abrahams, Sharon; Al-Chalabi, Ammar; Hardiman, Orla

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To determine the degree of consensus among clinicians on the clinical use of genetic testing in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and the factors that determine decision-making. Methods: ALS researchers worldwide were invited to participate in a detailed online survey to determine their attitudes and practices relating to genetic testing. Results: Responses from 167 clinicians from 21 different countries were analyzed. The majority of respondents (73.3%) do not consider that there is a consensus definition of familial ALS (FALS). Fifty-seven percent consider a family history of frontotemporal dementia and 48.5% the presence of a known ALS genetic mutation as sufficient for a diagnosis of FALS. Most respondents (90.2%) offer genetic testing to patients they define as having FALS and 49.4% to patients with sporadic ALS. Four main genes (SOD1, C9orf72, TARDBP, and FUS) are commonly tested. A total of 55.2% of respondents would seek genetic testing if they had personally received a diagnosis of ALS. Forty-two percent never offer presymptomatic testing to family members of patients with FALS. Responses varied between ALS specialists and nonspecialists and based on the number of new patients seen per year. Conclusions: There is a lack of consensus among clinicians as to the definition of FALS. Substantial variation exists in attitude and practices related to genetic testing of patients and presymptomatic testing of their relatives across geographic regions and between experienced specialists in ALS and nonspecialists. PMID:28159885

  3. The Borrelia burgdorferi telomere resolvase, ResT, anneals ssDNA complexed with its cognate ssDNA-binding protein

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Shu Hui; Kobryn, Kerri

    2016-01-01

    Spirochetes of the genus Borrelia possess unusual genomes that consist in a linear chromosome and multiple linear and circular plasmids. The linear replicons are terminated by covalently closed hairpin ends, referred to as hairpin telomeres. The hairpin telomeres represent a simple solution to the end-replication problem. Deoxyribonucleic acid replication initiates internally and proceeds bidirectionally toward the hairpin telomeres. The telomere resolvase, ResT, forms the hairpin telomeres from replicated telomere intermediates in a reaction with similarities to those promoted by type IB topoisomerases and tyrosine recombinases. ResT has also been shown to possess DNA single-strand annealing activity. We report here that ResT promotes single-strand annealing of both free DNA strands and ssDNA complexed with single-stranded DNA binding protein (SSB). The annealing of complementary strands bound by SSB requires a ResT–SSB interaction that is mediated by the conserved amphipathic C-terminal tail of SSB. These properties of ResT are similar to those demonstrated for the recombination mediator protein, RecO, of the RecF pathway. Borrelia burgdorferi is unusual in lacking identifiable homologs of the RecFOR proteins. We propose that ResT may provide missing RecFOR functions. PMID:27131360

  4. Ventilatory Control in ALS

    PubMed Central

    Nichols, Nicole L.; Van Dyke, J.; Nashold, L.; Satriotomo, I.; Suzuki, M.; Mitchell, G.S.

    2015-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal, progressive neurodegenerative disease. ALS selectively causes degeneration in upper and lower (spinal) motor neurons, leading to muscle weakness, paralysis and death by ventilatory failure. Although ventilatory failure is generally the cause of death in ALS, little is known concerning the impact of this disorder on respiratory motor neurons, the consequences of respiratory motor neuron cell death, or the ability of the respiratory control system to “fight back” via mechanisms of compensatory respiratory plasticity. Here we review known effects of ALS on breathing, including possible effects on rhythm generation, respiratory motor neurons, and their target organs: the respiratory muscles. We consider evidence for spontaneous compensatory plasticity, preserving breathing well into disease progression despite dramatic loss of spinal respiratory motor neurons. Finally, we review current and potential therapeutic approaches directed toward preserving the capacity to breathe in ALS patients. PMID:23692930

  5. Radiation Belt Transport Driven by Solar Wind Dynamic Pressure Fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kress, B. T.; Hudson, M. K.; Ukhorskiy, A. Y.; Mueller, H.

    2012-12-01

    The creation of the Earth's outer zone radiation belts is attributed to earthward transport and adiabatic acceleration of electrons by drift-resonant interactions with electromagnetic fluctuations in the magnetosphere. Three types of radial transport driven by solar wind dynamic pressure fluctuations that have been identified are: (1) radial diffusion [Falthammer, 1965], (2) significant changes in the phase space density radial profile due to a single or few ULF drift-resonant interactions [Ukhorskiy et al., 2006; Degeling et al., 2008], and (3) shock associated injections of radiation belt electrons occurring in less than a drift period [Li et al., 1993]. A progress report will be given on work to fully characterize different forms of radial transport and their effect on the Earth's radiation belts. The work is being carried out by computing test-particle trajectories in electric and magnetic fields from a simple analytic ULF field model and from global MHD simulations of the magnetosphere. Degeling, A. W., L. G. Ozeke, R. Rankin, I. R. Mann, and K. Kabin (2008), Drift resonant generation of peaked relativistic electron distributions by Pc 5 ULF waves, textit{J. Geophys. Res., 113}, A02208, doi:10.1029/2007JA012411. Fälthammar, C.-G. (1965), Effects of Time-Dependent Electric Fields on Geomagnetically Trapped Radiation, J. Geophys. Res., 70(11), 2503-2516, doi:10.1029/JZ070i011p02503. Li, X., I. Roth, M. Temerin, J. R. Wygant, M. K. Hudson, and J. B. Blake (1993), Simulation of the prompt energization and transport of radiation belt particles during the March 24, 1991 SSC, textit{Geophys. Res. Lett., 20}(22), 2423-2426, doi:10.1029/93GL02701. Ukhorskiy, A. Y., B. J. Anderson, K. Takahashi, and N. A. Tsyganenko (2006), Impact of ULF oscillations in solar wind dynamic pressure on the outer radiation belt electrons, textit{Geophys. Res. Lett., 33}(6), L06111, doi:10.1029/2005GL024380.

  6. The BonaRes Centre - A virtual institute for soil research in the context of a sustainable bio-economy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wollschläger, Ute; Helming, Katharina; Heinrich, Uwe; Bartke, Stephan; Kögel-Knabner, Ingrid; Russell, David; Eberhardt, Einar; Vogel, Hans-Jörg

    2016-04-01

    Fertile soils are central resources for the production of biomass and provision of food and energy. A growing world population and latest climate targets lead to an increasing demand for both, food and bio-energy, which require preserving and improving the long-term productivity of soils as a bio-economic resource. At the same time, other soil functions and ecosystem services need to be maintained. To render soil management sustainable, we need to establish a scientific knowledge base about complex soil system processes that allows for the development of model tools to quantitatively predict the impact of a multitude of management measures on soil functions. This, finally, will allow for the provision of site-specific options for sustainable soil management. To face this challenge, the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research recently launched the funding program "Soil as a Natural Resource for the Bio-Economy - BonaRes". In a joint effort, ten collaborative projects and the coordinating BonaRes Centre are engaged to close existing knowledge gaps for a profound and systemic understanding of soil functions and their sensitivity to soil management. This presentation provides an overview of the concept of the BonaRes Centre which is responsible for i) setting up a comprehensive data base for soil-related information, ii) the development of model tools aiming to estimate the impact of different management measures on soil functions, and iii) establishing a web-based portal providing decision support tools for a sustainable soil management. A specific focus of the presentation will be laid on the so-called "knowledge-portal" providing the infrastructure for a community effort towards a comprehensive meta-analysis on soil functions as a basis for future model developments.

  7. A high resolution coupled hydrologic-hydraulic model (HiResFlood-UCI) for flash flood modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Phu; Thorstensen, Andrea; Sorooshian, Soroosh; Hsu, Kuolin; AghaKouchak, Amir; Sanders, Brett; Koren, Victor; Cui, Zhengtao; Smith, Michael

    2016-10-01

    HiResFlood-UCI was developed by coupling the NWS's hydrologic model (HL-RDHM) with the hydraulic model (BreZo) for flash flood modeling at decameter resolutions. The coupled model uses HL-RDHM as a rainfall-runoff generator and replaces the routing scheme of HL-RDHM with the 2D hydraulic model (BreZo) in order to predict localized flood depths and velocities. A semi-automated technique of unstructured mesh generation was developed to cluster an adequate density of computational cells along river channels such that numerical errors are negligible compared with other sources of error, while ensuring that computational costs of the hydraulic model are kept to a bare minimum. HiResFlood-UCI was implemented for a watershed (ELDO2) in the DMIP2 experiment domain in Oklahoma. Using synthetic precipitation input, the model was tested for various components including HL-RDHM parameters (a priori versus calibrated), channel and floodplain Manning n values, DEM resolution (10 m versus 30 m) and computation mesh resolution (10 m+ versus 30 m+). Simulations with calibrated versus a priori parameters of HL-RDHM show that HiResFlood-UCI produces reasonable results with the a priori parameters from NWS. Sensitivities to hydraulic model resistance parameters, mesh resolution and DEM resolution are also identified, pointing to the importance of model calibration and validation for accurate prediction of localized flood intensities. HiResFlood-UCI performance was examined using 6 measured precipitation events as model input for model calibration and validation of the streamflow at the outlet. The Nash-Sutcliffe Efficiency (NSE) obtained ranges from 0.588 to 0.905. The model was also validated for the flooded map using USGS observed water level at an interior point. The predicted flood stage error is 0.82 m or less, based on a comparison to measured stage. Validation of stage and discharge predictions builds confidence in model predictions of flood extent and localized velocities

  8. Modeling the Effects of a Normal-Stress-Dependent State Variable, Within the Rate- and State-Dependent Friction Framework, at Stepovers and Dip-Slip Faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, Kenny J.; Oglesby, David D.

    2017-03-01

    slip and a greater peak slip rate on reverse faults than on normal faults, given the same initial conditions for each (Nielsen Geophys Res Lett 25:125-128, 1998; Oglesby et al. Science 280:1055-1059, 1998; Oglesby and Archuleta J Geophys Res 105:13643-13653, 2000; Oglesby et al. Bull Seismol Soc Am 90:616-628, 2000). For dip-slip models, we find that adding the Linker-Dieterich normal stress dependence to the state variable serves to mitigate differences in peak slip rate between reverse and normal fault models. However, differences in total slip among reverse and normal fault models remain relatively unchanged. We also examine effects from initial shear stress (loading stress) and effects from incorporating a rate-strengthening zone on the uppermost portion of a reverse and a normal fault.

  9. ALS2 mutations

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Susanne A.; Carr, Lucinda; Deuschl, Guenther; Hopfner, Franziska; Stamelou, Maria; Wood, Nicholas W.; Bhatia, Kailash P.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To determine the genetic etiology in 2 consanguineous families who presented a novel phenotype of autosomal recessive juvenile amyotrophic lateral sclerosis associated with generalized dystonia. Methods: A combination of homozygosity mapping and whole-exome sequencing in the first family and Sanger sequencing of candidate genes in the second family were used. Results: Both families were found to have homozygous loss-of-function mutations in the amyotrophic lateral sclerosis 2 (juvenile) (ALS2) gene. Conclusions: We report generalized dystonia and cerebellar signs in association with ALS2-related disease. We suggest that the ALS2 gene should be screened for mutations in patients who present with a similar phenotype. PMID:24562058

  10. Detection of negative pickup ions at Saturn's moon Dione

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nordheim, T.; Jones, G. H.; Coates, A. J.; Wellbrock, A.; Hand, K. P.; Waite, J. H., Jr.

    2015-12-01

    Negative ions may be formed in both tenuous and dense planetary atmospheres and have been observed in-situ at Earth, Titan [Coates et al., 2007, 2009; Wellbrock et al., 2013] and Enceladus [Coates et al., 2010] as well as at comet Halley [Chaizy et al., 1991]. In the case of Titan, heavy hydrocarbon and nitrile based ions with masses reaching almost 14,000 amu/q have been observed using the CAPS Electron Spectrometer (ELS) onboard Cassini. These are believed to form even more massive organic aerosols termed tholins which fall to lower altitudes where they make up the distinct haze layers, and eventually rain down onto Titan's surface perhaps forming the organic-rich dunes. Very tenuous atmospheres were predicted at the smaller icy moons of Saturn [Sittler et al., 2004; Saur and Strobel, 2005], and subsequently detected [Teolis et al., 2010; Tokar et al., 2012]. These are produced when charged particles from Saturn's magnetosphere interact with moon surfaces, ejecting neutral species. Some portion of these atmospheric neutrals will in turn become ionized and 'picked up' by Saturn's corotating magnetosphere. These pickup ions will then move in cycloidal trajectories that we may intercept using the Cassini spacecraft, even at considerable distance from the moon itself. In this fashion, negative and positive pickup ions have been used to infer a tenuous CO2-O2 atmosphere at Saturn's moon Rhea [Teolis et al., 2010], and positive pickup ions at Dione [Tokar et al., 2012]. Here we report on the detection of negative pickup ions during a close flyby of Dione by the Cassini CAPS ELS instrument, and the implications that these observations may have for the Dionian atmosphere. Chaizy, P., et al. (1991), Nature, 349(6308), 393-396 Coates, A. J., et al. (2007), Geophys. Res. Lett., 34(22), 6-11 Coates, A. J., et al. (2009), Planet. Space Sci., 57(14-15), 1866-1871 Coates, A. J., et al. (2010), Icarus, 206(2), 618-622 Saur, J., and D. F. Strobel (2005), Astrophys. J. Lett., 620

  11. Lou Gehrig's Disease (ALS)

    MedlinePlus

    ... when it becomes necessary. For instance, a power wheelchair can enable a paralyzed person with ALS to ... done these things despite being confined to a wheelchair for many years, being able to move only ...

  12. Genetic Testing for ALS

    MedlinePlus

    ... Involved Donate Familial Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (FALS) and Genetic Testing By Deborah Hartzfeld, MS, CGC, Certified Genetic ... guarantee a person will develop symptoms of ALS. Genetic Counseling If there is more than one person ...

  13. Ag-Al-Ca

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carow-Watamura, U.; Louzguine, D. V.; Takeuchi, A.

    This document is part of Part 1 http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/97.etType="URL"/> 'Systems from Ag-Al-Ca to Au-Pd-Si' of Subvolume B 'Physical Properties of Ternary Amorphous Alloys' of Volume 37 'Phase Diagrams and Physical Properties of Nonequilibrium Alloys' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group III 'Condensed Matter'. It contains the Chapter 'Ag-Al-Ca' with the content:

  14. Hunting the Extinct Steppe Bison (Bison priscus) Mitochondrial Genome in the Trois-Frères Paleolithic Painted Cave

    PubMed Central

    Marsolier-Kergoat, Marie-Claude; Palacio, Pauline; Berthonaud, Véronique; Maksud, Frédéric; Stafford, Thomas; Bégouën, Robert; Elalouf, Jean-Marc

    2015-01-01

    Despite the abundance of fossil remains for the extinct steppe bison (Bison priscus), an animal that was painted and engraved in numerous European Paleolithic caves, a complete mitochondrial genome sequence has never been obtained for this species. In the present study we collected bone samples from a sector of the Trois-Frères Paleolithic cave (Ariège, France) that formerly functioned as a pitfall and was sealed before the end of the Pleistocene. Screening the DNA content of the samples collected from the ground surface revealed their contamination by Bos DNA. However, a 19,000-year-old rib collected on a rock apart the pathway delineated for modern visitors was devoid of such contaminants and reproducibly yielded Bison priscus DNA. High-throughput shotgun sequencing combined with conventional PCR analysis of the rib DNA extract enabled to reconstruct a complete mitochondrial genome sequence of 16,318 bp for the extinct steppe bison with a 10.4-fold coverage. Phylogenetic analyses robustly established the position of the Bison priscus mitochondrial genome as basal to the clade delineated by the genomes of the modern American Bison bison. The extinct steppe bison sequence, which exhibits 93 specific polymorphisms as compared to the published Bison bison mitochondrial genomes, provides an additional resource for the study of Bovinae specimens. Moreover this study of ancient DNA delineates a new research pathway for the analysis of the Magdalenian Trois-Frères cave. PMID:26083419

  15. Hunting the Extinct Steppe Bison (Bison priscus) Mitochondrial Genome in the Trois-Frères Paleolithic Painted Cave.

    PubMed

    Marsolier-Kergoat, Marie-Claude; Palacio, Pauline; Berthonaud, Véronique; Maksud, Frédéric; Stafford, Thomas; Bégouën, Robert; Elalouf, Jean-Marc

    2015-01-01

    Despite the abundance of fossil remains for the extinct steppe bison (Bison priscus), an animal that was painted and engraved in numerous European Paleolithic caves, a complete mitochondrial genome sequence has never been obtained for this species. In the present study we collected bone samples from a sector of the Trois-Frères Paleolithic cave (Ariège, France) that formerly functioned as a pitfall and was sealed before the end of the Pleistocene. Screening the DNA content of the samples collected from the ground surface revealed their contamination by Bos DNA. However, a 19,000-year-old rib collected on a rock apart the pathway delineated for modern visitors was devoid of such contaminants and reproducibly yielded Bison priscus DNA. High-throughput shotgun sequencing combined with conventional PCR analysis of the rib DNA extract enabled to reconstruct a complete mitochondrial genome sequence of 16,318 bp for the extinct steppe bison with a 10.4-fold coverage. Phylogenetic analyses robustly established the position of the Bison priscus mitochondrial genome as basal to the clade delineated by the genomes of the modern American Bison bison. The extinct steppe bison sequence, which exhibits 93 specific polymorphisms as compared to the published Bison bison mitochondrial genomes, provides an additional resource for the study of Bovinae specimens. Moreover this study of ancient DNA delineates a new research pathway for the analysis of the Magdalenian Trois-Frères cave.

  16. Co-located ionospheric and geomagnetic disturbances caused by great earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Yongqiang; Zhang, Donghe; Xiao, Zuo

    2016-07-01

    Despite primary energy disturbances from the Sun, oscillations of the Earth surface due to a large earthquake will couple with the atmosphere and therefore the ionosphere, to generate so-called coseismic ionospheric disturbances (CIDs). In the cases of 2008 Wenchuan and 2011 Tohoku earthquakes, infrasonic waves accompanying the propagation of seismic Rayleigh waves were observed in the ionosphere by a combination of techniques, total electron content, HF Doppler, and ground magnetometer. This is the very first report to present CIDs recorded by different techniques at co-located sites and profiled with regard to changes of both ionospheric plasma and current (geomagnetic field) simultaneously. Comparison between the oceanic (2011 Tohoku) and inland (2008 Wenchuan) earthquakes revealed that the main directional lobe of latter case is more distinct which is perpendicular to the direction of the fault rupture. We argue that the different fault slip (inland or submarine) may affect the way of couplings of lithosphere with atmosphere. Zhao, B., and Y. Hao (2015), Ionospheric and geomagnetic disturbances caused by the 2008 Wenchuan earthquake: A revisit, J. Geophys. Res., doi:10.1002/2015JA021035. Hao, Y. Q., et al. (2013), Teleseismic magnetic effects (TMDs) of 2011 Tohoku earthquake, J. Geophys. Res., doi:10.1002/jgra.50326. Hao, Y. Q., et al. (2012), Multi-instrument observation on co-seismic ionospheric effects after great Tohoku earthquake, J. Geophys. Res., doi:10.1029/2011JA017036.

  17. Échange terres rares légères Ca dans l'apatite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iqdari, Abderrahmane; Velde, Bruce; Benalioulhaj, Noureddine; Dujon, Saint-Clair; El Yamine, Nacer

    2003-04-01

    Diffusion experiments were carried out on natural apatite crystals that were immersed in molten light rare earth element (REE) chloride salt at temperatures between 900 and 1150 °C for periods up to 35 days. Electron microprobe analysis of the crystals showed that light REEs replaced Ca according to electronic balance, i.e. 2 REE3+ for 3 Ca2+. These diffusion profiles indicate that a maximum amount of substitution in the structure occurs when two of the ten Ca ions in apatite are replaced by the REE diffusing elements. Anisotropic diffusion is observed between a and c crystallographic directions. Comparison of maximum distance indicates that the larger ions move more easily in the apatite structure. We conclude that the light REEs diffuse within the channel structures of the mineral, and that this diffusion is controlled by the substitution type of elements in the calcium sites. To cite this article: A. Iqdari et al., C. R. Geoscience 335 (2003).

  18. Magnetic-azimuth dependence of D-layer radio reflectivity, using lightning sferics as radio transmitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobson, A. R.; Shao, X.; Holzworth, R. H.; Lay, E. H.

    2011-12-01

    The Very Low Frequency (3-30 kHz) and Low-Frequency (30-300 kHz) radiation from lightning strokes provides a convenient intense source for studying radio propagation in the ionospheric D-region [Cheng and Cummer, 2005; Cheng et al., 2006; Cheng et al., 2007; Cummer et al., 1998; Jacobson et al., 2010; Shao and Jacobson, 2009]. In this poster we present a new study of the magnetic-azimuth dependence of D-layer radio reflectivity at relatively short ranges (r < 1000 km). This range regime is poorly adapted to a waveguide approach but is well treated by our discrete-reflection approach [Jacobson et al., 2009]. We use cloud-to-ground strokes, which are ~100X more numerous than the Narrow Bipolar Pulse sferics to which our method had previously been confined. Cheng, Z., and S. A. Cummer (2005), Broadband VLF measurements of lightning-induced ionospheric perturbations, Geophys. Res. Lett., 32, L08804, doi:08810.01029/02004GL022187. Cheng, Z., S. A. Cummer, D. N. Baker, and S. G. Kanekal (2006), Nighttime D region electron density profiles and variabilities inferred from broadband measurements using VLF radio emissions from lightning, J. Geophys. Res., 111, A05302, doi:05310.01029/02005JA011308. Cheng, Z., S. A. Cummer, H.-T. Su, and R.-R. Hsu (2007), Broadband very low frequency measurement of D region ionospheric perturbations caused by lightning electromagnetic pulses, J. Geophys. Res., 112, A06318. Cummer, S. A., U. S. Inan, and T. F. Bell (1998), Ionospheric D region remote sensing using VLF radio atmospherics, Radio Sci., 33, 1781-1792. Jacobson, A. R., X. Shao, and R. H. Holzworth (2009), Full-wave reflection of lightning long-wave radio pulses from the ionospheric D-region: Numerical model, J. Geophys. Res.- Space, 114, A03303, doi:03310.01029/02008JA013642. Jacobson, A. R., R. Holzworth, and X.-M. Shao (2010), Full-wave reflection of lightning long-wave radio pulses from the ionospheric D-region: Comparison with midday observations of broadband lightning signals

  19. Sheared velocity flows as a source of pressure anisotropy in low collisionality plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Sarto, Daniele; Pegoraro, Francesco; Cerri, Silvio Sergio; Califano, Francesco; Tenerani, Anna

    2015-04-01

    Non-Maxwellian metaequilibrium states may exist in low-collisionality plasmas as evidenced by direct (particle distributions) and indirect (e.g., instabilities driven by pressure anisotropy) satellite and laboratory measurements. These are directly observed in the solar wind (e.g. [1]), in magnetospheric reconnection events [2], in magnetically confined plasmas [3] or in simulations of Vlasov turbulence [4]. By including the full pressure tensor dynamics in a fluid plasma model, we show that a sheared velocity field can provide an effective mechanism that makes an initial isotropic state anisotropic. We discuss how the propagation of "magneto-elastic" waves can affect the pressure tensor anisotropization and the small scale formation that arise from the interplay between the gyrotropic terms due to the magnetic field and flow vorticity, and the non-gyropropic effect of the flow strain tensor. We support this analysis by a numerical integration of the nonlinear equations describing the pressure tensor evolution. This anisotropization mechanism might provide a good candidate for the understanding of the observed correlation between the presence of a sheared velocity flow and the signature of pressure anisotropies which are not yet explained within the standard models based e.g. on the CGL paradigm (see also [5]). Examples of these signatures are provided by the threshold lowering of ion-Weibel instabilities in the geomagnetic tail, observed in concomitance to the presence of a velocity shear in the near-earth plasma profile [6], or by the relatively stronger anisotropization measured for core protons in the fast solar wind [4,7] or in "space simulation" laboratory plasma experiments [3]. 1] E. Marsch et al., Journ. Geophys. Res. 109, A04120 (2004); Yu. V. Khotyainstev at el., Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 165001 (2011). [2] N. Aunai et al., Ann. Geophys. 29, 1571 (2011); N. Aunai et al., Journ. Geophys. Res. 116, A09232 (2011). [3] E.E. Scime et al., Phys. Plasmas 7, 2157

  20. Cross Calibration of Omnidirectional Orbital Neutron Detectors of Lunar Prospector (LP) and Lunar Exploration Neutron Detector (LEND) by Monte Carlo Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, J.; SU, J. J.; Sagdeev, R.; Chin, G.

    2014-12-01

    Introduction:Monte Carlo (MC) simulations have been used to investigate neutron production and leakage from the lunar surface to assess the composition of the lunar soil [1-3]. Orbital measurements of lunar neutron flux have been made by the Lunar Prospector Neutron Spectrometer (LPNS)[4] of the Lunar Prospector mission and the Lunar Exploration Neutron Detector (LEND)[5] of the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter mission. While both are cylindrical helium-3 detectors, LEND's SETN (Sensor EpiThermal Neutrons) instrument is shorter, with double the helium-3 pressure than that of LPNS. The two instruments therefore have different angular sensitivities and neutron detection efficiencies. Furthermore, the Lunar Prospector's spin-stabilized design makes its detection efficiency latitude-dependent, while the SETN instrument faces permanently downward toward the lunar surface. We use the GEANT4 Monte Carlo simulation code[6] to investigate the leakage lunar neutron energy spectrum, which follows a power law of the form E-0.9 in the epithermal energy range, and the signals detected by LPNS and SETN in the LP and LRO mission epochs, respectively. Using the lunar neutron flux reconstructed for LPNS epoch, we calculate the signal that would have been observed by SETN at that time. The subsequent deviation from the actual signal observed during the LEND epoch is due to the significantly higher intensity of Galactic Cosmic Rays during the anomalous Solar Minimum of 2009-2010. References: [1] W. C. Feldman, et al., (1998) Science Vol. 281 no. 5382 pp. 1496-1500. [2] Gasnault, O., et al.,(2000) J. Geophys. Res., 105(E2), 4263-4271. [3] Little, R. C., et al. (2003), J. Geophys. Res., 108(E5), 5046. [4]W. C. Feldman, et al., (1999) Nucl. Inst. And Method in Phys. Res. A 422, [5] M. L. Litvak, et al., (2012) J.Geophys. Res. 117, E00H32 [6] J. Allison, et al, (2006) IEEE Trans. on Nucl Sci, Vol 53, No 1.

  1. Statins: Do They Cause ALS?

    MedlinePlus

    Statins: Do they cause ALS? Do statins cause amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS)? Answers from Francisco Lopez-Jimenez, M.D. ... D. References Sorensen HT, et al. Statins and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: The level of evidence for an association. Journal ...

  2. Rapidly solidified NiAl and FeAl

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaydosh, D. J.; Crimp, M. A.

    1984-01-01

    Melt spinning was used to produce rapidly solidified ribbons of the B2 intermetallics NiAl and FeAl. Both Fe-40Al and Fe-45Al possessed some bend ductility in the as spun condition. The bend ductility of Fe-40Al, Fe-45Al, and equiatomic NiAl increased with subsequent heat treatment. Heat treatment at approximately 0.85 T (sub m) resulted in significant grain growth in equiatomic FeAl and in all the NiAl compositions. Low bend ductility in both FeAl and NiAl generally coincided with intergranular failure, while increased bend ductility was characterized by increasing amounts of transgranular cleavage fracture.

  3. ALS superbend magnet system

    SciTech Connect

    Zbasnik, J.; Wang, S.T.; Chen, J.Y.; DeVries, G.J.; DeMarco, R.; Fahmie, M.; Geyer, A.; Green, M.A.; Harkins, J.; Henderson, T.; Hinkson, J.; Hoyer, E.H.; Krupnick, J.; Marks, S.; Ottens, F.; Paterson, J.A.; Pipersky, P.; Portmann, G.; Robin, D.A.; Schlueter, R.D.; Steier, C.; Taylor, C.E.; Wahrer, R.

    2000-09-15

    The Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is preparing to upgrade the Advanced Light Source (ALS) with three superconducting dipoles (Superbends). In this paper we present the final magnet system design which incorporates R&D test results and addresses the ALS operational concerns of alignment, availability, and economy. The design incorporates conduction-cooled Nb-Ti windings and HTS current leads, epoxy-glass suspension straps, and a Gifford-McMahon cryocooler to supply steady state refrigeration. We also present the current status of fabrication and testing.

  4. Determination of meteoroid fluxes by using a high-res all-sky camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trigo-Rodriguez, J. M.; Castro-Tirado, A. J.; Gural, P. S.; Jelinek, M.; Vitek, S.; Llorca, J.; Fabregat, J.; Troughton, B.; Galvez, F.

    For several decades there was a large gap between the typical masses of the meteoroids detectable by ground-based photographic camera networks that typically reach -4 magnitude (Spurný and Boroviˇ ka, 2002) and those observed visually (mag. +6). Consequently, visual observations and medium-field photographic exposures have played an important role in determining meteoric fluxes during periods of moderate or high meteoric activity (Jenniskens, 1994, 1995; Trigo-Rodríguez et al., 2001, 2004a). However, the gap for recorded meteors from all-sky systems can be narrowed by using charge coupled devices (CCD) cameras to the detection of meteors until +2/+3 magnitude as was pointed out recently (Trigo-Rodríguez et al. 2004b). A full description of the system and its application to different research fields appears in Castro-Tirado et al. (2005). Continuous meteor and fireball observations have been carried out by the SPanish Meteor Network (SPMN) all sky cameras located in Barcelona, Huelva and Malaga provinces (Spain) during 2005-2006. As a result of the continuous monitoring of the night sky bright bolides have been recorded, but also tens of meteors from different streams or sporadics. On the basis of counting the recorded meteors emanating from different meteor streams in the all-sky exposures, we are able to estimate the meteoroid fluxes for different streams. Determination of these fluxes was made by using a meteor simulation tool (MeteorSim) in order to convert the count rates obtained from the all-sky camera observations to meteoroid spatial number densities. The tool employed was a Monte Carlo based simulation first detailed in an International Meteor Conference proceeding paper by Gural (2002). The same tool had been applied in Gural and Jenniskens (2000) to estimate both the mass ratio and flux for the Leonids, as well as in Molau, Gural, and Okamura (2002) to correct for variable detection efficiencies between multiple sensors and changing radiant

  5. RES-529: a PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway inhibitor that dissociates the mTORC1 and mTORC2 complexes

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    RES-529 (previously named Palomid 529, P529) is a phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/AKT/mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway inhibitor that interferes with the pathway through both mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) and mTOR complex 2 (mTORC2) dissociation. This compound is currently being developed in oncology and ophthalmology. The oncology focus is for the treatment of glioblastoma, where it has received orphan designation by the US Food and Drug Administration, and prostate cancer. We present a review of the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway, its role in tumorigenesis, and the potential of RES-529 in cancer treatment. RES-529 inhibits mTORC1/mTORC2 activity in various cancer cell lines, as noted by decreased phosphorylation of substrates including ribosomal protein S6, 4E-BP1, and AKT, leading to cell growth inhibition and death, with activity generally in the range of 5–15 μmol/l. In animal tumor models where the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway is abnormally activated (i.e. glioblastoma, prostate cancer, and breast cancer), RES-529 reduces tumor growth by as much as 78%. RES-529 treatment is synergistic with radiation therapy, chemotherapy, and hormonal therapy in reducing tumor growth, potentially by preventing PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway activation associated with these treatments. Furthermore, this compound has shown antiangiogenic activity in several animal models. mTORC1 and mTORC2 have redundant and distinct activities that contribute toward oncogenesis. Current inhibitors of this pathway have primarily targeted mTORC1, but have shown limited clinical efficacy. Inhibitors of mTORC1 and mTORC2 such as RES-529 may therefore have the potential to overcome the deficiencies found in targeting only mTORC1. PMID:26918392

  6. RES-529: a PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway inhibitor that dissociates the mTORC1 and mTORC2 complexes.

    PubMed

    Weinberg, Mark A

    2016-07-01

    RES-529 (previously named Palomid 529, P529) is a phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/AKT/mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway inhibitor that interferes with the pathway through both mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) and mTOR complex 2 (mTORC2) dissociation. This compound is currently being developed in oncology and ophthalmology. The oncology focus is for the treatment of glioblastoma, where it has received orphan designation by the US Food and Drug Administration, and prostate cancer. We present a review of the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway, its role in tumorigenesis, and the potential of RES-529 in cancer treatment. RES-529 inhibits mTORC1/mTORC2 activity in various cancer cell lines, as noted by decreased phosphorylation of substrates including ribosomal protein S6, 4E-BP1, and AKT, leading to cell growth inhibition and death, with activity generally in the range of 5-15 μmol/l. In animal tumor models where the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway is abnormally activated (i.e. glioblastoma, prostate cancer, and breast cancer), RES-529 reduces tumor growth by as much as 78%. RES-529 treatment is synergistic with radiation therapy, chemotherapy, and hormonal therapy in reducing tumor growth, potentially by preventing PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway activation associated with these treatments. Furthermore, this compound has shown antiangiogenic activity in several animal models. mTORC1 and mTORC2 have redundant and distinct activities that contribute toward oncogenesis. Current inhibitors of this pathway have primarily targeted mTORC1, but have shown limited clinical efficacy. Inhibitors of mTORC1 and mTORC2 such as RES-529 may therefore have the potential to overcome the deficiencies found in targeting only mTORC1.

  7. Sheared velocity flows as a source of pressure anisotropy in low collisionality plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Sarto, D.; Pegoraro, F.; Califano, F.

    2014-12-01

    Non-Maxwellian metaequilibrium states may exist in low-collisionality plasmas as evidenced by direct (particle distributions) and indirect (e.g., instabilities driven by pressure anisotropy) satellite and laboratory measurements. These are directly observed in the solar wind (e.g. [1]), in magnetospheric reconnection events [2], in magnetically confined plasmas [3] or in simulations of Vlasov turbulence [4]. By including the full pressure tensor dynamics in a fluid plasma model, we show that a sheared velocity field can provide an effective mechanism that makes an initial isotropic state anisotropic. We discuss how the propagation of magneto-elastic waves can affect the pressure tensor anisotropization and the small scale formation that arise from the interplay between the gyrotropic terms due to the magnetic field and the flow vorticity and the non-gyropropic effect of the flow strain tensor. We support this analysis by a numerical integration of the nonlinear equations describing the pressure tensor evolution. This anisotropization mechanism might provide a good candidate for the understanding of the observed correlation between the presence of a sheared velocity flow and the signature of pressure anisotropies which are not yet explained within the standard models based e.g. on the CGL paradigm. Examples of these signatures are provided e.g. by the threshold lowering of ion-Weibel instabilities in the geomagnetic tail, observed in concomitance to the presence of a velocity shear in the near-earth plasma profile [5], or by the relatively stronger anisotropization measured for core protons in the fast solar wind [4,6] or in "space simulation" laboratory plasma experiments [3]. [1] E. Marsch et al., Journ. Geophys. Res. 109, A04120 (2004); Yu. V. Khotyainstev at el., Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 165001 (2011). [2] N. Aunai et al., Ann. Geophys. 29, 1571 (2011); N. Aunai et al., Journ. Geophys. Res. 116, A09232 (2011). [3] E.E. Scime et al., Phys. Plasmas 7, 2157 (2000). [4

  8. Médecins Sans Frontières' Clinical Guidance mobile application: analysis of a new electronic health tool.

    PubMed

    Wright, V; Dalwai, M; Smith, R Vincent; Jemmy, J-P

    2015-12-21

    Many health care workers lack access to clinical support tools in rural and resource-limited settings. To address this gap, the Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) Clinical Guidelines manual was converted into a static mobile health reference application (app) entitled MSF Guidance. The app's utility and growth was examined, and within 6 months of its launch 150 countries had downloaded the app, with demonstrated retention among new and existing users. With over 3500 downloads and 36 000 sessions amounting to 250 000 screen views, MSF Guidance is a new mobile health platform with widely demonstrated utility, including potential use as an epidemiological tool, where clinical conditions investigated by app users were found to correlate with geographical outbreaks. These findings show that mobile apps can be used to disseminate health information effectively.

  9. The Theos/ComRes survey into public perception of Darwinism in the UK: a recipe for confusion.

    PubMed

    Baker, Sylvia

    2012-04-01

    A survey of the general public in the UK, conducted in 2008, suggested that more than half of the British population are unconvinced by Darwinism. That survey, conducted by the polling company ComRes on behalf of the theological think-tank Theos, reported its full findings in March 2009 and found them to be "complex and confused." This paper argues that the confusion identified may have been partly engendered by the way in which the survey questionnaire was constructed and that the survey itself, not simply its respondents, was confused. A source of the confusion, it is argued, could be found, first, in the definitions used for the four positions of young earth creationism, theistic evolution, atheistic evolution and intelligent design. Second, a failure to define the key terms "evolution" and "science," used in some of the survey questions, resulted in responses that were difficult to interpret.

  10. Storms from the past in a warmer climate. Results from high-res non-hydrostatic modeling over Crete.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koutroulis, Aristeidis; Grillakis, Manolis; Tsanis, Ioannis

    2016-04-01

    Weather extremes such as precipitation can be a hazard for life and property. The region of Crete has suffered from numerous severe flood events in the past decades and local authorities have a great interest in future scenarios in order to develop measures against natural calamities. In this study we use high-res non-hydrostatic modeling outputs provided by three modeling groups (GERICS, UNI and SMHI) at horizontal resolution of about 2km. Three recent, high impact, extreme storms were selected for simulation. High spatiotemporal resolution precipitation fields were compared to observations. Simulations proved to be sufficiently efficient in realistic capturing storm events and thus valuable in impact modelling. Similar simulations, but with a perturbation of +2 degrees were conducted for the representation of warmer climate conditions. Similar storm events of today's climate over Crete could result in significantly higher precipitation accumulations and intensities in a warmer climate.

  11. Hyperemesis gravidarum avec troubles ioniques sévères: à propos d'un cas

    PubMed Central

    Jarraya, Anouar; Elleuch, Sahar; Zouari, Jawhar; Trigui, Khaled; Sofiene, Abidi; Smaoui, Mohamed; Kolsi, Kamel

    2015-01-01

    L'hyperemesis gravidarum s'accompagne habituellement d'une perte de poids, d'une acétonurie et de troubles hydro-électrolytiques comme il peut également s'accompagner d'anomalies du bilan hépatique. Nous rapportons un cas de vomissements gravidiques à 10 semaines d'aménorrhée non traité et vu tardivement avec des troubles ioniques sévères associés à des répercussions cliniques dans un contexte de cytolyse, de cholestase et d'insuffisance rénale aigue. Ce cas a bien répondu au traitement médical. PMID:26161187

  12. Validation of SSiB model over grassland with CHeRES field experiment data in 2001

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Lan; Xue, Yongkang

    2004-08-01

    The Simplified Simple Biosphere model (SSiB) is validated in off-line simulations against field measurements in the summer of 2001 from the China Heavy Rainfall Experiment and Study (CHeRES) over a grassland site located in the lower reaches of the Yangtze River. When initialized and driven by the observed atmospheric forcing, the model reproduced the observed surface heat fluxes and surface skin temperature realistically. The model was also able to well simulate the variation of soil water content. The sensitivity experiments found that the leaf reflectance was the most significant parameter in improving the estimation of surface albedo during both wet and dry periods. This study suggests that the model is capable of simulating the physical processes and of assessing the impact of biophysical parameters that relate to land-atmosphere interactions over the eastern Asian monsoon regions, which is crucial for mesoscale atmospheric models.

  13. Mutations in ADAR1 cause Aicardi-Goutières syndrome associated with a type I interferon signature

    PubMed Central

    Rice, Gillian I; Kasher, Paul R; Forte, Gabriella M A; Mannion, Niamh M; Greenwood, Sam M; Szynkiewicz, Marcin; Dickerson, Jonathan E; Bhaskar, Sanjeev S; Zampini, Massimiliano; Briggs, Tracy A; Jenkinson, Emma M; Bacino, Carlos A; Battini, Roberta; Bertini, Enrico; Brogan, Paul A; Brueton, Louise A; Carpanelli, Marialuisa; Laet, Corinne De; de Lonlay, Pascale; del Toro, Mireia; Desguerre, Isabelle; Fazzi, Elisa; Garcia-Cazorla, Àngels; Heiberg, Arvid; Kawaguchi, Masakazu; Kumar, Ram; Lin, Jean-Pierre S-M; Lourenco, Charles M; Male, Alison M; Marques, Wilson; Mignot, Cyril; Olivieri, Ivana; Orcesi, Simona; Prabhakar, Prab; Rasmussen, Magnhild; Robinson, Robert A; Rozenberg, Flore; Schmidt, Johanna L; Steindl, Katharina; Tan, Tiong Y; van der Merwe, William G; Vanderver, Adeline; Vassallo, Grace; Wakeling, Emma L; Wassmer, Evangeline; Whittaker, Elizabeth; Livingston, John H; Lebon, Pierre; Suzuki, Tamio; McLaughlin, Paul J; Keegan, Liam P; O’Connell, Mary A; Lovell, Simon C; Crow, Yanick J

    2014-01-01

    Adenosine deaminases acting on RNA (ADARs) catalyze the hydrolytic deamination of adenosine to inosine in double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) and thereby potentially alter the information content and structure of cellular RNAs. Notably, although the overwhelming majority of such editing events occur in transcripts derived from Alu repeat elements, the biological function of non-coding RNA editing remains uncertain. Here, we show that mutations in ADAR1 (also known as ADAR) cause the autoimmune disorder Aicardi-Goutières syndrome (AGS). As in Adar1-null mice, the human disease state is associated with upregulation of interferon-stimulated genes, indicating a possible role for ADAR1 as a suppressor of type I interferon signaling. Considering recent insights derived from the study of other AGS-related proteins, we speculate that ADAR1 may limit the cytoplasmic accumulation of the dsRNA generated from genomic repetitive elements. PMID:23001123

  14. Fosetyl-al

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Fosetyl - al ; CASRN 39148 - 24 - 8 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Ef

  15. Al Shanker Remembers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Educator, 2000

    2000-01-01

    In a 1996 interview shortly before his death, Al Shanker, longtime president of the American Federation of Teachers, discussed such topics as: his own educational experiences; how he learned about political fighting in the Boy Scouts; the appeal of socialism; multinational corporations and the nation state; teaching tough students; and John Dewey…

  16. Prédiction du comportement à long terme des matériaux polymères

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemaire, J.

    1998-06-01

    Most of the world activity on research, development and control of polymer durability is still based on empirical techniques developed in the early ages of polymer uses. Those techniques should be critically analysed considering the state of the art in the fundamental understanding of these complex phenomena. A more rational approach is described, especially to predict the lifetime of polymeric materials in environmental conditions. That approach is based on the recognition of the chemical evolution mechanisms. Les activités de recherche, développement et contrôle de durabilité des matériaux polymères sont encore, pour une part très importante, basées sur l'emploi de techniques empiriques dont les principes ont été énoncés dès le début de l'exploitation de ces matériaux. Une analyse critique de ces méthodes s'impose aujourd'hui en tenant compte de l'avancement des connaissances. Une approche plus rationnelle est décrite, approche basée sur la reconnaissance des mécanismes d'évolution chimique. A titre d'exemple, le mécanisme d'évolution du PVC sous contraintes conjuguées de l'UV, de la chaleur et de l'oxygène, est décrit. Des études récentes de photooxydation de polymères conducteurs au sein de polyéthylène sont également succinctement rapportées.

  17. In-Plane Anisotropy in Mono- and Few-Layer ReS2 Probed by Raman Spectroscopy and Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Chenet, Daniel A; Aslan, O Burak; Huang, Pinshane Y; Fan, Chris; van der Zande, Arend M; Heinz, Tony F; Hone, James C

    2015-09-09

    Rhenium disulfide (ReS2) is a semiconducting layered transition metal dichalcogenide that exhibits a stable distorted 1T phase. The reduced symmetry of this system leads to in-plane anisotropy in various material properties. Here, we demonstrate the strong anisotropy in the Raman scattering response for linearly polarized excitation. Polarized Raman scattering is shown to permit a determination of the crystallographic orientation of ReS2 through comparison with direct structural analysis by scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). Analysis of the frequency difference of appropriate Raman modes is also shown to provide a means of precisely determining layer thickness up to four layers.

  18. Al Partitioning Patterns and Root Growth as Related to Al Sensitivity and Al Tolerance in Wheat.

    PubMed Central

    Samuels, T. D.; Kucukakyuz, K.; Rincon-Zachary, M.

    1997-01-01

    Studies of Al partitioning and accumulation and of the effect of Al on the growth of intact wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) roots of cultivars that show differential Al sensitivity were conducted. The effects of various Al concentrations on root growth and Al accumulation in the tissue were followed for 24 h. At low external Al concentrations, Al accumulation in the root tips was low and root growth was either unaffected or stimulated. Calculations based on regression analysis of growth and Al accumulation in the root tips predicted that 50% root growth inhibition in the Al-tolerant cv Atlas 66 would be attained when the Al concentrations were 105 [mu]M in the nutrient solution and 376.7 [mu]g Al g-1 dry weight in the tissue. In contrast, in the Al-sensitive cv Tam 105, 50% root growth inhibition would be attained when the Al concentrations were 11 [mu]M in the nutrient solution and 546.2 [mu]g Al g-1 dry weight in the tissue. The data support the hypotheses that differential Al sensitivity correlates with differential Al accumulation in the growing root tissue, and that mechanisms of Al tolerance may be based on strategies to exclude Al from the root meristems. PMID:12223623

  19. Al Sumelat Water Network. Village of Al Sumelat, Iraq

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-03-15

    OFFICE OF THE SPECIAL INSPECTOR GENERAL FOR IRAQ RECONSTRUCTION AL SUMELAT WATER NETWORK VILLAGE OF AL SUMELAT, IRAQ...Sumelat Water Network Village of Al Sumelat, Iraq 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e...Al Sumelat Water Network Village of Al Sumelat, Iraq Synopsis Introduction. This report was previously provided on a limited distribution basis

  20. 2008 Report for the Project Entitled: A Comprehensive Modeling Approach Towards Understanding and Prediction of the Alaskan Coastal System Response to Changes in an Ice-diminished Arctic

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-01

    Maslowski et al., 2007a, 2007b; Maslowski et al., 2004; Maslowski and Lipscomb 2003; Maslowski and Walczowski , 2002; Maslowski et al., 2001; Maslowski...Biogeosciences, 112, G04S49, doi:10.1029/2006JG000332. Clement, J.L., Maslowski, W., Cooper, L.W., Grebmeier, J.M., Walczowski , W. (2005) Ocean circulation...Alaskan Stream, J. Geophys. Res., 113, C07036, doi:10.1029/2007JC004341. Maslowski, W., D. Marble, W. Walczowski , U. Schauer, J. L. Clement, and A. J

  1. The Role of Shabansky Orbits in Compression-Related Electromagnetic Ion Cyclotron Wave Growth (Postprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-15

    C. Kale (2010), Physical mechanisms of compressional EMIC wave growth, J. Geophys. Res., 115, A10214, doi:10.1029/2010JA015393. Northrop, T. G...Geophys. Res., 115, A01205, doi:10.1029/2009JA014423. Usanova, M. E., I. R. Mann, I. J. Rae, Z. C. Kale , V. Angelopoulos, J. W. Bonnell, K.-H. Glassmeier

  2. Thermospheric Infrared Radiance Response to the April 2002 Geomagnetic Storm from SABER Infrared and GUVI Ultraviolet Limb Data

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-01-01

    non-LTE radiative excitation and infrared dayglow at 4.3-jim: Application to SPIRE data, J. Geophys. Res. 99, 10409-10419, 1994. 9 Lopez-Puertas, M... thermosynamic equilibrium (LTE) atmospheric limb emission at 4.6 jim 1. An update of the CO2 non-LTE radiative transfer model, J. Geophys. Res., 103, 8499

  3. Anomalous Tropical Ocean Circulation Associated with La Nina Modoki

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-12-02

    Behera , S. A. Rao, H. Weng, and T. Yamagata (2007), El Nifio Modoki and its possible telcconncction, J. Geophys. Res., 112, C11007, doi.10.1029...Oscillation, Geophys. Res. Lett., 24, 779-782, doi:10.1029/97GL00689. Weng, H., S. K. Behera , and T. Yamagata (2009), Anomalous winter cli- mate

  4. Geosynchronous Imaging of the Earth’s Ionosphere: Development Phase

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-09-30

    REFERENCES Kelley, M.C., J.J. Makela, B.M. Ledvina , and P.M. Kintner, Observations of equatorial spread-F from Haleakala, Hawaii, Geophys. Res...Kelley, M.C., J.J. Makela, B.M. Ledvina , and P.M. Kintner, Observations of equatorial spread-F from Haleakala, Hawaii, Geophys. Res. Lett., 29(20

  5. ALS insertion devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoyer, E.; Chin, J.; Halbach, K.; Hassenzahl, W. V.; Humphries, D.; Kincaid, B.; Lancaster, H.; Plate, D.

    1991-08-01

    The Advanced Light Source (ALS), the first US third generation synchrotron radiation source, is currently under construction at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. The low-emittance, 1.5 GeV electron storage ring and the insertion devices are specifically designed to produce high brightness beams in the UV to soft X-Ray range. The planned initial complement of insertion devices includes four 4.6 m long undulators, with period lengths of 3.9 cm, 5.0 cm (2) and 8.0 cm, and a 2.9 m long wiggler of 16 cm period length. Undulator design is well advanced and fabrication has begun on the 5.0 cm and 8.0 cm period length undulators. This paper discusses ALS insertion device requirements; general design philosophy; and design of the magnetic structure, support structure/drive systems, control system and vacuum system.

  6. Simulating the Phoenix Lander meteorological conditions with a Mars GCM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daerden, F.; Neary, L.; Whiteway, J.; Dickinson, C.; Komguem, L.; McConnell, J. C.; Kaminski, J. W.

    2012-04-01

    An updated version of the GEM-Mars Global Circulation Model [1] is applied for the simulation of the meteorological conditions at the Phoenix lander site for the time period of the surface operations (Ls=76-150). The simulation results for pressure and temperature at the surface are compared to data from the Phoenix Meteorological Station (MET). The vertical profiles of dust and temperature are compared to Phoenix LIDAR measurements and data from orbit (CRISM and MCS on MRO). The simulated conditions in the PBL are compared to those obtained in a dedicated PBL-Aeolian dust model [2] which was successfully applied to drive a detailed microphysical model [3] for the interpretation of clouds and precipitation observed by the LIDAR on Phoenix [4,5]. [1] Moudden, Y. and J.C. McConnell (2005): A new model for multiscale modeling of the Martian atmosphere, GM3, J. Geophys. Res. 110, E04001, doi:10.1029/2004JE002354 [2] Davy, R., P. A. Taylor, W. Weng, and P.-Y. Li (2009), A model of dust in the Martian lower atmosphere, J. Geophys. Res., 114, D04108, doi:10.1029/2008JD010481. [3] Daerden, F., J.A. Whiteway, R. Davy, C. Verhoeven, L. Komguem, C. Dickinson, P. A. Taylor, and N. Larsen (2010), Simulating Observed Boundary Layer Clouds on Mars, Geophys. Res. Lett., 37, L04203, doi:10.1029/2009GL041523 [4] Whiteway, J., M. Daly, A. Carswell, T. Duck, C. Dickinson, L. Komguem, and C. Cook (2008), Lidar on the Phoenix mission to Mars, J. Geophys. Res., 113, E00A08, doi:10.1029/2007JE003002. [5] Whiteway, J., et al. (2009), Mars water ice clouds and precipitation, Science, 325, 68 - 70.

  7. Retraction RETRACTION of "Association between polymorphisms in the XRCC1 gene and the risk of non-small cell lung cancer", by Han JC, Zhang YJ and Li XD - Genet. Mol. Res. 14 (4): 12888-12893 (2015).

    PubMed

    Han, J C; Zhang, Y J; Li, X D

    2016-10-07

    The retracted article is: Han JC, Zhang YJ and Li XD (2015). Association between polymorphisms in the XRCC1 gene and the risk of non-small cell lung cancer. Genet. Mol. Res. 14: 12888-12893. The GMR editorial staff was alerted about this article (received on May 3, 2015; accepted on August 18, 2015) published on October 21, 2015 (DOI: 10.4238/2015.October.21.9) that was found to be substantially similar to the publication of "Association of XRCC1 gene polymorphisms with risk of non-small cell lung cancer" (received on January 25, 2015; accepted on March 23, 2015; e-published on April 1, 2015) by Kang et al., published in the International Journal of Clinical Experimental Pathology 8 (4): 4171-4176. The authors were aware of the Kang et al.'s paper, since they cite it several times in the manuscript published in GMR. Some of the language is similar between the two manuscripts, but what is the most concerning is that several of the tables in the papers are nearly identical. Tables 2 and 3 are exactly identical between the two articles, suggesting that the publication in GMR was plagiarized from the publication in the International Journal of Clinical Experimental Pathology. The Publisher and Editor decided to retract these articles in accordance with the recommendations of the Committee on Publication Ethics (COPE). After a thorough investigation, we have strong reason to believe that the peer review process was failure and, after review and contacting the authors, the editors of Genetics and Molecular Research decided to retract the article. The authors and their institutions were advised of this serious breach of ethics.

  8. The Significance of Land-Atmosphere Processes in the Earth System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suni, T.; Kulmala, M. T.; Guenther, A. B.

