Science.gov

Sample records for al geophys res

  1. Comment on ``Geoeffectiveness of Halo Coronal Mass Ejections'' by N. Gopalswamy, S. Yashiro, and S. Akiyama (J. Geophys. Res. 2007, 112, doi:10.1029/2006JA012149)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yermolaev, Yu. I.

    2008-12-01

    Comment on paper: Gopalswamy, N., S. Yashiro, and S. Akiyama (2007), Geoeffectiveness of halo coronal mass ejections, J. Geophys. Res., 112, A06112, doi:10.1029/2006JA012149 Gopalswamy et al. [2007] studied the geoeffectiveness of halo coronal mass ejections (CMEs) on the basis of solar observations during 1996-2005 and found that the geoeffectiveness of 229 frontside halo CMEs was 71%. Recently for observations of 305 frontside halo CMEs during 1997-2003 the geoeffectiveness was found to be 40% [Kim et al., 2005]. Complex analysis of both solar and interplanetary measurements showed that the geoeffectiveness of frontside halo CMEs is likely to be about 50% [Yermolaev et al., 2005; Yermolaev and Yermolaev, 2006]. Gopalswamy et al. [2007] did not discuss possible causes of this difference and were limited only to the general words: "The reason for the conflicting results (geoeffectiveness of CMEs ranging from 35% to more than 80%) may be attributed to the different definition of halo CMEs and geoeffectiveness." So, here we shall present our point of view on high geoeffectivenees of CME obtained in paper by Gopalswamy et al. [2007].

  2. A new species of earth snake (Dipsadidae, Geophis) from Mexico.

    PubMed

    Canseco-Márquez, Luis; Pavón-Vázquez, Carlos J; López-Luna, Marco Antonio; Nieto-Montes de Oca, Adrián

    2016-01-01

    A new species of the Geophis dubius group is described from the mountains of the Sierra Zongolica in west-central Veracruz and the Sierra de Quimixtlán in central-east Puebla. The new species is most similar to Geophis duellmani and Geophis turbidus, which are endemic to the mountains of northern Oaxaca and the Sierra Madre Oriental of Puebla and Hidalgo, respectively. However, the new species differs from Geophis duellmani by the presence of postocular and supraocular scales and from Geophis turbidus by having a bicolor dorsum. With the description of the new species, the species number in the genus increases to 50 and to 12 in the Geophis dubius group. Additionally, a key to the species of the Geophis dubius group is provided. PMID:27587979

  3. A new species of earth snake (Dipsadidae, Geophis) from Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Canseco-Márquez, Luis; Pavón-Vázquez, Carlos J.; López-Luna, Marco Antonio; Nieto-Montes de Oca, Adrián

    2016-01-01

    Abstract A new species of the Geophis dubius group is described from the mountains of the Sierra Zongolica in west-central Veracruz and the Sierra de Quimixtlán in central-east Puebla. The new species is most similar to Geophis duellmani and Geophis turbidus, which are endemic to the mountains of northern Oaxaca and the Sierra Madre Oriental of Puebla and Hidalgo, respectively. However, the new species differs from Geophis duellmani by the presence of postocular and supraocular scales and from Geophis turbidus by having a bicolor dorsum. With the description of the new species, the species number in the genus increases to 50 and to 12 in the Geophis dubius group. Additionally, a key to the species of the Geophis dubius group is provided. PMID:27587979

  4. La faune de Mammifères du Pliocène terminal d'Ahl al Oughlam, Casablanca, Maroc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geraads, Denis; Amani, Fethi; Raynal, Jean-Paul; Sbihi-Alaoui, Fatima-Zohra

    1998-05-01

    The Late Pliocene site (ca 2.5 Ma) of Ahl al Oughlam has yielded a complete fauna of macroand micro-mammals, by far the richest of the late Cenozoic era of North Africa; it includes at least 55 species. Carnivora (23 species) are the dominant group. Many of them used the caves and fissures as dens or shelters, bringing in most of the ungulate remains. These remains include mostly medium-size species and juveniles of larger ones. Very few taxa are akin to Palearctic ones, and most of the faunal exchanges were intra-African. However, when compared to East Africa, the poor diversity of these ungulates must be noted, which the karstic nature of the site fails to fully explain, but which could result from a harsh, open and relatively cold environment.

  5. Response to "using of 'pseudo-second-order model' in adsorption", comment letter on "phenol removal from wastewater by adsorption on zeolitic composite" [Bizerea Spiridon et al., Environ Sci Pollut Res (2013) 20:6367-6381].

    PubMed

    Bizerea Spiridon, Otilia; Pitulice, Laura

    2014-01-01

    This letter is a response to the issues put forth by Dr. Y.S. Ho with regard to the article "Phenol removal from wastewater by adsorption on zeolitic composite" as reported by Bizerea Spiridon et al. (Environ Sci Pollut Res 20:6367-6381, 2013). The response proposes to clarify the error slipped in the typewritten linearized equation of the pseudo-second-kinetic model and the reason for using secondary reference regarding this model. PMID:24638835

  6. Resistance electroslag (RES) surfacing

    SciTech Connect

    Forsberg, S.G.

    1985-08-01

    RES-surfacing is an abbreviation of resistance electroslag surfacing. The ElectroSlag Welding (ESW) process is wellknown for the welding of heavy-walled materials. During the past few years, a RES-surfacing system has been developed, in which a strip electrode is used in an ESW process. This is a development of the submerged arc welding (SAW) surfacing process using strip electrodes, which has been used in industry for many years. The basic difference between the SAW- and RES-surfacing processes is in the way of obtaining penetration in the base metal, and in fusion of the strip electrode and flux. In the SAW process, the required heat is derived from an electric arc; in the RES-process, it is obtained by resistance heating (i.e., the Joule effect) as a result of current flowing through a shallow molten pool of electrically conductive slag. To satisfy the basic differences in the processes, specific combinations of strip electrodes and fluxes have been developed. The welding equipment used for RES-surfacing is basically the same as for SAW-surfacing, except for minor modifications of the welding head due to heat radiation from the visible molten slag pool, and the use of additional equipment for magnetic control of the molten pool. result of the magnetic control of the molten pool.

  7. Reply to the comment by Quartau et al. on "Construction and destruction of a volcanic island developed inside an oceanic rift: Graciosa Island, Terceira Rift, Azores", J. Volcanol. Geotherm. Res. 284, 32-45, by Sibrant et al. (2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sibrant, A. L. R.; Marques, F. O.; Hildenbrand, A.

    2015-09-01

    In Sibrant et al. (2014), we reconstructed the evolution of Graciosa Island (Azores). We extensively discussed the nature and the meaning of the destruction episodes, either tectonics or gravitational, and concluded that the island has evolved through major landslides. In their comment, Quartau et al. (2015) conclude that (1) "Sibrant et al. (2014) is based almost solely on subaerial observations," which is false because we used the bathymetric data available to us (Figs. 3 and 4 in Sibrant et al., 2014). (2) "…the published multibeam sonar data around Graciosa reveals that their proposed successive phases of destruction of the volcanic edifices composing the island by massive landslides is incompatible with the high-resolution bathymetry." First, saying that the data were published is misleading because only two images are now provided in Quartau et al. (2015). Most of the high-resolution data used by Quartau et al. (2015) are not published, and they still do not release the data for us to analyse and use in this reply. Second, the high-resolution bathymetric maps are not incompatible with our model. For instance, mounds on the eastern submarine slope may actually be landslide blocks, and the platform developed to the S may correspond to flank collapses of the successive volcanoes, blanketed more recently by the young basaltic cover. (3) "The interpretation of collapse structures appears to have originated partly from a misreading of the volcano-stratigraphy and tectonic structures". We certainly did not "misread" the volcanic stratigraphy and tectonic structures in Graciosa; in great contrast to Quartau et al. (2015), we (a) used major unconformities to establish the volcano-stratigraphy, (b) calibrated this stratigraphy with high precision K-Ar dating, (c) made careful measurement of lava flow attitudes to infer the pre-collapse position of the main edifices, and (d) did not use hypothetical tectonic faults, as Quartau et al. (2015) did, to draw an

  8. ResPlan Database

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zellers, Michael L.

    2003-01-01

    The main project I was involved in was new application development for the existing CIS0 Database (ResPlan). This database application was developed in Microsoft Access. Initial meetings with Greg Follen, Linda McMillen, Griselle LaFontaine and others identified a few key weaknesses with the existing database. The weaknesses centered around that while the database correctly modeled the structure of Programs, Projects and Tasks, once the data was entered, the database did not capture any dynamic status information, and as such was of limited usefulness. After the initial meetings my goals were identified as follows: Enhance the ResPlan Database to include qualitative and quantitative status information about the Programs, Projects and Tasks Train staff members about the ResPlan database from both the user perspective and the developer perspective Give consideration to a Web Interface for reporting. Initially, the thought was that there would not be adequate time to actually develop the Web Interface, Greg wanted it understood that this was an eventual goal and as such should be a consideration throughout the development process.

  9. RES: Regularized Stochastic BFGS Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mokhtari, Aryan; Ribeiro, Alejandro

    2014-12-01

    RES, a regularized stochastic version of the Broyden-Fletcher-Goldfarb-Shanno (BFGS) quasi-Newton method is proposed to solve convex optimization problems with stochastic objectives. The use of stochastic gradient descent algorithms is widespread, but the number of iterations required to approximate optimal arguments can be prohibitive in high dimensional problems. Application of second order methods, on the other hand, is impracticable because computation of objective function Hessian inverses incurs excessive computational cost. BFGS modifies gradient descent by introducing a Hessian approximation matrix computed from finite gradient differences. RES utilizes stochastic gradients in lieu of deterministic gradients for both, the determination of descent directions and the approximation of the objective function's curvature. Since stochastic gradients can be computed at manageable computational cost RES is realizable and retains the convergence rate advantages of its deterministic counterparts. Convergence results show that lower and upper bounds on the Hessian egeinvalues of the sample functions are sufficient to guarantee convergence to optimal arguments. Numerical experiments showcase reductions in convergence time relative to stochastic gradient descent algorithms and non-regularized stochastic versions of BFGS. An application of RES to the implementation of support vector machines is developed.

  10. Comment on `Magnitude conversion problem using general orthogonal regression' by H. R. Wason, Ranjit Das and M. L. Sharma, (Geophys. J. Int., 190, 1091-1096)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasperini, Paolo; Lolli, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    The argument proposed by Wason et al. that the conversion of magnitudes from a scale (e.g. Ms or mb) to another (e.g. Mw), using the coefficients computed by the general orthogonal regression method (Fuller) is biased if the observed values of the predictor (independent) variable are used in the equation as well as the methodology they suggest to estimate the supposedly true values of the predictor variable are wrong for a number of theoretical and empirical reasons. Hence, we advise against the use of such methodology for magnitude conversions.

  11. Neutron diffraction study of hydrogen-bond symmetrization in δ-AlOOD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sano-Furukawa, A.; Hattori, T.; Kuribayashi, T.

    2013-12-01

    δ-AlOOH, a high-pressure polymorph of diaspore, is an important hydrous mineral in the deep earth that has the ability to transport hydrogen into the lower mantle. Theoretical studies have pointed out that hydrogen would locate at the center between two oxygen atoms at high pressure, which is so called hydrogen-bond symmetrization [1]. It was also suggested that the symmetrization would trigger the increase of bulk modulus, which is one of the important parameters of minerals at high pressure. The transition of δ-AlOOH(D) at high pressure has been suggested by X-ray and neutron diffraction [2, 3]. X-ray diffraction study found that the axes a and b where the hydrogen bond is oriented become less compressible above 12 GPa in δ-AlOOD. Neutron diffraction study on δ-AlOOD up to 9.2 GPa showed the increase of O-D bond distance, that is considered as a precousor phenomena of the symmetrization. However, the pressure was insufficient to observe the symmetrization. To investigate the symmetrization of hydrogen bond directly, we conducted neutron diffraction experiments to 16.7 GPa at PLANET, MLF in J-PARC. Powder sample of δ-AlOOD was loaded in Paris-Edinburgh press with double-toroid sintered diamond anvils with methanol-ethanol mixture of pressure medium. In the experiments, the disappearance of 120 refrection was observed at 12.1 GPa, indicating the transition from P21nm to Pnnm, which can be attributed to the disorder of hydrogen bond or the symmtrization. Results of Rietveld refienment will be shown in the presentation. [1] Tsuchiya et al., Geophys. Res. Lett., 29, 1909, 2002. [2] Sano-Furukawa et al., Am. Mineral., 93, 1558-1567, 2008. [3] Sano-Furukawa et al., Am. Mineral., 94, 1255-1261, 2009.

  12. Suicide: Incidence or Prevalence? Comments on Hernández-Alvarado et al. Increase in Suicide Rates by Hanging in the Population of Tabasco, Mexico between 2003 and 2012. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2016, 13, 552.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Niño, Julián Alfredo

    2016-01-01

    I recently reviewed the paper published in this journal by Hernández-Alvarado et al., titled "Increase in Suicide Rates by Hanging in the Population of Tabasco, Mexico between 2003 and 2012" [1], and I noticed that the epidemiological concept "prevalence" is not correctly used.[...]. PMID:27376318

  13. RES-E-NEXT: Next Generation of RES-E Policy Instruments

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, M.; Bird, L.; Cochran, J.; Milligan, M.; Bazilian, M.; Denny, E.; Dillon, J.; Bialek, J.; O'Malley, M.; Neuhoff, K.

    2013-07-04

    The rapid deployment of renewable sources of electricity (RES-E) is transforming power systems globally. This trend is likely to continue with large increases in investment and deployment of RES-E capacity over the coming decades. Several countries now have penetration levels of variable RES-E generation (i.e., wind and solar) in excess of 15% of their annual electricity generation; and many jurisdictions (e.g., Spain, Portugal, Ireland, Germany, and Denmark; and, in the United States, Colorado) have experienced instantaneous penetration levels of more than 50% variable generation.1 These penetration levels of variable RES-E have prompted many jurisdictions to begin modifying practices that evolved in an era of readily dispatchable, centralised power systems. Providing insights for the transition to high levels of variable RES-E generation is the focus of this document, which is the final report of the RES-E-NEXT project commissioned by the International Energy Agency’s implementing agreement on Renewable Energy Technology Deployment (IEA-RETD). It presents a comprehensive assessment of issues that will shape power system evolution during the transition to high levels of variable RES-E generation. While policy will be a central tool to sustain the growth of RES-E capacity and to enable power system transitions, the scope of the report extends beyond policy considerations to include the related domains of regulation, power market design, and system operation protocols. This broad scope is in recognition that a changing resource mix with greater penetration levels of variable RES-E has broad implications for grid operations, wholesale and retail power markets, and infrastructure needs. The next decade will be a critical transition period for power system stakeholders, as global deployment of RES-E capacity (and especially variable RES-E capacity) continues to scale-up in many regions of the world. To address increased penetration levels of RES-E in power systems

  14. CHIP: Caltech High-res IRS Pipeline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pontoppidan, Klaus M.

    2016-02-01

    CHIP (Caltech High-res IRS Pipeline) reduces high signal-to-noise short-high and long-high Spitzer-IRS spectra, especially that taken with dedicated background exposures. Written in IDL, it is independent of other Spitzer reduction tools except IRSFRINGE (ascl:1602.016).

  15. 32 CFR 1908.22 - Requests barred by res judicata.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Requests barred by res judicata. 1908.22 Section 1908.22 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense CENTRAL INTELLIGENCE AGENCY... EXECUTIVE ORDER 12958 Agency Action on Mdr Requests § 1908.22 Requests barred by res judicata....

  16. 32 CFR 1907.22 - Challenges barred by res judicata.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Challenges barred by res judicata. 1907.22 Section 1907.22 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense CENTRAL INTELLIGENCE... ORDER 12958 Action on Challenges § 1907.22 Challenges barred by res judicata. The Executive Secretary...

  17. 32 CFR 1802.22 - Challenges barred by res judicata.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Challenges barred by res judicata. 1802.22 Section 1802.22 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense NATIONAL... EXECUTIVE ORDER 12958 Action On Challenges § 1802.22 Challenges barred by res judicata. The...

  18. 32 CFR 1908.22 - Requests barred by res judicata.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Requests barred by res judicata. 1908.22 Section 1908.22 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense CENTRAL INTELLIGENCE AGENCY... EXECUTIVE ORDER 12958 Agency Action on Mdr Requests § 1908.22 Requests barred by res judicata....

  19. Interactions between small and medium scale gravity waves in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heale, Christopher; Snively, Jonathan

    2016-07-01

    Gravity waves play a prominent role in the momentum and energy budget of the Earth's upper atmosphere [e.g. Fritts and Alexander ,Rev. Geophys., 41, 1003, 2003]. Small scale waves with large vertical wavelengths are able to propagate into the thermosphere where they will dissipate and deposit their energy and momentum [e.g. Vadas and Fritts, J. Geoph. Res.,110, D15103, 2005; Yiǧit et al., J. Geophys. Res.-Atmospheres, 114, D07101, 14, 2009; Liu et al., Ann. Geophys., 31, 2013; Heale et al., J. Geophys. Res. Space Physics, 119, 2014]. However, small scale waves are also prone to refraction, reflection, filtering, and instabilities by the temperature and wind structure of the atmosphere. One of the primary sources of variability on scales relevant to these small-scale waves is other, larger scale waves. The use of multiple instruments and Airglow keograms has begun to uncover the richness of the spectrum in the atmosphere, but interaction and relatively poorly understood [e.g. Fritts et al., J. Geophys. Res. Atmos., 119, 2014; Bossert et al., J. Geophys. Res. Atmos., 120, 2015; Lu et al., J. Geophys. Res. Atmos., 120, 2015; Yuan et al., J. Geophys. Res. Atmos., 121, 2016]. We use a 2D nonlinear, compressible numerical model to investigate the character of interactions between small-scale and medium-scale gravity waves at varied amplitudes as they approach nonlinearity. We investigate the relative importance of linear and nonlinear interaction processes and their effects on the propagation of multiple wave packets, and the possibility of energy exchanges and the threshold of onset for instability or breaking within the waves. Furthermore, we assess the validity of linear interpretations of observational data where coherent large-amplitude waves are detected at multiple, separated scales.

  20. ResDE-Dependent Regulation of Enterotoxin Gene Expression in Bacillus cereus: Evidence for Multiple Modes of Binding for ResD and Interaction with Fnr▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Esbelin, Julia; Armengaud, Jean; Zigha, Assia; Duport, Catherine

    2009-01-01

    In the food-borne pathogen Bacillus cereus F4430/73, the production of major virulence factors hemolysin BL (Hbl) and nonhemolytic enterotoxin (Nhe) is regulated through complex mechanisms. The two-component regulatory system ResDE is involved in the activation of hbl and nhe transcription. Here, the response regulator ResD and the sensor kinase ResE were overexpressed and purified, and autophosphorylation of ResE and transphosphorylation of ResD by ResE were demonstrated in vitro. ResD is mainly monomeric in solution, regardless of its phosphorylation state. ResD was shown to interact directly with promoter regions (p) of the enterotoxin regulator genes resDE, fnr, and plcR and the enterotoxin structural genes nhe and hbl, but with different affinities. Binding of ResD to pplcR, pnhe, and phbl was not dependent on the ResD phosphorylation status. In contrast, ResD phosphorylation significantly increased interactions between ResD and presDE and pfnr. Taken together, these results showed that phosphorylation of ResD results in a different target expression pattern. Furthermore, ResD and the redox activator Fnr were found to physically interact and simultaneously bind their target DNAs. We propose that unphosphorylated ResD acts as an antiactivator of Fnr, while phosphorylated ResD acts as a coactivator of Fnr. Finally, our findings represent the first molecular evidence of the role of ResDE as a sentinel system capable of sensing redox changes and coordinating a response that modulates B. cereus virulence. PMID:19395489

  1. Progress Towards a NASA Earth Science Reuse Enablement System (RES)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, James J.; Downs, Robert R.; Mattmann, Chris A.

    2010-01-01

    A Reuse Enablement System (RES) allows developers of Earth science software to contribute software for reuse by others and.for users to find, select, and obtain software for reuse in their own systems. This paper describes work that the X4S,4 Earth Science Data Systems (ESDS) Software Reuse Working Group has completed to date in the development of an RES for NASA.

  2. 19 CFR 171.54 - Substitute res in an administrative forfeiture action.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Substitute res in an administrative forfeiture... Procedures § 171.54 Substitute res in an administrative forfeiture action. (a) Substitute res. Where property... of the property (the res) to obtain release of the property. The offer, which may be tendered at...

  3. HiRes Deconvolution of Outflow Cavities Imaged by Spitzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velusamy, Thangasamy; Langer, W. D.; Marsh, K. A.

    2007-05-01

    Circumstellar outflows are believed to play a central role in the dispersal of the envelope and the ejection of angular momentum from protostars and their associated disks. The opening angle of the outflow is an important indicator of the time evolution of the outflow and its effects on infall and accretion. The scattered light emission escaping out the outflow cavities can be observed in the deep Spitzer images in the IRAC bands. We present examples of HiRes deconvolved Spitzer IRAC images of outflow cavities. HiRes achieves sub-arcsec resolution (< 0.8") for IRAC channels at 3.6 and 4.5 microns and 1" at 5.8 and 8 microns. Furthermore, HiRes deconvolution removes all the diffraction lobes producing cleaner looking narrow image of the protostar and nearby bright stars. Thus HiRes analysis improves our ability to trace the outflow cavities. We also present geometric models of the outflow (inclination and deprojected opening angles) derived by fitting SEDs and images of the outflow cavities. This work was performed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration

  4. 7 CFR 4280.115 - RES and EEI grant funding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... General Renewable Energy System and Energy Efficiency Improvement Grants § 4280.115 RES and EEI grant... contributions are acceptable for renewable energy system projects, including those that are eligible for Federal... this section, as long as the items are an integral and necessary part of the renewable energy system...

  5. 7 CFR 4280.115 - RES and EEI grant funding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... General Renewable Energy System and Energy Efficiency Improvement Grants § 4280.115 RES and EEI grant... contributions are acceptable for renewable energy system projects, including those that are eligible for Federal... this section, as long as the items are an integral and necessary part of the renewable energy system...

  6. 32 CFR 1802.22 - Challenges barred by res judicata.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Challenges barred by res judicata. 1802.22 Section 1802.22 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense NATIONAL COUNTERINTELLIGENCE CENTER CHALLENGES TO CLASSIFICATION OF DOCUMENTS BY AUTHORIZED HOLDERS PURSUANT TO SECTION 1.9...

  7. 32 CFR 1802.22 - Challenges barred by res judicata.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Challenges barred by res judicata. 1802.22 Section 1802.22 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense NATIONAL COUNTERINTELLIGENCE CENTER CHALLENGES TO CLASSIFICATION OF DOCUMENTS BY AUTHORIZED HOLDERS PURSUANT TO SECTION 1.9...

  8. 32 CFR 1802.22 - Challenges barred by res judicata.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Challenges barred by res judicata. 1802.22 Section 1802.22 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense NATIONAL COUNTERINTELLIGENCE CENTER CHALLENGES TO CLASSIFICATION OF DOCUMENTS BY AUTHORIZED HOLDERS PURSUANT TO SECTION 1.9...

  9. 32 CFR 1802.22 - Challenges barred by res judicata.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Challenges barred by res judicata. 1802.22 Section 1802.22 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense NATIONAL COUNTERINTELLIGENCE CENTER CHALLENGES TO CLASSIFICATION OF DOCUMENTS BY AUTHORIZED HOLDERS PURSUANT TO SECTION 1.9...

  10. Adolescents' View of Family Functioning: A Validation of the RES.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chambliss, Catherine; And Others

    The contextual model argues that people in a relationship must experience a sense of loyalty, fairness, and reciprocity in order to build commitment and trust and provide ongoing mutual care. The Relational Ethics Scale (RES), which assess key relational variables, was developed for use in empirical research to test the theoretical framework of…

  11. 32 CFR 1803.22 - Requests barred by res judicata.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Requests barred by res judicata. 1803.22 Section 1803.22 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense NATIONAL COUNTERINTELLIGENCE... SECTION 3.6 OF EXECUTIVE ORDER 12958 NACIC Action on MDR Requests § 1803.22 Requests barred by...

  12. Residential Utility Core Wall System - ResCore

    SciTech Connect

    Boyd, G.; Lundell, C.; Wendt, R.

    1999-06-01

    This paper describes activities associated with the RESidential utility CORE wall system (ResCore) developed by students and faculty in the Department of Industrial Design at Auburn University between 1996 and 1998. These activities analyize three operational prototype units installed in Habitat for Humanity Houses. The paper contains two Parts: 1) analysis of the three operational prototype units, 2) exploration of alternative design solutions. ResCore is a manufactured construction component designed to expedite home building by decreasing the need for skilled labor at the work site. The unit concentrates untility elements into a wall unit(s), which is shipped to the construction site and installed in minimum time. The ResCore unit is intended to be built off-site in a manufacturing environment where the impact of vagaries of weather and work-crew coordination and scheduling are minimized. The controlled environment of the factory enhances efficient production of building components through material and labor throughput controls, enabling the production of components at a substantially reduced per-unit cost. The ResCore unit when compared to traditional "stick-built" utility wall components is in may ways analogous to the factory built roof truss compared to on-site "stick-Built" roof framing.

  13. Manufactured residential utility wall system (ResCore), overview

    SciTech Connect

    Wendt, R.; Lundell, C.; Lau, T.M.

    1997-05-01

    This paper provides an overview of the design and development of a manufactured residential utility wall system referred to as ResCore. ResCore is a self-contained, manufactured, residential utility wall that provides complete rough-in of utilities (power, gas, water, and phone) and other functions (exhaust, combustion make-up air, refrigerant lines, etc.) to serve the residential kitchen, bath, utility, and laundry rooms. Auburn University, Department of Industrial Design faculty and students, supported by a team of graduate student researchers and the project`s advisory team, developed the ResCore. The project was accomplished through a research subcontract from the US Department of Energy administered by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The ResCore wall system features a ``layered`` manufacturing technique that allows each major component group--structural, cold water, hot water, drain, gas, electric, etc.--to be built as a separate subassembly and easily brought together for final assembly. The two structural layers are reinforced with bridging that adds strength and also permits firm attachment of plumbing pipes and other systems to the wall frame.

  14. Manufactured Residential Utility Wall System (ResCore),

    SciTech Connect

    Wendt, Robert; Lundell, Clark; Lau, Tin Man

    1997-12-31

    This paper describes the design and development of a manufactured residential utility wall system referred to as ResCore. ResCore is a self contained, manufactured, residential utility wall that provides complete rough-in of utilities (power, gas, water, and phone) and other functions (exhaust, combustion make-up air, refrigerant lines, etc.) to serve the kitchen, bath, utility, and laundry rooms. Auburn University, Department of Industrial Design faculty, students, supported by a team of graduate student researchers and the project`s advisory team, developed the ResCore. The project was accomplished through a research subcontract from the U.S. Department of Energy administered by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The ResCore wall system features a layered manufacturing technique that allows each major component group: structural, cold water, hot water, drain, gas, electric, etc. to be built as a separate subassembly and easily brought together for final assembly. The two structural layers are reinforced with bridging that adds strength and also permits firm attachment of plumbing pipes and other systems to the wall frame.

  15. 21 CFR 1316.94 - Posting of substitute res in an administrative forfeiture action.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Posting of substitute res in an administrative... Property § 1316.94 Posting of substitute res in an administrative forfeiture action. (a) Where property is... owner may obtain release of the property by posting a substitute res with the seizing agency....

  16. 21 CFR 1316.98 - Substitute res bond in a judicial forfeiture action against a conveyance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Substitute res bond in a judicial forfeiture... for Certain Property § 1316.98 Substitute res bond in a judicial forfeiture action against a..., the owner may obtain release of the property by filing a substitute res bond with the seizing...

  17. 21 CFR 1316.98 - Substitute res bond in a judicial forfeiture action against a conveyance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Substitute res bond in a judicial forfeiture... for Certain Property § 1316.98 Substitute res bond in a judicial forfeiture action against a..., the owner may obtain release of the property by filing a substitute res bond with the seizing...

  18. 21 CFR 1316.98 - Substitute res bond in a judicial forfeiture action against a conveyance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Substitute res bond in a judicial forfeiture... for Certain Property § 1316.98 Substitute res bond in a judicial forfeiture action against a..., the owner may obtain release of the property by filing a substitute res bond with the seizing...

  19. 77 FR 61579 - Grant of Interim Extension of the Term of U.S. Patent No. 5,454,779; ResQPump®/ResQPOD® ITD

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-10

    ... United States Patent and Trademark Office Grant of Interim Extension of the Term of U.S. Patent No. 5,454,779; ResQPump /ResQPOD ITD AGENCY: United States Patent and Trademark Office, Commerce. ACTION: Notice of Interim Patent Term Extension. SUMMARY: The United States Patent and Trademark Office has...

  20. Energetic Neutral Atom Imaging of the Lunar Poles and Night-Side

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vorburger, Audrey; Wurz, Peter; Barabash, Stas; Wieser, Martin; Futaana, Yoshifumi; Bhardwaj, Anil; Dhanya, Mb; Asamura, Kazushi

    2016-04-01

    So far all reported scientific results derived from measurements of the Chandrayaan-1 Energetic Neutral Analyzer (CENA) on board the Indian lunar mission Chandrayaan-1 focused on the sun-lit part of the Moon. Here, for the first time, we present the analysis of the Moon - solar wind interaction in Energetic Neutral Atoms (ENAs) from measurements over the poles and the night-side of the Moon. The Moon, not being protected by a global magnetic field or an atmosphere, is constantly bombarded by solar wind ions. Until recently, it was tacitly assumed that the solar wind ions that impinge onto the lunar surface are almost completely absorbed ( < 1% reflection) by the lunar surface (e.g. Crider and Vondrak [Adv. Space Res., 2002]; Feldman et al. [J. Geophys. Res., 2000]). However, recent observations conducted by the two ENA sensors of NASA's Interstellar Boundary Explorer and by Chandrayaan-1/CENA showed an average global energetic neutral atom (ENA) albedo of 10% - 20% (e.g. McComas et al. [Geophys. Res. Lett., 2009], Wieser et al. [Planet. Space Sci., 2009], Vorburger et al. [J. Geophys. Res., 2013]). In the past 6 years, several studies have closely investigated this solar wind - lunar surface interaction from various viewpoints. The main findings of these studies include (1) the dependency of the hydrogen reflection ratio on the local crustal magnetic fields (e.g., Wieser et al. [Geophys. Res. Lett. ,2010] and Vorburger et al. [J. Geophys. Res., 2012]), (2) the determination of the energy spectra of backscattered neutralized solar wind protons (Futaana et al. [J. Geophys. Res., 2012]) (3) the use of the spectra shape to remotely define an electric potential above a lunar magnetic anomaly (Futaana et al. [Geophys. Res. Lett., 2012]), (4) the favouring of backscattering over forward-scattering of impinging solar wind hydrogen particles (Vorburger et al. [Geophys. Res. Lett., 2011]), (5) the first-ever measurements of sputtered lunar oxygen (Vorburger et al. [J

  1. The Absolute Calibration of the HiRes Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, J. N.; Thomas, S. B.; HiRes Collaboration

    2003-07-01

    The HiRes experiment studies ultra high energy cosmic rays using the air fluorescence technique. The experiment uses large mirrors that collect the fluorescence light and fo cus it onto arrays of photomultiplier tubes (PMTs). The PMTs measure the intensity and time of arrival of the collected light. Our primary system for in situ calibration of the PMTs uses a high stability (<1%) portable light source. This source is transferred from the lab to the field where it is employed as a standard candle to calibrate the 64 detectors (>16,000 PMTs). To determine the absolute response it is necessary to understand the absolute light output of this source. We have measured the source irradiance using a hybrid photo dio de system, two NIST calibrated photo-dio des, and by observing the photo electron statistics of the PMTs. 2. Introduction The goal of the High Resolution Fly's Eye (HiRes) project is to study cosmic rays at the highest energies. An ultra high energy cosmic ray entering the earth's atmosphere collides with atmospheric nuclei triggering the development of an Extensive Air Shower (EAS). The EAS emits fluorescence light as it develops. HiRes uses the air fluorescence signal to measure properties of the primary cosmic ray particle. The fundamental detector elements in HiRes are photomultiplier tubes (PMTs). The light from an EAS is collected by large mirrors and fo cused into cameras each consisting of 256 PMTs [1]. Routine monitoring and calibration of the PMTs and associated electronics are crucial to the proper interpretation of the data. The primary system for in situ calibration of the PMTs involves the use of a high stability portable xenon flash lamp. The Roving Xenon Flasher (RXF) offers several advantages. The pulse-to-pulse variation in intensity is very small ˜0.3% and the stability over a night is better than 2%. The emission spectrum of the RXF is sufficiently broad to allow calibration over a wide range of wavelengths. It is also readily transported

  2. Melting enthalpies of mantle peridotite: calorimetric determinations in the system CaO-MgO-Al 2O 3-SiO 2 and application to magma generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kojitani, Hiroshi; Akaogi, Masaki

    1997-12-01

    High-temperature drop calorimetry in the temperature range of 1398-1785 K was performed for the samples of mixtures of synthetic anorthite (An), diopside (Di), enstatite (En) and forsterite (Fo) with the same compositions as those of primary melts generated at 1.1, 3 and 4 GPa at most 10° above the solidus of anhydrous mantle peridotite in the CaO-MgO-Al 2O 3-SiO 2 system. From the differences between the heat contents ( H T-H 298) of liquid and that of crystal mixture at the liquidus temperature, melting enthalpies of the samples of 1.1, 3 and 4 GPa-primary melt compositions were determined at 1 atm to be 531 ± 39 J · g -1 at 1583 K, 604 ± 21 J · g -1 at 1703 K, 646 ± 21 J · g -1 at 1753 K, respectively. These heat of fusion values suggest that mixing enthalpy of the melt in the An-Di-En-Fo system is approximately zero within the experimental errors when we use the heat of fusion of Fo by Richet et al. (P. Richet, F. Leclerc, L. Benoist, Melting of forsterite and spinel, with implications for the glass transition of Mg 2SiO 4 liquid, Geophys. Res. Lett. 20 (1993) 1675-1678). The measured enthalpies of melting at 1 atm were converted into those for melting reactions which occur under high pressures by correcting enthalpy changes associated with solid-state mineral reactions. Correcting the effects of pressure, temperature and FeO and Na 2O components on the melting enthalpies at 1 atm, heat of fusion values of a representative mantle peridotite just above the solidus under high pressure were estimated to be 590 J at 1.1 GPa and 1523 K, 692 J at 3 GPa and 1773 K, and 807 J at 4 GPa and 1923 K for melting reactions producing liquid of 1 g, with uncertainties of 50 J. By applying these melting enthalpies to a mantle diapir model which generates present MORBs, a potential mantle temperature of 1533 K has been estimated, assuming an eruption temperature of magma of 1473 K.

  3. ALS - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - ALS ... The following organizations are good resources for information on amyotrophic lateral sclerosis : Muscular Dystrophy Association -- mda.org/disease/amyotrophic-lateral-sclerosis National Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) Registry -- ...

  4. ALS Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... ALS. Find Out How Our Mission Leading the fight to treat and cure ALS through global research ... you participate, advocate, and donate, you advance the fight to find the cure and lead us toward ...

  5. Sulfur vacancy activated field effect transistors based on ReS2 nanosheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Kai; Deng, Hui-Xiong; Wang, Zhenxing; Huang, Yun; Wang, Feng; Li, Shu-Shen; Luo, Jun-Wei; He, Jun

    2015-09-01

    Rhenium disulphide (ReS2) is a recently discovered new member of the transition metal dichalcogenides. Most impressively, it exhibits a direct bandgap from bulk to monolayer. However, the growth of ReS2 nanosheets (NSs) still remains a challenge and in turn their applications are unexplored. In this study, we successfully synthesized high-quality ReS2 NSs via chemical vapor deposition. A high-performance field effect transistor of ReS2 NSs with an on/off ratio of ~105 was demonstrated. Through both electrical transport measurements at varying temperatures (80 K-360 K) and first-principles calculations, we find sulfur vacancies, which exist intrinsically in ReS2 NSs and significantly affect the performance of the ReS2 FET device. Furthermore, we demonstrated that sulfur vacancies can efficiently adsorb and recognize oxidizing (O2) and reducing (NH3) gases, which electronically interact with ReS2 only at defect sites. Our findings provide experimental groundwork for the synthesis of new transition metal dichalocogenides, supply guidelines for understanding the physical nature of ReS2 FETs, and offer a new route toward tailoring their electrical properties by defect engineering in the future.Rhenium disulphide (ReS2) is a recently discovered new member of the transition metal dichalcogenides. Most impressively, it exhibits a direct bandgap from bulk to monolayer. However, the growth of ReS2 nanosheets (NSs) still remains a challenge and in turn their applications are unexplored. In this study, we successfully synthesized high-quality ReS2 NSs via chemical vapor deposition. A high-performance field effect transistor of ReS2 NSs with an on/off ratio of ~105 was demonstrated. Through both electrical transport measurements at varying temperatures (80 K-360 K) and first-principles calculations, we find sulfur vacancies, which exist intrinsically in ReS2 NSs and significantly affect the performance of the ReS2 FET device. Furthermore, we demonstrated that sulfur vacancies

  6. Polar wander caused by the Quaternary glacial cycles and fluid Love number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakada, Masao

    2002-06-01

    Perturbations of the Earth's rotation caused by the Quaternary glacial cycles provide an important constraint on the viscosity of the deep mantle because they represent a long-wavelength response of the Earth to surface load redistribution. The predicted present-day polar wander speed (PWS) is, however, sensitive to both the lower mantle viscosity ( ηlm), the density jump at 670 km depth, and the lithospheric thickness and viscosity (e.g., Sabadini and Peltier, Geophys. J. R. Astron. Soc. 66 (1981) 553-578; Yuen et al., J. Geophys. Res. 87 (1982) 10745-10762; Peltier and Wu, Geophys. Res. Lett. 10 (1983) 181-184; Wu and Peltier, Geophys, J. R. Astron. Soc. 76 (1984) 753-791; Peltier, J. Geophys. Res. 89 (1984) 11303-11316; Vermeersen et al., J. Geophys. Res. 102 (1997) 27689-27702; Mitrovica and Milne, J. Geophys. Res. 103 (1998) 985-1005; Johnston and Lambeck, Geophys. J. Int. 136 (1999) 537-558; Nakada, Geophys. J. Int. 143 (2000) 230-238). For earth models with ηlm<5×10 21 Pa s and an elastic lithosphere, the present-day PWS is very sensitive to the M1 mode (buoyancy mode) related to the density jump at 670 km depth [Mitrovica and Milne, J. Geophys. Res. 103 (1998) 985-1005]. The contribution of the M1 mode, however, is less significant for earth models with a viscoelastic lithosphere [Nakada, Geophys. J. Int. 143 (2000) 230-238]. This is due to the fact that this contribution depends on the relative strength of the M1 mode, Δ k2T(M1)/ kfT, where Δ k2T(M1) is the magnitude of tidal Love number ( k2T) of the M1 mode and kfT is the value of k2T in the fluid limit (fluid Love number). The magnitude of kfT for earth models with a viscoelastic lithosphere is larger than that for an elastic lithosphere, and it is smaller for a thicker elastic lithosphere than for a thinner one. Thus, for earth models with a viscoelastic lithosphere, the PWS is mainly sensitive to the lower mantle viscosity regardless of the behavior of the 670 km density discontinuity. This

  7. 3D Boltzmann Simulation of the Io's Plasma Environment: Comparison with Observational Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Combi, M. R.; Lipatov, A. S.

    2003-12-01

    The global dynamics of the ionized and neutral components in the environment of Io plays an important role in the interaction of Jupiter's corotating magnetospheric plasma with Io [Combi et al., 2002; 1998; Kabin et al., 2001]. The stationary simulation of this problem was done in the MHD [Combi et al., 1998; Linker et al, 1998; Kabin et al., 2001] and the electrodynamic [Saur et al., 1999; 2003] approaches. In this report, we study the comparative role of ionization processes and charge exchange in formation of the plasma environment near Io by means of kinetic simulation. The atmosphere of Io is considered as an immobile obstacle in simulation. The comparison of results of such simulations with the Galileo spacecraft data is also discussed in this report. ~ M R Combi et al., J. Geophys. Res., 103, 9071, 1998. M R Combi, T I Gombosi, K Kabin, Atmospheres in the Solar System: Comparative\\ Aeronomy. Geophys. Monograph Series, 130, 151, 2002. K Kabin et al., Planetary and Space Sci., 49, 337, 2001. J A Linker et al., J. Geophys. Res., 103(E9), 19867, 1998. J Saur et al., J. Geophys. Res., 104, 25105, 1999. J Saur et al., ICARUS, 163, 456, 2003.

  8. 3D Boltzmann Simulation of the Io's Plasma Environment with Adaptive Mesh and Particle Refinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipatov, A. S.; Combi, M. R.

    2002-12-01

    The global dynamics of the ionized and neutral components in the environment of Io plays an important role in the interaction of Jupiter's corotating magnetospheric plasma with Io [Combi et al., 2002; 1998; Kabin et al., 2001]. The stationary simulation of this problem was done in the MHD [Combi et al., 1998; Linker et al, 1998; Kabin et al., 2001] and the electrodynamic [Saur et al., 1999] approaches. In this report, we develop a method of kinetic ion-neutral simulation, which is based on a multiscale adaptive mesh, particle and algorithm refinement. This method employs the fluid description for electrons whereas for ions the drift-kinetic and particle approaches are used. This method takes into account charge-exchange and photoionization processes. The first results of such simulation of the dynamics of ions in the Io's environment are discussed in this report. ~ M R Combi et al., J. Geophys. Res., 103, 9071, 1998. M R Combi, T I Gombosi, K Kabin, Atmospheres in the Solar System: Comparative\\ Aeronomy. Geophys. Monograph Series, 130, 151, 2002. K Kabin et al., Planetary and Space Sci., 49, 337, 2001. J A Linker et al., J. Geophys. Res., 103(E9), 19867, 1998. J Saur et al., J. Geophys. Res., 104, 25105, 1999.

  9. Sulfur vacancy activated field effect transistors based on ReS2 nanosheets.

    PubMed

    Xu, Kai; Deng, Hui-Xiong; Wang, Zhenxing; Huang, Yun; Wang, Feng; Li, Shu-Shen; Luo, Jun-Wei; He, Jun

    2015-10-14

    Rhenium disulphide (ReS2) is a recently discovered new member of the transition metal dichalcogenides. Most impressively, it exhibits a direct bandgap from bulk to monolayer. However, the growth of ReS2 nanosheets (NSs) still remains a challenge and in turn their applications are unexplored. In this study, we successfully synthesized high-quality ReS2 NSs via chemical vapor deposition. A high-performance field effect transistor of ReS2 NSs with an on/off ratio of ∼10(5) was demonstrated. Through both electrical transport measurements at varying temperatures (80 K-360 K) and first-principles calculations, we find sulfur vacancies, which exist intrinsically in ReS2 NSs and significantly affect the performance of the ReS2 FET device. Furthermore, we demonstrated that sulfur vacancies can efficiently adsorb and recognize oxidizing (O2) and reducing (NH3) gases, which electronically interact with ReS2 only at defect sites. Our findings provide experimental groundwork for the synthesis of new transition metal dichalocogenides, supply guidelines for understanding the physical nature of ReS2 FETs, and offer a new route toward tailoring their electrical properties by defect engineering in the future. PMID:26352273

  10. H.J.Res.79 — 112th Congress (2011-2012) Continuing Appropriations Resolution, 2012

    THOMAS, 112th Congress

    Rep. Rogers, Harold [R-KY-5

    2011-09-14

    09/15/2011 Rules Committee Resolution H. Res. 399 Reported to House. Rule provides for consideration of H.J. Res. 79 with 1 hour of general debate. Previous question shall be considered as ordered without intervening motions except motion to recommit with or without instructions... (All Actions)

  11. EPRI/NRC-RES fire human reliability analysis guidelines.

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, Stuart R.; Cooper, Susan E.; Najafi, Bijan; Collins, Erin; Hannaman, Bill; Kohlhepp, Kaydee; Grobbelaar, Jan; Hill, Kendra; Hendrickson, Stacey M. Langfitt; Forester, John Alan; Julius, Jeff

    2010-03-01

    During the 1990s, the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) developed methods for fire risk analysis to support its utility members in the preparation of responses to Generic Letter 88-20, Supplement 4, 'Individual Plant Examination - External Events' (IPEEE). This effort produced a Fire Risk Assessment methodology for operations at power that was used by the majority of U.S. nuclear power plants (NPPs) in support of the IPEEE program and several NPPs overseas. Although these methods were acceptable for accomplishing the objectives of the IPEEE, EPRI and the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) recognized that they required upgrades to support current requirements for risk-informed, performance-based (RI/PB) applications. In 2001, EPRI and the USNRC's Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research (RES) embarked on a cooperative project to improve the state-of-the-art in fire risk assessment to support a new risk-informed environment in fire protection. This project produced a consensus document, NUREG/CR-6850 (EPRI 1011989), entitled 'Fire PRA Methodology for Nuclear Power Facilities' which addressed fire risk for at power operations. NUREG/CR-6850 developed high level guidance on the process for identification and inclusion of human failure events (HFEs) into the fire PRA (FPRA), and a methodology for assigning quantitative screening values to these HFEs. It outlined the initial considerations of performance shaping factors (PSFs) and related fire effects that may need to be addressed in developing best-estimate human error probabilities (HEPs). However, NUREG/CR-6850 did not describe a methodology to develop best-estimate HEPs given the PSFs and the fire-related effects. In 2007, EPRI and RES embarked on another cooperative project to develop explicit guidance for estimating HEPs for human failure events under fire generated conditions, building upon existing human reliability analysis (HRA) methods. This document provides a methodology and guidance for conducting

  12. Intelligent energy buildings based on RES and nanotechnology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaplanis, S.; Kaplani, E.

    2015-12-01

    The paper presents the design features, the energy modelling and optical performance details of two pilot Intelligent Energy Buildings, (IEB). Both are evolution of the Zero Energy Building (ZEB) concept. RES innovations backed up by signal processing, simulation models and ICT tools were embedded into the building structures in order to implement a new predictive energy management concept. In addition, nano-coatings, produced by TiO2 and ITO nano-particles, were deposited on the IEB structural elements and especially on the window panes and the PV glass covers. They exhibited promising SSP values which lowered the cooling loads and increased the PV modules yield. Both pilot IEB units were equipped with an on-line dynamic hourly solar radiation prediction model, implemented by sensors and the related software to manage effectively the energy source, the loads and the storage or the backup system. The IEB energy sources covered the thermal loads via a south façade embedded in the wall and a solar roof which consists of a specially designed solar collector type, while a PV generator is part of the solar roof, like a compact BIPV in hybrid configuration to a small wind turbine.

  13. Intelligent energy buildings based on RES and nanotechnology

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplanis, S. Kaplani, E.

    2015-12-31

    The paper presents the design features, the energy modelling and optical performance details of two pilot Intelligent Energy Buildings, (IEB). Both are evolution of the Zero Energy Building (ZEB) concept. RES innovations backed up by signal processing, simulation models and ICT tools were embedded into the building structures in order to implement a new predictive energy management concept. In addition, nano-coatings, produced by TiO2 and ITO nano-particles, were deposited on the IEB structural elements and especially on the window panes and the PV glass covers. They exhibited promising SSP values which lowered the cooling loads and increased the PV modules yield. Both pilot IEB units were equipped with an on-line dynamic hourly solar radiation prediction model, implemented by sensors and the related software to manage effectively the energy source, the loads and the storage or the backup system. The IEB energy sources covered the thermal loads via a south façade embedded in the wall and a solar roof which consists of a specially designed solar collector type, while a PV generator is part of the solar roof, like a compact BIPV in hybrid configuration to a small wind turbine.

  14. Sulfuric Acid on Europa's Surface and the Radiolytic Sulfur Cycle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, R.; Johnson, R.; Anderson, M.

    1999-01-01

    Galileo infrared spectra of Europa's surface show distorted water bands that have been attributed to hydrated evaporite salts (McCord et al., J. Geophys. Res. 104, 11827, 1999) or to the scattering properties of ice (Dalton and Clark, Bull. Am. Astron. Soc. 30, 1081, 1998).

  15. Disorder engineering and conductivity dome in ReS2 with electrolyte gating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ovchinnikov, Dmitry; Gargiulo, Fernando; Allain, Adrien; Pasquier, Diego José; Dumcenco, Dumitru; Ho, Ching-Hwa; Yazyev, Oleg V.; Kis, Andras

    2016-08-01

    Atomically thin rhenium disulphide (ReS2) is a member of the transition metal dichalcogenide family of materials. This two-dimensional semiconductor is characterized by weak interlayer coupling and a distorted 1T structure, which leads to anisotropy in electrical and optical properties. Here we report on the electrical transport study of mono- and multilayer ReS2 with polymer electrolyte gating. We find that the conductivity of monolayer ReS2 is completely suppressed at high carrier densities, an unusual feature unique to monolayers, making ReS2 the first example of such a material. Using dual-gated devices, we can distinguish the gate-induced doping from the electrostatic disorder induced by the polymer electrolyte itself. Theoretical calculations and a transport model indicate that the observed conductivity suppression can be explained by a combination of a narrow conduction band and Anderson localization due to electrolyte-induced disorder.

  16. CeREs, A Compact Radiation Belt Explorer to study charged particle dynamics in geospace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanekal, S. G.; Summerlin, E. J.; Christian, E. R.; Crum, G.; Desai, M. I.; Evans, A.; Dumonthier, J.; Jamison, T.; Jones, A. D.; Livi, S. A.; Ogasawara, K.; Paschalidis, N.; Suarez, G.; Patel, D.

    2015-12-01

    The CeREs 3U CubeSat, set to be launched in mid-2016, will study the physics of the acceleration and loss of radiation belt electrons, particularly loss due to electron microbursts. CeRES will also observe solar electrons and protons entering the magnetosphere via the open field-line polar caps. CeREs is expected to be in a low earth high inclination orbit and carries onboard the Miniaturized Electron pRoton Telescope (MERiT). The MERiT instrument measures electrons and protons ranging in energy from 5 keV to >10 MeV with high time resolution of ~5ms in multiple differential energy channels. MERiT is particle telescope using a stack of solid-state detectors and space-facing avalanche photo diodes.We will describe the CeRES spacecraft, science goals and the MERiT instrument.

  17. Disorder engineering and conductivity dome in ReS2 with electrolyte gating.

    PubMed

    Ovchinnikov, Dmitry; Gargiulo, Fernando; Allain, Adrien; Pasquier, Diego José; Dumcenco, Dumitru; Ho, Ching-Hwa; Yazyev, Oleg V; Kis, Andras

    2016-01-01

    Atomically thin rhenium disulphide (ReS2) is a member of the transition metal dichalcogenide family of materials. This two-dimensional semiconductor is characterized by weak interlayer coupling and a distorted 1T structure, which leads to anisotropy in electrical and optical properties. Here we report on the electrical transport study of mono- and multilayer ReS2 with polymer electrolyte gating. We find that the conductivity of monolayer ReS2 is completely suppressed at high carrier densities, an unusual feature unique to monolayers, making ReS2 the first example of such a material. Using dual-gated devices, we can distinguish the gate-induced doping from the electrostatic disorder induced by the polymer electrolyte itself. Theoretical calculations and a transport model indicate that the observed conductivity suppression can be explained by a combination of a narrow conduction band and Anderson localization due to electrolyte-induced disorder. PMID:27499375

  18. RES-E Support Policies In The Baltic States: Development Aspect (Part I)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobinaite, V.; Priedite, I.

    2015-02-01

    Despite quite similar conditions (natural resources) for electricity production from renewable energy sources (RES-E) in three Baltic States (Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania), significant differences exist in these countries as to the RES-E production volume. In Latvia this volume is the highest, while in Estonia and Lithuania it is half as high. One of the factors that determine the RES-E production volumes is support policies, which in the Baltic States are different. The main objective of this work was to analyze and compare these support policies. The results have shown that for rapid RES-E development the most effective policy is to be market-oriented (as in Estonia), whereas for more stable development such policy should be producer-oriented (as in Lithuania).

  19. Disorder engineering and conductivity dome in ReS2 with electrolyte gating

    PubMed Central

    Ovchinnikov, Dmitry; Gargiulo, Fernando; Allain, Adrien; Pasquier, Diego José; Dumcenco, Dumitru; Ho, Ching-Hwa; Yazyev, Oleg V.; Kis, Andras

    2016-01-01

    Atomically thin rhenium disulphide (ReS2) is a member of the transition metal dichalcogenide family of materials. This two-dimensional semiconductor is characterized by weak interlayer coupling and a distorted 1T structure, which leads to anisotropy in electrical and optical properties. Here we report on the electrical transport study of mono- and multilayer ReS2 with polymer electrolyte gating. We find that the conductivity of monolayer ReS2 is completely suppressed at high carrier densities, an unusual feature unique to monolayers, making ReS2 the first example of such a material. Using dual-gated devices, we can distinguish the gate-induced doping from the electrostatic disorder induced by the polymer electrolyte itself. Theoretical calculations and a transport model indicate that the observed conductivity suppression can be explained by a combination of a narrow conduction band and Anderson localization due to electrolyte-induced disorder. PMID:27499375

  20. Impaired consciousness in epilepsy investigated by a prospective responsiveness in epilepsy scale (RES)

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Li; Shklyar, Irina; Lee, Hyang Woon; Ezeani, Celestine C.; Anaya, Joseph; Balakirsky, Samantha; Han, Xiao; Enamandram, Sheila; Men, Clara; Cheng, Joyce Y.; Nunn, Abigail; Mayer, Tanya; Francois, Czestochowa; Albrecht, Molly; Hutchison, Alan L.; Yap, Ee-Lynn; Ing, Kevin; Didebulidze, Gvantsa; Xiao, Bo; Hamid, Hamada; Farooque, Pue; Detyniecki, Kamil; Giacino, Joseph T.; Blumenfeld, Hal

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Impaired consciousness in epileptic seizures has a major negative impact on patient quality of life. Prior work on epileptic unconsciousness has mainly used retrospective and nonstandardized methods. Our goal was to validate and to obtain initial data using a standardized prospective testing battery. Methods The responsiveness in epilepsy scale (RES) was used on 52 patients during continuous video/EEG monitoring. RES begins with higher-level questions and commands, and switches adaptively to more basic sensorimotor responses depending on patient performance. RES continues after seizures and includes postictal memory testing. Scoring was conducted based on video review. Key Findings Testing on standardized seizure simulations yielded good intra-rater and inter-rater reliability. We captured 59 seizures from 18 patients (35% of participants) during 1420 hours of RES monitoring. RES impairment was greatest during and after tonic-clonic seizures, less in partial seizures, and minimal in auras and subclinical seizures. In partial seizures, ictal RES impairment was significantly greater if EEG changes were present. Maximum RES impairment (lowest ictal score) was also significantly correlated with long postictal recovery time, and poor postictal memory. Significance We found that prospective testing of responsiveness during seizures is feasible and reliable. RES impairment was related to EEG changes during seizures, as well as to postictal memory deficits and recovery time. With a larger patient sample it is hoped that this approach can identify brain networks underlying specific components of impaired consciousness in seizures. This may allow the development of improved treatments targeted at preventing dysfunction in these networks. PMID:22150524

  1. Vertically Oriented Arrays of ReS2 Nanosheets for Electrochemical Energy Storage and Electrocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jian; Li, Lu; Tan, Jiawei; Sun, Hao; Li, Baichang; Idrobo, Juan Carlos; Singh, Chandra Veer; Lu, Toh-Ming; Koratkar, Nikhil

    2016-06-01

    Transition-metal dichalcogenide (TMD) nanolayers show potential as high-performance catalysts in energy conversion and storage devices. Synthetic TMDs produced by chemical-vapor deposition (CVD) methods tend to grow parallel to the growth substrate. Here, we show that with the right precursors and appropriate tuning of the CVD growth conditions, ReS2 nanosheets can be made to orient perpendicular to the growth substrate. This accomplishes two important objectives; first, it drastically increases the wetted or exposed surface area of the ReS2 sheets, and second, it exposes the sharp edges and corners of the ReS2 sheets. We show that these structural features of the vertically grown ReS2 sheets can be exploited to significantly improve their performance as polysulfide immobilizers and electrochemical catalysts in lithium-sulfur (Li-S) batteries and in hydrogen evolution reactions (HER). After 300 cycles, the specific capacity of the Li-S battery with vertical ReS2 catalyst is retained above 750 mA h g(-1), with only ∼0.063% capacity decay per cycle, much better than the baseline battery (without ReS2), which shows ∼0.184% capacity decay per cycle under the same test conditions. As a HER catalyst, the vertical ReS2 provides very small onset overpotential (<100 mV) and an exceptional exchange-current density (∼67.6 μA/cm(2)), which is vastly superior to the baseline electrode without ReS2. PMID:27187173

  2. Al Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandanayaka, Tharaka; Azarmi, Fardad

    2014-05-01

    In the present study, cold spraying technique was used to fabricate a metal matrix composite (MMC) that consists of Ni matrix and 20 vol.% Ni3Al particles at two different particle sizes as reinforcement. This study intends to investigate the effect of reinforcement particle size on microstructural and mechanical properties of cold sprayed MMCs. Two different Ni3Al powders with nominal particle size of -45 to +5 and +45 to 100 μm were used as reinforcement in this study. Cold sprayed Ni-Ni3Al samples were subjected to the microstructural observation and characterization prior to any mechanical testing. Then, samples were tested using nano-indentation, Knoop hardness, Vickers hardness, and Resonance frequency to evaluate their mechanical properties. No significant changes were observed in microstructural characteristics due to different particle sizes. The results obtained from a variety of mechanical testings indicated that the increasing reinforcement particle size resulted in the slight reduction of mechanical properties such as elastic modulus and hardness in cold sprayed MMCs. The mechanical interlock between deposited particles defines the bonding strength in cold sprayed samples. Small size particles have a higher velocity and impact resulting in stronger interlock between deformed particles.

  3. HF Accelerated Electron Fluxes, Spectra, and Ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlson, Herbert C.; Jensen, Joseph B.

    2015-10-01

    Wave particle interactions, an essential aspect of laboratory, terrestrial, and astrophysical plasmas, have been studied for decades by transmitting high power HF radio waves into Earth's weakly ionized space plasma, to use it as a laboratory without walls. Application to HF electron acceleration remains an active area of research (Gurevich in Usp Fizicheskikh Nauk 177(11):1145-1177, 2007) today. HF electron acceleration studies began when plasma line observations proved (Carlson et al. in J Atmos Terr Phys 44:1089-1100, 1982) that high power HF radio wave-excited processes accelerated electrons not to ~eV, but instead to -100 times thermal energy (10 s of eV), as a consequence of inelastic collision effects on electron transport. Gurevich et al (J Atmos Terr Phys 47:1057-1070, 1985) quantified the theory of this transport effect. Merging experiment with theory in plasma physics and aeronomy, enabled prediction (Carlson in Adv Space Res 13:1015-1024, 1993) of creating artificial ionospheres once ~GW HF effective radiated power could be achieved. Eventual confirmation of this prediction (Pedersen et al. in Geophys Res Lett 36:L18107, 2009; Pedersen et al. in Geophys Res Lett 37:L02106, 2010; Blagoveshchenskaya et al. in Ann Geophys 27:131-145, 2009) sparked renewed interest in optical inversion to estimate electron spectra in terrestrial (Hysell et al. in J Geophys Res Space Phys 119:2038-2045, 2014) and planetary (Simon et al. in Ann Geophys 29:187-195, 2011) atmospheres. Here we present our unpublished optical data, which combined with our modeling, lead to conclusions that should meaningfully improve future estimates of the spectrum of HF accelerated electron fluxes. Photometric imaging data can significantly improve detection of emissions near ionization threshold, and confirm depth of penetration of accelerated electrons many km below the excitation altitude. Comparing observed to modeled emission altitude shows future experiments need electron density profiles

  4. AL Amyloidosis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Definition of the disease AL amyloidosis results from extra-cellular deposition of fibril-forming monoclonal immunoglobulin (Ig) light chains (LC) (most commonly of lambda isotype) usually secreted by a small plasma cell clone. Most patients have evidence of isolated monoclonal gammopathy or smoldering myeloma, and the occurrence of AL amyloidosis in patients with symptomatic multiple myeloma or other B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders is unusual. The key event in the development of AL amyloidosis is the change in the secondary or tertiary structure of an abnormal monoclonal LC, which results in instable conformation. This conformational change is responsible for abnormal folding of the LC, rich in β leaves, which assemble into monomers that stack together to form amyloid fibrils. Epidemiology AL amyloidosis is the most common type of systemic amyloidois in developed countries with an estimated incidence of 9 cases/million inhabitant/year. The average age of diagnosed patients is 65 years and less than 10% of patients are under 50. Clinical description The clinical presentation is protean, because of the wide number of tissues or organs that may be affected. The most common presenting symptoms are asthenia and dyspnoea, which are poorly specific and may account for delayed diagnosis. Renal manifestations are the most frequent, affecting two thirds of patients at presentation. They are characterized by heavy proteinuria, with nephrotic syndrome and impaired renal function in half of the patients. Heart involvement, which is present at diagnosis in more than 50% of patients, leading to restrictive cardiopathy, is the most serious complication and engages prognosis. Diagnostic methods The diagnosis relies on pathological examination of an involved site showing Congo red-positive amyloid deposits, with typical apple-green birefringence under polarized light, that stain positive with an anti-LC antibody by immunohistochemistry and/or immunofluorescence. Due to the

  5. The response regulator ResD modulates virulence gene expression in response to carbohydrates in Listeria monocytogenes.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Marianne H; Kallipolitis, Birgitte H; Christiansen, Janne K; Olsen, John E; Ingmer, Hanne

    2006-09-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a versatile bacterial pathogen that is able to accommodate to diverse environmental and host conditions. Presently, we have identified a L. monocytogenes two-component response regulator, ResD that is required for the repression of virulence gene expression known to occur in the presence of easily fermentable carbohydrates not found inside host organisms. Structurally and functionally, ResD resembles the respiration regulator ResD in Bacillus subtilis as deletion of the L. monocytogenes resD reduces respiration and expression of cydA, encoding a subunit of cytochrome bd. The resD mutation also reduces expression of mptA encoding the EIIABman component of a mannose/glucose-specific PTS system, indicating that ResD controls sugar uptake. This notion was supported by the poor growth of resD mutant cells that was alleviated by excess of selected carbohydrates. Despite the growth deficient phenotype of the mutant in vitro the mutation did not affect intracellular multiplication in epithelial or macrophage cell lines. When examining virulence gene expression we observed traditional induction by charcoal in both mutant and wild-type cells whereas the repression observed in wild-type cells by fermentable carbohydrates did not occur in resD mutant cells. Thus, ResD is a central regulator of L. monocytogenes when present in the external environment. PMID:16968229

  6. Industrial solutions trends for the control of HiRes spectrograph@E-ELT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Marcantonio, P.; Baldini, V.; Calderone, G.; Cirami, R.; Coretti, I.; Cristiani, S.

    Starting a few years ago, ESO initiated a number of projects aiming to explore the possible adoption of industrial standards and commercial off-the-shelf components (COTS) for the control of future VLT and E-ELT instrumentations. In this context, ESPRESSO, the next generation high-stability spectrograph for the VLT and to a certain extent, a precursor of HiRes, has adopted since the preliminary design phase those solutions. Based on the ESPRESSO experience and taking into account the requirements inferred from the preliminary Hi-Res studies in terms of both high-level operations as well as low-level control, I will present in this paper the current proposal for the HiRes hardware architecture.

  7. VisRes: A G RACE tool for displaying and analysing resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Busby, D. W.; Burke, P. G.; Burke, V. M.; Noble, C. J.; Scott, N. S.

    1998-11-01

    VisRes is a graphical tool for displaying and analysing resonance data. Files of eigenphase sums, generated during the computation of electron and photon interactions with atoms and molecules, can be read and the data displayed both as continuous and discontinuous graphs. Resonance resolution can be improved by interactively computing additional data points and merging them with the displayed data. Resonance positions and widths are determined by fitting user selected data points by the Breit—Wigner formula. VisRes is written in C and Motif for the UNIX operating system. It can be operated exclusively on the host workstation or in distributed mode where data is read from and computed on a remote computer but displayed and analysed on the host workstation. While it is published as a stand-alone tool, VisRes also forms part of the Graphical R-matrix Atomic Collision Environment (G RACE).

  8. Time-resolved spectroscopy of Bi3+ centers in Y4Al2O9

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babin, V.; Lipińska, L.; Mihokova, E.; Nikl, M.; Shalapska, T.; Suchocki, A.; Zazubovich, S.; Zhydachevskii, Ya

    2015-08-01

    Steady-state and time-resolved emission and excitation spectra as well as luminescence decay kinetics are studied at 4.2-400 K under excitation in the 3-6 eV energy range for Bi3+ ions substituting for Y3+ ions in four inequivalent crystal lattice sites of Y4Al2O9:Bi ceramics. Luminescence characteristics of Bi3+ centers of all the four types are identified and are shown to arise from the radiative decay of the triplet relaxed excited state (RES) of Bi3+ ions. The parameters of the triplet RES, namely, probabilities of the radiative and nonradiative transitions from the metastable and emitting levels as well as the energy distance between these levels, are determined. The influence of the nearest surroundings of Bi3+ ions on the luminescence characteristics and the parameters of the triplet RES of Bi3+ centers is discussed.

  9. Developing HEAT Scores with H-Res Thermal Imagery to Support Urban Energy Efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemachandran, Bharanidharan

    As part of The Calgary Community GHG Reduction Plan (2009) The City is seeking an implementation strategy to reduce GHGs and promote low-carbon living, with a focus on improving urban energy efficiency. The most cited obstacle to energy efficiency improvements is the lack of interest from consumers (CUI, 2008). However, Darby (2006) has shown that effective feedback significantly reduces energy consumption. To exploit these findings, the HEAT (Heat Energy Assessment Technologies) Geoweb project integrates high-resolution (H-Res) airborne thermal imagery (TABI 1800) to provide unique energy efficiency feedback to Calgary homeowners in the form of interactive HEAT Maps and Hot Spots (Hay et al., 2011). As a part of the HEAT Phase II program, the goal of this research is to provide enhanced feedback support for urban energy efficiency by meeting two key objectives: (i) develop an appropriate method to define HEAT Scores using TABI 1800 imagery that allows for the comparison of waste heat of one or more houses with all other mapped houses in the community and city, and (ii) develop a multi-scale interactive Geoweb interface that displays the HEAT Scores at City, Community and Residential scales. To achieve these goals, we describe the evolution of three novel HEAT Score techniques based on: (i) a Standardized Score, (ii) the WUFIRTM model and Logistic Regression and (iii ) a novel criteria weighted method that considers: (a) heat transfer through different roofing materials, (b) local climatic conditions and (c) house age and living area attributes. Furthermore, (d) removing or adding houses to analysis based on this 3rd technique, does not affect the HEAT Score of other houses and (e) HEAT Scores can be compared within and across different cities. We also describe how HEAT Scores are incorporated within the HEAT Geoweb architecture. It is envisioned that HEAT Scores will promote energy efficiency among homeowners and urban city planners, as they will quantify and

  10. A non-linear mathematical model for the in vivo evaluation of the RES phagocytic function.

    PubMed

    Bondareva, I B; Parfenov, A S

    1995-01-01

    A new non-linear mathematical model was constructed in order to perform in vivo quantification of the RES phagocytic function. This method is based on the same technical facilities as used for the routine liver-spleen scintigraphy with radiocolloids [1, 2]. But kinetic modeling of dynamic Tc-99m-sulfur colloid data produced estimations of the functional RE-parameters: the clearance rate of the colloidal particles, the rate of phagocytosis, and the RES functional volume, which can not be obtained by classical approaches. This non-linear model was designed on the basis of the principal characteristics of particulate material interaction with macrophages (attachment, phagocytosis, digestion) [3, 4, 5]. The theoretically examined behavior of this in vivo mathematical model corresponds with the experimental behavior of the RES. The mathematical expression of the dynamics is the system of non-linear differential equations with constant coefficients that have no analytical solution. Fitting of the normalized heart blood time-activity curve was obtained to identify the unknown model parameters via non-linear regression. For this purpose general interactive PASCAL procedure IDPAR for a PDP-11/34 computer was used (an IBM PC version is also available). Two to three iterations were needed to estimate the set of unknown parameters for any patient study (1-1.5 min). A very good fitting was obtained between experimental and model curves in every case of different pathologies (error of the approximation is about 2-3%). Studies were performed using an in vivo bolus injection of 3.6 mg/80 kg commercially available colloid KOREN labeled with 3m-Ci 99m-Tc (analog of TCK-1). Our method was used to determine the RES functional parameters for patient groups with different levels of the RES dysfunction. Obtained results illustrate the possibilities of our technique to quantitatively estimate not only great pathology (portal cirrhosis), but also small changes of the RE-function (case of

  11. 75 FR 5633 - Notice of Extension of Comment Period for NUREG-1921, EPRI/NRC-RES Fire Human Reliability...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-03

    ... document entitled ``NUREG-1921 (EPRI 1019196), EPRI/NRC-RES Fire Human Reliability Analysis Guidelines, Draft Report for Comment'' (December 11, 2009; 74 FR 65810). This document extends the public comment... COMMISSION Notice of Extension of Comment Period for NUREG-1921, EPRI/NRC- RES Fire Human...

  12. Comparison of Natural Narrow-banded Emissions and Sounder Stimulated Resonances In The Magnetospheres of Jupiter and The Earth (ulysses and Image Spacecraft)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osherovich, V. A.; Fainberg, J.; Benson, R. F.; MacDowall, R.

    The sounder stimulated resonances observed by Ulysses in JupiterSs Io torus re- vealed a spectrum of frequencies which has been interpreted in terms of Dn reso- nances together with electron plasma frequency fpe and Bernstein Qn resonances in order to determine the electron density and magnetic field strength (Osherovich et al. 1993; Benson et al. 1997). The presence of Dn resonances (cylindrical eigen- modes with frequencies proportional sqrtn, n = 1, 2, ...) has been predicted for the Io torus on the basis of the classification of the EarthSs Ionospheric sounder stim- ulated resonances (Osherovich 1987, 1989; Osherovich and Benson 1991; Benson and Osherovich 1992). The magnetic field strength measured by the Ulysses mag- netometer confirmed the values found from resonances to within a few percent. An alternative interpretation suggested that the Ulysses relaxation sounder did not excite Dn in JupiterSs magnetosphere( Le Sagre et al. 1998) and the topic has been subject to a recent debate (Canu 2001a; Benson et al. 2001; Canu 2001b) . We show that Dn resonances are present in both sounder stimulated spectra and in natural emissions ob- served by Ulysses during the inbound and outbound part of the trajectory inside the Io torus. The natural emissions (no sounding) have the same frequencies as their sounder stimulated counterparts. IMAGE/RPI observations, which confirm the specific rela- tion between Dn, fp and fce and for the subsidiary resonances Dn+ and Dn-, will also be presented. References: Benson, R.F. and V.A. Osherovich, Canu, J. Geophys. Res., 97, 19413, 1992. Benson, R.F. et al., Radio Sci., 32, 1127, 1997. Benson, R.F. et al., Radio Sci., 36, 1649, 2001. Canu, P., Radio Sci., 36, 171, 2001a. Canu, P., Radio Sci., 36, 1645, 2001b. Le Sagre, P. et al., J. Geophys. Res., 103, 26667, 1998. 1 Osherovich, V. A., J. Geophys. Res., 92, 316, 1987. Osherovich, V. A., J. Geophys. Res., 94, 5530, 1989. Osherovich, V. A. and R.F. Benson, ., J. Geophys. Res., 96

  13. Strain-engineering the anisotropic electrical conductance in ReS2 monolayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Sheng; Zhu, Hao; Eshun, Kwesi; Shi, Chen; Zeng, Min; Li, Qiliang

    2016-05-01

    Rhenium disulfide (ReS2) is a semiconducting layered transition metal dichalcogenide that exhibits a stable distorted 1 T (Re in octahedral coordination) phase. The reduced symmetry in ReS2 leads to in-plane anisotropy in various material properties. In this work, we performed a comprehensive first-principle computational study of strain effect on the anisotropic mechanical and electronic properties of ReS2 monolayers. We found that the anisotropic ratio in electron mobility along two principle axes is 2.36 while the ratio in hole mobility reaches 7.76. The study of strain applied along different directions shows that the elastic modulus is largest for out-of-plane direction, and the strain along a-direction induces indirect bandgap while strain along b- or c-direction does not. In addition, the carrier mobility can be significantly improved by the c-direction tensile strain. This study indicates that the ReS2 monolayer has promising applications in nanoscale strain sensor and conductance-switch FETs.

  14. Constructing CoRes--A Strategy for Building PCK in Pre-Service Science Teacher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hume, Anne; Berry, Amanda

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents findings from an exploratory study into a science teacher education initiative that seeks to build the foundations on which novice teachers can begin developing their pedagogical content knowledge (PCK). The initiative involved the use of Content Representations (CoRes), which were originally developed as part of a strategy for…

  15. Metal to insulator quantum-phase transition in few-layered ReS2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradhan, Nihar; Rhodes, Daniel; Lu, Zhenguang; Smirnov, Dmitry; Manousakis, Efstratios; Dobrosavljevic, Vladimir; Balicas, Luis; McCreary, Amber; Feng, Simin; Terrones, Maurico; Namburu, Raju; Dubey, Madan; Hight Walker, Angela; Terrones, Humberto

    ReS2 a layer-independent direct band-gap semiconductor of 1.5 eV implies a potential for its use in optoelectronic applications. Here, we present an overall evaluation of transport and anisotropic Raman of few-layered ReS2 FET. ReS2 exfoliated on SiO2 behaves as an n-type semiconductor with an intrinsic carrier mobility surpassing μi ~ 30cm2 /Vs at T = 300 K which increases up to ~ 350cm2 /vs at 2 K. Semiconducting behavior is observed at low electron densities n, but at high values of nthe resistivity decreases by a factor > 7 upon cooling to 2 K and displays a metallicT2-dependence. The electric-field induced metallic state observed in MoS2 was recently claimed to result from a percolation type of transition. Instead, through a scaling analysis of the conductivity as a function of Tand n, we find that the metallic state of ReS2 results from a second-order metal to insulator transition driven by electronic correlations. Supported by U.S. Army Research Office MURI Grant No. W911NF-11-1-0362.

  16. Metal to insulator quantum-phase transition in few-layered ReS2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradhan, Nihar; McCreary, Amber; Rhodes, Daniel; Lu, Zhenguang; Smirnov, Dmitry; Manousakis, Efstratios; Feng, Simin; Namburu, Raju; Dubey, Madan; Hight Walker, Angela; Terrones, Humberto; Terrones, Mauricio; Dobrosavljevic, Vladimir; Balicas, Luis

    ReS2 a layer-independent direct band-gap semiconductor of 1.5 eV implies a potential for its use in optoelectronic applications. Here, we present an overall evaluation of transport and anisotropic Raman of few-layered ReS2 FET. ReS2 exfoliated on SiO2 behaves as an n-type semiconductor with an intrinsic carrier mobility surpassing μi ~30 cm2/Vs at T = 300 K which increases up to ~350 cm2/vs at 2 K. Semiconducting behavior is observed at low electron densities n, but at high values of nthe resistivity decreases by a factor >7 upon cooling to 2 K and displays a metallicT2 -dependence. The electric-field induced metallic state observed in MoS2 was recently claimed to result from a percolation type of transition. Instead, through a scaling analysis of the conductivity as a function of Tand n, we find that the metallic state of ReS2 results from a second-order metal to insulator transition driven by electronic correlations. Supported by U.S. Army Research Office MURI Grant No. W911NF-11-1-0362.

  17. Anisotropic Electron transport and device applications of atomically thin ReS2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Erfu; Fu, Yajun; Wang, Yaojia; Feng, Yanqing; Liu, Huimei; Wan, Xiangang; Zhou, Wei; Wang, Baigeng; Zeng, Junwen; Ho, Ching-Hwa; Huang, Ying-Sheng; Yuan, Hongtao; Hwang, Harold Y.; Cui, Yi; Xing, Dingyu; Miao, Feng

    Semiconducting two-dimensional transition metal dichalcogenides are emerging as top candidates for post-silicon electronics. While most of them exhibit isotropic behavior, lowering the lattice symmetry could induce anisotropic properties, which are both scientifically interesting and potentially useful. In this talk, we will present atomically thin rhenium disulfide (ReS2) flakes with unique distorted 1T structure, which exhibit in-plane anisotropic properties. We first fabricated mono- and few-layer ReS2 field effect transistors, which exhibit competitive performance with large current on/off ratios (~107) and low subthreshold swings (100 mV dec-1) . The observed anisotropic ratio along two principle axes reaches up to 3.1. Furthermore, we successfully demonstrated an integrated digital inverter with good performance by utilizing two ReS2 anisotropic field effect transistors, suggesting the promising implementation of large-scale two-dimensional logic circuits. Recent results on ultra-high responsivity (as high as 88,600 A W-1) phototransistors based on few-layer ReS2 will also be discussed. Our results underscore the unique properties of two-dimensional semiconducting materials with low crystal symmetry for future electronic and optoelectronic applications.

  18. Anisotropic optical properties of few-layer transition metal dichalcogenide ReS2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhenglu; Cao, Ting; da Jornada, Felipe H.; Wu, Meng; Louie, Steven G.

    We present first-principles (DFT, GW and GW-BSE) calculations of the electronic and optical properties of few-layer rhenium disulfide (ReS2). Monolayer ReS2 shows strong many-electron effects with a fundamental quasiparticle band gap of 2.38 eV based on G0W0 calculation and a large exciton binding energy of 690 meV based on solving the Bethe-Salpeter equation. Highly anisotropic linear-polarized optical absorptions are revealed for few-layer and bulk ReS2. The band gap shows a decreasing trend with the optical polarization direction near the absorption edge gradually rotating from around 67 degree in the monolayer to 85 degree in the bulk, referencing to the Re-chain. Our calculations are consistent with recent experimental data and theoretical studies, and provide a systematic understanding of the electronic and optical properties in few-layer ReS2. This work was supported by National Science Foundation Grant No. DMR15-1508412 and the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231. Computational resources have been provided by DOE at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory's NERSC facility.