    2012-12-01

    management practices, energy production, industrial development, and urbanization. Emphasis should be placed on, for instance, new observation networks incorporating remote sensing techniques with ground-based observations; the role of land-cover changes in modulating carbon, nitrogen, and hydrological cycles and, consequently, atmospheric chemistry, aerosol dynamics, and climate; regional (high-latitude) processes and their influence on global simulations; and interactions among anthropogenic and biogenic aerosols, clouds, and climate. 1. Ciais Ph 2005 Nature 2. Kulmala M et al 2004 Atmos Chem Phys 3. Philippon N et al 2005 J Geophys Res 4. Arneth A et al 2010a Nature Geoscience 5. Ganzeveld L et al 2010 J Geophys Res 6. Teuling A et al. 2010 Nature Geoscience 7. Arneth A et al 2010b Biogeosciences 8. Bonan GB et al. 2011 J Geophys Res 9. Davin EL and Seneviratne SI 2011 Biogeosciences 10. Pitman AJ et al 2011 Int J Clim 11. de Noblet-Ducoudré N et al 2012 J Clim 12. Rosenfeld D et al. 2008 Science 13. Stevens B and Feingold G 2009 Nature 14. Li Z et al 2011 Nature Geoscience 15. Pitman AJ et al 2009 Geophys Res Let 16. Baldocchi DD et al. 2005 Int J Biomet 17. Hari P et al 2009 Bor Env Res 18. Guenther A et al 2011 Bor Env Res 19. de Leeuw G et al. 2011 Biogeosciences 20. Jung M et al 2011 J Geophys Res

  9. Science Teachers' Views on CoRes and PaP-eRs as a Framework for Articulating and Developing Pedagogical Content Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bertram, Adam; Loughran, John

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports on a study which was designed to examine how CoRes (Content Representations) and PaP-eRs (Pedagogical and Professional-experience Repertoires) might impact the practice of science teachers by considering how they might value (or not) pedagogical content knowledge (PCK) as part of their professional knowledge. The paper is based…

  10. The Rock Engineering System (RES) applied to landslide susceptibility zonation of the northeastern flank of Etna: methodological approach and results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apuani, Tiziana; Corazzato, Claudia

    2015-04-01

    Ground deformations in the northeastern flank of Etna are well known. Despite only a few landslide events have been documented, these have significantly involved and damaged lifelines and buildings. These events are mainly related to the activity of the volcano-tectonic structures and associated seismicity, as in the case of the 2002 reactivation of the Presa landslide during an increased activity of the Pernicana fault system. In order to highlight the areal distribution of potentially unstable slopes based on a detailed, site-specific study of the factors responsible for landslide, and to ultimately contribute to risk management, a landslide susceptibility analysis of the northeastern flank of Etna in the Pernicana area was carried out, and a susceptibility map at 1:10.000 scale was produced, extending over an area of 168 km2. Different methods are proposed in the literature to obtain the regional distribution of potentially unstable slopes, depending on the problem scale, the slope dynamic evolution in the geological context, and the availability of data. Among semi-quantitative approaches, the present research combines the Rock Engineering System (RES) methodology with parameter zonation mapping in a GIS environment. The RES method represents a structured approach to manage a high number of interacting factors involved in the instability problem. A numerically coded, site-specific interaction matrix (IM) analyzes the cause-effect relationship in these factors, and calculates the degree of interactivity of each parameter, normalized by the overall interactivity of the system (weight factor). In the specific Etna case, the considered parameters are: slope attitude, lithotechnical properties (lithology, structural complexity, soil and rock mass quality), land use, tectonic structures, seismic activity (horizontal acceleration) and hydrogeological conditions (groundwater and drainage). Thematic maps are prepared at 1:10.000 scale for each of these parameters, and

  11. Frequently Asked Questions about ALS and the ALS Registry

    MedlinePlus

    ... Why is it necessary to provide my Social Security Number (SSN) when registering in the National ALS ... Why is it necessary to provide my Social Security Number (SSN) when registering in the National ALS ...

  12. Conversion of raft associated prion protein to the protease-resistant state requires insertion of PrP-res (PrP(Sc)) into contiguous membranes.

    PubMed

    Baron, Gerald S; Wehrly, Kathy; Dorward, David W; Chesebro, Bruce; Caughey, Byron

    2002-03-01

    Prion protein (PrP) is usually attached to membranes by a glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchor that associates with detergent-resistant membranes (DRMs), or rafts. To model the molecular processes that might occur during the initial infection of cells with exogenous transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE) agents, we examined the effect of membrane association on the conversion of the normal protease-sensitive PrP isoform (PrP-sen) to the protease-resistant isoform (PrP-res). A cell-free conversion reaction approximating physiological conditions was used, which contained purified DRMs as a source of PrP-sen and brain microsomes from scrapie-infected mice as a source of PrP-res. Interestingly, DRM-associated PrP-sen was not converted to PrP-res until the PrP-sen was either released from DRMs by treatment with phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC), or the combined membrane fractions were treated with the membrane-fusing agent polyethylene glycol (PEG). PEG-assisted conversion was optimal at pH 6--7, and acid pre-treating the DRMs was not sufficient to permit conversion without PI-PLC or PEG, arguing against late endosomes/lysosomes as primary compartments for PrP conversion. These observations raise the possibility that generation of new PrP-res during TSE infection requires (i) removal of PrP-sen from target cells; (ii) an exchange of membranes between cells; or (iii) insertion of incoming PrP-res into the raft domains of recipient cells.

  13. Le groupe de recherches transfusionnelles d’Afrique francophone: bilan des cinq premières années

    PubMed Central

    Tagny, Claude Tayou; Murphy, Edward L.; Lefrère, Jean-Jacques

    2016-01-01

    Les travaux de recherches sur la sécurité transfusionnelle en Afrique sub-saharienne sont peu nombreux, souvent limités à des initiatives locales avec des conclusions difficilement représentatives de cette région. Le Groupe de recherches transfusionnelles en Afrique sub-saharienne francophone a été créé en mai 2007 avec pour objectif de développer des stratégies globales d’amélioration de la sécurité transfusionnelle mais adaptables à la situation de chaque pays. Les activités du Groupe à ce jour ont porté essentiellement sur l’obtention de données épidémiologiques et de laboratoire sur la transfusion sanguine et à proposer des stratégies de sécurité transfusionnelle dans le domaine des infections transmissibles par la transfusion. Pour mener à bien ces activités de recherche, le Groupe travaille en étroite collaboration avec les Centres nationaux de transfusion sanguine (CNTS), les Centres régionaux de transfusion sanguine (CRTS), les banques de sang hospitalières (BSH) et les postes de collecte de sang. Pour les 5 premières années, quatre priorités de recherche ont été identifiées: (i) des études descriptives sur les caractéristiques des donneurs de sang et des centres de transfusion; (ii) une estimation du risque résiduel post-transfusionnel des principales infections virales transmissibles par la transfusion; (iii) une analyse des stratégies de sélection médicale des donneurs de sang; et (iv) une description des stratégies de dépistage des ITT et une description du système d’assurance qualité externe existant. Durant cette période, sept projets ont été mis en œuvre au niveau national et publiés et cinq études multicentriques ont été réalisées et publiées. La présente étude rapporte les principales observations et recommandations de ces études. PMID:24360798

  14. Al Jazirah, Sudan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    Al Jazirah (also Gezira) is one of the 26 states of Sudan. The state lies between the Blue Nile and the White Nile in the east-central region of the country. It is a well populated area suitable for agriculture. The area was at the southern end of Nubia and little is known about its ancient history and only limited archaeological work has been conducted in this area. The region has benefited from the Gezira Scheme, a program to foster cotton farming begun in 1925. At that time the Sennar Dam and numerous irrigation canals were built. Al Jazirah became the Sudan's major agricultural region with more than 2.5 million acres (10,000 km) under cultivation. The initial development project was semi-private, but the government nationalized it in 1950. Cotton production increased in the 1970s but by the 1990s increased wheat production has supplanted a third of the land formerly seeded with cotton.

    The image was acquired December 25, 2006, covers an area of 56 x 36.4 km, and is located near 14.5 degrees north latitude, 33.1 degrees east longitude.

    The U.S. science team is located at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Science Mission Directorate.

  15. AL Amyloidosis and Agent Orange

    MedlinePlus

    ... for survivors' benefits . Research on AL amyloidosis and herbicides The Health and Medicine Division (formally known as ... to the compounds of interest found in the herbicide Agent Orange and AL amyloidosis." VA made a ...

  16. Evaluation of wrought Zn-Al alloys (1, 3, and 5 wt % Al) through mechanical and in vivo testing for stent applications.

    PubMed

    Bowen, Patrick K; Seitz, Jan-Marten; Guillory, Roger J; Braykovich, Jacob P; Zhao, Shan; Goldman, Jeremy; Drelich, Jaroslaw W

    2017-01-27

    Special high grade zinc and wrought zinc-aluminum (Zn-Al) alloys containing up to 5.5 wt % Al were processed, characterized, and implanted in rats in search of a new family of alloys with possible applications as bioabsorbable endovascular stents. These materials retained roll-induced texture with an anisotropic distribution of the second-phase Al precipitates following hot-rolling, and changes in lattice parameters were observed with respect to Al content. Mechanical properties for the alloys fell roughly in line with strength (190-240 MPa yield strength; 220-300 MPa ultimate tensile strength) and elongation (15-30%) benchmarks, and favorable elastic ranges (0.19-0.27%) were observed. Intergranular corrosion was observed during residence of Zn-Al alloys in the murine aorta, suggesting a different corrosion mechanism than that of pure zinc. This mode of failure needs to be avoided for stent applications because the intergranular corrosion caused cracking and fragmentation of the implants, although the composition of corrosion products was roughly identical between non- and Al-containing materials. In spite of differences in corrosion mechanisms, the cross-sectional reduction of metals in murine aorta was nearly identical at 30-40% and 40-50% after 4.5 and 6 months, respectively, for pure Zn and Zn-Al alloys. Histopathological analysis and evaluation of arterial tissue compatibility around Zn-Al alloys failed to identify areas of necrosis, though both chronic and acute inflammatory indications were present. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 2017.

  17. In Search of the ‘New Informal Legitimacy’ of Médecins Sans Frontières

    PubMed Central

    Calain, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    For medical humanitarian organizations, making their sources of legitimacy explicit is a useful exercise, in response to: misperceptions, concerns over the ‘humanitarian space’, controversies about specific humanitarian actions, challenges about resources allocation and moral suffering among humanitarian workers. This is also a difficult exercise, where normative criteria such as international law or humanitarian principles are often misrepresented as primary sources of legitimacy. This essay first argues for a morally principled definition of humanitarian medicine, based on the selfless intention of individual humanitarian actors. Taking Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) as a case in point, a common source of moral legitimacy for medical humanitarian organizations is their cosmopolitan appeal to distributive justice and collective responsibility. More informally, their legitimacy is grounded in the rightfulness of specific actions and choices. This implies a constant commitment to publicity and accountability. Legitimacy is also generated by tangible support from the public to individual organizations, by commitments to professional integrity, and by academic alliances to support evidence-based practice and operational research. PMID:22442647

  18. Kirkwood-Buff analysis of liquid mixtures in AdResS: Towards an open boundary simulation scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherji, Debashish; van der Vegt, Nico; Kremer, Kurt; Delle Site, Luigi

    2012-02-01

    Many biophysical processes in water are determined by interactions of cosolvents with the hydration shells of dissolved (bio)molecules. Computational approaches to study these systems are mostly limited to the closed boundary simulations. While closed boundaries are perfectly suitable in many cases, problems arise when concentration fluctuations are large, or intimately linked to the physical phenomenon. For example, in non-ideal mixtures of water/cosolvent and a biomolecule, the excess of water/cosolvent, close to a protein surface, leads to water/cosolvent depletion elsewhere. This complicates a comparison with experiments that are conducted under osmotic conditions. Therefore, we use Adaptive Resolution Simulation (AdResS) scheme, which describes a small sub-volume of a much larger system in atomistic detail, maintaining thermodynamic equilibrium with a surrounding coarse grained reservoir. We show that the Kirkwood-Buff integrals (KBI), which directly connect thermodynamic properties to the molecular distributions, can be efficiently calculated within the small open boundary all atom region and the coarse-grained reservoir maintains the correct particle fluctuations. Results will be presented for the methanol/water mixture and solvation of amino acids in urea/water mixture.

  19. Al Qaeda as a System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-03-15

    either as welcome guests or parasites . As welcome guests, Al Qaeda members take sanctuary in sponsor states. Sponsor states provide Al Qaeda with...sponsorship, Al Qaeda takes sanctuary as parasites either overtly or covertly. They take overt sanctuary in countries that publicly claim a policy...39 Yehudit Barsky, “Al Qa’ida, Iran, and Hezbollah: A Continuing Symbiosis ,” The American Jewish Committee Series on Terrorism , February 2004, 2-3

  20. Growth and Optical Properties of Al rich AlN/AlGaN Quantum Wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahtamouni, T. M. Al; Nepal, N.; Nakarmi, M. L.; Lin, J. Y.; Jiang, H. X.

    2006-03-01

    Al rich AlGaN alloys are promising materials for the applications in the optoelectronic devices such as deep ultraviolet (UV) emitters and detectors in the spectral range down to 200 nm. AlGaN based UV emitters (λ<340nm) has applications in bio-chemical agent detection and medical research/ health care. To realize deep UV emission (λ< 280 nm) Al rich AlGaN based quantum wells (QWs) are required. We report here the growth of AlN/AlxGa1-xNQWs (x>0.65) on AlN/sapphire templates by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). Deep UV photoluminescence (PL) was employed to study the optical properties of the QWs. Well width (Al composition) dependence was studied by varying the QW thickness (Al composition) with fixed x ˜ 0.65 (well width at 3 nm). Optical properties of these QWs such as the effects of alloy fluctuation, temperature, strain and piezoelectric field, carrier and exciton localizations on the quantum efficiency have been studied. Carrier and exciton dynamics were probed. Implications of our findings on the applications of Al rich AlN/AlGaN QWs for UV emitters and detectors will also be discussed.

  1. Studies of 27Al NMR in SrAl4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niki, Haruo; Higa, Nonoka; Kuroshima, Hiroko; Toji, Tatsuki; Morishima, Mach; Minei, Motofumi; Yogi, Mamoru; Nakamura, Ai; Hedo, Masato; Nakama, Takao; Ōnuki, Yoshichika; Harima, Hisatomo

    A charge density wave (CDW) transition at TCDW = 243 K and a structural phase (SP) transition at approximately 100 K occur in SrAl4 with the BaAl4-type body center tetragonal structure, which is the divalent and non-4f electron reference compound of EuAl4. To understand the behaviors of the CDW and SP transitions, the 27Al NMR measurements using a single crystal and a powder sample of SrAl4 have been carried out. The line width below TCDW is modulated by an electrical quadruple interaction between 27Al nucleus and CDW charge modulation. The incommensurate CDW state below TCDW changes into a different structure below TSP. The temperature dependences of Knight shifts of 27Al(I) and 27Al(II) show the different behaviors. The temperature variation of 27Al(I) Knight shift shows anomalies at the CDW and SP transition temperatures, revealing the shift to negative side below TCDW, which is attributable to the core polarization of the d-electrons. However, 27Al(II) Knight shift keeps almost constant except for the small shift due to the SP transition. The 1/T1T of 27Al(I) indicates the obvious changes due to the CDW and SP transitions, while that of 27Al(II) takes a constant value. The density of state at the Fermi level at Al(I) site below 60 K would be about 0.9 times less than that above TCDW.

  2. Development of a Lithospheric Model and Geophysical Data Base for North Africa,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1995-08-14

    production measurements of formations to estimate heat flow values (Figure 4, Nyblade et al., 1995). Heat flow in the Sirt Basin is elevated by about 10 mW/m 2...Keller, 1995, Terrestrial heat flow in the Sirt Basin , Libya, submitted to J. Geophys. Res. Suleiman, A.S., and D.I. Doser, 1995. Seismotectonics of...4. Map of Sirt basin showing heat flow (in mW/rn2 ) at wells (solid circles), major rift faults, and prominent structural features (from Nyblade et al

  3. Evidence of Nb-Ta mobility in high temperature F-rich fluids evidenced by the La Bosse quartz-Nb-ferberite stockwork (Echassières, French Massif Central).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marignac, C.; Cuney, M.

    2012-04-01

    ). Thus the unusual Nb content of the La Bosse ferberites is correlated to the apparently very distal setting of this quartz system relatively to the parent granite, in contrast with most quartz-W systems in the French Massif Central (Aïssa et al. 1987). When invaded by aplites or aplopegmatites, the ferberite-bearing quartz veins are dissolved, but the ferberites remain apparently unaffected - they are not dissolved by the granite melt. Yet, the acicular and lanceolate crystals have lost their Nb-zoning and display uniform homogenised Nb content. The emplacement of the Beauvoir granite was associated with late magmatic exsolution of an Al- and F-rich, silica undersaturated, hydrothermal fluid that percolated upwards in the surrounding schists (Cuney et al. 1992). When interacting with the quartz veins of the La Bosse stockwork, this fluid precipitated topazites. Again, included ferberites remain apparently unaffected. However, they display microscopic vuggy cavities, successively filled by a Nb-rich ferberite (up to 8.91% Nb2O5) with significant Ta content (up to 0.35 % Ta2O5), a wolframo-ixiolite and a Ta-rich columbite. Later Li-phengite was precipitated from the same magmatic fluid, and was associated with hubnerite enrichment of pre-existing ferberites along Li-phengite-bearing microcracks (down to 0.20 mole % Fb). Ta and Nb are known for their poor solubility in hydrothermal fluids, but the Nb and Ta enrichments observed in the wolframite of La Bosse stockwork show that they can be transported to some extent by F-rich fluids. Aïssa, M., Marignac, C., Weisbrod, A. (1987). Le stockwerk à ferbérite d'Echassières : évolution spatiale et temporelle; cristallochimie des ferbérites. In : Cuney, M., Autran, A. (eds), Echassières : le forage scientifique d'Echassières (Allier). Une clé pour la compréhension des mécanismes magmatiques et hydrothermaux associés aux granites à métaux rares. Mém. GPF, tome 1, 311-334. M Cuney, C Marignac, A Weisbrod (1992). The

  4. Geometry in Medias Res

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cukier, Mimi; Asdourian, Tony; Thakker, Anand

    2012-01-01

    Geometry provides a natural window into what it is like to do mathematics. In the world of geometry, playful experimentation is often more fruitful than following a procedure, and logic plus a few axioms can open new worlds. Nonetheless, teaching a geometry course in a way that combines both rigor and play can be difficult. Many geometry courses…

  5. Surgeons without borders: a brief history of surgery at Médecins Sans Frontières.

    PubMed

    Chu, Kathryn; Rosseel, Peter; Trelles, Miguel; Gielis, Pierre

    2010-03-01

    Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) is a humanitarian organization that performs emergency and elective surgical services in both conflict and non-conflict settings in over 70 countries. In 2006 MSF surgeons departed on approximately 125 missions, and over 64,000 surgical interventions were carried out in some 20 countries worldwide. Historically, the majority of MSF surgical projects began in response to conflicts or natural disasters. During an emergency response, MSF has resources to set up major operating facilities within 48 h in remote areas. One of MSF strengths is its supply chain. Large pre-packaged surgical kits, veritable "operating theatres to go," can be readied in enormous crates and quickly loaded onto planes. In more stable contexts, MSF has also strengthened the delivery of surgical services within a country's public health system. The MSF surgeon is the generalist in the broadest sense and performs vascular, obstetrical, orthopaedic, and other specialized surgical procedures. The organization aims to provide surgical services only temporarily. When there is a decrease in acute needs a program will be closed, or more importantly, turned over to the Ministry of Health or another non-governmental organization. The long-term solution to alleviating the global burden of surgical disease lies in building up a domestic surgical workforce capable of responding to the major causes of surgery-related morbidity and mortality. However, given that even countries with the resources of the United States suffer from an insufficiency of surgeons, the need for international emergency organizations to provide surgical assistance during acute emergencies will remain for the foreseeable future.

  6. The Miocene Sommières basin, SE France: Bioclastic carbonates in a tide-dominated depositional system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynaud, Jean-Yves; James, Noël P.

    2012-12-01

    The Miocene Sommières Basin in SE France is a semi-enclosed depression that was connected to the Mediterranean Sea by a flooded paleo-incised valley and then filled by a suite of sediments comprising carbonate grains coming from temperate factories that were largely deposited in tidal-dominated paleoenvironments. The strata are partitioned into two sequences that reflect repeated flooding of the incised valley system, one of several similar situations in this region of France. The carbonate grains are mostly bioclasts, namely from barnacles, bryozoans, coralline algae (encrusting, branching, and rhodoliths), echinoids, and benthic foraminifers (large and small) with ostracods, sponge spicules and planktic foraminifers prominent in muddy facies. Particles were produced by shallow water carbonate factories on hard substrates (valley walls in particular), associated with subaqueous dunes, and in deeper water basinal settings. Each depositional sequence is underlain by an eroded and bored hard surface that is progressively overlain by TST subaqueous tidal dunes or storm deposits that grade up, in one case, into HST marls (the HST of the upper sequence has been removed by erosion). The lower sequence is ebb tide dominated whereas the upper sequence is flood tide dominated. The succession is interpreted to represent a TST whose tidal currents were focused by the narrow valley and a HST that reflected flooding of the overbanks. This stratigraphic and depositional motif is comparable to that in other spatially separated Neogene paleovalleys that are filled with tide-dominated clastic carbonates in the region. Together with other recently documented similar systems, these limestones constitute an important new group of carbonate sand bodies in the carbonate depositional realm.

  7. Bruyères-le-Châtel Neutron Evaluations of Actinides with the TALYS Code: The Fission Channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romain, P.; Morillon, B.; Duarte, H.

    2016-01-01

    For several years, various neutron evaluations of plutonium and uranium isotopes have been performed at Bruyères-le-Châtel (BRC), from 1 keV up to 30 MeV. Since only nuclear reaction models have been used to produce these evaluations, our approach was named the "Full Model" approach. Total, shape elastic and direct inelastic cross sections were obtained from the coupled channels model using a dispersive optical potential developed for actinides, with a large enough coupling scheme including the lowest octupolar band. All other cross sections were calculated using the Hauser-Feshbach theory (TALYS code) with a pre-equilibrium component above 8-10 MeV. In this paper, we focus our attention on the fission channel. More precisely, we will present the BRC contribution to fission modeling and the philosophy adopted in our "Full Model" approach. Performing evaluations with the "Full Model" approach implies the optimization of a large number of model parameters. With increasing neutron incident energy, many residual nuclei produced by nucleon emission also lead to fission. All available experimental data assigned to various fission mechanisms of the same nucleus were used to determine fission barrier parameters. For uranium isotopes, triple-humped fission barriers were required in order to reproduce accurately variations of the experimental fission cross sections. Our BRC fission modeling has shown that the effects of the class II or class III states located in the wells of the fission barrier sometimes provide an anti-resonant transmission rather than a resonant one. Consistent evaluations were produced for a large series of U and Pu isotopes. Resulting files were tested against integral data.

  8. Melting curve of materials: theory versus experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alfè, D.; Vocadlo, L.; Price, G. D.; Gillan, M. J.

    2004-04-01

    A number of melting curves of various materials have recently been measured experimentally and calculated theoretically, but the agreement between different groups is not always good. We discuss here some of the problems which may arise in both experiments and theory. We also report the melting curves of Fe and Al calculated recently using quantum mechanics techniques, based on density functional theory with generalized gradient approximations. For Al our results are in very good agreement with both low pressure diamond-anvil-cell experiments (Boehler and Ross 1997 Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 153 223, Hänström and Lazor 2000 J. Alloys Compounds 305 209) and high pressure shock wave experiments (Shaner et al 1984 High Pressure in Science and Technology ed Homan et al (Amsterdam: North-Holland) p 137). For Fe our results agree with the shock wave experiments of Brown and McQueen (1986 J. Geophys. Res. 91 7485) and Nguyen and Holmes (2000 AIP Shock Compression of Condensed Matter 505 81) and the recent diamond-anvil-cell experiments of Shen et al (1998 Geophys. Res. Lett. 25 373). Our results are at variance with the recent calculations of Laio et al (2000 Science 287 1027) and, to a lesser extent, with the calculations of Belonoshko et al (2000 Phys. Rev. Lett. 84 3638). The reasons for these disagreements are discussed.

  9. A Few Highlights from Venus Monitoring Camera on Venus Express

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markiewicz, Wojciech J.; Titov, D.; Keller, H.; Moissl, R.; Limaye, S.; Ignatiev, N.; Jaumann, R.; Michalik, H.; Thomas, N.

    2008-09-01

    Venus is completely covered by a thick cloud layer whose upper part is composed of sulfuric acid and some unknown aerosols(1). The cloud tops are in fast retrograde rotation (super-rotation), but what is driving this super-rotation is unknown(2). Here we report observations of Venus with the Venus Monitoring Camera3 (VMC) on board the Venus Express spacecraft. Taking advantage of the VMC high resolution imaging and the polar orbit we investigate both global and small scale properties of these clouds, their temporal and latitudinal variations, and derive wind velocities. The Southern polar region is highly variable and can change dramatically on time scales as short as one day, perhaps arising from the injection of SO2 into the mesosphere. The convective cells in the vicinity of the sub-solar point are much smaller than previously inferred(4,5,6), which we interpret as indicating that they are confined to the upper cloud layer, contrary to previous conclusions(7,8), but consistent with more recent study(9). We will also report on surface observations with VMC. (1) Esposito, L.W. et al., in Venus, pp. 484-564, 1983, (2) Limaye, S. S., 2007, J. Geophys. Res., 112, 2007, (3) Markiewicz, W.J. et al., Planet. Space Sci., 55, 1701-1711, 2007, (4) Murray, B.C., et al., Science 183, 1307-1315 (1974), (5) Rossow, W.B. et al., J. Geophys. Res. 85, 8107-8128, 1980, (6) Covey, C.C. and G. Schubert, Nature, 290, 17-20, 1981, (7) Baker II, R.D. and G. Schubert, Nature, 355, 710-712, 1992, (8) Belton, M.J.S. et al., J. Atmos. Sci.. 33, 1394-1417, 1976, (9) Baker, R.D., G. Schubert, and P.W. Jones, J. Geophy. Res., 104, Issue E2, p. 3815-3832, 1999.

  10. Morphology and dynamics of the Venus upper cloud layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markiewicz, Wojciech; Titov, Dmitri; Limaye, Sanjay; Moissl, Richard; Ignatiev, Nikolay; Basilevsky, A. T.; Shalygin, E. V.; Kreslavsky, M. A.; Khatuntsev, Igor; Keller, Horst Uwe; Jaumann, Ralf; Thomas, Nicolas; Michalik, Harald

    Venus is completely covered by a thick cloud layer whose upper part is composed of sulfuric acid and some unknown aerosols1. The cloud tops are in fast retrograde rotation (super-rotation), but what is driving this super-rotation is unknown2. Here we report observations of Venus with the Venus Monitoring Camera3 (VMC) on board the Venus Express spacecraft. Taking advantage of the VMC high resolution imaging and the polar orbit we investigate both global and small scale properties of these clouds, their temporal and latitudinal variations, and derive wind velocities. The Southern polar region is highly variable and can change dramatically on time scales as short as one day, perhaps arising from the injection of SO2 into the mesosphere. The convective cells in the vicinity of the sub-solar point are much smaller than previously inferred4,5,6, which we interpret as indicating that they are confined to the upper cloud layer, contrary to previous conclusions7,8, but consistent with more recent study9. (1) Esposito, L.W. et al., in Venus, pp. 484-564, 1983, (2) Limaye, S. S., 2007, J. Geophys. Res., 112, 2007, (3) Markiewicz, W.J. et al., Planet. Space Sci., 55, 1701-1711, 2007, (4) Murray, B.C., et al., Science 183, 1307-1315 (1974), (5) Rossow, W.B. et al., J. Geophys. Res. 85, 8107-8128, 1980, (6) Covey, C.C. and G. Schubert, Nature, 290, 17-20, 1981, (7) Baker II, R.D. and G. Schubert, Nature, 355, 710-712, 1992, (8) Belton, M.J.S. et al., J. Atmos. Sci.. 33, 1394-1417, 1976, (9) Baker, R.D., G. Schubert, and P.W. Jones, J. Geophy. Res., 104, Issue E2, p. 3815-3832, 1999.

  11. Generation of Small-Mode Particles via Nucleation of Meteoric Dust in the Upper Haze of Venus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yung, Yuk; Gao, P.; Zhang, X.; Crisp, D.; Bardeen, C. G.

    2012-10-01

    Observations by the SPICAV/SOIR instruments aboard Venus Express has revealed that the Upper Haze of Venus is populated by two particle modes, as reported by Wilquet et al. (J. Geophys. Res., 114, E00B42, 13pp, 2009). In this work we posit that the large mode is due to the upwelling of cloud particles, while the smaller mode is generated by the nucleation of meteoric dust. We test this hypothesis by using version 3.0 of the Community Aerosol and Radiation Model for Atmospheres, first developed by Turco et al. (J. Atmos. Sci., 36, 699-717, 1979) and upgraded by Bardeen et al. (The CARMA 3.0 microphysics package in CESM, Whole Atmosphere Working Group Meeting, 2011). Using the meteoric dust production profile of Kalashnikova et al. (Geophys. Res. Lett., 27, 3293-3296, 2000), the sulfur/sulfate condensation nuclei production profile of Imamura and Hashimoto (J. Atmos. Sci., 58, 3597-3612, 2001), and sulfuric acid vapour production profile of Zhang et al. (Icarus, 217, 714-739, 2012), we numerically simulate a column of the Venus atmosphere from 40 to 100 km above the surface. Our aerosol number density results agree well with Pioneer Venus data from Knollenberg and Hunten (J. Geophys. Res., 85, 8039-8058, 1980), while our gas distribution results match that of Kolodner and Steffes (Icarus, 132, 151-169, 1998). There is a mediocre agreement between our cloud deck size distribution and Pioneer Venus data. The Upper Haze size distribution shows two lognormal distributions overlapping each other, possibly indicating the presence of two modes, though more analysis is required at this time. Finally, we treat the simulated aerosol particles as Mie scatterers and compute their optical parameters. The results show a minimum in the optical depth at a wavelength of 300 nm, comparable to the results of Lacis (J. Atmos. Sci., 32, 1107-1124, 1975).

  12. Experimental determination of the hydrothermal solubility of ReS2 and the Re–ReO2 buffer assemblage and transport of rhenium under supercritical conditions

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Yongliang; Wood, Scott A

    2002-01-01

    To understand the aqueous species important for transport of rhenium under supercritical conditions, we conducted a series of solubility experiments on the Re–ReO2 buffer assemblage and ReS2. In these experiments, pH was buffered by the K–feldspar–muscovite–quartz assemblage; in sulfur-free systems was buffered by the Re–ReO2 assemblage; and and in sulfur-containing systems were buffered by the magnetite–pyrite–pyrrhotite assemblage. Our experimental studies indicate that the species ReCl40 is dominant at 400°C in slightly acidic to near-neutral, and chloride-rich (total chloride concentrations ranging from 0.5 to 1.0 M) environments, and ReCl3+ may predominate at 500°C in a solution with total chloride concentrations ranging from 0.5 to 1.5 M. The results also demonstrate that the solubility of ReS2 is about two orders of magnitude less than that of ReO2. This finding not only suggests that ReS2 (or a ReS2 component in molybdenite) is the solubility-controlling phase in sulfur-containing, reducing environments but also implies that a mixing process involving an oxidized, rhenium-containing solution and a solution with reduced sulfur is one of the most effective mechanisms for deposition of rhenium. In analogy with Re, TcS2 may be the stable Tc-bearing phase in deep geological repositories of radioactive wastes.

  13. Should the Curricular Time Allocated to School Physical Education Be Increased? Insights from Participants in a Follow-up of the Trois-Rivières Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larouche, Richard; Laurencelle, Louis; Shephard, Roy J.; Trudeau, François

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we explored the effects of exposure to an experimental program of daily physical education (PE) during primary school on adult attitudes toward school PE. In 2008, 86 original participants in the Trois-Rivières study (44 women and 42 men aged 44.0 ± 1.2 years) underwent a semistructured interview in which their attitudes toward PE,…

  14. HiRes deconvolved Spitzer images of 89 protostellar jets and outflows: New data on the evolution of the outflow morphology

    SciTech Connect

    Velusamy, T.; Langer, W. D.; Thompson, T. E-mail: William.D.Langer@jpl.nasa.gov

    2014-03-01

    To study the role of protosellar jets and outflows in the time evolution of the parent cores and the protostars, the astronomical community needs a large enough database of infrared images of protostars at the highest spatial resolution possible to reveal the details of their morphology. Spitzer provides unprecedented sensitivity in the infrared to study both the jet and outflow features, however, its spatial resolution is limited by its 0.85 m mirror. Here, we use a high-resolution deconvolution algorithm, 'HiRes,' to improve the visualization of spatial morphology by enhancing resolution (to subarcsecond levels in the IRAC bands) and removing the contaminating side lobes from bright sources in a sample of 89 protostellar objects. These reprocessed images are useful for detecting (1) wide-angle outflows seen in scattered light, (2) morphological details of H{sub 2} emission in jets and bow shocks, and (3) compact features in MIPS 24 μm images as protostar/disk and atomic/ionic line emission associated with the jets. The HiRes FITS image data of such a large homogeneous sample presented here will be useful to the community in studying these protostellar objects. To illustrate the utility of this HiRes sample, we show how the opening angle of the wide-angle outflows in 31 sources, all observed in the HiRes-processed Spitzer images, correlates with age. Our data suggest a power-law fit to opening angle versus age with an exponent of ∼0.32 and 0.02, respectively, for ages ≤8000 yr and ≥8000 yr.

  15. Rub' al Khali, Arabia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    The Rub' al Khali is one of the largest sand deserts in the world, encompassing most of the southern third of the Arabian Peninsula. It includes parts of Oman, United Arab Emirates, and Yemen. The desert covers 650,000 square kilometers, more than the area of France. Largely unexplored until recently, the desert is 1000 km long and 500 km wide. The first documented journeys made by Westerners were those of Bertram Thomas in 1931 and St. John Philby in 1932. With daytime temperatures reaching 55 degrees Celsius, and dunes taller than 330 meters, the desert may be one of the most forbidding places on Earth.

    The image was acquired December 2, 2005, covers an area of 54.8 x 61.9 km, and is located near 20.7 degrees north latitude, 53.6 degrees east longitude.

    The U.S. science team is located at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Science Mission Directorate.

  16. Morton et al. Reply

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morton, Douglas C.; Nagol, Jyoteshwar; Carabajal, Claudia C.; Rosette, Jacqueline; Palace, Michael; Cook, Bruce D.; Vermote, Eric F.; Harding, David J.; North, Peter R. J.

    2016-01-01

    Multiple mechanisms could lead to up-regulation of dry-season photosynthesis in Amazon forests, including canopy phenology and illumination geometry. We specifically tested two mechanisms for phenology-driven changes in Amazon forests during dry-season months, and the combined evidence from passive optical and lidar satellite data was incompatible with large net changes in canopy leaf area or leaf reflectance suggested by previous studies. We therefore hypothesized that seasonal changes in the fraction of sunlit and shaded canopies, one aspect of bidirectional reflectance effects in Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) data, could alter light availability for dry-season photosynthesis and the photosynthetic capacity of Amazon forests without large net changes in canopy composition. Subsequent work supports the hypothesis that seasonal changes in illumination geometry and diffuse light regulate light saturation in Amazon forests. These studies clarify the physical mechanisms that govern light availability in Amazon forests from seasonal variability in direct and diffuse illumination. Previously, in the debate over light limitation of Amazon forest productivity, seasonal changes in the distribution of light within complex Amazon forest canopies were confounded with dry-season increases in total incoming photosynthetically active radiation. In the accompanying Comment, Saleska et al. do not fully account for this confounding effect of forest structure on photosynthetic capacity.

  17. Decursin in Angelica gigas Nakai (AGN) Enhances Doxorubicin Chemosensitivity in NCI/ADR-RES Ovarian Cancer Cells via Inhibition of P-glycoprotein Expression.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hyeong Sim; Cho, Sung-Gook; Kim, Min Kyoung; Kim, Min Soo; Moon, Seung Hee; Kim, Il Hwan; Ko, Seong-Gyu

    2016-12-01

    Angelica gigas Nakai (AGN, Korean Dang-gui) is traditionally used for the treatment of various diseases including cancer. Here, we investigated multidrug-resistant phenotype-reversal activities of AGN and its compounds (decursin, ferulic acid, and nodakenin) in doxorubicin-resistant NCI/ADR-RES ovarian cancer cells. Our results showed that a combination of doxorubicin with either AGN or decursin inhibited a proliferation of NCI/ADR-RES cells. These combinations increased the number of cells at sub-G1 phase when cells were stained with Annexin V-fluorescein isothiocyanate. We also found that these combinations activated caspase-9, caspase-8, and caspase-3 and increased cleaved PARP level. Moreover, an inhibition of P-glycoprotein expression by either AGN or decursin resulted in a reduction of its activity in NCI/ADR-RES cells. Therefore, our data demonstrate that decursin in AGN inhibits doxorubicin-resistant ovarian cancer cell proliferation and induces apoptosis in the presence of doxorubicin via blocking P-glycoprotein expression. Therefore, AGN would be a potentially novel treatment option for multidrug-resistant tumors by sensitizing to anticancer agents. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Caractérisation de la structure des membranes ionomères (NAFION^{tinytextregistered}) par diffusion de rayons X aux petits angles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubatat, L.; Rollet, A. L.; Diat, O.; Gébel, G.

    2002-07-01

    Ionomer membranes, like Nafion^{tinytextregistered} used in fuel cell, present a nano- phase separation between domains with different ionic concentrations. Up to now models describe the ionic domains as spheres of about 40 Å diameter. Small angles X-ray scattering studies over a large range of wave vectors, lead to a new assumption for the Nafion structure, describing the polymer aggregation as elongated objects surrounding by the ionic charges. Les membranes ionomères de type Nafion^{tinytextregistered} utilisées en pile à combustible, sont caractérisées par une nano-séparation de phases entre des domaines plus ou moins riches en sites ioniques. Les modèles proposés pour décrire ces domaines ioniques, les représentent généralement sous forme de sphères de 40 Å de diamètre. L'étude en diffusion de rayons X que nous avons menée récemment, sur une large gamme de vecteurs d'ondes, nous permet de proposer une vision différente de la structure du Nafion en considérant une agrégation de polymères sous formes d'objets très allongés, avec en surface les charges ioniques.

  19. Development of an aerosol-chemistry transport model coupled to non-hydrostatic icosahedral atmospheric model (NICAM) through applying a stretched grid system to regional simulations around Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goto, D.; Nakajima, T.; Masaki, S.

    2014-12-01

    Air pollution has a great impact on both climate change and human health. One effective way to tackle with these issues is a use of atmospheric aerosol-chemistry models with high-resolution in a global scale. For this purpose, we have developed an aerosol-chemistry model based on a global cloud-resolving model (GCRM), Nonhydrostatic Icosahedral Atmospheric Model (NICAM; Tomita and Satoh, Fluid. Dyn. Res. 2004; Satoh et al., J. Comput. Phys. 2008, PEPS, 2014) under MEXT/RECCA/SALSA project. In the present study, we have simulated aerosols and tropospheric ozone over Japan by our aerosol-chemistry model "NICAM-Chem" with a stretched-grid system of approximately 10 km resolution, for saving the computer resources. The aerosol and chemistry modules are based on Spectral Radiation-Transport Model for Aerosol Species (SPRINTARS; Takemura et al., J. Geophys. Res., 2005) and Chemical AGCM for Study of Atmospheric Environment and Radiative Forcing (CHASER; Sudo et al., J. Geophys. Res., 2002). We found that our model can generally reproduce both aerosols and ozone, in terms of temporal variations (daily variations of aerosols and diurnal variations of ozone). Under MEXT/RECCA/SALSA project, we also have used these results obtained by NICAM-Chem for the assessment of their impact on human health.

  20. Alexandria (Al Iskandariya), Egypt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This image of Alexandria was taken by astronauts on board the International Space Station in December 2000 using an Electronic Still Camera. A wider-angle view (STS088-739-90) taken from the Space Shuttle in December 1998 is available for context. Alexandria (Al Iskandariya) occupies a T-shaped peninsula and strip of land separating the Mediterranean from Lake Mariout. Originally the town was built upon a mole (stone breakwater) called Heptastadium, which joined the island of Pharos (see referenced website, below) to the mainland. Since then sedimentary deposits have widened the mole. Since 1905, when the 370,000 Alexandrians lived in an area of about 4 sq km between the two harbors, the city (population 4 million; see referenced website, below) has grown beyond its medieval walls and now occupies an area of about 300 sq km. The Mahmudiya Canal, connecting Alexandria with the Nile, runs to the south of the city and, by a series of locks, enters the harbor of the principal port of Egypt (note ships). The reddish and ochre polygons west of Lake Mariout are salt-evaporation, chemical-storage, and water-treatment ponds within the coastal lagoon. Reference Youssef Halim and Fatma Abou Shouk, 2000, Human impacts on Alexandria's marine environment: UNESCO, Coastal Regions and Small Islands Unit (CSI), Coastal Management Sourcebooks 2 (accessed December 20, 2000) Additional photographs taken by astronauts can be viewed at NASA-JSC's Gateway to Astronaut Photography of Earth. Image ISS001-ESC-5025 provided by the Earth Sciences and Image Analysis Laboratory, Johnson Space Center.

  1. Is there a paraneoplastic ALS?

    PubMed

    Corcia, Philippe; Gordon, Paul H; Camdessanche, Jean-Philippe

    2015-06-01

    Our objective was to examine the strength of evidence in support of the paraneoplastic syndrome (PNS) as one cause of ALS and, if the association appears more likely than chance, determine which features of ALS imply concurrent malignancy. We reviewed the literature on concurrent ALS and neoplasia assessing the strength of evidence for the association. Most accounts of ALS and neoplasm are case reports or small uncontrolled series. In order of strength of evidence, three clinical situations that support a paraneoplastic aetiology for ALS are: 1) laboratory evidence of well-characterized onconeuronal antibodies, most often anti-Hu, anti-Yo or anti-Ri; 2) co-occurrence of ALS and a neoplasm known to cause PNS, usually lymphoma or cancer of the breast; and 3) combined ALS and a neoplasm not classically associated with PNS, without detectable onconeuronal antibodies. Clinical features that warrant evaluation of neoplasm include upper motor neuron disease in elderly females, rapid progression, non-motor signs, and young onset. In conclusion, most examples of ALS and neoplasm do not constitute a classically established PNS. Rare instances of elevated onconeuronal antibody titres or typical neoplasm, implies that, albeit rare, the PNS is one of a multitude of causes of ALS.

  2. Impurity Enhancement of Al_2O_3/Al Adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiao-Gang; Smith, John R.; Zhang, Wenqing; Evans, Anthony

    2003-03-01

    Our first-principles computations indicate that the clean Al_2O_3/Al interface is relatively weak - weaker than bulk Al. Fracture experiments reveal that the interface is relatively strong with observed failure in bulk Al, however. This paradox is resolved via doping effects of the common impurity C. We have found that only 1/3 of a monolayer of carbon segregated to the interface can increase the work of separation by a factor of 3. The resulting strong interface is consistent with fracture experiments. It arises due to void formation in the interface, which provides low-strain sites for the carbon to segregate to. The degree of void formation is consistent with the relatively high heat of oxide formation of Al.

  3. Thermal Ion Flow Velocities: Signatures of the Enceladus Torus?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, R. J.; Tokar, R. L.; Henderson, M. G.

    2008-12-01

    For the middle/outer (> 5.5 RS) magnetosphere of Saturn, Cassini Plasma Spectrometer (CAPS) ion counting data provides thermal ion moments obtained assuming Maxwellian distributions for each ion species [Wilson et al., 2008]. However, in the inner magnetosphere (< 5.5 RS) within Saturn's extended neutral cloud and proposed Enceladus torus [Johnson et al., 2006], there is fresh ion production via charge exchange [Tokar et al., 2008], yielding a complex ion velocity distribution. In this study, a new technique is investigated to analyze the CAPS data in the inner region. The technique concentrates on finding the ion flow velocity using only the assumption that the ions are gryotropic. The available ion velocity space viewed by CAPS in a slice perpendicular to the magnetic field is translated within that plane to find the optimum flow velocity that yields gyrotropic ions. Near-equatorial trajectories of Cassini in the inner region are surveyed to determine both azimuthal and radial ion flow velocity. The azimuthal flow velocity profile with radial distance, a proxy for fresh ion production, is compared with models for both the Enceladus torus and extended neutral cloud. References: Wilson, R.J. et al., J. Geophys. Res. in press, doi:10.1029/2008ja013486 Johnson, R.E. et al., The Astrophysical Journal, pg L137, 20 June 2006. Tokar, R.L. et al, Geophys. Res. Letts., vol. 35, L14202, doi:10.1029/2008GL034749

  4. Quantum chemical study of ternary mixtures of: HNO3:H2SO4:H2O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verdes, M. A.; Gómez, P. C.; Gálvez, O.

    2009-04-01

    Water, nitric acid and sulfuric acid are important atmospheric species as individual species and as hydrogen-bonded aggregates involved in many physical-chemical processes both superficial and bulk. The importance of heterogeneous chemical reactions taking place on ice surfaces, either solid water or solid water plus nitric or sulfuric acid, is well established now in relation to the ozone-depleting mechanisms. Also the importance of liquid droplets formed by HNO3.H2SO4.H2O as components of PSC was soon recognized [1-3]. Finally the physical properties of finely divided aqueous systems is an interesting and active field of research in which theoretical information on the microphysical domain systems may help to understand and rationalize the wealth of experimental information. This can also be the initial step in the study of more complex mixtures with higher amounts of water or variable proportions of their constituents. This kind of calculations have been successfully performed in the past[4]. We present here our results on the structure and spectroscopic and thermodynamic properties of the energy-lowest lying structures among those thermodynamically stable formed by linking the acids plus water. The calculations have been carried out by means of DFT methods (in particular the successful B3LYP) using different basis sets that contain appropriate sets of polarization and diffuse functions up to quadruple-Z quality (Dunninǵs aug-cc-pVQZ). Careful assessment of the dependability of the methodology used has been carried out. This work has been supported by the Spanish Ministry of Education, Projects FIS2007-61686 and CTQ2008-02578/BQU References: [1] Carslaw, K. S. et al.: Geophys. Res. Lett. 21, 2479-2482, 1994 [2] Drdla, K. Et al. :Geophys. Res. Lett. 21, 2473-2478, 1994 [3] Tabazadeh, A. et al.: Geophys. Res. Lett 21, 1619-1622, 1994 [4] Escribano, R et al.: J. J. Chem. Phys A 2003, 107, 652.

  5. Water vapor in Titan's stratosphere from Cassini CIRS far-infrared spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cottini, V.; Nixon, C. A.; Jennings, D. E.; Anderson, C. M.; Gorius, N.; Bjoraker, G. L.; Coustenis, A.; Teanby, N. A.; Achterberg, R. K.; Bézard, B.; de Kok, R.; Lellouch, E.; Irwin, P. G. J.; Flasar, F. M.; Bampasidis, G.

    2012-08-01

    Here we report the measurement of water vapor in Titan's stratosphere using the Cassini Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS, Flasar, F.M. et al. [2004]. Space Sci. Rev. 115, 169-297). CIRS senses water emissions in the far infrared spectral region near 50 μm, which we have modeled using two independent radiative transfer codes (NEMESIS (Irwin, P.G.J. et al. [2008]. J. Quant. Spectrosc. Radiat. Trans. 109, 1136-1150) and ART (Coustenis, A. et al. [2007]. Icarus 189, 35-62; Coustenis, A. et al. [2010]. Icarus 207, 461-476). From the analysis of nadir spectra we have derived a mixing ratio of 0.14 ± 0.05 ppb at an altitude of 97 km, which corresponds to an integrated (from 0 to 600 km) surface normalized column abundance of 3.7 ± 1.3 × 1014 molecules/cm2. In the latitude range 80°S to 30°N we see no evidence for latitudinal variations in these abundances within the error bars. Using limb observations, we obtained mixing ratios of 0.13 ± 0.04 ppb at an altitude of 115 km and 0.45 ± 0.15 ppb at an altitude of 230 km, confirming that the water abundance has a positive vertical gradient as predicted by photochemical models (e.g. Lara, L.M., Lellouch, F., Lopez-Moreno, J.J., Rodrigo, R. [1996]. J. Geophys. Res. 101(23), 261; Wilson, E.H., Atreya, S.K. [2004]. J. Geophys. Res. 109, E6; Hörst, S.M., Vuitton, V., Yelle, R.V. [2008]. J. Geophys. Res., 113, E10). We have also fitted our data using scaling factors of ˜0.1-0.6 to these photochemical model profiles, indicating that the models over-predict the water abundance in Titan's lower stratosphere.

  6. Thermal Modeling of Al-Al and Al-Steel Friction Stir Spot Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jedrasiak, P.; Shercliff, H. R.; Reilly, A.; McShane, G. J.; Chen, Y. C.; Wang, L.; Robson, J.; Prangnell, P.

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents a finite element thermal model for similar and dissimilar alloy friction stir spot welding (FSSW). The model is calibrated and validated using instrumented lap joints in Al-Al and Al-Fe automotive sheet alloys. The model successfully predicts the thermal histories for a range of process conditions. The resulting temperature histories are used to predict the growth of intermetallic phases at the interface in Al-Fe welds. Temperature predictions were used to study the evolution of hardness of a precipitation-hardened aluminum alloy during post-weld aging after FSSW.

  7. Philosophieren als Unterrichtsprinzip im Mathematikunterricht

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meerwaldt, Diana

    Philosophieren und Mathematik scheinen zunächst gegensätzliche Bereiche zu sein, die sich kaum vereinbaren lassen. Dies trifft für eine Auffassung zu, die Philosophieren als "Gerede" disqualifiziert und Mathematik als eine reine "Formelwissenschaft" begreift. Beide Auffassungen werden den Gegenständen nicht gerecht.

  8. The Evolution of Al Qaeda

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-06-15

    Al Qaeda is a product of the forces of globalization. Increasing access to global finances , international travel, and sophisticated technology is...evolution. Al Qaeda is a product of the forces of globalization. Increasing access to global finances , international travel, and sophisticated technology...75 Finance

  9. Characteristics of CeCoIn5/Al/AlOx/Nb and CeCoIn5/Al/AlOx/Al Tunnel Junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Petrovic, C.; Nevirkovets, I.P.; Chernyashevskyy, O.; Hu, R.; Ketterson, J.B.; Sarma, B.K.

    2009-03-03

    We report characteristics of CeCoIn{sub 5}/Al/AlO{sub x}/Nb and CeCoIn{sub 5}/Al/AlO{sub x}/Al tunnel junctions fabricated on the (0 0 1) surface of CeCoIn{sub 5} crystal platelets. The main result of this work is the observation of a low Josephson current (as compared with that expected from the Ambegaokar-Baratoff formula), which is consistent with idea that the order parameter in the heavy-fermion superconductor CeCoIn{sub 5} has unconventional pairing symmetry.

  10. Analyses par diffraction de rayons X sur des revêtements barrières thermiques réalisés par un procédé hybride plasma-laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antou, G.; Hlawka, F.; Montavon, G.; Bach, M.; Cornet, A.; Coddet, C.

    2004-11-01

    Les revêtements barrières thermiques (BTs) constitués de zircone yttriée partiellement stabilisée (ZrO{2} + 7% en masse d'Y{2}O{3}) et d'une sous-couche métallique (MCrAlY où M représente une combinaison de nickel et de cobalt) sont extrêmement utilisés afin d'améliorer les performances des composants des parties chaudes des turbines à gaz. La projection plasma sous atmosphère ambiante et l'irradiation laser in situ (au moyen d'un laser à diodes) sont associés ici afin de modifier les caractéristiques structurales des BTs. Les phases présentes au sein de la BT ont un rôle important. Des analyses par diffraction de rayons X ont été menées pour étudier les changements de phase possibles après traitement laser. Aucun changement de phase n'a été remarqué : la phase tétragonale métastable (t') demeure la phase prépondérante aussi bien pour les dépôts projetés que les dépôts post-traités au laser et refondus in situ. La formation de cette phase semble être liée à la solidification et au refroidissement rapide découlant de la projection plasma ainsi que de la refusion laser. Ce résultat est prometteur, car :

  11. Wishstone to Watchtower: Alteration of Plagioclase-rich Rocks in Gusev Crater, Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruff, S. W.; Hamilton, V. E.

    2014-12-01

    this time. [1] Hurowitz, J. A., et al. (2006), J. Geophys. Res., 111, E12S14. [2] Ming, D. W., et al. (2006), J. Geophys. Res., 111, E02S12. [3] Morris, R. V., et al. (2006), J. Geophys. Res., 111, E02S13. [4] Ruff, S. W., and V. E. Hamilton (submitted). [5] Ruff, S. W., et al. (2006), J. Geophys. Res., 111, E12S18.

  12. Effects of Na+ and He+ pickup ions on the lunar plasma environment: 3D hybrid modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipatov, A. S.; Cooper, J. F.; Sittler, E. C.; Hartle, R. E.; Sarantos, M.