  19. Res-Parity: Parity Violation in Inelastic scattering at Low Q2

    SciTech Connect

    Reimer, Paul; Bosted, Peter; Arrington, John; Mkrtchyan, Hamlet; Zheng, Xiaochao

    2006-05-16

    Parity violating electron scattering has become a well established tool which has been used, for example, to probe the Standard Model and the strange-quark contribution to the nucleon. While much of this work has focused on elastic scattering, the RES-Parity experiment, which has been proposed to take place at Jefferson Laboratory, would focus on inelastic scattering in the low-Q2, low-W domain. RES-Parity would search for evidence of quark-hadron duality and resonance structure with parity violation in the resonance region. In terms of parity violation, this region is essentially unexplored, but the interpretation of other high-precision electron scattering experiments will rely on a reasonable understanding of scattering at lower energy and low-W through the effects of radiative corrections. RES-Parity would also study nuclear effects with the weak current. Because of the intrinsic broad band energy spectrum of neutrino beams, neutrino experiments are necessarily dependent on an untested, implicit assumption that these effects are identical to electromagnetic nuclear effects. RES-Parity is a relatively straight forward experiment. With a large expected asymmetry (~ 0.5 × 10-4) these studies may be completed with in a relatively brief period.

  20. Primary minerals of Zn-Pb mining and metallurgical dumps and their environmental behavior at Plombières, Belgium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kucha, H.; Martens, A.; Ottenburgs, R.; de Vos, W.; Viaene, W.

    1996-02-01

    The primary phases and minerals of the Plombières dumps include typical smelting furnace products such as metallic Fe, Pb, Cu, Zn, Fe-Zn alloys, carbides, phosphides, sulfides of Fe, Zn, Pb, Cu, Mn (alabandite), and FeAs. Spinels, mainly of Fe and Al, are common constituents of the primary assemblage; substitution by Zn, V, Cr, Ti, Mg, and Ca occurs. Primary phases also include the most common Zn-rich fayalite, Zn-rich Ca-Fe silicates, melilite, corundum, and apatite. Most of the Zn is incorporated in iron silicates, ZnO and ZnS. Lead occurs mainly as PbS, metallic lead, and is also present in coal residues. Cadmium is found mainly in metallic zinc and its alloys and in ZnO. The dumps also contain mining wastes composed of pyrite, melnikovite, and iron oxides produced by natural weathering of Zn-Pb ores. Melnikovite and iron oxides are rich in As, Pb, and Zn and possess an increased content of Tl. Leaching tests carried out on the surfaces of polished sections indicate that acid rain (solutions I and II) will mobilize mainly Zn and Cd and, to a much smaller extent, Pb and Sb. Leaching of metals by sulfate-chloride fluids present in the pore network of dumps (solutions III, IV, and V) depends on the pH, which in the dumps is controlled by the proportion of carbonates to sulfides. The more acid fluids leach both sulfides and silicates.

  1. Pinning effect of reactive elements on adhesion energy and adhesive strength of incoherent Al2O3/NiAl interface.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Z; Zhang, R F; Legut, D; Li, D Q; Zhang, S H; Fu, Z H; Guo, H B

    2016-08-17

    The profound effects of reactive elements (REs) on the adhesion energy and adhesive strength of the α-Al2O3/β-NiAl interface in thermal barrier coating (TBC) systems have attracted increasing attention because RE-doping has played a significant role in improving the thermal cycling lifetime of TBCs. However, the fundamental mechanism is, so far, not well understood due to the experimental difficulty and theoretical complexity in interface modelling. For this purpose, in the present study we have performed comprehensive density functional theory calculations and information targeted experiments to underline the origin of the surprising enhancement of interface adhesion, stability and mechanical strength of the α-Al2O3/β-NiAl interface by different RE doping levels. Our results suggest that the interface failure firstly appears within the NiAl layer adjacent to the Al-terminated oxide under mechanical loading, while the formation of O-RE-Ni bond pairs at the interface can effectively hinder the interface de-cohesion, providing a higher mechanical strength. By comparing several typical REs, it is observed that Hf can emerge not only with the highest interface adhesion energy, but also the highest mechanical strength; in agreement with our experimental results. By continuously increasing the dopant concentration, the strengthening effect may increase correspondingly, but is limited by the solute solubility. These results shed light into the effect of REs on the stability and strength of the α-Al2O3/β-NiAl interface, providing theoretical guidance for interface design via a combinational analysis of bond topology and electronic structure. PMID:27480916

  2. Edge-to-Edge Oriented Self-Assembly of ReS2 Nanoflakes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qin; Wang, Wenjie; Kong, Xin; Mendes, Rafael G; Fang, Liwen; Xue, Yinghui; Xiao, Yao; Rümmeli, Mark H; Chen, Shengli; Fu, Lei

    2016-09-01

    The self-assembly of two-dimensional (2D) nanomaterials, an emerging research area, still remains largely unexplored. The strong interlayer attraction between 2D nanosheets leads to face-to-face stacking rather than edge-to-edge coupling. We demonstrate, for the first time, how one can induce and control an edge-to-edge self-assembly process for 2D nanomaterials. The extremely weak van der Waals coupling and strong anisotropy of ReS2 allow us to realize an oriented self-assembly (OSA) process. The aspect ratio of the resulting ReS2 nanoscrolls can be well controlled. In addition, we perform simulations to further explain and confirm the OSA process, demonstrating its great potential to be expanded as a general edge-to-edge self-assembly process suitable for other 2D nanomaterials. PMID:27547983

  3. Highly efficient and ultrastable visible-light photocatalytic water splitting over ReS2.

    PubMed

    Liu, Huimei; Xu, Bo; Liu, J-M; Yin, Jiang; Miao, Feng; Duan, Chun-Gang; Wan, X G

    2016-06-01

    Two dimensional materials have many outstanding intrinsic advantages that can be utilized to enhance the photocatalytic efficiency of water splitting. Herein, based on ab initio calculations, we reveal that for monolayer and multilayer rhenium disulphide (ReS2), the band gap and band edge positions are an excellent match with the water splitting energy levels. Moreover, the effective masses of the carriers are relatively light, and the optical absorption coefficients are high under visible illumination. Due to the feature of weak interlayer coupling, these properties are independent of the layer thickness. Our results suggest that ReS2 is a stable and efficient photocatalyst with potential applications in the use of solar energy for water splitting. PMID:27167677

  4. US defensive operations against Libya and the nuclear accident at Chernobyl. Markup before the Committee on Foreign Affairs, House of Representatives, Ninety-Ninth Congress, Second Session on H. Res. 424 and H. Res 440, May 1, 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    The House Foreign Affairs Committee met to mark up two resolutions: H. Res. 424 and H. Res. 440. H. Res. 424 thanks the United Kingdom for its assistance in the April 14, 1986 operation against Libya. Despite objections to the raid and to including the British, as well as questions about the quality of the US response and about the President's compliance with the Constitution and the War Powers Resolution, the resolution passed. H. Res. 440 expresses sympathy to the victims of the Chernobyl accident and asks the Soviet Union to relax restrictions on communications and the transfer of whatever technology and assistance will be helpful. It also criticizes the Soviet handling of information about the accident. An amendment strengthened the wording of the criticism, and the resolution passed. The report includes the committee discussion and the tests of the two resolutions.

  5. EPRI/NRC-RES fire PRA guide for nuclear power facilities. Volume 1, summary and overview.

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2004-09-01

    This report documents state-of-the-art methods, tools, and data for the conduct of a fire Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) for a commercial nuclear power plant (NPP) application. The methods have been developed under the Fire Risk Re-quantification Study. This study was conducted as a joint activity between EPRI and the U. S. NRC Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research (RES) under the terms of an EPRI/RES Memorandum of Understanding [RS.1] and an accompanying Fire Research Addendum [RS.2]. Industry participants supported demonstration analyses and provided peer review of this methodology. The documented methods are intended to support future applications of Fire PRA, including risk-informed regulatory applications. The documented method reflects state-of-the-art fire risk analysis approaches. The primary objective of the Fire Risk Study was to consolidate recent research and development activities into a single state-of-the-art fire PRA analysis methodology. Methodological issues raised in past fire risk analyses, including the Individual Plant Examination of External Events (IPEEE) fire analyses, have been addressed to the extent allowed by the current state-of-the-art and the overall project scope. Methodological debates were resolved through a consensus process between experts representing both EPRI and RES. The consensus process included a provision whereby each major party (EPRI and RES) could maintain differing technical positions if consensus could not be reached. No cases were encountered where this provision was invoked. While the primary objective of the project was to consolidate existing state-of-the-art methods, in many areas, the newly documented methods represent a significant advancement over previously documented methods. In several areas, this project has, in fact, developed new methods and approaches. Such advances typically relate to areas of past methodological debate.

  6. Polytypism and unexpected strong interlayer coupling in two-dimensional layered ReS2.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Xiao-Fen; Wu, Jiang-Bin; Zhou, Linwei; Qiao, Jingsi; Shi, Wei; Chen, Tao; Zhang, Xin; Zhang, Jun; Ji, Wei; Tan, Ping-Heng

    2016-04-21

    Anisotropic two-dimensional (2D) van der Waals (vdW) layered materials, with both scientific interest and application potential, offer one more dimension than isotropic 2D materials to tune their physical properties. Various physical properties of 2D multi-layer materials are modulated by varying their stacking orders owing to significant interlayer vdW coupling. Multilayer rhenium disulfide (ReS2), a representative anisotropic 2D material, was expected to be randomly stacked and lack interlayer coupling. Here, we demonstrate two stable stacking orders, namely isotropic-like (IS) and anisotropic-like (AI) N layer (NL, N > 1) ReS2 are revealed by ultralow- and high-frequency Raman spectroscopy, photoluminescence and first-principles density functional theory calculation. Two interlayer shear modes are observed in AI-NL-ReS2 while only one shear mode appears in IS-NL-ReS2, suggesting anisotropic- and isotropic-like stacking orders in IS- and AI-NL-ReS2, respectively. This explicit difference in the observed frequencies identifies an unexpected strong interlayer coupling in IS- and AI-NL-ReS2. Quantitatively, the force constants of them are found to be around 55-90% of those of multilayer MoS2. The revealed strong interlayer coupling and polytypism in multi-layer ReS2 may stimulate future studies on engineering physical properties of other anisotropic 2D materials by stacking orders. PMID:27035503

  7. Resolvase-catalysed reactions between res sites differing in the central dinucleotide of subsite I.

    PubMed Central

    Stark, W M; Grindley, N D; Hatfull, G F; Boocock, M R

    1991-01-01

    The resolvase-catalysed reaction between two res sites in a circular DNA substrate normally gives two circular recombination products linked in a two-noded catenane. Homology between the two res sites at the central overlap dinucleotide of subsite I is important for recombination. Reactions between res sites differing at one position in the central dinucleotide (AC X AT) gave a low yield of recombinants containing mismatched base-pairs, but gave large amounts of a non-recombinant four-noded knot. This result was predicted by a 'simple rotation' model for strand exchange. The mismatch is evidently recognized only after commitment to an initial 180 degrees rotation of the resolvase-linked DNA ends, and it induces a second 180 degrees rotation which restores correct base-pairing at the overlap, giving the four-noded product. Correct base-pairing is not essential for religation, but may be important for release of the products. Characteristic patterns of 4, 6, 8 and 10 node knots, or 4, 8, 12 and 16 node knots were obtained, depending on the reaction conditions and the resolvase. Two pathways for multiple rounds of rotation in 360 degrees steps are inferred. The results support a model for strand exchange by supercoil-directed subunit rotation within a resolvase tetramer. Images PMID:1655422

  8. H.Res.1 — 113th Congress (2013-2014) Electing officers of the House of Representatives.

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Rep. McMorris Rodgers, Cathy [R-WA-5

    2013-01-03

    01/03/2013 Subsequent to the adoption of the resolution, the Chair announced that, without objection, H. Res. 1 is amended by striking "Florida" in the second place it appears and inserting "Oregon". (All Actions)

  9. Serendipity, International Cooperation and Navigational Aids: A History of Radio Echo Sounding (RES) Technologies, 1958-1979

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turchetti, S.; Dean, K.; Naylor, S.; Siegert, M. J.

    2006-12-01

    This paper explores the history of RES and examines major technological advances that fostered the use of this technique in the sub-glacial exploration of Antarctica. The paper will especially focus on three themes: the role played by accidental discoveries in the origins of RES; the importance of international collaboration in its technological development; and the need of establishing new technological networks in the deployment of RES apparatus during Antarctic missions. The origins of RES can be traced back to two important -albeit accidental- findings. First, during post-war US military operations in the Antarctic radio altimeters produced gross errors in height indication. Furthermore, during the IGY ionospheric research and sounding was hampered by interference due to bottom echoes. These serendipitous events helped to figure out that the Antarctic ice was transparent to certain frequencies, and therefore new radio technologies could be used to sound what lay beneath it. The establishment of the Scientific Committee on Antarctic Research (SCAR) and the Antarctic Treaty (AT) provided a new international framework vital to the development of RES technologies. This allowed researchers from different countries to come together and discuss important technological features for the first time. At a technical level, the setting up of international experiments (such as those of 1963 and 1964 in Greenland) gave an opportunity for experts from different countries to compare the performance of new RES apparatus. At a political level, the parallel debate within the AT community on the allocation of Antarctic radio frequencies helped radio engineers to work out ways to circumvent interference with radio communications. Finally, the deployment of RES equipment in Antarctic exploration relied upon a number of technological aids to improve the potential and accuracy of geophysical sounding. The use of new aircrafts, guidance systems, and computers proved vital in many

  10. Tellurium-Assisted Epitaxial Growth of Large-Area, Highly Crystalline ReS2 Atomic Layers on Mica Substrate.

    PubMed

    Cui, Fangfang; Wang, Cong; Li, Xiaobo; Wang, Gang; Liu, Kaiqiang; Yang, Zhou; Feng, Qingliang; Liang, Xing; Zhang, Zhongyue; Liu, Shengzhong; Lei, Zhibin; Liu, Zonghuai; Xu, Hua; Zhang, Jin

    2016-07-01

    Anisotropic 2D layered material rhenium disulfide (ReS2 ) with high crystal quality and uniform monolayer thickness is synthesized by using tellurium-assisted epitaxial growth on mica substrate. Benefit from the lower eutectic temperature of rhenium-tellurium binary eutectic, ReS2 can grow from rhenium (melting point at 3180 °C) and sulfur precursors in the temperature range of 460-900 °C with high efficiency. PMID:27121002

  11. Model of Io’s Local Interaction: Comparison with Galileo Flyby Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dols, V. J.; Delamere, P. A.; Wilson, R.; Bagenal, F.

    2009-12-01

    Past studies have tackled the problem of the local interaction of Io’s corona with the plasma in the torus using different complementary approaches, each involving some simplifications. The MHD models employ parameterization of the source of ionization, a conducting inner boundary but limited chemistry (Linker et al., 1998; Combi et al., 1998). Others have taken a 2-fluid approach assuming a constant magnetic field (Saur et al., 1999) or made a full hybrid simulation (Lipatov and Combi, 2006). Dols et al., 2008 focused on the physical chemistry in Io’s corona. They couple a model of the plasma flow around Io plus a multi-species chemistry model and compare the model results to the Galileo observation in Io’s wake. We extend Dols et al., 2008 study by simulating conditions along several other Galileo flybys (when Io experienced different upstream plasma characteristics) and compare the results with in situ observations. Linker, J. A.; Khurana, K. K.; Kivelson, M. G.; Walker, R. J., MHD simulations of Io's interaction with the plasma torus, J. Geophys. Res., 103(E9), p. 19867-19878, 1998. Combi, M. R.; Kabin, K.; Gombosi, T. I.; DeZeeuw, D. L.; Powell, K. G., Io's plasma environment during the Galileo flyby: Global three-dimensional MHD modeling with adaptive mesh refinement, J. Geophys. Res., 103(A5), p. 9071-9082, 1998. Saur, J.; Neubauer, F. M.; Strobel, D. F.; Summers, M. E., Three-dimensional plasma simulation of Io's interaction with the Io plasma torus: Asymmetric plasma flow, J. Geophys. Res., 104(A11), p. 25105-25126, 1999. Lipatov, A. S.; Combi, M. R., Effects of kinetic processes in shaping Io's global plasma environment: A 3D hybrid model, Icarus, 180, Issue 2, p. 412-427, 2006. Dols, V.; Delamere, P. A.; Bagenal, F. A multispecies chemistry model of Io's local interaction with the Plasma Torus, J. Geophys. Res., 113(A9), 2008.

  12. Polytypism and unexpected strong interlayer coupling in two-dimensional layered ReS2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Xiao-Fen; Wu, Jiang-Bin; Zhou, Linwei; Qiao, Jingsi; Shi, Wei; Chen, Tao; Zhang, Xin; Zhang, Jun; Ji, Wei; Tan, Ping-Heng

    2016-04-01

    Anisotropic two-dimensional (2D) van der Waals (vdW) layered materials, with both scientific interest and application potential, offer one more dimension than isotropic 2D materials to tune their physical properties. Various physical properties of 2D multi-layer materials are modulated by varying their stacking orders owing to significant interlayer vdW coupling. Multilayer rhenium disulfide (ReS2), a representative anisotropic 2D material, was expected to be randomly stacked and lack interlayer coupling. Here, we demonstrate two stable stacking orders, namely isotropic-like (IS) and anisotropic-like (AI) N layer (NL, N > 1) ReS2 are revealed by ultralow- and high-frequency Raman spectroscopy, photoluminescence and first-principles density functional theory calculation. Two interlayer shear modes are observed in AI-NL-ReS2 while only one shear mode appears in IS-NL-ReS2, suggesting anisotropic- and isotropic-like stacking orders in IS- and AI-NL-ReS2, respectively. This explicit difference in the observed frequencies identifies an unexpected strong interlayer coupling in IS- and AI-NL-ReS2. Quantitatively, the force constants of them are found to be around 55-90% of those of multilayer MoS2. The revealed strong interlayer coupling and polytypism in multi-layer ReS2 may stimulate future studies on engineering physical properties of other anisotropic 2D materials by stacking orders.Anisotropic two-dimensional (2D) van der Waals (vdW) layered materials, with both scientific interest and application potential, offer one more dimension than isotropic 2D materials to tune their physical properties. Various physical properties of 2D multi-layer materials are modulated by varying their stacking orders owing to significant interlayer vdW coupling. Multilayer rhenium disulfide (ReS2), a representative anisotropic 2D material, was expected to be randomly stacked and lack interlayer coupling. Here, we demonstrate two stable stacking orders, namely isotropic-like (IS) and

  13. Postlingual Adult Performance in Noise with HiRes 120 and ClearVoice Low, Medium and High

    PubMed Central

    Holden, Laura K.; Brenner, Christine; Reeder, Ruth M.; Firszt, Jill B.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives The study’s objectives were to evaluate speech recognition in multiple listening conditions using several noise types with HiRes 120 and ClearVoice (Low, Medium, High) and to determine which ClearVoice program was most beneficial for everyday use. Methods Fifteen postlingual adults attended four sessions; speech recognition was assessed at sessions one and three with HiRes 120 and at sessions two and four with all ClearVoice programs. Test measures included sentences presented in restaurant noise (R-SPACE™), in speech-spectrum noise, in four- and eight-talker babble, and connected discourse presented in 12-talker babble. Participants completed a questionnaire comparing ClearVoice programs. Results Significant group differences in performance between HiRes 120 and ClearVoice were present only in the R-SPACE™; performance was better with ClearVoice High than HiRes 120. Among ClearVoice programs, no significant group differences were present for any measure. Individual results revealed most participants performed better in the R-SPACE™ with ClearVoice than HiRes 120. For other measures, significant individual differences between HiRes 120 and ClearVoice were not prevalent. Individual results among ClearVoice programs differed and overall preferences varied. Questionnaire data indicated increased understanding with High and Medium in certain environments. Discussion R-SPACE™ and questionnaire results indicated an advantage for ClearVoice High and Medium. Individual test and preference data showed mixed results between ClearVoice programs making global recommendations difficult; however, results suggest providing ClearVoice High and Medium and HiRes 120 as processor options for adults willing to change settings. For adults unwilling or unable to change settings, ClearVoice Medium is a practical choice for daily listening. PMID:23683298

  14. Bio-SCoRes: A Smorgasbord Architecture for Coreference Resolution in Biomedical Text

    PubMed Central

    Kilicoglu, Halil; Demner-Fushman, Dina

    2016-01-01

    Coreference resolution is one of the fundamental and challenging tasks in natural language processing. Resolving coreference successfully can have a significant positive effect on downstream natural language processing tasks, such as information extraction and question answering. The importance of coreference resolution for biomedical text analysis applications has increasingly been acknowledged. One of the difficulties in coreference resolution stems from the fact that distinct types of coreference (e.g., anaphora, appositive) are expressed with a variety of lexical and syntactic means (e.g., personal pronouns, definite noun phrases), and that resolution of each combination often requires a different approach. In the biomedical domain, it is common for coreference annotation and resolution efforts to focus on specific subcategories of coreference deemed important for the downstream task. In the current work, we aim to address some of these concerns regarding coreference resolution in biomedical text. We propose a general, modular framework underpinned by a smorgasbord architecture (Bio-SCoRes), which incorporates a variety of coreference types, their mentions and allows fine-grained specification of resolution strategies to resolve coreference of distinct coreference type-mention pairs. For development and evaluation, we used a corpus of structured drug labels annotated with fine-grained coreference information. In addition, we evaluated our approach on two other corpora (i2b2/VA discharge summaries and protein coreference dataset) to investigate its generality and ease of adaptation to other biomedical text types. Our results demonstrate the usefulness of our novel smorgasbord architecture. The specific pipelines based on the architecture perform successfully in linking coreferential mention pairs, while we find that recognition of full mention clusters is more challenging. The corpus of structured drug labels (SPL) as well as the components of Bio-SCoRes and

  15. HiRes camera and LIDAR ranging system for the Clementine mission

    SciTech Connect

    Ledebuhr, A.G.; Kordas, J.F.; Lewis, I.T.

    1995-04-01

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory developed a space-qualified High Resolution (HiRes) imaging LIDAR (Light Detection And Ranging) system for use on the DoD Clementine mission. The Clementine mission provided more than 1.7 million images of the moon, earth, and stars, including the first ever complete systematic surface mapping of the moon from the ultra-violet to near-infrared spectral regions. This article describes the Clementine HiRes/LIDAR system, discusses design goals and preliminary estimates of on-orbit performance, and summarizes lessons learned in building and using the sensor. The LIDAR receiver system consists of a High Resolution (HiRes) imaging channel which incorporates an intensified multi-spectral visible camera combined with a Laser ranging channel which uses an avalanche photo-diode for laser pulse detection and timing. The receiver was bore sighted to a light-weight McDonnell-Douglas diode-pumped ND:YAG laser transmitter that emmitted 1.06 {micro}m wavelength pulses of 200 mJ/pulse and 10 ns pulse-width, The LIDAR receiver uses a common F/9.5 Cassegrain telescope assembly. The optical path of the telescope is split using a color-separating beamsplitter. The imaging channel incorporates a filter wheel assembly which spectrally selects the light which is imaged onto a custom 12 mm gated image intensifier fiber-optically-coupled into a 384 x 276 pixel frame transfer CCD FPA. The image intensifier was spectrally sensitive over the 0.4 to 0.8 {micro}m wavelength region. The six-position filter wheel contained 4 narrow spectral filters, one broadband and one blocking filter. At periselene (400 km) the HiRes/LIDAR imaged a 2.8 km swath width at 20-meter resolution. The LIDAR function detected differential signal return with a 40-meter range accuracy, with a maximum range capability of 640 km, limited by the bit counter in the range return counting clock.

  16. Bio-SCoRes: A Smorgasbord Architecture for Coreference Resolution in Biomedical Text.

    PubMed

    Kilicoglu, Halil; Demner-Fushman, Dina

    2016-01-01

    Coreference resolution is one of the fundamental and challenging tasks in natural language processing. Resolving coreference successfully can have a significant positive effect on downstream natural language processing tasks, such as information extraction and question answering. The importance of coreference resolution for biomedical text analysis applications has increasingly been acknowledged. One of the difficulties in coreference resolution stems from the fact that distinct types of coreference (e.g., anaphora, appositive) are expressed with a variety of lexical and syntactic means (e.g., personal pronouns, definite noun phrases), and that resolution of each combination often requires a different approach. In the biomedical domain, it is common for coreference annotation and resolution efforts to focus on specific subcategories of coreference deemed important for the downstream task. In the current work, we aim to address some of these concerns regarding coreference resolution in biomedical text. We propose a general, modular framework underpinned by a smorgasbord architecture (Bio-SCoRes), which incorporates a variety of coreference types, their mentions and allows fine-grained specification of resolution strategies to resolve coreference of distinct coreference type-mention pairs. For development and evaluation, we used a corpus of structured drug labels annotated with fine-grained coreference information. In addition, we evaluated our approach on two other corpora (i2b2/VA discharge summaries and protein coreference dataset) to investigate its generality and ease of adaptation to other biomedical text types. Our results demonstrate the usefulness of our novel smorgasbord architecture. The specific pipelines based on the architecture perform successfully in linking coreferential mention pairs, while we find that recognition of full mention clusters is more challenging. The corpus of structured drug labels (SPL) as well as the components of Bio-SCoRes and

  17. Multilayer ReS2 lateral p-n homojunction for photoemission and photodetection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Najmzadeh, Mohammad; Ko, Changhyun; Wu, Kedi; Tongay, Sefaattin; Wu, Junqiao

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, a multilayer ReS2 p-n homojunction is fabricated on an oxidized Si substrate, and its photoemission under a forward bias and its photodetection under a reverse bias are reported for the first time. Au nanoparticles were used to make lateral p-n homojunctions. The device shows room temperature photoemission in the IR range, and in the photodetector mode, it shows a 0.41 A/W responsivity under illumination by a 660 nm red laser.

  18. CH-RES-TOCSY: Enantiomers spectral resolution and measurement of heteronuclear residual dipolar couplings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lokesh, N.; Suryaprakash, N.

    2015-04-01

    A new 2D NMR technique cited as CH-RES-TOCSY, for complete unraveling the spectra of enantiomers and for the measurement of structurally important Csbnd H RDCs is reported. The spectral overlap and complexity of peaks were reduced by the blend of selective excitation and homo-decoupling. Differential values of Csbnd H RDCs of enantiomers (R and S) are exploited to separate the enantiomeric peaks. The complete unraveling of the spectra of both the enantiomers is achieved by incorporating a TOCSY mixing block prior to signal acquisition. The additional application of the method is demonstrated for the assignment of symmetric isomers.

  19. Res-E Support Policies in the Baltic States: Electricity Price Aspect (Part II)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobinaite, V.; Priedite, I.

    2015-04-01

    Increasing volumes of electricity derived from renewable energy sources (RES-E) affect the electricity market prices and the prices for final electricity consumers in the Baltic States. The results of a multivariate regression analysis show that in 2013 the RES-E contributed to decreasing the electricity market prices in the Baltic States. However, the final electricity consumers pay for the promotion of RES-E through the approved RES-E component which has a tendency to increase. It is estimated that in 2013 the net benefits from the wind electricity promotion were achieved in Lithuania and Latvia while the net cost - in Estonia. This suggests that the economic efficiency of the wind electricity support scheme based on the application of feed-in tariffs was higher than that based on the feed-in premium. Rakstā analizēta elektroenerģijas ražošanas no atjaunojamiem energoresursiem (AER-E) palielināšanas ietekme uz elektroenerģijas tirgus cenu un gala cenu elektroenerģijas lietotājiem Baltijas valstīs. Daudzfaktoru regresijas analīzes rezultāti atklāja, ka AER-E 2013. gadā varētu samazināt elektroenerģijas tirgus cenas Baltijas valstīs. Tomēr jāņem vērā, ka elektroenerģijas lietotāja gala cenā ir iekļauta AER-E atbalsta komponente, kurai ir raksturīgi palielināties. Aprēķināts, ka no vēja elektroenerģijas ražošanas Latvijā un Lietuvā tika iegūta tīrā peļņa, bet Igaunijā tikai nosedza pašizmaksu. Tas liecina, ka vēja elektroenerģijas atbalsta shēmai, kas balstīta uz obligātā iepirkuma atbalsta principu, ir augstāka ekonomiskā efektivitāte, nekā atbalsta shēmai, kas balstīta uz piemaksu par no AER saražoto elektroenerģiju obligātā iepirkuma ietvaros.

  20. The tomato res mutant which accumulates JA in roots in non-stressed conditions restores cell structure alterations under salinity.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Abellan, José O; Fernandez-Garcia, Nieves; Lopez-Berenguer, Carmen; Egea, Isabel; Flores, Francisco B; Angosto, Trinidad; Capel, Juan; Lozano, Rafael; Pineda, Benito; Moreno, Vicente; Olmos, Enrique; Bolarin, Maria C

    2015-11-01

    Jasmonic acid (JA) regulates a wide spectrum of plant biological processes, from plant development to stress defense responses. The role of JA in plant response to salt stress is scarcely known, and even less known is the specific response in root, the main plant organ responsible for ionic uptake and transport to the shoot. Here we report the characterization of the first tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) mutant, named res (restored cell structure by salinity), that accumulates JA in roots prior to exposure to stress. The res tomato mutant presented remarkable growth inhibition and displayed important morphological alterations and cellular disorganization in roots and leaves under control conditions, while these alterations disappeared when the res mutant plants were grown under salt stress. Reciprocal grafting between res and wild type (WT) (tomato cv. Moneymaker) indicated that the main organ responsible for the development of alterations was the root. The JA-signaling pathway is activated in res roots prior to stress, with transcripts levels being even higher in control condition than in salinity. Future studies on this mutant will provide significant advances in the knowledge of JA role in root in salt-stress tolerance response, as well as in the energy trade-off between plant growth and response to stress. PMID:25582191

  1. The effects of RE and Si on the microstructure and corrosion resistance of Zn-6Al-3Mg hot dip coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shiwei; Gao, Bo; Yin, Shaohua; Tu, Ganfeng; Zhu, Guanglin; Sun, Shuchen; Zhu, Xiaoping

    2015-12-01

    The effects of Si and RE on the microstructure and corrosion resistance of Zn-6Al-3Mg coating (ZAM) have been investigated. Surface morphology observations of the coating and corrosion products reveal that the additions of Si and rare earth metals (RES) improve the microstructural homogeneity of ZAMSR coating and stability of corrosion products formed on ZAMSR coating. Moreover, only uniform corrosion occurs in ZAMSR coating during the corrosion test, while intergranular corrosion and pitting occur in ZAM. As a result, the corrosion resistance of ZAM coating is improved by the additions of Si and RES.

  2. Predicting Power Output of Upper Body using the OMNI-RES Scale

    PubMed Central

    Bautista, Iker J.; Chirosa, Ignacio J.; Tamayo, Ignacio Martín; González, Andrés; Robinson, Joseph E.; Chirosa, Luis J.; Robertson, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    The main aim of this study was to determine the optimal training zone for maximum power output. This was to be achieved through estimating mean bar velocity of the concentric phase of a bench press using a prediction equation. The values for the prediction equation would be obtained using OMNI–RES scale values of different loads of the bench press exercise. Sixty males (age 23.61 2.81 year; body height 176.29 6.73 cm; body mass 73.28 4.75 kg) voluntarily participated in the study and were tested using an incremental protocol on a Smith machine to determine one repetition maximum (1RM) in the bench press exercise. A linear regression analysis produced a strong correlation (r = −0.94) between rating of perceived exertion (RPE) and mean bar velocity (Velmean). The Pearson correlation analysis between real power output (PotReal) and estimated power (PotEst) showed a strong correlation coefficient of r = 0.77, significant at a level of p = 0.01. Therefore, the OMNI–RES scale can be used to predict Velmean in the bench press exercise to control the intensity of the exercise. The positive relationship between PotReal and PotEst allowed for the identification of a maximum power-training zone. PMID:25713677

  3. An Upper Limit on the Electron-Neutrino Flux from the HiRes Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbasi, R. U.; Abu-Zayyad, T.; Allen, M.; Amann, J. F.; Archbold, G.; Belov, K.; Belz, J. W.; Ben Zvi, S. Y.; Bergman, D. R.; Biesiadecka, A.; Blake, S. A.; Boyer, J. H.; Brusova, O. A.; Burt, G. W.; Cannon, C.; Cao, Z.; Deng, W.; Fedorova, Y.; Findlay, J.; Finley, C. B.; Gray, R. C.; Hanlon, W. F.; Hoffman, C. M.; Holzscheiter, M. H.; Hughes, G.; Hüntemeyer, P.; Ivanov, D.; Jones, B. F.; Jui, C. C. H.; Kim, K.; Kirn, M. A.; Knapp, B. C.; Loh, E. C.; Maestas, M. M.; Manago, N.; Mannel, E. J.; Marek, L. J.; Martens, K.; Matthews, J. A. J.; Matthews, J. N.; Moore, S. A.; O'Neill, A.; Painter, C. A.; Perera, L.; Reil, K.; Riehle, R.; Roberts, M. D.; Rodriguez, D.; Sasaki, M.; Schnetzer, S. R.; Scott, L. M.; Seman, M.; Sinnis, G.; Smith, J. D.; Snow, R.; Sokolsky, P.; Song, C.; Springer, R. W.; Stokes, B. T.; Stratton, S. R.; Thomas, J. R.; Thomas, S. B.; Thomson, G. B.; Tupa, D.; Wiencke, L. R.; Zech, A.; Zhang, X.

    2008-09-01

    Air-fluorescence detectors such as the High Resolution Fly's Eye (HiRes) detector are very sensitive to upward-going, Earth-skimming ultra-high-energy electron-neutrino-induced showers. This is due to the relatively large interaction cross sections of these high-energy neutrinos and to the Landau-Pomeranchuk-Migdal (LPM) effect. The LPM effect causes a significant decrease in the cross sections for bremsstrahlung and pair production, allowing charged-current electron-neutrino-induced showers occurring deep in the Earth's crust to be detectable as they exit the Earth into the atmosphere. A search for upward-going neutrino-induced showers in the HiRes-II monocular data set has yielded a null result. From an LPM calculation of the energy spectrum of charged particles as a function of primary energy and depth for electron-induced showers in rock, we calculate the shape of the resulting profile of these showers in air. We describe a full detector Monte Carlo simulation to determine the detector response to upward-going electron-neutrino-induced cascades and present an upper limit on the flux of electron neutrinos.

  4. Radition belt dynamics : Recent results from van Allen Probes and future observations from CeREs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanekal, Shrikanth; O'Brien, Paul; Baker, Daniel N.; Ogasawara, Keiichi; Fennell, Joseph; Christian, Eric; Claudepierre, Seth; Livi, Stefano; Desai, Mihir; Li, Xinlin; Jaynes, Allison; Turner, Drew; Jones, Ashley; Schiller, Quintin

    2016-07-01

    We describe recent observations of the Earth's radiation belts made by instruments on board the Van Allen Probes mission, particularly the Relativistic Electron Proton Telescope (REPT) and the Magnetic Electron Ion spectrometer (MagEIS). These observations have significantly advanced our understanding of terrestrial radiation belt dynamics. The Van Allen Probes mission comprises two identically instrumented spacecraft which were launched 31 August, 2012 into low-inclination lapping equatorial orbits. The orbit periods are about 9 hours, with perigees and apogees of of ~600 km and 5.8 RE respectively. We discuss the new scientific findings of the Van Allen Probes mission regarding the physics of energization and loss of relativistic electrons and their implications for future low-cost missions, especially CubeSats. We describe the CeREs (a Compact Radiation belt Explorer) CubeSat mission currently being built at the Goddard Space Flight Center, and carrying on board, an innovative instrument, the Miniaturized Electron Proton Telescope (MERiT). The MERiT is a compact low-mass low-power instrument measuring electrons from a few keV to tens of MeV in multiple differential channels. MERiT is optimized to measure electron microbursts with a high time resolution of a few milliseconds. We present and discuss possible future scientific contributions from CeREs.

  5. Variance Anisotropy of Solar Wind Velocity and Magnetic Field Fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oughton, S.; Matthaeus, W. H.; Wan, M.

    2015-12-01

    At MHD scales in the solar wind, velocity and magnetic fieldfluctuations are typically observed to have much more energy in thecomponents transverse to the mean magnetic field, relative to theparallel components [eg, 1,2]. This is often referred to asvariance anisotropy. Various explanations for it have been suggested,including that the fluctuations are predominantly shear Alfvén waves[1] and that turbulent dynamics leads to such states [eg, 3].Here we investigate the origin and strength of such varianceanisotropies, using spectral method simulations of thecompressible (polytropic) 3D MHD equations. We report on results from runs with several different classes ofinitial conditions. These classes include(i) fluctuations polarized only in the same sense as shear Alfvénwaves (aka toroidal polarization),(ii) randomly polarized fluctuations, and(iii) fluctuations restricted so that most of the energy is inmodes which have their wavevectors perpendicular, or nearly so, to thebackground magnetic field: quasi-2D modes. The plasma beta and Mach number dependence [4] of quantities like the variance anisotropy, Alfven ratio, and fraction of the energy in the toroidal fluctuations will be examined, along with the timescales for the development of any systematic features.Implications for solar wind fluctuations will be discussed. References:[1] Belcher & Davis 1971, J. Geophys. Res, 76, 3534.[2] Oughton et al 2015, Phil Trans Roy Soc A, 373, 20140152.[3] Matthaeus et al 1996, J. Geophys. Res, 101, 7619.[4] Smith et al 2006, J. Geophys. Res, 111, A09111.

  6. Radiation Belt Transport Driven by Solar Wind Dynamic Pressure Fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kress, B. T.; Hudson, M. K.; Ukhorskiy, A. Y.; Mueller, H.

    2012-12-01

    The creation of the Earth's outer zone radiation belts is attributed to earthward transport and adiabatic acceleration of electrons by drift-resonant interactions with electromagnetic fluctuations in the magnetosphere. Three types of radial transport driven by solar wind dynamic pressure fluctuations that have been identified are: (1) radial diffusion [Falthammer, 1965], (2) significant changes in the phase space density radial profile due to a single or few ULF drift-resonant interactions [Ukhorskiy et al., 2006; Degeling et al., 2008], and (3) shock associated injections of radiation belt electrons occurring in less than a drift period [Li et al., 1993]. A progress report will be given on work to fully characterize different forms of radial transport and their effect on the Earth's radiation belts. The work is being carried out by computing test-particle trajectories in electric and magnetic fields from a simple analytic ULF field model and from global MHD simulations of the magnetosphere. Degeling, A. W., L. G. Ozeke, R. Rankin, I. R. Mann, and K. Kabin (2008), Drift resonant generation of peaked relativistic electron distributions by Pc 5 ULF waves, textit{J. Geophys. Res., 113}, A02208, doi:10.1029/2007JA012411. Fälthammar, C.-G. (1965), Effects of Time-Dependent Electric Fields on Geomagnetically Trapped Radiation, J. Geophys. Res., 70(11), 2503-2516, doi:10.1029/JZ070i011p02503. Li, X., I. Roth, M. Temerin, J. R. Wygant, M. K. Hudson, and J. B. Blake (1993), Simulation of the prompt energization and transport of radiation belt particles during the March 24, 1991 SSC, textit{Geophys. Res. Lett., 20}(22), 2423-2426, doi:10.1029/93GL02701. Ukhorskiy, A. Y., B. J. Anderson, K. Takahashi, and N. A. Tsyganenko (2006), Impact of ULF oscillations in solar wind dynamic pressure on the outer radiation belt electrons, textit{Geophys. Res. Lett., 33}(6), L06111, doi:10.1029/2005GL024380.

  7. Detection of negative pickup ions at Saturn's moon Dione

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nordheim, T.; Jones, G. H.; Coates, A. J.; Wellbrock, A.; Hand, K. P.; Waite, J. H., Jr.

    2015-12-01

    Negative ions may be formed in both tenuous and dense planetary atmospheres and have been observed in-situ at Earth, Titan [Coates et al., 2007, 2009; Wellbrock et al., 2013] and Enceladus [Coates et al., 2010] as well as at comet Halley [Chaizy et al., 1991]. In the case of Titan, heavy hydrocarbon and nitrile based ions with masses reaching almost 14,000 amu/q have been observed using the CAPS Electron Spectrometer (ELS) onboard Cassini. These are believed to form even more massive organic aerosols termed tholins which fall to lower altitudes where they make up the distinct haze layers, and eventually rain down onto Titan's surface perhaps forming the organic-rich dunes. Very tenuous atmospheres were predicted at the smaller icy moons of Saturn [Sittler et al., 2004; Saur and Strobel, 2005], and subsequently detected [Teolis et al., 2010; Tokar et al., 2012]. These are produced when charged particles from Saturn's magnetosphere interact with moon surfaces, ejecting neutral species. Some portion of these atmospheric neutrals will in turn become ionized and 'picked up' by Saturn's corotating magnetosphere. These pickup ions will then move in cycloidal trajectories that we may intercept using the Cassini spacecraft, even at considerable distance from the moon itself. In this fashion, negative and positive pickup ions have been used to infer a tenuous CO2-O2 atmosphere at Saturn's moon Rhea [Teolis et al., 2010], and positive pickup ions at Dione [Tokar et al., 2012]. Here we report on the detection of negative pickup ions during a close flyby of Dione by the Cassini CAPS ELS instrument, and the implications that these observations may have for the Dionian atmosphere. Chaizy, P., et al. (1991), Nature, 349(6308), 393-396 Coates, A. J., et al. (2007), Geophys. Res. Lett., 34(22), 6-11 Coates, A. J., et al. (2009), Planet. Space Sci., 57(14-15), 1866-1871 Coates, A. J., et al. (2010), Icarus, 206(2), 618-622 Saur, J., and D. F. Strobel (2005), Astrophys. J. Lett., 620

  8. Aicardi-Goutières syndrome is caused by IFIH1 mutations.

    PubMed

    Oda, Hirotsugu; Nakagawa, Kenji; Abe, Junya; Awaya, Tomonari; Funabiki, Masahide; Hijikata, Atsushi; Nishikomori, Ryuta; Funatsuka, Makoto; Ohshima, Yusei; Sugawara, Yuji; Yasumi, Takahiro; Kato, Hiroki; Shirai, Tsuyoshi; Ohara, Osamu; Fujita, Takashi; Heike, Toshio

    2014-07-01

    Aicardi-Goutières syndrome (AGS) is a rare, genetically determined early-onset progressive encephalopathy. To date, mutations in six genes have been identified as etiologic for AGS. Our Japanese nationwide AGS survey identified six AGS-affected individuals without a molecular diagnosis; we performed whole-exome sequencing on three of these individuals. After removal of the common polymorphisms found in SNP databases, we were able to identify IFIH1 heterozygous missense mutations in all three. In vitro functional analysis revealed that IFIH1 mutations increased type I interferon production, and the transcription of interferon-stimulated genes were elevated. IFIH1 encodes MDA5, and mutant MDA5 lacked ligand-specific responsiveness, similarly to the dominant Ifih1 mutation responsible for the SLE mouse model that results in type I interferon overproduction. This study suggests that the IFIH1 mutations are responsible for the AGS phenotype due to an excessive production of type I interferon. PMID:24995871

  9. An alternative method to finding patterns in HiRes stereo data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbasi, R. U.; Abu-Zayyad, T.; Amman, J. F.; Archbold, G. C.; Belov, K.; Blake, S. A.; Belz, J. W.; BenZvi, S.; Bergman, D. R.; Boyer, J. H.; Burt, G. W.; Cao, Z.; Connolly, B. M.; Deng, W.; Fedorova, Y.; Findlay, J.; Finley, C. B.; Gray, R. C.; Hanlon, W. F.; Hoffman, C. M.; Holzscheiter, M. H.; Hughes, G. A.; Hüntemeyer, P.; Jones, B. F.; Jui, C. C. H.; Kim, K.; Kirn, M. A.; Knapp, B. C.; Loh, E. C.; Maestas, M. M.; Manago, N.; Mannel, E. J.; Marek, L. J.; Martins, K.; Matthews, J. A. J.; Matthews, J. N.; Moore, S. A.; O'Neill, A.; Painter, C. A.; Perera, L.; Reil, K.; Riehle, R.; Roberts, M.; Rodriguez, D.; Sasaki, M.; Schnetzer, S.; Scott, L. M.; Seman, M.; Sinnis, G.; Smith, J. D.; Sokolsky, P.; Song, C.; Springer, R. W.; Stokes, B. T.; Thomas, J. R.; Thomas, S. B.; Thomson, G. B.; Tupa, D.; Westerhoff, S.; Weincke, L. R.; Zech, A.; Zhang, X.

    2007-12-01

    In this paper ultra-high energy cosmic rays UHECRs data observed by the HiRes fluorescence detector in stereo mode is analyzed to search for events in the sky with an arrival direction lying on a great circle. Such structure is known as the arc structure. The arc structure is expected when the charged cosmic rays pass through the galactic magnetic field. The arcs searched for could represent a broad or a small scale anisotropy depending on the proposed source model for the UHECRs. The arcs in this paper are looked for using Hough transform were Hough transform is a technique used to looking for patterns in images. No statistically significant arcs were found in this study.

  10. Malaria, malnutrition and MSF. Médecins Sans Frontières.

    PubMed

    Evans, D W

    This is a personal account of my brief time in Burundi as a volunteer doctor with Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) at the beginning of 2001. Burundi is a small nation in central Africa (bounded by the Democratic Republic of Congo, Rwanda and Tanzania) which has suffered from problems between the Hutu and Tutsi "ethnic groups", similar to those for which Rwanda is better known. Unlike Rwanda, the war between government troops and rebel forces continues in Burundi. MSF has been in Burundi since 1992, providing basic healthcare, nutrition programs, surgical services and epidemiological intervention. In late 2000, a malaria epidemic began in Burundi's highland regions where transmission is normally low, and thus the population largely not immune. Malnutrition rates also increased and MSF rapidly expanded its usual program in an attempt to control these new health problems. PMID:11837845

  11. An RES-Based Model for Risk Assessment and Prediction of Backbreak in Bench Blasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faramarzi, F.; Ebrahimi Farsangi, M. A.; Mansouri, H.

    2013-07-01

    Most blasting operations are associated with various forms of energy loss, emerging as environmental side effects of rock blasting, such as flyrock, vibration, airblast, and backbreak. Backbreak is an adverse phenomenon in rock blasting operations, which imposes risk and increases operation expenses because of safety reduction due to the instability of walls, poor fragmentation, and uneven burden in subsequent blasts. In this paper, based on the basic concepts of a rock engineering systems (RES) approach, a new model for the prediction of backbreak and the risk associated with a blast is presented. The newly suggested model involves 16 effective parameters on backbreak due to blasting, while retaining simplicity as well. The data for 30 blasts, carried out at Sungun copper mine, western Iran, were used to predict backbreak and the level of risk corresponding to each blast by the RES-based model. The results obtained were compared with the backbreak measured for each blast, which showed that the level of risk achieved is in consistence with the backbreak measured. The maximum level of risk [vulnerability index (VI) = 60] was associated with blast No. 2, for which the corresponding average backbreak was the highest achieved (9.25 m). Also, for blasts with levels of risk under 40, the minimum average backbreaks (<4 m) were observed. Furthermore, to evaluate the model performance for backbreak prediction, the coefficient of correlation ( R 2) and root mean square error (RMSE) of the model were calculated ( R 2 = 0.8; RMSE = 1.07), indicating the good performance of the model.

  12. Toxoplasmosis in a bar-shouldered dove (Geopelia humeralis) from the zoo of Clères, France

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Toxoplasmosis causes mortality in several avian species, especially passerine birds. Toxoplasmosis was diagnosed in a bar-shouldered dove (Geopelia humeralis) found dead at the zoo of Clères (France). The bird had necrotizing pneumonia and nephritis with intralesional tachyzoites of Toxoplasma gondi...

  13. ALS - The cost cutter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colucci, Frank

    1987-10-01

    The Advanced Launch System (ALS) development program will avail itself of existing technologies in the short term in order to produce an interim 'core' vehicle that may be operational by 1993; the full, booster-incorporating system objective will then be achieved in 1998. This programmatic 'decoupling' of booster and core vehicle development efforts will separate their funding peaks. The ALS program will cut costs by colocating manufacturing and launch facilities, using Al-Li alloys in booster primary structures, and aggressively applying 'paperless' CIM. The ALS launch vehicle configuration will be primarily determined by both payload requirements and flight frequency.

  14. Les nouveaux critères de la Maladie d’Alzheimer – Perspective gériatrique*

    PubMed Central

    Molin, Pierre; Rockwood, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    RÉSUMÉ Deux nouvelles séries de critères pour le diagnostic de la maladie d’Alzheimer sont maintenant en vigueur, incluant une série publiée en 2014. Un « nouveau lexique » conceptualisant la maladie a également été proposé. En 2012, la Conférence consensuelle canadienne affirmait que, pour l’instant, ni les nouveaux critères ni la nouvelle terminologie ne modifiaient la pratique en première ligne. Néanmoins, pour les consultants spécialisés en démence, l’avènement de ces critères ouvre la porte à de nombreux défis et occasions. En général, les nouveaux critères accordent une place grandissante aux biomarqueurs. Toutefois, les évidences qui sous-tendent leur utilisation demeurent incomplètes. L’étude de sujets provenant de la communauté ayant raffiné notre compréhension des critères neuropathologiques des démences, il est probable que notre expérience avec les biomarqueurs en bénéficierait également. Pour l’instant, ces critères sont réservés à la recherche. Cependant, leur adoption à plus large échelle est pressentie, particulièrement aux États-Unis. Les gériatres canadiens doivent être conscients de la terminologie maintenant utilisée et du changement fondamental qui en découle : un diagnostic de maladie d’Alzheimer ne requiert plus un diagnostic de démence. Dans l’attente de nouvelles données – auxquelles les gériatres peuvent contribuer – il y a lieu de faire preuve de prudence dans l’adoption des nouveaux critères, car ils sont susceptibles de moins bien s’appliquer aux personnes âgées. PMID:27403215

  15. Co-located ionospheric and geomagnetic disturbances caused by great earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Yongqiang; Zhang, Donghe; Xiao, Zuo

    2016-07-01

    Despite primary energy disturbances from the Sun, oscillations of the Earth surface due to a large earthquake will couple with the atmosphere and therefore the ionosphere, to generate so-called coseismic ionospheric disturbances (CIDs). In the cases of 2008 Wenchuan and 2011 Tohoku earthquakes, infrasonic waves accompanying the propagation of seismic Rayleigh waves were observed in the ionosphere by a combination of techniques, total electron content, HF Doppler, and ground magnetometer. This is the very first report to present CIDs recorded by different techniques at co-located sites and profiled with regard to changes of both ionospheric plasma and current (geomagnetic field) simultaneously. Comparison between the oceanic (2011 Tohoku) and inland (2008 Wenchuan) earthquakes revealed that the main directional lobe of latter case is more distinct which is perpendicular to the direction of the fault rupture. We argue that the different fault slip (inland or submarine) may affect the way of couplings of lithosphere with atmosphere. Zhao, B., and Y. Hao (2015), Ionospheric and geomagnetic disturbances caused by the 2008 Wenchuan earthquake: A revisit, J. Geophys. Res., doi:10.1002/2015JA021035. Hao, Y. Q., et al. (2013), Teleseismic magnetic effects (TMDs) of 2011 Tohoku earthquake, J. Geophys. Res., doi:10.1002/jgra.50326. Hao, Y. Q., et al. (2012), Multi-instrument observation on co-seismic ionospheric effects after great Tohoku earthquake, J. Geophys. Res., doi:10.1029/2011JA017036.

  16. The role of Al in C-S-H: NMR, XRD, and compositional results for precipitated samples

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, G.K.; Young, J. Francis; Kirkpatrick, R. James . E-mail: kirkpat@uiuc.edu

    2006-01-15

    X-ray diffraction, compositional analysis, and {sup 29}Si and {sup 27}Al MAS NMR spectroscopy of Al-substituted tobermorite-type C-S-H made by precipitation from solution provide significant new insight into the structural mechanisms of Al-substitution in this important and complicated phase. Al occurs in 4-, 5-, and 6-coordination (Al[4], Al[5], and Al[6]) and plays multiple structural roles. Al[4] occurs on the bridging tetrahedra of the drierkette Al-silicate chains, and Al[5] and Al[6] occur in the interlayer and perhaps on particle surfaces. Al does not enter either the central Ca-O sheet or the pairing tetrahedra of the tobermorite-type layers. Al[4] occurs on three types of bridging sites, Q{sup 3} sites that bridge across the interlayer; Q{sup 2} sites that are charge balanced by interlayer Ca{sup +2}, Na{sup +}, or H{sup +}; and Q{sup 2} sites that are most likely charge balanced by interlayer or surface Al[5] and Al[6] through Al[4]-O-Al[5,6] linkages. Although the data presented here are for relatively well-crystallized tobermorite-type C-S-H with C/S ratios {<=} 1.2, comparable spectral features for hydrated white cement pastes in previously published papers [M.D. Andersen, H.J. Jakobsen, J. Skibsted, Incorporation of aluminum in the calcium silicate hydrate (C-S-H) of hydrated Portland cements: a high-field {sup 27}Al and {sup 29}Si MAS NMR investigation Inorg. Chem. 42 (2003) 2280-2287; M.D. Andersen, H.J. Jakobsen, J. Skibsted, Characterization of white Portland cement hydration and the C-S-H structure in the presence of sodium aliminate by {sup 27}Al and {sup 29}Si MAS NMR spectroscopy, Cem. Concr. Res. 43 (2004) 857-868; M.D. Andersen, H. J. Jakobsen, J. Skibsted, A new aluminum-hydrate phase in hydrated Portland cements characterized by {sup 27}Al and {sup 29}Si MAS NMR spectroscopy, Cem. Concr. Res., submitted for publication.] indicate the presence of similar structural environments in the C-S-H of such pastes, and by implication OPC pastes.

  17. Al-Anon/Alateen

    MedlinePlus

    Find an Al-Anon meeting Español | Français 2018 Int'l Convention Home About Group Meetings What If I'm not ready ... a meeting? What can I expect at an Al-Anon meeting? What was my first meeting like? ...

  18. Chemical Composition of Rocks in the Columbia Hills at Gusec Crater, Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dreibus, G.; Bruckner, J.; Gellert, R.; Athena Science Team

    concentrations of 7 to 10 wt. % water equivalent hydrogen detected by the Mars Odyssey Gamma-Ray Spectrometer instrument suite [5]. Ref.: [1] Gellert, R. et al. (2006) J. Geophys. Res. - Planets, 111, E02S05, doi:10.1029/2005JE002555. [2] [Squyres, S. W. et al., (2006) J. Geophys. Res. - Planets, 111, E02S11, doi:10.1029/2005JE002562; [3] Ming D. W. et al. (2006) J. Geophys. Res., 111, E02S12, doi:10.1029/2005JE002560; [4] Clark, B. C. et al. (2006) J. Geophys. Res. submitted; [5] Feldman W. C. et al, (2004) J. Geophys. Res., 109 E09006, doi: 10.1029/2003JE002160.

  19. Magnetic-azimuth dependence of D-layer radio reflectivity, using lightning sferics as radio transmitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobson, A. R.; Shao, X.; Holzworth, R. H.; Lay, E. H.

    2011-12-01

    The Very Low Frequency (3-30 kHz) and Low-Frequency (30-300 kHz) radiation from lightning strokes provides a convenient intense source for studying radio propagation in the ionospheric D-region [Cheng and Cummer, 2005; Cheng et al., 2006; Cheng et al., 2007; Cummer et al., 1998; Jacobson et al., 2010; Shao and Jacobson, 2009]. In this poster we present a new study of the magnetic-azimuth dependence of D-layer radio reflectivity at relatively short ranges (r < 1000 km). This range regime is poorly adapted to a waveguide approach but is well treated by our discrete-reflection approach [Jacobson et al., 2009]. We use cloud-to-ground strokes, which are ~100X more numerous than the Narrow Bipolar Pulse sferics to which our method had previously been confined. Cheng, Z., and S. A. Cummer (2005), Broadband VLF measurements of lightning-induced ionospheric perturbations, Geophys. Res. Lett., 32, L08804, doi:08810.01029/02004GL022187. Cheng, Z., S. A. Cummer, D. N. Baker, and S. G. Kanekal (2006), Nighttime D region electron density profiles and variabilities inferred from broadband measurements using VLF radio emissions from lightning, J. Geophys. Res., 111, A05302, doi:05310.01029/02005JA011308. Cheng, Z., S. A. Cummer, H.-T. Su, and R.-R. Hsu (2007), Broadband very low frequency measurement of D region ionospheric perturbations caused by lightning electromagnetic pulses, J. Geophys. Res., 112, A06318. Cummer, S. A., U. S. Inan, and T. F. Bell (1998), Ionospheric D region remote sensing using VLF radio atmospherics, Radio Sci., 33, 1781-1792. Jacobson, A. R., X. Shao, and R. H. Holzworth (2009), Full-wave reflection of lightning long-wave radio pulses from the ionospheric D-region: Numerical model, J. Geophys. Res.- Space, 114, A03303, doi:03310.01029/02008JA013642. Jacobson, A. R., R. Holzworth, and X.-M. Shao (2010), Full-wave reflection of lightning long-wave radio pulses from the ionospheric D-region: Comparison with midday observations of broadband lightning signals

  20. Sheared velocity flows as a source of pressure anisotropy in low collisionality plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Sarto, Daniele; Pegoraro, Francesco; Cerri, Silvio Sergio; Califano, Francesco; Tenerani, Anna

    2015-04-01

    Non-Maxwellian metaequilibrium states may exist in low-collisionality plasmas as evidenced by direct (particle distributions) and indirect (e.g., instabilities driven by pressure anisotropy) satellite and laboratory measurements. These are directly observed in the solar wind (e.g. [1]), in magnetospheric reconnection events [2], in magnetically confined plasmas [3] or in simulations of Vlasov turbulence [4]. By including the full pressure tensor dynamics in a fluid plasma model, we show that a sheared velocity field can provide an effective mechanism that makes an initial isotropic state anisotropic. We discuss how the propagation of "magneto-elastic" waves can affect the pressure tensor anisotropization and the small scale formation that arise from the interplay between the gyrotropic terms due to the magnetic field and flow vorticity, and the non-gyropropic effect of the flow strain tensor. We support this analysis by a numerical integration of the nonlinear equations describing the pressure tensor evolution. This anisotropization mechanism might provide a good candidate for the understanding of the observed correlation between the presence of a sheared velocity flow and the signature of pressure anisotropies which are not yet explained within the standard models based e.g. on the CGL paradigm (see also [5]). Examples of these signatures are provided by the threshold lowering of ion-Weibel instabilities in the geomagnetic tail, observed in concomitance to the presence of a velocity shear in the near-earth plasma profile [6], or by the relatively stronger anisotropization measured for core protons in the fast solar wind [4,7] or in "space simulation" laboratory plasma experiments [3]. 1] E. Marsch et al., Journ. Geophys. Res. 109, A04120 (2004); Yu. V. Khotyainstev at el., Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 165001 (2011). [2] N. Aunai et al., Ann. Geophys. 29, 1571 (2011); N. Aunai et al., Journ. Geophys. Res. 116, A09232 (2011). [3] E.E. Scime et al., Phys. Plasmas 7, 2157

  1. S.Res.282 — 112th Congress (2011-2012) A resolution to authorize testimony in Kanelos v. County of Mohave, et al. and Zanna, et al. v. Mohave County, et al.

    THOMAS, 112th Congress

    Sen. Reid, Harry [D-NV

    2011-09-23

    09/23/2011 Submitted in the Senate, considered, and agreed to without amendment and with a preamble by Unanimous Consent. (consideration: CR S5958-5959; text as passed Senate: CR S5959; text of measure as introduced: CR S5952) (All Actions)

  2. Les cellulites cervico-faciales graves, facteurs et critères de gravité

    PubMed Central

    Lakouichmi, Mohammed; Tourabi, Khalid; Abir, Bader-eddine; Zouhair, Said; Lahmiti, Saad; Hattab, Nadia Mansouri

    2014-01-01

    La cellulite cervico-faciale grave est une infection polymicrobienne extensive et redoutable du tissu cellulo-adipeux de la face et du cou. L'objectif de cette étude est d'analyser certains facteurs favorisants et d’évaluer les critères de gravité en fonction des formes anatomo-cliniques. Il s'agit d'une étude rétrospective réalisée, entre janvier 2007 et décembre 2012, au service de chirurgie maxillo faciale de l'hôpital militaire Avicenne de Marrakech. Sur 147 cas de cellulites cervico-faciales pris en charge au niveau du service, 13 dossiers de cellulites graves ont été retenus. Neuf hommes (69%) et quatre femmes (31%) ont fait l'objet de cette étude, avec un âge moyen de 35 ans. Tous les patients ont été adressés pour prise en charge secondaire après avoir pris des anti-inflammatoires (AI). Sept cas (54%) étaient immunocompétents. La cause dentaire était soulevée chez neufs cas (69%). Cinq cas (38%) ont présenté une forme pseudo phlegmoneuse avec des signes compressifs des voies aéro-digestives. L'extension médiastinale a été observée chez quatre patients (31%). La forme nécrosante extensive a été retrouvée dans trois cas (23%). L’étude bactériologique, réalisée chez tous les patients, avait mis en évidence une flore microbienne mixte et polymorphe. Les cellulites cervico-faciales graves posent un réel problème de prise en charge thérapeutique. L'analyse des facteurs favorisants et l’évaluation des critères de gravité dans cette série ont permis de limiter une évolution défavorable. PMID:26113891

  3. [Environmental factors in ALS].

    PubMed

    Juntas-Morales, Raul; Pageot, Nicolas; Corcia, Philippe; Camu, William

    2014-05-01

    ALS is likely to be a disorder of multifactorial origin. Among all the factors that may increase the risk of ALS, environmental ones are being studied for many years, but in the recent years, several advances have pointed to a new interest in their potential involvement in the disease process, especially for the cyanotoxin BMAA. Food containing BMAA has been found on Guam, a well-known focus of ALS/parkinsonism/dementia and high levels of BMAA have been identified into the brain of these patients. The BMAA cyanotoxin is potentially ubiquitous and have also been found into the food of patients who died from ALS both in Europe and USA. BMAA can be wrongly integrated into the protein structure during mRNA traduction, competing with serine. This may induce abnormal protein folding and a subsequent cell death. Heavy metals, such as lead or mercury may be directly toxic for neuronal cells. Several works have suggested an increased risk of ALS in individuals chronically exposed to these metals. Exposure to pesticides has been suggested to be linked to an increased risk of developing ALS. The mechanism of their toxicity is likely to be mediated by paraoxonases. These proteins are in charge of detoxifying the organism from toxins, and particularly organophosphates. To date, there are insufficient scientific data to suggest that exposure to electromagnetic fields may increase the risk of having ALS. We are particularly missing longitudinal cohorts to demonstrate that risk. PMID:24703731

  4. Sheared velocity flows as a source of pressure anisotropy in low collisionality plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Sarto, D.; Pegoraro, F.; Califano, F.

    2014-12-01

    Non-Maxwellian metaequilibrium states may exist in low-collisionality plasmas as evidenced by direct (particle distributions) and indirect (e.g., instabilities driven by pressure anisotropy) satellite and laboratory measurements. These are directly observed in the solar wind (e.g. [1]), in magnetospheric reconnection events [2], in magnetically confined plasmas [3] or in simulations of Vlasov turbulence [4]. By including the full pressure tensor dynamics in a fluid plasma model, we show that a sheared velocity field can provide an effective mechanism that makes an initial isotropic state anisotropic. We discuss how the propagation of magneto-elastic waves can affect the pressure tensor anisotropization and the small scale formation that arise from the interplay between the gyrotropic terms due to the magnetic field and the flow vorticity and the non-gyropropic effect of the flow strain tensor. We support this analysis by a numerical integration of the nonlinear equations describing the pressure tensor evolution. This anisotropization mechanism might provide a good candidate for the understanding of the observed correlation between the presence of a sheared velocity flow and the signature of pressure anisotropies which are not yet explained within the standard models based e.g. on the CGL paradigm. Examples of these signatures are provided e.g. by the threshold lowering of ion-Weibel instabilities in the geomagnetic tail, observed in concomitance to the presence of a velocity shear in the near-earth plasma profile [5], or by the relatively stronger anisotropization measured for core protons in the fast solar wind [4,6] or in "space simulation" laboratory plasma experiments [3]. [1] E. Marsch et al., Journ. Geophys. Res. 109, A04120 (2004); Yu. V. Khotyainstev at el., Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 165001 (2011). [2] N. Aunai et al., Ann. Geophys. 29, 1571 (2011); N. Aunai et al., Journ. Geophys. Res. 116, A09232 (2011). [3] E.E. Scime et al., Phys. Plasmas 7, 2157 (2000). [4

  5. When Does ALS Start? ADAR2–GluA2 Hypothesis for the Etiology of Sporadic ALS

    PubMed Central

    Hideyama, Takuto; Kwak, Shin

    2011-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is the most common adult-onset motor neuron disease. More than 90% of ALS cases are sporadic, and the majority of sporadic ALS patients do not carry mutations in genes causative of familial ALS; therefore, investigation specifically targeting sporadic ALS is needed to discover the pathogenesis. The motor neurons of sporadic ALS patients express unedited GluA2 mRNA at the Q/R site in a disease-specific and motor neuron-selective manner. GluA2 is a subunit of the AMPA receptor, and it has a regulatory role in the Ca2+-permeability of the AMPA receptor after the genomic Q codon is replaced with the R codon in mRNA by adenosine–inosine conversion, which is mediated by adenosine deaminase acting on RNA 2 (ADAR2). Therefore, ADAR2 activity may not be sufficient to edit all GluA2 mRNA expressed in the motor neurons of ALS patients. To investigate whether deficient ADAR2 activity plays pathogenic roles in sporadic ALS, we generated genetically modified mice (AR2) in which the ADAR2 gene was conditionally knocked out in the motor neurons. AR2 mice showed an ALS-like phenotype with the death of ADAR2-lacking motor neurons. Notably, the motor neurons deficient in ADAR2 survived when they expressed only edited GluA2 in AR2/GluR-BR/R (AR2res) mice, in which the endogenous GluA2 alleles were replaced by the GluR-BR allele that encoded edited GluA2. In heterozygous AR2 mice with only one ADAR2 allele, approximately 20% of the spinal motor neurons expressed unedited GluA2 and underwent degeneration, indicating that half-normal ADAR2 activity is not sufficient to edit all GluA2 expressed in motor neurons. It is likely therefore that the expression of unedited GluA2 causes the death of motor neurons in sporadic ALS. We hypothesize that a progressive downregulation of ADAR2 activity plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of sporadic ALS and that the pathological process commences when motor neurons express unedited GluA2. PMID:22102833

  6. Kinetic-Hydrodynamic Models of the Solar Wind Interaction with the Partially Ionized Supersonic Flow of the Local Interstellar Gas: Predictions and Interpretations of the Experimental Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baranov, Vladimir B.

    2009-02-01

    At present there is no doubt that the local interstellar medium (LISM) is mainly partially ionized hydrogen gas moving with a supersonic flow relative to the solar system. The bulk velocity of this flow is approximately equal ˜26 km/s. Although the interaction of the solar wind with the charged component (below plasma component) of the LISM can be described in the framework of hydrodynamic approach, the interaction of H atoms with the plasma component can be correctly described only in the framework of kinetic theory because the mean free path of H atoms in the main process of the resonance charge exchange is comparable with a characteristic length of the problem considered. Results of self-consistent, kinetic-hydrodynamic models are considered in this review paper. First, such the model was constructed by Baranov and Malama (J. Geophys. Res. 98(A9):15,157-15,163, 1993). Up to now it is mainly developed by Moscow group taking into account new experimental data obtained onboard spacecraft studying outer regions of the solar system (Voyager 1 and 2, Pioneer 10 and 11, Hubble Space Telescope, Ulysses, SOHO and so on). Predictions and interpretations of experimental data obtained on the basis of these models are presented. Kinetic models for describing H atom motion were later suggested by Fahr et al. (Astron. Astrophys 298:587-600, 1995) and Lipatov et al. (J. Geophys. Res. 103(A9):20,631-20,642, 1998). However they were not self-consistent and did not incorporate sources to the plasma component. A self-consistent kinetic-hydrodynamic model suggested by Heerikhuisen et al. (J. Geophys. Res. 111:A06110, 2006, Astrophys. J. 655:L53-L56, 2007) was not tested on the results by Baranov and Malama (J. Geophys. Res. 111:A06110, 1993) although it was suggested much later. Besides authors did not describe in details their Monte Carlo method for a solution of the H atom Boltzmann equation and did not inform about an accuracy of this method. Therefore the results of

  7. X-ray detector calibration at CEA/Bruyères-le-Châtel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, L.; Stemmler, P.; Ban, G.; Villette, B.; Frotté, V.; Bizeuil, C.; Boutin, J.-Y.; Nazet, C.

    1996-02-01

    At CEA/Bruyères-le-Châtel (Service CEM), there are facilities to calibrate X-ray detectors from 200 eV to 100 keV, with an accuracy of 4% at high energies ( E > 3 keV). The source is the direct radiation from the X-ray tubes [C Kα (277 eV) to Ti KαKβ (4.51/4.93 keV)] or fluorescence emission from secondary targets [Mg Kα (1.25 keV) to U Kα (98 keV)]. In addition, calibrations are carried out with the synchrotron radiation of the Super-ACO storage ring (LURE-Orsay), by selecting the monoenergetic beams with a double crystal monochromator which is tunable between 0.8 and 8 keV. The resolution is better than 1 eV. This last tool is very useful in the study of the absorption edges of the detector compounds (for example, Si K-edge and Ar K-edge). Some examples are presented of results obtained between 1 and 50 keV, with special reference to high flux detectors such as gold photocathodes and silicon avalanche photodiodes. Thick silicon photodiodes (for the high energy range) were also calibrated.

  8. Effects of soil tillage on Tuber magnatum development in natural truffières.

    PubMed

    Salerni, E; Iotti, M; Leonardi, P; Gardin, L; D'Aguanno, M; Perini, C; Pacioni, P; Zambonelli, A

    2014-04-01

    Tuber magnatum Pico, the Italian white truffle, commands the highest prices of any truffle. Despite its commercial value, it is the only edible European truffle which has not yet been successfully cultivated. Because of this, it is essential to safeguard natural truffières and to identify cultural practices to maximize their productivity. Soil tillage is successfully and extensively used in black truffle cultivation to enhance productivity, but its effects are not known on the development of T. magnatum. A recently developed real-time PCR assay was applied to evaluate the effects of tillage (10-15 cm depth) on T. magnatum mycelium in two different natural truffle grounds located in Tuscany and Emilia-Romagna. Tillage effects on bulk density, ectomycorrhizal fungal communities, and ascoma production were also assessed. Tilling significantly increased the quantity of T. magnatum mycelium which seemed to be related to an increase in soil porosity by up to 34%, and the diversity of ectomycorrhizal fungal communities. On the contrary, no significant effects were found on ascoma production. The results highlight that real-time PCR is the most reliable method for evaluating the effects of cultural practices on the development of T. magnatum in soil avoiding long-term studies on fruiting body production. PMID:24281760

  9. In Search of the 'New Informal Legitimacy' of Médecins Sans Frontières.

    PubMed

    Calain, Philippe

    2012-04-01

    FOR MEDICAL HUMANITARIAN ORGANIZATIONS, MAKING THEIR SOURCES OF LEGITIMACY EXPLICIT IS A USEFUL EXERCISE, IN RESPONSE TO: misperceptions, concerns over the 'humanitarian space', controversies about specific humanitarian actions, challenges about resources allocation and moral suffering among humanitarian workers. This is also a difficult exercise, where normative criteria such as international law or humanitarian principles are often misrepresented as primary sources of legitimacy. This essay first argues for a morally principled definition of humanitarian medicine, based on the selfless intention of individual humanitarian actors. Taking Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) as a case in point, a common source of moral legitimacy for medical humanitarian organizations is their cosmopolitan appeal to distributive justice and collective responsibility. More informally, their legitimacy is grounded in the rightfulness of specific actions and choices. This implies a constant commitment to publicity and accountability. Legitimacy is also generated by tangible support from the public to individual organizations, by commitments to professional integrity, and by academic alliances to support evidence-based practice and operational research. PMID:22442647

  10. All About ALS

    MedlinePlus

    ... External link, please review our exit disclaimer . Subscribe All About ALS Understanding a Devastating Disorder In the ... a coffee pot, or button a shirt. Eventually, all muscles under voluntary control are affected, and people ...

  11. Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pictures of ALS Mutant Proteins Support Two Major Theories About How the Disease is Caused May 2003 ... All NINDS-prepared information is in the public domain and may be freely copied. Credit to the ...

  12. Genetic Testing for ALS

    MedlinePlus

    ... Involved Donate Familial Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (FALS) and Genetic Testing By Deborah Hartzfeld, MS, CGC, Certified Genetic ... guarantee a person will develop symptoms of ALS. Genetic Counseling If there is more than one person ...

  13. ALS synchrotron radiation shielding

    SciTech Connect

    Donahue, R.J.

    1995-10-01

    This note discusses the assumptions and results of synchrotron radiation shielding estimates for ALS bend magnet and wiggler beamlines. Estimates of gas bremsstrahlung production are not included and are dealt with elsewhere.

  14. What Is ALS?

    MedlinePlus

    ... scarring or hardening ("sclerosis") in the region. Motor neurons reach from the brain to the spinal cord ... the body. The progressive degeneration of the motor neurons in ALS eventually leads to their demise. When ...

  15. Electrical transport properties of ReS2 with polymer electrolyte gating in the high-doping limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ovchinnikov, Dmitry; Allain, Adrien; Pasquier, Diego; Dumcenco, Dumitru; Ho, Ching-Hwa; Huang, Ying-Sheng; Yazyev, Oleg; Kis, Andras

    Two-dimensional (2D) materials have emerged as promising candidates for future electronic applications. Among them, transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) demonstrate not only potential as ultrathin transistor channel material, but also intriguing spin and valley physics, which in principle could allow new types of devices and circuits. Here we report on the first study of two-dimensional anisotropic ReS2 at high doping levels, enabled by polymer electrolyte gating. Significantly increasing the doping level using electrolyte instead of standard solid gate, we measured an unusual modulation of the conductivity at high carrier densities in monolayer ReS2. In the case of thicker flakes, the effect is milder and an insulator-metal-insulator sequence with increasing doping is observed. Transport measurements provide the evidence of major influence of ionic disorder. Furthermore, we discuss possible band structure effects.

  16. ANALYSIS OF LARGE-SCALE ANISOTROPY OF ULTRA-HIGH ENERGY COSMIC RAYS IN HiRes DATA

    SciTech Connect

    Abbasi, R. U.; Abu-Zayyad, T.; Allen, M.; Archbold, G.; Belov, K.; Belz, J. W.; Bergman, D. R.; Blake, S. A.; Brusova, O. A.; Burt, G. W.; Cannon, C.; Cao, Z.; Deng, W.; Fedorova, Y.; Findlay, J.; Gray, R. C.; Hanlon, W. F.; Amann, J. F.; Hoffman, C. M.; Finley, C. B.

    2010-04-10

    Stereo data collected by the HiRes experiment over a six-year period are examined for large-scale anisotropy related to the inhomogeneous distribution of matter in the nearby universe. We consider the generic case of small cosmic-ray deflections and a large number of sources tracing the matter distribution. In this matter tracer model the expected cosmic-ray flux depends essentially on a single free parameter, the typical deflection angle {theta} {sub s}. We find that the HiRes data with threshold energies of 40 EeV and 57 EeV are incompatible with the matter tracer model at a 95% confidence level unless {theta} {sub s} > 10 deg. and are compatible with an isotropic flux. The data set above 10 EeV is compatible with both the matter tracer model and an isotropic flux.

  17. Stratigraphical and morphological evidence for pingo genesis in the Cerberus plains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Page, David P.; Murray, John B.

    2006-07-01

    'Rootless' debris cones (or pseudocraters) occur in platy, patterned ground throughout the Cerberus plains of Mars and are thought to represent the products of explosive magma-ice interaction [Lanagan et al., 2001. Geophys. Res. Lett. 28, 2365-2368; Fagents et al., 2002. In: Smellie, J.L., Chapman, M.G. (Eds.), Volcano-Ice Interaction on Earth and Mars. In: Geol. Soc. Spec. Publ., vol. 202, pp. 295-317]. Requiring lava and water interspersed, they are central to theories of multiple magmatic and aqueous flood events [Burr et al., 2002. Icarus 159, 53-73; Berman, D.C., Hartmann, W.K., 2002. Icarus 159, 1-17] and widespread sheet volcanism [Keszthelyi et al., 2000. J. Geophys. Res. 105, 15027-15049] in the region during the late Amazonian (a region reported to have been occupied by water bodies ranging from lakes to oceans [Scott et al., 1995. Map of Mars showing channels and possible paleolake basins. USGS Miscellaneous Investigations Series, Map I-2461 (1:30,000,000)]). The nature of the platy substrate is the subject of debate, with evidence given for lava [Keszthelyi et al., 2000. J. Geophys. Res. 105, 15027-15049; Plescia, J.B., 2003. Icarus 164, 79-95] and ice [Brakenridge, G.R., 1993. Lunar Planet. Sci. XXIV (Part 1), 175-176; Rice et al., 2002. Lunar Planet. Sci. XXXIII. Abstract #2026; Murray et al., 2005. Nature 434, 352-355]. The superposition relationships of cones and platy deposits in the channels of the Athabasca Valles precludes a magmatic origin, indicating later formation as permafrost mounds (or 'pingos'), with implications for geologically recent flood volcanism, age constraints on young surfaces and recent climate change on Mars.

  18. Toxoplasmosis in a bar-shouldered dove (Geopelia humeralis) from the Zoo of Clères, France

    PubMed Central

    Rigoulet, Jacques; Hennache, Alain; Lagourette, Pierre; George, Catherine; Longeart, Loïc; Le Net, Jean-Loïc; Dubey, Jitender P.

    2014-01-01

    Toxoplasmosis causes mortality in several avian species, especially passerine birds. Toxoplasmosis was diagnosed in a bar-shouldered dove (Geopelia humeralis) found dead at the zoo of Clères (France). The bird had necrotizing pneumonia and nephritis with intralesional tachyzoites of Toxoplasma gondii. The diagnosis was confirmed by immunostaining with polyclonal rabbit T. gondii antibodies and by transmission electron microscopy. To our knowledge, the bar-shouldered dove is a new host record for T. gondii. PMID:25407506

  19. High-Performance 2D Rhenium Disulfide (ReS2 ) Transistors and Photodetectors by Oxygen Plasma Treatment.

    PubMed

    Shim, Jaewoo; Oh, Aely; Kang, Dong-Ho; Oh, Seyong; Jang, Sung Kyu; Jeon, Jaeho; Jeon, Min Hwan; Kim, Minwoo; Choi, Changhwan; Lee, Jaehyeong; Lee, Sungjoo; Yeom, Geun Young; Song, Young Jae; Park, Jin-Hong

    2016-08-01

    A high-performance ReS2 -based thin-film transistor and photodetector with high on/off-current ratio (10(4) ), high mobility (7.6 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) ), high photoresponsivity (2.5 × 10(7) A W(-1) ), and fast temporal response (rising and decaying time of 670 ms and 5.6 s, respectively) through O2 plasma treatment is reported. PMID:27206245

  20. The Significance of Land-Atmosphere Processes in the Earth System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suni, T.; Kulmala, M. T.; Guenther, A. B.

    2012-12-01

    management practices, energy production, industrial development, and urbanization. Emphasis should be placed on, for instance, new observation networks incorporating remote sensing techniques with ground-based observations; the role of land-cover changes in modulating carbon, nitrogen, and hydrological cycles and, consequently, atmospheric chemistry, aerosol dynamics, and climate; regional (high-latitude) processes and their influence on global simulations; and interactions among anthropogenic and biogenic aerosols, clouds, and climate. 1. Ciais Ph 2005 Nature 2. Kulmala M et al 2004 Atmos Chem Phys 3. Philippon N et al 2005 J Geophys Res 4. Arneth A et al 2010a Nature Geoscience 5. Ganzeveld L et al 2010 J Geophys Res 6. Teuling A et al. 2010 Nature Geoscience 7. Arneth A et al 2010b Biogeosciences 8. Bonan GB et al. 2011 J Geophys Res 9. Davin EL and Seneviratne SI 2011 Biogeosciences 10. Pitman AJ et al 2011 Int J Clim 11. de Noblet-Ducoudré N et al 2012 J Clim 12. Rosenfeld D et al. 2008 Science 13. Stevens B and Feingold G 2009 Nature 14. Li Z et al 2011 Nature Geoscience 15. Pitman AJ et al 2009 Geophys Res Let 16. Baldocchi DD et al. 2005 Int J Biomet 17. Hari P et al 2009 Bor Env Res 18. Guenther A et al 2011 Bor Env Res 19. de Leeuw G et al. 2011 Biogeosciences 20. Jung M et al 2011 J Geophys Res

  1. On the postprocessing removal of correlated errors in GRACE temporal gravity field solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, X. J.; Guo, J. Y.; Shum, C. K.; van der Wal, W.

    2009-11-01

    We revisit the empirical moving window filtering method of Swenson and Wahr (Geophys Res Lett 33:L08402, 2006) and its variants, Chambers (Geophys Res Lett 33:L17603, 2006) and Chen et al. (Geophys Res Lett 34: L13302, 2007), for reducing the correlated errors in the Stokes coefficients (SCs) of the spherical harmonic expansion of the GRACE determined monthly geopotential solutions. Based on a comparison of the three published approaches mentioned, we propose a refined approach for choosing parameters of the decorrelation filter. Our approach is based on the error pattern of the SCs in the monthly GRACE geopotential solutions. We keep a portion of the lower degree-order SCs with the smallest errors unchanged, and high-pass filter the rest using a moving window technique, with window width decreasing as the error of the SCs increases. Both the unchanged portion of SCs and the window width conform with the error pattern, and are adjustable with a parameter. Compared to the three published approaches mentioned, our unchanged portion of SCs and window width depend on both degree and order in a more complex way. We have used the trend of mass change to test various parameters toward a preferred choice for a global compromise between the removal of the correlated errors and the minimization of signal distortion.

  2. Prediction of Meteorological Conditions for the Mars Science Laboratory Rover Curiosity and comparisons with the Rover Environmental Monitoring Station (REMS) measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pla-García, Jorge; Rafkin, Scot; Martín-Torres, Javier; Elvira-Gómez, Javier; Lepinette, Alain; Kahanpää, Henrik; Rodríguez-Manfredi, Jose; Navarro, Sara; Sebastián, Eduardo

    2013-04-01

    The Mars Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (MRAMS) is applied to the Gale Crater region, the landing site of the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Rover Curiosity. The landing site within Gale Crater is at one of the lowest elevation locations between the crater rim and the ~4 km high central mound known as Mt. Sharp. As Curiosity heads toward its long term target of Mt. Sharp, the meteorological conditions are expected to change due to the increasing influence of topographically-induced thermal circulations that have been predicted by numerous previous studies [1, 2 ,3, 4]. For the first time ever, these mesoscale model predictions of slope flows can be validated against the meteorological data that is currently being collected by the Rover Environmental Monitoring Station (REMS) [5]. We first provide a comparison of MRAMS predictions (pressure, temperature, winds, and ground temperature) to the REMS data available near the season of landing (~LS 150-200) in order to provide a baseline of model performance, and then we provide predictions of the meteorological conditions as a function of season and expected location of the rover as a function of time. Acknowledgements: JP-G and FJM-T are supported by Economy and Competitivity Ministry (AYA2011-25720). S. R. is supported by the MSL Project at JPL. References: [1] Rafkin, S. C. R., and T. I. Michaels (2003), J. Geophys. Res., 108(E12), 8091. [2] Michaels, T. I., and S. C. R. Rafkin (2008), J. Geophys. Res.-Planets, 113. [3] Toigo, A. D., and M. I. Richardson (2003), J. Geophys. Res., 108(E12), 8092. [4] Tyler, D., J. R. Barnes, and E. D. Skyllingstad (2008), J. Geophys. Res.-Planets, 113(E8). [5] Gómez-Elvira, J., et al. (2012), Space Science Reviews, 170(1-4), 583-640.

  3. Simulating the Phoenix Lander meteorological conditions with a Mars GCM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daerden, F.; Neary, L.; Whiteway, J.; Dickinson, C.; Komguem, L.; McConnell, J. C.; Kaminski, J. W.

    2012-04-01

    An updated version of the GEM-Mars Global Circulation Model [1] is applied for the simulation of the meteorological conditions at the Phoenix lander site for the time period of the surface operations (Ls=76-150). The simulation results for pressure and temperature at the surface are compared to data from the Phoenix Meteorological Station (MET). The vertical profiles of dust and temperature are compared to Phoenix LIDAR measurements and data from orbit (CRISM and MCS on MRO). The simulated conditions in the PBL are compared to those obtained in a dedicated PBL-Aeolian dust model [2] which was successfully applied to drive a detailed microphysical model [3] for the interpretation of clouds and precipitation observed by the LIDAR on Phoenix [4,5]. [1] Moudden, Y. and J.C. McConnell (2005): A new model for multiscale modeling of the Martian atmosphere, GM3, J. Geophys. Res. 110, E04001, doi:10.1029/2004JE002354 [2] Davy, R., P. A. Taylor, W. Weng, and P.-Y. Li (2009), A model of dust in the Martian lower atmosphere, J. Geophys. Res., 114, D04108, doi:10.1029/2008JD010481. [3] Daerden, F., J.A. Whiteway, R. Davy, C. Verhoeven, L. Komguem, C. Dickinson, P. A. Taylor, and N. Larsen (2010), Simulating Observed Boundary Layer Clouds on Mars, Geophys. Res. Lett., 37, L04203, doi:10.1029/2009GL041523 [4] Whiteway, J., M. Daly, A. Carswell, T. Duck, C. Dickinson, L. Komguem, and C. Cook (2008), Lidar on the Phoenix mission to Mars, J. Geophys. Res., 113, E00A08, doi:10.1029/2007JE003002. [5] Whiteway, J., et al. (2009), Mars water ice clouds and precipitation, Science, 325, 68 - 70.

  4. Integrated digital inverters based on two-dimensional anisotropic ReS2 field-effect transistors.

    PubMed

    Liu, Erfu; Fu, Yajun; Wang, Yaojia; Feng, Yanqing; Liu, Huimei; Wan, Xiangang; Zhou, Wei; Wang, Baigeng; Shao, Lubin; Ho, Ching-Hwa; Huang, Ying-Sheng; Cao, Zhengyi; Wang, Laiguo; Li, Aidong; Zeng, Junwen; Song, Fengqi; Wang, Xinran; Shi, Yi; Yuan, Hongtao; Hwang, Harold Y; Cui, Yi; Miao, Feng; Xing, Dingyu

    2015-01-01

    Semiconducting two-dimensional transition metal dichalcogenides are emerging as top candidates for post-silicon electronics. While most of them exhibit isotropic behaviour, lowering the lattice symmetry could induce anisotropic properties, which are both scientifically interesting and potentially useful. Here we present atomically thin rhenium disulfide (ReS2) flakes with unique distorted 1T structure, which exhibit in-plane anisotropic properties. We fabricated monolayer and few-layer ReS2 field-effect transistors, which exhibit competitive performance with large current on/off ratios (∼10(7)) and low subthreshold swings (100 mV per decade). The observed anisotropic ratio along two principle axes reaches 3.1, which is the highest among all known two-dimensional semiconducting materials. Furthermore, we successfully demonstrated an integrated digital inverter with good performance by utilizing two ReS2 anisotropic field-effect transistors, suggesting the promising implementation of large-scale two-dimensional logic circuits. Our results underscore the unique properties of two-dimensional semiconducting materials with low crystal symmetry for future electronic applications. PMID:25947630

  5. Studies of systematic uncertainties in the estimation of the monocular aperture of the HiRes experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    High Resolution Fly'S Eye Collaboration; Abu-Zayyad, T.; Amman, J. F.; Archbold, G.; Belov, K.; Belz, J. W.; Ben Zvi, S. Y.; Bergman, D. R.; Blake, S. A.; Brusova, O.; Burt, G. W.; Cao, Z.; Connolly, B. C.; Deng, W.; Fedorova, Y.; Finley, C. B.; Gray, R. C.; Hanlon, W. F.; Hoffman, C. M.; Hughes, G. A.; Holzscheiter, M. H.; Hüntemeyer, P.; Jones, B. F.; Jui, C. C. H.; Kim, K.; Kirn, M. A.; Loh, E. C.; Maestas, M. M.; Manago, N.; Marek, L. J.; Martens, K.; Matthews, J. A. J.; Matthews, J. N.; Moore, S. A.; O'Neill, A.; Painter, C. A.; Perera, L.; Reil, K.; Riehle, R.; Roberts, M.; Rodriguez, D.; Sasaki, M.; Schnetzer, S. R.; Scott, L. M.; Sinnis, G.; Smith, J. D.; Sokolsky, P.; Song, C.; Springer, R. W.; Stokes, B. T.; Thomas, J. R.; Thomas, S. B.; Thomson, G. B.; Tupa, D.; Westerhoff, S.; Wiencke, L. R.; Zech, A.; Zhang, X.

    2007-06-01

    We have studied several sources of systematic uncertainty in calculating the aperture of the High Resolution Fly’s Eye experiment (HiRes) in monocular mode, primarily as they affect the HiRes-II site. The energy dependent aperture is determined with detailed Monte Carlo simulations of the air showers and the detector response. We have studied the effects of changes to the input energy spectrum and composition used in the simulation. A realistic shape of the input spectrum is used in our analysis in order to avoid biases in the aperture estimate due to the limited detector resolution. We have examined the effect of exchanging our input spectrum with a simple E-3 power law in the “ankle” region. Uncertainties in the input composition are shown to be significant for energies below ˜1018 eV for data from the HiRes-II detector. Another source of uncertainties is the choice of the hadronic interaction model in the air shower generator. We compare the aperture estimate for two different models: QGSJet01 and SIBYLL 2.1. We also describe the implications of employing an atmospheric database with hourly measurements of the aerosol component, instead of using an average as has been used in our previously published measurements of the monocular spectra.

  6. Integrated digital inverters based on two-dimensional anisotropic ReS2 field-effect transistors

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Erfu; Fu, Yajun; Wang, Yaojia; Feng, Yanqing; Liu, Huimei; Wan, Xiangang; Zhou, Wei; Wang, Baigeng; Shao, Lubin; Ho, Ching-Hwa; Huang, Ying-Sheng; Cao, Zhengyi; Wang, Laiguo; Li, Aidong; Zeng, Junwen; Song, Fengqi; Wang, Xinran; Shi, Yi; Yuan, Hongtao; Hwang, Harold Y.; Cui, Yi; Miao, Feng; Xing, Dingyu

    2015-01-01

    Semiconducting two-dimensional transition metal dichalcogenides are emerging as top candidates for post-silicon electronics. While most of them exhibit isotropic behaviour, lowering the lattice symmetry could induce anisotropic properties, which are both scientifically interesting and potentially useful. Here we present atomically thin rhenium disulfide (ReS2) flakes with unique distorted 1T structure, which exhibit in-plane anisotropic properties. We fabricated monolayer and few-layer ReS2 field-effect transistors, which exhibit competitive performance with large current on/off ratios (∼107) and low subthreshold swings (100 mV per decade). The observed anisotropic ratio along two principle axes reaches 3.1, which is the highest among all known two-dimensional semiconducting materials. Furthermore, we successfully demonstrated an integrated digital inverter with good performance by utilizing two ReS2 anisotropic field-effect transistors, suggesting the promising implementation of large-scale two-dimensional logic circuits. Our results underscore the unique properties of two-dimensional semiconducting materials with low crystal symmetry for future electronic applications. PMID:25947630

  7. Rapidly solidified NiAl and FeAl

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaydosh, D. J.; Crimp, M. A.

    1984-01-01

    Melt spinning was used to produce rapidly solidified ribbons of the B2 intermetallics NiAl and FeAl. Both Fe-40Al and Fe-45Al possessed some bend ductility in the as spun condition. The bend ductility of Fe-40Al, Fe-45Al, and equiatomic NiAl increased with subsequent heat treatment. Heat treatment at approximately 0.85 T (sub m) resulted in significant grain growth in equiatomic FeAl and in all the NiAl compositions. Low bend ductility in both FeAl and NiAl generally coincided with intergranular failure, while increased bend ductility was characterized by increasing amounts of transgranular cleavage fracture.

  8. Clinical and Molecular Phenotype of Aicardi-Goutières Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Rice, Gillian ; Patrick, Teresa ; Parmar, Rekha ; Taylor, Claire F. ; Aeby, Alec ; Aicardi, Jean ; Artuch, Rafael ; Montalto, Simon Attard ; Bacino, Carlos A. ; Barroso, Bruno ; Baxter, Peter ; Benko, Willam S. ; Bergmann, Carsten ; Bertini, Enrico ; Biancheri, Roberta ; Blair, Edward M. ; Blau, Nenad ; Bonthron, David T. ; Briggs, Tracy ; Brueton, Louise A. ; Brunner, Han G. ; Burke, Christopher J. ; Carr, Ian M. ; Carvalho, Daniel R. ; Chandler, Kate E. ; Christen, Hans-Jürgen ; Corry, Peter C. ; Cowan, Frances M. ; Cox, Helen ; D’Arrigo, Stefano ; Dean, John ; De Laet, Corinne ; De Praeter, Claudine ; Déry, Catherine ; Ferrie, Colin D. ; Flintoff, Kim ; Frints, Suzanna G. M. ; Garcia-Cazorla, Angels ; Gener, Blanca ; Goizet, Cyril ; Goutières, Françoise ; Green, Andrew J. ; Guët, Agnès ; Hamel, Ben C. J. ; Hayward, Bruce E. ; Heiberg, Arvid ; Hennekam, Raoul C. ; Husson, Marie ; Jackson, Andrew P. ; Jayatunga, Rasieka ; Jiang, Yong-Hui ; Kant, Sarina G. ; Kao, Amy ; King, Mary D. ; Kingston, Helen M. ; Klepper, Joerg ; van der Knaap, Marjo S. ; Kornberg, Andrew J. ; Kotzot, Dieter ; Kratzer, Wilfried ; Lacombe, Didier ; Lagae, Lieven ; Landrieu, Pierre Georges ; Lanzi, Giovanni ; Leitch, Andrea ; Lim, Ming J. ; Livingston, John H. ; Lourenco, Charles M. ; Lyall, E. G. Hermione ; Lynch, Sally A. ; Lyons, Michael J. ; Marom, Daphna ; McClure, John P. ; McWilliam, Robert ; Melancon, Serge B. ; Mewasingh, Leena D. ; Moutard, Marie-Laure ; Nischal, Ken K. ; Østergaard, John R. ; Prendiville, Julie ; Rasmussen, Magnhild ; Rogers, R. Curtis ; Roland, Dominique ; Rosser, Elisabeth M. ; Rostasy, Kevin ; Roubertie, Agathe ; Sanchis, Amparo ; Schiffmann, Raphael ; Scholl-Bürgi, Sabine ; Seal, Sunita ; Shalev, Stavit A. ; Corcoles, C. Sierra ; Sinha, Gyan P. ; Soler, Doriette ; Spiegel, Ronen ; Stephenson, John B. P. ; Tacke, Uta ; Tan, Tiong Yang ; Till, Marianne ; Tolmie, John L. ; Tomlin, Pam ; Vagnarelli, Federica ; Valente, Enza Maria ; Van Coster, Rudy N. A. ; Van der Aa, Nathalie ; Vanderver, Adeline ; Vles, Johannes S. H. ; Voit, Thomas ; Wassmer, Evangeline ; Weschke, Bernhard ; Whiteford, Margo L. ; Willemsen, Michel A. A. ; Zankl, Andreas ; Zuberi, Sameer M. ; Orcesi, Simona ; Fazzi, Elisa ; Lebon, Pierre ; Crow, Yanick J. 

    2007-01-01

    Aicardi-Goutières syndrome (AGS) is a genetic encephalopathy whose clinical features mimic those of acquired in utero viral infection. AGS exhibits locus heterogeneity, with mutations identified in genes encoding the 3′→5′ exonuclease TREX1 and the three subunits of the RNASEH2 endonuclease complex. To define the molecular spectrum of AGS, we performed mutation screening in patients, from 127 pedigrees, with a clinical diagnosis of the disease. Biallelic mutations in TREX1, RNASEH2A, RNASEH2B, and RNASEH2C were observed in 31, 3, 47, and 18 families, respectively. In five families, we identified an RNASEH2A or RNASEH2B mutation on one allele only. In one child, the disease occurred because of a de novo heterozygous TREX1 mutation. In 22 families, no mutations were found. Null mutations were common in TREX1, although a specific missense mutation was observed frequently in patients from northern Europe. Almost all mutations in RNASEH2A, RNASEH2B, and RNASEH2C were missense. We identified an RNASEH2C founder mutation in 13 Pakistani families. We also collected clinical data from 123 mutation-positive patients. Two clinical presentations could be delineated: an early-onset neonatal form, highly reminiscent of congenital infection seen particularly with TREX1 mutations, and a later-onset presentation, sometimes occurring after several months of normal development and occasionally associated with remarkably preserved neurological function, most frequently due to RNASEH2B mutations. Mortality was correlated with genotype; 34.3% of patients with TREX1, RNASEH2A, and RNASEH2C mutations versus 8.0% RNASEH2B mutation–positive patients were known to have died (P=.001). Our analysis defines the phenotypic spectrum of AGS and suggests a coherent mutation-screening strategy in this heterogeneous disorder. Additionally, our data indicate that at least one further AGS-causing gene remains to be identified. PMID:17846997

  9. The Union and Médecins Sans Frontières approach to operational research.

    PubMed

    Harries, A D; Rusen, I D; Reid, T; Detjen, A K; Berger, S D; Bissell, K; Hinderaker, S G; Edginton, M; Fussell, M; Fujiwara, P I; Zachariah, R

    2011-02-01

    Operational research (OR) has become a hot topic at national meetings, international conferences and donor fora. The International Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease (The Union) and Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) Operational Centre Brussels strongly promote and implement OR with colleagues in low- and middle-income countries. Here we describe how the two organisations define OR, and explain the guiding principles and methodology that underpin the strategy for developing and expanding OR in those countries. We articulate The Union's and MSF's approach to supporting OR, highlighting the main synergies and differences. Then, using the Malawi National Tuberculosis Control Programme as an example, we show how OR can be embedded within tuberculosis control activities, leading to changes in policy and practice at the national level. We discuss the difficult, yet vitally important, issue of capacity building, and share our vision of a new paradigm of product-related training and performance-based OR fellowships as two ways of developing the necessary skills at country level to ensure research is actually performed. Finally, we highlight the need to consider and incorporate into practice the ethical components of OR. This is a key moment to be involved in OR. We are confident that in partnership with interested stakeholders, including the World Health Organization, we can stimulate the implementation of quality, relevant OR as an integral part of health service delivery that in turn will lead to better health for people, particularly for those living in the poorer parts of the world. PMID:21219672

  10. Simulation of Regional Explosion S-Phases (SiRES) Project

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, S C; Wagner, J; Larsen, S; Rodgers, A; Mayeda, K; Smith, K; Walter, W

    2003-07-01

    Seismic monitoring aims to locate and identify all events that generate elastic waves in the solid earth. Amplitudes and arrival-times of seismic phases are commonly exploited to accomplish these goals. For large events that produce strong body and surface waves out to 90{sup o}, events can be accurately located and the Ms/m{sub b} discriminant can be used to distinguish earthquakes from explosions. As event yield/magnitude decreases, the probability of detecting signals at distant stations diminishes, and monitoring relies heavily on regional-distance stations (between about 2{sup o} and 13{sup o}). Many regional discriminant and magnitude methods make use of S-phase amplitude measurements, which are expected to diminish for explosion sources. Despite the general success of regional monitoring methods there remain instances when explosions produce anomalously large S-phases that confound regional discriminants. The 2-year Simulation of Regional Explosion S-phases (SiRES) project explores the phenomenology of regional S-phase generation through numerical simulation. In the first year of this study we construct a 3-dimensional model of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and the surrounding region. Extensive databases of geologic information, including existing 3-dimensional models developed under past and ongoing NTS programs, are used to construct the regional model. In addition to deterministic geologic structure and topography we introduce stochastic variability within geologic units and along boundaries. The stochastic variability provides a more realistic simulation of the regional wave field, which is known to largely consist of scattered energy. Here we introduce the project and report on the first few months of progress.

  11. Ready for a world without antibiotics? The Pensières Antibiotic Resistance Call to Action

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Resistance to antibiotics has increased dramatically over the past few years and has now reached a level that places future patients in real danger. Microorganisms such as Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae, which are commensals and pathogens for humans and animals, have become increasingly resistant to third-generation cephalosporins. Moreover, in certain countries, they are also resistant to carbapenems and therefore susceptible only to tigecycline and colistin. Resistance is primarily attributed to the production of beta-lactamase genes located on mobile genetic elements, which facilitate their transfer between different species. In some rare cases, Gram-negative rods are resistant to virtually all known antibiotics. The causes are numerous, but the role of the overuse of antibiotics in both humans and animals is essential, as well as the transmission of these bacteria in both the hospital and the community, notably via the food chain, contaminated hands, and between animals and humans. In addition, there are very few new antibiotics in the pipeline, particularly for Gram-negative bacilli. The situation is slightly better for Gram-positive cocci as some potent and novel antibiotics have been made available in recent years. A strong and coordinated international programme is urgently needed. To meet this challenge, 70 internationally recognized experts met for a two-day meeting in June 2011 in Annecy (France) and endorsed a global call to action ("The Pensières Antibiotic Resistance Call to Action"). Bundles of measures that must be implemented simultaneously and worldwide are presented in this document. In particular, antibiotics, which represent a treasure for humanity, must be protected and considered as a special class of drugs. PMID:22958833

  12. Modulus measurements in ordered Co-Al, Fe-Al, and Ni-Al alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harmouche, M. R.; Wolfenden, A.

    1985-01-01

    The composition and/or temperature dependence of the dynamic Young's modulus for the ordered B2 Co-Al, Fe-Al, and Ni-Al aluminides has been investigated using the piezoelectric ultrasonic composite oscillator technique (PUCOT). The modulus has been measured in the composition interval 48.49 to 52.58 at. pct Co, 50.87 to 60.2 at. pct Fe, and 49.22 to 55.95 at. pct Ni for Co-Al, Fe-Al, and Ni-Al, respectively. The measured values for Co-Al are in the temperature interval 300 to 1300 K, while those for the other systems are for ambient temperature only. The data points show that Co-Al is stiffer than Fe-Al, which is stiffer than Ni-Al. The data points for Fe-Al and Ni-Al are slightly higher than those reported in the literature.

  13. The Borrelia burgdorferi telomere resolvase, ResT, anneals ssDNA complexed with its cognate ssDNA-binding protein

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Shu Hui; Kobryn, Kerri

    2016-01-01

    Spirochetes of the genus Borrelia possess unusual genomes that consist in a linear chromosome and multiple linear and circular plasmids. The linear replicons are terminated by covalently closed hairpin ends, referred to as hairpin telomeres. The hairpin telomeres represent a simple solution to the end-replication problem. Deoxyribonucleic acid replication initiates internally and proceeds bidirectionally toward the hairpin telomeres. The telomere resolvase, ResT, forms the hairpin telomeres from replicated telomere intermediates in a reaction with similarities to those promoted by type IB topoisomerases and tyrosine recombinases. ResT has also been shown to possess DNA single-strand annealing activity. We report here that ResT promotes single-strand annealing of both free DNA strands and ssDNA complexed with single-stranded DNA binding protein (SSB). The annealing of complementary strands bound by SSB requires a ResT–SSB interaction that is mediated by the conserved amphipathic C-terminal tail of SSB. These properties of ResT are similar to those demonstrated for the recombination mediator protein, RecO, of the RecF pathway. Borrelia burgdorferi is unusual in lacking identifiable homologs of the RecFOR proteins. We propose that ResT may provide missing RecFOR functions. PMID:27131360

  14. The Borrelia burgdorferi telomere resolvase, ResT, anneals ssDNA complexed with its cognate ssDNA-binding protein.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shu Hui; Kobryn, Kerri

    2016-06-20

    Spirochetes of the genus Borrelia possess unusual genomes that consist in a linear chromosome and multiple linear and circular plasmids. The linear replicons are terminated by covalently closed hairpin ends, referred to as hairpin telomeres. The hairpin telomeres represent a simple solution to the end-replication problem. Deoxyribonucleic acid replication initiates internally and proceeds bidirectionally toward the hairpin telomeres. The telomere resolvase, ResT, forms the hairpin telomeres from replicated telomere intermediates in a reaction with similarities to those promoted by type IB topoisomerases and tyrosine recombinases. ResT has also been shown to possess DNA single-strand annealing activity. We report here that ResT promotes single-strand annealing of both free DNA strands and ssDNA complexed with single-stranded DNA binding protein (SSB). The annealing of complementary strands bound by SSB requires a ResT-SSB interaction that is mediated by the conserved amphipathic C-terminal tail of SSB. These properties of ResT are similar to those demonstrated for the recombination mediator protein, RecO, of the RecF pathway. Borrelia burgdorferi is unusual in lacking identifiable homologs of the RecFOR proteins. We propose that ResT may provide missing RecFOR functions. PMID:27131360

  15. Comments on Li et al. Effects of in Utero Exposure to Dicyclohexyl Phthalate on Rat Fetal Leydig Cells. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2016, 13, 246

    PubMed Central

    Svingen, Terje

    2016-01-01

    Profiling the expression levels of genes or proteins in tissues comprising two or more cell types is commonplace in biological sciences. Such analyses present particular challenges, however, for example a potential shift in cellular composition, or ‘cellularity’, between specimens. That is, does an observed change in expression level represent what occurs within individual cells, or does it represent a shift in the ratio of different cell types within the tissue? This commentary attempts to highlight the importance of considering cellularity when interpreting quantitative expression data, using the mammalian testis and a recent study on the effects of phthalate exposure on testis function as an example. PMID:27231928

  16. Comments on Li et al. Effects of in Utero Exposure to Dicyclohexyl Phthalate on Rat Fetal Leydig Cells. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2016, 13, 246.

    PubMed

    Svingen, Terje

    2016-01-01

    Profiling the expression levels of genes or proteins in tissues comprising two or more cell types is commonplace in biological sciences. Such analyses present particular challenges, however, for example a potential shift in cellular composition, or 'cellularity', between specimens. That is, does an observed change in expression level represent what occurs within individual cells, or does it represent a shift in the ratio of different cell types within the tissue? This commentary attempts to highlight the importance of considering cellularity when interpreting quantitative expression data, using the mammalian testis and a recent study on the effects of phthalate exposure on testis function as an example. PMID:27231928

  17. Al Shanker Remembers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Educator, 2000

    2000-01-01

    In a 1996 interview shortly before his death, Al Shanker, longtime president of the American Federation of Teachers, discussed such topics as: his own educational experiences; how he learned about political fighting in the Boy Scouts; the appeal of socialism; multinational corporations and the nation state; teaching tough students; and John Dewey…

  18. ALS renewal moves forward

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falcone, R. W.; Feinberg, B.; Hussain, Z.; Kirz, J.; Krebs, G. F.; Padmore, H. A.; Robin, D. S.; Robinson, A. L.

    2007-11-01

    As the result of an extensive long-term planning process involving all its stakeholders—management, staff, and users—the ALS has seen its future and is aggressively moving ahead to implement its vision for keeping the facility at the cutting edge for the next 2-3 decades. The evolving strategic plan now in place aims to renew the ALS so it can address a new generation of fundamental questions about size dependent and dimensional-confinement phenomena at the nanoscale; correlation and complexity in physical, biological, and environmental systems; and temporal evolution, assembly, dynamics and ultrafast phenomena. The renewal spans three areas: (1) increased staffing at beamlines to support the growing user community and safety professionals to keep an increasingly complex facility hazard free; (2) implementing advances in accelerator, insertion device, beamline, and detector technology that will make it possible for ALS users to address emerging grand scientific and technological challenges with incisive world-class tools; and (3) construction of a user support building and guest housing that will increase the safety and user friendliness of the ALS by providing users office, meeting, experiment staging, and laboratory space for their work and on-site accommodations at reasonable rates.

  19. Fosetyl-al

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Fosetyl - al ; CASRN 39148 - 24 - 8 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Ef

  20. S6K1ing to ResTOR Adipogenesis with Polycomb.

    PubMed

    Juan, Aster H; Sartorelli, Vittorio

    2016-05-01

    Signal-directed chromatin recruitment of mammalian Polycomb complexes is a fundamental component of epigenetic regulation. In this issue, Yi et al. (2016) reveal how mTORC1 activation deploys the ribosomal serine/threonine kinase S6K1 and Polycomb proteins at genomic regulatory regions to repress expression of anti-adipogenic developmental regulators. PMID:27153531

  1. The impact of rhetoric and education on the "Res Gestae" of Ammianus Marcellinus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez, Pablo

    The aim of this thesis is to explore and underline the impact of education and rhetoric on the Res Gestae of Ammianus Marcellinus. I will examine the concept of education in two different aspects. First, I will determine the role of education in regards to Ammianus' early life by describing the cultural climate in the East in the fourth century (Introduction and chapter 1). In this analysis, I will argue that the historian's familiarity with Latin suggests an early acquaintance with the language, indicating that he should not be invariably associated with earlier Greek historians. Second, I will look at how the content of the curriculum is reflected in the RG, explaining how literary sources shaped the composition of the historian's digressions on geography (Chapter 3) and astronomy (Chapter 4). In the past, scholars have examined Ammianus' cultural digressions as an example of the tension between things seen and things read. In my argumentation, I will concentrate on explaining the reasons why Ammianus often tended to rely on literary works rather than observation. I will show that the explanation greatly lies in the content of the curriculum. Concerning the role of rhetoric, I will examine how rhetorical training is articulated in the RG. In Chapter 2, I will show that Ammianus' selection of historical material can be explained in light of the ancient theory of styles. In this context, I will study the role of a rhetorical device designed to raise the emotions of readers by bringing the scene before their eyes: enargeia. In Chapters 3 and 4, I will demonstrate that the cultural digressions in the RG are mostly the product of cultural stereotypes and literary influences. In Chapter 5, I will show the impact of rhetorical treatises on some passages of the RG, arguing that the traditional classification of oratory into deliberative, epideictic and judicial is echoed in both the speeches and the historical narrative. To conclude: the main purpose of my dissertation

  2. Energetic particle energy deposition in Titan's upper atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westlake, J. H.; Smith, H. T.; Mitchell, D. G.; Paranicas, C. P.; Rymer, A. M.; Bell, J. M.; Waite, J. H., Jr.; Mandt, K. E.

    2012-04-01

    Titan’s upper atmosphere has been observed to be variable on a pass-by-pass basis. During the nominal mission where the Cassini Ion and Neutral Mass Spectrometer (INMS) only sampled the northern hemisphere this variability was initially believed to be tied to solar drivers manifest in latitudinal variations in the thermal structure of the upper atmosphere. However, when Cassini delved into the southern hemisphere the latitudinal dependence was not present in the data. Recently, Westlake et al. (2011) showed that the pass-by-pass variability is correlated with the deviations in the plasma environment as identified by Rymer et al. (2009) and Simon et al. (2010). Furthermore, the studies of Westlake et al. (2011) and Bell et al. (2011) showed that Titan’s upper atmosphere responds to changes in the ambient magnetospheric plasma on timescales of roughly one Titan day (16 Earth days). We report on recent studies of energy deposition in Titan’s upper atmosphere. Previous studies by Smith et al. (2009), Cravens et al. (2008), Tseng et al. (2008), and Shah et al. (2009) reported on energetic proton and oxygen ion precipitation. Back of the envelope calculations by Sittler et al. (2009) showed that magnetospheric energy inputs are expected to be of the order of or greater than the solar processes. We report on further analysis of the plasma environment around Titan during the flybys that the INMS has good data. We utilize data from the Magnetospheric Imaging Instrument to determine how the magnetospheric particle population varies from pass to pass and how this influences the net magnetospheric energy input prior to the flyby. We also report on enhanced energetic neutral atom emissions during select highly energetic passes. References: Bell, J., et al.: “Simulating the time-dependent response of Titan's upper atmosphere to periods of magnetospheric forcing”. Geophys. Res. Lett., Vol. 38, L06202, 2011. Rymer, A. M., et al.: “Discrete classification and electron

  3. The BonaRes Centre - A virtual institute for soil research in the context of a sustainable bio-economy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wollschläger, Ute; Helming, Katharina; Heinrich, Uwe; Bartke, Stephan; Kögel-Knabner, Ingrid; Russell, David; Eberhardt, Einar; Vogel, Hans-Jörg

    2016-04-01

    Fertile soils are central resources for the production of biomass and provision of food and energy. A growing world population and latest climate targets lead to an increasing demand for both, food and bio-energy, which require preserving and improving the long-term productivity of soils as a bio-economic resource. At the same time, other soil functions and ecosystem services need to be maintained. To render soil management sustainable, we need to establish a scientific knowledge base about complex soil system processes that allows for the development of model tools to quantitatively predict the impact of a multitude of management measures on soil functions. This, finally, will allow for the provision of site-specific options for sustainable soil management. To face this challenge, the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research recently launched the funding program "Soil as a Natural Resource for the Bio-Economy - BonaRes". In a joint effort, ten collaborative projects and the coordinating BonaRes Centre are engaged to close existing knowledge gaps for a profound and systemic understanding of soil functions and their sensitivity to soil management. This presentation provides an overview of the concept of the BonaRes Centre which is responsible for i) setting up a comprehensive data base for soil-related information, ii) the development of model tools aiming to estimate the impact of different management measures on soil functions, and iii) establishing a web-based portal providing decision support tools for a sustainable soil management. A specific focus of the presentation will be laid on the so-called "knowledge-portal" providing the infrastructure for a community effort towards a comprehensive meta-analysis on soil functions as a basis for future model developments.

  4. Can Energy Cost During Low-Intensity Resistance Exercise be Predicted by the OMNI-RES Scale?

    PubMed

    Vianna, Jefferson M; Reis, Victor M; Saavedra, Francisco; Damasceno, Vinicius; Silva, Sérgio G; Goss, Fredric

    2011-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the precision of the OMNI-RES scale to predict energy cost (EC) at low intensity in four resistance exercises (RE). 17 male recreational body builders (age = 26.6 ± 4.9 years; height = 177.7 ± 0.1 cm; body weight = 79.0 ± 11.1 kg and percent body fat = 10.5 ± 4.6%) served as subjects. Initially tests to determine 1RM for four resistance exercises (bench press, half squat, lat pull down and triceps extension) were administered. Subjects also performed resistance exercise at 12, 16, 20, and 24% of 1RM at a rate of 40 bpm until volitional exhaustion. Oxygen uptake (VO2) and rate of perceived exertion (RPE) using the OMNI-RES were obtained during and after all RE. EC was calculated using VO2 and the caloric values of VO2 for non-protein RER. Regression analyses were performed for every RE, using EC as the dependent and RPE as the predictor variable. The triceps extension, lat pull down and bench press, RPE correlated strongly with EC (R > 0.97) and predicted EC with a error of less than 0.2 kcal.min(-1). In conclusion, RPE using the OMNI-RES scale can be considered as an accurate indicator of EC in the bench press, lat pull down and triceps extension performed by recreational bodybuilders, provided lower intensities are used (up to 24% of 1-RM) and provided each set of exercise is performed for the maximal sustainable duration. It would be interesting in future studies to consider having the subjects exercise at low intensities for longer durations than those in the present study. PMID:23486188

  5. Can Energy Cost During Low-Intensity Resistance Exercise be Predicted by the OMNI-RES Scale?

    PubMed Central

    Vianna, Jefferson M.; Reis, Victor M.; Saavedra, Francisco; Damasceno, Vinicius; Silva, Sérgio G.; Goss, Fredric

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the precision of the OMNI-RES scale to predict energy cost (EC) at low intensity in four resistance exercises (RE). 17 male recreational body builders (age = 26.6 ± 4.9 years; height = 177.7 ± 0.1 cm; body weight = 79.0 ± 11.1 kg and percent body fat = 10.5 ± 4.6%) served as subjects. Initially tests to determine 1RM for four resistance exercises (bench press, half squat, lat pull down and triceps extension) were administered. Subjects also performed resistance exercise at 12, 16, 20, and 24% of 1RM at a rate of 40 bpm until volitional exhaustion. Oxygen uptake (VO2) and rate of perceived exertion (RPE) using the OMNI-RES were obtained during and after all RE. EC was calculated using VO2 and the caloric values of VO2 for non-protein RER. Regression analyses were performed for every RE, using EC as the dependent and RPE as the predictor variable. The triceps extension, lat pull down and bench press, RPE correlated strongly with EC (R > 0.97) and predicted EC with a error of less than 0.2 kcal.min−1. In conclusion, RPE using the OMNI-RES scale can be considered as an accurate indicator of EC in the bench press, lat pull down and triceps extension performed by recreational bodybuilders, provided lower intensities are used (up to 24% of 1-RM) and provided each set of exercise is performed for the maximal sustainable duration. It would be interesting in future studies to consider having the subjects exercise at low intensities for longer durations than those in the present study. PMID:23486188

  6. ALS Project Management Manual

    SciTech Connect

    Krupnick, Jim; Harkins, Joe

    2000-05-01

    This manual has been prepared to help establish a consistent baseline of management practices across all ALS projects. It describes the initial process of planning a project, with a specific focus on the production of a formal project plan. We feel that the primary weakness in ALS project management efforts to date stems from a failure to appreciate the importance of ''up-front'' project planning. In this document, we present a guide (with examples) to preparing the documents necessary to properly plan, monitor, and control a project's activities. While following the manual will certainly not guarantee good project management, failure to address the issues we raise will dramatically reduce the chance of success. Here we define success as meeting the technical goals on schedule and within the prescribed budget.

  7. ALS insertion devices

    SciTech Connect

    Hoyer, E.; Chin, J.; Halbach, K.; Hassenzahl, W.V.; Humphries, D.; Kincaid, B.; Lancaster, H.; Plate, D.

    1990-11-01

    The Advanced Light Source (ALS), the first US third generation synchrotron radiation source, is currently under construction at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. The low-emittance, 1.5 GeV electron storage ring and the insertion devices are specifically designed to produce high brightness beams in the UV to soft X-Ray range. The planned initial complement of insertion devices includes four 4.6 m long undulators, with period lengths of 3.9 cm, 5.0 cm (2) and 8.0 cm, and a 2.9 m long wiggler of 16 cm period length. Undulator design is well advanced and fabrication has begun on the 5.0 cm and 8.0 cm period length undulators. This paper discusses ALS insertion device requirements; general design philosophy; and design of the magnetic structure, support structure/drive systems, control system and vacuum system. 18 refs., 9 figs., 5 tabs.

  8. Ausbildung als zentrale Aufgabe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krämer, Walter; Schmerbach, Sibylle

    Anders als Lesen und Schreiben zählen Grundkenntnisse in Statistik heute noch nicht zu den Voraussetzungen einer sinnvollen Teilhabe am Sozialgeschehen. Und auch in der akademischen Statistik-Ausbildung gibt es noch einiges zu tun. Das vorliegende Kapitel zeichnet die Geschichte dieser akademischen Ausbildung an deutschen Universitäten nach dem zweiten Weltkrieg nach, stellt aktuelle Defizite vor und weist auf mögliche Verbesserungen hin.

  9. Retention of Rotavirus Infectivity in Mussels Heated by Using the French Recipe Moules Marinières.

    PubMed

    Souza, Doris Sobral Marques; Miura, Takayuki; Le Mennec, Cécile; Barardi, Célia Regina Monte; Le Guyader, Françoise S

    2015-11-01

    To evaluate the persistence of infectious virus after heating, mussels contaminated with a rotavirus strain were prepared following the French recipe moules marinières (mariner's mussels). Rotavirus was then quantified by real-time quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) and a cell culture infectivity assay. Results showed the persistence of infectious virus after 3 min of cooking. After 5 min, when no infectious virus could be detected, the RT-qPCR approach showed a 1-log decrease compared with concentrations detected after 1 min of cooking. PMID:26555530

  10. RES-TOCSY: A facile approach for accurate determination of magnitudes, and relative signs of nJHF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lokesh; Chaudhari, Sachin R.; Suryaprakash, N.

    2014-05-01

    The RES-TOCSY experiment for accurate determination of heteronuclear nJHF is reported. The main feature of the proposed technique is the accurate measurement of magnitudes of heteronuclear couplings from the displacement of cross sections of the 2D spectrum and their relative signs from the slopes of their displacement vectors. The experiment is highly advantageous as the couplings of smaller magnitudes hidden within line widths could also be accurately determined, and also in situations when the spectrum does not display any coupling fine structures. The efficient utility of the developed pulse sequence is unambiguously established on fluorine containing aromatic and aliphatic molecules.

  11. Generation of Small-Mode Particles via Nucleation of Meteoric Dust in the Upper Haze of Venus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yung, Yuk; Gao, P.; Zhang, X.; Crisp, D.; Bardeen, C. G.

    2012-10-01

    Observations by the SPICAV/SOIR instruments aboard Venus Express has revealed that the Upper Haze of Venus is populated by two particle modes, as reported by Wilquet et al. (J. Geophys. Res., 114, E00B42, 13pp, 2009). In this work we posit that the large mode is due to the upwelling of cloud particles, while the smaller mode is generated by the nucleation of meteoric dust. We test this hypothesis by using version 3.0 of the Community Aerosol and Radiation Model for Atmospheres, first developed by Turco et al. (J. Atmos. Sci., 36, 699-717, 1979) and upgraded by Bardeen et al. (The CARMA 3.0 microphysics package in CESM, Whole Atmosphere Working Group Meeting, 2011). Using the meteoric dust production profile of Kalashnikova et al. (Geophys. Res. Lett., 27, 3293-3296, 2000), the sulfur/sulfate condensation nuclei production profile of Imamura and Hashimoto (J. Atmos. Sci., 58, 3597-3612, 2001), and sulfuric acid vapour production profile of Zhang et al. (Icarus, 217, 714-739, 2012), we numerically simulate a column of the Venus atmosphere from 40 to 100 km above the surface. Our aerosol number density results agree well with Pioneer Venus data from Knollenberg and Hunten (J. Geophys. Res., 85, 8039-8058, 1980), while our gas distribution results match that of Kolodner and Steffes (Icarus, 132, 151-169, 1998). There is a mediocre agreement between our cloud deck size distribution and Pioneer Venus data. The Upper Haze size distribution shows two lognormal distributions overlapping each other, possibly indicating the presence of two modes, though more analysis is required at this time. Finally, we treat the simulated aerosol particles as Mie scatterers and compute their optical parameters. The results show a minimum in the optical depth at a wavelength of 300 nm, comparable to the results of Lacis (J. Atmos. Sci., 32, 1107-1124, 1975).

  12. Martian Dust Aerosol Size and Shape as Constrained by Phoenix Lander Polarimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemmon, Mark T.; Mason, Emily L.

    2014-11-01

    Dust aerosol morphology is important to dust transport and the radiative heating of the Martian atmosphere. Previous analyses of Mars dust have shown that spherical particles are a bad analog for the dust, in terms of reproducing the distribution of scattered light. Parameterized scattering, based on laboratory observations of scattering by irregular dust particles, has been used for Viking, Pathfinder and Mars Exploration Rover data [Pollack et al., J. Geophys. Res. 100, 1995; Tomasko et al., J. Geophys. Res. 104, 1999; Lemmon et al., Science 306, 2004]. Analytical calculations have shown that cylinders are a better scattering analog than spheres [Wolff et al., J. Geophys. Res. 114, 2009]. Terrestrial studies have shown that a diverse assortment of triaxial ellipsoids is a good analog for dust aerosol [Bi et al., Applied Optics 48, 2009].The Phoenix Lander operated in the Martian arctic for 5 months of 2008, around the northern summer solstice. During the mission atmospheric optical depth was tracked through direct solar imaging by the Surface Stereo Imager (SSI). For solar longitude (Ls) 78-95 and 140-149, small dust storms dominated the weather. Low-dust conditions (optical depths <0.4) dominated during Ls 95-140, with sporadic ice clouds becoming more common after Ls 108. The SSI also obtained occasional cross-sky photometric data through several filters from 440 to 1000 nm and cross-sky polarimetry at 750 nm wavelength. Radiative transfer models of the sky radiance distribution are consistent with dust aerosols in the same 1.3-1.6 micron range reported for models of observations from previous missions. Cylinders, triaxial ellipsoids, and the parametric model can fit sky radiances; spheres cannot. The observed linear polarization, which reached 4-5% and had a similar angular distribution to Rayleigh polarization, is similar to the triaxial ellipsoid model, but not spheres or cylinders. An extension to the parametric model using 7-10% Rayleigh scattering mixed

  13. Optical gain characteristics in Al-rich AlGaN/AlN quantum wells

    SciTech Connect

    Oto, Takao; Banal, Ryan G.; Funato, Mitsuru; Kawakami, Yoichi

    2014-05-05

    The optical gain characteristics of Al-rich AlGaN/AlN quantum wells (QWs) were assessed by the variable stripe length method at room temperature. An Al{sub 0.79}Ga{sub 0.21}N/AlN QW with a well width of 5 nm had a large optical gain of 140 cm{sup −1}. Increasing the excitation length induced a redshift due to the gain consumption and the consequent saturation of the amplified spontaneous emission. Moreover, a change in the dominant gain polarization with Al composition, which was attributed to switching of the valence band ordering of strained AlGaN/AlN QWs at Al compositions of ∼0.8, was experimentally demonstrated.

  14. Hunting the Extinct Steppe Bison (Bison priscus) Mitochondrial Genome in the Trois-Frères Paleolithic Painted Cave.

    PubMed

    Marsolier-Kergoat, Marie-Claude; Palacio, Pauline; Berthonaud, Véronique; Maksud, Frédéric; Stafford, Thomas; Bégouën, Robert; Elalouf, Jean-Marc

    2015-01-01

    Despite the abundance of fossil remains for the extinct steppe bison (Bison priscus), an animal that was painted and engraved in numerous European Paleolithic caves, a complete mitochondrial genome sequence has never been obtained for this species. In the present study we collected bone samples from a sector of the Trois-Frères Paleolithic cave (Ariège, France) that formerly functioned as a pitfall and was sealed before the end of the Pleistocene. Screening the DNA content of the samples collected from the ground surface revealed their contamination by Bos DNA. However, a 19,000-year-old rib collected on a rock apart the pathway delineated for modern visitors was devoid of such contaminants and reproducibly yielded Bison priscus DNA. High-throughput shotgun sequencing combined with conventional PCR analysis of the rib DNA extract enabled to reconstruct a complete mitochondrial genome sequence of 16,318 bp for the extinct steppe bison with a 10.4-fold coverage. Phylogenetic analyses robustly established the position of the Bison priscus mitochondrial genome as basal to the clade delineated by the genomes of the modern American Bison bison. The extinct steppe bison sequence, which exhibits 93 specific polymorphisms as compared to the published Bison bison mitochondrial genomes, provides an additional resource for the study of Bovinae specimens. Moreover this study of ancient DNA delineates a new research pathway for the analysis of the Magdalenian Trois-Frères cave. PMID:26083419

  15. Hunting the Extinct Steppe Bison (Bison priscus) Mitochondrial Genome in the Trois-Frères Paleolithic Painted Cave

    PubMed Central

    Marsolier-Kergoat, Marie-Claude; Palacio, Pauline; Berthonaud, Véronique; Maksud, Frédéric; Stafford, Thomas; Bégouën, Robert; Elalouf, Jean-Marc

    2015-01-01

    Despite the abundance of fossil remains for the extinct steppe bison (Bison priscus), an animal that was painted and engraved in numerous European Paleolithic caves, a complete mitochondrial genome sequence has never been obtained for this species. In the present study we collected bone samples from a sector of the Trois-Frères Paleolithic cave (Ariège, France) that formerly functioned as a pitfall and was sealed before the end of the Pleistocene. Screening the DNA content of the samples collected from the ground surface revealed their contamination by Bos DNA. However, a 19,000-year-old rib collected on a rock apart the pathway delineated for modern visitors was devoid of such contaminants and reproducibly yielded Bison priscus DNA. High-throughput shotgun sequencing combined with conventional PCR analysis of the rib DNA extract enabled to reconstruct a complete mitochondrial genome sequence of 16,318 bp for the extinct steppe bison with a 10.4-fold coverage. Phylogenetic analyses robustly established the position of the Bison priscus mitochondrial genome as basal to the clade delineated by the genomes of the modern American Bison bison. The extinct steppe bison sequence, which exhibits 93 specific polymorphisms as compared to the published Bison bison mitochondrial genomes, provides an additional resource for the study of Bovinae specimens. Moreover this study of ancient DNA delineates a new research pathway for the analysis of the Magdalenian Trois-Frères cave. PMID:26083419

  16. Development of an aerosol-chemistry transport model coupled to non-hydrostatic icosahedral atmospheric model (NICAM) through applying a stretched grid system to regional simulations around Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goto, D.; Nakajima, T.; Masaki, S.

    2014-12-01

    Air pollution has a great impact on both climate change and human health. One effective way to tackle with these issues is a use of atmospheric aerosol-chemistry models with high-resolution in a global scale. For this purpose, we have developed an aerosol-chemistry model based on a global cloud-resolving model (GCRM), Nonhydrostatic Icosahedral Atmospheric Model (NICAM; Tomita and Satoh, Fluid. Dyn. Res. 2004; Satoh et al., J. Comput. Phys. 2008, PEPS, 2014) under MEXT/RECCA/SALSA project. In the present study, we have simulated aerosols and tropospheric ozone over Japan by our aerosol-chemistry model "NICAM-Chem" with a stretched-grid system of approximately 10 km resolution, for saving the computer resources. The aerosol and chemistry modules are based on Spectral Radiation-Transport Model for Aerosol Species (SPRINTARS; Takemura et al., J. Geophys. Res., 2005) and Chemical AGCM for Study of Atmospheric Environment and Radiative Forcing (CHASER; Sudo et al., J. Geophys. Res., 2002). We found that our model can generally reproduce both aerosols and ozone, in terms of temporal variations (daily variations of aerosols and diurnal variations of ozone). Under MEXT/RECCA/SALSA project, we also have used these results obtained by NICAM-Chem for the assessment of their impact on human health.

  17. AL Amyloidosis and Agent Orange

    MedlinePlus

    ... for survivors' benefits . Research on AL amyloidosis and herbicides The Health and Medicine Division (formally known as ... to the compounds of interest found in the herbicide Agent Orange and AL amyloidosis." VA made a ...

  18. Al(+)-ligand binding energies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sodupe, M.; Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Ab initio calculations are used to optimize the structure and determine the binding energies of Al(+) to a series of ligands. For Al(+)-CN, the bonding was found to have a large covalent component. For the remaining ligands, the bonding is shown to be electrostatic in origin. The results obtained for Al(+) are compared with those previously reported for Mg(+).

  19. Al Jazirah, Sudan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    Al Jazirah (also Gezira) is one of the 26 states of Sudan. The state lies between the Blue Nile and the White Nile in the east-central region of the country. It is a well populated area suitable for agriculture. The area was at the southern end of Nubia and little is known about its ancient history and only limited archaeological work has been conducted in this area. The region has benefited from the Gezira Scheme, a program to foster cotton farming begun in 1925. At that time the Sennar Dam and numerous irrigation canals were built. Al Jazirah became the Sudan's major agricultural region with more than 2.5 million acres (10,000 km) under cultivation. The initial development project was semi-private, but the government nationalized it in 1950. Cotton production increased in the 1970s but by the 1990s increased wheat production has supplanted a third of the land formerly seeded with cotton.

    The image was acquired December 25, 2006, covers an area of 56 x 36.4 km, and is located near 14.5 degrees north latitude, 33.1 degrees east longitude.

    The U.S. science team is located at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Science Mission Directorate.

  20. Studies of 27Al NMR in EuAl4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niki, H.; Nakamura, S.; Higa, N.; Kuroshima, H.; Toji, T.; Yogi, M.; Nakamura, A.; Hedo, M.; Nakama, T.; Ōnuki, Y.; Harima, H.

    2015-03-01

    EuAl4 orders antiferromagnetically at TN ≈ 16 K with an effective magnetic moment of 8.02 μB. In the paramagnetic phase, the magnetic susceptibility of EuAl4 follows the Curie-Weiss law with a positive Curie-Weiss temperature θP = +14 K. The antiferromagnetic state is changed into the field induced ferromagnetic state at a critical field Hc of approximately 2 T. In order to microscopically investigate the magnetic and electronic properties in EuAl4, the NMR measurements of EuAl4 have been carried out at temperatures between 2 and 300 K, applying an external magnetic field of approximately 6.5 T. The 27Al NMR spectra corresponding to Al(I) and Al(II) sites are obtained. From the 27Al NMR spectra, the isotropic part Kiso and anisotropic part Kaniso of Knight shift, and nuclear quadrupole frequncy νQ are obtained. The Kiso and Kaniso shift to negative side with decreasing temperature due to the RKKY interaction. These temperature dependences follow the Curie-Weiss law with θP = +14 K, which is consistent with that of the magnetic susceptibility. From the K - χ plot, the values of the hyperfine fields Hhf_iso and Hhf_aniso are -3.231 and -0.162 kOe/μB for Al(I) site, and -1.823 and -0.264 kOe/μB for Al(II) site, respectively. The values of νQ of 27Al nucleus for Al(I) and Al(II) sites are approximately 0.865 and 0.409 MHz, respectively. The nuclear relaxation time T1 of 27Al NMR for both sites is almost constant in the paramagnetic phase, while the value of 1/T1 is abruptly decreased in the ordered ferromagnetic state.

  1. MHD instability with dawn-dusk symmetry in near-Earth plasma sheet during substorm growth phase*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, P.; Raeder, J.; Hegna, C.; Sovinec, C.

    2010-12-01

    Recent global MHD simulations of March 23, 2007 THEMIS substorm event using the OpenGGCM code have confirmed the presence of both high-ky ballooning modes and zero-ky instabilities in the near-Earth plasma sheet during the substorm growth phase [Raeder et al 2010]. These results are consistent with findings from earlier analyses [Siscoe et al 2009; Zhu et al 2009]. Here ky is the azimuthal wavenumber in the dawn-dusk direction. However, the nature and role of the ky=0 mode, as well as its interaction with the high ky ballooning modes, in the process leading to the expansion onset remain unclear. In this work, we focus on the stability properties of the ky=0 mode. A re-evaluation of the tail-tearing mode criterion by Sitnov and Schindler (2009) suggested that the dipolarization front (DF) structure identified in THEMIS observations [Runov et al 2009] could be tearing-unstable. Linear calculations using the NIMROD code have found a growing tearing mode in a generalized Harris sheet with a DF-like structure, which is also a unique feature closely correlated with the appearance of zero-ky mode in the OpenGGCM simulation. The ideal-MHD energy principle analysis is used to address the question whether the ky=0 mode is an ideal or resistive MHD instability. We further compare the linear and nonlinear tail-tearing mode in NIMROD simulations with the ky=0 mode from OpenGGCM simulations. *Supported by NSF Grants AGS-0902360 and PHY-0821899. References: Raeder, J., P. Zhu, Y.-S. Ge, and G. Siscoe (2010), Tail force imbalance and ballooning instability preceding substorm onset, submitted to J. Geophys. Res. Runov, A., et al. (2009), Geophys. Res. Lett., 36, L14106. Siscoe, G.L., M.M. Kuznetsova, and J. Raeder (2009), Ann. Geophys., 27, 3141. Sitnov, M.I. and K. Schindler (2010), Geophys. Res. Lett., 37, L08102. Zhu, P., J. Raeder, K. Germaschewski, and C.C. Hegna (2009), Ann. Geophys., 27, 1129.

  2. RES-529: a PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway inhibitor that dissociates the mTORC1 and mTORC2 complexes

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    RES-529 (previously named Palomid 529, P529) is a phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/AKT/mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway inhibitor that interferes with the pathway through both mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) and mTOR complex 2 (mTORC2) dissociation. This compound is currently being developed in oncology and ophthalmology. The oncology focus is for the treatment of glioblastoma, where it has received orphan designation by the US Food and Drug Administration, and prostate cancer. We present a review of the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway, its role in tumorigenesis, and the potential of RES-529 in cancer treatment. RES-529 inhibits mTORC1/mTORC2 activity in various cancer cell lines, as noted by decreased phosphorylation of substrates including ribosomal protein S6, 4E-BP1, and AKT, leading to cell growth inhibition and death, with activity generally in the range of 5–15 μmol/l. In animal tumor models where the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway is abnormally activated (i.e. glioblastoma, prostate cancer, and breast cancer), RES-529 reduces tumor growth by as much as 78%. RES-529 treatment is synergistic with radiation therapy, chemotherapy, and hormonal therapy in reducing tumor growth, potentially by preventing PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway activation associated with these treatments. Furthermore, this compound has shown antiangiogenic activity in several animal models. mTORC1 and mTORC2 have redundant and distinct activities that contribute toward oncogenesis. Current inhibitors of this pathway have primarily targeted mTORC1, but have shown limited clinical efficacy. Inhibitors of mTORC1 and mTORC2 such as RES-529 may therefore have the potential to overcome the deficiencies found in targeting only mTORC1. PMID:26918392

  3. RES-529: a PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway inhibitor that dissociates the mTORC1 and mTORC2 complexes.

    PubMed

    Weinberg, Mark A

    2016-07-01

    RES-529 (previously named Palomid 529, P529) is a phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/AKT/mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway inhibitor that interferes with the pathway through both mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) and mTOR complex 2 (mTORC2) dissociation. This compound is currently being developed in oncology and ophthalmology. The oncology focus is for the treatment of glioblastoma, where it has received orphan designation by the US Food and Drug Administration, and prostate cancer. We present a review of the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway, its role in tumorigenesis, and the potential of RES-529 in cancer treatment. RES-529 inhibits mTORC1/mTORC2 activity in various cancer cell lines, as noted by decreased phosphorylation of substrates including ribosomal protein S6, 4E-BP1, and AKT, leading to cell growth inhibition and death, with activity generally in the range of 5-15 μmol/l. In animal tumor models where the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway is abnormally activated (i.e. glioblastoma, prostate cancer, and breast cancer), RES-529 reduces tumor growth by as much as 78%. RES-529 treatment is synergistic with radiation therapy, chemotherapy, and hormonal therapy in reducing tumor growth, potentially by preventing PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway activation associated with these treatments. Furthermore, this compound has shown antiangiogenic activity in several animal models. mTORC1 and mTORC2 have redundant and distinct activities that contribute toward oncogenesis. Current inhibitors of this pathway have primarily targeted mTORC1, but have shown limited clinical efficacy. Inhibitors of mTORC1 and mTORC2 such as RES-529 may therefore have the potential to overcome the deficiencies found in targeting only mTORC1. PMID:26918392

  4. GNSS-monitoring of Natural Hazards: Ionospheric Detection of Earthquakes and Volcano Eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shults, K.; Astafyeva, E.; Lognonne, P. H.

    2015-12-01

    During the last few decades earthquakes as sources of strong perturbations in the ionosphere have been reported by many researchers, and in the last few years the seismo-ionosphere coupling has been more and more discussed (e.g., Calais and Minster, 1998, Phys. Earth Planet. Inter., 105, 167-181; Afraimovich et al., 2010, Earth, Planets, Space, V.62, No.11, 899-904; Rolland et al., 2011, Earth Planets Space, 63, 853-857). Co-volcanic ionospheric perturbations have come under the scrutiny of science only in recent years but observations have already shown that mass and energy injections of volcanic activities can also excite oscillations in the ionosphere (Heki, 2006, Geophys. Res. Lett., 33, L14303; Dautermann et al., 2009, Geophys. Res., 114, B02202). The ionospheric perturbations are induced by acoustic and gravity waves generated in the neutral atmosphere by seismic source or volcano eruption. The upward propagating vibrations of the atmosphere interact with the plasma in the ionosphere by the particle collisions and excite variations of electron density detectable with dual-frequency receivers of the Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS). In addition to co-seismic ionospheric disturbances (CID) observations, ionospheric GNSS measurements have recently proved to be useful to obtain ionospheric images for the seismic fault allowing to provide information on its' parameters and localization (Astafyeva et al., 2011, Geophys. Res. Letters, 38, L22104). This work describes how the GNSS signals can be used for monitoring of natural hazards on examples of the 9 March 2011 M7.3 Tohoku Foreshock and April 2015 M7.8 Nepal earthquake as well as the April 2015 Calbuco volcano eruptions. We also show that use of high-resolution GNSS data can aid to plot the ionospheric images of seismic fault.

  5. Water vapor in Titan's stratosphere from Cassini CIRS far-infrared spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cottini, V.; Nixon, C. A.; Jennings, D. E.; Anderson, C. M.; Gorius, N.; Bjoraker, G. L.; Coustenis, A.; Teanby, N. A.; Achterberg, R. K.; Bézard, B.; de Kok, R.; Lellouch, E.; Irwin, P. G. J.; Flasar, F. M.; Bampasidis, G.

    2012-08-01

    Here we report the measurement of water vapor in Titan's stratosphere using the Cassini Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS, Flasar, F.M. et al. [2004]. Space Sci. Rev. 115, 169-297). CIRS senses water emissions in the far infrared spectral region near 50 μm, which we have modeled using two independent radiative transfer codes (NEMESIS (Irwin, P.G.J. et al. [2008]. J. Quant. Spectrosc. Radiat. Trans. 109, 1136-1150) and ART (Coustenis, A. et al. [2007]. Icarus 189, 35-62; Coustenis, A. et al. [2010]. Icarus 207, 461-476). From the analysis of nadir spectra we have derived a mixing ratio of 0.14 ± 0.05 ppb at an altitude of 97 km, which corresponds to an integrated (from 0 to 600 km) surface normalized column abundance of 3.7 ± 1.3 × 1014 molecules/cm2. In the latitude range 80°S to 30°N we see no evidence for latitudinal variations in these abundances within the error bars. Using limb observations, we obtained mixing ratios of 0.13 ± 0.04 ppb at an altitude of 115 km and 0.45 ± 0.15 ppb at an altitude of 230 km, confirming that the water abundance has a positive vertical gradient as predicted by photochemical models (e.g. Lara, L.M., Lellouch, F., Lopez-Moreno, J.J., Rodrigo, R. [1996]. J. Geophys. Res. 101(23), 261; Wilson, E.H., Atreya, S.K. [2004]. J. Geophys. Res. 109, E6; Hörst, S.M., Vuitton, V., Yelle, R.V. [2008]. J. Geophys. Res., 113, E10). We have also fitted our data using scaling factors of ˜0.1-0.6 to these photochemical model profiles, indicating that the models over-predict the water abundance in Titan's lower stratosphere.

  6. Quantum chemical study of ternary mixtures of: HNO3:H2SO4:H2O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verdes, M. A.; Gómez, P. C.; Gálvez, O.

    2009-04-01

    Water, nitric acid and sulfuric acid are important atmospheric species as individual species and as hydrogen-bonded aggregates involved in many physical-chemical processes both superficial and bulk. The importance of heterogeneous chemical reactions taking place on ice surfaces, either solid water or solid water plus nitric or sulfuric acid, is well established now in relation to the ozone-depleting mechanisms. Also the importance of liquid droplets formed by HNO3.H2SO4.H2O as components of PSC was soon recognized [1-3]. Finally the physical properties of finely divided aqueous systems is an interesting and active field of research in which theoretical information on the microphysical domain systems may help to understand and rationalize the wealth of experimental information. This can also be the initial step in the study of more complex mixtures with higher amounts of water or variable proportions of their constituents. This kind of calculations have been successfully performed in the past[4]. We present here our results on the structure and spectroscopic and thermodynamic properties of the energy-lowest lying structures among those thermodynamically stable formed by linking the acids plus water. The calculations have been carried out by means of DFT methods (in particular the successful B3LYP) using different basis sets that contain appropriate sets of polarization and diffuse functions up to quadruple-Z quality (Dunninǵs aug-cc-pVQZ). Careful assessment of the dependability of the methodology used has been carried out. This work has been supported by the Spanish Ministry of Education, Projects FIS2007-61686 and CTQ2008-02578/BQU References: [1] Carslaw, K. S. et al.: Geophys. Res. Lett. 21, 2479-2482, 1994 [2] Drdla, K. Et al. :Geophys. Res. Lett. 21, 2473-2478, 1994 [3] Tabazadeh, A. et al.: Geophys. Res. Lett 21, 1619-1622, 1994 [4] Escribano, R et al.: J. J. Chem. Phys A 2003, 107, 652.

  7. Interfacial characterization of Al-Al thermocompression bonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malik, N.; Carvalho, P. A.; Poppe, E.; Finstad, T. G.

    2016-05-01

    Interfaces formed by Al-Al thermocompression bonding were studied by the transmission electron microscopy. Si wafer pairs having patterned bonding frames were bonded using Al films deposited on Si or SiO2 as intermediate bonding media. A bond force of 36 or 60 kN at bonding temperatures ranging from 400-550 °C was applied for a duration of 60 min. Differences in the bonded interfaces of 200 μm wide sealing frames were investigated. It was observed that the interface had voids for bonding with 36 kN at 400 °C for Al deposited both on Si and on SiO2. However, the dicing yield was 33% for Al on Si and 98% for Al on SiO2, attesting for the higher quality of the latter bonds. Both a bond force of 60 kN applied at 400 °C and a bond force of 36 kN applied at 550 °C resulted in completely bonded frames with dicing yields of, respectively, 100% and 96%. A high density of long dislocations in the Al grains was observed for the 60 kN case, while the higher temperature resulted in grain boundary rotation away from the original Al-Al interface towards more stable configurations. Possible bonding mechanisms and reasons for the large difference in bonding quality of the Al films deposited on Si or SiO2 are discussed.

  8. Studies of 27Al NMR in SrAl4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niki, Haruo; Higa, Nonoka; Kuroshima, Hiroko; Toji, Tatsuki; Morishima, Mach; Minei, Motofumi; Yogi, Mamoru; Nakamura, Ai; Hedo, Masato; Nakama, Takao; Ōnuki, Yoshichika; Harima, Hisatomo

    A charge density wave (CDW) transition at TCDW = 243 K and a structural phase (SP) transition at approximately 100 K occur in SrAl4 with the BaAl4-type body center tetragonal structure, which is the divalent and non-4f electron reference compound of EuAl4. To understand the behaviors of the CDW and SP transitions, the 27Al NMR measurements using a single crystal and a powder sample of SrAl4 have been carried out. The line width below TCDW is modulated by an electrical quadruple interaction between 27Al nucleus and CDW charge modulation. The incommensurate CDW state below TCDW changes into a different structure below TSP. The temperature dependences of Knight shifts of 27Al(I) and 27Al(II) show the different behaviors. The temperature variation of 27Al(I) Knight shift shows anomalies at the CDW and SP transition temperatures, revealing the shift to negative side below TCDW, which is attributable to the core polarization of the d-electrons. However, 27Al(II) Knight shift keeps almost constant except for the small shift due to the SP transition. The 1/T1T of 27Al(I) indicates the obvious changes due to the CDW and SP transitions, while that of 27Al(II) takes a constant value. The density of state at the Fermi level at Al(I) site below 60 K would be about 0.9 times less than that above TCDW.

  9. ALS Performance Summary - Update

    SciTech Connect

    Waters, A M; Brown, W D; Martz, Jr., H E

    2004-09-30

    High Energy Density Physics (HEDP) experiments play an important role in corroborating the improved physics codes that underlie LLNL's Stockpile Stewardship mission. Conducting these experiments, whether on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) or another national facility such as Omega, will require not only improvement in the diagnostics for measuring the experiment, but also detailed knowledge of the as-built target components and assemblies themselves. To assist in this effort, a defined set of well-known reference standards designed to represent a range of HEDP targets have been built and are being used to quantify the performance of different characterization techniques [Hibbard, et al. 2004]. Without the critical step of using reference standards for qualifying characterization tools there can be no verification of either commercial or internally-developed characterization techniques and thus an uncertainty in the input to the physics code models would exist.

  10. Doppelthydrophile Blockcopolymere als Mineralisationstemplate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasparova, Pavla

    2002-07-01

    Die vorliegende Arbeit beschäftigt sich mit der Synthese und den Eigenschaften von doppelthydrophilen Blockcopolymeren und ihrer Anwendung in einem biomimetischen Mineralisationsprozeß von Calciumcarbonat und Bariumsulfat. Doppelthydrophile Blockcopolymere bestehen aus einem hydrophilen Block, der nicht mit Mineralien wechselwirkt und einem zweiten Polyelektrolyt-Block, der stark mit Mineraloberflächen wechselwirkt. Diese Blockcopolymere wurden durch ringöffnende Polymerisation von N-carboxyanhydriden (NCA's) und a-methoxy-ω-amino[poly(ethylene glycol)] PEG-NH2 als Initiator hergestellt. Die hergestellten Blockcopolymere wurden als effektive Wachstumsmodifikatoren für die Kristallisation von Calciumcarbonat und Bariumsulfat Mineralien eingesetzt. Die so erhaltenen Mineralpartikel (Kugeln, Hantel, eiförmige Partikel) wurden durch Lichtmikroskopie in Lösung, SEM und TEM charakterisiert. Röntgenweitwinkelstreuung (WAXS) wurde verwendet, um die Modifikation von Calciumcarbonat zu ermitteln und die Größe der Calciumcarbonat- und Bariumsulfat-Nanopartikel zu ermitteln. This work describes the synthesis and characterization of double hydrophilic block copolymers and their use in a biomimetic mineralization process of Calcium Carbonate and Barium Sulfate. Double hydrophilic block copolymers consist of a hydrophilic block that does not interact with minerals and another hydrophilic polyelectrolyte block that strongly interacts with mineral surfaces. These polymers were synthesised via ring opening polymerisation of N-carboxyanhydride (NCA), and the first hydrophilic block a-methoxy-ω-amino[poly(ethylene glycol)] PEG-NH2 was used as an initiator. The prepared block copolymers were used as effective crystal growth modifiers to control the crystallization of Calcium Carbonate and Barium Sulfate minerals. The resulting mineral particles (spheres, dumbbells, egg-like particles) were characterised by light microscopy in solution, by SEM, and by TEM. X-Ray scattering

  11. Échange terres rares légères Ca dans l'apatite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iqdari, Abderrahmane; Velde, Bruce; Benalioulhaj, Noureddine; Dujon, Saint-Clair; El Yamine, Nacer

    2003-04-01

    Diffusion experiments were carried out on natural apatite crystals that were immersed in molten light rare earth element (REE) chloride salt at temperatures between 900 and 1150 °C for periods up to 35 days. Electron microprobe analysis of the crystals showed that light REEs replaced Ca according to electronic balance, i.e. 2 REE3+ for 3 Ca2+. These diffusion profiles indicate that a maximum amount of substitution in the structure occurs when two of the ten Ca ions in apatite are replaced by the REE diffusing elements. Anisotropic diffusion is observed between a and c crystallographic directions. Comparison of maximum distance indicates that the larger ions move more easily in the apatite structure. We conclude that the light REEs diffuse within the channel structures of the mineral, and that this diffusion is controlled by the substitution type of elements in the calcium sites. To cite this article: A. Iqdari et al., C. R. Geoscience 335 (2003).

  12. Generation of a global longitudinal asymmetry in Saturn's magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, T. W.; Jaggi, A.; Wolf, R.; Sazykin, S. Y.

    2014-12-01

    Numerous empirical studies have indicated that a global longitudinal asymmetry of Saturn's magnetospheric plasma population (the m=1 term in a Fourier expansion, where m is the azimuthal wavenumber) is required to explain observed spin-periodic modulations (~ 10.7 hr) of magnetospheric behavior (e.g., Carbary and Mitchell [2013], Rev. Geophys., 51, doi:10.1029/2012RG000416, and references therein). This is true in spite of the fact that Saturn's intrinsic magnetic field is well described by a perfectly spin-aligned dipole. The Rice Convection Model (RCM) has been used previously to simulate plasma transport in Saturn's magnetosphere with a spin-aligned dipole field and a longitudinally symmetric plasma source that is largely confined to the radial range L ~ 5 - 8 (e.g., Liu et al. [2010], J. Geophys. Res., 115, doi:10.1029/2010JA015859; Liu and Hill [2012], J. Geophys. Res., 117, doi:10.1029/2012JA017827). We have begun to explore the consequences of a global-scale longitudinal asymmetry of the plasma source. Preliminary results indicate that a small (~1%) asymmetry of the imposed plasma source produces a magnetospherically significant (factor ~2) m=1 asymmetry of the resultant plasma distribution in the middle magnetosphere (L ~ 8-15). Our objective is not to explain the (still mysterious) underlying cause of the source asymmetry, but rather to investigate the effects of a given source asymmetry on the plasma distribution in the more distant magnetosphere.

  13. Mutations in ADAR1 cause Aicardi-Goutières syndrome associated with a type I interferon signature

    PubMed Central

    Rice, Gillian I; Kasher, Paul R; Forte, Gabriella M A; Mannion, Niamh M; Greenwood, Sam M; Szynkiewicz, Marcin; Dickerson, Jonathan E; Bhaskar, Sanjeev S; Zampini, Massimiliano; Briggs, Tracy A; Jenkinson, Emma M; Bacino, Carlos A; Battini, Roberta; Bertini, Enrico; Brogan, Paul A; Brueton, Louise A; Carpanelli, Marialuisa; Laet, Corinne De; de Lonlay, Pascale; del Toro, Mireia; Desguerre, Isabelle; Fazzi, Elisa; Garcia-Cazorla, Àngels; Heiberg, Arvid; Kawaguchi, Masakazu; Kumar, Ram; Lin, Jean-Pierre S-M; Lourenco, Charles M; Male, Alison M; Marques, Wilson; Mignot, Cyril; Olivieri, Ivana; Orcesi, Simona; Prabhakar, Prab; Rasmussen, Magnhild; Robinson, Robert A; Rozenberg, Flore; Schmidt, Johanna L; Steindl, Katharina; Tan, Tiong Y; van der Merwe, William G; Vanderver, Adeline; Vassallo, Grace; Wakeling, Emma L; Wassmer, Evangeline; Whittaker, Elizabeth; Livingston, John H; Lebon, Pierre; Suzuki, Tamio; McLaughlin, Paul J; Keegan, Liam P; O’Connell, Mary A; Lovell, Simon C; Crow, Yanick J

    2014-01-01

    Adenosine deaminases acting on RNA (ADARs) catalyze the hydrolytic deamination of adenosine to inosine in double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) and thereby potentially alter the information content and structure of cellular RNAs. Notably, although the overwhelming majority of such editing events occur in transcripts derived from Alu repeat elements, the biological function of non-coding RNA editing remains uncertain. Here, we show that mutations in ADAR1 (also known as ADAR) cause the autoimmune disorder Aicardi-Goutières syndrome (AGS). As in Adar1-null mice, the human disease state is associated with upregulation of interferon-stimulated genes, indicating a possible role for ADAR1 as a suppressor of type I interferon signaling. Considering recent insights derived from the study of other AGS-related proteins, we speculate that ADAR1 may limit the cytoplasmic accumulation of the dsRNA generated from genomic repetitive elements. PMID:23001123

  14. Médecins Sans Frontières' Clinical Guidance mobile application: analysis of a new electronic health tool

    PubMed Central

    Wright, V.; Dalwai, M.; Smith, R. Vincent

    2015-01-01

    Many health care workers lack access to clinical support tools in rural and resource-limited settings. To address this gap, the Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) Clinical Guidelines manual was converted into a static mobile health reference application (app) entitled MSF Guidance. The app's utility and growth was examined, and within 6 months of its launch 150 countries had downloaded the app, with demonstrated retention among new and existing users. With over 3500 downloads and 36 000 sessions amounting to 250 000 screen views, MSF Guidance is a new mobile health platform with widely demonstrated utility, including potential use as an epidemiological tool, where clinical conditions investigated by app users were found to correlate with geographical outbreaks. These findings show that mobile apps can be used to disseminate health information effectively. PMID:26767171

  15. Validation of SSiB model over grassland with CHeRES field experiment data in 2001

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Lan; Xue, Yongkang

    2004-08-01

    The Simplified Simple Biosphere model (SSiB) is validated in off-line simulations against field measurements in the summer of 2001 from the China Heavy Rainfall Experiment and Study (CHeRES) over a grassland site located in the lower reaches of the Yangtze River. When initialized and driven by the observed atmospheric forcing, the model reproduced the observed surface heat fluxes and surface skin temperature realistically. The model was also able to well simulate the variation of soil water content. The sensitivity experiments found that the leaf reflectance was the most significant parameter in improving the estimation of surface albedo during both wet and dry periods. This study suggests that the model is capable of simulating the physical processes and of assessing the impact of biophysical parameters that relate to land-atmosphere interactions over the eastern Asian monsoon regions, which is crucial for mesoscale atmospheric models.