    2011-12-01

    The hybrid kinetic model used here supports comprehensive simulation of the interaction between different spatial and energetic elements of the moon-solar wind-magnetosphere of the Earth system. There is a set of MHD,kinetic, hybrid, drift kinetic, electrostatic and full kinetic modeling of the lunar plasma environment [1]. However, observations show the existence of several species of the neutrals and pickup ions like Na, He, K, O etc., (see e.g., [2,3,4]). The solar wind parameters are chosen from the ARTEMIS observations [5]. The Na+, He+ lunar exosphere's parameters are chosen from [6,7]. The hybrid kinetic model allows us to take into account the finite gyroradius effects of pickup ions and to correctly estimate the ions velocity distribution and the fluxes along the magnetic field, and on the lunar surface. Modeling shows the formation of the asymmetric Mach cone, the structuring of the pickup ion tails, and presents another type of lunar-solar wind interaction. We will compare the results of our modeling with observed distributions. References [1] Lipatov, A.S., and Cooper, J.F., Hybrid kinetic modeling of the Lunar plasma environment: Past, present and future. In: Lunar Dust, Plasma and Atmosphere: The Next Steps, January 27-29, 2010, Boulder, Colorado, Abstracts/lpa2010.colorado.edu/. [2] Potter, A.E., and Morgan, T.H., Discovery of sodium and potassium vapor in the atmosphere of the Moon, Science, 241, 675-680, doi:10.1126/science.241.4866.675, 1988. [3] Tyler, A.L., et al., Observations of sodium in the tenuous lunar atmosphere, Geophys. Res. Lett., 15(10), 1141-1144, doi:10.1029/GL015i010p01141, 1988. [4] Tanaka, T., et al., First in situ observation of the Moon-originating ions in the Earth's Magnetosphere by MAP-PACE on SELENE (KAGUYA), Geophys. Res. Lett., 36, L22106, doi:10.1029/2009GL040682, 2009. [5] Wiehle, S., et al., First Lunar Wake Passage of ARTEMIS: Discrimination of Wake Effects and Solar Wind Fluctuations by 3D Hybrid Simulations, Planet

  13. Medical application of 26Al

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinhausen, C.; Gerisch, P.; Heisinger, B.; Hohl, Ch.; Kislinger, G.; Korschinek, G.; Niedermayer, M.; Nolte, E.; Dumitru, M.; Alvarez-Brückmann, M.; Schneider, M.; Ittel, T. H.

    1996-06-01

    Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) measurements with 26Al as tracer were performed in order to study the aluminium metabolism and anomalies in the human body and in rats. In particular, the differences between healthy volunteers and patients with renal failure were investigated. The obtained data points of 26Al in blood and urine were described by an open compartment model with three peripheral compartments. It was found that the minimum of peripheral compartments needed to describe 26Al concentrations in blood and urine over a time period of three years is at least three.

  14. Detection of Heater Generated Super Small Scale Striations Using GPS Signal Diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Najmi, A. C.; Milikh, G. M.; Chiang, K.; Psiaki, M.; Secan, J. A.; Bernhardt, P. A.; Briczinski, S. J.; Siefring, C. L.; Papadopoulos, K.

    2013-12-01

    Recent theoretical models predict that super small striations (SSS) of the electron density, on the order of ten centimeters, can be excited by HF waves with frequency close to multiples of the electron gyro frequency [Gurevich et al., 2006]. The first experimental verification of SSS was made at HAARP [Milikh et al., 2008]. We present results of HAARP experiments that include simultaneous observations of GPS carrier phase and SEE observations of ionospheric turbulence. These observations show that SSS excited by HF frequencies near the fourth harmonic of the gyro frequency scatter GPS signals, and in three out of six experiments indicate the presence of strong turbulence, similar to that observed in descending artificial ionized layer experiments [Pedersen et al., 2010]. This turbulence is capable of generating suprathermal electrons, and in one of the experiments, the presence of fast electrons was confirmed by the HAARP incoherent scattering radar. Estimates on the SSS shows that they correspond to 3-10% electron density depletions. Such irregularities affect UHF signals including GPS, and thus can be important in applications. Gurevich, A.V. and K.P. Zybin (2006), Phys. Lett. A, 358, 159. Milikh, G., et al. (2008), Geophys. Res. Let., 35, L22102, doi:10.1029/2008GL035527. Pedersen, T. et al. (2010), Geophys. Res. Let., 37, L02106, doi:10.1029/2009GL041895.

  15. Estradiol and progesterone-mediated regulation of P-gp in P-gp overexpressing cells (NCI-ADR-RES) and placental cells (JAR).

    PubMed

    Coles, Lisa D; Lee, Insong J; Voulalas, Pamela J; Eddington, Natalie D

    2009-01-01

    The effect of progesterone and estrogen treatment on the expression and function of P-glycoprotein (P-gp) was evaluated in JAR cells and a P-gp overexpressing cell line, NCI-ADR-RES. Western blot analysis and real-time Q-PCR were used to evaluate P-gp protein and MDR1 mRNA expression respectively in the cells following incubation with progesterone (P4) and/or beta-estradiol (E2). Cellular uptake studies of the P-gp substrates, saquinavir and paclitaxel, were performed to evaluate function. Treatment with either E2 or P4 resulted in a significant increase in P-gp protein levels in the NCI-ADR-RES cells at concentrations of or greater than 100 nM or 10 nM, respectively. JAR cells also had increased levels of P-gp with 100 nM of P4 but were much more sensitive to E2 showing increased P-gp at a concentration of 1 nM. Furthermore, E2 or P4 treatment resulted in a significant decrease in cellular uptake of the P-gp substrates tested in these cells lines. Based on mRNA quantitation, a transient increase (2-fold) in MDR1 levels was observed at 8 h postincubation with either E2 or P4, while MDR1 levels remained high in the JAR cells treated with E2 for 72 h postincubation. The addition of actinomycin D, a transcription inhibitor negated the increase in P-gp by P4 and E2. P4 and E2 increase P-gp expression and function in NCI-ADR-RES and JAR cells with the ERalpha-expressing cells (JAR) much more sensitive to E2. Furthermore, transcriptional regulation by E2 and P4 likely contributes to the modulation of P-gp levels.

  16. Bacillus cereus Fnr binds a [4Fe-4S] cluster and forms a ternary complex with ResD and PlcR

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Bacillus cereus is a facultative anaerobe that causes diarrheal disease in humans. Diarrheal syndrome may result from the secretion of various virulence factors including hemolysin BL and nonhemolytic enterotoxin Nhe. Expression of genes encoding Hbl and Nhe is regulated by the two redox systems, ResDE and Fnr, and the virulence regulator PlcR. B. cereus Fnr is a member of the Crp/Fnr family of iron-sulfur (Fe-S) proteins. Only its apo-form has so far been studied. A major goal in deciphering the Fnr-dependent regulation of enterotoxin genes is thus to obtain and characterize holoFnr. Results Fnr has been subjected to in vitro Fe-S cluster reconstitution under anoxic conditions. UV-visible and EPR spectroscopic analyses together with the chemical estimation of the iron content indicated that Fnr binds one [4Fe-4S]2+ cluster per monomer. Atmospheric O2 causes disassembly of the Fe-S cluster, which exhibited a half-life of 15 min in air. Holo- and apoFnr have similar affinities for the nhe and hbl promoter regions, while holoFnr has a higher affinity for fnr promoter region than apoFnr. Both the apo- and holo-form of Fnr interact with ResD and PlcR to form a ternary complex. Conclusions Overall, this work shows that incorporation of the [4Fe-4S]2+ cluster is not required for DNA binding of Fnr to promoter regions of hbl and nhe enterotoxin genes or for the formation of a ternary complex with ResD and PlcR. This points to some new unusual properties of Fnr that may have physiological relevance in the redox regulation of enterotoxin gene regulation. PMID:22731107

  17. Rubus coreanus Miquel extract causes apoptosis of doxorubicin-resistant NCI/ADR-RES ovarian cancer cells via JNK phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min Kyoung; Choi, Hyeong Sim; Cho, Sung-Gook; Shin, Yong Cheol; Ko, Seong-Gyu

    2016-05-01

    Cancer cells can acquire an anticancer, drug-resistant phenotype following chemotherapy, which is tightly linked to cancer malignancy and patient survival rates. Therefore, the identification of options to treat chemotherapy‑resistant cancer cells is an urgent requirement. Rubus coreanus Miquel (RCM) has long been used as a source of food. In addition, it has been reported that RCM has effective functions against particular diseases, including cancer and inflammation. In the present study, it was demonstrated that RCM extract caused the apoptotic cell death of doxorubicin‑resistant NCI/ADR‑RES ovarian cancer cells by phosphorylating c‑Jun N‑terminal kinase (JNK). The RCM‑mediated reduction of cell viability showed no synergism with doxorubicin. In addition, ellagic acid and quercetin, which are phytochemicals found in RCM, also caused apoptosis of the NCI/ADR‑RES cells. In subsequent investigations of the RCM‑altered signaling pathway, RCM extract, ellagic acid and quercetin were found to commonly induce the phosphorylation of JNK and AKT. Additionally, the inhibition of JNK with SP600125 repressed the apoptotic cell death induced by RCM extract, ellagic acid and quercetin, and the inhibition of JNK appeared to switch apoptosis to necrosis. JNK inhibition also reduced the phosphorylation of AKT, which was induced by RCM extract, ellagic acid and quercetin, suggesting that the phosphorylation of JNK is required for AKT phosphorylation in RCM‑, ellagic acid‑ or quercetin‑induced apoptotic cell death. Therefore, the data obtained in the present study led to the conclusion that RCM caused apoptosis of doxorubicin‑resistant NCI/ADR-RES ovarian cancer cells via JNK phosphorylation, and suggested that RCM may be effective in the treatment of chemotherapy‑resistant cancer cells.

  18. An updated set of nutations derived from the reanalysis of 3.5 decades VLBI observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Ping; Koot, Laurence; Rivoldini, Attilio; Dehant, Veronique

    2016-04-01

    The global VLBI observation started in the 1979. After that the qualities of the measurements are continuously improving by taking into account various instrumental and environmental effects. The MHB2000 models was introduced in 2002 (Mathews, et.al. 2002, [1]) and it has a good agreement (5 μas) on the short period nutation series (<400 days) with the values derived from 2 decades (1979-2000) VLBI data while a higher uncertainties up to 56 μas for those longer periods (>400 days) nutation series (Herring et.al. 2002). In MHB2000, the forcing frequencies of the nutation series are solved by least-squares fitting to the VLBI data in frequency domain. Koot et al. (2008), have processed another similar set of nutation series by inversing the time series of VLBI data (1984-2005) using a Bayesian approach. In the present work, we will repeat both approaches using the up-to-date 3.5 decades VLBI observations (1980-2014) meanwhile paying more attention on the results of longer period (>400 days). Finally some features of Earth's interior structure will be discussed based on the determined nutation series. [1] Mathews, P.M., Herring, T.A. & Buffett, B.A., 2002. Modeling of nutation and precession: new nutation series for nonrigid Earth and insights into the Earth's interior, J. Geophys. Res., 107, 2068, doi: 10.1029/2001JB000390. [2] Herring, T. A., P. M. Mathews, and B. A. Buffett, Modeling of nutation and precession: Very long baseline interferometry results, J. Geophys. Res., 107, B4, 2069, doi: 10.1029/2001JB000165, 2002 [3] Koot, L., Rivoldini, A., de Viron, O. & Dehant, V., 2008. Estimation of Earth interior parameters from a Bayesian inversion of very long baseline interferometry nutation time series, J. Geophys. Res., 113, 8414, doi: 10.1029/2007JB005409.

  19. Copolymères (carbazolylène-pyrrolylène) : synthèse par oxydation chimique et propriétés

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boucard, V.; Adès, D.; Siove, A.

    1998-06-01

    Conditions in which (carbazolylene-pyrrolylene) random copolymers could be synthetized directly by chemical oxidation by FeCl3 were studied. A substantial amount of soluble copolymers is obtained after work-up in the conditions corresponding to carbazole/pyrrole/2 FeCl3 molar proportions. An important fraction of polypyrrole was obtained beside a fraction of species soluble in ethanol (carbazole and dimer) and an other fraction of products soluble in water (pyrrole accompanied by the first terms of the oligomeric series). Soluble copolymers were characterized by means of SEC, NMR and UV-Visible spectroscopies. Cyclic voltammetry analysis disclosed that these copolymers exhibit both the carbazolic and the pyrrolic features. Les conditions dans lesquelles des copolymères statistiques (carbazo lylène-pyrrolylène) pouvaient être synthétisés directement par oxydation chimique par FeCl3 ont été étudiées. Des quantités substantielles de copolymères solubles en milieu organique sont obtenues par extraction lorsque les proportions molaires en réactifs carbazole/pyrrole/2 FeCl3 sont utilisées. Une fraction importante de polypyrrole est obtenue à côté d'une fraction d'espèces solubles dans l'éthanol (carbazole et son dimère) et d'une fraction de produits solubles dans l'eau (pyrrole et les premiers termes oligomères). Les copolymères solubles ont été caractérisés par CES, spectroscopies RMN et UV-Visible. L'analyse voltampérométrique de ces matériaux révèle qu'ils possèdent à la fois les caractéristiques des entités carbazolylènes et celles des entités pyrrolylènes.

  20. The Aicardi-Goutières syndrome (familial, early onset encephalopathy with calcifications of the basal ganglia and chronic cerebrospinal fluid lymphocytosis).

    PubMed Central

    Tolmie, J L; Shillito, P; Hughes-Benzie, R; Stephenson, J B

    1995-01-01

    Aicardi-Goutières syndrome (Mendelian inheritance in man Catalog No *225750) is an autosomal recessive encephalopathy which causes developmental arrest, intracerebral calcification, and white matter disease in the presence of chronic cerebrospinal fluid lymphocytosis, and a raised level of cerebrospinal fluid interferon-alpha (IFN-alpha). Diagnosis requires the presence of progressive encephalopathy with onset shortly after birth, and characteristic clinical neurological and neuroimaging signs together with chronic CSF lymphocytosis. The syndrome has superficial resemblance to the neurological sequelae of congenital infection, thus a rigorous search for microbiological and serological evidence of embryopathic infections should be carried out in each case. Images PMID:8592332

  1. Reply to Gopalswamy et al.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cane, H. V.; Richardson, I. G.

    2003-01-01

    The comment of Gopalswamy et al. (thereafter GMY) relates to a letter discussing coronal mass ejections (CMEs), interplanetary ejecta and geomagnetic storms. GMY contend that Cane et al. incorrectly identified ejecta (interplanetary CMEs) and hypothesize that this is because Cane et al. fail to understand how to separate ejecta from "shock sheaths" when interpreting solar wind and energetic particle data sets. They (GMY) are wrong be cause the relevant section of the paper was concerned with the propagation time to 1 AU of any potentially geoeffective structures caused by CMEs, i.e. upstream compression regions with or without shocks, or ejecta. In other words, the travel times used by Cane et al. were purposefully and deliberately distinct from ejecta travel times (except for those slow ejecta, approx. 30% of their events, which generated no upstream features), and no error in identification was involved. The confusion of GMY stems from the description did not characterize the observations sufficiently clearly.

  2. In memory of Al Cameron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowan, John; Truran, James W.

    Al Cameron, who died recently (October 3, 2005) at 80, was one of the giants in astrophysics. His insights were profound and his interests were wide-ranging. Originally trained as a nuclear physicist, he made major contributions in a number of fields, including nuclear reactions in stars, nucleosynthesis, the abundances of the elements in the Solar System, and the origin of the Solar System and the Moon. In 1957, Cameron and, independently, Burbidge, Burbidge, Fowler and Hoyle, wrote seminal papers on nuclear astrophysics. Most of our current ideas concerning ele- ment formation in stars have followed from those two pioneering and historical works. Al also made many contributions in the field of Solar System physics. Particularly noteworthy in this regard was Cameron's work on the formation of the Moon. Al was also a good friend and mentor of young people. Al Cameron will be missed by many in the community both for his scientific contributions and for his friendship.

  3. Al-Co-Fe (030)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carow-Watamura, U.; Louzguine, D. V.; Takeuchi, A.

    This document is part of Part 1 http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/9getType="URL"/> 'Systems from Ag-Al-Ca to Au-Pd-Si' of Subvolume B 'Physical Properties of Ternary Amorphous Alloys' of Volume 37 'Phase Diagrams and Physical Properties of Nonequilibrium Alloys' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group III 'Condensed Matter'. It contains the Chapter 'Al-Co-Fe (030)' with the content:

  4. Al-La-Nb (068)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carow-Watamura, U.; Louzguine, D. V.; Takeuchi, A.

    This document is part of Part 1 http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/97.etType="URL"/> 'Systems from Ag-Al-Ca to Au-Pd-Si' of Subvolume B 'Physical Properties of Ternary Amorphous Alloys' of Volume 37 'Phase Diagrams and Physical Properties of Nonequilibrium Alloys' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group III 'Condensed Matter'. It contains the Chapter 'Al-La-Nb (068)' with the content:

  5. Al-Cu-Zr (050)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carow-Watamura, U.; Louzguine, D. V.; Takeuchi, A.

    This document is part of Part 1 http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/9getType="URL"/> 'Systems from Ag-Al-Ca to Au-Pd-Si' of Subvolume B 'Physical Properties of Ternary Amorphous Alloys' of Volume 37 'Phase Diagrams and Physical Properties of Nonequilibrium Alloys' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group III 'Condensed Matter'. It contains the Chapter 'Al-Cu-Zr (050)' with the content:

  6. Al-La-Ni (069)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carow-Watamura, U.; Louzguine, D. V.; Takeuchi, A.

    This document is part of Part 1 http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/9getType="URL"/> 'Systems from Ag-Al-Ca to Au-Pd-Si' of Subvolume B 'Physical Properties of Ternary Amorphous Alloys' of Volume 37 'Phase Diagrams and Physical Properties of Nonequilibrium Alloys' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group III 'Condensed Matter'. It contains the Chapter 'Al-La-Ni (069)' with the content:

  7. Al-Au-La (010)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carow-Watamura, U.; Louzguine, D. V.; Takeuchi, A.

    This document is part of Part 1 http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/9getType="URL"/> 'Systems from Ag-Al-Ca to Au-Pd-Si' of Subvolume B 'Physical Properties of Ternary Amorphous Alloys' of Volume 37 'Phase Diagrams and Physical Properties of Nonequilibrium Alloys' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group III 'Condensed Matter'. It contains the Chapter 'Al-Au-La (010)' with the content:

  8. Al-Ce-V (029)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carow-Watamura, U.; Louzguine, D. V.; Takeuchi, A.

    This document is part of Part 1 http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/97.etType="URL"/> 'Systems from Ag-Al-Ca to Au-Pd-Si' of Subvolume B 'Physical Properties of Ternary Amorphous Alloys' of Volume 37 'Phase Diagrams and Physical Properties of Nonequilibrium Alloys' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group III 'Condensed Matter'. It contains the Chapter 'Al-Ce-V (029)' with the content:

  9. The Appearance of Equilibrium-like Properties in Driven Dissipative Systems in Complex Earth (and Other) Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rundle, J. B.; Klein, W.

    2001-05-01

    Driven dissipative systems constitute some of the most important nonlinear systems in geophysics. Examples include earthquakes, mantle convection, and the geodynamo. A number of these systems also appear to show behavior that is very similar to equilibrium systems residing near a critical point, namely, the appearance of scaling laws and in some cases, nucleation. Examples of scaling laws include the Gutenberg-Richter magnitude-frequency relation, the Kolmogorov 5/3 law for turbulent fluid systems, and similar scaling laws (not named) for landslide frequency and wildfire occurrence. Examples of nucleation include earthquakes, the formation of hurricanes, and catastrophic landslides. A fundamental question is why such equilibrium-like scaling laws should be demonstrated in manifestly non-equilibrium systems, and why in many cases such systems seem to have ergodic properties. The answer to this question, at least in some cases, is evidently connected to the long-range nature of the interactions with which various parts of the system communicate. In recent years, a number of studies (JBR et al., Phys. Rev. Lett., 75, 1658, 1995; WK et al., Phys. Rev. Lett., 78, 3793, 1997; G. Morein et al., Geophys. J. Int., 131, 552, 1997; D. Fisher et al., Phys. Rev. Lett., 78, 4885, 1997; CD Ferguson et al., Phys. Rev. E., 60, 1359, 1999; DA Egolf, Science, 287, 101, 2000; IG Main et al., J. Geophys. Res., 105, 6105, 2000; A. Hunt, Geophys. Res. Lett., in press, 2001) have shown that when a system has mean field properties arising from long range interactions, together with a dynamical randomizing ("thermalizing") mechanisim, the system demonstrates ergodic behavior. In this lecture, I discuss these issues, along with recent examples that demonstrate how nucleation and critical phenomena arise, and how these processes can be physically understood. I also discuss how these results apply to other systems.

  10. Comparing the Thermodynamic Behaviour of Al(1)+ZrO2(s) to Al(1)+Al2O3(s)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Copland, Evan

    2004-01-01

    In an effort to better determine the thermodynamic properties of Al(g) and Al2O(g). the vapor in equilibrium with Al(l)+ZrO2(s) was compared to the vapor in equilibrium with Al(l)+Al2O3(s) over temperature range 1197-to-1509K. The comparison was made directly by Knudsen effusion-cell mass spectrometry with an instrument configured for a multiple effusion-cell vapor source (multi-cell KEMS). Second law enthalpies of vaporization of Al(g) and Al2O(g) together with activity measurements show that Al(l)+ZrO2(s) is thermodynamically equivalent to Al(l)+Al2O3(s), indicating Al(l) remained pure and Al2O3(s) was present in the ZrO2-cell. Subsequent observation of the Al(l)/ZrO2 and vapor/ZrO2 interfaces revealed a thin Al2O3-layer had formed, separating the ZrO2-cell from Al(l) and Al(g)+Al2O(g), effectively transforming it into an Al2O3 effusion-cell. This behavior agrees with recent observations made for Beta-NiAl(Pt) alloys measured in ZrO2 effusion-cell.

  11. Behavior of Ionized Plasma in the High Latitude Topside Ionosphere.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-26

    equations has been discussed by Gear et al., [19791. We will use the general procedure used by Watkins [1981]. III. SIMULATIONS AND RESULTS Schunk...R.W. and D.S. Watkins, Proton Temperature Anisotropy in the Ploar Wind, J.Geophys. Res., 87 171-180, 1982. Shampine, L.F. and C.W. Gear , A User’s...Research Laboratory (Institute of Geophysics and Washington, D.C. 20375 Planetary Physics): ATTN: Code 4700 (26 Copies) ATTN: Library Code 4701 C

  12. Thermal-Infrared Laboratory Measurements in Support of the Diviner Lunar Radiometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Ian; Bowles, N. E.; Warren, T.; Greenhagen, B. T.; Donaldson Hanna, K. L.; LRO Diviner Team

    2012-10-01

    The Diviner Lunar Radiometer is a high-resolution, nine-channel mapping radiometer currently orbiting the Moon on Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter. The instrument consists of two solar channels (0.35 - 2.8 μm), three ‘8 μm’ channels (7.55 - 8.05, 8.1 - 8.4 and 8.4 - 8.7 μm) and four thermal channels (13 - 23, 25 - 41, 50 - 100, and 100 - 400 μm) [6]. The ‘8 μm’ channels were designed to map the spectral location of the Christiansen Feature (CF), a mid-infrared emissivity maximum, the wavelength of which is highly dependent on surface composition [5], while the longer-wavelength channels measure surface brightness temperatures down to < 30K [6]. The shape and wavelength of the CF is highly affected by the lunar environment [e.g. 1,2,3,4 etc.], therefore using most existing mid-infrared spectral libraries is problematic, hence new measurements made in a simulated thermal environment are required. Also, mid-infrared emission and scattering properties are poorly constrained at present. Therefore, to further understand Diviner observations, several experiments have been built (and continue to be built) in the department. These include: (a) a chamber for measuring the mid- and far- infrared emissivity of minerals and lunar samples in a simulated lunar environment; (b) a multiple-angle infrared reflectance apparatus; and (c) a mid- and far- infrared lunar environment goniometer, which is currently under construction. [1] Henderson, B. G. et al. (1996) J. Geophys. Res., 101, 14969-1497 [2] Henderson, B. G. & Jakosky, B. M. (1997) J. Geophys. Res., 102, 6567-6580 [3] Logan, L. M. and Hunt G. R. (1970) Science, 169, 865-866 [4] Logan, L. M. et al. (1973) J. Geophys. Res., 78, 4983-5003 [5] Nash, D. B. et al. (1993) J. Geophys. Res., 98, 23535-23552 [6] Paige, D. A. et al. (2009) Space Sci. Rev., 150, 125-160

  13. Using Wave-Current Observations to Predict Bottom Sediment Processes on Muddy Beaches

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-30

    Hill and Foda , 1999; Chan and Liu, 2009; Holland et al., 2009; and others). Many theoretical models of wave-mud interaction have been proposed...University of California at Berkeley, Doctoral thesis, 149p. Chou, H.-T., M.A. Foda , and J.R. Hunt (1993). Rheological response of cohesive sediments to...Raubenheimer (2008). Wave dissipation by muddy seafloors, Geophys. Res. Lett. 35/7, L07611. Foda , A.M., J.R. Hunt, and H.-T. Chou (1993). A nonlinear model

  14. Que nous apprennent les petits frères et sœurs sur les signes précoces d’autisme?1

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, Sally J.

    2010-01-01

    L’objectif de cette revue est de présenter une synthèse des réponses que l’on peut actuellement apporter à la question de savoir quelles sont les premières caractéristiques comportementales qui prédisent le développement de l’autisme. L’article se centre sur 5 points : la présence de Troubles du Spectre Autistique (TSA) dans des groupes de frères et sœurs puînés d’enfants déjà diagnostiqués, les patterns et caractéristiques du développement moteur, les patterns et caractéristiques du développement social et émotionnel, les patterns et caractéristiques de la communication intentionnelle verbale et non verbale, et les patterns qui marquent le début de comportements pathognomoniques de TSA. La discussion porte sur les aspects inattendus des résultats et les pistes de recherche nouvelles qu’ils peuvent engendrer. PMID:20890377

  15. Geometric Aspects of Artificial Ionospheric Layers Driven by High-Power HF-Heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milikh, G. M.; Eliasson, B.; Shao, X.; Djordjevic, B.; Mishin, E. V.; Zawdie, K.; Papadopoulos, K.

    2013-12-01

    We have generalized earlier developed multi-scale dynamic model for the creation and propagation of artificial plasma layers in the ionosphere [Eliasson et al, 2012] by including two dimensional effects in the horizontal direction. Such layers were observed during high-power high frequency HF heating experiments at HAARP [Pedersen et al., 2010]. We have numerically investigated the importance of different angles of incidence of ordinary mode waves on the Langmuir turbulence and the resulting electron acceleration that leads to the formation of artificial ionospheric layers. It was shown that the most efficient electron acceleration and subsequent ionization is obtained at angles between magnetic zenith and the vertical, where strong Langmuir turbulence dominates over weak turbulence. A role played by the heating wave propagation near caustics was also investigated. Eliasson, B. et al. (2012), J. Geophys. Res. 117, A10321, doi:10.1029/2012JA018105. Pedersen, T., et al. (2010), Geophys. Res. Lett., 37, L02106, doi:10.1029/2009GL041895.

  16. Temperature Dependences of Air-Broadening and Shift Parameters in the ν_3 Band of Ozone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Mary Ann H.; Devi, V. Malathy; Benner, D. Chris

    2015-06-01

    Line parameter errors can contribute significantly to the total errors in retrievals of terrestrial atmospheric ozone concentration profiles using the strong 9.6-μm band, particularly for nadir-viewing experiments Detailed knowledge of the interfering ozone signal is also needed for retrievals of other atmospheric species in this spectral region. We have determined Lorentz air-broadening and pressure-induced shift coefficients along with their temperature dependences for a number of transitions in the ν_3 fundamental band of 16O_3. These results were obtained by applying the multispectrum nonlinear least-squares fitting technique to a set of 31 high-resolution infrared absorption spectra of O_3 recorded at temperatures between 160 and 300 K with several different room-temperature and coolable sample cells at the McMath-Pierce Fourier transform spectrometer at the National Solar Observatory on Kitt Peak. We compare our results with other available measurements and with the ozone line parameters in the HITRAN database. J.~Worden et al., J.~Geophys.~Res. 109 (2004) 9308-9319. R.~Beer et al., Geophys.~Res.~Lett. 35 (2008) L09801. D.~Chris Benner et al., JQSRT 53 (1995) 705-721. Rothman et al., J. Quant. Spectrosc. Radiat. Transfer 130 (2013) 4. JQSRT 130 (2013) 4-50.

  17. Air-Broadening and Shift Parameters in the ν_3 Band of Ozone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, M. A. H.; Devi, V. Malathy; Benner, D. Chris

    2013-06-01

    Line parameter errors can contribute significantly to the total errors in retrievals of terrestrial atmospheric ozone concentration profiles using the strong 9.6-μm band, particularly for nadir-viewing experiments Detailed knowledge of the interfering ozone signal is also needed for retrievals of other atmospheric species in this spectral region. We have determined Lorentz air-broadening and pressure-induced shift coefficients along with their temperature dependences for a number of transitions in the ν_3 fundamental band of ^{16}O_3. These results were obtained by applying the multispectrum nonlinear least-squares fitting technique to a set of 31 high-resolution infrared absorption spectra of O_3 previously recorded at temperatures between 160 and 300 K with several different room-temperature and coolable sample cells at the McMath-Pierce Fourier transform spectrometer at the National Solar Observatory on Kitt Peak. We compare our results with other available measurements and with the ozone line parameters in the 2008 HITRAN database. J. Worden {et al., J. Geophys. Res. {109} (2004) 9308-9319.}. R. Beer {et al., Geophys. Res. Lett. {35} (2008) L09801. D. Chris Benner {et al., JQSRT {53} (1995) 705-721. L. S. Rothman {et al., JQSRT {110} (2009) 533-572.

  18. A deep scar in the flank of Tenerife (Canary Islands): Geophysical contribution to tsunami hazard assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coppo, Nicolas P.; Schnegg, Pierre-André; Falco, Pierik; Costa, Roberto

    2009-05-01

    Among the high-intensity on-Earth tsunami generating events, seismicity, submarine landslides, and volcano lateral collapses are the most important [Ward, S.H., 2001. Landslide tsunami. J. Geophy. Res. 106, 11201-11215; Holcomb, R.T., Searle, R.C., 1991. Large landslides from oceanic volcanoes. Mar. Geotech. 10, 19-32; Tinti, S., Bortolucci, E., Romagnoli, C., 2000. Computer simulations of tsunamis due to the sector collapse ar Stromboli, Italy. J. Volcano. Geotherm. Res. 96, 103-128; Ward, S.N., Day, S., 2003. Ritter Island Volcano — lateral collapse and the tsunami of 1888. Geophys. J. Int. 154, 891-902; MacGuire, W.J., 2003. Volcano instability and lateral collapse. Revista 1, 33-45]. Offshore bathymetry studies highlighted huge accumulations of large mass-waste flows (up to thousands cubic kilometres) inherited from past lateral collapses or submarine landslides [ Le Friant, A., Boudon, G., Deplus, C., Villemant, B., 2003. Large-scale flank collapse events during the activity of Montagne Pelée, Martinique, Lesser Antilles. J. Geophys. Res. 108, ECV13; Moore, J.G. et al., 1989. Prodigious submarine Landslides on the Hawaiian ridge. J. Geophys. Res. 94, 17465-17484] which spread over more than 100 km off the northern Tenerife (Canary Islands) coastline [Watts, A.B., Masson, D.G., 1995. A giant landslide on the north flank of Tenerife, Canary Islands. J. Geophys. Res. 100, 24487-24498]. Although mechanics and dynamics triggering such catastrophic events follow from combined complex processes and interactions [Hürlimann, M., Garcia-Piera, J.-O., Ledesma, A., 2000. Causes and mobility of large volcanic landslides: application to Tenerife, Canary Islands. J. Volcano. Geotherm. Res. 103, 121-134; Masson, D.G. et al., 2002. Slope failures on the flanks of the western Canary Islands. Earth-Sci. Rev. 57, 1-35; Reid, M.E., Sisson, T.W., Brien, D.L., 2001. Volcano collapse promoted by hydrothermal alteration and edifice shape, Mount Rainier, Washington. Geology 29, 779

  19. Modeling of the ALS linac

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, C.H.

    1996-08-01

    The ALS injector linac is used for the Beam Test Facility (BTF) and the Damping Experiments when it is available in between the ALS filings. These experiments usually require higher quality beams and a better characterization than is normally required for ALS operations. This paper focuses on the beam emittance, energy tilt, and especially the longitudinal variation of the beam parameters. For instance, the authors want to avoid longitudinal variations at the low beta section of the BTF. On the other hand, a large energy tilt is required for post-acceleration compression of the bunch using an alpha magnet. The PARMELA code was modified to calculate and display longitudinal variations of the emittance ellipse. Using the Microsoft Development Studio under Windows NT environment the code can handle a much larger number of particles than was previously possible.

  20. Areal Crater Density Analysis of Volcanic Smooth Plains: A New Approach to Distinguishing Age Units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostrach, L. R.; Robinson, M. S.

    2013-12-01

    and composition) are not observed on Mercury [e.g., 13-15], so the ACD method can be used to test hypotheses concerning timing of smooth plains emplacement [15]. [1] Hartmann W.K. et al. (1981) In: BVTP, 1049-1127. [2] Stöffler D. et al. (2006) Rev. Mineral. Geochem, 60, 519-596. [3] Hiesinger H. et al. (2011) Spec. Pap. - Geol. Soc. Am, 477, 1-51. [4] Pieters C.M. (1978) Proc. Lunar Plan. Sci. Conf, 9th, 2825-2849. [5] Hiesinger H. et al. (2000) J. Geophys. Res, 105, 29239-29275. [6] Staid M.I. and C.M. Pieters (2001) J. Geophys. Res, 106, 27887-27900. [7] Staid M.I. et al. (2011) J. Geophys. Res, 116, E00G10. [8] Lucey P.G. et al. (2000) J. Geophys. Res, 105, 20297-20306. [9] Schaber G.G. (1973) In: Apollo 17 PSR, NASA SP-330, 30-17 to 30-25. [10] Schaber G.G. et al. (1975) The Moon, 13, 395-423. [11] Boyce J.M. and A.L. Dial Jr. (1975) Proc. Lunar Sci. Conf, 6th, 2585-2595. [12] Bugiolacchi R. and J.E. Guest (2008) Icarus, 197, 1-18. [13] Robinson M.S. et al. (2008) Science, 321, 66-69. [14] Denevi B.W. et al. (2009) Science, 324, 613-618. [15] Denevi B.W. et al. (2013) J. Geophys. Res, 118, 1-17.

  1. How Much Carbonate in Mars Rocks?: A Co-Analysis of CRISM, TES and THEMIS Data at the Nili Fossae Carbonate Plains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, C. S.; Ehlmann, B. L.

    2013-12-01

    minimum value, as the carbonate bearing rock exposures are significantly smaller than a single TES pixel. In co-located CRISM, THEMIS, and CTX data we observe an areal mixture of 2 components: 1) high TI (~600 J K-1 m-2 s-1/2) carbonate bearing, olivine-basalt bedrock and 2) low TI (~270 J K-1 m-2 s-1/2) carbonate-poor, olivine-basalt sands. By relating the TES spectral unmixing values to the areal fraction of carbonate rock exposures mapped using alternate datasets, the carbonate abundance of the only the bedrock component will be constrained. Furthermore, using Hapke modeling of CRISM spectra, we further constrain our abundance estimates of the unit. References: Ehlmann, B. L., et al. (2008), Science, 322(5909), 1828. Ehlmann, B. L., et al. (2009), J. Geophys. Res., 114, E00D08. Fergason, R. L., et al. (2006), J. Geophys. Res., 111, E12004. Hamilton, V. E. and P.R. Christensen (2005), Geology, 33(6), 433-436. Mangold, N., et al. (2007), J. Geophys. Res., 112, E08S04. Mustard, J. F., et al. (2007), J. Geophys. Res., 112, E08S03. Mustard, J. F., et al. (2009), J. Geophys. Res., 114, E00D12.

  2. Superconductivity in Al/Al2O3 interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palnichenko, A. V.; Vyaselev, O. M.; Mazilkin, A. A.; Khasanov, S. S.

    2016-06-01

    Metastable superconductivity at Tc ≈ 65 K has been observed in Al foil subjected to special oxidation process, according to the ac magnetic susceptibility and electrical resistance measurements. Comparison of the ac susceptibility and the dc magnetization measurements infers that the superconductivity arises within the interfacial granular layer formed during the oxidation process between metallic aluminum and its oxide.

  3. Baumard et al.'s moral markets lack market dynamics.

    PubMed

    Fessler, Daniel M T; Holbrook, Colin

    2013-02-01

    Market models are indeed indispensable to understanding the evolution of cooperation and its emotional substrates. Unfortunately, Baumard et al. eschew market thinking in stressing the supposed invariance of moral/cooperative behavior across circumstances. To the contrary, humans display contingent morality/cooperation, and these shifts are best accounted for by market models of partner choice for mutually beneficial collaboration.

  4. FTD and ALS: genetic ties that bind.

    PubMed

    Orr, Harry T

    2011-10-20

    Curiously, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD), seemingly disparate neurodegenerative disorders, can be inherited together. Two groups (DeJesus-Hernandez et al. and Renton et al.) show that the long sought after ALS/FTD mutation on chromosomal region 9p is a hexanucleotide expansion in C90RF72. These studies, plus a study on X-linked ALS/FTD, provide molecular starting points for identifying pathways that link ALS and FTD pathogenesis.

  5. ALS - A unique design approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamberlain, Roger A.

    1990-09-01

    An advanced launch system (ALS), which is intended to be flexible and to deliver a wide range of payloads at a reduced cost, is discussed. The ALS concept also features total quality management, modular subsystems, standardized interfaces, standardized missions, and off-line payload encapsulation. The technological improvements include manufacturing of dry structures, use of composite materials, adaptive guidance and control systems, and laser-initiated radar systems. The operational improvements range from paperless management, to rocket engine leak detection devices and automated ground operations.

  6. A Search for Plasma "Fingers" in the Io Torus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaggar, S.; Schneider, N. M.; Bagenal, F.; Trauger, J. T.

    1996-09-01

    We have compared model and data images of the Io plasma torus to test the radial diffusion model of Yang et al. (J. Geophys. Res., Vol 99, p. 8755, 1994). They predict that radial diffusion takes the form of `fingers' of dense plasma flowing outward due to the centrifugal force. Furthermore, they show that the spatial scale of these significant longitudinal variations is approximately 15(o) . The observations used in this study were obtained using a 2.4m telescope at Las Campanas Observatory using a narrowband filter to isolate emissions from S(++) at 9531 Angstroms. S(++) images are dominated by emission from the warm torus where outward radial transport is expected. Although S(+) images are brighter, they are contaminated by emission from the cold torus where fingers are not expected. We used the Colorado Io Torus Emission Package (CITEP)(Taylor et al., J. Geophys. Res., Vol. 100, p. 19541, 1995) to simulate images of the torus with fingers. CITEP is a comprehensive program which incorporates accurate atomic physics, plasma physics and magnetic field models to simulate the brightness and morphology or torus emissions. We used a Voyager empirical model (Bagenal, J. Geophys. Res., Vol. 99, p. 11043, 1994) modulated by a sinusoidal longitudinal density variation with a 15(o) period and an amplitude proportional to the density at that L-shell. We compared simulated images with data to determine the minimum density contrast necessary to make fingers detectable. We place an upper limit on the density contrast of +/- 20% on a 15(o) spatial scale. We conclude that either the density contrast of this mode of transport is small, or other processes are more important for radial transport. This constraint can also be used in other radial diffusion models which predict density variations on this spatial scale. This work has been supported by NASA's Planetary Astronomy and Planetary Atmospheres programs.

  7. Gravity wave effects in the thermosphere during sudden stratospheric warmings and vertical coupling between the lower and upper atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yiǧit, Erdal; Medvedev, Alexander S.

    2016-07-01

    Gravity waves are primarily generated in the lower atmosphere, propagate upward, and have profound effects not only in the middle atmosphere but also at much higher altitudes. However, their effects in the upper atmosphere beyond the turbopause ( 105 km) have not been sufficiently studied. Using a general circulating model extending from the lower atmosphere to upper thermosphere and incorporating a whole atmosphere nonlinear parameterization of small-scale GWs developed by Yiǧit et al. (2008)}, we demonstrate that not only GWs penetrate into the thermosphere above the turbopause but also produce substantial dynamical and thermal effects that are comparable to ion drag and Joule heating. During sudden stratospheric warmings, GW propagation in the thermosphere is enhanced by more than a factor of three (Yiǧit and Medvedev, 2012)}, producing appreciable body forcing of up to 600 m s^{-1} day^{-1} around 250-300 km. The resultant impact on the variability of the thermospheric circulation can exceed ± 50% depending on the phase of the sudden warming (Yiǧit et al., 2014)}. References: Yiǧit, E., and A. S. Medvedev (2012), Gravity waves in the thermosphere during a sudden stratospheric warming, Geophys. Res. Lett., 39, L21101, doi:10.1029/2012GL053812. Yiǧit, E., A. D. Aylward, and A. S. Medvedev (2008), Parameterization of the effects of vertically propagating gravity waves for thermosphere general circulation models: Sensitivity study, J. Geophys. Res., 113, D19106, doi:10.1029/2008JD010135. Yiǧit, E., A. S. Medvedev, S. L. England, and T. J. Immel (2014), Simulated vari- ability of the high-latitude thermosphere induced by small-scale gravity waves during a sudden stratospheric warming, J. Geophys. Res. Space Physics, 119, doi:10.1002/2013JA019283.

  8. Empirical age spectra in the lower stratosphere derived from in-situ measurements of halocarbons during TACTS/ESMVal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boenisch, Harald; Engel, Andreas; Keber, Timo

    2014-05-01

    The age spectrum is the transit time distribution of the fluid constituents in a specific stratospheric air parcel and therefore contains all the information of the air parcel's transport history. Unfortunately, it is not possible to directly measure the age spectrum of a stratospheric air parcel. Only the first moment of the distribution - the mean age of air - is directly observable from observations of passive tracers like SF6 and CO2. However, it is possible to reconstruct the age spectrum from a bunch of chemical active tracers with different stratospheric lifetimes (Schoeberl et al., 2005; Ehhalt et al., 2007) assuming to first order that the age spectrum follows the analytical solution given by Hall and Plumb (1994). Here, we will present empirical age spectra in the extratropical lower stratosphere of the northern hemisphere derived from a dataset gathered during the combined campaigns TACTS (Transport and Composition in the UT/LMS) and ESMVal (Earth System Model Validation). About 20 halocarbons have been measured with the new developed in-situ GC/MS instrument GHOST-MS. These chemical active species have different stratospheric lifetimes ranging from several days (e.g. Methylbromoform) up to several decades (e.g. CFC-12). Ehhalt, D. H., Rohrer, F., Blake, D. R., Kinnison, D. E., and Konopka, P.: On the use of nonmethane hydrocarbons for the determination of age spectra in the lower stratosphere, J. Geophys. Res., 112, D12208, 10.1029/2006jd007686, 2007. Hall, T. M., and Plumb, R. A.: Age as a Diagnostic of Stratospheric Transport, J. Geophys. Res., 99, 1059-1070, 1994. Schoeberl, M. R., Douglass, A. R., Polansky, B., Boone, C., Walker, K. A., and Bernath, P.: Estimation of stratospheric age spectrum from chemical tracers, J. Geophys. Res., 110, D21303, 10.1029/2005jd006125, 2005.

  9. Development of Hydrophone and Its Aapplications Use in OBS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, C. R.; Kuo, B. Y.; Wang, C. C.; Chang, H. K.; Jang, J. P.

    2014-12-01

    The seismic wave is translated to T-wave when earthquakes occur below seafloor with a traveling speed of 1500 m/s in the SOFAR channel which centers roughly at 1000 m water depths (Tolstoy and Ewing, 1950). Many studies have shown that hydrophone can be set up in the SOFAR channel to collect acoustic data to investigate plate movement (Fox and Dziak, 1999), seismisity (Fox et.al, 2001), characteristic of T-wave (Park et.al, 2001), seafloor volcanism (Nicolas, 1989), among others. Institute of Earth Sciences of Academia Sinica has been collaborating with Taiwan Ocean Research Institute (TORI) and the Institute of Undersea Technology (IUT) of the National Sun Yat-sen University (NSYSU) to succefully build a new wide-band OBS (Yardbird). We hope that Yardbird is not only an OBS but also a multi-function underwater recording plotform. Therefor we are developing a low-power consumption, inexpensive hydrophone to catch acoustic signals. The protoypte of it has passed a series of tests and got some seismic seafloor data. This paper describes the design goal of hydrophone, component specifications, field data analyzed, and discusses the future directions of instrument development. Keywords: T-wave; Hydrophone; OBS; acoustic signal Referance: 1 Fox, C. G. and R. P. Dziak, Intenal deformation of the Gorda Plate observedb y hydroacoustimc onitoring, J . Geophys Res., 104, 17603-17615, 1999. 2 Fox, C. G., H. Matsumoto and T.K.Lau, Monitoring Pacific Ocean seismicity from an autonomous hydrophone array. , J . Geophys. Res., 106,4183-4206, 2001. 3 Nicolas, A., Structures of ophiolites and dynamics of oceanic lithosphere. Dordrecht ; Boston : Kluwer Academic Publishers, 1989. 4. Park, M., R.I. Odom, and D.J. Soukup (2001). Modal scattering: a key to understanding oceanic T-waves, Geophys. Res. Lett. 28, 3401-3404. 5. Tolstoy, I. and M. Ewing (1950). The T phase of shallow-focus earthquakes, Bull. Seismol. Soc. Am. 40, 25-51.

  10. Retraction RETRACTION of "Efficacy and safety of nucleoside analogues in preventing vertical transmission of the hepatitis B virus from father to infant", by L.-H. Cao, P.-L. Zhao, Z.-M. Liu, S.-C. Sun, D.-B. Xu, J.-D. Zhang and Z.-H. Shao - Genet. Mol. Res. 14 (4): 15539-15546 (2015).

    PubMed

    Cao, L-H; Zhao, P-L; Liu, Z-M; Sun, S-C; Xu, D-B; Zhang, J-D; Shao, Z-H

    2016-10-07

    The retracted article is: Cao L-H, Zhao P-L, Liu Z-M, Sun S-C, et al. (2015). Efficacy and safety of nucleoside analogues in preventing vertical transmission of the hepatitis B virus from father to infant. Genet. Mol. Res. 14: 15539-15546. The article published in Genetics and Molecular Research 14 (4): 15539-15546 (2015) is a very good paper, but it appears that the authors' group submitted this manuscript to multiple journals, which is ethical misconduct. This manuscript (similar language and identical data) was published in the Experimental and Therapeutic Medicine Journal prior to being submitted to GMR. There are parts copied from "Efficacy and safety of nucleoside analogs on blocking father-to-infant vertical transmission of hepatitis B virus", by Li-Hau Cao, Pei-Li Zhao, Zhi-Min Liu, Shao-Chun Sun, et al. Exp. Ther. Med. 9 (6): 2251-2256 (2015) - DOI: 10.3892/etm.2015.2379. The GMR editorial staff was alerted and after a thorough investigation, there is strong reason to believe that the peer review process was failure. Also, after review and contacting the authors, the editors of Genetics and Molecular Research decided to retract this article in accordance with the recommendations of the Committee on Publication Ethics (COPE). The authors and their institutions were advised of this serious breach of ethics.

  11. Excavation of buried hydrated minerals on Mars by impact cratering? (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, J.; Poulet, F.; Loizeau, D.; Bibring, J.

    2010-12-01

    buried, pre-existing phyllosilicates is thought to be the driving process. Other hydrated mineral formation pathways linked with impact cratering include impact-induced hydrothermal alteration [10-12], shock-induced and post-impact changes to mineral composition. [1]Poulet et al., Nature 438, 623 (2005). [2]Murchie et al., J. Geophys. Res. 114, E00D06 (2009). [3]Bibring et al., Science 312, 5772 (2006). [4]Baratoux et al., J. Geophys. Res. 112, E08S05 (2007). [5]Tanaka et al., J. Geophys. Res. 108, (E4), 8043 (2003). [6]Carter et al., Science 328, 1682 (2010). [7]Bibring et al., Eur. Space Agency Spec. Pub. 1240, 37 (2004). [8]Murchie et al., J. Geophys. Res. 114, E00D07 (2009). [9]Carter et al., Proc. Lunar Planet. Sci. Conf. 40, abstr. 2028 (2009). [10]Abramov and Kring, J. Geophys. Res. 110, (E12), E12S09 (2005). [11]Schwenzer and Kring, Geology 37, 1091 (2009). [12]Marzo et al., Icarus 208, 667-683 (2010).

  12. Dynamic Modeling of ALS Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Harry

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of dynamic modeling and simulation of Advanced Life Support (ALS) systems is to help design them. Static steady state systems analysis provides basic information and is necessary to guide dynamic modeling, but static analysis is not sufficient to design and compare systems. ALS systems must respond to external input variations and internal off-nominal behavior. Buffer sizing, resupply scheduling, failure response, and control system design are aspects of dynamic system design. We develop two dynamic mass flow models and use them in simulations to evaluate systems issues, optimize designs, and make system design trades. One model is of nitrogen leakage in the space station, the other is of a waste processor failure in a regenerative life support system. Most systems analyses are concerned with optimizing the cost/benefit of a system at its nominal steady-state operating point. ALS analysis must go beyond the static steady state to include dynamic system design. All life support systems exhibit behavior that varies over time. ALS systems must respond to equipment operating cycles, repair schedules, and occasional off-nominal behavior or malfunctions. Biological components, such as bioreactors, composters, and food plant growth chambers, usually have operating cycles or other complex time behavior. Buffer sizes, material stocks, and resupply rates determine dynamic system behavior and directly affect system mass and cost. Dynamic simulation is needed to avoid the extremes of costly over-design of buffers and material reserves or system failure due to insufficient buffers and lack of stored material.

  13. Titan's Timescales: Constraints On The Age of The Methane-Supported Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nixon, C. A.; Mandt, K.; Lorenz, R. D.

    2012-12-01

    Titan's atmosphere, unique amongst moons in the solar system presents a persistent riddle: how can it survive over geologic time if its methane is being rapidly destroyed by solar radiation and will last only another ~20 Myr? (Yung et al. 1984; Krasnopolsky 2010) Methane, the second most abundant (CH4, 2-6%) atmospheric gas after nitrogen (N2, 98-94%) supports the entire atmosphere via its greenhouse effect (McKay 1991) and total loss of methane could theoretically lead to atmospheric collapse (Lorenz et al. 1997). In this presentation we will review the available evidence constraining methane's prior lifetime in the atmosphere, including (i) isotopic constraints, especially D/H and 12C/13C in CH4 (Nixon et al. 2012; Mandt et al. 2012), 40Ar and 36Ar abundances, and 14N/15N in N2 (Niemann et al. 2010); (ii) the surface hydrocarbon inventory (Lorenz et al. 2008); (iii) the time to chemically produce Titan's CO (Hörst et al. 2008); (iv) the crater retention age of the surface (Neish and Lorenz 2012); (v) interior models (Tobie et al. 2006); (vi) changes in Titan's shape (Choukroun and Sotin 2012). Each of these independent lines of evidence yields a time estimate that, although individually ambiguous, combine to provide context for a cohesive understanding of the history of Titan's methane. We will conclude by summarizing the current constraints on the age of Titan's atmosphere in its present form, and highlight the key remaining challenges and critical measurements and modeling work needed to further refine our understanding of Titan's perplexing atmospheric history. References: Choukroun, M. and Sotin, C., Geophysical Research Letters, 39, L04201, 2012. Hörst, S. M., R. V. Yelle and V. Vuitton, J. Geophys. Res., 113, E10006, 2008. Krasnopolsky, V. A., Plan. and Space Sci., 58, 1507-1515, 2010. Lorenz, R. D., C. P. McKay and J. I. Lunine, Science, 275, 642-644, 1997. Lorenz, R. D. et al., Geophys. Res. Lett., 35, L02206, 2008. McKay, C. P., J. B. Pollack and R

  14. Salinisation des nappes côtières : cas de la nappe nord du Sahel de Sfax, Tunisie

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trabelsi, Rouaida; Zaïri, Moncef; Smida, Habib; Ben Dhia, Hamed

    2005-04-01

    The intensive agricultural and economic activities induce the increase of the risk of groundwater quality degradation through high groundwater pumping rates. The salinization and contamination are the main sources of this pollution, especially in coastal aquifers. The explanation of the origin of salinity for the shallow aquifer of Northern Sahel of Sfax was analysed by a chemical study of the groundwater main compounds. The partitioning of groundwaters into homogenous groups is undertaken by graphical techniques, including a Stiff pattern diagram, an expanded Durov diagram and several binary diagrams. The study indicates the presence of various salinization processes. In the recharge area, salinization is the result of dissolution/precipitation of the aquifer formation material (group I). The irrigation water return and the intensive pumping have been identified as major sources of salinization in the south by direct cation exchange and mixing reactions (groups II and III). The anomaly of high groundwater salinity observed near the Hazeg zone was explained by the presence of a seawater intrusion in this area. This hypothesis is related to the high chloride concentration, to the presence of inverse cation exchange reactions (group IV), and to the piezometric level inferior to sea level. To cite this article: R. Trabelsi et al., C. R. Geoscience 337 (2005).