  16. Storms from the past in a warmer climate. Results from high-res non-hydrostatic modeling over Crete.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koutroulis, Aristeidis; Grillakis, Manolis; Tsanis, Ioannis

    2016-04-01

    Weather extremes such as precipitation can be a hazard for life and property. The region of Crete has suffered from numerous severe flood events in the past decades and local authorities have a great interest in future scenarios in order to develop measures against natural calamities. In this study we use high-res non-hydrostatic modeling outputs provided by three modeling groups (GERICS, UNI and SMHI) at horizontal resolution of about 2km. Three recent, high impact, extreme storms were selected for simulation. High spatiotemporal resolution precipitation fields were compared to observations. Simulations proved to be sufficiently efficient in realistic capturing storm events and thus valuable in impact modelling. Similar simulations, but with a perturbation of +2 degrees were conducted for the representation of warmer climate conditions. Similar storm events of today's climate over Crete could result in significantly higher precipitation accumulations and intensities in a warmer climate.

  17. The Theos/ComRes survey into public perception of Darwinism in the UK: a recipe for confusion.

    PubMed

    Baker, Sylvia

    2012-04-01

    A survey of the general public in the UK, conducted in 2008, suggested that more than half of the British population are unconvinced by Darwinism. That survey, conducted by the polling company ComRes on behalf of the theological think-tank Theos, reported its full findings in March 2009 and found them to be "complex and confused." This paper argues that the confusion identified may have been partly engendered by the way in which the survey questionnaire was constructed and that the survey itself, not simply its respondents, was confused. A source of the confusion, it is argued, could be found, first, in the definitions used for the four positions of young earth creationism, theistic evolution, atheistic evolution and intelligent design. Second, a failure to define the key terms "evolution" and "science," used in some of the survey questions, resulted in responses that were difficult to interpret. PMID:23045881

  18. Quality orthopaedic care in sudden-onset disasters: suggestions from Médecins Sans Frontières-France.

    PubMed

    Herard, Patrick; Boillot, François

    2016-03-01

    A huge change is needed in the conception and implementation of surgical care during sudden-onset disasters (SOD). The inadequate surgical response mounted by the majority of foreign medical teams (FMT) after Haiti's earthquake is a striking example of the need for a structured professional approach. Logistical capacity already exists to provide safe, timely, effective, efficient, equitable and ethical patient-centred care with minimum standards. However, knowledge, skills and training in the fields of general, orthopaedic and plastic surgery need further clarification. Surgical activity data and clinical examples from several Médecins Sans Frontières-France (MSF) projects are used here to describe the skill set and experience essential for surgeons working in SOD contexts. PMID:26614107

  19. Hyperemesis gravidarum avec troubles ioniques sévères: à propos d'un cas

    PubMed Central

    Jarraya, Anouar; Elleuch, Sahar; Zouari, Jawhar; Trigui, Khaled; Sofiene, Abidi; Smaoui, Mohamed; Kolsi, Kamel

    2015-01-01

    L'hyperemesis gravidarum s'accompagne habituellement d'une perte de poids, d'une acétonurie et de troubles hydro-électrolytiques comme il peut également s'accompagner d'anomalies du bilan hépatique. Nous rapportons un cas de vomissements gravidiques à 10 semaines d'aménorrhée non traité et vu tardivement avec des troubles ioniques sévères associés à des répercussions cliniques dans un contexte de cytolyse, de cholestase et d'insuffisance rénale aigue. Ce cas a bien répondu au traitement médical. PMID:26161187

  20. Interfacial reactions and oxidation behavior of Al 2O 3 and Al 2O 3/Al coatings on an orthorhombic Ti 2AlNb alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, H. Q.; Wang, Q. M.; Gong, J.; Sun, C.

    2011-02-01

    The uniform and dense Al2O3 and Al2O3/Al coatings were deposited on an orthorhombic Ti2AlNb alloy by filtered arc ion plating. The interfacial reactions of the Al2O3/Ti2AlNb and Al2O3/Al/Ti2AlNb specimens after vacuum annealing at 750 °C were studied. In the Al2O3/Ti2AlNb specimens, the Al2O3 coating decomposed significantly due to reaction between the Al2O3 coating and the O-Ti2AlNb substrate. In the Al2O3/Al/Ti2AlNb specimens, a γ-TiAl layer and an Nb-rich zone came into being by interdiffusion between the Al layer and the O-Ti2AlNb substrate. The γ-TiAl layer is chemically compatible with Al2O3, with no decomposition of Al2O3 being detected. No internal oxidation or oxygen and nitrogen dissolution zone was observed in the O-Ti2AlNb alloy. The Al2O3/Al/Ti2AlNb specimens exhibited excellent oxidation resistance at 750 °C.

  1. S.Res.485 — 112th Congress (2011-2012) A resolution to authorize representation by the Senate Legal Counsel in the case of Common Cause, et al. v. Joseph R. Biden, et al.

    THOMAS, 112th Congress

    Sen. Reid, Harry [D-NV

    2012-06-06

    06/06/2012 Submitted in the Senate, considered, and agreed to without amendment and with a preamble by Unanimous Consent. (consideration: CR S3799; text as passed Senate: CR S3799; text of measure as introduced: CR S3783) (All Actions)

  2. Response to Madans et al. Comments on Sabariego et al. Measuring Disability: Comparing the Impact of Two Data Collection Approaches on Disability Rates. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health, 2015, 12, 10329-10351.

    PubMed

    Sabariego, Carla; Oberhauser, Cornelia; Posarac, Aleksandra; Bickenbach, Jerome; Kostanjsek, Nenad; Chatterji, Somnath; Officer, Alana; Coenen, Michaela; Chhan, Lay; Cieza, Alarcos

    2016-01-01

    We greatly appreciate and wish to thank Madans, Mont and Loeb for the issues they raise in their Comment [1] on our paper "Measuring Disability: Using the WHO Model Disability Survey to Address the Impact of Screeners on Disability Rates" [2]. [...]. PMID:26703704

  3. Effects of Na+ and He+ pickup ions on the lunar plasma environment: 3D hybrid modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipatov, A. S.; Cooper, J. F.; Sittler, E. C.; Hartle, R. E.; Sarantos, M.

    2011-12-01

    The hybrid kinetic model used here supports comprehensive simulation of the interaction between different spatial and energetic elements of the moon-solar wind-magnetosphere of the Earth system. There is a set of MHD,kinetic, hybrid, drift kinetic, electrostatic and full kinetic modeling of the lunar plasma environment [1]. However, observations show the existence of several species of the neutrals and pickup ions like Na, He, K, O etc., (see e.g., [2,3,4]). The solar wind parameters are chosen from the ARTEMIS observations [5]. The Na+, He+ lunar exosphere's parameters are chosen from [6,7]. The hybrid kinetic model allows us to take into account the finite gyroradius effects of pickup ions and to correctly estimate the ions velocity distribution and the fluxes along the magnetic field, and on the lunar surface. Modeling shows the formation of the asymmetric Mach cone, the structuring of the pickup ion tails, and presents another type of lunar-solar wind interaction. We will compare the results of our modeling with observed distributions. References [1] Lipatov, A.S., and Cooper, J.F., Hybrid kinetic modeling of the Lunar plasma environment: Past, present and future. In: Lunar Dust, Plasma and Atmosphere: The Next Steps, January 27-29, 2010, Boulder, Colorado, Abstracts/lpa2010.colorado.edu/. [2] Potter, A.E., and Morgan, T.H., Discovery of sodium and potassium vapor in the atmosphere of the Moon, Science, 241, 675-680, doi:10.1126/science.241.4866.675, 1988. [3] Tyler, A.L., et al., Observations of sodium in the tenuous lunar atmosphere, Geophys. Res. Lett., 15(10), 1141-1144, doi:10.1029/GL015i010p01141, 1988. [4] Tanaka, T., et al., First in situ observation of the Moon-originating ions in the Earth's Magnetosphere by MAP-PACE on SELENE (KAGUYA), Geophys. Res. Lett., 36, L22106, doi:10.1029/2009GL040682, 2009. [5] Wiehle, S., et al., First Lunar Wake Passage of ARTEMIS: Discrimination of Wake Effects and Solar Wind Fluctuations by 3D Hybrid Simulations, Planet

  4. Detection of Heater Generated Super Small Scale Striations Using GPS Signal Diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Najmi, A. C.; Milikh, G. M.; Chiang, K.; Psiaki, M.; Secan, J. A.; Bernhardt, P. A.; Briczinski, S. J.; Siefring, C. L.; Papadopoulos, K.

    2013-12-01

    Recent theoretical models predict that super small striations (SSS) of the electron density, on the order of ten centimeters, can be excited by HF waves with frequency close to multiples of the electron gyro frequency [Gurevich et al., 2006]. The first experimental verification of SSS was made at HAARP [Milikh et al., 2008]. We present results of HAARP experiments that include simultaneous observations of GPS carrier phase and SEE observations of ionospheric turbulence. These observations show that SSS excited by HF frequencies near the fourth harmonic of the gyro frequency scatter GPS signals, and in three out of six experiments indicate the presence of strong turbulence, similar to that observed in descending artificial ionized layer experiments [Pedersen et al., 2010]. This turbulence is capable of generating suprathermal electrons, and in one of the experiments, the presence of fast electrons was confirmed by the HAARP incoherent scattering radar. Estimates on the SSS shows that they correspond to 3-10% electron density depletions. Such irregularities affect UHF signals including GPS, and thus can be important in applications. Gurevich, A.V. and K.P. Zybin (2006), Phys. Lett. A, 358, 159. Milikh, G., et al. (2008), Geophys. Res. Let., 35, L22102, doi:10.1029/2008GL035527. Pedersen, T. et al. (2010), Geophys. Res. Let., 37, L02106, doi:10.1029/2009GL041895.

  5. Rub' al Khali, Arabia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    The Rub' al Khali is one of the largest sand deserts in the world, encompassing most of the southern third of the Arabian Peninsula. It includes parts of Oman, United Arab Emirates, and Yemen. The desert covers 650,000 square kilometers, more than the area of France. Largely unexplored until recently, the desert is 1000 km long and 500 km wide. The first documented journeys made by Westerners were those of Bertram Thomas in 1931 and St. John Philby in 1932. With daytime temperatures reaching 55 degrees Celsius, and dunes taller than 330 meters, the desert may be one of the most forbidding places on Earth.

    The image was acquired December 2, 2005, covers an area of 54.8 x 61.9 km, and is located near 20.7 degrees north latitude, 53.6 degrees east longitude.

    The U.S. science team is located at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Science Mission Directorate.

  6. H.J.Res.43 — 113th Congress (2013-2014) Removing the deadline for the ratification of the equal rights amendment.

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Rep. Andrews, Robert E. [D-NJ-1

    2013-05-09

    03/12/2014 Ms. Speier asked unanimous consent that she be considered the first sponsor of H.J. Res. 43, removing the deadline for the ratification of the equal rights amendment, a bill originally introduced by Representative Robert Andrews of New Jersey, for the purposes of adding... (All Actions)

  7. Science Teachers' Views on CoRes and PaP-eRs as a Framework for Articulating and Developing Pedagogical Content Knowledge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertram, Adam; Loughran, John

    2012-12-01

    This paper reports on a study which was designed to examine how CoRes (Content Representations) and PaP-eRs (Pedagogical and Professional-experience Repertoires) might impact the practice of science teachers by considering how they might value (or not) pedagogical content knowledge (PCK) as part of their professional knowledge. The paper is based on a 2 year longitudinal study that used CoRes and PaP-eRs as a form of intervention with a group of teachers ( n = 6) to determine how they interpreted, used and developed their understanding of PCK over time. The study concluded that the participating teachers developed rich understandings of their professional knowledge of science teaching and were of the view that CoRes and PaP-eRs were significant in shaping that development. As a consequence, the study also validates the use of CoRes and PaP-eRs as a meaningful methodology for examining science teachers' PCK.

  8. Sequential bottom-up and top-down processing for the synthesis of transition metal dichalcogenide nanosheets: the case of rhenium disulfide (ReS2).

    PubMed

    Al-Dulaimi, Naktal; Lewis, Edward A; Lewis, David J; Howell, Simon K; Haigh, Sarah J; O'Brien, Paul

    2016-06-14

    Bottom-up (aerosol-assisted chemical vapor deposition, AACVD) and top-down (liquid phase exfoliation, LPE) processing methodologies are used in tandem to produce colloids of few-layer thick rhenium disulfide (ReS2) in N-methyl pyrrolidone. The processing route we use is a potentially robust and scalable pathway to manufacture useful 2D materials. PMID:27250595

  9. ResQ: An Approach to Unified Estimation of B-Factor and Residue-Specific Error in Protein Structure Prediction.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jianyi; Wang, Yan; Zhang, Yang

    2016-02-22

    Computer-based structure prediction becomes a major tool to provide large-scale structure models for annotating biological function of proteins. Information of residue-level accuracy and thermal mobility (or B-factor), which is critical to decide how biologists utilize the predicted models, is however missed in most structure prediction pipelines. We developed ResQ for unified residue-level model quality and B-factor estimations by combining local structure assembly variations with sequence-based and structure-based profiling. ResQ was tested on 635 non-redundant proteins with structure models generated by I-TASSER, where the average difference between estimated and observed distance errors is 1.4Å for the confidently modeled proteins. ResQ was further tested on structure decoys from CASP9-11 experiments, where the error of local structure quality prediction is consistently lower than or comparable to other state-of-the-art predictors. Finally, ResQ B-factor profile was used to assist molecular replacement, which resulted in successful solutions on several proteins that could not be solved from constant B-factor settings. PMID:26437129

  10. Unusual cutaneous features associated with a heterozygous gain-of-function mutation in IFIH1: overlap between Aicardi–Goutières and Singleton–Merten syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Bursztejn, A.-C.; Briggs, T.A.; del Toro Duany, Y.; Anderson, B.H.; O’Sullivan, J.; Williams, S.G.; Bodemer, C.; Fraitag, S.; Gebhard, F.; Leheup, B.; Lemelle, I.; Oojageer, A.; Raffo, E.; Schmitt, E.; Rice, G.I.; Hur, S.; Crow, Y.J.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Cutaneous lesions described as chilblain lupus occur in the context of familial chilblain lupus or Aicardi–Goutières syndrome. To date, seven genes related to Aicardi–Goutières syndrome have been described. The most recently described encodes the cytosolic double-stranded RNA receptor IFIH1 (also known as MDA5), a key component of the antiviral type I interferon-mediated innate immune response. Enhanced type I interferon signalling secondary to gain-of-function mutations in IFIH1 can result in a range of neuroinflammatory phenotypes including classical Aicardi–Goutières syndrome. It is of note that none of the patients with a neurological phenotype so far described with mutations in this gene was reported to demonstrate cutaneous involvement. We present a family segregating a heterozygous pathogenic mutation in IFIH1 showing dermatological involvement as a prominent feature, variably associated with neurological disturbance and premature tooth loss. All three affected individuals exhibited increased expression of interferon-stimulated genes in whole blood, and the mutant protein resulted in enhanced interferon signalling in vitro, both in the basal state and following ligand stimulation. Our results further extend the phenotypic spectrum associated with mutations in IFIH1, indicating that the disease can be confined predominantly to the skin, while also highlighting phenotypic overlap with both Aicardi–Goutières syndrome and Singleton–Merten syndrome. PMID:26284909

  11. An updated set of nutations derived from the reanalysis of 3.5 decades VLBI observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Ping; Koot, Laurence; Rivoldini, Attilio; Dehant, Veronique

    2016-04-01

    The global VLBI observation started in the 1979. After that the qualities of the measurements are continuously improving by taking into account various instrumental and environmental effects. The MHB2000 models was introduced in 2002 (Mathews, et.al. 2002, [1]) and it has a good agreement (5 μas) on the short period nutation series (<400 days) with the values derived from 2 decades (1979-2000) VLBI data while a higher uncertainties up to 56 μas for those longer periods (>400 days) nutation series (Herring et.al. 2002). In MHB2000, the forcing frequencies of the nutation series are solved by least-squares fitting to the VLBI data in frequency domain. Koot et al. (2008), have processed another similar set of nutation series by inversing the time series of VLBI data (1984-2005) using a Bayesian approach. In the present work, we will repeat both approaches using the up-to-date 3.5 decades VLBI observations (1980-2014) meanwhile paying more attention on the results of longer period (>400 days). Finally some features of Earth's interior structure will be discussed based on the determined nutation series. [1] Mathews, P.M., Herring, T.A. & Buffett, B.A., 2002. Modeling of nutation and precession: new nutation series for nonrigid Earth and insights into the Earth's interior, J. Geophys. Res., 107, 2068, doi: 10.1029/2001JB000390. [2] Herring, T. A., P. M. Mathews, and B. A. Buffett, Modeling of nutation and precession: Very long baseline interferometry results, J. Geophys. Res., 107, B4, 2069, doi: 10.1029/2001JB000165, 2002 [3] Koot, L., Rivoldini, A., de Viron, O. & Dehant, V., 2008. Estimation of Earth interior parameters from a Bayesian inversion of very long baseline interferometry nutation time series, J. Geophys. Res., 113, 8414, doi: 10.1029/2007JB005409.

  12. Alexandria (Al Iskandariya), Egypt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This image of Alexandria was taken by astronauts on board the International Space Station in December 2000 using an Electronic Still Camera. A wider-angle view (STS088-739-90) taken from the Space Shuttle in December 1998 is available for context. Alexandria (Al Iskandariya) occupies a T-shaped peninsula and strip of land separating the Mediterranean from Lake Mariout. Originally the town was built upon a mole (stone breakwater) called Heptastadium, which joined the island of Pharos (see referenced website, below) to the mainland. Since then sedimentary deposits have widened the mole. Since 1905, when the 370,000 Alexandrians lived in an area of about 4 sq km between the two harbors, the city (population 4 million; see referenced website, below) has grown beyond its medieval walls and now occupies an area of about 300 sq km. The Mahmudiya Canal, connecting Alexandria with the Nile, runs to the south of the city and, by a series of locks, enters the harbor of the principal port of Egypt (note ships). The reddish and ochre polygons west of Lake Mariout are salt-evaporation, chemical-storage, and water-treatment ponds within the coastal lagoon. Reference Youssef Halim and Fatma Abou Shouk, 2000, Human impacts on Alexandria's marine environment: UNESCO, Coastal Regions and Small Islands Unit (CSI), Coastal Management Sourcebooks 2 (accessed December 20, 2000) Additional photographs taken by astronauts can be viewed at NASA-JSC's Gateway to Astronaut Photography of Earth. Image ISS001-ESC-5025 provided by the Earth Sciences and Image Analysis Laboratory, Johnson Space Center.

  13. Undulators at the ALS

    SciTech Connect

    Hoyer, E.; Akre, J.; Chin, J.

    1994-07-01

    At Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory`s (LBL) Advanced Light Source (ALS), three 4.6 m long undulators have been completed, tested and installed. A fourth is under construction. The completed undulators include two 5.0 cm period length, 89 period devices (U5.0s) which achieve a 0.85 T effective field at a 14 mm minimum gap and a 8.0 cm period length, 55 period device (U8.0) that reaches a 1.2 T effective field at a 14 mm minimum gap. The undulator under construction is a 10.0 cm period length, 43 period device (U10.0) that is designed to achieve 0.98 T at a 23 mm gap. Undulator magnetic gap variation (rms) is within 25 microns over the periodic structure length. Reproducibility of the adjustable magnetic gap has been measured to be within +/{minus} 5 microns. Gap adjusting range is from 14 mm to 210 mm, which can be scanned in one minute. The 5.1 m long vacuum chambers are flat in the vertical direction to within 0.74 mm and straight in the horizontal direction to within 0.08 mm over the 4.6 m magnetic structure sections. Vacuum chamber base pressures after UHV beam conditioning are. in the mid 10{sup {minus}11} Torr range and storage ring operating pressures with full current are in the low 10{sup {minus}10} Torr range. Measurements show that the uncorrelated magnetic field errors are 0.23%, and 0.20% for the two U5.Os and the U8.0 respectively and that the field integrals are small over the 1 cm by 6 cm beam aperture. Device description, fabrication, and measurements are presented.

  14. Transport, metabolism, cytotoxicity and effects of novel taxanes on the cell cycle in MDA-MB-435 and NCI/ADR-RES cells.

    PubMed

    Ehrlichová, Marie; Ojima, Iwao; Chen, Jin; Václavíková, Radka; Němcová-Fürstová, Vlasta; Vobořilová, Jana; Simek, Petr; Horský, Stanislav; Souček, Pavel; Kovář, Jan; Brabec, Marek; Gut, Ivan

    2012-10-01

    Resistance of tumours to taxanes causes chemotherapy failure in numerous patients. Resistance is partly due to the low tumour uptake of taxanes and their rapid metabolism. Structural modifications of taxanes can reduce their P-glycoprotein-related efflux or decrease metabolism and consequently increase taxane efficiency. This study compared cytotoxicity and effects of the cell cycle, transport and metabolism of novel taxanes SB-T-1102, SB-T-1103, SB-T-1214 and SB-T-1216, fluorinated SB-T-12851, SB-T-12852, SB-T-12853, SB-T-12854 and IDN5109 with paclitaxel in paclitaxel-sensitive (MDA-MB-435) and paclitaxel-resistant (NCI/ADR-RES) human cancer cells. We have shown before that NCI/ADR-RES cells were 1,000-fold less sensitive to paclitaxel than MDA-MB-435 cells in correspondence to P-glycoprotein overexpression and up to 20-fold lower uptake of the drug in the resistant cells. The uptake of novel taxanes was 1.2 to 3.8 times lower than that of paclitaxel in the MDA-MB-435 cells, but 1.5 to 6.5 times higher in NCI/ADR-RES cells. NCI/ADR-RES cells were correspondingly only 2- to 6.6-fold less sensitive than the MDA-MB-435 cells to novel taxanes. Both cell lines showed minimal metabolism of the novel taxanes which was therefore not responsible for their different sensitivity, the observed differences in their individual efficiency and higher effects than paclitaxel. All novel taxanes caused G(2)/M block of the cell cycle similar to paclitaxel, but lower at concentrations by order of magnitude. Thus, structural modifications of taxanes resulting in their decreased P-glycoprotein-related transport probably caused their higher efficiency than paclitaxel in multidrug-resistant NCI/ADR-RES tumour cells. PMID:22855252

  15. Thermal Modeling of Al-Al and Al-Steel Friction Stir Spot Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jedrasiak, P.; Shercliff, H. R.; Reilly, A.; McShane, G. J.; Chen, Y. C.; Wang, L.; Robson, J.; Prangnell, P.

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents a finite element thermal model for similar and dissimilar alloy friction stir spot welding (FSSW). The model is calibrated and validated using instrumented lap joints in Al-Al and Al-Fe automotive sheet alloys. The model successfully predicts the thermal histories for a range of process conditions. The resulting temperature histories are used to predict the growth of intermetallic phases at the interface in Al-Fe welds. Temperature predictions were used to study the evolution of hardness of a precipitation-hardened aluminum alloy during post-weld aging after FSSW.

  16. The February 24, 2010 substorm: a refined view involving a pseudobreakup/expansive phase/poleward boundary intensification sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connors, Martin; Russell, Christopher T.; Chu, Xiangning; McPherron, Robert L.

    2015-12-01

    A substorm on February 24, 2010 was chosen for study by Connors et al. (Geophys. Res. Lett. 41:4449-4455, 2014) due to simple symmetric subauroral magnetic perturbations observed in North America. It was shown that a substorm current wedge (SCW) three-dimensional current model could represent these perturbations well, gave a reasonable representation of auroral zone perturbations, and matched field-aligned currents determined in space from the Active Magnetosphere and Planetary Electrodynamics Response Experiment (AMPERE) project. The conclusion was that substorm onset was at approximately 4:30 UT and that the substorm current wedge (SCW) formed in the region 1 (more poleward) current system.

  17. Modeling neuronal vulnerability in ALS.

    PubMed

    Roselli, Francesco; Caroni, Pico

    2014-08-20

    Using computational models of motor neuron ion fluxes, firing properties, and energy requirements, Le Masson et al. (2014) reveal how local imbalances in energy homeostasis may self-amplify and contribute to neurodegeneration in ALS. PMID:25144872

  18. Philosophieren als Unterrichtsprinzip im Mathematikunterricht

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meerwaldt, Diana

    Philosophieren und Mathematik scheinen zunächst gegensätzliche Bereiche zu sein, die sich kaum vereinbaren lassen. Dies trifft für eine Auffassung zu, die Philosophieren als "Gerede" disqualifiziert und Mathematik als eine reine "Formelwissenschaft" begreift. Beide Auffassungen werden den Gegenständen nicht gerecht.

  19. Absolute gravity measurements in Southeast Alaska and continuous gravity observation in Juneau by ISEA2 project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, T.; Kazama, T.; Miura, S.; Ohta, Y.; Okubo, S.; Fujimoto, H.; Kaufman, M.; Herreid, S. J.; Larsen, C. F.; Freymueller, J. T.

    2012-12-01

    to evaluate the seasonal gravity changes including the hydrological effects. References: Inazu et al., 2009, J. Oceanography, Vol.65, 335-347. Kazama and Okubo, 2009, J. Geophys. Res., 114, B08402. Larsen et al., 2005, EPSL, Vol.237, 548-560. Sato et al., 2008, J. Geodyn., Vol.46, 78-89. Sato et al., 2011, Tectonophysics, Vol.511,79-88. Sato et al., 2012, J. Geophys. Res., 117, B01401. Sun et al., 2010, J. Geophys. Res., 115, B12406.

  20. Characteristics of CeCoIn5/Al/AlOx/Nb and CeCoIn5/Al/AlOx/Al Tunnel Junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Petrovic, C.; Nevirkovets, I.P.; Chernyashevskyy, O.; Hu, R.; Ketterson, J.B.; Sarma, B.K.

    2009-03-03

    We report characteristics of CeCoIn{sub 5}/Al/AlO{sub x}/Nb and CeCoIn{sub 5}/Al/AlO{sub x}/Al tunnel junctions fabricated on the (0 0 1) surface of CeCoIn{sub 5} crystal platelets. The main result of this work is the observation of a low Josephson current (as compared with that expected from the Ambegaokar-Baratoff formula), which is consistent with idea that the order parameter in the heavy-fermion superconductor CeCoIn{sub 5} has unconventional pairing symmetry.

  1. Geometric Aspects of Artificial Ionospheric Layers Driven by High-Power HF-Heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milikh, G. M.; Eliasson, B.; Shao, X.; Djordjevic, B.; Mishin, E. V.; Zawdie, K.; Papadopoulos, K.

    2013-12-01

    We have generalized earlier developed multi-scale dynamic model for the creation and propagation of artificial plasma layers in the ionosphere [Eliasson et al, 2012] by including two dimensional effects in the horizontal direction. Such layers were observed during high-power high frequency HF heating experiments at HAARP [Pedersen et al., 2010]. We have numerically investigated the importance of different angles of incidence of ordinary mode waves on the Langmuir turbulence and the resulting electron acceleration that leads to the formation of artificial ionospheric layers. It was shown that the most efficient electron acceleration and subsequent ionization is obtained at angles between magnetic zenith and the vertical, where strong Langmuir turbulence dominates over weak turbulence. A role played by the heating wave propagation near caustics was also investigated. Eliasson, B. et al. (2012), J. Geophys. Res. 117, A10321, doi:10.1029/2012JA018105. Pedersen, T., et al. (2010), Geophys. Res. Lett., 37, L02106, doi:10.1029/2009GL041895.

  2. Temperature Dependences of Air-Broadening and Shift Parameters in the ν_3 Band of Ozone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Mary Ann H.; Devi, V. Malathy; Benner, D. Chris

    2015-06-01

    Line parameter errors can contribute significantly to the total errors in retrievals of terrestrial atmospheric ozone concentration profiles using the strong 9.6-μm band, particularly for nadir-viewing experiments Detailed knowledge of the interfering ozone signal is also needed for retrievals of other atmospheric species in this spectral region. We have determined Lorentz air-broadening and pressure-induced shift coefficients along with their temperature dependences for a number of transitions in the ν_3 fundamental band of 16O_3. These results were obtained by applying the multispectrum nonlinear least-squares fitting technique to a set of 31 high-resolution infrared absorption spectra of O_3 recorded at temperatures between 160 and 300 K with several different room-temperature and coolable sample cells at the McMath-Pierce Fourier transform spectrometer at the National Solar Observatory on Kitt Peak. We compare our results with other available measurements and with the ozone line parameters in the HITRAN database. J.~Worden et al., J.~Geophys.~Res. 109 (2004) 9308-9319. R.~Beer et al., Geophys.~Res.~Lett. 35 (2008) L09801. D.~Chris Benner et al., JQSRT 53 (1995) 705-721. Rothman et al., J. Quant. Spectrosc. Radiat. Transfer 130 (2013) 4. JQSRT 130 (2013) 4-50.

  3. Imaging the South Pole - Aitken Basin in Backscattered Energetic Neutral Hydrogen Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vorburger, Audrey; Wurz, Peter; Barabash, Stas; Wieser, Martin; Futaana, Yoshifumi; Bhardwaj, Anil; Asamura, Kazushi

    2015-04-01

    The Moon, not being protected by a global magnetic field or an atmosphere, is constantly bombarded by solar wind ions. Until a few years ago, it was tacitly assumed that the impinging solar wind ions are almost completely absorbed ( < 1% reflection) by the lunar surface (e.g. Crider and Vondrak, Adv. Space Res., (2002); Feldman et al., J. Geophys. Res., (2000)). Recent observations by IBEX and the Sub-keV Atom Reflecting Analyzer (SARA) onboard Chandrayaan-1 invalidated this assumption, though: In fact, these measurements showed that the lunar surface very efficiently reflects impinging solar wind ions as energetic neutral atoms (ENAs) (e.g. McComas et al., GRL, 2009; Wieser et al., PSS, 2009). Most recently, a global analysis of lunar hydrogen ENAs measured by SARA showed that on average 16% of the solar wind protons are reflected, and that the reflected fraction can range from less than 8% to more than 24%, depending on location (Vorburger et al., J. Geophys. Res., 2013). Whereas it is established that magnetic anomalies reduce the flux of backscattered hydrogen ENAs by screening-off a fraction of the impinging solar wind ions (e.g. Wieser et al., Planet. Space Sci., (2009); Lue et al., Geophys. Res. Lett., (2011); Vorburger et al., J. Geophys. Res., (2012); Futaana et al., Geophys. Res. Lett., (2013)), the effects of other surface properties such as porosity, roughness, chemical composition, and extent of weathering, was not known. To investigate the effects of these surface properties on the properties of scattered ENAs, we conducted an in-depth analysis of ENA observations near the South Pole - Aitken basin using the complete dataset collected by SARA. The South Pole - Aitken basin is an ideal object for such a study, because it highly differs in many properties from the surrounding terrain. It is very deep (~13 km), possesses strikingly elevated concentrations in iron (~15 wt%) and thorium (~7 wt%), has a low albedo and coincides with a cluster of strong

  4. The Rock Engineering System (RES) applied to landslide susceptibility zonation of the northeastern flank of Etna: methodological approach and results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apuani, Tiziana; Corazzato, Claudia

    2015-04-01

    Ground deformations in the northeastern flank of Etna are well known. Despite only a few landslide events have been documented, these have significantly involved and damaged lifelines and buildings. These events are mainly related to the activity of the volcano-tectonic structures and associated seismicity, as in the case of the 2002 reactivation of the Presa landslide during an increased activity of the Pernicana fault system. In order to highlight the areal distribution of potentially unstable slopes based on a detailed, site-specific study of the factors responsible for landslide, and to ultimately contribute to risk management, a landslide susceptibility analysis of the northeastern flank of Etna in the Pernicana area was carried out, and a susceptibility map at 1:10.000 scale was produced, extending over an area of 168 km2. Different methods are proposed in the literature to obtain the regional distribution of potentially unstable slopes, depending on the problem scale, the slope dynamic evolution in the geological context, and the availability of data. Among semi-quantitative approaches, the present research combines the Rock Engineering System (RES) methodology with parameter zonation mapping in a GIS environment. The RES method represents a structured approach to manage a high number of interacting factors involved in the instability problem. A numerically coded, site-specific interaction matrix (IM) analyzes the cause-effect relationship in these factors, and calculates the degree of interactivity of each parameter, normalized by the overall interactivity of the system (weight factor). In the specific Etna case, the considered parameters are: slope attitude, lithotechnical properties (lithology, structural complexity, soil and rock mass quality), land use, tectonic structures, seismic activity (horizontal acceleration) and hydrogeological conditions (groundwater and drainage). Thematic maps are prepared at 1:10.000 scale for each of these parameters, and

  5. Evidence of Nb-Ta mobility in high temperature F-rich fluids evidenced by the La Bosse quartz-Nb-ferberite stockwork (Echassières, French Massif Central).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marignac, C.; Cuney, M.

    2012-04-01

    ). Thus the unusual Nb content of the La Bosse ferberites is correlated to the apparently very distal setting of this quartz system relatively to the parent granite, in contrast with most quartz-W systems in the French Massif Central (Aïssa et al. 1987). When invaded by aplites or aplopegmatites, the ferberite-bearing quartz veins are dissolved, but the ferberites remain apparently unaffected - they are not dissolved by the granite melt. Yet, the acicular and lanceolate crystals have lost their Nb-zoning and display uniform homogenised Nb content. The emplacement of the Beauvoir granite was associated with late magmatic exsolution of an Al- and F-rich, silica undersaturated, hydrothermal fluid that percolated upwards in the surrounding schists (Cuney et al. 1992). When interacting with the quartz veins of the La Bosse stockwork, this fluid precipitated topazites. Again, included ferberites remain apparently unaffected. However, they display microscopic vuggy cavities, successively filled by a Nb-rich ferberite (up to 8.91% Nb2O5) with significant Ta content (up to 0.35 % Ta2O5), a wolframo-ixiolite and a Ta-rich columbite. Later Li-phengite was precipitated from the same magmatic fluid, and was associated with hubnerite enrichment of pre-existing ferberites along Li-phengite-bearing microcracks (down to 0.20 mole % Fb). Ta and Nb are known for their poor solubility in hydrothermal fluids, but the Nb and Ta enrichments observed in the wolframite of La Bosse stockwork show that they can be transported to some extent by F-rich fluids. Aïssa, M., Marignac, C., Weisbrod, A. (1987). Le stockwerk à ferbérite d'Echassières : évolution spatiale et temporelle; cristallochimie des ferbérites. In : Cuney, M., Autran, A. (eds), Echassières : le forage scientifique d'Echassières (Allier). Une clé pour la compréhension des mécanismes magmatiques et hydrothermaux associés aux granites à métaux rares. Mém. GPF, tome 1, 311-334. M Cuney, C Marignac, A Weisbrod (1992). The

  6. Evidence of Nb-Ta mobility in high temperature F-rich fluids evidenced by the La Bosse quartz-Nb-ferberite stockwork (Echassières, French Massif Central).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marignac, C.; Cuney, M.

    2012-04-01

    ). Thus the unusual Nb content of the La Bosse ferberites is correlated to the apparently very distal setting of this quartz system relatively to the parent granite, in contrast with most quartz-W systems in the French Massif Central (Aïssa et al. 1987). When invaded by aplites or aplopegmatites, the ferberite-bearing quartz veins are dissolved, but the ferberites remain apparently unaffected - they are not dissolved by the granite melt. Yet, the acicular and lanceolate crystals have lost their Nb-zoning and display uniform homogenised Nb content. The emplacement of the Beauvoir granite was associated with late magmatic exsolution of an Al- and F-rich, silica undersaturated, hydrothermal fluid that percolated upwards in the surrounding schists (Cuney et al. 1992). When interacting with the quartz veins of the La Bosse stockwork, this fluid precipitated topazites. Again, included ferberites remain apparently unaffected. However, they display microscopic vuggy cavities, successively filled by a Nb-rich ferberite (up to 8.91% Nb2O5) with significant Ta content (up to 0.35 % Ta2O5), a wolframo-ixiolite and a Ta-rich columbite. Later Li-phengite was precipitated from the same magmatic fluid, and was associated with hubnerite enrichment of pre-existing ferberites along Li-phengite-bearing microcracks (down to 0.20 mole % Fb). Ta and Nb are known for their poor solubility in hydrothermal fluids, but the Nb and Ta enrichments observed in the wolframite of La Bosse stockwork show that they can be transported to some extent by F-rich fluids. Aïssa, M., Marignac, C., Weisbrod, A. (1987). Le stockwerk à ferbérite d'Echassières : évolution spatiale et temporelle; cristallochimie des ferbérites. In : Cuney, M., Autran, A. (eds), Echassières : le forage scientifique d'Echassières (Allier). Une clé pour la compréhension des mécanismes magmatiques et hydrothermaux associés aux granites à métaux rares. Mém. GPF, tome 1, 311-334. M Cuney, C Marignac, A Weisbrod (1992). The

  7. A deep scar in the flank of Tenerife (Canary Islands): Geophysical contribution to tsunami hazard assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coppo, Nicolas P.; Schnegg, Pierre-André; Falco, Pierik; Costa, Roberto

    2009-05-01

    Among the high-intensity on-Earth tsunami generating events, seismicity, submarine landslides, and volcano lateral collapses are the most important [Ward, S.H., 2001. Landslide tsunami. J. Geophy. Res. 106, 11201-11215; Holcomb, R.T., Searle, R.C., 1991. Large landslides from oceanic volcanoes. Mar. Geotech. 10, 19-32; Tinti, S., Bortolucci, E., Romagnoli, C., 2000. Computer simulations of tsunamis due to the sector collapse ar Stromboli, Italy. J. Volcano. Geotherm. Res. 96, 103-128; Ward, S.N., Day, S., 2003. Ritter Island Volcano — lateral collapse and the tsunami of 1888. Geophys. J. Int. 154, 891-902; MacGuire, W.J., 2003. Volcano instability and lateral collapse. Revista 1, 33-45]. Offshore bathymetry studies highlighted huge accumulations of large mass-waste flows (up to thousands cubic kilometres) inherited from past lateral collapses or submarine landslides [ Le Friant, A., Boudon, G., Deplus, C., Villemant, B., 2003. Large-scale flank collapse events during the activity of Montagne Pelée, Martinique, Lesser Antilles. J. Geophys. Res. 108, ECV13; Moore, J.G. et al., 1989. Prodigious submarine Landslides on the Hawaiian ridge. J. Geophys. Res. 94, 17465-17484] which spread over more than 100 km off the northern Tenerife (Canary Islands) coastline [Watts, A.B., Masson, D.G., 1995. A giant landslide on the north flank of Tenerife, Canary Islands. J. Geophys. Res. 100, 24487-24498]. Although mechanics and dynamics triggering such catastrophic events follow from combined complex processes and interactions [Hürlimann, M., Garcia-Piera, J.-O., Ledesma, A., 2000. Causes and mobility of large volcanic landslides: application to Tenerife, Canary Islands. J. Volcano. Geotherm. Res. 103, 121-134; Masson, D.G. et al., 2002. Slope failures on the flanks of the western Canary Islands. Earth-Sci. Rev. 57, 1-35; Reid, M.E., Sisson, T.W., Brien, D.L., 2001. Volcano collapse promoted by hydrothermal alteration and edifice shape, Mount Rainier, Washington. Geology 29, 779

  8. Areal Crater Density Analysis of Volcanic Smooth Plains: A New Approach to Distinguishing Age Units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostrach, L. R.; Robinson, M. S.

    2013-12-01

    and composition) are not observed on Mercury [e.g., 13-15], so the ACD method can be used to test hypotheses concerning timing of smooth plains emplacement [15]. [1] Hartmann W.K. et al. (1981) In: BVTP, 1049-1127. [2] Stöffler D. et al. (2006) Rev. Mineral. Geochem, 60, 519-596. [3] Hiesinger H. et al. (2011) Spec. Pap. - Geol. Soc. Am, 477, 1-51. [4] Pieters C.M. (1978) Proc. Lunar Plan. Sci. Conf, 9th, 2825-2849. [5] Hiesinger H. et al. (2000) J. Geophys. Res, 105, 29239-29275. [6] Staid M.I. and C.M. Pieters (2001) J. Geophys. Res, 106, 27887-27900. [7] Staid M.I. et al. (2011) J. Geophys. Res, 116, E00G10. [8] Lucey P.G. et al. (2000) J. Geophys. Res, 105, 20297-20306. [9] Schaber G.G. (1973) In: Apollo 17 PSR, NASA SP-330, 30-17 to 30-25. [10] Schaber G.G. et al. (1975) The Moon, 13, 395-423. [11] Boyce J.M. and A.L. Dial Jr. (1975) Proc. Lunar Sci. Conf, 6th, 2585-2595. [12] Bugiolacchi R. and J.E. Guest (2008) Icarus, 197, 1-18. [13] Robinson M.S. et al. (2008) Science, 321, 66-69. [14] Denevi B.W. et al. (2009) Science, 324, 613-618. [15] Denevi B.W. et al. (2013) J. Geophys. Res, 118, 1-17.

  9. How Much Carbonate in Mars Rocks?: A Co-Analysis of CRISM, TES and THEMIS Data at the Nili Fossae Carbonate Plains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, C. S.; Ehlmann, B. L.

    2013-12-01

    minimum value, as the carbonate bearing rock exposures are significantly smaller than a single TES pixel. In co-located CRISM, THEMIS, and CTX data we observe an areal mixture of 2 components: 1) high TI (~600 J K-1 m-2 s-1/2) carbonate bearing, olivine-basalt bedrock and 2) low TI (~270 J K-1 m-2 s-1/2) carbonate-poor, olivine-basalt sands. By relating the TES spectral unmixing values to the areal fraction of carbonate rock exposures mapped using alternate datasets, the carbonate abundance of the only the bedrock component will be constrained. Furthermore, using Hapke modeling of CRISM spectra, we further constrain our abundance estimates of the unit. References: Ehlmann, B. L., et al. (2008), Science, 322(5909), 1828. Ehlmann, B. L., et al. (2009), J. Geophys. Res., 114, E00D08. Fergason, R. L., et al. (2006), J. Geophys. Res., 111, E12004. Hamilton, V. E. and P.R. Christensen (2005), Geology, 33(6), 433-436. Mangold, N., et al. (2007), J. Geophys. Res., 112, E08S04. Mustard, J. F., et al. (2007), J. Geophys. Res., 112, E08S03. Mustard, J. F., et al. (2009), J. Geophys. Res., 114, E00D12.

  10. Simulation of the 2008 Iowa Flood using HiResFlood-UCI Model with Remote Sensing Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, P.; Thorstensen, A. R.; Hsu, K. L.; AghaKouchak, A.; Sanders, B. F.; Sorooshian, S.

    2014-12-01

    Precipitation is a key forcing variable in hydrological modeling of floods and being able to accurately observe precipitation is extremely important in mitigating flood impacts. The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission, launched in Feb 2014 also presents an opportunity for high-quality real-time precipitation data and improved flood warnings. The PERSIANN-CCS developed by the scientists at the Center for Hydrometeorology and Remote Sensing (CHRS) at the University of California, Irvine is one algorithm integrated in the IMERG of PMM/GPM. In this research, the high resolution coupled hydrologic/hydraulic model named HiResFlood-UCI was applied to simulate the historical 2008 Iowa flood in the Cedar River basin. HiResFlood-UCI is a coupling of the NWS's distributed hydrologic model HL-RDHM and the hydraulic model BreZo developed by the Computational Hydraulics Group at the University of California, Irvine. The model was forced with the real-time PERSIANN-CCS and NEXRAD Stage 2 precipitation data. Simulations were evaluated based on 2 criteria: hydrographs within the basin and the areal extent of the flooding. Streamflow hydrographs were compared at 7 USGS gages, and simulated inundation maps were evaluated using USDA AWiFS 56m resolution areal flood imagery. The results show reasonable simulated hydrographs compared to USGS streamflow observations when simulating with PERSIANN-CCS and NEXRAD Stage 2 as forcing inputs. The simulation driven by NEXRAD Stage 2 slightly outperforms the PERSIANN-CCS simulation as the latter marginally underestimated the observed hydrographs. The simulation in both cases shows a good agreement (0.672 and 0.727 CSI for Stage 2 and PERSIANN-CCS simulations respectively) with the AWiFS image over the most impacted area in the Cedar Rapids region. Since the PERSIANN-CCS simulation slightly underestimated the discharge, the probability of detection (0.925) is lower than that of the Stage 2 simulation (0.965). As a trade-off, the false

  11. Stimulated emission in AlGaN/AlGaN quantum wells with different Al content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mickevičius, J.; Jurkevičius, J.; Kazlauskas, K.; Žukauskas, A.; Tamulaitis, G.; Shur, M. S.; Shatalov, M.; Yang, J.; Gaska, R.

    2012-02-01

    Stimulated emission (SE) is studied in AlGaN/AlGaN multiple quantum wells (MQWs) with different Al content grown on sapphire substrate. The spectra of spontaneous and stimulated emission and their transformations with increasing temperature as well as stimulated emission thresholds were measured in the temperature range from 8 to 300 K. Phonon-assisted band broadening in low-Al-content MQWs and double-scaled potential profile in high-Al-content MQWs were observed in the samples and linked with carrier localization conditions. The temperature dependence of the stimulated emission threshold was similar in the samples where the stimulated transitions occur between extended states and in the samples where the transitions occur in localized states. The stimulated emission threshold depends predominantly on the density of nonradiative recombination centers.

  12. Medical application of 26Al

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinhausen, C.; Gerisch, P.; Heisinger, B.; Hohl, Ch.; Kislinger, G.; Korschinek, G.; Niedermayer, M.; Nolte, E.; Dumitru, M.; Alvarez-Brückmann, M.; Schneider, M.; Ittel, T. H.

    1996-06-01

    Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) measurements with 26Al as tracer were performed in order to study the aluminium metabolism and anomalies in the human body and in rats. In particular, the differences between healthy volunteers and patients with renal failure were investigated. The obtained data points of 26Al in blood and urine were described by an open compartment model with three peripheral compartments. It was found that the minimum of peripheral compartments needed to describe 26Al concentrations in blood and urine over a time period of three years is at least three.

  13. Empirical age spectra in the lower stratosphere derived from in-situ measurements of halocarbons during TACTS/ESMVal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boenisch, Harald; Engel, Andreas; Keber, Timo

    2014-05-01

    The age spectrum is the transit time distribution of the fluid constituents in a specific stratospheric air parcel and therefore contains all the information of the air parcel's transport history. Unfortunately, it is not possible to directly measure the age spectrum of a stratospheric air parcel. Only the first moment of the distribution - the mean age of air - is directly observable from observations of passive tracers like SF6 and CO2. However, it is possible to reconstruct the age spectrum from a bunch of chemical active tracers with different stratospheric lifetimes (Schoeberl et al., 2005; Ehhalt et al., 2007) assuming to first order that the age spectrum follows the analytical solution given by Hall and Plumb (1994). Here, we will present empirical age spectra in the extratropical lower stratosphere of the northern hemisphere derived from a dataset gathered during the combined campaigns TACTS (Transport and Composition in the UT/LMS) and ESMVal (Earth System Model Validation). About 20 halocarbons have been measured with the new developed in-situ GC/MS instrument GHOST-MS. These chemical active species have different stratospheric lifetimes ranging from several days (e.g. Methylbromoform) up to several decades (e.g. CFC-12). Ehhalt, D. H., Rohrer, F., Blake, D. R., Kinnison, D. E., and Konopka, P.: On the use of nonmethane hydrocarbons for the determination of age spectra in the lower stratosphere, J. Geophys. Res., 112, D12208, 10.1029/2006jd007686, 2007. Hall, T. M., and Plumb, R. A.: Age as a Diagnostic of Stratospheric Transport, J. Geophys. Res., 99, 1059-1070, 1994. Schoeberl, M. R., Douglass, A. R., Polansky, B., Boone, C., Walker, K. A., and Bernath, P.: Estimation of stratospheric age spectrum from chemical tracers, J. Geophys. Res., 110, D21303, 10.1029/2005jd006125, 2005.

  14. Gravity wave effects in the thermosphere during sudden stratospheric warmings and vertical coupling between the lower and upper atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yiǧit, Erdal; Medvedev, Alexander S.

    2016-07-01

    Gravity waves are primarily generated in the lower atmosphere, propagate upward, and have profound effects not only in the middle atmosphere but also at much higher altitudes. However, their effects in the upper atmosphere beyond the turbopause ( 105 km) have not been sufficiently studied. Using a general circulating model extending from the lower atmosphere to upper thermosphere and incorporating a whole atmosphere nonlinear parameterization of small-scale GWs developed by Yiǧit et al. (2008)}, we demonstrate that not only GWs penetrate into the thermosphere above the turbopause but also produce substantial dynamical and thermal effects that are comparable to ion drag and Joule heating. During sudden stratospheric warmings, GW propagation in the thermosphere is enhanced by more than a factor of three (Yiǧit and Medvedev, 2012)}, producing appreciable body forcing of up to 600 m s^{-1} day^{-1} around 250-300 km. The resultant impact on the variability of the thermospheric circulation can exceed ± 50% depending on the phase of the sudden warming (Yiǧit et al., 2014)}. References: Yiǧit, E., and A. S. Medvedev (2012), Gravity waves in the thermosphere during a sudden stratospheric warming, Geophys. Res. Lett., 39, L21101, doi:10.1029/2012GL053812. Yiǧit, E., A. D. Aylward, and A. S. Medvedev (2008), Parameterization of the effects of vertically propagating gravity waves for thermosphere general circulation models: Sensitivity study, J. Geophys. Res., 113, D19106, doi:10.1029/2008JD010135. Yiǧit, E., A. S. Medvedev, S. L. England, and T. J. Immel (2014), Simulated vari- ability of the high-latitude thermosphere induced by small-scale gravity waves during a sudden stratospheric warming, J. Geophys. Res. Space Physics, 119, doi:10.1002/2013JA019283.

  15. Development of Hydrophone and Its Aapplications Use in OBS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, C. R.; Kuo, B. Y.; Wang, C. C.; Chang, H. K.; Jang, J. P.

    2014-12-01

    The seismic wave is translated to T-wave when earthquakes occur below seafloor with a traveling speed of 1500 m/s in the SOFAR channel which centers roughly at 1000 m water depths (Tolstoy and Ewing, 1950). Many studies have shown that hydrophone can be set up in the SOFAR channel to collect acoustic data to investigate plate movement (Fox and Dziak, 1999), seismisity (Fox et.al, 2001), characteristic of T-wave (Park et.al, 2001), seafloor volcanism (Nicolas, 1989), among others. Institute of Earth Sciences of Academia Sinica has been collaborating with Taiwan Ocean Research Institute (TORI) and the Institute of Undersea Technology (IUT) of the National Sun Yat-sen University (NSYSU) to succefully build a new wide-band OBS (Yardbird). We hope that Yardbird is not only an OBS but also a multi-function underwater recording plotform. Therefor we are developing a low-power consumption, inexpensive hydrophone to catch acoustic signals. The protoypte of it has passed a series of tests and got some seismic seafloor data. This paper describes the design goal of hydrophone, component specifications, field data analyzed, and discusses the future directions of instrument development. Keywords: T-wave; Hydrophone; OBS; acoustic signal Referance: 1 Fox, C. G. and R. P. Dziak, Intenal deformation of the Gorda Plate observedb y hydroacoustimc onitoring, J . Geophys Res., 104, 17603-17615, 1999. 2 Fox, C. G., H. Matsumoto and T.K.Lau, Monitoring Pacific Ocean seismicity from an autonomous hydrophone array. , J . Geophys. Res., 106,4183-4206, 2001. 3 Nicolas, A., Structures of ophiolites and dynamics of oceanic lithosphere. Dordrecht ; Boston : Kluwer Academic Publishers, 1989. 4. Park, M., R.I. Odom, and D.J. Soukup (2001). Modal scattering: a key to understanding oceanic T-waves, Geophys. Res. Lett. 28, 3401-3404. 5. Tolstoy, I. and M. Ewing (1950). The T phase of shallow-focus earthquakes, Bull. Seismol. Soc. Am. 40, 25-51.

  16. Excavation of buried hydrated minerals on Mars by impact cratering? (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, J.; Poulet, F.; Loizeau, D.; Bibring, J.

    2010-12-01

    buried, pre-existing phyllosilicates is thought to be the driving process. Other hydrated mineral formation pathways linked with impact cratering include impact-induced hydrothermal alteration [10-12], shock-induced and post-impact changes to mineral composition. [1]Poulet et al., Nature 438, 623 (2005). [2]Murchie et al., J. Geophys. Res. 114, E00D06 (2009). [3]Bibring et al., Science 312, 5772 (2006). [4]Baratoux et al., J. Geophys. Res. 112, E08S05 (2007). [5]Tanaka et al., J. Geophys. Res. 108, (E4), 8043 (2003). [6]Carter et al., Science 328, 1682 (2010). [7]Bibring et al., Eur. Space Agency Spec. Pub. 1240, 37 (2004). [8]Murchie et al., J. Geophys. Res. 114, E00D07 (2009). [9]Carter et al., Proc. Lunar Planet. Sci. Conf. 40, abstr. 2028 (2009). [10]Abramov and Kring, J. Geophys. Res. 110, (E12), E12S09 (2005). [11]Schwenzer and Kring, Geology 37, 1091 (2009). [12]Marzo et al., Icarus 208, 667-683 (2010).

  17. Genome-wide DNA hypomethylation and RNA:DNA hybrid accumulation in Aicardi–Goutières syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Yoong Wearn; Sanz, Lionel A; Xu, Xiaoqin; Hartono, Stella R; Chédin, Frédéric

    2015-01-01

    Aicardi–Goutières syndrome (AGS) is a severe childhood inflammatory disorder that shows clinical and genetic overlap with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). AGS is thought to arise from the accumulation of incompletely metabolized endogenous nucleic acid species owing to mutations in nucleic acid-degrading enzymes TREX1 (AGS1), RNase H2 (AGS2, 3 and 4), and SAMHD1 (AGS5). However, the identity and source of such immunogenic nucleic acid species remain undefined. Using genome-wide approaches, we show that fibroblasts from AGS patients with AGS1-5 mutations are burdened by excessive loads of RNA:DNA hybrids. Using MethylC-seq, we show that AGS fibroblasts display pronounced and global loss of DNA methylation and demonstrate that AGS-specific RNA:DNA hybrids often occur within DNA hypomethylated regions. Altogether, our data suggest that RNA:DNA hybrids may represent a common immunogenic form of nucleic acids in AGS and provide the first evidence of epigenetic perturbations in AGS, furthering the links between AGS and SLE. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.08007.001 PMID:26182405

  18. Ethical dilemmas in medical humanitarian practice: cases for reflection from Médecins Sans Frontières.

    PubMed

    Sheather, Julian; Shah, Tejshri

    2011-03-01

    Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) is an independent medical humanitarian organisation working in over 70 countries. It has provided medical assistance for over 35 years to populations vulnerable through conflict, disease and inadequate health systems. Medical ethics define the starting point of the relationship between medical staff and patients. The ethics of humanitarian interventions and of research in conflict settings are much debated. However, less is known about the ethical dilemmas faced by medical humanitarian staff in their daily work. Ethical dilemmas can be intensified in humanitarian contexts by insecure environments, lack of optimum care, language barriers, potentially heightened power discrepancies between care providers and patients, differing cultural values and perceptions of patients, communities and medical staff. Time constraints, stressful conditions and lack of familiarity with ethical frameworks can prevent reflection on these dilemmas, as can frustration that such reflection does not necessarily provide instant solutions. Lack of reflection, however, can be distressing for medical practitioners and can reduce the quality of care. Ethical reflection has a central role in MSF, and the organisation uses ethical frameworks to help with clinical and programmatic decisions as well as in deliberations over operational research. We illustrate and discuss some real ethical dilemmas facing MSF teams. Only by sharing and seeking guidance can MSF and similar actors make more thoughtful and appropriate decisions. Our aim in sharing these cases is to invite discussion and dialogue in the wider medical community working in crisis, conflict or with severe resource limitations. PMID:21084354

  19. Un exemple de transfert de technologie dans le domaine des polymères conducteurs : le projet ``HYRA"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parneix, J. P.; Miane, J. L.; Colin, T.; Ruffie, G.; Mege, J.

    1998-06-01

    The HYRA project is a response to the restructuration of local companies : these are purveyors of high technology military and spatial especially in the radars business. Furthermore, the development of mobile communications needs devices and materials in the millimeter range (from 20 to 100Ghz). The aim of the HYRA project is the development of materials with specific properties - particularly conducting materials - in the millimeter wave range. The results obtained on thermoplastic/conducting polymer composites are presented. Le projet HYRA répond à des préoccupations régionales liées à des restructurations industrielles : les industries régionales fournissant les marchés militaires et spatiaux disposent de techniques très performantes mais coûteuses, en particulier dans le domaine des radars. Par ailleurs le développement des communications mobiles a besoin de dispositifs et de matériaux dans tout le domaine millimétrique (de 20 à 100 Ghz). Le projet HYRA a pour but le développement de matériaux à propriétés spécifiques - en particulier conducteurs - dans ce domaine de fréquence. Les résultats obtenus sur des composites thermoplastiques/polymères conducteurs sont présentés.

  20. Public health surveillance after the 2010 haiti earthquake: the experience of médecins sans frontières.

    PubMed

    Polonsky, Jonathan; Luquero, Francisco; Francois, Gwenola; Rousseau, Caroline; Caleo, Grazia; Ciglenecki, Iza; Delacre, Clara; Siddiqui, M Ruby; Terzian, Mego; Verhenne, Leen; Porten, Klaudia; Checchi, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    Background In January 2010, Haiti was struck by a powerful earthquake, killing and wounding hundreds of thousands and leaving millions homeless. In order to better understand the severity of the crisis, and to provide early warning of epidemics or deteriorations in the health status of the population, Médecins Sans Frontières established surveillance for infections of epidemic potential and for death rates and malnutrition prevalence. Methods Trends in infections of epidemic potential were detected through passive surveillance at health facilities serving as sentinel sites. Active community surveillance of death rates and malnutrition prevalence was established through weekly home visits. Results There were 102,054 consultations at the 15 reporting sites during the 26 week period of operation. Acute respiratory infections, acute watery diarrhoea and malaria/fever of unknown origin accounted for the majority of proportional morbidity among the diseases under surveillance. Several alerts were triggered through the detection of immediately notifiable diseases and increasing trends in some conditions. Crude and under-5 death rates, and acute malnutrition prevalence, were below emergency thresholds. Conclusion Disease surveillance after disasters should include an alert and response component, requiring investment of resources in informal networks that improve sensitivity to alerts as well as on the more common systems of data collection, compilation and analysis. Information sharing between partners is necessary to strengthen early warning systems. Community-based surveillance of mortality and malnutrition is feasible but requires careful implementation and validation. PMID:23330069

  1. Teleradiology Usage and User Satisfaction with the Telemedicine System Operated by Médecins Sans Frontières

    PubMed Central

    Halton, Jarred; Kosack, Cara; Spijker, Saskia; Joekes, Elizabeth; Andronikou, Savvas; Chetcuti, Karen; Brant, William E.; Bonnardot, Laurent; Wootton, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) began a pilot trial of store-and-forward telemedicine in 2010, initially operating separate networks in English, French, and Spanish; these were merged into a single, multilingual platform in 2013. We reviewed the pattern of teleradiology usage on the MSF telemedicine platform in the 4-year period from April 2010. In total, 564 teleradiology cases were submitted from 22 different countries. A total of 1114 files were uploaded with the 564 cases, the majority being of type JPEG (n = 1081, 97%). The median file size was 938 kb (interquartile range, IQR 163–1659). A panel of 14 radiologists was available to report cases, but most (90%) were reported by only 4 radiologists. The median radiologist response time was 6.1 h (IQR 3.0–20). A user satisfaction survey was sent to 29 users in the last 6 months of the study. There was a 28% response rate. Most respondents found the radiologist’s advice helpful and all of them stated that the advice assisted in clarification of a diagnosis. Although some MSF sites made substantial use of the system for teleradiology, there is considerable potential for expansion. More promotion of telemedicine may be needed at different levels of the organization to increase engagement of staff. PMID:25389524

  2. In Search of the ‘New Informal Legitimacy’ of Médecins Sans Frontières

    PubMed Central

    Calain, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    For medical humanitarian organizations, making their sources of legitimacy explicit is a useful exercise, in response to: misperceptions, concerns over the ‘humanitarian space’, controversies about specific humanitarian actions, challenges about resources allocation and moral suffering among humanitarian workers. This is also a difficult exercise, where normative criteria such as international law or humanitarian principles are often misrepresented as primary sources of legitimacy. This essay first argues for a morally principled definition of humanitarian medicine, based on the selfless intention of individual humanitarian actors. Taking Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) as a case in point, a common source of moral legitimacy for medical humanitarian organizations is their cosmopolitan appeal to distributive justice and collective responsibility. More informally, their legitimacy is grounded in the rightfulness of specific actions and choices. This implies a constant commitment to publicity and accountability. Legitimacy is also generated by tangible support from the public to individual organizations, by commitments to professional integrity, and by academic alliances to support evidence-based practice and operational research. PMID:22442647

  3. Characterization of samhd1 morphant zebrafish recapitulates features of the human type I interferonopathy Aicardi-Goutières syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kasher, Paul R; Jenkinson, Emma M; Briolat, Valérie; Gent, David; Morrissey, Catherine; Zeef, Leo A H; Rice, Gillian I; Levraud, Jean-Pierre; Crow, Yanick J

    2015-03-15

    In humans, loss of function mutations in the SAMHD1 (AGS5) gene cause a severe form of Aicardi-Goutières syndrome (AGS), an inherited inflammatory-mediated encephalopathy characterized by increased type I IFN activity and upregulation of IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs). In particular, SAMHD1-related AGS is associated with a distinctive cerebrovascular pathology that commonly leads to stroke. Although inflammatory responses are observed in immune cells cultured from Samhd1 null mouse models, these mice are physically healthy, specifically lacking a brain phenotype. We have investigated the use of zebrafish as an alternative system for generating a clinically relevant model of SAMHD1-related AGS. Using temporal gene knockdown of zebrafish samhd1, we observe hindbrain ventricular swelling and brain hemorrhage. Furthermore, loss of samhd1 or of another AGS-associated gene, adar, leads to a significant upregulation of innate immune-related genes and an increase in the number of cells expressing the zebrafish type I IFN ifnphi1. To our knowledge, this is the first example of an in vivo model of AGS that recapitulates features of both the innate immune and neurological characteristics of the disease. The phenotypes associated with loss of samhd1 and adar suggest a function of these genes in controlling innate immune processes conserved to zebrafish, thereby also contributing to our understanding of antiviral signaling in this model organism. PMID:25672750

  4. "Nationals" and "expatriates": challenges of fulfilling "sans frontières" ("without borders") ideals in international humanitarian action.

    PubMed

    Shevchenko, Olga; Fox, Renée C

    2008-01-01

    The international humanitarian organization, Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF), is strongly committed to principles of universalism, egalitarianism, and equity, in both its internal and external relations. Nevertheless, the organization distinguishes between so-called "national" staff members (those who are indigenous to the countries where MSF projects are located), and "expatriate" staff (those who are involved in projects outside their countries of residence), in certain ways that it has self-critically termed "discriminatory", "colonialist", and even "racist". It has resolved to remedy such practices. Through a first-hand case study of MSF activities in Russia, this article demonstrates that the dynamics of the "nationals"/ "expatriates" divide is a more complex phenomenon than MSF's self-accusatory diagnosis implies; that a fuller recognition and utilization of nationals' local knowledge would mitigate some of the conditions of inequality and inequity that they experience; but that it would not necessarily be desirable to expunge all differences between the two groups of staff Furthermore, because they are intrinsic to the structure and conditions of international humanitarian action, some of these differences could not easily be elminated by MSF, or by any other organization engaged in this kind of action. PMID:20845834

  5. In memory of Al Cameron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowan, John; Truran, James W.

    Al Cameron, who died recently (October 3, 2005) at 80, was one of the giants in astrophysics. His insights were profound and his interests were wide-ranging. Originally trained as a nuclear physicist, he made major contributions in a number of fields, including nuclear reactions in stars, nucleosynthesis, the abundances of the elements in the Solar System, and the origin of the Solar System and the Moon. In 1957, Cameron and, independently, Burbidge, Burbidge, Fowler and Hoyle, wrote seminal papers on nuclear astrophysics. Most of our current ideas concerning ele- ment formation in stars have followed from those two pioneering and historical works. Al also made many contributions in the field of Solar System physics. Particularly noteworthy in this regard was Cameron's work on the formation of the Moon. Al was also a good friend and mentor of young people. Al Cameron will be missed by many in the community both for his scientific contributions and for his friendship.

  6. Reply to Gopalswamy et al.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cane, H. V.; Richardson, I. G.

    2003-01-01

    The comment of Gopalswamy et al. (thereafter GMY) relates to a letter discussing coronal mass ejections (CMEs), interplanetary ejecta and geomagnetic storms. GMY contend that Cane et al. incorrectly identified ejecta (interplanetary CMEs) and hypothesize that this is because Cane et al. fail to understand how to separate ejecta from "shock sheaths" when interpreting solar wind and energetic particle data sets. They (GMY) are wrong be cause the relevant section of the paper was concerned with the propagation time to 1 AU of any potentially geoeffective structures caused by CMEs, i.e. upstream compression regions with or without shocks, or ejecta. In other words, the travel times used by Cane et al. were purposefully and deliberately distinct from ejecta travel times (except for those slow ejecta, approx. 30% of their events, which generated no upstream features), and no error in identification was involved. The confusion of GMY stems from the description did not characterize the observations sufficiently clearly.

  7. Comparing the Thermodynamic Behaviour of Al(1)+ZrO2(s) to Al(1)+Al2O3(s)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Copland, Evan

    2004-01-01

    In an effort to better determine the thermodynamic properties of Al(g) and Al2O(g). the vapor in equilibrium with Al(l)+ZrO2(s) was compared to the vapor in equilibrium with Al(l)+Al2O3(s) over temperature range 1197-to-1509K. The comparison was made directly by Knudsen effusion-cell mass spectrometry with an instrument configured for a multiple effusion-cell vapor source (multi-cell KEMS). Second law enthalpies of vaporization of Al(g) and Al2O(g) together with activity measurements show that Al(l)+ZrO2(s) is thermodynamically equivalent to Al(l)+Al2O3(s), indicating Al(l) remained pure and Al2O3(s) was present in the ZrO2-cell. Subsequent observation of the Al(l)/ZrO2 and vapor/ZrO2 interfaces revealed a thin Al2O3-layer had formed, separating the ZrO2-cell from Al(l) and Al(g)+Al2O(g), effectively transforming it into an Al2O3 effusion-cell. This behavior agrees with recent observations made for Beta-NiAl(Pt) alloys measured in ZrO2 effusion-cell.

  8. Corrosion Behavior of Al-Al3Ni and Al-Al2Cu Functionally Graded Materials Fabricated by a Centrifugal Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noda, Kazuhiko; Miyahara, Keita; Watanabe, Yoshimi

    2008-02-01

    Intermetallic compounds, such as Al3Ni and Al2Cu, are effective for enhancing the mechanical properties of an alloy. Al-Al3Ni and Al-Al2Cu functionally graded materials (FGMs) might be attractive materials for advanced materials. Al-Al3Ni and Al-Al2Cu FGMs were fabricated by a centrifugal method; the centrifugal method is an extremely effective method for fabricating FGMs. Al-Al3Ni and Al-Al2Cu FGMs that had a graded distribution of intermetallic compounds could be produced by this in-situ centrifugal method. Particle size, particle shape and the distribution of intermetallic compounds were controlled by varying the content of the alloy element (Ni, Cu) in the master alloy, the cooling rate in casting and the gravity number. The casting mechanism is explained in terms of the microstructures of the Al-Al3Ni and Al-Al2Cu FGMs fabricated by this method. The corrosion behavior of the FGMs was investigated by electrochemical analysis. Polarization curves of the FGMs in a borate solution were measured by a potentiodynamic method. The presence of Al2Cu exerted a larger effect on the corrosion behavior of the FGMs than Al3Ni. Analysis of the polarization curve parameters was effective for evaluating the corrosion resistance of the FGMs.

  9. Experimental determination of the hydrothermal solubility of ReS2 and the Re–ReO2 buffer assemblage and transport of rhenium under supercritical conditions

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Yongliang; Wood, Scott A

    2002-01-01

    To understand the aqueous species important for transport of rhenium under supercritical conditions, we conducted a series of solubility experiments on the Re–ReO2 buffer assemblage and ReS2. In these experiments, pH was buffered by the K–feldspar–muscovite–quartz assemblage; in sulfur-free systems was buffered by the Re–ReO2 assemblage; and and in sulfur-containing systems were buffered by the magnetite–pyrite–pyrrhotite assemblage. Our experimental studies indicate that the species ReCl40 is dominant at 400°C in slightly acidic to near-neutral, and chloride-rich (total chloride concentrations ranging from 0.5 to 1.0 M) environments, and ReCl3+ may predominate at 500°C in a solution with total chloride concentrations ranging from 0.5 to 1.5 M. The results also demonstrate that the solubility of ReS2 is about two orders of magnitude less than that of ReO2. This finding not only suggests that ReS2 (or a ReS2 component in molybdenite) is the solubility-controlling phase in sulfur-containing, reducing environments but also implies that a mixing process involving an oxidized, rhenium-containing solution and a solution with reduced sulfur is one of the most effective mechanisms for deposition of rhenium. In analogy with Re, TcS2 may be the stable Tc-bearing phase in deep geological repositories of radioactive wastes.

  10. Should the Curricular Time Allocated to School Physical Education Be Increased? Insights from Participants in a Follow-up of the Trois-Rivières Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larouche, Richard; Laurencelle, Louis; Shephard, Roy J.; Trudeau, François

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we explored the effects of exposure to an experimental program of daily physical education (PE) during primary school on adult attitudes toward school PE. In 2008, 86 original participants in the Trois-Rivières study (44 women and 42 men aged 44.0 ± 1.2 years) underwent a semistructured interview in which their attitudes toward PE,…

  11. HiRes deconvolved Spitzer images of 89 protostellar jets and outflows: New data on the evolution of the outflow morphology

    SciTech Connect

    Velusamy, T.; Langer, W. D.; Thompson, T. E-mail: William.D.Langer@jpl.nasa.gov

    2014-03-01

    To study the role of protosellar jets and outflows in the time evolution of the parent cores and the protostars, the astronomical community needs a large enough database of infrared images of protostars at the highest spatial resolution possible to reveal the details of their morphology. Spitzer provides unprecedented sensitivity in the infrared to study both the jet and outflow features, however, its spatial resolution is limited by its 0.85 m mirror. Here, we use a high-resolution deconvolution algorithm, 'HiRes,' to improve the visualization of spatial morphology by enhancing resolution (to subarcsecond levels in the IRAC bands) and removing the contaminating side lobes from bright sources in a sample of 89 protostellar objects. These reprocessed images are useful for detecting (1) wide-angle outflows seen in scattered light, (2) morphological details of H{sub 2} emission in jets and bow shocks, and (3) compact features in MIPS 24 μm images as protostar/disk and atomic/ionic line emission associated with the jets. The HiRes FITS image data of such a large homogeneous sample presented here will be useful to the community in studying these protostellar objects. To illustrate the utility of this HiRes sample, we show how the opening angle of the wide-angle outflows in 31 sources, all observed in the HiRes-processed Spitzer images, correlates with age. Our data suggest a power-law fit to opening angle versus age with an exponent of ∼0.32 and 0.02, respectively, for ages ≤8000 yr and ≥8000 yr.

  12. Ab initio modeling of zincblende AlN layer in Al-AlN-TiN multilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, S. K.; Wang, J.; Liu, X.-Y.

    2016-06-01

    An unusual growth mechanism of metastable zincblende AlN thin film by diffusion of nitrogen atoms into Al lattice is established. Using first-principles density functional theory, we studied the possibility of thermodynamic stability of AlN as a zincblende phase due to epitaxial strains and interface effect, which fails to explain the formation of zincblende AlN. We then compared the formation energetics of rocksalt and zincblende AlN in fcc Al through direct diffusion of nitrogen atoms to Al octahedral and tetrahedral interstitials. The formation of a zincblende AlN thin film is determined to be a kinetically driven process, not a thermodynamically driven process.

  13. Effects of Additives and Impurity on the Adhesive Behavior of the NiAl(110)/Al2O3 (0001) Interface: An Ab Initio Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozfidan, Isil; Chen, Kuiying; Fu, Ming

    2011-12-01

    Using ab initio density functional theory (DFT), the adhesive behavior of NiAl(110)/Al2O3(0001) interface in thermal barrier coatings was systematically studied with an emphasis on the effects of alloying additives and impurity elements. To reveal possible atomic-scale mechanisms, the separations between certain atoms at the interface, the electron localization function (ELF), and the electron density of states (DOS) are thoroughly investigated. First, effects of individual elements such as S, Pt, and Cr, and reactive elements (REs) Hf, Zr, and Y, on the work of separation, W sep, of the interface were examined. As expected, the segregation of S to the interface significantly degrades the adhesion, while the substitution of Pt for Ni adjacent to the interface does not enhance the W sep. Cr and RE addition to the interface individually result in a considerable increase of W sep. Second, the addition of Pt, Hf, and Cr to the S containing interface is shown to mitigate the detrimental effect of sulfur to some extent. Co doping the interface with a selected combination of (Pt, Hf), (Pt, Cr), (Cr, Hf), (Cr, Y), (Hf, Y), and (Y, Zr) was implemented to probe possible synergistic interactions between elements on W sep. Synergistic effects are detected on increasing W sep for (Hf, Y), (Hf, Zr) combinations. Co doping the interface with (Cr, Y) and (Cr, Hf), however, is found to weaken the adhesion. Through a detailed analysis of electronic structures in terms of ELF and DOS, four dominant bonds across the interface, RE-O, RE-Ni, Aloxide-Ni, and AlNiAl-O, are identified to play a decisive role in governing the adhesive strength of the interface.

  14. High Density Sliding at Ta/Al and Al/Al Interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Hammerberg, J. E.; Germann, T. C.; Ravelo, R.

    2006-07-28

    We present 3D-nonequilibrium molecular dynamics results for the velocity dependence of the frictional force at smooth sliding interfaces for Ta and Al single crystals. For Ta/Al we consider Al(100)/Ta(100) and Al(111)/Ta(110) interfaces sliding along [001] and [11(bar sign)0]fcc /[001]bcc respectively. These are compared with Al(111)/Al(100) interfaces at the same loads, corresponding to a pressure of 15 GPa. Both interfacial pairs show similar behavior in the velocity dependence of the frictional force: a low velocity regime with an increasing frictional force followed by a strain induced transformation regime at velocities above approximately 1/10 the transverse sound speed, followed by a fluidized interface at high velocities. For both interfacial pairs, the high velocity dependence of the frictional force exhibits power law behavior, Ft {proportional_to} v-{beta} with {beta}=3/4. We discuss the structural changes that influence dissipation in each of these regimes.

  15. Provision of antiretroviral treatment in conflict settings: the experience of Médecins Sans Frontières

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Many countries ravaged by conflict have substantial morbidity and mortality attributed to HIV/AIDS yet HIV treatment is uncommonly available. Universal access to HIV care cannot be achieved unless the needs of populations in conflict-affected areas are addressed. Methods From 2003 Médecins Sans Frontières introduced HIV care, including antiretroviral therapy, into 24 programmes in conflict or post-conflict settings, mainly in sub-Saharan Africa. HIV care and treatment activities were usually integrated within other medical activities. Project data collected in the Fuchia software system were analysed and outcomes compared with ART-LINC data. Programme reports and other relevant documents and interviews with local and headquarters staff were used to develop lessons learned. Results In the 22 programmes where ART was initiated, more than 10,500 people were diagnosed with HIV and received medical care, and 4555 commenced antiretroviral therapy, including 348 children. Complete data were available for adults in 20 programmes (n = 4145). At analysis, 2645 (64%) remained on ART, 422 (10%) had died, 466 (11%) lost to follow-up, 417 (10%) transferred to another programme, and 195 (5%) had an unclear outcome. Median 12-month mortality and loss to follow-up were 9% and 11% respectively, and median 6-month CD4 gain was 129 cells/mm 3. Patient outcomes on treatment were comparable to those in stable resource-limited settings, and individuals and communities obtained significant benefits from access to HIV treatment. Programme disruption through instability was uncommon with only one program experiencing interruption to services, and programs were adapted to allow for disruption and population movements. Integration of HIV activities strengthened other health activities contributing to health benefits for all victims of conflict and increasing the potential sustainability for implemented activities. Conclusions With commitment, simplified treatment and monitoring

  16. Bruyères-le-Châtel Neutron Evaluations of Actinides with the TALYS Code: The Fission Channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romain, P.; Morillon, B.; Duarte, H.

    2016-01-01

    For several years, various neutron evaluations of plutonium and uranium isotopes have been performed at Bruyères-le-Châtel (BRC), from 1 keV up to 30 MeV. Since only nuclear reaction models have been used to produce these evaluations, our approach was named the "Full Model" approach. Total, shape elastic and direct inelastic cross sections were obtained from the coupled channels model using a dispersive optical potential developed for actinides, with a large enough coupling scheme including the lowest octupolar band. All other cross sections were calculated using the Hauser-Feshbach theory (TALYS code) with a pre-equilibrium component above 8-10 MeV. In this paper, we focus our attention on the fission channel. More precisely, we will present the BRC contribution to fission modeling and the philosophy adopted in our "Full Model" approach. Performing evaluations with the "Full Model" approach implies the optimization of a large number of model parameters. With increasing neutron incident energy, many residual nuclei produced by nucleon emission also lead to fission. All available experimental data assigned to various fission mechanisms of the same nucleus were used to determine fission barrier parameters. For uranium isotopes, triple-humped fission barriers were required in order to reproduce accurately variations of the experimental fission cross sections. Our BRC fission modeling has shown that the effects of the class II or class III states located in the wells of the fission barrier sometimes provide an anti-resonant transmission rather than a resonant one. Consistent evaluations were produced for a large series of U and Pu isotopes. Resulting files were tested against integral data.

  17. Dynamics of the Sanières rockslide from the time-lapse analysis of airborne and terrestrial point clouds.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malet, Jean-Philippe; Skupinsky, Gregorz; Guérin, Antoine; Derron, Marc-Henri; Bornemann, Pierrick

    2015-04-01

    The Roche-Plombée rocsklide (South French Alps) has been triggered in early August 2013 in the lower part of the Sanières catchment as a result of undercutting of the torrent banks after a debris flow event. During several days, a large amount of debris have been mobilised along a 300m length cliff. Deposits have reached and filled the torrential channel downslope. Several field observations carried out in the following weeks have shown the progressive opening of fissures along the main scarp. Today, large volumes of unstable debris are still available on the slope. Local stakeholders are now expecting the formation of a debris-dam in the channel which could lead to a debris flow in case of failure. This work is focused on the use of remote sensing techniques (terrestrial photogrammetry, airborne and terrestrical LiDAR) to detect and quantify spatial and temporal distribution of materials on the slope. The Structure From Motion (SFM) technique is used to generate multi-date high-resolution digital elevation models (HRDEMs) in order to quantify volumes changes; a time-lapse image correlation analysis of four terrestrial LiDAR scans is used to estimate displacements at the surface. The analysis of the point cloud dataset indicates a global deformation of the rockslope along several slip surfaces. The progressive development of the main scarp with velocity of a few cm.month-1 is also monitored. The analysis of an airborne LiDAR point cloud allows to characterize the main discontinuities. The possibility of extension of the rockslide is discussed.

  18. The Miocene Sommières basin, SE France: Bioclastic carbonates in a tide-dominated depositional system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynaud, Jean-Yves; James, Noël P.

    2012-12-01

    The Miocene Sommières Basin in SE France is a semi-enclosed depression that was connected to the Mediterranean Sea by a flooded paleo-incised valley and then filled by a suite of sediments comprising carbonate grains coming from temperate factories that were largely deposited in tidal-dominated paleoenvironments. The strata are partitioned into two sequences that reflect repeated flooding of the incised valley system, one of several similar situations in this region of France. The carbonate grains are mostly bioclasts, namely from barnacles, bryozoans, coralline algae (encrusting, branching, and rhodoliths), echinoids, and benthic foraminifers (large and small) with ostracods, sponge spicules and planktic foraminifers prominent in muddy facies. Particles were produced by shallow water carbonate factories on hard substrates (valley walls in particular), associated with subaqueous dunes, and in deeper water basinal settings. Each depositional sequence is underlain by an eroded and bored hard surface that is progressively overlain by TST subaqueous tidal dunes or storm deposits that grade up, in one case, into HST marls (the HST of the upper sequence has been removed by erosion). The lower sequence is ebb tide dominated whereas the upper sequence is flood tide dominated. The succession is interpreted to represent a TST whose tidal currents were focused by the narrow valley and a HST that reflected flooding of the overbanks. This stratigraphic and depositional motif is comparable to that in other spatially separated Neogene paleovalleys that are filled with tide-dominated clastic carbonates in the region. Together with other recently documented similar systems, these limestones constitute an important new group of carbonate sand bodies in the carbonate depositional realm.

  19. Increased delivery of condensation nuclei during the Late Heavy Bombardment to the terrestrial and martian atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Losiak, Anna

    2014-05-01

    LHB should be taken into account when constructing models of terrestrial and Martian climates around 4 Ga. Bland P.A., Artemieva N.A. (2006) Meteorit.Planet.Sci. 41:607-631. Bottke W.F. et al. (2012) Nature 485: 78-81. Fassett C.I., Minton D.A. (2013) Nat.Geosci. 6:520-524 (2013). Hunten D.M. et al. (1980) J.Atmos.Sci. 37:1342-1357. Haberle R.M. et al. (1999) J.Geophys.Res. 104:8957-8974. Ivanov B.A., Hartmann W.K. (2009) Planets and Moons: Treatise on Geophysics (eds. Spohn T.): 207-243. Michaels T.I. et al. (2006) Geophys.Res.Lett. 33:L16201. Montmessin F. et al. (2004) J.Geophys.Res. 109:E10004. Ogurtsov M.G., Raspopov O.M. (2011) Geomagnetism&Aeronomy 51:275-283. Rosen J.M. (1968) Space Sci.Rev. 9:58-89. Ryder G. (2002) J.Geophys.Res. 107: doi:10.1029/2001JE001583. Segura T.L. et al. (2002) Science 298:1977-1980. Segura T.L. et al. (2012) Icarus 220:144-148. Sleep N.S. et al. (1989) Nature 342:139-142. Tegen I. (2003) Quat.Sci.Rev. 22:1821-1834. Urata R.A., Toon O.B. (2013) Icarus 226:229-250. Wordsworth R. et al. (2012) Icarus 222:1-19.

  20. Superconductivity in Al/Al2O3 interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palnichenko, A. V.; Vyaselev, O. M.; Mazilkin, A. A.; Khasanov, S. S.

    2016-06-01

    Metastable superconductivity at Tc ≈ 65 K has been observed in Al foil subjected to special oxidation process, according to the ac magnetic susceptibility and electrical resistance measurements. Comparison of the ac susceptibility and the dc magnetization measurements infers that the superconductivity arises within the interfacial granular layer formed during the oxidation process between metallic aluminum and its oxide.

  1. AlN/Fe/AlN nanostructures for magnetooptic magnetometry

    SciTech Connect

    Lišková-Jakubisová, E. Višňovský, Š.; Široký, P.; Hrabovský, D.; Pištora, J.

    2014-05-07

    AlN/Fe/AlN/Cu nanostructures with ultrathin Fe grown by sputtering on Si substrates are evaluated as probes for magnetooptical (MO) mapping of weak currents. They are considered for a laser wavelength of λ = 410 nm (3.02 eV) and operate at oblique light incidence angles, φ{sup (0)}, to enable detection of both in-plane and out-of-plane magnetization. Their performance is evaluated in terms of MO reflected wave electric field amplitudes. The maximal MO amplitudes in AlN/Fe/AlN/Cu are achieved by a proper choice of layer thicknesses. The nanostructures were characterized by MO polar Kerr effect at φ{sup (0)} ≈ 5° and longitudinal Kerr effect spectra (φ{sup (0)} = 45°) at photon energies between 1 and 5 eV. The nominal profiles were refined using a model-based analysis of the spectra. Closed form analytical expressions are provided, which are useful in the search for maximal MO amplitudes.

  2. Thermal expansion of Fe3C at high pressure and carbon in the Earth's inner core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, L.; Chen, B.; Wang, Y.; Li, J.

    2008-12-01

    Carbon is one of the major candidates for the principal light element in the Earth's core. Wood [1993] proposed that Fe3C, rather than iron-nickel alloy, is the dominant phase in the Earth's solid inner core. Testing the model of Fe3C-rich inner core requires knowledge on the thermal equation-of-state (EoS) of Fe3C under core conditions. To date, EoS data of Fe3C are only available at high pressure and 0 or 300 K [Scott et al., 2001, Li et al., 2002, Vocadlo et al., 2002] or at high temperature and 1 bar [Wood et al., 2004]. Wood et al. [2004] found that the thermal expansion coefficient is significantly affected by the ferromagnetic to paramagnetic transition above the Curie temperature. In this study, we have determined the thermal expansion coefficient of Fe3C up to 20 GPa and 1273 K, using a T-cup device and synchrotron x-ray diffraction techniques at beamline 13-ID of the Advanced Photon Source. Our results place constraints on the abundance of carbon the Earth's inner core. This work is supported by NSF EAR 06-09639. References: Gao et al. (2008), Geophys. Res. Lett., doi:10.1029/2008GL034817. Li, J. et al. (2002), Phys. Chem. Miner., 29(3), 166-169. Scott, H. P. et al. (2001), Geophys. Res. Lett., 28, 1875-1878 Vocadlo, L., et al. (2002), Earth Planet. Sci. Lett., 203(1), 567-575. 347. Wood, B. J. (1993), Earth Planet. Sci. Lett., 117(3-4), 593-607. Wood, I. G. et al. (2004), J. Appl. Crystallogr., 37, 82-90.

  3. ALS - A unique design approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamberlain, Roger A.

    1990-09-01

    An advanced launch system (ALS), which is intended to be flexible and to deliver a wide range of payloads at a reduced cost, is discussed. The ALS concept also features total quality management, modular subsystems, standardized interfaces, standardized missions, and off-line payload encapsulation. The technological improvements include manufacturing of dry structures, use of composite materials, adaptive guidance and control systems, and laser-initiated radar systems. The operational improvements range from paperless management, to rocket engine leak detection devices and automated ground operations.

  4. A post-Tohoku earthquake review of earthquake probabilities in the Southern Kanto District, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somerville, Paul G.

    2014-12-01

    The 2011 Mw 9.0 Tohoku earthquake generated an aftershock sequence that affected a large part of northern Honshu, and has given rise to widely divergent forecasts of changes in earthquake occurrence probabilities in northern Honshu. The objective of this review is to assess these forecasts as they relate to potential changes in the occurrence probabilities of damaging earthquakes in the Kanto Region. It is generally agreed that the 2011 Mw 9.0 Tohoku earthquake increased the stress on faults in the southern Kanto district. Toda and Stein (Geophys Res Lett 686, 40: doi:10.1002, 2013) further conclude that the probability of earthquakes in the Kanto Corridor has increased by a factor of 2.5 for the time period 11 March 2013 to 10 March 2018 in the Kanto Corridor. Estimates of earthquake probabilities in a wider region of the Southern Kanto District by Nanjo et al. (Geophys J Int, doi:10.1093, 2013) indicate that any increase in the probability of earthquakes is insignificant in this larger region. Uchida et al. (Earth Planet Sci Lett 374: 81-91, 2013) conclude that the Philippine Sea plate the extends well north of the northern margin of Tokyo Bay, inconsistent with the Kanto Fragment hypothesis of Toda et al. (Nat Geosci, 1:1-6,2008), which attributes deep earthquakes in this region, which they term the Kanto Corridor, to a broken fragment of the Pacific plate. The results of Uchida and Matsuzawa (J Geophys Res 115:B07309, 2013)support the conclusion that fault creep in southern Kanto may be slowly relaxing the stress increase caused by the Tohoku earthquake without causing more large earthquakes. Stress transfer calculations indicate a large stress transfer to the Off Boso Segment as a result of the 2011 Tohoku earthquake. However, Ozawa et al. (J Geophys Res 117:B07404, 2012) used onshore GPS measurements to infer large post-Tohoku creep on the plate interface in the Off-Boso region, and Uchida and Matsuzawa (ibid.) measured similar large creep off the Boso

  5. New Paleomagnetic Data from the Wadi Abyad Crustal Section and their Implications for the Rotation History of the Oman Ophiolite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, M.; Morris, A.; Anderson, M.; MacLeod, C. J.

    2014-12-01

    The Oman ophiolite is an important natural laboratory for understanding the construction of oceanic crust at fast spreading axes and its subsequent tectonic evolution. Previous paleomagnetic research in lavas of the northern ophiolitic blocks (Perrin et al., 2000, Mar. Geophys. Res.) has demonstrated substantial clockwise intraoceanic tectonic rotations. Paleomagnetic data from lower crustal sequences in the southern blocks, however, have been more equivocal due to complications arising from remagnetization, and have been used to infer that clockwise rotations seen in the north are internal to the ophiolite rather than regionally significant (Weiler, 2000, Mar. Geophys. Res.). Here we demonstrate the importance and advantages of sampling crustal transects in the ophiolite in order to understand the nature and variability in magnetization directions. By systematically sampling the lower crustal sequence exposed in Wadi Abyad (Rustaq block) we resolve for the first time in a single section a pattern of remagnetized lowermost gabbros and retention of earlier magnetizations by uppermost gabbros and the overlying dyke-rooting zone. Results are supported by a positive fold test that shows that remagnetization of lower gabbros occurred prior to the Campanian structural disruption of the Moho. NW-directed remagnetized remanences in the lower units are consistent with those used by Weiler (2000, Mar. Geophys. Res.) to infer lack of significant rotation of the southern blocks and to argue, therefore, that rotation of the northern blocks was internal to the ophiolite. In contrast, E/ENE-directed remanences in the uppermost levels of Wadi Abyad imply a large, clockwise rotation of the Rustaq block, of a sense and magnitude consistent with intraoceanic rotations inferred from extrusive sections in the northern blocks. We conclude that without the control provided by systematic crustal sampling, the potential for different remanence directions being acquired at different times

  6. Tests of ionospheric control of young injection events identified from magnetometer observations at Saturn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kivelson, M.; Jia, X.

    2015-12-01

    Kennelly et al. (2013) reported that young plasma injection events observed in Saturn's nightside magnetosphere and identified from plasma wave signatures are modulated at the period associated with the winter hemisphere. In a system unstable to interchange, radial motion of flux tubes is constrained by the "line-tying" effect of high ionospheric conductance (Southwood and Kivelson, 1989). Slippage of a flux tube would then occur initially in the hemisphere in which the ionospheric conductance is lowest. Saturn's ionospheric conductances vary not only with season, but also with rotation phase because of the presence of a pattern of rotating field-aligned currents that drive "planetary period oscillations" (Jia and Kivelson, 2012). The conductance should minimize near the center of the downward current region and, at this rotation phase in the winter hemisphere, the growth rate of the instability would be largest, accounting for control by the northern period. With motion starting in the winter hemisphere, the flux tube would develop a tilt of predictable sense and the initial inward motion of the interchanging flux tube would occur at a specific rotation phase of the winter ionosphere. For a subset of the Kennelly events, we found that the tilt and phase are consistent with expectations based on the control of displacement by ionospheric conductance. Many additional young interchange events have been identified by K. K. Khurana [personal communication, 2015] whom we thank for making the list available. We examine this more extensive set of events and use them to investigate the proposed mechanism more fully. __________ Jia, X., and M. G. Kivelson (2012), J. Geophys. Res., 117, A11219. Kennelly, T. J., J. S. Leisner, G. B. Hospodarsky, and D. A. Gurnett (2013), J. Geophys. Res. Space Physics, 118, 832-838. Kivelson, M., and X. Jia (2014), , AGU Fall meeting, 2014, SM51E-4295. Southwood, D. J., and M. G. Kivelson (1989), J. Geophys. Res., 94, 299-308.

  7. Mitigation of hurricane storm surge impacts: Modeling scenarios over wide continental shelves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lima Rego, Joao; Li, Chunyan

    2010-05-01

    The improvement of present understanding of surge dynamics over wide and shallow shelves is vital for the improvement of our ability to forecast storm surge impacts to coastal regions, particularly the low-lying land areas that are most vulnerable to hurricane flooding (e.g. the Northern Gulf of Mexico, coastal Bangladesh, the Southeast China sea). Given the increase of global sea-surface temperature, both the total number and proportion of intense tropical cyclones have increased notably since 1970 (Emanuel, 2005; Nature). Therefore, more intense hurricanes may hit densely populated coastal regions, and this problem may be aggravated by the prospect of accelerated sea-level rise in the 21st century. This presentation offers a review of recent work on hurricane-induced storm surge. The finite-volume coastal ocean model ("FVCOM", by Chen et al., 2003; J. Atmos. Ocean Tech.) was applied to the storm surge induced by Hurricanes Rita and Ike along the coasts of Louisiana and Texas in 2005 and 2008, respectively, to study coastal storm surge dynamics. The sensitivity analysis of Rego and Li (2009; Geophys. Res. Lett.) demonstrated how stronger, wider or faster tropical cyclones would affect coastal flooding. Li, Weeks and Rego (2009; Geophys. Res. Lett) looked into how hurricane flooding and receding dynamics differ, concluding that the overland flow in the latter stage is of considerable importance. Rego and Li (2010; J. Geophys. Res.) showed how extreme events may result of a combination of non-extreme factors, by studying the nonlinear interaction of tide and hurricane surge. The ability of models to reproduce these extreme events and to proactive plan for damage reduction is covered in Rego and Li's (2010; J. Marine Syst.) study of how barrier island systems protect coastal bays from offshore surge propagation. Here we combine these results for a wider perspective on how hurricane flooding could be mitigated under changing conditions.

  8. The Relationship Between Dipolarization Fronts and Pi2 Pulsations in the Near-Earth Magnetotail - A MHD Case Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ream, J. B.; Walker, R. J.; Ashour-Abdalla, M.; El-Alaoui, M.

    2011-12-01

    dipolarization front begins to travel earthward, Pi2 fluctuations are generated in the pressure and velocity components which propagate along the plasma sheet into the inner magnetosphere. Inside ~-7 RE the frequency seen in the velocity perturbations is matched by perturbations in pressure and magnetic field components. References Ashour-Abdalla, M., et al (2011), Observations and simulations of non-local acceleration of electrons in magnetotail magnetic reconnection events, Nature Physics, vol.7. Cao, X., et al. (2008), Multispacecraft and ground-based observations of substorm timing and activations: Two case studies, J. Geophys. Res., 113, A07S25. El-Alaoui, M. (2001), Current disruption during November 24, 1996 substorm, J. Geophys. Res., 106, 6229- 6245. Kepko, L. and M. Kivelson (1999) Generation of Pi2 pulsations by bursty bulk flows, J. Geophys Res. 104(A11),25,021-25,034. Panov, E. V., et al (2010), Multiple overshoot and rebound of a bursty bulk flow, Geophys. Res. Lett., 37, L08103. Raeder, J., et al. (1998), The Geospace Environment Modeling Grand Challenge: Results from a global geospace circulation model, J. Geophys. Res., 103, 14,787.

  9. Characterization of emergent leakage neutrons from multiple layers of hydrogen/water in the lunar regolith by Monte Carlo simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    SU, J.; Sagdeev, R.; Usikov, D.; Chin, G.; Boyer, L.; Livengood, T. A.; McClanahan, T. P.; Murray, J.; Starr, R. D.

    2013-12-01

    CSETN from the leakage neutron spectrum, emission angle, detector energy sensitivity and angular response. Reference: [1] W. C. Feldman, et al., Science 4 September 1998: Vol. 281 no. 5382 pp. 1496-1500. [2] Gasnault, O., et al., (2000) J. Geophys. Res., 105(E2), 4263-4271. [3] Little, R. C., et al. (2003), J. Geophys. Res., 108(E5), 5046. [4] McKinney et al., (2006), J. Geophys. Res., 111, E06004. [5] Lawrence et al., (2006), J. Geophys. Res., 111, E08001. [6] Looper et al, (2013), Space Weather, VOL. 11, 142-152. [7] J. Allison, et al, (2006) IEEE TRANS. ON NUCL SCI, VOL. 53, NO. 1. [8] J. Masarik and R. Reedy (1996), J. Geophys. Res., 101, 18,891-18,912. [9] P. O'Neil (2010) IEEE Trans. Nucl. Sci., 57(6), 3148-3153. [10] D. Pelowitz, (2005), Rep. LA-CP-05-0369, LANL, Los Alamos, NM.

  10. Geometry in Medias Res

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cukier, Mimi; Asdourian, Tony; Thakker, Anand

    2012-01-01

    Geometry provides a natural window into what it is like to do mathematics. In the world of geometry, playful experimentation is often more fruitful than following a procedure, and logic plus a few axioms can open new worlds. Nonetheless, teaching a geometry course in a way that combines both rigor and play can be difficult. Many geometry courses…

  11. Dynamic Modeling of ALS Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Harry

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of dynamic modeling and simulation of Advanced Life Support (ALS) systems is to help design them. Static steady state systems analysis provides basic information and is necessary to guide dynamic modeling, but static analysis is not sufficient to design and compare systems. ALS systems must respond to external input variations and internal off-nominal behavior. Buffer sizing, resupply scheduling, failure response, and control system design are aspects of dynamic system design. We develop two dynamic mass flow models and use them in simulations to evaluate systems issues, optimize designs, and make system design trades. One model is of nitrogen leakage in the space station, the other is of a waste processor failure in a regenerative life support system. Most systems analyses are concerned with optimizing the cost/benefit of a system at its nominal steady-state operating point. ALS analysis must go beyond the static steady state to include dynamic system design. All life support systems exhibit behavior that varies over time. ALS systems must respond to equipment operating cycles, repair schedules, and occasional off-nominal behavior or malfunctions. Biological components, such as bioreactors, composters, and food plant growth chambers, usually have operating cycles or other complex time behavior. Buffer sizes, material stocks, and resupply rates determine dynamic system behavior and directly affect system mass and cost. Dynamic simulation is needed to avoid the extremes of costly over-design of buffers and material reserves or system failure due to insufficient buffers and lack of stored material.

  12. Soil water content plays an important role in soil-atmosphere exchange of carbonyl sulfide (OCS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Zhigang; Behrendt, Thomas; Bunk, Rüdiger; Wu, Dianming; Kesselmeier, Jürgen

    2016-04-01

    Carbonyl sulfide (OCS) is a quite stable gas in the troposphere and is transported up to the stratosphere, where it contributes to the sulfate aerosol layer (Crutzen 1976). The tropospheric concentration seems to be quite constant, indicating a balance between sinks and sources. Recent work by Sandoval-Soto et al. (2005) demonstrated the enormous strength of the vegetation sink and the urgent needs to understand the sinks and sources. The role of soils is a matter of discussion (Kesselmeier et al., 1999; Van Diest and Kesselmeier, 2008; Maseyk et al., 2014; Whelan et al., 2015). To better understand the influence of soil water content and OCS mixing ratio on OCS fluxes, we used an OCS analyzer (LGR COS/CO Analyzer 907-0028, Los Gatos, CA, USA) coupled with automated soil chamber system (Behrendt et al., 2014) to measure the OCS fluxes with a slow drying of four different types of soil (arable wheat soil in Mainz, blueberry soil in Waldstein, spruce soil in Waldstein and needle forest soil in Finland). Results showed that OCS fluxes as well as the optimum soil water content for OCS uptake varied significantly for different soils. The net production rates changed significantly with the soil drying out from 100% to about 5% water holding capacity (WHC), implying that soil water content play an important role in the uptake processes. The production and uptake processes were distinguished by the regression of OCS fluxes under different OCS mixing ratios. OCS compensation points (CP) were found to differ significantly for different soil types and water content, with the lowest CP at about 20% WHC, implying that when estimating the global budgets of OCS, especially for soils fluxes, soil water content should be taken into serious consideration. References Crutzen, P. J. 1976, Geophys. Res. Lett., 3, 73-76. Sandoval-Soto, L. et al., 2005, Biogeosciences, 2, 125-132. Kesselmeier, J. et al., 1999, J. Geophys. Res., 104, 11577-11584. Van Diest, H. and Kesselmeier, J. 2008

  13. Characterising Biomass Burning Aerosol in WRF-Chem using the Volatility Basis Set, with Evaluation against SAMBBA Flight Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowe, D.; Topping, D. O.; Archer-Nicholls, S.; Darbyshire, E.; Morgan, W.; Liu, D.; Allan, J. D.; Coe, H.; McFiggans, G.

    2015-12-01

    The burning of forests in the Amazonia region is a globally significant source of carbonaceous aerosol, containing both absorbing and scattering components [1]. In addition biomass burning aerosol (BBA) are also efficient cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), modifying cloud properties and influencing atmospheric circulation and precipitation tendencies [2]. The impacts of BBA are highly dependent on their size distribution and composition. A bottom-up emissions inventory, the Brazilian Biomass Burning Emissions Model (3BEM) [3], utilising satellite products to generate daily fire emission maps is used. Injection of flaming emissions within the atmospheric column is simulated using both a sub-grid plume-rise parameterisation [4], and simpler schemes, within the Weather Research and Forecasting Model with Chemistry (WRF-Chem, v3.4.1) [5]. Aerosol dynamics are simulated using the sectional MOSAIC scheme [6], incorporating a volatility basis set (VBS) treatment of organic aerosol [7]. For this work we have modified the 9-bin VBS to use the biomass burning specific scheme developed by May et al. [8]. The model has been run for September 2012 over South America (at a 25km resolution). We will present model results evaluating the modelled aerosol vertical distribution, size distribution, and composition against measurements taken by the FAAM BAe-146 research aircraft during the SAMBBA campaign. The main focus will be on investigating the factors controlling the vertical gradient of the organic mass to black carbon ratio of the measured aerosol. This work is supported by the Nature Environment Research Council (NERC) as part of the SAMBBA project under grant NE/J010073/1. [1] D. G. Streets et al., 2004, J. Geophys. Res., 109, D24212. [2] M. O. Andreae et al., 2004, Science, 303, 1337-1342. [3] K. Longo et al., 2010, Atmos. Chem. Phys., 10, 5,785-5,795. [4] S. Freitas et al., 2007, Atmos. Chem. Phys., 7, 3,385-3,398. [5] S. Archer-Nicholls et al., 2015, Geosci. Model Dev., 8

  14. New Particle Formation Events During 2013 in Hada Al Sham, Saudi-Arabia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neitola, K.; Hyvärinen, A.; Lihavainen, H.; Alghamdi, M.; Hussein, T.; Khodeir, M.; Shehata, A.; Laaksonen, A. J.; Kulmala, M. T.

    2014-12-01

    clear growth, S is clear shrinkage, G + S is both growth and shrinkage and unclear is not clear in either way.ReferencesM. Dal Maso, et al. (2005). Bor. Env. Res., 10, 323-336.M. Kulmala, et al. (2006). Atmos. Chem. Phys., 6, 787-793. M. Kulmala, et al. (2013). Science, 336, 943-946.

  15. Large rectification magnetoresistance in nonmagnetic Al/Ge/Al heterojunctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Kun; Li, Huan-Huan; Grünberg, Peter; Li, Qiang; Ye, Sheng-Tao; Tian, Yu-Feng; Yan, Shi-Shen; Lin, Zhao-Jun; Kang, Shi-Shou; Chen, Yan-Xue; Liu, Guo-Lei; Mei, Liang-Mo

    2015-09-01

    Magnetoresistance and rectification are two fundamental physical properties of heterojunctions and respectively have wide applications in spintronics devices. Being different from the well known various magnetoresistance effects, here we report a brand new large magnetoresistance that can be regarded as rectification magnetoresistance: the application of a pure small sinusoidal alternating-current to the nonmagnetic Al/Ge Schottky heterojunctions can generate a significant direct-current voltage, and this rectification voltage strongly varies with the external magnetic field. We find that the rectification magnetoresistance in Al/Ge Schottky heterojunctions is as large as 250% at room temperature, which is greatly enhanced as compared with the conventional magnetoresistance of 70%. The findings of rectification magnetoresistance open the way to the new nonmagnetic Ge-based spintronics devices of large rectification magnetoresistance at ambient temperature under the alternating-current due to the simultaneous implementation of the rectification and magnetoresistance in the same devices.

  16. Interaction Between Eddies and Mean Flow in Jupiter's Atmosphere: Analysis of Cassini Imaging Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salyk, Colette; Ingersoll, Andrew P.; Lorre, Jean; Vasavada, Ashwin; DelGenio, Anthony D.

    2006-01-01

    Beebe et al. [Beebe, R.F., et al., 1980. Geophys. Res. Lett. 17, 1-4] and Ingersoll et al. [Ingersoll, A.P., et al., 1981. J. Geophys. Res. 86, 8733-8743] used images from Voyagers 1 and 2 to analyze the interaction between zonal winds and eddies in Jupiter's atmosphere. They reported a high positive correlation between Jupiter's eddy momentum flux, pu'v', and the variation of zonal velocity with latitude, du/dy. This correlation implied a surprisingly high rate of conversion of energy from eddies to zonal flow: approx. 1.5-3.0 W/sq m, a value more than 10% of Jupiter s thermal flux emission. However, Sromovsky et al. [Sromovsky, L.A., et al., 1982. J. Atmos. Sci. 39,1413-1432] argued that possible biases in the analysis could have caused an artificially high correlation. In addition, significant differences in the derived eddy flux between datasets put into question the robustness of any one result. We return to this long-standing puzzle using images of Jupiter from the Cassini flyby of December 2000. Our method is similar to previous analyses, but utilizes an automatic feature tracker instead of the human eye. The number of velocity vectors used in this analysis is over 200,000, compared to the 14,000 vectors used by Ingersoll et al. We also find a positive correlation between u'v' and du/dy and derive a global average power per unit mass, u'v' du/dy, ranging from (7.1-12.3) x 10(exp -5)W/kg. Utilizing Ingersoll et al.'s estimate of the mass per unit area involved in the transport, this would imply a rate of energy conversion of approx.0.7-1.2 W/sq m. We discuss the implications of this result and employ several tests to demonstrate its robustness.

  17. AlSb/InAs/AlSb quantum wells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kroemer, Herbert

    1990-01-01

    Researchers studied the InAs/AlSb system recently, obtaining 12nm wide quantum wells with room temperature mobilities up to 28,000 cm(exp 2)/V center dot S and low-temperature mobilities up to 325,000 cm(exp 2)/V center dot S, both at high electron sheet concentrations in the 10(exp 12)/cm(exp 2) range (corresponding to volume concentrations in the 10(exp 18)/cm(exp 2) range). These wells were not intentionally doped; the combination of high carrier concentrations and high mobilities suggest that the electrons are due to not-intentional modulation doping by an unknown donor in the AlSb barriers, presumably a stoichiometric defect, like an antisite donor. Inasmuch as not intentionally doped bulk AlSb is semi-insulating, the donor must be a deep one, being ionized only by draining into the even deeper InAs quantum well. The excellent transport properties are confirmed by other observations, like excellent quantum Hall effect data, and the successful use of the quantum wells as superconductive weak links between Nb electrodes, with unprecendentedly high critical current densities. The system is promising for future field effect transistors (FETs), but many processing problems must first be solved. Although the researchers have achieved FETs, the results so far have not been competitive with GaAs FETs.

  18. Nutrition and Age-Related Eye Diseases: The ALIENOR (Antioxydants, LIpides Essentiels, Nutrition et Maladies OculaiRes) Study

    PubMed Central

    Delcourt, Cécile; Korobelnik, Jean-François; Barberger-Gateau, Pascale; Delyfer, Marie-Noëlle; Marie-Bénédicte, Rougier; Le Goff, Mélanie; Malet, Florence; Joseph, Colin; Dartigues, Jean-François

    2010-01-01

    Background Worldwide, degenerative eye diseases (age-related maculopathy (ARM), cataract, glaucoma) are the main causes of visual impairment and blindness, which contribute to disability in the elderly. Mainly three types of nutritional factors are investigated for their potential protection against eye ageing: antioxidants; lutein and zeaxanthin (carotenoids which accumulate specifically in the eye); omega 3 polyunsaturated fatty acids. Few epidemiological studies have been conducted in this field, particularly in Europe. Objective The Alienor (Antioxydants, Lipides Essentiels, Nutrition et maladies OculaiRes) Study aims at assessing the associations of eye diseases with nutritional factors, determined from plasma measurements and estimation of dietary intakes. Design, setting and participants Subjects were recruited in Bordeaux (France) from the ongoing population-based 3C study. In 2006–2008, 963 subjects from the 3C Study, aged 73 years or more, had an eye examination and will have follow-up eye examinations every 2 years. Measurements Vascular, genetic and nutritional factors were assessed at baseline (1999–2001) and follow-up examinations of the 3C Study. Eye diseases were classified according to international classifications. Results Nutritional status and vascular disease and risk factors were similar between participants and non participants, except for a slight difference in plasma triglycerides and HDL-cholesterol. As expected, the prevalence of eye diseases was high: early and late ARM (28.4 % and 5.6 %, respectively), open-angle glaucoma and treated ocular hypertension (4.8 % and 10.0 %, respectively), cataract extraction (45.2 %), retinopathy (8.4 %), retinal vein occlusion (1.1 %), epiretinal membrane (3.9 %), current use of artificial tears (17.3 %). Conclusions This study confirms the high prevalence of eye diseases in the elderly. Its main strength is the combination of nutritional, vascular and genetic information, collected over a 7 year

  19. Links between extreme UV-radiation, total ozone, surface albedo and cloudiness: An analysis of 30 years of data from Switzerland and Austria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rieder, H. E.; Staehelin, J.; Weihs, P.; Vuilleumier, L.; Blumthaler, M.; Holawe, F.; Lindfors, A.; Maeder, J. A.; Simic, S.; Wagner, J. E.; Walker, D.; Ribatet, M.

    2009-04-01

    .: A composite study on the structure and formation of ozone miniholes and minihights over central Europe, J. Geophys. Res., 32, doi:10.1029/2004GL022062, 2005. Lindfors, A., and Vuilleumier, L.: Erythemal UV at Davos (Switzerland), 1926-2003, estimated using total ozone, sunshine duration, and snow depth, J. Geophys. Res., 110, D02104, doi:10.1029/2004JD005231, 2005. Molina, M. J., and Rowland, F. S.: Stratospheric sink for chlorofluoromethans: Chlorine atom-catalysed destruction of ozone, Nature, 249, 810-812, 1974. Rieder, H.E., Holawe, F., Simic, S., Blumthaler, M., Krzyscin, J.W., Wagner J.E., Schmalwieser A.W., and Weihs, P.: Reconstruction of erythemal UV-doses for two stations in Austria: A comparison between alpine and urban regions, Atmos. Chem. Phys., 8, 6309-6323, 2008. Rieder, H.E., Staehelin, J., Maeder, J.A., Ribatet, M., Stübi, R., Weihs, P., Holawe, F., Peter, T., and Davison, A.C.: From ozone mini holes and mini highs towards extreme value theory: New insights from extreme events and non stationarity, submitted to J. Geophys. Res., 2009. Staehelin, J., Kegel, R., and Harris, N. R.: Trend analysis of the homogenized total ozone series of Arosa (Switzerland), 1929-1996, J. Geophys. Res., 103(D7), 8389-8400, doi:10.1029/97JD03650, 1998a. Staehelin, J., Renaud, A., Bader, J., McPeters, R., Viatte, P., Hoegger, B., Bugnion, V., Giroud, M., and Schill, H.: Total ozone series at Arosa (Switzerland): Homogenization and data comparison, J. Geophys. Res., 103(D5), 5827-5842, doi:10.1029/97JD02402, 1998b.

  20. Assimilative Modeling of Large-Scale Equatorial Plasma Trenches Observed by C/NOFS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Y.; Retterer, J. M.; de La Beaujardiere, O.; Burke, W. J.; Roddy, P. A.; Pfaff, R. F.; Hunton, D. E.

    2009-12-01

    Low-latitude plasma irregularities commonly observed during post sunset local times have been studied extensively by ground-based measurements such as coherent and incoherent scatter radars and ionosondes, as well as by satellite observations. The pre-reversal enhancement in the upward plasma drift due to eastward electric fields has been identified as the primary cause of these irregularities. Reports of plasma depletions at post-midnight and early morning local times are scarce and are typically limited to storm time conditions. Such dawn plasma depletions were frequently observed by C/NOFS in June 2008 [de La Beaujardière et al., 2009]. We are able to qualitatively reproduce the large-scale density depletion observed by the Planar Langmuir Probe (PLP) on June 17, 2008 [Su et al., 2009], based on the assimilative physics-based ionospheric model (PBMOD) using available electric field data obtained from the Vector Electric Field Instrument (VEFI) as the model input. In comparison, no plasma depletion or irregularity is obtained from the climatology version of our model when large upward drift velocities caused by observed eastward electric fields were absent. In this presentation, we extend our study for the entire month of June 2008 to exercise the forecast capability of large-scale density trenches by PBMOD with available VEFI data. Geophys. Res. Lett, 36, L00C06, doi:10.1029/2009GL038884, 2009.Geophys. Res. Lett., 36, L00C02, doi:10.1029/ 2009GL038946, 2009.

  1. Dielectric constant estimation of the uppermost Basal Unit layer in the martian Boreales Scopuli region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauro, Sebastian E.; Mattei, Elisabetta; Soldovieri, Francesco; Pettinelli, Elena; Orosei, Roberto; Vannaroni, Giuliano

    2012-05-01

    An electromagnetic inversion model has been applied to echoes from the subsurface sounding Shallow Radar (SHARAD) to retrieve the dielectric properties of the uppermost Basal Unit (BU) beneath the North Polar Layered Deposits of Mars. SHARAD data have been carefully selected to satisfy the assumption of the inversion model which requires a stratigraphy consisting of mostly plane parallel layers. The resulting values of the dielectric constant have been interpreted in terms of a variable percentage of dust in an ice-dust mixture through the use of a mixing model for dielectric properties. The resulting dust content exceeds 65%, reaching perhaps 95%, depending on the permittivity values assumed for the dust. Such a concentration is higher than that obtained by Selvans et al. (Selvans, M.M., Plaut, J.J., Aharonson, O. [2010]. J. Geophys. Res, 115, E09003). This discrepancy could be justified considering that our observations refer to the uppermost BU layer, whereas Selvans et al. (Selvans, M.M., Plaut, J.J., Aharonson, O. [2010]. J. Geophys. Res, 115, E09003) probed the BU full thickness. Moreover, if the BU is considered spatially inhomogeneous, with very different dust content and thickness (Tanaka, K.L., Skinner, J.A., Fortezzo, C.M., Herkenhoff, K.E., Rodriguez, J.A.P., Bourke, M.C., Kolb, E.J., Okubo, C.H. [2008]. Icarus, 196, 318-358), the discrepancy could be furtherly reconciled.

  2. Shear Instabilities as a Probe of Jupiter's Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosak, Tanja; Ingersoll, Andrew P.

    2002-08-01

    Linear wave patterns in Jupiter's clouds with wavelengths strongly clustered around 300 km are commonly observed in the planet's equatorial atmosphere (F. M. Flasar and P. J. Gierasch, 1986, J. Atmos. Sci.43, 2683-2707). We propose that the preferred wavelength is related to the thickness of an unstable shear layer within the clouds (A. P. Ingersoll and D. W. Koerner 1989, Bull. Am. Astron. Soc.21, 943). We numerically analyze the linear stability of wavelike disturbances that have nonzero horizontal phase speeds in Jupiter's atmosphere and find that, if the static stability in the shear layer is very low (but still nonnegative), a deep vertical shear layer like the one measured by the Galileo probe (D. H. Atkinson et al. 1998, J. Geophys. Res.103, 22911-22928) can generate the instabilities. The fastest growing waves grow exponentially within an hour, and their wavelengths match the observations. Close to zero values of static stability that permit the growth of instabilities are within the range of values measured by the Galileo probe in a hot spot (A. Seiff et al. 1998, J. Geophys. Res.103, 22857-22889). Our model probes Jupiter's equatorial atmosphere below the cloud deck and suggests that thick regions of wind shear and low static stability exist outside hot spots.

  3. Alternative interpretation of results from Kelvin-Helmholtz vortex identification criteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plaschke, F.; Taylor, M. G.; Nakamura, R.

    2013-12-01

    In 2006, simulations and data analysis by Takagi et al. [J. Geophys. Res., 111, A08202, 2006] and Hasegawa et al. [J. Geophys. Res., 111, A09203, 2006] resulted in a set of criteria for single-spacecraft identification of rolled-up magnetopause vortices generated by the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability. The main criterion is the observation of plasma of lower density and excess velocity with respect to the magnetosheath. We apply these criteria to multi-spacecraft measurements of magnetopause surface waves, observed by THEMIS A, D, and E on 6 October 2011 in the dayside/afternoon sector. The criteria are fulfilled, although a previous study showed that the magnetopause was just undulated at that time (not rolled-up) and that the waves were not subject to the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability. We find that, in part, this is due to the presence of a high speed plasma depletion layer between the low-latitude boundary layer and the magnetosheath proper. Furthermore, the surface waves are associated with phase dependent velocity disturbances that are superposed to the background plasma flows: On the magnetosheath side of inward magnetopause indentations, where largest densities are observed, MHD theory predicts a diminished plasma velocity with respect to background values. As a result, this effect contributes to fulfilling the vortex identification criteria.

  4. The distribution of solar proton energy on electronic states of molecules in the atmospheres of Earth and Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirillov, Andrey S.; Werner, Rolf; Guineva, Veneta

    Precipitations of intensive fluxes of high-energy solar protons in the atmospheres of terrestrial planets cause electronic excitation of main molecular components of the atmospheres. Electronically excited molecules play very important role in chemical balances of the atmospheres. Recent investigations of Seppala et al. [2008, J. Geophys. Res., v.113, A11311] and Lillis et al. [2012, J. Geophys. Res., v.117, E03004] consider the precipitations of solar energetic particles in the atmospheres of Earth and Mars, consequently. The main aim of our studies is the development of a model of electronic and vibrational kinetics of molecular components in the atmospheres of terrestrial planets. The calculated quenching rate coefficients of electronically excited molecules are applied in the simulations of vibrational populations of N2, CO, O2 electronic states in the mixture of N2, O2, CO, CO2 gases. We consider electronic kinetics of triplet states of N2 and CO and the kinetics of Herzberg states of O2. The calculations are made for the altitudes of the atmospheres of Earth and Mars.

  5. The magnetospheric clock of Saturn--A self-organized plasma dynamo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, J.; Brenning, N.

    2013-08-01

    The plasma in the inner magnetosphere of Saturn is characterized by large-amplitude azimuthal density variations in the equatorial plane, with approximately a sinusoidal dependence on the azimuthal angle [D. A. Gurnett et al., Science 316, 442 (2007)]. This structure rotates with close to the period of the planet itself and has been proposed to steer other nonaxisymmetric phenomena, e.g., the Saturn kilometric radiation SKR [W. S. Kurth et al., Geophys. Res. Lett. 34, L02201 (2007)], and inner-magnetosphere magnetic field perturbations [D. J. Southwood and M. G. Kivelson, J. Geophys. Res. 112(A12), A12222 (2007)]. There is today no consensus regarding the basic driving mechanism. We here propose it to be a plasma dynamo, located in the neutral gas torus of Enceladus but coupled both inwards, through electric currents along the magnetic field lines down to the planet, and outwards through the plasma flow pattern there. Such a dynamo mechanism is shown to self-regulate towards a state that, with realistic parameters, can reproduce the observed configuration of the magnetosphere. This state is characterized by three quantities: the Pedersen conductivity in the polar cap, the ionization time constant in the neutral gas torus, and a parameter characterizing the plasma flow pattern. A particularly interesting property of the dynamo is that regular (i.e., constant-amplitude, sinusoidal) variations in the last parameter can lead to complicated, non-periodic, oscillations around the steady-state configuration.

  6. Computations of wind-driven ocean-induced magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sachl, Libor; Einspigel, David; Martinec, Zdenek

    2016-04-01

    We present the results of computations of the secondary magnetic field induced by ocean motions. Ocean velocities are computed using the baroclinic ocean model LSOMG. The velocities are then used to determine the Lorentz force which is plugged into the magnetic induction code TLAM as a principal forcing. The TLAM is a 2D magnetic induction code based on the thin-shell approximation (Vivier et al., 2004; Tyler et al., 1997). In this approximation, the equation of magnetic induction simplifies significantly, time derivatives of main and induced magnetic fields are neglected as well as the self-induction term. The price for simplification of governing equations is the limited applicability of the resulting system. It is only suitable for slowly evolving processes. In order to meet the condition, we restrict ourselves to the wind (buoyancy) driven ocean circulation, although the LSOMG model is able to model both tidally- and wind-driven circulations. We assess the accuracy of thin-shell approximation in our setup by comparing the results with the Swarm satellite magnetic data. References Tyler, R. H., Mysak, L. A., and Oberhuber, J. M, 1997. Electromagnetic fields generated by a three dimensional global ocean circulation. J. Geophys. Res., 102, 5531-5551. Vivier, F., Meier-Reimer, E., and Tyler, R. H., 2004. Simulations of magnetic fields generated by the Antarctic Circumpolar Current at satellite altitude: Can geomagnetic measurements be used to monitor the flow? Geophys. Res. Lett., 31, L10306, doi:10.1029/2004GL019804.

  7. The Hermean Bow Shock and Ion Foreshock as Seen by Three-Dimensional Global Hybrid Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chanteur, G. M.; Modolo, R.; Leblanc, F.

    2015-12-01

    The thinness of the Hermean magnetosheath evidenced by Mariner 10 and MESSENGER observations results from the small average standoff distance of the Bow Shock equal to 1.45RM and has important consequences especially in the region of the parallel shock. The magnetopause is clearly identified in front of the perpendicular shock meanwhile it is hardly recognized in front of the parallel shock due to a strong interaction between the shock and the magnetospheric boundary mediated by the magnetosheath flow. This interaction is investigated by means of three-dimensional global hybrid simulations for different IMF orientations and by varying the spatial resolution of the simulations between 120 and 40km. Accordingly to MESSENGER observations (Anderson et al, 2012) the planetary magnetic field implemented in the simulations combines a dipole and a quadrupole axisymmetric sources (Richer et al, 2012). References Anderson, B. J., C. L. Johnson, H. Korth, R. M. Winslow, J. E. Borovsky, M. E. Purucker, J. A. Slavin, S. C. Solomon, M.T. Zuber, and R. L. McNutt Jr. (2012), Low-degree structure in Mercury's planetary magnetic field, J. Geophys. Res.,117, E00L12, doi:10.1029/2012JE004159. Richer, E., R. Modolo, G. M. Chanteur, S. Hess, and F. Leblanc (2012), A global hybrid model for Mercury's interaction with the solar wind: Case study of the dipole representation, J. Geophys. Res., 117, A10228, doi:10.1029/2012JA017898.

  8. The 2014 M 6.0 South Napa Earthquake in the Context of the Earthquake Cycle in the San Francisco Bay Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaume, S. C.

    2014-12-01

    The 2014 M 6.0 South Napa earthquake is the second M ≥ 5.5 earthquake to occur in the San Francisco Bay region since the 1989 M 7.0 Loma Prieta earthquake. This poster will examine how this earthquake fits into the earthquake history of the Bay region, which has shown considerable variation in the rate of moderate (M 5.5-6.5) earthquakes. A number of models have been developed to explain these changes in moderate earthquake rates, including the Accelerating Moment Release model (e.g., Sykes and Jaumé, Nature, 1990; Bufe and Varnes, J. Geophys. Res., 1993) and the Stress Shadow model (e.g., Harris and Simpson, J. Geophys. Res., 1998). In addition, various groups have made projections of future earthquake activity in the San Francisco Bay region, including the Working Group on California Earthquake Probabilities (Field et al., USGS OFR, 2008) and Bebbington et al. (PAGEOPH, 2010), utilizing different physical models for earthquake occurrence. In my poster I will compare and contrast these different views of seismicity in the Bay region and where the 2014 South Napa earthquake fits into them. In particular, I will explore what these different models imply for future moderate earthquake occurrence and hazards thereof.

  9. The magnetospheric clock of Saturn—A self-organized plasma dynamo

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, J.; Brenning, N.

    2013-08-15

    The plasma in the inner magnetosphere of Saturn is characterized by large-amplitude azimuthal density variations in the equatorial plane, with approximately a sinusoidal dependence on the azimuthal angle [D. A. Gurnett et al., Science 316, 442 (2007)]. This structure rotates with close to the period of the planet itself and has been proposed to steer other nonaxisymmetric phenomena, e.g., the Saturn kilometric radiation SKR [W. S. Kurth et al., Geophys. Res. Lett. 34, L02201 (2007)], and inner-magnetosphere magnetic field perturbations [D. J. Southwood and M. G. Kivelson, J. Geophys. Res. 112(A12), A12222 (2007)]. There is today no consensus regarding the basic driving mechanism. We here propose it to be a plasma dynamo, located in the neutral gas torus of Enceladus but coupled both inwards, through electric currents along the magnetic field lines down to the planet, and outwards through the plasma flow pattern there. Such a dynamo mechanism is shown to self-regulate towards a state that, with realistic parameters, can reproduce the observed configuration of the magnetosphere. This state is characterized by three quantities: the Pedersen conductivity in the polar cap, the ionization time constant in the neutral gas torus, and a parameter characterizing the plasma flow pattern. A particularly interesting property of the dynamo is that regular (i.e., constant-amplitude, sinusoidal) variations in the last parameter can lead to complicated, non-periodic, oscillations around the steady-state configuration.

  10. Influence of magnetospheric inputs definition on modeling of ionospheric storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tashchilin, A. V.; Romanova, E. B.; Kurkin, V. I.

    Usually for numerical modeling of ionospheric storms corresponding empirical models specify parameters of neutral atmosphere and magnetosphere. Statistical kind of these models renders them impractical for simulation of the individual storm. Therefore one has to correct the empirical models using various additional speculations. The influence of magnetospheric inputs such as distributions of electric potential, number and energy fluxes of the precipitating electrons on the results of the ionospheric storm simulations has been investigated in this work. With this aim for the strong geomagnetic storm on September 25, 1998 hour global distributions of those magnetospheric inputs from 20 to 27 September were calculated by the magnetogram inversion technique (MIT). Then with the help of 3-D ionospheric model two variants of ionospheric response to this magnetic storm were simulated using MIT data and empirical models of the electric fields (Sojka et al., 1986) and electron precipitations (Hardy et al., 1985). The comparison of the received results showed that for high-latitude and subauroral stations the daily variations of electron density calculated with MIT data are more close to observations than those of empirical models. In addition using of the MIT data allows revealing some peculiarities in the daily variations of electron density during strong geomagnetic storm. References Sojka J.J., Rasmussen C.E., Schunk R.W. J.Geophys.Res., 1986, N10, p.11281. Hardy D.A., Gussenhoven M.S., Holeman E.A. J.Geophys.Res., 1985, N5, p.4229.

  11. Characteristics of Pickup Ions in Titan's Upper Atmosphere and Escape of Nitrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michael, M.; Johnson, R. E.; Ledvina, S. A.

    2004-11-01

    The distribution of 14 amu and 28-29 amu pickup ions with depth into Titan's atmosphere have calculated by Ledvina et al. (2004) and Brecht et al. (2000). Here we study the interaction of these ions with molecules in the upper atmosphere of Titan. As its environment is highly variable, Titan can be within Saturn's magnetosphere or can interact directly with the solar wind. These pickup ions follow the corresponding magnetic field as they penetrate into the atmosphere. The magnetic field strength considered here are 5.1 nT and 0.5 nT when Titan is inside the magnetosphere and in the solar wind respectively. The incident pick up ions collide with atmospheric neutrals. After they charge exchange, they are tracked under the influence of Titan's gravitational field. The energetic ions and neutral impart energy to the molecules in the Titan's atmosphere causing ejection, bond breaking and heating. Predictions will be made for the Cassini Titan flyby. The model described is flexible to incorporate that data as it becomes available. References Brecht, S.H., J.G. Luhmann, and D.J. Larson, Simulation of the Saturnian magnetospheric interaction with Titan, J. Geophys. Res., 105, 13119-13130, 2000. Ledvina, S.A., S.H. Brecht, J.G. Luhmann, Ion distribution of 14 amu pickup ions associated with Titan's plasma interaction, Geophys. Res. Lett., 31, L17S10, 10.1029/2004GL019861, 2004.

  12. Physical Parameters Controlling Subduction Dynamics and Surface Topography in Self-consistent Global Models of Mantle Convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crameri, F.; Pears, M. I.; Lithgow-Bertelloni, C. R.; Tackley, P. J.

    2014-12-01

    Recent advances in numerical modelling allow global models of mantle convection to realistically reproduce the behaviour at convergent plate boundaries (Crameri et al., 2012a). This allows for a more extensive study of subduction that, in contrast to the numerous regional models, incorporates the complete framework of mantle convection. Here, we focus on different aspects of mantle convection including (i) slab dip variations, (ii) variations in radial mantle viscosity, and (iii) the presence of localised mantle upwellings and discuss their control on the dynamics of Earth-like plate tectonics. Additionally, we present the effect these parameter variations have on measurable quantities like dynamic topography and plate velocity. The models are calculated by the finite-volume code Stag-YY (e.g., Tackley 2008) using a multi-grid method on a fully staggered grid. Second, the sticky-air method (Matsumoto and Tomoda 1983; Schmeling et al, 2008) is applied and thus approximates a free surface when the sticky-air parameters are chosen carefully (Crameri et al., 2012b). Overall, this study demonstrates the ability of various parameters to significantly influence both subduction dynamics and surface topography. REFERENCES Crameri, F., et al. (2012a), Geophys. Res. Lett., 39(3). Crameri, F., et al. (2012b), Geophys. J. Int., 189(1). Matsumoto, T., and Y. Tomoda (1983), J. Phys. Earth, 31(3). Schmeling, H., et al. (2008), Phys. Earth Planet. Int., 171(1-4). Tackley, P. J. (2008), Phys. Earth Planet. Int., 171(1-4).

  13. Long-term decline of the populations of Fucales (Cystoseira spp. and Sargassum spp.) in the Albères coast (France, North-western Mediterranean).

    PubMed

    Thibaut, Thierry; Pinedo, Susana; Torras, Xavier; Ballesteros, Enric

    2005-12-01

    Only five of fourteen species of Fucales reported at the end of the XIXth century are currently present in the Albères Coast (France, NW Mediterranean). According to historical data there has been a steady decrease of all the populations since the 1940s. Seven taxa now extinct (Cystoseira crinita, Cystoseira barbata, Cystoseira foeniculacea f. tenuiramosa, Cystoseira spinosa, Cystoseira spinosa var. compressa, Sargassum hornschuchii and Sargassum vulgare) were considered frequent and some of them were the dominant and engineering species in several phytobenthic assemblages. Moreover, only one of the five species left, shows no signs of regression (Cystoseira compressa), two are considered as rare (Cystoseira caespitosa, Cystoseira zosteroides), and one is very rare (Cystoseira elegans). Cystoseira mediterranea, a species that was reported to make a continuous belt along the shores of the Albères coast, has almost disappeared from some areas. Overgrazing by sea urchins, outcompetition by mussels, habitat destruction, scientific research sampling and, probably, human trampling and chemical pollution are to be blamed for the decline of populations thriving in shallow waters. Deep-water species have been affected by an increase in water turbidity and, probably, chemical pollution and direct plant destruction attributed to net fishing. If degradation of the environmental conditions continues, the remaining Cystoseira species will face a most unwelcome prospect. Even after the removal of the causes that led to its die-off, natural restoration of extinct species seems not to be possible because the decline has also affected populations from nearby areas and zygotes are unable to disperse over long distances. Urgent management actions have to be designed in order to improve the current situation of the populations of Fucales in the Albères coast. PMID:16026805

  14. Rubus coreanus Miquel extract causes apoptosis of doxorubicin-resistant NCI/ADR-RES ovarian cancer cells via JNK phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min Kyoung; Choi, Hyeong Sim; Cho, Sung-Gook; Shin, Yong Cheol; Ko, Seong-Gyu

    2016-05-01

    Cancer cells can acquire an anticancer, drug-resistant phenotype following chemotherapy, which is tightly linked to cancer malignancy and patient survival rates. Therefore, the identification of options to treat chemotherapy‑resistant cancer cells is an urgent requirement. Rubus coreanus Miquel (RCM) has long been used as a source of food. In addition, it has been reported that RCM has effective functions against particular diseases, including cancer and inflammation. In the present study, it was demonstrated that RCM extract caused the apoptotic cell death of doxorubicin‑resistant NCI/ADR‑RES ovarian cancer cells by phosphorylating c‑Jun N‑terminal kinase (JNK). The RCM‑mediated reduction of cell viability showed no synergism with doxorubicin. In addition, ellagic acid and quercetin, which are phytochemicals found in RCM, also caused apoptosis of the NCI/ADR‑RES cells. In subsequent investigations of the RCM‑altered signaling pathway, RCM extract, ellagic acid and quercetin were found to commonly induce the phosphorylation of JNK and AKT. Additionally, the inhibition of JNK with SP600125 repressed the apoptotic cell death induced by RCM extract, ellagic acid and quercetin, and the inhibition of JNK appeared to switch apoptosis to necrosis. JNK inhibition also reduced the phosphorylation of AKT, which was induced by RCM extract, ellagic acid and quercetin, suggesting that the phosphorylation of JNK is required for AKT phosphorylation in RCM‑, ellagic acid‑ or quercetin‑induced apoptotic cell death. Therefore, the data obtained in the present study led to the conclusion that RCM caused apoptosis of doxorubicin‑resistant NCI/ADR-RES ovarian cancer cells via JNK phosphorylation, and suggested that RCM may be effective in the treatment of chemotherapy‑resistant cancer cells. PMID:26986492

  15. The effect of Si in Al-alloy on electromigration performance in Al filled vias

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kageyama, Makiko; Hashimoto, Keiichi; Onoda, Hiroshi

    1998-01-01

    Electromigration performance of vias filled with Al-Si-Cu alloys on Ti glue layers was investigated in comparison with W-stud vias. In Al-Si-Cu filled vias, voids were formed at only a few locations in the test structure, while voids were formed at every via in W-stud via chains. It is supposed that Al moves through the Al-Si-Cu via during electromigration in spite of the existence of a glue layer at the via bottom. This phenomenon was observed only in the vias filled with Al-Si-Cu alloy. Al movement was prohibited in Al-Cu filled vias. In Al-Si-Cu filled vias, an Al-Ti-Si alloy was formed at the via bottom while Al3Ti was formed at Al-Cu filled vias. Al is speculated to move through this Al-Ti-Si alloy during electromigration.

  16. Copolymères (carbazolylène-pyrrolylène) : synthèse par oxydation chimique et propriétés

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boucard, V.; Adès, D.; Siove, A.

    1998-06-01

    Conditions in which (carbazolylene-pyrrolylene) random copolymers could be synthetized directly by chemical oxidation by FeCl3 were studied. A substantial amount of soluble copolymers is obtained after work-up in the conditions corresponding to carbazole/pyrrole/2 FeCl3 molar proportions. An important fraction of polypyrrole was obtained beside a fraction of species soluble in ethanol (carbazole and dimer) and an other fraction of products soluble in water (pyrrole accompanied by the first terms of the oligomeric series). Soluble copolymers were characterized by means of SEC, NMR and UV-Visible spectroscopies. Cyclic voltammetry analysis disclosed that these copolymers exhibit both the carbazolic and the pyrrolic features. Les conditions dans lesquelles des copolymères statistiques (carbazo lylène-pyrrolylène) pouvaient être synthétisés directement par oxydation chimique par FeCl3 ont été étudiées. Des quantités substantielles de copolymères solubles en milieu organique sont obtenues par extraction lorsque les proportions molaires en réactifs carbazole/pyrrole/2 FeCl3 sont utilisées. Une fraction importante de polypyrrole est obtenue à côté d'une fraction d'espèces solubles dans l'éthanol (carbazole et son dimère) et d'une fraction de produits solubles dans l'eau (pyrrole et les premiers termes oligomères). Les copolymères solubles ont été caractérisés par CES, spectroscopies RMN et UV-Visible. L'analyse voltampérométrique de ces matériaux révèle qu'ils possèdent à la fois les caractéristiques des entités carbazolylènes et celles des entités pyrrolylènes.

  17. Retrieval of Venus' clouds parameters with polarization using SPICAV-IR onboard Venus Express

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, Loïc; Marcq, Emmanuel; Montmessin, Franck; Fedorova, Anna; Stam, Daphne; Bertaux, Jean-Loup; Korablev, Oleg

    2015-04-01

    agreement with previous measurements from Braak et al. (2002) and Knibbe et al. (1997). References Hansen, J. E. and Hovenier, J. W., 1974, Interpretation of the polarization of Venus., Journal of Atmospheric Sciences, 31. Kawabata et al., 1980, Cloud and haze properties from Pioneer Venus Polarimetry, J. Geophys. Res., 85. Markiewicz, W.J. et al., 2014, Glory on venus cloud tops and the unknown UV absorber, Icarus, 234. de Haan, J. F. et al, 1987, The adding method for multiple scattering calculations of polarized light, Astron. Astrophys., 183. de Rooij, W. A. and van der Stap, C. C. A. H., 1984, Expansion of Mie scattering matrices in generalized spherical functions, Astron. Astrophys., 131 Stam, D. M. et al., 1999, Degree of linear polarization of light emerging from the cloudless atmosphere in the oxygen A band, J. Geophys. Res., 104. Rossi, L. et al., 2014, Preliminary study of Venus cloud layers with polarimetric data from SPICAV/VEx, Planet. Space Sci., In Press. Braak, C. J. et al., 2002, Spatial and temporal variations of Venus haze properties obtained from Pioneer Venus Orbiter polarimetry, J. Geophys. Res. (Planets), 107. Knibbe, W. J. J. et al., 1997,A biwavelength analysis of Pioneer Venus polarization observations, J. Geophys. Res., 102.

  18. Emerging mechanisms of molecular pathology in ALS

    PubMed Central

    Peters, Owen M.; Ghasemi, Mehdi; Brown, Robert H.

    2015-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a devastating degenerative disease characterized by progressive loss of motor neurons in the motor cortex, brainstem, and spinal cord. Although defined as a motor disorder, ALS can arise concurrently with frontotemporal lobal dementia (FTLD). ALS begins focally but disseminates to cause paralysis and death. About 10% of ALS cases are caused by gene mutations, and more than 40 ALS-associated genes have been identified. While important questions about the biology of this disease remain unanswered, investigations of ALS genes have delineated pathogenic roles for (a) perturbations in protein stability and degradation, (b) altered homeostasis of critical RNA- and DNA-binding proteins, (c) impaired cytoskeleton function, and (d) non-neuronal cells as modifiers of the ALS phenotype. The rapidity of progress in ALS genetics and the subsequent acquisition of insights into the molecular biology of these genes provide grounds for optimism that meaningful therapies for ALS are attainable. PMID:25932674

  19. Reconciliation of global temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benestad, R. E.

    2012-03-01

    reassuring to see reasonably good agreement between the different data sources, suggesting both robust results and high credibility of the underlying observations. However, these results are not so reassuring in terms of the implications for our society and the question about where we are heading. In fact, there is increased reason for concern because the analysis suggests a fairly substantial sensitivity to other external conditions, especially if the climate sensitivity is similar for GHGs and other forcings (Benestad and Schmidt 2009). References Benestad R E and Schmidt G A 2009 J. Geophys. Res.—Atmos. 114 D14101 Brohan P et al 2006 J. Geophys. Res. 11 D12106 Easterling D R and Wehner M F 2009 Geophys. Res. Lett. 36 L08706 Foster G and Rahmstorf S 2011 Environ. Res. Lett. 6 044022 Hansen J et al 2010 Rev. Geophys. 48 RG4004 Isaksen K et al 2007 Geophys. Res. Lett. 34 L17502 Kalnay E et al 1996 Bull. Am. Meteorol. Soc. 77 437-71 Kaufmann R K et al 2011 Proc. Natl Acad. Sci. 108 11790-3 Kinnard C et al 2011 Nature 479 509-12 Lean J and Rind D H 2008 Geophys. Res. Lett. 35 L18701 Mernild S H et al 2009 EOS Trans. Am. Geophys. Union 90 13-4 Solomon S et al 2010 Science 327 1219 Wagner W 2011 Remote Sens. 3 2002-4

  20. Ab initio modeling of zincblende AlN layer in Al-AlN-TiN multilayers

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Yadav, S. K.; Wang, J.; Liu, X. -Y.

    2016-06-14

    An unusual growth mechanism of metastable zincblende AlN thin film by diffusion of nitrogen atoms into Al lattice is established. Using first-principles density functional theory, we studied the possibility of thermodynamic stability of AlN as a zincblende phase due to epitaxial strains and interface effect, which fails to explain the formation of zincblende AlN. We then compared the formation energetics of rocksalt and zincblende AlN in fcc Al through direct diffusion of nitrogen atoms to Al octahedral and tetrahedral interstitials. Furthermore, the formation of a zincblende AlN thin film is determined to be a kinetically driven process, not a thermodynamicallymore » driven process.« less

  1. Synthesis of AlN/Al Polycrystals along with Al Nanoparticles Using Thermal Plasma Route

    SciTech Connect

    Kanhe, Nilesh S.; Nawale, A. B.; Kulkarni, N. V.; Bhoraskar, S. V.; Mathe, V. L.; Das, A. K.

    2011-07-15

    This paper for the first time reports the (200) oriented growth of hexagonal Aluminum nitride crystals during synthesis of aluminum nanoparticles in dc transferred arc thermal plasma reactor by gas phase condensation in nitrogen plasma. The structural and morphological study of as synthesized AlN crystal and aluminium nanoparticles was done by using the x-ray diffraction method, scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy.

  2. Embedded-atom-method study of structural, thermodynamic, and atomic-transport properties of liquid Ni-Al alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asta, Mark; Morgan, Dane; Hoyt, J. J.; Sadigh, Babak; Althoff, J. D.; de Fontaine, D.; Foiles, S. M.

    1999-06-01

    Structural, thermodynamic, and atomic-transport properties of liquid Ni-Al alloys have been studied by Monte Carlo and molecular-dynamics simulations based upon three different embedded-atom method (EAM) interatomic potentials, namely those due to Foiles and Daw (FD) [J. Mater. Res. 2, 5 (1987)], Voter and Chen (VC) [in Characterization of Defects in Materials, edited by R. W. Siegel et al. MRS Symposia Proceedings. No. 82 (Materials Research Society, Pittsburgh, 1987), p.175] and Ludwig and Gumbsch (LG) [Model. Simul. Mater. Sci. Eng. 3, 533 (1995)]. We present detailed comparisons between calculated results and experimental data for structure factors, atomic volumes, enthalpies of mixing, activities, and viscosities. Calculated partial structure factors are found to be in semiquantitative agreement with published neutron scattering measurements for Ni20Al80 alloys, indicating that short-range order in the liquid phase is qualitatively well described. Calculated thermodynamic properties of mixing are found to agree very well with experimental data for Ni compositions greater than 75 atomic %, while for alloys richer in Al the magnitudes of the enthalpies and entropies of mixing are significantly underestimated. The VC and LG potentials give atomic densities and viscosities in good agreement with experiment for Ni-rich compositions, while FD potentials consistently underestimate both properties at all concentrations. The results of this study demonstrate that VC and LG potentials provide a realistic description of the thermodynamic and atomic transport properties for NixAl1-x liquid alloys with x>=0.75, and point to the limitations of EAM potentials for alloys richer in Al.

  3. Synthesis of Al-Al2O3 and Al-Aln Nanoparticle Composites Via Electric Explosion of Wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lerner, M. I.; Lozhkomoev, A. S.; Pervikov, A. V.; Bakina, O. V.

    2016-07-01

    Composite Al-Al2O3 and Al-AlN nanoparticles were synthesized via electric explosion of aluminum wires in an argon-oxygen gas mixture and in nitrogen. The parameters of electric explosion and gas medium affect the size and relative content of nitride and aluminum oxide in the nanoparticles. Processes of forming chemical compounds during aluminum oxidation at the contact surface between explosive products and gas and of nitrogen diffusions into the nanoparticles of the condensed phase are considered.

  4. Investigation of Wear Anisotropy in a Severely Deformed Al-Al3Ti Composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Hadad, Shimaa; Sato, Hisashi; Watanabe, Yoshimi

    2012-09-01

    In the current investigation, Al-Al3Ti composite was processed by equal channel angular pressing (ECAP). ECAP was carried out using routes A and BC up to eight passes of deformation. It was observed that increasing the number of ECAP passes causes fragmentation of Al3Ti platelet particles and decreases their sizes compared to their original sizes in the undeformed Al-Al3Ti specimens. Moreover, the microstructure of route A-ECAPed Al-Al3Ti composite samples showed a strong alignment of the fragmented Al3Ti particles parallel to the pressing axis. On the other hand, ECAPed Al-Al3Ti alloy specimens by route BC have a relatively homogeneous distribution of Al3Ti particles. Because of the platelet Al3Ti particle fragmentation by ECAP, all the ECAPed specimens showed small anisotropy in their wear property in spite of this observed anisotropic microstructure induced by route A-ECAP.

  5. Investigation of Wear Anisotropy in a Severely Deformed Al-Al3Ti Composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Hadad, Shimaa; Sato, Hisashi; Watanabe, Yoshimi

    2012-05-01

    In the current investigation, Al-Al3Ti composite was processed by equal channel angular pressing (ECAP). ECAP was carried out using routes A and BC up to eight passes of deformation. It was observed that increasing the number of ECAP passes causes fragmentation of Al3Ti platelet particles and decreases their sizes compared to their original sizes in the undeformed Al-Al3Ti specimens. Moreover, the microstructure of route A-ECAPed Al-Al3Ti composite samples showed a strong alignment of the fragmented Al3Ti particles parallel to the pressing axis. On the other hand, ECAPed Al-Al3Ti alloy specimens by route BC have a relatively homogeneous distribution of Al3Ti particles. Because of the platelet Al3Ti particle fragmentation by ECAP, all the ECAPed specimens showed small anisotropy in their wear property in spite of this observed anisotropic microstructure induced by route A-ECAP.

  6. NiAl-base composite containing high volume fraction of AlN for advanced engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hebsur, Mohan (Inventor); Whittenbeger, John D. (Inventor); Lowell, Carl F. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A particulate reinforced NiAl-AlN composite alloy has a NiAl matrix and greater than about 13 volume percent fine particles of AlN within the matrix. The particles preferably have a diameter from about 15 nanometers to about 50 nanometers. The particulate reinforced NiAl-AlN composite alloy may be prepared by cryomilling prealloyed NiAl in liquid nitrogen using grinding media having a diameter of from about 2 to 6 mm at an impeller speed of from about 450 RPM to about 800 RPM. The cryomilling may be done for a duration of from about 4 hours to about 20 hours to obtain a cryomilled powder. The cryomilled powder may be consolidated to form the particulate reinforced NiAl-AlN composite alloy. The particulate reinforced alloy can further include a toughening alloy. The toughening alloy may include NiCrAlY, FeCrAlY, and FeAl.

  7. Analysis of Venus Express optical extinction due to aerosols in the upper haze of Venus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parkinson, Christopher; Bougher, Stephen; Mahieux, Arnaud; Tellmann, Silvia; Pätzold, Martin; Vandaele, Ann C.; Wilquet, Valérie; Schulte, Rick; Yung, Yuk; Gao, Peter; Bardeen, Charles

    Observations by the SPICAV/SOIR instruments aboard Venus Express (VEx) have revealed that the Upper Haze of Venus is populated by two particle modes, as reported by Wilquet et al. (J. Geophys. Res., 114, E00B42, 2009; Icarus 217, 2012). Gao et al. (In press, Icarus, 2013) posit that the large mode is made up of cloud particles that have diffused upwards from the cloud deck below, while the smaller mode is generated by the in situ nucleation of meteoric dust. They tested this hypothesis by using version 3.0 of the Community Aerosol and Radiation Model for Atmospheres, first developed by Turco et al. (J. Atmos. Sci., 36, 699-717, 1979) and upgraded to version 3.0 by Bardeen et al. (The CARMA 3.0 microphysics package in CESM, Whole Atmosphere Working Group Meeting, 2011). Using the meteoric dust production profile of Kalashnikova et al. (Geophys. Res. Lett., 27, 3293-3296, 2000), the sulfur/sulfate condensation nuclei production profile of Imamura and Hashimoto (J. Atmos. Sci., 58, 3597-3612, 2001), and sulfuric acid vapor production profile of Zhang et al. (Icarus, 217, 714-739, 2012), they numerically simulate a column of the Venus atmosphere from 40 to 100 km above the surface. Their aerosol number density results agree well with Pioneer Venus Orbiter (PVO) data from Knollenberg and Hunten (J. Geophys. Res., 85, 8039-8058, 1980), while their gas distribution results match that of Kolodner and Steffes below 55 km (Icarus, 132, 151-169, 1998). The resulting size distribution of cloud particles shows two distinct modes, qualitatively matching the observations of PVO. They also observe a third mode in their results with a size of a few microns at 48 km altitude, which appears to support the existence of the controversial third mode in the PVO data. This mode disappears if coagulation is not included in the simulation. The Upper Haze size distribution shows two lognormal-like distributions overlapping each other, possibly indicating the presence of the two distinct

  8. How relevant is heterogeneous chemistry on Mars? Strong tests via global mapping of water and ozone (sampled via O2 dayglow)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villanueva, Geronimo Luis; Mumma, Michael J.; Novak, Robert E.

    2015-11-01

    Ozone and water are powerful tracers of photochemical processes on Mars. Considering that water is a condensable with a multifaceted hydrological cycle and ozone is continuously being produced / destroyed on short-time scales, their maps can test the validity of current 3D photochemical and dynamical models. Comparisons of modern GCM models (e.g., Lefèvre et al. 2004) with certain datasets (e.g., Clancy et al. 2012; Bertaux et al. 2012) point to significant disagreement, which in some cases have been related to heterogeneous (gas-dust) chemistry beyond the classical gas-gas homogeneous reactions.We address these concerns by acquiring full 2D maps of water and ozone (via O2 dayglow) on Mars, employing high spectral infrared spectrometers at ground-based telescopes (CRIRES/VLT and CSHELL/NASA-IRTF). By performing a rotational analysis on the O2 lines, we derive molecular temperature maps that we use to derive the vertical level of the emission (e.g., Novak et al. 2002). Our maps sample the full observable disk of Mars on March/25/2008 (Ls=50°, northern winter) and on Jan/29/2014 (Ls=83°, northern spring). The maps reveal a strong dependence of the O2 emission and water burden on local orography, while the temperature maps are in strong disagreement with current models. Could this be the signature of heterogeneous chemistry? We will present the global maps and will discuss possible scenarios to explain the observations.This work was partially funded by grants from NASA's Planetary Astronomy Program (344-32-51-96), NASA’s Mars Fundamental Research Program (203959.02.02.20.29), NASA’s Astrobiology Program (344-53-51), and the NSF-RUI Program (AST-805540). We thank the administration and staff of the European Southern Observatory/VLT and NASA-IRTF for awarding observing time and coordinating our observations.Bertaux, J.-L., Gondet, B., Lefèvre, F., et al. 2012. J. Geophys. Res. Pl. 117. pp. 1-9.Clancy, R.T., Sandor, B.J., Wolff, M.J., et al. 2012. J. Geophys. Res

  9. 77 FR 73732 - In the Matter of Amendment of the Designation of al-Qa'ida in Iraq, aka Jam'at al Tawhid wa'al...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-11

    ... Matter of Amendment of the Designation of al-Qa'ida in Iraq, aka Jam'at al Tawhid wa'al-Jihad, aka The... al-Rafidayn, aka The Organization of al-Jihad's Base of Operations in Iraq, aka al-Qaida of Jihad in Iraq, aka al-Qaida in Iraq, aka al-Qaida in Mesopotamia, aka al-Qaida in the Land of the Two...

  10. The Al-Al3Ni Eutectic Reaction: Crystallography and Mechanism of Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Yangyang; Makhlouf, Makhlouf M.

    2015-09-01

    The characteristics of the Al-Al3Ni eutectic structure are examined with emphasis on its morphology and crystallography. Based on these examinations, the mechanism of formation of this technologically important eutectic is postulated. It is found that a thin shell of α-Al forms coherently around each Al3Ni fiber. The excellent thermal stability of the Al-Al3Ni eutectic may be attributed to the presence of this coherent layer.

  11. Reply to Pachai et al.

    PubMed

    Harrison, William J; Bex, Peter J

    2016-05-01

    Peripheral vision is fundamentally limited by the spacing between objects. When asked to report a target's identity, observers make erroneous reports that sometimes match the identity of a nearby distractor and sometimes match a combination of target and distractor features. The classification of these errors has previously been used to support competing 'substitution' [1] or 'averaging' [2] models of the phenomenon known as 'visual crowding'. We recently proposed a single model in which both classes of error occur because observers make their reports by sampling from a biologically-plausible population of weighted responses within a region of space around the target [3]. It is critical to note that there is no probabilistic substitution or averaging process in our model; instead, we argue that neither substitution nor averaging occur, but that these are misclassifications of the distribution of reports that emerge when a population response distribution is sampled. This is a fundamentally different way of thinking about crowding, and on this basis we claim to have provided a mechanism unifying categorically distinct perceptual errors. Our goal was not to model all crowding phenomena, such as the release from crowding when target and flanks differ in color or depth [4]. Pachai et al.[5] have suggested that our model is not unifying because it inaccurately predicts perceptual performance for a particular stimulus. Although we agree that our model does not predict their data, this specific demonstration overlooks the critical aspect of the model: perceptual reports are drawn from a weighted population code. We show that Pachai et al.'s [5] own data actually provide evidence for the population code we have described [3], and we suggest a biologically-plausible analysis of their stimuli that provides a computational basis for their 'grouping' account of crowding. PMID:27166690

  12. Effects of the Al content on pore structures of porous TieAl alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Jaing, Y; He, Y H; Xu, N P; Zou, J; Huang, B; Lui, C T

    2008-01-01

    Porous TieAl alloys with different nominal compositions were fabricated through a reactive synthesis of Ti and Al elemental powders. It has been found that the pore parameters vary with the Al contents, indicating that the nature of the pores can be manipulated through changing the Al contents. In addition, detailed structural characterizations showed that the fabricated porous TieAl alloys can have three crystalline phases (i.e., a2-Ti3Al, g-TiAl, and TiAl3) when using different compositions. The fundamental reasons behind these phenomena have been explored.

  13. Everyday Life with ALS: A Practical Guide

    MedlinePlus

    ... course of ALS. ALS also will require some adaptations to your environment, both for safety and to ... the way, Chapter 6 will include information on adaptations for computer access. Though the chapter is called “ ...