  15. Large rectification magnetoresistance in nonmagnetic Al/Ge/Al heterojunctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Kun; Li, Huan-Huan; Grünberg, Peter; Li, Qiang; Ye, Sheng-Tao; Tian, Yu-Feng; Yan, Shi-Shen; Lin, Zhao-Jun; Kang, Shi-Shou; Chen, Yan-Xue; Liu, Guo-Lei; Mei, Liang-Mo

    2015-09-01

    Magnetoresistance and rectification are two fundamental physical properties of heterojunctions and respectively have wide applications in spintronics devices. Being different from the well known various magnetoresistance effects, here we report a brand new large magnetoresistance that can be regarded as rectification magnetoresistance: the application of a pure small sinusoidal alternating-current to the nonmagnetic Al/Ge Schottky heterojunctions can generate a significant direct-current voltage, and this rectification voltage strongly varies with the external magnetic field. We find that the rectification magnetoresistance in Al/Ge Schottky heterojunctions is as large as 250% at room temperature, which is greatly enhanced as compared with the conventional magnetoresistance of 70%. The findings of rectification magnetoresistance open the way to the new nonmagnetic Ge-based spintronics devices of large rectification magnetoresistance at ambient temperature under the alternating-current due to the simultaneous implementation of the rectification and magnetoresistance in the same devices.

  16. Large rectification magnetoresistance in nonmagnetic Al/Ge/Al heterojunctions

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Kun; Li, Huan-huan; Grünberg, Peter; Li, Qiang; Ye, Sheng-tao; Tian, Yu-feng; Yan, Shi-shen; Lin, Zhao-jun; Kang, Shi-shou; Chen, Yan-xue; Liu, Guo-lei; Mei, Liang-mo

    2015-01-01

    Magnetoresistance and rectification are two fundamental physical properties of heterojunctions and respectively have wide applications in spintronics devices. Being different from the well known various magnetoresistance effects, here we report a brand new large magnetoresistance that can be regarded as rectification magnetoresistance: the application of a pure small sinusoidal alternating-current to the nonmagnetic Al/Ge Schottky heterojunctions can generate a significant direct-current voltage, and this rectification voltage strongly varies with the external magnetic field. We find that the rectification magnetoresistance in Al/Ge Schottky heterojunctions is as large as 250% at room temperature, which is greatly enhanced as compared with the conventional magnetoresistance of 70%. The findings of rectification magnetoresistance open the way to the new nonmagnetic Ge-based spintronics devices of large rectification magnetoresistance at ambient temperature under the alternating-current due to the simultaneous implementation of the rectification and magnetoresistance in the same devices. PMID:26387967

  17. AlSb/InAs/AlSb quantum wells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kroemer, Herbert

    1990-01-01

    Researchers studied the InAs/AlSb system recently, obtaining 12nm wide quantum wells with room temperature mobilities up to 28,000 cm(exp 2)/V center dot S and low-temperature mobilities up to 325,000 cm(exp 2)/V center dot S, both at high electron sheet concentrations in the 10(exp 12)/cm(exp 2) range (corresponding to volume concentrations in the 10(exp 18)/cm(exp 2) range). These wells were not intentionally doped; the combination of high carrier concentrations and high mobilities suggest that the electrons are due to not-intentional modulation doping by an unknown donor in the AlSb barriers, presumably a stoichiometric defect, like an antisite donor. Inasmuch as not intentionally doped bulk AlSb is semi-insulating, the donor must be a deep one, being ionized only by draining into the even deeper InAs quantum well. The excellent transport properties are confirmed by other observations, like excellent quantum Hall effect data, and the successful use of the quantum wells as superconductive weak links between Nb electrodes, with unprecendentedly high critical current densities. The system is promising for future field effect transistors (FETs), but many processing problems must first be solved. Although the researchers have achieved FETs, the results so far have not been competitive with GaAs FETs.

  18. Cadmium and the reticuloendothelial system (RES). A specific defect in blood clearance of soluble aggregates of IgG by the liver in mice given cadmium.

    PubMed Central

    Knutson, D W; Vredevoe, D L; Aoki, K R; Hays, E J; Levy, L

    1980-01-01

    The ability of the reticuloendothelial system (RES) to bind and catabolize soluble stable heat aggregates of 125I-IgG (A-IgG) was studied in mice given oral cadmium. Cadmium caused a delay in the circulation clearance of A-IgG in intact animals. The defect was due to impaired liver uptake of A-IgG and correlated with increased liver cadmium. Subsequent catabolism of bound A-IgG by liver slices was not affected. The defect was specific in that clearance of aggregated human serum albumin and colloidal carbon was normal in cadmium mice; this suggests that cadmium may affect either Fc or complement receptors of Kupffer cells in liver. PMID:7419241

  19. Bringing comfort and convenience to the colonial table: Delhaize Frères & Cie's Colonial Department in the 1920s and 1930s.

    PubMed

    Teughels, Nelleke

    2015-11-01

    The paper explores the role of convenient shopping in establishing a sense of comfort for Europeans in a colonial environment. So far, there has been little investigation into how Belgian retailers tried to gain a firm foothold in the Congo, how they presented themselves and promoted their wares. This paper examines the activities of the colonial department of Delhaize Frères & Cie 'Le Lion', Belgium's first and largest food multiple. It examines how this large grocery chain tried to establish itself in the Congo, what motivations it had to extend its business to the colony, what audience it wished to reach, what products and services it had to offer and what sales and marketing strategies were used. It appears that convenient shopping was one of the key selling points Delhaize's advertising, while also characterising its products as indispensable for Europeans' comfort, moral respectability and homely warmth in a so-called primitive, backward environment.

  20. Effect of interface geometry on electron tunnelling in Al/Al2O3/Al junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koberidze, M.; Feshchenko, A. V.; Puska, M. J.; Nieminen, R. M.; Pekola, J. P.

    2016-04-01

    We investigate how different interface geometries of an Al/Al2O3 junction, a common component of modern tunnel devices, affect electron transport through the tunnel barrier. We study six distinct Al/Al2O3 interfaces which differ in stacking sequences of the metal and the oxide surface atoms and the oxide termination. To construct model potential barrier profiles for each examined geometry, we rely on first-principles density-functional theory (DFT) calculations for the barrier heights and the shapes of the interface regions as well as on experimental data for the barrier widths. We show that even tiny variations in the atomic arrangement at the interface cause significant changes in the tunnel barrier parameters and, consequently, in electron transport properties. Especially, we find that variations in the crucial barrier heights and widths can be as large as 2 eV and 5 Å, respectively. Finally, to gain information about the average properties of the measured junction, we fit the conductance calculated within the Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin approximation to the experimental data and interpret the fit parameters with the help of the DFT results.

  1. A Community Terrain-Following Ocean Modeling System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-09-30

    turbulent closure model for geophysical fluid problems. Rev. Geophys., 20, 851-875. Mellor, G. L., S. Hakkinen and T. Ezer and R. Patchen, 2002: A...Analysis of results from a numerical ocean model, J. Geophys. Res., 10.1029/2002JC001509. Mellor, G. L., S. Hakkinen and T. Ezer and R. Patchen, 2002: A

  2. Comment on: Tarasov, A. & Titov, K., 2013, On the use of the Cole-Cole equations in spectral induced polarization, Geophys. J. Int., 195, 352-356

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macnae, James

    2015-07-01

    A recent paper by Tarasov and Titov suggested that the Cole-Cole conductivity models should be preferred to the Pelton resistivity model in fitting induced polarization responses. Each model has four parameters: resistivity ρ (or its inverse conductivity σ), chargeability m, time parameter τ and frequency dependence c. Tarasov and Titov showed that in fitting experimental data, 3 of the parameters directly correspond across the two formulations, but that there is a difference between the Pelton and Cole-Cole model in that parameter τ is only the same at low frequency, but is an entangled function with m and c at high frequencies in the Pelton formulation. This claim of inconsistent τ was based on using the Pelton complex resistivity formulation and the Cole-Cole complex conductivity equation to analyse complex conductivity data as a function of frequency. However, if Pelton and Cole-Cole models are used to fit complex resistivity, rather than fitting conductivity, then it is the Cole-Cole model that has an entangled parameter at high chargeability m values. Simple testing shows that a Pelton model used to fit resistivity has all four model parameters directly corresponding with conductivity data fitted with a Cole-Cole model. The conclusion is that Cole-Cole and Pelton models in fact require identical independent parameters that can fit experimental or synthetic data, provided the Pelton resistivity formulation is restricted to fitting to resistivity data, and the Cole-Cole conductivity formulation is restricted to fitting conductivity results.

  3. Risk Analysis and Prediction of Floor Failure Mechanisms at Longwall Face in Parvadeh-I Coal Mine using Rock Engineering System (RES)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aghababaei, Sajjad; Saeedi, Gholamreza; Jalalifar, Hossein

    2016-05-01

    The floor failure at longwall face decreases productivity and safety, increases operation costs, and causes other serious problems. In Parvadeh-I coal mine, the timber is used to prevent the puncture of powered support base into the floor. In this paper, a rock engineering system (RES)-based model is presented to evaluate the risk of floor failure mechanisms at the longwall face of E 2 and W 1 panels. The presented model is used to determine the most probable floor failure mechanism, effective factors, damaged regions and remedial actions. From the analyzed results, it is found that soft floor failure is dominant in the floor failure mechanism at Parvadeh-I coal mine. The average of vulnerability index (VI) for soft, buckling and compressive floor failure mechanisms was estimated equal to 52, 43 and 30 for both panels, respectively. By determining the critical VI for soft floor failure mechanism equal to 54, the percentage of regions with VIs beyond the critical VI in E 2 and W 1 panels is equal to 65.5 and 30, respectively. The percentage of damaged regions showed that the excess amount of used timber to prevent the puncture of weak floor below the powered support base is equal to 4,180,739 kg. RES outputs and analyzed results showed that setting and yielding load of powered supports, length of face, existent water at face, geometry of powered supports, changing the cutting pattern at longwall face and limiting the panels to damaged regions with supercritical VIs could be considered to control the soft floor failure in this mine. The results of this research could be used as a useful tool to identify the damaged regions prior to mining operation at longwall panel for the same conditions.

  4. Providing for the consideration of the resolution (H. Res. 36) establishing a select committee to investigate and report on the attack on the United States consulate in Benghazi, Libya.

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Rep. Stockman, Steve [R-TX-36

    2013-07-18

    07/30/2013 Motion to Discharge Committee filed by Mr. Stockman. Petition No: 113-4. (Discharge petition text with signatures.) (All Actions) Notes: On 7/30/2013, a motion was filed to discharge the Committee on Rules from the consideration of H.Res.306 a resolution providing for consideration of H.Res.36. A discharge petition requires 218 signatures for further action. (Discharge Petition No. 113-4: text with signatures.) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  5. Providing for the consideration of the resolution (H. Res. 251) directing the Secretary of the Treasury to transmit to the House of Representatives all information in his possession relating to specific communications with American International Group, Inc. (AIG).

    THOMAS, 111th Congress

    Rep. LaTourette, Steven C. [R-OH-14

    2009-04-23

    05/07/2009 Motion to Discharge Committee filed by Mr. LaTourette. Petition No: 111-3. (Discharge petition text with signatures.) (All Actions) Notes: On 5/7/2009, a motion was filed to discharge the Committee on Rules from consideration of H.Res.359 a resolution providing for consideration of H.Res.251. A discharge petition requires 218 signatures for further action. (Discharge Petition No. 111-3: text with signatures.) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  6. Aspects théoriques et expérimentaux du dopage physique (implantation) des polymères électroactifs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moliton, A.; Duroux, J. L.; Froyer, G.

    In this paper is presented the physicist point of view concerning the transport mechanisms and the doping of electroactive polymers, and the main results collected by physical doping (ion implantation) of these materials. In a first step, the Peierls transition is explained in the frame of solid state physics and we show by using the Hückel theory that a band gap shows up in a model atoms separated by bond lengths alternating between two values. Doping mechanisms and their effects on the band structure are presented following Bredas theory through the example of polyparaphenylene. Therefore we show that defects (polarons and bipolarons) are introduced on the chain generating localized gap states. For high level doping, bipolaron bands are obtained which partly close the gap. The second step of this paper describes the overall conduction process and not only the intrachain process. It may be explained in terms of Mott theory (variable range hoping) elaborated for amorphous semiconducting materials. From the experimental point of view, cristallographic studies performed so far show that dopants are localized in intersticial position and thus can transfer charge to the polymer chain. Some examples of implantation profiles are presented in electroactive polymers, it is possible to calculate the mean ion range from the stopping powers deduced from implantation parameters. With large implantation parameters, particularly E > 100 keV, polymer degradation becomes noticeable and is constant whatever the polymer type, electroactive or not. With smoother parameters, electroactive polymers can be doped efficiently and in a stable way allowing thus the practical formation of components which should become important in the forth coming years. Dans cet article nous présentons essentiellement du point de vue du physicien d'une part les mécanismes de conduction et de dopage des polymères électroactifs, et d'autre part les principaux résultats obtenus à la suite du dopage

  7. Relativity and Al^+ Optical Clocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, Chin-Wen; Hume, David B.; Wineland, David J.; Rosenband, Till

    2010-03-01

    We have constructed an optical clock based on quantum logic spectroscopy of an Al+ ion that has a fractional frequency inaccuracy of 8.6x10-18. The frequency of the ^1S0<->^3P0 clock transition is compared to that of a previously constructed Al^+ optical clock with a statistical measurement uncertainty of 7.0x10-18. The two clocks exhibit a relative stability of 2.8x10-15&-1/2circ;, and a fractional frequency difference of -1.8x10-17, consistent with the accuracy limit of the older clock. By comparing the frequencies of the clocks, we have observed relativistic effects, such as time dilation due to velocities less than 10 m/s and the gravitational red shift from a 0.33 m height change of one of the clocks.

  8. A Verification of Optical Depth Retrievals From High Resolution Satellite Imagery

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-03-01

    Mauna Loa measurements, comparisons, inferred particle size distributions, radiative effects, and relationship to lidar data. J. Geophys. Res., 98...photometers operated by NASA and LOA -PHOTON (CNRS) that provides observations of spectral AOD, inversion products, and precipitable water in diverse

  9. Dual Hemisphere Investigations of Ionospheric Irregularities that Disrupt Radio Communications and Navigation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-07-25

    Mouginot, J. , Morgan, D., & Gurnett, The equ ivalent slab thickness of Mars ’ ionosphere: Implications for thermospheric temperature Geophys. Res. Lett. , 42, 3560-3568, doi:l0.1002/2015GL063096, 2015. 8

  10. Improving the Bulk Formula for Sea-Surface Fluxes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-14

    weak SST heterogeneity. J. Geophys. Res, 115, D11103,doi:10.1029/2009JD013161. Vickers D and L. Mahrt 2010: Sea-surface roughness lengths in the midlatitude coastal zone. Quart. J. Roy. Meterol. Soc. 136, 1089 -1093.

  11. Addendum: shiue, I.; et Al. 2014 future Earth young scientists conference on integrated science and knowledge co-production for ecosystems and human well-being. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public health 2014, 11, 11553-11558.

    PubMed

    Shiue, Ivy; Samberg, Leah; Kulohoma, Benard; Dogaru, Diana; Wyborn, Carina; Hamel, Perrine; Jørgensen, Peter Søgaard; Lussier, Paul; Sundaram, Bharath; Lim, Michelle; Tironi, Antonio

    2015-02-12

    The authors would like to add the following affiliation for Peter Søgaard Jørgensen of paper [1]:   8 International Network of Next-Generation Ecologists, Universitetsparken 15, Building 3, Copenhagen 2100, Denmark[...].

  12. Comments on Hynes et al. Prevalence of Marijuana Use among University Students in Bolivia, Colombia, Ecuador and Peru. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2015, 12, 5233–5240

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Novack, Maria Claudia; Ortiz-Ortiz, Maria Teresa; Castañeda-Carbajal, Bruno; Alvarado, German F.

    2015-01-01

    We have read and analyzed the article entitled “Prevalence of marijuana use among university students in Bolivia, Colombia, Ecuador and Peru”. We propose some objective points which could enhance the internal validity of the study (i.e., we suggest to report participation proportions). PMID:26393629

  13. Optical Properties Of Mineral Dust Particles Mixed With Black Carbon In Indo-Ganges Basin, Northern India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, S. K.; Tripathi, S. N.

    2008-12-01

    non spherical shapes such as concentric spheres, spheroids, ellipsoids and layered rectangular bar, and various combinations of spheres and spheroids attached externally (maximum up to three). References Clarke, A. D., et al. (2004), Size distributions and mixtures of dust and black carbon aerosol in Asian outflow: Physiochemistry and optical properties, J. Geophys. Res., 109, D15S09. Dey, S., et al. (2008), On the mixing state of aerosols in the Indo-Gangetic basin, northern India, Geophys. Res. Lett., 35, L03808. Draine, B. T., and P. J. Flatau (2004), User Guide for the Discrete Dipole Approximation Code DDSCAT 6.1, http://arxiv.org/abs/astro-ph/0409262v2. Lau, K. M., et al. (2006), Asian summer monsoon anomalies induced by aerosol direct forcing: the role of the Tibetan Plateau., J. Climate, 26, 855-864. Mishra, S. K., and S. N. Tripathi (2008), Modeling optical properties of mineral dust over the Indian Desert, J. Geophys. Res., accepted. Sokolik, I. N., and O. B. Toon (1999), Incorporation of mineralogical composition into models of the radiative properties of mineral aerosol from UV to IR wavelengths, J. Geophys. Res., 104, 9423- 9444. Tripathi S. N., et al. (2005), Aerosol black carbon radiative forcing at an industrial city in Northern India, Geophys. Res. Lett., 32(8), L08802. class="ab'>

  14. Effect of Solar Variability on Earth Climate Patterns.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruzmaikin, A.; Feynman, J.

    2006-12-01

    We discuss the impact of solar variability on the patterns of Earth climate variability. These climate patterns are naturally excited in the noisy atmosphere-ocean dynamical system as deviations (anomalies) from a global (mean) state. The patterns include North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) and related Northern Annular Mode (NAM), Southern Annular Mode (SAM), Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO), Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation (AMO). An example of a pattern influenced by variations in solar UV irradiance is the NAM, a wintertime climate anomaly with two states corresponding to higher pressure at high latitudes with a band of lower pressure at lower latitudes and the other way round (Thompson &Wallace, 1998). Two states of the NAM arise due to the dynamical interaction of planetary waves and zonal mean wind (Limpasuvan &Hartmann, 2001; Ruzmaikin et al., 2006). The NAM accounts for 23% of atmospheric variability at sea level and about 50% of the variability in the stratosphere. Solar variability affects the NAM and that the influence varies dependent on the phase of the Quasi Biennial Oscillation and time in the winter season (Ruzmaikin &Feynman, 2002). The temperature pattern (cold in Europe-warm in Greenland) produced by the negative NAM was dominant during the Maunder Minimum of solar activity (Ruzmaikin et al., 2004). We discuss possible physical mechanisms by which solar variability can influence the climate patterns. In particular, we address the Rossby-Palmer hypothesis (Palmer, 1998) that external forcing (in our case solar variability) may affect only the magnitude of the pattern variability without changing its spatial structure. References: Thompson, D. W. J. &J. M. Wallace, Geophys. Res. Lett., 25, 1297, 1998; Palmer, T. N., Bull. Amer. Meteor. Soc., 79, 1412 1998; Baldwin, M. P. and T. J. Dunkerton, J. Geophys. Res. 104, 30,937, 1999; Limpasuvan, V., &D. Hartmann, J. Climate, 13, 4414, 2001; Ruzmaikin, A., J, Feynman, J. Geophys. Res., 107, D14, 10

  15. New Particle Formation Events During 2013 in Hada Al Sham, Saudi-Arabia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neitola, K.; Hyvärinen, A.; Lihavainen, H.; Alghamdi, M.; Hussein, T.; Khodeir, M.; Shehata, A.; Laaksonen, A. J.; Kulmala, M. T.

    2014-12-01

    clear growth, S is clear shrinkage, G + S is both growth and shrinkage and unclear is not clear in either way.ReferencesM. Dal Maso, et al. (2005). Bor. Env. Res., 10, 323-336.M. Kulmala, et al. (2006). Atmos. Chem. Phys., 6, 787-793. M. Kulmala, et al. (2013). Science, 336, 943-946.

  16. Increased delivery of condensation nuclei during the Late Heavy Bombardment to the terrestrial and martian atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Losiak, Anna

    2014-05-01

    LHB should be taken into account when constructing models of terrestrial and Martian climates around 4 Ga. Bland P.A., Artemieva N.A. (2006) Meteorit.Planet.Sci. 41:607-631. Bottke W.F. et al. (2012) Nature 485: 78-81. Fassett C.I., Minton D.A. (2013) Nat.Geosci. 6:520-524 (2013). Hunten D.M. et al. (1980) J.Atmos.Sci. 37:1342-1357. Haberle R.M. et al. (1999) J.Geophys.Res. 104:8957-8974. Ivanov B.A., Hartmann W.K. (2009) Planets and Moons: Treatise on Geophysics (eds. Spohn T.): 207-243. Michaels T.I. et al. (2006) Geophys.Res.Lett. 33:L16201. Montmessin F. et al. (2004) J.Geophys.Res. 109:E10004. Ogurtsov M.G., Raspopov O.M. (2011) Geomagnetism&Aeronomy 51:275-283. Rosen J.M. (1968) Space Sci.Rev. 9:58-89. Ryder G. (2002) J.Geophys.Res. 107: doi:10.1029/2001JE001583. Segura T.L. et al. (2002) Science 298:1977-1980. Segura T.L. et al. (2012) Icarus 220:144-148. Sleep N.S. et al. (1989) Nature 342:139-142. Tegen I. (2003) Quat.Sci.Rev. 22:1821-1834. Urata R.A., Toon O.B. (2013) Icarus 226:229-250. Wordsworth R. et al. (2012) Icarus 222:1-19.

  17. [Coagulation behavior of Al13 species].

    PubMed

    Hu, Cheng-zhi; Liu, Hui-juan; Qu, Jiu-hui

    2006-12-01

    Coagulation behavior of Al13 species was examined in synthetic water with high alkalinity and high humic acid concentration from viewpoint of the transformation of Al hydrolysis products during the coagulation process. The results indicated that coagulation efficiency of Al coagulants positively correlated with the content of Al13 in the coagulation process. Aluminum chloride (AlCl3) was more effective than polyaluminum chloride (PACI) in removing turbidity and dissolved organic matter in the synthetic water because AlCl3 could not only generate Al13 species but also function as pH control agent in the coagulation process. During coagulation process pH control can improve coagulation process through regulating Al speciation, and AlCl3 benefited most from pH control.

  18. Synthesis of AlN/Al Polycrystals along with Al Nanoparticles Using Thermal Plasma Route

    SciTech Connect

    Kanhe, Nilesh S.; Nawale, A. B.; Kulkarni, N. V.; Bhoraskar, S. V.; Mathe, V. L.; Das, A. K.

    2011-07-15

    This paper for the first time reports the (200) oriented growth of hexagonal Aluminum nitride crystals during synthesis of aluminum nanoparticles in dc transferred arc thermal plasma reactor by gas phase condensation in nitrogen plasma. The structural and morphological study of as synthesized AlN crystal and aluminium nanoparticles was done by using the x-ray diffraction method, scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy.

  19. Buoyant Outflows in the Presence of Ccomplex Topography

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-30

    Balopoulos, 1999. Climatic changes in the Aegean Sea influence the eastern Mediterranean thermohaline circulation (1986– 1997). Geophys. Res. Lett...Georgopoulos and P. G. Drakopoulos, 2000. The role of the North Aegean in triggering the recent Eastern Mediterranean climate changes . J. Geophys. Res., 105...if the inter-annual variability of the Dardanelles plume (in the context of changing outflow properties and regional atmospheric forcing) is related

  20. Synthetic Seismogram Modeling.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-11-15

    Yellowstone-Snake River plain seismic profiling experiment: crustal structure of the eastern Snake River Plain, J. Geophys. Res., 87, p. 2597-2609, 1982...and Q-structure of the upper mantle lid and low velocity zone for the eastern Great Basin, Geophys. Res. Letters, 7, p. 1029-1032, 1980. Olsen, K.H...Planet. Interiors, 31, (in press), 1982. Sparlin, M.A., and Braile, L.W., Crustal structure of the eastern Snake River plain determined from ray trace

  1. Comprehensive Methods for Determining Space Effects on Air Force Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-08-04

    condensation on ice, Part I: Non-HN03 Constituent of NOy Condensing on Low Temperature Upper Tropospheric Cirrus Cloud Particles,"/ Geophys. Res. Ill...Kinetic limitations, a possible ’ cloud clock’ for determining cloud parcel lifetime," J. Geophys. Res. 112, D12209 (2007). W. Geppert, A...34Electron attachment to SF6 under well defined conditions: Comparison of statistical modeling results to experiments," J. Phys. Conf. Series. 115,012019

  2. Ionosphere-Thermosphere Coupling - Data Analysis and Numerical Simulation Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-12-12

    magnetospheric energy, and tidal perturbations at the lower boundary of the model. Magnetospheric energy inputs include auroral particle precipitation and...10.1029/97JD02430. Frank, L. A., 1971, Plasma in the Earth’s polar magnetosphere , J. Geophys. Res., 76, pp. 5202- 5219. Fuller-Rowell, T. and D. Evans...W. J. and J. D. Winningham, 1971, Penetration of magnetosheath plasma to low altitudes through the dayside magnetospheric cusps, J. Geophys. Res

  3. Acceleration Processes in the Earth’s Magnetosphere.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-05-17

    Abdalla, M., H. Okuda, Turbulent heating of heavy ions on auroral field lines. J. Geophys. Res., 89, 2235, 1984. Balsiger , H., P. Eberrd, J. Geiss. and D...2 observations of hvy ion effects by synchronous satellite ATS-6. Planet. Space Sci., 3D, 1229. 1982. Geiss. J.. H. Balsiger . P. Eberhardt, H. P...Petersen, W. K., R. D. Sharp, E. G. Shelley, R. G. Johnson and H. Balsiger , Energetic ion composition of the plasma sheet, J. Geophys. Res.. 86, 761. 1981

  4. Investigations of Al-Dalang and Al-Hawashat meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gismelseed, A. M.; Abdallah, S. B.; Al-Rawas, A. D.; Al-Mabsali, F. N.; Widatallah, H. M.; Elzain, M. E.; Yousif, A. A.; Ericsson, T.; Annersten, H.

    2016-12-01

    Mössbauer spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements, and electron microprobe analysis (EMPA) have been performed on two meteorites named Al-Dalang and Al-Hawashat after identifying their falling sites in the Western region of Sudan. These two meteorites are ordinary chondrites with similar mineralogy. XRD and EMPA show that the two specimens consist of primary olivine, ortho-pyroxene and later crystallising clino-pyroxene as reaction rims against plagioclase. Fe-metal phases are dominated by kamacite (≈6 wt.% Ni) and minor amounts of tetrataenite (≈52 wt.% Ni). Troilite (FeS) and alabandite (MnS) are optically observed as sulphide phases. The Mössbauer measurements at 295 and 78 K are in agreement with the above characterizations, showing at least two paramagnetic doublets which are assigned to olivine and pyroxene and magnetic sextets assigned to kamacite (hyperfine field ≈33.5 T) and troilite FeS (hyperfine field ≈31 T).

  5. Al-Al2O3-Pd junction hydrogen sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okuyama, K.; Takinami, N.; Chiba, Y.; Ohshima, S.; Kambe, S.

    1994-07-01

    Al-Al2O3-Pd MIM (metal insulator metal) junctions fabricated on a glass substrate were tested as hydrogen sensors. The I-V (current versus voltage) characteristics of the junctions were measured at room temperature in a vacuum of 10-5 Torr and in H2 gas of 10-2-100 Torr. A significant increase in the current was observed upon introduction of H2 gas. This phenomenon is believed to occur due to the work function lowering of the hydrogen-absorbed Pd top electrode. The rise time was on the order of minutes, while the recovery time when hydrogen was purged was more than 20 h. However, when the junction was placed in an oxidizing ambient such as air, the recovery time was drastically reduced to the order of minutes, indicating that the device is operative as a hydrogen sensor in the atmospheric ambient. Hydrogen adsorption and desorption behavior of the Pd film was also investigated using a Pd coated quartz microbalance, and the results explained the current response of the Pd MIM junction to hydrogen in the presence of oxygen.

  6. A post-Tohoku earthquake review of earthquake probabilities in the Southern Kanto District, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somerville, Paul G.

    2014-12-01

    The 2011 Mw 9.0 Tohoku earthquake generated an aftershock sequence that affected a large part of northern Honshu, and has given rise to widely divergent forecasts of changes in earthquake occurrence probabilities in northern Honshu. The objective of this review is to assess these forecasts as they relate to potential changes in the occurrence probabilities of damaging earthquakes in the Kanto Region. It is generally agreed that the 2011 Mw 9.0 Tohoku earthquake increased the stress on faults in the southern Kanto district. Toda and Stein (Geophys Res Lett 686, 40: doi:10.1002, 2013) further conclude that the probability of earthquakes in the Kanto Corridor has increased by a factor of 2.5 for the time period 11 March 2013 to 10 March 2018 in the Kanto Corridor. Estimates of earthquake probabilities in a wider region of the Southern Kanto District by Nanjo et al. (Geophys J Int, doi:10.1093, 2013) indicate that any increase in the probability of earthquakes is insignificant in this larger region. Uchida et al. (Earth Planet Sci Lett 374: 81-91, 2013) conclude that the Philippine Sea plate the extends well north of the northern margin of Tokyo Bay, inconsistent with the Kanto Fragment hypothesis of Toda et al. (Nat Geosci, 1:1-6,2008), which attributes deep earthquakes in this region, which they term the Kanto Corridor, to a broken fragment of the Pacific plate. The results of Uchida and Matsuzawa (J Geophys Res 115:B07309, 2013)support the conclusion that fault creep in southern Kanto may be slowly relaxing the stress increase caused by the Tohoku earthquake without causing more large earthquakes. Stress transfer calculations indicate a large stress transfer to the Off Boso Segment as a result of the 2011 Tohoku earthquake. However, Ozawa et al. (J Geophys Res 117:B07404, 2012) used onshore GPS measurements to infer large post-Tohoku creep on the plate interface in the Off-Boso region, and Uchida and Matsuzawa (ibid.) measured similar large creep off the Boso

  7. New Paleomagnetic Data from the Wadi Abyad Crustal Section and their Implications for the Rotation History of the Oman Ophiolite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, M.; Morris, A.; Anderson, M.; MacLeod, C. J.

    2014-12-01

    The Oman ophiolite is an important natural laboratory for understanding the construction of oceanic crust at fast spreading axes and its subsequent tectonic evolution. Previous paleomagnetic research in lavas of the northern ophiolitic blocks (Perrin et al., 2000, Mar. Geophys. Res.) has demonstrated substantial clockwise intraoceanic tectonic rotations. Paleomagnetic data from lower crustal sequences in the southern blocks, however, have been more equivocal due to complications arising from remagnetization, and have been used to infer that clockwise rotations seen in the north are internal to the ophiolite rather than regionally significant (Weiler, 2000, Mar. Geophys. Res.). Here we demonstrate the importance and advantages of sampling crustal transects in the ophiolite in order to understand the nature and variability in magnetization directions. By systematically sampling the lower crustal sequence exposed in Wadi Abyad (Rustaq block) we resolve for the first time in a single section a pattern of remagnetized lowermost gabbros and retention of earlier magnetizations by uppermost gabbros and the overlying dyke-rooting zone. Results are supported by a positive fold test that shows that remagnetization of lower gabbros occurred prior to the Campanian structural disruption of the Moho. NW-directed remagnetized remanences in the lower units are consistent with those used by Weiler (2000, Mar. Geophys. Res.) to infer lack of significant rotation of the southern blocks and to argue, therefore, that rotation of the northern blocks was internal to the ophiolite. In contrast, E/ENE-directed remanences in the uppermost levels of Wadi Abyad imply a large, clockwise rotation of the Rustaq block, of a sense and magnitude consistent with intraoceanic rotations inferred from extrusive sections in the northern blocks. We conclude that without the control provided by systematic crustal sampling, the potential for different remanence directions being acquired at different times

  8. Mitigation of hurricane storm surge impacts: Modeling scenarios over wide continental shelves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lima Rego, Joao; Li, Chunyan

    2010-05-01

    The improvement of present understanding of surge dynamics over wide and shallow shelves is vital for the improvement of our ability to forecast storm surge impacts to coastal regions, particularly the low-lying land areas that are most vulnerable to hurricane flooding (e.g. the Northern Gulf of Mexico, coastal Bangladesh, the Southeast China sea). Given the increase of global sea-surface temperature, both the total number and proportion of intense tropical cyclones have increased notably since 1970 (Emanuel, 2005; Nature). Therefore, more intense hurricanes may hit densely populated coastal regions, and this problem may be aggravated by the prospect of accelerated sea-level rise in the 21st century. This presentation offers a review of recent work on hurricane-induced storm surge. The finite-volume coastal ocean model ("FVCOM", by Chen et al., 2003; J. Atmos. Ocean Tech.) was applied to the storm surge induced by Hurricanes Rita and Ike along the coasts of Louisiana and Texas in 2005 and 2008, respectively, to study coastal storm surge dynamics. The sensitivity analysis of Rego and Li (2009; Geophys. Res. Lett.) demonstrated how stronger, wider or faster tropical cyclones would affect coastal flooding. Li, Weeks and Rego (2009; Geophys. Res. Lett) looked into how hurricane flooding and receding dynamics differ, concluding that the overland flow in the latter stage is of considerable importance. Rego and Li (2010; J. Geophys. Res.) showed how extreme events may result of a combination of non-extreme factors, by studying the nonlinear interaction of tide and hurricane surge. The ability of models to reproduce these extreme events and to proactive plan for damage reduction is covered in Rego and Li's (2010; J. Marine Syst.) study of how barrier island systems protect coastal bays from offshore surge propagation. Here we combine these results for a wider perspective on how hurricane flooding could be mitigated under changing conditions.

  9. Tests of ionospheric control of young injection events identified from magnetometer observations at Saturn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kivelson, M.; Jia, X.

    2015-12-01

    Kennelly et al. (2013) reported that young plasma injection events observed in Saturn's nightside magnetosphere and identified from plasma wave signatures are modulated at the period associated with the winter hemisphere. In a system unstable to interchange, radial motion of flux tubes is constrained by the "line-tying" effect of high ionospheric conductance (Southwood and Kivelson, 1989). Slippage of a flux tube would then occur initially in the hemisphere in which the ionospheric conductance is lowest. Saturn's ionospheric conductances vary not only with season, but also with rotation phase because of the presence of a pattern of rotating field-aligned currents that drive "planetary period oscillations" (Jia and Kivelson, 2012). The conductance should minimize near the center of the downward current region and, at this rotation phase in the winter hemisphere, the growth rate of the instability would be largest, accounting for control by the northern period. With motion starting in the winter hemisphere, the flux tube would develop a tilt of predictable sense and the initial inward motion of the interchanging flux tube would occur at a specific rotation phase of the winter ionosphere. For a subset of the Kennelly events, we found that the tilt and phase are consistent with expectations based on the control of displacement by ionospheric conductance. Many additional young interchange events have been identified by K. K. Khurana [personal communication, 2015] whom we thank for making the list available. We examine this more extensive set of events and use them to investigate the proposed mechanism more fully. __________ Jia, X., and M. G. Kivelson (2012), J. Geophys. Res., 117, A11219. Kennelly, T. J., J. S. Leisner, G. B. Hospodarsky, and D. A. Gurnett (2013), J. Geophys. Res. Space Physics, 118, 832-838. Kivelson, M., and X. Jia (2014), , AGU Fall meeting, 2014, SM51E-4295. Southwood, D. J., and M. G. Kivelson (1989), J. Geophys. Res., 94, 299-308.

  10. The Relationship Between Dipolarization Fronts and Pi2 Pulsations in the Near-Earth Magnetotail - A MHD Case Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ream, J. B.; Walker, R. J.; Ashour-Abdalla, M.; El-Alaoui, M.

    2011-12-01

    dipolarization front begins to travel earthward, Pi2 fluctuations are generated in the pressure and velocity components which propagate along the plasma sheet into the inner magnetosphere. Inside ~-7 RE the frequency seen in the velocity perturbations is matched by perturbations in pressure and magnetic field components. References Ashour-Abdalla, M., et al (2011), Observations and simulations of non-local acceleration of electrons in magnetotail magnetic reconnection events, Nature Physics, vol.7. Cao, X., et al. (2008), Multispacecraft and ground-based observations of substorm timing and activations: Two case studies, J. Geophys. Res., 113, A07S25. El-Alaoui, M. (2001), Current disruption during November 24, 1996 substorm, J. Geophys. Res., 106, 6229- 6245. Kepko, L. and M. Kivelson (1999) Generation of Pi2 pulsations by bursty bulk flows, J. Geophys Res. 104(A11),25,021-25,034. Panov, E. V., et al (2010), Multiple overshoot and rebound of a bursty bulk flow, Geophys. Res. Lett., 37, L08103. Raeder, J., et al. (1998), The Geospace Environment Modeling Grand Challenge: Results from a global geospace circulation model, J. Geophys. Res., 103, 14,787.

  11. Characterization of emergent leakage neutrons from multiple layers of hydrogen/water in the lunar regolith by Monte Carlo simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    SU, J.; Sagdeev, R.; Usikov, D.; Chin, G.; Boyer, L.; Livengood, T. A.; McClanahan, T. P.; Murray, J.; Starr, R. D.

    2013-12-01

    CSETN from the leakage neutron spectrum, emission angle, detector energy sensitivity and angular response. Reference: [1] W. C. Feldman, et al., Science 4 September 1998: Vol. 281 no. 5382 pp. 1496-1500. [2] Gasnault, O., et al., (2000) J. Geophys. Res., 105(E2), 4263-4271. [3] Little, R. C., et al. (2003), J. Geophys. Res., 108(E5), 5046. [4] McKinney et al., (2006), J. Geophys. Res., 111, E06004. [5] Lawrence et al., (2006), J. Geophys. Res., 111, E08001. [6] Looper et al, (2013), Space Weather, VOL. 11, 142-152. [7] J. Allison, et al, (2006) IEEE TRANS. ON NUCL SCI, VOL. 53, NO. 1. [8] J. Masarik and R. Reedy (1996), J. Geophys. Res., 101, 18,891-18,912. [9] P. O'Neil (2010) IEEE Trans. Nucl. Sci., 57(6), 3148-3153. [10] D. Pelowitz, (2005), Rep. LA-CP-05-0369, LANL, Los Alamos, NM.

  12. Ab initio modeling of zincblende AlN layer in Al-AlN-TiN multilayers

    DOE PAGES

    Yadav, S. K.; Wang, J.; Liu, X. -Y.

    2016-06-13

    An unusual growth mechanism of metastable zincblende AlN thin film by diffusion of nitrogen atoms into Al lattice is established. Using first-principles density functional theory, we studied the possibility of thermodynamic stability of AlN as a zincblende phase due to epitaxial strains and interface effect, which fails to explain the formation of zincblende AlN. We then compared the formation energetics of rocksalt and zincblende AlN in fcc Al through direct diffusion of nitrogen atoms to Al octahedral and tetrahedral interstitials. Furthermore, the formation of a zincblende AlN thin film is determined to be a kinetically driven process, not a thermodynamicallymore » driven process.« less

  13. NiAl-base composite containing high volume fraction of AlN for advanced engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hebsur, Mohan (Inventor); Whittenbeger, John D. (Inventor); Lowell, Carl F. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A particulate reinforced NiAl-AlN composite alloy has a NiAl matrix and greater than about 13 volume percent fine particles of AlN within the matrix. The particles preferably have a diameter from about 15 nanometers to about 50 nanometers. The particulate reinforced NiAl-AlN composite alloy may be prepared by cryomilling prealloyed NiAl in liquid nitrogen using grinding media having a diameter of from about 2 to 6 mm at an impeller speed of from about 450 RPM to about 800 RPM. The cryomilling may be done for a duration of from about 4 hours to about 20 hours to obtain a cryomilled powder. The cryomilled powder may be consolidated to form the particulate reinforced NiAl-AlN composite alloy. The particulate reinforced alloy can further include a toughening alloy. The toughening alloy may include NiCrAlY, FeCrAlY, and FeAl.

  14. Soil water content plays an important role in soil-atmosphere exchange of carbonyl sulfide (OCS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Zhigang; Behrendt, Thomas; Bunk, Rüdiger; Wu, Dianming; Kesselmeier, Jürgen

    2016-04-01

    Carbonyl sulfide (OCS) is a quite stable gas in the troposphere and is transported up to the stratosphere, where it contributes to the sulfate aerosol layer (Crutzen 1976). The tropospheric concentration seems to be quite constant, indicating a balance between sinks and sources. Recent work by Sandoval-Soto et al. (2005) demonstrated the enormous strength of the vegetation sink and the urgent needs to understand the sinks and sources. The role of soils is a matter of discussion (Kesselmeier et al., 1999; Van Diest and Kesselmeier, 2008; Maseyk et al., 2014; Whelan et al., 2015). To better understand the influence of soil water content and OCS mixing ratio on OCS fluxes, we used an OCS analyzer (LGR COS/CO Analyzer 907-0028, Los Gatos, CA, USA) coupled with automated soil chamber system (Behrendt et al., 2014) to measure the OCS fluxes with a slow drying of four different types of soil (arable wheat soil in Mainz, blueberry soil in Waldstein, spruce soil in Waldstein and needle forest soil in Finland). Results showed that OCS fluxes as well as the optimum soil water content for OCS uptake varied significantly for different soils. The net production rates changed significantly with the soil drying out from 100% to about 5% water holding capacity (WHC), implying that soil water content play an important role in the uptake processes. The production and uptake processes were distinguished by the regression of OCS fluxes under different OCS mixing ratios. OCS compensation points (CP) were found to differ significantly for different soil types and water content, with the lowest CP at about 20% WHC, implying that when estimating the global budgets of OCS, especially for soils fluxes, soil water content should be taken into serious consideration. References Crutzen, P. J. 1976, Geophys. Res. Lett., 3, 73-76. Sandoval-Soto, L. et al., 2005, Biogeosciences, 2, 125-132. Kesselmeier, J. et al., 1999, J. Geophys. Res., 104, 11577-11584. Van Diest, H. and Kesselmeier, J. 2008

  15. Characterising Biomass Burning Aerosol in WRF-Chem using the Volatility Basis Set, with Evaluation against SAMBBA Flight Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowe, D.; Topping, D. O.; Archer-Nicholls, S.; Darbyshire, E.; Morgan, W.; Liu, D.; Allan, J. D.; Coe, H.; McFiggans, G.

    2015-12-01

    The burning of forests in the Amazonia region is a globally significant source of carbonaceous aerosol, containing both absorbing and scattering components [1]. In addition biomass burning aerosol (BBA) are also efficient cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), modifying cloud properties and influencing atmospheric circulation and precipitation tendencies [2]. The impacts of BBA are highly dependent on their size distribution and composition. A bottom-up emissions inventory, the Brazilian Biomass Burning Emissions Model (3BEM) [3], utilising satellite products to generate daily fire emission maps is used. Injection of flaming emissions within the atmospheric column is simulated using both a sub-grid plume-rise parameterisation [4], and simpler schemes, within the Weather Research and Forecasting Model with Chemistry (WRF-Chem, v3.4.1) [5]. Aerosol dynamics are simulated using the sectional MOSAIC scheme [6], incorporating a volatility basis set (VBS) treatment of organic aerosol [7]. For this work we have modified the 9-bin VBS to use the biomass burning specific scheme developed by May et al. [8]. The model has been run for September 2012 over South America (at a 25km resolution). We will present model results evaluating the modelled aerosol vertical distribution, size distribution, and composition against measurements taken by the FAAM BAe-146 research aircraft during the SAMBBA campaign. The main focus will be on investigating the factors controlling the vertical gradient of the organic mass to black carbon ratio of the measured aerosol. This work is supported by the Nature Environment Research Council (NERC) as part of the SAMBBA project under grant NE/J010073/1. [1] D. G. Streets et al., 2004, J. Geophys. Res., 109, D24212. [2] M. O. Andreae et al., 2004, Science, 303, 1337-1342. [3] K. Longo et al., 2010, Atmos. Chem. Phys., 10, 5,785-5,795. [4] S. Freitas et al., 2007, Atmos. Chem. Phys., 7, 3,385-3,398. [5] S. Archer-Nicholls et al., 2015, Geosci. Model Dev., 8

  16. Benefits for Military Veterans with ALS

    MedlinePlus

    ... Advocate Get Involved Donate Military Veterans Resources for Military Veterans, Families & Survivors The ALS Association is working everyday to ... and Caregivers Newly Diagnosed Clinical Trials Familial ALS Military Veterans For Caregivers Resources Read stories ... Site ...

  17. Interaction Between Eddies and Mean Flow in Jupiter's Atmosphere: Analysis of Cassini Imaging Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salyk, Colette; Ingersoll, Andrew P.; Lorre, Jean; Vasavada, Ashwin; DelGenio, Anthony D.

    2006-01-01

    Beebe et al. [Beebe, R.F., et al., 1980. Geophys. Res. Lett. 17, 1-4] and Ingersoll et al. [Ingersoll, A.P., et al., 1981. J. Geophys. Res. 86, 8733-8743] used images from Voyagers 1 and 2 to analyze the interaction between zonal winds and eddies in Jupiter's atmosphere. They reported a high positive correlation between Jupiter's eddy momentum flux, pu'v', and the variation of zonal velocity with latitude, du/dy. This correlation implied a surprisingly high rate of conversion of energy from eddies to zonal flow: approx. 1.5-3.0 W/sq m, a value more than 10% of Jupiter s thermal flux emission. However, Sromovsky et al. [Sromovsky, L.A., et al., 1982. J. Atmos. Sci. 39,1413-1432] argued that possible biases in the analysis could have caused an artificially high correlation. In addition, significant differences in the derived eddy flux between datasets put into question the robustness of any one result. We return to this long-standing puzzle using images of Jupiter from the Cassini flyby of December 2000. Our method is similar to previous analyses, but utilizes an automatic feature tracker instead of the human eye. The number of velocity vectors used in this analysis is over 200,000, compared to the 14,000 vectors used by Ingersoll et al. We also find a positive correlation between u'v' and du/dy and derive a global average power per unit mass, u'v' du/dy, ranging from (7.1-12.3) x 10(exp -5)W/kg. Utilizing Ingersoll et al.'s estimate of the mass per unit area involved in the transport, this would imply a rate of energy conversion of approx.0.7-1.2 W/sq m. We discuss the implications of this result and employ several tests to demonstrate its robustness.

  18. Interaction between eddies and mean flow in Jupiter's atmosphere: Analysis of Cassini imaging data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salyk, Colette; Ingersoll, Andrew P.; Lorre, Jean; Vasavada, Ashwin; Del Genio, Anthony D.

    2006-12-01

    Beebe et al. [Beebe, R.F., et al., 1980. Geophys. Res. Lett. 17, 1-4] and Ingersoll et al. [Ingersoll, A.P., et al., 1981. J. Geophys. Res. 86, 8733-8743] used images from Voyagers 1 and 2 to analyze the interaction between zonal winds and eddies in Jupiter's atmosphere. They reported a high positive correlation between Jupiter's eddy momentum flux, ρuv¯, and the variation of zonal velocity with latitude, du¯/dy. This correlation implied a surprisingly high rate of conversion of energy from eddies to zonal flow: ˜1.5-3.0 Wm, a value more than 10% of Jupiter's thermal flux emission. However, Sromovsky et al. [Sromovsky, L.A., et al., 1982. J. Atmos. Sci. 39, 1413-1432] argued that possible biases in the analysis could have caused an artificially high correlation. In addition, significant differences in the derived eddy flux between datasets put into question the robustness of any one result. We return to this long-standing puzzle using images of Jupiter from the Cassini flyby of December 2000. Our method is similar to previous analyses, but utilizes an automatic feature tracker instead of the human eye. The number of velocity vectors used in this analysis is over 200,000, compared to the 14,000 vectors used by Ingersoll et al. We also find a positive correlation between uv¯ and du¯/dy and derive a global average power per unit mass, uv¯du¯/dy, ranging from (7.1-12.3)×10 Wkg. Utilizing Ingersoll et al.'s estimate of the mass per unit area involved in the transport, this would imply a rate of energy conversion of ˜0.7-1.2 Wm. We discuss the implications of this result and employ several tests to demonstrate its robustness.

  19. Cenomanian-Turonian biostratigraphy of the Jardas Al Abid area, Al Jabal Al Akhdar, northeast Libya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Qot, Gamal M.; Abdulsamad, Esam O.

    2016-09-01

    The Upper Cenomanian-Turonian succession exposed at Jardas al'Abid area consists mainly of carbonates with siliciclastic intercalations. This succession is subdivided lithostratigraphically into: Qasr al'Abid (Late Cenomanian) and Al Baniyah (Late Cenomanian-Coniacian) formations. This sequence is relatively rich in macrofossil assemblages especially bivalves, gastropods, and echinoids with rare ammonites. Based on the first occurrence (FO) and last occurrence (LO) of some index species of these macrofossil groups, an integrated biostratigraphic framework has been constructed. The studied Cenomanian-Turonian sequence is subdivided biostratigraphically into three ammonite biozones; Pseudaspidoceras pseudonodosoides Total Range Zone, Choffaticeras segne Total Range Zone, and Coilopoceras requienianum Total Range Zone. Based on the rest of macrofossil assemblages other than the ammonites, eight biozones were recognized; Mecaster batnensis Total Range Zone, Ceratostreon flabellatum-Neithea dutrugei Acme Zone, Costagyra olisiponensis Acme Zone, Pycnodonte (Phygraea) vesicularis vesiculosa Acme Zone, Mytiloides labiatus Total Range Zone = Mecaster turonensis Acme Zone, Rachiosoma rectilineatum-Curvostrea rouvillei-Tylostoma (T.) globosum Assemblage Zone, Radiolites sp.-Apricardia? matheroni Total Range Zone, and Nerinea requieniana Total Range Zone. Most of the proposed biozones are recorded for the first time from Libya. The integration among these biozones as well as local and inter-regional correlation of the biozones have been discussed. The stage boundaries of the studied stratigraphic intervals are discussed, where the Cenomanian/Turonian boundary is delineated at the last occurrence (LO) of Pseudaspidoceras pseudonodosoides (Choffat), while the Turonian/Coniacian boundary is delineated arbitrary being agree with the LO of the Turonian fauna.

  20. Effects of the Al content on pore structures of porous TieAl alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Jaing, Y; He, Y H; Xu, N P; Zou, J; Huang, B; Lui, C T

    2008-01-01

    Porous TieAl alloys with different nominal compositions were fabricated through a reactive synthesis of Ti and Al elemental powders. It has been found that the pore parameters vary with the Al contents, indicating that the nature of the pores can be manipulated through changing the Al contents. In addition, detailed structural characterizations showed that the fabricated porous TieAl alloys can have three crystalline phases (i.e., a2-Ti3Al, g-TiAl, and TiAl3) when using different compositions. The fundamental reasons behind these phenomena have been explored.

  1. Links between extreme UV-radiation, total ozone, surface albedo and cloudiness: An analysis of 30 years of data from Switzerland and Austria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rieder, H. E.; Staehelin, J.; Weihs, P.; Vuilleumier, L.; Blumthaler, M.; Holawe, F.; Lindfors, A.; Maeder, J. A.; Simic, S.; Wagner, J. E.; Walker, D.; Ribatet, M.

    2009-04-01

    .: A composite study on the structure and formation of ozone miniholes and minihights over central Europe, J. Geophys. Res., 32, doi:10.1029/2004GL022062, 2005. Lindfors, A., and Vuilleumier, L.: Erythemal UV at Davos (Switzerland), 1926-2003, estimated using total ozone, sunshine duration, and snow depth, J. Geophys. Res., 110, D02104, doi:10.1029/2004JD005231, 2005. Molina, M. J., and Rowland, F. S.: Stratospheric sink for chlorofluoromethans: Chlorine atom-catalysed destruction of ozone, Nature, 249, 810-812, 1974. Rieder, H.E., Holawe, F., Simic, S., Blumthaler, M., Krzyscin, J.W., Wagner J.E., Schmalwieser A.W., and Weihs, P.: Reconstruction of erythemal UV-doses for two stations in Austria: A comparison between alpine and urban regions, Atmos. Chem. Phys., 8, 6309-6323, 2008. Rieder, H.E., Staehelin, J., Maeder, J.A., Ribatet, M., Stübi, R., Weihs, P., Holawe, F., Peter, T., and Davison, A.C.: From ozone mini holes and mini highs towards extreme value theory: New insights from extreme events and non stationarity, submitted to J. Geophys. Res., 2009. Staehelin, J., Kegel, R., and Harris, N. R.: Trend analysis of the homogenized total ozone series of Arosa (Switzerland), 1929-1996, J. Geophys. Res., 103(D7), 8389-8400, doi:10.1029/97JD03650, 1998a. Staehelin, J., Renaud, A., Bader, J., McPeters, R., Viatte, P., Hoegger, B., Bugnion, V., Giroud, M., and Schill, H.: Total ozone series at Arosa (Switzerland): Homogenization and data comparison, J. Geophys. Res., 103(D5), 5827-5842, doi:10.1029/97JD02402, 1998b.

  2. VLA Images of Venus at 1.3 CM and 2 CM Wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suleiman, S. H.; Kolodner, M. A.; Butler, B. J.; Steffes, P. G.

    1996-09-01

    On April 5, 1996, we performed an observation of Venus using the Very Large Array (VLA) at 15 GHz (2 cm) and 22 GHz (1.3 cm) simultaneously. High resolution continuum images for Venus were obtained at both frequencies. These images show significant polar darkening at latitudes above 60(deg) which is consistent with the results obtained by the Pioneer Venus Orbiter Infrared Radiometer (OIR) experiment (Taylor et al., J. Geophys. Res. 85, 7963-8006, 1980). These images are currently being used to detect potential spatial (longitudinal and latitudinal) variations in the abundances of gaseous sulfur dioxide (SO_2) and gaseous sulfuric acid (H_2SO_4) across the disk of Venus. Our new radiative transfer model (RTM) has shown that the emission spectrum is especially sensitive to the abundances of these constituents at these wavelengths. The detection of these constituents is being accomplished by matching the computed emission from our RTM to the measured emission of Venus by the VLA. Our RTM incorporates the newly developed Ben Reuven formalism which provides a more accurate characterization of the microwave absorption of gaseous SO_2 (Suleiman et al., J. Geophys. Res. 101, 4623-4635, 1996). A description of the observation, visibility data, and images are presented. This work was supported by the NASA Planetary Atmospheres Program under grant NAGW-533.

  3. Simulating Three Dimensional Radiation Belt Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perry, K. L.; Eccles, A. A.; Elkington, S. R.; Hudson, M. K.

    2001-12-01

    The model by Elkington et al. [1999], which uses a compressed dipole and a time-varying electric field in two dimensions, is extended to three dimensions by specifying a poloidal mode ULF wave with a single vector potential component described by Li et al. [1993] resulting in Eφ , Br and B//. The toroidal mode can similarly be specified by a single vector potential component yielding Er and Bφ . These vector potentials assume a Gaussian radial amplitude profile, a simple sine or cosine for the parallel mode structure and a time varying exponential depending on the mode number and angle in the azimuthal direction. Elkington, S. R., M. K. Hudson, and A. A. Chan, Acceleration of relativistic electrons via drift-resonant interaction with toroidal-mode Pc-5 ULF oscillations,Geophys. Res. Lett., 26, 3273, 1999. Li, X., M. K. Hudson, A. A. Chan, and I. Roth, Loss of ring current O+ ions due to interaction with Pc-5 waves, J. Geophys. Res., 98, 215, 1993.

  4. A cold pool reference frame for analyzing polar stratospheric clouds and tropospheric forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fromm, M. D.

    2011-12-01

    The dominance of synoptic scale tropospheric forcing as a driver for Arctic PSC existence has been established for a single season [Teitelbaum et al., 2001, J. Geophys. Res.] and over the entire SAM II, POAM II, POAM III era [Fromm et al. 2003, J. Geophys. Res.]. These results suggest that a meteorological context for PSC occurrence and composition, based on synoptic-scale dynamics, is appropriate and useful for unified PSC studies. Here we analyze satellite PSC observations in a new geospatial context: the cold pool reference frame (CPRF). We present a CPRF using the canonical nitric acid trihydrate (NAT) saturation isotherm as the boundary, with isotherms for liquid ternary aerosol condensation and the water-ice frost point for inner PSC-composition "latitudes." The temperature minimum and the longitude of the temperature minimum mark the pole and axis of the CPRF, respectively. The CPRF also incorporates the air flow through the cold pool with the Montgomery stream function. With such information, we relate SAGE and POAM occurrence of PSCs with respect to the cold pool axis and the upwind/downwind PSC-composition latitude belts. The CPRF model, and a justification based on monthly average December 2002 meteorological analyses, is presented. To illustrate, we show the case of 19 December 2002 as well as monthly PSC results. We also apply the CPRF to PSC observations from the Arctic winter of 2010/2011.

  5. The 2014 M 6.0 South Napa Earthquake in the Context of the Earthquake Cycle in the San Francisco Bay Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaume, S. C.

    2014-12-01

    The 2014 M 6.0 South Napa earthquake is the second M ≥ 5.5 earthquake to occur in the San Francisco Bay region since the 1989 M 7.0 Loma Prieta earthquake. This poster will examine how this earthquake fits into the earthquake history of the Bay region, which has shown considerable variation in the rate of moderate (M 5.5-6.5) earthquakes. A number of models have been developed to explain these changes in moderate earthquake rates, including the Accelerating Moment Release model (e.g., Sykes and Jaumé, Nature, 1990; Bufe and Varnes, J. Geophys. Res., 1993) and the Stress Shadow model (e.g., Harris and Simpson, J. Geophys. Res., 1998). In addition, various groups have made projections of future earthquake activity in the San Francisco Bay region, including the Working Group on California Earthquake Probabilities (Field et al., USGS OFR, 2008) and Bebbington et al. (PAGEOPH, 2010), utilizing different physical models for earthquake occurrence. In my poster I will compare and contrast these different views of seismicity in the Bay region and where the 2014 South Napa earthquake fits into them. In particular, I will explore what these different models imply for future moderate earthquake occurrence and hazards thereof.

  6. Characteristics of Pickup Ions in Titan's Upper Atmosphere and Escape of Nitrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michael, M.; Johnson, R. E.; Ledvina, S. A.

    2004-11-01

    The distribution of 14 amu and 28-29 amu pickup ions with depth into Titan's atmosphere have calculated by Ledvina et al. (2004) and Brecht et al. (2000). Here we study the interaction of these ions with molecules in the upper atmosphere of Titan. As its environment is highly variable, Titan can be within Saturn's magnetosphere or can interact directly with the solar wind. These pickup ions follow the corresponding magnetic field as they penetrate into the atmosphere. The magnetic field strength considered here are 5.1 nT and 0.5 nT when Titan is inside the magnetosphere and in the solar wind respectively. The incident pick up ions collide with atmospheric neutrals. After they charge exchange, they are tracked under the influence of Titan's gravitational field. The energetic ions and neutral impart energy to the molecules in the Titan's atmosphere causing ejection, bond breaking and heating. Predictions will be made for the Cassini Titan flyby. The model described is flexible to incorporate that data as it becomes available. References Brecht, S.H., J.G. Luhmann, and D.J. Larson, Simulation of the Saturnian magnetospheric interaction with Titan, J. Geophys. Res., 105, 13119-13130, 2000. Ledvina, S.A., S.H. Brecht, J.G. Luhmann, Ion distribution of 14 amu pickup ions associated with Titan's plasma interaction, Geophys. Res. Lett., 31, L17S10, 10.1029/2004GL019861, 2004.

  7. The magnetospheric clock of Saturn—A self-organized plasma dynamo

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, J.; Brenning, N.

    2013-08-15

    The plasma in the inner magnetosphere of Saturn is characterized by large-amplitude azimuthal density variations in the equatorial plane, with approximately a sinusoidal dependence on the azimuthal angle [D. A. Gurnett et al., Science 316, 442 (2007)]. This structure rotates with close to the period of the planet itself and has been proposed to steer other nonaxisymmetric phenomena, e.g., the Saturn kilometric radiation SKR [W. S. Kurth et al., Geophys. Res. Lett. 34, L02201 (2007)], and inner-magnetosphere magnetic field perturbations [D. J. Southwood and M. G. Kivelson, J. Geophys. Res. 112(A12), A12222 (2007)]. There is today no consensus regarding the basic driving mechanism. We here propose it to be a plasma dynamo, located in the neutral gas torus of Enceladus but coupled both inwards, through electric currents along the magnetic field lines down to the planet, and outwards through the plasma flow pattern there. Such a dynamo mechanism is shown to self-regulate towards a state that, with realistic parameters, can reproduce the observed configuration of the magnetosphere. This state is characterized by three quantities: the Pedersen conductivity in the polar cap, the ionization time constant in the neutral gas torus, and a parameter characterizing the plasma flow pattern. A particularly interesting property of the dynamo is that regular (i.e., constant-amplitude, sinusoidal) variations in the last parameter can lead to complicated, non-periodic, oscillations around the steady-state configuration.

  8. Dynamical vertical structure of the tropical upper troposphere and stratosphere revealed by CH4:N2O correlations derived from in situ measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catoire, Valery; Berthet, Gwenael; Huret, Nathalie

    Within the frame of an ENVISAT satellite validation campaign operated by CNES, the SPI- RALE balloon-borne absorption spectrometer using six infrared diode lasers was flown in the Tropics (Teresina, Brazil, 5.1° S-42.9° W) in June 2005. In situ vertical profiles of O3, CO, CH4, HCHO, N2O, NO, NO2, HNO3, and HCl were obtained between 12 and 34 km height at a very high vertical resolution ( 5 m). In the present paper, emphasis is put on the dynamics. CH4:N2O tracer correlations are used to characterize the air mass origin and possible mixing processes. The results are compared to the well-established correlations from Michelsen et al. (J. Geophys. Res., 1998), and possibly to a new SPIRALE dataset collected during the May 2008 planned flight. Previous SPIRALE measurements at midand high-latitudes have shown their relevance for studying detailed dynamical vertical structure from the upper troposphere to the middle stratosphere (Huret et al., J. Geophys. Res., 2006). They will therefore help for the interpretation of the tropical profile together with the use of outputs from potential vorticity maps.

  9. Photoelectrical, photophysical and photocatalytic properties of Al based MOFs: MIL-53(Al) and MIL-53-NH2(Al)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Yang; Li, Huiliang; Liu, Yuanyuan; Huang, Baibiao; Sun, Qilong; Dai, Ying; Qin, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Xiaoyang

    2016-01-01

    Two Al based MOFs (MIL-53(Al) and MIL-53-NH2 (Al)) were synthesized, and their photoelectrical, photophysical and photocatalytic properties towards oxygen evolution from water were investigated. Different from the ligand to metal charge transfer process previously reported, we proposes a new photocatalytic mechanism based on electron tunneling according to the results of theoretical calculation, steady state and time resolved fluorescence spectra. The organic linkers absorb photons, giving rise to electrons and holes. Then, the photogenerated electrons tunnel through the AlO6-octahedra, which not only inhibit the recombination of photogenerated charge carriers, but also is a key factor to the photocatalytic activity of Al based MOFs.

  10. Framework Al zoning in zeolite ECR-1.

    PubMed

    Shin, Jiho; Ahn, Nak Ho; Cho, Sung June; Ren, Limin; Xiao, Feng-Shou; Hong, Suk Bong

    2014-02-25

    Rietveld analyses of the synchrotron X-ray diffraction data for various cation forms of zeolite ECR-1 have demonstrated framework Al zoning, which parallels the alternation of Al-rich maz and Al-poor mor layers. This can be further supported by notable differences in the average bond valence of its 10 crystallographically distinct tetrahedral sites.

  11. Opportunity's 'Rub al Khali' Panorama

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on the image for Opportunity's 'Rub al Khali' Panorama (QTVR)

    This panoramic image, dubbed 'Rub al Khali,' was acquired by NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity on the plains of Meridiani during the period from the rover's 456th to 464th sols on Mars (May 6 to May 14, 2005). Opportunity was about 2 kilometers (1.2 miles) south of 'Endurance Crater' at a place known informally as 'Purgatory Dune.'

    The rover was stuck in the dune's deep fine sand for more than a month. 'Rub al Khali' (Arabic translation: 'the empty quarter') was chosen as the name for this panorama because it is the name of a similarly barren, desolate part of the Saudi Arabian desert on Earth.

    The view spans 360 degrees. It consists of images obtained in 97 individual pointings of the panoramic camera. The camera took images with five camera filters at each pointing. This 22,780-by-6,000-pixel mosaic is an approximately true-color rendering generated using the images acquired through filters admitting light wavelengths of 750, 530, and 480 nanometers.

    Lighting varied during the nine sols it took to acquire this panorama, resulting in some small image seams within the mosaic. These seams have been smoothed in sky parts of the mosaic to better simulate the vista that a person would see if able to view it all at the same time on Mars.

    Opportunity's tracks leading back to the north (center of the panorama) are a reminder of the rover's long trek from Endurance Crater. The deep ruts dug by Opportunity's wheels as it became stuck in the sand appear in the foreground. The crest and trough of the last ripple the rover crossed before getting stuck is visible in the center. These wind-formed sand features are only about 10 to 15 centimeters (4 to 6 inches) tall. The crest of the actual ripple where the rover got stuck can be seen just to the right of center. The tracks and a few other places on and near ripple crests can

  12. Biological functionality and mechanistic contribution of extracellular matrix-ornamented three dimensional Ti-6Al-4V mesh scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Kumar, A; Nune, K C; Misra, R D K

    2016-11-01

    The 3D printed metallic implants are considered bioinert in nature because of the absence of bioactive molecules. Thus, surface modification of bioinert materials is expected to favorably promote osteoblast functions and differentiation. In this context, the objective of this study is to fundamentally elucidate the effect of cell-derived decellularized extracellular matrix (dECM) ornamented 3D printed Ti-6Al-4V scaffolds on biological functions, involving cell adhesion, proliferation, and synthesis of vinculin and actin proteins. To mimic the natural ECM environment, the mineralized ECM of osteoblasts was deposited on the Ti-6Al-4V porous scaffolds, fabricated by electron beam melting (EBM) method. The process comprised of osteoblast proliferation, differentiation, and freeze-thaw cycles to obtain decellularized extra cellular matrix (dECM), in vitro. The dECM provided a natural environment to restore the natural cell functionality of osteoblasts that were cultured on dECM ornamented Ti-6Al-4V scaffolds. In comparison to the bare Ti-6Al-4V scaffolds, a higher cell functionality such as cell adhesion, proliferation, and growth including cell-cell and cell-material interaction were observed on dECM ornamented Ti-6Al-4V scaffolds, which were characterized by using markers for focal adhesion and cytoskeleton such as vinculin and actin. Moreover, electron microscopy also indicated higher cell-material interaction and enhanced proliferation of cells on dECM ornamented Ti-6Al-4V scaffolds, supported by MTT assay. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 2751-2763, 2016.

  13. Instandhaltungsmanagement als Gestaltungsfeld Ganzheitlicher Produktionssysteme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dombrowski, Uwe; Schulze, Sven; Otano, Isabel Crespo

    Sich kontinuierlich verändernde Rahmenbedingungen, wie beispielsweise eine steigende Variantenvielfalt, verkürzte Produktlebenszyklen sowie Kundenforderungen nach höherer Qualität, kürzeren Lieferzeiten und geringeren Kosten, fordern von produzierenden Unternehmen eine stetige Anpassung der Prozesse, der Organisation und der Strukturen. Seit den 90er Jahren versuchen immer mehr deutsche Unternehmen diesen veränderten Anforderungen mit der Einführung eines Ganzheitlichen Produktionssystems (GPS) zu begegnen. Ganzheitliche Produktionssysteme sind dabei in ihren Grundlagen an das Toyota Produktionssystem angelehnt, vereinigen aber auch weitere Methoden zu einem unternehmensspezifischen Regelwerk. Im Rahmen des langfristigen Trends zu unternehmensindividuellen Produktionssystemen wird sowohl in der Industrie als auch in der Forschung intensiv über das Toyota Produktionssystem, Lean Production, Lean Management und Ganzheitliche Produktionssysteme diskutiert, werden Konzepte zu Implementierung und Betrieb erstellt und die Wirtschaftlichkeit untersucht.

  14. Systems Engineering Techniques for ALS Decision Making

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriquez, Luis F.; Drysdale, Alan E.; Jones, Harry; Levri, Julie A.

    2004-01-01

    The Advanced Life Support (ALS) Metric is the predominant tool for predicting the cost of ALS systems. Metric goals for the ALS Program are daunting, requiring a threefold increase in the ALS Metric by 2010. Confounding the problem, the rate new ALS technologies reach the maturity required for consideration in the ALS Metric and the rate at which new configurations are developed is slow, limiting the search space and potentially giving the perspective of a ALS technology, the ALS Metric may remain elusive. This paper is a sequel to a paper published in the proceedings of the 2003 ICES conference entitled, "Managing to the metric: an approach to optimizing life support costs." The conclusions of that paper state that the largest contributors to the ALS Metric should be targeted by ALS researchers and management for maximum metric reductions. Certainly, these areas potentially offer large potential benefits to future ALS missions; however, the ALS Metric is not the only decision-making tool available to the community. To facilitate decision-making within the ALS community a combination of metrics should be utilized, such as the Equivalent System Mass (ESM)-based ALS metric, but also those available through techniques such as life cycle costing and faithful consideration of the sensitivity of the assumed models and data. Often a lack of data is cited as the reason why these techniques are not considered for utilization. An existing database development effort within the ALS community, known as OPIS, may provide the opportunity to collect the necessary information to enable the proposed systems analyses. A review of these additional analysis techniques is provided, focusing on the data necessary to enable these. The discussion is concluded by proposing how the data may be utilized by analysts in the future.

  15. Wear behavior of Al-Al{sub 3}Ti composite manufactured by a centrifugal method

    SciTech Connect

    Watanabe, Yoshimi; Yamanaka, Noboru; Fukui, Yasuyoshi

    1999-12-01

    The purpose of the present study was to develop a wear-resistant, light Al-Al{sub 3}Ti composite material. An Al-Al{sub 3}Ti composite specimen was machined from a thick-walled tube of Al-Al{sub 3}Ti functionally graded material (FGM) manufactured by the centrifugal method from a commercial ingot of Al-5 mass% Ti master alloy. The alloy was heated to a temperature where solid Al{sub 3}Ti particles resided in a liquid Al matrix, and then the centrifugal method was carried out. Al{sub 3}Ti particles in a commercial alloy ingot exist as platelets, and this shape was maintained through the casting. Three kinds of wear specimens were prepared, taking into account the morphology of the Al{sub 3}Ti particles in the thick-walled FGM tube; the Al{sub 3}Ti particles were arranged with their platelet planes nearly normal to the radial direction as a result of the applied centrifugal force. The wear resistance of the Al-Al{sub 3}Ti composite was significantly higher than that of pure Al. Wear-resistance anisotropy and dissolution of the Al{sub 3}Ti into the Al matrix at the near-surface region, around 100 {micro}m in depth, were also observed. The mechanism of the supersaturated-layer formation and the origin of the anisotropic wear resistance are discussed.

  16. Retraction RETRACTION of "Methylation of the RASSFIA promoter in breast cancer" by Y. Ji, H.H. Jin, M.D. Wang, W.X. Cao, J.L. Bao - Genet. Mol. Res. 15 (2): gmr.15028261 (2016) - DOI: 10.4238/gmr.15028261.

    PubMed

    Ji, Y; Jin, H H; Wang, M D; Cao, W X; Bao, J L

    2016-10-07

    The retracted article is: Ji Y, Jin HH, Wang MD, Cao WX, et al. (2016). Methylation of the RASSFIA promoter in breast cancer. Genet. Mol. Res. 15: gmr.15028261. There are significant parts of this article (particularly, in the discussion section) that are copied from "Methylation of HIN-1, RASSF1A, RIL and CDH13 in breast cancer is associated with clinical characteristics, but only RASSF1A methylation is associated with outcome", by Jia Xu, Priya B Shetty, Weiwei Feng, Carol Chenault, Robert C Bast Jr, Jean-Pierre J Issa, Susan G Hilsenbeck and Yinhua Yu, published in BMC Cancer 2012; 12: 243. DOI: 10.1186/1471-2407-12-243. The first paragraphs of both discussions are identical. This is concerning. The abstract and introduction sections have much of their text plagiarized. Overall, there is high plagiarism detected. The GMR editorial staff was alerted and after a thorough investigation, we have strong reason to believe that the peer review process was failure and, after review and contacting the authors, the editors of Genetics and Molecular Research decided to retract the article in accordance with the recommendations of the Committee on Publication Ethics (COPE). The authors and their institutions were advised of this serious breach of ethics.

  17. Retraction RETRACTION of "Tumor necrosis factor alpha gene -308G>A polymorphism association with the risk of esophageal cancer in a Han Chinese population" by H. Zhao, H.W. Zhang, T. Zhang and X.M. Gu - Genet. Mol. Res. 15 (2): gmr.15025866 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.4238/gmr.15025866.

    PubMed

    Zhao, H; Zhang, H W; Zhang, T; Gu, X M

    2016-10-07

    The retracted article is: Zhao H, Zhang HW, Zhang T and Gu XM (2016). Tumor necrosis factor alpha gene -308G>A polymorphism association with the risk of esophageal cancer in a Han Chinese population. Genet. Mol. Res. 15: gmr.15025866. Two major concerns were found in this article. Firstly, it was found to be substantially equal to the article "Tumor necrosis factor-alpha gene -308G > A polymorphism alters the risk of hepatocellular carcinoma in a Han Chinese population" published in the Diagnostic Pathology Diagnostic Pathology (2014) 9: 199, by Feng et al.; licensee BioMed Central. 2014 - DOI: 10.1186/s13000-014-0199-3. Secondly, the authors do not discuss limitations of their approaches in the discussion. The discussion is largely an elaboration of the literature in the introduction part. However, even in that context, the discussion does not appropriately review the literature and there are frequent references to conclusions that are not supported by the cited literature. The GMR editorial staff was alerted and after a thorough investigation, there is strong reason to believe that the peer review process was failure. Also, after review and contacting the authors, the editors of Genetics and Molecular Research decided to retract this article in accordance with the recommendations of the Committee on Publication Ethics (COPE). The authors and their institutions were advised of this serious breach of ethics.

  18. Comments on the article by A. J. Lecloux (J Nanopart Res (2015) 17:447) regarding the use of volume-specific surface area (VSSA) to classify nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, Neil; Rauscher, Hubert; Roebben, Gert

    2016-08-01

    In November 2015, an article by A. J. Lecloux was published in this journal (J Nanopart Res, 17:447, 2015). The article focused on the use of volume-specific surface area (VSSA) for the implementation of the European Commission's recommended definition of "nanomaterial". In that paper, VSSA values were calculated for polydisperse particulate materials using a particle number-based averaging method which do not agree with earlier results of VSSA simulations of polydisperse materials reported in 2014 by the Joint Research Centre (JRC) of the European Commission (EC). In this contribution, we explain the difference between traditional view of VSSA which was used by the JRC and the proposed model of Lecloux. Through the use of some simple examples for polydisperse materials, it is demonstrated that the latter produces values which neither correspond to the generally accepted definition of VSSA nor relate to the commonly used experimental methods for determining VSSA using gas adsorption. Lecloux's model therefore does not constitute a basis for practical implementation of the EC's definition of nanomaterial using gas adsorption techniques.

  19. Early physical and functional rehabilitation of trauma patients in the Médecins Sans Frontières trauma centre in Kunduz, Afghanistan: luxury or necessity?

    PubMed Central

    Gohy, Bérangère; Ali, Engy; Van den Bergh, Rafael; Schillberg, Erin; Nasim, Masood; Naimi, Muhammad Mahmood; Cheréstal, Sophia; Falipou, Pauline; Weerts, Eric; Skelton, Peter; Van Overloop, Catherine; Trelles, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Background In Afghanistan, Médecins Sans Frontières provided specialised trauma care in Kunduz Trauma Centre (KTC), including physiotherapy. In this study, we describe the development of an adapted functional score for patient outcome monitoring, and document the rehabilitation care provided and patient outcomes in relation to this functional score. Methods A descriptive cohort study was done, including all patients admitted in the KTC inpatient department (IPD) between January and June 2015. The adapted functional score was collected at four points in time: admission and discharge from both IPD and outpatient department (OPD). Results Out of the 1528 admitted patients, 92.3% (n = 1410) received at least one physiotherapy session. A total of 1022 patients sustained either lower limb fracture, upper limb fracture, traumatic brain injury or multiple injury. Among them, 966 patients received physiotherapy in IPD, of whom 596 (61.7%) received IPD sessions within 2 days of admission; 696 patients received physiotherapy in OPD. Functional independence increased over time; among patients having a functional score taken at admission and discharge from IPD, 32.2% (172/535) were independent at discharge, and among patients having a functional score at OPD admission and discharge, 79% (75/95) were independent at discharge. Conclusions The provision of physiotherapy was feasible in this humanitarian setting, and the tailored functional score appeared to be relevant. PMID:27738078

  20. Comments on the article by A. J. Lecloux (J Nanopart Res (2015) 17:447) regarding the use of volume-specific surface area (VSSA) to classify nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Neil; Rauscher, Hubert; Roebben, Gert

    In November 2015, an article by A. J. Lecloux was published in this journal (J Nanopart Res, 17:447, 2015). The article focused on the use of volume-specific surface area (VSSA) for the implementation of the European Commission's recommended definition of "nanomaterial". In that paper, VSSA values were calculated for polydisperse particulate materials using a particle number-based averaging method which do not agree with earlier results of VSSA simulations of polydisperse materials reported in 2014 by the Joint Research Centre (JRC) of the European Commission (EC). In this contribution, we explain the difference between traditional view of VSSA which was used by the JRC and the proposed model of Lecloux. Through the use of some simple examples for polydisperse materials, it is demonstrated that the latter produces values which neither correspond to the generally accepted definition of VSSA nor relate to the commonly used experimental methods for determining VSSA using gas adsorption. Lecloux's model therefore does not constitute a basis for practical implementation of the EC's definition of nanomaterial using gas adsorption techniques.

  1. Mesozoic vein-type Pb-Zn mineralization in the Pyrenees: Lead isotopic and fluid inclusion evidence from the Les Argentières and Lacore deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munoz, Marguerite; Baron, Sandrine; Boucher, Adrien; Béziat, Didier; Salvi, Stefano

    2016-03-01

    The Axial Zone of the Pyrenees contains numerous sedimentary-exhalative Pb-Zn deposits formed during the Early Palaeozoic, which have been the subject of several studies. In addition to these, base-metal vein-type mineralizations are also exposed within the Axial Zone metasediments. These deposits, however, have not been investigated in depth and the timing and geodynamic context of their formation has not been specifically addressed. The vein-type Pb-Zn deposits of Les Argentières and Lacore are located in Devonian terranes of the eastern Pyrenees, south of the Mesozoic Aulus basin. They are interpreted as having been emplaced under an extensional setting. They are characterized by silver-rich tetrahedrite that occurs with Pb-Zn sulphides deposited by low-temperature NaCl-CaCl2 brines. Lead isotopic 208Pb/204Pb and 206Pb/204Pb ratios acquired on galena show more radiogenic values compared to those from the Palaeozoic sedimentary-exhalative mineralization, thus indicating younger ages. According to the model ages, the formation of the two deposits may be narrowed down to middle Late Triassic and Late Jurassic periods, respectively, which allows us to argue in favour of the role of pre-Alpine rifting phases in hydrothermal fluids circulation and mineralization deposition in a vein system bounding the Mesozoic Aulus basin.

  2. Exponential Gaussian approach for spectral modeling: The EGO algorithm I. Band saturation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pompilio, Loredana; Pedrazzi, Giuseppe; Sgavetti, Maria; Cloutis, Edward A.; Craig, Michael A.; Roush, Ted L.

    2009-06-01

    Curve fitting techniques are a widespread approach to spectral modeling in the VNIR range [Burns, R.G., 1970. Am. Mineral. 55, 1608-1632; Singer, R.B., 1981. J. Geophys. Res. 86, 7967-7982; Roush, T.L., Singer, R.B., 1986. J. Geophys. Res. 91, 10301-10308; Sunshine, J.M., Pieters, C.M., Pratt, S.F., 1990. J. Geophys. Res. 95, 6955-6966]. They have been successfully used to model reflectance spectra of powdered minerals and mixtures, natural rock samples and meteorites, and unknown remote spectra of the Moon, Mars and asteroids. Here, we test a new decomposition algorithm to model VNIR reflectance spectra and call it Exponential Gaussian Optimization (EGO). The EGO algorithm is derived from and complementary to the MGM of Sunshine et al. [Sunshine, J.M., Pieters, C.M., Pratt, S.F., 1990. J. Geophys. Res. 95, 6955-6966]. The general EGO equation has been especially designed to account for absorption bands affected by saturation and asymmetry. Here we present a special case of EGO and address it to model saturated electronic transition bands. Our main goals are: (1) to recognize and model band saturation in reflectance spectra; (2) to develop a basic approach for decomposition of rock spectra, where effects due to saturation are most prevalent; (3) to reduce the uncertainty related to quantitative estimation when band saturation is occurring. In order to accomplish these objectives, we simulate flat bands starting from pure Gaussians and test the EGO algorithm on those simulated spectra first. Then we test the EGO algorithm on a number of measurements acquired on powdered pyroxenes having different compositions and average grain size and binary mixtures of orthopyroxenes with barium sulfate. The main results arising from this study are: (1) EGO model is able to numerically account for the occurrence of saturation effects on reflectance spectra of powdered minerals and mixtures; (2) the systematic dilution of a strong absorber using a bright neutral material is not

  3. Retrieval of Venus' clouds parameters with polarization using SPICAV-IR onboard Venus Express

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, Loïc; Marcq, Emmanuel; Montmessin, Franck; Fedorova, Anna; Stam, Daphne; Bertaux, Jean-Loup; Korablev, Oleg

    2015-04-01

    agreement with previous measurements from Braak et al. (2002) and Knibbe et al. (1997). References Hansen, J. E. and Hovenier, J. W., 1974, Interpretation of the polarization of Venus., Journal of Atmospheric Sciences, 31. Kawabata et al., 1980, Cloud and haze properties from Pioneer Venus Polarimetry, J. Geophys. Res., 85. Markiewicz, W.J. et al., 2014, Glory on venus cloud tops and the unknown UV absorber, Icarus, 234. de Haan, J. F. et al, 1987, The adding method for multiple scattering calculations of polarized light, Astron. Astrophys., 183. de Rooij, W. A. and van der Stap, C. C. A. H., 1984, Expansion of Mie scattering matrices in generalized spherical functions, Astron. Astrophys., 131 Stam, D. M. et al., 1999, Degree of linear polarization of light emerging from the cloudless atmosphere in the oxygen A band, J. Geophys. Res., 104. Rossi, L. et al., 2014, Preliminary study of Venus cloud layers with polarimetric data from SPICAV/VEx, Planet. Space Sci., In Press. Braak, C. J. et al., 2002, Spatial and temporal variations of Venus haze properties obtained from Pioneer Venus Orbiter polarimetry, J. Geophys. Res. (Planets), 107. Knibbe, W. J. J. et al., 1997,A biwavelength analysis of Pioneer Venus polarization observations, J. Geophys. Res., 102.

  4. Magnetism of Al-substituted magnetite reduced from Al-hematite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Zhaoxia; Liu, Qingsong; Zhao, Xiang; Roberts, Andrew P.; Heslop, David; Barrón, Vidal; Torrent, José

    2016-06-01

    Aluminum-substituted magnetite (Al-magnetite) reduced from Al-substituted hematite or goethite (Al-hematite or Al-goethite) is an environmentally important constituent of magnetically enhanced soils. In order to characterize the magnetic properties of Al-magnetite, two series of Al-magnetite samples were synthesized through reduction of Al-hematite by a mixed gas (80% CO2 and 20% CO) at 395°C for 72 h in a quartz tube furnace. Al-magnetite samples inherited the morphology of their parent Al-hematite samples, but only those transformed from Al-hematite synthesized at low temperature possessed surficial micropores, which originated from the release of structural water during heating. Surface micropores could thus serve as a practical fingerprint of fire or other high-temperature mineralogical alteration processes in natural environments, e.g., shear friction in seismic zones. In addition, Al substitution greatly affects the magnetic properties of Al-magnetite. For example, coercivity (Bc) increases with increasing Al content and then decreases slightly, while the saturation magnetization (Ms), Curie temperature (Tc), and Verwey transition temperature (Tv) all decrease with increasing Al content due to crystal defect formation and dilution of magnetic ions caused by Al incorporation. Moreover, different trends in the correlation between Tc and Bc can be used to discriminate titanomagnetite from Al-magnetite, which is likely to be important in environmental and paleomagnetic studies, particularly in soil.

  5. Reconciliation of global temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benestad, R. E.

    2012-03-01

    reassuring to see reasonably good agreement between the different data sources, suggesting both robust results and high credibility of the underlying observations. However, these results are not so reassuring in terms of the implications for our society and the question about where we are heading. In fact, there is increased reason for concern because the analysis suggests a fairly substantial sensitivity to other external conditions, especially if the climate sensitivity is similar for GHGs and other forcings (Benestad and Schmidt 2009). References Benestad R E and Schmidt G A 2009 J. Geophys. Res.—Atmos. 114 D14101 Brohan P et al 2006 J. Geophys. Res. 11 D12106 Easterling D R and Wehner M F 2009 Geophys. Res. Lett. 36 L08706 Foster G and Rahmstorf S 2011 Environ. Res. Lett. 6 044022 Hansen J et al 2010 Rev. Geophys. 48 RG4004 Isaksen K et al 2007 Geophys. Res. Lett. 34 L17502 Kalnay E et al 1996 Bull. Am. Meteorol. Soc. 77 437-71 Kaufmann R K et al 2011 Proc. Natl Acad. Sci. 108 11790-3 Kinnard C et al 2011 Nature 479 509-12 Lean J and Rind D H 2008 Geophys. Res. Lett. 35 L18701 Mernild S H et al 2009 EOS Trans. Am. Geophys. Union 90 13-4 Solomon S et al 2010 Science 327 1219 Wagner W 2011 Remote Sens. 3 2002-4

  6. Chemical provinces reveal Elysium Volcano's compositional evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Susko, D. A.; Karunatillake, S.; Wray, J. J.; Skok, J. R.; Hurowitz, J.; Ojha, L.; Judice, T.; Bently, R. O. J.

    2014-12-01

    Chemical provinces of Mars became definable[1-3] with the maps of elemental mass fractions generated with Mars Odyssey Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS) data[4,5]. Previous work highlighted the Elysium lava flow province as anomalous, with a depletion in K and Th relative to the average crust in the rest of Mars (ROM).[3] We characterize the elemental composition, geology, and geomorphology of the region to constrain the processes that have contributed to its evolution. We compare SE Elysium with its North West lava fields, advancing prior work on thermal evolution of the martian mantle.[6] Lava fields at both sites probably source from Elysium eruptions. Both show similar Si content, as well as a Ca-enrichment compared to ROM, consistent with prior models.[6,7] Nevertheless, the two fields are compositionally distinct from each other, with NW Elysium decisively depleted in Ca and Fe, but enriched in K and Th. Such distinctness, in elements that reflect magmatic fractionation, reveals the possibility that a single volcanic complex on Mars may evolve rapidly during the Amazonian era, causing variable flow compositions. Interestingly, a chemical province containing volcanics that is contemporaneous with Elysium, overlaps the Tharsis region.[3] Unlike Elysium, the K and Th distributions within Tharsis are indistinguishable from ROM. Meanwhile, the mass fraction signature in Tharsis is enriched in Cl and depleted in Si. Such contrast, in chemical anomalies between volcanic constructs of similar age, may indicate that the depletion of K and Th in SE Elysium did not arise from temporal evolution of the mantle. [1] Taylor, G. et al. Geology 38, 183-186, 2010 [2] Gasnault, O. et al. 207, 226-247, 2010 [3] Karunatillake, S. et al. J. Geophys. Res. 114, E12001, 2009 [4] Boynton, W. V. et al. J. Geophys. Res. 112, E12S99, 2007 [5] Feldman, W. C. et al. J. Geophys. Res. 109, E09006, 2004 [6] Baratoux, D. et al. Nature 472, 338-41, 2011 [7] Balta, J. et al. Geology 41, 1115

  7. How relevant is heterogeneous chemistry on Mars? Strong tests via global mapping of water and ozone (sampled via O2 dayglow)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villanueva, Geronimo Luis; Mumma, Michael J.; Novak, Robert E.

    2015-11-01

    Ozone and water are powerful tracers of photochemical processes on Mars. Considering that water is a condensable with a multifaceted hydrological cycle and ozone is continuously being produced / destroyed on short-time scales, their maps can test the validity of current 3D photochemical and dynamical models. Comparisons of modern GCM models (e.g., Lefèvre et al. 2004) with certain datasets (e.g., Clancy et al. 2012; Bertaux et al. 2012) point to significant disagreement, which in some cases have been related to heterogeneous (gas-dust) chemistry beyond the classical gas-gas homogeneous reactions.We address these concerns by acquiring full 2D maps of water and ozone (via O2 dayglow) on Mars, employing high spectral infrared spectrometers at ground-based telescopes (CRIRES/VLT and CSHELL/NASA-IRTF). By performing a rotational analysis on the O2 lines, we derive molecular temperature maps that we use to derive the vertical level of the emission (e.g., Novak et al. 2002). Our maps sample the full observable disk of Mars on March/25/2008 (Ls=50°, northern winter) and on Jan/29/2014 (Ls=83°, northern spring). The maps reveal a strong dependence of the O2 emission and water burden on local orography, while the temperature maps are in strong disagreement with current models. Could this be the signature of heterogeneous chemistry? We will present the global maps and will discuss possible scenarios to explain the observations.This work was partially funded by grants from NASA's Planetary Astronomy Program (344-32-51-96), NASA’s Mars Fundamental Research Program (203959.02.02.20.29), NASA’s Astrobiology Program (344-53-51), and the NSF-RUI Program (AST-805540). We thank the administration and staff of the European Southern Observatory/VLT and NASA-IRTF for awarding observing time and coordinating our observations.Bertaux, J.-L., Gondet, B., Lefèvre, F., et al. 2012. J. Geophys. Res. Pl. 117. pp. 1-9.Clancy, R.T., Sandor, B.J., Wolff, M.J., et al. 2012. J. Geophys. Res

  8. Analysis of Venus Express optical extinction due to aerosols in the upper haze of Venus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parkinson, Christopher; Bougher, Stephen; Mahieux, Arnaud; Tellmann, Silvia; Pätzold, Martin; Vandaele, Ann C.; Wilquet, Valérie; Schulte, Rick; Yung, Yuk; Gao, Peter; Bardeen, Charles

    Observations by the SPICAV/SOIR instruments aboard Venus Express (VEx) have revealed that the Upper Haze of Venus is populated by two particle modes, as reported by Wilquet et al. (J. Geophys. Res., 114, E00B42, 2009; Icarus 217, 2012). Gao et al. (In press, Icarus, 2013) posit that the large mode is made up of cloud particles that have diffused upwards from the cloud deck below, while the smaller mode is generated by the in situ nucleation of meteoric dust. They tested this hypothesis by using version 3.0 of the Community Aerosol and Radiation Model for Atmospheres, first developed by Turco et al. (J. Atmos. Sci., 36, 699-717, 1979) and upgraded to version 3.0 by Bardeen et al. (The CARMA 3.0 microphysics package in CESM, Whole Atmosphere Working Group Meeting, 2011). Using the meteoric dust production profile of Kalashnikova et al. (Geophys. Res. Lett., 27, 3293-3296, 2000), the sulfur/sulfate condensation nuclei production profile of Imamura and Hashimoto (J. Atmos. Sci., 58, 3597-3612, 2001), and sulfuric acid vapor production profile of Zhang et al. (Icarus, 217, 714-739, 2012), they numerically simulate a column of the Venus atmosphere from 40 to 100 km above the surface. Their aerosol number density results agree well with Pioneer Venus Orbiter (PVO) data from Knollenberg and Hunten (J. Geophys. Res., 85, 8039-8058, 1980), while their gas distribution results match that of Kolodner and Steffes below 55 km (Icarus, 132, 151-169, 1998). The resulting size distribution of cloud particles shows two distinct modes, qualitatively matching the observations of PVO. They also observe a third mode in their results with a size of a few microns at 48 km altitude, which appears to support the existence of the controversial third mode in the PVO data. This mode disappears if coagulation is not included in the simulation. The Upper Haze size distribution shows two lognormal-like distributions overlapping each other, possibly indicating the presence of the two distinct

  9. Reply to Vance et al.

    SciTech Connect

    Woon-Chee Yee; Elliott, J.L; Kwon, J.M.; Goodfellow, P.

    1996-07-01

    In our report of a family with a motor and sensory polyneuropathy that was linked to chromosome 3q, we classified this neuropathy as a form of hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy II (HMSN II, also known as {open_quotes}CMT2{close_quotes}). Doubts have been raised by Vance et al. as to whether this neuropathy should be classified as hereditary sensory autonomic neuropathy I (HSAN I) instead of HMSN II. While it is reasonable to raise such doubts, we believe that the neuropathy is best designated as HMSN II for the reasons described below. The group of disorders described as HSAN are characterized by primary or predominant involvement of sensory and autonomic neurons that fail to develop or that undergo atrophy and degeneration. These disorders were extensively reviewed by Dyck and Ohta, who initially described them as the hereditary sensory neuropathies (HSN). It was Dyck who subsequently suggested that these disorders be designated HSAN rather than HSN, because of the presence of autonomic involvement. 8 refs.

  10. Between ice and gas: CO2 on the icy satellites of Jupiter and Saturn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hibbitts, C.

    2010-12-01

    , with the position of its ν3 fundament absorption band dependent on the cation composition and on the dosing temperature. It may also be that the presence of charge-compensating ions, and the resulting negative charge of the remaining structure, enables CO2 to adsorb through an induced dipole attraction. In general, the IR absorption band of CO2 in montmorillonite tends to shift toward longer wavelengths as the density of the electric field of the principle cation decreases, with the exception that the IR absorption band of the Na-rich endmember occurs at a shorter wavelength than for the Li-rich endmember. References: [1] Carlson et al., (1996) Science; [2] McCord et al., (1998) J. Geophys. Res.; [3] Buratti et al., (2005) Astrophys. J.; [4]Clark et al., (2005) Nature; [5] Brown et al., (2006) , Icarus; [6] Filacchione et al., (2006) , Icarus; [7] Cruikshank et al., (2010), Icarus, 206, 561-572; [9] Smythe et al., (1998),DPS,30, #55.P07, 1448; [9] Hansen and McCord, (2008), GRL, 35; [10] Hibbitts et al., (2000) J. Geophys. Res.; [11] Hibbitts et al., (2002) , J. Geophys. Res.; [12] Hibbitts et al., (2003) J. Geophys. Res.; [13] Moore et al., (2000), Icarus, 140, 294-312; [14] Hibbitts and Szanyi, (2007), Icarus. 191, 371-380; [15] Dyar et al., (2010), Icarus, 208, 425-437.

  11. How to teach geocomplexity at two opposite levels? The 'Klippen of Cabrières' case study (Hérault, France).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giusti, Christian

    2014-05-01

    The starting point of this essay is a question from a school teacher who came in contact with me via my photo gallery online. His question, "What is the origin of the Roc de Murviel?" actually covers three or four separate problems, and requires to devise simple and specific comparisons in order to help children of 8 years old to understand a bunch of difficult and abstract concepts. But, in contrast, Carboniferous marine sedimentary deposits of the so-called unit "Klippen of Cabrières" are known of geologists worldwide, due to the presence of a Global boundary Stratotype Section and Point (GSSP) located not far from the "Roc de Murviel", the "La Serre" section, where is defined the base of the Carboniferous System, Mississippian Sub-System and Tournaisien Stage. In this case, to remind how the conceptions about the formation of the "Klippen of Cabrières" evolved may serve as an introduction to the explanation of syntectonic sedimentation and to the history of the concept of thrust nappe for the well-trained public as well as academics or engineers not experts in the specificities of regional geology. Difficulty (at least in France) will come from the scarcity of naturalists, a species in danger of extinction, and from the small number of historians concerned by the natural sciences. At the public school, the first method is to decompose the problem into independent issues (Cartesian reductionism) such as: nature and age of the rock? mode of sedimentation? part of an ancient mountain chain? existence as a landform in the current landscape? Concerning the specific question of geological time, because most children of this age do not yet know how to read the time, a second method is to replace the model of the clock (the entire history of the planet Earth reduced to one year) by the metaphor of either the staircase or the ladder, both adapted from the international stratigraphic scale. A third method is to use the concept of "toolbox" for each sub-disciplines or

  12. Total ozone patterns over the northern mid-latitudes: spatial correlations, extreme events and dynamical contributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rieder, H. E.; Staehelin, J.; Maeder, J. A.; Ribatet, M.; Bodeker, G. E.; Davison, A. C.

    2009-04-01

    Tools from geostatistics and extreme value theory are applied to analyze spatial correlations in total ozone for the northern mid-latitudes. The dataset used in this study is the NIWA combined total ozone dataset (Bodeker et al., 2001; Müller et al., 2008). New tools from extreme value theory (Coles, 2001; Ribatet, 2007) have recently been applied to the world's longest total ozone record from Arosa, Switzerland (e.g. Staehelin 1998a,b), in order to describe extreme events in low and high total ozone (Rieder et al., 200x). Within the current study, patterns in spatial correlation and frequency distributions of extreme events (e.g. ELOs and EHOs) are studied for the northern mid-latitudes. New insights in spatial patterns of total ozone for the northern mid-latitudes are presented. Koch et al. (2005) found that the increase in fast isentropic transport of tropical air to northern mid-latitudes contributed significantly to ozone changes between 1980 and 1989. Within this study the influence of changes in atmospheric dynamics (e.g. tropospheric and lower stratospheric pressure systems) on column ozone over the northern mid-latitudes is analyzed for the time period 1979-2007. References: Bodeker, G.E., J.C. Scott, K. Kreher, and R.L. McKenzie, Global ozone trends in potential vorticity coordinates using TOMS and GOME intercompared against the Dobson network: 1978-1998, J. Geophys. Res., 106 (D19), 23029-23042, 2001. Coles, S.: An Introduction to Statistical Modeling of Extreme Values, Springer Series in Statistics, ISBN:1852334592, Springer, Berlin, 2001. Koch, G., H. Wernli, C. Schwierz, J. Staehelin, and T. Peter (2005), A composite study on the structure and formation of ozone miniholes and minihighs over central Europe, Geophys. Res. Lett., 32, L12810, doi:10.1029/2004GL022062. Müller, R., Grooß, J.-U., Lemmen, C., Heinze, D., Dameris, M., and Bodeker, G.: Simple measures of ozone depletion in the polar stratosphere, Atmos. Chem. Phys., 8, 251-264, 2008. Ribatet

  13. Unraveling the empirical relationship between Arctic stratospheric ozone loss and temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Hobe, Marc; Grooß, Jens-Uwe; Müller, Rolf

    2014-05-01

    Ever since the discovery of the Antarctic ozone hole it has been recognized that cold temperatures play a key role in fostering strong ozone depletion in the polar stratosphere. Compact negative correlations between total winter ozone loss and vortex area exposed to temperatures below certain threshold values have been demonstrated (e.g. Harris et al., 2010; Rex et al., 2006; Rex et al., 2004). The most commonly used threshold is the NAT equilibrium temperature, but other choices have been suggested, such as the temperature when the rate of chlorine activation on liquid aerosols exceeds a certain limit. Interestingly, both thresholds relate to critical temperatures in the context of heterogeneous chlorine activation, and Harris et al., 2010, stated that original activation (i.e. the activation in early winter) is the most important factor influencing ozone loss. But at least two other key processes - catalytic ozone loss and denitrification - depend directly on temperature, and temperature also controls the stability and therefore the persistence of the polar vortex. Here, we investigate such "vortex area" correlations for a number of different temperature thresholds, as well as direct correlations with vortex mean temperature and with the date of the final warming. We also carry out sensitivity studies using the Chemical Lagrangian Model of the Stratosphere (CLaMS) to investigate the response of ozone loss to temperature modifications for particle formation and growth, surface reaction probabilities and gas phase reactivity separately. Rex et al., Arctic ozone loss and climate change, Geophys. Res. Lett., 31, L04116, 2004. Rex et al., Arctic winter 2005: Implications for stratospheric ozone loss and climate change, Geophys. Res. Lett., 33, L23808, 2006. Harris et al., A closer look at Arctic ozone loss and polar stratospheric clouds, Atmos. Chem. Phys., 10, 8499-8510, 2010.

  14. A comparison of four relative radiometric normalization (RRN) techniques for mosaicing H-res multi-temporal thermal infrared (TIR) flight-lines of a complex urban scene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, M. M.; Hay, G. J.; Couloigner, I.; Hemachandran, B.; Bailin, J.

    2015-08-01

    High-spatial and -radiometric resolution (H-res) thermal infrared (TIR) airborne imagery, such as the TABI-1800 (Thermal Airborne Broadband Imager) provide unique surface temperature information that can be used for urban heat loss mapping, heat island analysis, and landcover classifications. For mapping large urban areas at a high-spatial resolution (i.e., sub-meter), airborne thermal imagery needs to be acquired over a number of flight-lines and mosaiced together. However, due to radiometric variations between flight-lines the similar objects tend to have different temperature characteristics on the mosaicked image, resulting in reduced visual and radiometric agreement between the flight-lines composing the final mosaiced output. To reduce radiometric variability between airborne TIR flight-lines, with a view to produce a visually seamless TIR image mosaic, we evaluate four relative radiometric normalization techniques including: (i) Histogram Matching, (ii) Pseudo Invariant Feature (PIF) Based Linear Regression, (iii) PIF-Based Theil-Sen Regression, and (iv) No-Change Stratified Random Samples (NCSRS) Based Linear Regression. The techniques are evaluated on two adjacent TABI-1800 airborne flight-lines (each ∼30 km × 0.9 km) collected ∼25 min apart over a portion of The City of Calgary (with ∼30% overlap between them). The performances of these techniques are compared based on four criteria: (i) speed of computation, (ii) ability to automate, (iii) visual assessment, and (iv) statistical analysis. Results show that NCSRS-Based Linear Regression produces the best overall results closely followed by Histogram Matching. Specifically, these two radiometric normalization techniques: (i) increase the visual and statistical agreement between the tested TIR airborne flight-lines (NCSRS Based Linear Regression increases radiometric agreement between flight-lines by 53.3% and Histogram Matching by 52.4%), (ii) produce a visually seamless image mosaic, and (iii) can

  15. Health Services for Gender-Based Violence: Médecins Sans Frontières Experience Caring for Survivors in Urban Papua New Guinea

    PubMed Central

    Lokuge, Kamalini; Verputten, Meggy; Ajakali, Maryanne; Tolboom, Bianca; Joshy, Grace; Thurber, Katherine A.; Plana, Daisy; Howes, Steven; Wakon, Anastasia; Banks, Emily

    2016-01-01

    Background Levels of gender-based violence in Papua New Guinea (PNG) are high; health services for survivors are limited. Evidence from the few existing health services for survivors can inform improvements in care in this and similar settings. Methods Médecins Sans Frontières supported health services for survivors in Lae, PNG from 2008–2013. Routine monitoring data from August 2010-April 2013 were used to describe patient and service characteristics. Results 5,892 individuals received care over 6,860 presentations, the majority self-referred or referred by friends and family. Presentations were attributed to intimate partner violence(62%), non-partner sexual violence(15%), other forms of violence(3%), and past (but not current) violence(21%). 97% were female; an estimated 4.9% (95%CI:4.8–5.0%) of females resident in the catchment area presented to the programme during the 2.8years analysed. Of presentations for non-partner sexual violence, 79% knew their abuser and 50% were children <16 years. 92% of presentations reporting current violence received medical treatment for injuries. The majority of patients who received multiple counselling sessions reported improved functioning and decreased severity of psycho-social complaints. Conclusions Community awareness of the availability of free, best-practice, accessible, confidential medical and counselling services for sexual and gender-based violence in Lae, PNG resulted in many survivors presenting for care. High levels of ongoing intimate partner violence and child sexual abuse by known abusers indicates that alongside comprehensive medical care, access to effective services in non-health sectors such as policing, protection and legal services are needed if survivors are to escape the cycle of violence. PMID:27285845

  16. Characterizing the Magnetospheric State for Sawtooth Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fung, S. F.; Tepper, J. A.; Cai, X.

    2015-12-01

    Magnetospheric sawtooth events, first identified in the early 1990's, are named for their characteristic appearance of multiple quasi-periodic intervals of slow decrease followed by sharp increase of proton energy fluxes in the geosynchronous region. The successive proton flux decrease-and-increase intervals have been interpreted as recurrences of stretching and dipolarization, respectively, of the nightside geomagnetic field [Reeves et al., 2003]. Due to their often-extended intervals with 2- 10 cycles, sawteeth occurrences are sometimes referred to as a magnetospheric mode [Henderson et al., 2006]. Studies over the past two decades of sawtooth events (both event and statistical) have yielded a wealth of information on the conditions for the onset and occurrence of sawtooth events, but the occurrences of sawtooth events during both storm and non-storm periods suggest that we still do not fully understand the true nature of sawtooth events [Cai et al., 2011]. In this study, we investigate the characteristic magnetospheric state conditions [Fung and Shao, 2008] associated with the beginning, during, and ending intervals of sawtooth events. Unlike previous studies of individual sawtooth event conditions, magnetospheric state conditions consider the combinations of both magnetospheric drivers (solar wind) and multiple geomagnetic responses. Our presentation will discuss the most probable conditions for a "sawtooth state" of the magnetosphere. ReferencesCai, X., J.-C. Zhang, C. R. Clauer, and M. W. Liemohn (2011), Relationship between sawtooth events and magnetic storms, J. Geophys. Res., 116, A07208, doi:10.1029/2010JA016310. Fung, S. F. and X. Shao, Specification of multiple geomagnetic responses to variable solar wind and IMF input, Ann. Geophys., 26, 639-652, 2008. Henderson, M. G., et al. (2006), Magnetospheric and auroral activity during the 18 April 2002 sawtooth event, J. Geophys. Res., 111, A01S90, doi:10.1029/2005JA011111. Reeves, G. D., et al. (2004), IMAGE

  17. Growth and Stress-induced Transformation of Zinc blende AlN Layers in Al-AlN-TiN Multilayers

    PubMed Central

    Li, Nan; Yadav, Satyesh K.; Wang, Jian; Liu, Xiang-Yang; Misra, Amit

    2015-01-01

    AlN nanolayers in sputter deposited {111}Al/AlN/TiN multilayers exhibit the metastable zinc-blende-structure (z-AlN). Based on density function theory calculations, the growth of the z-AlN is ascribed to the kinetically and energetically favored nitridation of the deposited aluminium layer. In situ nanoindentation of the as-deposited {111}Al/AlN/TiN multilayers in a high-resolution transmission electron microscope revealed the z-AlN to wurzite AlN phase transformation through collective glide of Shockley partial dislocations on every two {111} planes of the z-AlN. PMID:26681109

  18. Growth and stress-induced transformation of zinc blende AlN layers in Al-AlN-TiN multilayers

    DOE PAGES

    Li, Nan; Yadav, Satyesh K.; Wang, Jian; ...