  14. Benefits for Military Veterans with ALS

    MedlinePlus

    ... Chapters Certified Centers and Clinics Support Groups About ALS About Us Our Research In Your Community Advocate ... Veterans Resources for Military Veterans, Families & Survivors The ALS Association is working everyday to support people with ...

  15. Between ice and gas: CO2 on the icy satellites of Jupiter and Saturn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hibbitts, C.

    2010-12-01

    , with the position of its ν3 fundament absorption band dependent on the cation composition and on the dosing temperature. It may also be that the presence of charge-compensating ions, and the resulting negative charge of the remaining structure, enables CO2 to adsorb through an induced dipole attraction. In general, the IR absorption band of CO2 in montmorillonite tends to shift toward longer wavelengths as the density of the electric field of the principle cation decreases, with the exception that the IR absorption band of the Na-rich endmember occurs at a shorter wavelength than for the Li-rich endmember. References: [1] Carlson et al., (1996) Science; [2] McCord et al., (1998) J. Geophys. Res.; [3] Buratti et al., (2005) Astrophys. J.; [4]Clark et al., (2005) Nature; [5] Brown et al., (2006) , Icarus; [6] Filacchione et al., (2006) , Icarus; [7] Cruikshank et al., (2010), Icarus, 206, 561-572; [9] Smythe et al., (1998),DPS,30, #55.P07, 1448; [9] Hansen and McCord, (2008), GRL, 35; [10] Hibbitts et al., (2000) J. Geophys. Res.; [11] Hibbitts et al., (2002) , J. Geophys. Res.; [12] Hibbitts et al., (2003) J. Geophys. Res.; [13] Moore et al., (2000), Icarus, 140, 294-312; [14] Hibbitts and Szanyi, (2007), Icarus. 191, 371-380; [15] Dyar et al., (2010), Icarus, 208, 425-437.

  16. Aluminium distribution in ZSM-5 revisited: The role of Al-Al interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Ruiz-Salvador, A. Rabdel; Grau-Crespo, Ricardo; Gray, Aileen E.; Lewis, Dewi W.

    2013-02-15

    We present a theoretical study of the distribution of Al atoms in zeolite ZSM-5 with Si/Al=47, where we focus on the role of Al-Al interactions rather than on the energetics of Al/Si substitutions at individual sites. Using interatomic potential methods, we evaluate the energies of the full set of symmetrically independent configurations of Al siting in a Si{sub 94}Al{sub 2}O{sub 192} cell. The equilibrium Al distribution is determined by the interplay of two factors: the energetics of the Al/Si substitution at an individual site, which tends to populate particular T sites (e.g., the T14 site), and the Al-Al interaction, which at this Si/Al maximises Al-Al distances in general agreement with Dempsey's rule. However, it is found that the interaction energy changes approximately as the inverse of the square of the distance between the two Al atoms, rather than the inverse of the distance expected if this were merely charge repulsion. Moreover, we find that the anisotropic nature of the framework density plays an important role in determining the magnitude of the interactions, which are not simply dependent on Al-Al distances. - Graphical abstract: Role of Al-Al interactions in high silica ZSM-5 is shown to be anisotropic in nature and not dependent solely on Coulombic interactions. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Si-Al distribution in ZSM-5 is revisited, stressing the role of the Al-Al interaction. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Coulomb interactions are not the key factors controlling the Al siting. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Anisotropy of the framework is identified as a source of departure from Dempsey's rule.

  17. Total ozone patterns over the northern mid-latitudes: spatial correlations, extreme events and dynamical contributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rieder, H. E.; Staehelin, J.; Maeder, J. A.; Ribatet, M.; Bodeker, G. E.; Davison, A. C.

    2009-04-01

    Tools from geostatistics and extreme value theory are applied to analyze spatial correlations in total ozone for the northern mid-latitudes. The dataset used in this study is the NIWA combined total ozone dataset (Bodeker et al., 2001; Müller et al., 2008). New tools from extreme value theory (Coles, 2001; Ribatet, 2007) have recently been applied to the world's longest total ozone record from Arosa, Switzerland (e.g. Staehelin 1998a,b), in order to describe extreme events in low and high total ozone (Rieder et al., 200x). Within the current study, patterns in spatial correlation and frequency distributions of extreme events (e.g. ELOs and EHOs) are studied for the northern mid-latitudes. New insights in spatial patterns of total ozone for the northern mid-latitudes are presented. Koch et al. (2005) found that the increase in fast isentropic transport of tropical air to northern mid-latitudes contributed significantly to ozone changes between 1980 and 1989. Within this study the influence of changes in atmospheric dynamics (e.g. tropospheric and lower stratospheric pressure systems) on column ozone over the northern mid-latitudes is analyzed for the time period 1979-2007. References: Bodeker, G.E., J.C. Scott, K. Kreher, and R.L. McKenzie, Global ozone trends in potential vorticity coordinates using TOMS and GOME intercompared against the Dobson network: 1978-1998, J. Geophys. Res., 106 (D19), 23029-23042, 2001. Coles, S.: An Introduction to Statistical Modeling of Extreme Values, Springer Series in Statistics, ISBN:1852334592, Springer, Berlin, 2001. Koch, G., H. Wernli, C. Schwierz, J. Staehelin, and T. Peter (2005), A composite study on the structure and formation of ozone miniholes and minihighs over central Europe, Geophys. Res. Lett., 32, L12810, doi:10.1029/2004GL022062. Müller, R., Grooß, J.-U., Lemmen, C., Heinze, D., Dameris, M., and Bodeker, G.: Simple measures of ozone depletion in the polar stratosphere, Atmos. Chem. Phys., 8, 251-264, 2008. Ribatet

  18. Photoelectrical, photophysical and photocatalytic properties of Al based MOFs: MIL-53(Al) and MIL-53-NH2(Al)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Yang; Li, Huiliang; Liu, Yuanyuan; Huang, Baibiao; Sun, Qilong; Dai, Ying; Qin, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Xiaoyang

    2016-01-01

    Two Al based MOFs (MIL-53(Al) and MIL-53-NH2 (Al)) were synthesized, and their photoelectrical, photophysical and photocatalytic properties towards oxygen evolution from water were investigated. Different from the ligand to metal charge transfer process previously reported, we proposes a new photocatalytic mechanism based on electron tunneling according to the results of theoretical calculation, steady state and time resolved fluorescence spectra. The organic linkers absorb photons, giving rise to electrons and holes. Then, the photogenerated electrons tunnel through the AlO6-octahedra, which not only inhibit the recombination of photogenerated charge carriers, but also is a key factor to the photocatalytic activity of Al based MOFs.

  19. Characterizing the Magnetospheric State for Sawtooth Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fung, S. F.; Tepper, J. A.; Cai, X.

    2015-12-01

    Magnetospheric sawtooth events, first identified in the early 1990's, are named for their characteristic appearance of multiple quasi-periodic intervals of slow decrease followed by sharp increase of proton energy fluxes in the geosynchronous region. The successive proton flux decrease-and-increase intervals have been interpreted as recurrences of stretching and dipolarization, respectively, of the nightside geomagnetic field [Reeves et al., 2003]. Due to their often-extended intervals with 2- 10 cycles, sawteeth occurrences are sometimes referred to as a magnetospheric mode [Henderson et al., 2006]. Studies over the past two decades of sawtooth events (both event and statistical) have yielded a wealth of information on the conditions for the onset and occurrence of sawtooth events, but the occurrences of sawtooth events during both storm and non-storm periods suggest that we still do not fully understand the true nature of sawtooth events [Cai et al., 2011]. In this study, we investigate the characteristic magnetospheric state conditions [Fung and Shao, 2008] associated with the beginning, during, and ending intervals of sawtooth events. Unlike previous studies of individual sawtooth event conditions, magnetospheric state conditions consider the combinations of both magnetospheric drivers (solar wind) and multiple geomagnetic responses. Our presentation will discuss the most probable conditions for a "sawtooth state" of the magnetosphere. ReferencesCai, X., J.-C. Zhang, C. R. Clauer, and M. W. Liemohn (2011), Relationship between sawtooth events and magnetic storms, J. Geophys. Res., 116, A07208, doi:10.1029/2010JA016310. Fung, S. F. and X. Shao, Specification of multiple geomagnetic responses to variable solar wind and IMF input, Ann. Geophys., 26, 639-652, 2008. Henderson, M. G., et al. (2006), Magnetospheric and auroral activity during the 18 April 2002 sawtooth event, J. Geophys. Res., 111, A01S90, doi:10.1029/2005JA011111. Reeves, G. D., et al. (2004), IMAGE

  20. Nonstoichiometry of Al-Zr intermetallic phases

    SciTech Connect

    Radmilovic, V.; Thomas, G.

    1994-06-01

    Nonstoichiometry of metastable cubic {beta}{prime} and equilibrium tetragonal {beta} Al-Zr intermetallic phases of the nominal composition Al{sub 3}Zr in Al-rich alloys has been extensively studied. It is proposed that the ``dark contrast`` of {beta}{prime} core in {beta}{prime}/{sigma}{prime} complex precipitates, in Al-Li-Zr based alloys, is caused by incorporation of Al and Li atoms into the {beta}{prime} phase on Zr sublattice sites, forming nonstoichiometric Al-Zr intermetallic phases, rather than by Li partitioning only. {beta}{prime} particles contain very small amounts of Zr, approximately 5 at.%, much less than the stoichiometric 25 at.% in the Al{sub 3}Zr metastable phase. These particles are, according to simulation of high resolution images, of the Al{sub 3}(Al{sub 0.4}Li{sub 0.4}Zr{sub 0.2}) type. Nonstoichiometric particles of average composition Al{sub 4}Zr and Al{sub 6}Zr are observed also in the binary Al-Zr alloy, even after annealing for several hours at 600{degree}C.

  1. Cyclic oxidation resistance of a reaction milled NiAl-AlN composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowell, Carl E.; Barrett, Charles A.; Whittenberger, J. D.

    1990-01-01

    Based upon recent mechanical property tests a NiAl-AlN composite produced by cryomilling has very attractive high temperature strength. This paper focuses on the oxidation resistance of the NiAl-AlN composite at 1473 and 1573 K as compared to that of Ni-47Al-0.15Zr, one of the most oxidation resistant intermetallics. The results of cyclic oxidation tests show that the NiAl-AlN composite has excellent properties although not quite as good as those of Ni-47Al-0.15Zr. The onset of failure of the NiAl-AlN was unique in that it was not accompanied by a change in scale composition from alumina to less protective oxides. Failure in the composite appears to be related to the entrapment of AlN particles within the alumina scale.

  2. Cenomanian-Turonian biostratigraphy of the Jardas Al Abid area, Al Jabal Al Akhdar, northeast Libya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Qot, Gamal M.; Abdulsamad, Esam O.

    2016-09-01

    The Upper Cenomanian-Turonian succession exposed at Jardas al'Abid area consists mainly of carbonates with siliciclastic intercalations. This succession is subdivided lithostratigraphically into: Qasr al'Abid (Late Cenomanian) and Al Baniyah (Late Cenomanian-Coniacian) formations. This sequence is relatively rich in macrofossil assemblages especially bivalves, gastropods, and echinoids with rare ammonites. Based on the first occurrence (FO) and last occurrence (LO) of some index species of these macrofossil groups, an integrated biostratigraphic framework has been constructed. The studied Cenomanian-Turonian sequence is subdivided biostratigraphically into three ammonite biozones; Pseudaspidoceras pseudonodosoides Total Range Zone, Choffaticeras segne Total Range Zone, and Coilopoceras requienianum Total Range Zone. Based on the rest of macrofossil assemblages other than the ammonites, eight biozones were recognized; Mecaster batnensis Total Range Zone, Ceratostreon flabellatum-Neithea dutrugei Acme Zone, Costagyra olisiponensis Acme Zone, Pycnodonte (Phygraea) vesicularis vesiculosa Acme Zone, Mytiloides labiatus Total Range Zone = Mecaster turonensis Acme Zone, Rachiosoma rectilineatum-Curvostrea rouvillei-Tylostoma (T.) globosum Assemblage Zone, Radiolites sp.-Apricardia? matheroni Total Range Zone, and Nerinea requieniana Total Range Zone. Most of the proposed biozones are recorded for the first time from Libya. The integration among these biozones as well as local and inter-regional correlation of the biozones have been discussed. The stage boundaries of the studied stratigraphic intervals are discussed, where the Cenomanian/Turonian boundary is delineated at the last occurrence (LO) of Pseudaspidoceras pseudonodosoides (Choffat), while the Turonian/Coniacian boundary is delineated arbitrary being agree with the LO of the Turonian fauna.

  3. Venting of CO2 at Enceladus’ Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matson, Dennis L.; Davies, Ashley G.; Johnson, Torrence V.; Combe, Jean-Philippe; McCord, Tom B.; Radebaugh, Jani

    2015-11-01

    Enceladus has CO2 surface deposits in its South Polar Region that have been recently mapped by J.-P. Combe et al. (2015 AGU Fall Meeting). Assuming that these are CO2 frost, we show how they can be formed. We use an ocean-water circulation model [1] that specifies pressure gradients that drive water to the surface from a relatively gas-rich, subsurface ocean. We now examine the movement of CO2 to the surface; formation of shallow CO2 gas pockets in the ice; and the venting of CO2, when at least some of the gas freezes to form frost. If the local heat flow is known (cf. [2]), then the depths of the corresponding gas pockets can be calculated. References: [1] Matson et al. (2012) Icarus, 221, 53-62. [2] Howett et al. (2011) J. Geophys. Res. 116, E03003. Acknowledgements: AGD thanks the NASA OPR Program for support.

  4. Possible cause of enhancement of electron temperature in high electron density region in the dayside ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakinami, Yoshihiro; Watanabe, Shigeto

    2016-07-01

    When neutral atmosphere is ionized by solar EUV, energetic electrons named photoelectrons are emitted. The photoelectrons are primary heat source of electrons in the ionosphere in the daytime. The heating rate of electron by photoelectron is proportion to 0.97 power of electron density (Ne) while the heated electron is cooled through the Column collision with ions, the rate of which rate is square of Ne. Therefore, electron temperature (Te) decreases and approach ion temperature (Ti) with increase of Ne. Ions are also cooled through the collision with neutral spices. Finally, these temperatures (Te, Ti and Tn) show very similar values in high Ne region. However, Te enhancement with increase of Ne is found in the satellite observation at 600 km in the daytime ionosphere [Kakinami et al., 2011]. Similar Ti variation is also found around the magnetic dip equator [Kakinami et al., 2014]. One possible cause of the enhancement of Te is enhacement of Tn with increase Ne because both Ne and Tn increase with increase of solar irradiance flux, F10.7 [Lei et al., 2007]. However, since such the enhancements of Te are seen in any F10.7, it is hard to explain the phenomenon. In this paper, we present correlation between Te (Ti) and Ne obtained by the Incoherent Scatter radar at Jicamarca. The similar correlation, namely positive correlation of Te (Ti) with Ne in high Ne region are found above 300 km. Using the observations and Tn and neutral density calculated with MSIS, the Column collision cooling with ions, and inelastic collision cooling with neutral spices for electron are shown. The heat conduction along the magnetic field line is also estimated by using IRI model. Using these information, we discuss possible cause of the enhancement of Te in the high Ne region. References Kakinami et al. (2011), J. Geophys. Res., doi:10.1029/2011JA016905. Kakinami et al. (2014), J. Geophys. Res., 119, doi:10.1002/2014JA020302. Lei et al.(2007), J. Geophys. Res., doi:10.1029/2006JA012041.

  5. Effect of Organic Sea Spray Aerosol on Global and Regional Cloud Condensation Nuclei Concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westervelt, D. M.; Nenes, A.; Moore, R.; Adams, P. J.

    2009-12-01

    Physical processes on the ocean surface (bubble bursting) result in formation of sea spray aerosol. It is now recognized that this aerosol source includes a significant amount of organic matter (O’Dowd et al. 2004). Higher amounts of aerosol lead to higher cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) concentrations, which perturb climate by brightening clouds in what is known as the aerosol indirect effect (Twomey 1977). This work quantifies the marine organic aerosol global emission source as well the effect of the aerosol on CCN by implementing an organic sea spray source function into a series of global aerosol simulations. The new organic sea spray source function correlates satellite retrieved chlorophyll concentrations to fraction of organic matter in sea spray aerosol (O’Dowd et al. 2008). Using this source function, a global marine organic aerosol emission rate of 17.2 Tg C yr-1 is estimated. Effect on CCN concentrations (0.2% supersaturation) is modeled using the Two-Moment Aerosol Sectional (TOMAS) microphysics algorithm coupled to a general circulation model (Adams and Seinfeld 2002). Upon including organic sea spray aerosol in global simulations, changes in CCN concentrations are induced by the changed aerosol composition as well as the ability of the organic matter to serve as surfactants. To explore surfactant effects, surface tension depression data from seawater samples taken near the Georgia coast were applied as a function of carbon concentrations (Moore et al. 2008). Preliminary findings suggest that organic sea spray aerosol exerts a localized influence on CCN(0.2%) concentrations. Surfactant effects appear to be the most important impact of marine organic aerosol on CCN(0.2%), as changes in aerosol composition alone have a weak influence, even in regions of high organic sea spray emissions. 1. O’Dowd, C.D., Facchini, M.C. et al., Nature, 431, (2004) 2. Twomey, S., J. Atmos. Sci., 34, (1977) 3. O’Dowd C.D et al. Geophys. Res. Let., 35, (2008) 4

  6. Systems Engineering Techniques for ALS Decision Making

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriquez, Luis F.; Drysdale, Alan E.; Jones, Harry; Levri, Julie A.

    2004-01-01

    The Advanced Life Support (ALS) Metric is the predominant tool for predicting the cost of ALS systems. Metric goals for the ALS Program are daunting, requiring a threefold increase in the ALS Metric by 2010. Confounding the problem, the rate new ALS technologies reach the maturity required for consideration in the ALS Metric and the rate at which new configurations are developed is slow, limiting the search space and potentially giving the perspective of a ALS technology, the ALS Metric may remain elusive. This paper is a sequel to a paper published in the proceedings of the 2003 ICES conference entitled, "Managing to the metric: an approach to optimizing life support costs." The conclusions of that paper state that the largest contributors to the ALS Metric should be targeted by ALS researchers and management for maximum metric reductions. Certainly, these areas potentially offer large potential benefits to future ALS missions; however, the ALS Metric is not the only decision-making tool available to the community. To facilitate decision-making within the ALS community a combination of metrics should be utilized, such as the Equivalent System Mass (ESM)-based ALS metric, but also those available through techniques such as life cycle costing and faithful consideration of the sensitivity of the assumed models and data. Often a lack of data is cited as the reason why these techniques are not considered for utilization. An existing database development effort within the ALS community, known as OPIS, may provide the opportunity to collect the necessary information to enable the proposed systems analyses. A review of these additional analysis techniques is provided, focusing on the data necessary to enable these. The discussion is concluded by proposing how the data may be utilized by analysts in the future.

  7. Testing Physical Models of Episodic Tremor and Slip with Earthquake and Creep Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomberg, J.; Pratt, T.; Bodin, P.

    2006-12-01

    pressure change: A mechanism to explain dynamic earthquake triggering, Seismo. Res. Letts., 72, 250. Boatwright, J. and M. Cocco (1996), Frictional constraints on crustal faulting, J. Geophys. Res., 101, 13, 895- 13,909. Kao, H., S.J. Shan, H. Dragert, G. Rogers, J. F. Cassidy, and K. Ramachandran (2005), A wide depth distribution of seismic tremors along the northern Cascadia margin, Nature, 436, 841- 844. Liu, Y., and J. R. Rice (2005), Aseismic slip transients emerge spontaneously in three-dimensional rate and state modeling of subduction earthquake sequences, J. Geophys. Res., 110, doi:10.1029/2004JB003424. Marone, C., and C. H. Scholz (1988)The depth of seismic faulting and the upper transition from stable to unstable slip regimes, Geophys. Res. Letts., 15, 621-624. Sibson, R.H. (1990) Rupture nucleation on unfavorably oriented faults, Seismo. Soc. Am. Bull., 80, 1580-1605.

  8. Opportunity's 'Rub al Khali' Panorama

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on the image for Opportunity's 'Rub al Khali' Panorama (QTVR)

    This panoramic image, dubbed 'Rub al Khali,' was acquired by NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity on the plains of Meridiani during the period from the rover's 456th to 464th sols on Mars (May 6 to May 14, 2005). Opportunity was about 2 kilometers (1.2 miles) south of 'Endurance Crater' at a place known informally as 'Purgatory Dune.'

    The rover was stuck in the dune's deep fine sand for more than a month. 'Rub al Khali' (Arabic translation: 'the empty quarter') was chosen as the name for this panorama because it is the name of a similarly barren, desolate part of the Saudi Arabian desert on Earth.

    The view spans 360 degrees. It consists of images obtained in 97 individual pointings of the panoramic camera. The camera took images with five camera filters at each pointing. This 22,780-by-6,000-pixel mosaic is an approximately true-color rendering generated using the images acquired through filters admitting light wavelengths of 750, 530, and 480 nanometers.

    Lighting varied during the nine sols it took to acquire this panorama, resulting in some small image seams within the mosaic. These seams have been smoothed in sky parts of the mosaic to better simulate the vista that a person would see if able to view it all at the same time on Mars.

    Opportunity's tracks leading back to the north (center of the panorama) are a reminder of the rover's long trek from Endurance Crater. The deep ruts dug by Opportunity's wheels as it became stuck in the sand appear in the foreground. The crest and trough of the last ripple the rover crossed before getting stuck is visible in the center. These wind-formed sand features are only about 10 to 15 centimeters (4 to 6 inches) tall. The crest of the actual ripple where the rover got stuck can be seen just to the right of center. The tracks and a few other places on and near ripple crests can

  9. Providing for the consideration of the resolution (H. Res. 36) establishing a select committee to investigate and report on the attack on the United States consulate in Benghazi, Libya.

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Rep. Stockman, Steve [R-TX-36

    2013-07-18

    07/30/2013 Motion to Discharge Committee filed by Mr. Stockman. Petition No: 113-4. (Discharge petition text with signatures.) (All Actions) Notes: On 7/30/2013, a motion was filed to discharge the Committee on Rules from the consideration of H.Res.306 a resolution providing for consideration of H.Res.36. A discharge petition requires 218 signatures for further action. (Discharge Petition No. 113-4: text with signatures.) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  10. Immunomodulatory drugs in AL amyloidosis.

    PubMed

    Jelinek, T; Kufova, Z; Hajek, R

    2016-03-01

    Immunoglobulin light chain amyloidosis (AL amyloidosis) is indeed a rare plasma cell disorder, yet the most common of the systemic amyloidoses. The choice of adequate treatment modality is complicated and depends dominantly on the risk stratification of these fragile patients. Immunomodulatory drugs (IMiDs) are currently used in newly diagnosed patients as well as in salvage therapy in relapsed/refractory patients. IMiDs have a pleiotropic effect on malignant cells and the exact mechanism of their action has been described recently. Thalidomide is the most ancient representative, effective but toxic. Lenalidomide seems to be more effective, nevertheless the toxicity remains high, especially in patients with renal insufficiency. Pomalidomide is the newest IMiD used in this indication with a good balance between efficacy and tolerable toxicity and represents the most promising compound. This review is focused on the evaluation of all three representatives of IMiDs and their roles in the treatment of this malignant disorder. PMID:26806146

  11. Instandhaltungsmanagement als Gestaltungsfeld Ganzheitlicher Produktionssysteme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dombrowski, Uwe; Schulze, Sven; Otano, Isabel Crespo

    Sich kontinuierlich verändernde Rahmenbedingungen, wie beispielsweise eine steigende Variantenvielfalt, verkürzte Produktlebenszyklen sowie Kundenforderungen nach höherer Qualität, kürzeren Lieferzeiten und geringeren Kosten, fordern von produzierenden Unternehmen eine stetige Anpassung der Prozesse, der Organisation und der Strukturen. Seit den 90er Jahren versuchen immer mehr deutsche Unternehmen diesen veränderten Anforderungen mit der Einführung eines Ganzheitlichen Produktionssystems (GPS) zu begegnen. Ganzheitliche Produktionssysteme sind dabei in ihren Grundlagen an das Toyota Produktionssystem angelehnt, vereinigen aber auch weitere Methoden zu einem unternehmensspezifischen Regelwerk. Im Rahmen des langfristigen Trends zu unternehmensindividuellen Produktionssystemen wird sowohl in der Industrie als auch in der Forschung intensiv über das Toyota Produktionssystem, Lean Production, Lean Management und Ganzheitliche Produktionssysteme diskutiert, werden Konzepte zu Implementierung und Betrieb erstellt und die Wirtschaftlichkeit untersucht.

  12. Magnetism of Al-substituted magnetite reduced from Al-hematite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Zhaoxia; Liu, Qingsong; Zhao, Xiang; Roberts, Andrew P.; Heslop, David; Barrón, Vidal; Torrent, José

    2016-06-01

    Aluminum-substituted magnetite (Al-magnetite) reduced from Al-substituted hematite or goethite (Al-hematite or Al-goethite) is an environmentally important constituent of magnetically enhanced soils. In order to characterize the magnetic properties of Al-magnetite, two series of Al-magnetite samples were synthesized through reduction of Al-hematite by a mixed gas (80% CO2 and 20% CO) at 395°C for 72 h in a quartz tube furnace. Al-magnetite samples inherited the morphology of their parent Al-hematite samples, but only those transformed from Al-hematite synthesized at low temperature possessed surficial micropores, which originated from the release of structural water during heating. Surface micropores could thus serve as a practical fingerprint of fire or other high-temperature mineralogical alteration processes in natural environments, e.g., shear friction in seismic zones. In addition, Al substitution greatly affects the magnetic properties of Al-magnetite. For example, coercivity (Bc) increases with increasing Al content and then decreases slightly, while the saturation magnetization (Ms), Curie temperature (Tc), and Verwey transition temperature (Tv) all decrease with increasing Al content due to crystal defect formation and dilution of magnetic ions caused by Al incorporation. Moreover, different trends in the correlation between Tc and Bc can be used to discriminate titanomagnetite from Al-magnetite, which is likely to be important in environmental and paleomagnetic studies, particularly in soil.

  13. Reactive Plasma Spraying of Fine Al2O3/AlN Feedstock Powder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahien, Mohammed; Yamada, Motohiro; Yasui, Toshiaki; Fukumoto, Masahiro

    2013-12-01

    Reactive plasma spraying (RPS) is a promising technology for in situ formation of aluminum nitride (AlN) coatings. Recently, AlN-based coatings were fabricated by RPS of alumina (Al2O3) powder in N2/H2 thermal plasma. This study investigated the feasibility of RPS of a fine Al2O3/AlN mixture and the influence of the plasma gases (N2, H2) on the nitriding conversion, and coating microstructure and properties. Thick AlN/Al2O3 coatings with high nitride content were successfully fabricated. The coatings consist of h-AlN, c-AlN, Al5O6N, γ-Al2O3, and a small amount of α-Al2O3. Use of fine particles enhanced the nitriding conversion and the melting tendency by increasing the surface area. Furthermore, the AlN additive improved the AlN content in the coatings. Increasing the N2 gas flow rate improved the nitride content and complete crystal growth to the h-AlN phase, and enhanced the coating thickness. On the other hand, though the H2 gas is required for plasma nitriding of the Al2O3 particles, increasing its flow rate decreased the nitride content and the coating thickness. Remarkable influence of the plasma gases on the coating composition, microstructure, and properties was observed during RPS of the fine particles.

  14. Al/Al-N/AlN compositional gradient film synthesized by ion-beam assisted deposition method

    SciTech Connect

    Amamoto, Yoshiki; Uchiyama, Shingo; Watanabe, Yoshihisa; Nakamura, Yoshikazu

    1997-12-01

    Al/Al-N-AlN compositional gradient thin film was deposited on a Si(100) substrate at room temperature by ion-beam assisted deposition method, with a diminishing ion beam current from 1.4 to 0 mA at increments of 0.3 mA in order to gradually decrease the nitrogen to aluminum ratio at the substrate. The gradual Al and AlN variation in composition was shown by the change of the Al/N atomic ratio analyzed by the energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) and the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) in the cross section of the film. The formation of crystalline Al metal and AlN ceramic layer on the Si substrate was revealed by X-ray diffraction (XRD). The cross sectional image taken by high resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM) showed a nano-sized crystalline Al-N ceramic material and the flat interface between the Si substrate and the AlN film.

  15. Accumulation of Al in Root Mucilage of an Al-Resistant and an Al-Sensitive Cultivar of Wheat.

    PubMed Central

    Archambault, D. J.; Zhang, G.; Taylor, G. J.

    1996-01-01

    To estimate rates of Al accumulation within the symplasm, all apoplastic pools of Al need to be eliminated or accounted for. We have developed a revised kinetic protocol that allows us to estimate the contribution of mucilage-bound Al to total, nonexchangeable Al, and to eliminate the mucilage as an apoplastic pool of Al. By comparing the Al content of excised root tips (2 cm) of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) with and without the removal of the mucilage (using a 10-min wash in 1 M NH4Cl), we found that Al bound to the mucilage accounted for approximately 25 to 35% of Al remaining after desorption in citric acid. The kinetics of Al uptake into mucilage were biphasic, with a rapid phase occurring in the first 30 min of uptake, followed by a linear phase occurring in the remainder of the experimental period (180 min). By adopting a step for removal of mucilage into our existing kinetic protocol, we have been able to isolate a linear phase of uptake with only a slight deviation from linearity in the first 5 min. Although we cannot unambiguously identify this phase of uptake as uptake into the symplasm, we believe this new protocol provides us with the most accurate quantitative estimate of symplastic Al yet available. PMID:12226458

  16. Response of radiation belt simulations to different radial diffusion coefficients for relativistic and ultra-relativistic electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drozdov, Alexander; Mann, Ian; Baker, Daniel N.; Subbotin, Dmitriy; Ozeke, Louis; Shprits, Yuri; Kellerman, Adam

    Two parameterizations of the resonant wave-particle interactions of electrons with ULF waves in the magnetosphere by Brautigam and Albert [2000] and Ozeke et al. [2012] are evaluated using the Versatile Electron Radiation Belt (VERB) diffusion code to estimate the effect of changing a diffusion coefficient on the radiation belt simulation. The period of investigation includes geomagnetically quiet and active time. The simulations take into account wave-particle interactions represented by radial diffusion transport, local acceleration, losses due to pitch-angle diffusion, and mixed diffusion. 1. Brautigam, D. H., and J. M. Albert (2000), Radial diffusion analysis of outer radiation belt electrons during the October 9, 1990, magnetic storm, J. Geophys. Res., 105(A1), 291-309, doi:10.1029/1999JA900344 2. Ozeke, L. G., I. R. Mann, K. R. Murphy, I. J. Rae, D. K. Milling, S. R. Elkington, A. A. Chan, and H. J. Singer (2012), ULF wave derived radiation belt radial diffusion coefficients, J. Geophys. Res., 117, A04222, doi:10.1029/2011JA017463.

  17. HMF sectors since 1926: Comparison of two ground-based data sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiltula, T.; Mursula, K.

    In this paper, we compare two recent long-term data sets of daily HMF sector polarities since 1926 based on ground-based geomagnetic measurements: the combined data set by Echer and Svalgaard [Echer, E., Svalgaard, L. Asymmetry in the Rosenberg-Coleman effect around solar minimum revealed by wavelet analysis of the interplanetary magnetic field polarity data (1927-2002). Geophys. Res. Lett. 31, 12808, 2004] (ES data set) and a three-station data set derived by Vennerstroem et al. [Vennerstroem, S., Zieger, B., Friis-Christensen, E. An improved method of inferring interplanetary sector structure, 1905-present. J. Geophys. Res. 106 (15), 16011-16020, 2001] (VZF data set). The Rosenberg-Coleman rule is consistently valid in the ES data during the last 80 years, but fails in the VZF data set in the early cycles. There is a clear bias (T sector dominance) in the VZF data that is not observed in satellite measurements collected in the OMNI-2 data set, or in the ES data. Also, there is a difference on the success rates between the two sectors in the VZF data. Therefore, we conclude that the ES data set is more reliable, especially in cycles 16-18, in reproducing the HMF sector structure. Both data sets reproduce the southward shift of the heliospheric current sheet during the OMNI-2 interval. However, only the more reliable ES data set depicts this systematically also during the early cycles 16-18.

  18. Model of Artificial Ionospheric Ducts due to the HF-heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vartanyan, A.; Milikh, G. M.; Demekhov, A. G.; Papadopoulos, K.; Huba, J.; Joyce, G. R.

    2009-12-01

    The presence of field aligned density striations plays a critical role in the propagation of whistler waves in the ionosphere. Such density structures have often been observed to extend over distances covering entire magnetic field lines, trapping, channeling and reflecting whistler waves between conjugate regions. The possibility for artificially creating such trans-hemispheric ducts was first discussed by Perrine et al. [2006]. They showed that long term (> 15 minutes) continuous HF-heating of the F-region by powerful ionospheric heaters such as HAARP generates a strong thermal wave in the ionospheric and magnetospheric plasma. This thermal wave propagates along the magnetic field line through the topside ionosphere and magnetosphere, driving ion outflows, displacing the ambient plasma and leading to the formation of density ducts. Two recent experiments detected large scale ducts caused by the HF-heating. One experiment was conducted at HAARP and used the low orbit satellite DEMETER as a diagnostic tool [Milikh et al., 2008]. The experiment shows in situ detected plasma ducts with the spatial scale of a few tens kilometers. Another heating experiment was conducted at the EISCAT HF facility and used UHF radar as a diagnostic tool [Rietveld et al., 2003]. As a result vertical profiles of electron and ion temperature were obtained in the height range 150-600 km. It is the objective of this paper to present the first detailed model of the formation of ionospheric ducts due to HF-heating. The model is checked against the observations made at EISCAT. The results show a good agreement between the model and observations. Milikh, G.M., K. Papadopoulos, et al. (2008), Geophys. Res. Lett, 35, doi:10.1029/2008GL034630. Perrine, R.P., G.M. Milikh, K. Papadopoulos, et al., Radio Sci. (2006), 41, doi:10.1029/2005RS003371. Rietveld, M.T., M.J. Kosch, et al., J. Geophys. Res. (2003), 108, doi:10.1029/2002JA009543.

  19. Examining Buoyancy Waves in the Martian Atmosphere with Mars Climate Sounder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edmonds, Robert; Murphy, J.; Teal, D.

    2010-10-01

    Bouyancy ('gravity') waves can potentially play a significant role in the dynamics of the Martian atmosphere (Barnes, 1990). Small wave disturbances created at the surface (i.e. topographically) or at low altitudes (ex. convection) can propagate vertically under the appropriate thermodynamic conditions. To conserve energy, the amplitude of small waves can grow substantially in response to decreasing densities at higher altitudes. Gravity waves in the upper atmosphere have been analyzed from atmospheric densities derived from aerobarking Martian spacecraft (Creasey et al., 2006b & Fritts et al., 2006). Potentially large wave amplitudes aloft can result in wave saturation and wave breaking (Lindzen, 1981). The breaking waves deposit momentum, potentially altering the winds at that breaking level substantially. Creasey et al. (2006a) investigated the amplitudes of Martian atmospheric gravity waves by attempting to determine their manifested temperature perturbations as derived from Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) radio occultation measurements. Their results showed little correlation between topographic variance and gravitational wave energy. Motivated by this result, we are interested in how wave energies derived from Mars Climate Sounder (MCS) limb radiance measurements compare to the MGS Radio Science (RS) results. The continuous nature of the MCS measurements offer the opportunity to systematically investigate buoyancy wave characteristics diurnally, seasonally, and geographically, and to do so to a higher altitude (lower pressure) than the MGS RS profiles afforded. The MCS data used in this work is made publicly available through NASA's Planetary Data System's Atmospheres Node. This work is supported by NSF Grant ATM-0535811 (Univ. of Michigan), NMSU subcontract 3000615888 Barnes, J.R., 1990, JGR, 95, B2, 1401-1421. Creasey, J.E., et al., 2006, Geophys. Res. Lett., 33, L01803. Creasey, J.E., et al., 2006, Geophys. Res. Lett., 33, L22814. Fritts, D.C., et al., 2006

  20. The in-situ formation of methyl-nitrate during NOx re-cycling involving CH3O2: global impacts and implications in the troposphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Jason; Le Bras, Georges; Kukui, Alexandre

    2013-04-01

    Organic nitrates are formed via chain termination steps involving peroxy-radicals and NO thus impacting the efficiency of ozone production and global oxidative capacity, especially in low NOx environments (Browne and Cohen, 2012). Recently the direct formation of methyl nitrate (CH3ONO2) has been observed during the re-cycling of NOx by CH3O2 (Butkovskaya et al., 2012) with a branching ratio of 1.0(+/-)0.7% for tropospheric conditions. Considering that the CH3O2 route acts as the second most important radical mechanism of NOx re-cycling at global scale implies that this sequestration of reactive nitrogen into a more long lived reservoir could potentially decrease the efficiency of tropospheric ozone production, especially in the tropical regions where the highest mixing ratios of CH3O2 exist as a result of methane oxidation. Past measurements of alkyl-nitrates have shown that although resident mixing ratios of organic nitrates are high under urban conditions, they are also present in the more pristine regions of the tropical Pacific (e.g. Blake et al, 2003) and above Antarctica (i.e. in low NOx environments). Using the global 3D TM5 model we investigate the impact that the direct in-situ formation of CH3ONO2 has on global tropospheric composition. By comparing against measurements we also show that such a process could go part way towards explaining the distribution of CH3ONO2 in the tropical troposphere, where direct emissions from the ocean have previously been used to explain observations (Neu et al, 2008). Browne and Cohen, Atms. Chem. Phys., 12, 11917-11932, 2012. Butkovskaya et al., J. Phys. Chem. A., 116(24), 5972-5980, 2012. Blake et al., J. Geophys. Res., 108(D2), 8242, 2003. Neu et al., Geophys. Res. Letts., 35, L13814, 2008.

  1. Changing snow cover in tundra ecosystems tips the Arctic carbon balance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zona, D.; Hufkens, K.; Gioli, B.; Kalhori, A. A. M.; Oechel, W. C.

    2014-12-01

    The Arctic environment has witnessed important changes due to global warming, resulting in increased surface air temperatures and rain events which both exacerbate snow cover deterioration (Semmens et al, 2013; Rennert et al, 2009; White et al, 2007; Min et al, 2008; Sharp et al, 2013; Schaeffer et al, 2013). Snow cover duration is declining by almost 20% per decade, a far higher rate than model estimates (Derksen and Brown, 2012). Concomitant with increasing temperatures and decreasing snow cover duration, the length of the arctic growing season is reported to have increased by 1.1 - 4.9 days per decade since 1951 (Menzel et al, 2006), and, plant productivity and CO2 uptake from arctic vegetation are strongly influenced by changes in growing season length (Myneni et al., 1997; Schaefer et al., 2005; Euskirchen et al., 2006). Based on more than a decade of eddy flux measurements in Arctic tundra ecosystems across the North slope of Alaska, and remotely sensed snow cover data, we show that earlier snow melt in the spring increase C uptake while an extended snow free period in autumn is associated with a higher C loss. Here we present the impacts of changes in snow cover dynamics between spring and autumn in arctic tundra ecosystems on the carbon dynamics and net C balance of the Alaskan Arctic. ReferencesDerksen, C., Brown R. (2012) Geophys. Res. Lett., doi:10.1029/2012GL053387 Euskirchen, E.S., et al. (2006) Glob. Change Biol., 12, 731-750. Menzel, A., et al. 2006. Glob. Change Biol., 12, 1969-1976. Min SK, Zhang X, Zweirs F (2008) Science 320: 518-520. Rennert K J, Roe G, Putkonen J and Bitz C M (2009) J. Clim. 22 2302-15. Schaefer, K., Denning A.S., Leonard O. (2005) Global Biogeochem. Cycles, 19, GB3017. Schaeffer, S. M., Sharp, E., Schimel, J. P. & Welker, J. M. (2013). Soil- plant N processes in a High Arctic ecosystem, NW Greenland are altered by long-term experimental warming and higher rainfall. Glob. Change Biol., 11, 3529-39. doi: 10.1111/gcb.12318

  2. Fabrication of Nb/AlO x/Al/AlO x/Nb junctions for voltage standard applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maezawa, M.; Urano, C.; Kaneko, N.; Kiryu, S.

    2007-10-01

    We present an overdamped superconductor-insulator-normal-insulator-superconductor (SINIS) junction technology for ac voltage standard applications. Modifying our standard Nb-junction process, we developed a simple process for Nb/AlOx/Al/AlOx/Nb-junction circuits. A Josephson arbitrary waveform synthesizer device which consisted of a 100-SINIS-junction array embedded in a 50 Ω coplanar waveguide was fabricated and successfully tested.

  3. Bringing comfort and convenience to the colonial table: Delhaize Frères & Cie's Colonial Department in the 1920s and 1930s.

    PubMed

    Teughels, Nelleke

    2015-11-01

    The paper explores the role of convenient shopping in establishing a sense of comfort for Europeans in a colonial environment. So far, there has been little investigation into how Belgian retailers tried to gain a firm foothold in the Congo, how they presented themselves and promoted their wares. This paper examines the activities of the colonial department of Delhaize Frères & Cie 'Le Lion', Belgium's first and largest food multiple. It examines how this large grocery chain tried to establish itself in the Congo, what motivations it had to extend its business to the colony, what audience it wished to reach, what products and services it had to offer and what sales and marketing strategies were used. It appears that convenient shopping was one of the key selling points Delhaize's advertising, while also characterising its products as indispensable for Europeans' comfort, moral respectability and homely warmth in a so-called primitive, backward environment. PMID:25862981

  4. Clinical and neuroradiologic variability of Aicardi-Goutiéres syndrome: Two siblings with RNASEH2C mutation and a boy with TREX1 mutation.

    PubMed

    Uyur Yalçın, Emek; Maraş Genç, Hülya; Kara, Bülent

    2015-01-01

    Aicardi-Goutières syndrome (AGS) is a rare, autosomal recessively inherited, immune-mediated neurodevelopmental disorder. The syndrome causes infantile-onset progressive encephalopathy characterized by the neuroradiologic features of basal ganglia and periventricular white matter calcification, leucodystrophy and cerebral atrophy. Lymphocytosis and elevated levels of interferon alpha (IFN-alpha) in the cerebrospinal fluid are supplementary findings of AGS. It is frequently misdiagnosed as sequelae of congenital infection (pseudo-TORCH) and mostly recognized later. We describe three AGS cases with different clinical presentation, two male siblings with RNASEH2C mutation and a boy with TREX1 mutation. These cases highlight the importance of considering AGS in the differential diagnosis of unexplained leukoencephalopathy and developmental delay. We suggest to search for intracranial calcification, especially if there are more than one affected cases in a family. PMID:27411419

  5. Meteoric Dust as Condensation Nuclei of Small-Mode Particles in the Upper Haze of Venus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, P.; Zhang, X.; Crisp, D.; Bardeen, C.; Yung, Y. L.

    2012-12-01

    Observations by the SPICAV/SOIR instruments aboard Venus Express have revealed that the Upper Haze of Venus is populated by two particle modes, as reported by Wilquet et al. (J. Geophys. Res., 114, E00B42, 2009). In this work, we posit that the large mode is made up of cloud particles that have diffused upwards from the cloud deck below, while the smaller mode is generated by the in situ nucleation of meteoric dust. We test this hypothesis by using version 3.0 of the Community Aerosol and Radiation Model for Atmospheres, first developed by Turco et al. (J. Atmos. Sci., 36, 699-717, 1979) and upgraded to version 3.0 by Bardeen et al. (The CARMA 3.0 microphysics package in CESM, Whole Atmosphere Working Group Meeting, 2011). Using the meteoric dust production profile of Kalashnikova et al. (Geophys. Res. Lett., 27, 3293-3296, 2000), the sulfur/sulfate condensation nuclei production profile of Imamura and Hashimoto (J. Atmos. Sci., 58, 3597-3612, 2001), and sulfuric acid vapor production profile of Zhang et al. (Icarus, 217, 714-739, 2012), we numerically simulate a column of the Venus atmosphere from 40 to 100 km above the surface. Our aerosol number density results agree well with Pioneer Venus data from Knollenberg and Hunten (J. Geophys. Res., 85, 8039-8058, 1980), while our gas distribution results match that of Kolodner and Steffes below 55 km (Icarus, 132, 151-169, 1998). The resulting size distribution of cloud particles shows two distinct modes, qualitatively matching the observations of Pioneer Venus. We also observe a third mode in our results with a size of a few microns at 48 km altitude, which appears to support the existence of the controversial third mode in the Pioneer Venus data. This mode disappears if coagulation is not included in the simulation. The Upper Haze size distribution shows two lognormal-like distributions overlapping each other, possibly indicating the presence of the two distinct modes. We test our hypothesis by simulating the

  6. Pioneer Venus Orbiter (PVO) Ionosphere Evidence for Atmospheric Escape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grebowsky, J. M.; Hoegy, W. R.

    2009-12-01

    An early estimate of escape of H2O from Venus [McElroy et al., 1982] using observed hot oxygen densities inferred by Nagy et al. [1981] from PVO OUVS 1304 Å dayglow and using ionization rates from photoionization and electron impact. This resulted in an estimated oxygen ionization rate planet-wide above the plasmapause of 3x1025 atoms/s. Based on the energetic O+ being swept up and removed by solar wind, McElroy et al. [1982] gave an estimate of a loss rate for O of 6x106 atoms/cm2/s. Using a different method of estimating escape based data in the ionotail of Venus, Brace et al. [1987] estimated a total planetary O+ escape rate of 5x1025 ions/s. Their estimate was based on PVO measurements of superthermal O+ (energy range 9-16 eV) in the tail ray plasma between 2000 and 3000 km. Their estimated global mean flux was 107 atoms/cm2/s. The two escape rates are remarkably close considering all the errors involved in such estimates of escape. A study of escape by Luhmann et al. [2008] using VEX observations at low solar activity finds modest escape rates, prompting the authors to reconsider the evidence from both PVO and VEX of the possibility of enhanced escape during extreme interplanetary conditions. We reexamine the variation of escape under different solar wind conditions using ion densities and plasma content in the dayside and nightside of Venus using PVO ionosphere density during times of high solar activity. Citations: Brace, L.H., W. T. Kasprzak, H.A. Taylor, R. F. Theis, C. T. Russess, A. Barnes, J. D. Mihalov, and D. M. Hunten, "The Ionotail of Venus: Its Configuration and Evidence for Ion Escape", J. Geophys. Res. 92, 15-26, 1987. Luhmann, J.G., A. Fedorov, S. Barabash, E. Carlsson, Y. Futaana, T.L. Zhang, C.T. Russell, J.G. Lyon, S.A. Ledvina, and D.A. Brain, “Venus Express observations of atmospheric oxygen escape during the passage of several coronal mass ejections”, J. Geophys. Res., 113, 2008. McElroy, M. B., M. J. Prather, J. M. Rodiquez, " Loss

  7. Risk Analysis and Prediction of Floor Failure Mechanisms at Longwall Face in Parvadeh-I Coal Mine using Rock Engineering System (RES)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aghababaei, Sajjad; Saeedi, Gholamreza; Jalalifar, Hossein

    2016-05-01

    The floor failure at longwall face decreases productivity and safety, increases operation costs, and causes other serious problems. In Parvadeh-I coal mine, the timber is used to prevent the puncture of powered support base into the floor. In this paper, a rock engineering system (RES)-based model is presented to evaluate the risk of floor failure mechanisms at the longwall face of E 2 and W 1 panels. The presented model is used to determine the most probable floor failure mechanism, effective factors, damaged regions and remedial actions. From the analyzed results, it is found that soft floor failure is dominant in the floor failure mechanism at Parvadeh-I coal mine. The average of vulnerability index (VI) for soft, buckling and compressive floor failure mechanisms was estimated equal to 52, 43 and 30 for both panels, respectively. By determining the critical VI for soft floor failure mechanism equal to 54, the percentage of regions with VIs beyond the critical VI in E 2 and W 1 panels is equal to 65.5 and 30, respectively. The percentage of damaged regions showed that the excess amount of used timber to prevent the puncture of weak floor below the powered support base is equal to 4,180,739 kg. RES outputs and analyzed results showed that setting and yielding load of powered supports, length of face, existent water at face, geometry of powered supports, changing the cutting pattern at longwall face and limiting the panels to damaged regions with supercritical VIs could be considered to control the soft floor failure in this mine. The results of this research could be used as a useful tool to identify the damaged regions prior to mining operation at longwall panel for the same conditions.

  8. Growth and stress-induced transformation of zinc blende AlN layers in Al-AlN-TiN multilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Nan; Yadav, Satyesh K.; Wang, Jian; Liu, Xiang -Yang; Misra, Amit

    2015-12-18

    We report that AlN nanolayers in sputter deposited {111}Al/AlN/TiN multilayers exhibit the metastable zinc-blende-structure (z-AlN). Based on density function theory calculations, the growth of the z-AlN is ascribed to the kinetically and energetically favored nitridation of the deposited aluminium layer. In situ nanoindentation of the as-deposited {111}Al/AlN/TiN multilayers in a high-resolution transmission electron microscope revealed the z-AlN to wurzite AlN phase transformation through collective glide of Shockley partial dislocations on every two {111} planes of the z-AlN.

  9. Growth and Stress-induced Transformation of Zinc blende AlN Layers in Al-AlN-TiN Multilayers

    PubMed Central

    Li, Nan; Yadav, Satyesh K.; Wang, Jian; Liu, Xiang-Yang; Misra, Amit

    2015-01-01

    AlN nanolayers in sputter deposited {111}Al/AlN/TiN multilayers exhibit the metastable zinc-blende-structure (z-AlN). Based on density function theory calculations, the growth of the z-AlN is ascribed to the kinetically and energetically favored nitridation of the deposited aluminium layer. In situ nanoindentation of the as-deposited {111}Al/AlN/TiN multilayers in a high-resolution transmission electron microscope revealed the z-AlN to wurzite AlN phase transformation through collective glide of Shockley partial dislocations on every two {111} planes of the z-AlN. PMID:26681109

  10. Growth and Stress-induced Transformation of Zinc blende AlN Layers in Al-AlN-TiN Multilayers.

    PubMed

    Li, Nan; Yadav, Satyesh K; Wang, Jian; Liu, Xiang-Yang; Misra, Amit

    2015-01-01

    AlN nanolayers in sputter deposited {111}Al/AlN/TiN multilayers exhibit the metastable zinc-blende-structure (z-AlN). Based on density function theory calculations, the growth of the z-AlN is ascribed to the kinetically and energetically favored nitridation of the deposited aluminium layer. In situ nanoindentation of the as-deposited {111}Al/AlN/TiN multilayers in a high-resolution transmission electron microscope revealed the z-AlN to wurzite AlN phase transformation through collective glide of Shockley partial dislocations on every two {111} planes of the z-AlN. PMID:26681109

  11. Reply to Vance et al.

    SciTech Connect

    Woon-Chee Yee; Elliott, J.L; Kwon, J.M.; Goodfellow, P.

    1996-07-01

    In our report of a family with a motor and sensory polyneuropathy that was linked to chromosome 3q, we classified this neuropathy as a form of hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy II (HMSN II, also known as {open_quotes}CMT2{close_quotes}). Doubts have been raised by Vance et al. as to whether this neuropathy should be classified as hereditary sensory autonomic neuropathy I (HSAN I) instead of HMSN II. While it is reasonable to raise such doubts, we believe that the neuropathy is best designated as HMSN II for the reasons described below. The group of disorders described as HSAN are characterized by primary or predominant involvement of sensory and autonomic neurons that fail to develop or that undergo atrophy and degeneration. These disorders were extensively reviewed by Dyck and Ohta, who initially described them as the hereditary sensory neuropathies (HSN). It was Dyck who subsequently suggested that these disorders be designated HSAN rather than HSN, because of the presence of autonomic involvement. 8 refs.

  12. Effects of Al Contents on Carburization Behavior and Corrosion Resistance of TiAl Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Cui Jiao; He, Yue Hui; Ming, Xing Zu

    2015-10-01

    TiAl alloys with Al contents of 30.7, 37, 46.5, and 54.2 at.% were carburized. Corrosion resistance of the untreated and the carburized TiAl alloys was comparatively analyzed. The phase and microstructure of the carburized TiAl alloys were studied by x-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy, respectively. Electrochemical corrosion behavior of the untreated and the carburized TiAl alloys was investigated using potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. Experimental results indicate that different Al contents bring about distinct microstructure of the carburized layers. The lower Al content leads to the formation of the thicker binary carbides and the thinner Ti2AlC phase. Additionally, the lower Al content leads to higher corrosion resistance in the untreated and the carburized states.

  13. Orientation relationship of eutectoid FeAl and FeAl2

    PubMed Central

    Scherf, A.; Kauffmann, A.; Kauffmann-Weiss, S.; Scherer, T.; Li, X.; Stein, F.; Heilmaier, M.

    2016-01-01

    Fe–Al alloys in the aluminium range of 55–65 at.% exhibit a lamellar microstructure of B2-ordered FeAl and triclinic FeAl2, which is caused by a eutectoid decomposition of the high-temperature Fe5Al8 phase, the so-called ∊ phase. The orientation relationship of FeAl and FeAl2 has previously been studied by Bastin et al. [J. Cryst. Growth (1978 ▸), 43, 745] and Hirata et al. [Philos. Mag. Lett. (2008 ▸), 88, 491]. Since both results are based on different crystallographic data regarding FeAl2, the data are re-evaluated with respect to a recent re-determination of the FeAl2 phase provided by Chumak et al. [Acta Cryst. (2010 ▸), C66, i87]. It is found that both orientation relationships match subsequent to a rotation operation of 180° about a 〈112〉 crystallographic axis of FeAl or by applying the inversion symmetry of the FeAl2 crystal structure as suggested by the Chumak data set. Experimental evidence for the validity of the previously determined orientation relationships was found in as-cast fully lamellar material (random texture) as well as directionally solidified material (∼〈110〉FeAl || solidification direction) by means of orientation imaging microscopy and global texture measurements. In addition, a preferential interface between FeAl and FeAl2 was identified by means of trace analyses using cross sectioning with a focused ion beam. On the basis of these habit planes the orientation relationship between the two phases can be described by (01)FeAl || (114) and [111]FeAl || [10]. There is no evidence for twinning within FeAl lamellae or alternating orientations of FeAl lamellae. Based on the determined orientation and interface data, an atomistic model of the structure relationship of Fe5Al8, FeAl and FeAl2 in the vicinity of the eutectoid decomposition is derived. This model is analysed with respect to the strain which has to be accommodated at the interface of FeAl and FeAl2. PMID:27047304

  14. Comments on Hynes et al. Prevalence of Marijuana Use among University Students in Bolivia, Colombia, Ecuador and Peru. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2015, 12, 5233-5240.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Novack, Maria Claudia; Ortiz-Ortiz, Maria Teresa; Castañeda-Carbajal, Bruno; Alvarado, German F

    2015-09-01

    We have read and analyzed the article entitled "Prevalence of marijuana use among university students in Bolivia, Colombia, Ecuador and Peru". We propose some objective points which could enhance the internal validity of the study (i.e., we suggest to report participation proportions). PMID:26393629

  15. Comments on Hynes et al. Prevalence of Marijuana Use among University Students in Bolivia, Colombia, Ecuador and Peru. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2015, 12, 5233–5240

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Novack, Maria Claudia; Ortiz-Ortiz, Maria Teresa; Castañeda-Carbajal, Bruno; Alvarado, German F.

    2015-01-01

    We have read and analyzed the article entitled “Prevalence of marijuana use among university students in Bolivia, Colombia, Ecuador and Peru”. We propose some objective points which could enhance the internal validity of the study (i.e., we suggest to report participation proportions). PMID:26393629

  16. Response to the Svingen Comments on Li et al. Effects of in Utero Exposure to Dicyclohexyl Phthalate on Rat Fetal Leydig Cells. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health, 2016, 13, 246.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaoheng; Chen, Xiaomin; Hu, Guoxin; Li, Linxi; Su, Huina; Wang, Yiyan; Chen, Dongxin; Zhu, Qiqi; Li, Chao; Li, Junwei; Wang, Mingcang; Lian, Qingquan; Ge, Ren-Shan

    2016-01-01

    Referring to the comments of Svingen [1] on our latest publication about Effects of in utero Exposure to Dicyclohexyl Phthalate on Rat Fetal Leydig Cells [2], we would like to give some comments.[...]. PMID:27231929

  17. Addendum: shiue, I.; et Al. 2014 future Earth young scientists conference on integrated science and knowledge co-production for ecosystems and human well-being. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public health 2014, 11, 11553-11558.

    PubMed

    Shiue, Ivy; Samberg, Leah; Kulohoma, Benard; Dogaru, Diana; Wyborn, Carina; Hamel, Perrine; Jørgensen, Peter Søgaard; Lussier, Paul; Sundaram, Bharath; Lim, Michelle; Tironi, Antonio

    2015-02-01

    The authors would like to add the following affiliation for Peter Søgaard Jørgensen of paper [1]:   8 International Network of Next-Generation Ecologists, Universitetsparken 15, Building 3, Copenhagen 2100, Denmark[...]. PMID:25685955

  18. Tensile Behavior of Al2o3/feal + B and Al2o3/fecraly Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Draper, S. L.; Eldridge, J. I.; Aiken, B. J. M.

    1995-01-01

    The feasibility of Al2O3/FeAl + B and Al2O3/FeCrAlY composites for high-temperature applications was assessed. The major emphasis was on tensile behavior of both the monolithics and composites from 298 to 1100 K. However, the study also included determining the chemical compatibility of the composites, measuring the interfacial shear strengths, and investigating the effect of processing on the strength of the single-crystal Al2O3 fibers. The interfacial shear strengths were low for Al203/FeAl + B and moderate to high for Al203/FeCrAlY. The difference in interfacial bond strengths between the two systems affected the tensile behavior of the composites. The strength of the Al203 fiber was significantly degraded after composite processing for both composite systems and resulted in poor composite tensile properties. The ultimate tensile strength (UTS) values of the composites could generally be predicted with either rule of mixtures (ROM) calculations or existing models when using the strength of the etched-out fiber. The Al2O3/FeAl + B composite system was determined to be unfeasible due to poor interfacial shear strengths and a large mismatch in coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE). Development of the Al2O3/FeCrAlY system would require an effective diffusion barrier to minimize the fiber strength degradation during processing and elevated temperature service.

  19. A New Phase in ALS Research.

    PubMed

    Chong, P Andrew; Forman-Kay, Julie D

    2016-09-01

    In this issue of Structure, Conicella et al. (2016) present evidence that the low complexity C-terminal region of TDP-43 undergoes liquid-liquid phase separation. ALS-associated mutations alter this phase separation process, providing a possible mechanism for the pathology caused by these TDP-43 mutations. The work is strongly supportive of toxic loss of RNA processing function in ALS. PMID:27602988

  20. Memory deficits and retrieval processes in ALS.

    PubMed

    Mantovan, M C; Baggio, L; Dalla Barba, G; Smith, P; Pegoraro, E; Soraru', G; Bonometto, P; Angelini, C

    2003-05-01

    Subtle neuropsychological deficits have been described in patients affected by amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) without dementia. Overall, selective impairment in memory function has been reported, but the source of memory impairment in ALS has yet to be defined. We performed neuropsychological screening in 20 ALS patients. Semantic encoding and post-encoding cue effects on the retrieval of word lists were investigated in the ALS patients and normal controls. Severity of memory impairment was correlated to cerebral blood perfusion detected by single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). ALS patients showed moderate impairments in frontal and memory tests. Short-term memory was normal, while serial position retrieval of word lists with normal recency effect but poor primacy effect showed long-term memory deficit. ALS patients performed better in cued encoding than in cued post-encoding recall condition. In the cued post-encoding condition, the primacy effect in word list recall improved significantly in controls, but not in ALS patients, as compared with both the free recall and cued encoding conditions. SPECT hypoperfusion was observed in frontal and temporal areas in ALS patients. ALS patients showed a long-term memory deficit which did not improve in cued post-encoding condition as it does for controls. We hypothesize abnormal retrieval processes related to frontal lobe dysfunction which entails difficulties in generating stable long-memory traces at encoding. PMID:12752394

  1. Interfacial Phenomena in Al/Al, Al/Cu, and Cu/Cu Joints Soldered Using an Al-Zn Alloy with Ag or Cu Additions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pstruś, Janusz; Gancarz, Tomasz

    2014-05-01

    The studies of soldered joints were carried out in systems: Al/solder/Al, Al/solder/Cu, Cu/solder/Cu, where the solder was (Al-Zn)EUT, (Al-Zn)EUT with 0.5, 1.0, and 1.5 at.% of Ag and (Al-Zn)EUT with 0.5, 1.0, and 1.5 at.% of Cu addition. Brazing was performed at 500 °C for 3 min. The EDS analysis indicated that the composition of the layers starting from the Cu pad was CuZn, Cu5Zn8, and CuZn4, respectively. Wetting tests were performed at 500 °C for 3, 8, 15, and 30 min, respectively. Thickness of the layers and their kinetics of growth were measured based on the SEM micrographs. The formation of interlayers was not observed from the side of Al pads. On the contrary, dissolution of the Al substrate and migration of Al-rich particles into the bulk of the solder were observed.

  2. Al-doped ZnO nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadam, Pratibha; Agashe, Chitra; Mahamuni, Shailaja

    2008-11-01

    Al3+-doped ZnO nanocrystals were differently obtained by wet chemical and an electrochemical route. An increase in forbidden gap due to change in crystal size and also due to Al3+ doping in ZnO is critically analyzed. The Moss-Burstein type shift in Al3+-doped ZnO nanocrystals provides an evidence of successful Al3+ doping in ZnO nanocrystals. The possibility of varying the carrier concentration in ZnO nanocrystals is the indirect implication of the present investigations.

  3. Genetics of Familial and Sporadic ALS

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-21

    Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS); Familial Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis; Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis With Frontotemporal Dementia; Lou Gehrig's Disease; Motor Neuron Disease; Primary Lateral Sclerosis

  4. Major water-related episodes on the lowlands of Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fairén, A. G.; Dohm, J. M.; Baker, V. R.

    2003-04-01

    in Arabia Terra, where the initial shoreline might have been as far south as Sinus Meridani (Edgett and Parker, 1997), forming an almost equipotential line (total elevation differences are ˜2 km) that we name Contact 0, which is also consistent with the location of the boundary in crustal thickness dichotomy, as deduced from topography and gravity data (Zuber et al., 2000), and with the locus of debouch of almost every valley network in Arabia (Edgett and Parker, 1997; Carr, 2002); a Late Hesperian sea, which would have extended over the deeper areas in the lowlands inset within the boundary of the first great ocean, and so portrayed by Contact 2; and a number of widely distributed minor lakes that may represent a reduced Late Hesperian sea, or ponded waters in the deepest reaches of the northern plains related to minor Tharsis (e.g., Anderson et al., 2001) and Elysium (Skinner and Tanaka, 2001) induced Amazonian flooding. Possible biologic evolution throughout the resulting different climatic and hydrologic conditions would account for very distinct metabolic pathways for hypothesized organisms capable of surviving and perhaps evolving in each aqueous environment, those that existed in the dry and cold periods between the flood inundations, and those organisms that could survive both extremes. Terrestrial microbiota, chemolithotrophic and heterotrophic bacteria, provide exciting analogues for such potential extremophile existence in Mars, especially where long-lived, magmatic-driven hydrothermal activity is indicated (Farmer and Des Marais, 1999). Such Martian environments and related materials and life forms may have been excavated to the surface by catastrophic outflows making targets readily available for sampling and in-deep analyses. References Anderson, R. C. et al.: Primary centers and secondary concentrations of tectonic activity through time in western hemisphere of Mars. J. Geophys. Res. 106, 20 563--20 585, 2001. Baker, V.R., et al.: Ancient oceans, ice

  5. Processing and Mechanical Properties of Directionally Solidified NiAl/NiAlTa Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, D. R.; Oliver, B. F.; Noebe, R. D.; Whittenberger, J. D.

    1994-01-01

    Promising creep strengths were found for a directionally solidified NiAl-NiAlTa alloy when compared to other NiAl based intermetallics. The directionally solidified alloy had an off-eutectic composition that resulted in microstructures consisting of NiAl dendrites surrounded by aligned eutectic regions. The room temperature toughness of the two phase alloy was similar to that of polycrystalline NiAl even with the presence of the brittle Laves phase NiAlTa. Alloying additions that may improve the room temperature toughness by producing multiphase alloys are discussed.

  6. Effects of the Al content on pore structures of porous TieAl alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Y; He, Y H; Zou, J; Huang, B; Liu, C

    2008-01-01

    PorousTi Alalloys with different nominal compositions were fabricated through a reactive synthesis of Ti and Al elemental powders. It has been found that the pore parameters vary with the Al contents, indicating that the nature of the pores can be manipulated through changing the Al contents. In addition, detailed structural characterizations showed that the fabricated porousTi Alalloys can have three crystalline phases (i.e., 2-Ti3Al, -TiAl, and TiAl3) when using different compositions. The fundamental reasons behind these phenomena have been explored.

  7. Systematic High-Resolution Remote-Sensing Investigation of Martian South Polar Landforms: Thermal Contraction Polygons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Gasselt, Stephan; Hao, Jingyan

    2015-04-01

    landforms and combine results of two polar surveys. The work presented here provides a detailed assessment of data coverage, a review of polygonal landform types and of their distribution based on CTX observations. [1] Thomas et al. (2000): Nature, 404(6774): 161-164. [2] Kieffer (2003): 6th Int. Conf. Mars, #3158. [3] Piqueux & Christensen (2008): J. Geophys. Res., 113(E2), CiteID E02006. [4] Mangold (2005): Icarus, 174(2): 336-359. [5] van Gasselt et al. (2006): Europ. Planet. Sci. Congr., #629. [6] van Gasselt et al. (2005): J. Geophys. Res., 110(E8), CiteID E08002. [7] Byrne & Ingersoll (2003): Science, 299(5609): 1,057-1,053 [8] Piqueux et al. (2003): J. Geophys. Res., 108(E8), CiteID 5084. [9] Pilorget et al. (2013): J. Geophys. Res. 118(12): 2,520-2,536. [10] James et al. (2010): Icarus, 208(1): 82-85. [11] Portyankina et al. (2010): Icarus, 205(1): 311-320. [12] Thomas et al. (2010): Icarus, 205(1): 296-310. [13] Hansen et al. (2010): Icarus, 205(1): 283-295.

  8. Thermophysical Properties of the Lunar Surface from Diviner Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayne, Paul; Bandfield, Joshua; Vasavada, Ashwin; Ghent, Rebecca; Siegler, Matthew; Williams, Jean-Pierre; Greenhagen, Benjamin; Aharonson, Oded; Paige, David

    2013-04-01

    explained by the emplacement of ejecta, and instead are well modeled by the in situ decompression of the top ~1-10 cm of regolith. Among a variety of explanations for this phenomenon, a model of grain lifting and turbulent mixing within an expanding vapor cloud best matches observations. The Diviner observations suggest impact vaporization leads to prominent yet ephemeral scars in the upper regolith that may be common on airless bodies in the Solar System. Surface roughness at scales smaller than the ~250 m Diviner footprint affects the measured spectral slope in brightness temperatures. We used Diviner brightness temperature spectra measured at a variety of solar illumination and viewing geometries to constrain and map the RMS slopes of the Moon's surface [6]. Due to the general increase in roughness at smaller scales, the RMS slopes of ~20-30° derived from Diviner data are likely dominated by the smallest scales where strong temperature gradients can exist, which are of order millimeters for typical lunar regolith [7,8]. Thus, these measurements complement those acquired by other techniques, such as laser altimetry [9], which typically measure surface roughness at scales larger than one meter. [1] Paige D. A., et al. (2009) Space Sci. Rev., 150, 135-160. [2] Bandfield J. L., et al. (2011) J. Geophys. Res., 116, E00H02. [3] Vasavada A. R., et al. (2012), J. Geophys. Res., 117, E00H18. [4] Ghent R., et al. (2012) AGU Fall Mtg., #P42A-07. [5] Hayne P. O., et al. (2013) Lunar and Planet. Sci. Conf. XLIV. [6] Hayne P. O., et al. (2013) Lunar and Planet. Sci. Conf. XLIII, #2829. [7] Buhl D., et al. (1968) J. Geophys. Res., 73, 5281-5295. [8] Williams J-P., et al. (2012) EPSC-DPS2011, vol. 6, 1678. [9] Rosenburg M. A., et al (2011), J. Geophys. Res., 116, E02001.

  9. Multi-scale dynamical analysis (MSDA) of sea level records versus PDO, AMO, and NAO indexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scafetta, N.

    2014-07-01

    Herein I propose a multi-scale dynamical analysis to facilitate the physical interpretation of tide gauge records. The technique uses graphical diagrams. It is applied to six secular-long tide gauge records representative of the world oceans: Sydney, Pacific coast of Australia; Fremantle, Indian Ocean coast of Australia; New York City, Atlantic coast of USA; Honolulu, US state of Hawaii; San Diego, US state of California; and Venice, Mediterranean Sea, Italy. For comparison, an equivalent analysis is applied to the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO) index and to the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation (AMO) index. Finally, a global reconstruction of sea level (Jevrejeva et al. in Geophys Res Lett 35:L08715, 2008) and a reconstruction of the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) index (Luterbacher et al. in Geophys Res Lett 26:2745-2748, 1999) are analyzed and compared: both sequences cover about three centuries from 1700 to 2000. The proposed methodology quickly highlights oscillations and teleconnections among the records at the decadal and multidecadal scales. At the secular time scales tide gauge records present relatively small (positive or negative) accelerations, as found in other studies (Houston and Dean in J Coast Res 27:409-417, 2011). On the contrary, from the decadal to the secular scales (up to 110-year intervals) the tide gauge accelerations oscillate significantly from positive to negative values mostly following the PDO, AMO and NAO oscillations. In particular, the influence of a large quasi 60-70 year natural oscillation is clearly demonstrated in these records. The multiscale dynamical evolutions of the rate and of the amplitude of the annual seasonal cycle of the chosen six tide gauge records are also studied.

  10. Response to Signorovitch et al.

    PubMed

    Flot, Jean-François; Debortoli, Nicolas; Hallet, Bernard; Van Doninck, Karine

    2016-08-22

    Signorovitch et al.[1] comment that an Oenothera-like meiosis [2] could produce a pattern similar to what we observed in our study of natural isolates of the bdelloid rotifer Adineta vaga, which we attributed to horizontal gene transfers (HGTs) [3]. Indeed, our HGT hypothesis appears at first sight difficult to conciliate with their observation of a congruent pattern of allele sharing at four large loci possibly located on different chromosomes [4]. However, one might imagine conditions under which massive horizontal gene transfer between bdelloid individuals could produce such a pattern, notably if the individuals involved had previously lost most of their heterozygosity because of their exposure to frequent desiccation (which produces DNA double-strand breaks [5]). In the published A. vaga genome the loss of heterozygosity due to large-scale gene conversion events or break-induced replication covers only about 10% of the genome [6], but this percentage may be much higher in environmental isolates that often experience dessication. Besides, if an Oenothera-like mode of meiosis occurs in bdelloids frequently enough to be detected in a single sampling of 29 individuals (as in [4]), one would expect males and meiosis to be observed at least occasionally, and instances of congruent allele sharing across loci should turn up frequently in genetic surveys. This was not the case in [3]: among the 82 A. vaga individuals sequenced for four nuclear markers, no trio of individuals presented congruent patterns of shared sequences at different loci. For these reasons, and in the absence of any direct evidence for an Oenothera-like meiosis in bdelloids, we still consider inter-bdelloid HGTs a more parsimonious explanation for our results. PMID:27554651

  11. Atomic structure and oxygen deficiency of the ultrathin aluminium oxide barrier in Al/AlOx/Al Josephson junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Lunjie; Tran, Dung Trung; Tai, Cheuk-Wai; Svensson, Gunnar; Olsson, Eva

    2016-07-01

    Al/AlOx/Al Josephson junctions are the building blocks of a wide range of superconducting quantum devices that are key elements for quantum computers, extremely sensitive magnetometers and radiation detectors. The properties of the junctions and the superconducting quantum devices are determined by the atomic structure of the tunnel barrier. The nanoscale dimension and disordered nature of the barrier oxide have been challenges for the direct experimental investigation of the atomic structure of the tunnel barrier. Here we show that the miniaturized dimension of the barrier and the interfacial interaction between crystalline Al and amorphous AlOx give rise to oxygen deficiency at the metal/oxide interfaces. In the interior of the barrier, the oxide resembles the atomic structure of bulk aluminium oxide. Atomic defects such as oxygen vacancies at the interfaces can be the origin of the two-level systems and contribute to decoherence and noise in superconducting quantum circuits.

  12. Atomic structure and oxygen deficiency of the ultrathin aluminium oxide barrier in Al/AlOx/Al Josephson junctions

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Lunjie; Tran, Dung Trung; Tai, Cheuk-Wai; Svensson, Gunnar; Olsson, Eva

    2016-01-01

    Al/AlOx/Al Josephson junctions are the building blocks of a wide range of superconducting quantum devices that are key elements for quantum computers, extremely sensitive magnetometers and radiation detectors. The properties of the junctions and the superconducting quantum devices are determined by the atomic structure of the tunnel barrier. The nanoscale dimension and disordered nature of the barrier oxide have been challenges for the direct experimental investigation of the atomic structure of the tunnel barrier. Here we show that the miniaturized dimension of the barrier and the interfacial interaction between crystalline Al and amorphous AlOx give rise to oxygen deficiency at the metal/oxide interfaces. In the interior of the barrier, the oxide resembles the atomic structure of bulk aluminium oxide. Atomic defects such as oxygen vacancies at the interfaces can be the origin of the two-level systems and contribute to decoherence and noise in superconducting quantum circuits. PMID:27403611

  13. Atomic structure and oxygen deficiency of the ultrathin aluminium oxide barrier in Al/AlOx/Al Josephson junctions.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Lunjie; Tran, Dung Trung; Tai, Cheuk-Wai; Svensson, Gunnar; Olsson, Eva

    2016-01-01

    Al/AlOx/Al Josephson junctions are the building blocks of a wide range of superconducting quantum devices that are key elements for quantum computers, extremely sensitive magnetometers and radiation detectors. The properties of the junctions and the superconducting quantum devices are determined by the atomic structure of the tunnel barrier. The nanoscale dimension and disordered nature of the barrier oxide have been challenges for the direct experimental investigation of the atomic structure of the tunnel barrier. Here we show that the miniaturized dimension of the barrier and the interfacial interaction between crystalline Al and amorphous AlOx give rise to oxygen deficiency at the metal/oxide interfaces. In the interior of the barrier, the oxide resembles the atomic structure of bulk aluminium oxide. Atomic defects such as oxygen vacancies at the interfaces can be the origin of the two-level systems and contribute to decoherence and noise in superconducting quantum circuits. PMID:27403611

  14. Effects of Perchlorate on Organic Molecules under Simulated Mars Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrier, B. L.; Kounaves, S. P.

    2014-12-01

    Perchlorate (ClO4-) was discovered in the northern polar region of Mars by the Mars Phoenix Lander in 2008 and has also been recently detected by the Curiosity Rover in Gale Crater [1,2]. Perchlorate has also been shown to be formed under current Mars conditions via the oxidation of mineral chlorides, further supporting the theory that perchlorate is present globally on Mars [3]. The discovery of perchlorate on Mars has raised important questions about the effects of perchlorate on the survival and detection of organic molecules. Although it has been shown that pyrolysis in the presence of perchlorate results in the alteration or destruction of organic molecules [4], few studies have been conducted on the potential effects of perchlorate on organic molecules under martian surface conditions. Although perchlorate is typically inert under Mars-typical temperatures [5], perchlorate does absorb high energy UV radiation, and has been shown to decompose to form reactive oxychlorine species such as chlorite (ClO2-) when exposed to martian conditions including UV or ionizing radiation [6,7]. Here we investigate the effects of perchlorate on the organic molecules tryptophan, benzoic acid and mellitic acid in order to determine how perchlorate may alter these compounds under Mars conditions. Experiments are performed in a Mars Simulation Chamber (MSC) capable of reproducing the temperature, pressure, atmospheric composition and UV flux found on Mars. Soil simulants are prepared consisting of SiO2 and each organic, as well as varying concentrations of perchlorate salts, and exposed in the MSC. Subsequent to exposure in the MSC samples are leached and the leachate analyzed by HPLC and LC-MS to determine the degree of degradation of the original organic and the identity of any potential decomposition products formed by oxidation or chlorination. References: [1] Kounaves et al., J. Geophys. Res. Planets, Vol. 115, p. E00E10, 2010 [2] Glavin et al., J. Geophys. Res. Planets, Vol

  15. Magnetic Reconnection Controls Impacts of Solar Wind Ions at Mercury's Surface : Investigation By Global Hybrid Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chanteur, G. M.; Modolo, R.; Leblanc, F.

    2014-12-01

    MESSENGER has revealed the complexity of the Hermean magnetic field which is dominated by dipolar and quadrupolar components (Anderson et al., 2012 and references therein). By contrast to other magnetized planets having large scale dynamo driven magnetic fields Mercury has a quadrupolar field large enough to reinforce the dipolar field at high northern latitudes and to shape the topology of the planetary field in the equatorial region and the southern hemisphere. Magnetic reconnection at Mercury is extremely effective for all IMF orientations [DiBraccio et al., JGR, 2013]. Global hybrid simulations by Richer et al. (2012) have demonstrated the dramatic influence of the quadrupolar field of Mercury on the topology of the Hermean magnetosphere. Then Chanteur et al. (AOGS 2014) have investigated the impacts of solar wind protons and alphas on Mercury's surface with the same hybrid code and have presented a case study to demonstrate the importance of magnetic reconnection between the IMF and the planetary field in this process. We will present a set of different results corresponding to different configurations depending upon the IMF orientation and solar wind parameters. References Anderson, B. J., C. L. Johnson, H. Korth, R. M. Winslow, J. E. Borovsky, M. E. Purucker, J. A. Slavin, S. C. Solomon, M. T. Zuber, and R. L. McNutt Jr. (2012), Low-degree structure in Mercury's planetary magnetic field, J. Geophys. Res., 117, E00L12, doi:10.1029/2012JE004159. DiBraccio, G. A., J. A. Slavin, S. A. Boardsen, B. J. Anderson, H. Korth, T. H. Zurbuchen, J. M. Raines, D. N. Baker, R. L. McNutt Jr., and S. C. Solomon (2013), MESSENGER observations of magnetopause structure and dynamics at Mercury, J. Geophys. Res. Space Phys., 118, 997-1008, doi:10.1002/jgra50123. Richer, E., R. Modolo, G. M. Chanteur, S. Hess, and F. Leblanc (2012), A global hybrid model for Mercury's interaction with the solar wind: Case study of the dipole representation, J. Geophys. Res., 117, A10228, doi:10

  16. Density measurements and structural properties of liquid and amorphous metals under high pressure studied by in situ X-ray scattering (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morard, G.; Garbarino, G.; Andrault, D.; Antonangeli, D.; Guignot, N.; Siebert, J.; Roberge, M.; Boulard, E.; Lincot, A.; Denoeud, A.; Petitgirard, S.