    2015-12-18

    We report that AlN nanolayers in sputter deposited {111}Al/AlN/TiN multilayers exhibit the metastable zinc-blende-structure (z-AlN). Based on density function theory calculations, the growth of the z-AlN is ascribed to the kinetically and energetically favored nitridation of the deposited aluminium layer. In situ nanoindentation of the as-deposited {111}Al/AlN/TiN multilayers in a high-resolution transmission electron microscope revealed the z-AlN to wurzite AlN phase transformation through collective glide of Shockley partial dislocations on every two {111} planes of the z-AlN.

  19. Orientation relationship of eutectoid FeAl and FeAl2

    PubMed Central

    Scherf, A.; Kauffmann, A.; Kauffmann-Weiss, S.; Scherer, T.; Li, X.; Stein, F.; Heilmaier, M.

    2016-01-01

    Fe–Al alloys in the aluminium range of 55–65 at.% exhibit a lamellar microstructure of B2-ordered FeAl and triclinic FeAl2, which is caused by a eutectoid decomposition of the high-temperature Fe5Al8 phase, the so-called ∊ phase. The orientation relationship of FeAl and FeAl2 has previously been studied by Bastin et al. [J. Cryst. Growth (1978 ▸), 43, 745] and Hirata et al. [Philos. Mag. Lett. (2008 ▸), 88, 491]. Since both results are based on different crystallographic data regarding FeAl2, the data are re-evaluated with respect to a recent re-determination of the FeAl2 phase provided by Chumak et al. [Acta Cryst. (2010 ▸), C66, i87]. It is found that both orientation relationships match subsequent to a rotation operation of 180° about a 〈112〉 crystallographic axis of FeAl or by applying the inversion symmetry of the FeAl2 crystal structure as suggested by the Chumak data set. Experimental evidence for the validity of the previously determined orientation relationships was found in as-cast fully lamellar material (random texture) as well as directionally solidified material (∼〈110〉FeAl || solidification direction) by means of orientation imaging microscopy and global texture measurements. In addition, a preferential interface between FeAl and FeAl2 was identified by means of trace analyses using cross sectioning with a focused ion beam. On the basis of these habit planes the orientation relationship between the two phases can be described by (01)FeAl || (114) and [111]FeAl || [10]. There is no evidence for twinning within FeAl lamellae or alternating orientations of FeAl lamellae. Based on the determined orientation and interface data, an atomistic model of the structure relationship of Fe5Al8, FeAl and FeAl2 in the vicinity of the eutectoid decomposition is derived. This model is analysed with respect to the strain which has to be accommodated at the interface of FeAl and FeAl2. PMID:27047304

  20. Reactivity of aluminum cluster anions with ammonia: selective etching of Al11(-) and Al12(-).

    PubMed

    Grubisic, Andrej; Li, Xiang; Gantefoer, Gerd; Bowen, Kit H; Schnöckel, Hansgeorg; Tenorio, Francisco J; Martinez, Ana

    2009-11-14

    Reactivity of aluminum cluster anions toward ammonia was studied via mass spectrometry. Highly selective etching of Al(11)(-) and Al(12)(-) was observed at low concentrations of ammonia. However, at sufficiently high concentrations of ammonia, all other sizes of aluminum cluster anions, except for Al(13)(-), were also observed to deplete. The disappearance of Al(11)(-) and Al(12)(-) was accompanied by concurrent production of Al(11)NH(3)(-) and Al(12)NH(3)(-) species, respectively. Theoretical simulations of the photoelectron spectrum of Al(11)NH(3)(-) showed conclusively that its ammonia moiety is chemisorbed without dissociation, although in the case of Al(12)NH(3)(-), dissociation of the ammonia moiety could not be excluded. Moreover, since differences in calculated Al(n)(-) + NH(3) (n=9-12) reaction energies were not able to explain the observed selective etching of Al(11)(-) and Al(12)(-), we concluded that thermodynamics plays only a minor role in determining the observed reactivity pattern, and that kinetics is the more influential factor. In particular, the conversion from the physisorbed Al(n)(-)(NH(3)) to chemisorbed Al(n)NH(3)(-) species is proposed as the likely rate-limiting step.

  1. First-principles study of the Al(001)-Al3Nb(001) interfacial properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Yanhong; Xu, Rui

    2017-03-01

    The adhesion, interfacial energy and bonding on fcc-Al(001)/D022-Al3Nb(001) interface were investigated using density functional calculations. Considering different terminations of Al3Nb(001) (Al+Nb-terminated and Al-terminated) and stacking sites (top-, bridge- and center-sites), six Al(001)/Al3Nb(001) models were calculated. For the models with same stacking site, Al+Nb-terminated model has larger work of adhesion (Wad) than the Al-terminated one. For the models with same termination, the work of adhesion increases, and the interface energy decreases as the order of center-sited, bridge-sited and top-sited. Al+Nb-terminated-center-sited and Al-terminated-center-sited models are more stable among six models. The interfacial bonding was discussed with analysis of valence electron density distribution and partial density of states (PDOS). The bonding is mainly contributed from Al-Nb covalent bonds and Al-Al metallic interactions.

  2. Interfacial Phenomena in Al/Al, Al/Cu, and Cu/Cu Joints Soldered Using an Al-Zn Alloy with Ag or Cu Additions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pstruś, Janusz; Gancarz, Tomasz

    2014-05-01

    The studies of soldered joints were carried out in systems: Al/solder/Al, Al/solder/Cu, Cu/solder/Cu, where the solder was (Al-Zn)EUT, (Al-Zn)EUT with 0.5, 1.0, and 1.5 at.% of Ag and (Al-Zn)EUT with 0.5, 1.0, and 1.5 at.% of Cu addition. Brazing was performed at 500 °C for 3 min. The EDS analysis indicated that the composition of the layers starting from the Cu pad was CuZn, Cu5Zn8, and CuZn4, respectively. Wetting tests were performed at 500 °C for 3, 8, 15, and 30 min, respectively. Thickness of the layers and their kinetics of growth were measured based on the SEM micrographs. The formation of interlayers was not observed from the side of Al pads. On the contrary, dissolution of the Al substrate and migration of Al-rich particles into the bulk of the solder were observed.

  3. Genetics of Familial and Sporadic ALS

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-04

    Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS); Familial Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis; Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis With Frontotemporal Dementia; Lou Gehrig's Disease; Motor Neuron Disease; Primary Lateral Sclerosis

  4. L’utilisation du prémélange de monensin chez les vaches laitières : un suivi simple et essentiel pour s’assurer d’une utilisation adéquate

    PubMed Central

    Dubuc, Jocelyn; Baril, Jean; DesCôteaux, Luc

    2009-01-01

    Le prémélange de monensin est utilisé fréquemment sur les fermes laitières canadiennes. L’ingrédient actif de ce produit est le monensin sodique. Bien que son utilisation chez les vaches laitières soit sécuritaire, des cas de surdose ont été rapportés à la suite de consommation de niveaux de monensin plus élevés que ceux recommandés. Un suivi hebdomadaire du pourcentage de matières grasses du réservoir de lait de la ferme devrait être fait de routine suite à la livraison d’aliment médicamenteux contenant du monensin pour détecter rapidement les situations de surdose. L’observation d’une baisse soudaine de la consommation volontaire de matière sèche et l’apparition de diarrhée dans un troupeau sont d’autres signes cliniques de surdose de monensin. Une détection rapide de ces cas permettra de corriger la situation. PMID:19721781

  5. Eversion congénitale bilatérale des paupières: prise en charge d’un cas selon l’approche conservatrice au Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Yaoundé, Cameroun

    PubMed Central

    Monebenimp, Francisca; Kagmeni, Gilles; Chelo, David; Bilong, Yannick; Moukouri, Ernest

    2012-01-01

    L’éversion congénitale des paupières est une affection rare. Son traitement en première intention est généralement conservateur, constitué de lubrifiant, d’antibiotiques, de manœuvres d’inversion de la paupière éversée et d’une éducation des parents. Nous présentons le cas d’un nouveau-né de huit heures de vie ayant une éversion congénitale bilatérale des paupières avec surinfection bactérienne. La ponction à l’aiguille de la conjonctive œdémateuse associée au traitement topique avec du sérum salé isotonique et des antibiotiques ont accéléré le processus de guérison. Une récidive n’a pas été observée lors des pleurs après trois semaines d’inversion des paupières. PMID:22514768

  6. Characterizing Mafic and Clay Components in Libya Montes, Mars, using Automated Gaussian Modeling of Spectral Features found in MRO/CRISM Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makarewicz, H. D.; Parente, M.; Bishop, J. L.

    2008-12-01

    compositions in this region and comparing them to those observed for the greater Isidis region. References [1]Crumpler, L. S., and K. L. Tanaka (2003) J. Geophys. Res., 108, DOI: 8010.1029/2002JE002040. [2]Bishop, J. L., et al. (2007) 7th Int'l Mars Conf. [3]Mustard, J. F., et al. (2008) Nature, 454, 07305. [4]Bibring, J.-P., et al. (2005) Science, 307,1576. [5]Mustard, J. F., et al.(2005) Science, 307, 1594. [6]Tornabene, et al. (2008) J. Geophys. Res., DOI:10.1029/2007JE002988, in press. [7]Sunshine, J. M., et al. (1990) J. Geophys. Res., 95, 6955. [8]Mustard, J., and J. M. Sunshine (1995) Science, 267, 1623.

  7. Comparative study of numerical simulations of the solar wind interaction with Venus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breus, T. K.; Krymskii, A. M.; Mitnitskii, V. Ya.

    1995-09-01

    The assumptions and peculiarities of the numerical codes, as well as the spatial resolution of the gas-dynamical and hybrid simulations which are available at present are discussed. As found the present day estimates of O + ion production rates which can effect the bow shock geometry as intensively as observed by Pioneer-Venus-Orbiter are controversial. The disagreement of the gas-dynamical simulations by Breus et al. (Planet. Space Sci.40, 131-138, 1992) and Stahara and Spreiter ( Venus and Mars: Atmospheres, Ionospheres and Solar Wind Interactions, Geophysical Monograph 66, p. 345. AGU, 1992) is a result of different numerical implementation of the flow tangency condition which does not permit the specification of the equation of state p = p( ϱ) at the impenetrable obstacle. The numerical code by Breus et al. uses the reflection procedure for the implementation of the flow tangency condition and is insensitive to the equation of state at the obstacle surface. The reflection procedure does not employ explicitly the boundary conditions at the obstacle which the Stahara and Spreiter code does. As a result Stahara and Spreiter's ( Venus and Mars: Atmoshheres, Ionospheres and Solar Wind Interactions, Geophysical Monograph 66, p. 345. AGU, 1992) simulation is in agreement with observations only in the case of an unreasonable value of the electron impact ionization: in several times of the photoionization within the magnetic barrier at Venus. Breus et al. (Planet. Space Sci.40, 131-138, 1992) agree well with observations if the electron impact ionization is 60-70% of the photoionization there. Brecht and Ferrante ( J. geophys. Res.96, 11209-11220, 1991) simulated an insignificant effect of the magnetic barrier on the shock geometry. However this simulation is unable to estimate the O + ionization rate to fit the hybrid model with observations. The cells employed by Moore et al. (J. geophys. Res.96, 7779-7791, 1991) are larger than the thickness of the magnetic barrier

  8. Possible cause of enhancement of electron temperature in high electron density region in the dayside ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakinami, Yoshihiro; Watanabe, Shigeto

    2016-07-01

    When neutral atmosphere is ionized by solar EUV, energetic electrons named photoelectrons are emitted. The photoelectrons are primary heat source of electrons in the ionosphere in the daytime. The heating rate of electron by photoelectron is proportion to 0.97 power of electron density (Ne) while the heated electron is cooled through the Column collision with ions, the rate of which rate is square of Ne. Therefore, electron temperature (Te) decreases and approach ion temperature (Ti) with increase of Ne. Ions are also cooled through the collision with neutral spices. Finally, these temperatures (Te, Ti and Tn) show very similar values in high Ne region. However, Te enhancement with increase of Ne is found in the satellite observation at 600 km in the daytime ionosphere [Kakinami et al., 2011]. Similar Ti variation is also found around the magnetic dip equator [Kakinami et al., 2014]. One possible cause of the enhancement of Te is enhacement of Tn with increase Ne because both Ne and Tn increase with increase of solar irradiance flux, F10.7 [Lei et al., 2007]. However, since such the enhancements of Te are seen in any F10.7, it is hard to explain the phenomenon. In this paper, we present correlation between Te (Ti) and Ne obtained by the Incoherent Scatter radar at Jicamarca. The similar correlation, namely positive correlation of Te (Ti) with Ne in high Ne region are found above 300 km. Using the observations and Tn and neutral density calculated with MSIS, the Column collision cooling with ions, and inelastic collision cooling with neutral spices for electron are shown. The heat conduction along the magnetic field line is also estimated by using IRI model. Using these information, we discuss possible cause of the enhancement of Te in the high Ne region. References Kakinami et al. (2011), J. Geophys. Res., doi:10.1029/2011JA016905. Kakinami et al. (2014), J. Geophys. Res., 119, doi:10.1002/2014JA020302. Lei et al.(2007), J. Geophys. Res., doi:10.1029/2006JA012041.

  9. Spin-dependent tunneling junctions with AlN and AlON barriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Manish; Nickel, Janice H.; Anthony, Thomas C.; Wang, Shan X.

    2000-10-01

    We report on ferromagnetic spin-dependent tunneling (SDT) junctions with NiFe/AlN/NiFe and NiFe/AlON/NiFe structures. Good barriers were formed by plasma nitridation and oxy-nitridation of Al films. Tunneling magnetoresistance ratios (TMR) up to 18% were observed at room temperature. The devices exhibit lower resistance-area products than those seen in reference junctions with Al2O3 barriers. The degradation in TMR at higher bias voltages is found to be less than that found in standard alumina junctions. AlN and AlON could thus be alternate materials for the tunnel barrier in SDT junctions.

  10. Processing and Mechanical Properties of Directionally Solidified NiAl/NiAlTa Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, D. R.; Oliver, B. F.; Noebe, R. D.; Whittenberger, J. D.

    1994-01-01

    Promising creep strengths were found for a directionally solidified NiAl-NiAlTa alloy when compared to other NiAl based intermetallics. The directionally solidified alloy had an off-eutectic composition that resulted in microstructures consisting of NiAl dendrites surrounded by aligned eutectic regions. The room temperature toughness of the two phase alloy was similar to that of polycrystalline NiAl even with the presence of the brittle Laves phase NiAlTa. Alloying additions that may improve the room temperature toughness by producing multiphase alloys are discussed.

  11. Atomic structure and oxygen deficiency of the ultrathin aluminium oxide barrier in Al/AlOx/Al Josephson junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Lunjie; Tran, Dung Trung; Tai, Cheuk-Wai; Svensson, Gunnar; Olsson, Eva

    2016-07-01

    Al/AlOx/Al Josephson junctions are the building blocks of a wide range of superconducting quantum devices that are key elements for quantum computers, extremely sensitive magnetometers and radiation detectors. The properties of the junctions and the superconducting quantum devices are determined by the atomic structure of the tunnel barrier. The nanoscale dimension and disordered nature of the barrier oxide have been challenges for the direct experimental investigation of the atomic structure of the tunnel barrier. Here we show that the miniaturized dimension of the barrier and the interfacial interaction between crystalline Al and amorphous AlOx give rise to oxygen deficiency at the metal/oxide interfaces. In the interior of the barrier, the oxide resembles the atomic structure of bulk aluminium oxide. Atomic defects such as oxygen vacancies at the interfaces can be the origin of the two-level systems and contribute to decoherence and noise in superconducting quantum circuits.

  12. Atomic structure and oxygen deficiency of the ultrathin aluminium oxide barrier in Al/AlOx/Al Josephson junctions.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Lunjie; Tran, Dung Trung; Tai, Cheuk-Wai; Svensson, Gunnar; Olsson, Eva

    2016-07-12

    Al/AlOx/Al Josephson junctions are the building blocks of a wide range of superconducting quantum devices that are key elements for quantum computers, extremely sensitive magnetometers and radiation detectors. The properties of the junctions and the superconducting quantum devices are determined by the atomic structure of the tunnel barrier. The nanoscale dimension and disordered nature of the barrier oxide have been challenges for the direct experimental investigation of the atomic structure of the tunnel barrier. Here we show that the miniaturized dimension of the barrier and the interfacial interaction between crystalline Al and amorphous AlOx give rise to oxygen deficiency at the metal/oxide interfaces. In the interior of the barrier, the oxide resembles the atomic structure of bulk aluminium oxide. Atomic defects such as oxygen vacancies at the interfaces can be the origin of the two-level systems and contribute to decoherence and noise in superconducting quantum circuits.

  13. Atomic structure and oxygen deficiency of the ultrathin aluminium oxide barrier in Al/AlOx/Al Josephson junctions

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Lunjie; Tran, Dung Trung; Tai, Cheuk-Wai; Svensson, Gunnar; Olsson, Eva

    2016-01-01

    Al/AlOx/Al Josephson junctions are the building blocks of a wide range of superconducting quantum devices that are key elements for quantum computers, extremely sensitive magnetometers and radiation detectors. The properties of the junctions and the superconducting quantum devices are determined by the atomic structure of the tunnel barrier. The nanoscale dimension and disordered nature of the barrier oxide have been challenges for the direct experimental investigation of the atomic structure of the tunnel barrier. Here we show that the miniaturized dimension of the barrier and the interfacial interaction between crystalline Al and amorphous AlOx give rise to oxygen deficiency at the metal/oxide interfaces. In the interior of the barrier, the oxide resembles the atomic structure of bulk aluminium oxide. Atomic defects such as oxygen vacancies at the interfaces can be the origin of the two-level systems and contribute to decoherence and noise in superconducting quantum circuits. PMID:27403611

  14. University of Utrecht 1636-1676: "Res Ecclesia, Res Publica and … Res Pecunia"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Rinsum, Henk; Koops, Willem

    2016-01-01

    The early history of Utrecht University (founded 1636) reflects an emerging public sphere (Habermas's "bürgerliche öffentlichkeit") of a major town in the Netherlands. This public sphere was a contested field among the different groups establishing and administering the university: university professors, town magistrates and…

  15. Effects of renal impairment on aluminum (Al) kinetics and Al-induced toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Yokel, R.A.; McNamara, P.J.

    1986-03-01

    Al-induced toxicity most commonly occurs in the renally impaired. To study the influence of renal impairment on Al kinetics and toxicity, renally impaired rabbits were prepared by the remnant kidney procedure. Six weeks after partial nephrectomy creatinine clearance was 21% of controls and serum creatinine, BUN, Ca, and PO/sub 4/ were 222, 248, 122, and 50% of presurgery levels respectively. Serum Al kinetics after i.v. Al were: Al clearance 27%, initial and steady state volumes of distribution 50 and 80%, half life 362% and mean residence time 300% of controls (renally intact rabbits). Beginning 9 weeks after partial nephrectomy, rabbits received 145 to 160 ..mu..mole Al/kg s.c. daily, 5 x weekly x 4 weeks. Acquisition of a classically conditioned reflex (nictitating membrane extension) was impaired comparable to that produced by 100-200 ..mu..mole Al in controls but retention and extinction deficits were greater than those seen after 400 ..mu..mole Al in controls. Tissue Al concentrations were less than those seen after 200 ..mu..mole Al in controls. Body weight was comparable to that produced by 400 ..mu..mole Al in controls. These results suggest that renal impairment alters Al serum distribution, impairs its clearance, and increases the Al-induced impairment of memory and body weight gain.

  16. Influence of AlN thickness on AlGaN epilayer grown by MOCVD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayasakthi, M.; Juillaguet, S.; Peyre, H.; Konczewicz, L.; Baskar, K.; Contreras, S.

    2016-10-01

    AlGaN/AlN layers were grown by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) on sapphire substrates. The AlN buffer thickness was varied from 400 nm to 800 nm. The AlGaN layer thickness was 1000 nm. The crystalline quality, thickness and composition of AlGaN were determined using high resolution X-ray diffraction (HRXRD). The threading dislocation density (TDD) was found to decrease with increase of AlN layer thickness. Reciprocal space mapping (RSM) was used to estimate the strain and relaxation between AlGaN and AlN. The optical properties of AlGaN layers were investigated by temperature dependent photoluminescence (PL). PL intensities of AlGaN layers increases with increasing the AlN thickness. The surface morphology of AlGaN was studied by atomic force microscopy (AFM). Root mean square (RMS) roughness values were found to be decreased while increase of AlN thickness.

  17. Response of radiation belt simulations to different radial diffusion coefficients for relativistic and ultra-relativistic electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drozdov, Alexander; Mann, Ian; Baker, Daniel N.; Subbotin, Dmitriy; Ozeke, Louis; Shprits, Yuri; Kellerman, Adam

    Two parameterizations of the resonant wave-particle interactions of electrons with ULF waves in the magnetosphere by Brautigam and Albert [2000] and Ozeke et al. [2012] are evaluated using the Versatile Electron Radiation Belt (VERB) diffusion code to estimate the effect of changing a diffusion coefficient on the radiation belt simulation. The period of investigation includes geomagnetically quiet and active time. The simulations take into account wave-particle interactions represented by radial diffusion transport, local acceleration, losses due to pitch-angle diffusion, and mixed diffusion. 1. Brautigam, D. H., and J. M. Albert (2000), Radial diffusion analysis of outer radiation belt electrons during the October 9, 1990, magnetic storm, J. Geophys. Res., 105(A1), 291-309, doi:10.1029/1999JA900344 2. Ozeke, L. G., I. R. Mann, K. R. Murphy, I. J. Rae, D. K. Milling, S. R. Elkington, A. A. Chan, and H. J. Singer (2012), ULF wave derived radiation belt radial diffusion coefficients, J. Geophys. Res., 117, A04222, doi:10.1029/2011JA017463.

  18. Analysis of Self Similar Scaling in Kinetic and Magnetic Energy Density as a Function of Distance From Sun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, A.; Coplan, M. A.

    2009-12-01

    We analyze solar wind and interplanetary magnetic field data to study scaling properties of kinetic and magnetic energy density as a function of solar cycle and distance from the sun. In his original theory on turbulence, Kolmogorov predicted that in the inertial range the fluctuations in velocity differences should be self-similar. Analysis of solar wind data showed this not to be the case. On the other hand B. Hnat et.al.(Geophys. Res. Lett., 29 (10), 1446, 2002) and J.J Podesta (J. Geophys. Res., 111, A09105, 2006) showed that fluctuations in kinetic and magnetic energy density are approximately self-similar. We extend this analysis using data from the SWE and MFI experiments on the WIND spacecraft (at 1AU) during solar minimum (2006) and solar maximum (2001) and VHM/FGM experiment on the Ulysses spacecraft (1AU to 5AU). We calculate the cumulative distribution function (CDF) of the time delayed differences in kinetic and magnetic energy density and present a method through which the scaling exponent can be reliably calculated from the CDFs, instead of using structure functions which are very sensitive to large fluctuations. We compare the scaling exponents derived from the CDFs to the ones calculated from structure functions and study the rescaling properties of CDFs.

  19. Durability Assessment of TiAl Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Draper, Susan L.; Lerch, Bradley A.

    2008-01-01

    The durability of TiAl is a prime concern for the implementation of TiAl into aerospace engines. Two durability issues, the effect of high temperature exposure on mechanical properties and impact resistance, have been investigated and the results are summarized in this paper. Exposure to elevated temperatures has been shown to be detrimental to the room temperature ductility of gamma alloys with the most likely mechanisms being the ingress of interstitials from the surface. Fluorine ion implantation has been shown to improve the oxidation resistance of gamma alloys, and ideally it could also improve the environmental embrittlement of high Nb content TiAl alloys. The effect of F ion implantation on the surface oxidation and embrittlement of a third generation, high Nb content TiAl alloy (Ti-45Al-5Nb-B-C) were investigated. Additionally, the ballistic impact resistance of a variety of gamma alloys, including Ti-48Al-2Cr- 2Nb, Ti-47Al-2Cr-2Nb, ABB-2, ABB-23, NCG359E, 95A and Ti-45Al-5Nb-B-C was accessed. Differences in the ballistic impact properties of the various alloys will be discussed, particularly with respect to their manufacturing process, microstructure, and tensile properties.

  20. Diana Al-Hadid: Identity and Heritage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jungerberg, Tom; Smith, Anna; Borsh, Colleen

    2012-01-01

    Diana Al-Hadid's sculptures reflect the many locations, cultures, histories, and mythologies that have shaped her as an artist. In large-scale works which have the appearance of architectural ruins, Al-Hadid employs imagery drawn from many diverse interests including science and technology, history, and literature. She also incorporates images and…

  1. Sporadic and hereditary amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS).

    PubMed

    Ajroud-Driss, Senda; Siddique, Teepu

    2015-04-01

    Genetic discoveries in ALS have a significant impact on deciphering molecular mechanisms of motor neuron degeneration. The identification of SOD1 as the first genetic cause of ALS led to the engineering of the SOD1 mouse, the backbone of ALS research, and set the stage for future genetic breakthroughs. In addition, careful analysis of ALS pathology added valuable pieces to the ALS puzzle. From this joint effort, major pathogenic pathways emerged. Whereas the study of TDP43, FUS and C9ORF72 pointed to the possible involvement of RNA biology in motor neuron survival, recent work on P62 and UBQLN2 refocused research on protein degradation pathways. Despite all these efforts, the etiology of most cases of sporadic ALS remains elusive. Newly acquired genomic tools now allow the identification of genetic and epigenetic factors that can either increase ALS risk or modulate disease phenotype. These developments will certainly allow for better disease modeling to identify novel therapeutic targets for ALS. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Neuromuscular Diseases: Pathology and Molecular Pathogenesis.

  2. Energetics of Al13 Keggin cluster compounds

    PubMed Central

    Armstrong, Christopher R.; Casey, William H.; Navrotsky, Alexandra

    2011-01-01

    The ϵ-Al13 Keggin aluminum hydroxide clusters are essential models in establishing molecular pathways for geochemical reactions. Enthalpies of formation are reported for two salts of aluminum centered ϵ-Keggin clusters, Al13 selenate, (Na(AlO4)Al12(OH)24(SeO4)4•12H2O) and Al13 sulfate, (NaAlO4Al12(OH)24(SO4)4•12H2O). The measured enthalpies of solution, ΔHsol, at 28 °C in 5 N HCl for the ε-Al13 selenate and sulfate are −924.57 (± 3.83) and −944.30 ( ± 5.66) kJ·mol-1, respectively. The enthalpies of formation from the elements, ΔHf,el, for Al13 selenate and sulfate are −19,656.35 ( ± 67.30) kJ·mol-1, and −20,892.39 ( ± 70.01) kJ·mol-1, respectively. In addition, ΔHf,el for sodium selenate decahydrate was calculated using data from high temperature oxide melt solution calorimetry measurements: −4,006.39 ( ± 11.91) kJ·mol-1. The formation of both ε-Al13 Keggin cluster compounds is exothermic from oxide-based components but energetically unfavorable with respect to a gibbsite-based assemblage. To understand the relative affinity of the ϵ-Keggin clusters for selenate and sulfate, the enthalpy associated with two S-Se exchange reactions was calculated. In the solid state, selenium is favored in the Al13 compound relative to the binary chalcogenate, while in 5 N HCl, sulfur is energetically favored in the cluster compound compared to the aqueous solution. This contribution represents the first thermodynamic study of ε-Al13 cluster compounds and establishes a method for other such molecules, including the substituted versions that have been created for kinetic studies. Underscoring the importance of ε-Al13 clusters in natural and anthropogenic systems, these data provide conclusive thermodynamic evidence that the Al13 Keggin cluster is a crucial intermediate species in the formation pathway from aqueous aluminum monomers to aluminum hydroxide precipitates. PMID:21852572

  3. Dose-enhancement effects in TaSi/Al- and Al-gate MOS devices

    SciTech Connect

    Fleetwood, D.M.; Beutler, D.E.; Draper, B.L.; Knott, D.; Brown, D.B.; Rosenstock, H.

    1988-01-01

    The response of MOS capacitors with TaSi/Al and Al electrodes to medium- and low-energy x-irradiation is investigated. Experimentally measured dose-enhancement effects are compared with computer simulations for these structures.

  4. Phase stability in binary Ti-Al

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, C. D.; Hofmeister, W. H.; Bayuzick, R. J.

    1991-01-01

    Binary Ti-Al samples containing from 46 to 54 at. pct Al were solidified while undercooled by various amounts using electromagnetic levitation techniques. A detailed thermal history of these samples was obtained with sampling rates as high as 500 KHz during recalescence. This very high sampling rate was essential to resolve the thermal events. Primary alpha solidification was observed in samples containing from 51 to 54 at. pct Al that were undercooled less than about 100 K at solidification. Primary beta solidification was found for all undercoolings tested in samples containing less than 51 at. pct Al and for undercoolings greater than about 100 K in samples containing 51 to 54 at. pct Al.

  5. The neuropathology of FTD associated With ALS.

    PubMed

    Mackenzie, Ian R A

    2007-01-01

    There is increasing recognition of a clinical overlap between frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Recent advances in our understanding of the neuropathologic, biochemical, and genetic basis of these conditions provides evidence for a common underlying pathogenesis. The neuropathology in most cases of FTD with ALS is a subtype of frontotemporal lobar degeneration, characterized by neuronal inclusions that are immunoreactive for ubiquitin but not tau (frontotemporal lobar degeneration with ubiquitinated inclusions). These cases show significant pathologic overlap with clinically pure FTD and those with classic ALS. Moreover, the ubiquitinated pathologic protein in all these conditions has recently been identified as TDP-43. A number of families have been reported with autosomal dominant FTD-ALS linked to chromosome 9p and these also have TDP-43-positive frontotemporal lobar degeneration with ubiquitinated inclusions pathology. Together, these findings suggest that FTD-ALS is part of a clinicopathologic spectrum of disease, now identified as TDP-43 proteinopathies.

  6. NiAl alloys for structural uses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koss, D. A.

    1991-01-01

    Alloys based on the intermetallic compound NiAl are of technological interest as high temperature structural alloys. These alloys possess a relatively low density, high melting temperature, good thermal conductivity, and (usually) good oxidation resistance. However, NiAl and NiAl-base alloys suffer from poor fracture resistance at low temperatures as well as inadequate creep strength at elevated temperatures. This research program explored macroalloying additions to NiAl-base alloys in order to identify possible alloying and processing routes which promote both low temperature fracture toughness and high temperature strength. Initial results from the study examined the additions of Fe, Co, and Hf on the microstructure, deformation, and fracture resistance of NiAl-based alloys. Of significance were the observations that the presence of the gamma-prime phase, based on Ni3Al, could enhance the fracture resistance if the gamma-prime were present as a continuous grain boundary film or 'necklace'; and the Ni-35Al-20Fe alloy was ductile in ribbon form despite a microstructure consisting solely of the B2 beta phase based on NiAl. The ductility inherent in the Ni-35Al-20Fe alloy was explored further in subsequent studies. Those results confirm the presence of ductility in the Ni-35Al-20Fe alloy after rapid cooling from 750 - 1000 C. However exposure at 550 C caused embrittlement; this was associated with an age-hardening reaction caused by the formation of Fe-rich precipitates. In contrast, to the Ni-35Al-20Fe alloy, exploratory research indicated that compositions in the range of Ni-35Al-12Fe retain the ordered B2 structure of NiAl, are ductile, and do not age-harden or embrittle after thermal exposure. Thus, our recent efforts have focused on the behavior of the Ni-35Al-12Fe alloy. A second parallel effort initiated in this program was to use an alternate processing technique, mechanical alloying, to improve the properties of NiAl-alloys. Mechanical alloying in the

  7. Photoelectrical, photophysical and photocatalytic properties of Al based MOFs: MIL-53(Al) and MIL-53-NH{sub 2}(Al)

    SciTech Connect

    An, Yang; Li, Huiliang; Liu, Yuanyuan; Huang, Baibiao; Sun, Qilong; Dai, Ying; Qin, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Xiaoyang

    2016-01-15

    Two Al based MOFs (MIL-53(Al) and MIL-53-NH{sub 2} (Al)) were synthesized, and their photoelectrical, photophysical and photocatalytic properties towards oxygen evolution from water were investigated. Different from the ligand to metal charge transfer process previously reported, we proposes a new photocatalytic mechanism based on electron tunneling according to the results of theoretical calculation, steady state and time resolved fluorescence spectra. The organic linkers absorb photons, giving rise to electrons and holes. Then, the photogenerated electrons tunnel through the AlO{sub 6}-octahedra, which not only inhibit the recombination of photogenerated charge carriers, but also is a key factor to the photocatalytic activity of Al based MOFs. - Graphical abstract: The photoelectrical, photophysical and photocatalytic properties towards oxygen evolution from water of two Al based MOFs were investigated. A new photocatalytic mechanism was proposed based on electron tunneling according to the results of both theoretical calculation and steady state, time resolved fluorescence spectra. The electron tunneling process not only inhibit the recombination of photogenerated charge carriers, but also is a key factor to the photocatalytic activity of Al based MOFs.

  8. Changing snow cover in tundra ecosystems tips the Arctic carbon balance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zona, D.; Hufkens, K.; Gioli, B.; Kalhori, A. A. M.; Oechel, W. C.

    2014-12-01

    The Arctic environment has witnessed important changes due to global warming, resulting in increased surface air temperatures and rain events which both exacerbate snow cover deterioration (Semmens et al, 2013; Rennert et al, 2009; White et al, 2007; Min et al, 2008; Sharp et al, 2013; Schaeffer et al, 2013). Snow cover duration is declining by almost 20% per decade, a far higher rate than model estimates (Derksen and Brown, 2012). Concomitant with increasing temperatures and decreasing snow cover duration, the length of the arctic growing season is reported to have increased by 1.1 - 4.9 days per decade since 1951 (Menzel et al, 2006), and, plant productivity and CO2 uptake from arctic vegetation are strongly influenced by changes in growing season length (Myneni et al., 1997; Schaefer et al., 2005; Euskirchen et al., 2006). Based on more than a decade of eddy flux measurements in Arctic tundra ecosystems across the North slope of Alaska, and remotely sensed snow cover data, we show that earlier snow melt in the spring increase C uptake while an extended snow free period in autumn is associated with a higher C loss. Here we present the impacts of changes in snow cover dynamics between spring and autumn in arctic tundra ecosystems on the carbon dynamics and net C balance of the Alaskan Arctic. ReferencesDerksen, C., Brown R. (2012) Geophys. Res. Lett., doi:10.1029/2012GL053387 Euskirchen, E.S., et al. (2006) Glob. Change Biol., 12, 731-750. Menzel, A., et al. 2006. Glob. Change Biol., 12, 1969-1976. Min SK, Zhang X, Zweirs F (2008) Science 320: 518-520. Rennert K J, Roe G, Putkonen J and Bitz C M (2009) J. Clim. 22 2302-15. Schaefer, K., Denning A.S., Leonard O. (2005) Global Biogeochem. Cycles, 19, GB3017. Schaeffer, S. M., Sharp, E., Schimel, J. P. & Welker, J. M. (2013). Soil- plant N processes in a High Arctic ecosystem, NW Greenland are altered by long-term experimental warming and higher rainfall. Glob. Change Biol., 11, 3529-39. doi: 10.1111/gcb.12318

  9. Al/Al2O3 Metal Matrix Composites (MMCs) and Macrocomposites for Armor Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-01

    ceramics (high hardness, high stiffness, low thermal expansion). In this study , Al/Al2O3 MMCs with alumina particle contents ranging from 12% to 46% were...expansion). In this study , Al/Al2O3 MMCs with alumina particle contents ranging from 12% to 46% were fabricated by different processing approaches...the different MMCs. The matrix alloy, alumina volume fraction, densities, mechanical properties , and thermal properties are summarized in Table 2

  10. High temperature creep behaviour of Al-rich Ti-Al alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sturm, D.; Heilmaier, M.; Saage, H.; Aguilar, J.; Schmitz, G. J.; Drevermann, A.; Palm, M.; Stein, F.; Engberding, N.; Kelm, K.; Irsen, S.

    2010-07-01

    Compared to Ti-rich γ-TiAl-based alloys Al-rich Ti-Al alloys offer an additional reduction of in density and a better oxidation resistance which are both due to the increased Al content. Polycrystalline material was manufactured by centrifugal casting. Microstructural characterization was carried out employing light-optical, scanning and transmission electron microscopy and XRD analyses. The high temperature creep of two binary alloys, namely Al60Ti40 and Al62Ti38 was comparatively assessed with compression tests at constant true stress in a temperature range between 1173 and 1323 K in air. The alloys were tested in the cast condition (containing various amounts of the metastable phases Al5Ti3 and h-Al2Ti) and after annealing at 1223 K for 200 h which produced (thermodynamically stable) lamellar γ-TiAl + r-Al2Ti microstructures. In general, already the as-cast alloys exhibit a reasonable creep resistance at 1173 K. Compared with Al60Ti40, both, the as-cast and the annealed Al62Ti38 alloy exhibit better creep resistance up to 1323 K which can be rationalized by the reduced lamella spacing. The assessment of creep tests conducted at identical stress levels and varying temperatures yielded apparent activation energies for creep of Q = 430 kJ/mol for the annealed Al60Ti40 alloy and of Q = 383 kJ/mol for the annealed Al62Ti38 material. The latter coincides well with that of Al diffusion in γ-TiAl, whereas the former can be rationalized by the instability of the microstructure containing metastable phases.

  11. Corrosion Studies of 2195 Al-Li Alloy and 2219 Al Alloy with Differing Surface Treatments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danford, M. D.; Mendrek, M. J.

    1998-01-01

    Corrosion studies of 2195 Al-Li and 2219 Al alloys have been conducted using the scanning reference electrode technique (SRET) and the polarization resistance (PR) technique. The SRET was used to study corrosion mechanisms, while corrosion rate measurements were studied with the PR technique. Plates of Al203 blasted, soda blasted and conversion coated 2219 Al were coated with Deft primer and the corrosion rates studied with the EIS technique. Results from all of these studies are presented.

  12. Pioneer Venus Orbiter (PVO) Ionosphere Evidence for Atmospheric Escape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grebowsky, J. M.; Hoegy, W. R.

    2009-12-01

    An early estimate of escape of H2O from Venus [McElroy et al., 1982] using observed hot oxygen densities inferred by Nagy et al. [1981] from PVO OUVS 1304 Å dayglow and using ionization rates from photoionization and electron impact. This resulted in an estimated oxygen ionization rate planet-wide above the plasmapause of 3x1025 atoms/s. Based on the energetic O+ being swept up and removed by solar wind, McElroy et al. [1982] gave an estimate of a loss rate for O of 6x106 atoms/cm2/s. Using a different method of estimating escape based data in the ionotail of Venus, Brace et al. [1987] estimated a total planetary O+ escape rate of 5x1025 ions/s. Their estimate was based on PVO measurements of superthermal O+ (energy range 9-16 eV) in the tail ray plasma between 2000 and 3000 km. Their estimated global mean flux was 107 atoms/cm2/s. The two escape rates are remarkably close considering all the errors involved in such estimates of escape. A study of escape by Luhmann et al. [2008] using VEX observations at low solar activity finds modest escape rates, prompting the authors to reconsider the evidence from both PVO and VEX of the possibility of enhanced escape during extreme interplanetary conditions. We reexamine the variation of escape under different solar wind conditions using ion densities and plasma content in the dayside and nightside of Venus using PVO ionosphere density during times of high solar activity. Citations: Brace, L.H., W. T. Kasprzak, H.A. Taylor, R. F. Theis, C. T. Russess, A. Barnes, J. D. Mihalov, and D. M. Hunten, "The Ionotail of Venus: Its Configuration and Evidence for Ion Escape", J. Geophys. Res. 92, 15-26, 1987. Luhmann, J.G., A. Fedorov, S. Barabash, E. Carlsson, Y. Futaana, T.L. Zhang, C.T. Russell, J.G. Lyon, S.A. Ledvina, and D.A. Brain, “Venus Express observations of atmospheric oxygen escape during the passage of several coronal mass ejections”, J. Geophys. Res., 113, 2008. McElroy, M. B., M. J. Prather, J. M. Rodiquez, " Loss

  13. Meteoric Dust as Condensation Nuclei of Small-Mode Particles in the Upper Haze of Venus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, P.; Zhang, X.; Crisp, D.; Bardeen, C.; Yung, Y. L.

    2012-12-01

    Observations by the SPICAV/SOIR instruments aboard Venus Express have revealed that the Upper Haze of Venus is populated by two particle modes, as reported by Wilquet et al. (J. Geophys. Res., 114, E00B42, 2009). In this work, we posit that the large mode is made up of cloud particles that have diffused upwards from the cloud deck below, while the smaller mode is generated by the in situ nucleation of meteoric dust. We test this hypothesis by using version 3.0 of the Community Aerosol and Radiation Model for Atmospheres, first developed by Turco et al. (J. Atmos. Sci., 36, 699-717, 1979) and upgraded to version 3.0 by Bardeen et al. (The CARMA 3.0 microphysics package in CESM, Whole Atmosphere Working Group Meeting, 2011). Using the meteoric dust production profile of Kalashnikova et al. (Geophys. Res. Lett., 27, 3293-3296, 2000), the sulfur/sulfate condensation nuclei production profile of Imamura and Hashimoto (J. Atmos. Sci., 58, 3597-3612, 2001), and sulfuric acid vapor production profile of Zhang et al. (Icarus, 217, 714-739, 2012), we numerically simulate a column of the Venus atmosphere from 40 to 100 km above the surface. Our aerosol number density results agree well with Pioneer Venus data from Knollenberg and Hunten (J. Geophys. Res., 85, 8039-8058, 1980), while our gas distribution results match that of Kolodner and Steffes below 55 km (Icarus, 132, 151-169, 1998). The resulting size distribution of cloud particles shows two distinct modes, qualitatively matching the observations of Pioneer Venus. We also observe a third mode in our results with a size of a few microns at 48 km altitude, which appears to support the existence of the controversial third mode in the Pioneer Venus data. This mode disappears if coagulation is not included in the simulation. The Upper Haze size distribution shows two lognormal-like distributions overlapping each other, possibly indicating the presence of the two distinct modes. We test our hypothesis by simulating the

  14. Surface Irradiation of Jupiter's Moon Europa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubin, M.; Tenishev, V.; Combi, M. R.; Jia, X.; Hansen, K. C.; Gombosi, T. I.

    2010-12-01

    Jupiter’s moon Europa has a complex and tightly coupled interaction with the Jovian magnetosphere. Neutral gas of the moon’s exosphere is ionized and picked up by the corotating plasma that sweeps past Europa at a relative velocity of almost 100 km/s. This pick-up process alters the magnetic and electric field topology around Europa, which in turn affects the trajectories of the pick-up ions as well as the thermal and hot magnetospheric ions that hit the moon’s icy surface. In turn these surface-impinging ions are the responsible source for the sputtered neutral atmosphere, which itself is again crucial for the exospheric mass loading of the surrounding plasma. We use the magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) model BATSRUS to model the interaction of Europa with the Jovian magnetosphere. The model accounts for the exospheric mass loading, ion-neutral charge exchange, and ion-electron recombination [Kabin et al. (J. Geophys. Res., 104, A9, 19,983-19,992, 1999)]. The derived magnetic and electric fields are then used in our Test Particle Monte Carlo (TPMC) model to integrate individual particle trajectories under the influence of the Lorentz force. We take the measurements performed by Galileo’s Energetic Particle Detector (EPD) [Williams et al. (Sp. Sci. Rev. 60, 385-412, 1992) and Cooper et al. (Icarus 149, 133-159, 2001)] and the Plasma Analyzer (PLS) [Paterson et al. (J. Geophys. Res., 104, A10, 22,779-22,791, 1999)] as boundary conditions. Using a Monte Carlo technique allows to individually track ions in a wide energy range and to individually calculate their energy deposition on the moon’s surface. The sputtering yield is a function of incident particle type, energy, and mass. We use the measurements performed by Shi et al. (J. Geophys. Res., 100, E12, 26,387-26,395, 1995) to turn the modeled impinging ion flux into a neutral gas production rate at the surface. We will show preliminary results of this work with application to the missions to the Jupiter system

  15. Japanese version of the ALS-FTD-Questionnaire (ALS-FTD-Q-J).

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Yasuhiro; Beeldman, Emma; Raaphorst, Joost; Izumi, Yuishin; Yoshino, Hiide; Masuda, Michihito; Atsuta, Naoki; Ito, Satoru; Adachi, Tadashi; Adachi, Yoshiki; Yokota, Osamu; Oda, Masaya; Hanashima, Ritsuko; Ogino, Mieko; Ichikawa, Hiroo; Hasegawa, Kazuko; Kimura, Hideki; Shimizu, Toshio; Aiba, Ikuko; Yabe, Hayato; Kanba, Makoto; Kusumi, Kimiyoshi; Aoki, Tetsuya; Hiroe, Yu; Watanabe, Hirohisa; Nishiyama, Kazutoshi; Nomoto, Masahiro; Sobue, Gen; Nakashima, Kenji

    2016-08-15

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD) share common clinical, genetic and neuropathological features. Some ALS patients have behavioral/personality changes, which could result in significant obstacles in the care provided by family members and caregivers. An easy screening tool would contribute greatly to the evaluation of these symptoms. We translated the ALS-FTD-Questionnaire, developed in the Netherlands, into Japanese (ALS-FTD-Q-J) and examined the clinimetric properties (internal consistency, construct and clinical validity). Patients with ALS and/or behavioral variant FTD (bvFTD) were evaluated alongside healthy controls in this multicenter study. All ALS patients, regardless of bvFTD status, were further evaluated by the frontal behavioral inventory (FBI) and for frontal/executive function, cognition, anxiety/depression, and motor functions. Data from 146 subjects were analyzed: ALS (92), ALS-bvFTD (6), bvFTD (16), and healthy controls (32). The internal consistency of the ALS-FTD-Q-J was good (Cronbach α=0.92). The ALS-FTD-Q-J showed construct validity as it exhibited a high correlation with the FBI (r=0.79). However, correlations were moderate with anxiety/depression and low with cognitive scales, in contrast to the original report, i.e. a moderate correlation with cognition and a low correlation with anxiety/depression. The ALS-FTD-Q-J discriminated ALS patients from (ALS-)bvFTD patients and controls. Thus, the ALS-FTD-Q-J is useful for evaluating Japanese ALS/FTD patients.

  16. Alanes formation on the Al(111) surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rangan, Sylvie; Veyan, Jean-Francois; Chabal, Yves J.; Chaudhuri, Santanu; Muckerman, James T.

    2008-03-01

    Alane clusters (AlxHy) are believed to be the ubiquitous intermediates in hydrogen storage reactions for a wide variety of alanates (LiAlH4, NaAlH4) currently considered for hydrogen storage. The formation and behavior of alanes at surfaces appear to control and limit the efficiency of hydrogen storage. In particular, hydrogen adsorption on the Al(111) surface leads to the coexistence of several adsorbed species, the concentration of which is affected by the step density, the surface coverage and the temperature. We combine density functional theory (DFT) and surface infra-red (IR) absorption spectroscopy to uncover the mechanisms for alane formation on Al(111) surfaces. At low coverage, DFT predicts a two-fold bridge site adsorption for atomic hydrogen, consistent with previous Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy measurements. At higher coverage, the formation of small chemisorbed AlH3 occurs at the step edges. With increasing coverage AlH3 is extracted from the step edge and becomes highly mobile on the terraces in a weakly bound state. This mobility is the key factor leading to the growth of larger alanes through AlH3 oligomerization. For these large alanes, previous Thermal Programmed Desorption studies are discussed and compared to the thermal stability observed in IR.

  17. Morphological characteristics of disturbances generated in the polar cap region of the upper thermosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujiwara, Hitoshi

    Recent radar and satellite observations have shown various disturbances in the polar cap region of the upper thermosphere. For example, the European incoherent scatter (EISCAT) radar, Super Dual Auroral Radar Network (SuperDARN), and CHAMP satellite observations have revealed ionospheric and thermospheric variations due to energy inputs from the magnetosphere. From the simultaneous observations with the EISCAT Svalbard radar and CUTLASS radar, Fujiwara et al. [2007] showed existence of significant heat source in the dayside polar cap/cusp region of the upper thermosphere in association with the dayside magnetospheric phenomena of reconnections and flux transfer events. Bruinsma and Forbes [2007] showed trans-polar propagation of the traveling atmospheric disturbances (TADs) in connection with three sudden injections of energy at high latitudes from the CHAMP mass density observations. In the present study, we focus our attention on both disturbances directly generated in the polar cap region of the upper thermosphere and those propagating from other regions. We perform numerical simulations with a general circulation model, which includes all the atmospheric regions, developed by Miyoshi and Fujiwara [2003]. The morphological characteristics of the disturbances due to auroral particle precipitation and electric field enhancement are investigated here. References: Bruinsma, S., and J. M. Forbes, Global observation of traveling atmospheric disturbances (TADs) in the thermosphere, Geophys. Res., Lett., 34, L14103, doi: 10.1029/2007GL030243, 2007. Fujiwara, H., R. Kataoka, M. Suzuki, S. Maeda, S. Nozawa, K. Hosokawa, H. Fukunishi, N. Sato, and M. Lester, Electromagnetic energy deposition rate in the polar upper thermosphere derived from the EISCAT Svalbard radar and CUTLASS Finland radar observations, Ann. Geophys., 25, 2393-2403, 2007. Miyoshi, Y., and H. Fujiwara, Day-to-day variations of migrating diurnal tide simulated by a GCM from the ground surface to the

  18. Effects of hydrogen absorption in TbNiAl and UNiAl

    SciTech Connect

    Bordallo, H.N.; Nakotte, H.; Schultz, A.; Kolomiets, A.V.; Havela, L.; Andreev, A.V.

    1998-12-31

    Although hydrides of intermetallic compounds are used extensively as hydrogen-storage media, little is known about the exact nature of metal-hydrogen interactions. However, this knowledge is of essential importance for the understanding of thermodynamics and other properties. Hydrides (deuterides) of TbNiAl and UNiAl have been widely studied because of drastic increase of magnetic ordering temperature under hydrogenation. Here the authors report neutron-diffraction results of the three deuterides, TbNiAlD{sub 1.28}, TbNiAlD{sub 0.8}a nd UNiAlD{sub 2.23}.

  19. Phase diagrams of Al-Si and Al-Ge systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kagaya, Hiroko-Matsuo; Imazawa, Kazumoto; Sato, Mayumi; Soma, Toshinobu

    1998-03-01

    Considering the contributions from the band and local mode frequencies, the temperature- and pressure-dependent mean-square displacement for Al-Si and Al-Ge solid solutions is quantitatively calculated to be similar to that for matrix Al. Then, the concentration-dependence of the Debye temperature at higher and lower temperatures is estimated, the pressure effect on the solidus curve is presented by applying Lindeman's melting law to the Al-Si and Al-Ge alloy systems. The solidus curve obtained increases as a function of the pressure, and is in good agreement with the observed tendency for these solid solutions.

  20. A new discontinuously reinforced aluminum MMC: Al+AlB{sub 2} flakes

    SciTech Connect

    HALL,AARON C.; ECONOMY,J.

    2000-06-08

    Development of a novel metal matrix composite based on the Al-B alloy system has been undertaken. Preparation of this discontinuously reinforced material is based on the precipitation of high aspect ratio AlB{sub 2} from an Al-B alloy. This paper describes a number of efforts forced on preparing high volume fractions (> 30 v%) of AlB{sub 2} in aluminum. New insights into the behavior of the Al-B alloys system allowed this effort to be successful.

  1. Atomistic Modeling of RuAl and (RuNi) Al Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gargano, Pablo; Mosca, Hugo; Bozzolo, Guillermo; Noebe, Ronald D.; Gray, Hugh R. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Atomistic modeling of RuAl and RuAlNi alloys, using the BFS (Bozzolo-Ferrante-Smith) method for alloys is performed. The lattice parameter and energy of formation of B2 RuAl as a function of stoichiometry and the lattice parameter of (Ru(sub 50-x)Ni(sub x)Al(sub 50)) alloys as a function of Ni concentration are computed. BFS based Monte Carlo simulations indicate that compositions close to Ru25Ni25Al50 are single phase with no obvious evidence of a miscibility gap and separation of the individual B2 phases.

  2. Decoding ALS: from genes to mechanism.

    PubMed

    Taylor, J Paul; Brown, Robert H; Cleveland, Don W

    2016-11-10

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a progressive and uniformly fatal neurodegenerative disease. A plethora of genetic factors have been identified that drive the degeneration of motor neurons in ALS, increase susceptibility to the disease or influence the rate of its progression. Emerging themes include dysfunction in RNA metabolism and protein homeostasis, with specific defects in nucleocytoplasmic trafficking, the induction of stress at the endoplasmic reticulum and impaired dynamics of ribonucleoprotein bodies such as RNA granules that assemble through liquid-liquid phase separation. Extraordinary progress in understanding the biology of ALS provides new reasons for optimism that meaningful therapies will be identified.

  3. Ni{sub 3}Al aluminide alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, C.T.

    1993-10-01

    This paper provides a brief review of the recent progress in research and development of Ni{sub 3}Al and its alloys. Emphasis has been placed on understanding low ductility and brittle fracture of Ni{sub 3}Al alloys at ambient and elevated temperatures. Recent studies have resulted in identifying both intrinsic and extrinsic factors governing the fracture behavior of Ni{sub 3}Al alloys. Parallel efforts on alloy design using physical metallurgy principles have led to properties for structural use. Industrial interest in these alloys is high, and examples of industrial involvement in processing and utilization of these alloys are briefly mentioned.

  4. Arsenate uptake by Al nanoclusters and other Al-based sorbents during water treatment.

    PubMed

    Mertens, Jasmin; Rose, Jérôme; Wehrli, Bernhard; Furrer, Gerhard

    2016-01-01

    In many parts of the world, arsenic from geogenic and anthropogenic sources deteriorates the quality of drinking water resources. Effective methods of arsenic removal include adsorption and coagulation with iron- and aluminum-based materials, of which polyaluminum chloride is widely employed as coagulant in water treatment due to its low cost and high efficiency. We compared the arsenic uptake capacity and the arsenic bonding sites of different Al-based sorbents, including Al nanoclusters, polyaluminum chloride, polyaluminum granulate, and gibbsite. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy revealed that As(V) forms bidentate-binuclear complexes in interaction with all Al-based removal agents. The octahedral configuration of nanoclusters and the distribution of sorption sites remain the same in all types of removal agents consisting of nano-scale Al oxyhydroxide particles. The obtained distances for As(V)-O and As(V)-Al agreed with previously published data and were found to be 1.69 ± 0.02 Å and 3.17-3.21 Å, respectively. Our study suggests that As(V) binds to Al nanoclusters as strongly as to Al oxide surfaces. The As sorption capacity of Al nanoclusters was found to be very similar to that of Al clusters in a polyaluminum chloride. The most efficient Al-based sorbents for arsenic removal were Al nanoclusters, followed by polyaluminum granulate.

  5. InAlN/AlN/GaN heterostructures for high electron mobility transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usov, S. O.; Sakharov, A. V.; Tsatsulnikov, A. F.; Lundin, V. W.; Zavarin, E. E.; Nikolaev, A. E.; Yagovkina, M. A.; Zemlyakov, V. E.; Egorkin, V. I.; Ustinov, V. M.

    2016-08-01

    The results of development of InAlN/AlN/GaN heterostructures, grown on sapphire substrates by metal-organic chemical vapour deposition, and high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs) based on them are presented. The dependencies of the InAlN/AlN/GaN heterostructure properties on epitaxial growth conditions were investigated. The optimal indium content and InAlN barrier layer thicknesses of the heterostructures for HEMT s were determined. The possibility to improve the characteristics of HEMTs by in-situ passivation by Si3N4 thin protective layer deposited in the same epitaxial process was demonstrated. The InAlN/AlN/GaN heterostructure grown on sapphire substrate with diameter of 100 mm were obtained with sufficiently uniform distribution of sheet resistance. The HEMTs with saturation current of 1600 mA/mm and transconductance of 230 mS/mm are demonstrated.

  6. Oxidation of Al2O3 continuous fiber-reinforced/NiAl composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doychak, J.; Nesbitt, J. A.; Noebe, R. D.; Bowman, R. R.

    1992-01-01

    The 1200 C and 1300 C isothermal and cyclic oxidation behavior of Al2O3 continuous fiber-reinforced/NiAl composites were studied. Oxidation resulted in formation of Al2O3 external scales in a similar manner as scales formed on monolithic NiAl. The isothermal oxidation of an Al2O3/NiAl composite resulted in oxidation of the matrix along the fiber/matrix interface near the fiber ends. This oxide acted as a wedge between the fiber and the matrix, and, under cyclic oxidation conditions, led to further oxidation along the fiber lengths and eventual cracking of the composite. The oxidation behavior of composites in which the Al2O3 fibers were sputter coated with nickel prior to processing was much more severe. This was attributed to open channels around the fibers which formed during processing, most likely as a result of the diffusion of the nickel coating into the matrix.

  7. Elimination of AlGaN epilayer cracking by spatially patterned AlN mask

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarzyński, Marcin; Kryśko, Marcin; Targowski, Grzegorz; Czernecki, Robert; Sarzyńska, Agnieszka; Libura, Adam; Krupczyński, Wiktor; Perlin, Piotr; Leszczyński, Michał

    2006-03-01

    The inherent problem in III-nitride technology is the cracking of AlGaN layers that results from lattice mismatch between AlGaN and GaN. In case of thin substrates (30-90μm), such as, bulk GaN grown by the high-pressure/high-temperature method, the bowing of AlGaN /GaN strained structures becomes an additional problem. To eliminate cracking and bowing, AlGaN layers were grown on GaN substrates with an AlN mask patterned to form 3-15μm wide windows. In the 3μm window, the AlGaN layer was not cracked, although its thickness and Al composition exceeded critical values for growth on nonpatterned substrates. Dislocation density in the windows was of 5×106/cm2.

  8. Diffusion at the Al/Al oxide interface during electromigration in wide lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Augur, R. A.; Wolters, R. A. M.; Schmidt, W.; Dirks, A. G.; Kordić, S.

    1996-03-01

    Significant large-scale modification of the surface of Al-Si conductors was observed, due to electromigration in wide lines and under low stress conditions. After electromigration stressing the Al layers showed local thickness variations, i.e., damage by thinning. The mechanism underlying this damage causes substantial metal transport. Nevertheless, damage by thinning has received little attention in the past. Thinning was observed: (1) in a number of different alloys (Al-Si, Al-Cu, Al-Si-V, and Al-Si-V-Pd), (2) with a number of different underlayers [SiO2, W-Ti (no vacuum break after Al deposition) and W-Ti (oxidized surface before Al deposition)], (3) over an extended temperature range, (4) over a range of current density, and (5) in structures with and without passivation. The results show that thinning is a general phenomenon. An activation energy of approximately 0.5 eV was determined for the temperature dependence of a combined mechanism of concurrent thinning plus voiding in Al99Si1. Several alternatives are examined to explain the observations, namely mass movement along dislocations, Al bulk diffusion, and diffusion at the interface between the Al and its oxide. It is shown that diffusion at the Al/Al oxide interface most probably plays an important role in the damage mechanism, even under stress conditions where grain boundary diffusion is traditionally thought to dominate. Results also showed that alloying of Al with Pd can reduce the effects of damage by thinning.

  9. Interdiffusion in Diffusion Couples: U-Mo v. Al and Al-Si

    SciTech Connect

    D. D. Keiser, Jr.; E. Perez; B. Yao; Y. H. Sohn

    2009-11-01

    Interdiffusion and microstructural development in the U-Mo-Al system was examined using solid-tosolid diffusion couples consisting of U-7wt.%Mo, U-10wt.%Mo and U-12wt.%Mo vs. pure Al, annealed at 600°C for 24 hours. The influence of Si alloying addition (up to 5 wt.%) in Al on the interdiffusion microstructural development was also examined using solid-to-solid diffusion couples consisting of U-7wt.%Mo, U-10wt.%Mo and U-12wt.%Mo vs. pure Al, Al-2wt.%Si, and Al-5wt.%Si annealed at 550°C up to 20 hours. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) were employed to examine the development of a very fine multiphase intermetallic layer. In ternary U-Mo-Al diffusion couples annealed at 600°C for 24 hours, interdiffusion microstructure varied of finely dispersed UAl3, UAl4, U6Mo4Al43, and UMo2Al20 phases while the average composition throughout the interdiffusion zone remained constant at approximately 80 at.% Al. Interdiffusion microstructure observed by SEM/TEM analyses and diffusion paths drawn from concentration profiles determined by EPMA appear to deviate from the assumption of “local thermodynamic equilibrium,” and suggest that interdiffusion occurs via supersaturated UAl4 followed by equilibrium transformation into UAl3, U6Mo4Al43, UAl4 and UMo2Al20 phases. Similar observation was made for U-Mo vs. Al diffusion couples annealed at 550°C. The addition of Si (up to 5 wt.%) in Al significantly reduced the thickness of the intermetallic layer by changing the constituent phases of the interdiffusion zone developed in U-Mo vs. Al-Si diffusion couples. Specifically, the formation of (U,Mo)(Al,Si)3 with relatively large solubility for Mo and Si, along with UMo2Al20 phases was observed along with disappearance of U6Mo4Al43 and UAl4 phases. Simplified understanding based on U-Al, U-Si, and Mo-Si binary phase diagrams is discussed in the light of the beneficial effect of Si alloying addition.

  10. Systematic High-Resolution Remote-Sensing Investigation of Martian South Polar Landforms: Thermal Contraction Polygons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Gasselt, Stephan; Hao, Jingyan

    2015-04-01

    landforms and combine results of two polar surveys. The work presented here provides a detailed assessment of data coverage, a review of polygonal landform types and of their distribution based on CTX observations. [1] Thomas et al. (2000): Nature, 404(6774): 161-164. [2] Kieffer (2003): 6th Int. Conf. Mars, #3158. [3] Piqueux & Christensen (2008): J. Geophys. Res., 113(E2), CiteID E02006. [4] Mangold (2005): Icarus, 174(2): 336-359. [5] van Gasselt et al. (2006): Europ. Planet. Sci. Congr., #629. [6] van Gasselt et al. (2005): J. Geophys. Res., 110(E8), CiteID E08002. [7] Byrne & Ingersoll (2003): Science, 299(5609): 1,057-1,053 [8] Piqueux et al. (2003): J. Geophys. Res., 108(E8), CiteID 5084. [9] Pilorget et al. (2013): J. Geophys. Res. 118(12): 2,520-2,536. [10] James et al. (2010): Icarus, 208(1): 82-85. [11] Portyankina et al. (2010): Icarus, 205(1): 311-320. [12] Thomas et al. (2010): Icarus, 205(1): 296-310. [13] Hansen et al. (2010): Icarus, 205(1): 283-295.

  11. On Dobbert et al, 'Cultural Transmission...'

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gearing, Frederick

    1984-01-01

    Criticizes Dobbert et al's model of cultural transmission (presented in earlier article) as being a species of social physics. Suggests improvements to the model, notably that observation and analysis at the emic level be taken into account. (RDN)

  12. Pike International, LLC et al. Information Sheet

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Pike International LLC, et al. (the Company) is located in New Haven, Connecticut. The Complaint involves the lease of, and renovation activities conducted at, property constructed prior to 1978, located in New Haven, Connecticut.

  13. ALS and Oxidative Stress: The Neurovascular Scenario

    PubMed Central

    Thakur, Keshav; Gupta, Pawan Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Oxidative stress and angiogenic factors have been placed as the prime focus of scientific investigations after an establishment of link between vascular endothelial growth factor promoter (VEGF), hypoxia, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) pathogenesis. Deletion of the hypoxia-response element in the vascular endothelial growth factor promoter and mutant superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) which are characterised by atrophy and muscle weakness resulted in phenotype resembling human ALS in mice. This results in lower motor neurodegeneration thus establishing an important link between motor neuron degeneration, vasculature, and angiogenic molecules. In this review, we have presented human, animal, and in vitro studies which suggest that molecules like VEGF have a therapeutic, diagnostic, and prognostic potential in ALS. Involvement of vascular growth factors and hypoxia response elements also highlights the converging role of oxidative stress and neurovascular network for understanding and treatment of various neurodegenerative disorders like ALS. PMID:24367722

  14. 12th Annual ALS Users' Association Meeting

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, Arthur L.

    1999-12-17

    Science took the front seat as 219 Advanced Light Source (ALS) users and staff gathered on Monday and Tuesday, October 18 and 19 for the twelfth annual users' meeting. The bulk of the meeting was dedicated to reports on science at the ALS. Packed into two busy days were 31 invited oral presentations and 80 submitted poster presentations, as well as time to visit 24 vendor booths. The oral sessions were dedicated to environmental science, chemical dynamics, biosciences, magnetic materials, and atomic and molecular science. In addition, there was an ALS highlights session that emphasized new results and a session comprising highlights from the young scientists who will carry the ALS into the future.

  15. Half life of /sup 26/Al

    SciTech Connect

    Norris, T.L.; Gancarz, A.J.; Rokop, D.J.; Thomas, K.W.

    1983-01-01

    The half-life of /sup 26/Al has been redetermined because of suggestions of an error in the accepted value based on its use in calculating /sup 21/Ne production rates from cosmic rays in meteorites. Two solutions of /sup 26/Al were analyzed for the specific radioactivity and mass spectrometric determination of the /sup 26/Al concentration. The half-life obtained for /sup 26/Al was 7.05 x 10/sup 5/ years +- 3.7% at the two sigma level. This is identical to the accepted value of 7.16 x 10/sup 5/ years and indicates that problems with the /sup 21/Ne production rate is not due to an erroneous half-life.

  16. Al Qaeda: A Modern Day Lernaean Hydra

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-03-01

    insurgency. Still others have referred to it as a netwar organization waging conflict primarily through the use of networks. A few authors have...organization waging conflict primarily through the use of networks. A few authors have characterized it as a religious movement. Like the Hydra, Al...Al Qaeda as an insurgency. Still others have referred to it as a Netwar organization waging conflict primarily through the use of networks.1 A

  17. Patterns of inheritance in familial ALS.

    PubMed

    Bradley, Marcus; Bradley, Lloyd; de Belleroche, Jackie; Orrell, Richard W

    2005-05-10

    We investigated 185 families with ALS for evidence of anticipation and mitochondrial inheritance. Although initial analysis demonstrated significant anticipation of age at death between generations in patients with familial ALS, further analysis demonstrated features of regression to the mean, suggesting that the perceived differences are the result of bias. In addition, there was no evidence of an effect of preferential maternal inheritance, which would have supported transmission of mitochondrial DNA mutations.

  18. 17th Annual ALS Users' Association Meeting

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, Art; Tamura, Lori

    2004-11-29

    It's not exactly Russian roulette, but scheduling October events outdoors is not risk-free, even in usually sunny California. An overflow crowd of more than 400 registered users, ALS staff, and vendors enjoyed a full indoor program featuring science highlights and workshops spread over two and a half days from October 18 to October 20. However, a major storm, heralding the onset of the San Francisco Bay Area rainy season, posed a few weather challenges for the events on the ALS patio.

  19. Density measurements and structural properties of liquid and amorphous metals under high pressure studied by in situ X-ray scattering (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morard, G.; Garbarino, G.; Andrault, D.; Antonangeli, D.; Guignot, N.; Siebert, J.; Roberge, M.; Boulard, E.; Lincot, A.; Denoeud, A.; Petitgirard, S.

    2013-12-01

    Density determination for crystalline materials under high pressure and high temperature is straightforward using X-ray diffraction. For liquid and amorphous materials, it is more complicated due to the absence of long-range order. Different high pressure techniques have been developed: in-situ X-ray absorption 1-4 or ex-situ sink/float method 5-8. However, these techniques suffer several limitations, such as the limited pressure range or the long exposure time required. We have implemented an in situ X-ray diffraction analysis method suitable for the determination of Pressure-Volume-Temperature equations of state (P-V-T EoS) in the critical case of liquid and amorphous materials over an extended thermodynamic range (T>2000 K and P> 40 GPa). This method is versatile, it can be applied to data obtained using various angle-dispersive X-ray diffraction high-pressure apparatus and, contrary to in situ X-ray absorption techniques, is independent from the sample geometry. Further advantage is the fast data acquisition (between 10 to 300 seconds integration time). Information on macroscopic bulk properties (density) and local atomic arrangement (pair distribution function g(r)) can be gathered in parallel. To illustrate the method, we present studies on liquid Fe-S alloys in Paris Edinburgh press and in laser-heated diamond anvil cell, and measurements on Ce glass in diamond anvil cell at room temperature. References 1 G. Shen, N. Sata, M. Newville et al., App. Phys. Lett. 81 (8), 1411 (2002). 2 C. Sanloup, F. Guyot, P. Gillet et al., Geophys. Res. Lett. 27 (6), 811 (2000). 3 Y. Katayama, K. Tsuji, O. Shimomura et al., J. Synch. Rad. 5, 1023 (1998). 4 T. Sato and N. Funamori, Phys. Rev. Lett. 101, 255502 (2008). 5 R. Knoche and R. W. Luth, Chem. Geol. 128, 229 (1996). 6 P.S. Balog, R.A. Secco, D.C. Rubie et al., J. Geophys. Res. 108 (B2), 2124 (2003). 7 C. B. Agee and D. Walker, J. Geophys. Res. 93 (B4), 3437 (1988). 8 E. Ohtani, A. Suzuki, and T. Kato, Proc. Jpn. Acad

  20. Venus Lyman-Alpha a Morphological and Radiative Transfer Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colwell, William Bradford

    The Venus Lyman-α corona is caused by resonance scattering of the solar 1215.67A Lyman-α line by hydrogen atoms in the Venus upper atmosphere. The atmospheric atomic hydrogen content is probed remotely via Lyman-α observations. On 10 February 1990 the Galileo spacecraft flew by Venus, obtaining a series of Venus scans with the Ultraviolet Spectrometer Experiment. The Pioneer Venus Orbiter Ultraviolet Spectrometer obtained Venus Lyman-α images approximately weekly throughout its 14-year mission (1978-1992), spanning the 11-year solar cycle. I analyze the data using a two-dimensional non-isothermal complete-frequency-redistribution multiple scattering code modified from the LYAB code provided by James Bishop for the Earth corona. I employ the VTS3 neutral thermosphere model (Hedin et al., J. Geophys. Res., 88, 73, 1983), and calculate diffusive profiles for the vertical distribution of atomic hydrogen, characterized by hydrogen number density n0 and vertical flux φ0 at the exobase (Paxton et al., J. Geophys. Res., 193, 1766, 1988). The flux parameter controls the hydrogen amount in the lower thermosphere and the exobase density controls the amount in the upper thermosphere and exosphere. I determine the parameter values which best fit the data for selected segments of the sunlit disk, taking advantage of the almost linear relationship between the PV Langmuir probe photoelectron current and measured solar Lyman-α output. I find an equatorial minimum of hydrogen and evidence for a polar hood of enhanced hydrogen abundance. The pre-dawn bulge enhancement near the dawn terminator extends to high latitudes (>60o). All features examined persist throughout solar cycle and increase in hydrogen abundance with solar activity. The parameters I determine agree with the work of Paxton et al. and with densities derived from in situ measurement by Brinton et al. (Geophys. Res. Ler., 7, 865, 1980). Both parameters increase with solar activity and there is evidence suggesting

  1. True Polar Wander of Enceladus From Topographic Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tajeddine, Radwan; Soderlund, Krista M.; Thomas, Peter C.; Helfenstein, Paul; Hedman, Matthew M.; Burns, Joseph A.; Schenk, Paul M.

    2016-10-01

    . Geophys. Res, Let., 36, Issue 16, CiteID L16202 (2009).[8] Besserer, J. et al. J. Geophys. Res. Planets, 118, 908-915 (2013).[9] Crow-Willard, E.N. & Pappalardo, R.T. J. Geophys. Res., 120, 928-950 (2015).

  2. Effects of Perchlorate on Organic Molecules under Simulated Mars Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrier, B. L.; Kounaves, S. P.

    2014-12-01

    Perchlorate (ClO4-) was discovered in the northern polar region of Mars by the Mars Phoenix Lander in 2008 and has also been recently detected by the Curiosity Rover in Gale Crater [1,2]. Perchlorate has also been shown to be formed under current Mars conditions via the oxidation of mineral chlorides, further supporting the theory that perchlorate is present globally on Mars [3]. The discovery of perchlorate on Mars has raised important questions about the effects of perchlorate on the survival and detection of organic molecules. Although it has been shown that pyrolysis in the presence of perchlorate results in the alteration or destruction of organic molecules [4], few studies have been conducted on the potential effects of perchlorate on organic molecules under martian surface conditions. Although perchlorate is typically inert under Mars-typical temperatures [5], perchlorate does absorb high energy UV radiation, and has been shown to decompose to form reactive oxychlorine species such as chlorite (ClO2-) when exposed to martian conditions including UV or ionizing radiation [6,7]. Here we investigate the effects of perchlorate on the organic molecules tryptophan, benzoic acid and mellitic acid in order to determine how perchlorate may alter these compounds under Mars conditions. Experiments are performed in a Mars Simulation Chamber (MSC) capable of reproducing the temperature, pressure, atmospheric composition and UV flux found on Mars. Soil simulants are prepared consisting of SiO2 and each organic, as well as varying concentrations of perchlorate salts, and exposed in the MSC. Subsequent to exposure in the MSC samples are leached and the leachate analyzed by HPLC and LC-MS to determine the degree of degradation of the original organic and the identity of any potential decomposition products formed by oxidation or chlorination. References: [1] Kounaves et al., J. Geophys. Res. Planets, Vol. 115, p. E00E10, 2010 [2] Glavin et al., J. Geophys. Res. Planets, Vol

  3. A Survey of Sinuous Ridges and Inferred Fluvial Discharge Rates in Northwest Hellas, Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, R. B.; Herkenhoff, K. E.

    2012-12-01

    Sinuous ridges are a widespread class of geomorphic feature on Mars, and in many cases are interpreted to be inverted fluvial channels. Although negative-relief valley networks thought to be related to fluvial activity have been mapped in detail over the entire planet (e.g. Carr, 1995; Hynek et al., 2010), few regional- to global-scale surveys of sinuous ridges have been conducted (e.g. Williams, 2007; Jacobsen and Burr, 2012). With the availability of Context Camera (CTX ) images from the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) covering a significant fraction of the martian surface at 6 meters per pixel, such studies are now feasible. In addition, Williams et al. (2009) have demonstrated that paleodischarge can be calculated based on the width, meander wavelength, and meander radius of sinuous ridges interpreted to be inverted channels. This method has been used successfully on the sinuous ridges in the Aeolis/Zephyria plana region (Burr et al., 2010). We have begun a survey of sinuous ridges in the northwest Hellas region (-15 N to -45 N, 30 E to 75 E) using 1156 radiometrically calibrated and map projected CTX images. This region includes the northwestern portion of the Hellas basin floor and rim, as well as a significant expanse of the cratered highlands to the north and west of the basin. This region was chosen because it includes terrain of varying age (primarily Noachian to Hesperian; Leonard and Tanaka, 2001) and includes "raised curvilinear features" identified by Williams (2007) on the western basin floor, northern rim, and in the highlands northwest of Hellas . By mapping the distribution of sinuous ridges in terrain of varying age and estimating their paleodischarge rates, we will be able to determine how the discharge rate varied over martian history. Carr, M. H. (1995), J. Geophys. Res., 100, 7479-7507, doi:10.1029/95JE00260. Hynek, B. M., M. Beach, and M. R. T. Hoke (2010), J. Geophys. Res., 115, E09008, doi:10.1029/2009JE003548. Williams, R.M.E. (2007

  4. An interpretation of the CONSERT and SESAME-PP results based on new permittivity measurements of porous water ice and ice-basaltic/organic dust mixtures suggests an increase of porosity with depth in 67P.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brouet, Yann; Levasseur-Regourd, Anny-Chantal; Sabouroux, Pierre; Neves, Luisa; Encrenaz, Pierre; Poch, Olivier; Pommerol, Antoine; Thomas, Nicolas; Kofman, Wlodek; Le Gall, Alice; Ciarletti, Valérie; Hérique, Alain; Lethuillier, Anthony

    2016-10-01

    The CONSERT bistatic radar on Rosetta and Philae sounded the interior of the small lobe of 67P/C-G at 90 MHz and determined the average of the real part of the complex permittivity (hereafter ɛ') to be equal to 1.27±0.05 [1,2]. The permittivity probe (PP) of the SESAME package sounded the near-surface in the 400-800 Hz range and derived a lower limit of ɛ' equal to 2.45±0.20 [3,4]. At the time of the measurements, the temperature was found to be below 150 K at Philae's location and expected to be close or below 100 K inside the nucleus [4-6].The complex permittivity depends of the frequency, the composition, the porosity and the temperature of the material [7,8,9]. These parameters have to be taken into account to interpret the permittivity values. The non-dispersive behavior of ɛ' below 150 K [9], allows us to compare the CONSERT and SESAME-PP results and to interpret their difference in terms of porosity and/or composition. For this purpose we use a semi-empirical formula obtained from reproducible permittivity measurements performed in the laboratory at 243 K on water ice particles and ice-basaltic dust mixtures [10], with a controlled porosity in the 26-91% range and dust-to-ice volumetric ratios in the 0.1-2.8 range. The influence of the presence of organic materials on ɛ' is also discussed based on new measurements of analogues of complex extraterrestrial organic matter [11]. Our results suggest an increase of the porosity of the small lobe of 67P with depth [11], in agreement Lethuillier et al. [4]'s conclusion using a different method.[1]Kofman et al., 1998. Adv. Space Res., 21, 1589.[2]Ciarletti et al., 2015. A&A, 583, A40.[3]Seidensticker et al., 2007. Space Sci. Rev., 128, 301.[4]Lethuillier et al., 2016. A&A, 591, A32.[5]Spohn et al., 2015. Science, 349, aab0464.[6]Festou et al. (Eds.), Comets II. Univ. of Arizona Press.[7]Campbell and Ulrichs, 1969. J. Geophys. Res., 74, 5867.[8]Brouet et al., 2015. A&A, 583, A39.[9]Mattei et al., 2014. Icarus

  5. Modeling of precipitation in Al alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Asta, M.; Foiles, S.M.; Wolfer, W.G.

    1996-10-01

    Objective was the development of a computational model of precipitation from a supersaturated alloy solid solution. The model is based on the formalism of chemical-reaction-rate theory combined with classical descriptions of precipitate thermodynamic properties and a mean-field treatment of diffusion-limited growht and coarsening. For the case of precipitation of Al{sub 3}Sc in supersaturated Al-Sc alloys, it is demonstrated how the model can be used to calculate number densities and size distributions of precipitates as a function of aging time and temperature, including effects of continuous cooling and thermally generated point defects. Application of the model to a specific alloy system requires knowledge of diffusion data, point defect energetics, and thermodynamic properties for bulk phases and interphase interfaces. For interfaces and point defects, thermodynamic data can be difficult to measure and reliable values of defect free energies are often unavailable. For this reason, part of the efforts were devoted to applying semiempirical and first-principles atomistic techniques to the calculation of interfacial and point-defect thermodynamic properties. This report discusses applications for interphase interfaces in the Al-Ag, Al-Sc, and Al-Li alloy systems. We also describe atomistic work aimed at understanding the energetics of vacancy clusters in Al. These clusters serve as sinks for isolated vacancies during aging and their growth can lead to more complex defects, such as dislocation loops, that act as heterogeneous nucleation sites.

  6. Theoretics-directed effect of copper or aluminum content on the ductility characteristics of Al-based (Al3Ti, AlTi, AlCu, AlTiCu2) intermetallic compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yong; Ma, Xiao-Juan; Liu, Qi-Jun; Kong, Ge-Xing; Ma, Hai-Xia; Wang, Wen-Peng; Wang, Yi-Gao; Jiao, Zhen; Liu, Fu-Sheng; Liu, Zheng-Tang

    2016-11-01

    First-principle simulations have been applied to investigate the effect of copper (Cu) or aluminum (Al) content on the ductility of Al3Ti, AlTi, AlCu, and AlTiCu2 alloys. The mechanical stable and elastic properties of Al-based intermetallic compounds are researched by density functional theory with the generalized gradient approximation (DFT-GGA). The calculated lattice constants are in conformity with the previous experimental and theoretical data. The deduced elastic constants show that the investigated Al3Ti, AlTi, AlCu, and AlTiCu2 structures are mechanically stable. Shear modulus, Young’s modulus, Poisson’s ratio, and the ratio B/G have also been figured out by using reckoned elastic constants. A further analysis of Young’s modulus and Poisson’s ratio reveals that the third added element copper content has significant effects on the Al-Ti-based ICs ductile character. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 41674088, 11574254, 11272296, and 11547311), the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2011CB808201), the Fundamental Research Fund for the Central Universities, China (Grant Nos. 2682014ZT30 and 2682014ZT31), and the Fund of the State Key Laboratory of Solidification Processing in Northwestern Polytechnical University, China (Grant No. SKLSP201511).

  7. Metastability in the MgAl2O4-Al2O3 System

    DOE PAGES

    Wilkerson, Kelley R.; Smith, Jeffrey D.; Hemrick, James G.

    2014-07-22

    Aluminum oxide must take a spinel form ( γ-Al2O3) at elevated temperatures in order for extensive solid solution to form between MgAl2O4 and α-Al2O3. The solvus line between MgAl2O4 and Al2O3 has been defined at 79.6 wt% Al2O3 at 1500°C, 83.0 wt% Al2O3 at 1600°C, and 86.5 wt% Al2O3 at 1700°C. A metastable region has been defined at temperatures up to 1700°C which could have significant implications for material processing and properties. Additionally, initial processing could have major implications on final chemistry. The spinel solid solution region has been extended to form an infinite solid solution with Al2O3 at elevatedmore » temperatures. A minimum in melting at 1975°C and a chemistry of 96 wt% Al2O3 rather than a eutectic is present, resulting in no eutectic crystal formation during solidification.« less

  8. Temperature dependence of the dielectric response of anodized Al-Al2O3-metal capacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hickmott, T. W.

    2003-03-01

    The temperature dependence of capacitance, CM, and conductance, GM, of Al-Al2O3-metal capacitors with Cu, Ag, and Au electrodes has been measured between 100 and 340 K at seven frequencies between 10 kHz and 1 MHz. Al2O3 films between 15 and 64 nm thick were formed by anodizing evaporated Al films in borate-glycol or borate-H2O electrolyte. The interface capacitance at the Al2O3-metal interface, CI, which is in series with the capacitance CD due to the Al2O3 dielectric, is determined from plots of 1/CM versus insulator thickness. CI is not fixed for a given metal-insulator interface but depends on the vacuum system used to deposit the metal electrode. CI is nearly temperature independent. When CI is taken into account the dielectric constant of Al2O3 determined from capacitance measurements is ˜8.3 at 295 K. The dielectric constant does not depend on anodizing electrolyte, insulator thickness, metal electrode, deposition conditions for the metal electrode or measurement frequency. By contrast, GM of Al-Al2O3-metal capacitors depends on both the deposition conditions of the metal and on the metal. For Al-Al2O3-Cu capacitors, GM is larger for capacitors with large values of 1/CI that result when Cu is evaporated in an oil-pumped vacuum system. For Al-Al2O3-Ag capacitors, GM does not depend on the Ag deposition conditions.

  9. Datation de la grossesse en pratique courante au Cameroun: fiabilité de la date de dernières règles

    PubMed Central

    Ngowa, Jean Dupont Kemfang; Mando, Emmanuel; Guegang, Emilienne; Ngassam, Anny; Kasia, Jean Marie

    2014-01-01

    Introduction La détermination précise de l’âge gestationnel (AG) est essentielle pour un suivi adapté de la grossesse. La date de dernières règles (DDR) et l’échographie de datation du premier trimestre sont les moyens habituels de datation de la grossesse. La DDR est souvent imprécise du fait des erreurs de rappel ou d'un trouble du cycle menstruel. Cette étude transversale et descriptive avait pour objectif d’évaluer la fiabilité de la DDR dans la datation de la grossesse en pratique courante à Yaoundé. Méthodes Etude transversale et descriptive réalisée dans deux hôpitaux universitaires de Yaoundé du 15 décembre 2012 au 15 avril 2013. La collecte des données était effectuée par un interrogatoire des femmes enceintes au cours de la consultation prénatale et l'examen de leur dossier médical. Les femmes enceintes présentant une complication du premier trimestre (menace d'avortement, grossesse arrêtée ou extra-utérine, grossesse molaire) et celles ne se rappelant pas de leur DDR ont été exclues de l’étude. Les données étaient saisies dans Epi-Data 3.1 et analysées dans le logiciel SPSS. 21. Résultats Cinq cent huit femmes enceintes ont été enrôlées dans cette étude, 267(52,56%) d'entre elles avaient noté leur DDR sur un support tandis que 241(47,44%) utilisaient leur mémoire pour se rappeler leur DDR. Cent dix-sept (23,03%) femmes enceintes avait réalisé une échographie de datation du premier trimestre et parmi elles, 50 (42,70%) avaient une discordance des âges gestationnels théorique et échographique. Le rappel de la DDR par la mémoire (OR. 3,46; IC: 1,59-7,53), le cycle irrégulier (OR. 6,15; IC: 1,24-30,4) et le doute sur la DDR communiquée (OR. 31,06; IC: 3.95-244) étaient les facteurs significativement associés à la discordance des AG théorique et échographique. Conclusion La DDR utilisée pour la datation de la grossesse en pratique courante à Yaoundé est fréquemment imprécise. PMID:25309664

  10. Les rivières et les sources de la Plaine du Cul-de-Sac: extrait du rapport sur les eaux souterraines de la Plaine du Cul-de-Sac

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Taylor, George C.; Lemoine, Rémy C.

    1949-01-01

    Les principales rivières de la Plaine du Cul-de-Sac, la Rivière Grise ou Grande Rivière du Cul-de-Sac et la Rivière Blanche, prennent naissance sur le flanc Nord du Massif de la Selle à des altitudes de 1,300 à 1,800 mètres au dessus du niveau de la mer. Elles coulent à l’amont à travers des gorges profondes et sont éloignées de 9 Kms. dans la partie central de la bordure Sud de la plaine.

  11. Reconstruction of Interplanetary Magnetic Field and Solar Wind Speed for the Last 135 Years Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osherovich, V. A.; Fainberg, J.

    2007-12-01

    We reconstruct the magnitude of the interplanetary magnetic field B and solar wind speed v at 1 AU using 1) yearly values of sunspot numbers and geomagnetic index aa; 2) available spacecraft measurements of v and B since 1964. We compare our results with the reconstruction done by Stamper et al. (1999) and also with the reconstruction by Svalgaard et al. (2003). References Stamper, R., M. Lockwood and M.N. Wild, Solar causes of the long-term increase in geomagnetic activity, J. Geophys. Res., Vol.104 (A12), 24325, 1999. Svalgaard, Leif, E. W. Cliver and P. Lesager, In; Solar variability as an input to the Earth's environment. International Solar Cycle Studies (ISCS) Symposium, 23 - 28 June 2003, Tatranska Lomnica, Slovak Republic. Ed.:A. Wilson. ESA SP-535, Noorwijk: ESA Publications Division, IBSN 92-9092-845-X, 2003, p. 15 - 23

  12. Laboratory simulation of magnetospheric chorus wave generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Compernolle, B.; An, X.; Bortnik, J.; Thorne, R. M.; Pribyl, P.; Gekelman, W.

    2017-01-01

    Whistler mode chorus emissions with a characteristic frequency chirp are important magnetospheric waves, responsible for the acceleration of outer radiation belt electrons to relativistic energies and also for the scattering loss of these electrons into the atmosphere. A laboratory experiment (Van Compernolle et al 2015 Phys. Rev. Lett. 114 245002, An et al 2016 Geophys. Res. Lett.) in the large plasma device at UCLA was designed to closely mimic the scaled plasma parameters observed in the inner magnetosphere, and shed light on the excitation of discrete frequency whistler waves. It was observed that a rich variety of whistler wave emissions is excited by a gyrating electron beam. The properties of the whistler emissions depend strongly on plasma density, beam density and magnetic field profiles.

  13. Effects of Al(III) and nano-Al13 species on malate dehydrogenase activity.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaodi; Cai, Ling; Peng, Yu; Li, Huihui; Chen, Rong Fu; Shen, Ren Fang

    2011-01-01

    The effects of different aluminum species on malate dehydrogenase (MDH) activity were investigated by monitoring amperometric i-t curves for the oxidation of NADH at low overpotential using a functionalized multi-wall nanotube (MWNT) modified glass carbon electrode (GCE). The results showed that Al(III) and Al(13) can activate the enzymatic activity of MDH, and the activation reaches maximum levels as the Al(III) and Al(13) concentration increase. Our study also found that the effects of Al(III) and Al(13) on the activity of MDH depended on the pH value and aluminum speciation. Electrochemical and circular dichroism spectra methods were applied to study the effects of nano-sized aluminum compounds on biomolecules.

  14. Microscopic Properties of Long-Period Ordering in Al-Rich TiAl Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hata, S.; Nakano, T.; Kuwano, N.; Itakura, M.; Matsumura, S.; Umakoshi, Y.

    2008-07-01

    The ordering mechanism of long-period superstructures (LPSs) in Al-rich TiAl alloys has been investigated by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). The LPSs are classified in terms of arrangements of base clusters with different shapes and compositions formed in Ti-rich (002) layers of L10-TiAl matrix: square Ti4Al, fat rhombus Ti3Al, and lean rhombus Ti2Al type clusters. The HRTEM observations revealed that antiphase boundaries of long-range-ordered LPS domains and short-range-ordered microdomains are constructed by various space-filling arrangements of the base clusters. Such a microscopic property characterized by the base clusters and their arrangements is markedly analogous to that of the {left< {{text{1,1/2,0}}} rightrangle } * special-point ordering alloys such as Ni-Mo.

  15. Effects of Al(III) and Nano-Al13 Species on Malate Dehydrogenase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xiaodi; Cai, Ling; Peng, Yu; Li, Huihui; Chen, Rong Fu; Shen, Ren Fang

    2011-01-01

    The effects of different aluminum species on malate dehydrogenase (MDH) activity were investigated by monitoring amperometric i-t curves for the oxidation of NADH at low overpotential using a functionalized multi-wall nanotube (MWNT) modified glass carbon electrode (GCE). The results showed that Al(III) and Al13 can activate the enzymatic activity of MDH, and the activation reaches maximum levels as the Al(III) and Al13 concentration increase. Our study also found that the effects of Al(III) and Al13 on the activity of MDH depended on the pH value and aluminum speciation. Electrochemical and circular dichroism spectra methods were applied to study the effects of nano-sized aluminum compounds on biomolecules. PMID:22163924

  16. Protective Al2O3 scale formation on NbAl3-base alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doychak, J.; Hebsur, M. G.

    1991-01-01

    The oxidation of NbAl3 with additions of Cr and Y was studied to determine the mechanisms of the beneficial effects of these elements upon oxidation. Cr additions to the binary NbAl3 alloy of up to 6.8 at. percent reduced the scale growth rates and promoted alpha-Al2O3 formation over much longer times relative to binary NbAl3. A major effect of Cr is to form a layer of AlNbCr at the metal/scale interface, which is inherently more oxidation-resistant than the matrix alloy in the long term. Yttrium additions to a Cr-containing alloy improved the scale growth rate and adherence and changed the scale microstructure to mimic that of a typical protective Al2O3 scale.

  17. Magnetic behavior of CoPt-AlN granular structure laminated with AlN layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Youxing; Shi, Ji; Nakamura, Yoshio

    2011-04-01

    The magnetic behavior of CoPt-AlN granular structure laminated with AlN layers has been studied. Ultrathin multilayer structure, [CoPt0.5 nm/AlN0.5nm]4, is used as the precursor of the magnetic layers, which are separated by 5-nm-thick AlN layers. Upon thermal annealing, the ultrathin multilayer transforms into CoPt-AlN granular structure, and the thick AlN layers remain to be spacers. When the film was annealed at 400 °C, the out-of-plane direction becomes the easy axis of magnetization, although the coercivity remains small. TEM observation has proved that CoPt shows disklike shape at such an annealing temperature. When increasing the annealing temperature to 600 °C and above, the films show "isotropic" magnetic behavior due to the formation of equiaxial CoPt particles in the magnetic layers.

  18. Potential skin involvement in ALS: revisiting Charcot's observation - a review of skin abnormalities in ALS.

    PubMed

    Paré, Bastien; Gros-Louis, François

    2017-03-25

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a neurodegenerative disease affecting motor neurons of the brain and spinal cord, leading to progressive paralysis and death. Interestingly, many skin changes have been reported in ALS patients, but never as yet fully explained. These observations could be due to the common embryonic origin of the skin and neural tissue known as the ectodermal germ layer. Following the first observation in ALS patients' skin by Dr Charcot in the 19th century, in the absence of bedsores unlike other bedridden patients, other morphological and molecular changes have been observed. Thus, the skin could be of interest in the study of ALS and other neurodegenerative diseases. This review summarizes skin changes reported in the literature over the years and discusses about a novel in vitro ALS tissue-engineered skin model, derived from patients, for the study of ALS.

  19. Process Capability Analysis of Vacuum Moulding for Development of Al-Al2O3 MMC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, R.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the present study is to investigate process capability of vacuum moulding (VM) for development of Al-Al2O3 metal matrix composite (MMC). Starting from the identification of component, prototypes were prepared (with three different input parameters namely: vacuum pressure; component volume and sand grit size to give output in form of dimensional accuracy). Measurements on the coordinate measuring machine helped in calculating the dimensional tolerances of the Al-Al2O3 MMC prepared. Some important mechanical properties were also compared to verify the suitability of the components. Final components produced are acceptable as per ISO standard UNI EN 20286-I (1995). The results of study suggest that VM process lies in ±4.5 sigma (σ) limit as regard to dimensional accuracy of Al-Al2O3 MMC is concerned. This process ensures rapid production of pre-series technological prototypes and proof of concept at less production cost and time.

  20. Relative importance of hydrolyzed Al(III) species (Al(a), Al(b), and Al(c)) during coagulation with polyaluminum chloride: a case study with the typical micro-polluted source waters.

    PubMed

    Yan, Mingquan; Wang, Dongsheng; Qu, Jiuhui; He, Wenjie; Chow, Christopher W K

    2007-12-15

    The relative importance of three different Al species, Al(a) (monomeric species, instantaneous reacted species), Al(b) (medium polymer species, reacted less than 120 min), and Al(c) (colloidal or solid species, no reaction), defined by timed complexation reaction rate measured by using ferron reagent in polyaluminum chloride (PACl) was investigated in terms of DOC (dissolved organic carbon), UV(254), and turbidity removal efficiencies. Micro-polluted, typical North China, source waters were used to conduct the experiments. The results show that DOC removal is correlated well to the content of Al(b). Removal of UV(254) is determined by the content of Al(b) and Al(c), particularly Al(c). Turbidity removal is primarily related to the content of Al(c); however, Al(b) could destabilize particles efficiently, and the flocs formed by Al(b) are not as large as those formed by Al(c), which affected the settling efficiency. Unlike the preformed Al(b), the in situ formed Al(b) could remove turbidity more efficiently since Al(c) is the dominant final species formed during coagulation. Al(a) shows a strong ability to react with some unsatisfied coordinate bonds of organic matter to facilitate particle and DOC removal. The distinct coagulation feature of Al(a), Al(b), and Al(c) can be applied to develop tailor-made PACl (with the correct distribution of Al species) to match the characteristics of raw water for optimized coagulation.

  1. The lowest ionization potentials of Al2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Barnes, Leslie A.; Taylor, Peter R.

    1988-01-01

    Potential curves for the lowest two electronic states (X 2 sigma g + and A 2 pi u) of Al2(+) were computed using complete active space SCF/multireference CI wave functions and large Gaussian basis sets. The lowest observable vertical ionization potential (to Al2(+) X 2 sigma g +) of the Al2 X 3 pi u ground state is calculated to occur around 6.1 eV, in excellent agreement with the experimental range of 6.0 to 6.42 eV obtained in recent cluster ionization studies by Cox and co-workers. The second vertical ionization potential (to Al2(+) A 2 pi u) occurs near 6.4 eV, also within the experimental range. The adiabatic IP of 5.90 eV is in good agreement with the value of 5.8 to 6.1 eV deduced by Hanley and co-workers from the difference in thresholds between collision induced dissociation processes of Al3(+). The computed IP values are somewhat larger than those deduced from branching ratios in cluster fragmentation experiments by Jarrold and co-workers. The observation of an ionization threshold below 6.42 eV is shown to be incompatible with an Al2 ground electronic state assignment of 3 sigma g -, but the separation between the two lowest states of Al2 is so small that it is likely that both are populated in the experiments, so that this does not provide unambiguous support for the recent theoretical assignment of the ground state as 3 pi u.

  2. Influence of RCS on Al-3Mg and Al-3Mg-0.25Sc alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhovi, Prabhakar M.; Venkateswarlu, K.

    2016-02-01

    An influence of repetitive corrugation and straightening (RCS) was studied on Al-3Mg and Al-3Mg-0.25Sc alloys up to eight passes. Each pass consist of a corrugation and followed by straightening. This has resulted in introducing large plastic strain in sample, and thus led to formation of sub-micron grain sizes with high angle grain boundaries. These sub grain formation was eventually resulted in improved mechanical properties. The average grain size of Al-3Mg-0.25Sc alloy after 8 passes yielded to ∼0.6pm. Microhardness, strength properties were evaluated and it suggests that RCS was responsible for high hardness values as compared to the as cast samples. The microhardness values after RCS were 105 HV and 130 HV for Al-3Mg and Al-3Mg-0.25Sc alloys, respectively. Similarly, ∼ 40% improvement in tensile strength from 240 MPa to 370 MPa was observed for Al- 3Mg-0.25Sc alloy after RCS process.Al-3Mg and Al-3Mg-0.25Scalloys exhibited maximum strength of 220 MPa and 370 MPa, respectively. It is concluded that RCS process has a strong influence on Al- 3Mg and Al-3Mg-0.25Sc alloys for obtaining improved mechanical properties and grain refinement. In addition to RCS process and presence of AESc precipitates in Al-3Mg-0.25Sc alloy had a significant role in grain refinement and improved mechanical properties as compared to Al-3Mg alloy.

  3. Stabilization of itinerant (band) magnetism in FeAl by Ga substitution for Al

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papaconstantopoulos, D. A.; Mazin, I. I.; Hathaway, K. B.

    2001-06-01

    Band structure calculations of FeGa1-xAlx have been performed, to further investigate the stability of ferromagnetism in FeAl. The Stoner parameter increases by about 20% at the FeGa end. This is also confirmed by our spin-polarized calculations. We conclude that Ga substitution for Al is likely to stabilize the elusive (or illusive) ferromagnetic state in FeAl.

  4. Another Security Improvement over the Lin et al.'s E-voting Scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asaar, Maryam Rajabzadeh; Mohajeri, Javad; Salmasizadeh, Mahmoud

    In 2003, Lin et al. have proposed an electronic voting scheme which can be utilized in large-scale elections, and claimed it detects double voting. But in this paper, by presenting an attack, we show that voters can successfully vote more than once without being detected. Hence, we propose a new modified scheme based on the Lin et al.'s scheme with the same efficiency to solve this weakness and analyze its security.

  5. Two-Phase (TiAl+TiCrAl) Coating Alloys for Titanium Aluminides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brady, Michael P. (Inventor); Smialek, James L. (Inventor); Brindley, William J. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    A coating for protecting titanium aluminide alloys, including the TiAl gamma + Ti3Al (alpha(sub 2)) class, from oxidative attack and interstitial embrittlement at temperatures up to at least 1000 C. is disclosed. This protective coating consists essentially of titanium, aluminum. and chromium in the following approximate atomic ratio: Ti(41.5-34.5)Al(49-53)Cr(9.5-12.5)

  6. Small Al clusters. II - Structure and binding in Al(n) (n = 2-6, 13)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pettersson, Lars G. M.; Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Halicioglu, Timur

    1987-01-01

    The structure and stability of aluminum clusters containing up to six atoms have been studied using correlated wave functions and extended basis sets. The lowest energy structure is planar for Al4 and Al5, but three dimensional for Al6. The icosahedral, hcp, fcc, and two planar structures of Al13 were considered at the SCF level. The lowest energy structure is the icosahedron, but the planar structures are fairly low lying even in this case. A simplified description using two- and three-body interaction potentials is found to agree well with the ab initio structures and binding energies.

  7. The Dissociation Energies of AlH2 and AlAr

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ricca, Alessandra; Partridge, Harry; Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Visscher, Luuk; Langhoff, Stephen R. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    The D(sub 0) values for AlH2 and AlAr are computed using the coupled cluster approach in conjunction with large basis sets. Basis set superposition and spin-orbit effects are accounted for as they are sizeable due to the small binding energy. The computed dissociation energy for AlAr is 101 /cm , which is 83% of the experimental value (122.4/ cm). Our best estimate for the H2 binding energy in AlH2 is 40 +/- 28 /cm.

  8. Synthesis of core-shell AlOOH hollow nanospheres by reacting Al nanoparticles with water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lozhkomoev, A. S.; Glazkova, E. A.; Bakina, O. V.; Lerner, M. I.; Gotman, I.; Gutmanas, E. Y.; Kazantsev, S. O.; Psakhie, S. G.

    2016-05-01

    A novel route for the synthesis of boehmite nanospheres with a hollow core and the shell composed of highly crumpled AlOOH nanosheets by oxidizing Al nanopowder in pure water under mild processing conditions is described. The stepwise events of Al transformation into boehmite are followed by monitoring the pH in the reaction medium. A mechanism of formation of hollow AlOOH nanospheres with a well-defined shape and crystallinity is proposed which includes the hydration of the Al oxide passivation layer, local corrosion of metallic Al accompanied by hydrogen evolution, the rupture of the protective layer, the dissolution of Al from the particle interior and the deposition of AlOOH nanosheets on the outer surface. In contrast to previously reported methods of boehmite nanoparticle synthesis, the proposed method is simple, and environmentally friendly and allows the generation of hydrogen gas as a by-product. Due to their high surface area and high, slit-shaped nanoporosity, the synthesized AlOOH nanostructures hold promise for the development of more effective catalysts, adsorbents, vaccines and drug carriers.

  9. Possible Involvement of Al-Induced Electrical Signals in Al Tolerance in Wheat.

    PubMed Central

    Papernik, L. A.; Kochian, L. V.

    1997-01-01

    The relationship between Al-induced depolarization of root-cell transmembrane electrical potentials (Em) and Al tolerance in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) was investigated. Al exposure induced depolarizations of Em in the Al-tolerant wheat cultivars Atlas and ET3, but not in the Al-sensitive wheat cultivars Scout and ES3. The depolarizations of Em occured in root cap cells and as far back as 10 mm from the root tip. The depolarization was specific to Al3+; no depolarization was observed when roots were exposed to the rhizotoxic trivalent cation La3+. The Al-induced depolarization occurred in the presence of anion-channel antagonists that blocked the release of malate, indicating that the depolarization is not due to the electrogenic efflux of malate2-. K+-induced depolarizations in the root cap were of the same magnitude as Al-induced depolarizations, but did not trigger malate release, indicating that Al-induced depolarization of root cap cell membrane potentials is probably linked to, but is not sufficient to trigger, malate release. PMID:12223834

  10. High temperature deformation of NiAl and CoAl

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nix, W. D.

    1982-01-01

    The high temperature mechanical properties of the aluminides are reviewed with respect to their potential as high temperature structural materials. It is shown that NiAl and CoAl are substantially stronger than the pure metals Ni and Co at high temperatures and approach the strength of some superalloys, particularly when those superalloys are tested in "weak" directions. The factors that limit and control the high temperature strengths of NiAl and CoAl are examined to provide a basis for the development of intermetallic alloys of this type.

  11. Extreme Events: low and high total ozone over Arosa, Switzerland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rieder, H. E.; Staehelin, J.; Maeder, J. A.; Ribatet, M.; Stübi, R.; Weihs, P.; Holawe, F.; Peter, T.; Davison, A. C.

    2009-04-01

    The frequency distribution of days with extreme low (termed ELOs) and high (termed EHOs) total ozone is analyzed for the world's longest total ozone record (Arosa, Switzerland - for details see Staehelin et al.,1998a,b), with new tools from extreme value theory (e.g. Coles, 2001; Ribatet, 2007). A heavy-tail focused approach is used through the fitting of the Generalized Pareto Distribution (GPD) to the Arosa time series. Asymptotic arguments (Pickands, 1975) justify the use of the GPD for modeling exceedances over a high (or below a low) enough threshold (Coles, 2001). The analysis shows that the GPD is appropriate for modeling the frequency distribution in total ozone above or below a mathematically well-defined threshold. While previous studies focused on so termed ozone mini-holes and mini-highs (e.g. Bojkov and Balis, 2001, Koch et al., 2005), this study is the first to present a mathematical description of extreme events in low and high total ozone for a northern mid-latitudes site (Rieder et al., 2009). The results show (a) an increase in days with extreme low (ELOs) and (b) a decrease in days with extreme high total ozone (EHOs) during the last decades, (c) that the general trend in total ozone is strongly determined by these extreme events and (d) that fitting the GPD is an appropriate method for the estimation of the frequency distribution of so-called ozone mini-holes. Furthermore, this concept allows one to separate the effect of Arctic ozone depletion from that of in situ mid-latitude ozone loss. As shown by this study, ELOs and EHOs have a strong influence on mean values in total ozone and the "extremes concept" could be further used also for validation of Chemistry-Climate-Models (CCMs) within the scientific community. References: Bojkov, R. D., and Balis, D.S.: Characteristics of episodes with extremely low ozone values in the northern middle latitudes 1975-2000, Ann. Geophys., 19, 797-807, 2001. Coles, S.: An Introduction to Statistical Modeling of

  12. Survey and alignment at the ALS

    SciTech Connect

    Krebs, G.F.; Lauritzen, T.; Thur, W.

    1995-11-01

    This paper describes survey and alignment at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory`s Advanced Light Source (ALS) accelerators from 1993 to 1995. The ALS is a 1.0 - 1.9 GeV electron accelerator producing extremely bright synchrotron light in the UV and soft-X-ray wavelengths. At the ALS, electrons are accelerated in a LINAC to 50 MeV, injected into a booster ring for further acceleration and finally injected into the storage ring. This is shown schematically in Figure 1. The storage ring, some 200 m in circumference, has been run with electron currents above 400 mA with lifetimes as high as 24 hours. The ALS is a third generation light source and requires for efficient storage ring operation, magnets aligned to within 150 mm of their ideal position. To accomplish this a network of monuments was established and their positions measured with respect to one another. The data was reduced using GEONET`` and STAR*NET`` software. Using the monuments as reference points, magnet positions were measured and alignment confirmed using the Kem Electronic Coordinate Determination System (ECDS``). A number of other papers dealing with survey and alignment (S&A) at the ALS have been written that may further elucidate some details of the methods and systems described in this paper.