    2013-12-01

    Density determination for crystalline materials under high pressure and high temperature is straightforward using X-ray diffraction. For liquid and amorphous materials, it is more complicated due to the absence of long-range order. Different high pressure techniques have been developed: in-situ X-ray absorption 1-4 or ex-situ sink/float method 5-8. However, these techniques suffer several limitations, such as the limited pressure range or the long exposure time required. We have implemented an in situ X-ray diffraction analysis method suitable for the determination of Pressure-Volume-Temperature equations of state (P-V-T EoS) in the critical case of liquid and amorphous materials over an extended thermodynamic range (T>2000 K and P> 40 GPa). This method is versatile, it can be applied to data obtained using various angle-dispersive X-ray diffraction high-pressure apparatus and, contrary to in situ X-ray absorption techniques, is independent from the sample geometry. Further advantage is the fast data acquisition (between 10 to 300 seconds integration time). Information on macroscopic bulk properties (density) and local atomic arrangement (pair distribution function g(r)) can be gathered in parallel. To illustrate the method, we present studies on liquid Fe-S alloys in Paris Edinburgh press and in laser-heated diamond anvil cell, and measurements on Ce glass in diamond anvil cell at room temperature. References 1 G. Shen, N. Sata, M. Newville et al., App. Phys. Lett. 81 (8), 1411 (2002). 2 C. Sanloup, F. Guyot, P. Gillet et al., Geophys. Res. Lett. 27 (6), 811 (2000). 3 Y. Katayama, K. Tsuji, O. Shimomura et al., J. Synch. Rad. 5, 1023 (1998). 4 T. Sato and N. Funamori, Phys. Rev. Lett. 101, 255502 (2008). 5 R. Knoche and R. W. Luth, Chem. Geol. 128, 229 (1996). 6 P.S. Balog, R.A. Secco, D.C. Rubie et al., J. Geophys. Res. 108 (B2), 2124 (2003). 7 C. B. Agee and D. Walker, J. Geophys. Res. 93 (B4), 3437 (1988). 8 E. Ohtani, A. Suzuki, and T. Kato, Proc. Jpn. Acad

  17. Computational materials design of attractive Fermion system with large negative effective Ueff in the hole-doped Delafossite of CuAlO2, AgAlO2 and AuAlO2: Charge-excitation induced Ueff < 0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakanishi, A.; Fukushima, T.; Uede, H.; Katayama-Yoshida, H.

    2015-12-01

    On the basis of general design rules for negative effective U(Ueff) systems by controlling purely-electronic and attractive Fermion mechanisms, we perform computational materials design (CMD®) for the negative Ueff system in hole-doped two-dimensional (2D) Delafossite CuAlO2, AgAlO2 and AuAlO2 by ab initio calculations with local density approximation (LDA) and self-interaction corrected-LDA (SIC-LDA). It is found that the large negative Ueff in the hole-doped attractive Fermion systems for CuAlO2 (UeffLDA = - 4.53 eV and UeffSIC-LDA = - 4.20 eV), AgAlO2 (UeffLDA = - 4.88 eV and UeffSIC-LDA = - 4.55 eV) and AuAlO2 (UeffLDA = - 4.14 eV and UeffSIC-LDA = - 3.55 eV). These values are 10 times larger than that in hole-doped three-dimensional (3D) CuFeS2 (Ueff = - 0.44 eV). For future calculations of Tc and phase diagram by quantum Monte Carlo simulations, we propose the negative Ueff Hubbard model with the anti-bonding single π-band model for CuAlO2, AgAlO2 and AuAlO2 using the mapped parameters obtained from ab initio electronic structure calculations. Based on the theory of negative Ueff Hubbard model (Noziéres and Schmitt-Rink, 1985), we discuss |Ueff| dependence of superconducting critical temperature (Tc) in the 2D Delafossite of CuAlO2, AgAlO2 and AuAlO2 and 3D Chalcopyrite of CuFeS2, which shows the interesting chemical trend, i.e., Tc increases exponentially (Tc ∝ exp [ - 1 / | Ueff | ]) in the weak coupling regime | Ueff(- 0.44 eV) | < W(∼ 2 eV) (where W is the band width of the negative Ueff Hubbard model) for the hole-doped CuFeS2, and then Tc goes through a maximum when | Ueff(- 4.88 eV , - 4.14 eV) | ∼ W(2.8 eV , 3.5 eV) for the hole-doped AgAlO2 and AuAlO2, and finally Tc decreases with increasing |Ueff| in the strong coupling regime, where | Ueff(- 4.53 eV) | > W(1.7 eV) , for the hole-doped CuAlO2.

  18. Durability Assessment of TiAl Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Draper, Susan L.; Lerch, Bradley A.

    2008-01-01

    The durability of TiAl is a prime concern for the implementation of TiAl into aerospace engines. Two durability issues, the effect of high temperature exposure on mechanical properties and impact resistance, have been investigated and the results are summarized in this paper. Exposure to elevated temperatures has been shown to be detrimental to the room temperature ductility of gamma alloys with the most likely mechanisms being the ingress of interstitials from the surface. Fluorine ion implantation has been shown to improve the oxidation resistance of gamma alloys, and ideally it could also improve the environmental embrittlement of high Nb content TiAl alloys. The effect of F ion implantation on the surface oxidation and embrittlement of a third generation, high Nb content TiAl alloy (Ti-45Al-5Nb-B-C) were investigated. Additionally, the ballistic impact resistance of a variety of gamma alloys, including Ti-48Al-2Cr- 2Nb, Ti-47Al-2Cr-2Nb, ABB-2, ABB-23, NCG359E, 95A and Ti-45Al-5Nb-B-C was accessed. Differences in the ballistic impact properties of the various alloys will be discussed, particularly with respect to their manufacturing process, microstructure, and tensile properties.

  19. 76 FR 18783 - United States et al.

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-05

    ... Antitrust Division United States et al. v. Dean Foods Company; Proposed Final Judgment, Stipulation and... of America, et al. v. Dean Foods Company, Civil Action No. 2:10-cv-00059 (JPS). On January 22, 2010, the United States and its co-plaintiffs filed a Complaint alleging that Dean Foods...

  20. Diana Al-Hadid: Identity and Heritage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jungerberg, Tom; Smith, Anna; Borsh, Colleen

    2012-01-01

    Diana Al-Hadid's sculptures reflect the many locations, cultures, histories, and mythologies that have shaped her as an artist. In large-scale works which have the appearance of architectural ruins, Al-Hadid employs imagery drawn from many diverse interests including science and technology, history, and literature. She also incorporates images and…

  1. 75 FR 62858 - United States, et al.

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-13

    ... Antitrust Division United States, et al. v. American Express Company, et al.; Proposed Final Judgment and... been filed with the United States District Court for the Eastern District of New York in United States..., 2010, the United States and seven States filed a Complaint alleging that certain rules, policies,...

  2. Energetics of Al13 Keggin cluster compounds

    PubMed Central

    Armstrong, Christopher R.; Casey, William H.; Navrotsky, Alexandra

    2011-01-01

    The ϵ-Al13 Keggin aluminum hydroxide clusters are essential models in establishing molecular pathways for geochemical reactions. Enthalpies of formation are reported for two salts of aluminum centered ϵ-Keggin clusters, Al13 selenate, (Na(AlO4)Al12(OH)24(SeO4)4•12H2O) and Al13 sulfate, (NaAlO4Al12(OH)24(SO4)4•12H2O). The measured enthalpies of solution, ΔHsol, at 28 °C in 5 N HCl for the ε-Al13 selenate and sulfate are −924.57 (± 3.83) and −944.30 ( ± 5.66) kJ·mol-1, respectively. The enthalpies of formation from the elements, ΔHf,el, for Al13 selenate and sulfate are −19,656.35 ( ± 67.30) kJ·mol-1, and −20,892.39 ( ± 70.01) kJ·mol-1, respectively. In addition, ΔHf,el for sodium selenate decahydrate was calculated using data from high temperature oxide melt solution calorimetry measurements: −4,006.39 ( ± 11.91) kJ·mol-1. The formation of both ε-Al13 Keggin cluster compounds is exothermic from oxide-based components but energetically unfavorable with respect to a gibbsite-based assemblage. To understand the relative affinity of the ϵ-Keggin clusters for selenate and sulfate, the enthalpy associated with two S-Se exchange reactions was calculated. In the solid state, selenium is favored in the Al13 compound relative to the binary chalcogenate, while in 5 N HCl, sulfur is energetically favored in the cluster compound compared to the aqueous solution. This contribution represents the first thermodynamic study of ε-Al13 cluster compounds and establishes a method for other such molecules, including the substituted versions that have been created for kinetic studies. Underscoring the importance of ε-Al13 clusters in natural and anthropogenic systems, these data provide conclusive thermodynamic evidence that the Al13 Keggin cluster is a crucial intermediate species in the formation pathway from aqueous aluminum monomers to aluminum hydroxide precipitates. PMID:21852572

  3. Nonlinear whistler-mode Chorus Amplification: a lasing mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soto-chavez, A.; Bhattacharjee, A.

    2013-12-01

    A mechanism for chorus wave amplification is presented. We show [1] that the whistler-mode chorus dynamical equations can be put in a form similar to the ones describing the physics of Free-electron lasers (underscoring the well known observational fact that the intensity of whistler-mode chorus demand a quasi-coherent mechanism [2]). We solve these dynamical equations numerically in the nonlinear regime [3]. In this regime our numerical results exhibit strong amplitude modulation and particle trapping, consistent with observations and numerical results previously obtained in the literature. Finally, our model gives simplified analytical expressions of wave growth rate in terms of a few measurable plasma parameters that can be used by observers without further simplification. 1. A. R. Soto-Chavez et al. Phys. Plasmas, 19, 010701, (2012). 2. P. A. Isenberg et al. J. Geophys. Res., 87, 1495, (1982). 3. A. R. Soto-Chavez and A. Bhattacharjee, JGR, (2013) submitted.

  4. Mirror Instability: Quasi-linear Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellinger, P.; Travnicek, P. M.; Passot, T.; Sulem, P.; Kuznetsov, E. A.

    2008-12-01

    Nonlinear properties of the mirror instability are investigated by direct integration of the quasi-linear diffusion equation [Shapiro and Shevchenko, 1964] near threshold. The simulation results are compared to the results of standard hybrid simulations [Califano et al., 2008] and discussed in the context of the nonlinear dynamical model by Kuznetsov et al. [2007]. References: Califano, F., P. Hellinger, E. Kuznetsov, T. Passot, P. L. Sulem, and P. M. Travnicek (2008), Nonlinear mirror mode dynamics: Simulations and modeling, J. Geophys. Res., 113, A08219, doi:10.1029/2007JA012898. Kuznetsov, E., T. Passot and P. L. Sulem (2007), Dynamical model for nonlinear mirror modes near threshold, Phys. Rev. Lett., 98, 235003 . Shapiro, V. D., and V. I. Shevchenko (1964), Quasilinear theory of instability of a plasma with an anisotropic ion velocity distribution, Sov. JETP, 18, 1109.

  5. Characteristics of heat resistant alloys Ti10Nb45Al and Ti18Nb48Al

    SciTech Connect

    Weijun Zhang; Guoliang Chen; Yandong Wang; Zuqing Sun )

    1993-05-01

    Based on a systematic study of the ternary Ti-Nb-Al system, two attractive heat resistant alloys, Ti10Nb45Al and Ti18Nb48Al, were developed, and the characteristics of these alloys were discussed: (1) After annealing at 1,200 C for 240 h and furnace cooling to room temperature, the Ti10Nb45Al alloy exhibits an [alpha][sub 2] + [gamma] lamellar microstructure, and the Ti18Nb48Al alloy shows a plate-like structure consisting of [alpha][sub 2], [gamma] and [gamma][sub 1] phases. (2) The specific strengths of Ti10Nb45Al and Ti18Nb48Al are much higher than TiAl and superalloys in the temperature range of 800 [approximately] 1,100 C. The compressive yield strengths of these alloys are on the order of 700 MPa at 800 C and 350 MPa at 1,100 C. The density of these alloys is about 4.3 g/cm[sup 3]. (3) The annealed Ti10Nb45Al and Ti18Nb48Al exhibit some ductility at room temperature, with the compressive elongation on the order of 12% and the fracture toughness as high as 16 MPa[radical]m. The ductile-brittle transformation temperatures for Ti10Nb45Al and Ti18Nb48Al are 650 C and 750 C, respectively. (4) The parabolic constant K[sub p] for oxidation of Ti10Nb45Al and Ti18Nb48Al are 0.88 and 0.29 mg[sup 2]cm[sup [minus]4]h[sup [minus]1] respectively, which are two orders of magnitude lower than that of TiAl and Ti[sub 3]Al alloys.

  6. Nucleation and Precipitation Strengthening in Dilute Al-Ti and Al-Zr Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knipling, Keith E.; Dunand, David C.; Seidman, David N.

    2007-10-01

    Two conventionally solidified Al-0.2Ti alloys (with 0.18 and 0.22 at. pct Ti) exhibit no hardening after aging up to 3200 hours at 375 °C or 425 °C. This is due to the absence of Al3Ti precipitation, as confirmed by electron microscopy and electrical conductivity measurements. By contrast, an Al-0.2Zr alloy (with 0.19 at. pct Zr) displays strong age hardening at both temperatures due to precipitation of Al3Zr (L12) within Zr-enriched dendritic regions. This discrepancy between the two alloys is explained within the context of the equilibrium phase diagrams: (1) the disparity in solid and liquid solubilities of Ti in α-Al is much greater than that of Zr in α-Al; and (2) the relatively small liquid solubility of Ti in α-Al limits the amount of solute retained in solid solution during solidification, while the comparatively high solid solubility reduces the supersaturation effecting precipitation during post-solidification aging. The lattice parameter mismatch of Al3Ti (L12) with α-Al is also larger than that of Al3Zr (L12), further hindering nucleation of Al3Ti. Classical nucleation theory indicates that the minimum solute supersaturation required to overcome the elastic strain energy of Al3Ti nuclei cannot be obtained during conventional solidification of Al-Ti alloys (unlike for Al-Zr alloys), thus explaining the absence of Al3Ti precipitation and the presence of Al3Zr precipitation.

  7. High temperature creep behaviour of Al-rich Ti-Al alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sturm, D.; Heilmaier, M.; Saage, H.; Aguilar, J.; Schmitz, G. J.; Drevermann, A.; Palm, M.; Stein, F.; Engberding, N.; Kelm, K.; Irsen, S.

    2010-07-01

    Compared to Ti-rich γ-TiAl-based alloys Al-rich Ti-Al alloys offer an additional reduction of in density and a better oxidation resistance which are both due to the increased Al content. Polycrystalline material was manufactured by centrifugal casting. Microstructural characterization was carried out employing light-optical, scanning and transmission electron microscopy and XRD analyses. The high temperature creep of two binary alloys, namely Al60Ti40 and Al62Ti38 was comparatively assessed with compression tests at constant true stress in a temperature range between 1173 and 1323 K in air. The alloys were tested in the cast condition (containing various amounts of the metastable phases Al5Ti3 and h-Al2Ti) and after annealing at 1223 K for 200 h which produced (thermodynamically stable) lamellar γ-TiAl + r-Al2Ti microstructures. In general, already the as-cast alloys exhibit a reasonable creep resistance at 1173 K. Compared with Al60Ti40, both, the as-cast and the annealed Al62Ti38 alloy exhibit better creep resistance up to 1323 K which can be rationalized by the reduced lamella spacing. The assessment of creep tests conducted at identical stress levels and varying temperatures yielded apparent activation energies for creep of Q = 430 kJ/mol for the annealed Al60Ti40 alloy and of Q = 383 kJ/mol for the annealed Al62Ti38 material. The latter coincides well with that of Al diffusion in γ-TiAl, whereas the former can be rationalized by the instability of the microstructure containing metastable phases.

  8. Corrosion Studies of 2195 Al-Li Alloy and 2219 Al Alloy with Differing Surface Treatments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danford, M. D.; Mendrek, M. J.

    1998-01-01

    Corrosion studies of 2195 Al-Li and 2219 Al alloys have been conducted using the scanning reference electrode technique (SRET) and the polarization resistance (PR) technique. The SRET was used to study corrosion mechanisms, while corrosion rate measurements were studied with the PR technique. Plates of Al203 blasted, soda blasted and conversion coated 2219 Al were coated with Deft primer and the corrosion rates studied with the EIS technique. Results from all of these studies are presented.

  9. NiAl alloys for structural uses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koss, D. A.

    1991-01-01

    Alloys based on the intermetallic compound NiAl are of technological interest as high temperature structural alloys. These alloys possess a relatively low density, high melting temperature, good thermal conductivity, and (usually) good oxidation resistance. However, NiAl and NiAl-base alloys suffer from poor fracture resistance at low temperatures as well as inadequate creep strength at elevated temperatures. This research program explored macroalloying additions to NiAl-base alloys in order to identify possible alloying and processing routes which promote both low temperature fracture toughness and high temperature strength. Initial results from the study examined the additions of Fe, Co, and Hf on the microstructure, deformation, and fracture resistance of NiAl-based alloys. Of significance were the observations that the presence of the gamma-prime phase, based on Ni3Al, could enhance the fracture resistance if the gamma-prime were present as a continuous grain boundary film or 'necklace'; and the Ni-35Al-20Fe alloy was ductile in ribbon form despite a microstructure consisting solely of the B2 beta phase based on NiAl. The ductility inherent in the Ni-35Al-20Fe alloy was explored further in subsequent studies. Those results confirm the presence of ductility in the Ni-35Al-20Fe alloy after rapid cooling from 750 - 1000 C. However exposure at 550 C caused embrittlement; this was associated with an age-hardening reaction caused by the formation of Fe-rich precipitates. In contrast, to the Ni-35Al-20Fe alloy, exploratory research indicated that compositions in the range of Ni-35Al-12Fe retain the ordered B2 structure of NiAl, are ductile, and do not age-harden or embrittle after thermal exposure. Thus, our recent efforts have focused on the behavior of the Ni-35Al-12Fe alloy. A second parallel effort initiated in this program was to use an alternate processing technique, mechanical alloying, to improve the properties of NiAl-alloys. Mechanical alloying in the

  10. Al-Akhawayni's description of pulmonary circulation.

    PubMed

    Yarmohammadi, Hassan; Dalfardi, Behnam; Rezaian, Jafar; Ghanizadeh, Ahmad

    2013-10-01

    Since antiquity, heart function and the mechanism of blood circulation within the human body have been the focus of attention of scientists from different parts of the world. Over the passage of time, the theories and works of these scientists have resulted in the achievement of today's knowledge of circulation. The medieval Persian scholar, Al-Akhawayni Bukhari (?-983AD), is among the physicians who investigated both the anatomy and the physiology of the human body. Al-Akhawayni describes the mechanism of pulmonary circulation in his only extant book, "Hidayat al-Muta`llemin fi al-Tibb" (A Scholar's Guide to Medicine) with which he made a contribution to the development of knowledge regarding this mechanism in the medicine of the Islamic world. In this paper, Al-Akhawayni's viewpoints on anatomy and the function of the heart, its related vessels, and also pulmonary circulation will be briefly discussed. PMID:23890868

  11. Opportunities for improving therapy development in ALS.

    PubMed

    Bruijn, Lucie; Cudkowicz, Merit

    2014-06-01

    In May 2013, The ALS Association and The Northeast ALS Consortium (NEALS) convened a meeting of stakeholders for a round-table discussion of ways to improve therapy development in ALS. The following overview summarizes issues raised and potential new directions discussed at the meeting. We recommend that future phase II clinical trials in ALS proceed when the proposed treatment is directed at targets that are likely to be involved in ALS pathogenesis in a defined subgroup of patients, and be accompanied by one or more biomarkers to track both clinical progression and pharmacodynamic engagement of the target. Innovations in trial structure and design, and greater involvement of patient advocates, may also improve trials. PMID:24472060

  12. AL(0) in municipal waste incinerator ash

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stipp, S. L.; Ronsbo, J. G.; Zunic, T. B.; Christensen, T. H.

    2003-04-01

    Disposal of municipal waste is a challenge to society. Waste volume is substantially decreased by incineration but residual ash usually contains a number of toxic components which must be immobilised to insure environmental protection. One element, chromium, is mobile and toxic in its oxidised state as Cr(VI) but it can be reduced to Cr(III) and immobilised. Reduction can be promoted by ash treatment with Fe(0) or Fe(II), but recent evidence shows that at least some Cr(VI) is reduced spontaneously in the ash. Aspects of ash behaviour suggest metallic aluminium as the reducing agent, but no direct evidence of Al(0) has been found until now. We examined filter ash from an energy-producing, municipal-waste incinerator (Vest-forbrænding) near Copenhagen. X-ray diffraction (XRD) identified expected salts of Na, K and Ca such as halite, sylvite, calcite, anhydrite and gypsum as well as quartz, feldspar and some hematite. Wave-dispersive electron microprobe produced elemen-tal maps of the ash; Al-rich areas were analysed quantitatively by comparison with standards. We identified metallic Al particles, averaging 50 to 100 micrometers in di-ameter, often with a fractured, glassy border of aluminum oxide. The particles were porous, explaining fast Cr(VI) reduction and they contained thin exsolution lamellae of Al-alloys of Pb and Cu or Mn, Fe and Ag, which provide clues of the Al(0) origin in the waste. Sometimes Al(0) occurred inside glassy globes of Al2O3. Time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectroscopy (TOF-SIMS) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) proved that surface Al concentrations on ash particles were below detection, confirming reactivity of the Al(0) bulk. The persistence of reduced Al through the highly oxidising combustion procedure comes as a surprise and is a benefit in the immobilisation of Cr(VI) from municipal-waste incineration residues.

  13. First volcanic CO2 budget estimate for three actively degassing volcanoes in the Central American Volcanic Arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robidoux, Philippe; Aiuppa, Alessandro; Conde, Vladimir; Galle, Bo; Giudice, Gaetano; Avard, Geoffroy; Muñoz, Angélica

    2014-05-01

    Mineralogy & Geochemistry, 75, 323-354 Galle et al., (2010). J. Geophys. Res., 115, D05304 Aiuppa, A. et al. (2009). J. Volcanol. Geotherm. Res.,182, 221-230 Shinohara, H. (2008). Rev. Geophys., 46, RG4005 Conde, V. et al. (2013). International Journal of Earth Sciences, (submitted) Mather et al (2006). J. Volcanol. Geotherm. Res., 149, 297-311

  14. Japanese version of the ALS-FTD-Questionnaire (ALS-FTD-Q-J).

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Yasuhiro; Beeldman, Emma; Raaphorst, Joost; Izumi, Yuishin; Yoshino, Hiide; Masuda, Michihito; Atsuta, Naoki; Ito, Satoru; Adachi, Tadashi; Adachi, Yoshiki; Yokota, Osamu; Oda, Masaya; Hanashima, Ritsuko; Ogino, Mieko; Ichikawa, Hiroo; Hasegawa, Kazuko; Kimura, Hideki; Shimizu, Toshio; Aiba, Ikuko; Yabe, Hayato; Kanba, Makoto; Kusumi, Kimiyoshi; Aoki, Tetsuya; Hiroe, Yu; Watanabe, Hirohisa; Nishiyama, Kazutoshi; Nomoto, Masahiro; Sobue, Gen; Nakashima, Kenji

    2016-08-15

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD) share common clinical, genetic and neuropathological features. Some ALS patients have behavioral/personality changes, which could result in significant obstacles in the care provided by family members and caregivers. An easy screening tool would contribute greatly to the evaluation of these symptoms. We translated the ALS-FTD-Questionnaire, developed in the Netherlands, into Japanese (ALS-FTD-Q-J) and examined the clinimetric properties (internal consistency, construct and clinical validity). Patients with ALS and/or behavioral variant FTD (bvFTD) were evaluated alongside healthy controls in this multicenter study. All ALS patients, regardless of bvFTD status, were further evaluated by the frontal behavioral inventory (FBI) and for frontal/executive function, cognition, anxiety/depression, and motor functions. Data from 146 subjects were analyzed: ALS (92), ALS-bvFTD (6), bvFTD (16), and healthy controls (32). The internal consistency of the ALS-FTD-Q-J was good (Cronbach α=0.92). The ALS-FTD-Q-J showed construct validity as it exhibited a high correlation with the FBI (r=0.79). However, correlations were moderate with anxiety/depression and low with cognitive scales, in contrast to the original report, i.e. a moderate correlation with cognition and a low correlation with anxiety/depression. The ALS-FTD-Q-J discriminated ALS patients from (ALS-)bvFTD patients and controls. Thus, the ALS-FTD-Q-J is useful for evaluating Japanese ALS/FTD patients. PMID:27423564

  15. Extreme Events: low and high total ozone over Arosa, Switzerland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rieder, H. E.; Staehelin, J.; Maeder, J. A.; Ribatet, M.; Stübi, R.; Weihs, P.; Holawe, F.; Peter, T.; Davison, A. C.

    2009-04-01

    The frequency distribution of days with extreme low (termed ELOs) and high (termed EHOs) total ozone is analyzed for the world's longest total ozone record (Arosa, Switzerland - for details see Staehelin et al.,1998a,b), with new tools from extreme value theory (e.g. Coles, 2001; Ribatet, 2007). A heavy-tail focused approach is used through the fitting of the Generalized Pareto Distribution (GPD) to the Arosa time series. Asymptotic arguments (Pickands, 1975) justify the use of the GPD for modeling exceedances over a high (or below a low) enough threshold (Coles, 2001). The analysis shows that the GPD is appropriate for modeling the frequency distribution in total ozone above or below a mathematically well-defined threshold. While previous studies focused on so termed ozone mini-holes and mini-highs (e.g. Bojkov and Balis, 2001, Koch et al., 2005), this study is the first to present a mathematical description of extreme events in low and high total ozone for a northern mid-latitudes site (Rieder et al., 2009). The results show (a) an increase in days with extreme low (ELOs) and (b) a decrease in days with extreme high total ozone (EHOs) during the last decades, (c) that the general trend in total ozone is strongly determined by these extreme events and (d) that fitting the GPD is an appropriate method for the estimation of the frequency distribution of so-called ozone mini-holes. Furthermore, this concept allows one to separate the effect of Arctic ozone depletion from that of in situ mid-latitude ozone loss. As shown by this study, ELOs and EHOs have a strong influence on mean values in total ozone and the "extremes concept" could be further used also for validation of Chemistry-Climate-Models (CCMs) within the scientific community. References: Bojkov, R. D., and Balis, D.S.: Characteristics of episodes with extremely low ozone values in the northern middle latitudes 1975-2000, Ann. Geophys., 19, 797-807, 2001. Coles, S.: An Introduction to Statistical Modeling of

  16. Impact of device size and thickness of Al2O 3 film on the Cu pillar and resistive switching characteristics for 3D cross-point memory application.

    PubMed

    Panja, Rajeswar; Roy, Sourav; Jana, Debanjan; Maikap, Siddheswar

    2014-12-01

    Impact of the device size and thickness of Al2O3 film on the Cu pillars and resistive switching memory characteristics of the Al/Cu/Al2O3/TiN structures have been investigated for the first time. The memory device size and thickness of Al2O3 of 18 nm are observed by transmission electron microscope image. The 20-nm-thick Al2O3 films have been used for the Cu pillar formation (i.e., stronger Cu filaments) in the Al/Cu/Al2O3/TiN structures, which can be used for three-dimensional (3D) cross-point architecture as reported previously Nanoscale Res. Lett.9:366, 2014. Fifty randomly picked devices with sizes ranging from 8 × 8 to 0.4 × 0.4 μm(2) have been measured. The 8-μm devices show 100% yield of Cu pillars, whereas only 74% successful is observed for the 0.4-μm devices, because smaller size devices have higher Joule heating effect and larger size devices show long read endurance of 10(5) cycles at a high read voltage of -1.5 V. On the other hand, the resistive switching memory characteristics of the 0.4-μm devices with a 2-nm-thick Al2O3 film show superior as compared to those of both the larger device sizes and thicker (10 nm) Al2O3 film, owing to higher Cu diffusion rate for the larger size and thicker Al2O3 film. In consequence, higher device-to-device uniformity of 88% and lower average RESET current of approximately 328 μA are observed for the 0.4-μm devices with a 2-nm-thick Al2O3 film. Data retention capability of our memory device of >48 h makes it a promising one for future nanoscale nonvolatile application. This conductive bridging resistive random access memory (CBRAM) device is forming free at a current compliance (CC) of 30 μA (even at a lowest CC of 0.1 μA) and operation voltage of ±3 V at a high resistance ratio of >10(4). PMID:26088986

  17. Atomistic Modeling of RuAl and (RuNi) Al Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gargano, Pablo; Mosca, Hugo; Bozzolo, Guillermo; Noebe, Ronald D.; Gray, Hugh R. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Atomistic modeling of RuAl and RuAlNi alloys, using the BFS (Bozzolo-Ferrante-Smith) method for alloys is performed. The lattice parameter and energy of formation of B2 RuAl as a function of stoichiometry and the lattice parameter of (Ru(sub 50-x)Ni(sub x)Al(sub 50)) alloys as a function of Ni concentration are computed. BFS based Monte Carlo simulations indicate that compositions close to Ru25Ni25Al50 are single phase with no obvious evidence of a miscibility gap and separation of the individual B2 phases.

  18. Effects of hydrogen absorption in TbNiAl and UNiAl

    SciTech Connect

    Bordallo, H.N.; Nakotte, H.; Schultz, A.; Kolomiets, A.V.; Havela, L.; Andreev, A.V.

    1998-12-31

    Although hydrides of intermetallic compounds are used extensively as hydrogen-storage media, little is known about the exact nature of metal-hydrogen interactions. However, this knowledge is of essential importance for the understanding of thermodynamics and other properties. Hydrides (deuterides) of TbNiAl and UNiAl have been widely studied because of drastic increase of magnetic ordering temperature under hydrogenation. Here the authors report neutron-diffraction results of the three deuterides, TbNiAlD{sub 1.28}, TbNiAlD{sub 0.8}a nd UNiAlD{sub 2.23}.

  19. A new discontinuously reinforced aluminum MMC: Al+AlB{sub 2} flakes

    SciTech Connect

    HALL,AARON C.; ECONOMY,J.

    2000-06-08

    Development of a novel metal matrix composite based on the Al-B alloy system has been undertaken. Preparation of this discontinuously reinforced material is based on the precipitation of high aspect ratio AlB{sub 2} from an Al-B alloy. This paper describes a number of efforts forced on preparing high volume fractions (> 30 v%) of AlB{sub 2} in aluminum. New insights into the behavior of the Al-B alloys system allowed this effort to be successful.

  20. MESSENGER Observations of Substorm Activity at Mercury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, W. J.; Slavin, J. A.; Fu, S.; Raines, J. M.; Zong, Q. G.; Poh, G.; Jia, X.; Sundberg, T.; Gershman, D. J.; Pu, Z.; Zurbuchen, T.; Shi, Q.

    2015-12-01

    MErcury Surface, Space ENviroment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) magnetic field and plasma measurements taken during crossings of Mercury's magnetotail from 2011 to 2014 have been investigated for substorms. A number of events with clear Earth-like growth phase and expansion phase signatures were found. The thinning of the plasma sheet and the increase of magnetic field intensity in the lobe were observed during the growth phase and plasma sheet was observed to thicken during the expansion phase, which are similar to the observations at Earth. But the time scale of Mercury's substorm is only several minutes comparing with the several hours at Earth [Sun et al., 2015a]. Detailed analysis of magnetic field fluctuations during the substorm expansion phase have revealed low frequency plasma waves, e.g. Pi2-like pulsations. The By fluctuations accompanying substorm dipolarizations are consistent with pulses of field-aligned currents near the high latitude edge of the plasma sheet. Further study shows that they are near-circularly polarized electromagnetic waves, most likely Alfvén waves. Soon afterwards the plasma sheet thickened and MESSENGER detected a series of compressional waves. We have also discussed their possible sources [Sun et al., 2015b]. Sun, W.-J., J. A. Slavin, S. Y. Fu, et al. (2015a), MESSENGER observations of magnetospheric substorm activity in Mercury's near magnetotail. Geophys. Res. Lett., 42, 3692-3699. doi: 10.1002/2015GL064052.Sun, W.-J., J. A. Slavin, S. Y. Fu, et al. (2015b), MESSENGER observations of Alfvénic and compressional waves during Mercury's substorms. Geophys. Res. Lett., 42, in press. doi: 10.1002/ 2015GL065452.

  1. Oblique Propagation, Wave-Particle Interaction and Particle Distribution Functions in the Quasi-Perpendicular Bow Shock.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osmane, A.; Hamza, A. M.; Meziane, K.

    2007-12-01

    Recent results from the Cluster mission have stimulated theoretical investigations and simulations to explain ion distribution functions observed in the quasi-perp bow shock. [Meziane et al., 2001] High-time resolution observations have revealed distributions of gyrating ions that are gyrophase-bunched. When not produced at the shock, such distributions are believed to be resulting from interactions between field-aligned beams and low frequency beam-driven waves (ω <Ømega) [Hamza et al., 2005] The Conventional models used to account for such distributions assume that the waves are purely transverse, and that they propagate parallel to the ambient magnetic field. However observations indicate that these waves are propagating obliquely (θ ≤ 30 ° ) with respect to the ambient magnetic field [Meziane et al., 2001]. A theoretical investigation of the non-relativistic wave-particle interaction in a background magnetic field with the electromagnetic wave propagating obliquely has been addressed previously, resulting in a dynamical system describing the wave interaction with a single ion in the absence of dissipation mechanisms. [Hamza et al., 2005] This dynamical system can be numerically integrated to construct the ion distribution functions by seeding the particles with different initial conditions. We compute the particle orbits and simulate the time evolution of the distribution functions based on Liouville's theorem of phase space density conservation. This exercise can then provide insights on the particle dynamics away from the shock. Meziane, K., C. Mazelle, R.P. Lin, D. LeQueau, D.E. Larson, G.K. Parks, R.P. Lepping (2001), Three dimensional observations of gyrating ions distributions far upstream from the Earth's bow shock and their association with low-frequency waves, J. Geophys. Res. 106, 5731 Hamza, A. M., K. Meziane, and C. Mazelle (2006), Oblique propagation and nonlinear wave particle processes, J. Geophys. Res., 111, A04104

  2. Detailed spectroscopic analysis of chloride salt deposits in Terra Sirenum, Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osterloo, M. M.; Glotch, T. D.; Bandfield, J. L.

    2015-12-01

    Chloride salt-bearing deposits have been identified throughout the southern highlands of Mars [1] based on the lack of diagnostic spectral features of anhydrous chlorides in both the visible near infrared (VNIR) and middle infrared (MIR) wavelength ranges [1,2]. A puzzling aspect of martian chloride deposits is the apparent lack of other weathering or evaporite phases associated with most of the deposits. A global analysis over the chloride salt sites conducted by [3] found that only ~9% of the deposits they analyzed were associated with minerals such as phyllosilicates. Most of these occurrences are in Terra Sirenum where [4] noted that salt-bearing deposits lie stratigraphically above Noachian phyllosilicates. Although a variety of formation mechanisms have been proposed for these intriguing deposits, detailed geologic mapping by [5] suggests that surface water and evaporation played a dominant role. On Earth, evaporative settings are often characterized by a multitude of evaporite and phyllosilicate phases including carbonates, sulfates, and nitrates. [6] evaluated chemical divides and brine evolution for martian systems and their results indicate three pathways wherein late-stage brines favor chloride precipitation. In each case the pathway to chloride formation includes precipitation of carbonates (calcite, siderite, and/or magnesite) and sulfates (gypsum, melanterite, and/or epsomite). Here, we present the results of our detailed and systematic spectroscopic study to identify additional evaporite phases associated with salt/silicate mixtures in Terra Sirenum. [1] Osterloo et al. (2008) Science, 319, [2] Glotch, T. D. et al. (2013) Lunar and Planet. Sci. XLIV, abstract #1549 [3] Ruesch, O. et al. (2012), J. Geophys. Res., 117, E00J13 [4] Glotch, T. D. et al. (2010) Geophys. Res. Lett. 37, L16202, [5] Osterloo, M. M. and B. M Hynek (2015) Lunar and Planet. Sci XLVI. Abstract #1054 [6] Tosca, N. J. and S. M. McLennan (2006), Earth and Planet. Sci. Lett., 241.

  3. A 420 Year Annual 10Be Record from the WAIS Divide Ice Core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodruff, T. E.; Welten, K. C.; Caffee, M. W.; Nishiizumi, K.

    2011-12-01

    Annual ice layers archive the cosmogenic radionuclide 10Be, which is in turn an important proxy for solar activity, complementary to the 14C tree ring archive. Although production is primarily determined by the strength of the solar magnetic field 10Be deposition is also determined by local weather phenomena and snow accumulation rates, especially within shorter timescales. Accordingly, multiple ice core records of varying locations and accumulation rates are necessary to build a representative 10Be archive. We are presently engaged in a study to obtain continuous 10Be and 36Cl records in the West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS) Divide ice core, a high snow accumulation site analogous to the GISP2 core from Greenland (Finkel and Nishiizumi1997). Here we present an annual resolution record of 10Be in the WAIS Divide core spanning the last 420 years including the Maunder (1645-1715 AD) and Dalton (1790-1830 AD) solar minima. Preliminary results for the periods of 1580-1740 and 1945-2006 AD show that the10Be flux during the Maunder Minimum was ~60% higher than in the last 60 years (4.8 vs. 3.0 x 105 atoms yr-1 cm-2). Although the low sunspot numbers during the Maunder Minimum suggest little change in solar activity, the 10Be data show that the heliomagnetic field strength continued to vary in a 11-year cycle, as observed in other annual 10Be records (e.g., Beer et al. 1990; Berggren et al. 2009). The 10Be record for the WAIS Divide core will be compared to 10Be records of Greenland ice cores as well as the 14C tree ring record. Acknowledgment. This work was supported by NSF grants ANT-0839042 and 0839137. Beer J. et al. 1990.Nature 347, 164. Finkel R. C. and Nishiizumi K. 1997.J. Geophys. Res. 102, 26,699. Berggren A.- M., et al. 2009. Geophys. Res. Lett. 36, L11801.

  4. The statistical mechanics basis of non-equilibrium stationary states in the solar wind and outer heliosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livadiotis, G.; McComas, D. J.

    2009-12-01

    In situ observations of solar wind at 1 AU have occasionally detected ion distributions in equilibrium, where the three-dimensional spectral slope or k-index approaches infinity (a Maxwellian distribution) [e.g., Hammond, C. M., et al. (1996), J. Geophys. Res., 100, 7881-7889]. More commonly, however, suprathermal particle distributions in the solar wind routinely show highly non-equilibrium stationary states, with a k~1.5 [Fisk, L. A., and G. Gloeckler (2006), Astrophys. J., 640, L79-L82], while other observations from Voyager 1 detected k~1.63 in the inner heliosheath, beyond the termination shock [Decker, R. B., et al. (2005), Science, 309, 2020-2024]. While this value is close to 1.5, the observations demonstrated a clear statistical difference between these two indices. Finally, recent observations show distributions for which k~2.45 is a special value, separating indices that appear to be near or far from equilibrium [e.g., Dayeh, M. A., et al. (2009), Astrophys. J., 693, 1588-1600; Dialynas, K., et al. (2009), J. Geophys. Res., 114, A01212]. In this study we show how all of these special values of k~1.5, 1.63, 2.45, and infinity can be predicted by a special relationship of the entropy, defined in the framework of non-extensive Statistical Mechanics as applied to space physics [Livadiotis, G., and D. McComas (2009), in Press in JGR-Space Physics], which characterizes plasmas in stationary states out of equilibrium. Amazingly, the four values observed in the solar wind plasma and mentioned above are uniquely identified with the four special points in the derived entropy function. This correlation suggests that the observations are detecting the primacy of these stationary states.

  5. Orthorhombic aluminium oxyfluoride, AlOF.

    PubMed

    Vasiliev, Alexander D; Melnikova, Svetlana V; Isaenko, Lyudmila I

    2009-04-01

    Crystals of the title compound were extracted from the bulk of grown SrAlF(5) crystals as unexpected inclusions that were identified as the long sought after aluminium oxyfluoride. The structure of AlOF is built up from tetrahedral and octahedral polyhedra. Each tetrahedron is bisected by a mirror plane, with the Al atom and two vertex anions in the plane. All tetrahedral vertices are positions of competing oxide and fluoride ions and are shared with octahedra. These shared vertices belong to two octahedral edges which join the octahedra to form infinite zigzag chains. The chains are strung along twofold screw axes that run parallel to the unit-cell b axis. The remaining two octahedral vertices are occupied only by fluoride ions. A small deficiency in the occupation of the octahedral Al position was suggested by the refinement. However, the stoichiometry of the compound is AlOF within experimental uncertainty. The Al-F(O) distances are separated into three groups with average values of 1.652 (3) (tetrahedra), 1.800 (2) (octahedra) and 1.894 (2) A (octahedra). This structure differs widely from the reported tetragonal phase Al(1-x)O(1-3x)F(1+3x) (x = 0.0886) [Kutoglu (1992). Z. Kristallogr. 199, 197-201], which consists solely of octahedral structural units. PMID:19346595

  6. Electrical conductivity of Al-bearing bridgmanite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshino, T.; Kamada, S.; Ohtani, E.; Hirao, N.

    2015-12-01

    Electrical conductivity measurements of bridgmanite with various Al contents and constant Mg# 90 at room temperature up to 2000 K and 26-28 GPa were performed in Kawai-type multianvil apparatus using impedance spectroscopic analyses. The incorporation of Al into bridgmanite significantly raises the electrical conductivity but it is small conductivity variation with respect to the amount of Al. Synchrotron Mössbauer spectroscopy of recovered samples showed a significant amount of ferric iron in aluminous bridgmanite. The mobility of charge carriers in bridgmanite was calculated from the conductivity and Fe3+/ΣFe. A relation between the logarithm of electrical conductivity and reciprocal temperature is consistent with Fe2+-Fe3+ electron hopping (small polaron) as the dominant conduction mechanism at low temperatures (< 1400 K) and ionic conduction at high temperatures (> 1600 K). Taking various conduction mechanisms into account, we develop an electrical conductivity model for aluminous bridgmanite as a function of Al and Fe content. This conductivity model suggests that the electrical conductivity of aluminous bridgmanite has a maximum at around 0.13 Al per formula unit, and further increase of Al in bridgmanite reduces the conductivity. The conductivity increase observed in the uppermost lower mantle by electromagnetic studies can be explained by increases of Fe and Na content in combination with substitution of Al into bridgmanite with increasing pressure due to the gradual decomposition of majorite garnet.

  7. Comparative study on interface and bulk charges in AlGaN/GaN metal-insulator-semiconductor heterostructures with Al2O3, AlN, and Al2O3/AlN laminated dielectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jie-Jie; Ma, Xiao-Hua; Chen, Wei-Wei; Hou, Bin; Xie, Yong; Hao, Yue

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, the interface and bulk charges in AlGaN/GaN metal-insulator-semiconductor (MIS) heterostructures with AlN, Al2O3, and Al2O3/AlN laminated dielectrics were studied. In situ plasma pretreatment resulted negligible interface trap states and voltage hysteresis. The fixed charge density at Al2O3/AlN (or Al2O3/barrier) interface was estimated to be 1.66 × 1013 cm-2 by using flat-band voltage shift, and the oxide bulk charge concentration was 2.86 × 1017 cm-3. The interface charge density at other interfaces were at the order of 1011 cm-2. Simulation results using the above charge density/concentration indicated that Al2O3/AlN interface fixed charges dominated the dielectric-related voltage shift in AlGaN/GaN MIS heterostructures, which caused a large voltage shift of -3 V with 10 nm Al2O3 thickness, while the flat-band voltage variety resulting from other types of charges was within 0.1 V.

  8. Arsenate uptake by Al nanoclusters and other Al-based sorbents during water treatment.

    PubMed

    Mertens, Jasmin; Rose, Jérôme; Wehrli, Bernhard; Furrer, Gerhard

    2016-01-01

    In many parts of the world, arsenic from geogenic and anthropogenic sources deteriorates the quality of drinking water resources. Effective methods of arsenic removal include adsorption and coagulation with iron- and aluminum-based materials, of which polyaluminum chloride is widely employed as coagulant in water treatment due to its low cost and high efficiency. We compared the arsenic uptake capacity and the arsenic bonding sites of different Al-based sorbents, including Al nanoclusters, polyaluminum chloride, polyaluminum granulate, and gibbsite. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy revealed that As(V) forms bidentate-binuclear complexes in interaction with all Al-based removal agents. The octahedral configuration of nanoclusters and the distribution of sorption sites remain the same in all types of removal agents consisting of nano-scale Al oxyhydroxide particles. The obtained distances for As(V)-O and As(V)-Al agreed with previously published data and were found to be 1.69 ± 0.02 Å and 3.17-3.21 Å, respectively. Our study suggests that As(V) binds to Al nanoclusters as strongly as to Al oxide surfaces. The As sorption capacity of Al nanoclusters was found to be very similar to that of Al clusters in a polyaluminum chloride. The most efficient Al-based sorbents for arsenic removal were Al nanoclusters, followed by polyaluminum granulate. PMID:26613179

  9. Hybrid Al + Al3Ni metallic foams synthesized in situ via laser engineered net shaping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Baolong; Li, Ying; Smugeresky, John E.; Zhou, Yizhang; Baker, Dean; Lavernia, Enrique J.

    2011-09-01

    A hybrid, Al + Al3Ni metallic foam was synthesized in situ via laser engineered net shaping (LENS®) of Ni-coated 6061 Al powder in the absence of a foaming agent. During LENS® processing, the Ni coating reacted with the Al matrix, resulting in the simultaneous formation of a fine dispersion of Al3Ni, and a high volume fraction of porosity. As a reinforcement phase, the intermetallic compound formed particles with a size range of 1-5 µm and a volume fraction of 63%, with accompanying 35-300 µm pores with a 60% volume fraction. The microstructure of the as-deposited Al + Al3Ni composite foams was characterized using SEM, EDS, XRD and TEM/HRTEM techniques. The evolution of the microstructure was analyzed on the basis of the thermal field present during deposition, paying particular attention to the thermodynamics of the Al3Ni intermetallic compound formation as well as discussing the mechanisms that may be responsible for the observed porosity. The mechanical behavior of the as-deposited material was characterized using compression and microhardness testing, indicating that the yield strength and hardness are 190 MPa and 320 HV, respectively, which represents an increase of over three times higher than that of annealed Al6061, or similar to heat-treated Al6061 fully dense matrix, and much higher than those of traditional Al alloy foams, and with a low density of 1.64 g/m3.

  10. Optical characterization of Al- and N-polar AlN waveguides for integrated optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rigler, Martin; Buh, Jože; Hoffmann, Marc P.; Kirste, Ronny; Bobea, Milena; Mita, Seiji; Gerhold, Michael D.; Collazo, Ramon; Sitar, Zlatko; Zgonik, Marko

    2015-04-01

    Dispersion of the extraordinary and ordinary refractive indices of Al- and N-polar AlN waveguides is measured by multiple angle-of-incidence and spectroscopic ellipsometry techniques. The polarity-controlled AlN layers are grown by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition on (0001)-sapphire substrates. Taking into consideration the different surface morphologies of the Al- and N-polar AlN waveguides, we propose two optical models to describe the measured ellipsometry data. The results indicate that there is no difference between the refractive indices of the AlN grown in opposite directions, which confirms the potential of the AlN lateral polar structures for use in nonlinear optical applications based on quasi phase matching.

  11. A Rechargeable Al/S Battery with an Ionic-Liquid Electrolyte.

    PubMed

    Gao, Tao; Li, Xiaogang; Wang, Xiwen; Hu, Junkai; Han, Fudong; Fan, Xiulin; Suo, Liumin; Pearse, Alex J; Lee, Sang Bok; Rubloff, Gary W; Gaskell, Karen J; Noked, Malachi; Wang, Chunsheng

    2016-08-16

    Aluminum metal is a promising anode material for next generation rechargeable batteries owing to its abundance, potentially dendrite-free deposition, and high capacity. The rechargeable aluminum/sulfur (Al/S) battery is of great interest owing to its high energy density (1340 Wh kg(-1) ) and low cost. However, Al/S chemistry suffers poor reversibility owing to the difficulty of oxidizing AlSx . Herein, we demonstrate the first reversible Al/S battery in ionic-liquid electrolyte with an activated carbon cloth/sulfur composite cathode. Electrochemical, spectroscopic, and microscopic results suggest that sulfur undergoes a solid-state conversion reaction in the electrolyte. Kinetics analysis identifies that the slow solid-state sulfur conversion reaction causes large voltage hysteresis and limits the energy efficiency of the system. PMID:27417442

  12. Oxidation of Al2O3 continuous fiber-reinforced/NiAl composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doychak, J.; Nesbitt, J. A.; Noebe, R. D.; Bowman, R. R.

    1992-01-01

    The 1200 C and 1300 C isothermal and cyclic oxidation behavior of Al2O3 continuous fiber-reinforced/NiAl composites were studied. Oxidation resulted in formation of Al2O3 external scales in a similar manner as scales formed on monolithic NiAl. The isothermal oxidation of an Al2O3/NiAl composite resulted in oxidation of the matrix along the fiber/matrix interface near the fiber ends. This oxide acted as a wedge between the fiber and the matrix, and, under cyclic oxidation conditions, led to further oxidation along the fiber lengths and eventual cracking of the composite. The oxidation behavior of composites in which the Al2O3 fibers were sputter coated with nickel prior to processing was much more severe. This was attributed to open channels around the fibers which formed during processing, most likely as a result of the diffusion of the nickel coating into the matrix.

  13. High performance AlGaN/GaN HEMTs with AlN/SiNx passivation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, Tan; Yuanjie, Lü; Guodong, Gu; Li, Wang; Shaobo, Dun; Xubo, Song; Hongyu, Guo; Jiayun, Yin; Shujun, Cai; Zhihong, Feng

    2015-07-01

    AlGaN/GaN high electron-mobility transistors (HEMTs) with 5 nm AlN passivation by plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition (PEALD) were fabricated, covered by 50 nm SiNx which was grown by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD). With PEALD AlN passivation, current collapse was suppressed more effectively and the devices show better subthreshold characteristics. Moreover, the insertion of AlN increased the RF transconductance, which lead to a higher cut-off frequency. Temperature dependence of DC characteristics demonstrated that the degradations of drain current and maximum transconductance at elevated temperatures for the AlN/SiNx passivated devices were much smaller compared with the devices with SiNx passivation, indicating that PEALD AlN passivation can improve the high temperature operation of the AlGaN/GaN HEMTs. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 60890192).

  14. Ni{sub 3}Al aluminide alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, C.T.

    1993-10-01

    This paper provides a brief review of the recent progress in research and development of Ni{sub 3}Al and its alloys. Emphasis has been placed on understanding low ductility and brittle fracture of Ni{sub 3}Al alloys at ambient and elevated temperatures. Recent studies have resulted in identifying both intrinsic and extrinsic factors governing the fracture behavior of Ni{sub 3}Al alloys. Parallel efforts on alloy design using physical metallurgy principles have led to properties for structural use. Industrial interest in these alloys is high, and examples of industrial involvement in processing and utilization of these alloys are briefly mentioned.

  15. Suspected variables among Al Sufi stars.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffleit, D.

    In the tenth century Al Sufi compiled a catalogue of some 1100 stars. J.E. Gore, around 1900, wrote extensively on the magnitudes of these stars. On intercomparing them with a few other catalogues, Gore surmised that some 38 stars appeared to show secular variations. Here all the Al Sufi magnitudes have been compared with numerous additional sources, but smooth secular variations are not substantiated although some stars seem to have undergone comparatively sudden changes after about 1600. About 70 Al Sufi stars are now named or suscpected variable stars, but nearly all with amplitudes under 0.3 V.

  16. Thirteen Iron Meteorites Found at Gale Crater, Meridiani Planum, and Gusev Crater — Exogenic Witnesses to Weathering Processes Near the Martian Equator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashley, J.

    2014-12-01

    . and M. A. Velbel (2000), MAPS, v. 35 no. 5 Supplement, p. A22. [2] Golombek et al., (2010) J. Geophys. Res., 115, E00F08, doi:10.1029/2010JE003628. [3] Ashley J. W. et al., (2011) J. Geophys. Res., 116, E00F20, doi:10.1029/2010JE003672. [4] Greeley R. et al., (2002) J. Geophys. Res., 107, E1, 5005, doi : 10.1029/2000JE001481.

  17. Protons and alpha particles in the solar wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellinger, Petr; Travnicek, Pavel M.; Passot, Thierry; Sulem, Pierre-Louis; Matteini, Lorenzo; Landi, Simone

    2014-05-01

    We investigate energetic consequences of ion kinetic instabilitities in the solar wind connected with beam and core protons and alpha particles drifting with respect to each other. We compare theoretical predictions, simulations and observation results. For theoretical prediction we assume drifting bi-Maxwellian ion populations and we calculate theoretical quasilinear heating rates (Hellinger et al., 2013b). The nonlinear evolution of beam-core protons, and alpha particles in the expanding solar wind we investigate using hybrid expanding box system (Hellinger and Travnicek, 2013). The expansion leads to many different kinetic instabilities. In the simulation the beam protons and alpha particles are decelerated with respect to the core protons and all the populations are cooled in the parallel direction and heated in the perpendicular one in agreement with theoretical expectations. On the macroscopic level the kinetic instabilities cause large departures of the system evolution from the double adiabatic prediction and lead to a perpendicular heating and parallel cooling rates. The simulated heating rates are comparable to the heating rates estimated from the Helios observations (Hellinger et al., 2013a); furthermore, the differential velocity between core and beam protons observed by Ulysses exhibits apparent bounds which are compatible with the theoretical constaints imposed by the linear theory for the magnetosonic instability driven by beam-core differential velocity (Matteini et al., 2013). References Hellinger, P., P. M. Travnicek, S. Stverak, L. Matteini, and M. Velli (2013a), Proton thermal energetics in the solar wind: Helios reloaded, J. Geophys. Res., 118, 1351-1365, doi:10.1002/jgra.50107. Hellinger, P., T. Passot, P.-L. Sulem, and P. M. Travnicek (2013b), Quasi-linear heating and acceleration in bi-Maxwellian plasmas, Phys. Plasmas, 20, 122306. Hellinger, P., and P. M. Travnicek (2013), Protons and alpha particles in the expanding solar wind: Hybrid

  18. Variations of carbon monoxide in the martian lower atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasnopolsky, Vladimir A.

    2015-06-01

    Our observations of variations of CO on Mars by means of the ground-based spatially-resolved high-resolution spectroscopy (Krasnopolsky, V.A. [2003]. J. Geophys. Res. 108(E2), 5010; Krasnopolsky, V.A. [2007]. Icarus 190, 93-102) have been significantly improved using the 13CO lines near 4148 cm-1 and the CO2 lines near 4570 cm-1. These lines are of optimal strength, of low sensitivity to variations of temperature, and covered by the ATMOS solar spectrum that makes it possible to use the synthetic spectra technique for retrieval of CO and CO2 to get CO mixing ratios. The CO2 line strengths from Toth et al. (2008) were also essential to improve accuracy of the results. The 13CO/CO ratio of 1.023 times the terrestrial carbon isotope ratio was calculated using the known 13CO2/CO2 = 1.046 in the martian atmosphere (Webster, C.R., et al. [2013]. Science 341, 260-263), the photo-induced isotope fractionation (Miller, C.E., Yung, Y.L. [2000]. J. Geophys. Res. 105(D23), 29039-29051) in the CO2 photolysis, and isotope fractionation in the reaction between CO and OH (Feilberg, K.L., Johnson, M.S., Nielsen, C.J. [2005]. Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 7, 2318-2323). The observations were conducted at LS = 60°, 89°, 110°, and 145° and extend over the maximum of CO in the southern hemisphere during the northern summer. The CO mixing ratio was observed to be constant over the 55°S-90°N latitudinal range to within 7%, for each observed LS period. Therefore our observations show that the enrichment of incondensable gases by condensation of CO2 in the southern polar regions does not significantly extend to the middle and low latitudes. This behavior agrees with the Mars Climate Database (Lefevre, F., Forget, F. [2009]. Nature 460, 720-722), whereas most other observations exhibit much larger latitudinal gradients and seasonal variations. Our measurements do not show the CO depletion at high northern latitudes predicted by MCD of ∼20% at LS≈ 60-150° and observed as much stronger

  19. Comparisons of selected atmospheric escape mechanisms on Venus, Mars and Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartle, R. E.; Sittler, E. C.

    2008-09-01

    The similarities and differences of the escape mechanisms for H+ and D+ from Venus, H and D from Mars, and heavier ions (~ 17 and ~ 28 amu) from Titan are described. The dominant escape process for hydrogen and deuterium on Venus is thought to originate in the night side ionosphere, located in the night side H and D bulge region, where the polarization electric field is the dominant force accelerating ionospheric H+ and D+ upward into the induced magnetic tail of Titan [1]. The resulting loss rates ~ 8.6x1026 s-1 and ~ 3.2x1023 s-1 for H+ and D+, respectively, are consistent with the large observed D/H ratio ~ 160 times that of terrestrial water and an ancient ocean more than 10 m of liquid uniformly distributed on the surface. In contrast, Jeans escape is the dominant loss mechanism for H and D on Mars [2], which has a D/H ratio ~ 5.3 times that of terrestrial water. The resulting loss rates for H and D of ~ 3.7x1026 s-1 and ~ 1022 s-1, respectively, can be related to possible ancient water reservoirs below the surface. When horizontal atmospheric winds are taken into account, the Jeans escape rates for H and D are enhanced considerably [3], as are the corresponding water reservoirs. On Titan, 28 amu ions were observed to escape along its induced magnetic tail by the Voyager 1 Plasma Science Instrument (PLS). In analogy with Venus, the escaping ions were thought to originate in the ionosphere [4]. The Cassini mission permits a test of this principal due to the numerous flybys of Titan through both the ionosphere and the tail. A polarization electric field is obtained in the ionosphere of the TA flyby, yielding an upward acceleration of 17 and 28 amu ionospheric ions that is consistent with the flux of heavy ionospheric ions observed escaping along the magnetic tail by the Cassini Ion Mass Spectrometer (CAPS) during the T9 flyby [5]. References [1] R. E. Hartle, T. M. Donahue, et al., J. Geophys. Res., 101,4525, 1996. [2] T. M. Donahue, Icarus, 167, 225, 2004. [3

  20. Characterization of AlInN/AlN/GaN Heterostructures with Different AlN Buffer Thickness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Çörekçi, S.; Dugan, S.; Öztürk, M. K.; Çetin, S. Ş.; Çakmak, M.; Özçelik, S.; Özbay, E.

    2016-05-01

    Two AlInN/AlN/GaN heterostructures with 280-nm- and 400-nm-thick AlN buffer grown on sapphire substrates by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) have been investigated by x-ray diffraction (XRD), atomic force microscopy (AFM), photoluminescence (PL) and Hall-effect measurements. The symmetric (0002) plane with respect to the asymmetric (10bar{1} 2) plane in the 280-nm-thick AlN buffer has a higher crystal quality, as opposed to the 400-nm-thick buffer. The thinner buffer improves the crystallinity of both (0002) and (10bar{1} 2) planes in the GaN layers, it also provides a sizeable reduction in dislocation density of GaN. Furthermore, the lower buffer thickness leads to a good quality surface with an rms roughness of 0.30 nm and a dark spot density of 4.0 × 108 cm-2. The optical and transport properties of the AlInN/AlN/GaN structure with the relatively thin buffer are compatible with the enhancement in its structural quality, as verified by XRD and AFM results.

  1. Characterization of AlInN/AlN/GaN Heterostructures with Different AlN Buffer Thickness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Çörekçi, S.; Dugan, S.; Öztürk, M. K.; Çetin, S. Ş.; Çakmak, M.; Özçelik, S.; Özbay, E.

    2016-07-01

    Two AlInN/AlN/GaN heterostructures with 280-nm- and 400-nm-thick AlN buffer grown on sapphire substrates by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) have been investigated by x-ray diffraction (XRD), atomic force microscopy (AFM), photoluminescence (PL) and Hall-effect measurements. The symmetric (0002) plane with respect to the asymmetric (10bar{1}2) plane in the 280-nm-thick AlN buffer has a higher crystal quality, as opposed to the 400-nm-thick buffer. The thinner buffer improves the crystallinity of both (0002) and (10bar{1}2) planes in the GaN layers, it also provides a sizeable reduction in dislocation density of GaN. Furthermore, the lower buffer thickness leads to a good quality surface with an rms roughness of 0.30 nm and a dark spot density of 4.0 × 108 cm-2. The optical and transport properties of the AlInN/AlN/GaN structure with the relatively thin buffer are compatible with the enhancement in its structural quality, as verified by XRD and AFM results.

  2. Diffusion at the Al/Al oxide interface during electromigration in wide lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Augur, R. A.; Wolters, R. A. M.; Schmidt, W.; Dirks, A. G.; Kordić, S.

    1996-03-01

    Significant large-scale modification of the surface of Al-Si conductors was observed, due to electromigration in wide lines and under low stress conditions. After electromigration stressing the Al layers showed local thickness variations, i.e., damage by thinning. The mechanism underlying this damage causes substantial metal transport. Nevertheless, damage by thinning has received little attention in the past. Thinning was observed: (1) in a number of different alloys (Al-Si, Al-Cu, Al-Si-V, and Al-Si-V-Pd), (2) with a number of different underlayers [SiO2, W-Ti (no vacuum break after Al deposition) and W-Ti (oxidized surface before Al deposition)], (3) over an extended temperature range, (4) over a range of current density, and (5) in structures with and without passivation. The results show that thinning is a general phenomenon. An activation energy of approximately 0.5 eV was determined for the temperature dependence of a combined mechanism of concurrent thinning plus voiding in Al99Si1. Several alternatives are examined to explain the observations, namely mass movement along dislocations, Al bulk diffusion, and diffusion at the interface between the Al and its oxide. It is shown that diffusion at the Al/Al oxide interface most probably plays an important role in the damage mechanism, even under stress conditions where grain boundary diffusion is traditionally thought to dominate. Results also showed that alloying of Al with Pd can reduce the effects of damage by thinning.

  3. The effect of iron spin transition on convective dynamics, slab dynamics and the geoid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, Michael; van den Berg, Arie; Spakman, Wim; Cadek, Ondrej; Cizkova, Hana; Matyska, Ctirad

    2013-04-01

    vigorous as observed in Boussinesq type modelling results of Bower et al, 2009, Shanas et al, 2011. Negative buoyancy of lithospheric slabs in the deep mantle is enhanced by the increase of thermal expansivity induced by the spin transition. Therefore the sinking rate of slabs are affected by the presence of the spin transition. Therefore the effects of the transition must be included in mantle convection modelling, done in order to bracket mantle viscosity values (Cizkova et al., 2012). Here we investigate the impact of the iron spin transition on the convective dynamics of the mantle and the distribution of material properties. As the spin transition related variations of material properties (e.g. thermal expansivity) are significant especially at lower temperatures, we concentrate mainly on the consequences for slab dynamics. To this end we use a compressible convection model based on a self consistent formulation of the thermo-physical material properties density, thermal expansivity and specific heat at constant pressure as described in (Jacobs and van den Berg, 2011). Finally, we evaluate the consequences of spin induced density contrasts in cold downwellings for the interpretation of the geoid. Bower et al. (2009) Geophys Res Lett, 36, L10306 Cizkova et al. (2012) Phys Earth Planet Inter 200, 56-62 Fei et al. (2007) Geophy res Lett, 34, L17307, 1-5 Jacobs and de Jong (2007) Geochim Cosmochim Acta, 71, 3630-3655 Jacobs and van den Berg (2011) Phys Earth Planet Inter, 186, 36-48 Jacobs et al. (2013) Phys Chem Minerals, in press Lin et al. (2005) Nature 436, 377-380 Shahnas et al (2011) J Geophys Res 116, B08205, 1-16 Umemoto et al (2010) Phys Earth Planet Int, 180, 209-214 Wu et al (2009) Phys Rev B 80, 014409, 1-8

  4. Electroforming and Ohmic contacts in Al-Al2O3-Ag diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hickmott, T. W.

    2012-03-01

    Electroforming of metal-insulator-metal (MIM) diodes is a non-destructive dielectric breakdown process that changes the diode from its initial high resistance state (HRS) to a low resistance state (LRS). After electroforming, resistance switching memories (RSMs) use voltages to switch from HRS to LRS and back. Many MIM combinations are proposed for use in RSMs. In many cases conduction in the LRS is nearly temperature independent at low temperatures; an Ohmic contact with a barrier to electron injection of ˜0 eV results from electroforming. Electroforming of Al-Al2O3-Ag diodes with amorphous anodic Al2O3 thicknesses between 12 and 41 nm has been studied. Two anodizing electrolytes have been used; 0.1 M ammonium pentaborate (bor-H2O) and a solution of 0.1 M of ammonium pentaborate per liter of ethylene glycol (bor-gly). Polarization of Al2O3 and negative charge in Al2O3 are much larger when Al2O3 is formed in bor-H2O solution than when Al is anodized in bor-gly solution. Electroforming of Al-Al2O3-Ag diodes results in an Ohmic contact at the Al-Al2O3 interface, voltage-controlled negative resistance (VCNR) in the current-voltage (I-V) characteristics, electroluminescence (EL), and electron emission into vacuum (EM) from filamentary conducting channels. Two distinct modes of electroforming occur for Al-Al2O3-Ag diodes. α-forming occurs for 2.5 V ≲ VS ≲ 5 V, where VS is the applied voltage. It is characterized by an abrupt current jump with the simultaneous appearance of EL and EM. β-forming occurs for VS ≳ 7 V. I-V curves, EL, and EM develop gradually and are smaller than for α-forming. Electroforming occurs more readily for diodes with Al2O3 formed in bor-H2O that have greater defect densities. Fully developed I-V curves have similar VCNR, EL, and EM after α-forming or β-forming. A model is proposed in which excited states of F-centers, oxygen vacancies in amorphous anodic Al2O3, form defect conduction bands. Electroforming that results in an Ohmic

  5. Measuring the scattering mean free path of Rayleigh waves on a volcano from spatial phase decoherence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obermann, Anne; Larose, Eric; Margerin, Ludovic; Rossetto, Vincent

    2014-05-01

    We analyze the statistics of phase fluctuations of seismic signals obtained from a temporary small aperture array deployed on a volcano in the French Auvergne. We demonstrate that the phase field satisfies Circular Gaussian statistics. We then determine the scattering mean free path of Rayleigh waves from the spatial phase decoherence. This phenomenon, observed for diffuse wavefields, is found to yield a good approximation of the scattering mean free path. Contrary to the amplitude, spatial phase decoherence is free from absorption effects and provides direct access to the scattering mean free path. Our method may find applications in various areas of seismology where the effects of scattering are prominent and a knowledge of the scattering properties is necessary to describe the propagation. As an example, an unbiased estimate of the scattering mean free path is crucial for the localization of changes in multiply scattering media, where a sensitivity kernel based on diffusion theory is used (Larose et al. 2010; Obermann et al. 2013a,b). Our experimental approach may also provide independent estimates of the scattering mean free path in volcanic areas where particularly strong scattering has been proposed, based on the fitting of energy envelopes using energy transport approaches (Wegler & Lühr 2001; Yamamoto & Sato 2010). References: Larose, E., Planès, T., Rossetto, V. & Margerin, L., 2010. Locating a small change in a multiple scattering environment, Appl. Phys. Lett., 96(204101), 1-3. Obermann, A., Planès, T., Larose, E. & Campillo, M., 2013a. Imaging pre and co-eruptive structural and mechanical changes on a volcano with ambient seismic noise, J. geophys. Res., 118, 1-10. Obermann, A., Planès, T., Larose, E., Sens-Schönfelder, C. & Campillo,M., 2013b. Depth sensitivity of seismic coda waves to velocity perturbations in an elastic heterogeneous medium, Geophys. J. Int., 194(1), 372-382. Wegler, U. & Lühr, B.G., 2001. Scattering behaviour at Merapi volcano

  6. Ultra High Energy Cosmic Rays in the North: Measurement of UHE Cosmic Rays with the High Resolution Fly's Eye (HiRes) Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Matthews, J. N.

    2006-11-17

    The High Resolution Fly's Eye (HiRes) observatory has been collecting Ultra High Energy Cosmic Ray (UHECR) data since 1997. The experiment observes cosmic ray air showers via the air fluorescence technique and consists of two observatory sites separated by 12.6 km in the western Utah desert. The two stations can each measure the cosmic rays in monocular mode. In addition, the data from the two stations can also be combined to form a stereo measurement of the air showers. The experiment measures such properties as the energy spectrum, chemical composition, and p-air cross-section of these cosmic rays. It also searches for point sources and other anisotropy. The spectrum is measured above {approx}3 x 1017 eV and shows significant structure including the 'ankle' and a steep fall off which is consistent with the expectation of the GZK. threshold. The spectrum is inconsistent with a continuing spectrum at the 5{sigma} level. The composition is measured using the Xmax technique. It was found to be predominantly light and unchanging over the range from 1018 to 3 x 1019 eV. Finally, several different styles of searches for anisotropy in the data were performed. There are some tantalizing hints including potential correlation with BL Lac objects and the 'AGASA triplet', however these will need to be confirmed with an independent data set.

  7. The selective distribution of LYVE-1-expressing endothelial cells and reticular cells in the reticulo-endothelial system (RES).

    PubMed

    Zheng, Miao; Kimura, Shunsuke; Nio-Kobayashi, Junko; Iwanaga, Toshihiko

    2016-01-01

    LYVE-1, a receptor molecule for hyaluronan, is expressed in the lymphatic endothelium, blood sinus endothelium, and certain macrophage lineages. The present immunohistochemical study revealed a broader distribution of LYVE-1 in vascular endothelial cells of the murine lung, adrenal gland, and heart as well as the liver and spleen. In addition, sinus reticular cells-including sinuslining cells-in the medulla of the lymph node also intensely expressed LYVE-1. Ultrastructurally, immuno-gold particles for LYVE-1 were localized on the entire length of plasma membrane in all cell types. Most of these LYVE-1-expressing cells had previously been classified as the reticuloendothelial system (RES) specialized for eliminating foreign particles. An LPS stimulation decreased the LYVE-1 expression in macrophages but elevated the expression at mRNA and protein levels in the liver and lung, major organs for the elimination of blood-born waste substances. LYVE-1-expressing endothelial cells in these organs participated in the endocytosis of exogenous particles, and the uptake ability was conspicuously enhanced by the LPS challenge. Although the expression of the degrading enzyme, hyaluronidase, was generally low in the LYVE-1-expressing cells, they were topographically associated with a dense distribution of macrophages possessing hyaluronidase activities in each tissue. These findings suggest that the LYVE-1-expressing cells might be involved in the uptake of hyaluronan and other waste products as well as foreign particles circulating in the blood and lymph while participating in the subsequent degradation in relay with adjacent macrophage populations. PMID:27356606

  8. Striking intrafamilial phenotypic variability in Aicardi-Goutières syndrome associated with the recurrent Asian founder mutation in RNASEH2C.

    PubMed

    Vogt, Julie; Agrawal, Shakti; Ibrahim, Zala; Southwood, Taunton R; Philip, Sunny; Macpherson, Lesley; Bhole, Malini V; Crow, Yanick J; Oley, Christine

    2013-02-01

    Aicardi-Goutières syndrome (AGS) is an encephalopathy of early childhood which is most commonly inherited as an autosomal recessive trait. The disorder demonstrates significant genetic heterogeneity with causative mutations in five genes identified to date. Although most patients with AGS experience a severe neonatal or infantile presentation, poor neurodevelopmental outcome and reduced survival, clinical variability in the onset and severity of the condition is being increasingly recognized. A later presentation with a more variable effect on development, morbidity and mortality has been particularly observed in association with mutations in SAMHD1 and RNASEH2B. In contrast, the recurrent c.205C > T (p.R69W) RNASEH2C Asian founder mutation has previously only been identified in children with a severe AGS phenotype. Here, to our knowledge, we present the first report of marked phenotypic variability in siblings both harboring this founder mutation in the homozygous state. In this family, one female child had a severe AGS phenotype with an onset in infancy and profound developmental delay, whilst an older sister was of completely normal intellect with a normal head circumference and was only diagnosed because of the presence of chilblains and a mild hemiplegia. An appreciation of intrafamilial phenotypic expression is important in the counseling of families considering prenatal diagnosis, and may also be relevant to the assessment of efficacy in future clinical trials. In addition, marked phenotypic variation raises the possibility that more mildly affected patients are not currently identified. PMID:23322642

  9. Nitrogen and oxygen regulation of Bacillus subtilis nasDEF encoding NADH-dependent nitrite reductase by TnrA and ResDE.

    PubMed

    Nakano, M M; Hoffmann, T; Zhu, Y; Jahn, D

    1998-10-01

    The nitrate and nitrite reductases of Bacillus subtilis have two different physiological functions. Under conditions of nitrogen limitation, these enzymes catalyze the reduction of nitrate via nitrite to ammonia for the anabolic incorporation of nitrogen into biomolecules. They also function catabolically in anaerobic respiration, which involves the use of nitrate and nitrite as terminal electron acceptors. Two distinct nitrate reductases, encoded by narGHI and nasBC, function in anabolic and catabolic nitrogen metabolism, respectively. However, as reported herein, a single NADH-dependent, soluble nitrite reductase encoded by the nasDE genes is required for both catabolic and anabolic processes. The nasDE genes, together with nasBC (encoding assimilatory nitrate reductase) and nasF (required for nitrite reductase siroheme cofactor formation), constitute the nas operon. Data presented show that transcription of nasDEF is driven not only by the previously characterized nas operon promoter but also from an internal promoter residing between the nasC and nasD genes. Transcription from both promoters is activated by nitrogen limitation during aerobic growth by the nitrogen regulator, TnrA. However, under conditions of oxygen limitation, nasDEF expression and nitrite reductase activity were significantly induced. Anaerobic induction of nasDEF required the ResDE two-component regulatory system and the presence of nitrite, indicating partial coregulation of NasDEF with the respiratory nitrate reductase NarGHI during nitrate respiration. PMID:9765565

  10. Nitrogen and Oxygen Regulation of Bacillus subtilis nasDEF Encoding NADH-Dependent Nitrite Reductase by TnrA and ResDE

    PubMed Central

    Nakano, Michiko M.; Hoffmann, Tamara; Zhu, Yi; Jahn, Dieter

    1998-01-01

    The nitrate and nitrite reductases of Bacillus subtilis have two different physiological functions. Under conditions of nitrogen limitation, these enzymes catalyze the reduction of nitrate via nitrite to ammonia for the anabolic incorporation of nitrogen into biomolecules. They also function catabolically in anaerobic respiration, which involves the use of nitrate and nitrite as terminal electron acceptors. Two distinct nitrate reductases, encoded by narGHI and nasBC, function in anabolic and catabolic nitrogen metabolism, respectively. However, as reported herein, a single NADH-dependent, soluble nitrite reductase encoded by the nasDE genes is required for both catabolic and anabolic processes. The nasDE genes, together with nasBC (encoding assimilatory nitrate reductase) and nasF (required for nitrite reductase siroheme cofactor formation), constitute the nas operon. Data presented show that transcription of nasDEF is driven not only by the previously characterized nas operon promoter but also from an internal promoter residing between the nasC and nasD genes. Transcription from both promoters is activated by nitrogen limitation during aerobic growth by the nitrogen regulator, TnrA. However, under conditions of oxygen limitation, nasDEF expression and nitrite reductase activity were significantly induced. Anaerobic induction of nasDEF required the ResDE two-component regulatory system and the presence of nitrite, indicating partial coregulation of NasDEF with the respiratory nitrate reductase NarGHI during nitrate respiration. PMID:9765565

  11. RNase H2 catalytic core Aicardi-Goutières syndrome-related mutant invokes cGAS-STING innate immune-sensing pathway in mice.

    PubMed

    Pokatayev, Vladislav; Hasin, Naushaba; Chon, Hyongi; Cerritelli, Susana M; Sakhuja, Kiran; Ward, Jerrold M; Morris, H Douglas; Yan, Nan; Crouch, Robert J

    2016-03-01

    The neuroinflammatory autoimmune disease Aicardi-Goutières syndrome (AGS) develops from mutations in genes encoding several nucleotide-processing proteins, including RNase H2. Defective RNase H2 may induce accumulation of self-nucleic acid species that trigger chronic type I interferon and inflammatory responses, leading to AGS pathology. We created a knock-in mouse model with an RNase H2 AGS mutation in a highly conserved residue of the catalytic subunit, Rnaseh2a(G37S/G37S) (G37S), to understand disease pathology. G37S homozygotes are perinatal lethal, in contrast to the early embryonic lethality previously reported for Rnaseh2b- or Rnaseh2c-null mice. Importantly, we found that the G37S mutation led to increased expression of interferon-stimulated genes dependent on the cGAS-STING signaling pathway. Ablation of STING in the G37S mice results in partial rescue of the perinatal lethality, with viable mice exhibiting white spotting on their ventral surface. We believe that the G37S knock-in mouse provides an excellent animal model for studying RNASEH2-associated autoimmune diseases. PMID:26880576

  12. Altered spatio-temporal dynamics of RNase H2 complex assembly at replication and repair sites in Aicardi-Goutières syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kind, Barbara; Muster, Britta; Staroske, Wolfgang; Herce, Henry D; Sachse, René; Rapp, Alexander; Schmidt, Franziska; Koss, Sarah; Cardoso, M Cristina; Lee-Kirsch, Min Ae

    2014-11-15

    Ribonuclease H2 plays an essential role for genome stability as it removes ribonucleotides misincorporated into genomic DNA by replicative polymerases and resolves RNA/DNA hybrids. Biallelic mutations in the genes encoding the three RNase H2 subunits cause Aicardi-Goutières syndrome (AGS), an early-onset inflammatory encephalopathy that phenotypically overlaps with the autoimmune disorder systemic lupus erythematosus. Here we studied the intracellular dynamics of RNase H2 in living cells during DNA replication and in response to DNA damage using confocal time-lapse imaging and fluorescence cross-correlation spectroscopy. We demonstrate that the RNase H2 complex is assembled in the cytosol and imported into the nucleus in an RNase H2B-dependent manner. RNase H2 is not only recruited to DNA replication foci, but also to sites of PCNA-dependent DNA repair. By fluorescence recovery after photobleaching, we demonstrate a high mobility and fast exchange of RNase H2 at sites of DNA repair and replication. We provide evidence that recruitment of RNase H2 is not only PCNA-dependent, mediated by an interaction of the B subunit with PCNA, but also PCNA-independent mediated via the catalytic domain of the A subunit. We found that AGS-associated mutations alter complex formation, recruitment efficiency and exchange kinetics at sites of DNA replication and repair suggesting that impaired ribonucleotide removal contributes to AGS pathogenesis. PMID:24986920

  13. Clinical and pathologic features of Aicardi-Goutières syndrome due to an IFIH1 mutation: A pediatric case report.

    PubMed

    Marguet, Florent; Laquerrière, Annie; Goldenberg, Alice; Guerrot, Anne-Marie; Quenez, Olivier; Flahaut, Philippe; Vanhulle, Catherine; Dumant-Forest, Clémentine; Charbonnier, Françoise; Vezain, Myriam; Bekri, Soumeya; Tournier, Isabelle; Frébourg, Thierry; Nicolas, Gaël

    2016-05-01

    We describe the case of a young patient with calcifying encephalopathy, born to asymptomatic parents. An extensive hypothesis-driven etiological assessment was performed and failed to detect the precise etiology during many years. We therefore decided to perform whole exome sequencing of the child-unaffected parents trio. A de novo pathogenic variant in the IFIH1 gene which has recently been shown to cause autosomal dominant forms of Aicardi-Goutières syndrome was identified. This child presented with a severe form with neonatal thrombocytopenia and hepatomegaly, the latter having been detected during late gestation. Although first milestones were uneventful, he progressively lost motor skills from the age of 12 months and developed severe spastic paraplegia. Brain imaging revealed white matter abnormalities and extensive calcifications. He also presented atypical skin lesions, different from chilblains. His medical history was marked by two episodes of acute pancreatitis. We provide herein the results of pathological examination including detailed description of the neuropathological hallmarks. To our knowledge, this the first detailed clinico-pathological description of a patient with an IFIH1 pathogenic variant. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26833990

  14. Mesozoic vein-type Pb-Zn mineralization in the Pyrenees: Lead isotopic and fluid inclusion evidence from the Les Argentières and Lacore deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munoz, Marguerite; Baron, Sandrine; Boucher, Adrien; Béziat, Didier; Salvi, Stefano

    2016-03-01

    The Axial Zone of the Pyrenees contains numerous sedimentary-exhalative Pb-Zn deposits formed during the Early Palaeozoic, which have been the subject of several studies. In addition to these, base-metal vein-type mineralizations are also exposed within the Axial Zone metasediments. These deposits, however, have not been investigated in depth and the timing and geodynamic context of their formation has not been specifically addressed. The vein-type Pb-Zn deposits of Les Argentières and Lacore are located in Devonian terranes of the eastern Pyrenees, south of the Mesozoic Aulus basin. They are interpreted as having been emplaced under an extensional setting. They are characterized by silver-rich tetrahedrite that occurs with Pb-Zn sulphides deposited by low-temperature NaCl-CaCl2 brines. Lead isotopic 208Pb/204Pb and 206Pb/204Pb ratios acquired on galena show more radiogenic values compared to those from the Palaeozoic sedimentary-exhalative mineralization, thus indicating younger ages. According to the model ages, the formation of the two deposits may be narrowed down to middle Late Triassic and Late Jurassic periods, respectively, which allows us to argue in favour of the role of pre-Alpine rifting phases in hydrothermal fluids circulation and mineralization deposition in a vein system bounding the Mesozoic Aulus basin.

  15. Implementation of European Council resolution ResAP(2008)1 in Italy. National and regional regulation of tattoo practices: diversity and challenges.

    PubMed

    Renzoni, Alberto; Pirrera, Antonia; Novello, Francesco; Diamante, Maria Simonetta; Guarino, Carmine

    2015-01-01

    In Italy, tattoos and permanent make-up have become increasingly popular in recent years. The number of tattoo parlours has increased from 257 in 2009 to 2,055 in 2014, wich is a eight-fold increase over the last 6 years. Although there is no specific legislation, the Italian Ministry of Health issued a document containing the 'Guidelines for the implementation of procedures for tattooing and piercing in safe conditions'. This document has not been adopted by all Italian regions, principally regarding training course requirements for tattoo professionals, creating a highly fragmented situation that resembles the European scene in miniature. ResAP(2008)1, which is not mandatory in Italy but was made binding by Italian Decree n. 206/2005, has been applied uniformly throughout the country. Thus, as far as the safety of inks is concerned, the surveillance system appears to be working well. However, surveillance has highlighted the presence of non-compliant inks and potentially unsafe preparations for tattoo removal in the market. Updating and rebalancing the situation will be the goal in order to face the challenge of combining well-being with the on-going social demand of looking after and beautifying the body. This would include the growing fashion of tattoos, provided that the products that are used are safe and that tattooing is performed in controlled hygienic conditions that fully guarantee the health of consumers. PMID:25833645

  16. Stem Cells Deemed Safe for ALS Patients

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_159627.html Stem Cells Deemed Safe for ALS Patients But further research ... June 29, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Scientists report that stem cell therapy appears to be safe for people with ...

  17. Pesticides Linked to Raised Risk of ALS

    MedlinePlus

    ... nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_158737.html Pesticides Linked to Raised Risk of ALS One toxin ... MONDAY, May 9, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Exposure to pesticides and other chemicals may increase the risk for ...

  18. Stem Cells Deemed Safe for ALS Patients

    MedlinePlus

    ... nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_159627.html Stem Cells Deemed Safe for ALS Patients But further ... June 29, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Scientists report that stem cell therapy appears to be safe for people ...

  19. ALS and Oxidative Stress: The Neurovascular Scenario

    PubMed Central

    Thakur, Keshav; Gupta, Pawan Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Oxidative stress and angiogenic factors have been placed as the prime focus of scientific investigations after an establishment of link between vascular endothelial growth factor promoter (VEGF), hypoxia, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) pathogenesis. Deletion of the hypoxia-response element in the vascular endothelial growth factor promoter and mutant superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) which are characterised by atrophy and muscle weakness resulted in phenotype resembling human ALS in mice. This results in lower motor neurodegeneration thus establishing an important link between motor neuron degeneration, vasculature, and angiogenic molecules. In this review, we have presented human, animal, and in vitro studies which suggest that molecules like VEGF have a therapeutic, diagnostic, and prognostic potential in ALS. Involvement of vascular growth factors and hypoxia response elements also highlights the converging role of oxidative stress and neurovascular network for understanding and treatment of various neurodegenerative disorders like ALS. PMID:24367722

  20. Glial cells in ALS: the missing link?

    PubMed

    Raibon, Elsa; Todd, Lisa Marie; Möller, Thomas

    2008-08-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) was initially known as Charcot's sclerosis, named after the French neurobiologist and physician Jean-Martin Charcot who first described this type of muscular atrophy in the early nineteenth century. In the United States, ALS became widely known as Lou Gehrig's disease after the famous baseball player who succumbed to the disease in the late 1930s. Currently, ALS is the most common motor neuron disease, with a worldwide incidence of 8 cases per 100,000 population per year. Familial forms constitute approximately 5% to 10% of all cases. Onset increases with age, with a peak in the seventh decade and a slight preponderance (relative risk, 1.3-1.5) among men compared with women. Rapid progression of motor neuron loss leads to death an average of 3 to 5 years after symptom onset. The cause of ALS remains unknown and there is still no curative therapy. PMID:18625409

  1. Thermal Conductivity of Al-Salt Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Peng; Zhang, Mei; Wang, Lijun; Seetharaman, Seshadri

    2015-11-01

    With a view to examine the possibility of estimating the content of entrapped metallic aluminium in the salt cake from aluminium remelting, the thermal diffusivity of reference composites of KCl-NaCl-Al was measured as a function of aluminium metal content at room temperature. The thermal conductivity of the reference composites was found to increase with the metallic Al content. The lumped parameter model approach was carried out to discuss the influence of different geometry arrangements of each phase, viz. air, salts and metallic aluminium on the thermal conductivity. Application of the present results to industrial samples indicates that factors such as the interfacial condition of metallic Al particles have to be considered in order to estimate the amount of entrapped Al in the salt cake.

  2. ALS: Recent Developments from Genetics Studies.

    PubMed

    Therrien, Martine; Dion, Patrick A; Rouleau, Guy A

    2016-06-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal disorder that is characterized by a progressive degeneration of the upper and lower motor neurons. Most cases appear to be sporadic, but 5-10 % of cases have a family history of the disease. High-throughput DNA sequencing and related genomic capture tools are methodological advances which have rapidly contributed to an acceleration in the discovery of genetic risk factors for both familial and sporadic ALS. It is interesting to note that as the number of ALS genes grows, many of the proteins they encode are in shared intracellular processes. This review will summarize some of the recent advances and gene discovery made in ALS. PMID:27113253

  3. Pesticides Linked to Raised Risk of ALS

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_158737.html Pesticides Linked to Raised Risk of ALS One toxin ... MONDAY, May 9, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Exposure to pesticides and other chemicals may increase the risk for ...

  4. Ion clusters in the lower stratosphere and upper troposphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Auria, R.; Turco, R. P.

    2003-04-01

    acid/water embryos can act as freezing nuclei for supercooled polar stratospheric clouds [Hamill and Turco, 2000; D'Auria and Turco, 2001]. Is likely that similar processes occur throughout the troposphere. We discuss the techniques used to define ion cluster properties, and potential applications of our hybrid thermodynamic model to study aerosol formation. References: begin{description [textmd{Arnold,}] F., D. Krankowsky and K. H. Marien, First mass spectrometric measurements of positive ions in the stratosphere, Nature, 267, 30-32, 1977. [textmd{Arnold,}]F., A. A. Viggiano, H. Schlager, Implications for trace gases and aerosols of large negative ion clusters in the stratosphere, Nature, 297, 371-376, 1982. [textmd{D'Auria,}]R. and R. P. Turco, Ionic clusters in the polar winter stratosphere, Geophys. Res. Lett., 28, 3871-3874, 2001. [textmd{D'Auria,}]R. and R. P. Turco, Atmospheric Ion Clusters: Properties and Size Distributions, EOS Trans. AGU, 83, Fall Meet. Suppl., Abstract A71F-10, 2002. [textmd{Eichkorn,}]S., S. Wilhelm, H. Aufmhoff, K. H. Wohlfrom, F. Arnold, Cosmic ray-induced aerosol-formation: First observational evidence from aircraft-based ion mass spectrometer measurements in the upper troposphere, Geophys. Res. Lett., 29, 10.1029/2002GL015044, 2002. [textmd{Gilligan,}]J. J., and A. W. Castleman, Jr., Acid dissolution by aqueous surfaces and ice: Insights from a study of water cluster ions, J. Phys. Chem. A, 105, 5601-5605,2001. [textmd{Hamill,}]P. and R. P. Turco, Ion nucleation of NAT in ternary system polar stratospheric clouds, Trans. Amer. Geophys. Union, 81 (19, May 9, 2000) Suppl., S97, 2000. [textmd{Hõrrak,}]U, J. Salm and H. Tammet, Bursts of intermediate ions the atmospheric air, J. Geophys. Res., 103, 13,909-13,915, 1998. [textmd{Turco,}]R. P., J.-X. Zhao, and F. Yu, A new source of tropospheric aerosols: Ion-ion recombination, Geophys. Res. Lett., 25, 635 -638, 1998. [textmd{Yu,}]F., and R. P. Turco, Ultrafine aerosol formation via ion

  5. 17th Annual ALS Users' Association Meeting

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, Art; Tamura, Lori

    2004-11-29

    It's not exactly Russian roulette, but scheduling October events outdoors is not risk-free, even in usually sunny California. An overflow crowd of more than 400 registered users, ALS staff, and vendors enjoyed a full indoor program featuring science highlights and workshops spread over two and a half days from October 18 to October 20. However, a major storm, heralding the onset of the San Francisco Bay Area rainy season, posed a few weather challenges for the events on the ALS patio.

  6. Itinerant antiferromagnetism of TiAl alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrişor, T.; Pop, I.; Giurgiu, A.; Farbaş, N.

    1986-06-01

    Magnetic susceptibility measurements of TiAl alloys are reported. Aluminium, by alloying, acts on the Néel temperature of pure titanium giving rise to a complicated phase diagram. A theoretical model, based on the itinerant antiferromagnetism model of chromium is proposed in order to explain the magnetic phase diagram of TiAl alloys. The experimental and theoretical magnetic phase diagram are in good agreement.

  7. Magnetism of Al-Mn quasicrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, F.; Khanna, S.N.; Magaud, L.; Jena, P. ); de Coulon, V.; Reuse, F. ); Jaswal, S.S.; He, X. ); Cyrot-Lackman, F. )

    1993-07-01

    The effect of symmetry and concentration of Mn on the magnetism of Al-Mn quasicrystals has been investigated through self-consistent density-functional calculations using molecular clusters and supercell band-structure schemes. A single Mn atom surrounded by 54 Al atoms in an icosahedral or a cuboctahedral structure is found to be nonmagnetic. However, as the Mn concentration is increased, moments develop on Mn sites whose magnitude and coupling depend on their location.

  8. LADEE UVS Observations of Atoms and Dust in the Lunar Tail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wooden, Diane H.; Colaprete, Anthony; Cook, Amanda M.; Shirley, Mark H.; Vargo, Kara E.; Elphic, Richard C.; Stubbs, Timothy J.; Glenar, David A.

    2014-11-01

    .nasa.gov Farrell, W. M. et al. (2012), Icarus 219, 498Mayer-Vernet, N. et al. (2009), Solar Phys. 256, 463Smith, S. M. et al. (1999), Geophys. Res. Lett. 26, 1649Stubbs, T. et al. (2014), Planet. Space Sci. 90, 10 Wilson, J. K. et al. (1999) Geophys. Res. Lett. 26, 1645

  9. 4-D Transdimensional Tomography of Iceland Using Ambient Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhowmick, D.; Tkalcic, H.; Young, M.

    2012-12-01

    excellent property that it treats the number of model parameters (e.g. the number of basis functions) and the noise in the data as an unknown in the problem (Bodin and Sambridge, 2009; Bodin et al., 2012). This approach is advantageous over general optimisation framework where we need to assume the knowledge of noise in the data, define the smoothness and damping, etc. The level of data noise is crucial because it effectively quantifies the usable information present in the data (a very noisy dataset does not contain much retrievable information) and here it naturally controls the quantity of information that consequently should be present in the model (i.e. the number of model parameters). This work is further extended to image the crust for different time intervals and study ongoing dynamics of the Icelandic crust. References: Bodin and Sambridge (2009), Geophys. J. Int., 178, 1411-1436. Bodin et al. (2012), J. Geophys. Res., 117, B02301. Fichtner and Tkalcic (2010), Earth Planet. Sci. Lett., 297, 607-615. Foulger et al. (2001), Geophys. J. Int., 146, 504-530. Foulger (2010), Plates Vs Plumes: A Geological Controversy, 328. Gudmundson et al. (2007), Geophys. Res. Lett., 34, L14314. Rawlinson and Sambridge (2005), Explor. Geophys., 36,341-350. Tkalcic et al. (2009), Bull. Seismol. Soc. Am., 99, 3077-3085.

  10. Next-generation sequencing of 28 ALS-related genes in a Japanese ALS cohort.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Ryoichi; Sone, Jun; Atsuta, Naoki; Tohnai, Genki; Watanabe, Hazuki; Yokoi, Daichi; Nakatochi, Masahiro; Watanabe, Hirohisa; Ito, Mizuki; Senda, Jo; Katsuno, Masahisa; Tanaka, Fumiaki; Li, Yuanzhe; Izumi, Yuishin; Morita, Mitsuya; Taniguchi, Akira; Kano, Osamu; Oda, Masaya; Kuwabara, Satoshi; Abe, Koji; Aiba, Ikuko; Okamoto, Koichi; Mizoguchi, Kouichi; Hasegawa, Kazuko; Aoki, Masashi; Hattori, Nobutaka; Tsuji, Shoji; Nakashima, Kenji; Kaji, Ryuji; Sobue, Gen

    2016-03-01

    We investigated the frequency and contribution of variants of the 28 known amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS)-related genes in Japanese ALS patients. We designed a multiplex, polymerase chain reaction-based primer panel to amplify the coding regions of the 28 ALS-related genes and sequenced DNA samples from 257 Japanese ALS patients using an Ion Torrent PGM sequencer. We also performed exome sequencing and identified variants of the 28 genes in an additional 251 ALS patients using an Illumina HiSeq 2000 platform. We identified the known ALS pathogenic variants and predicted the functional properties of novel nonsynonymous variants in silico. These variants were confirmed by Sanger sequencing. Known pathogenic variants were identified in 19 (48.7%) of the 39 familial ALS patients and 14 (3.0%) of the 469 sporadic ALS patients. Thirty-two sporadic ALS patients (6.8%) harbored 1 or 2 novel nonsynonymous variants of ALS-related genes that might be deleterious. This study reports the first extensive genetic screening of Japanese ALS patients. These findings are useful for developing genetic screening and counseling strategies for such patients. PMID:26742954

  11. Metastability in the MgAl2O4-Al2O3 System

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wilkerson, Kelley R.; Smith, Jeffrey D.; Hemrick, James G.

    2014-07-22

    Aluminum oxide must take a spinel form ( γ-Al2O3) at elevated temperatures in order for extensive solid solution to form between MgAl2O4 and α-Al2O3. The solvus line between MgAl2O4 and Al2O3 has been defined at 79.6 wt% Al2O3 at 1500°C, 83.0 wt% Al2O3 at 1600°C, and 86.5 wt% Al2O3 at 1700°C. A metastable region has been defined at temperatures up to 1700°C which could have significant implications for material processing and properties. Additionally, initial processing could have major implications on final chemistry. The spinel solid solution region has been extended to form an infinite solid solution with Al2O3 at elevatedmore » temperatures. A minimum in melting at 1975°C and a chemistry of 96 wt% Al2O3 rather than a eutectic is present, resulting in no eutectic crystal formation during solidification.« less

  12. Hydrated Minerals in Circumpolar Terrains: Geographic Distribution, Mineralogical Composition and Possible Origins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langevin, Y.; Poulet, F.; Fishbaugh, K. E.; Roach, L.; Vincendon, M.; Gondet, B.; Bibring, J.; Murchie, S.

    2007-12-01

    evidence for induration (Schatz et al., 2006). Weaker occurrences of the 1.93 µm OH stretch band have been observed in other northern and southern circumpolar locations. Sulfates and hydrated oxides provide much better matches for these signatures than phyllosilicates. The formation of large amounts of hydrated sulfates in the relatively young northern circumpolar terrains requires a source of sulfur (already present in soils? volcanic activity?) as well as water, which most likely is provided by outflows from the nearby polar cap (Fishbaugh et al., 2007). This process for generating hydrated minerals is distinct from that which was active during the first few hundred million years of the history of the planet. Bibring et al., Science 307, p. 1576-1581 (2005); Bibring et al., Science 312, p. 400-404 (2006); Feldman et al., Lunar Planet. Sci. 38 #2311 (2007); Fishbaugh et al., J. Geophys. Res. 112, E07002 (2007); Herkenhoff and Vasavada, J. Geophys. Res. 104, 16484. Horgan et al., 7th Int. Conf. on Mars #3241 (2007); Langevin et al., Science 307, p. 1581-1583 ; Langevin et al., Lunar Planet. Sci. 36 #1652 (2005) ; Roach et al., Lunar Planet. Sci. 38 #1970 (2007) ; Schatz et al., J. Geophys. Res. 111, E04006 (2006).

  13. Excitotoxicity in ALS: Overstimulation, or overreaction?

    PubMed

    King, Anna E; Woodhouse, Adele; Kirkcaldie, Matthew T K; Vickers, James C

    2016-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is an adult onset neurodegenerative disease that results in motor dysfunction and death, generally from respiratory failure. 90% of ALS cases are sporadic with no known cause. Familial cases have been linked with mutations in several disparate classes of genes, including those involved in DNA/RNA metabolism, protein misfolding, oxidative stress and the cytoskeleton, leading to the proposition that ALS could be a multi-factorial disease. However, alterations in excitability have been reported in all types of ALS cases, and may be a common disease mechanism predisposing neurons to degeneration. Excitotoxicity has long been suspected as a mediator in the disease process, and may arise from changes in synaptic inputs, or alterations in the excitability of the neurons being stimulated. Although the glutamatergic system is widely recognised as a therapeutic avenue with the potential to extend lifespan and delay disease onset, the causes of altered excitability in ALS are currently unclear and warrant further investigation. This article reviews current evidence of alterations to excitatory and inhibitory signalling in the cortex and spinal cord, and in the intrinsic excitability of motor neurons, in ALS. PMID:26584004

  14. Clinical trials for neuroprotection in ALS.

    PubMed

    Siciliano, G; Carlesi, C; Pasquali, L; Piazza, S; Pietracupa, S; Fornai, F; Ruggieri, S; Murri, L

    2010-07-01

    Owing to uncertainty on the pathogenic mechanisms underlying motor neuron degeneration in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) riluzole remains the only available therapy, with only marginal effects on disease survival. Here we review some of the recent advances in the search for disease-modifying drugs for ALS based on their putative neuroprotective effetcs. A number of more or less established agents have recently been investigated also in ALS for their potential role in neuroprotection and relying on antiglutamatergic, antioxidant or antiapoptotic strategies. Among them Talampanel, beta-lactam antibiotics, Coenzyme Q10, and minocycline have been investigated. Progress has also been made in exploiting growth factors for the treatment of ALS, partly due to advances in developing effective delivery systems to the central nervous system. A number of new therapies have also been identified, including a novel class of compounds, such as heat-shock protein co-inducers, which upregulate cell stress responses, and agents promoting autophagy and mitochondriogenesis, such as lithium and rapamycin. More recently, alterations of mRNA processing were described as a pathogenic mechanism in genetically defined forms of ALS, as those related to TDP-43 and FUS-TLS gene mutations. This knowledge is expected to improve our understanding of the pathogenetic mechanism in ALS and developing more effective therapies. PMID:20406180

  15. Modeling of precipitation in Al alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Asta, M.; Foiles, S.M.; Wolfer, W.G.

    1996-10-01

    Objective was the development of a computational model of precipitation from a supersaturated alloy solid solution. The model is based on the formalism of chemical-reaction-rate theory combined with classical descriptions of precipitate thermodynamic properties and a mean-field treatment of diffusion-limited growht and coarsening. For the case of precipitation of Al{sub 3}Sc in supersaturated Al-Sc alloys, it is demonstrated how the model can be used to calculate number densities and size distributions of precipitates as a function of aging time and temperature, including effects of continuous cooling and thermally generated point defects. Application of the model to a specific alloy system requires knowledge of diffusion data, point defect energetics, and thermodynamic properties for bulk phases and interphase interfaces. For interfaces and point defects, thermodynamic data can be difficult to measure and reliable values of defect free energies are often unavailable. For this reason, part of the efforts were devoted to applying semiempirical and first-principles atomistic techniques to the calculation of interfacial and point-defect thermodynamic properties. This report discusses applications for interphase interfaces in the Al-Ag, Al-Sc, and Al-Li alloy systems. We also describe atomistic work aimed at understanding the energetics of vacancy clusters in Al. These clusters serve as sinks for isolated vacancies during aging and their growth can lead to more complex defects, such as dislocation loops, that act as heterogeneous nucleation sites.

  16. How common are ALS plateaus and reversals?

    PubMed Central

    Vaughan, Timothy; Wicks, Paul; Heywood, Jamie; Sinani, Ervin; Selsov, Roger; Macklin, Eric A.; Schoenfeld, David; Cudkowicz, Merit; Sherman, Alex

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To determine the frequency of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) plateaus and reversals in the Pooled Resource Open-Access ALS Clinical Trials (PRO-ACT) database. Methods: We analyzed Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Functional Rating Scale (ALSFRS) and ALSFRS–revised (ALSFRS-R) data from PRO-ACT participants. The frequencies of participants experiencing plateaus (periods where scores did not change) were calculated over 6-, 12-, and 18-month epochs. The percentage of participants ever experiencing reversals (periods where scores improved) of different lengths were also calculated and plotted. Results: Over 6 months, 25% of 3,132 participants did not decline. Over 12 months, 16% of 2,105 participants did not decline. Over 18 months, 7% of 1,218 participants did not decline. Small ALS reversals were also common, especially over shorter follow-up intervals; 14% of 1,343 participants had a 180-day interval where their ALSFRS-R slope was greater than zero. Fewer than 1% of participants ever experienced improvements of 4 or more ALSFRS-R points lasting at least 12 months. Conclusion: ALS plateaus and small reversals are common, especially over brief intervals. In light of these data, stable disease, especially for a short period of time, should not be interpreted as an ALS treatment effect. Large sustained ALS reversals, on the other hand, are rare, potentially important, and warrant further study. PMID:26658909

  17. Scattering induced by Al segregation in AlGaN/GaN heterostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Xiwen; Lu, Yanwu; Ji, Dong

    2015-08-17

    The effect of Al segregation near dislocations on the mobility of two-dimensional electron gas in AlGaN/GaN heterostructure-based high-electron-mobility transistors was investigated. Exponentially varied composition fluctuation was effective in describing Al segregation near dislocations when calculating scattering behavior. Mobility, which was limited by Al segregation surrounding dislocation lines, was calculated to be in the order of 10{sup 3} cm{sup 2}/Vs to 10{sup 6} cm{sup 2}/Vs. Results indicated that the mobility in AlGaN/GaN heterojunction was enhanced upon the reduction of dislocation density at low temperature. This study contributes to generating higher electron mobility in AlGaN/GaN heterojunctions.

  18. Thermal Properties in the MgAl2O4-Al2O3 System

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkerson, Dr. Kelley R.; Smith, Jeffrey D; Hemrick, James Gordon

    2013-01-01

    Compositional effects on the thermal diffusivity in the MgAl2O4-Al2O3 system were studied. The lowest thermal diffusivity, 0.0258 +/-5% cm/s, was measured between 79.8 and 83.9 wt% Al2O3 quenched from various temperatures between 1500 and 1700C. All of the chemistries in this range extend past the solvus, but still form a singe super-saturated spinel solid solution, regardless of quenching tempeature. A super-saturated metastable solid solution region was observed at 1500, 1600, and 1700C extending to 83.9, 85.2, and 87.1 wt% Al2O3, respectively. Beyond 83.9% Al2O3 a significant increase in thermal diffusivity, 11.7%, was observed and its attributed to precipiation of Al2O3 through spinodal decomposition.

  19. Effects of Al(III) and nano-Al13 species on malate dehydrogenase activity.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaodi; Cai, Ling; Peng, Yu; Li, Huihui; Chen, Rong Fu; Shen, Ren Fang

    2011-01-01

    The effects of different aluminum species on malate dehydrogenase (MDH) activity were investigated by monitoring amperometric i-t curves for the oxidation of NADH at low overpotential using a functionalized multi-wall nanotube (MWNT) modified glass carbon electrode (GCE). The results showed that Al(III) and Al(13) can activate the enzymatic activity of MDH, and the activation reaches maximum levels as the Al(III) and Al(13) concentration increase. Our study also found that the effects of Al(III) and Al(13) on the activity of MDH depended on the pH value and aluminum speciation. Electrochemical and circular dichroism spectra methods were applied to study the effects of nano-sized aluminum compounds on biomolecules. PMID:22163924

  20. TEM studies of oxidized NiAl and Ni3Al cross sections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doychak, J.; Ruhle, M.

    1989-01-01

    Cross sections of oxide scale/(Ni-Al) intermetallics were prepared by a new method and studied using primarily TEM. The cross sections were prepared by encasing an oxidized metal specimen sandwich in a low-melting-temperature zinc alloy. Observations of oxidized zirconium-doped beta-NiAl cross sections revealed crystallographic voids beneath an adherent Al2O3 scale. The oxide-metal interface was incoherent, but a high dislocation density in the metal near the interface suggested that a large tensile stress was induced by the attached oxide scale. A duplex Al2O3-NiAl2O4 scale formed on zirconium-doped and zirconium/boron-doped gamma-prime-Ni3Al alloys. Additional results are presented involving oxidation mechanisms and oxide-metal interface structures.

  1. Microscopic Properties of Long-Period Ordering in Al-Rich TiAl Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hata, S.; Nakano, T.; Kuwano, N.; Itakura, M.; Matsumura, S.; Umakoshi, Y.

    2008-07-01

    The ordering mechanism of long-period superstructures (LPSs) in Al-rich TiAl alloys has been investigated by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). The LPSs are classified in terms of arrangements of base clusters with different shapes and compositions formed in Ti-rich (002) layers of L10-TiAl matrix: square Ti4Al, fat rhombus Ti3Al, and lean rhombus Ti2Al type clusters. The HRTEM observations revealed that antiphase boundaries of long-range-ordered LPS domains and short-range-ordered microdomains are constructed by various space-filling arrangements of the base clusters. Such a microscopic property characterized by the base clusters and their arrangements is markedly analogous to that of the {left< {{text{1,1/2,0}}} rightrangle } * special-point ordering alloys such as Ni-Mo.

  2. Eversion congénitale bilatérale des paupières: prise en charge d’un cas selon l’approche conservatrice au Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Yaoundé, Cameroun

    PubMed Central

    Monebenimp, Francisca; Kagmeni, Gilles; Chelo, David; Bilong, Yannick; Moukouri, Ernest

    2012-01-01

    L’éversion congénitale des paupières est une affection rare. Son traitement en première intention est généralement conservateur, constitué de lubrifiant, d’antibiotiques, de manœuvres d’inversion de la paupière éversée et d’une éducation des parents. Nous présentons le cas d’un nouveau-né de huit heures de vie ayant une éversion congénitale bilatérale des paupières avec surinfection bactérienne. La ponction à l’aiguille de la conjonctive œdémateuse associée au traitement topique avec du sérum salé isotonique et des antibiotiques ont accéléré le processus de guérison. Une récidive n’a pas été observée lors des pleurs après trois semaines d’inversion des paupières. PMID:22514768

  3. Layer specific optical band gap measurement at nanoscale in MoS2 and ReS2 van der Waals compounds by high resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dileep, K.; Sahu, R.; Sarkar, Sumanta; Peter, Sebastian C.; Datta, R.

    2016-03-01

    Layer specific direct measurement of optical band gaps of two important van der Waals compounds, MoS2 and ReS2, is performed at nanoscale by high resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy. For monolayer MoS2, the twin excitons (1.8 and 1.95 eV) originating at the K point of the Brillouin zone are observed. An indirect band gap of 1.27 eV is obtained from the multilayer regions. Indirect to direct band gap crossover is observed which is consistent with the previously reported strong photoluminescence from the monolayer MoS2. For ReS2, the band gap is direct, and a value of 1.52 and 1.42 eV is obtained for the monolayer and multilayer, respectively. The energy loss function is dominated by features due to high density of states at both the valence and conduction band edges, and the difference in analyzing band gap with respect to ZnO is highlighted. Crystalline 1T ReS2 forms two dimensional chains like superstructure due to the clustering between four Re atoms. The results demonstrate the power of HREELS technique as a nanoscale optical absorption spectroscopy tool.

  4. Influence of RCS on Al-3Mg and Al-3Mg-0.25Sc alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhovi, Prabhakar M.; Venkateswarlu, K.

    2016-02-01

    An influence of repetitive corrugation and straightening (RCS) was studied on Al-3Mg and Al-3Mg-0.25Sc alloys up to eight passes. Each pass consist of a corrugation and followed by straightening. This has resulted in introducing large plastic strain in sample, and thus led to formation of sub-micron grain sizes with high angle grain boundaries. These sub grain formation was eventually resulted in improved mechanical properties. The average grain size of Al-3Mg-0.25Sc alloy after 8 passes yielded to ∼0.6pm. Microhardness, strength properties were evaluated and it suggests that RCS was responsible for high hardness values as compared to the as cast samples. The microhardness values after RCS were 105 HV and 130 HV for Al-3Mg and Al-3Mg-0.25Sc alloys, respectively. Similarly, ∼ 40% improvement in tensile strength from 240 MPa to 370 MPa was observed for Al- 3Mg-0.25Sc alloy after RCS process.Al-3Mg and Al-3Mg-0.25Scalloys exhibited maximum strength of 220 MPa and 370 MPa, respectively. It is concluded that RCS process has a strong influence on Al- 3Mg and Al-3Mg-0.25Sc alloys for obtaining improved mechanical properties and grain refinement. In addition to RCS process and presence of AESc precipitates in Al-3Mg-0.25Sc alloy had a significant role in grain refinement and improved mechanical properties as compared to Al-3Mg alloy.

  5. Remarks on Peinado et al.'s Analysis of J3Gen.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Alfaro, Joaquin; Herrera-Joancomartí, Jordi; Melià-Seguí, Joan

    2015-01-01

    Peinado et al. analyzed the security of the J3Gen pseudorandom number generator proposed by Melià-Seguí et al., and claimed weaknesses regarding its security properties. They also presented a deterministic attack based on the decimation of the J3Gen output sequences. We show that the assumptions made by Peinado et al. are not correct and that the proposed deterministic attack against J3Gen does not hold in practice. PMID:25781510

  6. Two-Phase (TiAl+TiCrAl) Coating Alloys for Titanium Aluminides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brady, Michael P. (Inventor); Smialek, James L. (Inventor); Brindley, William J. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    A coating for protecting titanium aluminide alloys, including the TiAl gamma + Ti3Al (alpha(sub 2)) class, from oxidative attack and interstitial embrittlement at temperatures up to at least 1000 C. is disclosed. This protective coating consists essentially of titanium, aluminum. and chromium in the following approximate atomic ratio: Ti(41.5-34.5)Al(49-53)Cr(9.5-12.5)

  7. Another Security Improvement over the Lin et al.'s E-voting Scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asaar, Maryam Rajabzadeh; Mohajeri, Javad; Salmasizadeh, Mahmoud

    In 2003, Lin et al. have proposed an electronic voting scheme which can be utilized in large-scale elections, and claimed it detects double voting. But in this paper, by presenting an attack, we show that voters can successfully vote more than once without being detected. Hence, we propose a new modified scheme based on the Lin et al.'s scheme with the same efficiency to solve this weakness and analyze its security.

  8. Excited states of 26Al studied via the reaction 27Al(d,t)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, Vishal; Bhattacharya, C.; Rana, T. K.; Manna, S.; Kundu, S.; Bhattacharya, S.; Banerjee, K.; Roy, P.; Pandey, R.; Mukherjee, G.; Ghosh, T. K.; Meena, J. K.; Roy, T.; Chaudhuri, A.; Sinha, M.; Saha, A. K.; Asgar, Md. A.; Dey, A.; Roy, Subinit; Moin Shaikh, Md.

    2016-05-01

    The reaction 27Al(d,t) at 25 MeV was utilized to study the excited states of 26Al. The angular distributions of the observed excited states of 26Al were analyzed with zero range distorted wave Born approximation as well as by incorporating finite range correction parameters to extract spectroscopic factors. The two sets of extracted spectroscopic factors were compared with each other to see the effect of using finite range correction in the transfer form factor.

  9. Temperature dependence diode parameters studies of Al/CuPc/n-Si/Al structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Ratnesh; Kaur, Ramneek; Sharma, Mamta; Kaur, Maninder; Tripathi, S. K.

    2015-08-01

    This paper presents the fabrication of Al/CuPc/n-Si/Al metal-organic-semiconductor diode. The copper phthalocyanine as organic layer is deposited on Si substrate by thermal evaporation technique. The temperature dependent current-voltage measurements are performed on Al/CuPc/n-Si structure. The important diode parameters i.e. the barrier height and ideality factor have been calculated. The temperature dependence of barrier height and ideality factor has been studied.

  10. The effects of artificially impounded water on tide gauge measurements of sea level over the last century

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haberling, S.; Zhang, Y.; Rothacher, M.; Geiger, A.; Clinton, J. F.

    2011-12-01

    Tide gauge measurements spanning the last century reveal global scale and regionally varying changes in sea level. These changes are comprised of signals from a number of natural and anthropogenically forced processes, including ongoing glacial isostatic adjustment, mass flux from polar ice sheets and glaciers, thermosteric effects, and variability in patterns of ocean circulation. We present a new analysis of sea-level changes arising from the impoundment over the last century of more than 6,100 km3 of water (plus estimates of seepage into surrounding soils) in ~6,800 reservoirs around the globe (Chao et al., Science, 2008; Fiedler & Conrad, Geophys. Res. Lett., 2010). In particular, we extend the analysis of Fiedler & Conrad (2010) by adopting a database that includes an additional ~30% of water impoundment. Our calculations are based on a gravitationally self-consistent theory that incorporates the full suite of gravitational, rotational and (elastic) deformational effects on sea level (Kendall et al., Geophys. J. Int., 2005). The signal associated with impoundment at each reservoir is characterized by a sea level fall that is ~30% higher than the globally averaged (eustatic) value of the impoundment. In contrast, in the near field, sea level rises in response to both deformational and gravitational effects with an amplitude that is roughly an order of magnitude greater than the eustatic amplitude. We present global maps of the total sea-level change associated with the reservoirs, and report on an effort to detect the impoundment signal at individual tide gauges.

  11. The lowest ionization potentials of Al2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Barnes, Leslie A.; Taylor, Peter R.

    1988-01-01

    Potential curves for the lowest two electronic states (X 2 sigma g + and A 2 pi u) of Al2(+) were computed using complete active space SCF/multireference CI wave functions and large Gaussian basis sets. The lowest observable vertical ionization potential (to Al2(+) X 2 sigma g +) of the Al2 X 3 pi u ground state is calculated to occur around 6.1 eV, in excellent agreement with the experimental range of 6.0 to 6.42 eV obtained in recent cluster ionization studies by Cox and co-workers. The second vertical ionization potential (to Al2(+) A 2 pi u) occurs near 6.4 eV, also within the experimental range. The adiabatic IP of 5.90 eV is in good agreement with the value of 5.8 to 6.1 eV deduced by Hanley and co-workers from the difference in thresholds between collision induced dissociation processes of Al3(+). The computed IP values are somewhat larger than those deduced from branching ratios in cluster fragmentation experiments by Jarrold and co-workers. The observation of an ionization threshold below 6.42 eV is shown to be incompatible with an Al2 ground electronic state assignment of 3 sigma g -, but the separation between the two lowest states of Al2 is so small that it is likely that both are populated in the experiments, so that this does not provide unambiguous support for the recent theoretical assignment of the ground state as 3 pi u.

  12. The new structure type Gd3Ni7Al14.

    PubMed

    Pukas, Svitlana; Gladyshevskii, Roman

    2015-11-01

    The crystal structure of Gd3Ni7Al14 (trigadolinium heptanickel tetradecaaluminide) belongs to a family of two-layer structures and can be described as an assembly of interpenetrating centred straight prisms. For the Ni atoms, trigonal prisms (Al4Gd2 and Al6) are observed, the Al atoms are inside tetragonal (Ni2Al2Gd4, Ni2Al4Gd2, Al4Gd4, Ni4Al4 and Al8) and pentagonal (Ni4Al6 and Al10) prisms, while the Gd atoms are at the centres of pentagonal (Ni4Al6) and hexagonal (Ni4Al8) prisms. In each case, the true coordination polyhedron is a capped prism, also including atoms from the same layer. The structural features of Gd3Ni7Al14 are similar to those of the intermetallides PrNi2Al3 and ZrNiAl. In all these structures, Ni-centred trigonal prisms form infinite columns via common triangular faces. The columns share prism edges and form a three-dimensional framework with six-membered rings in the (001) plane in the case of the PrNi2Al3 and ZrNiAl types. In the case of Gd3Ni7Al14, six-membered rings are also observed, but only two-thirds of the rings are interconnected via prism edges. PMID:26524174

  13. Reply to comment by Ben-Zvi, A., D. Rosenfeld and A. Givati on the paper: Levin, Z., N. Halfon and P. Alpert, “Reassessment of rain experiments and operations in Israel including synoptic considerations,” Atmos. Res. 97, 513-525. DOI: 10.1016/j.atmosres.2010.06.011

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levin, Zev; Halfon, Noam; Alpert, Pinhas

    2011-03-01

    Levin et al. (2010; hereafter LHA) (Levin, Z., Halfon, N., Alpert, P., 2010. Reassessment of rain experiments and operations in Israel including synoptic considerations. Atmos. Res. 97, 513-525. DOI:10.1016/j.atmosres.2010.06.011.), reanalyzed the results of the operational seeding in northern Israel between 1975 and 2007 and the preceding Israel 2 cloud seeding experiment (1969-1975) and concluded that there is no net increase in precipitation over the target areas. Our analysis revealed that a synoptic bias during Israel 2 is one of the reasons for the apparent positive effect of seeding in the northern target area and the negative effect in the southern area both of which disappeared in the following experiment in the south (Israel 3; 1975-1995) and the operational seeding in the north. Ben-Zvi et al. (2010;hereafter BRG) criticized our paper primarily on the ground that we did not consider the positive results of Israel 1 experiment (1960-1967). It should be noted that in Israel 1 different seeding lines were used from those in both Israel 2 and the operational period. In addition, its raw data is not accessible anymore for reanalysis. Furthermore, Israel 2 had been designed as a confirmatory cross-over experiment to Israel 1 and failed to reproduce its promising results with double ratio (DR) of ~ 1.00, namely, zero rainfall enhancements. The same DR values were also found in Israel 3 and in the operational seeding. Therefore, because of the differences in the two experiments, the lack of access to the raw data and the disappointing results of the confirmatory experiment, we decided to concentrate our analysis on the more recent seeding activities. The attempt by BRG to explain the reduction of the DR to ~ 1.00 in the operational seeding period by the suppression due to pollution have been disproved by Alpert et al. (2008, 2009) and also fail to explain the sharp decline of the target/control ratio right at the beginning of the operational seeding period when

  14. Long range order and vacancy properties in Al-rich Fe{sub 3}Al and Fe{sub 3}Al(Cr) alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, S.M.; Morris, D.G.

    1998-05-01

    Neutron powder diffraction measurements have been carried out in situ from room temperature to about 100 C in Fe28Al (28 at.% Al), Fe32.5Al (32.5 at.% Al) and Fe28Al15Cr (28 at.% Al, 5 at.% Cr) alloys. X-ray diffraction and TEM studies provided supporting information. The data were analyzed to obtain information about the temperature dependence of the DO{sub 3} and B2 long range order parameters, the location of the Cr atoms and their effect on the ordering energies, and on the vacancy formation and migration properties in Fe28Al and Fe32.5Al alloys. The location of the ternary alloying addition in DO{sub 3} and B2 ordered Al-rich Fe{sub 3}Al is shown to be consistent with considerations of interatomic bond energies.

  15. Strain Rates and Grain Growth in Al 5754 and Al 6061 Friction Stir Spot Welds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerlich, A.; Yamamoto, M.; North, T. H.

    2007-06-01

    The stir zone temperature and microstructures are compared in friction stir spot welds produced in Al 5754 and Al 6061 alloys. Electron backscattered diffraction was used to determine the relationship between tool rotation speed during welding and final stir zone grain size. Comparison of the grain sizes in rapidly quenched welds with those in air-cooled joints confirmed that grain growth occurred only in Al 6061 spot welds. There was no evidence of abnormal grain growth in the stir zones of Al 6061 welds; the final grain size could be represented using an Arrhenius equation. The strain rates during welding were determined by incorporating the stir zone temperature and average subgrain sizes in quenched spot welds in the Zener-Hollomon relation. When the tool rotation speed increased from 750 to 3000 RPM, the strain rate values ranged from 180 to 497 s-1 in Al 5754 spot welds and from 55 to 395 s-1 in Al 6061 spot welds. It is suggested that a no-slip boundary condition may be appropriate during numerical modeling of Al 5754 and 6061 friction stir spot welding. This is not the case during Al 7075, Al 2024, and Mg-alloy AZ91 spot welding because spontaneous melting facilitates slippage at the tool contact interface.

  16. High temperature deformation of NiAl and CoAl

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nix, W. D.

    1982-01-01

    The high temperature mechanical properties of the aluminides are reviewed with respect to their potential as high temperature structural materials. It is shown that NiAl and CoAl are substantially stronger than the pure metals Ni and Co at high temperatures and approach the strength of some superalloys, particularly when those superalloys are tested in "weak" directions. The factors that limit and control the high temperature strengths of NiAl and CoAl are examined to provide a basis for the development of intermetallic alloys of this type.

  17. Small Al clusters. II - Structure and binding in Al(n) (n = 2-6, 13)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pettersson, Lars G. M.; Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Halicioglu, Timur

    1987-01-01

    The structure and stability of aluminum clusters containing up to six atoms have been studied using correlated wave functions and extended basis sets. The lowest energy structure is planar for Al4 and Al5, but three dimensional for Al6. The icosahedral, hcp, fcc, and two planar structures of Al13 were considered at the SCF level. The lowest energy structure is the icosahedron, but the planar structures are fairly low lying even in this case. A simplified description using two- and three-body interaction potentials is found to agree well with the ab initio structures and binding energies.

  18. Synthesis of core-shell AlOOH hollow nanospheres by reacting Al nanoparticles with water.

    PubMed

    Lozhkomoev, A S; Glazkova, E A; Bakina, O V; Lerner, M I; Gotman, I; Gutmanas, E Y; Kazantsev, S O; Psakhie, S G

    2016-05-20

    A novel route for the synthesis of boehmite nanospheres with a hollow core and the shell composed of highly crumpled AlOOH nanosheets by oxidizing Al nanopowder in pure water under mild processing conditions is described. The stepwise events of Al transformation into boehmite are followed by monitoring the pH in the reaction medium. A mechanism of formation of hollow AlOOH nanospheres with a well-defined shape and crystallinity is proposed which includes the hydration of the Al oxide passivation layer, local corrosion of metallic Al accompanied by hydrogen evolution, the rupture of the protective layer, the dissolution of Al from the particle interior and the deposition of AlOOH nanosheets on the outer surface. In contrast to previously reported methods of boehmite nanoparticle synthesis, the proposed method is simple, and environmentally friendly and allows the generation of hydrogen gas as a by-product. Due to their high surface area and high, slit-shaped nanoporosity, the synthesized AlOOH nanostructures hold promise for the development of more effective catalysts, adsorbents, vaccines and drug carriers. PMID:27053603

  19. HYDROGEN ADSORPTION ON β-TiAl (001) AND Ni/TiAl (001) SURFACES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mubarak, A. A. Karim; Alelaimi, Mahmoud

    2014-04-01

    In this paper, we present first principles calculations of the energetic, electronic and magnetic properties of the variant termination of TiAl (001) and Ni/TiAl (001) surfaces with and without hydrogen atoms. The calculations have been performed within the density functional theory using full-potential linearized augmented plane wave method. The generalized gradient approximation (GGA) is utilized as the exchange-correlation energy. The octahedral site is the stable absorption site of H atom in the β-TiAl system. This absorption reduces the cohesive energy of β-TiAl system due to increase in the lattice constant. The surface energy for both TiAl (001) terminations is calculated. The stable adsorption site of H atoms on the variant termination of TiAl (001) surface is performed. The adsorption energy of hydrogen on Ti is more energetic than that on Al. The adsorption of H atom on both terminations of H/Ni/TiAl (001) is more preferable at the bridge site. The adsorption energies are enhanced on Ni atom due to the contraction between d-Ni bands and TiAl substrate band.

  20. Synthesis of core–shell AlOOH hollow nanospheres by reacting Al nanoparticles with water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lozhkomoev, A. S.; Glazkova, E. A.; Bakina, O. V.; Lerner, M. I.; Gotman, I.; Gutmanas, E. Y.; Kazantsev, S. O.; Psakhie, S. G.

    2016-05-01

    A novel route for the synthesis of boehmite nanospheres with a hollow core and the shell composed of highly crumpled AlOOH nanosheets by oxidizing Al nanopowder in pure water under mild processing conditions is described. The stepwise events of Al transformation into boehmite are followed by monitoring the pH in the reaction medium. A mechanism of formation of hollow AlOOH nanospheres with a well-defined shape and crystallinity is proposed which includes the hydration of the Al oxide passivation layer, local corrosion of metallic Al accompanied by hydrogen evolution, the rupture of the protective layer, the dissolution of Al from the particle interior and the deposition of AlOOH nanosheets on the outer surface. In contrast to previously reported methods of boehmite nanoparticle synthesis, the proposed method is simple, and environmentally friendly and allows the generation of hydrogen gas as a by-product. Due to their high surface area and high, slit-shaped nanoporosity, the synthesized AlOOH nanostructures hold promise for the development of more effective catalysts, adsorbents, vaccines and drug carriers.

  1. AlN/IDT/AlN/Sapphire SAW Heterostructure for High-Temperature Applications.

    PubMed

    Legrani, Ouarda; Aubert, Thierry; Elmazria, Omar; Bartasyte, Ausrine; Nicolay, Pascal; Talbi, Abdelkrim; Boulet, Pascal; Ghanbaja, Jaafar; Mangin, Denis

    2016-06-01

    Recent studies have evidenced that Pt/AlN/Sapphire surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices are promising for high-temperature high-frequency applications. However, they cannot be used above 700°C in air atmosphere as the Pt interdigital transducers (IDTs) agglomerate and the AlN layer oxidizes in such conditions. In this paper, we explore the possibility to use an AlN protective overlayer to concurrently hinder these phenomena. To do so, AlN/IDT/AlN/Sapphire heterostructures undergo successive annealing steps from 800°C to 1000°C in air atmosphere. The impact of each step on the morphology, microstructure, and phase composition of AlN and Pt films is evaluated using optical microscopy, scanning and transmission electron microscopy (SEM and TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS). Finally, acoustical performance at room temperature of both protected and unprotected SAW devices are compared, as well as the effects of annealing on these performance. These investigations show that the use of an overlayer is one possible solution to strongly hinder the Pt IDTs agglomeration up to 1000°C. Moreover, AlN/IDT/AlN/Sapphire SAW heterostructures show promising performances in terms of stability up to 800°C. At higher temperatures, the oxidation of AlN is more intense and makes it inappropriate to be used as a protective layer. PMID:27076407

  2. Microstructure and strengthening of creep-tested cryomilled NiAl-AlN

    SciTech Connect

    Garg, A.; Whittenberger, J.D.; Luton, M.J.

    1997-12-31

    The B2 intermetallic NiAl is considered to be a prime candidate material for use as very high temperature structural components in gas turbine engines. The mechanical grinding of prealloyed NiAl powder in liquid nitrogen (cryomilling) results in an intermetallic matrix composite where micron sized particle free aluminide cores (grains) are surrounded by thin mantles comprised of nanometer sized AlN particles and NiAl grains. Under high temperature, slow strain rate conditions both compressive and tensile creep testing have shown that the mechanical strength of hot extruded cryomilled NiAl approaches the levels exhibited by advanced NiAl-based single crystals and simple Ni-based superalloys. Transmission electron microscopy of cryomilled materials tested between 1,100 and 1,300 K revealed little, if any, dislocation structure within the mantle regions, while the NiAl cores contained subgrains and dislocation networks after testing at all strain rates between 10{sup {minus}4} and 10{sup {minus}8} s{sup {minus}1}. These and other microstructural observations suggest that creep strength is the result of a fine NiAl grain/subgrain size, the inability of dislocations to move through the mantle and stabilization of the microstructure by the AlN particles.

  3. Ice Nucleation in the Contact Mode by Size Selected Mineral Dusts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunker, K. W.; Jacobson, D.; China`, S.; Mazzoleni, C.; Cantrell, W. H.

    2011-12-01

    There is ample evidence of ice initiation in clouds in the temperature range -15 to -20 C (Rangno and Hobbs, 2001). Laboratory studies, however, show that mineral dusts, the most prevalent natural ice nuclei, are not effective in the immersion/condensation mode for temperatures above ~ -25 C (Luond et al., 2010; Niedermeier et al., 2010, Murray et al., 2011) Ice nucleation in the contact mode has been hypothesized as a possible mechanism for ice initiation at relatively high temperatures. We present measurements of ice nucleation in the contact mode by size selected mineral dusts. For example, less than one in a thousand Arizona Test Dust particles catalyzes freezing of water in the contact mode at -17 C. The data for Arizona Test Dust suggest that smaller particles are less efficient in the contact mode than are larger ones. F. Luond, O. Stetzer, A. Welti, and U. Lohmann, Experimental study on the ice nucleation ability of size-selected kaolinite particles in the immersion mode. J. Geophys. Res., 115, doi:10.1029/2009JD012959, 2010. B. Murray, S. Broadley, T. Wilson, J. Atkinson, and R. Wills, Heterogeneous freezing of water droplets containing kaolinite particles. Atmos. Chem. Phys., 11, 4191-4207, 2011. D. Niedermeier, S. Hartmann, R. Shaw, D. Covert, T. Mentel, J. Schneider, L. Poulain, P. Reitz, C. Spindler, T. Clauss, A. Kiselev, E. Hallbauer, H. Wex, K. Mildenberger, and F. Stratmann, Heterogeneous freezing of droplets with immersed mineral dust particles - measurements and parameterization. Atmos. Chem. Phys., 10, 3601-3614, 2010. A. Rangno and P. Hobbs, Ice particles in stratiform clouds in the Arctic and possible mechanisms for the production of high ice concentrations. J. Geophys. Res., 106, doi:200110.1029/2000JD900286, 2001.

  4. Escape of Nitrogen from Titan's atmosphere driven by magnetospheric and pick-up ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michael, M.; Liu, M.; Johnson, R. E.; Luhmann, J. G.; Shematovich, V. I.

    2003-05-01

    The nitrogen rich atmosphere of Titan is a significant source of the neutrals in Saturn's magnetosphere. As Titan does not posses an intrinsic magnetic field, energetic Kronian magnetospheric ions penetrate Titan's atmospheric exobase as can local pick-up ions (e.g. Shematovich et al. 2003). Penetration by energetic ions is described here using a 3-D Monte Carlo model. The incident ions can lead directly or indirectly to the production of fast neutrals that collide with other atmospheric neutrals. This leads to dissociation and the ejection of both atomic and molecular nitrogen. The recently calculated dissociation cross sections of N2 are used in the present model (Tully and Johnson 2002). The incident flux of slowed magentospheric N+ ions and pick-up C2H_5+ ions is estimated from the work of Brecht et al. (2000). These ions of energy less than 1.2 keV are shown to be more efficient in ejecting material from Titan's atmosphere than the higher energy corotating ions described in early estimates (Lammer et al. 1998). This incident flux of ions are used in the model and the results are used as a source of nitrogen for the Saturnian plasma torus. Acknowledgment: This work is supported by NASA:s Planetary Atmospheres Program. References Brecht, S.H., J.G. Luhmann, and D.J. Larson, J. Geophys. Res., 105, 13119, 2000. Lammer, H. W. Stumptner, and S.J. Bauer, Planet. Space Sci., 46, 1207, 1998. Shematovich, V.I., R.E. Johnson, M. Michael and J.G. Luhmann, J. Geophys. Res., in press, 2003. Tully, C., R.E. Johnson, J. Chem. Phys. 117, 6556-6561, 2002.

  5. Quantum chemical study of the reactions of Al, AlO and AlOH with H2O2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharipov, Alexander S.; Starik, Alexander M.

    2016-02-01

    Quantum chemical calculations with the use of hybrid density functional with perturbative second-order correlation and dispersion correction are carried out to study the reactions of Al, AlO and AlOH with the H2O2 molecule. The values of energy barriers are estimated by means of extrapolation to the basis set limit. The energetically favorable reaction pathways have been revealed during the examination of the potential energy surfaces. Complex character of the processes under study has been established. It has been found that the initial stages of the considered processes are barrierless. Appropriate rate constants for principal channels of the reactions under study have been estimated by using capture model and canonical variational theory. The Arrhenius approximations for these channels have been proposed for the temperature range T = 300-4000 K.

  6. Reactions of CO2 on solid and liquid Al100+.

    PubMed

    Leslie, Katheryne L; Shinholt, Deven; Jarrold, Martin F

    2013-02-14

    The reactions of CO(2) on the Al(100)(+) cluster have been investigated as a function of cluster temperature (300-1100 K) and relative kinetic energy (0.2-10 eV). Two main products are observed at low cluster temperature: Al(100)O(+) (which is believed to result from a stripping reaction) and Al(100)CO(2)(+) from complex formation. As the cluster temperature is raised, both products dissociate by loss of Al(2)O. Al(100)O(+) forms Al(98)(+), while Al(100)CO(2)(+) forms Al(98)CO(+) and Al(96)C(+). In both cases, loss of Al(2)O turns-on above the melting temperature of Al(100)(+). This presumably occurs because the overall reaction leading to the loss of Al(2)O is significantly less endothermic for the liquid cluster than for the solid. PMID:22680973

  7. Coating of a layer of Au on Al13 : The findings of icosahedral Al@Al12Au20- and Al12Au202- fullerenes using ab initio pseudopotential calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Vijay

    2009-02-01

    We report results of ab initio pseudopotential calculations on the nanocoating of gold on an icosahedral Al13 cluster and the findings of icosahedrally symmetric endohedral Al@Al12Au20- and empty cage Al12Au202- compound fullerenes formed of metal atoms. Twelve Al atoms cap the pentagonal faces of a dodecahedral Au20 cage in which each Au atom has three Al atoms and three Au atoms as nearest neighbors. Mixing of Al13 and Au20 magic clusters leads to a large heat of formation of 0.55 eV/atom and high stability of the Al@Al12Au20 compound fullerene. The binding energies of Al12Au20 and Al@Al12Au20 are 3.017 and 3.007 eV/atom, respectively, which are much larger than 2.457 eV/atom for Au32 fullerene, leading to the possibility of their high abundance.

  8. Preparation and structure of NaSr{sub 0.5}Al{sub 2}B{sub 2}O{sub 7} and NaCa{sub 0.5}Al{sub 2}B{sub 2}O{sub 7}

    SciTech Connect

    Gao Jianhua; Li, R.K. . E-mail: rkli@cl.cryo.ac.cn

    2005-05-15

    Two compounds NaSr{sub 0.5}Al{sub 2}B{sub 2}O{sub 7} and NaCa{sub 0.5}Al{sub 2}B{sub 2}O{sub 7}, have been found to crystallize into a new structure type by Rietveld refinement from X-ray powder diffraction data. Their structure belongs to hexagonal space group P6{sub 3}/m, with lattice parameters of a=4.85640(8)A, c=15.6635(4)A for NaSr{sub 0.5}Al{sub 2}B{sub 2}O{sub 7} and a=4.81292(10)A, c=15.4056(4)A for NaCa{sub 0.5}Al{sub 2}B{sub 2}O{sub 7}, respectively. The structure is built up by [Al{sub 2}B{sub 2}O{sub 7}]{sup 2-} double layer and Na{sup +}/Ca{sup 2+} or Na{sup +}/Sr{sup 2+} ions alternatively stacking along the c-axis. The sites in the inter-double layer are fully occupied jointly by Na and Ca or Sr, but the intra-double layer sites are only half occupied solely by Na. A mechanism of the transition of the structure from CaAl{sub 2}B{sub 2}O{sub 7} to present structure type by replacing only 1% Ca by Na (2%) as observed by Chang and Keszler (Mater. Res. Bull. 33 (1998) 299) is also proposed.

  9. Trend of surface solar radiation over Asia simulated by aerosol transport-climate model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takemura, T.; Ohmura, A.

    2009-12-01

    . Continuous hindcast simulation during the last several decades is done to compare with surface radiation measurements. Cause of the global dimming and brightening is separated into the aerosol direct and indirect effects from the simulation. Acknowledgments. The simulation in this study was performed on the NIES supercomputer system (NEC SX-8R). This study is partly supported by the Global Environment Research Fund (RF-091) by the Ministry of the Environment of Japan, Grant-in-Aid for Young Scientist (21681001) by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science, and Technology of Japan, and Mitsui & Co., Ltd. Environment Fund (R08-D035). References Ohmura, A. (2009), J. Geophys. Res., 114, doi:10.1029/2008JD011290. Takemura, T., et al. (2000), J. Geophys. Res., 105, 17853-17873. Takemura, T., et al. (2002), J. Climate, 15, 333-352. Takemura, T., et al. (2005), J. Geophys. Res., 110, doi:10.1029/2004JD005029. Takemura, T., et al. (2009), Atmos. Chem. Phys., 9, 3061-3073. Wild, M. (2009), J. Geophys. Res., 114, doi:10.1029/2008JD011470.

  10. Ephemeral Liquid Water at the Surface of Martian North Polar Cap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Losiak, Anna; Czechowski, Leszek; Velbel, Michael A.

    2015-04-01

    potentially habitable environments on Mars. References: [1] Langevin et al. 2005. Science 307: 1584-1586. [2] Fishbaugh et al. 2007. J. Geophys. Res. 112, doi: 10.1029/2006JE002862 [3] Niles and Michalski 2009. Nat. Geosci. 2, 215-220. [4] Catling et al. 2006. Icarus 181, 26-51. [5] Zolotov and Mironenko 2007. J. Geophys. Res. 112, doi:10.1029/ 2006JE002882. [6] Masse et al. 2010. Icarus 209, 434-451. [7] Masse et al. 2012. Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 317-318, 44-55. [8] Czechowski 2012. Acta Geophys. Pol. 60, 1192-1212.

  11. Survey and alignment at the ALS

    SciTech Connect

    Krebs, G.F.; Lauritzen, T.; Thur, W.

    1995-11-01

    This paper describes survey and alignment at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory`s Advanced Light Source (ALS) accelerators from 1993 to 1995. The ALS is a 1.0 - 1.9 GeV electron accelerator producing extremely bright synchrotron light in the UV and soft-X-ray wavelengths. At the ALS, electrons are accelerated in a LINAC to 50 MeV, injected into a booster ring for further acceleration and finally injected into the storage ring. This is shown schematically in Figure 1. The storage ring, some 200 m in circumference, has been run with electron currents above 400 mA with lifetimes as high as 24 hours. The ALS is a third generation light source and requires for efficient storage ring operation, magnets aligned to within 150 mm of their ideal position. To accomplish this a network of monuments was established and their positions measured with respect to one another. The data was reduced using GEONET`` and STAR*NET`` software. Using the monuments as reference points, magnet positions were measured and alignment confirmed using the Kem Electronic Coordinate Determination System (ECDS``). A number of other papers dealing with survey and alignment (S&A) at the ALS have been written that may further elucidate some details of the methods and systems described in this paper.

  12. Sound Velocities and Density of (Mg0.65, Fe0.35)O ferropericlase up to 1.4 Mbar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, B.; Jackson, J. M.; Sturhahn, W.; Zhang, D.; Zhao, J.; Murphy, C. A.; Wicks, J. K.

    2010-12-01

    other iron-poor and iron-rich ferropericlases and discuss the implications for seismological observations and compositional variations in the lower mantle. (References: Speziale, S., Milner, A., Lee, V. E., et al. (2005) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A. 102, 17918-17922. Lin, J.-F., Struzhkin, V. V., Jacobsen, S. D., et al. (2005) Nature 436, 377-380. Lin, J.-F., Jacobsen, S. D., Sturhahn, W., et al. (2006) Geophys. Res. Lett. 33, L22304. Crowhurst, J., Brown, J., Goncharov, A., & Jacobsen, S. (2008) Science 319, 451-453. Marquardt, H., Speziale, S., Reichmann, H. J., et al. (2009) Science 324, 224-226. Zhuravlev, K., Jackson, J., Wolf, A., et al. (2009) Physics and Chemistry of Minerals 37, 465-474. Bower, D. J., Gurnis, M., Jackson, J. M., & Sturhahn, W. (2009) Geophys. Res. Lett. 36, L10306. Westrenen, W., Li, J., Fei, Y., et al. (2005) Phys. Earth Planet. Inter. 151, 163-176. Sinmyo, R., Hirose, K., Nishio-Hamane, D., et al. (2008) J. Geophy. Res. - Solid Earth 113, B11204.)

  13. Subsurface structure of Planum Boreum from Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter Shallow Radar soundings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Putzig, Nathaniel E.; Phillips, Roger J.; Campbell, Bruce A.; Holt, John W.; Plaut, Jeffrey J.; Carter, Lynn M.; Egan, Anthony F.; Bernardini, Fabrizio; Safaeinili, Ali; Seu, Roberto

    2009-12-01

    We map the subsurface structure of Planum Boreum using sounding data from the Shallow Radar (SHARAD) instrument onboard the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. Radar coverage throughout the 1,000,000-km 2 area reveals widespread reflections from basal and internal interfaces of the north polar layered deposits (NPLD). A dome-shaped zone of diffuse reflectivity up to 12 μs (˜1-km thick) underlies two-thirds of the NPLD, predominantly in the main lobe but also extending into the Gemina Lingula lobe across Chasma Boreale. We equate this zone with a basal unit identified in image data as Amazonian sand-rich layered deposits [Byrne, S., Murray, B.C., 2002. J. Geophys. Res. 107, 5044, 12 pp. doi:10.1029/2001JE001615; Fishbaugh, K.E., Head, J.W., 2005. Icarus 174, 444-474; Tanaka, K.L., Rodriguez, J.A.P., Skinner, J.A., Bourke, M.C., Fortezzo, C.M., Herkenhoff, K.E., Kolb, E.J., Okubo, C.H., 2008. Icarus 196, 318-358]. Elsewhere, the NPLD base is remarkably flat-lying and co-planar with the exposed surface of the surrounding Vastitas Borealis materials. Within the NPLD, we delineate and map four units based on the radar-layer packets of Phillips et al. [Phillips, R.J., and 26 colleagues, 2008. Science 320, 1182-1185] that extend throughout the deposits and a fifth unit confined to eastern Gemina Lingula. We estimate the volume of each internal unit and of the entire NPLD stack (821,000 km 3), exclusive of the basal unit. Correlation of these units to models of insolation cycles and polar deposition [Laskar, J., Levrard, B., Mustard, J.F., 2002. Nature 419, 375-377; Levrard, B., Forget, F., Montmessin, F., Laskar, J., 2007. J. Geophys. Res. 112, E06012, 18 pp. doi:10.1029/2006JE002772] is consistent with the 4.2-Ma age of the oldest preserved NPLD obtained by Levrard et al. [Levrard, B., Forget, F., Montmessin, F., Laskar, J., 2007. J. Geophys. Res. 112, E06012, 18 pp. doi:10.1029/2006JE002772]. We suggest a dominant layering mechanism of dust-content variation during

  14. Red Sprites as the source of ELF emission from lightning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rai, J.

    2013-12-01

    Jagdish Rai Invertis University, NH-24, Bareilly, India and Manoj K. Paras Department of Applied Sciences, DIT University, Dehradun, India. ABSTRACT Rai (1974) discussed the possibility of upper atmospheric lightning discharges. These discharges were observed experimentally by sertman et al (1995), Lyons (1996), Stenback- Nielsen and Mc Harg (2008) and many others. Cummer et al (1998) and Cummer (2003) observed that the radiation from red sprites lie in the ELF range. From the knowledge of velocity and current expressions obtained by Paras and Rai (2011) for red sprites, authors obtained the frequency spectrum of emitted radiation. The radiation lies mainly in ELF range and peaks around 40Hz. A comparative study of radio emissions from red sprite and return stroke- lateral corona current system shows that the power radiated from the former is higher than the later. When subjected to the propagation in earth -ionosphere waveguide, authors find that the Schumann resonances are caused by red sprites and not by return strokes. References:- 1. Cummer, S.A., U.S. Inan, T.F. Bell and C.P. Barrington-Leigh, 1998, ELF radiation produced by electrical currents in sprites, Geophys. Res. Letters 25, 8. 2. Cummer, S.A. 2003, Current moment in sprite producing lightning , J. Atmos. Solar Terr. Phys., 65, 499-908. 3. Lyons W.A., 1996 Sprite observations above the U.S. high plains in relation to their parent thunderstorm systems, J. Geophys. Res. D101, 29641. 4. Paros M.K. and J. Rai, 2011 Electric and magnetic fields from return stroke- lateral corona system and red sprites J. Electromagnetic Analysis and Applications, 3. 5. Rai J., 1974 some studies on lighting, Ph.D. Thesis Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi, India. 6. Sentman D.D., E.M. Wescott, D.L. Osborne, D.L. Hampton and M.J. Heazener, 1995, Preliminary results from the sprites 94 Campaign, Red Sprites, Geophy. Res. Letters, 22, 1205. 7. Stenback- Nielson H.C. and Mc Harg M.G., 2008, High time resolution sprite imaging

  15. Modulation of Young Injection Events at Saturn at the Rotation Period of Perturbations in the Winter Hemisphere: A Proposed Mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kivelson, M.; Jia, X.

    2014-12-01

    . ______________ Jia, X., and M. G. Kivelson (2012), J. Geophys. Res., doi:10.1029/2012JA018183 Kennelly, T. J., J. S. Leisner, G. B. Hospodarsky, and D. A. Gurnett (2013),J. Geophys. Res. Space Phys, doi:10.1002/jgra.50152 Southwood, D. J., and M. G. Kivelson (1989), J. Geophys. Res., 94(A1), doi:10.1029/JA094iA01p00299.

  16. How to teach geocomplexity at two opposite levels? The 'Klippen of Cabrières' case study (Hérault, France).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giusti, Christian

    2014-05-01

    The starting point of this essay is a question from a school teacher who came in contact with me via my photo gallery online. His question, "What is the origin of the Roc de Murviel?" actually covers three or four separate problems, and requires to devise simple and specific comparisons in order to help children of 8 years old to understand a bunch of difficult and abstract concepts. But, in contrast, Carboniferous marine sedimentary deposits of the so-called unit "Klippen of Cabrières" are known of geologists worldwide, due to the presence of a Global boundary Stratotype Section and Point (GSSP) located not far from the "Roc de Murviel", the "La Serre" section, where is defined the base of the Carboniferous System, Mississippian Sub-System and Tournaisien Stage. In this case, to remind how the conceptions about the formation of the "Klippen of Cabrières" evolved may serve as an introduction to the explanation of syntectonic sedimentation and to the history of the concept of thrust nappe for the well-trained public as well as academics or engineers not experts in the specificities of regional geology. Difficulty (at least in France) will come from the scarcity of naturalists, a species in danger of extinction, and from the small number of historians concerned by the natural sciences. At the public school, the first method is to decompose the problem into independent issues (Cartesian reductionism) such as: nature and age of the rock? mode of sedimentation? part of an ancient mountain chain? existence as a landform in the current landscape? Concerning the specific question of geological time, because most children of this age do not yet know how to read the time, a second method is to replace the model of the clock (the entire history of the planet Earth reduced to one year) by the metaphor of either the staircase or the ladder, both adapted from the international stratigraphic scale. A third method is to use the concept of "toolbox" for each sub-disciplines or

  17. Health Services for Gender-Based Violence: Médecins Sans Frontières Experience Caring for Survivors in Urban Papua New Guinea

    PubMed Central

    Lokuge, Kamalini; Verputten, Meggy; Ajakali, Maryanne; Tolboom, Bianca; Joshy, Grace; Thurber, Katherine A.; Plana, Daisy; Howes, Steven; Wakon, Anastasia; Banks, Emily

    2016-01-01

    Background Levels of gender-based violence in Papua New Guinea (PNG) are high; health services for survivors are limited. Evidence from the few existing health services for survivors can inform improvements in care in this and similar settings. Methods Médecins Sans Frontières supported health services for survivors in Lae, PNG from 2008–2013. Routine monitoring data from August 2010-April 2013 were used to describe patient and service characteristics. Results 5,892 individuals received care over 6,860 presentations, the majority self-referred or referred by friends and family. Presentations were attributed to intimate partner violence(62%), non-partner sexual violence(15%), other forms of violence(3%), and past (but not current) violence(21%). 97% were female; an estimated 4.9% (95%CI:4.8–5.0%) of females resident in the catchment area presented to the programme during the 2.8years analysed. Of presentations for non-partner sexual violence, 79% knew their abuser and 50% were children <16 years. 92% of presentations reporting current violence received medical treatment for injuries. The majority of patients who received multiple counselling sessions reported improved functioning and decreased severity of psycho-social complaints. Conclusions Community awareness of the availability of free, best-practice, accessible, confidential medical and counselling services for sexual and gender-based violence in Lae, PNG resulted in many survivors presenting for care. High levels of ongoing intimate partner violence and child sexual abuse by known abusers indicates that alongside comprehensive medical care, access to effective services in non-health sectors such as policing, protection and legal services are needed if survivors are to escape the cycle of violence. PMID:27285845

  18. A comparison of four relative radiometric normalization (RRN) techniques for mosaicing H-res multi-temporal thermal infrared (TIR) flight-lines of a complex urban scene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, M. M.; Hay, G. J.; Couloigner, I.; Hemachandran, B.; Bailin, J.

    2015-08-01

    High-spatial and -radiometric resolution (H-res) thermal infrared (TIR) airborne imagery, such as the TABI-1800 (Thermal Airborne Broadband Imager) provide unique surface temperature information that can be used for urban heat loss mapping, heat island analysis, and landcover classifications. For mapping large urban areas at a high-spatial resolution (i.e., sub-meter), airborne thermal imagery needs to be acquired over a number of flight-lines and mosaiced together. However, due to radiometric variations between flight-lines the similar objects tend to have different temperature characteristics on the mosaicked image, resulting in reduced visual and radiometric agreement between the flight-lines composing the final mosaiced output. To reduce radiometric variability between airborne TIR flight-lines, with a view to produce a visually seamless TIR image mosaic, we evaluate four relative radiometric normalization techniques including: (i) Histogram Matching, (ii) Pseudo Invariant Feature (PIF) Based Linear Regression, (iii) PIF-Based Theil-Sen Regression, and (iv) No-Change Stratified Random Samples (NCSRS) Based Linear Regression. The techniques are evaluated on two adjacent TABI-1800 airborne flight-lines (each ∼30 km × 0.9 km) collected ∼25 min apart over a portion of The City of Calgary (with ∼30% overlap between them). The performances of these techniques are compared based on four criteria: (i) speed of computation, (ii) ability to automate, (iii) visual assessment, and (iv) statistical analysis. Results show that NCSRS-Based Linear Regression produces the best overall results closely followed by Histogram Matching. Specifically, these two radiometric normalization techniques: (i) increase the visual and statistical agreement between the tested TIR airborne flight-lines (NCSRS Based Linear Regression increases radiometric agreement between flight-lines by 53.3% and Histogram Matching by 52.4%), (ii) produce a visually seamless image mosaic, and (iii) can

  19. Towards an effective calibration theory for a broadly applied land surface model (VIC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melsen, Lieke; Teuling, Adriaan; Torfs, Paul; Zappa, Massimiliano

    2014-05-01

    The Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC, Liang et al., 1994) model has been used for a broad range of applications, in hydrology as well as in the fields of climate and global change. Despite the attention for the model and its output, calibration is often not performed. To improve the calibration procedures for VIC applied at grid resolutions varying from meso-scale catchments to the 1 km 'hyper'resolution now used in several global modeling studies, the parameters of the model are studied in more detail. An earlier sensitivity analysis study on a selection of parameters of the VIC model by Demaria et al (2007) showed that the model is not or hardly sensitive to many of its parameters. With improved sensitivity analysis methods and computational power, this study focuses on a broader spectrum of parameters and with state of the art methods: both the DELSA sensitivity analysis method (Rakovec et al., 2013) and the ABC-method (Vrugt et al., 2013) will be employed parallel to a single cell VIC model of the Rietholzbach in Switzerland (representative of the 1 km hyperresolution), and a single and multiple-cell VIC model of the meso-scale Thur basin in Switzerland. In the latter case, also routing plays an important role. With critically screening the parameters of the model, it is possible to define a frame work for calibration of the model at multiple scales. References Demaria, E., B. Nijssen, and T. Wagener (2007), Monte Carlo sensitivity analysis of land surface parameters using the Variable Infiltration Capacity model, J. Geophys. Res., 112, D11,113. Liang, X., D. Lettenmaier, E. Wood, and S. Burges (1994), A simple hydrologically based model of land surface water and energy fluxes for general circulation models, J. Geophys. Res., 99 (D7),14,415-14,458. Rakovec, O., M. Hill, M. Clark, A. Weerts, A. Teuling, and R. Uijlenhoet (2013), A new computationally frugal method for sensitivity analysis of environmental models, Water Resour. Res., in press Vrugt, J.A. and M

  20. The mechanical properties of FeAl

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, I.; George, E.P.

    1996-12-31

    Only in the last few years has progress been made in obtaining reproducible mechanical properties data for FeAl. Two sets of observations are the foundation of this progress. The first is that the large vacancy concentrations that exist in FeAl at high temperature are easily retained at low temperature and that these strongly affect the low-temperature mechanical properties. The second is that RT ductility is adversely affected by water vapor. Purpose of this paper is not to present a comprehensive overview of the mechanical properties of FeAl but rather to highlight our understanding of key phenomena and to show how an understanding of the factors which control the yield strength and fracture behavior has followed the discovery of the above two effects. 87 refs, 9 figs.