  13. Model interpretation of cloud observations by the LIDAR on the Phoenix Mars lander

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daerden, Frank; Whiteway, J. A.; Davy, R.; Komguem, L.; Dickinson, C.; Taylor, P. A.

    2010-05-01

    Phoenix LIDAR observations [Whiteway et al. 2009] of clouds and precipitation in the planetary boundary layer (PBL) on Mars have been interpreted by a microphysical model for Mars ice clouds in combination with a coupled PBL-Aeolian dust model [Davy et al. 2009, Daerden et al. 2010]. The model simulates nighttime clouds and fall streaks within the PBL that are similar in structure to the LIDAR observations. Sizes of precipitating crystals grow to sizes of 30-50 µm effective radius, comparable to ice crystals observed in precipitation from terrestrial cirrus clouds which are formed under similar meteorological conditions. The observed regular daily pattern of water ice cloud formation and precipitation in the PBL is indicative of a diurnal process in the local water cycle in which the combination of strong daytime vertical mixing and nighttime precipitation of large ice crystals acts to confine water to the PBL [Whiteway et al. 2009]. The simulations support this interpretation. This process may contribute to the seasonal variation of atmospheric humidity. References Daerden, F., J.A. Whiteway, R. Davy, C. Verhoeven, L. Komguem, C. Dickinson, P. A. Taylor, N. Larsen (2010), Simulating Observed Boundary Layer Clouds on Mars, Geophys. Res. Lett., in press Davy, R., P. A. Taylor, W. Weng, and P.-Y. Li (2009), A model of dust in the Martian lower atmosphere, J. Geophys. Res., 114, D04108, doi:10.1029/2008JD010481 Whiteway, J.A., L. Komguem, C. Dickinson, C. Cook, M. Illnicki, J. Seabrook, V. Popovici, T.J. Duck, R. Davy, P.A. Taylor, J. Pathak, D. Fisher, A.I. Carswell, M. Daly, V. Hipkin, L. Tamppari, N. Renno, J. Moores, M. Lemmon, F. Daerden, H. Smith (2009), Mars Water Ice Clouds and Precipitation, Science 325, 68

  14. The effect of solar wind parameters on proton backscattering from the Moon: Chandrayaan-1/SARA observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lue, Charles; Futaana, Yoshifumi; Barabash, Stas; Wieser, Martin; Wurz, Peter; Bhardwaj, Anil

    2013-04-01

    Backscattered solar wind protons from the lunar surface were first observed by Kaguya [1], at a backscattering efficiency of 0.1% - 1% of the incident solar wind proton flux. Subsequent observations by Chandrayaan-1 [2] and IBEX [3] revealed that a larger fraction (10% - 20%) of the solar wind protons is backscattered as energetic neutral hydrogen atoms. In the present study, we use observations from the Solar Wind Monitor (SWIM) of SARA on Chandrayaan-1 to investigate the backscattered proton fraction's dependence on the solar wind parameters. Our observations indicate a large variability in the proton backscattering fraction that strongly depends on the solar wind velocity (~0.01% to ~1% for solar wind velocities of 250 to 550 km/s). The observed backscattered proton fluctuation agrees well with a model of proton survivability against neutralisation as a function of impact velocity, available from theoretical and laboratory studies [4]. This dependence on impact velocity is important to take into account when modelling the interaction between airless bodies and their surrounding plasma. An enhanced understanding of the particle-surface interaction may open up for remotely determining properties of the surface and/or the impacting particles. [1] Saito, Y. et al. (2008), Geophys. Res. Lett., 35, L24205, doi:10.1029/2008GL036077. [2] Wieser, M. et al. (2009), Plan. Space Sci., 57(14), 2132-2134, doi:10.1016/j.pss.2009.09.012. [3] McComas, D.J. et al. (2009), Geophys. Res. Lett., 36, L12104, doi:10.1029/2009GL038794. [4] Niehus, H. et al. (1993), Surf. Sci. Rep. 17(4), 213-303, doi:10.1016/0167-5729(93)90024-J.

  15. The importance of the melting process for quantifying mantle heterogeneity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambart, S.

    2015-12-01

    A variety of data requires that the mantle source for basaltic magmatism is heterogeneous. Thanks to numerous experimental studies, parameterizations are available to model the melting behavior of peridotite and pyroxenite compositions that are thought to be present in the mantle (e.g., 1, 2). Based on these parameterizations, numerous studies have attempted to estimate the proportion of pyroxenites in magmatic sources. However, while almost all melting experiments correspond to a batch melting process, it is likely that oceanic basalts are formed by near fractional melting rather than batch melting (e.g., 3). Due to the limited extent of melting of peridotites under upper mantle conditions, their magmatic productivity and melt compositions are similar for batch and fractional melting (e.g., 4). In contrast, pyroxenites undergo much higher meting degrees during decompression of a heterogeneous, peridotite-rich mantle source. Using pMELTS, I investigated the effect of near-fractional melting of pyroxenite. Results suggest that the nature of the melting process for pyroxenites can significantly affect (1) the melt productivity of pyroxenites and thus their potential contribution in basalt genesis, (2) the major element composition of melts and thus their interaction with the surrounding peridodite, and (3) the concentration of minor elements such as Ni and consequently the estimation of pyroxenite proportion in magma-source (e.g., 5). In particular, calculations imply that the proportion of solid pyroxenite in the magma source is likely to be underestimated using "batch melting" rather than "fractional melting" parameterization. An increase in the pyroxenite proportion may affect the buoyancy of the mixture in the upper mantle and have important geodynamical implications. 1-Katz et al., 2003, GGG 4; 2-Lambart et al., 2013, Lithos 160-161; 3- Hirose & Kawamura, 1994, Geophy. Res. Let 21; 4-Johnson et al., 1990, J. Geophy. Res. 95; 5-Sobolev et al., 2007, Science 316

  16. Detailed spectroscopic analysis of chloride salt deposits in Terra Sirenum, Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osterloo, M. M.; Glotch, T. D.; Bandfield, J. L.

    2015-12-01

    Chloride salt-bearing deposits have been identified throughout the southern highlands of Mars [1] based on the lack of diagnostic spectral features of anhydrous chlorides in both the visible near infrared (VNIR) and middle infrared (MIR) wavelength ranges [1,2]. A puzzling aspect of martian chloride deposits is the apparent lack of other weathering or evaporite phases associated with most of the deposits. A global analysis over the chloride salt sites conducted by [3] found that only ~9% of the deposits they analyzed were associated with minerals such as phyllosilicates. Most of these occurrences are in Terra Sirenum where [4] noted that salt-bearing deposits lie stratigraphically above Noachian phyllosilicates. Although a variety of formation mechanisms have been proposed for these intriguing deposits, detailed geologic mapping by [5] suggests that surface water and evaporation played a dominant role. On Earth, evaporative settings are often characterized by a multitude of evaporite and phyllosilicate phases including carbonates, sulfates, and nitrates. [6] evaluated chemical divides and brine evolution for martian systems and their results indicate three pathways wherein late-stage brines favor chloride precipitation. In each case the pathway to chloride formation includes precipitation of carbonates (calcite, siderite, and/or magnesite) and sulfates (gypsum, melanterite, and/or epsomite). Here, we present the results of our detailed and systematic spectroscopic study to identify additional evaporite phases associated with salt/silicate mixtures in Terra Sirenum. [1] Osterloo et al. (2008) Science, 319, [2] Glotch, T. D. et al. (2013) Lunar and Planet. Sci. XLIV, abstract #1549 [3] Ruesch, O. et al. (2012), J. Geophys. Res., 117, E00J13 [4] Glotch, T. D. et al. (2010) Geophys. Res. Lett. 37, L16202, [5] Osterloo, M. M. and B. M Hynek (2015) Lunar and Planet. Sci XLVI. Abstract #1054 [6] Tosca, N. J. and S. M. McLennan (2006), Earth and Planet. Sci. Lett., 241.

  17. Mars Atmospheric Composition, Isotope Ratios and Seasonal Variations: Overview and Updates of the SAM Measurements at Gale Crater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webster, C. R.; Mahaffy, P. R.; Atreya, S. K.; Conrad, P. G.; Franz, H.; Trainer, M. G.; Wong, M. H.; Mischna, M. A.; Flesch, G.; Farley, K. A.; Owen, T. C.; Niles, P. B.; Jones, J. H.; Christensen, L. E.; Martín-Torres, J.; Zorzano, M. P.

    2014-12-01

    We will summarize the in situ measurements of atmospheric composition and the isotopic ratios of D/H in water, 13C/12C, 18O/16O, 17O/16O, and 13C18O/12C16O in carbon dioxide, 38Ar/36Ar, xKr/84Kr, and 15N/14N made in the martian atmosphere at Gale Crater from the Curiosity Rover using the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM)'s Quadrupole Mass Spectrometer (QMS) and Tunable Laser Spectrometer (TLS). With data over 700 sols since the Curiosity landing, we will discuss evidence and implications for changes on seasonal and other timescales. We will also present results for continued methane and methane enrichment experiments over this time period. Comparison between our measurements in the modern atmosphere and those of martian meteorites like ALH 84001 implies that the martian reservoirs of CO2 and H2O were largely established ~4 billion years ago, but that atmospheric loss or surface interaction may be still ongoing. References:[1] Mahaffy P. R. et al., Science, 341, 263-266, 2013, doi:10.1126/science.1237966. [2] Webster C. R. et al. (2013), Science, 341, 260-263, doi:10.1126/science.1237961. [3] Wong, M. H. et al. (2013), Geophys. Res. Lett., doi:10.1002/2013GL057840. [4] Atreya S. K. et al (2013), Geophys. Res. Lett., 40, 1-5, doi:10.1002/2013GL057763. The research described here was supported by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA).

  18. MESSENGER Observations of Substorm Activity at Mercury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, W. J.; Slavin, J. A.; Fu, S.; Raines, J. M.; Zong, Q. G.; Poh, G.; Jia, X.; Sundberg, T.; Gershman, D. J.; Pu, Z.; Zurbuchen, T.; Shi, Q.

    2015-12-01

    MErcury Surface, Space ENviroment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) magnetic field and plasma measurements taken during crossings of Mercury's magnetotail from 2011 to 2014 have been investigated for substorms. A number of events with clear Earth-like growth phase and expansion phase signatures were found. The thinning of the plasma sheet and the increase of magnetic field intensity in the lobe were observed during the growth phase and plasma sheet was observed to thicken during the expansion phase, which are similar to the observations at Earth. But the time scale of Mercury's substorm is only several minutes comparing with the several hours at Earth [Sun et al., 2015a]. Detailed analysis of magnetic field fluctuations during the substorm expansion phase have revealed low frequency plasma waves, e.g. Pi2-like pulsations. The By fluctuations accompanying substorm dipolarizations are consistent with pulses of field-aligned currents near the high latitude edge of the plasma sheet. Further study shows that they are near-circularly polarized electromagnetic waves, most likely Alfvén waves. Soon afterwards the plasma sheet thickened and MESSENGER detected a series of compressional waves. We have also discussed their possible sources [Sun et al., 2015b]. Sun, W.-J., J. A. Slavin, S. Y. Fu, et al. (2015a), MESSENGER observations of magnetospheric substorm activity in Mercury's near magnetotail. Geophys. Res. Lett., 42, 3692-3699. doi: 10.1002/2015GL064052.Sun, W.-J., J. A. Slavin, S. Y. Fu, et al. (2015b), MESSENGER observations of Alfvénic and compressional waves during Mercury's substorms. Geophys. Res. Lett., 42, in press. doi: 10.1002/ 2015GL065452.

  19. Model analysis of secondary organic aerosol formation by glyoxal in laboratory studies: the case for photoenhanced chemistry.

    PubMed

    Sumner, Andrew J; Woo, Joseph L; McNeill, V Faye

    2014-10-21

    The reactive uptake of glyoxal by atmospheric aerosols is believed to be a significant source of secondary organic aerosol (SOA). Several recent laboratory studies have been performed with the goal of characterizing this process, but questions remain regarding the effects of photochemistry on SOA growth. We applied GAMMA (McNeill et al. Environ. Sci. Technol. 2012, 46, 8075-8081), a photochemical box model with coupled gas-phase and detailed aqueous aerosol-phase chemistry, to simulate aerosol chamber studies of SOA formation by the uptake of glyoxal by wet aerosol under dark and irradiated conditions (Kroll et al. J. Geophys. Res. 2005, 110 (D23), 1-10; Volkamer et al. Atmos. Chem. Phys. 2009, 9, 1907-1928; Galloway et al. Atmos. Chem. Phys. 2009, 9, 3331- 306 3345 and Geophys. Res. Lett. 2011, 38, L17811). We find close agreement between simulated SOA growth and the results of experiments conducted under dark conditions using values of the effective Henry's Law constant of 1.3-5.5 × 10(7) M atm(-1). While irradiated conditions led to the production of some organic acids, organosulfates, and other oxidation products via well-established photochemical mechanisms, these additional product species contribute negligible aerosol mass compared to the dark uptake of glyoxal. Simulated results for irradiated experiments therefore fell short of the reported SOA mass yield by up to 92%. This suggests a significant light-dependent SOA formation mechanism that is not currently accounted for by known bulk photochemistry, consistent with recent laboratory observations of SOA production via photosensitizer chemistry.

  20. The Bisa GEM-Mars GCM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neary, Lori; Daerden, Frank

    2013-04-01

    data from HEND [Litvak et al. 2004] and GRS [Kelly et al. 2006]. The effect of the polar cap formation on the pressure cycle is found to be in very good agreement with the Viking Landers and Phoenix [Taylor et al. 2010] data. References: Côté J., S. Gravel, A. Méthot, A. Patoine, M. Roch and A. Staniforth, The operational CMC-MRB Global Environmental Multiscale (GEM) model: Part I - Design considerations and formulation, Mon. Wea. Rev., 126, 1373-1395. Davy, R., J. A. Davis, P. A. Taylor, C. F. Lange, W. Weng, J. Whiteway, and H. P. Gunnlaugson (2010), Initial analysis of air temperature and related data from the Phoenix MET station and their use in estimating turbulent heat fluxes, J. Geophys. Res., 115, E00E13, doi:10.1029/2009JE003444. Kelly, N. J., W. V. Boynton, K. Kerry, D. Hamara, D. Janes, R. C. Reedy, K. J. Kim, and R. M. Haberle (2006), Seasonal polar carbon dioxide frost on Mars: CO2 mass and columnar thickness distribution, J. Geophys. Res., 111, E03S07, doi:10.1029/2006JE002678 [printed 112(E3), 2007]. Kleinbohl, A., J. T. Schofield, D. M. Kass, W. A. Abdou, C. R. Backus, B. Sen, J. H. Shirley,W. G. Lawson, M. I. Richardson, F. W. Taylor, N. A. Teanby, and D. J. McCleese (2009). "Mars Climate Sounder limb profile retrieval of atmospheric temperature, pressure, dust and water ice opacity," J. Geophys. Res., 114, E10006, doi:10.1029/2009JE003358. Litvak, M. L., et al. (2004), Seasonal carbon dioxide depositions on the Martian surface as revealed from neutron measurements by the HEND instrument onboard the 2001 Mars Odyssey Spacecraft, Sol. Syst. Res., 38, 167 - 177. Smith M. D. (2004), Interannual variability in TES atmospheric observations of Mars during 1999-2003, Icarus 167, 148 -165. Taylor, P. A., et al. (2010), On pressure measurement and seasonal pressure variations during the Phoenix mission, J. Geophys. Res., 115, E00E15, doi:10.1029/2009JE003422. Wolff, M. J., et al. (2006), Constraints on dust aerosols from the Mars Exploration Rovers using MGS

  1. Complete synthetic seismograms for 3-D heterogeneous Earth models computed using modified DSM operators and their applicability to inversion for Earth structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeuchi, Nozomu; Geller, Robert J.; Cummins, Phil R.

    2000-04-01

    We compute complete (including both body and surface waves) synthetic seismograms for laterally and vertically heterogeneous Earth models using the Direct Solution Method (DSM). We use the optimally accurate modified operators derived by Geller and Takeuchi [Geller, R.J., Takeuchi, N., 1995. A new method for computing highly accurate DSM synthetic seismograms. Geophys. J. Int. 123, 449-470] and extended to spherical coordinates by Takeuchi et al. [Takeuchi, N., Geller, R.J., Cummins, P.R., 1996. Highly accurate P-SV complete synthetic seismograms using modified DSM operators. Geophys. Res. Lett. 23, 1175-1178] and Cummins et al. [Cummins, P.R., Takeuchi, N., Geller, R.J., 1997. Computation of complete synthetic seismograms for laterally heterogenous models using the Direct Solution Method. Geophys. J. Int. 130, 1-16] for 1- and 3-D models, respectively. In this study we greatly reduce the CPU time by treating the laterally heterogeneous structure as a perturbation to a spherically symmetric model (i.e., using the Born approximation). Note, however, that (1) our methods do not require the use of the Born approximation and (2) the reference model for the Born approximation is not required to be spherically symmetric. The synthetic seismograms in this paper are computed using the first-order Born approximation. However, accuracy can be greatly improved by using higher order terms of the Born series; theoretical results are presented in this paper, and some preliminary numerical examples are presented in this volume by Igel et al. [Igel, H., Takeuchi, N., Geller, R.J., Megnin, C., Bunge, H.P., Clévédé, E., Dalkolmo, J., Romanowicz, B., 1998. The COSY project: verification of global seismic modeling algorithms, Phys. Earth Planet. Inter., this issue].

  2. 78 FR 76054 - Establishment of Class E Airspace; Chatom, AL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-16

    ..., Georgia 30320; telephone (404) 305-6364. ] SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: History On September 4, 2013, the... Above the Surface of the Earth. * * * * * ASO AL E5 Chatom, AL Roy Wilcox Airport, AL (Lat. 31 27'06''...

  3. Statistics of MF-Burst Emissions: Analysis of Data from South Pole Station and from Multiple Northern Hemisphere Stations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labelle, J.; Jackson, E.; Tantiwiwat, M.; Linder, J.; Ye, S.; Weatherwax, A.

    2004-05-01

    Medium-frequency burst (MF-burst) is a broadband impulsive emission at 1-5 MHz observed at ground level during auroral substorm onsets [Weatherwax et al., 1994; LaBelle et al., 1997; review by LaBelle and Treumann, 2002]. Its amplitude is comparable to that of auroral hiss, with which it often coincides. Polarization measurements indicate that MF-burst propagates in the LO mode in the ionosphere [Shepherd et al., 1997], but aside from that its generation mechanism is unknown. In order to measure MF-burst and related auroral emissions, Dartmouth College operates LF/MF/HF radio receivers at South Pole Station and at various northern hemisphere observatories. South Pole is one of the best sites worldwide for observing MF-burst, because of the low level of man-made and natural noise in the 1-5 MHz band. This low noise level allows easy identification of events and semi-automatic data analysis; exploiting these, we present statistics of MF-burst amplitudes, frequencies, dates and local times of occurrence, etc., for one full year of data collected in 2003. To complement this single-station statistical study, we examine MF-burst data from 1997-8 when simultaneous data from up to five northern hemisphere stations, separated by 200-400 km north-south, exist. 80--90% of the MF-burst events occur at a single station; however, some events occur on up to four of the five stations simultaneously. In MF-burst emissions which occur at multiple stations, the onset of the emission often shifts poleward as the substorm onset progresses. We examine the statistics of this poleward shift in comparison to other substorm diagnostics. References: Weatherwax, A.T., J. LaBelle, and M.L. Trimpi, A new type of auroral radio emission at 1.4-3.7 MHz observed from the ground, Geophys. Res. Lett., 21, 2753, 1994. LaBelle, J., S.G. Shepherd, and M.L. Trimpi, Observations of auroral medium frequency burst emissions, J. Geophys. Res., 102, 22221, 1997. Shepherd, S.G., J. LaBelle, and M.L. Trimpi

  4. Thirteen Iron Meteorites Found at Gale Crater, Meridiani Planum, and Gusev Crater — Exogenic Witnesses to Weathering Processes Near the Martian Equator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashley, J.

    2014-12-01

    . and M. A. Velbel (2000), MAPS, v. 35 no. 5 Supplement, p. A22. [2] Golombek et al., (2010) J. Geophys. Res., 115, E00F08, doi:10.1029/2010JE003628. [3] Ashley J. W. et al., (2011) J. Geophys. Res., 116, E00F20, doi:10.1029/2010JE003672. [4] Greeley R. et al., (2002) J. Geophys. Res., 107, E1, 5005, doi : 10.1029/2000JE001481.

  5. Comparisons of selected atmospheric escape mechanisms on Venus, Mars and Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartle, R. E.; Sittler, E. C.

    2008-09-01

    The similarities and differences of the escape mechanisms for H+ and D+ from Venus, H and D from Mars, and heavier ions (~ 17 and ~ 28 amu) from Titan are described. The dominant escape process for hydrogen and deuterium on Venus is thought to originate in the night side ionosphere, located in the night side H and D bulge region, where the polarization electric field is the dominant force accelerating ionospheric H+ and D+ upward into the induced magnetic tail of Titan [1]. The resulting loss rates ~ 8.6x1026 s-1 and ~ 3.2x1023 s-1 for H+ and D+, respectively, are consistent with the large observed D/H ratio ~ 160 times that of terrestrial water and an ancient ocean more than 10 m of liquid uniformly distributed on the surface. In contrast, Jeans escape is the dominant loss mechanism for H and D on Mars [2], which has a D/H ratio ~ 5.3 times that of terrestrial water. The resulting loss rates for H and D of ~ 3.7x1026 s-1 and ~ 1022 s-1, respectively, can be related to possible ancient water reservoirs below the surface. When horizontal atmospheric winds are taken into account, the Jeans escape rates for H and D are enhanced considerably [3], as are the corresponding water reservoirs. On Titan, 28 amu ions were observed to escape along its induced magnetic tail by the Voyager 1 Plasma Science Instrument (PLS). In analogy with Venus, the escaping ions were thought to originate in the ionosphere [4]. The Cassini mission permits a test of this principal due to the numerous flybys of Titan through both the ionosphere and the tail. A polarization electric field is obtained in the ionosphere of the TA flyby, yielding an upward acceleration of 17 and 28 amu ionospheric ions that is consistent with the flux of heavy ionospheric ions observed escaping along the magnetic tail by the Cassini Ion Mass Spectrometer (CAPS) during the T9 flyby [5]. References [1] R. E. Hartle, T. M. Donahue, et al., J. Geophys. Res., 101,4525, 1996. [2] T. M. Donahue, Icarus, 167, 225, 2004. [3

  6. Protons and alpha particles in the solar wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellinger, Petr; Travnicek, Pavel M.; Passot, Thierry; Sulem, Pierre-Louis; Matteini, Lorenzo; Landi, Simone

    2014-05-01

    We investigate energetic consequences of ion kinetic instabilitities in the solar wind connected with beam and core protons and alpha particles drifting with respect to each other. We compare theoretical predictions, simulations and observation results. For theoretical prediction we assume drifting bi-Maxwellian ion populations and we calculate theoretical quasilinear heating rates (Hellinger et al., 2013b). The nonlinear evolution of beam-core protons, and alpha particles in the expanding solar wind we investigate using hybrid expanding box system (Hellinger and Travnicek, 2013). The expansion leads to many different kinetic instabilities. In the simulation the beam protons and alpha particles are decelerated with respect to the core protons and all the populations are cooled in the parallel direction and heated in the perpendicular one in agreement with theoretical expectations. On the macroscopic level the kinetic instabilities cause large departures of the system evolution from the double adiabatic prediction and lead to a perpendicular heating and parallel cooling rates. The simulated heating rates are comparable to the heating rates estimated from the Helios observations (Hellinger et al., 2013a); furthermore, the differential velocity between core and beam protons observed by Ulysses exhibits apparent bounds which are compatible with the theoretical constaints imposed by the linear theory for the magnetosonic instability driven by beam-core differential velocity (Matteini et al., 2013). References Hellinger, P., P. M. Travnicek, S. Stverak, L. Matteini, and M. Velli (2013a), Proton thermal energetics in the solar wind: Helios reloaded, J. Geophys. Res., 118, 1351-1365, doi:10.1002/jgra.50107. Hellinger, P., T. Passot, P.-L. Sulem, and P. M. Travnicek (2013b), Quasi-linear heating and acceleration in bi-Maxwellian plasmas, Phys. Plasmas, 20, 122306. Hellinger, P., and P. M. Travnicek (2013), Protons and alpha particles in the expanding solar wind: Hybrid

  7. [Al-Biruni--a universal scientist].

    PubMed

    Kujundzić, E; Masić, I

    1999-01-01

    Al-Biruni's was of Persian descent. He was born in Horesmiya and had studied mathematics, history and medicine. Acquiring knowledge from these sciences, he wrote an outstanding work on chronology of several nations and devoted it to Ziyarit ruler Kabus. He made a chronological overview of calendars from many nations, including Persians, Greeks, Egyptians, Jews, Melkitian and Nestorian Christians, Sabeyaans as well as the old Arabs. Data presented in the work, according to the later authors, were taken from very reliable sources. He was contemporary of Ibn-Sina, and thanks to their friendship, they have discussed very much miscellaneous topics. He belonged to the group of scholars, taken by Gaznevian Soultan Mahmud to a long journey to India. Afterwards Al-Biruni wrote and published detailed work "Description of India"--a work on cultural history of India. Due to excellent abilities of Al-Biruni as a philosopher and scholar, there are still significant and reliable notes about buddhistic philosophy, structure of castes and Brahmans' life style. In this Al-Biruni's masterpiece, there are many comparative analysis of Suffism and certain Indian philosophical methods. Al-Biruni's most important work is "Pharmacopoeia"--"Kitab al-saydala", which brilliantly describes all medicaments. This work has been published in many languages. He also wrote few works on astronomy and astrology. In those works he has explained some astrological events through scientific approach in a such peculiar way that nobody has ever explained before. He was also interested in sciences like geology, mineralology, geography, mathematics, psychology and many others.

  8. Al Sahawa - The Awakening: An Education and Training Resource Guide

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-07-01

    Mamoun Sami Rashid , Al Anbar Governor during 2005–06 described it best as a sequence of actions and events throughout Al Anbar: When we started... Rashid , Al Anbar Governor 2005 to 2006, interview with Dr. William Knarr, Colonel Dale Alford, USMC, and Lieutenant Colonel David Graves, USMC...1 . Who’s Who Appendix A Interviewees Abd al-Hakim Muhammad Rashid Muhammad al-Jughayfi, Mayor of Hadithah Abdul Qadir Mohammed Jassim Obeidi al

  9. A Comment on Eerland et al. (2016).

    PubMed

    Hart, William

    2016-03-01

    People imagine criminal behavior in greater detail and ascribe more blame to criminals when a description of a crime is written using the imperfective verb aspect (Hart & Albarracín, 2011, Experiment 3). An initiative to reproduce these findings conducted by Eerland et al. (2016) yielded a lack of replication. Eerland et al. have suggested that the original effect was likely driven by a Type I error produced by methodological aspects of the experiment, including low sample size. Recent conceptual replications of Hart and Albarracín's effect (Sherrill, Eerland, Zwaan, & Magliano, 2015), however, might imply the effect could be contingent on sample characteristics.

  10. Vibrations on Al surfaces covered by sodium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rusina, G. G.; Eremeev, S. V.; Borisova, S. D.; Sklyadneva, I. Yu.; Chulkov, E. V.

    2006-09-01

    In this paper we present the results of a comparative study of vibrational and structural properties of the ordered (√{3}×√{3})R30∘ and c(2 × 2) phases formed by Na adatoms at room temperature on the Al(1 1 1) and Al(1 0 0) surfaces, respectively. The surface relaxation, surface phonon dispersion, and polarization of vibrational modes are calculated using the embedded-atom method. Our calculated structural parameters are in agreement with experimental and ab initio results. The obtained vibrational frequencies compare fairly well with available experimental data.

  11. Complementary and Alternative Therapies in ALS

    PubMed Central

    Bedlack, Richard S.; Joyce, Nanette; Carter, Gregory T.; Pagononi, Sabrina; Karam, Chafic

    2015-01-01

    Synopsis Given the severity of their illness and lack of effective disease modifying agents, it is not surprising that most patients with ALS consider trying complementary and alternative therapies. Some of the most commonly considered alternative therapies include special diets, nutritional supplements, cannabis, acupuncture, chelation and energy healing. This chapter reviews these in detail. We also describe 3 models by which physicians may frame discussions about alternative therapies: paternalism, autonomy and shared decision making. Finally, we review a program called ALSUntangled which using shared shared decision making to review alternative therapies for ALS. PMID:26515629

  12. The Future of Al Qa’ida

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-05-24

    commissions and panels; and private review and oversight bodies. C O R P O R A T I O N For More Information Visit RAND at www.rand.org Explore RAND...affiliated groups and its leadership. A range of senior officials, including Saif al-Adel and Abu Miqad al-Masri, continue to play key roles. Finally, there...20 30 40 50 60 70 2003 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 Turkey Egypt Jordan Lebanon Indonesia Pakistan Pe rc te nt ag e  of   R es po nd en ts  w it h  Co

  13. The effect of iron spin transition on convective dynamics, slab dynamics and the geoid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, Michael; van den Berg, Arie; Spakman, Wim; Cadek, Ondrej; Cizkova, Hana; Matyska, Ctirad

    2013-04-01

    vigorous as observed in Boussinesq type modelling results of Bower et al, 2009, Shanas et al, 2011. Negative buoyancy of lithospheric slabs in the deep mantle is enhanced by the increase of thermal expansivity induced by the spin transition. Therefore the sinking rate of slabs are affected by the presence of the spin transition. Therefore the effects of the transition must be included in mantle convection modelling, done in order to bracket mantle viscosity values (Cizkova et al., 2012). Here we investigate the impact of the iron spin transition on the convective dynamics of the mantle and the distribution of material properties. As the spin transition related variations of material properties (e.g. thermal expansivity) are significant especially at lower temperatures, we concentrate mainly on the consequences for slab dynamics. To this end we use a compressible convection model based on a self consistent formulation of the thermo-physical material properties density, thermal expansivity and specific heat at constant pressure as described in (Jacobs and van den Berg, 2011). Finally, we evaluate the consequences of spin induced density contrasts in cold downwellings for the interpretation of the geoid. Bower et al. (2009) Geophys Res Lett, 36, L10306 Cizkova et al. (2012) Phys Earth Planet Inter 200, 56-62 Fei et al. (2007) Geophy res Lett, 34, L17307, 1-5 Jacobs and de Jong (2007) Geochim Cosmochim Acta, 71, 3630-3655 Jacobs and van den Berg (2011) Phys Earth Planet Inter, 186, 36-48 Jacobs et al. (2013) Phys Chem Minerals, in press Lin et al. (2005) Nature 436, 377-380 Shahnas et al (2011) J Geophys Res 116, B08205, 1-16 Umemoto et al (2010) Phys Earth Planet Int, 180, 209-214 Wu et al (2009) Phys Rev B 80, 014409, 1-8

  14. Heterogeneity of Mg Isotopes and Variable ^26Al/^27Al Ratio in FUN CAIs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, C.; Nagashima, K.; Hutcheon, I. D.; Wasserburg, G. J.; Papanastassiou, D. A.; Davis, A. M.; Huss, G. R.; Krot, A. N.

    2013-09-01

    We report high-precision Mg-isotope data of individual minerals from the Axtell 2271, BG82DH8, EK1-4-1, C1, TE, and CG14 FUN CAIs, which shows variations in both Mg-isotope ratio and ^26Al/^27Al ratio.

  15. Directional Solidification and Mechanical Properties of NiAl-NiAlTa Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, D. R.; Chen, X. F.; Oliver, B. F.; Noebe, R. D.; Whittenberger, J. D.

    1995-01-01

    Directional solidification of eutectic alloys is a promising technique for producing in-situ composite materials exhibiting a balance of properties. Consequently, the microstructure, creep strength and fracture toughness of directionally solidified NiAl-NiAlTa alloys were investigated. Directional solidification was performed by containerless processing techniques to minimize alloy contamination. The eutectic composition was found to be NiAl-15.5 at% Ta and well-aligned microstructures were produced at this composition. A near-eutectic alloy of NiAl-14.5Ta was also investigated. Directional solidification of the near-eutectic composition resulted in microstructures consisting of NiAl dendrites surrounded by aligned eutectic regions. The off-eutectic alloy exhibited promising compressive creep strengths compared to other NiAl-based intermetallics, while preliminary testing indicated that the eutectic alloy was competitive with Ni-base single crystal superalloys. The room temperature toughness of these two-phase alloys was similar to that of polycrystalline NiAl even with the presence of the brittle Laves phase NiAlTa.

  16. Electronic circuits having NiAl and Ni.sub.3 Al substrates

    DOEpatents

    Deevi, Seetharama C.; Sikka, Vinod K.

    1999-01-01

    An electronic circuit component having improved mechanical properties and thermal conductivity comprises NiAl and/or Ni.sub.3 Al, upon which an alumina layer is formed prior to applying the conductive elements. Additional layers of copper-aluminum alloy or copper further improve mechanical strength and thermal conductivity.

  17. An Alternative Perspective on von Winterfeldt et al.'s (1997) Test of Consequence Monotonicity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ho, Moon-Ho R.; Regenwetter, Michel; Niederee, Reinhard; Heyer, Dieter

    2005-01-01

    D. von Winterfeldt, N.-K. Chung, R. D. Luce, and Y. Cho (see record 1997-03378-008) provided several tests for consequence monotonicity of choice or judgment, using certainty equivalents of gambles. The authors reaxiomatized consequence monotonicity in a probabilistic framework and reanalyzed von Winterfeldt et al.'s main experiment via a…

  18. Transport mechanisms of leakage current in Al2O3/InAlAs MOS capacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Chengji; Lu, Hongliang; Zhang, Yimen; Zhang, Yuming; Guan, He; Wu, Lifan; Lu, Bin; Liu, Chen

    2016-09-01

    An Al2O3 layer is inserted between the InAlAs layer and the metal gate in InAs/AlSb HEMTs to suppress the leakage current. The transport mechanisms of leakage current in Al2O3/InAlAs metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) capacitors at both positive and negative biases at different temperatures ranging from 10 °C to 70 °C are investigated. For positive bias, the leakage current is dominated by Schottky emission. Based on the fitted straight lines, the relative dielectric constant of Al2O3 and the barrier height between Al2O3 and InAlAs are extracted. However, for negative bias, the leakage current is dominated by Frenkel-Poole (F-P) emission and the depth of the trap energy level from the conduction band (ϕt) is extracted. Furthermore, authors explain the reason why the dominating mechanisms at positive and negative biases are different.

  19. The Genyornis Egg: Response to Miller et al.'s commentary on Grellet-Tinner et al., 2016

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grellet-Tinner, Gerald; Spooner, Nigel A.; Handley, Warren D.; Worthy, Trevor H.

    2017-04-01

    Williams (1981) and Williams and Rich (1991) attributed Australian Quaternary fossil eggshell that differed from that of emu Dromaius novaehollandiae to the extinct bird Genyornis newtoni without any osteological or embryonic support. Such association by proximity or abundance mirrors the case of the mistaken association of oviraptor eggs to Protoceratops in the 1920's by Andrews (Grellet-Tinner and Makovicky, 2006). No other candidate species was considered, and this attribution has been unchallenged and followed by everyone thereafter. Much research has been done on this Australian eggshell, with one result being that the extinction of the parent of this eggshell is the most well documented for a taxon in Australia (e.g., Miller et al., 1999, 2005). Grellet-Tinner et al. (2016) raised several problems with the identity of the eggshell Williams (1981) attributed to Genyornis newtoni and suggested that extinct megapodes of the genus Progura were the more likely layer of this eggshell type, therein referred to as ;putative Genyornis oological material; (PGOM). Miller et al. (2017) challenged our hypothesis stating that ;Based on the dimensions of the reconstructed Spooner Egg,Grellet-Tinner et al. (2016)argue that PGOM is too small for a bird with the body mass estimated for Genyornis (168-275 kg) … …[and] …. None of the additional PGOM observations reported byGrellet-Tinner et al. (2016)are inconsistent with a Genyornis parent;. Here we take the opportunity to respond to their critique, the basis of which resolves into a few points, which we address in turn.

  20. An impedance study of complex Al/Cu-Al2O3 electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denisova, J.; Katkevics, J.; Erts, D.; Viksna, A.

    2011-06-01

    Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) was used to investigate different Cu deposition regimes on Al surface obtained by internal electrolysis and to characterize properties of fabricated electrodes. EIS experimental data confirmed that Cu deposition by internal electrolysis is realized and the complex electrode system is obtained. The main difficulty in preparation of Al/Cu electrodes is to prevent aluminium oxidation before and during electrochemical deposition of Cu particles. In this work NaCl, CH3COONa, K2SO4, mono- and diammonium citrate electrolytes were examined to determine their suitability for impedance measurements. Al/Cu-Al2O3 electrode composition was approved by equivalent circuit analysis, optical and scanning electron microscope methods. The most optimal Cu deposition mode using internal electrolysis was determined. The obtained results are promising for future electrochemical fabrication of nanostructures directly on Al surfaces by internal electrolysis.

  1. Fundamental Influence of C on Adhesion of the Al2O3/Al Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiao-Gang; Smith, John R.; Evans, Anthony

    2002-12-01

    Our first-principles computations indicate that the clean Al2O3/Al interface is relatively weak—weaker than bulk Al. Fracture experiments reveal that the interface is relatively strong with observed failure in bulk Al, however. This paradox is resolved via doping effects of the common impurity C. We have found that only 1/3 of a monolayer of carbon segregated to the interface can increase the work of separation by a factor of 3. The resulting strong interface is consistent with fracture experiments. It arises due to void formation in the interface, which provides low-strain sites for the carbon to segregate to. The degree of void formation is consistent with the relatively high heat of oxide formation of Al.

  2. CVD Fiber Coatings for Al2O3/NiAl Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boss, Daniel E.

    1995-01-01

    While sapphire-fiber-reinforced nickel aluminide (Al2O3/NiAl) composites are an attractive candidate for high-temperature structures, the significant difference in the coefficient of thermal expansion between the NiAl matrix and the sapphire fiber creates substantial residual stresses in the composite. This study seeks to produce two fiber-coating systems with the potential to reduce the residual stresses in the sapphire/NiAl composite system. Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) was used to produce both the compensating and compliant-fiber coatings for use in sapphire/NiAl composites. A special reactor was designed and built to produce the FGM and to handle the toxic nickel precursors. This process was successfully used to produce 500-foot lengths of fiber with coating thicknesses of approximately 3 microns, 5 microns, and 10 microns.

  3. Temperature dependence of the activity of Al in dilute Ni(Al) solid solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang Yong; Smith, J. R.; Evans, A. G.

    2006-12-01

    Activities of dilute Al solid solutions in Ni are determined from a first-principles approach. Both thermal lattice vibration and electronic contributions to free energies are considered and compared. Vibrational contributions tend to dominate the temperature dependencies of the free energies, though electron thermal effects are significant. Calculations show opposing temperature trends for the formation enthalpies and entropies, leading to a partial cancellation of their role in the overall energetics. Nevertheless, their remaining temperature effects are strong. Over the temperature range, 400 KAl activity coefficient varies by 15 orders of magnitude, due to the relative strength of Al-Ni and Al-Al bonds. The Ni activity coefficient only varies less than 4% over the same range. Calculational results compare well with available experimental data. The thermodynamic principles elucidated from the calculations are used to provide a fundamental interpretation.

  4. Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ adherence on CoCrAl alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Kingsley, L.M.

    1980-04-01

    Adherence of protective oxides on NiCrAl and CoCrAl superalloys has been promoted by a dispersion of a highly oxygen reactive element or its oxide being produced within the protection system. Two aspects of this subject are investigated here: the use of Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ as both the dispersion and protective oxide; and the production of an HfO/sub 2/ dispersion while simultaneously aluminizing the alloy. It was found that an Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ dispersion will act to promote the adherence of an external scale of Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ to a degree comparable to previously tested dispersions and an HfO/sub 2/ dispersion comparable to that produced by a Rhines pack treatment is produced during aluminization.

  5. 1300 K compressive properties of a reaction milled NiAl-AlN composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whittenberger, J. Daniel; Arzt, Eduard; Luton, Michael J.

    1990-01-01

    When B2 crystal-structure nickel aluminide is subjected to high-intensity mechanical ball milling in a liquid nitrogen bath, or 'cryomilling', an NiAl composite is obtained which contains about 10 vol pct AlN particles. This composition arises from the incorporation of N during cryomilling; during subsequent thermomechanical processing, the N reacts with Al. While compressive testing of extruded or isostatically pressed specimens at 1300 K indicated that strength at relatively fast strain rates is slightly dependent on consolidation method, slower strain rates indicate no clear dependency on densification technique: four different consolidation methods were found to yield similar creep strengths. The creep properties of NiAl-AlN are similar to those of the single-crystal Ni-base superalloy NASAIR 100.

  6. Bonding characters of Al-containing bulk metallic glasses studied by 27Al NMR.

    PubMed

    Xi, X K; Sandor, M T; Wang, H J; Wang, J Q; Wang, W H; Wu, Y

    2011-03-23

    We report very small (27)Al metallic shifts in a series of Cu-Zr-Al bulk metallic glasses. This observation and the Korringa type of spin-lattice relaxation behavior suggest that s-character wavefunctions weakly participate in bonding and opens the possibility of enhanced covalency (pd hybridization) with increasing Al concentration, in good agreement with elastic constants and hardness measurements. Moreover, ab initio calculations show that this bonding character originates from the strong Al 3p band and Zr 4d band hybridization since their atomic energy levels are closer to each other while the Al 3s band is localized far below the Fermi level. This study might provide a chemical view for understanding flow and fracture mechanisms of these bulk glass-forming alloys.

  7. Ion clusters in the lower stratosphere and upper troposphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Auria, R.; Turco, R. P.

    2003-04-01

    acid/water embryos can act as freezing nuclei for supercooled polar stratospheric clouds [Hamill and Turco, 2000; D'Auria and Turco, 2001]. Is likely that similar processes occur throughout the troposphere. We discuss the techniques used to define ion cluster properties, and potential applications of our hybrid thermodynamic model to study aerosol formation. References: begin{description [textmd{Arnold,}] F., D. Krankowsky and K. H. Marien, First mass spectrometric measurements of positive ions in the stratosphere, Nature, 267, 30-32, 1977. [textmd{Arnold,}]F., A. A. Viggiano, H. Schlager, Implications for trace gases and aerosols of large negative ion clusters in the stratosphere, Nature, 297, 371-376, 1982. [textmd{D'Auria,}]R. and R. P. Turco, Ionic clusters in the polar winter stratosphere, Geophys. Res. Lett., 28, 3871-3874, 2001. [textmd{D'Auria,}]R. and R. P. Turco, Atmospheric Ion Clusters: Properties and Size Distributions, EOS Trans. AGU, 83, Fall Meet. Suppl., Abstract A71F-10, 2002. [textmd{Eichkorn,}]S., S. Wilhelm, H. Aufmhoff, K. H. Wohlfrom, F. Arnold, Cosmic ray-induced aerosol-formation: First observational evidence from aircraft-based ion mass spectrometer measurements in the upper troposphere, Geophys. Res. Lett., 29, 10.1029/2002GL015044, 2002. [textmd{Gilligan,}]J. J., and A. W. Castleman, Jr., Acid dissolution by aqueous surfaces and ice: Insights from a study of water cluster ions, J. Phys. Chem. A, 105, 5601-5605,2001. [textmd{Hamill,}]P. and R. P. Turco, Ion nucleation of NAT in ternary system polar stratospheric clouds, Trans. Amer. Geophys. Union, 81 (19, May 9, 2000) Suppl., S97, 2000. [textmd{Hõrrak,}]U, J. Salm and H. Tammet, Bursts of intermediate ions the atmospheric air, J. Geophys. Res., 103, 13,909-13,915, 1998. [textmd{Turco,}]R. P., J.-X. Zhao, and F. Yu, A new source of tropospheric aerosols: Ion-ion recombination, Geophys. Res. Lett., 25, 635 -638, 1998. [textmd{Yu,}]F., and R. P. Turco, Ultrafine aerosol formation via ion

  8. Physics of Earthquakes and Faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-Zion, Yehuda

    2010-03-01

    Detailed observations and theoretical results on brittle failure events in individual fault zones point to three general dynamic regimes [1]. The first is associated with broad range of heterogeneities, little dynamic weakening during failure, power law frequency-size statistics, and temporal clustering of events. The second is associated with relatively-uniform localized structures, significant dynamic weakening, and quasi-periodic occurrence of characteristic system-size events. For a range of conditions, the response can switch back and forth between the forgoing two types of behavior. These dynamic regimes, geometrical properties of slip, and observed moment rate shapes can be explained by a simple model having two tuning parameters: dynamic weakening and conservation of elastic stress transfer during failure events [2]. The model can also explain multiple aspects of deformation in volumetric regions, including stress-strain curves, acoustic emissions and related power spectra, with a continuous transition from brittle to plastic behavior, and statistics of failure events in granular media [3]. The results from the latter studies are in good agreement with experimental data [4] and simulations with other frameworks [5]. An extension of the model to include cohesion changes during failure and healing phases of deformation may account for transitions between solid and granular phases of materials [6].[4pt] [1] Y. Ben-Zion, Rev. Geophys., 46, RG4006 (2008) and references therein. [0pt] [2] D.S. Fisher et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 78, 4885 (1997); Y. Ben-Zion, and J.R. Rice, J. Geophys. Res., 98, 14109, (1993). K.A. Dahmen et al., Phys. Rev. E 58, 1494 (1998). A.P. Mehta et al., Phys. Rev. E 73, 056104 (2006). [0pt] [3] K.A. Dahmen, et al., Phys. Rev. Lett., 102, 175501, 2009. K.A.Dahmen, Y. Ben-Zion and J.T. Uhl, submitted, 2009. [0pt] [4] K.E. Daniels and N.W. Hayman, Journal of Geophysical Research, 113 B11411 (2008). H. Jaeger, S.R. Nagel, R.P. Behringer, Revs. Mod

  9. 4-D Transdimensional Tomography of Iceland Using Ambient Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhowmick, D.; Tkalcic, H.; Young, M.

    2012-12-01

    excellent property that it treats the number of model parameters (e.g. the number of basis functions) and the noise in the data as an unknown in the problem (Bodin and Sambridge, 2009; Bodin et al., 2012). This approach is advantageous over general optimisation framework where we need to assume the knowledge of noise in the data, define the smoothness and damping, etc. The level of data noise is crucial because it effectively quantifies the usable information present in the data (a very noisy dataset does not contain much retrievable information) and here it naturally controls the quantity of information that consequently should be present in the model (i.e. the number of model parameters). This work is further extended to image the crust for different time intervals and study ongoing dynamics of the Icelandic crust. References: Bodin and Sambridge (2009), Geophys. J. Int., 178, 1411-1436. Bodin et al. (2012), J. Geophys. Res., 117, B02301. Fichtner and Tkalcic (2010), Earth Planet. Sci. Lett., 297, 607-615. Foulger et al. (2001), Geophys. J. Int., 146, 504-530. Foulger (2010), Plates Vs Plumes: A Geological Controversy, 328. Gudmundson et al. (2007), Geophys. Res. Lett., 34, L14314. Rawlinson and Sambridge (2005), Explor. Geophys., 36,341-350. Tkalcic et al. (2009), Bull. Seismol. Soc. Am., 99, 3077-3085.

  10. Formation of gamma(sup prime)-Ni3Al via the Peritectoid Reaction: gamma + beta (+ Al2O3)=gamma(sup prime)(+ Al2O3)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Copeland, Evan

    2008-01-01

    The activities of Al and Ni were measured using multi-cell Knudsen effusion-cell mass spectrometry (multi-cell KEMS), over the composition range 8-32 at.%Al and temperature range T=1400-1750 K in the Ni-Al-O system. These measurements establish that equilibrium solidification of gamma(sup prime)-Ni3Al-containing alloys occurs by the eutectic reaction, L (+ Al2O3)=gamma + Beta(+ Al2O3), at 1640 +/- 1 K and a liquid composition of 24.8 +/- 0.2 at.%al (at an unknown oxygen content). The {gamma + Beta (+Al2O3} phase field is stable over the temperature range 1633-1640 K, and gamma(sup prime)-Ni3Al forms via the peritectoid, gamma + Beta (+ Al2O3)=gamma(sup prime) (+ Al2O3), at 1633 +/- 1 K. This behavior is consistent with the current Ni-Al phase diagram and a new diagram is proposed. This new Ni-Al phase diagram explains a number of unusual steady-state solidification structures reported previously and provides a much simpler reaction scheme in the vicinity of the gamma(sup prime)-Ni2Al phase field.

  11. Formation of gamma'-Ni3Al via the Peritectoid Reaction: gamma plus beta (+Al2O3) equals gamma'(+Al2O3)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Copland, Evan

    2008-01-01

    The activities of Al and Ni were measured using multi-cell Knudsen effusion-cell mass spectrometry (multi-cell KEMS), over the composition range 8 - 32 at.%Al and temperature range T = 1400 - 1750 K in the Ni-Al-O system. These measurements establish that equilibrium solidification of gamma'-Ni3Al-containing alloys occurs by the eutectic reaction, L (+ Al2O3) = gamma + beta (+ Al2O3), at 1640 plus or minus 1 K and a liquid composition of 24.8 plus or minus 0.2 at.%Al (at an unknown oxygen content). The {gamma + beta + Al2O3} phase field is stable over the temperature range 1633 - 1640 K, and gamma'-Ni3Al forms via the peritectiod, gamma + beta (+ Al2O3) = gamma'(+ Al2O3), at 1633 plus or minus 1 K. This behavior is inconsistent with the current Ni-Al phase diagram and a new diagram is proposed. This new Ni-Al phase diagram explains a number of unusual steady state solidification structures reported previously and provides a much simpler reaction scheme in the vicinity of the gamma'-Ni3Al phase field.

  12. 76 FR 62481 - Incapital LLC, et al.

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-07

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION Incapital LLC, et al.; Notice of Application September 30, 2011. AGENCY: Securities and Exchange Commission (``Commission''). ACTION: Notice of application for an order under section 12(d)(1)(J) of...

  13. Electron impact exctation of Al X

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aggarwal, Kanti; Keenan, Francis

    2013-05-01

    Emission lines of Al ions, including Al X, are important for the modeling and diagnostics of lasing, fusion and astrophysical plasmas, for which atomic data are required for a variety of parameters, such as energy levels, radiative rates (A- values), and excitation rates or equivalently the effective collision strengths (Υ), which are obtained from the electron impact collision strengths (Ω). Experimentally, energy levels are available for Al X on the NIST website, but there is paucity for accurate collisional atomic data. Therefore, here we report a complete set of results (namely energy levels, radiative rates, and effective collision strengths) for all transitions among the lowest 98 levels of Al X. These levels belong to the (1s2) 2s2, 2s2p, 2p2, 2s3 l, 2p3 l, 2s4 l, and 2p4 l configurations. Finally, we also report the A- values for four types of transitions, namely electric dipole (E1), electric quadrupole (E2), magnetic dipole (M1), and magnetic quadrupole (M2), because these are also required for plasma modeling. For our calculations of wavefunctions, we have adopted the fully relativistic GRASP code, and for the calculations of Ω, the Dirac atomic R-matrix code (DARC) of PH Norrington and IP Grant. Additionally, parallel ca

  14. Kinematics of Disease Progression in Bulbar ALS

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yunusova, Yana; Green, Jordan R.; Lindstrom, Mary J.; Ball, Laura J.; Pattee, Gary L.; Zinman, Lorne

    2010-01-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate the deterioration of lip and jaw movements during speech longitudinally in three individuals diagnosed with bulbar amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). The study was motivated by the need to understand the relationship between physiologic changes in speech movements and clinical measures of speech…

  15. U-ALS: A Ubiquitous Learning Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piovesan, Sandra Dutra; Passerino, Liliana Maria; Medina, Roseclea Duarte

    2012-01-01

    The diffusion of the use of the learning virtual environments presents a great potential for the development of an application which meet the necessities in the education area. In view of the importance of a more dynamic application and that can adapt itself continuously to the students' necessities, the "U-ALS" (Ubiquitous Adapted Learning…

  16. 75 FR 1420 - Alabama Disaster # AL-00025

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-11

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Alabama Disaster AL-00025 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a notice of an Administrative declaration of a disaster for the State of Alabama dated...

  17. 78 FR 4967 - Alabama Disaster #AL-00046

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-23

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Alabama Disaster AL-00046 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a notice of an Administrative declaration of a disaster for the State of ALABAMA dated...

  18. 76 FR 29810 - Alabama Disaster #AL-00037

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-23

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Alabama Disaster AL-00037 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a Notice of the Presidential declaration of a major disaster for Public Assistance Only for...

  19. 75 FR 474 - Alabama Disaster #AL-00026

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-05

    ... [Federal Register Volume 75, Number 2 (Tuesday, January 5, 2010)] [Notices] [Pages 474-475] [FR Doc No: E9-31259] SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION [Disaster Declaration 11988 and 11989] Alabama Disaster AL-00026 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a Notice...

  20. 78 FR 26100 - Alabama Disaster #AL-00050

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-03

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Alabama Disaster AL-00050 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a notice of an Administrative declaration of a disaster for the State of Alabama dated...